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OBITUARY RECORD 



OF 



GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 



.... // 

If, 



DECEASED FROM JUNE, 1870, TO JUN]^, 1880. 



PRESENTED AT THE ANNUAL MEETINGS OF 
THE ALUMNI, 



1870-80. 






NEW HAVEN: 

TUTTLE, MOREHOUSE & TAYLOR 
1880. 



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OBITUARY RECORD 



GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 



Deceased during the academical year ending in July, 1 871 , 

including the record of a few who died a short 

time previous, hitherto unreported. 



[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMNI, JULY 12th, 18T1.] 



[No. 1 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 30 of the whole Record.] 








INDEX. 






ClasB. 




Page. 


Class. 


Page. 


1842 


Adam, John H. 


27 


1814 


Huntington, Jedidiah 


8 


1817 


Alden, Augustus 


11 


1863 


Ives, WHbur 


32 


1823 


Ashmun, George 


17 


1821 


King, Asa H. 


16 


1794 


Bacon, Bzekiel 


3 


1814 


Tianman, Chas. J. 


8 


1826 


Barber, E;dad 


19 


1829 


Lathrop, John 


20 


1815 


Barnes, Julius S. 


9 


1822 


Lyman. Solomon 


16 


1845 


Bibbins, Wm. B. 


28 


1835 


McPhail, George W. 


23 


1863 


Bishop, Edw. G-. 


32 


1815 


Marshall, Thos. A. 


10 


1864 


Booth. Chas. E. 


33 


1864 


Mather, Edw. T. 


33 


1853 


Bradley, Henry R. 


30 


1837 


Mather, OHver W. 


24 


1820 


Brockway, John H. 


15 


1825 


Maverick, Samuel A. 


18 


1868 m 


Brown, David B. 


38 


1853 


Nicholas, Thos. P. 


30 


1809 


Brown, Garrett G. 


4 


1864 


Palmer, Wm. H. 


33 


1846 m 


Candee, Judson 


36 


1819 


Parsons, Samuel H. 


14 


1828 


Carter, Wm. 


20 


1819 


Payson, Joshua P. 


14 


1859 


Catlin, Benj. S. 


31 


1818 


Perkins, Thos. C. 


13 


1840 


Chauvenet, Wm. 


25 


1816 


Pierce, George B. 


11 


1817 


Chesebrough, Robert J 


r. 11 


1840 


Richards, George 


25 


1818 


Chester, Alfred 


12 


1833 m 


Rising, Henry H. 


35 


1824 


Child, Linus 


18 


1867 


Robinson, Ernest 


34 


1837 


Clarke, Walter, 


23 


1812 


Rumsey, Wm. 


7 


1808 


Coe, Noah, 


4 


1832 


Stone, Collins 


22 


1820 


Collis, John T. 


16 


1855 


Talcott, George 


30 


1869 


Conkling. Frederick G. 


34 


1826 


Thompson, Andrew 


19 


1815 


Cook, George 


9 


1816 m 


Tracy, Richard P. 


34 


1831 


Cutler, Wm. W. 


21 


1863 m 


Treadway, Frederick S. 


37 


1818 


Davi?, Richard D. 


31 


1813 


Van Rensselaer, Jeremiah 


8 


1839 


Day, Thomas 


24 


1826 


Van Rensselaer, Philip S. 


20 


1841 


Dean, Gilbert 


26 


1809 


Ward, Samuel D. 


5 


1813 


Elliot, George A. 


7 


1842 


Welch, Henry K. W. 


27 


1845 


Braigh, Ward 


28 


1809 


Welles, Gaylord 


5 


1856 


Fellowes, Francis 


30 


1858 


Wells, Henry A. 


31 


1810 


Fitch, Eleazar T. 


6 


1851 


Wells, Henry D. 


29 


1797 


Goodrich, Chas. 


38 


1844 m 


Wells, John F. 


36 


1817 


Grammer, John 


12 


1834 


Wickes, Thos. 


23 


1816 


Gridley, Frederick 


10 


1818 


Wilkins, Gouvemeur M. 


13 


1848 Z 


Hammond, George C. 


W. 37 


1840 m 


Williams, Francke 


36 


1842 


Hiester, Isaac E. 


27 


1850 


Woodford, Oswald L. 


29 


1825 m 


Holmes, Henry 


35 


1862 


WoodhuU, George L. 


32 


1821 m 


Holt, Hiram 


34 


1832 


Wright, James L. 


22 


1819 


Huntington, Asahel 


14 


1822 


Wright, Luther 


16 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OP YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the academical year ending in July 1871, inclu- 
ding the record of a few who died previously^ 
hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting of the Alumni, July 12, 1871.] 

[No. 1 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 30 of the whole Record.] 



1794. 

EzEKiEL Bacon, for nearly six years the oldest surviving grad- 
uate of the college, died in Utica, 1^. Y., 18 Oct., 1870, aged 94. 

In reply to a request made a few years since for a sketch of the 
events of his life, he wrote as follows : — 

"Ezekiel Bacon was born in Boston, on the 1st of Sept., 1776, 
the only son of the Rev. John Bacon, then late pastor of the Old 
South Church, and of Elizabeth his wife, who was the daughter of 
Ezekiel Goldthwait, of Boston, and widow of the Rev. Alexander 
Cummings, Mr. Bacon's predecessor in office. The family settled 
in Stockbridge, Berkshire County, Mass., and the son was educated 
and graduated at Yale College of the class of 1794 ; read law at 
Judge Reeve's law school in Litchfield, Ct., and practiced it in 
Berkshire ; was a member of the legislature of Massachusetts in 
1806 and 7 ; was a member of the House of Representatives of 
the U. S. Congress from 1807 to 1813, serving on the committee of 
ways and means, and during one year its chairman. He then held 
the office of Chief Justice of the Circuit Court of Common Pleas 
for the Western District of Massachusetts, until he received the 
office of Comptroller of the Treasury of the U. S. ; which owing 
to ill health he soon after resigned, and removing into the State of 
N. Y., settled in Utica, where except holding the offices of mem- 
ber of the legislature for one year. Judge of the County Court of 
Common Pleas for two years, and member of the Convention of 
1821 for revising the Constitution of the State, he has since re- 
sided in private life, having passed fully one-third of a long-pro- 



tracted life in a condition of continued ill health and great depres- 
sion of the vital and active powers of being. ' Sic itur ad astra.''' 
He married Abigail, daughter of Dr. Reuben Smith, of Litch- 
field, Conn., and had five children. 

1808. 

Noah Coe, son of Charles and Hannah (Bates) Coe, was born 
in Durham, Conn., May 24th, 1786. 

He pursued his theological studies in part at Andover,in 1809 and 
10, as a member of the second class which graduated from that 
institution. He was ordained July 3, 1811, and preached in Ches- 
ter, N. Y., for two years. In 1814 he was installed over the Pres- 
byterian church in New Hartford, N. Y., where he remained until 
1835. In 1836 he commenced preaching in the 2d Congregational 
church in Greenwich, Conn., where he was installed May 23d, 1837. 
He was dismissed May 20th, 1845, and was not again a settled 
pastor, though he preached and labored almost continuously until 
over seventy years of age. From 1848 to 1854 he was engaged as 
a city missionary in New York city, and in Williamsburg, L. I. 
He then removed to New Haven, Conn., where he resided until his 
death. From Nov., 1854, to Feb., 1856, he served as stated sup- 
ply of the Congregational church in Northfield, Conn., and for the 
succeeding year supplied the Congregational church at New Pres- 
ton Hill, Conn. He died, suddenly, in Hartford, Conn., May 9th, 
1871, aged 85. 

His wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. Samuel Goodrich, (Y. C. 
1783,) of Berlin, Conn., died in New Haven March 10, 1864. 
Two of his sons, Frederick A. and Rev. Samuel G. Coe, graduated 
at this college in 1837 and 1838 respectively, and died a little more 
than a year before him. His daughter, the widow of Rev. Chaun- 
cey Goodrich, (Y. C. 1837,) survives him. 

1809. 

Garrett Garnsey Brown, son of David and Philena Brown, 
was born in Bethlehem, Conn., in 1784. 

He was prepared for college under his pastor, the Rev. Azel 
Backus, D.D., and at the Morris Academy, Litchfield ; and entered 
('ollege in the second Sophomore term. After graduation he taught 
in Milford, Conn., for one term, and then became a student in An- 
dover Theological Seminary. He remained there until licensed to 
preach by the New Haven East Association of Congregational 
ministers, Sept., 1811. 



The next fifty years of his life were spent in the Southern and 
Southwestern States, where he taught in private families and in se- 
lect schools, preaching also as opportunity oifered, though not or- 
dained. During these years he had no fixed residence, and scarcely 
remained for a year in any one place. In 1854 he visited the Sand- 
wich Islands, and opened a private school, but returned the next 
year to the South. After the breaking out of the late civil war, he 
came back to his native town. The closing part of his life was 
spent in the almshouse in Woodbury, Conn., where he died Oct. 
1st, 1870. He was unmarried. 

Samuel Dexter Ward was the eldest son of the Hon, Artemas 
Ward (Harv. Coll. 1783), Chief Justice of the Court of Common 
Pleas in Boston, and grandson of Gen. Artemas Ward (Harv. 
Coll. 1748), of Revolutionary fame. His mother was Catherine 
M., daughter of the Hon. Samuel Dexter, of Boston. 

He spent the first three years of his College course in Harvard 
College. He was a lawyer in Boston, where he died unmarried, 
of pneumonia. May 28th, 1871, aged 82 years, 7 months, and 4 
days. He was a member of the Common Council during the first 
years of the City Charter ; but his principles prevented him. from 
further entrance into political life. 

Gaylord Welles died from an attack of apoplexy, at the resi- 
dence of his daughter, in Bristol, Conn., Sept. 24th, 1870, aged 
82-^ years. 

He was the youngest son of James and Abigail (Gaylord) 
Welles, and was born in Wethersfield, Conn., April 15th, 1788. 

He studied medicine and surgery with Dr. Everest, of Canton, 
Conn., and in 1815 began practice in Hebron, but soon removed to 
Harwinton, Conn. In 1842 he removed to Hillsdale, N. Y., con- 
tinuing his practice there till 1855, when at the request of his 
daughters he retired from his profession and removed to their res- 
idence in West Hartford, Conn., and later to Bristol. An attack of 
paralysis partially disabled him in Jan., 1869, but he continued to 
employ himself in visiting the sick until the day before his sudden 
death. 

Dr. Welles married, June 16th, 1814, Electa, daughter of James 
Brace, Esq., of Harwinton. Their eight children, five of whom 
still survive, were born in Harwinton. Mrs. Welles died March 
8th, 1836. 



He was well known as a firm supporter of the Temperance and 
Anti-Slavery causes, and of the American Peace Society in its 
earlier and more active years. 

1810. 

Eleazar Thompson Fitch, a descendant in the fifth generation 
from Rev. James Fitch, of Norwich, Conn., was the youngest 
child of Capt. Nathaniel and Mary (Thompson) Fitch, of New 
Haven, Conn., where he was born Jan. 1, 1791. 

He early evinced a decided taste for learning, being quiet and 
thoughtful in manner, and eager and diligent in study. He won 
distinction in College, both for punctuality and scholarship. His 
conversion occurred while an undergraduate, and it at once deter- 
mined the character of his life work. After graduation he was a 
teacher at East Windsor Hill, and subsequently of the New Haven 
Hopkins Grammar School. In 1812 he entered Andover Theol. 
Seminary, where after completing the regular course he remained 
pursuing advanced studies, giving assistance in instruction, and 
preaching, until his election in 1817, to succeed Pres. D wight in 
the office of Professor of Divinity in Yale College. One branch of 
his work was to teach Theology to graduates. In this he found 
his classes so increase that he was led to urge upon the Corpora- 
tion the founding of a Theological Department, which was organ- 
ized in 1822. In this Department he filled the chair of Homiletics, 
at the same time being College Preacher and Pastor, and giving 
instruction in the Academical Department in Natural Theology 
and the Evidences of Christianity. As Preacher he delivered to 
successive classes a series of sermons in Systematic Theology. 
Some of his doctrinal views thus presented becoming publicly con- 
troverted, he was compelled to defend them as publicly ; and thus 
for truth and conscience's sake he was willing to appear in print, 
a thing which he was never prevailed upon to do on other grounds. 

In 1852 his growing infirmities (he scarcely ever enjoyed even 
from youth full bodily health) induced him to resign his office as 
Professor; yet he retained his connection with the Theol. Semi- 
nary as Lecturer until 1861, and with the Theol. Faculty as Pro- 
fessor Emeritus until his death. 

At his resignation he became a member of the " Circle of retired 
Clergymen and Laymen," in whose weekly meetings he always 
took an active part, and thus maintained his interest in all the liv- 
ing issues of the day even to the last. He was never a mere 



Theologian, but pushed his researches into matters of science, liter- 
ature, and taste, and of public and social order. He possessed a 
decided genius for music and its kindred fine arts, and in smaller 
matters displayed great versatility and ready inventive powers. 

He died January 31, 18 71, in his 81st year. 

He was thrice married: Nov. 12, 1817 to Elizabeth Lucia, only 
child of Joseph Lucius Wooster of ISTew Haven, a graduate of 
1781, and a lawyer by profession. She died Aug. 30, 1821, hav- 
ing lost a daughter in infancy, and leaving a son, now living : Sept. 
5, 1822 to Susan Augusta Root of New Haven, who died Oct. 2, 
1846 : and Jan. 6, 1848 to Mary Coffin Lunt of Newburyport, 
Mass., who survives him. 

1812. 

William Rumsey was born in Kent County, Maryland, in 1792. 
After graduation he studied medicine, and received the degree of 
M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania ; in the meantime he 
enlisted in the army during the war with Great Britain, and was 
stationed at Camp Dupont in Delaware. 

He settled in Philadelphia, where he continued to practice his 
profession until April, 1869, when he removed to the home of his 
sister, Mrs. S. C. Brinckle, near Wilmington, Delaware, where he 
died of old age, April 23d, 1871, in his 79th year. Although born 
in a slave-holding State, his attachment to the Union was warm 
and decided during the late war. 

Dr. Rumsey was married, in 1829, to Anna Rumsey Dunlap, of 
Philadelphia, his second cousin, and the sister of his classmate, 
Thomas Dunlap. She died in 1835, leaving one daughter, who 
died in 1838. 

1813. 

George Augustus Elliot was born in Guilford, Conn., June 
7th, 1792, and was the third son of William and Ruth (Rossiter) 
Elliot, and a descendant in the fifth generation from Rev. John 
Eliot, the " Apostle to the Indians." 

He pursued the study of law with Seth P. Staples, of Kew 
Haven, and being admitted to the bar in this city in the autumn 
of 1815, started at once for the West. He selected Erie, Pa., as 
the place of his residence, where he followed his profession suc- 
cessfully until 1 855, when with somewhat impaired health he re- 
tired from active business, and devoted his leisure to the improve- 



ment of his farm. He died in Erie, July 23d, 1870, of paralysis, 
at the age of 78. 

He married, Nov. 12th, 1818, Miss Sarah M. Brown, eldest 
daughter of Robert Brown, of Erie, who still survives him, with 
one son, John Eliot, Esq. 

Jeremiah VanRensselakr was born at the old family man- 
sion, Greenbush, Rensselaer county, N. Y., Aug. 4th, 1793. 

He studied medicine with his uncle, Archibald Bruce, M.D., and 
in 1819 received the degree of M.D. 

The three following years were passed in Edinburgh, London, 
and Paris, in the prosecution of his medical studies. After this 
course he returned to N". Y. city, and acquired an extensive prac- 
tice. For many years he was Corresponding Secretary of the N. 
Y. Lyceum of Natural History, and in 1825 he delivered a course 
of lectures on geology before the N. Y. Athengeum; he had ac- 
quired from Dr. Bruce a great love for the natural sciences. 

In 1840 he visited Europe, and after three years spent abroad 
resumed practice in N. Y. In 1852 he retired from active pur- 
suits, and occupied the old mansion at Greenbush, having charge 
of his estates. In 1867 he again visited Europe, and returned last 
autumn in feeble health, and died in N. Y. city, of pneumonia, 
March 7th, 1871, aged 77^ years. He leaves one son. 

1814. 

Jedidiah Huntington, eldest son of Deacon Jabez Hunting- 
ton (Y. C. 1784) and Mary (Lanman) Huntington, of Norwich, 
Conn., was born 15 Sept., 1794, and died in Norwich, 6 Dec, 1870, 
from paralysis, 

He spent his entire life in Norwich, engaged in business. At 
the time of his death he was a vice-president and director of the 
Norwich Savings Society. 

He married, 2 July, 1834, Rebecca M. Snow, who died 3 Sept., 
1836. He married again, 24 Feb., 1841, Happy Kinney. Of his 
three children, one daughter only is living. 

Charles James Lanman died in New London, Conn., 25 July, 
1870. He was born 5 June, 1795, the eldest of twelve children of 
Hon. James Lanman (Y. C. 1 788), of Norwich, Conn., tJ. S. Sen- 
ator and Judge of the Supreme Court of Connecticut. His mother 
was Mary Ann, daughter of Hon. Charles C. Chandler (Harv. 
ColL 1763). 



9 

He studied law with his kinsman, Hon. Roger Griswold (Y. C. 
1780), as well as with his father, and was admitted to the bar 
early in 1817, in New London. Soon afterwards he decided to 
seek his fortune in the Territory of Michigan, and joined William 
Woodbridge, Esq., in his law office at Detroit. He soon settled 
permanently in Frenchtown, now Monroe. There he held many 
local offices, as Attorney for the Territory, Judge of Probate and 
Colonel of the militia. Under Presidents Monroe and Adams he 
was Receiver of Public Moneys for the District of Michigan. 

In 1835 he returned to Norwich, and in 1838 was elected mayor 
of the city. During the financial revulsion of 1837 he lost the 
bulk of his property, all of which was located in Michigan. In 
1862 he removed his residence to New London. 

He married Mary Ghee, who survives him. His only son, 
Charles Lanman, Esq., of Washington, and seven daughters also 
survive. 

1815. 

Julius Steele Barnes, son of Jonathan Barnes (Y. C. 1784), 
was born 23 Feb., 1792, in Tolland, Conn. His mother was Rachel 
Steele, of West Hartford, Conn, adopted daughter of her maternal 
uncle, Rev. George Colton (Y. C. 1756), of Bolton, Conn., under 
whose instruction Dr. Barnes was fitted for college. 

He graduated at the Yale Medical School in 1818, and shortly 
after commenced practice in Southington, Conn., and there con- 
tinued until his death, 12 Nov., 1870, in his 79th year. Besides 
being a skillful practitioner, and devoted to his calling, he also la- 
bored heartily for the social good of the community. He served 
one term as State Senator, and held for a time the office of Judge 
of Probate. 

He married Laura Lewis, of Southington, who died two years 
before him. Of their nine children, seven survive them ; 'one son 
graduated at this college in 1847. 

George Cooke, son of John and Anne (Lyon) Cooke, was born 
in New Haven, Conn., March 30th, 1796, and died in the same city, 
May 30th, 1871. 

He taught school at the south for two or three years after his 
graduation ; and was then engaged in business for a few years in 
New Canaan, Conn. He then entered into the carriage business in 
N. Y City with his father and brother, superintending also the ex- 



10 

tensive manufactory of the firm, in New Haven. About 1849 he re- 
moved to New Haven, and continued in the same business with 
his brother for many years. 
He was never married. 

Thomas Alexander Marshall was born in "Woodford county, 
Ky., Jan. 15th, 1794. His father, Humphrey Marshall, was a U. S. 
Senator, and his mother was a daughter of Col. Thomas Mar- 
shall, of Virginia, and a sister of Chief Justice Marshall. 

He studied law at home, and in 1817 began the practice of that 
profession in Frankfort, the capital of Kentucky. Family consid- 
erations induced him to move to Paris, Ky., in 1819, where he 
closely pursued his practice until his election to Congress in 1831. 
He served for two Congressional terms, and was then (March 18th, 
1835,) commissioned a Judge of the Court of Appeals. He re- 
tired to private life in August, 1856. During 1836, he moved to 
Lexington, and was soon after appointed a professor in the Law 
School of Transylvania University; he thus continued until 1849 
or 1850. In 1857 he removed to Frankfort, and in 1859 to Louis- 
ville. In 1866 he was appointed to complete the unexpired term 
of Judge Sampson, and he served as Chief Justice for six months : 
thus making twenty- two years of service on the bench of the Court 
of Appeals — for seven years as Chief Justice. In 1866 this col- 
lege conferred on him the degree of Doctor of Laws. He died in 
Louisville, April 17th, 1871, aged 77. 

In Nov., 1816, he married Miss Price, of Lexington, a niece of 
Mrs. Henry Clay. 

1816. 

Frederick GRiDLEY,son of Rev. Uriel Gridley (Y. C. 1783) and 
Susannah (Norton) Gridley, wan born in Watertown, Conn., Febr. 
29th, 17P6, and died in Stratford, Conn., Febr. 21, 1871. 

After completing his College course, he was for two years 
Principal of the Academy in Monson, Mass. During this time 
he studied theology with Rev. Dr. Alfred Ely, and afterwards 
pursued his studies for a short time with Professors Fitch and 
Goodrich in New Haven. 

He was licensed to preach by the Hampden (Mass.) Association, 
March, 1819, and was ordained as pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Ellsworth (in the town of Sharon), Conn., June 7th, 
1820, where he remained until dismissed at his own request in 
March, 1836. He was installed, Oct. 5th, 1836, over the Congre- 



11 

gational Churcli in East Lyme, Conn., and after twenty years' 
pastorate, took a dismission, chiefly on account of declining 
health. His home was afterwards in Newington, Conn., and later 
in Stratford. 

Mr. Gridley was twice married: first, to Miss Elizabeth, 
daughter of Major Wm. Clark, of N'orth Wilbraham, Mass., and 
again to Miss Mary Edwards Ely, daughter of Eli Ely, of Hart- 
ford, Conn. He had three children, one of whom, the widow of 
David P. Judson (Y. C. 1831), of Stratford, survives him. 

George Edmond Pierce was born in Southbury, Conn., Sept. 
9th, 1794. His father was Samuel Pierce, and his mother Martha, 
daughter of Robert Edmond, from Ireland. 

After graduation, he taught in Fairfield (Conn.) Academy for 
two years, and was for the next three years a member of Andover 
Theol. Seminary. He was ordained pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Harwinton, Conn., July 10th, 1822, and continued so 
until June, 1834, when he was dismissed to accept the Presidency 
of the Western Reserve College, in Hudson, Ohio. He entered on 
his new duties in the next month, and remained in office twenty, 
one years. After his resignation his residence continued in Hud- 
son, till his sudden death. May 27th, 1871. 

Dr. Pierce was married, Dec. 1st, 1824, to Miss Susan Rockwell, 
daughter of Martin Rockwell, of Colebrook, Conn., who now sur- 
vives him. They had five sons and one daughter : one son died 
in infancy, and three of the other sons graduated at Western Re- 
serve College. 

Dr. Pierce received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Mid- 
dlebury College in 1838. 

1817. 

Augustus Alden, second child and eldest sen of the Rev. 
Abishai and Betsey (Parker) Alden, was born in Willington, 
Conn. 

After leaving College, he taught one year in Richmond, Va., 
and thence went to Georgia, where he spent the rest of his life as 
a teacher. He married, in 1823, Miss Ann S., daughter of Gov. 
Wilson Lumpkin, and had nine children. 

He died at Cave Spring, Ga., Sept, 14th, 1870, aged 73. 

Robert John Chesebrough, eldest son of Robert and Content 
(Rathbone) Chesebrough, was born in jN'ew York City, Jan. 18th 

1798. 



12 

He resided during his life in his native city, first studying law 
and practicing it for a few years, and then going into business 
Avith a brother, in the firm of Chesebrough, Satterlee, & Co., 
Pearl street. The firm met with great loss in the disastrous fire 
of 1835, and Mr. Chesebrough returned to his profession, in which 
he continued till his death, being especially entrusted with the 
management of many estates, as executor or trustee. He died, of 
Bright's disease, Dec. 30th, 1870. 

His wife, to whom he was married in 1839, survives him, with 
six daughters, out of a family of eight children. 

John Gbammer died at Halifax Court House, Va., March 5th, 
1871, aged 73. He was born in Petersburg, Va., where he began 
the practice of law some two years after leaving College. He 
married, in Dec, 1819, a Miss Barton, of Frederick County, Va., 
but his wife dying in Oct., 1823, he withdrew from the bar and 
removed to a farm in Dinwiddle County, Va. In Jan., 1824, he 
joined the Episcopal Theol. Seminary at Alexandria, Va., and on 
July 15th, 1826, received Deacon's orders. For the next ten years, 
his life was that of a missionary. He' lived upon his estate, and 
preached in eight or ten of the neighboring counties. In Oct., 
1835, his dwelling house was burnt down, and he removed to Law- 
rence ville, Brunswick County. In 1838 he accepted a call to the 
parish of Halifax Court House and removed there, where he con- 
tinued to reside till his death. In Sept., 1832, he married a Miss 
Meade, of Brunswick County, and by her he had six children. 
Washington College, Va , conferred on him in 1853 the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity. 

1818. 

Alfred Chester, the second child and only son of Thomas 
Chester (Y. C. 1780) and Esther (M. Bull) Chester, of Hartford, 
Conn., was born March 17th, 1798. 

The year after leaving College was spent in the Andover Theol. 
Seminary, and the two succeeding years in Princeton Seminary. 

After three years' service as a Home Missionary in South Caro- 
lina, he was ordained over the Presbyterian Church in Rahway, 
N. J., in July, 1826. He left his charge in 1829, and for the next 
14 years was the principal of a classical school in Morristown, N. 
J., where his residence continued until about 1 858. During the 
latter part of his life he resided in Elizabeth, "N". J., and for the 
last nine years was chaplain of the County Prison. He died in N. 
Y. City, July 2d, 1871. 



13 

Mr. Chester married, Aug. 24th, 1826, Mary Ann Frances Chet- 
woocl, of Elizabethtown, N. J. By this marriage he had two 
children. 

Richard David Davis, a native of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., died 
very suddenly at his home in Waterford, N. Y., June 17th, 1871. 

He studied law, and was admitted to the bar at Poughkeepsie 
in 1821. He was a Representative in the U. S. Congress, for two 
terms, beginning with 1841. He subsequently removed to Water- 
ford. 

Thomas Clap Perkins was bom in Hartford, Conn., July 29th, 
1798. His father was Enoch Perkins, Esq. (Y. C. 1781), of Hart- 
ford, and his mother, Anna Pitkin, was a daughter of Rev. 
Timothy Pitkin (Y. C. 1747), of Farmington, Conn. His brother, 
Rev. George W. Perkins, graduated in 1824. 

After graduation he studied law with Seth P. Staples, Esq., in 
ISTew Haven, and in 1820 was admitted to the bar in Hartford, 
where he practiced his profession for half a century, with distin- 
guished success. He was several times elected to the State Senate 
and House of Representatives, and was once elected a Judge of the 
Supreme Court, but declined the position. He died in Hartford, 
Oct. 11th, 1870, at the age of 72. 

Mr. Perkins married in 1827 Mary, daughter of the Rev. Lyman 
Beecher, D.D. (Y. C. 1797). She survives him, with two sons and 
two daughters : the elder son being a graduate of this College in 
the class of 1850. 

Go'uvERNEUR MoRRis WiLKiNS was bom Nov. 4th, 1799, and 
died in New York City, Febr. 7th, 1871, aged 71 years. 

He studied law, but never practiced. He was an attache of 
the U. S. Legation in Paris in the reign of Louis Philippe, who 
was during most of his exile in this country, while Duke of Orleans, 
the guest of Gouverneur Morris, whose nephew and adopted son 
Mr. Wilkins was. Mr. Wilkins mingled but little in public life, 
preferring the private station which he so becomingly adorned. 
The record of some of his various services is found in the following 
pamphlets which he published.* "A Letter to the Trustees of 
Columbia College, from a Citizen," 1856; " In the matter of the 
Extension of Central Park," 1861; "A Project for the Relief of 
Broadway," 1866. 



14 

His first wife was Mary, daughter of John Wood, Esq., of 
Charleston, S. C. One daughter survived this marriage, and has 
just deceased. Subsequently he married Catharine, eldest daugh- 
ter of Gen. Stephen YanRensselaer, of Albany, N. Y. 

1819. 

AsAHEL Huntington was born in Topsfield, Mass., 23 July, 
1798, and died in Salem, Mass., after a brief illness, 5 Sept., 1870. 
His father was the Rev. Asahel Huntington (Dartmouth Coll. 
1786), and his mother was Alethea, daughter of Dr. Elisha Lord, 
of Pomfret, Conn. 

After leaving College, Mr. Huntington commenced his legal 
studies at Newburyport, and after some interruptions completed 
them at Salem, Mass., where he was admitted to the bar in 1824. 
He continued in practice in Salem until 1851, when he was ap- 
pointed clerk of all the courts in the County : this office he held 
till his death. He served the State repeatedly in the Legislature, 
and in the Constitutional Convention of 1853: and in the same 
year was mayor of the city of Salem. 

He was married, 15 Aug., 1842, to Mrs. Caroline (Deblois) 
Tucker, of Boston, who survives him, with a son and daughter. 

Samuel Holden Parsons, second son of Enoch and Mary 
Wiley (Sullivan) Parsons, was born in Middletown, Conn., Aug. 
11th, 1800. 

He studied law, was admitted to the bar of his native county in 
April, 1822, and commenced practice in Middletown. In 1824, he 
was appointed Attorney to the Branch of the U. S. Bank, loi^ated 
in Hartford, and Pension Agent of the U. S. for Connecticut. He 
accordingly removed to Hartford, and resided there until after the 
expiration of the charter of the Bank and the winding up of its 
affairs in 1847. During the rest of his life, his home was in Mid- 
dletown. In 1851 he was made the first President of the Farmers' 
and Mechanics' Savings Bank, and held that office for many years. 

He died in Middletown, Febr. 23d, 187l', aged 70. He was un- 
married. 

Joshua Payne Payson, the son of John H. and Amaryllis 
(Payne) Payson, was born in Abington, a parish of Pomfret, Conn., 
Aug. 15th, 1800. 

He studied theology in the Andover Seminary, completing the 
course in 1824. Although in delicate health, he preached, more or 



15 

less, for about six years, during the latter half of the time being 
the stated supply of the Congregational churches in Chilmark and 
Tisbury (Martha's Vineyard), Mass. He was ordained as an evan- 
gelist at Falmouth, Mass., June 26th, 1828. 

In 1830 he was compelled, by repeated attacks of bleeding at the 
lungs, to relinquish preaching, and he retired to his native home- 
stead. From about 1838 until his death he was a confirmed invalid, 
and for the latter part of the time deprived of sight. He died in 
Pomfret, Apr. 29th, 1871, in the 71st year of his age. 

He was married, in Dec, 1840, to Miss Anna, daugter of Rev. 
Joseph Steward, of Hartford. She survives him, without children. 

1820. 

John Hall Brockway, the oldest child of the Rev. Diodate 
Brockway (Y. C. 1797) and of Miranda (Hall) Brockway, of Elling- 
ton, Conn., was born, 31 Jan., 1801, and died in the same town, 
where he had always resided, 29 July, 1870. 

After he left College he taught in East Windsor for a few months, 
but soon commenced to read law in the private school of Seth P. 
Staples, Esq., and Judge S. J. Hitchcock, of New Haven. He was 
admitted to the New Haven County Bar in April, 1823, and im- 
mediately opened an office in his native town. 

In 1832 and in 1838 he was a member of the State House of 
Representatives, and in 1834 of the Senate. From 1839 to 1843 he 
was member of Congress. In Aug., 1849, he was appointed State's 
Attorney for Tolland County, and held the office until April, 1867, 
when he resigned on account of his health. 

He married, 12 Jan., 1829, Miss Flavia Field Colton, of Long- 
meadow, Mass., who survives him, with her three daughters. 

John Tucker Collis, the eldest son of Solomon and Hannah 
(Howe) Collis, was born in New Haven, Conn., Jan. 8th, 1801. 

For a number of years after leaving College he was engaged in 
the banking business, and afterwards was connected with the-U. 
S. Custom House, in his native city. In the latter years of his 
life, he was made the curator and librarian of the New Haven 
Colony Historical Society, upon its organization in 1863, and so 
continued for several years. He was never married. He died in 
Hartford, Conn., Aug. 8th, 1870, in his 7 0th year. 



16 

1821. 

Asa Howe King, son of Rev. Asa and Eunice (Howe) King, was 
born in New Haven, Conn., Apr. 5th, 1798, and entered College 
from Killing worth, where his father was then pastor. 

He attended a course of medical lectures in this College in 1824, 
and subsequently in the same year at Bowdoin College, where he 
received the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He commenced prac- 
tice as a physician in Branford, Conn., in 1824. In 1827 he re- 
moved to Essex, and in 1835 to Old Saybrook, Conn., where he re- 
mained till his death, Nov. 20th, 1870. 

In 1831 he was married to Miss Emily Starkey, of Essex. He 
had four children, one daughter and three sons. His widow and 
two sons survive him. 

1822. 

Solomon Lyman, son of Deacon Solomon and Lois (Janes) 
Lyman, was born in Easthampton, Mass., Jan. 11th, 1795. 

He worked on a farm until he was 21 years of age, when he re- 
solved to be a minister and began to prepare for College, which he 
entered as sophomore. After graduating, he studied theology 
two years in N. Y. City, with Rev. Drs. Spring, Cox, and Baldwin, 
and then spent three years in preaching at Pittstown, N. Y., being 
ordained over the Presbyterian Church there, Jan. 4th, 1826. He 
was afterwards pastor of the Congregational Church in Keeseville, 
N. Y., for about 8 years; and was installed over the Congrega- 
tional Church in Poultney, Yt., Febr. 26th, 1835, and dismissed 
Nov. 16th, 1842. His aged parents needing his assistance, he 
then removed to Easthampton, and for seven years supplied the 
pulpit in West Farms, about four miles distant. He continued 
to preach as occasion offered until past 70 years of age. He died 
in Easthampton, Jan. 17th, 1871, aged 76. 

In 1826, Mr. Lyman married Mary Curtis, of N. Y, daughter 
of Reuben Curtis, of Danbury, Conn. She survives him, with two 
of their three sons. 

Luther Wright, son of Luther and Sarah (Lyman) Wright, was 
born in Easthampton, Mass., Nov. 24th, 1796, and died in the 
same place, Sept. 5th, 1870, in his 74th year. 

He was principal of an academy in Maryland for two years, and 
then began the study of theology in New Haven. From March, 
1825, to Sept., 1828, he was a tutor in this College, and afterwards 
taught in Middletown and in Ellington, Conn. From Sept., 1833, 



17 

to Oct., 1839, he was principal of the academy in Leicester, Mass., 
and from Dec, 1841, to July, 1849, the first principal of Williston 
Seminary in his native town. After resigning this last position, 
he continued his residence in Easthampton, giving instruction for 
several years to private pupils. 

He married, Oct., 1829, Emeline G., daughter of Samuel Colton, 
of Longmeadow, Mass., who died suddenly, March 6th, 1863, 
leaving two daughters and two sons : one of the sons has since 
died. 

Mr. Wright published an Address at the dedication of a new 
Academy building at Leicester, in 1833 ; and an historical sketch 
of Easthampton, in 1851. 

1823. 

Geoege Ashmun was born in Blandford, Mass., Dec. 25, 1804. 
His father was Hon. Eli P. Ashmun, afterwards XJ. S. Senator, and 
his mother was a daughter of Rev. John Hooker (Y. C. 1751), of 
Northampton, Mass. 

He studied law, and for a short time practiced in Enfield, Mass., 
but in 1828 established himself in Springfield, where he resided 
till his death. From 1834 to 1851, when he retired from his pro- 
fession, he was associated in business with Hon. Reuben A. Chap- 
man, now Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Mass. He was 
elected to the State House of Representatives, in 1833, 1835, 1836, 
and 1841, being in the last-named year speaker; and in 1838 and 
1839, he was a member of the State Senate. He was three times 
elected to the House of Representatives of the Congress of the U. 
S., namely for the years 1845 to 1851. After Hon. Daniel Web- 
ster delivered his famous speech, on the Vth of March, 1850, Mr. 
Ashmun took up his defence in the ensuing political and personal 
quarrels, and in consequence retired from public life. In 1860 he 
was induced to attend the convention of the new Republican party 
at Chicago, which nominated Mr. Lincoln, and to serve as chair- 
man. From this relation to the nomination, he formed an intimacy 
with President Lincoln, which caused his counsel to be sought and 
accepted during the years of the rebellion. 

For several years a palsy of the nervous system had been coming 
over him, and confined him to his house for the last months of his 
life. He died in Springfield, July IVth, 1870, in his 66th year. 
His wife. Miss Martha E. Hall, of Springfield, whom he married 
in 1828, died a few years before him. He left two daughters. 
2 



18 

1824. 

Linus Child was born in North Woodstock, Conn., Febr. 27th, 
1802, being one of nine children of Rensselaer and Priscilla 
(Cowles) Child. 

He completed his preparatory studies at the Colchester Acad- 
emy, and entered the College near the close of the Freshman year. 

After studying with S. P. Staples, Esq., of this city, and Hon. 
E. Stoddard, of Woodstock, he was admitted to the bar in Connecti- 
cut in 1826. He then spent a year in the office of Hon. George 
Tufts, of Dudley, Mass., and in 182'7 began the practice of law in 
Southbridge, Mass., where he continued till 1845. In that year, 
relinquishing his profession, he removed to Lowell, Mass., to take 
charge of one of the large manufacturing establishments of that 
city, in which employment he continued till 1862, when he re- 
sumed the practice of the law in Boston in company with his son, 
and so continued till his death. He died in Hingham, Mass., his 
summer residence, suddenly, of congestion, on the 26th of August, 
1870, in his 69th year. 

In 1835 he was chosen a member of the state senate, and con- 
tinued in that body for five years : as chairman of the Rail Road 
Committee during that time, he had a large share in shaping the 
railroad charters and policy of Massachusetts. He was for many 
years a member of the Prudential Committee of the Amer. Board 
of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and of the Boards of Trus- 
tees of Amherst College, Andover Theol. Seminary, and Phillips' 
Academy at Andover : to these and kindred institutions he devo- 
ted a large share of his time. 

Mr. Child was married, in 1829, to Berinthia, daughter of 
Oliver Mason, Esq., of Southbridge, and by her had two daugh- 
ters and one son. The son graduated at this College in 1855. 

1825. 

Samuel Augustus Maverick was bom, July 28th, 1803, in 
Pendleton, S. C, then the residence of his father, who had been a 
leading merchant in Charleston : his mother was a daughter of 
Gen. Robert Anderson. 

He studied law with Henry St. George Tucker, of Winchester, 
Va., and was admitted to the bar of his native state; but being 
opposed to nullification (his principles having even led him into a 
duel with Mr. Calhoun, in which Mr. Calhoun was wounded), he 
emigrated to Alabama, and thence in 1834 to Texas, arriving at 



19 

San Antonio, his future home, in 1835. During the Texas war of 
independence, he was taken prisoner by the Mexicans and 
sentenced to be shot. He was a signer of the Dec laration of In- 
dependence of the new Republic, March 2d, 1836, and after the 
battle of San Jacinto, which secured the safety of Texas for a time, 
he returned to Alabama, where he married, in August of the same 
year, and in 1838 again arrived in San Antonio. In Sept., 1842, a 
Mexican force entered San Antonio, and overpowered the few 
Americans who attempted its defence : Mr. Maverick was carried 
to Mexico, and only released in April, 1843, on the intercession of 
the American Minister. He then visited South Carolina to look 
after his property, which he converted into investments in Texas 
lands, and in 1847 returned to San Antonio, where he resided 
until his death, Sept. 2d, 1870. In 1860 he advocated secession 
from the Union, but after 1861 took no part in public affairs. He 
had frequently served in both Houses of the State Legislature. 

1826. 

Eld AD Barber, son of Eldad and Lois (Bissell) Barber, was 
born in East Windsor, Conn , Sept. 24th, 1801 ; and died in 
Florence, O., March 27th, 1871, in the 70th year of his age. 

He completed his theological course in Yale College in the 
summer of 1829, having spent the winter of 1828-9, under the 
direction of the American Sunday School Union, in central and 
southern Ohio. He was ordained as a missionary under appoint- 
ment of the American Home Missionary Society, Aug. 26th, by the 
Litchfield South Association, at Woodbury, Conn., and for the 
next two years preached in the Presbyterian Church in Marion, O. 
From Apr., 1832, to Oct., 1835, he had charge of the Huron Insti- 
tute in Milan, O., supplying also neighboring churches. From 
Milan he removed to Florence, O., and was pastor of the Presby- 
terian Church in that place from 1837 until his death. 

In Sept., 1831, he married Mary, daughter of Dr. Ebenezer 
Ballentine (Y. C. 1777), of Marion, O., who died Sept. 15th, 1832, 
leaving one son now living. In Apr., 1834, he married Mrs. 
Hannah E. Crosby, formerly Miss Osborn, of East Windsor, Conn. , 
who survives him : by this marriage he had two daughters, one of 
whom is still living. 

Andrew Thompson, was the only child of William Thompson, 
and was born in Orange County, N. Y., Feb. 22d, 1806. He 
entered College in Sophomore year from Crawford, Orange County. 



20 

After graduation he studied law, first with the late James Smith, 
of N. Y. City, and afterwards with the late Willard Crafts in 
Oneida County, wh^re he married. Upon being admitted to the 
bar, he began practicing law in Ithaca, whence he removed to 
Oneida County. In 1838 he removed to N. Y. City, where he con- 
tinued the practice of his profession until his death, which occurred 
March 10th, 1871, at the age of 65. 

He had four children, three of whom, with his widow, now sur- 
vive him, the only son following his father's profession. 

Philip Stephen Van Rensselaer, son of Gen. Stephen and 
Cornelia (Patterson) Van Rensselaer (Harv. Coll. 1782), of Al- 
bany, died in N. Y. City, very suddenly, June Ist, 1871, in his 
65th year. 

1828. 

William Carter, son of Ebenezer and Rhoda Carter, was born 
in New Canaan, Conn., Dec. 31st, 1803. 

From 1830 to 1833, he was a Tutor in this College, and at the 
same time a member of the Theological Seminary. In 1833, as one 
of the " Illinois Association " formed in this Seminary, he went to' 
Illinois, where the rest of his life was spent. He first had charge 
of the Congregational Church in Jacksonville, being ordained by 
the Schuyler Presbytery in Oct., 1834. In Oct., 1838, he removed 
to Pittsfield, where he founded and ministered to the Congrega- 
tional Church until March, 1866. His residence continued in 
Pittsfield until his sudden death, of heart disease, Febr. 2d, 1871, 

He was for many years a trustee of Illinois College, one of the 
early directors of the Chicago Theological Seminary, and a Cor- 
porate Member of the American Board of Commissioners for 
Foreign Missions. 

He married, in Sept., 1833, Miss Elizabeth Bell, of Darien, Conn, 
They had no children. 

1829. 

John Lathrop, son of Hon. Samuel Lathrop, M. C. (Y. C. 1792) 
and Mary (Mc Crackan) Lathrop, born in West Springfield, Mass., 
March 6th, 1809, and died in Buffalo, N. Y., June 16th, 1870. 

He was fitted for College at the Westfield, Mass., Academy, 
then under the care of the Rev. S. M. Emerson. 

After graduation he studied law in his father's office, for a year 
or more, but not relishing the confined life of a student, he chose 



21 

the profession of a civil Engineer. One of his earliest engage- 
ments was in the construction of the Chenango (N. Y.) Canal, 
which occupied him from 1833 to 183Y. Soon after he was ap- 
pointed Resident Engineer on a section of the Erie Canal, with his 
headquarters at Jordan, N. Y. He remained in this position till 
June, 1843, when he took charge of the laying out of a double 
track on the N. Y. Central Railroad between Syracuse and Utica, 
residing in Syracuse. In 1846 he was appointed Chief Engineer 
of the Syracuse and Oswego Railroad, and held the place till the 
completion of the work, about three years later. From July, 
1849, to 1862, he resided in Buffalo, N. Y., as Division Engineer 
upon the Erie Enlargement ; while he also superintended the con- 
struction of an extensive breakwater and other important improve- 
ments in the harbor of Buffalo. After a brief employment, till Dec. 
1853, on the construction of a portion of the Chicago, Alton, and 
St. Louis Railroad, he returned to his former position, which he 
again resigned in the summer of 1855, to assume the charge of the 
Chesapeake and Albemarle Canal. This important work was near 
completion when interrupted by the breaking out of the civil war. 
During the summer of 1862 he accepted a position on the Erie 
and Pittsburgh Railroad, which occupied him for a year, and was 
his last professional work, owing to his impaired health. 

Mr. Lathrop married, in 1838, Elizabeth Miller, of Oxford, N. Y., 
and had a son and daughter. His widow and daughter survive 
him. 

1831. 

William Ward Cutler, son of Hon. Pliny Cutler, was born 
in Boston, May 21st, 1812. His mother was Phebe, daughter of 
Rev. Ephraim and Mary (Colman) Ward, of West Brookfield, 
Mass. 

His preparation for College was made at the Boston Latin 
School and at the Mt. Pleasant institution in Amherst. 

After graduation he studied medicine in the Medical School of 
Harvard University, receiving his diploma in 1838, and then 
spent a year in further study in Paris. After his return from 
Europe he practiced for a while in Boston, but not finding it con- 
genial relinquished his profession, and removed to South Reading, 
Mass., where he resided until the death of his first wife in 1850. 
He subsequently resided in N'orthampton, Mass., New London, 
Conn., North Andover, Mass., and finally in Norwich Town, Conn., 
where he died, Aug. 12th, 1870. 



22 

He was married three times: 1st, Febr. 4th, 1839, to Charlotte, 
daughter of Phineas Upham, of Boston; 2d, May 4th, 1854, to 
Mary, daughter of Maj. Thomas W. Williams, of New London ; 
and 3d, Sept. 5th, 1865, to Isabel, daughter of Hon. Allen A. Hall, 
of Nashville, Tenn., who survives him. He has left two children, 
a son by his second, and a daughter by his last marriage. 

1832. 

Collins Stone, the second son of Timothy and Eunice (Parma- 
lee) Stone, of Guilford, Conn., was born in that town, 3ept. 6th, 
1812. 

In 1833 he became a teacher in the American Asylum for the 
Deaf and Dumb, at Hartford, Conn., and continued in that relation 
until Oct., 1852, when he became Principal of the Ohio State 
Asylum at Columbus. In 1863 he was recalled to the American 
Asylum, as Principal, and .held that office at the time of his death. 
He was killed, almost instantly, Dec. 23d, 1870, in attempting to 
drive across the railroad track in Hartford, in front of an approach- 
ing train. 

Mr. Stone studied theology with the Rev. Dr. Hawes of Hart- 
ford, and was ordained in Ohio as an evangelist, April 5th, 1853. 
At the time of his death he was a deacon in the Center Church in 
Hartford. 

Mr. Stone left a widow, two sons, and three daughters: the 
elder son graduated at this College in 1862, and has succeeded his 
father in the charge of the American Asylum. 

James Lockwood Wright, son of Joseph Wright (Y. C. 1804) 
and Sarah (Lockwood) Wright, born May 12, 1810, in Glasten- 
bury. Conn., died in Haddam, Conn., Jan. 18th, 1871, aged 60. 

He spent the three years succeeding graduation in the Yale 
Theol. Seminary, and then returned home. He preached occasion- 
ally, and was ordained to the work of the ministry, June 4th, 1839. 
He spent two or three years in Fair Haven, Conn., as a teacher, 
and then taught in his native town for a somewhat longer time. 
In 1848 he began to serve the Congregational Church in Burling- 
ton, Conn., as a stated supply, and was installed pastor there, 
March 7th, 1849. He laid down this charge at the close of the 
year 1854, and was installed over the First Congregational Church 
in Haddam, Conn., in May, 1855, where he continued till his death. 

He married Lucy Ann North, of Middletown, Conn., May 30th, 
1838, and had four children. 



23 

1834. 

Thomas Wickes, the second son of VanWyck and Eliza (Herri- 
man) Wiekes, was born in Jamaica, L. I, Oct. 31st, 1814. 

He entered Princeton Theol. Seminary in Nov., 1834, and re- 
mained there until Aug., 1836. He spent the succeeding year in 
the Theol. Department of this College, and was licensed to preach, 
in 1837, by the New Haven West Association. His first engage- 
ment was as a supply in the First Presbyterian Church of Troy, 
N. Y., during a fourteen months' absence of the pastor, Dr. Beman, 
in Europe. 

At the close of this service he was called in the spring of 1 840 
to the pastoral charge of the First Congregational Church in 
Marietta, O., and was installed, July 28th. He continued in this 
charge during nearly the whole of his ministerial life, resigning in 
the spring of 1 869. He was then installed over the Congregational 
Church in Jamestown, N. Y., where he remained one year, resign- 
ing in Aug., 1870. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Wabash 
College in 1864. 

He was married to Mary A., daughter of Rev. Dr. Alexander 
Gunn, of N. Y., Nov. 7th, 1838. She died in 1848. He married, 
secondly, Lydia Frances, daughter of Wm. Rockwell, of N. Y., 
Aug. 28th, 1849, who survives him. He left at his death one son 
and two daughters by his first, and one son and two daughters by 
his second marriage. 

Dr. Wickes died, of cancer of the stomach, Nov. 10th, 1870, in 
Orange, N. J., while visiting at the house of his elder brother. 

1835. 

George Wilson McPhail, President of Davidson College, 
Mecklenburg County, N. C, died there June 28th, 1871. 

He came to College from Norfolk, Va. 

He was a Presbyterian clergyman, and received the degree of 
D.D. from Jefferson College, Pa., in 1857. 

During the last five years, of his life he was President of David- 
son College, and had formerly been President of Lafayette College, 
in Easton, Pa., resigning in 1863. 

1837. 
Walter Clarke, son of Warner B. and Abigail A. Clarke, was 
born in Middletown, Conn., April 5th, 1812, and entered College in 
1834, from Farmington, where his father then resided. 



24 

During the year succeeding graduation he taught in the Water- 
bury (Conn.) Academy, at the same time reading law. In 1839 he 
taught in Mobile. He afterwards studied theology (for one term 
in the Yale Theol. Seminary), and in May, 1841, was ordained pas- 
tor of the First Congregational Church in Canterbury, Conn. From 
this church he was called to the South Church in Hartford, over 
which he was settled from June 4th, 1845 to Jan., 1859. He was 
for the next two years pastor of the Mercer street Presbyterian 
Church in N. Y. City, and for the remainder of his life was pastor 
of the First Presbyterian Church in Buffalo, N. Y., where he died, 
greatly loved and respected, at the age of 59, May 23d, 1871. 

He married, Aug. 26th, 1839, Mary A. Clark, daughter of Cyrus 
Clark, of Waterbury. She died in Hartford, Febr. 4th, 1849. He 
married, secondly, in 1850, Elizabeth G., daughter of Deacon Seth 
Terry, of Hartford, who survives him. He leaves one son, Rev. 
Samuel T. Clitrke, who graduated at Hamilton College in 1862, and 
an adopted daughter. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Williams Col- 
lege in 1 853. 

Oliver Wolcott Mather, son of Ellsworth and Laura (Wol- 
cott) Mather, was born in Windsor, Conn., Jan. 23d, 1815, and 
died, in the room in which he was born, Nov. 7th, 1870. 

He taught in South Carolina after graduation ; studied theolo- 
gy in the Yale Theological Seminary (1839-41) ; and was after- 
wards a settled minister (N. S. Presb., in Ohio, and from 1850 to 
1860 in Michigan. 

During his later years he was invalid, and resided in Windsor. 

He leaves a widow (his second wife), and one daughter. 

1839. 

Thomas Day, fifth son of Koble and Elizabeth (Jones) Day, 
was bom June 18, 1816, at New Preston, Litchfield county. Conn. 
He was a grandson of Rev. Jeremiah Day of the class of 1756, 
and nephew of the late President Day. His brothers, Henry N. 
and Charles Day, graduated, the former in 1828, the latter in 1840. 

After graduating he pursued his studies in the Yale Law School 
and then removed to Cleveland, Ohio, where he entered upon the 
practice of his profession. He remained in that city till April, 
1864, when in the hope of benefit to his health he removed to New 
York city. In October, 1869, he went to Nevada on professional 
business where he continued till his death, which occurred very 



25 

suddenly just before his intended return home. He died of pneu- 
monia, at Hamilton, Nevada, October 17th, 1870. He never 
married. 

1840. 

William Chauvenet, LL.D., ex-Chancellor of Washington Uni- 
versity, St. Louis, died in St. Paul, Minnesota, Dec. 13th, 1870, at 
a little more than fifty years of age. He had long been in poor 
health, and on this account resigned his position in the University 
in 1869. After traveling in the South without the benefit hoped 
for, he returned to St. Louis in June, and in the autumn went to 
St. Paul to try that climate ; his disease terminated in paralysis of 
the cerebellum. 

Chancellor Chauvenet was born in Milford, Pa., and removed at 
at early age with his parents to Philadelphia. His father, Wm. 
M. Chauvenet, was a grocer, and wished his son to succeed him in 
business : he was with difficulty persuaded by his son's teacher to 
develop the boy's decided mathematical turn by a college course. 

Immediately after graduation he was employed in taking me- 
teorological observations at the Girard College Observatory, but 
accepted in 1841 the place of instructor in mathematics at the 
U. S. Naval Asylum in Philadelphia. Soon after, when it was pro- 
posed to found a Naval Academy at Annapolis, the measure found 
in him a strong advocate, and when the institution was established 
in 1845, he was made one of the Board of Directors, Professor of 
Astronomy and Mathematics, and Director of the Observatory. 
For the next 14 years he was the chief agent in building up the 
Academy. In 1859 he accepted the professorship of astronomy 
and mathematics in Washington University, St. Louis. In 1862, 
on the death of his classmate, Chanoellor Hoyt, the office of Chan- 
cellor of the University was also given him. 

Professor Chauvenet published several works of great merit, 
viz.: — a text-book, entitled "Binomial Theorem and Logarithms" 
(Philad., 1843, 8vo.), "A Treatise on Plane and Spherical Trigo- 
nometry" (Philad., 1850, 8vo.), a "Manual of Spherical and Prac- 
tical Astronomy" (Philad., 1863, 2 vols., 8vo.), and an Elementary 
Geometry (Philad., 1870, 8vo.) 

He married, Dec. 30th, 1841, Miss Catharine Hemple, of Phila- 
delphia, who survives him with five of their six children. 

George Richards, the fifth son and eighth child of Peter and 
Ann Channing (Huntington) Richards, was born in New London, 
Conn., Nov. 2d, 1816. 



26 

He taught school for a short time, and in 1842 entered Andover 
Theological Seminary. A year later he removed to the Yale 
Theological Seminary, and 1844 became a Tutor in this College. 

He was ordained, Oct. 8th, 1 845, as associate pastor of the Cen 
tral (Congregational) Church, in Boston, where he remained until 
1859, having become sole pastor in 1851. After a visit to Europe, he 
took charge of the Congregational Church in Litchfield, Conn., in 
Dec, 1860. Thence he removed at the close of the year 1865 to 
Bridgeport, Conn., where he was installed over the First Con- 
gregational Church, Jan. 3d, 1866. He was dismissed from this 
pastorate, Aug., 1870. For a year or two previous, Mr. Richards 
had been afflicted with a nervous disease, which was accompanied 
with partial loss of sight and impaired reason, and which finally 
resulted in his decease, at Bridgeport, Oct. 20th, 1870. 

In July, 1868, Mr. Richards was chosen a member of the Cor- 
poration of Yale College. 

He married, in 1846, Miss Anna M. Woodruff, of Philadelphia. 

She is still living with five children : of whom the eldest son is 
now a member of the Junior Class in this College. 

1841. 

Gilbert Dean, son of Gilbert and Abigail Rogers Dean, was 
bora in Pleasant Valley, Dutchess Co., N. Y., 14 Aug., 1819, and 
died of consumption at his summer-residence in Poughkeepsie, N. 
Y., 12 Oct., 1870. 

After his graduation he studied law, and was admitted to the 
bar in Litchfield Co., Conn., and afterwards (May, 1844) in N. Y. 

From 1844 to 1855 he was a lawyer in Poughkeepsie, and for the 
rest of his active life in N. Y. City. He was chosen Representa- 
tive in Congress in Nov., 1850, and again in 1862; in June, 1854, 
he resigned his seat, to accept the office of Justice of the Supreme 
Court of N. Y. State, for the Second Judicial District, and served 
in this office until Jan., 1856, being one of the Judges of the Court 
of Appeals for the last year. In 1862, he was chosen Member of 
the Assembly, and when the session began was the Democratic 
candidate for Speaker. 

Judge Dean married, Sept. 28, 1841, Miss Amelia Smith, of 
Sharon, Conn. She died Sept. 6th, 1850, leaving one son and one 
daughter. He married, July 11th, 1855, Mary, daughter of the late 
Alvan Stewart, Esq., of N. Y., who survives him with her three 
sons. 



27 



1842. 



John Henry Adam was born Dec. 29th, 1822, and entered Col- 
lege in 1839 from Salisbury, Conn. 

He studied law in Litchfield, Conn., until admitted to the bar, 
in the spring of 1844, when he began practice in Bridgeport, 
Conn., with Hon. Henry Dutton. In Jan., 1846, he removed to 
N. Y. City ; but was soon interrupted in the practice of his pro- 
fession by ill health. After a short stay at his father's house, in Sal- 
isbury, he removed to Pottsville, Pa., in the autumn of 1847. He 
subsequently removed to Oyster Bay, L. I., where he was residing 
at the time of his death, Aug. 24th, 1870. 

He was married, Nov. 8th, 1848, to Miss Sarah Sampson, of N. 
Y. City, who now survives him. 

Isaac Ellmaker Hiestek, son of Hon. William Heister, was born 
in New Holland, Lancaster County, Pa., May 29th, 1824. 

He commenced the study of law in 1843 in Lancaster, Pa., was 
admitted to the bar in 1845, and practiced law until his death in 
the same place. He held the office of Deputy Attorney General 
for the county from 1848 to 1850, and was a member of the House 
of Representatives in the 33d Congress, from 1853 to 1855. He 
was elected as a Whig, but not being in accord with his party on 
the Kansas and Nebraska Bill, was defeated at the election in 
1854, as also in 1856 when he was the candidate of the Democratic 
party. 

He died in Lancaster, Febr. 6th, 3 871, in his 47th year. He was 
unmarried. 



Henry Kirke White Welch, the oldest child of Dr. Archi- 
bald and Cynthia (Hyde) Welch, was born in Mansfield, Conn., 
Jan. 1st., 1821. 

He taught in Brooklyn, Conn., from Oct., 1842, to March, 1843, 
when an affection of the throat compelled him to desist. After a 
few months passed in Wethersfield, Conn., where his father then 
resided, he went to Georgia for his health. In the autumn of 1 844 
he returned, but finding his throat still sensitive, went South agam, 
and spent the next two years teaching in Montgomery, Ala., at the 
same time studying law. During the winter of 1 846-7 he read law in 
Brooklyn, Conn., with his uncle, Jonathan A. Welch (Y. C. 1813). 
He afterwards spent two years in the Law Department of this col- 
lege, and received the degree of LL. B. He was admitted to the 



28 

bar in March, 1850, and in June opened an office in Hartford, 
Conn., where he resided, engaged in the practice of his profession, 
until his death. He was a member of the State Senate in 1862 and 
of the House of Representatives in 1864 and 1865. 

Mr. Welch married, March 24th, 1852, Miss Frances Louisa, 
youngest daughter of Professor C. A. Goodrich, of Yale College. 
His wife died Dec. 2d, 1855; and he married three years later, 
Miss Susan L. Goodwin, of Hartford, who survives him with four 
sons and a daughter. The sudden death of his youngest boy, Nov. 
15th, is believed to have brought on the illness which caused his 
own death, Nov. 25th, 1870, at the age of 49. 

1845. 

William Burr Bibbins, second and youngest son of Elijah 
Bibbins, was born in Fairfield, Conn., Aug. 8th, 1823. His mother 
was Eunice Burr, daughter of the Rev. Andrew Eliot, pastor of 
the Congregational church in Fairfield. 

For a few months after graduation he taught in the Academy in 
Southport, a part of his native town, and spent the next three 
years in the study of medicine in the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, N. Y. city, where he graduated in 1849. 

He served as Assistant Physician in BeUevue Hospital for one 
year to May, 1850, and afterwards as Assistant Physician in the 
Nursery Hospital on Randall's Island till April, 1852. He then 
began the regular practice of his profession in N. Y. city. While 
thus engaged he was, from Jan., 1852, to June, 1863, Visiting Phy- 
sician to the Demilt Dispensary, and afterwards Attending Physi- 
cian at the same institution until 1856. He was also from Jan., 
1868, till his death, the Secretary of the Third Avenue Savings 
Bank, a responsible position of great labor, gratuitously bestowed. 
He died in N. Y. city, Jan. 16th, 1871, of typhoid fever, contracted 
in the discharge of his professional duties. 

Dr. Bibbins was never married. 

His will, made in 1858, provides that after the death of his 
brother, the bulk of his property, including a Life Insurance Policy 
for $10,000, shall go to Yale College. 

Ward Emigh, son of George P. and Eliza (Prindle) Emigh, was 
bom in Great Barrington, Mass., March ]4th, 1822, and died in 
Fishkill, N. Y., Febr. 16th, 1869. 

He studied law with Robert Barnard, Esq., of Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., until his admission to the bar in 1847. He then began the 



29 

practice of his profession in Union Vale, Dutchess county, N. Y., 
but in 1851 was obliged by the state of his health to seek recrea- 
tion in travel. In 1852 he settled in Fishkill, where he remained 
until his death, never in good health, and for the last three years 
of his life not able to attend to his profession. 

Mr. Emigh married, March 14th, 1847, in Fishkill Landing, Helen 
A. Champlin, who still remains his widow. Two of his five chil- 
dren died before him, and one has died since. 

1850. 

Oswald Langdon Woodford was the son of Zerah and 
Minerva (Potter) Woodford, of West Avon, Conn., where he w^as 
born Oct. 31st, 1827, and where he died, of typhoid fever, Oct. 
21st, 1870. 

He was for two years a teacher in the Cherokee Male Seminary, 
and then entered the Andover Theological Seminaryj- where he 
remained till Febr., 1855, when he returned to the Cherokees, and 
was principal of the Male Seminary until Aug., 1856. He then 
came to New Haven, to attend Theological lectures, and in May, 
1857, went to Kansas as a Home Missionary. He settled in Grass- 
hopper Falls, organizing a Congregational Church there, April 
19th, 1858, but in Aug., 1859, he was compelled by the failure of 
his health to give up his chosen profession and return to his native 
town. He spent his remaining years with his parents, engaged in 
farming. In 1865 he was a member of the State House of Repre- 
sentatives. 

He was married, first, to Pauline Avery, of Conway, Mass., Nov. 
18th, 1856. She died in Kansas, Febr. 26th, 1858. He married, 
secondly. May 18th, 1859, Esther Butler, of Van Buren, Ark. 
She survives him, with a daughter by the first marriage, and a 
son and two daughters by the second marriage. 

1851. 

Henry Dorrance Wells died of disease of the heart in Charles- 
ton, S. C, May 30th, 1870, aged 41 years. He was the son of 
Joseph T. and Mary (Dorrance) Wells, and was born in Charles- 
ton, Aug. 30th, 1829. He studied law at the Yale Law School 
immediately after graduation, but never practiced the profession. 

He was employed in mercantile business at Charleston until his 
death. 



30 

1863. 

Henry Roswell Bradley died in Southington, Conn., 22 July, 
1870, aged 38. He was the youngest son of Roswell and Julia 
(Newell) Bradley, and was born in Southington, 7 May, 1832. 

After graduating, he studied law, first in the Law School at 
New Haven, and then with Hon. W. W. Eaton of Hartford. From 
1855 until his death, he practiced law in his native town. Though 
laboring under great embarrassment from physical defects, he 
became a prominent man in the town, holding successively the 
ofiices of Town Clerk, Treasurer, Registrar, and Judge of Probate. 
He twice represented the town in the State Legislature, and was a 
member of the Senate in 1863. 

Mr. Bradley was never married. 

Thomas Prather Nicholas died in Louisville, Ky., Jan. 27th, 
1870, age(>35. 

He entered College from Louisville, in the first term of Junior 
year. His residence continued at Louisville until his death. Dur- 
ing the civil war he was Colonel of the 2d Kentucky Cavalry, in 
the Union Army. 

1856. 

George Talcott was born in West Hartford, Conn., in 1833, 
and died at Niagara Falls, May 29th, 1871. 

He was for a few months after graduation in Commission busi- 
ness with his brother in N. Y. City. He then studied law, and 
practiced his profession in N. Y. until Jan., 1869, when he joined 
his brother in the wholesale drug business in Hartford, Conn. He 
was thus engaged until his death. He married Miss Laura W. 
Cone, of Hartford, in 1862. She died in 1863, and Mr. Talcott 
was married a second time. May 16th, 1871, to Miss Eleanor S., 
daughter of Wm. S. Hurd, of Hartford. He died of pneumonia 
while on his bridal tour. 

1856. 

Francis Fellowes, Jr., was born in Hartford, Conn., May 8th, 
1830, and died in the same city, Febr. 18th, 1871, in his 41st year. 

He studied law in his father's office until his admission to the 
bar, 26 March, 1859. Soon after, he formed a partnership with 
his father, which continued till his own death. He served as a 
private in the Hartford Rifles, 1st Regiment Conn. Vols., for 
three months in the summer of 1861. 



31 

He married, 23 Dec, 1862, Miss Annie T. Clarke, daughter of 
Alexander Clarke, Esq., of N. Y. city. 

1858. 

Hexry Albert Wells, son of Albert and Emma (Hassert) 
Wells, was born in Sing Sing, N. Y., May 23d, 1838 ; and died in 
Peekskill, N. Y., May 27th, 1871, of disease of the heart, after con- 
finement to his room for three weeks. 

He studied law in Peekskill with his uncle, Edward Wells, and 
was admitted to the bar, in May, 1862. From that time he prac- 
ticed law in N. Y. City until July, 1865, when he temporarily left 
his profession, to engage in the construction of some Oil Works, 
in Brooklyn. He was engaged in this and other business enter- 
prises in New York City until his death. 

1859. 

Benjamin Spencer Catlin, eldest son of Benjamin H. Catlin, 
M.D., and Amelia D. (Spencer) Catlin, was born in Haddam, 
Conn., Sept. 14th, 1837. In 1842 his parents removed to Meriden, 
Conn., where they still reside. 

After leaving College he studied medicine, and graduated from 
the Medical Department of this College in July, 1862. He was 
soon after appointed Assistant Surgeon of the 2d N. Y. Infantry, 
and joined his regiment on the banks of York River. He was for 
some time on duty in the hospitals in Washington, and was with 
his regiment at the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. 
His regiment being mustered out of service, he was appointed in 
the autumn of 1863 Surgeon of the 21st (Griswold) N. Y. 
Cavalry: and his Colonel being made Brigadier General, Dr. 
Catlin was placed on his staff and became Surgeon in Chief of the 
Brigade. At the close of the war the regiment was ordered to 
the West, and his headquarters were at Denver. In Oct., 1865, 
he was mustered out of service, and returned to his father's resi- 
dence. In the following winter he attended lectures in two of the 
Medical Colleges of N. Y. City, and in June, 1866, opened an 
office in Troy, N. Y., where he remained till Oct., 1870, when he 
returned home, prostrated by neuralgia. He so far recovered as 
to leave in January on a visit to his brother, residing in Barton 
County, Missouri ; but in twelve days after his arrival he became 
delirious with marked symptoms of organic disease of the brain, 
and his death occurred February 15th. 

He was brevetted by Gov. Hoffman, March 4th, 1870, Colonel 
for faithful and meritorious service during the war. 



82 

1862. 

George Lee Woodhull, son of Richard and Fanny (Greene) 
Woodhull, was born, Oct. 3d, 1832, at Ronkonkoma, L. I., N. Y., 
being the seventh of a family of eleven children. One of his 
brothers graduated at this College in the class of 1850. 

He studied theology for three years in the Theol. Department of 
Yale College. While preaching for a few months as a Home Mis- 
sionary in Hartland, Conn., he became interested in the new open- 
ing for missionary labor in western Iowa, and was stationed by 
the American Home Missionary Society in May, 1866, at Onawa 
City, where he was ordained, July 18th, 1866. Besides doing the 
ordinary work of a pastor, he superintended the building of a church 
edifice (the first in that county), performing much of the work with 
his own hands. Excessive care and labor brought on a fever, and 
after an illness of four weeks, he died, Oct. 1st, 1870, among his 
people. 

He was married, Aug. 28th, 1867, to Miss Eleanor Bristol, of 
New Preston, Conn., who survives him, without children. 

1863. 

Edward Gould Bishop, third son of George G. and Julia (Tay- 
lor) Bishop, was born in Norwalk, Conn., Sept. 14th, 1838. 

He was prepared for College at Phillips Academy, Andover^ 



In Sept., 1863, he entered the U. S. Navy, as paymaster, and 
served in the west Gulf Squadron, on the steamer Arkansas, until 
he resigned in Nov., 1865. He then entered the Law department 
of Harvard University, where he graduated in June, 1867. In the 
autumn of 1867, he commenced the practice of law in N. Y. City, 
where he continued until May 16th, 1870, when he returned to his 
father's house, hoping to recover from a severe hemorrhage of the 
lungs. A removal to St. Paul, Minn., was proposed, as afibrding 
the only hope of relief: but after a few weeks there he found him- 
self rapidly sinking, and returned, reaching home but ten days 
before his death,which occurred on the evening of Aug. 28th, 1870. 

Wilbur Ives, son of Henry and Eliza Ives, was born in Hamden, 
Conn., Jan. 3d, 1843. 

In Oct., 1863, he entered the U. S. Navy, as Acting Assistant 
Paymaster, and remained in the service until Jan., 1866. He then 
commenced at once the study of medicine in the Medical Depart 



33 

ment of this College; but his failing health obliged him in the 
spring of 186 Y to relinquish his studies. In May, 1868, he sailed 
for Europe in hopes of recovery, but his disease — consumption — 
was too deeply seated, and he returned only to die at his home in 
New Haven, Dec. 27th, 1870, aged 28 years. He was unmarried. 

1864. 

Charles Edward Booth, son of Charles H. Booth, was born in 
New York City, March 27th, 1843. 

He left College early in Senior year, to enter into business as a 
commission merchant in New York. In 1866 he received from the 
corporation the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and was enrolled with 
his class. He continued in business, as above, until the time of his 
death. He died at his home in New York, after a few hours' ill- 
ness, Sept. 18th, 1870. 

Edward Taylor Mather, only son of Roland Mather, of Hart- 
ford, Conn., was born in Hartford, Aug. 30th, 1841. 

He pursued the study of the law after graduation, but finally en- 
gaged in business. For more than a year from Sept., 1866, he was 
in the Dry-goods bnsiness with John V. Farwell & Co., of Chicago. 

In the spring of 1868 he formed a partnership for the lumber 
business, in the same city, and was so engaged until the latter part 
of July, 1870, when he started alone in a small row-boat on an ex- 
pedition to Lake Superior. He rowed over Lake Michigan in safety, 
and crossed by rail to Marquette on Lake Superior : thence he 
started on Aug. 17th, with the intention of rowing along the lake 
shore to the straits, and then returning by steamer to Chicago. 

From this time no tidings of him reached his friends, until a 
search was undertaken, and his body found, Oct. 26th, washed 
ashore near the mouth of Fox River, about forty miles east of 
Marquette. He was unmarried. 

William Henry Palmer, son of Alexander Palmer, was born 
in Stonington, Conn., Aug. 17th, 1840. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Medicine from the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, N. Y. City, in 1867, and settled in 
Cleveland, O., where he was a practicing physician at the time of 
his death. He died of consumption, in Hartford, Conn., June 
19th, 1871. He was married in Oct., 1870, to Miss Frances Col- 
lins, of Hartford. 

3 



34 

1867. 

Ernest Robinson, the youngest of eight children of Charles 
Robinson (Y. C. 1821) and Nancy (Mulford) Robinson, was born 
in New Haven, Conn., Dec. 20th, 1845, and died in the same city, 
Nov. 18th, 1870, aged 25. 

He remained in New Haven after graduating, studying medi- 
cine during the first two years, and for the last year engaged in the 
insurance business. His health had been gradually declining, and 
an attack of inflammatory rheumatism in the region of the heart 
and chest caused his death, after an illness of about three weeks. 

1869. ^ 

Frederick Gray Conkling, the eldest son of Col. Fred'k A. 
and Eleanora R. Conkling, of N. Y. City, died in New Orleans, 
Apr. 3d, 1871, in his 22d year. 

He was born in N. Y. City, July 18th, 1849. 

He entered this College at the begining of the Sophomore year, 
from Columbia College, N. Y. After graduation he spent a year 
in Europe, and then entered the Law School of Columbia College, 
of which he was a member at the time of his death. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



1816. 

Richard Proctor Tracy died at his residence in Norwich 
Town, Conn., March 18th, 1871, aged 80. He was son of Dr. 
Philemon and Abigail (Trott) Tracy, and was born March 26th, 
1791, in the same house in which he died. His grandfather. Dr. 
Elisha Tracy (Y. C. 1738), and his father, (M. D. Yale, 1817), were, 
for 40 and 55 years respectively, leading physicians in Norwich. 

The subject of this notice studied medicine with his father, as 
well as in the Medical School, and settled in his native place, where 
he was engaged in practice for nearly sixty years. 

He was unmarried. 

[1821.] 
Hiram Holt was born Jan. 31st, 1798, in that part of the 
ancient town of Windham, Conn., which is now Chaplin. He was 
the son of Neheraiah and Mary (Lamphear) Holt, and the seventh 



35 

of fourteen children. After he became of age he began the study 
of medicine with Dr. Brewster, of Hampton, Conn., aud after- 
wards continued his professional studies with Dr. Thomas Hub- 
bard, of Pomfret, Conn., who became at a later date Professor of 
Surgery in the Medical Department of Yale College. He also 
attended two courses of lectures in this Medical School, but did 
not receive his degree until 1834, honoris causd. He established 
himself on the completion of his studies in Pomfret, Conn., where 
he continued in the active practice of his profession for almost 
fifty years, until his death, Nov. 30th, 1870. 

Dr. Holt was twice married: Feb. 21st, 1828, to Marian, daugh- 
ter of Major John Wilkes Chandler, of Pomfret, who died March 
16th, 1857 ; and March 30th, 1858, to Mrs. Martha Colton, daugh- 
ter of Eleazer Mather, of Brooklyn, Conn., who survives him. He 
left two daughters and one son : the son a graduate of this College 
in the Class of 1866. 

1825. 

Henry Holmes, oldest child of Hon. Uriah Holmes (Y. C. 1784) 
and Esther (Austin) Holmes, of Litchfield, Conn., was born in 
Litchfield, 14 Febr., 1795. His brother Uriah graduated at this 
College in 1816. 

He settled in Durham, Conn., as a physician, where he remained 
until 1833, spending the winter of 1830-31 as a student at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons in N. Y. City. The rest of his 
life was passed in Hartford, Conn., as a practicing physician. He 
was also for many years city coroner. For the last few months of 
his life he was an inmate of the Retreat for the Insane, where he 
died 31 July, 1870, at the age of 75. He was unmarried. 

1833. 

Henry Harmon Rising, son of Nathaniel and Lydia (Spencer) 
Rising, was born in Sufiield, Conn., in 1807, and died in Westboro', 
Mass., Aug. I7th, 1870. 

He studied his profession in his native town with his brother, 
Dr. Aratus Rising, and attended three sessions of the Medical 
Department of this College. In 1834 he commenced practice in 
Westboro', Mass., where he remained until his death. In addition 
to his regular practice, he was the physician at the State Reform 
School, located in Westboro', from its establishment, in 1847. 

The winter and spring of 1869-70 he spent in Florida, for the 
benefit of his health. His sudden death was the result of injuries 



36 

received the same day by being thrown from his carriage as he 
was about to visit a patient. 

Dr. Rising married Joanna F., daughter of Charles Parkman, of 
Westboro', who survives him. He left no children. 

1840. 

Francke Williams died, May 23d, 1871, at Montmorenci Park, 
Aiken, S. C, in the 56th year of his age. He was the youngest 
son of Rev. Samuel P. Williams (Y. C, 1796), of Newburyport, 
Mass., and of Mary (Hanford Wells) Williams, and was born in 
Mansfield, Conn., Aug. 31st, 1815. 

He entered the Freshman class in this College in 1836, but was 
obliged by ill-health to leave before the close of the year. Upon 
the completion of his medical studies he settled in N. Y. City, 
and in 1844 removed to Newburyport, where he continued his 
practice. He was obliged by feeble health to give up his profes- 
sion, and in 1854 he removed to Yonkers, N. Y. In 1856 he went 
to Hartford, Conn., and about four years before his death removed 
to West Haven, Conn. He married Caroline H., daughter of Hon. 
Wm. Bartlet, of Newburyport, and had 7 children. One son is a 
graduate of this College in the Class of 1869. 

1844. 

John Freme Wells, second son and fourth child of James H, 
and Anne (Watkinson) Wells (both natives of England), was born 
in Hartford, Conn., Oct. 11th, 1810. 

He studied medicine with Dr. Wm. Pierson, of Windsor, Conn, 
previous to entering this medical school. 

Soon after graduating he succeeded to the practice of Dr. Hub- 
bard of Bloomfield, Conn., and remained there until 1852, when he 
removed to Hartford, where he continued in the uninterrupted 
practice of his profession until his death, in Hartford, May 4th, 
1871, of rheumatism of the heart, after three days' illness. 

He married, Apr. 30th, 1834, Rebecca Colt, daughter of the late 
Elisha Colt, of Hartford, by whom he had five children, four sons 
and one daughter, who with their mother survive him. 

1846. 

JuDSON Candee was born in Oxford, Conn., in 1821. He 
taught school for several years near his home and in New Jersey, 
and in 1843 began the study of medicine in New Haven. 



37 

He settled in Pompey Center, Onondaga Co., N. Y,, in the spring 
of 1846, and remained there, in successful practice and greatly re- 
spected, until his sudden death, by being thrown from his carriage? 
11 July, 1870. 

He was married, in 1851, to Miss Hale, of Oran, N. Y., who sur- 
vives him, with two children. 

1863. 

Frederic Starr Treadway, died at New Haven, Conn., June 
27, 1870, aged 36 years. 

He was the son of George and Minerva (Merwin) Treadway, 
and was born in Norwalk, Conn., Aug. 10, 1833. 

He entered the three months' service in 1861, as a private in 
Company C, 2d Regiment Conn. Militia, under Col. Terry ; but 
was at once detailed as hospital steward and served thus until 
mustered out. He then began the study of medicine, but before 
graduating, passed an examination and entered the nine months' 
service as Assistant Surgeon of the 27th Regiment. He returned 
to graduate with his class, and immediately thereafter was appoint- 
ed Assistant Surgeon in the 75th Regiment N. Y. Volunteers. At 
the close of the war, he married and settled in Williamsport, Pa., 
where he soon secured a large practice. While testifying in court, 
he was seized with apoplexy, from which he rallied, only to be 
stricken down by a second attack. From this he recovered suffi- 
ciently to permit his being brought to New Haven, where he had a 
third attack which proved fatal. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 



1848. 

George Charles Wilcox Hammond was born in Bolton, Conn., 
Oct. 3d, 1824, and removed to Ohio when nine years of age. He 
graduated at Western Reserve College in 1846, and after leaving 
New Haven, practiced law for a short time in Cleveland, O. He 
then went into the drug business in Cleveland, with Mr. E. F. Gay- 
lord, whose daughter he had married. About 1863 he removed to 
Chicago, as General Freight Agent of the Alton and St, Louis 
R. R., and was so occupied until the early summer of 1870, when 



38 

he was compelled by illness to resign. He died, of congestion of 
the brain, at the residence of his parents, in Richfield, Ohio, Aug. 
12th, 1870. 

1868. 

David Beveridge Brown, died of typhoid fever, in Independ- 
ence, Kansas, Aug. 18th, 18V0, aged 21 years. He was the son of 
David B. and Alice H. Brown, and was born July 6th, 1849. 

After receiving his degree, he returned to his home in Washing- 
ton, D. C, was admitted to the bar and remained there until the 
following Spring, when his health being impaired he started for 
the West. From May to December, 1869, he was in Osage 
Station, Kansas, and then removed to Independence, a new settle- 
ment, in Montgomery County, where the hardships of the first 
few months told on him severely, and exposed him to an attack of 
typhoid fever which in ten days ended his life. He was un- 
married. 



Intelligence of the following death is received, too late for inser- 
tion elsewhere. 

1797. 

Charles Goodrich, the last survivor of his class, died at the 
residence of his son-in-law, in Penn Yan, IST. Y., June 16th, 1871, 
aged 93. 

He was born in Pittsfield, Mass., Apr. 2d, 1778, where his 
father, Hon. Charles Goodrich, died in the 96th year of his age. 

Immediately after graduation, he married Amelia, daughter of 
Isaac Jones, of New Haven, and returning home took charge of 
his father's farm. He was soon after led by a sense of duty to 
commence theological studies, but postponed entrance into the 
ministry until after the death of his aged father. In 1822 he was 
licensed to preach, and in June, 1824, was ordained as an Evan- 
gelist by the Berkshire Association of Congregational ministers. 
He preached in various parts of Massachusetts and New York, 
without being settled; until in 1831 he removed to Havana, N. Y., 
where three of his children were living. For many years he con- 
tinued to preach in destitute neighborhoods, generally under com- 
mission from the Home Missionary Society, until disabled by in- 
firmities. In 1852 he removed to the house of his daughter, in 
Penn Yan, where he resided until his death. 

He was the father of eight children. 



SUMMARY. 



Academical Department. 



Class. Name and Age. 

1794 Ezekiel Bacon, 94, 

1797 Charles Goodrich, 93, 

1808 Noah Coe, 85, 

1809 Garrett G. Brown, 86, 
1809 Samuel D. Ward, 82, 

1809 Gaylord Welles, 82, 

1810 Eleazar T. Fitch, 80, 

1812 William Rumsey, 78, 

1813 George A. Elliot, 78, 

1813 Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, 77, 

1814 Jedidiah Huntington, 76, 

1814 Charles J. Lanman, 75, 

1815 Julius S. Barnes, 78, 
1815 George Cooke, 75, 

1815 Thomas A. Marshall, 77, 

1816 Frederick Gridley, 75, 

1816 George E. Pierce, 76, 

1817 Augustus Alden, 73, 

1817 Robert J. Chesebrough, 73, 

1817 John Grammer, 73, 

1818 Alfred Chester, 73, 
1818 Richard D. Davis, 72, 
1818 Thomas U. Perkins, 72, 

1818 Gouverneur M. Wilkins, 71, 

1819 Asahel Huntington, 72, 
1819 Samuel H. Parsons, 70, 

1819 Joshua P. Pay son, 70, 

1820 John H. Brockway, 69, 

1820 John T. Collis, 69, 

1821 Asa H. King, 72, 

1822 Solomon Lyman, 76, 

1822 Luther Wright, 73, 

1823 George Ashmun, 65, 

1824 Linus Child, 68, 

1825 Samuel A. Maverick, 67, 

1826 Eldad Barber, 69, 
1826 Andrew Thompson, 65, 
1826 Philip S. Van Rensselaer, 64, 

1828 William Carter, 67, 

1829 John Lathrop, 61, 

1831 William W. Cutler, 58, 

1832 Collins Stone, 58, 
1832 James L. Wright, 60, 

1834 Thomas Wickes, 56, 

1835 George W. McPhail, 55, 
1837 Walter Clarke, 59, 
1837 Ohver W. Mather, 55, 

1839 Thomas Day, 54, 

1840 William Chauvenet, 51, 

1840 George Richards, 54, 

1841 Gilbert Dean, 51, 

1842 John H. Adam, 47, 



i'lace and 
Utica, N. Y., 
Penn Yan, N. Y. 
Hartford, Conn., 
Woodbury, Conn., 
Boston, Mass., 
Bristol, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Wilmington, Del., 
Erie, Pa., 
New York City, 
Norwich, Conn., 
New London, Conn., 
Southington, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Louisville, Ky., 
Stratford, Conn., 
Hudson, 0., 
Cave Spring, Ga., 
New York City, 
HaHfax C. H., Va., 
New York City, 
Waterford, N. Y., 
Hartford, Conn., 
New York City, 
Salem, Mass., 
Middletown, Conn., 
Pomfret, Conn,, 
Ellington, Conn., 
Hartford, Conn., 
Old Saybrook, Conn., 
East Hampton, Mass., 
East Hampton, Mass., 
Springfield, Mass., 
Hingham, Mass., 
San Antonio, Tex., 
Florence, 0., 
New York City, 
New York City, 
Pittstield. 111., 
Buffalo, N. Y., 
Norwich, Conn., 
Hartford, Conn., 
Haddam, Conn., 
Orange, N. J., 
Davidson Coll., N. C, 
Buffalo, N. Y., 
Windsor, Conn., 
Hamilton, Nev., 
St. Paul, Minn., 
Bridgeport, Conn., 
Poughkeepsie, N.Y., 
Oyster Bay, (L.I.) N.Y., 



Time of Death. 
Oct. 18, 1870. 
June 16, 1871. 
May 9, 1871. 
Oct. 1, 1870. 
May 28, 1871. 
Sept. 24, 1870 
Jan. 31, 1871. 
April 23, 1871. 
July 23, 1870. 
March 7, 1871. 
Dec. 6, 1870. 
July 25, 1870. 
Nov. 12, 1870. 
May 30, 1871. 
April 17, 1871. 
Feb. 21, 1871. 
May 27, 1871. 
Sept. 14, 1870. 
Dec. 30, 1870. 
March 5, 1871. 
July 2, 1871. 
June 17, 1871. 
Oct. 11, 1870. 
Feb. 7, 1871. 
Sept 5, 1870. 
Feb. 23, 1871. 
April 29, 1871. 
July 29, 1870. 
Aug. 8, 1870. 
Nov. 20, 1870. 
Jan. 17, 1871. 
Sept. 5, 1870. 
July 17, 1870. 
Aug. 26, 1870. 
Sept. 2, 1870. 
March 27, 1871. 
March 10, 1871. 
June 1, 1871. 
Feb. 2. 1871. 
June 16, 1870. 
Aug. 12, 1870. 
Dec. 23, 1870. 
Jan. 18, 1871. 
Nov. 10, 1870. 
June 28, 1871. 
May 23, 1871. 
Nov. 7, 1870. 
Oct. 17, 1870. 
Dec. 13, 1870. 
Oct. 20, 1870. 
Oct. 12, 1870. 
Aug. 24, 1870. 



40 



Class. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Death. 


1842 


Isaac B. Hiester, 46, 


Lancaster, Pa., 


Feb. 6, 1871. 


1842 


Henry K. W. Welch, 49, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Nov. 25, 1870. 


1845 


William B. Bibbins, 47, 


New York City 


Jan. 16, 1871. 


1845 


Ward I'.migh, 47, 


Fishkill, N. y., 


Feb. 16, 1869. 


1850 


Oswald L. Woodford, 43, 


West Avon, Conn., 


Oct. 21, 1870. 


1851 


Henry D. Wells, 41, 


Charleston, S. C, 


May 30, 1870. 


1853 


Henry R. Bradley, 38, 


Southington, Conn., 


July 22, 1870. 


1853 


Thomas P. Nicholas, 35, 


Louisville, Ky., 


Jan. 27, 1870. 


1856 


George Talcott, 38, 


Niagara Falls, N. Y., 


May 29, 1871. 


1856 


Francis Fellowes, 40, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Feb. 18. 1871. 


1858 


Henry A. Wells, 33, 


Peekskill, N. Y., 


May 27, 1871. 


1859 


Benjamin S. Catlin, 33, 


Barton County, Mo., 


Feb. 15, 1871. 


1862 


George L. WoodhuU, 38, 


Onawa, Iowa, 


Oct. 1, 1870. 


1863 


Edward G. Bishop, 32, 


Norwalk, Conn., 


Aug. 28, 1870. 


1863 


Wilbur Ives, 28, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Dec. 27, 1870. 


1864 


Charles E. Booth, 27, 


New York City, 


Sept. 18, 1870. 


1864 


Edward T. Mather, 29, 


Lake Superior, 


August, 1870. 


1864 


William H. Palmer, 30, 


Hartford, Coun., 


June 19, 1871. 


1867 


Ernest Robinson, 25, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Nov. 18, 1870. 


1869 


Frederick G. Oonkling, 21, 


New Orleans, La., 


April 3, 1871. 




Medical Department. 




1816 


Richard P. Tracy, 80, 


Norwich, Conn., 


March 18, 1871 


[1821] Hiram Holt, 12, 


Pomfret, Conn., 


Nov. 30, 1870. 


1825 


Henry Holmes, 76, 


Hartford, Conn, 


July 31, 1870. 


1833 


Henry H. Rising, 63, 


Westborough, Mass., 


Aug. 17, 1870. 


1840 


Francke Williams, 55, 


Aiken, S. C, 


May 23, 1871. 


1844 


John F. Wells, 60, 


Hartford, Conn., 


May 4, 1871. 


1846 


Judson Candee, 48, 


Pompey, N. Y., 


July 11, 1870. 


1863 


Frederick S. Treadway, 36, 


• New Haven, Conn., 


June 27. 1870. 




Law 


Department. 




1848 


George C. W. Hammond, 45. 


Richfield, 0., 


Aug. 12, 1870. 


1868 


David B. Brown, 21, 


Independence, Kansas, Aug. 18, 1870. 



The whole number of deaths reported as occurring during the past year is 82, 
and the average age of the graduates of the Academical Department is nearly 61 
years. 

Of the deceased, from the Academical Department, 19 were Clergymen, 24 
Lawyers, 10 Physicians, 10 in Business, 6 Teachers, and 1 Engineer. 

The deaths are distributed as follows: — in Connecticut, 33; N. Y., 19; Mass., 7; 
Ohio, 3; Ky., Pa., S. C, 2 each; and the remaining 14 in as many diflferent 
States. 

The surviving graduates of the past century are. 
Class of 1796, Timothy Bishop, New Haven, Conn., born Oct. 29, 1777. 
Class of 1800, Rev. Thomas Williams, Providence, R. I., bom Nov., 1779. 




OBITUARY RECORD 

OP 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 



Deceased during the academical year ending in July, 1872, 

including the record of a fe"w who died a short 

time previous, hitherto unreported. 



[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMNI, JULY 10th, 18T2.] 



[No. 2 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 31 of the whole Record.] 







INDEX. 






ClMt. 




Page. 


OlaM. 




Pi»«e. 


1852 


Bannan, Douglass R. 


61 


1864 


Haughee, Thomas 


66 


J826 


Baraes, Josiah 


53 


1823 


Haxall, Robert W. 


52 


1828 


Beardsley, Sheldon 


53 


1816 


Hill, George 


50 


1825 


Belden. Joshua 


53 


1815 


Hmsdale, Charles J. 


48 


1843 m 


Betts, Wm. C. 


67 


1857 


Holmes, John M. 


62 


1811 


Board. Charles H. 


66 


1849 


Hough, Edward C. 


60 


1812 


Boardman, "Wm. W. 


46 


1822 m 


Isham, Oliver K. 


66 


1862 


Boies, Wm. 


61 


1847 


Jessup, Edward 


69 


1824 


Bulkeley, Eliphalet A. 


52 


1831 


Jones, Elisha C. 


56 


1821 


Bulkley, Henry D. 


51 


1855m 


Keese, Hobart 


68 


1861 


Bulkley, Milton 


63 


1824 


Leonard, Frederick B. 


63 


1642 


Buttles, Albert B. 


58 


1813 


Longstreet, Aug. B. 


47 


180t 


Champion, Aristarchos 


43 


1850 


Lyman, Joseph B. 


61 


1641 


Champlin, Louis D. 


57 


1810 


Morse, Samuel F. B. 


44 


1870 


Chapin, Charles H. 


65 


1811 


Morse, Sidney E. 


46 


1838 


Clark, Perkins K. 


56 


1831m 


Peabody, Jeremiah N. 


67 


1848 


Colton, Henry M. 


60 


1804 


Pluramer, George 


43 


1846 


Conyngham, John B. 


59 


18711) 


PoweU, Ferdinand B. 


68 


1870 


Cope, Orlando 


66 


1808 


Robbins, Silas W. 


44 


1812 


Day, Benjamin 


47 


1870 


Robinson, George A. 


66 


1843 


Dean, Philotus 


58 


1820 


Sanford, Peleg P. 


60 


1814 


Dickson, Samuel H. 


48 


1841 


Schott, Guy B. 


58 


1863 


PJramons. Julius 


64 


1863 


Scott, Henry W. 


64 


1858 


Evans, Lemuel R. 


63 


1868 J) 


Stone, Lewis B. 


68 


1828 


Foster, Lemuel 


54 


1820 


Tudor, Wm. W. 


61 


1816 


Garfield, John M. 


49 


1864 


Tyler, James B. 


66 


1820 


Goddard, George C. 


50 


1837 


Whelpley, James D. 


66 


1840 


Gregory, Samuel 


57 


1853 


Whittelsey, Charles H. 


62 


1821 


Griswold, John F. 


62 


1864 


Wilson, Harry 


66 


1831 


Hart, John C. 


54 


1846 m 


Winter, Enoch T. 


67 



OBITUARY RECORD 

or 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the academical year ending July^ 18Y2, includ- 
ing the record of a few who died previously, 
hitherto unreported. 

fPBESENTED AT THE MEETING OP THE AlUMNI, JuLT 10, 1872.] 

[No. 2 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 31 of the whole Record.] 



1804. 

George Plummbr, a native of Glastenbury, Conn., the son of 
Isaac and Abigail E. (Mills) Plummer, was born 7 Dec, 1785. 

He studied law with his uncle, Judge Mills, of New Haven, 
until his admission to the bar in March, 1807. He then settled in 
Glastenbury, and continued in the practice of law, until the death 
of his father, in April, 1812, obliged him to choose between the 
abandonment of the farm which he inherited and his profession. 
He decided on the life of a farmer, and never returned to the law. 
During the summer of 1814 he was in active service in the war 
with Groat Britain. In 1844 and 1861 Mr. Plummer represented 
the 2d District in the State Senate, and during both years was 
ex officio a member of the Corporation of Yale College. He was 
chosen a Deacon of the Congregational Church in Glastenbury, in 
1827, and held that office until his death, which occurred on the 2d 
of June, 1872. 

He married, 7 May, 1807, Anne, eldest daughter of Rev. 
William Lockwood (Y. C. 1774) of Glastenbury. She died 26 
Dec, 1869. Of their three children, two daughters died in early 
married life, and one son (Y. C. 1832) survives. 

1807. 
Aristarchfs Champion, son of Gen. Henry Champion, and 
Abigail (Tinker) Champion, was born in Colchester, Conn., 23 
Oct., 1784. 



i 



44 

He at first studied law in New London, Conn., but soon became 
the manager of his father's interest in the " New Connecticut " 
lands and in lands in Western New York, and in 1826, took up 
his residence in Rochester, where he invested largely in real estate, 
while the place was as yet a mere village. There he spent the rest of 
his life, occupied with the care of his lands, and in labors of local 
and public benevolence. His systematic munificence toward 
religious and philanthropic objects has rarely been equaled in this 
country. He died at his residence, outside the city limits, in the 
township of Gates, 18 Sept., 1871, aged nearly 87. He was un- 
married. 

1808. 

Silas [Webster] Robbixs, son of Jacob and Eunice (Webster) 
Robbins, of Rocky Hill, in Wethersfield, Conn., was born 24 Aug., 
1785. 

Immediately after graduation, he entered the Law School at 
Litchfield, under Judge Reeve, and in 1811 emigrated to Kentucky 
and began the practice of his profession in Winchester. In the 
following year he was married, in Litchfield, to Caroline, youngest 
daughter of the late Uriah Tracy (Y. C. 1778), at the time of his 
death (in 1807) U. S. Senator from Conn. 

Mr. Robbins soon became prominent in his profession, and was 
appointed Judge of the Supreme Court of his adopted State ; as 
such he was conspicuous as an " Old Court Judge " in the severe 
political struggle in Kentucky, in which the judges so named 
were finally successful. 

Having lost his wife in 1837, Judge Robbins removed in 1838 
to Springfield, 111., where he resumed the practice of law. In 1858 
he retired from active life to his farm in the township of Spring- 
field, about four miles from the city, where he died, 19 June, 1871, 
aged nearly 86. 

He was married twice after the death of his first wife, and left 
a widow. His only surviving child is a daughter. 

1810. 

Samuel Finlet Breese Morse, who died of paralysis of the 
brain at his residence in N. Y. city, Apr. 2, 1872, was the eldest 
son of Rev. Jedediah Morse, D.D. (Y. C. 1783) and Elizabeth 
Ann (Breese) Morse. He was born in Charlestown, Mass., Apr. 
27, 1791. 

Having developed a decided talent for painting, he went to 
England in 1811 with Washington Allston, to study under his 



45 

tuition and that of Benjamin West. By Allston's advice lie also 
devoted himself to sculpture, and in 1813 received the gold medal 
of the Adelphi Society of Arts for an original model of a Dying 
Hercules. 

In 1815 Mr. Morse returned to America, settling at first in 
Boston. Thence he went to Concord, N. H., in 1818, and thence 
to Charleston, S. C, and about 1822 he opened a studio in N. Y. 
city. It was chiefly by his exertions that in 1826 the National 
Academy of Design, of which he was the first president, was 
established. 

In 1829 he went to Europe to prosecute art studies, and dur- 
ing his absence he was elected Professor of the literature of the 
Arts of Design in the University of the city of N. Y. While return- 
ing, in the autumn of 1832, to till this professorship, Mr. Morse, who 
had always been interested in scientific studies, learning of recent 
discoveries in the science of electro-magnetism, conceived the idea 
of conveying intelligence by electricity. Circumstances prevented 
the completion of the first telegraphic recording apparatus until 
1835. In 1837 Professor Morse had constructed two instruments, 
and began to exhibit the operation of his system ; and in 1838 he 
applied to Congress for aid in erecting an experimental line. Fail- 
ing in this, he visited Europe in the hope of securing patents from 
the various governments, but was unsuccessful. In 1843, after 
great effort, he obtained a grant of $30,000 for the construction of 
a telegraph from Washington to Baltimore. This work was com- 
pleted in 1844, and satisfactorily demonstrated its value. The 
history of the Morse system of telegraphs since that date is sufii- 
ciently well known. 

In 1846 this College conferred the degree of LL.D. on Professor 
Morse ; and he received, within a few years after, a most gratify- 
ing number of testimonials from foreign governments. Not the 
least pleasing, however, of the honors paid to him was the erection 
of his statue in bronze in the Central Park in N. Y. city, in June, 
1871, from the free contributions of the telegraphic fraternity. 

Professor Morse seems also entitled to the credit of having laid 
the first telegraph lines under water, in 1842, and of having sug- 
gested the ocean telegraph in 1843. 

His first marriage was in Oct., 1818, to Miss Lucretia P., daugh- 
ter of Charles Walker, of Concord, N. H., by whom he had one 
daughter. His wife died Feb. 7, 1825, aged 25. He married 
again, Aug. 9, 1848, Miss Sarah E. Griswold, of New Orleans. 



46 

Professor Morse was a liberal benefactor of this College, and 
especially to be mentioned are his recent gifts of $10,000 to the 
Theological building fund, and of a painting by Allston, pur- 
chased at a cost of $7)000, 

1811. 

Sidney Edwards Morse, the second son of Rev. Jedidiah 
Morse, D.D. (Y. 0. 1783), and of Elizabeth Ann (Breese) Morse, 
was born on the battle*field of Bunker's Hill, in Charlestown, 
Mass., Feb. 7, 1794. 

In 1806, when but eleven years old, he passed the examination 
for admission into Yale College, but did not actually enter until 
two years later, and graduated the youngest in his class. 

He studied law in the Litchfield Law School, and from that 
occupation was invited to Boston, to become the first editor (in 
Jan., 1816) of the Boston Recorder^ "the oldest religious news- 
paper in the world." His connection with the Recorder was a brief 
one, and he subsequently spent more than two years (1817-20) in 
the Andover Theological Seminary. In 1823, in connection with 
his younger brother, Richard C. Morse (Y. C. 1812) he established 
the N&m York Ohservet^ of which he remained chief editor and 
proprietor until 1858, when he retired to devote himself to scien- 
tific pursuits. He had already, in 1817, in connection with his 
elder brother, Samuel F. B. Morse (Y. C. 1810), patented a newly 
invented flexible piston-pump ; and in 1839 had invented a new 
mode of engraving which he styled cerography. After leaving 
the Observer^ he was especially interested in perfecting a new 
bathometer, on which he had been engaged during the evening of 
his fatal illness. He died of paralysis, at his residence in N. Y. 
city, Dec. 23d, 1871, in his 78th year. 

Mr. Morse was married, Apr. 1, 1841, to Catharine, eldest child 
of Rev. Gilbert R. Livingston, D.D., of Philadelphia, who sur- 
vives him, with one son and one daughter, 

1812. 

William WnirrifG Boardman, the eldest child of Hon. Elijah 
Boardman (U. S. Senator from Ohio) and Mary Ann (Whiting) 
Baardman, was bom in New Milford, Conn., where his parents 
then resided, 10 Oct., 1794, and died in New Haven, Conn., 27 
Aug., 1871. 

The youngest member of his class at graduation, he spent a 
yeaf" at Harvard College, as a resident graduate, and then read 



47 

law in New Milford and at the Litchfield Law School. He settled 
as an attorney in New Haven, in 1819, and for the five following 
years was clerk of the State Senate. For the next five years he 
served as Judge of Probate for the District of New Haven. In 
1830 he was sent to the State Senate, and was twice re-elected. 
In 1836 and for three succeeding years he was elected to the 
House of Representatives, serving for the latter half of the time as 
Speaker. In 1840 he was appointed to fill an unexpired term in 
the U. S. Congress, and in the next year was elected for the next 
session. He was also a member of the State Legislature in 1845, 
1849 and 1851, and for the first of these terms the Speaker of the 
House. He was prominently engaged in many of the successful 
business corporations of the city, and had large influence in the 
councils of the Episcopal Church in this diocese. The degree of 
Doctor of Laws was conferred on him by Trinity College in 1863. 
Judge Boardman was married, 28 July, 1857, to Miss Lucy 
Hall, of Poland, 0., who survives him without children. 

Benjamin Day died in Springfield, Mass., 13 May, 1872, aged 
81. He was the fourth son of Heman and Lois (Ely) Day, of 
West Springfield, where he was born, 9 Nov., 1790. 

He studied law, but early abandoned the practice of it for busi- 
ness. He was for several years cashier of the Springfield Bank, 
and then a merchant in the same city. From 1824 to 1827 he 
was cashier of a bank in Geneva, N. Y., but returned to business 
in Springfield. He was afterwards superintendent of the factories 
at Chicopee Falls, Mass., and for a short time a broker in N. Y, 
city. He then retired from active business, and for the rest of his 
life resided in Springfield. 

He married, 3 Dec, 1 820, Frances, daughter of James Dwight, 
of Springfield, who survives him, with two of their four children. 

1813. 

Augustus Baldwin Longstreet, son of William Longstreet, 
was born in Augusta, Ga., Sept. 22, 1790, and died in Oxford, 
Mpi., Sept. 9, 1870. 

He studied in the Litchfield (Conn.) Law School, and settled in 
his native State. In 1821, he represented Greene County in the 
State Legislature, and the following year was made Judge of the 
Superior Court of the State. Declining reelection after one term, 
he resumed practice, and became especially distinguished in 
criminal cases. During the Nullification excitement, he established 



48 

the Augusta Sentinel. In 1838 he entered the ministry of the 
Methodist P^piscopal Church, and from 1839 to 1848 was President 
of Emory CoUeaje, in Oxford, Ga. He was then for a short time 
President of Centenary College, Jackson, La., and from ] 849 to 
1856 President of the University of Mississippi. Still later he 
was President of South Carolina College. After the outbreak of 
the late civil war he lived in seclusion in Oxford, Mpi. 

He was a frequent contributor to Southern periodicals, and 
published many separate works. Among the best known is his 
humorous collection of " Georgia Scenes." He received the degree 
of LL.D. from this College in 1841. 

1814. 

Samuel Henry Dickson, who died in Philadelphia, 31 March, 
1872, was born in Charleston, S. C, 20 Sept., 1798. 

He studied medicine in Charleston with Dr. P. G. Prioleau, and 
practiced there during the prevalence of the yellow-fever in 1817. 
He subsequently attended a course of lectures at the University of 
Pennsylvania, and received the degree of M.D. in 1819. He 
returned to Charleston, and opened an office in July of the same 
year. Through his instrumentality a Medical College was es- 
tablished in Charleston in 1824, and he was called to the chair of 
the Institutes and Practice of Medicine, which he filled until 1832. 
He then withdrew, but on the reorganization of the institution in 
1833, as the Medical College of the State, resumed his position. 
From 1847 to 1850 he occupied the corresponding chair in the 
University of the city of N. Y., but his health obliged him to 
return to his former post in Charleston. In 1858 he was called to 
the chair of Practice of Medicine in Jefferson College, Philadelphia, 
where he continued till his death. He received the degree of 
LL.D. from the University of the City of N. Y. in 1853. 

Dr. Dickson was the author of several successful professional 
works, the chief of which was his Elements of Medicine, published 
in 1855. He was also a ready writer on miscellaneous subjects. 
An oration delivered by him before the Phi Beta Kappa Society 
of this College in 1842, was published. 

1815. 
Charles James Hinsdale, son of Epaphras and Elizabeth 
(Bowen) Hinsdale, was born in New York city, 12 Feb., 1796. 
When four years old, his parents removed to Newark, N. J., from 
which place he entered college. 



49' 

He pursued a theological course for over two years in Andover 
Seminary, and finished his studies at Princeton Seminary in 1819, 
In 1820 he went on a missionary tour to the South, remaining 
about two years. On his return he was invited to Meriden, Conn., 
w^here he was ordained pastor of the First Congregational Churchy 
15 June, 1823. This charge he retained until Dec, 1833. Im 
1835 he was called to the Congregational Church in Blandford„ 
Hampden County, Mass., where he was installed, 20 Jan., 1836.. 
He continued the settled pastor of that church until 1863, and 
performed occasional ministerial service until his death. His- 
residence remained in Blandford, where he was instantly killed, by- 
being thrown from his carriage, 17 Oct., 1871, in the 76th year- 
of his age. 

He married Mrs. Catharine Banks Chittenden, daughter of 
David D. Crane, Esq., of Newark, N. J., who died 26 Apr., 1865.. 
They had seven children, of whom three died in infancy, and two- 
sons and two daughters survive. 

In Nov., 1866, he married Mrs. Mary A. Lloyd, of Blandford^ 
who is still living. 

1816. 

John Metcat.p Garfield, eldest son of Timothy and Euinice 
(Pond) Garfield, was born 21 July, 1790, in Grafton, Mass. 

After graduation he began the study of law with Seth P. Staples 
of New Haven. At the close of his second year, he became a 
teacher in the Lansingburgh (N. Y.) Academy, and after a' year 
spent there, took charge of the Grammar School in Troy, N. Y. 

In 1819 he established a Female Seminary in New Haven, which 
he conducted successfully until 1831, where he was appointed 
Principal of the Albany Female Seminary. During this time he 
pursued theological studies, and was ordained deacon in the Prot. 
Episc. Church by Bishop Brownell, in Hamden, Conn., 11 Aug., 
1822, and was admitted to the priesthood, by the same prelate, in 
Meriden, 4 June, 1823. From this time he regularly officiated in 
neighboring towns until his removal from the State. 

Mr. Garfield continued in his position in Albany until 1849, 
when he returned to New Haven. Here he resided until his 
death, and for the greater part of the time had charge of a church 
of colored people in the city. 

He married, 22 Nov., 1816, Ann, eldest daughter of Nathaniel 
Lyon, of New Haven, and had two sons and six daughters. He 
died 10 March, 1872, and his wife two days later. 



50 

George Hill, the youngest son of Judge Henry and Leah Hill, 
was born in Guilford, Conn., 29 Jan., lYQe. 

After his graduation, he was employed in Washington, in the 
U. S. General Land Office, and in 1827 was appointed teacher of 
mathematics in the navy, in which capacity he was attached to 
the Mediterranean squadron till 1831. On his return he was made 
librarian of the State Department, with which office and other 
kindred duties he was occupied until 1839. He was then ap- 
pointed consul in Turkey in Asia, but soon returned to Wash- 
ington on account of ill health, and was employed in the State 
Department until his resignation in 1865. The remainder of his 
life was spent chiefly in his native town. 

He died in St. Vincent Hospital, N. Y. city, 15 Dec. 1871. 

Mr. Hill was married in 1817 to Miss Elizabeth S. Hamilton, of 
New Haven, Conn., and in 1833 to Miss Mary K. Greer, of Wash- 
ington. By the latter, who died in 1836, he had a son and a 
daughter, both of whom died before him. 

Mr. Hill published in 1839 a volume of poems, an earlier edition 
of which had appeared anonymously in 1831. 

1820. 

George Calvin Goddard, son of Hon. Calvin Goddard (Dart- 
mouth Coll., 1786), was bom in Norwich, Conn., in November, 
1799. His mother, Alice Cogswell Hart, was the daughter of Rev. 
Levi Hart, D.D. (Y. C. 1760), of Preston, Conn. 

Immediately upon graduation he entered on the study of the 
law with Hon. James Broome, of Philadelphia, and continued in 
that city for some years. In 1828 he removed to N. Y. city, and 
formed a partnership with his father-in-law ; he remained in the 
practice of his profession in N. Y. until compelled by ill health to 
retire in 1 867. He then removed his residence to Norwich, Conn., 
where he died on the morning of July 4th, 1871. 

Mr. Goddard married, in 1825, Catharine Susan, eldest daughter 
of Seth P. Staples (Y. C. 1797). She survives him, with one son 
(a surgeon in the U. S. army) and one daughter, the only children 
living of a large family. 

Peleg Phei^s Sanford, son of Peleg and Esther (Phelps) 
Sanford, was bom in New Haven, Conn., 15 Nov., 1801. 

After graduation he was engaged in mercantile business in New 
Haven until 1827. He then removed to Painesville, O., where he 
became a manufacturer of iron and stoves, from which business 



61 

he retired in 1866. In Oct., 1870, he was rendered helpless by a 
fall, and continued so until his death at his residence in Paines- 
ville, 13 Nov., 18V1. 

He was twice married: first, to Elizabeth Mary Phelps, of New 
Haven, Conn., and again in 1829, to Elizabeth Ann Phelps, of 
Painesville, who died two years before him. He had six children, 
of whom two sons and one daughter survive him, one son being a 
graduate of this College of the Class of 1850. 

William Watson Tudor died in Brooklyn, N. Y., June 25, 
1872, in his 72d year. He was the elder son of Samuel and Mary 
(Watson) Tudor, and was born in Hartford, Conn. He married 
Mary, daughter of Dr. Barwick Bruce, of Hartford, who survives 
him with children. His residence was in Brooklyn. 

1821. 

Henry Daggett Bulkley, son of John and Amelia Bulkley, 
was born in New Haven, Conn., Apr. 20, 1803. His mother was 
a daughter of Judge Henry Daggett, of New Haven. 

He was engaged in mercantile pursuits in N. Y. city for six or 
seven years after graduation, and then returned here to study me- 
dicine under Dr. Knight. He received the degree of M.D. in 1830, 
and soon after went to Europe for further advantages, and spent 
some time in the hospitals of Paris studying cutaneous diseases. 

He began practice in N. Y. city in Nov., 1832, and remained in 
extensive practice until his decease. He was especially an au- 
thority in cutaneous medicine, and one of the first in the country 
to lecture on these disorders, and the first to establish a dispensary 
in N. Y. city for their treatment. Besides his connection with 
several other dispensaries, he was appointed in 1848 attending 
physician to the N. Y. Hospital, which position he held until his 
death. He occupied at difierent times the presidential chairs of 
the N, Y. Academy of Medicine, the N. Y. County Medical So- 
ciety, &c In 1846 and in 1852, he published editions of Cazenave 
and Schedel on Diseases of the Skin, and in 1851 edited Gregory 
on Eruptive Fevers. 

Dr. Bulkley visited Europe for his health in June, 1871, return- 
ing much benefited in October. He died of pneumonia at his resi- 
dence in N. Y. city, Jan. 4, 1872, after an illness of four days. 

In 1 835 he mamed Juliana, daughter of Wheeler Barnes, Esq., 
of Rome, N. Y. He had four daughters and two sons ; his widow 
survives him, with two daughters, and both sons, one of whom 
graduated here in 1866 and follows the profession of his father. 



52 

John Flavel Griswold, son of Theophilus Griswold, of 
Greenfield, Mass., was born 14 Apr., 1795. 

He took a three years' course at Andover Theol. Seminary, 
graduating in 1824, and was ordained 8 Nov., 1825, at Shelbume, 
Mass., as an Evangelist. He passed the next three years in home- 
mission work in New Hampshire, and was installed pastor of the 
Second Congregational Church in South Hadley, Mass., 3 Dec, 
1828. This charge he relinquished in 1832. On 10 Apr., 1834, 
he was installed over the Congregational Church in Newfane, Vt. 
(Fayetteville parish), where he remanied until 31 July, 1839. 
He was pastor of the Church in Hartland, Vt., from 15 Sept., 
1839, to 13 Feb., 1844, and stated supply of the Church in Wash- 
ington, N. H., from 1 July, 1844, until the spring of 1866. His 
home was afterward in Brooklyn, N. Y., and during the summer 
months at Bernardston, Mass. He died in Brooklyn, 15 Feb., 
1872, in his 77th year. 

Mr. Griswold was first married in 1830 to Catharine Gillet, of 
South Hadley, who died in 1832. He was subsequently twice 
married. 

1823. 

Robert William Haxall died in Richmond, Va., during the 
last week of the month of March, 1872, aged about 69. 

He graduated from the Medical School of the University of 
Maryland in 1826, and was a practising physician in Richmond. 

1824. 

Eliphalet Adams Bulkelet, son of John C. and Sarah 
(Taintor) Bulkeley, was bom in Colchester, Conn., in June, 1804. 

He studied law with Wm. J. Williams, of Lebanon, and began 
to practice his profession in East Haddam, Conn. After serving 
as Judge of Probate Court, County Judge, and member of the Leg- 
islature, he removed in 1847 to Hartford, where he resided till 
his death, from paralysis, 13 Feb., 1872. While in Hartford he 
was Judge of the City Court and State Senator. He was also 
prominently connected with the insurance business of Hartford. 
He was the first president of the Conn. Mutual Company, which 
he assisted in organizing; and subsequently in 1850 organized the 
^tna Life Company, and held its presidency till his death. He 
was alsp the first president of the JEtna Bank. 

He married, Jan. 31, 1830, Lydia S., daughter of Col. Avery 
Morgan, of Colchester, who survives him, with three of their six 
children. One son, who graduated at this College in 1856, died in 
the late war. 



53 

Fredeeick Baldwin Leonard, second son of Timothy and 
Mary (Baldwin) Leonard, was born in Sharon, Conn., 13 July, 
1804. His parents removed to Lansingburgh, N. Y., in 1807. 

He returned to New Haven in 1826 to study medicine, and re- 
ceived the degree of M.D. in 1828. He then established him- 
self in Troy, N. Y., but his widowed mother needing his care, be 
soon removed to Lansingburgh, and for a time relinquished his 
profession. In 1834 he attended another course of medical lec- 
tures in Philadelphia, and on his return began practice in Lansing- 
burgh. In 1851 he retired from practice, and became engaged in 
banking. He died suddenly, 9 Feb., 1872. 

Dr. Leonard married, 25 May, 1835, Margaret C, daughter of 
John Nicholas, Esq., of Geneva, N. Y., and by her had four sons 
and three daughters, of whom the daughters and one son are still 
living. After the death of his first wife, he married Miss Anna 
M. Stewart, who survives him. 

1825. 

JosiAH Barnes, son of Hon. Jonathan Barnes (Y. C. 1784) and 
of Rachel (Steele) Barnes, of Tolland, Conn., died in Buffalo, 
N. Y., June 1, 1871, 'aged about 67. His older brothers 
graduated at this college in 1810 and 1815. 

Dr. Barnes received the degree of M. D. at the University of 
Pennsylvania in 1829, and was for many years a practising 
physician in Buffalo. 

A son graduated at this college in 1860. 

Joshua Belden, son of Dr. Joshua Belden, Jr. (Y. C. 1787), was 
born in Newington Parish, in Wetherstield, Conn., Aug. 3d, 1802. 

He settled in St. Louis, Mo., in 1828, but being unsuccessful in 
business, removed in 1830 to Howard county, in the same State, 
where he engaged in farming. His residence continued in or near 
Glasgow, in that county, until his death, March 2d, 1870, in his 
68th year. 

Mr. Belden married, June 10th, 1834, Mrs. Agnes Graves, 
daughter of Judge Henry Lewis. He survived his wife many 
years, buried two sons and left an only daughter. At the time of 
his death he was an Elder in the Presbyterian Church. 

1828. 
Sheldon Beardsley, son of Stephen and Catharine (Beardsley) 
Beardsley, was bom at Long Hill, in Trumbull, Conn., in the 
year 1803. 



64 

On leaving College he entered the Yale Medical School, from 
which he received the degree of M.D. in 1831. 

Having practiced a year or more with Jehiel Williams, M.D., 
of New Milford, Conn., he removed to North Branford, Conn., 
where he spent the remainder of his life in the practice of his pro- 
fession. He died of heart disease, Jan. 26, 1872. 

He leaves one son, who graduated from this College in the 
Class of 1857. 

Lemuel Fostee, son of Phineas and Hannah (Kilborn) Foster, 
was born in Hartland, Conn., Nov. 24, 1799. 

For the three years following graduation he studied theology 
in the Yale Theol. Seminary. Having been commissioned by 
the Home Missionary Society, he left for Illinois in Sept., 
1832, and there remained until his death, occupied as preacher 
and teacher, gathering churches and establishing academies, 
with great devotion and with great success. He was ordained 
by the Sangamon Presbytery, in Sept., 1833, having labored 
for the preceding year in that county. He was then stationed at 
the following places, in succession : at Bloomington for five years, 
at Bethel for seven years, at Alton for eight years, at Atlanta for 
six years, at Onarga for four years, and at Blue Island, where he 
formed a church, April 1, 1863, for six years. 

He died at Washington Heights, April 1, 1872, aged 72. 

He married in May, 1831, Miss Lydia Cowdery, of Hartland, 
who survives him. They had no children. 

1831. 

John Clark Hart was born in Cornwall, Conn., 10 Dec, 
1804, the eldest of twelve children. He was fitted for college 
at Goshen Academy, and spent the first year of his course at 
Amherst College. 

He pursued his theological studies chiefly in Philadelphia, 
being employed for a part of the time as City Missionary. In 
Jan., 1 835, he was ordained and installed over the Presbyterian 
Church in Springfield, N. J. Here he labored for nine years. 
He then took a dismission on account of illness in his family, and 
in the spring of 1844 became pastor of the Congregational Church 
in Hudson, O. This position he held for eight years, and for the 
next two years edited the " Ohio Observer" at Hudson. He was 
then for six years pastor of the Congregational Church in Ravenna, 
next for two years pastor of the churches of Edinburgh and Charles- 



66 

town, and for the four following years pastor in Kent. For the 
live remaining years of his life he was supplying the pulpit of 
other destitute churches in the same part of Ohio. He died in 
Mantua, O., in Oct., 1871, in his 67th year. 

Elisha Cowles Jones was born July 14, 1807, in Barkhamp- 
sted (Hartland Society), Conn., where his youth was spent upon 
his father's farm. 

After graduating he was for nearly two years a teacher in New 
London, Conn. From May, 1833, till August, 1835, he studied 
theology in Yale Seminary, also filling, for the last year of this 
period, the office of tutor in the College. He was licensed to 
preach. May 26, 1835, and was married to Miss Julia Chappell, of 
New London, Conn., Sept. 17, 1835. The health of his wife re- 
quired him to seek a southern climate, and he spent the next six 
months in Union Theol. Seminary, Virginia. 

