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Full text of "The 13th General Hospital in World War II"

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The 
13th GENERAL HOSPITAL 



in 



WORLD WAR II 




1942 



1945 



9a MemoJiiam 

LET US PAUSE IN SILENT 
PRAYER AS WE RECALL THOSE 
OF OUR COMRADES WHO 
HAVE ANSWERED THE FINAL 
ROLL CALL. 

Joseph M. Aspel 
John H. Bodfish 
Nelle Crout 
Walter J. Czaja 
Thomas R. Edwards 
Clarence D. Haslam 
Richard Holic 
Johnnie P. Parker 
Alfred William Schnoor 
Eugene Stinetorf 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://archive.org/details/13thgeneralhospi00edit 



TO ALL THE MEN AND WOMEN 

WHO ASSISTED IN THE WORK OF 

THE 13th GENERAL HOSPITAL THIS 

HISTORY IS GRATEFULLY 

DEDICATED 



fyoSl&WGAd 



This account of the 13th General Hospital, a unit 
of the great armed forces of the United States during 
World War II, was brought about not by any one 
individual but by a combination of many. In deter- 
mining the manner of telling the story those intrusted 
with that decision concluded that the work should as 
far as possible avoid mention of individuals both in 
script and pictures. Among the more than sixteen 
hundred men and women who came into the family 
of the 13th and thereafter moved to other units or 
remained until discharge, there was a great wealth 
of personalities. To dwell upon particular persons 
might be an injustice to others, whether real or fan- 
cied, and while criticism cannot be totally eliminated, 
it should be minimized by the policy adopted. 

Shortly after their return from Japan and their dis- 
charge from service in this country, about twenty-five 
of the men attended the Annual Reunion of Base 
Hospital 13, a hospital unit which was recruited at 
Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago and which saw 
service in World War I. At this affair it was decided 
to form an alumni group of the 13th General Hospital 
so that associations and friendships made during th? 
strain and stress of war might not languish and die 
during peace. The 13th General Hospital Associa- 
tion was formed and an unselfish group devoted 
much of their time and efforts to this organization. 
Three splendid dinner-dance reunions have been 
conducted in 1946, 1947, and 1948. It is hoped that 
the reunions will continue long into the future as 
successfully as they have during the first few years. 

The active members of the 13th General Hospital 
Association early conceived the idea of a permanent 
record of the hospital group. In the first communica- 
tions sent to the former 13th personnel from the 
alumni group a request was made for pictures and 
anecdotes. The response to this request was negli- 
gible and most of the pictures sent to the secretary 
were of individuals and could not be used in view of 
the policy adopted. The plan however did not perish. 

While in service, Dr. Joseph Bennett, Robert Volk, 
Michael Dolark, and James Hammond helped to 
register and preserve a record of facts and dates con- 
cerning the unit. From this voluminous documenta- 
tion of statistics a committee composed of Alvin J. 
Bielak, Edwin Oertel, Harry F. Layson, and Michael 
Dolark plucked the important and interesting details. 
This group also succeeded in obtaining a number of 
appropriate pictures. The work was then turned ovei 
to Richard T. Tobin, who did the final editing. 



While it is impossible to name all those who as- 
sisted in the production of this history by giving coun- 
sel or suggestions, and by supplying photographs, 
it is appropriate that the officers of the 13th General 
Hospital Association should be listed for without the 
encouragement, interest, and assistance of that or- 
ganization, it is more than probable that this small 
treasure of hallowed memories might never have 
come into existence. 



OFFICERS OF 13th GENERAL HOSPITAL 
ASSOCIATION 

1945 - 1946 

President Richard T. Tobin 

Vice-President Walter P. Horvat 

Secretary Maybelle Hawkins 

Assistant Secretary James Hammond 

Treasurer Robert J. Flaskamp 

1946 - 1947 

President Robert J. Flaskamp 

First Vice-President Fred K. Stewart 

Second Vice-President Ellen McCumber 

Secretary Frances Zoller 

Assistant Secretary Alvin J. Bielak 

Treasurer Joseph L. Essery 

1947 - 1948 

President Fred K. Stewart 

First Vice-President Ellen McCumber High 

Second Vice-President Alvin J. Bielak 

Secretary Velma Bowman 

Assistant Secretary Dr. Leslie Gavlin 

Treasurer Joseph L. Essery 

1948 - 1949 

President Maybelle Hawkins 

First Vice-President Joseph L. Essery 

Second Vice-President Velma Bowman 

Secretary Dr. Leslie Gavlin 

Assistant Secretary Dr. H. Ivan Sippy 

Treasurer Leon Benkoff 



BIRTH OF THE 



13 tit Qette/ial <Jfad.fxital 



December 7, I94l--a dread whisper of the bomb- 
ing of Pearl Harbor soon grew into a furious roar. 
WAR followed with rapid mobilization and integra- 
tion of all industrial and military forces. In the plan 
of things Presbyterian Hospital of Chicago was des- 
tined to contribute to the military phase of this effort 
a competent general hospital, for during World War 
I a unit organized at the hospital established an en- 
viable record as Base Hospital 13, ministering to the 
sick and wounded at Limoges, France, to the termi- 
nation of that conflict. 

With such tradition established at the Chicago 
Hospital a request came from Washington, D. C, for 
an organization to serve in World War II, and with 
some of the veterans of the Base Hospital serving as 
a nucleus, a new hospital unit began to take form. 
As this new born group was scheduled to serve over- 
seas and therefore bear a number rather than a 
name, it became fitting to follow the brilliant heritage 
of the 13th Base and accordingly the name 13th 
GENERAL HOSPITAL was attached to the already 
growing infant. 

Recruiting machinery was set up at offices in Pres- 
byterian Hospital and soon the full complement of 
doctors, dentists, and nurses was filled. Instead of 
gleefully administering shots to others these special- 
ists soon found themselves on the receiving end of 
the hypodermic needles, and many were hastily sent 
into advance training at specialist schools and 
camps throughout the country. 

A more difficult job was the selection of 350 en- 
listed men to fill the positions of medical, surgical, 
laboratory, and X-Ray technicians, office personnel, 
plumbers, carpenters, and steamfitters with no re- 
gard for union pay rates, barbers, chiropodists, phar- 
macists, optometrists, cooks, tailor, the inevitable 
yardbirds, and others required in the Table of Organ- 
ization. Wide-eyed, serious young men appeared at 
the hospital recruiting office with splendid back- 
grounds and qualifications slightly exaggerated, and 
upon acceptance into the unit they departed with 
radiant belief and hopeful certainty that they would 
not be inducted as ordinary soldiers but as men of 
many stripes. The quota being filled by October, 
1942, enlistments closed. 

Under the direction of AMC officers and enlistees 
with prior military experience, the hopefuls volun- 
tarily congregated several evenings each week on 



the grounds near Presbyterian Hospital and with 
cooling weather they assembled in the fieldhouse of 
the University of Chicago for practice in close order 
drill and for lectures on military technique until De- 
cember when letters from the War Department ad- 
vised all to report to the army receiving centers 
nearest their homes. The majority being from the 
Chicago area, they had by December 18, 1942, given 
up their freedom of movement and speech for the 
gruff orders of the soldiers at the Reception Center 
of Camp Grant, near Rockford, Illinois. Here nothing 
of moment occurred other than routine physical ex- 
aminations, tetanus and typhoid innoculations ad- 
ministered viciously and simultaneously by evil 
appearing technicians between whom each one had 
to pass and get stabbed in both arms, carefully fitted 
clothing tossed from shelves by the supply boys after 
a swift visual measuring, the first torturing walk 
under the Herculean burden of loaded barracks 
bags, a few brisk drills in the zero cold, the baptism 
of long periods of waiting to fall out on the double 
quick only to be ordered back to wait some more, 
the introduction to army chow with long waiting lines, 
the technique of policing the area, and the memor- 
able first night when the latrines of two barracks 
echoed all through the hours to the wailing and vom- 
iting of some fifty 13th'rs whose stomachs were in a 
state of turmoil — oh, but not from the first GI food 
according to the official investigation which fol- 
lowed. A conclusion that the general internal dis- 
turbances might possibly have been caused by some 
cool ice cream the boys had consumed before get- 
ting to camp seemed sufficient to close the matter. 

After two or three days the neophyte soldiers haa 
grown to love the new surroundings so much that 
one hundred per cent of them cheerfully accepted the 
offer of a week end pass and they headed for home 
in their oddly fitting military apparel. But the lure 
of garrison life being too strong to resist, all the men 
were back in camp Sunday night after a full fledged 
battle to get aboard the few trains at the rail depot. 
And then on December 22nd the first order for unit 
movement was sounded. Barracks bags were packed 
and loaded on creaking shoulders, and the boys like 
Volga boatmen groaned along over crunching snow 
on the trek to a waiting train, there to sit some three 
hours before the engine coughed and jerked out of 
Grant headed for a new destination. 



COMMANDING 


OFFICER 


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COL. LYLE S. POWELL 


Assumed Comma 


nd at Camp Robinson 



10 



CAMP ROBINSON 



After a devious thirty-six hour itinerary the expec- 
tant passengers were at last ejected into a new world 
of wonderment with white helmeted militia in the 
gloom of the evening directing the visitors into trucks 
for a bumpy ride to a section of what proved to be 
Camp Joseph T. Robinson, a short distance from the 
City of Little Rock, Arkansas. "Take up thy bed and 
walk" became the first reality here as the boys lined 
up at a supply depot and were issued a metal cot, 
mattress, and bed clothing to lug back to their newly 
found homes — hutments — a wooden form of pyra- 
midal tent holding six closely fitting cots for six home- 
sick occupants. The directing troops under the white 
helmets turned out to be members of the 214th Gen- 
eral Hospital, who were to be the training cadre for 
the 13th. 



duty before eight. Then came training by the num- 
bers — salute — attention — at ease— forward march- 
to the rear march — left face — right face — column right 
— about face — company attention— battalion pass in 
review (No, No! Do that over again) — guard duty — 
general and special orders — K.P. — ascertaining what 
General Orders the Officer of the Day had mem- 
orized and was asking of the members of the guard. 
Astonished veterans viewed with amazement Pfc's 
of the cadre teaching sergeants and corporals sim- 
ple military rudiments. But gradually things took 
shape and the unit began to function like a well 
trained force. 

Being a hospital group the outdoor drilling was 
eased by a medical and first aid lecture series to- 
gether with an exhibition of training films. Physi- 




"*t. 



Camp Robinson Entrance 






The following days were a new awakening. The 
lusty sounds of the bugler at 5:30 A. M. meant dress- 
ing in nothing flat, falling out on the road a few 
blocks away for roll call, exercises by the numbers, 
announcements, ablutions, breakfast, bed making 
(army style), sweeping and scrubbing the hutments 
after borrowing someone's scrub pail and mop, 
quietly and unnoticed, to replace the combination 
which had been surrepticiously borrowed from you 
in the dark of the night, policing the hutment area, 
getting fitted in the proper type of clothing for the 
particular functions of the moment, and ready for 



ology, tourniquets, wounds, fractures, bandages, 
poison gases and the respective treatments for the 
different types, fhe method of admitting patients to an 
army hospital, management of a hospital ward, and 
other equally interesting subjects were part of the 
agenda. Soon everyone was a pseudo physician at 
ease with words like compound comminuted fracture, 
contused or incised wounds, zygoma, epidermis, 
spica bandages, protargol, diaphoretics, capillaries. 
Class rcoms were often warm and close, and sol- 
diers were often tired from an evening of fun in 
Little Rock. The combination resulted in many an 




Hutments with Mess Hall in Distance 



attentive student drowsing into a deep slumber only 
to be awakened suddenly by the reverberating clang 
of his steel helmet as it bounced on the wooden floor 
after slipping from a relaxing grip; other sleepers 
would awake with a yell as they dreamed of walk- 
ing on hot ploughshares only to find the charred 
embers of match sticks protruding from their shoes, 
mute but convincing evidence that the familiar hot- 
foot had been administered by a "buddy." Since it 
was ail in fun they took it graciously and the teach- 
ing officers joined in the merriment — most of the time. 

There was the usual griping about everything, 
which was considered a healthful condition. Busses 
left camp every fifteen minutes for Little Rock and it 
was not difficult to get there since a liberal policy 
prevailed on passes. And when passes were for- 
bidden some of the boys took a tortuous alpine path 
down a steep hill to the back of camp risking their 
personal safety and military security to pay a visit 
to the "Honky Tonk" for a social drink, while those 
who chose to live within the rules could attend 
movies, frequent the day room, the PX, Service Club, 
or Field House. 

Approximately nine weeks after arrival, happy 
GI's wrote home that basic training was finished. 
They were now full-fledged medical soldiers. This 
wave of happiness was short lived as a contingent 
of medical officers and 105 nurses arrived to com- 
plete the roster of the 13th G. H., and an order de- 
scended from headquarters to begin another basic 
training period. This would prove to be the third 
for the boys of the 214th, which had been deactivated 
on January 15, 1943, and most of its personnel trans- 
ferred to the 13th. As this was the army and all the 
fellows good sports, everyone griped but nobody 
resigned. 

And so there was more tent pitching by the num- 
bers with Mister 5x5 calling out the duties of the 
number 1 and 4, 2 and 5, and 3 and 6 men; there 




Typical Chapel at Robinson 



were more bed displays, inspections, obstacle 
courses, long marches to an imaginary battlefield 
with realistic charges out of woodlands and across 
open fields, up hills, into valleys, across streams, 
with message centers and company field headquar- 
ters like the real thing; simulated wounded were car- 
ried by litter to battalion aid stations, then to clearing 
stations for ambulance transport to evacuation hos- 
pitals, and finally to the general hospital in the rear 
echelon. Sometimes the going was rough on the 
long marches, especially for the scouts, and it was 
for everybody when the rugged climb up coronary 
hill was encountered on the double at the end of the 
day. Doctors all became military strategists as they 
directed platoons and companies. However, every- 
one seemed to survive — even those who theatrically 
died in the aid stations or evacuation hospitals from 
the simulated wounds received in the mock combat. 

Many will vividly recall the episode of the "lost 
battalion", which started out an hour in advance of 
the regular force to intercept it at a designated point 
according to plan, but didn't because of a mistake on 
the compass or the taking of a wrong azimuth, with 
the result that long after the main force had safely 
returned, a bedraggled company of men returned to 
camp around the midnight hour. It is reported that 
the Major in charge after realizing that his command 
was lost stood in the midst of them and bellowed 
out "Where the hell are we?" 

Nurses having been toughened by the training 
marched along on the sixteen mile hikes in stride 
with the men and at the signal of air attack dispersed 
and sought cover from the aerial bombs dropped in 
the form of paper bags of flour from the attacking 
planes overhead. Behind the lines of the planned bat- 
tlefield these nurses set up and administered a field 
hospital where they received the casualties whose 
EMT tags bore notations: chest wound; perforated leg 
wound and fracture; mustard gas; burns on arms and 
legs; eye abrasion. One of the girls swore that even 
such rugged duty was mild compared to the shock 
she received upon encountering a venomous snake 
reposing in her foot locker even though the emer- 
gency squad called out to battle the intruder found 
it to be a harmless, artificial copy planted there by a 
person or persons unknown. 

One of the proud extra curricular accomplishments 
of basic was the formation of a splendid band to per- 
form magnificently for the parades on the field, which 
became as regular as the old Saturday Night Bath 
of a few generations back. Visiting dignitaries stood 



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Row of Hutments 



in the reviewing stand as Colonel Powell over a 
portable loud speaker issued the order "Captain 
Klein, sound off," and as the band began the strains 
of a Sousa march, the officers, nurses, and men 
passed smartly before the reviewing stand with eyes 
right. One such day as the nurses measured their 
cadence before the stand, an old regular army offi- 
cer, unaccustomed to marching nurses, blurted out 
that he couldn't say they looked the best but they 
sure smelled the best. 

Toward the end of the last basic, everyone received 
a seven-day furlough after which training was given 
in the Station Hospital of Camp Robinson where 
medical officers performed their medical and surgical 
work, the nurses their nursing duties according to 
the army method, and the men obtained practical 
experience as orderlies, technicians, and clerks. 

By mid-April basic training had again been com- 
pleted and the unit looked forward to some action. 
It was not long in coming. For several weeks orders 
were given to fall out with bags packed ready for 
shipment only to bring them back, unpack, and hang 
the clothing in required order; no telephone calls; no 
outgoing letters; everything was secret. Finally one 
day it was no longer practice and everyone was 
assigned a place on two waiting trains which 
chugged out of Camp Robinson for points unknown, 
with everyone in merry mood on leaving and many 
of the boys singing the hospital theme song com- 
posed by two of the enlisted men and sung to the tune 
of "Solomon Levi": 
Stanza 1 . 

