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Full text of "Obituary record of the graduates of the undergraduate schools, deceased 1860-70--1950/51"

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OBITUARY BECORD 



GRADUATES OF YALE DNIVERSITY 



DECEASED FROM JUNE, 1880, TO JCM, 1890. 



PRESENTED AT THE ANNUAL MEETINGS 
OF THE ALUMNI, 



1880-90. 



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o-s*. 



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NEW HAVEN: 

TUTTLE, MOREHOUSE & TAYLOR, PRINTERS, 
1890. 




^ DEC 31 1037 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OP 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 

June, 1881- 

[.INCLUDING THE RECORD OF A FEW WHO DIED PREVIOUSLY, HITHEItTO UNREPOKTEU. 

[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUItmi, JUNE 88th, I881.J 
[No. 1 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 40 of the whole Record.] 



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■*-3^(^' 




OBITUARY RECORD 



GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 
June, 1881. 

Including the record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting op the Alumni, June 28th, 1881.] 

[No. 1 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 40 of the whole Record.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTJVIENT. 

1811. 

Samuel Nichols, son of Ephraim and Miriam (Bradly) Nichols, 
was born on Greenfield Hill, in Fairfield, Conn., Nov. 14, 1787, 
and entered college in 1809, during the last term of the Sopho- 
more year. 

After graduation he studied for the ministry of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church under the direction of the Rev. Timothy 
Clowes, of Albany, N. Y., and was subsequently appointed by 
the wardens and vestry of Trinity Church, N. Y., tutor in the 
academy in Fairfield, Herkimer County. He was married, March 
27, 1816, to Miss Susan N. Warner, and some months later was 
ordained deacon by Bishop Hobart in New York City. After an 
interval of residence in Connecticut, he was called in 1819 to the 
rectorship of St. Matthew's Church, in Bedford, Westchester 
County, N. Y., where he was advanced to the priesthood, March 
10, 1820. He held this rectorship, with great sincerity of devo- 
tion to the interests of his people, till obliged by failing health to 
resign in 1838. He then removed to the place of his birth, 
where the rest of his life was spent, amid the universal esteem of 
the community. He died in Greenfield Hill, July 17, 1880, in his 
93d year, the oldest living presbyter of the American Episcopal 
2 



Church. The degree of D.D. was conferred on him by Williams 
College a few weeks before his death. His wife died March 22, 
1872, in her '74th year. Their seven sons and two daughters are 
all living, — two of the sons being graduates of this college in the 
classes of 1835 and 1841. 

David Marsh Smith, the only child of the Rev. David Smith, 
D.D., by his first wife, Betsey Marsh, was born in New Marl- 
borough, Mass., Aug. 11, 1789. After his mother's early death, 
his father fitted for college (graduating here in 1795), and subse- 
quently was long the pastor of the church in Durham, Conn. 

Immediately upon graduation he entered the Andover Theol. 
Seminary, where he finished the course in 1814. He .was soon 
after ordained, and in 1816 went as a missionary to Lewiston, 
Niagara County, N. Y., where he was installed over a Presby- 
terian Church the following year, and remained till 1828. He 
next supplied the pulpit in Little Falls, N. Y., for about a year, 
and from 1830 to 1835 had charge of the Presbyterian Church 
and of the academy in Stockbridge, Madison County, N. Y. He 
was then for four years principal of an academy in Stockport, 
Columbia County, N. Y., which he left to become the general 
agent of the N. Y. State Society for improving popular education 
by the establishment of Normal Schools. He subsequently sup- 
plied weak churches in difierent parts of the State, especially in 
Lewis County, until his removal to Princeton, N. J., in 1860, 
where the remainder of his long life was spent. He died in 
Princeton, July 15, 1880, in his 91st year, of bilious ieY^er. 

He was married, Aug. 29, 1815, to Clarissa, daughter of Robert 
Parker, of Londonderry, N. H. She died in Princeton, Sept. 24, 
1863. Their three sons and one of their three daughters survive 
them. 

1815. 

Levi Brooks, son of Levi and Persis (Ely) Brooks, was born 
in Springfield, Mass., Sept, 23, 1791. 

He was first employed after graduating as a private tutor in 
New York, and then studied medicine, completing his course in 
the Medical Department of this college, and receiving a license 
to practice from the Conn. Medical Society in 1819. He prac- 
ticed his profession for three years in Catskill, N. Y., where he 
was married to Asenath, daughter of Judge Blanchard ; and in 



1822 he removed to Ohio. He continued in practice in St. 
Clairville, Belmont County, and in other localities in the middle 
and northern parts of that State until about 1844, when he re- 
tired. He settled in Cleveland about 1855, where his wife died, 
Aug. 30, 1864. Thence he removed, a year or two later, to the 
residence of a married daughter in Albion, N. Y., with whom the 
remainder of his life was spent. He retained the use of his facul- 
ties unimpaired until a few weeks before his death, when a slight 
stroke of paralysis rendered him speechless. He died Aug. 28, 
1878, at the age of 87. Five of his nine children survive him. 

Nathaniel Benedict Smith, only child of the Hon. Nathaniel 
Smith, Judge of the Supreme Court of Connecticut, was born in 
Woodbury, Dec. 7, 1795. His mother was Ruth Benedict, only 
daughter of the Rev. Noah Benedict, third pastor of the First 
Church in Woodbury. 

He studied law in the office of his uncle, the Hon. Noah B. 
Benedict (Y. C. 1788), of Woodbury, and at Judge Reeve's Law 
School in Litchfield, and was admitted to the bar in 1818. He 
began practice in New Haven, but was soon obliged by his 
father's infirm health to return to Woodbury, and after two or 
three years found his time so much engrossed by the care of his 
father's large landed property that he withdrew from his profes- 
sion. He represented the town in the General Assembly in 1828, 
and again in 1847. For four years from May, 1838, he held the 
office of Judge of Probate. But his inclination and ambition 
did not lead him to seek public honors, and for the remainder of 
his life he was content to be interested in his farm, and to rest 
in the sincere esteem of his fellow-citizens. 

He died suddenly at his house in Woodbury, Febr. 5, 1881, in 
his 86th year. He was married, Febr. 22, 1819, to Mary Ann W., 
daughter of Rev. Samuel Goodrich ( Y C. 1783), of Berlin, Conn., 
who died Jan. 20, 1872. Their children, two daughters and one 
son, are also deceased. 

1816. 

William Chauncey Fowler, second son of Reuben R. and 
Catharine (Chauncey) Fowler, was born in Killingworth, now 
Clinton, Conn., Sept. 1, 1793. In 1797 his parents removed to 
Durham, Conn,, and in his 15th year he went to Middletown, 
Conn., where for nearly two years he was engaged as a clerk in a 



6 

store. Meantime his parents had removed to East Guilford, now 
Madison, Conn., where he was prepared for college. 

Before his graduation he was appointed Rector of the Hopkins 
Grammar School, in New Haven, and he acted in that capacity 
during the last term of the college course. By these double 
duties his health was impaired, and in November, 1816, he went 
South for a year, spending the time as private tutor in a family 
in Fauquier County, Va. He then resumed his position as Rector 
of the Grammar School, beginning also the study of theology 
under Professor Fitch. 

He was appointed in 1819 a Tutor in the college, and filled that 
office for five years lacking one term. During this period he was 
licensed to preach, and on the 31st of August, 1825, was ordained 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Greenfield, Mass. In 
1827 he was dismissed, to accept the appointment of Professor of 
Chemistry and Natural History, in Middlebury College, Vt., where 
he remained till 1 838, when he went to Amherst College, Mass., as 
Professor of Rhetoric. He resigned this professorship in 1843, 
but continued to reside in Amherst till 1858, when he removed to 
Durham, Conn., where he died, after a brief illness, of pneumonia, 
Jan. 15, 1881, in his 88th year. 

From the time of his resignation as Professor, he was engaged 
in preparing various works for the press. In 1845 he edited the 
University edition of Webster's Dictionary (octavo). He next 
prepared three volumes, composing a series of English Gram- 
mars, the first of the series (entitled The English Language in its 
Elements and Forms : N. Y., 1850, octavo) being a work of great 
labor. In 1858 he published Memorials of the Chaunceys; in 
1863, The Sectional Controversy; in 1866, a History of Durham; 
in 1872, a treatise on Local Law in Mass. and Conn. ; and later 
several collections of Essays. The degree of LL.D. was con- 
ferred upon him by Lafayette College in 1861. In 1850 he was 
elected to the Massachusetts Legislature from the town of Am- 
herst. He represented the 18th district of Connecticut in the 
State Senate in 1864. 

Professor Fowler was mai-ried, July 21, 1825, to Harriet, third 
daughter of Dr. Noah Webster (Y. C. 1778), and widow of Edward 
Cobb, of Portland, Me.; she died in Amherst, March 30, 1844. 
Of their four children, one son died in early childhood, and an- 
other in middle life. The remaining son and one daughter are 
still living. 



Timothy Dwight Porter was born in Hadley, Mass., March 
14, 1797, being the second child and eldest son of Jonatlian E. 
Porter (Harv. Coll. 1786) and Fidelia (Dwight) Porter. His par- 
ents were both grandchildren of the elder President Edwards, his 
mother being a sister of President Dwight, When he was about 
ten years old his father removed from Iladley to New Haven, 
where (at the Hopkins Grammar School) he was prepared for 
college. 

After graduating he spent a year as tutor in a family in Lynch- 
burg, Va., and then returned to New Haven to attend lectures in 
the Medical School. He took his medical degree in 1820, prepar- 
ing a graduating thesis of special value (on " Tests of Arsenic"), 
portions of which were published. Not, however, being inclined 
to follow medicine as a profession, he accepted the offer of a 
tutorship in the College of South Carolina, at Columbia. From 
this position he retired early in 1823, having no desire to reside 
permanently in a Southern State. He settled in New York City, 
and soon after became proprietor of the Religious Chronicle^ a 
weekly newspaper established in the same mototh with the New 
York Observer, and having the same general character. This 
was conducted with ability, but in November, 1826, was pur- 
chased by the proprietors of the Observer and became merged in 
that paper. Dr. Porter next became associated in the editorship 
of the Albion, a literary paper published in New York and having 
a wide circulation. The proprietor was English and his paper in 
a measure identified with English sentiments; preferring different 
associations. Dr. Porter withdrew from the Albion, and estab- 
lished a new literaiy paper, called the Atlas, which soon won a 
high place in popular esteem. The publication of the Atlas was 
suspended about 1833, on account of the financial mismanagement 
of his partner, and Dr. Porter then abandoned the editorial pro- 
fession. His younger brother, Theodore W. Porter (Y. C. 1819), 
had long been an instructor in The Washingtori Institute, a cele- 
brated school for boys in New York, originally founded by George 
W. Hall (Y. C. 1803), and named by General Lafayette in 1824. 
The two brothers became proprietors of this school, then in 13th st., 
and after several years transferred it to a tract of land on the 
eastern slope of Murray Hill, then considered far out of town, 
now bounded by 36th and 37th streets and Lexington and Third 
avenues. The school enjoyed a high reputation until it was relin- 
quished by reason of the illness of the younger l»rother, which 
3 



8 

resulted fatally in 1 855. The later life of Dr. Porter was occu- 
pied in congenial literary pursuits and with the care of and plans 
for the ultimate disposal of his property so as to advance higher 
education. In the spring of 1878 he conveyed by far the larger 
part of his estate to Yale College, subject to an annuity to his 
family — not large in comparison with the value of the entire prop- 
erty. The net value of the fund thus constituted, and named 
The T. JJ. and T. W. Porter Fund, will, it is hoped,* not fall be- 
low |1 70,000. Since his death an additional gift to the Porter 
Fund amounting to about $43,000 has been received from his 
estate. 

Dr. Porter died in New York, Dec. 12, 1880, in his 83d year, 
and was buried in the college lot in the New Haven burial ground. 
He was married in December, 1839, to Mary Eliza, daughter of 
Hon. Ephraim Hart, of Utica, N. Y. She died Feb. 23, 1864. 
One of their two daughters is still living. 

1817. 

David Nevins Lord, the youngest but one of sixteen childrefi 
of Deacon Nathan and Mary (Nevins) Lord, was born in Franklin, 
Conn., March 4, 1792. He went to New York City in 1807, in- 
tending to follow a mercantile career; but in 1811 his health be- 
came affected, and he was advised by his physician to seek a less 
active life. After graduating from College he studied theology 
in New Haven with Professors Fitch, Kingsley, and Goodrich, 
but was prevented by the loss of his voice and by ill health from 
continuing in the ministry. In 1823 having an excellent offer to 
embark in trade, he settled in New York City, and was for many 
years a successful importer of dry goods. He was also engaged 
in various important business enterprises, particularly in the early 
management of the N. Y. & Erie R. R. Company ; and was a 
liberal contributor to many works of charity. In the great fire of 
1835 and in the panic of 1837 he was a heavy loser, but later be- 
came again a rich man by inheritance from his brother Rufus, 
only to be again financially ruined. From early manhood he 
gave a large part of each day to study and composition on theo- 
logical subjects, particularly on the fulfilment of prophecy, the 
true methods of interpretation, and symbolism. For 13 years 
(1848-61) he edited a quarterly, entitled The Theological and 
Literary Journal, a great part of the contents being contributed 
by himself; he also published a collection of papers under the 
title of Vicwfi in Theology, and various other works. 



I 



He was married. May 8, 1823, to Eliza J., daui^hter of Under- 
liill Lyon, of Rye, N. Y., then of New Haven. She died, witliout 
children, Dec. 7, 1841. He died in New York City, July 14, 
1 880, in his 89th year. 

1818. 

Joseph Hunt Breck, only son of Joseph H. and Abigail 
(Kingsley) Breck, was born in Northampton, Mass., July 9, 1798. 

He studied theology at the Andover (Mass.) Seminary, finish- 
ing his course in 182.'3, and being ordained in December of that 
year by the Hampshire County (Mass.) Central Association. He 
was at once sent out as a Home Missionary to Ohio and began 
his ministerial life in Portage County. After three years of varied 
service, he was installed, April 25, 1827, pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church in Andover, Ashtabula County, where he remained for 
two and a half years. Thence he removed to Cuyahoga County, 
and preached in Brecksville and vicinity, until his health became 
impaired, when in 1833 he settled in the then village of Cleveland 
and opened a school for boys. There he continued, preaching also 
as health and opportunity allowed, until 1843, when he took up 
his residence in the neighboring town of Newburgh, where he 
spent the rest of his life in honored retirement, his health not 
permitting him to undertake any professional employment. He 
died in Newburgh, June 21, 1880, at the age of 82 years. 

He was married, July 30, 1830, to Miss Angeline Snow, of 
Northampton, Mass., who died in 1838, leaving one son and one 
daughter, who are still living. He was again married, Oct. 9, 
1844, to Miss Diantha Chamberlain, of Monkton, Vt., who sur- 
vives him. 

1820. 

John Mortimer Catlin, the eldest son of Lynde Catlin (Y. 
C. 1786) and Helen M. (Kip) Catlin, was born in New York City 
on the 28th day of May, 1801. 

After graduating he entered the office of the late John Jacob 
Astor, of the American Fur Company. He was subsequently an 
officer of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, and President of 
the Great Western Railroad Company of Illinois. In 182(5 he 
married the daughter of Nicholas Wm. Stuyvesant, a descendant 
of the Dutch Governor. During the month of May last he visited 
a son resident in New Haven, with the intention of reniainino- to 



10 

attend the exercises of Commeneement week at the (/ollege, but 
upon his arrival was taken ill, and being soon removed to his 
home in New York City, lingered until the early morning of 
June 13, when he died, at the age of 80. He had survived his 
wife for a number of years, but leaves two" sons and two 
daughters. 

Samuel Baknum Mead was born in Greenwich, Conn., Oct. 
18, 1799, and died in Augusta, 111., Nov. 11, 1880, aged 81 years. 

After graduation he taught in an academy in New Salem, N. 
Y., and subsequently attended medical lectures in New York City, 
and began the practice of medicine in his native place. 

In the spring of 1833 he went to Western Illinois, and with two 
other pioneers laid out the town of Augusta, in Hancock County, 
where he settled and continued to practice his profession until 
1860. He resided in Augusta till his death, which is believed to 
have been occasioned by a fall some four weeks previously. 

He was married, Jan. 9, 1822, to Araelta Purdy, of North Sa- 
lem, N. Y., who died May 7, 1865. Of their two sons and four 
daughters, one daughter sui-vives. He was again married, April 
18, 1866, to Martha Putnam, of Putnam, O., who survives him 
with one daughter. 

Dr. Mead was greatly interested in the progress of the natural 
and physical sciences, and had paid special attention to botany, 
mineralogy, and meteorology. His herbarium, representing the 
collections of nearly fifty years, contained at his death about 
8000 species. 

John Montgomeey Sterling, fourth child of Gen. Elisha 
Sterling (Y. C. 1787) and Alma (Canfield) Sterling, was born in 
Salisbury, Conn., Feb. 21, 1800. 

He studied law with Chief Justice Swift, in Windham, Conn., 
and was admitted to the bar in Litchfield, Conn., in 1828. He 
was married, Jan. 7, 1 823, to Marianne, daughter of Elias Beers, 
of New Haven, Conn., by whom he had four sons and six daugh- 
ters. In 1827 he settled in Cleveland, Ohio. After several years 
he relinquished the practice of law, and devoted himself to 
advancing various reforms. He was associated, in particular, 
with Birney, Gerrit Smith, Garrison, Weld, and other pioneers in 
the anti-slavery cause. 

He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 12, 1880, in his 81st year. 



11 

1821. 

HoDOLPHUS Landpear, SOU of David and Luciiida (Lord) Land- 
fear, was born in Manchester (then Oxford, the east parish in 
East Hartford), Conn., Nov. 2, 1794. 

He spent the three years after graduation in the Andover 
Theological Seminary, and was first employed as a home mission- 
ary in western New York. He was ordained as an evangelist, in 
Martford, July 1, 1828, and was installed over the Congregational 
Church in Montville, Conn,, Aug. 26, 1829. He was dismissed, 
May 30, 1832, and then supplied the pulpit in Bozrahville, Conn., 
for two years. He then preached in Westford, a village in Ash- 
ford, Conn., for three years, at the same time having charge of an 
academy there. Being now debarred from the work of the minis- 
try by the loss of his voice, he settled in North Mansfield, Conn., 
in 1838, as a farmer and teacher, whence he removed in 1843 to 
North Coventry for employment as an agent of the Bible Society. 
In 1849 he retired to his native town, and in 1856 removed to 
Hartford, Conn., where he died, of malarial fever, Sept. 30, 1880, 
in his 86 th year. 

He was married, Sept. 25, 182'?, to Nancy, daughter of Gen. 
Russell Bissell, of Manchester, who died July 6, 1872. They had 
five children. 

Hexry White, the only surviving child of the Hon. Dyer and 
Hannah (Wetmore) White, was bora in New Haven, Conn., 
March 5, 1803. 

From 1823 to 1825 he served as a tutor in this College. He 
then studied law, and entered on its practice in 1828 in his native 
city, where he continued to reside until his sudden death, from 
neuralgia of the heart, Oct. 7, 1880, at the age of 77. His tastes 
led him to appear rarely in court, but he was specially occupied 
with the settlement of estates and the care of trust funds, and in 
these duties had the entire confidence of the community through 
a long life. He was also much interested in matters of local 
history, and had given particular attention to the compilation 
of a history of the ownership of land in New Haven. He was 
one of the founders and the first president of the New Haven 
Colony Historical Society. For nearly half a century he was a 
deacon in the Center Church. He was married, Jan. 7, 1830, to 
Martha, daughter of Roger Sherman, of New Haven, and grand- 
daughter of the Hon. Roger Sherman. She survives him with 



12 

six sons, grsuluates of this College in 1851, 1854, 1859, 1860, 
1864 and 1866 — a seventh son having died a few months before 
his father. 

1822. 

William Henry Law, third son of the Hon. Lyman Law 
(Y. C. 1791), and grandson of the Hon. Richard Law (Y. C. 1751), 
was born in New London, Conn., Sept. 11, 1803. His mother 
was Elizabeth, daughter of Araasa Learned (Y. C. 1772). 

He studied law with his father, in New London, and after his 
admission to the bar, in 1826, practiced there until 1830. He 
then retired from his profession, and in 1832 removed to Nor- 
wich, Conn., which he represented the same year in the General 
Assembly of the State. In 1868 he removed to New Haven, 
Conn., where he died, March 27, 1881, in his 78th year. 

Li February, 1829, he married Mary Lee, of Norwich, who 
died in October, 1839, leaving one daughter. In October, 1855, 
he mariied Mrs. Harriet B. Mills, of Mississippi, who survives 
him with one son, a graduate of this College in the class of 1878. 

1823. 

John Dennison Russ, son of Dr. Parker and Elizabeth (Cogs- 
well) Russ, was born in Essex (then the parish of Chebacco, in 
Ipswich), Mass., Sept. 1, 1801. 

On leaving College he began the study of medicine with Dr. 
John D. Wells, Professor of Anatomy and Physiology in Bow- 
doin College ; he continued it in the Baltimore and Boston Medi- 
cal Schools, and received his doctorate from the Yale Medical 
School in 1825. After spending a year in hospitals abroad, he 
began practice in New York city, but in June, 1827, sailed from 
Boston in charge of supplies for the Greeks in their struggle for 
liberty. He remained in Greece, superintending the development 
of a hospital service, until his health failed, in the spring of 1830. 
On his return he entered again on practice in New York city. 
At an early date he became interested in the condition of poor 
children suffering from ophthalmia in the city hospitals, and at his 
own cost made (in March, 1832) the first attempt at the instruction 
of the blind which was made in America. He was in the same 
year appointed Superintendent of the newly-chartered New York 
Institution for the Blind, and in that position introduced many 
devices in methods of teaching which have been permanently 




18 

"uHeful. In tlie midst of these labors his healtli failed, and he was 
compelled to resign and seek restoration by a long absence in 
Europe. After his return, he engaged in numerous other phihm- 
thropic schemes, especially by serving from 1846 to 1854 as the 
Corresponding Secretary of the Prison Association of New York, 
and by originating measures in 1849 which led to the incorpora- 
tion of the New York Juvenile Asylum in 1851. He was the 
Superintendent of this Asylum, resigning in 1858. He was also 
a member of the Board of Education of the City of New York 
for four years, 1848-51. During his old age he resided in Pomp- 
ton, N. J., making further improvements in methods of printing 
for the blind, and interesting himself in other general studies. 

He died in Pompton, of diabetes, March 1, 1881, in his 80th 
year. In 1830 he married Miss Eliza P. Jenkins, daughter 
of a captain in the English navy. She survives him, with one 
granddaughter. 

James I)e Lancey Verplanck, the son of Daniel Crommelin 
Verplanck, was born in Fishkill, N. Y., on Feb. 2, 1805. 

At fourteen he entered Yale College. After graduating he 
lived until some time after his father's death at the family home- 
stead. 

In 1837 he married Julia Agnes, daughter of Peter Caverly, 
Esq., of Wilmington, Del., and lived for the remainder of his life 
upon his farm in Fishkill, dividing his time between the care of 
his farm, the education of his children, and his books. 

Me died May 7, 1881, leaving a wife, one son, and two daugh- 
ters. 

1825. 

William Gelston Bates, the eldest chihi of the Hon. Elijah 
Bates (Y. C. 1794) and of his wife Mary, daughter of Dr. Israel 
Ashley, Jr. (Y. C. 1767), of Westfield, Mass., was born in West- 
field, Nov. 17, 1803. 

He began the study of law with his father, and continued it at 
the law school in Northampton, Mass. In August, 1828, he was 
admitted to the bar of his native county, and began practice in 
W^estfield, succeeding to the business of his father, who now 
retired. He soon won distinction as a counselor, and continued 
in successful practice until forced to retire by the approach 
of disease and old age. From 1839 to 1847 he was a member 
of the State Board of Education. In 1840 he was elected to the 



14 

State Senate, and in 1844 and 1845 was a member of the Gover- 
nor's Council. In 1868 he was also a member of the House 
of Representatives. In 185.3 he was appointed District Attorney 
for the Western District of Massachusetts ; but finding that the 
necessary duties encroached too much on his regular engage- 
ments, he resigned the office after one year's service. 

Besides his professional labors his readiness and felicity as a 
writer and speaker led him to be invited to the delivery of many 
public addresses ; of several which were printed the most impor- 
tant were the Historical Address at the 200th Anniversary of 
the Incorporation of Westfield in 1869, and the Address at the 
Dedication of the new Court House in Springfield, in 1874. His 
general culture and admirable social qualities made him widely 
honored and beloved. 

He died in Westfield, July 5, 1880, in his 77th year. 

He was married, in October, 1830, to Jane P., daughter of Maj. 
Wra. Ashley, of Sheffield, Mass. Of their eight children three 
daughters are still living. 

Daniel Tyler Coit, the only child of Daniel T. and Rebecca 
(Coit) Coit, was born in the North society of Preston, afterwards 
Griswold, Conn., April 7, 1806. 

He graduated at the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 
1828, and settled in Boston, Mass., where he had a long and suc- 
cessful professional career. Late in life he removed to Norwich, 
Conn., where he died July 2, 1880, aged 74 years. 

He married, Oct. 6, 1829, Jane G., daughter of the Hon. James 
Lanman (Y. C. 1788), who died before him. Their only daughter 
died in early childhood. 

Dr. Coit left by his last will the sum of one hundred thousand 
dollars (subject for the present to an annuity) to the President and 
Fellows of Yale College, the income to be used at their discretion. 

Sai^uel Rockwell, second son of Alpha and Rhoda (Ensign) 
Rockwell, of Winchester, Conn., was born in that town, April 18, 
1803. 

He spent the two years after graduation in the Theological 
Seminary at Andover, Mass., but finished his professional studies 
at the Yale Divinity School in 1828. His first pastorate was over 
the Congregational Church in Plainfield, Conn., from April 11, 
1832, to April 16, 1841. He was installed pastor of the. South 




16 

Congregational Church in New Britain, Conn., Jan. 4, 1843, and 
resigned this charge, June 20, 1858. His residence continued in 
New Britain. In 1862 and 1869 he represented the town in the 
Connecticut Legislature; and in 1865 he was elected to the State 
Senate, and as senator became ex officio a member of the Corpora- 
tion of Yale College. He served as Treasurer of the Savings Bank 
of New Britain for many years after its incorporation in 1 862. He 
was stricken with paralysis on the night of Dec. 21, 1880, and died 
four days later, at his home, in the V8th year of his age. 

He was married, June 6, 1833, to Julia Ann, daughter of the 
Hon. George Plumraer (Y. C. 1804), of Glastonbury, Conn. She 
died April 7, 1838, and he married, secondly, May 5, 1840, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Judge Elkanah C. Eaton, of Plainfield, who 
died April 18, 1843. He married, thirdly, July 29, 1844, Char- 
lotte, daughter of Maj. Seth J. North, of New Britain, and widow 
of John Stanley, of New Britain. An only son, by the first mar- 
riage, survives him : an only daughter, by the second marriage, 
died in 1866. 

Thomas Staughton Savage, the son of Josiah and Mary (Rob- 
erts) Savage, was born in the northern part of Middletown (now 
Cromwell), Conn., June 7, 1804. 

He studied medicine in the Yale Medical School, graduating in 
1833, and after a course in Theology in the (Prot. Episc.) Theo- 
logical Seminary, near Alexandria, Va., was admitted to the Order 
of Deacons by Bishop Moore, of Virginia, July 17, 1836, and three 
months later, Oct. 23, was advanced to the priesthood by Bishop 
Brownell, at Naugatuck, Conn. In the same year he was appointed 
Associate Missionary with the Rev. Horatio Southgate to Persia ; 
but thinking that with his knowledge of medicine he could be 
more useful in the mission to West Africa, then projected by the 
Prot. Episcopal Church, he declined the mission to Persia, and 
oiFered himself for Africa. He sailed for Cape Palmas, as the 
pioneer of the mission, Nov. 16, 1836. In 1847, his health having 
broken down in that trying climate, he returned to America. For 
eighteen years from 1850 he devoted himself to the work of the 
ministry and the cause of education in the southern part of Missis- 
sippi, between New Orleans and Mobile', suffering severely by the 
disastrous results of the civil war. In 1868 he came North for the 
education of his children, and in the fall of 1869 accepted the 
appointment of Associate Secretary of the Foreign Committee of 
the Board of Missions, assuming also the charge of the Church of 
4 



16 

the Ascension at RhineclitF, in the township of Rhinebeck, Dutchess 
County, N. Y. He died in Rhinecliff, Dec. 29, 1880, in his llth 
year. 

While in Africa he found relaxation from the severe pressure of 
his duties in the study of natural history, and published a num- 
ber of scientific articles. He is supposed to have been the first to 
describe the habits of the chimpanzee in its adult native state, and 
also the discoverer and first describer of the gorilla. 

The honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him 
by Delaware College in 1876. 

Dr. Savage was three times married. His first wife accompanied 
him on his mission to Africa, and shortly after died there. His 
second wife, whom he married at Fredericksburg, Va., during a 
visit to the United States in the summer of 1838, w^as also unable 
to stand the unhealthy climate, and died April 16, 1839. In 1844 
he was married to Miss Elizabeth Rutherford, a missionary from 
New York to Cape Palmas, who survives him, with three sons and 
one daughter. 

1826. 

James Cogswell Fisher, son of Rev. Dr. Samuel Fisher (Wil- 
liams Coll. 1799) and Alice (Cogswell) Fisher, was born in Wil- 
ton, Conn., where his father was then pastor, April 6, 1808, and 
came to College from Paterson, N. J. 

He studied medicine in New York City, and received his de- 
gree in 1831 from the College of Physicians and Surgeons. He 
then went to the west, but was obliged to return to New Jersey 
in consequence of ill health. In 1837 he settled in New York 
City, and in 1839 was appointed Professor of Chemistry and Min- 
eralogy in tlie New York University, but resigned in 1 840. After 
two years in Virginia, he removed to Philadelphia in 1843, and 
was principal of the Southwest Grammar School for ten years. 
He next had charge of the Cooper Female Institute, in Dayton, O., 
for two years, but then returned to Philadelphia, and was Libra- 
rian of the Academy of Natural Sciences until August, 1861, 
when he enlisted as Surgeon of the 5th New Jersey Volunteers. 
He was made, in April, 1862, Brigade Surgeon of the 2d New 
Jersey Brigade, and afterwards performed valuable service in 
charge of hospitals till the close of the war. He then bought a 
farm near New Brunswick, N. J., and devoted himself to agricul- 
tural i>ursuits, till the failure of his mental powers. Some two or 




17 

'three years ago he was taken to a hospital near Washington, T). 
C, where he died about the 1st of October, 1880, in his ln<\ year. 

Dr. Fisher was married, in May, 1831, to Miss Eliza Sparks, of 
Paterson, N. J., who survives hira with six of their twelve chil- 
^dren. 

1827. 

William Adams, fourth son and sixth child of John Adams 
(Y. C. 1795), and Elizabeth (Ripley) Adams, was born in Colches- 
ter, Conn., where his father was then Preceptor of Bacon Acad- 
emy, Jan. 25, 1807. Two of his elder brothers were graduated at 
this College in 1821 and 1825. In 1810 his father, an eminent 
teacher, became the Principal of Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., where he was prepared to enter the Sophomore class of 
this College, in December, 1824. 

Immediately after graduation he entered the Theol. Seminary in 
Andover, where he completed the regular course in September, 
1830. After preaching for a few months in the Congregational 
Church in Brighton, Mass., he was ordained and installed as its 
pastor, Feb. 2, 1831. Being obliged, in 1834, by the illness of his 
wife to leave this place, he was invited in the same summer to 
the pastorate of the Central Presbyterian Church, in Broome 
street, New York City, and was installed Nov. 13. In 1853 a 
large body colonized from this church to the corner of Madison 
Square and 24th street, where they erected a splendid building ; 
of this church — containing in later years over a thousand mem- 
bers, and distinguished for its intelligence, liberality, and useful- 
ness — Dr. Adams was the pastor from its organization until his 
resignation in the spring of 1874. On the 11th of May, 1874, he 
was installed as President of the Union Theol. Seminary, in New 
York (3ity, — a position which he had twice declined (in 1840 and 
1871), but which, with the Professorship of Sacred Rhetoric, he 
now held till his death. Me died at his country residence, on 
Orange Mountain, N. J., Aug. 31, 1880, in his 74th year, after a 
severe illness of more than two months. 

He was married, in July, 1831, to Miss Susan P., daughter of 
Thatcher Magoun, Esq., of Medford, Mass. She died in New York 
City, May 22, 1834. In August, 1835, he was married to Martha 
B. Magoun, a sister of his first wife, who survives him. The only 
child by his first marriage, and two others by his second marriage, 
died in infancy ; two sons (members of this College in the classes 
of 1858 and 1861) and two daughters survive him. 



18 

Dr. Adams occupied an eminent position in the Presbyterian 
Church, as was due to his great success as a pastor, the charm of 
his presence, his consummate address as a speaker, and his wisdom 
as a counselor. He published two or three volumes on religious 
themes, and a large number of occasional discourses, tracts, and 
articles in reviews. The University of the City of New York 
gave him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1842, and he was 
made a Doctor of Laws by the College of New Jersey in 1869. 

Stiles French, the third child of David and Anna (Johnson) 
French, was born in Bethany, a parish of Woodbridge, ('onn., 
Dec. 6, 1801. He began to teach a district school at the age of 
17, and it was not until the spring of 1823 that he was able to make 
systematic preparation for College. He was admitted to the 
Sophomore Class at the end of the first term. 

After graduation he pursued advanced scientific studies under 
the direction of the College for two or three years, being also con- 
nected from the Spring of 1828 with the "New Haven Gymna- 
sium," as mathematical teacher. He taught in New Haven till the 
spring of 1831, when he accepted the position of teacher of Mathe- 
matics in the "Round Hill School," at Northampton, Mass., 
where he remained for two years. In August, 1833, he estab- 
lished, with his brother, a Collegiate and Commercial School in 
Wooster Square, in New Haven, which he conducted for about 
twelve years. After an interval of leisure he established another 
classical and scientific school in this city, which he maintained for 
over twenty-five years. About the year 1875 he removed to North- 
ampton, but in 1880 returned to New Haven, where he died May 
9, 1881, of a disease of the kidneys, after five months' illness. 

He was twice married, and by his second marriage had a son 
and a daughter. His son was drowned in 1869, while a member 
of the Sophomore Class in College. His wife and daughter are 
still living. 

1828. 

Oliver Ellsworth Daggett, son of the Hon. David Daggett 
(Y. C. 1783), Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Connecticut 
and Kent Professor of Law in Yale College, and of Wealthy 
Ann, daughter of Dr. ^ueas Munson (Y. C. 1753), first Professor 
of Materia Medica in the Yale Medical School, was born in New 
Haven, Jan. 14, 1810. 



19 

He spent three years in the Yale Law School, and was admit- 
ted to the bar in March, 1831. Subsequently, as a convert in the 
great religious revival of 1831, he determined to enter the Chris- 
tian ministry, and spent nearly two years in the Yale Divinity 
School. 

He was ordained pastor of the South Church in Hartford, 
Conn., Apr. 12, 1837, and resigned that charge, June 23, 1843. 
He was installed Jan. 30, 1845, over the First Congregational 
Church in Canandaigua, N. Y, and was dismissed, Oct. 16, 1867, 
to accept the pastorate of the church in Yale College, with the 
title of Professor of Divinity. He resigned this charge after 
three years of service, and was installed, Febr. 21, 1871, over the 
Second Congregational Church in New London, Conn. He re- 
tired from the arduous labors of a settled ministry with his dis- 
mission from this charge, Sept. 5, 1877, and removed his residence 
to Hartford, Conn., where he died, without previous warning, of 
rupture of the heart, Aug. 31, 1880, in his 71st year. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Hamilton 
College in 1853. He left no published memorials of his fine 
powers as a writer and his discriminating literary taste, except a 
few sermons, and articles in various periodicals. Since his death 
a small volume of his poems has been printed. From 1872 he 
was a member of the Corporation of the college. 

He was married, July 15, 1840, to Elizabeth, daughter of 
William Watson, of Hartford. She survives him with two 
daughters and a son, the son being a graduate of the Sheffield 
Scientific School in 1864. 

1829. 

Silas Billings was born in Somers, Conn., August 10, 1804, 
and died in Winchester, Va., January 8, 1881, in his 77th year. 

From 1830 to 1833 he was a student of theology in the Semi- 
nary at Princeton, N. J. He began his ministry at Merchant's 
Hope, Prince George County, eleven miles from Petersburg, Va., 
but the malarial fever of that climate so affected his health that 
in a short time he removed to Woodstock, in the Shenandoah 
Valley, Va., where he labored intently in preaching and teaching, 
assuming also the charge of two or three neighboring churches, 
for nine years. The strain upon both mind and body from such se- 
vere labor disabled him for the work of the ministry, and he next 
spent seven years in teaching in Morgantown, building up an 



20 

academy which lias grown into the University of West Virginia. 
He luid been from early youth a great suiferer from a diseased 
leg, and about 1853 his suffering increased so that he was obliged 
to lay down his work and go to New York for medical treatment. 
After years of enforced retirement he accepted a call to a small 
church in West Bloomfield, N. J., where he labored until called 
back to (West) Virginia by the church at Duffield's, near Harper's 
Ferry. In 1869 he removed to Winchester, and founded a flour- 
ishing school for young ladies, besides preaching statedly in 
neighboring stations. For a year before his death his infirmities 
confined him to his house ; but during his long, active life he had 
been an unusually laborious pastor and popular preacher, his 
special musical gifts adding to the interest taken in religious ser- 
vices which he conducted. 

1830. 

Benjamin Lockwood died in Linden, Genesee County, N. Y., 
of general prostration, September 29, 1880, aged 72 years. 

He was a native of Norwalk, Conn., and after graduation 
studied theology in the Princeton Seminary. He was licensed to 
preach and was employed for some years in teaching in Williams- 
burg, N. Y., and in preaching as opportunity offered. About 
1851 he engaged in the book business in New York City, in 
which he continued for nine years. He was then engaged to 
supply the jmlpit of a church in Islip, L. I., where for some years 
he spent a part of his time. Later he preached in Linden. 

He was married in New York in 1834, and left one son. 

1831. 

Pierre Teller Babbit, son of Seth and Margaret Babbit, was 
born in New York City, February 12, 1811. In early youth his 
parents removed to Albany, N. Y., and thence to New Haven 
when their son entered college. 

The three years after graduation he devoted to teaching, and 
then entered the General Theological Seminary of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, in New York City, where he graduated in 
1836. He was ordained deacon by Bishop B. T. Onderdonk, July 
3, 1836, and was advanced to the priesthood by the same bishop. 
May 4, 1837. He officiated for a short time, in 1836, in St. Paul's 
Church, Woodbury, Conn., and thence removed to Boonville, Mo., 
where he did frontier service as a minister and teacher until 1838, 



when he 



21 



when he accepted the rectorship of St. Luke's Church, Erie, Pa. 
A year or two later he went to Hudson, N. Y., as rector of 
Christ Church, but while there contracted a painful asthma which 
necessitated in 1844 his removal to a milder climate. He went to 
South Carolina, and took charge of the parochial school of St. 
Philip's Church, in Charleston, performing missionary work also. 
The climate proved too enervating for him, and he returned in 
1848 to his old parish in Woodbury, but in 1850 removed to 
North Carolina, to take charge of a school near Raleigh. After 
a brief service there, he went to Tallahassee, Fla., as assistant min- 
ister of St. John's Church, but in 1853 came North again, and 
accepted the rectorship of Grace Church, South Middleton, N. Y. 
In 1862 he removed to St. Mark's Church, Newark, N. Y., and in 
Oct. 1867, became head master of the Doolittle Institute, Wethers- 
field Springs, N. Y. In Nov., 1869, he sought relief for his dis- 
tressing disease by a removal to Bainbridge, Ga., where he served 
as rector of the Episcopal Church and also as a teacher till his 
death, which occurred in that place after a few days' illness, April 
1, 1881, at the age of 70. 

The degree of D.D. was conferred upon him by Hobart College 
in 1868. 

He was married in the fall of 1836 to Miss Juliet M., daughter 
of Floyd Smith, Esq., of New York, who survives him with five 
children. 

Alvin Chase Bradley, son of Lyman and Hannah (Tread- 
well) Bradley, was born in Ulysses, N. Y., July 22, 1810. He 
entered Geneva (now Hobart) College, N. Y., from Trumansburg, 
N. Y., where his father then resided, and after remaining for two 
years joined the Senior Class in this College. 

He began the study of law in Trumansburg, and continued it 
in Ithaca, N. Y., with Judges Bruen and Dana ; was admitted to 
the bar in October, 1 833, and settled in Trumansburg. Later he 
removed to Lockport, N. Y., and formed a partnership with the 
Hon. Hiram Gardiner in 1835. In 1841 his connection with the 
McLeod trial brought him to New York City, where he opened 
an office in 1842 and continued practice until 1879, taking part in 
many important trials. In 1849 he purchased a farm on Staten 
Island, located partly in Castleton and partly in Middletown, and 
resided on this estate till his death. He died there, after three 
years of patient suffering, February 23, 1881, in his 71st year. 



22 

He married, March 3, 1835, at Rochester, N. Y., Julia, 
daughter of Charles Smith, of Lyme, Conn. She died Sept. 27, 
1876, and he married, April 28, 1878, Louisa P., the sister of his 
iirst wife, who survives him. Of the six children by his first 
marriage, one son and two daughters are still living. 

1832. 

Ephraim Lyman, fourth child and second son of Erastus and 
Abigail (Starr) Lyman, was born in Goshen, Litchfield County, 
Conn., June 3, 1810. 

In the fall of 1832 he entered the Yale Divinity School, and 
there remained for the full three years' course. From the semi- 
nary he went directly to Plymouth, Conn., to supply the pulpit of 
the Congregational Church; and on Oct. 28th, 1835, he was or- 
dained and installed their pastor. He was dismissed, at his own 
request, June 8, 1851, and after a year of recreation was installed 
over the Congregational Church in Washington, Conn., June 30, 
1852, where he enjoyed a happy and successful pastorate until his 
health failed and he was obliged to resign, June 7, 1863. In 
May, 1864, he removed to Northampton, Mass., and in October, 
1873, followed two of his sons to Minneapolis, Minn., where he 
resided till his death, of typhoid fever, Oct. 29, 1880, showing 
alike in his useful active life, and in his years of enforced retire- 
ment, the same Christian courage and devotion to duty. 

He was married, Oct. 2, 1839, to Miss Hannah D., youngest 
daughter of Peter Richards, of New London, Conn., who is still 
living. Of their four sons and four daughters, three sons and 
two daughters survive him, — the youngest son being a graduate 
of this college in the class of 1873. 

1833. 

DoRSON Ebenezer Sykes, son of Ashbel and Ruth Sykes, was 
born in Lisbon, N. Y., Aug. 16, 1808, and died in Grass Valley, 
Cal., Sept. 13, 1880, aged 72 years. 

After graduation he taught for two years in Milledgeville, Ga., 
and then entered the Theological Department of this college. 
After completing his studies in 1838, he attempted to preach, but 
was obliged by a bronchial difficulty to return to Georgia. In 
1842, his health being partially restored, he became editor and 
proprietor of the Norwich (Conn.) Courier^ a Whig paper, which 
he conducted until March, 1859. His failing health then rendered 



23 

him unequal to the care of the enterprise, and in November, 1861, 
he removed to Nevada County, California, where he was ap- 
pointed Deputy Recorder and one of tlie county magistrates. In 
October, 1871, while residing in Truckee, in that county, he was 
disabled by a stroke of paralysis, from which he only partially 
recovered. A few months later he removed to the home of his 
brother in Grass Valley, in the same county, where he remained 
in gradually declining health till his decease. 

He was married in Norwich, Nov. 19, 1840, to Georgiana, 
daughter of Ralph May, of Savannah, Ga. She died Apr. 12, 
1857. 

1834. 

Chauncey Demixg Cowles, son of Timothy and Catharine 
(Deming) Cowles, was born in Farmington, Conn., June 27, 1812. 

He studied theology in the Yale Seminary for two years (1838- 
40), and was ordained, June 10, 1841, the first pastor of the Con- 
gregational Church in Plainville, then a parish in his native town, 
where he continued for two years. He then retired from the 
ministry and removed to Buffalo, N. Y., where he was engaged 
in manufacturing until 1853, when he returned to Farmington, 
where he continued to reside, upon his farm, until his death. He 
died in Farmington, after a long feebleness resulting from an 
affection of the lungs, Jan. 12, 1881, in his 69th year. 

He was married, Jan. 7, 1835, to Miss Jane E. Bid well, of 
Farmington, who survives him with their two sons. 

1835. 

John Chandler Rafferty was born in Woodbury, N. J., 
December 29, 1816. His father, the Rev. Wm. Rafferty, D.D., 
was born in Ireland, educated at Glasgow, removed to America, 
married Miss Chandler, of Orange County, N. J., lived for a time 
in Woodbury, and was principal of St. John's College, Annapolis, 
Md., from 1824 till his death in 1831. 

The son, after graduation, attended lectures- in the Harvard 
Law School, and continued his preparation in the office of O. W. 
Ogden, Esq., New York City, where he was admitted to the bar 
in 1838. In 1841 he married Miss Laura E. Ogden, by whom he 
had two sons and two daughters. From the time of his marriage 
until 1862, he resided near Germantown, and during this period 
held for three years the office of State Senator; in 1860 he 
5 



24 

was elected Secretary of the Senate, and was one of the delegates 
at large to the memorable convention at Charleston. 

In 1862 he removed to Flemmgton, N. J. In 1863 he was ad- 
mitted counsellor, and was appointed by Gov. Parker the mili- 
tary agent for New Jersey ; this position he occupied for three 
years at Washington. In 1867 he was elected to the office of 
County Superintendent of Schools. In 1872 he was appointed 
to fill a vacancy in the Court of Common Pleas, and in 1877 was 
made Prosecutor of the Pleas. 

On the evening of December 30, 1880, he was without warning 
stricken by paralysis. He did not return to consciousness, but 
died early the next morning. His wife died in 1864; one daugh- 
ter and two sons survive their parents. 

1836. 

Dillon Williams was born in Colchester, Conn., Febr. 16, 
1805, the youngest of the nine children of Frederic William 
Williams and Mary Bailey, his wife. His minority was spent 
upon his father's farm, and in study at the Colchester academy. 
By teaching he acquired the means for entering college, where 
he supported himself entirely by his own exertions. 

Upon graduation he immediately entered the Yale Divinity 
School, and remained there for the course of three years. He 
was ordained June 30, 1841, pastor of the Congregational Church 
in Feeding Hills, a parish of West Springfield, Mass., where he 
continued until May 17, 1848. He then preached for briefer 
periods in North Chelsea and Chester Factories, Mass., in Otis, 
Me., and in Bridge water and Orange, Conn. In 1856, he re- 
moved to Boonville, N. Y., to supply a Presbyterian Church 
there, and in 1859 was called to the pastorate of the Presbyterian 
Church in Cleveland, N. Y., where his residence continued till his 
death, though dismissed from his charge some years ago. He 
died in Cleveland, Nov. 23, 1879, in his 75th year. 

He was married, July 14, 1841, to Mary Chapman Truman, of 
New Haven, Conn., who died in 1866, leaving six children, all of 
whom survive their parents. 

1837. 

AViLLiAM Thompson Bacon, son of Daniel and Rebecca 
(Thompson) Bacon, was born in Woodbury, Conn., Aug. 24, 
1812. He entered college at the age of 21, after having spent 
several years in mercantile life. 



r 



25 



After graduation he studied theology in the Yale Divinity 
School for three years, and was ordained, Dec. 28, 1842, pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Trumbull, Conn., which charge he 
resigned on account of ill health, May 28, 1844. In 1845-6 he 
edited the New Englander, a quarterly magazine published in 
New Haven, and in the latter year joined in establishing the New 
Haven Morning Journal and Courier^ which he edited until 
1849. For the next year or two he supplied the pulpit of the 
Congregational Church in South Britain, a parish of Southbury, 
Conn. ; and subsequently, in 1853-4, supplied his old church in 
Trumbull, while residing in the family homestead in Woodbury. 
He also conducted a boarding and day school in Woodbury for 
some years. In 1866 he removed to Derby, Conn., and soon with 
a view of providing occupation for his sons became proprietor 
and editor of the Derby Transcript^ a weekly paper, which he 
conducted with vigor. A great sufferer, for the most of his life 
from dyspepsia and erysipelas, he died after a week's illness, in 
Derby, May 18, 1881, aged nearly 69 years. 

His literary tastes were already marked while in college. He 
was, if not the earliest to suggest, one of the most earnest sup- 
porters of the Yale Literary Magazine^ of which he was one of 
the first board of editors. He published three volumes of poems, 
the last in 1880. 

He was married, August 7, 1839, to Elizabeth A., eldest 
daughter of Dr. Jonathan Knight (Y. C. 1808), Professor of 
Anatomy and Surgery in Yale College, who survives him with 
five sons and two daughters. One daughter and one son died be- 
fore him. 

Edwin Osgood Carter was born in Brimfield, Mass., Oct. 30, 
1815, and came to College from Worcester, Mass., then his 
father's place of residence. After graduation he followed the 
profession of a civil engineer in Massachusetts and New York, 
until in 1845 he went to Valparaiso, Chili, to survey a route for a 
government railroad. He remained in Chili and Peru till 1849, 
then went to California, and subsequently revisited South Amer- 
ica. In 1862 he settled in Chicopee Falls, Mass., and became 
identified with the progress of the town. From 1863 until his 
death he was judge of the Chicopee police court, and from 1866 
auditor of the town. He was also connected with many of the 
manufacturing concerns of the neighborhood, besides holding 



26 

many important private trusts. His probity and weight of char- 
acter gained universal respect. He died in Chicopee, after a 
painful illness of nearly three weeks' duration, from a complica- 
tion of diseases of the stomach and kidneys, Jan. 20, 1881, in his 
66th year. 

Judge Carter was married. May 20, 1845, to Miss Elizabeth B. 
Jenks, who died in March, 1846, during his absence in South 
America. He was again married, June 25, 1862, to Miss Ellen 
M. Huse, of Newburyport, Mass., who survives him with their 
only son. 

WiLLARD Mason Harding, son of Willard and Mary (Howard) 
Harding, was born in Langdon, N. H., Sept. 18, 1810. 

He was the Rector of the New Haven Hopkins Grammar 
School during the last half of his senior year and until February, 
1838, and for the next two years studied in the Yale Theologi- 
cal Seminary. He was ordained pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Princeton, Mass., May 20, 1840, and remained there 
until Aug. 28, 1844. He was then for three years acting pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Milton, Mass. Nov. 17, 184*7, he 
was installed over the Union Church in South Weymouth, Mass., 
and resigned this charge, Apr. 8, 1858, to become the financial 
agent of the Association for completing the Monument to the 
Pilgrims at Plymouth. In this agency he labored zealously until 
his death, his residence during most of the time being in Chelsea, 
Mass. He died in Chelsea, of paralysis of the throat, Dec. 20, 
1880, aged 70 years. 

He was married, Nov. 28, 1839, to Elvira L., daughter of Dr. 
Phineas Longley, of Millbury, Mass., who survives him with an 
adopted son, their only child having died in infancy. 

1839. 

Matthew Darbyshire Bagg, son of Moses Bagg, was born 
in Utica, N. Y., March 20, 1818. In January, 1834, he joined the 
Sophomore Class in Hamilton College, but after eighteen months 
spent there, left the institution and found employment in the sur- 
veys connected with the Erie Canal. In the fall of 1836 he en- 
tered the Sophomore Class in this College. 

After graduation he studied law ior two years in Utica with 
Messrs. Mann and Edmonds, and then for a year in the Harvard 
Law School. In October, 1842, he was admitted to the bar and 



27 

began practice in Utica, at first in partnership with his former in- 
structors. In March, 1853, he removed to New York City, where 
he continued in the practice of his profession until 1873, when ill 
health compelled him to retire. He then returned to Utica and 
made his home (being unmarried) with a sister. During these later 
years he was subject to severe paroxysms of pain about the heart, 
coming on after even slight exertion. On the evening of Dec. 31, 
1880, he retired to his room, apparently in his usual health, but 
was found dead in his bed the next morning. The cause of death 
is supposed to have been fatty degeneration of the heart. 

William Fairchild Hubbard, eldest son of Col. William 
Hubbard, was born in Trenton, N. Y., Feb. 5, 1814. 

After graduating he went to St. Catharines (near Niagara 
Falls), Canada, where he had charge of a grammar school for 
eighteen years. In 1857 he removed to Ashtabula, O., where he 
resided till his death, for most of the time engaged in teaching, 
and also cultivating a small farm, and interesting himself actively 
in the work of the County Agricultural Society. He died in Ash- 
tabula, of pneumonia, Nov. 6, 1880, aged 66 years. 

He was married, in December, 1847, to Miss Eliza Taylor, a 
lady of Scottish birth, who survives him with their two 
daughters. 

1840. 

Gideon H. Hollister, son of Gideon Hollister, was born in 
Washington, Litchfield County, Conn., Dec. 14, 1817. 

After studying law in Litchfield with the Hon. Origen S. Sey- 
mour (Y. C. 1824), he was admitted to the bar in April, 1842. 
He began practice in Woodbury, Conn., but soon removed to 
Litchfield, where, in 1 843, he was appointed Clerk of the Court, 
an ofiice which he held — a single year excepted — till 1852. In 
1856 he was elected to the State Senate, and in February, 1868, 
was appointed by President Johnson Minister of the United 
States to Hayti, but was recalled by President Grant in Septem- 
ber, 1869. He then resumed the practice of law, in company with 
his brother (Y. C. 1851), in Bridgeport, Conn., but in 1876 re- 
turned to Litchfield. In 1880 he represented the town in the leg- 
islature, as a democrat. 

He died in Litchfield, after about a week's illness, of suffusion 
of the heart, March 24, 1881, in his 64th year. 



28 

In June, 1847, be married Miss Mary S. Brisbane, a native of 
Charleston, 8. C, who survives him with one only of their four 
children — now a member of Trinity College, Hartford. 

Mr. Hollister was best known as the author of a History of 
Connecticut, in two volumes, published in 1 855, and not super- 
seded by any later work. A revised edition was about to appear 
at the time of his death. He also published, in ] 851, an historical 
romance, entitled " Mount Hope, or Philip, King of the Wampa- 
noags," which his maturer judgment disapproved as too florid in 
style; and a tragic poem, in 1866, entitled "Thomas a Becket," 
which was dramatized and played by Edwin Booth, besides other 
minor poems. 

Egbert Abiel Thompson was born in Bethlehem, Conn., in 
1814, and entered College with the class of 1839. He left that 
class in the Sophomore year, returaing to College a year later. 

In December, 1840, while a student in the Yale Law School, he 
was married to Miss Caroline A. Smith, daughter of Hon. Nathan 
Smith, of New Haven. He settled as a lawyer in Quincy, 111., 
where he practiced his profession and edited a paper. In 1847 he 
removed to Cincinnati, where he engaged for some years in the 
practice of the law, but subsequently moved across the Ohio to 
Covington, Ky., where he cultivated a vineyard for the manufac- 
ture of wine. 

He died in Hutchinson, Kan., Feb. 4, 1879. 

William Henry Tiffany, a son of Comfort Tiffany, was born 
in Killingly, Conn., Feb. 10, 1819. 

He was engaged in. business with his only brother (the founder 
of the house of Tiffany & Co., gold and silver smiths), in New 
York City, until 1849, when he went to California, where he re- 
mained for fourteen years, occupied in mining, real estate opera- 
tions, and other pursuits, and a prominent member of the Pioneer 
Society. After his return in 1863, he resided most of the time 
in New York City, but more recently in Stamford, Conn., where 
he died, Dec. 23, 1880, in his 62d year. I[e was unmarried. 

1841. 

John Morrison Pinkerton, son of Elder James and Sarah 
(Wallace) Pinkerton, was born in Derry, then the eastern part of 
the town of Londonderry, N. H., February 6, 1818. 



^ 29 

After his graduation he taught for two years, in Bricklaiul, 
Lnnenburg County, Va., then pursued the study of the law 
for two years in the Harvard Law School, receiving in August, 
1845, the degree of LL.B., was then for one year in the office of 
Wra. Gray, Esq., of Boston, and was admitted to the bar in 1846. 
From that time till his death he practiced his profession in Boston, 
attaining material success and winning the high esteem of those 
who came in contact with him. For twenty-one years before his 
death he served as a deacon in the Mount Vernon Congregational 
Church. He was specially interested in the cause of education, 
and in particular served for the last twenty-three years as a di- 
rector of the American College and Education Society, giving to 
it freely of his time and substance. He was never married, and 
by his last will his property (which is understood to be about 
$200,000), is given ultimately to Pinkerton Academy, in his na- 
tive place, which was founded by his uncle. 

He died suddenly, at his home in Boston, on the day on which 
he completed his 63d year, February 6, 1881. 

1842. 

Albert Bentley Capwell was born in Middlebury, Genesee 
(now Wyoming) County, N. Y., Dec. 12, 1818. 

After graduation he was principal of the Middlebury Academy, 
in Wyoming, N. Y., for two years, pursuing legal studies in the 
meantime in the office of John B. Skinner, Esq. He then spent 
a year in the Law Department of Harvard University, and in 
1845 entered the office of Messrs. Foot and Davies in New York 
City. He was shortly after admitted to the bar, and for the rest 
of his life practiced — mainly as a life-insurance and real-estate 
lawyer — in that city, though since 1848 residing in Brooklyn. 
From 1853 to 1870 he was a member of the Board of Education, 
and for two years (1855 and 1856) a member of the Common 
Council of Brooklyn. He was also a prominent Baptist layman, 
and held many positions of trust in connection with that denomi- 
nation ; thus, he was President of the Board of Trustees of the 
Rochester Theological Seminary, Chairman of the Board of Man- 
agers of the American Baptist Home Missionary Society, Vice- 
President of the American and Foreign Bible Society, and Presi- 
dent of the Baptist Home of Brooklyn. He died, of pneumonia, 
Aug. 23, 1880, in his 62d year. 

He was married, Aug. 22, 1849, to Miss Julia A. Look, of 



30 

Cheshire, Prince William County, Va., who survives him with 
three of their six children. 

Alexander MacWhortee, the only surviving child of Alex- 
ander C. and Frances C. G. (Lawrence) MacWhorter, was born in 
Newark, N. J., Jan. 1, 1822. 

He studied for three years in the Theological Department of 
Yale College, and was licensed to preach in 1844. After 1845 he 
continued to reside in New Haven, pursuing philosophical and 
theological studies, with the exception of a brief residence (1859- 
60) in Troy, N. Y., as Professor of Metaphysics and English Lit- 
erature in Troy University. He received deacon's orders m the' 
Protestant Episcopal Church, May 31, 1863, at the hands of 
Bishop Potter of New York. He married, Sept. 7, 1857, Henri- 
etta VV., daughter of Eli W. Blake (Y. C. 1816), of New Haven, 
who survives him without children. He published a volume en- 
titled " Yahveh Christ, or the Memorial Name," besides several 
magazine articles on metaphysical and theological subjects. Dur- 
ing the extreme heat in June, 1880, he had labored assiduously to 
finish an article for the Princeton Review, and at the close of his 
labors was struck with apoplexy on Friday, the 24th. He died 
on Tuesday, the 28th, at the age of 58. 

Cyrus Pitts was born in Honeoye, Ontario County, N. Y., 
March 31, 1817. For the first three years after graduation he was 
a member of the Yale Divinity School, and in 1845 returned to 
Honeoye, where he remained till 1854, for much of the time in 
very feeble health, and so compelled to relinquish the calling 
which he had chosen. In 1854 he removed to Moline, 111., and was 
engaged with his brothers in the lumber business, but the part- 
nership came to a disastrous end in the financial crisis of 1857-58. 
He continued to reside in Moline, and for some years was a book- 
keeper for a manufacturing company there, until obliged by the 
state of his health to give up all business. In the autumn of 
1872 he went abroad, on account of his wife's ill health, and re- 
mained for two years. On her account, also, he spent the next 
two winters after his return in Washington, D. C, and the winter 
of 1876-77 in Austin, Texas. She died in August, 1878, and in 
July, 1879, he and his only daughter went abroad, on account of 
his health, spending the following winter in Nice. In the latter 
part of March, 1880, they left Nice for Switzerland, and he died 



81 

in Geneva, on the morning of the 1st of April, after less than four 
days' illness, of pneumonia. 

He was married Aug. 27, 1846, to Miss Margaret Buckley, of 
New Haven, Conn., by whom he had one son, who was drowned 
at the age of 17, and the daughter who survives him. 

John Calvin Strong, fourth son of the Rev. Henry P. Strong 
(Y. C. 1807) and Laura (Clark) Strong, was born in St. Albans, 
Vt., where his father was then pastor of the Congregational 
Chufch, Dec. 7, 1818. 

On leaving College he spent one year studying law in Rush- 
ville, N. Y., the place of his father's last settlement. The next 
year he continued the study in Palmyra, N. Y., with his cousin, 
the Hon. Theron R. Strong. He was admitted to the bar in 
Rochester, in October, 1844 ; and after a year spent in Port Gib- 
son, Miss., he began the practice of his profession in Geneva, 
N. Y. Thence he removed in September, 1850, to Buffalo, N. Y., 
where he continued in successful practice until his sudden death 
in that city, July 5, 1879, in his 61st year. 

He was married, Feb. 4, 1847, to Emeline, only child of Ira. 
Merrill, Esq., of Avon Springs, N. Y., who survives him with two 
of their four daughters. 

1846. 

Robert Cochran, son of Robert and Ann Cochran of New 
York City, was born in that place Nov. 8, 1826. 

He studied law in New York with George T. Strong, Esq., and 
was admitted to the bar in 1847, and began practice in connec- 
tion with Mr. Strong. In 1 850 he formed a partnership with 
Munson I. Lockwood, Esq., in Sing Sing, N. Y., but in 1852 re- 
moved to White Plains, N. Y., where he was at first in partner- 
ship with Samuel E. Lyon, Esq., and later with ex-Judge John 
W. Mills. He obtained an extensive and lucrative practice in 
Westchester County, and also in New^ York City. In 1867 be 
was elected a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of the 
State, and later in the same year was elected County Judge, on 
the Democratic ticket, for a term of four years. In 1874 he was 
elected District Attorney of Westchester County. In 1875 his 
health began to fail, and some two years later he was obliged by 
the progress of his disease (tubercular consumption) to retire 
from his profession, in which he had ranked as a learned and bril- 



32 

liant lawyer. He died Dec. 14, 1880, in Brooklyn, N. Y., where 
he had resided for a year previously. 

He was married, Apr. 23, 1853, to Miss Eliza J. Vanderbilt, of 
New York City, who died March 30, 1865. He was again mar- 
ried, June 13, 1867, to Miss Jennette C. O'Farrell, who survives 
him. Three daughters and three sons by the first marriage are 
living, the eldest son being a graduate of this College In 1875. 

Samuel Thomas Richards, the son of John and Annie K. 
(Love) Richards, was born in Haverford, J Delaware County,- Pa., 
Sept. 14, 1820. He entered College in 1841, but at the close of 
the first year was obliged to leave for a year for his health. 

After graduation he studied theology for one year with the 
Rev. Albert Barnes, and for two and a half years in the Yale Di- 
vinity School. He was ordained in Simsbury, Conn., May 14, 
1850, as colleague pastor with the Rev. Allen McLean (Y. C. 
1805) of the Congregational Church in that town. He was dis- 
missed from this charge July 15, 1858, and in the following May 
was settled over the Congregational Church in Spencerport, near 
Rochester, N. Y., from which, on account of failing health, he 
took a dismission. May 1, 1866. He was engaged in business in 
New York City from the fall of 1868 until his death, which oc- 
curred there January 20, 1881, after two weeks' illness, from 
rheumatism affecting the kidneys and the heart. 

He was married. May 7, 1850, to Miss Sarah M. Cooke, of New 
York City, who survives him with their three sons and two 
daughters. 

1848. 
John Peyton Clark died in 1878. (See page 56.) 

Charles Olmsted Reynolds, son of John and Hannah (Good- 
win) Reynolds, of East Hartford, Conn., was born in that town, 
Feb. 16, 1822. 

He studied for the ministry in the Bangor and Yale Semi- 
naries, and was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in 
Flushing, L. L, Oct. 26, 1851. He was dismissed from this 
charge to accept a call to the Congregational Church in Morris- 
ania, N. Y., where he remained from Sept. 21, 1854, to Oct. 20, 
1859. After an interval of six months, spent in foreign travel, he 
then supplied the pulpit of the Presbyterian Church in Hunter, 



33 

Greene County, N. Y., until 1864, when he went to the Southern 
States in the employ of the U. S. Christian Commission. In 1865, 
though in delicate health, he began to preach statedly to the 
Presbyterian Church in St. Augustine, Fla., and continued in 
that service as long as his health allowed, until 1874. He con- 
tinued to reside there, coming North for the summers. In 1878 
and 1879 he preached in West Durham, N. Y., and when on his 
way there again in May, 1880, was prostrated by illness in New 
York city, and died there, July 3, in his 59th year. 

He married, Feb. 18, 1852, Lucy W., second daughter of the 
Kev. Hiram Bingham, one of the first missionaries to the Ha- 
waiian Islands. 

1849. 

John Catlin Bull, elder son of Dr. Norman Bull (Y. C. 1819) 
and Lucy (Catlin) Bull, was born, Oct. 12, 1824, in South Britain, 
a parish of Southbury, Conn., where his father was then practis- 
ing medicine. In 1825 his father removed to Watertown, Conn., 
where he died in 1830, leaving his wife and two little boys to the 
care of her brother, the late Benjamin H. Catlin, M.D., of Meri- 
den. Conn. 

After graduating he spent a year in teaching, in Danbury, 
Conn, and Tarry town, N. Y., and then entered the Yale Divinity 
School. At the end of his second year in the Seminary, a position 
was offered him as teacher in the American Asylum for the Deaf 
and Dumb, in Hartford, Conn., in which office he remained for 
the rest of his life. In January, 1867, he took charge of the 
Gallaudet Scientific School connected with the Asylum, and so 
continued until the giving up of the school in 1877, when he 
resumed his regular teaching in the Institution. For this work he 
was peculiarly fitted by his patient, sympathetic nature, and in it 
he was happy. After an illness of about six weeks he died, 
of eczema, in Hartford, July 12, 1880, in his 56th year. 

He was married. May 18, 1858, to Miss Julia P., daughter 
of William M. Sergeant, of Galveston, Texas, who survives with 
three daughters, two sons and one daughter having died before 
him. 

1850. 

Abraham DeWitt Baldwin, third son of David L. and Martha 
P. (DeWitt) Baldwin, was born in Milford, Conn., Oct. 15, 1828. 



34 

After graduation he studied in the Yale Law School until 
January, 1852, when he entered the office of Philo T. liuggles, 
Esq., in New York city. He was admitted to the bar in Octo- 
ber, 1852, and soon after entered the office of Judge Chas. A. 
Peabody, passing in Maj^, 1853, to the office of Judge Benj. W. 
Bonney, in connection with whom he remained until May 1, 1859, 
when he formed a law partnership with his classmate Farnham, 
which continued for fourteen years. As a member of the 7th 
Regiment, of New York city, he participated in the Maryland 
campaign of January, 1863. He continued in the practice of his 
profession in New York until broken down by illness. He was sun- 
struck while parading (as a veteran) with the 7th Regiment at 
the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876, and suffered a 
second attack as the regiment was marching up Broadway on its 
return. Progressive paralysis of the brain was developed by 
degrees, and a few months before his death he was taken, by his 
own desire, to the Bloomingdale Asylum, in New York, where he 
died, Aug. 26, 1880, in his 52d year. 

He was married, Oct. 24, 1877, to Miss Mamie E. Christie, 
of New York city, who survives him, without children. 

1851. 

Charles Gordon Hayes, eldest son of the Rev. Gordon Hayes 
(Y. C. 1823) and Mary D. (Fassett) Hayes, was born in Washing- 
ton, Litchfield County, Conn., where his father was then settled 
in the ministry, Jan. 20, 1830. 

After graduation he taught school for a few months in Wood- 
bury, Conn., and then for upwards of two years in Bennington, 
Vt. In September, 1854, he entered the Union Theological Semi- 
nary in New York city, but after a brief interval turned to the 
study of the law, and was admitted to the bar in Litclifield, Conn. 
Thence he removed to Rock Island, 111., and a year later to 
Muscatine, Iowa. After a few years he was obliged to abandon 
his practice and engage in outdoor pursuits. He made the breed- 
ing of domestic animals, and especially of horses, a study, and 
became well known through his articles on breeding, published in 
leading stock journals. In addition, he devoted much of his leis- 
ure time to the cultivation of his literary tastes and to miscellane- 
ous composition, in prose and poetry and in music. His genial 
disposition and unselfish nature made him a general favorite. 

He was married, in September, 1858, to Miss Ada Stone, 
of Muscatine, who with two children survives him. 



36 

He died, of consumption of the bowels, at Des Moines, Iowa, to 
which place he removed in 1877, on the 8th of April, 1878, in his 
49th year. 

David Paige Smith, eldest son of James M. Smith, M.D. 
(Y. C. 1828), and grandson of Nathan Smith, M.D., the first Pro- 
fessor of Theory and Practice in the Yale Medical Institution, 
was born in Westfield, Mass., Oct. 1, 1830. His father removed 
to Baltimore, Md., in 1838, and returned to Springfield, Mass., 
about 1841, from which place the son entered College. 

He studied medicine in the Jefferson Medical College, Philadel- 
phia, and also with his father, who was killed in the railroad dis- 
aster at Norwalk, Conn., in June, 1853. Upon graduation at 
Philadelphia, in March, 1854, he succeeded to his father's practice 
in Springfield, and was married the same year to Miss Eunice S. 
Brewer. In 1860 he went to Europe and spent a year in medical 
and surgical study. On his return he entered the army as Sur- 
geon of the 18th Mass. Infantry, but was soon made Medical 
Director of Gen. Geo. H. Thomas's division. After the Peninsula 
campaign, he was placed in charge of the hospital at Fairfax 
Seminary, near Alexandria, Va., and while there rendered most 
valuable and conspicuous service, and laid the foundation for his 
subsequent eminence and success in diflicult surgical operations. 
After resuming practice in Springfield at the close of the war, he 
rapidly advanced in professional standing, and when in 1873 he 
was elected to the chair originally held by his grandfather in the 
Yale Medical School, he was the acknowledged head of his pro- 
fession in the region of his residence. In 1877 he was transferred 
to the more congenial chair of surgery, and his services were 
of great value to the school, though he continued to reside in 
Springfield till his death. His laborious practice and the intense 
energy with which he gave himself to it, had unfitted him for 
resisting disease, and death resulted from a chill contracted in 
a drive to a neighboring town and neglected until too late. He 
died in Springfield, Dec. 26, 1 880, at the age of 50 years. 

His wife is still living. Their only child, a son, died in 1873. 
By his will his professional library and his valuable collections 
of medical and surgical instruments were given to Yale College, 
and eventually the proceeds of two-fifths of his estate are to be 
used for the endowment of the chair of tlie Theory and Practice 
of Medicine. 



36 



1853. 



Thomas McKinney Jack, son of Wm. H. and Laura (Harrison) 
Jack, was born Dec. 19, 1831, at San Felipe de Austin, then the 
capital of the Republic of Texas. His father, a Georgian by birth, 
a lawyer of distinction, and a member of Congress and Secretary 
of State of the Texan Republic, removed soon after his son's birth 
to Brazoria County. His boyhood was spent in that county and 
he entered Yale in February, 1851, from Georgetown College, Ky. 
Upon graduation he returned to Texas, where he read law in Gal- 
veston under the direction of Hon. W. P. Ballinger, his brother-in- 
law, with whom he entered into a partnership in October, 1854, 
which continued till his death. In 1856, at the age of 24, he was 
elected county judge, and served for two years. In 1859 he was 
elected to the State Legislature. In July, 1861, he enlisted in the 
Confederate army as a private in Captain Wharton's company of 
Rangers (8th Texas Cavalry). He was made in December, 1861, 
1st Lieutenant of Cavalry, and aide de camp to Gen. Albert Sid- 
ney Johnston, acting in that capacity at Shiloh when Gen. John- 
ston fell. He was then commissioned Major in the Adjutant 
General's Department, and assigned to duty as Adjutant General 
of Gen. Polk's corps in the Army of Tennessee, in which posi- 
tion he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. After 
Gen. Polk's death in 1864, he was assigned to duty as Adjutant 
General of the Department of Texas, with the rank of Colonel. At 
the close of the war he resumed his practice in Galveston, but took 
no part in political life, except to serve as a delegate at large to the 
Presidential Convention at Cincinnati in 1880, where he hoped to 
see Mr. Bayard nominated. He died in Galveston, of pneumonia, 
Aug. 26, 1880, in his 49th year. His ability as a practitioner and 
the purity of his character won for him in a marked degree tlie 
regard of the community, which has found expression since his death 
in a Memorial published by members of the bar and officers of the 
courts at Galveston. 

He was married in 1857 to Miss Nannie M. Knox, who survived 
him only four months. Four children are still living. 

Benjamin Kinsman Phelps, only child of the Rev. Dudley 
Phelps (Y. C. 1823) by his first wife, Ann, daughter of Dr. Aaron 
Kinsman (Dartmouth Coll. 1787), of Portland, Me., was born in 
Haverhill, Mass., where his father was then settled as pastor of the 
Congregational Church, Sept. 16, 1832. His residence from 1837 
'was in Groton, Mass., where he was prepared for college. 



37 

He was occupied during most of the year 1854 with a voyage 
around the world, and upon his return studied law with the Hon. 
Benjamin M. Farley, of Hollis, N. H. In July, 1856, he was 
admitted to the bar at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and in the same year 
began the practice of law in New York City. He soon entered 
into partnership with his classmate Knevals, and so continued until 
1866, when he became Assistant District Attorney of the U. S. 
for the Southern District of New York. He retained this position 
until 1870, when he returned to private practice. In November, 
1872, he was elected District Attorney of the City and County of 
New York, receiving the support of the Republicans and of the 
"Committee of Seventy" which represented the citizens' move- 
ment, organized to oppose the so-called "Tweed Ring." At the 
expiration of his three years' term of office he was reelected to the 
same position upon a fusion ticket composed of Republicans and 
Independent Democrats, receiving a majority of about 27,000 
votes. He was a third time elected upon a similar ticket in 1878, 
and continued in office until his death, from internal hemorrhage, 
Dec. 30, 1880, at the age of 48. 

In his career as District Attorney Mr. Phelps proved himself a 
lawyer of ability and judgment, while those who knew him more 
intimately appreciated equally the strength and nobleness of his 
character. 

He was married, Oct. 21, 1857, to Anna M., daughter of Hon. 
Julius Catlin, of Hartford, Conn., by whom he had two daughters 
who survive him, and one son, now a member of the Sophomore 
Class in this College. Mrs. Phelps died on Dec. 20, 1880, after an 
illness of nearly two years, and her husband who was already ill, 
was unable to withstand the shock given by her death. 

1855. 

Calvin Goddard Child, son of the Hon. Asa Child (Y. C. 
1821), of Norwich, Conn., was born in that town, April 6, 1834. 
His mother was Alice H., daughter of Judge Calvin Goddard, of 
Norwich. He entered College from New York City, to which 
place his father had removed in 1845.. 

He studied law in his father's office and in the Harvard Law 
School, and was admitted to the bar in 1868. He entered on the 
practice of his profession in Norwich, Conn., continuing his resi- 
dence there until June, 1864. For two years from May, 1862, he 
was private secretary to Governor Buckingham, rendering efficient 



38 

service at a time when the duties of that position were unusually 
responsible and onerous. During his last year in Norwich he was 
also Judge of the City Court. In 1864 he opejied an office in New 
York City, his residence being in Southport, Conn. In 1867 he 
removed both his office and his home to Stamford, Conn., where 
he formed a partnership with Hon. Joshua B. Ferris (Y. C. 1828). 
He was appointed XJ. S. District Attorney for Connecticut, March 
1, 1870, and held that position until his death. He had been in 
poor health for some years, and in March, 1880, was stricken with 
apoplexy, but so far recovered as to be able to make a visit to the 
Hot Springs of Arkansas, with benefit. At the end of August, 
while at Saratoga Springs, another attack seized him. He was 
brought home and lingered in great feebleness until his death, 
Sept. 28th, in his 47th year. 

His standing as a lawyer was very high, and in private life he 
was warmly beloved. 

He was married Sept. 16, 1858, to Miss Kate, daughter of Capt. 
Jonathan Godfrey, of Southport. She survives him with several 
children. 

Augustus Benjamin Fitch was born in Batavia, N. Y., Sept. 
5, 1834, and entered College from Buffalo, N. Y. 

From July, 1855, to July, 1856, and again from October, 1857, 
to May, 1858, he was traveling in Europe. In the interval he 
studied law in Buffalo, where he was admitted to the Bar in Decem- 
ber, 1858, and began practice. He was auditor of the city in 
1862-3. He was married, Sept. 30, 1857, to Mrs. Eliza H. Pitkin, 
the youngest daughter of Judge Rochester. Mrs. Fitch died, 
April 24, 1868, and thenceforth he devoted much of his time to the 
education of his three surviving children. In April, 1869, he left 
Buffalo to practice his profession in New York City, where he 
continued till his death. He died in New York, after a few 
months' illness, Oct. 16, 1880, in his 47th year. 

1859. 

Theodore McDonald, the last surviving of seven children 
of Allen and Harriet (Wildman) McDonald, was born in Dan- 
bury, Conn., March 26, 1835. An elder brother was a member 
of the Class of 1858, and died near the close of his Junior year. 

After graduation he entered the law office of Wm. F. Taylor, 
Esq., in Danbury, and on being admitted to the bar in 1861 con- 



I 



39 

tinned in successful practice with Mr. Taylor for about ten years. 
Subsequently he formed a partnership with Col. Moss N. White, 
in which relation he continued till his death, though failing health 
prevented his attention to business during the last three years 
of life. He died at his father's residence in Danbury, March 29, 
1880, in the full assurance of the Christian faith. He was never 
married. 

1860. 

George Walter Giddings, son of Nathaniel Giddings, Jr., 
was born in Pittston, Pa., July 3, 1832. 

He studied theology for three years in the Seminary in Prince- 
ton, N. J., but after he had graduated his eyes failed him, and in 
consequence of this, and also of his extreme diffidence, he finally 
abandoned the idea of preaching. He served as a private in the 
49th Pa. Militia during the invasion of the State by the Confeder- 
ate forces, and subsequently from Sept., 1864, until August, 1865, 
in the 198th Pa. Volunteers. The following years were spent in 
teaching, in farming, and in business, his home being for much 
of the time in Poughkeepsie, N". Y. In 1880 he returned to his 
native town, where his invalid mother needed his care. In 
November he entered into the employ of the Lehigh Valley Rail 
Road Company, and while thus engaged fell from a trestling, and 
received an injury on the head which caused his death a week 
later. He died in Pittston, Jan. 12, 1881, in his 49th year. He 
was never married. 

1861. 

James Lanman Harmar, youngest son of Josiah and Sarah C. 
Harmar, and grandson of Hon. James Lanman (Y. C. 1788), and 
also of Brig. Gen. Josiah Harmar, was born in Chester County, 
Pa., May 20, 1841, and entered College from Philadelphia, then 
his mother's residence. 

After graduation he studied law in Philadelphia, with Charles 
E. Lex, Esq., and after being admitted to the bar in May, 1864, 
entered on active practice there. For some years after the sad 
death of his elder brother (Y. C. 1855), in the summer of 186V, 
he did but little in his profession, and never resumed full practice, 
his circumstances enabling him to indulge his tastes in the accu- 
mulation and study of rare books. He died after a very brief 
illness, in Philadelphia, Aug. 8, 1880, in his 40th year. 



40 

He was married, Sept. 25, 1872, to Mrs. Josephine (Neilson) 
liarmar, the widow of his cousin, wlio survives him with one son 
and one daughter. 

1863. 

Jacob Bkrry, son of John Berry, was born in Clarence, Erie 
County, N. Y., Oct. 4, 1834. 

After graduation he taught in Brooklyn, also in his native 
county, in Buffalo, and in Rochester, N. Y. In April, 1870, he 
was appointed Principal of one of the Public Schools in Buffalo, 
and he remained so engaged until his death. He had been for 
some time suffering from mental prostration, induced by physical 
disability, and about the first of May, 1881, went to the residence 
of his brother, in Hamburgh, Erie County, for rest. While there, 
on the morning of June 3d, he took his own life, while in a state 
of mental aberration. 

He leaves a wife and two daughters. 

1865. 

Alexander Buell, son of the Hon. Alexander H. Buell, was 
born in Fairfield, N. Y., April 28, 1 845. 

Soon after graduation he entered the law office of Judge Doo- 
little, of Utica, and in 1866-67 attended lectures at the Albany 
Law School, where he received the degree of LL.B. Subse- 
quently he practiced his profession in Utica. During the last 
year or more of his life he was absent on business in Chicago, 
where he died of heart disease, Oct. 10, 1880, in his 36th year. 
He was unmarried. 

1867. 

William Edward Bliss, eldest son of George and the late 
Catherine S. Bliss, was born in New York city, July 8, 1846. 

While in College the condition of his health made it necessary 
for him to spend a portion of tw^o winters in a milder climate. 
This necessity continued during the remainder of his life, so that, 
till the winter preceding his death, when he was too feeble to 
travel, he passed the cold months of each year in a southern 
latitude, either in this country or in the vicinity of the Mediter- 
ranean. He was a member of the firm that succeeded his father 
in business in 1869, but, his health continuing feeble, he retired at 
the end of three years. He died at his father's house in New 
York city, Dec. 12, 1880, in his 35th year. 



41 

Leonard Treat Brown, eldest son of the Rev. Joshua R. and 
Susan A. Brown, was born in Goshen Parish, in the town 
of Lebanon, Conn., where his father was then pastor, Dec. 26, 
1846. 

On graduation he chose teaching as his profession, and con- 
tinued in this employment until his death. He first taught in 
Woodstock, Conn., and was then for several years principal 
of the Academy in Glastonbury, Conn. In 18*75 he removed 
from this place to Cranbury, N. J., where he conducted the 
" l^rainerd Institute " until made vice-principal of one of the 
public schools in Brooklyn, N. Y. His prospects were bright for 
a position of wider usefulness, when a sudden cold, resulting 
in pneumonia, closed his life, after ten day's illness, in Brooklyn, 
Dec. 28, 1880, at the age of 34. 

He was married, Aug. 3, 1870, to Miss Ida E. Meech, of Gros- 
venor Dale, in Thompson, Conn., who survives him with one child. 

1868. 

Charles Edwin Smith, elder son of Richard and Mary Smith, 
was born in Cincinnati, O., Sept 29, 1847. 

Immediately after graduation he entered the editorial office 
of the Cincinnati Gazette (with which his father has so long 
been identified), and there gave promise of a useful and successful 
career. He was married, Feb. 20, 1873, to Miss Sophia B., 
daughter of B. B. Whiteitian, Esq., of Clifton, one of the suburbs 
of Cincinnati. Soon after this, pulmonary weakness manifested 
itself, and he was obliged to spend several months in Colorado 
and California. By this he was considerably benefited, and 
subsequent medical treatment seemed to have completed a cure. 
It was not thought advisable, however, that he should return to 
the hard work of a journalist, and he therefore accepted a respon- 
sible position in the Internal Revenue office in Cincinnati. But 
his health continued delicate, and he was again attacked with 
disease of the lungs, brought on by overwork. He was for some 
weeks confined to his room, and died, in Clifton, Dec. 23, 1880, in 
his 34th year. His widow, with an only son, survives him. 

Edward Jefferson Tytus, son of Francis B. and S. J. Tytus, 
was born in Middletown, Ohio, Aug. 22, 1847. 

After leaving College he spent a year at home, engaged 
in farming. He then removed to Milwaukee, Wise, where he 



42 

continued as a member of a firm of wholesale dealers in paper 
until November, 1874. He was married, June 24, 1874, to Char- 
lotte M., daughter of John M. Davies, of New Haven, Conn., and 
sailed for Europe in April, 1875. While abroad he was warned 
of serious trouble in his lungs, and he returned to this country a 
confirmed invalid. The rest of his life, both winters and sum- 
mers, was largely spent in the Adirondack woods. He died at 
Saranac Lake, N. Y., May 19, 1881, in his 34th year. His wife, 
with one son, survives him. 

1869. 

Edwin Hedges, second son of the Hon. Henry P. Hedges (Y. C. 
1838) and Gloriana (Osborn) Hedges, was born in Sag Harbor, 
L. I., N. Y., Feb. 12, 1847. During his childhood his father 
removed to Bridge Hampton, L. I., from which place he entered 
College. 

Upon graduation he returned home and was occupied for three 
years with the charge of an academy and with law studies in his 
father's office. He was admitted to the bar in May, 1873, and 
remained in practice with his father. He died at his father's 
house, in Bridge Hampton, May 8, 1881, in his 35th year, 
of purpura hemorrhagica^ possibly complicated with a slight 
attack of varioloid. He was married in June, 1873, to Miss 
Emily Cook. 

Beverly Jones was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., June 18, 1845, 
and died in the same city, March 29, 1881. 
He was a lawyer in Pittsburgh. 

1871. 

Thomas Campbell Sproat, youngest child of Earle and 
Bethania (Weston) Sproat, was born in Middleboro', Mass., 
March 20, 1849, and had resided there since his graduation. He 
died in Middleboro', May 15, 1881, in his 33d year. 

1872. 

David Sumner Holbrook, son of Sumner and Lurania Hol- 
brook, was born in Chester, Mass., Oct. 29, 1848. 

After graduation he entered the Yale Divinity School, where 
he finished the course in May, 1875. During the following 
summer he was invited to preach in the Congregational Church 



43 

in Ellington, Conn., and the result was a call to the pastorate. 
He was ordained there. May 4, 1876, but was obliged to take a 
dismissal, Oct. 11, 1880, on account of his failing health. He 
died, of consumption, in New Haven, Conn., Jan. 25, 1881, in his 
33d year. 

He was married, Oct. 20, 1875, to Miss Caroline G., daughter 
of William Moulthrop, of New Haven, who survives him. 

GusTAvus Adolphus Slade, only son of David and Elizabeth 
(Whitaker) Slade, was born in Chelsea, Mass., July 13, 1849. He 
was prepared for College in the Chelsea High School, and on the 
first of November, after graduation, went into business with his 
father in the firm of D. & L. Slade, importers and manufacturers 
of spices, etc., and dealers in grain, in Boston. 

His promising career was cut short by his death at his father's 
house in Chelsea, Dec. 17, 1880, at the age of 31. He was un- 
married. 

Clement Brooke White, son of William R. and Ann C. 
(Brooke) White, was born in Philadelphia, June 23, 1852. 

He had resided in Philadelphia since his graduation, and was 
admitted to the bar there, a short time before his departure for a 
European trip in June, 1880. While in Rome he was attacked 
with typhoid fever, and died after an illness of two weeks, March 
20, 1881, in his 29th year. He was unmarried. 

1875. 

Charles Trumbull Russ, the only son of the late Charles J. 
Russ, was born in Hartford, Conn., Jan. 16, 1853. 

He studied law in Columbia College Law School and was 
admitted to the bar in 1878, though he never engaged in practice. 
For a year and a half before his death he held a position in the 
office of the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company in 
Hartford. He died in Hartford, of pneumonia, after five days' 
illness, May 2, 1881, in his 29th year, leaving the record of a 
blameless life. 

He was married to Miss Elizabeth B., daughter of Rev. Henry 
B. Camp (Y. C. 1831), who survives him with two sons. 

1878. 

Archibald Alexander Dershimer, son of Peter and Laura 
(Woodbridge) Dershimer, was born in Falls, Wyoming County, 
Pa., July 28, 1854. 



44 

He remained at home for a year after graduation, and then 
went to Seward, Nebraska, where he was engaged in the study 
of law until the time of his death, filling also the chair of Natural 
Science in the Seward Preparatory School of Medicine and Sur- 
gery. He died there very suddenly, Jan. 23, 1881, from an 
abscess on the brain, after only a few hours' suffering. He was 
unmarried. 

Charles Minor Gilbert, younger surviving son of the Rev. 
William H. Gilbert (Y. C. 1841) and Mary (Goodridge) Gilbert, 
was born in Ashfield, Mass., April 22, 1855. 

With his twin brother he was fitted for College in the Hartford 
High School, and entered Yale in September, 1874. After gradu- 
ation he taught in Packard's Business College, New York city, 
for a little more than a year, and then began the study of the law. 
But after a few months, fearing the beginnings of the disease 
(diabetes) which had already caused his brother's death, he broke 
off his studies and made a brief visit to Europe. The disease 
was, however, fastened upon him, and he sank gradually, dying 
at his father's house, in South Norwalk, Conn., April 15th, 1881, 
at the age of 26. 

1879. 

Delevan Sumner Sweet was born in Phcenix, Oswego County, 
N. Y., Nov. 2, 1856, and died there March 3, 1881. He had lived 
at home after graduating, and died after an illness of about a 
week, growing out of ailments by which had been affected in 
early life. He was unmarried. 

1880. 

Dana William Kellogg, only son of Hawley Kellogg, of 
Hartford, Conn., was born in that city, Dec. 7, 1859. 

He was intending at the time of his graduation to begin medi- 
cal studies in New York city after the summer's vacation. He 
died of an attack of typhoid fever, at his father's residence in 
Hartford, Sept. 11, 1880, after an illness of about ten days. 

Robert William Selden, second son of Edward D. Selden 
(Y. C. 1844) and Elizabeth M. (Conant) Selden, was born in 
Brandon, Vt., March 13, 1859. 

His health was not robust at the time of graduation, and a cold 
contracted soon after so enfeebled him that it was thought advis- 



46 

able for him to spend the following winter at the South. Accord- 
ingly he left his father's present residence, at Saratoga Springs, 
N. Y., intending to make the journey by slow stages, but was 
able to proceed no farther than New York city, where, after a 
lingering illness, he died in St. Luke's Hospital, Jan. 6, 1881, in 
his 2 2d year. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1823. 

John Beaufair Irving, son of Jacob Irving, was born on the 
island of Jamaica, W. I., Sept. 28, 1800. He was educated 
chiefly in England, going to Rugby at the age of 12, and thence 
to Cambridge University. At the age of 21 he returned to 
America, the home of his mother, and soon married Emma, 
daughter of Mr. Nicholas Cruger, of Santa Cruz, W. I., and 
settled in Charleston, S. C. He did ncd practice his profession, 
but was variously employed, — being at one time sheriff of the 
county, at another time manager of a theater, and again con- 
ductor of a newspaper, in which his reports of sporting events 
were especially valued. When about 45 years of age he studied 
for the ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church, but through 
the refusal of one of the vestry to sign his credentials, failed 
of ordination. He then retired to his estate on the Cooper River, 
S. C, and devoted himself to literary pursuits and the care of his 
family and property. The civil war brought ruin upon him, and 
at its close he removed to New York city. In 1866 he took 
a position as secretary of the American Jockey Club, but resigned 
it in 1868, and returned to South Carolina. After the complete 
breaking up of his health by the death of his elder son, he came 
North again in 1874 to reside with his younger son, a well-known 
artist, in Greenville, N. J. In 1877 he returned to Charleston, 
but two years later came back to make his home with his 
widowed daughter-in-law, in Bergen, N. J., where he died, Feb. 
22, 1881, in his 81st year. 

1824. 

George Taylor was born in New Milford, Conn., Aug. 24, 
1802, the son of Col. William Taylor (Y. C. 1785) and Abigail 



46 

(Starr) Taylor. His great grandfather, Rev. Daniel Boardman 
(Y. C. 1709), and his grandfather. Rev. Nathaniel Taylor (Y. C. 
1745), were the first and second pastors of New Milford. 

Immediately on graduation he began practice in his native 
town, where he continued to reside until his death, after a long 
illness, Jan. 14, 1881, in his 79th year. 

He became convinced of the truth of homoeopathy in 1837, and 
was the first practitioner of that school in Connecticut. 

He was elected to the State Senate in 1835 and 1836, and 
represented New Milford in the Legislature in 1833, 1834, 1850, 
1863, 1871, 1872, and 1874, being in the last instance the senior 
member of the House, save one, in length of service. He filled 
various ether local offices, being Judge of Probate from 1836 to 
1838, from 1842 to 1844, and from 1855 to 1857, and Town 
Treasurer for 14 years. In 1844 he was the Democratic candi- 
date for Congress in his district; in 1864, a delegate to the 
Democratic National Convention; and in 1876, on the Democratic 
ticket for Presidential Elector. 

He was married, Oct. 2^, 1826, to Harriett D. Allen, who died 
in 1847. Two children survive him, — his only son and only grand- 
son following the same profession. 

1825. 

Edwakd Elisha Phelps was born in Peacham, Vt., April 24, 
1803. His father. Dr. Elisha Phelps, removed to Windsor, Vt., 
soon after his birth. In 1819 the son entered the Academical 
Department of this College, but he took a dismission during the 
Sophomore year. In 1822 he attended a course of lectures at the 
Medical School connected with Dartmouth College, which was 
followed by two courses at New Haven. 

After his graduation impaired health led him to visit the South, 
and it was not until 1828 that he began his professional life in 
Windsor, where he continued in practice till his death. His 
native ability, cultivated by assiduous study, soon brought him 
reputation, and in 1835 he was elected Professor of Anatomy and 
Surgery in the medical school of the University of Vermont, 
at Burlington. This chair he held for two years, and in 1841 he 
was appointed Lecturer on Materia Medica, Medical Botany, and 
Medical Jurisprudence, in Dartmouth Medical College. The 
next year he was advanced to the Professorship of Materia 
Medica and Therapeutics, which chair he held, with the Lecture- 



ship on Medical Botany, nntil 1849, when he was transferred to 
the chair of Theory and Practice and Fathanatoniy. In 1871 
he finally retired from teaching, remaining in connection with 
the Institution, however, as Professor Emeritus, and busying 
himself somewhat with the construction and development of a 
Museum of Pathological Anatomy. 

During the war of th« Rebellion he was appointed Surgeon in 
the U. S. Army. He spent nearly a year in the field, and for the 
most of the war was very efficient in administering the Military 
Hospital in Brattleboro', Vt. He died in Windsor, Nov. 20, 
1880, in his 78th year. 

He was married, in 1830, to Phtebe F. Lyon, of Boston, Mass., 
who survives bira with one daughter. 

The degree of LL.D. was conferred on him by the University 
of Vermont, in 1857. 

1828. 

Alexander Hamilton Vinton, the son of David and Mary 
(At well) Vinton, was born in Providence, R. I., May 2, 1807. 

After taking his diploma, he settled in the parish of Abington, 
in Pomfret, Conn., where he practiced medicine for about three 
years. His attention was then strongly attracted to the sacred 
ministry, and he abandoned his original profession, and after hav- 
ing finished the usual course of study in the General Theological 
Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, he was ordained in 
New York City by Bishop B. T. Onderdonk, June 28, 1835. 
Almost immediately afterwards he took charge of Grace Church, 
New York City, during the absence of the rector, and in October 
went to Portland, Me., where he officiated for a few months until 
he became rector of Grace Church, in Providence, R. I. In Feb- 
ruary, 1842, he accepted a call to St. Paul's, Boston. During his 
connection with St. Paul's, he was invited no less than fourteen 
times to other pulpits, and finally in October, 1858, accepted a 
pressing invitation to take charge of the new parish of the Church 
of the Holy Trinity, in Philadelphia, On the death of the Rev. 
Dr. Anthon, rector of St. Mark's Church in the Bowery, New 
York City, Dr. Vinton, impelled by the precarious condition of 
his wife's health, which was believed to require a change of cli- 
mate, accepted the charge of St. Mark's, where he officiated from 
May, 1861, until November, 1869, when he returned to Boston, 
as the rector of Emmanuel Church. Here he continued to labor 
until, in accordance with a long-contemplated purpose of relin- 



48 

quishiiig active parochial service on the attainment of his 70th 
year, he resigned in December, 1877, and retired to his country 
house in Pomfret, Conn., which he had retained ever since his 
residence and marriage there. During the following winters he 
lectured on Systematic Divinity to the students of the Episcopal 
Theological Scliool, in Cambridge, Mass. In April, 1881, he went 
to Philadelphia, to preach at the consecration of his old church 
on Thursday, the 21st of that month. He was attacked two days 
later with pneumonia, which terminated fatally on the morning of 
the 26th. His wife. Miss Eleanor Stockbridge Thompson, of 
Providence, died in the summer of 1878. A son and daughter 
survive him. 

Dr. Vinton was a man of great personal dignity, combined with 
rare attractiveness of manner, a profound thinker, an eloquent 
speaker, preeminent in influence among his generation in the 
church. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the 
University of the City of New York in 1843, and again from 
Harvard University in 1853. 

1831. 

Edwin Augustus Tweedy, son of John and Rhoda (Kings- 
bury) Tweedy, was born in Hampton, Conn., Feb. 3, 1805. 

He began the study of medicine with Dr. Brewster, in his 
native place, and attended lectures in Boston the year before he 
graduated in New Haven. 

He practiced his profession in Tolland, Conn., for three years, 
but in the fall of 1834 he removed to Norwich, Conn., to engage 
in the dry goods trade. In 1850 he went to New York city, and 
continued in the same business there till January, 1879, when he 
retired, having acquired an ample fortune. The next month he 
was stricken with paralysis, but partially recovered, and a year 
later returned to Norwich. On the 20th of February, 1881, he 
was prostrated by a second attack, and died three days later, at 
his residence in Norwich, in his 77th year. 

He was twice married, and leaves a wife and son. 

1833. 

Charles Osgood, eldest child of Dr. Erastus and Martha 
(Morgan) Osgood, was born in Lebanon, Conn., in February, 1808. 

He began the study of medicine with his father— for nearly 
half a century a practitioner in Lebanon — and for two winters 



attended medical lectures here. He then associated himself with 
Dr. Arnold, of Providence, R. I., where he remained for several 
years. He next went to Michigan, settling in Monroe, a small 
place on the Raisin river, about two miles from Lake Erie. 
While in active practice here, he obtained the formula for a 
remedy for the cure of fever and ague, by means of which he 
amassed eventually a large fortune. He returned to Norwich to 
develop this business, in connection with a wholesale drug store; 
there he also became interested in many manufacturing and other 
enterprises. He was elected mayor of the city in 1876, but 
resigned before his term expired, on account of poor health. 
From 1873 until his death he was the President of the New 
London Northern Railroad company. 

He died in Norwich, after a long illness, March 18, 1881, aged 
73 years. His wife, two sons, and a daughter survive him. 

1838. 

Lucius Nichols Beardsley, the only son of Agur and Lu- 
cinda Beardsley, was born in Monroe (then the parish of New 
Stratford, in Huntington), Conn., Oct. 8, 1814. 

He received his early education chiefly at the Monroe Academy, 
a classical school of which his uncle, Samuel B. Beardsley (Y. C. 
1815), was for nearly twenty years the principal. 

He began the study of medicine somewhat early, and after 
a time entered the office of Professor Eli Ives, M.D., of Yale 
College. He received his degree in March, 1838, and settled in 
Milford, Conn., the same month. The generous confidence at 
once extended him by the people of Milford, enabled him, sooner 
than most young physicians, to acquire an extensive practice, 
in which he continued until his retirement, owing to failing 
health, in 1877. During these years he was a prominent member 
of the County Medical Society, and was repeatedly chairman 
of the Connecticut delegation at the meetings of the National 
Medical Association. He was warmly interested in everything 
that contributed to the advance of his profession, being, for 
instance, among the first to use ether in minor operations. 

His constitution, never robust, was severely taxed by so many 
years of laborious country practice, and after 1877 he endeavored 
by a removal from his old home and by frequent visits to a 
Southern climate to regain his vigor. He died in West Haven, 
Conn., Nov. 22, 1880, in his 67th year. 



50 

His first wife, Betsey Aim, the only daugliter of E. B. Coley, 
Principal of the Union Hall Seminary, New York city, died Nov. 
24th, 1869. He was again married, Oct. 5, 1874, to Susan 
Prudden Smith, who survives him. His two sons were educated 
at this College, and both follow their father's profession. 

1843. 

Alfred Washington Coates, son of Amos and Anna Coates, 
was born in North Stonington, Conn., July 8, 1813. His earlier 
studies in medicine were pursued with Thomas P. Wattles, M.D., 
of North Stonington, in connection with whom he began practice 
soon after graduating. In about a year he removed to Poquetan- 
noc, in the town of Preston, Conn., where he practiced about eight 
years. Thence he removed to Brooklyn, N. Y., but had only 
practiced there for six months when the state of his health obliged 
him to return to Connecticut. He went to Norwich, where he 
remained in full practice till June, 1853, when he settled in Mystic 
River, in the town of Groton, Conn., where he continued till his 
death, on the 27th of October, 1880. He was in his usual health 
the day before he died, but was stricken wnth apoplexy during the 
night, and died the ensuing forenoon. 

He was first married to Martha Esther Wheeler, of North Ston- 
ington, who died March 28, 1846. His second wife, Huldah 
Emma Sydleman, of Poquetannoc, died Dec. 28, 1861. His third 
wife, Harriet Newell Miner, of North Stonington, survives him 
with one daughter ; a son by the second marriage is also living. 

1852. 

EzEQUiEL Uricoechea was born in Santa Fe de Bogota, New 
Granada, April 9, 1834, his family being of Basque origin. 

In 1853 he became Doctor of Philosophy at Gottingeu, whence 
he went to Brussels, where he assisted M. Quetelet at the 
Observatory. He afterwards visited Paris and London for the 
purpose of extending his scientific knowlege, and on his return to 
Bogota founded a college for the higher branches of science, 
where he delivered lectures on chemistry, his favorite subject, 
and the theme of several of his published monographs. Dr. 
Uricoechea was also an able philologist, and while in Bogota 
made many excursions to collect materials for the study of the 
languages and archaeology of extinct races. The revolutions 
in New Granada caused him to return to Europe, where he had 



51 

leisure for his favorite researches. While residing in Spain and 
Morocco he made such progress in Arabic that when a chair 
of that language was founded in the University of Brussels, 
he was chosen Professor. He had only accomplished in the work 
appropriate to his new chair a translation into French of Caspari's 
Arabic Grammar, when he was carried off by dysentery, in 
Beirut, Syria, July 28, 1880, having gone there for further study 
of Arabic in the locality where it is spoken with the purest accent. 
He was also the author of various works on the antiquities 
and primitive languages of Spanish America, and of a valuable 
catalogue of the maps relating to the same region. 

1856. 

Edward Bulkley, Jr., only surviving child of Edward and 
Lucy (Mansfield) Bulkley, died in New Haven, Conn., Nov. 5, 
1880, aged 47. 

He was born in New Haven, May 15, 1833, and settled in prac- 
tice in his native city. He entered the army as assistant sur- 
geon in the 6th Regiment, Conn. Infantry, in September, 1861, and 
served for three years. From November, 1864, to July, 1865, he 
was stationed in Washington, as Acting Assistant Surgeon, U. S. 
A. From July, 1865, until his last illness, he practiced medicine 
in New Haven. In May, 1880, he was attacked with nervous 
debility, from which he partially recovered, but was prostrated 
again in August, and from that time till his death suffered greatly, 
the disease finally attacking the brain. 

He married Grace C. Bishop, of New Haven, in May, 1867, who 
survives him with four daughters and one son. 

1866. . 

Stephen Henry Bronson, the youngest son of Henry Bronson, 
M.D. (Y. C. 1827), and Sarah M. (Lathrop) Bronson, was born in 
Waterbury, Conn., Feb. 18, 1844. His early studies were greatly 
hindered by weak eyes, an infirmity which in certain directions 
made progress difficult ever afterwards. 

After graduation he spent more than a year in Cambridge 
Mass., pursuing especially the study of Comparative Anatomy 
under the direction of Professor Jeffries Wyman. He went abroad 
in the autumn of 1867, and for two years and a half continued his 
studies in the Laboratory of Comparative Anatomy in Paris, pay- 
ing attention also to general medicine. On liis return he opened 



62 

an office in New Haven, Conn., about the first of November, 1870, 
where he continued in practice until his death. He was one of 
the projectors, in 1871, of the New Haven Dispensary, and took 
a deep interest in its welfare, serving from the outset until his 
decease as one of the physicians in attendance, and giving much 
time to its general interests. He was also, from 1874, one of the 
physicians of the Connecticut Hospital, and for the last year one 
of the Prudential Committee of management. For three or four 
years from 1876 he lectui'ed on Physiology in the Yale Medical 
School, and shortly before his death was appointed a member of 
the City Board of Health. He had also been the President of the 
New Haven Medical Association. Together with these outside 
engagements he had built up a large and desirable private prac- 
tice. While attending to his ordinary duties, he went to bed on 
the evening of the 18th of August, 1880, ill; and died the next 
day. An examination after death disclosed a diseased condition 
of the kidneys, probably of several years' standing, though known 
to no one but himself. His attractive personal character and his 
marked ability rendered more keen the shock of his sudden death. 
He was never married. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
1865. 

William Law Foster, the only child of Pierpont B. Foster, 
was bom in New Haven, Conn., April 20, 18*1. 

He entered the Academical Department in 1860, but was obliged 
to leave after a few weeks by a severe attack of typhoid fever. 

Upon taking his degree he began practice in New Haven. 
From September, 1872, to July, 1875, he was assistant clerk of 
the Court of Common Pleas, and the next year acted as assistant 
clerk of the Superior Court. From 1876 until his death he held 
his former position in the Court of Common Pleas. After a dis- 
tressing illness of six months, he died in New Haven, June 24, 
1881, in his 41st year. He was married, Oct. 12, 1870, to Miss 
Mary E. Board, who survives him with one of their two children. 

1874. 

James Francis Fitzpatrick died in New Haven, Conn., July 
8, 1880, of congestion of the lungs. 

He was a resident of Waterbury, Conn., when he entered the 
school, and practiced his profession there until his death. 



53 



1876. 



JocELYN Plant Oleavkland, the eldest child of the Rev. James 
B. Cleaveland (Y. C. 1847) and Elizabeth H. Cleaveland, and 
^^B grandson of the late Nathaniel Jocelyn, of New Haven, entered 
'^^ the Sheffield Scientific School in 1873, and the Law School in 1874. 
After his graduation he remained in New Haven, where he prac- 
ticed at the bar until his sudden death, which occurred on the 
morning of June 15, 1881, after an hour's illness, from apoplexy, 
probably resulting from over-exertion in the sun. He was 
unmarried. 



I 



1879. 

OswiN HiNKLEY TuTTLE, SOU of EHzur C. and Hannah W. 
(Hinkley) Tuttle, was born in North Haven, Conn., Oct. 2, 1852. 

After graduation he remained for a few months in New Haven, 
where his mother then resided. Early in November, 1879, he left 
home for the West, and in July, 1880, reached Leadville, Colo- 
rado, where he hoped to find an opening for the practice of his pro- 
fession. In August he completed arrangements for a partnership 
with Carlton F. Drake, Esq. (Yale Law School, 1877) ; but under- 
taking a journey into the mountains to look after a claim in which 
he and his partner were interested, he was attacked with fever, 
September 12th, and after his return to Leadville suffered a relapse, 
which proved fatal, on the 30th of the same month. He was 
unmarried. 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1858. 

Demetrio Tomas Arosmena, son of Senor Don Justo Arosmena, 
now the Minister-Resident from the United States of Colombia 
to the United States of America, took his degree in civil engineer- 
ing in 1858, being then a resident of Panama. 

He died in New York City, Sept. 26, 1880, of pulmonary con- 
sumption, having been for thirteen years tlie casliier of the New 
York Associated Press. 



54 

1870. 

Frederick Hosea Churchill, son of William A. and Sarah B. 
('hnrchill, was born in New Britain, Conn., March 27, 1848. 

After graduating he began to study law and continued in a pri- 
vate office for nearly three years, after which he spent a year at 
the Harvard Law School, graduating in 1875. He was admitted 
to the bar the same year, and practiced his profession successfully 
in New Britain until 1880. Previous to this date, however, he 
became deeply interested in the science of electricity, and had 
made a trip to Europe with the special view of obtaining informa" 
tion concerning the uses and adaptability of the electric light. His 
studies and researches resulted in his leaving his chosen profession 
and organizing at New Britain the American Electric Company, a 
corporation now in operation and of which he was the manager up 
to the time of his death, which occurred March 4, 1881. 

Mr. Churchill married Annie, only child of the late William H. 
Smith, of New Britain, who, with three children, survives him. 

1875. 

James Freeland, the youngest son of James and Isabella J. 
Freeland, and grandson of the late Henry Rankin, of New York, 
was born August 23, 1852, at Fishkill-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

On graduation he decided to become an architect, and was 
engaged for some two years in the study of his profession in the 
office of George B. Post, of New York. In 1877 he was employed 
in St. John, New Brunswick, assisting in the rebuilding which 
became necessary, after the great conflagration of that year. In 
the autumn of 1878 he returned to New York, and entering the 
office of Messrs. Gambrill & Ficken, devoted himself energetically . 
to the practice of his profession. A close student, with a clear 
practical mind, he was already engaged in several important 
works, and was winning an assured position, when seized with the 
attack which suddenly ended his life. 

He died at Yonkers, N. Y., of typhoid pneumonia, Sept. 28, 
1880, in the 29th year of his age. 

1876. 

William Bahcock Sawyer, son of James D. and Charlotte O. 
(F'ield) Sawyer, was born in Buffalo, April 27, 1856. After two 
years at the New Haven Hopkins Grammar School, he entered 
College in 1872, but lost a yc^ar through ill-health on account of 



I 



55 

ma. The three years after graduation were passed in travel 
and in business with his father at home. In 1879 he sought in 
St. Louis a climate more favorable to one subject to asthma, and 
early in 1880 engaged in business as a cotton factor and commis- 
sion merchant, as one of the firm of Beall & Sawyer. Late in 
August he returned to Buffalo stricken with a fatal disease — leuco- 
cythemia— which he fought with characteristic manliness and 
atience until he died peacefully Nov. 'Zth, in his 25th year. 



Charles Williams Van Vleck, son of the late Rev. William 
Yan Vleck, was born in Cleveland, O., July 21, 1855, and died at 
his father's residence, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O., Sept. 25, 1880, 
of paralysis of the brain. His death was sudden, though his 
health had previously not been good. 

1878. 

John Luis Blackmore, son of Robert T. Blackmore, was born 
in the City of Mexico, June 21, 1852, and died in the same place, 
March 1, 1881, in his 29th year. After graduation he was at first 
in charge of a brewery in the City of Mexico, and later followed 
his father's profession, that of an engineer, in the same place. 

George Webb Mason, eldest son of Dr. William and Mary L 
Mason, and grandson of Dr. Lowell Mason, as also of George 
James Webb, was born in New York City, April 7, 1858. 

Soon after his graduation he entered the dry goods business in 
New York. In February, 1881, his health failing, he went to 
Europe, and died in London two months later, on the 20th of 
April, at the age of 23 years. 

George Henry Potts, eldest son of Frederic A. and Sarah 
Brevoort Potts, was born in Lenox, Mass., Sept. 17, 1858, and died 
in Paris, France, May 8, 1881, in his 23d year. 

Upon graduation he went into the coal business with his father 
in New York City. He sailed for Europe at a few hours' notice 
on March 9, 1880, on the receipt of the news of the dangerous ill- 
ness of his two brothers in Naples. The ship had hardly left the 
dock when a dispatch arrived, stating that the youngest brother 
was dead. The survivors proceeded to Paris, and there the elder 
was attacked with typhoid fever. His parents immediately sailed 
to meet him, but he died before their arrival. He was unmarried. 



56 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1878. 

Fkank Woodbury Cobb, son of Charles C. and Estlier (Sydle 
man) Cobb, was born in Durham, Me., Nov. 20, 1851, and gradu- 
ated at Bates College, Lewiston, Me., in 1873. 

He began to preach in the Union Evangelical Church at the 
village of Three Rivers, in Palmer, Mass., in the autumn of 1878, 
and was ordained there Feb, 12, 1879. After a brief pastorate of 
less than two years, during which he had proved himself an unusu- 
ally able minister, he died after a week's illness, of peritonitis, at 
the residence of his brother, in Lynn, Mass., Sept. 4, 1880, in his 
29th year. He was unmarried. 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1848. 

John Peyton Clark, the eldest son of William L. Clark (Y. 
C. 1817) and Louisa M. (Peyton) Clark, was born in Winchester, 
Va., in March, 1827, and entered the class at the beginning of 
sophomore year. 

After his graduation he studied law for two years at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and then settled in practice in Winchester. 
After three years he abandoned his profession to become the 
principal of a flourishing academy in Middletown, Frederick coun- 
ty, Va., in which situation he continued until the beginning of 
the late civil war. After the war he opened a private school in 
the country, in Frederick county, which he taught successfully 
for some years. In the fall of 1876 he removed to Rockville, 
Md., to become the principal of an academy there. In February, 
1878, he was attacked in his schoolroom with paralysis. He lin- 
gered for six months, with faculties unimpaired, until he died in 
Rockville, without pain, on the 5th of August, at the age of 51. 

He was married, July 17, 1856, to Miss Cornelia L., daughter 
of the late Dr. Robert T. Baldwin, of Winchester, who died 
Feb. 15, 1871 ; two daughters and two sons survive their parents. 




Class. 

1811 
1811 
1815 
1815 
1816 
1816 
1817 
1818 
1820 
1820 
1820 
1821 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1823 
1825 
1825 
1825 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1827 
1828 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1831 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 
1837 
1837 
1839 
1839 
1840 
1840 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1842 



SXJMMA^RY. 



Academical Department. 