After his return to Connecticut, early in 1836, he supplied 
various churches, and declined a call to the Second Congregational 
Church in New London. In March, 1837, he received a unani- 
mous call from the Congregational Church in Southington, Conn., 
which, after some hesitation, he accepted, and was accordingly 
ordained June 28, 1837. He died in office March 9, 1872, after 
an illness of eighteen days. He was a member of the Corpora- 
tion of Yale College, from 1862, and one of its Prudential Com- 
mittee from 1867. In all the relations of life he was greatly be- 
loved and honored. 

His first wife died July 4, 1842, and he married Miss Jane R. 
Barnes, of Middletown, Conn., Apr. 14, 1844, who survives him. 
Of the four children by his first marriage, one son and one 
daughter are now living — the son a graduate of this College, in 
the Class of 1857. 

The discourse delivered at the funeral of Mr. Jones, by Presi- 
dent Porter, has been published. 

1837. 

James Davenpoet Whelpley was born in N. Y. City, 23 
Jan., 1817. His father was Rev. Philip M. Whelpley, pastor of 
the 1st Presbyterian Church in N. Y. City, and his mother was 
Abigail Fitch Davenport, a descendant of the first minister of 
New Haven. 

After graduation he acted as assistant in Rogers' Geological 
Survey of Penn., for two years, and then entered the Medical 
Department of this College, where he graduated in 1 842. 



56 

He remained in New Haven until 1846, engaged in the study 
of the sciences, and in literary pursuits. He then went to Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., and began to practice his profession, but was soon 
obliged to relinquish it from ill-health. In 1847, he removed to 
N. Y. City, and became the editor and one of the owners of the 
" American Whig Review," to which he had been a frequent con- 
tributor from 1845. While thus engaged, in 1849, he formed a 
project of establishing a commercial colony in Honduras, and in 
furtherance of this enterprise, spent two years in San Francisco, 
purchasing and editing one of the daily papers there. His 
arrangements were disturbed by the presence of the filibuster 
Walker in Honduras, and on going thither he was detained by 
Walker for nearly a year, enduring great privation, and being 
impressed into service as a surgeon. Escaping to San Francisco, 
he returned early in 1857 to the East, and again devoted himself 
to literature, and to scientific studies. For the last ten years of 
his life he was a great sufferer from asthma, which gradually de- 
veloped into consumption of the lungs, of which disease he died, 
at his residence in Boston, 15 April, 1872. 

Dr. Whelpley's publications show a most original mind, and 
his unpublished papers are even more remarkable. He was a 
member of the American Academy. His scientific researches 
were chiefly in physics and in metallurgy. 

He married first, in Jan., 1848, Miss Anna M. Wells, of Rox- 
bury, Mass., who died 29 July, 1859, leaving one daughter, still 
living. His second wife was Miss Mary L. Breed, of Virginia, 
whom he married in the autumn of 1861, and who survives him, 
with her three children. 

1838. 

Perkins Kiekland Clark, son of Enoch and Abigail (Kirk- 
land) Clark, was born in Westfield, Mass., Dec. 8, 1811. 

After graduation, he spent a year or more in Savannah, Ga., as 
a teacher, and in 1 840 entered the Theol. Seminary at Andover, 
Mass. In 1841 he transferred himself to the Yale Theol. Semi- 
nary, where he finished the course in 1843. In the meantime he 
entered, in 1842, on the ofl[ice of tutor in the College, which he 
occupied until 1845. The next year he taught in the Normal 
School in Westfield, Mass., and resigned this position to engage 
in the work of the ministry, having been licensed to preach in 
August, 1842, by the Hampden Association. 

He supplied the pulpit of the Congregational Church, in Ches- 
ter village (now Huntington), Mass., from his ordination, August 



57 

26, 1 846, until the spring of 1852. He then accepted a call to Hins- 
dale, Mass., where he was installed over the Congregational 
Church, June 16, 1852, and where he remained until compelled by 
ill-health to resign, October 2, 1855. Having partially recovered, 
he began in May, 1856, to supply the First Church in South Deer- 
field, Mass., (though not installed until June 29, 1859) where he 
remained until Sept 26, 1865, when the church of which he had 
been pastor was united with the other Congregational Church in 
the village. He was installed over the Congregational Church 
in Mittineague (West Springfield), Mass., Jan. 16, 1866, and was 
dismissed from this charge April 18, 1871, to accept a call to the 
First Church in Charlemont, Mass., where he was installed, Aug. 
16, 1871, A bronchial difficulty, from which he had sufiered for 
many years, was aggravated by the labor of removal, and his 
health, which all his life had been very far from vigorous, 
gradually failed until he died, at Charlemont, Jan. 4, 1872. 

Mr. Clark married, Nov, 20, 1845, Hannah S, Avery, of Spring- 
field, Mass., and she, with three of her four children, survives him. 
The only son is a graduate of this College, in the Class of 1870. 

1840. 

Samuel Geegory was bom in Guilford, Yt., Apr. 19, 1813, 
and died in Boston, Mass., of consumption, March 23, 1872. 

For several years after graduating he was engaged in teach- 
ing, lecturing, and writing, on educational and sanitary 
subjects. 

In 1847 he began the special work which engrossed his 
attention for the rest of his life, — the medical education of women 
and their introduction into the profession. In 1848 he was prom- 
inent in starting the New England Female Medical College, in 
Boston, said to be the first institution of the kind in the world. 
He continued to be the secretary of this institution until his death, 
and had the satisfaction of seeing it firmly established. 

He was unmarried. 

1841. 

Louis De Onis Champlin, son of Matthew F. and Sally A. 
Champlin, was born in Elbridge, N. Y., 22 Jan., 1822. His 
parents removed in his childhood to Beaver Co., whence he 
entered college, having first spent nearly a year in Marion 
College, Mo. 

He studied law in Pittsburgh, Pa., where he was admitted to 
the bar in 1844 ; but in the same year he removed to Cincin- 

5 



58 

nati, and in the spring of 1845 began practice in that city. He 
continued there, in the profession of the law, — with the exception 
of one year (1853-4) passed in San Francisco — until his death. 
He died of jaundice, 15 Oct., 1871, aged 49. 

He married, in Nov., 1848, Miss Isabella Carter, of Cincinnati, 
who survives him. 

Guy Bryan Schott, son of James Schott, of Philadelphia, Pa., 
w-as born Feb. 11, 1822. 

He studied medicine for a year after graduation, and then law 
for two years. He was admitted to the bar in Philadelphia, but 
soon gave up practice. He continued to reside in or near Phila- 
delphia, and died in that city, of consumption, Sept. 6, 1871. 

He married Miss Marion Gray, of Boston, Mass., who survives him. 

1842. 

Albert Barnes Buttles, the son of Joel B. and Lauretta 
Buttles, was born 25th Apr., 1822, in Columbus, O. 

He entered Kenyon College, Ohio, in 1837, and having passed 
through the Junior year in that institution, entered the Junior 
Class in this College, in Sept., 1840. On graduation, he im- 
mediately entered the Yale Law School, and studied until the 
Spring of 1844, when he received his degree, and was admitted to 
the bar in this State. He then returned to his native city, where 
he resided till his death. In the summer of 1845 he was admitted 
to the bar in Ohio, and practised law (with intervals spent in hor- 
ticultural pursuits, on account of imperfect health) until Oct., 
1854, when he was elected Clerk of the County Court of Common 
Pleas, and ex officio Clerk of the Supreme Court of the State. 
After retirement from these offices, in Febr., 1858, he devoted 
himself chiefly to private business, filling various local offices of 
trust. 

He died in Columbus, 27 Jan., 1872, in his 50th year. He 
married, 27 Nov. 1849, Miss Mary E. Ridgway, of Columbus, who 
survives him. 

1843. 

Philotus Dean, fourth son of Amos and Nancy (Kempton) 
Dean, was bom in South Glastenbury, Conn., 29 Oct., 1822. 

After graduating, he remained at home in consequence of ill- 
health, until Nov., 1844, whenhe entered the theological seminary 
in Oberlin, O. He was licensed to preach, 18 June, 1846, by the 
Lorain County Congregational Association. From Nov.j 1846, 



59 

to April, 1849 (with the exception of one summer spent in preaching 
in Penfield, O.), he taught in Selma, O. In Dec, 1849, he was 
appointed principal of Avery College, Allegheny City, Pa., where 
he remained until September, 1855, when he was elected to the 
chair of Natural Science in the Pittsburgh (Pa.) Central High 
School. Three years later he became principal of the school, and 
held these two positions until his death. He was also from Nov., 
1863, to Sept., 1867, director of the Allegheny Observatory, and 
spent his leisure time in astronomical calculations, and in editing 
a series of arithmetics. 

He died of dysentery, Aug. 30, 1871, at his residence in 
Wilkinsburg, after an iUness of two weeks. His physicians were 
confident that he could have recovered, if his constitution had not 
been greatly weakened by excessive devotion to his ofiicial duties. 

Professor Dean was married 16 Aug., 1852, to Miss Grace P. 
South may d^ of Middletown, Conn., who survives him, as do two 
of their three children. 

1846. 

John Butlek Conyngham, second son of Judge John N. and 
Ruth A, (Butler) Conyngham, was born in Wilkes Barre, Pa., 
29 Sept., 1827. 

He studied law for three years in Wilkes Barre, and there began 
practice, but in Dec, 1851, removed to St. Louis, where he con- 
tinued in his profession. 

On the breaking out of the war he enlisted at the first call for 
three months' volunteers in the 8th Pa. Infantry, and was chosen 
2d Lieut, of his company. At the close of this service he re- 
enlisted as Major of the 5 2d Pa. Infantry, was immediately 
promoted to be Lieut.-Col., and held the rank of Col. when mus- 
tered out in July, 1865. He afterwards went to Montana, and in 
March, 1867, entered the regular army as Captain of the 38th 
Infantry. Near the l)eginning of 1871, while stationed at Fort 
Clark, Texas, he suffered from apoplexy, followed by Bright's 
disease. He lived to reach Wilkes Barre, where he died 26 May, 
1871. He was unmarried, 

1847. 

Edward Jessup died in Vevay, Switzerland, April 2, 1872, in 
the 46th year of his age. He was a native of Southwick, Mass. 

Upon graduation he began his theological studies in the Berke- 
ley Divinity School in Connecticut, being a member of the first 
class. He was ordained Deacon by Bishop Brownell, at Hartford 



60 

Dec. 22, 1850, and immediately took a position as assistant minis- 
ter of St. John's Church, Waterbury, Conn. After remaining 
there for two years, being in the meantime advanced to the Priest- 
hood by Bishop Williams, March 7, 1852, he took charge of a 
parish in Chicopee, Mass. In 1854 he became rector of Grace 
Church, Bath, Me., where he remained until the autumn of 1859, 
when he accepted the rectorship of the Church of the Redeemer, 
in Brooklyn, N. Y. This position he held at the time of his 
death. Exhausted by the labors of his ministry, he sailed for 
Europe in July, 1871, and at first improved in health ; but grad- 
ually his strength failed, and he sought Vevay at the beginning 
of the winter. 

Mr. Jessup married in 1859, and leaves a wife, with two 
daughters and three sons. 

1848. 

Henry Martyn Colton was born in Royalton, Niagara 
county, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1826. He was the fifth of six brothers 
who graduated at this College, the sons of Rev. George Colton 
(Y. C. 1804) and Lucy (Cowles) Colton. 

He remained at the College for one year after graduation, as 
Berkeley Scholar, pursuing a select course in philosophy and 
language. The next three years were spent in the Yale Theo- 
logical Seminary, and in Nov. 1852, he was ordained pastor of the 
First Congregational (^hurch in Woodstock, Conn. This charge 
he resigned in Jan., 1855, and he removed to East Avon, Conn, 
where he supplied the pulpit of the Congregational Church until 
April, 1857. In May, 1857, he established a classical school in 
Middletown, which he continued for eleven years. In Sept., 1858, 
he opened the " Yale School for Boys," in N. Y. City, which he 
was still conducting at the time of his death. 

Mr. Colton died, after a short illness, in Middletovm, June 2, 
1872, aged 45| years. 

He married Lucy, daughter of Ezra Tuttle, of New Haven, 
Conn., Oct. 25, 1852. His wife survives him, with children. 

1849. 

Edward Clement Hough, second son of Rev. Joseph and 
Lavinia P. (Wightman) Hough, was bom in Bloomfield, Conn., 
Sept. 10, 1827. While he was in College, his family residence 
was in Hawkinsville, Ga. 

During the year 1850, he taught in a private family in South 
Carolina, and in 1851 he began the study of law in Waynesboro', 



61 

Ga. He was admitted to the bar May 8, 1852, but did not 
engage in the profession. He remained in Georgia, first as assis- 
tant treasurer of the Central Road and Banking Company for one 
year, then for four years in the Railroad Bank of Savannah, and 
from 1857 as teller in the Bank of Savannah. He died in Savannah 
of heart disease, June 11, 1872, in his 45th year. 

1850. 

Joseph Bard well Lymai^- was born in Chester, Mass., Oct. 6, 
1829. 

He taught in Cromwell, Conn., during the winter after gradua- 
tion, and subsequently in Adams County, Miss. From June, 1853, 
till Jan., 1855, he was studying law and teaching in Nashville, 
Tenn. He then went to the New Orleans Law School, and there 
graduated in 1856, in August of which year he was admitted to 
the bar. He practised law in New Orleans until the beginning of 
the late war, when he removed to Stamford, Conn. After a few 
years, during which he was a frequent contributor to the N. Y. 
press, he went to N. Y. city as agricultural editor of the World, 
After two years in this position, he became managing editor of 
Hearth and Some, and soon after agricultural editor of the 
Tribune, which place he filled for the last four years of his life. 
He died, of the small-pox, at his residence in Richmond Hill, L. I., 
Jan. 28, 1872. 

Mr. Lyman married, in Nashville, July 14, 1858, Miss Laura E., 
daughter of Rev. Charles Baker, of Somerville, Mass. She sur- 
vives him, with six children. 



1852. 

Douglass Ridgway Bannan, son of John Bannan, was born in 
Schuylkill County, Pa., March 6, 1832, and died in Charlestown, 
Mass., Nov. 16, 1871, of typhoid pneumonia. 

He studied medicine in the Medical Department of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, receiving his degree in 1856. He afterward 
spent two years in Paris, and then established himself in Phila- 
delphia. On July 22, 1861, he entered the IT. S. Navy, as 
Assistant Surgeon, and subsequently rose to the rank of Surgeon. 
He held this position at the time of his death. He was unmarried. 

William Boies, son of Justus Boies, was born in Northampton, 
Mass., March 21, 1828, and died of heart disease in Troy, N. Y., 
June 17, 1872. 



62 

He studied law with Hon. Henry Hogeboom (Y. C. 1827), in 
Hudson, N.Y., and subsequently became his law-partner there, 
and later at Albany, until April, 1855, when he removed to N. Y. 
city and entered into partnership with Judge Sutherland. A few 
years ago he returned to his native town, and there practised his 
profession until March, 1871, when he removed to Troy, where he 
was in extensive practice at the time of his death. 

Mr. Boies married in 1859 Susan K, daughter of Judge Hoge- 
boom, who survives him with two children, 

1853. 

Charles Henry Whittelsey, only son of Charles B. and 
Jane (Mulford) Whittelsey, was born in New Haven, Conn., Oct. 
2, 1832. 

A hemorrhage of the lungs during the latter part of his Senior 
year obliged him to give up all study, and have perfect rest for 
several months. After the recovery of his health, he was in 
business in N. Y. city until the beginning of the late war. He 
entered the volunteer service in March, 1862, as a Lieutenant in 
the 1st Conn. Artillery, but was soon appointed Assistant Ad- 
jutant General on the Staff of General R. D. Tyler, and in 1864 
assumed the same position on the staff of Maj.-Gen. H. G. Wright. 
In 1 865 the rank of Brevet Brigadier General was conferred on 
him. In July, 1866, he accepted an appointment as Captain in 
the U. S. Army, and served until his death in the Department of 
the Platte. 

He died at Fort Bridger, Wyoming Territory, Oct. 18, 1871, of 
typhoid fever, after an illness of several weeks. 

In 1865, the degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon him, 
and his name was enrolled with his class. 

1857. 

John Milton Holmes, the son of Rev. Wm.* Holmes, was bom 
in the Isle of Sheppy, Kent, England, 23 May, 1831. He was 
hardly four years of age when his parents emigrated to this 
country. 

From college he went to Oak Ridge, 111., where he taught until 
April, 1859. The next two years were spent in the Andover 
Theological Seminary. He was called from the Seminary to the 
First Congregational Church in Jersey City, N. J., of which he 
was ordained the first pastor, 23 May, 1861. His labors in 
building up this church, and in the cause of the country during 



the war, so impaired his health that in April, 186 7, he was sent to 
Europe by his parish. He returned in June, 1868, but with 
renewed labors came renewed symptoms of pulmonary, disease, 
and he was obliged to remove to Minnesota for the winter. With 
great reluctance, his church consented to his dismission, 5 May, 

1869. The following summer was spent in Andover, Mass., and 
the winter in Duquoin, 111. After visiting other western States in 
the hope of checking his disease, he returned to Jersey City to die 
among his people. His death occurred on Sept. 20th, 1871. 

He married, 3 July, 1861, Miss Fanny L. Tyler, of Trenton, 
N. Y. His widow survives him, with three children. 

A volume of his Sermons is just published by 0. C. Chatfield 
& Co., New Haven. 

1858. 

Lemuel Relet Evans, son of Onesimus and Eliza E. (Wallace) 
Evans, was bom in Fayetteville, Ark., 12 Jan., 1838, and entered 
college from San Antonio, Tex. 

After graduation he studied law in San Antonio, with some 
interruption from ill-health, until the secession of his State. Early 
in 1861 he was appointed private secretary to the Governor of 
Texas, and served until the latter part of the year, when he 
entered the military service, in which he continued till the end of 
the war. From March, 1866, till Aug. 1869, he was deputy-col- 
lector of Internal Revenue in San Antonio. He then came north 
for the benefit of his health, and returned to Texas about May, 

1870. In August he started for Arkansas on business, and while 
on the steamboat Erie on the Red River, near Shreveport, La., fell 
overboard, 27 Sept., and was drowned. 

1861. 

Milton Bulkley was born July 14, 1840, in Southport, Conn. 
His death took place in San Francisco, Cal., Jan. 25, 1872. 

The winter after graduation he spent in N. Y. city, studying 
medicine, and in 1862, during a part of McClellan's Peninsula 
campaign, he was in the service of the Sanitary Commission on 
board of a hospital ship. While thus employed, he was prostrated 
by malarial fever, and instead of being able to resume his studies, 
was advised to try a sea voyage. Accordingly he embarked, in 
the autumn of 1862, for San Francisco in a sailing vessel. The 
voyage proved of great benefit, and finding the climate of Cali- 
fornia invigorating, he decided to remain, and became a member 
of the firm of Sherwood, Bulkley & Co., shipping and commission 



64 

merchants in San Francisco. In this business he continued until 
his death. 

His health remained good until the winter of 1866-67, when he 
was suddenly attacked with hemorrhage of the lungs. From this 
time he was more or less of an invalid, although until the last few 
months of his life able to attend to his business. 

He married, Feb. 12, 1868, Miss Kate A., daughter of W. R. 
Wheaton, Esq., of San Francisco, who remains his widow, with 
one son. 

1863. 

Julius Emmons died of quick consumption at his father's resi- 
dence in Colchester ("Westchester Society), Conn., 4 Dec, 1871, at 
the age of 31. 

The son of Aaron E. and Mary N". (Kellogg) Emmons, he was 
born in "Westchester, 8 Dec, 1840, and was fitted for college at 
East Hampton, Mass. 

After graduation, he was for about six years occupied chiefly 
in teaching ; — first in Bacon Academy, Colchester, for two terms ; 
afterward in East Haddam, Conn. ; and after Sept., 1866, in Cale- 
donia, Minn. 

In the spring of 1870 he undertook a journey, as agent for a 
business firm in Boston, through the States and Territories lying 
along the Rocky Mountains and on the Pacific Coast. A year 
was spent on this trip, and he was about beginning another when 
fatal illness overtook him. 

Henry Whitney Scott, only child of Henry "W. and Susan 
(Fenn) Scott, was born in SouthWy, Conn., May 1, 1841^ 

The first year after graduation he was Principal of an academy 
in Cohoes, N. Y. Removing to Philadelphia in the autumn of 
1864, he took charge of the Chestnut Hill Academy, and con- 
ducted it for five years with remarkable success. He then became 
associate principal with Mr. R. H. Chase of an English and Clas- 
sical School for boys in Philadelphia, and so continued until his 
death. 

In June, 1871, he sailed for Europe. While traveling in Ger- 
many, he became conscious of a failure of health,, which developed 
so speedily that it was only by a great effort that he reached 
home. He left Liverpool Oct. 12, and arrived at New York on 
the 23d. He finally reached Southbury Nov. 3, and after linger- 
ing with varying symptoms of congestion of the lungs, he died 
Dec 6, 1871, aged 30. 



65 



Mr. Scott testified his affection for his Alma Mater by creating 
in his will a fund of $1000 for Academical premiums for excellence 
in Modem Languages, and by leaving the bulk of his earnings 
(about $2500) as a teacher to constitute a fund for the College 
Library. 

1864. 

Thomas Haughee was born in Longford, Ireland, in 1836. He 
prepared for College in the Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven. 

After graduation he studied medicine in the medical depart- 
ment of this College, receiving his degree in 1868. He subse- 
quently spent some time in hospital practice in Hartford, Conn., 
and in New Haven, and then went to Laramie, Nebraska, as 
assistant surgeon in the Union Pacific R. R. Hospital. While 
there he received an offer of partnership with an experienced phy- 
sician in Lincoln, Nebr. This he accepted, and after several 
months of successful practice, he went on a visit to Ireland, where 
he married. 

He left Liverpool for America on the steamship "Oceanic," 
Dec. 20, 1871. On Jan. 6, 1872, he was on deck when a heavy 
wave breaking over the bulwarks swept him off his feet, fractur- 
ing his arm and otherwise injuring him : congestion of the lung& 
set in, and he died Jan. 8, 1872. He was buried at sea. 

James Braineed Tyler, son of Ralph and Sarah Ann (Lay) 
Tyler, was born at Brainerd Station, Jamaica, W. I., March 23y 
1842, where his father was then a missionary. 

After graduation, he spent four years in teaching in Millbury, 
Mass., and then entered the Yale Theol. Seminary, where he com- 
pleted the course, and received the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, 
in May, 1871. 

He was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in 
Groton, Conn., Sept. 27, 1871, where he died suddenly, of rheu- 
matic fever. May 28, 1872. 

He was unmarried. 

Harry Wilson, son of James Wilson, was born at Jersey 
Shore, Pa., Sept. 3, 1841, and died there after a short illness 
August 9, 187L 

He had been a practising lawyer in Forest City, Minn. 

1870. 
Charles Hosmer Chapin, son of Charles Chapin, was bom in 
Champlain, N. Y., 27 June^ 1848, and entered College from 
Whitehall, N, Y. 



66 

He died in Natchez, Mpi., where he was a teacher in the public 
schools, 5 Nov., 1871, of yellow fever. 

Orlando Cope, born 10 March, 1843, died at Jasper, Ind., of 
bilious fever, 2 July, 1871. He entered this College at the begin- 
ning of Sophomore year, from Indiana State University. At the 
time of his death he was with an engineer corps, surveying a route 
for the Rockport and Cincinnati railroad. 

George Alexander Robinson, son of Jeremiah M. Robinson, 
was born in Baltimore, Md., 31 Jan., 1848. 

His residence at graduation was Philadelphia, and he returned 
thither to pursue a course of study, with the intention of entering 
the medical department of the U. S. Navy. When near the com- 
pletion of his second course of lectures in Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege, he died of apoplexy, 28 Nov., 1871. 

1871. 

Charles Howell Board died in Edenville, Orange County, 
N. y., Aug. 8, 1871, less than four weeks after his graduation. 
He was born in Edenville, Sept. 5, 1848, and was left an orphan in 
early childhood. He was prepared for College at Williston Sem- 
inary, East Hampton, Mass. 

He was unwell for some time before graduation, without any dis- 
tinctly marked disease. Probably too close application, with insuffi- 
cient exercise, produced general debility. He left for home on the 
day after Commencement, and seemed to rally, but only for a brief 
period. Typhoid fever attacked him, and in his weak state he 
sank rapidly and died after being confined to his bed less than a 
week. 

In his will, which was made a few months before his death, he 
left the sum of $2,500 to the Library of Yale College, the annual 
income to be devoted to the purchase of books on political 
economy and social science. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1822. 
Oliver Kingsley Isham, son of James and Mary Isham, was 
born in Tolland, Conn., March 22, 1798, and died in the same 
town, of consumption, March 10, 1872. 



67 

He studied medicine with Dr. Silas Fuller, of Columbia, Conn., 
before entering this Medical School. 

He entered on his profession as partner of the late Dr. Nathan 
Howard, of ^outh Coventry, Conn. He remained in this place 
three years, and then removed to Tolland, where he resided, 
fulfilling the duties of his profession till within a few months of 
his decease. 

He married Minerva Griggs, of Tolland, and had five children. 

1831. 

Jeremiah Nathaniel Peabody., son of John N. and Mary 
(Mason) Peabody, was born in Lebanon, Conn. 26 Aug., 1809. 

After practicing his profession in Montville, Conn., and else- 
where at the East, Dr. Peabody removed in 1848 to St. Clair, 
Mich., where he continued in extensive practice until 1867, when 
on the failure of his health he retired from his profession and 
removed to Detroit, where after five years of extreme bodily suf- 
fering, he died, 10 Febr. 1872. 

1843. 

William Colet Betts died in Hartford, Conn., July 23, 1871, 
aged 56 J years. 

He had been for more than twenty years a practising physician 
and druggist in Brooklyn, N. Y. He was also specially interested 
in the subject of ventilation, and had obtained several patents for 
inventions in that connection. 



1845. 

Enoch Tenney Winter, the fifth son and tenth child of Ben- 
jamin Winter, a captain in the Revolution, and of Hannah (Searle) 
Winter, was born in Danbury, N. H., Sept. 19, 1806. 

He finished his studies in the New Hampton (N. H.) Lit. and 
Theol. Institution, and was ordained over the first Baptist Church 
in Bradford, N. H., in March, 1831. From 1832 to 1835 he was a 
pastor in Henniker, N. H. ; from 1835 to 1838 in Cavendish, Ver- 
mont, and then accepted a call to a church in Fredericksburgh, 
Va. While here his voice gave out, and he turned his thoughts to 
the medical profession. 

After receiving his degree, he settled in N. Y. city as the 
superintendent of the N. Y. Orphan Asylum, which place he 
occupied until 1848. From that date until within a year of his 
death he was a practising physician in N. Y. city. He died 



68 

Apr. 27, 1871, in Harlem, K. Y., at the house of his only child, a 
daughter. 

1855. ^ 

HoBART EtEESB, SOU of Rev. Wm. Linn Keese (Columbia Coll., 
1823) and of Mary Matilda (Drake) Keese, was born in Albany^ 
N. Y., Sept. 18, 1831. 

He practised his profession in New Haven for about two years, 
and then made an extended foreign tour. About 1859 he opened 
an office in N. Y. city. His professional career was much inter- 
rupted by disease. He died of consumption in N. Y. city, Nov. 
7, 1871, aged 40. 



DEPARTMENT 01' PHILOSOPHY AND THE ARTS. 

1868. 

Lewis Bridge Stone, son of the late J. Cameron Stone, of 
N. Y. city, died in Paris, Erance, Nov. 10, 1871, aged 24. 

He Was returning from a visit to California, Japan, China, and 
Europe. During the summer of 1871 he contracted the malarial 
fever in Rome, from the effects of which he never recovered. 

1871. 

Ferdinand Eugene PoWell was bofn in Lyonville, tJwchlan 
Township, Chester County, Pa., June 3, 1849. 

After graduating at the Sheffield Scientific School, he entered 
Columbia College Law School. He died, of a kidney disease, in 
"N. Y. City, May 20, 1872. 



SUMMARY. 



Academical Department. 



Class. Name and Age. 

1804 George Plummer, 86, 

1807 Aristarchus Champion, 87, 

1808 Silas W. Robbins, 85, 

1810 Samuel F. B. Morse, 81, 

1811 Sidney E. Morse, 77, 

1812 Wm. W. Boardman, 76, 

1812 Benjamin Day, 81, 

1813 Augustus B. Longstreet, 80, 

1814 Samuel H. Dickson, 73, 

1815 Charles J. Hinsdale, 75, 

1816 John M. Garfield, 81, 
1816 George Hill, 76, 

1820 George C. Goddard, 71, 

1820 Peleg P. Sanford, 70, 

1820 William W. Tudor, 71, 

1821 Henry D. Bulkley, 68, 
1821 John F. Griswold, 76, 

1 823 Robert W. Haxall, 69, 

1824 Eliphalet A. Bulkeley, 67, 

1824 Frederick B. Leonard, 67, 

1825 Josiah Barnes, 67, 
1825 Joshua Belden, 67;' 
1828 Sheldon Beardsley, 68, 
1828 Lemuel Foster, 72, 
1831 John C. Hart, 66, 
1831 Elisha C. Jones, 64, 

1837 James D. Whelpley, 55, 

1838 Perkins K. Clark, 60, 

1840 Samuel Gregory, 59, 

1841 Louis D. Champlin, 49, 

1841 Guy B. Schott, 49, 

1842 Albert B, Buttles, 49, 

1843 Philotus Dean, 48, 

1846 John B. Conyngham, 43, 

1847 Edward Jessup, 45, 

1848 Henry M. Colton, 45, 

1849 Edward G. Hough, 44, 

1850 Joseph B. Lyman, 42, 
1852 Douglass R. Bannan, 39, 

1852 Wm. Boies, 44, 

1853 Charles H. Whittelsey, 39, 

1857 John M. Holmes, 40, 

1858 Lemuel R. Evans, 32, 
1861 Milton Bulkley, 31, 
1863 Julius Emmons, 31, 

1863 Henry W. Scott, 30, 

1864 Thomas Haughee, 35, 
1864 James B. Tyler, 30, 
1864 Harry Wilson, 30, 



Place and 
Glastenbury, Conn., 
Gates, N. Y., 
Springfield, 111., 
New York City, 
New York City, 
New Haven, Conn., 
Springfield, Mass., 
Oxford, MpL, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Blandford, Mass., 
New Haven, Conn., 
New York City, 
Norwich, Conn., 
Painesville, 0,, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
N. Y. City, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Richmond, Ya., 
Hartford, Conn., 
Lansingburgh, N. Y.. 
Bufialo, N. Y., 
Glasgow, Mo., 
North Branford, Conn., 
Washington Heights, 111 
Mantua, 0., 
Southington, Conn., 
Boston, Mass., 
Charlemont, Mass., 
Boston, Mass., 
Cincinnati, 0., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Columbus, 0., 
Wilkinsburg, Pa., 
Wilkes Barre, Pa., 
Yevay, Switzerland, 
Middletown, Conn., 
Savannah, Ga., 
Richmond HiU, N. Y., 
Charlestown, Mass., 
Troy, N. Y., 
Ft. Bridger,Wyom. Terr. 
Jersey City, N. J., 
Red River, La., 
San Francisco, Cal., 
Colchester, Conn., 
Southbury, Conn., 
At sea, 

Groton, Conn., 
Jersey Shore, Pa., 



Time of Death. 

June 1, 1872. 

Sept. 18, 1873. 

June 19, 1871. 

April 2, 1872. 

Dec. 23, 1871. 

Aug. 27, 1871. 

May 13, 1872. 

Sept. 9, 1870. 

March 31, 1872. 

Oct. 17, 1871. 

March 10, 1872. 

Dec. 15, 1871. 

July 4, 1871. 

Nov. 13, 1871. 

June 25, 1872. 

Jan. 4, 1872. 

Feb. 15, 1872. 

March, 1872. 

Feb. 13, 1872. 

Feb. 9, 1872. 

June 1, 1871. 

March 2, 1870. 

Jan. 26, 1872. 
,, April 1, 1872. 

October, 1871. 

March 9, 1872. 

April 15, 1872. 

Jan. 4, 1872. 

March 23, 1872. 

Oct. 15, 1871. 

Sept. 6, 1871. 

Jan. 27, 1872. 

Aug. 30, 187L 

May 26, 1871. 

April 2, 1872. 

June 2, 1872. 

June 11, 1872. 

Jan. 28, 1872. 

Nov. 16, 1871. 

June 17, 1872. 
, Oct. 18, 1871. 

Sept. 20, 1871. 

Sept. 27, 1870. 

Jan. 25, 1872. 

Dec. 4, 1871. 

Dec. 6, 1871. 

Jan. 8, 1872. 

May 28, 1872. 

Aug. 9, 1871. 



70 

1870 Charles H. Chapin, 23, Natchez, Mpi., Nov. 5, 1871. 

1870 Orlando Cope, 28, Jasper, Ind., July 2, 1871. 

1870 George A. Robinson, 23, Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 28, 1871. 
18ri Charles H. Board, 23, EdenviUe, N. Y , Aug. 8, 1871. 

Medical Depaetment. 

1822 Oliver K. Isham, 74, Tolland, Conn., March 10, 1872. 

1831 Jeremiah N. Peabody, 62, Detroit, Mich., Feb. 10, 1872. 

184.^ William C. Betts, 56, Hartford, Conn., July 23, 1871. 

1845 Enoch T. Winter, 64, Harlem, N. Y., April 27, 1871, 

1855 Hobart Keese, 40, N. Y. City, Nov. 7, 1871. 

Department op Philosophy and the Arts. 

1868 Lewis B. Stone, 24, Paris, France, Nov. 10, 1871. 

1871 Ferdinand E. Powell, 23, N. Y. City, May 20, 1872. 



The whole number of deaths reported as occurring during the past year is 60, 
and the average age of the graduates of the Academical Department is 56^ years. 

Of the deceased, from the Academical Department, 10 were Clergymen, 8 
Lawyers, 9 Physicians, 6 in Business, and 7 Teachers. 

The deaths are distributed as follows: — in N. Y., 15; Conn., 13; Mass. and 
Pa., 6 each ; Ohio, 4 ; 111. and Mpi., 2 each ; Europe, 2 ; and the remaining 10 in as 
many diflferent States and Territories. 

The surviving graduates of the past century are. 
Class of 1796, Timothy Bishop, New Haven, Conn., bom Oct. 29, 1777. 
Class of 1800, Rev. Thomas Williams, Providence, R. I., bom Nov. 5, 1779. 




t> 



DEC 31 1937 I 



^% 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OP 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 



Deceased during the academical year ending in June, 1 873, 

including the record of a few who died a short 

time previous, hitherto unreported. 

[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMNI, JUNE 25th, 18T3.] 



[No. 3 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 32 of the whole Record.] 



1\ 



OBITUARY RECORD 

or 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the academical year ending June, 1873, includ- 
ing the record of a few who died previously, 
hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting op the Alumni, June 25, 18T3.] 
[No. 3 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 32 of the whole Record.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1796. 

Timothy Bishop, son of Daniel and Louisa (Hotchkiss) Bishop, 
was born in New Haven, Conn., Oct. 29th, 1777. 

Upon leaving college he engaged in business in this city, and 
after a long life of business activity, during which he held in a 
high degree the esteem of his fellow-citizens, lived in his native 
city in retirement until his death, March 6th, 1873, at the age of 
95 years and 4 months. Since October, 1870, he had been the 
oldest surviving graduate of the college, and for some five years 
the only survivor of his class. 

He married, April 3d, 1800, Louisa, daughter of William Wal- 
ter, of New Haven, who died about a month after her marriage. 
His second wife, Esther Huggins, of New Haven, died in Feb., 
1845, and his third wife, Mrs. Elizabeth (Beers) Huggins, in 1854. 
Of his children, only one son, by his second marriage (Y. C. 1826), 
survives him. 

1803. 

Thomas Davies Burrall, second son of Jonathan Burrall (Y. C. 
1781) and of Charlotte, daughter of Rev. Thomas Davies (Y. C. 
1758), was bom in Canaan, Conn., June 2d, 1786. 

In " Memoranda for my Children," written when over 83 years 
of age, he says, "At 13 I entered college, a mere boy, a round- 
faced, red-cheeked, curly-headed boy, in a round-about jacket, open 



collar with ruffles over my^ shoulders, with my head tolerably 
well filled with Latin and Greek, but unconscious of art or guile, — 
a veritable Freshman." 

Soon after graduation he entered the office of Hon. Sherman 
Boardman, in New Milford, Conn., as a student at law, but subse- 
quently removed to Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and there began prac- 
tice. After a year or two his health failed, and he passed one 
year at the South. After his return he removed to Geneva, N. 
Y., in Sept., 1812, where he resumed practice, but in a short time 
finding his strength unequal to the labors of his profession, he 
abandoned it, and purchased a farm near by, where he resided for 
more than forty years ; the last twelve years of his life were spent 
at his residence on the banks of the Seneca Lake, in Geneva, where 
he died after a three weeks' illness, June 24th, 1872. 

For more than forty years he gave most of his time and 
thoughts to the invention and improvement of agricultural imple- 
ments, having erected foundries and shops for that branch of 
manufacture, and having accomplished much in the way of lighten- 
ing the labors of the farmer. 

He was one of the founders and original trustees of the Geneva 
Academy, now Hobart College, and took the deepest interest in 
its welfare, remaining a trustee till his death. 

He married Miss Charlotte, daughter of William and Polly 
Da vies, of Poughkeepsie, Aug. 25th, 1813, who died, without 
issue, in Geneva, Sept. 14th, 1820. In Jan., 1822, he married Miss 
Sarah J. Mann, of Hudson, N. Y., who died in Geneva, April 12th, 
1831, leaving two sons, still surviving. In March, 1837, he 
married Mrs. Margaret W. Mott, widow of Samuel Mott, who, 
with one son by this marriage, is still living. 

1806. 

Frederick Marsh, son of Jonathan and Damans (Pitkin) 
Marsh, was born in New Hartford, Conn., Sept. 18th, 1780. 

After graduation he studied theology with Rev. Asahel Hooker 
(Y. C. 1789), of Goshen, Conn., and was licensed to preach by 
Litchfield North Association, Sept. 30th, 1806. He spent the 
following year in preaching in North Goshen and New Preston, 
Conn., and in Newark, N. J. In the course of the next year he 
declined calls to Simsbury and Branford, Conn., on account of ill 
health. In Dec, 1808, he accepted an invitation to settle over the 
Congregational Church in Winchester, Conn., and was ordained 



^3 



pastor Feb. 1st, 1809. He occupied the house which he entered 
at this date until his death, Feb. 6th, 1873, in his 93d year. He 
continued sole pastor until Feb. 1st, 1846, when he relinquished 
his salary and asked for a colleague. Oct. 1st, 1851, he was dis- 
missed from the pastorate, and for the next ten years, until his eye- 
sight failed, he preached for neighboring churches as he was 
needed. At the time of his death he was the oldest Congrega- 
tional clergyman in the State. From 1836 to 1870 he was trustee 
of the " Theological Institute of Connecticut." 

He married. May 22d, 1809, Pamal, daughter of Joseph Merrill, 
of New Hartford, who bore him eight children, of whom four sons 
and a daughter survive him. She died March 11th, 1860. 

1807. 

Gut Richards died in New York City, March 26th, 1873. 

He was the son of Guy and Hannah (Dolbeare) Richards, and 
was born in New London, Conn., January 8th, 1788. After 
graduation he began the study of law, but soon left this profession, 
and for several years followed the sea, rising in a short time to the 
position of Master. In 1820 he commenced business in New York, 
to which he devoted himself with great zeal, and from which he 
retired many years since with the ample rewards of an industrious 
life. 

He was twice married, but had no children. 



Ely Warner, son of Jonathan and Hephzibah (Ely) Warner, 
was born in Chester (then a parish in Saybrook), Conn., May 24th, 
1785. 

After graduation he taught school for a year or more, and then 
entered the Law School at Litchfield, Conn., and was admitted to 
the bar at Middletown about 1811. So untiring was his industry 
while pursuing his professional studies, that he wrote from his own 
stenographic notes the entire course of lectures, making three 
manuscript volumes, said to be the only correct copy of the lec- 
tures of Judges Reeve and Gould now extant. 

Settling in Haddam in 1816, he afterwards represented that 
town in the State Legislature for two sessions, in 1825 and 1831. 
In 1828 he was appointed chief judge of the Middlesex County 
Court, and was re-appointed for several terms. Subsequently he 
became cashier of the East Haddam Bank, but removed to Chester 
in 1837, where his farm was situated, and where he resided during 



14 

the remainder of his life. In 1855 he was appointed County Com- 
missioner, and held office for two terms. He was also for more 
than fifty years actively engaged as County Surveyor. He died 
of paralysis, at his residence in Chester, Oct. 23d, 18V2,inhis 88th 
year, being at that time the oldest lawyer in the State. 

Judge Warner was married, Nov. 11th, 1817, to Sarah H., 
eldest daughter of John Warner, of Chester, who survives him. 
Of their eight children, three sons and three daughters are now 
living. One son, Jared C. Warner, graduated at this college in 
1854, and died Aug. 9th, 1855, in East Saginaw, Mich., where he 
was engaged in teaching. 

1808. 

Joseph Harvet, a native of East Haddam, Conn., the son of 
Deacon Ithamar and Electa (daughter of Rev. Joseph Fowler, Y. 
C. 1743) Harvey, was born March 1st, 1787. 

After graduation he studied theology with Rev. Ebenezer Por- 
ter, D.D., of Washington, Conn, (afterwards Professor in Andover 
Seminary), and was licensed to preach by the Litchfield County 
Association in June, 1809. Accepting a unanimous call, he was 
ordained and installed over the Congregational Church in Goshen, 
Conn., in Oct., 1810. During the early part of his pastorate he 
was married to Qatharine D. Selden, his companion for more than 
fifty years. Of their seven children, one son and two daughters 
survive him. 

In Sept., 1825, he resigned his pastorate, to accept the position 
of Secretary of the American Education Society, whose office was 
in Boston. Disappointed with the nature of his work, he returned 
after a short experience to the place of his birth, in impaired 
health. On his recovery, he was installed pastor of the Second 
Congregational Church, in Colchester (Westchester Society), 
Conn. He remained here until Dec. 13th, 1835. In the last 
named year the degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him 
by Amherst College. During his last two years in Westchester, 
he edited the " Evangelical Magazine," and for the next three 
years a weekly paper called the " Watchman." Meanwhile he 
removed his residence to South Windsor, Conn., in 1836, and 
supplied the Congregational Church in that place for one year. 

In the latter part of 1838 he was engaged to preach statedly in 
Thompsonville, a village in Enfield, Conn. Here his labors soon 
led the people to desire a church organization, and as they pre- 
ferred connection with the Presbyterian body. Dr. Harvey was 



I 



75 



installed as pastor of the First Presbyterian Church formed in 
Connecticut, on the 10th of July, 1839. He held this charge until 
his resignation at the age of seventy, April 28 th, 1857. In the 
spring of 1858, he removed to the upper peninsula of Michigan, 
where he continued for 16 years, preaching and teaching from 
time to time, as he was enabled by the bracing influence of that 
climate ; and where he died in the village of Harvey, on the shore 
of Lake Superior, Feb. 4th, 1873, wanting 24 days of 86 years 
of age. 

Ralph Isaacs Ingbrsoll, son of Hon. Jonathan and Grace 
(Isaacs) Ingersoll, was born in New Haven, Conn., Feb. 8th, 1789. 
His father graduated at this college in 1766, and his grandfather. 
Rev. Jonathan Ingersoll, in 1736. 

He studied law with Seth P. Staples, Esq., of New Haven, and 
was admitted to the bar in Dec, 1810. He immediately entered 
on the practice of his profession in his native city, and was thus 
successfully employed, with the exception of the time spent in the 
public service, until his last illness. In 1818 he became prominent 
in State politics, allying himself with the Democratic party in the 
movement for a new Constitution. From 1819 to 1825, he was a 
representative of New Haven, in the General Assembly, and for 
the last two of these years Speaker. In 1825, he was elected a 
Representative in Congress, where he remained until his resigna- 
tion in 1833. During this period he served for one year (1830-31) 
as Mayor of New Haven. On retiring from Congress he was 
appointed State's Attorney for New Haven County, and held that 
office until 1845, when he declined further re-appointment. Presi- 
dent Polk, who had been intimate with Mr. Ingersoll while in 
Congress, nominated him, in August, 1846, Envoy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary of the U. S. to the Court of Russia. 
The nomination, which was unanimously confirmed by the Senate, 
was entirely unsolicited and unlooked for. Mr. Ingersoll accepted, 
and was recalled in Sept., 1848, at his own request. 

Mr. Ingersoll was severely disabled by a fall in the street, in the 
early summer of 1872, and gradually lost strength until his death, 
Aug. 3l8t, in the 84th year of his age. 

His widow survives him. One of his sons graduated at this 
college in 1840, and is at present the Chief Magistrate of this 
State. 



76 

James Hill ParMelee, Bon of Capt. Ezra and Sybil (Hill) 
Parmelee, was born in Newport, N. H., on the 16th of May, 1783. 
His parents were natives of Killingworth, Conn. 

After his graduation he taught in New Berne, N. C, for two 
years or more, and subsequently in 1812 joined the first class 
which was formed in Princeton Theol. Seminary. In the year 
1813-14 he was employed as a tutor in the College of New Jersey, 
and in the spring of 1815 Was licensed to preach by the Presby- 
tery of New Brunswick. From 1815 to 1819 he taught in Balti- 
more with unusual success. In 1816 he was married in Baltimore 
to Priscilla Horn, a lady of English birth, who assisted him in 
maintaining a school for young ladies. Mrs. Parmelee's health 
obliged them to give up this school in 1820, and they removed to 
Zanesville, Ohio, where she died in 1822. ^ 

He was ordained by the Presbytery of Lancaster, and spent 
several years in pastoral service, and in the work of a home-mis- 
sionary and colporteur. During this time he removed to Duncan's 
Falls, O., where his residence continued till his death. In 1836 
he was married to Catherine F., daughter of Col. Barker, of 
Duchess Co., N. Y. She died in 1844, and he afterwards married 
Miss Hannah Wilson, who survives him. His only child, a son by 
his first wife, died in opening manhood. 

Mr. Parmelee died, of pneumonia, at Duncan's Falls, on the 6th 
of April, 1872, in his 89th year. t 

1809. 

William Hctngerford, the son of Robert and Olive (Ely) 
Hungerford, was born in Hadlyme parish, in the town of East 
Haddam, Conn., Nov. 22d, 1786. 

For six months after graduating, he taught at West Chester, in 
the town of Colchester, Conn., and then entered on the study of 
law with Hon. Matthew and Ex-Gov. Roger Griswold, at Lyme, 
ConH., and was admitted to the bar in 1812. 

He pursued his profession in his native town until 1829, when 
he came to Hartford, where he resided (in full practice until 1860) 
until his death, Jan. 15th, 1873. 

For his legal attainments, this college gave him the degree of 
Doctor of Laws in 1856. He represented both East Haddam and 
Hartford in the Legislature, but beyond this declined to accept 
public office. He was never married. 



11 

1811. 

Selah Brewster Strong, eldest child of Judge Thomas S. 
and Hannah (Brewster) Strong, was born in Brookhaven (L. L), 
N. Y., May 1st, 1792, and died at his country-seat, in Setauket, 
L. I., Nov. 29th, 1872. 

He studied law in New York city, and was admitted to the bar 
in November, 1814. He subsequently removed his office to his 
father's house, and in 1821 was appointed District Attorney of 
Suffolk County, and held the position (with the exception of one 
interval of nine months) for twenty years. In 1 842 he was elected 
to Congress, and served for one term. In 1847 he was elected, 
under the new constitution. Judge of the Supreme Court of the 
State of N. Y. for the Second District, drawing the short term of 
two years. Two years later he was re-elected, and served for the 
full term, until Jan., 1860. He was also a member of the State 
Constitutional Convention of 1867. 

Judge Strong married, Aug. 14th, 1823, Cornelia, daughter of 
Dr. Richard Udall, of Islip, L. I., who survives. They had six 
sons and four daughters, of whom the eldest son graduated at this 
college in 1855, and the next two surviving sons in 1864. 

1812. 

George Bliss, eldest son of Hon. George Bliss (Y. C. 1784), 
by his first wife, Hannah, daughter of Dr. John Clark (Y. C. 
1749), of Lebanon, Conn., was born in Springfield, Mass., Nov. 
16th, 1793. 

Upon graduation he entered his father's law-ofiice as a pupil, 
and on being admitted to practice, in Sept., 1815, established him- 
self in Monson, Mass., where he remained for 7 years. He then 
returned to Springfield, entering into partnership with Mr. Jona- 
than Dwight, Jr., whose daughter Mary he married in April, 1825. 
In 1827 he entered public life as a member of the House of Repre* 
sentatives of Mass., and was re-elected in 1828, 1829 and 1853, 
serving in the last instance as Speaker ; he was also chosen a mem- 
ber (and President) of the State Senate in 1835. Among many 
public enterprises which occupied his attention, the chief was his 
bringing the Western Railroad, between Worcester and Albany, 
to a successful completion. On retiring from the Presidency of 
this road, in 1846, he visited Europe, and after his return became 
interested in other railroad schemes, chiefly at the West, in con- 
ducting which he gained an enviable reputation. In May, 1860, 



78 

he withdrew from all active business. He died in Springfield, 
April 19th, 1873, in his 80th year. His wife died a few years 
before him. Of their three children, one died in infancy, and a 
son and daughter are still living. 

1813. 

Zedekiah Smith Baestow, the youngest child of Deacon John 
and Susannah (Smith) Barstow, was born in Canterbury, Conn., 
Oct. 4th, 1790. 

Having previously prepared himself in the mathematics and the 
higher English branches, while working on his father's farm, he 
commenced the study of the classics at the age of 19, with Rev. 
Erastus Learned, of Canterbury, and after 6 months of persevering 
study, was admitted to college in 1811. After graduation he 
pursued his theological studies under the direction of President 
Dwight, and was licensed to preach in New Haven in 1814. For 
two years he was tutor and college chaplain in Hamilton College, 
where he received the degree of A.M. {ad eundem) in 1816, and 
was invited to accept a professorship, but declined, preferring to 
devote his life to pastoral work. 

He was settled over the Congregational Church in Keene, N. 
H., July 1st, 1818. July 1st, 1868, he resigned his charge, after 
50 years of pastoral service, during which long period he had 
failed to preach but 8 Sabbaths. After his resignation he still 
continued to preach for destitute parishes in the vicinity until 
within a year of his death, which occurred in Keene, March 1st, 
1873, in the 83d year of his age. 

Dr. Barstow's influence as a pastor, a scholar, and a public man, 
will long be felt not only in the town where he lived, but through- 
out the State. For 37 years he served as trustee of Dartmouth 
College (never missing attendance on a single meeting of the 
Board during his term of service) ; he was secretary for many 
years of the Gen. Association of N. Hamp., a corporate member 
of the A. B. C. F. M., trustee of Kimball Union Academy, trustee 
and secretary of Keene Academy until his death, and prominent 
in all the educational and religious movements of the day. He 
was also member of the N. H. Legislature, and chaplain of that 
body in 1868 and '69. He received the degree of Doctor in 
Divinity from Dartmouth College in 1849. 

Dr. Barstow married, Aug., 1818, Elizabeth Fay Blake, eldest 
daughter of Elihu Blake, of Westborough, Mass., who died Sept. 
15th, 1869. Two sons only of their five children survive them. 



79 

1814. 

John Mulliken Atwood, the eldest son of Moses and Mary 
(Tenney) Atwood, was born in Haverhill, Mass., Aug. 4th, 1795. 
One of his sisters was the well-known missionary, Harriet 
Newell. 

He studied law one year in Haverhill, but then decided on a 
mercantile life. After a single year's clerkship in Boston, he es- 
tablished himself in Philadelphia, in 1816, in partnership with a 
relative, and the firms of " Atwood & Co.," and " Atwood, White 
& Co.," are names honored in Philadelphia and among Western 
merchants. He withdrew from business in 1864. 

He gave to public interests much of his time, and was connected 
with many beneficent efforts. He was one of the formers of the 
American Sunday School Union, and on its committee of publica- 
tion for more than forty years. He was one of the founders, and 
for fifteen years the president of the Merchants' Fund, a noble 
charity for the relief of decayed merchants. 

He died suddenly in Hartford, Conn., May 29th, 1873, at the 
house of his son-in-law. His wife, a Miss Coffin, of Gloucester, 
Mass., died many years before him. 

Joshua Leavitt, eldest child of Roger and Chloe (Maxwell) 
Leavitt, was born in Heath, Mass., Sept. 8th, 1794. His grand- 
father. Rev. Jonathan Leavitt, of Charlemont, Mass., graduated 
at this college in 1758. 

After teaching awhile, he studied law, and was admitted to the 
bar in Northampton, Mass., in 1819. He then practiced as an 
attorney in Putney, Vt, until 1823, when he returned to New 
Haven, and pursued theological studies with the first class in the 
newly-organized Theological Department. In August, 1824, he 
was licensed to preach, and on February 23d, 1825, was ordained 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Stratford, Conn. While 
in this place, he became interested in the Temperance movement, 
and served for four months as an agent of the American Temper- 
ance Society. In 1828 he was appointed secretary of the Ameri- 
can Seamen's Friend Society, and removed to N. Y. city, being 
dismissed from his pastoral charge Oct. 22d. In his new posi- 
tion he took charge of the " Sailor's Magazine," and the rest of his 
life was devoted to editorial service. In 1831, he became editor 
and proprietor of the " N. Y. Evangelist," and so continued until 
the financial crisis of 1837 obliged him to dispose of the paper. 



80 

Meantime he had been a pioneer in the Anti-Slavery cause, and 
now gladly seized the opportunity of devoting his whole time to 
it, as editor of the " Emancipator," from 1837 to 184 7. In 1848 he 
became office editor of the "Independent," and retained this position 
until he reached the age of 70, when he relinquished the manage- 
ment, and took a place of less labor, which he occupied till his 
death. He died of an apoplectic stroke, while at the residence of 
his son, in K Y. city, Jan. 16th, 1873, aged 78. 

Besides his conspicuous connection with the Anti-Slavery move- 
ment. Dr. Leavitt was active in many other directions. He was 
a diligent writer in behalf of Free Trade, and in 1869 received 
from the Cobden Society of England a gold medal for an essay. 
He was also a vigorous advocate of cheap postage. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Wabash College in 1854. 

He married Sarah, daughter of Rev. Solomon Williams (Y. C. 
1770), of Northampton, Mass. One of his sons graduated at this 
college in the class of 1840. 

John Titswoeth, a native of Deckertown, N. J., died in that 
place in the spring of 1873, aged nearly 80. 

He studied medicine in New Haven, receiving his degree in 
1818, and immediately establishing himself in this city. He re- 
mained here as a physician and apothecary for about eight years, 
and then retired and spent the rest of his life upon a farm in his 
native town. 

Dr. Titsworth married Abigail A., daughter of Deacon Nathan 

Beers, of New Haven. She died before him, as did two of their 

four children. 

1815. 

Edward Harleston, son of Edward and Annabella (Moultrie) 
Harleston, was born in Charleston, S. C, 25th Dec, 1794, and died 
11th Feb., 1871, aged 76 years. 

Most of his life was passed as a planter of rice and cotton. He 
served in the State Legislature several years. He married, 26th 
Jan., 1826, Ann Isabella Huger, who survives him. 

Andrew Huntington, ninth son of Capt. Andrew and Ruth 
(Hyde) Huntington, of Lebanon, Conn., was born May 31st, 1791. 

Soon after graduating he began to teach in the academy in 
Greenville, N. Y., and while there he married, May 1st, 1819, Mary, 
daughter of Barnabas Chipman, of Shoreham, Vt. In 1 822, he 



81 

removed to N. Y. city, where he continued to teach, at the same 
time studying theology and reciting with a class to Rev. Drs. 
Spring and Cox, and Rev. Mr. Whelpley. In 1825, he was 
licensed to preach by the North River Presbytery. About 1830, 
he became principal of an academy in Pompey, N. Y., and while 
there supplied during most of the time vacant churches of the 
neighborhood. He afterwards taught and preached in various 
places in N. Y. State, and was ordained as a Presbyterian clergy- 
man, Feb. 19th, 1852. From 1850 to 1862, he preached in 
Chenango County, N. Y., but refused all offers of settlement. In 
1862 he retired from his professional labors. He died in Milan, 
Ohio, June 5th, 1872, aged 81. His widow survives him, with 
three of their four children. One son graduated at this college in 
1843, and is now a clergyman. 

1817. 

Robert Haktshoene was born March 14th, 1798. On his 
return from college he took up his residence at his family home, 
the Highlands, in Portland, N. J., where he lived until his death, 
July 18th, 1872, at the age of 74. He was foremost in all public 
improvements in his neighborhood, and thus a benefactor to the 
community. His wife was a Miss Minton of N. Y. city. He 
leaves a family. 

1818. 

Caleb Day died in Catskill, N. Y., June 6th, 1873, of paralysis. 
He was the son of Ira Day, of Catskill, and born April 7th, 1798. 

He studied law in Catskill, and there practised from 1821 till 
his retirement in 1850. For more than forty years he was an 
elder in the Presbyterian church. He married, Jan. 18th, 1826, 
Lucretia, daughter of Moses Lyman, of Goshen, Conn., and had 
five children, of whom three are still living, with his widow. 

Ralph Randolph Gijrlet was born in Lebanon, Conn., May 
26th, 1797. His father, the Rev. John Gurley (Y. C. 1773), was 
the first pastor of the Congregational Church in Exeter Parish, in 
Lebanon. His mother was Mary, daughter of the Rev. David 
Porter, D.D., of Catskill, N. Y. 

After graduation he studied theology, and was licensed to preach 
by the Baltimore Presbytery. In 1822 he was appointed Agent 
of the American Colonization Society, and from that time till his 
death devoted himself to its service. He resided in Washington, 



82 

D. C, and thougli never ordained performed much labor as a 
preacher and pastor among the poor of the city. He thrice visited 
Liberia ; for the first time in 1824, when he originated the plan of 
goverament under which the colony has been successfully con- 
ducted. He edited the " African Repository," the monthly organ 
of the Society, prepared the annual reports, and published several 
volumes, of which the most important were a life of Ashmun, the 
Agent at Liberia, a life of Rev. Sylvester Larned, and an account 
of his own mission to England. In 1864, on account of declining 
health, he was made honorary secretary. His death took place in 
Washington, July 30th, 1872. 

His wife, Eliza McLellan, whom he married in 1827, died April 
27th, 1872. Eleven of their children died before them. 

James Starr Huggins, son of Samuel and Martha D. (Starr) 
Huggins, was bom in New Haven, Conn., May 1st, 1799. 

After some eighteen months spent in teaching in North Caro- 
lina, he began the study of law with Seth P. Staples, Esq., of New 
Haven, and subsequently completed his preparation in the office of 
Ludlow Ogden, Esq., of N. Y. city, where he was admitted to the 
bar. He entered into partnership with Mr. Ogden, and afterwards 
continued in practice by himself until the time of his death. He 
was especially trusted in the administration of estates and in the 
drawing of wills. 

In the spring of the year 1872 he suffered from a severe attack 
of pneumonia, after which he never recovered his full strength. 
About the first of September, he was rendered unconscious by 
paralysis of the brain, and he died at his residence on Sept. 4th. 

He married, about May, 1839, Helen, daughter of Mr. Richard 
Arden, of Putnam County, N. Y., who died a few years before 
him. Of their seven children, one son and two daughters are still 
living. 

1820. 

Philip Gadsden, son of Philip and Catharine (Edwards) 
Gadsden, of Charleston, S. C, and grandson of Gen. Christopher 
Gadsden, of Revolutionary fame, was born in Charleston, Sept. 
13th, 1798. 

The means of the family being at the time greatly reduced, he 
was educated entirely at home, and was prepared for college by 
his brother, the Rev. Christopher E. Gadsden (Y. C. 1804), after- 
wards Bishop of South Carolina. 



83 

On his return to Charleston in 1820, he engaged for a short time 
in teaching, but entered the General TheoL Seminary, in N. Y. 
city, in 1822. There he remained for a little over two years, when 
pecuniary circumstances obliged him to withdraw. He continued 
his studies at home under his brother's supervision, and was 
ordained deacon by Bishop Bowen, Feb. 6th, 1825. He was sub- 
sequently ordained to the priesthood by the same prelate, April 
14th, 1830. The earlier years of his diaconate were spent in 
arduous missionary work in the lower counties of the State, and 
in 1827 or 1828 he accepted a call to the Church of St. Paul's, 
Stono. The church lay in the unhealthy region contiguous to the 
Edisto river, and was attended in the winter season by the plan- 
ters whose plantations were situated in that section. Mr. Gadsden 
immediately devoted himself to the erection of a chapel at Sum- 
merville, the summer resort of his parishioners, and thus in the 
service of this community passed his active life. His health was 
always delicate, and in the autumn of 1863 failing strength and 
the loss of an eye from paralysis of the nerve compelled him to 
resign his charge. He retired to the up-country, still laboring as 
he had strength in the work of the ministry. In 1869 he accom- 
panied his eldest son to Charleston, and there died on Dec. 26th, 
1870. 

In 1831, he married Miss Susan B. Hamilton, daughter of ex- 
Gov. Paul Hamilton, by whom he had six children, four sons and 
two daughters, all of whom survived him. 

1821. 

JosiAH Brewer was bom June 1st, 1796, in Monterey, then a 
part of Tyringham, Mass. 

He began the study of theology at Andover Seminary in 1822, 
but in 1824 transferred himself to New Haven and finished his 
studies with the first class which received instruction in the Theo- 
logical Department of Yale College. He was also for nearly two 
years, from 1824 to 1826, a tutor in the college. 

He was ordained at Springfield, Mass., May 10th, 1826, as a 
missionary, and in the following September embarked for the 
East, under the direction of the " Boston Female Society for the 
promotion of Christianity among the Jews." He spent about two 
years in laboring in Smyrna and Constantinople, and then returned 
to the U. S. While here he published a volume descriptive of his 
residence in Turkey, and was married, Dec. 1st, 1829, to Emilia 



84 

A., daughter of * Rev. D. D. Field (Y. C. 1802), of Stockbridge, 
Mass. In 1830 he went back to Smyrna, where he remained for 
eight years as a missionary of the " Ladies Greek Association " of 
New Haven, Conn. After his final return to this country, in 1838, 
he was for three years chaplain of the Connecticut State Prison, 
at Wethersfield, and for a short time afterwards agent of the 
Anti-Slavery Society, and editor of an anti-slavery paper in Hart- 
ford, Conn. In 1844 he opened a Young Ladies' Seminary in 
New Haven, Conn., which was afterwards removed to Middletown, 
Conn., and which occupied him until 1857. , He then took up his 
residence in Stockbridge, Mass., and after serving for nine years 
as stated supply of the Congregational Church in the neighboring 
town of Housatonic, lived in retirement until his decease (preceded 
by a few months of severe suffering), Nov. 19th, 1872. 

His first wife died Dec. 16th, 1861, and he was married in May, 
1863, to Miss Lucy T. Jerome, of New Hartford, Conn., daughter 
of the late Rev. Amasa Jerome. Two sons (graduates of this 
college in 1852 and 1856), and four daughters, by his first wife, 
survive him, his youngest son having died of fever contracted in 
the late war. 

1822. 

Francis Hiram Case, son of Titus and Sarah (Egleston) Case, 
was born in West Simsbury, now Canton, Conn., Oct. 1st, 1797. 

He entered the Yale Divinity School immediately upon gradua- 
tion, being a member of the first class and continuing for a three 
years' course. Feb. 1st, 1826, he was ordained pastor of the Con- 
gregational Church in Goshen, Conn. From this charge he was 
dismissed, Sept. 30th, 1828. He was then for 18 months an agent 
of the American Tract Society in the Southern States. Returning 
to Connecticut, he was installed pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Avon, Dec. 22d, 1830. He was dismissed, April 28th, 
1840, and soon after removed to Whitewater, Wise, where he 
supplied the pulpit from 1842 to 1844, and where he resided until 
1863. He then returned to his native town, but in 1868 went 
again to Wisconsin, and there died, in the town of Cold Spring, 
Dec. 20th, 1872, aged 75. 

He married, Oct. 26th, 1825, Lucinda, daughter of Uriah Case, 
and had four children, of whom two sons survived him. 

Harvey Prindle Peet, son of Richard and Joanna (Prindle) 
Peet, was bom in Bethlem, Conn., Nov, 19th, X794. 



85 

He began to teach a district school at the age of 16, and perse- 
vered until he had earned money enough for a two years' course 
at Phillips Academy, Andover. On leaving college his intention 
was to devote his life to the Christian ministry, but an invitation 
to teach in the " American Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb," at 
Hartford, Conn., gave him the opportunity to discover and 
develop his rare fitness for what was then a new profession. His 
life was thenceforwards devoted to the cause of deaf-mute educa- 
tion. For nearly nine years he continued in Hartford, and was 
then appointed Principal of the " N. Y. Institution for the Instruc- 
tion of the Deaf and Dumb," in N. Y. city. Entering on this 
office in Feb., 1831, he fulfilled its duties for more than thirty-six 
years, — for fourteen of them being President of the Board of 
Directors. The degree of LL.D. was conferred on him in 1849 
by the Regents of the University of the State of N. Y., and that 
of Ph.D. by the National Deaf-mute College in 1871. Under his 
care the N". Y. Institution rose to be much the largest of its kind 
in the world, and one of the most successful. He published a 
series of elementary text-books for the use of deaf-mutes, and wrote 
numerous papers on deaf-mute education and kindred topics. 

In 1867, Dr. Peet retired from the active labors of his position, 
retaining the title of Emeritus Principal, and serving as one of the 
Board of Directors until his death. For the last few years of his 
life he suffered from rheumatic affections, which finally reaching 
the region of the heart induced congestion of the lungs. He died 
within two hours after the opening of the New Year, 1873. 

Dr. Peet was thrice married. His first wife, Margaret Maria 
Lewis, daughter of Rev. Isaac Lewis, D.D. (Y. C. 1794), to whom 
he was married Nov. 27th, 1823, died Sept. 23d, 1832, leaving 
three sons, who became able and accomplished teachers of the 
deaf and dumb. The two younger, Edward and Dudley (the 
latter a graduate of this college in 1852), died in 1862 ; and the 
eldest (Y. C. 1845) has succeeded to his father's office. Dr. Peet 
married, in 1835, Miss Sarah Ann Smith, a daughter of Matson 
Smith, M.D., who died Dec. 30th, 1864. His third wife, Mrs. 
Louisa P. Hotchkiss, to whom he was married Jan. 15th, 1868,. 
survives him. 

The number of the " American Annals of the Deaf and Dumb " ' 
for April, 1873, is a memorial of his life and services. 
7 



86 

1823. 

Milton Badger was born May 6th, 1800, in Coventry, Conn., 
and died March 1st, 1873, in Madison, Conn. 

After spending a year in teaching in New Canaan, Conn., he 
began his theological studies in Andover Seminary, but in 1826 
removed t6 New Haven to become a tutor in Yale College (a posi- 
tion which he held for a little more than a year), and to finish his 
preparation for the ministry in the Yale Divinity School. He was 
licensed to preach in 1827 by the New Haven East Association, 
and was ordained, Jan. 3d, 1828, pastor of the South Congrega- 
tional Church in Andover, Mass. From this promising field of 
labor, he was called in May, 1845, to be an associate secretary of 
the American Home Missionary Society. He was dismissed from 
his pastoral charge, Oct. 4th, and removed to New York, and 
entered on his duties during the following month. His faithful 
service in this work ceased four years before his death, when he 
was obliged by disease to retire to his residence at Madison. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Middlebury College 
in 1844. 

His widow and two sons survive him. 

Handel Gershom Nott, son of Josiah and Sarah (Williams) 
Nott, and great-grandson of the Rev. Abraham Nott (Y. C. 1720), 
was born in Saybrook, Conn., Nov. 10th, 1799. 

After a three years' course in Yale Theol. Seminary, he received 
a unanimous call to the First Congregational Church in Nashua, 
N. H., in 1826, where he began his labors in August, and was 
ordained Nov. 8th. His health failing after four years, he was 
absent from his people for nearly a year. Becoming a Baptist 
from conviction of duty during the eighth year of his pastorate, 
he left Nashua, and was engaged as agent of the Amer. Bethel 
Society, and as Bethel chaplain in Buffalo, N. Y., from Oct., 1834, 
to Sept., 1837. After an interval of a few months, he became 
pastor of the Federal (now Clarendon) Street Baptist Church, in 
Boston, in May, 1838, but resigned a year later, the field proving 
discouraging from the formation of new churches and the encroach- 
ment of business houses. From Oct., 1839, to July, 1847, he was 
settled over the Baptist Church in Bath, Me. Then, after supply- 
ing the church in Waterville, Me., for several months, he became 
pastor of the church in Kennebunkport, Me., in July, 1848, and 
remained there for 12 years. Suffering from bronchial and lung 



87 



difficulties, and hoping for benefit from a change of climate, he 
accepted a call from the Baptist Church in Avon, N. Y., in July, 
1860, where he continued until Aug., 1864. Physical infirmities 
then compelled him to give up active service, and after a few 
years spent in Avon, in Champaign, 111., and at the South, he 
resided in Rochester, N. Y., from the summer of 1868 until his 
death. May 3d, 1873, after a short but very distressing illness. 

Mr. Nott was married, July 11th, 1827, to Lydia C, daughter of 
Dea. Abner Kingman, of Providence, R. I. She died in Bath, Feb. 
9th, 1844, leaving six children, of whom one son and four daughters 
are still living. Mr. Nott married a second time, Jan. 29th, 1846, 
Sarah L. Smith, of Bath, who survives him. Of the children of 
this marriage, one son is still living. 



William Starling Sullivant died at his residence in Colum- 
bus, O., April 30th, 1873. He was the eldest son of Lucas Sulli- 
vant, a noted surveyor of the " North Western Territory," and 
was born, Jan. 15th, 1803, in Franklinton, then a frontier settle- 
ment, near the site of the present city of Columbus. 

The death of his father, occurring in the year of his graduation, 
frustrated his plans for studying a profession, and obliged him to 
occupy himself with the care of the family property. He became 
a surveyor and practical engineer, and was actively engaged in 
that business during the larger part of his life. His residence 
being established near Columbus, in a rich floral district, his inter- 
est was excited in botany, and he began a careful study of the 
plants of central Ohio. After giving special attention to the 
grasses and sedges, he turned to the mosses, and by his diligent 
study in this department for thirty years, because the most accom- 
plished bryologist of America. Several elaborate works, mostly 
printed at his owm expense, have laid the foundation for the study 
of mosses in this country. The degree of LL.D. was given him 
by Kenyon College in 1864. 

In January last. Dr. Sullivant was prostrated by an attack of 
pneumonia, from the efiects of which, after a seeming convales- 
cence, he died on the last day of April. His first wife, Jane Mar- 
shall, of Kentucky, a niece of Chief Justice Marshall, died a few 
years after marriage. His second wife, Eliza G. Wheeler, died of 
cholera, in 1850 or 1861. His third wife, Mrs. Caroline E. (Sutton) 
Sullivant, survives him, as do several children. 



88 

1824. 

Joel Talcott, son of Deacon Phineas and Hannah (Kellogg) 
Talcott, and grandson of Rev. Ebenezer Kellogg (Y. C. 1757), 
was born in North Bolton, now Vernon, Conn., Oct. 12th, 1797. 

He pursued his theological studies at Auburn (N. Y.) Theol. 
Seminary, and was licensed to preach by the Hartford North 
(Congregational) Association, June 3d, 1828. He was ordained 
at Hartford, Conn., as an evangelist, July 1st, 1828, and went 
directly to Wellington, Lorain Co., Ohio, where he was settled as 
pastor for ten years. He afterwards preached for different periods 
in Sullivan, Brighton, and Norwalk, Ohio. In consequence of im- 
paired health and weakness of the eyes, he relinquished preaching 
during the last ten or twelve years of his life, and engaged in 
agricultural pursuits in the town of Wakeman, Ohio, where he 
died, Dec. 28th, 1871, aged 74 years. 

He was twice married ; first, in 1829, to Lois Twining, of Tolland, 
Mass., by whom he had three children, and who died in 1836. 
He then married, in 1838, Sarah Ann Cummings, of Sullivan, O., 
who survives him, as does one of her four children ; one son hav- 
ing lost his life through service in the army in 1865. 

William Patterson VanRensselaer, son of Gen. Stephen 
VanRensselaer, the Patroon of Albany, and of his second wife, 
Cornelia (Patterson) VanRensselaer, was born in 1803. 

He studied law, and after traveling in Europe settled at 
Rensselaerwyck, across the river from Albany. When the anti- 
rent difficulties broke out, he removed to Norwalk, Conn., and 
subsequently to the village of Portchester, in Rye, N. Y., where 
he resided for most of the time until his death, which occurred in 
N. Y. city, Nov. 13th, 1872. 

He married Miss Eliza Bayard Rogers, who died at Matanzas, 
March 20th, 1835. He subsequently married a sister of his first 
wife. He left several children. 

1826. 

Isaac Closson Beach was born in New Milford, Conn., March 
2d, 1802. 

He studied theology in private, and after being licensed to preach 
by the Litchfield South Association in 1828, preached in Washing- 
ton, Conn., and in Bethel, Conn. His health failing, he engaged 
as an agent of the American Bethel Society in Ohio, in 1820-'30. 



89 



He was then ordained pastor of the Presbyterian Church in New 
Paltz, Ulster County, N. Y., where he remained for about five 
years. Thence he removed to a small church in Chester, Orange 
County, N. Y., where he continued about eleven years. After 
about eighteen months' service as pastor of a church in Newburgh, 
InT. Y., he removed in 1848 to Northern Illinois, where he labored 
for three and a half years as a home missionary. His next 
remove was to Southern Ohio, where he had charge of the church 
at North Bend for about three years ; thence he went to Cincin- 
nati, and spent between three and four years as pastor of the 
Sixth Presbyterian Church. His health again failed, and in Sep- 
tember, 1858, he settled in Kansas, residing first at Wyandotte, 
and afterwards at Olathe, where he died, Feb. 23d, 1873. Until 
1862 he was the general missionary of the Presbyterian Church 
for the Territory, and traveled largely over the southern portion, 
engaged in organizing churches. 

In 1829, he married Miss Emily A. Wheeler, of New Haven, 
Conn., who survives him. They had eight children, of whom three 
sons and two daughters are living. 

Edwix Eleazar Clark died in Ann Arbor, Mich., Feb. 1st, 
1873, aged 66 years. 

He was born in Belchertown, Mass., and after studying law in 
his native town with Hon. Mark Doolittle (Y. C. 1804), and prac- 
ticing for a short period, he removed to Ann Arbor in 1837, and 
resided there for the rest of his life. In his latter years he aban- 
doned his profession. He was never married. 



George James Pumpellt, son of James and Mary (Pixley) 
Pumpelly, was born in Owego, N. Y., Dec. 11th, 1805, on the 
same estate where his life was spent, and where he died May 9th, 
1873. 

Afier completing the course at the Litchfield Law School, he 
entered the office of Judge Wm. Kent, in New York city, and in 
1829 was admitted to the bar. He then entered his father's land 
office, where he found an opportunity of putting his legal knowl- 
edge in practice. About 1835 he also began to devote himself 
largely to agricultural improvements and to the breeding of choice 
stock. In these pursuits he passed his honored and useful life. 

In April, 1832, he married Susan I. Pumpelly, by whom he had 
four sons and a daughter. His second son graduated at this col- 
lege in 1858. Mrs. Pumpelly died in 1864. 



90 

1827. 

Albert Gallatin Bristol, son of Hon. William Bristol (Y. 
C. 1V98) and Sarah (Edwards) Bristol, was born Dec. 22d, 1808, 
in New Haven, Conn. 

After his graduation he studied medicine with Dr. Jonathan 
Knight, receiving his doctor's degree from the college in 1830, and 
then supplemented his professional course by spending two years 
in the hospitals in Paris. On his return to this country he estab- 
lished himself in Canandaigua, N. Y., where he married. He soon 
afterwards removed to Rochester, N. Y., where he continued the 
practice of his profession for some years, finally relinquishing it 
on account of ill health and spending the remainder of his life in 
manufacturing pursuits. 

He died in Rochester on the 9th of Jan., 1873, at the age of 
64. His widow survives him. 

Philip Rogers Hoffman entered college from Baltimore in 
the Junior year. 

Upon graduation he entered the Yale Medical School, and con- 
tinued medical studies also in Baltimore, but afterwards studied 
law. He married Miss Emily L, Key, of Maryland, and spent 
many years abroad, settling in Dresden, Saxony. On his return 
to this country, about 1860, he made N. Y. city his home, but was 
not obliged to rely upon the active pursuit of his profession for 
the support of his family. He died in N. Y. city, June 12th, 1873, 
aged about 66. He had three children. A son graduated at this 
college in the class of 1863. 

Henry Hogeboom was the son of John C. and Margaret 
(Styck) Hogeboom, of Ghent, Columbia Co., N. Y., and was born 
at Claverack in that county, Feb. 25th, 1809. 

After completing his academical course, he began the study of 
law in the office of his brother-in-law, Abraham Van Buren, in 
Ghent, where he continued until the following spring, when he 
entered for one year the office of Powers & Day, in Catskill. He 
was afterwards in the office of Campbell Bushnell, of Hudson, N. 
Y., and was admitted to the bar in the summer of 1830. From 
that date he practiced his profession in Hudson until elected a 
Judge of the Supreme Court of the State in 1857, which office he 
held at the time of his death. In 1836 he was appointed by Gov. 
Throop Judge of the Court of Common Pleas for his native county, 



91 

and served for two or three years, when he resigned. In 1839, he 
was a prominent member of the General Assembly of the State. 
He received the degree of LL.D. from Rutgers College in 1870. 

Judge Hogeboom married, in Nov., 1832, Miss Jane Eliza, 
daughter of Col. James Rivington, of Poughkeepsie, N". Y. She 
died March 25th, 1858. 

He died Sept. 12th, 1872, at his residence in Hudson. He had 
been failing in health for some months, from over-work. 

1828. 

Edward William Casey was born in Middletown, Conn., Oct. 
3d, 1809, the son of James and Susan (Chandler) Casey. 

After graduation he studied law in Philadelphia. He removed 
to Chicago about the time of its first settlement, and practiced his 
profession there from 1833 to 1838. His health then failed, and 
he was never afterwards able to resume work. He returned to the 
Eastern States, purchased a farm in North Charlestown, N. H., 
and there remained until 1853, when he moved to New Bedford, 
Mass. (where several relatives of his wife resided), and lived there 
until his death, of diabetes. May 3d, 18*72. 

He married, Jan. 1st, 1842, Susan Hilliard, of Claremont, N. 
H., who survives him. Their four children are also all living. 

John Erskine Edwards died at Longwood, Brookline, Mass., 
April 3d, 1873, of paralysis of the brain. He was born in Hart- 
ford, Conn., July 4th, 1809, a great-grandson of President Edwards, 
and son of Jonathan Walter Edwards, Esq. (Y. C. 1789), a dis- 
tinguished lawyer of Hartford, and of Elizabeth, his wife, daugh- 
ter of Capt. Moses Tryon, of Wethersfield, Conn. He was the 
first to die of a family of six brothers, all graduates of this col- 
lege, one in the same class with himself, and the others in the 
classes of 1819, 1820, 1832, and 1839. 

He studied theology at Andover, graduating in 1836. His first 
settlement was in Stonington, Conn., where he was ordained pastor 
of the Second Congregational Church, April 6th, 1840. In April, 
1843, he resigned his charge, and removed soon after to Lancaster, 
Mass., where he settled upon a farm. Here he remained for many 
years, preaching only occasionally. In 1862 he began to preach 
statedly to the Congregational Church in Blackstone, Mass., where 
he continued until failing health compelled him to retire, about a 
year before his death. He then removed to Brookline, and sank 



92 

gradually to rest. His character was remarkable for conscien- 
tiousness, sincerity, and purity. 

He married, in May, 1840, Elizabeth Lucretia Weir Hubbard, 
of Worcester, Mass., who died May 23d, 1841. In Oct., 1841, he 
married Mrs. Ann Phelps, widow of Charles P. Phelps, of Ston- 
ington, and daughter of Mr. Hammond, of Newport, R. I. By 
his second marriage he had two daughters, who with their mother 
survive hinu 

1829. 

Alexander Chakles Robinson was born in Baltimore, Md., 
where his father was a merchant, Aug. 29th, 1809, and died after 
a lingering illness, Nov. 10th, 1871. His early studies were pur- 
sued in St. Mary's College, Baltimore, and in Columbia College, 
N. Y. city, whence he entered Yale in 1827. 

On his return home, he selected medicine as his profession, and 
after the usual course of study, graduated with distinction at the 
Medical School of the University of Maryland. He established 
himself in practice in Baltimore, and was soon in the foremost 
rank of his profession. For one or two years he took part in the 
instruction in the Medical College where he had graduated, but 
finding the tax upon his time too great, he devoted himself solely 
to active practice, in which he continued until obliged by failing 
health to retire a few years before his death. He was especially 
earnest in efibrts for the relief of the unfortunate classes and for 
institutions established for their benefit. He was also keenly alive 
to his convictions in regard to political affkirs. 

At an early age Dr. Robinson married Rosa Wirt, a daughter 
of the distinguished William Wirt. Of six sons and five daugh- 
ters born to them, only four are now living. His wife died in 
1849, and he married, in 1857, M. Louisa, daughter of C.oL R. W. 
Hall, a veteran of the war of 1812. A son and two daughters by 
this marriage are all living. 

1830. 

Benjamin Duffield Neill died in Philadelphia, Pa., in Sept., 
1872, aged 60. 

He was a native of Philadelphia, and entered college in Sopho- 
more year. He became after a few years hopelessly insane, and 
was the inmate of an asylum until the time of his death. 



98 



1831. 



Hugh Thompson Harrison was the son of Hall Harrison, Esq., 
of Baltimore, Md. He was born in 1809, in Easton, Md., where 
his father was then living. 

After taking his degree he studied theology at the Theol. Sem- 
inary of Virginia, and became a clergyman of the Protestant Episc. 
Church. Shortly after his ordination he became Rector of Christ 
Church, Queen Caroline Parish, and of St. John's Church, Howard 
County, Md. In a few years he resigned the former charge. The 
latter he retained (living near Ellicott city) until 1866, when 
growing infirmity of health compelled him to give up regular min- 
isterial work. He then removed to Baltimore, where he resided 
until his death, which occurred June 21st, 1872, in the 63d year 
of his age. 

He was married in 1834, and left a widow and four children. 
He was regarded as specially versed in German theology, and had 
collected a library of German, Dutch and Latin theological 
writers quite unusual for a country clergyman. 



Ephraim Dod Saunders, who died suddenly at his residence 
in W. Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 13th, 1872, was the son of Ephraim 
and Sarah (Rodgers) Saunders, and was born near Mendham, 
N. J., Sept. 30th, 1809. 

After graduation he remained in New Haven for several months 
for the purpose of theological study. In the autumn of 1832 he 
went to Virginia to fill the position of tutor in a family in Cum- 
berland County, and after a year spent in teaching and study, he 
was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of East Hanover, in 
session at Nottoway, Oct. 18th, 1833. After four years of pastoral 
work, during which time he collected money to build two churches, 
he opened a school for boys in Cumberland County, which he sub- 
sequently removed to Goochland County. In 1843 he became 
principal of the Classical Institute at Petersburg, Va., and held 
this position for four years. In 1848 he visited Europe, and on 
his return established a church in Pottsville, Pa., collecting the 
funds needed for the purchase and repairing of a church-building. 
In 1851 he removed to West Philadelphia, and founded a school 
for boys, which was afterwards chartered as a college. During the 
late war a military department was established, the pupils being 
styled the " Courtland Saunders Cadets," in honor of the founder's 
only child, who was killed in battle in September, 1862. After 



94 

the death of his son, Dr. Saunders was made chairman of the 
" Bounty Fund Commission " of Philadelphia, and rendered very- 
efficient service in securing the quota of men necessary to save the 
city from a draft. 

In 1871, he offered to give his real estate in W. Philadelphia, 
valued at $160,000 (reserving a life-annuity of $4000), to the Pres- 
byterian Alliance for the purpose of founding a hospital. The 
offer was accepted, and the property was publicly transferred on 
July 1st, 1871. Dr. Saunders also obtained subscriptions, to the 
amount of $100,000, towards the endowment of the hospital. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Lafayette 
College. 

He was married, Nov. 13th, 1833, to Miss Ann P., daughter of 
Halsey Guerin. She is still living. 

1832. 

Henry Eddy, second son of Thomas and Abi (Lewis) Eddy, 
of New Britain, Conn., was born in New Britain, Oct. 1st, 1805, 
and died in North Bridgewater, Mass., Sept. 23d, 1872, aged 67. 

He studied theology for one or two years after graduiating, at 
Andover Theol. Seminary, and then continued his studies in the 
Yale Seminary. He was ordained, Feb. 16th, 1836, pastor of the 
Congregational Church in West Granville, Mass., from which 
charge he was dismissed, Sept. 25th, 1839. He was installed over 
the Congregational Church in Stoughton, Mass., Nov. 4th, 1840, 
and dismissed in 1844. He then supplied for two years the pulpit 
of the Congregational Church in Turner, Me., and was next settled 
for two years over a church in Kennebunkport in the same State. 
At this time, finding that his voice was failing, he thought it best 
to prepare himself for another profession, and while supplying the 
Congregational Church in North Guilford, Conn, (from Jan., 1849, 
to March, 1851), studied medicine in New Haven and received the 
degree of M.D. from this college in 1851. From that date until 
his death he resided in North Bridgewater, Mass., at first practic- 
ing medicine, but after a few years engaged in farming and in 
business growing out of inventions of his own, and the patent- 
rights connected with them. 

He married, first. Miss Conielia, daughter of Rev. Luke Wood, 
of Clinton, Conn., Jan. 25th, 1836. She died Feb. 6th, 1842, leav- 
ing one daughter, who is still living. He married, secondly, Miss 
Sarah H. Torrey, of N. Bridgewater, Mass., Aug. 23d, 1843, who 



95 

survives him, with two sons, graduates of this college in 1867 and 
1870. 

1833. 

RuFus Abbot was born in Wilton, N. H., Apr. 17th, 1807 ; the 
second son of Zebadiah and Elizabeth (Hale) Abbot. 

For two years after graduation he taught school and stud- 
ied medicine in Greensburg, Ky., and then attended a course 
of lectures in the Medical School in Lexington, Ky. He began 
practice in the spring of 1836, but subsequently, in the winter of 
1838-39, attended lectures in Louisville, Ky., and received the 
degree of M.D. He then established himself in Jefferson City, 
Mo., where he practiced until 1856, when he removed to Fulton, 
Mo. In 1867 he removed to Pleasant Hill, Mo., where he died 
Jan. 12th, 1873. Dr. Abbot married, Apr. 5, 1838, Mary B., 
daughter of Joseph Aikin, of Greensburg, Ky., who died on the 
12th of the following October. He again married, October 21st, 
1840, Mary R. Hart, of Jefferson City, who survives him, with 
their three children. 

Edward Anthony Bradford was born in Plainville, Conn., 
Sept. 27th, 1813, the son of Henry and Lois (Eaton) Bradford. 

He began the study of law at the Harvard Law School in 1834, 
graduating in 1837 ; and in the winter of 1837-8 established him- 
self in practice in New Orleans. He pursued his profession there 
with eminent success until 1869, when he was attacked by an in- 
curable disease which forced him to give up all business. The 
winter of 1869-70 he spent at Pau, France, and in June went to 
Berlin for medical treatment. The war prevented his intended 
removal to Paris, and he passed the two years from Sept., 1870, to 
Aug., 1872, in Torquay, England. He then was taken to Paris, 
where he died Nov. 22d, 1872. 

He married Sarah E. Fanning, of K Y., Sept. 14th, 1848, who 
survives him, with two sons. 

John Henry Southard, son of Zebulon and Catharine (Van 
Yoorhies) Southard, was born in Fishkill, N. Y., Jan. 10th, 1812, 
and died in the same place, Dec. 19th, 1872, aged nearly 61 years. 

He studied law, after graduation, in N. Y. city, and was in 
practice there until the time of his death. He was never married. 

1835. 
Xehemiaii Bushnell was born in Westbrook, Conn., Oct. 
9th, 1813. 



96 

Shortly after graduation he began the study of law, at the Law 
School in Cambridge, Mass., where he remained for one year. In 
1837 he was admitted to the bar in Middletown, Conn., and im- 
mediately removed to Quincy, III, where he associated himself in 
the practice of his profession with Hon. O. H. Browning. Mr. 
Bushnell soon became identified with some of the most important 
public improvements in the western part of the State. In 1851 
he became President of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R. 
Co., and held that position till 1861, when he retired, and was 
appointed attorney for the road, which ofiice he held until his 
death. He was elected in the autumn of 1872 to represent the 
city of Quincy in the General Assembly of the State. While in 
Springfield in attendance on this duty, he contracted a severe cold, 
which superinduced an attack of erysipelas, which terminated 
fatally, Jan. 31st, 1873. 

In Oct., 1840, he married Miss Eliza H. Benedict, of Millbury, 
Mass. They had seven children, of whom four are now living, one 
son being a graduate of this college in the Class of 1865. 

George Peter Prudden, son of Peter and Charity (Davis) 
Prudden, was born in Orange, Conn., Feb. 13th, 1816. 

After graduating he taught in Lockport, N. Y., for one year. 
He studied theology at the Yale Divinity School for two years 
(1837 to 1839), and was licensed to preach by the New Haven 
West Association, in May, 1 838. 

In May, 1839, he was called to the pastorate of the First Pres- 
byterian Church in Medina, N. Y., and was ordained there on the 
25th of Sept. following. From this charge he was dismissed in 
Nov., 1844. From Dec, 1845, to March, 1851, he served as stated 
supply for the Congregational Church in Middlebury, Conn., his 
health not permitting him to settle. For the next four years he 
supplied the pulpit of the Congregational Church in Southbury, 
Conn., and was then obliged by ill -health to cease from profes- 
sional labor for a year. From Nov., 1856, until 1861, he was 
acting pastor of the Congregational Church in Watertown, Conn., 
and for the two following years sustained a similar relation in 
Monroe, Conn. In 1864 he removed to New Haven, Conn., but 
was not able to engage in active labor again. He died in Brattle- 
boro, Vt., Aug. 20th, 1872, after a depressing illness continued 
through many years. 

Mr. Prudden was married, Nov. 4th, 1839, to Miss Eliza A. 
Johnson, of Southbury, Conn., who survives him, with four of 



97 

their five children. Two of his sons have received degrees from 
this college. 

1836. 

Henry Champion Deming was born in Colchester, Conn., May 
23d, 1815, the son of Gen. David and Abigail (Champion) Deming. 

He studied law at the Harvard Law School, where he graduated 
in 1839. He then opened an office in New York city, but devoted 
himself rather to literature than to his profession. At this time he 
was engaged with Park Benjamin in editing the " New World," 
a literary weekly, and at this time also he published a translation 
of Eugene Sue's "Wandering Jew." In 1847 he removed to 
Hartford, Conn., and opened a law-office. In 1850 he married 
Sarah, daughter of Laurent Clerc, the first deaf-mute instructor in 
this country. In 1849, 1850, 1859 and 1860, he was a member of 
the State House of Representatives. In 1854 he was elected 
Mayor of Hartford, and served until 1858, and again from 1860 to 

1862. At the close of the year 1861, he was appointed Colonel of 
the 12th Connecticut Volunteers, and accompanied Gen. Butler's 
expedition to New Orleans. After the capture of that city he was 
detailed mayor, and sei-ved with tact and ability until January, 

1863, when he resigned both military and civil position, on ac- 
count of his own health and the health of his wife. In the spring 
of the same year, he was elected to Congress, and represented the 
First District of Connecticut fiDr four years. In 1868 he wrote a 
life of General Grant, which had an extensive sale. In the follow- 
ing year he was appointed by the President, Collector of Internal 
Revenue, and this office he held until his death, which occurred at 
his residence in Hartford, Oct. 9th, 1872. His wife died in July, 
1869, leaving three sons, of whom two graduated at this college in 
1872. In June, 1871, he married Mrs. Annie Putnam Jillson, a 
great-granddaughter of Gen. Putnam, who survives him. 

Besides his Congressional speeches. Col. Deming published a 
Eulogy of Abraham Lincoln, delivered before the General As- 
sembly of Connecticut, in 1865 ; an Oration delivered at the com- 
pletion of the Monument to Gen. Wooster, at Danbury, in 1854, 
and many other public addresses. These with his unpublished 
writings abundantly attest his great fertility of intellect; his 
personal power as an orator was equally remarkable. He received 
the degree of LL.D. from Trinity College in 1861. 

Hexry Hatch Dent was born in Maryland, on Feb. 11th, 
1815. 



98 

He studied law under the late Hon. Felix Grundy, at Washing- 
ton, D. C, and began practice as a partner with the distinguished 
jurist under whom he had completed his professional studies. 

He married Miss Adlum, of Georgetown, D. C, on Sept. 14th, 
1841. 

After having fulfilled all his duties with honor and fidelity, he 
departed this life in the city of Baltimore, Nov. 19th, 18V2. 

1837. 

Thomas Tallman, son of Eleazar and Susan Tallman, was born 
in the parish of Middle Haddam (in Chatham), Conn., June 12th, 
1816. 

He studied theology in Yale Theological Seminary for three 
years after leaving college, and was ordained pastor of the Con- 
gregational Church in Scotland, Conn., March 20th, 1844. From 
this charge he was dismissed, June 26th, 1861. From July, 1861, 
to Nov., 1863, he supplied the pulpit of the Congregational Church 
in Groton, Conn. In 1864, he removed to Thompson, Conn., and 
there resided until his death, in the interval preaching in West- 
minster (in 1864-65), and in East Putnam (from April, 1868, to 
Nov., 1869). He was a member of the State House of Represen- 
tatives in the sessions of 1866 and 1867. He died, after great 
sufferings, Oct. 9th, 1872, from the effects of a cartilaginous tumor, 
which had been forming in the abdomen for more than three 
years. 

Mr. Tallman was married, May 17th, 1842, to Frances M., 
daughter of Simon Hazleton, of Haddam. She died July 30th, 
1860. He was again married, April 27th, 1864, to Hannah C. 
Graves, of Thompson, who survives him. His children were a son 
and a daughter by his first, and a son and a daughter by his 
second marriage. The elder son graduated at this college in 
1867. 

1841. 

Jackson Jones Bushnell was born in Old Saybrook, Conn., 
Feb. 19th, 1815, and died after a week's illness, of typhoid pneu- 
monia, in Beloit, Wisconsin, March 8th, 1873. 

He entered Andover Theol. Seminary in December, 1841, but 
after a few months there, became a tutor in Western Reserve Col- 
lege, Ohio. After a tutorship of two years, during the latter of 
which he was licensed to preach, he was appointed financial agent 
of the college, and served in that relation, and as an agent of the 



Western College Society, until April, 1 848. He was then appointed 
Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Beloit Col- 
lege, and entered on his office as the pioneer instructor of the new 
institution. In 1858 he resigned, and devoted himself to business 
in Beloit, but in 1863 was re-appointed and continued in office 
until his death. Besides his proper work as a professor, he was 
the financier of the college, and its prosperity, as well as the growth 
of the business interests of the town, is largely due to him. 

Professor Bushnell married in 1854 Miss Sarah E. Lewis, of 
Southington, Conn. She survives him, with their three children. 

1842. 

James Hadley, son of James Hadley, was born in Fairfield, N. 
Y., March 30th, 1831, where his father was then Professor of 
Chemistry in the Medical College. After a boyhood peculiarly set 
apart to study by an accident which early disabled him, he entered 
this college at the beginning of the Junior year, and graduated 
the foremost of his class. 

After living in New Haven one year as resident graduate, he 
entered the Theological Department, where he remained two years, 
except a few months, from Sept., 1844, to April, 1845, during 
which he acted as tutor in Middlebury College. In Sept., 1845, 
he became a tutor in Yale College, and held that office three years, 
until Aug., 1848, when he was appointed Assistant Professor of 
Greek. In July, 1851, when President Woolsey resigned the Pro- 
fessorship of Greek, he was appointed to succeed him in that place. 
He died, after an illness of about a month, in New Haven, Nov. 
14th, 1872, aged 51 years. The discourse delivered at his funeral 
by President Porter was printed in the " New Englander " for Jan., 
1873, and has also been published separately. 

Professor Hadley published a Greek Grammar in 1866, and an 
abridgment of the same in 1869. Since his death a volume of 
essays selected from his papers has been published, and also a 
volume of Lectures on Roman Law. 

He was married, Aug. 13th, 1851, to Miss Ann Twining, daugh- 
ter of the late Stephen Twining, Esq. (Y. C. 1795), of New Haven, 
who survives him, with one son, now a member of the Freshman 
Class in this college. 

1844. 

Edward Artemas Raymond, only child of Robert Raymond, 
was born in Canandaigua, N. Y., Jan. 27th, 1826. He entered 



100 

college from the Canandaigua Academy in the third term of Fresh- 
man year. 

After leaving college he remained at his father's residence, then 
in Lima, N. Y., for two years, for the purpose of recruiting his 
health. In 1846 he went to Rochester, N. Y., where he studied 
law and was admitted to the bar in 1850. He entered into part- 
nership with Wm. S. Bishop, Esq., and in 1854 was elected Dis- 
trict Attorney, which office he held for several years. He con- 
tinued in successful practice in Rochester until his final illness. 
For a year or more before his death, he suffered from a pulmonary 
difficulty, which steadily undermined his vital powers. He died 
at his residence in Brighton, a suburb of Rochester, May 12th, 
1873, leaving a widow, with five sons and one daughter. 

Mr. Raymond was an elder in St. Peter's Presbyterian Church, 
in Rochester, and had held many positions of official trust in the 
community. 

1847. 

Andrew Tully Pratt, eldest child of Wm. T. and Eliza H. 
(Steele) Pratt, was born at Black Rock, near Buffalo, N". Y., Feb. 
22d, 1826. During his college course, his family resided in Ber- 
lin, Conn. 

He taught for a few months after graduation in Southport, 
Conn., and spent the next year in the Union Theol. Seminary, 
N. Y. city. He then began the study of medicine in New Haven, 
was also connected with the Yale Theol. Seminary for two years, 
and graduated M.D. at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
N. Y., in 1852. 

In pursuance of the plan which had been in his mind from the 
time when he began to study in the academy at Berlin, he was 
ordained as a missionary and physician of the American Board, 
at New Haven, Aug. 8th, 1852 ; and, having been married on the 
same day to Miss Sarah Frances Goodyear, of New Haven, sailed 
with his wife, Dec. 22d, for his mission field in Syria. His first 
station was at Aintab, but he removed to Aleppo in 1856, and to 
Marash in 1859. In 1868, he was transferred to the Western 
Turkey Mission, and stationed at Constantinople, where he was 
engaged on the revision of the Armeno-Turkish Bible, until his 
death in that city, Dec. 5th, 1 872. 

Of his ten children, four survive him. 



101 

1848. ' 

Edmund Denison Stanton was born in Stonington, Conn., 
April 15th, 1829, and died in N. Y. city, May 29th, 1873. 

The first three years after graduation were spent at home and 
in European travel. He then entered a brokef's office in N. Y. 
city, and continued in that business until the brief illness which 
preceded his death. 

He married, Oct 11th, 1863, Louise, daughter of the late Court- 
landt Babcock, Esq., of N. Y, city, who survives him. 

1849. 

George Anderson Gordon was born in Savannah, Ga., Sept. 
26th, 1830, and died in Huntsville, Ala., Oct. 5th, 1872, aged 42. 

He entered the Sophomore Class in Sept., 1846, and after grad- 
uation remained for a year, engaged in the study of law, in the 
Law Department. In Nov., 1850, he began the practice of his 
profession in Newark, N. J., but in the following summer returned 
to Savannah, where he continued in practice till the close of the 
year 1860. During this period he was, successively, U. S. District 
Attorney and Member of the House of Representatives, In 1860 
-61 he was a member of the State Senate, and then entered the 
Confederate military service, as captain in the Ist Regiment of 
Georgia Volunteers. He subsequently became major and colonel. 
After the close of the war, he removed to Huntsville, where he 
engaged in the practice of the law until his last illness. 

He married Carolina B. Steenbergen, of Virginia, June 6th, 
1850. She died July 16th, 1851, leaving one son. He was again 
married, Jan. 12th, 1854, to Ellen C. Bevine, of Huntsville, Ala., 
who died Aug. 15th, 1867, leaving six children. 

John Waties, the son of Thomas Waties, was born in States- 
burg, Sumter County. S. C, in March, 1828. His mother was a 
sister of Bishop Rutledge (Y. C. 1820), of Florida. 

For four years succeeding graduation he was employed in civil 
engineering. Afterwards he studied law, serving meantime from 
1854 to 1859 as Clerk of the Court of Appeals of his native State. 
From 1857 until his death he practiced his profession in Columbia, 
S. C, except that during the civil war he served as a lieutenant 
and captain of artillery in the Confederate service. In his military 
career were sown the seeds of the disease which, after a long and 
painful illness, closed his life, on the 29th of April, 1873. 
8 



102 

Mr. Waties was married, Dec. 18th, 1853, to Miss Fannie C. 
Parker, of Columbia, S. C, who survives him, with several 
children. 

Erasttjs Hay Reiser was born in York, Pa., Jan. 28th, 1826. 
After a course of legal study in his native place, he was admitted 
to the bar, June 1st, 1851, and began the practice of his profes- 
sion, at first in partnership with Hon. Daniel Durkee, of York. 
After Judge Durkee's death, in 1854, he continued in practice 
alone until his death, July Uth, 1872. He was for a number of 
years before his death an elder in the Presbyterian Church. 

He married, Oct. 12th, 1852, Miss Anne Franklin, of York, and 

had one child. 

1851. 

William Pitt Riddell, fifth son and ninth child of Professor 
John L. and Lephe (Gates) Riddell, was born in Preston, 
Chenango Co., N. Y., Oct. 1st, 1828. He entered this college 
from Amherst College in the Sophomore year. 

He went to New Orleans in 1851, studied chemistry at the 
University of Louisiana, and was afterwards appointed Professor 
of Chemistry. 

He spent his life as a teacher in the South. He is reported to 
have been killed in Houston, Texas, in the month of June, 1872. 

Richard Cresson Stiles was born in Philadelphia, Oct. 3d, 
1830. 

He pursued the study of medicine with Dr. Joseph Carson, in 
Philadelphia, attended lectures at the University of Pennsylvania,^ 
and received the degree of M.D. in 1854. After a short service as 
Assistant Physician at the Kings County Hospital, Flatbush, L. I., 
he went to Europe where he continued his studies, chiefly in Paris, 
until 1857. 

In the year of his return to this country, he was appointed pro- 
fessor of Physiology in the University of Vermont. Although he 
had faithfully prepared himself for such a position, on his appoint- 
ment he returned immediately to Paris, and spent several months 
in the review of physiological studies, before entering on his course 
of lectures. In 1858 he accepted also the chair of Physiology in 
the Berkshire (Mass.) Medical Institution. In 1 860 he established 
with Dr. W. H. Thayer the Berkshire Medical Journal, a monthly 
publication ; but the absorption of all interests in the war was 
unfavorable for the enterprise^ and it was discontinued at the close 
^f the first year. 



103 



In 1862, Dr. Stiles was impelled by patriotic motives to enter 
the U. S. Service. Passing his examintion as Surgeon of Volun- 
teers, he was ordered to the charge of a General Hospital at Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. The next year his desire for field-service was gratified 
by his transfer to the Army of the Potomac as Surgeon-in-chief of 
CaldwelPs Division, Hancock's Corps, in which position he parti- 
citated in all the movements of the arduous campaign of 1863. 

In 1864 he left the service, and coming to Brooklyn, N. Y., was 
appointed Resident Physician of the Kings County Hospital. 
His connection with the Berkshire Med. Institution terminated 
with his entering the army, but he retained his position in the 
Univ. of Vermont until 1865. In 1865, also, he removed to 
Brooklyn to practice medicine ; and at the formation of the Metro- 
politan Board of Health, in 1866, accepted the office of Deputy 
Registrar of Vital Statistics, that is, Registrar for Kings County. 
In 1868 he was made Assistant Saintary Superintendent, and held 
the two positions until the Board of Health was dissolved in 1870. 
In the summer of this year his mental powers, which had been 
severely overworked in his professional studies, gave way. After 
a few months' residence in an Insane Asylum, his health improved 
and he engaged again in general practice. In 1872 he traveled in 
Europe, but in the fiDllowing spring his mental disease grew more 
serious, and towards the close of March he left Brooklyn for his 
mother's home in West Chester, Pa. There he was attacked with 
pneumonia, and after ten days' illness he died on the 16th of 
April, 1873. 

Dr. Stiles married in 1856, in Leghorn, a daughter of Dr. 
Thomas Wells, of New Haven, Conn. His widow survives him, 
with one son. 

1852. 

James Harrison Dwight was born on the island of Malta, 
Oct. 9th, 1830. His father was Rev. H. G. O. Dwight, D.D., late 
missionary of the A. B. C. F. M., and his mother (Elizabeth Bar- 
ker) was from North Andover, Mass. His early years were spent 
at Constantinople and Broosa, in Turkey. At the age of 1 7 he 
came to this country and entered Williston Seminary, Easthamp- 
ton, Mass. 

From 1852 to 1855 he was a member of the Union Theol. Sem- 
inary, in N. Y. city. He was licensed to preach in May, 1855, by 
the 4th Presbytery of N. Y., and in the following September 
married Miss Susan E., daughter of Rev. Benjamin Schneider, 



104 

D.D., of Turkey. He then attended medical lectures at the 23d 
St. Medical College, N. Y. city, finishing the required course 
though not taking the degree. He now engaged with his next 
younger brother (Y. C. 1854) in maturing plans for opening a 
college in Constantinople, and meanwhile, after receiving ordina- 
tion. May 24th, 185Y, supplied for one year the Presbyterian 
Church in Cherry Valley, N. Y. Returning to N. Y. city in 
1858, he spent nearly a year in developing the college enterprise ; 
but at the last moment found himself confronted with unforeseen 
obstacles, which caused the transfer of the whole scheme to other 
hands. Disappointed in what he had looked forward to as the 
work of his life, he removed to the new town of Englewood, N. 
Y, where he organized a Presbyterian Church, and was installed 
pastor. Just after his installation, he suffered another bitter trial 
in the death of his wife, Feb. 13th, 1860. 

In the autumn of 1861, under leave of absence from his church, 
he accepted the appointment of chaplain of the 66th N. Y. Vols., 
and served for 18 months with the Army of the Potomac. 

In March, 1866, he was attacked with hemorrhage from the 
lungs, and in May, 1867, was obliged by his health to resign his 
pastoral charge. He continued to reside in Englewood, content- 
ing himself with occasional work of various kinds. He was for a 
time associate editor of the " Church Union," now the " Christian 
Union," and subsequently had charge of special departments of 
that paper and of the " Independent." His last work was the task 
of raising funds for the Palestine Exploration Society, and of pro- 
viding for the equipment of the expedition. When after many 
weary months of labor, he saw the expedition sail out of the har- 
bor of New York, he felt that his work was over, and sank so 
rapidly that he died within about three weeks. After a final ill- 
ness of a very few days, he passed away, Dec. 2d, 1872. 

Mr. Dwight married for his second wife, in 1865, Miss Josephine 
C. Wilder, daughter of the late S. V. S. Wilder. She survives 
him, as does one son by his first marriage. 

Reginald Heber Hall died in Menphis, Tenn., Feb. 16th, 
1872, in the fortieth year of his age. He was the son of Robert 
C. Hall, and was born at Muncy Farms, Lycoming Co., Pa., June 
1st, 1832. 

After studying law in Williamsport, Pa., he was admitted to 
the bar in Nov., 1854, and in the following month settled in In- 



105 



dianapolis, Ind., where he remained in full practice until his death. 
He left home early in February, 18Y2, on a journey for the benefit 
of his health, and after a few days of exposure to severe cold, was 
seized while in Memphis with a paralytic attack, from which he 
never rallied. 

Major Hall married, July 29th, 1859, Sarah L., daughter of Dr. 
George W. Mears, of Indianapolis, who survives him. 

Nathaniel William Taylor Root, son of Rev. Judson A. 
Root (Y. C. 1823), and of Emily M. (Peck) Root, was born in 
New Haven, Conn., Nov. 24th, 1829. 

He was connected with college only during the Freshman year, 
but in 1864 received the honorary degree of M.A., and was subse. 
quently enrolled with his class. 

After leaving college he spent several years in teaching in New 
Haven and elsewhere. He afterwards pursued theological studies, 
in the Berkeley Divinity School, in Middletown, Conn., and was 
ordained Deacon by Bishop Williams, at Middletown, May 25th, 
1859. A year later he removed to Rhode Island, where he was 
advanced to the priesthood, and took charge of the parish of 
Lonsdale. This charge he relinquished in May, 1861, to become 
chaplain of the Ninth Regiment of R. I. Volunteers. After three 
months' service, he returned to his parish, and early in 1865 re- 
turned to Newtown, L. I., as rector of the Episcopal Church. This 
charge he resigned in 1868, and he then went to Portland, Me., 
where he served as rector of St. Paul's Church until his death, of 
small-pox, Dec. 14th, 1872. A few months previous to his death 
he was appointed instructor in drawing in Bowdoin College. 

Mr. Root married, Jan. 1st, 1855, Charity E., daughter of Capt.. 
Burr Nash, of New Haven, who survives him, with two sons and 
one daughter. 

. 1853. 

Samuel Adams Lyons Law Post was born in Meredith,. 
Delaware County, N. Y., June 10th, 1829. His parents were 
Stephen and Amanda W. (Burchard) Post, who emigrated from 
Bozrah, Conn., in 1818. 

He was early obliged to provide for himself, beginning by teach- 
ing a district school, in the winter of 1842-43, when he was not 
yet 14 years old. These necessities delayed his entrance inta 
college, and determined also his subsequent work. 

After graduation he taught for a year in an academy in 
Mamaroneck, Westchester County, N. Y., and then took charge 



106 

of a classical school in Derby, Conn. In 1856, he removed to 
Ulster County, N. Y., as principal of the Ellenville High School. 
Two years later he became also the proprietor of the school, and 
conducted it successfully until 1868, when having been admitted 
to the bar he began the practice of law. In the autumn of 1871 
he was prostrated by a disease of the lungs, which prevented his 
further pursuit of his profession. He now undertook the editor- 
ship of the " American Odd-Fellow," published in N. Y. city, but 
strength was soon exhausted, and he came back to Ellenville to 
die. His death occurred Jan. 8th, 1873. 
He married, Dec. 6th, 1854, Miss Laura Judd, of Lockport, N. 

Y., who survives him, with children. 
I 

1855. 

Emil Spanier, son of Louis and Rosalie L. (Meyer) Spanier, 
was born in Hanover, Germany, March 21st, 1836. 

He came with his parents to this country when three years of 
age, and resided at Albany, N. Y., until he entered the Junior 
Class in this college. 

His health failing, at the time of his graduation, he was com- 
pelled to abandon his intention of studying law. He visited 
Europe with his mother in 1857, and consulted eminent physicians, 
but his tour was without benefit, and for years he was confined to 
his room, yet without losing his marked literary tastes and his 
innate gentleness of disposition. In May, 1864, he removed with 
his parents to N. Y. city, and become a partner in a manufactur- 
ing house. He remained in this business until the time of his 
death, and found leisure for the prosecution of his favorite studies, 
and also for the cultivation of his poetical talent, so that he left a 
manuscript volume of poems nearly ready for publication. 

He died after five months of intense suffering, on the 13th of 
October, 1872, a true and zealous believer in the Jewish faith. 
He was unmarried. 

1858. 

Samuel Caldwell, son of William and Sarah (Lindsay) Cald- 
well, was born in Salem, Mercer County, Pa., April 14th, 1834. 
His parents removed to Farmington, 111., from which place he en- 
tered this college at the beginning of the Junior year, having 
spent the two preceding years in Knox College. 

On graduating, he edited a paper in Rock Island, 111., during 
the State campaign of 1858, and then spent some time in the study 



lOV 



of law and in teaching. In April, 1861, lie enlisted as a private 
in the 8th Illinois Infantry, and remained in service until May, 
1866; from February, 1864, with the rank of captain. In Jan., 
1867, he formed a law-partnership with his classmate Robison, in 
Peoria, III., whose sister, Mary J. Robison, he had married, Jan. 
5th, 1865. lu 1870 he was elected to the lower House of the 
State Legislature, and contracted while at the Capitol a malarious 
disease, which after distressing physical and mental weakness 
ended his life, on the 13th of Sept., 1872. 

His wife survives him, with one of his two daughters. 

1860. 

Edgar Augustus Finkey, son of James and Harriet Finney, 
was born in Norwalk, Conn., March 27th, 1836. 

After graduation he studied law for two years, — during the 
first year in N. Y. city, and then in Norwalk. He was about to 
be admitted to the bar when he enlisted for nine months in the 
31st New Jersey Volunteers, in which regiment he was soon after 
chosen captain. At the battle of Chancellorsville, in May, 
1863, he was taken prisoner, and was confined for two months in 
Libby Prison. 

After his return to the North, he was engaged in business for a 
short time in New York, but soon retired to his native place, 
where he died of consumption, Sept. 21st, 1872, in the 37th year 
of his age. 

Mr. Finney was married, March 5th, 1867, to Mary, eldest 
daughter of John Van Cleef, of Brooklyn, N. Y., who remains his 
widow. Their only child, a daughter, died in infancy. 



1862. 

William Russell Kimbeely, son of Henry and Julia A. 
(Fratt) Kimberly, was born in West Troy, N. Y., Sept. 19th, 
1840. 

In the winter of 1862-63, he was a student in Bryant and Strat- 
ton's Commercial College at Troy, N. Y., and in that institution 
he taught during the year 1863. He was then for a year a 
teacher in the Hudson River Institute at Claverack, N. Y., and in 
1865 was employed in Bryant and Stratton's Commercial College 
in N. Y. city. In October, 1865, he purchased a half-interest (and 
subsequently the entire interest) in the Philadelphia establishment 
of the same firm. The position of principal in this institution he 
retained until his death. 



108 

In the summer of 1872 he visited a sister in Wisconsin, and was 
there attacked with intermittent, afterwards changing to typhoid 
fever. His anxiety to return home was so great that his physi- 
cian consented ; but the journey exhausted his strength, and he 
died four days after reaching Philadelphia, Aug. 26th, 1872. 

He was married at Williamsburgh, N. Y,, April 19th, 1866, to 
Miss Mary Harding, who with an only daughter survives him. 

1864. 

Thomas Kast Boltwood, seventh son of Hon. Lucius and 
Fanny H. (Shepard) Boltwood, was bom in Amherst, Mass., Feb. 
16th, 1844. 

He entered college, from Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., in 
Sept., 1859, but at the end of the first term of his Sophomore year 
was obliged to go away on account of illness. A year later he 
joined the next class. 

He studied law, receiving the degree of LL.B. from the Albany 
Law School in May, 1866, and in April, 1867, he began to practice 
his profession in Toledo, O. In 1869 he suffered from mental 
disease, and was obliged to give up his profession. He subse- 
quently resided in Castleton, N. Y, 

He died in Hartford, Conn., Dec. 25th, 1872, in the 29th year 
of his age. 

He married, June 6th, 1867, Miss M. Matilda Van Hoesen, of 
Castleton, N. Y., who survives him. 

Alfred Eastman Walker, youngest son of Alfred and Eunice 
(Minor) Walker, was bom in New Haven, Conn., Jan. 6th, 1842. 

He studied medicine in New York and New Haven, receiv- 
ing the degree of M.D. from this college in 1867. Intending to 
devote himself to the study of nervous diseases, he became Assis- 
tant Physician at the Insane Asylum in Worcester, Mass., in May, 
1868, but a short experience cast a depressing influence over his 
mind, from which, perhaps, he never entirely recovered. He sub- 
sequently went to Washington Territory, and then established 
himself in practice in Chicago. After the fire in that city, in Oct., 
1871, he returned to New Haven for a permanent residence, but 
the state of his health made him a great sufferer, and he found 
relief in death, March 5th, 1873. 

He leaves a wife and child. 



109 



1868. 



John Marvin Chapin, son of Marvin Chapin, was born in 
Springfield, Mass., May 15th, 1844. 

Already of mature years at graduation, and with experience in 
the charge of a mission-church, he labored as an evangelist in 
North Blandford, Mass., for the most of the time from February 
to November, 1869. At the latter date he entered the Theologi- 
cal Seminary at Hartford, Conn., where he graduated in June, 
18V2. On the 19th of the same month, he was ordained pastor of 
the First Congregational Church in West Springfield, Mass., and 
labored untiringly through the hot summer months which followed. 
His health declined, and at the end of the summer he took a vaca- 
tion, from which he returned at the beginning of October, much 
refreshed: but after preaching two Sundays he grew rapidly 
worse, and symptons of typhoid fever were developed. He was 
removed to his father's house in Springfield, where he died on the 
evening of the 26th of October, aged 28 years. He was not 
married. 

1869. 

John Eliason, son of Thomas W. Eliason, was born in Ches- 
tertown, Md., July 29th, 1848. He was a student in Washington 
College, Md., before entering this college. 

The first year after graduation he spent in teaching in Easton, 
C'Onn. He then returned home and studied medicine, completing 
his preparation by attending lectures at Jefierson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, where he received the degree of M.D., March 12th, 
1873. He died, at his father's house, of typhoid fever, on the 4th 
of the following month. He was unmarried. 

1870. 

Henry AuGUSTtrs Cleveland, the youngest son of Henry and 
Charlotte A. Cleveland, was bom Aug. 27th, 1848, in Batavia, N. 
Y. His preparation for college was conducted in the New Haven 
Hopkins Grammar School. 

After his graduation he visited St. Louis in October, and in 
November sailed for Germany, with the purpose of spending a 
year or more in study and travel. Soon after settling in Dresden 
his health began to decline. The change did not appear serious 
to himself, and his physician gave him no reason for anxiety until 
the first of June, 1871, when he was ordered to a consumptive- 
>cure. By advice he returned home in August, and in September 



no 

his mother and sister went with him to Italy and Egypt for the 
winter. He remained abroad for ten months, but with no mater- 
ial benefit. The winter of 1872-73 was despairingly begun in 
Perry, Wyoming County, N. Y., but as spring opened he seemed 
to be gaining, and plans were hopefully made for the summer, 
when fatal symptoms suddenly appeared in the night of April 
21st, and before noon of the following day he was dead. 

1872. 

RoBBRT Elmbr Coe, second son of Rev. David B. Coe (Y. C. 
1837), and of Rebecca (Phoenix) Coe, was bom in New York city, 
Dec. 13th, 1850. 

He was prepared for college at the private school of Mr. Morris 
W. Lyon (Y. C. 1846), in N. Y. city. While an undergraduate, 
he showed scholarship of a high order, and unusual promise as a 
writer. After the summer vacation, he returned to New Haven 
to pursue his studies privately, and while thus engaged was at- 
tacked with typhoid fever. The disease terminated fatally on the 
12th of November, 1872. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT, 

1824. 

Kelson Carpenter, eldest child of Joseph T. and Huldah 
(Davidson) Carpenter, was born in Eastford, Conn., Jan. 12th, 
1801. 

By his father's early death, he was obliged from the time he 
was nine years old to provide for himself; but he persevered in 
obtaining a good education, and in 1822 entered the Medical 
School, as a resident of Willington, Conn. 

On April 1st, 1824, he established himself as a physician and 
Surgeon in Warren (then called Western), Mass., where he re- 
mained in successful and extensive practice until his death, at the 
age of 71, Aug. 21st, 1872» 

Dr. Carpenter was married, in Jan., 1829, to Miss Eliza S., 
daughter of Harvey Sessions, of Warren, by whom he had two 
daughters and three sons ; the daughters and one of the sons are 
still living. His wife died Sept. 16th, 1839, and he was again 
married, June 6th, 1841, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Wm. 
McCray, of Ellington, Conn., who survives him. 