We're the 13th General Medics 

And we'd rather heal than fight, 
We push the pans and roll the pills 
Throughtout the day and night. 
We've tried to flirt with nurses 
When underneath the stars, 
But found it doesn't work so well 
Because we have no bars. 
Chorus 

Hey, for the Medics, 

That's the place to be, 
Ho, for the Medics, 

That's the place for me. 
Hi, for the Medics, 

They save the infantry, 
The Medicals, The Medicals, 
That's for you and me. 
Stanza 2. 

We bandage heads, and splint the legs, 

And carry litters, too. 
With enemas and littie ducks 
We know just what to do. 
The work is really very hard 

It nearly breaks our backs, 
And if we had our way, boys, 
We'd go and join the WAACS. 
Chorus 
Stanza 3. 

There are cases by the hundreds, 

That we've been trained to meet. 
Everything from Chicken Pox 

To curing ailing feet. 
When instruments are lacking 

We sometimes use a fork 
But the thing that bothers us the most 
Is helping out the stork. 
Chorus 



THE GOLDEN STATE 



Over the vast plains of the southwest the train 
caravan steadily increased the mileage away from 
Arkansas and edged on into the foothills and then 
the mountains of the far west. Regular stops were 
made for exercises outside the cars. The scenes 
gradually changed to desert, and for the first time 
many eyes beheld cactus, yucca, and other arid 
plants, with occasional long rows of grape vines or 
groves of orange, lemon, and grapefruit in irrigated 
spots. CALIFORNIA— the 13th General Hospital had 
entered the proud boundaries of the Golden State. 

Along in the desert bleakness the trains came to 
a stop and in a rutted, one way, sand road fringed 
with sage brush, there loomed a convoy of army 
trucks which quickly loaded and taxied the 13th 
through orange scented air to a paved highway and 
finally a destination which appeared to be in the 
midst of nowhere — a valley sprouting shoulder high 
grass surrounded by the gentle sloping San Jose hills. 



This was Spadra on May 7, 1943, a place destined 
to be home for four months of life. Noses were 
counted. An advance group had supplies on hand 
and soon everyone was tugging at tent poles, pound- 
ing stakes at improper angles, and tying guy ropes, 
as pyramidal tents sprang up in planned rows. As- 
signments of men to the tents were made, changed, 
re-made, and re-changed without even an excusing 
smile. Some tenants moved as many as ten times 
that evening before settling down to temporary rest. 

Six cots were dumped in front of each tent after 
which each prospective occupant of a cot was fur- 
nished a sack resembling a long pillow case and 
directed to a stack of bales of straw. Here for the 
first time the men became mattress makers, stuffing 
gobs of straw into the long bags. So eagerly was the 
straw accepted that those toward the end of the line 
found none left. Soon an order went the rounds that 
everyone must return his custom-made mattress to 



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Spadra Railroad Depot 






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Tent Street 









Tent City 



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Camping-Out at Spadra 




Vitamins 



the straw pile and disgorge one fourth of the contents; 
later dire threats were sounded for the selfish who 
sought to retain the pot bellied accomplishments of 
their handiwork. A water supply was furnished from 
two 3/4-inch stand pipes blocks away. Yes, a line 
formed there, too. 

The days ahead were busy ones with striking tents 
and re-pitching them so that lines were straight or 
in trying to make the tents resemble the pictures of 
tents in the regulations book; ground was ditched; 
grass cut down with scythes; swamps drained; fields 
cleared; and within a short time tent city took on the 
appearance of a regular camp with orderly rows of 
tents fronting on company streets, some weak elec- 
tricity produced by a gasoline powered generator, a 
shower room in which two shower heads trickled 
cold water onto the shivering flesh of a few of the 
brave, willing for the sake 01 c:eaniiness to endure 
such mild torture. Steel helmets which had served 
as seats or head coverings were now found to have 
more diversified uses as wash basins for shaving or 
tubs for sponge baths. Water was either cold or 
colder, and razors squeaked across staunch beards. 




Spadra — PX and Showers in foreground shack; Tent Living Quarters in center; 
Rising Hospital Wards in background 



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13th G. H. Float in Pomona July 4th Parade 



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Barracks at Spadra 



As night descended Ihe camp desert air penetrated 
beneath muscle and fat, and to try to keep moder- 
ately warm, woolen underwear was put to service, 
OD's were worn to bed, overcoat and all, beneath 
the full standard issue of three blankets. But the icy 
cold still crept into beds insidiously and heads were 
tucked beneath covers. Not until the middle of morn- 
ing did the outside air moderate and then the burn- 
ing desert sun beat down mercilessly while sweat 
rolled down backs and necks. 

Latrines were in the open and to cogitate there by 
evening one had to be an eskimo, while during the 
heat of the day myriads of air minded flies dive 
bombed from above and those with naval prefer- 
ence torpedoed from below. Woe was he who was 
careless enough to develop a slight dysentery. And 
loud became the cry "Give California back to the 
Indians." 

Nearby buildings which had been the objects of 
varying rumors turned out to be incomplete hospital 
wards which were to be operated by the 13th. The 
333rd Engineer Corps, who were already in the area, 
started to work and the medics were set to be con- 
tent in watching the buildings completed under 
skilled construction hands. But the buildings were to 
have more of a personal touch for most of the 13th 



men as detail lists were posted on bulletin boards 
announcing that the men were assigned to help the 
engineers finish the job. Shovels and hammers were 
substituted for medical instruments, concrete was 
laid, roofs were papered, shelves erected, and the 
final clean-up jobs completed; medical officers used 
their scientific training by acting as construction 
foremen. Medics on duty as first aid men were kept 
in practice as a steady stream of ambulatory patients 
flowed into the clinic with bruised fingers from mis- 
directed hammers and misguided saws. Soon the 
name was on all lips — "The 13th Medical Engi- 
neers." 

Twenty days after arrival the 13th began its first 
operation as a field unit when casualties from man- 
euvers in Desert Training Center of California and 
Arizona were brought in. Men were assigned specific 
duties as medical technicians, surgical technicians, 
dental and laboratory technicians, pharmacists, driv- 
ers, typists, clerks, litter bearers, guards. Nurses re- 
sponded to their assignments in the wards. Medical 
officers took up their practices of diagnosis and pre- 
scribing, cutting and sewing together. The 13th was 
functioning on its own as an independent unit. Facili- 
ties were limited but improvisations were soon 
learned. 






Convoy of Patients awaiting train at Spadra Rail Termina 



Home Sweet Home in a Barracks 



Patients were brought by ambulance direct from 
station and evacuation hospitals as far away as 
Yuma, Arizona, Needles and Indio, California, while 
some were flown by plane to nearby air fields and 
wheeled from there to the Receiving and Evacuation 
office from which they walked or were carried to 
designated wards. After recovery they were sent 
to the Replacement Depot at Pomona or San Bernar- 
dino, or taken by train for further observation and 
treatment to permanent general hospitals within the 
continental United States, such as Bruns at Santa Fe, 
New Mexico; Bushnell at Brigham City, Utah; or 
William Beaumont at El Paso, Texas. For all prac- 
tical purposes the Desert Training Center was re- 
garded as an overseas area, and soon the food took 
on an overseas atmosphere with paraffin-tasting, 
non-melting butter, powdered milk, canned meat and 
vegetables, and powdered eggs. 

A compensation for this life was the fact that 
Pomona was only seven miles distant while Los 



Life became more comfortable as water heaters 
were installed in the wash and shower rooms. Trans- 
portation inconveniences vanished as direct bus 
service between the hospital and Pomona was estab- 
lished. 

While the men were going through this tent and 
barracks life, the nurses were housed in permanent 
buildings on the grounds which had been part of a 
State Narcotic Hospital. 

The hospital of the 13th was built and functioning, 
and a formal dedication took place July 30, 1943. 
Visitors were invited and escorted through the wards. 
A grand parade of the officers, nurses, and enlisted 
men in Sunday best passed the reviewing stand in 
solid ranks while the band played favorite marches 
in spirited style. A bronze plaque imbedded in a 
stone foundation proclaimed the feat of construction 
of the hospital by the members of the 13th General 
Hospital and the 333rd Corps of Engineers. The 
dedication was solemnly proclaimed with the raising 




Col. Powell and Officers on Reviewing Stand 



Angeles and Hollywood measured thirty miles. A 
short three mile walk down San Jose road brought 
one to Valley Highway where busses could be 
boarded or rides obtained from a generous, friendly 
public. Covina, El Monte, and other closer towns ex- 
hibited patriotic hospitality. Through the good offices 
of the Hospital Red Cross Workers dances were ar- 
ranged, Hollywood artists gave performances, and 
invitations were extended for private operatic rendi- 
tions at nearby ranches. 

Gradually civilization came to the 13th hospital 
personnel area as wooden barracks were erected 
for the officers and enlisted men. Orders were issued 
to build shelving according to army specifications 
over each bunk but no issue of lumber, nails, or tools 
was made. The boys had learned to improvise so 
the 333rd Engineers became a simulated enemy and 
stealthy raids were made on the general supplies 
of this enemy. All shelves were constructed. 



of the colors and complimentary speeches. This truly 
was a significant event since the 13th was the first 
numbered hospital ever to operate as a going unit 
within the United States. 

A part of the combat training to which the rear 
echelon medics had to be exposed was the infiltra- 
tion course. No one was excused from this important 
assignment and one-third of the personnel responded 
on each of three successive days for the trip to the 
course at San Bernardino. Each group returned with 
dread tales of what could be expected by those who 
were to follow. Dressed in fatigues and carrying full 
packs, officers, nurses, Red Cross workers, and en- 
listed men were led into a narrow trench and then 
directed over the top to work their way to an objec- 
tive one hundred fifty yards distant. Barbed wire 
entanglements covered the course. Real ammuni- 
tion studded with tracer bullets and continuously 
fired from machine guns set at the finish line whistled 



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Hospital Wards 




Chapel Murals Painted by Enlisted Man 




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three feet above the ground to become imbedded in 
a hill to the rear of the trench. If one became panicky 
and arose it meant death or serious injury. Along 
this course the men and women wormed their way 
in stomach crawls under the wire entanglements, and 
where the barbs were low enough to catch the back 
packs, it became necessary to wiggle over from stom- 
ach to back and push forward with heel power while 
raising the wire with uplifting hands. Finally with a 
sigh of relief one came to the end of the lively one 
hundred fifty yards and while brushing California 
sand from clothes, mouth, ears, and eyes, it became 
more satisfying to watch others negotiate the haz- 
ards. 

As the days and weeks passed many changes took 
place. Some who had applied for Officers' Candidate 
School received notice of acceptance; others were 
sent to the newly formed Army Specialized Training 
Program. Hospital ship platoons and portable sur- 
gical hospital groups were formed from the experi- 
enced medics and shipped away. Replacements 
trickled in and new friends were made. Those de- 
parting took with them fond memories of humor and 
sadness. They could recall the drummer of the band 
disappearing during a march as he dropped with his 
big bass drum into an unseen fox hole on the 
grounds; they could remember the sadness of the 
camp as word was received of the death of Al 
Schnoor in an auto accident and the serious injuries 
received by his companions; they could picture the 
home-made zoo of native snakes and animals cor- 
ralled by one of the doctors; they could recall the 
evening rush to the Pomona Y.M.C.A. where they 
were generously given towels, the use of fine re- 
freshing showers and the swimming tank; they would 
also miss the sandwiches and ccffee at the Pomona 
U.S.O. Center; some would remember the lessons in 
Spanish, typing, mathematics, and other subjects 
taken three evenings a week at the Pomona Junior 
College; they would chuckle at the bewilderment of 
some of the officers who could find only a few score 
men in camp on a week end when passes were re- 
stricted to twenty per cent of the personnel of more 
than five hundred enlisted men; and most important 
they would not forget the ministrations which were 
given to heal the sick and injured by combinations 
of themselves, the nurses, and the doctors. 





Nurses in Battle Dress on Spadra Critique 



The training had been thorough. The officers, 
nurses, and enlisted men of the 13th had proven 
themselves under conditions closely parallel to those 
encountered in a combat area. On peak days as 
many as 1700 patients were treated. Commendations 
by the commanding general of the Desert Training 
Center bore witness to the efficiency and capability 
of the unit. 

September 13th— after many days of rumors, the 
34th General Hospital moved into the 13th area, and 
it became evident that once again the 13th would be 
on the move. There was the hustle of checking in 
supplies and packing. More experienced by now, 
everyone restricted belongings more sharply. Trains 
were boarded and the outfit headed East for Brigham 
City, Utah, to receive final training at Bushnell Gen- 
eral Hospital. 



19 



COMMANDING OFFICER 




COL. AUGUST W. SPITTLER 



Assumed Command at Bushnell General Hospital 



20 



THE LAND OF THE MORMONS 



After several days of travel the destination, Brig- 
ham City, Utah, was reached, and as the first sights 
of the city were unveiled, it appeared to the aston- 
ished men and women that here at last they were 
to be stationed near a town where hospitality and 
good will would have no equal elsewhere, for streets 
were gaily decorated, flags waved from standards 
and stores, windows revealed artistic displays, all 
this for the auspicious entry of the 13th. The illusion 
was short-lived as it became known that this was the 
occasion of the Annual Peach Festival. 

The setting up of the unit was by now an old story 
to the veterans of desert training. Work was almost 
routine, and efficiency became a matter of course. 
About half of the nurses tarried but one week after 
which they were dispatched on detached duty to such 
places as Fort Ord at Santa Barbara, Calif., Camp 
Adair, near Corvallis, Oregon, and Camp Abbot 
in Bend, Oregon, where possibility of mistaken bar- 
racks would be less likely. Their barracks at Bush- 
nell happened to be close to those where the male 
officers were quartered, and one dark evening a cer- 
tain captain on high wobbled into the nurses' bar- 
racks and confidently edged his way to that part 
of the building where familiar room number 8 was 
located. There he proceeded to make ready for 
sleeping only to be jarred suddenly into complete 
sensibility by a scared feminine scream piercing the 
stillness of the night air and sending a forlorn, shad- 
owy form scurrying into the open holding on to dan- 
gling bits of clothing. After a more careful survey 
of the neighboring barracks he found the more fam- 
iliar one where he would not be unwelcome in a 
room number 8 of his own. 

The men settled down quickly in the small, friendly 
city nestling high among the mountains and beet 
farms, and in the months ahead they were to look 
back longingly upon their Utah stay. Red Cross Vol- 
unteer Services from neighboring towns sponsored 
parties, dances, and get-togethers. Wives and sweet- 
hearts came to share the last few months with the 
men to whom they would soon bid an uncertain fare- 
well. Many men were assigned to the welcome duty 
of accompanying sick and wounded to points in the 
East where they were allowed extra time to visit 
their homes. The others were surprised with the grant- 
ing of an unrequested fifteen day furlough, and they 



happily left to enjoy to the full the brief respite prior 
to Port of Embarkation. 

When the unit departed from Spadra, they left be- 
hind them one of their own members as a very sick 
patient, Captain John Bodfish, who had served as 
Detachment Commander both at Robinson and 
Spadra. Several of the medical specialists remained 
to attend him, but Captain Bodfish died just about the 
time that the rest of the group was settling down at 
Bushnell. 

Meanwhile, in Washington, D. C, the higher au- 
thorities had decided to transfer the Commanding 
Officer, Colonel Lyle S. Powell, to another post. His 
successor assumed command November 6, 1943, and 
was greeted by a full dress parade of the members, 
who stood in silent attention as the new commander, 
Colonel August W. Spittler, was awarded the Legion 
of Merit. Col. Spittler, who was stationed at Pearl 
Harbor during the Jap sneak attack, had distin- 
guished himself as Chief of Surgery at Trippler Gen- 
eral Hospital during and after the bombing. 

Events moved rapidly. The 13th was nearing its 
destiny. The doctors, nurses, and enlisted men were 
assigned to wards where they had the opportunity 
to serve human casualties from the real battle areas, 
men badiy maimed and wounded, shell shock vic- 
tims, battle neurotics, types which would soon be 
common patients in the echelons across the sea. 

A short time before departure a story circulated 
that a cadre was to be formed from the 13th per- 
sonnel. Many who had looked with resigned dread 
upon the nearing ocean voyage started pulling fav- 
ored strings to be assigned to the group which would 
insure at least a temporary respite in the states. 
Soon the men were selected, and detachment head- 
quarters, which had from the days of Camp Robinson 
been tagged with the sobriquet "Boars' Nest", was 
more than decimated as most of its occupants 
boarded trains for Camp Grant and a new tour of 
duty as a training group. 