Name and Age. 
Samuel Nichols, 92, 
David M. Smith, 91, 
Levi Brooks, 87, 
Nathaniel B. Smith, 85, 
William 0. Fowler, 87, 
T. Dwight Porter, 82, 
David N. Lord, 88, 
Joseph H. Breck, 82, 
John M. Catlin, 80, 
Samuel B. Mead, 81, 
John M. Sterling, 80, 
Rodolphus Landfear, 86, 
Henry White, 77, 
William H. Law, 77, 
John D. Russ, 79, 
James D. Verplanck, 76, 
William G. Bates, 76, 
Daniel T. Coit, 74, 
Samuel Rockwell, 77, 
Thomas S. Savage, 76, 
James C. Fisher, 72, 
William Adams, 73, 
Stiles French, 79, 
Oliver E. Daggett, 70, 
Silas Billings, 76, 
Benjamin Lock wood, 72, 
P. Teller Babbit, 70, 
Alvin C. Bradley, 70, 
Ephraim Lyman, 70, 
Dorson E. Sykes, 72, 
Chauncey D. Cowles, 68, 
John C. Rafferty, 64, 
Dillon Williams. 74, 
William T. Bacon, 68, 
Edwin 0. Carter, 65, 
Willard M. Harding, 70, 
Matt View D. Bragg, 63, 
William F. Hubbard, 66, 
Gideon H. Hollister, 63, 
Egbert A. Thompson, 65, 
William H. Tiffany, 61, 
John M. Pinkerton, 63, 
Albert B. Capwell, 61, 
Alexander MacWhorter, 58, 



Place and 
Greenfield Hill, Conn., 
Princeton, N. J., 
Albion, N. Y., 
Woodbury, Conn., 
Durham, Conn., 
New York City, 
New York City, 
Newburgh, 0., 
New York City, 
Augusta, 111., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Hartford, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Pompton, N. J., 
Fishkill, N. Y., 
Westfield, Mass., 
Norwich, Conn., 
New Britain, Conn., 
Rhinecliff, N. Y., 
Washington, D. C, 
Orange Mountain, N. J., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Hartford, Conn, 
Winchester, Ya., 
Linden, N. Y., 
Bainbridge, Ga., 
Castleton Corners, S. I., N ' 
Minneapolis, Minn., 
Grass Valley, Cal., 
Farmington, Conn., 
Flemington, N. J., 
Cleveland, N. Y., 
Birmingham, Conn., 
Chicopee, Mass., 
Chelsea, Mass., 
Utica, N. Y., 
Ashtabula, 0., 
Litchfield, Conn., 
Hutchinson, Kan., 
Stamford, Conn., 
Boston, Mass., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
New Haven, Conn., 



Date of Death. 
July 17, '80. 
July 15, '80. 
Aug. 28, '78. 
Feb. 5, '81. 
Jan. 15, '81, 
Dec. 12, '80. 
July 14, '80. 
June 21, '80. 
June 13, '81. 
Nov. 1 1, '80. 
Oct. 12, '80. 
Sept. 30, '80. 
Oct. 7, '80. 
March 27, '81. 
March 1, '81. 
May 7, '81. 
July 5, '80. 
July 2, '80. 
Dec. 25, '80. 
Dec. 29, '80. 
October, '80. 
Aug. 31, '80. 
May 9, '81. 
Aug. 31, '80. 
Jan. 8, '81. 
Sept. 29, '80. 
April 1, '81. 
, Feb. 23, '81. 
Oct. 29, '80. 
Sept. 13, '80. 
Jan. 12, '81. 
Dec. 31, '80. 
Nov. 23, '79. 
May 18, '81. 
Jan. 20, '81. 
Dec. 20, '80. 
Jan. 1, '81. 
Nov. 6, '80. 
March 24, '81. 
Feb. 4, '79. 
Dec. 23, '80. 
Feb. 6, '81. 
Aug. 23, '80. 
June 28, '80. 



58 



Cla88. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Date of Death. 


1842 


Cyrus Pitts, 63, 


Geneva, Switzerland, 


April 1, '80. 


1842 


John C. Strong, 60, 


Buffalo, N. Y., 


July 5, '79. 


1846 


Robert Cochran, 54, 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Dec. 14, '80. 


1846 


Samuel T. Richards, 60, 


New York City, 


Jan. 20, '81. 


1848 


John P. Clark, 51, 


Rockland, Md., 


Aug. 5, '78. 


1848 


Charles 0. Reynolds, 58, 


New York City, 


July 3, '80. 


1849 


John C. Bull, 55, 


Hartford, Conn., 


July 12, '80. 


1850 


A. DeWitt Baldwin, 51, 


New York City, 


Aug. 26. '80. 


1851 


Charles G. Hayes, 48, 


Des Moines, Iowa, 


April 8, '78. 


1851 


David P. Smith, 50, 


Springfield, Mass., 


Dec. 26, '80. 


1853 


Thomas M. Jack, 48, 


Galveston, Tex., 


Aug. 26, '80. 


1853 


Benjamin K. Phelps, 48, 


New York City, 


Dec. 30, '80. 


1855 


Calvin G. Child, 46, 


Stamford, Conn., 


Sept. 28, '80. 


1855 


Augustus B. Pitch, 46, 


New York City, 


Oct. 16, '80. 


1859 


Theodore McDonald, 45, 


Danbury, Conn., 


March 29, '80. 


1860 


George W. Giddings, 48, 


Pittston, Pa., 


Jan. 12, '81. 


1861 


James L. Harmar, 39, 


Philadelphia, Pa., 


Aug. 8, '80. 


1863 


Jacob Berry, 47, 


Hamburgh, N. Y., 


June 3, '81. 


1865 


Alexander Buell, 35, 


Chicago. 111., 


Oct. 10, '80. 


1867 


Wmiam E. Bliss, 34, 


New York City, 


Dec. 12, '80. 


1867 


Leonard T. Brown, 34, 


Brooklyn, N. Y., 


Dec. 28, '80. 


1868 


Charles E. Smith, 33, 


Cincinnati, 0., 


Dec. 23, '80. 


1868 


Edward J. Tytus, 33, 


Saranac Lake, N, Y., 


May 19, '81. 


1869 


Edwin Hedges, 34, 


Bridge Hampton, N. Y., 


May 8, '81. 


1869 


Beverly Jones, 35, 


Pittsburgh, Pa., 


March 29, '81. 


1871 


Thomas C. Sproat, 32, 


Middleboro, Mass., 


May 15, '81. 


1872 


David S. Holbrook, 32, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Jan. 25, '81. 


1872 


G. Adolphus Slade, 31, 


Chelsea, Mass., 


Dec. 17, '80. 


1872 


C. Brooke White, 28, 


Rome, Italy, 


March 20, '81. 


1875 


Charles T. Russ, 28, 


Hartford, Conn,, 


May 2, '81. 


1878 


Archibald A. Dershimer, 26, 


Seward, Nebr., 


Jan. 23, '8J. 


]878 


Charles M. Gilbert, 26, 


South Nor walk, Conn., 


Apr. 15, '81. 


1879 


Delevan S. Sweet. 24, 


Phoenix, N. Y., 


March 3, '81. 


1880 


Dana W. Kellogg, 20, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Sept. 11, '80. 


1880 


Robert W. Selden, 21, 


New York City, 


Jan. 6, '81. 



Medical Department. 



1823 John B. Irving, 80, 

1824 George Taylor, 78, 

1825 Edward E. Phelps, 77, 
1828 Alexander H. Vinton, 13, 
1831 Edwin A. Tweedy, 76, 
1833 Charles Osgood, 73, 
1838 Lucius N. Beardsley, 66, 
1843 Alfred W. Coates, 67, 
1852 Ezequiel Uricoechea, 46, 
1856 Edward Bulkley, Jr., 47, 
1866 S. Henry Bronson, 36, 



Bergen, N. J., 
New Milford, Conn. 
Windsor, Vt., 
Philadelphia, Pa:, 
Norwich, Conn., 
Norwich. Conn., 
West Haven, Conn., 
Groton, Conn., 
Beirut, Syria, 
New Haven, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn., 



Feb. 22, '81. 
Jan. 14, '81. 
Nov. 26, '80. 
April 26, '81. 
Feb. 23, '81. 
March 18, '81. 
Nov. 22, '80. 
Oct. 27, '80. 
July 28, '80. 
Nov. 5, '80. 
Aug. 19, '80. 



Law Department. 



1865 Wm. Law Foster, 40, 

1874 James P. Fiizpatrick, 

1876 Jocelyn P. Cleaveland, 27, 

1879 Oswin H. Tuttle, 28, 



New Haven, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Leadville, Col., 



June 24, '81. 
July 8, '80. 
June 15, '81. 
Sept. 30, '80. 



59 



Sheffield Scientific School. 



Name and Ajjc. 

1 858 Demetrio T. Arosmena, 

1870 Frederick H. Churchill. :-}:5, 

1875 James Freeland, 28. 

1876 William B. Sawyer, 24, 
1876 C. WiUiams Van Vleck, 25, 
1878 John L. Blackmore, 28, 
1878 George W. Mason, 23, 
1878 George H. Potts, 22, 



Place and 
New York City, 
New Britain, Conn., 
Yonkers, N. Y., 
Buffalo, N. Y., 
Cincinnati, 0.. 
City of Mexico, Mcx. 
London, England, 
Paris, France, 



Date of Death. 
Sept. 26, '80. 
March 4, '81. 
Sept. 28, '80. 
Nov. 7, '80. 
Sept. 25, '80. 
March ], '81. 
April 20, '81. 
May 8, '81. 



Theological Department. 
1878 Frank W. Cobb. 28, Lynn, Mass., 



Sept. 4, '80. 



The number of deaths above given is 103, and the average age of the gradu- 
ates of the Academical Department is 5d^ years. 



The oldest living graduate is Sbth Pieboe, of the class of 1806, of Cornwall, 
Conn., born May 15, 1785. 



fiO 



INDEX. 



Class 
1827 
1858 
1831 
1837 
1839 
1850 
1825 
1838 
1863 
1829 
1878 
1867 
1831 
1818 
1866 
1815 
1867 
1865 
1856 
1849 
1842 
1837 
1820 
1855 
1870 
1848 
1876 
1843 
1878 
1846 
1825 
1834 
1828 
1878 
1826 
1855 
1874 
1865 
1816 
1875 
1827 
I860 
1878 
1837 
1861 
1851 
1869 
1872 
1840 
1839 
1823 
1853 



Page 

Adams, William, ..- 17 

s Arosmena. Demetrio T., 53 

Babbit, P. Teller, 20 

Bacon, William T 24 

Bagg, Matthew D., 26 

Baldwin, A. DeWitt, 33 

Bates, William G., 13 

m Beardsley, Lucius N., 49 

Berry, Jacob, — 40 

Billings, Silas, 19 

s Blackmore, J. L,, . . . 55 

Bliss, William E., 40 

Bradley, Alvin C, 21 

Breck, Joseph H., 9 

m Bronson. S. Henry, 51 

Brooks, Levi, 4 

Brown, Leonard T 41 

Buell, Alexander, 40 

m Bulkley, PMward, ,. 51 

BuU, JohnC, 33 

Cap well. Albert B., 29 

Carter, Edwin 25 

Catlin, .John M., 

Child, Calvin Ct., 

s Churchill. Frederick H., 
Clark, John P., 

I Cleaveland, Jocelyn P., . 



m Coates, Alfred W. 



t Cobb, Frank W., 

Cochran, Robert, 31 

Coit, Daniel T., 14 

Cowles, Chauncey D., 23 

Daggett, Oliver E., 18 

Dershiraer, Archibald A., .. 43 

Fisher, James C, 16 

Fitch, Augustus B., 38 

I Fitzpatrick, James F., 52 

I Foster, William L., 52 

Fowler, William C, 5 

s Freeland, James, 54 

French, Stiles,.. 18 

Giddings, George W., 39 

GUbert, Charles M., _ 44 

Harding, Willard M., 26 

Harmar, James L., 39 

Hayes, Charles G., 34 

Hedges, Edwin, 42 

Holbrook. David S., 42 

Hollister. Gideon H., 27 

Hubbard, William F 27 

m Irving, John B 45 

Jack, Thomas M., 36 | 



Class Page 

1869 Jones, Beverly, 42 

1880 Kellogg, Dana W., 44 

1 821 Landfear, Rodolphus, 1 1 

1822 Law, William H., 12 

1830 Lookwood, Benjamin, 20 

1817 Lord, David N.,-. 8 

1832 Lyman, Ephraim, 22 

1859 McDonald, Theodore. 38 

1 84 2 MacWhorter, Alexander, ... 30 

1878 s Mason, George W.,. 55 

1820 Mead, Samuel B., 10 

1811 Nichols, Samuel, 3 

1833 m Osgood, Charles, 48 

1853 Phelps, Benjamin K., 36 

1825 m Phelps, Edward E 46 

1841 Pinkt'rton, John M 28 

1842 Pitts, Cyrus, 30 

1816 Porter, T. D wight, .... 7 

1878 s Potts, George H 55 

1835 Rafferty, John C, 23 

1848 Reynolds, Charles 0., 32 

1846 Richards. Samuel T.. 32 

1825 Rockwell, Samuel, .- 14 

1875 Russ, Charles T., 43 

1823 Russ. John D., 12 

1 825 Savage, Thomas S., 15 

1876 s Sawyer, William B., 54 

1 880 Selden, Robert W., 44 

1872 Slade, G. Adolphus, . 43 

1868 Smith, Charles E., . . . 41 

1811 Smith, David M., 4 

1851 Smith, David P., _ 35 

181 5 Smith, Nathaniel B., 5 

1871 Sproat, Thomas C, 42 

1 820 Sterling. John M 10 

1842 Strong, John C, 31 

1 879 Sweet, Delevan S,, . 44 

1833 Sykes. Dorson E., 22 

1824 m Taylor, George, 45 

1840 Thompson, Egbert A., 28 

1 840 Tiffany, William H. , 28 

1879 Z Tuttle. Oswin H., 53 

1831 m T^weedy, Edwin A., 48 

1868 Tytus, Edward J., 41 

1852 m Uricoechea, Ezequiel,.- 50 

1876 s Van Vleck, C. Williams, 55 

1823 Yerplanck, James D., 13 

1828 m Vinton, Alexander H., 47 

1 872 White. C. Brooke, 43 

1821 While. Henry, II 

1836 Williams, Dillon. 21 




OBITUARY RECORD 



OF 



GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 



Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 
J" line, 18SS. 

iNCLUDINa THE RECORD OF A PEW WHO DIED PEEVIOUSLY, HITHERTO UNREPORTED. 

[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMNI, JUNE 27th, 1882.] 
[No. 2 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 41 of the whole Record.] 



b'^' 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 

June, 1882. 

Including the record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

[Pbesented at the Meeting op the Alumni, June 27th, 1882.] 

[No. 2 of the Tliird Printed Series, and No. 41 of the whole Record.] 



I 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 
1806. 

Seth Pierce, son of Captain Seth Pierce, was born in Corn- 
wall, Litchfield County, Conn., May 16, 1785. 

At his graduation he was suflfering from a disease of the eyes, 
which prevented his entering on a professional life, and which 
never left him. He returned to his home, and found occupation 
in the care of his father's large farm, of over a thousand acres. 
He had no taste for public business; but once (in 1828) he con- 
sented to represent Cornwall in the Legislature, and he was for ii 
number of years one of the board of school visitors for the town. 
Through an unusually long life he retained the entire respect 
of his fellow townsmen, and as far as his infirmity allowed, kept 
up his interest in the studies of his youth. He died in Cornwall, 
Aug. 6, 1881, in his OYth year, having been for five years the old- 
est surviving graduate of the College. He was never married. 



1814. 



I 



Samuel Bulkley Ruggles, eldest son of the Hon. Philo and 
Ellen (Bulkley) Ruggles, of New Milford, Conn., was born in that 
town Apr. 11, 1799. In 1804 his parents removed to Poughkeep- 
sie, N. Y., from which place he entered the senior class in this 
college in August, 1813, in his 15th year. 



64 

He studied law, and at the age of 21 was admitted to the har 
in New York City, where his life was spent. Success attended 
him from the first, and outside of his professional life he early 
became interested in great public improvements, such as the 
building of the N. Y. & Erie Railroad and the enlargement of 
the Erie Canal. In 1838 he was elected to the State Legisla- 
ture, where he made such a reputation for himself in con- 
nection with tlie development of the canal system that in 
1839 he was appointed a Canal Commissioner; he was presi- 
dent of the Board of Canal Commissioners from 1840 to 1858, 
and his services to the State and the City of New York in 
this position were most important. During these years he was 
also active as a commissioner of the Croton aqueduct. He be- 
came an authority in all matters affecting the commercial influ- 
ence of New York City, and after his retirement from the Canal 
Board, devoted himself especially to the careful study of ques- 
tions of finance. He served with distinction on many important 
public commissions, and was repeatedly sent abroad to represent 
the country in international conferences, — as, in 1863 and 1869 to 
the Statistical Congress, and in 1867 to the Monetary Conference 
in Paris. He was also a voluminous writer on economic topics. 

He was married May 15, 1822, to Mary Rosalie, daughter of 
John Rathbone, of New York, who died three or four years before 
him. In June, 1881, he suffered from a stroke of paralysis, which 
caused his death on the 28th of the following August, at Fire 
Island, N. Y., in the 83d year of his age. One son died early ; 
the remaining son and a daughter are still living. 

Mr. Ruggles received the degree of Doctor of Laws from this 
College in 1869; on the semi-centennial anniversary of his gradu- 
ation he delivered a remarkable address before the Alumni, on 
the progress of the half-century, which was printed. 

1816. 

James Angel Fox, son of Daniel and Lucy (Angel) Fox, 
was born in Montville, Conn., March 19, 1*794, and entered Col- 
lege at the beginning of the Sophomore year. 

After graduating he began the study of law with Judge Syl- 
vester Gilbert, of Hebron, Conn., and in the spring of 1818 ob- 
tained a situation as teacher in a classical school in Cincinnati. 
Thence in 1819 he removed to Mississippi, expecting to become 
a lawyer ; but becoming impressed with a sense of the religious 



66 

needs of the Southwest, he gave himself to the work of the min- 
istry, and in the intervals of teaching pursued theological studies, 
and was admitted, June 29, 1823, at Cincinnati, to Deacon's or- 
ders in the Protestant Episcopal Church by Bishop Chase of Ohio. 
He was advanced to the priesthood by Bishop Brownell, at Hart- 
ford, Conn., Aug. 3, 1826. Meantime, in 1824, he organized St. 
Paul's Church, Woodville, Miss., of which he had charge for four 
years. In 1825 he was the leader in the establishment of the 
Diocese of Mississippi ; he was the president of its earlier con- 
ventions, and until age rendered such service burdensome repre- 
sented it in the Triennial Conventions of the Church. He was an 
active member of the Standing Committee of the Diocese till 
his death. As a clergyman he was an enterprising and self-sacri- 
ficing pioneer. Deriving his support from teaching and from the 
management of his farm, in both of which he was eminently suc- 
cessful, his ministerial services were freely given to w^aste places 
and to feeble congregations. During a period of more than forty 
years of such pioneer labor, his longest term of service was as 
rector of Christ Church, Jefferson County, Miss., for seven years. 
In 1847 he was elected president of Jefferson College, in Wash- 
ington, Miss., where he continued for one year. Shortly before 
the outbreak of the civil war he retired to a farm near Bovina, 
in Warren County, where the rest of his life was spent. He also 
served for some of this time as rector of St. Alban's Church, 
l^ovina. He died in Bovina, July 1, 1881, in his 88th year. 

Mr. Fox was four times married ; 1st, to Sarah, daughter of 
John Otis, Esq., of Verona, N. Y., by whom he had five sons; 
2d, to Emma L. Seguin, of New Orleans, by whom he had four 
daughters and three sons ; 3d, to Catharine O., daughter of George 
Newman, of Washington County, Miss,, by whom he had two 
sons; 4th, to Ellen L., daughter of Ephraim Chesebrough, by 
whom he had two daughters. 

1817. 

Lyman Coleman, younger son of Dr. William and Achsah 
(Lyman) Coleman, was born in Middlefield, Mass., June 14, 1796. 

On leaving College he was for three years a teacher in the Latin 
Grammar School in Hartford, Conn., and then entered on a tutor- 
ship in this college, which he retained for four and a half years, 
at the same time pursuing theological studies. 

He was ordained, Oct. 19, 1825, as pastor of the Congrega- 



66 

tional Church iu Belchertown, Mass., and was dismissed from this 
charge at his own request, Sept. 4, 1832. For the next five years 
he w^as principal of the Burr Seminary, Manchester, Vt., and was 
then for an equal period principal of the English department of 
Phillips Academy, in Andover, Mass. The year 1842-43 was 
spent abroad, chiefly in Germany, in obtaining materials for a re- 
vised edition of a work on the Antiquities of the Christian Church 
which he had compiled in 1841, and in preparation for a work on 
the Apostolical and Primitive Church, which appeared in 1844 
with an introduction by Dr. Neander. 

After his return he resided in Amherst, Mass., for three years, 
being employed as Instructor in Latin and Greek in Amherst Col- 
lege. I'rom 1847 to 1849 he held the Professorship of German in 
Princeton College, and for the next nine years he was engaged in 
classical instruction in Philadelphia. Later he made an extended 
visit to Europe and the East, and in 1861 he was appointed to the 
chair of Ancient Languages in Lafayette College, Easton, Pa., 
which he held until his death, though after 1868 his instruction 
was confined to Latin, Hebrew, and Biblical Geography. In No- 
vember, 1880, when he was probably the oldest College professor 
in active service in America, he was stricken with paralysis, and 
he failed gradually until his death, at Easton, March 16, 1882, in 
his 86th year. The degree of D. D. was conferred upon him by 
Princeton College in 1847. 

He was married, Sept. 21, 1826, to Maria, daughter of Rufus 
Flynt, of Monson, Mass., who died Jan. 11, 1871. In October, 
1873, he was married to Miss Marion B. Philleo, who survives 
him. His two daughters, by his first marriage, died before him. 

Besides the works above mentioned. Dr. Coleman published an 
Historical Geography of the Bible (1850), Ancient Christianity 
exemplified (1852), Historical Text Book and Atlas of Biblical 
Geography (1854), and Genealogy of the Lyman Family (1872) ; 
several of these works passed through many editions, in the United 
States and in England, and they were supplemented by numerous 
other briefer writings. 

1819. 

Jo^UA CoiT, the youngest child of Daniel L. and Elizabeth 
(Bill) Coit, of Norwich, Conn., was born in that town, Aug. 25, 
1800. 

After his graduation he went to New York City to study law, 



67 

and settling there had a successful career as a member of the bar, 
during which he accumulated a large fortune. He retired from 
practice in 1860, and then made a prolonged visit to Europe. Re- 
turning in the fall of 1864, he settled in New Haven, Conn., 
where he spent the rest of his life, making his home with the only 
surviving member of his family, the widow of Pelatiah Perit 
(Y. C. 1802). After a year's ill health, caused by an affection of 
the heart, he died, in New Haven, Oct. 8, 1881, in his 82d year. 
He was never married. 

By his last will the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars was be- 
queathed to the College Library. 

1820. 

Leonard Bacon, eldest child of the Rev. David and Alice 
(Parks) Bacon, was born Feb. 19, 1802, in Detroit, Mich., whither 
his father had gone, under appointment of the Missionary Society 
of Connecticut, to labor among the Indians. In the summer of 
1 804 Mr. Bacon Was transferred to the " Western Reserve " in 
Ohio, and in 1812 returned to Connecticut, where he died in 1817. 
His son entered college from Hartford at the beginning of the 
Sophomore year. 

After graduation his theological studies were pursued for three 
years at the Andover Seminary, where he remained also for a 
fourth year as a resident licentiate; he was ordained as an evan- 
gelist by the Hartford North Consociation, at Windsor, Conn., 
Sept. 28, 1824, it being his intention to find a field of labor at the 
West. 

Just at this time he was invited to preach to the First Church 
in New Haven, and the result was his installation there, March 
9, 1825. He continued the beloved and honored pastor of this 
church until his death, — although relieved from active duty, at 
his own request, after September, 1866. For the first five years 
after his retirement, he acted as Professor of Revealed Theology 
in the Yale Divinity School, and for the remaining eleven years 
continued in the Faculty of the School as Lecturer on Church 
Polity and American Church History, subjects which he had 
made peculiarly his own. He was elected to a seat in the Cor- 
poration of Yale College in 1839, but resigned it in 1846, to cre- 
ate an opportunity for the election of President Day to the 
Board on his withdrawal from the presidency ; he was again elect- 
«ed in 1864, and served until his death, being also a member of the 



68 

Prudential Committee of the Corporation from 1843 to 1846, and 
from 1865 to 1882. In 1839 he was elected to the Professorship 
of Rhetoric and Oratory in the College, but in accordance with 
the wishes of his people declined the call. 

Outside of his labors as pastor and teacher. Dr. Bacon was a 
voluminous contributor to the public press. He began, while yet 
in Andover, to write for the Christian ISpectator^ of New Haven, 
and was a leading spirit in the inception and support of the 
Spectator's successor, the New Englander. In 1848 he joined 
with Drs. J. P. Thompson and R, S. Storrs, Jr., in establishing 
the Independent newspaper, and was largely responsible for the 
stand assumed by that journal in the ensuing contest with sla- 
very, dov/n to his withdrawal in 1863. Of his separate publica- 
tions, a volume of essays (published in 1846) on Slavery is re- 
markable as having shaped the views of President Lincoln ; his 
Historical Discourses, published in 1839, Were models of research 
as well as of felicitous expression, and are still the best history of 
New Haven for the first 200 years ; in the Gejiesis of the New 
England Churches, published in 1874, he pursued a kindred 
theme with equal felicity of method. 

Dr. Bacon was also a valued leader in all the public movements 
of the Congregational denomination, unequaled for fertility of 
suggestion, for boldness as an advocate, and for effectiveness as 
an orator. The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on 
him by Hamilton College in 1842, and that of Doctor of Laws by 
Harvard University in 1870. 

In the spring of 1881 he became aware of a disease of the 
heart which threatened to terminate his life at any moment ; he 
continued, however, under recurring attacks of angina pectoris^ 
to meet his accustomed duties until his death, which occurred at 
his home in New Haven, Dec. 24, 1881, in his 80th year. A 
memorial volume has been published by the First Church, and a 
biography is announced as in preparation by members of his family. 

Dr. Bacon was married July 28, 1825, to Lucy, daughter of 
Daniel Johnson, of Johnstown, N. Y., by whom he had nine chil- 
dren, and who died Nov. 28, 1844. He was again married, June 
16, 1847, to Catharine E., daughter of Gen. Nathaniel Terry, of 
Hartford, Conn., who survives him. Four sons by the first mar- 
riage, and three daughters and two sons by the second marriage, 
are still living, — two daughters and three sons by the first mar- 
riage having died before him; all the sons except one who died 
in infancy have received degrees from this College. 



i 



69 

Walter Edwards was born in Hartford, Conn., Nov. 20, 1801, 
the second son of Jonathan Walter Edwards (Y. C. 1789), a dis- 
tinguished lawyer, and son of the younger President Edwards. 
His mother was Elizabeth, daughter of Capt. Moses Tryon, of 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

After graduation he taught school for a short time, and then 
began the study of the law in the office of Daniel Lord, Esq., of 
New York City. Upon his admission to the bar, in 1825, he was 
l&ssociated in business with Mr. Lord. He formed a copartnership 
about 1834 with Albon P. Man, Esq., under the firm name of Ed- 
wards & Man, and continued a member of this firm, afterwards 
Edwards, Man & Parsons, until his retirement from practice in 
1863. The remainder of his life was spent quietly in New York 
City, which had so long been his residence. He died April 29, 
1882, in his 81st year. 

He was married in 1830 to Sarah, daughter of Lockwood de 
Forest, of New York City, whom he survived for less than six 
months. He left four sons and a daughter, — one son being a 
graduate of this college in the class of 1866, and another a gradu- 
ate of the Sheffield Scientific School in the class of 1874. 

1821. 

x\dam Leopold Alexander, son of Dr. Adam and Louisa 
Fred erica (Schmidt) Alexander, was born in Sunbury, Liberty 
County. Georgia, January 29, 1803. 

After graduating he studied law in Savannah, Georgia, under 
the Hon. John McPherson Berrien, but never entered on the prac- 
tice of his profession. 

He married, April 29, 1823, Sarah Hillhouse, only child of 
Felix H, Gilbert, Esq., of Washington, Wilkes County, Ga., and 
removed his residence to that place. Here he lived, and reared 
to maturity a family of six daughters and four sons, all of whom 
survive him. He was for many years Cashier of the Branch Bank 
of the State of Georgia, at Washington, and was succeeded in 
that position by his eldest son (Y.C. 1851). During his long and 
peaceful life, mu.;h of his time was devoted to the education of 
his children, and incidentally to the general educational interests 
of the community, which profited by his intelligent zeal in such 
matters and by the higher standard which he introduced. In 
February, 1855, he lost his wife, who had been no less zealous 
than himself in all the religious and educational interests of the 



70 

place of their residence. In 1865 he married Mrs. Jane Marion 
Glenn, and a few years later removed to Augusta, Ga., where he 
closed a long and happy life on Easter morning, April 9, 1882, in 
his 80th year. 



John Boyd, son of James and Mary (Munro) Boyd, of the 
borough of Winsted, in the town of Winchester, Conn., was born 
March 17,1799. 

He studied law in New Haven, with Messrs. Staples and 
Hitchcock, and was admitted to the bar in 1825. He settled in 
his native town as an iron manufacturer, retiring from business in 
1853, and was also largely occupied with public trusts. He was 
a representative in the General Assembly of the State in 1830 and 
1835, and a member of the State Senate in 1854. For fifteen 
years he was Judge of Probate, and for twenty-six years Town 
Clerk of his native town. He was Secretary of State in 1859, 
1860, and 1861. In 1873 he published the Annals and Family 
Records of Winchester (octavo, pp. 632), a laborious work, ex- 
cellently planned and executed. 

He was married, in New Haven, May 17, 1831, to Emily W., 
daughter of Elias Beers, who died Nov. 25, 1842, at the age of 37, 
leaving three children, of whom one daughter only survives. He 
next married, Dec. 10, 1843, Jerusha, daughter of Solomon Rock- 
well, and widow of the Hon. Theodore Hinsdale, of Winsted, 
who died March 11, 1875, aged 72 years. 

He died in West Winsted, in Winchester, Dec. 1, 1881, in his 
83d year. 



1822. 

Giles Taintor, only son of Charles and Mary (Abbe) Taintor, 
was born in Windham, Conn., July 17, 1802. 

After graduation he was actively engaged for ten years in the 
dry-goods business in New York City, and for the rest of his life 
resided in Windham, Conn., though usually passing the winters 
in New York. He died, of old age, after long feebleness, in New 
York City, March 7, 1882, in his 80th year. 

He was married. May 10, 1836, to Mariann, daughter of Thomas 
West, of Boston and Haverhill, Mass., who died Nov. 28, 1876, 
leaving three sons; their only daughter died in childhood. 



71 



1824. 



i 



John Tukvill Adams was born Sept. 29, 1805, of English 
parentage, in Demerara, South America. In 1810 his father, 
Richard Adams, removed to Norwich, Conn., from which place 
the son entered College. 

He began the study of law in the law school of the Hon. Samuel 
J. Hitchcock, of New Haven, in 1824, and while resident here pub- 
lished a small volume of poems (N. H., 1825), but soon embarked 
in the dry-goods jobbing business in New York City, in partner- 
ship with Felix A. Huntington, of Norwich. This pursuit not 
proving congenial, he abandoned it and returned to Connecticut. 
In 1828 he started a newspaper called the Telegraphy in Stoning- 
ton, Conn., which was merged the next year in the Norwich Re- 
publican^ of which Mr. Adams continued the editor until 1834. 
About this time he was admitted to the bar, and in i835 he was 
elected Judge of Probate, but held the office for only a short 
period, resigning it to remove from town, at first to Harrisburg, 
Pa., and afterwards to Michigan. About 1844 he returned to 
Norwich, and in 1850 abandoned the practice of the law. 'He 
devoted himself later to literary pursuits, and published several 
tales of American life, such as The Lost Hunter (N. Y., 1856), 
and The Knight of the Golden Melice (N. Y., 1860). For the 
four years from 1860 to 1863 he represented Norwich in the 
Legislature, and in 1864 he was a member, and acting President, 
of the State Senate. 

He died in Norwich, March 30, 1882, in his YVth year. 

He married, Dec. 20, 1826, Hannah P., daughter of Joseph 
Huntington, of Norwich, who died in Michigan, leaving a son 
and daughter, who are both deceased. He next married, Sept. 7, 
1839, Elizabeth, daughter of Benjamin Lee, of Norwich, and 
widow of James S. Dwight, of Springfield, Mass. She died in 
Springfield, Jan. 9, 1865. By her Mr. Adams had no children. 

Hiram Phelps Aems^ son of William and Mary (Snow) Arms, 
was born in Windsor, Conn., June 1, 1799. 

After graduation he taught a private school in New Haven, and 
pursued a course of theological study in the Yale Divinity 
School (1825-28). He was then for nearly two years principal of 
the Kingston Academy, Ulster County, N. Y., and was ordained 
pastor of the Congregfitional Church in Hebron, Conn., June 30, 



72 

1830. He was dismissed at his own request from this charge 
Oct. 10, 1832, and was installed over the Congregational Church 
in Wolcottville, a parish in Torrington, Litchfield County, Conn., 
on the 6th of the following February. From this church he was 
dismissed July 6, 1836, to accept a call from the First Church of 
Norwich, Conn., where he was installed August 3. On the 20th 
of February, 1873, being then in his 74th year, he resigned the 
active duties of the pastorate, continuing to be the revered pas- 
tor emeritus till his death, at Norwich, Apr. 6, 1882, in his 83d 
year. 

He was married, Sept. 12, 1824, to Lucy Ann Wadhams, of 
New Haven, who died July 3, 1837. His second wife was Abby 
Jane Baker, of New York, to whom he was married Sept. 12,. 
1838, and who died Aug. 10, 1878. The children by his second 
marriage, three in number, and three out of seven children by his 
first marriage, survive him. Of the sons, two are graduates of 
this College, in the Classes of 1853 and 1863 respectively. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the Univer- 
sity of the City of New York in 1864. Li 1866 he was elected 
to the Corporation of Yale College, but resigned his seat three 
months before his death, on account of increasing feebleness. 

James Murdock Huntting, third son of John H. and Eliza- 
beth (Stratton) Huntting, was born in Easthampton, L. I., Aug. 
5, 1798. 

For two years after graduation he was in charge of Clinton 
Academy in his native town, and in 1826 entered Princeton The- 
ological Seminary, where he spent nearly two years. . He then 
preached for two years in the Presbyterian Church in Shrews- 
bury, N. J., being ordained there by the Presbytery of New 
Brunswick, June 9, 1829. The labor of serving a scattered coun- 
try congregation proving too exhausting, he then spent a year in 
travel as an agent of the American Sunday School Union. With 
improved health he accepted, in December, 1831, a call from the 
1st Presbyterian Church of Westfield, 1^. J. On October 11th 
of the same year he married Catharine, eldest daughter of Joseph 
and Hannah Ogden, of Elizabethtown, N. J., who now survives 
him. In October, 1849, he resigned his pastoral charge, and 
early in 1850 removed to Jamaica, L. I., where he opened a board- 
ing school for boys, which he conducted successfully until failing 
health led him in 1867 to desire rest. The remainder of his life 




7'6 

^as spent in comfortable retirement in Jamaica, where he died, 
after a week's illness, of a bronchial aflfection, May 14, 1882, in 
his 84th year. Of his six children, two sons and two daughters 
survive him. 

Origex Stores Seymour, the eldest child of Ozias and Selima 
{Storrs) Seymour, was born in Litchfield, Conn, Feb. 9, 1 804. 

Upon graduation he began the study of law in the Litchfield 
Law School. He was admitted to the bar in September, 1826, 
and at once began practice in his native town. He devoted him- 
self uninterruptedly to his profession for twenty-five years, in the 
meantime representing the town in 1842, 1849, and 1850 in the 
General Assembly, and serving the last time as Speaker. In 1851 
he was elected as representative to Congress, and re-elected two 
years later. As a Union Democrat, pledged to the earnest sup- 
port of the recent compromise measures on slavery, he opposed 
the well-known Kansas and Nebraska bills. On his retirement 
from Congress he was elected a Judge of the Superior Court, 
and held that laborious office for one term, from 1855 to 1863. 
He then resumed the practice of law, in partnership with his 
■eldest son, and continued in full practice until 1870, when he 
was chosen Judge of the Supreme Court of the State, He held 
this office until he became 70 years of age, when by the pro- 
visions of the constitution his term expired; during his last year 
of service he was the Chief Justice. After his retirement from 
judicial life, he declined to appear in court as an advocate, but 
his time was still occupied with office business and as arbitrator 
and referee. In these years he did important service as chairman 
of three commissions appointed by the State, for the investigation 
of the life-insurance companies of Connecticut, for the prepara- 
tion of a new code of legal procedure, and for the settling of the 
boundary with New York. He also delivered, from 1876, an an- 
nual course of lectures in the Yale Law School, on Judicial Pro- 
cedure and Practice. In 1880 he was elected to the Connecticut 
House of Representatives, by the votes of all parties of his fel- 
low-citizens ; but the effects of age showed themselves before the 
close of the session, and the failure of his health then begun 
ended only with his death, at his home, Aug. 12, 1881, in his 78th 
year. 

He was married, Oct. 5, 1830, to Lucy M., daughter of the 
Hon. Morris Woodruff, of Litchfield, who survives him, with 



74 

three sons (graduates of this college in the classes of 1853, 1857, 
and 1866) and one daughter. 

Judge Seymour received the degree of LL.D. from this col- 
lege in 1873, and from Trinity College in 1866. He was esteemed 
a man of singular purity of character, a learned lawyer, an upright 
judge, and a wise legislator. 

1825. 

Thomas Hinckley Bond, younger son of Dr. Solomon and 
Sally (Hinckley) Bond, was born in Enfield, Conn., Jan. 14, 1804. 

He studied law in the Yale Law School for three years, but be- 
fore beginning practice invested his entire patrimony in a manu- 
facturing enterprise in Waterbury, Conn., by the failure of which 
within a year he was left a poor man. He then settled in the 
practice of law in Pittsburg, Pa., but in 1831 removed to Oswego, 
N. Y., where he resided for twenty-three years engaged in the 
milling and flouring business, being also for some time collector 
of the port, and a State Senator. In 1854, having accumulated a 
handsome property, he retired from business, and after a year 
spent in Europe returned to New Haven, Conn., where he contin- 
ued until his death. He became politically prominent in Con- 
necticut, serving in both branches of the State Legislature, and 
in 1864 and 1865 being the Democratic candidate for Lieutenant- 
Governor. 

He died in New Haven, May 27, 1882, having been an invalid 
for seven years from disease of the spine and of the kidneys. 

He was twice married, his first wife being Elizabeth, daughter 
of Capt. James Goodrich, of New Haven, by whom he had a son 
and a daughter, both of whom are now living. In June, 1869,. 
he married Mary E., daughter of the Hon. Royal R. Hinman (Y. 
C. 1804), who survives him. 

William Fuller was born in Hampton, Conn., Jan. 28, 1801,. 
and at the age of thirteen was left by the death of both his 
parents to work his own way in the world. At eighteen he pro- 
fessed the Christian faith, and began his preparation for the 
Sophomore Class in college, having the ministry in view. 

He studied theology, partly under the Rev. Thomas J. Mur- 
dock, of Canterbury, Conn., and partly in the Princeton Semi- 
nary. In October, 1827, he was licensed to preach by the Wind- 
ham County (Conn.) Association, and for some years was occupied 




75 

with home-missionary work at the east, especially in New York 
State, being ordained as an evangelist by the Windham County 
Association, Oct. 19, 1830. The first church over which he was 
installed as pastor (in 1836) was at Conneaut, O., where he was 
married, Aug. 27, 1837, to Miss Margaret Knox, of Carlisle, Pa., 
who now survives him. Later, in 1839, he was called to the 
Presbyterian churches in Fulton and Granby, N. Y. In the 
spring of 1842 he and his wife took charge of the Erie (Pa.) 
Female Seminary, where they remained lor two years, when Mr. 
Fuller was called to the West. He found his vocation there for 
the remainder of his life in the establishment and service of new 
and growing Presbyterian churches. From 1846 to 18-54 he was 
pastor at White Pigeon, Mich., and for the next nine years at 
Sturgis in the same State. From 1863 to 1869 he was settled in 
Buchanan, Mich. During the winter of 1870-71 he removed to 
Delphos, ()., at the instance of family friends, where he resided 
till his death, after a brief illness, Oct. 3, 1881, in his 81st year. 
During all these latter years he had charge of feeble churches in 
the neighborhood, to which he ministered faithfully. One of his 
two sons survives him. 

1826. 

Henry Cowles, son of Samuel and Olive (Phelps) Cowles, was 
born in Norfolk, Conn., April 24, 1803. 

After two years of study in the Yale Divinity School, he was 
ordained, with a view to home-missionary work, at Hartford, 
Conn., July 1, 1828. He went to Ohio, and after laboring about 
two years in Ashtabula and Sandusky, took charge of the Con- 
gregational Church in Austinburg, where he remained till the fall 
of 1835, when he became Professor of Latin and Greek in Oberlin 
College. In 1838 he was transferred to the chair of Ecclesiastical 
History, %nd in 1 840 to that of Hebrew, in the Theological De- 
partment, in which he continued until 1848; at that time he be- 
came the editor of the Oberlin JEvangelist, which he conducted 
until 1863. For the rest of his life he remained in Oberlin, en- 
gaged in literary labor. During the fourteen years from 1867 
he published sixteen volumes of Commentaries, covering the 
whole Scriptures, and devoted the profits arising from them to 
the missionary cause. He died, of ataxia, at the house of his 
daughter, in Janesville, Wise, Sept. 7, 1881, aged 78 years. 
He was married, July 30, 1830, to Alice, daughter of Benjamin 



76 

Welch, M.D., of Norfolk, Conn., who died Oct. 14, 1843. By her 
he had three sons and three daughters, of whom one son (Oberlin 
College, 1856) and one daughter are still living. In March, 1844, 
lie was married to Minerva, daughter of William Dayton, of 
Watertown, Conn., and widow of Anson Penfield, of Oberlin, 
who died Nov. 29, 1880. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Hillsdale 
College, Michigan, in 1863. 

Charles Rockwell, son of Martin and Mary (Burrall) Rock- 
well, was born in Colebrook, Conn., Nov. 22, 1806. 

After leaving college he was engaged in teaching for about five 
years, — for more than two of them in the Deaf and Dumb Asy- 
lum in Hartford, Conn. In 1834 he completed a three years' 
oourse of theological study at Andover Seminary, and for two and 
a half years after his ordination, at Hartford, Sept. 23, 1834, he 
performed service as Chaplain in the U. S. Navy, attached to ves- 
sels of the Mediterranean squadron. As a result of this cruise he 
published in 1842 two volume's of "Sketches of Foreign Travel 
and Life at Sea." 

After his retura he was installed. Mar. 27, 1 839, pastor of the Con- 
gregational Church in Chatham, Mass., where he remained until 
1845. The health of his family rendering a change of climate 
desirable, he removed in 1846 to Pontiac, Mich., and after preach- 
ing there for a year, went to Kentucky for two years of preaching 
and teaching. From April, 1850, to June, 1851, he supplied the 
pulpit of the Congregational Church in Sharon, Conn., and after 
a series of short engagements with various churches, became the 
pastor of a Dutch Reformed Church in Catskill, N. Y., in June, 
1860. After closing this pastorate, in 1866, he published a vol- 
ume on "The Catskill Mountains and the Regions Around," 
which passed through several editions. * 

He continued for several years preaching and teaching in vari- 
ous places, and finally at the age of 74, in infirm health, became 
an inmate of the Home for Aged Men, in Albany, N. Y., in Octo- 
ber, 1880. He died there, of dropsy, Apr. 17, 1882. 

His first wife, Miss Mary Howes, of Chatham, Mass., to whom 
be was married July 29, 1839, died in Henderson, Ky., in 1848. 

He was married in June 10, 1852, to Miss Mary Dayton, of 
East Hampton, L, I., who died before him. Of three children by 
the first marriage, one son is still living. 



77 

James Allwood Smith, son of Norman and Elizabeth (Kings- 
bury) Smith, was born in Hartford, Conn., Nov. 6, 1806. 

After graduating he spent nearly two years as principal of the 
Union Academy, in New London, Conn. He then entered the 
Yale Divinity School, and completed his course of preparation for 
the ministry at Andover Theol. Seminary in 1831. He was 
ordained pastor of the Congregational Church at Great Falls, 
in the town of Somersworth, N. H., April 17, 1832. He was dis- 
missed from this charge, July 24, 1837, and on the 6th of Decem- 
ber following was installed over the 1 st Congregational Church in 
Glastonbury, Conn., where he continued for just twenty years. 
Early in 1858 he removed to Unionville, in the town of Farming- 
ton, Conn., where he remained until his death, alter three days' 
illness, of dropsy of the heart, on the 15th of April, 1882. He 
had been usefully occupied during much of his residence in Union- 
ville in supplying vacant churches in the neighborhood, and had 
served for one year (1867) as a member of the State Legislature. 

In July, 1832, he married Miss Mary Morgan, of Hartford ; of 
their ten children, two sons and two daughters are still living, the 
elder son being a graduate of this college in the class of 1854. 

Ephraim Tanner Sturtevant, son of Warren and Lucy 
(Tanner) Sturtevant, was born in Warren, Conn., July 28, 1803. 
In 1816 his family removed to the "Western Reserve," and set- 
tled in Tallmadge, O., from which place he entered college. 

For twenty years after graduation he was occupied in teaching, 
beginning in Derby, Connecticut. In the fall of 1827, on the 
opening of Western Reserve College, at Hudson, O., he was ap- 
pointed instructor in mathematics, and in the absence of other 
teachers performed the duties of the entire faculty for the first 
year. In May, 1829, finding the burden too severe, he resigned 
his position, and opened a select school in Tallmadge, which he 
maintained with great success until 1846, when, in consequence of 
impaired health, he removed to a farm in East Cleveland, O., 
where he interested himself in all matters of public improvement 
and education. 

At length he felt obliged to remove from this trying climate, 
and in March, 1870, he settled on Biscayne Bay in Southern Flori- 
da, where he occupied himself in cultivating tropical fruits and 
flowers. He also took an active part in the reconstruction gov- 
ernment of the State, and was efficient in promoting the control 
2 



78 

of the Republican party. He was twice appointed County Judge^ 
and in 1872 was elected to the State Senate for four years, where 
his services were of great value. 

In the spring of 1880 the infirmities of advancing age com- 
pelled him to return to Cleveland, where he made his home with 
his only surviving daughter during the rest of his life. He died 
in Cleveland, Dec. 12, 1881, aged 78 years. 

In 1829 he married Miss Helen L. Oviatt, of Hudson, who died 
early, leaving a daughter who survived for only a single year. 
He next married Miss Julia A. DeForest, of Huntington, Conn., 
who died in 1845, leaving a daughter and two sons. He was 
again married to Mrs. Frances (Pierce) Leonard, of Woodbury, 
Conn., who survives him with one daughter ; one son by the sec- 
ond marriage is also living. 

1827. 

Walter Hilliard Bidwell, son of William and Mary (Pel- 
ton) Bidwell, was born in Farmington, Conn., June 21, 1798, and 
joined the Sophomore Class in this college in 1824. 

The two years after graduation were employed in extinguish- 
ing the debts incurred by his college course; in 1829 he entered 
the Yale Divinity School, and was licensed to preach in the spring 
of 1833. He had previously man'ied Miss Susan M. Duryea, of 
New York, and on account of her feeble health spent with her a 
year in England and France. Sept. 19, 1833, he was ordained 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Medfield, Mass., but on 
the failure of his voice, after a pastorate of four years, removed 
to the milder climate of Philadelphia. 

In the beginning of 1841 he began editorial life as the conduc- 
tor of the American National Preacher, which — with the omission 
of some years — he continued to edit until 1867, 19 years in all. 
In April, 1843, he became the proprietor and nominal editor of 
the New York Evangelist ; he retained this connection for nearly 
twelve years, when he was obliged to relinquish it on the tem- 
porary failure of his health. In the meantime (1846) he became 
the proprietor and conductor of the American Biblical Repository, 
and also of the Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature ; the for- 
mer periodical passed out of his hands in 1849, but the latter he 
conducted in person until 1868. In the autumn of 1860 he became 
the proprietor and publisher of the American Theological Review,, 
which was merged in another review two years later. 



79 

During the years of his business life he went to Europe six 
times, partly on account of his health, and partly in the interest 
of the Eclectic Magazine. 

After retiring from active employment, he removed to Oberlin, 
Ohio, being attracted by the earnest religious life which he found 
there. Much of the last year of his life was spent in Chicago ; 
a few weeks before his death he went to Saratoga Springs, where 
he died, suddenly, Sept. 11, 1881, in the 84th year of his age. 

Samuel Lije, only son of Samuel and Sarah (Burnett) Lee, of 
Kensington parish, in the town of Berlin, Conn., was born March 
18, 1803. His father died a fortnight later, and in June, 1810, his 
mother married and removed to Westfield, in Middletown, Conn., 
from which place he entered college. 

For three years after graduation he studied in the Yale Divinity 
School, and on tlie 4th of November, 1830, he was ordained pas- 
tor of the Evangelical Church in Sherborn, Middlesex County, 
Mass. This charge he resigned, Apr. 27, 1836, to accept a call to 
the Congregational Church in New Ipswich, N. H., where he was 
installed on the 5th of the following month. He was dismissed, 
Dec. 4, 1860, worn out with hard work. After some years of re- 
laxation he so far regained his health as to be able to use his pen 
in the preparation of a volume, entitled The Bible Regained, 
which appeared in 1874. He had before published several pam- 
phlets, and in 1859 a volume on Eschatology. His writings show 
marked intellectual ability, and treat the subjects considered with 
boldness. His theological views provoked much criticism, and 
the tenacity with which he held them made his second pastorate 
a stormy one. He died in New Ipswich, of paralysis, Aug. 27, 
1881, at the age of 78. 

He was married, Nov. 3, 1834, to Emily, daughter of Deacon 
Samuel Fiske, of Natick, Mass., who died March 5, 1843, leaving 
one daughter. He was next married, Jan. 14, 1846, to Lydia C, 
daughter of the Hon. Paul Wentworth, of Concord, N. H., and 
sister of the Hon. John Wentworth, of Chicago ; she died 
March 6, 1855 ; two of her four sons died in infancy. He was 
again married, June 3, 1856, to Mary Jane, widow of the Rev. 
David P. Smith, of Greenfield, N. H., daughter of the Hon. Sam- 
uel Chandler, of Bedford, N. H., and sister of the Hon. Zachariah 
Chandler, of Micnigan. She died May 17, 1881. 

In 1848, 1849, and 1862, he represented New Ipswich in the 
State Legislature. 



80 

Charles Cooke Pakmelee, son of Elias and Fanny (Fitch) 
Parmelee, was born in Lansingburgh, N. Y., Nov. 14, 1808. 

Upon finishing his course at college he returned to Lansing- 
burgh, and soon after began the study of law, and continued it at 
Troy and Albany, where he was admitted to the bar in 1832. 
For the first six years he practiced his profession in Troy, and 
afterwards at Lansingburgh. In 1 847 he was elected to the office 
of County Judge for Rensselaer County, and was re-elected in 
1852, holding the office for about nine years. 

He died in Lansingburgh, Feb. 8, 1882, in his '74th year. 

He was never married. 

1829. 

Allison Amos Pettengill, son of the Rev. Amos Pettengill 
(Harvard Coll., 1805), was born in Champlain, Clinton County, 
N. Y., Nov. 13, 1808. 

In his early years his father removed to Morris, Conn., and from 
that place the son entered- Middlebury College, whence he came 
to this college at the close of the first year. 

For nine or ten years after graduation he was employed in 
teaching pi-ivate select schools in Bridgeport, Conn., and neigh- 
boring towns. In 1839, while conducting a successful school in 
Bridgeport, he bought the newspaper known as the Bridgeport 
Press, and changing the name to the Standard, became its editor. 
He continued the publication of this paper — for the most of the 
time alone — until 1863, when he retired from active business. He 
was also much in public life. He was elected to the House of 
Representatives of the State, and in 1845 to the State Senate. 
For four years he was United States Marshal. 

He died at his residence in Bridgeport, Jan. 17, 1882, aged 73 
years. 

He was twice married. His first wife, Elizabeth Philipps, of 
Danbury, Conn., died about 1843. He then married Catherine 
A., daughter of Isaac Burroughs, of Bridgeport, who survives 
him, without children. 

1830, 

John Rogers Murray, son of John R. and Harriet (Rogers) 
Murray, of New York City, was born in New York, Oct. 15, 
1811. 

He entered college at the opening of the sophomore year, and 



81 

upon graduation returned to New York, where he resided until 
after his marriage, Aug. 3, 1837, to Anna V., daughter of D. W. 
C. Olyphant, Esq., of the same city. He then removed to the 
Genesee Valley, where (as well as on Murray Hill in New York 
City) his family owned large estates. He settled in Ellendon, 
where he lived for thirty years the quiet life of a country gentle- 
man, largely engaged in agriculture. Later, after some years 
spent in travel, he made his home at Mount Morris, N. Y., where 
he died, of Bright's disease, Nov. 1, 1881, at the age of 70 years. 

1831. 

Hezekiah Gold Rogers, the eldest child of the Hon. Edward 
Rogers, M. C. (Williams College, 1809), and of Sally Maria 
(Gold) Rogers, was born in Madison, N. Y., February 22, 1811. 

He studied law and began practice in Pittsburgh, Pa., and in 
1837 was one of the delegates from Alleghany County to the 
convention for the revision of the State constitution. In June, 
1840, he was appointed charge d'affaires to Sardinia by President 
Van Buren, but showing symptoms of mental derangement he 
was superseded in November, 1841, and returned to his father's 
house. During his later life he was a "wanderer. 

He died in the county alms-house in Lancaster, Pa., March 19, 
1882, in his 72d year. He was unmarried. 

1832. 

Henry Thorp Bulkley was born at Mill River, now South- 
port, in Fairfield, Conn., Jan. 23, 1813, the elder son of Jonathan 
and Miranda (Thorp) Bulkley. 

Leaving college in 1830 (but restored to his Class in 1879), he 
was graduated at Rutgers College in 1832, and soon after went 
into business in New York City, and subsequently became a 
member of his grandfather's firm, E. Bulkley & Sons, shippers, 
on South street. New York. Many years before his death he re- 
tired from business, and made his residence in Southport. He 
died in New Haven, Conn., at the residence of a brother-in-law, 
Oct. 28, 1881, in his 69th year. 

He married, Feb. 10, 1862, Rebekah W., daughter of Benjamin 
Pomeroy, Esq., of Stonington, Conn. 

Charles Dickson, son of Walter and Anna (Tufts) Dickson, 
was born in Groton, Mass., Aug. 8, 1809. 

On account of the failure of his health after leaving college, he 



82 

did not study for a profession, but taught school for about ten 
years, after which continued ill-health led him to occupy himself 
with farming. In 1854 he removed from Groton to Kansas, to 
help to make it a free State ; and took an active part in the " bor- 
der ruffian war" of 1855-6. In the war of the rebellion he also 
served for two years, under a captain's commission, in one of the 
State regiments. 

He died at his residence in Quenemo, Osage County, Kansas, of 
congestion of the lungs, July 5, 1881, in his 72d year. 

He was married, August 20, 1835, to Rebecca F. R. Mills, of 
New' Haven,- who died in Kansas, Jan. 17, 1868. He afterwards 
married Lydia Ann Herrick, of Kansas. Two sons and four 
daughters survive him. • 

Horace Bunch Gould, of St. Simon's Island, Ga., died there 
very suddenly of heart disease, April 7, 1881, aged 69 years. He 
was a native of Georgia, and had spent his life on St. Simon's 
Island, engaged in the cultivation of the Sea-Island cotton. In 
1845 he married Deborah Abbott, who survives him with ten 
children. 

John Francis Hofp was born in Lancaster, Pa., Jan. 10, 1814, 
the son of George and Margaret Hoff, and joined the Sophomore 
Class in the autumn of 1829. He left in the spring of 1830, but 
was admitted to a degree in 1879. 

In 1831 he entered the University of Pennsylvania, and was 
graduated in 1833. After two years' study in the Theological 
Seminary of the Diocese of Virginia, and a further year in the 
General Theol. Seminary, New York City, he was ordained a 
Deacon in the Protestant Episcopal Church, in July, 1836, and 
for two years was minister of several churches in the Juniata 
region, Pa., having his residence at Lewistown. In 1 838 he became 
the rector of Christ Church, Georgetown, D. C, but resigned this 
charge in 1843 in consequence of imperfect health. After a year 
spent in Europe, he resumed duty in St. Mark's parish, Frederick- 
town, Md. Thence he removed to Millwood, Clark County, Va., 
where he was rector of Christ Church from 1847 to 1858; and 
from that time until his death he was rector of Trinity Church, 
in Towsontown, Baltimore County, Md. He died in Baltimore, 
whither he had gone two weeks before for a surgical operation, 
Dec. 18, 1881, of typho-malaria, in his 68th year. He leaves a 
wife and several children. 



88 

Isaac William Plummer, the only son of George Plummer 
(Y. C, 1804) and Anne (Lockwood) Plummer, was born in Glas- 
tonbury, Conn., Sept. 19, 1812. 

He spent the year 1833 in studying medicine in Worcester, 
Mass. In 1835 he entered the Yale Divinity School, but though 
he completed his theological course in 1837, the state of his health 
prevented him from undertaking the care of a parish until 1842, 
when he was licensed to preach by the Hartford South Associa- 
tion of Congregational ministers. He was ordained as an evan- 
gelist by the Congregational Association of Illinois, at Quincy, in 
October, 1843; and for the two following years had charge of a 
small church in Richland in that State. He afterwards spent a 
year (1853-4) with the churches in Reed's Corners and Le Roy, 
N. Y., and then returned to his native place. He was married, 
Oct. 16, 1856, to Abby A., daughter of Thomas Morton, of Bos- 
ton, Mass., who died Nov. 2V, 1874. At the last-named date he 
was residing in Boston, having removed there from Glastonbury 
some two years earlier. He then settled in Norwich, Conn., 
where after steadily failing in health he died suddenly, of rheu- 
matism of the heart, June 28, 1881, in his 69th year. His two 
sons and three daughters are all living. 



Peter Anthoxy Van Bergen was born in Coxsackie, N. Y., 
Jan. 12, 1812, and was the third child of Anthony and Clarine 
(Peck) Van Bergen. 

Soon after leaving Yale, in August, 1830, he was admitted into 
Rutgers College, where he graduated in 1832; he was admitted 
to the same degree here in 1879. 

He studied law in the office of Powers & Day, in Catskill, N. 
Y., and was admitted to the bar in 1836. The next year he began 
practice in Kingston, N. Y., in partnership with the late John 
Romeyn Brodhead, the historian. In 1841 he removed to New 
York City, where he continued the practice of his profession for 
many years. On June 20, 1849, he married Lucy A., daughter 
of William Smart, of Flushing, L. I., and from that time made 
Flushing his place of residence. From October, 1866, to July, 
1877, he was employed in the New York Custom House. 

He was killed by being thrown from his carriage, while driving 
a spirited horse, at Flushing, June 25, 1881, in his 70th year. 

His wife and an only daughter survive him. 



84 



1834. 



Oliver Beckwith Bidwell was born in Farmington, Conn.^ 
May 16, 1810, the son of William and Mary (Pelton) Bidwell, and 
the brother of the Rev. Walter H. Bidwell (Y. C. 1827), com- 
memorated above on page 78. 

His parents removed, when he was quite young, at first to 
Pennsylvania, and afterwards to Madison, O., from which place 
he entered college with the class of 1833; he left that class in 
Freshman year, and joined the next class as a Sophomore. 

For the year after graduation he taught in AUentown, N. J., 
and then entered the Yale Divinity School. 

At the expiration of his three years' course here, he was occu- 
pied for a year in preaching, and then spent an additional year in 
New Haven as a resident licentiate. On Dec. 1, 1841, he was or- 
dained pastor of the Congregational Church in Hubbardston, 
Mass., where he remained till Nov. 25, 1845. While in this pas- 
torate he prepared an excellent series of missionary maps, for use 
in church lecture-rooms, and on leaving Hubbardston went to 
New York City, and was occupied for about ten years in the pub- 
lication and circulation of these maps. From 1854 to 1856 he 
edited the Christian Parlor Magazine, and from the latter date 
was associated with his brother in editing and publishing the 
Eclectic Magazine. Besides briefer visits to England, he spent 
there three years (1865-68) as agent for the Turkish Mission Aid 
Society. 

In the last years of his life he supplied the pulpit of the West- 
minster Presbyterian Church in Jersey City, N. J., where he was 
residing, and where he died, Aug. 5, 1881, in his Y2d year. He 
was never married. 

James Augustus Clark, son of Col. James and Anna (Cham- 
pion) Clark, was born in Lebanon, Conn., Aug. 15, 1808. 

He spent his minority upon a farm, and at the age of 21 began 
preparation for college, and was admitted after six months' study. 
After graduation he studied theology in the Princeton Seminary 
for upwards of a year, and later spent two years in the Yale 
Divinity School. When his studies were finished, desiring to 
labor in the extreme West, he went under the direction of the 
American Home Missionary Society as its pioneer missionary to 
what is now the State of Iowa. He was ordained in Canton, 111., 
in October, 1838, and preached in Fort Madison, Iowa, for eleven 



85 

years, establishing churches meantime at other principal towns, 
such as Burlington, Dubuque, and Keokuk. In 1 849, in consequence 
of overwork, and the better to educate his children, he came east 
and for one year supplied the Congregational Church in East 
Woodstock, Conn., and then for three years that in Deep River, 
a village in the present township of Saybrook, Conn. He then 
had charge, until April, 1855, of the Congregational Church in 
Hanover parish, Meriden, Conn. His next settlement was in 
South wick, Mass. He was then, from June, 1858, to December, 
1863, pastor of the Congregational Church in Cromwell, Conn.,, 
whence he went to Monterey, Mass., where his residence continued 
until late in 1870, when he took charge of a church in Spencer- 
town, X. Y. In 1873 he went to Lanesborough, Mass., and in 
1875 retired to his former home in Monterey. He died in Ridge- 
field, >!. J., while on a visit to his son for the benefit of his 
health, July 1, 1881, in his 73d year. 

By his wife, Louisa Thompson, he had one daughter and three 
sons, — the eldest and youngest sons having graduated at this 
college in the classes of 1869 and 1877 respectively, and the re- 
maining son having taken a part of the college course with the 
class of 1875. 

1835. 

Aaron Crowell Beach, son of David J. and Huldah (Crow- 
ell) Beach, was born in South Orange, N. J., Dec. 28, 1805, and 
entered college at the beginning of Sophomore year. 

Immediately after graduation he entered the Yale Divinity 
School, remaining for four years — the last as a resident licentiate. 
After a year spent in trying to regain health in New Jersey, he 
returned to Connecticut. He preached for six months in Wol- 
cott, was called to be pastor there, was ordained June 22, 1842, 
and continued in this office until dismissed, at his own request, in 
June, 1857, on account of inadequate support. February 16, 
1859, he was installed pastor in Millington parish, East Haddam, 
Conn., and remained in that relation for seventeen years. He 
then resigned, Apr. 19, 1876, at the age of 70, and died at his 
home in East Haddam, July 30, 1881, in his 76th year. 

He was married, Dec. 28,.1840, to Lucy A., daughter of Ste- 
phen Walkley, of Southington, Conn., who died in April, 1853. 
Of his three sons by this marriage, one died in infancy, one was 
killed in the late civil war, and the other (Y. C. 1864) is still liv- 
ing ; two daughters are both deceased. 



I 



86 

He was again married, May 6, 1856, to Jane, daughter of Rev. 
Hervey Talcott (Y. C. 1810), of Portland, Conn., who survives 
him. Of their two dauorhters, one is still livinor. 

1836. 

Oscar Fisher, son of Olcott and Eunice (Royce) Fisher, was 
born in West Woodstock, Conn., Feb. 6, 1812. 

After graduation he took charge, for a few years, of Nichols 
Academy, in Dudley, Mass., where he had mainly fitted for col- 
lege. While there he married Miss Jane Fay Bemis, niece and 
adopted daughter of Phineas Bemis, Esq., of Dudley, who died 
in Newark, N. J., March 3], 1849, while her husband was en- 
gaged in teaching there. Some time after this affliction, his 
health having become impaired by long confinement in school, he 
retired from this occupation. He had in the meantime read law, 
and had been admitted to the bar of Windham County, Conn., but 
did not at any time engage in practice. In 1862 he settled per- 
manently in his native town, and the next year represented Wood- 
stock in the State Legislature. For fourteen years from 1867 he 
was Judge of Probate for the district of Woodstock. He died 
in West Woodstock, May 7, 1882, aged 70 years. 

He was married, May 29, 1866, to Melissa Haskell, who sur- 
vives him with two daughters. An only son by his first wife died 
at the age of twenty, when about entering collesfe. 

1837. 

Henry Harramond Bacot, eldest son of Thomas W. Bacot, 
of Charleston, S. C, was born in that city, March 30, 1818. 

After graduation he studied medicine at the Medical College 
of South Carolina, situated in Charleston, and on taking his 
degree in 1840 entered on the practice of his profession at Society 
Hill, S. C. There he was married, Oct. 21, 1841, to Miss Mary 
Elizabeth Mclver, but while in the full vigor of manhood he was 
prostrated by a sunstroke, from the effects of which he never fully 
recovered. He was obliged to relinquish the practice of his pro- 
fession, continuing, however, to reside at Society Hill, where he 
died Apr. 29, 1882, in his 65th year. 

His wife survives him with five sons and four daughters, two 
sons having died before him. 



Frederick William Gunn, the youngest son of John N. and 
Mary Gunn, was born Oct. 4, 1816, in Washington, Litchfield 
County, Conn. 

After graduating he taught in the parish of New Preston, and 
in the academy in his native town, until the spring of 1847. From 
that date till the fall of 1849, he taught in the academy in 
Towanda, Pa. He then returned to Washington, and founded 
the family school for boys now known as " The Gunnery," over 
which he presided till his death, of heart disease, on the 16th of 
August, 1881, in his 65th year. 

In his earlier career he encountered great opposition, owing to 
his active advocacy of abolition principles ; but with the gradual 
change of public sentiment in this regard, there came also a 
hearty recognition of his remarkable qualifications as a teacher, 
and his school was in later days a notable success, perhaps 
unique in the influence of the master for molding manly charac- 
ter, and in the system of discipline. 

Mr, Gunn was married, Apr. 16, 1848, to Abigail Irene, 
daughter of Gen. Daniel B. Brinsmade, of Washington, who 
survives him with an only daughter. Their only son died in 
1865 at the age of 16. 

John Phelps Putnam, son of Major George and Nancy 
(Shepard) Putnam, was born in Hartford, Conn., March 21, 1817. 

After graduation he studied law with the Hon. Wm. W. Ells- 
worth, of Hartford, and then in the Law School of Harvard Uni- 
versity, and in 1840 began the practice of his profession in Boston. 

After a successful career at the bar, he filled the office of Judge 
of Probate for Suffolk County in 1857-58, and in 1859, at the 
establishment of the present Superior Court of Massachusetts, he 
was appointed one of the Judges, and held this position with a 
constantly growing respect for his courtesy, integrity, and impar- 
tiality, as well as for his attainments, until his death. 

He died, of pneumonia, after an illness of four days, at his resi- 
dence in Boston, Jan. 5, 1 882, in his 65th year. 

He was married, Sept. 21, 1842, to Harriette, daughter of the 
Hon. Thomas Day (Y. C. 1797), of Hartford, who survives him 
with two of their five children. 

Ebenezer Platt Rogers, the son of Edmund J. and Rebecca 
(Piatt) Rogers, was born in the City of New York, Dec. 18, 1817. 



88 

In 1831 his parents removed to a country residence in Fairfield, 
Conn., from which place the son entered college. 

The sudden death .of his father, in June, 1835, terminated his 
college course the next year; but he received the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts in 1844, and was thenceforth enrolled with his class. 

He was engaged for a time in mercantile pursuits, and in 1837 
entered the Princeton Theological Seminary, but after a year was 
compelled to suspend his studies by weakness of the eyes. After 
two years of out-door life in the country, he resumed his prepara- 
tion for the ministry, in Fairfield and in Hartford, Conn. He was 
married in the latter place, Feb. 26, 1839, to Elizabeth, daughter 
of John, Caldwell, Esq., who survives him. 

Nov. 4, 1840, he was ordained pastor of the Congregational 
church of Chicopee Falls, Mass., and in 1843 removed to the 
charge of the Edwards Congregational Church in Northampton, 
Mass. In December, 1846, he resigned, in order to recruit his 
health by a Southern residence, and while in Augusta, Ga., wa& 
invited to supply temporarily the pulpit of the Ist Presbyterian 
Church in that city; his services proved so acceptable that he 
was called to the pastorate, and he held that position from 1847 
to 1854, when he became pastor of the 7th Presbyterian Church 
in Philadelphia. In November, 1856, he was installed pastor of 
the North Reformed Dutch Church, of Albany, N. Y., and after 
six years of acceptable and useful service there, became pastor of 
the South Reformed Church in New York City, where he labored, 
endearing himself especially to his people by his ready personal 
sympathy, until the failure of his health obliged him to offer his 
resignation, in February, 1881. A few days later he was pros- 
trated by a stroke of paralysis, from the effects of which he never 
recovered. He died in Montclair, N. J., Oct. 22, 1881, in his 64th 
year. 

His five daughters and three of his five sons survive him ; 
one son having died in infancy, and another — his eldest child — 
having fallen in the Union army in the late war. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Oglethorpe 
University, Ga., in 1853. He had published several volumes on 
religious subjects, besides many sermons. A memorial sketch has 
been printed for private circulation. . 



89 



1838. 



Robert Bethell CLAXTOisr, son of John Claxton, a native ol 
Bermuda who settled in Philadelphia, was born in that city, Nov. 
6, 1814 ; his mother was Mary, daughter of Daniel Newman, a 
Revolutionary surgeon. During his youth he was employed as a 
clerk in a book store in Philadelphia, but. gave up business in 
1834 to devote himself to study for the ministry, and was admit- 
ted to college at the beginning of the Sophomore year. 

He spent two years in the (Protestant Episcopal) Theological 
Seminary of Virginia, and was ordained Deacon by Bishop H. U. 
Onderdonk, in Philadelphia, July 19, 1840, and advanced to the 
priesthood on Dec. 6 of the same year. Meantime, on Sept. 4, he 
•entered on the rectorship of St. Stephen's Church, Wilkesbarre, 
Pa. He was married, Aug. 31, 1841, to Caroline P., daughter of 
B. Howard Rand, Esq., of Philadelphia, who died in February, 
1843. On the 2d of June, 1844, he was married to Elizabeth, 
daughter of the Hon. David Scott, of Wilkesbarre. In May, 
1846, largely for the sake of his wife's health, he resigned his 
charge and removed to West Chester, Pa. In March, 1848, he 
accepted a call to Christ Church, Madison, Ind., where he re- 
mained until May, 1853, when he became rector of St. Paul's 
Church, Cleveland, O. From Cleveland he went in December, 
1859, to St. Luke's Church, Rochester, N. Y., where he spent 
nearly six years. In October, 1865, he returned to his native 
city, as Professor of Homiletics and the Pastoral Care in the West 
Philadelphia Divinity School. He had a strong preference, how- 
ever, for pastoi-al work, in which he was markedly successful, and 
in December, 1873, accepted the rectorship of St. Andrew's 
Church in West Philadelphia, laying dov/n his professorship in 
the following July. In this pastorate he continued until his 
death, which occurred in West Philadelphia, May 24, 1882, in his 
68th year; for upwards of a month previous he had suffered from 
an affection of the heart, and while absent on a brief vacation, 
contracted a severe cold, resulting in pneumonia, which caused his 
death. 

His second wife died in January, 1867, and in July, 1874, he 
was married to Harriet M., daughter of William McKnight, of 
Rochester, N. Y., who survives him, with two daughters by his 
second marriage. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1849 from 
Kenyon College. 



90 

Lemuel Ttlee Downing, son of Dr. Eleazar B. and Louisa 
Downing, was born in Preston, Conn., Aug. 26, 1814. His father 
received the honorary degree of M. D. from this college, and his 
mother was the daughter of the Rev. Lemuel Tyler (Y. C. 1780). 

Upon his graduation he went to Columbus, Ga., and spent two 
years in teaching school and in the study of law under Judge 
Grigsby E. Thomas, with whom he subsequently formed a part- 
nership which continued until Judge Thomas's death. He con- 
tinued to reside in Columbus, engaged iji the practice of his pro- 
fession, and sincerely respected by the community, until his sud- 
den death from apoplexy, March 24, 1882, in his 68th year. 

He was married, June 20, 1843, to Mary Eugenia, the eldest 
daughtfel- of his law partner, who died May 1, 1847. On Dec. 7, 
1849, he was married to Miss Caroline Lucy Urquhart, who sur- 
vives him. Two daughters by the first marriage, and two sons 
and a daughter by the second marriage, are still living. The eld- 
est son was graduated at this college in 1872. • 

1840. 

Enoch Long Childs, second son of Solomon and Mary (Long) 
Childs, was born in Henniker, N. H., Oct. 6, 1808. 

^He entered college in 1831, but only completed the Freshman 
year, and then withdrew, returning six years later. 

He was married, Oct. 6, 1840, to Harriet Long, and went imme- 
diately to the Southern States. He taught school for some years 
in Montgomery, Ala., but in 1846 engaged in business with his 
brothers as a contractor for building railroad bridges. Subse- 
quently he was for many years a revenue-officer, under the employ 
of the U. S. government, in Washington and New York City. 

He received a severe injury to the spinal column, about the first 
of March, J880, and after long prostration died in Henniker, Sept. 
8, 1881, at the age of 73. He had no children. 

John Bray Gardiner, the eldest son of Nathaniel and Eliza 
(Fraunces) Gardiner, of the Gardiner's Island family, was born in 
New York City, Sept. 9, 1821. 

He was fitted for college at East Hampton, L. L, and entered 
the class of 1839 (from New York City) at the beginning of the 
course, his father's family at the same time removing to New 
Haven. He was obliged to leave college during Junior year, 
and returned to the same rank a year later. 



91 

Soon after his graduation his family removed to Brooklyn, N. 
Y. He studied law in New York City, and was admitted to the 
bar in May, 1844. For many years he practiced his profession in 
Brooklyn, and was highly esteemed as a faithful, efficient, and 
honorable attorney. He was in declining health for eleven years, 
and died in Brooklyn, of paralysis of the spine, Sept. 11, 1881, 
aged 60 years. 

He was married, Oct. 1, 1857, to Miss Mary E. Garrett, of 
Brooklyn, who survives him with two daughters. 



1844. 

Christopher Cushing, son of George and Nancy (Gushing) 
Cushing, was born in South Scituate, Mass., May 3, 1820. 

He studied theology for one year at Yale, and then for two 
years in Andover, Mass., and was married, Sept. 23, 1847, to Mary 
Frances, daughter of William Choate, of Derry, N. H. He soon 
after engaged in the labor of building up a new church in Boston, 
Mass., of which — under the name of the Edwards Church — he 
was ordained pastor Feb. 21, 1849. From this charge he was 
dismissed, on account of the want of a suitable house of worship, 
Apr. 23, 1851. On the I7th of September following, he was in- 
stalled as colleague pastor of the Congregational Church in 
North Brookfield, Mass. Here he labored successfully till 1865, 
when his health broke down from overwork. He took a year's 
rest, including a long European tour, but his health began to fail 
again in the spring of 1867, and he then accepted the office of 
Boston Secretary of the American Congregational Union, being 
formally dismissed from North Brookfield, Sept. 17, 1868. He 
continued in the discharge of his new duties until 1877, and 
from 1867 was also one of the editors and proprietors of the 
Congregational Quarterly ; in 1874- he became sole owner of the 
Quarterly, and conducted it until its close in 1878. 

In January, 1879, he was appointed the Treasurer of the Mass. 
Home Missionary Society, but resigned after six months on ac- 
count of ill health. He died at his residence in Cambridge, 
Mass., of progressive anaemia, Oct. 23, 1881, in his 62d year. His 
wife survives him, with an only daughter, their two sons having 
died before him. 

The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him by Am- 
herst College in 1871. 



92 

William Frederick Miller, son of Capt. William T. and 
Elizabeth G. Miller, was born in Bufialo, N. Y., July 16, 1822. 

He spent one year in Geneva (now Hobart) College, and en- 
tered Yale at the beginning of the Sophomore year. He studied 
law at home with Messrs. Potter & Rowland, and on his admis- 
sion to the bar in 1847, began practice in Buffalo by himself, but 
About 1855 formed a partnership with the Hon. Joseph G. Mas- 
ten, which continued until dissolved by Judge Masten's elevation 
to the bench. About 1860 he became associated with A. P. 
Laning, Esq., and so remained for some twelve years, the firm 
having a very large practice. During the rest of his life Mr. 
Miller continued practice alone, being principally occupied with 
real estate business and with the secretaryship of the Buffalo, New 
York and Lake Erie Railroad. By his ability and integrity he 
had attained a prominent position in his native city. He was 
taken ill in the fall of 1880 with an affection of the lungs, and 
after sinking gradually, died of pneumonia, July 28, 1881, aged 
59 years. 

He was married, Apr. 25, 1849, to Julia A., daughter of Buck- 
ley Stedman, of Cleveland, O., who survives him with two sons 
and two daughters. 

Edward Warren Root, fourth son of Abner and Christiana 
{Hall) Root, was born in Conway, Mass., March 15, 1820. 

After graduation he taught for two years in Haddam, Conn., 
and then entered on the study of theology in New York City ; 
four months later he removed to the Yale Divinity School, where 
he finished his course in 1849, having in the meantime (in 1848) 
become a tutor in the college. Resigning his tutorship in 1850, 
he was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in Wil- 
liamsburg, Mass., on the 23d of October. Being dismissed from 
this charge in May, 1856, he \^as installed over the 2d Presbyte- 
rian Church in Oxford, Ohio, two months later (July 6), where he 
remained until Sept. 25, 1859. He immediately began to supply 
the pulpit of the Congregational Church in Springfield, O., where 
he was installed pastor, Feb. 22, 1860. He retired from this posi- 
tion, Aug. 29, 1865, and returned to the East, supplying until 
July 1, 1867, the church in Sunderland, Mass., and from that date 
the church in Westerly, R. L, where he was installed pastor, Nov. 
11, 1868. The health of a step-child requiring him to remove in- 
land, he was dismissed from this charge June 27, 1870, and on 



93 

the 29th of the following November was installed over the Con- 
gregational Church in Batavia, 111. Being dismissed from here, 
June 86, 18*73, he then took temporary charge of the Congrega- 
tional Chm-ch in Hudson, O., and after two years removed to Che- 
nango Forks, N. Y., where he was acting pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church for three or four years. He then held a similar rela- 
tion to the Presbyterian Church in Dryden,N. Y., where his health 
was shattered by the sudden loss of his youngest son. He was 
attacked with partial paralysis, and resigned his jx)sition Jan. 1, 
1881, removing to Schenectady, where his surviving son is attend- 
ing Union College. There he died, Apr. 25, 1882, aged 62 years. 



1847. 

John Christopher Burch, son of Morton N. and Mary (Bal- 
lard) Burch, was born in Jefferson County, Ga., Oct. 27, 1827. 

He studied law with Gov. McDonald of Georgia and practiced 
for three years in his native State, removing to Chattanooga, 
Tenn., in 1852. In 1855 and 1856 he was elected to the lower 
house of the State Legislature, and in 1857 and 1858 to a seat in 
the State Senate, bringing such a reputation for ability and fair- 
ness that he was made the presiding officer, notwithstanding his 
youth and little experience. In 1859 he removed to Nashville, 
undertaking besides the practice of his profession the editorship 
of the Union and Aiyierican, the old Democratic newspaper of 
the State. During the stormy canvass of 1860, he took the 
Southern side with fervor in his editorial position, and from 1861 
to 1865 served faithfully in the Confederate army, at first on the 
staff of Gen. Pillow, and subsequently as aid to Gen. Forrest 
and Gen. Withers. At the close of the war he resumed the prac- 
tice of law in Nashville, and was attaining high rank at the bar, 
when in 1869 he was tempted to purchase a controlling influence 
in the paper which he had formerly edited, and to assume the 
duties of managing editor. He was thus occupied for the remain- 
ing years, and also in 1873 served as Comptroller of the State. 
In March, 1879, he was elected Secretary of the U. S. Senate, un- 
der the Democratic reorganization. In this situation he won the 
lesteem of vSenators of all parties, and at his death left an excel- 
lent record for probity and efficiency. He died in Washington, 
July 28, 1881, in his 54th year, from heart disease, supervening 
oh an existing complication of diseases of the liver and kidneys. 
3 



94 

He was married in 1852 to Miss Lucy Newell, who survives 
him with four sons and two daughters. 

Charles Frederick Sanford, youngest son of Hervey and 
Mary (Lyman) Sanford, was born in New Haven, Conn., March 
22, 1827. 

He studied law in the Yale Law School, and subsequently in 
the office of Messrs. Butler & Evarts, of New York City. After 
admission to ^he bar, he practiced his profession in New York 
alone during 1852 and 1853, being associated during the next 
four years with his classmate, Henry M. Brace. On Jan. 1, 1862, 
he formed a law-partnership with Judge Lewis B. Woodruff (Y. 
C. 1830) and his son (Y. C. 1858), which continued — with changes 
due to Judge Woodruff's appointment to a Circuit Judgeship in 
1868 — until his own election, in the fall of 1875, as one of the 
Judges of the Superior Court of New York City for a term of 14 
years. Early in 1878 his health broke down from overwork, and 
after an unavailing struggle he relapsed in April, 1879, into a 
condition of mental feebleness, due to softening of the brain, 
which continued until his death, in New York, Oct. 21, 1881, 
aged 54 years. 

He had sustained on the bench the high character which his 
previous career at the bar had established. 

He married, Aug. 24, 1853, Elizabeth A., daughter of Col. Da- 
vid Looney, of Memphis, Tenn., who survives him with a son (Y. 
C. 1876) and a daughter. 

1850. 

William Elliott Bassett, youngest son of John and Nancy 
A. (Lee) Bassett, was born in Derby, Conn., May 24, 1829. 

The first year after graduation he spent in teaching in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. He then began the study of divinity in the Union 
Theological Seminary, New York City, removing a year later to 
the Yale Divinity School. After finishing his course in 1854 he 
preached in various places until he was ordained, Oct. 14, 1856, 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Central Village, in Plain- 
field, Conn. In the spring of 1859, on account of ill-health, he 
requested a dismission, and removed to Norfolk, Conn., where he 
had married Miss Mary, daughter of Elizur Dowd, Oct. 22, 1856. 
After resting for several months and regaining his health, he took 
charge of the Congregational Church in North Manchester, 



95 

Cotin., which he served as acting pastor until 1863, when he re- 
moved to Warren, Conn. After a year's service of the Congre- 
gational Church in Warren, he was installed pastor Oct. 12, 1864, 
and remained until Nov. 15, 187^"^, when he resigned, feeling that 
his health required a rest. He then resided in New Haven for 
three or four years, and in 1879 took charge of the Congregational 
Church in Bethlehem, Conn. From this position he was called in 
the spring of 1881 to the Congregational Church in North Ca- 
naan, Conn. He died at the house of his father-in-law in Norfolk, 
Nov. 6, 1881, after an illness of ten days, of typhoid fever, in 
tlie 5.Sd year of his age. His wife survives him with his only sun 
and only daughter. 

Franklix Shaw, son of Franklin Shaw, M.D., and Sylvia 
(Weeks) Shaw, was born in Greensboro', Ala., May 9, 1829. 

His life was spent in mercantile business in New Orleans, 
wl»ere he had made many friends, and where he died May 8, 1882, 
aged 53 years. 

He was never married. 

LuciAX Sumner Wilcox, son of Dr. Justus D. and Emeline B. 
Wilcox, was born in West Granby, Conn., July 17, 1826. 

For three years after graduation he taught in Easton", Conn., 
and there married. May 18, 1853, Harriet C, daughter of David 
Silliman. He then studied medicine in the Yale Medical School, 
and received the degree of M.D. in 1855. After spending about 
a y^ar in the Cherokee nation, teaching and practicing his profes- 
sion, he returned to Connecticut, and in 1857 settled in Hartford, 
where he was engaged until his last illness in successful practice. 
From September, 1877, until his death he also filled with efficiency 
and devotion the chair of Theory and Practice, in the Yale 
Medical School. He died in Hartford, after a long and painful 
illness, Nov. 25, i881, in his 56th year. His wife survives him 
with several children. 

1853. 

Delano Alexander Goddard, son of Benjamin Goddard, 
was born in Worcester, Mass., Aug. 27, 1831, and first entered 
Brown University, removing to this college at the beginning of 
the Sophomore year. 

He passed the first year after graduation in Cleveland, O., and 



96 

having determined on journalism as his profession, then spent a 
year in the office of the Painesville (O.) Herald. He was next at 
home for a year, and in 1856 became editorially connected with 
the Boston Chronicle. In 1857 he returned to Worcester as asso- 
ciate editor of the Transcript \ from this office he went to the 
Worcester i^):>y, and left that editorial chair for a position on the 
Boston Daily Advertiser in 1868. After a few months' service 
he succeeded Mr. 0. F. Dunbar as editor-in-chief of the paper^ 
and held this important position until his death, in Boston, after 
a brief illness, Jan. 11, 1882, in his 51st year. 

Mr. Goddard was admirably equipped for the work to which 
his best years were given, and which he pursued with conscien- 
tious devotion and marked success. 

He was married, June 30, 1863, to Miss Martha H. LeBaron, of 
Worcester, who survives him without children. 

1855. 

Henry Albert Yardley, second son of Thomas Yardley,. 
M.D., was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 20, 1834. He first en- 
tered the University of Pennsylvania, and joined this college in 
the third term of the Freshman year. 

After graduation he spent two years in Europe, and one year 
in the study of law in the office of George W. Biddle, Esq., of 
Philadelphia. He was then for four terms (September, 1858, to 
December, 1859) a tutor in this college, and having decided to 
enter the ministry, and having spent a year in theological study 
in New York City, was ordained a Deacon in the Protestant 
Episcopal Church by Bishop Williams, in New Haven, Dec. 22, 
1860. He married, May 22, 1 861, Jane Andrews, second daughter 
of John M. Woolsey (Y. C. 1813), of New Haven, and immedi- 
ately entered on his duties as Rector of Trinity Church, Lenox,. 
Mass. He was ordained Priest by Bishop Eastburn, Oct. 14, 1861. 

In 1864 he settled in Middletown, Conn., and was made Pro- 
fessor of Homiletics and Christian Evidences in the Berkeley Di- 
vinity School. In this work he continued, showing remarkable 
ability as an instructor, until his death, at Middletown, April 3, 
1882, in his 48th year. He had been for many years in failing 
health and subject to almost incessant suffering, from an affection 
of the spinal cord, but worked on to the last, with an unusual 
power of will, useful and beloved. His wife, one son, and three 
daughters survive, three daughters having died before him. 



97 



1858. 



Sheldon Goodwin, son of Edward Goodwin (Y. C. 1823), and 
Eliza A. (Lewis) Goodwin, was born in Hartford, Conn., July 7, 
1836. 

For two years after graduation he was a clerk in his father's 
paper manufactory in Hartford. In October, 1860, he entered 
the house of Holmes, Booth & Haydens, dealers in metals, in 
New York City, and remained there until February, 1866, when 
he became Assistant Treasurer of the Brooklyn White Lead Com- 
pany, also located in New York City. In 1872 he was promoted to 
the Treasurership, and continued in that position with great ac- 
ceptance until his death. 

After two years of ill-health, he died of consumption at his resi- 
dence, in Morristown, 2\. J., Nov. 15, 1881, in his 46th year. 

He was married, in Brooklyn, N. Y., Apr. 18, 1866, to Emma 
S., daughter of the Rev. John F. Messenger, who survives him 
without children. 

1860. 

Joseph Lord Taintok, eldest child of Ralph S. and Phebe L. 
Taintor, was born in Colchester, Conn., Sept. 21, 1835. 

He entered college in 1854, but on the failure of his health in 
the second term of Freshman year was obliged to engage in out- 
door business, returning to college in the spring of 1857. 

He had purposed to study law, but anxiety about his health in- 
duced him on graduation to enter the map and guide-book pub- 
lishing business, with his uncle and his brother. In the spring of 
1864, while residing in Avon, Livingston County, N. Y., he pur- 
chased the interests of his partners in business. Two years later 
he was attacked with congestion of the lungs, and on regaining 
strength he removed to South Orange, N. J., where he continued 
to reside, highly esteemed for his public spirit and Christian in- 
fluence, till his death. In the spring of 1867, in conjunction with 
his brother (Y. C. 1865) he began the business of publishing 
school and miscellaneous books, in New York City. The success 
and growth of this firm were evidence of the good judgment, 
strict integrity, and painstaking industry of the senior partner. 
In 1879 he was attacked by pneumonia, which was followed by 
a permanent weakness of the lungs, in consequence of which he 
retired from business in Auscust, 1880, and devoted himself to 



98 

the care of his health. He died in Bloomingdale (in the Adiron- 
dack Region), N. Y., Sept. 1, 1881, at the age of 46. 

He was married, Sept. 4, 1862, to Miss Isabella Comstock, of 
Avon, N. Y., who survives him with several children. 

1861. 

Webster Park, the youngest son of Benjamin F. and Hannah 
(Avery) Park, was born in Preston, Conn., May 31, 1837. 

Immediately upon graduation he began the study of law in 
Norwich, Conn., with his brother, Albert F. Park, Esq., and was 
admitted to the bar in that city, in April, 1863. He gave little 
attention to the practice of his profession in the courts, but early 
applied himsef to the business of soliciting patents. In July 
1865, he was appointed associate clerk of the Superior and Su- 
preme Courts of New London County, and held this office until 
advanced to the chief clerkship in 1875, which he held until 
removed in June, 1881. He died in Norwich, December 28, 1881, 
in his 45th year. 

He was twice married, and leaves a widow and a daughter by 
the first marriage. 

1863. 

Frederick Fanning Harral, son of Henry K. and Sarah Ann 
(Peet) Harral, was born in Bridgeport, Conn., February 24, 1 842. 

After graduation he entered the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons in the city of New York, and received the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine from that institution in March, 1868. He then be- 
came connected with the New York Hospital, where he remained, 
as Assistant House Surgeon and House Surgeon, until the sum- 
mer of 1869, when he left for Europe to continue his studies. 
After remaining some months at Brunswick, Germany, he went 
to Vienna and connected himself with some of the hospitals in 
that city. He removed to Paris about the year 1872, where he 
married, in 1877, Mile. Claire Le Gar. -While in Paris he was 
attacked with softening of the brain, which in time entirely 
wrecked his mind. In this condition he was brought home, in 
May, 1878, and shortly afterward placed in the Kirkbride Asylum, 
at Philadelphia, where he died, July 5, 1881, in his 40th year. 

1865. 
Allen McLean, eldest son of Allen N. and Emeline (Barber) 
McLean, of Simsbury, Conn., was born in East Granby, Conn.. 
November 17, 1837. 



99 

The three years after graduation he spent in the Yale Theolog- 
ical Seminary, and on October 14, 1868, he was ordained pastor 
of the Grove Street Congregational Church, East Orange, N. J. 
He married, December 1, 1869, Miss Anne Belden, of Simsbury, 
tind on account of her failing health was obliged to resign his pas- 
torate, June 16, 1874. He spent the following year in Europe, his 
wife dying at Nice, April 27, 1875. After returning to this coun- 
try he took charge of the Congregational Church in Litchfield, 
Conn., in November, 1875, and acted as pastor until his death. 
He was married, June 13, 1878, to Miss Fanny M., daughter of 
Henry R. Coit, of Litchfield, who survives him, with his three 
children. 

After a gradual decline of health he went to Jacksonville, Fla., 
in the autumn of 1881, and died there April 21, 1882, in his 45th 
year. 

1868. 

William Abbott Hamilton, son of Dr. Robert and Jane Ab- 
bott Hamilton, was born in Chicago, 111., Aug. 31, 1847, and en- 
tered college from Saratoga Springs, N. Y., to which place his 
father had removed in 1854. 

For some years after graduation he was employed in business 
in Saratoga Springs. He then studied medicine, and received his 
degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York 
City, in 1876. He was house physician in Bellevue Hospital, 
New York City, for some two years, and soon after settled in 
Minneapolis, Minn., where he was much respected as a physician. 
He died there Oct. 21, 1881, in his 35th year. He was unmarried. 

1869. 

Lewis Elliot Condict, son of Stephen H. and Sophia H. Con- 
diet, was born in Newark, N. J., January 16, 1848. 

After graduation he spent a year in foreign travel. Upon his 
return he studied theology for a few months in the Princeton 
Theological Seminary, and then entered a law office in Morris- 
town, N. J. His plans for life were interrupted, however, by 
almost continuous poor health. While hurrying to catch a rail- 
road train, in Newark, on the morning of the 12th of July, 1881, 
he fell to the sidewalk, and died within a few minutes of heart 
disease. 

He was never married. 



100 



1871. 



Edmund Luther Pettengill, son of Samuel C. Pettengill, 
M.D., was born in Hancock, N. Y., May 13, 1850. 

After graduation he attended medical lectures in Cleveland, O., 
and completed his studies in the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, New York City, graduating in March, 1876. He then 
returned home, and began the practice of his profession, succeed- 
ing especially in surgical cases. About the beginning of the year 
1880 formed a partnership with his father; this continued until 
his death, at his home, August 16, 1881, in his 32d year. 

He was married, at Hancock, December 22, 1880, to Miss Ida 
L. Allison, who survives him. 

1872. 

Pascal Martin, eldest son of the Rev. Dr. William A. P. 
Martin (University of Indiana, 1847) and Jane (Vansant) Martin, 
was born in Ningpo, China, October 29, 1850, and was sent to 
this country to be fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Ando- 
ver, Mass. He spent the Freshman Year at Princeton College, 
and entered here as Sophomore in October, 1868. In the follow- 
ing February he left college, and subsequently joined the next 
class. 

Soon after graduation he returned to China and entered the 
Imperial Maritime Customs Service. He died, unmarried, at 
Chinkiang, China, March 5, 1882, in his 32d year. 



• 1874. 

George Fingland Doughty, son of George E. and Louisa F. 
Doughty, was born in Cincinnati, O., Oct. 14, 1852. 

He returned home after graduation with the purpose of devoting 
himself to a literary life, but in the meantime thought it best to 
learn some mercantile business, and went into the employ of 
Stribley & Co., manufacturers of shoes in Cincinnati. About 
1879 he took the position of Secretary and Treasurer of a com- 
pany organized in the same city for sujDplying naphtha lights. In 
this position he manifested untiring energy and extraordinary 
executive ability, so that when in 1880 the Southern Railway, 
running from Cincinnati to Chattanooga, was oftered for lease, 
he was able to form a company for taking the lease. Though the 



101 

bid offered by his company was not the successful one, the finan- 
cial power which he had shown was duly appreciated, and he was 
offered the position of secretary of the new corporation. This 
position he held with increasing credit until his sudden death, of 
diphtheria, in Cincinnati, May 25, 1882, in his 30th year. He was 
not married. 



Charles Edward Humphrey, son of Jeffrey A. and Julia F. 
(Merriman) Humphrey, was born in Brooklyn, K Y., January 23, 
1854. He was prepared for college at Englewood, N. J., — then 
and afterwards his family residence, — and at first entered in 1 869, 
but was obliged by a failure of his health to leave college during 
the following winter. 

After graduation he began the study of law in New York City 
in the office of Chapman, Crowell & Scott, and also in Columbia 
College Law School, where he received the degree of LL.B. in 
1876, Soon after this he began practice by himself, and was 
making good progress in his profession when he was attacked by 
Bright's disease. After an illness of twelve months, he died at 
his father's residence in Englewood, December V, 1881, in his 
28tli year. He was unmarried. 



1875. 

William Sigerson Fulton, son of the Rev. Jonathan G. Fulton 
(Western University of Pennsylvania, 1833) and Fanny (Mc- 
Clintock) Fulton, was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., Feb. 14, 1853. 

He completed the course of study in the Western Theological 
Seminary of the Presbyterian Church, in Alleghany, Pa., in the 
spring of 1877, and after some months' labor in Chicago, was 
ordained pastor of the church in Braddock's Field, Pa., Decem- 
ber 31, 1877. In September, 1878, he was obliged by ill-health 
to resign this charge, but seemed so much better by June, 1879, 
that he then began preaching at Stewart's Station, Pa. At the 
beginning of 1881 he returned to Pittsburgh, having accepted a 
<;all from the 8th Presbyterian Church of that city ; but before 
his formal installation he died of consumption, April 20, 1881, at 
the age of 28 years. 

He was married, July 3, 1879, to Miss Laura E. Batchelor, of 
East Liberty, Pa., who survives him, with one son. 



102 



1878. 

Walter Erskine Dimmtck, the eldest son of the late Samuel 
E. and Liicretia B. Dimmick, was born in Honesdale, Pa., July 4, 
1856. 

Immediately upon leaving New Ha-ven, he entered the Columbia 
College Law School in New York city, and graduated therefrom 
in the spring of 1880. He was occupied with the settlement of 
his mother's estate until October, 1881, when he was married to 
Mary Scott, daughter of Mrs. E. S. Lord, of Albany, N. Y. He 
then took a short trip West with his wife, and came back in No- 
vember with the intention of settling permanently in Minnesota ; 
but upon his arrival in New York City, he was attacked with 
typhoid fever, and died there, January 16, 1882, in his 26th year. 

1881. 

Arthur Heyward Ripley, only son of Daniel C. and Sarah 
B. (Trumbull) Ripley, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., May 8, 1858, 
and entered college at the beginning of the Sophomore year, hav- 
ing spent the previous year in foreign travel. 

Upon graduation he entered the Law School of Harvard Uni- 
versity, and while pursuing his studies there accompanied hi& 
father in April on a visit to the Southern States, during which he 
contracted typhoid fever. After an illness of about eighteen 
days, he died in Cambridge, Mass., May 21, 1882, at the age of 24. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1825. 

Ira Hutchinson was born in Gilead, Conn., March 1, 1800, 
and was brought up on a farm in that town. He was educated 
at Bacon Academy, in Colchester, Conn., and for some years 
taught school in various parts of his native State. He taught a 
select school in Cromwell in 1819-20, and was there brought un- 
der influences which deepened and made permanent his earlier re- 
ligious impressions. 

After graduation he beg'kn the practice of medicine in Long- 
meadow, Mass., but in a few months removed to Haddam, Conn., 



108 

where he continued in active service till 1853, when he returned 
to Cromwell, where he died Aug. 8, 1881, in his 82d year, being 
then the oldest practicing physician in Middlesex County. He 
was considered, when in his prime, an excellent practitioner, and 
in 1873 was elected President of the State Medical Society. He 
was also highly esteemed as a public-spirited citizen and an earn- 
est advocate of practical reforms. 

He was first married, March 16, 1826, to Lucinthia, widow of 
Dr. Andrew F. Warner (Y. C. 1812), of Haddam, and daughter 
of Cephas Cone, of Colchester, Conn.; and again, Jan. 12, 1848, 
to Laura Ann, daughter of Joseph Dart, Esq., of Middle Haddam,. 
who survives him with seven children. 

1834. 

David Hull Nash was born in the parish of Greenfield, in 
Fairfield, Conn., March 21, 1811, the only son of Dr. William B. 
Nash and his wife Kutha, daughter of the Rev. Andrew Eliot 
(Haw. Coll. 1762). The family removed to the adjoining town 
of Bridgeport during his boyhood. 

He at first chose the occupation of a druggist, and entered a 
store in New Haven to learn the business ; but being disabled by 
an accident returned home, and during a long convalescence his 
attention was turned to his father's profession. After studying 
with his father, and subsequently with Drs. Ives of New Haven, 
he entered the Yale Medical School in 1832. 

In 1835 he began practice with his father, and so continued 
until the latter withdrew from business. He then associated Rob- 
ert Hubbard, M.D. (Y. C. 1851), with himself, in a partnership 
which lasted for eighteen years, after which he practiced alone 
until his health failed in 1881. In his forty-six years of profes- 
sional life he became increasingly known and esteemed, as a most 
devoted, laborious, and trusted physician. Overtasked at length 
by exhausting professional cares, his vigorous constitution gave 
way, and his health slowly declined during a painful illness of 
more than a year's duration. He died in Bridgeport, May 24, 
4882, in his 72d year. 

He married, Jan. 6, 1836, Miss Susan E., daughter of Jesse and 
Sarah (Gregory) Sterling, of Bridgeport, who survives him with 
two of their three sons. 



104 



1842. 



Edwabd Phelps Lyman, third son of Dr. Norman and Eunice 
(Smith) Lyman, was born in Glastonburj^, Conn., April 1, 1821, 
and spent his youth in Warren, Conn., where the family removed 
in 1828. He was fitted for the medical school by his father, 
and on graduation began practice in New Hartford, Conn., and 
was meeting with good success, but by request of his father 
came to New Preston, a village in Washington, Conn., after a 
year and formed a partnership with an elder brother (M.D. 
Yale 1839), which continued until 1855, when he bought the 
residence which he occupied till his death. In 1856 he was 
married to Sarah Ann Lemmon, who died in the fall of 1880. 
They had an only son, who survives them. Dr. Lyman enjoyed 
for the last twenty years of his life as large a practice as any 
physician in Litchfield County. He was stricken down, while in 
active service, with pneumonia, and died after five days' illness, 
on the 4th of April, 1882, aged 61 years. 

In 1878, much to his surprise as his political party was in the 
minority in the town, he was elected as a representative in the 
General Assembly. 

1858. 

John Martin Aimes died of epilepsy, at his residence in Or- 
ange, Conn., Oct. 26, 1881, at the age of 53. 

He was a native of New York City, but in his childhood his 
father removed to Orange. 

He graduated as Bachelor of Arts from Columbia College in 
1850, and after studying medicine practiced for a few years in 
New York City and subsequently in Orange. 

He leaves a widow, two daughters, and a son. 



1859. 

Jo.vATHAN Hamilton Lee, only son of Selah and Electa Ann 
(Bushnell) Lee, was born in Madison, Conn., Apr. 10^ 1837. 

He began the study of medicine with Edwin Bidwell, M.D.* 
(Y. C. 1847), in Haddam, Conn., and upon receiving his degree 
went to Greeneville, a suburb of Norwich, Conn., to practice his 
profession. After the civil war broke out, he was appointed Sec- 
ond Assistant Surgeon of the 21st Conn. Volunteers, and joined 



105 

his regiment, Aug. 22, 1862; before he left the army (in October, 
1864), he was acting brigade-surgeon. He was then urged to re- 
turn to Greeneville, but having a desire to try life at the West, 
went for a short time to a place on the Mississippi River. He soon 
came back, however, to his native State, and settled finally about 
1874 in the town of Killingworth, where he died, after a fort- 
night's illness, of disease of the brain, Oct. 8, 1881, in his 45th 
year. He was a skillful physician and surgeon, and remarkable 
for his power of giving sympathy and comfort in the sick-room. 

He was married. May 22, 1861, to Mary Frances Clark, of Nor- 
wich, who with their only son survives him. 

1879. 

George Henry Hammond, son of Cornelius E. Hammond, 
M.D. (N. Y. Univ. 1848), was born in South Glastonbury, Conn., 
Dec. 21, 1855. 

He graduated as Bachelor of Arts at the Wesleyan University, 
Middletown, Conn., in 1877, and entered at once on medical 
studies here. In 1879 he became a graduate student in the Medi- 
cal Department of the University of the City of New York, 
whose diploma he received in February, 1880. In the next 
month he was appointed Junior Assistant Physician in Bellevue 
Hospital, New York City, and shortly after, while engaged in his 
duties there, received an injury of the knee-joint, which finally re- 
sulted in inflammation ; septic poisoning followed, which termi- 
nated fatally, in New York City, May 18, 1881, a month after he 
had passed with distinguished honor an examination for promo- 
tion in the hospital service. His early death blighted high hopes 
of professional distinction. • 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

1850. 

Tompkins Westervelt, the oldest son of Dr. John Westervelt, 
was born on Staten Island, Jan. 24, 1830. His mother was Han- 
nah E., daughter of Daniel D. Tompkins, Vice-President of the 
United States. He entered Columbia College in 1843, before he 
was 14 years of age, and graduated in 1847, with the second 
honor of his class. He then spent about a year in the law ofllice 
of Messrs. Tucker & Crapo, of New York City, before coming to 
New Haven. 



106 

After graduating here he returned to the office of Messrs. 
Tucker & Crapo, and was admitted to the bar in 1851. Later he 
formed a partnership with Mr. Thomas D. Hall, and some years 
subsequently with Mr. George IST. Titus, whose daughter Anna he 
married in 1860. About 1873, when Mr. Titus partially retired 
from active business, Mr. Westervelt associated himself with Mr. 
George J. Greenfield, and they continued together until tlie sub- 
ject of this notice was elected County Judge and Surrogate of 
Richmond County, in 1875, which office he held for six years. 

He died at his residence, Brighton Heights, Tompkinsville, 
Staten Island, Apr. 20, 1882, of an affection of the heart, from 
which he sufiered acutely during the last days of life ; grief for 
the loss of his wife, who died Feb. 26, 1881, helped to hasten his 
«nd. He leaves two sons and a daughter. 



1876. 

Cornelius Sleight, youngest son of William R. and Anna C. 
(Dering) Sleight, was born in Sag Harbor, L. I., Dec. 21, 1853. 

Pie entered the Sheffield Scientific School in 1873, and after one 
year's study there became a member of the Law School. 

He had already shown some aptitude for journalism, and after 
graduation accepted a position in the editorial department of the 
Norwich (Conn.) Daily Advertiser, where he remained for several 
months, but the work proved too confining for a constitution not 
naturally robust. Returning home, he assisted his brother (Y. C. 
1858) from time to time in the editorial work of The Corrector, a 
weekly paper in Sag Harbor. 

In the autumn of 1878^ having been attacked by hemorrhage 
of the lungs, he sought the Pacific slope for recuperation and was 
materially benefited. Returning home in the summer of 1880, 
he was married on the 6th of October, at Sag Harbor, to Miss 
Elizabeth R., daughter of Stephen Clarke. The unusual inclem- 
ancy of the early autumn again prostrated him, and he revisited 
California, but without benefit. He crossed the continent for 
home in June, 1881, arriving on the 16th of July; but the pro- 
gress of the disease was so rapid that he did not rally, but passed 
away on the 5th of August, at the age of 27. 



107 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1874. 

William Richardson LTpham, eldest son of Dr. George B. 
and Sarah B. Upliam, was born in Brunswick, Me., April 2, 
]852. His parents removed in 1853 to Yonkers, N. Y., his resi- 
dence for the^-est of his life. 

In the Scientific School he took the course preparatory to medi- 
*cine, and upon graduation entered the Bellevue Hospital Medical 
College in New York City, but after a year there went to Europe, 
where he studied in Paris and traveled extensively. Returning 
to New York, he became a pupil of the late Dr. James R. Wood, 
took his degree at the Medical College in 1877, and was House 
Surgeon in Bellevue Hospital for eighteen months. Thence he 
went to Yonkers, where he began practice with his father, and 
was so employed at the time of his death there. May 24, 1882, in 
his 31st year. He was not married. 

* 

John Charles Weber, second son of John H. and Caroline C. 
Weber, was born in Como, Illinois, Oct. 5, 1851, and removed 
with his parents to New York City in 1867. In the same year he 
entered the scientific department of Williston Seminary, East- 
hampton, Mass., and on his graduation in 1870 made for the 
second time a short tour of the continent of Europe, Return- 
ing in 1871 he entered the Scientific School, where he pursued 
the course in Civil Engineering. 

On graduation he was offered a clerkship in the Ninth Na- 
tional Bank of New York City, and was twice promoted within 
four months to more responsible positions, but after one year 
failing health compelled him to resign. Pie spent the next year 
in Colorado, and then traveled for about eighteen months in 
Europe. He then again, by the advice of his physicians, visited 
Colorado, and also Southern California, where his health finally 
broke down in the early spring of 1881. He arqved at his home 
in New York City on the 2d of July, and died, in the full as- 
surance of the same Christian faith which had ruled his whole 
life, on the I7th of the following month, in the 30th year of his 
age. He was unmarried. 



8XJ]Vr]VI_A.RY. 



Academical Department. 



'Class. Name and Age. 

1806 Seth Pierce, 96, 

1814 Samuel B. Ruggles, 82, 

1816 James A. Fox, 87, 

1817 Lvman Coleman, 85, 

1819 Joshua Coit, 81, 

1820 Leonard Bacon, 80, 

1820 Walter Edwards. 80, 

1821 Adam L. Alexander, 79, 

1821 John Boyd. 82, 

1822 Giles Taintor, 79, 
1824 John T. Adams, 76, 
1824 Hiram P. Arms, 83, 
1824 James M. Huntting, 83, 

1824 Origen S. Sejimour, 77, 

1825 Thomas H. Bond, 78, 

1825 William FuTler, 80. 

1826 Henry Cowles, 78, 
1826 Charles Rockwell, 75, 
1826 James A. Smith, 75, 

1826 Ephraim T. Sturtevant, 78, 

1827 Walter H. Bid well. 83, 
1827 Samuel Lee, 78, 

1827 Charles C. Parraelee, 73, 

1829 Alhson A. Pettengill, 73, 

1830 John R. Murray, 70, 

1831 H. Gold Rogers, 71, 

1832 Henry T. Bulkiey, 68, 
1832 Charles Dickson, 72, 
1832 Horace B. Gould, 69, 
1832 JohnF. Hoff, 68, 
1832 Isaac W. Plummer, 68, 
1832 Peter A. Van Bergen, 69, 
1834 Oliver B. Bid well, 71, 

1834 James A. Clark, 73, 

1835 Aaron C. Beach, 75, 

1836 Oscar Fisher, 70, 

1837 Henry H. Bacot, 64, 
1837 Frederick W. Gunn, 65, 
1837 John P. Putnam, 64, 

1837 Ebenezer P. Rogers, 64, 

1838 R. Bethell Claxton, 67, 
1838 Lemuel T. Downing, 67, 
1840 Enoch L. Childs, 73, 
1840 John B. Gardiner, 60, 
1844 Christopher Gushing, 61, 
1 844 William F. Miller, 59, 
1844 Edward W. Root, 62, 



Place and 
Cornwall, Conn,, 
Fire Island, Islip, N. Y., 
Bovina, Miss., 
Easton, Pa., 
New Haven, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn., 
New York City, 
Augusta, Ga,, 
Winchester, Conn., 
New York City, 
Norwich, Conn., 
Norwich, Conn., 
Jamaica, N. Y., 
Litchfield, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Delphos, 0., 
Janes ville. Wise, 
Albany, N. Y., 
Unionville. Conn., 
Cleveland, 0., 
Saratoga, N. Y., 
New Ipswich. N. H., 
Lansingburgh, N. Y., 
Bridgeport, Conn., 
Mount Morris, N. Y.,r 
Lancaster, Pa., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Quenerao, Kan., 
St. Simon's Island, Ga., 
Baltimore, Md., 
Norwich. Conn., 
Flushing, N. Y., 
Jersey City, N. J., 
Ridgefield, N. J., 
East Haddam, Conn., 
West Woodstock, Conn, 
Society Hill, S. C, 
Washington, Conn., 
Boston. Mass., 
Montclair, N. J., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Columbus, Ga., 
Henniker, N. H., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Cambridge, Mass., 
Buffalo, N. Y., 
Schenectady, N. Y., 



Date of Death. 
Aug. 6, '81. 
Aug. 28, '81. 
July 1, '81. 
March 16, '82. 
Oct. 8, '81. 
Dec, 24, '81. 
Apr. 29, '82. 
Apr. 9, '82. 
Dec. 1, '81. 
March 7, '82. 
March 30, '82. 
Apr. 6, '82. 
May 14, '82. 
Aug. 12, '81.. 
May 27, '82. 
Oct. 3. '81. 
Sept. 7, '81. 
Apr. 17, '82.. 
Apr. 15, '82. 
Dec. 12, '81. 
Sept. 11, '81.. 
Aug 27, '81. 
Feb. 8, '82. 
Jan. 17, '82. 
Nov. 1, '81. 
March 19, '82. 
Oct. 28, '81. 
July 5, '81. 
Apr. 7, '81. 
Dec. 18, '81. 
June 28, '81. 
June 25, '81. • 
Aug. 5, '81. 
July ], '81. 
July 30, '81, 
May 7, '82. 
Apr, 29, '82, 
Aug. 16. '81, 
Jan, 5, '82. 
Oct, 22, '81. 
May 24, '82. 
March 24, '82. 
Sept. 8, '81. 
Sept. 11, '81. 
Oct. 23, '81. 
July 28, '81. 
Apr. 25, '82. 



109 



Class. Name and Age. 

1847 John C. Burch, 53, 

1847 Charles F. Sauford, 54, 

1850 William E. Bassett, 62, 

1850 Franklin Shaw, 53, 

1850 Lucian S. Wilcox, 55, 

1 853 Delano A. Goddard, 50, 

1855 Henry A. Yardlej, 47, 

1858 Sheldon Goodwin, 45, 

1860 Joseph L. Taintor, 46, 

1861 Webster Park, 44, 
1863 Frederick F. Harral, 39, 
1865 Allen McLean, 44, 

1868 William A. Hamilton, 34, 

1869 Lewis E. Condict, 33, 

1871 Edmund L. Pettingill, 31, 

1872 Pascal Martin, 31, 
1874 George F. Doughty, 29, 

1874 C. Edward Humphrey, 28, 

1875 William S. Fulton, 28, 
1878 Walter E. Dimmick. 25, 
1881 Arthur H. Ripley, 24, 



Place and 
Washington, D. C, 
New York City, 
Norfolk, Conn., 
New Orleans, La., 
Hartford, Conn., 
Boston, Mass., 
Middletown, Conn., 
Morristown, N. J., 
Bloomingdale, N. Y. 
Norwich, Conn., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Jacksonville, Fla., 
Minneapolis, Minn., 
Newark, N. J., 
Hancock, N. Y., 
Chinkiang, China, 
Cincinnati, 0., 
Englewood, N. J., 
Pittsburgh, Pa., 
New York City, 
Cambridge, Mass., 



Date of Death. 
July 28, '81. 
Oct. 21, '81. 
Nov. 6, '81. 
May 8, '82. 
Nov. 2.5, '81. 
Jan. 11, '82. 
Apr. 3, '82. 
Nov. 15, '81. 
Sept. 1, '81. 
Dec. 28, '81. 
July 5, '81. 
Apr. 21, '82. 
Oct. 21, '81. 
July 12, '81. 
Aug. 16, '81. 
March 5, '82. 
May 25, '82. 
Dec. 7, '81. 
Apr. 20, '81. 
Jan. 16, '82. 
May 21, '82. 



Medical Department. 



1825 Ira Hutchinson, 81, 

1834 David H. Nash, 71, 

1842 Edward P. Lyman, 61, 

1858 J. Martin Aimes, 53, 

1859 J. Hamilton Lee, 44, 
1879 George H. Hammond, 25, 



Cromwell, Conn., 
Bridgeport, Conn., 
New Preston, Conn., 
Orange, Conn., 
Killingworth, Conn., 
New York City, 



Aug. 8, '81. 
May 24, '82. 
Apr. 4, '82. 
Oct. 26, '81. 
Oct. 8, '81. 
May 18. '81. 



Law Department. 



1850 Tompkins Westervelt, 52. 
1876 Cornelius Sleight, 27, 



New Brighton, N. Y. 
Sag Harbor, N. Y., 



Apr. 20, '82. 
Aug. 5, '81. 



Sheffield Scientific School. 



1874 William R. Upham, 30, 
1874 John C. Weber, 30, 



Yonkers, N. Y., 
New York City, 



May 24, '82. 
Aug. 17, '81. 



• The number of deaths above given is 78, and the average age of the graduates 
of the Academical Department is QS^ years. 



The oldest living graduates are — 
Class of 1813, Rev. David L. Hunn, of Buffalo, N. Y., born Nov. 5, 1789; 
" " Rev. George Allen, of Worcester, Mass., born Feb. 1, 1792; 

Rev. Leonard Withington, of Newburyport, Mass., born Aug. 9, 

1789; 
George Hooker, M.D , of Longmeadow, Mass., born March 17, 
179.3. 




1814, 



INDEX 



Class. Page. 