% 



Ill 

1828. 

Thomas Belden Butler was born in Wethersfield, Conn., Aug. 
22d, 1806, the son of Frederick Butler (Y. C. 1Y85) and of Mary 
(Belden) Butler. His father, a man of literary tastes, gave him a 
classical education. After attending two courses of lectures in 
this Medical School he received his degree, and he then spent an 
additional year in professional study in Philadelphia. On his 
return he settled in Norwalk, Conn., where he continued in prac- 
tice for nearly eight years. Finding that the strain of his profes- 
sion upon him was too severe, he decided to abandon it, and after 
studying law with Hon. Clark Bissell (Y. C. 1806) he was admitted 
to the bar in 1837. 

He formed a partnership almost immediately with Hon. Thad- 
deus Betts (Y. C. 1807), of Norwalk, and after the death of Mr. 
Betts, in 1840, entered into partnership with George A. Davenport, 
Esq. At a later period he associated with himself O. S. Ferry, 
Esq. (Y. C. 1844), and still later, in 1847. J. M. Carter, Esq. 
(Y. C. 1836). The firm of Butler & Carter continued until Judge 
Butler was raised to the bench. He served in the Conn. House 
of Representatives in 1832, 1833, 1837, 1843, and 1846, and in the 
State Senate in 1848, 1852, and 1853. In 1849 he was elected to 
Congress, and served for one term. In May, 1855, he was elected 
a Judge of the Superior Court of Connecticut, and served until 
1861, when he was appointed to the Supreme Court, of which he 
was made Chief Justice in 1870. On account of continued ill 
health he resigned his position May 20th, 1878, and rapidly sink- 
ing died at his residence in Norwalk, June 8th, in his 67th year. 

Judge Butler won deserved respect in his professional career. 
His active mind also led him to an uncommon degree of interest 
in other affairs, especially in agriculture, mechanics, and meteor- 
ology. He was the author of " The Philosophy of the Weather," 
published in 1856, and of "The Atmospheric System developed: 
a Weather Book for practical men," published in 1870. 

He married, March 14th, 1831, Mary Phillips Crosby, of Xor- 
walk, who survives him. They had no children. 

1829. 

Ira Gregory was born in Wilton, Conn., Jan. 31st, 1804, and 
died at his residence in Norwalk, Conn., Sept. 2d, 1872. 

He began the study of medicine under Dr. David Willard, of 
Norwalk, and after receiving his degree settled in Moriches, L. I., 



112 

where he practiced his profession for some twelve years. He then 
removed to Norwalk, where he continued in practice until within 
a few weeks of his death. He was also especially influential in 
in all the educational interests of the town, being for many years 
chairman of the Board of Education. He often represented Nor- 
walk in the State Legislature. At the time of his death he was 
the President of the Medical Society of Fairfield County, and the 
Vice-President of the State Medical Society. 

Dr. Gregory married soon after his removal to Norwalk. One 
son graduated at this College in 1865, and follows his father's 
profession. 

1846. 

JosiAH Hall Beechee was born in Barkhamsted, Conn., about 
1825, and died in New Haven, Conn., March 14th, 1873. His 
medical studies were pursued under David A. Tyler, M.D. (Y. C. 
1844), of New Haven. On receiving his degree he settled in East 
Haven, Conn., and married in 1847 Susan J., daughter of Hoadley 
Bray, of that town. He practiced in East Haven and Fair Haven 
until 1866. He then moved to N. Y. City, but after an interval 
of about eighteen months returned to New Haven, where he con- 
tinued until his death. During the war he served for six months 
in the 1st Conn. Artillery. In the fall of 1867 his wife died, and 
he afterwards married again. He leaves a widow but no children, 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

1846. 

James Montgomery Woodward died in Wolcottville, Conn., 
Jan. 11th, 1873, at the age of 46. He was a son of Thomas G. 
Woodward, founder and editor of the Herald, the first daily paper 
printed in New Haven. 

He was admitted to the New Haven bar, and practiced law in 
this city until 1851, when he became the principal editor of the 
New Haven Daily Journal and Courier. This position he occupied 
until the breaking out of the late war, when he was elected lieu- 
tenant colonel of the Second Conn. Militia, and had charge of the 
camps in this vicinity during the organization of the nine-months 
troops. He afterwards resumed editorial work, at first in the 
office of the Waterbury (Conn.) American, and afterwards at his 
old post in New Haven. He was obliged to cease work about 
1869, on account of failing health. He was unmarried. 



SUMMARY 





Academical Department, 


ClasB. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


1T96 


Timothy Bishop, 95, 


New Haven, Conn., 


1803 


Thomas D. Burrall, 86, 


Geneva, N. Y., 


1805 


Frederick Marsh, 92, 


Winchester, Conn., 


1807 


Guy Richards, 85, 


New York City, 


u 


Ely Warner, 87, 


Chester, Conn., 


1808 


Joseph Harvey, 86, 


Harvey, Mich., 


(( 


Ralph I. Ingersoll, 83, 


New Haven, Conn., 


(t 


James H. Parmelee, 89, 


Duncan's Falls, 0., 


1809 


William Hungerford, 86, 


Hartford, Conn., 


1811 


Selah B. Strong, 80, 


Setauket, L. I., 


1812 


George Bliss, 79, 


Springfield, Mass., 


1813 


Zedekiah S. Barstow, 82, 


Keene, N. H., 


1814 


John M. Atwood, 77, 


Hartford, Conn., 


i( 


Joshua Leavitt, 78, 


New York City, 


« 


John Titsworth, 79, 


Deckertown, N. J., 


1815 


Edward Harleston, 76, 


Charleston, S. C, 


« 


Andrew Huntington, 81, 


Milan, 0., 


1817 


Robert Hartshorne, 74, 


Portland, N. J., 


1818 


Caleb Day, 75, 


Catskill, N. Y., 


i( 


R. Randolph Gurley, 76, 


Washington, D. C, 


« 


James S. Huggins, 73, 


New York City, 


1820 


Phihp Gadsden, 72, 


Charleston, S. C, 


1821 


Josiah Brewer, 76, 


Stockbridge, Mass., 


1822 


Francis H. Case, 75, 


Cold Spring, Wise, 


t( 


Harvey P. Peet, 78, 


New York City, 


1823 


Milton Badger, 72, 


Madison, Conn., 


u 


Handel G. Nott, 73, 


Rochester, N. Y., 


i( 


WiUiam S. Sullivant, 70, 


Cincinnati, 0., 


1824 


Joel Talcott, 74, 


Wakeman, 0., 


« 


WiUiam P. Van Rensselaer, 71, New York City, 


1826 


Isaac C. Beach, 71, 


Olathe, Kan., 


u 


Edwin E. Clark, 66, 


Ann Arbor, Mich., 


<i 


George J. Pumpelly, 67, 


Owego, N. Y., 


1827 


Albert G. Bristol, 64, 


Rochester, N. Y., 


u 


Philip R. Hoffman, 66, 


New York City, 


" 


Henry Hogeboom, 63, 


Hudson, N. Y., 


1828 


Edward W. Casey, 62, 


New Bedford, Mass., 


" 


J. Erskine Edwards, 63, 


Longwood, Mass., 


1829 


Alexander C. Robinson, 62, 


Baltimore, Md., 


1830 


Benjamin D. Neill, 60, 


Philadelphia, Pa*, 


1831 


Hugh T. Harrison, 62, 


Baltimore, Md., 


<( 


Ephraim D. Saunders, 63, 


W. Philadelphia, Pa., 


1832 


Henry Eddy, 67, 


N. Bridgewater, Mass. 


1833 


Rufus Abbot, 65, 


Pleasant Hill, Mo., 


u 


Edward A. Bradford, 59, 


Paris, France, 


u 


John H. Southard, 61, 


FishkiU, N. Y., 


1835 


Nehemiah Bushnell, 59, 


Quincy, 111., 


u 


Greorge P. Prudden, 56, 


Brattleboro, Vt., 


1836 


Henry 0. Deming, 57, 


Hartford, Conn., 



Time of Death. 
March 6, '73. 
June 24, '72. 
Feb. 6, '73. 
March 26, '73. 
Oct. 23, '72. 
Feb. 4, '73. 
Aug. 31, '72. 
April 6, '72. 
Jan. 15, '73. 
Nov. 29, '72. 
April 19, '72. 
March 1, '73. 
May 29, '73. 
Jan. 16, '73. 
'73. 
Feb. 11, '71. 
June 5, '72. 
July 18, 72. 
June 6, '73, 
July 30, '72. 
Sept. 4, '72. 
Dec. 26, '70. 
Nov. 19. '72. 
Dec. 20, '72. 
Jan. 1, '73. 
March 1, '73. 
May 3, '73. 
April 30, '73. 
Dec. 28, '71. 
Nov. 13, '72. 
Feb. 23, '73. 
Feb. 1, '73. 
May 9, '73. 
Jan. 9, '73. 
Juno 12, '73. 
Sept. 12, '72. 
May 3, '72. 
April 3, '73. 
Nov. 10, '71. 
Sept., '72. 
June 21, '72. 
Sept. 13, '72. 
Sept. 23, '72. 
Jan. 12, '73. 
Nov. 22, '72. 
Dec. 19, '72. 
Jan. 31, '73. 
Aug. 20, '72. 
Oct. 9, '72. 



^ 



114 



Class. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Death. 


1836 


Henry H. Dent, 57, 


Baltimore, Md., 


Nov. 19, '72. 


1837 


Thomas Tallman, 57, 


Thompson, Conn., 


Oct. 9, '72. 


1841 


Jackson J. Bushnell, 58, 


Beloit, Wise, 


March 8, '73. 


1842 


James Hadley, 51, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Nov. 14, '72. 


1844 


Edward A. Raymond, 47, 


Rochester, N. Y., 


May 12, '73. 


1847 


Andrew T. Pratt, 46, 


Constantinople, Turkey, 


Dec. 5, '72. 


1848 


Edmund D. Stanton, 44, 


New York City, 


May 29, '73. 


1849 


Greorge A. Gordon, 42, 


Huntsville, Ala., 


Oct. 5, '72. 


(( 


John Waties, 45, 


Columbia, S. C, 


April 29, '73. 


u 


Erastus H. Weiser, 46, 


York, Pa., 


July 11, 72. 


1851 


William P. Eiddell, 43, 


Houston, Tex., 


June, '72. 


« 


R. Cresson Stiles, 42, 


West Chester, Pa., 


April 16, '73. 


1852 


James H. Dwight, 42, 


Englewood, N. J., 


Dec. 2, '72. 


(( 


Reginald H. Hall, 39, 


Memphis, Tenn., 


Feb. 16, '72. 


u 


N. W. Taylor Root, 43, 


Portland, Me., 


Dec. 14, '72. 


1853 


Samuel A. L. L. Post, 43, 


EUenville, N. Y., 


Jan. 8, '.73. 


1855 


Emil Spanier, 36, 


New York City. 


Oct. 13, '72. 


1858 


Samuel Caldwell, 38, 


Peoria, 111., 


Sept. 13, '72. 


1860 


Edgar A. Finney, 36, 


Norwalk, Conn., 


Sept. 21, '72. 


]862 


William R. Kimberly, 32, 


Philadelphia, Pa., 


Aug. 26, '72. 


1864 


Thomas K. Boltwood, 29, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Dec. 25, '72. 


u 


Alfred E. Walker, 31, 


New Haven, Conn., 


March 5, '73. 


1868 


John M. Chapin, 28, 


Springfield, Mass., 


Oct. 25, '72. 


1869 


John Eliason, 24, 


Chestertown, Md., 


April 4, '73. 


1870 


H. Augustus Cleveland, 24, 


Perry, N. Y., 


April 22, '73. 


1872 


Robert E. Coe, 22, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Nov. 12, '72. 




Medical Department. 




1824 


Nelson Carpenter, 71, 


Warren, Mass., 


Aug. 21, '72. 


1828 


Thomas B. Butler, 66, 


Norwalk, Conn., 


June 8, '73. 


1829 


Ira Gregory, 68, 


Norwalk, Conn., 


Sept. 2, '72. 


1846 


Josiah H. Beeeher, 48, 


New Haven, Conn., 


March 14, '73. 



Law Department. 
1846 James M. Woodward, 46, Wolcottville, Conn., 



Jan. 11, '73. 



The whole number of deaths reported above is 80, and the average age of the 
graduates of the Academical Department is 61-J- years. 

Of the Academical graduates, 25 were Lawyers, 23 Clergymen, 7 Physicians, 
and 7 in Business. 

The deaths are distributed as follows : — in New York, 19 : Connecticut, 1 8 ; 
Massachusetts, 7.; Pennsylvania, 5 ; Maryland and Ohio, 4 each; New Jersey 
and South Carolina, 3 each ; Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Europe, 2 each ; 
and the remaining 9 in as many different States. 



The only surviving graduate of the last century is (class of 1 800) Rev. Thomas 
Williams, Providence, R. I., born Nov. 5th, 1779. 



INDEX 



Class. Page. 

1833 Abbot, Rufus, 95 

1814 Atwood, John M., 19 

1823 Badger, Milton, 86 

1813 Barstow, ZedekiahS.,..- 78 

1826 Beach, Isaac C, 88 

1846 m Beecher, Josiah H., 112 

1795 Bishop, Timothy, 71 

1812 Bhss, George, 77 

1864 Boltwood, Thomas K.,;.- 108 

1833 Bradford, Edward A., _._ 95 

1821 Brewer, Josiah, 83 

1827 Bristol, Albert G., _ 90 

1803 Burrall, Thomas D., 71 

1841 Bushnell, Jackson J.,_.. 98 

1835 Bushnell, Nehemiah, 95 

1828 m Butler, Thomas B., Ill 

1858 Caldwell, Samuel, 106 

1824m Carpenter, Nelson, 110 

1822 Case, Francis H.,__ 84 

1828 Casey, Edward W., 91 

1868 Chapin, John M., 109 

1826 Clark, Edwin E., 89 

1870 Cleveland, H. Augustus, 109 

1872 Coe, Robert E., 110 

1818 Day, Caleb, 81 

1836 Doming, Henry C, 97 

1836 Dent, Henry H., 97 

1852 Dwight, James H., 103 

1832 Eddy, Henry, 94 

1828 Edwards, J. Erskine, __. 91 

1869 Eliason, John, 109 

1 860 Einney, Edgar A., 107 

1820 Gadsden, Philip, 82 

1849 Gordon, George A., 101 

1829 m Gregory, Ira, 111 

1818 Gurley, R. Randolph,... 81 

1842 Hadley, James, 99 

1852 HaU, Reginald H., 104 

1815 Harleston, Edward, 80 

1831 Harrison, Hugh T, 93 



Class. Page. 

1817 Hartshorne, Robert, 81 

1808 Harvey, Joseph, 74 

1827 Hoffman, Philip R,, 90 

1827 Hogeboom, Henry, 90 

1818 Huggins, James S., 82 

1809 Hungerford, Wm., 76 

1815 Huntington, Andrew, 80 

1808 Ingersoll, Ralph I., 75 

1862 Kimberly, Wm. R., 107 

1814 Leavitt, Joshua, 79 

1805 Marsh, Frederick, 72 

1830 Neill, Benj. D., 92 

1823 Nott, Handel G.,._ 86 

1808 Parmelee, James H., 76 

1822 Peet, Harvey P., 84 

1853 Post, Samuel A. L. L.,._ 105 

1847 Pratt, Andrew T.,. 100 

1835 Prudden, George P., 96 

1826 Pumpelly, George J., ... 89 

1844 Raymond, Edward A.,.. 99 

1807 Richards, Guy, 73 

1851 RiddeU, Wm. P., 102 

1829 Robinson, Alex. C, 92 

1852 Root, N. W. Taylor, 105 

1831 Saunders, EphraimD.,.. 93 

1833 Southard, John H., 95 

1855 Spanier, Emil, 106 

1848 Stanton, Edmund D., 101 

1851 Stiles, R. Cresson, 102 

1811 Strong, Selah B., 77 

1823 SuUivant, Wm. S., 87 

1 824 Talcott, Joel, 88 

1837 Tallman. Thomas, 98 

1814 Titsworth, John, 80 

1824 Van Rensselaer, Wm. P., 88 

1864 Walker, Alfred E., 108 

1807 Warner, Ely, 73 

1849 Waties, John, 101 

1849 Weiser, Erastus H., 102 

1846 I Woodward, James, M.,.. 112 




^^«' 



DEC 31 1937 1 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the academical year ending in June, 1 874, 

including the record of a few who died a short 

time previous, hitherto unreported. 

[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMNI, JUNE 24th, 18T4.] 



[No. 4 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 33 of the whole Eecord. 



OBITUARY RECORD 



GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the academical year ending June^ 1874, includ- 
ing the record of a few who died previously, 
hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting op the Alumni, June 25, 18^4.] 
[No. 4 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 33 of the whole Eecord.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 



1805. 

Gardiner Spring was the third child and second son of Rev. 
Dr. Samuel Spring (Coll. of N. J. 1771) of Newburyport, Mass., 
where he was born, Feb. 24, 1785. His mother was Hannah, the 
daughter of Rev. Dr. Samuel Hopkins (Y. C. 1749), of Hadley, 
Mass. He entered college in 1800. but on the failure of his health 
at the end of the first year, withdrew for a time, and then entered 
the next class. 

He remained in New Haven after graduation, studying law 
with Judge Daggett, and supporting himself by private teach" 
ing. Subsequently he passed fifteen months in the Bermudas, 
where he established a school, and continued his legal studies. 
Meantime he was married, May 25, 1806, to Susan, daughter of 
Capt. Hanover Barney, of New Haven. He again returned to New 
Haven, was admitted to the bar in Dec, 1808, and began practice. 
In September, 1809, he listened to a powerful sermon by Rev. 
Dr. John M. Mason, of New York, in the College Chapel, on the 
duty of preaching the gospel ; and urged by an irresistible con- 
viction , immediately closed his office, hastened to the Theological 
Seminary just opened at And over, and applied himself to prepa- 
ration for his new calling. Early in the following summer he 
received a unanimous invitation to the pastorate of the Old Brick 
Presbyterian Church in Beekman street (since removed to Murray 



118 

Hill), N. Y. City, where he was ordained on the &th of August, 
1810. With this church, although frequently called to posts of 
honor and responsibility elsewhere— among others to the presi- 
dencies of Hamilton and Dartmouth Colleges — he remained until 
his death, which occurred in N. Y. City, Aug. 18, 18V3. During 
the last twelve years, successive colleagues were associated with 
him in the pastoral office. 

Dr. Spring published more than a score of volumes, chiefly in 
the line of his pulpit ministrations, several of which attained a wide 
circulation. His latest work, entitled " Personal Reminiscences," 
appeared in 1866. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity 
from Hamilton College in 1819, and that of Doctor of Laws 
Irom Lafayette College in 1853. He was twice married, and out- 
lived eight of his fifteen children. His second wife died but a 
few days before him. 

1807. 

James Fowler, eldest child of Samuel Fowler (Y. C. 1768) 
and Jemima (Lyman) Fowler, was born in Westfield, Mass., in 
1788, and died in the same town, October 18, 1873, aged 85. 
He was the last survivor of his class. 

He studied law at the Litchfield (Conn.) Law School, but mainly 
followed agricultural pursuits in his native town. From 1820 to 
1830 he was successively a member of both houses of the State 
Legislature. He was also one of the Governor's council, and filled 
a number of local offices. He was especially interested in educa- 
tion, and was from 1826 to 1838 one of the trustees of Amherst 
College. 

He married, first, Feb. 9, 1820, Lucy L., daughter of Major T. 
J. Douglas, who died July 16, 1840. He married, secondly, Oct. 
6, 1841, Charlotte, daughter of Capt. Silas Whitney. He leaves 
one son, a graduate of this college in 1839, and one daughter. 

1809. 

Philo Judson, the second son of Philo and Emma (Minor) 
Judson, was bom in Woodbury, (>onn., Jan. 14, 1782, and died in 
Rocky Hill, Conn., March 12, 1874, aged 92 years. 

He studied theology for about two years with Rev. Charles 
Backus, D.D., of Somers, Conn., and was ordained Sept. 11, 1811, 
pastor of the First Church in Ashford, Conn., where he continued 
until March, 1833. He was installed over the Congregational 



119 



Church in Hanover Society, in Lisbon, Conn., June 6, 1833, and 
dismissed in July, 1834. He was settled over the church in Willi- 
mantic. Conn., in December, 1834, and remained until March, 1839. 
He afterwards supplied the church in North Stonington, Conn., 
from April, 1841, to April, 1845 ; and in 1846-7, for a little more 
than a year, preached in Middle Haddam, Conn. Afterwards he 
established himself in Rocky Hill, and for eight or nine years con- 
tinued to preach as opportunity offered. The remaining portion 
of his life was spent in retirement on his farm. 

His first marriage was to Currence, daughter of David Curtiss, 
of Woodbury. After her death, he married, March 15, 1866, Mrs. 
Aulemia Barnard, of Hartford, Conn., who survives him. 

1810. 

Elias Hubbard Ely, son of Elihu and Anne Ely, was born in 
Old Lyme, Conn., June 26, 1790. 

After his graduation he studied law in the city of New York, 
where he was admitted to the bar in 1814. He immediately 
entered on the practice of his profession in that city, and was 
thus continuously and successfully employed until 1864, a period 
of half a century, when he retired from active pursuits. He 
died at Portland, Me., Feb. 8, 1874, in the 84th year of his age. 

Mr. Ely married, Nov. 5, 1832, Eliza, daughter of Henry Nichols, 
of East Haddam, Conn., and had four children, two sons and two 
daughters. 



Ammi Linsley, was bom March 12, 1789, in North Branford, 
then a part of Branford, Conn. 

He was the son of Rufus and Abigail Linsley, the sixth child in 
a family of nine children. The same year he graduated, he began 
the study of theology with the Rev. Mr. Pinneo of Milford, and in 
the fall of 1811 removed to Washington in this State, and prose- 
cuted his studies with the Rev. Ebenezer Porter. When Dr. 
Porter was invited to a professorship at Andover in 1812, Mr. 
Linsley went to reside in the spring of that year with the Rev. 
Bennet Tyler, in South Britain, and continued his studies with 
him until October, when he was licensed to preach. After preach- 
ing in several churches in New York and Conn., he was ordained 
and installed pastor, July 1.9, 1815, of the Congregational Church 
in East Hartland, Conn., where he remained until ill health and 
inadequate support compelled him to resign his pastorate, in 1835. 



120 

He continued to preach in the winter of 1836 and 1837 in 
Wolcott, Conn. For two years and a half (1837 to 1839), he 
supplied the Church in Prospect, Conn. Still preaching occa- 
sionally, and teaching school, he resided from 1839 to 1842 at 
North Haven, Conn., and devoted himself to the education of 
his children. In 1865 he removed to New Haven, but returned 
again to North Haven in 1857, where he remained until his death, 
which occurred in that town, December 21, 1873, at the age of 84 
years. 

He was married, Aug. 23, 1815, to Abigail Minor, of Milford, 
who died in North Haven, Feb. 20, 1868. They had four chil- 
dren, two sons who graduated at this college in 1843, and two 
daughters. One of the sons and the two daughters are now living. 

1813. 

Sherman Converse was born in Thompson, Conn., April 17, 
1790. 

Soon after graduating he settled in New Haven, and became 
proprietor and editor of the Connecticut Journal, and the head of 
the largest publishing house in New England. He published, 
among other works, the Christian Spectator, Silliman's Journal, 
and Swift's Digest; and in 1828 Noah Webster's American 
Dictionary, the first quarto edition in two large volumes, from the 
original manuscript, and under the supervision of the author. This 
last was a work of great magnitude, requiring a heavy outlay of 
means and labor, and making a notable event in the history of 
the American press. 

Mr. Converse removed to the city of New York in 1828, and 
was for several years actively engaged in business of various kinds, 
both in this country and in Canada. About the year 1850 he 
became crippled by a severe attack of rheumatism, which made 
him an invalid for the rest of his life, and for ten years before his 
death he never left his room. Besides suffering from disease, he 
was sorely tried by grave financial embarrassments, but he bore 
all his trials with the patience and resignation of a true Christian. 

He was married, in 1820, to Ann Huntington Perkins, daughter 
of Samuel Perkins (Y. C, 1785), of Windham, Conn., who, with an 
infant child, died in the summer of 1821. In 1824 he married 
Eliza, daughter of the Rev. Samuel Nott, D.D., of Franklin, Conn. 
She died in 1845, leaving one son, a graduate of this college, in 
1850. 



121 



Since the spring of 1863, Mr. Converse has resided with his son 
in Boston Highlands, Mass. He died, Dec. 10, 1873, after an 
illness of three days. 

1814. 

David Shelton Edwards, son of Hezekiah and Martha Ed- 
wards, was born in Trumbull, Conn., June, 22, 1794, and died at 
his homestead, on Chestnut Hill, in Trumbull, near Bridgeport, 
March 18, 1874. 

He studied medicine at this College, receiving his diploma in 

1817, and entered the U. S. Navy, as Assistant Surgeon, July 30, 

1818. He was promoted Surgeon, May 6, 1825, and remained in 
that position until his death. At the beginning of the Mexican 
war he was attached to the army and accompanied General Scott, 
as Medical Director of the 4th Division. During the war of the 
rebellion he was stationed at New Bedford, Mass., at the U. S. 
Naval Rendezvous. In 1869, he was appointed President of the 
Naval Medical Board of Examination. For several years before 
his death he was retired from active duty, and spent his summers 
at Chestnut Hill, and his winters in Washington. 

John Law was bom in New London, Conn., Oct. 28, 1796; he 
died in Evansville, Ind., Oct. 7, 1873. He was a great-grandson 
of Governor Jonathan Law, of Connecticut, who graduated at 
Harvard College in 1695 ; while his grandfather, Hon. Richard 
Law, and his father, Hon. Lyman Law, were graduated at Yale. 
His mother was Elizabeth, daughter of Amasa Learned (Y. C. 
1772). 

He studied law with his father, and was admitted to the Con- 
necticut bar in 1817. But the West proved more attractive, and 
in October, ] 817, he left home for the new State of Indiana. He 
was admitted to practice in December, and settled at Vincennes. 
He was appointed prosecuting attorney for the circuit court within 
two months, and rose rapidly into prominence at the bar. As 
early as 1824 he was a member of the State legislature, and in 
1830 was elected Judge of the Seventh Judicial Circuit, an office 
which he held by re-elections for eight years, and finally resigned. 
In 1851, he removed to Evansville, where he resided until his 
death. He was appointed by President Pierce in 1855 Judge of 
the Court of Land Claims, and in 1860 and in 1862 was elected a 
Representative in Congress. His public career, as well as his 
private life, gained the cordial respect of all who knew him. 



122 

Judge Law was married, Nov. 24, 1822, to Sarah, daughter of 
Gov. Nathaniel Ewing, of Vincennes. 

1816. 

Henry Kellogg, the youngest child of Daniel and Mercy 
(Eastman) Kellogg, was born in Amherst, Mass., Dec. 10, 1794. 
At the age of about 9 years he was placed in the family of a sister 
in Newfane, Vt., where he was prepared for college. 

After graduation he returned to Newfane and studied for the 
legal profession, and, being admitted to practice, settled in Ben- 
nington, Vt., in 1818, where he resided for half a century. He 
here made the acquaintance of the family of James Hubbell, Esq., 
and married, Jan. 27, 1825, his daughter, Margaret V,, and after- 
wards (Oct. 16, 183 1 ) her sister Anne Maria Hubbell, who survives 
him. Of his nine children but four are now living. 

During his residence in Bennington, Mr. Kellogg, in addition 
to an extensive practice in the law, held the offices of Postmaster 
and of Clerk of the Supreme and County Courts. In later years 
he removed to the residence of his son, in Troy, N. Y., where he 
died, Nov. 4th, 1873. 

James Henry Mitchell, son of James and Maty (Fosdick) 
Mitchell, was born in Wethersfield, Conn., Feb. 26, 1796. 

After graduation he left home for Ohio, settling first in Lebanon, 
where he taught school for some five years, and thence removing 
to Dayton, where after a residence of 53 years he died, on 
the 13th of Oct., 1873. He was a civil engineer by profession. 

While in Lebanon he married Miss Martha Skinner, of that 
place, who died March 5, 1 866. Of their nine children six are 
still living. 

1816. 

William Abbott Moseley, son of Dr. Elizur Moseley (Y. C, 
1786), was bom in Whitesboro', Oneida County, N. Y.,in 1799. 

He studied law at home, and began practice in Bufi*alo in 1822. 
In 1834 he was drawn into political life by being elected to the 
State Legislature. Again, in 1837, he was returned to the State 
Senate, for the term of four years, and believing his duties as 
Senator (and one of the Court of Appeals) somewhat incompatible 
with his professional employments, he relinquished his practice, 
which he did not again resume. 



123 



Declining a re-election, he made an extended tour in Europe, 
and the week after his return (in 1842) was nominated for Con- 
gress, and served in that body for four years. He spent the rest 
of his life in Buffalo and abroad, and died at the Fifth Avenue 
Hotel, N. Y. city, Nov. 19, 1873. He was twice married. 

1817. 

Samuel Huntington Perkins, son of Samuel Perkins (Y. C, 
1786) and Anna (Huntington) Perkins, was born in Windham, 
Conn., Feb. 17, 1797, and died in Philadelphia, Pa., May 22, 
1874. 

He spent a year in teaching in a private family in North Caro- 
lina, and then settled in Philadelphia, teaching and studying law 
with Josiah Randall. He was admitted to the bar, December 13, 
1820, and continued in full practice until a few years before his 
death. Outside of his professional labors, he was active in many 
benevolent enterprises. He was also one of the Directors of the 
Girard College from its organization in 1847 till 1861. 

Mr. Perkins was twice married. He leaves one son, who 
graduated at this college in 1848, and one daughter. 

1820. 

Jared Foote, son of Dr. Joseph Foote (Y. C. 1787) and Mary 
(Bassett) Foote, was born in North Haven, Conn., Jan. 2, 1800. 

On the evening after his graduation, he was married to Re- 
bekah Beecher, of New Haven, who survives him. They had six 
children, five sons and one daughter, all of whom are now living, 
excepting the eldest, a son, who died in 1841. 

After spending a short time in teaching in his native State, Mr. 
Foote settled in North Haven, and became a partner in a manu- 
facturing enterprise, which did not prove successful. His subse- 
quent life was spent chiefly on his farm in Hamden, Conn., where 
he died, July 28, 1873, after an illness of only a single day. 



1821. 

Ornan Eastman, fifth son of John and Hephzibah (Keyes) 
Eastman, was bom in Amherst, Mass., March 27, 1796. He was 
prepared for Yale at the Academy in that town, afterwards char- 
tered as Amherst College. 

He studied theology at Andover, Mass., graduating in 1824, and 
served for the following year in organizing auxiliaries to the Amer- 



124 

ican Board for Foreign Missions, in New Hampshire. He then 
entered on his life-long work in the service of the American Tract 
Society, and after employment as Secretary of the New England 
Branch in Boston (where he was ordained as an evangelist, Aug. 
27, 1828), and as General Agent for the Mississippi Valley^ was 
elected May, 1832, Financial Secretary. In this work he labored 
untiringly until May, 1870, when he voluntarily laid down his 
heavier responsibilities, and thenceforward as Honorary Secretary 
attended only to such lighter duties as his growing years permitted. 
After less than a week's illness, he died at his home in New York 
City, April 24, 1874. 

Mr. Eastman was married in Marblehead, Mass., in November, 
1832, to Mary, daughter of Benjamin T. Reed. She survives him, 
with two sons (one of whom graduated at this college in 1854) 
and three daughters. 

Edwabd Rockwell was the eldest child of Deacon Alpha and 
Rhoda (Ensign) Rockwell, of Winsted, Conn., and was bom in 
Colebrook, Conn., June 30, 1801. 

He studied law in New Haven, under Seth P. Staples, Esq., and 
Judge Hitchcock, and was admitted to the bar in 1825. A year 
or two later he removed to Youngstown, Trumbull County, Ohio, 
where he practiced his profession until 1834, when he became 
interested in mercantile affairs and in the manufacture of iron. 
From 1855 to 1867 he served as Secretary of the Cleveland and 
Pittsburgh Railroad Company. In the latter year, the condition 
of his health induced him to resign and to accept a responsible 
position in a large commercial house in New York City ; but con- 
tinued ill health obliged him soon to retire. The next few years 
were spent in foreign travel, and he finally returned in increased 
feebleness to Winsted, where he died at the house of his sister, 
Feb. 25, 1874. 

Mr. Rockwell was married, in 1828, to Matilda du Plessis Salter, 
of New Haven, who died about 1846. Of their five children, three 
are still living. 

John Smith, son of James and Sarah (Hanmer) Smith, was 
born in Wethersfield, Conn., Sept. 2, 1796, and died of pneumonia, 
at the house of his son, in Stamford, Conn., Feb. 20, 1874. 

He studied theology for two years at Andover, Mass., and then 
for one year at Princeton, N. J., and was licensed to preach by 



125 

the Fairfield (Conn.) East Association, April 24, 1824. He was 
ordained pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Trenton, N. J., 
March 8, 1826, and resigned in August, 1828. He was installed 
over the 1st Congregational Church in Exeter, N. H., March 12, 
1829, and dismissed at his own request, Feb. 14, 1838. After a 
year spent as an agent of the American Tract Society, he was 
settled in Feb., 1839, over the Congregational Church in Wilton, 
Conn., where he continued until June, 1848. From July 26, 1848, 
to Sept. 18, 1850, he was pastor. of the Congregational Church in 
Kingston, N. H., and on the 9th of October, 1850, took the pas- 
toral charge of the First Church in York, Me., which office he 
resigned early in 1855. He then came to Stamford, Conn., to live 
with his children, and after this preached but little, his most con- 
tinuous service being in the supply of the pulpit of the church in 
Long Bridge, Stamford, from 1856 to 1858. 

Mr. Smith was twice married; first, in Trenton, N. J., Sept. 11, 
1 826, to Esther Mary, daughter of Hon. Dickinson Woodruff. She 
died in Wilton, in 1841, after the birth of her sixth child; and he 
married, two years later, Louisa Gridley, of Middletown, Conn., 
who died without children. 

1822. 

JuDAH Lee Bliss, son of Dr. Judah Bliss, was bom in North 
Wilbraham, Mass., March 16, 1803, and died in N. Y. city, June 
4, 1873. His mother was Lucy, daughter of Rev. Dr. Andrew 
Lee (Y. C. 1766), of Lisbon, Conn. 

In accordance with the desire of his father, that his son should 
follow his own profession, he studied medicine at the Berkshire 
Medical School, and graduated in 1825. He, however, never 
practiced his profession, but entered into mercantile life in Blen- 
heim, Canada, and subsequently in N. Y. city. Satisfied by his. 
losses that this was not his calling, he went in 1830 to Adams ; 
County, Mississippi, where he remained as a teacher in private 
families in or near Natchez, for twenty years, and succeeded in 
accumulating a considerable property, which was afterwards 
seriously diminished by the outbreak of the war. The rest of his 
life was spent in retirement, chiefly in N. Y. city. He visited 
Europe in 1851, and again a few years later. 

Mr. Bliss married, Oct. 20, 1854, at Copake Iron Works, 
Columbia County, N. Y., Aurelia Hollister, widow of Lemuel 
Pomeroy, of Pittsfield, Mass. She survives him. They had no 
children. 



126 

Elizur Goodrich Smith, son of Rev. Dr. David Smith (Y. 
C. 1Y95), was born in Durham, Conn., where his father was then 
pastor. May 30, 1802. His mother was Catharine, daughter of 
Rev. Dr. Elizur Goodrich (Y. C. 1752). He entered Middlebury 
College in 1817, but' on the removal of President Davis, came to 
New Haven the following year. 

After graduating, he taught a year at Bacon Academy, Col- 
chester, Conn., and in 1824 entered Yale Theological Seminary, 
where he graduated in course in 1827. He was licensed to preach 
Aug. 29, 1826, and was ordained to the ministry, in New Haven, 
May 7, 1829. He had charge of the church in Ogdensburgh, 
N. Y., for the next three years, and married, Sept. 13, 1830, 
Adeline Denny, of that place, who died Nov. 4, 1831. On the 
failure of his health, he returned to New Haven, and was from 
1833 to 1838 the editor of the "Quarterly Christian Spectator," 
and a large contributor to its pages. He married June 7, 1837, 
Susan C. Wadsworth, of Durham, who survives him. From 1838 
to 1842, he was engaged in literary pursuits in New York City. 
He then, in the winter of 1842-43, went to Washington, as tem- 
porary clerk in the Patent Office. After a year's service, he was 
appointed in June, 1844, chief clerk, and a year later, agricultural 
clerk and librarian. 'During these years (until 1850) he accom- 
plished a useful work in the formation of the Patent Office Library 
and in the preparation of five successive Agricultural Reports of 
the Commissioner of Patents. From 1850 to 1857, he was clerk 
in the General Land Office, and was then, after the election of 
President Buchanan, dismissed for political and religious reasons. 
He continued to reside in Washington, employing himself in 
various literary labors, and in 1860 was reinstated in a clerkship 
at the Patent Office, which he held until his death. He died in 
Washington, after an illness of about three weeks, from a disease 
of the heart, Aug. 26, 1873, at the age of 71. His children, one 
by his first, and two by his second marriage, died before him. 

Aside from the thoroughness with which his official duties were 
performed, the scholarly tastes and habits which he carried through 
life were specially noteworthy. He accumulated a library of about 
14,000 volumes, said to have been one of the best, if not the 
largest, of the private libraries in the city. By his will a valuable 
portion of this library, numbering some 1800 volumes, was given 
to the Divinity School of Yale College. 



127 



John Todd, youngest child of Dr. Timothy and Phebe (Buel) 
Todd, was born in Rutland, Vt., October 9, 1800. In his child- 
hood his father died, and it was only by his own exertions that he 
was able to secure a liberal education. 

From college he went to Andover Seminary, where he com- 
pleted the three years' course, and afterwards remained for nearly 
a year engaged in advanced study. 

On the 3d of Jan., 1827, he was ordained first pastor of the 
Union Church in Groton, Mass., and in the following March was 
married to Mary S., daughter of Rev. Joab Brace (Y. C. 1804), of 
Newington, Conn. He resigned his charge at Groton, Jan. 8, 
1833, and on the 30th of the same month was installed over the 
Edwards Church, Northampton, Mass. Here he remained until 
Nov. 4, 1836, when he removed to Philadelphia, where he was 
installed pastor of the First Congregational Church, on the 1 7th 
of the same month. This position he resigned in Nov., 1841, 
and soon after removed to Pittsfield, Mass., where he took charge 
of the First Congregational Church, Jan. 1, 1842, and was in- 
stalled, Feb. 22. In 1870 he proposed to the church to lay down 
the active duties of pastor, but at their request his resignation was 
deferred, until in March, 1872, impaired health enforced his retire- 
ment. He died in Pittsfield, after an illness of three months 
Aug. 24, 1873, in his 73d year. His widow survives him, with 
five of their nine children, one of whom graduated at this college 
in 1855. 

In 1845 Mr. Todd received the degree of D.D. from Williams 
College, and was elected one of the trustees of that institution, 
which ofiice he held until 1872. 

Dr. Todd was remarkably successful as a pastor, and also wielded 
a powerful influence as an author. He published over thirty 
volumes, besides many sermons and pamphlets. His most widely 
known book, "The Student's Manual," was first published in 
1835. 



Thomas Tileston Waterman died August 2, 1873. He was 
the son of Rev. Elijah (Y. C. 1791) and Lucy (Abbe) Waterman, 
and was born in Windham, Conn., Sept. 24, 1801. 

In 1806, Bridgeport, Conn., became his home. Here he was 
prepared for college in a private school kept by his father, with 
whom, after graduating, he pursued a course of theological study. 
He was licensed to preach by the Fairfield East Association, June 
1, 1825, and was ordained pastor of what afterwards became the 



128 

Richmond Street Congregational Church, in Providence, R. I., 
Dec. 13, 1826. 

In Jan., 1837, he removed to Philadelphia, Pa., the change being 
made necessary by the state of his health, the result of a severe 
sickness. Here he remained until early in 1843, as pastor of the 
Fifth Presbyterian Church. Returning to Providence, he was 
instrumental in organizing the Fourth Congregational Church, 
and continued with them until the spring of 1852. He then 
removed to Galena, 111., and on Dec. 15, was installed pastor of 
the Second Presbyterian Church. Leaving Galena early in 1856, 
he became acting pastor of the Congregational Church in Winona, 
Minn., and was active in securing the building of the house of 
worship upon which was raised the first spire north of Dubuque, 
and west of the Mississippi river. 

In 1857 he returned to the East, and became pastor of the 
Congregational Church in Danielsonville, Conn. In 1861 he 
removed to Spencer, Mass., and was installed pastor of the Con- 
gregational Church there, June 5, closing his labors in Dec, 1862. 
In 1863, he removed to Monroe, Conn., of which place he was a 
resident until his death. He acted as pastor of the Congregational 
Church there until the latter part of 1868. During this time and 
afterwards, he assisted in establishing churches in Springfield, 111., 
and Marshall, Mich. In the last three years of his life, he was 
prostrated several times by severe attacks of a chronic complaint, 
but continued to preach occasionally, until very near the end of 
life. He died in Stratford, Conn., at the residence of his daughter, 
which he had made an occasional and temporary home for a year 
or more previous. 

He married, Dec. 11, 1827, Delia, daughter of Dan Storrs, of 
Mansfield Center, Conn. His widow, a daughter and four sons 
survive him. One son was graduated at this college in 1855; 
another at Beloit College in 1856. 

William Leeds Wight, third son of Hezekiah L. and Nancy 
(Leeds) Wight, was born in Richmond, Va., March 17, 1802. 

He studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, receiv- 
ing his diploma in 1825, and remained for some time in attendance 
at the Philadelphia almhouse. After a year in Europe, he settled 
as a practicing physician in Goochland County, Va., where he died 
(near Dover Mills) suddenly, Oct. 2, 1873. 

He married, Dec. 7, 1834, Grace M., daughter of Samuel Hughes, 
of New Haven. She died in New Haven, May 19, 1874. One of 
their two sons is still living. 



129 



1823. 



Edward Dickinson was the eldest son of Hon, Samuel F. Dickin- 
son (Dartmouth Coll., 1195) and .Lucretia (Gunn) Dickinson, and 
was born in Amherst, Mass., Jan. 1, 1803. He entered college 
from Amherst Academy, at the beginning of the Sophmore year. 

He studied law for two years with his father, and for a third 
year in Northampton, Mass., and then established himself in his 
native place, where he remained in practice until his death. As 
early as 1835 he was elected the treasurer of Amherst College, 
and held the position until the present year ; having by his judi- 
cious management proved himself one of the most efficient friends of 
that institution. He received the honorary degree of LL.D. from 
Amherst in 1863. 

In 1838 and 1839 he was a member of the Massachusetts House 
of Representatives, and in 1842 and 1843 of the State Senate. 
In 1846 and 1847 he was one of the Governor's Council, and from 
1853 to 1855 a Representative in Congress. As the leading citi- 
zen of the town, he was elected in 1873 as a member of the State 
Legislature, for the main purpose of securing to the town the 
advantages of the Massachusetts Central Railroad ; and after a 
careful speech in the House, on the morning of June 16, 1874, in 
the interests of this railroad in connection with the Hoosac Tun- 
nel, he was attacked with apoplexy, and died at his hotel before 
evening. 

He married, May 6, 1828, Emily, daughter of Joel Norcross, of 
Monson, Mass., who survives him. One son and two daughters 
are also livinof. 



Gordon Hayes was born in Granby, Conn., April 24, 1798. 
He took a full course at the Andover Theological Seminary, 
graduating in 1827, and after supplying for a time the church in 
Castleton, Yt.^ was ordained over the Presbyterian church in 
Cambridge, N. Y., July 30, 1828. He remained there but a. 
single year, preferring to be connected with the Congregational 
denomination, and in July, 1829, he was called to the church in 
Washington, Conn., where he preached until 1851. He then took 
charge of a seminary in Bennington, Yt., for two or three years, 
and then supplied for one year the church in Pownal, and for three 
years the church in East Arlington, in the same State. In 1860 
he removed to Iowa, whither all his children had preceded him. 
For five years he preached in Brighton, and the rest of his life 



130 

was spent with his son in Muscatine, where he died after an 
ilhiess of several months, May 26, 1874. 

While settled in Cambridge, he was married to Mary D. Fassett, 
of Bennington, who did a few years before him. Of their children 
four sons and one daughter are still living. 

Edwards Johnson, son of Samuel William Johnson, and 
Susanna, daughter of Pierpont Edwards, was bom in Stratford, 
Conn., Feb. 20, 1804. 

After his graduation, he studied law at the Litchfield Law 
School, but never applied for admission to the bar. He carried on 
a farm in his native town for a number of years, and afterwards 
was engaged in the iron business. 

He married, Sept. 29, 1830, Ann Johnson Dowdall, daughter of 
George R. Dowdall, who survives him. They had four children, 
three of whom are now living. He died, June 24, 18V3, at his 
residence in Stratford. 

Addison Hayes White, youngest son of Hon. Asa and Zilpah 
(Hayes) White, of Williamsburg, Mass., was born in that town, 
Aug, 23, 1 803. 

He studied law and practiced for several years in Tennessee, 
residing principally in Covington, Tipton County. In 1839, he 
returned to the family homestead in Williamsburg, where he 
resided, engaged in farming and in the practice of his profession, 
until his death, which occurred in that town, Feb. 2, 1873. 

He married, first, Feb. 27, 1 833, Matilda J», daughter of Rev. 
Samuel Brown, of Tipton County, Tenn. She died Dec. 10, 1837. 
He married secondly, April 30, 1840, Clarissa, daughter of Ariel 
Taylor, of Williamsburg. His only child, a son by his second 
marriage, is still living. 

1824. 

William Hayden Rockwell, son of Charles and Sarah (Hay- 
den) Rockwell, was bom in South Windsor, Conn., Feb. 15, 1800„ 
the only son in a family of eight children. 

He entered college in the Junior year, and after receiving his 
degree taught school for two years in Dudley, Mass. He then 
attended a course of medical lectures in this college, and entered 
the office of Dr. Thomas Hubbard, of Pomfret, Conn, (afterwards 
professor). But almost immediately (in July, 1827) he was ap- 
pointed assistant physician in the Hartford (Conn.) Retreat for the 



131 

Insane, where he pursued his studies under Dr. Eli Todd. In the 
winter of 1830-31 he attended a second course of lectures at the 
Yale Medical School, and received the degree of M.D. He began 
practice in Durham, Conn., but in 1833 was recalled to his former 
position at Hartford, which he held until appointed, in June, 1836, 
Superintendent of the Vermont Asylum for the Insane, at Brat- 
tleboro'. This relation he sustained until his death, at Brattle- 
boro,' Nov. 30, 1873. 

Dr. Rockwell was married in 1835 to Mrs. Maria F. Chapin, 
daughter of Peter Farnara, Esq., of Salisbury, Conn., and had by 
this marriage one daughter and two sons. 

1826. 

James Fitch Bunnell, third son of Rufus Bunnell (Y. C. 1797) 
and of Diantha (Fitch) Bunnell, was born in Bloorafield, N. Y., 
March 27, 1807. He came to college from New York city, to 
which place his father removed in 1817. 

He studied law in Litchfield, Conn., and was admitted to the 
bar in New York, but did not pursue the profession. He was 
engaged in banking until 1832, when he began the manufacture 
of woolen goods, near Bridgeport, Conn. He retired from busi- 
ness in 1846, on account of the failure of his health, and continued 
to reside in Bridgeport. He died in Middletown, Conn., April 9, 
1874, aged 67. He was unmarried. 

William Poetee Bueeall, son of Hon. Wm. M. and Abigail 
(Porter, Stoddard) Burrall, was born in Canaan, Conn., Sept. 18, 
1806. 

Immediately upon graduation he began the study of the law 
with his father. After one year, he entered the office of Hon. 
Samuel Church (afterwards Chief Justice of the State), in Salis- 
bury, and subsequently attended a course of lectures at the Litch- 
field Law-school, and was admitted to the bar of Litchfield County 
in April, 1829. He practiced law in his native town until October, 
1838, when he removed to Bridgeport, Conn., to undertake the 
Presidency of the Housatonic Railroad Company, then just organ- 
ized. He held this office until 1852 or '53, when he resigned in 
consequence of the pressure of other engagements. He was also 
connected with the N. Y. and N. H. Railroad during its construc- 
tion and the earlier years of its operation, and at the same time, 
and later, with the Illinois Central Railroad, first as Treasurer, 
9 



132 

and afterwards as President. In 1862 he was chosen Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Hartford and New Haven Railroad, and at the death 
of the President in 1 868, succeeded to the vacant office, and finally 
became Vice-President of the New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Railroad, upon the consolidation of the companies. This 
position he retained with distinguished credit until his sudden 
death, from apoplexy, in Hartford, March 3, 1874. He had re- 
moved his residence from Bridgeport to Salisbury, Conn., in 1859, 
and had subsequently represented that town several times in the 
General Assembly, and had also been a member of the State 
Senate. 

In May, 1831, he married Miss Harriet Holley, daughter of 
John M. Holley, of Salisbury, who is left his widow. Five of his 
six children are also living. 

Sidney Mills, son of Gardner and Mary (Skinner) Mills, was 
bom in Canton, Conn., March 29, 1799. 

He studied theology with Rev. Grant Power, at Goshen, Conn., 
and with Rev. George E. Pierce, of Harwinton, Conn., and was 
licensed to preach by the Litchfield South Association, in 1831. 
His life was occupied with the duties of his profession, and in in- 
struction. He was connected with the Presbyterian denomination. 

He died at his residence in Clifton, Va., March 25, 1874. He 
married Miss Laura P. Fuller, and had four children. 

1827. 

Robert Kerr Richards, son of Abraham and Sarah (Arnold) 
Richards, of N. Y. city, was born in Savannah, Ga., Sept. 5, 1806 ; 
and died of consumption, at the residence of his son in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., March 5, 1874. 

Soon after leaving college he entered the Law School at Litch- 
field, Conn., and after a year or more removed to Rhode Island, 
where he studied in the office of Attorney-General Greene for 
about a year longer. He then established himself, in the autumn 
of 1830, in St. Louis, where he practiced his profession and 
became connected with the press of the city. 

While in New York on a visit, he married, Oct. 30, 1832, the 
daughter of Gen. Anthony Lamb. In 1833 he removed from St. 
Louis to New York, thence in 1834 to Chicago, and in 1836 went 
southward, spending some time in Washington, D. C, and in 
Florida, and finally settling in Brooklyn, N. Y. Owing to a 



133 



severe malady, he was advised to try the effect of a long sea- 
voyage, and in Jan., 1849, embarked for San Francisco. A few 
years' residence there nearly restored him to health, and he again 
returned, in 1858, to New York. 

His wife died many years before him. Two sons and a daughte r 
are still living. 

1828. 

John Cleveland Palmer, son of William and Dorothy Palmer, 
was born in East Haddam, Conn., Nov. 17, 1807: died in Hart- 
ford, Conn., Aug. 12, 1873, after a brief illness. 

After graduating, he entered the Yale Law School, and in 1831 
began the practice of law in his native town, which he repre- 
sented several times in the Legislature. He served for two years 
as Bank Commissioner, and in 1846 was chosen Judge of the County 
Court. He was appointed School Fund Commissioner in 1850, 
and again in 1853. 

Having been elected President of the Sharp's Rifle Company, 
he removed to Hartford in 1855, and retained an official connec- 
tion with the company during the rest of his life. 

He married, in 1831, Mary Ann, daughter of David Hoadley, at 
that time a leading architect of New Haven, who survives him , 
with two of their three children. 



1829. 

Edwin Randolph Gilbert, son of Hon. Peyton R. and Anna 
(Porter) Gilbert, was born in Gilead, a parish of Hebron, Conn., 
Feb. 10, 1808. 

He entered the Yale Divinity School in 1829 and completed the 
course in 1832. On the 3d of Oct., 1832, he was ordained over the 
Congregational Church in Wallingford, Conn., and retired as 
pastor emeritus, Jan. 1, 1874. His long pastorate was marked by 
great fidelity and judiciousness. He died of pneumonia at his 
residence in Wallingford, April 17, 1874, after an illness of eight 
days. The sermon preached at his funeral by the Rev. Dr. 
Leonard Bacon, who also preached the sermon at his ordination, 
is to be published. From August, 1849, until his death, Mr. 
Gilbert was a member of the Corporation of Yale College. 

He was married. May 7, 1833, to Ann S. Langdon, of Hartford, 
Conn., by whom he had four children. She died Feb. 13, 1841. 
His second marriage was with Dorcas S., daughter of Rev. Aaron. 



184 

Dutton (Y. C. 1803) of Guilford, July 26, 1842. She died July 10, 
1849, having had three children. He married again, Sept. 7, 1 852, 
Clara, daughter of William Baldwin, of New Haven, who died 
Aug. 19, 1864. Pie was again married, Oct. 16, 1865, to Henrietta 
M. Carrington, of Wallingford, who survives him. Two sons, one 
by his first and one by his second marriage, are also living, the 
younger of whom is a graduate of this college. 

1832. 

James Madison Bunker was born in Nantucket, Mass., March 
5, 1811, and died at the same place, Nov. 19, 1873. 

He was educated as a lawyer at the Cambridge (Mass.) Law 
School, where he graduated in 1835. He practiced his profession 
in his native town, and also taught school there for some years. 
He afterwards removed to New Bedford, Mass., where he con- 
tinued to practice law. He again returned to Nantucket, and at 
the time of his death was Judge of the Probate Court. He left 
several children. 

Edwakd Osborne Dunning, son of Capt. Luman and Elizabeth 
(Osborne) Dunning, was born in New Haven, Conn., March 12, 
1810, and died in the same city, March 23, 1874. 

He studied theology in the Yale Divinity School, where he 
graduated in 1835. In June, 1840, he was ordained pastor of the 
First Congregational Church in Rome, N. Y., but was dismissed 
in the next year. From 1842 to 1846 he was settled over the 
Reformed Church in Canajoharie, N. Y. He was afterwards for 
many years employed by the American Bible Society as an agent 
in the Southern States, his family residence being in New Haven. 
During the late civil war he entered the service as a chaplain, and 
was stationed at the hospital in Cumberland, Md. In the last 
few years of his life he became interested in the exploration of 
ancient mounds in various parts of the South. 

He married, in 1839, Miss Catharine Bent, of Middlebury, Vt., 
who survives him, with four of their five children. 

Henry Lawrence Hitchcock was born in Burton, Geauga 
County, Ohio, Oct. 31, 1813. His father, Hon. Peter Hitch- 
cock, a native of Cheshire, Conn., graduated at this college in 
1801, and emigrated to Burton in 1806, becoming afterwards a 
member of Congress and Chief Justice of the State. His mother 
was Nabby, daughter of Elam Cook, of Cheshire. 



135 



On his graduation he returned home and for two years had 
charge of the Burton Academy, at which he had been prepared 
for college. He remained in town a year longer, engaged partly 
in teaching privately, and partly in studying theology. In the 
autumn of 1835 he entered Lane Theological Seminary, then under 
the care of Dr. Lyman Beecher, where he spent two years. In 1837 
he was licensed to preach, in Burton, and during the same year 
was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in Morgan, 
Ashtabula County, where he labored for two and a half years. In 
1840 he was called to Columbus to take charge of the Second 
Presbyterian Church, then recently formed. Here he continued, 
and with ' remarkable success, until elected President of Western 
Reserve College, May 31, 1855. He found the college in a lan- 
guishing condition, and by his untiring energy relieved it of debt 
and placed it on a firmer foundation. Besides his duties of Pre- 
sident, he was the College Pastor, and instructed in the depart- 
ment of Natural Theology and the Evidences of Christianity. 
Under this burden of labor, his health declined, and he spent the 
winter of 1867 in Europe, remaining abroad until June. For 
three years longer he continued at the head of the college, and then 
insisted on retiring, retaining only the duties of pastor and pro- 
fessor. He died at Hudson, after two weeks' illness, of typhoid 
fever, July 6, 1873, in the sixtieth year of his age. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Williams College in 1855. 

President Hitchcock was married in Dec, 1837, to Miss Clarissa 
M., daughter of Stephen Ford, of Burton, Ohio. He had eleven 
children, of whom five, with their mother, are now living. Two 
of their sons were graduated at Western Reserve College in 
1859 ; the elder of whom is a clergyman, and the younger was 
killed at the battle of Stone River, in Tennessee, Dec. 31, 1862. 

[1833. For notice of E. D. Gaednee, see p. 155.] 



1834. 

Churchill Coffing was born Nov. 13, 1813, in Salisbury, 
Conn. He was the son of John C. and Maria (Birch) Coffing. 

He studied law at the Yale Law School, and settled, in 1839, in 
Peru, III, where he resided until the spring of 1870, when he 
removed to Chicago, where he died. May 17, 1873, of an attack of 
rheumatism, inducing dropsy around the heart. 

Mr. Coffing was married July 8, 1841, to Asenath C, daughter 
of Daniel Brewster, of Salisbury. She survives him with a son and 
a daughter. 



136 

Thomas Henry Totten was born in New Haven, Conn., 
March 4, 1815. He was the youngest son of Gilbert Totten and 
Mary (Rice) Totten. 

After his graduation, he pursued his medical studies three years 
under Dr. Eli Ives, of the Yale Medical School. 

On receiving his degree he settled in Pottsville, Pa., remain- 
ing there till ill health compelled his returning to his native air, 
where he was obliged to remain some months. A second trial of 
the climate of Pottsville convinced him that it was impossible for 
him to remain there, or even to endure the fatigue and exposure 
of his profession. He therefore returned to New Haven and 
relinquished practice, except occasionally among friends. He 
never regained his health and died at his family residence, March 
26, 1874. He was unmarried. 

1835. 

Samuel Ware Fisher, son of Rev. Samuel Fisher, D.D., a 
distinguished Presbyterian clergyman, and of Alice (Coggswell) 
Fisher, was born in Morristown, N. J., April 5, 1814. 

He entered Princeton Theological Seminary in 1836, and after 
nearly two years there went to the Union Seminary in N. Y. city, 
where he graduated in 1839. Before leaving the Seminary, he was 
called to the pastoral charge of the Presbyterian Church in West 
Bloomfield, now Mont Clair, N. J. He was ordained its first 
pastor in April, 1839, and remained there three years and a half. 
He was next installed, Oct. 13, 1843, pastor of the Fourth Presby- 
terian Church in Albany, N. Y. While here, he was called, 
Oct. 26, 1846, to the Second Presbyterian Church in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, the charge of which had lately been laid down by Dr. 
Lyman Beecher. Over this church he was installed in April, 
1847. He resigned July 19, 1858, to accept the Presidency of 
Hamilton College. This office he held until 1866, when he was 
installed (Nov. 15) pastor of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 
Utica, N. Y., where he continued until May 11, 1870, when he 
was stricken down by paralysis. In this enfeebled state, physi- 
cally weak, and powerless in speech, bat mentally strong, he 
lingered until Jan. 18, 1874, when he died suddenly, without a 
moment's warning, at College Hill, near Cincinnati, where the 
last years of his life had been spent. 

Dr. Fisher was first married, October 20, 1839, to Miss Annie 
C. Johnson, of Morristown, N. J., who died Aug. 31, 1840. He 



137 



was afterwards married, May 18, 1842, to Miss Jane Jackson, of 
Newark, N. J., who with four of their eight children survives 
him. 

He received the degree of D.D. from Miami University in 1852, 
and that of LL.D. from the University of New York in 1866. 

Ethelbekt Smith Mills was born in N. Y. city in 1816, and 
was drowned at Coney Island, N. Y., July 15, 1873. 

After graduation he studied law in N. Y. city, and entered into 
practice in partnership with Hon. Ebenezer Seeley (Y. C. 1814). 
Subsequently he became better known as a member of the firm of 
Bradford, Mills, and WoodhuU, and continued in practice until 
1868. 

On the 27th of June, 1849, he married Miss Ellen S. Low, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y, and became a resident of that city. At the time 
of his death he was President of the Brooklyn Trust Company. 
He was also President of the Brooklyn Art Association, to the 
objects of which he had devoted himself with a characteristic 
energy and enthusiasm. 

His wife and two sons survive him. 



1836. 

Frederick Buel was born in Sheffield, Mass., Jan. 4, 1813. 
Three years later the family removed to Litchfield, Conn., where 
his childhood was spent. Later, he came to New Haven as a 
merchant's clerk, and while thus engaged became a Christian at 
the age of 16, and resolved to devote himself to the gospel min- 
istry. 

After graduation, he taught for a while, and then studied theol- 
ogy under Rev. Dr. Hickok, at Hudson, O. In 1840, having by 
continued study seriously impaired his sight, he was advised to try 
sea-life, and spent seven years on ship-board. Then returning to 
Connecticut, he was licensed to preach, and for a time served as 
general agent of the American Bible Society in that State. In 
August, 1849, he was sent by the Bible Society to California, and 
remained actively and untiringly engaged as its agent for the 
Pacific Coast, until a few months before his death. He was 
ordained to the ministry by the San Francisco Presbytery, in 
Benicia, Aug. 7, 1851. He died at his residence in Oakland, 
Cal., of consumption, Oct. 27, 1873. He left a wife and children. 



138 

Charles Backus McLean was born in Simsbury, Conn., Aug. 
23, 1815. His father was the Rev. Allen McLean (Y. C. 1805), 
for more than fifty years pastor of the Congregational Church in 
that place. 

After graduation, he taught for a few months in North Stam- 
ford, Conn., and in 1837 began the study of theology, which he 
pursued for four years, spending the first in Andover, Mass., the 
second in Union Theological Seminary, N. Y. city, another in 
New Haven, and the fourth under the tuition of his father at home. 
On the Yth of February, 1844, he was ordained pastor of the Con- 
gregational Church in Collins ville. Conn., which office he con- 
tinued to fill until failing health compelled him to resign it, in 
May, 1866. He now removed to Wethersfield, Conn., and sank 
gradually until his death, in Wethersfield, Oct. 29, 1873. 

He married Miss Mary T>, Williams, of Wethersfield, who sur- 
vives him. 

Joseph Forman Sabine^ died in Syracuse, N. Y., of pneumonia, 
June 4, 1874, at the age of about 60 years. He was a native of 
Onondaga, N. Y. 

He studied law with James R. Lawrence, of Camillus, N. Y,, 
whose daughter Margaret he afterwards married. She remains 
his widow, with one daughter. On being admitted to the bar he 
settled at first in Camillus, but soon removed to Syracuse, where 
he continued in successful practice until his death. 

1838. 

Joel Grant, son of Elijah and Elizabeth (Phelps) Grant, was 
born in Colebrook, Conn., Jan. 24, 1816, and entered college 
in the Sophomore year. 

After his graduation, he taught school for one year in Berlin, 
Md., and then served for nearly three years as Professor of Mathe- 
matics on the U. S. ship of war Potomac, cruising about the coast 
of South America. He then entered the Theological Seminary at 
Andover, and a year later removed to the Seminary at New Haven, 
where he completed his course in 1846. Having received a com- 
mission from the American Home Missionary Society, he was 
ordained an Evangelist by the North Consociation of Litchfield 
County, at South Cornwall, Conn., Sept. 29th, and was married to 
Miss Abigail F. Cowles, of Norfolk, Conn., Oct. 12th, 1845. He 
went immediately to Lockport, Illinois, where he had charge of 



139 



the Congregational Church until June, 1847, when he returned to 
Connecticut to regain his health. In December, he began to sup- 
ply the pulpit of the Congregational Church in West Avon, and 
was installed there, June 14, 1848. His health being re-estab- 
lished, he resigned this charge, Oct. 11, 1852, and went bacJi to his 
people in Lockport, where he remained until Oct., 1858. He then 
went to Bristol, 111., where he preached from Dec, 1858, until 
April, 1860, and then returned again to his parish in Lockport. 
In August, 1861, he became chaplain of the 12th Illinois Volun- 
teers, and served until July, 1865. He was then, from Oct., 1865, 
to April, 1866, the chaplain of the 113th U. S. Colored Infantry. 
In these years he was especially identified with the work of the 
Freedmen's Bureau. 

The most of the year 1867 he spent in his native town, caring 
for his aged father, and acting as pastor of the church. Return- 
ing to Illinois and to the missionary work to which he devoted his 
useful life, he supplied the pulpit in Bristol until 1870, when he 
became stated pastor of the Congregational Church in Cambridge. 
In May, 1873, he took charge of the church at Downer's Grove, 
and while in this service died suddenly, in Chicago, of heart dis- 
ease, Dec. 31, 1873. 

His wife survives him, with his only son, a graduate of this col- 
lege in the class of 1869. 

1839. 

Elt Whitney Blake, son of Philos and Esther (Hotchkiss) 
Blake, was born in New Haven, Conn., Dec. 28, 1819. 

He studied medicine in the Yale and Harvard Medical Schools, 
graduating at the former in 1842. For the next six months he was 
Assistant Physician at the city institutions in South Boston, and 
then began general practice in Boston. In 1863 he removed to 
New Haven, and continued in full practice, until his death, of 
typho-malarial fever, Nov. 19, 1873. 

He was married, Oct. 17, 1842, to Frances T., daughter of Sid- 
ney Babcock, of New Haven. She survives him, with one son, who 
graduated at this college in 1872 ; three other children having 
died in childhood. 



Charles Astor Bristed was born in N. Y. city, Oct. 6, 1820, 
and was the only son of the Rev. John Bristed, an Episcopal 
clergyman, of English birth, and of his wife Margaret B., the eld- 
est daughter of John Jacob Astor, 



140 

He remained for a year in New Haven as a resident graduate, 
attending some exercises at the Law School, and pursuing classi- 
cal studies. In the autumn of 1840, he went abroad, and entered 
Trinity College, Cambridge University, where he graduated B. A. 
in 1 845, having been much interrupted by ill-health. In the spring 
of 1846 he returned to New York, and married, Jan. 14th, 1847, 
Laura, daughter of Henry Brevoort. In 1849 he edited selections 
from Catullus, and in 1851 wrote "Five Years in an English Uni- 
versity," besides contributing numerous articles in the meantime 
to various American periodicals, and a series of papers to Fraser's 
Magazine, afterwards published under the title of " The Upper Ten 
Thousand: Sketches of New York Society." In 1851 he went 
abroad on account of his wife's health, and until her death, in 
August, 1861, passed most of his time in Paris and Baden. In 
October following he returned to New York, enfeebled in health, 
but with the purpose, nevertheless, of devoting himself to the 
service of his country in the civil war. A recurrence, however, of 
a dangerous illness, aggravated by the severity of the climate, 
completely broke down his health, and made him for the remainder 
of his life a confirmed invalid. In 1867 he published "The Inter- 
ference Theory of Government," and in 1873 a revised edition of 
his " Five Years in an English University." While in Baden he 
printed, in 1858-9, a collection of his miscellanies, in four volumes, 
whimsically entitled " Pieces of a Broken-Down Critic, picked up 
by himself." 

He was married a second time, to Miss Grace Sedgwick, who 
survives him, with several children. He died in Washington, D. 
C, which had been his later winter residence, on the 15th of Jan- 
uary, 1874. 

By far the largest share of Mr. Bristed's published writings was 
in the^form of contributions to the periodicals of the day, and in 
this way he did much for the cause of literary culture in America. 
In the same direction were his benefactions to this college. In 
1848 he established the " Bristed Scholarship," on a foundation of 
11,300, and in 1871 he gave $500 for the purchase of books on 
classical philology for the Library. 

Daniel Gordon Estes was born in Maiden, Mass., June 6, 
1819. In the autumn of 1839 he entered the Andover (Mass.) 
Theol. Seminary, but was obliged to leave on account of ill-health 
early in 1 840. For the next two years he was engaged in a 
mercantile house in Boston, but in 1842 he joined the middle class 



141 

in the General Theol. Seminary, N. Y. city, where he graduated in 
June, 1844. He was ordained a deacon in the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church, July 12, 1844, and soon after took charge of St. 
James's Parish, Amesbury, Mass. On the 30th of July, 1845, he 
received priest's orders, in Salem, Mass., from Bishop Eastburn. 

On account of impaired health he left Amesbury in 1851, and 
removed to Missouri. While in that State, he officiated in several 
places, but principally in St. Louis as rector of St. Paul's Church. 
Having returned to his residence in Amesbury, in 1857, he soon 
took charge again of his first parish, with which he remained con- 
nected until his death, Aug. 9, 1873. 

He was married, Oct. 14, 1846, to Hannah M., daughter of 
Paul Moody, of Lowell, Mass., who survives him. They had no 
children. 

In 1861 the degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him 
by St. Paul's College, Missouri. 

1841. 

Charles Henet Clakk was born in Saybrook, Conn., June 11, 
1818. He taught in the academy in Clinton, Conn., for a year 
after graduating ; and then studied law, first in Saybrook, and sub- 
sequently in Rochester, N. Y. He was admitted to the bar in 
October, 1845, and was for many years a successful lawyer in 
Rochester. In 1858 he was mayor of the city, and in June, 1863, 
was appointed Colonel of the 64th Regiment of the N. Y. State 
National Guard. 

He died in Rochester, Nov. 20, 1870, aged 52, having been 
affected for nearly a year with an organic disease of the heart, 
which was apparently complicated with a disease of the brain. 

He married, March 8, 1848, Miss Maria B. Viele, of Saratoga 
County, N. Y., who with his two sons is still living. 

1842. 

Robert T. Gill was born in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., in July, 
1821, and died in Hillsdale, Mich., of aneurism of the aorta, July 
1, 1873. 

He studied medicine at home and in Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, receiving the degree of M.D. in 1846. He then 
began practice in New York city. In 1849 he went to California, 
and in 1853 returned to Spring Brook, near Poughkeepsie, where 
he resided for many years, engaged chiefly in farming and milling. 



142 

1846. 
William Woodruff Atwater, third son of Ira and Roxanna 
(Buckingham) Atwater, was born in New Haven, Conn., Nov. 4, 

1824. 

After taking his degree, he taught for a year in Goldsborough, 
N. C, and then retiurned to New England, and spent a year in 
Andover and two years in New Haven, pursuing theological 
studies. He was licensed to preach by the Middlesex (Conn.) 
Association, Aug. 7, 1849, and was ordained Dec. 3, 1850, at Lima, 
Mich., where he was stationed as a Home Missionary for about 
two years. Two other engagements succeeded, each of two years, 
with the churches at Niles and Hudson, in the same State. He 
then preached at Elkhart, Ind., for three years, and in 1860 
returned to Connecticut, and was installed over the Congrega- 
tional Church in Prospect, on the 31st of October. He was dis- 
missed from this charge, Jan. 31, 1865, and in December began to 
preach in the West parish in Avon, Conn., where he continued 
until 1868. His last regular employment in the ministry was in 
South Killingly, where he settled in August, 1869. The state of 
his health led him to resign in 1873, and he removed to New 
Haven, where he died March 15, 1874. At the time of his death 
he was the Librarian of the Yale Law School. 

He married, Sept. 27, 1847, Mary Elizabeth Olmstead, of 
Bridgeport, Conn. His wife survives him, with several children. 



1847. 

George Gideon Webster was born in West Hartford, Conn., 
March 14, 1824, and died very suddenly, of congestion of the 
brain, in San Francisco, Cal., June 1, 1874. He was the fifth son 
of Ira Webster (Y. C. 1802) and Ann (L. Francis) Webster. 

He graduated at the Yale Law School, in 1850, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar. He joined one of the pioneer companies for 
California, and was for a few years engaged in mining. Hethen 
became a banker, and agent of Wells, Fargo & Co., at Forest Hill, 
Placer County, Cal., for ten years. For the remainder of his life 
he was a broker in San Francisco. 

He married, in Sept., 1856, Annie E. Soule, of Fall River, Mass., 
who survives him, with one of his two sons. 



148 



1849. 



David Peck was born in Greenwich, Conn., Feb. 16, 1825, and 
entered college in the Sophomore Year. 

From college he passed directly to the Yale Divinity School, 
where he finished the course in 1852, having been licensed to 
preach by the New Haven West (Congregational) Association, in 
July, 1851. He was ordained as the first pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church in Orange, Mass., Oct. 13, 1852, where he labored 
until May 25, lS5l. For six months from Dec. 15, 1857, he sup- 
plied the pulpit in Woodbridge, Conn., and was then installed 
(June 23, 1858) pastor of the 2d Congregational Church in Dan- 
bury, Conn. He resigned this charge, Jan. 2, 1861, and his next 
settlement was over the Evangelical Congregational (Church in 
Barre, Mass., from April 16, 1861, to Nov. 25, 1867. He then 
went to Sunderland, Mass., where he was pastor from Dec. 18, 
1867, till his death, in that place, Jan. 31, 1874. 

He married, Sept. 8, 1852, Miss Frances M. Jocelyn, of New 
Haven, Conn., who is still living. 

1860. 

Joel Sherland Blatchley, the eldest child of Samuel and 
Mary (Robinson) Blatchley, was born in North Madison, Conn., 
March 8, 1829. 

After graduation, he taught for a year in New Orleans, and 
then went to Dubuque, Iowa, where he studied law, was admitted 
to the bar, and practiced until the autumn of 1863. At that date, 
having lost several children, whose deaths were attributable, as 
he thought, to the climate, he removed to San Francisco, where 
he continued in his profession until early in 1870, when his health 
failed. He returned to his father's residence in Connecticut, and 
died suddenly in Fair Haven, Jan. 8, 1874. 

He was married in Feb., 1859, to Mrs. Marion Hall, of Monroe, 
Mich. His widow and three children survive him. 



1861. 

Evan William Evans, son of William and Catharine (Howell) 
Evans, was born Jan. 6, 1827, near Swansea, South Wales. His 
parents removed to Bradford County, Pa., in 1831, where he ob- 
tained his early education. 

He studied theology at New Haven for about a year, and then 
became principal of the Delaware Literary Institute, in Franklin, 



144 

N. Y. From this position he was called to a tutorship in this 
college, which he resigned, however, after one year's service 
(1855-6). In 1857 he was appointed Professor of Natural Philoso- 
phy and Astronomy in Marietta College, Ohio, and filled that 
place until 1864. He was then for three years occupied in Mining 
Engineering, and spent a fourth year in European travel. He was 
the first professor appointed in Cornell University, N. Y., and 
from the opening of that institution, in the fall of 1868, until 1872, 
filled the chair of Mathematics. He resigned on account of failing 
health, and after an absence of a few months at the South, re- 
turned to Ithaca, and gradually sank, until his death of consump- 
tion. May 22, 1874. Professor Evans was a general scholar, and 
while excelling in mathematics, was perhaps the most thorough 
Celtic student in this country. 

He was married, Aug. 6, 1856, to Helen E., daughter of Rev. 
Dr. Tertius S. Clarke (Y. C. 1824), then of Franklin, N. Y. She 
is still living, with several children. 

George Granbery Hastings, son of George and Mary L. 
(Granbery) Hastings, was born in New York city, Feb. 8, 1830. 
He entered college at the beginning of the Sophomore year, and 
remained for two years. His degree was granted him in 1854. 

After an interval of travel, he studied commercial law in New 
York city, and in 1853 took a partial course at the Harvard Law 
School He then devoted himself to his profession, in New York, 
until the autumn of 1861, when he raised a company of the 1st U. 
S. Sharpshooters, was commissioned captain, and joined the Army 
of the Potomac. He was soon after commissioned Major of his 
Regiment. He was wounded at the battle of Chancellorsville, and 
on recovering was appointed to the staff of Gen. Meade as Judge- 
Advocate of the Army of the Potomac. The Brevets of Lt. 
Colonel and Colonel were conferred on him for gallantry in the 
field. 

After the close of the war he devoted a few years to his private 
business, and then entered the civil service. About the close of 
1871, he was stricken with paralysis, from which he never fully 
recovered. He died at Sing Sing, JST. Y., Oct. 20, 1873. 

He was married in 1856 to Laura Helen, daughter of James L. 
Curtis, of New York. His only child, a daughter, survives him. 



145 



1852. 



Christopher Dicran Seropyan was born in Constantinople, 
Turkey, Aug. 16, 1825. 

After graduation he studied in the Yale Divinity School, and 
was licensed to preach the gospel, July 12, 1854. Meantime he 
was also pursuing studies in chemistry. In Sept., 1854, he entered 
on the study of medicine and attended lectures in New Haven 
and at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, 
receiving the degree of M.D. from this college in 1856. In Oct., 
1858, he left America, and for eighteen months continued his medi- 
cal studies in Paris. In July, 1860, he arrived at Constantinople, 
and began the practice of his profession. His chemical knowledge 
was a means of service to the Turkish Government, and he was 
soon appointed a member of the Imperial Mining Council. He 
died, of paralysis, about the middle of May, 1874. 

Dr. Seropyan was married, Feb. 16, 1864, to Miss Mugerdich, 
the daughter of an Armenian banker of Constantinople. 

1853. 

Samuel Mills C apron was bom in Uxbridge, Mass., May 15, 
1832, and was prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass. 

Immediately upon graduation he became principal of the Hop- 
kins Grammar School, constituting the Classical Department of the 
Public High School, in Hartford, Conn. In this position he re- 
mained until the summer of 1863, when he went to Europe for 
the benefit of his health. He returned in Nov., 1864, and in May 
of the next year added to his duties the principalship of the High 
School, and continued thus engaged with singular success until 
his death, at Hartford, after ten days' illness, of pneumonia, Jan, 
4, 18V4. 

He married, Nov. 23, 1854, Miss Eunice M. Chapin, of Whitins- 
ville, Mass., who survives him, with three of their five children. 



1854. 

Albert Haller Tracy, son of Hon. Albert H. and Harriet F. 
Tracy, was bora in Norwich, Conn., Oct. 29, 1834. He came to 
college from Buffalo, N. Y., and resided there until his very sud- 
den death, Jan. 23, 1874. He studied law, and was admitted to 
the bar in May, 1856, but retired from practice after a few years. 



146 

Elizur Wolcoti\ son of Guy and Annis (Porter) Wolcott, was 
born in Tallmadge, O., July J 4, 1833. His early years were spent 
on his father's farm. He entered Western Reserve College in 
1860, where he remained two years. In 1852 he entered the 
Junior Class in this college. 

He remained a year in New Haven after his graduation, pursu- 
ing the study of philosophy and modern languages. In 1855 he 
was appointed tutor in Western Reserve College, where he taught 
three years. In 1858 he began the study of theology at Andover, 
Mass., but his health soon gave way, and he abandoned study for 
a time, hoping, after a period of recreation, to resume it and enter 
the Christian ministry. He did not recover from his disease, and 
at length, in 1860, he married and settled down upon a farm in his 
native town. On the night of Dec. 20, 1873, he retired in his 
usual health, but was found in the morning dead in his bed, hav- 
ing probably suffocated in an epileptic attack. He was a man of 
more than ordinary ability and scholarship, and was very useful 
and active in all the public affairs of the church and town where 
he lived. 

He was married, Nov. 29, 1860, to Mary L. Pierce, of Tallmadge, 
who survives him, with four daughters. 

1866. 

Lafayette Washington Groves, son of David Groves, was 
born in Sumner County, Tenn., April 11, 1834. His father emi- 
grated to Lafayette County, Mo., in 1836, and the son spent three 
years in the Masonic College in Lexington, in the same county, 
before entering Yale in the Junior year. 

Returning home after graduation, he studied law in the office of 
Judge John Ryland, of Lexington, was admitted to the bar in 
1857, and began practice in St. Joseph, where he remained about 
eighteen months. He then went to Mississippi, and took charge 
of a High School, in C-ayuga, Hinds County, and was thus engaged 
at the beginning of the war. He then returned to Missouri, and 
entered the Southern army, under the command of Gen. Sterling 
Price. After the close of the war he spent some time at home, 
and in 1868 was elected Professor of Languages in Richmond 
College, at Richmond, Mo., where he continued until 1870. In 
the spring of 1871 he purchased the " Lexington Intelligencer," and 
was its editor until his death. He was assassinated, on the streets 
of Lexington, on the 8th of Nov., 1872, by Edwin Turner, the 



147 



publisher of a rival paper, who had been severely denounced by 
Mr. Groves for printing a slanderous personal attack upon him. 

1856. 

John C. Morehead was born in Frankfort, Ky., March 4, 1837, 
and died at his plantation near Greenville, Mississippi, about the 
26th of October, 1873, of heart disease. 

He entered college at the beginning of the Junior year, from 
Frankfort. After graduating he returned home and studied law 
and was admitted to the bar. 

Oliver Starr Taylor was born in Brookfield, Conn., March 
14, 1832, and died in Kittaning, Pa., April 5, 1874. 

He spent two years in the Yale Divinity School, and was first 
settled in Simsbury, Conn., where he was ordained over the Con- 
gregational Church, Sept. 21, 1859. He resigned this charge, 
Aug. 1, 1865, and from Jan. 1, 1866 to Feb., 1867, preached in 
Essex, Conn. The next six months were spent in European travel, 
and after his retuan he spent some time in the West. He was 
ordained Deacon in the Protestant Episcopal Church, April 6, 
1870, and advanced to the priesthood Oct. 18, 1871, on which day 
he was also instituted Rector of St. Paul's Church, in Kittaning. 
In this position he continued until his death. 

He married, July 6, 1858, Miss Lottie Baldwin, of Bridgeport, 
Conn., and had several children. 



1857. 

John Thomas Croxton was born, Nov, 20, 1837, in Bourbon 
County, within a few miles of Paris, Ky., the eldest son of a far- 
mer. He was prepared for college at home, and entered as 
Sophomore. 

Selecting the law as his profession, he studied under Gov. James 
F. Robinson, at Georgetown, Ky., acting also as a teacher in his 
family, and was admitted to the bar in September, 1 858. The 
next year he spent in teaching in Mississippi, and in Aug., 1859, 
began practice in Paris. He was married, April 10, 1860, to Miss 
Carrie A., daughter of Nathaniel P. Rogers, Esq., of Bourbon 
County. 

The war found him busily engaged in his profession. He was 
one of the first to enter into the movement for raising Union 
troops in Kentucky, and was very active in recruiting men for the 
10 



148 

4th Ky. Infantry, becoming its Lieutenant-Colonel, at its organiza- 
tion in June, 1861, and succeeding to the command of the regi- 
ment in March, 1862. He was promoted Brigadier-General, Aug. 
16, 1864, for gallant conduct at Chickamauga, and subsequently 
brevetted Major-General. After a conspicuous share in the ex- 
ploits of the war, its close found him at Macon, where he remained 
until Dec, 1866, in command of the District of Southwestern 
Georgia. Resigning his commission, he spent part of the year 
1866 in reviewing his professional studies, and in 1867 returned to 
his farm near Paris, and resumed the practice of law. Subse- 
quently he became chiefly instrumental in establishing the Louis- 
ville Commercial as a Republican journal. His health was 
greatly injured by exposure during the war and by subsequent 
overwork, and in 1873, while absent in Colorado for relief, the 
position of U. S. Minister to Bolivia was ofiered him by President 
Grant. He accepted the oifer, for the sake of his health ; but the 
relief came too late, and he died of consumption, at La Paz, April 
16, 1874, leaving a widow and two children. 

1858. 

Benjamin Franklin Penny, son of Robert and Sarah (Christ- 
mas, Burns) Penny, was born in Baton Rouge, La., Sept. 17, 
1836. 

Soon after graduating he entered the New Orleans Medical 
School, where he received the degree of M.D. in March, 1861. On 
the death of an older brother, who was a physician in Greenville, 
Washington County, Miss., he inherited in June, 1861, his brother's 
property and succeeded to his well-established practice. During 
the war, after the town was burned he remained near by, and 
when it was partially rebuilt returned to it. He died, in Greenville, 
of consumption, after two years' illness, July 4, 1873. 

Dr. Penny was married, in April, 1861, to Miss Amelia E. 
Charnley, a native of Providence, R. L, who survives him. Of his 
three children, two daughters are still living. 

1860. 

John Moses Morris, son of Moses and Laura W. Morris, was 
born in Wethersfield, Conn., April 27, 1837. 

In Nov. 1 860, he entered the Divinity School of Yale College, 
and remained there until February, 1862. On the 25th of the 
following April he was ordained in New Haven as an Evangelist? 



149 

and accepted an appointment as Chaplain of the 8th Connecticut 
Volunteers. In this position, which he occupied until Sept., 1863, 
he shrank from no service or exposure, however severe. On his 
resignation he returned to New Haven and conducted the " Con- 
necticut War Record " until the close of the war. He then began 
the compilation of a " History of Connecticut during the Civil 
War," which was completed in conjunction with Mr. W. A. 
Croifut, and was published in 1868 (pp. 891, 8vo.) In the mean- 
time he became in 1865 assistant clerk of the Connecticut House 
of Uepresentatives, and in 1866 clerk of the same body. In 1867 
he was clerk of the State Senate, and at the close of this service 
went to Washington as private secretary to Senator Ferry. In 
Oct, 1868, he established the Charleston (S. C.) " Weekly Repub- 
lican," which he conducted as editor for two years, it becoming a 
daily paper after Aug., 1869. In March, 1869, he was elected 
executive clerk of the Secretary of the United States Senate, 
which position he held until his death. During the winter of 
1870-71 he purchased the "Washington Chronicle" and continued 
as principal stockholder and editor-in-chief until June, 1872, when 
he withdrew from the management on account of declining health. 
He died in Washington, of consumption, Nov. 27, 1873, aged S6^ 
years. 

He married, Dec. 31, 1863, Miss Augusta R. Griswold, of 
Wethersfield, who survives him. 

1862. 

Robert Galbraith Woods was born in Salem, O., Nov. 2, 
1836, and died in New Lisbon, O., after an illness of several weeks, 
Oct. 13, 1873. He entered college in 1857, but left at the end of 
Sophomore year, and a year later joined the next class, with which 
he graduated. 

He studied law at home with his brother, Thomas S. Woods, 
and after being admitted to the bar was taken into partnership 
with him. He found the practice of his profession uncongenial, 
and upon his brother's death, in March, 1869, succeeded him as 
editor and publisher of the " Ohio Patriot," a weekly Democratic 
paper of New Lisbon. In this occupation he continued until his 
death. He was unmarried. 

1863. 

Adrian Voorhees Cortelyou, son of Adrian V. and Mary A. 
Cortelyou, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept, 17, 1841, and died 
in the same city, Sept. 25, 1873. 



160 

He studied law at the Columbia College Law School, where he 
graduated in May, 1865. From that date he was a practicing 
lawyer in Brooklyn. 

Charles Rowland Wesson was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., on 
the 14th of January, 1840 : he was the eldest son of David Wesson 
and Alice G. Rowland. 

Immediately upon graduation, he entered the Columbia College 
Law School, and after taking his degree, in May, 1865, practiced 
his profession in the city of New York with great diligence until 
May, 1873, when he went to Europe, in the*ope of benefitting his 
health. After travelling on the continent, he sailed by the advice 
of Paris physicians for Vera Cruz. He was thence taken to 
various places in Mexico, and finally to the capital, where he died 
on the 21st of November. A post-mortem examination revealed, 
what his physicians had not suspected, that he died of a disease 
of the heart. 

Mr. Wesson married, June 8, 1869, Miss Emma M. Leland, of 
Brooklyn, who survives him. 

1864. 

Gilbert John Raynor was born in East Moriches, L. L, Oct. 
9, 1842. In September, 1864, he received an appointment as 
clerk in the office of the Commissary General of Pensions, in 
Washington, which he resigned in Jan., 1866, to accept a similar 
position in the office of the Second Auditor of the Treasury. 
Meantime he pursued his studies, and graduated at the Law De- 
partment of the Columbian College, in June, 1866. He afterwards 
left Washington and obtained a clerkship in the Court of Appeals, 
in Albany, which he resigned in order to enter on the practice of 
law in Sag Harbor, L. I. ; but in 1871 he was obliged by the state 
of his health to retire and to devote a year to rest at his father's 
house. On regaining strength, he obtained a clerkship in the 
State Department of Public Instruction, and filled that position 
at the time of his death. He contracted a severe cold, early in 
the month of January, 1874, by exposure after a hemorrhage from 
the lungs, and sank rapidly until his death, at Albany, on the 29th 
of the same month. He was unmarried. 

1866. 

Harry Ward Foote, the youngest child of Hon. Samuel E. 
and Elizabeth (B. Elliott) Foote, was born in Cincinnati, O., Aug. 



151 

5, 1844, and died in New Haven, Conn., June 28, 1873. He was 
prepared for college in Xew Haven, where his family then re- 
sided. 

During the winter of 1866-67, he attended lectures in the Co- 
lumbia College Law School, but early in the following summer 
an unsuspected disease of the lungs manifested itself, and he sailed 
for Europe in October. After a prolonged struggle for life, he 
returned to his home in Xew Haven in the spring of 1873, to 
die. By his will, a bequest was made to the college of twenty- 
five thousand dollars, for the endowment of graduate scholarships. 

1868. 

Russell William Ayres, son of James R. and Eliza Ayres, 
was born in Peekskill, N. Y., Jan. 10, 1844. His father removed 
to Waterbury in 1848. While preparing for college he enlisted 
(in August, 1862) in the 23d Connecticut Infantry, and served for 
a year. Upon his return, he completed his preparatory studies at 
the Academy in Wilbraham, Mass. 

Immediately after graduation he began the study of law in 
Judge Gillett's office in Waterbury, and after remaining there for 
a year and being admitted to the bar, spent a year in the Harvard 
Law School, where he graduated in June, 1870. In the meantime 
he had become so enfeebled in health that he was obliged to 
defer entering on the active duties of his profession. He rallied 
at length, and in the spring of 1872 removed to the town of Mil 
ford. Conn., and took a great interest in building up a new 
settlement there, to which he gave the name of Woodmont. 
His hope was to make this his residence, and to practice his pro- 
fession in New Haven. Meantime he spent the winter of 1872- 
73 in Florida, with benefit to his health. But on his return from 
a business visit to the west, he took a severe cold, and while 
struggling to reach home was attacked with pneumonia at Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., and died there, Dec. 14, 1873. He was unmarried. 

1869. 

George Edward Hand, son of J. M. and Caroline W. (Allen) 
Hand, was born in Durham, Conn., Aug. 9, 1847, and died in 
Memphis, Tenn., Jan. 28, 1874. 

In the winter of 1869-70 he attended medical lectures at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons in N. Y. city ; and spent the 
ensuing summer in the care of his health. Having changed his 



162 

mind as to a profession, he then entered the General Theological 
Seminary of the Episcopal Church, in New York city, and studied 
for one year. Failing health then interrupted his plans for nearly 
two years ; at the end of which time he went to Memphis, in the 
hope that the climate would prove beneficial, but he died soon 
after his arrival, of typhoid fever. 

Frederic Peet Terry, son of John T. Terry, was born in * 
Brooklyn, N. Y., May 14, 1847. 

He was engaged in business in New York city from the time of 
his graduation, except while absent on a trip around the world, 
from May, 1870, to February, 1871. 

He was married, Feb. 5, 1873, to Miss Nellie M., daughter of 
Hon. Bobbins Battell (Y. C. 1839), of Norfolk, Conn. He died 
at his residence in Mont Clair, N. J., May 12, 1874. His death 
was caused by a malignant pustule. His wife survives him, with 
one son. 

1872. 

James Stone Jones, the son of Newland and Mary Jane Jones, 
was born in Madison County, Ky., near the town of Richmond, 
Sept. 21, 1852. He was prepared for college in Richmond. 

After graduating he returned home in poor health, and 
by October consumption was fully developed. For the next six 
months he was closely confined to his room, and much of the time 
to his bed. In the spring of 1873, he seemed to rally, but the 
approach of the autumn brought on the disease in a severer form, 
and he died at his father's house on the first of October. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1823. 

Timothy Dimock died in South Coventry, Conn., April 29, 
1874. He had practiced medicine in Coventry since taking his 
degree. In 1846 he was a member of the State Senate, and ex 
officio one of the corporation of Yale College. 

Benjamin Welch, son of Dr. Benjamin Welch, was born in 
Norfolk, Conn., May 24, 1798. His mother, Louisa Guiteau, was 
the daughter of Dr. Ephraim Guiteau, of Norfolk. 

He was licensed to practice medicine and surgery in 1820. The 
following year he spent in Canton, Conn., with Dr. Everest, at 



153 

that time one of the most eminent surgeons of the State. After 
receiving his degree, he entered the Jefferson Medical College in 
Philadelphia, in order to pursue still further the study of anatomy 
and surgery. Having received in 1824 a diploma of honorary 
membership in the Philadelphia Medical Society, he entered upon 
the practice of his profession in Norfolk. 

In 1842 he removed to Litchfield, Conn., where he remained 
four years, and in 1846 to Salisbury, Conn., where the remainder 
of his life, a period of twenty-seven years, was spent. After an 
arduous and successful practice of fifty-four years, he died, in Salis- 
bury, Oct. 9, 1873, of typhoid fever, believed to have been induced 
by his untiring efforts during an epidemic of the fever then pre- 
vailing in the community. 

Dr. Welch, although highly successful as a physician, was 
especially eminent in the practice of surgery, for which his me- 
chanical skill and thorough knowledge of anatomy fitted him. 

In 1835 he read the annual dissertation before the State Medical 
Society on the " Vitality of the Blood ; " and in 1853 he delivered 
the annual address at the Commencement exercises of the Medical 
Department of Yale College, which was published. 

He married. May 12, 1829, Sarah, daughter of James Beebe, 
Esq., of Winchester, Conn., who survives him. 

1835. 

Benjamin Bacon Spalding died in Brooklyn, Conn., May 7, 
1874. His residence had been in Brooklyn during the greater part 
of his life. 

1836. 

Samuel Thurber Salisbury died in Plymouth, Conn., March 1, 
1874. He was born in Providence, R. L, March 14, 1814. He 
was at one time a student in Brown University, and also began 
theological studies, but the state of his health rendered a change 
of profession advisable. He became interested in medicine, and 
settled in Plymouth, where he began to practice as a botanical 
physician about 1 834. After taking his degree, he returned to 
Plymouth, and continued a resident of that place until his death. 
He was obliged by his disease (locomotor ataxia, terminating in 
paralysis and apoplexy) to retire from practice during the last 
four or five years of his life. 

Dr. Salisbury married, in 1836, Miss Harriet Fenn, of Ply- 
mouth ; by whom he had two daughters, who died in 1848, their 



154 

mother dying also in 1850. In 1862 he married Miss Amelia P. 
Morse, of Cheshire, Conn., by whom he had three sons, who sur- 
vive him. 

1847. 

John Lumax Wakefield, eldest son of Dr. Luman and Betsey 
(Rockwell) Wakefield, was born in Winsted, Conn., May 25, 
1823. 

After graduation he returned to Winsted and remained in the 
practice of his profession until 1849, when he went to California. 
There he continued in practice until 1854, when he was severely 
attacked with the cholera, and upon partial recovery and a visit 
home settled in Shakopee, Minnesota, for the sake of his health. 
In 1861 he was appointed physician to the Upper Agency for the 
Sioux Indians, and was there at the time of the massacre of Aug. 
18, 1862, when he succeeded in escaping, while his wife and ehildren 
were captured. After their release in October, he settled at St. 
Paul, being stationed at Fort Snelling, in medical charge of the 
friendly Indians. In 1863, after a brief visit to Missouri in the 
same capacity, he resigned his appointment, and returned to Sha- 
kopee, where he was a practising physician until his sudden death 
on Feb. 11, 1874, of congestion of the brain. 

Dr. Wakefield was married, in 1836, to Sarah F. Brown, of 
Providence, R. I., who survives him, with two sons and two 
daughters. 

1849. 

Moses Harrison Perkins, son of Moses and Mary (Harrison) 
Perkins, was born in New Haven, Conn., Feb. 12, 1823, and died 
in Columbia, Conn., Feb. 17, 1874. 

After receiving his degree, he was employed for about a year 
in New Haven, as a druggist, and then undertook the practice of 
his profession in Waterbury, Conn. About 1858 he removed to 
Columbia, and remained in practice until the time of his death. 
He had been for a long time a Sufi*erer from Bright's disease. 

During the late war he enlisted as Assistant Surgeon of the 
15th Conn. Infantry ; but the failure of his health prevented his 
continuance in the field. He leaves a widow and two sons. 

1859. 

John William Lawton died suddenly in Syracuse, N. Y., 
June 3, 1874. He was the son of Rev. Sanford Lawton (Y. C. 
1 825), of Longmeadow, Mass. 



156 

He entered the volunteer service in August, 1862, as the assis- 
tant surgeon of the 2d Connecticut Artillery, and the next year, 
having attained the rank of surgeon, transferred himself to the 
regular service. Soon after the close of the civil war, he settled 
in Syracuse, where he practiced until his death. After a visit to 
Europe in 1872, which he spent in professional studies, he held the 
position of professor in the Syracuse Medical College, devoting 
himself to diseases of the eye and ear. 

SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 
1871. 

Daniel Hobart Pierpont was the son of Rufus and Harriet 
Pierpont, and was born in North Haven, Conn., May 8, 1851. 

Almost immediately after graduation he was employed by the 
IT. S. Coast Survey, under Mr. R. M. Bache, in the survey of the 
region about New Haven, and was thus engaged until near the 
time of his death. His health began to fail in the spring of 1873, 
and he died of a pulmonary affection, at his father's residence in 
North Haven, May 17, 1874. He was unmarried. 



Intelligence of the following deaths has been received too late 
for insertion elsewhere : 

1833. 

Robert Dixon Gardner was born in Bast Haddam, Conn., March 16, 1805 j 
the son of Nicholas and Sarah (Wright) G-ardner. 

For the two years succeeding graduation he taught in Wheeling, Va., and East 
Hampton, L. I. For the next three years he was a student of theology in East Wind- 
sor, Conn. From March 31, 1841, to Sept. 30, 1861, he was pastor of the Congre- 
gational Church in Monroe, Conn. He was next for five years a teacher in Lyme, 
Conn. His last settlement as pastor was in Ellsworth, Conn., from June, 1858, to 
1865. He then removed to Sharon, Conn., and in 1871 to East Hampton, L. I., 
where he died June 4, 18*71, of a disease of the face, resulting in necrosis of the 
bone of the jaw. After his retirement from pastoral duties, he had occupied him- 
self with teaching a few pupils, and also since his removal to East Hampton with 
the care of a small farm. 

He was married, Sept. 5, 1838, to Phebe G., daughter of Samuel Miller, of East 
Hampton. She died July 7, 1840. He was married a second time, Aug. 25, 1842, 
to Louisa M. Ely, daughter of Elisha Ely, of Huntington, Conn. He leaves one 
son, by his first marriage. 

1872. 

Richard Dana Willson, son of George and Mary Ann (Watson) Willson, was 
born in Canandaigua, N. Y., July 20, 1848, and died in New Haven, Conn., June 
21, 1874. 

He entered the Yale School of the Fine Arts, after his graduation, and continued 
there until his last illness. An epileptic affection had for years made him a 
partial invalid, and finally caused his death. 



SUMMARY 



Academical DEPABTiaasrT. 



€Smm. THaine and Age. 

1805 Q-ardiner Spring, 88, 

1807 Jamee Fowler. 85, 

1809 Philo JudBon. 92, 

1810 EliaE H. Ely, 83. 

" A-m-mi LinsleT. 84, 

1813 Sherman Converse, 83, 

1814 David S. Edwards, 79, 
" John Law. 77, 

1B15 Henry Kellogg. 78, 

" Jamee H. Mitchell, 77, 

1816 "William H. Moseley. 74, 

1817 Samnel H. Perkins, 77, 

1820 Jared Foote, 73, 

1821 Oman Eastman, 78, 

" Edward Rockwell, 72, 

" John Smith, 77, 

1822 J. Lee Bhss, 70. 

E. Goodrich Smith, 71, 

John Todd. 72, 

" Thomas T. Waterman, 71, 

♦' William L. Wight, 71, 

1823 Edward Dickinson. 71, 
'' Gordon Hayes. 76, 

" Edwards Johnson. 69, 

" Addison H. White, 69, 

1824 William H. Eockwell. 73, 

1826 James F. Bunnell. 67, 

" William P. Biirrall, 67, 

** Sidney Mais, 75, 

1827 Robert K. Eichards. 67, 

1828 John C. Palmer, 65, 

1829 Edwin R. Gflbert. 66, 
1832 Janaes M. Bunker, 62, 

" Edward 0. Dunning, 64, 

" Henry L. Hitchcock, 69, 

183:^. Ec.bert D. Grardner, 69, 

1834 Churchil] Ooffing, 59. 
Thomas H Totten, 59, 

1835 Samuel W. Fisher, 59. 
^ Bthelbert 6. Mills. 57., 

lia€ Frederick Buel, 60. 

Charles B. McLean, 58, 

" Joseph F. Sabine, 60, 

1838 Joel Grant, 58, 
18B9 E. Whitney Blake, 54, 
Charles A* Hristed, a, 
D. Gordon Estes. 54, 

1841 Charles H. Clark, 52, 

1842 Robert T. Gill. 51. 
1846 William W. Atwatter, 4», 
IM^ GMcge G. Webster, 59. 



Place and 
S. Y. City, 
Westfield. Mass., 
Rocky Hill. Conn., 
Pordand. Me., 
North Haven. Conn.. 
Boston Highlands, Mass. 
Bridgeport, Conn., 
EvansvOle, Ind.^ 
Troy, K. T-, 
Davton, 0., 
N.*r. City, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Hamden, Conn., 
N. T. City, 
Winstead, Conn^ 
Stamford, Conn., 
N. T. City, 
Washington, D. O, 
Pittsfield, Mass., 
Stratford, Conn., 
Dover Mills, Ta., 
Boston. Mass.. 
Muscatine, Iowa, 
Stratford, Conn., 
WilliamBburg, Mass., 
Brattleboro. Tt., 
Middletown. Conn., 
Hartford, Conn.^ 

Chfton, Ta., 
Brooklyn, N. T., 
Hartford. Conn., 
Wallingford, Conn., 
Nantucket, Mass., 

Isew Haven, Corai., 

Hudson, 0., 

East Hampton, L. L, 

Chicago, HL, 

New Haven. Coim., 

Cincinnati, 0., 

Conev Island, N. Y-, 

Oakland, GaL, 

Wethersfield, Camu, 

Syracuse, N. T., 

Chicago, HL, 

Isew Haven, Coxm^ 

Washington, D. C, 

Amesbury. Mas&^ 

Rochester, N. T., 

Hillsdale, Mich., 

K ew Haven, Ooim., 

San FranoiBOo, OiL, 



TimeafBesfih. 
Aug. 18, "TX 
Oct 18, ^73. 
March 12, *74- 
Feb. 8, ^4. 
Dec. 21, '73u 
Dec. 10, *73. 
March 18, ^74. 
Ocst 7, ^73. 
Nov. 4, 'T3u 
Oct. 13, "73. 
Nov. 19. ^71. 
May 21, '74. 
July 28, *73. 
April 24, ^74. 
Feb. 25, '74. 
Feb. 20, ^4. 
June 4, TS. 
Aug. 26, "'Ta. 

Aug. 24, '71. 

Aug. 2, "n, 
Oct 2, 13. 

JiBU 1«, ^4. 

May 26, 14. 
June 24, 73. 

Feb. 2,'73- 

Nov. 30, ^73. 

April 9, '74. 

Marcli 3, 14. 

March 25, '74. 

March 5, '74. 

Aug. 12, '73. 

April 17, '74. 

Nov. 19, '73. 

March 23, '74. 

July 6, '73- 

June 4, '74. 

Mav 17, '73- 

Marcii 26, '74. 

Jan. 16, '74. 

July 1&, '73. 

Oct. 27, 13. 

Oct. 29, 13. 

June 4, 14. 

Dec. 31, 13. 

Nov. 19, 13. 

Jan. 15, 14. 

Aug. 9, 13. 

Nov. 20, '73. 

Julv 1, '73. 

March 15. 14. 

June L 14. 



151 



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apB (2£ iJiB ^lai^ 






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N^' 



INDEX. 



ClaBs. Page. 

1846 Atwater, Wm. W., 142 

1868 Ayres, Russ W., 151 

1839 Blake, E. Whitney, 139 

1860 Blatchley, Joel S., 143 

1822 Bliss, J. Lee, 126 

1839 Bristed, Charles A., 139 

1836 Buel, Frederick, 137 

1832 Bunker, James M., 134 

1826 Bunnell, James F., 131 

1826 Burrall, Wm. P., _. 131 

1853 Capron, Samuel M., 145 

1841 Clark, Charles H., 1 41 

1834 Coffing, Churchill, 135 

1813 Converse, Sherman, 120 

1863 Cortelyou, Adrian V.,.._ 149 

1 857 Croxton, John T. _ 147 

1823 Dickinson, Edward, 129 

1823 m Dimock, Timothy 152 

1832 Dunning, Edward 0.,.._ 134 
1821 Eastman. Oman, 123 

1814 Edwards, David S., 121 

1810 Ely, Elias H., v- - - - 119 

1839 Estes, D. Gordon, 140 

1861 Evans, Evan W., 143 

1835 Fisher, Samuel- W., 136 

1866 Foote, Harry W., 150 

1820 Foote, Jared, 123 

1807 Fowler, James, 118 

1833 Gardner, Robert D., 155 

1829 Gilbert, Edwin R., 133 

1 842 Gill, Robert T., _ 141 

1838 Grant, Joel, 138 

1856 Groves, Lafayette W., _ . 146 

1869 Hand, George E., 151 

1851 Hastings, George G., _.. 144 

1823 Hayes, Gordon, __ 129 

1832 Hitchcock, Henry L.,_.. 134 

1823 Johnson, Edwards, 130 

1872 Jones, James S., 152 

] 809 Judson, Phiio, _ 118 

1816 Kellogg, Henry, 122 



1862 Woods, Robert G., 



Class. Page 

1814 Law, John, 121 

1859 m Lawton, John W., 164 

1810 Linsley, Ammi, 119 

1836 McLean, Charles B., 138 

1835 Mills, Ethelbert S., 137 

1826 Mills, Sidney, 132 

1815 Mitchell, James H., 122 

1856 Morehead, John C, 147 

1860 Morris, John M., 1 48 

1816 Mosely, Wm. H., 122 

1828 Palmer, John C, _ 133 

1849 Peck. David, 143 

1858 Penny, Benj. F., 148 

1849 m Perkins, Moses H.. 154 

1817 Perkins, Samuel H., 123 

187 1 p Pierpont, D. Hobart, 155 

1 864 Raynor, Gilbert J., 150 

1827 Richards, Robert K., .. _ 132 

1821 Rockwell, Edward, 124 

1824 RockweU, Wm. H., 130 

1836 Sabine, Joseph F., 1.^8 

1836 m Salisbury, Samuel T.,._. 153 

1852 Seropyan, Christopher D., 145 

1822 Smith, E. Goodrich, 126 

1821 Smith, John, 124 

1835 m Spalding, Benj. B., 153 

1805 Spring, Gardiner, 114 

1856 Taylor, Oliver S., 147 

1869 Terry, Frederic P., 152 

1822 Todd, John, _. 127 

1834 Totten, John, _ 136 

1854 Tracy, Albert H., 146 

1847 m Wakefield, John L., 164 

1822 Waterman, Thomas T., J. 127 

1847 Webster, George G., 142 

1813 m Welch, Benj., _ 152 

1863 Wesson, Charles H., 150 

1823 White, Addison H., 130 

1822 Wight, Wm. L., 128 

1872 Willson, Richard D., 155 

1854 Wolcott, Elizur, 146 

. 149 




OBITUARY RECORD 



OP 



GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 



Deceased during the academical year ending in June, 1 875, 

including the record of a few who died a short 

time previous, hitherto unreported. 



[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMNI, JUNE 30th, 1875.] 
[No. 5 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 84 of the whole Record.] 



.^\ 



OBITUARY RECORD 



GRADUATES OP YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the academical year ending June^ 1875, includ- 
ing the record of a few who died previously^ 
hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting of the Alumni, June 30, 1875.] 
[No. 5 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 34 of the whole Kecord.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1804. 

Jacob Adrien VanHeuvel was born in Maestricht, Holland, 
Jan. 14, 1787, the son of John C. and Justina H. F. VanHeuvel. 

He was admitted to the bar in N. Y. City (where his father 
then resided), in 1808, but never practiced. Soon after, he removed 
to Ogdensburgh, St. Lawrence County, N. Y., where, or in the 
neighboring town of Heuvelton (named from him), he lived, in- 
dulging his literary tastes, until about 1 860, when he went to 
Oneida County, and subsequently to Syracuse, and in that neigh- 
borhood lived, until his death, in Syracuse, May 3, 1874. He was 
the last survivor of his class. 



1806. 

James Root, second son of Ephraim Root (Y. C. 1782) and 
Eunice (Buell) Root, was born in Hartford, Conn., April 23, 1787. 

At the time of his graduation his father met with reverses of 
fortune, and gave to this son, as his patrimony, a lot of land in 
the distant west. He made his way thither alone, and for about 
thirty years was the only settler in what became Rootstown, near 
Cleveland, Ohio. While there he engaged in the Indian warfare, 
and underwent all the other hardships of pioneer life. After a 
time his land began to appreciate in value, and after he returned 
to Hartford, in middle life, he became by this means very wealthy. 



160 

On his return he married Lucy Olrastead, of New Hartford, 
Conn., who died not long after, leaving one daughter, who is also 
deceased. Mr. Root died in Hartford, April 17, 1875. 

1808. 

Joseph Delapield, second son of John and Ann (Hallett) Dela- 
field, was born in N. Y. City, Aug. 22, 1790. 

He studied law in the oifice of Josiah Ogden Hoffman, of New 
York City, and was admitted to the bar in 1811. While still a 
student, he received a commission as Lieutenant in the 5th Regi- 
ment of the State Militia, and on Feb. 4, 1812, was appointed to 
the rank of Captain. When war was declared, in the spring of 
that year, he raised a full company of volunteers, and joined the 
command of Col. Hawkins. After being quartered at Sandy 
Hook for a year, Capt. Delafield helped to recruit a regiment for 
the regular army, of which he was commissioned Major in 1814. 
The regiment, however, did not see active service. After the 
close of the war. Major Delafield was appointed on the commis- 
sion for settling the North-Western boundary, and in this capacity 
was employed (and ultimately as the sole commissioner) until 
1828. During this period, in his excursions to the border, he be- 
gan a collection of minerals, which subsequently occupied much of 
his time. For the rest of his life he resided in New York, not en- 
gaged in active business. He was interested in scientific pursuits, 
and was at one time President of the Lyceum of Natural History. 
He died in New York, of pneumonia, Feb. 12, 1876. 

He married Julia, daughter of Maturin Livingston, who sur- 
vives him, with their two sons. 

1812. 

William Platt BuFFETT, son of Isaac and Hannah (Hedges) 
Buffett, was born in Smithtown, L. I., April 1, 1793. He was 
fitted for college by his uncle. Rev. Platt Buffett, of Stanwich, 
Conn. 

During the second year after graduation he studied in the 
Litchfield (Conn.) Law School, and was subsequently,' for two yearp, 
in a law office in N. Y. City, and in 1817 was admitted to practice. 
He remained in N. Y. until the death of his partner (Ezra L'Hom- 
medieu) in 1820, when he returned to his native place, where he 
resided, engaged in the practice of his profession and in agricul- 
tural pursuits, until his death, on the 7th of October, 1874. He 



161 

was honored with various professional trusts, and in 1851 was 
elected County Judge and Surrogate. For many years he was an 
Elder in the Presbyterian Church. 

He was married, in 1825, to Nancy, daughter of Jarvis Rogers, 
of Islip, L. I., who with five children survives him. 

Edward Delafikld died at his residence in New York City, 
Feb. 13, 1875, in the 81st year of his age. He was the fifth son 
of John Delafield, of New York, and was bom in that city, May 
1 7, 1794. The death of his elder brother has been noticed on the 
preceding page of this pamphlet. 

On graduating here, he entered the office of Dr. Borrowe, of 
New York, .and in 1816 obtained his medical degree from the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. He completed his regular 
term of service in the N. Y. Hospital, and then spent a year abroad, 
chiefly in London, where he was a pupil of Sir Astley Cooper and 
Dr. Abernethy. After his return, he established, in Nov., 1820, in 
connection with Dr. J. Kearney Kodgers, the N. Y. Eye and Ear 
Infirmary, of which he continued to be an attending surgeon until 
1850, when he was elected consulting surgeon; in 1870, he was 
made vice-president. Much of the success of this important 
enterprise is justly due to his care. Soon after the foundation of 
the Infirmary, he became a partner of Dr. Borrowe, and was early 
introduced into a large and lucrative practice. In 1834 he was 
appointed one of the attending physicians to the N. Y. Hospital. 
In 1825 he was appointed Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of 
Women and ChildrcD in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
and continued to fill the chair with signal ability until 1838, 
when his increasing private practice obliged him reluctantly to 
resign both his professorship and his position at the Hospital. In 
1842 he founded the Society for the relief of the Widows and 
Orphans of Medical Men, of which he was the first president, and 
to the management of whose aflairs he devoted much time. In 
1858 he was elected President of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, a position which he held until his death. He thus be- 
came oflicially a member of the Board of Governors of the 
Roosevelt Hospital, and, as chairman of its Building Committee, 
gave himself unsparingly to the details of the building and the 
organization of the institution. 

Dr. Delafield married, first, Oct. 12, 1821, Elinor E. L., daughter 
of Thomas L. Elwyn, Esq., of Portsmouth, N. H., and secondly. 



162 

Julia, daughter of Col. Nicoll Floyd, of Mastic, L. I. A son, by 
his second marriage, graduated at this college in 1860. 

The disease which caused his death was pneumonia, of which he 
had been sick for nearly a year and a half. 

1813. 

Abram Dixon, son of Major Joseph and Mercy (Raymond) 
Dixon, was born in Manchester, Vt, in July, 1787, and died, after 
a very brief illness, of pneumonia, at his residence in Westfield, 
Chautauqua County, N. Y., April 19, 1875. His father removed 
to Sherburne, N. Y., in 1 795, and from that place he entered college. 
A brother graduated in 1 807. 

He studied law with Judge Foote of Hamilton, N. Y., and in 
1817 removed to Westfield, and began the practice of his profession. 
He continued in active practice until enfeebled by age, and was 
highly respected as an honest lawyer. From 1840 to 1844 he was 
a member of the State Senate. 

He was married, just before his removal to Westfield, to Miss 
Caroline Pelton, who died Sept. 10, 1837, leaving four children. 
He was afterwards married to Mrs. Eliza Higgings, daughter of 
Gen. Holt of Bufialo, who died March 10, 1858, leaving a daughter 
and a son. Of his children, two daughters and a son survive him. 

John Austin Stevens, the youngest of the four sons of Gen. 
Ebenezer Stevens, who were graduated at this college, was born 
in N. Y. City, Jan. 22, 1795. His mother was Lucretia Ledyard, 
widow of Richardson Sands. 

In 1818 he became a partner in his father's business-house, in 
N. Y. City, and was associated with that firm (Ebenezer Stevens' 
Sons) in its long and honorable career. He was from 1820 a 
member of the Chamber of Commerce, and was the first President 
of the Merchants' Exchange. From its organization in 1839 until 
1866, when he voluntarily retired on account of the approaching 
infirmities of age, he was the President of the Bank of Commerce. 

At a critical moment in the history of the late civil war, Mr. 
Stevens, as the chairman of the Committee of the Banks of N. Y., 
Boston, and Philadelphia, strongly advocated the loan of money 
($160,000,000 in all) to the U. S. Treasury, and by his prompt 
and bold action was largely instrumental in preserving the credit 
of the Government. 

He married, in 1824, Abby, daughter of Benjamin Weld, of 



163 

Brunswick, Me., and left a large family of children, one of whom 
bears his father's name. He died in his native city, Oct. 19, 18'74, 
in his 80th year. 

John William Weed was born in Darien, Conn., Feb. 21, 1792. 
His parents were Benjamin and Mary Weed. 

Previous to entering college in 1809, he was principal of a 
select school in New York City, where, after graduation, he studied 
medicine in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, being an 
office-student of Dr. Alexander H. Stevens. He practiced his pro- 
fession in the same city for nearly fifty years. The last ten years 
of his life were spent in Metuchen, N. J., where he died, after a 
brief illness, from pneumonia, Jan. 7, 1875. For a long series of 
years he was a Ruling Elder in the Central Presbyterian Church, 
New York, and on removing to Metuchen, filled the same office in 
the 1st Presbyterian Church there. 

On Sept. 5, 1825, he was married to Miss Margaret M. Mix, of 
New Haven. She, with two daughters and four sons, survives 
him. 

1814. 

Lucius Wooster Leffingwell, son of William Leffingwell, 
Esq. (Y. C. 1786), was born Sept. 25, 1796. 

In 1817 he went to Ohio, and settled upon a farm in Ellsworth, 
in the north-eastern part of the State, where he continued to reside 
until about 1850. He then removed to Cleveland, where he was 
engaged for some years in business. His last days were spent in 
New Haven, where he died, of paralysis, Feb. 1, 1875. 

He married, in 1819, Olive Douglas Starr, of Norwich, Conn., 
who died in 1830. In 1832 he was married again to Catharine 
D. Scott, of Warren, Ohio. She died in 1842, and he afterwards 
married Emily Gay lord Ward, of Hadley, Mass. Of his nine 
children, eight are still living. 

Joseph Clay Stiles, second son of Joseph Stile^, Esq., and 
Catherine Clay, and elder brother of Hon. William Henry Stiles, 
was bom in Savannah, Ga., December 6th, 1795. 

After graduation he studied law in the law school of Judge 
Gould, in Litchfield, Conn., and afterwards in the office of Senator 
Berrien, of Savannah. For some years he practiced law with 
success in that city in partnership with Col. W. W. Gordon. 

Under the pressure of deep religious convictions he abandoned 



164: 

the practice of the law, in opposition to his father's remonstrances, 
and began to preach, principally to the colored people on his 
father's plantation, and in the neighborhood. 

By his father's consent and advice he went to Andover to 
pursue theological studies, and spent part of two years with the 
class of 1825, but owing to the failure of his eyes, was unable 
to complete the course. Returning to Georgia, he was ordained 
evangelist by the Hopewell Presbytery, and spent several years 
in preaching in Georgia and Florida, and in establishing churches 
in those States. 

In the winter of 1834-6 he went to Central Kentucky, preach- 
ing first for a short time in Cincinnati, Ohio, and afterwards at 
Versailles, Harmony, Midway, &c., in Ky., at times taking a 
prominent part in the public theological discussions then common. 

In 1844 he accepted a call to the pastorate of the Shockoe Hill 
(now Grace St.) Presbyterian Church in Richmond, Va., where he 
labored until 1848, when he became pastor of the Mercer St. Church, 
in New York City. His health becoming impaired, he resigned 
that charge, and was appointed General Secretary for the South 
of the American Bible Society. He spent the years 1850-51 
advocating that cause and preaching in the Southern States. In 
October, 1852, he accepted the charge of the South Church in 
New Haven, to which he devoted a portion of his time until Nov., 
1857. 

In Oct., 1853, he was appointed General Agent to the Southern 
Aid Society, and labored in that office until the spring of 1861. 

Upon the outbreak of hostilities he went South and during the 
war preached as evangelist under appointment of the Synod of 
Va., principally to the soldiers in the Southern armies. After the 
war he preached in Virginia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, and 
Missouri, closing an unusually long, steadily sustained, and suc- 
cessful ministry with his last sermon in June, 1874. 

He died at Savannah, Ga., March 27th, 1875, in the 80th year 
of his age. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Transyl- 
vania University in 1846, and that of Doctor of Laws from 
Oglethorpe University in 1860. 

He was twice married, first to Mary, daughter of Capt. Gad 
Peck of New Haven, and afterwards in 1828 to Caroline Clifford, 
daughter of James Nephew, Esq., of Mcintosh Co., Ga., who 
survives him, with five children. One son graduated at this col- 
lege in 1859. 



165 



1815. 



Erasmus Norceoss was born in Monson, Mass., in 1794, and 
was prepared for college at the Academy in that town. 