December 10, 1943, a little more than two years 
after Pearl Harbor, the hospital unit had completed 
preparations for the last stateside move, and on that 
night dark forms filed silently into shaded Pullman 
cars. The next stop was to be a Port of Embarkation. 



21 




.. 



1 



' •*?•. 



22 



GOODBYE AMERICA, GOODBYE 



Two days later the trains pulled into Camp Stone- 
man near Pittsburg, California, in customary reverse 
with the first to leave being the last to arrive. The 
nurses on detached service arrived shortly thereafter. 
A compressed month of physical examinations, se- 
curity lectures, and policing the area followed. Physi- 
cal exams were brief, taking several minutes of a 
bored doctor's time. It was whispered that if the 
subject was but slightly breathing and could move, 
his or her record would show for posterity that on this 
occasion for once here was a perfect physical speci- 
men. However, in fairness to the examiners, let it 
be said that the unfit had previously been weeded 
out. 

Pamphlets were handed out warning against idle 
talk. The designation of the hospital was submerged 
in its shipping number, 0522-L, and soldiers looked 
about cautiously before discussing the merit of the 



food they had for breakfast. Chow lines were long. 
Luckless GI's finding their names on the K.P. list 
came back with unbelievable tales of Camp Stone- 
man style K.P. Company punishment was the pen- 
alty if garbage cans contained more than six inches 
of scrap after two thousand had eaten. K.P.'s were 
threatened with Courts Martial for eating a slice of 
bread in the kitchen. 

One last pass gave the entire group an opportunity 
to see civilian America again before shipping out. 
Things taken for granted so long now assumed new 
realities. Movies, soda fountains, neon lights — a last 
look was taken as it was realized that it might be a 
long time before such wonders would be seen again. 
In the future, San Francisco tales would gain impor- 
tance and glamour as reminiscing hospitaleers in 
New Guinea and the Philippines discussed their last 
pass in the States. 



23 




•1 



..-•** 



24 




Golden Gate Bridge 



OCEAN TRAVEL 



On January 5, 1944, a long column of the men and 
women of the 13th weighted down under bags con- 
taining the required equipment, supplemented with 
extras ranging from coat hangers to bourbon smell- 
ing liquids, wended their way the three miles from 
Camp Stoneman to Pittsburg, where they found two 
river boats on which they were squeezed and com- 
pressed into an immovable pack for a twelve hour 
ride through a cold mist to Frisco. Reaching the em- 
barkation point they filed through a long shed and 
gradually ascended the gangplank where a worried 
officer checked the names of those who passed. Into 
the hold of the Nieuw Amsterdam, a former Dutch 
luxury liner, the long file was swallowed. 

Eight thousand military personnel were to ride this 
transport. Places had been assigned. Staterooms 
constructed for two became the nesting places for 
from six to twelve nurses. However, they had the 
luxury of towels, sheets, and linen, and running water 
twice a day, at which times they put to use their 
desert training by hoarding the water in steel hel- 
mets. The male officers had similar luxuries and 
were quartered six to eighteen, depending on rank, 
in staterooms similar to those assigned ship K.P.'s. 
The enlisted personnel were placed in what was 
formerly the Ritz Carlton Bar. Collapsible metal 
frames reached from floor to ceiling throughout the 
vast room. Canvas strips were attached to the frames 
in four tiers with in-between spaces of twenty-four 
inches to make up the private bedroom of each GI. 
The place was slightly cramped and the air stuffy, 
especially at night when all windows were shut. 

The next day, January 6th, the transport shoved off 
and steamed under the Golden Gate Bridge for its 
long voyage without armed escort. The speed of 
the vessel made it unlikely prey for enemy armed 
craft in any race. Enlisted men of the 13th were ques- 
tionably honored by being selected as K.P.'s for the 
other troops aboard, and as the ship plowed steadily 
across the Pacific they were busy carrying from the 
ship's hold to the mess hall food for consumption. 
Salad, meat, potatoes, vegetable, and dessert, con- 
stituting a meal, were piled hodge podge into a dish 



resembling a soup bowl. Then they reversed the 
procedure carting the empties from mess hall to the 
hold. Five settings were held for each meal; two 
meals a day were served for those whose appetites 
were not voided by the waves. Officers fared better 
being served by Dutch waiters at linen covered 
tables. 

Boxing and gambling were the favorite pastimes 
during the day. News and music were broadcast on 
the sun deck and main lounge. Upon crossing the 
Equator, high jinx developed with some heads left 
glistening after a razor treatment administered by 
Father Neptune. 

Alarms were sounded frequently for boat drills. 
Nurses had been given kits in which they were to 
pack those things they thought most necessary to lif 3- 
if a catastrophe should leave them bobbing about in 
open boats on the waves for an unknown period. A 
peek into such kits religiously carried to the life 
boats on each alarm would have revealed such ne- 
cessaries as bobby pins, candy bars, fish hooks, 
safety pins, and bras. Water was carefully con- 
served and issued only in the morning and evening. 
Despite this if canteens were not full of the precious 
liquid at the mid-afternoon inspections, the guilty 
parties would be placed on the punishment list. To 
be on the safe side one remained thirsty from break- 
fast to mid-afternoon. 

The trip was not entirely uneventful. One night 
when evening festivities were in full swing on the 
blacked out ship, the alarm for general quarters was 
flashed throughout the craft. This was not practice. 
The large ship lurched forward, belching forth huge 
clouds of black smoke. It veered crazily, it creaked 
and groaned as it zigzagged through the waves like 
an expert open field runner. The cause was a light 
spotted in the ocean blackness. Gradually the light 
was no longer visible and the radar indicated all 
clear which returned things to normal. Following this 
episode it is known that at least one 13th soldier 
deserted the crowded sleeping quarters below deck 
in favor of the hard boards of the open deck during 
the remainder of the trip. 



DOWN UNDER 



Eleven days after the departure of the huge trans- 
port from the States the welcome sight of land ignited 
a silent prayer of appreciation in the hearts of all. 
Colored dots on the gentle, green, sloping hills be- 
came steadily larger as the distance to shore nar- 
rowed, and they then burst forth as neat homes 
surmounted by brilliant red tile roofs. Small ferry 
boats feverishly raced back and forth in the wide 
harbor. This was Auckland, New Zealand, the first 
scheduled stop where a contingent of the troop cargo 
was discharged from the ship. 



first experience of riding in opposite English style, 
on the left side of the road, to the objective, Heme 
Bay. 

A large hospital center had been erected at Heme 
Bay and it looked as though this would be the war 
locale of the 13th. This wishful conclusion gradually 
wore off as the only work assigned the EM'S was 
"Police de area", again, again, and again. 

Passes were given every fourth day and large con- 
tingents rode the trams to Sydney and other neigh- 
boring towns. The large city with its many stores 




^^./•■^V* V V>^ c'^o *^:/» >;< , * % 













0» r 



8- A 



■mm> 



Sydney Harbor 



A brisk business consisting of exchange of Ameri- 
can cigarettes for New Zealand coins was interrupted 
only by the departure of the Nieuw Amsterdam for 
the 13th G. H. destination, Sydney, Australia, which 
was reached January 22, 1944. The personnel of the 
13th filed off the transport into waiting ferry boats 
which chugged slowly towards the train shed. Here 
a transfer was made to rickety, antiquated Australian 
trains which succeeded in getting all to the suburb 
of Punchbowl, where another transfer to busses was 
effected. Hilarity and ribald comments echoed 
through the conveyances as the Americans had their 



afforded a welcome opportunity for shopping, and 
hasty purchases of woolen goods, yams, and sheep 
rugs were soon traveling on their way to homes in 
the States. The zoo provided sights of the strange 
Koala Bear and the Wallaby. Pubs were opened a 
half hour in the forenoon and a half hour in the 
afternoon. In the near one hundred degree tempera- 
ture the brief opportunity to sample Aussie beer was 
a heavenly delight but many wondered whether the 
brief ascension was worth it as they nursed devilish 
poundings in their heads as an aftermath of the 
potent 12% amber fluid. 



26 



The faithful followers of horseflesh who managed 
to get out to the race track were amazed to witness 
the thorobreds racing around the track in the wrong 
direction. There was an air of domestic familiarity, 
however, as the cash turned in at the betting win- 
dows followed the usual pattern of failing to bring the 
multiplied returns anticipated. 

Taking full advantage of this possible last contact 
with civilization, the girls rushed the beauty shops 
for last permanents, sets, and manicures. After 5:30 
P. M. everything in town closed and all activity 
ceased. Most popular meeting place of the 13th in 
Sydney was the modern Australian Hotel. 

The three weeks at Heme Bay passed quickly. 
Aussie "stike and aigs" supplemented the less exotic 
army chow. Heavy olive drab clothes were turned 
in for light summer clothing, but barracks bags 
seemed to bulge and weigh as much as before the 
change. Finally word was spread that the next stop 
of the 13th would be Brisbane, Queensland. Another 
ride in the so-called "first class" trains of the Aus- 
tralian rail system was dramatically climaxed in that 
city by an enthusiastic welcome from the usually 
stolid Aussies. 

The new hospital area was at Holland Park, a 
suburb of Brisbane, one-half hour by tram from that 
metropolis. The 42nd General Hospital was operat- 
ing a hospital here for casualties which were pouring 
in from New Guinea. Almost immediately the work 
of their staff was lightened as the doctors, nurses, 
and enlisted men of the 13th stepped into the heal- 
ing roles they had learned so well. In addition engi- 
neering details were assigned to not unskilled hands 



to dig ditches, clean de area, and install plumbing 
in the hospital wards. Everyone was working at 
something. Might this be the place? 

At night there was a general exodus from Holland 
Park to Brisbane where relaxation and food could be 
had cheaply, despite the fact that this was a garrison 
town, headquarters of the Southwest Pacific Com- 
mand. MacArthur headquarters were at Lennon's 
Hotel. Memories of pointed admonitions at Camp 
Robinson to salute all staff cars (Chevrolets and 
Dodges) became laughs here as sleek, highly pol- 
ished Cadillacs whisked staff officers through the 
streets without the necessity of the soldier pedestrian 
pumping his arm into a salute motion. Street cars 
were of the open variety with girls only performing 
as conductors. Streets were narrow and cramped. 
For those who had learned from experience not to 
drink Aussie beer there were Milk Bars at which 
milk and ice cream could be purchased, and for six 
pence one could enjoy a dish of ice cream and cherry 
sauce. 

Many places of entertainment had been set up in 
Brisbane. For officers there were the American Cen- 
ter and Gregory Terrace. There were swanky clubs 
where admittance was limited only to officers above 
the rank of Major. For the enlisted men there were 
Service Men's Centers and U..S.O. Clubs. There were 
splendid beaches with glistening white sand, and 
clubs manned by the Red Cross. All such conveni- 
ences served to make the members of the 13th satis- 
fied to remain in such a place. But disappointment 
loomed again as booster shots were administered 
along with some new ones, such as cholera. 




The Maetsuycker 



COMMANDING OFFICER 




COL. HOMER K. NICOLL 



Assumed Command at Brisbane 



,:\s 



News rapidly spread that Col. Spittler had been 
transferred and that Lt. Col. Homer K. Nicoll, Execu- 
tive Officer under both Powell and Spittler, and a 
Laboratory Officer of Base Hospital 13 during World 
War I, was to assume command on March 18, 1944. 
Soon thereafter, March 25th, orders were issued to 
prepare to move. Newly found Aussie friends had 
been made but there had to be a parting. 

The Maetsuycker, a hospital ship on the white 
sides and top of which were painted large Red 
Crosses, took aboard an advance group for a rolling 
trip across the Coral Sea, reputed to be the roughest 
body of water in the world. A second similar ship, 
the Tasman, sailed ten days later with the remainder 
of the personnel, except the nurses, who remained 
with the 42nd G. H. for six weeks and then proceeded 
to Oro Bay where they found what appeared to be 
the largest rat population on earth. Some still are 
willing to swear that the rodents were as large as 
dogs and sometimes took on the size of small ponies. 

The girls were housed in open type barracks with 
canvas walls and roof. Ordinary mosquito bars were 
the only protection from insect and animal life. Rats 
squealed and ran around the floor throughout the 
night. A few of the bolder rodents intent on a choice 
morsel managed to climb the cots and through the 
mosquito mesh inflict bites on some of the girls. It 



was not with any sense of regret at departing that the 
nurses after a few weeks of this life smilingly walked 
the gangplank onto the returned Tasman for the 
rough Coral Sea voyage. 

At Oro Bay the girls had their first glimpse of the 
native Fuzzies with teeth stained black from chewing 
Betel nuts, and with contrasting blonde hair bleached 
with peroxide, an expendible item in the army sys- 
tem. Here also they were privileged to attend the 
1 1th Division Air Review with planes roaring past in 
regular formations, soldiers marching in high para- 
troop boots, and paratroopers sailing from transport 
planes down through the air under their ballooning 
parachute brakes. 

Aside from the bumpy sea, the three passages to 
Finschhafen, New Guinea, on the Maetsuycker and 
Tasman were uneventful. At night the ships were 
fully lighted and contact was maintained with the 
Japanese Navy, the positions of the ships being sig- 
nalled to the enemy every twenty-four hours. Each 
person wore a Red Cross badge on his or her arm. 
Since the ships were carrying hospital personnel they 
were accorded the courtesy of safe conduct under 
the rules of civilized war. The food aboard was the 
best yet, but many who had bravely weathered the 
trip across on the larger ship now could develop no 
semblance of appetite for the choice and tasty dishes 
offered. 




All Travel Was Not by Train, Ship, or Plane 




2\ — Sanitary District Crew at Work 

25 — Operation Mud 

26 — Improved New Guinea Highway 

27 — Cocoanuts on ground alongside Enlisted Men's 

Quarters 
28— Buildings in the Making 
29 — Building Completed 



30 



IN NEW GUINEA'S TEEMING 
JUNGLES 



The 13th General Hospital was destined to spend 
most of its army life in the dank, teeming jungles of 
New Guinea. From some 45 acres of swamp land, 
hot and overgrown with the lush plant and animal 
life of the jungle, sprang a hospital with twenty-nine 
pre-fabricated ward buildings. Long hours and days 
of heavy labor under depressing conditions were the 
lot of the 13th in accomplishing the task but accom- 
plish it they did to their everlasting credit. Before 
even a ward had been completed, patients were be- 
ing received in temporary ward tents and men had to 
lay aside their carpentry and cement mixing duties 
to turn their talents to the better known art of healing. 

The first detachment on the Maetsuycker had 
arrived at night. From the ship in Langemak Bay 
could be seen many small lights where feverish activ- 
ity was going on. With the approach of dawn a 
steady stream of trucks and motor vehicles could be 
seen plying their way along the sandy shore. This 
was Finschhafen, destined to be one of the great 
bases of the South Pacific. 




Col. Nicoll stands outside one of Buildings of 
Officers' Quarters 




Enlisted Men's Tent Area No. 1 

Ashore the men gaped at the furious activity before 
them in a wilderness. Their first close look at jungle 
was had as a convoy of trucks carried them through 
muddy, rutted roads. At a seemingly impassable 
point in the jungle wall, they turned into a narrow 
road where a sign, almost overgrown with tentacles, 
proclaimed that this was the site of the 54th Evacua- 
tion Hospital. 

In the spot assigned the 13th, a hot, damp, ener- 
vating heat repelled the GI's as they jumped from the 
trucks. Two or three buildings, nearly in ruin and 
partially overgrown with vegetation, were visible. 
One, an old German mission, had served as field 
headquarters for the troops who had invaded this Jap 
stronghold only a few months before. Hundreds of 
foxholes pitted the area. An air alert the first night 
and twenty-four hour guard duty were grim warn- 
ings that they were in a genuine battle zone. Only 
sixty miles away Japs and Yanks were slugging it 
out in the front lines. 




Enlisted Men's Tent Area No. 4 



31 



The first few weeks were a kaleidoscope of activi- 
ties. The area had to be ditched and drained, the fox- 
holes filled, unserviceable buildings razed, the jungle 
hacked through and thrust back. Three eight-hour 
shifts kept the work going on round the clock. Knee 
deep mud and stifling heat became accepted facts. 
Atabrine was taken with the regularity of eating. 
Before donning shoes and clothing, close inspections 
had to be made for detection of dozing snakes and 
other forms of jungle life. The ever present green 
mould on clothes became taken for granted. 