1824 Adams. John T 71 

1858 w Aimes, J. Martin 104 

1821 Alexander, Adam L 69 

1824 Arms, Hiram P 71 

1820 Bacon, Leonard 67 

1837 Bacot, Henry H 86 

1 850 Bassett, William K 94 

1835 Beach, Aaron C. 85 

1 834 Bidwell, Oliver B 84 

1827 Bidwell, Walter H 78 

1825 Bond, Thomas H 74 

1821 Boyd, John 70 

1832 Bulkley, Henry T 81 

1847 Burch, John C 93 

1840 Childs, Enoch L.... 90 

1834 Clark, James A... 84 

1838 Claxton, R. Bethell... 89 

1819 Coit, Joshua 66 

1817 Coleman, Lyman.. 65 

1869 Condict, Lewis E 99 

1826 Cowles, Heury... 75 

1844 Cushing, Christopher 91 

1832 Dickson, Charles 81 

1878 Dimmick, Walter E ...102 

1874 Doug:hty, George F 100 

1838 Downing, Lemuel T 90 

1 820 Edwards, Walter 69 

1836 Fisher, Oscar .86 

1816 Fox, James A 64 

1825 Fuller, William 74 

1875 . Fulton, William S 101 

1840 Gardiuer, John B 90 

1853 Goddard, Delano A 95 

1858 Goodwin, Sheldon.. 97 

1832 Gould, Horace B 82 

1837 Gunn, Frederick W... 87 

1868 Hamilton, William A 99 

1879 m Hammond, George H.,. ...105 
1863 Harral, Frederick F. 98 



Class. Page. 

1832 Hoff, John F 82 

1874 Humphrey, C. Edward 101 

1824 Huntting, James M 72 

1825 m Hutchinson, Ira 102 

1859 w Lee, J. Hamilton. 104 

1827 Lee, Samuel-. 79 

1 842 m Lyman, Edward P 104 

1865 McLean, Allen 98 

1872 Martin, Pascal 100 

1844 Miller, Wimam F. 92 

1830 Murray, John R 80 

1834 m Nash, David H .103 

1861 Park, Webster... ...98 

1827 Parmalee, Charles C - 80 

1829 Pettengill, Alhson A . 80 

1871 Pettiagill, Edmund L .100 

1806 Pierce, Seth 63 

1832 Plummer, Isaac W 83 

1837 Putnam, John P. ..87 

1881 Ripley, Arthur H 102 

1826 Rockwell, Charles ...76 

1 837 Rogers, Etjenezer P 87 

1831 Rogers, H. Gold ..81 

1 844 Root, Edward W _ 92 

1814 Ruggles, Samuel B 63 

1847 Sanford, Charles F 94 

1824 Seymour, Origen S. 73 

1850 Shaw, Frankhn 95 

1876 I Sleight, Cornelius 106 

1826 Smith, James A 77 

1826 Sturtevant, Ephraim T 77 

1822 Taintor, Giles... 70 

1860 Taintor, Joseph L 97 

1874 p Upham, WiUiam R 107 

1832 Van Bergen, Peter A 83 

1874 j) Weber, John C 107 

1850 / Westervelt, Tompkins 105 

1850 Wilcox, Lucian S 95 

1855 Yardley, Henry A 96 




OBITUARY RECORD 

OP 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 

June, IS 83. 

Including- the Kecord of a pew who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

[PRESENTED AT THE MEETISfG OF THE ALIMM, JUNE 26th, 1883.] 

[No. 3 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 42 of the whole Record.] 



TuTTLE, Morehouse & Taylor, Printers. 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical year ending in 

June, 1883. 

Including the record a few who died previously, hitherto unreported, 

[Presented at the Meeting op the Alumni, June 26th, 1883.] 
[No. 3 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 42 of the whole Record.] 






ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 
1813. 

George Allen, son of the Hon. Joseph Allen, M. C, and 
grandson of a sister of the Revohitionary leader, Samuel Adams, 
was born in Worcester, Mass., February 1, 1'792. 

After graduation he studied theology with the Rev. Dr. Andrew 
Yates (Y. C. 1794), of Schenectady, and spent some years in home 
missionary worli in the new settlements of Western New York. 
On the 19th of November, 1823, he was ordained colleague pastor 
of the Congregational Church in Shrewsbury, an adjoining town 
to his native place. By the decease of the senior pastor a year 
later, he was left in sole charge of the parish, and so remained 
until dismissed in 1839 on account of failing eyesight, with cor- 

ial attestations to his fidelity and success. He then removed to 

orcester, and for more than seventeen years from October, 

1840, officiated as chaplain at the State Lunatic Hospital,* con- 

ucting a daily service. He laid down this duty at the age of ^^^ 
and subsequently undertook no regular professional work, but 
lived in retirement, though retaining an active interest in public 
affairs and assisting to further many moral and political refonns. 
His mental and physical powers were unimpaired, except by the 
gradual failure of his sight, until at the age of 90 he fractured a 



114 

thigh by a fall on the ice. His great enjoyment in bis later years 
was in reading and study, and in communicating to others his 
stores of knowledge concerning the past. He died from an at- 
tack of pneumonia, in Worcester, March 31, 1883, aged 91 years 
and 2 months. 

He married in 1814 Eliza, daughter of Elisha Pitkin, of Enfield, 
Conn., who died many years before him. Their three children 
are all deceased, — the eldest having been a graduate of this Col- 
lege in the Class of 1838. 

1816. 

William Tkacy Gould, son of Judge James Gould (Y. C. 
1791) and Sally McCurdy Tracy, daughter of the Hon. Uriah 
Tracy (Y. C. 1778), was born in Litchfield, Conn,, October 25, 
1799, and entered College at the very early age of thirteen. 

Immediately upon graduation he began to read law in his 
father's Law School in Litchfield, and was admitted to the bar on 
arriving at the age of 21. In 1821 he settled in Clinton, in the 
central part of Georgia, and in June, 1823, he removed to the 
city of Augusta, in the same State, where the rest of his life was 
spent, and where he ranked for forty years with the best lawyers 
of the community. He opened a Law School in Augusta in 1840, 
and maintained it with good success until it was interrupted by 
the affliction caused by the death of his eldest son in 1854. He 
declined to enter political life, but accepted in 1851 an election 
to the judgeship of the City Court of Augusta, and discharged 
the duties of that office with eminent ability for fifteen years. 
In this position, as in his earlier career, he was honored by the 
profession for his learning and courtesy and esteemed by all 
classes with whom he came in contact. 

A severe fall several months before his death fractured a hip 
bone and confined him to a bed of sufi'ering, until his final release 
on the 18th of July, 1882, when he had nearly comj^leted his 83d 
year. 

H^was married, October 7, 1824, to Mrs. Anna McKinne, the 
widowed daughter of James Gardner, Esq., of Augusta. She 
died October 6, 1860, having borne him two sons (the elder a 
graduate of this College in the Class of 1845) and one daughter. 
He was again married, September 20, 1864, to Miss Virginia H., 
daughter of Wimberly J. Hunter, Esq., of Savannah, who sur- 
vives him with several children. 



115 



1817. 



LoAMMi Ives Hoadly, son of Rufus and Obedience (Stevens) 
Hoadly, was born in Northford, a parish in North Branford (then 
part of Branford), Conn., October 25, 1*790. 

He took the regular three years' course at the Theological 
Seminary in Andover, Mass., directly after graduation, and re- 
mained for a fourth year as resident licentiate on a scholarship 
foundation. In 1822 he began to preach to the Calvinist (now 
Center) Church in Worcester, Mass., then newly organized ; and 
on the 15tli of October, 1823, he was ordained their pastor. The 
loss of health (from disease of the lungs) caused his dismission, 
December 9, 1829, and he spent the next few months in Andover, 
as assistant in the department of Sacred Rhetoric. He was again 
settled in the ministry, October 15, 1830, over the First Congre- 
gational Church in Bradford, Mass. ; but his health not allowing 
him to remain, he withdrew from this charge late in 1832 and re- 
moved to Charlestown, Mass., where he resided until the spring 
of 1844, engaged in literary work. He edited the last volume of 
"The Spirit of the Pilgrims," and assisted Dr. Jenks in preparing 
the " Comprehensive Commentary." He next removed to his 
native place, where he kept a family school. Finding that he 
could bear public speaking again, he undertook in September, 
1850, the supply of the Congregational church in Orono, Me., 
where he continued for three years ; he was then similarly em- 
ployed in Auburn, Mass., from February, 1854, to January, 1857. 
In August, 1858, he went to Craftsbury, Vt., where he acted as 
pastor of the Congregational Church for over seven years. Hav- 
ing then reached the age of 75, he retired from active labor and 
spent the evening of life partly in New Haven (1867-74) and 
partly with his married daughters. He died .of old age, in Shel- 
ton, apart of Huntington, Conn., March 21, 1883, aged 92 years 
and 5 months. 

He married, September 22, 1824, Lydia Smith, of Northford, 
a sister of the Rev. Dr. Eli Smith (Y. C. 1821); she died July 19, 
1871. One son and two daughters survive him. 

Peter Lockwood, son of Lambert and Elizabeth (Roe) Lock- 
wood, was born in Bridgeport, Conn., February 8, 1798. He 
spent the three years next after graduation in the Theological 



I 



116 

Seminary at Andover, Mass., and after another year passed at his 
home in Bridgeport, was ordained as an evangelist, August 15, 
1821, by the Fairfield West Association of Ministers, and labored 
as a home missionary for two winters in Virginia. He was 
married, October 2, 1822, to Matilda, youngest daughter of the 
Hon. John Davenport (Y. C. 1770), of Stamford, Conn., and had 
his first permanent settlement, as home missionary and teacher, 
in Peekskill, N. Y. In the summer of 1827 he received an urgent 
call to become colleague pastor of the First Presbyterian Church 
in Binghamton, N. Y., and was accordingly installed there, 
December 5, 1827. After the death of the senior pastor, in July, 
1828, he continued in sole charge of the church for five years 
longer — years of wonderful energy on his part, and of great 
increase to the church. From 1834 to 1837 he taught a select 
classical school in Binghamton, and then served for five years 
as stated supply of the church in Cortlandville, N. Y. From 
April, 1843, until 1848, he preached in Berkshire, Tioga County, 
N. Y., and then on account of failing health returned to Bing- 
hamton, where he resided in honored retirement for the rest of 
his life. He died there, November 16, 1882, in his 85th year. 
His wife survives him, with one son and three daughters. Two 
sons died in infancy ; another, the oldest child, of whom a 
memoir by his father was published, died while a Freshman in 
Yale College. 

A small volume of interesting Memorials of his life and work, 
has been printed by his children. 



1821. 

Erastus Maltby, son of Benjamin and Rebecca (Tainter) 
Maltby, was born in Northford, a parish in North Branford, 
Conn., December 2, 1796. 

After graduating he took the full course of three years in the 
Theological Seminary in Andover, Mass., and was ordained at 
Andover as an evangelist, September 29, 1824, with the expecta- 
tion of laboring as a home missionary at the West. Accordingly 
he preached for some months in Marietta, O., but then decided to 
return to the East. In September, 1825, he began to supply the 
vacant pulpit of the Trinitarian Church in Taunton, Mass., organ- 
ized four years before ; he was called in November to the pas- 
torate, and was installed there, Jan. 18, 1826. He remained in 



117 

active service until September, 1870, and as pastor emeritus until 
his death, which occurred, of old age, after several years of failing 
power, in Taunton, March 28, 1883, in his 87th year. He was so 
indefatigable in the discharge of pastoral duties, and so efficient 
as an administrator, that the growth of the church under his 
leadership was remarkable, while his sincere character commanded 
universal respect. He also rendered long and valuable service to 
the town in matters of education and general welfare. 

He married, September 7, 1826, Almira, daughter of Caleb 
Smith, of East Haven, Conn., who died December 8, 1876. They 
had two sons and four daughters, of whom only one daughter and 
one son survive. 

Edward Augustus Strong, third son of Benjamin and Sarah 
(Weeks) Strong, of New York, was born in that city, June 17, 
1803, and died, after a brief illness, at Southampton, L. I., where 
he was sojourning temporarily for his health, September 14, 1882, 
in his 80th year. 

After leaving College he engaged in mercantile pursuits for a 
number of years in New York City, but subsequently removed 
to Newark, N. J., and became secretary and director of the 
Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company of that city, and so con- 
tinued for upwards of twenty years. 

He married, October 5, 1831, Marianne, daughter of Mr. Ralph 
Clay, of Savannah, Ga., who died in 1876. Their children, one 
son and two daughters, survive them. 

1823. 

Edward William Pket, son of William and Jemima (Dar- 
row) Peet, was born in Bridgeport, Conn., February 19, 1804. 
He graduated from the General Theological Seminary (Protestant 
Episcopal) in June, 1827, was ordained Deacon by Bishop 
Brownell, in Bridgeport, on September 2, 1827, and was ordained 
Priest by Bishop Moore, in Richmond, Va., on Christmas day, 
1828. 

From 1827 to 1830 he was engaged in ministerial duties in 
King George County, Va., and from 1830 to 1833 was Rector of 
St. John's Church in Richmond in that State. From 1833 to 1841 
he was Rector of St. Paul's Church, Chillicothe, Ohio. In 1843 
he organized and became the first Rector of St. Paul's Church, 
Rahway, N. J., where he remained until 1855, when he removed 
to Des Moines, Iowa, where he founded and took charge of St. 



118 

Paul's Church in that place. While in this position he rendered 
valuable services of a missionary character, establishing churches 
at Oskaloosa, Council Bluflfs, and other places in Iowa. 

In 1866 he resigned his charge at Des Moines, and in 1867 ac- 
cepted a call to the church at Holyoke, Mass., where he remained 
until January, 1872. From 1873 to 1880 he was assistant minis- 
ter at St. George's Church, New York City. 

On June 30th, 1834, he married Sarah, daughter of Hon. 
William Creighton, of Chillicothe, Ohio, by whom he had seven 
sons, one of whom died in infancy, and another in 1864, while in 
the Union army. His wife died June 7, 1881. He died at Crom- 
well, Conn., August 17, 1882, in his 79th year. 

He received the degree of Doctor in Divinity from Kenyon 
College in 1859. 

Charles Stetson, third son of the Hon. Simeon and Elizabeth 
(Kidder) Stetson, was born in New Ipswich, N. H., November 7, 
1801. His father soon removed to Hampden, Me., from which 
place the son entered College. 

After graduation he returned to Hampden, where and in Ban- 
gor he studied law with Hon. Enoch Brown and John Godfrey, 
Esq., and then opened a law office and practiced until 1833) 
when he removed to Bangor (six miles distant) and there con" 
tinned the pursuit of his profession. In 1834 he was appointed 
Judge of the Municipal Court, just established on the incorpora- 
tion of Bangor as a city. In 1839 he resigned this office to accept 
the position of Clerk of the Courts of Penobscot County, in 
which he continued for several years. He was for two terms 
(from 1845) a member of the Governor's Council, and filled nu- 
merous positions of trust in the city of his residence. In 1848 he 
was elected to the Thirty-First Congress, as a Democrat, and 
served for one term. After the close of his Congressional service 
he withdrew from his profession and devoted himself to the care 
of his large private estate. He was, however, to the end of his 
life active in many of the business interests of the city and State 
and was esteemed as one of the most prominent and respected 
residents of Bangor. From the formation of the Republican 
party he acted with that political organization. He died in Ban- 
gor, March 27, 1883, in his 82d year. 

He married Emily J., daughter of Waldo Pierce, of Frankfort,^ 
Me., who survives him with three sons and five daughters ; one 
fion is a graduate of this College in the Class of 1855. 



119 



1825. 



Charles Ely, son of Justin and Lucy (Barrow) Ely, of West 
Springfield, Mass., was born in that town December 21, 1805. 

On leaving College he married Harriet, daughter of James. 
Kent, of West Springfield, and entered on a business life in his 
native town. After his wife's death he removed to New York 
City and was extensively engaged in the dry goods trade as a 
member of the firm of Merritt, Ely & Co. After his retirement 
from business he was much interested in charitable enterprises in 
New York, especially in the Sailors' Home and the Five Points 
House of Industry. 

He died at his residence in New York, February 10, 1883, in 
his Y8th year. 

His second wife, Eliza A., a daughter of General Timothy 
Upham, of Charlestown, Mass., survives him with two sons and 
three daughters. 

Sanford Lawton, son of John and Mary Lawton, was born in 
Dudley, Mass., Dec. 11, 1798, and lived there until he was eight 
years old, when his family removed to Hardwick, Mass., where his. 
youth was spent upon his father's farm. 

After graduation he studied theology for two years in the Yale 
Divinity School, and was ordained an evangelist at North Bran- 
ford, Conn., October 15, 1828. He preached for a year in Barre, 
Mass., and then served as principal for three years of the academy 
in his native town. From 1832 to 1835 he had charge of the 
Monson (Mass.) Academy, and in 1836 he established a private 
school for boys in Springfield, Mass. This he continued success- 
fully until 1852, when he removed his school to Longmeadow, the 
southern suburb of Springfield. He continued to teach until 
1862, and retained his residence at Longmeadow until 1874. He 
then returned to Springfield and made his home with his son (Y. 
C. 1852). 

He outlived his son for a little more than three months and died 
of old age, at the family residence, November 7, 1882, aged nearly 
84 years. 

He was married, December 4, 1828, to Mary Ann Colton, of 
Longmeadow, who died January 5, 1880. His four children all 
died before him. 



120 



1826. 



Sylvester Dana, son of Anderson and Sarah (Stevens) Dana,, 
was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., May 28, 1806. His parents both 
came from Connecticut in their youth to this place, and the father 
of each was slain in the battle of Wyoming, July 3, 1778. 

He entered College at the beginning of the Sophomore year, and 
after graduating spent two years in reading law with Judge Garrick 
Mallery (Y. C. 1808) of Wilkes-Barre. He -was admitted to the 
bar in 1828, and the same year went to Ohio, where he conducted 
for two years the academy at Worthington, near Columbus ; hav- 
ing then been admitted to practice in the courts of the State, he 
removed to Circleville, and entered into a law-partnership with 
G. W. Doane, Esq., which continued for about four years, during 
a portion of which time he edited a paper called The Olive Branch. 
His health failing, he was advised to return to Wilkes-Barre, and 
in 1835 he became the principal of the Academy there, which 
position he held until 1839, when he built a private academy of 
his own, called the Wyoming Boarding School, which he conduc- 
ted successfully, in connection with the adjoining farm, until 
October, 1866, when he removed to Bucks County, near Morris- 
ville, directly opposite Trenton, N. J., where he was occupied 
with farming and with his interest in the Morrisville Rubber 
Works, of which he was principal owner. In the latter part of 
July, 1879, he had an attack of paralysis, from which, however, he 
mainly recovered. He died, at his place near Morrisville, on the 
19th of June, 1882, after an attack of pneumonia, in his 77th year. 

In the spring of 1832 he married Miss Elizabeth Brown, of 
Worthington, O., who died in February, 1878. Their children are 
all living at the family homestead, four daughters and one son, — 
the latter a graduate of the Jefferson Medical College in Phila- 
delphia. 

Charles Goddard, son of Dr. John Goddard, was born in 
Portsmouth, N. H., September 15, 1797. His mother was Mary, 
daughter of the Rev. Samuel Langdon, D.D., President of Har- 
vard College from 1774 to 1780. 

After graduation he studied at first with a view to the ministry, 
but abandoned this design on account of a weakness of the 
throat. Afterwards he engaged in teaching in Boston ; but soon 



1^1 

became the first principal of the Abbot Academy at Andover, 
Mass. In 1842 he accepted a responsible position in the office of 
the Boston & Lowell Railroad corporation, and was there em- 
ployed for twenty-four years, during about eighteen of which he 
was cashier of that and several connecting roads. In January, 
1866, he fell upon the ice and broke his hip, which made him 
an invalid for the last seventeen years of his life. He died at 
his residence in Brookline, Mass., January 29, 1883, in his 86th 
year. 

He was married in 1830 to Caroline A. LeRow, of Boston, by 
whom he had two sons and two daughters. In 1845 he was mar- 
ried to Elizabeth Goddard, of Brookline, who survives him, as do 
also his daughters. 

Throughout life his uprightness and gentleness commanded in 
a marked degree the love and respect of all his associates. 

1827. 

Silas Mix, the son of William and Lucy (Benham) Mix, was 
born in New Haven, Conn., in 1808. 

Upon graduation he entered the law school in New Haven, where 
he continued until the autumn of 1829, when he was admitted to 
the bar in his native city. Soon after he entered the office of the 
Hon. Nathan Smith, then at the head of the profession, and at once 
stepped into a large and valuable practice, with as fair promise 
for the future as any lawyer of his age in the State. He mingled 
also assiduously in politics, and perhaps the asperities of such 
conflicts acting on a nervous temperament tended to unsettle his 
mind. In 1832 and again in 1833 he represented New Haven in 
the General Assembly, and in the latter year was appointed Ex- 
ecutive Secretary of Governor Edwards. 

After a gradual loss of business, owing to his increasing mood- 
iness and irritability, traces of insanity began to show themselves, 
and about 1850 he was taken to the Retreat for the Insane in 
Hartford, where he was confined until his death, August 19, 1882, 
at the age of 74. 

He was never married. 

1828. 
Joseph Lyman, the eldest of thirteen children of the Hon. 
Jonathan H. Lyman (Y. C. 1802) and Sophia (Hinckley) Lyman, 
was born in Northampton, Mass., July 14, 1809. He entered 



122 

Williams College in 1823, but left there two years later, and be- 
came a member of this Coljege in 1826. 

After" graduation he studied law for one year with the Hon. 
Lewis Strong, of Northampton, and then with the Hon. Jonathaa 
Sloane, of Ravenna, Ohio. He" practiced his profession for some 
years in Ravenna, and afterwards in Cleveland, in the same 
State, where he was engaged in business as a general commission 
merchant and land agent. About 1865, having acquired a com- 
petence, he removed to Englewood, N, J., where he thenceforth 
resided, not concerned in any active business. 

He died suddenly, of heart disease, while on a train on the 
Metropolitan Elevated Railroad, in New York city, July 11, 1882, 
at the age of 73. 

He was married, May 25, 1836, to Mary A., daughter of Oliver 
Clarke, of Atwater, Ohio, who survived him, and died in March, 
1883. Their three sons — the eldest of whom was graduated at 
this College in 1861 — are still living. An only daughter died in 
infancy. 

1829. 

Leverett Griggs was the youngest of six children of Stephen- 
and Elizabeth (Lathrop) Griggs, and was born in Tolland, Conn., 
November 11, 1808. 

For a year after graduation he was engaged in teaching in 
Mount Hope Seminary, near Baltimore. He then spent two 
years in the Theological Seminary in Andover, Mass., finishing his 
course in the Yale Divinity School, while occupied as a Tutor in 
College (1832-33). 

He was ordained and installed pastor of the Congregational 
church in North Haven, Conn., October 30, 1833, and was dis- 
missed from that place, July 30, 1845, to accept the pastorate of 
the Chapel Street Church in New Haven, over which he was in- 
stalled one week later. His suifenngs from asthma obliging him 
to leave the sea-board, he took a dismission from his parish on the 
6th of September, 1847, and was installed on the 22d of the same 
month, over the Second Church in Millbury, Mass. In February, 
1856, he resigned at Millbury, and was installed pastor of the 
Congregational Church in Bristol, Conn. From this charge he 
was dismissed, December 15, 1869, his health having utterly 
broken down ; but his residence continued in Bristol till his death. 
From May, 1870, until October, 1874, he was able to act as agent 



123 

for the American Education Society, and after this he preached 
occasionally, until disabled by a stroke of paralysis, on the 4th 
^f July, 1881. A second attack, on the 29th of October follow- 
ing, reduced him to a helpless condition in which he lingered until 
his death, in Bristol, January 28th, 1883, at the age of 74. 

He married, August 28, 1833, Catharine, eldest daughter of the 
Hon. Elisha Stearns (Y. C. 1796), of Tolland ; she was the mother 
of three daughters and three sons, and died in Millbury, Mass., 
March 10, 1848. He married, November 30, 1848, Charlotte A., 
-sister of his former wife, by whom he had one son and three 
daughters. The eldest son, a graduate of Amherst College in 
1860, follows his father's profession ; the second son died a sol- 
dier in the Union Army. 

Of a singularly pure and gentle character, he was greatly 
beloved in the community where he dwelt. The College con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1868. 



1830. 

Edward Hammond, son of Dr. Lloyd T. and Elizabeth (M^rri- 
weather) Hammond, was born at Font Hill, his father's estate 
in Howard County, Md., on March 17,1812. He was prepared 
for College at the age of 14, by Mr. Isaac Sams, at Rock Hill 
Academy, Ellicott City. 

After graduation he began the study of law in New Haven 
under Judges Daggett and Hitchcock, and finished his course in 
the office of the late Reverdy Johnson, of Baltimore. He was 
admitted to the bar of Maryland in 1833, and established himself 
in Annapolis. He soon acquired reputation as a safe, conscien- 
tious, and reliable counselor, and had a large and lucrative prac- 
tice in the State. His career was much impeded, however, by 
ill health from his youth, and especially by attacks of inflammation 
of the eyes. He was elected to the State Legislature sevetal 
times, and in 1849 resigned his seat in the State Senate to go 
to Congress. He served in the House of Representatives from 
1849 to 1853. In the latter year his eyesight becoming much 
impaired, he abandoned the practice of law and devoted himself 
to the active and successful management of his farm inherited 
from his father. 

At the outbreak of the late war, he warmly espoused and advo- 
<=cated the cause of the Union, and in 1862 consented to serve in 



124 

the State Legislature, and again in 1867, being elected to the 
latter by the then newly formed Democratic Conservative Con- 
vention. In 1867 he was also elected to a judgeship, and was 
completing the terra of fifteen years, when stricken with paraly- 
sis. After a painless illness of ten days, he passed quietly away 
at the home in which he was born and had always lived, on Octo- 
ber 19, 1882, in the 71st year of his age. 

Mr. Hammond was held in high esteem for both moral and 
intellectual qualities ; his career as a judge was distinguished by 
the clearness and correctness of his decisions, as well as by his 
uniform courtesy and conscientious diligence. 

He was married, June 2, 1842, to Mary Catherine, second 
daughter of the late George Mackubin, of Annapolis, long the 
treasurer of the State, who survives him with three sons and 
three daughters. 

Richard Athil Udall, the only son of Dr. Richard and Pru- 
dence (Carll) Udall, was born in Islip, Long Island, New York^ 
May 11, 1811. 

He studied law with his brother-in-law, Judge Selah B. Strong 
(Y. C. 1811), of Setauket, L. I.; but his father's advanced age 
and dependence upon him prevented his entering on practice. He 
spent his life in Islip, and on three occasions (in 1842, 1846, and 
1866) represented with credit his district in the State Assembly. 
His inclinations and tastes led him, however, to prefer the com- 
forts of his home life to the exertions and contests involved in 
seeking political or professional advancement. General Udall (as 
he was universally called) was eminently social and hospitable, 
and enjoyed vigorous health throughout his life ; he became 
blind, however, in 1875, but operations for cataract were per- 
formed on both eyes in January, 1876, and his sight restored. He 
had a stroke of paralysis and apoplexy combined, on March 29^ 
1883, from the effects of which he died two days later, in his 72d 
year, in the village of Babylon, in Islip. 

He left two daughters by his first marriage with Miss Hannah 
Willets. 

He was married for a second time, February 5, 1845, to Marie 
Antoinette, eldest daughter of Timothy P. jCarll, of Babylon, who 
survives him, with one son and one daughter. 



125 



1831. 



Lyman Hotchkiss Atwater, second son of Lyman and 
Clarissa (Hotchkiss) Atwater, was born at Cedar Hill, then in 
Hamden, but now included in the town of New Haven, Conn.^ 
February 23, 1813. 

For the year after leaving College he was occupied in teaching 
in Mount Hope Seminary, near Baltimore, Md., and then began 
the study of theology in the Yale Divinity School. In the fall of 
1833 he became a tutor in the College, but continued to prosecute 
his theological studies, and on leaving the tutorship was ordained^ 
July 29, 1835, pastor of the First Congregational Church in Fair- 
field, Conn. He began in 1840 to contribute to the Princeton 
Review^ and the mental power shown in his articles, with the 
stand which he took in Connecticut in opposition to the theolog- 
ical views of Dr. Taylor, Dr. Bushuell, and others, brought him 
to the notice of the College at Princeton, which in 1851 conferred 
on him the degree of Doctor of Divinity, and in 1854 called him 
to the chair of Mental and Moral Philosophy. In September, 
1854, he was dismissed from his parish and entered on his new 
duties. In 1863 the Presbyterian General Assembly elected him 
to a Professorship in the Western Theological Seminary, at Alle- 
gheny, Pa., but he did not accept the appointment. From 1869 
the chair which he held included Logic, Metaphysics, Ethics, 
Economics, and Political Science. He was also from 1869 to 1878 
the principal editor of the Princeton Review^ and from 1860 till 
his death was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Theolog- 
ical Seminary, and vice-president of the Board from 1876. He 
wrote largely for periodicals, and published in 1867 a Manual of 
Elementary Logic. After serving the College with singular devo- 
tion and fidelity for nearly thirty years, he died in Princeton, 
February 17, 1883, at the age of 70. He had suffered for fourteen 
years from diabetes, and in October, 1882, had an attack of pneu- 
monia from which he partly rallied, but in the meantime symp- 
toms of heart-disease had developed, which ended in his death. 

He married Susan, daughter of Elihu Sanford, of New Haven, 
who died a few years before him ; three sons (graduates of the 
College of New Jersey) and one daughter survive their parents. 

The degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon him by this 
College in 1873. 



126 

Edward Ingeesoll, youngest son of the Hon. Jonathan Inger- 
soll (Y. C. 1V66) and Grace (Isaacs) Ingersoll, was born in New 
Haven, Conn., November, 26, 1810. 

After having studied divinity, he was admitted to deacon's 
orders in the Protestant Episcopal Church by Bishop Brownell, 
at New Haven, October 18, 1834, and was advanced to the priest- 
hood by the same bishop, November 20, 1835. In the meantime 
he had become rector of St. Andrew's Church, Meriden, Conn.; 
but after only a year's stay he removed to Westport, Conn., 
where he was rector of Christ Church for four years. On the 7th 
of June, 1840, he was instituted rector of Christ Church, Troy, 
N. Y., but resigned in about two years, on account of the unsatis- 
factory financial condition of the parish. In the spring of 1844 
be was elected rector of Trinity Church in Buffalo, N. Y., and 
this position he retained for just thirty years. For the remainder 
of his life he was rector emeritus of his old parish, and acted as 
chaplain of the Church Home for aged women and orphans in the 
«ame city. He was also President of the Standing Committee of 
the Diocese of Western New York, and loved and honored 
wherever known. 

His wife died many years ago, and of a large family of children 
only one daughter is still living. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Hobart Col- 
lege in 1856. 

He died, suddenly, without previous warning, in Buffalo, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1883, in his 73d year. 

Samuel Beach Jones, elder son of Paul T. and Mary L. 
(Beach) Jones, was born, November 23, 1811, in Charleston, S. 
C, where he spent his childhood. He was prepared for College 
at the academy in Morristown, N. J. 

In 1832 he entered the Princeton Theological Seminary, where 
he remained for four years, — taking an extra course of one year 
in addition to the regular course. He was employed for a year 
or two as Assistant Secretary of the Board of Foreign Missions 
in Philadelphia, and was meantime ordained by the Presbytery 
of New Brunswick, October 4, 1837. In 1838 he became Profes- 
sor of Hebrew and Theology in Oakland College, Claiborne 
County, Mississippi. On the 9th of May, 1839, he was installed 
pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Bridgeton, Cumber- 
land County, New Jersey, and so continued for nearly twenty-five 



127 

years. In 1863 he resigned his charge, and soon after, his sympa- 
thies being southern, he connected himself with the synod of Vir- 
ginia. In 1869 he became the stated supply of the Presbyterian 
Church in Fairton, four miles from Bridgeton, and remained so 
employed until stricken with apoplexy in 1874, at which time his 
active labors ceased. 

The degree of D.D. was conferred upon him in 1851 by Prince- 
ton College, of which he was a Trustee from 1861 till his resigna- 
tion in 1865 ; he was also a Director of the Princeton Theological 
Seminary from 1847 to 1874. 

He died at his residence in Bridgeton, March 19, 1883, in his 
7 2d year. 

He married, in June, 1838, Miss Sarah Ralston, eldest daughter 
of the Rev. Dr. John Chester (Y. C. 1804), of Albany, N. Y., by 
whom he had five sons and three daughters. His widow, four 
sons and a dauo^hter survive him. 



1832. 

Isaac Weltoist Warner, son of Lyman and Annis (Welton) 
Warner, was born in Plymouth, Conn., February 8, 1806. 

He studied theology for two years (1834-36), in the Yale 
Divinity School, and was licensed to preach in 1835 by the Litch- 
field (Conn.) South Association of Ministers. He labored as a 
Home Missionary for»a few years in the Western Reserve, Ohio, 
and in 1845 settled in Williamsburg, now Brooklyn, E. D., N. Y., 
where the rest of his life was spent in teaching and in bible distri- 
bution under the employ of the Brooklyn City Bible Society. He 
died in Brooklyn, April 12, 1883, in his 7Sth year. 

He was married in 1842 to Emily H. Jones, of Huntington, 
Conn. ; and again, in 1860, to Jane Ann Sutphin, of New Bruns- 
wick, N. J. 

1833. 

George Benjamin Hawtley, son of Abram and Alice Hawley, 
was born in Bridgeport, Conn., February 13, 1812, and entered 
College from Watertown, Conn. 

He graduated from the Medical Institution of Yale College in 
1836, and after practicing his profession for a few months in Charl- 
ton, Mass., was appointed assistant physician at the Retreat for 
the Insane in Hartford, Conn., then in charge of Silas Fuller, 

B 



128 

M.D. (Yale 1823), When Dr. Fuller resigned in 1840, Dr. Haw- 
ley also left the institution and began general practice, and on the 
18th day of November, of the same year, he married Zerviah C, 
daughter of Dr. Fuller. 

His career as a physician was a rapidly and continuously suc- 
cessful one. He was the most active promoter of the Hartford 
Hospital, beginning his service as a member of the executive 
committee in February, 1855, and retaining this position till his 
death. He also procured the charter for an Old People's Home 
in Hartford in 1873, and devoted ten years of labor to its suc- 
cessful erection and endowment. For several years before his 
death he was in feeble health, and latterly suffered from nervous 
prostration, resulting from overwork. After more than a year 
spent in the Hartford Hospital, he died there, April 17, 1883, in 
his 72d year. 

His wife died October 20, 1847, leaving one son, who follows 
his father's profession. He soon after married Sarah D., daughter 
of Sherman Boardman, of Hartford, who survives him without 
children. 

1834. 

Allen Hayden Weld, was born in Braintree, Vt., September 
7, 1809, the son of Samuel and Sarah (Hay den) Weld. He was 
obliged to struggle to obtain an education, and from motives of 
economy entered Dartmouth College in 1830, whence he removed 
to this College two years later. 

He spent two years in the Andover Theological Seminary, not, 
however, with the expectation of entering the ministry. He then 
became an assistant teacher in Phillips Academy in Andover, but 
in 1837 was called to take charge of a classical academy in North 
Yarmouth, Maine. During his connection of eleven years with 
this institution he published a successful English Grammar, and 
several other school books. In 1839 he was elected a member of 
the Board of Overseers of Bowdoin College and served during 
his residence in Maine. 

He next taught for a year in Boston, and was then for six years 
principal of the Cumberland Academy in Maryland. He then 
established the Tilden Female Seminary in West Lebanon, Vt., 
but, in 1858, in order to avoid the loss of some investments in 
government lands, romoved to the neighborhood of River Falls, 
Wise, where he spent the rest of his life on a farm, devoting 



129 

much of his time to the interests of popular education and normal 
schools. He died of paralysis of the brain, in Troy, Wisconsin, 
October 18, 1882, at the age of 73. 

He was married, March 7, 1837, to Miss Harriet W., daughter 
of Captain John Wood, of Lebanon, N. H., who survives him 
with one of their two sons. 



1836. 

Edward Spencer Blake, son of Elihu and Elizabeth (Whit- 
ney) Blake, was born in Westborough, Mass., July 12, 1811. 

He studied for two years (1836-38) in the Western Theological 
Seminary, Allegheny, Pa., and was ordained in the Presbyterian 
Church, but the condition of his health kept him from active 
service in the ministry. For a while he applied himself to 
teaching, but found that occupation too confining. About 1848 
he took up and pursued for some time with interest the new art 
of Electrotypy. For upw^ards of thirty years before his death he 
resided in Pittsburgh, Pa., engaged in industrial pursuits. He 
died in Sewickley, Pa., October 26, 1881, at the age of 70. 

He was married in Allegheny, Pa., in September, 1838, to Sarah 
E. Hannen, who survives him. Their children were three sons 
and two daughters ; one of the sons lost his life in the defence of 
his country during the civil war. 

Louis Bristol, son of Judge William Bristol (Y. C. 1798) and 
Sarah (Edwards) Bristol, was born in New Haven, Conn., Decem- 
ber 18, 1814. Reentered College in 1830, but left during the 
Freshman year, to resume his studies a year later. 

He was occupied for five years after graduation as a civil engi- 
neer in the surveys for new railroads in Connecticut, New York, 
and Illinois. He then studied law in the Yale Law School, was 
admitted to the bar in 1843, and settled in New Haven. He 
married, May 29, 1844, Mary D., only daughter of William P. 
Cleaveland, Jr., (Y. C. 1816), of New London, Conn., by whom 
he had three sons and one daughter. In ] 857 the failure of his 
health led him to give up his professional practice, and in 1859 he 
removed to Makanda, a small town in Southern Illinois, where he 
undertook farming and fruit raising, thus securing the reestab- 
lishment of his health. In February, 1 865, his wife obtained a 
divorce, and in January, 1866, he married Augusta, the daughter 



130 

of Col. Otis Cooper, of Croydon, N. H., and formerly the wife of 
Gustavus F. Kimball, of East Canaan, N. H. They resided at 
first in Carbondale, 111., and in 1872 removed to a farm in Vine- 
land, N. J., where he died December 21, 1882, at the age of 68. 

Christopher Christian Cox, son of the Rev. Luther J. and 
Maria C. (Keener) Cox, was born in Baltimore, Md., August 28, 
1816. He entered College, from the Washington schools, at the 
beginning of the Junior year. Before he graduated, he was 
married to Amanda, daughter of Clark Northrop, of New Haven. 

His first intention was to enter on the practice of law, but he 
soon adopted instead the profession of medicine, and after a 
course of study received the degree of M.D. from the Washing- 
ton Medical College at Baltimore, in 1838. He at first entered 
on practice in Baltimore county, where he remained until 1843, 
when he established himself in Easton, Talbot county, Md., where 
most of his professional life was spent. In 1848 he was appointed 
Professor of Medical Jurisprudence and the Institutes of Medi- 
cine in the Philadelphia College of Medicine, but resigned after 
delivering a single course of lectures. He also took a lively in- 
terest in politics, and was for a time an associate editor of the Bal- 
timore Patriot. In 1861 he was outspoken for the Union, and in 
October was appointed brigade surgeon of the U. S. army. The 
next year he was made medical purveyor of the Middle Military 
Department, with headquarters at Baltimore, and in the same 
year was appointed surgeon general of Maryland, with the rank 
of colonel of cavalry. In 1864 he was elected lieutenant gov- 
ernor of the State. 

In 1868 he was appointed United States Commissioner of Pen- 
sions, and removed with his family to Washington, and in 1869 
he accepted the chair of Medical Jurisprudence and Hygiene in 
the Georgetown Medical College. In April, 1871, he was ap- 
pointed a member of the Board of Health of the District of 
Columbia, of which body he was repeatedly elected president. 
In June, 1879, he Was appointed to superintend the exhibit of the 
United States at the International Exhibitions to be held in Aus- 
tralia. His health had already begun to fail, and in January, 
1880, he was forced to return home. He was not again able to 
perform any labor, and died in Washington, D. C, November 25, 
1882, in his 67th year. 



131 

His wife survives him. Of their four sons and four daughters, 
one son (a graduate of the Medical Department of this College) 
and two daughters are still living. 

Dr. Cox received the honorary degree of LL.D. from Trinity 
College in 1867. 

William Hinchman Platt was born in Owego, N. Y., Sep- 
tember 23, 1815, the son of William and Lesbia (Hinchman) 
Platt, and the brother of ex-senator Platt, of New York. He 
entered Amherst College in 1831, and two years later removed to 
this College. 

He studied law for a year or two, but because of imperfect 
health engaged in mercantile pursuits in Owego. His business 
life was spent in Owego and New York. For the last eight years 
he was assistant superintendent of the Inquiry Department in 
the New York Post Office. After an illness of nearly a month 
he died at his residence in New York City, February 23, 1883, in 
his 68th year. 

In September, 1839, he maiTied Sarah E., daughter of William 
Pumpelly, at Owego. She died in January, 1856. In February, 
1858, he married Mary E., daughter of James Pumpelly, who 
survives him with their younger daughter. 

Alfred Stubbs, for forty-three years the rector of Christ Church, 
New Brunswick, N. J., died while on a visit to his daughter, in 
Princeton, N. J., December 12, 1882, in his 68th year. He was 
the youngest child of Henshall Stubbs, from Cheshire, England, 
and Jane Boyer, of Bermuda, and was born at Turk's Island, 
West Indies, May 12, 1815. He was sent to New York for his 
education, at the age of 14. 

He studied theology at the General Theological Seminaty in 
New York City, and was ordained deacon by Bishop B. T. On- 
derdonk, June 30, 1839. On the 29th of October in the same 
year, he was unanimously chosen rector of Christ Church, New 
Brunswnck, where he labored with untiring devotion, being ad- 
vanced to the priesthood on the 1st of May, 1840, by Bishop 
Doane. In the convention of the diocese he took a leading part, 
and was frequently a deputy to the General Convention. For a 
long time he was the president of the standing committee of the 
diocese. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from 
Columbia College in 1856. 



132 

He was married in August, 1840, to Amelia, daughter of Abel 
Houghton, Esq., of St. Albans, Vt., who died April 10, 1857. 
Of their seven children, two died in childhood ; and two follow 
their father's profession. 

1836. 

William Cleaveland Crump, son of Reuben and Eliza R. 
Crump, was born in the City of New York, Sept. 19, 1816, but 
came to college from New London, Conn. 

On graduation he went to Western New York, with a party of 
civil engineers engaged in the preliminary surveys for the Erie 
Railroad. He continued thus employed until the following 
spring, when, the surveys being suspended, he returned to New 
London, and began the study of law. He was admitted to the 
bar in 1839, and continued in practice in New London until his 
death. His health began to fail in the spring of 1881 ; and from 
that time he suffered from a complication of diseases, which 
finally terminated in disease of the heart, of which he died, 
March 9, 1883, at the Massachusetts General Hospital, in Boston, 
where he had been for two months for medical treatment. 

In October, 1852, he married Mary C. Chew, of New London, 
and had five children ; the father's death was the first break in 
the family circle. 

Mr. Crump was eminent among the members of the Connecti- 
cut Bar for learning and sound judgment, as well as for his high 
character. 

Edgar Jared Doolittle, son of Jared and Anna (Jones) 
Doolittle, was born in New Haven, Conn., Oct. 19, 1810. After 
his father's death, in 1816, the family removed to Wallingford, 
Conn. ; and in early manhood Mr. Doolittle was a merchant's 
clerk in New Haven, until his decision to enter the ministry. 

After graduation he spent two years in teaching an academy 
in Cromwell, then a part of Middletown, Conn. He then studied 
for three years in the Yale Divinity School, and on the 18th of 
May, 1842, he was ordained and installed pastor of the Congre- 
gational Church in Hebron, Conn. After a pleasant and success- 
ful ministry, he was dismissed from this church, Dec. 14, 1852, to 
accept a call to the Congregational Church in Chester, Conn., 
where he was installed April 26, 1853. Here he was greatly be- 



133 

loved by his people, and after he was obliged by failing health to 
take a dismission in April, 1859, he returned to them in 1861 and 
acted as their pastor for eight years longer. His health then for- 
bidding further labor, he removed to Wallingford, where the rest 
of his life was spent in retirement. He died after long feeble- 
ness, February 1, 1883, in his 73d year. 

He was married, June 8, 1842, to Jane E., daughter of Deacon 
Isaac Sage, of Cromwell, who survives him with four of their 
eight children. 

George Lockwood Marvin, son of Asa and Sarah (Lock- 
wood) Marvin (emigrants from Norwalk, Conn.), was born in 
Clinton, Oneida County, N. Y., April 29, 1810. 

After graduating he went to Buffalo, N. Y., where he studied 
law ; he was admitted to the bar of the State as an attorney, Jan. 
18, 1839, and as counselor, Oct. 28, 1842, and practiced his pro- 
fession in Buffalo until his death in that city, Oct. 31, 1882, in 
his 73d year. He was married, July 18, 1839, in Milan, O., to 
Elizabeth S. Lockwood, daughter of Ralph Lockwood, from 
Norwalk, Conn. She survives him with two daughters an4 
three sons. 

1837. 

William Metcalf Birchard was born in Bozrah, Conn., Feb- 
ruary 14, 1810. After graduation he studied theology in Ando- 
ver for a year, and finished his course there in 1842, — having 
taught school in the interval in Ashby, Mass. 

He began preaching in 1842 in Littleton, N. H., and on the 
25th of October, 1843, was ordained pastor of the Congregational 
Church in his native town, which charge he held till October, 
1848. After a short residence in Worcester, Mass., he returned 
to Connecticut, and supplied successively the Congregational 
churches in Eastford and Hebron. On September 6, 1854, he 
was installed over the Congregational Church in Broad Brook, a 
small parish in the town of East Windsor. Here he remained 
until the close of 1858, and the following year was spent in Hart- 
ford. From the spring of 1860 to the spring of 1863 he supplied 
the church at Feeding Hills, in the town of Agawam, Mass., and 
then again returned to Hartford. On May 4, 1864, he was settled 
over the Congregational Church in Voluntown and Sterling, Conn., 
and immediately upon his dismissal (March 25, 1868) from this 



134 

post, engaged to supply the church in Montville, Conn., for thre& 
years. At the close of this service, in consequence of an affection 
of the eyes, he decided to retire from the ministry, and removed 
to Washington, D. C. In 1879 he returned to Montville, wher& 
he died of pneumonia, March 19, 1883, in his '74th year. 

He was married, December 8, 1843, to Mary Whitmore, by 
whom he had four sons and two daughters. 

1838. 

Anson McLoud, son of Anson and Clarissa McLoud, was born 
in Hartland, Conn., June 22, 1813. 

He studied for the two years next after graduation in the 
Union Theological Seminary, New York City, and then for a 
single year in the Andover Theological Seminary. He was or- 
dained and installed on the 8th of December, 1841, over the 
Congregational Church in Topsfield, Mass., and from this, his only 
pastoral charge, he was dismissed April 27, 1869. 

He was elected as a representative-from Topsfield in the State 
Legislature for the session of 1872, and had general charge of 
the schools in the town from that time. By his efforts a Public 
Library was founded in Topsfield in 1875, and he acted as the 
librarian until his death. He had always kept up his interest in 
his earlier studies, and was a wide reader on all subjects. He 
died in Topsfield, after a protracted illness, Febr. 21, 1883, in his 
70th year. 

He married, May 5, 1842, Jane Cornish, of Simsbury, Conn.^ 
who survives him, with one daughter and two sons. 

William Holme YanBuren, the descendant of a family of 
Dutch physicians long established in New York City, was born 
there, April 5, 1819. His mother was a daughter of John Holme, 
of Holmesburg, near Philadelphia. He entered college at the 
beginning of the Sophomore year, and left during Junior year, 
but received a degree and was enrolled with his class in 1864. 

Immediately upon leaving Yale he began the study of medi- 
cine in the University of Pennsylvania where he was graduated 
in 1840, after his return from a year spent in .the Paris hospitals. 
He then entered the medical service of the United States Army, 
and remained at Washington until 1846. He had married, on, 
the 8th of November, 1842, Louisa D., the eldest daughter of the 



136 

eminent surgeon, Dr. Valentine Mott, and on leaving the array 
came to New York to assist his father-in-law in the work of his 
surgical clinique in the Medical Department of the University of 
New York. He was appointed Surgeon of Bellevue Hospital in 
1847, and of St. Vincent's Hospital about 1849, and in 1852 was 
elected to the chair of Anatomy in the University of the City of 
New York. This position he resigned in 1867, and two yeara 
later he accepted the professorship of Surgery in the Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, which he held until his death. His 
success in operative surgery gave him a national reputation, 
which was enhanced by his contributions to literature. These 
included four or five large volumes, and many articles in the 
various medical periodicals, by which he advanced materially his 
favorite branches of science. 

In 1861 he assisted in founding the U. S. Sanitary Commission,, 
and served as medical member of the executive committee, at 
great pecuniary loss, throughout the war ; while he declined the 
offer of the position of Surgeon General of the United States. 

The degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred on him by this 
college in 1879. 

He was seized with a slight attack of paralysis in May, 1882,. 
from the effects of which he never recovered. In the following 
autumn he undertook to deliver his usual lectures, but gave up 
the attempt early in December, and thenceforwards failed grad- 
ually. He died at his residence in New York City, March 25, 
1883, at the age of 64. His widow survives him with two 
daughters, — their only son having died in 1863, while preparing 
for college. 

1839. 

WiLLARD Preble Hall, son of John Hall, was born in Har- 
per's Ferry, Va., May 9, 1820. 

Upon graduation he entered the law office of an older brother. 
Judge Wm. A. Hall, of Harper's Ferry. The next year he went 
West, settling on a farm near Huntsville, Missouri, where he con- 
tinued his law studies and was admitted to the bar in 1841. In 
1842 he moved to Sparta, then the county-seat of Buchanan 
County, and there opened a law office and was almost imme- 
diately appointed Circuit Attorney. In 1844 he was one of the 
presidential electors on the Polk and Dallas ticket, an(i the next 
year he removed to St. Joseph, as a better opening for the prac- 



136 

tice of his profession. In 1846 he enlisted as a private for ser- 
vice in the Mexican war, and during his absence was elected, in 
August, 1846, as a member of the 30th Congress. He represented 
his district with distinguished credit for three terms (1847-53), 
and in his position as Chairman of the Committee on Public 
Lands drafted and secured the passage of the bills giving land 
grants to Missouri^ which did so much for the development of the 
northern and western portions of the State. On leaving Congress 
he resumed the practice of his profession, at the same time man- 
aging his farm near St. Joseph, until he was elected to the State 
Convention of 1861, where though of southern birth and a slave- 
holder he successfully opposed the secession of Missouri. This 
convention deposed the existing State officers and elected Mr. 
Hall Lieutenant-Governor ; by the death of his superior in office, 
Jan. 31, 1864, Mr. Hall became Governor, and so continued until 
Gov. Fletcher's inauguration in January, 1865. He then resumed 
practice in St. Joseph, and was thus occupied until his death, Nov. 
3, 1882, in his 63d year. 

He married, in the fall of 1847, Annie E., the only daughter of 
Gen. Wm. P. Richardson, of St. Joseph, who died in 1862, leav- 
ing three sons. 

He next married, in June, 1 864, Miss OUie L. Oliver, by whom 
he had several children. 

Hervey Eliphaz Weston, son of Capt. Warren and Nancy 
Weston, was born in Weymouth, Mass., June 21, 1817. His 
mother was a sister of Joshua Bates, the well-known head of the 
firm of Baring Brothers & Company of London, and the great 
benefactor of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 

He studied medicine in the Medical School of Harvard Univer- 
sity, graduating in 1844; and soon afterwards spent thr^e years 
in Paris, practising in the hospitals. He then returned to this 
country, and began practice, at first in Boston, and later in Wey- 
mouth. The years 1860 and 1861 he spent in Italy; and after 
his return he did not resume practice, being a confirmed invalid. 
He died at the family residence in Weymouth, of paralysis, June 
29, 1882, at the age of 65. He was unmarried. 

1840. 

GiLRS Henry Deshon was born in New London, Conn., 
March 31, 1820, the fourth child of John and Fannie Deshon. 



137 

He studied theology in the General Theological Seminary in 
New York City, was ordained Deacon in the Protestant Episco- 
pal Church by Bishop Brownell at New London, July 7, 1843, 
and was advanced to the priesthood by the same bishop at New 
York City on the 1st of May, 1844. He began to officiate in St. 
Paul's Church, Windham, Conn., on the 20th of August, 1843; 
and at Easter, 1845, became rector of St. Luke's Church, in Glas- 
tonbury, Conn. Some time in 1848 his health compelled him to 
resign this office ; and after a period of foreign travel he was in- 
vited in December, 1849, to the rectorship of St. Andrew's Church 
in Meriden, Conn. He assumed this charge at Easter, 1850, and 
remained there, greatly beloved and honored, until his death, 
after a brief illness, January 1, 1883, in his 63d year. The degree 
of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him by Trinity College 
in 1871. He had been for a dozen years a member of the 
standing committee of the diocese. 

He married. May 25, 1853, Miss Jane Brainerd, daughter of 
Erastus Brainerd, Esq., of Portland, Conn., who died April 10, 
1881. Their four daughters are still living. 

Orin Fowler Otis, son of David and Fanny (Fowler) Otis, 
was born in Colchester, Conn., May 12, 1812. 

After graduation he spent three years in the Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City. His first settlement as a pastor was 
in Chepachet, R. L, where he was ordained March 11, 1847, hav- 
ing already preached there for some time a stated supply. After 
a long and faithful service he was dismissed March 29, 1864, and 
after a short residence in Berlin, Conn., removed to Providence, 
R. I., where the rest of his life was spent. He was largely em- 
ployed there as a missionary among the poor, and latterly as an 
assistant to the pastor of the Union Church. He died in Provi- 
dence, February 11, 1883, in his 71st year. 

He married a sister of his classmate, the Rev. Jared O. Knapp, 
from Greenwich, Conn., and had five children. 



1841. 

Samuel Brace was born February 24, 1817, in Newington, 
then a parish of Wethersfield, Conn., where his father, the Rev. 
Dr. Joab Brace (Y. C. 1804), was for more than half a century 
the pastor of the Congregational Church. 



138 

After graduation he taught for nearly a year in Philadelphia; 
and spent the greater part of the next two years in the Andover 
Theological Seminary. From 1844 to 1848 he was a tutor in this 
College. The next six years were spent in Pittsfield, Mass., occu- 
pied at first in teaching and afterwards in business pursuits which 
he took up as a relief from ill-health. He had married, August 
19, 1847, Sarah R., daughter of Alvin North, of New Britain, 
Conn., and in 1854 he removed to New Britain and became a 
member of the firm of O. B. North & Co., with which he was 
connected till his death. In 1863, on the destruction of the 
company's factory by fire, the business was removed to New 
Haven, where he died, after long suffering from nervous disease,, 
which had obliged him to lead a secluded life, May 31, 1883, in 
his 67th year. 

His wife survives him ; their two sons died in infancy. 



1842. 

James Ensign, of the village of South Canaan, in Canaan, 
Litchfield County, Conn., was born February 2, 1819. 

He engaged in teaching after graduation, and was principal of 
the academy in Easton, Conn., for four years. He then spent a 
year in the Yale Law School, and a second year in the study of 
law at home, and was admitted to the bar at Litchfield, October 
12, 1848. Preferring to practice in New York State, he spent 
some additional time in study there, and was admitted to the bar 
in P(»ughkeepsie, in January, 1849. He then opened an office in 
Dover, Duchess County, but after six months removed to Fall& 
Village, in his native town, where he practiced law until April, 
1852. He then took up farming, and was successfully engaged in 
that pursuit at Lime Rock, in the adjoining town of Salisbury, 
until his death. 

He died in Lime Rock, February 3, 1883, after a three weeks* 
illness of typhoid fever, at the age of 64. 

He was married, February 26, 1851, to Miss Julia Goodwin, 
of Salisbury, who survives him, with two sons and three daugh- 
ters. 

William Postell Gready entered College from Charleston, 
S. C, where he was born June 5, 1817. 

He spent the three years next after graduation in the Princeton 



i 



139 

(N. J.) Theological Seminary, and then returned to Charleston. 
In 1846 he went to Georgia, and after a short engagement at 
Turkey Creek, was invited to take charge of two churches in 
Madison County ; in view of this charge he was ordained as an 
evangelist by the Presbytery of Hopewell in 1847. He spent 
three years in this field, and after three years more of similar 
labor in other parts of the State, he was invited in 1853 to preach 
in a mission chapel in Charleston, S. C, with a view to building 
up a new church in that city. His health, however, obliged him 
the next year to return to Georgia, where the remainder of his 
life was spent. His longest service was in Habersham County in 
the northeastern corner of the State, where he preached from 1857 
to 1869, and again from 1874 to 1881 in Toccoa City, where he 
died, January 28, 1882, in his 65th year. For several years he 
had been suffering from a complication of diseases, and for about 
a year before his death was obliged to relinquish preaching. 

He was married, January 23, 1879, to Mrs. Cora McDaniel, who 
survives him. , » 

Ika Harvey Smith, son of Ira and Rachel (Riggs) Smith, was 
born in that part of Derby which is now Seymour, Conn., August 
20, 1815. He was for nearly two years a member of the class 
which graduated in 1841. 

After having studied for three years in the Yale Divinity 
School, he was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in 
North Haven, Conn., February 11, 1846. His health failing him, 
he was dismissed from this charge in March, 1848. After five 
months' residence in the Massachusetts General Hospital in Bos- 
ton, he undertook the supply of the pulpit in Prospect, Conn., but 
was very shortly (»bliged again to relinquish his profession for 
out-door occupations. From the spring of 1853 till the summer 
of 1854 he resided in California, and in the fall of 1854 joined in 
the tide of free emigration to Kansas, where he remained for the 
rest of his life. There he was at first engaged in the public sur- 
veys of the territory, and also took up the business of land agent. 
He was a member of the first State Legislature, from Brown 
County, and in the summer of 1861 was appointed Receiver of 
the U. S. Land Office, first at Kickapoo and afterwards at Atchi- 
son. He held this position until January, 1864, when he was 
made Register of the U. S. Land OflSce at Topeka, — a responsible 
situation which he held until the summer of 1873. In 1876 he 



140 

became interested in the development of the San Juan country in 
southwestern Colorado, but retained his residence in Topeka, to 
which he returned in 1880, and where he died after a severe ill- 
ness on the 18th of April, 1883, in his 68th year. He was one of 
the founders of Washburn College in Topeka, and among its 
most generous benefactors. 

He was married, February 26, 1846, to Miss Sarah J., daughter 
of William Bartholomew, of Wolcott, Conn., who survives him 
with one son, a graduate of the Kansas State University. 



1843. 

RoswELL Haet, son of Roswell Hart, one of the early settlers 
of Rochester, N. Y., was born in that town, August 4, 1824. His 
parents dying early, his education was begun at St. Paul's 
School, Flushing, L. I., under the charge of the Rev. Dr. Muhlen- 
berg, by whom he was fitted for the Junior Class in this College 
\Vhich he entered in 1841. 

After graduation he studied law for three years in his native 
place, and was admitted to the bar, but never practiced. Follow- 
ing the steps of his father, he went into business and established 
the first retail «oal yard in Rochester. At the outbreak of the 
civil war he showed an active interest in the enlistment of sol- 
diers, and was appointed provost marshal of the district. In 
1864, having already established a local reputation for eloquence 
as a public speaker, he was elected on the Republican ticket as a 
Representative in Congress, and took high rank as a new mem- 
ber; he was defeated, however, for reflection after a very exci- 
ting contest. He was appointed soon after this superintendent of 
railway mail service for the States of New York and Pennsylva- 
nia, and was not again actively engaged in politics. In 1872 he 
was elected president of the board of Water Commissioners, and 
to his exertions his fellow citizens are much indebted for the 
completion of their system of water works. He was also secre 
tary of the Rochester Savings Bank from 1876, having previously 
for many years been a trustee of the Institution. 

He died in Rochester, April 20, 1883. in his 59th year. 

Mr. Hart was married, June 27, 1849, to Deette Phelon, of 
Cherry Valley, N. Y., who survives him with one son and three 
daughters. 



141 

Cyrus Huntington, the eldest child of the Rev. Andrew Hunt- 
ington (Y. C. 1815) and Mary (Chipraan) Huntington, was born 
in Greenville, Greene County, N. Y., where his father was then 
teaching, on the 10th of April, 1820, and entered College from 
New London, Conn., at the beginning of the Sophomore year. 

He taught school for two years in New Jersey, and then spent 
two years in the Princeton Theological Seminary. On gradua- 
ting from this institution, he received a call from the Presbyte- 
rian Church in Havre de Grace, Md., of which he was ordained 
and installed pastor, November 14, 1848. He remained liere 
until 1852, when he was elected Secretary of the Maryland Tract 
Society and removed to Baltimore ; but after three months' trial 
he resigned this office, and in October of the same year was in- 
stalled over the Presbyterian Church in Ellicott's Mills, Md., 
where he continued for ten years. He then accepted the position 
of chaplain to the 1st Regiment of Maryland Infantry in the 
service of the Union; and in 1863 was settled over the Presby- 
terian Church in Dover, Delaware, with which he continued to 
labor till his death. 

He died in Dover, April 15, 1 883, at the age of 63. 

He was married in 1851 to Mrs. Henrietta M., widow of Dr. J. 
J. Boyd, of Havre de Grace, and daughter of Capt. Nathaniel 
Chew, of Cecil County, Md. 

They had no children. 

1844. 

James King Mereitt, son of James D. and Hannah Fitz Ran- 
dolph Merritt, was born in Harrison, Westchester County, N. Y., 
in 1824. 

He studied medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
in New York City, receiving the degree of M.D. in 1848, and in 
the same year entering the New York Hospital as Assistant Sur- 
geon. He spent most of the three years from 1850 in Central 
and South America, acting as surgeon with parties of exploration. 
In December, 1853, he settled in New York, and on the Vth of 
May, 1855, he married Virginia, daughter of William Norris, of 
Philadelphia, who died two days later. This bereavment broke 
up all his plans, and he again went to South America as superin- 
tendent and surgeon in charge of a mining company in New Gra- 
nada. He returned to New York in 1859 to practice his profes- 
sion ; and on October 24, 1860, he married Julia T., daughter of 



142 

James Rowe, of New York City. On the 1st of January, 1865, 
be removed to Flushing, L. I., having purchased the good-will of 
an extensive practice ; he found, however, that his health had 
been seriously impaired by a fever contracted in South America, 
and was eventually obliged to withdraw to a great extent from 
active work. He returned to New York city, and was chiefly 
engaged at the time of his death in connection with mining ope- 
rations. 

He died in New York, December 22, 1882, at the age of 58. 

1845. 

John Southaed Belcher, son of Dr. Elisha R. and Esther 
R. (Knapp) Belcher, was born in Portchester, N. Y., August 29, 
1823, but spent most of his early life in New York City. 

After graduation he studied medicine in New York City for 
one year ; and then, for family reasons, went into the grocery 
business in the same city, and was so engaged for fifteen or six- 
teen years. He was active in the formation of the Republican 
party in 1855, and in 1 856 was elected one of the Presidential Elec- 
tors for the State. He was also at one time President of the New 
York Fire Department. Being unsuccessful in business, he was 
for some years without regular occupation, but about 1876, be- 
came an agent of one of the Fire Insurance Companies of New 
York. He continued in business as an insurance broker until a 
short time before his death, which occurred at Greenwich, Conn., 
February 20, 1883, in his 60th year. 

He was married December 15, 1853, to Emma, daughter of Peter 
Snyder, of Claverack, N. Y., who died January 14, 1858. Their 
only child, a daughter, is still living. 

1849. 

Franklin Asher Durkee was born in Susquehanna County, 
Pa., July 31, 1825. 

He studied law in Binghamton, N, Y. (from which place he 
had entered college), was admitted to the bar in January, 1852, 
and practiced his profession in Binghamton until the complete 
failure of his health in the spring of 1879. He had for several 
years been suffering from nervous prostration, and was now 
ordered to the West, but without benefit. He returned subse- 
quently to New York State, and was for some time at Addison, 



143 

under the care of Dr. John Mitchell; in August, 1881, he was 
brought to his home, and there died, suddenly, on the 25th of 
November, 1881, in his 57th year. 

He married, Sept. 27, 1854, Miss Maria Ellen Miller, of Guil- 
ford, Conn., who survives him with two sons. 

1850. 

Edward Duohman Muhlenberg was born in Lancaster, Pa., 
May 18, 1832, and entered the class the first term of Sophomore 
year. From graduation until September, 1867, he was engaged 
as civil engineer on various railroads and canals in Pennsylvania. 
He then sailed for Brazil to assist in the construction of a por- 
tion of a railroad running west from Rio Janeiro. In four years 
he returned, and immediately entered the army as Lieutenant- 
Colonel of a Pennsylvania Regiment. In October, 1861, he was 
appointed 1st Lieutenant in the 4th Regiment, U. S. Artillery. 
He served in Company F, known as Best's Battery, until Decem- 
ber, 1864, when he was made Adjutant and Regimental Quarter- 
master. 

He left the army in May, 1866, and resumed his profession. 
He was then employed on the Kansas and Pacific Railroad for a 
year, and from September, 1867, to January, 1870, on the Read 
ing and Wilmington Railroad. His health failed at the end of 
1871, when he was occupied as one of the surveyors of the Texas 
and Pacific Railroad. After a long illness he died at Lancaster, 
Pa., March 10, 1883, in his 51st year. He was unmarried. 

1862. 

Sanford Lawton, son of Rev. Sanford Lawton (Y. C. 1825), 
'Whose death is noticed above (p. 119), was born inMonson, Mass., 
[Oct. 16, 1832. His preparation for college in his father's school 
[was completed unusually early, and he had already had expe- 
Irience in teaching when he entered Yale at the age of sixteen. 

After two years of further teaching, in Pepperell, Mass., and 
'Poestenkill, N. Y., he entered the Yale Medical School in 1854, 
'and finished his studies in 1856. He then began the work of his 
Jprofessiou in Pittston, Pa., where he resided until 1870, when he 
'relinquished a successful practice there and removed to Spring- 
field, Mass., for the sake of providing a home for his aged parents 
and an invalid sister and giving his children better educational 
c 



144 

advantages. Here he continued, widely appreciated as a faithful 
and intelligent physician, until his death. He was for three years 
President of the Hampden District Medical Society ; he also 
served with ability on the local school board. In July, 1882, he 
left home for his first visit to Pittston since coming to New Eng- 
land ; and while at the house of friends in Scranton, Pa., he died 
on the 23d of the same month, of heart-disease, in his 50th year. 
He was married, in New Haven, Conn., July 1, 1856, to Miss 
Harriet F., daughter of Col. J. B. Bull, of Tallahassee, Fla., who 
survives him with four of their six children. 

1856. 

John Buffington Stickney, younger son of Jeremiah C. 
Stickney (Harv. Coll. 1824) and Anna (Frazier) Stickney, of 
Lynn, Mass., was born in Lynn, May 25, 1832. 

He read law in New York City and in his father's ofiice, and in 
1857 was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar. During the Civil 
War he assisted in raising a company of volunteers, and joined 
the United States Service on the 1st of August, 1862, as Second 
Lieutenant in the 35th Massachusetts Regiment. He saw active 
service at Antietam, South Mountain, and Fredericksburg, and 
was subsequently promoted (June 17, 1863) to the captaincy of 
his company. He also acted as> Judge Advocate, and for a time 
as Adjutant of the Regiment. In 1864 he removed to Florida, 
where he settled permanently as a lawyer, and subsequently re- 
ceived the appointment of U. S. District Attorney for the State. 
While absent from his residence (in St. Augustine) on business 
in Washington, he was taken sick and died there, Nov. 5, 1882, 
in his 51st year. 

He was married in Boston, Nov. 10, 1863, to Carrie F. Rust, by 
whom he had one child who died in infancy. 

1859. 

Samuel Slawson Hartwell was born in Minisink, Orange 
County, N. Y., November 30, 1831. 

After graduating he became principal of an academy in Mon- 
trose, Pa., and while there married Miss Mary C. Stiles, the 
daughter of the principal of the school (at Deckertown, N. J.) at 
which he had prepared for College. In the fall of 1864 he took 
charge of his father-in-law's school, remaining until 1867 when it 



145 

-was discontinued. He afterwards conducted a school in Corn- 
wall, N. Y., for two years. He then established a boys' school 
in Unionville, Orange County, N. Y., which he conducted success- 
fully until his last illness. His wife died in January, 1882, and 
his own health never recovered from the blow. He suffered from 
mal-nutrition and also from a lung difficulty, and in December 
last went to Kansas by advice of his physicians. He was not 
benefited by the change, and returned to the East in Marcli, 
arriving at his home two days before his death, which occurred 
on the 5th of April. He leaves six children. 

1862. 

George Miller Beard, son of the Rev. Spencer F. Beard 
(Amherst Coll. 1824), and Lucy A. (Leonard) Beard, was born in 
Montville, Conn., where his father was then pastor. May 8, 1839. 

For a year after graduation he studied medicine in New Haven, 
and then removed to New York and matriculated at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. In the spring of 1864, though he 
had not yet obtained his degree, he entered the United States 
Navy as acting assistant surgeon, and served for eighteen months. 
He then resumed his studies in New York, and on receiving his 
degree in March, 1865, at once began practice. He soon formed 
a partnership with Dr. A. D. Rockwell, making electro-therapeu- 
tics his specialty, and began to publish on that subject in 1866. 
From that date to his death he was an incessant investigator and 
prolific writer in this department, and in the specialty of nervous 
diseases and the kindred topics of hypnotism and mesmerism. 
[e was at different times employed as a lecturer in various medi- 
jal institutions in New York, and frequently visited Europe for 
jomparison of views with other workers. 

He died in New York, of embolic pneumonia, after a brief ill- 
less, January 23, 1883, in his 44th year. 

He was married, December 25, 1866, to Elizabeth A., daughter 
>f William H. Alden, of Westville, Conn. Mrs. Beard died of 
>neumonia (contracted at the time of her husband's funeral) on 
bhe 31st of January, leaving an only daughter. 

1863. 

Samuel Reading Throckmorton, son of Samuel R. and 
Susanna (McClaren) Throckmorton, was born October 9, 1842, in 

D 



146 

Nashville, Tenn., and was prepared for College in San Francisco, 
entering the class at the beginning of Sophomore year. 

After leaving college he took a course in civil engineering in 
the Sheffield Scientific School, graduating in 1865. Soon after 
this he returned to San Francisco, and pursued his profession in 
and near that city until 1868, when he became connected with 
the U. S. Coast Survey, with which he remained until 1 874. He 
then resumed his profession, which he followed until his death, 
which occurred in San Francisco on the 1st of March, 1880, in his 
38th year. 

1864. 

Albert Barnes Clark, son of Arazi Clarke, was born in La 
Porte, Ind., August 24, 1842, and entered College at the begin- 
ning of Junior year from Wabash College. 

Soon after graduating he spent a year and a half in the U. S. 
Navy, as Acting Assistant Paymaster, in the Gulf Squadron. On 
leaving this position with impaired health, he remained for some 
months in Cincinnati; then engaged in insurance business in New 
Haven, and afterwards found employment as a phonographer in 
Chicago, New York, and Washington. During 1870 and 1871 
he accompanied Mr. Clarence King, in charge of the U. S. i&eo- 
logical Exploration of the 40th parallel, to the western territories, 
and after his return was again in Washington, as a clerk to one 
of the Senate Committees. 

About 1875, having lately married, he settled in Orange, Los 
Angeles County, California, and devoted himself with success to 
raising semi-tropical fruits. He also organized and was largely 
interested in the Santa Ana Valley Irrigation Company. In the 
spring of 1882 his health began to fail seriously, and in the follow- 
ing winter he was prostrated by typhoid fever ; a lung disease 
supervened, and he sank rapidly until his death, at his residence 
in Orange, April 24, 1883, in his 41st year. His wife, three 
daughters, and an infant son survive him. 

1865. 

Ben.tamin Clapp Riggs, son of Lawrason Riggs, was born in 
St. Louis, Mo., February 16, 1845, and entered college from New- 
port, R. I. 

On leaving college he began the study of medicine at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, and received 



I 



147 

his degree in the spring of 1868. For the next year he was house 
physician at Bellevue Hospital, and for another year was house 
surgeon at St. Luke's Hospital, in New York City. He then made 
an extended visit to Europe, spending most of the time in Vienna 
and settling in Baltimore on his return in the fall of 1872. About 
a year later an attack of partial paralysis, brought on by exposure 
to a storm, undermined his health so seriously that he never, in 
fact, recovered. He removed to New York in the spring of 1874 
and was married there June 11, to Miss Rebecca Fox, daughter of 
George H. Fox, of that city. They went abroad at once, return- 
ing in 1876. Dr. Riggs then attempted to resume practice in 
New York, and with his superior natural abilities, aided by the 
uncommon advantages which he had enjoyed, and the personal 
traits which had always won him friends, success would have 
seemed easy; but his health again failed, and in June, 1876, he 
went abroad for the third time, abandoning all his hopes and am- 
bitions. 

In August, 1879, he returned to America, and lived in Newport 
till the next summer. At about this time it was discovered that 
his lungs were seriously diseased. The winter of 1880 was spent 
at the South, and he then settled in the Adirondack region, near 
Saranac Lake, N. Y., where he died on the 18th of April, 1883, in 
his 39th year. His widow, a daughter and two sons survive him. 



1866. 

Albert Barnes Herrick, son of Stephen L. Herrick, was 
born in Burlington, Vt., Sept. 16, 1846. 

Soon after leaving college he studied law for a short time in 
the office of Senator Edmunds in Burlington, and in September, 
1867, entered the Law School in Albany, from which he was 
graduated in the following May. He was admitted to the bar, 
and in July, 1868, sailed for Europe. He spent the next five 
years and upwards in London, employed in legal and other 
business. 

He then returned to New York City, and began practice there. 
In 1876 he was appointed Assistant U. S. District Attorney, in 
which office he continued until his death. During this time he 
acted with credit in many important cases for the Government. 
He was offered at one time the position of Deputy Collector in 
charge of the law department of the New York Custom-house, 



148 

but declined it ; he also declined the position of Assistant Dis- 
trict Attorney of the city. 

He died after a few days' illness, in New York, of pneumonia, 
Dec. 28, 1882, in his 37th year. He was never married. 



1867. 

Thomas Alltn, son of the Hon. Timothy M. Allyn, was born 
in Hartford, Conn., January 2, 1845. 

He traveled extensively in P^urope and elsewhere after gradua- 
tion, and finally began the study of medicine in Boston, graduat- 
ing at the Harvard Medical School in 1872. After some experi- 
ence in the practice of his profession in Hartford, his health failed. 

He was drowned while traveling in Europe in August, 1882, 
being in his 38th year. He was unmarried. 



1869. 

Francke Sherman Williams, the son of Francke Williams, 
M.D. (Y. C. 1840), and Caroline H. (Bartlet) Williams, was born 
in Newburyport, Mass., April 20, 1847. His father removed to 
Yonkers, N. Y., in 1854, and two years later to Hartford, Conn., 
where the son was prepared for college. 

For the first year after his graduation he taught in the New 
Haven Hopkins Grammar School. He then went to New York 
City, and divided his time between teaching and the study of 
law. In 1872 he received the degree of LL.B. from Columbia 
College and was admitted to the bar. From November, 1872, 
until January, 1874, he was in real estate business in New York 
City. He then received (after a competitive examination) an 
appointment in the office of the Second Auditor of the Treasury 
Department, at Washington, which he held until appointed, also 
as a result of competitive examination, to the position of 3d 
Assistant Examiner in the U. S. Patent Office, Feb. 1, 1875. 
On June 1, 1877, he was promoted to be 2d Assistant, and Jan. 
1, 1878, to be 1st Assistant Examiner. . On the 16th of November, 
1880, he was appointed Principal Examiner, and held that posi- 
tion until his death, in Washington, of typhoid fever, Sept. 22, 
1882, in his 36th year. 



149 



1875. 



I 



Edward Strong Peck, the only son of the Rev. Whitman 
Peck (Y. C. 1838) and Ruth M. (Keeler) Peck, was born in North 
Branford, Conn., June 23, 1855. Before he entered college his 
father removed to New Haven, Conn. 

He taught school for two years and a half after graduation, in 
Westville and Greenwich, Conn., and in Morristown, N. J. He 
was then interrupted in his work by a severe fever, which left 
him in feeble health. He was able, however, to complete one 
year in the Yale Divinity School; and in the fall of 1881 entered 
the Episcopal Divinity School in Faribault, Minn., where he was 
ordained deacon by Bishop Whipple in the spring of 1882. 
Some time before this the disease which ended his life (consump- 
tion) had attacked him. In November last he went to Colorado, 
hoping to be able to preserve sufficient strength to do light work 
in his chosen profession ; but in February a change came on for 
the worse, and he died at Colorado Springs, March 22, 1883, in 
his 28th year. 

He was married, March 18, 1883, to Fanny P., daughter of I. 
C. Chesbrough, of Copake Iron Works, N. Y. 

1876. 

Henry Francis Mather, son of Henry T. and Lucy I. 
Mather, was born in Marlboro, Vt., Oct. 31, 1852. 

He studied law at Yale, receiving the degree of LL.B. in 1 878. 
He then traveled extensively, in the Southern States and in 
Europe, on account of poor health. His later life was spent in 
Columbus, Ga., where he died, February 10, 1883, in the 3l8t 
year of his age. 



1879. 



Edward Southworth, son of the Hon. Edward South worth 
(Harvard Coll. 1826), was born in West Springfield, Mass., Sep- 

Itember 27, 1857. In 1870 he was placed in the Gymnasium in 
Tubingen, Germany, where he remained for two and a half years. 
He spent nearly two years more in travel, and in study in 
France, before his return to America. In 1875 he entered college 
from the New Haven Hopkins Grammar School. 



150 

Medical School, and after one year here (during which he acted 
as honorary assistant to Dr. Thacher in the Physiological Labora- 
tory) removed to the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New 
York City, where he received his degree in May, 1882. In the 
previous month, in the competitive examination with some forty 
other candidates for positions on the staff of the Charity Hospi- 
tal on Blackwell's Island, he won the third out of eight places. 
In the following August, while still at his work in the hospital, he 
was attacked with peritonitis, which was followed by typhoid 
fever ; he died in New York City on the 15th of that month, in 
his 25th year. 

1881. 

Edward Paul Brandt, oldest son of the Rev. Charles Edward 
Brandt, was born at Halle on the Saale, Prussia, Dec. 25, 1859, 
and came to this country in 1865. In the autumn of 1881 he en- 
tered the medical department of the University of the City of 
New York. An attack of pleurisy, however, compelled him to 
return home (Farmington, Conn.), about the middle of December. 
In August, 1882, he went to Europe, hoping to restore his health 
and to continue the study of medicine ; but on his arrival in 
Germany he was very feeble and died at Coethen, Anhalt, Oct. 
12, at the age of 23. 

1882. 

Theodore Cuyler was born in Philadelphia on the 18th of 
May, 1862, the son of Theodore and Mary (DeWitt) Cuyler. 

He was prepared for College at a private school in Philadel- 
phia, and entered the Class of 1882 at the commencement of the 
course. After graduation he began the study of the law under 
his brother (Y. C. 1874), and was earnestly pursuing his studies 
at the time of his death, which occurred at his residence in Phila- 
delphia on January 1, 1883, from an attack of scarlet fever, after 
an illness of three days. 

A tablet has just been erected to his memory in the vestibule 
of the Battell Chapel. 



151 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 
1822. 

John Adams MacLean was born in Danbury, Conn., in 1798, 
and died in Norwalk, Conn., March 2, 1883, in his 85th year. 

His whole professional life was spent in Norwalk, excepting two 
years, during which he resided in Maryland. 

1824. 

Garry Hinman Minor, the youngest child of Solomon Minor, 
was born in Woodbury, Conn., December 28, 1802. 

In August, 1824, he began practice in that part of Litchfield, 
Conn., which is now the town of Morris, where until near the 
time of his death he was the only resident physician. A man of 
vigorous constitution, he retained his full bodily faculties until 
within a month of eighty years of age. On Thanksgiving Day, 

1882, he fell in his yard and an injury to his spine brought on a 
fever, of which he died on the 9th of December. 

He was married shortly after his settlement in Morris, to Miss 
Susan Allen, of his native town, who died in 1855. He had no 
children. 

1835. 

Daniel Holt, son of Nehemiah and Eunice (Fuller) Holt, was 
born in Chaplin, Conn., July 2, 1810. 

He spent his life as a physician (practicing homoeopathically) 
in Lowell, Mass., where he died, April 11, 1883, in his 73d year. 

He first married Julia Fuller, of Hampton, who died soon after 
marriage, without children. He next married Abby, daughter of 
Pardon Brown, of South Glastonbury, and widow of Stephen J« 
Holmes, by whom he had one son and two daughters. He next 
married, June 5, 1861, Mary G., daughter of Gen. Richard T. 
Dunlap. 

Morgan Stuart died at his home in Milan, Ohio, June 16, 

1883, in his 76th year. 

He was bom in Sherman, Conn., December 7, 1807, and while 
teaching school in his native State prepared himself for admission 
to this department. In the fall of 1835 he went to Milan, Ohio» 
where he at once entered on the practice of his profession. After 



152 

several years he opened a drug and book store, in which business 
he continued to the time of his death. Throughout his life in 
Milan he was one of the most active and influential members and 
oflicers of the Presbyterian church, and by his earnest Christian 
character had won the esteem of the entire community. 

In 1837 he was married to Mary W., daughter of Deacon Philo 
Adams, of Huron, Ohio. 

His widow, three daughters and a son survive him. 

1836. 

Levi Daniels Wright, was born in Middle Haddam, Conn., 
November 8, 1810. 

He was married, March 16, 1836, to Mary A. Hurd, of Middle 
Haddam, and for a few months practiced his profession in Leba- 
non, Conn., thence removing to Bridge-Hampton on Long Island, 
where he resided continuously in the practice of medicine until his 
last illness, which extended over two or three months. After a 
long life of laborious and efficient service, in which his intense 
activity and strong individuality had endeared him warmly to 
the community, he died in Bridge-Hampton, March 23, 1883, in 
his 73d year. 

1837. 

Charles Edmund Parker was born in Amherst, N. H., Oct. 
4, 1814, the son of the Hon. Edmund Parker (Dartmouth Coll. 
1803) and Susan (Cutter) Parker, and the nephew of Professor 
Joel Parker. 

He graduated at Dartmouth College in 1834, and had pursued 
the study of medicine in Jaffrey, N. H., and in Pepperell, Mass., 
before coming to this school. He began practice in Alstead, N. 
H., thence removing to Pepperell, Mass., from which place he 
went to Beardstown, 111., about 1855. After a few years' resi- 
dence and practice there, he went into the drug business in 
Springfield, 111., continuing about nine years. His health then 
failing, he returned to Beardstown, and in the course of another 
year was able to resume the practice of his profession, and 
remained thus occupied until stricken with paralysis a few days 
before his death. He was especially efficient in the small-pox 
scourge which visited Beardstown, and his death, on the 23d of 
August, 1882, left the city and county in mourning. 



163 

He was first married to Sarah E., daughter of Lemuel Parker^ 
of Pepperell, who died soon, leaving one daughter who is stilt 
living. He was next married, while residing in Pepperell, to 
Anna K., daughter of John S. Pierce, and niece of President 
Pierce. She survives him with one son, — a daughter having died 
since her father. 

1847. 

Samuel Erskinb Matnabd, who died in Norwich, Conn., Juljr 
12, 1882, was born in Montville, Conn., in January, 1820. 

He practiced his profession in Montville until 1862, when he re- 
moved to Norwich, taking up his residence in the village of West 
Chelsea, where he enjoyed a large and remunerative practice for 
ten or twelve years. Ill health then compelled his retirement 
from active work, and he gradually declined in physical strength 
until his decease. 

While a resident of Montville he was the faithful government 
agent of the reservation fund for the Mohegan Indians, remaining 
in that vicinity. 

1865. 

William Henry Trowbridge, eldest son of James H., and 
Mary (Banks) Trowbridge, was born in Stamford, Conn., February 
2, 1822. 

He practiced his profession in Stamford from his graduation 
until his death, excepting the period of his service (from Septem- 
ber, 1862, to August, 1863), as surgeon of the 23d Regiment of 
Conn. Volunteers. 

His death occurred at Stamford, October 1, 1882. An autopsy 
showed that his brain had been for some time in a diseased state. 

He married May 3, 1843, Sylvia Peck, by whom he had twa 
sons and three daughters. 

1861. 

George Augustus Ward died in Corro de Pasco, Peru, in 
September, 1882. 

His residence while in college, was in Rushville, Illinois. 

He had been for some years before his death, living in Peru, in 
charge of the hospital service attached to some of the new rail* 
roads in that country. 



154 
LAW DEPARTMENT. 

1874. 

William Curtis Wildman, son of George F. Wildman, was 
born in Bridgeport, Conn., in 1852. 

His preliminary law studies were pursued in the office of Judge 
Sidney B. Beardsley, in Bridgeport. After his graduation he be- 
gan the practice of law in the same city, and continued thus 
engaged until failing health interfered with his labors. He died 
of consumption, at his residence in Bridgeport, June 19, 1883, 
aged 31 years. He leaves a widow, the daughter of George W. 
Lewis, of Bridgeport, and one child. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND THE ARTS. 

(Sheffield Scientific School.) 
1857. 

Selden Silliman Richaeds, son of Timothy P. and Agnes 
(Lyon) Richards, was born in New York City, May 4, 1836. 

After his graduation he entered on the profession of civil en- 
gineering, and was for a number of years assistant engineer of the 
Brooklyn (N. Y.) water w^orks. Later he succeeded his father in 
the business of a broker in railroad bonds in New York City, and 
in 1864 was elected to a seat in the Stock Exchange, of which he 
continued to be a well-known and highly respected member for the 
rest of his life. His residence had been for many years at Grand 
View on the Hudson, near Nyack; but about the middle of 
April, 1883, he went to Atlantic City, N. J., with the hope of 
breaking up a malarial fever with which he was afflicted. He 
•died at Atlantic City, suddenly, on May 7, at the age of 47. 

He married, November 1, 1859, Jane A. Davison, who survives 
him with their four children. 

1870. 

Francis Asbury Lowe, a native of Washington, D. C, died 
in Sau Luis Potosi, Mexico, on the Uth of March, 1883, in his 



155 

37th year, of small-pox contracted while in the discharge of his 
duty as a mining engineer. 

After graduation here he studied also at the Academy of Mines 
in Freiberg, Saxony, and in the practice of his profession visited 
most of the important mining regions of the United States and of 
Mexico. He was never married. 



1872. 

George Wesson Hawes was born Dec. 31, 1848, in Marion, 
Ind., where his father, the Rev. Alfred Hawes (Brown Univ. 1841), 
was pastor of the Presbyterian Church. He lost his parents at an 
early age, and his youth was spent in Worcester, Mass., from 
wliich place he entered the Sheffield Scientific School in 1865. 
After two years he left the School, to enter into business in Bos- 
ton ; but his natural taste for scientific pursuits brought him back 
to New Haven in 1871 to finish his course of study. 

For the year after graduation he assisted Professor Johnson in 
his chemical laboratory, and for the next six years filled with 
marked success the position of assistant and instructor in miner- 
alogy and blowpipe analysis in the Scientific School. He spent 
six months in the summer of 1878 in study in Breslau, and in 
March, 1879, again went abroad, for further study in Bonn and 
Heidelberg. He received the degree of Ph.D. at Heidelberg in 
the summer of 1880, and then returned to his old place at New 
Haven. In the following February he was made Director of the 
Geological Department of the National Museum in Washington, 
which position he held till his death. Overwork early in 1881, 
in connection with an investigation of the building-stones of the 
United States, for the Census Report, developed symptoms of 
consumption in the fall of the same year; and after a prolonged 
period of weakness, he died at Manitou Springs, Colorado, June 
22, 1882, about a week after his arrival there, in the 34th year of 
his age. He was never married. 

Dr. Hawes had given evidence of superior promise in the de- 
partments of mineralogy and lithology by his publications, the 
most important of which was a report in 1878 on the mineralogy 
and lithology of New Hampshire, published as part 4 of the 
Geology of that State. In his private character singularly pure 
and winning, he is sincerely mourned by all who knew him. 



156 



1875. 



George Leland Upham, second son of Dr. George B. ancT. 
Sarah B. Upham, was born in Yonkers, N. Y., June 5, 1854. 

He graduated from the Law School of Columbia College in 
1880, and had just entered upon the. practice of his profession in 
the city of New York, when he was obliged to accompany his 
parents on a European trip undertaken for the health of Dr. 
Upham. 

He was taken ill about two weeks after his return, and after an 
illness of three months died in Yonkers, Aug. 18, 1882, at the age 
of 28. He was not married. 



1876. 

David Root Alden, son of William H. and Harriet B. (Riley) 
Alden, was born in Dover, N. H., November 20, 1851. His par- 
ents removed to Westville, Conn., in 1854, where his youth was 
spent. After preparing for college at the New Haven Hopkins 
Grammar School, he entered the Academical Department in 1869. 
He left this class during the junior year, and was for a short time 
connected with the succeeding class, but subsequently entered the 
Scientific School with an advanced standing. 

After graduation he was engaged upon the work of the U. S. 
Coast Survey at New Haven, and at Philadelphia, and then pur- 
sued his profession of railroad engineering, especially in connection 
with the construction of the Northern Pacific Railroad. In the 
fall of 1881 he went to South America and found employment as 
one of the chief engineers on a new railroad in the United States 
of Colombia. While there he contracted the fatal South Ameri- 
can fever, and died in Buenventura, Colombia, July 21, 1882, in 
his 3l8t year. He was unmarried. 



SXIMIM^IIY. 



Academical Depaetment. 



Class. Name and Age. 

1813 George Allen, 91, 

1816 William T. Gould, 82, 

1817 L. Ives Hoadly, 92, 
18 It Peter Lock wood, 84, 
1821 Erastus Maltby, 86, 
1821 Edward A. Strong, 79, 
1823 Edward W. Peet, 78, 
1823 Charles Stetson, 81, 
1825 Charles Ely, 77, 

1825 Sanford Lawton, 84, 

1826 Sylvester Dana, 76, 

1826 Charles Goddard, 85, 

1827 Silas Mix, 74, 

1828 Joseph Lyman, 73, 

1829 Leverett Griggs, 74, 

1830 Edward Hammond, 70, 

1830 Richard A. Udail, 72, 

1831 Lyman H. Atwater, 70, 
1831 Edward Ingersoll, 72, 

1831 S. Beach Jones, 71, 

1832 Isaac W. Warner, 77, 

1833 George B. Hawley, 71, 

1834 Allen Bf. Weld, 73, 

1835 Edward S. Blake, 70, 
1835 Louis Bristol, 68, 
1835 Christopher C. Cox, 66, 
1835 William H. Piatt, 67, 

1835 Alfred Stubbs, 67, 

1836 William 0. Crump, 66, 
1836 Edgar J. Doolittle, 72, 

1836 George L. Marvin, 72, 

1837 William M. Birchard, 73, 

1838 Ansou McLoud, 69, 

1838 William H. YanBuren, 64, 

1839 Willard P. Hall, 62, 

1839 Hervey E. Weston, 65, 

1840 Giles H. Deshon, 62, 

1840 Grin F. Otis, 70, 

1841 ' Samuel Brace, 66, * 

1842 James Ensign, 64, 
1842 William P. Gready, 64, 

1842 Ira H. Smith, 67, 

1843 Roswell Hart, 58, 

1843 Cyrus Huntington, 63, 

1844 J. King Merritt, 58, 

1845 John S. Belcher, 59, 



Place and 
Worcester, Mass., 
Augusta, Ga., 
Shelton, Conn., 
Binghamton, N. Y., 
Taunton, Mass., 
Southampton, N. Y., 
Cromwell, Conn., 
Bangor, Me,, 
New York City, 
Springfield, Mass., 
Morrisville, Pa., 
Brookline, Mass., 
Hartford, Conn., 
New York City, 
Bristol, Conn., 
Howard County, Md., 
Babylon, N.. Y., 
Princeton, N. J., 
Buffalo, N. Y., 
Bridgeton, N. J., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Hartford, Conn., 
Troy, Wise, 
Sewickley, Pa., 
Yinelaud, N. J., 
Washington, D. C, 
New York City, 
Princeton, N. J., 
Boston, Mass., 
Wallingford, Conn., 
Buffalo, N. Y., 
Montville, Conn., 
Topsfield, Mass., 
New "York City, 
St. Joseph, Mo., 
Weymouth, Mass., 
Meriden, Conn., 
Providence, R. I., 
New Haven, Conn,, 
Lime Rock, Conn., 
Toccoa City, Ga., 
Topeka, Kan., 
Rochester, N. Y., 
Dover, Del., 
New Yo^k City, 
Greenwich, Conn., 



Date ot Death. 
March 31, '83. 
July 18, '82. 
March 21, '83. 
Nov. 16, '82. 
March 28, '83. 
Sept. 14, '82. 
Aug. 17, '82. 
March 27, '83. 
Feb. 10, '83. 
Nov. 7, '82. 
June 19, '82. 
Jan. 29, '83. 
Aug. 19, '82, 
July 11, '82. 
Jan. 28, '83. 
Oct. 19, '82. 
March 31, '83. 
Feb. 17, '83. 
Feb. 6, '83. 
March 19, '83. 
April 12, '83. 
April 17, '83. 
Oct. 18, '82. 
Oct. 26, '81. 
Dec. 21, '82. 
Nov. 25, '82. 
Feb. 23, '83. 
Dec. 12, '82. 
March 9, '83. 
Feb. 1, '83. 
Oct. 31, '82. 
March 19, '83. 
Feb. 21, '83. 
March 25, '83. 
Nov. 3, '82. 
June 29, '82. 
Jan. 1, '83. 
Feb. 11, '83. 
May 31, '83. 
Feb. 3, '83. 
Jan. 28, '82. 
April 18, '83. 
April 20, '83. 
April 15, '83. 
Dec. 22, '82. 
Feb. 20, '83. 



158 



1849 Franklin A. Durkee, 56, 

] 850 Edward D. Muhlenberg, 60, 

1852 Sanford Lawton, Jr., 49, 

1856 John B. Stickney, 50, 

1859 Samuel S. Hart well, 51, 

1862 George M. Beard, 43, 

1863 Samuel R. Throckmorton, 37, 

1864 Albert B. Clark, 40, 

1865 Benjamin C. Riggs, 38, 
] 866 Albert B. Herriek, 36, 
1867 Thomas Allyn, 37, 
1869 Francke S. Williams, 35, 

1875 Edward S. Peck, 27, 

1876 Henry F. Mather, 30, 
1879 Edward Southworth, 25, 

1881 Edward P. Brandt, 22, 

1882 Theodore Cuyler, 20, 



Binghamton, N. T., 
Lancaster, Pa., 
Scranton, Pa., 
Washington, D. C, 
Unionville, N. T., 
New York City, 
San Fraucisco, Cal., 
Orange, Cal., 
Saranac Lake, N". Y., 
New York City, 
Europe, 

Washington, D. C, 
Colorado Springs, Col., 
Columbus, Ga., 
New York City, 
Coethen, Germany, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 



Nov. 25, '81. 
March 10, '83. 
July 23, '82. 
Nov. 5, '82. 
April 5, '83. 
Jan. 23, '83. 
March 1, '80. 
April 24, '83. 
April 18, '83. 
Dec. 28, '82. 
August, '82. 
Sept. 22, '82. 
March 22, '83. 
Feb. 10, '83. 
Aug. 15, '82. 
Oct. 12, '82. 
Jan. 1, '83. 



Medical Department. 



]822 John A. MacLean, 84, 

1824 Garry H. Minor, 80, 

1835 Daniel Holt, 72, 

1835 Morgan Stuart, 76, 

1836 Levi D. Wright, 72, 

1837 Charles E. Parker, 68, 
1847 Samuel E. Maynard, 62, 
1855 William H. Trowbridge, 60, 
1861 George A. Ward, 



Norwalk, Conn., 
Morris, Conn., 
Lowell, Mass., 
Milan, 0., 

Bridgehampton, N. Y., 
Beardstown, HI., 
Norwich, Conn., 
Stamford, Conn., 
Corro de Pasco, Peru, 



March 2, '83. 
Dec. 9, '82. 
April 11, '83. 
June 16. '83. 
March 23, '83. 
Aug. 23, '82. 
July 12, '82. 
Oct. 1, '82. 
Sept., '82. 



Law Depaetment. 
1874 William C. Wildman, 31, Bridgeport, Conn,, 



June 19, '83. 



Department of Philosophy and the Arts. 
{Sheffield Seimtific School.) 



1857 Selden S. Richards, 47, 

1870 Francis A. Lowe, 36, 

1872 George W. Hawes, 33, 

1875 George L. Upham, 28, 

1876 David R. Alden, 30, 



Atlantic City, N. J., May 7, '83. 

San Luis Potosi, Mexico, March 14, '83. 
Manitou Springs, Col., June 22, '82. 

Yonkers, N. Y., Aug. 18, '82. 

Buenventura, Colombia, S. A., July 21, '82. 



The number of deaths above given is 78, and the average age of the graduates 
of the Academical Department is 62f years. 



The oldest living graduates are — 
Class of 1813, Rev. David L. Hunn, of BufEalo, N. Y., born Nov. 5, 1789; 

" 1814, Rev. Leonard Withington, of Newburyport, Mass., born August 9r 

1789; 
" " George Hooker, M:D., of Longmeadow, Mass., born March 17» 
1793. 



INDEX 



ClasB. Page. 

1876 p Alden, David R 156 

1813 Allen, George 113 

1867 AUyn, Thomas... 148 

1831 Atwater, Lyman H 125 

1862 Beard, George M 145 

1845 Belcher, John S 142 

1837 Birchard, Wm. M 133 

1835 Blake, Edward S 129 

1841 Brace, Samuel 137 

1881 Brandt, Edward P '. 150 

1836 Bristol, Louis 129 

1 864 Clark, Albert B 146 

1835 Cox, Christopher C 130 

1836 Crump, Wm. C 132 

1 882 Cuyler, Theodore 150 

1826 Dana, Sylvester 120 

1840 Deahon, Giles H 136 

1836 Doohttle, Edgar J 132 

1 849 Durkee, Franklin A 142 

1825 Ely, Charles 119 

1842 Ensign, James 138 

1826 Goddard, Charles 120 

1816 Gould, Wm. T 114 

1842 Gready, Wm. P 138 

1829 Griggs, Leverett 122 

1839 Hall, Wm. P 135 

1830 Hammond, Edward 123 

1843 Hart, Roswell 140 

1859 Hartwell, Samuel S... 144 

1872 p Hawes, George W 165 

1833 Hawley, George B 127 

1866 Herrick, Albert B. 147 

1817 Hoadly, L. Ives .115 

1835 TwHolt, Daniel 151 

1843 Huntington, Cyrus 141 

1 83 1 Ingersoll, Edward 126 

1831 Jones, S. Beach 126 

1825 Lawton, Sanford 119 

1852 Lawton, Sanford, Jr 143 



Class, " Page. 

1817 Lockwood, Peter 115 

1870 p Lowe, Francis A 154 

1828 Lyman, Joseph 121 

1822 m MacLean, John A 151 

1838 McLoud, Anson 134 

1821 Maltby, Erastus 116 

1836 Marvin, George L 133 

1876 Mather, Henry F 149 

1847 m Maynard, Samuel E 153 

1844 Merritt, J. King 141 

1824 m Minor, Garry H 151 

1827 Mix, Silas 121 

1850 Muhlenberg, Edward D 143 

1840 Otis, Orin F 137 

1837 m Parker, Charles E 152 

1875 Peck, Edward S 149 

1823 Peet, EdwardW 117 

1835 Piatt, Wm. H 131 

1857 j) Richards, Selden S 154 

1865 Riggs, Benjamin C 146 

1842 Smith, Ira H 139 

1879 Southworth, Edward 149 

1823 Stetson, Charles. 118 

1856 Stickney, John B 144 

1821 Strong, Edward A. 117 

1835 m Stuart, Morgan 161 

1835 Stubbs, Alfred 131 

1863 Throckmorton, Samuel R...146 

1855 m Trowbridge, Wm. H 153 

1830 Udall, Richard A .124 

1875 p Upham, George L 166 

1838 VanBuren, Wm. H 134 

1861 wi Ward, George A 153 

1832 Warner, Isaac W 127 

1834 Weld, Allen H 128 

1 839 Weston, Hervey B 136 

1874 I Wildman, Wm. C 154 

1869 Williams, Francke S 148 

1836 m Wright, Levi D 162 



I 

i 




DEC 31 1937 



I 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OP 

GRADDATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 

JTune, 18S4r. 

Including the Record of a pew who died previously, hitherto unreported, 

[PRESEiXTED AT THE HIEETIXG OF THE ALUMM, JUNE 84th, 1884.] 

[No. 4 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 4? of the whole Record.] 



Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, Printers, 
New Haven, Conn. 



■9 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical year ending in 

June, 1884. 

Including the record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting op the Alumni, June 24th, 1884.] 
[No. 4 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 43 of the whole Record.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 



1814. 



I George Hooker, second son and last surviving child of Judge 
John Hooker (Y. C. 1782) and Sarah (D wight) Hooker, was bom 
in Springfield, Mass., March 17, 1793. Four of his brothers were 
also graduated here. 
He studied medicine in the Medical Institution of Yale College, 
1^^ received the degree of M.D. in 1817, and for one year practiced in 
^^K connection with Dr. Eli Ives in this city. For about six years he 
practiced his profession in his native towB, and then removed to 
Syracuse, N. Y., where he was similarly engaged for twelve years. 
After a brief interval of residence in Chicopee, Mass., he settled 
in Longmeadow, Mass., where he continued until his death. 

After a very vigorous and intelligent old age, he died in Long^ 
meadow, March 14, 1884, and was buried on his 91st birthday. 

He married, Jan. 20, 1819, Rachel, daughter of Joseph H. and 
Abigail (Kingsley) Breck, of I^orthampton, Mass., who died Jan. 
6, 1879. Of their eight children, two sons and two daughters 
are still living. 



164 

1815. 

Tbuman Smith, the eldest child of Phineas and Deborah Ann 
(Judson) Smith, was born in Roxbury, Litchfield County, Conn., 
Nov. 29, 1791. 

He was brought up on his father's farm, and soon after gradua- 
tion began the study of the law. He was admitted to the Litch- 
field county bar in March, 1818, and in the fall of that year opened 
an office for the practice of his profession in Litchfield, which con- 
tinued to be his home till 1854. At the time of his admission, an 
unusual number of the members of the County bar were eminent 
for ability, so that his own steady advancement was specially 
remarkable. 

After some fifteen years at the bar he found himself possessed of 
the confidence of the community and able to wield a large political 
influence. In 1831, in 1832, and in 1834, he represented Litchfield 
in the State Legislature. In 1839 and again in 1841 he was elected 
to and served in the National House of Representatives, and in 
1843 he declined the nomination to the same position. In 1844 he 
-was one of the electoral college which gave the vote of Connecticut 
for Henry Clay for President. In 1845 and 1847 he was reelected 
to a seat in Congress ; and during this last term he was the chair- 
man of the Whig Committee which had in charge the Presidential 
canvass which resulted in the election of Gen. Taylor. Meantime 
he was elected to the U. S. Senate for a term of six years from 
March, 1849. Before he took his seat, Gen. Taylor offered him 
the Secretaryship of the Interior, which he declined. He contin- 
ued an active, honored, and efficient member of the Senate until 
May, 1854, when for business reasons he resigned. In the fall of 
that year he removed his residence to Stamford, Conn., with the 
view of opening an office for the practice of law in New York City ; 
he did so, and was so engaged until the fall of 1872, when he re- 
tired from business. On the organization of the Court of Claims, 
to decide cases regarding the claims against the government for 
losses resulting from the Civil War, President Lincoln appointed 
him one of the judges, and he held the office during the existence 
of the court. In the closing years of his life he interested himself 
largely in benevolelit and philanthropic movements. He died at 
his residence in Stamford, May 3, 1884, aged 92^ years. 

He married, June 2, 1832, Maria, daughter of Roger Cook, of 
Litchfield, by whom he had two daughters and one son. She died 
Apr. 24, 1849, and he married, Nov. 7, 1850, Mary A. Dickinson, 



165 

hy whom he had six sons, — three of whom, as well as one daughter 
by the former marriage, are still living. 

1823. 

Frederick William Boardmax, the eldest son of Daniel 
Boardman (Y. C. 1781) and Hetty (More) Boardman, was born 
in New York City in August, 1804, and studied law after gradua- 
tion in the office of Peter A. Jay, Esq. 

He was admitted to the bar of New York City in 1827, and 
in 1836 he married Miss Philippina A. Belin, stepdaughter of 
Mr. William Slosson, an eminent lawyer of the same city. Soon 
after he removed to New Hamburgh, in Duchess .County. He re- 
turned to New York in 1850, but did not again engage in active 
business. From that time until his death he resided in the city 
and vicinity. His wife died in 1875. They had two sons, grad- 
uates of Columbia College in 1857 and 1863 respectively. 

Mr. Boardman died Febr. 10, 1882, at the residence of his elder 
and only surviving son, the Rev. Wm. S. Boardman, of Perth 
Amboy, N. J., in the 78th year of his age. He was a courteous, 
honorable gentleman of the old school, and a consistent, devoted 
member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

Edward Goodwin died of pneumonia at his residence in Hart- 
ford, Conn., on the 25th of Octobe*r, 1883, in his 83d year. He 
was born in the same city, Dec. 7, 1800, being the youngest son of 
George and Mary (Edwards) Goodwin. Two of his brothers were 
graduated here, in 1806 and 1807 respectively. 

He began the study of law in the Litchfield Law School, but 
before completing his course returned to Hartford as editor of 
the Connecticut Courant, of which his father was the publisher. 
He continued in this position until 1836, when his father disposed 
of the newspaper to other parties, and devoted himself entirely to 
the paper business. Mr. Edward Goodwin wa» associated in this 
business, and continued to be so occupied until 1861, when the 
mills owned by the firm passed into other hands. He then retired 
from active business, but was subsequently employed as deputy 

■ collector of internal revenue. He was a man of strict integrity, 
and of signal purity of character. 

He was twice married. His first wife was Miss Susan Leavitt, 
of Bethlehem, Conn., who lived but one year after marriage ; in 
^k 1831 he married Mrs. Eliza A. (Lewis) Sheldon, who survives him 



166 

with one daughter — the widow of the Hon. H. K. W. Welch 
(Y. C. 1842) — and one son. His younger son was graduated at 
this College in 1858 and died in 1882. 

Charles Marvin died at his ancestral home in Wilton, Conn., 
December 1, 1 883, in his 81st year, after a protracted illness. 

On leaving College he began to read law, but from trouble with 
his eyes was led to engage in farming in his native town, which 
occupation he afterwards adopted. He became a deacon in the 
Congregational church of his native town in 1841, and was 
through life earnestly interested in that church's welfare. In 
1846, and again in 1847, and in 1851, he was chosen to the State 
Senate, and thus became ex officio in the two latter terms a member 
of the Corporation of the College. In 1848 he represented Wilton 
in the House, and in 1852 was appointed bank commissioner. He 
had already been for many years one of the directors of the Fair- 
field County Bank. In all these positions of trust and honor he 
maintained the assured respect of his fellow-citizens. 

In November, 1836, he married Clarina, third daughter of the 
Rev. Samuel Merwin (Y. C. 1802), then of Wilton, who survives 
him, with three daughters and two sons. 

1825. 

Simeon North was born ia Berlin, Conn., Sept. 7, 1802. At 
graduation he entered the Yale Divinity School, and there pursued 
a three years' course in theology, being engaged also during the 
greater part of this time as a Tutor in College. While in the 
Tutorship and considering a call to pastoral service, he was elected, 
in May, 1829, to the chair of ancient languages in Hamilton College, 
Clinton, N. Y. His ten years of valuable service as a professor 
there, were followed by his election to the presidency of the same 
institution in 1839. He held this position with credit to himself 
and with advantage to the College, until his resignation in Sep- 
tember, 1857. He lived in retirement in Clinton, though still 
connected with the College as one of its Trustees, until his death, 
after a week's illness, of pneumonia, February 9, 1884, aged 81. 

He married, Apr. 21, 1835, Frances Harriet, daughter of Pro- 
fessor Thomas Hubbard, M.D., of Yale College, who died Jan. 
21, 1881. Their only child died in early boyhood. 

President North was remarkable for gentleness and kindness of 
heart and for sympathetic interest in his pupils, as well as for sound 



167 

scholarship. The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred 
upon him by Wesleyan University in 1849, — he having received 
ordination on May 25, 1842, — and the degree of Doctor of Laws 
by Western Reserve College in 1842. 

William Twining, son of Stephen Twining (Y. C. 1795) and 
Almira (Catlin) Twining, of New Haven, Conn., was born in New 
Haven, December 9, 1805. 

He studied theology for one year in the Yale Divinity School, 
and for less than a year in the Andover Theological Seminary, 
and was ordained as an evangelist at Great Falls, Somersworth, 
N. H., January 6, 1830, where he supplied the Congregational 
Church for nearly two years. He was then installed (October 4, 
1831) pastor of the Appleton Street (Congregational) Church, in 
Lowell, Mass., where he continued for four years. In the spring 
of 1836 he removed to Madison, Indiana, and thence in 1843 to 
Wabash College, at Crawfordsville in the same state, where he 
filled the professorship of Mathematics, Natural Philosophy and 
Astronomy for eleven years. In 1859 he took charge of the Con- 
gregational Church in Beardstown, 111., but was obliged by the 
failure of his health to lay down this work in 1863, when he 
removed to St. Louis, to reside with his children. His later years 
were occupied to some extent in business pursuits. He died of 
paralysis, in Laclede, a suburb of St. Louis, June 5, 1884, at the 
age of 79^ years. 

He married, June 1, 1830, Margaret Eliza Johnson, of New 
York City, who died about 1875. Five of their eight children 
are still living. 

1826. 
John Glover Adams. See page 210. 

James Maxwell Barker, son of Christopher and Sarah (Max- 
well) Barker, both of English birth, was born in Boston, Mass., 
March 14, 1806. 

After graduation he began the study of law with the Hon. Sam- 
uel Hubbard (Y. C. 1802), of Boston, and after the usual time 
was admitted to the bar. A year or two later he left Boston, 
and after an interval of about ten years, spent in teaching in 
Philadelphia and in Newcastle, Del., and in lawyers' offices in 
New York City and Philadelphia, returned in 1843 to Massachu- 
setts. He was employed in the office of the Hon. Charles Allen, 



of Worcester, until Mr. Allen's election to Congress in 1850. 
He then returned to Boston, where he continued until 1868, when 
he removed to Cambridge, Mass., where he died, June 4, 1882, at 
the age of 76. 

He was for the last nine years of his life the Senior Warden of 
St. James Parish in North Cambridge. He was never married. 

Reuben Hitchcock, the eldest son of the Hon. Peter Hitchcock 
(Y. C. 1801), Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Ohio, and of 
Nabby (Cowles) Hitchcock, was born in Burton, Geauga County, 
Ohio, Sept. 2, 1806, and entered the Sophomore class in the fall of 
1823. 

He studied law with his father, while teaching in the Burton 
Academy, and was admitted to the bar in June, 1830. The same 
year he removed to Painesville, and there practiced his profession 
until 1846, — with the exception of a brief term of service as Judge 
of the Court of Common Pleas. He removed to Cleveland in 
1846, but returned to Painesville in 1851, when he was elected 
Judge of the Common Pleas district, including Lake and Geauga 
Counties. This office he resigned in 1855, to accept the vice- 
presidency of the Cleveland and Mahoning Railroad, of which he 
also became the legal adviser. At the same time he removed his 
law-office again to Cleveland. After 1865 he engaged very little 
in general practice, in which he had attained a high standing, but 
retained his connection with the Mahoning railroad, as director 
and legal adviser, and was moreover appointed in 1869 the receiver 
of the Atlantic and Great Western Railway, and managed its 
aftairs for ten years. In the field of railway management he 
achieved distinguished success. 

Politically, Judge Hitchcock became identified with the Free- 
Soil party in 1848, and with the Republican party on its organiza- 
tion. He was a delegate to the Peace Convention which met at 
Washington early in 1861. 

In September, 1834, he married Miss Sarah Marshall, of Cole- 
brook, Conn., who survives him. Their children were three 
daughters and three sons. 

Judge Hitchcock died at Clifton Springs, N. Y. (where he had 
been sojourning for some months for his wife's health), Dec. 9, 
1883, in the 78th year of his age. 

His sterling integrity, his large-hearted beneficence, and his 
great kindness of heart deserve remembrance. 



I 



169 

Stephen Hubbell, son of Nathan and Sarah Hubbell, was born 
in Wilton, Conn., Apr. 2, 1802. After delays made necessary by 
the necessity of earning funds, he entered college with the Sopho- 
more class in 1823. 

After graduation he spent three years in the Yale Divinity 
School, and in the ensuing fall began to supply the pulpit of the 
Congregational Church in Mount Carmel (Hamden), Conn., where 
he continued until his ordination as pastor. May 18, 1830. His 
pleasant and prosperous pastorate here was terminated at his own 
request at the expiration of six years from this date. On the 1 st 
of March, 1837, he was installed as pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Wolcottville (in Torrington), Conn. His situation 
here was unfavorably affected by the pressure of the ' hard times,* 
and this with other circumstances led to his dismission, Sept. 29, 
1839. 

He was next installed, Dec. 31, 1840, over the Congregational 
Church in East Avon, Conn., where valuable results were attained 
until displeasure was aroused in the parish by the book called 
* Shady Side ' published by his wife. He passed immediately from 
the pastorate, in the summer of 1853, to the church in North Ston- 
ington. Conn., where he served successfully until April 6, 1869. 
He was then settled, June 1, 1869, over the small church in Long 
Ridge, in Stamford, Conn., where he remained until compelled to 
retire by the approach of old age, in 1874. 

He then returned to Mount Carmel, where he resided for six 
years, removing thence to New Haven, where he died March 3, 
1884, at the age of 82. 

He married, Oct. 30, 1832, Martha, daughter of Noah Stone,. 
M.D., of Oxford, Conn., who died in August, 1856. Of their three 
children, one survives, a graduate of this College in 1858. 

Mr. Hubbell married, secondly, on the 11th of May, 1858, 
Harriet T., daughter of Ezra Hawley, of Catskill, N. Y., who sur- 
vives him. 

John Riley Lee, the fourth of eleven children of Thomas 
and Electa (Riley) Lee, of New Britain, Conn., was born in New 
Britain, April 22, 1804. 

After graduating he began the study of medicine, first with Dr. 
Hooker, of the Yale Medical School, — from which he received 
the degree of M.D. in 1829, — and afterwards with Dr. Samuel 
B. Woodward, of Wethersfield, Conn. In 1832 Dr. Woodward 



170 

iDGcame the Superintendent of the State Lunatic Hospital, at 
Worcester, Mass., and Dr. Lee became associated with him as 
assistant-physician in the spring of 1842, — having been a great 
sufferer from a disease of the heart for several years previously. 
After about ten years service in this position, he returned to New 
Britain, where he continued to practice medicine for about eight 
years. He afterwards spent considerable time in foreign travel, 
a.nd in particular distinguished himself by exploring a part of 
Syria before unknown. 

He was also greatlj'- interested in the reforms of the age, espe- 
oially in the anti-slavery and temperance causes. He definitely 
gave up professional practice about 1855, and in later years spent 
his time in travel and in the neighborhood of large libraries. He 
died in the hospital at Hartford, Conn, (where he had lived in 
very infirm health for several years), on January 21, 1884, in his 
80th year. 