He studied law with Hon. George Bliss, of Springfield, Mass., 
and was admitted to the bar in due course. After practicing his 
profession in his native town, he retired from active business in 
1833, and removed to N. Y. City, where his residence continued 
until his death, with the exception of the years from 1842 to 1852, 
which he spent in Boston. He died of apoplexy, Aug. 23, 1874, 
in Stratford, Conn., where he was passing the summer. 

He was married in Springfield, in 1822, to Eliza Holbrook, who 
survives him, with an only son. 

1816. 

Harvey Freegrace Leavitt was born in Hartford, Vt., Dec. 
1, 1796, the only son of Freegrace and Jerusha (Loomis) Leavitt. 
The first three years of his college course were spent in Dartmouth 
College, which he left during the troubles consequent on the 
attempt to change it into a State University. 

He had the ministry in view at graduation, but foimd obstacles 
to that course and instead entered the Law School at Litchfield, 
C-onn., under Judges Reeve and Gould. After a year there, he 
completed his legal studies in Granville, N. Y., and was admitted 
to practice in Jan., 1820. He was married, Feb. 6, 1821, to 
Minerva S. Shipherd, of Granville. After practicing law in 
Saratoga Springs, N. Y., and in Hartford, Vt., for about ten years, 
he concluded that it was his duty to give up his profession and 
enter the ministry. The Congregational Church in Strafford, Vt., 
invited him to become its pastor, and he was ordained there. May 
18, 1830, remaining until called to the Congregational Church in 
Vergennes, Vt., where he was installed, Aug. 31, 1836. Here the 
wife of his youth died, in Oct., 1843, and he was again married, 
in August, 1845, to Nancy Miranda, widow of Rev. Lamson 
Miner. In 1856 his wife took charge of the Seminary in Vergennes, 
and in 1860 they removed to Middlebury, where they became the 
principals of the Female Seminary. In 1866, ]\lrs. Leavitt's 
health failed, and their school was closed. After a season of 
travel in the West and South, they settled in Ferrisburgh, Vt., 
where Mr. Leavitt supplied the pulpit of the Congregational 
Church for a year or two. He then returned to Middlebury, 
where his wife died, Feb. 20, 1873. He was subsequently married 



166 

to Mrs. Elizabeth Chatterton, of Grinnell, Iowa, who survives 
him. His children, two by his first marriage and one by his 
second, died before him. He died in Grinnell, after a very brief 
illness, of pneumonia, Nov. 11, 1874. From 1839 until his death 
he was a member of the Corporation of Middlebury College. 

Fleming Bowyer Miller, son of John and Priscilla (Bowyer) 
Miller, was born in Fincastle, Va., Oct. 8, 1792, and died in 
Staunton, Va., Aug. 10, 1874. 

He graduated at Washington College, Lexington, Va., in 1813, 
and then entered this college. After graduation here, he studied 
for two years in the Litchfield (Conn.) Law School. In the fall of 
1819 he was admitted to the bar in Nashville, Tenn., and practiced 
there for a year, but then returned to Virginia and settled in his 
native place, where he resided until Jan. 1, 1874, when he removed 
to his son-in-law's house in Staunton. From 1825 to 1838, he 
represented his county in the State Legislature, either in the 
Senate or the House, and again in 1852, and 1867, he was returned 
to the State Senate. In 1835, he was the unsuccessful candidate 
of the Democratic party for the U. S. Senate. In 1836 the 
nomination for Governor was declined by him, owing to the severe 
illness of his wife. In 1853 he was appointed U. S. Attorney for 
the Western District of Virginia, and held the office until the 
breaking out of the war ; and upon the organization of the Con- 
federate Judiciary, he was appointed to the same position under 
that Government. 

1817. 

George Marvin was born in Norwalk, Conn., Feb. 23, 1798, 
the elder son of Barnabas and Hannah (Richards) Marvin. On 
leaving college he took charge of an academy in Brookville, Md., 
for six months ; after which he studied medicine, and received the 
degree of M.D. in 1821 from the University of Pennsylvania. 

In July, 1821, he settled in Rochester, N. Y., where he practiced 
until 1828, when on account of his wife's health he removed to Nor- 
walk, Conn. ; then to New York City, and in 1831 to Brooklyn, 
N. Y., where he continued in the active practice of his profession 
until his death, which occurred Dec. 23, 1874, in his 77th year. 

In 1824 he was married to Agnes, daughter of Joseph Piatt, of 
Westport, Conn., who died May 29, 1870. Of their twelve chil- 
dren, two sons and two daughters survive him. 



167 



1818. 



Samuel Griswold, third child and eldest son of Sylvanus and 
Mary (Denison) Griswold, was born in East Lyme, Conn., Oct. 
25, 1795. 

From college he went to the Theological Seminary at Andover, 
Mass., where he completed his course in 1821. He was licensed 
to preach by the Haverhill Association, Aug. 8, 1821, and labored 
until 1829 as an evangelist among the Connecticut churches. 
Meantime, he was ordained, Oct. 14, 1828, at Farmington, by a 
council of the North Hartford Consociation. In 1830 he was 
employed as an editor of the " N, Y. Evangelist," and after another 
interval of evangelistic work in Connecticut, removed to Western 
N. Y. in 1833, first as editor of the "Rochester Observer," and 
afterwards, until 1843, as an evangelist. From Oct., 1845, to Sept., 
1848, he served as stated supply of the Congregational Church in 
Hamburg, Conn., and was subsequently for a year the chaplain 
of the State Prison at Wethersfield. He was later employed, for 
brief periods, as an evangelist or as a stated supply, in various 
places in Connecticut and New York, and retired from active 
labor, May 1, 1856, removing to Old Saybrook, Conn., where he 
resided until his death, Jan. 18, 1875. 

He was first married to Miss Maria Cobb, with whom he lived 
for fifteen years. After her death he married Miss Amelia Ayer, 
May 4, 1853, who survives him. He had no children. 

Joseph Hurlbut was bom in New London, Conn., Aug. 22, 
1799, and died very suddenly, of a disease of the heart, in the 
same place, June 5, 1875. 

After pursuing theological studies at Andover and Princeton 
Seminaries, he served the First Presbyterian Church in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., as stated supply, for a year, and was then ordained, Oct. 
25, 1823, pastor of the Third Presbyterian Church in Albany, 
N. Y. The failure of his health obliged him, in 1829, to give up the 
responsibilities of that charge. He resided in New York City 
until 1833, and then returned to New London for the remainder of 
his life. He took a leading part in the formation of the Second 
Congregational Church in New London, and for the first part of 
its existence, from April, 1835, to March, 1837, served it gratui- 
tously as its stated supply. As a chaplain in the late war, he 
officiated at Fort Trumbull in New London harbor. 



168 

He was married, June 16, 1824, to Mary C. Hattrick, of New 
York. She, with seven of their twelve children, survives him. 
One son graduated at this college in 1849, and died in 1855. 

David Kimball was born in Hopkinton, N. H., March 18, 1791. 
When he was eight years old, his mother was left a widow with 
five children to support. This second son was apprenticed to a 
printer in Concord at 14, and on gaining his majority started for 
Phillips Academy, at Andover, to prepare for college. 

The three years succeeding his graduation he spent in Andover 
Theological Seminary, and thence went directly to Martinsburg, 
N. Y., where he was ordained and installed over the Presbyterian 
Church, June 27, 1822. In August, 1822, he was married to Miss 
Elizabeth E. Carter, a native of Newburyport, Mass., who survives 
him. Besides his diligent labors in Martinsburg, he formed 
a church in Lowville, of which also he had the pastoral charge. 
From this field he removed to Plainfield, Mass., in 1831, where he 
was settled as colleague pastor of the Congregational Church, 
March 2, and remained until Jan., 1835, when he assumed the 
editorship of the " New Hampshire Observer" (afterwards the 'Con- 
gregational Journal"), published in Concord. Nine years later, he 
removed to Hanover, N. H., with a view to the education of his 
sons. Here he remained until 1866, having charge of the Dart- 
mouth Press, and the college printing, and also for most of the 
time preaching to neighboring churches. Three of his five sons 
graduated from Dartmouth College, in 1852, 1855, and 1858, 
respectively. At the age of 76 he removed to Rockford, 111., in 
poor health, and there resided until his sudden death, Feb. 8, 1875. 

1820. 

Garnett Duncan, son of Henry and Nancy Shipp Duncan, was 
bom in Louisville, Ky., March 2, 1 800. 

He returned to Louisville after graduation, studied law, was ad- 
mitted to the bar, and practiced successfully, until elected to Con- 
gress as the Whig candidate in 1847. At the expiration of his 
term in 1850, he removed to New Orleans, and resumed the prac- 
tice of law with abundant success ; but upon the death of his sec- 
ond wife, Caroline, daughter of Elias Shipman, of New Haven, 
Conn., in 1854, he relinquished his professional pursuit, and re- 
tired to a plantation on the Mississippi. In July, 1863, he went to 
Europe, dividing his time for a few years between England and 



169 

France, and then establishing his residence in France. A few 
months since, his heaUh began to fail ; and his physician apprised 
him that denutrition of the stomach, resulting in cancer, left no 
hope of his recovery. Yearning to die in his native place, he re- 
turned to Louisville, and on the 2.')th of May, 1875, about a fort- 
night after arriving at the house of his only son, he passed 
quietly away. 

1821. 

Peter Fleming Clark died at his residence in New York 
City, May 15, 1875, aged 74 years. 

He entered college from Milford, Conn., and in 1827 established 
himself in New York City in the practice of medicine. In 1830 
he was married to Ann Maria Goodwin, of New York, by whom 
he had two sons and four daughters. For many years before his 
death he was in business as a druggist. 

1822. 

OsMYN Baker, son of Enos and Dorothy (Smith) Baker, was 
born in Amherst, Mass., May 18, 1800. 

He studied law in Northampton, Mass., and in 1825 began 
practice in Amherst. In 1833, '34, '36, and '37, he represented 
the town in the State Legislature, and from 1839 to 1845 served 
three terms in Congress. In 1842 he formed a copartnership with 
Charles Delano, Esq., which continued until his retirement from 
practice in 1859. In 1845 he removed to Northampton, where his 
residence continued until his death, Feb. 9, 1875. During the 
latter part of his life his time was devoted to the management of 
the estate of Oliver Smith of Hatfield (a large bequest for 
charitable purposes), and other financial trusts. 

He was married, in Aug., 1832, to Elizabeth, daughter of Henry 
Olmstead, of Norfolk, Conn. Mrs. Baker died in Aug., 1833, 
leaving a daughter, who is still living. He was married in Oct., 
1838, to Cornelia, daughter of Alpha Rockwell, of Winchester, 
Conn., who died in Feb., 1840, leaving a son, who was killed at 
the battle of Antietam. 

1823. 

Richard William Dickinson, the eldest son of Charles Dick- 
inson, of New York City, was born Nov. 21, 1804. 

He entered the Theological Seminary at Princeton, N. J., in 
December, 1823, where he remained until May, 1826. After 



170 

additional private study, he was licensed to preach by the Second 
Presbytery of New York, March 5, 1828, and was ordained as an 
evangelist by the same Presbytery, Oct. 24, 1828. His first 
settlement was over the Presbyterian Church in Lancaster, Pa., 
where he was installed Oct. 18, 1829, From over-exertions during 
a revival of great power, loss of voice ensued, and he was obliged 
to resign his charge in November, 1833. Having spent the fol- 
lowing winter in Florida, and the next season in foreign travel, he 
resumed preaching on his return to New York City, where he 
supplied the pulpit of the Market Street Dutch Reformed Church, 
from December, 1834, to September, 1835. In April, 1836, he 
was called to the Bowery Presbyterian Church, of which he was 
installed pastor, Nov. 2, but utter failure of health compelled him 
to resign in the April following. After a period of comparative 
rest, he was installed over the Canal St. Presbyterian Church, 
Oct. 22, 1839. His health again proved inadequate to the con- 
stant pressure of pastoral duty, and he resigned his charge in 
January, 1844, with little prospect of ever preaching statedly 
again. He received in 1842, from the University of the City of 
New York, the degree of Doctor of Divinity. In 1858 he was 
elected by the General Assembly a Professor in the Western 
Theological Seminary, Allegheny, Pa., but declined the position. 
In November, 1859, he was invited to take charge of the Mount 
Washington Valley Church, New York, and acted as its pastor 
for about thirteen years, residing at Fordham. In the summer of 
1873 his health entirely broke down. He died in Fordham, Aug. 
16, 1874, leaving the record of an eminently useful life. His 
widow and two daughters survive him. 

A brief Memorial of Dr. Dickinson has been published by 
Robert Carter & Brothers. 

1824. 

Tebtius Strong Clarke, second son of Jonathan and Jemima 
(Lyman) Clarke, of Westhampton, Mass., was born in that town, 
Dec. 17, 1799, and died in Neath, Pa., April 12, 1875. He was 
fitted for college by Rev. Moses Hallock, of Plainfield, Mass. 

He studied theology at Auburn (N. Y.) Theological Seminary, 
and was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in South 
Deerfield, Mass., Oct. 3, 1827. In 1833 he was invited to become 
Secretary of the Western Agency for Home Missions, at Geneva, 
N. Y., but though dismissed from his charge at Deerfield, April 1, 



171 

for the purpose of accepting that office, he finally declined it, and 
in April, 1834, began to preach in the Congregational Church in 
Haddam, Conn. June 15, 1837, he became pastor of the Congre- 
gational Church in Stockbridge, Mass., and remained until 1860, 
when he took charge of the Congregational Church in Penn Yan, 
N. Y. From Penn Yan, he removed in 1852 to the 2d Congrega- 
tional Church in Franklin, N. Y., which he served until 1858. 
His last ministerial settlement was in Cuyahoga Falls, O., and he 
was able to preach to destitute churches in the neighborhood of 
his residence until near the close of his life. He received the 
degree of D.D. from Hamilton College in 1856. His ministry, in 
the various places of his service, was crowned with marked success. 
He married, Sept. 10, 1828, Almira A. Marshall, of Granville, 
Mass., who died Sept. 23, 1856. He married, Nov. 9, 1858, Mary 
Rattle, of Cuyahoga Falls. Of his five children, by his first wife, 
two daughters only survive him. A son graduated at this college 
in 1850. 

Bennett Fairchild Northrop was born in Brookfield, Conn., 
Oct. 16, 1801, and was prepared for college at Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass. 

After graduation he taught in the Fairfield (Conn.) Academy 
for six months, and then entered the Theological Seminary in 
Auburn, N. Y, where he remained for two years. His first 
employment as a stated preacher was in Tolland, Hampden County, 
Mass., for a year. He was ordained the pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church in Manchester, Conn., Feb. 4, 1829, and labored in 
this field with fidelity until compelled by declining health to 
resign his charge in Oct., 1850. For two years he was employed 
as a collecting agent for the American Sunday School Union, 
and having in a measure recovered his strength, was installed 
pastor of the First Church in Griswold, Conn., July 1, 1853. His 
ministry here continued until, enfeebled by disease, he retired from 
active service, July 3, 1870. He died of softening of the brain, 
at the residence of his son-in-law, in Griswold, March 4, 1875. 

Mr. Northrop was married in 1827 to Martha Stillman, of 
Wethersfield, Conn. Of the children by this marriage, three 
daughters are still living. His second wife, Elizabeth C. Bull, of 
Hartford, also survives him. 



172 



1825. 



Moses Raymond, son of Moses and Rebecca (Bouton) Ray- 
mond, was born in Norwalk, Conn., Jan. 9, 1798. 

After graduation he studied theology under the direction of Rev. 
Benj. F. Stanton, of Bethlem, Conn., and was ordained as an 
Evangelist by the South Association of Litchfield County in 
Oct., 1830. As a missionary of the Presbyterian Assembly's 
Board he went to Hampshire County, (now West) Virginia, in 
1833, and after thirteen years of this service, was installed pastor 
of Mt. Bethel Church, July 17, 1846, and continued uninterrup- 
tedly that connection until Sept. 12, 1872, when at his own request, 
by reason of age and bodily infirmity, it was dissolved. Continu- 
ously during that period he had several other churches and places 
of stated preaching under his charge, which he regularly filled. 
The last sermon he delivered was in June, 1873. He was married, 
Feb. 17, 1835, to Sarah Walker, of Green Spring Valley, in Hamp- 
shire County, where he settled upon a farm and resided during his 
life. His wife and their children, two daughters and one son, sur- 
vive him. 

During the late war he suffered many severe losses, but contin- 
ued preaching from Sabbath to Sabbath, although the military 
control of the neighborhood was frequently changed by the ad- 
vancing and retreating of the contending forces. 

Before his death he became totally blind from paralysis and the 
infirmities of age. His death occurred May 19, 1875, in his 78th 
year. 

1826. 

AuRELius DwiGHT Parker was born in Princeton, Mass., April 
23, 1802, the son of Ebenezer and Mary (Binney) Parker. 

He began the study of law in the Litchfield (Conn.) Law School, 
and completed his preparation for admission to the bar in the office 
of Hon. Samuel Hubbard, of Boston, Mass. Li 1830 he began 
the practice of law in that city, and though owing to some bodily 
infi unities he seldom appeared in the court room, was mu6h em- 
ployed as a chamber counsellor, and much trusted in drafting im- 
portant papers. He was for many years a member of the city 
school committee, and repeatedly elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives. He died in Boston, June 18, 1875, after an illness of 
some four months, occasioned by a cancer of the throat. He was 
never married. 






173 

• 

William Preston, the youngest son of Nathan Preston (Y. C. 
17V6), was born in Woodbury, Conn., Aug. 26, 1801. His mother 
was Sally Benjamin Preston, widow of Rev. Philo Perry (Y. C. 
1777). 

He entered college at the beginning of Sophomore year. After 
graduation he was first a clerk in New York City, then studied 
theology in Alexandria, Va., was tutor in Kenyon College for a 
year, and Oct. 12, 1828, was admitted to Deacon's orders by 
Bishop Chase of Ohio. He began his ministry in the town of 
Worthington, where the Bishop then resided, but soon removed 
to Trinity Church, Columbus, where he remained for twelve years. 
In 1841 he accepted a call from the parish of St. Andrew's in 
Pittsburgh, Pa., where he continued ten years. He was then re- 
called to his former parish in Columbus, but owing to the ill-health 
of his family he removed some four years later to Christ Church, 
Bridgeport, Conn., where he labored until in 1 856 he went back 
to his old charge in Pittsburgh. In 1873, he resigned this post to 
younger hands, and after a time removed to Bedford, Pa., where 
he was rector of St. James' Church up to his decease. He died in 
Bedford, April 25, 1875, and was buried in Pittsburgh, with de- 
monstrations of the most sincere respect. 

In 1860 he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Kenyon College. 

He married, about 1836, Sarah Maria, widow of James K. Corey, 
and daughter of Wm. K. Lainson, of Woodbury, Conn., who died 
in 1841, leaving a son and daughter, both still living. He married, 
in 1842, Miss Caroline Scoville, of Waterbury, who died before 
him, as did also her two children. 

1827. 

Henry Durant was born in Acton, Mass., June 18, 1802, the 
son of Henry and Lucy (Hunt) Durant. He was prepared for col- 
lege at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. 

After receiving his degree, he had charge of the Garrison Forest 
Academy, Baltimore County, Md., for two years, until in- 
vited to the tutorship in this college. From 1829 to 1833 
he served as tutor, pursuing also, for the first three years, 
the regular course in the Theological Seminary. April 9, 
1833, he was licensed to preach by the Association of the 
Western District of New Haven County. He was ordained pas- 
tor of the Congregational Church in Byfield Parish, in Newbury, 
Mass., December 25, 1833. In April, 1847, he was invited by the 
12 



174 

trustees of the Dummer Academy in By field, to take charge of that 
institution. He accepted the position, but although he offered the 
resignation of his pastorate on the 15th of the following Sep- 
tember, he was not dismissed until March 31, 1849, two councils 
of ministers having been held before his church was willing to 
give him up. 

He was subsequently led into a business venture which resulted ' 
unfortunately, and in May, 1853, he went to California, to start 
anew. Early in June, he began in Oakland, across the bay from 
San Francisco, a collegiate school, which under his shaping hand 
became the College of California. On the formal opening of the 
new institution, in 1859, he took the chair of Greek, and continued 
in that position until, with his aid, the college was merged in the 
University of California. Of the university, so largely the result 
of his wise foresight, he was the first president, from 1870 to 1872, 
when a long and critical illness compelled him to retire to 
private life. After the return of health and energy, he was elected 
Mayor of the city of Oakland, in 1873, and while still in office, 
died, after a few hours' illness, January 22, 1875. 

Mr. Durant was married in Stanwich, Conn., December 10, 1833, 
to Miss Mary E., daughter of Rev. Piatt Buffett, of Stanwich, who 
survives him. Their only child, a daughter, died in early youth. 

The degree of LL.D. was given him by the University of Ro- 
chester, in 1871. 

Samuel Howe, fourth son of Isaac and Keziah (Mead) Howe, 
was born in Greenwich, Conn., March 27, 1802, and pursued his 
preparatory studies with Rev. Piatt Buffett, of Stanwich, Conn. 

He entered the Yale Divinity School in 1827, and remained for 
three years, spending also part of a subsequent year in Princeton 
Seminary. Receiving a license to preach from the New Haven 
West Association, he was engaged for some months in missionary 
work on Cape Cod, thence going to New York State for similar 
labors. He was ordained July 25, 1835, as pastor of the Presby- 
terian Church in Hopewell, Ontario County. This church having 
been greatly weakened by emigration to the West, Mr. Howe 
was dismissed in January, 1837, and was installed, March 16, 
over the Congregational Church in Ridgeville, Oneida County, 
where he remained until 1840, when he removed to North 
East Center, Duchess County, where he was pastor of the 
Congregational Church for three years. His next pastoral 



175 

charge was in South Tyringham, now Monterey, Mass., where 
he was installed in May, 1844. Here he was usefully and 
happily employed until February, 1854, when an affection of 
the throat obliged him to desist for a while from preaching. He 
spent the next four years in New Haven, and then labored from 
1858 to 1866 as stated supply of the Congregational Church in 
North Madison, Conn., and for the three succeeding years as stated 
supply in Willington, Conn. In 1869 he was constrained by im- 
paired health to cease from ministerial work, and removed to 
Bricksburg, N. J,, where he busied himself with horticulture A 
heart disorder, with which he was afflicted for several months, 
terminated his life, September 28, 1874. 

Mr. Howe married, August 20, 1 835, Elouisa L., eldest daughter 
of Rev. Piatt Buffett, who, with one of their four children, sur- 
vives him. A son graduated at this college in 1860, and died in 
1863. 

Ralph DunnIx\g Smyth was born in Southbury, Conn., Oct. 
24, 1804. He was the son of Richard and Lovine (Hebert) 
Smith. He was fitted for college under John H. Lathrop, at the 
Weston (now Easton) Academy. 

On the completion of his collegiate course he began the study 
of law with Hon. Edward Hinman, of Southbury, and Heman 
Birch, Esq., of Brookfield, finishing his course in the Yale Law 
School, then under the care of Judges Daggett and Hitchcock. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1831, and immediately settled in Guil- 
ford, Conn., where he spent the rest of his life. In January, 1 844, he 
was appointed judge of the Probate Court. In 1859 he represented 
his adopted town in the General Assembly. From 1848 to 1854 
he was engaged in chartering, constructing, and conducting the 
New Haven and New London, and the New London and Stoning- 
ton railroads. He earned the reputation of a thorough office lawyer, 
conscientious in the performance of his professional duties. His 
favorite outside studies were in the departments of history and 
genealogy, and of English literature. His collection, in manu- 
script, of genealogies of the families of Guilford, and of their 
ramifications in the Connecticut Valley, is very large and valuable. 
The lives of the early graduates of the college also claimed much 
of his spare time, and he left in manuscript a series of more or 
less complete biographical sketches of these, from the begin- 
ning to the class of 1767. The sketches of the graduates of the first 
eight years were printed in the College Gourant in 1868. 



176 

During the spring of 1874, he began to lay aside his favorite 
pursuits, retaining, however, to the last, his ardent attachment to 
the college, whose Commencement exercises he attended in June. 
After this date, his health began to fail rapidly, until death 
released him from his sufferings, September 11, 1874. 

Mr. Smyth was married, October 1 8, 1837, to Rachel S., daughter 
of Amos Seward, of Guilford, who, with a married daughter, sur- 
vives him. Their two sons, graduates of this college in 1863 and 
1866, died in 1863 and 1868. 

1828. 

George Perkins, son of Hon. William Perkins (Y. C. 1 792) 
and of Mary, daughter of Rev. Andrew Lee, D.D. (Y. C. 1766), 
was born in Ashford, Conn., December 2, 1803. 

Upon graduation he went to Norwich, Conn., as a law student 
in the office of Hon. Calvin Goddard, and there he remained for 
the rest of his life. He died in Norwich, after a protracted ill- 
ness, October 13, 1874. During his long life Mr. Perkins filled 
many important and official business positions with fidelity and 
acceptance. He was for some years Judge of Probate, and later 
in life was the trustee of many large estates. He was an efficient 
member and officer of the Second Congregational Church. Oct. 
4, 1837, he was married to Maria H., youngest daughter of 
General Ebenezer Huntington (Y. C. 1775). She survives him, 
with two daughters. 

1829. 

Warren Backus Dutton, son of Hubbard and Abigail 
(Backus) Dutton, of Lebanon, Conn., was born in that town, 
April 16, 1803. He learned a trade and attained his majority be- 
fore he began to prepare for college. 

After some time employed in teaching in the Edge Hill School, 
in Princeton, N. J., finding that his frail health required a milder 
climate, he entered, in 1832, the Union Theological Seminary at 
Hampden Sidney, Va. On leaving the Seminary, he was employed as 
financial agent in its behalf, and as a preacher in various neighboring 
churches. While acting as an assistant to the pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church in Farmville, Prince Edward County, he was called 
to the care of the Presbyterian Church in Charleston, (West) Ya., 
and began preaching there in December, 1841. He was there or- 
dained and installed, Nov. 20, 1842, and this relation continued 
until April 20, 1860, when he resigned his charge on the ground 



177 

of ill-health. After two years' rest, he undertook, as his strength 
permitted, to reorganize the Presbyterian Church in Harper's 
Ferry, W. Va., which the fortunes of war had nearly desolated ; 
while engaged in this labor, the disastrous flood of the Shenan- 
doah River, in October, 1870, swept through the town, and Dr. 
Dutton narrowly escaped alive. His health was entirely shattered 
by this event, and he returned to Charlestown to await the end. 
He died at his residence there, Sept. 5, 1874, aged Vl. 

As a preacher and as a man he was greatly beloved and revered. 
The degree of D.T>. was conferred on him by Union College in 
1857. He left a wife, but no children. 

Joseph Eldeidge, son of Joseph and Deborah Eldridge, was 
born in Yarmouth, Mass., July 8, 1804. 

From college he immediately entered the Yale Theological Sem- 
inary, where he finished the prescribed coui-se in the spring of 
1832. While still in the Seminary, he received a call (Jan. 23, 
1832) to the pastorate of the Congregational Church in Norfolk, 
Litchfield County, Conn., and there he was ordained on the 25th 
of April. In this relation he continued until November, 1874, 
when at his own desire he laid down his office, leaving the record 
of a singularly beneficent and wise pastorate. He died in Nor- 
folk, after a brief illness, March 31, 1875. He was a member of 
the Corporation of this college from 1847 until his death. The 
degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him by Marietta 
College in 1856. 

He was married, April 1, 1832, to Rachel C. Purple of New 
Haven, who died childless, March 6, 1833. He was again married, 
Oct. 12, 1836, to Sarah, daughter of Joseph Battell, Esq., of 
Norfolk, who survives him, with five daughters and one son. 

1830. 

Elijah Phelps Gran^t, son of Deacon Elijah and Elizabeth 
(Phelps) Grant, was born in Norfolk, Conn., August 23, 1808. 

In his infancy his parents removed to Colebrook, Conn., from 
which place he entered college. He studied law with Hon. John 
Boyd (Y. C. 1821), of Winsted, Conn., and subsequently in the 
Yale Law School, and began practice in Winsted in 1833. In 
1 836 he removed to Canton, Ohio, where he continued the practice 
of his profession until 1849. He then became cashier of the 
Stark County National Bank, in Canton, which position he held 



178 

until 1868. During the remainder of his life he was not engaged 
in active business. He gave much attention to the question of 
labor reform, and kindred subjects, upon which he was an able 
writer. He died in Canton, December 21, 1874. 

He was married, September 7, 1836, to Miss Susan B. Boyd, the 
sister of his law instructor, who survives him, with four of their 
seven children. 

1831. 

Isaac Stockton Keith Legare died of paralysis, on his farm 
near Orangeburg, S. C, July 29, 1874. He was of Huguenot 
descent, the twelfth of thirteen children of Thomas and Ann Eliza 
(Berwick) Legare, and born in Charleston, S. C, Dec. 24, 1 808. 

After a course in theology at the Columbia (S. C.) Theol. Sem- 
inary, he was called to the mission chapel in Orangeburg, which 
he subsequently organized as a Presbyterian Church, and for 
many years served as pastor. By reason of the failure of his 
voice, he was induced, in 1848, to establish the Orangeburg Female 
College, resigning in consequence his pastorate. With his peculiar 
talents for teaching, this enterprise proved very successful, until 
broken up by the civil war. At the close of the war, Mr. Legar6 
entered the service of the American Sunday School Union, and in 
that employment labored with enthusiasm until obliged by weak- 
ness to give up work, in the spring of 1 874. 

His first wife. Miss Emma C. Matthews, by whom he had two 
sons and a daughter, died some years before him ; and in 1872 he 
was married to Miss Eliza C. Palmer, an adopted daughter of 
Hon. Richard Yeadon, who survives him, with an infant daughter. 

John Line Mayer died suddenly of heart disease at his resi- 
dence in York, Pa., Aug. 16, 1874, at the age of 63. He was the 
son of Rev. Dr. Lewis Mayer, and was born in Jefferson County, 
Va., but during his youth his father removed to York, from which 
place the son entered college at the end of Junior year. 

He studied law with John Evans, of York, and was admitted 
to the bar in February, 1834. He continued in full practice, with 
growing distinction, until his death. 

About 1860 Mr. Mayer married Miss Line of Virginia, who 
survives him, with several children. 



179 



1834. 



Davis Smith Brainerd was born in Haddam, Conn., Oct. 12, 
1812, the son of Heber and Martha (Tyler) Brainerd. 

He spent the first year after graduation in Princeton Theol. 
Seminary, and the two succeeding years in the Theol. Department 
of this college. He was ordained, June 30, 1841, pastor of the 
Congregational Church in Lyme, Conn., where he died in office, 
after a short illness, April 30, 1875. In 1861 he was elected a 
Fellow of Yale College, and this office he filled until his death ; 
being also since 1867, as one of the Prudential Committee of the 
Corporation, especially intrusted with the oversight of its affairs. 

He was married. May 24, 1842, to Miss Anna Maria Chad wick, 
of Lyme, who survives him, with their four children. 

Henry Chalker was born in Saybrook, Conn., Aug. 5, 1812, 
the son of William and Amitte Chalker. 

After graduation he spent a year in Texas, and then removing 
to N. Y. State, taught school in Sag Harbor, and afterwards at 
Hunt's, Livingston County. He studied law in Geneseo, and about 
1845 established himself in Nunda, where he continued in the suc- 
cessful practice of his profession until the failure of his health. 
He spent the winter of 1872-3 at the island of Nassau, and the next 
winter in Florida. From Florida he was brought home to Nunda, 
where he died about two weeks after his return, on the 24th of 
May, 1874. 

Mr. Chalker married, June 26, 1860, in Nunda, Miss Adeline 
Nicholds, who survives him. They had no children. 

William Leverett was born, July 8, 1813, in Windsor, Vt., 
the son of John and Elizabeth (Salisbury) Leverett, and a lineal 
descendant of Sir John Leverett, the early Governor of Massa- 
chusetts. 

He began the study of law in the Yale Law School, continued 
his preparation in New York City, and completed his course in 
the office of Willard Crafts, Esq., of Utica, N. Y., where he was 
admitted to the bar in 1839. In the same year he established 
himself in Plymouth, N. H., where he remained in successful 
practice, until laid aside by declining health. He died in Ply- 
mouth, Sept. 18, 1874, of consumption of the lungs, which had 
confined him to his house for the most of the two or three years 
preceding. 



180 

Mr. Leverett married, Oct. 5, 1851, Miss Catharine R Spaulding 
of Kumney, N. H. She survives him, with two of their three 
daughters. 

1835. 

John Edward Seeley, eldest child of John B. and Nancy 
(Harger) Seeley, was bom in Ovid, N. Y., Aug. 1, 1810. 

He was prepared for college at the Ovid Academy, and after 
graduation returned home and studied law with Hon. John 
Maynard. Being admitted to the bar, he began practice in Mon- 
roe, Mich., but after a few months returned to his native place, 
where he continued to reside until his death. He served as County 
Judge and Surrogate from 1851 to 1855, was a Presidential elector 
in 1860 and 1864, and elected to Congress in 1870. In the sum- 
mer of 1871 he was stricken with paralysis, and a second stroke 
supervening in the following year left him a permanent invalid. 
He died, on the farm on which he was born, March 30, 1875. 

Judge Seeley married, January 20, 1846, Cornelia, daughter of 
Peter DeForest, of the city of New York, and was the father of 
four sons and one daughter. His widow and all his children but 
the youngest son survive him. He enjoyed in a high degree the 
confidence of the community in which he spent his life. 

1836. 

Charles Pumpelly Avery, son of John H. and Stella (Hinch- 
man) Avery, was born in Owego, Tioga County, N. Y., in July, 
1817, and died at his residence in the same village, Aug. 31, 1872, 
aged 55 years. 

Upon graduation he entered the office of his brother-in-law, 
Hon. Thomas Farrington, of Owego, as a student of law, and was 
admitted to practice in the courts of the State, at Albany, in 1840. 
He immediately began the practice of his profession in his native 
village, and soon attained a prominent position. At the age of 
thirty he was elected County Judge and Surrogate ; a position 
which he filled by re-election until January, 1856. Soon after the 
close of his judicial term. Judge Avery removed to Flint, Mich- 
igan, where he applied himself to the active practice of his pro- 
fession. The climate, however, afiected his health unfavorably, 
and by degrees his constitution was so much weakened, that in 
the spring of 1872 he was forced to return to his native air. But 
his return had been too long deferred, and he continued to sink 
gradually until his death. 



181 

Edwabd Pitkin Cowles, son of Rev. Pitkin Cowles (Y. C. 
1800) and Fanny (Smith) Cowles, was bom in North Canaan, 
Conn., January, 1815. 

Early in 183Y he began the study of law in the office of the late 
Hon. Ambrose L. Jordan, of Hudson, N. Y. Two years later he 
was admitted to the bar, and began practice in Hudson, where his 
younger brother, David S. Cowles, was subsequently associated 
with him. He had attained a prominent position in the bar of 
Columbia County when, in 1853, he removed his office to the city 
of New York. In the spring of 1855 he was appointed Judge of 
the Supreme Court of the State. He resigned the appointment in 
the following winter, but was reappointed to fill a vacancy caused 
by the death of Judge Morris. Subseqently, a claim having been 
made to the seat by Hon. Henry E. Davies by virtue of an elec- 
tion. Judge Cowles retired in his favor, and was for several 
years occupied mainly in hearing cases as referee, but at length 
resumed general practice. He continued to reside in New York 
until about 18Y1, when he removed to Rye, Westchester County, 
where he was living at the time of his death. He left home in 
October, 1874, for a visit to California, and there met with a 
slight injury, which resulted, while on his return, in his death, at 
Chicoga, from gangrene, on the 2d of December. 

Judge Cowles married, in November, 1852, Sarah, daughter of 
Justus Boies, Esq., of Northampton, Mass., by whom he had four 
sons, all of whom, with their mother, survive him. 

1838. 

Joseph Bradley Vaenijm was born in the city of Washington, 
D. C, April 4, 1818. He came of a distinguished Massachusetts 
family, his grandfather. Gen. Joseph B. Varnum, of Revolutionary 
fame, being a member of Congress and of the U. S. Senate for 
over twenty years. James M. Varnum, the father of the graduate, 
settled in Washington and died suddenly there, at the age of 35, 
Sept. 11, 1821, the same day Gen. Yarnum died in Massachusetts. 

Mr. Varnum studied for two years in the Yale Law School, and 
afterwards in the office of Chief Justice Taney, in Baltimore, 
where he was admitted to the bar and practiced for a few years ; 
but thence removed to N. Y. City and entered on a successful 
practice, which he continued until the time of his death. As one 
of his uncles, bearing the same name as himself, was also a resi- 
dent of New York, the nephew added the affix " Junior " to his 



182 

name, which he continued to use until his uncle's death in 1867. 
In 1843 he married Miss Susan M., daughter of Nathan B. Graham, 
Esq., of N. Y. City. Mr. Varnum soon became prominent in 
professional, social, and artistic circles, and also took an active part 
in politics, at first as a Whig, and afterwards as a Republican. 
He was elected to the State Assembly in 1849, 1850, and 1857, 
and in 1851 served as speaker. He was a candidate for Congress 
in 1852, and declined a similar nomination in 1858. In 1871 he 
was one of the leaders in the movements for the overthrow of the 
Tweed Ring, and devoted much time and labor to the object. 
He was one of the original members of both the Century and 
the Union League Clubs, and was a prominent member of the 
N. Y. Historical Society, the American Geographical Society, and 
other similar institutions. 

He retained considerable real estate in Washington, and showed 
his continued interest in his native city by two volumes which he 
published, entitled, "The Seat of Government of the U. S.," and 
" The Washington Sketch Book." He was through life a frequent 
contributor to the newspapers and magazines of the day. 

His first wife died in 1857 (leaving one son, who was graduated 
at this college in 1868), and in 1863 he married Miss Helen M., 
daughter of Robert L. Taylor, Esq., of N. Y. City. She died in 
July, 1874, leaving one son and three daughters. Mr. Varnum 
died in Astoria, L. I., Dec. 31, 1874, after a month's illness. 

Charles Ciiaitncet Whittlesey, son of Chauncey and Sarah 
(L. Tracy) Whittlesey, was born in Middletown, Conn., Feb. 5, 
1819, and died March 10, 1875, in St. Louis, Mo., where he had 
spent his life as a lawyer. 

1840. 

Horace James was bom in Medford, Mass., May 6, 1818, the 
eldest child of Deacon Galen and Mary Rand (Turner) James. He 
came to college from Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. 

On graduating he returned to Andover for theological study, 
pursuing there the first and third years of the course, and passing 
the intermediate year in the Yale Seminary. He was settled as 
colleague pastor of the First Congregational Church in Wrentham, 
Mass., Nov. 1, 1843. He left this charge to become the pastor of 
the First Congregational Church in Worcester, Mass., where he 
was installed Feb. 3, 1853. When the civil war broke out he left 



I 



183 

this position to become chaplain of the 25th Regiment Massachu- 
setts Volunteers. After the term of three years' service had ex- 
pired, he was commissioned assistant quartermaster, with the 
rank of captain, and placed in charge of the Freedmen in North 
Carolina. He was mustered out of service in January, 1866, and 
remained a year longer at the South, planting cotton and organiz- 
ing labor among the Freedmen. On his return to the North, he 
was at once invited to settle over the First Congregational 
Church, in Lowell, Mass., where he was installed, Oct. 31, 1867. 
Three years later he was elected District Secretary of the Ameri- 
can and Foreign Christian Union, for New York and vicinity, and 
for family reasons accepted the appointment, being dismissed 
from his church, Dec. 13, 1870. A year later he became the 
active pastor of the Second Congregational Church of Greenwich, 
Conn. He left his post for a year's travel abroad in 1872-3, and 
during his journey so far overtasked his strength that he broke 
down with a bad hemorrhage from the lungs almost immediately 
on his return. The next winter was spent at the South, and he 
then settled in Boylston, Mass., waiting for the end. He died 
there, June 9, 1875. Besides his other labors, he was from 1867 
one of the proprietors and an associate editor of the Congrega- 
tionalist. 

He was married, in September, 1843, to Helen, daughter of 
David Leavitt of Boston, who survives him, with one daughter, of 
their seven children. 

1841. 

Maunsell Beadhukst Field was born in New York, March 
26, 1822, and died in the same city, after a lingering illness, Jan. 
24, 1875. 

He was the eldest son of Moses Field and Susan Kittridge, 
daughter of Hon. Samuel Osgood, first Commissioner of the U. S. 
Treasury. 

After his graduation he began the study of law in New Haven 
and New York. From March, 1843, till November, 1845, he 
spent in European and Asiatic travel, and then resumed his stud- 
ies in N. Y., where he was admitted to the bar in Jan., 1848, and 
was for several years in partnership with his cousin, Hon. John 
Jay. His health having failed, he visited Europe again in the 
spring of 1848, and a third time in the autumn of 1854, when he 
was solicited to fill the position of Secretary of the U. S. Legation 



184 

at Paris, which he accepted. He was also subsequently for a short 
time attached to the U. S. Mission in Spain. In 1 855, Gov. Sey- 
mour having appointed him a Commissioner for the State of New 
York, he was made President of the Board of U. S. Commissioners 
to the French Universal Exposition ; and at the Exposition's close 
was designated by the late Emperor with the cross of Knight of 
the Legion of Honor, for his eminent services. In August, 1861, 
he was appointed Deputy Sub-Treasurer of the U. S. in N. Yi 
City. In Oct., 1 863, he was appointed Asst. Secretary of the 
Treasury at Washington, which office he resigned June 15, 1865, 
on the failure of his health. He was then appointed Collector of 
Internal Revenue for the 6th district of N. Y., which position he 
held until 1 869, when he resumed the practice of the law. In 
Dec, 1873, Gov. Dix appointed him to fill a vacancy in the judge- 
ship of the 2d District Court in N. Y. City. He retained this 
office until Jan. 1, preceding his death. 

In 1851, he wrote, with G. P. R. James, a romance called 
"Adrian," which was published. In 1869 he published a small 
volume of poems, and in 1873 a volume entitled "Memories of 
Many Men and Some Women," which was very favorably received. 
He was also a frequent contributor to various magazines. 

Judge Field manifested his interest in the college by serving as 
Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Woolsey Fund, 
from its organization in 1871 until his death. 

He was married, Jan. 7, 1846, to Julia, daughter of Daniel Stan- 
ton, of New York. By this marriage he had four sons. 

George Whitepield Ives, son of Jason and Phebe Freeman 
Ives, was born in Hamden, Conn., Aug. 22, 1819, and died in N. Y. 
City, after a brief illness, of pleuro-pneumonia, Dec. 6, 1 874. 

He taught for two years in Virginia and North Carolina, and 
then began the study of medicine in the Medical Department of 
this college. After attending one course of lectures, he was em- 
ployed for a year as assistant physician in the Hartford Retreat for 
the Insane, and then returned to New Haven, and received the 
degree of M.D. in January, 1846. In the following month he 
began the practice of medicine in N. Y. City, and continued thus 
engaged until his death. He was for two years physician to the 
N. Y. Lying-in Asylum, and in 1848 became one of the physicians 
of the Eastern Dispensary. He was one of the original members 
of the N. Y. Academy of Medicine, and a member of the County 
Medical Society. 



I 



185 

Dr. Ives married Miss Frances S. Smith, of Stratford, (^.onn., 
Dec. 20, 1848. His only child is a physician in N. Y. City. 

1842. 

Hugh Brodie Gardiner, son of Alexander and Mary Gar- 
diner, was born in Renfrewshire, Scotland, March IT, 1820. His 
parents removed to this country in his infancy, and he was fitted 
for college at the Academy in Fort Covington, Franklin County, 
N. Y. He entered the Junior class here, after having spent one 
year in Middlebury College. 

After graduating he taught for three years in an academy in 
Austerlitz, Columbia Co., N. Y., and contracted a serious throat 
difficulty, which obliged him to remain at home (in Dundee, 
Canada) for a year. He then took the three years' course in 
Princeton Theological Seminary, on the completion of which he 
went immediately to Galena, 111., in response to a call from the 
South (Presbyterian) Church, over which he was ordained in Sept., 
1849. He resigned this charge in the spring of 185 1, and removed 
to Madison, where he was instrumental in organizing the First 
Presbyterian Church, of which he continued the pastor until Nov., 
1855. In March, 1856, he became the pastor of the Reformed 
Dutch Churches of Coeymans and NeVr Baltimore in Albany 
County. He removed in 1860 to Herkimer, where he was for four 
years pastor of the Reformed Dutch Church. He then took 
charge of the Congregational Church in Bergen, where he re- 
mained for three years, when impaired health led him to seek a 
change, and he was appointed District Secretary of the American 
Tract Society for Northern and Eastern N. Y., in which work he 
continued until the spring of 1869, when he resumed the regular 
duties of the ministry. In July, 1870, he was called to the pas- 
torate of the Presbyterian Church in Perry, where he remained a 
little more than two years. The rest of his life was spent in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., where he was engaged in teaching until the 
failure of his health in Jan., 1874. He died in Brooklyn, July 23, 
1874. Mr. Gardiner was married, Oct. 14, 1850, to Miss Mary E. 
Niles, of Spencertown, N. Y., who survives him, with three 
daughters. 

John Webb Platts, son of John Platts, was born in Deep 
River, Conn., January 22, 1 821, and died in Princeton, Oal., in the 
early part of 1874. 



186 

He studied law in Connecticut, and established himself as a 
lawyer in Milwaukee, Wise, as early as 1847. In 1848 he was 
married to a lady residing in Lyme, Conn., who died a few 
months after in Milwaukee. In the spring of 1850 he left Mil- 
waukee for California, where the rest of his life was spent. 

1843. 

William Austin Benton, the second son of Deacon Azariah 
and Presenda Ladd Benton, was born in Tolland, Conn., October 
11, 1817. 

The first two years of his undergraduate course were spent in 
Williams College, and in 1841 he entered the Junior class at 
Yale. He spent some part of the first year after graduation in 
teaching, and then began his theological course in the semi- 
nary in East Windsor, where he remained until 1846. Having 
given himself to the foreign missionary work, he was ordained 
in his native town, May 18, 1847, and in connection with the ordi- 
nation services was married to Miss Loanza Goulding of Worces- 
ter, Mass. On the 21st of the following month they sailed from 
Boston, as missionaries of the American Board, for Syria and 
Palestine. Arriving in Beirut in October, he spent the winter in 
the study of Arabic, and in April, 1848, went to Aleppo, where 
he labored with zeal and success until February, 1851, when, in 
consequence of the failure of his health, he left Aleppo, and in a 
few months returned to this country. Re-embarking for Syria, 
in January, 1853, he established in April a missionary station at 
Bhamdun, on Mount Lebanon, where he continued until the spring 
of 1869. 

The remaining years of his life were spent in America. He 
died, very suddenly, in Barre, Mass., August 23, 1874, and was 
buried in Tolland. His widow survives, with three sons, of whom 
one graduated at this college in 1874, another graduates at this 
Commencement, and the third is a member of the present Fresh- 
man class. 

William Henry Goodrich, youngest son of Prof. Chauncey 
A. Goodrich (Y. C. 1810), was bom in New Haven, Conn., 
January 19, 1823. His mother was Julia, daughter of Noah 
Webster (Y. C. 1778). 

After leaving college, he spent a year in Ncav Haven, as a resi- 
dent graduate, in the study of law and general literature. He 



187 

then began the study of theology in the Divinity School, and fin- 
ished the course in 1847. Pie was immediately appointed to a 
tutorship in this college ; but receiving a severe injury while in 
the discharge of his duty as an officer, in December of the same 
year, he was obliged to relinquish all mental occupation, and con- 
sequently resigned his position, and in April sailed for Europe. 
He returned with improved health in January, 1849, and was 
ordained over the First Congregational Church in Bristol, Conn., 
March 13, 1850. He remained in Bristol until invited to the 
Presbyterian Church in Binghampton, N. Y., where he was in- 
stalled December 6, 1854. From this church he was dismissed, 
July 4, 1858, and on the 12th of the next month was installed 
associate pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Cleveland, O. 
From April, 1861, until August, 1872, he was the sole pastor, and 
at the latter date, an associate having been installed, Dr. Good- 
rich left home for a visit to Europe, with the hope of renewing 
his impaired strength. After a long succession of deferred hopes 
of improvement, and a rapid decline at the last, he died in Lau- 
sanne, Switzerland, July 11, 1874. 

He was married, April 23, 1850, to Miss Mary Pritchard of 
New Haven. She sui-vives him, with five children. 

A memorial volume has been published by his church. 

The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him by 
Western Reserve College in 1864. 

Alexander Johnston was born in the city of Philadelphia, Pa., 
in the year 1 822. His father was Alexander W. Johnston and his 
grandfather was Colonel Francis Johnston of the Fifth Penns. 
Regiment in the Army of the Revolution. 

He returned to Philadelphia and studied law in the office of St. 
George Tucker Campbell, Esq., and was admitted to the bar, 
Sept. 5, 1848, but never practiced. He devoted his time chiefly to 
foreign travel, especially in the Orient, and to the literature of the 
dramatic school. He was an active and valued member of the 
Shakespeare Society instituted in Philadelphia in 1851, and was a 
cultivated and admirable reader, which added much to his inimit- 
able acting as an amateur in the legitimate drama. 

In January, 1855, he read before the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania a well prepared paper from original unpublished 
material, entitled " An Account of the Society of the Cincinnati," 
of which he was a member in right of his grandfather. This 



188 

monograph was published by the Society, in the sixth volume of 
its Memoirs. 

In May, 1874, he made another visit to Europe, accompanied by 
his sister and sister-in-law, and after a year's absence was return- 
ing home in the steamship Indiana, when he was lost overboard 
on the afternoon of May 10, 1875, at or near Bombay Hook, 
Delaware Bay ; his body has not been recovered. He was never 
married. 

1847. 

Martin Van Buken Wilcoxson, of Kinderhook, N. Y., was 
born March 4, 1829, and died in London, England, Oct. 17, 1874. 

He studied law in New York City, and practiced there for a 
time. The latter years of his life were spent mainly in Europe. 

1849. 

Stephen Fenn was born in Plymouth, Conn., October 6, 
1824. 

The two years after his graduation were spent in teaching in 
Norwich and Stonington, Conn., and he then entered on the pre- 
paration for the ministry in the Yale Divinity School ; two years 
later he removed to Andover, Mass , where he completed his theo- 
logical course in 1854. He was ordained pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church in Torringford, Conn., November 16, 1854, and dis- 
missed on account of ill-health, September 14, 1857. After a year 
of rest in his native town, he took charge of the First Congrega- 
tional Church in (South) Cornwall, Conn., where he was installed, 
May 18, 1859. From this pastorate he was dismissed, January 18, 
1868, and a few months later began preaching in Watertown, 
Conn., where he was settled over the Congregational Church, Sep- 
tember 16, 1868. His feeble health obliged him again to resign 
his charge April 1, 1872. He afterwards supplied the pulpit in 
Vernon, Conn., and later in Wapping (South Windsor), Conn., 
where he resided until his death. 

He was married, December 6, 1854, to Miss Sarah Roberts of 
Vernon, who died February 11, 1876. Her husband, who was ill 
of typhoid pneumonia at the time of her sudden death, sank 
rapidly under his bereavement and died eight days later. They 
had no children. 



I 



189 



1851. 



Timothy Campbell Downie was born in Frankfort, Herkimer 
County, N. Y., January 15, 1829. 

At the age of sixteen he had completed the course of prepara- 
tion at the Herkimer Academy, and being considered too young to 
enter college at once, was placed in a machine shop to learn a 
trade ; but after a few months his natural abilities secured him 
the position of foreman of the shop. He entered this college in 
May, 1849. 

After graduation he taught at the West, and then in the Western 
Military Institute, Tyree Springs, Tenn., where he remained sev- 
eral years. At the breaking out of the civil war he was employed 
as a private tutor in the family of Col. Plant of Macon, Ga. He 
was averse to entering the Southern service ; but his refusal was 
overborne by the officers who knew of his technical skill, and who 
obliged him to take an important position in the Engineers Corps 
and Ordnance Department, in which he served till towards the close 
of the war, when he escaped to the JSTorth with the loss of all his 
property. He was afterwards employed for a time in collecting 
natural-history specimens for the eastern slope of the Rocky 
Mountains. Later he settled in Delavan, Wise, and found employ 
ment as book-keeper and master mechanic in a factory for the 
construction of pumps and windmills. He died in Delavan, May 
13, 18Y5. He was never married. 

Edwin Burr Trumbull was born in Stonington, Conn., June 
5, 1830. 

After graduation he studied law in Norwich with Hon. L. F. S. 
Foster; was admitted to the bar at Norwich in November, 1853 ; 
was clerk of both branches of the General Assembly. After 
practicing law for some years, he engaged in mercantile life in con- 
nection with the Union Manufacturing Company of Norwich. He 
soon after resumed his profession again and continued in it until 
his last sickness. 

He was married. May 17, 1864, to Miss Ellen P. Hakes of Nor- 
wich, and died in Stonington, February 16, 1875. 

1854. 

Jacob Brown Harris, son of Reuben and Rowena (Wood- 
bury) Harris, was bom in Winchendon, Mass., Jan. 24, 1830. 
The year after graduation he spent in Strasburgh, Pa., studying 
13 



190 

law and teaching. After an interval of more than a year, caused 
by severe illness, he resumed the study of law in June, 1837, with 
Hon. Giles H. Whitney, of Winchendon. In 1859, he removed to 
East Abington (in that portion which is now Rockland), Mass., 
and won for himself a leading position in the Plymouth County 
Bar. He was for two sessions a member of the Legislature. A 
few years ago he removed to Boston, where he died, after many 
months of suffering, of Bright's disease of the kidneys, F'eb. 6^ 
18V5. 

He married, Dec. 31, 1862, Miss Mary M. Knight, of Boston, 
who survives him, without children. 

1855. 

Augustus DeBerkeley Hughes was born in New York City, 
Oct. 28, 1834, and died in St. Louis, Mo., May 3, 1875. 

He studied law in the office of H. C. Van Vorst, Esq., of New 
York, and was admitted to the bar in 1856. He practiced his 
profession in New York until December, 1862, when he removed 
to New Orleans, where he resided until his death. He was a 
captain in a Louisiana Regiment during a part of the Civil War. 

1857. 

Geokge Pratt was born in East Weymouth, Mass., Oct. 12, 
1832. 

After graduation he taught for a year in Blooming Grove, N. 
Y., pursuing legal studies at the same time, and then entered the 
law office of Hon. John T. Wait, in Norwich Town, Conn., and 
was admitted to the bar in April, 1859. While studying with 
Mr. Wait, his residence was in Salem, Conn., where he had mar- 
ried, July 31, 1858, Miss Sarah V., daughter of Hon. Oramel 
Whittlesey. He was elected to represent the town in the General 
Assembly in 1860, and in the same year removed to Norwich, 
where he opened a law office, and resided in the practice of his 
profession until his death. In 1864, '65, and '69, he represented 
Norwich in the General Assembly, and in that capacity was the 
author of several important measures. Meantime he rose steadily 
in his profession, and in the city where he was best known was 
more extensively employed and trusted than any practitioner of 
his years. He was for some years City Attorney, and was Cor- 
poration Counsel at the time of his death. 



I 



191 

On a visit to Hartford in the middle of May last, he contracted 
a cold which developed into typhoid pneumonia, subsequently 
followed by paralysis and cerebro-spinal meningitis, which ended, 
after a painful struggle, in his death at Norwich, June 4, 18'75. 

His widow survives him, with children. 

Nathan Willey was born in South Windsor, Conn., Aug. 24, 
1831, and died at his residence in Brooklyn, N. Y., after a very 
brief illness, Dec. 31, 1874. 

He studied law, and was admitted to the bar in Minnesota in 
Oct., 1858. After practicing his profession in St. Paul for two 
years, he returned in poor health to Hartford, Conn., where he 
became editor of the "Post." In August, 1862, he enlisted in the 
25th Connecticut Volunteers, and served for nine months in 
Louisiana. He remained in Louisiana until the close of the war, 
and was next employed as night editor of the " Boston Journal." 
During the rest of his life he was engaged in life insurance, and 
at the time of his death had charge of the " Insurance Law Journal," 
published in New York City. He published several volumes on 
various topics connected with life insurance. He was never 
married. 

1860. 

Daniel Riker Elder, youngest son of George and Hannah E. 
Elder, of Stamford, Conn., was born in New York City, July T, 
1838. 

He remained at home until June, 1861, when he entered the 
navy. From March, 1862, until near the time of his death he was 
engaged in business in New York City. In June, 1874, he left 
home for a trip round the world, and continued in good health 
until his departure from Japan on the steamer City of Peking, 
in April, 1875. He was taken seriously ill with dysentery, and 
died on the 25th of that month, within three days' sail of San 
Francisco. 

William Fowler, son of Rev. Philemon H. Fowler, D.D., and 
Jennette (Hopkins) Fowler, was born in Albany, N. Y., Sept. 26, 
1839, and entered college from Utica. 

He graduated in the summer of 1861, with the degree of LL.B., 
at the Albany Law School, and in the autumn entered into part- 
nership with his classmate, D. Cady Eaton, for the practice of 



192 

law in New York City. In 1862 he was commissioned lieutenant 
in the I'ZSd Regiment New York Infantry, and served with that 
regiment throughout the siege of Port Hudson and Banks' Louisi- 
ana expedition, sowing there the seeds of the disease of which he 
finally died. In August, 1863, he was commissioned captain and 
transferred to the 146th New York Infantry, and in his capacity 
as line officer and afterwards as assistant adjutant general on the 
staff of Gen. Charles Griffen of the 5th Corps, participated in all 
the movements of the Army of the Potomac from this date 
until the surrender of General Lee. At the conclusion of the war 
he was commissioned as captain in the regular army, and at the 
request of General Howard assigned to duty with the Freedmen's 
Bureau, and placed in charge of the Land and Claim Division. 
In 1868 he left the army and undertook the business of manufac- 
turing turpentine in Newbern, N. 0. Not succeeding in this, he 
returned to the practice of his profession, in Elmira, N. Y., where 
his diligent efforts were beginning to bring success, when he was 
prostrated by the long and painful illness which resulted in his 
death. 

He was married, Oct. 26, 1871, to Miss Laura A. Wentworth, of 
Elmira, who survives him. He died in New York City, Nov. 26, 
1874. 

Jacob Wadswokth Kussell, son of Jacob and Mary H. 
Russell, was born in Chicago, 111., Dec. 22, 1839. 

After a year's study of law in his native city, he entered the 
military service, as an attache of the Paymaster's Department, 
and served until 1863, when he resigned and engaged in oil 
speculations and subsequently in banking. From 1867 until his 
death he was secretary of the Chicago Board of Health, and was 
esteemed as a faithful and efficient public officer. He died sud- 
denly of pleuro-pneumonia, in Chicago, May 29, 1875. 

1861. 

Charles Borland Hill, son of Nathaniel P. and Matilda 
(Can-ford) Hill, was bom in Montgomery, N. Y., May ]6, 1836. 

Upon graduation he began the study of law in New York City, 
and after admission to the bar practiced his profession there until 
his last illness. He died in the summer of 1873, of consumption, 
having previously tried in vain the benefits of European travel 
and of a trip to Minnesota. He was never married. 



193 



1871. 



Orville Justus Bliss, son of Aaron Bliss, was born at Chagrin 
Falls, Ohio, May 17, 1849. He was prepared for college at Willis- 
ton Seminary, East Hampton, Mass. 

For six months after graduation, he was in the stationery busi- 
ness in Chicago. His health not being firm, he spent the next 
eighteen months in travel, visiting Colorado, Europe, and the East. 
In September, 1872, he began the study of law in the Union Law 
College, Chicago, and in March, 1874, entered the law office of 
Isham & Lincoln. In December he was admitted to the Missouri 
bar, and he was expecting to be admitted to the bar of Illinois 
early in the present summer. On the 9th of March, 1875, he was 
married to Miss Ella H. Rankin of Newark, N. J., and spent the 
next ten days in a visit to Washington and the South. On reach- 
ing Jacksonville, Fla., he was taken ill with typhoid fever, and 
died in that place on the 9th of April. 

Mr. Bliss had manifested considerable literary ability in college, 
and had since been a constant writer for the press. He was in- 
tending to devote himself to law or journalism. 

John Wolcott Starr, younger son of John S. and Lydia A. 
(Lay) Starr, was born in Guilford, Conn., March 9, 1848. 

He entered the Yale Divinity School in September, 1871, and 
on graduating in May, 1874, accepted an appointment to supply 
for a year the Congregational Church in West Stewartstown, N. 
H. He was ordained at his home in Guilford, June 18, and was 
within a few days of completing his year of service when he died 
in West Stewartstown, June 22. The untiring devotion with 
which he had labored during the unusually severe winter, had 
probably contributed to develop consumptive tendencies, so that 
he fell a victim to an attack of lung fever, after about a week's ill- 
ness. He was unmarried. 

1872. 

Lewis Greene Parsons, the son of Gen. Lewis B. Parsons 
(Y. C. 1840) and Sarah Greene Edwards, was born in St. Louis, 
Mo., Aug. 3, 1848. He completed his preparation for college at 
the Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven. 

On leaving college he went into business in St. Paul, Minn., 
residing there so as to be with a sister who was in failing health. 
After her death, in May, 1873, he took a position in a bank in 



194 

St. Louis, with the expectation of continuing there permanently ; 
but signs of consumption manifested themselves, and in December 
he went to Southern California. There he remained until August, 
1874, and then removed to Colorado. He died in Denver, Jan. 
29, 1875, in his 27th year. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1819. 

Benjamin Franklin Bowers died in New York City, Feb. 7, 
1875, aged 78 years. He had long practiced homoeopathy in 
New York. He was a native of Billerica, Mass., and son of 
Benjamin and Silence (Stickney) Bowers. 

1823. 

Henry Sullivan Lee was born in New London, Conn., May 
1, 1797. He was the son of Dr. Samuel H. P. Lee, of that city. 

In early life he practiced his profession in Providence, R. I., 
and was subsequently engaged in the manufacture of cotton cloth 
in Leesville, Conn., until 1843, when he removed to Boston, Mass., 
and resumed medical practice. In 1870, ill-health, consequent on 
paralysis, compelled him to retire, and he removed to New York 
City, where he died, March 25, 1875. 

1829. 

Denison Hale Hubbard was born in Bolton, Tolland County, 
Conn., Sept. 1, 1805. 

He began the study of medicine under Dr. Wm. O. Talcott 
(Y. C. 1823), of Winsted, Conn. Upon receiving his degree he 
settled in Glastonbury, Conn., but in 1832 removed to Bloomfield, 
Conn., where he continued in active practice until 1844, when on 
account of a failure of health, caused by intense professional labors, 
he removed to Clinton, Conn., where the remainder of his life was 
spent. In 1864, he buried his wife, and two of his three children ; 
and this great sorrow, added to physical infirmities resulting from 
over-work, brought on an illness from which he never fully 
recovered, although he continued in practice until disabled in 
March, 1874, by a second paralytic seizure, which teminated his 
useful life, Aug. 12, 1874. At the time of his fatal illness, he was 
the President of the Middlesex County Medical Society. His 



I 



195 

only surviving child graduated from the Medical Department of 
this college in 1860. 

1850. 

Henry Wyllt Edmund Matthews was born on S. Simon's 
Island, Ga., Dec. 10, 1827, nine days after the death of his father, 
Rev. Edmund Matthews, a clergyman of the Episcopal Church. 
His mother, a native of Cheshire, Conn., returned to that town in 
a few years, and in due time the son was fitted for college in the 
Episcopal Academy there. He graduated from Trinity College 
in 1847, and then entered on the study of medicine here. 

On receiving his degree, he began practice in this city, and 
acquired a leading position among the younger members of the 
profession. In November, 1872, he met with an accident which 
in all probability hastened his death. While assisting in a post- 
mortem examination, he became inoculated in the hand with the 
virus of malignant erysipelas, and for some time his life was in 
suspense, but he finally rallied, and was able in about a year to 
make a trip to Cuba. He returned much improved, and resumed 
practice. After a week's illness, of pleuro-pneumonia, he died 
suddenly, in New Haven, Jan. 29, 1875. He was unmarried. 

Dr. Matthews was especially skilled in obstetrics, and at the 
time of his accident in 1872 had (besides a large general practice) 
a more extensive practice in that department than any other 
physician in the city. 

1856. 

Charles Clinton Latimer, son of Erastus and Seviah (Web- 
ster) Latimer, was born in Newington, Conn., Oct. 17, 1831. 

After a course of study at Williston Seminary, East Hampton, 
Mass., he entered the Freshman Class in the Academical Depart- 
ment of this college in 1850, but was obliged by ill health to give 
up his studies after two years. A year later he entered the Medi- 
cal Department, and on receiving his degree began practice in 
Neponset, 111. In 1858 he removed to the neighboring city of 
Princeton, 111., where he practiced successfully until obliged by 
failing health to give up work, in 1873. During the war of the 
rebellion he served, in the summer of 1864, as surgeon in the 139th 
Illinois Infantry. He died Sept. 6, 1874, in West Bloomfield, 
N. Y., where he had rejoined his family after a sojourn of six 
months in Minnesota. 

Dr. Latimer married, July 21, 1858, Miss Emily M. Peck, who 
survives him, with two daughters. 



196 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

1845. 

Edward Zechariah Lewis, son of Zechariah Lewis (Y. C. 
1794), was born in New York in 1824. He graduated in Arts at 
Columbia College in 1843, and immediately entered this Law 
School. 

After practicing the law for some time in Binghamton, N. Y., 
he studied for the ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
with Rev. Amos B. Beach, D.D., then Rector of Christ Church 
in that place, and was ordained Deacon by Bishop DeLancey, 
Aug. 14, 1855. He was assistant minister for a short time to 
Dr. Beach, and then became rector of Christ Church, Corning, 
N. Y., when he remained until 1860. He was next, until 1871, 
the rector of Emmanuel Church, Norwich, N. Y. ; then in charge 
of St. Paul's Church, Holland's Patent, N. Y., for a year; then 
assistant minister of Grace Church, Utica, N. Y., in charge of 
St. Luke's Mission; in 1873 and 1874 taking charge of St. John's, 
Whitesboro', and the Mission of the Good Shepherd, East Utica. 
He died in Utica, of pneumonia, after seven days' illness, Feb. 8, 
1875. 

SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1857. 

Charles Harger, the second son of Alfred and Ruth Harger, 
was born in Oxford, Conn., Jan. 23d, 1834. 

Soon after graduating he removed, with his brother Henry, to 
Delhi, the county-seat of Delaware County, Iowa, where he has 
since resided, engaged in land surveying and real estate business. 
At the time of his death, and for nearly twelve years previously, 
he was Deputy Treasurer of Delaware County. He died, after 
about a week's illness, June 15th, 1875. He leaves a widow and 
one son. *» 

1866. 

Alexander Ufford McAlister, son of Alexander and Susan 
McAlister, and grandson of Rev. Hezekiah G. Ufford (Y. C. 1806), 
was born in Bridgeport, Conn., Feb. 10, 1846. In his youth his 
family removed to this city, where their residence has since 
continued. 



197 

After graduation tie adopted journalism as his profession, serv- 
ing for a time on various New Haven papers. He was soon able 
to make a practical application of his scientific training, by join- 
ing the editorial staff of the " Scientific American," published in 
New York City, with which he was connected for two years, 
contributing also to other New York papers. He returned to 
New Haven early in 1874 with failing health, and after five 
months' illness, died on the 20th of October. He was married, 
Oct. 19, 1874, to Nellie L., daughter of S. C. Decker, of New 
York City. 



SUMMARY 





Academical Department. 




Class. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Death. 


1804 


Jacob A. Van Heuvel, 87, 


Syracuse, N. Y., 


May 3, '74. 


1806 


James Root, 88, 


Hartford, Conn., 


April 17, '75. 


1808 


Joseph Delafield, 84, 


N. Y. City, 


Feb. 12, '75. 


1812 


Wm. P. Buffett, 81, 


Smithtown, L. I., 


Oct. 7, '74. 


(( 


Edward Delafield, 80, 


N. Y. City, 


Feb. 13, '75. 


1813 


Abram Dixon, 87, 


Westfield, N. Y., 


April 19, '75. 


u 


John A. Stevens, 79, 


N. Y. City, 


Oct. 19, '74. 


t( 


John W. Weed, 82, 


Metuchen, N. J., 


Jan. 7, '75. 


1814 


Lucius W. Leffingwell, 78, 


New Haven, Conn. 


Feb. 1, '75. 


(( 


Joseph C. Stiles, 79, 


Savannah, Ga., 


March 27, '75. 


1815 


Erasmus Norcross, 80, 


Stratford, Conn., 


Aug. 23, '74. 


1816 


Harvey F. Leavitt, 78, 


Grinnell, Iowa. 


Nov. 11, '74. 


u 


Fleming B. Miller, 81, 


Staunton, Ya., 


Aug. 10, '74. 


1811 


George Marvin, 76, 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Dec. 23, '74. 


1818 


Samuel Griswold, 79, 


Old Saybrook, Conn., 


Jan. 18, '75. 


<( 


Joseph Hurlbut, 75, 


New London, Conn., 


June 5, '75. 


u 


David KimbaU, 83, 


Rockford, 111., 


Feb. 8, '75. 


1820 


Garnett Duncan, 75, 


Louisville, Ky., 


May 25, '75. 


1821 


Peter F. Clark, 74, 


N. Y. City, 


May 15, '75. 


1822 


Osmyn Baker, 74, 


Northampton, Mass., 


Feb. 9, '75. 


1823 


Richard W. Dickinson, 69, 


Fordham, N Y., 


Aug. 16, '74. 


1824 


Tertius S. Clarke, 75, 


Neath, Pa., 


April 12, '75. 


u 


Bennett F. Northrop, 73, 


Griswold, Conn., 


March 4, '75. 


1825 


Moses Raymond, 77, 


Green Spring Yalley,W.Ya., May 19, '75. 


1826 


Aurelius D. Parker, 73, 


Boston, Mass., 


June 18, '75. 


(( 


Wm. Preston, 73, 


Bedford, Pa., 


April 25, '75. 


1827 


Henry Durant, 72, 


Oakland, Cal., 


Jan. 22, '75. 


(( 


Samuel Howe, 71, 


Bricksburg, N. J., 


Sept. 28, '74. 


u 


Ralph D. Smyth, 69, 


Guilford, Conn., 


Sept. 11, '74. 


1828 


George Perkins, 70, 


Norwich, Conn., 


Oct. 13, '74. 


1829 


Warren B. Dutton, 71, 


Charlestown, W. Ya., 


Sept. 5, '74. 


u 


Joseph Bldridge, 70, 


Norfolk, Conn., 


March 31, '75 


1830 


Elijah P. Grant, 66, 


Canton, 0., 


Dec. 21, '74. 


1831 


Isaac S. K. Legare, 65, 


Orangeburg, S. C, 


July 29, '74. 


" 


John L. Mayer, 63, 


York, Pa., 


Aug. 16, '74. 


1834 


Davis S. Brainerd, 62, 


Lyme, Conn., 


April 30, '75. 


(i 


Henry Chalker, 61, 


Nunda, N. Y., 


May 24, '74. 


(t 


Wm. Leverett, 61, 


Plymouth, N. H., 


Sept. 18, '74. 


1835 


John E. Seeley, 64. 


Ovid, N. Y., 


March 30, '75. 


1836 


Charles P. Avery, 55, 


Owego, N. Y., 


Aug. -31, '72. 


t( 


Edward P. Cowles, 60, 


Chicago, lU., 


Dec. 2, '74. 


1838 


Joseph B. Yarnum. 56, 


Astoria, L. I., 


Dec. 31. '74. 


(( 


Charles C. Whittlesey, 56, 


St. Louis, Mo., 


March JO, '75. 


1840 


Horace James, 57, 


Boylston, Mass., 


June 9, '75. 


1841 


MaunseU B. Field, 52, 


N. Y. City, 


Jan. 24, '75. 


(( 


George W. Ives, 55, 


u •^* 


Dec. 6, '74. 


1842 


Hugh B. Gardiner, 54, 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


July 23, '74. 


(( 


John W. Platts, 53, 


Princeton, Cal., 


'74. 


1843 


Wm. A. Benton, 56, 


Barre, Mass., 


Aug. 30, '74. 


(( 


Wm. H. Goodrich, 51, 


Lausanne, Switzerland, 


July 11, '74. 



199 



Class. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Death. 


1843 


Alexander Johnston, 53, 


Delaware Bay, 


May 10, '75. 


184Y 


Martin V. B. Wilcoxson, 45, 


London, England, 


Oct. 17, '74. 


1849 


Stephen Fenn, 50, 


Wapping, Conn., 


Feb. 19, '75. 


1851 


Timothy C. Downie, 46, 


Delavan, Wise, 


May 13, '75. 


u 


Edwin B. TrumbuU, 44, 


Stonington, Conn., 


Feb. 16, '75. 


1854 


Jacob B. Harris, 45, 


Boston, Mass., 


Feb. 6, '75. 


1855 


Augustus DeB. Hughes, 40, 


St. Louis, Mo., 


May 3, '75. 


1857 


George Pratt, 42, 


Norwich, Conn., 


June 4, '75. 


(( 


Nathan Willey, 43, 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Dec. 31, '74. 


1860 


D. Riker Elder, 36, 


Pacific Ocean, 


April 25, '75. 


(( 


William Fowler, 35, 


N. Y. City, 


Nov. 26, '74. 


i( 


Jacob W. Russell, 35, 


Chicago, 111., 


May 29, '75. 


1861 


Charles B. Hill, 37, 


N. Y., 


'73. 


1811 


OrviUe J. Bliss. 25, 


Jacksonville, Fla., 


April 9, '75. 


'' 


John W. Starr, 27, 


West Stewartstown, N. 


H., June 22, '75. 


1872 


Lewis G. Parsons, 26, 


Denver, Col., 


Jan. 29, '75. 




Medical Department. 




1819 


Benj. P. Bowers, 78, 


N. Y. City, 


Feb. 7, '75. 


1823 


Henry S. Lee, 77, 


N. Y. City. 


March 25, '75 


1829 


Denison H. Hubbard, 69. 


Clinton, Conn., 


Aug. 12, '74. 


1850 


Henry W. E. Matthews, 47, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Jan. 29, '75. 


1856 


C. Clinton Latimer, 42, 


W. Bloomfield, N. Y., 


Sept. 6, '74. 



Law Department. 
1845 Edward Z. Lewis, 51, Utica, N. Y., 



Feb. 8, '75. 



Sheffield Scientific School. 



1857 Charles Harger, 41, 
1866 Alex. U. McAlister, 28, 



Delhi, Iowa, 

New Haven, Conn., 



June 15, '75. 
Oct. 20, '74. 



The number of deaths reported above is 74, and the average age of the grad- 
uates of the Academical Department is 62f years. 

Of the Academical Graduates, 26 were lawyers, 2] clergymen, 8 in business, 
and 5 physicians. 

The deaths are distributed as follows: — in New York, 23; Connecticut, 16; 
Massachusetts, 5; Illinois and Pennsylvania, 3 each; California, Europe, Iowa, 
Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey and West Virginia, 2 each ; and the re- 
mainder in as many different States. 



The only surviving graduate of the last century is Rev. Thomas Williams, of 
Providence, R. I., who was born Nov. 5, 1779, and graduated in 1800. 



-/ 



INDEX. 



Class. Page. 

1836 Avery, Charles P., 180 

1822 Baker, Osmyn, 169 

1843 Benton, Wm. A., 186 

18n Bliss, Orville J., 193 

1819 m Bowers, Benj. R, 194 

1834 Brainerd, Davis S., 179 

1812 Buffett, Wm. P., 160 

1 834 Chalker, Henry, 179 

1821 Clark, Peter F., 169 

1824 Clarke, Tertius S., 170 

1836 Cowles, Edw. P.,. 181 

1812 Delafield, Edward, 161 

1808 Delafield, Joseph, 160 

1823 Dickinson, Hichard W., _ 169 

1813 Dixon, Abram,, 162 

1851 Downie, Timothy C, 189 

1820 Duncan. Garnett, 168 

1827 Durant, Henry, 173 

1829 Dutton, Warren B., 176 

1860 Elder, D. Riker, 191 

1829 Eldridge, Joseph, 177 

1849 Fenn, Stephen,. 188 

1841 Field, Maunsell B., 183 

1860 Fowler, Wm., 191 

1842 Gardiner, Hugh B., 185 

1843 Goodrich, Wm. H., 186 

1830 Grant, Elijah P., 177 

1818 Griswold, Samuel, 167 

1857 p Harger, Charles, 196 

1854 Harris, Jacob B., 189 

1861 Hill, Charles B,, 192 

1827 Howe, Samuel, 174 

1829 m Hubbard, Denison H., .. 194 

1855 Hughes, Aug. DeB., 190 

1818 Hurlbut, Joseph, 167 

1841 Ives, Geo W., 184 

1840 James, Horace, 182 



Class. Page. 

1843 Johnston, Alex., __ 187 

1818 KimbaU, David, 168 

1856 m Latimer, C. Clinton, 195 

1816 Leavitt, Harvey F., 165 

1823 m Lee, Henry S., ._ 194 

1814 LeffingweU, Lucius W., _ 163 
1831 Legare, Isaac S. K., 178 

1834 Leverett, Wm., 179 

1845 Z Lewis, Edw. Z.,__ 196 

1866 ^ McAlister, Alex. U., 196 

1817 Marvin, Geo., 166 

1850 m Matthews, Henry W. E., 195 

1831 Mayer, John L., 178 

1816 Miller, Fleming B., 166 

1815 Norcross, Erasmus, 165 

1824 Northrop, Bennett F.,_.. 171 

1826 Parker, Aurelius D., 172 

1872 Parsons, Lewis G., 193 

1824 Perkins, Geo., - 176 

1842 Platts, John W., 185 

1857 Pratt, Geo., 190 

1826 Preston, Wm., 173 

1825 Raymond, Moses, 172 

1806 Root, James, 159 

1860 Russell, Jacob W., 192 

1835 Seeley, John E., 180 

1827 Smyth, Ralph D., 175 

1871 Starr, John W., 193 

1813 Stevens, John A., 162 

1814 Stiles, Joseph C- 163 

1851 Trumbull, Edwin B., 189 

1804 Van Heuvel, Jacob A., _ - 159 

1838 Vamum, Joseph B., 181 

1813 Weed, John W., „. 163 

1838 Whittlesey, Charles C.,-. 182 

1847 Wilcoxson, Martin Y. B., 188 

1857 WiUey, Nathan, 191 




^ 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in June, 1876, 

including the record of a few who died a short 

time previous, hitherto unreported. 

[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF TBE ALUMNI, JUNE 28th, 18T6.J 

[No. 6 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 35 of the whole Record.] 



INDEX 



Class. Page 

1821 Adams, Geo. E., 210 

1861 Arnold, Hubbard, 226 

1844 Barrett, Myron, 220 

1847 Bassett, Benj. R, 223 

1816 Bird, Isaac, 207 

1872 Blake, Frank W.,. 232 

1868 Boardman, Herbert, 230 

1818 Bronson, Oliver, 209 

1817 Brown, Nehemiah, 207 

1812 Brown, Solyman, 204 

1864 Browning, Robert M., 228 

1823 Buck, David, 211 

1863 Bull, Cornelius W., - 228 

1827 Bushnell, Horace, .213 

1808 Chandler, John, 203 

1868 Chapman, Timothy P., ... 230 

1829 Church, John B., 214 

1874 t Danforth, Wm. B., 234 

1817 Dickinson, Baxter, 208 

1830 Dorsey, Samuel W.,. 215 

1814 Dulles, Joseph H., 205 

1819 Edwards, Jonathan, 209 

1847 EUsworth, Stukely, 223 

1821 Esty, Isaac,. 210 

1844 Perry, Orris S., 220 

1849 Ford, Rufus A., 223 

1841 Gillett, Ezra H., 219 

1875 Grinnell, Frank L., 232 

1853 Hall, T. Dwight, 224 

1 875 f Harris, George, 234 

1836 Hart, Edward L.,... 218 

1835 Hequembourg, Charles L., 217 

1847 m Hunt, Isaac S., 233 



Class. Page 

1867 Johnston, Alex., 229 

1840 Lamont, Geo. D., 218 

1 824 Lowrey, James, 212 

1 849 Miles, James B., 224 

1835 Mills, Geo. L 217 

1874 t Morris, James W., 233 

1857 Nolen, Geo. A., 225 

1826 Parker, Edward W., 212 

1861 Perkins, Geo. C, 227 

1831 Polk. Trusten, .216 

1873 p Pomeroy, Benj., 233 

1858 Porter, Edward C, 226 

1826 Pratt, Mark, 213 

1 841 Raymond, Henry H., 220 

1809 Rice, John P., 203 

1849 Richardson, Walker, 224 

1823 Riddel, Samuel H., 211 

1826 Ritter, Thomas, 213 

1866 Roberts, Henry, 229 

1857 Sandys, Edwin P., ..225 

1866 Schroeder, Ernest, 229 

1837 Self ridge, Wm. W., 218 

1865 Sharp, John, 228 

1846 Sherwood, Thomas D., ... 222 

1865 Smith, Walter B., 229 

1815 Sprague, Wm. B., 205 

1 844 Taylor, Nath'l W. , 221 

1846 Thompson, AbijahH., ... 222 

1825 Topliff, Stephen, 212 

1862 Weeks, Robert K.,.. 227 

1869 Williams, Orin M., 231 

1868 Wood,Wm. C, i... 231 

1830 Woodruff, Lewis B., 216 






OBITUARY RECORD 



OF 



GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending June^ 187H, includ- 
ing the record of a few who died previously^ 
hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meetinq of the Alumni, June 28, 1816.] 
[No. 6 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 35 of the whole Record ] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1808. 

John Chandler, the eldest child of John and Mary (Campfield; 
Chandler, was born in Elizabethtown, N. J., Dec. 30, 1784. He 
at first entered the college of New Jersey, but spent the last three 
years of the course here. 

After a short period of study at Andover Theological Seminary, 
he began to preach, but his delicate health and feeble vocal power 
kept him from active work in the ministry. He was one of the 
oldest and most devoted members and ofiicers qf the Third Pres- 
byterian Church of Newark, N. J., in which city he passed the 
greater part of his life. 

He married, Sept. 16, 1818, Margaret, daughter of Samuel Chap- 
man, of Elizabethtown (and widow of James C. Mulford), whom 
he survived fourteen years, and by whom he had four children, 
three of whom are still living. He died at the residence of his son- 
in-law, in Brooklyn (E. D.), N. Y., Dec. 1, 1875, aged nearly 91 
years. Of a class of fifty members, he was the last survivor. 

1809. 

John Parker Rice was born in Princeton, Mass., Sept. 24, 1786, 
the only son of Soloman and Mary (Binney) Rice. He assumed a 
middle name (by act of the state legislature) about 1816, in com- 



204 

pliment to his mother who had married Mr. Ebenezer Parker, of 
Princeton, as her second husband. His only half-brother, Aurelius 
T>. Parker, was graduated at this college in 1826. 

Soon after leaving college, Mr. Rice went to Salem, Mass., and 
engaged in teaching. He was married to Sarah, daughter of 
George Crowninshield, Esq., of Salem, Nov. 18, 1816, when here- 
moved to Philadelphia, at the same time giving up his profession 
as a teacher. In the summer of 1818 he settled in Boston, where 
the greater part of his married life was spent. Here he became 
actively interested in the politics of the day and in various benev- 
olent and public enterprises. For a few years he was in business 
in Boston as a merchant, removing his residence, however, to Ded- 
ham a few years after his wife's death, which occurred Feb. 5, 1847. 

He finally gave up business, and in 1856 removed to his native 
town, where he resided in honored retirement until his death, Sept. 
20, 1875, at the age of 89. His only child, a daughter, survives 
him. 

1812. 

SoLYMAN Browx, son of Nathaniel and Thankful (Woodruff) 
Brown, was born in Litchfield, Conn., Nov. 17, 1790. 

He studied theology, and was licensed to preach by the Litch- 
field North Association, Sept. 30, 1813, and for seven or eight 
years combined the duties of teacher and preacher, until a severe 
hemorrhage of the lungs obliged him to relinquish almost entirely 
public speaking. In 1821 he removed to New York city, to pursue 
his vocation as a classical teacher, and there he embraced the doc- 
trines of Emanuel Swedenborg, and was constituted a regular 
preacher of the New Jerusalem Church. He continued to teach, 
however, until 1832, when he took up dental surgery as a profes- 
sion, and for many years followed his calling in New York city. 
He showed his enthusiasm for his art by publishing two poems 
(" Dentologia," in 1833, and "Dental Hygeia," in 1838) and sev- 
eral essays, elucidating its principles. He also published in 1818 
" An Essay on American Poetry," and was for many years a fre- 
quent contributor to the periodical press, and especially to the 
columns of the New York " Mirror." 

Dr. Brown married in 1834 Elizabeth, daughter of Amos Butler, 
for many years editor and proprietor of the New York " Mercan- 
tile Advertiser." In 1874 they removed to Minnesota, where he 
continued at the residence of his son-in-law, Judge C. D. TuthilL 



205 

in Dodge Center, until his death, which occurred Feb. 13, 1876, in 
the 86th year of his age. His mental faculties continued clear and 
vigorous until his last illness, which was very brief. His wife, five 
daughters and one son survive him ; two sons having died in early 
manhood. 

1814. 

Joseph Heatlt Dulles, son of Joseph and Sophia (Heatly) 
Dulles, was born in Charleston, S. C, Febr. 7, 1795. 

Almost immediately after graduation, he entered on a mercan- 
tile career in Philadelphia. Although he had in large measure 
the talents which lead to success in business, from the beginning 
he never forgot what was due from a liberally educated man to 
the promotion of public interests. He was one of the founders of 
the Academy of Natural Sciences and of the Mercantile Library, 
and one of the earliest and most efficient friends of the Franklin 
Institute. He was also one of the organizers and for over fifty 
years one of the managers of the American Sunday School Union. 
Of the Presbyterian Church he was an earnest working member. 
In business enterprises he was equally active, and in his maturer 
years was especially interested in the development of the coal and 
iron interests of his adopted state. He died at his residence in 
Philadelphia, March 12, 1876, in his 82d year. He married, in 
1819, a daughter of John Welsh, Esq., of Philadelphia, who sur- 
vives him, with four sons and four daughters. Of his sons three 
were graduated at this college, in 1839, 1844, and 1852. One of 
his daughters is the wife of Charles J. Stille, LL.D. (Y. C. 1839.) 

1815. 

William Buell Sprague', the youngest son of Benjamin and 
Sybil (Buell) Sprague, of Andover, Conn., was born in that town, 
Oct. 16, 1795, and died in Flushing, N. Y., May 7, 1876. 

For a year after graduating, he was a private tutor in the family 
of Major Lewis, a nephew of Washington, at Woodlawn, Va. 
In the fall of 1816 he entered the Theological Seminary at Prince- 
ton, N. J., and was graduated in the regular course. He was set- 
tled, Aug. 25, 1819, over the Congregational Church in West Spring- 
field, Mass., as colleague pastor with Kev. Dr. Joseph Lathrop (Y. C. 
1754), who died in the following year. Here he remained until 
1 829, when he accepted a call from the Second Presbyterian Church 
in Albany, N. Y., and was installed as their pastor on the 26th of 



206 

August. His settlement in Albany continued for a period of forty 
years, and until he had reached the age of 74. In the fall of 1869 
he resigned his pastoral charge, and in May, 1870, removed to 
Flushing, L. I., where he spent the remaining years of his life. 

In 1828 he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Co- 
lumbia College, and in 1848 the same degree from Harvard 
University. In 1859 Princeton College conferred on him the 
degree of Doctor of Laws. 

The principal literary work of his life was the " Annals of the 
American Pulpit," of which nine volumes are published, and a 
concluding volume is complete in manuscript and will probably be 
brought out at some future time. Among other published writings 
may be mentioned, "Letters to a Daughter," "Letters from 
Europe," " Lectures to Young People," " Lectures on Revivals," 
" Contrast between True and False Christianity," " Life of Dr. E. 
D. Griffin," " Life of Jedidiah Morse," " Life of President Dwight " 
(in Sparks's " American Biography "). The number of his pub- 
lished sermons, addresses and orations is about 175. Among 
them are the Phi Beta Kappa address at this college in 1843, and 
the oration before the Alumni in 1860. 

One of the principal recreations of his life was the collection of 
autograph manuscripts. He began this at an early day, and suc- 
ceeded in accumulating a great quantity of interesting material. 
A considerable portion of Gen. Washington's private correspond- 
ence was presented to him by one of the members of the Wash- 
ington family, and his collection includes two complete sets of the 
autographs of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, a 
complete set of the generals of the Revolution commissioned by 
the Continental Congress (the only set in existence), all the 
English sovereigns from James I, all the Frencli sovereigns from 
Louis XIV, together with such individual names as St. Augustine, 
Calvin, Bunyan, Melanchthon, Erasmus, the Emperor Charles V, 
Henry IV of France, Henry VIII of England, and most men and 
women of note in this country or abroad during the 18th or 19th 
centuries. The collection fills four large cases. 

Dr. Sprague was first married, Sept. 5, 1820, to Charlotte, 
daughter of Gen. Wm. Eaton, of Brimfield, Mass. She died June 
25, 1S21. He was married, secondly, Aug. 2, 1824, to Mary, 
daughter of Hon. Samuel Lathrop, of West Springfield. She 
died Sept. 16, 1837, and he was again married. May 13, 1840, to 
Henrietta B., daughter of Hon. Samuel Lathrop, who is still living. 



207 

All the children of the second and third marriages who sni'vived 
infancy, are still living: they are two sons and one daughter by 
the second marriage, and two daughters and one son by the third. 

1816. 

Isaac Bird, son of Isaac and llhoda (Selleck) Bird, was born 
in Salisbury, Conn., June 19, 1793. 

He spent the year after graduation as a teacher in the academy 
in West Nottingham, Md., and in Nov., 1817, entered Andover 
Theol. Seminary. His three years there were passed in close com- 
panionship with his classmates, William Goodell and Daniel Tem- 
ple, the associates of his future missionary life, and the three friends 
together offered themselves on graduating to the American Board 
for work among the heathen. Mr. Bird spent two years in the 
service of the Board in this country, and was ordained, w^ith Mr. 
Temple, at North Bridgewater, Mass., Oct. 31, 1821. He was 
married, Nov. 18, 1822, to Ann, daughter of Capt. Wm. Parker, 
of Dunbarton, N. H., and they embarked the next month with 
Mr. and Mrs. Goodell for Malta. He passed the succeeding 
winter in Jerusalem, and the next 13 years in or near Beirut, 
Syria. In the summer of 1836 he returned to the United States, 
on account of the long continued ill-health of his wife, and was 
for the next two years employed as an agent of the American 
Board. In Sept., 1839, he began to give instruction in the Theol. 
Seminary in Gilmanton, N. H., where he remained for six years, 
during the last part of the time serving as Professor of Sacred 
Literature. From 1846 to 1869 he conducted a family school in 
Hartford, Conn., and then removed to Great Barrington, where he 
died at the residence of his son, June 13, 1876, at the age of 83. 
His wife survives him. Of their ten children four died in infancy. 
One son graduated at Dartmouth College in 1844, and another at 
this College in 1848. The eldest son is a missionary on Mount 
Lebanon, and the eldest daughter is the wife of Rev. Dr. Van 
Lennep, so long a missionary in the Turkish Empire. 

1817. 

Nehemiah Brown was born in Canterbury, Conn., June 11, 
1791, and died in New York City, Jan. 5, 1876, in his 85th year. 

After leaving College he studied divinity with Rev. James M. 
Mathews, D.D., of New York City, and taught in his family as 
private tutor about three years. He was then, for about the same 



208 

length of time, principal of Clinton Academy, in East Hampton, 
L. I. 

He was ordained and installed eighth pastor of the Fii-st Pres- 
byterian Church in Huntington, L. I., Oct. 18, 1824. In conse- 
quence of failing health he resigned this charge June 25, 1 832, and 
removed to New York City. Here he was for several years prin- 
cipal of the Pickett School, and he afterwards taught a collegiate 
school in Washington, D.C., but returned to New York to pass 
his later years. 

He married Henrietta Conklin, of Huntington, who died some 
years before him. Of their three sons and four daughters, one son 
and two daughters survive him. 

Baxter Dickinson, youngest son of Azariah and Mary (East- 
man) Dickinson, was born in Amherst, Mass., April 14, 1*795. 

He spent a year in teaching in Virginia, and in 1818 entered 
Andover (Mass.) Theological Seminary, where he completed the 
course in 1821. He was ordained and installed pastor of the 
Congregational Church in Longmeadow, Mass., March 5, 1823, and 
there remained until called to the 3d Presbyterian Church in 
Newark, N. J., where he was installed Nov. 17, 1829. He labored 
successfully for six years in that relation, and then accepted an 
invitation to the Professorship of Sacred Rhetoric and Pastoral 
Theology in Lane Seminary, Cincinnati. After four years of 
active devotion to the interests of that institution, he accepted an 
appointment to the corresponding chair in the seminary in Auburn, 
N. Y , and held the position eight years. For ten years he served 
the American and Foreign Christian Union as one of its District 
Secretaries at New York and Boston, and then removed with his 
family to Lake Forest, near Chicago, where with them he opened 
a Young Ladies' Seminary, which was puccessfuUy maintained 
until 186'7. The infirmities of age rendering necessary a retire- 
ment from all labor, he removed in 1868 to Brooklyn, N. Y, 
to spend his closing years, and died in that city, Dec. 5, 1875. 

In 1838 he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Amherst College. He was the author of the paper known as the 
" True Doctrines," which was adopted in 1 837 as the exponent of 
the doctrinal beliefs of the New School branch of the Presby- 
terian Church, and received the endorsement of both branches at 
the late Reunion. In 1839 he was the moderator of the New 
School General Assembly. He published several sermons, and 



209 

some of these, as well as a volume of " Letters to Students," were 
republished in England. 

Dr. Dickinson was married, June 4, 1823, to Martha Bush, of 
Boylston, Mass., who survives him. Of their nine children, one 
son and three daughters are living. Two of the sons graduated at 
Amherst College, in 1844 and 1848 respectively. 

1818. 

Oliver Bronson died at Richfield Springs, N. Y., after a short 
illness, July 21, 1875, in the 76th year of his age. 

After graduating at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
1825, he was long a resident of New York City, and had for many 
years made St. Augustine, Florida, his winter home, becoming 
thus a liberal benefactor of the educational and religious interests 
of that State. His widow, Mrs. Joanna Bronson, died in Balti- 
more, Md,, Feb. 13, 1876. 

1819. 

Jonathan Edwards was born in Hartford, Conn., Sept. 27, 
1798, and was the eldest son of Jonathan Walter Edwards 
(Y. C. 1789), a distinguished lawyer of Hartford, and son of the 
younger President Edwards. His mother was Elizabeth, daughter 
of Capt. Moses Tryon, of Wethersfield, Conn, 

After leaving college, he studied law with Chief-Justice Zeph- 
aniah Swift (Y. C. 1778), of Windham, Corm., was admitted to 
the bar in 1824, and was for a few years a practicing attorney in 
Hartford. In 1830 he went to the island of Cuba to reside, but 
the death of his father in April, 1831, changed his plans, and in- 
duced him to return to his native city. In 1 835 he was appointed 
by the state legislature judge of probate for the district of Hart- 
ford, and held the office for one year. In 1836 he was nominated 
by the whigs for secretary of state, but was defeated, with all his 
associates on the ticket. He removed in 1838 to Troy, N. Y., 
where he was subsequently mayor of the city, and for two years 
(1854 and 1855) a mtmber of the s-tate legislature. 

He was married, March 1, 1837, to Maria Champion, of Col- 
chester, Conn. After her death he removed in the spring of 1867 
with his son to New Haven, Conn., where he spent the remainder 
of his life in invalid retirement. He died in this city, quite sud- 
denly, of a congestive chill, Aug. 23, 1875, in his 77th year. His 
only son graduated at this college in 1863. 



210 



1821. 



Geokge Eliashib Adams, eldest son of Deacon Eliashib Adams, 
was born in Worlhington, Mass., Oct. 27, 1801. His mother was 
Anne, daughter of Rev. John Lei and, of Peru, Mass. 

In 1803 the family removed to Bucksport, Me., and in 1813 to 
Bangor, from which place the son entered college. He studied 
theology in Andover Seminary, graduating in 1826, and in 1827 
was appointed Professor of Sacred Literature in the Bangor 
Theological Seminary, which position he retained until ordained 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Brunswick, Me., Dec. 30, 
1829. At Brunswick the students in Bowdoin College were a part 
of his regular congregation, and after forty years of successful 
labor he was apprehensive that a younger man might be better 
adapted to the place, and listened to an invitation to remove to 
Orange, N.J. He resigned his pastorate in June, 1870, and was 
soon installed over the Trinity Congregational Church in Orange. 
Here, though at times quite feeble, he continued his ministry until 
his resignation in March, 1875. He died after a long illness, in 
Orange, Dec. 25, 1S75, aged 74 years. 

He married, in 1826, Miss Sarah Ann Folsom, of Portsmouth, 
N. H. They had no children, but adopted two daughters. About 
1853, some years after the death of his first wife, he married a Miss 
Root, who survives him with two daughters. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from Bowdoin College in 1849. 

Isaac Esty, son of David and Mercy Esty, was born in West- 
moreland, Cheshire county. N. H., April 24, 1796. 

He spent three years in Andover Theological Seminary, gradu- 
ating in 1824, and was for some time employed as a home mis- 
sionary in his native county. He was ordained, Jan. 29, 1829, 
pastor of a Congregational Church at Cape Elizabeth, Me., where he 
remained until 1831. He then removed to Bridgeton, Me., where 
he preached until the spring of 1 832, when he returned to his 
native place. Here he remained in feeble health, devoting him- 
self to farming, for eight years. In the spring of 1840 he removed 
to Westminster, Vt., where he resided until April, 1846, when he 
accepted a call to the Congregational Churches in Bethlehem and 
Franconia, N. H., preaching in each pulpit on alternate Sabbaths. 
This arrangement continued until the spring of 1851, when he 
returned to Westminster, where he lived until the spring of I 855, 
acting during the last two years of this period as pastor of the 



211 

Congregational Church. He then removed to Amherst, Mass., 
where he resided until his death, July 31, 1875, at the age of 79. 
He was married, Feb. 1 1, 1829, to Nancy Goldsmith, daughter 
of Asa Cole, of Westmoreland. She died Dec. 13, 1872. Of 
their two sons, one died in infancy ; the other graduated at Am- 
herst College in 1860, and is a Professor in that institution. 

1823. 

David Buck, eldest son of Gurdon and Susanna (Manwaring) 
Buck, was born in New York city, Jan. 29, 1806. 

The first year of his college course was spent in Columbia Col- 
lege. He resided in Boston, where he married Matilda, daughter 
of Henry Hall, Esq., by whom he had five children. He died at 
his summer residence in Marblehead, Mass., Aug. 15, 1875. 

Samuel Hopkins Riddel, eldest son of Rev. William Riddel 
(Dartmouth College 1793), was born in Bristol, Me., where his 
father was then pastor, Jan. 2, 1800. His mother was Lucy, 
daughter of Rev. Dr. Samuel Hopkins (Y. C, 1749), of Hadley, 
Mass. 

He went from college to the Andover Theological Seminary, 
and finished the course there in 1826. He was called to the pas- 
torate of the Congregational Church in Glastonbury, Conn., April 
23, 1827, and was ordained there on the 27th of the following 
June. Having been in 1836 appointed an Agent of the American 
Education Society, he was dismissed in February, 1837, from his 
pastoral charge, and for the next two years devoted himself to the 
interests of that Society as its agent for Connecticut and Rhode 
Island and as Secretary of the Connecticut branch. In April, 
1839, having been appointed editor of the " Congregationalist," 
a religious newspaper published in Hartford, Conn., he resigned 
his agency, but two years later was recalled to the service of the 
same society as its Secretary at its general ofllice in Boston. In 
this position he continued until 1850. He was subsequently, from 
1853 to 1858, an editor and proprietor of the " Puritan Recorder," 
and was installed, Aug. 15, 1860, over the Congregational ChurcK 
in Tamworth, N. H. While in this ofiice his wife died, Febr. 4, 
1866, and later the only remaining member of his family, an invalid 
daughter, was taken away. Soon after this last affliction he 
resigned his charge, July 12, 1871. In the fall of 1875 he went 
to the West to visit, and was prevailed upon to pass the winter 



212 

with friends in Des Moines, Iowa. In the spring he contracted a 
cold which developed into pneumonia, of which disease he died, 
June 1, 1876, in his 77th year. 

1824. 

James Lowrey, youngest child of Daniel and Anna (Munson) 
Lowrey, was born in that part of Farmington which is now 
Plainville, Conn., Sept. 10, 1802. • 

He went to Wellsboro, Pa., as the principal of the academy, 
and there studied law, and entered into partnership with Hon. 
Ellis Lewis. He was at one time a member of the State Legisla- 
ture. He retired from practice several years before his death, and 
removed to Burlington, N. J., where he died, Nov. 30, 1875, aged 
73 years. 

He married, in 1830, Mary W., daughter of Hon. Samuel W. 
Morris, of Pennsylvania, who is still living. 

1825. 

Stephen Topliff, son of Cyrus and Mary (Streeter) Topliff, 
was born in Willington, Conn., Nov. 9, 1796. 

From College he entered directly the Yale Divinity School, and 
upon finishing the three years' course there was ordained as an 
evangelist at North Branford, Conn., Oct. 15, 1828. His first pas- 
toral charge was over the 4th Congregational church in Middle- 
town, Conn., (Westfield society), from May 27, 1829, to Oct. 3, 
1838. After serving as stated supply in Columbus, O., in 1839- 
40, he returned to Connecticut and was settled over the Congrega- 
tional Church in Oxford, from Sept. 1, 1841, to July 1, 1860. He 
then retired to Cromwell, Conn., where he resided until his death, 
of dysentery, Aug. 7, 1875, at the age of 78. 

He was married, Oct. 14, 1838, to Almira, daughter of Seth 
Wilcox, of Middletown, by whom he had two daughters. 

1826. 

Edward Waring Parker was bom in Charleston, S. C, April 
13, 1806, and entered college at the beginning of Sophomore year 
from Spartanburgh District, S. C. 

After graduation he studied law in Edgefield, S. C, and was 
admitted to the bar, May 15, 1828, but never practised. He 
spent some years in travel, and in Jan., 1834, married Martha W. 
Williamson, of Fairfield, S. C, and settled in Spartanburgh, 



213 

where he remained until his death, after six months' illness, Dec. 
11, 18*73, in his 58th year. He lived in the country, and devoted 
himself to reading and to the education of his two daughters, 
who died after they were grown up, within five days of each 
other, in the year 1865. His wife survives him. 

Mark Pkatt, son of Hopson and Delia (Skiff) Pratt, was bom 
in Kent, Conn., April 15, 1804. 

After graduation he taught school at home for a few months, 
and was then for a time engaged in business. He finally studied 
medicine, graduating at the Yale Medical School in 1831. For 
the first two years he practiced his profession in Delhi, N. Y., but 
in 1833 settled in Haverstraw, N". Y., where he remained until his 
death, Jan. 23, 1876, in his 72d year. 

In 1838 he was married to Miss Fanny A. Coggswell, of New 
Preston, Conn., who survives him, with tw^o of their four children. 

Thomas Rittee, son of David and Lydia (Bailey) Ritter, of New 
Haven, Conn., was born in this city, April 28, 1806. 

After leaving College he took charge of an academy in Una- 
dilla, N. Y., but returned to New Haven in 1827 and entered the 
Medical School, where he received his diploma in the spring of 
1829. After an interval of further study in New York, he made 
a brief trial of the practice of his profession in Longmeadow, 
Mass., and in Wethersfield, Conn., but returned to New York, 
where he entered upon the retail drug business, continuing also 
his medical practice. He finally gave his whole attention to the 
preparation of medical stores for vessels, and published a medical 
work for the use of ships, of which over 30,000 copies have been 
sold. Dr. Ritter was an active Christian, and the exertions which 
he made in connection with the recent services of Messrs. Moody 
and Sankey in New York contributed to shorten his life. He 
died, after an illness of twelve days, of pneumonia, May 12, 1876, 
at the age of 70. 

In June, 1830, he was married to Miss Delia Maria Ayres, of 
New Canaan, Conn., and had nine children, four of whom, with 
his wife, survive him. 

1827. 

Horace Bushnell, son of Ensign and Dotha (Bishop) Bush- 
nell, was born in Litchfield, Conn., April 14, 1802. At the time 



214 

of his admission to college, his residence was in the parish of New 
Preston, in Washington, Conn. 

On graduating, he went to Norwich, Conn., as principal of the 
Chelsea Grammar School, but in February, 1828, accepted a posi- 
tion in the editorial office of the N. Y. " Journal of Commerce," 
which he held until the close of the year. He then returned to 
New Haven as a law student, but was diverted from the prepara- 
tion for his profession by the offer of a tutorship in college, in 
which office he remained for two years, 1829-31. While then 
looking forward to entrance on the legal profession, his religious 
life received a special impulse, the result of which was that he 
devoted himself to the study of theology in the Divinity School 
of this college, and after two years of preparation was ordained 
over the North Church in Hartford, Conn., May 22, 1833. With 
this church he remained, until the loss of health obliged him to 
resign, Nov. 22, 1859. He was then suffering from consumption, 
which seemed to threaten a speedy decline ; but the strength of 
his constitution so far prevailed that he was spared for nearly 
twenty years more of unofficial residence among his former peo- 
ple. He died in Hartford, Feb. 17, 1876, in the 74th year of his 
age. 

He married Miss Mary Apthorp, of New Haven, who survives 
him w^ith three of their live children. 

His principal publications were : in 1847, " Christian Nurture" ; 
in 1849, "God in Christ"; in 1851, "Christ in Theology"; in 
1858, "Sermons for the New Life," and " Nature and the Super- 
natural" ; in 1 864, " Work and Play," and " Christ and His Salva- 
tion" ; in 1865, "The Vicarious Sacrifice" ; in 1868, "Moral Uses 
of Dark Things"; in 1869, "Woman Suffrage"; in 1872, "Ser- 
mons on Living Subjects" ; and in 1874, "Forgiveness and Law." 
In his repute and influence as an author he was unrivalled among 
the graduates of the college of his generation. The degree of 
Doctor of Divinity was given him by Wesleyan University in 
1842 and by Harvard University in 1852 ; that of Doctor of Laws 
by this college in 1871. v 

1829. 

John Barker Church, eldest son of Philip and Ann Matilda 
Church, was born, Feb. 21, 1808, in Philadelphia, during a win- 
ter's residence of his family in that city, their home being on a 
large landed property in Allegany County, N. Y., near the village 



215 

of Angelica, which was named from his paternal grandmother, 
Angelica Schuyler. 

Mr. Church began his college course in Geneva College, joining 
the Sophomore class at Yale in January, 1827. The first year 
after graduation he spent in the Yale Law School, but then de- 
cided to devote himself to agriculture and the development of his 
property adjoining his father's estate. After a residence of twelve 
years in Allegany County, he removed to New Haven, passing 
five years there, and thence to New York City, where or in the 
vicinity he remained until his death. P^or several years his home 
was on the Hudson river, near Scarborough, where he found the 
greatest pleasure in the improvemen^t of his estate. He enjoyed 
robust health during a long life, but during its last year declined 
rapidly from failure of the digestive organs, and died, in Scar- 
borough, July 23^, \815, in the OSth year of his age. 

In 1831 he married Maria Trumbull, daughter of Professor 
Benjamin Silliman of Yale College, who with seven children sur- 
vives him. 

1830. 

Samuel Worthington Dorset, son of Hon. Thomas B. Dorsey, 
chief Judge of the Court of Appeals of the State of Maryland, 
and of Milcah (Goodwin) Dorsey, was bom in Baltimore in 1811. 

He studied law with John Glenn, Esq., in Baltimore, where he 
was admitted to the bar and engaged in practice for two years, after 
which he removed to Vicksburg, Miss., and there pursued his pro- 
fession for about two years longer. During these last years he 
was also occupied with cotton planting, and he now abandoned 
his profession, and for the rest of his life was extensively engaged 
as a planter in Louisiana. He went to Maryland for a visit in the 
spring of 1875, intending also to be present in New Haven at the 
meeting of his class in June. But the threatened overflow of the 
Mississippi river called him home ; he sank under the exposure to 
which he was subjected, and died, October 18, at his residence 
in Tensas Parish, La. Mr. Dorsey enjoyed the confidence and 
affection of a wide circle of friends for his high character. He 
had been State Senator for several terms, and was a member of 
the State Convention which passed the ordinance of secession in 
1861, though he took no active part in the struggle which followed. 

He was married in 1853 to Miss Sarah A. Ellis, of Natchez, 
Miss., who is still living. Mrs. Dorsey is extensively known in 
the South as an author. 



216 

Lewis Bartholomew Woodruff was bom in Litchfield, Conn., 
June 19, 1809. His father was Gen. Morris Woodruff, a judge of 
the County Court, and his mother a daughter of Lewis Catlin, of 
Harwinton, Conn. 

In the fall of 1830 he entered Judge Gould's Law School at 
Litchfield, and after completing the course there, was admitted to 
practice in April, 1832. From Oct., 1832, till Jan., 1836, he was in 
partnership with Hon. Willis Hall (Y. C. 1 824) in New York 
City. He continued in New York in practice by himself for a 
number of years, and was later associated with Richard Good- 
man, Esq., and with George Wood, Esq. In the fall of 1849 he 
was elected Judge of the City Court of Common Pleas, and held 
the office for six years. He was then chosen a Judge of the Supe- 
rior Court of the city, and at the close of his term of office, re- 
sumed the practice of his profession, Jan. 1, 1862. He remained 
for six years at the bar, in partnership with his elder son and 
with Charles H. Sanford, Esq. (Y. C. 1847.) He was then, in 
Jan., 1868, appointed a Judge of the Court of Appeals of the 
State of New York, which office he held until Dec, 1 869, when 
he was made Judge of the Circuit Court of the U. S., for the sec- 
ond judicial circuit, embracing New York, Connecticut, and Ver- 
mont. This office he held at the time of his death. Both at the 
bar and upon the bench. Judge Woodruff was very highly es- 
teemed and respected. He received the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from Columbia College in 1860. For some years before his death 
he was an elder of the Collegiate Reformed Church. He died at 
his summer residence in Litchfield, Conn., Sept. 10, 1875, from the 
effects of a complicated disorder of the kidneys, which had con- 
tined him to the house since early spring. 

Judge Woodruff married, in Nov., 1835, Harriette B., daughter 
of Chief Justice Joseph C. Hornblower, of Newark, N. J. She 
died April 5, 1868. Their three children survive him, the two 
sons being graduates of this college. 

1831. 

Trusten Polk, son of Wm. N. Polk, of Sussex County, Del., 
was born May 29, 1811. His mother was a sister of Gov. Peter 
F. Causey, of Delaware. 

Returning home after graduation, he began the study of law in 
the office of the Attorney-General of the State, and a year later 
came back to New Haven for a tw^o years' course in the law 



217 

school. In 1835 he removed to St. Louis, Mo., and establishing 
himself there in the practice of his profession rose by his own 
exertions to eminence. He was in 1856 nominated and elected as 
the Democratic candidate for Governor of the State. He held the 
office until elected to the U. S. Senate, which he entered on March 
4, 1857, for a term of six years. On the breaking out of the war 
he cast in his fortunes with the Confederate Government and filled 
various offices of responsibility. In 1864 he was taken prisoner, 
and after his exchange occupied the position of Military Judge of 
the Department of the Mississippi. After the close of the war he 
returned to St. Louis, and devoted himself to the practice of his 
profession, until his sudden death, April 16, 1876, in his 65th year. 
Gov. Polk was married in 1837 to Elizabeth N. Skinner, of St. 
Louis, who survives him with four daughters. Their only son died 
in infancy. 

1835. 

Charles Lewis Hequembourg, a native of New Haven, Conn., 
died at Fort McPherson, Nebraska, Dec. 24, 1875, aged 64 years 
and 5 months. 

He graduated from Auburn (N. Y.) Theological Seminary in 
1838, and preached for a year or more in the Presbyterian Church 
in Fredonia, N. Y. He was ordained and installed over the Pres- 
byterian Church in Dunkirk, N. Y., Oct. 27, 1841, from which 
charge he was dismissed in 1 846. H e subsequently preached in 
Jamestown, N. Y., and in Warren, Pa., and in July, 1870, was 
appointed Chaplain in the U. S. army, and was successively sta- 
tioned at various points in the Territories. In 1874 he was trans- 
ferred to Fort McPherson, where he died. 

His wife, who survives him with three children, was a daughter 
of Dr. Ezra Williams, who emigrated from North ford, Conn., to 
Dunkirk, N. Y. 

George Lewis Mills was born in 1815, in Becket, Mass., where 
his father, Rev. Joseph L. Mills (Union College 1802) was pastor 
of the Congregational Church for over thirty years. 

Aftei* graduation he taught in the academy at Bellport, L. I., 
for nearly tw^o years, and later in New England. In 1840 he went 
to Ohio, and took charge of an academy in Windham, which place 
had been settled by a colony from his father's parish. The 
remainder of his life was devoted to the educational interests of 
14 



218 

his adopted State, where his influence as a teacher and a superin- 
tendent of schools was widely felt. He died after a brief illness, 
of congestion of the lungs, at North Liberty, O., March 2, 1^76. 

He married, in Windham, in 1 842, Mary E. Raymond, who died 
in 1865. Of their three children, one daughter is the only sur- 
vivor. 

1836. 

Edward Lucas Hart, second son of Rev. Lucas and Harriet 
(Morris) Hart, of Wolcott, Conn., was born Dec. 31, 1813, in East 
Haven, Conn., the home of his widowed mother, to which she had 
returned after the death of her husband, two months before. 

Having decided on teaching as a profession, he opened a classical 
school in New Haven, from which he removed to the charge of the 
academy in Berlin, Conn., where he continued until he settled in 
Farmington, Conn., as associate principal with his uncle, Simeon 
Hart, (Y. C. 1823) in a boarding school for boys. He remained 
in Farmington, occupied mainly in teaching, until his death, May 
15, 1876. 

He married, April 26, 1837, Nancy C, daughter of Wm. G. 
Hooker, of New Haven. Of their six children, one son was grad- 
uated at this college in 1872. 

1837. 

William Wilson Selfridge was bom in Kutztown, Pa., March 
18, 1817. After graduation he was for three years in business in 
AUentown, Pa., and after a succession of other business pursuits, 
settled in South Bethlehem, Pa., where he died Sept. 10, 1875, of 
inflammation of the brain, consequent on paralysis of over a year's 
standing. 

He was married, March 1, 1842, to Maria W. Wilson, and had 
four children, of whom two survive him. 

1840. 

George Darwin Lamont was bom in Yates, Orleans county, 
N. Y., Jan. 24, 1819, and entered College at the beginninj^ of the 
Sophomore year from Gaines, in the same county. He left his 
class in April of the Junior year, but received his degree in 1841. 
He studied law with Hon. J. S. Curtenius, of Lockport, N. Y., and 
being admitted to the bar in 1841, began practice in that place. 
The first public office which he held was that of Commissioner of 



219 

public schools in Niagara county, and aftewards in 1850 he was 
elected District Attorney of the county. In 1859 he was elected 
State Senator from the 29th senatorial district, to fill a vacancy, and 
in 1862 was appointed U. S. Attorney for the Provisional Court then 
established in Louisiana, and performed the duties of that position 
until the court was dissolved in the summer of 1865. Returning 
to Lockport, he was elected in the autumn of 1865 County Judge, 
and in 1868, while holding this office, was appointed a Justice of 
the Supreme Court of the State for the 8th Judicial District, to fill 
a vacancy ; in 1871 he was elected to the same position for a full 
term, and died in office, at his residence in Lockport, Jan. 15, 
1876, of disease of the heart. 

He married, in 1842, Mary, daughter of J. Cole, of Chili, N. Y. 
She, with one son and two daughters, survives him. 

1841. 

Ezra Hall Gillett, the second son of Ely H. and Mary (Wil- 
liams) Gillett, was born in Colchester, Conn., July 15, 1823, and 
after thorough preparation at the Bacon Academy in his native 
town entered College at the opening of Junior year. 

After graduation he spent nearly four years in the Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, New York City, for the last year having charge 
of the library. He was ordained and installed pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church in Harlem, N. Y., April 16, 1845, and continued 
in this relation for just 25 years. In the mean time he was 
appointed in 1868 Professor of Political Science in the University 
of the City of New York, and occupied the chair, giving instruc- 
tion also in Moral Science and Ancient History, until his death. 
He continued also to preach almost every Sunday. His publica- 
tions include a translation of Luther's Commentary on Peter 
and Jude (N. Y., 1859) ; Life and Times of Huss (Boston, 1863, 2 
vols.); a History of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S (Phila- 
delphia, 1864, 2 vols.) ; God in Human Thought (N. Y., 1874, 2 
vols.) ; and The Moral System (N. Y., 1874). He was for more than 
20 years before his death a frequent contributor to the religious 
press ; hardly a number of the New York Evangelist for the last 
15 years had failed to contain editorial or review articles from his 
ready pen. His contributions to reviews include several exhaus- 
tive articles which deserve to be counted as separate historical 
monographs. In recognition of his thoroughness and zeal in his 
chosen field of research, church history, the degree of D.D. was 



220 

conferred on him by Hamilton College in 1864. His death, which 
occurred at Harlem, Sept. 2, 1875, after an illness of three weeks, 
was the result of a nervous fever, traceable to overwork. 

He was first married, Oct. 15, 1851, to Maria H. Ripley, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., by whom he had no children. She died March 
28, 1853. June 19, 1 854, he married Mary J. Kendall, of Saratoga 
Springs, who with her two sons survives him. 

Henry Hunter Raymond was bom July 2, 1822, in Charles- 
ton, S. C, and entered College at the beginning of the Sophomore 
year. 

He studied law at home, and afterward in the Harvard Law 
School, graduating there in 1 845. He settled in Charleston as a 
lawyer, and his residence continued there until his death in that 
city. May 31, 1876, in his 54th year. During the late war he was 
a Major in the Confederate service. 

He married, in 1849, Miss Taveau, who died about 1865. One 
of their two children survives her parents. 

1844. 

Myron Barrett, third son of Ezekiel and Rhoda (Dakin) Bar- 
rett, was born in North East, Duchess County, N. Y., Sept. 9, 
1816. 

He taught for four years in Columbus, O., and then studied 
theology for two years in Union Seminary, New York City,. and 
for one year in Princeton, where he graduated in 1851. The ensu- 
ing fall he began preaching in Pontiac, Mich., and after six 
months was invited to supply a pulpit in Detroit, where he con- 
tinued for over a year, while the pastor was abroad. He was 
ordained by the Presbytery of Detroit, March 9, 1852, and in 
June, 1854, became pastor of the Presbyterian Church in New- 
ton, N. J. He resigned his charge five years later on account of 
impaired health, and after briefer terms of pastoral service else- 
where returned to Newton, where he died. May 8, 1876, in his 
60th year. 

He was mariied, April 8, 1856, to Emma E., eldest daughter of 
Hon. David Ryerson, of Newton, by whom he had three children. 
His wife, with one son and one daughter, survives him. 

Orris Sanpord Ferry was born in Bethel, Fairfield county, 
Conn., Aug. 15, 1823, and died at his residence in Norwalk, in the 
same county, Nov. 21,1 875, aged 52 years. 



221 

He studied law and was admitted to the bar in August, 1846, 
and settled in Norwalk, where he married in May of the following 
year, Charlotte E., daughter of Governor Clark Bissell (Y. C. 
1806). He retained his connection with the Norwalk bar until 
his death. In 1849 he was appointed Judge of Probate, and in 
1855 and 1856 served in the State Senate. In 1856 he was made 
District Attorney for Fairfield county, and held this ofl&ce until 
his election to Congress in 1 85 y. After one term's service as Repre- 
sentative he was renominated, but was defeated, and in July, 1861, 
was commissioned as Colonel of the 5th Regiment of Conn. Vol- 
unteers, and served through the war. He was promoted to the 
rank of Brigadier General, in April, 1862. In May, 1866, he was 
elected to the U. S. Senate, and was re-elected in May, 1872. He 
was prostrated by spinal disease in 1868, and for the rest of his 
life was an invalid. For a few weeks before his death he had 
been under medical treatment in Brooklyn, N. Y., and reached 
home in a very feeble condition on Saturday, Nov. 20. The next 
morning a severe attack of hemorrhage of the bowels supervened, 
from which death in a few hours relieved him. His wife and only 
daughter survive him. 