Other contingents began to arrive. Those who had 
remained for two days at Milne Bay were flown in. 
These were closely followed by the members who 
had left Brisbane on the Tasman, and then came a 
small group who arrived on a liberty ship. Except 
for the nurses the unit was complete. 

Gradually out of chaos form came into being. The 
first installation completed was the nurses' quarters 
and then the emergency surgery building, first of its 
type in New Guinea. Nearby, the laboratory, phar- 
macy, X-Ray, and headquarters were housed in tem- 
porary structures. 



Meanwhile the men of the 13th had been busy with 
their own homes, tents pitched in shimmering ponds 
of oozy mud. Such quarters were gradually trans- 
formed by the industrious home makers into tents 
with elevated floors, built-in shelves, closets, desks 
and other home-made or borrowed furnishings. Be- 
fore the departure from New Guinea no well-equipped 
tent would be without its sunken cold box in which 
would repose a few bottles of cool beer and delica- 
cies received in welcome packages from home. Light- 
ing systems of candles, gasoline, or mosquito repel- 
lant illuminated the tents with a ghastly, flickering 
light. Stronger light could be had by slushing to the 
mess hall where 40 watt bulbs cast pale reflections 
on the oil drum tables. Later every tent was equipped 
with electric lights. 

While the men, like eager beavers, were engaged 
in their building activities, the nurses arrived from 
Oro Bay aboard the Tasman. The expected recep- 
tion committee was not present at the dock to greet 
or meet them, and here they sat in the open alongside 
their belongings taking a drenching in the daily 
downpour. After four hours of this moist welcome to 




Nurses' Stockade 



The name of 13th Medical Engineers coined at 
Spadra became a reality on the under side of the 
earth as the medics wrested hard coral out of pits, 
then crushed and used it for filling and leveling the 
area. Despite the sizzling temperature, incessant 
rain, and quicksand mud, and the much too frequent 
requisitioning of lumber and other material by ad- 
jacent units, buildings began to take shape. Men 
became more proficient in construction work as prac- 
tice developed short cuts. Unloading crews hastily 
removed the contents of the never-ending line of 
trucks bringing lumber, cement, pre-fabricated units, 
and other equipment. Electric lights and plumbing 
were installed. 

Engineering units came and went during the con- 
struction phase. The old German Mission was the 
hub of the building activity. Finally the 866th EAB 
arrived to help erect the ward buildings and com- 
plete the job. 



Finschhafen, ambulances arrived and the girls 
poured themselves into the interiors for a ride to the 
secluded home which had been prepared for them — 
the stockade. One boundary fronted on the ocean. 
The other three were land boundaries marked off 
with barbed wire fences screened with canvas. At 
night large spot lights threw their powerful beams 
on the building and around the grounds of this gold 
fish bowl while guards paced before the entrances 
to make certain that only those privileged to live 
within the enclosure could gain admittance. Despite 
the detailed precautions the planning brains had not 
anticipated the strange and uncanny movements of 
the sea as male swimmers were helplessly caught in 
the ocean currents and surely wafted onto the beach 
front of the stockade. To overcome such strange 
forces of the waves a mesh fence was built out into 
the sea and helpless men no longer found themselves 
on sands out-of-bounds. 



Not content with their building accomplishments 
on necessary structures, the medical engineers em- 
banced on the construction of a theatre with seats 
made from cocoanut logs and a stage featuring a 
screen made of a canvas fly-tent stretched across 
trusses. This spot became the center of off-duty activ- 
ity. Movies were shown three times a week. Men 
and women of the hospital sat through rain, dressed 
in helmet liners and raincoats, watching Hollywood 



figures darting about on the screen. The first stage 
show was performed by an Australian Mobile Enter- 
tainment Troupe. Other such units, U.S.O. Trouba- 
dours, name bands, and famous personalities such 
as Irving Berlin, Lanny Ross, Candy Jones, Al 
Schacht, and Judith Anderson did their acts. 

Engineer outfits, infantry and tank units — all 
pitched in to help the 13th build a chapel, an officers' 
club, a new theatre to replace the one first erected, 



4 * m 




34— Here Tis 

35 — Tents Open for Airing 

36 — Outdoor Theatre 

37 — Registrar and Detachment of Patients Office 

38 — Emergency Ward Tent 

39 — Dermatology Ward 



33 




43 — Telephone Exchange and Post Office 

44 — Communications through the Palms 

45 — Headquarters 

46 — Detachment Headquarters, left; E. M. Laundry, right 

47 — Post Exchange 

48— Barnyard Golf beside GI Wash 



34 




Chapel at Finschhafen 



and other buildings. Junglized tents with floors, studs 
and frames grew up in company streets. Small pre- 
fabricated buildings at the end of streets named 
North Shore Drive, Garvey Boulevard, Brisbane Ave- 
nue, housed the first flush toilets seen by the natives. 
In the Southern area a community arose named 
"Home Town", complete with miniature golf course, 
and horse stables. Boats and outriggers were fash- 
ioned and launched; swimming piers were extended 
out into the water. As there were few items to pur- 
chase, metal coins lost all value and men engaged 
in contests of skill to see how far out to sea they 
could scale the coins along the water surface. 

Other pastimes were introduced. A "Farmers As- 
sociation" developed with keen competition arising 
as to which section could grow the best crop of rad- 
ishes, watermelons, and tomatoes. Various types of 
handicraft were practiced and Aussie coins were 
converted into bracelets, necklaces, and watch 
bands. Cocoanut shells were converted into trays, 
buttons, and other bric-a-brac. Walks built above the 
muck connected the buildings in the hospital area. 
Nurses exerted their influence to obtain white paint, 
and furniture in the sick wards took on a more aes- 
thetic appearance. Parachutes decorated the Red 
Cross recreation hall and officers' club. 



Taverns and pubs are not even a rarity in New 
Guinea. They just aren't. Arrival of beer from the 
States was a slow process. Soldiers who had been 
taught to improvise looked upon this situation as a 
challenge to their ingenuity and so there was con- 
cocted in the jungle the "Purple Passion Drink". A 
heat lotion consisting of 90 % alcohol, colored a deep 
hue by the addition of Gentian Violet, was freely dis- 
tributed for relief of skin reactions to the extreme heat. 
It soon became known that the amount of Gentian 
Violet added was harmless to the internal organs, 
and so the violet colored heat repellant mixed with 
GI grapefruit juice became a delectable purple cock- 
tail to be leisurely sipped under cocoanut trees while 
the birds and monkeys of the jungle provided a caba- 
ret background of wierd, discordant sounds. With- 
drawals of the heat repellant soon became so enor- 
mous that an investigation disclosed the practice of 
lifting one on good old Uncle Sam. A silent cease 
and desist order was devised by adding camphor 
to the solution but the cease and desist was of short 
duration as a well trained GI employed his knowl- 
edge of chemistry by straining the solution through 
charcoal and thus removing the harsh tasting cam- 
phor. The "Purple Passion Drink" was an innocent 
passing incident in this lonely jungle far from home. 
No one is known to have suffered any ill effects. 



J 5 



COMMANDING OFFICER 



L 




n 



\ 



COL. ALLAN B. RAMSAY 



Assumed Command in New Guinea 



JO 




£•> 



Receiving Office 



«P* 








.■_' 



Patients Departing 



Months had passed since the 13th arrived. The 
bleak rutted road the hospital personnel had trav- 
elled when they arrived at this forlorn spot was now 
lined with installations from Scarlet Beach to the 
staging area of the 32nd Division — some 35 miles. 
Hospital routine was established. Despite all the rec- 
reational activities, the doctors, nurses, enlisted men, 
Red Cross workers and dieticians were daily per- 
forming their errand of mercy and military service. 
Sick and wounded were being brought in regularly, 
mostly from Morotai, the advance echelon of the New 
Guinea fighting. Some were brought in by boat, 
others by plane. After the invasion of the Philippines, 
most casualties came from those islands. The sights 
which had chilled the men and women at Bushnell 
now became ordinary medical and surgical cases 
which required prompt attention, patient treatment, 
and sympathetic understanding. 



The summer was hot; one day the thermometer 
registered 140 degrees in the dank humidity. Per- 
spiration flowed profusely, and the tempo of life 
slowed. Uniforms were scanty. Garrison rules were 
relaxed with saluting and inspections a rarity. Never- 
theless, morale was high and the hospital was func- 
tioning perfectly. 

Colonel Homer K. Nicoll, who had succeeded to the 
top post of Commanding Officer upon the transfer of 
Colonel Spittler in Australia, had remained unruffled 
by the difficulties of terrain, mud, and lack of engi- 
neering facilities in Finschhafen. He had been an 
omnipresent figure throughout the erection of the hos- 
pital. But the ways of the army are unknown to the 
directing powers themselves, and Colonel Nicoll re- 
ceived orders to assume new duties as executive 
officer of the 26th Hospital Center in Manila, while 
Colonel Allan B. Ramsay reported to take over the 
13th command on December 28, 1944. 






53 — Natives Lay Air Strip Sidewalk alongside Coral Road 

54 — Labor on the Beach 

55 — Friendly Neighbors 

56 — Number One Boy 

57 — Native Cemetery 

58 — Fuzzies Leave Hospital Area after Cocoanut Harvest 

59 — Leaving Native Village for Big Sing-Sing 

38 




Surgical Building 



Shortly after his succession as commanding officer 
base orders went out to restore garrison discipline 
with its despised saluting and propriety of uniform. 
A brief time before this new order an unusual dress 
parade was being held on the road through the hos- 
pital grounds when a patient in the Neuropsychiatric 
ward shouted out "You guys should be in here in- 
stead of us." Gradually a semblance of rule book 
discipline was restored amid occasional grumblings. 

Frequent excursions were made into the hospital 
area by the Fuzzies in search of cocoanuts. The co- 
coanuis would be shaken from the trees and hulled 
by the men. The women would then pick up and 
carry the loads, and the Fuzzies would be back off 
to their villages. Occasional trips by the members of 
the hospital were made to native villages but the 



heat and tangled vegetation made the journey ardu- 
ous. The general conclusion was that the sight of 
a smelly, dirty, fly-infested village was not worth the 
effort. 

The new theatre which had been installed seated 
2500 persons. The stage was equipped with foot- 
lights, overhead lighting, revolving side screens, and 
dressing rooms. To the rear of the theatre was the 
radio and sound room with controls installed for vari- 
ous broadcast programs. The studio was equipped 
with microphone sets, turntables for recordings, and 
a radio. Nearly 200 small amplifiers located in every 
ward, clinic, office, detachment building, and tent 
carried from the station news broadcasts, musical 
programs, and even training programs as "Why We 
Fight". 




Orthopedic Ward 



39 



%^' : 




mtk 



■ ; . -i 






Basketball Court 



Medical Ward 




Medical Supply Building 



Probably holding top place in the interest of hospi- 
tal personnel and patients at Finsch were sports. 
Baseball, basketball, softball, all shared the spotlight. 
Teams from neighboring units played their best on 
fields leveled off by army equipment. Sectional and 
island champions were crowned. 

Animal life was plentiful and some species were 
readily cultivated as pets. The dental clinic devel- 
oped the prize pet — Willie — a bald headed, fine tailed 
parrot. He learned to yell out "Beer Call," and a few 
other choice expressions innocently acquired from 
admiring GI's. As Willie had become a part of the 
13th and civilization it became fitting in the minds of 
his dental associates that a feather trim was appro- 
priate for him. The technician who performed the 
clipping did not reckon with the laws of nature for it 
seems that Willie's tail feathers were trimmed a wee 
bit too short as a result of which his sense of balance 
was disturbed and he wobbled around with an 
inebriated stumble. Finally one fine day Willie fell 
headlong from a perch to which he had ascended, 
and when the medical aid men recovered him the 
emergency medical tag which they attached to his 
leg indicated a long incised chest wound. As' part 
of the 13th, Willie was immediately rushed to sur- 
gery where a delicate surgical operation was per- 
formed by a top-ranking surgeon, and Willie recov- 
ered from the operation and as the tail grew back in 
length he recovered from the feather trim. Later he 
was smuggled to Manila where one day he hap- 
pened upon an open bottle of sedative pills which 
suited his sense of smell and taste. The sedatives 
soon disappeared and shortly thereafter Willie also 
disappeared in a parrot grave after a fitting military 
service. 

Another pet was Chigger, an Australian mongrel, 
who could be petted by only a chosen few. Having 
been injured he continued to limp about the base 
though X-Rays disclosed that his injuries had been 
completely healed. 




Si- 



Willie the Parrot Gets Lecture fror 
Nurse on Psittacosis 



During Thanksgiving and Christmas elaborate holi- 
day meals were served with printed menus to iden- 
tify the courses. Turkey with the customary trim- 
mings was consumed in the atmosphere of gaily 
decorated mess halls. During the impressive Christ- 
mas ceremonies of 1944 the piercing desire for home 
was temporarily forgotten. Catholic services inau- 
gurated the spirit with Midnight Mass in the Chapel. 
During the morning at the Protestant service a Christ- 
mas Pageant was performed by members of the unit 
under the direction of Chaplain Luginbill and Cap- 
tain Textor, who also acted as organist. The trained 
13th choir of male and female voices missed none of 
the yuletide carols, and throughout the day a Night- 
ingale chorus of nurses paraded through the wards 
singing carols to the accompaniment of a portable 
organ pushed along on a GI food cart. 




Plaster-of-Paris Snowmen Visit Finsch 
at Christmas 






Yule Decorated Ward 



4 1 




Mess Hall with Wards toward rear 



The stay in New Guinea was not all pleasant. Dur- 
ing the early weeks dysentery struck viciously. The 
latrine, known as Rabaul, because of the many trips 
paid to it, was always crowded, and seas of mud 
made the numerous trips difficult to traverse. The 
jungle dampness and torrid heat had their effect upon 
skins. Innumerable dermatological diseases became 
prevalent. Calomine lotion and Gentian Violet cov- 
ered the bodies of many. Emergency airplane flights 
carried to the States many of those suffering the 
effects of jungle-rot. 

Tragedy in the form of death also made dread vis- 
its. Nelle Crout, who had been Chief of Nurses from 



the inception of the unit, died in the midst of the in- 
hospitable jungle. She had directed the nursing 
duties in a firm and kindly manner, and had en- 
deared herself to all those whose position or work 
brought them in contact with her. Death also came 
here to Eugene Stinetorf, one of the enlisted men. 

A lull in military activity in New Guinea resulted 
in a slackening of the admission of patients. Sud- 
denly news of the Philippine invasion was broadcast, 
and soon the full force of the hospital went into action 
as casualties from Leyte, and later Luzon, were hur- 
ried in for treatment. 




Enlisted Men's Housing Project 



May 8, 1945 — rockets and flares lit the skies under 
the mantle of the Southern Cross as the great news 
was flashed that the war in Europe had ended. Ger- 
many had capitulated. Celebrations were wild. Car- 
bines, rifles, and ack-ack cracked loudly with ammu- 
nition flying wildly into the air. Casualties of the 
victory celebrations were soon being registered on 
the hospital records, and medical work continued 
from the effects of peace as well as war. 

Thoughts ran to a rapidly disbanding army and 
home, that most wonderful word in all the world. For 
many of the younger soldiers a United States without 
Franklin D. Roosevelt would seem strange. When 
news arrived in New Guinea that he had died on 
April 12th, the sorrowing men and women recalled 
vividly the Sunday morning at Camp Robinson when 
they stood in ankle-deep Arkansas mud as the 
Commander-in-Chief in caped overcoat reviewed 
them from his passing automobile. 

On May 30, 1945, Lt. Col. Evan M. Barton, who had 
weathered the 13th G. H. campaign as Chief of the 
Laboratory Service, was placed in command upon 
the assignment of Colonel Ramsay to the 120th Gen- 
eral Hospital. It was Colonel Barton's good fortune 
to guide and direct the hospital through its final 



peace-time moves, and then to witness the demobi- 
lization of this grand hospital group. 

The New Guinea job was about finished. Fighting 
had moved to the West of that great base, and it was 
no surprise when the rumor gathered momentum that 
a move was impending. Preparations for the move- 
ment were routine. Buildings were dismantled and 
wrecked carefully for re-use of the lumber which 
was marked, inventoried, and stacked for removal, 
only then to be abandoned since the ships carrying 
the personnel had no room for dead timber. 