He was never married ; and left his fortune to various charita- 
ble and educational institutions, — the bulk of it to the American 
Missionary Association. 

1827. 

Robert McEwen was born in New London, Conn., June 22, 
1808. He was the eldest child of the Rev. Dr. Abel McEwen 
(Y. C. 1304), for thirty-four years a Fellow of the Corporation, 
and Sara*h (Battell) McEwen. 

On leaving College he became an instructor in the Hopkins 
Grammar School of New Haven, and after two years accepted a 
tutorship in this College, which he held until the summer of 1832. 
Meanwhile he had entered the Theological School, and was 
licensed to preach in 1833. From the spring of 1833 to the fall 
of 1834 he was employed as a Home Missionary in Michigan 
Territory, and was ordained, October 9, 1833, as an evangelist at 
Detroit. 

He then returned in feeble health to Connecticut, and on May 
Y, 1835, was installed as pastor of the South Congregational 
Church of Middletown, where he remained until August, 1838. 

On the 16th of February, 1842, he was installed pastor of the 
Congregational Church of Enfield, Mass., and so continued until 
December 10, 1861, when poor health compelled him to return to 
bis native city. 

For the rest of his life he resided in New London in indifferent 



171 

tealth, prosecuting to a limited extent the work of the ministry 
in the vacant churches and parishes in the vicinity. His untiring 
zeal as a pastor, and the purity of his personal character, made 
him greatly beloved. Amherst College conferred on him the 
degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1858. 

He died in New London, August 29, 1883, at the age of 75. 

He married, May 30, 1833, Miss Betsey P. Learned, daughter of 
Ebenezer Learned (Y. C. 1798), of New London, who survives 
him. They had no children. 

Chables Grandison Selleck, son of Charles and Hannah 
(Mather) Selleck, of the parish of Darien in Norwalk, Conn., was 
born in that town, February 10, 1802. 

After graduating he taught a class of young ladies for two 
years in Norfolk, Va., and meanwhile began his studies prepara- 
tory to the ministry under the care of the Hanover Presbytery. 
Returning to Connecticut, he was licensed to preach by the Fair- 
field West Association, March 2, 1830. Soon after he received a 
call from the Congregational Church in Ridgefield, Conn., where 
he was ordained and installed in May, 1831. He remained until 
September, 1837, when he was dismissed, and about the same 
time received a call to become the pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church in Upper Alton, Illinois. From Alton he removed in 
1840 to Waverly, Illinois, where he was employed for eleven 
years in the double labor of preaching and of teaching a semi- 
nary. In 1851 he took charge of a female academy in Jackson- 
ville, III. In the autumn of 1857 he went south, to conduct a 
similar institution in Plaquemine, La., at the same time becoming 
pastor of the Presbyterian Church there. He continued in the 
pleasant and successful discharge of his duties until the end of 
June, 1861, when on account of his Union sympathies he was 
expelled from the town by the local authorities. He then 
returned to Southern Illinois, and was occupied in teaching and 
preaching, until his removal to New Smyrna, Florida, where he 
died about the end of January, 1884, at the age of 82. 

He married, in April, 1830, Emily, daughter of the Rev. Daniel 
Crocker (Y. C. 1782), of New Fairfield, Conn., by whom he had 
one son, who died in early manhood. 



I 



172 



1829. 



William Perkins Apthorp, younger son of George H. and 
Anna (Perkins) Apthorp, of Quiucy, Mass., was born in that 
town, March 23, 1806. He spent one year at Harvard College, 
and then entered the Sophomore Class at Yale with his brother. 

He pursued theological studies in Anclover Seminary, and then 
for one year in Princeton, where he completed the course in 1832. 
After brief engagements in preaching, in Raleigh, N. C, and 
Quincy and Mendon, Mass., he was ordained as an Evangelist by 
the Harmony Congregational Association at Ward, now Auburn, 
Mass., April 20, 1836. From 1837 to 1 847 he was engaged in teach- 
ing in the Mission Institute, near Quincy, 111. He then resumed 
preaching, and was employed, successively, in Oskaloosa, Iowa, 
and Port Byron, Illinois. From January, 1855, to 1859 he was 
settled over the Congregational Church in Moultonborough, N. H., 
and then returned to Iowa, where he continued until his final 
removal to Tallahassee, Florida, in 1869. He died in Tallahassee, 
March 14, 1883, at the age of 77. 

He married, December 1, 1836, Mary S. Thurston, of Green- 
wich, R. I., who died in Port Byron, 111., December 15, 1852. 
Their children were three sons and two daughters. The two 
elder sons were graduated at Amherst College, and the youngest 
was killed in the Union army. 

1830. 

John Chester Backus, son of Eleazer F. Backus, a retired 
wholesale bookseller, of Albany, N. Y., and of Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Col. John Chester (Y. C. 1766), of Wethersfield, Conn., 
was born in Wethersfield, September 3, 1810. He entered Colum- 
bia College in 1826, and removed to Yale the latter part of Soph- 
omore year. 

He studied law for one year in the Law School in New Haven, 
but under convictions of duty then joined the Yale Divinity 
School, where he remained for part of a year. He also studied 
for part of a year in the Andover Theological Seminary, and 
afterwards removed to Princeton Seminary, where he took the 
full three years' course. In December, 1835, while employed as 
Assistant Secretary of the Board of Domestic Missions of the 
Presbyterian Church, he was ordained as an evangelist by the 
Presbytery of New Brunswick; and on April 11, 1836, he was 
called to the pastorate of the 1st Presbyterian Church in Balti- 



173 

more, Md. He accepted the call, and was installed September 
15, 1836, and in this charge he continued until his death, although 
relieved in 1875 at his own request from active duty. In 1848 he 
received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Hanover College, 
Indiana; and in 1875 that of Doctor of Laws from the C6llege 
of New Jersey, of which he was a Trustee from 1860 to 1872. 
In 1861 he was the Moderator of the General Assembly of the 
Presbyterian Church (Old School). Both in and out of the pulpit 
he was a man of power, and under his lead his church became a 
mother of churches in Baltimore. He died at his residence in 
that city, after a few weeks' illness, April 8, 1 884, in his 74th year. 
He married, June 2, 1840, Mrs. Letitia C. Cooper, daughter 
of John C. Smith, of Philadelphia, who survives him with one 
daughter. 

1831. 

George Frederick DeForest was the eldest child of John 
H. and Dotha (Woodward) DeForest, and was born in Water- 
town, Conn., September 14, 1812. In his youth the family 
removed to Humphreysville, a precinct named from Gen. David 
Humphreys, in the town of Derby, Conn., now constituting the 
separate town of Seymour. 

On his graduation he entered the counting-room of his father, 
who was the half-owner and sole manager of the cotton and 
paper manufactories which had been established in the buildings 
and on the water-power and landed estate of the then late Gen. 
Humphreys ; and after his father's death in 1839 he remained sole 
agent and manager of the business until the property was sold 
in 1 843. In connection with Mr. George L. Hodge, he estab- 
lished in 1845 a new paper mill. He was also interested as owner 
and officer in the Copper Company established at Seymour in 
1852, and was president of the bank in that town from its incor- 
poration in 1851 until he left the State. He resided for several 
years in New Haven, but for most of the time in Seymour until 
1857, when he removed to Freeport, 111., and in connection with 
others established a private bank, which after a successful career 
was merged in the 1st National Bank of Freeport. With the 
latter institution he was connected either as president or cashier 
until the termination of the first charter in January, 1883. He 
was incapacitated for further service by a stroke of paralysis 
■which fell upon him in September, 1881. He never recovered 



174 

from this attack, but lingered in varied degrees of comfort or 
suffering until his death, at his home in Freeport, September 16, 
1883, at the age of 71. 

In July, 1846, he married Caroline E. Sergeant, of Stockbridge, 
Mass., who died in Freeport, leaving three daughters who are 
still living, — one of them the wife of the Rev. David J. Burrell 
(Y. C. 1867). He afterwards married Anna Sergeant, a sister of 
his former wife, who survives him with two sons and one daughter 

Seageove William Magill, son of Charles and Eliza Ann 
(Zubly) Magill, was born in St. Mary's, Ga., September '27, 1810 ; 
being a great-grandson of the Rev. Dr. John Joachim Zubly, of 
Savannah, and a grandson of Capt. Charles Magill, of Middle- 
town, Conn. 

He entered Amherst College in 1827, and spent only the Senior 
year in New Haven. Two years of his theological study were 
pursued in the Yale Divinity School, and one in the Princeton 
Seminary. 

Being licensed to preach by the New Haven West Association 
in April, 1833, he went South in October, 1834, feeling that as a 
Georgian he was adapted to that field of labor ; and for nearly 
six years he was employed as stated supply to Presbyterian 
churches in Bryan County, Georgia. During this period (in 1836, 
at Terry ville, in Plymouth, Conn.), he was ordained as an evan- 
gelist. 

Efforts for the moral elevation of the negroes were so circum- 
scribed by State laws and public sentiment that in 1840 he 
accepted a call to the Congregational Church in Tallmadge, Ohio, 
where he remained until August, 1843. From Tallmadge he 
went in the following autumn to the Congregational Church in 
Cornwall, Yt., where he was installed July 9, 1844. He was 
dismissed from this charge, September 14, 1847, symptoms of 
pulmonary disease requiring a change to a Southern climate. He 
spent three or four years as the principal of Young Ladies' Sem- 
inaries in Greensboro' and Athens, Ga., and then with restored 
health became the first pastor of the Second Congregational 
Church in Waterbury, Conn., which was gathered in April, 1852. 
He resigned this charge, November 29, 1 864, to organize schools^ 
for the freedmen in Georgia and the southwest, under the care of^ 
the American Missionary Association. Two years of this labor 
proved very exhausting ; but after a period of rest, during which 



b 



175 

he was engaged in soliciting funds for the Yale Divinity School, 
he was recalled to his former charge in Cornwall, where he was 
installed October 13, 1867. After eleven years in this pastorate, 
disease of the heart required him to cease from regular work. In 
1878 he bought a home in Amherst, Mass., and there in the con- 
genial atmosphere of a college town spent his last years. 

He died in Amherst, of angina pectoris, January 20, 1884, at 
the age of 73. 

He married, June 12, 1 834, Helen Almira, daughter of Stephen 
Twining (Y. C. 1795), of New Haven, Conn., who survives him 
with their only child, a graduate of this College in 1858. 

In 1875 the degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on 
him by Middlebury College. He was a man of dignified pres- 
ence, and faithful in pastoral work. Both in Cornwall and in 
Waterbury he has left an abiding impression. 

1832. 

Richard Simpson Fellowes, son of James and Waite T. 
(Simpson) Fellowes, was born in Troy, N. Y., March 4, 1814. 

Soon after graduation he entered upon a mercantile life (in con- 
nection with the wholesale clock and watch business) in New 
York city ; the active part of this business he laid down in 1858, 
and he left it entirely in 1863. 

He married in 1839 Emma Wistar, of Philadelphia, who died 
May 25, 1852. In 1854 he came to New Haven to reside, in the 
house which was his home for the rest of his life. Here he devo- 
ted his leisure to works of public and private charity, varied by 
foreign travel, and the cultivation of his literary taste. His 
beneficent personal sympathy with want and suftering, the out- 
come of his strong religious character, made him a most valuable 
citizen. From the establishment of the State Hospital for the 
Insane, at Middletown, in 1866, until his death, he was a very 
efficient member of its Board of Trustees. 

He died in New Haven, March 10, 1884, aged 70 years, in con- 
sequence of an attack of paralysis twelve days before. His only 
son died at the age of thirty ; three daughters are still living, — 
the eldest the wife of J. Davenport Wheeler (Ph.B. 1858). 

Joseph Longworth, son of Nicholas Longworth, was born in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, October 2, 1813. 

Having graduated at Augusta College, Ky., he entered the 



176 

Senior Class in this College. From New Haven he returned to 
Cincinnati, and studied law in the Cincinnati Law School, but 
never entered upon practice. 

Upon his father's death, in 1863, he found himself responsible 
for the management of an estate of five millions. In this posi- 
tion he showed sound financial judgment. His gifts to charitable 
objects were large. He inherited from his father a love for art, 
and became a very liberal contributor to the aesthetic interests of 
Cincinnati, especially by endowing a School of Design. 

He married, in early life. Miss Reeves, daughter of Dr. Lang- 
don Reeves, who died before him. One of his two sons (both of 
whom graduated at Harvard College) and a daughter survive 
him. 

He died of paralysis in Cincinnati, December 30, 1883, aged 70 
years. 

Augustus Theodore Norton, only son of Theodore and 
Mary (Judd) Norton, was born in Cornwall, Conn., March 2», 
1808. 

After graduation he was principal for two years of the academy 
in Catskill, N. Y., at the same time reading theology with the 
Rev. Thomas M. Smith (Y. C. 1816). On April 1, 1835, he was 
ordained pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Windham, Greene 
County, N. Y. ; but his strong preference of the West as a field 
of labor led him to resign this pastorate after a few months, and 
remove to Illinois. He arrived at Naples, in that State, in Octo- 
ber, 1835, and after short engagements in that town, in Griggs- 
ville, in Pittsfield, and in St. Louis, he was called in February, 
1839, to the pastorate of the First Presbyterian Church in Alton, 
Illinois, and was installed there on the 9th of the following May. 
This position he held for more than 19 years, the church flour- 
ishing greatly under his leadership. In May, 1845, he originated, 
and for 23 years edited and published the Presbytery Reporter^ 
a monthly magazine. 

In September, 1859, he was appointed "District Secretary of 
Church Extension and Home Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church," for the West, and for a few months after this he resided 
in Chicago ; but in the spring of 1861 he returned to Alton, 
where he continued till his death. After the union of the Old and 
New School Assemblies in 1870, the field of his secretaryship 
was limited to the Synod of Illinois South. He died, after a 



177 

lingering illness, in Alton, April 29, 1884, at the age of 76. His 
usefulness was especially marked in planting and nourishing 
churches in Central and Southern Illinois. The degree of Doctor 
of Divinity was conferred on him by Wabash College, Indiana, 
in 1868. He published in 1879 a History of the Presbyterian 
Church in Illinois (737 pp. 8vo). 

He married, November 12, 1834, Eliza, daughter of Deacon 
Noah Rogers, of Cornwall, who survives him with two sons and 
two daughters. 

John Derby Smith, the youngest son of Nathan Smith, 
M.D., Professor of Medicine in Dartmouth College, was born in 
Hanover, N. H., April 9, 1812. The year after his birth his 
father became the head of the newly organized Medical Institu- 
tion of Yale College. 

In 1833 he entered the Yale Divinity School, and after two 
years there and two in the Andover Theological Seminary, he 
was licensed to preach in 1837. After a brief employment as 
acting pastor in Athol, Mass., he was ordained, November 20, 1839, 
pastor of the 2d Congregational Church in Charlemont, Mass., 
where he continued until August 11, 1844. Then, on the par- 
tial failure of his health, he took up the study of medicine, and re- 
ceived a diploma from the Baltimore Medical College in 1846. In 
June, 1848, he was resettled over his former charge in Charle- 
mont, which he finally left in May, 1852, though for some time 
longer residing in the town, which he represented in the State 
Legislature in 1854. He supplied the pulpit in Berkley, Mass., 
from 1854 to 1858, and in Douglas, Mass., from 1860 to 1863, 
when he entered the U. S. Army as a 'contract-surgeon. After 
the close of the civil war he was for a short time a clerkjin the 
Treasury Department at Washington, and in July, 1867, received 
the appointment of acting assistant surgeon in the U. S. Navy. 
At the close of four years' charge of the Naval Hospital in Pen- 
sacola, Fla., his health was so far broken by attacks of fever that 
he was ordered home on sick leave. His later years were spent in 
the village of Scotland, in Bridgewater, Mass., where he died, of 
congestion of the liver, April 26, 1884, aged 72 years. 

He married, March 17, 1837, Sarah, daughter of Garry Bacon, 
of Woodbury, Conn., who died May 11, 1848. He next married, 
April 22, 1849, Mary M. Dole, of Charlemont, who died March 
30, 1854 ; he was again married, April 12, 1855, to Susan A,, 



178 

eldest daughter of Dr. J. H. Anthony, of Providence, R. I., who 
died June 10, 1883. He left a large family of children ; one son 
by his third marriage received the degree of M.D. at this College 
in 1878. 

William Jewett Tenney, son of the Rev. Dr. Caleb J. Ten- 
ney (Dartmouth College 1801) and Ruth (Channing) Tenney, 
was born in Newport, R. I., where his father was then settled as 
l^astor, in 1811. He entered College from Wethersfield, Conn, 
(the place of his father's later settlement), in 1827, but spent only 
the Freshman year with the class of 1831. 

He studied medicine, and was for a time connected, with the 
medical service in the Retreat for the Insane, in Hartford, Conn. 
Later he went to Western New York and began the study of 
law, and was for a time in active practice. 

About 1 840 he settled in New York City, and was successively 
engaged in editorial work on the Journal of Commerce and the 
Evening Post. Subsequently (1853-55) he was the editor of the 
Mining Magazine, and was also for a time connected with Hunt's 
Merchants' Magazine. He also became connected with the pub- 
lishing house of Appleton & Co., and was employed on many of 
their publications ; he was, for instance, the editor of the American 
Annual Cyclopaedia from its inception in 1861 until his death. 
Among the services which he rendered the same firm was the 
completion of the Rise and Fall of the Confederate States, by 
Jefferson Davis. In the summer of 1883, being in poor health, 
he paid Mr. Davis a visit, and returned home somewhat improved, 
but soon after died of conjestion of the lungs, at his home in 
Newark, N. J., on the 20th of September, 1883. 

Besides his literary labors, he was at one time presiding judge 
of one of the criminal courts of Brooklyn, and during President 
Buchanan's administration was collector of the port at Elizabeth, 
N.J. 

He married Sarah, daughter of Dr. Orestes A. Brownson, of 
Boston, who died at Elizabeth, October 30, 1876. Two sons and 
three daughters are living. 

Charles Archibald Winthrop, son of Francis B. Winthrop 
(Y. C. 1804) and Julia Ann (Rogers) Winthrop, was born in New 
York City, January 25, 1813. Before he entered College his 
family had removed to New Haven. 



179 

In 1844 he married Jeannette Bradley, of New Haven, and 
was for several years after this engaged in agriculture in Tioga, 
N. Y. In 1848 he was again married, to Mary Boyer, of Caro- 
line, Tompkins County, N. Y. About 1860 he removed to 
Owego, N. Y., and continued there until September, 1869, when 
he came to Cambridge, Mass., on account of Mrs. Winthrop's 
health; he having been again married, December 14, 1854, to 
Mary C. Gray, of Boston. 

He died in Cambridge, June 5, 1884, in the 72d year of his age. 

1833. 

Elishama Brandegee, son of Elishama Brandegee, was born 
in Berlin, Conn., January 14, 1814. 

On graduation he entered the Law School in New Haven, and 
after a partial course there entered the Medical Institution of Yale 
College, from which he received his degree in 1838. 

He practiced medicine in St. Louis, Mo., for two years. In the 
spring of 1841 he married Florence Stith, of Petersburg, Va., and 
from that date until his death practiced in his native town. He 
died, in an honored old age, in Berlin, from paralysis, February 
17, 1884, in his 7lst year. 

His widow, with six sons and three daughters, survives him. 
The eldest son was graduated at the Sheffield Scientific School in 
1870, and the youngest son has just completed the Sophomore 
year in College. 

Amasa Brainard Campbell, youngest son of James and 
Elizabeth Campbell, was born in Litchfield, Herkimer County, N. 
Y., September 29, 1808, and had been a member of Amherst 
College before entering Yale. 

About fifteen years of his life, partly previous to and partly 
subsequent to graduation, were devoted to teaching, chiefly in his 
native State and in Illinois, to which latter State he removed about 
1836. He married, October 1, 1835, Mary A., daughter of David 
Whittlesey, of New Preston, Conn., who died October 29, 1849. 
He next married, August 7, 1857, Abigail Crosby, at Ohio City, 
O., who died March 18, 1884. 

In 1863 he removed from his farm in Illinois to the northern 
part of Missouri, where he continued, engaged in farming (in 
Brookfield and Macon City) until about 1878, when he went to 
North Springfield, in the southwestern part of the same State. 



180 

He died there, January 18, 1884, in his 76th year, having been 
enfeebled for some months from the effects of a cyclone which 
destroyed his home. Three daughters and one son survive him. 

Edward Ruggles Landon was born in Guilford, Conn., May 
31, 1813, the eldest son of Nathaniel Ruggles and Mary (Gris- 
wold) Landon. 

On leaving College he studied law in New Haven, and later in 
Detroit, and began practice in Tecumseh, Mich. He married in 
Guilford, January 1, 1838, Miss Anna Theodora Lay, who died 
September 18, in the same year, with her infant child, in Tecum- 
seh. In December, 1838, he returned to Guilford, where the rest 
of his life was spent in the practice of his profession. He was 
chosen town-clerk in 1848, and judge of probate in 1854, and held 
both positions by continued re-election until the year of his death. 
In 1866 he was a member of the State Senate, and in 1870 of the 
House of Representatives. He was long the principal magistrate 
in the town, prominent and useful in all public affairs, and 
universally respected for integrity and fidelity. 

H§ died in Guilford, after a long illness, of gastric fever and 
disease of the nervous system, on the 25th of July, 1883, in the 
71st year of his age. 

He married, October 5, 1871, Miss Parnel C. Hotchkiss, of Guil- 
ford, who survives him without children. 

1834. 

John Robinson Keep, son of Samuel and Anne (Bliss) Keep, 
was born in Longraeadow, Mass., May 22, 1810. 

After graduation he was employed for a year in the " N. Y. 
Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb," and then 
spent two years in the Yale Divinity School. Having then 
accepted an appointment to go to China in the service of the 
Morrison Education Society, he was prevented by an attack of 
partial blindness (amaurosis), which laid him aside from study 
for three years ; after which he was able to begin preaching in 
Union ville, a village in Farmington, Conn., where he was instru- 
mental in gathering a Congregational Church. Thence he went 
to Franklin, N. Y., where he was ordained pastor of the Congre- 
gational Church, May 5, 1842, and remained till January, 1844. 
He then returned to Connecticut, and was installed, June 12, 
1844, over the Congregational Church in Warren, Litchfield 



^ 



181 

County. He was dismissed from this charge, Nov. 5, 1852, on 
account of ill health. 

He then took a position as teacher in the Ohio Institute for the 
Deaf and Dumb ; but finding the climate too debilitating accepted, 
the next year, an invitation to a similar position in New York 
City. From New York he removed to Hartford in 1854, where 
he was an honored instructor in the American Asylum for the 
Deaf and Dumb for nearly all the rest of his life. 

He died in Hartford, after long feebleness, June 15, 1884, at the 
age of 74. 

He married, Aug. 24, 1844, Rebecca, daughter of the Rev. Dr. 
Noah Porter (Y. C. 1803), of Farmington. She survives him 
with one son (Y. C. 1865) and one of their two daughters. 
Their younger son died in 1867, at the close of his freshman year 
in College. 

Billings Peck Learned, second son of Deacon Ebenezer 
Learned (Y. C. 1798) and Charlotte (Peck) Learned, of New 
London, Conn., was born in Norwich, Conn., June 24, 1813, and 
entered College in 1829. He left towards the close of Freshman 
year, and returned a year later to join the next class. 

He studied law with Judge Henry M. Waite (Y. C. 1809), of 
Lyme, and with Judge Wm. L. Storrs (Y. C. 1814), of Middle- 
town, Conn., and was admitted to the Middlesex County bar. He 
established himself in the practice of the law, with good pros- 
pects, in Lockport, N. Y., but was soon obliged in consequence of 
ill health to relinquish the profession. He was then engaged for 
a few years in the flou^r business in Troy, and after that became a 
farmer in Ballston, N. Y. Thence he removed to Albany, and in / 
1850 engaged in the manufacture of stoves, in company with Ex- 
Mayor Thacher. After a few years the partnership was dissolved, 
and on Mr. Learned's taking an active part in the organization of 
the Union Bank, he was made its President, which position he 
held until his sudden death, which occured in Albany, April 16, 
1884, in his Ylst year. 

He married, November 1, 1836, Mary A., daughter of William 
Noyes, of Lyme, Conn., who died December 30, 1875. Of their 
six children, three daughters and one son are still living. 

Nathaniel Smith Richardson, second son and fifth child of 
Nathaniel and Comfort (Stone) Richardson, was born in Middle- 
bury, Conn., January 8, 1810. 




182 

After graduating, he spent two years in teaching : one as prin- 
cipal of the Academy in Millbury, Mass., and the other in the 
"Episcopal School of North Carolina," at Raleigh. He then 
spent two years in the General Theological Seminary in New 
York City, and on July 8, 1 838, was ordained Deacon in the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church, by Bishop Brownell, at (what is now) 
Portland, Conn. He immediately accepted the rectorship of 
Christ Church, Watertown, Conn., where he was advanced to the 
Priesthood by Bishop Brownell, September 29, 1839. In 1845 he 
resigned, to accept the rectorship of Christ Church, Derby, Conn., 
and while there became interested in a project for the establish- 
ment of a new periodical in the interests of the Episcopal Church. 
Accordingly in 1848 he removed to New Haven, and devoted 
himself to the " American Quarterly Church Review," of which 
he was sole editor and proprietor. In 1861 he removed the review 
to New York City, where he also took duty as assistant minister 
of St. Thomas' Church. Twenty years of such exhaustive labor 
at last broke down his health, and early in 1867, having disposed 
of his magazine, he accepted the rectorship of St. Paul's Church, 
a missionary enterprise in Bridgeport, Conn. With characteristic 
energy he devoted himself to building up this parish, until it be- 
came one of the strongest in the city. About 1878 he established 
the Guardian, a weekly Church newspaper, published in New 
York, and finding the double labor too much resigned his rector- 
ship at Easter, 1881. He continued to reside in Bridgeport, 
devoting his entire attention to editing and publishing the Guar- 
dian, until his sudden decease in that city, of paralysis, August 7, 
1883, in his 74th year. 
r^ On the 16th of October, 1838, he married, in New Haven, Miss 
Lydia A., only daughter of the Rev. Dr. James Murdock (Y. C. 
1797), who survives him. They had five sons and one daughter, 
none of whom are now living. 

The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him by 
Racine College in 1857. 

James Bates Thomsox was born in Springfield, Vt., May 21, 
1808, the son of John and Elizabeth (Brown) Thomson. After 
several years' experience in teaching, he entered College in 1829, 
but on completing the Freshman year was obliged to be absent 
on account of illness, and so fell back into the next class. 

After taking his degree he spent one year in New Haven as a 



183 

tesident graduate, and then took charge of an academy in Nan- 
tucket, Mass., where he remained until 1842, when he resigned 
and removed to Auburn, N. Y. He was then intrusted by Presi- 
dent Day with the duty of abridging his treatise on Algebra, and 
for four or five years subsequently devoted himself to the organ- 
ization and extension of Teachers' Institutes and similar gather- 
ings. He removed to the city of New York in 1846, where (and 
in Brooklyn) he spent the rest of his life, engaged to the last in 
the completion and revision of a series of mathematical works, 
which has met with considerable success. He received the degree 
of Doctor of Laws from Hamilton College in 1853, and again from 
the University of Tennessee in 1882, He removed his residence 
to Brooklyn in 1868, and for eight years before his decease was a 
great suflferer from rheumatism. He died in Brooklyn, June 22, 
1883, in his 76th year. 

He married, August 25, 1840, Miss Mary Coffin, who survives 
him with their only child, a daughter. 

1835. 

Horatio Smith Noyes. was born in Brattleboro', Vt., April 
16, 1815. He was the son of the Hon. John Noyes (Dartmouth 
College 1795), of Putney, Vt., a member of Congress in 1815-17, 
and of Polly (Hayes) Noyes, a sister of the father of President 
Hayes. 

In 1830 he entered Dartmouth College; but in the winter of 
his Sophomore year was so prostrated by severe illness that he 
was obliged to withdraw from his class. He entered Yale in 1833. 

After graduation he was engaged in business until 1838, when 
he returned to Putney to take care of his father's afiairs ; and 
thence he removed to Brattleboro' in 1840, as cashier of a bank. 
He left this employment in 1851 and went to Springfield, Mass., 
where he engaged in manufacturing, insurance, brokerage, patent 
and pension business, and in editing a new evening paper. In 
1867 he removed to Newton, Mass., where he chiefly resided, oc- 
cupied in dealing in real estate, until his death in that place, after 
a very brief illness, August 10, 1883, in his 69th year. 

He married May 24, 1843, Mary Augusta, youngest daughter 
of Judge David Chandler, of Rockingham, Vt. She died Febru- 
ary 22, 1855, leaving one son, who is still surviving. On the 19th 
of May, 1857, he married Abbie S., daughter of Charles Wood- 
man, of Boston, who is still living with two sons and one daughter. 



184 



1836. 



Dan Collins Curtiss, third son and sixth child of Benjamin/ 
and Mary (Collins) Curtiss, was born in Meriden, Conn., October 
23, 1807. 

After graduating he studied theology for three years in the 
Yale Divinity School. His first settlement in the ministry was as 
pastor of the Congregational Church in the parish of Green's 
Farms, in the town of Westport, Conn., where he was ordained 
June 4, 1840. On January 5, 1843, he was dismissed, and on 
October 4 of the same year was installed over the Congrega- 
tional Church in Brookfield, Conn, where he labored for twelve 
years with marked success. Traveling in the West in the sum- 
mer of 1855, he received a call to become acting pastor of the 
Congregational Church in Fort Atkinson, Wise, and against the 
unanimous wishes of his former people he removed thither in the 
following October. In November, 1863, he removed to the Con- 
gregational Church in Fort Howard in the same State, of which 
he remained the acting pastor until his death. From the end of 
October, 1882, he was compelled by failing health to cease from 
active labor; and he died in Fort Howard, July 24, 1883, in his 
'i'6th year. 

He married, April 12, 1842, Harriet, eldest daughter of James 
Atwater, of New Haven, who died in Brookfield, October 17, 
1844, leaving two daughters, both of whom are still living. On 
the 9th of May, ] 847, he married Frances A., daughter of James 
French, of Monroe, Conn., who survives him, with one son and 
one daughter. 

1837. 

James Kilbourn, the son of Whitman and Thalia (Osborn) 
Kilbourn, was born in Litchfield, Conn., May 27, 1816.. He left 
college during the first term of Junior year, on account of ill 
health, but was admitted to a degree in 1851. 

From 1835 to 1840 he was on a farm in Litchfield, and soon 
after entered the Yale Divinity School, where he studied between 
one and two years. On the 21st of February, 1844, he was 
ordained and installed pastor of the Congregational Church in 
Bridgewater, Conn., where he remained until July 1, 1850. After 
preaching as a stated supply in Prosj^ect, Conn., for two years, he 
was installed over the Congregational Church in Middle Haddam, 
Conn., on the 4th of Mav, 1853. This connection was terminated 



( 



185 

on the Ist of July, 1857 ; he then removed to the West, and for 
the next six years supplied the church in Sandwich, 111. Thence 
he went to Lanark, in Carroll County, 111., where he labored as a 
Home Missionary for about two years, and thence to Union Grove, 
Wise, where he took charge of the Congregational Church for a 
year and a half. In 1866 he removed to Racine, Wise, where, 
until the time of his death, he was engaged in city missionary 
work, for which he seemed eminently fitted. He died suddenly 
of heart disease, July 23, 1883, at the age of 67. 

On December 12, 1838, he married Miss Amelia C, daughter 
of the Rev. Bela Kellogg (Williams College, 1800), of Avon, 
Conn., who died May 5, 1862. He married as his second wife. 
May 12, 1863, Miss Marcia A., daughter of Deacon Calvin Jen- 
nings, of West Brookfield, Mass., who survives him with his four 
sons — two by each marriage. 

Benjamin Nicholas Martin was born in Mount Holly, N. J., 
October 20, 1816, the second son of John Peter Martin, a sol- 
dier of the Revolution, and Isabella (Innes) Martin. 

After graduation he studied theology in the Theological 
Department of Yale College for three years, and during the year 
1841 supplied the Carmine Street (now the West) Presbyterian 
Church in New York City. On the 19th of January, 1843, he 
was ordained pastor of the First (Congregational) Church in 
Hadley, Mass., where he remained till the summer of 1847, when 
he felt compelled, by his wife's health, to seek another charge. 
On the 19th of July, 1848, he was installed over the Fourth Pres- 
byterian Church in Albany, N. Y., but resigned in November, 
1849. For three years more he remaii.ed in Albany, preaching 
often in the vicinity, and much engaged in writing and studying, 
— extending his studies especially into the domain of the natural 
sciences. 

In October, 1852, he was appointed to the professorship of In- 
tellectual Philosophy and Rhetoric in the University of the City 
of New York, and here found the appropriate work of his life. 
He continued in active service until his death, — the title of his 
chair being meantime changed to Philosophy and Logic. His 
previous studies gave him a breadth of culture peculiarly desira- 
ble in his new work, and his ardent interest in his pupils and 
love for truth kept him always a learner and an enthusiastic, 
inspiring teacher. 



186 

He died, of acute bronchitis, in New York City, December 26, 
1883, aged 67 years. 

He married, July 1, 1841, Miss Louisa C. Strobel, who died 
April 3, 1883, leaving an only son. 

He received the degree of S.T.D. from Columbia College in 
1862, and that of L.H.D. from the Regents of the University of 
the State of New York in 1869. He had been for some years a 
prominent member and officer of the Evangelical Alliance, the 
American and Foreign Christian Union, the Society for the Pre- 
vention of Crime, and the New York Academy of Sciences. Be- 
sides many reviews and essays in the religious magazines and 
papers, his chief publication was a volume of " Choice Specimens 
of American Literature," of which two editions have been issued. 

1838. 

Sanders Diefendorf was born in Minden, Montgomery 
County, N. Y., April 24, 1816, and had been a member of Rutgers 
College, before joining this College at the beginning of the Sopho- 
more year. 

After graduation he spent a few months in teaching at West 
River, Md., and in May, 1839, took charge of a young ladies' 
school in Annapolis, at the same time studying theology. In 
September, 1841, he was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of 
Albany, and after preaching at Esperance, N. Y, removed in 1844 
to Millersburg, Holmes County, Ohio, where he supplied the 
Presbyterian Church. In April, 1845, he was ordained by the 
Presbytery of Coshocton, and became pastor of two churches, one 
in Hopewell and one in Nashville, both in Holmes County. From 
this service he was called in the Spring of 1849 to be pastor of 
the church and principal of Vermilion Institute, a Presbyterian 
academy in Hayesville, Ashland County, Ohio. Here his remain- 
ing years were spent, with brief interruptions; in 1853-4 he 
preached in Athens, O., in 1868-9 had charge of academies in 
Lincoln, Nebraska and Tipton, Mo., and in 1869-73 taught in 
Bridgeton, N. J. After this he was recalled to Hayesville by the 
citizens who had found him so faithful to their educational inter- 
ests in the past. His influence was felt for good in the community 
as truly as among his pupils. In recognition of his soundness as 
a theologian and his success as an educator the degree of Doctor 
of Divinity was given him by Jefferson College in 1859. 

He married, November 11, 1839, Miss Mary E. Taylor, of 



187 

Cazenovia, N. Y., who died in 1864 ; of their seven sons and six 
daughters, all but two sons are still living. He next married Miss 
Mary E. Harris, of Bridgeton, who survives him. 

George Thuelow Dole died in Reading, Mass., March 26, 
1884, in his Yeth year. He was born in the town of Newbury 
(Byfield parish), Mass., October 30, 1808, the only son of Moses 
and Sarah (Thurlow) Dole. He was engaged as a skillful 
machinist in Lowell, when in 1833 he decided to study for the 
ministry. He entered College at the beginning of the Sophomore 
year. 

After graduation he studied theology for two years in the Yale 
Divinity School, and finished his course at Andover in 1841. He 
was ordained pastor of the Washington Street (Congregational) 
Church in Beverly, Mass., October 6, 1842, and was dismissed, 
after a suspension of labor for several months on account of hem- 
orrhage of the lungs, July 1, 1851. He was installed pastor of 
the Congregational Church in North Woburn, Mass., October 12, 
1852, and was dismissed October 3, 1855. From July, 1856, to 
July, 1863, he served as acting pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Lanesboro', Mass., and then removed to Stockbridge, 
Mass., and taught the Williams Academy for one year. From 
April, 1864, for eight years he acted as pastor of the church in 
Curtisville, a village in the same town. He remained in Stock- 
bridge (still preaching) until May, 1875, when he removed to 
Reading, where he continued till his death, from acute bronchitis, 
March 26, 1884, in his '76th year. 

He married, May 10, 1843, Jane P. Treat, of South Britain, in 
Southbury, Conn., who survives him, with two daughters. 

1839. 

Levi Wells Flagg, eldest son of Augustus and Lydia (Wells) 
Flagg, was born in West Hartford, Conn., February 14, 1817. 

After graduating he spent three years in Louisiana as tutor in 
the family of Judge Butler of New Orleans. He then pursued 
the study of medicine for two years in Hartford, and in 1844 
entered the office of Dr. Willard Parker in New York City. He 
also attended lectures in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
from which he graduated in 1847. In the spring of 1847 he took 
up his residence in Yonkers, N. Y., where he remained in success- 
ful practice till his death. In 1849 he became acquainted with 



188 

Dr. Grey, of New York, and in consequence soon after took up 
the study of horaceopathy, which school of practice he afterwards 
followed. He was widely known and beloved as a physician, and 
always genial and hope-inspiring both as a friend and medical 
adviser. In 1881 his health began to fail owing to disease of the 
heart, and he lost at that time the sight of one eye. He continued^ 
however, to practice to some extent till within two months of his 
death, from heart-disease, at his home in Yonkers, May 15, 1884, 
in his 68th year. 

He married, May 17, 1848, Charlotte, daughter of Capt. Samuel 
Whitman, of West Hartford, Conn., who survives him, with 
three sons and two daughters. 

Richard Dudley Hubbard was born in Berlin, Conn., Sep- 
tember 7, 1818. 

Being early left an orphan he became a resident in the family 
of Ozias Roberts, of East Hartford, Conn., where he prepared 
for College. 

After graduation he studied law for one year in the office of 
Judge William Hungerford (Y. C. 1809), in Hartford, and for 
one year in the Yale Law School. In 1842 he was admitted to 
the bar and immediately began the practice of bis profession in 
Hartford. In 1842-1843 he represented East Hartford in the 
State Legislature, but in the latter year removed to Hartford, 
where he resided for the rest of his life. From 1846 to 1869 he was 
State's Attorney for Hartford County. In 1855 and 1 858 he repre- 
sented the town in the Legislature. He was sent to Congress in 
1867; and in 1877 was elected on the Democratic ticket to the 
Governorship of Connecticut for a term of two years. He was 
superior to partisan politics, and as a lawyer, as an orator, and a 
social companion was admired and beloved by all who knew him. 

His brilliant and honored career was suddenly closed by his 
death, in Hartford, of acute Bright's disease, complicated with 
blood poisoning, on the 28th of February, 1884, in his 66th year. 

He married, in December, 1845, Mary, daughter of Dr. Wm. 
H. Morgan, of Hartford, who survives him. Their children were 
three sons and three daughters. 

1840. 

JosiAH Curtis was born in Wethersfield, Conn., April 30, 
1816. He entered College with the class, but left during Sopho- 
more year, and received a degree in 1860. 



\ 



189 

He subsequently studied medicine and received tlie degree of 
M.D. from the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, in 184^3. 
The next year he settled in the practice of medicine in Lowell, 
Mass., and thence removed in 1849 to Boston, where he continued 
in his profession until 1861, when he entered the U. S. volunteer 
service, and was commissioned as brigade surgeon. He served 
in the field and in hospitals until the close of the war, and attained 
the rank of Colonel of Cavalry — the highest rank in the Volun- 
teer Medical Department. He then took up his residence in 
Knoxville, Tenn., but his exposures and labors during the war 
had so impaired his health that he was not able to resume his 
profession. During his later years he devoted much time to the 
study of natural history. In 1872 he crossed the Rocky Moun- 
tains as surgeon, m^croscopist, and naturalist to the U. S. Geolo- 
gical Survey, and in 1873 was appointed chief medical officer to 
the U. S. Indian Service. 

He died suddenly in London, August 1, 1883, in his 68th year. 

John Waldo Douglas was born in Trenton, N. Y., April 14, 
1818.. 

He taught school for a time in the South, and in 1844 began the 
study of theology in the Union Seminary, New York City. On 
completing (after some interruptions) his course there in 1848, he 
was intending to go as a missionary of the American Board to 
Africa ; but the acquisition of California by treaty at that date, 
appealed to him strongly, and he sailed for that Territory in De- 
cember, under a commission from the American Home Missionary 
Society. He was ordained November 29, 1848, as a Presbyterian 
-minister. For eighteen months he labored in San Jose, and thence 
went to Los Angeles. From Los Angeles he removed in 1851 to 
San Francisco to act as editor and proprietor of *' The Pacific," 
a weekly religious newspaper which was begun at that time. 
After four years of very severe labor in this position he parted, in 
the autumn of 1855, with his interest in the paper, resigned the 
editorship, and returned to his mother's home in Trenton. 

He did not resume ministerial labors, but spent his time in 
literary work and in the care of his health, which was never 
robust. During the late war he was in the civil service on the 
Union side in connection with military railroads in North 
Carolina, and in 1864 was a member of the New York Legislature 
ii'om Oneida County. 



190 

He died, after a few hours' illness, of congestive chills, at North 
Lake, Herkimer County, K Y., September 24, 1883, in his 66th 
year. He was never married. 

1841. 

Francis Mayrant Adams, eldest son of the Rev. Dr. Jasper 
Adams (Brown, 1815), was born October 9, 1821, while his father 
was Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Brown 
University, and entered College at the beginning of Sophomore 
year, when his father was Chaplain and Professor at West Point. 

Just after his graduation his father, who had recently removed 
to Pendleton, South Carolina, died, and his son took up at once 
the work of teaching in the same locality. He also studied law,, 
and was admitted to the bar. 

He married, in 1853, in St. Mary's, Ga., Miss Isabel McDonald, 
and was for many years a rice-planter at that place. His feeble 
health prevented his taking an active part in the late civil war, 
but his sympathies were entirely with the South. He died, in St. 
Mary's, March 15, 1884, in his 63d year, after a lingering and 
painful illness. His widow and his only child, a daughter who is 
a helpless invalid, are left in straitened circumstances. 

Henry Waldo Denison, son of Dr. Henry and Hannah 
(Waldo) Denison, was born at North Inlet, Georgetown County, 
S. C, September 3, 1821. 

After graduation he studied in the Law School in New Haven 
for three years, and was admitted to the bar here in June, 1844. 
He was for a tiqje in a law office in New York City, and subse- 
quently engaged in mercantile business in Richmond, Ya., which 
he left for California in 1850. He returned to Richmond shortly 
before the beginning of the late civil war, and during its continu- 
ance was employed in the War Department of the Confederate 
States. From the close of the war till the time of his death he 
was employed in various mercantile pursuits in Richmond. He 
died, unmarried, in a hospital near Richmond, December 22, 1882, 
in his 6 2d year. 

1844. 

Charles Henry Crane, son of Col. Ichabod B. Crane, 1st U. 
S. Artillery, was born in Newport, R. I., July 19, 1825. 

He graduated from the Medical Department of Harvard Uni- 



191 

versity in August, 1847 ; and having been approved by a Medical 
Examining Board, December 11, 1847, as a candidate for the 
position of Assistant Surgeon in the U. S. Army, immediately 
accompanied a detachment of troops to Mexico. His commission 
was dated February 14, 1848. He returned from Mexico early in 
August, and from November, 1848, till August, 1851, was stationed 
in Florida. From 1852 till the end of 1856 he was on duty in 
California and Oregon. From 1857 until March, 1862, he was in 
New York City, being promoted to the rank of Major and Svirgeon 
May 21, 1861. He served successively in the department of Key 
West, and in the department of the South, as Medical Director, 
until September, 1863, when he was placed on duty in the Sur- 
geon General's office at Washington. In March, 1865, he received 
the brevets of Lieut. Colonel, Colonel, and Brigadier General for 
faithful and meritorious services during the civil war; and July 
28, 1866, he was appointed Assistant Surgeon General of the Army 
with the rank of Colonel. On the 3d of July, 1882, he was ap- 
pointed Surgeon General. He died at his residence in Washington, 
after a brief illness, October 10, 1883, in his 59th year. His 
sound judgment, delicate sense of justice, deliberateness of action, 
and firmness of decision, had won him an enviable reputation. 

He married, in July, 1861, Sarah Payne NicoU, of Shelter Island, 
N. Y., by whom he had one son. 

Hannibal Lowe Stanley was born March 13, 1824, in Rogers- 
ville. East Tennessee, and his earlier education was received in 
Virginia. The removal of his parents, Rufus and Mary (Clark) 
Stanley, to the North caused him to prepare for college at Ando ver, 
Mass.; and he entered from Monroe, Mich., in 1840. 

He studied and taught in Monroe during the year after -gradua- 
tion, and then began a theological course in Lane Seminary ; after 
two years there he removed to the Yale Divinity School, where 
he graduated in 1848. 

His desire to go as a Missionary to China could not be carried 
out for family reasons ; and his first employment in the ministry 
was at Le Roy, N. Y. While supplying the Presbyterian Church 
in Churchville, N. Y., he was ordained, September 24, 1850, by 
the Presbytery of Le Roy, and left immediately for the West, 
where he had charge for eleven years of the Presbyterian Church 
in Jonesville, Mich. From 1862 to 1867 he was the stated supply 
of the Presbyterian Church in Lyons, Iowa, and for the three 



192 

succeeding years agent for Lyons College. He went to the 
Presbyterian Church in Wheatland, Iowa, in 1870, and continued 
there for eight years. In all these successive pastorates his 
charges flourished under his care. 

In 1879 he took up his residence in Lake Forest, 111., for the 
better education of his children, and to the end of his life contin- 
ued to busy himself in every good work. He labored successfully 
in raising funds for the Lake Forest University, and also took the 
burden of two feeble churches in the vicinity. 

He died very suddenly of heart disease at his home in Lake 
Forest, July 12, 1883, in his 60th year. 

He married at Monroe, Mich., October 15, 1848, Elizabeth A., 
daughter of Charles Noble, who died August 23, 1849, leaving one 
daughter, who died soon. He next married, at Fredonia, N. Y., 
October 14, 1856, Cornelius C, daughter of Hiram J. Miner, who 
survives him, with three sons and two daughters. 

1845. 

James Beebee Brinsmade, son of James B. Brinsmade (Y. 
C. 1813) and Phebe (Smith) Brinsmade, was born in New York 
City, May 1, 1824, and entered College at the beginning of the 
Junior year. 

After graduation he began the study of law in the oiRce of the 
Hon. Victory Birdseye, of Pompey, N. Y., but completed his 
studies in Albany. He was admitted to the bar in October, 1847, 
and remained in successful practice in Albany until 1853, when 
he removed to New York City to enter into a partnership with 
William C. Barrett, which lasted until 1868, when his health 
partially failed from overwork. He had for some years acted as 
council for several of the iron- works in the State, and he was now 
admitted to a partnership in the Poughkeepsie Iron Works, and 
occupied mainly with the manufacture of iron at Poughkeepsie for 
the rest of his life, though retaining his residence in Brooklyn. 

He fell heavily on the ice near his home on the 26th of Decem- 
ber, 1883, breaking his thigh, and he died of syncope of the heart 
on the 3d of the following month, in the 60th year of his age. 

He married, October 12, 1854, Miss Jennie Newman, daughter 
of Henry Newman, of Albany, who survives him, with their three 
sons and three daughters ; the second son is now a member of the 
Freshman class in this College. 



193 

John Tallmadge Marsh, son of the Rev. Dr. John Marsh 
(Y. C. 1804) and Frances (Tallmadge) Marsh, was born in Had- 
dam, Conn., where his father was then pastor, December IV, 
1825. In 1837 his father settled in New York City, as the Secre- 
tary of the American Temperance Union, and there young Marsh 
entered the University and completed the Freshman year, begin- 
ning Sophomore at Yale in 1842. 

The year following graduation he spent in teaching in an acad- 
emy in Kingston, N. Y. He then began theological studies, 
spending one year in the Union Theol. Seminary, N. Y. City, and 
three years in Andover. In the fall of 1851 he went to Illinois, 
and labored in that and in the neighboring States of Iowa and 
Wisconsin for about twelve years under a commission from the 
American Home Missionary Society ; he was ordained at Peoria, 
111., September 14, 1853. In 1863 he enlisted as a private in the 
Ist Ohio Light Artillery, but was mainly employed as clerk in a 
hospital and in the Quartermaster-General's office, until mustered 
out of service in 1866. He then acted for a short time as Super- 
intendent of the Colored Schools of the American Missionary 
Association in Washington, and in 1867 became acting pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Harpersfield, N. Y. There he 
remained for four years, and for the next ten years was employed 
by the N. Y. Home Missionary Society to supply feeble churches 
in different parts of the State for brief periods. In 1881 he was 
again commissioned for the West by the American Home Mis- 
sionary Society, and after two years' labor in Colfax, Washington 
Territory, was sent in September, 1883, to Siskiyou County, 
Northwestern California. Here he died, of pneumonia, after one 
week's illness, in Etna Mills, March 21, 1884, in his 59th year. 

He married, August, 1853, Miss Susan M. Huntoon, of Marble- 
head, Mass., who died in Peoria, June, 1854, leaving a son who is 
still living. He next married, January, 1856, Mrs. Lucy E. Jenks, 
of Roscoe, 111., who died in Fort Howard, Wise, August, 1858. 
On the 6th of June, 1861, he married Miss Josephine A. Stowell, 
of Friendship, Wise, who is believed to be still living. 

1846. 

Henry Case, son of Deacon Samuel and Sally (Bailey) Case, 
was born in Norwich, Conn., November 19, 1823. 

After graduating he studied law in Norwich, and began prac- 
tice in Winchester, 111., thence removing to Middletown, Conn. 
3 



194 

Subsequently he took a two years' course in the Yale Divinity^ 
School, and was ordained an evangelist at Norwich, July 31^ 
1855. He went immediately to Ohio, and was stated preacher, 
first at McConnellsville, and afterwards at Cuyahoga Falls. After 
some years he resumed the practice of the law. In the late civil 
war, he was appointed (May, 1868) Colonel of the 129th Illinois 
Infantry, served as such for two years, and accompanied Gen. 
Sherman on his march to the sea. He was breveted Brigadier 
General in March, 1865. 

On the return of peace, he reopened his law-office in Jackson- 
ville, 111. 

His health failing, he finally returned to his father's house in 
Norwich, where he died, March 12, 1884, aged 60 years. 

He was never married. 

Edwin Johnson was born in Plymouth, Conn., December 1, 
1826, the son of Robert and Wealthy Johnson. 

After leaving New Haven, he taught for two or three years in 
the city of New York, where he also studied theology at the 
Union Seminary, afterwards completing the course in 1850 at the 
Yale Divinity School. During a part of the ensuing year he was 
acting pastor in Milford, Conn., and on the 6th of June, 1851, he 
was ordained over the Congregational Church in Jacksonville, 
III, where he remained until May 26, 1859. On June 29, 1859, 
he was installed over the Bowdoin Street (Congregational) 
Church, Boston, Mass., and thence he removed (October 16, 1861) 
to the Hammond Street Church, in Bangor, Me., from which he 
was dismissed, November 7, 1865, having accepted a call to be- 
come the first pastor of the Congregational Church in Baltimore, 
Md. In November, 1869, he resigned this charge, and went 
abroad for health and recreation. After his return he was in- 
stalled over the South Congregational Church in Bridgeport, 
Conn., in November, 1870, where he spent six years. In 1878 he 
established a young ladies' seminary in Morrisania, New York 
City, and from that time until his death also supplied the Congre- 
gational Church there. 

He died in Morrisania, December 25, 1883, at the age of 57. 

He published, beside occasional sermons, and many articles in 
reviews, a volume of poems. 

He married, August 21, 1850, Sarah K., daughter of James 
Bartlett, of Portsmouth, N. H., who survives him with one son 
and three daughters. 



I 



195 

Orson William Stow was born in Rocky Hill, Conn., May 
30, 1820, the elder son of Solomon and Eunice (Shepherd) Stow, 
and entered College in the spring of the Sophomore year. 

The same year with his graduation he entered the Yale Divin- 
ity School, finishing the course in 1849. His health, to his great 
disappointment, hindered his asking at the time for a license to 
preach ; and in June, 1849, he engaged with his father and 
brother in his native place in manufacturing tools for workers in 
tin and sheet iron, hoping soon to be able to return to his profes- 
sion. But his health continued poor for eight years ; after that 
date, his strength recovered, but he continued in successful manu- 
facturing business, having ^Iso marked success as an inventor. 
His business was removed to Plantsville, in Southington, Conn., 
in 1852, and from 1871 until his death he held the vice-presidency 
of the Peck, Stow and Wilcox Manufacturing Company ; he was 
also president of the Southington Water Company, and a director 
in other local enterprises. He represented the town in the legis- 
lature from 1873 to 1877. Though thus engaged he did not lose 
sight of the ends which actuated his theological study. He took 
an active part in the formation of the Congregational Church in 
Plantsville, and held office in it for many years. 

He died, suddenly, in Plantsville, of rheumatism of the heart, 
November 10, 1883, in his 64th year. 

He married, June 13, 1849, Sarah, second daughter of Stephen 
Walkley of Southington, who survives him with their son and 
daughter. 

1847. 

John Robinson was born in Letterkenny, County Donegal, 
Ireland, September 17, 1819. Coming to the United States in 
1836, he taught school until his admission to College (in the third 
term of the Junior year) from Philadelphia. 

After graduation he took charge successively of the academies 
in Doylestown, Norristown, and Danville, Pa., studying law in 
the meantime with the Hon. Caleb Wright and Judge Cooper^ 
and being admitted to the bar in 1852. He then settled in Phila- 
delphia, where he practiced his profession until laid aside by his 
last illness. His leisure was closely occupied with the study of 
the classics and current literature. He died in Philadelphia, May 
9, 1882, in his 63d year. 

He married in April, 1856, Anna M., daughter of Gen. Valen- 



196 

tine Best, of Danville, by whom he had three sons, all of whom 
survive him. 

1848. 

DwiGHT Foster, the only son of the Hon. Alfred Dwight 
Foster (Harv. Coll. 1819) and Lydia (Stiles) Foster, of Worces- 
ter, Mass., and grandson of Judge Dwight Foster (Brown Univ. 
1774), of Brookfield, Mass., was born in Worcester, December 
13, 1828. 

From 1849 to 1851 he was a student in the Law School of 
Harvard University, and he then entered Judge Bacon's office in 
Worcester. He practiced law in Worcester for several years, and 
then removed his office to Boston, to which city he also removed 
his residence in 1864. From 1861 to 1864 he was Attorney-G-en- 
«ral of Massachusetts, and from 1866 till his resignation in 1869 
was one of the associate justices of the Supreme Court, being thus 
the fourth Judge Foster on the bench of the State in direct lineal 
succession. In 1869 he returned to practice, in which he was 
engaged until his death. Before leaving Worcester he had already 
'been recognized as a leader at the bar, and his later career was 
one of steadily advancing distinction. His native ability, his 
extensive and accurate learning, and the judicial character of his 
mind were conspicuous both on the bench and at the bar. The 
-degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred on him by this College 
in 1871. 

Judge Foster died in Boston, after several months of feeble 
health, from heart disease, April 18, 1884, in the 56th year of his 
age. 

He married, August 20, 1850, Henrietta P., younger daughter 
of the Hon. Roger S. Baldwin (Y. C. 1811), of New Haven. She 
survives him, with four sons and three daughters ; one son is a 
graduate of Harvard College, and two are graduates of Yale Col- 
lege, while the youngest is a member of the present senior class. 

1850. 

Joseph Forward Foote, for many years a prominent citizen of 
Nor walk, Conn., died at his residence in that town, December 5, 
1883, in his 56th year. He was the youngest son of Col. Thad- 
deus and Polly (Forward) Foote, of Southwick, Mass., where he 
was born, February 7, 1828. 

Immediately on leaving College he entered upon the study of 



197 

the law in Norwich, Conn., in the office of the Hon. LaFayette S. 
Foster. At the end of a year he removed to Norwalk, and con- 
cluded his studies in the office of the Hon. Orris S. Ferry, being 
admitted to the bar in December, 1852. For thirty-one years he 
resided in Norwalk in the practice of his profession, actively for 
most of the time, but chiefly by way of consultation for the last 
four years. During the two terms (1855-67) of the administra- 
tion of the Hon. Wm. T. Minor as Governor of the State, he held 
the position of Executive Secretary, and was subsequently for 
many years the trial justice for Fairfield County in Norwalk. He 
was also for twelve years clerk of the court of burgesses and of 
the borough, and for several years selectman of the town. In all 
places of trust, public or private, his course was highly honorable 
to himself and satisfactory to his constituents. 

He married, March 20, 1873, Jennie D., youngest daughter of 
George B. Middlebrook, of Norwalk, who survives him. 

1853. 

William Pope Aiken-, son of Capt. Lemuel S. and Sarah 
(Coffin) Aiken, was born in Fairhaven, Bristol County, Mass., 
July 9, 1825. 

After his graduation he taught for two years in New Haven, 
and then for a little over a year filled a tutorship in the College, 
at the same time studying theology in the Divinity School. On 
the 14th of January, 1857, he was ordained colleague-pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Nevvington, Conn. The senior 
pastor, Dr. Brace, died in 1861, and Mr. Aiken continued in office 
until his resignation, August 7, 1867. He was then made princi- 
pal of the Lawrence Academy, in Groton, Mass., but this engage- 
ment was terminated in 1869 in consequence of the destruction of 
the school-building by fire. Ill health obliged him then to abstain 
from active work, and he retired to Rutland, Yt., the home of his 
wife's family. From 1873 to 1876 he served as acting pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Vergennes, Vt. ; but after this 
employment was not able to undertake any stated labor. 

He died in Rutland, March 29, 1884, in his 59th year. 

He married, August 13, 1857, Susan C, daughter of the Hon. 
Edwin Edgerton, of Rutland, who survives him, with their two 
sons and two daughters. The elder son was graduated at this 
College in 1881. 



198 



1854. 



Joseph Morgan Smith, elder surviving son of the Rev. James 
A. Smith (Y. C. 1826) and Mary (Morgan) Smith, was born in 
Glastonbury, Conn., April 26, 1833. 

After graduating he taught in Elmira, N. Y., until April, 1855. 
He soon entered the Theological Seminary in Andover, Mass., 
where he completed his studies (with some interruption, caused 
by an engagement as teacher) in March, 1869. In the following 
June he became acting pastor of the Congregational Church in 
West Avon, Conn., and there he was ordained August 2. He 
closed his labors in West Avon, October 1, 1862, and removed to 
his father's house in Unionville, Conn. While paying a visit in 
Chicago, in August, 1863, he was brought into acquaintance with 
the Congregational Church at Grand Rapids, Mich., the result of 
which was that he became their acting pastor the next month, 
and continued vsdth the church for twenty years. His career in 
Michigan was one of wide and eminent usefulness. His health 
failing in the summer of 1883, he was compelled to resign, and he 
removed to Dansville, N. Y., for medical care. He died at a 
home for invalids in Dansville, of heart disease, October 1, 1883, 
at the age of 50^ years. 

He married, August 1, 1859, Miss Cordelia Root, daughter of 
Deacon Edward Root, of Middletown, Conn. She survives him, 
with their two daughters and three sons. 

Samuel Walker, son of John and Ann (McNeal) Walker, was 
born in Londonderry township, Chester Co., Pa., June 25, 1825. 
The family removed to Downington, Pa., in 1836, whence he 
entered College in 1850; having acquired the greater part of his 
preparation while working at his trade as a wheelwright. 

After graduation he entered the service of the U. S. Coast Sur- 
vey, and from 1859 to 1866 had charge of the Magnetic Observa- 
tory at Key West, Fla. The series of magnetic observations 
being ended, he resigned on May 15, 1866, receiving the highest 
encomiums for his labors from the Department. 

He immediately entered upon the practice of law, having pre- 
viously prepared himself and been admitted to the bar in 1864. 
On June 18, 1866, he was appointed prosecuting attorney in the 
County Criminal Court at Key West. In 1867 he removed to 
Tallahassee, where he remained for the rest of his life. He 
enjoyed the confidence and respect of his fellow-citizens, and was 



199 

elected member of the Legislature and mayor of the city. He 
was also appointed by the Governor of the State, Judge of Leon 
County Court. In 1874 he was the choice of the majority of the 
Republican members of the Legislature for U. S. Senator. During 
the autumn of 1876 he had a stroke of paralysis, and he was a 
sufferer from nervous debility ever after. Relinquishing his pro- 
fession, he passed the most of his time on a small plantation 
which he had purchased for his amusement some time before. In 
May, 1881, he went North to visit his relatives, and arrived in 
Downington just a month before his death, which occurred at his 
sister's house in that town, June 9, 1881, at the age of 55. 
Mr. Walker was never married. 

1868. 

David Marks Bean, only son of Daniel Q. and Ann (Trickey) 
Bean, was born in Tamworth, N. H., March 30, 1832, and entered 
College from Sandwich, N. H. 

In 1858-9 he taught in Stamford, Conn. During 1860-62 he 
studied in the Andover Theological Seminary, and in 1863 began 
preaching at Groton Junction (now Ayer), Mass., where he was 
ordained July 23, 1863. On the 28th of June, 1864, he was 
installed over the Congregational Church in South Maiden (now 
Everett), Mass., where he continued until his resignation, October 
1, 1867 ; during the preceding winter he served as a member of the 
Legislature of the State, In December, 1868, he was installed 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Webster, Mass. ; becom- 
ing seriously ill in December, 1870, he resigned his pastorate in 
May following. In December, 1871, he went to Europe, and after 
visiting also Egypt and Palestine returned in September, 1872. 
In May, 1873, he took charge of the Congregational Church in 
South Framingham, Mass. ; and soon after his reluctant with- 
drawal from professional work in July, 1879, was elected Super- 
intendent of Schools for the town. He resigned this position, 
also, in consequence of pulmonary trouble, and in November, 
1882, removed with his family to Colorado Springs, Col., where in 
his brief residence he made many warm friends. He died there, 
of mountain fever, January 23, 1884, in his 52d year. 

He married, in Stamford, Conn., May 27, 1863, Miss Fanny M., 
daughter of Seymour Hoyt, who survives him, with their four 
■daughters. 



200 



1859. 



Charles Wheeler Sharp, son of Sherman and Apphia E. 
(Wheeler) Sharp, was born in Newtown, Conn., January 2, 1832, 
and entered College from New Haven at the beginning of Senior 
year. 

After graduation he studied theology for two years in the 
Union Seminary, New York City, and then having been licensed 
to preach continued his studies for another year in the Yale 
Divinity School. His health was not sufficient for pastoral work 
until 1865, when he went to Hancock, Delaware County, N. Y., 
where he was ordained over the Congregational Church on the 
28th of June. A little later he removed to the Congregational 
Church in Greene, Chenango County, N. Y., but after remaining 
there for a year and a half, the condition of his health obliged 
him (in 1867) to give up preaching. 

He then went to Charleston, W. Va., under the auspices of the 
Freedmen's Bureau and the American Missionary Association, to 
erect schoolhouses for the Freedmen in the Kanawha Valley. 
After a year of this employment he was sent by the Association 
just named to Wilmington, and thence to Savannah, as Superin- 
tendent of Schools. In Savannah he organized a Congregational 
Church among the colored population. Subsequently he spent 
some time on a plantation in South Carolina, to recover his health, 
and taught for three years in Connecticut. In 1879, he opened 
in Boydton, Ya,, a school for the higher education of the colored 
people, and after a year's labor went to Boston, Mass., for needed 
rest, and there died, December 13, 1880, of consumption, at the 
age of 49. 

He married, September 28, 1865, Helen Bradford, of Bingham- 
ton, N. Y., who survives him with four daughters. 

Hezektah Watkins, the eldest son of Dr. John D. and Harriet 
Watkins, was born in Liberty, Sullivan County, N. Y., August 
24, 1835. He had graduated from the Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute at Troy, and had spent two years in Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, before entering this College. 

After graduation he studied law and received the degree of 
LL.B. in 1860 at the Albany Law School. He then began prac- 
ticing law in connection with his brother-in-law, Henry R. Low, 
in Monticello, N. Y., and remained there until the fall of 1862^ 
when he organized Company A of the 143d Regiment N. Y. State 



201 

Volunteers, of which company he was appointed Captain on the 
2l8t of November. He was promoted to the rank of Major, 
November 29, 1863, and to that of Lieut.-Colonel, January 8, 
1864, and was subsequently breveted Colonel. He served with 
bis regiment in all its battles and campaigns, until it was mustered 
out of service (July 20, 1865) ; he was in command from Chatta- 
nooga to Atlanta, and thence with Gen. Sherman on his march to 
the coast. He distinguished himself especially in the battle of 
Bentonsville, where after placing his own men he rallied a broken 
regiment and covered a break in the line of the Union army which 
threatened the destruction of one wing. 

After the war he resumed the practice of law in New York 
City, also engaging in other business. He became identi- 
fied with the New Jersey Midland Rail Road Company, as one of 
its directoi-s and as its secretary and treasurer ; and after the col- 
lapse of that company continued his professional practice so far as 
impaired health permitted. He was appointed by the President 
government inspector of certain portions of the Northern Pacific 
Rail Road, and was returning from this trip when prostrated by 
the attack of pulmonary disease which resulted in his death, at St. 
Clair Springs, Michigan, February 12, 1884, in his 49th year. 

He married, in January, 1873, Miss Elizabeth Fitzhugh, daugh- 
ter of Col. Charles C. Fitzhugh, of Bay City, Michigan, who died 
in April, 1880, leaving three children who are still living. 

1860. 

George Dwight Phelps, son of George D. Phelps, was born 
in New York City, August 8, 1839. 

Upon graduation he began the study of law in New York, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1863. He then opened an office in 
Wall street, but did little or no professional business, though his 
residence continued in New York. He was found in a dying 
condition in Vesey street, near Broadway, at an early hour in the 
morning of June 22, 1883, and expired soon after. His skull had 
been fractured, it is supposed, by a fall on the sidewalk or in the 
street. A post-mortem examination showed that his brain had 
been for some time seriously diseased. 

He was unmarried. 



202 

1862. 

Thomas Gairdner Thurston was born, May 9, 1 836, at Kailua, 
Hawaiian Islands, the only son and youngest child of the Rev. 
Asa (Y. C. 1816) and Lucy (Goodale) Thurston, members of the 
:first band of missionaries to the Islands. He died February 22, 
1884, in his 48th year. 

He studied at the Royal School, Honolulu, and then for two 
years at the newly-founded Oahu College, before entering Yale. 
After college he took the usual three years' course in the Union 
Theological Seminary, New York, graduating May 8, 1865. The 
next spring he returned to the Islands, where he was ordained 
and installed at Wailuku, Maui, October 21, 1866. In 1868 he 
removed to California. He was pastor at Grass Valley, Nevada 
County, from January 1, 1869, to the summer of 1872 ; and then 
to the fall of 1874 ministered in Hay wards, Alameda County. 
He then came East, and in the next spring settled in Taylorsville, 
Alexander County, North Carolina. For three years, with his 
wife's cooperation, he taught the Academy there, fitting boys for 
college. Finding increasing employment in preaching he gave 
up the school and devoted himself to the care of three Presby- 
terian churches at Taylorsville, Wilkesboro', and Hickory. In 
1883 he gave up Wilkesboro', retaining the other two as the reg- 
ularly installed pastor ; and at the same time he removed his 
residence to Hickory, where he also became Principal of High- 
land Academy. 

He left home February 22, accompanied by his daughter of six- 
teen years, to go to Taylorsville with his horse and buggy. He was 
to cross the Catawba river, as often before. The river was high, 
and he seems to have tried the ford once, carrying his trunk, and 
then to have returned for his daughter. But the third crossing, 
apparently, was too much for the horse's strength ; both father 
and daughter were carried down the stream and drowned. 

Mr. Thurston was highly respected for intellectual qualities, — 
being of more than average scholarship, much wit, and marked 
individuality, — and for genuine piety and consecration to hir; work. 

He was married at the Islands, October 25, 1866, to Miss Har- 
riet Frances Richardson. She died May 25, 1872, leaving one 
daughter, who died with her father. May 13, 1875, he was mar- 
ried to Miss Alice Gasking, who survives him with a daughter 
and son. 



I 



203 

1863. 

Orlando Franklin Bump, the second of four children of 
Saranel C. and Abby Ann Bump, was born on the 28th of Feb- 
ruary, 1841, in Afton, Chenango County, N. Y. By his own exer- 
tions he secured the means for coming to college, which he entered 
at the beginning of the Junior year. His father had removed 
to Maryland some years before. 

In the fall of 1863 he entered the law office of William Daniel, 
of Baltimore, and in September, 1865, he was admitted to the bar 
of that city, where he was engaged for the rest of his life in suc- 
cessful practice. From 1866 to 1860 he was also on the editorial 
staff of the Baltimore American. In June, 1867, he was ap- 
pointed Register in Bankruptcy, and as an early fruit of his 
studies published in 1868 a work on "The Law and Practice of 
Bankruptcy," which became the leading text-book on that subject, 
and passed through ten editions in as many years. In 1870 he 
edited the U. S. Annotated Internal Revenue Laws, and in 1872 
issued a valuable Treatise on Fraudulent Conveyances. He was 
also employed in 1872 to assist in the revision of the Statutes of 
the United States. In 1877 he published another valuable work, 
on " The Law of Patents, Trademarks and Copyright," and in 
1878 "Notes of Constitutional Decisions." He also annotated 
other legal authors, edited several volumes of the National Bank- 
ruptcy Register, and contributed to various professional journals. 
As an acknowledgment of his eminent ability as a writer this 
college conferred on him the honorary degree of Master of Arts 
in 1876. 

After a lingering illness (malarial fever) he was seized with 
brain fever, which caused his death, at his residence in Baltimore, 
January 29, 1884, in his 43d year. 

He married, July 27, 1870, Miss Sallle E. Weathers, who sur- 
vives him with two of their three sons. 

1865. 

Thomas Chester Ingersoll, the second son of the Hon. 
Charles A. Ingersoll, Judge of the U. S. for the District of Con- 
necticut, and Henrietta (Sidell) Ingersoll, was born in New Haven, 
Conn., May 29, 1845. 

On graduation he went to the Albany Law School, from which 
he received the degree of LL.B. in the spring of 1866. He 
immediately began practice in the city of New York, where he 



L 



204 

continued until the summer of 1873, when he removed to New'" 
Haven and opened an office here. 

He died in New Haven, February 7, 1884, after a week's illness,, 
of pneumonia, in the 39th year of his age. He was unmarried. 

1866. 

Benjamin Poole, son of Benjamin Poole, was born in Tops- 
field, Essex County, Mass., October 12, 1843. 

He was admitted to the bar of Suffolk County, Mass., in 1869; 
having completed his preparatory studies at the Law School in 
Cambridge. He then began practice in Boston, but the gradual 
decline of his health rendered a proper application to his profes- 
sion impossible. After several years he retired entirely from 
business, and passed the remainder of his life at home, a victim 
to a painful catarrhal disease. He died in Topsfield, July 28, 1882,. 
in his 39th year. He was unmarried. 

1867. 

Charles Terry Collins, the eldest son of Charles and Mary 
(Terry) Collins, then of Hartford, Conn., was born in that city, 
October 14, 1845. 

In October, 1867, he sailed for Europe, where he remained, 
engaged in study (in Berlin and Heidelberg) and travel until 
October, 1868. He then entered the Union Theological Semi- 
nary, New York City, where he spent one year. In 1869 he 
removed to the Seminary in Andover, Mass., where he completed 
his studies in 1871. In November, 1871, he took charge of the 
Olivet Chapel Mission, in New York City, being ordained by the 
Presbytery of New York, on the 21st of the following month. 
In May, 1873, prostrated by overwork among the poor people to 
whom his labors were given, he was obliged to give up work tem- 
porarily. He went abroad for rest and travel, remaining until 
November, 1874. In December, 1874, he received a call from the 
Plymouth (Congregational) Church, of Cleveland, O., which he 
accepted, being installed January 27, 1875. When he had nearly 
completed nine years of devoted service in this church, he was 
attacked, in the middle of November, 1883, by malarial fever; and 
after having become convalescent left home for a visit to his 
father's house in Yonkers, N. Y. He arrived in New York City" 
on the afternoon of December 20, and just after having reached: 



205 

the train starting for Yonkers, expired, probably from heart dis- 
ease, at the age of 38 years and 2 months. 

He married, in Pittsfield, Mass., December 26, 1872, Miss May 
A. Wood, who survives him, with three sons and one daughter. 

Mr. Collins was peculiarly fitted for success in the ministry, by 
the singular purity and gentleness of his character, and by his 
elevated Christian zeal, and his special sympathy with efforts for 
benefiting the poor and neglected. The power of his example 
and the effects of his work in Cleveland are already great and not 
to be forgotten. 

1869. 

Edward Heaton, son of Thomas Heaton, was born in Cincin- 
nati, September 29, 1842. Before entering College he served for 
three years and a half (from August, 1861) as a lieutenant in the 
2d Regiment of Artillery, U. S. Army. 

He taught after graduation for a year in Gen. Russell's school 
in New Haven, remained for another year in the city engaged in 
private instruction, and then entered on a tutorship in mathe- 
matics in the College, which he held for two years. He then went 
to his parents' home in Covington, Ky., and after a brief period of 
study was admitted to the Kentucky bar in May, 1874. In the 
ensuing September he came to New York City, and after his 
admission to the bar there, practiced his profession until his 
death. 

He died at his residence in Ridgefield, N. J., January 12, 1884, 
at the age of 41. 

He married, January 28, 1880, Miss Charlotte G. Beers, of 
Litchfield, Conn., who survives him, with two children. 

Moses Stuart Phelps, a sOn of the Rev. Professor Austin 
Phelps (Univ. of Pa. 1837), and a grandson of the Rev. Professor 
Moses Stuart (Y. C. 1799), was born in Andover, Mass., March 
16, 1849. 

After a short experience as tutor in Beloit College, Wisconsin, 
he entered the Theological Seminary at Andover in January, 
1870, where he finished the course in June, 1872. The next year 
was spent in philosophical studies in New Hav^en, and for the two 
following years he was a tutor in the College, having marked suc- 
cess in the department of logic. In 1874 he took the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. After a brief engagement as instructor in 



206 

-mental philosophy in Middlebury College, Vt., he went abroad ia 
the summer of 1876, and spent a year in travel and study (in 
Berlin). He was next employed for a year in literary work in 
New Haven, and in 1878 entered on the duties which occupied 
him for the rest of his life as Professor of Mental and Moral Phi- 
losophy in Smith College (for women) in Northampton, Mass. 

The circumstances of his death were very distressing. While 
spending a part of his summer vacation, with a friend, in the 
Maine woods, on August 29, 1883, he was putting a gun into a 
canoe, when it discharged accidentally a load of buckshot into his 
head, killing him instantly. 

He was not married. 

1870. 

Edwaed Haight Phelps, elder son of the Hon. Edward J. 
Phelps (Middlebury College 1840) and of Mary (Haight) Phelps, 
and grandson of Senator Samuel S. Phelps (Y. C. 1811), was born 
in Middlebury, Vt., June 30, 1847. 

He was prepared for College at Northampton, Mass., under 
Professor Josiah Clark (Y. C. 1833), and on graduation returned 
to his father's house, in Burlington, Vt., to complete his studies 
for the profession of civil engineering. He received the degree 
of C. E. in course from the University of Vermont in 1872. He 
then spent a year in Europe, and shortly after his return received 
the appointment of Civil Engineer of Burlington. In the dis- 
charge of the duties of this office, he manifested the thoroughness 
and energy which proved to be characteristic of his whole career. 
He also took a leading part in the building of the Burlington and 
Lamoille Railroad, and in 1878 was entrusted with an important 
task in the reconstruction of the Panama Railroad. In the spring 
of 1880 he was appointed chief engineer of the Jackson, Lansing 
& Saginaw Division of the Michigan Central Railroad, and in the 
new work which he carried forward while in this responsible 
position he acquitted himself so satisfactorily that in 1883 he was 
promoted to be chief engineer of the Michigan Central and its 
1500 miles of road. He bore a heavy share of responsibility in 
the ensuing season, — notably in the construction of the approaches 
on the Canadian side to the cantilever bridge over the Niagara 
river, — and in consequence of the strain and of excessive labor 
and exposure, was attacked, late in January, 1884, with fever 
which soon developed typhoid symptoms. He died in Detroit, 
March 20, in his 37th year. He was not married. 



207 



1872. 



Clarence Campbell, the second son of Lt.-Gov. Robert and 
Fanny C. Campbell, was born in Bath, N. Y., April 6, 1851. 

He spent two years in the Law School of Columbia College, 
New York City, and received his degree there in 1874. He 
returned to Bath, was admitted to the bar, and began practice 
there the same year. In 1877 he was appointed by Governor 
Robinson to the position of Quartermaster-General on his staff. 
For a brief period, in 1878-9, he was engaged in banking business 
with one of his brothers ; but with this exception continued in 
the practice of his profession until his death. He was also prom- 
inent in social and political matters, and apparently on the 
thl-eshold of a very promising career, when he fell a victim to 
typhoid fever, on the 8th of December, 1883, in his 33d year. He 
was to have been married within a few weeks. 

By his last will General Campbell left the sum of $3000 to the 
College. 



1873. 

Edwaed Sheffield Cowles, son of the Hon. Thomas Cowles 
(Y. C. 1829) and Elizabeth E. (Sheffield) Cowles, was born in 
Farmington, Conn., December 24, 1851, and was prepared for 
College at Phillips Academy, Andover. 

For four years after graduation he remained in New Haven, 
assisting Professor Loomis, more particularly in meteorological 
work. He also pursued a course of study in the Graduate 
Department (in History and Political Science), and in 1876 
received the degree of Ph.D. 

In 1877 he was invited by Miss Porter to take charge of the 
department of Physical Science in her school for young ladies in 
Farmington. His love of scientific study, added to family rea- 
sons, led him to accept the position, the duties of which he per- 
formed for six years with ever increasing interest and devotion. 
For most of this time he also took the general oversight of his 
father's farm. His life was very busy, and in the spring of 1883 
overwork suddenly developed symptoms of consumption. The 
struggle for life was brave but short. In July, at the close of his 
school-work, he went to the Adirondacks, but during ten weeks 
spent there failed rapidly. He then returned to his father's 
house, where he died suddenly, from the rupture of a blood-vessel, 
on the 28th of September, in his 32d year. He was not married. 



208 

1874. 

Charles Ives, son of Charles and Catharine M. Ives, was 
T)orn in New Haven, Conn., February 14, 1853, and was fitted for 
college at the Hopkins Grammar School in this city. 

After graduation he studied law in the Yale Law School, receiv- 
ing the degree of LL.B. in June, 1876. Before leaving the law 
school he entered his father's office and was soon after admitted to 
the bar of his native city. He continued in practice here, after his 
father's death (in 1880), applying himself with signal ability and 
industry, but was seriously affected for several years by hereditary 
rheumatism. He died at his summer residence in West Haven, 
Conn., August 31, 1883, in his 31st year, after a few days' illness, 
of typhoid fever. 

He was not married. 

1875. 

Thomas Slidell Clarke, the only son of the Hon. Thomas 
Allen Clarke (Hamilton Coll. 1834), and Abby H. (Condit) 
Clarke, was born in New Orleans, La., March 25, 1854. 

In May, 1877, he graduated at the Columbia College Law 
School, and was admitted to the New York bar. For the follow- 
ing year he was in the office of Man & Parsons, in New York 
City, but in September, 1878, opened an office of his own in the 
same city, in which he continued through his life. On the 3d of 
July, 1883, he left home in company with a party of friends for a 
trip to the Yellowstone Park ; on his return he was taken ill, of 
peritonitis, and died just after reaching St. Paul, Minn., alone, on 
the 10th of August, aged nearly 29 years. 

He was not married. 

1880. 

Henry Lee Gower, only son of George D. and Ellen (Mans- 
field) Gower, was born in New Haven, Conn., June 19, 1857. 

After graduating he spent a year and a half in business in New 
Haven. Not acquiring a taste for business pursuits, he entered 
the U. S. Army, December 26, 1881, as clerk in the 9tli Infantry, 
and immediately began a rigid course of study, which the leisure 
in the army made possible and its discipline encouraged. While 
engaged in the faithful discharge of his duty, he was stricken 
with malaria, and after two days in hospital died suddenly, from 
a congestive chill, April 8, 1884, at Fort D. A. Russell, Chey- 
-enne, Wyoming Territory, in the 27th year of his age. 



209 

1881. 

James Leighton, son of Andrew and Frances M. Lcighton, 
was born in Abington, Montgomery County, Pa., May 2, 1859, 
and died at his father's house in Glenburn, Lackawanna County, 
Pa., December 5, 1883, in his 25th year. 

The year after graduation he spent in Chicago in the law offices 
of Messrs. E. G. & A. B. Mason. He then returned to New 
Haven, where he continued the study of law in the Yale Law 
School, until prostrated by the attack of typhoid fever, which 
caused his death. 

Mr. Leighton distinguished himself in college as a writer and 
orator, and during the busy years after graduation found time 
for unusually wide reading in Greek and Latin authors as well as 
in the topics more closely related to his studies. His love of hard 
work and desire to improve all his opportunities rendered him 
susceptible to the fatal disease which overtook him on the thresh- 
old of a promising career. 

Eben Hale Wells, youngest son of William H. and Lydia 
S. G. Wells, was born in Chicago, III., March 12, 1860, and died at 
the residence of his parents in the same city, on the 19th January, 
1884, in his 24th year, after two weeks' illness of typhoid fever. 

He was fitted for college at the Chicago High School, entered 
the first class of Lake Forest (111.) University in 18V6, and re- 
mained in that institution two years. In 1879 he entered the 
Junior class in this college. 

After graduation he began the study of law in the office of 
Wilson & Collier, of Chicago, and in the spring of 1883 was ad- 
mitted to the bar. After this he remained with Wilson & Collier 
for a few months, and then went into the law office of Dent & 
Black, where he continued until his fatal illness. 

His versatility and industry gave promise of distinguished use- 
fulness, while his sunny disposition and earnest Christian character 
had endeared him to a large circle of friends. 

1883. 

Fred William Kellogg, son of John D. Kellogg, was born in 
Watertown, Wise, October 30, 1 860. He was prepared for college 
at the Shattuck School, in Faribault, Minn., the family residence 
being at Red Wing, Minn., when he entered Yale. 

After a college career brilliant with promise both as a scholar 
4 



210 

and as a writer, he remained in New Haven under an engagement 
as private tutor ; but about the middle of October was attacked 
by typhoid fever, from the effects of which he died, in New Haven, 
November 19, 1883, at the age of 23. He was looking forward 
to entering the ministry of the Episcopal Church. 

Yew Fun Tan was born in Hong Kong, China, March 1, 
1861, and was sent to America by the Chinese government, in 
1872, in the course of its remarkable educational experiment. 
He was placed at first in a private family for instruction, and was 
subsequently prepared for college at Williston Seminary, East- 
hampton. 

When the Chinese government, in 1881, under conservative reac- 
tion, determined to recall their students, he was one of those first 
singled out for return, because he had become so thoroughly Ameri- 
canized. Taking the matter, however, into his own hands, he broke 
away from the commissioner and remained in New Haven to con- 
tinue his studies. Largely through the instrumentality of the 
late Rev. Dr. Bacon, at whose house he found a home, the means 
were provided for his continuance here. After graduation he 
hoped to go to California to teach his countrymen there ; but this 
plan failing, he availed himself of an offer of employment in the 
office of the Chinese Consulate in New York City. He had been 
at work there for only a few weeks when a confirmed delicacy of 
constitution caused his return for a change of air to Colebrook, 
Conn., the place of his early instruction, where he died among 
friends, November 13, 1883, in his 23d year. 

1826. 

John Glovee Adams, eldest child of John and Ann (Glover) 
Adams, was born in New York City, Aug. 12, 1807, and took the 
first two years of the college course in Columbia College. 

After graduating he began the study of medicine with Dr. 
Alexander H. Stevens, and received the degree of M.D. from the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York in May, 1830. 

During the year 1833 he served as physician to the N. Y. City 
Dispensary, and in May, 1834, went to Europe for two years' 
study in Paris. In October, 1836, he resumed practice in New 
York City, and was soon after elected President of the New 
Medical and Surgical Society. In 1851 he established a monthly 
medical journal, called "The New York Medical Times," 'which 



211 

he continued, for five years. In 1858 he married Margaret 
Aspinwall, daughter of Daniel Sterling, of Bridgeport, Conn., 
and immediately embarked for Europe, which he had repeatedly 
visited before for his health. He returned in August, 1860, and 
resided in Bridgeport until his wife's death in October, 1866. 
Soon after he took up his residence in New York again, where he 
continued to live, with the exception of a long visit to Europe. 

He left New York, May 24, 1884, on a foreign voyage, in feeble 
health, and died at the Adelphi Hotel, in Liverpool, England, 
June 19, 1884, in his 77th year. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1825. 

James Baldwin, son of Dr. Gabriel Baldwin, of Weston, 
Conn., was born in 1802. 

He was for some thirty-five years a practicing physician in that 
part of Weston which is now Easton, and afterwards in Stratford, 
until about 1867. 

He died in Danbury, Conn., July 15, 1883, at the age of 81. 
He had resided there for nearly twenty years, and had been in the 
drug business about fifteen years. 

1834. 

David Bbinsmade Wilcockson Hard was born in Beth- 
lehem, Conn., August 7, 1806. During his medical studies he 
was for some time a private pupil of Dr. Valentine Mott, of New 
York. 

Soon after taking his degree he settled in Montgomery, 
Alabama, where he gained an extensive practice, both as a physi- 
cian and a surgeon. The southern climate affected his health un- 
favorably, and in 1844 he returned to his native town, and gave 
his attention to the manufacture of some special surgical instru- 
ments of his own invention. He died there, January 11, 1881, of 
a chronic disease of the kidneys, in the 75th year of his age. 

He married, April 6, 1836, Miss Anna M. Hard, of Charleston, 
S. C. He had two sons, both of whom died in infancy ; also, two 
daughters, who with his wife are still living. 



212 

Noble Bennet Pickett, the eldest son of Bennet and Sarah 
(Giddings) Pickett, was born, January 19, 1801, in Sherman, then 
the North Society in New Fairfield, Conn. In his early manhood 
he spent ten years in teaching, while at the same time pursuing 
his own studies, in medicine and other subjects. 

In the September after his graduation he was married to Laura 
Giddings, of Sherman. He then settled in professional practice 
in North East, Duchess County, N. Y., but a year later at the 
urgent request of friends removed to Great Barrington, Mass., 
where the rest of his life was spent. His medical skill and his 
earnest religious character made him much beloved. He was also 
specially interested in the educational work of the town. He 
served as a member of the State Legislature during two sessions, 
in 1851 and 1862. His public services were cut short by blind- 
ness, which overtook him about 1870. During the last ten years 
of his life he also suffered much from epileptic attacks. He died 
suddenly at the house of his only child, a daughter, in Great 
Barrington, February 6, 1884, in his 84th year. 

1839. 

Allyn Merriam Hungerpord was born in Watertown, 
Conn., August 16, 1810. 

After graduation he practiced his profession for a short time in 
Hartford, Conn., and then in Cincinnati, O., but in the year 1844 
returned to his native town, where he continued medical practice 
till his death by apoplexy on the 17th of June, 1883, in his 73d 
year. 

He married Emily Piatt, of Prospect, Conn., who died July 15, 
1880. They had but one child, a son, who survives them. 

Dr. Hungerford was thoroughly respected and esteemed as a 
physician and a citizen. He represented Watertown in the State 
Legislature in the sessions of 1850 and 1851, and was Judge of 
Probate in the Watertown district in the years 1851, 1852, 1877, 
and 1878. 

1840. 

Pliny Adams Jewett, the second son of the Rev. Stephen 
and Elizabeth (Backus) Jewett, was born in Hampton, Washing- 
ton County, N. Y., October 4, 1816. 

He graduated from Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., in 1837^ 
On receiving his medical degree, he sailed for Europe, and after 



213 

spending a year or two in study in London and Paris, entered on 
medical and surgical practice in New Haven. In this work he 
continued with great acceptance until the civil war. During this 
entire time he was connected very usefully with the hospital in 
the city, being appointed attending physician as early as 1852. 
Also, from 1856 to 1863 he was Professor of Obstetrics in the 
Medical Institution of Yale College. During the war he relin- 
quished everything else and devoted himself to the care of the 
wounded and disabled soldiers placed under his treatment at the 
Knight Military Hospital. 

After the war he established a sanitarium in Aiken, S. C, but 
the venture proved pecuniarily unsuccessful. He returned to 
New Haven and for the rest of his life was chiefly employed as a 
consulting surgeon. In 1875 he was elected President of the 
State Medical Society; he was also an honorary member of the 
New York State Medical Society. When the State Pharmacy 
Commission was established in 1881, he was appointed president 
of the commission. 

He married Juliet M. Carrington, November 10, 1847, who 
died before him, leaving two sons (the elder a graduate of the 
Medical Department in 1879) and one daughter. 

Dr. Jewett was summoned to Providence, R. I., on April 3, 
1884, to testify as a medical expert in a trial for manslaughter. 
He was there attacked by pneumonia, and died on April 10, at 
the age of 67. 

1850. 

Henry Augustus Collins, the youngest child of Henry and 
Clarissa (White) Collins, was bom in South Hadley, Mass., 
August 27, 1826. 

After graduation he began practice as a homoeopathic physician 
in Conway, Mass., but within three years removed to Springfield, 
Mass., where he soon took a leading place among the physicians 
of his school. His practice increased rapidly and steadily until 
he stood in the foremost rank among the homoeopathic physi- 
cians of the city and vicinity. He died, after five months' illness, 
in Springfield, May 13, 1884, in his 58th year. 

He married, August 20, 1851, Juliette, daughter of Jesse P. 
Bliss, of Wilbraham, Mass. She died soon after his removal from 
Conway, and he next married Mary J.,, daughter of Martin 
Graves, of Springfield, who survives him with three daughters and 
two sons. 

5 



214 



1852. 



Richard Miles Buell, the son of Miles and Lucinda (Plumb) 
Buell, was born in Killingworth, now Clinton, Conn., May 10, 
1822. 

After finishing his early education, he learned the turner's 
trade, but soon relinquished it on account of his health. He then 
taught school in his native place, and studied the so-called Botanic 
system of medicine, but being dissatisfied with it began regular 
study under Reynold Webb, M.D. (Y. C. 1819), of Madison, 
Conn., in 1849. 

After graduation here, he began practice in Killingworth, re- 
moving after two years to Jamestown, N. Y. In 1855 he accepted 
an invitation from Wm. H. Williams, M.D. (Y. C. 1847), to settle 
near him in Brooklyn, N. Y., where he married Miss Anna Louise, 
daughter of the Rev. George F. Butler, of Brooklyn, June 1, 1859. 
The failure of his health from overwork caused him to go to the 
South in 1867 and to Europe in 1869 ; from this time his health 
was not good, but he continued his practice until about two 
months before his death. A complication of diseases gradually 
undermined his strength until his death, of diabetes, in Brooklyn, 
July 1, 1883, in his 62d year. His wife survives him, without 
children. 

Dr. Buell was retiring in disposition, studious in his profession, 
and kind, careful, and skillful as a practitioner. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND THE ARTS. 

(Sheffield Scientific School. 
1874. 

LeRoy Gale, son of William and Elizabeth Naylor Gale, 
was born in New York City, September 18, 1853. 

On leaving New Haven he entered the Bellevue Hospital Med- 
ical College in New York, from which he graduated in 1877. 
He spent two additional years in attendance on medical lectures, 
both in New York and Vienna, and in 1879 began practice in New 
Haven. In 1 880 he removed to New York. 

He died in New York, of typhoid fever, October 6, 1883, at 
the age of 30 years. 



215 

Beverley Livingston, only son of Francis A. and Sara J. 
(Arden) Livingston, of New York City, was born in that city 
December 24, 1852. 

On graduation he entered the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, New York City, where he received the degree of M.D. in 
1877. He was, at a competitive examination, admitted to a posi- 
tion on the staff of Bellevue Hospital, New York, where he spent 
two years. He then went abroad for the further study of pathol- 
ogy, and especially of children's diseases, in Paris and in Wilrz- 
burg. He returned to New York in August, 1881, and began 
practice, giving particular attention to the specialty first named. 
He was elected attending physician at the Northern Dispensary 
and at the Nursery and Child's Hospital, and was very active at 
both those institutions. 

Early in the summer of 1883 he became associated in practice 
with Dr. John T. Metcalfe, and a very promising future seemed 
open before him when he was attacked with diphtheria, and died 
after a few days' illness, in New York City, June 30, 1883, aged 
30^ years. He was not married. 

Dr. Livingston was greatly interested in some branches of natu- 
ral history, and had made while a student here and soon after 
graduation collections of algsB, musci, and other cryptogamous 
plants, of considerable value, and a large collection of microscopic 
specimens, illustrating human histology and pathology. In ac- 
cordance with his request, these collections, with S3, 000 in money, 
have been presented to the Scientific School since his decease. 

1879. 

Arthur Stoddard VanVoorhis, son of Bartow W. and Helen 
VanVoorhis, was born in New York City, July 1, 1858, and died 
in New York City, January 8, 1884, in his 26th year. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 



1876. 



Samuel Arthur Marsden was born in Westville, Conn., Oc- 
tober 14, 1854, the only child of Samuel L. and Catharine P. R. 
(Eaton) Marsden. His delicate health while young obliged him 
to finish his education under private instruction. In 1871 he ac- 



216 

companied his parents to Europe for an extended visit, during 
which he was largely occupied in study. 

After his graduation from the Yale Law School he spent two 
years in the law office of Professor Piatt, and then began practice 
in New Haven. 

He died at his home in Westville on the 8th of July, 1883, in 
his 29th year, after an illness of about ten days, of congestion of 
the brain and cerebro-spinal meningitis. 

He married, October 14, 1879, Miss Kitty E., daughter of the 
Rev. James L. Willard (Y. C. 1849), of Westville, who survives 
him with one son. 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1874. 

John Newton McLoney died in Sioux Falls, Dakota, March 
17, 1884, after an illness of several months, in the 37th year of his 
age. 

He was born in Summit County, Ohio, December 2, 1847, and 
was graduated at Iowa College (Grinnell, Iowa), in 1871. 

After three years spent in the Yale Seminary, he received a 
commission from the American Home Missionary Society for the 
supply of the Congregational Church in Vermillion, Dakota. In 
1879, he was transferred to Sioux Falls, where he was in active 
service until his last illness. 



( 



SUMMARY. 



Academical Department. 



<}Ia8B. Name and Age. 

1814 George Hooker, 91, 

1815 Truman Smith, 92, 

1823 Frederick W. Boardman, 77, 

1823 Edward Goodwin, 83, 

1823 Charles Marvin, 80, 

1825 Simeon North, 81, 

1825 William Twining, 78, 

1826 John G. Adams, 77, 
1826 James 31. Barker, 76, 
1826 Reuben Hitchcock, 77, 
1826 Stephen Hubbell, 82, 

1826 John R. Lee, 79, 

1827 Robert McEwen, 75, 
1827 Charles G. Selleck, 82, 

1829 William P. Apthorp, 77, 

1830 John C. Backus, 73, 

1831 George F. DeForest, 71, 
1H31 Seagrove W. Magill, 73, 

1832 Richard S. Fellowes, 70, 
1832 Joseph Longworth, 70, 
1832 Augustus T. Norton, 76, 
1832 John D. Smith, 72, 
1832 William J. Tenney, 72, 

1832 Charles A. Winthrop, 71, 

1833 EUshama Brandegee, 70, 
1833 Amasa B. Campbell, 75, 

1833 Edward R. Landon, 70, 

1834 John R. Keep, 74, 
1834 Billings P. Learned, 71, 
1834 Nathaniel S. Richardson, 73, 

1834 James B. Thomson, 75, 

1835 Horatio S. Noyes, 68, 

1836 Dan C. Curtiss, 75, 

1837 James Kilbourn, 67, 

1837 Benjamin N. Martin, 67, 

1838 Sanders Diefendorff, 68, 

1838 George T. Dole, 75, 

1839 Levi W. Flagg, 67, 

1839 Richard D. Hubbard, 65, 

1840 Josiah Curtis, 67, 

1840 John W. Douglas, 65, 

1841 Francis M. Adams, 62, 
1841 Henry W. Denison, 61, 
1844 Charles H. Crane, 58, 

1844 Hannibal L. Stanley, 59, 

1845 James B. Brinsmade, 59, 

1845 John T. Marsh, 58, 

1846 Henry Case, 60, 
1846 Edwin Johnson, 57, 

1846 Orson W. Stow, 63, 

1847 John Robinson, 62, 



Place and 
I'Ongmeadow, Mass., 
Stamford, Conn.. 
Perth Araboy, N. J., 
Hartford, Conn., 
Wilton, Conn., 
Clinton, N. Y., 
Laclede, Mo., 
Liverpool, England, 
Cambridge, Mass., 
Clifton Springs, N. T., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Hartford, Conn., 
New London, Conn., 
New Smyrna, Fla., 
Tallahassee, Fla., 
Baltimore, Md., 
Freeport, HI., 
Amherst, Mass., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Cincinnati, 0. 
Alton, 111., 
Bridgewater, Mass., 
Newark, N. J., 
Cambridge, Mass., 
Berlin, Conn., 
North Springfield, Mo., 
Guilford, Conn., 
Hartford, Conn., 
Albany, N. Y., 
Bridgeport, Conn., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Newton v'lle, Mass., 
Fort Howard, Wise. 
Racine, Wise. 
Ne\y York City, 
Hayesvilie, 0.. 
Reading, Mass. 
Yonkers, N. Y., 
Hartford, Conn., 
London, England, 
North Lake, N. Y., 
St. Mary's, Ga., 
near Richmond, Va., 
Washington, D. C, 
Lake Forest, 111., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Etna Mills, Cal., 
Norwich, Conn., 
Morrisania, N, Y., 
Southington, Conn., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 



Date of Death. 

March 14, '84. 
May 3, '84. 
Feb. 10, '84. 
Oct. 25, '83. 
Dec. 1, '83. 
Feb. 9, '84. 
June 5, '84. 
June 19, '84. 
June 4, '82. 
Dec. 9, '83. 
March 3, '84. 
Jan. 21, '84. 
Aug. 29, '83. 
January, '84. 
March 14, '83. 
April 8, '84. 
Sept. 16, '83. 
Jan. 20, '84. 
March 10, '84. 
Dec. 30, '83. 
April 29, '84: 
AprU 26, '84. 
Sept. 20, '83. 
June 5, '84. 
Feb. 17, '84. 
Jan. 18, '84. 
July 25, '83. 
June 15, '84. 
April 16, '84. 
Aug. 7, '83. 
June 22, '83. 
Aug. 10, '83. 
July 24, '83. 
July 23, '83. 
Dec. 26. '83. 
Feb. 14, '84. 
March 26, '84. 
May 15, '84. 
Feb. 28, '84. 
Aug. 1. '83. 
Sept. 24, '83. 
March 1 5, '84. 
Dec. 22, '82. 
Oct. 10, '83. 
July 12, '83. 
Jan. 3, '84. 
March 21, '84. 
March 12, '84. 
Dec. 25, '83. 
Nov. 10, '83. 
May 9, '82. 



218 



1848 Dwight Foster, 55, 

1850 Joseph F. Foote, 56, 

1853 William P. Aiken, 58, 

1854 J. Morgan Smith, 50, 
1854 Samuel Walker, 55, 

1858 David M. Bean, 51, 

1859 Charles W. Sharp, 49, 

1859 Hezekiah Watkins, 48, 

1860 George D. Phelps, 44, 

1862 Thomas G. Thurston, 41, 

1863 Orlando F. Bump, 4H, 

1865 Thomas C. IngersoU, 38, 

1866 Benjamin Poole, 38, 

1867 Charles T. Colhns, 38, 
1869 Edward Heaton, 41, 

1869 M. Stuart Phelps, 34, 

1870 Edward H. Phelps, 36, 

1872 Clarence CampbeU, 32, 

1873 Edward S. Cowles, 31, 

1874 Charles Ives, 30, 

1875 Thomas S. Clarke, 29, 

1880 Henry L. Gower, 26, 

1881 James Leighton, 24, 
1881 Eben H. Wells, 24, 
1883 Fred W. Kellogg, 23, 
1883 Yew Fun Tan, 22, 



Boston, Mass., 
Norwalk, Conn., 
Rutland, Vt., 
Dansville, N. Y., 
Tallahassee, Fla., 
Colorado Springs, Col., 
Boston, Mass., 
St. Clair, Mich., 
New York City, 
Alexander Co., N. C, 
Baltimore, Md., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Topsfleld, Mass., 
New York City, 
Ridgefield, N. J., 
Chamberlain Lake, Me,, 
Detroit, Mich., 
Bath, N. Y., 
Farmington, Conn., 
West Haven, Conn., 
St. Paul, Minn., 
Cheyenne, Wyoming, 
Glenburn, Pa., 
Chicago, 111., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Colebrook, Conn., 



April 18, '8C- 
Dec. 5, '83. 
March 29, '84. 
Oct. 1, 'B3. 
June 9, '81. 
Jan. 23, '84. 
Dec. 13, '80. 
Feb. 1 2, '84. 
June 22, '83. 
Feb. 22, '84. 
Jan. 29, '84. 
Feb. 7, '84. 
July 28, '82. 
Dec. 21, '83. 
Jan. 12, '84. 
Aug. 29, '83. 
March 20, '84. 
Dec. 8, '83. 
Sept. 28, '83. 
Aug. 31, '83. 
Aug. 10, '83. 
April 8, '84. 
Dec. 5, '83. 
Jan. 19, '84. 
Nov. 19, '83. 
Nov. 13, '83. 



Medical Department. 



1825 
1834 
1834 
1839 
1840 
1850 
1852 



1876 



1874 



James Baldwin, 81, 
David B. W. Hard, 74, 
Noble B. Pickett, 83, 
Allyn M. Hungerford, 73, 
Pliny A. Jewett, 67, 
Henrv A. Collins, 57, 
Richard M. Buell, 61, 



Danbury, Conn., 
Bethlehem, Conn., 
Great Barrington, Mass. 
Watertown, Conn., 
Providence, R. I., 
Springfield, Mass., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 



Law Depabtment. - 
S. Arthur Marsden, 28, Westville, Conn., 

Theological Department. 
John N. McLoney, 36, Sioux Falls, Dak., 



July 15, '83. 
Jan. 11, '81. 
Feb. 5, '84. 
June 17, '83. 
April 10, '84. 
May 13, '84. 
July 1, '83. 



July 8, '83. 
March 17, '84. 



Department op Philosophy and the Arts. 

{Sheffield Scientific School) 

1874 LeRoy Gale, 30, New York City, 

1874 Beverley Livingston, 30, New York City, 

1879 Arthur S. VanVoorhis, 25, New York City, 



Oct. 5, '83. 
June 30, '83. 
Jan. 8, '84. 



The number of deaths above given is 89, and the average age of the graduates 
of the Academical Department is 60|- years. 



The oldest living graduates are — 
Class of 1813, Rev. David L. Hunn, of Buffalo, N. Y., born Nov. 5, 1789 ; 

" 1814, Rev. Leonard Withington. of Newburyport, Mass., born August 
9, 1789. 



INDEX. 



Class. Page. 

1 841 Adams, Francis M 190 

1826 Adams, John G. 210 

1853 Aiken, Wm. P 197 

1829 Apthorp, Wm. P 172 

1830 Backus, John C 172 

1825 m Baldwin, James 211 

1826 Barker, James M 167 

1858 Bean, David M 199 

1823 Boardman, Frederick W. ...165 

1833 Braudegee, Elishama 179 

1845 Brinsniade, James B 192 

1852 m Buell, Richard M. 214 

1863 Bump, Orlando F 203 

1833 Campbell, Amasa B 179 

1872 Campbell, Clarence .207 

1846 Case, Henry 193 

1875 Clarke, Thomas S. 208 

1867 Colli*, Charles T 204 

1850 m Collins, Henry A 213 

1873 Co wles, Edward S 207 

1844 Crane, Charles H 190 

1840 Curtis. Josiah 188 

1836 Curtiss, Dan C .184 

1831 DeForest, George F .173 

1841 Denison, Henry W. 190 

1838 Dief endorff , Sanders .186 

1838 Dole, George T 187 

1 840 Douglas, John W 189 

1832 Fellowes, Richard S 175 

1839 Flagg, Levi W. 187 

1850 Foote, Joseph F 196 

1848 Foster. D wight 196 

1874^5 Gale, LeRoy, 214 

1823 Goodwin, Edward 165 

1880 Gower, Henry L. 208 

1834 m Hard, David B. W 211 

1869 Heaton, Edward 205 

1826 Hitchcock, Reuben 168 

1814 Hooker, George 163 

1839 Hubbard, Richard D 188 

1826 Hubbell. Stephen 169 

1839 m Hungerford, Allyn M 212 

1865 Ingersoll, Thomas C 203 

1874 Ives, Charles 208 

.1840 m Jewett, Pliny A 2121 



Class. 

1846 

1834 

1883 

1837 

1833 

1834 

1826 

1881 

1874 p 

1832 . 

1827 

1874 t 

1831 

1876 I 

1845 

1837 

1823 

1825 

1832 

1835 

1870 

1860 

1869 

1834 m 

1866 

1834 

1847 

1827 

1859 

1832 

1854 

1815 

1844 

1846 

1883 

1832 

1834 

1862 

1825 

1879 p 

1854 

1859 

1881 

1832 



Page. 

Johnson, Edwin 194 

Keep, John R. 180 

Kellogg, Fred. W. 209 

Kilbourn, James 184 

Landon, Edward R 180 

Learned, Billings P 181 

Lee, John R 169 

Leighton, James 209 

Livingston, Beverley 215 

Longworth, Joseph 175 

McEwen, Robert 170 

McLoney, John N -.216 

Magill, Seagrove W -.174 

Marsden, S.Arthur 215 

Marsh, John T 193 

Martin, Benj. N 185 

Marvin, Charles 166 

North, Simeon 166 

Norton, Aug. T 176 

Noyes, Horatio S. 183 

Phelps, Edward H 206 

Phelps, George D 201 

Phelps. M. Stuart 205 

Pickett, Noble B 212 

Poole, Benj 204 

Richardson, Nathaniel S 181 

Robinson, John ..195 

Selleck, Charles G 17 1 

Sharp, Charles W.. 200 

Smith, John D 177 

Smith, Jos. Morgan 198 

Smith, Truman 164 

Stanley, Hannibal L. 191 

Stow, Orson W 195 

Tan, Yew Fun 210 

Tenney, Wm. J 178 

Thomson, James B 182 

Thurston, Thos. G 202 

Twining, William 167 

Yan Voorhis, Arthur S 215 

Walker, Samuel 198 

Watkins, Hezekiah 200 

Wells, Eben H 209 

Wmthrop, Charles A ,178 




>»^ 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 



Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 



June, ISSa. 



Including the Record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

[PRESEi\TED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALrMNI, JUNE 23d, 1885.] 

[No. 5 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 44 of the whole Record.] 



Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, Printers, 
New Haven, Conn. 



.'■' 



OBITUAET BECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical year ending in 

June, 1885. 

Including the record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting op the Alumni, June 23d, 1885.] 
[No. 5 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 44 of the whole Record.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1814. 

Leona-rd Withington, sou of Joseph W. and Elizabeth 
(White) Withington, was born in Dorchester, Mass., Aug. 9, 
1789, and died in Newbury, Mass., April 22, 1885, in his 96th 
year, being the last survivor of his class, and older than any other 
surviving graduate, as well as the oldest Congregational clergy- 
man in the country. He entered College as a Sophomore, having 
already served an apprenticeship as a printer, and having thus 
acquired an ambition for a literary life. 

While in College he decided to enter the ministry, and accord- 
ingly upon graduation pursued such studies with President 
Dwight and with his own pastor, the Rev. Dr. Codman, and also 
for a few months at Andover. On the 31st of October, 1816, he 
was ordained as pastor of the First church in Newbury, Mass., 
and there spent his long life. After forty-two years of active ser- 
vice, while his powers were still in full vigor, he retired on the 
anniversary of his ordination, with the title of senior pastor, and 
his declining years were passed in calm happiness in the midst of 
his grateful people. 



224 

He was a man of original thought and vigorous expression, and 
of extensive and accurate learning. No one could meet him, 
even casually, without admiration of his unusual gifts. 

He published in 1836, anonymously, two volumes of essays, en- 
titled "The Puritan" (16°, pp. 248, 268); and also, in 1861, 
"Solomon's Song, translated and explained" (12°, pp. 329), be- 
sides numerous sermons, addresses, and lectures. Bowdoin Col- 
lege gave him in 1850 the degree of Doctor of Divinity. 

He married, Jan. 17, 1817, Sophia, daughter of William Sher- 
burne, Esq., of Boston, who died April 1, 1826. On the 28th of 
May, 1827, he married Caroline, daughter of the Hon. Nathan 
Noyes, M.D. (Dartmouth Coll.), of Newburyport, who died Aug. 
5, 1860. By his first wife he had three sons, who are all dead, and 
by his second wife five sons and four daughters, of whom two 
sons and the daughters survive him. 



1817. 

Jonathan Silliman was born in Chester, Conn., July 22, 
1793, and died in Cornwall, N. Y., May 13, 1885, aged nearly 92 
years. He was the son of Deacon Thomas and Huldah (Dunk) 
Silliman, and the grandson of the Rev, Robert Silliman (Y. C. 
1737). 

He studied theology in Andover Seminary, teaching meantime 
for one year in Phillips Academy, and finishing his professional 
studies in 1821. He soon went South and labored as a home 
missionary in eastern Virginia, being ordained on October 8, 
1823. In 1830 he was settled over the Presbyterian Church in 
New Kent, Va., and on September 5, 1832, he married Anna, 
daughter of the late Rev. Dr. Amzi Armstrong, of Perth Amboy, 
N. J., and widow of Mr. Jared Mead; she was a woman of 
remarkable intelligence. As both his own and his wife's health 
suffered from the Virginia climate, they returned to the North in 
1835, and in the same year he was installed over the Canterbury 
Presbyterian Church in Cornwall, Orange County, N. Y., where 
he labored in the ministry until his voluntary retirement in 1862. 
He continued his residence among his former people, and his 
benign presence was felt as a benediction. 

His wife died January 24, 1882. Their only child, a colonel in 
the Union army, died at Beaufort, S. C, in 1864. 



225 



1819. 



David Booth, the eldest son of David and Margaret (Colton) 
Booth, was born in Longmeadow, Mass., December 10, 1796. 

After his graduation he taught for a while in Maryland and 
elsewhere, and studied law with the late Hon. George Bliss, of 
Springfield, Mass. His father dying in 1827, he returned to the 
old farm at Longmeadow, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. He married Ann Colton, of Longmeadow, in 1833, and died 
August 11, 1884, leaving no children. 

He was a man of marked intelligence and strict integrity, and 
his quiet life was more than ordinarily useful to the community 
in which it was mainly spent. 

1820. 

Alexander Catlin Twining, son of Stephen Twining (Y. C. 
1795) and Almira (Catlin) Twining, was born in New Haven, 
Conn., July 5, 1801. 

He left College with the intention of entering the ministry, 
and soon after studied for one year in Andover Theological 
Seminary. In 1823 he returned to New Haven as tutor in the 
College, in which office he served for two years. Meantime he 
had decided to become a civil engineer, and now went to West 
Point to prepare himself for his profession. He was first em- 
ployed upon the State works of Pennsylvania, and his earliest 
independent work was in 1835-37 as chief of the survey for the 
Hartford and New Haven railroad; he was subsequently em- 
ployed either as chief or consulting engineer upon every railroad 
running out of New Haven (excepting possibly the Derby road). 
In like manner he was employed on the northern lines running 
up the Connecticut and through Vermont, on the Lake Shore 
road between Bufialo and Erie, and on other roads in Ohio, 
Illinois, and Michigan. From 1839 to 1848 he filled the chair of 
Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Middlebury College, 
Vt. ; this position he resigned to give himself the more fully to 
his engineering labors. He removed from Middlebury to New 
Haven in 1852, and resided here for the rest of his life. From 
1856 until his death he was a deacon in the First Church, in 
which his father had filled the same office. 

For several years after his return to New Haven his labor was 
mainly given to the development of his invention for the artifi- 
cial production of ice on a large scale and with economy. The 



226 

principle of his invention was widely adopted, but he failed to 
secure pecuniary recompense for it. He made valuable original 
investigations in astronomy, mathematics, and physics ; and was 
equally interested in questions of theology and political science, 
both in their theoretical and practical aspects. In connection 
with the remarkable star-shower of November, 1833, he deserves 
the credit of first suggesting the correct theory of radiation of 
meteor tracks from a fixed point among the stars. 

Early in October, 1884, he was attacked with congestion of the 
brain, and he died at his home in New Haven on the 22d of 
November, in his 84th year. 

He married, March 2, 1829, Miss Harriet Amelia Kinsley, of 
West Point, N. Y., who died October 12, 1871. Their children 
were three sons (graduates of this College) and four daughters ; 
they survive their parents, with the exception of one son who 
died in the war. 

1823. 

Geoege Washington Blagden was born in Washington, D. C, 
October 3, 1802, and entered College in 1820. 

After graduation he took the three years' course in Andover 
Theological Seminary. On the 26th of December, 1827, he 
was ordained the first pastor of the Congregational Church in 
Brighton, Mass., then just organized as a result of the prevailing 
Unitarian controversy. He left this parish to accept a call to the 
Salem Street (Congregational) Church in Boston, where he was 
installed, November 3, 1830; and he was dismissed on September 
6, 1836, from this engagement, to be installed on the 28th of the 
same month over the Old South Church, in the same city. He 
had already developed unusual power as a preacher, and in this 
important pulpit he sustained himself with honor. He was also 
a member of the State Constitutional Convention in 1853, and 
from 1854 to ]859 was one of the Board of Overseers of Harvard 
University, from which institution he had received a doctorate in 
divinity in 1850, as well as from Union College in 1849. A 
colleague pastor was settled in 1857. In 1872 he resigned his 
charge, continuing, however, to be connected with the church 
as pastor emeritus until his death. In 1883 he removed to New 
York City, to spend his remaining days in the home of a married 
daughter, and there he died very suddenly, of heart-disease, 
December 17, 1884, in his 83d year. 



227 

He married, June 8, 1831, Miriam, younger daughter of the 
Hon. John Phillips (Harv. 1788), of Boston, who died April 26, 
1874. Their children were five sons and three daughters, of 
whom four sons and a daughter are still living. 

George Manson Hanners came to College from Boston, 
Mass., and returned thither after graduation. 

A considerable part of his life was spent in New York City, 
where he practiced dentistry. 

In his old age he became an inmate of a hospital in Utica, N. Y., 
where he died August 2, 1884, at the age of 83. 

1824. 

James Berdan, son of David and Susan Berdan, was born in 
the city of New York, July 4, 1805. 