Senator Ferry was recognized as a brilliant debater, conscien- 
tious and independent in his public career," and gifted with abili- 
ties which ranked him among the leaders of the Senatorial 
Chamber. 

Nathaniel William Taylor, son of Rev. Nathaniel W. Tay- 
lor, D.D. (Y. C. 1807), Professor of Didactic Theology in Yale 
College, and l^ebecca (M. Hine) Taylor, was born in New Haven, 
Conn., July 27, 1823. 

He graduated from the Medical Department of this college in 
January, 1846, and then became a resident physician in Bellevue 
Hospital, New York city. In March, 1 847, he returned to New 
Haven, and continued there in the practice of his profession until 
the summer of 1851. The next two years were spent in a voyage 
to the Southern Indian Ocean for the benefit of his health. From 
June, 1853, until March, 1855, he practiced his profession in 
Springfield, Mass. After a trip to England he then returned to 
New Haven, and in July, 1857, his health continuing feeble, he 
sailed again for the Southern Indian Ocean, and was absent until 
April, 1859. During the next two years he was occupied with 
farming in West Hartford and Bloomfield, Conn., and in March. 



222 

1861, removed to Blandford, Mass., and resumed practice. In 
August, 1862, he enlisted in the 27th Mass. Regiment, and con- 
tinued in active service (mainly employed in hospital duty) until 
October, 1864, when he was discharged. He returned to Bloom- 
field, Conn., where he remained, engaged in farming, with the 
exception of another Indian voyage in 1866-67, until his death. 
He was married July 7, 1865, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of 
Benoni Hubbard, of Bloomfield, who survives him without chil- 
dren. He died in Bloomfield after a lingering illness, August 8, 
1875, aged 52 years. 

1846. 

Thomas DuBois Sheewood, son of Samuel and Ruth (DuBois) 
Sherwood, was born in Fishkill, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1823. 

Immediately upon graduation he began the study of law in New 
York city in the office of his brother, John D. Sherwood (Y. C. 
1839), with whom soon after his admission to the bar (in 1853) he 
entered into partnership. He continued in this partnership, doing 
a successful and lucrative business, until 1865, when the firm was 
dissolved by the retirement of his brother, on account of ill health. 
He continued in practice by himself, until appointed, in October, 
1873, one of the Police Justices of the city, under the new act of 
the Legislature removing those offices from political control. In 
this position he continued, performing its duties with remarkable 
uprightness and impartiality, until his sudden death, after an 
illness of a few hours, in New York city. May 26, 1875, in his 62d 
year. 

Judge Sherwood was married, Jan. 25, 1849, to Mary, youngest 
daughter of Judge Samuel J. Hitchcock (Y. C. 1809), of the Yale 
Law School, who died in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 13, 1852, leaving 
one son. In May, 1858, he married Fanny A., daughter of J. S. 
Fitch, Esq., of Marshall, Mich. She died in New York city, Aug. 
9, 1868, leaving one daughter. 

Abijah Hull Thompson was born Dec. 14, 1825, and entered 
College from Black Rock, N. Y., at the close of Freshman year. 

His life was spent in business pursuits. He died after a very 
brief illness, of erysipelas, at his residence in his native place, 
June 19, 1876, in his 51st year. 

He married Miss Bird, daughter of the President of the Niag- 
ara Falls Railroad Company, and had seven children. 



228 



1847. 



BENjAMif^ Franklin Bassett, son of John Bassett, was born 
in Derby, Conn., Jan. 23, 1825. While he was yet young, his 
family removed to New Haven, and he entered college with the 
class of 1846, but on account of ill health joined the next class. 

He studied medicine in New Haven and New York city, and 
received the degree of M. D. from this college in 1851. He prac- 
ticed his profession in Brooklyn, N. Y., until May, 1868, when 
owing to a failure of health, from the effects of a partial sun- 
stroke, he removed to Wilton, Conn., where he occupied himself 
with agriculture, in the hope of regaining his full strength. Con- 
tinuing feeble, he removed to New Haven in 1 874, and while on a 
visit in Warren, Conn., died of billions dysentery, Sept. 4, 1875, 
aged 50 years. 

He was married, Oct. 8, 1864, to Mrs. Mary L. Howe, the widow 
of Lewis Howe (Y. C. 1852), of Greenwich, Conn., who with two 
of their three children survives him. 

Stukely Ellsworth, eldest son of Dr. Waterman Ellsworth, 
was born Dec. 18, 1826, and entered college from Stockton, Chau- 
tauqua County, N. Y. After teaching for a while, he studied law, 
and after practicing in Stockton, removed in April, 1855, to 
Eugene City, Oregon, where he continued in professional life until 
near the close of his career. He died in LaGrande, Oregon, Jan. 
28, 1876, at the age of 49. 

He married, in July, 1856, Mary C. Stevens, from Cold Water, 
Mich., and had five children. 

1849. 

RiTPus Austin Foiid was born in Natchez, Mpi., Feb. 27, 1827, 
and entered college at the beginning of Junior year. 

After graduating he studied medicine for a year at home, and 
for two years in the Medical Department of the University at 
Louisville, Ky., where he graduated in March, 1852. During 
most of the time until 1858 he practiced his profession in Wilkin- 
son County, Mpi., and was then occupied as a planter in the same 
county until the year 1862, when he was obliged to enter the 
Confederate Cavalry service. He served later as surgeon in the 
army, and after the w^ar was over returned to his plantation. In 
1868 he established himself as a physician in Kansas City, Mo., 
where he continued until his death, July 6, 1875, aged 48 years. 
His death was attributed to the excessive use of tobacco. 



224 

Dr. Ford was married, in June, 1854, to Miss Sarah B. Petti- 
bone, of Wilkinson County, Mpi., by whom he had seven children. 

James Browning Miles, son of Willard M. and Alice 
(Browning) Miles, was bom in Rutland, Mass., Aug. 18, 1823. 

He spent a year in teaching in North Fairfield, Conn., and then 
entered the Yale Divinity school. He subsequently removed to 
Andover Theol. Seminary, but on receiving the appointment of 
Tutor in this college, returned to fill that position in Sept., 1852. 
He left the tutorship in July, 1854, having in the meantime con- 
tinued his theological studies, and was ordained pastor of the Ist 
Congregational Church in Charlestown, Mass., Jan. 2, 1855. He 
remained with this church until Oct., 1871, when he resigned and 
removed to Boston, to accept the Secretaryship of the American 
Peace Society. He threw himself into the work of reorganizing 
this society with great vigor, and effected a cooperation between 
its friends and those who were devoting themselves (largely under 
his guidance) to the reform and codification of the law of nations. 
In the pursuit of these objects he twice visited Europe to take 
part in the Congresses of the International Code Association — for 
the last time in July, 1875. The labor of this last Congress proved 
too much for his strength, and on his way home he was attacked 
with illness. With difficulty he reached his brother's house in 
Worcester, Mass., where he died, of peritonitis, on the 13th day 
of November, aged 52. The degree of Doctor of Divinity was 
conferred on him by Beloit College in 1873. 

He was married, Aug. 7, 1856, to Miss Julia E., daughter of 
Rev. Joseph Hurlbut (Y. C. 1818), of New London, Conn. She 
survives him, with two of their three children. 

Walker Richardson, son of Dr. Wm. N. Richardson, was 
born in Elbert County, Ga., in 1825. 

He was a planter in Glennville, Ala., from the date of gradua- 
tion until his sudden death from apoplexy, Jan. 20, 1875. He 
served in the Confederate army of Tennessee from Aug. 1, 1 863, 
to May, 1865. 

1853. 

Timothy Dwight Hall, third son of Daniel and Philena 
(Lyman) Hall, was born in Perry, N. Y., Sept. 3, 1830, and 
entered college at the beginning of Sophomore year. 



225 

After graduation he taught a school and studied law in Adams 
county, Mpi., and in 1855 settled in Hudson, Wise, as an attorney 
and dealer in real estate. Owing to poor health he abandoned 
his profession in 1859, and in the spring of 1861 retired to his 
farm a few miles out of town, and devoted himself to scientific 
farming. Although remaining an invalid, there was no cause for 
special alai-rn until a severe attack of congestion of the liver in 
March, 1874. Recovering from this by main force of will, he 
made two journeys to Colorado with hopes of improvement, and 
purposed to remove thither with his family ; but the rapid pro- 
gress of consumption ended his life, in Hudson, Oct. 19, 1875, at 
the age of 45. 

He was married, July 22, 1856, to Helen M., daughter of Col. 
Alvah Jefferson, of Darien, N. Y. She survives him with two 
daughters. 

1857. 

George Augustus Nolen was born in Sutton, Mass., Jan. 9, 
1831. He remained in New Haven as a graduate student, until 
he accepted a tutorship in the College in the summer of 1860. He 
resigned this office in July, 1865, when he was appointed Assist- 
ant Examiner in the U. S. Patent OflSce. He entered on his duties 
in Jan. 1866, and at the time of his death held the position of 
Examiner-in-chief, having been appointed to that rank by Presi- 
dent Grant in April, 1875. A few weeks after this appointment he 
was attacked with consumption, which first manifested itself by a 
violent hemorrhage of the lungs, on the 13th of May. He failed 
steadily and rapidly, and died in Washington, Aug. 17. His 
wife, who had been struggling for three years with the same dis- 
ease, survived him but a few hours. They left one son. In ability, 
integrity and courtesy, no one in the Patent Office was his superior. 

• 

Edwin Francis Sandys, son of Rev. Edwin and Mary Sandys, 
was born at Lebanon Springs, N. Y., March 12, 1832. In 1847 
his parents removed to Pittsfield, Mass., which was his home for 
the remainder of his life. 

He read law in Pittsfield with Judge Colt, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1860. He did not follow his profession for any length 
of time, but was for many years the Secretary of the Berkshire 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company. After resigning this position, 
he continued to the close of his life in business as a general insur- 



226 

ance agent, so far as his health, which had long been poor, would 
permit. He died in Pittsfield, July 30, 18V5, aged 43 years. He 
was unmarried. 

1858. 

Edward Clarke Porter, eldest child of James B. and Susanna 
(Parsons) Porter, was born in Old Hadley, Mass., Dec. 3, 1836. 

For the first year after graduation, he studied in the Andover 
Theological Seminary, and in the next year taught a parish school 
in Louisville, Ky. In 1861 he taught in Iowa City, Iowa, and 
later in Chicago. From July, 186-', he was instructor in meta- 
physics and English literature in the Chicago High School. In 
March, 1866, he was ordained by Bishop Clarkson, in Racine, 
Wise, a Deacon in the Protestant Episcopal Church, and resign- 
ing next month his place as teacher, took charge of the parish of 
St. James in Chicago. On Sept. 23, he was ordained a Presbyter, 
by Bishop Lee, of Iowa, and in April, 1867, became rector of St. 
Luke's Church, in Racine, in which office he continued until com- 
pelled by ill-health to resign, Feb. 1, 1875. In 1873 he went 
abroad and spent nearly a year, in the hope of recovering his 
health, but on his return found himself not materially benefitted, 
and after a long and very painful illness died in Racine, Jan. 8, 
1876, leaving record of a singularly pure and winning ministry. 

He was married, Oct. 10, 1866, to Julia, daugher of John H. 
Foster, of Chicago. She survives him, with children. 

1861. 

Hubbard Arnold, son of Joseph and Clarinda (Hubbard) 
Arnold, was born Jan. 5, 1 840, in Westfield, Mass. 

The first year after graduation he spent in travel and study in 
Europe. From Dec, 1862, to Sept., 1865, he was engaged in 
teaching and in studying law, most of the time in New Haven. 
He was admitted to the bar in this city, May 10, 1865, but never 
practiced. During the remainder of his life he was in business in 
New York City, and was for some time before his death a member 
of the firm of D. Watts & Co., cotton-brokers. He had been in 
delicate health for some years, and late in the past winter went to 
Palatka, Fla., to seek relief from a serious inflammation of the 
throat. Not improving, he afterwards removed to Aiken, S. C, 
and thence to Charlotte, N. C, arriving there early in April. The 
disease (consumption of the throat) progressed with great rapid- 



II 227 

ity, and he died on the 9lh of April, aged 36 years. He was 
unmarried. 
George Clap Perkins, son of Henry A. and Sarah (Emmons) 
Perkins, of Hartford, Conn., was born in that city, Aug. 8, 1839. 
He was a descendant in the fourth generation from Rev. Thomas 
Clap, President of the college from 1739 to 1V66. 
After graduation he continued to reside in Hartford, during the 
first year studying law, and then entering the banking-house of 
George P. Bissell & Co., in which his elder brother, Edward H. 
Perkins (for a time a member of the class of 1859), was a partner. 
Here he remained until July, 1869, when he purchased a large 
interest in certain patents for making matresses from woven wire, 
and became the secretary and treasurer of a joint-stock company, 
organized to prosecute this enterprise. The remainder of his life 
was spent in developing the business of this company and devising 
improvements in their processes of manufacture, in which he met 
with great success. 

He was married, Oct. 23, 18*73, to Mary, daughter of George 
Roberts, of Hartford, who survives him with one son (born after 
his decease) and one daughter. He died after a brief illness, in 
Hartford, Sept. 23, 1875, aged 36 years. 

1862. 

Robert Kelley Weeks, eldest son of Edward C. and Emily 
(Stephens) Weeks, was born in New York City, September 21st, 
1840. 

After graduating he became a member of the Columbia Law 
School, where, at the conclusion of the course, in May, 1864, he 
received the degree of LL.B. In the same month he was admitted 
to the Bar of New York. 

His tastes led in the direction of litei-ature, and turning from the 
practice of la-vy, he devoted himself to reading and study. 

In 1866 a small volume appeared, entitled, " Poems, by Robert 
K. Weeks," and in 1870 a volume entitled, "Episodes and Lyric 
Pieces," both published by Leypoldt & Holt. A third volume of 
poems was in press at the time of his death. He also prepared for 
publication a book of Extracts from English literature, and made 
occasional poetical and critical contributions to the periodicals of 
the day. 

He died at Harlem, unmarried, of consumption, on April 13th, 
1876, in the 36th year of his age. 



228 



1863. 



Cornelius Wade Bull, son of Jabez B. and Mary (Ford) Bull, 
was born April 8, 1839, in Tallahassee, Fla. 

After graduation he began the study of medicine in the Yale 
Medical School, and in the following spring joined the U. S. Navy 
as acting assistant paymaster, and was assigned to the Mississippi 
squadron. He remained in this service until August, 1865, when 
he returned to New Haven, and completed his medical course, 
graduating in January, 1867. He was resident physician at the 
State Hospital in this city until April, 1868, when lie established 
himself as a practicing physician in Terryville, Conn. Some five 
years later he gave up practice, on account of the state of his 
health, and removed to Hartford, where he was employed as sten- 
ographic clerk for the Hartford Fire Insurance Company. He died 
in Hartford, May 19, 1876, at the age of 37. 

1864. 

Robert Matlack Browning, son of Hon. Abraham Browning, 
was born in Camden, N. J., June 5, 1844. 

He studied law in his father's ofiice in Camden, and was admit- 
ted to practice in the November term of 1867. From this date he 
was actively engaged in his profession in his native place, until 
May, 1874, when a severe attack of inflammatory rheumatism dis- 
abled him for four months. This was succeeded by other inroads 
of disease which prevented his again attending to business. He 
died, of organic disease of the heart, March 8, 1875, at his home in 
Camden, in his 3 1 st year. He was unmarried. 

1865. 

John Sharp, only son of Jacob and Mary Sharp, was born in 
Cherry Valley, N. Y., Dec. 4, 1844. 

He graduated as Doctor of Medicine from the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, and immediately in Jan., 1868,«entered on the 
practice of his profession in Ottawa, 111. He remained there two 
years, when his health began to decline, and he returned to -his home 
in Cherry Valley, where he engaged in the drug business. After 
three years in this employment, his lungs showed signs of weak 
ness, and he attempted to ward off disease by a change of climate. 
He spent the winter of 1873-4 in California, and the succeeding 
wiuter in Florida. In the fall of 1875 he again left home, and 
arrived in Charleston, S. C, the last of November, and there grad- 



229 



Iually grew weaker until the evening of Dec. 23, when he quietly 
passed away. 
Walter Buchanan Smith, son of Isaac R. and Caroline E. 
Smith, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 29, 1844. 
Shortly after his graduation he began the study of analytical 
chemistry; but never possessing a strong constitution, his lungs 
I were seriously affected by the fumes of his laboratory, and he 
became the victim of a lingering consumption, so that he could 
only pursue as a pastime what he had hoped to engage in as an 
active profession. He died at his home in Philadelphia, Oct. 3, 
1875, at the age of 3 1. Pie was unmarried. 

1866. 

Henry Roberts, son of Samuel Roberts, was born in Sharon, 
Conn., Jan. 20, 1845. > 

He entered this College at the beginning of the Junior year, 
having spent the Freshman year in Amherst College, and a sec- 
ond year in private study. After graduation he was for a few 
months in the Columbia College Law School, and for two years 
was employed as a surveyor and as a teacher in Illinois and Iowa. 
He afterwards resumed the study of law, and entered on the prac- 
tice in Middletown, N. Y., where he died, Aug. 28, 1873, aged 28 
years. 

He was married, in Albany, Dec. 30, 1869, to Mary Blackledge, 
and left one daughter. 

Ernest Schroeder was born in the city of New York, Aug. 4, 
1845 

After graduation, he was occupied as a teacher at St. Clement's 
Hall, EUicott City, Md., until within a year of his death. He hoped 
to enter the ministry of the Episcopal Church, and had begun the 
study of theology. He died of consumption at his family resi- 
dence in Red Bank, N. J., Sept. 24, 1874, aged 29 years. He was 
unmarried. 

1867. 

Alexander Johnston, elder son of Frank Johnston (Y. C. 1835) 
and Mary E. Johnston, was born in Alleghany City, Pa., Oct. 21, 
1843. 

He entered with the class of 1866, and at the end of the first 



230 

year left college, to return a year later to the class of 1867. He 
graduated at the Yale Divinity School in 1871, having lost one 
year from ill health. He then spent a year in charge of the Con- 
gregational Church in Quindaro, Kansas, and in the fall of 1872 
removed to Oberlin, Ohio, where he studied for the following year 
in the Theological Seminary. In May, 1873, he sailed for Europe, 
and devoted himself for two years to the study of logic and meta- 
physics in Berlin, hoping to spend his future life in studying and 
teaching these branches. He returned to America in the summer 
of 1875, and in November settled in Boston for the winter. But 
his health broke down in February from overwork, and he was 
removed to the McLean Asylum in Somerville, for what was 
believed to be only a temporary loss of mental power. While 
there he was attacked, in April, with diphtheria, which terminated 
fatally on the 5th of May. He was not married. 

1868. 

Herbekt Boardman, son of Hon. Truman Boardman, formerly 
State Senator of New York, died suddenly in Rochester, N. Y., 
July 4, 1875, in his 30th year. 

He was born in Covert, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1845, and entered col- 
lege from Trumansburg, N. Y., where his father still resides. 
After graduation he spent some time in fruit-farming at home, and 
was later a teacher in the Ithaca Academy. He then went to 
Washington, D. C, and studied in the Medical Department of 
Georgetown College, graduating in March, 1872. He also held a 
clerkship in the General Land Office, and remained in Washington 
till Nov., 1873, when he established himself in Rochester for the 
practice of his profession. He died in the faithful discharge of his 
duty, having contracted malignant diphtheria from a patient whom 
he was attending the week before his death. 

He was married, June 18, 1874, to Miss U. Louise Cole, of Covert, 
who survives him. 

Timothy Pitkin Chapman, the second son of Timothy P. and 
Rachel (Hartwell) Chapman, was born in New Haven, Conn., June 
24, 1848. 

He graduated at the Columbia College Law School in May, 
1870, and after an eighteen months' tour in Europe, entered the 
law office of Seward, Griswold, Blatchford & Da Costa, in New 
York City, in the spring of 1 872, — at first as a student and later 



231 

as honorary chief clerk. In the spring of 1874 he became junior 
member of the finn, and this position he held at the time of his 
death, which occurred at his residence in Brooklyn, N. Y., after a 
brief illness, Sept. 13, 1875. 

He was married, Nov. 25, 1 873, to Leila Trescott Tisdale, of 
Brooklyn, who with an infant daughter survives him. 

William Curtis Wood, son of Rev. William Wood (Dartmouth 
College, 1842) and Lucy Maria (Lawrence) Wood, was born April 
20, 1849, at Mahabaleshwar, a health-resort about thirty miles from 
Satara, India, where his parents were then stationed as mission- 
aries of the American Board. 

He was prepared for college at the Law^rence Academy, in his 
mother's native town, Groton, Mass., and graduated with eminent 
distinction. For the year 1868-9 he taught in the Hopkins 
Grammar School of New Haven. From Sept., 1869, to April, 

1870, he was a tutor in this college, but resigned his position on 
account of apprehended disease of the heart. He remained in 
New Haven until his death, with the exception of one year (May 

1871, to April, 1872) spent in Ohio. During this time he was 
employed in private teaching and in mathematical study, and was 
looking forward to the profession of a civil engineer or to the 
chance of a position in the U. S. Patent Office. His death, which 
occurred in New Haven, July 15, 1875, was the sudden and unex- 
pected result of long-continued ill-health and mental depression. 
He was unmarried. 

1869. 

Grin Merwin Williams, the youngest of ten children of the 
late Seth Williams, of Ledyard, Conn., was born in Ledyard, Nov. 
17, 1845, and died in Winona, Minn., March 26, 1875, aged 29 
years. 

During his college course he was quite an invalid from rheuma- 
tism, and when able to settle in professional life chose the climate 
of Minnesota as most favorable to his state of health. He began 
the study of law with Hon. Thomas Wilson of Winona, in Feb- 
ruary, 1871. He was admitted to the bar in April, 1872, and 
remained in the office of Judge Wilson until Jan. 1, 1874, when he 
formed a partnership with A. Harry Bissell, formerly of the same 
class in College. At the close of the year, Mr. Bissell withdrew, 
Mr. Williams continuing in successful practice by himself. From 
Jan. 1875, until his death, he was city attorney. An occasional 



232 

recurrence of his old complaint, rheumatism of the heart, kept 
him in delicate health ; and at the time of his very sudden death 
he was apparently recovering from an attack which had confined 
him to his room for about three weeks. He was unmarried. 

1872. 

Frank Whitney Blake, only surviving child of Eli Whitney 
Blake, M.D. (Y. C, 1839) and Frances T. (Babcock) Blake, was 
born in Boston, Mass., Sept. 16, 1850. 

He was fitted for college in the Boston Latin School and in the 
Hopkms Grammar School, of New Haven ; and won a good posi- 
tion in his class, notwithstanding the fact that during his college 
course and for some time previous he was entirely unable to use 
his eyes for reading or studying. The year after graduating he 
spent at the Berkeley Divinitj^ School in Middletown, Conn., but 
the condition of his health and especially a difficulty with the 
throat made a change of climate necessary. Accordingly he fin- 
ished his theological studies in the Divinity School at Faribault, 
Minn., where he was ordained to the diaconate by Bishop Whip- 
ple, June 20, 1875. During all this period, however, his nervous 
system had been gradually prostrated under the effects of close 
study, rendered especially trying by the inability to use his eyes. 
A few weeks after his ordination he went to Colorado, in hope of 
being benefitted by that climate, and during the summer and fall 
officiated regularly, most of the time at Idaho Springs. But while 
he was still in feeble health an attack of typhoid fever ended his 
life, at Denver, Nov. 11, 1875. 

1875. 

Fkank Lansing Grinnell, son of George B. and Helen Lan- 
sing Grinnell, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., May 27, 1853, and 
was prepared for college by a private tutor in New York City, 
where his father then resided. 

He graduated in June, 1875, and was spending the summer at 
his father's house in Milford, Conn., when on Tuesday, September 
7, he went to Bridgeport, by invitation, to play as a substitute in 
the Milford Base Ball Club, of which, however, he was not a mem- 
ber. Before the game had begun, while the players were prac- 
ticing in the field, he was struck at the base of the skull by a ball. 
He was taken to the residence of Hon. William D. Bishop, where 
he died on Saturday evening, Sept. 11, having been conscious only 
during a brief portion of the intervening time. 



233 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1847. 

Isaac Shafer Hunt, son of Thomas and Rebecca (Turner) 
Hunt, was born in Newton, Sussex county, N. J., Nov. 1, 1819. 
His early education was acquired in Newton, and after receiving 
his medical degree he returned to his native county, establishing 
himself in Sandyston township. A malignant form of typhoid fever, 
styled " Finch fever," was then raging in the vicinity, and after 
some weeks of arduous professional labor he contracted the dis- 
ease, and only recovered after a serious and prolonged illness. On 
regaining health he secured an extensive practice in Northern 
New Jersey, which he held for eighteen years, when he removed 
to Port Jervis, N. Y., fourteen miles north of his former residence. 
In his new field of practice he maintained himself with eminent 
success, until October 23, 1875, when he was attacked with phle- 
bitis, or inflammation of the veins of the lower limbs, which ter- 
minated fatally on the 23d of November. 

Dr. Hunt married, Nov. 1, 1848, Miss Sarah A. Fleming, of 
Sandyston, who with two sons and three daughters survives him. 

SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1873. 

Benjamin Pomeroy, son of Mary J. and the late Benjamin 
Pomeroy, died at his mother's house in Southport, Conn., Dec. 15, 
1875, aged 23 years. His death was caused by a sudden congestion 
of the lungs, resulting from exposure to the night air. 

He was at the time of his death the cashier of the Arctic Fur 

Company of New Haven. 

• 

THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1874. 

James William Morris, the first student of African descent 
who was ever graduated from the Theological School, was born 
in Providence, R. I., Oct. 30, 1847. He graduated at Lincoln Uni- 
versity in 1871, and after his graduation here engaged in preaching 
and teaching in Beaufort and Aiken, S. C. He died in the latter 
place, of consumption, Feb. 7, 1876, aged 28 years. 
15 



234 

William Burke Danforth was born in Barnard, Vt., Feb. 
21, 1849, and entered this Divinity School on his graduation from 
Dartmouth College in 1871. 

He went from the Seminary to Gilead, a parish of Hebron, 
Conn., w^here he was ordained over the Congregational Church, 
July 8, 1874. His faithful labors here were terminated by a 
tedious illness resulting in his death, July 4, 1875, aged 26. 

1875. 

George Harris, son of Joseph C. and Harriet H. Harris, was 
born in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Sept. 17, 1849. 

He lost his sight in early childhood, and was thenceforth totally 
blind. He was a pupil in the Perkins Institution for the blind 
in South Boston, Mass., for seven years, and having determined 
to enter the ministry, completed honorably the regular course in 
the Divinity School of Harvard University, where he graduated 
in 1874. He then entered the Senior class in this Divinity School, 
and after graduating purposed to remain another year in advanced 
theological study. But he was attacked with typhoid fever, and 
after three weeks' illness died in New Haven, Nov. 8, 1875, at 
the age of 26. In his attainments and his powers of impressing 
himself upon others, he was already a remarkable instance of the 
possibilities open to one of his peculiar infirmities. 



SUMMARY. 



Academical Department. 



Class. Name and Age. 

1808 John Chandler, 91, 

1809 John P. Rice, 89, 
1812 Solymann Brown, 85, 

1814 Joseph H. DuUes. 81, 

1815 Wm. B. Sprague, 80, 

1816 ^ Isaac Bird, 83, 

1817 Xehemiah Brown, 84, 
Baxter Dickinson, 80, 

1818 Oliver Bronson, 75, 

1819 Jonathan Edwards, 77, 
1821 George E. Adams, 74, 

" Isaac Esty. 79, 

1823 David Buck, 69, 

" Samuel H. Riddel. 76, 

1824 James Lowrey, 73, 

1825 Stephen Topliff, 78, 

1826 Edward W. Parker, 67, 
" Mark Pratt, 71, 

" Thomas Ritter, 70, 

1827 Horace Bushnell, 73, 

1829 John B. Church, 67. 

1830 Samuel AV. Dorsey,' 

" Lewis B. Woodruff, 66, 

1831 Trusten Polk, 64, 

1835 Charles L. Hequembourg, 64, 
" George L. Mills, 61, 

1836 Edward L. Hart, 62, 

1837 Wm. W. Selfridge, 58, 

1840 George D. Lamont. 57, 

1841 Ezra H. Gillett, 52, 

" Henry H. Raymond, 54, 

1844 Myron Barrett, 59, 

" Orris S. Ferry, 52, 

" Nathaniel W. Taylor, 52, 

1846 Thomas D. Sherwood, 51, 
" Abijah H. Thompson, 50. 

1847 Benj. F. Bassett, 50, 

" Stukely Ellsworth, 49, 

1849 Rufus A. Ford, 48, 

" James B. Miles, 52, 

" Walker Richardson, 49, 

1853 T. Dwight Hall, 45, 

1857 Georke A. Nolen, 44, 
" Edwin F. Sandys, 43, 

1858 Edward C. Porter, 39, 

1861 Hubbard Arnold, 36, 

" George C. Perkins, 36, 

1862 Robert K. Weeks, 35, 

1863 Cornelius W. Bull, 37, 

1864 Robert M. Browning, 30, 



Place and 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Princeton, Mass., 
Dodge Center, Minn., 
Philadelphia. Pa., 
Flushing, N. Y., 
Great Barrington, Mass., 
New York City, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Richfield Springs, N. Y., 
New Haven. Conn., 
Orange, N. J.. 
Amherst, Mass., 
Marblehead, Mass., 
Des Moines, Iowa, 
Burhngton, N. J., 
Cromwell, Conn., 
Spartanburgh, S. C, 
Haverstraw. N. Y., 
New York City, 
Hartford, Conn., 
Scarborough, N. Y., 
Tensas Parish, La., 
Litchfield, Conn., 
St. Louis, Mo., 
Fort McPherson, Neb., 
North Liberty, 0., 
Farraington, Conn., 
Bethlehem, Pa., 
Lockport, N. Y., 
Harlem, N. Y. City, 
Charleston, S. C, 
Newton, N. J., 
Norwalk, Conn., 
Bloomfield, Conn., 
New York City, 
Black Rock, N. Y., 
Warren, Conn., 
La Grande, Oregon, 
Kansas City, Mo., 
Worcester, Mass., 
Glenville, Ala., 
Hudson, Wise, 
Washington, D. C, 
Pittsfield, Mass., 
Racine, Wise, 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Hartford, Conn., 
Harlem, N. Y. City, 
Hartford, Conn.. 
Camden, N. J., 



Time of Death. 
Dec. 1, '75. 
Sept. 20, '75. 
Feb. 13, '76. 
March 12, '76. 
May 7, '76. 
June 13, '76. 
Jan. 5, '76. 
Dec. 5, '75. 
July 21, '75. 
Aug. 23, '75. 
Dec. 25, '75. 
July 31, '75. 
Aug. 15, '75. 
June 1, '76. 
Nov. 30, '75. 
Aug. 7, '75. 
Dec. 1 1, '73. 
Jan. 23, '76. 
May 12, '76. 
Feb. 17, '76. 
July 23, '75. 
Oct. 18, '75. 
Sept. 10, '75. 
April 16, '76. 
Dec. 24, '75. 
March 2, '76. 
May 15, '76. 
Sept. 10, '75. 
Jan. 15, '76. 
Sept. 2, '75. 
May 31, '76. 
May 8, '76. 
Nov. 21, '75. 
Aug. 8, '75. 
May 25, '75. 
June 19, '76. 
Sep. 4, '75. 
Jan. 28, '76. 
July 6, '75. 
Nov. 13, '75. 
Jan. 20, '75. 
Oct. 19. '75. 
Aug. 17, '75. 
July 30, '75. 
Jan. 8. '76. 
April 9, '76. 
Sept. 23, '75. 
April 13, '76 
May 19, '76. 
March 8, '75. 



236 



Class. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


1865 


John Sharp, 31, 


Charleston, S. C, 


(( 


Walter B. Smith, 31, 


Philadelphia, Pa., 


1866 


Henry Roberts, 28, 


Middletown, N. Y., 


(( 


Ernest Schroeder, 29, 


Red Bank, N. J., 


1867 


Alexander Johnston, 31, 


Somerville, Mass., 


1868 


Herbert Boardman, 


Rochester, N. Y., 


u 


Timothy P. Chapman, 27, 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


t( 


William C. Wood, 26, 


New Haven, Conn., 


1869 


Orin M. WilHams, 29, 


Winona, Minn., 


1872 


Frank W. Blake, 25, 


Denver, Col., 


1875 


Frank L. Grinnell, 22, 


Bridgeport, Conn., 



Time of Death. 
Dec. 23, 75. 
Oct. 3, '75. 
Aug. 28, '73. 
Sept. 24, '74. 
May 5, '76. 
July 4, '75. 
Sept. 13, '75. 
July 15, '75. 
March 26, '76. 
Nov. 11, '75. 
Sept. 11, '75. 



1847 Isaac S. Hunt, 56, 



Medical Department. 

Port Jervis, N. Y. 



Nov. 23 '76. 



Sheffield Scientific School. 
1873 Benj. Pomeroy, 23, Southport, Conn., 



Dec. 15, '75. 



Theolo&ical Department. 



1874 William B. Danforth, 26, 
" James W. Morris, 28, 

1875 George Harris, 26, 



Gilead, Conn., 
Aiken, S. C, 
New Haven, Conn., 



July 4, '75. 
Feb. 7, '76. 
Nov. 8, '75. 



The number of deaths reported is 66, and the average age of the graduates of 
the Academical Department is 55^ years. 

Of the Academical Graduates, 16 were clergymen, 14 lawyers, 10 physicians, 
8 in business, and 6 teachers. 

The deaths are distributed as follows: — in New York, 17; Connecticut, 15; 
Massachusetts, 7 ; New Jersey, 5 ; South Carolina, 4 ; Pennsylvania, 3 ; Minnesota, 
Missouri, and Wisconsin, 2 each ; and the remaining 9 in as many different states. 



The only surviving graduate of the last century is (class of 1800) Rev. Thomas 
Williams, Providence, R. I., born Nov. 5, 1779. 




OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLE^ 



Deceased during the Academical Year ending in June, 1877, 

including the record of a few who died a short 

time previous, hitherto unreported. 

[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF TBE ALUMNI, JUNE 27th, 18T7.] 
[No. 1 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 36 of the whole Record.] 



1x 



OBITUARY RECORD 



GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending June, 1877, iiiclud- 

ing the record of a few who died previously, 

hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting op the Alumni, June 27, 1817.] 
[No. 7 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 36 of the whole Record.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1800. 

Thomas Williams was born in Pomfret, Conn., Nov. 5, 1779, 
the son of Joseph and Lucy (Witter) Williams. 

He entered the Freshman Class of Williams Collei^e in the fall 
of 1795, and continued there until March, 1798. In the succeed- 
ing fall he entered the Junior Class of this College. 

Before graduation he had begun to teach, and after successive 
engagements in Beverly, Mass., and in Woodstocl^ and Norwich, 
Conn., he opened in the spring of 1803 in Boston a school for 
colored pupils. While thus employed he was licensed to preach. 
May 17, 1803, by the Windham County Association, in order that 
he might officiate as chaplain in the almshouse in Boston, in con- 
nection with his o>ther duties. Late in the same year he gave up 
his school, and served for some weeks as a missionary preacher in 
New York State. On his return, and after spending six weeks 
with Rev. Dr. Emmons, of Franklin, Mass. (his entire course of 
theological preparation), he was ordained as an evangelist, at 
Killingly, Conn., May 16, 1804. Two other missionary tours to 
New York succeeded, and in the summer of 1806 he supplied the 
pulpit of the Congregational Church in Branford, Conn. In 
Jan., 1807, without formal installation, he took charge of the 
Pacific Congregational Church in Providence, R. L, where he 



240 

continued until April, 1816. He was next installed pastor, Nov. 
6, 1816, of the church in Foxborough, Mass., which he served for 
about four years. In July, 1821, he returned to his former charge 
in Providence, and remained with them until August, 1823. In 
Dec, 1823, he began to preach for the First Church in Attle- 
borough, Mass., and was installed there Sept. 29, 1824, Dr. 
Emmons preaching the sermon, as well as at his former installa- 
tion. From this church he was dismissed, Dec. 11, 1827; and at 
the same time a new church was formed in Hebronville, in the 
southern part of the town, of which Mr. Williams became at once 
the pastor, without formal installation, and so continued until 
April, 1830, when he removed to Providence, after which he was 
employed for four or five years in occasional preaching through 
the State. From May, 1835, to March, 1838, he preached statedly 
to the Congregational Church in Barrington, R. I., his last regular 
engagement. In 1839-40 he resided in Hartford, Conn., and then 
for three years in East Greenwich, R. I., whence he returned to 
Providence, where his residence continued until his death. Dur- 
ing all these years, until extreme old age, he was restlessly em- 
ployed in his calling, preaching as he found opportunity over a 
wide circuit. His last appearance in the pulpit was in 1872, when 
in his 93d year. He died in Providence, Sept. 29, 1876, aged 97 
years, lacking 36 days, — of old age, with no indication of disease. 
For upwards of 13 years he had been the last survivor of his class 
and since March, 1873, the sole living graduate of the eighteenth 
century. 

He was married. May 20, 1812, to Ruth, daughter of Isaac and 
Ruth (Jewett) Hale, of Newbury (old town), Mass. She died in 
Providence, March 7, 1867, in her 79th year. They had seven 
children, four sons and three daughters, of whom three sons sur- 
vive, one of whom graduated at this College in 1842. 

His published writings comprise some thirty sermons and dis- 
courses. In his best days he was a remarkably pungent and 
powerful preacher, and as such made a distinct mark on his 
generation. 

1805. 

John Owex Pettibone, the last survivor of his class, died in 
Simsbury, Conn., the place of his birth, Aug. 19, 1876, at the age 
of 89. 

He had spent his life in Simsbury, highly respected and honored. 
He had repeatedly been a member of both houses of the State 
Legislature. 



241 



1806. 



Phineas Lyman Tracy was born in Norwich, Conn., Dec. 25, 
1786, and died in Batavia, N. Y., Dec. 22, 1876, within three days 
of 90 years of age. He was the eldest child of Dr. Philemon and 
Abigail (Trott) Tracy, of Norwich, and the grandson of Dr. Elisha 
Tracy (Y. C. 1738). 

After graduating, he taught school for a year in his native 
town, and then entered the law-office of the Hon. John Wood- 
worth of Albany. In 1811 he was admitted to the bar in Utica, 
and settled in Madison County, N. Y. After residing there 
between three and four years, he removed to Batavia, where he 
immediately entered on an extensive and lucrative practice. 

In 1815 he was married to Harriet Lay, and soon after formed 
a law partnership with her brother, the Hon. George W. Lay. 
He continued in practice until the fall of 1827 when he was elected 
to Congress (to fill a vacancy), and remained a member until 1833, 
when his partner, Mr. Lay, was chosen to succeed him. In 1840 
he was a Presidential elector, and in January, 1841, was appointed 
First Judge of Genesee County, and held the office for five years, 
at the expiration of that time retiring from public life. His resi- 
dence continued in Batavia until his death. His wife died about 
five years before him, and they left no children. 

1812. 

Samuel Lynson Edwards, son of Samuel and Jane (Shelton) 
Edwards, was born in Fairfield, Conn., Feb. 14, 1789. 

On graduation he settled in Manlius, Onondaga County, N". Y., 
where he died, — the last survivor of his College Class, — April 7, 
1877, at the age of 88. 

He studied law with Messrs. Wattles & Randall, and during 
his clerkship secured the establishment of the first academy in the 
town, of which he was the principal superintendent. He was 
admitted to practice as an attorney, Oct. 26, 1815, and became a 
partner with Mr. Randall. In 1823 and 1824 he was a member of 
the State Assembly, and in 1831 was appointed first Judge of the 
County Court of Common Pleas. On the expiration of his term 
of office, in 1833, he was elected to the State Senate, where he 
served for two terms, of four years each. On leaving the Senate, 
he retired from public office, and confined himself until shortly 
before his death to the practice of his profession. In all his pro- 
fessional relations he was conscientious and industrious and highly 
respected. 



242 

He was married, May 12, 1819, to Harriet Bristol, of Clinton, 
N. Y., by whom he had one daughter, who survives him, and one 
son. The son was graduated at this college in 1850, and died in 
1862. After the death of his wife, in 1832, he married Julia Gor- 
ham, of Stratford, Conn., who died in 1864 without issue. 

Samuel Coit Morgan, younger son of Captain Elisha and 
Olive (Coit) Morgan, was born in the parish of Newent, in Lisbon, 
Conn., Aug. 12, 1789. 

He studied law with Hon. Thomas Day (Y. C. 1V97), of Hart- 
ford, and Hon. Timothy Pitkin (Y. C 1785), of Farmington, 
Conn., and in 1816 began practice in Jewett City, Conn., but being 
elected in 1842 President of the Quinebaug Bank in Norwich, 
Conn., he removed thither, where he continued to reside until his 
death, which occurred Sept. 11, 1876, at the age of 87 years. 
After accepting the appointment just referred to, which he held 
for nineteen years, Mr. Morgan relinquished in great degree the 
direct practice of his profession. 

His first marriage in September, 1816, was to Maria B., daughter 
of Rev. Edward Porter (Y. C. 1786), of Farmington. She died 
Nov. 11, 1848, and he was married, Nov. 26, 1849, to Francis A., 
daughter of Gen. Moses Cleaveland (Y. C. 1777), of Canterbury, 
Conn., the agent of the Connecticut Land Company, for whom 
the city of Cleveland, Ohio, was named. She died Feb. 18, 1860, 
and he was married again, June 12, 1861, to Mary C, daughter 
of Dr. John C. Tibbits, of Jewett City. He left no children. 

Tn his last will, he made liberal bequests in behalf of various 
literary institutions and objects of benevolence. 

1814. 

John Daggett Meers was born in Hartford, Conn., Feb. 28, 
1794. 

In his infancy his parents removed to New Haven, and thence 
to the state of Georgia, where he was early left an orphan. At 
the age of 1 3 he returned to New Haven, and was furnished with 
the means of an education by his maternal uncle, Henry Daggett. 

After graduation he taught for a little time in the Walling- 
ford (Conn.) Academy, and studied medicine with Dr. Charles 
Shelton of the adjoining town of Cheshire. In 1818 he was 
licensed to practice by the Greene County (N. Y.) Medical Asso- 
ciation, and for a few years practiced in New^ York city, but about 



243 

1824 removed to what is now the town of Naugatuck, then Salem 
Bridge, a parish in Waterbury, Conn. Here he continued in prac- 
tice (with the exception of about two years, 1842-44, spent in 
New Jersey) until enfeebled by old age. He died in Naugatuck, 
May 19, 1877, aged 83 years. 

Dr. Meers was twice married, first about 1822 to Mrs. Julia B. 
Wickes, and again in 1835 to Miss Susan Bateman. He had three 
children by his first marriage, and nine by his second. Five chil- 
dren, with his widow, survive him. One son is a graduate of the 
Medical Department of this College in the class of 1874. 

Thomas Scudder Wickes, only son of the Hon. Eliphalet and 
Martha (Herriman) Wickes, was born in Jamaica, L. I., April 18, 
1795. 

He studied theology in the Princeton Seminary, remaining for 
nearly three years, but being prevented by ill health from com- 
pleting the course. He was licensed to preach by the Presbytery 
of New York, April 21,1819. After spending some time in mission- 
ary work in the South, he was ordained by the same Presbytery, 
Sept. 9, 1822, and from this time until 1836 was employed in 
preaching in various places, mostly at his own expense, as by 
reason of ill health he would never consent to be installed over 
any church. 

He afterwards resided in Albany for three or four years, and 
subsequently at Ballston, N. Y., and for the last quarter of a cen- 
tury in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where he died, of acute pneumonia, 
Nov. 30, 1876, aged 81 years. 

He was first married, Sept. 7, 1819, to Maria Pannett, of St. 
Thomas, W. I., by whom he had one child. He married again, 
Sept. 15, 1829, Julia Penniman, of Albany, by whom he had ten 
children. She, with three sons and three daughters, survives 
him. , 

1817. 

John Beard, only son of Lewis and Susannah (Dunn) Beard, 
was born in Salisbury, N. C, June 14,^1797, and died in Tallahas- 
see, Fla., July 15, 1876, aged 79 years. 

Keturning to his native place at graduation, he was elected the 
next year, just after reaching his majority, and without opposition, 
to the State Legislature, where he took at once a leading position. 

In the winter of 1820 he married Miss Anna M. Kelly, and 
settled on a plantation near Salisbury. 



244 

In 1826 he was elected without opposition to the State Senate, 
but declined a reelection for private reasons. In 1832, although 
previously a Federalist, he espoused the Nullification theory, and 
in the three succeeding years was again a member of the State 
Senate. 

His wife having died in 1830, he was married in the summer of 
1838 to Miss Maria W. Anderson, of St. Augustine, Fla., and the 
next year went there to reside. In 1840 he was appointed Clerk of 
the U. S. District Court for East Florida, and in 1842, U. S. Marshal 
for the same district, which office he held until Florida was ad- 
mitted i^s a State three years later. In Jan. 1847, he was elected 
Slate Register of Public Lands (and ex officio Superintendent of 
Schools), and removed his residence to Tallahassee. This office 
he resigned in the summer of 1850, on his reluctant acceptance of 
the Democratic nomination for Congress. He was defeated, but a 
few months afterwards was elected Comptroller of Public Ac- 
counts, which position he resigned in 1854 to accept the agency of 
the Apalachicola Land Company. He was a member of the 
Florida Secession Convention in 1861, and during the war which 
followed contributed all in his power to make the cause of the 
South a success. He was again appointed to the Comptroller's 
office in 1866. In 1869 he was attacked by vertigo, from which 
combined with neuralgia he was a great sufferer until a few 
months before his death. In all relations he maintained a spotless 
character for personal and official integrity. 

His first wife left two sons and three daughters, and by his 
second wife, who survives him, he had two sons and a daughter. 

Smith Clark died in Haddam, Conn., his native place, Sept. 
12, 1876, aged 84. 

He practiced law in Haddam during all his active life ; was at 
different times a member of the State Legislature and Judge of 
Probate. He left one son. 

1820. V 

Samuel Ktrby Sneed, only son of James and Catherine Sneed, 
was born in Louisville, Ky., Jan. 16, 1798. 

The plans formed by his father in sending him away from home 
for an education were entirely overthrown by his choosing the 
ministry as a profession ; and on his return from College he found 
himself at once obliged to obtain means to pursue his studies. 



245 

Accordingly he taught school in Louisville, and afterwards spent 
a year at the Andover Theological Seminary, 

He was ordained as an evangelist, at Middletown, Ky., May 10, 
1826, and was installed pastor of the churches at Lebanon and 
Springfield, Dec. 5, 1827. He remained in Kentucky until 1833, 
when in order to emancipate the slaves which he owned he 
removed to Indiana and was installed over the Presbyterian 
church in New Albany. He spent some ten years with this church, 
and was afterwards employed for shorter periods in various places, 
until his removal in 1859 to Kirkwood, Missouri, a few miles from 
St. Louis, where two of his daughters have charge of a Seminary, 
and where the rest of his life was passed. He died in Kirkwood, 
after a gradual failure of his powers, Aug. 30, 1876, aged 78 
years. 

His first wife, a sister of the Rev. Dr. Lewis Green, of Centre 
College, Danville, Ky., died without leaving children. His second 
wife was Miss Rachel Crosby, by whom he had three daughters 
and one son. ^ 

1821. 

Enoch Huntington was born in Middletown, Conn., March 8, 
1801, and died in South Manchester, Conn., Sept. 4, 1876, aged 75 
years. He bore the name of his grandfather, the pastor of the 
Congregational Church in Middletown, and of his father, a lawyer 
in the same town, who were graduates of this College, in 1 759 and 
1785 respectively. His mother was Sarah, daughter of Grove 
Ward, of Middletown. 

He taught school and studied theology in Norwalk, Conn., and 
was ordained deacon in the Protestant Episcopal Church by Bishop 
Brownell, at Middletown, Kov. 4, 1823. He was for a short time 
rector of St. Stephen's Church, Wilkes Barre, Pa., and while there 
was advanced to the priesthood by Bishop White, in Philadelphia, 
March 20, 1825. In June, 1827, he took charge of St. John's 
parish in New Milford, Conn., where labored faithfully for twenty 
years. He next established a select school in Bridgeport, and in 
addition to his duties there assisted in organizing in 1848 a new 
parish at Nichol's Farms, in Trumbull, of which he continued in 
charge until May, 1852, when he removed to Grace Church, in the 
village of Broad Brook, in East Windsor, Conn. He resigned 
this charge April 1, 1857, on account of a severe attack of bron- 
chitis. A year later he removed to Pine Meadow, New Hartford, 



246 

CoDD., and was rector of St. John's Church until the destruction of 
the church edifice by fire in Dec, 1859. For about three years 
from May, 1860, he had charge of St. John's Church, North 
Haven, Conn., and thence removed to St. James's Church, West- 
ville. Conn., where he spent nearly two years, and from which 
he went to St. Mary's Church, Manchester, Conn., of which he 
was rector at the time of his death. 

He was married. May 19, 1828, to Charlotte, daughter of John 
Taylor, of New Milford, and niece of Rev. Nathaniel W. Taylor, 
D.I)., Professor of Theology in this College. She survives him 
with five children, one of whom was graduated at Trinity College 
in 1 850, and is a Professor in that institution. 

Isaac Peck, the only son of Isaac Peck, was bom at Round 
Hill, in Greenwich, Conn., Aug. 7, 1802, and died at his birth- 
place, April 29, 1877, in his 75th year. 

He taught school for two years in Stratford, Conn., and then 
entered the Theological Seminary in Princeton, N. J., with the 
intention of becoming a Presbyterian minister; but after two 
years in the seminary his views underwent a change, and he 
became a candidate for orders in the Episcopal Church. He was 
ordained deacon by Bishop Griswold in 1829, and his first regular 
charge was in Gardiner, Maine, from 1830 to 1833. He was then 
rector of St. Paul's Church, Troy, N. Y., until 1836, when he 
became an assistant minister in Christ Church, New York city. 
He relinquished this duty in 1844, and took charge of an academy 
in New York. About 1850 he became the assistant minister of 
Christ Church, Rye, N. Y., and when the mission chapel attached 
to that church in Portchester was organized as a separate church, 
he was its first rector. About 1860 his failing health obliged him 
to retire to his patrimonial estate in Greenwich, where he ofliciated 
without compensation for four years in Calvary Church. From 
the autumn of 1865 until his death he was laid aside from all 
active employment by paralysis. 

He was married, Oct. 4, 1841, to Catharine C, second daughter 
of Chief Justice Samuel Jones (Y. C. 1790), of New York city, 
by whom he had two sons and two daughters. One son (a gradu- 
ate of this College in 1865) and one daughter survive him. 

Charles Robinson, youngest son of the Rev. William Robin- 
son (Y. C. 1773), by his fourth wife, Elizabeth Norton, was born 



247 

in Southington, Conn., where his father was for 41 years pastor of 
the Congregational Church, Feb. 10, 1801. He was half-brother 
of the distinguished Biblical scholar, Professor Edward Robinson. 

For some years after graduating he resided on his father's farm, 
and in 1832-33 took a course of study in the Yale Law School. 
He removed soon after to New Haven, was admitted to the bar in 
1834, and continued his residence and practice of his profession 
here until his death, Oct. 1, 18'76, which was caused by a fall about 
a week before from a ladder in his garden. 

He was married, March 13, 1826, to Nancy Maria, daughter of 
Hervey Mulford, of New Haven, and had five sons and three 
daughters, of whom only one son survives him. His youngest son 
was graduated at this College in 1867 and died in 1870. His first 
wife died Feb. 5, 1863, aged 62, and he married in 1871 Mrs. 
Ellen E. (Foote) Wilcox, who survives him. 

1822. 

John Stevens Law, son of Joseph and Elizabeth Law, was 
born in Liberty County, Ga., March 21, 1800. 

He entered college in the Sophomore year, and after graduation 
spent a year at home in the study of medicine. He then entered 
the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, in 
Philadelphia, and graduated M.D. in 1825. For three years he 
practiced his profession in his native county, and for about ten 
years in Savannah. He then retired from practice, and in 1847 
removed to Cincinnati, O., where for three years he kept a drug- 
store. He then became the agent of the Royal Insurance Company 
of Liverpool, which, with other English companies, he continued to 
represent up to the time of his death, his eldest son being asso- 
ciated with him, and latterly managing the business. 

In 1861 he purchased a farm in Loveland, twenty-three miles 
from the city, where he died, after a brief illness, Jan. 12, 1877, 
in his 77th year. He had been for over forty years an elder and 
an eminently useful member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Dr. Law married, jMay 1, 1828, Jane E., daughter of Hon. John 
Elliott (Y. C. 1794), U. S. Senator from Georgia; she and her 
infant child died in Dec, 1828. He married again, Nov. 24, 1831, 
Elizabeth R., daughter of Benjamin Burroughs, a merchant of 
Savannah, by whom he had six sons and three daughters. His 
widow, five sons, and a daughter, survived him. 



248 

Jabed Bell Waterburt was born in New York City, Aug. 
11, 1799. He spent upwards of two years in the Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary, and was ordained to the ministry by the Presby- 
tery of N. Y., in Oct., 1825. The next winter was passed in the 
South as an agent for the American Bible Society, and the follow- 
ing summer in Massachusetts and on Long Island in a similar way. 

From Jan. 10, 1827 to Feb. 24, 1829, he was the settled pastor 
of the Congregational Church in Hatfield, Mass., and on March 
18, 1829, took charge of the Pleasant Street Congregational 
Church in Portsmouth, N. H. He was obliged by his health to 
resign this charge in 1831, but a year later was able to resume 
work, and was settled over the Presbyterian Church in Hudson, 
N. Y., where he continued with great acceptance until he became, 
Sept. 3, 1846, pastor of the Bowdoin Street Congregational Church 
in Boston, Mass. In 1857 he retired from parish work, and after 
two years spent in Stamford, Conn., removed to Brooklyn, N. Y. 
While his health permitted, he was there engaged in city missions, 
and was Secretary of the Brooklyn and L. I. Christian Commission 
during the late war. He was stricken with paralysis about six 
years before his death, which occurred in Brooklyn, Dec. 31, 1876, 
at the age of 77. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Union Col- 
lege in 1841. He was the author of more than thirty larger 
religious works, and of several published tracts and sermons. 

He was married in 1827 to Eliza S., eldest daughter of Zechariah 
Lewis (Y. C. 1794), of Brooklyn, who survives him with four 
daughters and an only son. 

1823. 

Alexander Washington Marshall, son of Thomas Marshall, 
M.D., and Mary S. (Chanler) Marshall, was born in Charleston, 
S. C, Aug. 10, 1798. 

He was graduated at the General Theological Seminary of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in 1828, and in the fall of that year 
(Oct. 28) was ordained deacon, and took charge of St. David's 
Church, Cheraw, S. C. He continued there (having been ordained 
to the priesthood, March 14, 1830) until 1841, when he was called 
to the organization and care of a city mission, worshiping in St. 
John's Chapel (Hampstead), Charleston. Thirty-five years of 
devoted and effective service in this field were interrupted only by 
the gradual decline of strength and the illness of a few weeks 



249 

which terminated in his death, in Charleston, Xov. 7, 1876, at the 
age of 78. 

In 1851 he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Middlebury College. 

In 1830 he married Elizabeth Maynard, who with two sons and 
three daughters survives him. 

Joseph Ripley, third son of D wight and Eliza (Coit) Ripley, 
and brother of George B. Ripley (Y. C. 1822), was born in Nor- 
wich, Conn., Sept. 14, 1804. 

On leaving college he chose a business life, though he never 
abandoned his interest in literature and science. He at first 
entered into the dry goods business in New York City, in com- 
pany with the late Horace Waldo. Disaster overtook the firm in 
1836, when he returned to his native town, and became interested 
in the manufacture of paper. In 1842 he went back to New 
York, and from that time until his death was engaged in the wool 
trade, during the greater part of the time as the head of the 
extensively-known house of J. Ripley & Son. 

He spent the last evening of the year 1876 at home, in his 
usual health and among his usual occupations, and passed away 
quietly in his sleep during the following night. 

He was married in 1831 to Miss Catharine W. Andrews, of 
New York City, who died in 1864, leaving five children. 

1824. 

Selah Burr Treat, son of Selah and Anna (Williams) Treat, 
was born in Hartland, Conn., Feb. 19, 1804. When he was a boy 
of ten, the family removed to Hartford, Conn., where he was fitted 
for College. 

After graduation he studied law at home and in Litchfield, 
partly with Judge John T. Peters (Y. C. 1789), of Hartford, 
whose daughter, Abigail T., he married, Dec. 25, 1827. Being 
admitted to the bar in Dec, 1 826, he began practice in East Wind- 
sor, Conn., but in 1831 removed to Penn Yan, N. Y., forming a 
partnership with Henry Welles, afterwards a Judge of the Supreme 
Court of the State. In the summer of 1831 he became a religious 
man and united with the church, and two years later gave up his 
profession, and entered the Theological Seminary in Andover, 
Mass. He finished the course of study there in 1835, and was 
ordained, March 23, 1836, over the Third Presbyterian Church in 



250 

Newark, N. J. He was obliged by ill-health to resign his charge 
in 1840, and became joint-editor of the Biblical Repository and of 
the American Eclectic. After two years, he left these engage- 
ments, with the intention of again becoming a pastor, but his 
health was insufficient, and in 1843 he accepted an invitation to 
remove to Boston and edit the Missionary Herald, and the Youth's 
Dayspring, periodicals issued by the American Board of Commis- 
sioners for Foreign Missions. From that time his life was devoted 
to the American Board, and he proved himself eminently fitted 
for his work. In the autumn of 1 843 he was made Recording 
Secretary of the Board, and in 1847 was elected one of the Cor- 
responding Secretaries, to have charge especially of the missions 
among the American Indians. In 1859 his special duties were 
made to include also the care of the Home Department. He con- 
tinued also his editorial work until the autumn of 1856, when he 
was for the second time obliged to go abroad on account of his 
health ; and did not resume it until the end of 1876, when he was 
released at his own desire from the duties of Secretary, to which 
he felt no longer equal. After a few weeks' illness, he passed 
away suddenly, at his residence in Boston, March 28, 1877, at the 
age of 73. 

The degree of Doctor of Divinity was given him by Rutgers 
College in 1852, but he declined the honor. 

His wife survives, with three of their seven children. 

1825. 

William Brooks Bristol, son of Wm. Bristol (of the class of 
1798) and Sarah Edwards, and the grandson of Simeon Bristol (of 
the class of 1760), was born in New Haven, Conn., June, 1806, 
and died in that city after a long illness, October 10, 1876. 

Upon his graduation, Mr. Bristol entered upon the study of 
law at the Law School in New Haven, and in the office of his 
father, Judge Bristol, and on the completion of his legal studies 
practiced law for one or two years in Painesville, Ohio. He then 
returned to his native place and resumed practice there, and con- 
tinued it successfully with the general public esteem and the 
fullest confidence of those with whom he had relations of business 
in his integrity, judgment, and ability, nearly to the close of his 
life. 

Mr. Bristol was twice married : first to Mary Bliss, of Spring- 
field, Mass., Nov. 15, 1836, who died Feb. 15, 1849, by whom he 



251 

had six children, of whom two sons survive him (both graduates 
of this college), and secondly, Nov. 11, 1850, to Caroline Bliss, of 
the same place, by whom he has had three children (one of them 
a member of the graduating class of this year), who with their 
mother are still living. 

William McCkackan Lathrop, the second son of Hon. Samuel 
Lathrop (Y. C. 1792) and Mary (McCrackan) Lathrop, was born 
in West Springfield, Mass., Nov. 8, 1806. He was fitted for Col- 
lege by Rev. Dr. T. M. Cooley, of Granville, Mass. 

He studied law with his father, and settled in Enfield, Hamp- 
shire County, Mass., but after a brief experience at the bar 
removed about 1833 to New York City and became a commission 
merchant. He was not successful in business, and about 1850 
returned to his native State. He soon settled in Boston, first as 
Cashier of the Eliot Bank, and from 1854 as Secretary of the 
Eliot Insurance Company. He held the last-named office until in 
consequence of great losses by the fire in Boston in November, 
1872, the company became insolvent. He was made the Presi- 
dent of the Commonwealth Insurance Company, which was organ- 
ized as a successor to the Eliot, April 1, 1875, but the partial 
relief from severe labor which he expected in his new position, he 
was not long able to enjoy. 

He attended the meeting of his class in New Haven on the 50th 
anniversary of their graduation, July 1, 1875, and was greatly 
interested. While visiting some old acquaintances on this occa- 
sion, he was suddenly seized with hemiplegic symptoms, but 
recovered sufficiently to staii, for his home the next day. On 
reaching Hamilton (then the place of his residence, 22 miles north 
of Boston), he had a renewed and more decided attack. From 
that time he gradually declined until his death, Aug. 24, 1876, in 
his 70th year. 

He was thrice married, and left four children : two, a daughter 
and a son by his first wife — Charlotte Elizabeth Belcher, of 
Enfield— and two daughters by his last wife and widow — Eliza- 
beth Rogers. 

1827. 
Robert Alexander Hallam, the son of Orlando and Lucy 
(Christophers) Hallam, was born in New London, Conn., Sept. 30, 
1807. 



252 

After some time spent in teaching, he entered in October, 1829, 
the General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, in the city of New York, where he finished the course in 
June, 1832. On the 2d of August, 1832, he was ordained Deacon 
in Hartford, Conn., by Bishop Brownell, and went to Meriden, 
Conn., the next month, as rector of St. Andrew's Church, where 
he was ordained priest by Bishop Brownell, Aug. 2, 1833. He 
returned to New London, Jan. 1, 1836, as rector of St. James's 
Church, a position which he held until his death, being however 
incapacitated by infirmity from active duty during the last few 
years, and relieved by the appointment of an assistant. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Trinity Col- 
lege in 1853. In 1836 he published a volume of Lectures on the 
Morning Prayer, and a volume of Sermons ; also, in 1871 , a course 
of lectures on Moses, and in 1873 a history of his parish church. 

He died in New London, Jan. 4, 1877, aged 69 years. 

He was married, Nov. 4, 1834, to Phebe Ann, daughter of Asa- 
hel Curtis, of Meriden, Conn., who survives him without children. 

1828. 

Ebenezer White Arms, third son of Ebenezer and Mary 
(White) Arms, was born in Greenfield, Mass., March 29, 1805. 

On graduation he went at once to Geneva, N. Y., and entered 
on the study of law in the office of the late Hon. James H. 
Woods. He was admitted to the bar and remained with Mr. 
Woods in Geneva until the autumn of 1833, when he was induced 
to remove to Aurora, N. Y., by the persuasion of his friend Chris- 
topher Morgan, whose death is noticed below. They formed a 
copartnership which existed until Mr. Morgan removed to Auburn 
in 1841, Mr. Arms continuing in Aurora for the rest of his days. 
He was especially ti'usted in the care of estates, and universally 
honored for his pure and upright life. 

He was the chief contributor to the recent erection of St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church in the village of Aurora, w^hich is henceforth to 
be called the Arms Memorial Church. 

He died, after an illness of six weeks, of pneumonia, Jan. 15, 
1877, in the 72d year of his age. 

He was married, Nov. 12, 1835, to Lydia, daughter of Hon. 
Daniel Avery, of Aurora, who survives him. They had no chil- 
dren. 



253 

Frederick William Chapman, elder son of Abisha and Mary 
(Goss) Chapman, was born in Canfield, Ohio, Nov. 17, 1806. 

He taught the academy in Sharon, Conn., for the year after 
graduation, and spent the three succeeding years in the Divinity 
School of Yale College. Hq was ordained pastor of the Congre- 
gational Church in Stratford, Conn., Sept. 5, 1832, and resigned 
this charge, May 16, 1839, to accept a call from the Congrega- 
tional Church in Deep River (in Saybrook), Conn., where he was 
installed May 29. From this charge he was dismissed, Oct. 1, 
1850, and on the 24th of the same month was installed over the 
Congregational Church in South Glastonbury, Conn., where he 
remained until Oct. 29, 1854. He then became the principal of 
the high school in Ellington, Conn., and so continued until 1863, 
supplying in the mean time the church in West Stafford, Conn,, 
for four and a half years (1856-61), and afterwards the church in 
Bolton, Conn., to which town he next removed. Leaving Bolton 
in 1864, he supplied the pulpit of the Union Church in East 
Hampton, Conn., for two years, and for five years had charge of 
the church in Prospect, Conn. In 1871 he removed to Rocky 
Hill, Conn., and devoted himself thenceforth to genealogical re- 
searches. He had already published, in 1854, a genealogy of the 
Chapman Family, and in 1 864 one of the Pratt Family. Four 
more volumes compiled by him were printed, — the Trowbridge 
and Buckingham genealogies in 1872, the Coit genealogy in 1873, 
and the Bulkeley genealogy in 1875. In August, 1873, a stroke 
of paralysis impaired his faculties, but he continued to work until 
a second stroke, in October, 1875, which deprived him of speech, 
and left him to pass the remaining months in feebleness of body 
and mind, until his death, at his residence in Rocky Hill, July 20, 
1876, in his 70th year. 

He was married. May 6, 1833, to Emily, eldest child of Henry 
Hill, of Westbrook, Conn., who died in South Glastonbury, of 
apoplexy, March 30, 1854, aged 44 years. He married secondly, 
Nov. 7, 1855, Caroline, widow of John Crooks, of East Long- 
meadow, Mass., and daughter of Samuel Strickland, of Ellington, 
Conn., who sui-vives him. Of the three children by his first mar- 
riage, one son only survives. 

Thomas Oliver Lincoln, eldest son of Ensign and Sophia 
(Larkin) Lincoln, was born May 4, 1809, in Boston, Mass., where 
he was fitted for college in the Public Latin School. 

17 



254: 

He returned to Boston after graduating, and studied law in 
the office of Richard Fletcher, Esq., until June, 1831. About this 
time he began a religious life, and although his prospects of suc- 
cess in the law were bright, he felt it his duty to abandon that 
profession for the ministry. Accordingly he entered the Newton 
(Mass.) Theological Institution, where he graduated in 1834. He 
was ordained, Pec. 10, 1834, and soon became the pastor of the 
Baptist church in Kennebunk, Me. In 1836 he resigned in order 
to take charge of the new Free Street Baptist Church in Portland, 
Me., where he labored successfully till 1841, when he was called 
to Philadelphia. In the following years he exercised his ministry 
in Manchester, N. H., Utica and Elmira, N. Y., Williamsport, 
Pa., and other places. He received the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from Madison University in 1856. In 1871 he was called 
to the pastorate of the Baptist church in Roadstown, N. J., which 
he was obliged by failing health to resign in 1873. He then re- 
moved to Bridgeton, N. J., where he died of paralysis, after a 
lingering illness, Jan. 20, 1877, in his 68th year. 

He was first married, March 11, 1835, to Malvina B., daughter 
of Dr. Lemuel Wellman, of Piermont, N. H.,who died Nov. 10, 
1847. He married, Feb. 20, 1849, Mrs. Jane B. Dykes, daughter 
of James Buncher, of Lowell, Mass., who survives him. By his 
first marriage he had six children, and by his second marriage 
five ; of these, two daughters are still living. 

Cheistopher* Morgan was the second of six sons of Chris- 
topher and Nancy (Barber) Morgan, both natives of Groton, 
Conn., and early emigrants to Aurora, Cayuga Lake, N. T. He 
was born in Aurora, June 4, 1808, and died at his residence in 
Auburn, N. Y., April 3, 1877, in his 69th year. 

After graduation he read law in the office of William H. Seward 
(afterwards Governor), in Auburn, and practiced for a few years 
in Aurora. He was married, Oct. 24, 1832, to Mary Pitney, of 
Auburn. In 1837 he was elected to the Congress of the ij. S., 
and in 1839 reelected. At the close of his term he removed to 
Auburn, and entered into partnership with Gov. Seward, Hon. 
Samuel Blatchford, and Clarence Seward. In 1 847, and again in 
1849, he was elected Secretary of the State of New York, these 
being the first elections by the people to that office. He was also 
for the same time Superintendent of Public Schools. For many 
years and up to his death he was a trustee of the State Lunatic 



255 

Asylum, at Utica. He was also mayor of the city of Auburn 
where his residence continued until his decease. 

In the many positions of public trust to which he was called, 
he enjoyed an enviable reputation for integrity and ability ; while 
in social life his genial manners made him a great favorite. 

By his marriage he had one son and three daughters; the 
daugchters alone survive him. 



1830. 

James Knox, son of James and Nancy (Ehle) Knox, was born 
in Canajoharie, N. Y., July 4, 1807. 

He entered the Sophomore class of Hamilton College, Clinton, 
N. Y., in 1827, and a year later entered the corresponding class 
in this college, the former institution having been temporarily 
broken up by dissensions. After graduation he studied law with 
Wm. H. Maynard and Joshua A. Spencer, in Utica, N. Y., and 
after Mr. Maynard's death became in 1833 the partner of Mr. 
Spencer. In 1836 he emigrated to Knoxville, 111., with one of 
his brothers, whose ill-health soon threw on him an extensive 
mercantile business, so that his law-practice was abandoned. In 
the winter of 1841 he was married to Miss Prudence H. Blish, 
of Wetherstield, 111., whose death in 1846 so depressed him that 
he undertook a variety of additional employments as a relief. 
He became the proprietor and occasional editor of the village 
newspaper, engaged extensively in farming, and established a 
very thriving business in the manufacture of agricultural im- 
plements. In 1 846 he was an unsuccessful candidate for Congress, 
but in 1852 was elected and again in 1864. Owing to failing 
eyesight he went to Europe in Oct., 1859, and after a successful 
operation for cataract returned in Jan., 1861. In Sept., 1865, he 
again visited Europe for an operation on his eyes, and remained 
until May, 1869; and in 1872-3 made a third foreign visit. He 
died in Knoxville, after an illness of two weeks, Oct. 9, 1876, 
aged 69 years. He had no children. 

From his ample estate he gave during his lifetime the sum of 
810,000 to this college, '^520,000 to Hamilton College, and up- 
wards of 130,000 to educational institutions in his adopted county. 
He also left in his last will a further sum of money for the pro- 
motion of education. The degree of Doctor of Laws was con- 
ferred on him by Hamilton College in 1862. 



256 



1832. 



Allen Taylor Caperton was born near Union, Monroe County, 
Va. (now West Va.), Nov. 21, 1810. His father, the Hon. Hugh 
Caperton, was a Representative in Congress from 1813 to 1815. 

He first studied in the University of Virginia, and in 1830 came 
to this college, entering the class of 1831, and finally graduating 
in 1832. He studied law with Judge Briscoe G. Baldwin, in 
Staunton, Va., and in 1834 was admitted to the bar, and began 
the practice of his profession in his native town. In 1841 and 
repeatedly afterwards, he was elected to the Virginia House of 
Delegates, and in 1844 to the State Senate. In 1860 and 1861, 
he was a member of the State Constitutional Convention, and 
like many other prominent southern whigs, was a conservative 
union man, and opposed secession until the actual beginning of 
hostilities, when he felt it his duty to go with his State. He was 
a member of the Confederate States Senate, from 1862 until the 
close of the war, when he returned to his home and resumed the 
practice of his profession, devoting much of his time and energies 
to the development of the resources of West Virginia. In Feb- 
ruary, 1875, he was elected almost unanimously to the U. S. 
Senate, and took his seat on the fourth of March following. He 
died in Washington, after a few days' illness, of angina pectoris, 
July 26, 1876, in his 66th year. 

He was married soon after graduating to Miss Harriet Echols, 
who survives him, with children. 

1833. 

William Patrick Johnston, the son of Col. James and Ann 
Marion (Houston) Johnston, was born in Savannah, Ga., June 
11, 1812. He entered college in the third term of the Sopho- 
more year. 

After spending a winter in Georgia, he began the study of 
medicine in 1834 in Philadelphia, and received the degree of M.D. 
two years later from the University of Pennsylvania. He then 
devoted himself to hospital service in that city until the fall of 
1837, when he sailed for Europe, where he spent two years in 
study in Paris, and another year in travel. 

He was married, Dec. 3, 1840, to Mary E., daughter of Bernard 
Hooe, Esq., of Alexandria, Va., and immediately after settled in 
Washington, D. C, for the practice of medicine. Besides his ex- 
tensive and lucrative practice, he was connected, from 1842, with 



257 

the Medical Department of the Columbian College (now the 
National Medical College), for three years as Professor of Sur- 
gery, and after that as Professor of Obstetrics and the Diseases 
of Women and Children. He also assumed a large responsibility 
in the management of the Children's Hospital in Washington, 
and was otherwise an active and public-spirited citizen. His 
death, which was caused by fatty degeneration of the heart, oc- 
curred in Washington, after a lingering illness of six months, 
Oct. 24, 1876, at the age of (U. His wife survives him, with four 
sons and one daughter. 

William Newton Matson, son of William and Rhoda (New- 
ton) Matson, was born in Colchester, Conn., Oct. 22, 1812. 

He taught the Hopkins Grammar School in Hartford, Conn., 
for one year after graduation ; studied law in the same city, and 
for many years practiced his profession there. He was for two 
years Judge of the Probate Court, and from 1853 to 1857 Re- 
porter of the Supreme Court. Subsequently he became interested 
in the publishing business, and as a member of the firm of S. S. 
Scranton & Co. amassed a fortune. He had for some time been 
depressed in mind, and on Dec. 29, 1876, left home for New York 
City, taking passage that night at Saybrook on board the steam- 
ship Granite State ; he was last seen alive early the next morning 
on the boat, and his body was found near Riker's Island, in the 
East River, May 23, 1877. 

Judge Matson married. May 20, 1840, Elizabeth C, daughter 
of Lewis Strong (Harv. Coll. 1803), of IsTorthampton, Mass., who 
died Jan. 29, 1867, aged 49 years. Besides two daughters wh© 
died in infancy, they had one son, who is still living, a graduate 
of this college in 1862. 

George Lemuel Potter was born in New Haven, Conn., 
Nov. 10, 1812, the son of Samuel and Jemima (Scovil) Potter. 

He studied law, immediately after graduating, in the Yale Law 
School, and in the spring of 1837 entered on his profession in 
Natchez, Miss.; in the spring of 1842 he removed to Jackson, 
the capital, where he gained a large practice and became one of 
the leading lawyers of the State. On Feb. 5, 1877, while attend- 
ing Court in Lexington, Miss., he died suddenly, of an apoplectic 
stroke. 

He was married, in the autumn of 1845, to Cynthia Ann, 
daughter of Judge Mayes, formerly of Louisville, Ky., who died 



258 

some years before him. Of their five children, three sons and 
one daughter are still living. 

1834. 

Eleazek KmGSBURY Foster was born in New Haven, Conn., 
May 20, 18J3. His father, Eleazer Foster (Y. C, 1802), was a 
prominent lawyer of New Haven until his early death in 1819, 
and his mother, Mary Pierpont, was a great-grandchild of Rev. 
James Pierpont, one of the principal founders of Yale College. 

He studied law in the Yale Law School, was admitted to the 
bar in March, 1837, and settled in practice in his native city. He 
represented New Haven in the General Assembly in 1844 and 
1845, and again in 1865 when he served as Speaker of the House. 
In 1845, 1846, 1848, and 1849, he was Judge of Probate for the 
district of New Haven. In 1854 he was appointed State's Attor- 
ney for New Haven County, and was nominated Register in 
bankruptcy when that ofiice was created, and continued in both 
these positions till his death. Besides his professional success. 
Judge Foster's social qualities gained him the warm regard of a 
large circle of friends. He died, in New Haven, after a brief ill- 
ness, of pneumonia, June 13, 1877, aged 64 years. 

He married Mary, daughter of William C. Codrington, a lady 
of English birth, and formerly of Kingston, Jamaica, but then of 
New Haven, Jan. 2, 1838. She died" Sept. 25, 1872. Of their 
children, two daughters died before their parents, and three sons, 
all graduates of this College, are still living. 

Samuel St. John was born March 29, 1813, in New Canaan, 
Conn., the fourth son and fifth child of Samuel and Hannah B. 
(Richards) St. John, of New Canaan. 

After graduation he studied law in the Yale Law School, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1836. During the academical year, 
1836-37, he was a tutor in the college, at the same time attending 
lectures in the Medical Department. At the close of the year he 
resigned his position on account of ill-health, and went to Europe, 
where he continued his studies in Paris. In 1838 he accepted an 
appointment as Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Geology, 
in the Western Reserve College, Hudson, Ohio, in which ofiice he 
remained until 1851. For the following year he held a similar 
position in Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, and was next for four 
years principal of the Cleveland (O.) Seminary for young ladies, 



259 

and Professor of Chemistry and Medical Jui'isprudence in the 
Cleveland Medical College. In 1856 he visited Europe again, and 
after his return entered in 1860 on the duties of Professor of 
Chemistry in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Medi- 
cal Department of Columbia College, New York City ; the sub- 
ject of Medical Jurisprudence was added to his chair in IS'TO, and 
he continued in the full discharge of his duties until his death, at 
his residence in New Canaan, Conn., Sept. 9, 1876, aged 63 years. 
He had been in poor health for several years. 

He was married. May 26, 1840, in New York City, to Miss 
Amelia P. C. Curtis. She died in Cleveland, O., Dec. 22, 1855. 
Their children, a son and a daughter, are both living ; the son be- 
ing a graduate of this college in 1866. 

He received the honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine from 
the Vermont Academy of Medicine, Western Reserve College, 
and the College of Physicians and Surgeons, and that of LL.D. 
from Georgetown College, Kentucky. 

George Tomlinson was born in that part of Derby which is 
now the town of Seymour, Conn., Feb. 5, 1806, the son of Abijah 
and Betsey Tomlinson. In 1808 his parents removed to New 
Preston, in Washington, Conn., whence he entered college, not 
however beginning his preparation until past his majority. 

After graduation he spent three years in the Yale Divinity 
School, and after brief engagements as a preacher in New Pres- 
ton, and in St. Johnsbury, Vt., became in Jan., 1839, principal of 
the academy in Bellport, L. I. While in this position he took 
charge of the Presbyterian church in South Haven, a parish in 
the town of Brook Haven, L. I., where he was ordained pastor, 
Sept. 9, 1840. He remained here until October, 1852, and in Feb- 
ruary, 1 854, he took charge of the Presbyterian Church in Pendle- 
ton, Niagara county, N. Y., where he continued until his return 
to New Preston, in March, 1 860. For two years he supplied the 
pulpit of the First church there, and then on the death of his 
father settled in the family homestead, in the village of Marble- 
dale, where he resided till his death, July 16, 1876, aged 70. He 
had been for some two years in poor health, and in the early 
spring of 1876 was attacked with diabetes, after which he de- 
clined gradually until still further prostrated by a fever a few 
days before his death. 

He was married, April 13, 1841, to Miss Anne M. Taylor, of 
Warren, Conn. She died after a lingering illness, Sept. 17, 1865. 
Their only son is still living. 



260 

1835. 
[For a notice of Ebenezeb B. Adams, see page 279.] 

Edward Buck, fifth son of Gurdon and Susannah (Manwaring) 
Buck, and a descendant of Gov. Gurdon Saltonstall, of Connecti- 
cut, was born in New York City, Oct. 6, 1814. 

He studied law in New York, and began practice in that city 
in 1838. In 1843 he removed to Boston, where he continued 
actively engaged in his profession until his death. Froni 1854 his 
residence was in Andover, Mass., where he died, July 16, 18*76, in 
his 6 2d year. 

Mr. Buck was a frequent writer for the newspapers, and pub- 
lished in 1866 an important volume on " Massachusetts Ecclesi- 
astical Law" (Boston, 8vo, 316 pp.). As a prominent Christian 
layman his interest in all educational and philanthropic matters 
was always intelligent and active. 

He married, June 8, 1841, Elizabeth Greene, daughter of Hon. 
Samuel Hubbard (Y. C. 1802), of Boston, a Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Massachusetts. She survives him with their two chil- 
dren, a son and a daughter. The son graduated at this college in 
1870. 

1839. 

David Jitdson Burr, son of David J., and Arabella (Shedden) 
Burr, was bom in Richmond, Va., Oct. 16, 1820. 

After graduation he studied law (partly in the Yale Law 
School), and was engaged in successful practice for a few years, 
but finding it ill-suited to his temperament he abandoned the pro- 
fession and became a merchant. Although disinclined to public 
life, he served for several years at the urgent desire of his fellow- 
citizens, in the Common Council of Richmond and in the State 
Legislature. On the organization of the Richmond Chamber of 
Commerce he was elected President, and continued in that ofiice 
until he positively declined a re-election. His energies were di- 
rected to the advancements of the commercial interests of his 
native State and city ; and to facilitate those interests he assumed, 
at the inception of the enterprise, the responsible and laborious 
duties of President of the Virginia Steamship Company, which 
he continued to discharge to the day of his death. He died in 
Richmond, Aug. 3, 1876, from the efiects of a paralytic stroke in 
1873. He sympathized entirely with the South in the late war, 
and was one of the committee who surrendered Richmond to the 
U. S. troops, April 3, 1865. 



261 

He was married in New York, April 10, 1844, to a daughter of 
Dr. H. W. Denison of Georgetown, S. C, and had six children, 
four of whom are still living. 

1840. 

James Porter Hart, second son of Dr. John A. Hart, and 
grandson of Dr. John Hart (Y. C. 1776), both of Farmington, 
Conn., was born in Farmington, July 27, 1817. His mother was 
Joanna, daughter of Samuel Porter, of Berlin, Conn. 

He spent the three years after graduation in the Yale Divinity 
School, and afterwards resided in New Haven, where he died Jan. 
10, 1877, aged 59 years. 

He was interested in the science of phonography, and pub- 
lished several tracts on that subject. At an earlier period he 
took a warm interest in the settlement of fugitive slaves in 
Canada. 

He was married, Feb. 11, 1846, to Mary E. Pierpont, of New 
Haven, who survives him, with one son. 

Chauncey Henry Hubbard, the only son of Mr. Boardman 
Hubbard, was born in Middletown, Conn., Feb. 10, 1819. He 
entered college from Springfield, Mass., where his father was for 
many years inspector of the U. S. Arsenal. 

He taught for a while at the South, and afterwards studied 
theology, in part in the Yale Divinity School, and was licensed 
to preach by the Litchfield (Conn.) South Association in 1845. 
During the next year he supplied the pulpit of the Congrega- 
tional church in Stanwich, a parish in Greenwich, Conn., and 
from there went to the 1st Presbyterian Church in Sandlake, 
N. Y.jWhere he was ordained pastor in February, 1848. In 1851 
he removed to Bennington, Vt., where he served as acting pastor 
of the 2d Congregational Church until Jan. 1, 1872. During this 
time he had made two extended foreign tours, and his resignation 
of his pastorate was caused by the impaired health of a relative, 
which obliged him to spend the next two winters in the South, 
and to cross the ocean again in the summer of 1873. His resi- 
dence continued in Bennington, where he died Aug. 22, 1876, 
aged 57 years. While in Philadelphia early in the preceding 
June, he was thrown down by a passing wagon, and while weak- 
ened by the injuries thus sustained he contracted a cold which 
developed a latent disease of the kidneys, from the effects of 
which he died. 



262 

He was married, in April, 1854, to Martha E., daughter of Syl- 
vester Norton, of Troy, N. Y., who survives him. Their only 
child, a son, died in 1861. 

1842. 

Seth Bradley Stone, son of Seth and Abigail (Bradley) 
Stone, was born in Madison, Conn., Sept. 30, 1817. 

After teaching for some years in Williamsburg, L. I., he pur- 
sued a course of theological study in the Union Theological Sem- 
inary, from 1847 to 1850. In the latter year he was ordained to 
the ministry, and sailed from New York, October 14, as a mis- 
sionary from the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions, to the Zulus, in South Africa. He arrived at Port 
Natal in January, 1851, and labored zealously, particularly in 
preparing books for the natives in their own language, until 1871, 
when he visited this country to provide for the education of his 
children. In the summer of 1873 he returned with his wife to 
Africa, but a year and a half later they were obliged to leave 
their post on account of her failing health. 

He died in Harlem, N. Y., January 27, 1877, from the effects of 
a complicated disease of the kidneys, which had confined him to 
the house for almost a year. 

Mr. Stone married April 26, 1848, Katharine M. Arthur, of New 
York city, who survives him with four sons and three daughters, 
— two children having died in early childhood. 

1843. 

John Kendrick, only son of the Hon. Greene Kendrick (Lieu- 
tenant-Governor of Connecticut in 1851) and Anna M. (Leaven- 
worth) Kendrick, was born in Charlotte, N. C, May 27, 1825. In 
1829 his father removed from Charlotte to Waterbury, Conn. 

After a short business experience in New York City, he studied 
law for a year with Norton J. Buel, Esq., of Waterbury, and for 
the next year (1846-7) in the Yale Law School. He did not, 
however, practice his profession with any regularity until a few 
years before his death. His residence continued in Waterbury, 
with the exception of a brief period (about 1859) during which he 
was an assistant editor of the Daily Register in New Haven. He 
represented Waterbury several times in the Legislature, was for 
three tei-ms Mayor of the city, and through his life an active 
democratic politician. In 1870 he was nominated for Congress, 
but was not elected. 



263 

He died in Waterbury, May 27, 1877, being on that day 52 
years of age. He had been confined to his house for several 
weeks by rheumatism, which so seriously affected the bones of 
one leg that an operation was performed and some pieces of the 
bone removed. Afterwards an artery in the leg burst, and he 
lived but a few hours. 

In October, 1849, he was married to Miss Marian Marr, of 
Waterbury, who survives him with two of their three children. 
One son graduated at this college in 1872. 

1844. 

Charles Foster, son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth Foster, was 
bom in Lansingburgh, Rensselaer County, N. Y., Sept. 2, 1823. 
In 1836 his parents removed to Pompey, Onondaga County, where 
he was prepared for College. 

He studied law successively with Hon. Victor Birdseye, of 
Pompey, Hon. B. D. Noxon, of Syracuse, and Hon. John Van 
Buren, of Albany. In October, 1847, he was admitted to the bar, 
but on account of health was advised to try a more active life, 
and occupied himself in the cattle-trade, until January, 1853, 
when he began practice as a lawyer in Cortland, N. Y., where he 
remained until his death. He was in partnership with R. H. 
Duell, from January, 1857, till 1874, when failing health com- 
pelled him to give up his profession. He had been for some years 
subject to pulmonary difficulties, and spent the three succeeding 
winters in Washington, but without any marked improvement. 
From November, 1875, to February, 1877, he was employed as an 
examiner in the U. S. Patent Office. He died, of consumption, in 
Cortland, May 23, 1877, aged 53 years. 

Besides local offices of trust and honor, the only public position 
.which he filled was that of member of the State Legislature in 
1870. In his own village he was held in the highest esteem. 

He was married, Oct. 13, 1853, to Jane M., daughter of Richard 
G. Fowler, of Cortland, who survives him. They had no children. 

1845. 

Augustus William Lord, son of Reuben and Sarah Lord, was 
born in Lyme, Conn., April 3, 1825. 

He studied law in the Yale Law School, and began practice in 
Colchester, Conn., which town he represented in the State Legis- 
ture in 1850. Just after this date he removed to New York city, 



264 

where he continued in the practice of law for about twenty years. 
He then returned to Lyme, where he resided until his death. He 
was missed from home on Thursday, October 21, 1875, and his 
body was found in a lake in the neighborhood the next day. The 
circumstances proved that he had committed suicide. He was 
unmarried. 

1846. 

William Banfield Capron was born in Uxbridge, Mass., 
April 14, 1824, son of Deacon William C. and Chloe D. Capron. 

The year after graduation he spent as a private tuter in Balti- 
more, and then (Dec, 1847) became a teacher in the Hopkins 
Grammar School in Hartford, Conn., and from 1848 its Principal. 
This situation he resigned in July, 1863, to enter the Theological 
Seminary in Andover, with the design of becoming a foreign mis- 
sionary. He graduated at Andover in 1856, was ordained in his 
native town, Sept. 3, and sailed under the appointment of the 
American Board, for the Madura (India) mission, in November, 
1856. He was stationed at Mana Madura, and except for one 
visit to America (May, 1872 to Sept., 1874) continued his useful 
ministry there until his death. He died very suddenly, of disease 
of the heart, at Mana Madura, Oct. 6, 1876, aged 52| years. 

He was married, Oct. 1, 1856, to ISarah B., daughter of Rev. 
Henry B. Hooker, D.D., of Boston. Mrs. Capron survives him, 
with two daughters. Their only son died in infancy. 

1848. 

Charles Condit, the son of Stephen and Phebe S. Condit, was 
born in Orange, N. J., Dec. 8, 1827. 

He studied law in Columbus, O. and in New York, was admit- 
ted to the bar in New York in October, 1850, and from that time to 
the day of his death, was engaged in the successful practice of the 
law in Brooklyn. From 1859 his brother, Stephen Condit (Y. C. 
1856), was in partnership with him. He died suddenly, of paral- 
ysis of the heart, in Brooklyn, Oct. 19, 1876, in the 49th year oi 
his age. He was unmarried. 

Charles Theodore Cottox, born in Natchez, Miss., Dec. 21, 
1825, died of consumption in Washington, D. C, March 15, 1877, 
aged 61 years. 

He entered College at the beginning of the Sophomore year, 
and after graduation returned home to teach school. He after- 



265 

wards studied law and began practice in St. Paul, Minn., in 1855. 
At the time of the breaking out of the late civil war he was prac- 
ticing his profession in Memphis, Tenn., and on a visit to Natchez 
was driven North by a vigilance committee, on account of his loy- 
alty to the U. S. Government. He came to Washington in 1862, 
and was from that time until his death a clerk in the Interior 
Department. 

Charles Loweet, eldest child of Romeo Lowrey (Y. C. 1818) 
and Elizabeth A. (Whittlesey) Lowrey, was bom in Southington, 
Conn., Feb. 12, 1829. 

He studied law with Judge Thomas B. Osborne, of Fairfield, 
Conn., and subsequently in Brooklyn, N. Y., and was admitted to 
the bar in October, 1850. He settled in Brooklyn, where he 
became widely and favorably known as a lawyer, and a public- 
spirited citizen. He was for a long time the secretary and counsel 
of the Dime Savings Bank in Brooklyn. In 1868 he was a mem- 
ber of the State Constitutional Convention. 

He died in Brooklyn, of inflammation of the bowels, after ten 
days' illness, Feb. 17, 1877, aged 48 years. 

He was married in 1853 to Sarah, daughter of Obadiah W. 
Jones, of Fairfield, by whom he had one son and one daughter. 

1849. 

Edward Parmelee Smith, son of the Rev. Noah Smith (Dart- 
mouth Coll. 1818) and Laura (Parmelee) Smith, was born in South 
Britain, a parish of Southbury, Conn., where his father was pastor, 
June 3, 1827. On the death of his father, in Oct., 1830, he was 
taken to the home of an uncle. Col. Ashbel Smith, of Hanover, 
N. H. He entered Dartmouth College in 1845, and this College 
two years later. 

After graduation, he taught school for three years in Mobile, 
Ala., and then began the study of theology in the Yale Seminary. 
In March, 1853, he removed to N. Y. City, and studied in the 
Union Theol. Seminary, laboring also in connection with the Chil- 
dren's Aid Society, until the fall of 1854, when he went to Ando- 
ver Seminary for the closing year of theological study. After 
another year spent in preaching in Rockville, Conn., and Pompey, 
N. Y., he was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in 
Pepperell, Mass., June 11, 1856. In Jan., 1863, he offered his 
services to the IT. S. Christian (Commission, and was employed, at 



266 

first as one of the General Field Agents and later as Field Secre- 
tary, until the closing of the work of the Commission, in January, 
1866. He had, meantime, resigned his pastorate in 1864, and 
now entered the service of the American Missionary Association 
(devoted especially to educational work among the Freedmen) as 
District Secretary at Cincinnati. In 1867 he was called to N. Y. 
City as General Field Agent of the Association, and in that 
capacity performed a large share of the work of planting schools 
for freedmen in the South. When President Grant in 1871 invited 
cooperation in the work of Indian civilization, Mr. Smith resigned 
his position in New York, and offered his services as Indian Agent. 
He was appointed to the Chippewa Agency in Minnesota, and 
remained there until unexpectedly offered the position of Commis- 
Bioner of Indian Affairs of the U. S. Government in April, 1873. 

This position he resigned in 1875, and was immediately elected 
President of Howard University, in Washington. He accepted 
the Presidency, and in the spring of 1876 sailed for Africa, on invi- 
tation of the American Missionary Association, to survey and 
report on the work of their missions in that country. He left 
Sierra Leone in May in good health, but while on board the steam- 
ship Ambric on his way from Monrovia (in Liberia) was taken 
with the African fever, and was too ill to land at Accra, as he had 
intended. He died on shipboard, in the Gulf of Guinea, near the 
island of Fernando Po, on the night of June 15, and was buried 
on the 16th at the Presbyterian Mission Station, Old Calabar. 

He was married, June 3, 1856, to Hannah C, daughter of Levi 
Bush, of Westfield, Mass., who survives him with one of their two 
children. 

1862. 

Joseph Frederick Waring, son of William R. Waring, M.D., 
and Ann (Johnston) Waring, and brother of James J. Waring 
(Y. C. 1850), was born in Savannah, Ga., Feb. 13, 1832. 

He studied law in Philadelj^hia for a year and a half after 
graduation, and then spent a year in European travel. After his 
return he was a planter, and during the late war was in the Con- 
federate service, with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. At the 
time of his death he was living in Savannah as the head of the 
forwarding department of the Central Railroad, and returned 
from a Northern vacation to his post just as the yellow fever of 
September, 1876, was reaching its height. His duties obliged 
him to be in the part of the city most subject to the epidemic, and 
he was attacked on Sept. 30, and died Oct. 4, at the age of 44. 



267 



1855. 



SiMEO^r Thomas Hyde, son of James N. and Mary Ann 
(Thomas) Hyde, was bom in Brooklyn, N. Y., July 6, 1834. 
One of his brothers, Rev. James T. Hyde, was graduated at this 
College in 1847. He entered College with the class of 1854, and 
remained with them until the Senior year. 

He taught school and studied law for two years, and on being 
admitted to the bar began practice in 1857 in Colchester, Conn., 
the home of his widowed mother. A year or two later he 
removed to New York City, where and in Brooklyn he practiced 
law until a short time before his death. He served in the late 
war in the 13th Regiment N. Y. State National Guard, and as 
1st Lieutenant of the 15th Conn. Volunteers. His health was 
permanently impaired by his army experience and by injuries 
received in the New York riots of 1863. He died in Hartford, 
Conn., June 2, 1877, in his 43d year. 

He married. May 3, 1859, Charlotte B., daughter of William A. 
Morgan, of Hartford, who survives him with five children. 



1856. 

George Blagden Bacon, fifth son of Rev. Dr. Leonard Bacon 
(Y. C. 1820) and Lucy (Johnson) Bacon, was born in New Haven, 
Conn., May 23, 1836. 

He entered college as Freshman, but left in November of the 
Sophomore year, on account of ill-health ; in 1866 he received a 
degree and was enrolled with his class. In April, 1856, he ob- 
tained a position as Captain's Clerk on the U. S. ship Portsmouth, 
and in that capacity and as acting purser, spent two years in a 
cruise in the East Indies and the China and Japan seas, and in 
European travel. After his return he spent two years in the Yale 
Divinity School, and on the completion of his course there re- 
ceived a call to the pastorate of the Congregational church in 
Orange Valley, N. J., where he was ordained March 27, 1861. 
He retained this charge, though absent thrice for long periods on 
account of the delicate state of his health, until his death, in 
Orange, Sept. 15, 1876, at the age of 40. Hia disease was con- 
sumption, and his death was preceded by eight months of enforced 
absence from public duties ; but his character and attainments 
had given him a remarkable hold on the affection and respect of 
his people, and of a wide circle of friends. The degree of Doctor 



268 

of Divinity was bestowed on bim by the University of the city of 
New York in 1872. 

He was married in Kent, Conn., May 28, 1862, to Miss Frances 
Jane Mills, of Kent, who survives him with two daughters. 

Ira Dunlap, son of Thomas Dunlap, was born, Feb. 22, 1832, 
in Middleport, Niagara County, N. Y., and died in Boston, Mass., 
June 18, 1876, aged 44 years. 

He spent the year after graduation in travel and in the settle- 
ment of his father's estate. He then engaged in banking in 
Rochester, N. Y., and was for several years cashier of the Roches- 
ter Exchange Bank. The later years of his life were spent in 
travel and in the pursuit of health. 

1857. 

Richard Henry Green, son of Richard Green, was born in 
New Haven, Conn., Nov. 14, 1833. 

After leaving College he taught school in Milford, Conn., for 
about eighteen months, and then in the Bennington Seminary, 
Bennington, Vt. While here he began the study of medicine, 
which he continued at Dartmouth College, receiving his degree in 
1864. In the meantime he entered the U. S. Navy, Nov. 5, 1863, 
as Acting Assistant Surgeon, a position which he held until the 
close of the war. He then settled in Hoosick, N. Y., and followed 
his prolession there until March 23, 1877, when he died, of disease 
of the heart, at the age of 43. 

While in the navy he was married to Miss Charlotte Caldwell, 
of Bennington, who survives him with one daughter. 

William Arad Thompson was born in Middleboro', Mass., 
June 21, 1835. 

He began the study of law in New Haven, and continued it at 
Harvard University, where he received the degree of LL.B. in 
1860. He was admitted to the bar in Boston in April, 1860, and 
at once entered on the practice of his profession there. In 1869 
he removed to his native town, but two years later returned to 
Boston where he remained in practice until his death. He was 
also engaged largely in real estate transactions, and the ill-success 
of his ventures caused despondency to such an extent that he lost 
control of himself and took his own life. He was found dead in 
his rooms at Newton Highlands, on the morning of Sept. 5, 1876. 



269 

He was married, Nov. 14, 1866, to Ella M., daughter of James 
M. Williams, Esq., of Cambridge, Mass., who died before him. 
He left several children, 

1858. 

MoNTELiFS Abbott, son of James and Caroline (Montelius) 
Abbott, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 2, 1838. 

He spent a year or two after graduation in France, and then 
began the study of law in the Law School of Harvard University. 
Subsequently he pursued his studies in Philadelphia, and received 
the degree of LL.B. from the University of Pennsylvania in June, 
1862, being admitted to the bar at the same time. He afterwards 
practiced his profession in Philadelphia. His death, which 
occurred in that city, May 18, 1877, w^as the result of ill-health 
caused by a sun-stroke a few years since. He was unmarried. 

Edwaed Payson" Batchelor, son of Deacon Stephen F. and 
Mary Ann (Fletcher) Batchelor, was born in Whitinsville, Mass., 
Jan. 30, 1835. 

He taught school in Litchfield County, Conn., for the most of 
the time until he entered the Law School at Cambridge, Mass., in 
Sept., 1860. In 1862 he graduated from Harvard with the degree 
of LL.B., and was admitted to the bar in Worcester, Mass. On 
the 1st of March in that year he sailed for San Francisco, where 
he practiced his profession until his death in that city, of pneu- 
monia, Dec, 28, 1876, in his 42d year. He was unmarried. 

Edwakd Seymour, son of Rev. Ebenezer and Mary (Hoe) 
Seymour, was born in Bloomfield, N. J., Apr. 1, 1835, 

A few months after graduation he entered the ofiice of the New 
York Times as a reporter. He was assistant-editor of the Times 
from 1859 till Aug. 1, 1867, when he became connected with the 
publishing-house of Messrs. Scribner & Co., of which two or 
three years later he became a member. He so continued until his 
death, at his residence in Bloomfield, Apr. 28, 1877, aged 42 
years. He had been worn down by overwork, and was ordered 
away for a vacation ; but on the night before he was expecting to 
leave home, was attacked with congestion of the brain, which ended 
his life within a week. Besides his proper work, Mr, Seymour 
had written frequently for the periodicals of the day, and had 
performed much literary labor in connection with the publications 
18 



270 

issued by his firm. For his industry, energy, and integrity, he 
was very highly esteemed. 

He was married, Sept. 22, 1859, to Miss Sarah J., daughter of 
Rev. J. M. Sherwood, who survives him with their three children. 

1862. 

James Alfred Dunbak was born in Carlisle, Pa., Dec. 21, 
1840. 

After graduation he resided in Carlisle, studying and practising 
law, until the summer of 1869, when he removed to Columbia^ 
S. C. He there formed a law-partnership with his classmate, Hon. 
D. H. Chamberlain, then Attorney-General of the State, which 
continued until Jan. 1, 1873, when he entered into a similar part- 
nership with J. H. Runkle, Esq., of Columbia. He died in March, 
1876, while in Aiken, S. C, for the benefit of his health. 

He was married, in Sept., 1869, to Miss Anne Stringfellow, of 
Carlisle. 

Merrttt Cicero Page was born in Wyoming, N. Y., June 12, 
1840, from which place he entered College. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of Hon. J. W. 
Edmonds of New York City for two years, and settled the next 
year in Chattanooga, Tenn., in the practice of his profession. 
Here he continued until May, 1868, when in consequence of the 
continued prostration of business, he removed to Wyoming Terri- 
tory, where in Laramie City and the mining camp of Sweetwater 
he remained until January, 1871. He then removed to Raders- 
burg, Montana, where he continued in the practice of law. He 
was drowned in Madison River in that Territory, May 13, 1877. 
From May, 1872, until his death, he was IT. S. District Attorney 
for Montana. 

1863. 

Henry Edwards Cooley, son of Charles J. and Lucy B. (Ely) 
Cooley, was born Apr. 5, 1838, in Norwich, Conn., where his 
youth was spent. He was fitted for college at Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered from Newton, Mass., where his wid- 
owed mother then resided. 

He was engaged in teaching in Gen. Russell's Collegiate and 
Commercial Institute in New Haven, for a year after graduation, 
beginning in the mean time his theological studies, which he com- 
pleted in the Yale Divinity School in 1866. He was ordained, 



271 

Aug. 7, 1866, pastor of the First (Congregational) Church in 
Plymouth, Conn., where he remained until Mch. 31, 1869. He 
was subsequently for one year the acting pastor of the First 
Church in Winsted, Conn., and again for a year the stated supply 
of the Congregational church in South Weymouth, Mass. He 
was installed, May 9, 1872, pastor of the Congregational church 
in Littleton, Mass., and was dismissed Oct. 29, 1874, to accept a 
call from the Congregational Church in North Leominster, Mass., 
where he was installed, Nov. 10. In this field he labored with 
diligence until prostrated about the first of February, 1877, by an 
attack of diphtheria of a very painful type, which terminated his 
life on the 17th of the same month. He was married, Oct. 10, 
1866, to Kate A., daughter of Charles H. Sedgwick, of Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y., who survives him with two children. 

Thomas Clark Steele, son of Thomas C. and Jane Steele, 
was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., May 5, 1838. 

The three years after leaving college were spent in the study of 
theology, for the first year in the Western Theol. Seminary, 
in Allegheny, Pa., and for the last two years in the Union Semin- 
ary, N. Y. City. He was married, Dec. 11, 1866, to Kate B. 
Corbin, of New Rochelle, N. Y., where and in Pittsburgh, the 
next few years of his life were passed. He was ordained, June 
20, 1871, as pastor of the Presbyterian Church in White Plains, 
N. Y., but resigned in 1873 on account of ill-health. He after- 
wards resided in New Rochelle, employed in teaching, and while 
on a visit to Pittsburgh, to make arrangements for the removal 
of his family thither, took a violent cold, which aggravated the 
consumptive tendencies with which he was struggling, and caused 
his death, in that city, March 29, 1877. 

1866. 

Charles Converse Chatfield, son of Oliver S. Chatfield, 
was born in Bethany, Conn., Apr. 21, 1841. 

During his Senior year he established with others of his class 
the Yale Courant^ which proved the pioneer of a large number 
of college newspapers. Mr. Chatfield remained in New Haven as 
editor and proprietor of the Yale Courant and the College 
Courant until 1875, when the latter was united with other papers 
in the New England Journal of Education^ having its ofiice in 
Boston, of Avhich he became the publisher. He resided in New- 



272 

ton, Mass., and died, of consumption, while visiting in New 
Haven, Aug. 22, 1876, at the age of 35. He was married in Mid- 
dleburgh, K. Y., Dec. 24, 1867, to Miss Frances C. Watson, who 
survives him with two sons and one daughter. 

1867. 

Henry Weyman Walker, son of George L. and Isabella 
(Weyman) Walker, was born in New York City, March 20, 1845. 

He traveled somewhat extensively after graduation, and subse- 
quently studied law in New York, where he died suddenly, Aug. 
16, 1876, aged 31 years. 

1871. 

Charles Morris Swann, son of Thomas Swann, was born in 
Crowland, Lincolnshire, England, Feb. 23, 1844. His parents 
afterwards removed to this country, and resided during his college 
life in Guilderland, Albany County, N. Y. He enlisted at the 
outbreak of the late civil war, in the 11th New York Volunteers, 
and received in the battle of Gettysburg a bullet which penetrated 
the shoulder and remained lodged in the neighborhood of the 
lungs, — contributing, perhaps, to cause the disease which ter- 
minated his life. After leaving the service, he completed, among 
many discouragements from poverty, his preparatory studies at 
Claverack, N. Y, and his college course in New Haven. He then 
returned to Claverack as a teacher, until so much enfeebled by 
the progress of consumption that he removed in 1874 to Minne- 
sota, where he became principal of the high school in Mankato. 
He spent the summer of 1875 in San Francisco, attending (in pur 
suance of studies begun in Claverack) medical lectures and 
receiving a degree. The fogs of the coast aggravated, however, 
his disease. He was able to finish another year of teaching in 
Mankato, but grew gradually feebler, until his death in that city, 
Jan. 11, 1877, aged nearly 33 years. He was married, in the 
spring of 1876, to Miss D. A. Hall, who survives him. 

1874. 

Thomas Armstrong Bent, son of David J. Bent, was born in 
West Chester, Pa., April 23, 1844, and died after a brief illness in 
Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 31, 1876, aged 32 years. 

He entered College in 1869, and remained with the Class of 
1873 until the close of the Junior year. He had been since his 
graduation a member of the Divinity School of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in Philadelphia. He was unmarried. 



273 



1875. 



Wilbur Allen Fuller, last surviving son of Hon. Allen C. 
Fuller, was born in Belvidere, Boone Co., Illinois, July 16, 1854, 
and died in Denver, Colorado, Jan. 13, 1877, of consumption. 

In 1868, at the age of 14, he entered the preparatory depart- 
ment of Beloit College, in Beloit, Wise, and in 1872 at the close 
of the Freshman year there, he became a member of the corre- 
sponding class in this College. 

The most of the time since graduation he spent in California 
and in Colorado in the vain pursuit of health. 

1876. 

Henry Clay Easton, youngest son of Shadford and Eliza 
Easton, of Covington, Ky., was born in that city, Nov. 7, 1852, 
and died there, Aug. 1, 1876, aged 23 years and 8 months. 

He finished his College course with great difficulty, under the 
continually increasing inroads of tubercular consumption; and 
a cold contracted by unusual exposure a few weeks after grad- 
uation brought on a hemorrhage which terminated his life. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 
1823. 

William Henry Cogswell, the eldest child of Col. William 
and Mercy Cogswell, was born, Dec. 3, 1798, in that part of Pres- 
ton, Conn., which is now included in the town of Griswold. He 
was employed on his father's farm until he entered on the study 
of medicine in New Haven. 

Immediately upon receiving his degree he settled in Plainfield, 
Conn., at first in partnership with Dr. Josiah Fuller, but after two 
or three years he established a separate office and continued there, 
prominent and respected in the active practice of his profession, 
until his death, after two days' illness, Nov. 22, 1876, aged 78 
years. In 1830 he represented the town in the Legislature, and 
in 1860 was a member of the State Senate. For nearly three 
years during the late war he was a special agent, appointed by 
the Governor, to care for the sick and wounded soldiers of Con- 
necticut regiments on the field or in the hospitals. 

He was married, at about the time he began practice, to Mary 
L., daughter of Dr. Josiah Fuller. After her death he was again 



274 

married, in 1829, to Miss Lucretia A. Payne, of Canterbury, Conn., 
who survives him with five children. 

1828. 

Isaac Hartshorn, the youngest son of Edward and Mary 
Hartshorn, was born in Manchester, Vt., July 6, 1804, and died in 
Providence, R. I., Jan. 29, 1877, aged V2 years. 

He went to Providence, R. 1., in early life, to reside with an 
uncle, and after taking his medical degree returned there to be- 
gin practice. He was, however, soon turned aside from profes- 
sional life to some business ventures for which lie found himself 
to have a special adaptation. He became interested in the manu- 
facture of india rubber shoes, and applied himself with great en- 
ergy and perseverance to tlie development of the inventions which 
he introduced. In this connection he became a party to several 
celebrated law suits. He was also interested at a later period in 
other manufacturing enterprises ; as president and agent, for ex- 
ample, of the Burnside Rifle Company. He made three visits to 
Europe, on account of his health, and while on the last return 
voyage, was attacked with paralysis, which some three years later 
terminated his life. 

Dr. Hartshorn married a Miss Gardiner, of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
by whom he had issue, a son and two daughters. The daughters 
alone survive. 

1829. 

Almon Hawley, the sixth child of Timothy R. and Deborah 
Hawley, was born in Farmington, Conn., Aug. 11, 1801. His 
parents removed to Ohio, in 1802, settling in 1811 in Jefferson, 
where he lived for the rest of his life. 

On graduation he at once began the practice of medicine, in 
which he continued actively until his death, of pneumonia, Nov. 
3, 1876, in Keokuk, Iowa, while on a visit to a relative. 

Dr. Hawley was first married, Oct. 20, 1827, to Miss Susan A. 
Dunn, of Connecticut, who died Aug. 8, 1839 ; by her he had six 
children, the only one who survived infancy, a daughter, ^being 
still living. He was married a second time, Oct. 27, 1841, to Miss 
Sophronia Marsh, daughter of Alvin Marsh, a prominent lawyer 
of Manlius, N. Y. She, with four of their six children, — two 
sons and two daughters, — survives him. 



275 



1837. 



Artemas Bell, son of James and Mary (Percival) Bell, was 
born in Chester, Mass., May 7, 1815. His father's death (in 1830) 
obliged him to support himself; and by working on a farm in the 
summers and teaching in the winters, he gained the means to 
carry out his strong desire of studying medicine. He was at first 
a pupil of Dr. Jairus Case, of Granby, Conn., and finished his 
preparation in this college. 

After receiving his degree he established himself in Southwick, 
Mass., but soon removed to the neighboring town of Southampton, 
where he was a successful and highly esteemed physician for up- 
w^ards of thirty years. His health then failing he removed to 
Feeding Hills, Mass., where he spent the remainder of his life as 
an invalid in the family of his brother, Dr. Cyrus Bell. He died 
in Feeding Hills, March 18, 1877, in his 62d year. 

He was married, May, 1839, to Eliza, daughter of Col. Thad- 
deus Foot, of Southwick. 

1839. 

Sidney Haskell Lyman, the eldest of eight children of Nor- 
man Lyman, M.D., and Eunice (Smith) Lyman, was born, Nov. 7, 
1813, in Glastonbury, Conn., where his father resided until 1828, 
when he removed to Warren, in Litchfield County. 

While in the Medical School, Dr. Lyman assisted Dr. Charles 
Hooker, the Professor of Anatomy, in the preparation for his lec- 
tures, and so laid the foundation for somewhat unusual surgical 
skill. After graduation he taught school for a brief period, and 
for a year practiced medicine in New Fairfield, Conn. He was 
married, March 31, 1841, to Almira, daughter of Ira Eaton, of 
Kent, Conn., and in the following autumn, he removed to New 
Preston, a village in the township of Washington, Conn., where a 
few months later he was joined by a younger brother, on his 
graduation from this Medical School. They practiced their pro- 
fession together until 1867, and from that date separately. 

After the death of his first wife. Dr. Lyman was married, Apr. 
20, 1847, to Abigail Esther, daughter of Birdsey Beardsley, Esq., 
of Kent. He represented the town in the State Legislature in 
18G1, and was an examining surgeon during the war. He died in 
New Preston, of softening of the brain, Feb. 16, 1877, aged 68 
years. Of the three children of his first marriage, one daughter 
is still living. By his second wife he had four children, three of 
whom survive him. 



276 



1843. 



George Edwin Perkins, son of Moses and Mary (Harrison) 
Perkins, was born in New Haven, Conn., May 13, 1821. 

After receiving his degree he established himself as a physician 
in North Madison, Conn., and in 1850 removed to Waterbury, 
Conn., where he practiced his profession continuously until his 
death. For a few years his younger brother. Dr. Moses H. 
Perkins, who graduated at this Medical School in 1 849, was asso- 
ciated in business with him. He died after ten days' illness, of 
congestion of the brain, in Waterbury, Aug. 22, 1876, aged 55 
years. 

He was married, May 13, 1858, to Margaret A., daughter of 
Ard Welton, of Waterbury. She died in October, 1860, aged 
33, and he was again married in March, 1874, to Mary J., eldest 
daughter of Lemuel H. Munson, of Waterbury, who survives 
him. He had no children. 

1847. 

John Deacon died in Waterbury, Conn., June 9, 1877, aged 
49 years. 

He had practiced his profession in Waterbury for nearly thirty 
years. 

1852. 

Pierre Robeau Holly, son of Wm. Welles Holly, of Stamford, 
Conn., died in Hamilton, Bermuda, March 3, 1877. 

He practiced medicine for a few years in the West Indies, and 
then in Greenwich, Conn., and from 1860 in Stamford. 

Welles Hamilton Sellew, son of Philip H. Sellew, was born 
in Portland (then a part of Chatham), Conn., Sept. 11, 1829. 

He settled in Moscow, Livingston County, N. Y., in the prac- 
tice of his profession, in the autumn of 1852, and remained there, 
gaining the entire confidence of the community, until his death, 
June 23, 1876, in his 47th year. He had suffered for several years 
from diabetes, which terminated in consumption. 

He was married. May 30, 1854, to Miss Helen B. Smith, who 
with two sons survives him. 

Zebulon Wanton Thomson, son of John and Anna M. Thom- 
son, was a native of Watertown, N. Y., and graduated from 
Hamilton College in .1849. 



277 

After taking his medical degree he engaged in the practice of 
his profession for a short time in Buffalo, N. Y., and thence re- 
moved to Indianapolis, Ind. He afterwards spent some years in 
California, and later settled in Virginia City, Nevada. In the 
latter part of the year 1875 he returned to California, and died in 
a hospital in Auburn in that State, April 27, 1876. He was never 
married. 

SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1866. 

Adeian John Ebell, son of Henry T. and Mary (Palm) Ebell, 
was born Sept. 20, 1840, in Jaffnapatam, on the Island of Ceylon. 
When about ten years of age, he was sent to this country to be 
educated. He entered the Academical Department of this college, 
with the class of 1862, remaining however for two terms only. 
The next year he again entered college with the class of 1863, but 
retired at the end of one term. He then taught music in New 
Haven and in Chicago, and served for a short time in the Indian 
war in Minnesota, with the rank of 1st Lieutenant, and then 
returned to New Haven and graduated at the Scientific School. 

He afterwards studied medicine at the Albany Medical College, 
graduating M.D. in 1869. In the meantime he had begun to lec- 
ture before schools and lyceums on natural science, and in 1871 
he established himself in New York City as director of " The 
International Academy of Natural Science," which comprised a 
plan of travel and study in Europe for annually organized classes 
of young ladies. He embarked from New York, on one of these 
tours, late in March, 1877, on board the steamship Frisia, and was 
taken ill almost immediately. He arrived, however, in the harbor 
at Hamburg, April 10th, and was able with assistance to get on 
board the small steamer which was to carry passengers to the dock, 
but died before reaching the shore. The immediate cause of death 
was rheumatism of the heart. 

He was married, in September, 1874, to Oriana L., daughter of 
Dr. A. J. Steele, of New York, who survives him. 

1872. 

Thomas Perkins Nevins, son of David H. and Cornelia L. 
(Perkins) Nevins, was born, March 1, 1850, in the city of New 
York, whence his parents removed in 1859 to Waterford, Conn. 



:4V» 

He was educated for the profession of a civil engineer, but not 
finding any satisfactory opening he abandoned the plan. The 
greater part of the two years after graduation he spent with 
friends in New York City. In the summer of 1874 his health 
began to fail, and after his return from a brief pedestrian tour in 
England grew rapidly worse. In November he returned to his 
father's house in Waterlord, and there died in January, 1875, aged 
nearly 25 years. 

1875. 

Wells Cushman Lake died in Lake Forest, 111., Oct. 3, 1876, 
aged 22 years. He returned to his home, in Lake Forest, on 
graduation, and was for the next year one of the proprietors of a 
" School of Art" in Chicago, giving also some instruction else- 
where in drawing. He was attacked with hemorrhage from the 
lungs in July, 1876, and gradually declined until his death. He 
was unmarried. 

THEOLOGICAL DEPART.MENT. 

1875. 

Chaelks Fitch Mouse, son of Amasa and Sarah A. Morse, 
was born in Union, Conn., Sept. 6, 1 844. 

He graduated at Amherst College in 1872, and immediately 
entered on the study of theology in this Seminary, his residence 
being at Stafford Springs, Conn. 

He died, of typhoid fever, Aug. 29, 1876, in Brookfield, Mass., 
where he was stated supply of the pulpit of the Evangelical Con- 
gregational Church. 

Marshall Reuben Peck died at his father's residence in 
Brookfield, Vt., Aug. 6, 1876, aged 29 years. 

He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1870, was for two 
years principal of a graded school in Northfield, began the study 
of theology in the Chicago Theol. Seminary, and spent the last 
two years of the course here. 

He was ordained in Brookfield, Sept. 2, 1875, and sailed 'with 
his wife, Mrs. Helen N. Peck, from New York City, Oct. 2, to 
join the Madura ^Mission of the American Board of Commission- 
ers for Foreign Missions. They arrived at their destination in 
December, but exposure to the climate of Southern India caused 
an alarming development of disease in Mr. Peck, such as to com- 
pel his almost immediate return. 



279 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
1871. 

Michael Edward Downes, son of William and Ellen Downes, 
was born in New Haven, Conn., in May, 1851. 

In December, 1871, he was appointed clerk in the Probate Court 
of New Haven, and only resigned the position on account of ill- 
health about a year before his death. He was soon after appointed 
assistant clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, and so continued 
until his death, of consumption, in this city, Sept. 22, 1876, at the 
age of 25. He was unmarried. 



[Notice of the following deaths were received too late for inser- 
tion elsewhere.] 

1813, 

FiiEDERicK MoRGAx, a native of Groton, Conn., died in Col- 
chester, Conn., June 18, 1877, aged 85 years. 

He taught for about six years after leaving college — from 1816 
to 1818 — as a Tutor in this College, so that at the time of his death 
he was the oldest living former officer of the college. He also 
studied medicine here, receiving his degree in 1819. In January, 
1 820, he began practice in Colchester, where he soon married a 
daughter of Dr. John R. Watrous. In 1824 he removed to Middle 
Haddam, and in the spring of 1826 to Middletown, and again 
three years later to Ellington; but in Oct., 1830, he returned to 
Colchester, where he remained until his death, and as long as his 
health permitted was engaged in the practice of his profession. 
He was confined to his house for the most of the year preceding 
his death. 

His wife survives him with several of their children. 

1835. 
Ebenezer Banks Adams died at his residence in Green's 
Farms, Westport, Conn., about the middle of June, 1877, aged QQ 
years. He had been a teacher of a private school in Westport for 
all his life, except as disabled by illness. His wife, who surWves 
him, is a daughter of the Rev. Thomas F. Davies {Y. C. 1813). 



SUMMARY. 





Academical Department. 




Class. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Death 


1800 


Thomas Williams, 97. 


Providence, R. I., 


Sept. 29, '76. 