On June 6, 1945, the New Guinea skies opened with 
a heavy downpour of farewell rain as the 13th bade 
a last adieu to the region. Hallowed memories of the 
trying early days spent here mingled with expecta- 
tions of what was to come. The men left on the 
James O'Hara, an APA, and quietly watched the 
fading coast of New Guinea and Hollandia vanish 
into the horizon. The ship was one of a convoy of 
sixteen heading for the Philippine Islands where the 
13th would be re-established. The nurses again were 
sent on detached duty to the 4th General Hospital 
and the 119th Station Hospital, after which they pro- 
ceeded to the Philippines, mostly by plane, a few by 
boat. 







Completed Hospital at Finschhafen Dedicated to the Men and Women 
of the 13th General Hospital 



43 



COMMANDING OFFICER 




i *jpP^ 



\ 




COL. EVAN M. BARTON 



Assumed Command in New Guinea 



MANILA, PEARL OF THE ORIENT 



The beautiful City of Manila was one of the first 
conquests of the Japs. From the rail of the James 
O'Hara the city seemed nearly intact. The harbor 
was sprinkled with sunken vessels and giant spars 
poked their heads from the water. Harbor traffic was 
heavy as ships dodged around the partly submerged 
wrecks. Several days passed before the men dis- 
embarked on June 17th, and climbed into transport 
trucks waiting at the dock. The wreckage of Manila 
immediately became more evident. Shattered houses, 
gaping walls, and scattered debris were mute re- 
minders of the fierce air bombings, naval shelling, 
and close-up combat fighting. Rubble filled much 
of the streets. 

After two hours of aimless cruising while the truck 
drivers sought to ascertain their bearing after missing 
a street azimuth somewhere, the convoy lurched to 
a stop at the Wack Wack Club, a swank country club 



which shortly before was entertaining the Jap Gen- 
eral, Yamashita, and the heavy brass of his official 
staff. Large tents studded the golf course. The area 
was teeming with women and children offering for 
sale bananas and pineapples. Philippine women bal- 
anced heavy, loaded trays on their heads. Cries of 
"Veectry, Joe, buy cheep" filled the air. 

There was little trouble getting this place in livable 
condition. Within two days electric lights were in all 
tents. Barber shop, Post Exchange, Chapel, head- 
quarters, supply, and motor pool tents had been 
erected. Here at last was army living for the enlisted 
men. Each tent had its particular Filipino boy to 
make the beds, sweep, clean, and tidy up the inte- 
rior and exterior. Filipino girls would come daily 
to take away soiled clothes and return them washed 
and ironed. Yes, army life was at last getting tol- 
erable. 




Chapel at Manila 



45 




73 to 79 — War Ruins in Manila 




Manila Water Front 



Medical officers were assigned to their professional 
duties at the hospital center. The nurses, who had 
been given quarters at Clarke Field, did temporary 
duty at the 248th General Hospital. Enlisted men 
were given work at the medical depots, and then de- 
tails began worikng on one cf Manila's first pre- 
fabricated air conditioned hospitals. 

On August 14th the apathy resulting from uncer- 
tain waiting was suddenly broken as the report was 
hysterically shouted from one to another that the 
Japs had surrendered. At last the war was over, and 
all plans, tentative or otherwise, went up in smoke. 
The celebration in the jungle which had marked the 
fall of the Third Reich was minor compared to that 
which greeted the Nipponese surrender. Men avari- 
ciously started counting their points with home ap- 
pearing closer and closer. 



As work slackened following the peace, men and 
women found more time to visit Manila and its en- 
virons. Diversification was plentiful. Such places as 
"Cafe Society", "Japs Surrender Bar", and others 
opened their doors wide now that there was no fur- 
ther fear by the native population of a Jap return. 
Tours were made to Santo Tomas, Bilibid prison, the 
Walled City, Bataan, Corregidor, and other famous 
places. A few weddings of members of the nursing 
corps took place followed by delightful receptions at 
the Officers' Club. To liberate and prove their frus- 
trated skills, the army cooks baked huge tiered wed- 
ding cakes which helped the solemnity and grandeur 
of the nuptial festivities. In true military fashion the 
brides resorted to swords for slicing the cakes. 




Cattle Car to San Fernando 



47 




248th G. H.— Manila Medical Center 



A few days before October 1st, men with 70 points 
or more were transferred to the 37th Division which 
was heading for home. Although the breaking up of 
an outfit is always a sad occasion, few were sorry 
to see their pals leave for it was but a foreshadowing 
of their own return. 

On October 1, 1945, the entire personnel of the 13th 
departed for Cava, La Union. There preparations 



were made for a forthcoming voyage to Japan. Ru- 
mor was that the 13th would be deactivated; another 
rumor was that the 13th would serve as a hospital 
for the occupation troops. When everybody, this 
time including the nurses, boarded the U.S.S. Dau- 
phin, nobody knew for sure what lay ahead. The 
ship left the Philippines October 22nd and arrived in 
the harbor of Sasebo, Japan, on October 27th. The 
trip was uneventful. 



LAND OF CHERRY BLOSSOMS 



Four months before, hostile gunfire would have 
greeted the new arrivals. Now Japanese peacefully 
moved about on the shore. The harbor was crowded 
with ships. Almost upon anchoring the desired news 
arrived that the hospital would be deactivated. With 



new spirit the men labored for eight days unloading 
the hospital cargo after which the entire personnel 
boarded trains for Kokura. Here the Tamaya depart- 
ment store had been requisitioned and was being 
converted into a hospital. The members of the 13th 




81 — Fukuoka Streamline Transportation 
82 — Kokura Maxwell Street 
83 — Mount Fujiyama 
84— Jap Mother and Child 



49 



gave this hospital a start until the 307th General Hos- 
pital moved in to take over the facilities. This unit 
became enamoured of the number 13 and soon there- 
after with proper permissions having passed through 
channels, the 307th G. H. became officially on Feb- 
ruary 10, 1946, the 13th G. H. This new-look 13th G. H. 
functioned in Japan until December, 1946, when it 
was inactivated. 

There being nothing to do now, the members of 
the original 13th became sightseers and tourists. 
Shinto Shrines and Geisha Houses were visited. 
Samurai swords, Jap pistols, silk kimonas, pearls, 
china, and lacquered bric-a-brac were eagerly pur- 
chased as souvenirs. Japanese beer made from rice 



was bought in quart bottles. On shopping tours the 
nurses were objects of curiosity for the Nips who 
would never fail to stop and stare curiously at the 
painted fingernails which they had never before 
seen. 

Gradually the point score sank — 68, 67, 63. By 
December 5, 1945, all the hospital members with 
more than 63 points had left the Separation Center 
near Nagoya. The others soon followed. Homeward 
trips were made by plane and boat. The landings 
took place at varying ports on the West Coast and 
then came the overland trip to separation centers 
nearest HOME— HOME SWEET HOME. 




Best Welcome Ever 



FINIS 



This short account of a great hospital unit in a 
great war must necessarily have omitted some things 
which some member may think was most startling or 
important, but in Minnesota, in Texas, in Illinois, in 
Vermont, in California, in every state of the union, 
it will help bring back fond memories of the places, 
incidents, and people who made the 13th General 
Hospital an outstanding organization. The clearing 
in New Guinea where the 13th G. H. operated may 
now be covered with the flora and fauna of the jun- 
gle, the other encampments may have changed their 
character, but the 13th General Hospital will live on 
in the hearts of those who at some time or other 
were a breathing part of it. 



Pesi&osuvel 



OF THE 

13th GENERAL HOSPITAL 

(Assembled from available rosters) 

^t Indicates deceased 



ACEVEDO, CAFERINO 
ACUNA, LAURO S. 
ADDISON, ROBERT G. 
ADEL, MAURICE 
ADEN, IRENE B. 
AFFRUNTI, SALVATORE 
AHOLA, VANER A. 
AIRITAM, HERBERT 
ALDERETE, LOUIS E. 
AKERBLOM, EMIL 
ALAMSHAH, ROBERT C. 
ALBINO, WILLIAM A. 
ALCOTT, DAN 
ALEXANDER, RALPH H. 
ALEXOVICH, ANDREW, JR. 
ALFORD, RALPH I. 
ALTSHAHON, WILLIAM 
ALLFREE, MARY BLANCHE 
ALLEN, CHARLES 
ALLEN, GLEN 
ALLISON, CLIFFORD 
ALTMIX, RITA (OLSON) 
AMNER, CHARLES E. 
AMUNDSON, IVA 
ANDERSON, FRED L. 
ANDERSON, JAMES T. 
ANDERSON, LILA 
ANDRESEN, ROSEMARY 
ANDREWS, CARROLL W. 
ANGE, LUTHER M. 
ANGELL, EDGAR C. 
ANGELO, OTTO M. 
ANGELONE, FRANK 
ARCH, WILLIAM M. 
ARNOLD, FELIX E. 
ARNOLD, ROBERT C. 
ARONER, JOSEPH L. 
ARONSON, EDMOND A, 
' ASPEL. JOSEPH M. 
ATKINSON, CHARLES L. 
ATMORE, FRANCIS A. 
AUCOIN, AMEDEE 
AUSTIN, BROWN 
AUSTIN, ELLSWORTH A, 
AUSTIN, WILLIAM A. 
AYCOCK, ELIZABETH (DEITICH) 



BAAR, WILLIAM D. 
BADILLA, RALPH 
BAILEY, WARD 
BAKER, CLAUDE A. 
BAKER, JAMES M. 
BAKER, MIRIAM (MARKEN) 
BAKER, ROBERT A. 
BALES, MILTON 
BALL, THOMAS R. 
BALOLIK, FRANK J. 
BANDOR, VICTOR 
BANJAVIC, EMIL T. 
BARCLAY, WILLIAM A. 
BARKLEY, HOWARD E. 
BARKWELL, FOSTER S. 
BARNES, EVERETT D, 
BARNES, KENNETH O. 
BARONE, DOMINIC J. 
BARR, FRANCES C. 
BARR, VIRGINIA M. 
BARRIER, RAY 
BARROW, STEPHEN J. 
BARRUS, JAMES E. 
BARTEL, JOHN H. 
BARTLETT, A. W., JR. 
BARTON, EVAN M. 
BARTZ, MELVIN E. 
BARUTZKE,~GERHARDT A. 
BASS, ROY E. 
BASSETT, LEROY E. 
BATES, ERNEST L. 
BATTAGLIA, CHARLES P. 
BAUM, HUGO C. 
BEAHM, THOMAS H. 
BEAT, JAY R. 
BEAVERS, MAX D. 
BECK, HAROLD V. 
BECK, HELEN I. 
BECK, MILO W. 
BECKERMAN, HARRY 
BEDRICK, JOHN W. 
BEEKMAN, VINCENT J. 
BEEMON, FRED E. 
BEERS, LARRY M. 
BEETS, EARL R. 
BEGG, EVA 



BEHRNDT, HARRISON R. 
BELGARD, HARVEY 
BELLER, LESLIE H. 
BELOIN, ERNEST E. 
BENKOFF, LEON 
BENNETT, JOSEPH R. 
BERGLUND, WILHELM A. 
BERNARDI, VICTOR D. 
BERNIE, JACK L. 
BERRISH, MICHAEL J. 
BERRON, STEPHEN 
BERRY, EVERLY N. 
BERTOCCHINI, GILBERT 
BETTINARDI, JOHN R. 
BETTS, CHARLES E. 
BEVERLY, BERT I., JR. 
SEVERS, MAX D. 
BEYER, EDWARD H. 
BEZARK, EDWARD 
BIANCHI, AMERICA W. 
BIBBY, ALBERT E. 
BIECK, ARTHUR 
BIELAK, ALVIN J. 

BINKLEY, PAULINE O. (JACOBSON) 
BiHGLECHNER, ALFRED J. 
BISHOP, LORAINE (ARMSTRONG) 
BITLER, JOHN F. 
BLAJE, VINCENT V. 
BLANTON, WILLIAM S. 
BLAYLOCK, THIRL W. 
BLAZEK, JOHN V. 
BLENDER, WILLIAM 
BLOUNT, HUBERT B. 
BOBIS, JOHN E. 
' BODFISH, JOHN H. 
BOLLUM, HELEN A. 
BONFIGLI, EMILE J. 
BONG, OTTO C. 
BOOKER, LEE C. 
BOPP, LAWRENCE A. 
BORIS, ALBERT J. 
BORSKI, DAVID R. 
BOTTOLFSON, HOWARD I. 
BOTTS, MABLE M. 
BOUCHER, MILDRED E. 
BOUDREAUX, CHARLES A. 



SJ 



ROSTER 



BOWER, HOWARD A. 
BOWMAN, BURTON 
BOWMAN, VELMA 
BOY, FRANK E. 
BOYDSTON, EARL E. 
BRADDY, CECIL 
BRAND, LELAN L. 
BRANSCOM, CARL H. 
BRAUCH, ALLAN E., JR. 
BREMER, FRANK O. 
BREMER, JOYCE M. 
BRENNEMAN, ROY 
BREUHAUS, HERBERT C. 
BRETT, JOHN F. 
BRIGGS, CARLYLE V. 
BRIM, WILLIAM A. 
BROCK, CLAYTON E. 
BROCK, ELSON F. 
BROCKETTE, ERNEST A. 
BROOKER, FRANCIS M. 
BROOKS, KENNETH E. 
BROSOSKY, CHARLES V. 
BROWN, HOAGY 
BROWN, HOLDEN D. 
BROWN, REX V. 
BROWN, SHELDON 
BROWN, STANLEY M. 
BROWNSTEIN, HYMAN 
BROYHILL. KENNETH D. 
BRUCHS, VILAS H. 
BRYAN, BERNICE A. 
BRYANT, THADAUS H. 
BRYON, JAKE K. 
BRZEZINSKI, MATTHEW B. 
BUCIOR, JOSEPH E. 
BUDZINSKI, FRANK 
BUE, RUTH T. 
BUHLER, MAC W. 
BUNDING, IRBY M. 
BUNKER, MARY E. (PACE) 
BUOTE, HAROLD F. 
BURCH, ROBERT 
BURKE, JOHN E. 
BURKE, THOMAS J., JR. 
BURNETT, ROBERT A. 
BURNS, RUSSELL H. 
BUSCH, FRANK W. 
BUSH, LONNIE A. 
BUSH, WILLIAM H., JR. 
BUSHAW, ROBERT J. 
BUSSARD, VERNON 
BUSSAS, ERWIN E. 
BYRD, JAMES H. 

CAIN, DACK G. 
CAMERON, WILLIAM G. 
CAMPBELL, ROBERT H. 
CANCELLIERI, CARMELO P. 
CANIZZARRO, EDWARD 



CANNING, CLARENCE 
CAPACI, TONY 
CAPADONA, FRANK 
CAPPADORO, VINCENZO J. 
CARDER, RALPH B. 
CARLSON, ALMA 
CARLSON, ALVIN 
CARLSON, BERNICE A. 
CARLSON, D. W. 
CARLSON, EDWIN M. 
CARLSON, JOHN M. 
CARLSON, RICHARD E. 
CARLSTRAND, CHARLES VERN 
CARON, RUSSELL H. 
CARRAS, EMMET 
CARROLL, JOHNNIE B. 
CARTER, DAVID N. 
CARTER, H. J. 
CASHMAN, MALACHY J. 
CASSIDY, ALEXANDER J. 
CASSIDY, EDWARD W. 
CASSITY, VERA 
CASTANEDA, ALFRED 
CATO, JOSEPH P. 
CAVNESS, RAGON C. 
CEBALLOS, EDWARD T. 
CERVONKA, GEORGE W. 
CHAMBERS, ROYCE M. 
CHAPMAN, JOHN P. 
CHAPMAN, KENNETH E. 
CHATTERTON, FRANCIS C. 
CHEEK, CARL R. 
CHILD, SARAH G. 
CHRISTENSEN, GEORGE E. 
CHRISTENSEN, LILLIAN K. • 
CHRISTENSEN, MARY M. 
CHUPCAVICH, JOSEPH 
CHURCH, WILLIAM R. 
CLANCY, LEO G. 
CLARK, CLAYTON 
CLARK, GEORGE J. 
CLARK, WILLIAM J. 
CLARKE, RAYMOND E. 
CLEMENT, ROY C. 
CLENDENIN, INEZ E. 
CLIFTON, CLYDE W. 
CLINE, VIRGIL L. 
CLUMPNER, HOWARD F. 
COGDELL, BERTRAND 
COHEN, J. C. 
COLE, J. C. 
COLE, LOREN 
COLLET, JOHN W. 
COLLIE, MICHAEL B. 
COLLIER, RACHEL O. 
COLLIER, WILLIAM A. 
COLLINS, LEO W. 
CONNER, ADINE R. 
CONRAD, GENEVA (OSWALT) 



CONRAD, LEONARD W. 