He studied law in New York City, where he was admitted to 
the bar in 1827. He began the practice of his profession there, 
in connection with his brother-in-law, Pierre M. Irving, but in 
1832 removed to the West. In 1833 he settled in Jacksonville, 
111., and there opened a law office. He waa twice elected Judge 
of the County Court, serving from 1849 to 1857. In all places of 
trust, public and private, his course was highly honorable to him- 
self and satisfactory to his constituents. 

He died at his home in Jacksonville, August 24, 1884, at the 
age of 79, 

He married, June 27, 1848, Jane P. Simms, daughter of J. R. 
Simms, of Jacksonville, who survives him, with an adopted 
daughter. 

Samuel Hazzletox Fletcher, second son of Squire H. and 
Jerusha (Doolittle) Fletcher, was born in Townshend, Vt., in 
July, 1800. 

After graduation he taught for one year in a private family in 
Hartford, Conn., and then took the full course in Andover Theo- 
logical Seminary, On the 25th of September, 1828, he was or- 
dained at Newburyport, Mass., as an evangelist, and for a year 
labored as a home missionary in Iberville and Ascension, Louis- 
iana. He then returned to Massachusetts, and preached for some 
months to a newly organized Congregational society in Bolton,, 
Worcester County. On March 14, 1832, he was settled as pastor 
of the Congregational church in Northbridge, in the same county. 



228 

where he remained for two years. He then went to Illinois, but 
did not continue in the ministry. After spending six or seven 
years in teaching, he returned to the East, and was for many 
years engaged as a book-agent in the employ of publishing 
houses in New York City. He died at the Grand Central Hotel 
in New York City (where he had boarded since 1877), on April 
22, 1885, in his 85th year. He was unmarried. 

George Goodyear, son of Simeon and Hannah (Beardsley) 
Goodyear, was born in Hamden, Conn., December 9, 1801. 

After graduation he took a three years' course in the Yale 
Divinity School, and was ordained as an evangelist at New 
Haven, July 22, 1828. After brief engagements in Gaines, N. 
Y. (where he married Elizabeth, daughter of Judge Robert 
Anderson, May 3, 1830), and in East Windsor, Conn., he was 
installed pastor of the Congregational church in Ashburnham, 
Mass., October 10, 1832. He remained there until October 10, 
1841. Then followed a brief pastorate in Rensselaerville, N. Y., 
which was interrupted by the illness of his wife, who died Feb- 
ruary 28, 1844. He was next acting pastor for three or four years 
in Truro, on Cape Cod, and on December 19, 1849, was installed 
in South Royalston, Mass., where he remained until May 16, 1854. 
His last and longest pastorate was in Temple, N. H., from April 
28, 1855, to October 25, 1865; his resignation was occasioned 
by attacks of hemorrhage, which prevented his undertaking active 
duty in the ministry again. He was able, however, during this 
last period of his life to represent the town of Temple in two 
sessions of the State Legislature, and to preserve and extend his 
great influence for good in the community. He died in Temple, 
of consumption, November 18, 1884, at the age of 83. 

He married, December 18, 1844, Roxana, daughter of Deacon 
L. S. Rand, of Townshend, Vt., who survives him, with three chil- 
dren by his first marriage. 

Dexter Witter, son of Deacon Septimus and Anna (Kings- 
ley) Witter, was born in Hinsdale, Berkshire County, Mass., July 
15, 1803. In his early childhood his father removed to Aurora, 
Portage County, Ohio. He entered College from Aurora, at the 
beginning of Sophomore year. 

After graduating he taught in the academy in Burton, Geauga 
County, Ohio (where he had prepared for College), for two years. 



I 

I 



229 

and then entered the Auburn (N. Y.) Theological Seminary, 
where he spent two years. Being licensed to preach in October, 
1828, he preached his first sermon in Burton, and was immedi- 
ately invited to become a candidate for settlement in the Congre- 
gational church in that town. As the result of this invitation, he 
was there ordained and installed on the 25th of March following. 
This pastoral relation was continued harmoniously and pleas- 
antly for twenty years, when at his own request, owing to infirm 
health, it was dissolved. During the most of the next seven 
years he preached to neighboring feeble and destitute churches 
as a home missionary. In the summer of 1857, the pastor in 
Burton having resigned, Mr. Witter was invited to resume his 
work there, and continued in the service as stated supply for the 
next ten years. For the rest of his life he remained in Burton, 
in feeble health. He died there, Aug. 31, 1884, in his 82d year. 
He was thus through a long professional life identified with a 
single community, and his example and influence won the deepest 
universal respect. 

He married, in June, 1839, Miss Emily Moss, daughter of Jared 
Moss, of Augusta, N. Y., who died September 16, 1855. He next 
married, in March, 1859, Miss Mary DeForest, who survives him. 
He had no children. 

He was a trustee of Western Reserve College, from 1855 to 
1876. 

1826. 

Henry Curtiss Beardslee, son of Dr. Gideon and Sarah Ann 
(Curtiss) Beardslee, was born in that part of Huntington which 
is since 1823 the town of Monroe, Conn., July 2, 1807. 

His father died in 1826, and in May, 1827, he began the study 
of medicine in New Haven, graduating at the Medical Institu- 
tion in 1829. He shortly after opened an office in Montville, 
Conn., and soon had an extensive but laborious country practice. 
He was elected to the State legislature in 1844. 

In May, 1845, he removed to Painesville, O., where he devoted 
himself for the rest of his life to his profession, becoming espe- 
cially skillful and successful in the more difficult surgical opera- 
tions. He died in Painesville, December 21, 1884, in his 78th 
year. 

He married in the spring of 1833 Miss Harriet Hawley, of 
Monroe, by whom he had three daughters and two sons. She 
died July 8, 1860, and in November, 1861, he married Miss 



230 

Clementine M. Carrier, of Enfield, N. H. She survives him with 
her three sons, and a daughter and a son by his first marriage. 

The most laborious portion of Dr. Beardslee's professional life 
was from 1863 to 1865, when as examining surgeon for his Con- 
gressional district he examined upwards of 12,000 candidates for 
military service. His health failed in 1882, and the last three 
years were years of great and increasing weakness. 

Outside of his profession he was especially interested in botany, 
and has left an unpublished catalogue of the plants of the State 
compiled for the use of the Geological survey. 

Sherman Day, the only child of President Jeremiah Day, by 
his first wife, Martha, daughter of Roger Sherman, was born in 
New Haven, February 13, 1806, while his father was still Professor 
of Mathematics. 

From 1826 to 1835 he was engaged in business as a merchant 
in New York, Philadelphia, and Marseilles, and while settled in 
New York was married, September 6, 1832, to Elizabeth A., 
daughter of Henry King, of Westfield, Mass. ; a large part of the 
next two years was spent in Marseilles. In 1835 he abandoned 
mercantile pursuits, and from 1836 to 1841 resided in Ohio and 
Indiana, engaged in civil engineering. He then returned to the 
East, and while living in New Haven and Philadelphia, compiled 
a volume entitled " Historical Collections of Pennsylvania," which 
was published in 1843 (708 pp. 8vo). He then resumed a mercan- 
tile life, doing business in New York and St. Louis. 

Severe losses, together with failing health, induced him to em- 
bark for California in June, 1849. Thenceforth he devoted him- 
self to surveying and engineering, civil and mining, and both in 
his profession and outside it impressed himself on the community 
as a man of unswerving Christian principle and integrity. In 
1854 his family joined him, and for 1855 and 1856 he was a mem- 
ber of the State Senate from Santa Clara County. In 1855 he 
surveyed a route for a wagon road across the Sierra Nevada 
Mountains. At this time his residence was at Oakland, Cal, and 
there most of his later years Avere spent. He was one of the orig- 
inal trustees of the College of California, and for a short time held 
the professorship of Mine Construction and Surveying. From 
September, 1868, to February, ISVl, he was United States Sur- 
veyor General for California. After a year or two of feebleness, 
he died from a disease of the heart, at Berkeley, Cal., December 14, 



231 

1884, in his VQth year. His wife died in 1873. Two sons and two 
daugliters are still living ; one daughter is the wife of Charles T. 
H. Palmer (Y. C. 1847). 

John DeForest, the eldest child of Benjamin and Alma (South- 
mayd) DeForest, was born in Watertown, Conn., March 31, 1806. 

After graduating, he studied medicine with Dr. Samuel W. 
Gold, of Goshen, Conn., for three years, and meantime attended 
two courses of lectures in the Medical Institution of Yale College, 
where he received the degree of M.D. in 1829. He practiced his 
profession for about a year with Dr. Gold, and then availed himself 
of a favorable opening in his native town, where he continued in 
practice until 1845, when in consequence of ill health he was 
obliged to relinquish his profession. For the rest of his life he 
was not engaged in any active business, and for many years before 
his death he was cut off from society of his friends by extreme 
deafness. During his long residence in Watertown he distributed 
his large wealth freely and wisely for the furtherance of objects 
of benevolence and public utility. He was the founder of the 
Senior Mathematical Prizes in this College, and a generous donor, 
especially to the medical department. 

He died of heart disease, in Watertown, March 11, "1885, at the 
age of 79. 

He married. May 16, 1831, Lucy S., eldest daughter of Erastus 
Lyman, of Goshen, who died August 3, 1855, after twenty-one years 
of protracted suffering. Their elder son died in infancy; the 
younger (Y. C. 1854) survives them. 

James Taylor Dickinson, the eldest child of Horace and 
Mary Ann (Taylor) Dickinson (both from Western Massachu- 
setts), was born in Lowville, Lewis county, N. Y., October 27, 1806. 
His parents removed to Canada in 1816, and he entered College 
from Montreal in 1822. 

After graduating he began the study of law in Montreal ; but 
in 1827 he became convinced that he ought to enter the Christian 
ministry and removed to Andover Theological Seminary ; he took 
the last year of his course (1829-30) in the Yale Divinity School. 

He was ordained pastor of the Second (Congregational) church 
in Norwich, Conn., April 4, 1832, and on the 21st of November 
following married Mary, daughter of Samuel Hickok, of Burling- 
ton, Vt., where he had been preaching for some time and had de- 
clined a call to settle. She died in Norwich, April 6, 1834, at the 



232 

age of 19 ; and on the 20th of August next, he resigned his pastor- 
ate that he might fit himself for the work of a foreign missionary. 
After one year of preparatory studies in medicine, he embarked in 
July, 1835, for Singapore, in the East Indies, under an appoint- 
flient from the American Board. Five years passed in the study 
of the Chinese and Malay languages, and in missionary labor. 
For four years from 1840 he was employed as a teacher in the 
Singapore Institution, till the loss of his health obliged him to 
return home. 

In 1845, he settled in Middlefield, Conn., where he married. 
May 15, Sarah C, daughter of Deacon William Lyman, who sur- 
vives him. Owing to his shattered health, he lived in seclusion, 
in the midst of his large and continually replenished library, 
chiefly occupied in reading and study. He published a few arti- 
cles in periodicals, and contributed to Appleton's Cyclopedia an 
account of the Malay language ; he also wrote a brief memoir of 
his brother-in-law, the Rev. George W. Perkins (Y. C. 1824), pre- 
fixed to a volume of sermons in 1859. These are the only re- 
sults in print of his broad culture and accurate scholarship. 

He died of paralysis, at his home in Middlefield, July 22, 1884, 
in his '78th year. 

By his last will he added to a fund already established by him 
for the benefit of the College, which thus amounts to nearly 
150,000 ; about 1,500 volumes of his valuable library were also 
bequeathed to the College. 

1827. 

Samuel Sherwood Day, third son of Orrin and Mary B. 
(Hall) Day, of Catskill, N. Y., was born in Catskill, April 3, 1807. 

On leaving College he returned home, and became his father's 
valued assistant in business. In 1831 he also became interested 
in the management of the Tanners' (National) Bank, which was 
organized in that year under his father's presidency. In 1846 or 
47 he succeeded his father as president, in which position he con- 
tinued for the rest of his life. In this capacity and in his general 
influence, his career was a blessing to the community. For the 
last few years he had sufiered at times from a milder form of 
angina pectoris. He was actively engaged as usual on the 8th of 
April, 1885, was wakened by a sharp attack of pain during the fol 
lowing night, and died while sleeping, in the early morning of the 
9th, at the age of 78. 



233 

He married, September 26, 1833, Catharine A. DeForest, of 
Huntington, Conn., who died Aug. 20, 1837, having borne two sons, 
one of whom died in infancy. He next married, June 16, 1842, 
Cornelia E., daughter of the Hon. Joshua A. Spencer, of Utica, 
N. Y., by whom he had two sons and a daughter. 

Timothy Taylor Merwin, eldest child of the Rev. Samuel 
Merwin (Y. C. 1802), pastor of the United Society in New 
Haven, and Clarina B. (Taylor) Merwin, was born in New Haven, 
August 22, 1807. 

He was a member of the Law School connected with the Col- 
lege for two years, until June, 1829, when he was admitted to the 
Connecticut bar. He then began the practice of his profession in 
Norwalk, where he remained until December, 1843, when he 
removed to New York City. During his residence in Connecti- 
cut, he was once (1838) a member of the General Assembly, and 
for several years clerk of the county courts. 

He was also for a part of the time proprietor and editor of the 
Norwalk Gazette. 

On removing to New York he relinquished his profession, and 
was for some years engaged in a lucrative mercantile business ; 
later, he was entrusted with the management of a railroad, and 
thence drifted into the New York Stock Exchange. In 1862 he 
"was engaged with others in founding and organizing the North 
American Life Insurance Company, of which he was the first 
Secretary and for a long time (and at his death) the Vice Presi- 
dent. 

After frequent attacks of heart-disease, he died from that cause 
at his home in Brooklyn, January 15, 1885, in his 78th year. 

In September, 1830, he was married to Miss Hannah B. White, 
youngest daughter of Col. E. Moss White, of Danbury, Conn., 
by whom he had two sons and one daughter, who survive him. 
Her death in October, 1843, in connection with the failure of his 
health, was the occasion of the relinquishment of his profession 
and his removal to New York. 

Stephen Thomas Robinson, son of John and Susan Robinson, 
of Charleston, S. C, was born there. May 2, 1808. 

He studied law in Charleston under James L. Petigru, Esq., 
and was there admitted to the bar. After practising his profes- 
sion for about ten months he removed to Tallahassee, Fla., to be- 



234 

come cashier of the Bank of Florida; but he resigned this office 
after sixteen months' service, and became a cotton planter on 
John's Island. From September, 1836, to October, 1851, he was 
cashier of the Planters' and Mechanics' Bank of Charleston. This 
position he resigned, to enter into business in Charleston as a 
cotton factor or commission merchant, and he was so engaged up 
to the beginning of the civil war. The close of the war left him 
with ruined fortunes, and he attempted, but with small success, 
to resume his former occupation. Late in life he removed to St. 
Louis, Mo., the home of some of his children, where he died in 
July, 1884, in his 77th year. 

He married, in February, 1831, Mary Margaret, daughter of 
the Rev. Paul T. Gervais, by whom he had nine children. 

John Bethune Staples, the eldest son of Seth P. Staples 
(Y. C. 179'?) and Catharine (Wales) Staples, was born in New 
Haven, Jan. 23, 1807, and entered College in 1822, remaining for 
three years with the class of 1826. 

In 1824 his father, a distinguished lawyer, removed to New 
York City, and there this son pursued the study of the law, being 
admitted to practice as an attorney in 1829. He established 
himself in his profession in New York City, his specialty being 
patent law ; he continued in business until very near the end of 
his life. He died in West New Brighton, Staten Island, Sep- 
tember 27, 1884, in his 78th year. 

1828. 

Thomas Emlen Franklin, eldest son of Judge Walter and 
Anne (Emlen) Franklin, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., April 20, 
1810. 

After leaving College he began reading law with his brother- 
in-law, Washington Hopkins, of Lancaster, Pa., and on his admis- 
sion to the bar in 1831 at once opened an office in Lancaster, 
where he spent about fifty years in the practice of his profession 
and obtained distinction as the leader of the Lancaster bar. In 
1851, and again from 1855 to 1858, he served as Attorney-Gen- 
eral of the State. He was prominent as a Whig and later as a 
Republican, and was one of the delegates appointed to attend the 
"National Peace Convention" at Washington in 1861. He was 
also prominently connected with many local business organiza- 
tions and enterprises, and was a distinguished and valued mem- 



^ 



I 



235 

ber and officer of the Episcopal church in Central Pennsylvania, 
serving also as deputy to the General Convention, and during 
the last years of his life as Chancellor of the diocese. Franklin 
and Marshall College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Laws in 1874. 

He was attacked with paralysis on Tuesday, November 25, 1884, 
and died on Friday, November 28, in his VSth year. 

He married, November 7, 1837, Serena A., only daughter of Col. 
George Mayer, of Lancaster, by whom he had issue, six sons and 
six daughters, of whom all but two daughters survive him. The 
eldest son is a graduate of this College in the class of 1858. 

Darius Mead, son of Isaac and Polly (Mead) Mead, was born 
in Greenwich, Conn., February 28, 1807. 

He studied theology for three years (1828-31) in the Yale 
Divinity School, and from February, 1832, to July, 1834, sup- 
plied the pulpit of the Congregational Church in South Britain 
parish, in Southbury, Conn. Meantime he received ordination 
as an evangelist, at Litchfield South Farms, now Morris, Conn., 
July 31, 1833. He was next, from May 27, 1835, to October 3, 
1837, pastor of the Congregational Church at Deep River, in Say- 
brook, Conn. 

After leaving this charge he removed to New York City, where 
he became the editor, in the fall of 1838, of the National Preacher, 
and so continued until the close of 1840. In 1842 he became an 
associate editor of the Mother's Magazine, and at a later date 
was editor of the Christian Parlor Magazine. His residence con- 
tinued in New York City, or in Brooklyn, with a daughter, until 
his death, which occurred in the latter city, on the 30th of April, 
1885, in his 79th year. His mind had been enfeebled for some 
years. 

He married Emily C, youngest daughter of the Rev. Samuel 
Goodrich (Y. C. 1783), of Worthington, now Berlin, Conn., by 
whom he had two sons and three daughters. 

1829. 

Thomas Cowles, fourth son of Zenas and Mary (Lewis) Cowles, 
was born in Farmington, Conn., January 12, 1809. 

He spent his life on a farm in his native town, being also en- 
gaged in the practice of law and in political afi*airs. He served 
as Representative in the General Assembly in 1849, 1852, 1853, 



286 

1869, 1870, and 1872, and from 1849 to 1851 was the Judge of 
Probate in his district. In 1864 he was a member of the State 
Senate, and from 1863 to 1869 he held the position of Bank Com- 
missioner for Connecticut. 

He married, October 9, 1833, Julia Ann, daughter of Gad 
Cowles, of Farmington. After her death he married October 15, 
1845, Elizabeth E., daughter of William Sheffield, who died in 
Farmington, two days before his own death, which was on 
October 22, 1884. A son by this second marriage was graduated 
here in 1873, but his death was noticed in these pages last year. 
Two elder sons survive their father. 

Thomas Robinson Hubbard, the second son of Deacon Thomas 
and Frances (Taber) Hubbard, was born in Middletown, Conn., 
January 31, 1811. 

He studied law in the Yale Law School, and practiced in Day- 
ton, Ohio, and afterwards in Chicago ; the profession was perhaps 
not his own choice, but accepted in deference to the wishes of 
his grandfather, after whose death in 1837 he left the law, and 
entered the Bank of Commerce in New York City, becoming the 
Secretary to the Cashier and to the President of the Bank, a post 
created for him and one which he continued to fill for forty-six 
years, until his resignation in February, 1885. While in Florida, 
during the next month after this resignation, he took a cold which 
resulted in a congestive chill, settling in the kidneys, a spot 
already affected ; his death followed on the third day after his 
seizure, March 20, in his 75th year. He was never married. 

Charles Augustus Lewis came to College in 1826, the eldest 
child of James and Harriet (Richards) Lewis, of New London, 
Conn., and returned thither after graduation. He died in the 
same city, December 13, 1883, aged about 75 years. He had five 
sons, by his wife Adelaide A., daughter of George Richards, of 
New York. 

William Norton, eldest child and only son of Andrew and 
Ruth (Chittenden) Norton, was born in Guilford, Conn., Novem- 
ber 7,1801. 

After graduating he taught school for some time in East Haven 
and Southport, Conn. He then returned to G;uilford, where he 
was a large landholder, and spent the rest of his long life upon 
his farm. He was for many years a communicant in Christ 



237 

Church (Episcopal), and interested and active in Christian work. 
He died in Guilford, May 24, 1885, in his 84th year. He married, 
Dec. 19, 18*77, Miss Mary Frisbie, of Guilford, who survives him. 

1830. 

John Montgomery Gordon was born in Virginia in 1810, 
and entered College from Fredericksburgh. After graduation he 
studied law (for part of the time in the Yale Law School), but 
never practiced. For many years he resided in Baltimore, Md., 
being president of the Union Bank in that city. Prior lo March, 
1861, when he resigned this position, his health had failed, and at 
the date named he removed to Virginia, where he lived a very 
much secluded life. His last days were overshadowed by family 
bereavement and broken health, and for a time by a clouded 
mind. His sympathies with the South in the war were intensely 
strong. He died at the home of his only surviving child, a 
daughter, in Maryland, in March, 1884. His wife, a daughter of 
Dr. Chapman, of Philadelphia, died before the war, as did his 
only son. 

1832. 

William Frazier was born at Jenning's Gap, Augusta County, 
Va., November 19, 1812, the son of James A. and Martha (Ran- 
kin) Frazier. He left Yale in August, 1830, and entered the 
University of Virginia, where after further academic and legal 
studies, he was graduated in 1834 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Law. He was enrolled with his former class here in 1879. 

In October, 1834, he was admitted to the bar in Staunton, Va., 
and settled in that city, being for a time in partnership with 
Hon. John H. Peyton. In 1842 and several later years he repre- 
sented the county in the State Legislature, and from 1861 to 1865 
was a member of the State Senate. In 1853 his professional 
practice was interrupted by his being obliged, in consequence of 
the death of a brother, to assume the charge of the extensive 
health resort at Rockbridge Alum Springs, which absorbed most 
of his time and energies until 1869. He then returned to 
Staunton, and there spent the rest of his life, except from 1871 to 
1876, when he had charge of the Capon Springs House, West 
Va. He died in Staunton, June 7, 1885, in his 73d year. 

He married, November 17, 1847, Miss Sue M., daughter of 
James A. Lewis, of Charleston, (West) Virginia, who survives 
him with nine of their eleven children. 



238 

Cortland Lucas Latimer was born in Waterford, New Lon- 
don County, Conn., February 8, 1810, the son of Pickett and 
Eunice (Douglass) Latimer. He was obliged to leave College in 
1830, and was graduated at Rutgers College, N. J., in 1832, being 
also enrolled with his class here by vote of the corporation in 
1879. 

He read law in Norwalk, O., with Judge Ebenezer Lane, and 
for nearly thirty years practiced his profession in that place ; he 
was also while there a prominent officer and worker in the Pres- 
byterian church, and his attachment to that body continued till 
his death. In 1862 he removed to Cleveland, O., and for the rest 
of his life resided there, acting as the agent and attorney of Mr. 
Joseph Perkins and Mr. J. B. Perkins in the management of their 
large estates, and highly respected for his sterling integrity. 

He died at his home in Cleveland, May 20, 1885, in his 76th 
year, after three weeks' illness, from erysipelas. 

He married, July 7, 1834, Charlotte, eldest daughter of the 
Rev. Dr. Abel McEwen (Y. C. 1804), of New London, Conn., who 
died December 1, 1870. Four sons and a daughter died in infancy ; 
and an only son (Y. C. 1874) survives. 

Charles Tracy, the second son of William G. and Rachel 
(Huntington) Tracy, of Whitestown, Oneida County, N. Y., was 
born in Whitestown, February 17, 1810. 

He was admitted as an attorney-at-law in 1835, and spent his 
earlier professional life in Utica, N. Y. In 1849 he removed to 
New York City, and continued in active practice until his death. 
With great capacity and ability for work, he early achieved a 
prominent position at the bar ; and especially as counsel for many 
charitable societies in the city of his residence led a busy, faith- 
ful, earnest life. He was from 1879 to 1882 President of the 
New York Association of Yale Alumni. 

He was attacked with palpitation of the heart on March 11, 
1885, and died at his home three days later, in his 76th year. 

He married, August 30, 1837, Louisa, daughter of Gen. Joseph 
Kirkland (Y. C. 1790), of Utica, who survived him, with one son 
and, five of his six daughters. Mrs. Tracy died suddenly, 
June 1, 1885. 

Edward Wurts, son of Daniel and Phebe (Wade) Wurts, 
was born in the city of New York, in August, 1810. At the age 
of seven the family removed to Louisville, Ky., whence he entered 



I 



239 

the class of 1831, in the third term of his Freshman year. He 
was obliged to leave College by ill-health in the Junior year, and 
he returned for the Senior year with the next class. 

After graduation he was for about five years engaged in mer- 
cantile and banking business in Louisville. In the winter of 
1838-9 he entered Princeton Theological Seminary, but withdrew 
on account of his health after a few months. In 1843, the inter- 
val having been partly occupied with business, he returned to 
Princeton, where he finished the course in 1846. He was then 
for a time out of employment, owing to the state of his health. 
In 1850 he went to Louisiana, as a preacher to the colored people. 
In the fall of 1851, he was called to the Presbyterian Church in 
Rodney, Miss., and was ordained and installed there, April 4, 
1852. For ten years he preached continuously in Mississippi and 
Louisiana, his last charge in that region being at Lake Provi- 
dence, La., for four years. In the fall of 1859 he was called to 
the Portland Avenue Presbyterian Church in Louisville, Ky., 
where he remained until his resignation, from seriously impaired 
health, in July, 1865. During the three winter seasons from 
1866 to 1869 he had temporary charge of the Presbyterian Church 
in Palatka, Florida. After that period he lived in retirement in 
Philadelphia, Pa., where he died June 9, 1885, in his 75th year. 

1833. 

Baknabas Maynard Fay, son of Deacon Dexter and Zilpah 
(Maynard) Fay, was born iii Berlin, Mass., July 27, 1806. 

From 1833 to 1838 he was an instructor in the N. Y. Institu- 
tion for the Deaf and Dumb, in New York City. During the last 
two years of his residence there, he was also studying in the 
Union Theological Seminary. He was ordained pastor of the 
Congregational Church in Hardwick, Mass., May 20, 1840, and 
was dismissed August 23, 1843. After teaching for a year or two 
in Durham, Conn., he again settled in a Massachusetts pastorate, 
at Wilmington, where he remained from April, 1845, to October, 
1850. He then became a teacher in the Asylum for the Blind at 
Indianapolis, Ind., whence he went to Flint, Mich., in 1854, as the 
Principal of an Institution just established for the Deaf, Dumb, 
and Blind. He left this post in 1863, on account of his wife's 
health, and accepted an appointment as Chaplain to the 23d 
Michigan Infantry, but was very soon obliged to resign his com- 
mission on account of severe illness. He then established himself 



240 

in East Saginaw, Mich., as a banker. Having retired from busi- 
ness, he removed to Saratoga Springs, N". Y., in 1869, for the 
health of his family, and that was his residence till his wife's 
death in February, 1880. In 1881, being in New Haven, where 
his youngest son was attending the Divinity School, he was 
attacked with inflammatory rheumatism, and for a year and a 
half he remained an inmate of the City Hospital. He died in 
Washington, D. C, where his elder son is an instructor in the 
National Deaf-Mute College, March 8, 1885, in his 79th year. 

He married, September 7, 1842, Louise M. Mills, of Morristown, 
N. J., a sister of the Rev. Charles L. Mills (Y. C. 1835), by whom 
he had three sons, two of whom survive him. 

David Chaeles Perry, second son and third child of the Rev. 
David L. Perry (Williams Coll. 1798), pastor of the Congre- 
gational church in Sharon, Conn., was born there, January 5, 1810. 
His mother was Anne S., only daughter of the Rev. Dr. Nathan 
Strong (Y. C. 1769), of Hartford. He entered College in 1827, 
was obliged to leave two years later by severe illness, and re- 
turned in 1831. 

He studied theology with his father (who died in October, 
1836), and for one year in Andover Seminary; and in 1837 began 
to preach, in Ellsworth parish, in his native town. In the spring 
of 1838 he went to the Congregational church in New Fairfield, 
Conn., over which he was ordained, December 12, 1838. He was 
dismissed from this pastorate after six years, in consequence of ill 
health, and in 1845 removed to Barlow, Washington County, 
Ohio, where he purchased a farm and engaged in wool-growing. 
In 1846 he undertook the charge of a church in that place, which 
he resigned near the close of 1848, under the pressure of domestic 
affliction. Later, he occupied himself with the instruction of a 
few boys, and in such horticultural labor as his health would ad- 
mit of, until he was able to resume pastoral service in the same 
church as before. In the summer of 1857 he was so seriously dis- 
abled in a railroad accident, as to be incapable of further profes- 
sional labor. In the winter of 1870-71 he went to Columbus, 
Ohio, to reside with a son (Marietta Coll. 1865), who was then a 
teacher in the Ohio Institution for the Deaf and Dumb. In 1883 
this son removed to Montecito, four miles from Santa Barbara, 
Cal., where the father died of general debility and old age, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1885, in his 76th year. 



241 

He married, April 26, 1838, Margaret, daughter of William G. 
Williams, of New Hartford, Conn., who died August 1, 1840. 
He next married, September 21, 1841, Polly M., daughter of 
Ebenezer Ferry, of Bethel, then in Danbury, Conn., who died 
December 21, 1845. He married, thirdly, in January, 1847, 
Sarah, daughter of Ebenezer Piatt, of Danbury, who died October 
25, 1848. He married, as his fourth wife, January 31, 1850, 
Esther C, daughter of Nathan Walton, of Cincinnati, Ohio. The 
younger of two sons by his second marriage survives him. 

William Huntington Russell, son of Matthew Talcott Rus- 
sell (Y. C. 1779) and Mary (Huntington) Russell, was born in 
Middletown, Conn., August 12, 1809, a descendant from one of 
the founders of the College, each link of the descent having been 
in his turn a graduate and officer of the institution. 

He taught in Princeton, N. J., from September, 1833, to May, 
1835, when he entered on a tutorship in this College. During 
his tutorship he also studied medicine, and later (1838) received 
the degree of M.D. from the College. He resigned the tutorship 
in September, 1836, to establish in New^ Haven a family school 
for boys, — having been married on the 29th of the previous 
month to Mary E., daughter of the late Thomas Hubbard, M.D., 
Professor of Surgery in the Medical Institution of Yale College. 

The school thus begun developed into "The Collegiate and 
Commercial Institute," having at times as many as 160 pupils, 
and educating in the aggregate some four thousand young men. 
As early as 1853, it assumed the character of a military school, 
and was able during the late war to furnish about three hundred 
officers to the Union arniy, as well as many drill-masters to the 
volunteer companies in southern Connecticut. In recognition of 
Mr. RusselPs admirable qualities as an organizer, Gov. Bucking- 
ham appointed him in 1862 Major-General of the Militia of the 
State, and this position he held for eight years. He also held the 
office of Collector of Internal Revenue for five years from 
December, 3 868. At an earlier period (1846 and 1847) he repre- 
sented the town in the State Legislature. 

General Russell retained his place at the head of his school, 
and his powers remained almost untouched by age, until his last 
brief illness. By his transparent integrity and his native vigor of 
intellect he impressed himself on all his pupils and on every order 
of mind with which he came in contact. He was prostrated on 



242 

the 10th of May, 1885, in New Haven, in his Veth year, by a 
stroke of apoplexy, which proved fatal on the 19th of the same 
month. 

His wife survives him, with six of their ten children, two 
daughters and four sons. The sons are all graduates of the 
College, and a fifth son died while a member of College. 

1834. 

Lewis St. John Benedict, was born in New Canaan, Conn., 
October 24, 1811, the second son of Col. Ezra and Hannah (Corn- 
stock) Benedict. 

After graduation he taught an Academy in Fairfield, Conn., 
for two years, at the same time studying medicine. In 1837 he 
removed to New York City, and for about ten years was engaged 
in the jewelry business in the firm of A. C. Benedict & Co. In 
1847 he removed his residence to Brooklyn, where he lived until 
1864, being for this period engaged in the wholesale boot and 
shoe trade in New York City as one of the firm of Benedict, Hall 
& Benedict. In 18C4 he removed to Montclair, N. J., his home 
for the rest of his life. From 1866 to 1869 he was engaged in 
the rubber goods business, but after the last named date retired 
from active pursuits. He died in Montclair, October 23, 1884, at 
the age of 73. 

He married, September 1, 1840, Miss Harriet Jones, daughter 
of Capt. Czar Jones, of Ridgefield, Conn., by whom he had six 
daughters and four sons ; the third son was graduated here in 
1871. 

James Nelson Lea was born in New Orleans, La., November 
26, 1815, the son of Dr. Squire and Eliza (Nelson) Lea. 

He studied law with his uncle. Judge Samuel H. Harper, of 
New Orleans, and was admitted to the Louisiana bar in 1836. 
His practice was attended with success, and in 1846 he was 
elected a member of the State Legislature, and in 1847 was 
appointed Judge of the Second District Court of New Orleans, 
which ofiice he retained for several years. Subsequently, after 
the change in the State Constitution (in 1852) by which the 
judiciary were made elective, he was elected to the same judicial 
office which he had already held, and in recognition of the ability 
with which he performed his duties, he was chosen in 1855 one of 
the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the State. After 
his term of service on the bench, he returned to the bar. He 



24cS 

retired from practice in 1874, and the next! year removed his resi- 
dence to Lexington, Va., where he lived greatly respected for the 
rest of his days. After some months of declining strength, he 
went on a visit to Wilkes Barre, Pa., in search of health, but died 
in Wilkes Barre, October 26, 1884, at the age of 69. 

He married, March 16, 1841, Miss Hetty H. McNair, by whom 
he had six children, of whom two daughters and a son are still 
living. He next married Mrs. Mary R. Duncan, daughter of 
Dennis A. Smith, of Baltimore, Md., and widow of Lucius C. 
Duncan (Y. C. 1821), of New Orleans, who survives him. 

1835. 

Charles Lewis Mills, son of Jabez and Hannah (Coe) Mills, 
was born in Morristown, N. J., August 11, 1812. He spent his 
Freshman year in the College of New Jersey, and upon gradua- 
tion returned to Princeton for the study of theology. In the 
spring of 1837 his studies were interrupted by the state of his 
health, and he immediately went West to preach. At South 
Hanover, Ind., he was invited to take charge of a Presbyterian 
Church, and the same year he was married, September 5, to Eliza- 
beth C, daughter of Deacon William Lyman, of Middlefield, Conn. 
He received ordination as an evangelist at Elizabethtown, N. J., 
October 23, 1838. He left South Hanover in 1840, and on Api-il 
28, 1841, was installed over the Congregational Church in Durham, 
Conn. From this place he was dismissed, September 30, 1845. 
His next pastorate was in Ashland, Mass. (February 11, 1847- 
March 9, 1 849). Next came a brief service as stated supply of the 
First Presbyterian Church in Indianapolis, Ind., where his wife 
died July 10, 1851. Returning again to Massachusetts, he was in- 
stalled over the CongregationalChurch in North Bridgewater (now 
Brockton), August 11, 1852, where he continued until February 
16, 1862. Meantime he had married, on November 26, 1852, Re- 
becca B., daughter of Deacon Peter Smith, of Andover, Mass. On 
February 10, 1863, he was installed in Wrentham, Mass., his last 
settled pastorate, which he laid down, April 14, 1865. He resided 
in Jamaica Plain, Mass., from 1866 to 1877, and for the rest of 
his life in Andover, where he died, after a distressing illness of 
several months, October 3, 1884, aged 72 years. During all these 
later years he had labored zealously, even beyond his strength, 
in the work of planting new churches and building up feeble 
ones, in Maine and, Massachusetts. 



244 

His wife survives him, as do also a^on and a daughter by his 
first, and three sons and a daughter by his second marriage. 

John Lord Taylor, son of John and Anna (Beardsley) Tay- 
lor, was born in Warren, Conn., May 20, 1811. 

After graduation he taught for two years, in Upper Middle- 
town (now Cromwell), and Ellington, Conn., and in 1837 returned 
to the College as tutor. During the two years of his tutorship 
he also studied theology in the Divinity School. On the 18th of 
July, 1839, he was ordained and settled as pastor of the South 
Congregational Church, Andover, Mass. This place he resigned, 
July 19, 1852, to become the treasurer of Phillips Academy and 
of the Theological Seminary in Andover, and trustee of the same. 
In 1868 he exchanged these duties for the professorship of the- 
ology and homiletics in the special course of Andover Seminary, 
which he filled with success until 1879, when he was made pro- 
fessor emeritus^ on account of failing health. He was also from 
1870 to 1879, the president of the faculty. His closing years 
were passed in retirement in Andover, where he died, of paraly- 
sis and angina pectoris, September 23, 1884, in his 74th year. 

His life was one of great usefulness and of diligent labor. He 
published a Memoir of his Honor, Samuel Phillips (1856, 391 pp. 
8vo), besides sermons and addresses. The degree of Doctor of 
Divinity was conferred on him by Middlebury College in 1868. 

He married, July 3, 1839, Caroline L., daughter of Col. Epaph- 
ras L. Phelps, who died April 3, 1868. Of their five children, 
three died in infancy, and a fourth in his 22d year. The eldest 
child, a graduate here in 1862, is a professor in Andover. 

1836.. 

Albert Todd, third son of Ira and Sally (Hinman) Todd, was 
born in Hartwick, N. Y., March 4, 1813. He had spent one year 
in Amherst College, before entering as Sophomore here. 

He taught a high school in Canaan, Conn., until the spring of 
1837, when he began law studies with Judge Arphaxad Loomis, 
of Little Falls, N. Y. Upon his admission to the bar in 1839, he 
decided to emigrate to the West. He selected St. Louis as his 
field and arrived there in November, 1839, beginning practice in 
March, 1840. He gave special attention to questions afiecting 
real property, and achieved distinguished success in litigated 
cases of this nature. Through apprehensions with regard to \\u 



245 

health, he retired in 1860, at a comparatively early age, from active 
practice, confining himself thereafter to office consultations. He 
declined all political nominations until 1854, when he was elected 
to the State legislature. In 1860 he was an unsuccessful candi- 
date for Congress on the Bell and Everett ticket. In 1875 he 
was a member of the convention which revised the State constitu- 
tion. In public enterprises he always manifested a warm interest. 
He was a director of Washington University, in St. Louis, and 
served gratuitously for fifteen years in its Law Department as 
lecturer. After a month's illness, he died at his home in St. 
Louis, of meningitis, April 30, 1885, in his 73d year. 

He married, October 27, 1842, Miss Elizabeth Wilson, of Little 
Falls, who died February 9, 1848, leaving a daughter who is still 
living. He next married, August 10, 1854, Miss Caroline, daughter 
of Benjamin Johnson, of Bond County, Illinois, who survives him 
without children. 

1837. 

Aaron Rice Dutton, son of the Rev. Aaron Dutton (Y. C. 
1803) and Dorcas (Southmayd) Dutton, was born in Guilford, 
Conn., where his father was long pastor, July 28, 1816. 

After graduation he taught in Washington, Conn., and Berlin, 
Conn., and from December, 1840, to October, 1842, in a private 
family in Hopeton, Ga. He then spent a year in the Yale Law 
School, where he graduated LL.B. in 1843, and in December fol- 
lowing he settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he practiced his pro- 
fession for over thirty years. From Cincinnati he went to Wash- 
ington, where he received about 1876 the appointment of Chief 
Clerk, and later that of Law Clerk of the department of Justice, 
in the office of the Attorney-General of the United States. After 
an illness of more than a year, he tendered his resignation, in 
April, 1885, and died in Washington, on the 4th of the following 
month, in the'69th year of his age. 

He was married, November 26, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth B. 
Perry, who survives him with their only child, a daughter. 

Benjamin Silliman, only son of Professor Benjamin Silliman 
(Y. C. 1796) and Harriet (Trumbull) Silliman, was born in New 
Haven, December 4, 1816. 

Upon graduation he became his father's assistant in chemistry, 
mineralogy, and geology, and from 1838 was associated with his 



24:6 

father in the editorship of the American Journal of Science. By 
1842 he had also begun to receive private pupils in analytical 
chemistry and mineralogy, and this was the germ of the present 
Sheffield Scientific School. In 1846 the Department of Philoso- 
phy and the Arts was established, primarily as a result of Mr. 
Silliman's unselfish enterprise, and he was appointed Professor of 
Applied Chemistry, without salary. In 1849 he was elected 
Professor of Medical Chemistry and Toxicology in the Medical 
Department of the University of Louisville, Ky. This position 
he resigned in 1854, to take his father's professorship in the 
Medical Institution of Yale College, — at the same time also 
taking the instruction in Chemistry in the Academical Depart" 
ment; the latter duty he resigned in 1870, but he retained his 
connection with the Medical School until his death. 

In 1846 he published "First Principles of Chemistry," which 
passed through three large editions; and in 1858 appeared his 
*' First Principles of Physics," which also had a wide circulation. 

In 1853 he had charge of the Department of Mineralogy and 
Chemistry in the New York Exhibition of the Industry of all 
Nations, and subsequently was joint editor of two quarto vol- 
umes illustrating the progress of science and art from the exam- 
ples then gathered. He was the author of more than fifty papers 
in the Journal of Science, and of many other elaborate profes- 
sional reports and addresses. He was one of the original mem- 
bers of the National Academy of Sciences, incorporated in 1863. 

In October, 1884, he was prostrated with a severe attack of 
heart disease, complicated with pneumonia. After a slow decline 
he died in New Haven, January 14, 1885, in his 69th year. 

He was married. May 14, 1840, to Susan H., daughter of 
William J. Forbes, of New Haven. His happy domestic life 
was overshadowed by her death on March 26, 1878. Four of 
their six daughters and an only son (Y. C. 1870) survive them. 

1840. 

Theodoee Hutson Benedict, second son of Gen. James and 
Deborah (Coles) Benedict, was born in New York City, March 
13, 1821. He was for more than two years of his College course 
a member of the Class of 1839. 

His father's death in July, 1841, left him the master of large 
wealth, and enabled him to devote himself to foreign travel, to 
literary culture, and to the care of the family estate at Tarry- 
town, N. Y., where he resided through life, unmarried. 



I 
I 



247 

He entered politics as a whig, and by his personal popularity- 
overcame a democratic majority in his district, and was elected 
to the State Legislature in 1850. In 1851 he declined, on account 
of the condition of his health, a nomination to the State Senate ; 
and in 1852 he was a member of the convention which nomina- 
ted Gen. Scott for the Presidency. Later, his delicate health 
prevented him from active participation in politics. 

He died in Tarry town, June 14, 1885, in his 65th year. 

Richard Varick Dodge, son of Col. Henry S. and Jane D. 
(Varick) Dodge, was born in Kaskaskia, 111., August 4, 1822. In 
1824 his parents removed to New York, and his father's death 
followed in 1826. 

He began the study of law, but in 1841 entered Princeton 
Theological Seminary, where he completed the full three years' 
course. He was tirst employed for two years as the stated supply 
of a church in Princeton, Ind., and while there was ordained as 
an evangelist, June 16, 1846, by the Presbytery of Vincennes. 
He was next stationed in Terre Haute, Ind., for three years, and 
was then (from 1840 to 1857) pastor of the Third Presbyterian 
Church in Springfield, 111. While in this last position, he also 
taught for a year or two in the State University. His next 
pastorate was in Wheeling, (West) Virginia, where he remained 
until 1864, serving for part of the time as hospital chaplain in 
the Union army; and after a settlement in Washington, Pa. 
(1864-68)j he returned to another church in Wheeling. In 1869 
he removed to the Presbyterian Church in Madison, Wise, and 
thence in 1872 to the 1st Presbyterian Church, San Francisco. 
His later years were spent in San Diego, Cal., where he died 
February 26, 1885, in his 63d year. He married in 1845 a Miss 
Ridgely, by whom he had several children. 

1841. 

Hezekiah Sturges was born November 3, 1819, at Gilberts- 
ville, in the town of Butternuts, Otsego County, N. Y., whither 
his parents, Coley and Laura (Sturges) Sturges, had removed 
from Connecticut after their marriage in 1810. He entered 
College at the beginning of the Sophomore year. 

After graduation he was for a year or two teacher of Latin and 
Greek in the Gilbertsville Academy. In 1843 he entered the law 
office of Morehouse & Lathrop, in Cooperstown, N. Y., and sub- 



248 

sequently continued his studies with Charles C. Noble, Esq., of 
Unadilla, N. Y. He was admitted to the bar in May, 1846, and 
began the practice of his profession in Gilbertsville, continuing 
there until January, 1862, when he removed to Cooperstown and 
entered into a partnership with Judge E. Countryman. For four 
years from January, 1868, he was Judge of the Otsego County 
Court, and then resumed his practice. In 1877 he was appointed 
by Gov. Robinson and the Senate one of the three canal apprais- 
ers of the State, and filled that position acceptably for three 
years. In October, 1884, he was the candidate of the Democracy 
of Otsego County for Member of Congress, but was defeated by 
a combination of the other delegates in the district convention. 
The nervous strain connected with this incident resulted in serious 
prostration, from which he did not recover, the immediate cause 
of death being an organic disease of the heart. He died in Coop- 
erstown, after seven weeks' illness, December 4, 1884, at the age 
of 65. 

Judge Sturges stood in the front rank of the bar of Otsego 
County, and was universally esteemed as a man of high character. 

He married, January 13, 1863, Miss Anna Elizabeth, daughter 
of the Hon. W. W. Snow, of Oneonta, N. Y., who survives him 
with one son and one daughter. 

1842. 

John Jay Orton, the second son of Dr. Harlow N. and Grace 
Marsh Orton, was born in Brookfield, Madison County, N. Y., 
April 25, 1812, and died of erysipelas, at his home in Milwaukee, 
Wise, January 24, 1885, in his 73d year. He spent his boyhood 
in a store, began life as a merchant at 21, and thus earned the 
means for his preparatory and College studies. 

After graduation he studied law, at the same time being 
engaged in business, so that he was not admitted to the bar 
until May, 1847. For the next two years he was a wholesale 
lumber merchant in Buffalo, N. Y. He then went to the West 
and settled — as he supposed temporarily — in Milwaukee, which 
became his home for the rest of his life. He was at first engaged 
in business, especially as a dealer in real estate, but in 1852 or 3 
in the course of his business was made defendant in a series of 
vexatious lawsuits which absorbed the most of his attention (as 
he was his own lawyer) for the next thirty years, and in which 
he was finally and triumphantly victorious ; these circumstances 



249 

served incidentally to determine his adoption of the law as his 
main occupation, as well as to fix the place of his residence. 

He married, May 20, 1850, Miss Mary L. Sanford, of New 
Haven, by whom he had one child ; the union was not a happy 
one, and they separated in 1854. For his second wife he married, 
in 1864, Mrs. Lucinda Keith, of Milwaukee, who survives him 
with their two daughters. 

Robert William Weight, third son of Stephen and Zibiah 
(Richardson) Wright, was born in Ludlow, Vt., February 22, 
1816. 

For three years after graduation he was engaged in teaching 
in the public Grammar Schools in Boston, at the same time 
studying law. He was admitted to the bar in the autumn of 
1845, and immediately went to Wisconsin Territory. He settled 
in the spring of 1846 in Waukesha (then Prairieville), where he 
resided for ten years, actively engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession. In the fall of 1852 he declined the Whig nomination for 
Congress in his district. He left Wisconsin in the spring of 
1856, intending to settle in Selma, Ala.; but the outlook being 
unfavorable, he went instead to Waterbury, Conn., where he 
remained for three years, engaged in the practice of law, and a 
part of the time editing a weekly newspaper, as well as serving 
for one year as Judge of Probate. From 1859 to 1872 his resi- 
dence was in New Haven, and during most of that time he was 
-engaged in journalism ; he was also Executive Secretary of Gov- 
-ernor English for three years. From 1872 to 1883 he resided in 
Cheshire, Conn., still engaged in literary work ; here also he 
served for one year as Judge of Probate. From Cheshire he 
removed, late in 1883, to Cleveland, Ohio, where he died suddenly 
of congestion of the brain, January 9, 1885, at the age of 69. 

He contributed largely to magazines, and printed a number of 
poems, chiefly satirical. In 1880 he published a volume called 
"Life; its True Genesis" (12mo. pp. 298), which he considered to 
be a complete refutation of the Darwinian theory of evolution ; 
he was preparing a continuation of this work, when stricken with 
his last illness. 

He married, August 13, 1844, Miss Laurine L., daughter of 
Capt. John Luke, of St. Armand, Lower Canada, who died May 
29, 1851. He next married, October 14, 1852, Miss Sarah L., 
daughter of the Rev. Job H. Martyn, of New York City, who 



260 

survives him with one daughter and one son ; of the five children 
by his first marriage, two sons are also living, the elder being a 
graduate of the Law Department of this College. 

1843. 

Marius Brandegeb, son of Elishama and Emily (Stocking) 
Brandegee, was born in Berlin, Conn., March 8, 1823. 

In the April after his graduation he went to New York City, 
and entered the wholesale grocery house of Suydam, Reed & Co., 
where he continued until February, 1852, when he began busi- 
ness for himself as a produce broker. In June, 1853, he became 
associated with the firm of Wyckofi" & Hazen, brokers ; and in 
3 855 entered the foreign fruit trade, under the firm name of 
Wyckofi", Hazen and Brandegee. After 1861 he continued the 
business by himself or in partnership with Mr. P. J. Thorne, the 
firm name being Brandegee & Thorne. About a year ago he 
retired from active business life. He died from blood-poisoning, 
the result of a carbuncle, at his home in Elizabeth, N. J., on 
Sunday morning. May 3, 1885, in his 63d year. He was interred 
in the old family burying ground in Berlin. 

He married, November 21, 1847, Catharine A. Fountain, of 
New York, who survives him with two of their three children, — 
the only son being a member of the present Junior Class in 
College. 

Alfred Lambert, son of William G. and Sarah (Perley) Lam- 
bert, was born in Boston, Mass., July 5, 1822. 

After graduation, he studied medicine for a year in New York 
City, with Dr. Willard Parker, and then for two years in the 
Harvard Medical School, where he was graduated in 1846, having 
served one year as Interne in the Massachusetts General Hospital. 
He then went to Paris, and spent two years in the study of medi- 
cine in that city. On his return, in 1848, he located himself in 
Springfield, Mass., and began the practice of his profession. In 
1849, he was elected secretary and treasurer of the Hampden Dis- 
trict Medical Society, and subsequently was both vice-president 
and president of the association. He was one of the incorpora- 
tors of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company, in 
May, 1851, and was the medical examiner of the company until 
he resigned the position in 1868, when he also relinquished his 
practice, to go to New York as a medical examiner of the Equita- 
ble Life Assurance Society. 



251 

He remained in New York about eight years, when he returned 
to Springfield and resumed practice. Dr. David P. Smith had 
succeeded him as medical examiner of the Massachusetts Mutual, 
and on his death in 1880, Dr. Lambert resumed that position. 

Dr. Lambert was a well informed and carefully read physician, 
and was highly regarded by his patients for his urbanity of man- 
ner and his professional skill. From appearances he had every 
prospect of a long life, but in the fall of 1884, symptoms of 
Bright's disease developed in his system, and he steadily failed 
until on January 11, 1885, he quietly passed away. 

He was married, September 27, 1849, to Elizabeth Sargent, of 
Leicester, Mass., sister of the late Dr. Henry Sargent (Y. C. 
1841), who survives him without children. A brother was gradu- 
ated at this College in 1854. 

1844. 

Samuel Augustus Fisk, son of William and Jane Fisk, was 
born in Cambridge, Mass., March 26, 1821. 

Immediately after graduating, he began the study of medicine 
at the Medical School of Harvard University, and he continued 
his studies the next year at the University of Pennsylvania, 
where he received his degree in 1846. After some experience of 
hospital practice in Philadelphia, he settled in Northampton, 
Mass., in December, 1848, where he continued to reside till his 
death. In 1870 he was honored by being elected President of 
the Massachusetts Medical Society, to which office he was re- 
elected the following year. He retired from active practice about 
1876, and suffered much from ill-health for the rest of his life. 
He died of organic disease of the heart, in Northampton, Novem- 
ber 16, 1884, aged 63 years. 

Besides his highly creditable professional activity, he was also 
much interested in all local public matters. He was one of the 
incorporators of the Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes, and at 
the establishment of Smith College for women he was appointed 
lecturer on physiology and hygiene, and performed that duty 
until prevented by ill-health. 

He married, in June, 1851, Harriet B., daughter of Abraham 
Bininger, of New York City, who survives him, with several 
adopted children, the children of his deceased brother. 

1845. 
Daniel Chadwick, son of Daniel and Nancy (Waite) Chad- 
wick, was born in Lyme, Conn., January 5, 1825. 



252 

After graduation he studied law in Lyme, with his uncle, the 
Hon. Henry M. Waite (Y. C. 1809), and for one year with his 
cousin, the present Chief Justice of the United States, in Ohio. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1847, and at once began the prac- 
tice of law in Lyme, and continued there until 1854, when he 
removed to Baltimore. Two years later his father's death recalled 
him to Lyme, where he continued the practice of his profession. 

He served as a member of the State Senate in 1858, and of the 
House of Representatives in 1859, and again as a member of the 
State Senate in 1864, being thus twice ex officio a fellow of the 
College. JHe was State's attorney for New London County from 
1861 to 1876, and from 1880 till his death United States Attor- 
ney for the District of Connecticut. He died very suddenly at 
his home in Lyme, November 23, 1884, in his 60th year. His 
private and professional character, his public services, and the 
esteem in which he was held by his brethren, made his death a 
serious loss. 

He married, March 21, 1848, Ellen, third daughter of Enoch 
Hayes, of Lyme, who survives him, with two sons and one of 
their two daughters. 



Geokge Crawfoed Murray, son of William W. and Mary 
(Crawford) Murray, was born in Middletown, N. J., January 3, 
1827. 

After leaving College he studied law in Trenton, N. J., and 
with the Hon. George Wood in New York City, where he was 
admitted to the bar in January, 1849. He then pursued a course 
of study in analytical chemistry in the newly established school 
of applied chemistry in this College, and in the summer of 1850 
returned to his home in Middletown to engage in farming. He 
continued through life deeply interested in agricultural and ana- 
lytical chemistry and in kindred scientific studies. He served for 
one year in the State Legislature, but declined a re-nomination. 
Late in life he removed to Jersey City, N. J., where he died very 
suddenly, of paralysis of the heart, after having been for two 
months in feeble health, on Thanksgiving Day, November 27, 
1884, aged nearly 58 years. 

He married, February 27, 1855, Mary C, daughter of James 
Cooper, of Middletown, who survives him. Their children were 
two daughters and a son. 



253 

Charles Miner Runk, son of Jacob and Barbara (Fisher) 
Riink, was born in Locust Township, Columbia County, Pa., 
August 3, 1818. He entered College at the beginning of the 
course, from Catawissa, Pa., but left in Sophomore year; he was 
admitted to a degree in 1864, and enrolled with his Class. 

He read law with an uncle in Allentown, Pa., and was there 
admitted to the bar, August 31, 1846, but immediately entered 
the law department of Harvard University, where he remained 
for two years, though taking his degree of LL.B. in 1847. Re- 
turning to Allentown in the summer of 1848, he began the prac- 
tice of his profession, and continued in it there until Bis death, 
besides filling other' important positions. He died after pro- 
longed suffering from cancer of the stomach, May 11, 1885, in his 
67th year. 

He married, July 27, 1852, Miss Sarah Louisa, eldest daughter 
of Charles Saeger, of Allentown, who survives him, with three of 
their seven children, — one son and two daughters. 

Mr. Runk manifested his attachment to the College by a gift 
of 81,000, soon after he was admitted to a degree, for the found- 
ing of a scholarship known as the Third Freshman scholarship. 



1 



1846. 



Henry Childs was born in Deerfield, Mass., July 18, 1819, the 
on of Henry and Matilda (Billings) Childs. 

After graduating he taught in Cleveland, Ohio, until 1853 ; his 
health requiring a more active mode of life, he afterwards traveled 
as an agent for Messrs. A. S. Barnes & Co., the book-publishers, 
for about three years. In 1858 he removed to Buffalo, N. Y., 
where he established the "Buffalo Steam Forge Company," which 
did a large and lucrative business in the manufacture of iron. He 
was prominent in the affairs of Buffalo until his death, especially 
in the promotion of religious, educational and charitable institu- 
tions. 

He married, August 19, 1847, Elizabeth Hitchcock of Deer- 
field. Of their four children, two sons died by accident, and two 
daughters, with th^ir mother, survive. From the death of his 
last remaining son, in the spring of 1884, at the age of 21, he 
never fully recovered. He died in Buffalo, February 10, 1885, in 
his 66th year. 

3 



254 



1847. 



Francis Henry Palmer died of heart disease during the 
night of July 20-21, 1884, in the 56th year of his age. He was 
born February 22, 1829, probably in New York City. 

After leaving College he became a banker and broker in New 
York City, but he retired from active business several years 
before his death. His residence continued in New York, though 
he was in the habit of devoting several months of every year to 
field sports of which he was very fond. 

On the 19th of July, 1884, being in his usual health, he arrived 
at the house of a friend in Providence, R. I., on a visit. During 
a part of the next day he complained of pain in his chest ; and 
on the morning of the 21st he was found dead in his bed. He 
was unmarried. 

Elbert Jones Smith, second son of Wm. Sidney and Eleanor 
(Jones) Smith, was born at Cold Spring, Long Island, January 3, 
1826. 

After graduation he was engaged in the insurance business in 
New York City, until his health failed ; as it was not restored by 
an extended trip to New Orleans and Honduras, he went to Cali- 
fornia in 1851. Thence he made a voyage to the Philippine 
Islands, but finally settled in California, in 1853. He was for 
several years engaged in mercantile business in Stockton, was 
also county surveyor of San Joaquin County, and then United 
States Internal Revenue Collector. He was afterwards cashier of 
the banks in Napa City and San Luis Obispo. His health failed 
again in 1878, and after seven years of suffering from neuralgia, 
he died in Berkeley, Cal., October 18, 1884, in his 59th year. 

He married, in Stockton, January 1, 1863, Alma A., daughter 
of the Rev. A. S. Allen, of Black Earth, Wise, who with one 
daughter and two sons survives him. 

1849. 

Charles Lewis Brent was born in Winchester, Va., in 1829, 
and entered College in the Sophomore year. 

He studied law in Winchester, and was admitted to the bar in 
September, 1851. He practiced law and was engaged in farming 
in his native place until his death, which occurred at Baltimore, 
while temporarily absent from home, on the 18th of November, 
1882, in his 54th year. 



265 

He married, May 12, 1858, Miss Mary M. Myers, of Winches- 
ter, by whom he had two sons and three daughters. 

1850. 

Thomas Heber Jackson was born in Leesburg, Va., in Sep- 
tenoiber, 1830. 

He studied medicine in Philadelphia, and was graduated at 
the Jefferson Medical College in March, 1853. He remained in 
Philadelphia in the practice of his profession until February, 
1857, when he settled in Prince George's County, Md. He con- 
tinued in practice there until the fall of 1859, when he again 
removed, to North Carolina; but on the failure of his health he 
removed to Garretson's Landing, Jefferson County, Ark., and 
engaged in cotton planting. His latest residence was in Lin- 
wood, in the same countj^ where he died, July 21, 1884, in his 
o4th year, after seven years of close confinement to his room. 

He married. May 5, 1857, Miss Christiana B., daughter of 
William A. Eaton, by whom he had two daughters, one of whom 
died in infancy. 

Jacob Kent Warner, son of Milo Warner, was born in 
Strykersville, Wyoming County, N. Y., September 10, 1824. 

The three years after graduation he spent in the Auburn 
(N. Y.) Theological Seminary. He then began preaching in the 
Congregational Church in Allegany, N. Y., removing in 1855 to 
the Presbyterian Church in Burdett, N. Y., and to Dundee, 
N. Y., in 1857. He was ordained at Waterloo, N. Y., by the 
Geneva Presbytery, Februarys, 1858. In the fall of 1859 he, 
removed to the neighborhood of Janesville, Wisconsin, his wife's 
health requiring a change of climate. In 1862 he took charge of 
the Congregational Church in Johnstown, Wisconsin. There 
his health failed in 1867, and after a long illness he was com- 
pelled to migrate to a warmer climate. He spent a year in 
Augusta, Ga., in charge of schools of the American Missionary 
Association, and thence went to Jacksonville, Fla., where he set- 
tled permanently in business, preaching occasionally as health 
permitted. 

He died in Burdett, N. Y., February 12, 1885, at the age of 60. 

He married, June 29, 1854, Miss Mary A., daughter of the Rev. 
E. Piatt, of Brooklyn, N. Y., who died December 18, 1864; one 
of her four children died in infancy. He next married, Decem- 



266 

ber 6, 1865, Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel Mason, of Bristol, 
N. H., who died in Jacksonville, June 19, 1870. In 1873 he 
married Miss Louise Brown, of Burdett, N. Y., by whom he had 
several children. 

Daniel Ellis Willes, son of Horatio and Susan P. Willes, 
was born in Franklin, Conn., October 27, 1824. He was also a 
member of the two preceding classes, and spent only a part of 
Junior year with the class of 1850 ; he was admitted to a degree 
in 1855. 

After leaving college he studied law in Detroit, Mich., was 
admitted to the bar in 1851, and practiced law in that city. Re- 
turning to the East on account of ill health, he taught for three 
years in Westchester County, N. Y., and then studied theology 
in the General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church. He was ordained deacon, June 27, 1858, by Bishop 
Horatio Potter, in New York City ; and after brief engagements 
in Granville, N. Y., and West Rutland, Vt., went in the spring 
of 1860 as missionary to the Pacific slope. After five years of 
this service he settled as Rector of the Church of the Advent in 
Brooklyn, Cal., whence he returned in 1868 to New York City. 
From March, 1869, to 1874, he was Rector of St. Peter's Church, 
Hobart, N. Y., and from 1878 until his. death he was Rector of 
All Saints Church, Sunderland, Md. 

In the autumn of 1883 his health became impaired, and though 
somewhat improved it was unequal to the shock caused by a fall 
and the consequent fracture of his arm a year later. Though he 
attended to his duties in the winter of 1884-5, there was a want 
of circulation in the injured arm, and in March secondary causes 
set in, and after great suffering he died at his home in Sunder- 
land, on the 10th of April, in his 61st year. 

He married in May, 1863, in San Francisco, Miss Bithynia M., 
daughter of Capt. Francis Peet, of Bridgeport, Conn., who sur- 
vives him with their children, — three daughters and two sons. 

1853. 

William Loag Williamson, son of Samuel E. and Sarah J. 
(Loag) Williamson, was born Sejjtember 4, 1832, in East Nant- 
meal township, Chester County, Pa., and was prepared for the 
Junior year in college at Freeland Seminary, now XJrsinus Col- 
lege, in Freeland, Pa. 



257 

After graduation he began teaching in Pottstown, Pa., and in 
April, 1854, became instructor in languages in Freeland Semi- 
nary. In April, 1857, he purchased an interest in the Montgom- 
ery Ledger, a newspaper in Pottstown, and assumed editorial 
charge, though also continuing his teaching for more than two 
years. Besides his editorial work he was for nearly five years, 
1862-67, U. S. assessor of internal revenue, and for two or three 
years conducted a successful real estate and insurance business. 
In April, 1866, he disposed of his interest in the Ledger, and in 
1868 entered the banking house of J. W. Casselberry & Co., in 
Pottstown, as junior partner, and so continued till the time of his 
death. He was also one of the School Board for nine years, a 
director of the National Bank of Pottstown, and the secretary of 
the Gas and Water Board. His ability and willingness to fulfill 
all the obligations of his busy life rendered him a most useful 
man to the community. 

He died in Pottstown after a brief illness. May 19, 1885, in his 
58d year. 

He married, Oct. 6, 1859, Mary E. Pennypacker, of Charles- 
town, Chester County, Pa., who survives him with one daughter 
and two sons. His eldest son, a graduate of Lafayette College, 
died before him. 

1854. 

William Hutchison, son of the Rev. William and Helen 
(Seabold) Hutchinson, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., September 
20, 1827. His boyhood was mainly spent in New Hampshire, 
where his father was a settled pastor for most of the time from 
1830 till his death in 1842. He entered college from Chester 
County, Pennsylvania, having been a member of Delaware Col- 
lege, at Newark, Delaware. 

After graduating he taught in New Haven until he entered on 
a tutorship in college in 1857. In the summer of 1858 (having 
taken a partial course in the Divinity School) he resigned his 
tutorship, in order to go to Constantinople as a missionary of the 
American Board. He was married, July 8, 1858, to Miss For- 
resta G., daughter of Professor Forrest Shepherd (Y. C. 1827), of 
New Haven, and was ordained to the ministry before his depart- 
ure from the country in October. The condition of his wife's 
health obliged him to return to America in 1859, and he resumed 
at once his former position in the college, continuing here until 



258 

1863, when he accepted the place of Principal of Lawrence 
Academy in Groton, Mass. In September, 1865, he left Groton 
to become Principal of the Free Academy in Norwich, Conn., 
where he spent the rest of his life. His success as a teacher was 
exceptionally great, and was owing as much to his unusual power 
of sympathy with boys and to the impression made by his own 
manly character as to his good scholarship. He was besides a 
most valuable citizen of Norwich in his service as a member of 
the Board of Education, as a trustee of the Otis Library, and as 
a deacon in the Broadway Church. 

While on a hunting trip in North Carolina, late in December, 
1884, he took a sudden cold and was threatened with pneumonia. 
He was able to reach home, and seemed to be improving ; but 
died suddenly, from the rupture of a blood-vessel of the brain, 
on the 6th of January, 1885, in the 58th year of his age. 

His wife survives him, with their only son, a graduate of this 
College in 1880; an only daughter died early. 

Chauncey Minott Thompson, son of Charles C. and Lydia 
(Bacon) Thompson, was born in New York City, March 29, 1833. 

After graduation he passed a few months with commercial 
houses in New York, familiarizing himself with mercantile affairs, 
and then went to Europe with his father. His subsequent life 
was almost entirely spent abroad. He traveled in the southern 
portions of Europe during the winter, resided at Paris during the 
spring and autumn, and at German watering places during the 
summer. After his father's death in 1883, he returned to this 
country, and remained about a year, but went back to Europe, 
with health entirely broken by his loss, in May, 1884. 

He died at Paris, France, July 6, 1884, of marasmus, in his 
6 2d year. 

1856. 

Robert Milton Baker, son of Jacob Baker, was born in 
Winchester, Va., June 16, 1834, and entered College at the begin- 
ning of the Sophomore year. 

He read law for about a year at Winchester, in the office of 
David Barton, Esq., and then began the study of divinity. He 
was ordained a clergyman in the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the fall of 1861, and took charge of a parish in Fauquier County, 
Va., where he remained until driven away by the changes of war. 



He became a Chaplain in the Confederate service in the summer 
of 1863, and continued thus until he signed his parole at Appo- 
mattox Court House. Afterwards he resumed parochial work in 
Frederick and Warren Counties, Va. ; from 1871 to 18*73 he was 
settled in Louisville, Ky., — next in Hopkinsville, Ky., and for the 
last six years of his life as Rector of Grace Church, Georgetown, 
D. C. The call upon his sympathies and strength by work among 
the poor and suffering in Georgetown and South Washington, 
brought on nervous prostration and brain disease, on account of 
which he was taken to a Sanitarium near Baltimore, where he 
died, March 3, 1884, in his 60th year. 

He married, Jan. 28, 1862, Louisa F. Davison, of Warren 
County, Va., who survives him with their six sons and two 
dauo;hters. 



Lewis Richard Packard died at his home in New Haven, 
Connecticut, October 26, 1884, in the 49th year of his age. He 
was the youngest child of Frederick A. Packard (Harv. 1814) 
and Elizabeth D. (Hooker) Packard, of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was born, August 22, 1836. 

He pursued graduate studies at the College for a year after 
graduation, and then spent something over a year in travel and 
study abroad. For another year he was occupied, in Philadel- 
phia, with the study of Hebrew, with the view of entering the 
ministry. In September, 1859, he entered on a tutorship in the 
College, which he held until his appointment in 1863 to the 
Assistant Professorship of Greek. In the same year he was 
admitted on examination to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
While in the tutorship he took a full course in theology in the 
Divinity School, and he continued to preach as he had oppor- 
tunity so long as his health allowed. 

In 1867 he was advanced to the Hillhouse Professorship of 
Greek, and that position he retained until his death. About 1870 
his health began to fail, and from that date his work was seri- 
ously interrupted by the constant inroads of disease; he has 
nevertheless left the distinct impress of his broad and accurate 
scholarship on all the classes which he met, and has made the 
College for all these years the richer by his teaching and his 
example, and the purity and nobleness of his character. 

In 1883 he accepted the directorship for a year of the Ameri- 
can School of Classical Studies at Athens, in the hope that the 



260 

change of climate might be benelicial. In fact the year proved 
to be one of greatly increased feebleness, and he returned in 
July, much the worse for his absence ; the remaining months of 
his life were months of severe suffering. 

Professor Packard was married, December 29, 1870, to Miss 
Harriet M. Storrs, eldest daughter of the Rev. Dr. R. S. Storrs, 
of Brooklyn, New York, who survives him with their only child, 
a daughter. 

Chables Goodbich Southmayd, the eldest child of Frederick 
R. and Catharine (Goodrich) Southmayd, of New Orleans, Louis- 
iana, was born in New Orleans, October 18, 1834, and entered 
College as a Sophomore. His father was a native of Middletown, 
Connecticut. 

His life was spent in New Orleans, where he was employed as 
a clerk in a mercantile house, except during the period from 
March, 1862, till the close of the Civil War, during which he 
served in the Confederate Army. 

He was attacked with severe hemorrhage of the lungs, about 
the 25th of February, 1885, while at home in New Orleans, and 
was removed by his physician's advice on the 1st of March to 
Sour Lake, Texas, but died there on the following day, in the 
51st year of his age. He was never married. 

1859. 

George Heney Coffey was born in MuUingar, Ireland, 
August 15, 1835. He was brought to this country in his child- 
hood, and entered College from Albany, New York. 

After graduation he studied theology, for one year in Union 
Theological Seminary, and from September, 1860, to December, 
186], in the Yale Divinity School. He then accepted a call to 
the Congregational Church in Saugerties, New York, where he was 
ordained and installed, January 22, 1862. In January, 1865, he 
was settled over the Congregational Church in Jackson, Michigan, 
whence he removed in March, 1868, to a new Congregational 
Church in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. He left the ministry in 
1870, and after studying law in Hackensack, New Jersey, with 
Judge Knapp, opened an office in that place, and continued to 
reside there until his death. He was for many years prominent 
in Bergen County politics, being an earnest republican and an 
eloquent campaign speaker. 



261 

He died on May 31, 1885, in the State Lunatic Asylum 
in Trenton, New Jerseyf where he had been for some months 
under medical treatment ; his health for two or three years had 
been very poor. He married August 30, 1860, Miss Ellen H. 
Tourtelotte, of Springfield, Massachusetts, who survives him 
with their two children. 



Geoege Whitepield Fisher, son of John and Almira (King) 
Fisher, was born in Cambridge, Washington County, New York, 
December 25, 1831, and entered College at the beginning of the 
Sophomore year. 

The three years after graduation he spent in teaching, — two 
years in the Conference Seminary in Charlotteville, New York, 
and one in the Fort Edward Institute, Fort Edward, New York. 
He then took a three years' course in the Yale Divinity School, 
and immediately began preaching in Saugerties, New York, 
where he was ordained pastor of the Church of the Forefathers, 
November 23, 1865. He was dismissed from Saugerties in Janu- 
ary, 1888, and in the following September took charge of the 
Congregational Church in Peacedale, Rhode Island, though he 
was not regularly installed there until July 24, 1872. After 
twelve years of very happy and useful service, he took a dismis- 
sion, October 11, 1880; his pastorate had been marked by a 
steady growth in the Church and the Sabbath School, a beautiful 
house of worship had been erected, and he had also been the 
means of establishing a high school in the town. After some 
time spent in New Haven, he went to St. Louis, and in January, 
1883, t(.)ok cliarge of the Congregational Church in Cameron, 
Missouri ; but failing health compelled him to lay down his work, 
in January, 1884, and in April he was brought to his father-in- 
law's house in Berlin, New Jersey, where he died, of consump- 
tion, July 12, aged 52^ years. 

He married, July 1, 1863, Ella, daughter of John Wescott, of 
Waterford, New Jersey, who survives him. Of their four chil- 
dren two sons are still living ; the elder son is a member of the 
Freshman Class in this College. 

1861. 

Francis Edward Kernochan, son of Joseph and Margaret 
(Seymour) Kernochan, was born in New York City, December 
12, 1840. 



262 

After graduation he entered the Law School of Columbia Col- 
lege, and received the degree of LL.B. m May, 1863. He then 
spent two years in a lawyer's office, and a year in foreign travel. 
On the 27th of June, 1866, he married Miss Abba E. Learned, 
the eldest daughter of Edward Learned, Esq., of Pittsiield, 
Massachusetts, and in the following November opened a law-office 
in New York City in partnership with his brother (Y. C. 1863). 
He continued in practice until June, 1873, when he removed to 
Pittsfield, to engage in the manufacture of woolen goods, as prin- 
cipal owner in the Bel Air Manufacturing Company. Here he 
gave himself to the care of his business, and not less to the inter- 
ests of the community, with characteristic energy and devotion ; 
so that his death was a heavy public loss, as well as a' deep grief 
to an unusually wide circle of personal friends. 

He died at his home in Pittsfield, September 26, 1884, in his 
44th year, in consequence of the accidental discharge the night 
before of a pistol which he was carrying, on a supposed alarm 
from burglars. 

His wife survives him with two daughters and one of their two 
sons. 

1864. 

Murray Colegate Shoemaker, the second son of Robert M. 
and Mary (Colegate) Shoemaker, was born in Tiffin, Seneca 
County, Ohio, September 18, 1844. He entered Kenyon College 
in 1859, and left in 1862, joining this College in the spring of 1863. 

After graduating he studied in the Cincinnati Law School for 
one year, and for a second year in the Law School of Columbia 
College, where he completed the course in May, 1866. His 
father, an eminent railroad contractor, was at that dale engaged 
in the construction of the Pacific Railroad, and the son was for 
some time employed in the construction and the land departments 
of the road. Later he entered on the practice of his profession 
in Cincinnati, at first in partnership with his classmate, Charles 
P. Taft, Esq. He was also extensively engaged with his father 
in railroad business. In February, 1883, he formed with Mr. C. 
B. Matthews the law firm of Matthews & Shoemaker, in which 
he continued till his death. The most of his time was occu- 
pied, however, with the management of his large estate. 

Last/ winter his spine was severely injured by an accident 
which occurred while he was coasting, near his home, in Glendale, 



263 

a suburb of Cincinnati. Symptoms of brain disease and nervouft 
prostration resulted, and he was accordingly placed in the Sani- 
tarium at Oxford, Ohio, where he died suddenly, April 8, 1885, 
in his 41st year. 

His wife, a daughter of the Hon. James M. Marvin, of Sara- 
toga, New York, survives him with two of their three children, — 
a son and a daughter. 

1865. 

Joseph Henry Isham, son of Joseph H. and Christina (Beach) 
Isham, was born in Auburn, New York, March 2, 1842, and 
entered College from Irvington, New York, though his parents 
soon removed to New Haven. 

The year following graduation he was an admiral's clerk in 
the United States Navy, and then spent a year in the Yale Law 
School. Being in indifferent health, he traveled extensively, in 
Europe in 1867-68 and in the Pacific States in 1870-73, and in 
September, 1873, entered the Yale Divinity School, where he was 
graduated in 18 76. He was ordained pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church in Cheshire, Connecticut, January 23, 1878, and 
remained with that parish until April 25, 1882, though much of 
the time in feeble health. He afterwards supplied the Presby- 
terian Church in Marquette, Mich., where he received a call to 
settle. 

He died, of consumption, in Gordonsville, Virginia, June 29, 
1884, in his 43d year. He was never married. 

1866. 

John Hampden Wood, son of the Hon. Bradford R. Wood 
(Union Coll. 1824), was born in Albany, New York, October 22, 
1843. 

After graduation he studied law in Albany with Messrs. Jen- 
kins & Cooper and with the Hon. John H. Reynolds, and also 
received a degree at the Albany Law School in May, 1867. He 
was then admitted to the bar in his native city, being the first 

kin his class to take that rank. In 1868 he formed a partnership 
with Joseph W. Russell, Esq., of Albany, with whom he con- 
tinued in business until 1883, when he opened an oflice of his 
own. During the administration of Governor Dix (1873-74) he 
served as Judge- Advocate-General on the Governor's staff ; and 
later was appointed by Judge Woodruff United States Commis- 



I 



264 

held till his death. He was exceedingly popular in society, and 
maintained the character of an honorable, courteous gentleman. 

After a confinement to his house for about seven weeks, caused 
by a complicated trouble with the liver, he died in Albany, July 
10, 1884, in his 41st year. 

He married, in January, 1882, a daughter of David I. Boyd, 
Esq., of Albany, who survives him without children. 

1870. 

Ross Johnston, younger son of Frank Johnston (Y. C. 1835) 
and Mary E. (Anderson) Johnston, was born in Allegheny, Pa., 
September 1, 1848, and entered College from Pittsburgh, Pa., the 
place of his father's residence. 

In October, 1870, he took a position as book-keeper in the 
wholesale house of H. Childs & Co., of Pittsburgh, and in 1872 
went into business in Chicago. While there his health suffered, 
and in the spring of 1873 he went abroad.- He returned in 1876, 
and settled in Pittsburgh, acquiring an interest in the firm of H. 
Childs & Co., which he retained till his death. 

He married, September 18, 1879, Miss Anna D., the only 
daughter of Thomas L. Blair, Esq., of Pittsburgh, who survives 
him with one child. 

Late in February, 1885, he went with his family to Fortress 
Monroe, Va., and while there died suddenly, after a few days' 
illness, from gastritis, March 11, 1885, in his 37th year. His 
winning social qualities made him warmly beloved and sincerely 
mourned. 

1871. 

Jonathan Wales, who died suddenly, of typhoid fever, in 
Randolph, Mass., July 21, 1884, was the youngest son of the late 
Jonathan and S. Augusta Wales, and was born in that town, 
October 4, 1849. 

Soon after graduation he began and pursued the study of law 
in the office of John F. Colby, Esq., in Boston ; he was also for a 
time a member of the Law School of Harvard University, and in 
1875 was admitted to the bar. During the rest of his life he prac- 
ticed his profession in Boston, being a part of the time associated 
in business with Mr. Colby. He was often honored by his fellow- 
citizens in Randolph (where his residence remained) with positions 
of usefulness and trust, which he filled to their entire satisfaction. 



I 

I 



266 

During 1880 and 1881 he was one of the Representatives to the 
General Court, and at the time of his death his name was promi- 
nently mentioned by the Republican party as a candidate for the 
office of State Senator. He was unmarried. 

1872. 

James Henry Clendenin, son of Charles A. Clendenin, was 
born in Gallipolis, Ohio, February 29, 1848. 

After graduation he taught school for some time in Circleville, 
Ohio, but subsequently returned to Gallipolis. His health while 
in College was very poor, from asthma ; and on the recurrence of 
the trouble he was driven to the excessive use of opiates, which 
resulted in the entire wreck of his health. He died in Gallipolis, 
June 17, 1884, at the age of 36. He was unmarried. 

Frank Abner Langworthy, the second son and last surviv- 
ing child of the Rev. Dr. Isaac P. Langworthy (Y. C. 1839) and 
Sarah (Williams) Langworthy, was born in Chelsea, Mass., Octo- 
ber 18, 1849. 

For the year following graduation he taught the Lyme (Conn.) 
High School. Ill health then laid him aside for half a year, after 
which he entered on medical studies with Dr. W. W. Crandall, 
of Andover, Alleghany County, N. Y. In October, 1874, he went 
to New York City, and after attending three full courses of lect- 
ures at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, received the 
degree of M.D. in March, 1877. He was then appointed on the 
house-staff of St. Francis Hospital, where he spent a profitable 
year and a half. 

On the 1st of January, 1879, he began practice in Chelsea, 
where he was acquiring a high position in his profession, when he 
was attacked in October, 1882, with bleeding from the lungs, and 
was obliged to seek a milder climate. He spent the winter of 
1883-4 in Santa Barbara, California, and in the late spring removed 
to Havilah, the residence of a cousin, a hundred miles northeast- 
wards, on a slope of the Sierra Nevada. Here he was visited in 
June by his father, soon after whose departure he contracted a 
fever which completely wrecked his strength. He died in camp 
near Havilah, August 31, 1884, in his 35th year. 

Dr. Langworthy had shown, in his brief professional career and 
in his subsequent experience, remarkable unselfishness "and cheer- 
ful obedience to duty — a bright Christian exarajDle. 



266 



1876. 



Oliver Ellsworth Lyman, elder son of Professor Chester S. 
Lyman (Y. C. 1837) and Delia W. (Wood) Lyman, was born in 
New Haven, May 10, 1856. 

He was prepared for College at the Hopkins Grammar School 
in this city, and after graduation entered the Yale Law School, 
where he received his degree in 1878. He was for a few months 
in a law office here, and in December, 1878, entered the office of 
James K. Hill (Y. C. 1854), Wing, and Shoudy, in New York 
City, where he continued till his death. He was also engaged 
with all the intensity of his nature in outside literary pursuits and 
in church work. After a prolonged illness, from typhoid fever, 
he died in Brooklyn, N. Y., September 6, 1884, in his 29th year. 
He was not married. 

1882. 

Barclay Johnson, son of J. Augustus and Sarah B. Johnson, 
was born on the 8th of August, 1861, in Beirut, Syria, where his 
father was then U. S. Consul. 

He was prepared for College at Mr. Siglar's School in New- 
burgh, N. Y., and was graduated at Yale with the highest honors 
and with the warm affection of all who had known him well. For 
the year 1882-83 he remained in New Haven on a scholarship 
foundation, pursuing advanced studies ; the succeeding year he 
spent at his home in New York City, engaged in study in the 
Law School of Columbia College. Li 1884 he went into the law 
office of Messrs. Alexander & Green, of New York, and was still 
there at the time of his death, though temporarily absent on 
account of illness, arising from overwork. He died, suddenly, in 
Greenwich, Conn., April 21, 1885, in his 24th year. 

1883. 

Allyn Cooke Loomis, the only son of the Hon. Thomas W. 
and Jennie (Cooke) Loomis, was born in Windsor, Conn., Novem- 
ber 21, 1860, and was prepared for College at the Hartford High 
School. 

After graduation he was employed in teaching a class of six 
boys in Saint Paul, Minn., until he was attacked with cerebro- 
spinal meningitis, of which he died, at St. Paul, after an illness of 
two weeks, on the 20th of June, 1884, in the 24th year of his age. 



207 



1884. 



I 



Edward Ashton Lawrence, youngest son of the Hon. Charles 
B. Lawrence, LL.D., Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Illi- 
nois, and Margaret (Marston) Lawrence, was born near Prairie 
City, Warren County, Illinois, July 25, 1861, and died in Wies- 
baden, Germany, August 31, 1884, in his 24th year, of tuberculosis, 
after a long illness. 

He was fitted for College at the Chicago High School, and en- 
tered Yale with unusually matured powers of mind. While 
keenly enjoying the activities and pleasures of College life, he 
gave himself with equal appreciation to the solid work of the 
course. His health had always given his family great anxiety, 
and at the close of the first term of senior year he returned home, 
stricken with an illness which rapidly developed into a compli- 
cation of diseases baffling all professional skill. At Commence- 
ment in view of his previous good scholarship and the inevitable 
nature of his detention, his name was enrolled with his class as a 
graduate. 

As a last resort his physicians advised a trial of the waters at 
Wiesbaden and Schwalbach, Germany, whither he was taken in 
July, 1884. He sank gradually after leaving America, although 
rallying a little at first under the influence of the mountain air. 
He died at Wiesbaden, August 31, and is buried in Galesburg, 
111., his former residence. 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 



1825. 



Theodore Gilbert, son of George F. Gilbert, of Tolland, 
Conn., was born about 1804. 

He married early, and settled in the practice of his profession 
in Orwell, Oswego County, N. Y. Thence he w^ent to the West. 
He became separated in some way from his family and finally 
returned to Oswego County, a confirmed inebriate. He was sup- 
ported at the public charge for about a dozen years, and died 
suddenly in the county almshouse, at Mexico, N. Y, September 
2, 1884, aged about 80. 



268 

Hiram Moses was a son of Thomas Moses, of Norfolk, Conn., 
where he was born, September 19, 1800. 

After having practiced his profession since 1825 in Peters- 
burgh, N. Y., he died in that town, June 4, 1886, being then 
the oldest physician in Rensselaer County. 

He married, in 1828, Abigail, daughter of Gen. Aaron Worth- 
ington, of Petersburgh, who died in 1878. 

1836. 

Michael Dunning Benedict was born in Bethel, Conn., 
January 21, 1814, the eldest child of Eli and Rebecca (Dunning) 
Benedict. He entered this Department in 1834, being then resi- 
dent in Brookfield, Conn. 

Upon graduation he began practice in New Haven, and re- 
mained here until October, 1838, when he removed to Skaneateles, 
Onondaga County, N. Y. On the 21st of November, 1861, he 
was mustered into the United States service as Surgeon of the 
75th N. Y. State Volunteers, and in 1862 he was made Brigade 
Surgeon on General Godfrey Weitzel's staff. After completing 
three years of service at the front, he became Medical Inspector 
of the U. S. Sanitary Commission, at Washington. In October, 
1865, he returned to New York State, and resumed the practice 
of his profession in Syracuse, where he died, after a long and 
painful illness, January 7, 1885, at the age of 71. 

His wife, Angeline Holly, daughter of Daniel Holley, of Brook- 
field, Conn., whom he married September 28, 1836, and one 
daughter survive him. 

1841. 

Frederick Norman Bennett was born in Weston, Conn., 
September 14, 1820, the youngest of seven children of Ezra Ben- 
nett, who died in 1831. 

In 1838 he entered the office of his brother. Dr. Ezra P. Ben- 
nett, a rising physician of Danbury, Conn., with whom he studied 
until he joined the Medical Institution. In February, 1842, he 
located himself in Orange, N. J., where he married in 1843, Abby 
Louisa, daughter of William Munn. Her death after a few years 
led him to abandon for a time his profession, and to remove to 
Millburn, N. J. There he was again married, to a daughter of 
Mr. J. Parkhurst, whom he subsequently assisted in his business, 
the manufacture of paper boards. Later, he resumed practice 
in Newark, remaining there until he returned to Orange. Fin- 



^69 

ally, in May, 1871, he came to Newtown, Conn., not far from his 
native hills, and there practiced his profession until his sudden 
death. 

On Thursday, March 26, 1885, he was thrown from a wagon 
and broke three of his ribs; pneumonia set in, and he died on 
Thursday, April 2, in his 65th year. One son by his first wife 
survives him. 

1844. 

David Atwater Tyler was born in Northford parish, in 
North Branford, Conn., November 10, 1818. His father, Augus- 
tus Tyler, died when his only son was five years of age, leaving 
his widow" in embarrassed circumstances. 

By his own exertions he fitted himself for admission to College, 
but on the advice of friends took up instead the study of medicine 
in the office of Dr. Nathan B. Ives, of New Haven. 

Jn B^ebrnary, 1844, he opened an office in Wooster Street, in 
this city, and remained in the same locality for almost forty 
years. In his practice he was more than ordinarily successful, 
displaying a clear and §ound judgment and much intuitive skill. 
In the fall of 1883, seriously failing health obliged him to aban- 
don regular work. After a prolonged illness, he died of chronic 
consumption at his recently completed residence in West Haven, 
Conn., March 27, 1885, in his 67th year. 

He married Miss Elizabeth Maltby, of Northford, who died in 
1868. His two sons died before him; his only daughter survives 
him, the wife of the Rev. S. J. Bryant (Y. C. Theol. Sem. 1876). 

1864. 

Augustus Huggins Abernethy was born in Litchfield, Conn., 
May 21, 1838, the second son and third child of the Hon. Elislia 
S. Abernethy (Y. C. 1825) and Charlotte M. (Huggins) Aber- 
nethy ; his parents removed to Bridgeport, Conn., in 1848. 

After some graduate study of his profession, he entered early 
in 1865 the U. S. Navy as Acting Assistant Surgeon, but the 
speedy close of the war led to his resignation, in October of the 
same year. In 1866 he entered on active practice as a physician 
and surgeon in Bridgeport, and was thus engaged, with growing 
reputation and success, especially in obstetrical cases, until his 
death. 

4 



270 

He was also a member of the City Board of Health for many 
years, for twelve years a member of the Board of Education, 
and in 1882 served as representative in the General Assembly. 

For two years before his death he suffered at times intensely 
from neuralgia of the chest ; he died very suddenly, it was sup- 
posed from angina pectoris^ at his home, November 9, 1884, aged 
46^ years. 

He was married, in Irvington-on-Hudson, September 10, 1874, 

to Miss Henrietta Stagg, daughter of the late John P. Stagg, 

of New York City, and she with one son and two daughters 

survives him. 

1880. 

Leonidas Curtin Vinal was a son of Judge Vinal, of Middle- 
town, Conn. 

He was originally an apothecary at the New Haven Dispensary, 
and after graduating had an office for a short time in New 
Haven, until he obtained an appointment as Superintendent of 
the Rhode Island insane asylum. About a year ago he left tikis 
position, and entered on successful practice in Branford, Conn. 
His health, however, had already begun to fail, and he died in 
Middletown, June 11, 1885, at the age of 40. He leaves a wife 
and four children. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

1853. 

Thomas Jefferson Bassett, son of William H. Bassett and 
Elenore O'Neil, was born in St. Mary's parish, Louisiana, on the 
6th of February, 1833. He died suddenly at his home in Bren- 
ham, Washington County, Texas, after six months' suffering from 
insomnia, on the 25th of May, 1885, at the age of 52. 

He received his academic education at St. Charles College, 
liOuisiana. On receiving his degree from the Yale Law School, 
he removed to Brenham in October, 1853, and in the spring of 
1854 began the practice of law in connection with his older 
brother. Major B. H. Bassett. The firm was in 1857 merged in 
that of Sayles & Bassett. 

In 1865, he organized the banking house of Bassett & Bassett, 
to which thenceforth he devoted his entire time and thought, and 
the credit of its honorable career is due to his integrity and 
capacity. He had no taste for public office, but filled the 
full measure of duty as a private citizen. 



271 

He was twice married, first to Lucy Breckinridge, daughter of 
Gary Breckinridge, of Fincastle, Virginia, who died within a few 
months after their marriage. His second wife was Martha I. 
Roberson, daughter of A. J. Roberson, of Washington County, 
Texas. She and four daughters of the marriage survive him. 



1856. 

George Brown Dusinberre was born, September 11, 1829, 
in PLattekill, Ulster County, N. Y. In 1837 his parents removed 
to Lima, Livingston County, N. Y., for the better education of 
their children. 

He was graduated from the VVesleyan University, Middle- 
town, Conn., in 1852, and in the next year began the study of 
law in Geneva, N. Y. After his admission to the bar, in 1856, 
he practiced in Geneva, until elected to the office of County 
Judge in 1860. He served as Judge for two full terms (eight 
years) and then resumed his practice, in which he continued with 
success. He was also for twenty-one consecutive years a mem- 
ber of the Geneva School Boai-d. 

After about two years of impaired health, he died in Geneva, 
June 15th, 1884, in his 55th year. 

He married, December 29, 1857, Miss Elizabeth C. Warner, ot 
Lima, who survives him with their three sons. 



I 



1872. 

Adolph Ashek, the eldest son of Louis and Henrietta Asher, 
was born in New Haven, Conn., in 1851. 

He was graduated at the New Haven High School in 1869, 
and soon after entered the law oflice of C. T. DriscoU, Esq., at 
the same time pursuing the course in the Law School. On his 
admission to the bar he formed a partnership with Mr. Driscoll, 
in which he continued to the time of his death. He was also 
Clerk of the City Court from 1874 to 1877. His career as a 
lawyer was very promising. He died, of typhoid fever, after ten 
days' illness, at his residence in New Haven, on the 25th of Sep- 
tember, 1884. 

llis wife, a daughter of Charles J. Mctzger, of New Haven, 
with one of his two children, survives him. 



272 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1878, 

Frank Hudson Taylor, son of Horace C. and Catharine M. 
(Snow) Taylor, was born in Oberlin, Ohio, November 14, 1855. 

He was graduated at Oberlin College in 1874, and took the 
full course of three years in this Seminary. His first pastorate 
was in Guilford, Conn., where he was ordained over the First 
(Congregational) Church, March 10, 1880. He was dismissed 
from this charge, September 3, 1883, and in November following 
began work as acting pastor of the Plymouth Congregational 
Church, Seattle, Washington Territory. While hunting, July 
18, 1884, he shot himself in the shoulder ; he died at his home, 
two days later, in his 29th year. 

He married, September 1, 1880, Jessalyn, daughter of John O. 
Couch, of Middlefield, Conn., who survives him with two sons. 

1882. 

WiNTHROP Butler Hawks, son of the Rev. Dr. Theron H. 
Hawks (Williams Coll. 1844) and Mary Hoadley Hawks, was 
born in West Springfield, Mass., April 13, 1858, and was gradu- 
ated at Marietta College, Ohio, in 1878. 

After the three-years' course (1879-82) in the Divinity School, 
in which he showed great promise, he remained for the fourth 
year of graduate study, and during that time offered himself to 
the committee of the American Board of Commissioners tor 
Foreign Missions, and was accepted, his probable destination be- 
ing China or Japan. He was ordained at Marietta (where his 
father had long been settled), March 22, 1883, and then assumed 
the temporary charge of the Congregational Church in Easton, 
Conn., which he was compelled by ill-health to give up after a 
few months. From that time he sought in vain the restoration 
of health. He went to Colorado early in the summer of 1884, 
and died in Colorado Springs, March 24, 1885, at the age of 27. 

He was not married. 



SUMMARY. 



Academical Dbpabtment. 



Class. Name and Age, 

1814 Leonard Withington, 95, 

1817 Jonathan Silliman, 92, 

1819 David Booth, 87, 

1820 Alexander C, Twining, 83, 
1823 George W. Blagdeu, 82, 

1823 George M. Hanners, 83, 

1824 James Berdan, 79. 
1824 Samuel H. Fletcher, 84, 
1824 George Goodyear, 83, 
1824 Dexter Witter, 81, 
1826 Henry C. Beardslee, 77, 
1826 Sherman Day, 78, 
1826 John DiePorest, 79, 

1826 James T. Dickinson, 77, 

1827 S. Sherwood Day, 78, 
1827 Timothy T. Merwin, 77, 
1827 Steplien T. Robinson, 76, 

1827 John B. Staples, 77, 

1828 Thomas E. Franklin, 74, 

1828 Darius Mead, 78, 

1829 Thomas Cowles, 75, 
1829 Thomas R. Hubbard, 74, 
1829 Charles A. Lewis, 75, 

1829 William Norton, 83, 

1830 John M. Gordon, 74, 
1832 William Frazier, 72, 
1832 Cortland L. Latimer, 75, 
1832 Charles Tracy, 75. 

1832 Edward Wurts, 75, 

1833 Barnabas M. Fay, 78, 
1833 David C. Perry, 75, 

1833 WilUam H. Russell, 75, 

1834 Lewis S. Benedict, 73, 

1834 James N, Lea, 69, 

1835 Charles L. Mills, 72, 

1835 John L. Tavlor, 73, 

1836 Albert Todd, 72, 

1837 Aaron R. Dutton, 68, 
1837 Benjamin Silliman, 68, 
1840' Theodore H. Benedict, 64, 

1 840 Richard V. Dodge, 62, 

1841 Hezekiah Sturges, 65, 

1842 John J. Orton, 72, 

1842 Robert W. Wright, 69, 

1843 Marius Brandegee, 62, 

1843 Alfred Lambert, 62, 

1844 Samuel A. Fisk, 63, 



Place and 
Newbury, Mass., 
Cornwall, N. Y. 
Longmeadow, Mass., 
New Haven, Conn., 
New York City, 
Utica, N. Y., 
Jacksonville, HI., 
New York City, 
Temple, N. H., 
Burton, 0., 
Painesville, 0., 
Berkeley, Cal., 
Watertown, Conn., 
Middlofield, Conn., 
Catskill, N. Y., 
Brooklyn, N, Y., 
St. Louis, Mo., 
W. N. Brighton, S. L,N. 
Lancaster, Pa., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Farmington, Conn., 
Gainesville, Fia., 
New London, Conn., 
Guilford, Conn., 
Maryland. 
Staunton, Va., 
Cleveland, 0., 
New York City, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Washington, D. C , 
Santa Barbara, Cal., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Montclair, N. J., 
Wilkes Barre, Pa., 
Andover, Mass., 
Andover, Mass., 
St. Louis, Mo., 
Washington, D. C, 
New Haven, Conn., 
Tarrytown, N. Y., 
San Diego, Cal., 
Cooperstown, N. Y., 
Milwaukee, Wise, 
Cleveland, 0., 
Elizabeth, N. J., 
Springfield, Mass., 
NorthnmptoD, Mass., 



Date of Death. 
April 22, '85. 
May 13, '85. 
Aug. 1 1 . '84. 
Nov. 22, '84. 
Dec. 17, '84. 
Aug. 2, '84. 
Aug. 24, '84. 
Apr. 22, '85. 
Nov. 18, '84. 
Aug. 31, '84. 
Dec. 2 1 , '84. 
Dec. 14, '84. 
March 11, '85. 
.July 22. '84. 
April 9, '85. 
Jan. 15, '85. 
July, '84. 
Y. Sept. 27, '84. 
Nov. 28, '84. 
Apr. 30, '85. 
Oct. 22, '84. 
March 20, '85. 
Dec. 13, '83. 
May 24, '85. 
March, '84. 
June 7, '85. 
May 20, '85. 
March 14, '85. 
June 9, '85. 
March 8, '85, 
Feb. 15, '85. 
May 19, '85. 
Oct. 23, '84. 
Oct. 26, '84. 
Oct. 3, '84, 
Sept. 23. '84, 
Apr. 30, '85. 
May 4, '85, 
Jan. 14, '86, 
June 14, '85, 
Feb. 26, '85, 
Dec. 4, '84. 
Jan. 24, '86. 
Jan. 9, '85. 
May 3, '85, 
Jan. 11, '85, 
Nov. 16, '84. 



274 



1845 Daniel Cliadwick, 59, 

1845 George C. Murray, 58, 

1845 Charles M. Rank, 66, 

1846 Henry Childs, 65, 

1847 Francis H. Palmer, 55, 
1841 Elbert J. Smith, 58, 

1849 0. Lewis Brent, 53, 

1850 Thomas H. Jackson, 54, 
1850 Jacob K. Warner, 60, 
1850 D. Ellis Willes, 60, 

1853 William L. Williamson, 52, 

1854 William Hutchison, 57. 
1854 Ohauncey M. Thompson, 51, 
1856 Robert M. Baker, 49, 

1 856 Lewis R. Packard, 48, 

1 856 Charles G. Southmayd, 50, 

1859 George H. Coffey, 49, 

1859 George W. Fisher, 52, 

1861 Francis E. Kernochan, 43, 

1864 Murray C. Shoemaker, 40, 

1865 Joseph H. Isham, 42, 

1866 J. Hampden Wood, 40, 

1870 Boss Johnston, 36, 

1871 Jonathan Wales, 34, 

1872 James H. Clendenin, 36, 
1872 Frank A. Langworthy, 33, 
1876 Oliver K. Lyman, 28, 

1882 Barclay Johnson, 23, 

1883 Allyn C. Loomis, 23, 

1884 Edward A. Lawrence, 23, 



Lyme, Conn., 
Jersey City, N. J., 
Allentown, Pa,, 
Buffalo, x^J. Y., 
Providence, R. L, 
Berkeley, Cal., 
Baltimore, Md., 
Lin wood. Ark., 
Burdett, N. Y., 
Simderland, Md., 
Pottstown, Pa., 
Norwich, Conn., 
Paris, France, 
Georgetown, D. C, 
New Haven, Conn., 
Sour Lake, Texas, 
Trenton, N. J., 
Berlin, N. J,, 
Pittsfield, Mass., 
Oxford, 0., 
Gordonsville, Va., 
Albany, N. Y., 
Fortress Monroe, Va., 
Randolph, Masa., 
Gallipolis, 0., 
Havilah, Cal., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Greenwich, Conn., 
St. Paul, Minn., 
Wiesbaden, Germany, 



Nov. 23, 
Nov. 27, 
May 11, 
Feb. 10, 
July 21, 
Oct. 18, ' 
Nov. 18, 
July 21, 
Feb. 12, 
April 10, 



'84. 
'84. 
'85. 
'85. 
'84. 
84. 
'82. 
'84. 
'85. 
'85. 



May 19, '85. 
Jan. 6, '&5. 
July 6, '84. 
March 3, '84. 
Oct. 26, '84. 
March 2, '85. 
May 31, '85. 
July 14, '84. 
Sept. 26, '84. 
April 8, '86. 
June 29, '84. 
July 10, '84. 
March 11, '85. 
July 21, '84. 
June 16, '84. 
.\ug. 31, '84. 
•Sept. 6, '84. 
April 21, '86. 
June 20, '84. 
Aug. 31, '84. 



Medical Department. 



1825 Theodore Gilbert, 80, 

1825 Hiram Moses, 84, 

1836 Michael D. Benedict, 71, 

1841 Frederick N. Bennett, 64, 

1844 David A. Tyler, 66, 

1864 Augustus H. Abernethy, 46, 

1880 Leonidas C. Vinal, 40, 



Mexico, N. Y., 
Petersburgh, N. Y., 
Syracuse, N. Y., 
Newtown, Conn., 
West Haven, Conn., 
Bridgeport, Conn., 
Middletown, Conn., 



Sept. 2, '84. 
June 4, '85. 
Jan. 7, '86. 
Apr. 2, '85. 
March 27, '85. 
Nov. 9, '84. 
June 11, '85. 



Law Department. 



1853 T. Jefferson Bassett, 52, 
1855 George B. Dusinberre, 54, 
1872 Adolph Asher, 33, 



Brenham, Texas, 
Geneva, N. Y., 
New Haven, Couu., 



May 25, '85. 
June 15, '84. 
Sept. 25, '84. 



Theological Department. 



1878 Frank H. Taylor, 28, 
1882 Winthrop A. Hawks, 27, 



Seattle, Wash. Terr., 
Colorado Springs, Col. 



July 20, '84. 
March 24, '85. 



The number of deaths above given is 89, and the average age of the graduates 
of the Academical Department is 64 years. 



The oldest living graduate is — 
Class of 1813, Rev. David L. Hunn, of Buffalo, N. Y., born Nov. 5, 1789, 



INDEX 



Class. 

1864-m 

1872 I 

1856 

1853 / 

1826 

1834 

183G m 

1840 

1841 m 

1824 

1823 

1819 

1843 

1849 

1845 

1S46 

1872 

1859 

1829 

1827 

1826 

1826 

1826 

1840 

1855 / 

1837 

1833 

1859 

1844 

1824 

1828 

1832 

1825 m 

1824 
il830 
n823 

1882 t 

1829 

1854 
rl865 
^850 

1882 

1870 

1861 

1843 



Page. 

Abernethy, Augustus H 269 

Asher, Adolph 271 

Eaker, Robert M 258 

Bassett, T. Jefferson 270 

Beardslee, Henry C 229 

Benedict, Lewis S 242 

Benedict, Michael D ..268 

Benedict, Theodore H 246 

Bennett, Frederick N 268 

Berdan, James 227 

Blagden, George W .226 

Booth, David 225 

Braudegee, Marius .... 250 

Brent, C. Lewis 254 

Chadwick, Daniel 251 

Childs, Henry 253 

Clendenin, James H. 265 

Coffey, George H .260 

Cowles, Thomas .235 

Day, S. Sherwood ...232 

Day, Sherman 230 

DeForest, John. 231 

Dickinson, James T ..231 

Dodge, Richard V. 247 

Dusinberre, George B 271 

Dutton, Aaron R 245 

Fay, Barnabas M 239 

Fisher, George W 261 

Fisk, Samuel A .251 

Fletcher, Samuel H. 227 

Franklin, Thomas B ..234 

Erazier, William 237 

Gilbert, Theodore 267 

Goodyear, George, 228 

Gordon, John M 237 

Hanners, George M ..227 

Hawks, WinthropB .272 

Hubbard, Thomas R 236 

Hutchison, William .257 

Isham, Joseph H 263 

Jackson, Thomas H 255 

Johnson, Barclay 266 

Johnston, Ross .264 

Kernochan, Francis E 261 

Lambert, Alfred 250 



Class. Page. 

1872 Langworthy, Frank A 265 

1832 Latimer, Cortland L... 238 

1884 Lawrence, Edward A 267 

1834 Lea, James N 242 

1829 Lewis, Charles A 236 

1883 Loomis, Allyn C 266 

18(f6 Lyman, Oliver E 266 

1828 Mead, Darius 235 

1827 Merwin, Timothy T 233 

1835 Mills, Charles L 1.243 

1825 m Moses, Hiram ...268 

1846 Murray, George C 252 

1829 Norton, William 236 

1842 Orton, JohnJ 248 

1856 Packard, Lewis R 209 

1 847 Palmer, Francis H 254 

1833 Perry, David C .240 

1S27 Robinson, Stephen T .233 

] 845 Runk, Charles M 253 

1833 Russell, William H 241 

1 864 Shoemaker, Murray C 262 

1837 Silliman, Benjamin... 245 

1811 Silliman, Jonathan.. 224 

1 847 Smith, Elbert J 254 

1856 Southmayd, Charles G. 260 

1827 Staples, John B. 234 

1841 Sturges, llezekiah ...247 

1818 t Taylor, Frank H 272 

1 835 Taylor, John L .244 

1854 Thompson, Chauncey M 258 

1836 Todd, Albert 244 

1832 Trucy, Charles 238 

1820 Twining, Alexander 225 

1844 m Tyler, David A ■= 269 

1880 m'Vinal, Leonidas C. 270 

1871 Wales, Jonathan 264 

1850 Warner, Jacob K ..255 

1850 Willes, D. Ellis .256 

1853 Williamson, William L 256 

1814 Withington, Leonard .223 

1824 Witter, Dexter 228 

1866 Wood, J. Hampden 263 

1 842 Wright, Robert W 249 

1832 Wurts, Edward 238 




\ 'I 
DEC 31 K:- 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 

June^ 1SS6. 

Including the Record op a few who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

[PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMNI, JUNE 29th, 1886.] 

[iTo. 6 of the Third Priuted Series, and No. -15 of the whole Record.] 



Tut tie, Morehouse & Taylor, Printers, 
New Haven, Conn. 



-^'^ 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE COLLEGE 

Deceased during the Academical year ending in 

JuxE, 1886. 

Including the record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting of the Alumni, June 29th, 1886.] 
[No. 6 of Third Printed Series, and No. 45 of the whole Kecord.] 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1815. 

John Hastings, the second son of the Hon. John and Sibyl 
(Dickinson) Hastings, of Hatfield, Mass., was born in that town 
on the 22d of December, 1791. 

He resided in Hatfield until about 1833, when he removed to 
Heath, on the northern border of the State, and thence in 1842 to 
Onondaga Valley, a village four or five miles out of the city of 
Syracuse, N. Y. He remained a resident of Onondaga Valley 
until his sudden death there, without previous illness, of paralysis 
of the Leart, on January 21, 1886, in his 95th year. His life 
was exemplary, and he was held in the highest respect by the 
community. He served as justice of the peace until he declined 
a re-election, and as town-clerk for twenty-eight years — continuing 
in that office until his death. He retained all his faculties until 
the very last. 

He married, January 23, 1823, Lucretia, daughter of Daniel 
Ward, of Petersham, Mass., who died June 27, 1873. Their 
children, two sons, died before him ; his home during his later 
years was with his grandchildren. 



280 

1820. 

Henry Augustus Chesebrough, son of Robert and Content 
(Rathbone) Chesebrough, of New York City, and brother of 
Robert J. Chesebrough (Y.C. 1817), was born March 7, 1801. 

He began life as a merchant in New York, but early became an 
invalid, both mentally and physically, and for many years was an 
inmate of Sanford Hall, a private hospital in Flushing, L. I., 
where he died, April 2, 1886, in his 86th year. He was never 
married. 

Horace Foote, the fourth child of Roger and Eunice (Bulkley) 
Foote, of Marlborough Parish, in Colchester, Conn., was born 
there, March 21, 1V99, and was admitted to the Sophomore 
class from the Episcopal Academy at Cheshire, early in 1818. 

After graduation he began at once the study of law in New 
Haven with Seth P. Staples, Esq. (Y. C. 1797), and two years 
later was admitted to practice. He then went to Genesee, N. Y., 
to open an office, but the death of his father, in 1823, recalled 
him to Marlborough for two or three years, to manage the pater- 
nal estate. In 1836 he removed to Cleveland, Ohio, where a 
brother-in-law was living, and there (in the part then called the 
City of Ohio, now the West Side) he opened an office for the 
practice of his profession. 

By his industry and energy he established a high reputation for 
sound learning and argumentative ability, so that his election in 
1853 to a judgeship of the Court of Common Pleas gave general 
satisfaction. He held the position for four terms or twenty years 
(February, 1854, to February, 1874), and left an unblemished 
record for judicial impartiality, sagacity, and thoroughness. 

He retired from active life at the age of 76, and died at bis 
home in Cleveland, after a brief illness, November 16, 1884, in 
his 86th year. 

He married in 1834 Miss Mary Elinor Hurd, of Middle Had- 
dam. Conn., who survived him. 

1821. 

DwiGHT Baldwin, the eldest son of Seth and Rhoda (Hull)^ 
Baldwin, was born in Durham, Conn., September 29, 1798. When 
he was five years old, his parents removed to Durham, N. Y., and 
thence he entered W^illiams College in 1817. Only the last year 
of his course was spent at Yale. 



281 

He taught school after graduation, in Kingston and Catskill, 
N. Y., and in 1824 began the study of medicine while teaching 
in Durham, N. Y. In the second year of his engagement he be- 
came a Christian, and decided to study for the ministry. He ac- 
cordingly spent three years (1826-29) in the Theological Serai- 
nary at Auburn, N. Y., and while there was accepted as a foreign 
missionary by the American Board. On the advice of the Board, 
he attended a course of medical lectures at Harvard University, 
after leaving Auburn. He was ordained at Utica, N. Y., October 
6, 1830, by the presbytery of Utica, and on the 3d of December 
he married Charlotte, daughter of Deacon Solomon Fowler, of 
North Branford, Conn., and on the 28th of the same month they 
sailed for Honolulu. They were first sent to a new station in the 
interior of Hawaii, where three years of hard labor broke down 
Mr. Baldwin's health. Removing in 1835 to Lahaiua, on the 
island of Maui, then the favorite residence of the King, he con- 
tinued there as pastor of the church and as physician to a wide 
neighborhood of mission families, until obliged by partial par- 
alysis to resign his greatly useful work in September, 1868. He 
then removed to Honolulu, where he was able for a few years to 
give instruction in Church History and Bible History in the 
native Theological School. Increasing feebleness (after the death 
of his wife, October 2, 1873) compelled him to give up this work 
also, and his last years were spent in the family of his youngest 
daughter, Mrs. S. C. Damon, in Honolulu. , He died there, in his 
88th year, January 3, 1886. The honorary degree of M.D. was 
conferred upon him by Dartmouth College in 1859. He was re- 
vered and beloved by the community in which he spent his mature 
life. 

His children were four sons and four daughters, of whom two 
died in infancy. The eldest son was graduated at this College in 
1857, and the eldest daughter married the Hon. W. D. Alexander 
(Y. C. 1855), of Honolulu. 

Thomas Winthrop Coit, elder son of Thomas Coit, M.D. 
(hon. Y. C. 1818), and Mary W. (Saltonstall) Coit, of New 
London, Conn., was born in that city, June 28, 1803. 

While in College he intended to follow his father's profession, 
but in 1823 he began the study of theology in Andover Seminary. 
In 1824 he removed to Princeton Seminary, but remained only a 
few months. He was ordained deacon in the Protestant Episco- 



282 

pal Church by Bishop Brownell, June '7, 1«26, at Newtown, 
Conn. His first parochial charge was as Rector (1827-29) of St. 
Peter's Church, Salem, Mass., where he was advanced to the 
priesthood by Bishop Griswold, November 15, 1827. He was 
next Rector of Christ's Church, Cambridge, Mass., from Easter, 
1829, to Easter, 1835. In 1831 an Episcopal Theological School 
was begun in Cambridge, and Mr. Coit was made Professor of 
Biblical Learning ; this position he held (in connection with his 
rectorship) until he became in 1835 the President of Transylvania 
University, Lexington, Ky., and Morrison Professor of Metaphys- 
ics and Moral Philosophy. He published in 3 834 a duodecimo 
edition of the Bible, arranged in paragraphs and parallelisms, with 
annotations, which was republished in England ; in the same year 
he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Columbia Col- 
lege ; that of Doctor of Laws was conferred by Trinity College 
in 1853. 

He resigned the office of President in 1837, and was for two 
years Rector of Trinity Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. In May, 1839, 
he became the Rector of Trinity Church, New Rochelle, N. Y., 
where he continued for ten years. While thus occupied he pub- 
lished a vigorous polemic, entitled "• Puritanism " (New York, 
1845, pp. 528, 12mo). He also prepared in 1844 a valuable report 
on the Standard Edition of the Prayer-Book, under appointment 
of the General Convention. In 1849 he accepted the appointment 
of Professor of Ecclesiastical History in Trinity College and for 
the next five years resided in Hartford. In May, 1854, he went to 
Troy, N. Y., as Rector of St. Paul's Church ; and about the same 
time the Berkeley Divinity School (an outgrowth from Trinity 
College) was established at Middletown, Conn., in which Dr. Coit 
continued to give instruction in the department which he had 
previously held in the college. He resigned the charge of a parish 
in 1872, and in February, 1873, became a resident professor in the 
Berkeley Divinity School, where he continued until his death 
there, from Bright's disease, June 21, 1885, at the age of 82. 

Besides the works mentioned, his publications include a volume 
of "Lectures on the Early History of Christianity in England, 
with sermons" (New York, 1860, pp. 334, 12mo). 

He married, January 30, 1828, Mrs. Eleanor Forrester Carlisle, 
of Salem, by whom he had three sons, of whom the two younger 
survived him. 



I 



283 

1822. 

Timothy Stillman, second son of Captain George and Martha 
(Deming) Stillman, was born in Wethersfield, Conn., March 21, 
1802. 

After graduating he taught for five years in East Windsor and 
Glastonbury, Conn., and then spent two or three years in the 
Auburn (N. Y.) Theological Seminary. From Auburn he went 
to Dunkirk, N. Y., where he organized a Presbyterian Church in 
1830, himself giving the ground on which the church building 
was to be erected. He had been ordained as an evangelist, on 
May 12, 1830, by the Presbytery of Buffalo, in session at Sher-. 
idan, N. Y. ; and he served as pastor to the church in Dunkirk 
until 1838, when he was dismissed, to take the office of General 
Agent of the American Bethel Society, in whose service he 
labored for thirty years, until it was merged in the Seamen's 
Friend Society. During this time, and until his death, his resi- 
dence continued in Dunkirk; and from 1834 to 1881, he served 
as stated clerk of the Presbytery of Buffalo, an office for which 
he was peculiarly fitted. He received the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from Yellow Springs College, Iowa, in 1857. 