1805 


John 0. Pettibone, 89. 


Simsbury, Conn., 


Aug. 19, '76. 


1806 


Phineas L. Tracy, 90. 


Batavia, N. Y., 


Dec. 22, '76. 


1812 


Samuel L. Edwards, 88. 


Manlius, N. Y., 


April 7, '77. 


i( 


Samuel C. Morgan, 87. 


Norwich, Conn., 


Sept. 11, '76. 


1813 


Frederick Morgan, 85. 


Colchester, Conn., 


June 18, '77. 


1814 


John D. Meers, 83. 


Naugatuck, Conn., 


May 19, '77. 


u 


Thomas S. Wickes, 81. 


Poughkeepsie, N. Y., 


Nov. 30, '76. 


1811 


John Beard, 79. 


Tallahassee, Fla., 


July 15, '76. 


(( 


Smith Clark, 84. 


Haddam, Conn., 


Sept. 12, '76. 


1820 


Samuel K. Sneed, 78. 


Kirkwood, Mo., 


Aug. 30, '76. 


1821 


Enoch Huntington, 75. 


Manchester, Conn., 


Sept. 4, '76. 


u 


Isaac Peck. 74. 


Greenwich, Conn., 


April 29, '77. 


(( 


Charles Robinson, 75. 


New Haven, Conn., 


Oct. 1, '76. 


1822 


John S. Law, 76. 


Loveland, 0., 


Jan. 12, '77. 


u 


Jared B. Waterbury, 77. 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Dec. 31, '76. 


1823 


Alexander W. Marshall, 78. 


Charleston, S. C, 


Nov. 7, '76. 


u 


Joseph Ripley, 72. 


New York City, 


Jan. 1, '77. 


1824 


Selah B. Treat. 73. 


Boston, Mass., 


Mch. 28, '77. 


1825 


William B. Bristol, 70. 


New Haven, Conn., 


Oct. 10, '76. 


u 


William M. Lathrop, 69. 


Hamilton, Mass., 


Aug. 24, '76. 


1827 


Robert A. Hallam, 69. 


New London, Conn,, 


Jan. 4, '77. 


1828 


Ebenezer W. Arms, 71. 


Aurora, N. Y., 


Jan. 15, '77. 


(1 


Frederick W. Chapman, 69. 


Rocky Hill, Conn., 


July 20, '76. 


(( 


Thomas 0. Lincoln, 67. 


Bridgeton, N. J., 


Jan. 20, '77. 


(( 


Christopher Morgan, 68. 


Auburn, N. Y., 


April 3, '77. 


1830 


James Knox, 69. 


Knoxville, 111., 


Oct. 9, '76. 


1832 


Allen T. Caperton. 65. 


Washington, D. C, 


July 26, '76. 


1833 


William P. Johnston, 64. 


Washington, D. C, 


Oct. 24, '76. 


(1 


William N. Matson, 64. 


Long Island Sound, 


Dec. 30, '76. 


u 


George L. Potter, 64. 


Lexington, Miss., 


Feb. 5, '77. 


1834 


Eleazer K. Foster, 64. 


New Haven, Conn., 


June 13, '77. 


" 


Samuel St. John, 63. 


New Caanan, Conn., 


Sept. 9, '76. 


(( 


George Tomlinson, 70. 


Washington, Conn., 


July 16, '76. 


1835 


Ebenezer B. Adams, 66, 


Westport, Conn., 


June, '77. 


" 


Edward Buck, 61. 


Andover, Mass., 


July 16, '76. 


1839 


David J. Burr, 55. -♦ 


Richmond, Va., 


Aug. 3, '76. 


1840 


James P. Hart, 59. 


New Haven, Conn., 


Jan. 10, '77. 


u 


Chauncey H. Hubbard, 57. 


Bennington, Vt., 


Aug. 22, '76. 


1842 


Seth B. Stone, 59. 


New York City, 


Jan. 27, '77. 


1843 


John Kendrick, 52, 


Waterbury, Conn., 


May 27, '77. 


1844 


Charles Foster, 53. 


Cortland, N. Y., 


May 23, '77. 


1845 


A. William Lord, 50. 


Lyme, Conn,, 


Oct. 21, '75. 


1846 


William B. Capron, 52, 


Man4 Madura, India, 


Oct. 6, '76. 


1848 


Charles Condit, 48. 


Brooklyn, N. Y,, 


Oct. 19, '76. 


u 


Charles T. Cotton, 51. 


Washington, D. C, 


Mch. 15, '77. 


u 


Charles Lowrey, 48. 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Feb. 17, '77. 


1849 


Edward P. Smith, 49. 


Gulf of Guinea, Africa, 


June 15, '76. 


1852 


Joseph F. Waring, 44. 


Savannah, Ga., 


Oct. 4, '76. 


1855 


Simeon T. Hyde, 43. 


Hartford, Conn., 


June 2, '77. 



282 



Class. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Death 


1856 


George B. Bacon, 40. 


Orange, N. J., 


Sept. 15, '76. 


1856 


Ira Dunlap, 44. 


Boston, Mass., 


June 18, '76. 


1857 


Richard H. Green, 


Hoosick Corners, N. Y., 


Mch. 23, '77. 


ii 


William A. Thompson, 41. 


Newton, Mass., 


Sept. 5, '76. 


1858 


Montelius Abbott, 38. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


May 18, '77. 


'* 


Edward P. Batchelor, 42. 


San Francisco, CaL, 


Dec. 28, '76. 


u 


Edward Seymour, 42. 


Bloomfield, N. Y., 


April 28, '77. 


1862 


James A. Dunbar, 35. 


Aiken, S. C, 


Mch. '76. 


u 


Merritt C. Page, 37. 


Madison River, Montana. 


May 13, '77. 


1863 


Henry E. Cooley, 38. 


North Leominster, Mass., 


Feb. 17, '77. 


(( 


Thomas C. Steele, 39. 


Pittsburgh, Pa., 


Mch. 29, '77. 


1860 


Charles C. Chatfield, 35. 


New Haven, Conn., 


Aug. 22, '76. 


1867 


Henry W. Walker, 31. 


New York City, 


Aug. 16, '76. 


1871 


Charles M. Swann, 32. 


^Mankato, Minn., 


Jan. 11, '77. 


1874 


Thomas A. Bent, 32. 


Philadelphia, Pa., 


Oct. 31, '76. 


1875 


Wilbur A. Fuller, 22. 


Denver, Col., 


Jan. 13, '77. 


1876 


Henry 0. Easton, 23. 


Covington, Ky., 


Aug. 1, '76. 




Medical Department. 




1823 


William H. Cogswell, 78. 


Plainfield, Conn., 


Nov. 22, '76. 


1828 


Isaac Hartshorn, 72. 


Providence, R. I., 


Jan. 29, '77. 


1829 


Almon Hawley, 75. 


Keokuk, Iowa, 


Nov. 3, '76. 


1837 


Artemas Bell, 62. 


Feeding Hills, Mass., 


Mch. 18, '77. 


1839 


Sidney H. Lyman, 63. 


Washington, Conn., 


Feb. 16, '77. 


1843 


George E. Perkins, 55. 


Waterbury, Conn., 


Aug. 22, '76. 


1847 


John Deacon, 49. 


Waterbury, Conn., 


June 9, '77. 


1852 


Pierre R. HoUy, 


Hamilton, Bermuda, 


Mch. 3, '77. 


u 


WeUes H. Sellew, 46. 


Moscow, N. Y., 


June 23, '76. 


« 


Zebulon W. Thomson. 


Auburn, Cal., 


April 27, '76. 




Sheffield Scientific School. 




1866 


Adrian J. Ebell, 36. 


Hamburg, Germany, 


Apr. 10, '77. 


1872 


Thomas P. Nevins, 25. 


Waterford. Conn., 


Jan. '75. 


1875 


Wells C. Lake, 22. 


Lake Forest, 111., 


Oct. 3, '76. 




Theological Department. 




1875 


Charles F. Morse, 32. 


Brookfield, Mass., 


Aug. 29, '76. 


a 


Marshall R. Peck, 29. 


Brookfield, Vt., 


Aug. 6, '76. 



Law Department. 
1871 Michael E. Downes, 25. New Haven, Conn. Sept. 22, '76. 



The number of deaths reported is 83 and the average age of the graduates of 
the Academical Department is 60 years. 

Of the Academical Graduates 20 were clergymen, 26 lawyers, 3 physicians, 
10 in business, and 3 teachers. 

The deaths are distributed as follows: — in Connecticut, 26; New York, 15; 
Massachusetts, 8 ; New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and District of Columbia, 3 each ; 
Vermont, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Illinois, and California, 2 each ; and the 
remaining 15 in as many different States or foreign countries. 



The oldest surviving graduates are of the Class of 1806:— George Goodwin, 
of East Hartford, Conn., born April 23, 1786; Seth Pierce, of Cornwall, Conn., 
born May 16, 1785. 



INDEX. 



Class. Page. 

1 858 Abbott, Montelius, 269 

1835 Adams, Ebenezer B., 279 

1828 Arms, Ebenezer W., 252 

1856 Bacon, George B., 267 

1858 Batchelor, Edward P.,... 269 

1817 Beard, John, 243 

1837 m Bell, Artemas,.. 275 

1874 Bent, Thomas A., 272 

1825 Bristol, William B., 250 

1835 Buck, Edward, .260 

1839 Burr, David J., 260 

1832 Caperton, Allen T., 256 

1 846 Capron, WiUiam B., 264 

1828 Chapman, Frederick W., _ 253 

1866 Chatfield, Charles C, 271 

1817 Clark, Smith, 244 

1823 m Cogswell, William H., ... 273 

1848 Condit, Charles, 264 

1863 Cooley, Henry E., 270 

1848 Cotton, Charles T., 264 

1847 w Deacon, John, 276 

1871 Z Downes, Michael E., 279 

1862 Dunbar, James A., .270 

1856 Dunlap, Ira,-- 268 

1876 Easton, Henry C, - 273 

1866 5 Ebell, Adrian J., .'. 277 

1812 Edwards, Samuel L., 241 

1 844 Foster, Charles, 263 

1834 Foster, Eleazer K., 258 

1875 Fuller, Wilbur A., 273 

1857 Green, Richard H.,- 268 

1827 Hallam, Robert A., 251 

1840 Hart, James P., 261 

1828 m Hartshorn, Isaac, 274 

1829 OT Hawley, Almon, 274 

1852 m Holly, Pierre R., 276 

1840 Hubbard, Chauncey H.,-. 261 

1821 Huntington, Enoch, 245 

1855 Hyde, Simeon T., 267 

1833 Johnston, WiUiam P., ... 256 
1843 Kendrick, John, 262 



Class. Page. 

1830 Knox, James, 255 

1875 5 Lake, Wells C, - 278 

1825 Lathrop, William M., 251 

1822 Law, John S., 247 

1828 Lincoln, Thomas 0., 253 

1845 Lord, A. William, 263 

1848 Lowrey, Charles, - 265 

1839 m Lyman, Sidney H., 275 

1823 Marshall, Alexander W.,. 248 

1833 Matson, WiUiam K, 257 

1814 Meers, John D., 242 

1828 Morgan, Christopher, 254 

1813 Morgan, Frederick, _ 279 

1812 Morgan, Samuel C, 242 

1875 t Morse, Charles F., 278 

1872 5 Nevins, Thomas P., 277 

1862 Page, Merritt C, 270 

1821 Peck, Isaac, 246 

1875 t Peck, MarshaU R., . 278 

1843 m Perkins, George E., 276 

1805 Pettibone, John 0., 240 

1 833 Potter, George L., 257 

1823 Ripley, Joseph, 249 

1821 Robinson, Charles, 246 

1834 St. John, Samuel, 258 

1852 m Sellew, WeUes H., 276 

1858 Seymour, Edward, 269 

1849 Smith, Edward P., 265 

1820 Sneed, Samuel K., 244 

1863 Steele, Thomas C, 271 

1 842 Stone, Seth B., 262 

1871 Swann, Charles M., 272 

1857 Thompson, William A.,.. 268 

1852 w Thomson, ZebulonW.,... 276 

1834 Tomlinson, George, 259 

1806 Tracy, Phineas L., 241 

1824 Treat, Selah B., 249 

1867 Walker, Henry W., 272 

1852 Waring, J. Frederick, ... 266 

1822 Waterbury, Jared B., 248 

1814 Wickes, Thomas S., 243 

1800 Williams, Thomas, 239 




OBITUARY RECORD 



OF 



GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 



Deceased during the Academical Year ending in June, 1878, 

including the record of a few who died a short 

time previous, hitherto unreported. 



[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMNI, JUNE 26th, 1878.] 
[No. 8 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 37 of the whole Record.] 



'f^J^^^f^Ln)^^,,-^^>^f^ 




.4^ 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending June, 1878, includ- 
ing the record of a few who died previously, 
hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting of the Alumni, June 26, 1878.] 
[No. 8 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 3*7 of the whole Record.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1806. 

George Goodwin, who died at his home in Burnside, East 
Hartford, Conn., Feb. 8, 1878, was the fourth child and third 
son of George and Mary (Edwards) Goodwin, of Hartford, where 
he was born, April 23, 1786. At the time of his death he was, 
with the exception of one of his classmates, the oldest living 
graduate of the college. Two of his brothers were graduated 
here in 1807 and 1823. 

Soon after leaving college he went into the grocery business in 
Hartford, in which he continued till about 1816. In 1818 the 
firm of Hudson & Goodwin, of which his father was a member, 
was dissolved, and the firm of George Goodwin & Sons succeeded 
to the business of printing, publishing and bookselling — the lead- 
ing interest then being the issue of the Connecticut Courant, a 
weekly paper, of which they retained control until 1836, and 
for which, as well as for other publications, they manufactured 
the paper at their mill in East Hartford. To give more attention 
to this manufacture, which gradually became their leading busi- 
ness, Mr. George Goodwin, Jr., removed, in 1821, to East Hart- 
ford, where he spent an active and useful life until 1861, when the 
mills passed into other hands. Soon after this his sight began to 
fail, and in 1868 he became totally blind. He bore this trial with 



284 

Christian submission, keeping up to the last his interest in books 
and general affairs. He represented East Hartford three times in 
the legislature. 

He was married, Nov. 25, 1809, to Maria, eldest daughter of 
Andrew Kingsbury, of Hartford, who died in 1851. Of their ten 
children, six are still living. 

1811. 

Samuel Speing died in East Hartford, Conn., Dec. 13, 1877, 
aged 85 years and 9 months. He was the sixth child and fourth 
son of Rev. Dr. Samuel Spring (College of N. J., 1771), of New- 
buryport, Mass., where he was born March 9, 1792. His mother 
was Hannah, daughter of Rev. Dr. Samuel Hopkins (Y. C. 1749), 
of Hadley, Mass. His elder brother, Rev. Dr. Gardiner Spring, 
of New York City, graduated at this College in 1805. 

Upon leaving college he began the study of law, but soon en- 
gaged in trade in his native town. After the war of 1812 he 
removed to Boston, and while in business there was married, Nov. 
27, 1816, to Lydia Maria, daughter of Winthrop B. Norton, of 
Berwick, Me. Some three years later he resolved to prepare him- 
self for the ministry of the Gospel, and entered the Theological 
Seminary in Andover, where he finished the course of study in 
1821. In the fall of 1821 he was called to settle over the 1st 
(Congregational) church in Abington, Mass., where he was or- 
dained, Jan. 2, 1822. He was dismissed Dec. 6, 1826, to accept a 
call fi-om the North, now Park (Congregational) Church in Hart- 
ford, Conn., which he served as pastor from March, 1827, to Jan- 
uary, 1833. He was then settled over the Congregational Church 
in East Hartford, Conn., which charge he resigned in 1861 on 
account of failing health. His residence continued in East Hart- 
ford, and for six years (from 1863) he officiated as chaplain for 
the American Asylum for the Insane in Hartford. In all these 
relations he was diligent and successful and greatly beloved. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Columbia College 
in 1858. 

On the evening of Nov. 24, 1877, he fell from his doorstep and 
fractured a hipbone, from which cause his death followed some 
three weeks later. 

The wife of his youth, with two sons and two daughters — the 
survivors of a family of nine children — is still living. 



285 



1815. 



William Smith Robert, the fourth child of Dr. Daniel and 
Mary (Smith) Robert, was born in Mastic, L. I., March 13, 1795, 
and died in the same place Nov. 9, 1877, in the 83d year of his 
age. An older brother, a graduate of this College in the class of 
1810, is still living. 

Mr. Robert never engaged in any business, or held office of any 
kind. His entire life was spent in the supervision of his ances- 
tral estate. 

He was married, Febr. 8, 1831, to ('aroline E. Smith, who died 
Aug. 16, 1850. Three sons and three daughters survive him, one 
of the sons having graduated at this College in the class of 1862, 
and another having been for three years a member of the same 
class. 

1817. 

WiLLARD Child, son of Willard and Sylvia (Child) Child, was 
born in Woodstock, Conn., Nov. 14, 1796. 

He studied theology at the Seminary in Andover, Mass., where 
he finished the course in 1820. He subsequently taught school, 
and in 1827 (April 25) was ordained pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Pittsford, Vt. He left this position in 1841 on account 
of ill health, and after a few months spent in his native town was 
installed in August, 1842, the first pastor of the Fifth (now the 
Broadway) Congregational Church in Norwich, Conn. He re- 
signed this charge in August, 1845, and for the next nine years 
was settled over the First Church in Lowell, Mass. From this 
place he removed to his last regular pastoral charge, the Congre- 
gational Church in Castleton, Vt. After his resignation of this 
charge in 1864, he supplied, with scarcely a Sunday's exception, 
vacant churches (the old South in Worcester, Mass., the First 
Church in North Brookfield, Mass., the First Church in Crown 
Point, N. Y., and the Presbyterian churches in Champlain and 
Mooers, N. Y.), until after the completion of his 80th year. In 
all the places of his ministry he was beloved and admired as a 
most attractive and inspiring preacher. He received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from the University of Vermont in 1848. 

He was married, Sept. 13, 1827, to Katherine Griswold, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Dan Kent, of Benson, Vt., and granddaughter of Dr. 
Daniel Griswold (Y. C. 1747), of Sharon, Conn., who died in 
Lowell, Mass., Febr. 26, 1851. Of their six children, but two 



286 

survived their mother. Dr. Child died Nov. 13, 1877, on the eve 
of completing his 81st year, in Mooers, N. Y., at the house of his 
only son, Willard A. Child, M. D., who survived his father but 
three months. Dr. Child's only daughter is the widow of Rev. 
Edward Ashley Walker (Y. C. 1856). 

Nathan Ryno Smith was born in Cornish, N. H., May 21, 1797, 
where his father. Dr. Nathan Smith, was at that time a practicing 
physician. In 1798 his father was appointed Professor of Medi- 
cine in Dartmouth College, and after a successful career in that 
institution, he became, in 1813, the head of the new Medical In- 
stitution of Yale College. 

The son, after graduation, spent about eighteen months as a 
private tutor in Fauquier County, Va., and then returned to New 
Haven, where he received his degree in medicine in 1820. Shortly 
after this he settled in Burlington, Vt., devoting himself especially 
to the department of surgery. In 1821 he was appointed Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy and Physiology in the University of Vermont 
(situated in Burlington), and shared in the organization of the 
medical department. With the desire of enlarging his profes- 
sional knowledge he resigned in 1825, and spent that winter in 
attending lectures in the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadel- 
phia, and was invited to the chair of anatomy and physiology in 
the medical department of Jefferson College, then just being or- 
ganized. He filled this chair for two years. 

In 1827 he accepted the professorship of anatomy in the School 
of Medicine of the University of Maryland, and from that date 
made Baltimore his home. Two years later he was transferred to 
the chair of surgery, but in 1838 he resigned, in consequence of 
a difficulty in the board of Trustees, and for the next two years 
lectured in Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky. ; in 1840 he 
resumed his former position, which he held until his final resigna- 
tion in March, 1870. From that time until his death, he devoted 
himself to his large private practice. 

Dr. Smith's fidelity and ability as an instructor, his skill and 
firmness as an operator, his ingenuity in devising practical appli- 
ances in surgery, and his benevolence and uprightness, secured 
him an eminent position in the wide circuit where he was known. 
The degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred on him by Dart- 
mouth College in 1875. 

After an illness of nearly six months, he died in Baltimore, July 3, 



287 

1877, in his 81st year. He was married while residing in Burling- 
ton, to Juliette, daughter of Mr. J. Penniman, of that town. She 
survives him with three of their nine children. His four sons 
were all surgeons, the only survivor being his father's successor 
in the professor's chair. 

1818. 

Francis Bugbee was born in Ashford, Conn., Febr. 18, 1794, 
the son of Amos and Martha (Woodward) Bugbee. 

After graduation he took charge of an academy in North Car- 
olina, at the same time studying law with Judge Badger. In 
June, 1820, he was admitted to the bar in that State, and in the 
October following to the bar of Pennsylvania at Harrisburg. In 
Jan., 1821, he settled inElyton, Jeiferson County, Alabama, where 
he remained until 1826, at which time he removed to Montgomery, 
in the same state, where he resided till his death. Besides pur- 
suing the regular duties of his profession, he was a warm friend 
of education, and served from 1836 to 1871 as a trustee of the 
State University. In 1843 he was a member of the State Legis- 
lature. During the late war he was an avowed Union man, and 
at its close was appointed a judge of the circuit court, in which 
relation he gave eminent satisfaction. From 1866 to 1869 he 
served as U. S. District Attorney. He died suddenly at his resi- 
dence in Montgomery, Apr. 21, 1877, of apoplexy, in the 84th 
year of his age. 

Judge Bugbee was married, in Jefferson County, Ala., July 5, 
1827, to Miss Lavinia H. Tarrant, by whom he had five children, 
of whom two daughters, with their mother, survive. His only 
son, a graduate of the University of Alabama, and a lawyer of 
high promise, died in 1859. 

Charles Hyde OlmTsted died in East Hartford, Conn., his 
native place, and his residence through his entire life, June 5, 

1878, aged 80 years. 

Having inherited a competent fortune, he did not study a pro- 
fession and never pursued any regular business. For many years 
after graduation he gave himself to the cultivation of his literary 
and scientific tastes, the special objects of his attention being the 
study of American history and certain departments of natural 
history. He was for several years the president of the Connecti- 
cut Society of Natural History. 

He was never married. 



288 

Henry Sherwood was born on what is known as Sherwood's 
Island, in the present township of Westport, Conn., Sept. 14, 1796, 
and died in the same town, May 5, 1878, in hi& 82d year. 

His mother died within three months of his birth, and his father 
three years later, so that he was brought up in the family of one 
of his uncles, living in that part of Fairfield which is now included 
in Westport. 

He studied law and practiced the profession for a brief period ; 
but m 1824 he entered into business in his native village and con- 
tinued to be thus employed until 1860, when he retired to private 
life. For the last two or three years before his death he had been 
in feeble health. He acquired the title of General by service in 
the State militia. 

1820. 

Cornelius Robert Bogert was born in New York City, 
Febr. 26, 1800, his father being John G. Bogert, a lawyer of that 
city, and for many years the Russian Consul for the port. 

On his graduation he returned to New York and pursued the 
study of medicine in the office of Dr. Samuel Borrowe, receiving 
his degree at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1824. 
He then spent six years in the West Indies as medical attendant 
to the slaves on several large plantations owned by a New York 
firm. In 1831 he returned to his native city, and formed an ac- 
quaintance which resulted in his marriage two years later to Miss 
Maria Louisa, daughter of Edward Champlin Thurston, a retired 
merchant of the same city. In the meantime he became settled 
in active practice, which he continued with growing success until 
the partial failure of his health, about two years before his death. 
Besides his wide general practice. Dr. Bogert was also, from its 
organization until his death, the medical examiner of the N. Y. 
Life Insurance Company. 

He died at his residence in New York City, Nov. 10, 1877, in 
the 78th year of his age. His wife survives him with one son and 
one daughter. 

1821. 

Nathaniel Bouton, the youngest of fourteen children of Wil- 
liam and Sarah (Benedict) Bouton, was born in Norwalk, Conn., 
June 20, 1799. 

At the age of 14 he was bound out as an apprentice in a print- 



289 

ing office in Bridgeport, Conn., and three years later purchased 
the balance of his time in order to obtain an education for the 
ministry. From college he entered the Theological Seminary in 
Andover, Mass., where he finished the course in 1824. On March 
23, 1825, he was settled over the First Congregational Church in 
Concord, N. H., with which he remained until his resignation, 42 
years later, March 23, 186'7. His residence continued in Concord, 
where he died June 6, 18V8, aged 79 years. He was much inter- 
ested in historical studies, and published while in the pastorate a 
valuable History of Concord (1 vol., octavo, 1856, 786 pages). 
He was early the President of the State Historical Society, and 
edited two volumes of its Collections. In August, 1866, he was 
appointed Editor and Compiler of the Provincial Records of New 
Hampshire, and in that capacity issued ten volumes of Provincial 
Papers, from 1867 to 1877. He also published over 30 sermons 
and addresses, and a few other volumes. Dartmouth College (of 
which he was a trustree from 1840 to 1877) conferred on him the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1851. 

He was married, Sept. 11, 1825, to Harriet, daughter of Rev. 
John Sherman (Y. C. 1792), who died in Concord, May 21, 1828, 
aged 21. His second wife, Mary Ann, daughter of Hon. John 
Bell, of Chester, N. H., died in Concord, Feb. 15, 1839, aged 34. 
His third wife was Elizabeth Ann, daughter of Horatio G. Cilley, 
of Deerfield, N. H. He had two children by the first marriage, 
five by the second, and six by the third. 

Waldo Brown was born in Canterbury, Conn., in 1794, and 
died in Norwalk, Conn., Oct. 27, 1877, aged 83 years. 

He taught school and pursued the study of medicine for several 
years on Staten Island, taking also a course of lectures at the 
Yale Medical Institution. In 1826 he settled as a physician in 
Connecticut Farms, N. J., practicing also in the neighboring 
towns of South Orange and Irvington. In 1 850 he removed to 
Stratford, Conn., and in 1857 to Norwalk, where his residence 
continued until his death. 

He married Mary Ann Brandt, of Connecticut Farms, who still 
survives. Of their two daughters, one only is living. 

1822. -^ 

Maro McLean Reed, son of Elijah F. and Hannah (McLean) 
Reed, was born in South Windsor (then the southern part of East 
Windsor), Conn., Oct. 18, 1801. His father was a prominent 



290 

physician, and the son early showed an inclination for the same 
profession. He attended lectures in the Yale Medical School, 
also in Pittsfield, Mass., and in Castleton, Vt., receiving his degree 
of M.D. from Middlebury College (with which the Castleton 
Medical School was connected) in 1826. He practiced medicine 
in his native town and in Hartford, Conn., until 1830, when he 
removed to Jacksonville, 111., where he resided, engaged in the du- 
ties of his profession, till his death, June 28, 1877, in his 76th year. 
Some twenty years ago he became a homceopathist in practice. 

Dr. Reed was married, Sept. 16, 1830, to Elizabeth, daughter of 
James Lathrop, of Hartford. By her he had nine children, of 
whom one son (a graduate of Illinois College in 1859) and four 
daughters survive him. 

1824. 

Stephen Reed, younger son of John and Susanna (Beach) 
Reed, was born in Cornwall, Conn., Sept. 26, 1801. When ten 
years old, his parents removed to Canaan, Conn., from which 
place he came to college. 

After two or three years spent in school-teaching and in study- 
ing medicine, he established himself as a physician in Goshen, 
Conn. A year later he removed to Roxbury, Conn., and in 1831 
to Richmond, Mass. Finding the exposure to the severity of the 
weather too much for his rather delicate constitution, he gave up 
his profession (about 1837), and opened a boarding-school for boys 
in Richmond, in which he proved highly successful. In 1848 he 
removed to Pittsfield, Mass., to take charge of an agricultural 
warehouse and seed store, connected with a printing office from 
which a weekly agricultural and miscellaneous newspaper was 
published. This paper, " The Gulturist and Gazette^^'^ he con- 
tinued to edit until 1858, when its publication was suspended. 
Dr. Reed afterwards sold out his share in the warehouse, and 
spent the rest of his life in Pittsfield, at leisure for his favorite 
study, geology. His name became well known in connection with 
geological discoveries in Western New England, mainly through 
his account of a long train of bowlders across part of Central Berk- 
shire. He was also active in all the public interests of the town. 

He died in Pittsfield, after less than a week's illness, July 12, 
1877, aged nearly 76 years. He was married in 1829 to Miss 
Emeline Beebe, of Canaan, Conn., who died in 1832; and again. 
May 7, 1833, to Miss Sarah E. Chapin, who survives him. He 
had no children. 



291 

1825. 

Oliver Ellsworth Huntington, third son of Joseph and 
Eunice (Carew) Huntington, was born in Norwich, Conn., Sept. 
3, 1802. 

The year after graduation he spent in New Haven, attending 
medical lectures. He soon after went to New York City, where 
he was engaged in mercantile business until 1837, when he 
removed to the West. A few years later he became a permanent 
resident of Cleveland, O., where he was engaged in the drug busi- 
ness until 185*7, when he retired from active pursuits. He 
remained in Cleveland until his death there, suddenly, of angina 
pectoris, July 13, 1877, in his 75th year. 

Mr. Huntington was married, June 10, 1830, to Mary Ann, 
daughter of Joseph Strong, of Norwich, who died Nov. 23, 1840. 
He was again married, in 1854, to Eunice K., daughter of Henry 
Hitchcock, of Deeriield, Mass., who is still living. Of the four 
children by his lirst marriage, one son only survived early child- 
hood. He is a graduate of this college in the Class of 1857. 

1827. 

William Atwater died in New Haven, Conn., Sept. 10, 1877, 
in his 71st year. He was the eldest son of Rev. Dr. Jeremiah 
Atwater (Y. C. 1793), the first President both of Middlebury Col- 
lege, Vt., and of Dickinson College, Pa., and was born in Middle- 
bury, Nov. 15, 1806. His mother was Clarissa, daughter of Rev. 
Eleazar Storrs (Y. C. 1762) of Sandisfield, Mass. In 1815 his 
father returned to New Haven, his native place, for the education 
of his children. He entered college w^ith the Class of 1826, but 
left that class at the end of Sophomore year. On graduation he 
began the study of medicine in New Haven, but abandoned it 
after two years, on account of failing health. For the next 
seven or eight years he remained at home in indifierent 
health, and in the fall of 1836 removed to Cincinnati to 
engage in the drug business. In 1837 he settled in JefPer- 
sonville, Ind., as a druggist, and after nine years' experience 
there continued in the same business in Brooklyn, N. Y., until the 
fall of 1859, when he returned to New Haven, where he passed 
the rest of his life in retirement. He died after a lingering ill- 
ness of three years' duration. 

He was married in 1841 to Miss Catherine A. Ault, of Jefferson- 
ville, Ind., who survives him with their only daughter. They had 
also one son, who died in childhood. 



292 

1828. 

James Chaffee Loomis, eldest son of James and Abigail S. 
(Chaffee) Loomis, of Windsor, Conn., was born in Windsor, Apr. 
29, 1807. 

On his graduation he began the study of law in the University 
of Virginia, but returned the next year to Connecticut, where he 
pursued his studies, first in the school connected with this col- 
lege, and later in Norwalk with Hon. Clark Bissell. In 1 832 he 
was admitted to the bar of Fairfield County, and settled in prac- 
tice with Hon. Samuel B. Sherwood, of Saugatuck, now Westport. 
He removed to Bridgeport in 1840, and before many years his 
business became more extensive than that of any of his asso- 
ciates in the county. He also took an active part in public 
affairs, was early elected to the State Senate (serving in 1837- 
38 as an ex-officio member of the corporation of this college), 
and repeatedly afterwards to the lower house of the State Legis- 
lature. He was in 1861 and 1862 the unsuccessful candidate of 
the Democratic party for the governorship. About 1870 he 
retired from the active practice of his profession, to devote him- 
self to the care of his large estate and to the interests of the 
various corporations and public trusts with which he was con- 
nected. At the time of his death he was President of the County 
Bar Association, of the City Board of Education, of the Mountain 
Grove Cemetery, and of the Bridgeport Library Association. 

Mr. Loomis went from home on August 18, 1877, to South 
Egremont, Mass., with the intention of spending some weeks 
there in rest. He was attacked two days later with a gastric 
fever, from the effects of which he died, in that town, Sept. 16, at 
the age of 70. 

He was first married. May 1, 1833, to Eliza C. Mitchell, of New 
Haven, who died March 24, 1840.. He was again married, Apr. 
24, 1844, to Mary B., daughter of Ira Sherman, of Bridgeport, 
who survives him. His children — one son by the first marriage, 
and one son and one daughter by the second marriage— all died 
before him. The younger son was at the time of his death (in 
October, 1867) a member of the Senior Class in this college. 

Ezra Palmer, eldest son of Ezra and Elizabeth (Caldwell) 
Palmer, was born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 15, 1808. He entered 
Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., at the age of fourteen, and 
there completed his preparation for college. He received his med- 



293 

ical degree at Harvard College August 31, 1831. From this time 
until March, 1878, he actively and devotedly practised his profes- 
sion in Boston. 

Dr. Palmer died of heart disease, at his home in Boston, May 
23, 1878. He was unmarried. 

William Wolcott was born in Stow, Mass., Jan. 22, 1800. 
He was the youngest in a family of fifteen children, and from the 
age of twelve years was obliged to earn for the most part his own 
living. 

After two years spent in the Yale Theological Seminary, he was 
ordained, Oct. 20, 1830, as pastor of the Congregational Church in 
Petersham, Mass., where he continued until November, 1833. He 
then removed to Pennsylvania, and was settled for a year or two 
over a church in Lower Providence, near Norristown. A desire 
to engage in missionary work then led him to Michigan Territory, 
where he was for a year or two a pastor in Adrian. For thirty 
years, from 1837, he labored cheerfully and earnestly as a home 
missionary in Michigan, wherever he found a needy church and 
the prospect of doing good. For the last few years of his life he 
resided in Hudson, Mich., the progress of disease (ossification of 
the brain) incapacitating him for ministerial labor. He died in 
Kalamazoo, Mich., June 3, 1877, aged 77 years. 

In September, 1830, he married Miss Lavinia Foote, daughter 
of Dr. Joseph Foote (Y. C. 1787), of North Haven, Conn., who 
died Jan. 9, 1832, leaving one son. In 1832 he married Miss 
M. A. Penniman, of Dorchester, Mass., and in September, 1868, 
was again married to Mrs. Sarah M. Smith, of Hudson, Mich., 
whom he survived but seven weeks. Of his six children, two 
daughters and one son are still living. 

1829. 

Thomas Adam Spence, a native of Cambridge, Md., entered 
college from Snow Hill, Md., at the beginning of the Sophomore 
year. 

He studied law and began practice in his native tow^n. He 
took a lively interest in politics, and in 1840 was a Presidential 
elector on the Whig ticket. In 1843 he represented his district in 
Congress, and after the adoption of the new State Constitution in 
1851 was elected Judge of the Circuit Court. During the civil 
war he was a staunch Union man, and under the Constitution of 



294 

1864 was elected to the circuit judgeship for Dorchester county. 
In 1867 he was removed from this position by the adoption of a 
new constitution, and returned to the practice of his profession at 
Snow Hill. In 1872 he was the Republican candidate for Con- 
gress, but was defeated. Not long after he was appointed by 
Postmaster-General Cresswell Assistant Attorney-General for the 
Post Office Department. From this position he was transferred 
to the position of Assistant Superintendent of the railway mail 
service, which he held up to the time of his death. He died of 
pneumonia in Washington, Nov. 10, 1877, aged 67 years. He 
leaves a wife, but no children. 

1830. 

William Morrison Tallman, son of David and Eunice Tall- 
man, was born in Lee, Oneida County, N. Y., June 13, 1808. His 
parents removed from Woodbury, Conn., to Oneida County in 
1806, and ten years later to Brooklyn, N. Y. In 1821 he entered 
the law office of Hon. Frederick A. Tallmadge, of N. Y. City, but 
soon found the need of a more thorough education, and began to 
prepare for college. 

Immediately after graduating he entered the Yale Law School, 
and was admitted to the bar in New Haven in September, 1832. 
He then went to N. Y. City and continued his legal studies in the 
office of Tallmadge & Bulkley for one year, and was admitted to 
the bar of that state in October, 1833. He then entered into the 
practice of law in Rome, N. Y., and continued there until 1850, 
when he removed to Janesville, Wise, his residence until his 
death. Two years before going West, he had purchased large 
tracts of land in Wisconsin, and in subsequent years he increased 
his purchases so wisely that he acquired a handsome fortune from 
this source. In July, 1854, he relinquished the practice of his pro- 
fession, finding ample occupation in the development and manage- 
ment of his estate. Much of his means and time were spent in 
effecting public improvements in Janesville. 

He left home in March, 1 878, for a visit to the South and East, 
and while in Washington became ill with a severe cold, which in- 
creased some asthmatic difficulties under which he labored, and 
finally caused his death. He was brought home about the first of 
May and died there May 13, in his 70th year. 

He was married in 1831 to Miss Emeline, daughter of Norman 
Dexter, of New Haven, who died on the 7th of June, three weeks 
after her husband. Their two sons are still living. Their only 
daughter was married in 1865 and died the following year. 



295 

1833. 

JosiAH Clark was born in Leicester, Mass., Febr. 7, 1814, the 
eldest son of Rev. Josiah Clark (Williams Coll. 1809) and Ase- 
nath, daughter of Nathaniel Edwards of Northampton, Mass. 
His father remained in Leicester as preceptor of the academy there 
until 1818, and then removed to Rutland, Mass., where he was 
pastor until his death in 1845. 

From 1833 to 1835 Mr. Clark was the principal of an academy 
in Westminster, Md., and for the next two years a teacher in the 
University of Maryland at Baltimore. He then studied theology 
in the Seminary in Andover, Mass., supplementing the usual 
course with an additional year of study. In 1841 he became an 
associate preceptor in Leicester Academy, and later the preceptor, 
remaining there until 1849, when he was made principal of Willis- 
ton Seminary, Easthampton, Mass. This position he retained 
until 1863, when he removed to Northampton, Mass. There he 
continued to teach, at first in a private school on Round Hill, and 
afterwards receiving pupils in his house, chiefly those preparing in 
the classics for admission to college. In the summer of 1875 the 
Smith College for women was opened in Northampton, and Dr. 
Clark (the degree of LL.D. was given him by Yale College in 
July, 1875) entered on the duties of the Professorship of Latin 
and Greek. In August, 1876, he was prostrated (perhaps in con- 
sequence of a partial sunstroke) by an obscure disease of the brain, 
and after a lingering illness died at his residence in Northampton, 
May 30, 1878, aged 64 years. 

Professor Clark impressed himself on his pupils in a remarka- 
ble degree, alike by his admirable character and his finished schol- 
arship ; and those who knew him in this relation will always look 
back to him as the model teacher. 

He was married, Nov. 21, 1842, to his cousin, Lucy Edwards, 
daughter of David L. Dewey, of Northampton, who survives him 
without children. 

1834. 

Samuel Gray Southmayd was born Oct. 30, 1811, in Middle- 
town, Conn., the only child of Samuel and Sarah (Gill) South- 
mayd, of that town. 

He entered college at the beginning of Sophomore year, and 
upon graduation studied medicine in the Yale Medical School, 
where he received the degree of M.D. in 1836. He practiced his 
profession for about six years, at first in Middletown and after- 



296 

wards in New York City. He then became connected with a 
planing mill in New York City, which under a lucrative patent 
yielded him a handsome fortune. He finally retired to Hoboken, 
N. J., where his later life was spent. He died in Hartford, Conn., 
Oct. 9, 1877, at the age of 66. 

Dr. Southmayd was married, Nov. 11, 1838, to Miss Sarah E. 
Russell, of Middletown, daughter of Matthew T. Russell (Y. C. 
1779). She died in June, 1866, leaving no children. 

He was again married, April 22, 1868, to Miss Maria C. Earned, 
by whom he had one daughter. 

1835. 

Alexander Smith Johnson, the eldest son of Alexander B. 
and Abigail L. (Adams) Johnson, was born in Utica, N. Y., July 
30, 1817. His father was a distinguished citizen of Utica; his 
mother was a granddaughter of the elder President Adams. 

The year after graduation he spent in the study of law in the 
school connected with Yale College, and then returned to Utica, 
where after further study he was admitted to the bar in July, 
1838. In the following January he formed a partnership with 
Samuel Beardsley, Esq., but as he still seemed to his early friends 
too young for the responsibilities of the profession, he removed in 
June of the same year to New York City, where he entered into a 
partnership with Elisha P. Hurlbut, Esq. Charles F. Southmayd, 
Esq., subsequently became a member of the firm, and in 1846 Mr. 
Hurlbut was elected a Judge of the Supreme Court. In Novem- 
ber, 1851, Mr. Johnson was elected a Justice of the Court of 
Appeals, and six years later, at the age of forty, he became the 
Chief Justice of that court. He resided in Albany during his 
judicial term, and at its close, in 1860, he returned to Utica and 
resumed the practice of the law. In July, 1 864, he was appointed 
U. S. Commissioner under the treaty with Great Britain for the 
settlement of the claims of the Hudson's Bay and Puget Sound 
Companies, and the duty, which occupied him until the fall of 
1867, was discharged in such a manner as to win the highest credit 
both at home and abroad. After this he resumed his practice at 
the bar, and in January, 1873, was appointed to fill a vacancy on 
the Commission of Appeals, a judicial body created to give tem- 
porary relief to the regular Court of Appeals. A year later he 
was transfeiTed by a similar appointment to the court just named, 
serving until Jan. 1, 1875. In October, 1875, he was appointed 



297 

U. S. Circuit Judge for the Second Judicial District (comprising 
the States of New York, Connecticut, and Vermont), succeeding 
Judge Lewis B. Woodruff (Y. C. 1830). The incessant labors of 
this position proved too severe a strain upon his constitution, and 
early in January, 1878, he left home for Nassau, in the Bahamas, 
where he died on the 26th of that month, in the 61st year of 
his age. 

Judge Johnson's success upon the bench is sufficiently attested 
by the record of the positions to which he was called. Equally as 
a man and as a judge he commanded the high respect of the com- 
munity. He received the degree of Doctor of Laws from Hamil- 
ton College in 1859. 

He was married in November, 1852. His wife, a son and three 
daughters survive him. 

1837. 

Sheldon Leavitt was born in New York City, June 26, 181 8, 
and joined college in the Sophomore year. 

He entered on a mercantile career in New York City in 1838, 
and with the exception of two visits to Europe continued in busi- 
ness until 1853, when he retired and changed his residence to 
Great Barrington, Mass. In later years he spent most of his 
time in Europe, residing in Paris. He died in New York City, 
of cirrhosis of the liver, Oct. 26, 1876, in his 59th year. 

He was married, Aug. 2, 1842, to Miss Josephine Wells, who 
died Apr. 26, 1863, leaving two sons and a daughter. 

1839. 

Philander Button was born Feb. 22, 1813, in North Haven, 
Conn., and died May 21, 1878, in Greenwich, Conn., aged 65 
years. 

The low state of his health at the time of graduation prevented 
him from studying for a profession. He was able, however, to 
take charge of an academy in Greenwich, and found in this occu- 
pation his main employment until 1861, when he gave up teaching. 
For the next few years he devoted himself to the improvement of 
a farm, in Greenwich, on which he had begun to reside as early 
as 1846. During the last years of his life he was a confirmed 
invalid. 

He was married, Oct. 11, 1843, to a daughter of Dr. Darius 
Mead (Y. C. 1807), of Greenwich, by whom he had one son and 
five daughters. 

20 



298 

RuFus Putnam Cutler, son of Temple (Sutler, and grandson 
of the eminent Rev. Dr. Manasseh ("utler (Y. C. 1765), for more 
than fifty years pastor of the Congregational Church in Hamilton, 
Mass., was born in Hamilton, July 11, 1815, and died in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., Dec. 9, 1877, at the age of 62. 

For upwards of a year after graduation he was the principal of 
an academy near Lowell, Mass., and in 1841 entered the Divinity 
School of Harvard University, where he finished the regular 
course of training in 1844, though he continued in residence for a 
year longer. On the 18th of March, 1846, he was ordained pastor 
of the Second Unitarian Congregational Society of Portland, Me., 
known as the Park Street Church of that city. After a success- 
ful ministry of eight years, he accepted a call to the pastorate of 
the First Unitarian Church in San Francisco, Cal., where he 
began his labors in August, 1854; and in the autumn of 1859 
returned to New England with abundant proof of the high esti- 
mation in which he had been held by his people in that growing 
community. For some years he lived in retirement in Portland, 
with the exception of a brief visit to Brooklyn, N. Y., and preach- 
ing for a few months at Staten Island. His health was impaired, 
and for a long time he was threatened with blindness; but in 
1869 he ventured on resuming work for a few Sundays as an 
experiment ; and was so much encouraged by the result that he 
consented to take the pastoral charge of the church of his faith 
in Charleston, S. C, which he continued to serve till the spring of 
1872. That church had been greatly depleted by the civil war, 
both in numbers and strength ; and when he left it on account of 
his ill health and the depressing effects of the climate, he left it 
replenished and strong and deeply regretting his withdrawal. In 
October, 1872, he sailed for Europe, and on his return voyage, in 
August, 1873, with his general health seemingly improved, he was 
struck with partial paralysis, from the effects of which he never 
recovered. In the interval before his death he resided in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., where with the best medical care, which he had ample 
means to secure, and though mostly confined to his chair or bed, 
able to enjoy fully the society of devoted friends, to read, and to 
converse with his wonted charm, he slowly declined, with periods 
of great suffering borne with entire patience and supported to the 
end by the sweetest Christian spirit. He was never married. 



299 



1840. 

Elijah Baldwin Huntington, eldest son of Deacon Nehemiah 
ind Nancy (Leffingwell) Huntington, was born in Bozrah, Conn., 
Aug. 14, 1816. By ill-health and want of means he was obliged 
to leave college at the beginning of the Sophomore year, but in 
1851 the degree of Master of Arts was conferred on him, and his 
name has subsequently been enrolled with his class. 

He taught school in Connecticut for several years, going over 
in the mean time the regular college studies and also pursuing a 
theological course, and in 1 845 he was licensed to preach by the 
New London Association of Congregational ministers. After 
laboring for the American Bible Society, he was engaged in 
organizing a church in Putnam village in Windham County, 
Conn., which had lately begun to form about a station of the Nor- 
wich and Worcester Railroad, and which is included in the 
present town of Putnam. Here he was ordained in November, 
1848. His voice failing, he was dismissed from this charge after 
two years' service, and in the spring of 1851 became the principal 
of a school in West Meriden, Conn. In the fall of 1852 he was 
invited to Waterbury, Conn., as principal of the high school, and 
superintendent of the other schools of the city. He removed 
again in December, 1854, to Stamford, Conn., where he had 
charge of a public school until 1857, when he opened a private 
school for boys, which he continued until 1864. He then devoted 
himself to literary labor, residing in Stamford until April, 1875, 
when he became acting pastor of the Congregational Church in 
South Coventry, Conn. He retired from this service in April, 
1877, and continued a resident of the town until his death. He 
was prostrated by an attack of paralysis in November, 1877, and 
after lingering for more than a month, died Dec. 27, in the 62d 
year of his age. 

He was married, March 6, 1843, to Julia Maria, daughter of 
Deacon Thomas Welch, of Windham, Conn., who survives him 
without children. 

Mr. Huntington published in 1863 " A Genealogical Memoir of 
the Huntington Family" (428 pages, octavo) ; also, in 1868, a 
"History of Stamford" (492 pages, octavo) ; in 1869, "Stamford 
Soldiers' Memorial" (166 pages, octavo) ; and in 1874, "Stamford 
Registration of Births, Marriages and Deaths down to 1825" 
(140 pages, octavo). 



300 



1841. 



William Henry Clarke, eldest son of Rev. Peter G. Clarke 
(hon. Y. C. 1821) and his wife Lucretia Hitchcock, was born in 
Norwich, Conn., Jan. 22, 1821. 

He entered college during the third term of Sophomore year 
from the Episcopal Academy, Cheshire, Conn., and on graduating 
proceeded to study in the General Theological Seminary of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. His course was interrupted by ill 
health, so that it was not completed until 1845, when he was 
ordained Deacon (June 29). 

He spent seven years engaged in teaching in the Patapsco 
Female Institute, Ellicott's Mills, Md., being in the meantime 
(Sept. 20, 1846) ordained Priest. 

In 1852-3 he served as an agent of the Church Book Society of 
New York, and from Sept., 1853, till Feb., 1856, had charge of 
Locust Grove Seminary (for girls) near Pittsburgh, Pa. In March, 
1856, he became the rector of St. Peter's Church, Rome, Ga., and 
left that position in the summer of 1861 to remove to Augusta, 
Ga., as assistant rector of St. Paul's Church. On the death of 
Rev. E. E. Ford, he became (in Jan., 1863) the rector, and so con- 
tinued till his death. From 1863 he was a member of the Stand- 
ing Committee of the Diocese, and from 186V its President. In 
October, 1875, he was selected by the House of Bishops to be 
Missionary Bishop to Cape Palmas, Africa, which office he declined 
to accept. 

On the morning of the 10th of August, 1811, he was summoned 
to the bed of a dying person, and while administering consolation 
to the bereaved family was stricken with paralysis of the brain, 
and died two hours later. 

He married, Aug. 6, 1850, Miss Sophia Green Creighton, of 
New Haven, Conn., who died in Augusta, Jan. 8, 1870. Their 
only child, a daughter, is still living. 

1843. 

(vHARLES Cramer, youngest son of Hon. John Cramer, was 
born in Waterford, Saratoga County, N. Y., July 11, 1823^ and 
died in the same place, after a lingering illness, Sept. 3, 1876, aged 
53 years. 

He studied law in New York City and began practice in Water- 
ford; but found the drudgery of professional labor distasteful, 
and gave himself up to reading, to the study of the ancient and 
modem literatures, and to foreign travel. He was never married. 



301 

William Grtswold Lane was born in Norwalk, O., Febr. 12, 
1824. His father, Judge Ebenezer Lane (Harv. Coll. 1811), was 
subsequently the Chief-justice of the Supreme Court of the State, 
and his mother (the first cousin of her husband) was Frances A., 
eldest daughter of Gov. Roger Griswold (Y. C. 1780), of Con- 
necticut. 

After graduation he spent a year in the Law School of Harvard 
University, and then continued his studies in Sandusky, O., at 
that time his father's residence. In 1846 he went to Germany, 
and after a year's further study in Berlin, returned to Sandusky 
to enter into practice in company with his father. He continued 
there in active practice until February, 1873, when he was made 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, an office which he held 
until forced by ill-health to resign. He died in Sandusky, Oct. 
28, 1877, in his 54th year. His career, as a lawyer, as a judge, 
and as a man, was singularly pure and honorable. 

Judge Lane married, Oct. 31, 1850, his second cousin, Elizabeth 
D., daughter of Charles C. Griswold, of Lyme, Conn. She sur- 
vives him with children. 

1844. 

John Jackson was born in Maiden, Mass., Dec. 25, 1817, the 
son of John and Mary (Howland) Jackson. His father was a sea- 
faring man, and during the war of 1812 was commissioned as 
sailing master in the U. S. navy. 

His early life was spent on a farm, until he was 16 years of age, 
when he became a clerk in a store in Charlestown, now a part of 
Boston. Here in 1836 he became interested in the subject of per- 
sonal religion, and soon after began to prepare for college with 
the view of entering the ministry. Upon graduation he entered 
the Theological Seminary at Andover, Mass., and after some inter- 
ruptions finished the course in 1848, and was licensed to preach 
by the Essex North (Congregational) Association on July 12. 
From a variety of causes, prominent among which was an 
enfeebled constitution, he preached but a few times, and then 
sought out-door employment. Until 1855 he was engaged in col- 
lecting and compiling statistical information. He then became 
assistant to the Secretary of the Boston Board of Trade, and so 
continued until 1868. After this his employment became more 
irregular, from indications of pulmonary disease and a succession 
of business misfortunes. He was unmarried, and died in Boston, 
Jan. 23, 1877, aged 59 years. 



302 



1846. 



Albert Henry Barnes, born in Morristown, N. J., Febr. 11, 
1826, was the son of Rev. Albert Barnes (Hamilton Coll. 1820), 
the well-known commentator on the Bible, and Abby A. (Smith) 
Barnes. 

After graduating he studied law in Philadelphia and Chicago, 
and practiced for a time. In 1854 he was ordained in Lawrence- 
ville, Tioga County. Pa., and preached in the Presbyterian Church 
there for five and a half years. In September, 1860, he settled in 
Philadelphia as a teacher, and was thus occupied, as far as his 
somewhat feeble health allowed, for many years. The degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy was conferred on him by Lafayette College 
in 1871. He died in Philadelphia, of heart disease. May 6, 1878, 
at the age of 52. 

He was married, Dec. 21, 1854, at Newark, Del., to Miss Annie 
M. Chamberlain, by whom he had two daughters. 

1847. 

George Nehemiah Cleaveland, son of Nehemiah Cleave- 
land (Bowdoin Coll. 1813), of Brooklyn, N. Y., was born Febr. 
27, 1826. He entered the class in Sophomore year, having pre- 
viously been a member of the class of 1846. 

He at first studied law, but in the summer of 1849 began the 
study of medicine in the office of Dr. Gurdon Buck, of New York 
City. He did not, however, follow either profession, but devoted 
himself to the study of botany and the cultivation of flowers. 
After residing on Brooklyn Heights for many years he removed 
to a farm near ^e village of Saugatuck, in Norwalk, Conn., and 
there gave himself successfully to his favorite pursuits till his 
death. On the afternoon of Oct. 30, 1877, he felt unwell, and 
drove to the house of his physician in the adjacent township of 
Westport. On his arrival there, while seated in his carriage, he 
expired suddenly, probably of a disease of the heart. He was 
never married. 

Amos Smith Darrow, son of Leavitt Darrow, was born in 
Plymouth, Conn., Febr. 7, 1825. He was named for his uncle, 
Amos Smith, who for many years kept a private school in New 
Haven, and with whom he prepared for College. 

After graduation he taught in Rochester and Danville, N. Y., 
for a short time, but on account of his health soon removed to the 



303 

South, and was engaged in teaching in Kentucky and Alabama 
until 1851, when he went to Vicksburg, Miss., as principal of an 
academy for young ladies. Finding a more active life necessary, 
he applied himself to civil engineering, and was occupied for some 
time in locating the Vicksburg, Shreveport and Texas railroad. 
He also became interested in constructing levees on the Missis- 
sippi river, and in this business had accumulated a handsome 
fortune when the civil war broke out. Although opposed to se- 
cession, he was forced into the army of his adopted state, and was 
subsequently attached to the staff of Gen. John Morgan as engi- 
neer, and accompanied him on some of his famous raids. On one 
of these excursions he succeeded in escaping from his companions, 
and remained at the North until the close of the war. 

In 1869 he married the widow of his former partner in business, 
and about the same time purchased a plantation on the Mississippi 
river, near Donaldsonville, La., and was engaged in sugar and rice 
planting until the time of his death. He had been in declining 
health for some years, but the immediate cause of death was a 
malignant carbuncle. He died at his residence, Aug. 10, 1877, 
aged 52 years. His widow with his only son survives him. 

Charles Augustus Nichols was born in Haverhill, Mass., 
Jan. 4, 1826. 

He studied law in Haverhill and in the Law School of Harvard 
University, and in 1851 was admitted to practice in New York 
City, where he formed a partnership with his classmate Peet, and 
attained a highly honorable position at the bar. In April, 1864, 
he married Isabella B., daughter of Ex-Gov. James Y. Smith, of 
Providence, R. I., and two years later removed thither to engage 
in the extensive manufacturing business of his father-in-law. He 
soon became identified with the interests of the city, representing 
it in the General Assembly, and becoming actively engaged in the 
direction of a number of banks and insurance companies. Through 
illness he was for some months withdrawn from active duty, but 
the end was very unexpected. He died in Somerville, Mass., Oct. 
20, 1877, in his 52d year. 

His wife survives him, with one son and two daughters. 

William Sharp was born Sept. 10, 1811, and died in Dover, 
Del., Sept. 13, 1876, aged 65 years. 

Mr. Sharp entered college at the beginning of the Senior year, 



304 

from Milford, Del. He was occupied in teaching and in the study 
of law in Delaware until his admission to the bar in 1854. He 
continued in practice in Dover until 1861, when he was appointed 
prothonotary of the Superior Court of the State and Clerk of the 
Court of Appeals, for a term of five years. At the close of this 
period he retired to private life and engaged in agriculture, his 
residence still being in Dover. He was editor of the State Senti- 
nel, when he was prostrated by nervous disease. He died after a 
painful illness of some weeks' duration. 

He was married in March, 1859, to Catharine E. Kingsbury of 
Salem, Ind., who survives him without children. 

Thomas Young Simons, third son of Dr. Thomas Y. Simons, 
was born in Charleston, S. C, Oct. 1, 1828. 

For two years after leaving College he taught in the Charles- 
ton High School, preparing himself at the same time for admission 
to the bar. In 1850 he was admitted to practice, and except 
during the period covered by the late war, continued to practice 
uninterruptedly in Charleston to the time of his death. He rep- 
resented his native city in the General Assembly from 1854 to 
1860, and in the latter year was one of the Presidential electors 
for South Carolina. He was also a member of the State Conven- 
tion which passed the ordinance of secession in December, 1860, 
and during the war which followed served as an officer in the 
Confederate service, first as Captain of the 2'7th Regiment, S. C. 
Volunteers, and later as Judge Advocate. In September, 1865, 
he became editor-in-chief of the Charleston Courier, and contin- 
ued to act in this capacity until April, 1873. This, joined with 
the labors of a lawyer in large practice, did much to impair his 
strength and to lay the foundation for his last illness. In the 
later years of his life he was prominently identified with the 
efibrts to secure local self-government and the creation of a Union 
Reform party, in South Carolina. He died after a long illness, in 
Charleston, Apr. 30, 1878, in his 50th year. 

He was married in July, 1852, to Miss Annie L. Ancram. 

1850. 

Patrick Cabell Massie, son of Dr. Thomas Massie, of Nel- 
son, Va., and grandson of Maj. Thomas Massie, a soldier of the 
Revolution, was born in Nelson County, Va., Jan. 8, 1829, and 
died in Lynchburgh, Va., Sept. 29, 1877, aged 48 years. 



306 

The first year after graduation he studied law in the Yale Law 
School, and then returned to his home in Nelson County, where 
he spent the rest of his life, engaged in agricultural pursuits. He 
was sincerely respected for his high Christian character. He was 
married, June 18, 1857, to Miss Susan C. Withers, of Campbell 
Co., Va., who survives him, with six sons and one daughter. He 
had been for many years afflicted with an obscure nervous dis- 
ease, and was taken to Lynchburgh a few weeks before his death 
for the sake of superior medical advice. 



1862. 

Henry Edward Phelps was born in New Haven, Conn., 
June 4, 1833, the son of Henry A. and Harriet (Noding) Phelps. 

After graduation he taught in Missouri (1852-3), in New York 
City (1853-4), and in Elizabeth, N. J. (1854-5). In the autumn 
of 1855 he removed to New Market, Platte County, Missouri, to 
engage in business, and a year later returned to N ew York City, 
where for several years before his death he held the position of 
secretary in the counting-room of H. B. Claflin & Co., residing in 
Jersey City, N. J. 

He died in Jersey City, June 29, 1877, aged 44 years. 

He was married, Nov. 7, 1855, to Miss Julia Truesdell, of New 
York City, who is still living, with their three sons and one 
daughter. 

1853. 

Charles Townsend, the youngest son of the Hon. Charles 
Townsend, was born in Buffalo, N. Y., April 12, 1 831. 

On leaving College he became a clerk in the Bank of Attica, 
in Buffalo, and from 1855 was cashier of the same institution. 
He was married, June 10, 1856, to Miss Martha S., youngest 
daughter of Gains B. Rich, of Buffalo, and spent the next few 
months in Europe. After his return he continued in his office as 
cashier until 1872, when he resigned on account of incipient dis- 
ease. The later years of his life were spent in travel. He died, of 
consumption, at Haslach, in the Black Forest, Germany, Sept. 1 
1877, aged 46. 

His widow, with two sons and two daughters, survives him. 



306 

1854. 

WiLLARD Cutting Flagg, only son of Gershom and Jane (Pad- 
dock) Flagg, was born in Moro, Madison County, 111., Sept. 16, 
1829. 

After leaving college he returned home, and owing to the fail- 
ing health of his father took charge of his extensive farm. He 
was married, Febr. 13, 1856, to Sarah, daughter of James Smith, 
of St. Louis, Mo., and continued to reside on his farm near Moro 
until his death. He took an active part in local politics in the 
campaigns of 1856 and 1860, and in 1862 was appointed collector 
of internal revenue for the 12th district of Illinois, retaining the 
office until elected to the State Senate, a position which he held 
for four years from 1869. He was greatly interested in the pro- 
motion of scientific agriculture and horticulture, and held a lead- 
ing position in connection with many organizations for this object. 
He was also a frequent and successful writer on political and agri- 
cultural topics. He was one of the originators of the farmers' 
movement in the West, and was elected in 1873 the first president 
of the Illinois State Farmers' Association. He was one of the 
earliest promoters and trustees of the Illinois Industrial University. 

He died in Moro, March 30, 1878, of influenza, having been in 
feeble health through the previous winter. 

His wife with three of their six children survives him. 

Orson Cowles Sparrow, son of Bradford and Adelia Sparrow, 
was born in Killingly, Conn., Sept. 3, 1832. 

He taught in Honesdale, Pa., for two years after graduation, 
and then took a course in chemistry in the Yale Scientfic School 
and received the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy in 1858. He 
was then called to the chair of chemistry in Andrew College, 
Newton, Tenn., where he remained till the civil war broke out 
and closed the institution. Returning North in 1861 he began 
the study of medicine and graduated at the Long Island College 
Hospital in 1864. Soon after, he entered the U. S. service as Act- 
ing Assistant Surgeon at the McDougall General Hospital near 
Fort Schuyler, N. Y., where he remained till the close of the war. 
On returning to Brooklyn he was appointed assistant to Dr. Flint 
in the L. I. College Hospital, and also secured a good private 
practice. He devoted a large share of his time to life-insurance 
examinations, and also made diseases of the heart and lungs the 
object of special study. In the spring of 1875 the ravages of con- 



807 

sumption compelled him to seek a warmer climate, and he settled 
in Yaldosta, Ga., where he resided till his death, Sept. 13, 1877, 
at the age of 45. He married Sarah, daughter of Deacon Lewis 
Edwards, formerly of Norwich, Conn., who died in Jan., 1874. 
Of their two children, the only son is still living. 

1856. 

Lewis Este Mills, son of Lewis and Sarah A. Mills, was bom 
in Morristown, N. J., Aug. 13, 1836. 

He studied law at first in Morristown, and afterwards com- 
pleted his studies in Cincinnati, where he was admitted to the bar 
in November, 1858, and became a partner in the firm of Mills & 
Hoadly, of which his elder brother was the senior member. In 
1859 he formed a partnership with Mr. A. T. Goshorn in the same 
city. He joined the army in the late civil war as a volunteer 
aide-de-camp on the staff of Gen. R. B. Potter, and served in the 
army of the Southwest during that year's campaign, which 
included the siege of Yicksburg. Returning to Cincinnati, he 
was married, Jan. 7, 1864, to Miss Jean Springer, daughter of 
Charles Springer, and thereafter gradually withdrew from active 
practice and devoted himself to travel and literary pursuits. He 
published a revision of Handy's Reports of the Superior Court of 
Cincinnati (in 1877), and printed privately (in 1867) a volume of 
" Glimpses of Southern France and Spain." 

He went to Europe (for the fourth time) in the summer of 1877, 
and after traveling in Normandy and passing the winter in Brus- 
sels, had reached Florence, Italy, in an invalid condition, where 
while wasting away from a disease of the kidneys a sudden attack 
of heart-disease ended his life on the 10th of April, 1878, in his 
42d year. 

His wife survives him, without children. 

1857. 

Israel Selden Spencer, eldest son of the late Horatio N. 
Spencer (Y. C. 1821) and Sarah A. (Marshall) Spencer, was born 
in Port Gibson, Claiborne County, Miss., March 23, 1837. He 
first entered college as Sophomore with the Class of 1856, but 
soon withdrew, to begin at the same point a year later. 

He engaged in planting cotton near Skipwith Landing, Issa- 
queena County, Miss., soon after graduation, and at a later period 
became a merchant, at the head of the firm of Spencer & Taylor 



308 



at Skipwith Landing. He was thus engaged at the time of his 
death, in that place, after a brief illness, June 3, 1878, at the age 
of 41. 

1858. 

Edward Augustus Manice, younger son of DeForest and 
Catherine M. (Booth) Manice, was born in New York City, Oct. 
19, 1838. 

For the two years after graduation he studied chemistry in the 
Yale Scientific School, receiving in ] 860 the Degree of Bachelor 
of Philosophy. He remained in New Haven for another year, 
continuing his chemical studies, and then returned to New York. 
He studied law at the Columbia College Law School, and was 
admitted to the bar, but an ample fortune made it unnecessary 
for him to engage in active practice. He was married, Nov. 4, 
1863, to Miss Phebe, daughter of Hon. John B. Jlobertson (Y. C. 
1829), of New Haven, who survives him, with their four children. 
He had suffered for some months from malarial fever, and in a fit 
of temporary insanity took his own life, in New York City, on 
the morning of Dec. 4, 1877. 



George Fairlamb Smith, son of Persifor F. and Thomasine S. 
(Fairlamb) Smith, was born in West Chester, Pa., Feb. 28, 1840, 
and died in the same place, after a short but painful illness, Oct. 
18, 1877, in his 38th year. 

He was a student of law in his father's office until enlisting for 
three months, April 17, 1861, as a private in the 2d Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Infantry. While with this regiment he was pro- 
moted to be 1 st Lieutenant, and in his subsequent connection with 
the 49th and 61st regiments reached the rank of Colonel. He 
served honorably through the war, was engaged in most of the 
battles of the Army of the Potomac, was wounded and taken 
prisoner at Fair Oaks, and again wounded at Spottsylvania Court 
House. At the close of the war he returned to the practice of his 
profession in West Chester, where he continued until his death. 
In 1876 he was made Judge Advocate on Gov. Hartranft's 'staff, 
with the rank of Brigadier General. 

He was married, in Thornbury, Pa., Sept. 25, 1867, to Anna E., 
daughter of Wellington Hickman, who survives him with one son 
and one daughter. 



809 



I860. 



Edward Bolt wood, sixth son of Hon. Lucius Boltwood (Wil- 
liams Coll. 1814) and Fanny H. (Shepard) Boltwood, was bom in 
Amherst, Mass., Sept. 4, 1889. 

He studied law in the Law School of Harvard University, and 
was admitted to the bar in Boston. After a short time spent in 
an office in Pittsfield, Mass., he removed early in 1 863 to Detroit, 
Mich., where he engaged in practice. He was married, Oct. 26, 
1865, to Miss Sarah E., eldest daughter of Thomas F. Plunkett, of 
Pittsfield, and the next year removed to Grand Haven, Mich. 
He was in 1868 elected Probate Judge of the county, but resigned 
that office early in the summer of 1871 to accept the treasurer- 
ship of the Berkshire Life Insurance Company, in Pittsfield. 
After the death of his father-in-law, he became (in January, 18Y6) 
also the President of the company, and continued to hold both 
these offices until his death. Under his management the good 
character and financial success of the company were satisfactorily 
promoted. The effect of too close attention to business, follow- 
ing on the death of his wife, was to develop tendencies to con- 
sumption which foreign travel failed to overcome. He spent the 
winter of 1876-77 in South Carolina, and on the approach of the 
next winter sailed for the south of France. He left Marseilles for 
Cairo, Egypt, on Jan. 10, but the exposure of the passage proved 
too great, and he rapidly declined. He died in Cairo on the 6th 
of February, 1878, in his 39th year. Of his two sons one only is 
still living. 

1867. 

Beverly Allen, only son of Beverly and Penelope Allen, was 
born in St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 15, 1845. His mother is a sister of 
Maj. Gen. John Pope, U. S. A. 

A few months afler leaving college he entered the Merchants' 
Bank of St. Louis, as teller, and continued in this position until 
compelled to retire by illness. Early in 1874 his health began to 
fail, and he endeavored by travel, but without success, to regain 
strength. He failed slowly until his death, in St. Louis, of consump- 
tion of the lungs, on the night of Jan. 25-26, 1876, at the age of 
31 years. 

He was married, June 7, 1870, to Mary V., daughter of William 
Price, Esq., of St. Louis, whom he leaves a widow, with two sons. 



810 

Henry Willson Payne, son of Hon. Henry B. Payne, was 
born in Cleveland, Ohio, March 7, 1845. 

He graduated at the Columbia College Law School, N. Y. City, 
in May, 1870, and then settled in Cleveland in the study and 
practice of his profession. The failure of his health obliged him 
to leave for Europe in the fall of 1 876. He spent the ensuing 
winter in Mentone, France, and returned there in October, 1877, 
with the hope of entire recovery by another spring; but the 
disease (consumption) terminated fatally, Feb. 8, 1878. 

Moses Strong, only son of Hon. Moses M. Strong (Dartmouth 
Coll. 1829) and Caroline F. (Green) Strong, was born, June 17, 
1846, at Mineral Point, Wise, where his father has for many years 
been largely interested in the development of lead mines. 

Selecting the profession of a mining engineer, he remained in 
New Haven until the summer of 1868, studying in the Sheffield 
Scientific School ; and during the next two years he continued his 
studies in Germany. He returned to America in the autumn of 
1870, and was employed in 1871-2 as civil engineer on the 
Northern Pacific and Wisconsin Central Railroads. In the 
spring of 1873, on the inauguration of the Geological Survey of 
Wisconsin, he was appointed assistant geologist, and served faith- 
fully in that capacity until his death. On Aug. 18, 1877, while 
completing a geological examination of the branches of the 
Chippewa River, in the northern part of the State, the skiff in 
which with a companion he was ascending the Flambeau River 
was capsized while passing some rapids, and in the effort to save 
the life of his comrade he was seized with cramp and drowned. 
Since his death his elaborate report on the geology and topo- 
graphy of the Lead Region of Wisconsin has been published by 
the director of the survey. 

He was married, Feb. 13, 1873, to Miss Julia M. Jones, at 
Mineral Point, who survives him with two daughters. 

1869. 

Thomas Walter Swan, son of Thomas S. Swan, was born in 
East Haddam, Conn., Sept. 13, 1846, but in childhood his family 
removed to Old Lyme, Conn., from which town he came to 
college. 

He read law after graduating, partly at home, and partly in 
Shelburne Falls, Mass., where he was principal of the Academy in 



311 

1810. He was admitted to the bar, Sept. 19, 1871, and was at 
once taken into partnership with Hon. John T. Wait, of Norwich, 
Conn. For three years from July, 1864, he was city attorney. 
He was obliged in January, 1878, to abandon his business and go 
to a warmer climate, on account of lung-disease, from which he 
had long suffered. Relief was sought in vain and he died, in 
Pilatka, Fla., on the 7th of March, in the 32d year of his age. 

He was married, Nov. 26, 1872, to Miss Jennie A. Maynard, 
of Shelburne Falls. She survived him, with three children, one of 
whom has since died. 

1871. 

Frank Monroe Parsons, son of Samuel M. and Sarah (Bick 
ford) Parsons, was born in York, Me., Nov. 6, 1848, and was 
fitted for College at Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H. His resi- 
dence while in College was in Niantic, 111. 

After graduating he studied law for several months in Jackson- 
ville, 111., acting also as principal of one of the schools. During 
1872-3 he was associated in the practice of law with his classmate 
Janes, in Paris, Tenn., and thence removed to Little Rock, Ark., 
where he died of typhoid fever, Oct. 3, 1877, aged nearly 29 years. 

He was married in Little Rock, July 28, 1877, to a daughter of 
Judge Compton (formerly of the Supreme Court of the State) 
with whom he was practicing law at the time of his death. 

1873. 

Ebenezer Hartwell Btjckingham, youngest son of the late 
Rev. Ebenezer Buckingham (Ohio University, 1833) and Laura S. 
(Horr) Buckingham, was born in Canton, O., where his father 
was then and for many years pastor of the Presbyterian Church, 
May 25, 1850. 

On graduation he began the study of law in an office in Omaha, 
Nebraska, and in 1875 was admitted to the bar. At that time he 
formed a partnership with C. J. Green, Esq., and the firm con- 
tinued the practice of law in Omaha until dissolved by death. In 
the fall of 1 875 Mr. Buckingham was the candidate of the Demo- 
cratic party for the county judgeship, but was defeated ; a year 
later he was elected district attorney of the Third District of 
Nebraska, and filled the office acceptably till his death. 

Me died in Omaha, after a brief illness, Nov. 28, 1877, at the 
aere of 27 years. He was unmarried. 



312 

John Franklin Chase, son of David and Sarah (Peckham) 
Chase, was born in Tiverton, R. L, March 28, 1850. He was fitted 
for college in Newport, R. I. 

On graduating he obtained a position as teacher in the Has- 
brouck Institute, Jersey City, N. J., where he continued until his 
death. He also pursued the study of law at the Columbia College 
Law School, where he graduated in 1875. After being admitted 
to the bar, in May, 1875, he gave part of his time for the next 
year to the practice of law in New York City, and was intending 
to devote himself wholly to that business after the summer of 1876. 
He died, in New York City, of malignant scarlet fever, after three 
days' illness, April 19, 1876, aged 26 years. 

He married, at Newport, R. I., July 30, 1874, Edna C. Tilley, 
who survives him with one son. 

1875. 

Harmanus Madison Welch, son of Hon. Harmanus M. and 
Antoinette (Pierce) Welch, was born in New Haven, Conn., June 
19, 1854. 

After graduation be entered Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
New York City, where he pursued his studies until March, 1877, 
when he received an appointment as assistant doctor to the 
Nursery Hospital on Randall's Island. While attending to his 
duties in the hospital, he contracted typhoid fever, and after a 
short illness died there, Sept. 18, 1877, in his 24th year. He was 
enthusiastically devoted to his chosen profession, and gave promise 
of a successful career, had his life been spared. At the time of 
his illness, he was on the point of resigning his position with the 
purpose of further study in Europe. He was unmarried. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1815. 

Jared Potter Kirtland was born in Wallingford, Conn., 
Nov. 10, 1793. His mother was Mary, daughter of Dr. Jared 
Potter (Y. C. 1760), a famous physician of Wallingford. His 
father, Turhand Kirtland, was largely interested in the purchases 
made by the Connecticut Land Company in Ohio, and removed 
to the Western Reserve in 1803. Meantime the son remained in 
Wallingford, and Dr. Potter dying in 1810 left a legacy to pro* 



313 

vide for his medical education at Edinburgh. But the war with 
Great Britain prevented the voyage, and when the Medical De- 
partment of this College went into operation in 1813, young 
Kirtland was the first matriculated student in a class of 38 
members. 

He was married in May, 1814, to Caroline, second daughter of 
Joshua Atwater, of Wallingford, and after graduation he prac- 
ticed in Wallingford until 1818, when he made a journey to Ohio 
to perfect arrangements for a removal thither. But on returning 
for his family he found a peculiarly attractive opportunity for 
establishing himself in Durham, Conn., and there remained until 
the death of his wife in 1823, when he carried out his intention of 
settling in Poland, Ohio. He had acquired a large country prac- 
tice, and had also been for three terms a member of the legislature, 
when in 183Y he was elected to the professorship of the theory 
and practice of medicine in the Ohio Medical College at Cincin- 
nati. He resigned this position in 1842, having in the meantime 
purchased a fine fruit farm in East Rockport, five miles from the 
city of Cleveland, where he spent the rest of his life. In 1843 
the medical department of the Western Reserve College was 
established, at Cleveland, and he filled the chair of theory and 
practice in that institution until 1 864. 

Besides his professional attainments. Dr. Kirtland was inter- 
ested in all departments of natural history. He was an efficient 
assistant in the first geological survey of Ohio, and was untiring 
in his efforts to improve the horticulture and agriculture of his 
adopted state. 

He died at his residence in East Rockport, Dec. 11, 1877, aged 
84 years. Shortly after the death of his first wife he was married 
to Miss Hannah F. Toucey, of Newtown, Conn. 

Of three children by his first marriage, one daughter survived 
him. 

1816. 

Harvey Campbell died in Groton, Conn., Sept. 16, 1877, at 
the age of 85. He was the son of Dr. Allen and Sarah (Kinne) 
Campbell, and was born in Voluntown, Conn., Sept. 30, 1792. 

He studied medicine with his father (long a successful physician 
in Eastern Connecticut) and afterwards in this Medical School. 
He settled in his native town and enjoyed a large practice. He 
was also interested in public affairs, and repeatedly a member of 
both houses of the General Assembly of the State. 
21 



314 

He married Sarah Cook, and after her death her sister, Eliza 
Cook, who also died before him. He leaves two sons and six 
daughters. 

1826. 

Asa Johnson Driggs was born in Middletown, Conn., about 
the year 1805. While a youth he was placed in the Episcopal 
Academy at Cheshire, Conn., for his education, and on leaving 
school entered the office of Professor Eli Ives of New Haven, as 
a student of medicine. 

Upon graduation he began practice in Cheshire, and during the 
next year was married to a daughter of Rev. Reuben Ives (Y. C. 
1786), the Rector of the Episcopal church in that town. In 1828 
his wife died, leaving one son who is still living. Immediately 
after this he went to the island of Trinidad and served for a few 
years as physician on several plantations there. He then resumed 
his practice in Cheshire, and for more than a generation continued 
the beloved and respected physician of that community. He died 
there suddenly, of paralysis, March 16, 1878, aged 73 years. 

1827. 

George Dyer died in Trumbull, Conn., May 8, 1878, asjed 75 
years. He was born in Windham, Conn., in August, 1802, the 
son of Benjamin Dyer, a druggist in Windham, and grandson of 
Eliphalet Dyer (Y. C. 1740), a member of Congress from Connec- 
ticut and afterwards Chief Justice of the State. 

He began the study of medicine with Dr. Chester Hunt, of 
Windham, and after taking his degree established himself in prac- 
tice in Greenfield Hill, Conn., but not finding a good opening there 
removed about 1 832 to Trumbull, Conn., where he continued in 
active practice for forty years. He was attacked about five years 
before his death with softening of the brain, and failed gradually 
in mental and physical strength. He took an interest in local 
politics, and once represented Trumbull in the State Legislature. 

He married when about 60 years of age, and his wife survives 
him without children. 

1829. 

James Beakes Coleman died in Trenton, N. J., Dec. 19, 1877, 
in the 72d year of his age. 

He was a native of Trenton, and received his early education 
there, where he also spent some years with an apothecary and 



316 

became a good practical chemist, before beginning the study of 
medicine. After graduating, he spent nearly two years in Phila- 
delphia, and then practiced in Burlington County, N. J., until 
1837 when he returned to Trenton, his home for the rest of his 
life. He was for this entire period a general practitioner, though 
especially skillful as a surgeon, and exercising his inventive genius, 
not only in contriving mechanical appliances for use in his profes- 
sion, but also in other ways. For instance, in 1841, while physi- 
cian of the State Prison, he was the first to introduce forced ven- 
tilation by means of a blowing-fan. He wrote largely for the 
press, in the line of his profession and the useful arts, and in the 
way of general literature, both prose and poetry. He was the 
President of the State Medical Society in 1855. 

His wife, who was a sister of Chief Justice Beasley of New 
Jersey, died in February, 1876. 

Seth Shove, long a practicing physician in Katonah, Westches- 
ter County, N. Y., died in that place, Febr. 24, 1878, aged 73 
years. 

1834. 

Noah Henry Byington was born in Bristol, Conn., Sept. 26, 
1809, and died in Southington, Conn., Dec. 29, 1877, aged 68 
years. 

His medical studies were begun with his elder brother, Charles 
Byington, M. D. (Yale 1821), of Bristol, and continued in New 
Haven and Philadelphia. On receiving his degree he began the 
practice of his profession in Wolcott, Conn., where he resided 
until 1849, when he removed to Southington, where he continued 
in active service until the attack of diphtheria which closed his 
life after a fortnight's illness. He had represented both Wolcott 
and Southington in the State Legislature, and had taken special 
interest in all educational matters. 

1840. 

Edmund Randolph Peaslee, son of James and Abigail (Chase) 
Peaslee, was born in Newton, N. H., Jan. 22, 1814. 

He graduated at Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H., in 1836, 
and after a year spent in teaching in Lebanon, N. H., returned to 
the college as tutor. He retired from the tutorship in 1839, hav- 
ing in the meantime begun his professional studies in the Medical 
School connected with Dartmouth, and then continuing them in 



316 

New Haven. In 1841 he began practice as a physician in Hano- 
ver, and a year later became Professor of Anatomy and Physi- 
ology in the college. This chair he continued to fill until 1 8'70. 
He was also appointed lecturer on Anatomy and Surgery in 
Bowdoin College, Maine, in 1843, and was made professor of these 
branches in the same college in 1845, retaining the position until 
1857, and also continuing to act as Professor of Surgery until 
1860. In 1851 he was appointed Professor of Physiology and 
Pathology in the New York Medical College, of N. Y. City, and 
in 1858 (in which year he removed his residence from Hanover to 
New York) he accepted the Professorship of Obstetrics in the 
same institution, which he held until 1860. From the date of his 
removal to New York he took a leading position in his profession, 
making a specialty of the diseases of women, and particularly 
of ovariotomy. His treatise on Ovarian Tumors, published in 
1872, is the standard authority on that subject. He also published 
in 1854 a work on Human Histology, and was a frequent and 
valued contributor to the medical journals. In 1872 he was 
elected Professor of Gynaecology in Dartmouth College, and in 
1874 Gynaecology was made a separate chair in Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, N. Y., and he was elected the first Professor. 
He filled many positions of honor in various Medical Associations 
of New York. In 1859 the degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred 
on him by Dartmouth College. 

After an unusually exhausting series of professional engage- 
ments, he was attacked with pneumonia, and died after a week's 
illness, Jan. 21, 1878, aged 64 years. 

He was married, July 11, 1841, to Martha T., daughter of Hon. 
Stephen Kendrick, of Lebanon, N. H., who survives him with one 
son and one daughter. The son was graduated at this College in 
1872. 

1843. 

Charles Barnes Whittlesey, only son of John S. and Phebe 
(Barnes) Whittlesey, was born in New Britain, Conn., Sept. 13, 
1820. 

He came to New Haven in 1840, and after his graduation 
established himself here as a druggist, continuing in the business 
until his death. Dr. Whittlesey was respected and successful as 
a business man, and honored wherever known as an earnest Chris- 
tian. From 1857 until his death he was a deacon of the First 



II 317 

Church. He died in New Haven, after a brief illness, Jan. 27, 
1878, in his 58th year. 
He was married in 1851 to E. Antoinette Wilcoxson, of Milan, 
O. She with four of their six children — one son and three 
daughters — survives him. 
1844. 

George Anson Moody, son of Dr. Anson (Y. C. 1814) and 
' Clarissa (Collins) Moody, was born in Palmer, Mass., Feb. 20, 
1821. 

After preliminary medical studies with his father he entered 
this school, and in June of the year of his graduation settled in 
Plainville, Conn., where he remained in active practice for a third 
of a century. During this entire period he was eminently useful 
and enjoyed the respect of the community. For some years he 
had been affected with rheumatism, and his very sudden death, on 
I Nov. 23, 1877, was caused by the disease reaching the heart. 

Dr. Moody was married in November, 1844, to Nancy E. San- 
ford, of North Haven, Conn., who survives him. Two sons died 
in early childhood, and two sons (one of them now a member of 
the medical department) and a daughter are still living. 

1848. 

Henry Clinton Porter, fourth son and youngest child of 
Horace and Hannah (Frisbee) Porter, was born in Waterbury, 
Conn., April 20, 1825. 

He was prepared, in the Episcopal Academy in Cheshire, Conn., 
to enter the Academical Department of this College, but obliged 
to give up his intention for family reasons, and decided on the 
profession of medicine. In 1846 he went to Towanda, Pa., and 
after beginning his studies with Dr. Houston of that place, 
returned to New Haven to obtain a degree. On graduating he 
entered into partnership with Dr. Houston, at the same time 
carrying on business as a druggist. After four or five years he 
withdrew from active practice to devote himself entirely to the drug 
business, in which by integrity and good judgment he was highly 
successful. He died of apoplexy, at his home in Towanda, March 
17, 1877, in his 52d year. 

He was married in 1850, to Eliza E., daughter of N. M. Betts, 
of Towanda, and had three children — two sons and a daughter — >. 
who with their mother are still living. 



318 



1856. 



Elijah Gregory was born in Danbury, Conn., Oct. 9, 1833. 
He began the study of his profession with Dr. E. P. Bennett of 
that town. 

After graduation he practiced medicine for a year in Lakeville, 
Conn., was then for two years in Lenox, Mass., and for the two 
following years in North Salem, N. Y. His health here failed 
him, but he was able after a brief rest in Danbury to begin prac- 
tice again, in Bridgeport, Conn., in the fall of 1861. In August, 
1862, he joined the IVth Regiment, Conn. Volunteers, as Assist- 
ant Surgeon, and served until the close of the war. He then 
returned to Bridgeport, where he continued in active practice 
until his sudden death, Oct. 5, 1877, at the age of 44. 

He was married in 1857 to Josephine Shepard, of Bethel, Conn., 
who survives him with one son. 

1869. 

Daniel Poll was born in Dresden, Saxony, in 1831. Being 
implicated in the revolutionary movements of 1848, he came to 
this country, settled in New York City as a physician, and was 
there married. He soon after removed to Williamsburgh, N. Y., 
and thence to Meriden, Conn. About 1864 he settled in Hart- 
ford, Conn., and soon became a favorite physician among the Ger- 
man population of that city. In 1868 he received the appoint- 
ment of " physician for the poor" in Hartford, and performed the 
duties of that office for three years in succession, to the public sat- 
isfaction. In 1876 he lost his wife, and his later days were not 
prosperous. 

He died in Hartford, of kidney disease, Apr. 3, 1877, aged 46. 
He left two children. 

Hanford Lyon Wixon, son of LeGrand and Roxana Wixon, 
was born in New Haven, Conn., Jan. 30, 1844, and died in the 
same city, June 30, 1877, aged 33 years. 

Dr. Wixon had practiced medicine in this city since his gradu- 
ation. He died, after a long illness, of typho-malarial fever. He 
was not married. 



819 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

1853. 

John Day Ferguson, son of John and Helen G. (Morewood) 
Ferguson, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec. 9, 1877, aged 45 years. 

He graduated at Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., in 1851, and 
practiced law in New York City and in Stamford, the place of his 
family residence. 

1874. 

Thomas Daniel Kennedy, son of Daniel Kennedy, died at 
his father's residence in New Hav^en, Conn., after a lingering 
illness, of paralysis of the brain, Nov. 25, 1877, aged 28 years. 

He was a graduate of the New Haven High School, and after 
studying law (partly in the office of Timothy J. Fox, Esq.) began 
practice in this city. In April, 1875, he was elected on the Demo- 
cratic ticket as one of the representatives of New Haven in the 
State Legislature. His health, always delicate, prevented his 
further participation in business or politics after the year 1875. 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1854. 

Stephen Lyford Crosby, second son of Dr. Josiah and Olive 
L. (Avery) Crosby, was born July 15, 1833, and died at his moth- 
er's house in Manchester, N. H., Nov. 29, 1875. 

He entered the school from Manchester, and fitted himself for 
the profession of a civil engineer. In 1859 he went to Peru, and 
was occupied there, especially in building the railroad over a por- 
tion of the Andes, until 1873, when he returned to Manchester 
attacked with the incipient disease of the lungs, which caused his 
death. He was never married. 

1865. 

Theron Skeel, son of Rufus R. Skeel, was born in the city of 
New York in July 1847, and died suddenly of heart-disease in 
the same city, April 22, 1878. 

After completing the regular course and receiving the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy, he remained in New Haven for another 
year, and was graduated civil engineer in the summer of 1866. 



820 

In the ensuing fall he joined a special class in steam engineering 
at the U. S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, and after a two years' 
course received the rank of 3d Assistant Engineer in the Navy. 
He served for a year in the South Pacific squadron, but was then 
obliged to ask a leave of absence on account of ill health. In 
1871 he was recalled to duty, and sent on the Tehuantepec Expe- 
dition. While in Mexico his resignation from the navy was 
accepted, and he returned to his father's house in Newburgh, N. Y. 
He spent the next six months in the practical exercise of his 
profession in the Washington Iron Works at Newburgh, and was 
afterw^ards similarly employed in Albany and New York City. 

In 1874 he opened an office in N. Y. City as consulting engi- 
neer, and was busily occupied till the day of his death in scientific 
researches for practical purposes, and in the construction of 
important public works. 

1867. 

Peter Houtz Grove, son of Elias and Sabina (Houtz) Grove, 
was born near Fredericksburg, Lebanon County, Pa., Nov. 23, 
1845. 

After graduation he became bookkeeper for the firm of Grove 
Brothers, in Danville, Pa. He died of typhoid fever, at his 
father's house, near Fredericksburg, Pa., Jan. 5, 1875, in his 30th 
year. 

He was married, July 7, 1873, to Miss May J. Baldy, of Dan- 
ville, who survives him with one daughter. 

1869. 

Edward Whiting Johnson, eldest son of Frank and Mary 
Rebecca Johnson, was born in Norwich, Conn., Dec. 28, 1848, and 
died in the same city, of spinal meningitis, Jan. 31, 1878, aged 29 
years. 

His preparatory training was received at Gen. Russell's Colle- 
giate and Commercial Institute, in New Haven. After his gradu- 
ation he sailed on the U. S. Flagship Lancaster, for a visit to 
South America, and then spent a year in European travel. Soon 
after his return he was married, Nov. 8, 1871, to Miss Alice Isa- 
bella Thomas, of Hartford, Conn., and he was engaged for the 
rest of his life in the banking business in Norwich, winning in 
his brief career the sincere respect of the community. His wife 
and one son survive him. 



321 



1871. 



Charles Woodford Griswold, son of Thomas F. and Mary 
Ann (Bishop) Griswold, was born in New Britain, Conn., May 
16, 1852. 

He graduated at the New* Britain High School in 1868, and 
then took the course in civil engineering in the Sheffield Scientific 
School. After receiving his degree he was employed temporarily 
on the U. S. Coast Survey, and in October, 1871, went to N. Y. 
City, where he filled the position of engineer of the Woodlawn 
Cemetery until his death. At the end of January, 1878, he was 
attacked with a disease of the brain induced by overwork, which 
after two or three sleepless nights developed into acute mania. 
At the urgent advice of his physician he was removed to the 
asylum in Poughkeepsie, and died there, Feb. 3, 1878, in his 26th 
year. 

He was married, Oct. 9, 1872, to Miss Sarah L. Garrett, of 
Sullivan County, N. Y., who survives him with their three chil- 
dren. 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1873. 

William Edward Safford was born in Oberlin, O., Apr. 11, 
1850. He was graduated at Oberlin College in 1870, and imme- 
diately entered this seminary. 

His first stated employment in the ministry was in 1874, when 
he took charge of a parish in Ashland, Wise. After one year's 
service there, he removed to Hudson, Wise, where he spent two 
years as acting pastor of the Congregational Church. He closed 
his engagement at Hudson in the autumn of 1877, and on* Oct. 
28th supplied a vacant pulpit in St. Paul, Minn. Directly after 
the service he was prostrated by an attack of typhoid fever, of 
which he died, in St. Paul, on the 6th of November, in his 28th 
year. He was unmarried. 

1876. 

Charles Whittlesey Guernsey, son of Rev. Jesse Guernsey, 
D.D., and Sarah L. (Whittlesey) Guernsey, was born in Derby, 
Conn., Sept. 2, 1850. In his boyhood his father removed to Iowa, 
residing in Dubuque from 1857 till his death in 1871. The son 



822 

graduated at Iowa College in 1871, and after an additional year 
spent at the College as tutor, he joined the Yale Divinity School. 
The middle year of his course was spent in Andover Seminary. 

He afterwards spent nearly a year in study and travel in Europe, 
and during this time decided upon the law as his profession, and 
with this in view settled in Cleveland, O., where he was admitted 
to the bar in the spring of 1877. In the following autumn, after 
having formed a promising business connection in the same city, 
he was attacked by pneumonia. Inflammation of the lungs soon 
set in, and after many weeks of great suffering he died, in Cleve- 
land, Febr. 11, 1878, in his 28th year. 

Samuel Lee Hillyer, son of Abraham R. and Charlotte 
(Mathews) Hillyer, and grandson of Rev. Asa Hillyer (Y. C. 
1786), who was for forty years pastor of the 1st Presbyterian 
Church in Orange, N. J., was born in Coshocton, O., March 9, 
1847. He graduated from Oberlin College, O., in 1872, and spent 
the next three years in the Yale Divinity School. 

Before he had completed his theological course, he received 
invitations to settle in the ministry in Woodbridge, N. J., Terre 
Haute, Ind., and Durham, Conn. The first of these calls he 
accepted, and was installed pastor of the 1st Congregational 
Church in Woodbridge, June 3, 1875. During his brief ministry 
of 2^ years, a new house of worship was built, and the church 
was more than doubled in numbers. In the spring of 1877 his 
failing health compelled him to relinquish work for a time. His 
church gave him a vacation of three months, which he spent in 
Europe ; but he found himself on his return no better, and by 
October his decline had been so rapid that he offered his resigna- 
tion of his charge. Immediately after this he was prostrated by 
a severe hemorrhage from which he never rallied. He died of 
quick consumption, Nov. 28, 1877, in a railway carriage, while on 
his way to Cleveland, O., the home of his wife. 

He was married, Sept. 29, 1875, to Ella E., daughter of Rev. 
Joseph S. Edwards, of Cleveland, who survives him. 



SXJMMi^RY. 



i 





Academical Department. 




Class. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Death. 


1806 


George Goodwin, 91, 


East Hartford, Conn., 


Febr. 8, '78. 


1811 


Samuel Spring, 85, 


East Hartford, Conn., 


Dec. 13, '77. 


1815 


William S. Robert, 82, 


Mastic, N. T., 


Nov. 9, '77. 


1817 


WiUard Child, 81, 


Mooers, N. Y., 


Nov. 13. '77. 


u 


Nathan R. Smith, 80, 


Baltimore, Md., 


July 3, '77. 


1818 


Francis Bugbee, 83, 


Montgomery, Ala., 


Apr. 21, '77. 


u 


Charles H. Olmsted, 80, 


East Hartford, Conn., 


June 5, '78. 


u 


Henry Sherwood, 81, 


Westport, Conn., 


May 5, '78. 


1820 


Cornelius R. Bogert, 77, 


New York City, 


Nov. 10, '77. 


1821 


Nathaniel Bouton, 79, 


Concord, N. H., 


June 6, '78. 


u 


Waldo Brown, 83, 


Nor walk, Conn., 


Oct. 27, '77. 


1822 


Maro McL. Reed, 75. 


Jacksonville, 111., 


June 28, '77. 


1824 


Stephen Reed, 75, 


Pitcsfield, Mass., 


July 12, '77. 


1825 


Oliver E. Huntington, 74, 


Cleveland, 0., 


July 13, '77. 


1827 


William Atwater, 70, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Sept. 10, '77. 


1828 


James C. Loomis, 70, 


South Egremont, Mass., 


Sept. 16, '77. 


a 


Ezra Palmer, 69, 


Boston, Mass., 


May 23, '78. 


a 


William Wolcott, 77, 


Kalamazoo, Mich., 


June 3, '77. 


1829 


Thomas A. Spence, 67, 


Washington, D. C, 


Nov. 10, '77. 


1830 


William M. Tallman, 70, 


Janesville, Wise, 


May 13, '78. 


1833 


Josiah Clark, 64, 


Northampton, Mass., 


May 30, '78. 


1834 


Samuel G. Southmayd, 66, 


Middletown, Conn., 


Oct. 9, '77. 


1835 


Alexander S. Johnson, 60, 


Nassau, Bahama Isl., 


Jan. 26. '78 


1837 


Sheldon Leavitt, 58, 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Oct. 26, '76. 


1839 


Philander Button, 65, 


Greenwich, Conn., 


May 21, '78. 


u 


Rufus P. Cutler, 62, 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Dec. 9, '77. 


1840 


Elijah B. Huntington, 61, 


South Coventry, Conn., 


Dec. 27, '77. 


1841 


WiUiam H. Clarke, 56, 


Augusta, Ga.. 


Aug. 10, '77. 


1843 


Charles Cramer, 53, 


Waterford, N. Y., 


Sept. 3, '76. 


" 


WilUam G. Lane, 53, 


Sandusky, 0., 


Oct. 28, '77. 


1844 


John Jackson, 59, 


Boston, Mass., 


Jan. 23, '77. 


1846 


Albert H. Barnes, 52, 


Philadelphia, Pa., 


May 6, '78. 


1847 


George N. Cleaveland, 51, 


Westport, Conn., 


Oct. 30, '77. 


u 


Amos S. Darrow, 52. 


Donaldsonville, La., 


Aug. 10, '77. 


li 


Charles A. Nichols, 51, 


Somerville, Mass., 


Oct. 20, '77. 


u 


William Sharp, 65, 


Dover, Del., 


Sept. 13, '76. 


(( 


Thomas Y. Simons, 49, 


Charleston, S. C, 


Apr. 30, '78. 


1850 


Patrick C. Massie, 48, 


Lynchburgh, Va., 


Sept. 29, '77. 


1852 


Henry E. Phelps, 44, 


Jersey City, N. J., 


June 29, '77. 


1853 


Charles Townsend, 46, 


Haslach, Germany, 


Sept. 1, '77. 


1854 


Willard C. Flagg, 48, 


Moro, 111., 


March 30, '78 


u 


Orson C. Sparrow, 45, 


Valdosta, Ga., 


Sept. 13, '77. 


1856 


Lewis E. Mills, 41, 


Florence, Italy, 


Apr. 10, '78. 


1857 


1. Selden Spencer, 41, 


Skipwith, Miss., 


June 3, '78. 


1858 


Edward A. Manice, 39, 


New York City, 


Dec. 4, '77. 


" 


George F. Smith, 37, 


West Chester, Pa., 


Oct. 18, '77. 


1860 


Edward Boltwood, 38, 


Cairo, Egypt, 


Febr. 6, '78. 


1867 


Beverly Allen, 31, 


St. Louis, Mo., 


Jan. 26, '76. 


u 


Henry W. Payne, 33, 


Mentone, France, 


Febr. 8, '78. 



324 



ClasB. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Df'.ath. 


1867 


Moses Strong, 31, 


Flambeau River, Wise, 


Aug. 18, '77. 


1869 


T. Walter Swan. 31, 


Pilatka, Fla., 


March 7, '78. 


1871 


Frank M. Parsons, 29, 


Little Rock, Ark., 


Oct. 3, '77. 


1873 


Ebenezer H. Buckingham, 27 


, Omaha, Nebr., 


Nov. 28, '77. 


(( 


John F. Chase, 26, 


New York City, 


Apr. 19, '76. 


1875 


Harmanus M. Welch, Jr., 23. 


New York City, 


Sept. 18, '77. 




Medical Department. 




1815 


Jared P. Kirtland, 84, 


East Rockport, 0., 


Dec. 11, '77. 


1816 


Harvey Campbell, 85, 


Groton, Conn., 


Sept. 16, '77. 


1826 


Asa J. Driggs, 73, 


Cheshire, Conn., 


March 16, '78. 


1827 


George Dyer, 75, 


Trumbull, Conn., 


May 8, '78. 


1829 


James B. Coleman. 71, 


Trenton, N. J., 


Dec. 19, '77. 


(( 


Seth Shove, 73, 


Katonah, N. Y., 


Febr. 24, '78. 


1834 


Noah H. Byington, 68, 


Southington, Conn,, 


Dec. 29. '77. 


1840 


Edmund R. Peaslee, 64, 


New York City, 


Jan. 21, '78. 


1843 


Charles B. Whittlesey, 57, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Jan. 27, '78. 


1844 


George A. Moody, 56, 


Plainville, Conn., 


Nov. 23, '77. 


1848 


Henry C. Porter, 52, 


Towanda, Pa., 


March 17, '77. 


1856 


Elijah Gregory, 44, 


Bridgeport, Conn., 


Oct. 5, '77. 


1869 


Daniel Poll, 46, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Apr. 3, '77. 


(( 


Hanford L. Wixon, 33, 


New Haven, Conn., 


June 30, '77. 




Department op Law. 




1853 


John D. Ferguson, 45, 


Stamford, Conn., 


Dec. 9, '77. 


1874 


Thomas D. Kennedy, 28, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Nov. 25, '77. 



1854 
1865 
1867 
1869 
1871 



Department of Philosophy and the Arts. 
{Sheffield Scientific School.) 



Stephen L. Crosby, 42, 
Theron Skeel, 30, 
Peter H. Grove, 29, 
Edward W. Johnson, 29, 
Charles W. Griswold, 25, 



Manchester, N. H., 
New York City, 
Fredericksburg, Pa., 
Norwich, Conn., 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., 



Theological Department. 



1873 William E. Safford, 27, 
1875 Charles W. Guernsey, 27, 
" S. Lee HUlyer, 30, 



St. Paul, Minn., 
Cleveland, 0., 
New York, 



Nov. 29, '75. 
Apr. 22, '78. 
Jan. 5, '75. 
Jan. 31, '78. 
Febr. 3, '78. 



Nov. 6, '77. 
Febr. 11, '78. 
Nov. 28, '77. 



The number of deaths reported above is 79, and the average age of the gradu- 
ates of the Academical Department is 58 years. 

Of the 55 Academical graduates, 15 were lawyers, 11 in business, 7 clergymen, 
7 doctors, and 4 teachers. 

The deaths are distributed as follows : — in Connecticut, 23 ; in New York, 14; 
in Massachusetts, 6 ; in OMo and Pennsylvania, 4 each ; in New Hampshire, New 
Jersey, and Wisconsin, 2 each ; and the remainder in as many different States or 
countries. 



The oldest surviving graduate is Seth Pierce, of Cornwall, Conn., of the Class 
of 1806, who was bom May 16, 1785. 



INDEX 



Class. Page. 

1867 AUen, Beverly, _ 309 

1827 Atwater, WiUiam, 291 

1846 Barnes, Albert H., 302 

1820 Bogert. Cornelius R., 288 

1860 Boltwood, Edward, 309 

1821 Bouton, Nathaniel, .288 

1821 Brown, Waldo, _. 289 

1873 Buckingham, Ebenezer H., 311 

1818 Bugbee, Francis,. _ 287 

1839 Button, PhUander, 297 

1834 TO Bjrington, Noah H., 315 

1816 m Campbell, Harvey, 313 

1873 Chase, John F., 312 

1817 Child, Willard, 285 

1833 Clark, Josiah, 295 

1 841 Clarke, WilHam H., 300 

1847 Cleaveland, George N., 302 

1829 TO Coleman, James B., 314 

1843 Cramer, Charles, 300 

1854 s Crosby, Stephen L., 319 

1839 Cutler, Rufus P., - 298 

1 847 Darrow, Amos S., 302 

1826 TO Driggs, Asa J., 314 

1827 TO Dyer, George, 314 

1853 I Ferguson, John D., ..! 319 

1 854 Flagg, Willard C, 306 

1 806 Goodwin, George, . 283 

1856 TO Gregory, Elijah, _ 318 

1871 s Griswold, Charles W., 321 

1867 s Grove, Peter H., .._ 320 

1875 t Guernsey, Charles W., 321 

1875 t Hillyer, S. Lee, ..., 322 

1840 Huntington, Elijah B., 299 

1825 Huntington, Oliver E., 291 

1 844 Jackson, John, 301 

1835 Johnson, Alexander S., --- 296 
1869 s Johnson, Edward W., 320 

1874 I Kennedy, Thomas D , 319 

1815 TO Eartland, Jared P., 312 

1843 Lane, William G 301 



Class. Page. 

1 837 Leavitt, Sheldon, _ 297 

1828 Loomis, James C, 292 

1858 Manice, Edward A., 308 

1850 Massie, Patrick C, 304 

1856 Mills, Lewis E., 307 

1844 TO Moody, George A., 317 

1847 Nichols, Charles A., 303 

1818 Olmsted, Charles H., 287 

1828 Palmer, Ezra, _ 292 

1871 Parsons, Frank M., 311 

1867 Payne, Henry W., 310 

1840 TO Peaslee, Edmund R., 315 

1852 Phelps, Henry E., 305 

1869 TO Poll, Daniel, 318 

1848 TO Porter, Henry C, _ 317 

1822 Reed, Maro McL , 289 

1 824 Reed, Stephen, _ 290 

1815 Robert, William S., 285 

1873 t Safford, William E., 321 

1847 Sharp, William, 303 

1818 Sherwood, Henry, 288 

1829 TO Shove, Seth, 315 

1847 Simons, Thomas Y., 304 

1865 s Skeel, Theron, 319 

1858 Smith, George F., 308 

1817 Smith, Nathan R., 286 

1834 Southmayd, Samuel G., -.. 295 

1854 Sparrow, Orson C, - 306 

1829 Spence, Thomas A., 293 

1857 Spencer, L Selden, 307 

1811 Spring, Samuel, _ 284 

1867 Strong, Moses, 310 

1869 Swan, T. Walter, .310 

1830 Tallman, William M., 294 

1853 Townsend, Charles, 305 

1875 Welch, Harmanus M., Jr.,. 312 

1843 TO Whittlesey, Charles B., ..- 316 

1869 TO Wixon, Hanford L., 318 

1 828 Wolcott, William, 293 




OBITUARY RECORD 

or 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 



Deceased during the Academical Year ending in June, 1879, 
including the record of a few who died a short 
time previous, hitherto unreported. 

[PRESEXTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMI, JOfE 25th, 18T9.] 

[No. 9 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 38 of the whole Record.] 



OBITUARY RECORD 

i OP 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending June^ 1879, includ- 
ing the record of a few who died previously, 
hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting op the Alumni, June 25, 18t9.] 
[No. 9 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 38 of the whole Eecord.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1810. 

Abraham Bruyn Hasbrouck, the last surviving member of 
the Class of 1810, died at his residence in Kingston, N. Y., after 
a few days' illness, Feb. 23, 1879, in the 88th year of his age. 
He was born in Kingston, Nov. 29, 1791, of mingled Huguenot and 
Dutch descent, his mother being a Miss Wynkoop, and his father 
Jonathan Hasbrouck, a county judge under the first Constitution 
of New York State. 

He entered the Litchfield (Conn.) Law School, under Judges 
Reeve and Gould, in 1812, and after continuing his studies with 
Elisha Williams, Esq., of Hudson, N. Y., began practice in 
Kingston in 1814. Three years later he formed a co-partnership 
with Charles H. Ruggles, Esq., which existed till the appointment 
of Mr. Ruggles to the bench in 1831 ; and in the fall of 1833 he 
formed a similar connection with Marius Schoonmaker, Esq., (Y. C. 
1830). Meantime he had served one term in Congress (1825-27) 
as a representative of Ulster and Sullivan Counties. But neither 
the practice of his profession nor political life proved so con- 
genial to his tastes as the offer, in 1840, of the Presidency of 
Rutgers College, in New Brunswick, N. J. He was inducted into 
this office on September 15 of that year, and did much during the 
ten years which followed to upbuild and strengthen that institution. 



330 

His scholarly attainments, his high religious character, and the 
dignity and courtesy of his manner combined to secure the sub- 
stantial success of his administration. The degree of Doctor of 
Laws was conferred on him by Columbia College in 1840 and by 
Union College in 1841. He resigned in 1850, and after about five 
years' residence in New York City, removed to his native town, 
where he spent the remainder of his life in dignified retirement. 
A large family of children survived him, one daughter being the 
wife of Gen. George H. Sharpe, of Kingston, and another the 
wife of Judge Joseph F. Barnard (Y. C. 1841), of Poughkeepsie. 

Daniel Robert, of Huguenot descent, the eldest son of Dr. 
Daniel and Mary (Smith) Robert, was born at Mastic, in the town 
of Brookhaven, L. I., Nov. 15, 1792, and died at New Utrecht, 
L. I., Aug. 21, 1878. A brother graduated at this College in the 
class of 1815. 

He studied law at the Litchfield Law School, and was 
admitted to the bar of New York City in 1815. In 1819 he 
was appointed by Gov. DeWitt Clinton, Judge Advocate of the 
First Brigade of Artillery, New York State Militia, a position 
which he held for several years. In 1822 he was licensed as a 
counsellor in chancery, and won a good position by his attainments. 

He continued to practice law in the city of New York with 
success, until the year 1836, when he retired to a farm in New 
Utrecht, on account of the health of his children; here he spent 
the remainder of his days in the quiet enjoyment of rural life, 
never holding any public office. 

He was married June 27, 1827, to Jane, daughter of John 
Cowenhoven, of New Utrecht, by whom he had three sons and 
two daughters. 

He died of ascites, after an illness of three weeks, his death 
being principally caused by a gradual decay of the vital powers, 
his mind being clear to the last. His wife and all his children 
survive him. 

1811. 

Heney Robinson, elder son of Deacon Samuel and Content 
(Robinson) Robinson, of Guilford, Conn., was born in that town, 
Dec. 20, 1788. 

After leaving college he taught in an academy in Wethersfield, 
Conn., and in 1813 entered the Theological Seminary in Andover, 
Mass., where he finished the course in 1816. In 1817 he accepted 



331 

a tutorship in Bowdoin College, but resigned after one year's 
service. He was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church 
in Litchfield South Farms (now Morris), Conn., Apr. 30, 1823, and 
was dismissed from this charge in poor health, Oct. 27, 1829. His 
succeeding pastorates were all in Connecticut, as follows : — Con- 
gregational Church in Suffield, June 1, 1831 — Apr. 29, 1837* 
North Killingly, now East Putnam, Nov. 20, 1838 — Apr. 1, 1845 ; 
Plainfield, Apr. 14, 1847— Apr. 10, 1856. The rest of his life was 
spent in retirement in his native town, where he died, of pneu- 
monia, Sept. 14, 1878, in the 90th year of his age. 

He was married, June 11, 1823, to Wealthy T., daughter of 
William Brown, of East Guilford, now Madison, Conn. She died 
March 24, 1833, leaving three children. He was again married, 
Apr. 8, 1835, to Mary C, widow of Spencer Judd, of Springfield, 
Mass., and daughter of Rev. Dr. Ebenezer Gay (Y. C. 1787), of 
Sufiield, Conn., who survives him, with one son (a graduate of this 
College in 1863) and one daughter. 

1814. 

Augustus Floyd, second son of NicoU and Phebe (Gelston) 
Floyd^ and a grandson of William Floyd, a signer of the Decla- 
ration of Independence, was born May 28, 1795, in Mastic, L. I., 
where he died, suddenly, Sept. 25, 1878. 

He studied law, and in 1817 was admitted to the bar in New 
York City, where he continued in practice until 1849, when — owing 
to an almost total loss of hearing — he retired to the village of 
Yaphank, near his birthplace, where he led henceforth a very 
secluded life. He was never married. 

1817. 

Augustus Lyman Chapin, second son of Moses A. and Lucina 
(Graves) Chapin, was born in West Springfield, Mass., Jan. 16, 
1795, and entered this College in 1814. A powerful revival of 
religion occurred in College in the spring of 1815, and in conse- 
quence his thoughts were turned towards the ministry of the 
gospel. 

After graduating he was engaged in teaching in Georgetown, 
D. C, and in Maryland, for some two and a half years, and in the 
summer of 1820 he entered the Theological Seminary at Prince- 
ton, N. J., where he spent upwards of two years. In October, 
1822, he was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of New Bruns- 



882 

wick, and after leaving the Seminary was engaged in missionary 
labors in Western New York, and as temporary supply for the 
churches of Clarkson, Madison, and Wolcott in that state. By 
reason of illness he was partially disabled for two or three years 
after this, though preaching so far as health allowed during this 
interval, in West Stockbridge, Mass., and in Andover, Conn. In 
1829 he went to Oxford, N. Y., where he labored for one and a half 
years, being ordained as an evangelist in Sept., 1830, by the 
Presbytery of Chenango. He then served as stated supply for 
two years in Walton, N. Y., and was married, May 12, 1831, to 
Abby, daughter of Col. Stephen Hayes, of Newark, N. J. In 
November, 1833, he was installed pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church of Lexington Heights, N. Y., where he remained till 1841, 
when he removed to Gal way, N. Y., in which place and in neigh- 
boring towns he preached as he was able for three years. From 
1844 to 1849 he acted as stated supply to the churches of Ley den 
and West Turin, N. Y., and then returned to Galway and 
preached in the vicinity for four years more. He then removed 
to Amsterdam, N. Y., where he remained till 1868, continuing 
meanwhile to labor in the ministry as opportunity offered. 

The later years of his life were spent with a married daughter 
in Galesburg, 111., where his wife died, March 23, 1873, and where 
his own death occurred, after a brief illness, Nov. 7, 1878. 

Of his four children, two only survived childhood, one of whom 
graduated at Amherst College in 1858, and has been since 1863 a 
missionary in China. 

1819. 

Maltby Strong, fourth son of Rev. Joseph Strong (Y. C. 1784) 
and Sophia (Woodbridge) Strong, was born in Heath, Mass., 
Nov. 24, 1796, his father being then settled over the church in 
that town. Two of his elder brothers were graduated here in 
1812 and 1815. 

After leaving college he attended a course of lectures at the 
Yale Medical School, and then entered the office of his brother. 
Dr. Woodbridge Strong, of Boston, as a student, and attended 
two courses of lectures at Harvard University. In 1822, he accom- 
panied Dr. Nathan Smith, the head of the Yale Medical School^ 
to Brunswick, Me., as private pupil and surgical assistant in a 
course of lectures, and while there received the degree of M.D. 
from Bowdoin College. He then began the practice of medicine 
in South Hadley, and pursued it with success for several years. 



833 

In 1831 he removed to Rochester, N. T., where he continued to 
practice his profession. In 1832 he engaged in the business of 
milling flour in connection with his eldest brother, Hon. Joseph 
Strong. This business, and other employments, such as the pur- 
chase and sale of real estate, engrossed his attention for some 
years, to the exclusion of his profession ; but he subsequently 
resumed practice, and did not finally relinquish it until about ten 
years before his death. In 1854 he was elected Mayor of the city, 
and held the oflice for one term. He was intelligently interested 
in all public affairs, and especially in the improvement of the 
educational privileges of Rochester. 

He was married, Sept. 9, 1835, to Miss Eliza B., daughter of 
Joseph E. Sprague, of Salem, Mass., who survives him, without 
children. He died in Rochester, Aug. 5, 1878, in his 82d year. 

1820. 

Henry Jones, younger son of Major Daniel Jones, of Hartford, 
Conn., was bom in that city, Oct. 16, 1801. His mother was 
Rhoda, daughter of Dr. Charles Mather (Y. C. 1763). 

He studied theology for four years in the Andover Theol. Sem- 
inary, and was settled as pastor of the Second Congregational 
Church in New Britain, Conn., Oct. 12, 1825. He was dismissed 
from this charge, Dec. 19, 1827, and in the following October 
opened a high school for young ladies in Greenfield, Mass. He 
removed in 1838 to Bridgeport, Conn., where he opened in Decem- 
ber of that year the " Cottage School" for young men, which he 
conducted with success until 1865. The remainder of his days 
was spent in retirement at his home on Golden Hill in Bridge- 
port, where he died after a brief illness, of angina pectoris, Nov. 
9, 1878, at the age of 77. 

He was married, Sept. 5, 1826, to Eliza S., daughter of Dr. 
Noah Webster, the lexicographer (Y. C. 1778), of New Haven, 
who survives him. Of their four children, one daughter and one 
son (a graduate of this college in 1865) are still living. 

1822. 

Joseph Hungerford Brainerd, eldest child of Joseph S. and 
Hannah (Hungerford) Brainerd, was born in Chatham, now Port- 
land, Conn., March 22, 1801. His parents removed in 1803 to 
Troy, N. Y., and in 1808 to St. Albans, Vt. He spent two and 
a half years in the University of Vermont, and then entered Yale. 



384 

After graduation and about a year spent in teaching in Bryan 
County, Ga., he returned to St. Albans and studied law with 
Hon. Asa Aldis. He was admitted to practice in September, 
1825, and soon opened a law oflSce in St. Albans. In 1831, 1832 
and 1833, he was elected one of the Executive Council of the 
State, — a body which was superseded by the present State senate. 
In 1831 he also became editor and proprietor of an anti-masonic 
paper in St. Albans, called the Franklin Journal, which he con- 
ducted for about five years. In April, 1834, he was appointed 
Clerk of the Courts of Franklin County, which office he held 
until his resignation in August, 1872. For forty years before his 
death he was one of the deacons of the Congregational Church in 
St. Albans. After a useful and honored life, he died at the 
family homestead, March 28, 1879, aged 78 years. 

He was married. May 8, 1839, to Fanny, daughter of Deacon 
Cotton Partridge, of Hatfield, Mass., who died May 10, 1848. 
He was again married, May 26, 1857, to Mrs. Hannah H. Whit- 
ney, a sister of his late wife, and the widow of David S. Whitney, 
of Northampton, Mass. She died Nov. 18, 1859. Of his four 
children, all by the first marriage, a son died in prison at Ander- 
sonville, Ga., in 1864, and a daughter died in childhood; the 
second son (a graduate of this College in 1867) and the younger 
daughter are still living. 

HoRAiio Nelson Brinsmade, son of Dr. Thomas C. and Eliza- 
beth (Goodwin) Brinsmade, was born in New Hartford, Conn., 
Dec. 28, 1798. 

He spent the year after leaving college in Princeton (N. J.) 
Theol. Seminary, and then became an instructor in the American 
Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb in Hartford, Conn., where he 
continued for eight years. In the meantime he completed his 
professional studies with Rev. Joel Hawes of Hartford, and was 
ordained to the work of the ministry by the Hartford North 
Association of Congregational ministers, June 1, 1828. In 1831 
he removed to Collinsville, a rising manufacturing village in 
Canton, Conn, (a township formed from New Hartford and Sims- 
bury in 1806), where he gathered a Congregational Church to 
which he ministered until the fall of 1834, when he was called to 
the charge of the First Congregational Church in Pittsfield, Mass. 
From Pittsfield he was called in 1841 to the Third Presbyterian 
Church of Newark, N. J. He resigned this charge in October, 
1853, on account of his wife's health, and removed to Beloit, 



385 

Wise, where he remained till her death in October, 1864. Dur- 
ing a part of this time he was pastor (1854-61) of the First Con- 
gregational Church in Beloit, and a temporary instructor in 
Beloit College. 

In 1864 he returned to Newark, and the next year gathered a 
chapel congregation to which he ministered with success, as in all 
his earlier pastorates, until his retirement within a few years of 
his death. The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on 
him by Union College in 1842. 

He died suddenly, of paralysis of the heart, at his residence in 
Newark, Jan. 18, 1879, at the age of 80. 

He was married, Sept. 9, 1825, to Maria S., only daughter of 
Rev. Joseph Washburn (Y. C. 1793), of Farmington, Conn., who 
died June 25, 1831 ; his second wife was Amelia, daughter of 
Alexander Collins, of Middletown, Conn., whom he married Apr. 
29, 1833; after her death he was again married, Jan. 1, 1866, to 
Anna M., daughter of Deacon George Turner, of Great Barring- 
ton, Mass., who survives him. 

His children, two sons by his first marriage, and two sons by 
his second, all died in infancy. 

Am AS A Gaillard Poutee, son of Rev. Amasa Porter (Y. C. 
1793) and Sarah (Bliss) Porter, was born in Derby, Conn., where 
his father was then pastor, Sept. 20, 1803. An elder brother 
graduated in the class before him. 

He studied law in New Haven in the school of Messrs. Staples 
& Hitchcock, and for ten years from 1825, practiced his profes- 
sion in Hebron, Conn. He then settled in New Haven, where he 
continued to reside till his death, April 29, 1879, in the 76th year 
of his age. He was never married. 

James Watson Robbins, son of Ammi R. and Salome Robbins, 
of Colebrook, Conn., and grandson of Rev. Ammi R. Robbins 
(Y. C. 1760), of Norfolk, Conn., was born in Colebrook, Nov. 18, 
1801. 