CONTORNO, VINCENT 

CONWAY, A. C. 

COOK, EARL R. 

COOK, HERBERT W. 

COOK, JAMES W. 

COOK, JACKIE D. 

COOK, MILDRED M. 

COONTZ, JOHN WALKER III 

CORCORAN, ADRIAN 

CORDAK, HENRY C. 

CORDTS, IRMA L. 

CORNELL, CHARLES M. 

CORSI, RENO 

COSTELLO, JAMES W. 

COTTON, ISAAC, JR. 

COTTON, MEYER L. 

COTTON, VICTOR G. 

COTUMACCIO, CAMILLA 

CRABTREE, JAMES 

CRABTREE, ROBERT H. 

CRACKEL, ROBERT H. 

CRANE, CYRIL V. 

CRAPSON, LELAND 

CRAWFORD, GENE J. 

CRAWFORD, THOMAS W. 

CROCKER, JOSEPH J. 

CRONIN, JOHN L. 

CROUCH, ROBERT D. 
*CROUT, NELLE 

CROWE, FRANCIS T. 

CROWE, LAWRENCE C. 

CRUICKSHANK, MARY JANE 

CRUICKSHANK, RUTH 

CUDNIK, ALOYSIUS B. 

CUNNINGHAM, EDWIN G. 

CUNNINGHAM, JAMES H. 

CURTAIN, DANIEL A. 
* CZAJA. WALTER J. 

DAINS, ROBERT F. 
DANFORTH, CHARLES J. 
DANIELS, MERLE J. 
DARCO, MICHAEL J. 
DAURIA, SALVATORE M. 
DAVIS, DELBERT D. 
DAVIS, MRS. NELL M. 
DAVIS, ROBERT E. 
DAVIS, VERNA 
DAVIS, VIRGINIA 
DAVISON, HARLEY R. 
DAViSON, VICTOR A. 
DAWSON, LAWRENCE W. 
DAY, CHARLES A. 
DEAL, JIMMIE P. 
DEAN, DOROTHY F. 
DEATON, ANDY 
DeBUNCE, BOYD W. 
DeCAMPO, RAUL 



54 



ROSTER 



DECKER, LILLIAN GOLDIE (STEWART) 

DeDOMINICIS, HENRY F. 

DEERING, THOMAS N. 

DeGUIRE, ROBERT 

DeHORN, JOHANNES 

DeLYRE, WOLF R. 

DeMAIO, THOMAS G., JR. 

DEMERS, HELAIR J. 

DEMETER, ALEXANDER C. 

DENSON, DELMAR R. 

DENTON, R. L. 

de PEYSTER, FREDERIC A. 

DEPPING, ALVIN 

DEPUTY, JAMES F. 

DEPUTY, RALPH B. 

DeSMITH, DAVID P. 

DeSTASIO, MARY C. 

DEVITT, PHYLLIS M. 

DEW, CHESLEY O. 

DEXHEIMER, BETH (ROSS) 

DiCATERINO, DANNY 

DICKERT, HOWARD J. 

DICKSON, BRUCE W„ JR. 

DIGGS, ARTHUR E. 

DiGIORGI, VIRGIL H. 

DIMMICK, LOUIS K. 

DITOMASO, ERNEST 

DIXON, FRED K. 

DIXON, WARREN FIELD 

DOLARK, MICHAEL 

DAMAGALSKI, RAYMOND F. 

DOMREN, WESLEY M. 

DONMOYER, JACOB P. 

DONOHUE, JAMES D. 

DONOVAN, DOROTHY A. 

DORSCH, FRANK, JR. 

DOUBT, MARY 

DRAA, CECIL C. 

DRAG, JACK 

DRAGANCEWITZ, GLADYS (HUBBARD) 

DRAGE, MARTHA O. 

DRAKE, DARWOOD S. 

DRANZEK, FRANK 

DROEGE, CHESTER C. 

DROWNES, HARRY J. 

DROZDA, RAYMOND J. 

DRUMHELLER, FLOYD J. 

DRUMMER, D. L. 

DUGAN, JOHN O., JR. 

DUGGAN, MARY A. 

DULGAR, WILLIAM H. 

DUNFEE, GLADYS I. 

DUNLOP, DIANNE E. 

DUNNE, FRANCES E. 

DURAN, PETE E. 

DURAN, JOSE W. 

DYBWARD, JOHN C. 

EARHART, GEORGE H. 

EATMON, CECIL 



EBERLY, JEROME F. 
EBY, IRENE M. 
EDEN, HENRY A. 
EDNEY, SAMMY B. 
EDWARDS, DONALD J. 
EDWARDS, THOMAS R. 
EGGERS, OSCAR R. 
EICK, WILLIAM H. 
EIDSNESS, LILLIAN B. 
ELLEDGE, MARSHALL S. 
ELLIS, RAYMOND C, JR. 
ELLIS, WILLIAM A. 
ELLISON, CLAUDE 
ELLSWORTH, JAMES W. 
ELOWSON, JOHN W. 

EMBURY, ROBERT E. 

EMERSON, FERNE 

ENDRES, GEORGE 

ENGE, GENE N. 

ENGEL, HOWARD W. 

ENGEN, HARTMAN O. 

ENGLAND, EDWARD 

ENGLISH, THOMAS P. 

EPPERSON, CAROL (SWENSON) 

EPPERSON, JOHN A. 

EPPERSON, ROBERT B. 

ERICKSON, DUANE A. 

ERRINGER, HAZEL L. 

ERWIN, JAMES C. 

ESSERY, JOSEPH L. 

ETRHIEM, ELMER W. 

EVANS, MARJORIE (KEKIE) 

EVATT, JAMES P. 

EVOY, RICHARD 

EVRIDGE, GENE B. 

EWELL, WINCHESTER H. 

FALCONE, FRANK J. 

FARENCE, JAMES O. 

FARMER, PAUL H. 

FARLESS, THOMAS L. 

FARLEY, DALE J. 

FARLEY, ISAAC D. 

FAULKNER, WILLIAM P. 

FAULKENBURRY, SIM M. 

FEIGEL, ARTHUR 

FEIOCK, JACK L. 

FELDSTEIN, HAROLD 

FELDMAN, MARY LOU (DUNCAN) 

FELL, EGBERT H. 

FENTON, ROBERT F. 

FERGUSON, JAMES W. 

FERNANDEZ, JOHN G. 

FICKE, LLOYD W. 

FIDRYCH, WALTER 

FIELDS, DELWIN E. 

FILIP, MITCHELL J. 

FISCHER, GEORGE E. 

FISHER, DOROTHY E. 



FISHER, ROBERT V. 

FITTANTO, DANIEL V. 

FLAHERTY, EILEEN 

FLASKAMP, ROBERT J. 

FLISSER, HERMAN 

FLOCKHART, MARGUARITE (HOLIC) 

FLOOD, RICHARD G. 

FLOYD, WiLLIAM D. 

FOLDS, GEORGE R. 

FOLEY, ARTHUR M. 

FONDREN, ROGERS E. 

FOREMAN, BURTON F. 

FORROR, ELIZABETH WAGONER 

FOULKES, DAVID T. 

FOX, JEROME 

FRACTOR, MORRIS 

FRANCIS, THELMA M. 

FRAYSER, JOHN A. 

FREDERICK, ALLAN W. 

FREEMAN, HELEN 

FRIEDBERG, STANTON A. 

FRIEDLAND, EVERHART K. 

FRIEL, CHARLES J. 

FRY, ARTHUR V. 

FUCHS, RUDOLPH 

FUHLBRIGGE, HELENA L. 

FUNDERBURK, GEORGE H. 

FUTTERER, ROBERT G. 

GABRIELSON, THERESA E. J. 
GADDIS, JOSEPH V. 
GAFFREY, AMELIA T. 
GALLAGHER, ALICE 
GALLO, ALDO J. 
GAMBLE. ROBERT L. 
GANN, CALVIN 
GANT, DAVID F. 
GARDELL, HARRY L. 
GARDNER, WILLIAM E. 
GARNER, WILLIAM P. 
GARRISON, HOWARD 
GARTIEZ, ERNEST 
GARVEY, LEON L. 
GARVIN, EDWARD L. 
GASPARAC, CARL 
GAUTHER, AMITE 
GAVLIN, LESLIE 
GELSOMINO, ENRICO J. 
GENSHOCK, EDWARD J. 
GERSMAN, MALCOLM G. 
GESELL, W. GERALD 
GFELLER, VERNON 
GIDDINGS, LYLE D. 
GIER, HARRY H. 
GIFFORD, MARSHALL W. 
GILBERT, DEMUS E. 
GILCHRIST, RICHARD K. 
GILES, EMMETT A. 
GILLIGAN, NORMAN 



ROSTER 



GILMORE, QUINCY M. 
GILSTRAP, WILLIAM M. 
GLAZE, EARL H. 
GLYNN. THOMAS M. 
GLOCK, ROBERT F. 
GODWIN, FRED 
GODWIN, JAMES R. 
GOLDE, PHILIP S. 
GOLDSTEIN, JACK 
GOLI, EVERETT 
GOLUB, VICTOR H. 
GOMEZ, LOUIS, JR. 
GONIA, CASIMIR J. 
GORDON, DAVID B. 
GORDON, GEORGE F., JR. 
GORDON, JASPER C. 
GORGONE, JOHN 
GOSKOWITZ, NATHAN 
GOURE, MELVIN H. 
GOVER, RONDALL W. 
GRADER, GEORGE T. 
GRADY, JOSEPH P. 
GRANT, HELEN G. (HONUS) 
GRAU, MARGARET M. 
GRAY, EARLE 
GRAY, FRED C. 
GRAY, JOHN F. 
GREEN, CHARLES W. 
GREEN, HOMER P. 
GREEN, JOHN 
GREEN, J. C. 
GREEN, JOHN G„ JR. 
GREEN, RALPH W. 
GREENLEE, ROY E. 
GREENSPAN, LAWRENCE 
GREER, BILLY B. 
GREGORY, JAMES E. 
GRIFFITH, CECIL E. 
GRIFFIN, CARL K. 
GRIFFITH, IRA H. 
GRIFFITH, WILLIS R. 
GRILLO, PAUL A. 
GROSS, CLETUS J. 
GROVER, LLOYD L. 
GRUBBS, CLAUDE R. 
GRUBER, BILL 
GRUBER, JOHN L. 
GUIMMARA, VINCENZO 
GUNDERSON, EVANGELINE 
GUNKEL, MELVIN F. 
GUNSTINSON, ERVIN J. 
GURIUS, DONALD E. 
GUTHRIDGE, JANE 

HABERMAN, ARDELL E. 
HACKER, ROBERT 
HAFER, VERNON G. 
HAGEN, CARL E. 
HAGEN, KARL W. 



HAHN, THEODORE J. 

HALE, HOMER M. 
HALBECK, VIRLYN F. 
HALFORD, ALLAN E. 
HALL, FRED P. 
HAMMOND, JAMES W. 
HANEY, FRED D. 
HANKE, WILLIAM C. 
HANKIN, ELIAS 
HANSON, ARTHUR R. 
HANSON, JOHN 
HARDING, ROBERT 
HARLOW, HAROLD S. 
HARPS, WILLIS F., JR. 
HARRAL, NOLAN C. 
HARRISON, CAMILLE J. 
HARRISON, PAUL 
HARROLD, WALTER V. 
HART, DALE D. 
HARTMANN, IRENE M. 
HARTWELL, EDWARD D. 
HARVY, MARCELLA C. 
HASKINS, AMOS 
1 HASLAM. CLARENCE D. 
HATFIELD, JAMES N. 
HAW, RICHARD C. 
HAWKINS, JAMES H. 
HAWKINS, MAYBELLE 
HAYDEN, CLARENCE E. 
HAYNES, HARRY A. 
HAYWARD, DAVID L. 
HAYWARD, THEODORE 
HEARD, THOMAS J. 
HEARTSILL, ABNER D. 
HEIN, ARTHUR T. 
HELLER, CHESTER K. 
HELMICK, JUDITH (SETTLE) 
HEMBROOK, EDWARD 
HEMBROOK, RUTH 
HEMICK, ALBERT S. 
HENDERSHOT, JACK J. 
HENDERSON, EDWARD T., JR. 
HENDRIX, MARSHALL Q. 
HENDRIX, ROGER D. 
HENICK, ALBERT S. 
HENINGER, CHARLES 
HENNINGSEN, NELL 
HENRY, CHARLES J. 
HENRY, WILLIAM C. 
HERMANEK, JOHN J. 
HERRING, MARY L. 
HESSLER, HENRY 
HIBBS, WILLIAM G. 
HICKMAN, FORREST E. 
HICKS, CLARENCE A. 
HICKS, EDWARD A. 
HIGGINS, FRANK C. 
HIGH, RALPH L. 
HIGHLAND, MILTON O. 



HIGHLEY BETTY L. 
HIGHMARK, WILFRED T. 
HIGLEY, GEORGE W. 
HILL, HONOR T. 
HILL, MARJORIE (HOELZEL) 
HILL, ORLANDO K. A. 
HINTON, KENNETH M. 
HIPPE, FRANCES L. (McQUINN) 
HIRLINGER, HAROLD G. 
HIRSCH, SIDNEY 
HOAGLAND, MARY (GRUEN) 
HOBBLE, GRACE E. 
HOEG, OVE 
HOEKO, HENRY J. 
HOEKSEMA, JOSEPH 
HOELZEL, MARJORIE P. 
HOFF, NAOMI R. (RALSTON) 
HOFFLANDER, JACK B. 
HOFFMAN, JAMES 
HOFSTRAND, RALPH A. 
HOHULIN, LAWRENCE 
HOLBROOK, EARL E. 
* HOLIC, RICHARD 
HOLLANDER, ALVIN 
HOLLE, EARL H. 

HOLUB, MARY JANE (DOMINIQUE) 
HOLWAY, DARWIN A. 
HONEYCUTT.CHESTER 
HOPKINS, LEONARD T. 
HORKY, GEORGE J. 
HORN, EDITH E. 
HORN, HERMAN E. 
HORVAT, WALTER P. 
HATAKAINEN, ARVI R. 
HOTZ, THOMAS A. 
HOUCK, NEIL A. 
HOWARD, HAROLD B. 
HUBBELL, RAY 
HUBER, RAY F. 
HUDDLE, EDWIN, L. 
HUDSONPILLER, THOMAS E. 
HUEBNER, FRANK J., JR. 
HUENEKE, HENRY E. 
HUEY, KIM 
HUGHES, ROBERT T. 
HUGHES, WILLIAM P. 
HUGHES, JOSEPHINE A. 
HULL, DEAN R. 
HULTGEN, WILLIAM J. 
HUMBLE, RUEBEN W. 
HUMM, BENJAMIN J. 
HUMPHREYS, ROME B. 
HUNSACKER, OLIVER C. 
HURLEY, THOMAS P. 
IHDE, EMIL J. 
INGHAM, JACK G. 
INGREHAM, RICHARD E. 
ISENBERG, FRANK F. 



5 b 



ROSTER 



ISRAEL, CARL R. 

JABLONKA, LUCIAN 
JABLONOWSKI, HENRY A. 
JACCUZZO, JAMES V. 
JACOBSEN, JOHN C. 
JACOBSON, GRANT K. 
JACOBSON, WARD K. 
JACKS, MELVIN W. 
JACKSON, GEORGE E. 
JAMESON, LESTER H. 
JAMISON, EVANGELINE 
JAMISON, LAWRENCE D. 
JANKOWSKI, LEONARD 
JARDOT, RAYMOND 
JAROSZEWSKI, CHESTER J. 
JASPER, MAURICE W. 
JENDRASAK, CHARLES T. 
JENKINS, ELI R. 
JENKINS, VICTOR E. 
JENKS, HENRY W. 
JENSEN, CLARENCE C. 
JERNBERG, ROY O. 
JIMENEZ, ONOFRE 
JOCHIM, ROBERT M. 
JOHNSON, ARNOLD W„ JR. 
JOHNSON, ARTHUR E. 
JOHNSON, EDWARD W. 
JOHNSON, EINAR C. 
JOHNSON, HAROLD 
JOHNSON, HERBERT F. 
JOHNSON, HERMAN F. 
JOHNSON, HOWARD E. 
JOHNSON, JUSTUS 
JOHNSON, RICHARD L. 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM D. 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM H. 
JONES, CARROLL S. 
JONES, CLEVELAND 
JONES, ELLSWORTH H. 
JONES, ETHELYNE B. (DRISCOLL) 
JONES, GEORGE A. 
JONES, HAZEL E. 
JONES, ROBERT Y. 
JONES, WENDELL M. 
JORGENSEN, ELROY C. 
JOUBERT, LOUIS N. 
JOURNEY, JOHN G. 
JUAREZ, MANUEL J. 
JUNEAU, CURTIS E. 