He died in Dunkirk, after months of extreme debility, Decem- 
ber 11, 1885, in his 84th year. 

He married, August 7, 1832, Miss Mary Ann Edwards Abell, 
third daughter of Mosely W. Abell, of Dunkirk, who survives 
him with several children. 

1823. 

Joshua Beal Ferris was born in Greenwich, C/onn., January 
13, 1804, and died in Stamford, Conn., June 8, 1886, in his 
83d year. 

He taught school for a few years after graduation in Stamford, 
and then entered on the study of law with the Hon. Charles 
Hawley (Y. C. 1813) in that town. In 1829 he was admitted to 
the bar, and in 1833 opened an office in Stamford, where he be- 
came successful and honored in his profession. He was a Rep- 
resentative in the State Legislature in 1836, 1837, and 1838, a 
member of the State Senate in 1840, 1841, 1849, and 1850, and for 
some years Judge of Probate and State's Attorney. 

Judge Ferris married soon after graduation Sally H., daughter 
of William B. Peters, and granddaughter of the Rev. Dr. Samuel 
A. Peters (Y. C. 1757), by whom he had eight children. 



284 

Joseph Edward Maxwell was born in Liberty County, Ga., 
November 14, 1802; his ancestors (from Max wellton, Dumfries, 
Scotland) had settled in that county in 1748. 

He studied law, and was admitted to the bar of his native 
State, but inherited wealth relieved him from the necessity of 
practicing his profession. In 1826 he married Sarah Martha 
Holmes, of Liberty County, who survives him, with five children. 
Modest and retiring, he sought no public position, and only held 
office for a single terra as the representative of his native county 
in the legislature. He inherited the sturdy integrity of his Scotch 
ancestry, and enjoyed through a prolonged life the esteem and 
honor of the entire community. During his later years he resided 
with a married daughter, near Grovetown, Ga., and there he died, 
very suddenly, while resting after his return from his usual mid- 
day walk, March 8, 1886, in his 84th year. 

1824. 

AsHBEL Smith was born in Hartford, Conn., August 13, 1805, 
the eldest child of Moses and Phebe (Adams) Smith. 

After graduation he taught a private school in North Carolina, 
and while there spent a year in the study of law, but on account 
of poor health abandoned that profession for medicine. He sup- 
plemented his studies by taking the degree of M.D. at this Col- 
lege in 1828, and by a visit to the hospitals of Paris in 1831-32. 
Returning to North Carolina, he practiced medicine there until 
1836, when he went to Texas, just erected by the American 
settlers into a republic. He tendered his services to Gen. Hous- 
ton, and received the appointment of surgeon-general of the army, 
though too late for operations in the field. Subsequently he 
practiced his profession in Galveston. Gen. Houston was re- 
elected to the presidency of the republic in 1841, and he at once 
commissioned Dr. Smith as minister to the courts of England and 
France. He accepted, and while residing in Paris and in London 
l^erformed special missions to various other continental courts. 
In anticipation of a change in the administration, he was recalled 
late' in 1844, and was appointed in 1845 Secretary of State under 
the new President, Anson Jones. In this office he continued, 
until annexation to the United States (in accomplishing which 
policy he had been a trusted agent) had become a certainty, 
when he returned to Europe to close the relations of the Republic 
with the various courts. He visited Europe a third time, as a 



I 



285 

private citizen, a few years later. Meantime he established his 
residence on Evergreen plantation, in Harris County, at the head 
of Galveston Bay ; but he relinquished very early the practice of 
his profession, and devoted himself to agriculture and to public 
interests, being many times a member of the State Legislature. 

On the outbreak of the civil war he entered the Confederate 
army, in which he attained the rank of colonel, serving with 
gallantry to the close of the contest. During his later years he 
was much engaged in the establishment of the State University 
and was active to the last as the President of the Board of 
Regents. Having been for nearly fifty years a prominent char- 
acter in Texas life, and respected as a public benefactor, he died 
at his home in Harris County, January 'Jl, 1886, in his 8 1st year. 
Pie was never married. 

1825. 

William Bliss, the eldest son of Moses and Mary (Wolcott) 
Bliss, of Springfield, Mass., was born in Springfield, December 
19, 1806. 

He studied law and began practice in Springfield, but in 1836 
removed to New York City, where he entered into a partnership, 
continuing for many years, with the late Orsamus Bushnell. Sub- 
sequently, he was in practice by himself. He was distinguished 
among his contemporaries f()r the exhaustive preparation and 
thorough argument of his cases; and his judicial habit of mind in 
the preliminary examination of causes made him one of the best 
of consulting counsel. 

He retained to the last a great affection for this College, and 
found solace during the progress of an incurable disease, in the 
preparation and publication (chiefly in the New Englander) of 
papers discussing points of current interest in its policy in their 
historical and legal bearings. He was a devout and consistent 
Christian believer. He died, in the Ophthalmic and Aural Hos- 
pital, New York City, April 19, 1886, in his 80th year. He was 
never married. 

William Thompson Peters, son of the Hon. John T. Peters 
(Y. C. 1789), for many years a judge of the Supreme Court of 
Connecticut, and Elizabeth (Caulkins) Peters, was born in Hebron, 
Conn., May 30, 1 805, and entered College from Hartford, then 
his father's residence. 



286 

On December 7, 1826, he married Miss Etha L. Town, daughter 
of Ithiel Town, the well-known architect of New Haven. He 
remained in New Haven, pursuing medical studies with Dr. Wil- 
liam Tully, and received the degree of M.D. from the College in 
1830. Soon after this he founded the drug-store in New Haven, 
long known as "Apothecaries' Hall." In 1851, owing to ill- 
health, he removed to Cheshire, Conn., where he engaged in farm- 
ing, though also prominent in political afiairs. He was elected a 
member of the State Senate in 1857, and represented the town of 
Cheshire in the General Assembly in 1861 and 1873. He also 
filled many local offices of trust and honor, such as town clerk, 
treasurer, and judge of probate; and was a collector of internal 
revenue under President Lincoln. 

He removed in 1881 to the residence of his youngest son, in 
Waterbury, Conn., where he died on the 24th of July, 1885, in 
his 81st year. Two children survive him; his eldest child was 
graduated at this College in 1849, and died in 1856. 

Williams Howe Whittemoke was born in Bolton, Conn., 
February 2, 1800, the son of Samuel Whittemore. He was left 
in needy circumstances by the early death of his parents, and at 
the age of six was adopted by a family in Belchertown, Mass., 
whence he entered College at the beginning of the Sophomore 
year. 

Upon graduation he entered the Yale Divinity School, where 
he completed the course in 1829, — having spent one year in teach- 
ing. On the first of May, 1829, he took tempoi-ary charge of a 
Presbyterian Church just organized in Rye, N. Y., where he 
labored with special success until April, 1832. He married Maria, 
daughter of Ebenezer Clark, of Rye, December 22, 1831, and 
was ordained as an evangelist, at Wilton, Conn, on the 26th of 
September of the same year. He preached for the Congrega- 
tional Church in Abington, a village in Pomfret, Conn., until 
called to the First (Congregational) Church in Charlton, Mass., 
where he was installed, August 21, 1833. He left this charge in 
January, 1836. His last regular settlement was in Southbury, 
Conn., from November 16, 1836, to October, 1850. In Septem- 
ber, 1851, when his eldest son (Y. C. ]855) entered College, he 
removed to New Haven, where he resided until May, 1868, en- 
gaged ^to some extent in preaching and teaching. The remaining 
years of his life were spent with his daughter in Brooklyn, N. Y. 



I 



287 

He died after a few hours' illness, of paralysis- of the heart, at 
the residence of the second of his three sons, in Rye, N. Y., July 
25, 1885, in his 86th year. His widow died in Brooklyn, Febru- 
ary 25, 1886, at the age of 83. 

George Catlin Woodruff, eldest son of Gen. Morris Wood- 
ruff and Candace (Catlin) Woodruff", was born in Litchfield (South 
Farms, now Morris), Conn., December 1, 1805. 

After graduating he studied law under Judge Gould at the 
Litchfield Law School, and was admitted to the bar in Septem- 
ber, 1827. After visiting Pennsylvania and Eastern Connecticut 
for the purpose of selecting a place for business, he returned to 
Litchfield, where he remained in the practice of his profession till 
his death, holding many positions of trust and responsibility. He 
was a member of the State Legislature in the years 1851, 1866, 
and 1 874, and Representative of the Fourth Congressional Dis- 
trict of Connecticut in the 37th Congress. He died at his home 
in Litchfield, after a brief illness, November 21, 1&85, in the 80th 
year of his age. • 

On September 28, 1829, he married Henrietta S. Seymour, 
sister of the late Chief Justice Origen S. Seymour (Y. C. 1824), 
who survives him. By her he had two children, a daughter who 
died in infancy and a son, George M. Woodruff (Y. C. 1857), who 
is still living. 

Mr. Woodruff's only literary undertaking was a brief History 
of Litchfield, published in 1845 (64 pp. 8vo), of characteristic 
accuracy and thoroughness. Li his professional relations he was 
notable for the clearness and solidity of his reasoning, and no 
less for the absoute integrity which governed his actions. 

1826. 

Selden Haines, son of Asa and Mary (Fuller) Haynes, was 
born in Hartland, Conn., November 27, 1800. His parents re- 
moved to the adjoining town of Granby in 1806, and to Vernon, 
in the "Western Reserve," Ohio, in 1818. 

After leaving College he began the study of law in an office in 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Two years later he went to Warren, O., 
and was principal of the Academy there for about eighteen 
months. In June, 1830, he was admitted to the bar, and for the 
next six years he practiced law in Poland, Trumbull County, 
Ohio. He then relinquished the profession-, and began the study 



288 

of theology, and on February 15, 1837, was ordained and in- 
stalled pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Braceville, Trum- 
bull County. After four years of home missionary service, two 
in Braceville, one in Perry Village, N. Y., and one in Scottsville, 
N. Y., he received a call to the First Presbyterian Church in 
Rome, N. Y., and entered on his duties there in January, 1841. 
In the summer of 1846 measures were adopted for uniting the 
First and the Second Churches in Rome, when it seemed advis- 
able for the pastors of both to resign, and thus a most harmonious 
and successful pastoral relation was dissolved. He was then called 
to the Houston Street Presbyterian Church, New York City, but 
resigned this charge in October, 1 848. He was then for brief 
periods a supply of the Central Church in Newark, N. J., an 
agent for the Western College Society, and pastor of the Congre- 
gational Church in South Abington, Mass. In 1851 he accepted 
a call from the Presbyterian Church in Skaneateles, N. Y., where 
he remained until, in the fall of 1865, he removed to northern 
New York, where he spent nine years in ministerial labor, in 
Champlain, Keeseville, and (!lranville. In November, 1864, he 
returned to Rome, as the home of his old age. Until about 1875, 
he was able to undertake occasional service in vacant pulpits in 
the vicinity; and for ten years longer he retained much of his 
strength and vigor. During the year before his death there was 
a gradual failure of powers, and he died in Rome, March 21, 
1886, in his 86th year. 

He was a hardworking and successful pastor, and influential 
among his brethren in the councils of his church. In 1872 he 
received the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from Mary- 
ville College, Tennessee. 

In April, 1828, he married Miss Catharine Butler, of Pough- 
keepsie, who survives him, with their three daughters. An only 
son died in early manhood. 

Julian Monson Sturtevant, son of Warren and Lucv (Tan- 
ner) Sturtevant, was born in Warren, Conn., July 26, 1805. In 
1816 the family removed to the Western Reserve, and settled in 
Tallmadge (then Portage), Ohio, whence two sons came to Col- 
lege in 1822. 

The younger son, Julian, after teaching school in New Canaan, 
Conn., entered the Yale Theological Seminary in 1828, and was 
ordained at Woodbury, Conn., August 27, 1829, as an evangelist. 



289 

Four days later he married Miss Elizabeth M. Fayerweather, of 
New Canaan, and in the ensuing fall, as one of the " Illinois 
Band " which he had helped to form in the Seminary, he settled 
in the infant town of Jacksonville, and there in January, 1830, 
he became the first teacher in what is now Illinois College. In 
1831 he was elected Professor of Mathematics and Natural Phi- 
losophy in the institution which he had organized, and he,con- 
tinued to be thus engaged until November, 1844, when he was 
advanced to the Presidency. He resigned the latter office in May, 
1876, but continued to teach for nine years longer in the depart- 
ment of Mental and Political Science. He accomplished a great 
work in the educational development of the West, and impressed 
his own strong and elevated character on the generations which 
came under him. Until after his retirement from the Presidency, 
his engagements were too burdensome to allow of extended 
authorship ; but in 1877 he published " Economics, or the Science 
of Wealth," and in 1880." The Keys of Sect; or the Church of 
the New Testament." The degree of Doctor of Divinity was 
conferred on him by the University of Missouri in 1848, and that 
of Doctor of Laws by Iowa College in 1871. 

His wife died in 1840, and the next year he married her sister, 
Miss Hannah Fayerweather, who died January 17, 1886. Her 
death was a severe shock to him, and his own death followed, at 
Jacksonville, on February 11, in the 81st year of his age. 

He had ten children, five by each marriage. The eldest son 
(Illinois College, 1854) is a clergyman, bearing his father's name. 

Elizur Wright, son of Elizur Wright (Y. C. 1781) and Cla- 
rissa (Richards) Wright, was born in the village of South Canaan, 
in Canaan, Litchfield County, Conn., February 12, 1804. In 1810 
his family removed to Tallmadge, Ohio, where he was prepared 
for College by his father. 

For two years after graduation he taught in the Lawrence 
Academy, Groton, Mass., and in 1829, he married Miss Susan 
Clark, of that town. In 1829 he was elected to the Professor- 
ship of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Western Reserve 
College, Hudson, Ohio; but having thrown himself heartily and 
on principle into the anti-slavery agitation, he resigned his pro- 
fessorship and with it many prospects, in 1833, in order to remove 
to New York City as Secretary of the local Anti-Slavery Society. 
He participated in the founding, December, 1833, of the Ameri- 



290 

can Anti-Slavery Society, and served for five years as its domestic 
secretary, and as an important member of its executive commit- 
tee. During the same period he also founded and conducted the 
Quarterly Aiiti-Slavery Magazine^ and promoted the cause by 
other publications. In 1839 the Society divided on the question 
of political action, and Mr. Wright, sympathizing with the 
founders of the Liberty Party, removed to Boston, and became 
for a short time the editor of the Massachusetts Abolitionist. He 
continued for several years to be connected with journalism, and 
in 1846 established the Chronotype^ which he edited for some time 
after it was merged in the Commomoealth in 1850. Meantime 
he published in 1841 a complete version of the Fables of La 
Fontaine, in an elegant form, which has been often reprinted and 
still remains the best English translation of the French classic. 
His work as an editor, and later as a frequent contributor to the 
press, is also worthy of remembrance, from its caustic raciness 
and fearless warfare on everything which he regarded as sham. 

From editing he turned to the study of questions of insurance 
and finance. From 1858 to 1866 he was one of the Insurance 
Commissioners of Massachusetts, and in that capacity he insti- 
tuted some reforms of the business of life insurance, which are 
recognized as of permanent value. For the most of the time 
after 1866 he sustained the relation of mathematical adviser and 
computer, under the title of actuary, to numerous life insurance 
companies. He also published several works in this line of in- 
vestigation, — such as his Life Insurance Valuation Tables (2d ed., 
1871, folio, pp. 203) and a tabular analysis of Life Insurance 
Policies (18'72, folio, pp. 30, 181), — which are of great value. Dur- 
ing his latest years he devoted himself with much enthusiasm to 
securing the purchase by the State of the Middlesex Fells, a 
forest tract near his residence in Medford. He had become a free- 
thinker in religion, or a " non-religionist," as he termed himself; 
and he continued to the last disinterestedly zealous in the promo- 
tion of various reforms of society and government. 

He died, very suddenly, probably from a rush of blood to the 
head, at his home in Medford, Mass., November 22, 1885, in 
his 82d year. His wife died in March, 1875. Their children were 
seven sons and eleven daughters, of whom four sons and four 
daughters died in infancy. 



291 



1827. 



Mason Grosvenor, son of the Rev. Nathan E. Grosvenor and 
Lydia (Fitch, Adams) Grosvenor, was born in Pomfret, Conn., 
Sept. 13, 1800. 

After graduation he was for one year principal of the academy 
in Greenwich, Conn., and then took the three years' course in the 
Yale Theological Seminary. While in the Seminary he was the 
prime mover in the organization of what was known the " Yale 
Band," for the development of religion and education in Illinois. 
He was ordained as an evangelist at Guilford, Conn., March 22, 
1831, and after a year and a half of brief engagements with vari- 
ous churches in Connecticut and Massachusetts, undertook to 
raise funds for the Illinois College. After a few months, illness 
put a stop to any present plans of removal to the west. When 
able to preach, he was settled (May 15, 1833) over the Congrega- 
tional Church in Ashfield, Mass., from which he was dismissed at 
his own request in July, 1835. He then supplied the pulpit in 
Chester and Saybrook, Conn., and on Sept. 28, 1836, was installed 
over the Congregational Church in Sharon, Conn. He left Sharon 
at his own request, June 28, 1839, and in the fall of 1840 settled 
in Hudson, Ohio, where he was installed over the First Congrega- 
tional Church from December 22, 1840, to July 23, 1843. He 
then established a female seminary in Hudson, with which he was 
connected for four years. From 1847 to 1853 he served as an 
agent of the Western College Society, with his residence in 
Springfield, Mass., and New Haven, Conn. He then, at the solici- 
tation of President Sturtevant, served for one year as teacher of 
Mathematics in Illrnois College, and for part of the next year 
filled a like position in Beloit College. In 1855 he returned to 
Northern Ohio, making his home principally at Hudson, and be- 
ing employed more or less steadily in the supply of vacant 
churches, until 1863, when he devoted a year to an agency for the 
Ohio Female College. In March, 1864, he became the general 
agent in Cincinnati for the JEtna Life Insurance Company, of 
Hartford, Conn. ; and in 1869 or 1870 removed to Jacksonville as 
Professor of Moral Philosophy and the Evidences of Christianity 
in Illinois College. He retired from this post about 1880, and 
spent the rest of his life at the home of his elder surviving son in 
Englewood, N. J., where he died March 27, 1886, in his 86th 
year. 



292 

He married, June 18, 1833, Miss Esther D. Scarborough, of 
Brooklyn, Conn., who died April 6, 1846, having borne five chil- 
dren, of whom only two survived her. He next married, April 
25, 1849, Miss Lucy P. Tappan, of Geneva, N. Y. 

Asa Turner, son of Asa and Abigail (Baldwin) Turner, was 
born in Templeton, Mass., June 11, 1799. On being converted, 
at a mature age, he turned his steps towards College. 

Immediately on graduation he entered the Yale Theological 
Seminary, and there early in 1829 united, with others in the forma- 
tion of the '* Illinois Association," the members of which pledged 
themselves to the cause of religion and education in the young 
State of Illinois. Mr. Turner finished his preparation in 1830, 
and on September 6 was ordained in New Haven as an evangelist. 
The week before (August 30) he married Martha, youngest 
daughter of Isaac D. Bull, of Hartford, Conn. On November 5 
they arrived at Quincy, 111., where he organized a Congregational 
Church a month later. He continued in abundant and successful 
labors in this vicinity until July, 1838, when he removed to Den- 
mark, Iowa, where he had two months before gathered the first 
Congregational Church in that Territory. He prosecuted his 
pioneer work in Denmark and its neighborhood with rare energy 
and wisdom until October, 1869, when in accordance with his 
settled intention he retired from active life, at the age of 70. On 
resigning his pastorate "Father Turner," as he was familiarly 
called, removed to Oskaloosa, Iowa, where his remaining years 
were spent in the home of a married daughter. Of his eleven 
children, one son was graduated here in 1858. 

He died in Oskaloosa, Dec. 12, 1885, in his. 87th year. 

1828. 

Thomas Hutson Gregorie was born in Beaufort, S. C, on 
the 27th of September, 1807, and died in Grahamville, Beaufort 
County, January 7, 1886, in his 79th year. 

He received the degree of M.D. from the Medical College in 
Charleston, in 1831, and began the practice of his profession in 
St. Luke's Parish, in his native county, where he obtained a large 
and lucrative business, and spent the full measure of his days in 
the exemplary discharge of the duties of a charitable and upiight 
life. Besides his professional services to the parish, he repre- 
sented it in the State Legislature for several years. 



I 



293 

He married in July, 1845, Miss Martha H. Gillison, who sur- 
vives him with six daughters and two sons, having lost three chil- 
dren in infancy. 

Charles McDermott, the son of Pulling and Emily (Ozan) 
McDermott, was born in West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, in 
1808, and entered College from St. Francisville, in that parish, 
in 1825. 

He adopted medicine as a profession, and after practicing in 
his native parish, removed to Chicot County, in southeastern 
Arkansas, in 1842, where he made a considerable fortune as a 
cotton-planter, but lost it all by the civil war, in which also some 
of his sons were killed. He was a man of original mind, and 
made several inventions (such as a flying machine, a cotton-picker, 
and a hollow wedge) which were patented. He was an elder in 
the Presbyterian (Jhurch, and was respected in the community 
for his consistent Christian life. He resented bitterly to the last 
the abolition of slavery and the triumph of the North. He died, 
of heart-disease, at his home, Dermott Station, Chicot County, 
Arkansas, October 13, 1884, in his 76th year. 

He married in St. Francisville, in 1833, Miss Hittie S. Smith, 
by whom he had sixteen children, seven of whom survive him. 
His wife died in 1880. 

1829. 

JoHx Abeel Baldwin, son of Jesse Baldwin, a merchant of 
New York City, was born in that city, April 25, 1810. 

He at first began the study of law ; but soon changed his plans, 
and pursued a theological course, — for one year (1831-32) in 
Andover Seminary, and for two years (1832-34) in Princeton 
Seminary. He was ordained, March 22, 1836, as pastor of the 
Reformed Dutch Churches of Flatlands and New Lots, on Long 
Island, and there continued until installed (October 28, 1852) the 
pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Lancaster, Pa. He 
resigned this charge, April 8, 1856, and was settled over the 
Presbyterian Church in New Providence, N. J., from May 12, 
1857, to November, 1863. He then removed to Brooklyn, and 
undertook, in 1869, the stated supply of the Presbyterian Church 
in Woodhaven, L. L He withdrew from this service in 1876, and 
spent the rest of his life in Brooklyn, N. Y., where he died, after 
a painful illness, February 22, 1886, in his 76th year. 
2 



294 

He married, September 19, 1837, Elizabeth E., daughter of Law- 
rence Van Kleeck, of Albany, by whom he had four sons and one 
daughter; one son was graduated at Lafayette College, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1858, and at the Yale Medical School in 1861. 

Melancthon Howe Colton was born in Hartford, Conn., in 
1806. 

Soon after leaving College he began to show signs of mental 
disease, which blighted his whole life. He was admitted to the 
Retreat for the Insane, in Hartford, in March, 1846, and im- 
proved sufficiently to be discharged in May, 1847. He was re- 
admitted in March, 1 854, and continued an inmate of the institu- 
tion until his death, from old age and general decay, January 
21, 1886, in his 80th year. 

1830. 

Joseph Emerson, younger, son of the Rev. Daniel Emer.-^on, Jr. 
(Harv. 1794), a native of Hollis, N. H., and Esther (Frothing- 
ham) Emerson, was born in Dartmouth, Mass., where his father 
was pastor of the Congregational Church, September 4, 1808. 
His father died in the following November, and the family re- 
turned to Hollis, whence this son entered Dartmouth College in 
1826. He removed to this College at the beginning of Junior 
year. 

He studied theology in Andover Seminary, 1832 to 1835, and 
after preaching in the Middle States, entered the service of the 
American Education Society in the fall of 1836, as one of its 
agents, being ordained to the ministry on the 12th of October in 
that year, at Francestown, N. H. He continued to be thus en- 
gaged until 1849, when he undertook a similar work for the 
Western College Society, his residence continuing in Andover. 
In 1853 he resigned his agency and removed to Illinois, and from 
May 22, 1854, to August 23, 1859, he was settled as pastor of the 
2d Congregational Church in Rockford. He then returned to 
Andover, Mass., where he resided until his death. From 1859 to 
1871 he was a District Secretary of the American and P^reign 
Christian Union; and from 1871, District Secretary of the A. B. 
C. F. M., for work in Papal lands. He retired from further ser- 
vice in 18*75, on account of failing health ; and died in Andover, 
of Bright's disease, after eight months' confinement to his house, 
July 21, 1885, in his 77th year. 



295 

He married, November 26, 1844, Sarah H., eldest daughter of 
Col. Stephen Davis, of Oxford, Mass., who died November 28, 
1856 ; of their two children, a son is still living ; a daughter died 
in infancy. He next married, September 16, 1858, Martha A. 
Howard, of Andover, daughter of Benjamin Howard, of Grafton, 
Vt ., who survives him without children. 

1832. 

John Stuart Patteeson, youngest son of Samuel and Mary 
(Stuart) Patterson, was born in Mercer, Pa., February 19, 1812. 
In 1815 the family removed to Cincinnati, O. On leaving this 
College in 1830 he entered Rutgers College, N. J., where he was 
graduated in 1832; in 1879 he was enrolled with his class here. 

He studied law in Cincinnati with his guardian, the Hon. Bel- 
lamy Storer, and was admitted to the bar in 1834. In 1835 he 
removed to Logansport, Ind., being married on the 8th of Decem- 
ber in that year to Emily A. Ball, of Cincinnati, daughter of 
Flamen Ball (Y. C. 1787). He remained in Logansport until 
1851 in active practice, and also serving twice as mayor of the 
city and for one term as judge of probate. In 1851 he removed 
to New York City, and entered into partnership with the late 
Hon. Henry M. Western; he continued in practice (the latter 
part of the time by himself) until about 1880, with the exception 

1^ the time of his service under appointment of the Governor in 
664 to fill an unexpired term in one of the District Court Judge- 
lips in New York City. For the last four or five years of his 
ife he was a great invalid, and seldom able to leave his house 
during the latter half of this time. He died in New York City, 
April 3, 1886, in his 75th year. His wife died in 1879, one son 
in 1876, and another in 1884; five daughters and one son survive 
him. 

1833. 

Thomas Hanscome Lbgarb was born in Charleston, S. C, 
April 19, 1811, the youngest child of Thomas and Ann Eliza 
(Berwick) Legare. He left College during the last part of the 
Junior year, but his high scholarship led to his receiving an hon- 
orary degree in 1841. 

He studied theology in the Seminary at Columbia, S. C, 1834- 
36, and after having served as a home missionary at Aiken, S. C, 
was pastor for four years of a Presbyterian Church on John's 



296 

Island, oj^posite Charleston. He then removed to Orangeburg, 
S. C, where he continued as pastor of the Presbyterian Church — 
under much bodily weakness — for eight years, or until he became 
associated with his elder brother (Y. C. 1831) in the conduct of 
the Orangeburg Female Seminary. He continued to preach, as 
his infirm health permitted. His employment as a teacher was 
broken up by the civil war, but his residence continued through 
life in Orangeburg; and during these later years his absorbing 
occupation was the study of the Bible. He died, suddenly, as he 
was sitting engaged in this favorite study, at his home in Orange- 
burg, on the 10th of July, 1885, in his 75th year. 

He married, in 1832, Miss F. M. Mathews, daughter of Mr. W. 
Mathews, of John's Island. Their children were one son and two 
daughters. 

Samuel Wolcott was born in East (now South) Windsor, 
Conn., July 2, 1813, the eldest son of Eliliu and Rachel M. 
(McClure) Wolcott. 

He spent the year after graduation n^ostly in New Haven, 
attending theological lectures; and during 1834-37 pursued the 
regular course in Andover Theological Seminary. For the next 
two years he was employed as an assistant in the rooms of the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, at Bos- 
ton. Meantime he had been accepted by the Board as a mission- 
ary, and on November 13, 1839, he was ordained in Boston to 
this work, having been married on the 5th of the preceding Sep- 
tember to Catharine E., daughter of Ezra Wood, of Westminster, 
Mass. He left Boston in January, 1840, and arrived at his des- 
tination, Syria, in April. He attempted to establish himself in a 
village on Mount Lebanon, but was soon driven away by an out- 
break of civil strife. A second attempt, in the summer of 1841, 
was also unsuccessful. His wife died in Beirut, October 26, 1841, 
and he spent the following winter in Jerusalem, making use of 
his residence in Palestine to prosecute valuable topographical 
explorations. He was again on Mount Lebanon in 1842, but 
when civil war once more broke up the mission he returned to 
the United States, arriving in April, 1843. On the 30th of 
August, 1843, he was installed over the Congregational Church 
in Longmeadow, Mass. After a short, but successful pastorate, 
he was dismissed December 27, 1847, and was settled over the 
Congregational Church in Belchertown, Mass., October 2, 1849, 



297 

where he continued until March 29, 1853. His next pastorate, 
over the High Street Congregational Church, in Providence, R. 
I., began April 20, 1853, and was terminated by his dismissal, 
September 20, 1859, and his removal to Chicago, where he was 
installed over the New England Church, just one week later. 
He removed again, February 5, 1862, to the Plymouth Church, 
Cleveland, O., and this pastorate he resigned, February 17, 1874, 
to become secretary of the Ohio Home Missionary Society, which 
position he held with distinguished usefulness far seven yearg. 
He resided for two years longer in Cleveland, and then returned 
to the East, fixing his residence in Longmeadow. In 1885, a dis- 
ease of the heart began to manifest itself, which caused his death, 
in Longmeadow, February 24, 1886, in his 73d year. 

This record of Dr. Wolcott's services does not adequately ex- 
press his usefulness to his generation. He was a leader in denom- 
inational work, and in this connection will be especially remem- 
bered by an exhaustive Report upon the Parish System, made to 
the National Congregational Council in 1877. His most elab- 
orate literary work was the Wolcott Memorial (1881, quarto), an 
exceptionally interesting record of family history. As a preacher, 
ho was unflinching and ardent in his convictions and utterances 
of truth, with a genuine, manly eloquence. In 1863 he received 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Marietta College. 

On the Ist of November, 1843, after his return from Syria, he 
married Harriet A., daughter of Jonathan A. Pope, of Millbury, 
Mass., who survives him. Of their eleven children, one daughter 

I led in infancy, and five sons and five daughters are living. 
The youngest son is a graduate of this Qollege in the Class of 
884; two others were members of the Classes of 1866 and 1870, 
Bspectively, the younger of whom received an honorary degree 
1 1883 ; another son is a graduate of Oberlin College (1874), 
nd follows his father's profession. 



1834. 



George Gtlman Spencer, son of Stephen and Jerusha (Gil- 
man) Spencer, of Hartford, Conn., was. born in that city, Septem- 
ber 13, 1812, and entered Yale as a Sophomore, having spent one 
year in Washington, now Trinity College, Hartford. 

During the winter after graduation he taught school in Alexan- 
dria, Va., and then returned to Hartford and engaged in mer- 
cantile business with his father, under the firm-name of Stephen 



298 

Spencer & Co. In 1841 he settled in New York City in the 
wholesale grocery business, in the firm of Roberts & Spencer. 
The business was successfully carried on at No. 106 Front Street, 
under different styles, for more than twenty-five years. In 1870 
Mr. Spencer removed to the west side of the city (No. 303 Green- 
wich Street), and there continued in the same line of business 
until his death, the firm being latterly Spencer, Stout & Co. He 
was a man of the strictest integrity, very active in his business 
habits, genial in private intercourse, and a generous helper to 
those in need. He died at his residence in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
after an illness of three weeks from heart disease, October 15, 
1885, aged 13 years. 

Mr. Spencer married in July, 1853, Miss Caroline Arnold, of 
Brooklyn, by whom he had two daughters and two sons ; the 
younger son is a member of the Junior Class in this College. 

1835. 

Jared Augustus Ayres was born in New Canaan, Conn., 
November 16, 1813, the son of Jared and Dinah (Benedict) 
Ayres. 

After graduation he became a teacher in the American Asylum 
for the Deaf and Dumb, at Hartford, Conn., and continued thus 
employed until 1864; for most of this time his residence was in 
East Hartford. 

During the remainder of his life he was engaged in manufac- 
turing enterprises. He removed to Mystic, Conn., in 1869, and 
died there, of old age, Feb. 24, ] 886, in his 73d year. 

He was married, in Clinton, Conn., early in 1841, to Miss S. L. 
Wilcox. Their children were three sons and three daughters, of 
whom one daughter died in early infancy. The eldest son was 
graduated at this College in 1864. 

William Gaston Bulloch was born in Savannah, August 4, 
1815, and was descended from some of the most illustrious fam- 
ilies of Georgia, being the great-grandson of Archibald Bulloch, 
the first President of the. State, and grandson of John Glen, the 
first Chief-Justice. 

He graduated M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 
1838, and went immediately to Paris, where he spent about 
eighteen months in attendance on medical lectures. He then re- 
turned to Savannah, and was for many years one of the best- 



299 

known surgeons of the State, as well as a skillful physician and 
especially noted as an oculist. He was one of the founders of 
the Savannah Medical College, and professor of surgery in its 
faculty, and was also president of the State Medical Society. He 
was also an active, public-spirited citizen, and at one time served 
on the board of aldermen of Savannah. During the late war he 
entered the Confederate service, as surgeon, with the rank of 
major. 

He died in Savannah, of gastro-enteritis, after ten days' illness, 
June 23, 1885, in his 70th year. 

In 1851 he married Miss Mary Eliza Adams Lewis, of Savan- 
nah, who survives him, with their two sons (of whom the elder 
follows his father's profession), and one of their four daughters. 

Samuel L'Hommedieu Gakdinek, son of the Rev. John D. 
Gardiner (Y. C. 1804) and Mary (L'Hommedieu) Gardiner, of 
Sag Harbor, L. L, N. Y., was born there, August 10, 1816, and 
entered College at the opening of Junior year. 

He studied law for three years in an office in New York City, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1839. He then spent eighteen 
months in further study in Cincinnati, with the intention of set- 
tling in that neighborhood; but in 1840 at his father's request he 
returned to his native town, where he remained for the rest of his 
life. He died there, after a very brief illness, August 2, 1885, 
aged 69 years. 

He married, October 3, 1841, in Lancaster, Mass., Anne Shaler, 
by whom he had five children. 

Nathaniel Saltonstall Howe was born in Haverhill, Mass., 
April 24, 1817, the son of Isaac R. Howe (Harv. 1810) and Sarah 
(Saltonstall) Howe, and spent the first two years of his course 
(1831-33) in Amherst College. 

He began the study of law in his father's office in Haverhill 
immediately upon graduation, but a year later went to Monroe, 
Mich., and completed his studies with the Hon. Alpheus Felch, 
beinw admitted to the bar there in the winter of 1837-8. He 

o 

practiced his profession in Monroe until 1848, when he returned 
to Haverhill and there continued in practice. In 1852 he was 
elected to the Massachusetts Senate. In 1853 he was appointed 
Judge of Probate for Essex County, and discharged the duties 
of that office until the abolition of the court in 1858. In 1862 he 



300 

was appointed to office in the Interior Department, Washington, 
and for about two years was an Assistant Private Secretary to 
President Lincoln. In ] 866 he was appointed Collector of In- 
ternal Revenue for the 6th District of Massachusetts, and held 
the office for four years. From 1871 to 1876 he was stationed at 
Little Rock, Ark., as Land Commissioner for the Little Rock 
and Fort Smith R. R. Company, and in 1877 he was appointed 
law clerk in the office of the Assistant Attorney General for the 
Interior Department in Washington, which office he held until his 
death, in that city, after eight days' illness, February 20, 1885, in 
his 68th year. 

He married. May 26, 1846, Sarah A,, daughter of Charles Brad- 
ley, of Boston, who survives him, and by whom he had one 
daughter and one son (Harv. 1869). 

OsBEET Burr Loomis, Ihe fourth son of James and Abigail S. 
(Chaffee) Loomis, was born in Windsor, Conn., July 30, 1813. 

After graduation he studied with Samuel F. B. Morse (Y. C. 
1810), the President of the National Academy, in New York 
City ; and in the winter of 1836 he began his career as a portrait 
painter, in Charleston, S. C. On January 19, 1843, he married 
Jeannette H., eldest daughter of the Rev. Dr. Samuel F. Jarvis 
(Y. C. 1805), of Middletown, Conn. In January, 1844, he went 
with his wife to Havana, Cuba, where their residence continued 
until May, 1862. Mr. Loomis soon became the most esteemed 
portrait painter in Havana, and besides painted a number of altar 
pieces for churches and chapels. On his return from Cuba he 
settled in New York City, where his residence continued — varied 
by foreign travel — until his death there, April 30, 1886, in his 73d 
year. Mrs. Loomis survives him without children. 

Ariel, Parish was born in South Coventry, a village in Cov- 
entry, Conn., July 20, 1808, the son of Jeremiah and Lydia 
(Manning) Parish. He began his career as a teacher at the age 
of 17, while preparing for College. Before he entered College, 
his father had removed to Tolland, Conn. 

After graduation he taught for two and a half years a private 
school in Berlin, Conn. ; from 1837 to 1844 had charge of the 
Academy in Westiield, Mass. ; and from 1844 to 1865 was princi- 
pal of the High School in Springfield, Mass. During this time 
he was for two years president of the State Teachers' Association, 



I 



301 

and for eight years (1855-63) a member of the State Board of 
Education. In 1865 he was called from Springfield to the respon- 
sible office of Superintendent of Schools in New Haven, Conn., 
which he held with fidelity and credit until his resignation, on 
account of advancing years, December 31, 1881. In 1883 he went 
in failing health to Denver, Colorado, where a married daughter 
was residing, and he died there, of thrombosis, November 24, 
1885, in his 78th year. 

He married, in 1836, Miss Caroline A. Dickman, of Springfield, 
who died in 1838. He next married, in 1839, Miss Anna Woods, 
daughter of Leonard Woods, Esq., of Enfield, Mass., who sur- 
vives him, with five of their six children ; the elder of their two 
sons was graduated here in 1872, and of their two married 
daughters one is the wife of Nathan B. Coy (Y. C. 1870) and the 
other the wife of William J. Betts {Y. C. 1870). 

GusTAvus Spencer, the youngest son of Deacon Calvin and 
Esther (Lewis) Spencer, was born in Naugatuck (then Salem), 
Conn., March 20, 1808. 

His intention on graduation was to enter upon a professional 
life, but protracted ill-health prevented him from carrying out 
his plans. In 1838 he went to North Carolina, and was there 
occupied until 1842 in teaching at Charlotte and Fayette ville. 
He then returned to Naugatuck, and soon afterwards engaged in 
business in that town as a merchant and manufacturer. In this 
he continued until the opening of the war. During the war he 
was engaged in business in Nashville, Tenn., remaining there 
until 1867. From that time until his death he resided chiefly in 
New York. He died in New York City, March 31, 1886, at the 
age of 78. 

In 1837 he married Julia A. Beecher, of Naugatuck, who died 
in 1843, leaving no children. In 1848 he married Mary C. Hurl- 
but, of Stratford, Conn., who with a son and daughter survives 
him. 

Thomas Anthony Thacher was born in Hartford, Conn., 
January 11, 1815, the son of Peter and Anne (Parks) Thacher. 

After graduation he taught for a few months in the academy 
at New Canaan, Conn., and then for three years in Georgia. On 
the 1st of December, 1838, he entered on the duties of a tutorship 
in this College. From this office he was advanced, in August, 



302 

1842, to the Professorship of Latin; and in this relation to the 
College he continued until his death. Besides his eminent suc- 
cess as an instructor, he was a most valued officer in the discipline 
and general administration of the College, and most happy in 
securing the confidence and regard of successive generations of 
students. Many of the most important benefactions received by 
the institution during his term of office were obtained through 
his wise and unremitting activity. His time and strength were 
given without stint to College affairs, but he was able also to 
evince his interest in public education by serving as a member of 
the State Board of Education from its formation in 1 865 until his 
resignation in 1877. The degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred 
on him by Western Reserve College in 1869. 

For some ten years before his death. Professor Thacher had 
been hindered in the full discharge of his duties by a liability to 
atisicks of angina pect67^is ; and the fatal result had thus been a 
matter of long anticipation. The end came, very suddenly, in 
the early morning of April 7, 1886, at his home in New Haven, 
in the 7 2d year of his age. 

He married, September 16, 1846, Elizabeth, second daughter 
of the Rev. President Jeremiah Day (Y. C. 1795), who died May 
18, 1858, leaving five sons, who are all graduates of the College. 
He next married, August 1, 1860, Elizabeth B., the youngest 
child of Roger Sherman, Esq. (Y. C. 1787), of New Haven. She 
survives him, with their four children, three sons and one daugh- 
ter; the eldest of these sons was graduated at College in 1883, 
and the second is a member of the present Junior Class. 

Charles Wright was born October 29, 1811, in Wethersfield, 
Conn., the son of James and Mary (Goodrich) Wright, of Weth- 
ersfield. 

While in College he was already interested in botany, and to 
the pursuit of this study he devoted his after life. He taught in 
Natchez, Miss., during the winter after graduation, and from that 
neighborhood wandered to Texas in the spring of 1837, where 
(and in New Mexico and Arizona) he remained fifteen years, 
mainly engrossed in botanical researches. After his return to 
the East he received the appointment of botanist to the North 
Pacific Exploring Expedition, which occupied him from June, 
1853, till the spring of 1856. In November, 1856, he sailed for 
Cuba, and began a thorough botanical exploration of that island, 



303 

which he prosecuted with industry and success until July, 1867. 
In 1868 he took charge of the Herbarium connected with Harvard 
University, while Professor Gray was in Europe, and he remained 
for some time after Dr. Gray's return as his assistant. In 1871 
he visited Santo Domingo in connection with the commission 
sent by President Grant. The rest of his life was spent at his 
home in Wethersfield, excepting six months in 1875-6, during 
which time he was the librarian of the Bussey Institution, the 
school of agriculture connected with Harvard University. He 
was found dead at his home in Wethersfield, on the Uth of 
August, 1885, having died from heart-disease. He was never 
married. 

As a careful and indefatigable explorer and collector, and also 
an acute observer, he merits the highest praise, and will be long 
and honorably remembered for his great services to his chosen 
science. 

1836. 

Arthur Fletcher, second son of Deacon Nathan and Nancy 
(Pillsbury) Fletcher, was born in Bridge water, N. H., October 1, 
1811, and spent the first two years of his course in Dartmouth 
College. His college residence was in Concord, N. H. 

After graduating, he was employed in teaching a boarding- 
school for boys in New York City for nearly a year, and then 
studied law with his uncle, Samuel Fletcher (Dartmouth Coll. 
1810), of Concord, and was admitted to the bar there in March, 
1840. He practiced law in Concord for about thirty-five years, 
and his residence continued there until his death. He died in 
Concord, after an illness of about nine weeks, of senile gangrene 
(after submitting to an amputation of the right foot), February 
19, 1885, in the 74th year of his age. His life was honorable and 
upright, and his death cheered by Christian trust. 

On August 1, 1848, he married Miss Harriet M. Minot, at 
Lebanon, N. H., who survives him, with a daughter, the young- 
est of their four children. 

1837. 

^Iyron Newton Morris, the youngest child of Newton J. 
and Eunice (Newton) Morris, was born on one of the College 
farms in Warren, Litchfield County, Conn., Nov. 19, 1810. After 
his father's death, in 1830, he took charge of the farm for a year 



• 304 

or two, and was then at length able to begin his preparation for 
College. 

After graduation he was principal of Bacon Academy, in Col- 
chester, Conn., till the summer of 1838, and again from March, 
1840, till the summer of 1843; in the interval he was instructor 
in the Teachers' Academy, Andover, Mass. He began theolog- 
ical studies while in Andover, and was licensed to preach shortly 
after his final withdrawal from Bacon Academy. He had mar- 
ried, January 10, 1838, Miss Julia S., daughter of Elisha Avery, 
of Colchester, and he retained his residence there — engaged in 
farming, private teaching, and preaching — until January, 1845, 
when he removed to Norwich, Conn., where he served as teacher 
in the academy for two terms. While living here he accepted a 
call to the Congregational Church in North Stonington, Conn., 
over which he was ordained, April 15, 1846. After a pleasant 
pastorate of six years, he was induced, chiefly for the sake of 
educational advantages to his children, to accept a thrice-repeated 
call to the Congregational Church in West Hartford, Conn.j 
where he was installed, July I, 1852. His very useful service 
here was terminated by his resignation, April 27, 1875, but his 
home continued among his people. While still a pastor, in July, 
1867, he was elected a Fellow of Yale College, and this office he 
retained until his death. He was twice a Representative (in 1872 
and 1875) from West Hartford to the. legislature, and for many 
years one of the school-visitors for the town. In that community, 
where so much of his life was spent, his influence for good is 
abiding and fruitful. 

He died in West Hartford, after four days' illness, from pleurisy, 
July 9, 1885, in his 75th year. 

His wife died March 26, 1854 ; and he next married, May 8, 
1855, Emeline, youngest daughter of Samuel Whitman, of West 
Hartford, who survives him, as do a daughter and two sons by 
his first marriage, and a son (Y. C. 1882) by his second marriage; 
two sons died in infancy, and a third in early manhood. 

He published three historical discourses, of more than ordinary 
value. In an interesting Memorial volume which has been issued 
by the church in West Hartford, a deserved tribute is paid to his 
character and services. 

William Bartlett Morse was born in Lowell, Mass., Nov. 
13, 1817, and died in that part of Boston, Mass., known as 



305 

Charlestowii, April 11, 1886, in the 69th year of his age. A son 
was graduated at Harvard College in 1876. 

Notice of Mr. Morse's death was received too late for the 
collection of further details. 

1838. 

Benjamin Stephenson Edwards, was born in Edwardsville, 
111., June 13, 1818, the youngest son of the Hon. Ninian Edwards, 
the first territorial governor of Illinois, and Elvira (Lane) Ed- 
wards. He was named for Col. Benjamin Stephenson, an intimate 
friend of his father, and one of the best known of the early 
pioneers of the state. His father died in 1830, and he entered 
College from the family residence in Belleville, 111., at the begin- 
ning of the Sophomore year. 

After graduation he studied law in the Yale Law School, and 
in the office of the Hon. Stephen T. Logan, in Springfield, 111. 
In 1840 he began practice in Springfield, in partnership with the 
Hon. Edward D. Baker, who was killed while in command of a 
brigade at the battle of Ball's Blufif in 1861. In 1843 he formed 
another law partnership, with the Hon. J. T. Stuart, which was 
only broken by Mr. Stuart's death in 1885. Mr. Edwards ap- 
plied himself studiously to his profession, paying little orno atten- 
tion to politics. In 1861 he was nominated without his own con- 
sent for Congress on the Democratic ticket, and greatly reduced 
the ordinary Republican majority in the district. At the earnest 
solicitation of the bar and the people, he became a candidate for 
a judgeship of the Circuit Court in 1869, and was accordingly 
elected, and discharged the duties to the entire satisfaction of the 
community. When the circuit was enlarged he retired from the 
bench, and devoted himself wholly to his profession. In the last 
year of his life he was the president of the State Bar Association. 
He had been in failing health for a month at the time of his 
partner's death, and was so much affected by that event that he 
fell into a more rapid decline, and within two months' time died 
at his home in Springfield, on the 4th of February, 1 886, in the 
68th year of his age. 

He married in New Haven, August 13, 1839, Miss Helen K. 
Dodge, of New York City, who survives him with their three 
daughters, their only son having died in childhood. 



306 . 

William Pitt Lynde, son of the Hon. Tilly and Eliza Lynde, 
was born in Sherburne, N. Y., December 16, 1817, and entered 
.College with an elder brother, at the beginning of Sophomore 
year, from Homer, N. Y., to which place his father had long be- 
fore removed. 

After graduation he studied law, in New York City and Cam- 
bridge, Mass., and was admitted to the bar in New York in the 
spring of 1841. He then removed to Wisconsin Territory, and 
settled in Milwaukee in the practice of the law, at first in con- 
nection with his brother and classmate, Charles J. Lynde, whose 
sudden death occurred the same summer. He was appointed 
Attorney General of the Territory in 1844, and after serving for 
one year was U. S. District Attorney from 1845 until the admis- 
sion of Wisconsin to the Union. On this last event, he was 
elected as representative in the 30th Congress, serving from De- 
cember, 1847, to March, 1849. In 1849 he was the unsuccessful 
Democratic candidate for the Supreme Court bench. He was 
elected Mayor of Milwaukee in 1860, and was a member of the 
State Assembly in 1866, and of the State Senate in 1868 and 
1869. He was also a member of the 44th and 45th Congresses 
(1875-79). He continued in the practice of his profession until 
the failure of his health, which began about a year before his 
death. He died at his home in Milwaukee, December 18, 1885, 
at the age of 68 years. 

He married, May 4, 1841, Mary E., daughter of Dr. A. 
Blanchard, of Truxton, N. Y., who survives him, with their three 
sons and three daughters ; two of the sons are graduates of the 
Shefiield Scientific School, in 1874 and 1875, respectively. 

He acquitted himself in his various public positions with ability, 
honesty, and fidelity, and attained the highest success in the line 
of his profession as an advocate. For many years before his 
death he was one of the ruling elders of the Presbyterian Church 
in Milwaukee. 

1839. 

Theodore Adgate Leete, third son of Miner and Lucinda 
(Norton) Leete, was born on Leete's Island, in Guilford, Conn., 
May 20, 1814. 

After graduating he spent a year or more in teaching at Madi- 
son, Conn^ and then entered the Yale Divinity School, where he 
completed the course in 1843. In 1844 he began preaching in the 



307 

First Church of Windsor, Conn., over which he was ordained 
pastor, September 24, 1845. After a useful pastorate of fourteen 
years, his resignation was accepted in September, 1859, and he 
removed to Longraeadow, Mass., to the homestead farm of his 
wife, Mary C, elder daughter of William White, whom he had 
married September 3, 1851. While in Longmeadow he was occu- 
pied with the cultivation of his farm, and temporarily supplied 
various pulpits in the neighborhood. Thus he labored for a year 
(1861-62) in the organization of the Florence Church in North- 
ampton, and for the succeeding year in Agawara, Next came a 
brief service in the Army of the Potomac, under the auspices of 
the Christian Commission. In the fall of 1.864 he became acting 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Blandford, which he left 
in the summer of 1870 to take a similar relation to the First 
Church in Palmer (Thorndike) ; on leaving this last field, in 1875, 
he organized a mission at Three Rivers, in the same town, which 
under his efforts developed into a Union Evangelical Church, of 
which he was pastor until 1877. At this time his elder son was 
about graduating at Amherst College, and entering the Yale Di- 
vinity School ; and Mr. Leete removed to Orange, Conn , where 
he had charge of the Congregational Church for a year or two. 
He resided in Orange and in New Haven, until the spring of 1880, 
when he went to Northford Society, in North Branford, Conn.., 
where he spent some two years as acting pastor. In May, 1883, 
he returned to Longmeadow, and there ended the record of an 
active life, fruitful with good. After a few days' illness, from 
inflammation of the kidneys and peritonitis, he died in Long- 
meadow, April 28, 1886, at the age of 72. His wife survives him 
with their children, one daughter and two sons. 

William Stueges Wright, son of Deacon Joseph Wright 
(Y. C. 1804) and Sarah (Lockwood) Wright, was born in Glaston- 
bury, Conn,, October 24, 1813. 

For two years after graduating he was engaged as a teacher in 
the academy in Fair Haven, Conn., and then spent two years in 
the Yale Divinity School, receiving a license to preach in June, 
1843. Finding public speaking difiicult on account of an asth- 
matic affection, he took charge in the fall of 1844 of the academy 
in what is now Cromwell, Conn., where he remained for six years. 
After another brief engagement as teaqher, in Manchester, Conn., 
he seemed strong enough to resume professional labor, and was 



808 

accordingly ordained as an evangelist by the Hartford South 
Association, in Berlin, Conn., June 3, 1851. He then had charge 
for nearly two years of the Congregational Church in Middle 
Haddam, Conn., and in February 16, 1853, was installed pastor of 
the Congregational Church in West Avon, Conn. He resigned 
this charge, May 19, 1859, to accept the pastorate of the Congre- 
gational Church in Chester, Conn., where he was installed June 
29. He was obliged to take a dismission, Aug. 11, 1861, on ac- 
count of the failure of his voice and general health, and spent 
the rest of his life in his native place, occupied mainly in teaching 
and farming. He died in Glastonbury, September 27, 1885, at 
the age of 72. 

He married, September 17, 1845, Elizabeth, daughter of James 
North, of Middletown, Conn. ; their only child died in infancy. 

1840. 

John Perkins, son of Judge John Perkins (who was a Mary- 
lander by birth), of Mississippi, was born in Natchez, July 
1, 1819. 

He studied law at Harvard University, where he received the 
degree of LL.B. in 1842. After a short interval he established 
himself in the practice of his profession in New Orleans, in part- 
nership with his classmate, James Smith, who died in 1846. His 
health failing, Mr. Perkins sailed for Europe in 1848, whence he 
returned in 1850. In July, 1850, he married Miss Mary E., 
daughter of the Rev. Dr. George Potts, of New York city, and 
the same year sailed again for Europe. This marriage proved an 
unhappy one. After his return he was elected to a judgeship in 
Louisiana, and subsequently (in 1853) to Congress, where he 
served for two terms. In the civil war, he cast his lot with the 
South, and was chairman in January, 1861, of the secession con- 
vention of his state. He was a representative in the Confederate 
Congress during the most of the war, and acted for a time as 
Secretary of the Navy. On the fall of Vicksburg and the occu- 
pation of the Mississippi, he applied the torch with his own hand 
to his palatial residence at Somerset ; and on the close of the war 
he left the country. He went at first to Mexico, where he re- 
mained for two years, until the death of the Emperor Maximilian ; 
and afterwards he traveled extensively in Europe. In 1878 he 
returned to the United States, and spent the rest of his life in 
Louisiana for the winters, and in Virginia during the summers. 



309 

his second wife, who survives him, being a daughter of Judge 
May, of Petersburg, Va., and the widow of the Hon. Thomas H. 
Bayly, congressman from the same state. 

His death, which was the result of a gradual decline of the 
vital powers, occurred in Baltimore (where a married daughter is 
now living), on the 28th of November, 1885, in the 67th year 
of his age. 

% 1841. 

Horace Dean Walker, the eldest child of Dean and Rebecca 
(Wright) Walker, was born in Framingham, Mass., September 15, 
1815, and entered this College towards the end of the Sophomore 
year from Medway, Mass., his parents' home. He had previously 
been matriculated (for reasons of health) at Western Reserve 
College in Ohio. 

After graduation he studied theology with his pastor, the Rev. 
Dr. Jacob Ide, and for one year (1842-43) in the Bangor (Maine) 
Seminarv. He was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church 
in East Abington, now Rockland, Mass., February 15, 1844, and 
remained with great acceptance and efficiency in this pastorate 
(though frequently invited elsewhere), until dismissed at his 
own request, October 31, 1867. The severe strain of so long a 
pastorate in an active, growing community had so affected his 
strength that it was necessary for him to seek some relief. He 
went immediately to the neighboring town of Bridgewater, where 
he was installed pastor of the Central Square (Congregational) 
Church, April 9, 1868. This charge he resigned, October 8, 1879, 
and he afterward made his home with his elder son in Nebraska, 
and finally in Palatine Bridge, Montgomery County, N. Y., where 
his younger daughter was a teacher. For nearly two years before 
his death he labored in the ministry in his native town, en- 
deavoring to heal a division in the ancient church of West Med- 
way. While on a visit to his family in Palatine Bridge, he 
met with a severe fall on the 30th of October, 1885 ; inflamma- 
tion set in, and he died on the 4th of the following month in his 
71st year. 

He married, January 21, 1844, Mercy A., daughter of Horatio 
Mason, of Medway, who survives him, with two sons and two 
daughters, three children having died in infancy. 

3 



310 



1842. 



Thomas Nelson Benedict, son of Stephen and Deborah 
(Delavan) Benedict, was born in Rutland, Jefterson County, N.Y., 
September 1, 1817. 

He studied for three years after graduation in the Yale Divinity 
school, and was ordained, February 3, 1846, as pastor of the Con- 
gregational Church in Champion, in his native county, being mar- 
ried on the 23d of September following, to Miss Caroline M., 
daughter of Philetus Raymond, of Peekskill, N. Y. In 1848 he 
was induced, by attacks of ophthalmia which had long troubled 
him, to resign his pastorate, and remove to Massena, in St. Law- 
rence County, for the benefit of the mineral springs at that place. 
Here his eyes improved, and he was able during his residence of 
five years to act as stated supply to the local church. In 1853, 
on account of his wife's health, he removed to Peekskill, where 
he remained until 1859, when he accepted an invitation to go 
to Brookfield, Conn., as acting pastor of the Congregational 
Church. This position he resigned in 1864, when he went 
in a similar capacity to Lisle, N. Y., where he continued 
until the latter part of 1869. Early in 1870 he removed to 
Aquebogue, near the eastern end of Long Island, N. Y., where 
he was settled over a Congregational Church, until his transfer to 
Jamesport, in the same neighborhood, in September, 1879. From 
the Congregational Church in Jamesport he went to that at Mil- 
ler's Place, near the middle of the Island, in May, 1882. There 
(and at Mount Sinai, an adjoining village) he was pastor until his 
death in the midst of his self-denying labors, on March 17, 1886, 
in his 69th year, after an illness of twelve days from bilious fever 
supplemented by bronchial pneumonia. 

His wife died in 1872, and he married in 1873 Mrs. Mary M. 
Reeve, daughter of D. T. Wells, of Aquebogue, who survives 
him. His only child, by his first marriage died in infancy ; by 
his second marriage he had three children, — a son who died in 
infancy, and a daughter and a son who are still living. 

William Edgar Waterhouse, son of Eleazer and Arabella 
(Crane) Waterhouse, was born in Pulteney, Steuben County, 
N. Y., October 27, 1814. 

After graduation he spent some years in Geneva, N. Y., engaged 
in teaching and editing, and also studying medicine. In 1 848 he 
removed to Pennsylvania, and after a brief interval of teaching. 



311 

settled in Logaiisville, York County, as a physician. In March, 
1853, he went to Maryland, and was engaged for a year in teach- 
ing in Upper Marlboro, Prince George County. In March, 1854, 
he settled in Baltimore as a druggist, and there continued until his 
death. 

After serious bronchial troubles for more than two years, 
which had confined him to his room for about five months, he 
died at his residence in Baltimore, June 21, 1885, in his 71st year. 

He was married, December 26, 1848, to Miss Margaret Ann 
Geesey, of Shrewsbury, York County, Pa., wlio survives him with 
two sons and five daughters. 

1843. 

Henry Stevens, son of Henry Stevens, was born in Barnet, 
Yt., August 24, 1819, and entered Middlebury College in 1838. 
A year later he obtained a clerksliip in Washington, and in 1840 
joined the Sophomore Class in this College. 

He had been a member of the Law School of Harvard Univer- 
sity, and had already distinguished himself as a collector of rare 
historical books, when in 1 845 he went to London. The library 
ot the British Museum soon made use of his agency to obtain 
American books, and in this way the present collection of Ameri- 
can publications in that great library has been mainly formed. 
Mr. Stevens remained permanently in London, as a bookseller, 
and was extensively employed by many wealthy American col- 
lectors, notably by James Lenox, in accumulating rare treasures 
for their shelves. 

He also evinced great literary activity. The catalogues which 
he printed, of his English Library (1853), of his Historical [Amer- 
ican] Nuggets (2 vols., 1862, and second series, 1885), of his 
Bibliotheca Historica (1870), and of the Bibles in the C^xton 
Exhibition (1878), with numerous smaller pamphlets, bear ample 
witness to his bibliographical attainments; and the volume of his 
Historical and Geographical Notes on the Earliest Discoveries in 
America (1869) is a valuable illustration of his minute knowledge 
of the foundations of the history of his native country. 

He died at his residence in London, February 28, 1886, in his 
67th year, after a long illness. His wife, an English lady, sur- 
vives him, and a son who succeeds him in business. 



312 

1845. 

Basil Duke, the second of ten children of James K. Duke (Y. 
C. 1818) and Mary (Buford) Duke, was born in Scott County, 
Kentucky, February 28, 1824, and joined College at the begin- 
ning of the Junior year. 

Soon after graduating he entered the Law School connected 
with Transylvania University (at Lexington, Ky.), and received 
the degree of LL.B. there in 1847. About the beginning of 1848 
he settled in St. Louis, Mo., and after further preparatory study 
in the office of Geyer & Dayton, was admitted to practice in 
October, 1849, and continued thus engaged until his last illness. 
He died in St. Louis, June 14, 1885, in his 62d year, having been 
a great sufferer for two and a half years. 

He married, April 10, 1851, Miss Adelaide Anderson, daughter 
of James Anderson, of Louisville, Ky. Of their four children, 
only two sons reached maturity. 

1846. 

Wilson Gary Nicholas Carr, the eldest son of the Hon. 
Dabney S. Carr, of Baltimore, Md., by his wife Sidney S. Nich- 
olas, daughter of Gov. Wilson Cary Nicholas, of Virginia, was 
born in Baltimore, February 18, 182Y. His father was a great- 
nephew of President Jefferson, long a prominent figure in Mary- 
land politics, and U. S. Minister to Turkey under Tyler and Polk. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of Messrs. Brown 
& Brune, of Baltimore, and in 1848 entered on the practice of his 
profession in his native city. At a later period he formed a part- 
nership with the Hon. William Pinkney White, afterwards Gov- 
ernor and U. S. Senator, which continued until the beginning of 
the civil war. Mr. Carr's sympathies carried him into the South- 
ern army as a private; when he surrendered at Appomattox, he 
was Captain on the staff. After the close of the war, he con- 
ducted at Charlottesville, Va., a preparatory school for young 
men intending to enter the University of Virginia. While in 
Charlottesville, he married Miss Susan Henderson, of Baltimore, 
who died soon after ; his two children also died in infancy. In 
1869 he returned to Baltimore, and after holding a clerkship in 
one of the courts, was appointed in 1873 Deputy State's- Attorney, 
a position which he held until 1880. In 1884, his health failing, 
he retired from the practice of the law and removed to Ashland, 
Va., where he died, April 18, 1886, in his 60th year, of paralysis, 
a disease which had proved fatal to many members of his family. 



313 

1847. 

Benjamin Gratz Brown was born in Lexington, Ky., May 28, 
]826. His father was the Hon. Mason Brown (Y. C. 1820), of 
Frankfort, Ky., and his mother was a daughter of the Hon. Jesse 
Bledsoe, a former XJ. S. Senator. Before entering this College, in 
1845, he had jDursued the classical course in Transylvania Univer- 
sity, at Lexington. 

He studied law at home, was admitted to the Kentucky bar in 
1849, and immediately removed to St. Louis, Mo., and began 
practice there, though he abandoned the profession after a few 
years. He early identified himself with the Free-Soil party, and 
in 1852, before he had completed his 26th year, was elected to 
the State Legislature, in which he served for six years, with 
increasing influence. In 1854 he became managing editor of the 
3Iissofi7% J)emoG7'at, and proved an able journalist during the five 
years for which he retained the position. Both as a legislator 
and as an editor, he strongly opposed slavery. 

On the approach of the civil war he helped to save his adopted 
State from secession; and w^hen the war began he recruited the 
first regiment of Missouri Volunteers for the U. S. government, 
and fought at their head through the campaign in Southwestern 
Missouri. He was called from military service in 1863 to accept 
a seat in the United States Senate. In 1866 he declined a reelec- 
tion, on account of the state of his health. In 1870 he was elected 
Governor by a coalition of the Liberal Republicans and Demo- 
crats, and his wise and popular administration led to his being 
selected by the National Convention of Liberal Republicans, at 
Cincinnati, May, 1872, as their candidate for the Vice-Presidency, 
on the ticket with Horace Greeley ; this ticket was afterwards 
endorsed by the Democrats, at Baltimore. 

After the unsuccessful termination of this canvass, he retired 
from political life and devoted himself to the management of his 
business interests and to literary pursuits, reentering also on the 
practice of law. He died while on a visit in Kirkwood, a suburb 
of St. Louis, from pneumonia complicated with heart-disease, 
December 13, 1885, in his 60th year. 

A widow and nine children survive him. 

James Thomas Hyde, the eldest child of James N. and Mary 
Ann (Thomas) Hyde, was born in Norwich Town, Conn., January 
28, 1827, and entered College from Colchester, Conn., the residence 
of his widowed mother. 



314 

He taught privately, and in 1848 entered the Yale Theological 
Seminary, where he finished the course in 1851, having served 
for the two years since 1849 as a tutor in the College. He was 
ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in New Braintree, 
Mass., June 22, 1853, and remained there until his resignation, 
August 28, 1855. From this date until April, 1857, he supplied 
the pulpit of the North Church in Hartford, during the absence 
of the pastor, Dr. Horace Bushnoll. On the 10th of June, 1857, 
he was installed over the Congregational Church in Middlebury, 
Yt., where he continued until November 1, 1867. From Jan- 
uary, 1868, he was for more than a year in charge of the Congre- 
gational Church in Ansonia, Conn., and in 1870 he accepted an 
appointment as Professor of Pastoral Theology and Special 
Studies in the Theological Seminary in Chicago. In 1879 he was 
transferred to the chair of New Testament Literature afld Inter- 
pretation, and this he retained until his death. He was beloved 
and respected in his work, both as a pastor and as an instructor. 
The degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him by this 
College in 1870, and also in the same year by Beloit College. 
His death, resulting from a paralytic attack, occurred at his resi- 
dence in Chicago, March 21, 1886, in his 60th year. 

He married, April 27, 1852, Augusta S., youngest daughter of 
Daniel B. Hempstead, of New London, Conn., who died suddenly 
June 20, 1882. He was again happily married, to Miss Margaret 
G. Russell, who survives him with three of his five children, one 
son being a member of the Sophomore Class in Amherst College. 

1849. 

John Light Atlee, Jr., the second son of Professor John L. 
Atlee, M.D. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1820), who survives him, 
and of Sarah H. (Franklin) Atlee, was born at Lancaster, Pa., 
June 21, 1830, and entered College in December, 1846. 

After graduation he studied medicine with his father in Lan- 
caster, and at the University of Pennsylvania, where he received 
the degree of M.D. in April, 1853. For the rest of his life he 
practiced his profession with distinguished success in Lancaster. 
He died in that city, of consumption, July 18, 1885, in his 56th 
year. He married, November 13, 1855, Miss Katharine B. Rogers, 
of Lancaster, who survives him with their three sons and six of 
their eight daughters. The eldest son was graduated at Franklin 
and Marshall College in 1 880. 



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315 

1861. 

Richard Jacobs Haldeman wasj^born in Harrisburg, Pa., 
May 19, 1831, and died iu the same city, of heart-disease, Octo- 
ber 1, 1885, in his 55th year. 

He went to Europe soon after graduation, and studied in the 
Universities of Berlin and Heidelberg. He remained for some 
time in Paris, as an attache of the American Legation, and spent 
the earlier part of the year 1854 in St. Petersburg in a similar 
relation. After extended travel he returned home, and from 
1857 to 1860 was the editor of the Harrisburg Patriot and 
Union. Later he became prominent in political life, and was a 
Representative in Congress from 1869 to 1873. 

His wife, Mrs. Margaretta Haldeman, survives him. 

1852. 

Lebeus Cornelius Chapin, son of Joseph Chapin, was born 
in the village of Gilbertsville, Butternuts township, Otsego 
County, N. Y., in 1825, but removed with his father's family in 
his early boyhood to Wattsburg, Erie County, Pa. At the age 
of 18 he left home, and by working as a mechanic and teaching 
provided the means for entering Amherst College in 1848. In 
May, 1 850, he removed to Yale College. 

He taught in Erie, Pa., during the winter of 1852, and then in 
Laconia, N. H., for two years, or until he entered on a tutorship 
in this College in September, 1855. He continued in the tutor- 
ship until January, 1864, and for all except one year of this time 
instructed in the department of Natural Philosophy, of which he 
had the entire charge for a year and a half after Professor Olmsted's 
death. Before his return to New Haven, he had been enrolled as a 
candidate for Deacon's orders in the Protestant Episcopal Church, 
and he continued to retain the purpose of entering the ministry 
until 1861 or 2, when he began the study of medicine. He received 
the degree of M.D. from this College early in 1864, and in May 
of that year was appointed Surgeon of the 28th Regiment U. S. 
Colored Troops, and soon after joined his regiment in South Car- 
olina. Later, he had charge of the hospital in Beaufort, N. C, 
and after the close of the war of the hospital in Burlington, Vt. 
In May, 1867, he removed from New Haven to Kalamazoo, Mich., 
where he spent the rest of his life. For a vear or two after his 
removal he continued to practice his profession, but very early 
became engaged in iron manufacturing, to which eventuallyhis 



316 

whole attention was devoted. He was actively interested in the 
improvement of the schools of the city, and also in the prosperity 
of the Episcopal Church there ; and w^as universally recognized 
as one of the leading citizens. 

He died in Kalamazoo, of angina pectoris, November 20, 1886, 
in the 61st year of his age. 

He married, April 25, 1859, Mrs. Sallie F. Elliot, of New Haven, 
widow of William H. Elliot (Y. C. 1844), and daughter of 
Nathaniel Sawyer, of Cincinnati, .0., who survives him with, their 
two sons and two daughters. 

MiEKs CiiARK CoNWELL was bom in Milton, Del, in Decem- 
ber, 1827. 

After graduation he was engaged in teaching and in the study 
of law, in Georgetown, and later in Dover, Del. He subsequently 
adopted civil engineering as his profession, and was employed in 
the lay-out of several railroads, his residence remaining in Dover. 
He was chief engineer of the surveying department of the city of 
Wilmington, Del, from 1870 to 1883, when he resigned to go to 
Antioquia, one of the United States of Colombia, in South 
America, to lay out and superintend the construction of a rail- 
road there. When work on this project was suspended by the 
government, in consequence of revolutionary troubles, he engaged 
in another similar enterprise in the vicinity. He died in Barran- 
quilla, near the mouth of the Magdalena River, after a few days' 
illness from fever, November 17, 1885, at the age of 58. 

He married, about 1860, Miss Alice Naudain, who survives him 
with their two sons and one daughter. 

1855. 

James Tyson Lane, son of William Allen and Catharine Lane, 
was born in Clinton, East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, April 10, 
1835, and died on his cotton-plantation, near Tallulah, Madison 
Parish, Louisiana, October 18, 1885, after an illness of three 
months, in the 51st year of his age. 

After graduation he studied in the New Orleans Law School 
until his admission to the bar in April, 1857. In the succeeding 
fall he began practice in Richmond, now Tallulah, Madison 
Parish. On August 17, in the same year, lie married Miss Emma 
F. Lay, of Branford, Conn., who died while visiting relatives in 
Quincy, III., October 8, 1867. 



I 



317 

He entered the Confederate army early in 1862, and joined the 
4th Kentucky Regiment, commanded by Colonel Trabue, his 
former law partner. He lost his right leg at the battle of Mur- 
freesboro (or Stone River), January 2, 1863, while acting as staff- 
officer under General Breckenridge. In 1863 he was elected to 
the Louisiana State Senate, and in 1865 he resumed the practice 
of his profession in Madison Parish, in which he continued to be a 
prominent lawyer and citizen until his last illness. His only child, 
a son, survives him. 

Elisha Mulford was bornin Montrose, Pa., November 19, 1833, 
and was prepared for College in Homer, N. Y., entering at the 
beginning of the Sophomore year. 

For the year after graduation he remained at home, studying 
law (with the Hon. William Jessup, Y. C. 1815) and general lite- 
rature. He then spent a year in the Union Theological Seminary, 
New York City, whence he removed to the Andover (Mass.) 
Theological Seminary. He left Andover in January, 1859, and 
in the following May went abroad. After a year or more, spent 
mainly in Germany and Italy, he pursued further studies in New 
York City. On April 20, 1861, he was ordained a Deacon in the 
Protestant Episcopal Church by Bishop Williams, at Middletown, 
Conn., and for a few months had temporary charge of a parish 
in Darien, Conn. On March 19, 1862, he was advanced to the 
priesthood by Bishop Odenheimer, and in the succeeding autumn 
became rector of the Church of the Holy Communion in South 
Orange, N. J. He withdrew from this charge, and from further 
service as a parish minister, in November, 1 864, on account of 
increasing deafness and for family reasons. He then settled in a 
secluded country home at Lakeside, near Montrose, Pa., where he 
devoted himself to reading and study. The first fruit of his re- 
tirement was a treatise entitled The Nation^ published in 1871 
(8°, pp. xiv, 418), which secured him a recognized place among 
the profound and original minds of his generation. One tribute 
which peculiarly touched him was the degree of Doctor of Laws 
conferred by this College in 1872. 

In 1880 he removed to Cambridge, Mass., chietiy for the sake of 
educational advantages for his children, and there he published 
in 1881 his second great work. The Republic of God, an Insti- 
tute of Theology (8", pp. viii, 261). He continued to be busy in 
study, and also found occupation in Cambridge, as Lecturer on 



318 

Apologetics and Theology in the Episcopal Theological School, a 
duty which he continued to fulfill to the very last. 

In the summer of 1885 his health began to fail, and it was dis- 
covered that he was suifering from an acute form of Bright's dis- 
ease ; he died, at his home in Cambridge, December 9, 1885, in 
his 53d year. 

He married, September 17, 1862, Miss Rachel P. Carmalt, of 
Lakeside, Pa., who survives him, with four of their six children, — 
two daughters and two sons. 



1857. 

George Seaman Gray, eldest son of John and Jane E. (Sea- 
man) Gray, was born in New York City, July 10, 1835. He was 
prepared for College at the age of fourteen, but was then on 
account of his youth put into a business house for four years. He 
entered his class in February, 1854. 

On leaving College he spent two years in the Theological Semi- 
nary at Auburn, N. Y., and a third year in Union Seminary, 
New York City. For a year he preached as a stated supply in 
the suburbs of Portland, Me., and in the meantime married. May 
1, 1861, Miss Sarah Brown, the only daughter of Robert Brown, 
of Cincinnati, O., and sister of a classmate. Later, he supplied 
the Presbyterian Church in Englewood, N. J., from the spring of 
1862, till February, 1863, during the regular pastor's absence ; 
but a constitutional weakness of tlie throat induced him to relin- 
quish preaching, after this time. He was then solicited to open a 
preparatory school for boys in Englewood, and spent over three 
years in that employment. In 1866 he removed to Cincinnati 
and ent(^red into business, in which he spent the rest of his life. 
He died in Cincinnati, after a short illness from typhoid fever, 
August 26, 1885, in his 51st year. His wife survives him, with- 
out children. 

Mr. Gray was an honored t^der in the Mount Auburn Presby- 
terian Church, from December, 1871, until his death, except for a 
brief interval of voluntary retirement ; and as the faithful teacher 
for half that time of a very large class in the Sunday School exer- 
cised a great influence over the young. He published anony- 
mously in 1884 a volume entitled "Eight Studies on the Lord's 
Day," which attracted attention widely as a scholarly and thought- 
ful defence of the Christian Sabbath. 



ar 

■i 



I 



319 

1858. 

Louis Dkmbinski, son of Louis and Magdalene (Bialka) Dem- 
binski, was born in Tarnow, Galicia, November 25, 1828, and 
came to this country in 1849. He was engaged in school teaching 
until his admission to College, at the beginning of the Sophomore 
year. 

He taught in Clinton, La., from October, 1858, until September, 
1861, when he enlisted (under compulsion) in the Confederate 
army, 16th Louisiana Lifantry. Nine months later he was dis- 
abled by illness, after which he returned to Clinton on an indefi- 
nite furlough, and resumed teaching. In 1863 he went to New 
Orleans, and obtained a clerkship in the U. S. service. In May, 
1864. he was elected principal of a school in Claiborne, Miss., 
where he taught until discharged in September, 1866, on account 
of his Union sentiments. For the next two years he taught in 
the academy in Westport, Conn., and thence went to Sherburne, 
N. Y., where he taught until June, 1875, when he retired to open 
a drug store in Philadelphia. He continued in this business until 
his death, in Philadelphia, March 9, 1886, in his 58th year. 

He married, August 16, 1860, Lilly, daughter of August Opper- 
mann, formerly of New Haven, by whom he had two daughters, 
besides one son who died in infancy. 

1859. 
Charles Franklix Robertson was born in the city of New 
York, March 2, 1835, the son of James and Mary A. Robertson. 
He entered College from Peekskill, N. Y. 

He studied theology for three years in the General Theological 
Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in New York City, 
and on June 29, 1862, was ordained deiacon by Bishop Potter. 
He at once took charge of St. Mark's Church, Malone, N. Y., and 
as there advanced to the priesthood by Bishop Potter, October 
i23, 1862. On the 1st of September, 1868, he accepted the rector- 
hip of St. James's Church, Batavia, N. Y., but four days later 
as elected Bishop of the Diocese of Missouri. He was conse- 
crated to this office, October 25, 1868, in Grace Church, New 
York City, and devoted himself with intense energy to its duties 
for the rest of his life. The incessant strain of his official labors, 
with some special anxieties, broke down his robust health, and 
fter some weeks of feebleness, resulting from a paralytic or apo- 
lectic stroke, he died at his residence in St. Louis, May 1, 1886, 



320 

in his 52d year. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity 
from Columbia College in 1869. 

He was married, August 7, 1861, to Miss Carrie R. Brisbin, of 
Sherburne, N. Y., who died without issue. He next married, in 
September, 1865, .Miss Rebecca Duane, of Malone, who survives 
him with four of their children. 

1860. 

Isaac Joseph Post was born in Montrose, Pa., June 21, 1837, 
the only child of the Rev. Albert L. Post (Union College, 1831) 
and Eleanor C. Post, both of whom survive him. 

He studied law with the Hon. Wm. Jessup (Y. C. 1815) and the 
Hon. Wm. H. Jessup (Y. C. 1849), and was admitted to the bar in 
January, 1862 ; but in September following he entered the Army 
of the Union and served one year with honor. He then accepted 
a position under the Solicitor of the Treasury Department at 
Washington. This position he resigned after two years' service, 
and entered into partnership (1866) in the practice of the law 
with Alfred Hand (Y. C. 1857) at Scranton, Pa. The partner- 
ship was dissolved in consequence of the election of Mr. Hand to 
the judgeship (187"9). Mr. Post continued the practice of the 
law alone for live years, during which his health began to fail. 
In January, 1885, he formed a partnership with his former pre- 
ceptor, Wm. H. Jessup. 

He married Eliza Blake Todd of Paterson, N. J., June 23, 1868. 
Two sons and their mother survive him. Mr. Post was an accu- 
rate and successful lawyer, retained a fondness for scientific in- 
vestigation, was thoroughly grounded in Christian principle, kept 
pace- with the religious controversies of the day, was a generous 
friend, and highly esteemed in business circles. 

He died July 10, 1885, at his native place, after a lingering 
illness of three years, during which he had visited Europe. He 
was prostrated only a few days before his death. 

1862. 

HiKAM HoLLiSTER KiMPTON, the sccoud SOU of Hiram and 
Lovina (Miller) Kimpton, of Ticonderoga, N. Y., was born in 
Ticonderoga, April 28, 1837. 

After graduation he entered the Yale Law School, where he re- 
ceived the degree of LL.B. in July, 1864; he never, however, 
practiced the profession. He was next engaged in the business 



321 

of produce-exchange between North Carolina and Virginia and 
various northern ports. In 186S he secured the appointment of 
Financial Agent (in New York City) of the State of South Cai^- 
olina, and accordingly opened a banking-house in Nassau street. 
He held this relation to South Carolina, notwithstanding many 
charges against him, until the downfall of Republican govern- 
ment there in 1877. Then followed his indictment, on a charge of 
having attempted to bribe members of the Carolina Legislature, 
and his arrest in 1878 while on a visit to Massachusetts; tlie Gov- 
ernor, however, refused to surrender him, on tlie ground that he 
was really wanted for a different object. The excitement conse- 
quent on these events, in connection with heavy losses in Wall 
street and other trials, unsettled his reason. He then plunged 
recklessly into speculation in New York, and had lost his entire 
forture before the fact that his brain was seriously affected was 
realized by his family. In April, 1885, he was placed in the In- 
sane Asylum on Ward's Island, New York City, and he died 
there, of paralysis of the brain, July 26, 1885, in his 49th year. 
He was buried in Ticonderoga. 

He was married, July 2, 1867, to Mrs. Josephine L. Dean, 
eldest daughter of Dr. Isaac Woolworth, of New Haven, who 
survives him without children. 



1863. 

GrEORGE [WASHINGTON] BiDDLE, the eldest SOU of George W. 
and Maria (McMurtrie) Biddle, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., 
August 21, 1843, and entered the Class in May of the Sophomore 
year. 

Soon after graduation he began the study of law in his father's 
ffice. In November, 1866, he was admitted to the bar of his 

tive city, and he practiced his profession in connection with his 
ather until his death. He was engaged in many cases of the first 
importance, and secured the respect and admiration of his contem- 
poraries for his fine abilities and brilliant success. In conjunction 
with one of his brothers (Y. C. 1873) he published a Treatise 
on the Law of Stock Brokers (Philadelphia, 1882, 8°), which has 
become a recognized authority. 

During the winter of 1885-86 he was several times prostrated 
with nervous exhaustion, from which, it is probable, he had not 
fully rallied on returning to work. After only three or four days' 



^HTat 



322 

illness, of cerebro-spinal meningitis, he died at his residence in 
Philadelphia, April 9, 1886, in the 43d year of his age. 

^He married November 8, 1876, Mary H. R., daughter of J. 
Kearney Rodgers, M.D., of New York city, who survives him 
with three daughters. 

Jonathan Edwards, the only son of Jonathan (Y. C. 1819) 
and Maria (Champion) Edwards, and a great-grandson of the 
younger President Edwards, was born in Troy, N. Y., October 
5, 1841. • He was prepared for College in New Haven. 

In January, 1864, he began the study of medicine in Troy. 
Later, he attended lectures in the Albany Medical College, and 
from October, 1865, to March, 1867, was a member of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, in New York City, from which insti- 
tution at the latter date he received his medical diploma. The care 
of an. invalid father then intervened, to prevent his entering on 
the practice of his profession. Removing to New Haven, he was 
closely occupied with this filial responsibility until death released 
him in 1875. His residence continued in New Haven, and for 
several years he devoted much time and labor, gratuitously, to 
the care and increase of the College collection of coins. He had 
also formed a valuable collection of his own, and was well-versed 
in the study of the subject. A permanent evidence of his interest 
and generosity is shown in the Catalogue of Greek and Roman 
Coins in the Numismatic Collection of Yale College (New Haven, 
1880. 236 pp. 8vo), which he edited with characteristic thorough- 
ness, and which was printed largely at his own expense. Dr. 
Edwards also made extensive collections for a history of the 
Edwards family. He made a visit to Europe after his father's 
death, and again in 1880, and was married, February 28, 1882, to 
Miss Marion Collins, youngest daughter of the late David C. 
Collins, of New Haven, who survives him. After his marriage 
Dr. Edwards and his wife spent a year in Europe, but he 
returned from abroad with his constitution undermined by Roman 
fever, and his general health quite shattered. The rest of his 
life was passed in increasing weakness in New Haven, where he 
died June 19, 1886, in the 45th year of his age. 

George Hoffman, son of Philip R. Hoffman (Y. C. 1827) and 
Emily L, (Key) Hoffman, was born in Baltimore, Md., December 
18, 1842. His parents lived abroad during his childhood (chiefly 



323 

in Dresden, Saxony), and be did not return to this country until 
near the time of his admission to College at the beginning of 
Senior year. 

He spent two years after graduating in the Law Department 
of Columbia College, and in May, 1865, received the degree of 
LL. B. He was then admitted to the bar in New York City and 
opened an office there. In ISYG he became a partner in the firm 
of Crosby, Hoffman and Crosby (later Crosby and Hoffman), in 
which firm he remained until his death. He was principally occu- 
pied with the care and management of estates and other office 
business, and rarely appeared in court. 

He died at his home in New York City, August 31, 1885, in 
his 43d year, of Bright's disease of the kidneys ; he had been a 
sufferer from this disease, and in precarious health, for two or 
three years previously. 

He married, November 13, 1873, Mary M., daughter of John 
W. Ellis, of New York city, who survives him, with children. 

Erastus New, son of Aaron O. and Ann (Dunspaugh) New, 
was born in Claverack, Columbia County, N. Y., December 12, 
1837, and entered College from Philmont, in the same county. 

On graduation he entered the LaAV School of Columbia College, 
and in the following spring was admitted to the bar in New 
York City. He at once began practice, in partnership with 
George W. Paine, Esq., but on Mr. Paine's removal to Iowa, a 
few years later, he continued in practice by himself. He married, 
June 26, 1873, Miss Julia S., daughter of William Porter, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and not many years before his death removed 
his office to that city. He inherited from his mother a tendency 
to lung-disease, and after being for some time in poor health 
'was prostrated about 1881 by a hemorrhage, from which he 
rallied, as it seemed, largely in consequence of his strong will. 
Similar hemorrhages continued at intervals, gradually weakening 
his vital force, until November, 1885, when he was prostrated be- 
yond the power of recovery. He died at his home in Brooklyn, 
April 28, 1886, in the 49th year of his age. His wife survives 
him, with their only child, a daughter. 

Mr. New had gained a high reputation in his profession by his 
close application to business, thorough knowledge of the law, 
quickness of perception, and ability as an advocate. 



324 

Edmund Asa Ware, son of Asa B. and Catharine (Slocum) 
Ware, was born December 22, 1837, in North Wrenthara, now 
Norfolk, Mass., and entered College from Norwich, Conn., to 
which place his family had removed about 1852. 

For the two years next after orraduation he taught in the Nor- 
wich Free Academy, where he had had his early education. In 
September, 1865, he went to Nashville, Tenn.,to assist in reorgan- 
izing the public schools, and thence a year later to Atlanta, 
Ga., under the auspices of the American Missionary Association, 
as Superintendent of the Association's schools in that city and 
vicinity. In December, 1866, he was. licensed to preach, and from 
that time preached more or less frequently. He received, August 
I, 1867, from Gen. Howard, the appointment of State Superin- 
tendent of Education for Georgia ; and while thus acting inter- 
ested himself in the establishment of an institution for the higher 
education of the colored race. He thus became the President of 
the Board of Trustees as well as of the Faculty of the Atlanta 
University, which was chartered in 1867, and opened in 1869; 
and the remainder of his life was spent in its service. That he 
attained such signal success in the work to which he had conse- 
crated himself, was due to his unselfish, patient, practical de- 
votion. 

He had lately returned from a visit to the mountains, to pre. 
pare for the opening of the school-, and appeared in usual health ; 
on the afternoon of September 25, 1885, he died suddenly, of 
heart-disease, in Atlanta, in the 48th year of his age. 

He married, November 10, 1869, Miss Sarah J. Twichell of 
Plantsville, Conn., who survive* him witji three daughters and 
one son. 

1864. 

Joseph Ritner Benjamin, son of Joseph and Martha (Mellen) 
Benjamin, was born in Carbondale, Pa., July 25, 1839. The first 
two years of his College course were spent with the class which 
was graduated in 1863. 

In the fall of 1864 he began the study of medicine at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, in New York City, and in March, 
1868, received the degree of M.D.; he did not, however, continue 
uninterruptedly in practice. He remained in New York, and was 
for a year or two, about 1871, a member of the firm of Pryer and 
Benjamin, wholesale provision dealers. 



I 

I 



325 

He left his home in New York on the afternoon of the 29th of 
October, 1885, to go to Troy, and was found dead in his 
stateroom, on the steamer Saratoga, the next morning; an au- 
topsy showed that death had occurred from paralysis of the heart. 

He married, November 23, 1871, Abbie, youngest daughter of 
Dr. Henry L. Sabin (Williams Coll. 1821), of Williamstown, 
Mass., who survives him with three daughters. 

1866. 

Chakles Hy de Gaylord, sou of Col. Horace and Mary A. 
(Davis) Gaylord, was born in Ashford, Conn., January 25, 1839. 
He entered college in 1 860, and took two years of his course with 
the class of 1864. 

In the fall of 1866 he joined the Yale Theological Seminary, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of B.D., in 1868. 
He was licensed to preach but did not pursue the profession. In 
1869 he entered the Yale Medical School, and was graduated 
M.D. in 1871. He established himself in practice in West 
Meriden, Conn., and was married in Groton, Conn., August 25, 
1874, to Mary S. Palmer, who died soon after. While traveling in 
Europe he was attacked with brain disease, for which he was 
treated in various institutions. The last years of his life were 
spent in Litchfield, Conn., where he died August 17, 1885. 

1867. 

Elbert Willett Clarke, son of Elbert W. and Louisa Steele 
Clarke, was born in Buffalo, N. Y., November 25, 1845, and 
entered this College in October, 1865, from Arcade, Wyoming 
County, N. Y., having spent the earlier years of his course in 
Obcrlin College. 

After graduation he became the editor and proprietor of the 
Lorain County News, in Oberlin, Ohio, whence in 1869 he removed 
to Bellevue, O., to publish the Gazette of that place. In 1870 
he removed to Painesville, O., and became the proprietor of the 
Painesville Advertiser, which he published for twelve years, until 
failing health compelled him to lay down his work. Those who 
had watched his career describe him as an able and conscientious 
writer, true to the best ideals of his profession. 

He died at Painesville, September 24, 1882, in his 37tli year. 

He married, September 7, 1870, Miss Nellie Greene, of West 
Lebanon, Ind., who survives him with a son and a daughter. 
4 



Theodore Lansing Day, son of Robert L. and Mary Ann 
(Stoddard) Day, was born in Boston, Mass., September 18, 1845. 

On graduating he entered Andover Theological Seminary, but 
his health gave way towards the close of his second year. In 
September, 1869, he was able to enter on a tutorship in this Col- 
lege, which he held for three 'years, being also for two years a 
student in the Theological Seminary, where he was graduated in 
18V1. 

He was ordained and installed as pastor of the First (Congre- 
gational) Church in Holyoke, Mass., December 18, 1872, and was 
married in New Haven, May 13, 1873, to Miss Nettie T., daughter 
of Benjamin C. Eastman, of this city. He resigned his pastorate 
in May, 1874, and in the fall of the same year declined a call to 
the First Congregational Church in Guilford, Conn., though he 
served the church as acting pastor from November, 1874, to Feb- 
ruary, 1877. His health being extremely poor, he then spent 
some time in Florida and in New Haven. In February, 1879, he 
took charge of the Congregational Church in Talcottville, in the 
town of Vernon, Conn., where he remained until in January, 
1883, he became acting pastor of the Edwards (Congregational) 
Church in Saxonville, Framingham, Mass.; but in October, 1884, 
he was obliged on account of his health to retire permanently 
from all mental labor. The most of the remaining months of 
his life were spent in retirement under medical care in Worcester, 
Mass., where he died after an illness of about twelve days, cul- 
minating in congestion of the brain, June 27, -1885, in his 40th 
year. His wife survives him without children. 

Henry Gardner Landis, son of Henry D. Landis, was born in 
Philadelphia, Pa., June 4, 1848. 

For three years after graduation he studied medicine in the 
Jefferson Medical College, and was then for about a year a resi- 
dent physician in the Philadelphia Hospital." In 1871, he re- 
moved to Niles, Ohio, where he continued in the practice of his 
profession until August, 1877, when he accepted the position of 
Professor of Obstetrics in the Starling Medical College in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, which position he held until his death. After having 
been for some time in ill health he went to Philadelphia for 
treatment in the spring of 1886, and died there of Addison's 
disease. May 22, 1886, at the age of 38. 

He married, at Philadelphiaj, April 9, 1871, Miss Elizabeth B. 
Hafey, who survives him with one child. 



327 

1870. 

George Washington Drew was born in Rockland, Maine, 
August 5, 1843, and was left an orphan at the age of eleven 
years. He pursued his studies in preparation for College in the 
Seminary in Bucksport, Me. Plis residence while in College 
was in Winterport, Me. 

After graduation he became sub-master of the Charlestown 
(Mass.) High School, and retained that position until November, 
1872, when he resigned in order to complete his professional 
studies in the Law School of Columbia College, New York City. 
While thus engaged, he also taught in a private school. He 
received the degree of LL.B. in the summer of 1874, and was 
admitted to the bar in New York. The same summer he removed 
to Boston, and began practice there, in which he was successful 
up to August, 1878, when he left the East for California. He 
was there engaged in private teaching until his health began to 
fail, when he abandoned his work, and went to Arizona, in the 
hope of a more favorable climate. Instead of improving, he 
grew gradually weaker, until his death, in Phoenix, Arizona, 
April 13, 1884, in his 41st year. His disease was catarrh of the 
larynx, which finally settled on his lungs in consumption; his 
illness extended over nearly three years, during the last one of 
which he was entirely disabled. 

He married, April 13, 1873, Miss Laura A. Mayers, of Charles- 
town, Mass., who survives him with their only child, a son. 

Frank Reamer Schell, son of the Hon. William P. and Mar- 
garetta (Reamer) Schell, was born in McConnellsburgh, Fulton 
County, Pa., January 1, 1851, and entered this College in Septem- 
ber, 1867, from Reading, Pa., having spent the first year of his 
course in the College at Princeton. At his graduation he was the 
youngest member of his class. 

He studied for one year in the Law School of Columbia College, 
and then took a year in the law-office of the Hon. John C. Bullitt, 
of Philadelphia. He was admitted to the bar in June, 1872, and 
in September settled in Reading, where he built up an extensive 
business. He was also an active worker in the Democratic party, 
both in local and state politics. He died in Reading, of con- 
sumption, February 26, 1886, in his 36th year. His wife, a 
daughter of Mr. W. O. Hickok, of Harrisburg, Pa., survives him. 



328 



1871. 



Willis Ephraim Walker, the eldest son of Hiram and Mary 
(Williams) Walker, was born in Detroit, Mich., March 25, 1849. 

After graduation he spent nearly three years abroad, traveling 
in Europe and the Orient. On his return to his native city he 
read law with Prof. Charles A. Bent, and attended one terra of 
lectures in the Law School at Ann Arbor. He was admitted to 
the bar of Detroit, May 26, 1877, and in September of that year 
formed a law partnership with William Aikman, Jr., whicli con- 
tinued until a short time prior to his death. In the spring of 
1885, the condition of his health, which had previously become 
seriously impaired, interfered altogether with the practice of his 
profession; and on the 3d of May, 1886, he died near Cincinnati, 
Ohio, whither he had gone in search of health. He was never 
married. 

1872. 

Edwin Christopher Woodruff, son of Eleazar and Harriet 
A. Woodruif, was born in Guilford, Conn., January 25, 1852. 

For a year after graduation he studied law in the Yale Law 
School, and then spent two years in teaching in Elizabeth, N. J. 
He then taught for several years in New York City, and finally 
returned to Guilford, where he became a prominent and respected 
citizen. From 1881 until his death he held the office of Judge of 
Probate for the Guilford district; he was also Chairman of the 
Board of Education, and was actively interested in important 
business and manufacturing enterprises in the town. He died in 
Guilford, May 17, 1886, aged 34 years, after two weeks' illness, 
from inflammatory rheumatism complicated with other causes. 

In June, 1884, he married Miss Charlotte Simes, of New York 
City, who survives him without children. 

1873. 

William Wade Beebe, son of Charles E. and Jane B. (Wade) 
Beebe, was born in New York City, May 2, 1851. 

He entered Columbia College Law School upon graduation, and 
received the degree of LL.B. in 1875. He then entered the law 
office of Messrs. Evarts, Southmayd and Choate, where he re- 
mained until impaired health, in June, 1878, induced him to try a 
prolonged stay in the Adirondacks. In the fall of 1879 he was 
able' to return to the practice of his profession in New York, 



329 

while he established his residence in Plainfield, N. J., having 
married, May lo, 1879, Miss Ellen L., daughter of the late William 
H. Carter, of Brooklyn, N. Y. His health failed again in the 
spring of 1881, and after passing the summer in the Adirondacks, 
he removed with his wife and infant son to Colorado Springs. 
The dry air of Colorado and extensive horseback-riding so im- 
proved his health that he resumed professional work in Silverton, 
in May, 1883. Early in 1885 he returned to Colorado Springs, to 
enter into the real estate and. insurance business, but his disease 
had steadily gained on him, and he died there, after a very brief 
illness, January 26, 1886, in his 35th year. His wife survives 
him, with one son. 

Samuel Nelson White, son of Kennetli G. White, was 
born in Cooperstown, N. Y., April 20, 1853. His mother 
was Jane E., daughter of Justice Samuel Nelson, of the Supreme 
Court of the United States. . He was prepared for College at 
Flushing, L. [., the family residence being at College Point. 

Alter graduation he entered the Law School of Columbia Col- 
lege, where he finished the course in May, 1875. He then began 
practice in New York, but did not remove his residence to the 
city until four or five years later. In 1882 he was appointed 
United States Commissioner, and Master and Examiner in Chan- 
cery for the United States Circuit Court of the Southern District 
of New York, of which Court his father was for many years the 
Clerk. He also continued a member of a law firm until his 
death, which occurred at his home in New York City, after five 
weeks' illness, November 23, 1885, in his 33d year. 

He married, June 14, 1882, Miss Grace I., daughter of George 
A. Prince, Esq., of Buffalo, N. Y., who survives him. 

1874. * 

Fbancis Howard Olmsted, the eldest child of Lucius D. and 
Jessie (Sherman) Olmsted, and grandson of the late Professor 
Denison Olmsted, was born in Chicago, III., April 14, 1853. 

He went abroad shortly after graduation, and remained for 
three years, engaged partly in travel and partly in the study 
of law at Heidelberg and Munich. He then continued his 
studies in the Law School of Columbia College, graduating in 
1879, and began the practice of his profession in New York City, 
but was interrupted by the development of consumptive ten- 



330 

dencies, and his later years were spent in Colorado in the struggle 
for life. He died in Denver, Col., March 2t), 1886, at the age of 
33. He was unmarried. 

1875. 

Charles William Cochran, son of the Hon, Robert Cochran 
(Y. C. 1846) and Eliza J. (Vanderbilt) Cochran, was born in 
White Plains, N. Y., May 14, 1855. 

After graduation he studied law at home with Messrs. Mills, 
Cochran and Verplanck, and was admitted to the bar in December, 
IBYY. He immediately (January 1, 1878) entered into practice 
with his father in White Plains, and the partnership continued 
until his father's death in December, 1880. 

Mr. Cochran remained in practice in White Plains until his 
own death, from consumption, July 9, 1 883, in his 29th year. He 
had held several local offices of trust, such as that of corporation 
counsel for the village. 

In 1879 he married Miss Sarah M. Groot, of White Plains, who 
survives him. 

Joseph Warren Dart, the only son of Harvey F. and Mary 
Jane (White) Dart, was born in New London, Conn., August 5, 
1853, and was prepared for College in New London and in Exeter, 
New Hampshire. 

He was in poor health at the time of graduation, but after two 
years' rest began the study of. Medicine with Dr. John G. Stanton, 
of New London. In the fall of 1879 he entered Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, New York City, and after graduating there in 
March, 1881, practiced medicine in that city for one year. He then 
obtained, on competitive examination, a position on the medical 
staff of the Hospital on Randall's Island, in New York harbor, 
where he remained for a year or more, when he returned to New 
London with strongly developed consumptive symptoms. After 
two years more of rest, he opened an office in New London, in 
July, 1885, and began practice with flattering prospects and high 
ambitions. Failing health obliged him to give up his office in 
January, and to confine himself to the house. By the first of 
March Bright's disease manifested itself, and this in connection 
with the inroads of consumption, brought on a rapid decline, 
which terminated on the 10th of May, 1886, in his 33d year. 



I 



331 

Henry Augustus Oaks, son of Charles H. and Rhoda (Miles) 
Oaks, was born in New Haven, Conn., May 24, 1852, and entered 
College with the class of 1873; he was also a member of the class 
of 1874 and spent the last two years of the course with the class 
with which he graduated. 

He studied medicine for six months in the Yale Medical School, 
and then entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New 
York City, from which he received the degree of M.D. in March, 
1878. In the following July he was appointed house-physician at 
the New Haven Hospital, where he remained about a year. In 
July, 1879, he opened an office in this city, and continued here for 
upwards of five years, when he removed to Southington, Conn. 
He went from Southington to Hartford on the 2d of July, 1885, 
and died suddenly in that city on the evening of the next day, in 
his 34th year. He was never married. 

1876 

Fred Norman Wright, son of N. F. Wright, was born in 
Alexander, Genesee County, N. Y., October 8, 1853. He was 
prepared for College by his father, who was at that time Principal 
of the Normal School in Cortland, N. Y. 

On graduation he took the headship of the Union School in 
Jordan, N. Y., a place which he filled most acceptably for seven 
years, until offered a much larger salary to become principal of 
the Union School and Academy in Waterville, N. Y. In Water- 
ville he sustained his reputation already established as a singularly 
Buccessful teacher. While in College he had secured in a peculiar 
degree the respect and esteem of all his class ; and the same high 
moral influence was characteristic of his later career. 

He was attacked with typhoid fever at the end of November, 
1885, and during his slow recovery pneumonia developed, which 
caused his death, in Waterville, January 9, 1886, in his 33d year. 
He was not married. 

1877. 

William Penn Macomber, third son of Joseph E. and Finis 
G. M. (Borden) Macomber, of Portsmouth, R. I., was born in 
Portsmouth, May 20, 1854, and was prepared for College at the 
Friends' School in Providence. 

After graduation he returned home, and there spent the rest of 
his life. He married, February 15, 1883, Mary Bowen, only 



332 

daughter of the late Benjamin M. Bowen, of Providence, who 
survives him with one daughter. His brief married life was 
spent on a farm in his -native place, where he died, of Bright's 
disease, after an illness of several months' duration, August 
25, 1885. His manly, Christian character made him sincerely- 
beloved. 

1878. 

Frank Armstrong Beckwith was born in Honolulu, Hawaiian 
Islands, April 23, 1854. His father was the Rev. Dr. Edward 
G. Beckwith (Williams College, 1849), at that time President of 
Oahu College, and his mother was Caroline P., daughter of the 
Rev. Dr. Richard Armstrong (Dickinson College, 182V), an early 
missionary to the Islands. Much of nis early boyhood was spent 
in California, but he entered College from Waterbury, Conn., 
where his father was pastor of the Second Congregational Church 
from 18V1 to 1881. 

On graduation he entered the Union Theological Seminary, 
New York City, and after the completion of his second year went 
to Europe in May, 1880. He attended theological and philosophi- 
cal lectures in the University of Berlin, and after some travel re- 
turned to America in March, 1881, and on the 17th of June, was 
married to Miss Ellen W. Holmes, daughter of Samuel Holmes, of 
Montclair, N. J. 

While in Berlin, in consequence of an attack of pleurisy, he had 
suffered a slight lesion in one lung, the effects of which were sup- 
posed to be temporary, but this proved to be the beginning of a 
fatal decline. After his marriage he and his wife went to San 
Francisco, where his parents made a home for them; and in the 
autumn he felt so well that he ventured to begin preaching to the 
Congregational Church in Santa Barbara, Cal., where he was 
soon called to the pastorate, and was ordained on the 4th of De- 
cember. He threw himself into the work of the ministry with 
his great natural enthusiasm, and was highly appreciated ; but 
the exertion was too much for him, and after little more than a 
year of service he was obliged to desist. In the spring of 1883 
he went to the Hawaiian Islands, and spent nearly a year in open 
air life, mostly, engaged in surveying. He then undertook service 
as teacher and religious helper in the Lahainaluna Seminary, but 
was obliged to abandon this work after a year's trial. He 
returned to his father's home in San Francisco, and died there, 
Dec. 12, 1885. His wife survives him, with two childreiL 



333 

Walter Squires, second son of Robert and Mary E. (Forbes) 
Squires, was born in New York City, September 24, 1857. 

For a year or two after graduation he was engaged in the wool- 
len importing business, and then entered the office of the Germa- 
nia Fire Insurance Company, where he held the position of actu- 
ary at the time of his death. Aside from his business life, he 
took pleasure in the cultivation of his literary and artistic tastes, 
an^ was specially interested in the work of the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art, of which he was a Fellow. He married, June 26, 
1879, Amy Zavala, granddaughter of John Jay Adams, of New 
York, who with one daughter survives him. He removed his resi- 
dence to Plainfield, N. J., in the fall of 1883, and in March, 1885, 
had a severe attack of pneumonia, followed by a relapse, after 
which he never regained his strength. In August he returned to 
New York City, where he remained (with the exception of a 
brief Southern trip) until his death there, on May 4, 1886, in his 
29th year. 

Arthur Bailey Taylor, eldest son of Varnum N. and Eliza- 
beth B. (Curtis) Taylor, was born in Chicopee Falls, Mass., 
March 22, 1853, and entered College from Springfield, Mass., 
where he had been prepared in the High School. 

After graduation he was engaged for three or four years in the 
paper-collar business in Springfield, in which his father was inter- 
ested. He was then for a year connected with another manufactur- 
ing enterprise in Springfield, but was obliged to give up all work 
by the inroads of consumption. He spent a winter in North Car- 
olina* and another in Southern California without benefit, and after 
a gradual decline died at his father's house in Springfield, March 
1, 1886, at the age of 33. He was not married. His life was the 
consistent expression of a noble character. 

1881. 

Frederick AdleR, son of David and Fanny Adler, was born 
in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, April 14, 1860, and died in Reichenau, 
Lower Austria, July 13, 1885, in his 26th year. 

He went from College to New York City, where he studied for 
two winters in the College of Physicians and Surgeons. He then 
sailed for Europe, and after spending the summer of 1883 in 
travel in Germany and Austria, settled in Heidelberg for the 
completion of his professional preparation. The climate, how- 



334 

ever, proved uncongenial, and he contracted a severe cold, which 
settled upoii his lungs, resulting in quick consumption. He was 
first removed to Meran, where he suffered from exhausting hem- 
orrhages ; after that he was taken to Gleichenberg, sinking all 
the time ; and finally to Reichenau, where he died. An older 
brother was with him during all the stages of his decline, and 
his body was brought home for burial. 

1882. 

Emmet Smith Williams, son of David S. Williams, was born 
in Portland, Conn., December 15, 1859, was prepared for College 
in the Hartford High School, and entered from West Meriden, 
Conn. 

He was employed after graduation in the Travelers' Insurance 
Company, until the sudden failure of his health. He died of 
quick consumption, at his father's residence in West Meriden, 
January 13, 1886, in his 27th year. 

1885. 

Benjamix Kate Heaton, youngest son of the late Jabez and 
Sarah Heaton, was born January 24, 185*7, in Brirelywood, Eng- 
land. His boyhood was spent in Glenham, N. Y., and in Stam- 
ford, Conn. From Stamford he went to Williston Seminary, 
Easthampton, Mass., where he was fitted for College. The resi- 
dence of his family when he entered College was in Philadelphia. 

He supported himself by his own exertions during his under- 
graduate course, and earned the respect of all by his manly inde- 
pendence and cheerfulness. After graduation he remained at Col- 
lege, as manager of the Yale Cooperative Society, and was also 
taking a course in the Law Department. The strain of these 
accumulated responsibilities was too severe for his constitution, 
and he died in New Haven, Decembei* 28, 1885, after about a 
week's illness, from inflammation of the stomach, aggravated and 
probably induced by overwork. 



I 



I 



335 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1823. 

David Sherman Hart, the eldest son of the Rev. Ira Hart 
(Y. C. 1797), of Middlebury, Conn., and of Maria (Sherman) 
Hart, a granddaughter of the Hon. Roger Sherman, was born 
September 26, 1799; and received an academic education, grad- 
uating B.A. at East Tennessee College in 1821. 

He settled in Stonington, Conn., as a druggist and bookseller, 
and was also occasionally employed in the instruction of young 
men fitting for College or for the work of teaching ; in this last 
office he was remarkably successful, and in recognition of these 
services to education and of his general attainments in science 
(especially mathematics) and languatje, the honorary degree of 
Master of Arts was conferred on him by this College in 1875. 

He died in Stonington, August 8, 1885, at the age of 86. 

He was never married. 

1836. 

Benjamin Franklin Harrison was born in 1811, in the 
parish of Northford, in North Branford, Conn., the sou of Elizur 
and Rebecca (Bartholomew) Harrison, of that parish. His early 
life was spent on his father's farm, and he was later engaged in 
teaching. 

Upon graduation he began practice in Milford, Conn., but was 
induced to remove to Wallingford, Conn., in September of the same 
year (1836). He remained there actively engaged in his profes- 
sion until September, 1846, when he disposed of his residence 
and business, and went to Europe, spending six months in study 
in Paris, and traveling extensively on the Continent. On return- 
ing to America, in October, 1847, he decided on settling in Cin- 
ciimati, but being prevented by circumstances from so doing, was 
after a few months persuaded to take up his former practice in 
Wallingford. Here he remained in active business until August, 
1862, when he was commissioned as surgeon of a New York regi- 
ment, then in the field at Yorktown, Va. He continued with his 
regiment until its term of service expired in 1864, and after that he 
labored in South Carolina and Florida in the interest of the Sanitary 
Commission. At the close of 1864 he resumed his practice in Wal- 
lingford, in which he continued until his last illness, with the excep- 



336 

tion of two winters spent in the West Indies for the sake jbf his 
health. He died in Wallingford, of heart-disease, after three 
weeks' iUness, April 23, 1886, at the age of 75. 

Dr. Harrison's scientific attainments, outside of his professional 
studies, were recognized by this College in the bestowal of the 
honorary degree of Master of Arts in 1872. He was especially 
interested in meteorology, and had kept careful records of rain-fall, 
etc., for thirty years. He also displayed characteristic energy in 
devotion to the public good of the community in which he lived ; 
with his own hands he planted many of the elms which beautify 
the streets, and he was largely instrumental in securing the intro- 
duction of water into the town. 

He married, June 8, 1837, Susan, daughter of Frederick Lewis, 
of Wallingford, who died September 10, 1839, leaving a daughter, 
who died at the age of seventeen. He next married, June 20, 1868, 
Virginia V. Abell, of Franklin, Conn., who died December 27, 1869. 
In 1 885 he was again married, to Sarah E. Hall, of Wallingford, 
who survives him. 

Aeon Weight was born in Monallan, Adams County, Penn- 
sylvania, September 30, 1810. Thence his parents removed, four 
years later, to Springboro', Warren County, Ohio, where his 
youth was spent. 

He began the study of medicine with his sister's husband, John 
T. Pluramer, M.D. (Y. C. 1 828), of Richmond, Indiana, and later 
spent two years in this Medical School. 

After graduation he practiced for three years in Springboro', 
but established himself in New York City in 1840, in which year 
he married Mary, daughter of Amos Willets, of the same city. 
After a successful practice of seventeen years in New York, he 
returned to Springboro' with his family and engaged in the care 
of landed property left to him by his father. He also interested 
himself in the establishment of a manual-labor institution (Miami 
Valley College) in the vicinity, contributing to it largely from 
his means and serving for a number of years as its president. 

In 1880 he returned to New York, making a home in Brooklyn, 
where he lived until his death, December 15, 1885, in his 76th 
year. 

He was a prominent member of the Society of Friends, and 
held in high respect by all who knew him. He left a wile, three 
sons, arid one daughter. 



1 



337 



1849. 



I 



Silas Foster Lindsey was born in Petersham, Mass., August 
18, 1827, the only son of Ebenezer Lindsey, M.D. (Middlebury Col- 
lege, 1825), who was afterwards a practicing physician in Union, 
Conn., and Dudley, Mass. 

He began the practice of his profession in Dudley, in 1851, 
and was for a time connected in business with Samuel Knight, 
M.D., at that time the physician in the town. His success is 
attested by his continuance in this field of labor for thirty-four 
years, or until his death, which occurred in Dudley, on the 10th 
of August, 1885, at the age of 58, after an illness of seven weeks 
from Bright's disease. 

He married, November 4, 1851, Miss Salome Chapman, of Ash- 
ford, Conn., who survives him, with one son and one daughter. 



1853. 

Elias Campbell Baker was a son of Isaac Baker, of Prince- 
ton, N. J. He practiced his profession there for a few years, and 
finally went to Hopewell, Mercer County, N. J., where he died 
June 26, 1883. 

1854. 

JosiAH Griffin Ely, son of Abner and Fannie (Griffin) Ely, 
was born February 22, 1829, in Lyme, Conn. 

On graduation he settled in Chicago, 111., where he remained 
in practice for three years, after which time he returned to his 
native town, where he was very successful as a physician, and 
continued in constant and extensive practice until his death, 
which occurred, from heart-disease, at his home, in the village of 
Hamburg, in Lyme, April 1, 188fi, in the 58th year of his age. 

He was prominent in the community through his intellectual 
ability and his acknowledged skill as a counselor. He represented 
the town in the General Assembly in 1875, and was twice a can- 
didate for Senator from bis district. He also held high position 
in the masonic order. 

He married, Dec. 3, 1855, Miss Elizabeth Chadwick, of Old 
Lyme, daughter of Capt. Mather Chadwick, by whom he had six 
daughters and one son, all of whom survive him, the son following 
his father's profession. 



388 



1861. 



Samuel McClellan^ died at Laver Lake, California, March 
19, 1886, in his 48th year. 

He was from Philadelphia, but remained in New Haven after 
taking his degree, and served during the civil war as Assistant 
Surgeon of the 5th Connecticut Infantrj- until January, 1862, 
and then until January, 1865, in the 13th Connecticut Infantry. 

He was a practicing physician in New York City from 1874 to 
1882. 

1863. 

Henry Sylvester Cornwell, a native of New London, Conn., 
died in that city, June 15, 1886, aged 51 years. 

He was one of a family of nine children, in humble circum- 
stances, and for many years before his professional education he 
was a workman in a manufactory in New London. Returning to 
New London after graduation, he soon acquired a lucrative prac- 
tice, but failing health (from consumption) prevented him from 
making the uiost of his powers. He early became known as a 
poet and his occasional contributions to the local papers had 
more than a merely local reputation. He published one volume 
of his pieces, The Land of Dreams, and Other Poems (New Lon- 
don, 1878. 12mo.) 

The immediate cause of his death was an ulcer in the stomach. 

1879. 

Thomas Backus Jewett, elder son of Pliny A. Jewett, M.D. 
(Y. C. 1840) and Juliet M. (Carrington) Jewett, was born in New 
Haven, Conn., Jan. 9, 1850. 

He studied medicine with his father and with Dr. Ambrose 
Beardsley, of Birmingham, Conn., and settled in Birmingham 
immediately on receiving his degree. He had obtained a good 
medical and surgical practice before his early death, from blood- 
poisoning, contracted while operating upon a patient about a year 
previously. He died in Birmingham, Aug. 7, 1885, at the age 
of 35. 

He was twice married: first, on Nov. 10, 1873, to Mary E., only 
daughter of Dr. Ambrose Beardsley, by whom he had two 
children ; Mrs. Jewett died March 24, 1878. His second wife, 
Mrs. Phebe M. Cross, survives him, with his two sons, one by 
either marriacre. 



339 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

1847. 

Nathaniel Ackley Cowdrey died very suddenly at his resi- 
dence in New York City, Oct. 18, 1885, aged 64 years. He was 
a native of the western part of New York State, but came to 
college from East Haddam, Conn. 