For a few months after graduation he taught in Enfield, Conn., 
and then went to Virginia, where he was similarly employed for 
some three years, in the family of Hon. Wm. L. Brent, and in the 
Peyton family at Warrenton, and at Arlington, where Robert E. 
Lee, afterwards general-in-chief of the Confederate army, was pre- 
pared by him for West Point. 



336 

Returning to New Haven in the latter part of 1825, he began 
the study of medicine, graduating in 1828. He spent six months 
of the year 1829 in a botanical exploration of the New England 
States ; and in this way formed the acquaintance of Dr. George 
Willard (Brown Univ. 1808), of Uxbridge, Mass., who induced 
him to settle in that town. He practiced medicine in Uxbridge 
(at first in partnership with Dr. Willard) for thirty years, until 
1859, when he accepted an appointment as physician and surgeon 
of several copper mining companies near Portage Lake, Lake 
Superior. During his professional life he had devoted himself 
largely to botany, gathering a valuable library, second, it is 
believed, to no private botanical library in the country ; and in 
the four years of his residence near Lake Superior, he made exten- 
sive botanical researches, and these were followed by a tour in 
1863-4 down the Mississippi to Texas and Cuba, which resulted 
in very valuable collections. He then returned to Uxbridge, 
where he spent the remainder of his life, mostly retired from 
medical practice and devoting his leisure to his favorite pursuit. 
He died there, Jan. 10, 1879, in his 78th year, of a disease of the 
kidneys, caused by the presence of trichinoB. He was unmarried. 

1823. 

Mabtin Bull Bassett died at his residence in Birmingham, 
Conn., May 15, 1879, aged 77 years. 

He was born in Hebron, Conn., May 14, 1802. His father was 
the Kev. Amos Bassett, D.D., a graduate of this college in 1784, 
and a member of the Corporation from 1810 to 1827, and for 
thirty years pastor of the Church in Hebron. His mother was 
Sophia Bull from Farmington. 

After graduation he studied medicine with Dr. Isaac Jennings, 
of Derby, taking also a partial course in the Yale Medical School. 

In 1831 he was married to Caroline Tomlinson, of Huntington, 
Conn., and went to Ohio, where he began to practice his profes- 
sion. In a short time, however, he returned east on account of 
delicate health, and having inherited a large farm near Birming- 
ham, he spent the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits and 
in the management of his other property. His early associations 
in his father's family left their trace in his ardent love for theo- 
logical studies and his earnest Christian life. 

His wife survives him with four daughters out of a family of 
eight children. 



837 

David Mack, son of Gen. David Mack, of Middlefield, Mass., 
was born in that town, May 23, 1804. He first entered Williams 
College, but after two years joined the corresponding class here. 

He studied law with his uncle. Judge Mack, of Salem, Mass., 
and for a time in the Yale Law School, and began the practice of 
the profession in Andover, Mass., but found it so distasteful to 
his sensitive nature that he early abandoned it for the vocation of 
a teacher. A special faculty for imparting knowledge made him 
unusually successful in his work. He was the principal of the 
Friends' Academy, in New Bedford, Mass., from December, 1831, 
to May, 1836, and was married in 1835 to Lucy M. K. Brastow, 
also a teacher. He next with his wife's assistance conducted a 
boarding and day school for young ladies in Cambridge, Mass., 
which was very successful until, in 1841-2, his desire to assist in 
making Christianity a practical part of every-day life induced 
him to join an " Industrial and Educational Association," in which 
all the participants were to have equal advantages. Disappointed 
in the working of this intended reform, Mr. Mack and his wife 
opened in 1847 another boarding school for young ladies, about 
three miles from Cambridge, in that part of Watertown which is 
now Belmont. This also was very prosperous for some years. 

In the late civil war he was so desirous to serve his country in 
some way that he went to South Carolina as a teacher of the con- 
trabands, the abolition of slavery having been for years one of 
his most ardent desires. 

In the last few years he remained in Belmont, suffering from 
heart-disease, of which he died, in that town, July 24, 1878, sur- 
rounded by his family — his wife, an only son, who is a physician 
in Atlanta, Ga., and two surviving daughters. 

William Gordon VerPlanck, eldest son of William Beekman 
VerPlanck and his wife Matilda, daughter of Gen. James Gordon, 
was born, Oct. 12, 1801, and entered college from Mount Pleasant, 
Saratoga County, N. Y. 

For some years he cultivated a farm in Saratoga County, near 
Ballston, and in 1849 removed to Geneva, N. Y., and was em- 
ployed in the old bank of Geneva until 1853. After brief periods 
of residence in Barrytown, N. Y., and Dubuque, Iowa, he was 
appointed in 1859 warden of the Bloomingdale Asylum for the 
Insane, in New York City, in which office he remained until Jan- 
uary, 1877, when he returned to Geneva, where he died at the 
residence of his son, March 30, 1879, in his 78th year. 



838 

He married, Feb. 21, 1826, Maiy Elizabeth, daughter of Hon. 
Samuel M. Hopkins (Y. C. 1791), LL.D. Of his four children, 
one son and one daughter survive him. 

1824. 

Jeremiah Townsend Denison, the eldest of eleven children 
of Captain Henry and Julia Anna (Townsend) Denison, was born 
in New Haven, Conn., Feb. 6, 1806, and died in Fairfield, Conn., 
Apr. 25, 1879, aged 73 years. 

The most of the year after graduation he spent in Europe, and 
while there he decided on his profession, and began the study of 
medicine in Paris. On returning to New Haven he continued his 
studies in the Yale Medical School, and received his degree in 
1828. In the same year he began practice at Warehouse Point, 
in East Windsor, Conn., but one year later removed his office to 
New Haven, where he was married, Sept. 7, 1830, to Miss Euretta 
Rosevelt, a niece of his medical preceptor, Dr. Knight. In 1833 he 
was induced by the request of prominent citizens in Fairfield to 
establish himself there, and there his residence continued till his 
death. His wife died in Fairfield in March, 1841, and he was 
again married, March 16, 1842, to Miss Esther Judson Goodsell, 
an adopted daughter of Deacon David Judson, of Fairfield, who 
died March 12, 1 863. His third wife, Mrs. Maria Meeker, to whom 
he was married. May 3, 1869, died on the 18th of August follow- 
ing. His children were two, both by the first marriage, a son, 
who is still living, and a daughter who married Dr. Myron N. 
Chamberlin (Y. C. 1857), and died in 1873. 

About the year 1850 Dr. Denison adopted the practice of 
homoeopathy, and in 1851 he was one of the founders and the first 
president of the Connecticut Homoeopathic Medical Society. He 
filled at difi*erent times various local offices, such as postmaster 
and judge of probate, and through life retained the high respect 
of his fellow-townsmen as a Christian gentleman. 

Dennis Platt, the son of Ebenezer and Anna (Hoyt) Platt, 
was born in the southern part of Danbury, now Bethel, Conn., 
Sept. 26, 1800. 

He began the study of theology in the Yale Divinity School in 
the fall of 1824, but left in the following winter to take charge of 
a female academy in New London, Conn. In the fall of 1826 he 
returned to New Haven, but ended his course in August, 1827, 



> 



339 

when he went to Willimantic^ Conn., in the employ of the Home 
Missionary Society, lie was ordained at North Coventry, Conn., 
as an evangelist, Apr. 30, 1828, and was installed March 31, 1830, 
over the Congregational Church in Canterbury, Conn. He left 
this charge, Jan. 1, 1833, and after preaching for six months at 
Greeneville, near Norwich, Conn., removed to Homer, N. Y., 
where he was pastor of the Presbyterian Church from March 12, 
1834, to Aug. 15, 1842. He was then settled over the Presbyterian 
Church in Manlius, N. Y., from Oct. 5, 1842, till Feb. 25, 1845, 
when he removed to Syracuse, N. Y., and became a joint editor 
and proprietor of the Meligious Recorder, From Oct. 20, 1846, 
till early in 1853, he was pastor of the Congregational Church in 
Binghamton, N. Y. In the fall of the latter year he removed to 
South Norwalk, Conn., where he remained till his death by apo- 
plexy, Oct. 21, 1878, at the age of 78. For the first six years of 
his residence there, he was the district secretary of the Western 
College Society, and subsequently as opportunity offered did much 
useful work as a home missionary in Fairfield County. 

He was married, June 16, 1828, to Caroline, daughter of Jabez 
Dwight, of New Haven, Conn. Of their five children two died 
in infancy, and one son while a member of the Freshman class in 
this College. 

Justus Sherwood, son of Justus and Sally (Bradley) Sher- 
wood, was born in Southport, Conn., Feb. 5, 1805. 

After graduation he remained in New Haven and attended 
three courses of lectures in the Medical School, receiving his de- 
gree in 1827. He then settled in his native place, where he con- 
tinued in practice until his death there, Dec. 3, 1878, in his 74th 
year. 

He married in 1827 Henrietta Isaacs, daughter of David Butler, 
of New Haven. She died in 1844, leaving one son and four 
daughters. 

1825. 

Richard Smith, the youngest son of Deacon Paul Smith, of 
Sharon, Conn., was born in that town, Aug. 7, 1802. After grad- 
uation he spent a year in teaching in Maryland, and then attended 
one course of lectures in the Law School at New Haven and com- 
pleted his preparation for the bar in the office of Gen. Charles F. 
Sedgwick in Sharon. He was admitted to practice in 1829, and 
opened an office in Sharon, but his father's decease endowing him 



340 

with a competency, including a large landed estate, and his tastes 
inclining him to agricultural employments, he gave much of his 
time to the care of his farm, and for many of the later years of 
his life ceased to attend the courts. After a long and honored 
life, in the summer of 1878 his usual good health gave way under 
the pressure of age, and he died at his home in Sharon, Dec. 21, 
aged 16 years. 

He was married, in April, 1830, to Hannah, daughter of Deacon 
Aaron Read, of Sharon, who died in June, 1831, leaving a son 
who yet survives. He was again married, in 1832, to Lydia Ann, 
daughter of Judge Moulton of Western New York. She died a 
year later, leaving one daughter who is still living. In 1836 he 
married Miss Catherine Hubbell, of Bennington, Vt., who survives 
him. 

1826. 

James Creighton Odiorne was born in London, England, 
June 4, 1802. His father, George Odiorne, was a merchant of 
Boston, Mass., and while spending two years in England for pur- 
poses connected with his business, he married as his third wife 
Maria, daughter of Rev. James Creighton (Univ. of Dublin, 
1764), an intimate associate of John Wesley. 

The family came to America in the summer of 1802, and James 
was fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover. 

He was married, June 25, 1828, to Susan Elizabeth, eldest 
daughter of Isaac Warren, Esq., of Framingham, Mass., and in 
the same year became a partner with his father in the iron and 
nail trade in Boston, but retired from business in 1837. In 1867 
he removed to Framingham, continuing however to spend the 
winters in part in Boston, where his wife died, Jan. 9, 1851. He 
was again married, June 8, 1870, to Frances M., youngest daughter 
of George Meacham, Esq., of Cambridge, Mass. He died sud- 
denly, in Wellesley, Mass., Feb. 5, 1879, while on the cars in a 
journey from Framingham to Boston. 

After his retirement from business he indulged his tastes for 
historical and scientific studies, and also gave considerable atten- 
tion to the law. In 1830 he took a deep interest in the movement 
against the Free Masons, and published a volume of 300 pages, 
entitled *' Opinions on Speculative Masonry." In 1832 he assisted 
in the formation of the New England Anti-Slavery Society, and 
for many years he served as its Treasurer, He was also an active 
member of the American Statistical Association, and of the Boston 



341 

Society of Natural History. In 1875 he published a Genealogy 
of the Odiorne Family (222 pages, octavo). 

Of the four sons and two daughters by his first marriage, three 
sons and one daughter survive him. 

Robert Gozman Rankin, son of Henry and Ann (Marsh) Ran- 
kin, was bom in New York City, June 29, 1806, and entered 
college as Sophomore in 1823. 

After leaving College he began the study of the law with Peter 
DeWitt, Esq., of New York, and a year later removed to the 
Litchfield (Conn.) Law School. He was admitted to practice in 
New York City in October, 1829, and was in full tide of success 
when a bronchial difficulty forced him to seek a more active out- 
of-door life. In 1837 he removed to Fishkill, and ultimately 
became largely engaged in cotton and iron manufactures. In 
1850 he changed his residence to Poughkeepsie, and in 1852 to 
Astoria, L. I., to engage in business as a consulting engineer. In 
1859 he removed to Washington Heights, and was for a time 
Superintendent of the Institution for the Blind. From 1863 he 
resided in Newburgh, where he died Aug. 29, 1878, aged 72 years. 
He had been during his latter years the general agent and con- 
sulting engineer of the Boston, Hartford & Erie Railroad Com- 
pany and of its successor, the New York & New England Rail- 
road Company, having been as early as 1847 the first projector of 
the present Hudson River Railroad, as well as of the roads just 
named. At the time of his death he was the oldest Regent of the 
University of the State of New York, having been elected in 1847. 
He was practically interested in philanthropic and religious work, 
founding, for instance, and carrying on till his death, a mission 
Sunday School in Newburgh. 

In March, 1831, he married Miss Laura M., daughter of Hon. 
Frederick Wolcott (Y. C. 1786), of Litchfield, Conn., by whom he 
had four sons and six daughters. 

1828. 

William Bushnell was born in Westbrook, then a village in 
Saybrook, Conn., April 14, 1801, and died in East Boston, Mass., 
April 28, 1879. 

At the age of 16 he left home to learn a trade in New Haven, 
where he remained until reaching his majority. During the later 
years of his apprenticeship a powerful revival of religion was in 



342 

progress here, by means of which his interest was directed towards 
the ministry as his personal work. It remained to prepare himself 
for college, and then, after receiving his degi-ee, and after a year 
spent in teaching, as principal of the academy in Greenwich, Conn., 
he entered the Yale Divinity School, where he finished the course 
in 1832. On August 8, of that year, he was ordained and installed 
over the Congregational Church in North Killingly, now East 
Putnam, Conn., where he remained until Apr. 8, 1835. He then 
accepted a call to the Presbyterian Church in Whippany, N. J., 
which he left in the following June. On Jan. 3, 1838, he was 
settled over the Congregational Church in Beverly, Mass., where 
he continued until called to the First Congregational Church in 
Newton, Mass., in May, 1843. His relations to this church ended 
with the close of the year 1846, when he became Secretary of the 
American Seaman's Friend Society in Boston. In consequence of 
failing health he deemed it necessary in 1855 to abandon this 
occupation, and also to give up the idea of a return to the ministry. 
He took up the study of medicine, receiving the degree of M. D. 
from the Pennsylvania University in 1858, and practiced after the 
homoeopathic system in East Boston till his death. 

He was married in May, 1832, to Miss Juliette Post, of West- 
brook, who survives him with one son of his five children. 

George Beige Hoffman died in Baltimore, Md., Jan. 11, 
1879, in the 71st year of his age, the last surviving son of 
George and Henrietta (Rogers) Hoffman. His father was a 
prominent merchant of Baltimore, and one of his brothers was 
graduated here in the Class of 1827. 

On taking his degree he returned to his native city and entered 
the dry-goods store of Hoffman & Co., as clerk. After retaining 
this position sufficiently long to become thoroughly acquainted 
with the business, he became a partner in the firm of Hoffman, 
Burneston & Co. About 1864 he retired from business, and then 
spent several years in Europe. On his return to Maryland he pur- 
chased as a residence the estate known as " Waltham" in Queen 
Anne County. 

Mr. Hoffman married Louisa, daughter of Gen. Benjamin C. 
Howard (College of JST. J. 1809), who died in November, 1876. 
They left no children. 

Alfeed Newton, son of Noah and Olive (Cheney) Newton, 
was born in Colchester, Conn., Nov. 11, 1803. An older brother 



L 



843 

graduated here in 1818. He received his early education in the 
common schools, and served as clerk in a country store until the 
spring of 1823, when he began to prepare for college, with the 
design of becoming a minister. He entered as Sophomore in 
1825, and after graduating engaged in teaching school, to earn 
the means of continuing his studies. From 1831 to 1834 he 
served as tutor in college, at the same time pursuing the regular 
course in the Divinity School. In the spring of 1835 he was invited 
to supply the pulpit of the Presbyterian Church in Norwalk, 
Ohio, and while in this connection was ordained to the ministrv 
by the Presbytery of Huron, Sept. 30, 1835. After serving as 
stated supply of this church until 1838, he was installed its pastor 
on July 24 of that year, and sustained that relation until Aug. 1, 
1870. He remained as pastor emeritus of the church and a resi- 
dent of the town until his death there, Dec. 31, 1878, at the age 
of 75. The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him 
by Hamilton College in 1861. 

His wife, to whom he was married Aug. 14, 1837, survives him. 

1829. 

William Frederick Clemson, youngest son of Thomas and 
Elizabeth Clemson, was born in the city of Philadelphia, Sept. 8, 
1811. He died Feb. 17, 1879, at his residence in New York City. 

He entered college at the age of fourteen, and after graduation 
read law under the direction of Hon. Joseph R. Ingersoll, an 
eminent attorney of Philadelphia, but he early relinquished the 
profession for other pursuits. His tastes led him to extensive 
reading, particularly in theological subjects, and in the arts and 
mechanics, as well as in general literature. 

He married early, and his wife survives him without children. 

Henry Sherman, who died in Washington, D. C, March 28, 
1879, was the third son of Josiah and Hannah (Jones) Sherman, 
of Albany, N. Y., where he was born March 6, 1808. 

He spent a part of the first year after graduation in the Prince- 
ton (N. J.) Theological Seminary, and then took up the study of 
law in the Yale Law School, returning in 1832 to his home in 
Albany, and there entering his profession. He soon removed to 
New York City, and while practicing there published in 1841 a 
" Digest of the Law of Marine Insurance," which ran through 
several editions. In 1843 he also published a "Governmental 

23 



844 

History of the U. S.," for use in schools. In 1850 he removed to 
Hartford, Conn., and there published (1858) a work on slavery, 
and (1860) an enlarged edition of his History. In 1861 he re- 
moved to Washington, and was employed until 1868 in connection 
with one of the bureaus of the Treasury Department. In 1868 
he resumed the practice of his profession in Washington, in 
which he continued until his death (which occurred, after a three 
weeks' illness, from erysipelas), being at that time of the law firm 
of Sherman & AtLee. Mr. Sherman was a personal friend of 
President Lincoln, who on the morning before his assassination 
tendered him the Chief Justiceship of the Territory of New 
Mexico ; his commission was afterwards sent him by President 
Johnson, but he resigned the office very soon. 

He was married, Sept. 20, 1843, to Miss Anna Amelia, daughter 
of Michael Burnham, Esq., publisher of the New York Evening 
Post. She survives him with three of their five children. 

1831. 

Alpheus Staekey Williams, son of Ezra and Hepzibah 
(Starkey) Williams, was born in Essex, then a part of the town 
of Saybrook, Conn., Sept. 20, 18] 0. 

He studied law, in part in the Yale Law School, and then 
traveled through Europe, during the years 1834-36. On his 
return to this country he removed to Detroit, Mich., and there 
began the practice of his profession. From 1840 to 1844 he was 
County Judge of Probate, besides filling other local offices of 
trust. He was also editor and proprietor of the Detroit Daily 
Advertiser from 1843 to 1848. He served in the Mexican War 
as Lieutenant Colonel of the 1st Michigan Volunteers, and on his 
return was made Brigadier General of the state Militia, and 
Major General in 1859. In 1861 he was commissioned Brigadier 
General of Volunteers in the Union Army. His career during 
the late war comprised a brilliant succession of exploits, as com- 
mander of the 12th Army Corps at South Mountain, Antietam, 
and Gettysburg, and as commander of the first division of the 
20th Corps in the march to Atlanta. He participated in every 
movement and in every battle from Chattanooga to the close of 
the war, and won in an unusual degree throughout his army 
career the regards of all associated with him or under his com- 
mand. In 1 865 he was sent by Gen. Sherman to command a 
military district in Arkansas, and it was not until June, 1866, 



345 

that he was discharged from service. In August, 1866, he was 
appointed Minister-Resident to San Salvador, Central America, 
which office he retained until October, 1869. In 1874 he was 
nominated by the Democratic party, and was elected Representa- 
tive in Congress for the 1st District of Michigan, and was re-elected 
in 1876. The purity of his Congressional career is evidenced by 
the hearty approval won at all hands by his administration as 
chairman of the House Committee on the District of Columbia 
and by the expressions of feeling elicited by his death. He died 
in Washington, from the effects of an apoplectic stroke, Dec. 21, 
1878, at the age of 68. 

He was married in February, 1839, to Mrs. Jane Larned Pinson 
of Detroit. After her death he was married, in 1875, to Mrs. 
Martha Conant Tillman, also of Detroit, who survives him, with 
two daughters and one son by his first marriage. 

1833. 

Samuel Henshaw Bates, eldest son of Hon. Isaac C. Bates 
(Y. C. 1802), U. S. Senator from Massachusetts, and of Martha, 
daughter of Judge Samuel Henshaw, was born in Northampton, 
Mass., Jan. 10, 1814, and was prepared for college at the Round 
Hill School in that town, under the charge of Messrs. Cogswell 
& Bancroft. 

He studied law with his father, was admitted to the bar, and 
remained in his father's office in Northampton for a year or two ; 
but soon relinquished his profession to engage in farming. Near 
the breaking out of the rebellion he enlisted for three years as a 
private, in the 24th Regiment Mass. Volunteers, declining a com- 
mission. He was engaged in all the early battles in North 
Carolina under General Foster, and was then transferred with his 
regiment to the vicinity of Charleston. At Fort Wagner he 
suffered two severe sunstrokes, which impaired his previously 
vigorous constitution and prevented his re-enlistment. He subse- 
quently spent several years as clerk in the War and Treasury 
departments at Washington, thence returning for about two years 
to his native town. He then bought a small farm in East Brook- 
field, Mass., but found himself unequal to the labor of managing 
it ; and started for California with a nephew, hoping for benefit 
to his health from that climate. But pulmonary disease had set 
in, which was aggravated by his journey, and proved fatal at 
Santa Rosa, California, Jan. 3, 1879. He was not married. 



346 



1834. 



John Newton Kendall, son of Joshua and Laura (Goodrich) 
Kendall, of Granby, Conn., was born in Granby, Feb. 4, 1813. 

After graduation he went to Natchez, Miss., where he taught a 
school, and found employment as a surveyor and civil engineer. 
In 1840 he removed to Alabama, and for five years resided in 
Autauga County in that State. He began the study of medicine 
in 1843, and in 1847 received the degree of M. D. from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. From that time he resided almost unin- 
terruptedly in Benton, Lowndes County, Alabama, engaged as a 
physician and druggist, until his death there of disease of the 
heart, Aug. 18, 1877, at the age of 64i| years. 

Dr. Kendall married, July 23, 1840, Miss Jane Fairchild, of 
Granby. He was again married, Nov. 23, 1852, to Miss Sallie R. 
Riggs, of Dallas County, Alabama, who survives him. He had 
nine children by his second marriage. 

Amasa Udolphin Lyon, son of Amasa and Perley (Penniman) 
Lyon, was born in Woodstock, Conn., Jan. 31, 1813. 

After his graduation he studied law, for a year in Southbridge, 
Mass., and then in the J^aw School of Harvard University. On 
the completion of his studies he settled in New York City, and 
began business as an attorney, acting as clerk of one of the courts 
for a time, and afterwards being in partnership with Judge 
Young. About 1850 a severe attack of inflammatory rheumatism 
interrupted his practice for an entire winter, and compelled him 
subsequently to seek out-door employment for a time. He them 
engaged in the preparation of brown stone for building purposes, 
his establishment being one of the earliest steam stone-dressing 
yards in the city. After some years he disposed of his business 
to advantage, and returned to the practice of law. Later, he 
took charge of extensive iron works in New Jersey, and after his 
retirement from this position spent the few remaining years of his 
life in travel, and in the quiet exercise of Christian beneficence. 
After suffering from an incurable disease for one or two years, he 
died at his residence in Brooklyn, N. Y., Aug. 12, 1878, at the 
age of 65. 

He married, in November, 1840, Miss Mary Esther, daughter 
of Rev. Samuel Backus (Union College, 1811), of East Wood- 
stock, Conn., and Palmer, Mass. He survived his wife 21 years, 
and left two sons. 



847 

1836. 

William Seward Piersox, the eldest son of Dr. William S. 
Pierson (Y. C. 1808), was born in Durham, Conn., March 28, 
1815 ; his mother was Nancy, daughter of Jacob Sargeant, of 
Hartford, Conn. In December, 1818, his father removed to 
Windsor, Conn., from which place he entered College. 

He studied law with Gov. Wm. W. Ellsworth (Y. C. 1810), of 
Hartford, and in the Yale Law School, and was admitted to the 
bar, in Hartford, November, 1838, and in New York City, Sep- 
tember, 1839. He practiced law in New York, in partnership 
with Frederick E. Mather, Esq. (Y. C. 1833), until compelled 
by the failure of his health to retire .from active professional 
labors. In 1853 he removed to Sandusky, Ohio; and while resid- 
ing there was chosen Mayor of the city in April, 1861, at a time 
when he was able by his position to contribute largely to the sup- 
port of the government in the first part of the struggle with 
rebellion. He was subsequently appointed to the command of 
the Hoffman Battalion (a body of soldiers organized for special 
duty as guard of the rebel officers held prisoners on Johnson's 
Island in Sandusky Bay), with the rank of major, and was pro- 
moted by successive steps to the rank of Brigadier General of 
Volunteers. 

In June, 1864, he removed to Windsor, and spent the last 
fifteen years of his life on his father's homestead, in uneventful 
but very active attention to a wide range of business, both per- 
sonal and as a trust for others, for which his integrity and judg- 
ment fitted him in a rare degree. He died very suddenly, April 
18, 1879, of congestion of the lungs, in Keene, N. H., where he 
had been called by the death of a relative. 

General Pierson was married, on the twelfth of October, 1840, to 
Miss Mary E. Beers, daughter of Dr. Timothy P. Beers, for nearly 
thirty years a Professor in the Medical School of Yale College, 
and a classmate and lifelong friend of his father. His wife sur- 
vives him. 

He was the fifth in direct descent from the first Rector of Yale 
College. As he had no children and no brothers who attained 
maturity, and as his father was the only son of an only son, the 
male line of this branch of Rector Pierson's descendants termin- 
ated with him, in one who was well worthy to close the line of a 
worthy ancestry. 



848 



1837. 



Henry Williams was born in Elizabethtown, N. J., Sept. 12, 
1818, and entered this College from Savannah, Ga., at the begin- 
ning of the Sophomore Year. 

He studied law for the first year after graduation in Savannah, 
and later in the Law School of Harvard University. In 1840 he 
began practice in Savannah, and there continued, highly respected 
in his profession, until his death, after a brief illness, July 11, 
1878, in his 60th year. During the late civil war he was a Lieu- 
tenant of the L'ish Volunteers from Savannah. He was for a 
number of years a member of the city Board of Education. 

He was married, Nov. 27, 1845, to Wilhelmina, daughter of 
Hon. John Berrien, of Savannah, who survives him with several 
children. 

1839. 

Charles Hammond, son of Dr. Shubael and Polly (Paul) 
Hammond, was born in Union, Conn., June 15, 1813. 

He was prepared for college at the academy in Monson, Mass., 
and on graduation returned to it for two years as Principal. He 
then spent three years in the study of divinity, one at Andover, 
and two at New Haven ; but in 1845 resumed the charge of the 
Monson Academy, which he now retained until 1852. From 1852 
to 1863 he was the Principal of the Lawrence Academy, in Groton, 
Mass., but in the latter year resigned to return to Monson, where 
he remained at his old post until his death. 

Dr. Hammond (he received the degree of LL.D, from Iowa 
College, in 1877) deserves to be remembered as a thorough and 
successful teacher, greatly interested in all educational interests 
and methods, and especially strong in his loyalty to his Alma 
Mater ; he was also a keen lover of historical studies, and had at 
his command a rare knowledge of New England history. 

He was ordained, without pastoral charge, at Tolland, Conn., 
Oct. 9, 1856, by the Consociation of Tolland County. 

He was married, March 27, 1855, to Adriana S., daughter of 
Rev. Dr. William Allen, of Northampton, Mass., and grand- 
daughter of Pres. John Wheelock, of Dartmouth College, who 
survives him. Twin sons were born to them in 1856, one of whom 
died in the same year ; the other died in 1866 — a blow from which 
Dr. Hammond never completely rallied. He died in Monson, after 
a painful illness of two months, caused by stone in the bladder, 
Nov. 7, 1878, in his 66th year. 



849 



1840. 



Charles Smith Shelton, who died at hia residence in Jersey 
City, K J., May 21, 1879, was the second son and fourth and 
youngest child of George and Betsey (Wooster) Shelton, of 
Huntington, Conn., where he was bom Aug. 28, 1819. 

He studied medicine in New Haven, receiving his degree in 
1844, but after entering on his profession took a partial course in 
theology, was licensed to preach by the Fairfield (Conn.) East 
Association of Congregational Ministers, March 28, 1848, and 
went in the same year to Southern India as missionary physician and 
surgeon under the appointment of the American Board of Com- 
missioners for Foreign Missions. He was stationed at Madura, 
until in consequence of the severity of the climate and the 
exhausting duties of his profession his health was utterly broken 
down and he was compelled to return to America in 1856. He 
resided successively in Davenport, Iowa (1856-59), in Springfield, 
111., (1859-67), and in Jersey City (1867-79), vainly seeking a 
restoration of health, and in the meantime practicing as a physi- 
cian and surgeon as he was able. During the late civil war he 
also served for two years as surgeon to a Missouri Engineer 
Corps. Through life the same missionary spirit which had in- 
spired his service in India made him a consistent minister to the 
spiritual as well as to the physical sufferings of his fellow-men. 

Dr. Shelton was married, July 6, 1848, to Henrietta Mills, third 
daughter of Zabdiel and Julia (Ely) Hyde, of New York City. 
His wife and their children — three daughters and one son — 
survive him. The son graduated at this College in 1877. 

George Thacher, son of Peter and Anne (Parks) Thacher, 
was born in Hartford, Conn., July 25, 1817, and died in the same 
city, of disease of the brain and heart, Dec. 27, 1878, aged 61 
years. 

He studied for three years in the Yale Divinity School, and 
began preaching in June, 1843, in the Congregational Church 
in Derby, Conn,, where he was ordained pastor, Jan. 4, 1844. 
From this charge he was dismissed, Oct. 10, 1848, to accept a call 
to the Congregational Church in Nantucket, Mass., over which 
he was settled from Nov. 14, 1848, to May 14, 1850. He was 
then installed, May 26, 1850, over the Allen St. Presbyterian 
Church in New York City, of which he continued pastor until his 
resignation, Oct. 9, 1854. His succeeding pastorates were over 



850 

the 1st Congregational Church, Meriden, Conn. (Nov. 16, 1854- 
Sept. 18, 1860), and the Orthodox Congregational Church, Keokuk, 
Iowa (Oct. 30, 1860— Apr. 8, 1867). He then spent some months 
in Europe, and in October, 1868, took temporary charge of the 
church in Waterloo, Iowa. From this service he was called to 
the Presidency of the State University of Iowa, which office he 
filled from April, 1871, till June, 1877. He then took charge of 
the Congregational Church in Iowa City, but the state of his 
health, which had caused his resignation of the presidency, put 
an end to his public work in the following March. He returned 
shortly after to the East, to die among his kindred. 

He was married, in April, 1844, to Miss Sarah M., daughter of 
Rev. Noah Smith (Dartmouth Coll. 1818), of South Britain, Conn. 
After her death (July 12, 1850), he was married, Aug. 27, 1851, 
to her younger sister. Miss Mary S. Smith, who is still living. 
His children — two by the first marriage, and one by the second — 
died before him. 

The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him, both 
by Knox College and by Iowa College, in 1871. 

1841. 

Philip Hiss Austen was born in Baltimore, Md., June 26, 
1822. He studied medicine at home, and received his degree from 
the University of Maryland in February, 1846. For eighteen 
months he practiced his profession in Baltimore, and then spent 
two years for the sake of his health on a farm some twenty miles 
from the city. He then pursued a course of study in the Baltimore 
Dental College, where he also gave instruction for many years 
later. From 1851 to 1856 he was again in general practice as a 
physician in Baltimore, and for the next nine years devoted him- 
self to dental surgery. His healfh then requiring a more active 
life, he became and continued for some years the secretary and 
general superintendent of the Austen coal and iron mines, in 
Preston County, West Virginia, of which he was part owner. 

On the morning of the 1st of October, 1878, Dr. Austen was 
aroused at his residence in Baltimore by a sound as of burglars 
in the house, and while going down the stairs he made a misstep 
and in consequence was fearfully burned by the flames from a 
candle in his hand coming in contact with his clothing. He was 
at the time just recovering from an illness, and the exhaustion of 
vital energy from this accident caused his death, on the 28th of 
the same month, at the age of 56. 



851 

He married, Oct. 13, 1852, Virginia, daughter of John Dushane, 
who survives him with three daughters. 

Joseph Brown, son of Othniel and Martha Brown, was born 
in Wickford, R. L, in 1813, but removed with his parents in his 
infancy to Genesee County, N. Y., his residence while in college. 

After graduation he taught in Western New York, and in a 
Female Seminary in Pittsburgh, Pa., until 1848, at the same time 
pursuing the study of theology. In the fall of 1848 he went to 
Gallipolis, O., organized a Baptist church, and was ordained to 
the ministry. In 1850 he accepted a call to the pastorate of the 
1st Baptist Church in Springfield, O., where he remained for ten 
years, and during this period took a full theological course in the 
Lutheran Seminary in connection with Wittenberg College in 
Springfield. His next pastorate was over the 1st Baptist Church 
in Terre Haute, Ind., where he continued (with the exception of 
two years spent in Charleston, 111.) until 1870, when he moved to 
Indianapolis. He was then for five years the Corresponding 
Secretary and Agent of the Baptist State Convention, but the 
failure of his health obliged him to give up all work in 1875. He 
died, after a long and trying illness, in Indianapolis, Aug. 11, 1878. 

He was married, Aug. 20, 1844, to Miss Harriet M. Thursby, of 
New Haven, Conn., who survives him. Of their three sons and 
two daughters, one son died shortly before him. 

1842. 

Horace Cowles Atwater, second son of Ezra and Esther 
(Leaming) Atwater, was born in Homer, Cortland County, N. Y., 
March 14, 1819. 

He studied for three years in the Yale Divinity School, and 
during these three years, being a licensed preacher of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, preached in Westville and other neighbor- 
ing places. He then spent twelve years in ministerial work in 
connection with the Methodist denomination in Southern New 
England, being ordained at Fall Kiver, Mass., Apr. 3, 1847. In 
1857 he went to the West, and was employed for some years in 
evangelistic work under the auspices of the Congregational 
churches. His longest settlement was in Alexandria, Ohio, from 
1861 to 1867. Through the period preceding the late war, he had 
been an ardent anti-slavery man, and after its close he removed 
to the South to aid in the work of reconstruction. He labored 



352 

chiefly in North Carolina and Tennessee, under the direction of 
the Presbyterian Church, and in 1870 settled in Elizabethton, 
Tennessee, as stated supply of the church there, but after the last 
presidential election was dismissed from this relation as a penalty 
for his vote for Governor Hayes. His residence continued in 
Elizabethton, where he died Feb. 7, 1879, at the age of 60. 

He was first married, March 9, 1851, to Miss Helen M. Bourne, 
by whom he had two daughters. He was divorced from his wife, 
and was again married, Nov. 30, 1871, to Miss Sarah J. Lewis, of 
Manchester, Conn., by whom he had one son who died in infancy. 

Samuel Lynes, from New York City, was born Dec. 1, 1821. 
He lived for two years after graduation in Allentown, Pa., teaching 
in an academy and devoting his leisure to the study of medicine. 
Returning then to New York City, he pursued his studies there, 
and received the degree of M. D. from the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, March 7, 1846. The next month he became a 
resident of Norwalk, Conn., where he spent the remainder of his 
life, engaged in the practice of his profession. For some six years 
before his death his health was seriously impaired by malarial 
fever, but the immediate cause of death was a partial sunstroke, 
received about the middle of July, 1878. He died in Norwalk, 
July 29, aged 56^ years. 

He was married, Aug. 22, 1854, to Miss Sarah R., daughter of 
Justin R. Bush, of Greenwich, Conn., who died the next month, 
Sept. 27. He was married, June 23, 1858, to Miss Emily A., 
daughter of Charles Sperry, Esq., of Norwalk, who survives him 
with three of their four children. 

At the time of his death Dr. Lynes was president of the Fair- 
field County Savings Bank, treasurer of the Norwalk Fire Insur- 
ance Company, and director in the National Bank of Norwalk, 
and held many other less prominent positions of trust. He had 
in former years represented Norwalk in the State Legislature, 
and was a trustee of the Connecticut Hospital for the Insane in 
Middletown, from 1871 to 1876. 

1843. 

Eli Sims Shorter was born in Monticello, Ga., March 15, 
1823, and entered college from Irwinton, near Eufaula, Alabama. 

After graduating he returned to Eufaula, where he studied law 
and entered on its practice. Subsequently, however, he relin- 
quished his profession and was occupied as a planter. In 1855 



353 

he was elected a Representative in Congress by the Democratic 
}jarty in his district, and was re-elected two years later. In 1859 
he declined to be again a candidate. 

He was married, Jan. 12, 1848, to Miss Fannin, of Georgia, by 
whom he had several children. He died in Eufaula, April 29, 
1879, aged 56 years. 

1844. 

Rockwell Emerson, born in Norfolk, Conn., Feb. 23, 1823, 
was the son of Rev. Dr. Ralph Emerson (Y. C. 1811) and Eliza 
(Rockwell) Emerson. In 1829 his father resigned the pastoral 
charge of the Congregational Church in Norfolk to accept a pro- 
fessorship in the Theol. Seminary at Andover, Mass., which he re- 
tained for 25 years. 

The son was fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, 
and after graduation spent three years as a student in the law 
office of Hon. Willis Hall (Y. C. 1824) at Albany, N. Y. He was 
admitted an attorney and counsellor at law in 1847, and practiced 
his profession in the city of New York until his death. He died 
in Flushing, L. I. (where he had resided for about two years), 
June 21, 1878, at the age of 55. His widow, Mrs. Mary (Hawley) 
Emerson, survives him, with one son and four daughters. 

Henry Huntley Haioht, elder son of Hon. Fletcher M. 
Haight (Hamilton Coll. 1818) and Elizabeth S. MacLachlan Haight, 
was born in Rochester, N. Y., May 20, 1825. 

He studied law in Rochester, until October, 1846, when he re- 
moved with his father to St. Louis, Mo., where he was admitted 
to the bar in July, 1847. He then entered into partnership with 
his father, but left in November, 1849, for San Francisco, where 
he arrived in Jan., 1850, and established himself as a lawyer. He 
was at one time in partnership with Gen. James A. McDougall, 
and afterwards with his father (who followed him to San Francisco 
in 1854) until the appointment of the latter as U. S. Judge for 
the Southern District of California in 1861. He was eminently 
successful in his chosen profession, and secured such public esteem 
that he was chosen Governor of the State for the term of four 
years beginning in December, 1867. His administration won for 
him additional honor, but he preferred to return to private life 
and spent his remaining years in the quiet practice of his profes- 
sion in San Francisco, his residence being in Alameda. He had 
suffered for a year or more from acute pain in the region of the 



354 

heart, and had found some relief in the practice of taking steam- 
baths. On Sept. 2, 1878, he left his office in San Francisco and 
went to the bath-house, but while there was seized with an acute 
attack and died a few minutes later ; the cause of death was 
found by an examination to be aneurism of the aorta. 

He was married, Jan. 24, 1855, to Anna E., daughter of Capt. 
Lewis Bissell, of St. Louis, who survives him with four children. 

1845. 

James Noaille Brickell was born in Columbia, S. C, of 
Huguenot descent, June 5, 1823, and had been a member of the 
College of Charleston, S. C, before entering the Sophomore Class 
in this College. In his boyhood his family had removed to Ten- 
nessee, and later to Madison County, Mississippi. 

Immediately on graduation he began the study of law in Mis- 
sissippi, and in July, 1848, was admitted to practice. He settled 
in New Orleans in 1849 and there engaged in his profession until 
the breaking out of the war. He disbelieved in the wisdom of 
secession, but as soon as the Louisiana Convention had joined in 
the movement, he volunteered as a private. After serving for 
fifteen months in the field in Virginia, he was made 1st Lieutenant 
of Ordnance, and served in that capacity — refusing all offers of 
higher position — till the close of the war. He then returned to 
New Orleans, and resumed his professional duties, accepting in 
good faith the results of the past struggle. But in the years 
which followed, his experience and observation of the evils of the 
military government of the state led him into vigorous and un- 
tiring opposition by tongue and pen. In the opinion of his asso- 
ciates at the bar, he was a lawyer of unusual ability, and in 
happier times would have reached and adorned the bench. About 
1873 he was prostrated by a severe attack of pleurisy, from the 
effects of which he never perfectly recovered, and after a gradual 
failure of his vital powers he was stricken with paralysis and died 
on Sept. 26, 1877, at the age of 54. He was never married. 

Andrew Flinn Dickson, son of Rev. John Dickson, was born 
in Charleston, S. C, Nov. 8, 1825. His mother was a daughter 
of Rev. Andrew Flinn, D.D., the first pastor of the 2d Presbyte- 
rian Church in Charleston. 

After graduation he began to teach in his native city, but was 
soon obliged to move to a more northern climate for the sake of 



355 

his father's health. He taught in Cincinnati for about a year, and 
after his father's death, in 1847, entered Lane Theological Semi- 
nary in that city. The next year he returned to ]Sew Haven, 
and was connected with the Yale Divinity School until January, 
1850. In the meantime he had been licensed to preach by the 
Middlesex (Conn.) Association of Congregational Ministers, and 
having been married, Jan. 7, 1850, to Miss A. H. Woodhull, of 
Long Island, he took charge of the Presbyterian Churches of 
John's Island and Wadmalaw, near Charleston, in which out of a 
membership of 360, 330 were colored people. After serving in 
this position for some years and acting for a short time as an 
agent of the American Tract Society, he took charge in 1856 of 
the Presbyterian Church in Orangeburg, S. C, and left this posi- 
tion to become a chaplain in the Confederate service during the 
late war. His next pastoral charge was over the Canal Street 
Presbyterian Church in New Orleans from 1868 to 1871. He 
subsequently served the church in Wilmington, N. C, for about 
18 months, and then the church in Chester, S. C, for three years. 
The General Assembly of the Southern Presbyterian Church 
having established an Institute for the training of colored min- 
isters at Tuscaloosa, Ala., he was appointed its first professor and 
entered on his duties in October, 1876. While filling this posi- 
tion he died, in Tuscaloosa, after two days' illness, of pleurisy, 
Jan. 8, 1879, aged 53 years. His wife with nine children survives 
him. 

Mr. Dickson had published, in 1856 and 1860, two series of 
" Plantation Sermons," and in 1872 a volume on the "Temptation 
in the Desert." He was also, in 1878, the successful competitor 
for the prize established by the late Hon. Richard Fletcher, by an 
essay entitled, " The Light — is it waning ?" 

He was of marked ability as a preacher, and especially earnest 
and successful in the work to which he devoted his first and last 
efiTorts in the ministry, the spiritual elevation of the colored race. 

John Grant, son of Deacon Elijah and Elizabeth (Phelps) 
Grant, was born in Colebrook, Conn., Aug. 29, 1822. 

After graduation he taught for a short time in Richmond, Va., 
and after an interval of ill-health, resumed teaching in the Acad- 
emy in Woodbury, Conn. From this position he was called in 
May, 1848, to a tutorship in this college, which he held till com- 
mencement, 1850. For the next three years he was the principal 



856 

of a classical school in Newark, N". J. From September, 1853, to 
the autumn of 1857 he taught in New York City, and then 
returned to Newark, where he resided till his death. He con- 
tinued teaching till about 1869, and was subsequently employed 
for some six years in the New York Custom House. He died in 
Newark, July 5, 1878, aged nearly 56 years. His death was 
caused by internal hemorrhage, consequent on the rupture of a 
deep-seated tumor under the back-bone, between the shoulders, 
which had been externally operated upon thirteen times during a 
period of forty years. His life had been one of great suffering, 
borne with Christian endurance. 

He was married in Canton, O., Aug. 20, 1857, to Gertrude, 
daughter of Samuel D. Day, who survives him with one son. 

George Dana Harringtox, the youngest child of Lyman and 
Al thine (Bruce) Harrington, was born in Londonderry, Vt., July 
28, 1823, and came to college from Factory Point in that State. 

He settled in Bennington, Vt., where he was engaged in busi- 
ness for several years. He was also for some time employed in 
civil engineering, — in the construction of the Central Vermont 
Railroad, and in other railroad building in Canada and New 
York. In 1862 he received a captain's commission as commissary 
of subsistence, and was with the Northern Army in Virginia for 
a timCj and later at headquarters in Columbus, Ohio. He per- 
formed his duties in the service so well as to gain the especial 
esteem of Gov. Tod, of Ohio, and through his influence received 
a full colonel's commission. While at Columbus he became inci- 
dentally interested in the condition of the State Penitentiary, and 
the impulse given to spiritual work among the convicts by his 
suggestions and cooperation was so marked that he was subse- 
quently appointed by Gov. Cox a member of the Board of State 
Charities. In connection with the U. S. Census of 1870 he was 
appointed Chief Clerk of the Census Bureau, at Washington, and 
was acting superintendent of the same at the time of his death. 

For the last six months of his life he was a sufferer from cardial 
asthma, which brought on paralysis of the brain, of which he died 
in Washington, March 13, 1879, in the 56th year of his age. 

He was married, June 8, 1847, to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of 
George Lyman, Esq., of Bennington, who survives him, with five 
of their nine children. The eldest son is a graduate of Williami 
College and of the Yale Divinity School. 



857 

Richard Taylor, the only son of Gen. Zachary Taylor, twelfth 
President of the United States, and of Margaret (Smith) Taylor, 
was born in New Orleans, La., Jan. 27, 1826. His early years 
were spent in the soldier's camp, until his father sent him about 
1839 to Edinburgh, Scotland, for a drill in the classics. Three 
years in Scotland and a year in France fitted him, with little other 
aid, to enter on advanced standing at Harvard College, whence he 
came to Yale near the beginning of the Junior Year. 

He went directly from college in 1845 to his father's camp on 
the Mexican frontier, in the capacity of military secretary and 
aide-de-camp ; and after a year's experience at the front, as it 
appeared that military operations were. temporarily suspended, he 
returned to Louisiana, to seek relief from acute rheumatism which 
had greatly impaired his health. During his father's brief presi- 
dency he acted as private secretary, and at its close (July, 1850) 
he retired to a sugar plantation in the Parish of St. Charles, about 
twenty miles above New Orleans, where he was still living when 
the late civil war broke out. His estate was large, and by his 
marriage, in February, 1851, to Miss Myrth Bringier, a lady of 
French extraction, and of an old and powerful Creole family, he 
had materially increased it. He was known as a leading citizen 
of Louisiana, and was in the State Senate from 1856 to 1860 ; but 
the noteworthy part of his public life began with the Democratic 
National Convention in 1860, at which he strongly opposed the 
movement for secession. He returned to Louisiana and was a 
member of the State Convention which voted secession in the 
spring of 1861, and he aided in the first organization of the state 
troops for the contest. In June, 1861, he accepted the colonelcy 
of the 9th Louisiana Regiment, which reached Manasses Junction 
in Virginia the night after the first battle of Bull Run. His first 
remarkable service was in Stonewall Jackson's campaign in the 
Valley of Virginia in the spring of 1862, notably at Port Republic 
where the brigade which he led decided the day in favor of 
the Confederate forces. For his conduct in this campaign he was 
promoted by his brother-in-law. President Davis, to a Brigadier- 
Generalship ; and for his share in the Seven Days' battles before 
Richmond which followed, he was made a Major General and 
assiscned to the command of the District of West Louisiana. He 
showed great ability in organizing and supplying an army there, 
and by his capture of Brashear City and its forts (in June, 1863) 
gained temporary control of the Mississippi above New Orleans. 



368 

But the fall of Vicksburg speedily overthrew his plans, and even 
his more famous defeat of Gen. Banks at Mansfield in the follow- 
ing May gained no permanent result. In the summer of 1864 he 
was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-General, the second grade 
in the Confederate Army, and ordered to the command of the De- 
partment of Alabama and Mississippi. This command, after the 
surrender of Lee and Johnston, Gen. Taylor surrendered to Gen. 
Canby, May 4, 1865. He returned to New Orleans to reside, 
ruined in fortune, and in uncertain health. After a time the Leg- 
islature of Louisiana put him in charge of some important public 
works, and in 1873 he went abroad on business and remained for 
a year or more. His varied accomplishments and the charm of 
his manner secured for him, especially in England, a considerable 
position in society, and the same was true in his own country, at 
the South, and as well at the North where he spent part of his 
later years. 

After passing the greater part of the last winter in Wash- 
ington, he came to New York to visit friends, and to finish 
the revision of the proofs of a book entitled " Destruction and 
Reconstruction" which was published about the 1st of April. He 
had long suffered from the effects of a malignant malarial fever, 
contracted in the first year of the late war, and late in March 
symptoms of a severe dropsical disorganization of the system set 
in. He died in New York, April 12, 1879, at the age of 53. His 
wife died in 1875. He leaves three daughters. 

Nathan Fox Wilbur was born in Cayuga County, N. Y., 
April 9, 1818. After graduation he taught a school for nine 
months, and studied law in Seneca Falls, N. Y. Having been 
admitted to the bar in January, 1848, he left his native state with 
the intention of settling in the South : but in April of the same 
year he visited Western Ohio, and was attracted to the town of 
Piqua, in the Miami valley, as a place of residence. He was a 
successful lawyer in Piqua from that time until his death. His 
habits of study and close application to business, with his pro- 
nounced Christian character, gave him a high position in the 
community. 

Pie died in Piqua, Feb. 28, 1878, in the 60th year of his age. 
He was married in the spring of 1855 to Miss H. Jane Reynolds, 
of New York, who survives him. Of their three children the 
youngest, a daughter, is still living. 



359 

1847. 

George Gardner Barnard died in New York City, April 27, 
1879, aged 50 years. He was the son of Frederic and Margaret 
(Allen) Barnard, and was born in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., in 1829. 
Three of his brothers were graduated at this college, in the classes 
of 1837, 1841 and 1848. 

He studied law in Poughkeepsie, in the offices of his brother, 
Joseph F. Barnard, and of Judge Barculo. On being admitted 
to the bar he went to San Francisco to join another brother, a 
successful practitioner of the law, who died about 1856. He then 
returned to the East and opened an office in New York City, in 
partnership with Joseph J. Chambers. In 1857 he was elected 
Recorder, and on the expiration of his term of office in 1860 was 
elected Justice of the Supreme Court, on the Tammany ticket, 
through the influence of William M. Tweed. In 1868 he was re- 
elected to a second term on the bench, and in the same year the 
complicated litigation began in which the Erie Railway was in- 
volved, culminating so far as Judge Barnard was concerned in 
his impeachment by the Legislature in March, 1872. At the en- 
suing trial, in August, the impeachment was sustained and he was 
removed from office. His subsequent life was spent in retirement. 
He had been for many years afflicted with rheumatic gout, and 
to this was superadded in the last months of his life an attack of 
Bright's disease of the kidneys. 

He was married in 1859 to Fanny A., daughter of John Ander- 
son, of New York City, who died in 1874. Two daughters and 
three sons survive him. 

Angelo Jackson was bom Nov. 25, 1819, and died in Wash- 
ington, D. C, suddenly, of heart-disease, June 8, 1878. 

He was married, about the time of graduation, to Miss Elizabeth, 
daughter of Dr. Asa Whitney, formerly of West Stockbridge, 
Mass. He settled in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and taught in the academy 
there for three years, studying law meantime. In April, 1850, he 
was admitted to the bar, and immediately began the practice of 
the law. He continued to be thus engaged with fair success until 
October, 1861, when he raised a company of light infantry, and 
entered the service of the U. S. as First Lieutenant. He. partic- 
ipated in some twenty-five or thirty battles and skirmishes, but 
left the army in July, 1866, unwounded, though with his health 
seriously impaired by exposure and hardships. His law-practice 
having been broken up by his absence, he accepted a clerkship in 
24 



360 

the Treasury Department in Washington, which he held till his 
death. 

His wife died, suddenly, of pneumonia, in January, 1859, and 
in 1863 he married Miss Margarita R. Kutz, a sister of his class- 
mate, Henry 0. Kutz, of Philadelphia. She survives him with 
one son. Of the three children by his first marriage, the elder 
son graduated at Union College. 

1848. 

John Ferree Brinton, the eldest son of Ferree Brinton, 
Associate Judge of Lancaster County, Pa., and of Elizabeth 
(Sharpless) Brinton, was born on a farm, in that county, July 29, 
1827. 

He entered college in the Sophomore year, and in September 
after graduation began the study of law in the office of Eli K. 
Price, Esq., of Philadelphia. In June, 1851, he was admitted to 
the bar; and he practiced his profession in that city until 1862 
when he was obliged by the State of his health to give up busi- 
ness. He then retired to a country seat in Lancaster County, 
having been married, Oct. 20, 1856, to Miss Anna Binney, daugh- 
ter of the late Dr. Amos Binney of Boston. In 1866, he went 
abroad for his health, and having found himself benefitted 
returned home in the spring of 1870 with the intention of recross- 
ing the ocean in the succeeding autumn. But immediately after 
his return his wife died, and the blow so entirely overthrew his 
physical strength that he was unable to carry out his purpose. 
From that time he lived in constant and excruciating pain, 
gradually losing the use of his limbs. Death, long prayed for, 
came at last on the 15th of November, 1878, at his home in 
Philadelphia. 

He leaves three sons and two daughters, having lost one daugh- 
ter in Paris. The eldest son is a member of the present Fresh- 
man Class in this college. 

1849. 

Edward Augustus Arnold, son of Rev. Joel R. and Julia 
(Arnold) Arnold, was born, May 28, 1827, at Chester, N. H., 
where his father was then pastor. He entered this college as a 
Sophomore in 1846, his father then residing in Colchester, Conn. 

He spent one year after graduation in teaching in Stonington, 
Conn., and then began the study of medicine at the University of 
Maryland, in Baltimore, where he received his medical degree in 



861 

March, 1852. He remained in Baltimore for another year, as a 
physician, and then settled in Davenpoit, Iowa, serving at the 
same time as Professor of Anatomy in the Medical Department 
of the State University at Keokuk. Two years later he removed 
to Fort Dodge, and in ]856 to Cedar Falls, both in the same 
State. In 1859 he went to Kansas, and after one year spent in 
practicing his profession in Atchison, visited Colorado and New 
Mexico, and finally entered the U. S. Navy in the fall of 1862. A 
year later he resigned his position and settled in Indianapolis, 
whence he returned to Cedar Falls in January, 1865. In 1868 
he again left Cedar Falls, and went to Missouri. In 1870 he 
removed to Illinois, and practiced his profession in various locali- 
ties in that State for six years. He died in Vincennes, Ind., on 
the 29th of September, 1877, of typho-malarial fever, having been 
resident there for little more than a year. 

He was married to Miss Caroline Frances Webber, of Hopkins- 
ville, Ky., Nov. 8, 1866, and left several children. 

Thomas Ridgway Bannan, son of John and Sarah Bannan, 
was born in Orwigsburg, near Pottsville, Pa., Oct. 10, 1828, and 
died suddenly from an attack of apoplexy, at his residence in 
Pottsville, Pa., on Christmas evening, 1878, at the age of 50 
years. 

He studied law, mainly with his father in Pottsville, and was 
admitted to practice there in September, 1852, where he continued 
thus engaged until his death. 

He was married, June 29, 1865, to Miss Alice Johnson, of Potts- 
ville, who died March 24, 1866. 

Chaeles Greene Came was born in Buxton, Me., Sept. 26, 
1826. 

After graduation he studied law in Portland, Me., being occu- 
pied a part of the time in teaching and in editorial work. On his 
admission to the bar, in October, 1862, he began the practice of 
law in Rockland, Me., but in September of the next year returned 
to Portland, where for two years he acted as assistant editor of 
the Portland Advertiser while also practicing his profession. 
During this time he was twice a member of the House of Repre- 
sentatives of Maine. In July, 1856, he became editor in-chief of 
the Advertiser^ a position which he held until May, 1857, when 
he accepted a position as associate editor of the Boston Journal^ 
which he retained to the time of his death. 



362 

He was married, in September, 1855, to Miss Sarah M. Lewis, 
of New Haven, who died after a long and painful illness in 1877. 
Soon after her death his health began to fail, and for the last few 
months he was confined to his house in Boston, where he died 
Jan. 16, 1879, at the age of 52. Of his four children, two daugh- 
ters and a son are still living. 

1850. 

George Lombard Frost, son of George Frost, M. D. (Bow- 
doin College, 1822) and Caroline A. Frost, was born in Springfield, 
Mass., Mch. 18, 1830. 

He studied law in Springfield for a year, and spent the succeed- 
ing year in the Law School of Harvard University. In September 
1852, he was admitted to the bar, and in the following March 
removed to Mineral Point, Wise, where he remained in the active 
practice of his profession until the autumn of 1869. During the 
winters of 1863 and 1864 he represented Iowa County in the 
State Senate. In 1869 he removed to Dodgeville, in the same 
county, where he resided, honored as an able lawyer and leading 
citizen, until his sudden death, while in Madison in the perform- 
ance of his duty as a representative in the legislature, Feb. 15, 
1879, in his 49th year. His affection for his Eastern home was so 
strong that he was contemplating removal during the present 
summer to Springfield, where his mother is still living. 

He was maried, Sept. 10, 1852, to Miss Malvina Gaszynski, of 
Boston, Mass., who died in February, 1867. He was again 
married, Nov. 20, 1871, to Miss Mary E. Thomas, of Dodgeville, 
who survives him. Of eight sons by his first wife, five are still 
living, as also an only son by his second marriage. 

1852. 

Charles Downs Helmer, son of Steuben Helmer, was born 
in Canajoharie, Montgomery County, N. Y., Nov. 18, 1827, and 
entered this college from Hamilton College, N. Y., at the begin- 
ning of the Junior year. 

For two years after graduation he taught in the Institution for 
the Deaf and Dumb in New York City, and then took the regular 
three years' course in the Union Theol. Seminary. Having 
declined the offer of a tutorship in this college, he then went to 
Europe, for study and travel. Returning early in 1859, he 
preached for several months in the North (Congregational) 



363 

Church in Hartford, Conn., but declining a proposition he remain 
there, went to Milwaukee, Wise, where he was ordained and 
installed over the Plymouth (Congregational) Church, in Septem- 
ber, 1859. In 1866 he accepted a call to the Union Park Congre- 
gational Church, Chicago, where he was installed on the 20th of 
December. He was dismissed by his own desire from this office, 
nine years from the day of his installation, and the next year 
began preaching in the newly established Tompkins Avenue 
Congregational Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., of which he was 
formally installed the pastor, March 28, 1877. Before leaving 
Chicago he had contracted a malarial fever, from which he had 
not entirely recovered when he began work again in Brooklyn. 
His work was in consequence much interrupted, and on returning 
from a long absence in the fall of 1878, he was almost immedi- 
ately prostrated again, and was obliged to resign his pastorate. 
He died at the residence of a brother in Lockport, N. Y., April 
28, 1879, in the 52d year of his age. He was buried in Milwaukee, 
by the side of three of his children. 

He was married, Dec. 25, 1861, to Miss Susan R., daughter of 
James Bonnell, of Milwaukee, who survives him with one son 
and one daughter. 

The degree of Doctor of Divinity was tendered him by Beloit 
College in 1875, but he refused to accept or use the title. He 
delivered by appointment a poem before the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society of Yale College at the Commencement in 1862, which was 
printed. 

Charles Linn^us Ives, only child of Dr. N. Beers Ives 
(Y. C. 1826) and Sarah (Badger) Ives, was born in New Haven, 
Conn., June 22, 1831. 

He attended two courses of lectures at the Jefferson Medical 
College in Philadelphia, where he received the degree of M.D. in 
1854. He then attended a supplementary course at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, N. Y. City, and remained as a resi- 
dent surgeon at the Bellevue Hospital until April, 1856, when he 
entered on the practice of his profession in New Haven. From 
1864 to 1868 he was partially engaged in teaching medicine in 
connection with the Yale Medical School, and in the latter year 
was appointed to the chair of the Theory and Practice of Medi- 
cine in this institution. In 1873, hoping to better his health by a 
change of locality, he resigned this professorship to accept the 
chair of Diseases of the Mind and Nervous System, in the 



864 

University of the City of New York. To prepare for this he 
made a second visit to Europe (having already made an extended 
tour in 1870), but failing health compelled him to resign this 
professorship also, and to give up entirely his profession. The 
rest of his life was spent in travel and the search for health. In 
March, 1879, he underwent a surgical operation, in consequence 
of which he died in Burlington, N. J., on the 2l8t of that month. 

He was married, June 20, 1860, to Miss Bessie W. Salter^ 
daughter of Cleveland J. Salter, of Waverly, 111., who survives 
him. They had no children. 

Dr. Ives published in 1873 a pamphlet on the Bible Doctrine of 
the Soul, which in 1877 he re-published in a duodecimo of 334 
pages. 

By his last will he left to the President and Fellows of Yale 
College the sum of $10,000, of which the income is to devoted to 
the support of indigent and worthy students. He was also during 
his life a generous benefactor of the Medical School. 

1853. 

Ltjthee Gould [ng Tarbox was born in Sheridan, Chautauqua 
County, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1832, and died in Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 
14, 1878, aged 46. 

After graduation he taught for a year in the public schools in 
Memphis, Tenn. On the introduction of the public school system 
into Nashville in 1855, he was elected principal of the High 
School, and served in this capacity until the breaking out of the 
late war. He then resigned his position and removed to Detroit, 
Mich., where he taught in a Seminary for young ladies. In 1865 
he returned to Nashville, and served as a member of the City 
Board of Education until 1875, when he resigned on account of 
his health. He was also employed as a cashier in a banking 
institution until the failure of his health. He died of paralysis 
after a long illness. 

He was married in Detroit in 1865, to Miss Cornelia Wajson, 
who survives him with one son. 

1856. 

Alfred Coit, son of Robert and Charlotte (Coit) Coit, was 
born in New London, Conn., May 23, 1835. 

After beginning the study of law with his brother, Robert 
Coit, Jr. (Y. C. 1850), in New London, he continued his studies 



865 

in the Law School of Harvard University, receiving the degree of 
LL.B. in 1858. In November of the same year he was admitted 
to the New London County Bar, and practiced his profession with 
success and public esteem in his native city until his death in that 
place, Jan. 17, 1879, after a short but severe illness, of ansemia of 
the brain. 

He was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives 
in 1862, 1863, and 1864, and of the Senate in 1868. From 1865 
to 1868 he was a member of the State Board of Education, and 
Judge of Probate for the New London District in 1875-76. At 
the session of the State Legislature in January, 1877, he was 
elected Judge of the Court of Common Pleas for New London 
County for four years from July 1, 1877, and was in the discharge 
of the duties of this office at the close of his life. 

Judge Coit was married, Aug. 1, 1862, to Ellen Hobron of 
New London. His wife with five children survives him. 

Charles Albert Swift, son of Rufus C. Swift, was born in 
New Lisbon, N. Y., Jan. 29, 1837, but entered college from 
Warren, Conn., where he returned to teach after graduation. In 
1857-8 he taught in Litchfield, Conn., and was for the next two 
years principal of the high school in Sacramento, Cal. While in 
Sacramento he became insane, and was never after entirely well. 
He studied law in New York City, in 1860-61, and then returned 
to California, where he spent two years on a farm in lone Valley: 
He then came back to Warren, and from 1865 to 1874 was farming 
in Vineland, N. J. He was then again in Warren until February, 
1877, when he left home without the knowledge of his friends. 
He died in Texas, Aug. 18, 1877, of a congestive chill. He was 
not married. 

1858. 

Isaac Riley, second son of Rev. Henry A. and Emma V. (Smith) 
Riley, was born in New York City, Feb. 2, 1835. 

Immediately upon graduation he entered the Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City. Ending his course there in May, 
1861, he began to preach the following September in the Forest 
Presbyterian Church, in Middletown, Del. In December he was 
called to the pastorate, and on March 5, 1862, was ordained and 
installed. 

He was married, Jan. 16, 1862, in New York City, to Kate A. 
S., daughter of Rev. Joel Parker, D.D. 



366 

In July, 1864, he enlisted for thirty days in the 7th Delaware 
Infantry, and after the expiration of his term of service returned 
to Middletown. He resigned his pastorate Sept. 18, 1864, and 
began preaching a month later in the First Presbyterian Church, 
Pottsville, Pa., where he was installed as pastor on the 30th of 
November. Having secured the union of the First and Second 
Presbyterian Churches in Pottsville, he resigned his charge at the 
close of September, 1867. He then began preaching in the Park 
Presbyterian Church, Newark, N. J., where he was installed as 
associate pastor with his father-in-law, Oct. 23. In the following 
July he was called to the pastorate of the 34th Street Reformed 
Church in New York City, where he was installed Sept. 27. 
From this position, which he filled with signal ability and success 
he was called to the charge of the Westminster Presbyterian 
Church, Buffalo, N. Y., where he was settled in October, 1875. 

His active and useful ministry there was terminated by his 
death, Oct. 23, 1878, at the age of 43, after a week's illness of 
pleurisy, ending in pneumonia. 

His wife with three children survives him. 

Pkeston Irving Sweet, second son of Eleazer D. and Jane 
Ann (Densmore) Sweet, was born in Wappinger's Falls, N. Y., 
March 7, 1837, and died in New York City, after a brief illness, 
Feb. 8, 1879, in the 42d year of his age. 

He studied law at the Albany Law School, receiving the degree of 
LL.B. there in May, 1859, and being in the same month admitted 
to the bar. He very soon decided to begin the practice of his 
profession in Chicago, but his residence there w^as interrupted by 
the partial failure of his health, on account of which he spent 
nearly a year in the Rocky Mountain gold region. In June, 1861, 
finding his health re-established, he resumed the practice of law 
in New York City. In the spring of 1874 he gave up the active 
duties of his profession. He was unmarried. 

1859. 

Robert John Carpenter, son of James and Sarah Carpenter, 
was born in Demorestville, Canada West, Oct. 13, 1837, and died 
in Berlin, New Hampshire, Feb. 2, 1879. 

After leaving college he spent upwards of two years in the 
Theological Seminary at Andover, Mass. He was married, Feb. 
6, 1862, to Miss Ellen Furbish, of Portland, Me., and ten days later 
started on a tour around the world, from which he returned in the 



367 

spring of 1863. He then engaged in business in New York City, 
becoming a partner with S. W. Hopkins & Co., dealers in rail- 
way iron and steel. He went soon after to London as resident 
partner for the firm in that city, where he remained until the 
Franco-German war caused a suspension of his business. He 
returned to this country, and for the last two years of his life was 
interested in mills for supplying material for the manufacture of 
paper. 

Near the end of January, 1879, he was suddenly attacked with 
scarlet fever ; three days later Bright's disease of the kidneys set 
in, and he was a great sufferer until death released him. 

His wife survives him with two sons and two daughters. 

Thomas Bradford Dwight, second son of Rev. Dr. William 
T. Dwight (Y. C. 1813), and grandson of President Timothy 
Dwight, was born in Portland, Me., where his father was for 
thirty-two years pastor, Sept. 17, 1837. His mother was Eliza L., 
daughter of Thomas Bradford, Esq., a distinguished lawyer of 
Philadelphia. 

He studied law with George M. Wharton, Esq., of Philadelphia, 
where he was admitted to the bar in December, 1861. During 
the civil war he was repeatedly engaged in service, especially in 
the summer of 1863. In 1864 he became the Assistant of the 
District Attorney for the county, and was thus employed in the 
prosecution of criminal cases for several years. He then resumed 
civil practice, and with such success that upon the establishment 
of the Orphans' Court for the county of Philadelphia in 1874, he 
was elected one of the judges. His judicial duties were performed 
with eminent ability, but his complete devotion to his work 
proved too severe a strain upon his system, and he was obliged to 
resign his office at the close of the year 1877. His remaining life 
was spent in great weakness at the home of his sister in Andover, 
Mass., where he died Aug. 31, 1878, at the age of 41. 

Judge Dwight was married, June 6, 1872, to Julia K., daughter 
of Robert R. Porter, M.D., of Wilmington, Del., who survives 
him without children. 

Samuel Dorr Faulkner, son of Hon. James Faulkner and 
Minerva (Hammond) Faulkner, was born in Dansville, N. Y., 
Nov. 14, 1835. 

He entered colllege at the age of 20, graduating in the same 
class with an older and a younger brother. After graduation he 



368 

studied law in the Albany Law School, and was admitted to the 
bar in May, 1860. In the following November he entered into 
partnership with S. Hubbard, Esq., for the practice of law in 
Dansville, which co-partnership existed till 1864, when Mr. 
Hubbard was elected County Judge. In 1862 he was appointed 
Supervisor of Dansville, to fill a vacancy, and was elected to the 
same position in the two succeeding years. In 1866 he was 
elected to the New York Assembly as a democrat, in a district 
which was strongly republican, and in 1871 was elected County 
Judge and Surrogate, overcoming an opposition majority of over 
1,000. In 1874 he received the democratic nomination for 
Congress in his district, and in the situation of parties at that 
time his election would have been certain if he had consented to 
run ; but the state of his health would not permit him to enter the 
canvass. In the fall of 1877 he was re-elected County Judge and 
Surrogate for a second term of six years, overcoming as before a 
very large opposition majority. 

In the fall of 1873, his unremitting application to judicial and 
professional duties brought on a hemorrhage of the lungs which 
compelled him to spend the remaining winters of his life in 
Florida or Colorado. From each of these visits he returned 
apparently much strengthened, but only to exhaust himself again 
by close attention to his duties. On the 22d of July, 1878, while 
returning home from a session of court, the horse he was driving 
stumbled and fell, and the shock which he received from the 
accident brought on a succession of hemorrhages, which caused 
his death, at Dansville, on August 9th, in the 43d year of his age. 
He was unmarried. 

Judge Faulkner was widely known through Western New 
York, and had attained an enviable reputation for judicial integ- 
rity, as well as oratorical abilities. 

1862. 

Edward Collins Stone, elder son of Rev. Collins Stone 
(Y. C. 1832) and Ellen J. (Gill) Stone, was born in Hartford, 
Conn., where his father was then teaching in the American 
Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb, Jan. 29, 1840. He first entered 
the class of 1861, but was compelled to leave it by an attack of 
typhoid fever during the first term. 

On graduating he became an assistant teacher under his father, 
' — since 1852 at the head of the Ohio Institution for Deaf Mutes at 



369 

Columbus — and when the latter returned to Hartford in 1863, as 
Principal of the American Asylum, he followed in June, 1864, as 
an assistant teacher. From Hartford he was called, in November, 
1868, to take charge of the State Institution for the Deaf and 
Dumb, at Delavan, Wisconsin. He remained there until Feb- 
ruary, 1871, when he was recalled to Hartford, to take the posi- 
tion vacated a few weeks before by his father's sudden death. 
The confidence placed in his abilities was not disappointed, and 
the institution under his charge steadily prospered until his death 
from malignant erysipelas, after about a week's illness, Dec. 21, 
1878, in his 39th year. 

He was married, July 26, 1869, to Miss Mary C, only daughter 
of Charles P. Welles, of Hartford, who survives him with four 
children. 

1863. 

Feank Howe Bradley, son of Abijah and Eliza Collis (Town- 
send) Bradley, was born in New Haven, Conn., Sept. 20, 1838, 
and died, from the falling of a bank in a gold mine, near Nacoo- 
chee, Ga., March 27, 1879. 

Through his undergraduate course he was partially employed 
in teaching in Gen. Russell's Collegiate and Commercial Institute 
in New Haven, at which school he was himself fitted for college. 
In the year 1 863-4 he taught in Hartford, Conn., and spent the 
next year as a student in the Chemical Laboratory of the Sheffield 
Scientific School. His tastes early led him to the study of geol- 
ogy, and up to this time his vacations had been largely spent in 
the field in making collections of fossils. In the summer of 1865 
he went to the Isthmus of Darien, and spent a year in that 
vicinity, obtaining large collections of corals and other zoological 
specimens, partly for the Yale Museum. During 1867 and 1868 
he was assistant geologist in the Illinois survey, and in November 
of the latter year, became Professor of Natural Sciences in Han- 
over College, at Hanover, Ind. In September, 1869, he left this 
position to accept the Professorship of Mineralogy and Geology 
in East Tennessee University, at Knoxville, and while there made 
some valuable geological explorations. He resigned this position 
in 1875, with the hope of so adding to his resources that he might 
be able with freedom to pursue his favorite science ; and to this 
end he undertook the development of a gold mine in Northern 
Georgia, where he met his death. 



870 

Professor Bradley was married, July 15, 1867, to Sarah M., 
daughter of Samuel P. Bolles, Esq., of New Haven. She survives 
him, with one daughter, two children having died earlier, and one 
on the day of his own death. 

Howard Kingsbury, son of llev. Oliver R. and Susan (Pat- 
terson) Kingsbury, was born in New York City, Febr. 3, 1842. 

After a few months spent at home, he went to Irvington, N. T., 
and remained there teaching in private families until September, 
1 865, when he sailed for Europe with one of his pupils. They 
remained abroad until July, 1867, having passed the greater part 
of the time in Berlin and Dresden. He then entered the Union 
Theological Seminary in New York City, and on finishing his 
course was ordained in New York City by the Third Presbytery 
of New York, June 20, 1869. He served as stated supply for six 
months in the First Presbyterian Church in Carlisle, Pa., and 
from December, 1869 to October, 1870, in Rome, N. Y., and in 
1871 (June 22) he was installed pastor of the Second Presbyterian 
Church in Newark, O. From this office he was invited to Amherst, 
Mass., where he was installed over the First (congregational Church, 
December 6, 1877. His useful pastorate there was terminated by 
his death, in that town, Sept. 28, 1878, in his 37th year, of typhoid 
fever, after about three weeks' illness. 

He was married, June 24, 1869, to Sophia H., daughter of 
Stephen H. Thayer, Esq., of New York City, who died Nov. 2, 
1873. Their only son survives his parents. 

1865. 

Henry Armitt Brow^n was born in Philadelphia, Dec. 1, 
1844, the second son of Frederick and Charlotte A. (Hoppin) 
Brown. 

He spent a year after graduating at the Columbia College Law 
School, New York City, and in July, 1866, sailed for Europe. 
He remained abroad until November, 1867, visiting also Egypt 
and Palestine. Resuming the study of the law in the office of 
Daniel Dougherty, Esq., of Philadelphia, he was admitted to the 
bar of that city in December, 1869. In April, 1870, he went 
again to Europe, spending most of the time until his return in 
November, in Sweden, Norway, and Russia, countries which he 
had not previously visited. He then settled down to the law in 
Philadelphia ; but his tastes inclined rather to literature, and in 



1371 
spite of a very considerable success in his profession, he made 
little effort to increase his practice. 
He wrote extensively for current periodicals, and began to be 
widely known as a public speaker. An oration delivered in Phila- 
delphia on the 100th anniversary of the assembling of the Continen- 
tal Congress of 1774 was followed by a brilliant succession of 
public addresses, especially in connection with the centennial cele- 
brations of revolutionary events. It was after a very fatiguing 
day at Valley Forge, on June 19, 1878, where he had delivered 
an impressive oration, that he returned to Philadelphia to com- 
plete his preparation for a similar engagement at Monmouth, on 
the 28th ; but what at first seemed a slight illness gradually 
developed into typhoid fever, so that for weeks his life was 
despaired of. About the first of August he rallied, and seemed 
likely to recover ; but successive relapses ensued, and he died on 
the 21st of that month, in the 34th year of his age. 

He was married, Dec. 7, 1871, to Miss Josephine L., daughter 
of Mr. John Baker, of Philadelphia, who survives him with his 
only child, a daughter. 

1871. 

Frederick Lawton Auchincloss, fifth son of John and Eliz- 
abeth (Buck) Auchincloss, was born in New York City, Feb. 26, 
1851. 

He entered after graduation the banking ofiice of Vermilye & 
Co., of New York City, as clerk, and in April, 1872, took a posi- 
tion in the importing house of John & Hugh Auchincloss, also of 
New York, of which firm he was admitted a member in January, 
1875, and with which he remained in connection until the time of 
his death. 

He died in Yokohama, Japan, on the 17th of November, 1878, 
while on a voyage around the world, partly for health and partly 
for pleasure. He was unmarried. Since his death the College 
has received from the executor of his last will, a legacy of 
twenty-five hundred dollars as an evidence of his regard for the 
place of his education. 

1872. 

Frank Hunt Smith, son of Denison B. and Mary S. (Hunt) 
Smith, was born in Toledo, Ohio, March 10, 1849. His pre- 
paration for college was completed at the school of Rev. A. V. 
Blake, in Gambier, O., and he was for a short time a member of 



372 

Kenyon College in that town. He then spent a year at home in 
business, and in January, 1867, entered the Freshman Class of 
this College. Six months later he returned home, but in 1869 
re-entered the college, as a member of the Sophomore Class. 

He spent the three years after graduation in the General Theo- 
logical Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal church, in New 
York City, and on the 9th of November, 1875, was ordained 
deacon by Bishop Bedell in Toledo. He was soon after called to 
St. Peter's Church, Albany, N. Y., as assistant to the Rev. Dr. 
W. W. Battershall (Y. C. 1864), and while in that position was 
ordained to the priesthood by Bishop Doane in the spring of 
1878. By exposure in returning from an evening reception early 
in 1877 he contracted a disease of the lungs which at once took a 
powerful hold on him. He continued at work until August, 1878, 
when he left Albany for Colorado. Finding that his strength 
was gradually failing he returned to his father's residence in 
Toledo in March last, and there died on the 23d of May. He 
was not married. 

1876. 

' David Trumbull, eldest surviving son of Rev. Dr. David 
Trumbull (Y. C. 1842) and Jane W. (Fitch) Trumbull, was born in 
Valparaiso, Chili, where his father has spent his life a missionary 
May 31, 1865. 

He was sent to the United States to be educated, and after 
graduation spent a year in a visit to his parents. In 1877 he 
returned to New Haven, and entered the Theological Department 
of the college. At the close of the year he was one of the boat 
crew which rowed at New London, in competition with a crew 
from Harvard University, on the 28th of June, and he remained 
there for a few days on a visit to relatives. On the afternoon of 
July 3d, while sailing in a yacht in New London harbor, with 
Col. Charles M. Coit, a little son of Col. Coit fell overboard, and 
Mr. Trumbull as well as the boy's father sprang to the rescue. 
The yacht hove to, and the child was drawn on board, but before 
the others were reached they both had sunk. Mr. Trumbull's 
body was recovered near the spot on July 10th, and was buried 
in New Haven the next day. The impulse of self-sacrifice which 
closed his life was thoroughly in keeping with the noble purposes 
which controlled it. 



373 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1829. 

CHAtTNCET Lewis Cooke formerly of Hempstead, L. I ,.died in 
New York City, Dec. 17, 1878, at the age of 70. 

Samuel Johnson, son of Isaac and Phebe (Burchard) Johnson, 
was born in Bozrah, Conn., July 1, 1805, and died in the same 
town, of angina pectoris^ Feb. 12, 1879, in the 74th year of his age. 

He began his professional studies with Dr. Earl Knight, of 
Bozrah, and. with Dr. Joseph Peabody, of Montville, Conn., and 
during the winter of 1827-8 he attended lectures in the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. 

After his graduation in 1829, he settled immediately in his 
native town, where he was engaged in practice without intermib- 
sion till his death. 

He was married in 1836; of his seven children, three died in 
early life, and three sons survive him, with his widow. The un- 
timely death of his only daughter overshadowed with great sorrow 
the close of his life. 

1831. 

Alexander LeBaron Monroe, the son of Dr. Stephen Mon- 
roe, a practising physician of Sutton, Mass., was born in Sutton, 
May 3, 1807. 

He entered on his profession in East Medway, a part of Medway, 
Mass., in the fall of 1832, and the next year removed to Medway 
Village, in the same town, where he practiced medicine for seven 
years. He then took up his residence in Cabotville, a part of 
Springfield, but now Chicopee, Mass., and in the winter of 1842-3, 
removed to the adjoining town of Granby. Ten years later, there 
being need of additional medical service in Medway, he was in- 
duced by his old friends to return, and for twenty-five years he 
continued in practice there, with the exception of a few months 
in 1862 spent as Surgeon in the Peninsula campaign under Gen. 
McClellan. In 1877 he was forced by impaired health to relin- 
quish practice. He died very suddenly, of heart disease, in Med- 
way, Feb. 20, 1879, in his 72d year. 

He was married, Oct. 2, 1834, to Louisa Barber, who died June 
2, 1836. He next married, Nov. 30, 1837, Mrs. Miriam Hawes, 
who with two children, a son and a daughter, survives him. 



374 

He was not only a skillful practitioner, but by the force of his 
Christian character exerted a deep influence for good in the com- 
munity where most of his life was spent. 

1834. 

William Watson Ely died at his residence in Rochester, 
N. Y., March 27, 1879, of angina pectoris, from which he had long 
been suffering, although the more acute symptoms developed 
only within the last two months of his life. 

Dr. Ely was born in Fairfield, Conn., April 30, 1812. He 
began the practice of his profession in Manlius, N. Y., and in 
1839 removed to Rochester, where he continued in practice till 
his death. He was held in high repute, alike for his scientific 
attainments, and for his personal worth. The degree of Doctor 
of Laws was conferred on him by the University of Rochester 
in 1869. 

William Henry Richardson, only son of Levi and Amelia 
(Trumbull) Richardson, was born in Chaplin, then a part of 
Mansfield, Conn., Dec. 5th, 1808. At an early age he removed 
with his parents to North Mansfield, Conn., where he resided 
much the greater part of his life. He pursued his medical studies, 
first with Dr. Archibald Welch of Mansfield, subsequently with 
Dr. Samuel B. Woodward of Wethersfield and Dr. Silas Fuller of 
Columbia, and at the medical school of Yale College. On grad- 
uating, he returned to Mansfield and immediately, entered on the 
practice of his profession, which he followed, with assiduity and 
success, for more than forty years. After some three years of 
impaired health, he died from disease of the brain, Dec. 14, 1878, 
aged 70 years. 

In 1862, he was a member of the State Legislature. For many 
years he served as School Visitor. 

He was married in 1853 to Abigail, daughter of Edmund Free- 
man, Esq., of Mansfield, who with their only son survives him. 

1837. 

Joseph Washburn Clark, the eldest son of Abraham and 
Milicent (Washburn) Clark, was born in Farmington, Conn., Jan. 
19, 1813, and died in San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 17, 1878, aged 
nearly 66 years. 

He entered the Academical Department of this college with 
the class of 1834, but owing to the removal of his parents in 1831 



375 

to Jacksonville, 111, was obliged to leave the class. After begin- 
ning the study of medicine with Dr. Henry of Springfield, III., he 
returned to New Haven in 1835. 

On receiving his degree he began practice at Rushville, 111., 
but removed soon to Rockingham, 111., where he remained till 1842. 
For the next eight years he practiced in Platteville, Wise, and 
then went to Georgetown, California, and devoted himself to mer- 
cantile pursuits. From 1852 till his death he was a merchant and 
broker in San Francisco, where he was for twenty-five years an 
active and honored member and officer of the First Congregational 
Church. 

He was married in 1837 to Miss Lucy A. Hooker, of Westfield, 
Mass. After her death he was again married, Apr. 10, 1842, to 
Miss Jane W., daughter of Joseph Fessenden of Brattleboro', 
Vt., who survives him with one son and one daughter. 

1846. 

Edwin Avert Park, son of Benjamin F., and Hannah (Avery) 
Park, was born in Preston, Conn., Jan. 27, 1817, and died in New 
Haven, Conn., Jan. 17, 1879. One of his brothers graduated 
from the Academical Department of this College in 1861, and 
another is now the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Con- 
necticut. 

Dr. Park had studied medicine in one of the colleges of New 
York City before taking his final course in this city, and immedi- 
ately upon receiving his degree he opened an office in New Haven 
where he practiced successfully until his last illness. He had been 
in failing health for a year, but the immediate cause of death was 
the effusion of water on the brain. 

His wife, who survives him with two sons and two daughters, 
was Miss Allen, of New Haven. 

1849. 

Roger Smith Olmstead, third son of Hawley Olmstead, 
LL.D. (Y. C. 1816), was born in Wilton, Conn., July 17, 1826. 

In 1839 his father removing to New Haven to take charge of the 
Hopkins Grammar School, he became a member of the school and 
completed there his preparation for college, which he entered in 
the autumn of 1843. After two years' study at Yale and other 
colleges and brief experiences of life as a sailor before the mast, 
he settled down to the study of medicine and graduated with 
25 



376 

honor. He immediately opened an office in Brooklyn, N. Y., and 
for twenty years was favored with a large and lucrative practice. 
In IS^O he removed to Omaha, Neb., where he died suddenly of 
apoplexy, Oct. 22d, 1878, in the 53d year of his age. His remains 
are interred in the family lot in New Haven. 

He was married in 1849 to Charlotte A. Hungerford, of Wol- 
cottville. Conn. She with three of their four daughters survives 
him. 

1863. 

Newton Bushnell Hall was born in Canaan, Conn., March 
14, 1828, the only son of Amaziah and Betsey Hall, who removed 
to Branford, Conn., in 1833, where he was educated and began 
preliminary medical studies. 

He entered upon his profession in Branford immediately upon 
graduation, and was successful in acquiring a large country prac- 
tice, which he retained till his death, in Branford, July 21, 1878, 
after a week's illness from malarial fever and rheumatism. 

Dr. Hall was married. May 4, 1862, to Amenia F. Coons, of 
Ulster County, N. Y., who survives him with one daughter. 

1866. 

Leopold Albert L. Angles died in Marseilles, France, in 
March, 1879, after two days' illness. 

He was a native of Avignon, F'rance, but came to America in 
his youth, and was educated in part in the Suburban Home 
School in New Haven. He subsequently resided in the family of 
the principal of this school. Rev. A. Gr. Shears, as an assistant 
teacher, and meantime pursued his medical studies. After gradua- 
tion he was for a time house physician in the City Hospital, and 
later visited France, with the expectation of returning to his friends 
in New Haven ; but his duty to his aged mother kept him from 
fulfilling his purpose. He leaves a wife and two children. 

Stephen Chalker Bartlett, the eldest son of Stephen R. 
and Susan (Chalker) Bartlett, was born in North Guilford, Conn., 
April 19, 1839, and died in Waterbury, Conn., of pleuro-pneumo- 
nia, after ten days' illness, Feb. 3, 1879, in his 40th year. 

Previous to his graduation he had served in the U. S. military 
hospitals at West Philadelphia, and Chester, Pa., and as acting 
assistant surgeon in the U. S. Navy in 1864-6. 



377 

On receiving his degree he entered into practice in Naugatuck, 
Conn., where he was married, Sept. 22, 1869, to Julia B., daughter 
of A. J. Pickett. In 1872 he removed to Waterbury, and there 
conducted a large practice until his death. One of his most 
important cases was a successful attempt at skin-grafting on an 
extensive scale, the patient's entire scalp having been torn off by 
the hair being caught in machinery. 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1872. 

Daniel Wardwell Wardwell, eldest son of Samuel and 
Mary A. (Stillman) Wardwell, was born in Adams, Jefferson 
County, N. Y., June 21, 1852, and died in New Orleans, La., of 
yellow fever, Sept. 28, 1878, after an illness of about four days. 

He entered the school from Rome, N. Y., and immediately after 
graduating accepted a position as assistant chemist in the coal tar 
works of Messrs. Page, Kidder & Fletcher, of New York City. 
In the spring of 1877 he entered into a ten years' contract with 
the Gas Light Company of New Orleans for furnishing its ammo- 
niacal liquor, and erected a factory in that city for the manu- 
facture of sulphate of ammonia, which he had operated with suc- 
cess for about a year, when he was stricken down with the 
prevalent fever, at the age of twenty-six. He was unmarried. 

1873. 

Charles Adams Cragin died in Wallingford, Conn., after a 
week's illness, Jan. 2, 1878, aged 36 years. The cause of his sud- 
den death was brain fever, induced by physical and mental over- 
exertion. 



SUMMARY. 





Academical Department. 




Class. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Death. 


1810 


A. Bruyn Hasbrouck, 87, 


Kingston, N. Y., 


Feb. 23, '79. 


«' 


Daniel Robert, 85, 


New Utrecht, N. Y., 


Aug. 21, '78. 


1811 


Henry Robinson, 89, 


GuDford, Conn., 


Sept. 14, '78. 


1814 


Augustus Floyd, 83, 


Mastic, N. Y., 


Sept. 25. '78. 


isn 


Augustus L. Chapin, 83, 


Galesburg, 111., 


Nov. 7, '78, 


1819 


Maltby Strong, 81, 


Rochester, N. Y., 


Aug. 5, '78. 


1820 


Henry Jones, 77, 


Bridgeport, Conn., 


Nov. 9, '78. 


1822 


Joseph H. Brainerd, 78, 


St. Albans, Yt., 


March 28, '79 


i( 


Horatio N. Brinsmade, 80, 


Newark, N. J., 


Jan. 18, '79, 


t( 


Amasa G. Porter, 75, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Apr. 29, '79. 


(( 


James W. Robbins, 77, 


Uxbridge, Mass., 


Jan. 10, '79. 


1823 


Martin B. Basse tt, 77, 


Derby, Conn., 


May 15, '79. 


it 


David Mack, 74, 


Belmont, Mass., 


July 24, '78. 


i( 


William G. YerPlanck, 77, 


Geneva, N. Y., 


March 30, '79. 


1824 


Jeremiah T. Denison, 73, 


Fairfield, Conn., 


Apr. 25, '79 


(( 


Dennis Piatt, 78, 


South Norwalk, Conn,, 


Oct. 21, '78. 


'« 


Justus Sherwood, 73, 


Southport, Conn., 


Dec. 3, '78. 


1825 


Richard Smith, 76, 


Sharon, Conn., 


Dec. 21, '78. 


1826 


James 0. Odiorne, 76, 


Wellesley, Mass., 


Feb. 5, '79. 


<( 


Robert G. Rankin, 72, 


Newburgh, N. Y., 


Aug. 29, '78. 


1828 


William Bushnell, 78, 


East Boston, Mass., 


Apr. 28, '79. 


li 


George B. Hoffman, 70, 


Baltimore, Md., 


Jan. 11, '79. 


(( 


Alfred Newton, 75, 


Norwalk, 0., 


Dec. 31, '78. 


1829 


William F. Clemson, 67, 


New York City, 


Feb. 17, '79. 


(( 


Henry Sherman, 71, 


Washington, D. C, 


March 28, '79. 


1831 


Alpheus S. Williams, 68, 


Washington, D. C, 


Dec 21, '78, 


1833 


S. Henshaw Bates, 65, 


Santa Rosa, Cal., 


Jan. 3, '79. 


1834 


John N. Kendall, 64, 


Benton, Ala., 


Aug. 18, '77. 


" 


Amasa U. Lyon, 65, 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Aug. 12, '78. 


1836 


William S. Pierson, 64, 


Keene, N. H., 


Apr. 18, '79, 


1837 


Henry WiUiams, 59, 


Savannah, Ga., 


July 11, '78, 


1839 


Charles Hammond, 65, 


Monson, Mass., 


Nov, 7, '78. 


1840 


Charles S. Shelton, 59, 


Jersey City, N. J., 


May 21, '79, 


(( 


George Thacher, 61, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Dec, 27, '78, 


1841 


Philip H. Austen, 56, 


Baltimore, Md., 


Oct, 28, '78, 


(i 


Joseph Brown, 65, 


Indianapolis, Ind., 


Aug. 11, '78, 


1842 


Horace C. Atwater, 60, 


Elizabethton, Tenn., 


Feb. 7. '79. 


(1 


Samuel Lynes, 56, 


Norwalk, Conn., 


July 29, '78. 


1843 


Eli S. Shorter, 56, 


Bufaula, Ala., 


Apr. 29, '79. 


1844 


Rockwell Emerson, 55, 


Flushing, N. Y., 


June 21, '78, 


(( 


Henrv H. Haight, 53, 


San Francisco, Cal., 


Sept. 2^, '78. 


1845 


James N. Brickell, 54, 


New Orleans, La., 


Sept. 26, '77. 


(( 


A. Flinn Dickson, 53, 


Tuscaloosa, Ala,, 


Jan. 8, '79. 


(( 


John Grant, 56, 


Newark, N, J,, 


July 5, '78. 


" 


George D. Harrington, 55, 


Washington, D. C, 


March 13, '79 


u 


Richard Taylor, 53, 


New York City, 


Apr, 12, '79, 


n 


Nathan F. Wilbur, 60. 


Piqua, 0.. 


Feb. 28, '78. 


184*7 


George G. Barnard, 50, 


New York City, 


Apr. 27, '79, 


u 


Angelo Jackson, 58, 


Washington, D. C, 


June 8, '78, 


1848 


John F. Brinton. 51, 


Philadelphia, Pa,, 


Nov, 15, '78, 



379 



Class. Name and Age. 

1849 Edward A. Arnold, 50, 
" Thomas R. Bannan, 50, 
" Charles Gr. Came, 52, 

1850 George L. Frost, 49, 

1852 Charles D. Helmer, 51, 
" Charles L. Ives, 47, 

1853 Luther G. Tarbox, 46, 
1856 Alfred Coit, 43, 

" Charles A. Swift, 40, 

1858 Isaac Riley, 43, 

" Preston I. Sweet, 42, 

1859 Robert J. Carpenter, 41, 
" T. Bradford Dwight, 41, 
" Samuel D. Faulkner, 42, 

1862 Edward C. Stone, 39, 

1863 Frank H. Bradley, 40, 

" Howard Kingsbury, 36, 

1865 Henry Armitt Brown, 33, 

1871 Frederick L. Auchincloss, 27, 

1872 Frank H. Smith, 30, 
1876 David Trumbull, 23, 



Place and 
Yincennes, Ind., 
Pottsville, Pa., 
Boston, Mass., 
Madison, Wise, 
Lockport, N. Y., 
Burlington, N. J., 
Nashville, Tenn., 
New London, Conn., 
Texas, 

Buffalo, N. Y., 
New York City, 
Beriin, N. H., 
Andover, Mass., 
Dansville, N. Y., 
Hartford, Conn., 
Nacoochee, Ga., 
Amherst, Mass., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Yokohama, Japan, 
Toledo, 0., 
New London, Conn., 



Time of Death. 
Sept. 29, '77. 
Dec. 25, '78. 
Jan. 16, '79. 
Feb. 15, '79. 
Apr. 28, '79. 
March 21, '79. 
Nov. 14, '78. 
Jan. 17, '79. 
Aug. 18, '77. 
Oct. 23, '78. 
Feb. 8, '79. 
Feb. 2, '79. 
Aug. 31, '78. 
Aug. 9, '78. 
Dec. 21, '78. 
March 27. '79. 
Sept. 28, '78. 
Aug. 21, '78. 
Nov. 17, '78. 
May 23, '79. 
July 3, '78. 



Medical Department. 



1829 Chauncey L. Cooke, 70, 

" Samuel Johnson, 73, 

1831 Alexander L. B, Monroe, 71, 

1834 WiUiam W. Ely, 67, 

" William H. Richardson, 70, 

1837 Joseph W. Clark, 66, 

1846 Edwin A. Park, 62, 

1849 Roger S. Olmstead, 52, 

1863 Newton B. Hall, 50, 

1866 Leopold A. L. Angles, 

" Stephen C. Bartlett, 39, 



New York City, 
Bozrah, Conn., 
Medway, Mass., 
Rochester, N. Y., 
North Mansfield, Conn., 
San Francisco, Cal., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Omaha, Nebr., 
Branford, Conn., 
Marseilles, France, 
Waterbury, Conn., 



Dec. 17, '78. 
Feb. 12, '79. 
Feb. 20, '79. 
March 27, '79. 
Dec. 14, '78. 
Dec. 17, '78. 
Jan. 17, '79. 
Oct. 22, '78. 
July 21, '78. 
March, '79. 
Feb. 3, '79. 



1872 
1873 



Sheffield Scientific School. 



Daniel W. Wardwell, 26, 
Charles A. Cragin, 36, 



New Orleans, La., 
Wallingford, Conn., 



Sept. 28, '78. 
Jan. 2, '78. 



The number of deaths reported above is 84 (the largest number as yet reported 
in any one issue of this Record), and the average age of the graduates of the 
Academical Department is 60 years. 

Of the 71 Academical graduates, 22 were lawyers, 13 clergymen, 11 physicians, 
9 in business, and 7 teachers. 

The deaths are distributed as follows: — in New York, 16; in Connecticut, 13; 
in Massachusetts, 8 ; in New Jersey and the District of Columbia. 4 each ; in 
Alabama, Ohio and Pennsylvania, 3 each ; in California, Georgia, Indiana, Mary- 
land, New Hampshire and Tennessee, 2 each; and the remainder in as many 
different States or countries. 



The oldest living graduate is Seth Pierce, of Cornwall, Conn., of the Class of 
1806, who was born May 15, 1785. 



IISTDEX 



Class. Page. 

1866 m Angles, Leopold A. L., 376 

1849 Arnold, PMward A., 360 

1842 At water, Horace C, 351 

ISTl Auchincloss, Frederick L., . 3*71 

1841 Austen, Philip H., 350 

1849 Bannan, Thomas R., 361 

184*7 Barnard, George G., 359 

1866 m Bartlett, Stephen C, 3*76 

1823 Bassett, Martin B., 336 

1833 Bates, S. Henshaw, 345 

1863 Bradley, Frank H., 369 

1822 Brainerd, Joseph K., 333 

1845 Brickell, James N., 354 

1822 Brinsmade, Horatio N., ,._ 334 

1848 Brinton, John F., 360 

1865 Brown, Henry A., 3*70 

1841 Brown, Joseph,. 351 

1828 Bushnell, William, 341 

1849 Came, Charles G., 361 

1859 Carpenter, Robert J,, 366 

181*7 Chapin, Augustus L., 331 

183*7 m Clark, Joseph W., 3*74 

1829 Clemson, William F., 343 

1856 Coit, AHred, 364 

1829 m Cooke, Chauncey L.,_ 3*73 

18*73 p Cragin, Charles A., 3*7*7 

1824 Denison, Jeremiah T., 338 

1845 Dickson, A. Flinn, 354 

1859 Dwight, T. Bradford, 36*7 

1 834 w Ely, WilHam W., _ 3*74 

1848 Emerson, Rockwell, 353 

1859 Faulkner, Samuel D., 36*7 

1814 Floyd, Augustus, 331 

1850 Frost, George L., 362 

1845 Grant, John, 355 

1 844 Haight, Henry H., 353 

] 863 m Hall, Newton B., _ 376 

1839 Hammond, Charles, 348 

1845 Harrington, George D., -_ _ 356 

1810 Hasbrouck, A. Brayn, 329 

1852 Helmer, Charles D., 362 

1828 Hoffman, George B., 342 



Class. Page. 

1852 Ives, Charles L., 363 

1847 Jackson, Angelo, 359 

1829 m Johnson, Samuel, 373 

1820 Jones, Henry, 333 

1 834 Kendall, John N., 346 

18 i3 Kingsbury, Howard, 370 

1842 Lynes, Samuel, _ 352 

1834 Lyon, Amasa TJ., 346 

1823 Mack, David, 337 

1831 m Monroe, .Alexander L. B., _ 373 

1828 Newton, Alfred, _ 342 

1826 Odiorne, James C, 340 

1849 m Olmstead, Roger S., 375 

1846 m Park, Edwin A., .._ 375 

1836 Pierson, William S., _ 347 

1824 Piatt, Dennis, 338 

1822 Porter, Amasa G., _ 335 

1826 Rankin, Robert G., .341 

1834 m Richardson, William H., .. 374 

1858 Riley, Isaac,. 365 

1822 Robbins, James W., 335 

1810 Robert, Daniel, 330 

1811 Robinson, Henry,. 330 

1840 Shelton, Charles S., 349 

1829 Sherman, Henry, 343 

1824 Sherwood, Justus, 339 

1843 Shorter, Eli S., 352 

1872 Smith, Frank H., 371 

1 825 Smith, Richard, 339 

1862 Stone, Edward C, 368 

1819 Strong, Maltby, 332 

1858 Sweet, Preston L, 366 

1856 Swift, Charles A.,... 365 

1853 Tarbox, Luther G., 364 

1845 Taylor, Richard, 357 

1 840 Thacher, George, I 349 

1876 Trumbull, David, 372 

1823 VerPlanck, Wilham G., _._ 337 

1872 p Wardwell, Daniel W., 377 

1845 Wilbur, Nathan F., 358 

1831 Williams, Alpheus S 344 

1837 Williams, Henry, 348 




OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 
June, 1S80. 

[PRESEIVTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMNI, JUNE 30tli, 1880.] 
[No. 10 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 39 of the whole Record.] 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year endhig in 

June, 1880. 

[Presented at the Meeting op the Alumni, June 25, 1880.] 

[No. 10 of the Second Printed Series, and No. 39 of the whole Record.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1809. 

Burr Baldwin was born in Weston, Fairfield County, Conn., 
Jan. 19, 1Y89. 

After liaving tauglit, chiefly in tlie Newarl: (N. J.) Academy, lie 
entered Andover (Mass.) Theol. Seminary in the spring of 1811, 
but was obliged by ill-health to leave in 1813, without having 
completed the full course. After a few months, having partly 
regained his health, he became the principal of the academy in 
which he had formerly taught, where he remained until able, in 
1816, to undertake home missionary work in the Ohio valley. He 
was ordained as an evangelist by the Litchfield (Conn.) South 
Association of Congregational ministers, June 2, 1819, and was 
employed with acceptance in various missionary labors in New 
Jersey and New York, until 1824, when he was settled over the 
Presbyterian Church in Montrose, Pa. From this charge he 
was dismissed in 1829, and was installed, Feb. 17, 1830, as the 
first pastor of the North Congregational Church in New Hart- 
ford, Conn. After three years' service he was dismissed, and 
supplied various pulpits until his installation over the Congrega- 
tional Church in Ashfield, Mass., April 20, 1836. He was dis- 
missed from Ashfield in September, 1838, and then established 



884 

a school in Newark (N. J.), which employed his time until the 
autumn of 1847. For the rest of his life his residence was in 
Montrose, Pa., while he was mainly and very usefully occupied 
in missionary work in that neighborhood and elsewhere. Daring 
the late civil war he was for two years post-chaplain at Bei^erly, 
W. Va. On the last Sabbath of the year 1879, he fell while on 
the way to church, and the shock to his system probably hastened 
his death, which occurred in Montrose, Jan. 23, 1880, at the age 
of 91 years. His failure of health in early life prevented the ful- 
filment of his purpose of becoming a foreign missionary, but his 
career in connection with the preaching of the gospel at home was 
eminently useful. He was also influential in the early introduction 
of Sabbath schools, and in the organization of the American Colo- 
nization Society. He was first married, Nov. 17, 1829, to Cornelia 
C. Keen, by whom he had six sons and two daughters. She died 
Oct. 2, 1854. He was again married, Apr. 25, 1857, to Mrs. Char- 
lotte A. Beach who survives him. He had been since 1875 the 
last survivor of his class, and was with one exception the oldest 
living graduate of the College. 



1815. 

William Courtney Wetmoee, third son of Victory and Katha- 
rine M. (McEwen) Wetmore, of Stratford, Conn., was born in 
that town, Oct. 12, 1796. 

He studied law in the Litchfield (Conn.) Law School, and about 
1818 entered the office of Messrs. Brackett & Clark, in New York 
City, afterwards becoming a partner in the firm. From 1 848 he 
was connected in business with Mr. Richard Bowne. From his 
admission to the bar he made a specialty of the law of real estate, 
and was chiefly occupied with conveyancing and with the admin- 
istration of trusts. He refused all offers of public position, but 
had served for three years before his death as President of the 
Board of Commissioners of the Central Park. He resided in New 
York City until about 1868, when he removed to Fordham, N. 
Y., where he remained until October, 1879, when he returned to 
the city. After having been in feeble health for some months, he 
died in New York, March 22, 1880, in his 84th year, of an organic 
disease of the heart. 

He married Miss Elizabeth Lovejoy, who survives him, with 
four sons and a dauo;hter. 



385 

1818. 

Samuel Howard Huntington, third son of Hon. Hezekiah 
and Susan (Kent) Huntington, was born in Suffield, Conn., Dec. 
14, 1793. In 1813 his father removed to Hartford, Conn., from 
which place he entered college. After graduation he studied 
law, and was admitted to the bar in Hartford, where he continued 
in practice. Besides the duties of his profession, he served in 
1829 as clerk of the State Senate, and was for three years (in 1842, 
1846 and 1850) judge of the County Court. On the establish- 
ment of the Court of Claims in Washington, D. C, in 1855, he 
was appointed its chief clerk, and held that position for most of 
the rest of his life. He was from 1830 to 1858 a trustee of Trinity 
College, and for many years one of the leading laymen in connec- 
tion with the Protestant Episcopal Church of Connecticut. He 
died at his residence in Hartford, after a brief illness, Feb. 4, 
1880, in the 87th year of his age. 

Judge Huntington was married, Oct. 25, 1825, to Catharine H., 
daughter of George Brinley, of Boston. She died July 21, 1832, 
and he was again married, Oct. 19, 1835, to Sarah B., daughter 
of Robert Watkinson, of Hartford, who died a few years before 
him. By his second marriage he had four daughters and three 
sons, all of whom survive him. One son was graduated at this 
college in 1863, and another at Trinity College in 1867. 

1820. 

Nathaniel Alpheus Pkatt, sixth son of Ezra and Temperance 
(Southworth) Pratt, was born in that part of Saybrook which is 
now the town of Essex, Conn., Jan. 29, 1796. 

For the three years after graduation he studied in Princeton 
Theological Seminary, and on the 25th of February, 1824, he was 
ordained to the work of the ministry by the Presbytery of New 
Brunswick, at Shrewsbury, N. J. After supplying the church 
in Shrewsbury for upwards of two years, he went to Georgia, and 
was installed over the Presbyterian church in Darien in April, 
1827. From this charge he was dismissed, April 2, 1840, and in 
the following month he removed to Roswell, Ga., where he 
gathered a church, over which he was installed as pastor, Sept. 
17, 1842, and where he continued to labor faithfully till his death. 
He was stricken with paralysis on March 20, 1879, but although 
he partially rallied from this attack, his power of speech did not 
return. He died suddenly, Aug. 30, 1879, in his 84th year. 



386 

He was married in March, 1830, to Miss Catharine B., daughter 
of Roswell King, of Darien. She survives him, with seven of 
their ten children. The degree of D.D. was given him by Ogle- 
thorpe University in 1864. 



1822. 

Lot Norton, son of Lot and Mary (Hickok) Norton, was born 
in the village of Lakeville, in Salisbury, Conn., Jan. 15, 1803. 

He settled as a farmer on his paternal estate, and lived there 
quietly through his life. In 1857 he was a member of the State 
Legislature. On Saturday, May 29, 1880, he went to the village 
church to attend the public exercises in honor of " Memorial 
Day," and fell dead as he was entering the building. 

He was married, Sept. 6, 1826, to Martha, daughter of Dea. 
Eliphalet Whittlesey, of Salisbury, who died Oct. 29, 1867. Of 
their six children, two daughters and one son are still living. 



1825. 

John Jay Abernethy, son of Roswell Abernethy, M.D., was 
born in Harwinton, Conn., Dec. 26, 1805. In the year of his 
graduation his father removed to Woodbury, Conn., and there 
the son acquired his earliest training in medicine. In 1828 he 
took the degree of M.D. at the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons in New York City, and in February, 1837, he entered the 
naval service of the U. S. as assistant Surgeon. During his fif- 
teen years of sea-service he served in the Pacific Squadron, and 
in the Mexican war ; and during the late rebellion he was in the 
Atlantic blockading squadron, though on the retired list. His 
last promotion was in March, 1871, to the position of Medical 
Director, with the rank of Captain; shortly after this date he 
retired from the service, and the last years of his life were spent 
in New York City. 

His only brother's death, early in 1878, gave a shock to his own 
health, from which he never recovered. Attacked at first with 
symptoms of heart disease, he gradually failed, and died in New 
York, Oct. 28, 1879, in his 74th year. He was unmarried. 

By his last will he made provision for the establishment, after 
the death of a relative, of a fellowship in this college by an endow- 
ment of $10,000. 



387 



1827. 



Joseph Gushing, son of Joseph Gushing, of Amherst, N. H., 
was born in Amherst, Dec. 11, 1806. In 1809 his father removed 
to Baltimore, Md., and there entered into the book and stationery 
business, in which his son joined him on his return from college. 
In 1829 Mr. Joseph Gushing, Jr., became a member of the firm, 
in which he continued until his retirement in 1877. He had been 
in declining health for some years, and was at Bedford Springs, 
Pa., with his daughter, when he died, somewhat suddenly, July 6, 
1879, aged 72^ years. 

He was married in 1832 to a daughter of Dr. Golin Mackenzie, 
of Baltimore. One of his sons graduated at Harvard Gollege in 
1855. 

1828. 

David Ely Bartlett, second son of Rev. Shubael Bartlett 
(Y. G. 1800) and Fanny (Leffingwell) Bartlett, was born in East 
Windsor, Gonn. (where his father held the pastorate for over fifty 
years), Sept. 29, 1805, and died in Hartford, Gonn., Nov. 29, 1879, 
aged 74 years. 

His whole life after leaving Gollege was devoted to the educa- 
tion of the deaf and dumb. Until 1 832 he was connected with 
the American Asylum in Hartford, and then for nearly twenty 
years with the Institution in New York Gity, during which time 
he took a partial course in the Union Theological Seminary, to fit 
himself for the work of a minister to those whom he was teach- 
ing. In 1852 he resigned his situation as senior teacher in the 
N. Y. Institution, and for several years resided in Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., supervising a private school in his family for younger deaf- 
mute children than were then admitted into public institutions. 
The experiment proved the expediency of such instruction, but 
was financially disastrous, and in 1860 Mr. Bartlett accepted an 
invitation to return to the American Asylum at Hartford, where 
he was actively engaged until his sudden death, after only two 
weeks of feebleness. His remarkable power of making himself 
understood by his pupils, his unwearied industry, and his wonder- 
ful sympathy made him extraordinarily beloved as a teacher ; 
while the transparency and enthusiasm of his character won the 
high regard of all who came in contact with him. 

He was married, July 15, 1846, to Miss Fanny P., daughter of 
Theodore Hinsdale, Esq., of Pittsfield, Mass. She survives him 



388 

with three daughters and one son. The son graduated at this 
College in 1816, and succeeds his father in his work as a teacher 
in Hartford 

1828. 

Alfued Blackman, son of Samuel C. Blackman (Y. C. 1793), 
was born in Newtown, Conn., Dec. 28, 1807. 

Immediately after graduation he began the study of law in the 
office of his father, a Judge of Probate for the district, and in 
1830 he was admitted to the bar. In 1832 he removed to the vil- 
lage of Humphreysville, now the town of Seymour, Conn., and 
practiced there until 1842, when he removed to Waterbury, Conn., 
to perform the duties of Judge of Probate. In the fall of 1 844 he 
transferred his residence to New Haven, Conn., where he re- 
mained until his death. In 1842 he was elected to the State Sen- 
ate, and in 1851 was appointed Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas, then known as the County Court, which office he consented 
to hold only for a single year. In 1852 he was appointed clerk 
of the U. S. District Court, which position he held until 1868. In 
1855 he was elected a representative to the General Assembly, 
l)eing the first Democrat elected to that office from New Haven 
since 1833. While engaged in the discharge of his duties as rep- 
resentative he was elected Mayor of the City ; he held the office 
for one year, declining a re-nomination. He remained in practice 
until 1869, when owing to the decline of his health he retired 
from active life, after a brilliant career as an advocate. He died 
in New Haven, Apr. 2^, 1880, in his 73d year, after a long illness. 

He was married, in 1832, to Miss Abbie Beers, of Newtown, 
w^ho survives him. Their two sons graduated at this College in 
1854 and 1857, — the younger only being now living. 

1829. 

Henry Augustus Boardman was born in Troy, N. Y., Jan. 9, 
1808. 

In the fall of 1830 he entered the Theological Seminary in 
Princeton, N. J., and in April, 1833, was licensed to preacTi. In 
September, 1833, he was called to the pastorate of the Tenth Pres- 
byterian Church of Philadelphia, over which he was duly installed, 
Nov. 8, 1833, and of which he continued in charge until May, 
1876, when he became Pastor Emeritus. After an interval of 
feeble health, he died in Philadelphia, June 15, 1880, aged 72 



889 

years. During his long and eminent pastorate, he was repeatedly 
called to other fields of labor, — notably in May, 1853, to the chair 
of Pastoral Theology in Princeton Seminary. He published many 
volumes and pamphlets, on theological subjects. The degree of 
D.D. was conferred on him by Marshall College. 

He leaves three sons and two daughters, one son being a grad- 
uate of this College in the Class of 1859. 

Francis Gillette, the youngest child of Ashbel and Achsah 
(Francis) Gillett, was born in that part of the old town of Wind- 
sor then known as Wintonbury, but now included in the town of 
Bloomfield, Conn., Dec. 14, 1807. His father, a farmer and a 
preacher to the small Baptist Society in Wintonbury parish, died 
in 1814, and the son's education at College was only accom- 
plished after bitter opposition from his natural guardians. 

After graduation he entered a law office, but his health having 
become impaired, he settled upon his patrimonial estate as a 
farmer. In 1832 he represented the town of Windsor in the Leg- 
islature, and in 1838 received a similar appointment from the new 
town of Bloomfield. During the session of the latter year he 
made himself prominent by anti-slavery utterances, and in 1841 
was nominated for Governor by the Liberty party, and the nomi- 
nation was frequently repeated during following years by the 
same party and by the Free Soilers. He removed to Hartford in 
1852, and in 1854 was elected by the Legislature to fill an unex- 
pired term of a single year in the U. S. Senate, through a coa- 
lition of Whigs, temperance advocates, and Free Soilers. At a 
later time he was one of the founders of the Republican party in 
Connecticut. 

After having been in feeble health for two or three years, he 
died suddenly at his residence in Hartford, Sept. 30, 1879, of 
paralysis of the heart. He was married, Sept. 10, 1834, to Eliza 
D., daughter of Edward Hooker (Y. C. 1805), of Farmington, 
Conn. She survives him, with three of their six children. One 
of the sons is now a member of Congress from Iowa. 

1830. 

John Cotton Smith, son of Deacon Wm. M. Smith (Y. C. 1805) 
and Helen (Livingston) Smith, was born in Sharon, Conn., March 
21, 1810. 

After graduation he pursued for a time the study of law, but 



390 

never engaged in practice. His residence was the old family 
homestead in Sharon, where he died of heart disease, Nov. 2, 1879, 
in his 70th year. He was elected to the State Legislature in 
1833, and also in 1842, 1853, 1854, 1870 and 1876. In politics he 
was a Democrat, and represented the State in three national 
conventions, those of 1835, 1844 and 1856. He received the votes 
of his political friends in 1839, and again in 1845, for a seat in 
Congress, but was defeated. He was also the unsuccessful candi- 
date for the lieutenant-govenorship in 1858, and in June of the 
same year was appointed by President Buchanan minister resi- 
dent to the republic of Bolivia, which position he resigned in 
February, 1861. 

He married about 1845 Mrs. Huder, formerly Miss Bishop, of 
New Haven, and spent the years from 1846 to 1850 in European 
travel. Mrs. Smith died some years ago, without children. 

1831. 

Henry Bates Camp, son of Dennis and Anna Camp, was born 
in Durham, Conn., Dec. 10, 1809. 

He began the study of theology in the Yale Divinity School, 
and completed his course at the Princeton Theological Seminary. 
In August, 1835, he was ordained pastor of the Congregational 
Church in North Branford, Conn., but resigned this charge in 
August, 1836, on account of ill-health. In 1837 he became an 
instructor in the American Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb, at 
Hartford, Conn., where he taught until 1864. The rest of his life 
was spent in retirement in Hartford, where he died quite suddenly, 
Feb. 16, 1880, aged 70 years. 

He married, May 21, 1835, Cornelia L. Baldwin, of North Guil- 
ford, Conn., who died about two years before him. Three daugh- 
ters survive their parents, two sons having died before them, — the 
elder being a graduate of this college in the Class of 1860. 

William Hemphill Jones, eldest son of Morgan and Mary 
(Hemphill) Jones, was born in Wilmington, Del., Oct. 26, 1811. 

He studied law in Philadelphia with Hon. Joseph R. Ingersoll, 
and when admitted to the bar returned to Wilmington. Soon 
tiring of the practice of his profession, he devoted himself to the 
more congenial pursuits of political life. In 1836 he was Secre- 
tary of State; then member of the legislature; and in 1851 was 
Mayor of Wilmington, being the first to hold the office by popu- 



391 

lar election. Soon after, on his removal to the city of Washing- 
ton, he was appointed to a position in the Treasury Department, 
and in December, 1858, was made Chief Clerk in the office of the 
First Comptroller, and during his long service in that position 
was repeatedly intrusted with trusts of the highest responsibility, 
which he executed with fidelity and success. July 1, 1875, he 
was appointed Deputy First Comptroller of the Treasury, but held 
this office only until Sept. 4, 1876. At the opening of the 45th 
Congress, in December, 1877, he was made Secretary of the Com- 
mittee of Ways and Means of the House of Representatives, a 
place for which he proved to be peculiarly fitted by his fund of 
information and his unfailing courtesy. He died in Washington, 
April 30, 1880, in his 69th year, of pneumonia, after a few days' 
illness. 

He leaves a widow, daughter of Allan Thomson, of Wilming- 
ton, and one daughter. 

BoLLiN Sanford died at his residence in New York City, Dec. 
2, 1879, in the 74th year of his age. He was a native of Vermont, 
but in his early youth his father removed to Litchfield South 
Farms, now Morris, Conn., from which place he entered College. 

He studied law in the Litchfield Law School, and was admitted 
to the bar, Apr. 2, 1832. In the following summer he removed to 
Auburn, N. Y., and entered the office of Wm. H, Seward, where 
he continued until 1834 when he opened an office in New York 
City with Hon. Lewis B. Woodruff (Y. C. 1830). In 1836 a 
severe illness with inflammation of the lungs obliged him to relin- 
quish the practice of his profession for a more active life. He 
then became connected with the management of the Stamford 
Manufacturing Company, which had its office in New York and 
extensive factories of dyestuffs, etc., in Stamford, Conn. He con- 
tinued to be a director and large shareholder in this corporation 
until his death. 

Mr. Sanford was first married to a sister of Judge O. S. Sey- 
mour (Y. C. 1824), of Litchfield, who died without children. By 
his second wife. Miss Wright, of Brooklyn, N. Y., he had a son 
and a daughter, who are both deceased. His third wife. Miss Clo- 
rinda Harrison, of Brooklyn, is still living, as are two of her sons. 
Mr. Sanford was warmly interested in the prosperity of the Col- 
lege, and at different times contributed efficiently to movements 
for its enlargement — especially in connection with the Fund 
raised in 1854. 



392 



1832. 