KAHNWEILER, ROBERT L. 
KALLAIL, RICHARD 
KALLING, RODERICK 
KALTER, ROBERT P. 
KAMINSKI, EDWARD J. 
KAMM, MAXINE M. 
KANDUS, LOUIS 
KAPLAN, ALEX 



KAPLAN, MAX 

KAPLOWITZ, ENGENE 

KAPLOWITZ, NATHAN 

KARDZIONAK, JOHN J. 

KAUFMAN, WILLIAM 

KEESEY, JANET A. (GEORGE) 

KELLER, SAMUEL M. 

KELLEY, ROBERT J. 

KELLEY, SUMNER E. 

KELLY, CHARLES H. 

KELLY, JOHN L. JR. 

KEMP, MAURICE A. 

KENNEDY, RALPH L. 

KENT, WILLIAM H. 

KENZIK, JOSEPH 

KEOWN, NORMAN 

KERSTEN, WILLIAM E. 

KERTMAN, LEON 

KICZULA, IRVING P. 

KIES, JOSEPH W. 

KIMBALL, EDWARD J. 

KING, DAUSE D. 

KING, HAROLD R. 

KINSEY, DON M. 

KINSEY, THOMAS V., JR. 

KINZER, ARTHUR E. 

KISNER, ROY S. 

KISSEE, WALTER L. 

KLEIN. A. DEO 

KLEIN, ALBERT 

KLEIN, GEORGE 

KLEIN, MORRIS 

KLENK, WILLIAM F. 

KLOCK, WILLIAM 

KLOW, FLORENCE 

KNIER, HENRY R. 

KNOX, EARL H. 

KNUDSEN, JENS O., JR. 

KNUPPER, HERMAN R. 

KNUTSON, "ELMER 

KNUTSON, JOHN G. 

KOCIUNAS, TONY 

KOENIG, GEORGE F. 

KOHLHASE, FRANK 

KOHLS, EDWARD L. 

KOLODZIK, HAROLD R. 

KONWANT, STANLEY J. 

KOONTZ, EDWARD E. 

KOOSER, MARGARET (MIZELLE) 

KOSGROVE, JULIAN R. 

KOVACIC, JOHN C. 

KRAKE, MARCUS S. 

KRAUSE, ROBERT R. 

KRIER, HENRY R. 

KRUEGER, GEORGE W. 

KUBIAK, JOSEPH E. 

KUBIEK, ALBIN A. 

KUCH, CHESTER A. 

KUNZ, LEWINE H. 



KURTZ, SEYMOUR 
KUTCHERA, MARGUERITE 

LACKOWSKI, WILLIAM F. 
LaBRANCHE, ALFRED J. 
LAIDERMAN, SAUL N. 
LAMPSHIRE, WALTER L. 
LANDGREN, JOHN E. 
LANE, ALVIN B. 
LANE LESLIE S. 
LANHAM, OVAL D. 
LANS, WILLIAM L. 
LaPIETRE, ANTHONY R. 
LoPOINT, LESTER E. 
LaROCHE, CHARLES W. 
LuRONDE, LORRAINE 
LARSEN, RALPH E. 
LARSON, JOREEN M. 
LATTIG, JOHN H. 
LAUTERBACK, THEODORE C. 
LAWSON, ROBERT G. 
LAWTON, STANLEY E. 
LAYSON, HARRY F. 
LAZICH, WILLIAM 
LEACH, ALBERT M. 
LEAKE, DENZILE F. 
LEE, ROBERT W. 
LEHMAN, LORAINE H. 
LEHTO, HELEN H. 
LEIBOVITZ, ALBERT S. 
LEINICKE, RALPH H. 
LENOX, KENNETH E. 
LEON, EDWARD S. 
LEONARD, HAROLD L. 
LEWIS, DICKEY W. L. 
LICASTRO, RALPH R. 
LIEBERMAN, SAUL 
LILES, JOSEPH 
LINDGREN, ERNEST G. 
LINDQUIST, CAROLYN 
LINDSTROM, KENNETH E. 
LIPKE, HAROLD R. 
LIPKIN, ARNOLD L. 
LIPSEY, WILLIAM E. 
LISTER, JOHN 
LIZER, DAVID 
LLOYD, JUNIOR L. 
LOKER, LORETTA M. (HOPPER) 
LONG, FRANCIS A. 
LONNQUIST, T. OSCARENA 
LORTON, CLYDE E. 
LOSIK, EDWARD 
LOUGH, ROBERT A. 
LOWRANCE, ALFRED C. 
LUCAS, GEORGE E. 
LUCAS, ROBERT B. 
LUCINSKI, JOHN 
LUGINBILL, DEAN O. 
LUND, ASTRID 



57 



ROSTER 



LYMAN, WALTER J. 
LYONS, THOMAS H. 
LYONS, THOMAS J. 

MacFARLANE, GORDON D. 

MACHACEK, EDWIN V. 

MACK, SHIRLEY M. 

MACKIE, EDWARD 

MacLEOD, HARLEY T. 

MACON, CLIFFORD S. 

MAHONEY, BERNICE C. 

MAIN, ELLIS H. 

MAKI, LEO 

MALDONADO, A. S. 

MALLORY, WILMA R. 

MALMGREN, DONALD 

MANCHIN, LAWRENCE F. 

MANGINI, ANTHONY 

MANIFOLD, THOMAS L. 

MANOR, CLARENCE S. 

MARCANGELO, MICHAEL A., JR. 

MARINO, SALVADOR 

MARKER, GEORGE R. 

MARKUSE, ROBERT H. 

MARLEY, J. W. 

MARQUIS, FRED M. 

MARSH, WAYNE 

MARSHALL, JOHN G. 

MARSTON, FLETCHER C. 

MARTIN, EDWARD 

MARTIN, JOHN T. 

MARTINEZ, EDDIE 

MARZULLA, FRED R. 

MATHESON, LEO A. 

MATSCHI, ALBERT P. 

MATSIL, NATHAN 

MATTESON, RAYMOND H. 

MATTHEW, HAROLD C. 

MATTHEWS, BENJAMIN T. 

MATTICE, DONALD 

MAXWELL, JEREMIAH M. 

MAY, HAROLD J. 

MAYHEW, MARVIN L. 

MAZZA, FRANKLIN E. 

MEAD, OUINTON P. 

MEARS, WILLIAM C. 

MECHLING, OLIN 

MEEGAN, DAN T. 

MELTON, FRANK 

MENEGHETTI, LAWRENCE R. 

MESSER, J. D. 

METZ, ROBERT R. 

MEYER, JOHN H. 

MEYER, KATHRYN M. 

MEYERS, ALFRED J. 

MEYTHALER, RUTH CLEON (DORNBUSH) 

MICHAEL, ISAAC E. 

MICHAEL, JOHN D. 

MICHAEL MARSHALL P. 



MICHAELIDES, PARASKEVAS 
MICHELOTTI, BRUNO 
MIDDAGH, ROBERT 
MILBOURN, CLYDE T. 
MILLER, DEAN D. 
MILLER, EDWIN 
MILLER, FORREST P. 
MILLER, IRVIN 
MILLER, HAYDEN H. 
MILLER, MONROE 
MILLER, OSCAR N. 
MILLER, ROBERT L. 
MILLER, RUSSELL D. 
MILLER, WILLIAM S. 
MILLIKAN, FRED 
MILONE, ANTHONY 
MING, LOUIS CHARLES 
MODRZEJEWSKI, FELIX F. 
MOLTZEN, MARY H. 
MONDELLO, PAUL, JR. 
MONTALBANO, SALVATORE T. 
MONTELEONE, JOSEPH 
MONTGOMERY, E. DALE 
MONK, GORDON V. 
MONSON, VERNON P. 
MOODY, ELMER L. 
MOORE, JAMES T. 
MOORE, JESSE J. 
MOOZA, DANIEL J. 
MORAN, ESTHER J. 
MORAN, JOHN J. 
MORGAN, MARGARET J. 
MORGAN, RICHARD L, 
MORRELL, PRESTON 
MORRIS, RICHARD P. 
MORRIS, WALTER D. 
MORRISON, DONALD A. R. 
MORRISON, JAMES E. 
MORRISON, RONALD W. 
MORRISON, WILBUR R. 
MORSE, FLORENCE E. (SKEELS) 
MOSHER, ROBERT E. 
MOSLEY, WALTER 
MOTYKA, JOSEPH 
MUCKLER, MYRNA (SCHNELL) 
MUDGE, HERBERT Q. 
MUDLAFF, FRANK 
MUELLER, CLARENCE A. 
MULKEEN, THOMAS P. 
MURCHISON, HENRY B., JR. 
MURPHY, EDWARD S. 
MURPHY, WINSTON C. 
MURRAY, MARTHA E. 
MURRAY, WILLIAM A. 
MUSARRA, ELMER A. 
MUSIELAK, STANLEY N. 
MUSOLF, RAY 
MULLEN, VIRGEL L. 
MYERS, GEORGE E. 



McAllister, Laurence b. 

McBRAYER, GEORGE L. 
McCAMY, ROBERT E. 
McCANDLESS, JOHN J. 
McCANN, JOHN J. 
McCANN, JOHN 
McCARTAN, ANNE T. 
McCARTNEY, MYRTHA G. 
McCLANAHAN, DANNIE M. 
McCOLLUM, LLOYD 
McCOY, CHARLES A. 
McCRARY, JACK W., JR. 

mccumber, ellen (high) 
mcdaniel, clarence t. 
Mcdonald, Arthur j., sr. 
Mcdonald, Harriet l. 
Mcdowell, Barbara 
Mcdowell, jane 
Mcdowell, Joseph m. 
Mcdowell, robert j. 
mcelligott, edward t. 

McENTEE, MARY E. 
McGARVEY, JAMES C. 
McGRATH, EDWIN L. 

McGregor, Archibald d. 

McKEE, GEORGE R. 
McKEEVER, ROONEY R. 
McKENZIE, WILLIE A. 
McKINNEY, JAMES C. 
McKINNEY, ORLA 
McLAIN, ROBERT C. 
McLAIN, THOMAS O. 
McLEAN, JAMES C. D. 
McLOGAN, EDWARD A. 

McMillan, grady c. 
McMillan, james t. 

McNEILLY, c. j. 
McNICOL, JAMES E. 

NAPPER, LESLIE K. 
NEAL, WILLIAM T. 
NEFF, DONALD 
NEIDERT, PAUL J. 
NELSON, BERTRAM G. 
NELSON, ROBERT L. 
NEMEC, SOPHIE 
NERESON, ARNOLD T. 
NESBIT, FRED S. 
NEUMANN, WALTER W. 
NEVOSAD, FRANKLYN W. 
NEWLIN, CLINTON D. 
NEWMAN, FRANK M. 
NEWMARK, SHELDON H. 
NEWTON, EDGAR D. 
NICKUM, CHARLES K. 
NICOLETTI, JOSEPH A. 
NICOLL, HOMER K. 
NIELSEN, HAROLD A. 
NIELSEN, FARREN 



ROSTER 



NIETHAMMER, GEORGE H. 
N1KKARI, EINO H. 
NOAH, DARRELL K. 
NOEL, LEON T. 
NORDENFORS, ERNEST H. 
NORFLEET, CLAUDE 
NORRIS, EVADVE 
NORTON, HOMER B. 
NOTTE, ROCCO J. 
NOVAK, CLARENCE L. 
NYE, NEVA 
NYGARD, MAE E. 

OAKLEY, THOMAS F. 
OBER, JEWELL 
OBERLIES, CHARLES W. 
O'BRIEN, ROBERT M. 
OERTEL, EDWIN A. 
OLANDER, CARL 
OLESON, MARIAN L. 
OLSEN, BERNARD C. 
OLSON, GORDON A. 
OLSON, HARLEY M. 
OLSON, ROBERT W. 
OLSON, ROY W. 
OLWIN, JOHN H. 
O'NEAL, CHAUNCEY 
O'NEILL, FRANK M. 
ONSRUD, MYRTLE 
OPFER, CARL S. 
O'REILLY, MYLES F., JR. 
ORIEZ, ORVILLE F. 
ORLER, HERBERT A. 
OSTROWSKI, EDWARD R. 
OSWALD, ESTHER I. 
OSWALT, JACK A. 
OTTEN, JOHN W. 
OTTO, DOROTHY M. 
OVERBEY, ROY S. 
OWEN, WILLIAM II. 

PAGNI, FAUSTINO 
PALMER, WILLIAM E. 
PAPE, THEODORE L., JR. 
PAPIERNIAK, FRANK B. 
PAPINEAU, LEROY J. 
PARKER, CHARLEY D. 
PARKER, EDWARD M. 
' PARKER. JOHNNIE P. 
PARSONS, WICKLIFF S. 
PASCHALL, SAMUEL H. 
PASCHALL, WALTER L. 
PATRICK, CLYDE W. 
PATTERSON, JAMES W. 
PAXTON, ROBERT J. 
PAYNE, RUSSELL 
PEARCY, THOMPSON 
PECK, LYSLE B. 
PEELER, LOREN T. 



PELKEY, GEORGE L. 
PENCE, PAUL 
PENN, WILLIS H. 
PENNINGTON, VIRGIL I. 
PERKINS, CHESTER O. 
PERKINS, J. B. 
PERKINS, NOEL L. 
PERKS, HOWARD 
PERREAULT, DELORE J. 
PERRY, EUEL P. 
PERRY, LEE 

PERSICHETTI, PETER V., JR. 
PERZANOWSKI, TED J. 
PESTOW, BERNARD F. 
PETERSEN, ROBERT L. 
PETERSON, GORDON B. 
PETERSON, HOWARD G. 
PETERSON, LEONARD 
PETERSON, RUSSELL W. 
PETROS, GEORGE A. 
PEYTON, ALLEN C. 
PFEIFER, HAROLD A. 
PFEIFER, WILLIAM D. 
PHILLIPS, GEORGE H. 
PHILLIPS, KATHLEEN W. 
PICKERING, MARTIN R. 
PICKERING, OUENTIN 
PIEKIELNIAK, THADDEUS W. 
PIERCE, CLAUDE E. 
PIERCE, CONRAD K. 
PIERCE, ROLLA 
PINDZIAK, STANLEY J. 
PISCITELLI, ANGELO 
PITRE, MAURICE L. 
PITT, JANE C. 
PIZZO, JOHN 
PLAGENS, JOSEPH E. 
PLEWKA, EMIL 
PODEL, NATHAN 
POKORNY, SIDNEY 
POLAK, RICHARD C. 
POMBRAKAS, EDWARD 
POMEROY, BILL 
PONTARELLI, RAYMOND H. 
PORTZLINE, MARY E. 
POSEY, LAWRENCE W. 
POST, IRA W. 
POTTER, CHARLES W. 
POTTER, FRANCIS E. 
POTTER, JACK A. 
POTTINGER, RUSSELL E. 
POTTS, ARTHUR 
POUCHOT, JAMES F. 
POULSEN, RUSSELL E. 
POWELL, LYLE S. 
POWERS, MRS. WILLIAM 
PRESLAR, MARVIN A. 
PRICE, JOHN H. 
PRICE, LLOYD M. 



PRICE, TWILA (ROUCK) 
PRIESS, JOHN L. 
PRINCE, AYL 
PRINDIVILLE, ALAN 
PRINGLE, HERBERT E. 
PRONIN, GEORGE 
PROVINE, DOROTHY L. 
PRUSIA, SYLVIA (GULDAGER) 
PULCINO, MARIO A. 
PUSEY, PAUL D. 
PYLE, CALVIN A. 
PYLE, JOHN S. 

QUEEN, MARY E. 
OUALLEY, HAROLD L. 

RABE, LUCILLE P. 

RABE, ROBERT E. 

RAFFERTY, CHARLES J. 

RAINES, ONEY C, JR. 

RALSTON, DELBERT C. 

RAMBERG, LLOYD G. 

RAMBO, JAMES C. 

RAMIREZ, HENRY G. 

RAMSAY, ALLAN B. 

RAMSDEN, CHARLES 

RANN, ELAINE E. 

RASH, JOHN T. 

RASKOV, HERMAN E. 