He remained in New Haven, in the practice of law, until about 
1857. While here he was also largely interested in various busi- 
ness enterprises. From New Haven he removed to New York 
City, where he became somewhat prominent as counsel in railroad 
litigation. He. left a wife and five children. 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1868. 

Joseph Perkins Rockwell, the youngest son of the Hon. 
John A. Rockwell (Y. C. 1822) and Mary W. (Perkins) Rock- 
well, was born in Norwich, Conn., in 1843. After leaving the 
Free Academy, in his native city, he made an extended sea 
voyage, and was still abroad when the civil war opened. Return- 
ing just as the 18th Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers was 
being organized, he enlisted, was appointed sergeant-major, pro- 
moted to a captaincy, shared with his brother officers for nine 
months the hardships of Libby prison, and after serving with 
credit was mustered out at the close of the war. He then entered 
the Scientific School, and took the course in civil engineering. 

His chief professional work was in connection with the con- 
struction of the Air Line and Shepaug Valley railroads in this 
State. After the completion of these roads, he entered the em- 
ploy of the Cliicago, Burlington and Quincy railroad, and in recog- 
nition of his faithfulness and ability was advanced by rapid ])ro- 
raotion to the position of assistant superintendent. 

He resigned this post in 1876, to become the manager of the North 
Texas Cotton Compressing Company, an important and prosper, 
ous business enterprise in Denison, Texas. A tendency to chills 
and fever, contracted in the army, was aggravated by his residence 



340 

in DenisoM, and he returned about 1880 to his old home. His 
health, however, was permanently broken, and after a long and 
heroic struggle he succumbed, while on a visit to Boston, to the 
final attacks of his disease, on November 22, 1885, at the age 
of 42. He was never married. 

1869. 

Charles Byron Koox was born in Rensselaer County, N. Y., 
in May, 1846. His parents removed about two years later to 
Auburn, N". Y., whence he entered college. 

After graduation he was employed as city engineer of Auburn. 
In the spring of 1871 he went to Kansas, and was engaged for 
about two years in the dangerous task of running the line of the 
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railway. He then returned to 
New York State at the solicitation of his friends, and remained at 
home until the spring of 1879, when he went to Nebraska in the 
employ of the Burlington and Missouri River Railway company, 
in running its line to Denver. In April, 1883, he left this situa- 
tion to accept a responsible position with the Mexican Central 
Railway company, for the survey of' a projected. line from Tam- 
pico to San Luis Potosi. When this service was nearly finished, 
he met his death by a fall down a precipice, while exploring 
the lower portion of the Rio Verde canon, near the village of 
Paliahuay, on April 16, 1885. His wife and three children 
survive him. 

1875. 

DwiGHT Edward Pierce, son of Josiah Pierce, was born in 
Ansonia, Conn., May 13, 1854. 

P\)r two years after graduation he was employed as an instructor 
in the Hopkins Grammar School in this city, and in the meantime 
was pursuing advanced studies in engineering. In 1877 he was 
appointed instructor in engineering in Lehigh University, at 
Bethlehem, Pa., and while there took the degree (in 1880) of 
Dynamic Engineer at this College. He resigned his position in 
1881 to become the president of the Lloyd Valve Company, a 
large manufacturing concern in Bethlehem, and this office he 
filled till his death. He died of typhoid fever, after two weeks' 
illness, while on a visit in Bristol, Conn., September 1, 1885. 

He married Miss Fannie E., the only child of Mr. William R. 
Lloyd, of New Haven, who died November 3, 1883. Three 
children survive him. 



341 



1879. 



George Clarence Egan, son of Captain William Egan, of 
Chicago, 111., was born in Chicago, September 24, 1858. 

He devoted himself especially, while in the Scientific School, to 
biological studies, and expected after graduation to enter his 
father's business, that of a grain and ship broker. He found him- 
self, however, in too poor health to undertake any occupation, and 
made a voyage to the Hawaiian Islands, and later an extended 
visit to California, in the vain hope of recovery. He next tried 
the climate of Florida, and after returning from there (in 1883) 
went again to California. He died at his father's house in 
Chicago, of consumption, June 10, 1886, in his 28th year. 

1880. 

George Bliss Rogers, the eldest son of George Marcus and 
Lucy Stebbins Rogers, was born in Boston, Mass., May 3, 1857, 
and came to College from Phillips Academy, Andover. 

After graduation he studied law for one year in the Yale Law 
School, but then decided to pursue a business life. At the time of 
his death he was engaged in the real-estate business in Boston with 
his father. For the four years of his residence in New Haven he 
devoted his spare time to the boating interests of the College, 
with the zeal and steadfastness characteristic of one who claimed 
descent from the illustrious protomartyr of Queen Mary's reign ; 
and on his election as captain of the Yale crew in 1880, he had 
the satisfaction of achieving victory after a series of defeats. 

He married, Jan. 26, 1886, Miss Emilie, the youngest daughter 
of Mr. Thomas R. Trowbridge, of New Haven, who survives him. 
Loved and respected by his comrades, and with a happy married 
life just opening before him, he died, very suddenly, of typhoid 
fever, on March 4, 1886, at his home in Cambridge, Mass., in his 
29th year. 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

1877. 

George Sanford Thrall was born in Rutland, Vt., June 30, 
1852, the son of the Rev. Samuel R. Thrall (Middlebury College, 
1853) and Miriam H. (Bowman) Thrall. 



342 



He was graduated at Amherst College in 1874, and spent the 
next three years in this Seminary. 

In July, 1877, he took charge of the Congregational church in 
Washington, Conn., being ordained to the ministry on the 18th 
of that month. There he remained until called to the Park street 
(Congregational) Church in Bridgeport, Conn., o^er which he was 
installed Nov. 30, 1881. On account of failing health, he was 
dismissed from this charge in April, 1884, having already become 
acting pastor of the Congregational Church in New Milford, 
Conn., where, as in his former settlements, he was warmly be- 
loved. This change had been made in the hope that the air of 
the hill-country would prove beneficial ; but it failed to restore 
him and he was obliged to abandon his work there, in April, 1885, 
in consequence of a recurrence of serious throat and lung diffi- 
culty. In July he went with his wife to the West in search of 
health, and he died suddenly, from a hemorrhage of the lungs, at 
the residence of bis brother in Salt Lake City, on the 20th of 
January, 1886, in his 34th year. 

He married, April 21, 1880, Miss Julia M., youngest daughter 
of Sidney M. Stone, of New Haven, who survives him, with their 
two daughters. 



1881. 

Albert Marion Wheeler, son of Oliver D. and Amanda J. 
(Rambo) Wheeler, was born in Shelby, Ohio, in September, 1851, 
and was graduated atOberlin College, Ohio, in 1878. He entered 
this Department from Shelby, O., in 1880, having taken the two 
earlier years of his theological course at Oberlin. 

He was ordained, Nov. 15, 1881, pastor of the Congregational 
Church in (East) Toledo, Ohio, where he continued until near the 
time of his death, which occurred at Culbertson, Nebraska, April 
4, 1886, in his 35th year. 



SXJ]VIM^R Y. 



Academical Department. 



Class. Name and Age. 

1815 John Hastings, 94, 

1820 Henry A. Chesebrough, 85 

1820 Horace Foote. 85, 

1821 Dwight Baldwin, 81, 

1821 Thomas W. Coit, 82, 

1822 Timothy Stillmau, 83, 

1823 Joshua B. Ferris. 82, 

1823 Joseph E. MaxweJl, 83, 

1824 Ashbel Smith, 80, 

1825 WiUiam Bliss, 79, 
1825 William T. Peters, 80, 
1825 Williams H. Whittemore 

1825 George C. Woodruff, 80, 

1826 Selden Haines. 85, 
182fi Julian M. Sturtevant, 80. 

1826 Elizur Wright. 81, 

1827 Mason Grosvenor, 85, 

1827 Asa Turner. 86, 

1828 Thomas 11. Gregorie, 18, 

1828 Charles McDermott, 76, 

1829 John Abeel Baldwin, 75, 

1829 Melancthon H. Colton, 79, 

1830 Joseph Kmerson. 7*7, 

1832 John S. Patterson, 74, 

1 833 T. Hanscome Legare, 74, 

1833 Samuel Wolcott, 72, 

1834 George G. Spencer, 73, 

1835 Jared A. Ayres, 72, 
1835 William G. Bulloch, 70, 
1835 Samuel L. Gardiner, 69, 
1835 Nathaniel S. Howe, 67, 
1835 Osbert B. Loomis, 72, 
1835 Ariel Parish, 77, 
1835 Gustavus Spencer, 78, 
1835 Thomas A. Thacher, 71, 

1835 Charles Wrisrht, 73, 

1836 Arthur Fletcher. 73, 

1831 Myron N. Morris, 74, 

1837 Wniiam B. Morse, 68, 

1838 Benjamin S. Edwards, 67, 

1838 William P. Lynde, 68. 

1839 Theodore A. Leete. 72, 

1839 William S. Wright, 72, 

1840 John Perkins, C6, 

1841 Horace D. Walker, 70, 

1842 Thomas N. Benedi»;t, 68, 
1842 William E. Waterhouse, 70, 



Place and Tim e of Death . 
Onondaga Valley, N. Y., Jan. 21, '86. 

Flushing, N. Y.. April 2, '86. 

Cleveland, 0, Nov. 16, '84. 

Honolulu, H. I., Jan. 3, '86. 

Middletown, Conn. June 21, '85. 

Dunkirk, N. Y., Dec. 11, '85. 

Stamford, Conn., June 8, '86. 

Grovetown, Ga., March 8, '86. 

Evergreen, Texas, Jan. 21, '86. 

New York City, April 19, '86. 

Waterbury, Conn., July 24, '85. 

85, Rye. N. Y., July 25, '8ft. 

Litchfield, Conn., Nov. 2 1 . '85. 

Rome, N. Y., March 21, '86. 

Jacksonville, 111., Feb. 11, '86. 

Medford, Mass., Nov. 22. '85. 

Englewood, N. J., March 27, '86. 

Oskaloosa. Iowa, Dec. 12, '85. 

Grahamville, S. C, Jan. 7, '86. 

Dermott, Ark.. Oct. 13, '84. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 22, '86. 

Hartford, Conn., Jan. 21, '86. 

Andover, Mass., July 21, '85. 

New York City, April 3, '86. 

Orangeburg, S. C, July 10, '85. 

Longmeadow. Mass., Feb. 24, '86. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 15, '85. 

Mystic, Conn., Feb. 24, '86. 

Savannah, Ga., June 23, '85. 

Sag Harbor, N. Y., Aug. 2, '85. 

Washington. D. C, Feb. 20, '85. 

New York City, April 30, '86. 

Denver, Col,, Nov. 24, '85. 

New York City, March 31, '86. 

New Haven, Conn., April 7, '86. 

Wethersfield, Conn., Aug. 11, '85. 

Concord, N. H., Feb. 19. '85. 

West Hartford, Conn., July 9. '85. 

Boston, Mass., April 11 '86. 

Springfield, 111., Feb. 4, '86. 

Milwaukee, Wise, Dec. 18, '85. 

Longmeadow, Mass., April 28. '86. 

Glastonbury, Conn., Sept. 27, '85. 

Baltimore, Md., Nov. 28, '85. 

Palatine Bridge, N. Y., Nov. 4, '85. 

Miller's Place, N. Y., March 17, '86. 

Baltimore, Md., June 21, '85. 



su 



1843 
1845 
1846 
184T 
184T 
1849 
1851 
1852 
1852 
1855 
1855 
1857 
1858 
1859 
I860 
1862 
1863 
1863 
1863 
1863 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1867 
1867 
1867 
1870 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1875 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1881 
1882 
1885 



1823 
1836 
1836 
1849 
1853 
1854 
1861 
1863 
1879 



Henrj Stevens, 66, 
Basil Duke, 61, 
Wilson C N. Carr, 59, 
B. Gratz Brown, 59, 
James T. Hyde, 59, 
John L. A.tlee, Jr., 55, 
Richard J. Haldeman, 54, 
Lebeus C. Chapin, 60, 
Miers C. Conwell, 58, 
J. Tyson Lane. 50, 
Elisha Mulford, 52, 
George S. Gray, 50, 
Louis Dembinski, 57, 
Charles F. Robertson, 51, 
Isaac J. Post, 48, 
Hiram H. Kimpton, 48, 
George Biddle, 42, 
Jonathan EJdwards, 44, 
George Hoffman, 42, 
Erastus New, 48, 
Edmund A. Ware, 47, 
Joseph R. Benjamin, 46, 
Charles H. Gaylord, 46, 
Elbert W. Clarke, 37, 
Theodore L. Day, 39, 
Henry G. Landis, 38, 
George W. Drew, 40, ' 
Frank R. Schell, 35, 
Willis E. Walker, 37, 
Edwin C. Woodruff, 34, 
Wm. Wade Beebe, 34, 
S. Nelson White, 32, 
Francis H. Olmsted, 33, 
Charles W. Cochran, 28, 
Joseph W. Dart. 32, 
Henry A. Oaks, 33, 
Fred N. Wright, 32, 
William P. Macomber, 31, 
Frank A. Beck with, 31, 
Waller Squires, 28, 
Arthur B. Taylor, 33, 
Frederick Adler, 25, 
Emmet S. Williams, 26. 
Benjamin K. Heaton, 29, 



London, England, 
St. Louis, Mo., 
Ashland. Va., 
Kirkwood, Mo., 
Chicago, 111., 
Lancaster, Pa., 
Harrisburg, Pa., 
Kalamazoo, Mich., 
Barranquilla, Colombia, 
Tallulah, La., 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Cincinnati, 0., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
St. Louis, Mo., 
Montrose, Pa., 
N'ew York City, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
New Haven, Conn., 
New York City, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Atlanta, Ga., 
Hudson River, N. Y., 
Litchfield, Conn., 
Painesville, 0. 
Worcester. Mass., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Phoenix, Arizona, 
Reading, Pa , 
near Cincinnati, 0. 
Guilford. Conn., 
Colorado Springs, Col. 
New York City, 
Denver, Col., 
White Plains, N. Y., 
New London, Conn., 
Hartford. Conn., 
Waterville, N. Y., 
Portsmouth, R. I., 
San Francisco, Cal., 
New York City, 
Springfield, Mass., 
Reichenau, Austria, 
Meriden, Conn., 
New Haven, Conn., 



Medical Department. 



David S. Hart, 86, 
Benjamin F. Harrison, 75, 
Aron Wright, 75, 
S. Foster Lindsey, 58, 
Elias C. Baker, 
J. Griffin Ely, 57, 
Samuel McClellan, 47, 
Henry S. Corn well, 51, 
Thomas B, Jewett, 35, 



Stonington, Conn.. ' 
Wallingford, Conn.. 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Dudley, Mass., 
Hopewell, N. J., 
Lyme, Conn., 
Laver Lake, Cal., 
New London, Conn. 
Birmingham, Conn., 



Feb. 28, '86. 
June 14, '85. 
April 18, '86. 
Dec. 13, '85. 
March 21 , '86. 
July 18, '85. 
Oct. 1, '85. 
Nov. 20, '85. 
Nov. 17, '85. 
Oct. 18, '85. 
Dec. 9, '85. 
Aug. 26, '85. 
March 9, '86. 
May 1, '86. 
July 10. '85. 
July 26, '85. 
April 9, '86. 
June 19, '86. 
Aug. 31, '85. 
April 28, '86. 
Sept. 25, '85. 
Oct. 30, '85. 
Aug. 17, '85.- 
Sept. 24, '82. 
June 27, '85. 
May 22, '86. 
April 13, '84. 
Feb. 26, '86. 
May 3, '86. 
May 17, '8^. 
Jan. 26, '86. 
Nov. 23, '85. 
March 26. '86. 
July 9, '83. 
May 10, '86. 
Julv 3, '85. 
Jan. 9. '86. 
Aug. 25, '85. 
Dec. 12, '85. 
May 4, '86. 
March 1, '86. 
July 13. '85. 
Jan. 13, '86. 
Dec. 28, '85. 



Aug. 8, '85. 
April 23, '86. 
Doc. 15, '85. 
Aug. 10, '85. 
June 26, '83. 
April 1, '86. 
March 19. '86. 
June 15, '86. 
Aug. 7, '85. 



I 
I 



Law Department. 
847 Nathaniel A. Cowdrey, 64, New York City, 



Oct. 18, '85. 



345 

Department of Philosophy and the Arts (Sheffield Scientific School.) 

1868 Joseph P. Rockwell, 42, Boston, Mass., Nov. 22, '85. 

1869 Charles B. Koon, 39, near Paliahuay, Mex., April 16, '85, 
1875 Dwight E. Pierce, 31, Bristol, Conn., Sept. 1. '85. 

1879 George C. Egan, 27, Chicago, III. June 10. '86. 

1880 George B. Rogers, 29, Cambridge, Mass., March 4, '86. 

Theological Department. 

1877 George S. Thrall, 33, Salt Lake City, Utah, Jan. 20, '86. 

1881 Albert M. Wheeler, 34, OiUbertson, Nebr. April 4, '86. 



The number of deaths recorded this year is 1 08 (a larger number than has been 
recorded any previous year), and the average age of the 9 1 graduates of the Aca- 
demical Department is 60^ years. 



The oldest living graduates are — 
Class of 1813, Rev. David L. Hunn, of Buffalo, N. T., born Nov. 5, 1789. 
Class of 1815, Rev. Joseph D. Wickham, of Manchester, Vt., born April 4, 1797. 
Class of 1816. Eli W. Blake, of New Haven, Conn., born Jan. 27, 1795. 
Class of 1816, Henry W. Taylor, of Canandaigua, N. Y., born Feb. 2, 1796. 



n 



INDEX. 



Class, Page. 

1881 Adler, Frederick 333 

1849 Atlee, John L 314 

1835 Ayres, Jared A. .298 

1853 m Baker, Klias G 337 

1821 Baldwin, Dwight 280 

1829 Baldwin, J. AbeeL 293 

1878 Beckwitli, Frank A 332 

1873 Beebe. Wm. W 328 

1842 Benedict, Thomas N 310 

1864 Benjamin, Joseph R 324 

1863 Biddle, Georj^e 321 

1825 Bliss, William 285 

1847 Brown, B. Gratz 313 

1835 Bulloch, Wm. G 298 

1846 Carr, Wilson 0. N 312 

1852 Chapin, Lebeus C .315 

1820 Chesebrough, Henry A 280 

1867 Clarke, Elbert W 325 

1875 Cochran, Charles W 330 

1821 Coit, Thomas W.... 281 

1829 Colton, Melancthon H 294 

1852 Conwell, Miers C. 316 

1863 in Cornwell, Henry S .338 

1847 I Cowdrey, Nathaniel A 339 

1875 Dart, Joseph W 330 

1867 Day, Theodore L. 326 

1858 Derabinski, Louis 319 

1870 Drew. George W 327 

1845 Duke. Basil 312 

1838 Edwards, Benj. S 305 

1863 Edwards. Jonathan 322 

1879 p Egan, George C 341 

1854 m Ely, J. Griffin 337 

1830 Emerson, Joseph 294 

Ferris, Joshua B. 283 

Fletcher, Arthur. .303 

Foote, Horace 280 

835 Gardiner, Samuel L 299 

865 Gaylord, Charles H 825 

857 Gray, George S 318 

828 Gregorie, Thomas H 292 

827 Grosvenor, Mason 291 

1826 Haines, Selden 287 

1851 Haldeman, Richard J 315 

1836 m Harrison, Benjamin F 335 

1823 m Hart, David S 335 

»815 Hastings, John 279 

*1885 Heaton, Benjamin K 334 

1863 Hoffmlia, George 322 

1835 Howe, Nathaniels ...299 

1847 Hyde, JamesT 313 

1879 m Jewetl. Thomas B. 338 

1863 Kimpton, Hiram H 320 

1869 p Kuon, Charles B .340 



1823 
1866 
^Kl820 
^■1835 
^■1865 
^Rl857 
^■1828 
^Hl827 
^^1826 



ClasB. Page, 

1867 Landis, Henry G 326 

1855 Lane, J, Tyson 316 

1839 Leete, Theodore A 306 

1833 Legare, T. Hanscome 295 

1849m Lindsey, S.Foster 337 

1835 Loomis, Osbert B 300 

1838 Lynde. Wm. P 306 

1861 m McClellan, Samuel 338 

1828 McDermott, Charles ..293 

1877 Macoraber, Wm. P 331 

1823 Maxwell, Joseph E 284 

1837 Morris, Myron N 803 

1837 Morse, Wm. B 304 

1855 Mulford, Elisha 317 

1863 New, Erastus 323 

1875 Oaks, Henry A ..331 

1874 Olmsted, Francis H 329 

1835 Parish, Ariel 300 

1832 Patterson, John S 295 

1840 Perkins, John 308 

1825 Peters. Wm. T 285 

1875 p Pierce, Dwight E 340 

1860 Post, Isaac J. ..320 

1859 Robertson, Charles F 319 

1868 p Rockwell, Joseph P 339 

1880 p Rogers. George B 341 

1870 SC;hell, Frank R. 327 

1824 Smith, Ashbel 284 

1 834 Spencer, George G 297 

1835 Spencer, Gustavus 301 

1878 Squires, Walter 333 

1843 Stevens, Henry 311 

1822 sun. nan, Timothy 283 

1826 Sturtevaut. Julian M ..288 

1878 Taylor, Arthur B 333 

1835 Thacher, Thomas A 301 

1877 t Thrall, George S 341 

1827 Turner, Asa 292 

1841 Walker, Horace D 309 

1871 Walker, Willis E 328 

1863 Ware, Edmund A 324 

1 842 Waterhouse, Wm, E 310 

1881 « Wheeler, Albert M 342 

1873 White, S. Nelson 329 

1825 Whittemore, Williams H. ..286 

1882 Williams, Emmet S 334 

1 833 Wolcott, Samuel 296 

1872 Woodruff, Edwin C ...328 

1825 Woodruff; George C. 287 

1836 7)1 Wright, Aron 336 

1 §85 Wright, Charles . .302 

1826 Wright. Elizur 289 

1876 Wright, Feed N. 331 

I 839 Wright, Wm, S 307 



1 








OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE UNIVERSITY 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 
June^, 1887_ 

Including the Record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALOINI, JUNE 28th, 1881.] 

[No. 7 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 46 of the whole Record.] 



Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, Printers, 
New Haven, Conn. 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OP 

GEADUATES OF YALE UOTYEESITY 

Deceased during the Academical year ending in 

June, 1887. 

Including the record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meeting of the Alumni, June 28th, 1881.] 
[No. 7 of Third Printed Series, and No. 46 of the whole Record.] 



YALE COLLEGE. 

ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 
1816. 

Eli Whitney Blake, son of Elihu and Elizabeth (Whitney) 
Blake, was born in Westborough, Mass., January 27, 1795. 

After spending tlie year succeeding graduation in the Litchfield 
(Conn.) Law School, he then at the request of his uncle, Eli 
Whitney (Yale 1792), the inventor of the cotton-gin, who was en- 
gaged at the same time in the manufacture of fire-arms for the 
government, abandoned a professional career and entered his 
uncle's employ in connection with the gun-manufactory at Whit- 
ney ville, in Hamden, just outside the bounds of New Haven. He 
continued in the same business, with one of his brothers, after Mr. 
Whitney's death in January, 1825, until 1836, when he and his 
two brothers established in Westville, another suburb of New 
Haven, a manufactory of house-furnishing hardware, which he 
carried on for about thirty-five years, until old age made his re- 
tirement necessary. 

In 1855 he served on a committee which had charge of the 
macadamizing of one of the principal streets of New Haven, and 



352 

thus had his attention drawn to the need of a machine which 
might perform the labor of crushing stone into small fragments. 
In 1857 he perfected the invention of a machine for this purpose 
and for use in mining, which for originality, simplicity and effec- 
tiveness has received the highest praise, and has proved to be of 
the utmost practical value. Mr. Blake made several other im- 
portant inventions while engaged in the manufacture of arms, and 
continued until very late in life an enthusiastic student in the 
higher mathematics and physics. In 1882 he collected and printed 
. in a small volume (61 pp. 8°) some of his most important papers, 
with the title " Original Solutions of Several Problems in Aero- 
dynamics." In 1879 the degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred 
on him by his Alma Mater. 

After an old age of honored retirement, followed by a few 
weeks of extreme feebleness, he died at his home in New Haven, 
August 18, 1886, in his 92d year. 

He married July 8, 1822, Eliza M., daughter of Edward J. and 
Mary (Pierpont) O'Brien, of New Haven, who died in 1876. Of 
their twelve children, six sons and four daughters liyed to matur- 
ity ; the daughters and three of the sons survive their parents. 
Five sons were graduated at this College, the remaining son be- 
ing prevented from completing his course by ill health. 

1817. 

RuFus Paine Spalding, the eighth child of Dr. Rufus and 
Lydia (Paine) Spalding, was born in West Tisbury, Martha's 
Vineyard, Mass., May 3, 1798. In 1812 his parents, who were 
natives of Canterbury, Conn., returned to this State, and settled 
in Norwich, whence their elder son entered college. 

On graduation he entered on the study of the law in Windham, 
Conn., with the Hon. Zephaniah Swift (Yale 1778), Chief Justice 
of the State, whose eldest daughter, Lucretia A., he married on the 
1st of October, 1822. 

In 1819 he settled in Little Rock, Arkansas, in the practice of 
his profession, but after a year and half he returned as far as War- 
ren, Ohio, where he remained for sixteen years. Thence he went 
to Ravenna, Ohio, where his ability as a lawyer and speaker soon 
caused him to be sent as a Representative to the General 
Assembly. He next removed to Akron, in Summit County, and 
being sent again to the Legislature served at two sessions 
(1841-42) as Speaker. 



353 

In the winter of 1848-49 he was elected by the General As- 
sembly as Judge of the Supreme Court for seven years ; after he 
had served for three years, the judiciary was reorganized under 
the new constitution of the State, and he declined being a candi- 
date in the popular canvass which followed. 

On retiring from the bench, he resumed the practice of the law 
in Cleveland, and in 1862 he was elected to Congress. He was 
twice reelected, but in 1868 returned to his profession, which he 
continued to practice with success until over eighty years of age. 
He died at his residence in Cleveland, of chronic catarrh, after a 
tedious illness, August 29, 1886, in hia 89th year. 

His wife died in 1858, after a long period of declining health. 
Their children were four daughters and three sons, of whom only 
one daughter and one son survive. Judge Spalding was again 
married, January 11, 1859, to Nancy S., eldest daughter of Dr. 
William S. Pierson (Yale 1808), of Windsor, Conn. 

1818. 

Thomas Leffingwell Shipman, the last survivor of his college 
class, and the only son of Judge Nathaniel and Abigail (Coit) 
Shipman, of Norwich, Conn., was born in that town, August 28, 
1798. 

After graduation he pursued the three years* course of study in 
Andover Theological Seminary, and then entered on his life-work, 
the Christian ministry. For some months in 1821-2 he labored 
under the direction of the South Carolina Home Missionary 
Society, and then returned to Andover for further study. Dur- 
ing the following winter he preached in Lebanon, Conn., and for 
another year in other parts of the Stat'^, declining meanwhile a 
unanimous call to Lebanon. He preached for a year in 1824-5 as 
a home missionary in Ohio, and then again in Connecticut. On 
the 28th of June, 1826, he was ordained over the First (Congre- 
gational) Church, in Southbury, Conn., where he remained until 
protracted illness in his family caused his resignation in 1836. 
His next engagement was in Bozrah, Conn., from 1837 to 1841, 
and in May, 1842, he began to preach to the Congregational 
Church in Jewett City, a village in the town of Griswold, Conn., 
where he remained as settled pastor from April 5, 1843, until 
September 6, 1854, when he asked a dismission on account of en- 
feebled health. He was able, however, to continue for eighteen 
mouths longer in the supply of the same pulpit, and for the rest 



354 

of his life in the more or less constant service of neighboring 
vacant churches. His residence was in Jewett City until his 
death there, August 29, 1886, aged 88 years and one day. His 
vigor of intellect and geniality of temperament made him every- 
where acceptable, both in the pulpit and the parish, and his long 
life was a continuous and growing power for good. 

He married, May 3, 1827, Mary T., eldest daughter of Gen. 
David Deming, of Colchester, Conn., who died October 15, 1841. 
Their only child is the Hon. Nathaniel Shipman (Yale 1848). Mr. 
Shipman was again married to Mrs. Pamela Coit, daughter of 
Josiah Fuller, M.D., of Plainfield, Conn., who survives him ; the 
two children by 'this marriage are not living. 

1821. 

Charles Atwood, the son of Moses Atwood, was born in 
Haverhill, Mass., May 15, 1803; the pioneer missionary, Harriet 
Newell, was his elder sister. 

He studied law in the office of Judge Samuel Hubbard, of Bos- 
ton, and in the law school of Messrs. Staples and Hitchcock, of 
New Haven. He was admitted to the bar in Boston, and prac- 
ticed his profession there from 1825 to 1828, when he removed 
his office to New York City. In 1833 he returned to Boston, 
which he made his home for the rest of his life. About 1863 he 
relinquished his professional business on account of infirm health, 
and his later years were devoted to reading and study, in general 
literature and esjDccially in theology. His attractive personal 
traits endeared him warmly to the circle of friends among whom 
he was familiarly known. He died in Boston, February 13, 1887, 
in his 84th year. He was never married. 

Joseph Habeesham Bradley, son of Abraham Bradley, As- 
sistant Postmaster General of the United States under President 
Monroe, was born in Washington, D. C, March 22, 1803. 

He studied law, and was admitted in 1824 to the bar in Wash- 
ington, where he practiced his profession with distinction through 
his life. He was engaged in the conduct of many of the most 
celebrated cases in the District, including the trial of John H. 
Surratt for complicity in the plot for the assassination of Presi- 
dent Lincoln. 

He died in Washington, after a month's illness, April 3, 1887, 
in his 85th year. 



355 

He married, December 5, 1825, Lucy S., eldei- daughter of 
Ashbel Tuttle, of New Haven, who died April 9, 1870. By her 
he had live children. In November, 1883, he was again raarried 
to Miss Mary Harris, of Washington. 

1824. 

John Miller Edwards, third and last surviving son of the 
Hon. Henry W. Edwards (College of N. J., 1797), a grandson of 
President Edwards, and Governor of Connecticut, and United 
States Senator, was born in New Haven, October 23, 1805. His 
mother was Lydia Miller, of New Haven. 

After graduating, he studied law with Judge William Bristol, 
and was admitted to the bar in New Haven in 1826. He practiced 
law here until 1832, when he removed to the Western Reserve in 
Ohio, where his father had inherited a considerable landed inter- 
est. He was occupied for some time with business outside of his 
profession, but in August, 1838, he was admitted to the bar of 
the State, and in 1839 he opened an office in Warren, the county 
seat of Trumbull County. In addition to his law practice he was 
for some time the editor of a weekly newspaper, the Trumbull 
Democrat^ and was active in many other public interests. In 
1846, on the organization of Mahoning County, he removed to 
Canfield, the county seat, where he was engaged in the practice 
of his profession until 1864. During part of this time he was also 
the Postmaster of the town, and edited the Mahoning Index, the 
first paper published in the county ; and for the whole period of 
his residence in Canfield he filled (as he had done in Trumbull 
County) the office of School Examiner. 

In 1864 he removed his law office to Youngstown, in the same 
county, and for some years undertook the added duty of assisting 
in the editorship of the Mahoning Register. In the fall of 1868 
he removed his residence also to Youngstown. From 1869 to 
1878 he was a Justice of the Peace for the township. He con- 
tinued in the active exercise of all his faculties until his death. 
He was one of the founders of the Mahoning Valley Historical 
Society, in 1874, and filled the office of president until his death. 
He was deeply interested in the collection of information appro- 
priate to the objects of that societ}^, and enjoyed the respect of 
the community and of the profession to which he belonged for 
his learning and ability. 

He died suddenly, of apoplexy, at his home in Youngstown, 
December 8, 1886, in his 82d year. 



356 

He married, in 1842, Miss Phebe Mary Crail, of Warren, who 
died May 15, 1877. Of their three children a daughter and a son 
are still living. 

1825. 

William Bennett Fleming was born in Liberty County, 
Georgia, in October, 1803, the son of William and Catharine 
(Winn) Fleming. His college course was interrupted in the 
Senior year by pecuniary misfortunes ; he was admitted, however, 
to a degree in 1829. 

Meantime he was engaged in teaching and in reading law in his 
native State, and had been admitted to practice. He settled in 
Savannah, and after an honorable career at the bar was advanced 
in 1847 to the Bench of the Superior Court of the State. He 
retained this position for only two years at this time, but in 1853 
returned to the oflSce, which he held until 1868. In 1879 he was 
elected to fill the unexpired term of the Hon. Julian Hartridge 
(deceased) for the closing weeks of the 45th Congress of the 
United States, and subsequently he resumed his place upon the 
bench, in which he maintained himself with general acceptance. 
In 1881 he resigned on account of failing health, and retired to 
his home in Walthourville, Liberty County, where he died after a 
long illness, August 19, 1886, in his 83d year. 

Judge Fleming was twice married ; by his first wife, Miss Ann 
Eliza Stevens,, he . had no children ; his second wife. Miss Eliza 
Ann Maxwell, was the mother of three sons and four daughters; 
three of the daughters survive their parents. 

Joseph Whittlesey, the eighth child of Joseph and Polly 
(Camp) Whittlesey, was born in New Preston, a parish in the 
town of Washington, Litchfield County, Conn., December 8, 
1797. 

In 1826 he entered the Yale Divinity School, where he finished 
the course in 1829. He was ordained pastor of the First (Con- 
gregational) Church, Stonington, Conn., May 27, 1830, and was 
dismissed from that service, on account of impaired health, 
December 4, 1832. On the 28th of August, 1833, he was in- 
stalled over the Central Church in Haverhill, Mass., a new 
organization, composed of members of the First Church in that 
town, who were at variance with the majority in the Parish. He 
resigned this charge, April 18, 1838, to accept a call from the 



357 

Congregational church in Berlin, Conn., where he was installed 
on the 8th of the following month. He was dismissed, after an 
attack of paralysis, August 9, 1841, but his residence continued 
among his former people until his death there, January 29, 1887, 
in his 90th year. He recovered sufficient health, after retiring 
from the pulpit, to engage in private teaching. 

He was married, October 10, J 83 1, to Maria A., daughter of 
Ezi-a Chappell, of New London, who died November 10, 1846. 
He was again married, May 22, 1849, to Sarah Maria Peck, who 
survives him. One of his four sons by his lirst wife was graduated 
here in 1858, and died in hospital during the late war. 

Stephen Clay Williams, the second son of Josiah and Mary 
(Magill) Williams, of Middletown, Conn., was born there in 1804. 
His father was a native of Bermuda. 

He studied law, and was admitted to the bar of New York 
City in 1828. His life was passed in that city, and during his 
long career as a lawyer he enjoyed the confidence of many of the 
old New York families. He died at his residence in New York 
City on the 23d of April, 1887, at the age of 83, from pileumonia, 
after three weeks' illness. He was never married. 



1826. 

Sidney Smith Franklin was a native of New York City, and 
entered College in Sophomore year. 

He married in New York after graduation, and at first estab- 
lished himself in business as a druggist, in the meantime prose- 
cuting regular medical studies, after which he was engaged in 
practice. In 1835 he settled in Columbus, Mississippi, where he 
resided until his death, universally respected. He died in 
Columbus, October 5, 1886, in his 80th year. 

Arad Gilbert, son of Solomon and Eunice (Walker) Gilbert, 
was born in (West) Brookfield, Massachusetts, October 6, 1801. 

After graduating he studied law in Northampton, Massachu- 
setts, and in September, 1829 was admitted to the bar of the 
State. His intention of becoming a practicing lawyer was inter- 
fered with a year or two later by the failure of his health, which 
obliged him to adopt a business career. In the early anti-slavery 
struggles he was an active supporter of the Garrison movement. 



358 

His home continued in West Brookfield, and he married, 
June 1, 1834, Miss Mary Fowler, daughter of the Rev. Bancroft 
Fowler (Yale 1796), then of Northfield, Massachusetts, but for- 
merly of West Brookfield. He was for many years in the employ 
of the Western (now a part of the Boston & Albany) Railroad. 
About 1860 he removed to New York City, where he was the 
secretary and treasurer of an oil company, and was subsequently 
employed in the Internal Revenue and Customs departments. of 
the government. In 1879 he retired from the position which he 
had held in the Custom House, but his health continued good un- 
til a 'few weeks before his death, which occurred at the honiQ of 
one of his daughters, in New York City, September 21, 1886, at 
the age of 85. His wife survives him, with their three daughters: 
one child died in infancy, and the remaining son in 1871, of con- 
sumption, induced by exposure and sufiering in the Union army 
during the civil war. 

CiNCiNNATUs Newton, the son of the Hon. Thomas Newton, a 
member of Congress in 1801-33 from Virginia, was born in 
Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1806, and entered College in the 
Junior year, from Norfolk, Virginia. 

After graduation he studied law in Staunton, Virginia, and 
was admitted to the bar in Norfolk. He inherited a handsome 
patrimony, and the care of his estate so engrossed him that he re- 
tired wholly, after a few years, from the practice of his profession. 

He represented the city of Norfolk for three years in the Legis- 
lature, but finding politics not to his taste declined further em- 
ployment of this nature. During the existence of the Whig 
party he was in sympathy with it, and in 1860 he was one of the 
Presidential Electors for the State of Virginia, voting for Bell 
and Everett. He was a Union man from conviction, but when 
hostilities began was led by his sympathies to act with his own 
people, and as a Presidential Elector assisted in the organization 
of the Confederate Government. At the close of the war he ac- 
quiesced quietly in its results. 

He died at his residence in Norfolk, from an attack of paraly- 
sis, November 15, 1886, in his 81st year. 

He was married in 1835, and his wife survives him, with a large 
family of children. 

In person and in character, in all the relations of life, he was a 
typical Virginia gentleman. 



359 



1827. 



Joseph Bloomfield Baldwin, the only sou of Elias A. and 
Esther (Cook) Baldwin, of Newark, New Jersey, was born there, 
November 4, 1804. His father died when he was six years of 
age, and he was prepared for College in New York City by the 
Rev. Dr. Elilm W. Baldwin (Yale 1812), who had married his 
only sister. 

On taking his first degree he entered the Theological Seminary 
in Auburn, New York, where he finished his course in August, 
1830. He then labored for two years as a home missionary in 
Essex, New York, being ordained while there, August 4, 1831, 
by the Third Presbytery of New York. He was next employed 
in Ticonderoga, New York, for two years, and in 1834 was in- 
stalled over a church in Canaan, New York. He left Canaan in 
1838 for the village of New Concord, in Chatham, New York, 
where he labored for two years. 

In November, 1840, he went to the West village (then called 
Hubbardville) in Cummington, Massachusetts, and took charge 
of a Congregational Church just established there, over which he 
was installed as pastor, September 1, 1841, and with which he 
continued until May, 1857. His home remained in West Cum- 
mington, and he again acted as pastor of the church there from 
1864 to 1868, having preached for most of the interval in West 
Hawley, a neighboring town. Later he supplied the pulpit in 
Weathersfield Center, Vermont, from 1869 to 1873, and in West 
Townshend, Vermont, from 1873 to 1878. He then retired to his 
home in West Cummington, having preached continuously for 
forty-eight years. Still later, though 75 years of age, he supplied 
for one year in Peru, Massachusetts, not once failing to keep his 
appointments. He preached occasionally to the last, enjoying 
greatly the privilege, and being able to look back on a record of 
successful labor, crowned with the affection of those among whom 
he had lived. On the 9th of June, 1886, though in feeble health, 
he took part in an ordination in the adjoining village, and within 
two weeks, on June 22, died suddenly at his home, from paralysis 

I of the heart, in his 82d year. 
He married. May 26, 1834, Sarah A., daughter of Captain 
Gideon Tenney, of Brandon, Vermont, who died November 20, 
1857. He next married, April 22, 1858, Rosina P., daughter of 
Ebenezer Whitman, of Windsor, Massachusetts, who survives 
him without children. 



360 

1829. 

Asa Holman Waters, son of Asa and Susan (Holman) 
Waters, was the tliird child in a family of eight, and was born 
in that part of Sutton, Massachusetts, which is now Millbury, 
February 8, 1808. He was of the seventh generation from Rich- 
ard Waters of Salem, Massachusetts, who came to this country in 
1632. Richard Waters was by trade a gun-maker, and gun- 
making has been a branch of industry carried on by some of his 
decendants almost ever since. 

After his graduation he chose the law as his j^rofession, and, 
with some delays, finished his studies at Harvard Law School, in 
1835, and was admitted to the bar. He was soon, however, 
called, as the only son, to assist his father in the armory busi- 
ness. His was therefore a business rather than a professional 
life, and the place of his activities was the village where he was 
born. 

He was united in marriage, June 27, 1849, with Miss Elizabeth 
M. Honey. His wife and three daughters survive. 

In the year 1868 he retired from active business with a hand- 
some property, and afterwards lived a life of comparative leisure. 
In 1874 he w^ent abroad with his wife and daughters, to visit a 
married daughter, the wife of a Professor in Robert College, Con- 
stantinople, and to travel extensively in Europe and the East. 
After his return, in 1877, he was only busy with his pen. 

His breaking down, at last, was very sudden and unexpected. 
There seemed to be no positive disease, but a gradual giving way 
of his powers. His death occurred in Millbury, January 17, 1887, 
at *he age of 79. 

1830. 

Norman [William Henderson] Butler was born in Nassau, 
New Providence, Bahama Islands, December 7, 1810, the son of 
George Butler, of Hartford, Conn., and Frances (Gibson) Butler. 

After graduation he settled in Augustine, Fla., where he was 
associated in business with his classmate Anderson, a native of 
that place. During the civil war, as he was not in full sympathy 
with the prevailing Southern sentiment, he removed to Nassau, 
where he was employed as a planter during the rest of his active 
life. He married in 1835 Miss Charlotte Malcolm, who died about 
five years before him. During these last years of his life he re- 
sided with one of his sons, in Orange County, Florida. After sev- 



361 

eral years of somewhat feeble health, he died very suddenly,. while 
kneeling by his bedside in prayer, in Tavares, Orange County, on 
the morning of October 12, 1886, in his 76th year. 

Of his six children two sons survive him ; one son entered the 
Confederate army in the war, and died of his wounds received in 
that service. 

Ray Palmer was the fourth child and tliird son of the Hon. 
Thomas and Susanna (Palmer) Palmer, of Little Corapton, R. I., 
where he was born November 12, 1808. It was intended that he 
should pursue a commercial career, and therefore he was sent at the 
age of 13 to Boston to begin a clerJsship in a large business house, 
while at the same time completing his education. By the age of 
15, he had decided that he wished to prepare for college, and he 
was then sent, accordingly, to Phillips Academy, Andover. 

On leaving college he taught for a year in a private school for 
young ladies in New York City, and then returned to New Haven, 
where — at first in connection with Dr. E. A. Andrews (Yale, 1810), 
and later as sole proprietor — he conducted the Young Ladies' Insti- 
tute, in Wooster Place. In the meantime he was married, October 
3, 1832, to Ann Maria, daughter of the late Marmaduke Waud, a 
merchant of Albany, of English birth. He also prosecuted theo- 
logical studies while in New Haven, and on disposing of his school, 
in the fall of 1834, removed to Boston, and began to preach. In 
1835 he accepted a call to a new church (now called the Central 
Chuich) in Bath, Maine, over which he was ordained on the 22d 
of July. Fifteen years of earnest, practical labor followed, after 
which rest and change of scene were needed, and on December 10, 
1850, he was installed as the first pastor of the newly-formed First 
Congregational Church in Albany, N. Y. Here he continued for 
fifteen most fruitful years of labor, until April 18, 1866, when he 
was dismissed to accept the secretaryship of the American Con- 
gregational Union, in New York City. Here he served the 
churches for twelve years, or until May 1, 1878, during which time 
more than 600 churches were erected by the aid of this society. 
As the salary was insufficient, he was stimulated to a good deal of 
literary labor during this period. In May, 1870, he removed his 
residence to Newark, N. J., where he spent the rest of his life. 
On retiring from the service of the Congregational Union, he de- 
voted himself to literary work almost exclusively. In November, 
1881, he became acting pastor (Dr. Hepworth having the care of 



362 

the p.ulpit) of the Belleville Avenue Congregational Church in 
Newark, and this arrangement continued for three years. 

On February 12, 1883, he had an attack of apoplexy, and was 
partially paralyzed. He rallied, however, and showed afterwards 
considerable vigor of mind and body. His infirmities increased 
with years, and on February 6, 1886, he suffered from a second 
attack, from which he rallied surprisingly; but on February 20, 
1887, a third attack came, and on March 22 a rapid degeneration 
of the brain began. He died March 29, 1887, in his 79th year. 

His wife died March 8, 1886; of their ten children, one son 
(Yale, 1855) and two daughters are still living. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Union Col- 
lege in 1852. From 1865 to 1878 he was a member of the Board 
of Visitors of Andover Seminary. He wrote extensively for the 
quarterlies, and for the literary and religious press generally. He 
published six or seven volumes in prose, besides numerous dis- 
courses, and three or four volumes of hymns and other poems; a 
complete edition of his poetical works is soon to be issued. He is 
known the world over as the author of the hymn. My faith looks 
up to Thee. 

Through his life Dr. Palmer used the fine powers with which 
he was endowed with untiring industry ; his buoyant and cheer- 
ful temperament and growing faith sustained him to the end 
under the pressure of sorrow and infirmity. 

1832. 

Edward Cleveland was born in the township of Shipton, Can- 
ada East, December 9, 1804, the son of Hosmerand Fluvia (Bissell) 
Cleveland, from Pomfret, Connecticut. He worked on a farm, 
and as an apprentice at a trade, until he came of age, when he 
went to New England to prepare for college. 

After graduation he taught in Danbury, Conn., for a year, and 
then spent two years in the Yale Divinity School. His first em- 
ployment as a preacher was in Hanover Parish, in Lisbon, now 
Sprague, Conn., and he was first ordained over the Congrega- 
tional Church in Rochester, N. H., January 11, 1837. From 1838 
to 1843 he was occupied in teaching in various places in New Eng- 
land. In February, 1843, he settled in Bath, N. H., w^here he re- 
gathered a Congregational Church, of which he was pastor from 
July 31, 1844, to October 16, 1849. He w^as married to Miss Mary 
M. Lang, of Bath, November 1, 1 843. Next came a very happy five 



I 



363 

years' settlement over the church in Cabot, Vt., followed by two 
years of combined service as preacher and teacher in Barnet, Vt. 
In 1856 he was invited to become the principal of St. Francis 
CoUege^in his native place; this position he resigned in 1860, and 
on account of impaired health sought a change by removal to the 
West. He preached for two years in Wilton, Iowa, and was then 
for four years professor of languages and chaplain in a military 
academy in Fulton, 111. He then settled in Lawrence, Mich., 
where he was acting pastor of the Congregational Church for five 
years, and county superintendent of schools for three years. In 
1873, on account of chills and fever, he was obliged to return to 
New England, and for the next three or four years served his 
former charge in Bath. He then preached a year in Burlington, 
Kansas, and after a brief interval of further service in Lawrence, 
returned to spend his last years in Burlington, where he died Sep- 
tember 29, 1886, in his 62d year. His wife survives him with two 
sons and two daughters. 

Elihu Parsons Ingeksoll was born in Lee, Mass., September 
20, 1804. His father was David Ingersoll, and his mother was 
Sarah Parsons, a granddaughter of Jonathan Edwards. 

He studied for one year in the Auburn Theological Seminary, 
and for somewhat over a year in the Yale Divinity School, and 
was ordained as pastor of the Congregational Church in Woon- 
socket, R. I., December 22, 1834. He left this charge in November, 
1835, to accept a call to Oberlin College, where he spent nearly 
five years, in part engaged as professor of sacred music. In 1840 
he removed to Michigan, with the purpose of founding there an 
institution similar to Oberlin ; but the efiects of the financial crisis 
of 1837 prevented the realization of his plan, and after thirteen 
years spent in home missionary work (chiefly at his own expense) in 
Michigan, he became pastor in May, 1853, of the Congregational 
Church in Bloomington, 111. In April, 1857, he resigned this 
position to go to Kansas in aid of the anti-slavery cause in that 
Territory. There he labored at his own charge in the work of the 
ministry, chiefly in the neighborhood of Burlingame, until 1861, 
when he returned to Illinois, supplying for a year the church in 
Elmwood, and then for five years the Congregational Church in 
Maiden, which he left on account of health in the spring of 1868. 
He then returned to Kansas, to be near his children, and settled 
in Rosevale, now Springfield, Clay County, where he died March 
29, 1887, in his 83d year. 



3fi4 

He married April 29, 1835, Louisa, elder daughter of Frederick 
Perry (Williams College, 1802), of Stockbridge, Mass., who died 
August 29, 1836, leaving an infant son. Fie next married, in Au- 
gust, 1838, Catharine, daughter of the Rev. Moses Gillett (Yale, 
1804), of Rome, N. Y,, by whom he had eight children. 

He published in 1886 *' Lost Israel Found." (84 pp., 12mo.) 

John Spen^cee Wallis, son of John and Susan (Parker) Wallis, 
was born in that part of Dan vers which is now Peabody, Mass., 
February 5, 1811. He was prepared for college in Salem, Mstss., 
and entered as a resident of Sudbury, Mass. 

He taught school for some ten years after graduation, spending 
also one year early in this time as a member of the Theological 
Seminary in Andover, Mass. For a greater part of his middle 
life he was a farmer, and his home from about 1875 was with his 
only surviving child, a daughter, in Bolton, Worcester county, 
Mass., where he died June 6, 1887, in his 'ZVth year; he had not 
been well for more than a year, but his last illness (from enlarged 
prostate) lasted for only eight days. 

He married, June 20, 1840, Susan J. Benton, of Berkshire County, 
Mass., who survives him ; their only son died in infancy. 

1833. 

William Woodwakd Eells was born in Middletown, Conn., 
September 6, 1811, the son of Samuel and Lucena (Woodward) 
Eells. 

After graduation he taught in St. Mary's, Ga., and subsequently 
studied theology in the Presbyterian Seminary at Columbia, S. C. 
He finished his theological course in the spring of 1839, and was 
immediately ordained (April 28) as pastor of a Presbyterian 
Church in Wilmington, N. C, where he was married in 1840 to 
Miss Christina Bradley. He laid down his pastorate after three 
or four years, and was then for a short time chaplain of the Sea- 
men's Bethel in Savannah, Ga. From 1844 to 1847 he preached 
in the Second Presbyterian Church in Washington, D. C; and 
for the next eight years was settled over the Presbyterian Church 
in Newburyport., Mass. He was then, from 1854 to 1862, a pas- 
tor in Carlisle, Pa., and thence removed to Pittsburgh, Pa., in 
which city or its surburbs his residence continued till his death. 

In April, 1863, he was appointed Secretary of the Bible Society 
for the Western part of the State, and in this service he labored 



I 
■ 
I 



365 

earnestly and successfully until his resignation a few years since 
on account of increasing infirmities. His entire active life was a 
struggle with ill-health, which suggested the changes of climate 
which accompanied his successive changes of residence. He was 
earnestly devoted to the faith and order of the Presbyterian 
Church, and widely respected ae an authority in expounding its 
polity. 

He died at his residence in Allegheny, Pa., August 28, 1886, at 
the age of 75. His wife died a year or two before him. 

Brown Emerson, son of Jacob and Dorothy (Warner) Emer- 
son, was born in Harvard, Worcester County, Mass., August 
1, 1807. 

He studied theology for two years (1834-36) in the Yale Di- 
vinity School, and for the most of the next year in the Andover 
Seminary. He was then ordained pastor, August 3, 1837, of the 
Congregational church in West Boylston, in his native county. 
After his dismission from this post, November 6, 1839, he served 
as an agent of the American Education Society until his engage- 
ment in Torringford parish, in the township of Torrington, Conn., 
where he was installed as pastor from July 21, 1841, to September 
24, 1844. 

After an interval of employment in teaching and in the service 
of the American and Foreign Christian Union, he was again set- 
tled in the ministry (June 5, 1850), as pastor of the Congrega- 
tional church in the West parish in Dracut, Mass. He resigned 
this charge. May 9, 1854, and was installed on the 12th of the fol- 
lowing July as pastor of a Presbyterian church in Northumber- 
land, Pa., where he remained until April, 1856. He was then 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Montague, Mass., from 
August 21, 1856, until March 2, 1859; and from June 9, 1859, 
to May 5, 1862, was over the church in Westminster, in the near 
neighborhood of his earliest settlement. He then supplied a small 
Presbyterian church in Cedarville, New Jersey, and was engaged 
in business for a time in Wallingford, Conn. For two years 
from July 1, 1867, he supplied the pulpit in Burlington, Conn., 
but after that the state of his throat incapacitated him from fur- 
ther service of this nature. He finally settled, in 1873, in Wy- 
oming, N. J., where the rest of his days were spent. He died 
there June 16, 1887, in his 80th year. 

He married Catharine B., daughter of the Rev. Dr. Brown 
2 



366 

Emerson (Dar mouth College, 1802), of Salem, Mass., and had 
one daughter and two sons. 

Christopher Rabokg McClellan was born in Baltimore, Md., 
October 18, 1813, the son of Samuel and Eliza (Raborg) Mc- 
Clellan. 

He studied medicine in Baltimore, and received the degree of 
M.D. from the University of Maryland in 1835. From 1836 until 
his death he resided in Brooklyn, N. Y. He was engaged for many 
years in the successful practice of his profession. He died in 
Brooklyn, January 13, 1887, in his 74th year. 

He married, April 8, 1835, in Brooklyn, Eloise Maria Perry, who 
died January 4, 1863. Of their three children, one son died in in- 
fancy, a daughter in 1869 to the lasting grief of her father, and a 
son is still living. 

Marshall Meriam was born in Concord, Mass., March 1, 1801, 
and died in Derry, K H., March 2, 1887, at tlie age of 86. He 
entered college in 1828, but left before the close of Freshman 
year to join the next class. 

After graduating he resided in Springfield, Ky., for two years, 
teaching school and studying medicine. Later he attended medi- 
cal lectures in Philadelphia, and settled as a practicing physician 
and surgeon in Pittsburgh, Pa., where he remained for about 
twelve years. His health then became impaired, and he was 
obliged to give up his active professional life. He removed to 
Derry, N. H., where he devoted his attention mainly to farming. 
He was for many years an elder in the Presbyterian church, and 
esteemed for his conscientious, upright life. 

In April, 1886, he was stricken with paralysis, from which he 
never fully recovered. 

He was married in Pittsburgh about 1838, and after the death 
of his wife from consumption, was again married about 1865. 
He leaves a widow and six sons. 

Hiram Wheeler was born in North East, Duchess County, 
N. Y., March 4, 1810. 

He cultivated his father's farm in his native place, was subse- 
quently a teacher in Rochester, N. Y., and finally settled as a 
farmer in Davenport, Iowa. He died, of Bright's disease, in 
Colfax, Iowa, May 17, 1887, in his 78th year, and was buried in 
Davenport. 



367 

He married in 1859 Miss Cornelia S. Lapham, who died in 1874. 
His children were three daughters and one son. 

1834. 

Henry Coit Kingsley was born in New Haven, Conn., De- 
cember 11, 1815, the second son of Professor James L. Kingsley 
(Yale 1799) and Lydia (Coit) Kingsley. 

After graduation he was employed for a few months as a pri- 
vate tutor, and in the autumn of 1835 entered the Yale Law 
School. Here he studied for two years, with the exception of 
the winter of 1836-37, which he spent in a law office in Colum- 
bus, Ohio. In December, 1837, he was admitted to the practice 
of law in Ohio, and established himself in Cleveland, in partner- 
ship with his brother (Yale 1832). He married, September 6, 
1841, Miss Cornelia H., elder daughter of John Day, of Cleve- 
land, who died August 31, 1843, leaving a daughter, who died 
in 1862. He married again, August 26, 1846, Mrs. Jane Handy, 
of Utica, N. Y., daughter of Briggs W. Thomas, of that place. He 
continued actively engaged in the practice of his profession, uniting 
with it land agencies, until the summer of 1852, when in conse- 
quence of the impaired health of himself and his wife, they went 
to Europe. On returning, in 1853, he removed his residence to 
New Haven. In 1854 he was elected a Director of the Cleveland 
and Pittsburgh Railroad Company, which was then seriously 
embarrassed, and in 1857 became insolvent. From 1857 to 1866 
Mr. Kingsley had the principal charge of the financial affairs of 
the company, which in 1862 regained a sound position. 

In July, 1862, he was elected Treasurer of Yale College, and 
he remained in this office until his death, fulfilling also during 
the same time many responsible private trusts with rare efficiency. 
On the morning of the 19tli of November, 1886, while driving to 
his business he received a severe injury. A cart was driven 
against his carriage, and as the result, he was thrown violently 
forwards upon one of the wheels. Two ribs were broken, and 
other injuries were received. For some weeks he seemed to be 
in a fair way to recover, when unfavorable symptoms developed, 
and after severe and protracted suffering he passed away on the 
morning of December 19, at the age of 71. His wife survives 
him, without children. 

Mr. Kingsley's services to the College which he loved so well, 
rendered as they were at much personal sacrifice, during years of 



368 

feeble health, deserve the fullest and most grateful recognition. 
His acute and rapid judgment, his caution and his thoroughness, 
have made the years of his administration of the College finances 
a notable period, while his personal character commanded the 
respect and admiration of all who were brought into intimacy 
with him. 

1835. 

George Alexander Oviatt was born in Bridgeport, Conn., 
April 5, 1811, the son of Daniel B. and Mary (Roberts) Oviatt. 

He spent the three years after graduation in the Yale Divinity 
School, and then began to labor with the Brainerd Church, of 
Belchertown, Mass., of which he was ordained pastor August 28, 
1838. This church was a recent offshoot from the old Congrega- 
tional church of the town, but under his conciliatory guidance 
the breach was healed some three years later, and he became pas- 
tor of the reunited church, which ranked as one of the largest 
churches in the State. Having broken down in health by over- 
work he resigned this charge in July, 1845, and on the 20th of 
November following was installed as the first pastor of the Suf- 
folk Street, now the Shawmut Church, in Boston. Here also his 
ministry was interrupted by the state of his health, on account of 
which he was dismissed, March 28, 1849. He next spent a year 
in the service of the American Sunday School Union as secretary 
for New England, and on October 15, 1851, was settled over the 
Third (Congregational) Church in Chicopee, Mass. This pastor- 
ate he resigned, December 1*7, 1855, and was installed three days 
later over the Congregational Church in Somers, Conn. His ser- 
vice of eleven years here was broken by an absence of one year 
during the civil war as chaplain of the Twenty-fifth Connecticut 
Volunteers. He left Somers, January 10, 1867, and was installed, 
March 13, 1867, over a Congregational church formed the same 
day in Talcottville, in the township of Vernon, Conn. He was 
dismissed from this parish, January 18, 1875, and settled the same 
year over the Union (Congregational) Church in Sudbury, Mass. 
He resigned this charge on account of feeble health at the end of 
1882, and died in the same town, June 1, 1887, in his 77th year. 
In all his pastorates he had marked success. 

He married, February 27, 1839, Martha A., youngest daughter 
of Charles B. Whittelsey, of New Haven, who died April 5, 
1846 ; her two children died before her. He next married, De- 



369 

cember 1, 1847, Isabella G., daughter of Isaac Parker, of Boston, 
who survives him with their three children, — one son (Yale, 1872) 
and two daughters. 

Thomas Benedict Sturges was born in Bridgeport, Conn., in 
1810, tlie son of Joseph P. and Laura (Benedict) Sturges. 

After graduating here he went immediately to Andover Theo- 
logical Seminary, where he spent one year, and then returned and 
spent two years in the Yale Seminary. His first engagement as 
a pastor was in Sacket's Harbor, Jefferson County, N. Y., which 
he was obliged to terminate on account of his health, which suf- 
fered from the lake winds. He returned to Bridgeport in the 
autumn of 1841, and during the following winter supplied the 
pulpit of the Congregational Society of Greenfield Hill, in the 
adjoining town of Fairfield. This church soon gave him a call to 
become their settled pastor, and on June 8, 1842, he was ordained 
and installed there, and there he remained in office until June 4, 
1867, when failing health compelled him to resign. He was not 
able afterwards to engage in any active labor, but he made two 
visits abroad, in 1869 to the Holy Land and the East, and in 1872 
to Europe, where he spent four years with his wife and daughters. 
His residence continued at Greenfield Hill, where he died, May 8, 
1887, at the age of 77. 

He was married in Sacket's Harbor to Hannah W. Barker, by 
whom he had three sons and two daughters. 

1836. 

Thomas Clap Pitkin, the youngest child of the Hon. Timo- 
thy Pitkin (Yale 1785), and grandson of the Rev. Timothy Pitkin 
(Yale 1747), was born in Farmington., Conn., December 12, 1816. 
His mother was Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. Bela Hubbard 
(Yale 1758), Rector of the Episcopal Church in New Haven. 

After leaving College he spent three years in the General The- 
ological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and was 
ordained fo the diaconate by Bishop Brownell, in New Haven, 
July 3, 1839. The next year he spent in the ministry in Law- 
renceburg, Ind., where he was advanced to the priesthood by 
Bishop Kemper in 1840. He then accepted a call to Christ 
Church, Louisville, Ky., whence he went in August, 1844, to the 
rectorship of St. Luke's Church, Rochester, >J. Y In July, 1847, 
he left Rochester, and became associate minister of Trinity 



370 

Church, New Haven, Conn. On December 1, 1855, he removed 
to St. Peter's Church, Albany, N. Y. On his resignation at 
Albany, after six years' service, he accepted a position as Assist- 
ant Rector of St. Paul's Church, Buffalo, N. Y., whence he went 
in 1867 to the rectorship of St. Paul's Church, in Detroit, Mich. 
He retired in 18'79, and declining all later calls, remained in 
Detroit, where he died, May 11, 1887^ in his 71st year. By his 
inherited force of intellect and acquisitions of scholarship, he was 
well equipped for public service ; while in private life he was 
peculiarly genial and attractive. Hamilton College conferred on 
him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1856. 

He married. May 19, 1841, Harriet L., younger daughter of 
Samuel Starr, Esq., of New York City, who survives him with 
their children, one son (Yale 1863) and three daughters. 

John Morton Swift, son of Henry Swift (Yale 1804) and 
Rebecca (Warner) Swift, was born in Washington, Duchess 
County, N. Y., September 18, 1816. 

After graduation he studied law in the Yale Law School and in 
his father's office, and for three years practiced his profession in 
Poughkeepsie, X. Y. He then, on account of some symptoms of 
failing health, became a farmer in Amenia, in the same county, 
and thus regained a good measure of health, though for most 
of the rest of his life threatened with consumptive tendencies. 
In his later years he spent the winters at the South, and he died 
in Jacksonville, Fla., April 3, 1887, in his 7 1st year. He was 
married in 1841, and had two children. 

1837. 

William Orville Atres, the son of Jared and Dinah (Bene- 
dict) Ayres, was born in New Canaan, Conn., September 11, 
1817. 

For fifteen years after graduation he was employed as a teacher 
as follows : in Berlin, Conn. (1837-38), Miller's Place, L. I. 
(1838-41), East Hartford, Conn. (1842-44), Sag Harbor, L. I. 
(1844-47), and Boston, Mass. (1845-52). He began the study of 
medicine in Boston, and in 1854 received the degree of M.D. 
from Yale College. He then removed to San Francisco, Cal., 
where he remained for nearly twenty years, engaged in practice. 
He also served as Pi-ofessor of the Theory and Practice of Medi- 
cine m the Toland Medical College in that city. He removed to 



371 

Chicago shortly before the great fire of 1871, in which he suf- 
fered considerable pecuniary loss. About 1878 he returned to 
New Haven, and opened an office for the practice of his profes- 
sion. From 1879 he also held an appointment as Lecturer on 
Diseases of the Nervous System in the Yale Medical School. He 
removed his residence, early in 1887, to Brooklyn, N. Y., his 
health having already begun to fail ; and he died in Brooklyn, on 
the 30t.h of April, in his 70th year. 

He married, November 23, 1847, Maria J. Hildreth, of Sag 
Harbor, L. I., who survives him, with one of their two daughters. 

Besides his specialty of nervous diseases. Dr. Ayres had made 
notable acquisitions in certain departments of natural science, 
especially in ichthyology, on which he had published a large num- 
ber of memoirs, in the Proceedings of the Boston Society of Nat- 
ural History and of the California Academy of Sciences. 

While in San Francisco he was a deacon in the First Congre- 
gational Church. 

John Hancock Pettingell, son of the Rev. Amos Pettingell 
(Harvard 1805) and Hannah (Dean) Pettingell, was born in Man- 
chester, Vt., May 11, 1815. In 1816 his father removed to Con- 
necticut, where he was settled as pastor, in the present towns of 
Morris and Naugatuck, until his death in 1830; these towns were 
then part of Waterbury, whence the son entered College. 

After graduation he taught for six years in the Institution for 
the Deaf and Dumb in New York City, pursuing in the meantime 
a theological course in the Union Seminary. On December 6, 
1843, he was ordained as pastor of the Congregational Church in 
South Dennis, Mass., where he spent four years. From April, 
1849, till October, 1852, he was settled over the Congregational 
Church in what is now the town of Essex, Conn. From 1853 to 
1860 he served as District Secretary of the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions, with his residence in Albany, 
N. Y. He was then settled, from April 1, 1860, to March 24, 
1863, over the Edwards (Congregational) Church, in Saxonville, 
Mass., and on May 6, 1863, was installed over the Congregational 
Church in Westbrook, Conn. He resigned this position. May 1, 
1866, to accept an appointment under {he Seaman's Friend 
Society, as their chaplain at Antwerp, Belgium, where he re- 
mained until the sunimer of 1872, when he returned to this coun- 
try. He then resided for a time in New York City, and subse- 



372 

queiitly in Philadelphia, where he was engaged in the preparation 
of a number of volumes for the press, in advocacy of the doctrine 
of conditional immortality. 

In the summer of 1886 his health began to fail, from a chronic 
inflammation of the stomach and bowels, and he removed about 
that time to New Haven, where he died on February 27, 1887, in 
his 72d year. 

He married, April 28, 1845, Rebecca S. Parker, of Falmouth, 
Mass., by whom he had a son and a daughter, both of whom sur- 
vive him. After her death he married, June 17, 1863, Jeannie 
Copeland, daughter of the late Judge Copeland, of Brooklyn, N. 
Y., who is still living. 

Owen Street was born in East Haven, Conn., September 8, 
1815, the second son of Nicholas and Betsey (Morris) Street, and 
grandson of the Rev. Nicholas Street (Yale 1751). 

After graduation he taught for a time in Clinton, formerly 
Killingworth, Conn., and studied theology, — in part in the Yale 
Seminary. His first settlement was in Jamestown, N. Y., where 
he was ordained over the Congregational Church, February 3, 
1842. He was married, November 29, 1841, to Mrs. Eliza M. 
Bolles, widow of Asa M. Bolles, Esq., of Clinton, and daughter of 
Jonah Rutty, of the same town. He took a dismission from the 
church in Jamestown, June 25, 1851, on account of ill health 
resulting from the humidity of the climate. Through that year 
and the first half of 1852 he supplied the pulpits in Woodbridge 
and North Haven, Conn. ; and on September 1, 1852, he was in- 
stalled over the Congregational Church in Ansonia, a borough in 
the township of Derby, Conn. He was dismissed from this 
charge in May, 1857, to accept a call from the High Street (Con- 
gregational) Church in Lowell, Mass., of which he was the pastor 
until his death. In this last service, of thirty years, he impressed 
himself upon his own parish and upon the community by his 
scholarship and public spirit no less than by his earnest and faith- 
ful Christian labor. Yale conferred on him in 1882 the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity. 

He had been in poor health for a year or more before his death, 
but his final illness was brief. He was prostrated on May 7, 
1887, by a general breaking up of his powers, and died at his 
home in Lowell on May 27, in his 72d year. His wife, worn out 
by faithful ministerings during the earlier weeks of his illness. 



373 

was confined to her bed before his death, and herself died tliree 
days later. Their children were two, — a daughter, who is the 
wife of the Rev. George S. Dickerman (Yale 1865), and a son who 
died in infancy. 

Samuel Jones Tilden was born in New Lebanon, Columbia 
County, N. Y., February 9, 1814. He left college in Sophomore 
year, on account of ill health, and though he pursued a course of 
study subsequently in the University of the City of New York, 
he received no collegiate degree until thatof LL.D. was given him 
by Yale in 18V5, at which time his name was also enrolled among 
those of his former class. 

He studied law in New York City, in the Law School of the 
University, and with Judge John W. Edmonds, and before his 
admission to the bar (in 1841) had already made his mark as a 
writer and speaker in support of the political and financial plat- 
form of the Democratic party. He opened an office in New York 
City in 1841, and continued in active practice until his election as 
Governor in 1874. In 1846 he was a member of the Legislature, 
and in the same year took a leading part in the work of the State 
Constitutional Convention. During the next twenty-five years 
he rose steadily in public estimation as a great lawyer, and 
amassed large wealth. 

In 18*71-73 he came into added prominence through his share 
in the overthrow of the Tammany " Ring." As one result of this 
struggle he was elected Governor of the State in the autumn of 
1874; and in the first year of his term of office he succeeded in 
securing the overthrow of another " Ring," which had long con- 
trolled the canals of the State. 

In 1876 he was nominated as the Democratic candidate for the 
Presidency, and at the ensuing election he received a majority of 
the popular vote. Dispute, however, arose in regard to the count 
of the electoral vote, the result of which as finally settled, through 
the medium of an Electoral Commission, was in favor of the Re- 
publican candidate. 

After this time Mr. Tilden lived in retirement, chiefly at his 
country house on the Hudson, near Yonkers, where a long period 
of ill-health was terminated by his death, from failure of the heart, 
August 4, 1886, in the 73d year of his age. He was never 
married. 



374 

1838. 

RuFus Wheelwright Clark, son of Thomas M. and Rebecca 
(Wheelwright) Clark, was born in Newburyport, Mass., Decem- 
ber 17, 1813. At an early age he went to New York City as a 
clerk in a mercantile house, and while thus engaged became con- 
vinced of his duty to prepare for the ministry. 

He spent the year after graduation in the Andover Theological 
Seminary, and the succeeding year in the Yale Divinity School. 
He was ordained and installed as» pastor of the Second Presby- 
terian Church in Washington, D. C, January 7, 1842, but 
resigned that charge in the following November, to accept a call 
to the North (Congregational) Church in Portsmouth, N. H., 
over which he was installed on the 16th of that month. He spent 
nine years in Portsmouth, leaving there in November, 1851, to 
remove to East Boston, Mass., where he was settled over the 
Maverick (Congregational) Church, on December 3 of that year. 
After a pastorate of five years and four months, he went to 
Brooklyn, N. Y., where he was installed over the South Congre- 
gational Church, from April 14, 1857, to November 17, 1862. 
From December 10, 1862, until his resignation twenty years later, 
he held the pastorate of the First Reformed Church in Albany, 
N. Y. As a pastor he was eminent for fidelity and power of work ; 
and he was also widely known through his question-books for 
Sunday Schools and other numerous contributions to religious 
literature. The most important of his published works, aside 
from those of a distinctly religious character, was his Heroes of 
Alhciny (1866, 8vo, pp. 870), written in commemoration of the 
sacrifices of the civil war. The degree of Doctor of Divinity 
was conferred on him by the University of the City of New York 
in 1862. 

After resigning his charge at Albany, in 1882, he made his 
home, in feeble health, with one of his sons, on Staten Island, 
N. Y. He went to Nantucket, Mass., for the summ'er of 1886, 
and died there, August 9, in his 73d year. 

He married, June 14, 1843, Eliza, daughter of the Rev. William 
C. Walton, of Alexandria, Ya., and Hartford, Conn.; she died 
May 21, 1877, leaving five sons and one daughter; four of the 
sons are clergymen. 

William Strong, the third son of the Rev. Henry P. Strong 
(Yale 1807) and Laura (Clark) Strong, was born in St. Albans, 



375 

Vt., July 15, 1817. He entered college from Rushville, N. Y., 
where his father was settled from 1832 until his death in 1835. 

On graduation he went to Cleveland, O., where he taught school 
and studied law. Being admitted to the bar he practiced his 
profession successfully in Cleveland. He was also actively in- 
terested in politics, and in 1849 was appointed by President 
Taylor one of the Judges of the IT. S. District Court for Oregon 
Territory. On his arrival in Oregon, in August, 1850, he was 
assigned to the district lying north of the Columbia River, and 
fixed his temporary home in Vancouver, though soon afterward 
removing to Cathlamet. By the division of the Territory in 1853 
he became a citizen of Washington Territory, and his term of 
office having expired he returned to the practice of the law. In 
1858 he was appointed U. S. District Judge for Washington 
Territory, and remained on the bench until 1861. He removed 
in 1862 to Portland, Oregon, where he resided until his death, 
being until 1883 engaged in his profession. For the last four 
years of his life failing health kept him out of active employment. 
He died in Portland, April 10, ]887, in his 70th year. 

He married, October 15, 1840, Lucretia, daughter of Wm. Pitt 
Robinson, of New Haven, III, who died November 5, 1884. Two 
sons died in infancy; four sons and two daughters are still 
living. 

1840. 

John Lawrexce Hamelin was born in Philadelphia, Pa., 
October 2, 1820, the eldest son of Joseph P. and Anna M. 
(Lawrence) Hamelin. 

For three years after graduation he was engaged in teaching in 
a classical school in Philadelphia. He then entered on a mercan- 
tile life, and continued in business for seventeen years, but from 
1860 until his death he was engaged in various forms of literary 
or journalistic labor. He was for some years editor and publisher 
of Bennetfs Monthly^ a magazine published in Philadelphia, 
and afterwards became financial editor of the Philadelphia Age^ 
and continued in that position until after that paper was merged 
in the Times. Later, until his death, he was connected with the 
German Demokrat of the same city. He had suffered for some 
time from disease of the heart, and died suddenly, from that 
cause, at his residence in Philadelphia, December 20, 1886, in his 
67th vear. 



376 

He was married, September 13, 1841, to Tberesa, daughter ol 
Dr. John Brown, of Philadelphia, who died October 17, 1879. 
His surviving children are two daughters. 

1841. 

David Botsford Davidson, son of Treat Davidson, was born 
in Roxbury, Connecticut, May 19, 1815. 

For the year after graduation he taught in New Milford, Con- 
necticut, after which he took the three years' course in the Yale 
Divinity School. In September, 1846, he began to preach in the 
Presbyterian Church in Paw Paw, Michigan, where he remained 
for two years, being ordained in the meantime as an evangelist, 
on the 9th of February, 1847. After two additional years of home 
missionary service, at Webster, in the same State, he removed to 
Ohio in 1851, and supplied successively the churches in Bellona 
and Streetsboro'. In the fall of 1854 he went to Iowa, and for 
some years devoted himself to the organization and supply of 
Congregational churches in Clayton County, his residence being 
in Monona. From Monona he removed to Danville, Des Moines 
County, about 1863, where he had charge of the Congregational 
church for four or five years. In 1868 he settled on a farm near 
Grinnell, Iowa, whence he removed to the residence of his eldest 
son, in Aurora, Nebraska, in 1884. He died in Aurora, August 29, 
1886, in his 72d year. 

He married, August 16, 1846, Susan H., daughter of Justus 
Parker, of Washington, Connecticut, who died May 31, 1850, 
leaving one son. He next married, October 16, 1850, Mrs. Jen- 
nette P. Bronson, sister of his first wife, by whom he had three 
sons. 

Stephen Dodd Law, fourth son of Samuel A. Law — who 
graduated from Yale in 1792 — and Sarah Law, was born in Mere- 
dith, Delaware County, N. Y., June 25, 1820. 
• After his graduation, he taught an academy for a while, was 
town clerk of Meredith, captain of militia, etc. He studied law 
at Delhi, N. Y,, and at Albany, N. Y., was admitted as solicitor 
and counselor in chancery in June, 1845, and as Attorney at law 
in January, 1846. He commenced practicing in Albany, but in 
1848 removed his ofiice to New York City. In July, 1843, he 
went to Washington, D. C, as Law-clerk in the office of the 
Solicitor of the Treasury ; but in 1849 returned to New York, 



377 

where he continued to practice law, making a specialty of patent 
cases, until the time of his death. 

In 1852 he published a Treatise on the Jurisdiction of the 
United States Courts ; in 1862, a Digest of all Cases decided in 
the American Courts in respect to Copyright, Patents for Inven- 
tions, and Trade marks; and in 1866, The Statute Laws of the 
United States respecting Copyrights and Patents for Inventions. 
New editions of the last two works have been frequently printed. 
He gave much attention to the study of the works of Shake- 
speare, and wrote several articles on the plays and characters of 
that poet, some of which it is intended to publish. His collection 
of books was quite large, and related mostly to editions of Shake- 
speare and works respecting that author. He was fond of his 
books, and when at home in the country spent most of his time 
in his library. 

He resided in Brooklyn, N. Y., before 1869, and after that date 
in Tarry town. He died at his home in Tarry town, October 22, 
1886, in his 67th year. 

He married, December 22, 1851, Miss Josephine Tewksbury, of 
Philadelphia, Pa., who died March 22, 1859. He had two sons, 
of whom the younger died in infancy ; the elder was graduated 
Ph.B. at the Sheffield Scientific School, 1876, and at the Colum- 
bia Law School, 1878, and practiced law with his father in New 
York. 

1842. 

Horatio Bingley Alden, the only son of Horatio B. and 
Mary (Belcher) Alden, was born in Randolph, Mass., April 8, 
1820, and spent the first two years of the College course with the 
Class of 1841. 

He resided in his native place throughout his life, although for 
some twenty years after graduation he was engaged in business 
in Baltimore, Md. In 1863 he terminated this engagement and 
for the next three or four years was employed in manufacturing 
in Randolph ; after which time he lived in retirement. In 1882 
he suffered a slight shock of paralysis, the effects of which con- 
tinued with him. He died in Randolph, April 14, 1887, at the 
age of 67. 

He married, February 26, 1852, Miss Clara B. Wales, of 
Randolph, who survives him with nine of their ten children. 



378 



1843. 



Edward McLeax, elder son of Colonel Francis and Sarah B. 
(Childs) McLean, of Vernon, Conn., was born in that town, Feb- 
ruary 24, 1818. 

Jle spent some time after graduation in teaching in South 
Coventry, Conn., and when delicate health seemed to debar him 
from entering a profession, he engaged for a few years in business 
in Philadelphia. 

In 1854 he was tempted by the climate to move to California, 
establishing a flourishing insurance agency in San Francisco. As 
early as 1.856 he became a resident of Oakland, where he was en- 
gaged in business as a real-estate broker for about twelve years. 
About 1869 his health obliged him to seek relief in Southern Cal- 
ifornia, where he was active and successful for the rest of his life 
in the development of the real-estate and fruit-raising interests of 
Los Angeles County. 

After many years of severe suffering from asthma, he died from 
inflammation of the bowels, after one day's illness, at his resi- 
dence in Pasadena, June 30, 1886, in his 69th year. 

He married, December 30, 1857, Miss Sarah Chester, of Elling- 
ton, Conn., who survives him with two daughters and one son, — 
an elder son having died a few months before his father. 

Mr. McLean was an early friend and trustee of the College of 
California, the predecessor of the State University, and deeply 
interested in all public enterprises in the places of his residence. 



1844. 

John Welsh Dulles was born in Philadelphia, Pa., November 
4, 1823, the son of Joseph H. Dulles (Yale 1814) and Margaret 
(Welsh) Dulles. 

After pursuing the study of medicine in the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 1844 and 1845, he entered the L'nion Theological 
Seminary, New York City, in January, 1846, and completed the 
course there in 1848. On the 2d of October, 1848, he was or- 
dained by the Fourth Presbytery of Philadelphia, and eight days 
later sailed from Boston to Madras, South India, as a missionary 
of the American Board of Foreign Missions. He labored among 
the Hindus until compelled by loss of voice to return to America, 
— reaching Boston in March, 1853. Unable to preach, though 
otherwise in crood health, he entered, in November, 1853, the ser- 



379 

vice of the American Sunday School Union (of which his father 
was one of the founders), in Philadelphia, and labored for three 
years as its Secretary for Missions. In ISoY he took charge of the 
affairs of the Presbyterian Publication Committee, as its Secre- 
tary and the Editor of its publications. This organization was 
connected with the then " New School " branch of the Presbyte- 
rian Church, and was consolidated with the ("Old School") Board 
of Publication, on the re-union of the two branches of that church 
in 1870. He then became Editorial Secretary of the united 
Board, editing its books and periodicals, and continuing in this 
relation until the close of his life ; he acted also for a year before 
his death as Corresponding Secretary. The position which he 
filled was one of abundant ancl congenial labor, and he so filled it 
as to accomplish a large service for the religious training of his 
generation. Besides countless smaller publications he was the 
author of two very useful books, " Life in India," and " The Ride 
through Palestine." The degree of Doctor of Divinity was con- 
ferred on him by the College of New Jersey in 1871. 

After some months of exhaustion, he was obliged to cease 
work in January, 1887, and he died at his home in Philadelphia, 
on the 13th of April, in his 64th year. 

He was married, September 20, 1848, in New York City, to 
Harriet L., daughter of the Rev. Miron Winslow, of Madras, who 
died September 6, 1861, leaving six sons and one daughter. He 
was again married, February 2, 1865, to Nataline Baynard, of 
Philadelphia, by whom he had one daughter and one son. His 
wife died in 1876. Of his six surviving sons three are graduates 
of Princeton College, and two are ministers. 

1845. 

Winston Jones Davie, elder son of Ambrose and Elizabeth 
Ann (Woodson) Davie, was born April 3, 1824, in Christian 
County, Ky., where his father was an extensive planter. 

After graduation he became a cotton and tobacco planter in his 
native State. He was elected to the legislature in 1849 as a 
Democrat, and in 1853 was a candidate for Congress, and failed 
of election by only a few votes. For most of the time between 
the latter date and the outbreak of the war he was engaged as a 
banker and real estate dealer in Memphis, Tenn.. He acted with 
the South during the war, and by the results of that contest lost 
all his property. From 1865 until 1876 he resided near Hopkins- 



380 

ville, in his native county. From IS'/G to 1879 he was State 
Commissioner of Agriculture, etc. Later he resided in Louisville, 
engaged in the raanufactui-e of chemical fertilizers. He died in 
Hopkinsville, May 24th, 1887, in his 64th year. 

He was married, August 7, 1845, to Miss Sarah Ann, daughter 
of Gen. Charles Philips, of Harris County, Ga., who died June 2, 
1859, leaving two sons, who have both been graduated at the Col- 
lege of New Jersey. He was again married, February 14, 1861, 
to Miss Addie E., daughter of Jacob W. Kalfus, of Louisville, 
Ky., by whom he had one son. 

William Burnham Woods, son of Ezekiel S. and Sarah J. 
(Burnham) Woods, was born in Newark, Ohio, August 3, 1824, 
and entered the Class in 1844, having had. his earlier training in 
Western Reserve College. 

On graduation he began the study of law in his native town, 
with S. D. King, Esq., and was admitted to the bar in November, 
1847. He soon after formed a partnership with Mr. King, which 
was only terminated by the outbreak of the rebellion in 1861. 
Meantime he was twice elected as a Democrat to represent Lick- 
ing County in the State Legislature, and served for one term as 
Speaker of the House. When the war came, his patriotism led 
him to take the field, and in September, 1861, he was commis- 
sioned as Lieutenant Colonel of the 76th Regiment, Ohio Volun- 
teers. In the fall of 1863 he was promoted to the rank of 
Colonel. He participated in some of the more important battles 
of the war, and in 1864 his command accompanied General Sher- 
man from Chattanooga to Atlanta, and from Atlanta to the sea. 

At the close of the war he had attained the rank of Brigadier 
General and brevet Major General of Volunteers. He was 
stationed at Alabama before being mustered out of service, and 
was so favorably impressed with the South that on resuming civil 
life in 1866 he removed with his family to Alabama, where he en- 
gaged in cotton planting as well as in the practice of his profes- 
sion. In February, 1867, he was elected to a six years' term of 
office as Chancellor of the Middle Chancery Division of the State. 

In 1869 he was appointed by President Grant United States 
Circuit Judge for the Fifth Circuit, comprising the Gulf States. 
In December, 1880, he was nominated by President Hayes as 
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, and 
was confirmed by the Senate with the general approval of the bar 



I 



.381 

of the Soutli. He was able to do good service on the Supreme 
Bench until October, 1886, when his health failed. He spent the 
winter at Los Angeles, Cal., but died of quick consumption, soon 
after his return, in Washington, May 14, 1887, in his 63d year. 

He married, June 21, 1855, Miss Anne E. Warner, of Newark, 
Ohio, who survives him, with their children, one son and one 
daughter. 

Judge Woods received the degree of Doctor of Laws from Yale 
in 1883. 

1846. 

Jaked Reid, Jr., the only son of the Rev. Jared Reid (Yale 
1817) and Sarah (Bigelow) Reid, was born in Reading, Mass., 
where his father was then pastor, November 22, 1824; he entered 
College from Tiverton, R. L 

After graduation he taught in Newport, R. L, from 1847 to 
1855, and married, April 19, 1854, Louise A., second daughter of 
the Rev. Edwin W. Dwigbt (Yale 1809), of Stockbridge, Mass. 
In 1855 he established a family school in Stockbridge, which occu- 
pied the house and grounds where Jonathan Edwards once re- 
sided. He was enthusiastically devoted to the profession of teach- 
ing, which he pursued in Stockbridge until 1863, when he went 
to New Haven for similar employment in Miss Brace's school for 
girls. From 1864 to 1866 he was the principal of a military 
academy in Perth Amboy, N. J., after which he returned to his 
former school in Stockbridge. In 1873 he established a family 
school for girls in Richmond, Mass., which he continued for a few 
years. Later he spent some time in the employ of one of the 
large publishing houses of New York, and for two years before 
his death he was an assistant editor of the New York Evangelist. 
After a month's illness he died at his residence in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
November 15, 1886, at the age of 62. His wife died in 1883; of 
their six children, one daughter and four sons are still living. 

• Samuel George Willard, son of Dr. David and Abby 
(Gregory) Willard, was born in Wilton, Conn., November 8, 
1819. At the age of 15, owing to infirm health, he relinquished 
the intention of entering college, and after that spent nearly two 
years and a half in business and three years in school-teaching, 
before he again took up his preparatory studies. 

After graduation he remained in New Haven for three years 
longer, engaged in teaching and in the study of divinity in the 
3 



382 

Yale Seminary. In September, 1849, he received a call from the 
First (Congregational) Church in Willimantic, Conn., over which 
he was ordained pastor, on the 8th of November following. 
From this charge he was dismissed, September 8, 1868, to accept 
a call to the Congregational Church in the neighboring town of 
Colchester, with which he continued as pastor for another equal 
period of 19 years, or until his death there, June 12, 1887, in his 
68th year. 

Mr. Willard was widely esteemed and trusted in his public 
vocation and by his brethren in the ministry. In the latter 
relation he was especially active in the management of the Mis- 
sionary Society of Connecticut and of the Fund for Ministers, 
which he aided in establishing. He was also much interested in 
the care of the public schools in both the places of his pastoral 
labor. 

In 1866 he was a member of the State Legislature, and was 
elected by that body as one of the trustees for the General 
Hospital for the Insane of the State, chartered that year; he 
served in this capacity until his last illness, and for much of the 
time as Secretary of the Board. 

In 1867 he was elected into the Corporation of Yale College, 
and held this position until his death, being also for twelve years 
a member of the important Prudential Committee of that body. 
While in attendance at the meeting of the Corporation at Com- 
mencement, 1886, he suifered an apoplectic stroke, due probably 
to recent overwork. He was taken home the next day, and rallied 
to some extent, but not sufficiently to perform any further labor. 
His powers gradually failed, and he died on June 12, 1887, in his 
68th year. 

He married, Nov. 14, 1849, Mary A., daughter of Samuel P. 
Randle, of Wilton, who died very suddenly. May 15, 1853, leav- 
ing no children. He married in 1854 Cynthia B. Witter, daugh- 
ter of Dan Barrows, of Mansfield, Conn., who survives him with 
their only son (Yale 1879) and two daughters. 

1848. 

Henry Slack was born June 10, 1826, in Albany, N. Y,, the 
youngest and only surviving son of John and Mary (Hoton) 
Slack. 

After graduation he devoted himself at first to the study of law 
in his native city, but later turned to medicine, and received the 
degree of M.D. from the Albany jVIedical College in 1852. 



383 

In 1853 he settled in New York City, and in 1856 went to 
Europe, where he devoted about two years to the further study, 
in Paris, of medicine and surgery, — especially the latter, for 
which his career showed that he possessed a remarkable talent. 
On June 11, 1861, he was married, in New York, to Frances 
Margaret Terry, granddaughter of the late Whitehead Hicks, and 
daughter of Charles M. Terry, lately deceased, all of New York 
City. In June, 1 865, he removed to Fishkill, N. Y., where he 
continued in active and extensive practice, until prostrated by a 
sudden and severe attack of pneumonia in April, 1886. During 
his slow recovery symptoms of Bright's disease, complicated with 
'hypertrophy of the heart, manifested themselves, but he was able 
to attend to his practice until October. He lingered on, in patient 
suffering, until the morning of December 10, when death released 
him, in his 61st year. The general expressions of sorrow in the 
community at his loss showed how useful had been his life. His 
wife and three children survive him, the eldest being a graduate 
of Columbia College. 

1849. 

Francis Edwin Harrison, son of Justus Harrison, was born 
in New Haven, November 27, 1830. 

After graduation he engaged in teaching in Windham County, 
Conn., and in the study of medicine in New York City, until 
April, 1852, when he became the editor of the Windham County 
Telegraphy at West Killingly. While thus occupied he " was 
elected, in May, 1854, Assistant Clerk of the House of Representa- 
tives, and in October following withdrew from his editorial post. 
In 1855 he served as Clerk of the House, and in the fall of the 
same year became the teller of the Elm City Bank in New Haven. 
He resigned the latter position in August, 1857, on account of ill 
health, and in 1858-59 was cashier and receiver of the Litchfield 
(Conn.) Bank. He then became general agent for the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of New Haven, and left this employment 
in April, 1861, to accept the Assistant Postmastership in this 
city, — a station which he filled with great efficiency for nearly 
eleven years. He left the post-office, January 1, 1872, to become 
the treasurer of the New Haven Gas Light Company, in which 
capacity he served acceptably until his death. He was a member 
of the New Haven Common Council from October, 1874, to 
January, 1878, and its President during the last year of his term 



384 

of service. He also performed, from April, 1867, the duties of 
Secretary of the New Haven and Derby Railroad Company. 
These accumulated responsibilities proved in the end too much 
for his strength, and in September, 1886, he experienced an attack 
of an apoplectic nature, which permanently disabled him. He 
died at his residence in New Haven, June 21, 1887, in his 57th 
year. 

He married, July 29, 1853, Miss Eliza Jane Gill, of New 
Haven, who survives him with four daughters and one son 
(Sheffield Scientific School, 1886). 

Charles Josiah Hutchins was born in Waterf ord, Erie County,- 
Pa., September 8, 1825. 

He spent the first year after graduation in teaching in his native 
town, and was then for nearly three years a member of the Yale 
Divinity School. On leaving that Seminary he preached for a 
year in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and then took an additional year of 
study in the Seminary in Andover, Mass. In June, 1855, he be- 
gan an engagement with the Presbyterian Church in York, Pa., 
where he was ordained and installed on the 14th of the following 
October. He was dismissed from York at his own request in 
April, 1859, and then served again for nearly a year the church in 
Kenosha. In 1860 he was settled over an important Presbyte- 
rian Church in Racine, Wisconsin, where he remained until May, 
1865, including an experience of the Civil War as chaplain (for 
100 days) of the 39th Wisconsin Volunteers. After brief em- 
ployments in various pulpits, he was again settled over the Pres- 
byterian Church in Fulton, N. Y., in June, 1867, whence he removed 
to California in 1869. From October, 1869, until March, 1879, 
he was pastor of the Congregational Church in Petaluma, going 
thence to a church of the same denomination in Los Angeles, the 
pastorate of which he held until 1882. During that year, while 
on his way to keep an appointment to preach, he was thrown from 
his carriage, and received an injury to his spinal column, which 
made his last years a period of excruciating pain. He endeavored, 
however, in 1883, to resume work, and was able for a year to 
preach to the church in Martinez, but after that effort was con- 
fined to his bed. He died in San Francisco, February 13, 1887, 
in his 62d year. 

He married, April 3, 1861, Clara A., daughter of Dr. James S. 
Shepherd, of Racine, who survives him with two daughters and 
one of his four sons. 



385 

CuBTiss Trowbridge Woodruff, the only child of Curtiss and 
Sarah M. (Trowbridge) Woodruff, was born September 8, 1816, in 
Washington, Litchfield County, Conn., where his parents then re- 
sided. In 1842 they settled in New Haven, whence their son en- 
tered college. 

For the year after graduation he was engaged in business in 
Worcester, Mass., and he spent the next year in the General The- 
ological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church in New 
York City. He was then obliged to resort to a business life again 
for the means of support, and it was not until 1853 that he was 
able to give himself wholly to renewed work in the seminary. 
On July 6, 1856, he was ordained to the diaconate by Bishop Ho- 
ratio Potter, in New York City, and he took charge at once of 
St. Paul's Church in Woodbury, Conn. On the 12th of Febru- 
ary, 1857, he was advanced to the priesthood. In January, 1860, 
he became rector of St. Michael's Church, Naugatuck, Conn., 
which position he left in September, 1861, for the chaplaincy of 
the 7th Regiment, Conn. Volunteers. On his return from this 
service, he assumed (May 1, 1864) the rectorship of St. Stephen's 
Church, Ridgefield, Conn., where he continued for two years. 
He was then for two years assistant to the rector of St. Paul's 
Church, Norwalk, Conn., and on the formation of a parish in South 
Norwalk, in April, 1868, became its rector. He was also from 
1864 to 1869 secretary of the diocesan convention, and from 1866, 
when the Insane Hospital at Middletown was founded, until 1869, 
a member and the Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 

In April, 1870, he was called to Christ Church, Hudson, N. Y., 
which he left in December, 1871, to become the Superintendent of 
The New York City Missioilary Society of the Episcopal Church, 
finding in that work for the rest of his life scope for his energy, 
kindness of heart, and strong personal influence. He was success- 
ful also in securing large gifts for the needs of the mission work. 
He died, very suddenly, in New York City, from asthma compli- 
cated with other disease, February 1, 1887, in his 71st year. 

He married, February 10, 1849, in New York City, Miss Julia 
L. M. Curtiss, who survives him without children. 

1850. 

Edward Warren Bentley, son of William and Pleiades (Wil- 
liams) Bentley, was born in Tyringham, Mass., July 23, 1826, and 
entered college from Harwinton, Conn. 



386 

After graduation he taught school for a year in Lyme, Conn., 
and then entered the Theological Institute of Connecticut, in East 
Windsor (now in Hartford). He finished his course at the sem- 
inary in July, 1854, and was ordained and installed on the 4th of 
the following October as pastor of the Reformed (Dutch) Church 
in Ellenville, Ulster County, N. Y. In this, his only pastorate, 
he labored for more than a quarter of a century most usefully and 
successfully, until induced to resign by failing health, January 1, 
1882. He was widely known and esteemed in the region of his 
home, and was a prominent figure in denominational councils. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the University of 
the City of New York in 1877. 

After his retirement from the ministry he moved to Canton 
Center, Conn., where he died October 23, 1886, in his 61st year. 

He was married, May 1, 1854, to Emily, third daughter of the 
Hon. Loin L. Humphrey, of Canton Center, who survives him 
with two sons and two daughters ; the elder son was graduated 
here in 1880. 

1854. 

Abeam Elisha Baldwin, second son of Birdsey and Lucia 
(Baldwin) Baldwin,' was born in G-oshen, Conn., November 18, 
1830. 

After leaving college he taught for a year in Ellington, Conn,, 
and then studied theology at Andover Seminary, where he was 
graduated in 1858. After preaching a few weeks in Warren, 
Conn., he accepted a call in January, 1859, from Akron, Ohio, 
where he remained three years. He was ordained February 28, 
1860. In 1862 he went to Ann Arbor, Mich., and became pastor 
of the First Congregational Church. In this field he labored until 
November, 1867, when he removed to Lincoln, 111., preaching to 
the Congregational Church of that town until April, 1870. The 
summer and fall of 1870 he passed in Chicago, and in December 
accepted a call to a Congregational Church in Memphis, Tenn. 
In the spring of 1874 he was driven from Memphis by the 
yellow fever epidemic, and passed the rest of the year with rela- 
tives in New Jersey. 

In January, 1875, he became the pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church of Bound Brook, N. J., and continued in his good work 
for eight and half years, resigning July 1, 1883, owing to im- 
paired health, resulting from the malaria of the locality. He im- 



387 

mediately located himself at New Brunswick, N. J., seeking rest 
and renewed health. In this he was 'disappointed. His health 
gradually failed, and in February, 1885, he was prostrated with 
catarrhal pneumonia, from which he never entirely recovered. 
He remained an invalid up to the time of his death, on October 
26, 1886, in New Brunswick. The Presbytery of Bound Brook 
bear testimony to his faithfulness, and his great worth to their 
church. He was a man of sensitive and kindly disposition, and 
an effective and eloquent preacher. 

Mr. Baldwin was married, January 14, 1868, to Mary M., daugh- 
ter of Lewis D. Janes, of Akron, Ohio. They had a son and a 
daughter, but both died in childhood. Mrs. Baldwin died May 
22, 1875. Mr. Baldwin was again married, October 15, 1879, to' 
Rachel DePuy, daughter of Henry C. Brokaw, of Bound Brook, 
N. J., who survives him. 

Joseph Warren Wtlsox, son of Robert G. and Rebecca F. 
(Conant) Wilson, was born in Hopkinton, Mass., January 4, 1827) 
and entered college a resident of Natick, Mass. 

After graduation he taught for two years in New Haven, spent 
one year as a student at the Yale Law School, and then settled 
as a lawyer in Norwalk, Conn., where he resided for the rest of 
his life. He gave much attention to educational matters, being 
for fourteen years a member of the Board of Education of Nor- 
walk ; during eight of which years he was an acting school vis- 
itor. For twenty-five years he was elected a justice. 

He also took a strong interest in religious matters; was for 
many years treasurer of the First Congregational Church, and 
from 1868 to 1881, when he resigned on account of failing health, 
was one of its deacons. 

He was prevented from practicing his profession for the last 
seven or eight years of his life by a severe cough, the result of 
chronic pneumonia, from which he died February 26, 1887, at the 
age of 60 years, at his home in Norwalk. 

Mr. Wilson was married on February 9, 1859, to Julia Virgi- 
nia, daughter of Erastus R. Phelps, of New Haven, Conn., who 
survives him with two of their four sons. 

1858. 
William Comstock Bennett, son of Ezra P. Bennett, M.D. 
(Berkshire Med. Institution, 1827), and Sarah M. (Comstock) Ben- 
nett, was born in the village (now the township) of Bethel, in 



b 



388 

Danbury, Conn., March 7, 1836. He entered college in 1853, but 
retired at the close of his first term, and re-entered with the fol- 
lowing class. 

On graduation he began the study of medicine with his father, 
and continued it in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New 
York City, where he recei'^'ed his medical degree in March, 1860. 
He then began practice in Danbury, but in July, 1861, enlisted in 
the 5th Regiment Conn. Volunteers, as Assistant Surgeon. He 
was promoted to be Surgeon in 3Iay, 1862, and immediately on 
his discharge from service in June, 1863, was appointed Assistant 
Surgeon U. S. Volunteers. His promotion as Surgeon followed 
in December, when he was assigned to the 12th, as afterwards to 
the 20th Army Corps, with which he served usually as Medical 
Inspector. He participated in Sherman's march to the sea, and 
resigned his position in February, 1865. He then returned to 
Danbury, where he gained a large practice, took a deep interest 
in local charitable works, and was greatly beloved. He died 
suddenly, in Danbury, July 12, 1886, from paralysis of the brain, 
in his 51st year. He was never married. 

William Dare jVLorgan, son of Captain Elisha E. and Eliza 
Anne (Robinson) Morgan, was born in New York City, February 
1, 1838. During his youth the family residence was in Saybrook, 
but early in his college course his father, the founder ©f the 
Morgan line of clipper ships plying between New York and Lon- 
don, settled permanently in New York. 

On graduation the son entered into the shipping business in his 
.father's office, and continued in the same line of business until his 
death; early in his career he spent four years (1860-64) in Lon- 
don as a member of the firm of Grinnell, Tinker & Morgan, ship 
and insurance brokers, but the rest of his life was passed as a 
shipping merchant in New York. He maintained the line of sail- 
ing vessels established by his father until they w^ere superseded 
by steamships ; among his other business he was from 1871 the 
agent of the line of steamers plying between New York and 
Bristol, England. His energy and uprightness in- the conduct of 
his business led men to trust him fully in other relations, and he 
thus filled many important positions, being a director of the Con- 
tinental Bank, a Pilot and Harbor Commissioner, Vice-President 
of the Produce Exchange, a Governor of the New York Hospital, 
etc. He was also a g^reat social favorite. He died in New York 



389 

City, after three days' illness, from pneumonia, April 24, 1887, in 
his 50th year. 

He married, October 31, 1868, Miss Angelica L,, daughter of 
Lydig M. Hoyt (Columbia College, 1840), of Staatsburgh, N. Y., 
who survives him with their children, three daughters and one 
son. 

J859. 

Henry Lincoln Breed, son of the Rev. William J. Breed 
(Yale 1831) and Mary (Smith) Breed, was born in Nantucket, 
Mass., where his lather was then pastor, December 14, 1838. 

Directly after graduation he sailed for Europe, where he re- 
mained — chiefly occupied in travel — until January, 1862. In 
October, 1862, he enlisted in the 44th Regiment Massachusetts 
Volunteers, in which he served until June, 1863. He then went 
to San Francisco, and with a partner opened a brokerage office, 
under the firm name of Tilden & Breed, dealing in real estate and 
mining stocks. He continued here until 1872, and amassed quite 
a fortune. In 1869 his father died, in Taunton, Mass., and the 
care of the family was assumed by him and maintained until his 
death with the most devoted affection and fidelity. On his re- 
turn from California he made his home in Taunton, with his 
mother and sisters, spending his summers in Nantucket, for which 
place as the field of his father's earliest ministerial labors he had 
an untiring fondness. His business interests in California were 
left in the hands of an agent, who proved untrustworthy, so that 
a considerable portion of his property was lost. He died sud- 
denly, at his home in Taunton, of angina pectoris^ December 6, 
1886, at the age of 48. He was never married. 

1861. 

William Cook, son of Edward and Catharine (Ireland) Cook, 
was born in New York City, April 3, 1842. 

He spent the greater part of the two years after graduation in 
the study of chemistry and languages at New Haven, but in 
November, 1863, he enlisted in the U. S. service and was ap- 
pointed Captain of the 9th Regiment of U. S. Colored Troops. 
In August, 1864, while with his regiment before Richmond, he 
was taken a prisoner, and remained in captivity for six months. 
When mustered out of service, in December, 1866, he returned to 
his studies at Yale, but went abroad in August, 1867, and subse- 



390 

quently settled in Berlin for the further study of chemistry. His 
residence there was interrupted by a visit to America in 1868, dur- 
ing which he was married, on May 28, to Miss Susan C, daugh- 
ter of John P. Boyd, of Portland, Me. In the autumn of 1869 he 
abandoned chemistry to take up the study of language, and his 
remaining years in Europe were divided between Germany, Italy, 
and France. 

He returned permanently in 1873, with the intention of devot- 
ing himself to the teaching of modern languages ; and in the 
autumn of that year he was appointed an instructor in German in 
Harvard College. After continuing for six years in this relation, 
he received a five-years' appointment as Assistant Professor of 
German, which expired in 1884. After this date his residence 
still continued in Cambridge, while he was occupied as Instructor 
in Modern Languages in the Institute of Technology in Boston. 
He threw himself with all the enthusiasm of his ardent nature into 
the work of teaching, and found time also for the application of 
much labor to a projected French-English Dictionary, and to a 
new German Grammar ; he had already published a revision of 
Otto's German Grammar and an edition of Faust with notes. He 
was spending the summer vacation of 1886 an Chatham, Mass., 



and while out gunning on August 27 his gun was accidentally 
discharged and he received a severe wound in the knee, which 
resulted in his death the same day, in the 45th year of his age. 
His wife survives him with five children. 

Edward Rowland Sill, the younger and only surviving son 
of Theodore Sill, M. D. (Yale 1831), and Elizabeth N. (Rowland) 
Sill, was born in Windsor, Conn., April 29, 1841. He was left an 
orphan at the age of twelve, and spent much of his boyhood in 
the family of an uncle, in Ohio. 

His health was poor at the time of his graduation, and in 
December, 1861, in company with his classmate. Shearer, he 
started on a voyage around Cape Horn to California. He re- 
mained on the Pacific coast until July, 1866, occupying himself 
with temporary employments. He then returned to the East, 
and on February 7, 1867, was married to his cousin, Miss Eliza- 
beth N., daughter of the Hon. Elisha N. Sill (Yale 1820), of 
Cuyahoga Falls, O. During the spring of 1867 he studied theol- 
ogy in the Harvard Divinity School, and then spent nearly a year 
in New York City, engaged in literary work, partly in connec- 



391 

tion with the Evening Mail newspaper. He then taught for one 
year in Medina County, Oliio, and for two years in Cuyahoga 
Falls. In 18V 1 he returned to California, accepting the position 
of principal of the Oakland High School, where he did excellent 
work. In 1874 he became Professor of English in the University 
of California, and in that capacity for eight years rendered most 
valuable service to the interests of higher education in the State. 
Thoroughly devoted to his special work, and possessed of a rare 
power of stimulating liis pupils, he was also most deeply inter- 
ested in all discussions bearing on theories of education, and his 
best powers were enlisted in tlie molding of public opinion on 
these questions. He resigned his professorship in March, 1882, 
partly on account of his own health, and partly for the sake of 
leisure to undertake some literary work. He soon returned to 
Cuyahoga Falls, w^here his wife's aged father still lives, and 
there the rest of his days were spent, in study and composi- 
tion. Early in the present year his health was such that he 
had planned a visit to Colorado for the spring months ; and in 
preparation for the journey he went to a hospital in Cleveland for 
a slight surgical operation that seemed desirable. The operation 
was performed successfully, but the low state of his nervous sys- 
tem was such that he was unable to rally and sank rapidly; he 
died in the hospital very suddenly, February 27, 1887, in his 46th 
year. His wife survives him, without children. 

While yet in College, Professor Sill was known as the poet of 
his class, and in his riper years he achieved distinction not only 
by his poetry, but also by his critical writings. He published in , 
1868 a volume entitled The Hermitage and other Poems (l2mo. 
pp. 152), and in 1883 he printed for private distribution The 
Venus of Milo and other Poems (16mo. pp. 81) ; besides these, 
many uncollected poems are scattered through the magazines of 
recent years, with considerable prose writing, much of it without 
his name. As poet and critic he had fulfilled the promise of his 
early years, and his premature death is a public loss ; to those 
who knew him personally he was also the most delightful of com- 
panions and the truest of friends. 

1862. 

BuEL Clinton Carter, son of Sanborn B. Carter, was born in 
Ossipee, N. H., January 20, 1840. 

After leaving College he returned to his native town, where he 



392 

was instrumental in raising a company of volunteers for the war. 
He entered the service as 1st Lieutenant of the 13th New Hamp- 
shire Regiment in September, 1862, and was promoted to a cap- 
taincy in the same regiment in July, 1863. In June, 1864, he 
was transferred to the staff of the regular army, as Captain and 
Assistant Quartermaster, and in July, 1865, he was brevetted 
Major. 

In June, 1866, he was mustered out of the service, but contin- 
ued in the employ of the government for about four months as 
Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue in Southwestern Virginia. 
He then returned home, and devoted himself to the study of law 
in his father's office. Being admitted to the bar he settled in 
Wolfeborough, where for ten years he was engaged in successful 
and lucrative professional business. He was appointed one of the 
Bank Commissioners of the State in 1872, but was displaced by a 
change of parties in 1874. In 1878 by reason of ill-health he was 
obliged to relinquish business temporarily, and he removed to 
Rollinsford, where he spent a year in out of door pursuits. In 
1879 he began practice again in Dover, as a member of the firm 
of Carter & Nason, but his health continued delicate. He was 
again appointed a Bank Commissioner in 1881, and held the office 
until his death. He died at his residence in Rollinsford, Decem- 
ber 11, 1886, in his 47th year, leaving the record of an upright 
and religious life. 

He married, May 16, 1866, Miss Ella F. Burbank, of Saco, Me., 
who survives him. 

Charles Hexry Lkwis was born in Carlinville, III, April 4, 
1838, and entered College from Chatham in the same State. 

■ On graduation he enlisted in the 16th Connecticut Regiment, 
and was wounded in the leg at the battle of Antietam (September, 
1862), so that in March, 1863, he received his discharge. Later, 
he entered the regular service, as hospital steward, and thus con- 
tinued until 1866. Meantime, while stationed at Keokuk, Iowa, 
he had attended medical lectures at the State University, and 
after leaving the army he completed his studies in the Yale Med- 
ical School, where he received the degree of M.D. in 1867. 

He practiced medicine for a year at his old home in Illinois, 
and then went to Kansas, where after various migrations, he 
settled in Cedar Vale, Howard County, engaged in farming and 
stock-raising, as well as in the drug business and in professional 



893 

practice. In 1882, on account of poor health he disposed of his 
business, and for a year or two spent most of his time in Califor- 
nia. On his return he settled in Grenola, Elk County, Kansas, 
where he won the respect of the community. He died in Grenola, 
September 9, 1885, in his 48th year. 

He married, April 11, 1869, Imogene, daughter of William A. 
Lewis, of Denver, Colorado, by whom he had one son, besides a 
daughter who died in infancy. 

1863. 

Charles Carroll Blatchley, son of Samuel L. and Mary 
Ann (Robinson) Blatchley, was born in North Madison, Conn., 
July 28, 1841. His parents removed to New Haven in his boy- 
hood. 

He studied law in New York, and wa» admitted to the bar in 
that city in December, 1864. In May, 1865, he opened an office 
in New Haven, but after two or three years he associated himself 
with his father and his two brothers in the real estate business, 
which engrossed his entire attention. In the course of his busi- 
ness he became much interested in the growth of the city to the 
eastward and northeastward, and in the promotion of public im- 
provement in those sections. He was one of the East Rock Park 
Commissioners. 

About the middle of January, 1887, he became seriously ill 
with Bright's disease, and he died at his home in New Haven, on 
the 5th of March, in his 46th year. 

He was married, November 27, 1863, to Susannah, daughter of 
Jacob Emery, of Hogansburg, N. Y., who survives him with two 
daughters and three sons. 

Samuel Willoughby Duffield, the eldest child of the Rev. 
Dr. George Duffield (Yale 1837) and Anna Augusta (Willoughby) 
Duffield, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., September 24, 1843. 

He entered College from Philadelphia, but before his gradua- 
tion his father had accepted a call to Adrian, Mich., and there the 
son taught school for a few months and then entered on the study 
of theology under his father's direction. He was .licensed to 
preach in April, 1866, and for the latter half of the same year 
had charge of a mission enterprise in Chicago. He then spent six 
months in New York and Philadelphia, engaged in study and 
preaching. He was ordained and installed, November 12, 1867, 



394 

as pastor of the Kenderton Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, 
from which he removed in 1870 to a brief pastorate in Jersey 
City, N. J. In the fall of 1871 he became pastor of the 1st Pres- 
byterian Church, Ann Arbor, Mich., which he left in November, 
1874, for the 8th Presbyterian Church in Chicago. This charge 
he resigned, October 1, 1876, and went to Auburn, N. Y., as 
acting pastor of the Central Presbyterian Church. Having ter- 
minated this relation on the 1st of May, 1878, he was installed 
over the 2d Presbyterian Church in Altoona, Pa., in October of 
the same year. From Altoona he went in 1881 to the Westmin- 
ster Presbyterian Church, Bloomfield, N. J., of which he remained 
the beloved pastor until his death. He suffered from disease of 
the heart, and was laid aside from active work in the summer of 
1886, with no reasonable hope of recovery. He died in Bloom- 
field, May 12, 1887, in his 44th year. 

He married, October 1, 1868, Hattie S., daughter of Isaac Hay- 
wood, of Adrian, Mich., who survives him with their two chil- 
dren, a daughter and a son. 

Mr. Duffield had shown fine literary ability, especially as a 
poet. His publications include "Warp and Woof," a book of 
verse (N. Y., 1870, pp. 188, 12mo.), and an elaborate work on the 
history of hymnology, entitled " English Hymns : their Authors 
and History" (K Y., 1886, pp. 675, 8vo.). 

DwiGHT Marcy, son of Calvin and Elvira (Clark) Marcy, was 
born, June 8, 1840, in Union, Tolland County, Conn. 

After graduation he studied law in Hartford, Conn., in the 
office of Waldo & Hyde, and was admitted to the bar in 1865. 
He then began practice in Plainfield, Conn., but on his appoint- 
ment as State's Attorney for Tolland County, in June, 1867, he 
removed his office to Rockville, in the township of Vernon, where 
he continued until his death. 

In May, 1867, he was chosen Assistant Clerk of the House of 
Representatives of the State, and served as clerk of the same 
body the following year, and as Clerk of the Senate in 1869. In 
1878, 1879, and 1880, he was elected to represent the town of 
Vernon in the House; he was an influential member of the 
Assembly in the first and second years of his service, and was 
elected as Speaker at the remaining session. At the time of his 
death he was the recognized leader of the bar in Tolland County. 
After having suffered from Bright's disease for a long time, he 
died suddenly at his home, May 7, 1887, at the age of 47. 



395 

He married. June 1, 1867, Miss Alline S. Williams, of Groton, 
Mass. 

George Worthington Moore, the second son of Chauncey W. 
and Clarissa Moore, was born in the City of New York, February 
28, 1841. From his early childhood the family residence was in 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

After his graduation he engaged in the dry-goods business at 
the corner of Worth Street and Broadway, in New York, at first 
with his father (who died in April, 1873) and under the firm name 
of Moore & Knapp ; and afterwards continued in the same busi- 
ness at the same location, until his own death, in connection with 
the firm of Tefft, Weller & Co. During these years he made 
several trips through various parts of Europe in the interest of his 
business. 

For some years past he had suffered from a lung difficulty, but 
he persevered hopefully to the last in the faithful discharge of 
his duties, allowing himself only a brief vacation of two or three 
weeks each summer for recreation. In September, 1886, he was 
obliged to give up all business, and to retire to Lakewood, N. J., 
where he spent two months. During that autumn he had three 
attacks of hemorrhage, and after an interval of great weakness, 
with periods of intense suffering, died peacefully, at his residence 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., February 7, 1887, at the age of 46. He was 
never married, and from the time of his father's death was wholly 
devoted to the care of his mother. 

1864. 

John Wickliffe Beach, second sop of the Rev. Aaron C. 
Beach (Yale 1835) and Lucy A. (Walkley) Beach, was born in 
Wolcott, Conn., January 5, 1843, and entered College from East 
Haddam, Conn., in which town his father settled in 1859, 

After graduating he taught for a year in a private school in 
Baltimore, Md. From September, 1865, to May, 1869, he studied 
theology in the Yale Divinity School, being also occupied for 
much of the time in teaching in the Hopkins Grammar School. 