Samuel Robbins Brown, only son of Timothy H. and Phebe 
(Hinsdale) Brown, was born iij Scantic Parish, in East Windsor, 
Conn., June 16, 1810. In 1818 his father removed to Monson, 
Mass., in order to avail himself of the advantages of the academy 
there in the education of his children ; and from that place the 
son entered Amherst College, in 1828. Three months later he 
removed to this College, and though greatly hampered by pov- 
erty succeeded in finishing the course without interruption. He 
then spent three years and a half as a teacher in the N. Y. Insti- 
tution for the Deaf and Dumb, earning money to pay his father's 
debts. In 1835, he went to Columbia, S. C, for the sake of the 
milder climate, and studied theology for two years in the Presby- 
terian Theol. Seminary. Returning to New York, he finished his 
studies at the Union Seminary, and was accepted by the Ameri- 
can Board as a foreign missionary. Before the Board could pro- 
vide a place for him, he was invited to go to China, in the service 
of the Morrison Education Society, as a teacher. In October, 
1838, he was married to Elizabeth G., daughter of Rev. Shubael 
Bartlett (Y. C. 1800), of East Windsor, and was ordained at New 
York on the following day, and sailed the same month for his post. 
He taught in Macao till 1842, and then in Hongkong until 1847, 
when he was obliged to return to America by his wife's protracted 
illness. For two years and a half, 1848-51, he had charge of an 
academy in Rome, N. Y. In 1 851 he went to the outlet of Owasco 
Lake, near Auburn, N. Y., as pastor of a very feeble Reformed 
Dutch Church, which was greatly strengthened by his care of it 
for eight years. Early in 1859 the Reformed Dutch Church's 
Board of Foreign Missions determined to send a mission to Japan, 
and Mr. Brown was appointed one of the missionaries. He sailed 
for China in April, 1859, and in November established himself in 
Japan, which continued to be his residence (with the exception of 
the period from June, 1867, to August, 1869, when he visited the 
United States), until July, 1879, when protracted illness obliged 
him to return to this country. He died in Monson, Mass., June 
20, 1880, aged 70 years. His wife survives him, with two sons 
and two daughters. The degree of Doctor of Divinity was con- 
ferred on him by the University of the City of New^ York in 1867. 

To Dr. Brown's influence by means of his pupils much of the 
recent development of China is justly due. His work in Japan 
was even more strikingly useful, in connection with education and 



39B 

the study of the Japanese language and the translation of the 
Bible. 

Martin Kellogg was born in Newington, then a parish of 
Wethersfield, Conn., Nov. 4, 1810. He was the son of Gen. 
Martin Kellogg and of Mary, daughter of Gen. Roger Welles 
(Y. C. 1775). He entered college in 1827, but spent only a part 
of the first year with that class. 

For two years after graduation he had charge of the academy 
in Sunbury, Gates County, N. C. He then spent six years 
in Illinois, after which he returned to North Carolina as a 
teacher. In March, 1849, he married Patience B., daughter of 
John C. Gordon, of Gates County, and until 1861 he continued 
engaged in his vocation. His wife died in September, 1 869, leav- 
ing two sons and three daughters. The younger son graduates 
from Amherst College this summer. 

His own residence continued at Sunbury until his death. He 
was brought North in an invalid conditio q in the summer of 
1879, and died Sept. 9, while in the City Hospital in Hartford, 
Conn., where he had placed himself for a surgical operation. 

1834. 

William Ives Budington was born in New Haven, Conn., 
April 21, 1815, the son of William and Lydia (Ives) Budington. 

After graduating he taught in the academy in New Canaan, 
Conn., for nearly a year, and then began a three years' course in 
the Yale Divinity School. The year 1838-9 he spent as a resident 
licentiate in the Andover Theological Seminary. He was or- 
dained pastor of the First Church (Congregational) in Charles- 
town, Mass., April 22, 1840, and fulfilled a happy and prosperous 
ministry there, until reasons connected with an impaired state of 
health led him to resign the charge, Sept. 22, 1854. He assumed 
at once the pastoral care of the Western Presbyterian Church in 
Philadelphia, Pa., but the death of his wife and other reasons led 
him to relinquish this position in the following April, when he 
removed to the Clinton Avenue Congregational Church in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., over which he was installed, Dec. 19, 1855. His 
ministry in Brooklyn was from the first highly esteemed, and the 
office was only laid down on account of the disease from which he 
died. In 1877 he was attacked with cancer of the lip, which after 
three operations still reappeared, each time in a more troublesome 



394 

form. He resigned his pastoral office, Dec. 22, 1878, and died in 
Brooklyn, Nov. 29, 1879, in his 65th year. 

He was married, Jan. 5, 1841, to Miss Elizabeth L., daughter 
of William Gunton, of Washington, D. C, who died Dec. 24, 
1854. He was again married, April 7, 1857, to Mrs. Elizabeth W. 
Nicholson, of Canandaigua, N. Y., who survives him. His chil- 
dren, three daughters and two sons by the first marriage, and 
one son by the second marriage, all survive him. 

He published (in 1845) an admirably written History of the First 
Church in Charlestown; also several occasional sermons and 
review-articles. The degree of D.D. was conferred on him by 
Amherst College in 1856. 

Reuben Gaylord was born in Norfolk, Conn., Apr. 28, 1812, 
the seventh child of Reuben and Mary (Curtiss) Gaylord. 

He taught an Academy in New Preston, Conn., for the winter 
after graduation, and from the spring of 1835 till the summer of 
1837 had charge of the preparatory department of Illinois Col- 
lege, at Jacksonville, 111. Meantime he was pursuing theological 
studies under Rev. Edward Beecher (Y. C. 1822), and after spend- 
ing a year in the Yale Divinity School, was ordained as an Evan- 
gelist, at Terryville, Conn., in August, 1838. He spent one year 
in the work of the ministry in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, and then 
took charge of the church in Danville, in the same State. He 
was dismissed from this pastorate, Nov. 7, 1855, and removed to 
Omaha, Nebraska, where he formed the first Congregational 
Church in that Territory, of which he was installed pastor. May 
4, 1856. While visiting the East on his first vacation, in the 
summer of 1864, he accepted the agency of the American Home 
Missionary Society for Nebraska and western Iowa, and in conse- 
quence was dismissed from his pastorate, on the 15th of the fol- 
lowing November. For six years he devoted himself with 
earnest fidelity to this new service, until in consequence of over- 
work he was stricken with a slight attack of partial paralysis, 
which obliged him to resign his office in May, 1870. He still 
continued to explore destitute parts of the country in behalf of 
the same Society, and to preach to settlements in the vicinity of 
his residence. From 1876 he supplied the church in Fontenelle, 
one of the many founded by him, and died there, of paralysis, 
Jan. 10, 1880, in his 68th year. 

He was married, Oct. 13, 1838, to Miss Sarah Burton, of Beth- 



395 

lem, Conn., who died less than two years after. He was again 
married, Nov. 8, 1841, to Miss Mary M. Welles, of Hartford, Iowa, 
who survives him, with one daughter and one son (a graduate of 
Iowa College). 

1835. 

AsHBEL Bradford Haile was born in Poultney, Vt., in 1806, 
and died in Norwich, Conn., March 9, 1880, aged 74 years. When 
he was two years of age his father removed to Gouverneur, St. 
Lawrence County, N. Y., then a wilderness settlement. He grew 
up as a farmer's boy, and after reaching his majority earned by 
teaching the means for completing his education, and entered the 
Junior Class of this college in 1833. 

On graduation he took the full course in the Yale Divinity 
School and was licensed to preach in 1838. He saw reasons, 
however, for a change of plan, and in 1839 entered the Yale Med- 
ical School, from which he graduated in 1 842. He then settled 
in Norwich, Conn., where he continued (with the exception of a 
residence in California from 1852 to 1855), successful and highly 
respected in the practice of the medical profession, until his last 
illness, which began about two years before his death. He mar- 
ried Miss Mary May, of Norwich, who survives him with one 
daughter. 

William McLellan, the son of Dr. John McLellan, a well 
known physician of Greencastle, Franklin County, Pa., was born 
in that town. May 8, 1815. 

After leaving college he taught school for a short time in his 
native place, and then began the study of the law in Chambers- 
burg, the county seat, under the direction of his uncle, Hon. 
Thomas G. McCulloh. He was admitted to the bar, Oct. 2, 1838, 
and went to Monroe, Mich., to begin practice. But he preferred 
his old surroundings, and in 1841 returned to his father's house, 
where he remained without regular occupation till 1846. He 
then removed to Chambersburg and entered on the active prac- 
tice of his profession, and on February 2, J 847, was married to 
Miss Ellen Cheney, of Washington County, Md. After 1874, he 
devoted himself chiefly to his private affairs, being no longer in 
vigorous health, and in May, 1878, he was stricken with paralysis. 
He partially recovered, but in August, 1879, was again attacked, 
and the third stroke proved fatal on Oct. 21. 



896 

His wife survives him with three daughters and a son, — a sec- 
ond son havinpj died since his father. 

He was distinguished in his profession, and exercised a wide in- 
fluence in public affairs in his native county. 

Aaron Snow, son of Freeman G. and Jane (Reed) Snow, was 
born at Centerbrook, in Say brook, Conn., June 26, 1804. After 
he had learned a trade and had started in business, at the age of 
24 he became a christian and resolved to seek an education, in 
order to preach the gospel. 

He studied theology in the Yale Divini,ty School, where he 
completed the course in 1838. In October, 1840, he was called to 
settle over the Congregational Church in the parish of East 
Glastonbury (now Buckingham), Conn., where he was ordained 
Apr. 18, 1841. From this charge he was dismissed. May 19, 
1862, and in the same year began to supply the pulpit of the 
Mount Sinai Congregational Church in the township of Brook- 
haven (L. I.), N. Y. In June, 1875, he retired from this service on 
account of infirmity, and soon after removed to Essex (formerly a 
part of Saybrook), Conn., where he died, after a short illness, 
March 1, 1880, in his 76th year. 

He was three times married : (1) to Sarah Ann, daughter of 
Calvin Hoit, of Stamford, Conn., May 9, 1841, who died Dec. 4, 
1841 ; (2), in November, 1843, to Mary B. Treat, of Glaston- 
bury, who died July 31, 1845; (3), November 11, 1846, to Abi- 
gail Hovey, of Ashford, Conn., who survives him. Two daugh- 
ters, one by the second and one by the third marriage, are also 
living. 

1836. 

Joshua F. Pearl, son of John M. and Achsah (Fenton) Pearl, 
was born in Belchertown, Mass., May 3, 1808. 

Upon graduation he began teaching in the Fair Haven Acad- 
emy in New Haven, where he continued for five or six years. 
He next taught for brief periods in his native town and in War- 
ren, Mass. In 1845 he went to Natchez, and organized there the 
first free school established in Mississippi. Later, he again re- 
turned to New Haven and taught for some years, and was then in- 
vited to Memphis, Tenn., to organize and superintend the free 
schools about to be started there. He next went to Nashville, 
Tenn., as Superintendent of Public Instruction, and remained in 



897 

that position until the breaking out of the civil war, when he 
went to Detroit, Mich., as principal of a Female Seminary. After 
the close of the war he was called on to reorganize the Nashville 
schools, and to resume his old position there, but he was obliged 
to resign after a few months on account of impaired health. He 
afterwards resided for a few years in New Haven. He died of 
bronchial phthisis in Belchertown, Mass., Oct. 18, 1879, aged 71 
years. 

He was married. May 2, 1837, to Louisa, daughter of Luther 
Brown, of Ware, Mass., who survives him. They had one son 
and three daughters ; two daughters are still living. 

1838. 

Lot Curran Clark was born in Norwich, Chenango County, 
N. Y., June 20, 1819, the son of Lot and Lavinia (Crosby) Clark. 
He entered College at the beginning of the Sophomore year, from 
St. Augustine, Fla., where his father was then living. 

Upon graduation he began the study of law in the office of 
Hon. Esek Cowen, at Saratoga Springs, N. Y. ; and after further 
studies in Lockport, N. Y., and in New York City, was admitted 
as an attorney in 1840. In December of the same year he opened 
an office in Port Richmond, Staten Island. In the following Sep- 
tember he was appointed District Attorney of Richmond County 
and served for six years, until the office was made elective. He 
was then elected for a term of three years, but resigned before the 
expiration of that period. This, with the exception of some 
trusts in connection with the common schools, was the only public 
office which he ever filled. He continued to reside on Staten 
Island, where he had first gone for his health, until 1872, having 
during most of the time an office in the city of New York as well 
as one in Port Richmond. In 1867, however, his health was so 
much broken by professional labor and hereditary tendency to 
asthma, that he was obliged to give up his business, and did not 
again resume it. At different periods he made six visits to 
Europe and one to the Rocky Mountains, for the benefit of his 
health. In 1872 he removed his residence to New York City, 
where he died of typhoid pneumonia, Feb. 11, 1880, in his 61st 
year. 

He was married, Nov. 9, 1859, to Frances S., daughter of Rev. 
Theodore Irving, of Staten Island. She survives him with their 
only child, a daughter. 

26 



398 

Joseph Parrish Thompson, son of Isaac and Mary Anne 
Thompson, was born in Philadelphia, Aug. 7, 1819. 

After beginning a theological course at the Andover (Mass.) 
Seminary, he continued his studies in the Yale Divinity School, 
and before he had reached his majority was invited- to become 
the pastor of the Chapel Street Congregational Church (now the 
Church of the Redeemer) in New Haven. Over this church he 
was ordained, Oct. 28, 1840. From this charge he was dismissed 
March 31, 1845, to become the first pastor of the church worship- 
ing in the Broadway Tabernacle in New York. He continued 
as pastor of the leading Congregational Church in that city, from 
April 15, 1845, until Nov. 15, 1871, when on account of the failure 
of his health he was obliged to resign his charge. During these 
years of eminently successful pastoral work and of distinguished 
pulpit power, he was also largely influential through the press, 
publishing some twenty volumes, and acting as editor-in-chief of 
The Independent^ a weekly newspaper, from its establishment in 
1848 till 1862. When relieved from parish labor, he devoted 
himself to study and authorship exclusively ; choosing for these 
purposes a residence in Berlin, Germany. He was especially ab- 
sorbed in studies in Egyptology, ^nd also contributed largely to 
the proceedings of numerous international congresses on the law 
of nations, geographical research, the regulation of trade, peace, 
education, and other subjects. He was, moreover, very active 
with his pen in explaining the history and polity of the United 
States to European minds. 

He died in Berlin, Sept. 20, 1879, aged 60 years. 

He was married. May 5, 184J, to Lucy O., daughter of James 
Bartlett, of Portsmouth, N. H. She died Jan. 27, 1852, and he 
was again married, Oct. 25, 1853, to Elizabeth C, daughter of 
Wm. C. Gilman, of New York City, who survives him with her 
only son, a graduate of the Sheffield Scientific School in 1877. 
Of the four children by his first marriage, two daughters and a 
son are still living, — one son having lost his life in the war of the 
rebellion. 

Dr. Thompson received the degree of D.D. from Harvard Col- 
lege in 1856, and that of LL.D. from the University of the City of 
New York in 1868. 



399 



1839. 



William Herbert Norris was born Nov. 4, 1814, and entered 
College as a resident of Alexandria, D. C. 

He studied for the Protestant Episcopal ministry and was for 
many years rector of a church in Carlisle, Pa. His next settle- 
ment, after an interval of rest in Philadelphia, was as rector of 
Christ Church, Woodbury, N. J., for twenty years from 1855. 
The remainder of his life was spent in retirement in Philadelphia, 
where he died Feb. 18, 1880, in his OGth year. He was married 
in 1840, and lost a son from a wound received at the battle of 
Antietam. 

1840. 

William Bartlett Brinsmade, son of Daniel B. and Mary W. 
(Gold) Brinsmade, of Washington, Conn., was born in that town. 
May 10, 1819. 

He became a civil engineer, and was employed largely in rail- 
road construction in Connecticut and Massachusetts. In 1856 he 
was made Superintendent of the Conn. River Railroad, and 
retained that position until 1868, when he was obliged to give up 
work on account of ill-health. A trip to Europe failed to restore 
him, and he i-emained an invalid until his death. His residence 
was for many years in Springfield, Mass., but about 1876 he was 
taken to Litchfield, (/onn., where he remained in a private insti- 
tution for nervous diseases. On the evening of May 15, 1880, he 
was suffocated in his room by a fire kindled from a match which 
he had probably secreted and lighted. 

He was married in 1 850 to Miss Chapin, of Springfield, and 
leaves two sons (one a graduate of Harvard College in 1874, and 
the other now a member of the Junior class in the same college) 
and a daughter. 

^ 1842. 

Leonard Case, Jr., second and only surviving son of Leonard 
and Elizabeth (Gaylord) Case, was born in Cleveland, O., June 
27, 1820. 

He studied law at home, and was admitted to the bar in 1845 ; 
but, instead of engaging in business, occupied himself mainly in 
private studies and in the care of his large estate. His health, 
never robust, became much enfeebled soon after graduation, and 
the later years of his life were only a prolonged struggle with fatal 



400 

disease of the lungs. During the last winter he failed rapidly, 
and on the evening of Jan. 5, 1880, when his friends last saw him 
alive, he was evidently very near his end. He was found dead in 
his bed the next morning, and it is probable that death resulted 
from the effect of chloroform which he was in the habit of using 
to check his severest paroxysms of coughing, and which in his 
very weak state proved too powerful. He was unmarried. 

Mr. Case had been during his life a large benefactor to public 
objects in his native city, and since his death his endowment of a 
School of Applied Science in Cleveland with property valued at 
over a million dollars has been made known. 

1843. 

Isaac Mills Ely, son of David Ely (Y. C. 1800), of New York 
city, and grandson of Rev. Dr. David Ely (Y. C. 1769), of Hunt- 
ington, Conn., was born in Fairfield, Conn., in 1819, and entered 
this college from Rochester, N. Y., at the beginning of the Sopho- 
more year. His mother was a daughter of Hon. Jonathan Sturges 
(Y. C. 1759), of Fairfield. 

After graduation he began immediately a course of theological 
study, taking one year in Andover Theological Seminary, and 
two in the Yale Divinity School. He was then licensed to preach 
by the Hartford (Conn.) Central Association, and at once began 
work in Silver Creek, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., but a speedy failure 
of health led him to try a removal to Tennessee, where he spent a 
year in teaching in Shelbyville. He then resumed preaching, but 
his health continued so infirm as to prevent him from undertakino- 
the duties of a settled pastorate. He accordingly preached tempo- 
rarily in vacant pulpits, his longest service being also the last, for 
three years in connection with the Congregational Church in 
Chenango Forks, N. Y. He was later principal for a time (from 
1872) of a select school for young lacjies, in Chenango Forks, 
where he continued to reside, and where he died Jan. 7, 1880 
in his 61st year. He was ordained as an evangelist, at Brighton, 
N. Y., Feb. 9, 1861, and subsequently served as Hospital Chap- 
lain in the Union service at Alexandria, Va. 

In 1868 he married Harriet E., eldest daughter of Henry A. 
Rogers, who survives him, with three children. 

Gordon Hall, son of Gordon and Margaret (Lewis) Hall, was 
born in Bombay, India, Nov. 4, 1823. His father was graduated 



401 

at Williams College in 1808, and was one of the pionee* mission- 
aries of the American Board. At two years of age the son was 
brought to America by his mother, and in consequence of his 
father's sudden death remained in this country. He spent the 
year after graduation in general study in New Haven, and then 
entered the Yale Divinity School, where he finished the course in 
1847. Meantime he had been called in 1846 to a tutorship in 
college, which he resigned in 1848. He was ordained pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Wilton, Conn., Oct. 25, 1848, where 
he remained until dismissed, May 4, 1852, to accept a call to the 
pastorate of the Edwards Church, in Northampton, Mass., over 
which he was installed on the 2d of the following month. His 
long and useful service in this position was only broken by death. 
On Sunday, Oct. 26, 1879, while on a brief visit in Binghamton, 
N. Y., he undertook to preach, but was interrupted by an attack 
of hemorrhage of the lungs; he seemed to be recovering, when 
typhoid pneumonia supervened, which caused his death, at Bing- 
hamton, Nov. 5, the day after he had completed his 56th year. 

He was married, Oct. 10, 1848, to Emily B., youngest daughter 
of Rev. Samuel Merwin (Y. C. 1802), of New Haven. She sur- 
vives him with five sons and one daughter. 

The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him by 
Amherst College in 1864. 

1844. 
Henry Postlethwaite Duncan died in New York City, Dec. 
6, 1879, in the 57th year of his age. He was a son of Dr. Stephen 
Duncan, of Natchez, Miss., who was before the late war one of 
the largest planters in the South. During the earlier part of his 
life he resided near Natchez, attending to his father's large plant- 
ing interests. Subsequently he traveled extensively, and spent 
much of his time in the neighborhood of New York. He was 
married, Oct. 6, 1847, to Mary, daughter of G. W. Sargent, of 
Natchez, but had no children. He died of quick consumption, 
after only six weeks of really serious illness. 

1845. 

Chaeles Thomas Chester, third son of Thomas L. and Eliza 
(Sidell) Chester, of New York City, was born Jan. 26, 1826. 

After graduation he began the study of medicine in New 
Haven, but in 1846 became interested in the telegraphic enter- 



402 

prise, then in embryo. After a few years' experience in the prac- 
tical management of lines, he engaged in business in New York 
in 1853 with Mr. John W. Norton, then the principal dealer in 
electrical and telegraphic apparatus and supplies. The following 
year he began business for himself in the same line in New York, 
and was so engaged until his death, at his residence in Engle- 
wood, N. J., of pneumonia, Apr. 13, 1880, at the age of 54. Be- 
sides being a manufacturer of electrical apparatus, Mr. Chester 
also made a number of telegraphic inventions and improvements, 
and was thoroughly respected for his integrity and ability. 

He was married, June 17, 1856, to Lucretia L. Roberts, of New- 
bern, N. C, who survives him. Of their five children, one son 
and two daughters are now living. 

Isaac Muneoe St. John, eldest child of Isaac R. and Abby R. 
(Munroe) St. John, was born in Augusta, Ga., where his father 
was then in business, Nov. 19, 1827. He entered College from 
New York City. 

On graduating he began the study of law in New York, but in 
1847 removed to Baltimore, where he was employed as assistant 
editor of the Patriot. He subsequently chose civil engineering as 
a profession, and until 1855 was connected with the engineering 
corps of the Baltimore and Ohio Rail Road. In 1855 he removed 
to Georgia, and was for five years in charge of divisions of the 
Blue Ridge Rail Road. In February, 1861, he entered the Con- 
federate service as a private in the Fort Hill Guards, South Caro- 
lina State troops. Two months later he was transferred to engi- 
neer duty, and rapidly rose to the position of chief engineer of 
the Army of the Peninsula. In May, 1862, he was made Major 
and chief of the Mining and Nitre Bureau Corps, and was subse- 
quently promoted through the various grades to the rank of Brig- 
adier General, and in 1865 to the position of Commissary Gen- 
eral of the Confederacy. After the war he resumed his profes- 
sion, and from 1866 to 1869 was chief engineer of the Louisville, 
Cincinnati and Lexington Rail Road. In 1870 and 1871 he was 
city engineer of Louisville ; and from 1871 till his death, consult- 
ing engineer of the Chesapeake and Ohio Rail Road. He died 
suddenly at his residence at the Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs, 
West Virginia, April 7, 1880, aged 52 years. 

During the war he was married to a daughter of Col. J. L. 
Carrington, of Richmond, Va. 



403 



1846. 



Isaac Clinton Collins, son of the Hon. Ela Collins, M. C, 
was born in Lowville, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1824. His mother was Maria, 
daughter of the Rev. Isaac Clinton (Y. C. 1786). 

After graduation he read law in New York for a year, and in 
1848, settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was admitted to the 
bar a year later. He continued in successful practice there until 
his death, except during two years' service as Judge of the Court 
of Common Pleas. He also served for two years as a member of 
the Ohio Legislature, and was otherwise prominent in political 
affairs in connection with the Democratic party. Though the 
record of his public life was not eventful, it was peculiarly honor- 
able in the degree of esteem in which he was held by all who 
knew him. He died suddenly at his home in Cincinnati, July 30, 
1879, of heart disease, at the age of 55. 

Judge Collins was married, Feb. 3, 1852, to Miss Emily H. 
Ruth, formerly of Baltimore. She survives him with six children. 

William Spencek Eakin was born July 6, 1820, in Shelby- 
ville, Tenn., the son of John and Lucretia Eakin. 

He w^as for many years a merchant in Nashville, Tenn., but his 
sympathy with the Union during the war obliged him to leave 
his native state. He subsequently settled in Groton, Conn., 
where he resided at the time of his death. During a visit to New 
York City he was seized Jan. 31, 1880, with an attack of heart 
disease while on an elevated railroad train, and died a few min- 
utes after. 

He was married Feb. 25, 1848, to Lemira G. Ewing, of Phila- 
delphia, who died suddenly in Dresden, Saxony, March 20, 1869. 
One of her two sons is still living. He was again married, June 
27, 1871, to Mary P., daughter of Rial Chancy, Esq., of New 
London, Conn., who survives him. 

Jonathan Homer Lane, eldest son of Mark and Henrietta 
(Tenney) Lane, was born in Geneseo, N. Y., Aug. 9, 1819, and 
entered College at the beginning of the Sophomore year. For the 
year after graduating he taught in a seminary in Castleton, Vt. ; 
was next for a year connected with the U. S. Coast Survey, and 
then became an Assistant Examiner in the Patent Office. He 
was subsequently advanced to the rank of Principal Examiner, 



404 

but in 1857 was removed for political reasons. A private office 
for patent business which he then opened was not successful. He 
spent much time and money in constructing apparatus designed 
for use in an 'experiment for compressing air in large quantities. 
In the autumn of 1869 he became connected with the U. S. Coast 
Survey Office as verifier of standard weights and measures, and so 
continued till his death, in Washington, May 3, 1880, in his 61st 
year. 

He had made scientific and mathematical studies his specialty, 
and had originated several improvements and inventions which 
are of permanent importance. He was never married. 



1849. 

Romeo Ezekiel North was born at Bayou Lafourche, La., 
March 27, 1830, and died at his residence in Louisville, Ky., after 
a short illness. May 22, 1880. 

He entered college as Sophomore, from Louisville, and returned 
to that city on graduation to study law. He did- not however 
practice the profession, but devoted himself to general study and 
literary labor. He was for some years on the editorial staff of the 
Louisville Courier and special correspondent of the New York 
Times. During the latter part of his life, much of his time was 
devoted to the duties of a director of the Louisville City National 
Bank. For many years he was a great sufferer from Bright's 
disease. He was never married. 



1854. 

Leander Hubbell Potter, son of Herman B. and Minerva 
(L'Hommedieu) Potter, was born in Rockford, 111., March 15, 
1829, and joined the class at the beginning of the Sophomore 
year. 

After graduating, he taught, first in Maryland, then in Iowa, 
and subsequently in the Chicago High School, where he remained 
until his removal to Bloomington, 111., in 1859, as Instructor in 
Language in the State Normal University. 

In September, 1861, he entered the army as Captain in the 33d 
Illinois Infantry. A year later he was promoted to the rank of 
Major, and in May, 1863, to that of Lieutenant Colonel in the 
same regiment. After three years' service he was compelled to 



405 

resign in September, 1864, on account of disability, resulting 
from a wound in the leg, received at Cotton Plant, Ark., July 7, 
1862. He was next engaged as principal of the High School in 
Beloit, Wise, and in 1867, became the President of the Illinois 
Soldiers' College and Military Academy, a state institution for 
the education of Illinois soldiers and their sons, located at Fulton. 
In 1871 he accepted the presidency of the Northern Illinois Col- 
lege, in the same town, which he held until in 1873. His resi- 
dence continued in Fulton, while he was teaching in Chicago, until 
in 1876, he was invited to act as professor of Logic, Rhetoric, and 
English Literature, in Knox College, at Galesburg, III. Increas- 
ing ill-health led to his retirement from this engagement in the 
summer of 1878, and the anxieties arising from serious pecuniary 
reverses, added to the inroads of consumption, hastened his 
death, which occurred at Galesburg on the 11th of July, 1879. 

He was married, July 26, 1858, to Miss Mary A. J. Bartlett, of 
New Haven, Conn., who survives him with three sons and two 
daughters. 

1857. 

JosEFH Payson Buckland was born in Springfield, Mass., 
Oct. 7, 1835. 

After teaching school in Holyoke, Mass., he studied law and 
was admitted to the bar in 1865. He was the first judge of the 
Holyoke police court, but after half a dozen years service removed 
to Springfield, where he practiced his profession until within a 
year or two of his decease. He then returned to Holyoke in fail- 
ing health, and devoted himself to the duties of superintendent 
of schools. He died suddenly, of consumption, after several 
months' illness, in Holyoke, Oct. 25, 1879, aged 44 years; and 
the importance of his public services to that community caused 
his death to be greatly lamented. He was unmarried. 

Edward John Evans, younger son of the late John Evans, a 
prominent lawyer of York, Pa., was born in that city, June 3, 
1837. 

He began in 1857 the study of law with his father, but was 
compelled by the failure of his eyes after a few months to seek 
other employment. Accordingly in 1858, with the cooperation of 
his father and under the firm name of Edward J. Evans & Co., 
he established an extensive nursery business in the management 



406 

of which he continued until his death. In July, 1879, while 
engaged at his nursery, he contracted a cold, which was increased 
by exposure on a journey, producing an attack of pneumonia, 
which rapidly developed into consumption, which caused his 
death, in York, on the 19th of April, 1880, in his 43d year. 

He was married, Dec. 31, 1861, to Fannie E., daughter of 
Edward Chapin, Esq. (Y. C. 1819), of York, who survives him 
with three daughters. 



James Henderson Grant, eldest son of Oliver DeForest Grant, 
was born in New York City, Jan. 8, 1838, and entered this Col- 
lege as Junior, after graduation at the N. Y. Free Academy. 

He was in business as a banker and broker with his father, 
most of the time until 1864. In 1862-63 he served as Lieut.-Col- 
onel of the 22d Regiment National Guard of N. Y. State. He 
went to Japan in 1866 and was for a few years in business there. 

He died in Denver, Col., Apr. 13, 1880, aged 42 years. 



1858. 

Joseph Worthy Pickett, son of Benjamin and Lydia O. 
(Birchard) Pickett, w^as born in Andover, Ashtabula County, 
Ohio, Jan. 28, 1832. He graduated at Allegheny College, Mead- 
ville. Pa., in 1855, and after spending two years in teaching in 
Taylorsville, Tenn., entered the Senior class in this College. 
From 1858 to 1861 he studied in the Andover (Mass.) Theol. Sem- 
inary, and from August, 1861, until May, 1863, preached in the 
Congregational Church in Wentworth, N. H. In the meantime 
he was ordained to the ministry, at Bristol, N. H., Jan. 2, 1862, 
and on Apr. 10, 1862, was married at Wayne, O., to Mary J., 
daughter of Rev. George Roberts, of his native town. After 
leaving Wentworth, he labored for six months in behalf of the 
U. S. Christian Commission in Gen. Sherman's army, and before 
the close of 1864 took charge of the Congregational Church in 
Mount Pleasant, Iowa. From this place he was called in the sum- 
mer of 1869 to become the Superintendent of the work of the 
American Home Missionary Society in Southern Iowa, and 
removed his residence to Des Moines. After nine years' diligent 
service in this field, he was appointed in April, 1878, superintend- 
ent of the same interests in the Rocky Mountain District, having 



407 

his headquarters at Colorado Springs, Col. His laborious and 
self-denying career was suddenly closed on the evening of Nov. 
14, 1879, by the overturning of a stage-coach on which he was 
traveling, in its route from Denver to Leadville, Col., at a point 
about eleven miles from the latter place. Since his death, " the 
Pickett Memorial Congregational Church" has been organized in 
Leadville, in honor of his work. His first wife died June 25, 
1868, and he was married, Apr. 18, 1878, to Mrs. Sybil B. Ryder, 
who survives him, with his three sons, two of them by his first 
marriage. 



1860. 

SiDMON Thorne Keese, SOU of Peter and Melinda A. Keese, 
was boru in Keeseville, Essex County, N. Y., May 16, 1840. 

He studied law in the Columbia College Law School, gradua- 
ting in 1862, and practiced his profession in New York City until 
April, 1871, when he was appointed by the Legislature of New 
Jersey, Justice of the First District Police Court of Jersey City, 
the place of his residence. He held this ofiice till 1877, when he 
resumed practice in Jersey City. A year or two later he had a 
severe attack of rheumatism, which induced dropsy. He went to 
Peru (near Keeseville), N. Y., for his health, but died there, 
Apr. 3, 1880. 

He was married, Feb. 14, 18G5, to Miss Mary E. Andrews, of 
New Haven, Conn., who survives him. 



1861. 

William Martin Johnson, eldest son of Bradish and Louisa 
A. (Lawrance) Johnson, was born in New York City, Oct. 10, 1839. 

After graduation he studied law for one year in the Columbia 
College Law School, and was from that time to his death in busi- 
ness with his father, in the firm of Bradish Johnson & Sons, sugar 
refiners. He died, after a very brief illness, while spending the 
summer at Niantic, in East Lyme, Conn., Sept. 20, 1879, in his 
40th year. 

He was married, Oct. 17, 1866^ to Miss Sallie E. Day, of Ston- 
ington. Conn., who survives him with several children. 



408 

1863. , 

Joseph Platt Cooke, the eldest son of Amos S. and Juliette 
(Montague) Cooke, was born, June 15, 1838, in Honolulu, Haw- 
aiian Islands. 

He was prepared for College at home and spent a year in Oahu 
College, entering his class at Yale at the beginning of the Sopho- 
more year. Upon graduation he returned immediately to Hono- 
lulu, and took the place of his father (who had been obliged by 
ill-health to retire from active employments) in the house of Cas- 
tle & Cooke, commission merchants. He subsequently became a 
member of the firm, and so continued, highly respected, until his 
death in Honolulu, after a painful illness, Aug. 29, 1879, at the 
age of 41. 

He was married, Jan. 18, 1870, in Honolulu, to Miss H. Emi- 
letta Wilder, who survives him, with four children. 

1866. 

Edwin Curtis Gormly was born in Allegheny City, Pa., Aug. 
14, 1845, and died in London, England, Feb. 8, 1880, in his 35th 
year. 

He studied law in Pittsburgh, Pa., (his home at graduation) for 
a year, but was obliged to change his plans by the failure of his 
eyes. He ultimately entered the ofiice of the Westinghouse Air 
Brake Company in Pittsburgh, and in May, 1873, took charge of 
the foreign office of the company, in Liverpool, which continued 
to be his occupation till his death. 
• 

1867. 

Arthur Herman Adams was born in Florence, O., Nov. 24, 
1847, and entered this college at the beginning of the Junior 
year. 

He taught for two years after graduation in the Delaware 
Literary Institute, Franklin, N. Y., and then took the three years' 
course in the Yale Theological Seminary. He remained in^ New 
Haven for two additional years, teaching, and studying medicine, 
receiving the degree of M.D. in 1874. On the 31st of August, 
1874, he was married, in Stevensville, Pa., to Miss Sarah C. 
Thomas, and two months later tkey sailed from San Francisco for 
Japan, where Dr. Adams was stationed as a Medical Missionary 
of the American Board of Foreign Missions till his death. In 1879 



■ 409 

he was obliged to bring his family to Southern California, on 
account of his wife's health, and having left them there he sailed 
on his return, November 15. He died on the passage to Yoko- 
hama, Nov. 23, 1879, aged 32 years. 

1869. 

Alexander Lardner Brown, son of Frederick and Charlotte 
A. (Hoppin) Brown, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., June 21, 1847. 

He returned home after graduation and was engaged in the 
wholesale and I'etail drug business with his eldest brother until 
the failure of his health, which was seriously undermined by the 
death of his only child, in 1876, and the subsequent loss of his 
brother Henry Armitt Brown (Y. C. 1865), in 1878. 

He died at his country home, in Burlington, N. J., Apr. 1, 1880, 
in his 33d year. 

He was married, May 29, 1872, to Miss Philippa M. Etting, of 
Philadelphia, who survives him. 

1870. 

John Wallingford Andrews, elder son of Hon. John W. 
Andrews (Y. C. 1830) and Lavinia (Gwynne) Andrews, was born 
in Columbus, O., May 4, 1849. 

The year after graduation was spent in reading and study at 
home, and in June, 1871, he sailed for Europe, where he remained 
for a year, — for the most of the time in Berlin. He then began 
the study of Law in Columbia College Law School, where he was 
graduated in May, 1874. He settled at first in the practice of 
his profession in Chicago, but the brilliant promise of his earlier 
career was interrupted by ill-health. In the summer of 1 879 he was 
appointed U. S. District Attorney for the Territory of Montana, 
and while in the performance of his duties died at Helena, May 8, 
1880, from an attack of gastritis, aged 31 years. 

He was not married. 

1873. 

Seth Weston Williams, son of the Hon. Charles and Eliza A. 
(Weston) Williams, was born in Nashua, N. H,, Apr. 15, 1849. 

He entered College in 1868, but at the close of the Freshman 
year was obliged by weakness of the eyes to withdraw for a year. 

In August, 1873, he went abroad, and after thirteen months 



410 

spent in travel in Europe and the Holy Land, began the study of 
medicine in the office of Dr. James R. Wood, of New York City. 
He received the degree of M.D. in the spring of 1876 from the 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, and was awarded at that time 
the Flint Prize for excellence in physiology. The next year he 
spent in special studies in Heidelberg, Germany, and then 
returned to Bellevue Hospital as one of the assistants. While 
performing his duties there he found time to prepare an elaborate 
essay on Pott's Disease of the spine, which was awarded the 
Sayre Prize, open to all the Alumni of the Medical College. His 
promising career was cut short by an attack of pneumonia, com- 
plicated with an abscess of the cerebellum, which came upon him 
while spending a vacation at the seaside. He died, after a week's 
illness, in Portland, Me., Sept. 20, ISYO, aged 30 years. 
He was unmarried. 

1875. 

Frank Elijah Hubbard, son of Jerome B. Hubbard, was born 
in Bristol, Conn., Feb. 5, 1853. 

An hereditary tendency to consumption led him at the end of 
his College course to spend a year in the Hawaiian Islands, and 
subsequently to enter into business in San Francisco. His health 
gradually failed, and he died in Alameda, Cal., in July, 1879, 
aged 26 years. 



1876. 

Low^ELL Lawrence Clapp, the last surviving son of Captain 
William Clapp, was born in Pomfret, Conn., March 31, 1852, and 
died in Westminster, in tlie town of Canterbury, Conn., Nov. 19, 
1879, in the 28th year of his age. 

He entered College from Brooklyn, Conn., and was throughout 
his course a very laborious student. He was principal of a school 
in East Killingly, Conn., for the first year after graduation, and 
for the rest of his life had charge of a school in Unionville, Hart- 
ford County, Conn. His gratifying success as a teacher had led 
him to postpone the intention of entering the ministry, which he 
had while in College. Meantime continued hard work had under- 
mined his health and strength. He had formed an engagement of 
marriage, and was on his way home for the marriage to take 
place, but on the journey was taken ill and was found by friends 



411 

at Danielsonville exhausted and deranged. He was carried to his 
father's residence, and there sank rapidly under an attack of brain- 
fever, and died in about a month's time. 

1878. 

George Clarence Ackerman, son of Theodore J. Ackerman, 
was born in New York City, Oct. 8, 1 856, and died at his father's 
residence in New Haven, Conn., May 23, 1880, in his 24th year. 

His Senior year in college was interrupted by a severe illness, 
which prevented his taking part in the regular work of the class 
for the last four months, and which developed into a seated pul- 
monary disease. He spent the winter of 1878-79 in Aiken, S. C, 
and the succeeding winter in Colorado, from which place he 
returned but a short time before his sudden death. 

George Edwards Gilbert, son of Rev. William H. Gilbert 
(Y. C. 1841) and Mary (Goodridge) Gilbert, was born in Ash- 
field, Mass., where his father was then pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church, Apr. 22, 1855. 

He was prepared for College at the Hartford (Conn.) High 
School, and entered Yale with his twin brother at the beginning 
of the Freshman year. Upon graduation he went to Englewood, 
N. J., as a teacher, but early in the winter was prostrated by a 
fatal disease (diabetes), from which he had already sufiered while 
in College. During the following summer he was apparently 
improving, until a few days before his death, 'which occurred at 
his father's residence, in South Norwalk, Conn., Sept. 20, 1879. 



412 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1823. 

Austin Chitrch, son of Oliver and Elizabeth (Cone) Church, 
was born in East Haddam, Conn., Jan. 9, 1799. 

He began his professional studies in 1820 with Dr. Josiah Good- 
hue, of Hadley, Mass., afterwards pursuing them with Dr. Amos 
Twitchell, of Keene, N. H., and attending one course of lectures 
at the Castleton (Yt.) Medical School. After receiving his degree 
he began practice in Utica, N. Y., but in 1826 removed to Coop- 
erstown, and in 1829 to Ithaca, N. Y. In 1834 he relinquished 
practice and established in Rochester, N. Y, chemical works for 
the manufacture of pearlash and saleratus. He removed to 
Oswego, N. Y., in 1842, and in 1845 settled in New York City, 
where he established extensive chemical works for the manufac- 
ture of bi-carbonate of soda for baking purposes from soda-ash, 
being the first in this country to develop the process, and contin- 
uing actively interested in the business till within a few years of 
his death. He died at his residence in Brooklyn, N. Y., Aug. 7, 
1879, aged 80 years. 

He was married. May 3, 1827, to Nancy, second daughter of 
Dr. Elihu D wight (Dartmouth Coll. 1790), of South Hadley, Mass. 
His wife with two daughters and two sons survives him. 

1824. 

Charles Rowland died suddenly of paralysis of the heart in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., Aug. 7, 1879, at the age of 79. 

He was a native of Fairfield, Connl, and in 1825 settled in 
Brooklyn, where he lived to become — with one . exception — the 
oldest practicing physician. He married, in 1827, Miss Maria 
Bellamy, of Derby, Conn. Two sons and two daughters survive 
him. 

Thomas Smith Williamson, the only son of Rev. William and 
Mary (Smith) Williamson, was born at Fair Forest, Union Dis- 
trict, S. C, in March, 1800; in 1805 his father, wishing to set 
at liberty the slaves which he had inherited, removed to Man- 
chester, Ohio. 

He was graduated at Jefferson College, Canonsburg, Pa., in 
1820, and soon after began to read medicine with his brother-in- 



418 

law, Dr. William Wilson, of West Union, Ohio. He also 
attended a course of medical lectures in Cincinnati, before attend- 
ing the Yale Medical School. 

On receiving his degree he settled in Ripley, Ohio, where he 
soon gained a good practice, and was married, Apr. 10, 1827, to 
Margaret, daughter of Col. James Poage. A half-formed purpose 
to devote themselves to missionary work was rendered stronger 
by the early deaths of their first three children ; and after spend- 
ing one winter at Lane Theological Seminary, Cincinnati, and 
being licensed to preach the gospel. Dr. Williamson was appointed 
by the American Board in the spring of 1834 to visit the Indian 
tribes west of and near the Mississippi River and north of the 
State of Missouri. The result was the establishment by the Board 
of a new mission, of which Dr. Williamson was put in charge. 
As soon as navigation opened in the spring of 1835, he left Ohio 
with his family, and until 1846 was stationed at Lac-qui-parle, 
among the Dakotas, in the western part of what is now the State 
of Minnesota. In 1846 he removed to Kaposia, five miles below 
St. Paul, and after the cession of these lands to the government, 
followed the Dakotas in 1852 to their reservation, and selected as 
his residence a spot some thirty miles south of Lac-qui-parle. He 
continued there until the Indian outbreak in 1862, and afterwards 
made his home at St. Peter, Minn., where he died, June 24, 1879, 
in his 80th year. His wife died in July, 1872. 

From the time of his entrance on the missionary work, he gave 
himself unreservedly to the elevation and Christianization of the 
Dakotas ; he lived to see among them ten native ordained minis- 
ters and about 800 church members, connected with the churches 
which he had planted* The crowning work of his life, the trans- 
lation of the Bible into the language of the Sioux nation, was 
only completed, in connection with Rev. Dr. Riggs, about three 
months before his death. 

His three surviving sons are all college graduates, and one of 
them was associated with his father in the missionary work. 

1830. 

Albert Alfred Wright, son of Asaph and Prudence (Moore) 
Wright, was born in Goshen, Conn., March 14, 1808, and died in 
North Canaan, Conn., May 14, 1880, aged 72. 

After graduation he attended an additional course of medical 
lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia. He 
27 



414 

began the practice of his profession at Canaan, Conn., in May, 
1830, and there continued until his death, with the exception of a 
brief residence during the winter of 1853-54, in Bridgeport, 
Conn. One week previous to his decease he made his last profes- 
sional visit, and his death followed from general exhaustion. 

He married (1), May 17, 1831, Frances Ann, eldest child of 
Rev. Pitkin Cowles (Y. C. 1800), of Canaan, Conn. She died 
April 3, 1853, aged 43 ; (2), July 18, 1854, Mary, widow of 
Samuel Beach, M. D. (Y. C. 1826), of Bridgeport, Conn., and 
daughter of Rev. Zephaniah Swift, of Derby, Conn. She died 
March 1, 1871, aged 65 ; (3), June 19, 1872, Eunice Albina, 
widow of David William Gardner, and daughter of Solomon 
Wright, of Pownal, Vt. By his first wife he had four children, 
of whom one son and two daughters, together with his last wife, 
survive him. 

1837. 

Robert Cephas Cone, eldest son of Rev. Jonathan Cone 
(Y. C. 1808) and Abbie C. (Usher) Cone, was born in Colchester, 
Conn., Apr. 12, 1811. He entered the Medical School from Dur- 
ham, Greene County, N. Y., where his father was then settled in 
the ministry, and after receiving his degree he returned to Dur- 
ham and opened an office. He practiced there for nine years, and 
then in Lowville, Lewis County, N. Y., for sixteen years, and in 
1865 removed to New York City, where he continued in full 
practice till his sudden death. He died in New York, Dec. 19, 
1879, in his 69th year, after less than a week's illness, of con- 
sumption. 

Dr. Cone was married in Durham, May 30, 1 842, to Miss Mary 
Pratt, who survives him with the younger of their two sons. 

1849. 

Gaylord Giles Bissell, eldest son of Roderick and Fanny 
(Gaylord) Bissell, was born in Torrington, Conn., Feb. 13, 1825. 

At the age of 16 he began to teach school, and in connection 
with his teaching pursued medical studies. In April, 184^, he 
entered on the practice of his profession in Bethlem, Conn., and 
on Nov. 7, 1849, was married to Emily A., daughter of Edwin 
Talmadge. In 1854 he removed to Union Mills, Pa., and in 1857 
to Fort Dodge, Iowa, where he and one of his brothers opened a 
drug store in connection with their practice. Dr. Bissell also 



k 



416 

took great interest in legal subjects; and while in Fort Dodge 
was admitted to the bar. Tn March, ] 860, he went with his two 
brothers to Colorado to develop mining interests, and subse- 
quently to Montana, where he was one of the original settlers 
of Virginia City and its first mayor. In the fall of 1865 he left 
Montana, and after a visit at the East returned to Iowa, where he 
subsequently resided,— from 1869 in Lovilia, Monroe County, 
where he exerted a wide influence in the community, and where 
he died, of Bright's disease, July 8, 1879, aged 54 years. His 
widow and two sons survive him. 

1866. 

CoKNELius Jay DuBois, the eldest son of Dr. Henry A. and 
Helen (Jay) DuBois, was born Aug. 30, 1836, in New York City, 
where his father was at that time a practicing physician. 

He studied law in the Law School of Columbia College, receiving 
the degree of LL.B. in 1861, and in April of the same year went 
with the Seventh Regiment, N. Y. State Militia, on three months' 
service in the civil war. In September, 1862, he raised a company 
of soldiers in New Haven, Conn, (to which city his father had 
removed), and was elected their captain. His company was at- 
tached to the 27th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, and after 
fighting at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, he was wounded 
in the arm at the battle of Gettysburg. After his recovery he 
was made, in April, 1864, Adjutant of the 20th Connecticut Vol- 
unteers, and served for three months, being breveted Lt. Col. for 
bravery at Resaca, Ga. 

He subsequently studied medicine, and practiced in Minneapo- 
lis, Minn., in San Rafael, Cal., and in New Haven. After a 
long and painful illness, he died at his father's residence, in New 
Haven, Feb. 11, 1880, in his 44th year. He was unmarried. 

Dexter Louis Lounsbuky, son of Allen Lounsbury, was born 
in Bethany, Conn., in 1844. 

After graduation while employed as house physician at the 
Conn. State Hospital in New Haven, he was married, Oct. 22, 
1866, to Mary E. Hart, of the same city. He afterwards prac- 
ticed his profession in Naugatuck, and elsewhere in Connecticut. 

Subsequently, he began preaching in the same State in connec- 
tion with the Methodists, and later took orders in the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, being ordained Deacon by the Bishop of Con- 



416 

necticut, June 13, 1874. His first charge was at Nichols Farms, 
in the town of Trumbull, Conn., and in April, 18*78, he was cho- 
sen rector of Christ Church in Stratford, Conn. While still filling 
this position he was instantly killed by a shot from a pistol in the 
hands of his wife, on the morning of the 24th of September, 1879. 
At a trial before the Superior Court of the State, Mrs. Lounsbury 
was acquitted of a criminal charge, on the ground of insanity, 
caused by disease. One daughter survives him. 

1867. 

Henry Potter was born in New London, Conn., in 1825. 
Brought up as a mechanic, it was not until late in life that he 
was able to devote himself to a profession. After receiving his 
degree he returned to his native place, and there practiced medi- 
cine. He was for a number of years city physician, but was re- 
moved from this office a short time before his death, on account 
of differences wath the Board of Health. He had also been a 
member of the City Board of Education. He was found dead in 
his room on the morning of March 10, 1880, death having been 
caused by apoplexy and a consequent hemorrhage of a blood ves- 
sel in the brain. 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1878. 

Henry Orton Finch, son of Martin and Caroline (Jackson) 
Finch, was born in Keeseville, N. Y., June 7, 1853, and gradua- 
ted at the University of Vermont, in 1874. 

After studying law for a year in his father's office, he entered 
the Union Theol. Seminary, in New York City, removing to this 
Divinity School for the last year of the course. After graduating 
he was employed as acting pastor of the First Congregational 
Church in Guilford, Conn., and while still in that relation died 
suddenly from the bursting of a blood-vessel while walking on the 
beach in Guilford, Aug. 27, 1879, at the age of 26. He was ex- 
pecting to be ordained pastor four days later. He was not mar- 
ried. 



SUMMARY. 





Academical Department. 




Class. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Death. 


1809 


Burr Baldwin, 91, 


Montrose, Pa. 


Jan. 23, '80. 


1815 


Wm. C. Wetmore, 83, 


New York City, 


March 22, '80 


1818 


Samuel H. Huntington, 86 


Hartford, Conn., 


Feb. 4, '80. 


1820 


Nathaniel A. Pratt, 83, 


Roswell, Ga., 


Aug. 30, '79. 


1822 


Lot Norton, 11, 


Salisbury, Conn., 


May 29, '80. 


1825 


John J. Abernethy, 74, 


New York City, 


Oct. 28, '79. 


182V 


Joseph Gushing, Jr., 12, 


Bedford Springs, Pa., 


July 6, '79. 


1828 


David K Bartlett, 74, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Nov. 29, '79. 


(1 


Alfred Blackman, 72, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Apr. 28, '80. 


1829 


Henry A. Boardman, 72, 


Philadelphia, Pa., 


June 15, '80. 


a 


Francis GiUette, 71, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Sept. 30, '79. 


1830 


John Cotton Smith, 69, 


Sharon, Conn., 


Nov. 21, '79. 


1831 


Henry B. Camp, 70, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Feb. 16, '80. 


'• 


Wm. Hemphill Jones, 68, 


Washington, D. C, 


Apr. 30, '80. 


(1 


EoUin Sanford, 73, 


New York City, 


Dec. 2, '79. 


1832 


Samuel R. Brown, 70, 


Monson, Mass., 


June 20, '80. 


a 


Martin Kellogg, 68, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Sept. 9, '79. 


1834 


Wm. I. Budington, 64, 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Nov. 29, '79. 


(( 


Reuben GTaylord, 67, 


Fontenelle, Neb., 


Jan. 10, '80. 


1835 


Ashbel B. Haile, 74, 


Norwich, Cqnn., 


March 9, '80. 


(( 


Wm. McLellan, 64, 


Chambersburg, Pa., 


Oct. 21, '79. 


'* 


Aaron Snow, 75, 


Essex, Conn., 


March 1, '80. 


1836 


Joshua F. Pearl, 71, 


Tewksbury, Mass., 


Oct. 18, '79. 


1838 


Lot C. Clark, 60, 


New York City, 


Feb. 11, '80. 


" 


Joseph P. Thompson, 60, 


Berlin, Prussia, 


Sept. 20, '79. 


1839 


Wm. H. Norris, 65, 


Philadelphia, Pa., 


Feb. 18, '80. 


1840 


Wm. B. Brinsmade, 61, 


Washington, Conn., 


May 15, '80. 


1842 


Leonard Case. 59, 


Cleveland, 0., 


Jan. 6, '80. 


1843 


Isaac M. Ely, 60, 


Chenango Forks, N. Y., 


Jan. 7, '80. 


'' 


Gordon Hall, 56, 


Bingham ton, N. Y., 


Nov. 5, '79. 


1844 


Henry P. Duncan, 56, 


New York City. 


Dec. 6, '79. 


1845 


Charles T. Chester, 54, 


Englewood, N. J., 


Apr. 13, '80. 


u 


Isaac M. St. John, 52, 


White Sulphur Springs, W. Ya., Apr. 7, '80. 


1846 


Isaac C. Collins, 55, 


Cincinnati, 0., 


July 30, '79. 


(( 


Wm. S. Eakin, 59, 


New York City, 


Jan. 31, '80. 


a 


J. Homer T-ane, 60, 


Washington, D. C, 


May 3, '80. 


1849 


Romeo E. North, 50, 


Louisville, Ky., 


May 22, '80. 


1854 


Leander H. Potter, 50, 


Galesburg, 111., 


July 11, '79. 


1857 


Joseph P. Buckland, 44, 


Holyoke, Mass., 


Oct. 25, '79. 


u 


Edward J. Evans, 43, 


York, Pa., 


Apr. 19, '80. 


u 


James H. Grant, 42, 


Denver, Col., 


Apr. 13, '80. 


1858 


Joseph W. Pickett, 47, 


near Leadville, Col., 


Nov. 14, '79. 


1860 


Sidmon T. Keese, 40, 


Peru, N. Y., 


Apr. 3, '80. 


1861 


Wm. M. Johnson, 40, 


East Lyme, Conn., 


Sept. 20, '79. 


1863 


Joseph P. Cooke, 41, 


Honolulu, H. I., 


Aug. 29, '79. 


1866 


Edwin C. Gormly, 34, 


London, England, 


Feb. 8, '80. 



418 



Class. Name and Age. 

ISGT Arthur H. Adams, 32, 

1869 A. Lardner Brown, 32, 

1870 John W. Andrews, Jr., 31, 
1873 Seth W. Williams, 30, 
18T5 Frank E. Hubbard, 26, 
1876 Lowell L. Clapp, 27, 
1878 George C. Ackerman, 23, 

" George E. Gilbert, 24, 



Place and 
Pacific Ocean, 
Burlington, N. J., 
Helena, Mont., 
Portland, Me., 
Alameda, Cal., 
Canterbury, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn. 
South Norwalk, 



Time of Death. 
Nov. 23, '79. 
Apr. 1, '80. 
May 8, '80. 
Sept. 20, '79. 
July, '79. 
Nov. 19, '79. 
May 23, '80. 
Sept. 20, '79. 



Medical Department. 



1823 Austin Church, 80, 

1824 Charles Rowland, 79, 

" Thomas S. Williamson, 79, 

1830 Albert A. Wright, 72, 

1837 Robert C. Cone, 68, 

1849 Gaylord G. Bissell, 54, 

1 866 Cornelius J. DuBois, 43, 
'' Dexter L. Lounsbury, 35, 

1867 Henry Potter, 55, 



Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
St. Peter, Minn., 
North Canaan, Conn., 
New York City, 
Lovilia, Iowa, 
New Haven, Conn., 
Stratford, Conn., 
New London, Conn., 



Aug. 7, '79. 
Aug. 7, '79. 
June 24, '79. 
May 14, '80. 
Dec. 19, '79. 
July 8, '79. 
Feb. 11, '80. 
Sept. 24, '79. 
March 9, '80. 



Theological Department. 
1878 Henry 0. Finch, 26, Guilford, Conn., 



Aug. 27, '79. 



The number of deaths above given is 64, and the average age of the graduates 
of the Academical Department is 57^ years. 

Of the 54 Academical graduates, 13 were in business, 11 clergymen, 10 law- 
yers, 8 teachers, and 4 physicians. 



The oldest living graduate is Seth Pierce, of the Class of 1806, of Cornwall, 
Conn., who was bom May 15, 1785. 



The present series of the Obituary Record closes with this number. Aid in 
preparing future numbers is urgently requested by the Secretary of the College. 

A Supplement, just printed, can be obtained at the Library, containing an 
index and title page to this series, with brief notices of some graduates who have 
died since July, 1870, but have not been before commemorated. 



INDEX. 



Class Page 

1825 Abernethy, John J.,_ 386 

1878 Ackerman, Geo. C, 411 

1867 Adams, Arthur H., 408 

1870 Andrews, John W., 409 

1809 Baldwin, Burr, .__ 383 

1828 Bartlett, David E., 387 

1849 m Bissell, Gaylord G., 414 

1828 Blackman, Alfred, ___ 388 

1829 Boardman, Henry A., 388 

1840 Brinsmade, William B.,-_. 399 

1869 Brown, A. Lardner, 409 

1832 Brown, Samuel R., 392 

1857 Buckland, Joseph P., 405 

1834 Budington, William I., 393 

1831 Camp, Henry B., 390 

1842 Case, Leonard, 399 

1845 Chester, Charles T., 401 

1823 m Church, Austin, _ 412 

1876 Clapp, LoweU L., 410 

1838 Clark, Lot C, 397 

1846 Collins, Isaac C, _ 403 

1837 w Cone, Robert C, 414 

1863 Cooke, Joseph P., 408 

1827 Cushing, Joseph, 387 

1866 m DuBois, Cornelius J., 415 

1844 Duncan, Henry P., __ 401 

1846 Eakin, William S., ..403 

1843 Ely, Isaac M., _ 400 

1857 Evans^ Edward J., _- 405 

1878 t Finch, Henry 0., 416 

1834 Gaylord, Reuben, 394 

1878 Gilbert, George E., 411 



Class Page 

1829 GiUette, Francis, 389 

1866 Gormly, Edwin C, _. 408 

1857 Grant, James H.,_ 406 

1835 Haile, Ashbel B., 395 

1843 Hall, Gordon, 400 

1832 Hubbard, Prank E., 410 

1818 Huntington, Samuel H.,._ 385 

1861 Johnson, William M., 407 

1831 Jones, William Hemphill,. 390 
1860 Keese, Sidmon T., 407 

1832 Kellogg, Martin, 393 

1846 Lane, J. Homer, 403 

1866 m Lounsbury, Dexter L., 415 

1835 McLellan, William, _- 395 

1839 Norris, William H., 399 

1849 North, Romeo E., 404 

1822 Norton, Lot, 386 

1836 Pearl, Joshua F., _ 396 

1858 Pickett, Joseph W., 406 

1867 m Potter, Henry,.. 416 

1854 Potter, Leander H, 404 

1820 Pratt, Nathaniel A., 385 

1824 m Rowland, Charles, 412 

1 846 St. John, Isaac M., 402 

1831 Sanford, Rollin, _. 391 

1830 Smith, John Cotton, 389 

1835 Snow, Aaron, 396 

1838 Thompson, Joseph P., 398 

1815 Wetmore, William C, 384 

1873 Williams, Seth W., 409 

1824 m Williamson, Thomas S 412 

1830 m Wright, Albert A., 413 




SUPPLEMENT 

TO THE 

OBITUARY RECORD 



OP 



GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE. 

1870— 80. 



1813. 

Ebenezer Brown died in Roscoe, Winnebago County, III, Feb. 13, 1872, aged 
83 years and 6 months. He was a native of Brimfield, Mass. 

He studied theology, and was first settled as pastor over the Congregational 
Church in the North Parish of Wilbraham, Mass., March 3, 1819. He resigned 
this charge in July, 1827, and was installed three months later over the Congre- 
gational Church in Prescott, Mass., where he continued until March, 1835. He 
left this church to accept a call to the Second Church in Hadley (Upper Falls), 
Mass. In 1838 he went from this position to Illinois, under a commission from the 
American Home Missionary Society, and settled first in Byron, Ogle County. In 
November, 1843, he aided in forming the Congregational Church in Roscoe, and two 
months later assumed its pastoral charge. He retained his residence in Roscoe till 
his death, preaching in many other places, and passing his last years in retirement. 

His widow and one son survive him. 



1814. 

Horace Goodrich was bom in Wethersfield, Conn., Aug. 3, 1795. In 1798 
his parents removed to Pittsfield, Mass., and subsequently to South Hadley, Mass., 
from which place he entered College. 

Upon graduation he began at once the study of medicine under the direction of 
Dr. Josiah Goodhue, of Hadley. In 1819 or 1820 he began practice in Ware, 
Mass., where he remained for 35 years, gaining in a high degree the respect and 
esteem of the community. He was twice a member of the State Legislature. At 
the age of 60 he found his health hopelessly impaired and retired td a farm in 
East Windsor, Conn., where he spent the most of his remaining days, in great 
28 



^^ 



422 

feebleness. He died at the home of his eldest daughter, in Vineland, N. J., Aug. 
21, 1812, aged 11 years. 

At the age of 33 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Deacon William Dickinson, 
of Hadley, by whom he had four sons aud four daughters. One son and three 
daughters are still living. 

1815. 

Hubbard Rockwell, elder son of Rev. Lathrop Rockwell (Dartmouth Coll. 
1789), pastor of the Congregational Church in Lyme, Conn., and of Olive (Dutton) 
Rockwell, was born in Lyme, in 1196. 

He was a tutor in this College from 1811 to 1819, and during the greater part 
of his life supported himself by teaching in New York City. After an old age of 
extreme poverty, he died, very suddenly, at his boarding house in New York, 
Jan. 14, 187 L. He was unmarried. 

1816. 

"Walter Smith died in Mount Vernon, 0., Feb. 1, 1811, aged 11 years. 

He was born in 1193 in Kent, Conn., and after studying theology under Rev. 
Dr. Matthew Perrine, of New York City, was licensed to preach by the Litchfield 
(Conu.) North Association, Sept. 30, 1818. On the 2d of June, 1819, he was set- 
tled over the Congregational Church in the village of North Cornwall, town of 
Cornwall, Conn. He was obliged to resign on account of mental derangement in 
April, 1838, and in the spring of 1840 removed to Mount Vernon, 0., where he 
engaged in teaching and also in business. 

He married Orpha Jerome, adopted daughter of Stephen Dodge, of New York 
City, who died near the close of the year 1874. They had three sons. 

1817. 

Anson Hubbard, son of David and Jemima (Chamberlain) Hubbard, was bom in 
Glastonbury, Conn., May 24, 1791, and died in Everett, Mass., March 6, 1876, in 
his 85th year. 

He studied theology with Rev. Nathan Perkins, D.D., of "West Hartford, Conn., 
and was licensed to preach by the Hartford North Association, Feb. 4, 1819. 
After preaching for a few months in Eastford, Conn., he was settled in 1820 over 
the Congregational Church in Lunetiborg, Vt., but was obliged to resign his charge 
some three years later, on account of poor health. He was installed Jan. 15, 1828, 
over the Congregational Church in Monson, Me., and there continued until his dis- 
mission, Aug. 19, 1834, He requested this dismission in order to join a colony, 
organized in Maine, for a settlement in Illinois, and he labored for a few years in 
Payson, Round Prairie, and Plymouth, in that State, until disabled by illness. He 
then returned to Maine, and for eight years from November, 1838, supplied the 
church in Andover. He then retired to Chelsea, Mass., and there and in the place 
of his death spent his closing years. 

He was married in 1829 to Miss Charlotte Adams, of Rumford, Me., who died 
in Chelsea in 1855. In September, 1859, he married Miss Caroline Augusta Hub- 
bard, of Glastonbury, Conn., who survives him. By his first marriage he had two 
sons, the elder of whom died of consumption in 1854, when just about to enter 
College. The younger son enlisted in the Union army in the late civil war, and 
was killed at the battle of Cold Harbor. 



423 

1818. 

Roger Wolcott Griswold was born in Lyme, Conn., March 15, 1797, the 
fourth son of Gov. Eoger Oris wold (Y. C. 1780), and grandson of Gov. Matthew 
Griswold. His mother was Fanny, daughter of Col. Zabdiel Rogers, of Norwich, 
Conn. 

Upon graduation he removed to Norwalk, Ohio, where he studied law with his 
brother-in-law Ebenezer Lane (Harvard CoUege 1811), afterwards Chief Justice of 
the Supreme Court of that State. In 1 8 1 9 he was admitted to the bar, and in 1820 
he settled in Ashtabula, 0., as a lawyer. He was also partially occupied in editing 
a newspaper, and was twice a representative in the State Legislature. A short 
time after his admission to the bar, he was married to his third cousin, Juliet, 
daughter of Thomas Griswold, of East Lyme, Conn., who bore him twelve children 
(eight of whom survive him), and who died in April, 1855. By his second wife, 
Mrs. Caroline R. Martin, of Kenosha, 111., he had no children. By his third wife, 
Mrs. H. C. Walker, he had two daughters, both still living. 

About the year 1832, he relinquished the practice of his profession, and was 
afterwards employed as an agent for persons at the East in the sale of lands, and 
during the latter part of his life was chiefly occupied in farming. He died in 
Ashtabula, Nov. 15, 1878, of heart disease. 

Horatio Hubbell, the eldest son of Walter Hubbell, Esq., was bora in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., July 9, 1799. 

At the age of 14 he entered Union College, but as the climate of Schenectady 
did not agree with him, he was transferred to this College, which he entered in 
1815. 

He studied law in the office of Joseph R. Ingersoll, Esq., of Philadelphia, and 
after his admission to the bar (in September, 1821), traveled extensively in Europe. 
He settled in Philadelphia, and for many years had an extensive practice. In 1842 
he was elected Brigadier General of the Third Philadelphia Brigade. 

His wife died in the early part of the winter of 1874-75, and his own health be- 
came soon after much impaired. While on a visit to relatives in Pittsburgh, Pa., 
he died of apoplexy, July 23, 1875, aged 76 years. • 

1819. 

Walter Livingston, son of Hon. Henry W. Livingston (Y. C. 1786), a member 
of Congress from the State of New York, and of Mary (Allen) Livingston, was 
born in Claverack, N. Y., July 28, 1799. 

He spent six months after graduation in Judge Reeve's law school, at Litchfield, 
Conn., and then devoted three years to travel in this country and in Europe. 
After his return he was elected to the New York Legislature from his native 
county, but soon removed to Allentown, Pa., where he remained until 1839, serv- 
ing meantime in both houses of the State Legislature. He then removed to Phila- 
delphia, where he engaged in business for the greater part of the rest of his life. 
He died in that city, Jan. 28, 1872, aged 72^ years. He married Miss Mary A. 
Greenleaf, who survived him with children. 

George Sheldon, of Aurora, Ohio, was born August 26, 1797, and died in 
Colfax, Ind., June 14, 1873, aged nearly 76 years. 



424 

He spent a year in teaching in Great Barrington, Mass., and then took a three - 
years' course in Andover Theol Seminary. He then went to Painesville, Ohio, as 
a home missionary, being ordained Sept. 25, 1823. In October, 1825, he removed 
to Franklin Mills, 0., where he remained as pastor until 1830. He was appointed 
in 1829 agent of the American Bible Society, and for the most of the remainder 
of his life was employed in its service, and left to it a part of his scanty property 
at his decease. He was also financial agent for Western Reserve College fjom 
1831 to 1854. About 1854 he was deposed from the ministry of the Presbyterian 
church and suspended from church membership, on account of irregularity in 
obtaining a divorce from his wife and re-marriage ; but in 1866 he was restored to 
fellowship by the church in Bellefontaine, 0., where he resided from 1856 till his 
removal to Indiana in 1870. 



1822. 

Charles Huntington Weld, son of Rev. Lewis Weld (Harv. Coll., 1789), pastor 
for more than 30 years of the Congregational church in Hampton, Conn., and of 
Elizabeth (Clark) Weld, was born in that town, in 1799. 

He studied theology for two years in the Andover Theol. Seminary, but was 
never ordained. His whole life was overshadowed by ill health, caused by dys- 
pepsia. He was for a time au agent of the American Bible Society in Mississippi, 
and subsequently preached in Manlius, N. Y., and elsewhere. He died at the 
residence of his brother, Theodore D. Weld, in Hyde Park, Mass., July 14, 1871, 
aged 72. He was married in 1862 to Mrs. Catharine Speer, of Newark, N. J., 
who died in 1865. He had no children. 



1823. 

Whitmill John Hill, a native of Halifax County, N. C, died at Scotland Neck, 
in that county, in February, 1871, in the 67th year of his age. 



1826. 

Henry Zachariah Hatner, son of Zachariah and Eve (Clum) Hayner, was 
born in Brunswick, N. Y., Sept. 18, 1802. 

He studied law in Troy, N. Y., where he was admitted to practice in 1829 and 
continued until 1851. In 1852 he received from President Fillmore the appoint- 
ment of Chief Justice of the territory of Minnesota. When superseded by a 
change in the national administration, he opened a law office in New York City, 
where he continued in practice until the opening of the civil war. He served as 
Major on the staff of Gen. Wool, and later as a Provost Marshal in Baltimore and 
in New York City. After the close of the war he was engaged in organizing 
some mining operations in the Western States, and returned to the East in feeble 
health. He died of Bright's disease, in New York City, in March, 1874, .in his 72d 
year. By his first wife, Miss Mary Herrick) of Sheffield, Mass., he had one son, 
(a member of the class of 1858, in this College), who was killed in the civil war. 
He was married twice subsequently, and left one son and two daughters. 



425 



1829. 



Stephen Galatty, a native of the island of Scio, in the Grecian Archipelago, 
resided in that island until the massacre of 1822, which drove his family from their 
home. They sought an asylum in Malta, and there met the American missionary, 
Rev. Daniel Temple, by whose advice Stephen, with a younger brother, was sent to 
Boston in 1823, and thence directly to New Haven, where the brothers prepared 
for college, one graduating in 1829, and one in 1830. 

They returned to Malta, and later removed to Syra, the capital of the island of 
that name in the group of Cyclades, near Athens. The elder brother was suc- 
cessful as a merchant, and also served for many years as Judge of the Superior 
Court. He died in Syra in 1876, at the age of 68, leaving a large family. 



1830. 

James Root Averill, son of Eliphalet Averill, was bom in Hartford, Conn., in 
1811, His mother was Mary, daughter of Hon. Jesse Root, of Coventry, Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court of Connecticut. 

After graduating he studied law, and on being admitted to the bar opened an 
office in New York City, which he soon gave up to enter on a mercantile career. 
This resulted disastrously, and for some years he lived in Europe, traveling exten- 
sively. After his return he occupied himself with journalism, and for several 
years was an editorial writer on the Hartford Times. He lived in seclusion in 
Hartford, and gave much time to scientific studies, especially in astronomy and 
microscopy. Much of his leisure was devoted to pedestrian tours in the White 
Mountain region, with which he was thoroughly familiar. On Sept. 20, 1875, he 
left Hartford, saying to a friend that he had been for some time in bad health and 
was going to Europe to consult physicians. Letters were received from him post- 
marked Boston on the day following, and on Sept. 22 he was met in Portland, Me., 
by an acquaintance, to whom he said that he was going to the White Mountains. 
No further trace of him has been recovered, and there is reason to suppose that he 
did not leave the country, but voluntarily put an end to his life, not long after the 
last mentioned date. He was not married. 



Daniel Dudley Avery, son of Dr. Dudley Avery, of G-roton, Conn., and of 
Mary Anne (Brown) Avery, from Bristol, England, was born in Groton, Apr. 1 2, 
1810, and died after a lingering illness at his residence on Petite Anse Island, in 
the Parish of Iberia, La., June 8, 1879, in his 70th year. 

In 1832, he was admitted to the bar in Baton Rouge, La., where he continued 
to reside until 1862. Soon after his settlement there he was twice elected to the 
General Assembly of the State. In 1860 he was elected Judge of the Circuit 
Court, and held the position until the city of New Orleans was taken by the 
Union troops in 1862, when he retired to his sugar plantation on Petite Anse 
Island. He went the following year to Texas, where he remained till the restora- 
tion of peace in 1865. 

He was married in 1837 to Miss Sarah C. Marsh, who died shonly before him. 
By this marriage there were two sons and three daughters. 



426 

1831. 

James Richards Fayerweat^er, son of Richard and Hannah (Richards) 
Fayerweather, was born in New Canaan, Conn., April 27, 1810. 

He studied law in the office of Hon. Hamilton Gamble, in St. Louis, Mo., and 
was admitted to the bar in that city in 1834, was married Nov. 20th of the same 
year to Ehza Ann Doan, and shortly thereafter removed to RushviUe, 111., and 
practiced there in his profession about five years. He thence removed to Bur- 
lington, Iowa, in which place he continued his practice and occupied several civil 
offices for some ten years. In 1855 he became actively engaged in railroad 
projects, then beginning to attract attention in the west, and was identified with 
such interests for upwards of twenty years. 

In 1875 he was prostrated by an attack of paralysis from which he suffered two 
years, and the direct result of which was liis death on the 27th day of June, 
1877, in Burlington. 

His wife and four sons survived him, two sons having died during his lifetime. 

1832. 

Abner Neal, son of a well-known bookseller of the same name, of Balti- 
more, Md., was born in that city, Aug. 7, 1810. 

He read law with James Mason Campbell, Esq., of Baltimore, and practiced his 
profession there until 1848, when he removed to the town of "Westminster, Carroll 
County, Md., where he continued in the pursuit of his profession until his death, 
on the 31st of August, 1874, at the age of 64. When "Westminister was erected 
into a city, he was elected its first mayor, and filled the office for several years. 

He was married Feb. 2, 1837, to Rose E., daughter of Abraham White, of Bal- 
timore. 

1834. 

William Henry Starr was born in Hartford, Conn., March 27, 1814, the 
second son of Charles and Nancy (Bodge) Starr. His parents removed to New 
York City in 1815, from which place he entered college with the class of 1833. 
He joined the class of 1834 in the third term of their Freshman year. After 
graduation he studied in the Yale Law School, and in the law office of Hon. Wm. 
W. Ellsworth (Y. C. 1810) of Hartford, and finally in New York city, where he was 
admitted to the bar. He was married, March 2, 1836, in Farmington, Conn., to 
Miss Frances C, daughter of Jamrs K. Camp, and soon after settled in Alton, 111. 
In 1838, he removed to Burlington, at that time in the Territory of Wisconsin, now 
in the State of Iowa, where he spent the most of his life. His wife died Dec. 
24, 1874. and his own death occurred Dec. 29, 1876. Of their seven children, two 
sons and two daughters survived them. 

1837. 

Arnoldus "Vanderhorst Dawson was born in Charleston, S. C, Apr. 11, 
1818, and died in the same city, Feb. 26, 1871, aged nearly 53 years. Ho studied 
law, and married Miss Hester Simons, of Charleston, who is also deceased. 

Walter Thomas Lenox was born in Washington, D. C, Aug. 15, 1817, and 
died in the same city, July 16, 1874. 



427 



After graduation he studied law in Washington, and entered on its practice 
there. He was at one time Mayor of the city. 

1839. 

John Mason Grant, son of Charles and Hannah Grant, was born in Litchfield 
Coun., June 14, 1817. ' 

He spent four years in theological study, -the first three in the Yale Divinity 
School, and the fourth in the Union Theol. Seminary, N. Y. City, where he also 
attended medical lectures. He then spent some years in teaching in New York 
City and the neighborhood, and in Virginia. In March, 1849, he entered the ser- 
vice of the Maryland Tract Society as colporteur, and continued in this employ- 
ment until July, 1 853. After another interval of teaching, he settled in Balti- 
more, in January, 1856, as an agent for the sale of religious periodicals. In No- 
vember, 1862, he was appointed as Assistant Assessor of Internal Revenue and 
was occupied with the duties of that position and as a book agent for several 
years. 

The last part of his life was spent in Florida, where he died, at Clearwater Har- 
bor, Hillsborough County, Nov. 3, 1818, aged 61 years. 

1841. 

Henry "William Wood, son of Andrew and Matilda A. Wood, was born in 
Washington, Ky., Oct. 2, 1822, and had graduated at Centre College, Danville, Ky., 
in 1839, before entering the Junior class in Yale College. 

He spent his life in his native place as a dry-goods merchant, and died there, 
after a few days of violent illness, Feb. 9, 1873, aged 50 years. 

He married, March 20, 1844, Miss Hannah J. Lashbrooke, of Washington, who 
survives him, with two sons and three daughters. 

1846. 

Charles Josias Pennington, eldest son of Josias and Sophia C. (Clapham) 
Pennington, was born in Baltimore, Md., Oct. 29, 1826, and died in the same city 
March 27, 1877, aged 50 years. 

He studied law in Baltimore, and opened an oflBce there, but in 1856, his 
health being unsettled, he removed to St. Paul, Minn., where he remained three 
years. He then returned to the East and accepted a clerkship in the Census Bureau 
at Washington. At the breaking out of the civil war he resigned his position and 
returned to Baltimore. He did not ag^n practice his profession, but spent the 
latter years of his life in retirement at Oakland, Garrett County, Md. 

He married April 4, 1852, Elizabeth T. Winder, of Talbot County, Md., who 
with his children — two sons and a daughter — survives him. 

1847. 

Sidney Tennent was born Feb. 19, 1827, near Seaford, in Sussex County, 
Del., and entered college from Philadelphia, Pa. 

He studied law in Philadelphia, and was admitted to the bar in 1850. In the 
same year he went to California, and received the appointment of Inspector of the 
Revenue for the port of San Francisco ; he was also admitted to the bar in that 



428 

city and engaged in the practice of his profession. His health failing him, he soon 
removed to St. Joseph, Mo., where he practiced law for several years, and also 
edited a paper. On the organization of the Territory of Kansas in 1854, he settled 
in Troy, the county seat of Doniphan County in that Territory, where he had an ex- 
tensive practice until near the time of his death. He died in Troy, of consumption, 
Aug. 10, 1873, aged 46 years. 

Col. Tenneat married Miss Chloe M. Smith, of Troy, Apr. 26, 1863, by whom he 
had one daughter, who died in infancy. His widow has since married Col. Cyrus 
Leland (Harvard Coll. 1832), of Troy. 

1848. 

Samuel Alexander Strickler, son of Benjamin and Sarah (Eakin) Strickler, 
was born in Shelbyville, Tenn., May 2, 1826. 

He studied law with an uncle in Nashville, but did not practice. He was in 
business in Nashville until 1851, and was subsequently clerk in a banking house 
in New York city. 

While on his way from New York in May, 1872, to visit relatives in Tennessee, 
he stopped for a day or two in Indianapolis, Ind., and there, in a fit of insanity (caused 
as is supposed by excitement on the subject of religion), took his own life. He 
was unmarried. 

1853. 

Benjamin Franklin Baer was bom in Lancaster, Pa., Jan. 9, 1834, and died 
after a lingering illness in the same place, Jan. 19, 1875, 

He studied law in the Yale Law School and in the ofiBce of Nathaniel Ellmaker, 
Esq., of Lancaster, and was admitted to the bar in September, 1 856. He practiced 
his profession in his native place. In the summer of 1862 he entered the Union 
Army as Captain of a company of the 122d Regiment Penns. Volunteers, but his 
health did not permit his seeing much active service in the field, and he was 
honorably discharged in April, 1863, on account of physical disability. He was 
never married. 

1859. 

Rudolph McMurtrie, only son of Dr. B. E. and Ellen (Dorsey) McMurtrie, was 
born April 5, 1838, in Huntingdon, Pa., from which place he entered college at the 
beginning of the Sophomore year. 

After graduation he studied law at home, and was admitted to the bar April 15, 
1862. He soon after entered the U. S! Army as a private, and served for nine 
months. After his discharge he enlisted in the Navy, where he served for about 
a year. Returning to Huntingdon he began practice, but after two years, having 
no taste for his profession, and having acquired a competent estate by his father's 
death he abandoned the law and devoted himself to other business. He died in 
Huntingdon, Nov. 9, 1870, after a short illness, leaving a widow, but no children. 
His wife was Jennie, daughter of Hon, Seth T. Hurd, of Brownsville, Pa. 

John Onins Slay, son of William Slay, was born in Hazlettville, Kent County, 
Del,, Feb, 14, 1839, and entered at the beginning of the Sophomore year, from 
Camden, Del., then his father's residence. 



429 

Upon leaving College he pursued the study of law in the ofiBce of Hon. Martin 
W. Bates, of Dover, Del., and in October, 1862, was admitted to the bar. He prac- 
ticed law in Dover (in several cases gaining particular credit) until April, 1864, 
when he removed to Chestertown, Md., as an assistant in the office of Hon. George 
Vickers. In a short time Gen. Vickers was elected to the U. S. Senate, and Mr, 
Slay being admitted to full partnership, the work of the firm mainly devolved upon 
him. His devotion to business was so incessant, that his health gradually grew 
weaker under the strain, until about Christmas, 1870, when on account of symp- 
toms of consumption, developed by close confinement and study, he was obliged to 
seek rest. Rather retrograding then mending, he spent the summer of 1871 in 
the Alleghany mountains, and in October of the same year went to Minnesota, but 
in June, 1872, returned to his father's house at Camden, where he died on the 27th 
of that month, aged 33 years. His unfinished career gave promise of marked 
distinction at the bar. He was not married. 

1860. 

Alfred Conrad Palfrey, son of William T. and Sidney A. (Conrad) Palfrey, 
was born in Franklin, La,, March 20, 1839, and died of pneumonia, after a painful 
illness of three months, at New Iberia, La., June 18, 1879, aged 40 years. 

On graduation he went to Charleston, S. C, where he was married, Nov. 27, 
1860, to EUza E., eldest daughter of James Tupper, Esq., Master in Equity of 
Charleston, He was the confidential assistant of his father-in-law in his business 
until the breaking out of the civil war, when he enlisted as a private in the Charles- 
ton Light Dragoons (afterwards Company K, 4th S, C, Cavalry), He continued 
with that command until in Oct., 1864, he was appointed assistant Auditor of S. 
Carolina, a position which his failing health made it advisable for him to accept. 
Soon after the close of the war he resumed his duties in the office of the Master of 
Equity, and remained in that employment until the death of Mr. Tupper in 1868. 
His wife died in Charleston, May 2, 1866, and in 1874 he removed to New Orleans, 
La. In 1876 he was appointed Secretary of the Sugar Shed Association of that 
city, and held this position until his death. One son, the last of a family of four 
children, survives him. 

1864. 

Elias Loughborough Kerr, son of Elias Kerr, was born in Fleming, N. Y., 
March 24, 1842. • 

After graduation he studied at the Albany Law School, receiving the degree 
LL.B. in May, 1865. He first settled in Lincoln, 111., but removed in the summer 
of 1867 to Omaha, Nebraska, and a year or two later to Laramie City, Wyoming 
Territory, where he practiced law until his very sudden death in 1871. He was 
unmarried. 

1869. 

Cornelius Sullivan, son of Patrick Sullivan, was bom in Bristol, Conn., Aug. 
15, 1846, and died in New York City in June, 1878. 

On graduation he went to New York City and there studied law and entered on 
its practice. About 1874 he was attacked with pulmonary consumption, and the 
remaining years of his life were years of much suflfering. He continued, however, 
to practice his profession up to the day of his death. He was unmarried. 



430 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1823. 

Horatio Nelson Fenn was bom in Plymouth, Conn., in March, 1^98, and died 
in Rochester, N. Y., April 10, 1871, aged 13 years. 

At an early age he removed with his father to New Haven, Conn., and he had 
already spent three years as a clerk in a drug store, when in the autumn of 1817 
he removed to Rochester, N. Y. He there pursued medical studies with Dr. F. F. 
Backus (Y. C. 1813), in whose drug store he was employed. 

After his graduation he began the practice of medicine in the village of Geneseo, 
N. Y., but in 1826 became engaged in the manufacture of window glass in Peter- 
borough, N. Y. This euterprise not proving successful, he resumed in 1830 the 
practice of his profession in Kochester, associating therewith the practice of dent- 
istry, in which art he was a pioneer in Western New York. After three or four 
years he devoted himself wholly to dentistry, in which he continued to be actively 
engaged until disabled by rheumatism some six or seven years before his death. 

He was married in October, 1833, to Henrietta F, Hughes, of Hagerstown, Md., 
who survived him and died March 21, 1879. Two of their four children are still 
living, 

1839. 

Ebenezer Bingham Allen, son of Deacon Ebenezer and Eliza B. Allen, was 
born in Hanover, a parish in the township of Lisbon (now in Sprague), New Lon- 
don County, Conn., Dec. 26, 1816. His medical studies were in part pursued with 
Dr. Wm. Witter. 

He practiced medicine in Belchertown and Chicopee, Mass., until the year 1 846, 
when he removed to Lawrence, Mass., practicing there until 1862. He then entered 
the U. S. army as surgeon, and served for one year, when his health failed him. 
In 1865 he gave up his profession, and removed to Norwich, Conn., opening an 
office there as a wool-broker. He continued in that business until his death, of 
Bright's disease, in Norwich, Dec. 1, 1873. 

He married in 1840 Miss Abbie C. Tingley, of Windham, Conn., who survives 
him, with one of their three children. 

• 
1841. 

Timothy Langdon died in New Haven, Conn., July 29, 1874, aged 56 years. 
He was bom in Bethlehem, Conn., March 14, 1818. His fathei* was Rev. John 
Langdon (Y. C. 1809), pastor of the Congreigational Church in Bethlehem, and his 
mother was Elizabeth Pierpont, of Litchfield, Conn., sister of Rev. John Pierpont 
(Y. C. 1804). 

During his medical course he spent considerable time in the office of Alanson 
Abbe, M.D. (Y. C. 1821), of Litchfield, and soon after receiving his degree he be- 
gan practice in Naugatuck, Conn., where he remained till the year 1867. The 
active duties of his profession were interrupted in 1848 by a severe and protracted 
illness from the effects of which he never fully recovered. In 1867 he removed to 
New Haven, where he spent most of his remaining days. 



431 



He was married, in Litchfield, Dec. 1, 1841, to Mary A. Morse, who survives him 
with one daughter. His only son died in 1856, and one daughter died a few days 
after his own death. 

1847. 

Nathaniel Bo wen Cooke, son of John and Susan (Bo wen) Cooke, was born in 
Cambridgeport, Mags., Feb. 26, 1816. 

He graduated at Brown University in 1 840, and spent the next three years as 
teacher of a select school in Bristol, R. I. He then spent a brief time in the Theol. 
Institution in Newton Center, Mass., and in 1844 begun the study of medicine, 
attending a course of lectures at the Medical School of Harvard University. 

On receiving his degree he began the practice of his profession, and subsequently 
returned to school teaching in Webster, Mass., and in Bristol, R. I. In 1862 he 
was ordained pastor of the Baptist Church, at Greenville, in the town of Leices- 
ter, Mass. In 1869 he was settled over the Baptist Church in Lonsdale, R. I., 
where he died, April 14, 1871. He was married in April, 1846, to Anne R. Mon- 
roe, of Bristol, who survived him with one daughter. 



1872. 

Joseph Mansfield Homiston died in Brooklyn, N. Y., Apr. 8, 1879, aged 50 
years. He was a native of Massachusetts, and had practiced in Brooklyn for sev- 
eral years. He had been in waning health for nearly two years. 



INDEX 



Members of the Law^ Medical^ and Philosophical Departments are denoted by 
the letters ?, m, and p, respectively. 



Class 




Page 


Class 




Page 


1833 


Abbot, Rufus 


95 


1866m Bartlett, Stephen C. 


376 


1858 


Abbott, Montelins 


269 


1847 


Bassett, Benj. F. 


223 


1825 


Abernethy, ^ohn J. 


386 


1823 


Martin B. 


336 


1878 


Ackerman, George C, 


411 


1858 


Batchelor, Edward P. 


269 


1842 


Adam, John H., 


27 


1833 


Bates, S. Henshaw 


345 


1867 


Adams, Arthur H. 


408 


1826 


Beach, Isaac C. 


88 


1835 


p]benezer B. 


279 


1817 


Beard, John 


243 


1821 


Geo. E. 


210 


1828 


Beardsley, Sheldon 


53 


1817 


Alden, Augustus 


11 


1846m Beecher, Josiah H. 


112 


1867 


Allen, Beverly 


309 


1825 


Belden, Joshua 


53 


1839w EbenezerB. 


430 


1837m Bell, Artemas, 


275 


1870 


Andrews, John W. 


409 


1874 


Bent, Thomas A. 


272 


1866m Angles, Leopold A. L. 


376 


1843 


Benton, Wm. A . 


186 


1828 


Arms, Ebenezer W. 


252 


1843m Belts, Wm. G. 


67 


1849 


Arnold, Edward A. 


360 


1845 


Bibbins, Wm. B. 


28 


1861 


Hubbard 


226 


1816 


Bird, Isaac 


207 


1823 


Ashmun, George 


17 


1863 


Bishop, Edw. G. 


32 


1842 


Atwater, Horace 0. 


351 


1795 


Timothy 


71 


1827 


Wmiam 


291 


1849m Bissell, Gaylord G. 


414 


1846 


Wm. W. 


142 


1828 


Biackman, Alfred 


388 


1814 


Atwood, John M. 


79 


1839 


Blake, E. Whitney 


139 


1871 


Auchincloss, Frederick L. 


371 


1872 


Frank W. 


232 


1841 


Austen, Philip H. 


350 


1850 


Blatchley, Joel S. 


143 


1830 


Averill, James R. 


425 


1812 


Bliss, George 


115 


1830 


Avery, Daniel D. 


425 


1822 


J.Lee 


125 


1836 


Charles P. 


180 


1871 


Orville J. 


193 


1868 


Ayres, Russ W. 


151 


1871 


Board, Charles H. 


66 








1829 


Boardraan, Henry A. 


388 


1794 


Bacon, Ezekiel 


3 


1868 


Herbert 


230 


1856 


George B. 


267 


1812 


Wm. W. 


46 


1823 


Badger, Milton 


86 


1820 


Bogert, Cornelius R. 


288 


1853 


Baer, Benj. F. 


428 


1852 


Boies, Wm. 


61 


1822 


Baker. Osmyn 


169 


1860 


Boltwood, Edward 


309 


1809 


Baldwin, Burr 


383 


1864 


Thomas K. 


108 


1852 


Bannan, Douglass R, 


61 


1864 


Booth, Chas. E. 


33 


1849 


Thomas R. 


361 


1821 


Bouton, Nathaniel 


288 


1826 


Barber, Eldad 


19 


1819m Bowers, Benj. F. 


194 


1847 


Barnard, George G. 


359 


1833 


Bradford,^Edward A. 


95 


1846 


Barnes, Albert H. 


302 


1863 


Bradley, Frank H. 


369 


1825 


Josiah 


53 


1853 


Henry R. 


30 


1851 


Julius S. 


9 


1834 


Brainerd, Davis S. 


179 


1844 


Barrett, Myron 


220 


1822 


Joseph H. 


333 


1813 


Barstow, Zedekiah S. 


78 


1821 


Brewer, Josiah 


83 


1828 


Bartlett, David E. 


387 


1845 


Brickell, James N. 


354 



434 



Class 




Page 


Class 




Paife 


1822 


Brinsmade, Horatio N. 


334 


1859 


Catlin, Benj. S. 


31 


1840 


Wm. B. 


399 


1834 


Chalker, Henry 


179 


1848 


Brintou, John F. 


360 


1807 


Champion, Aristarchus 


43 


1839 


Bristed, Charles A. 


139 


1841 


Champlin, Louis D. 


57 


1827 


Bristol, Albert G. 


90 


1808 


Chandler, John 


203 


1825 


William B. 


250 


1817 


Chapin, Augustus L. 


331 


1820 


Brockway, John H. 


15 


1870 


Charles H. 


65 


1818 


Bronson, Oliver 


209 


1868 


John M. 


109 


1869 


Brown, A. Lardner 


409 


1828 


Chapman, Frederick W. 


253 


1868; 


David B. 


38 


1868 


Timothy P. 


230 


1813 


Ebenezer 


421 


1873 


Chase, John F. 


312 


1809 


Garrett G. 


4 


1866 


Chatfield, Charles C. 


271 


1865 


Henry A. 


370 


1840 


Chauvenet, Wm. 


25 


1841 


Joseph 


351 


1817 


Chesebrough, Robert J. 


11 


1817 


Nehemiah 


207 


1818 


Chester, Alfred 


12 


1832 


Samuel R. 


392 


1845 


Charles T. 


401 


1812 


Solyman 


204 


1824 


Child, Linus 


18 


1821 


Waldo 


289 


1817 


WiUaKd 


285 


1864 


Browning, Robert M. 


228 


] 823m Church, Austin 


412 


1823 


Buck, David 


211 


1829 


John B. 


214 


1835 


Edward 


260 


1876 


Clapp, Lowell L. 


410 


1873 


Buckingham, Ebenezer H. 


311 


1841 


Clark, Charles H. 


141 


1867 


Buckland, Joseph P. 


405 


1826 


Edwin E. 


89 


1834 


Budiugtou, Wm. I. 


393 


1837m Joseph W. 


374 


1836 


Buel, Frederick, 


137 


1833 


Josiah 


295 


1812 


BufEett, Wm. P. 


160 


1838 


LotC. 


397 


1818 


Bugbee, Francis 


287 


1838 


Perkins K. 


56 


1824 


Bulkeley, Eliphalet A. 


52 


1821 


Peter F. 


169 


1821 


Bulkley, Henry D. 


51 


1817 


Smith 


244 


1861 


Milton 


63 


1824 


Clarke, Tertius S. 


170 


1863 


BuU, Cornelius W. 


228 


1837 


Walter 


23 


1832 


Bunker, James M. 


134 


1841 


WiUiam H. 


300 


1826 


Bunnell, James F. 


131 


1847 


Cleaveland, George N. 


302 


1839 


Burr, David J. 


260 


1829 


Clemson, William F. 


343 


1803 


Burrall, Thomas D. 


71 


1870 


Cleveland, H. Augustus 


109 


1826 


Wm. P. 


131 


1808 


Coe, Noah 


23 


1827 


Bushnell, Horace 


213 


1872 


Robert E. 


110 


1841 


Jackson J. 


98 


1834 


Coffing, Churchill 


135 


1835 


Nehemiah 


95 


1823m Cogswell, William H. 


273 


1828 


William 


341 


1856 


Coit, Alfred 


364 


1828w Butler, Thomas B. 


111 


1 829m Coleman, James B. 


314 


1842 


Buttles, Albert B. 


58 


1846 


Collins, Isaac C. 


403 


1839 


Button, Philander 


297 


1820 


Collis, John T. 


15 


1834m[Byington, Noah H. 


315 


1848 


Colton, Henry M. 


60 








1848 


Condit, Charles 


264 


1858 


Caldwell, Samuel 


106 


1837m Cone, Robert C. 


414 


1849 


Came, Charles G. 


361 


1869 


Conkling, Frederick G. 


34 


1831 


Camp, Henry B. 


390 


1813 


Converse, Sherman 


120 


1816m Campbell, Harvey 


313 


1846 


Conyngham, John B. 


59 


1846w Candee, Judsoa 


36 


1829m Cooke, Chauncey L. 


373 


1832 


Caperton, Allen T. 


256 


1815 


George 


9 


1853 


Capron, Samuel M. 


145 


1863 


Joseph P. 


^ 408 


1846 


William B. 


264 


1847 m Nathaniel B. 


431 


1824m Carpenter, Nelson 


110 


1863 


Cooley, Henry E. 


270 


1859 


Robert J. 


366 


1870 


Cope, Orlando 


66 


1828 


Carter, Wm. 


20 


1863 


Cortelyou, Adrian V. 


149 


1822 


Case, Francis H. 


84 


1848 


Cotton, Charles T. 


264 


1842 


Leonard 


399 


1836 


Cowles, Edw. P. 


181 


1828 


Casey, Edward W. 


91 


1873;? Cragin, Charles A. 


377 



435 



Class 




Page 


Class 




Page 


1843 


Cramer, Charles 


300 


1847 


Ellsworth, Stukely 


223 


1854/) Crosby, Stephen L. 


319 


1810 


Ely, Ellas H. 


119 


1857 


Croxton, John T. 


147 


1843 


Isaac M. 


400 


1827 


Cushing, Joseph 


387 


1834m William W. 


374 


1839 


Cutler, Rufus P. 


298 


1848 


Emerson, Rockwell 


353 


1831 


Wm. W. 


21 


1845 


Emigh, Ward 


28 








1863 


Emmons, Julius 


64 


1874^ 


Danforth, Wm. B. 


234 


1839 


Estes, D. Gordon 


140 


1847 


Darrow, Amos S. 


302 


1821 


Est/, Isaac 


210 


1818 


Davis, Richard D. 


31 


1857 


Evans, Edward J. 


405 


183t 


Dawson, Arnoldus V. 


426 


1857 


Evan W. 


143 


1812 


Day, Benjamin 


47 


1858 


Lemuel R. 


63 


1818 


Caleb 


81 








1839 


Thomas 


24 


1859 


Faulkner, Samuel D. 


367 


1847m Deacon, John 


276 


1831 


Fayerweather, James R. 


426 


1841 


Dean, Gilbert 


26 


1856 


Pellowes, Francis 


30 


1843 


Philotus 


58 


1823m Penn, Horatio N. 


430 


1812 


Delafield, Edward 


161 


1849 


Stephen 


188 


1808 


Joseph 


160 


1853^ 


Ferguson, John D. 


319 


1836 


Deming, Henry C. 


97 


1844 


Ferry, Orris S. 


220 


1824 


Denison, Jeremiah T. 


338 


1841 


Field, Maunsell B. 


183 


1836 


Dent, Henry H. 


97 


1878;; 


Fnich, Henry 0. 


416 


1817 


Dickinson, Baxter* 


208 


1860 


Finney, Edgar A. 


107 


1823 


Edward 


129 


1835 


Fisher, Samuel W. 


136 


1823 


Richard W. 


169 


1810 


Fitch, Eleazer T. 


6 


1845 


Dickson, A. FHnn 


354 


1854 


Flagg, Willard C. 


306 


1814 


Samuel H. 


48 


1814 


Floyd, Augustus 


331 


1823m Dimock, Timothy 


152 


1866 


Foote, Harry W. 


150 


1813 


Dixon, Abram 


162 


1820 


Jared 


123 


1830 


Dorsey, Samuel W. 


215 


1849 


Ford, RufusA. 


223 


1871^ 


Downes, Michael E. 


279 


1844 


Foster, Charles 


263 


1851 


Downie, Timothy C. 


189 


1834 


Eleazer K. 


258 


182677iDriggs, Asa J. 


314 


1828 


Lemuel 


54 


1866m DuBois, Cornelius J. 


415 


1807 


Fowler, James 


118 


1814 


Dulles, Joseph H. 


205 


1860 


Wm. 


191 


1862 


Dunbar, James A. 


270 


1850 


Frost, George L. 


362 


1820 


Duncan, Garnett 


168 


1875 


Fuller, Wilbur A. 


273 


1844 


Henry P. 


401 








1856 


Dunlap, Ira 


268 


1820 


Gadsden. Philip 


82 


1832 


Dunning, Edward 0. 


134 


1829 


Galatty, Stephen 


425 


1827 


Durant, Henry 


173 


1842 


Gardiner, Hugh B. 


185 


1829 


Dutton, Warren B. 


176 


1833 


Gardner, Robert D. 


155 


1852 


Dwight. James H. 


103 


1816 


Garfield, John M. 


49 


1859 


T. Bradford 


367 


18.34 


Gaylord, Reuben 


394 


1827??iDyer, George 


314 


1829 


Gilbert, Edwin R. 


133 








1878 


George E. 


411 


1846 


Eakln, Wm. S. 


403 


1842 


Gill, Robert T. 


141 


1821 


Eastman, Oman 


123 


1841 


Gillett, Ezra H. 


219 


1876 


Easton, Henry C. 


273 


1829 


Gillette, Francis 


389 


ISeQp 


Ebell, Adrian J. 


277 


1820. 


Goddard, George C. 


50 


1832 


Eddy, Henry 


94 


1797 


Goodrich, Chas. 


38 


1814 


Edwards, David S. 


121 


1814 


Horace 


421 


1828 


J. Erskine 


91 


1843 


Wm. H. 


186 


1819 


Jonathan 


209 


1806 


Goodwin, George 


283 


J812 


Samuel L. 


241 


1849 


Gordon, George A. 


101 


1860 


Elder, D. Riker 


191 


1866 


Gormly, Edwin C. 


408 


1829 


Eldridge, Joseph 


177 


1817 


Grammer, John 


12 


1869 


Eliason, John 


109 


1830 


Grant, Elijah P. 


177 


1813 


Elliot, George A. 


■ 7 


1857 


James H. 


406 



436 



Class 

1838 Grant, Joel 
1845 John 

1839 John M. 
]85t Green, Richard H. 
1856m Gregory, Ehjah 
1829m Ira 

1840 Samuel 

1816 Gridley, Frederick 
1875 Grinnell, Frank L. 
187 Ip Griswold, Charles W. 
1821 John F. 

1818 Roger W. 

1818 Samuel 

1867^ Grove, Peter H. 

1855 Groves, Lafayette W. 

1875^ Guernsey, Charles W. 

1818 Gurley, R. Randolph 

1842 Hadley, James 

1844 Haight, Henry H. 

1835 Haile, Ashbel B. 
1840 Hall, Gordon 
1863m Newton B. 

1852 Reginald H. 

1853 T. Dwight 

1827 Hallam, Robert A. 

1839 Hammond, Charles 
1848Z George C. W. 
1869 Hand, George E. 
1857^ Harger, Charles 

1815 Harleston, Edward 

1845 Harrington, George D. 
1875^ Harris, George 

1854 Jacob B. 
1831 Harrison, Hugh T. 

1836 Hart, Edward L. 

1840 James P. 

1831 John C. 
1828m Hartshorn, Isaac 

1817 Hartshorne, Robert 
1808 Harvey, Joseph 
1810 Hasbrouck, A. Bruyn 

1851 Hastings, George G. 
1864 Haughee, Thomas 
1829m Hawley, Almon 
1823 Haxall, Robert W. 
1823 Hayes, Gordon, 

1826 Hayner, Henry Z. 

1852 Helmer, Charles D. 
1835 Hequembourg, Charles L. 
1842 Hiester, Isaac E. 

1861 Hill, Charles B. 

1816 George 
1823 Whitmill J. 
1875^ Hillyer, S. Lee 
1815 Hinsdale, Charles J. 

1832 Hitchcock, Henry L. 

1828 Hoffman, George B. 

1827 Philip R. 



Page 


Class 




Page 


138 


1827 


Hogeboom, Henry- 


90 


355 


1852m HoUy, Pierre R. 


276 


427 


1825m Holmes, Henry 


35 


268 


1857 


John M. 


62 


318 


1821m Holt, Hiram 


34 


111 


1872m Homiston, Joseph M. 


431 


57 


1849 


Hough, Edward C. 


60 


10 


1827 


Howe. Samuel 


174 


232 


1817 


Hubbard, Anson 


422 


321 


1840 


Chauncey H. 


261 


52 


1829m Denison H. 


194 


423 


1875 


Frank E. 


410 


167 


1818 


Hubbell, Horatio 


423 


320 


1818 


Huggins, James S. 


82 


146 


1855 


Hughes, Aug. DeB. 


190 


321 


1809 


Hungerford, Wm. 


76 


81 


1 847m Hunt, Isaac S. 


233 




1815 


Huntington, Andrew 


80 


99 


1819 


Asahel 


14 


353 


1840 


Elijah B. 


299 


395 


1821 


Enoch 


245 


400 


1814 


Jedediah 


8 


376 


1825 


Oliver E. 


291 


104 


1818 


Samuel H. 


385 


224 


1818 


Hurlbut, Joseph 


167 


251 


1855 


Hyde, Simeon T. 


267 


348 








37 


1808 


Ingersoll, Ralph L 


75 


151 


1822m Isham, Oliver K. 


66 


196 


1852 


Ives, Charles L. 


363 


80 


1841 


Geo. W. 


184 


356 


1863 


Wilbur 


32 


234 








189 


1847 


Jackson, Angelo 


359 


93 


1844 


John 


301 


218 


1840 


James, Horace 


182 


261 


1847 


Jessup, Edward 


69 


54 


1835 


Johnson, Alexander S. 


296 


274 


1869p 


Edward W. 


320 


81 


1823 


Edwards 


130 


74 


1 829m Samuel 


373 


329 


1861 


Wm. M. 


407 


144 


1843 


Johnston, Alex. 


187 


64 


1867 


Alex. 


228 


275 


1833 


William P. 


256 


52 


1831 


Jones, Elisha C. 


55 


129 


1820 


Henry 


333 


424 


1872 


James S. 


152 


362 


1831 


Wm. H. 


390 


217 

27 

192 


1809 


Judson, Philo 


118 


1855m Keese, Hobart 


68 


50 


1860 


Sidmon T. 


407 


424 


1815 


Kellogg, Henry 


122 


322 


1832 


Martin 


393 


48 


1834 


Kendall, John N. 


346 


34 


1843 


Kendrick, John 


262 


342 


1874Z 


Kennedy, Thomas D. 


319 


90 


1864 


Kerr, PJias L. 


429 



437 



Class 




Page 


Class 




Page 


1818 


Kimball, David 


168 


1850m Matthews. Henrv W. E. 


195 


1862 


Kimberly, Wm. R. 


107 


1825 


Maverick, Samuel A. 


18 


1821 


King, Asa H. 


16 


1831 


Mayer, John L. 


178 


1863 


Kingsbury, Howard 


370 


1814 


Meers, John D. 


242 


1815m Kirtland, Jared P. 


312 


1849 


Miles, James B. 


224 


1830 


Knox, James 


255 


1816 


Miller, Fleming B. 


166 








1835 


Mills, Ethelbert S. 


137 


18l5p 


Lake, WeUs C. 


278 


1835 


Geo. L. 


217 


1840 


Lamont, Geo. D. 


218 


1856 


Lewis E. 


307 


1846 


Lane, J. Homer 


403 


1826 


Sidney 


132 


1843 


William a 


301 


1815 


Mitchell, James H. 


122 


1841m Langdon, Timothy 


430 


1831m Monroe, Alexander L. B. 


373 


1814 


Lanman, Chas. J. 


8 


1844m Moody, George A. 


317 


1829 


Lathrop, John 


20 


1856 


Morehead, John C. 


147 


1825 


William M. 


251 


1828 


Morgan, Christopher 


254 


1856m Latimer, C. Clinton 


195 


1813 


Frederick 


279 


1814 


Law, John 


121 


1812 


Samuel C. 


242 


1822 


John S. 


247 


1874# 


Morris, James W. 


233 


1859m Lawton, John W. 


154 


1860 


John M. 


148 


1816 


Leavitt, Harvey F, 


165 


1875^ 


Morse, Charles F. 


278 


1814 


Joshua 


79 


1810 


Samuel F. B. 


44 


1837 


Sheldon 


297 


1811 


Sidney E. 


46 


1823m Lee, Henry S. 


194 


1816 


Moseley, Wm. A. 


122 


1814 


Leffingwell, Lucius W. 


163 








1813 


Legare, Isaac S, K. 


178 


1832 


Neal, Abner 


426 


1837 


Lenox, Walter T. 


426 


1830 


Neill, Benj. D. 


92 


1824 


Leonard, Frederick B. 


53 


1872^ 


Nevins, Thomas P. 


277 


1834 


Leverett, Wm. 


179 


1828 


Newton, Alfred 


342 


1845Z 


Lewis, Edw. Z. 


196 


1853 


Nicholas, Thos. P. 


30 


1828 


Lincoln, Thomas 0. 


253 


1847 


Nichols, Charles A, 


303 


1810 


Linsley, Ammi 


119 


1857 


Nolen, Geo. A. 


225 


1819 


Livingston, Walter 


423 


1815 


Norcross. Erasmus 


165 


1813 


Longstreet, Aug. B. 


47 


1839 


Norris, Wm. H. 


399 


1828 


Loomis. James C. 


292 


1849 


North, Romeo E. 


404 


1845 


Lord, A. William 


263 


1824 


Northrop, Bennett F. 


171 


1866mLounsbury, Dexter L. 


415 


1822 


Norton, Lot 


386 


1848 


Lowrey, Charles 


265 


1823 


Nott, Handel G. 


86 


1824 


James 


212 








1850 


Lyman, Joseph B. 


61 


1826 


Odiorne, James C. 


340 


1839m Sidney H. 


275 


1849m Olmstead, Roger S. 


375 


1822 


Solomon 


16 


1818 


Olmsted, Charles H. 


287 


1842 


Ljmes, Samuel 


352 








1834 


Lyon, Amasa U. 


346 


1862 


Page, Merritt C. 


270 








1860 


Palfrey, Alfred 0. 


429 


1866^3 


McAlister, Alex. U. 


196 


1828 


Palmer, Ezra 


292 


1823 


Mack, David 


337 


1^28 


John C. 


133 


1836 


McLean, Charles B. 


138 


1864 


Wm. H. 


33 


1835 


McLellan, Wm. 


395 


1846m Park. Edwin A. 


375 


1859 


McMurtrie, Rudolph 


428 


1826 


Parker, Aurelius D. 


172 


1835 


McPhaU, George W. 


23 


1826 


Edward W. 


212 


1858 


Manice, Edward A. 


308 


1808 


Parmelee, James H. 


76 


1805 


Marsh, Frederick, 


72 


1871 


Parsons. Frank M. 


311 


1823 


Marshall, Alexander W. 


248 


1872 


Lewis G. 


193 


1815 


Thomas A. 


10 


1819 


Samuel H. 


■ 10 


1817 


Marvin, Geo. 


166 


1867 


Payne, Henry W. 


314 


1850 


Massie, Patrick C. 


304 


1819 


Payson, Joshua P. 


17 


1864 


Mather, Edw. T. 


33 


1831m Peabod7, Jeremiah K 


66 


1837 


Oliver W. 


24 


1836 


Pearl, Joshua F. 


396 


1833 


Matson,' William N. 


257 


1840m Peaslee, Edmund R. 


314 



29 



438 



Class 




Page 


Class 




Page 


1849 


Peck, David 


143 


1822 


Robbins, James W. 


335 


1821 


Isaac 


246 


1808 


Silas W. 


44 


1875^ 


Marshall R 


278 


1810 


Robert, Daniel 


330 


1822 


Peet, Harvey P. 


84 


1815 


WiUiam S. 


285 


1846 


Pennington, Charles J. 


427 


1866 


Roberts, Henry 


229 


1858 


Penny, Benjamin F. 


148 


1829 


Robinson, Alex. C. 


92 


1828 


Perkins, Greorge 


176 


1821 


Charles 


246 


1861 


Geo. C. 


227 


1867 


Ernest 


34 


1843TO George E. 


276 


1870 


George A. 


66 


lS49m Moses H. 


154 


1811 


Henry 


330 


1817 


Samuel H. 


123 


1821 


RockweU, Edward 


124 


1818 


Thomas C. 


13 


1815 


Hubbard 


422 


1805 


Pettibone, John 0. 


240 


1824 


Wm. H. 


130 


1852 


Phelps, Henry E, 


305 


1806 


Root, James 


159 


1858 


Pickett, Joseph W. 


406 


1850 


N. W. Taylor 


105 


1816 


Pierce, George E. 


11 


1824m Rowland. Charles 


412 


1871^ Pierpont, D. Hobart 


155 


1812 


Rumsey, Wm. 


7 


1836 


Pierson, William S. 


347 


1860 


Russell, Jacob W. 


192 


1824 


Piatt, Dennis 


338 








1842 


Platts, John W. 


185 


1836 


Sabine, Joseph F. 


138 


1804 


Plummer. George 


43 


18TM 


Safiford, William E. 


321 


1831 


Polk, Trusten 


216 


1845 


St. John, Isaac M. 


402 


1869m PoU, Daniel 


318 


1834 


Samuel 


258 


1873p Poraeroy, Benj. 


233 


1836m Salisbury, Samuel T. 


153 


1822 


Porter, Amasa G. 


335 


1857 


Sandys, Edwin F. 


225 


1858 


Edward C. 


226 


1820 


Sanford, Peleg P. 


50 


l8ASm Henry C. 


317 


1831 


Rollin 


391 


1853 


Post, Samuel A. L. L. 


105 


1831 


Saunders, Ephraim D. 


93 


1833 


Potter, George L. • 


257 


1841 


Schott, Guy B. 


58 


1867m Henry 


416 


1866 


Schroeder, Ernest 


229 


1854 


Leander H. 


404 


1863 


Scott, Henry W. 


64 


1871^9 


Powell, Ferdinand E. 


68 


1835 


Seeley, John E. 


180 


1847 


Pratt, Andrew T. 


100 


1837 


Selfridge, Wm. W. 


218 


1857 


Geo. 


190 


1852m Sellew, Welles H. 


276 


1826 


Mark 


213 


1852 


Seropyan, Christopher D. 


145 


1820 


Nathaniel A. 


385 


1858 


Seymour, Edward 


269 


1826 


Preston, Wm. 


173 


1865 


Sharp, John 


228 


1835 


Prudden, George P. 


96 


1847 


William 


303 


1826 


Pumpelly, George J. 


89 


1819 


Sheldon. George 


423 








1840 


Shelton, Charles S. 


349 


1826 


Rankin, Robert G. 


341 


1829 


Sherman, Henry 


343 


1844 


Raymond, Edward A. 


99 


1818 


Sherwood. Henry 


288 


1841 


Henry H. 


220 


1824 


Justus 


339 


1825 


Moses 


172 


1846 


Thomas D. 


222 


1864 


Raynor, Gilbert J. 


150 


1843 


Shorter, Eli S. 


352 


1822 


Reed, Maro McL. 


289 


1829m Shove, Seth 


315 


1824 


Stephen 


*290 


1847 


Simons, Thomas Y. 


304 


1809 


Rice. John P. 


203 


isebp 


Skeel, Theron 


319 


1840 


Richards, George 


25 


1859 


Slay, John 0. 


428 


1807 


Guy 


73 


1822 


Smith, E. Goodrich 


126 


1827 


Robert K. 


132 


1849 


Edward P. 


265 


1849 


Richardson, Walker 


224 


1872 


Frank H. 


37i 


1834m William H. 


374 


1858 


George F. 


308 


1823 


Riddel, Samuel H. 


211 


1821 


John 


124 


1851 


Riddell, Wm. P. 


102 


1830 


John C. 


389 


1858 


Riley, Isaac 


365 


1817 


Nathan R. 


286 


1823 


Ripley, Joseph 


249 


1825 


Richard 


339 


1833m Rising, Henry H. 


35 


1816 


Walter 


422 


1826 


Ritter, Thomas 


213 


1865 


Walter B. 


229 



439 



Class 




F&fre 


Class 




Page 


1827 


Smyth, Ralph D. 


175 


1816W Tracy, Richard P. 


34 


1820 


Sneed, Samuel K. 


244 


1863m Tread way, Frederick S. 


37 


1835 


Snow, Aaron 


396 


1824 


Treat, Selah B. 


249 


1833 


Southard, John H. 


95 


1876 


Trumbull, David 


372 


1834 


Southmayd, Samuel G. 


295 


1851 


Edwin B. 


189 


1835m Spalding, Benj. B. 


153 


1820 


Tudor, Wm. W. 


61 


1855 


Spanier, Emil 


106 


1864 


Tyler, James B. 


66 


1854 


Sparrow, Orson C. 


306 








1829 


Spence, Thomas A. 


293 


1804 


Van Heuvel, Jacob A. 


159 


1857 


Spencer, I. Selden 


307 


1813 


Yan Rensselaer, Jeremiah 


8 


1815 


Sprague, Wm. B. 


205 


1826 


Philip S. 


20 


1805 


Spring, Gardiner 


114 


1824 


Wm. P. 


88 


1811 


Samuel 


284 


1838 


Yarnum, Joseph B. 


181 


1848 


Stanton, P]dmund D. 


101 


1823 


Yer Planck, William G. 


337 


1871 


Starr, John W. 


193 








1834 


Wm. H. 


426 


1847m Wakefield, JohnL. 


164 


1863 


Steele, Thomas C. 


271 


1864 


Walker, Alfred E. 


108 


1813 


Stevens, John A. 


162 


1867 


Henry W. 


212 


1814 


Stiles, Joseph C. 


163 


1809 


Ward, Samuel D. 


5 


1851 


R. Cresson 


102 


1872^ Wardwell, Daniel W. 


377 


1832 


Stone, CoUins 


22 


1852 


Waring, J. Frederick 


266 


1862 


Edward C. 


368 


1807 


Warner, Ely 


73 


1868J9 


Lewis B. 


68 


1822 


Waterbury, Jared B. 


248 


1842 


Seth B. 


262 


1822 


Waterman, Thomas T. 


127 


1848 


Strickler, Samuel A. 


428 


1849 


Waties, John 


101 


1819 


Strong, Maltby 


332 


1847 


Webster, George G. 


142 


1867 


Moses 


310 


1813 


Weed, John W. 


163 


1811 


Selah B. 


77 


1862 


Weeks, Robert K. 


227 


1869 


Sullivan, Cornelius 


429 


1849 


Weiser, Erastus H. 


102 


1823 


SuUivant, Wm. S. 


87 


1833m Welch, Benj. 


152 


1869 


Swan, T. Walter 


310 


1875 


Harmanus M., Jr. 


312 


1871 


Swann, Charles M. 


272 


1842 


Henry K. W. 


27 


1858 


Sweet, Preston I. 


366 


1822 


Weld, Charles H. 


424 


1856 


Swift, Charles A. 


365 


1809 


Welles, Gaylord 


6 








1858 


Wells, Henry A. 


31 


1855 


Talcott, George 


30 


1851 


Henry D. 


29 


1824 


Joel 


88 


1844m JohnF. 


36 


1837 


Tallman, Thomas 


98 


1863 


Wesson, Charles H. 


150 


1830 


Wm. M. 


294 


1815 


Wetmore, Wm. C. 


384 


1853 


Tarbox, Luther G. 


364 


1837 


Whelpley, James D. 


56 


1844 


Taylor, Nathan'l W. 


221 


1823 


White, Addison H. 


130 


1856 


Ohver S. 


147 


1853 


Whittelsey, Charles H. 


62 


1845 


Richard 


357 


1843m Whittlesey, Charles B. 


316 


1847 


Tennent, Sidney 


427 


1838 


Charles C. 


182 


1869 


Terry, Frederic P. 


152 


1834 


Wickes, Thos. 


23 


1840 


Thacher, George 


349 


1814 


Thomas S. 


243 


1846 


Thompson. Abijah H. 


' 222 


1822 


Wight, Wm. L. 


128 


1826 


Andrew 


19 


1845 


Wilbur, Nathan F. 


358 


1838 


Joseph P. 


398 


1847 


Wilcoxson, Martin Y. B. 


188 


1857 


William A. 


268 


1818 


Wilkins, Gouverneur M. 


13 


1852m Zebulon W 


276 


1857 


WiUey, Nathan 


191 


1814 


Tits worth, John 


80 


1831 


Williams, Alpheus S. 


344 


1822 


Todd, John 


127 


1840m Francke 


36 


1834 


Tomlinson, Geo. 


259 


1837 


Henrv 


348 


1825 


Topliff, Stephen 


212 


1869 


Orin M. 


231 


1834 


Totten, Thomas H. 


136 


1873 


Seth W. 


409 


1853 


Townsend, Charles 


305 


1800 


Thomas 


239 


1854 


Tracy, Albert H. 


145 


1 824m Williamson, Thomas S. 


412 


1806 


Phiaeas L. 


241 


1872 


Willson, Richard D. 


166 



440 



ClasB 

1864 Wilson, Harry 
1 845 w Winter, Enoch T. 
1869m Wixon, Hanford L. 
1854 Wolcott, Elizur 
1828 William 

1841 Wood, Henry W. 
1868 Wm. C. 

1850 Woodford, Oswald L. 



Page 


Class 




Page 


65 


1862 


Woodhull, George L. 


32 


67 


1830 


Woodruff, Lewis B. 


216 


318 


1862 


Woods, Robert G. 


149 


146 


1846Z 


Woodward, James M. 


112 


293 


1830m Wright, Albert A. 


413 


42Y 


1832 


James L. 


22 


231 


1822 


Luther 


16 


29 









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