RASMUSSEN, WAYLAND G. 

RATH, ALBERT E. 

RAUCH, ROBERT J. 

RAWSON, MYDELLA (PAPIERNIAK) 

REAGAN, LUKE J. 

REARDON, MARY M. 

REBER, ERNEST 

REDDITT, ALBERT P. 

REDMAN, CHARLES 

REDMOND, MAX E. 

REECE, JOAN M. 

REED, THOMAS W. 

REED, WILLIE 

REESE, RAY A. 

REILLY, PHILLIP, J. 

REINKE, RUSSELL A. 

REIS, GEORGE W. 

REITER, LLOYD M. 

REMLEY, JOSEPHINE A. 

RENBARGER, RICHARD M. 

RENZ, VINCENT W. 

REYNOLDS, DWIGHT V. 

REYNOLDS, JOHN F. 

RHEA, MRS. W. S. 

RHODE, COURTNEY G. 

RICHARDSON, ARTCHIE II. 

RICHARDSON, SARABETH (WELCH) 

RICHARDSON, WILLIAM W. 

RICHMOND, CHESTER A. 

RIDDLE, RAYMOND G. 



R OS T E R 



RIEKER, ROBERT A. 
RIKER, WILLIAM F. 
RILEY, CHARLES O. 
RIMNAC, GEORGE C. 
RITCHIE, JEAN M. 
RIUTTA, TOIVO S. 
RIVIERE, ERNEST P. 
RIZZON, HERMAN A. 
ROBBINS, KENNETH C. 
ROBERTS, THOMAS E, 
ROBERTS, WILLIAM C. 
ROBERTSON, HOYT L. 
ROBINSON, ANDREW F. 
ROBINSON, STEWART C. 
ROERIG, EUGENE H. 
ROGERS, ISABELLE (EDSON) 
ROHM, MILTON C. 
ROKOS, CHARLES A. 
ROMERO, MANUEL 
ROMERO, TOMAS B. 
ROONEY, PHILLIP L. 
ROPER, HERBERT 
ROPERS, ARTHUR H. 
ROSEN, RUTH E. 
ROSENBERGER, HERMAN L. 
ROSENZWEIG, HARRY 
ROSSELOT, EUGENE R. 
ROSSO, MIKE E. 
ROTEN, BILL C. 
ROTERING, FLORENCE A. 
ROTH, ROBERT W. 
ROULEAU, EARL J. 
ROUNDY, DOYLE 
ROWE, CHARLES J. 
ROYSE, SIDNEY 
ROZNOVSKY, JOHN 
RUBEY, EDWARD 
RUFFOLO, DANTE, W. 
RUSSELL, ARTHUR J. 
RUTTEN, JAMES J. 

SAINTE, LOUIS R. 
SALK, RUTH (ORR) 
SALLOOM, EDWARD G. 
SANDERS, LOUIS J. 
SANDERS, ROBERT E. 
SANFORD, PAUL L. 
SARKISIAN, SARKIS A. 
SATER, CHARLES D. 
SATTERBERG, JACK 
SATTLER, JOHN F. 
SAUNDERS, JAMES G. 
SCALERO, NICHOLAS R. 
SCANAVINO, OTTO J. 
SCARFO, JOHN W. 
SCARVACE, ANTHONY, JR. 
SCHALLER, ROBERT C. 
SCHANTZ, RUSSELL L. 
SCHAUERMAN, ARTHUR H. 



SCHEELER, PAULINE L. 
SCHEIDEN, CARL M. 
SCHELL, FRANCES J. 
SCHILLING, ARNOLD A. 
SCHLESSER, HAROLD W. 
SCHLOSS, EUGENE M. 
SCHMIDT, DALE W. 
SCHMIDT, WILBUR H. 
SCHNETZ, ROBERT T. 
SCHNIER, SEYMOUR 
SCHOCK, JACOB F. 
>SCHNOOR, ALFRED WILLIAM 
SCHUCHART, ADA L. 
SCHULTE, LAWRENCE M. 
SCHULZ, GORDON R. 
SCHURTLIFF, ORLA C. 
SCHWARTZ, EDWIN K. 
SCHWEITZER, HARRY K. 
SCIPIOR, JOSEPH E. 
SCOBEE, ROSEN C, 
SCOTT, GLENWOOD A. 
SCOUGHTON, ORIN A. 
SEARL, CHESTER A. 
SECOY, OTTO 
SEEFELDT, CHRISTIAN W. 
SELL, ROBERT L. 
SELMEISTER, JOSEPH 
SELZLE, ELIZABETH A. 
SENSENBACH, ALFRED D. 
SENSKE, EDWIN F. 
SENTER, BRUCE D. 
SEVERSON, WINFIELD E. 
SHAFFER, WILLIAM L. 
SHANNON, HELEN C. 
SHAW, HOWARD E. 
SHAW, ROBERT P. 
SHIELDS, ALBERT F. 
SHIPLEY, ROYAL D. 
SHIPP, WINSTON B. 
SHIRLEY, LEWIS F. 
SHOCKLEY, JOHN, JR. 
SHOOK, VINTON E. 
SHREVE, LLOYD E. 
SHROUDER, AUSTIN D. 
SHUMAKER, KENNETH G. 
SIEGEL, ARTHUR B. 
SIEGEL, EDWIN H. 
SIEKMANN, GENE 
SIEMS, ELMER G 
SIERADZKI, CASIMIR J. 
SIKYTA, WILLIAM F. 
SILVA, FRANK A., JR. 
SIMMONS, FRED E. 
SIMMS, DOROTHY D. 
SIMONEAU, EARL T. 
SINCLAIR, ALVIN R. 
SINGER, CHARLES F. 
SIPPY, H. IVAN 
SISSON, ELIZABETH H. 



SKAVRONSKI, JOHN 

SKIPSKI, FRANK J. 

SLACK, ADA LOUISE 

SLAGER, ORA L. 

SLATTERY, JOHN R. 

SLOAN, DEWEY A. 

SLOAN, HUME S. 

SMEJKAL, MARLOWE F. 

SMELCER, CLYDE E. 

SMIETANA, WILLIAM J. 

SMITH, ALVIN 

SMITH, CHARLES E. 

SMITH, CHARLES 

SMITH, CHARLEY M. 

SMITH, DONN M. 

SMITH, EARL 

SMITH, ELGIE L. 

SMITH, HATCHER P. 

SMITH, JACK J. 

SMITH, JEAN H. (McMASTERS) 

SMITH, JOHN 

SMITH, JOSEPH F. 

SMITH, LELAND R. 

SMITH, LEO T. 

SMITH, LOUIS 

SMITH, LOUISE P. 

SMITH, STANLEY W. 

SMITH, VERNON S. 

SMITH, VINAL S. 

SMITH, WALTER T. 

SMITH, WARREN A. 

SMITH, WILLIAM G. 

SMOOT, ERIC A. 

SNELL, HARLEY L. 

SNELLING, THOMAS L. 

SNIDER, HOWARD E. 

SNODGRASS, HUBERT W. 

SNYDER, GLEN E. 

SNYDER, JOHN 

SNYDERMAN, LOUIS A. 

SOLLIS, DELMARA (COLEY) 

SONGER, ROBERT C. 

SOSKA, JOHN W. 

SOSNOVICH, NICHOLAS 

SOUTHALL, ALVIN R. 

SOUTHWICK, REX S. 

SOUZA, ROGER E. 

SOVDE, MARVIN H. 

SOWARD, VIRGIL W. 

SPARKUHL, HENRY 

SPEARS, ESTALENE T. (STAFFORD) 

SPENCE, JOHN M. 

SPICER, EDWIN S. 

SPIROUNIAS, PETER J. 

SPITTLER, AUGUST W. 

SPRAGUE, LAWRENCE E. 

SPRATZ, FRANK A. 

STAMP, NATHAN B. 

STANFORD, LONNIE 



ROSTER 



STAPLES, FRANK J. 

STATON, HARVEY N. 
STAUDENMAYER, JOHN 
STAUTY, CHESTER W. 
ST. CLAIR, EDMUND L. 
ST. DENNIS, SILAS A. 
STEELE, R. B. 
STEEN, EARL R„ JR. 
STEEN, ELSIE 
STEGE, JAMES D. 
STELLA, JOSEPH M. 
STEPHANY, EDNO 
STEPHEN, CHARLES O., JR. 
STEPHENS, EDGAR H. 
STEWART, FRED K. 
STICE, GLEN 
* STINETORF. EUGENE A. 
STOCH, JOSEPH C. 
STOCKTON, ROGER K. 
STOKOLS, HENRY 
STONE, CECIL H. 
STONE, ERIC W. 
STONE, LEWIS 
STONE, ROBERT A. 
STONE, WAYNE H. 
STORDEUR, ROLAND B. 
STOUR, HUBERT E. 
STOUT, HUBERT E. 
STRANKAY, SAM J. 
STRANZ, LEWIS W. 
STRAUSS, FRANCIS 
STRAYER, LYLE F. 
STRONG, JOHN PAUL 
STRICKLAND, ROBERT A. 
STRYZNY, GEORGE W. 
STUBBS, EDWIN L. 
STUPPY, GEORGE W. 
SUCHY, LAWRENCE 
SUDDATH, EDWARD E. 
SWAN, WILLIAM H. 
SWANSON, LILLIAN A. 
SWANSON, MYRTLE E. 
SWARTZFAGER, ELLA MAE 
SWENSON, CHARLES T. 
SWENSON, HILMER V. 

TALBOTT, RALPH E. 
TANNENBERG, JOST T. 
TANTILLO, FRANK F. 
TARNOW, MILDRED M. 
TAYLOR, CHARROLD A. 
TAYLOR, ENID L. 
TAYLOR, GLEN C. 
TAYLOR, TED 
TEETZ, WILLIAM A. 
TEIG, JUNE 
TENGLIN, CARL H. 
TERRIN, ALEXANDER J. 
TERRY, CHARLES R., JR. 



TERRY, WILLIAM C. 
TEXTOR, CHARLES S. II 
THACKER, DELMA 
THISTLETHWAITE, CHARLES D. 
THOMPSON, GEORGE H. 
THOMPSON, HANSFORD 
THOMPSON, ROBERT D. 
THOMPSON, WAYMON R. 
THOMSON, WALTER G. 
THORNE, JENS C. 
THORNTON, CURTIS F. 
TIBBY, ROBERT E. 
TIMBERLAKE, RALPH E. 
TIO, JAMES 

TJERNLUND, RODNEY E. 
TOBIN, RICHARD T. 
TODD, JAMES E. 
TODD, MERL 

TODOROVICH, WILLIAM A. 
TORGERSON, ROBERT P. 
TORRES, JESUS M. 
TOY, SIN G. 
TRACY, ARVID L. 
TRACY, DONALD W. 
TRALA, MELVIN L. 
TRANDEL, ROBERT J. 
TRIPI, RUSSELL, JR. 
TRUESDELL, ELBRIDGE E. 
TRULSON, MARTHA F. 
TRUMAN, ROY R. 
TRUNK, WALTER R. 
TUCHEK, JOSEPH 
TUCKER, CHARLES A. 
TUREK, STANLEY 
TURIN, ALEXANDER J. 
TURNER, GEORGE S. 
TURNER, RAY 
TURPIN, CECIL R. 
TURRILL, ROGER F. 
TUTTLE, EDWARD R. 
TVETEN, DOUGLAS 
TYSELL, JOHN E. 
TYSON, ANN 

UECKE, EARL W. 
UNFER, CHARLES W. 
UPHOFF, MURIEL E. 
UPTON, HARRY W. 
URBANI, WILLIAM M. 
URKOV, RICHARD 
URLACHER, FRANK J. 

VACCARELLO, VINCENT 

VAKOS, PENELOPE (MOSS) 

VALDEZ, FELIX 

VAN BRUSSELL, WILLIAM R. 

VANCE, ORLAN R. 

VAN DER SLUIS, JOHN 

VANDERVELDE, HARRY 



VANDY, RICHARD B. 
VANGEN, ERNEST O. 
VANHOOSIER, ZELMAR C. 
VAN ORT, DELVIA 
VARRIAL, VICTOR 
VARTIAK, JOSEPH F. 
VARZOS, PETER N. 
VASQUEZ, RITO A. 
VEATH, WILBUR L. 
VELLONE, CARNELLO 
VELINSKY, PAUL L. 
VERRET, ALLEN J. 
VETTER, HELEN D. 
VICK, CLIFTON E. 
VIOLETTE, HARVEY V. 
VIVACQUA, FRANK L. 
VOLK, ROBERT 
VON HORN, KENNETH A. 
VORIS, HARVEY C. 
VOSS, FRANK W. 

WACKTER, AURELIA E. 

WADE, RAYMOND L. 

WADDELL, WILLIAM M. 

WAGNER, CARLTON A. 

WAGONER, ELIZABETH (FORROR) 

WALKER, JOHN 

WALKER, JOHN, JR. 

WALKER, JOHN N. 

WALL, CHARLES S. 

WALLACE, GEORGE L. 

WALLACE, ROSALEE 

WALLNER, LINDEN J. 

WALRAD, RUTH 

WALSH, KENNETH E. 

WALSH, ROBERT 

WALSH, WILLIAM F. 

WALSH, WILLIAM P. 

WALTER, EVELYN 

WALTERS, LOUIS V. 

WALTHALL, MARTIN B. 

WARE, DOROTHY E. 

WAREHAM, ROBERT W. 

WARNER, IRVING 

WARNER, IRVING C. 

WARNER, PAUL 

WARNER, WAYNE H. 

WARREN, JACK 

WASEM, MARTHA C. 

WATSON, MARVIN E. 

WATSON, ROBERT C. 

WATTNER, OTTO S. 

WAXEL, GRACE H. 

WEBB, CHARLES E. 

WEBER, JAMES 

WEBSTER, JAMES R. 

WEGHORST, EDWARD A. 

WEINBERG, VIRGIL 

WEIR, M. HALL 



ROSTER 



WEISFELDTT, SIMON C. 

WEISS, ADOLPH 

WEISS, WILLIAM B. 

WEISS, WILLIAM D. 

WELLS, JAMES H. 

WELLS, WILMA M. 

WESOLOWSKI, MICHAEL M. 

WEST, DUDLEY S. 

WEST, ROYAL 

WETZEL, HARRY E. 

WHALEN, DOROTHY L. 

WHATLEY, HARRY R. 

WHEATCROFT, ARTHUR J, 

WHEELER, ALLAN G. 

WHELAN, EDWARD T. 

WHITE, CHARLES H. 

WHITE, SUZANNA O (OOSTERHOFF) 

WHITTMER, RUSSELL 

WHITSON, FLOYD H. 

WICKES, HUGH E. 

WIENER, HARVEY 

WIER, JOHN W. 

WILKERSON, LESTER G. 

WILLIAMS, AMBROSE 



WILLIAMS, AMY A, (MITCHELL) 
WILLIAMS, CLIFFORD B. 
WILLIAMS, GLADYS A. 
WILLIS, WILLIAM T. 
WILSON, EVERETT K, 
WILSON, HARRY R. 
WILSON, RICHARD E. 
WINGER, WILLIAM P. 
WISE, ARLENE M. 
WISER, ALFRED B. 
W1SHART, CHARLES H. 
WITTHAUS, LAWRENCE J. 
WITTLES, JACK S. 
WITTMER, RUSSELL W. 
WOLD, GEORGE 
WOODWARD, CHARLES E. 
WOODROW, HARRY A. 
WOODS, DONALD P. 
WORTHEN, RICHARD M. 
WRIGGE, SIDNEY J. 
WRIGHT, CASS R. 
WRIGHT, JOHN C. 
WRIGHT, ROBERT O. 
WUESTHOFF, HUBERT E. 



WUNDROCK, RICHARD J. 
WYMA, LAWRENCE A. 

YAEGER, BRUNO 
YANKEE, FREDERICK C. 
YEOMAN, HARRIET A. (BOWLIN) 
YONTZ, GAIL S., JR. 
YOUNG, BRITT 
YOUNG, CECIL 
YOUNG, DENTON R. 
YURKEWICZ, CHARLES J. 
YUSHOK, WASLEY 

ZARVOS, JAMES N. 
ZEHNER, FREDERICK N. 
ZEIBELL, JACK 
ZELASKO, ROBERT E. 
ZERRIEN, HERBERT M. 
ZIMMERMAN, EDGAR F. 
ZIMMERMAN, PHIL 
ZOLLER, FRANCES E. 
ZOCK, PAUL F. 
ZYCHAL, BRUNO 



02 



I J