On September 28, 1870, he was ordained and installed as pastor 
of the Congregational Church in Windsor Locks, Conn., where he 
had already been preaching for a year, and where he continued 
until July 1, 1874. Late in 1874 he removed to Norfolk, Conn., 
where he supplied for some months the vacant pulpit. In 



396 

November, 1877, he became acting pastor of the Congregational 
Church in North Branford, Conn., but his engagement there was 
terminated by an attack of brain-disease in February, 1879. On 
recovering his health he returned to Windsor Locks, where he 
conducted for three or four years a private school. 

In 1884 he became the first principal of the Robbins School, in 
Norfolk, in developing which he found opportunity for the full 
play of the enthusiasm and diligence of his nature. He labored, 
unconsciously, beyond his strength, and broke down, early in 
February, 1887, with an acute disease of the brain. He was 
taken for treatment to Hartford, Conn., where he died, on the 21st 
of that month, at the age of 44. 

He was married, August 24, 1869, to Maria, youngest daughter 
of Deacon Chester Talcott, of Coventry, Conn., who survives him 
wiih their two daughters. 

1867. 

Charles Wyllys Betts, the youngest child of the Hon. Fred- 
erick J. Betts (Williams College 1821) and Mary W. (Scoville) 
Betts, was born, August 3, 1845, in Newburgh, N. Y., the country 
residence of his father, who was a lawyer in New York City. In 
his early boyhood the family removed to New Haven, where the 
sons were prepared for College. 

In 1867 he entered the Columbia College Law School, where he 
was graduated in 1869. He then practiced law in New York 
City for two years, but in 1871 returned to New Haven to pursue 
graduate studies in history and literature. Before he had com- 
pleted the course for the degree of Ph.D., he accepted, in March, 
1873, an offer to resume the practice of law with the firm of 
Whitney & Betts, composed of his brother (Yale 1864) and Mr. 
Whitney, now the Secretary of the Navy. In October, 1875, 
the firm changed to F. H. and C. W. Betts (Mr. Whitney having 
accepted the position of Corporation Counsel), and since October, 
1875, it has been Betts, Atterbury & Betts. The Specialty of the 
firm was patent cases in the United States courts, and Mr. C. 
Wyllys Betts's ability in that branch of the profession was fully 
recognized, while the attractiveness of his personal character 
made him a great social favorite. He early became interested in 
the study of numismatics, and during his residence in New Haven 
gave much time to the arrangement and description of the College 
coin collection, and contributed freely to its increase. His interest 
in the subject was kept up in later years, and by his will he be- 



397 

queathed to the College his own rich collection of coins, as well 
as some valuable specimens of early carved oak chests and chairs. 
He was never married, but lived in the family of his brother in 
New York, where he died, after a week's illness, of pneumonia, 
April 27, 1887, in his 42d year. 

Louis Lambert Palmer, son of Captain Alexander S. and 
Priscilla (Dixon) Palmer, of Stonington, Conn., was born in the 
adjoining town of Westerly, R. I., July 21, 1845. 

After graduation he was for a short time in business with a 
brother in Chicago, 111. He then studied law there and entered on 
the practice of that profession in the same city. He continued in 
successful practice until 1883, when he returned to his father's 
house at Stonington. In 1886 he represented that town in the 
Legislature. 

On the 31st of May, 1887, he was accidentally killed, at his 
home, by the explosion of a loaded gun standing in a closet which 
he happened to be exploring. He was not married. 

Ebenezer Fowler Stoddard, the youngest child of Colonel 
Henry and Susan C. (Williams) Stoddard, was born in Dayton, 
Ohio, July 16, 1845. His father was a native of Woodbury, 
Conn. 

For four or five years after graduation he was engaged with his 
brother in the manufacture of linseed oil, varnish, and paints, in 
Dayton. In 1872 he disposed of his former business, and for two 
years was engaged in the manufacture of brass goods, in the 
same city. His residence continued in Dayton, Ofnd in 1875 he 
became a member of a firm employed in the manufacture of agri- 
cultural implements, of which firm he was the vice-president and 
superintendent at the time of his death. On the evening of May 
31, 1887, while standing in a doorway in the city, he was fatally 
shot in the head by a ball from a pistol discharged, it is believed, 
accidentally by a man passing in the street. Mr. Stoddard ling- 
ered for about eight hours, and died on the morning of June 1, in 
his 42d year. He was prominent in the community by his merits 
as a citizen and his success as the manager of a large business 
establishment. 

He was married, November 10, 1868, to Miss Bessie W., daugh- 
ter of Colonel John G. Lowe, of Dayton, who survives him with 
two daughters and one son. 
4 



398 

1868. 

Anson Phelps Tinker, the youngest of three children of 
Deacon Reuben and Almira (Wade) Tinker, was born in Old 
Lyme, Conn., October 15, 1844. When he was about 11 years of 
age, he entered on a business life in New York City, but forming 
soon after the purpose of going to College, he left New York and 
resumed his studies, which he pursued for a year in the High 
School in South Weymouth, Mass. He entered Yale with the 
class of 1867, but in the spring of his Freshman year withdrew 
on account of ill-health ; he re-entered in the fall with the next 
class. 

For the year after graduation he studied in the Yale Divinity 
School, and was then for a year a tutor in the College. He then 
completed his theological studies in the Andover Seminary, and 
before his graduation there, in 1872, had accepted a call to the 
pastorate of the High Street Congregational Church, in Auburn, 
Maine. On account of ill-health he was unable to enter imme- 
diately on his work, but took a voyage to Europe, from which he 
returned in May, 1873. He was married, October 9, 1873, to 
Miss Martha J. White, of South Weymouth, Mass., and was or- 
dained and installed at Auburn on the 16th day of the same 
month. His wife died January 20, 1880, and he was again 
married, July 20, 1881, to Miss H. Maria Walker, of Newtonville, 
Mass., who died May 12, 1882. He was dismissed from his charge 
in Auburn, December 20, 1882, to accept the pastorate of the Fort 
Street Presbyterian Church, Detroit, Mich., but nine months later 
he was obliged by pulmonary disease to go to Colorado. Though 
partially restored to health he was unable to return to his parish, 
but in June, 1885, undertook the charge of the Capitol Avenue 
(Presbyterian) Church in Denver. 

He was married to Mrs. Kate (Elias) Longman, of Brooklyn, 
N. Y., Nov. 25, 1884. In the spring of 1886 he was obliged to 
give up preaching, and his death occurred in Denver, November 
25, 1886, at the age of 42. His wife and two children (by his first 
marriage) survive him. For his unusual ability as a writer, his 
overflowing earnestness, and his warm sympathies, he was greatly 
beloved by the people of his charge. 

Enoch Day Woodbridge, the eldest child of the Hon. Fred- 
erick E. Woodbridge (University of Vermont 1841) and Mary 
(Halsey) Woodbridge, of Vergennes, Vt., was born in that place, 
July 29, 1848. 



399 

After leaving College he devoted himself to the study of medi- 
cine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York 
City, where he received the degree of M. D, in 1872. He then 
served for three or four years as house-surgeon in Bellevue Hos- 
pital, after which he entered on the practice of his profession in 
his native city. He died in Vergennes, January 4, 1887, in his 
39th year, 

1869. 

Dennis Alexander McQuillin, son of Dennis McQuillin, 
was born in Wilkes Barre, Pa., September 25, 1846. 

After graduation he read l9,w for two years in Wilkes Barre, 
and practiced there for seven months after his admission to the 
bar in June, 187!. In June, 1872, he began practice in Portland, 
Conn., where he remained thus engaged until his last illness. He 
suffered from hemorrhages some years since, but recovered his 
strength unexpectedly and resumed active practice. He was 
again prostrated in 1885, and after nearly a year of confinement 
died, of consumption, at his home in Portland, September 3, 1 886, 
at the age of 40 years. 

He was married, August 27, 1879, to Catharine S. McKinley 
who survives him with one son, a daughter having died in in- 
fancy. 

1871. 

Robert Edward Williams, son of Thomas Scott and Ellen 
(Goodwin) Williams, was born in Newton, Mass., January 27, 
1849. 

Upon graduation he took up civil engineering as a profession, 
and after two years' practice entered the University of Michigan 
to complete his studies. He was graduated in 1874 with the 
degree of Civil Engineer, and for the next year and a half was 
employed at the water works in Lawrence and Newton, Mass. He 
then entered the firm of Williams, Page & Co., of Boston, dealers 
in railroad supplies, with which he was connected for about six 
years. 

He was married, April 26, 1877, to Miss Helen E., daughter of 
the Hon. W. L. Seaton, of Jackson, Mich., and made that his resi. 
dence during his later years. While engaged as superintendent 
of the construction of water works in Rochester, Minn., in 1886 
and 1887, his health failed, and he was obliged to resign. The 



400 

immediate cause of his death, which occurred in Jackson, May 16, 
1887, was congestion of the lungs and kidneys. His wife sur- 
vives him, with one son and one daughter. 

1875. 

Louis Edward Alter, younger son of Joseph H. Alter (Yale 
1842) and Harriet J. (Smith) Alter, was born in New Haven, 
Conn., January 29, 1853. His father's death occurred during his 
infancy, and when he was in his 13th year his mother died, leav- 
ing him to the care of relatives in New Haven. 

His health failed about the date of his graduation, and he 
passed a few winters in Saint Augustine, Fla. He also began the 
study of medicine, but was obliged to abandon it. Subsequently 
he taught for brief periods, in Litchfield County, Conn., and in 
San Rafael, Cal. In 1882 he entered on a lumber manufacturing 
business in Portsmouth, Ohio, but disasters from floods combined 
with his health to cause him to abandon the enterprise. About 
six months before his death he was attacked with consumption, 
which proved fatal to him. He died at the house of an uncle, in 
New Haven, February 3, 1887, at the age of 34. He was never 
married. 

Charles [Taylor] Tillinghast, son of the Hon. Benjamin F. 
and Mary (Place) Tillinghast, was born in Cincinnatus, N. Y., 
October 5, 1853. 

After graduation he attended the Medical Department of Syra- 
cuse University for a year, and then taught (principally Latin and 
German) in the Albany Academy for four years, at the same time 
pursuing some studies in the Albany Medical College. Li 1880 
his health failed, from consumption, and he spent the following 
winter in Savannah, Georgia, receiving the degree of M.D. from 
the Savannah Medical College in February, 1881 ; he also received 
the degree of M.A., upon examination, from Yale College in June, 
1880. On his return from Georgia he sailed for Europe, where 
he spent a year, mainly in additional study in medicine and in 
German at Heidelberg. In June, 1882, he came home, with 
health somewhat improved, and in November he was married to 
Miss Isabel Nelson, only daughter of Dr. J. C. Nelson, of Trux- 
ton, N. Y. The next two winters were spent in Georgia, and the 
summer of 1884 at Las Vegas Hot Springs, New Mexico. He 
then returned to his father's house, in Cortland, N. Y., where he 



I 



401 

remained, gradually failing, until his death, December 26, 1886, 
in his 34th year. 

1876. 

CoLLES Johnston, son of John Taylor and Frances (Colles) 
Johnston, was horn in New York City, March 14, 1853. 

After graduation he entered the Law School of the University 
of the City of New York, and on his graduation, in June, 1878, 
was admitted to the bar. He had, as early as December, 1876, 
taken the position of treasurer of the Central Kew Jersey Land 
Improvement Company (with headquarters at New York), which 
he retained until his death, being also for the latter part of the 
time Vice-President of the Company. He was obliged by the 
state of his father's health to devote much time to his affairs, and 
these various occupations so engrossed him that he never regularly 
practiced law. After a lingering illness from consumption he died 
at Plainfield, N. J., September 11, 1886, in his 34th year. He was 
never married. 

Frank Montgomery was the son of R. W. Montgomery, a dis- 
tinguished merchant of New Orleans, La., and was born in Paris, 
France, March 26, 1854. He had studied at the Washington and 
Lee University, Lexington, Va., before entering Yale at the be- 
ginning of the Junior year. At that time the residence of his 
widowed mother was Tremont, N. Y. 

After graduation he spent two years in the Medical School of 
Harvard Unirersity, and served as a surgeon in Bellevue Hospital, 
New York City. Subsequently he prosecuted his professional 
studies in Vienna, and at length began practice in New York ; 
but his health soon gave way, and he died there, November 14, 
1885, in his 32d year. He was not married. 

1880. 

Alfred Edwards Hooker, the only child of Dr. Worthington 
Hooker (Yale 1825), Professor in the Medical Institution of Yale 
College, and Henrietta (Edwards) Hooker, was born in New 
Haven, Conn., January 6, 1857, and was prepared for college in 
the Hopkins Grammar School of this city. 

After taking his degree he remained in New Haven for two 
years, pursuing biological studies in the graduate department of 
the Sheffield Scientific School, and proceeded to the degree of 



402 

Bachelor of Philosophy in 1882. He then began the study of 
medicine in the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York 
City, and alter a very thorough course received the degree of M.D. 
in 1885. He then accepted an appointment in the Presbyterian 
Hospital in New York, and was thus occupied until his death. In 
the performance of his duty on the surgical side of the hospital, 
he contracted diphtheria from a patient, and died after a very 
brief illness on the 2'7th of April, 1887, in his 31st year. The 
purity of his life and the enthusiasm of liis devotion to medical 
science, as well as his brilliant promise, won the deep respect of 
all who had watched his brief career. 

Stephen Trumbull, second surviving son of the Rev. Dr. 
David Trumbull (Yale 1842) and Jane W. (Fitch) Trumbull, was 
born in Valparaiso, Chili, where his father has labored for over 
forty years as a Protestant missionary, February 15, 1858. 

He was prepared for college in New Haven, and after gradua* 
tion returned to Valparaiso. In 1883 he left home again, to com- 
plete his medical studies in Boston. He received the degree 
of M.D. at Harvard University in 1884, and then engaged in 
hospital practice in Providence, R. I. He terminated his engage- 
ment there on March 1, 1886, and was expecting to attend pro- 
frssional lectures in New York City, when a report of the im- 
paired health of his parents induced him to return home at once. 
He embarked at New York on the 17th of April, and died, greatly 
lamented, on May 8th, of fever, on board the steamer Serena, 
while on the voyage from Panama to Valparaiso. 



1882. 

Harry Chambers Fries, son of Aaron Fries, was born in 
Philadelphia, Pa., September 17, 1860. 

He studied law in the office of George W. Biddle, Esq., in 
Philadelphia, and was admitted to the bar of that city in Decem- 
ber, 1884. In January, 1885, he began practice, as a member of 
of the firm of Prevost & Fries, in Philadelphia, and there con- 
tinued until his sudden death. For some three months he had 
been in uncertain health, and five weeks before his death he suf- 
fered — without premonition — from a hemorrhage of the lungs. 
He died, of quick consumption, in Philadelphia, July 14, 1886, in 
his 26th year. 



403 



1883. 



Joseph McKeen Lewis, the eldest child of Charlton T. Lewis 
(Yale 1853) and Nannie D. (McKeen) Levvis, was born in Bruns- 
wick, Me., June 26, 1863. The family residence was in New 
York City from 1864 until his graduation. 

He went abroad for the year after graduation, spending most 
of his time in study in Germany. On his return he was appointed 
to the Soldiers' Memorial Fellowship at Yale, and devoted him- 
self mainly to Greek. After one term, however, he was called on 
by the Faculty to fill a temporary vacancy in a Greek tutorship, 
and was thus occupied for the remainder of the college year. In 
September, 1885, being still upon the Fellowship, he went to 
Athens, and remained there as a student in the American School 
of Archaeology for the school year. He spent the summer of 
1886 in further study in Berlin, and returned in October to 
Athens for another year's work. The winter proved unfavorable 
to his health, and he came home, but only to die, of quick con- 
sumption, on April 29, in his 24th year, about ten days after his 
arrival at his father's residence in Morristown, N. J. His re- 
markable powers of mind gave promise of unusual development, 
had his life been spared. 

1884. 

Ernest Buckingham Kimberly, son of Henry W. and Ann 
E. (Lane) Kimberly, was born in New Haven, Conn., January 9, 
1862, and was prepared for college at the High School in this 
city. His college course was only accomplished at the cost of 
much self-denial and active labor. 

After graduation he found employment as a teacher in New 
York City, and while thus engaged was prostrated by an attack 
of pleuro-pneumonia. He was brought home, but died here, after 
a few days' illness, accompanied by great suffering, May 1, 1887, 
in his 26th year. He was not married. 



404 



YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 
1830. 

Myron Downs, the son of David and Anna (Minor) Downs, 
was born inRoxbury, Conn., August 19, 1806. 

He began the study of medicine with Dr. Wm. C. Williams, of 
Roxbury, and had attended a course of lectures at the Berkshire 
Medical Institution, in Pittsfield, Mass., before coming to New 
Haven. 

In 1831 he began practice in connection with Dr. J. 0. Hatch, 
of New Preston, in the town of Washington, Conn., and thus con- 
tinued until 1834, when he married Melinda, elder daughter of 
Henderson Benedict, of Kent, Conn. He then succeeded to the 
place of Dr. Josiah B. Eastman, of Roxbury, and thereafter con- 
tinued in the practice of medicine in his native town until 1882, 
when he withdrew from business on account of poor health. He 
also held the office of town clerk for forty years. 

Dr. Downs died in Roxbyry, April 7, 1887, in his 81st year. 

1834. 

Cornelius Simonson Baker, son of David and Catharine 
(Simonson) Baker, was born in Rocky Hill, N. J., September 23, 
1813. 

On graduation he began practice in Churchville, Berks County, 
Pa., and soon married Eunice, eldest daughter of Professor Wil- 
liam Tully, M.D., of the Medical School, who died in Churchville, 
June 20, 1837 ; the only child by this marriage died in infancy. 

He next married, November 27, 1839, Elizabeth, daughter of 
Aaron Feaster. He continued in practice in Churchville until 
1844, when he removed to Newark, N. J. From Newark he went 
to Carlisle, Pa., and after a stay of two years in that place settled 
in Norristown, Pa., where he remained until his death, which 
occurred on September 9, 1884, at the age of 71. His wife sur- 
vived him but six months. They left three sons and four daugh- 
ters. 

Dr. Baker was for four years an elder in the Presbyterian 
church, and sustained an excellent reputation. 

1842. 
Fenner Harris Peckham, the son of Dr. Hazael and Susanna 
(Thornton) Peckham, was born in Killingly, Conn., January 27, 
1820. 



I 

I 



405 

After graduating he began medical practice in (North) Killing! y, 
Conn., but removed to Providence, R. I., in 1852, and there con- 
tinued until his death. He was twice chosen President of the 
Rhode Island Medical Society, and published several monographs 
on subjects of professional research. During the late civil war, 
he served with distinction as a surgeon, at first (August, 1861, to 
March, 1862) with the 3d R. I. Heavy Artillery, and afterwards 
(from April, 1863) as a surgeon of the Board of Enrolment of the 
2d Rhode Island District. 

About nine years ago he began to suffer from Bright's disease, 
which led to his gradual retirement from active professional ser- 
vice, and to his death, in Providence, February 17, 1887, in his 
68th year. 

He married Catharine Torrey, who died in 1853, leaving five 
daughters and one son (M.D. Yale 1866), all of whom with his 
second wife (Rhoda A. Fairbanks) are still living. 

1857. 

David Anson Hedges, son of David Hedges, Jr., was born in 
Bridgehampton, L. I., N. Y., December 25, 1835, and died at his 
residence in Fordham, New York City, January 1, 1887, at the 
age of 51. 

On graduation he settled in Illinois in the practice of his profes- 
sion ; but after two years' time he established himself in New 
York City, where he continued in practice until failing health 
necessitated his retirement in 1885. 

On June 25, 1873, he married in New York City, Fannie A. 
Higgins, of Lexington, Ky., who with one daughter and one son 
survives him. 



1869. 



George Bronson Farnam, the eldest son of Henry and Ann S. 
(Whitman) Farnam, was born in New Haven, Conn., August 21, 
1841. He entered the Academical Department of Yale College 
in 1858, from Chicago, 111., which was at that time his father's 
residence; his progress, however, was so much interrupted by ill- 
health, that at the end -of the first year he withdrew from his 
class. He re-entered College in October, 1859, with the class of 
1863, but was again obliged to leave by ill-health, in April, 1860. 
From December, 1861, until the summer of 1864, he was occupied 
in foreign travel, including a voyage around Cape Horn and a 



406 

winter in Egypt. In the autumn of 1864 he began the study of 
medicine in Paris, and in November, 1866, returned to America, 
resuming his medical studies here in 1867. 

He was married, April 28, 1870, to Caroline, youngest daughter 
of Thomas Wells, M.D., of New Haven, and in ]87l he began 
practice as a physician in this city. After a few years his very 
useful professional career was broken off by renewed ill-health, 
resulting in an obscure form of spinal disease, which proved in- 
curable and was attended with severe and prolonged suffering. 
The remaining years of prostration were marked by wonderful 
patience and cheerfulness and by the most active and intelligent 
interest in all that was taking place outside of his sick-room. He 
died at his home in New Haven, December 22, 1886, in his 46th 
year. His wife survives him with their seven children, two 
daughters and five sons. 

1883. 
William Heis^ry Chittenden, the eldest son of John D. and 
Lucy A. (Rossiter) Chittenden, was born in North Guilford, Conn., 
December 26, 1857, and died at his father's house, after a long 
and distressing illness,T)ctober 18, 1883, in his 26th year. 



YALE LAW SCHOOL. 

1845. 

Wilson Hart Clark was born in Woodbridge, Conn., in 1820. 
During his early life he assisted his father on his farm, and at the 
age of twenty left home to pursue a course of study in Wilbra- 
ham, Mass., with the intention of becoming a lawyer. 

For more than thirty years after taking his degree he practiced 
his profession in New Haven, and attracted a large business. He 
was also prominent in local politics, having been at different times 
a member of the Common Council of the city, prosecuting 
attorney, and a member of the State Senate for two terms 
(1859-60) ; while in the Senate he was one of the ex officio mem- 
bers of the Yale Corporation. 

He died suddenly, after several years of poor health, at the resi- 
dence of one of his daughters, in Ansonia, Conn., May 13, 1887, 
in his 67th year. 

He married in 1849 Julia Elizabeth Cable, of Oxford, who sur- 
vives him with three daug-hters. 



407 

1848. 

Dexter Russell Wright was V)orn in Windsor, Vt., June 27, 
1821, the son of Alphens and Anna E. (Loveland) Wright. Dur- 
ing his boyhood the family removed to the northern part of New 
York State, and in 1843 he entered the Junior Class of Wesley an 
University, at Middletown, Conn., from Heuvelton, St. Lawrence 
County. He was graduat(id in 1845, and then taught for a year 
in Meriden, Conn., after which he attended for two years the 
conrses in the Yale Law School. 

On taking his degree in law he opened an office in Meriden, and 
the next year (1849) began his political career by his election at 
an unusually early age to the State Senate. After serving for one 
term he sailed for California, where he spent two years, engaged 
in the practice of law and in land speculation. He then returned 
to Meriden, and followed his profession with success until 1862, 
when he enlisted in the Union Array. He served as Colonel 
of the 15th Regiment State Volunteers, from July, 1862, until 
February, 1863, when his health failed and he was honorably dis- 
charged. In 1863 he was a member of the Lower House in the 
Connecticut Legislature, and from 1863 to 1865 he served as a 
commissioner on the Board of Enrolment for the 2d Congressional 
District. In 1864 he resumed the practice of law, establishing his 
office in New Haven, and achieving marked success. He was 
Assistant U. S. District Attorney from 1865 to 1869, and subse- 
quently held a variety of important positions in connection with 
the city government. He was sent as a Representative to the 
General Assembly in 1879, and was chosen Speaker of the House. 

In the spring of 1886 he met with a severe fall on the steps of 
his residence, causing a shock to his entire system, from which he 
only partially recovered. On June 19 he was stricken with 
paralysis which resulted in his death, in New Haven, July 23, 
1886, at the age of 65. 

He married, February 3, 1848, Maria H., daughter of Col. 
Epaphras L. Phelps, of East Windsor, Conn., who survives him, 
with two daughters and two sons ; the younger son was graduated 
at this College in 1882. 

1852. 

Peter Warren Rousse was born in New Brunswick, N. J., 
July 26, 1832, and was graduated at Rutgers College in 7850. 

After taking his degree at New Haven he pursued further law 
studies at Harvard University, and in 1854 was admitted to the 



408 

bar of 'New York. In the autumn of that year he sailed for 
Europe, where he spent three years in travel. On his return he 
settled in Buffalo, N. Y., in the practice of his profession, whence 
he removed to New York City. About 1869 he left the law to 
accept the editorship of the Newark (N. J.) Daily Advertiser, 
with which he remained connected for about two and a half 
years. He was then for a short time editor of the Newark 
Hegister, and i'rom 1873 until his death in charge of the Eliza- 
beth (N. J.) Daily Journal. He died at his home in (East) 
Orange, N. J., May 2, 1887, in his 55th year. 

1856. 

Lewis Beach, son of Lewis and Sophia Beach, was born in 
New York City, March 30, 1835. 

Being admitted to the bar shortly after his graduation, he 
began his career as a practicing lawyer in New York City. In 
1861 he removed to Orange County, N. Y., where he established 
himself upon a farm near Cornwall, and there remained until his 
death, dividing his time between his profession, farming, politics, 
and literary labor. In 1873 he published a History of Cornwall 
(8vo, pp. 200). From 1877 to 1879 he was a member and treasurer 
of the Democratic State Central Committee. He was placed upon 
the Electoral ticket of 1 880, but on being nominated for Con- 
gress he resigned the position. He served in the 47th and 48th 
Congresses, and was reelected to the 49th. He died at his home 
in Cornwall, August 10, 1886, in his 52d year. 



YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL. 

1886. 

Fred Arthur Gaylord, son of Moses and Rebecca (Smith) 
Gaylord, was born in South Hadley, Mass., June 25, 1859. 

He was graduated with high honor at Amherst College in 1880, 
and spent the next two years as a mathematical instructor in the 
same college. In 1883 he entered this Divinity Schooh 

On completing the course here he was awarded a Graduate Fel- 
lowship, on account of special proficiency in the studies. He re- 
turned accordingly, after a summer in Europe, for a fourth year of 
advanced study in the Seminary, and was looking forward to a 
pastorate in his native State, with reasonable hopes of great use- 



409 

fulness. He was attacked, however, with pneumonia, which de- 
veloped into typho-meuingit-raalaria, and caused liis death in New 
Haven, March 12, 1887, in his 28th year. 

He married, August 26, 1885, Miss Clara A., daughter of Wil- 
liam Smith, of South Hadley, who survives him. 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1884. 

Henry Clay Johnson, the third son of John A. and Mary A. 
(Seabrook) Johnson, was born May 7, 1858, on his father's 
plantation in Bartow County, Georgia, about eight miles from the 
city of Rome. 

He returned home after graduation, and sought the opportunity 
to turn his knowledge of mechanics to account in some of the 
machine shops in the county ; but the small compensation offered 
discouraged him, and for a year or more he was occupied in 
managing his widowed mother's plantation. 

In the latter part of February, 1887, he was invited to put up 
and run the machinery of a saw-mill and other works, located at 
Griffin, Ga., about thirty miles south of Rome. He was then in 
perfect health, and by the work of the next few weeks demon- 
strated his scientific knowledge and ingenuity. A malignant 
pustule, however, neglected for a day, or improperly treated, 
resulted in his death on the 27th of March, before his alarmed 
relatives could reach him. 

Luther James Martin was born in Danielsonville, in the 
town of Killingly, Conn., December 12, 1861, the son of Dr. 
Jonathan W. and Elizabeth A. Martin. His father died in Nor- 
wich, Conn., in 1876, after having practiced medicine there for 
many years; and his mother removed to New Haven in 1881 for 
the education of her only surviving child. 

On graduation he began the study of medicine in the Long 
Island Medical College, and received his degree on June 2, 1886. 
At a competitive examination he secured an appointment as sur- 
geon of the hospital connected with the Long Island Medical 
College, and almost immediately thereafter was taken ill with 
peritonitis, and died in Brooklyn, July 6, in his 25th year. 



sum:m: A.R Y 



Yale College. 



Class. Name and Age, 

1816 Eli W. Blake, 91, 

1817 Rufus P. Spalding, 88, 

1818 Thomas L. Shipman, 88, 
1821 Charles Atwood, 83, 
1821 Joseph H. Bradley, 84, 

1824 John M. Edwards, 81, 
1826 William B. Fleming, 83, 

1825 Joseph Whittlesey, 89, 

1825 Stephen C. Williams, 83, 

1826 Sidney S. Franklin, 80, 
1826 Arad Gilbert, 84, 

1S26 Cincinnatus Newton, 80, 

1821 Joseph B. Baldwin, 81, 

1829 Asa H. Waters, 79, 

1830 Norman Butler, 76, 
1830 Ray Palmer, 78, 
1832 Edward Cleveland, 81, 
1832 Elihu P. Ingersoll, 82, 

1832 John S. Wallis, 76, 

1833 William W. Eells, 75, 
1833 Brown Emerson, 80, 

1833 Christopher R. McClellan, 73, 

1833 Marshall Meriam. 86, 

1833 Hiram Wheeler, 77, 

1834 Henry C. Kingsley, 71, 

1835 G-eorge A. Oviatt, 76, 

1835 Thomas B. Sturges, 77, 

1836 Thomas C. Pitkin, 70, 

1836 John M. Swift, 70, 

1837 William 0. Ayres, 69, 
1837 John H. Pettingell, 71, 
1837 Owen Street, 71, 

1837 Samuel J. Tildeu, 72, f 

1838 Rufiis W. Clark, 72, 
1838 William Strong, 69, 

1840 John L. Hamelin, 66, 

1841 David B. Davidson, 71, 

1841 Stephen D. Law, 66, 

1842 Horatio B. Alden, 67, 

1843 Edward McLean. 68, 

1844 John W. Dulles, 63, 

1845 Winston J, Davie, 63, 

1845 Wilham B. Woods, 62, 

1846 Jared Reid. 62, 

1846 Samuel G. Willard, 67, 

1848 Henry Slack, 60, 

1849 Francis E. Harrison, 56, 
1849 Charles J. Mutchins, 61, 

1849 Curtiss T. Woodruff, 70, 

1850 Edward W. Bentley, 60, 
1854 Abram E. Baldwin," 56, 
1854 Joseph W. Wilson, 60, 



Place and 
New Haven, Conn., 
Cleveland, 0., 
Jewett City, Conn., 
Boston, Mass., 
Washington, D. C, 
Youngstown, 0., 
Walthourville, Ga., 
Berlin, Conn., 
New York City, 
Columbus, Miss., 
New York City, 
Norfolk, Va.. 
West Cummington, 
Millbury, Mass., 
Tavares, Fla., 
Newark, N. J., 
Burlington, Kan., 
Springfield, Kan., 
Bolton, Mass., 
Allegheny, Pa., 
Wyoming, N. J., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Derry, N. H., 
Colfax, Iowa, 
New Haven, Conn., 
Sudbury, Mass., 
Fairfield, Conn., 
Detroit, Mich., 
Jacksonville, Fla., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Lowell, Mass., 
Yonkers, N. Y., 
Nantucket, Mass., 
Portland, Oregon, 
Philadelphia, Pa,, 
Aurora, Nebr., 
Tarrytown, N. Y., 
Randolph, Mass., 
Pasadena, Cal., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Hopkinsville, Ky., 
Washington, D. C, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Colchester, Conn., 
Fishkill, N. Y., 
New Haven, Conn., 
San Francisco, Cal., 
New York City, 
Canton, Conn., 
New Brunswick, N. J 
Norwalk, Conn., 



Time of Death. 

Aug. 18, '86. 

Aug. 29, '86. 

Aug. 29, '86. 

Feb. 13, '87. 

April 3, '87. 

Dec. 8, '86. 

Aug. 19, '86. 

Jan. 29, '87. 

April 23, '87. 

Oct. 5, '86. 

Sept. 21, '86. 

Nov. 16, '86. 

June 22, '86. 

Jan. 17, '87. 

Oct. 12, '86. 

March 29. '87. 

Sept. 29, '86. 

March 29, '87. 

June 6, '87. 

Aug. 28, '86. 

June 16, '87. 

Jan. 13, '87. 
March 2, '87. 

May 17, '87. 
Dec. 19, '86. 
June 1, '87. 
May 8, '87. 
May 11, '87. 
April 3, '87. 
April 30, '87. 
Feb. 27, '87. 
May 27, '87. 
Aug. 4, '86. 
Aug. 9, '86. 
April 10, '87. 
Dec. 20, '86. 
Aug. 29, '86. 
Oct. 22, '86. 
April 14, '87. 
June 30, '86. 
April 13, '87. 
May 24, '87. 
May 14, '87. 
Nov. 15, '86. 
June 12, '87. 
Dec. 10, '86. 
June 21, '87. 
Feb. 13, ''87. 
Feb. 1, '87. 
Oct. 23, '86. 
Oct. 26, '86. 
Feb. 26, '87. 



411 



ClSBS. 


Name and Age. 


Place and 


Time of Death. 


1858 


William C. Bennett, 50, 


Danbury, Conn., 


July 12, '86. 


1858 


William D. Morgan, 49, 


New York City, 


April 24, '87. 


1859 


Henry L. Breed, 48, 


Taunton. Mass., 


Dec. 6, '86. 


1861 


William Cook, 44, 


Chatham, Mass., 


Aug. 27, '86. 


1861 


Edward R. Sill, 45, 


Cleveland, 0., 


Feb. 27, '87. 


1862 


Buel C. Carter, 47, 


Rolliusford, N. H., 


Dec. 11, '86. 


1862 


Charles H. Lewis, 47, 


Grenola, Kan., 


Sept. 9, '85. 


1863 


Charles C. Blatchley, 45, 


New Haven, Conn., 


March 5, '87. 


1863 


Samuel W. Duffield, 43, 


Bloorafleld, N. J., 


May 12, '87. 


1863 


Dvvight Marcy, 47, 


Rockville, Conn., 


May 7, '87. 


1863 


George W. Moore, 46, 


Brooklyn. N. Y., 


Feb. 7, '87. 


1864 


J. Wickliffe Beach, 44, 


Hartford, Conn., 


Feb. 21, '87. 


1867 


C. Wyllys Betts, 41, 


New York City, 


April 27, '87. 


1867 


Louis L. Palmer, 42, 


Stonington. Conn., 


May 31, '87. 


1867 


E. Fowler Stoddard, 42, 


Dayton, 0., 


June 1, '87. 


1868 


A, Phelps Tinker, 42, 


Denver. Col., 


Nov. 25, '86. 


1868 


Enoch D. Woodbridge, 38, 


Vergennes,. Vt, 


Jan. 4, '87. 


1869 


Dennis A. McQuillin, 40,. 


Portland, Conn., 


Sept. 3, '86. 


1871 


Robert E. Williams, 38, 


Jackson. Mich., 


May 16, '87. 


1875 


Louis E. Alter. 34, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Feb. 3, '87. 


1875 


Charles Tilliughast, 33, 


Cortland, N. Y, 


Dec. 26, '86. 


1876 


Colles Johnston, 33, 


Plainfield, N. J., 


Sept. 11, '86. 


1876 


Frank Montgomery, 31, 


New York City, 


Nov. 14, '85. 


1880 


Alfred E. Hooker, 30, 


N«w York City, 


April 27, '87. 


1880 


Stephen Trumbull, 28, 


Pacific Ocean, 


May 8, '86. 


1882 


Harry C. Fries, 26, 


Philadelphia, Pa., 


July 14, '86. 


1883 


Joseph M. Lewis, 23, 


Morristown, N. J., 


April 29, '87. 


1884 


Ernest B. Kimberly, 25, 


New Haven, Conn., 


May 1, '87. 




Yale Medical School. 




1830 


Myron Downs, 80, 


Roxbury, Conn., 


April 7, '87. 


1834 


Cornelius S. Baker, 71, 


Norristown, Pa., 


Sept. 9, 84. 


1842 


Fenner H. Peckham, 67, 


Providence, R. I., 


Feb. 17, '87. 


1857 


David A. Hedges, 51, 


Fordham, N. Y. City, 


Jan. 1, '87. 


1869 


George B. Farnam, 45, 


New Haven, Conn., 


Dec. 22, '86. 


1883 


WiUiam H. Chittenden, 26, 


Guilford, Conn.. 


Oct. 18, '83. 




Yale Law School. 




1845 


Wilson H. Clark, 66, 


Ansonia, Conn., 


May 13, '87. 


1848 


Dexter R. Wright, 65, 


New Haven, Conn., 


July 23, '86. 


1852 


Peter W. Ronsse. 54, 


Orange, N. J., 


May 2, '87. 


1856 


Lewis Beach, 51, 


Cornwall, N. Y., 


Aug. 10, '86. 



1886 



1884 
1884 



Yale Divinity School. 
Fred A. Gaylord, 27, New Haven, Conn., 

Sheffield Scientific School. 



Henry C. Johnson, 29, 
Luther J. Martin, 24, 



Griffin, Ga.. 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 



March 12, '87. 



March 27, '87. 
July 6, '86. 



The number of deaths recorded this year is 93, and the average age of the 80 
graduates of the Academical Department is over 61| years. 

The oldest living graduates are — 
Class of 1813, Rev. David L. Hunn, of Buffalo, N. Y., born Nov. 5, 1789. 
Class of 1815, Rev. Joseph 1». Wickham, of Manchester, Vt, born April 4, 1797. 
Class of 1816, Henry W. Taylor, of Canandaigua, N. Y., born Feb. 2, 1796. 



INDEX 



Class. 

1842 

1875 

1821 

1837 

1834 m 

1854 

1827 

1864 

1856 / 
1858 
1850 
1867 
1816 
1863 
1821 
1859 
1830 
1862 

1883 m 
1838 
1845 I 
1832 
1861 
1841 
1845 
18H0 m 
1863 
1844 
1824 
1833 
1833 
1869 m 
1825 
1826 
1882 
1886 d 
1826 
1840 
1849 

1857 m 
1880 
1849 
1832 

1884 5 
1876 
1884 . 
1834 



Page. 

Alden, Horatio B 377 

Alter, Louis E. 400 

Atwood, Charles.- 354 

Ayres, William 370 

Baker, Cornelius S 404 

Baldwin, Abram E 386 

Baldwin, Joseph B :.. 359 

Beach, J. Wickliffo 395 

Beach, Lewis 408 

Bennett, William C 387 

Bentley, Edward W 385 

Betts, C. Wyllys 396 

Blake, Eli W 351 

Blatchley. Charles C. 393 

Bradley, Joseph. H. 354 

Breed, Henry L 389 

Butler, Norman 360 

Carter. Buel C. .-. 391 

Chittenden, William H. ... 406 

Clark, Rufus W. 374 

Clark, Wilson H.. 406 

Cleveland. Edward 362 

Cook, William 389 

Davidson, David B 376 

Davie, Winston J 379 

Downs, Myron. 404 

Duffield, Samuel W 393 

Dulles, John W 378 

Edwards, John M. 355 

Eells, William W 364 

Emerson, Brown 365 

Farnam, George B 405 

Fleming, AA^illiam B 356 

Franklin, Sidney S 357 

Fries, Harry C. 402 

Gaylord, Fred A 408 

Gilbert, Arad 357 

Hamelin, John L. -- 375 

Harrison, Francis E 383 

Hedges, David A 405 

Hooker, Alfred E 401 

Hutchins, Charles J 384 

Ingersoll, Elihu P 363 

Johnson, Henry C 409 

Johnston, Colles 401 

Kimberly, Ernest B. 403 

■Kingsley, Henry C. 367 



Class. Page. 

1841 Law. Stephen D 376 

1862 Lewis, Charles H... 392 

1883 Lewis, Joseph M 403 

1833 MeClellan, Christopher R.. 366 

1843 McLean, Edward 378 

1869 McQuillin, Dennis A 399 

1863 Marcy, Dwight 394 

1884 s Martin, Luther J. 409 

1833 Meriam, Marshall 366 

1876 Montgomery, Frank 401 

1863 Moore, George W 395 

1858 Morgan, William D 388 

1826 Newton, Cincinnatus 358 

1835 Oviatt, George A 368 

1867 Palmer, Louis L 397 

1830 Palmer, Ray 361 

1842 m Peckham, Fenner H. 404 

1837 Pettingell, John H 371 

1836 Pitkin, Thomas C. 369 

1846 Reid. Jared ...381 

1852 I Rousse, Peter W 407 

1818 Shipman, Thomas L 353 

1861 Sill Edward R 390 

1848 Slack, Henry . 382 

1817 Spalding, Rufus P 352 

1867 Stoddard, E. Fowler 397 

1837 Street, Owen 372 

1838 Strong, William 374 

1835 Sturges, Thomas B. 369 

1836 Swift. John M. 370 

1837 Tilden, Samuel J 373 

1875 Tillinghast, Charles 400 

1868 Tinker, A. Phelps-. 398 

1880 Trumbull, Stephen 402 

1832 Wallis, John S 364 

1829 Waters, Asa H 360 

1833 Wheeler, Hiram 366 

1825 Whittlesey, Joseph 356 

1846 Willard, Samuel G 381 

1871 Williams, Robert E 399 

1825 Williams, Stephen C 357 

1854 Wilson, Joseph W.- 387 

1868 Woodbridge, Enoch D 398 

1849 Woodruff, Curtiss T 385 

1845 Woods, William B.- 380 

1848 I Wright, Dexter R 407 




OBITUARY RECORD 



OF 



GRADUATES OF YALE UNIVERSITY 



Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 

^^^^^» June, ISSS. 

^^^iNCLUlDmG THE RECORD OF A FEW WHO DIED PREVIOUSLY, HITHERTO UNREPORTED. 

^B [PRESENTED AT THE MEETING OF THE ALUMNI, JUNE 26th, 1888.] 

^^H [No. 8 of the Third Printed Series, and No. 47 of the whole Record.] 



Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, Printers, 
New Haven, Conn. 



"7 

V 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OP 

GRADUATES OF YALE UlS'IYEESITY 

Deceased during the Academical year ending in 

June, 1888. 

Including the record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported. 

[Presented at the Meetixg of the Alumni, June 26th, 1888.] 

[Xo. 8 of Third Printed Series, and No! 47 of the whole Record.] 



YALE COLLEGE. 

ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 
1813. 

David Lathrop Hunn, the eldest child of Ephraira and Sub- 
mit (Lathrop) Hunn, was born in Colerain, Mass., November 5, 
1789, and died in Buffalo, N. Y., January 29, 1888, aged 98 years 
and nearly 3 months. His father (who lived to the age of 96) 
rgettled in 1800 in Longmeadow, IVIass., whence the son entered 
college. 

After graduation he spent three years in Andover Theological 
Seminary, and after preaching for a time in Greenfield, Mass., 
was ordained on February 25, 1818, as pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church in Sandwich, Mass., where he remained until his 
dismission in 1830. From November, 1830, to March, 1832, he 
supplied the Congregational Church in Vernon, Conn., and from 
July, 1832, to May 1, 1835, the church at Wapping, in South 
Windsor, Conn. His next engagement was for two years with a 
church in Somerset, N. Y., followed by two years with the Second 
Congregational Church in (North) Hadley, Mass. From 184], 



416 

when he was settled over the church in Lenox, Madison County, 
he remained permanently in New York State, and in connection 
with the Presbyterian denomination. In 1844 he resigned his 
charge at Lenox, and removed to Rochester, where a son was 
already living. He continued there, often preaching in neigh- 
boring pulpits, until 1858, when he removed to Buffalo ; thence 
to Angelica in 1863, and again to Rochester in 1872. In 1881 he 
returned to Buffalo, to the house of a widowed daughter, with 
whom he resided until his death. He had been since 1881 the 
oldest living graduate of the College, and since 1883 the last 
survivor of his class ; he is also believed to have been the oldest 
citizen of Buffalo, and the oldest clergyman of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States. His mental powers continued 
vigorous until the last, though his sight had nearly failed, and 
his hearing was impaired. 

He married Eunice Sexton, of Wilbraham, Mass., who died 
about fifteen years before him. Of their eight children, five sons 
and two daughters are still living. 

1819. 

William Wglcott Turner, the last survivor of his class, was 
born in Great Barrington, Mass., January 1, 1800, — his parents, 
Captain Jabez and Rebecca (Wolcott) Turner, having removed 
thither from New Haven, Conn., in 1796. 

After graduation he taught school in Wethersfield, Conn., until 
February, 1821, when he removed to Hartford, to accept an 
engagement as teacher in the American Asylum for the Deaf 
and Dumb. He continued as a teacher, greatly respected and 
useful, until 1853, when he was appointed principal of the insti- 
tution, in which important relation he served until 1863. Soon 
after he went to Hartford, he began the study of theology with 
the Rev. Dr. Hawes. He was licensed to preach m September, 
1824, and on July 1, 1828, was ordained as an evangelist ; after 
this date he preached statedly for many years in the sign language 
to the deaf mutes under his charge. He was for a long time a 
deacon in the Pearl Street Church in Hartford. The degree of 
Ph.D. was conferred on him by the National Deaf -Mute College, 
in 1870. 

He died in Hartford, July 11, 1887, in his 88th year, having 
been for five years laid aside from all activity by a failure of his 
powers. 



417 

He married, January 1, 1823, Maria Lucinda, daughter of 
Zaccheus Peaslee, of Burlington, Vt., who survives him, with one 
son (Yale 1846) apd two daughters. 

1820. 

Charles Chauncey Darling, son of Dr. Samuel Darling 
(Yale 1769) and Clarinda (Ely) Darling, of New Haven, Conn., 
was born in this city, January 27, 1799. • 

For the three years after graduation he studied theology in 
Princeton Seminary, and was subsequently licensed to preach by 
the Presbytery of New Brunswick. He then returned to New 
Haven, and was partially occupied for a time in editorial work on 
the Quarterly Christian Spectator ; but early in 1836 he removed 
to New York City, where the main work of his life was done. 
He interested himself there in missionary efforts, and became 
one of the secretaries of the Society for Improving the Condition 
of the Poor, and one of the missionaries of the New York City 
Tract Society, in which latter capacity he served for thirty years. 
He was also the chaplain of the Magdalen Society from 1836 to 
January 1, 1874. Though during all these years he performed a 
great amount of valuable missionary and evangelistic work in 
the metropolis, it was not until May 19, 1867, that he received 
ordination from the 4th Presbytery of New York. 

At the age of 75 he retired from active labor. His devoted 
and long-continued efforts in behalf of the poor and degraded ex- 
pressed faithfully his self-sacrificing, earnest Christian principle. 

He married, July 28, 1829, Adeline Eliza Dana, daughter of 
William Dana, of Boston, Mass., by whom he had two sons, of 
whom the elder died in 1852, just after graduation from the 
University of the City of New York. Mrs. Darling died Sep- 
tember 11, 1882, and after 1874 Mr. Darling made his home 
with his surviving son, in Utica, N. Y., where he died after a few 
days' illness, September 15, 1887, in his 89th year. 

Elisha Notes Sill, the second son of Dr. Elisha N. and 
Chloe (Allyn) Sill, was born in Windsor, Conn., January 6, 1801. 

After graduation he studied theology for two years in the 
Andover Seminary, and afterwards taught school in Windsor. 
He married, Oct. 6, 1824, Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Henry 
and Elizabeth (Strong) Newberry, who had removed from Wind- 
sor to Ohio in the preceding June. Mr. Newberry founded in 



418 

Ohio the town of Cuyahoga Falls, and thither his son-in-law fol- 
lowed him in 1829, and for several years the two were associated 
in enterprises for the development of manufacturing and in im- 
proving the water-power of the Cuyahoga River at that place. 
Mr. Sill was then drawn into public life, and after serving in the 
lower House of the Legislature, was elected to the State Senate 
in 1844. After this he was appointed Fund Commissioner for 
the State, which office he held for seven years. The financial 
ability and high integrity which marked this portion of his career 
assured his success in his later life, which was mainly devoted to 
banking. He organized the National Bank at Cuyahoga F'alls, 
and managed it for many years, besides being connected with 
the management of several other banks of the vicinity. He re- 
tained until old age an unusual fondness for mathematical study, 
and to the last impressed all who met him by his intellectual 
strength as well as by his old-school courtliness of demeanor. 
He died in Cuyahoga Falls on April 26, 1888, in his 88th year. 

His first wife died November 27, 1829, and he next married, 
June 17, 1834, her sister, Fanny Newberry, who died on February 
14, 1849. He was a third time married, to the widow of Henry 
Cook, of Cuyahoga Falls, who also died before him. By his 
first marriage he had two sons, who are both living ; and by his 
second marriage two daughters, of Avhom only the elder survives, 
the widow of Edward R. Sill (Yale, 1861). 

1821. 

William Williams Billings, the last survivor of the Class 
of 1821, was born in Stonington, Conn., in 1802, the son of 
Coddington and Eunice (Williams) Billings. In his childhood 
his father removed to New London, Conn., of which city he was 
Mayor in 1832-35. 

On leaving College Mr. Billings entered a counting house in 
New London, to prepare himself for a business life. In 1823-24 
he visited Europe to enlarge his mercantile training, and after 
his return he formed a partnership with his brother, the Hon. 
Noyes Billings (Yale, 1819), for carrying on the whaling business 
in New London. The firm continued for twenty years, or until 
such enterprises began to decline, and on his retirement Mr. Bill- 
ings had amassed a large fortune as the result of his distinguished 
enterprise and executive abilitj^ The remainder of his life was 
spentv in New London, where he died, from paralysis, June 30, 
1887, at the age of 85. 



I 

I 



419 

He married in 1828 Miss Louisa Trott, of New London, who 
died many years before him. No children survive him. 

1822. 

John Reynolds Knox, eldest son of Joseph and Hannah 
(Douglas) Knox, of Carlisle, Pa., was born in Carlisle, April 23, 
1802. He was a second cousin of President James Knox Polk, 
and also of the Hon. Robert J. Walker, President Polk's Secre- 
tary of the Treasury. 

After leaving College he studied medicine, and in 1827 re- 
ceived the degree of M.D. from, the Medical Department of the 
University of Pennsylvania. He opened an office in Philadeli^hia, 
and after practicing there for some years removed his office to 
New York City. Subsequently his health failed, and by the 
advice of an eminent physician whom he consulted while in Paris, 
he gave up his professional career on his return to this country. 
For many years he was an invalid, and his later life was spent in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., where he died of gastric catarrh on July 29, 
1887, in his 86th year. He had been for fifty years a member of 
the Episcopal Church, and died in Christian trust. 

He married in 1831 Charlotte J., daughter of Dr. John Bullus, 
U. S. N., Navy Agent at the Port of New York. Mrs. Knox 
died the following year, leaving a son M^ho is still living. Dr. 
Knox afterwards married a Mrs. Cox (by birth a Miss Cameron, 
of Philadelphia), who lived but a few months. 

1824. 

Elias Warner Leavenworth, the youngest son of David 
and Lucinda (Mather) Leavenworth, was born in Canaan, Colum- 
bia County, N. Y., December 20, 1803. Li his infancy the family 
removed to Great Harrington, Mass., and thus it happened that 
the son's Freshman year was spent at Williams College. 

He studied law with William Cullen Bryant, then of Great 
Barrington, and in the Litchfield (Conn.) Law School, and in 
November, 1827, he settled ia Syracuse, N. Y., for the practice 
of his profession. From 1828 until 1850, when he retired on 
account of the state of his health, he was very successful at the 
bar, and earned besides reputation a handsome fortune. 

He was for some years active in the militia, and in 1836 at- 
tained the rank of Brigadier- General. He held prominent local 
offices in Syracuse, and after its incorporation as a city served for 



420 

two terms as Mayor. In 1849 and 1856 he was elected to the 
Legislature, and in 1854-55 filled with honor the position of 
Secretary of State. In 1860 he was appointed one of the State 
Board of Quarantine Commissioners, and on its organization was 
chosen its President. In 1861-62 he served as the Commissioner 
on the part of the United States to adjust our claims against the 
government of New Grenada. In 1872 he was appointed one of 
the commission to amend the State Constitution, and from 1 874 
to 1876 he was a Representative in Congress. 

In local enterprises and charities he was a distinguished leader, 
and his remarkable executive capacity was freely exerted in be- 
half of such objects. He also took a deep interest in education, 
and was from 1861 until his death a valued member of the Board 
of Regents of the University of the State. Hamilton College 
gave him the honorary degree of LL.D. in 1872, and the same 
degree was conferred by this College in 1881 ; at a later period 
he presented to each of these Colleges a foundation for a Scholar- 
ship and Professorship Fund. He printed in 1873 a Genealogy 
of the Leavenworth Family (octavo, 376 pages). 

He died in Syracuse, November 25, 1887, in his 84th year. He 
married, June 21, 1833, Mary Elizabeth, daughter of the Hon. 
Joshua Forman, of Onondaga, N. Y., who died in 1880. He 
next married, in 1884, Mrs. Harriet Townley Ball, of Bergen, 
N J., who survives him. He had no children. 

1826. 

George Jeffrey Tillotson was born in Farmington, Conn., 
February 5, 1805, the son of Col. Daniel and Huldah (Gridley) 
Tillotson. 

After graduation he taught for a year in Ellington, Conn., and 
then spent two years in the Andover Theological Seminary. 
After another year of school-teaching (in Falmouth, Mass.), he 
took the closing year of theological study in the Yale Divinity 
School. 

He was ordained. May 25, 183J, in Brooklyn, Conn., over the 
Trinitarian Congregational Church, which was then in great 
adversity, the church building and funds having been taken pos- 
session of by the Unitarian majority of the Society. He de- 
voted himself with singular self-denial to the task before him, 
and saw a strong church grow up in connection with his efforts. 
He riasigned this charge on March 10, 1858, and for nearly thir- 



421 

teen years afterwards was acting pastor of a church which he 
had ah-eady assisted in organizing, in the neighboring town of 
Putnam. From July 1, 1870, until May, 1873, he had charge of 
the church at Central Village, in Plainfield, in the same county ; 
and his latest settlement was in Hampton, in the immediate 
vicinity of his other charges, where he was installed on May 29, 
1873, and remained until Oct. 25, 1875. He then retired to 
Rocky Hill, in Hartford County, and in 1878 built himself a 
home in the adjoining town of Wethersfield, where he died after 
an illness of about a week, on March 29, 1888, in his 84th year. 

After he had laid aside the active duties of the ministry he 
took a deep interest in and labored in behalf of the benevolent 
organizations of the churches, especially the American Missionary 
Association ; he gave largely in his lifetime and by his will for 
the endowment of a Collegiate and Normal Institute for the 
freedmen, in Austin, Texas, called in his honor the Tillotson In- 
stitute. He was elected a member of the Corporation of Yale 
College in 1849, and retained the position until his death, being 
for the last thirteen years Senior Fellow. 

He was married, January 8, 1834, to Rebecca, second daughter 
of Smith Wilkinson, the founder of the enterprising manufactur- 
ing town of Putnam. She died on December 18, 1839, and on 
May 8, 1844, he was married to Harriet, third daughter of 
Charles Seymour, of Hartford, who died on May 8, 1846, leaving 
a son who died in infancy. In 1848 he was again married to 
Elizabeth K. Lester, of Plainfield, Conn., who died in 1857, leav- 
ing one son and two daughters, who are still living. In 1860 he 
was married to Mary Sweetser Wood, of Athol, Mass., who sur- 
vives him, with one son. 

1826. 

William Peter Buel, elder son of Dr. William and Abigail 
(Bacon) Buel, was born in Sheffield, Mass., October 24, 1807. 
His father removed to Litchfield, Conn., in 1816, and was so 
highly esteemed in his profession as to receive the honorary de- 
gree of M.D. from this College in 1819 ; he was also elected 
President of the State Medical Society in 1832 and 1833. 

He taught school in Litchfield during the year after gradua- 
tion, at the same time beginning the study of medicine with his 
father. He then entered the Medical Institution of Yale College, 
but soon removed to New York Citv, where he studied under 



422 

Dr. A. W. Ives, and was graduated at the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons in 1830. He began practice immediately in New 
York, and continued there for twenty years, winning especial 
honor for his devotion in the two epidemics of cholera, in 1832 
and 1849. 

For most of the time from 1850 to 1855, he was surgeon on the 
line of mail steam-ships, running from New York Citj'- to the 
Isthmus of Panama, being induced to adopt this life in order to 
re-establish his health ; and from 1855 until the outbreak of the 
war, he was employed in a like capacity on the Pacific Mail Com- 
pany's line from the Isthmus to San Francisco. 

In September, 1862, when the 131st Regiment New York Vol- 
unteers was organized, he joined it as Surgeon, and served until 
the close of the war. Then followed half-a-dozen years of garri- 
son service in Wyoming and Colorado, until his retirement from 
active duty in 1871. In 1872 he settled on Staten Island, and 
subsequently removing to Brooklyn, died there at the residence 
of one of his sons, April 28, 1888, at the age of 80. 

He married in 1835 Miss Elizabeth Penny, of New York, who 
survives him. Of their five sons, one died in infancy and two in 
early manhood. 

Jared Linsly, the youngest child of Josiah J. and Eunice 
(Hall) Linsly, was born in Northford, a parish in that part of 
Branford which is now North Branford, Conn., Oct. 30, 1803. 
He entered College in the fall of 1821, but was obliged to leave 
on account of health during the Junior year, and after an absence 
of over a year returned to the next lower class. 

After graduating he began the study of medicine with Dr. 
John C. Cheesman in New York City, and was graduated at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons in the fall of 1829. In 1830 he 
formed a partnership with Dr. William Baldwin, whose daughter 
Catherine he married in 1834. Later he succeeded to Dr. Bald- 
win's entire business, and continued in practice by himself in New 
York until some five years before his death. His medical skill, 
his high character, and genial nature made him prominent as a 
physician, and endeared him to a large circle of friends. He 
filled many positions of trust in connection with medical and 
charitable organizations in New York. He was deeply interested 
in Yale College, and added |5000 to a bequest of 13000 to the 
Librai'y funds which was made by his uncle, Noah Linsly (Yale 
1791). 



423 

Dr. Linsly made his summer home in his native place, and died 
there, after nine months' illness resulting from pneumonia, July 
12, 1887, in his 84th year. His wife, four sons, and three daugh- 
ters survive him ; one son is a graduate of the Sheffield Scientific 
School (Class of 1866). 

Julius Rockwell, the eldest son of Reuben and Rebecca 
(Beebe) Rockwell, was bom in Colebrook, Conn., April 26, 1805. 
After graduation he studied law for two years in the Law School 
connected with the College, and spent a third year in the office of 
Swan & Sedgwick in Sharon, Conn. In 1829 he was admitted to 
the bar in Litchfield County, with the expectation, however, of 
settling in Northern Ohio, where his father owned some lands. 
But during a visit to Pittsfield, Mass., he was so attracted by the 
appearance of that town and its business prospects that he de- 
cided to remain there. Accordingly he removed thither, and in 
1830 began the practice of his profession, being for the first four 
years in partnership with Henry Hubbard, Esq., a prominent law- 
yer. At a later time, from 1842 to 1859, he was in partnership 
with the Plon. James D. Colt. He was a member of the House 
of Representatives of Massachusetts from 1834 to 1838, and dur- 
ing the last three years served as Speaker. Immediately after 
this he was appointed by Governor Everett on the first Board of 
Bank Commissioners for the State, in which office he served for 
three years, for the last two as Chairman. From January, 1844, 
to March, 1851, when he declined a re-election, he was a Repre- 
Isentative in Congress ; and in 1854, after the Hon. Edward 
Everett had resigned his seat in the Senate of the United States 
on account of his health. Governor Emory Washburn appointed 
Mr. Rockwell to fill out the unexpired term of one year. In 
1853 he was a member of the convention to revise the Constitu- 
tion of the State, and in 1855 he was the nominee of the new Re- 
publican party for Governor. In 1858 he was again elected to the 
Legislature of Massachusetts, and was chosen Speaker. In June, 
1859, he was appointed by Governor Banks one of the Judges of 
the newly established Superior Court of the State, and in Octo- 
ber, 1886, having retained the position beyond any of his original 
associates, he resigned it, with the high respect of all the people 
for his just and courteous administration of justice. 

He man-ied, Nov, 22, 1836, Miss Lucy F., the oldest child of 
Judge William P. Walker, of Lenox, Mass,; and in June, 1865, 



424 

Judge Rockwell removed from Pittsfield to Lenox, to occupy the 
Walker homestead, recently left vacant by the death of Mrs. 
Rockwell's mother. His wife died Feb. 13, 1887, leaving three 
children, one daughter and two sons (graduates of Amherst Col- 
lege in 1868 and 1871), who still survive. The eldest son died 
during the civil war, being a Captain of a Massachusetts regi- 
ment. 

Judge Rockwell was thrown from his carriage w^hile out driv- 
ing on the 11th of May, 1888, and his death, at his home in Lenox 
seven days later, was the result of the shock sustained at that 
time. 

1827. 

Sidney Law Joh:n^son, eldest son of Ebenezer and Sarah B. 
(Law) Johnson, was born in New Haven, Conn., Dec. 15, 1808. 

He studied law in New Haven and in the fall of 1829 was ap- 
pointed a tutor in the College, and so continued for one year. 
He then found it necessary, on account of impaired health, to in- 
termit his studies, and accordingly embarked on one of the ves- 
sels of the United States Navy, as Professor of Mathematics, for 
a three years' cruise in the Mediterranean. 

On his return he was admitted to the bar, and believing a 
southern climate to be best for his constitution he established 
himself in New Orleans for the practice of his profession. After 
twenty years' successful practice he removed to San Francisco in 
1856, where he continued until his death. He had long been re- 
cognized by the bench and bar as an eminent lawyer, especially in 
cases involving a knowledge of the French and Spanish systems 
of civil law. He was also distinguished in the community for his 
attainments as a scholar in both ancient and modern languages. 
He died at his residence in (East) Oakland, Cal., July 22, 1887, in 
his 79th year. 

He married in 1839 Miss Cornelia Covington, of Bowling 
Green, Ky., by whom he had three daughters and two sons. 

1828. 

Samuel Chaxdler Paine, son of John Paine, Esq., a leading 
citizen of Woodstock, Conn., was born in that town on the 21st 
of February, 1807. 

In 1829 he entered the Yale Medical School, where he was 
graduated two years later. He began practice immediately in 



I 



425 

the town of Oxford, in Worcester County, Mass., where he fol- 
lowed his profession successfully until his death. He retained 
his vigor to advanced age in a remarkable degree, and was widely 
influential in the community by his strong mind and decided char- 
acter. He was a deacon in the Congregational church ; from 
1873 to 1881 president of the Oxford National Bank; and in 1879 
a Representative in the State Legislature. 

On the 1st of December, 1887, he had a very slight shock of 
paralysis, from which he was supposed, however, to have entirely 
recovered, when he was again seized in March with a similar 
attack, from which he died, after two weeks' prostration, on the 
1st of April, 1888, in his 82d year. 

He married, June 18, 1834, Abigail, daughter of Abijah Davis, 
Esq., of Oxford. She died December 28, 1886. Two of their 
three daughters survive their parents. 

1829. 

Robert Alexander Nicoll was born in the city of New 
York in 1808, the son of Alexander Nicoll, of New York, who 
died in 1834, in Elizabeth, N. J., where the family then resided. 

He took a partial course of study in the Princeton (N. J.) 
Theological Seminary, from 1830 to 1832, and in October, 1832, 
he settled in Mobile, Alabama, in company with his brother-in- 
law. Dr. D. McVoy. At a later date he engaged in the cotton- 
trade, in the firm of McVoy & Nicoll; and he continued in busi- 
ness as a commission merchant for many years before the late 
civil war, under the tirm-name of Wycoff, Smith & Nicoll. After 
the close of the war he was employed in the collection of the 
revenue, but latterly owing to the precarious condition of his 
health had retired from active business. He was an elder in the 
Presbyterian Church. He died at his residence in Mobile, on 
June 28, 1887, in his 79th year. 

He was married in 1835 to Miss Mary Minter, daughter of Mr. 
A. Minter, a planter of Dallas County, Alabama, who survives 
him with one daughter. 

1830. 

David Close Comstock, third son and seventh child of Major 
Samuel and Catherine (Clock) Comstock, of New Canaan, Fair- 
field County, Conn., was born in that town, September 19, 1807. 

For two years after graduation he taught a high school in Nor- 
wich, Conn., at the same time studying law with Judge Calvin 



426 

Goddard. He then returned to New Haven, and served for two 
years as tutor in the College, while pursuing also studies in the 
Divinity School. He then engaged in teaching and in supplying 
various pulpits, until February, 1840, when he accepted a call to 
the Congregational church in Redding, Conn., where he had de- 
clined a previous call in December, 1835. He was ordained as 
pastor in Redding, March 4, 1840, and labored diligently there 
until his resignation, April 8, 1845. He preached in various 
places until 1849, when he went to Geneva, N. Y., and established 
a Young Ladies' Institute, which he conducted for two years. 
His health then failed and he removed to Stamford, Conn., where 
he established another Seminary for Young Ladies, which he di- 
rected until 1855, when the condition of his health obliged him 
to relinquish all active labor. His time was employed thence- 
f orwards, so far as he was able, in literary pursuits. He occupied 
himself in writing for the religious press, and in studies for a 
history of Poland, the completion of which was interrupted by 
the condition of his health. In 1879 he removed from Stamford 
to the residence of his eldest son, a physician in New York City. 
In the spring of 1883 he had a slight attack of cerebral hem- 
orrhage, which was soon followed by a partial sun-stroke at 
the time of the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge, which led to 
the gradual failure of his powers. He died in New York, Octo- 
ber 14, 1887, in his 81st year. 

He married, April 8, 1840, Elizabeth A., eldest daughter of the 
Rev. Nehemiah U. Tompkins, M.D., of New York City, who 
survives him, with their six children, three sons and three daugh- 
ters. The second son was graduated at this College in 1865. 

1830. 

Melancthon Hoyt, the youngest child of Melancthon and 
Betsey (Taylor) Hoyt, of Norwalk, Conn., was born in that 
town, in the village of South Norwalk, on February 13, 1809. 

After graduation he studied for the Episcopal ministry, and 
was ordained deacon by Bishop Brownell on Oct. 14, 1834, at 
Bridgeport, Conn., and priest by the same Bishop, at Camden, 
N. J., on August 23, 1835. In 1838-39 he was the rector of St. 
Andrew's Church, Meriden, Conn. ; and went thence to Michi- 
gan. The rest of his life was spent on the frontier of our 
country, in the employment of the Missionary Society of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. He was stationed for about six 



427 

years in Michigan, then for about fifteen years in Wisconsin and 
for most of the rest of his life in (South) Dakota, in or near 
Yankton ; he died on January 3, 1888, in his 79th year, at Scot- 
land, in that territory. 

He married Ann Eliza Yarrington, by whom he had ten chil- 
dren. 

1831. 

JoHj^ Guest Atterbury, son of Lewis and Catherine (Boudi- 
not) Atterbury, was born in Baltimore, Md., February 7th, 1811. 
He entered college from Newark, N. J., whither the family had 
removed. 

After graduation, he studied law in the city of New York, and 
a few years after being admitted to the bar he removed, in 1836, 
to Detroit, Mich., where he rose rapidly to eminence and success 
in his profession, becoming associated in business with his class- 
mate, Alpheus S. Williams. In 1840 he married Catherine J. 
Larned, third daughter of General Charles Larned, and a sister 
of the wife of Mr. Williams. Subsequently, having united with 
the Presbyterian church under the care of the Rev. George 
Duffield, he abandoned a promising profession and prepared for 
and entered the ministry, being ordained by the Presbytery of 
Detroit, in July, 1845. 

He commenced his pastorate, where he thought he was most 
leeded, at Flint, Mich., where he spent five years. While here 
he was appointed a Regent of the University at Ann Arbor, a 
position which he held till he left the State. 

Compelled by ill health to seek a change of climate, in 1852 he 
accepted a call to the pastorate of the Second Presbyterian 
Church of New Albany, Ind. Here he labored with marked suc- 
cess for fifteen years, building up a strong congregation and 
gaining much influence among the churches and pastors of 
Southern Indiana. In 1863, he received the title of D.D. from 
Marietta College. In 1866, constrained by impaired health, he 
resigned his charge, and a year or two after became Secretary of 
the (New School) Presbyterian Board of Education, with his resi- 
dence in New York. On the reunion of the two branches of the 
Presbyterian^ Church and the re-arrangement of its Boards, in 
1871, he resigned his Secretaryship and took up his residence in 
Detroit, where he spent the remainder of his life. 

For two or three years he had charge of an important mission 



428 

chapel, and afterwards, as health permitted, preached in the 
pulpits of the city and elsewhere. He was greatly beloved and 
esteemed in Detroit. His home was a center of social attraction 
to a large circle of friends and kindred. His counsel was greatly 
valued by the ministers and churches of the Synod. His mind 
was singularly well balanced, and he was generous in his judg- 
ments of others as well as in gifts and services. 

He died August 24th, 1887, at the age of 76, in full possession 
of his faculties and in perfect peace, surrounded by his family 
and most tenderly ministered to by friends. His wife survives 
him, with one daughter and five sons. One son was graduated 
at this college in 1864. 

William Brintnall DeForest, only son of DeLauzun and 
Lydia (Brintnall) DeForest, was born in New Haven, Conn., 
October 3d, 1811. 

He studied theology after graduation, for the first two years in 
the Yale Divinity School, and for the last year in Princeton Sem- 
inary. On January 1, 1835, he was ordained pastor of th( Con- 
gregational Church in Watertown, Conn., but the failure of his 
voice compelled him to resign this charge, June 21, 1837. He 
then returned to New Haven, and as a pastime began medical 
studies. He soon found himself so interested that he decided to 
adopt medicine as a profession, and he was graduated from the 
Yale Medical School in January, 1840. He practiced in Cole- 
brook, Conn., until December, 1845, and then for fourteen years 
with marked success in New York City, where he was for much 
of the time connected with the Board of Health. He removed to 
New Haven in May, 1860, and withdrew gradually from active 
labor. He served for five years, between 1865 and 1872, as a 
member of the Board of Aldermen, and in 1867 acted as assis- 
tant judge of the City Court; and in these and other public po- 
sitions, as in his private life, he impressed himself strongly by 
his integrity and earnestness. 

His health began to fail in 1885, and his last illness, from a 
complication of diseases, continued from February, 1887, until 
his death on September 21, at the age of 76. 

Dr. DeForest married. May 3, 1836, Mary Lucretia, second 
daughter of General Russell C. Abernethy, of Torrihgton, Conn., 
who died April 3, 1877, leaving a son and a daughter, who are 
still living. He next married Miss Lynde, of New York, who 
also survives him. 



429 

Weli.ington Gordon, fifth son of Samuel and Susan (Knox) 
Gordon, was born in Falmouth, Va , November 24, 1812, and en- 
tered college from Frederieksburgh, Va., in 1828. 

After graduation he studied law and was admitted to the bar, 
but was compelled by the failure of his eyesight to abandon his 
chosen profession. lie then traveled for two years in Europe, 
and on his return, having inherited a good estate from his father, 
he entered on the life of a Virginia planter, interesting himself 
also in politics and serving for a time in the legislature of the 
State. 

In 1869, having been wrecked in fortune by the results of the 
civil war, he removed to California, and utilized his early educa- 
tion by becoming a teacher in the public schools of San Fran- 
cisco. He died in that city, on March 21, 1888, in the V6th year 
of his age, after six days' illness, a peaceful and painless death, 
from the rupture of a blood-vessel of the brain. 

He married Frances A., daughter of the Hon. Cuthbert Powell, 
of Loudoun County, Va., who survives him with one son and one 
daughter, — an elder son, a youth of rare promise, having died at 
the age of sixteen. 

Etjenezer Learned, eldest son of Deacon Ebenezer Learned 
(Yale 1798) and Charlotte (Peck) Learned, of New London, 
Conn., was born in New London, November 3, 1811. 

He married August 20, 1834, Matilda D., daughter of Captain 
Samuel Hurlbut, of New London, and settled in Norwich, Conn., 
where he engaged in mercantile pursuits in partnership with 
William McEwen, of New London. This partnership was soon 
dissolved and Mr. Learned began the study of law. In Novem- 
ber, 1839, he was admitted to the bar, and at once opened an 
office in New London, where he continued in practice until he was 
appointed Secretary of the Norwich Fire Insurance Company, of 
which company he was afterwards made president. Through his 
life he was identified with the most important public interests in 
the city, and held many positions of trust. His services as a 
trustee and the treasurer of the Norwich Free Academy during 
its entire organization were especially valuable, as also his in- 
terest in the organization and earnest support of the Park Con- 
gregational Church. He gave largely of his time, money, and 
energies, for the advancement of the Union cause in the late civil 
war. 

2 



430 

In the early summer of 188*7 he was attacked by paralysis, 
from which he died, at his home in New London, July 29, at the 
age of 75. 

His wife died March 23, 1S31, leaving a daughter and a son 
who are still living — the latter being a graduate of this college 
in 1857. 

He next married, April 9, 1842, Mrs. Harriet M. (Vail) Town- 
send, of Troy, N. Y., who survives him. 



Peter Parker, the youngest and only surviving son of Nathan 
and Catharine (Murdock) Parker, of Framingham, Mass., was 
born in Framingham, June 18, 1804. His youth was spent in 
labor on his father's farm, and after coming of age he began a 
course of study looking towards the ministry. His means were 
limited, and he earned money for his expenses by teaching. In 
1827 he entered Amherst College, but removed to Yale for the 
last year of the course. 

After graduation he studied in the Yale Divinity School for 
two years (1832-34), and also finished a course of medical study, 
receiving the degree of M.D. in 1834. Having been ajipointed 
by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions a 
medical missionary to China, he was ordained at Philadelphia, 
May 16, 1834, and embarked the next month for Canton, being 
one of the earliest American missionaries to enter the kingdom. 
In the furtherance of his labors he opened in 1835 a hospital in 
Canton for the gratuitous relief of the sick, which was soon Recog- 
nized as a most beneficial agency and was of inestimable value in 
disarming prejudice. In 1840, on the outbreak of war between 
England and China, he visited America, and was married in 
Washington, March 29, 1841, to Miss Harriet C, daughter of 
John O. Webster, of Augusta, Me. ; the next year he returned to 
China, — Mrs. Parker being the first foreign lady to reside in 
Canton. 

In 1844, with the hope of thus forwarding the principles of the 
gospel, he accepted the appointment of Secretary and Interpreter 
to the United States Legation to China, and his connection with 
the American Board ceased soon after, though his labors in the 
hospital continued until the resignation of his secretaryship on 
his return to America in 1855. During these years he had also 
repeatedly acted as Charge d'aif aires ad interim. 



431 

Soon after his return lie was appointed United States Commis- 
sioner to China, with plenipotentiary powers, for the revision of 
the treaty of 1844. This service occupied him for two years, 
after which he was obliged to return to America in somewhat 
enfeebled health, owing to the effects of a sunstroke. lie fixed 
his residence in Washington, with his paternal homestead in 
Framingham as a summer resort. His later years were spent in 
retirement, the only public officer which he held being that of 
Regent of the Smithsonian Institution, to which he was elected 
in 1868. After several years of infirm health he died in Wash- 
ington, January 10, 1888, in his 84th year. 

His wife and only son survive him. 

William Edgar Witiirow was born in Lewisburg, Greenbrier 
County, (West) Virginia, on the 30th of December, 1809. The 
earlier part of his college course was spent at the Ohio Univer- 
sity, in Athens, Ohio, and the Senior year only at Yale College. 

After his graduation he gave up the idea of a professional life, 
on account of somewhat impaired liealth, and in 1835 settled as a 
merchant in Rushville, in Schuyler County, in Western Illinois. 
Subsequently, when the building of the Northern Cross Railroad 
through Macomb, in McDonough County, about twenty-five miles 
north of Rushville, doomed the latter place to comparative unim- 
portance, he removed his business to Macomb, and had his resi- 
dence there from 1855 until his death. He was prominent in all 
public interests, especially in respect to education, and filled 
many local positions of trust. From 1858 until his resignation 
in 1 875, and again for another period of three years, he was an 
elder in the Presbyterian Church of Macomb. 

He married, at Macomb, February 5, 1839, Miss Harriet E. 
Chase, wdio died on the 4th of August, 1843, leaving two sons 
and a daughter, who are still living. He afterwards married 
Miss Hannah B. Chase, a sister of his deceased wife, who died, 
January 9, 1885, without children. Mr. Withrow died at the 
house of his daughter, in Sterling, 111., November 15, 1886, in his 
77th year. 

1834. 

William Henry Adams was born in Portsmouth, N. II., Sep- 
tember 4, 1807, the youngest of ten children of Gideon and Lucy 
(Lewis) Adams. His youth was spent in Boston, where he came 



432 

under the influence of the Rev. Dr. Wisner, who encouraged him 
at a somewhat advanced age to prepare for the ministry. He 
entered college in 1829, but soon withdrew and re-entered in 1830. 

After leaving college he studied theology in the Yale Divinity 
School, where he finished the course in 1838. His first settle- 
ment as a pastor was in Wellfleet, Mass., where he was ordained 
on the 19th of February, 1840 ; on the 14th of the following 
May he was married to Mary Ann, daughter of the late Rev. 
Amos Pettengill, of Naugatuck, Conn. He was dismissed from 
his pastoral charge in 1841, and for two years afterwards supplied 
the Congregational Church in Harwich, also on Cape Cod.. 
Being then compelled to suspend preaching by the state of his 
health, he settled in Grantville, now Wellesle}^ Hills, Mass., 
where he and his wife conducted a day and boarding-school. 
After several years he removed to Rah way, N. J., where, and 
subsequently at Millville, N. Y., he continued teaching until 1854. 
With improved health he gradually resumed preaching, in con- 
nection with the Presbyterian Church, and in 1854-55 supplied 
regularly the church in Turin, N. Y. From 1855 to 1858 he had 
charge of the church in Danby, N. Y., then for nine years of that 
in Brooklyn, Susquehanna County, Pa. For over twelve years 
(1867-80) he ministered to the Presbyterian Church in East 
Greene, Erie County, Pa., after which he retired from active 
duty on account of increasing infirmities. The last years of his 
life were spent in blindness and feebleness in Lansdale, Mont- 
gomery County, Pa., where he died, March 27, 1888, in his 81st 
year. 

His wife survives him with two of their three daughters and 
their only son. 

Elijah Frink Rockwell was born in Lebanon, Conn., Octo- 
ber 6, 1809, the second son of Joseph and Sarah (Huntington) 
Rockwell. He entered college in 1829, but left before the end of 
Freshman year, and joined the next class at the opening of their 
Sophomore year. 

After graduation he taught in Monson, Mass. (1834-35), and 
was then induced to go to Fayetteville, N. C, as assistant to the 
Rev. Simeon Colton (Yale 1806), formerly of Monson, in the 
Donaldson Academy, of which he had lately taken charge. He 
left this position in 1837 to prosecute theological studies, — spend- 
ing one year at Princeton, N. J., and a second year at Columbia, 



I 



438 

S. C. He supplied the Presbyterian Chureli in Fayetteville from 
June, 1830, to December, 1840, in which month he removed to 
the Prenbyterian Church in Statesville, Iredell County, over 
which he was ordained and installed as pastor in the following 
spring. He continued in this charge until October, 1850, when 
he accepted a call to a Professorship in Davidson College, N. C, 
where he remained for eighteen years. He at first held the chair 
of Natural History, and afterwards that of Latin. In August, 
1868, he returned to Statesville, and for two years acted as the 
Principal of Concord Female College, which he had aided in 
establishing ; subsequently, however, the institution was sold for 
debt, by which means as well as by the results of the civil war 
he lost a large amount. For another year or two he conducted a 
classical academy for boys. During all these years since his 
retirement from the pastorate he had supplied vacant churches 
near his residence for most of the time ; and in 1872 he removed 
from Statesville to Cool Si)ring8, about ten miles to the northeast, 
where he supplied the local church (Fifth Creek Church) and two 
others. About 1883 he retired from active work, but his declin- 
ing years were still employed in his favorite studies and in works 
of practical benevolence. He was highly respected for his learn- 
ing and intellectual force. The degree of Doctor of Divinity 
was conferred upon him by the University of North Carolina 
in 1882. 

He had been in failing health for two years, and died after a 
week's illness, of pneumonia, at his home in Cool Springs, April 
15, 1888, in his 79th year. 

He married, June 18, 1839, Miss Margaret K. McNeill, daughter 
of George McNeill, of Fayetteville, who died May 21, 18CG, with- 
out issue. He next married, September 11, 1807, Miss Bettie H. 
Browne, of Davidson College, daughter of Archibald S. Browne, 
of Fayetteville, who survives him with one of their two sons. 

1835. 

William Wright was born in Middle Haddam, in the town of 
Chatham, Conn., November 8, 1808, the son of Nymphas and 
Hannah (Daniels) Wright, and was prepared for college mostly 
in the Academy in Colchester, Conn. 

He spent the three years after graduation in the Yale Divinity 
School, and on November 8, 1838, was ordained and installed 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Jewett City, a parish in 



434 

Lisbon, Conn. He resigned this charge on April 28, 1842, and 
on November 8, 1843, was settled over the church in Plainville, 
then part of Farmington, Conn., where he remained until Septem- 
ber, 1851. For the next two years he supi)lied the pulpit in his 
native village, and was then for eleven years (August 6, 1854 — 
May 1, 1865) in charge of the church in the parish of Wapping, 
in the town of South Windsor, Conn. Three years more of 
labor followed, in (West) Suffield, Conn., after which he retired 
from active service. The rest of his life was spent in Middle- 
town, Conn., where he died, very suddenly, of apoplexy, June 
26, 1887, in his 79th year. 

He married, August 9, 1838, Julia E., daughter of Waldo 
Carey, of Windham, Conn., by whom he had four daughters and 
one son; one daughter survives him. 

1836. 

Edward Elias Atwater, only surviving child of Elihu and 
Julia (Thompson) Atwater, was born in New Haven, Conn., May 
28, 1816. 

After graduation he taught for a year in a family in Oldham 
County, Kentucky. In 1837 he entered the Yale Divinity School, 
and completed there a three years' course of study. On Novem- 
ber 24, 1841, he was ordained pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Ravenna, Ohio, which office he resigned on July 1, 
1 849. He then spent a year in foreign travel, and on February 
3, 1852, was installed over the Congregational Church in Salmon 
Falls, in the township of Rollinsford, N. H. He was dismissed 
from this charge, November 3, 1857, when he returned to New 
Haven. A few months later he undertook a missionary enter- 
prise in the eastern part of the city, which resulted after years of 
patient labor in the organization of a church (the Davenport 
Church) of which he was installed pastor on April 22, 1863. He 
withdrew from this service on June 14, 1870, but continued to re- 
side in New Haven, partly engaged in literary labors, until his 
death. In 1887 he went to Florida for the winter, and died there, 
in the town of Hawthorn, very suddenly, from a stroke of apo- 
plexy, on the 2d of December, in his 7 2d year. 

He married, August 9, 1844, Rebecca H., daughter of Deacon 
David Dana, of Pomfret, Vt., who survives him. Their only 
child died in infancy. 

He published in 1873 a Genealogical Register of the Atwater 



435- 

Family (G4 ])]». 8vo), also in 1875 a History and Significance of 
the Sacred Tabernacle of the Hebrews (448 pp. 8vo), and in 1881 
a History of the Colony of New Haven (611 pp. 8vo). The last 
named elaborate work determined the more serious undertaking 
which occupied three or four years of his later life, — the editing 
of a History of the City of New Haven, which was published in 
1887 (702 pp. 8vo), and to which he was himself the chief con- 
tributor. 

James Wakefield Tucker, son of the Rev. James W. Tucker 
(Yale 1807) and Harriet (Atwater) Tucker, was born in Rowley, 
Mass., where his father was then pastor, on October 29, 1816. 
His father died in his infancy, and his mother returned to New 
Haven, her native place. 

After graduating he entered commercial life, at first in New. 
York City, where he spent fifteen years, and then in Paris, 
France, where he was in business as a banker for thirty years. 
He spent the remainder of his life in or near New York, and died 
very suddenly, on the steps of the Reform Club in that city (of 
which he was the managing secretary), on March 27, 1888, in his 
7 2d year. 

He was married, in January, 1849, to a daughter of George S. 
Fox, of New York, who died before him. Of his surviving sons 
the younger is a graduate of Swarthmore College and of the 
Harvard Medical School. 

1837. 

George Yates Gilbert was born in the village of Gilberts- 
ville, town of Butternuts, Otsego County, N. Y., March 28, 1815, 
the son of Deacon Joseph T. Gilbert, and a grandson of Abijah 
Gilbert, the original settler of the village. He first entered 
Hamilton College, and removed to this college in Junior year. 
Soon after graduation he began the study of law in New York 
City, where he practiced his profession until 1851, — for the last 
six years of the time being in partnership with John D. Sher- 
wood, Esq. (Yale 1839). In 1857, on the formation of the Eau 
Claire Lumber Company, of Eau Claire, Wise, he became its 
vice-president, and held the position for ten years or more. 
After retiring from this responsibility he settled again in his na- 
tive place, where his benevolence and public spirit were highly 
valued. 



43^ 

He died in New York City, April 29, 1 888, while temporarily 
absent from home, in the 74th year of his age. 

He married, July 20, 1840, Mary S., daughter of Jabez Fitch, 
of Marshall, Mich., who survives him, with one daughter and one 
son. 

Isaac Jennings, son of Isaac Jennings, M.D. (honorary Yale 
1828), and Nancy (Beach) Jennings, was born in Trumbull, Conn., 
July 24, 1816, and entered college in 1834, from Derby, Conn,, 
to which place his father had removed in 1820. 

After a year of teaching in Washington, Conn., he returned to 
New Haven, and spent over a year in the Divinity School while 
still continuing to teach. After this he took another year of 
theological study in Andover. He was ordained pastor of the 
Second Congregational Church in Akron, O., June 14, 1843, and 
was dismissed February 13, 184*7. On the 1st of the following 
September he was installed over the Congregational Cliurch in 
Stamford, Conn., and this charge he resigned on April 26, 1853. 
From September 21, 1853, until his death he was the pastor of 
the First Congregational Church in Bennington, Yt. — a period of 
faithful and approved service of thirty-four years. He died in 
Bennington, August 25, 1887, after a brief illness, from stone in 
the bladder, aged 71 years. 

He married, February 17, 1847, Sophia, daughter of Matthias 
Day, of Mansfield, O., who survives him with six of their eight 
sons; two sons are graduates of Williams College and one of 
Harvard. 

Mr. Jennings published in 1869 a valuable volume of 408 
pages, entitled " Memorials of a Century," on the early history 
of Bennington and its First Church. 

Charles Woodward Stearns, elder son of the Hon. Charles 
Stearns, of Springfield, Mass., was born in that city, September 
24, 1817. Ilis mother, Julia Ann Woodward, was a grand-daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Dr. Benjamin Trumbull (Yale 1759), of North 
Haven, Conn. 

After graduation he studied for two years in the Medical School 
of Harvard College, but took his degree of M.D. at the Medical 
School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1840. He began 
practice in Springfield, but soon became a surgeon in the United 
States Army, and served in Florida and in New York Harbor in 



437 

1841-42. He then spent two years in Europe, and after his re- 
turn resided mainly in Springfield and New York City, engaged 
in literary occupations and in the exercise of his remarkable in- 
ventive genius, as well ^s in the practice of his profession. On 
the outbreak of the late civil war he enlisted as surgeon of the 
Third New York Infantry, and remained with that regiment 
until it was mustered out in May, 1863, After this he relin- 
quished the practice of medicine. 

While spending some months in Williamstown, Mass., in 1884, 
he was stricken Avith paralysis, and remained an invalid for the 
rest of his life. He died in Longmeadow, Mass., September 8, 
1887, at the age of 70. 

Dr. Stearns married, June 23, 1853, Elizabeth Wolcott, of 
Springfield. After her death he married, July 2, 1862, Mary E., 
daughter of W. C. Shaw, of Baltimore, Md., who died in New 
York City, May 30, 1877. He next married, April 23, 1879, 
Miss Amanda Aikin, daughter of Judge Albro Aikin, of Duchess 
County, N. Y., who survives him. He left no children. 

Among other writings of his which have been published may 
be mentioned, Shakespeare's Medical Knowledge (1865, 8vo, pp. 
78), The Shakespeare Treasury of Wisdom and Knowledge 
(1869, 12mo, pp. 436), and A Concordance and Classified Index 
the Constitution of the United States (1872, 8vo, pp. 153). 

Morrison Remich Waite was born in Lyme, Conn., Novem- 
ber 29, 1816, the eldest child of the Hon. Henry M. Waite (Yale 
1809), afterwards Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the 
State, and Maria (Selden) Waite. 

After graduation he studied law for one year with his father, 
then one of the associate judges of the Supreme Court, and then 
removed to Maumee City, Lucas County, Ohio, where he contin- 
ued his studies in the office of Samuel M. Young, Esq. In 
October, 1839, he was admitted to the bar and began practice in 
Maumee City, being in partnership with his former instructor for 
some years. In 1849 he was elected to the State Legislature. 
In 1850 he removed to Toledo, in consequence of the change of 
the county seat, and his later rise in professional repute was steady 
and sure ; from 1856 he was associated in partnership with his 
brother Richard (Yale 1853). In 1871 he was appointed one of 
the three coimsel for the United States before the Tribunal of 
Arbitration, at Geneva, under the Treaty of Washington, and 
3 



438 



discharged the duties of that position with credit. In 1873 he 
was unanimously elected as a member of the convention called to 
revise the Constitution of Ohio, of which body he was chosen 
President. At that time he had been recognized for many years 
as the leader of the bar in northwestern Ohio, and had twice de- 
clined a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of the State. 

On January 19, 1874, he w^as nominated by President Grant as 
Chief Justice of the United States, and two days later was con- 
firmed by the unanimous vote of the Senate. He then removed 
to Washington, and for the rest of his life performed the duties 
of his high station with the same character and ability which he 
had shown in his earlier career. He died in Washington, of pneu- 
monia, after four days' illness, March 23, 1888, in his 72d year. 

The Chief Justice received the degree of LL.D. from this Col- 
lege in 1872, and was for the last six years of his life one of the 
members of the Corporation elected by the Alumni, 

He married, September 21, 1840, his second cousin, Miss Amelia 
C. Warner, of Lyme, who survives him with two of their four 
sons and an only daughter ; the youngest son was graduated at 
this College in 1869. 



1838. 

CuETiss Woodruff was born in New Haven, Conn., Dec. 10, 
1816, the son of Solomon and Julia (North) Woodruff, both 
natives of Farmington, Conn. In 1824 the family removed to 
Catskill, N. Y. 

After graduation he spent three years without any definite 
employment, and then went to Syracuse, N. Y., as the representa- 
tive of a business firm of New York City. After several years 
he engaged in business in Syracuse on his own account, very suc- 
cessfully. On the 19th of March, 1846, he married Augusta, 
youngest daughter of P. N. Rust, of Syracuse, by whom he had 
one son, who died in infancy. In 1853 he left Syracuse for 
Brooklyn, N. Y., where he was engaged in the storage business, 
until January, 1883, when he returned to Catskill to spend his 
remaining days with a sister at the family homestead. He had 
experienced several severe strains upon the nervous system, from 
the nature of his business and from other causes, the result of 
which was a weakness of mind that ended in paralysis after four 
moAths' illness. He died in Catskill on the 23d of November, 
1887, aged nearly 71 years. 



Wit' 



439 

1839. 

John Thomas Andrew was bom in Bethany, New Haven 
County, Conn., July 9, 1811, the son of Jonathan Andrew, and a 
direct descendant of Samuel Andrew, one of the early Rectors 
of the College. 

After graduation he had nearly completed a course of theologi- 
cal study in the Yale Divinity School, when he was prevented 
from entering on his chosen profession by an attack of bronchial 
disease, in 1842. He had married, immediately after graduation, 
on September 9, 1839, Jane Ann, daughter of Caleb Jones, of 
Cornwall, Conn. ; and he spent about two years in that town, after 
leaving New Haven, partly engaged in teaching a private school. 
Finding little improvement of his voice, he turned his attention 
to agriculture, and taking a farm in West Cornwall, on the bor- 
ders of Sharon, devoted himself to his new calling with enthu- 
siasm and success. In May, 1864, he withdrew from these labors 
and returned to the village of Cornwall, where he afterwards re- 
sided. He served his fellow-citizens in various capacities, and 
was active and liberal in the promotion of all public interests. 

He died in Cornwall, on May 3, 1887, of Bright's disease of the 
kidneys, in the 7 6th year of his age. His wife died three or four 
years before him. They had no, children. 

John Sheldon Beach, son of John and Marcia (Curtiss) 
Beach, of New Haven, was born in this city, Julj^ 23, 1819. 

He taught for a year in an academy in Wilmington, Del., and 

en entered on a course of study in the Yale Law School. In 
843 he began the practice of law in New Haven, and the next 
year entered into partnership with Gen. Dennis Kimberly. From 
1852, when Gen. Kimberly retired from the profession, he prac- 
ticed alone, until his own son was admitted to the bar in 1879. 
His career was marked with success from the first, and during 
his latter years he was acknowledged as the leader of his pro- 
fession in the community. The honorary degree of Doctor of 
Laws was conferred on him by this L^niversity in June, 1887. 

He married, September 15, 1847, Rebecca, daughter of Dr. 
William Gibbons, of Wilmington, Del., who survives him with 
four of their seven children; the surviving sons are graduates of 
Yale College, in the classes of 1877, 1883, and 1887, respectively. 

Mr. Beach had been out of health for some months, and died 
in New Haven, after a brief period of severe illness, on the 12th 
of September, 1887, in his 69th year. 



440 

William Henry Chandler, the only child of Randolph and 
Hannah (Tisdale) Chandler, of Providence, R. I., was bora in 
that city, on the 14th of April, 1815. 

Upon graduation he entered the Law School of Harvard Uni- 
versity, but in May, 1 840, a serious disease of the eyes compelled 
him to abandon all his plans. After a year of acute suffering, he 
made a trial of a country life in the village of Pomfret, Conn., 
his father's native place, with such encouraging results that in 
1842 he purchased a few acres of land in the adjoining town of 
Thompson, and after his marriage (on March 24, 1842, to Miss 
Martha Helen, second daughter of William Allen, of Pomfret) 
settled there, and by active outdoor life on a farm recovered fully 
his health. He continued in Thompson until his death, and was 
foremost in that community in the promotion of all matters of 
public concern. He declined repeatedly political preferment, ac- 
cepting only an election as Representative in the Legislature of 
the State in 184^, and an election to the State Senate in 1867. 

He died in Thompson, May 13, 1888, in his 74th year. His 
wife survives him with four daughters and one son; one daughter 
is the wife of Charles R. Forrest, Esq. (Yale 1865). 

Isaac Pendleton Langworthy was born in (North) Stoning- 
ton. Conn., January 19, 1806, the son of John and Sarah (Pendle- 
ton) Langworthy. 

After some early experience in school-teaching and in business, 
he studied medicine, taking one course of lectures at the Medical i 
School of Harvard University, and settled in practice in his^ 
native town at the age of 25. He was active in Christian labors, 
and was soon convinced, during a very general revival of religion ( 
in his neighborhood, of his duty to preach the gospel. Accord- j 
ingly at the age of 27 he began to prepare for College, support-, 
ing himself meantime by his medical practice and by teaching] 
music. 

After graduation he spent two years in the Yale Divinityj 
School, going thence to C'helsea, Mass., where he gathered a newj 
Congregational church, of which he was ordained pastor, No- 
vember 10, 1841. He resigned this position on the seventeenth 
anniversary of his settlement, having shown marked efficiency in 
his office and having exercised a wide and durable influence forj 
the religious and civil prosperity of the town. His residence 
continued in Chelsea until his death. Shortly before his with-! 



so 

t 



441 

drawal from the ])astorate he had accepted the position of Cor- 
responding Secretary of the American Congregational Union, in 
Boston, with the main work of aiding in building churches and 
parsonages for missionary congregations. He proved equally 
successful in the self-denying labors of his new field, but after 
ten years, in 1807, he exchanged this duty for a corresponding 
relation to the American Congregational Association, and devoted 
himself thenceforth with unremitting zeal to the congenial task 
of securing and enlarging a Congregational House and Library, 
in Boston. These efforts were crowned with remarkable success, 
and at his retirement from active service in 1887 he could point 
to a suitable building occupied as a denominational house, and to 
a very valuable library which had been increased by gifts pro- 
cured through his efforts from some 3500 to over 33,000 volumes. 

After a short period of feeble health, followed by a few weeks 
of more rapid failure, he died in Chelsea, on the 5th of January, 
1888, at the age of 82. 

He married, August 8, 1842, Sarah, daughter of Cyrus 
Williams, of New Haven, who survives him. His children, 
three sons and a daughter, died before him, — the last survivor 
being a graduate of this College in 1872, who died in 1884. 

Mr. Langworthy received the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Divinity from Iowa College in 1878. 

Increase Niles Tarbox was born in that part of East Wind- 
sor which is now South Windsor, Conn., February 11, 1815, the 
son of Thomas and Lucy (Porter) Tarbox; being left an orphan 

hen nine years old he was obliged to secure an education by his 
wn efforts. 

For two years after graduation he had charge of an academy 
in East Hartford, Conn. He then returned to New Haven and 
entered the Divinity School, being also occujHed during the 
second and third years of his course there with the duties of a 
tutor in college. In the summer of 1 844 he began to preach in 
Framingham, Mass., where he was ordained pastor of the HoUis 
Evangelical Church on November 22. In May, 1849, while still 
holding this pastorate, he was one of three editors who issued the 
tirst number of the religious newspaper, since widely known as 
The Gongregationalist. In July, 1851, he resigned his pastorate 
and withdrew from editorial work, to accept the position of Sec- 
retary of the American Education Society, which he held with 



442 

distinguished usefulness until his resignation on account of ad- 
vancing age in August, 1884. His office during these years was in 
Boston, and his residence was removed to West Newton in 1860. 
He was a frequent contributor to periodical literature, both in 
prose and verse, and besides a number of minor works for Juve- 
nile readers published in 1876 a Life of Israel Putnam (389 pp., 
8vo), which illustrates his keen interest in New England history. 
In his later years he had great pleasure in editing with full notes 
the privately printed Diary of the Rev. Dr. Thomas Robbins 
(Yale 1796), in two thick royal octavo volumes. The degree of 
Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him by this college in 
1869. 

In January, 1888, he went to North Carolina for the benefit of 
his health, and while there was seriously ill from pneumonia. He 
rallied so as to return home, arriving there at the end of April. 
Four days later, on May 3, he felt well enough to go into Boston, 
but died of exhaustion in about an hour after his return home. 

He was married, Jime 4, 1845, to Miss Delia A. Waters, daugh- 
ter of Asa Waters, of Millbury, Mass., who died in 1885. Of 
their four children two daughters are still living. 



1840. 

William Broxson Curtis was born in Exeter, Otsego County, 
N. Y., June 5, 1812. 

After graduation he studied theology for three years in the 
Yale Divinity School, and in June, 1843, was called to the pasto- 
rate of the Congregational Church in that part of Derby, Conn., 
then called Humphreysville, and now the town of Seymour. He 
was ordained there on Aug. 27, 1843, and was dismissed on Oct. 
15, 1849. Four months later he was installed over the Church in 
Huntington, Conn., which charge he resigned in June, 1858. 
Then followed a year of labor with the Presbyterian Church in 
New Egypt, Ocean County, N. J., after which he returned to 
Connecticut, and was installed in North Branford, on December 
22, 1859, where he continued in office until October 2, 1867. 
Subsequently he supplied the church in Monroe from 1869 to 
1872, and that in North Guilford from 1875 to 1877. 

His last years were spent in North Branford, which town he 
represented in the Legislature in 1882. He died there on June 7, 
1888,' at the age of 76. 



I 



443 

Daniel Parker Notes, son of Daniel and Mary H. Noyes, 
was born in Byiield Parish, in the town of Newbury, Mass., 
June 4, 1 820. He was descended, on his father's side, from the 
two earliest ministers of Newbury, and his mother was the 
daughter of the Rev. Dr. Elijah Parish (Dartmouth Coll. 1785), 
long pastor of the Byfield Church. 

After teaching school in various places he returned to College 
as a tutor in 1843, and continued in office for four years, at the 
same time reading theology. He then spent a year at Andover 
Seminary as a resident graduate, and on April 18, 1849, was or- 
dained over the Jay Street Presbyterian Church in Brooklyn, 
N. Y. After five years of happy and successful pastoral work, 
he resigned to accept a position as one of the Secretaries of the 
American Home Missionary Society, in New York City. After 
ten years of diligent service, he removed to the neighborhood of 
Boston, and acted for several years as Secretary of Home Evan- 
gelization for the Congregational Churches of Massachusetts. 

On October 11, 1877, he was installed over the church in Wil- 
mington, Mass., where he remained until December 15, 1885, 
when he retired from active service, removing in the following 
spring to the family homestead in Byfield, where his closing days 
were spent. 

He died in Byfield, of Bright's disease, on June 3, 1888, aged 
68 years, less one day. 

He married, December 30, 1850, Miss Helen McGregor Means, 
daughter of David McGregor Means, of Amherst, N. H., who 
survives him with a daughter and two sons (Yale College 1880 
and 1885). 

1841. 

Elijah Baldwin, the only son of Elijah Baldwin, M.D. (hon- 
orary Yale 1827), was born in (South) Canterbury, Conn., Octo- 
ber 26, 1820. 

He studied medicine in Boston and Philadelphia, receiving the 
degree of M.D. from Harvard University in 1845. He immedi- 
ately settled in practice in Central Village, in Plainfield, the town 
adjoining his birthplace, but ten years later retired to his father's 
farm in Canterbury, where he continued until his death, the result 
of Bright's disease, after three days' illness, on the 7th of March, 
1888, in his 68th year. After his return to Canterbury he re- 
tained to some extent his professional practice. 



444 

He married October 14, 1845, Sarah H., daughter of Bucklin 
Matthewson, of Lisbon, Conn., who survives him with four 
daughters and two sons, — two children having died in infancy. 
The eldest son was graduated at this college in 1874. 

William Tappan Eustis, the elder and only surviving son of 
the Hon. William T. Eustis, a merchant of Boston, and Susan 
(Moore) Eustis, was born in Boston, July 6, 1821. 

After graduation he studied theology in New Haven and An- 
dover, and on April 8, 1846, was ordained and installed as pastor 
of the Congregational Church in South Woburn, now Winches- 
ter, Mass., whence he was called to the Chapel Street Congrega- 
tional Church (now the Church of the Redeemer), in New Ha- 
ven, over which he was installed, March 10, 1848. After twenty- 
one years of honored service in this position, he was dismissed at 
his own desire, March 10, 1869, to accept a call to the (Indepen- 
dent) Memorial Church, in the northern part of the city of 
Springfield, Mass., which he served as pastor until his sudden 
death, at that ^jlace, after some years of failing health, March 30, 
1888, in his 6Vth year. 

He was elected in 1880 a member of the Board of Visitors of 
Andover Theological Seminary, and continued in that office till 
his death. He also received in 1880 the degree of Doctor of Di- 
vinity from Amherst College. 

He married, May 6, 1846, Miss Maria Louisa, elder daughter of 
the Rev. Louis Dwight (Yale 1813), of Boston. She survives 
him, with their four daughters and two sons; the eldest daughter 
is the wife of Dr. S. H. Chapman (Yale 1866). 



1842. 

Edwix Nesbit Chapman, elder son of Col. Phineas and Betsey 
(Abbot) Chapman, of Ridgefield, Conn., was born in that town, 
February 26, 1819. 

He was graduated in 1 845 with the degree of M.D. from Jef- 
ferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and settled immediately in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., where he continued in practice until the failure 
of his health some two years before his death. When the Long 
Island College Hospital was chartered in 1858, he was elected to 
the medical staff, and upon the organization of a teaching depart- 
ment in 1859, he was appointed Professor of Therapeutics and 



Materia Medica, and also (soon after) of Clinical Midwifery. 
Four years later he was elected to the chair of Obstetrics and the 
Diseases of Women and Children, to which subjects he had lat- 
terly given in his practice special attention ; and this position he 
held with distinction until his resignation in 1868. He published 
in 1872 an elaborate Treatise on the Diseases and Displacements 
of the Uterus (8vo, pp. xiv, 504) ; and also made voluminous con- 
tributions to medical periodicals. 

He died of paralysis, in Brooklyn, March 2, 1888, at the age 
of 69. 

He was married, March 19, 1846, to Mary A. Read, adopted 
daughter of George F. H. Read, of New Haven, by whom he 
had one daughter, who survives him, besides two children who 
died in infancy. His wife having died in 1856, he was married 
in 1865 to Maria B., daughter of John Davol, of Brooklyn, who 
survives him with their four sons. 

1844. 

• Wait Robbins Griswold, from Wethersfield, Conn., entered 
college in the Sophomore year. 

After graduation he went to the South, and upon his return 
became a teacher in his native State, — at first in Bristol, where 
he was married to Miss Roberts in 1846. At a somewhat late 
period in life he began the study of medicine with Dr. R. W. 
Mathewson, of Durham, Conn., and he received the degree of 
M.D. from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York 
City in 1863. In April, 1863, he was appointed Assistant Sur- 
[geon of the 2 2d Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, and the next 
year was transferred to the 86th Regiment U. S. Colored In- 
fantiy, with which he continued until June, 1865. 

Later he practiced medicine in Rocky Hill, a part of his native 
town, and there died on July 15, 1887, aged 67 years. 

Edward Sweet was born in Ipswich, Mass., October 23, 1815. 

He studied theology during the three years after graduation in 
the Yale Divinity School, and after temporary service elsewhere 
gathered a Congregational Church in Haydenville, in the town of 
Williamsburg, Mass., which was organized on March 1, 1851, 
when he was also ordained pastor. In the spring of 1 854 he was 
obliged to resign his parish and to retire permanently from the 
profession, on account of serious trouble with his head and throat. 



446 

He then became a partner in business with his brothers as a 
banker and broker in New York City, and was successful and 
highly esteemed in this relation until ill-health caused his retire- 
ment about 1880. In 1866 he removed his residence to Mont- 
clair, IST. J., where after a long period of invalidism he died on 
the 7th of January, 1888, in his 'ZSd year. 

Mr. Sweet married, April 16, 1863, Miss Caroline W. Bull, 
daughter of Mr. Frederic Bull, of New York City, who survives 
him with an adopted daughter. 

William Barrett Washburn, son of Asa and Phebe Wash- 
burn, was born in Winchendon, Mass., January 31, 1820. His 
father died in his infancy, and he was brought up mainly by his 
grandfather, Capt. Phineas Whitney, of Winchendon. 

His plans for entering on a profession were put aside by the 
call for his help in settling the estate of an uncle, who was inter- 
ested in an extensive manufactory of wooden ware, near Orange, 
Mass.; and the result was his engaging permanently in that 
business. He resided in Orange until 1848, when he removed to 
Greenfield, of which he continued to be the leading citizen until 
his death. From 1859 he was the president of the Greenfield 
Bank. 

He was elected to the State Senate in 1850, and to the lower 
house of the Legislature in 1853 and 1854. In 1862, in the trying 
times of the war, he was elected unanimously to represent his 
district in Congress. He was re-elected in 1865, 1867, 1869, and 
1871, his last term of service being interrupted by his election as 
Governor of Massachusetts. He was twice re-elected to the 
Governorship, and resigned his position. May 1, 1874, having 
been chosen by the Legislature to fill the unexpired term of the 
Hon. Charles Sumner as United States Senator. His public life 
closed with the expiration of this term, March 3, 1875. His 
integrity, sound judgment, and practical ability made his ofiicial 
career a highly honorable one. 

When members of the Yale Corporation were first chosen to 
represent the Alumni, in 1872, Governor Washburn was one of 
the number ; the three-years' term of oflice fell to him by lot, 
and he was re-elected in 1875, but declined to be again a candi- 
date in 1881. He was also a trustee of Smith College for Women 
from its incorporation until his death. Harvard University con- 
ferred on him the degree of Doctor of Laws in 1872. 



447 

He was deeply interested in philanthropic and missionary 
efforts, and was the president of the American Missionary Asso- 
ciation for six years before his death. He died suddenly, Octo- 
ber 5, 1887, of heart disease, in his 68th year, in Springfield, 
Mass., while in attendance on the Annual Meeting of the Ameri- 
can Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. By his last 
will very generous bequests were left to the American Board, the 
American Missionary Association, and the Home Missionary 
Society. In his lifetime he presented to the town of Greenfield a 
building for a public library and a part of its contents. 

He married, in September, 1847, Miss Hannah A. Sweetser, 
daughter of Col. Sweetser, of Athol, Mass., who survives him 
with one of their two sons and three daughters. The son was 
graduated at Yale College in the Class of 1874. 

1845. 

James Bailey Silkman was born in Bedford, N. Y., on the 
9th of October, 1819, the son of Daniel Silkman, of Dutch 
descent, and Sarah (Bailey) Silkman. In his childhood his father 
met with the loss of his property, and the son's preparation for 
college (which he entered in the Sophomore year) was thereby 
deferred and at the last imperfect. 

He taught school after graduation, as he had done before, and 
in the fall of 1846 entered the law office of Theodore Sedgwick, 
Esq., in New York City. Before long, however, he procured 
through Mr. Sedgwick's influence a position as assistant editor of 
the New York Evening Post ; this he resigned after two years, 
to become night editor of the New York Courier and Enquirer^ 
while continuing law studies. In December, 1850, he was 
admitted to the bar, of which he became a well-known member, 
devoting himself to real-estate and office practice. In politics 
originally a Democrat, his anti-slavery zeal drove him into the 
Republican ranks. During the war he was an active supporter 
of the Union. 

For many years he gave much attention to Sunday-school 
work and the temperance cause, and was a prominent figure in 
the old Fulton-street prayer-meeting. Eventually he became an 
ardent Spiritualist, and in 1882 was placed by some of his rela- 
tives under restraint as of unsound mind. Litigation ensued, 
which resulted in his release, and he gave much of his time after- 
wards to the investigation of cases alleged to be of a similar 
character. 



448 

In January, 1888, he was attacked with pneumonia, from which 
he partially recovered, but a failure of the heart's action resulted 
in his death, at a hospital in New York City, on the 4th of Feb- 
ruary, 1888, in his 69th year. 

He married, in 1856, Harriette V. C, daughter of the Rev. 
Alexander H. Crosby, Rector of the Episcopal Church in 
Yonkers, N. Y., where Mr. Silkman afterwards resided. She 
died July 13, 1877 ; her children,- three daughters and one son, 
are all living. 

1846. 

Edward VANScHOONHovEisr Kinsley, the son of Zebina 
J. D. Kinsley and Eliza (VanSchoonhoven) Kinsley, was born 
at West Point, N. Y., July 11, 1825. His preference was for an 
army career, but his father, though himself originally in the service, 
strongly opposed the design and insisted upon a college course, 
after which he studied law. Being admitted to the bar of New 
York State in November, 1848, he had just opened an oiRce in 
Newburgh, when he was recalled to West Point, on his father's 
sudden death, to take charge of the military school which had 
grown up under his direction. After a few years, however, he 
retired from this uncongenial occupation, and devoted himself in 
the intervals of foreign travel to the care of his ancestral estate 
at West Point, so far as imperfect health permitted. On a visit 
to Europe in 1867 he sjDent some time in Madrid, and there met 
Miss Lizzie L. Hale, daughter of the Hon. John P. Hale, of New 
Hampshire, United States Minister to Spain. He was married to 
Miss Hale, in Madrid, on March 7, 1868, and during a part of 
1869 was Acting Secretary of Legation under Mr. Hale. In 
June, 1870, he returned to America, and gave himself up to the 
cultivation of his literary and artistic tastes in retirement at West 
Point. He died there (of heart disease) in his sleep, in the early 
morning of Easter Day, April 1, 1888, in his 63d year. 

His wife survives him. Their only child died in infancy. 

1847. 

John McDonough Berry, the eldest son of John and Mary 
Ann Berry, was born in Pittsfield, New Hampshire, September 
18, 1827. 

Upon graduation he began the study of law in Concord, N. H., 
where he was admitted to the bar in July, 1850. He at once set- 
tled in practice in Alton Corners, N. H., which he left for the 



449 

west in 1 858. After two years' practice in Janesville, Wisconsin, 
he removed to Faribault, Minnesota, where he came at once into 
prominence. In 1856 he was a member of the House of Repre- 
sentatives for the Territory, and in 1862 was sent to the State 
Senate. In 1864 he was elected an Associate Justice of the Su- 
preme Court, a position which he held by successive re-elections 
until his death. In 1879 he removed his residence from Faribault 
to Minneapolis, where he died, after a lingering illness (of a para- 
lytic nature) extending over several months, on the 8th of No- 
vember, 1887, in his 61st year. 

As a Judge he was held in the highest esteem, being remark- 
ably conscientious in the discharge of his duties, as well as gifted 
by nature with the judicial mind and temper. 

He married. May 26, 1863, Alice A. Parker, of Roscoe, Illinois, 
who survives him with their three daughters and one son. 

JoHX DuTTON Candee, youugcr son of Benjamin and Almira 
C. (Dutton) Candee, was born in Pompey, Onondaga County, 
N. y., June 12, 1819. His parents returned about 1825 to their 
native State, of Connecticut, where his mother was soon left a 
widow in needy circumstances. At the age of 13 he began to 
work in a printing office in New Haven, and continued in the 
business until his admission to the Sophomore Class in College. 

Upon graduation he took a two years' course in the Yale Law 
School, and after a year's absence prospecting in Iowa returned to 
New Haven and practiced law for about twelve years. He then 
took temporary charge of the editorial department of the New 
Haven Journal and Courier^ and finding the occupation congenial, 
he purchased in 1863 a controling interest in the Bridgexjort Daily 
Standard^ and removed to that city. He continued in this po- 
sition until his death in Bridgeport, after an illness of several 
weeks, on February 27, 1888, in his 69th year. During his resi- 
dence there he had been prominent in all public matters, and had 
gained the regard and confidence of the community. 

He married, October 29, 1863, Miss Sallie B. Smith, daughter 
of the Rev. Dr. Samuel F. Smith (Harvard 1829), of Newton 
Center, Mass., who survives him with two of their three daughters. 

1849. 
George Benedict was born in Bethel, then a part of Dan- 
bury, Conn., December 6, 1824, the younger son of John and 
Betsey (Leavenworth) Benedict. 



450 

After graduation he attended a course of medical lectures in 
New York City, and a second course at the Yale Medical School, 
where he received the degree of M.D. in 1851. He settled in 
New York City for the practice of his profession, and remained 
there or in that vicinity until November, 1858, when he returned 
to Connecticut on account of his father's death. From 1859 to 
1862 he practiced in the neighboring town of Easton, and from 
1862 in Bethel, where his residence continued until his death. 
From February to September, 1863, he served as 1st Assistant 
Surgeon of the 23d Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers, sta- 
tioned in Louisiana. For the last half of his life he suffered 
much from asthma, to which was added chronic diarrhea con- 
tracted in the army. The latter disease so weakened him during 
the summer of 1887 that an attack of bronchial trouble, which 
he might otherwise have overcome, caused his death, after three 
days' illness, in Bethel, on September 23, at the age of 62. He 
stood high in his profession in the State, and was universally 
beloved. 

He married, April 14, 1852, Miss Grace Callbreath, by whom 
he had one child, a son, who survives him. 

Littleton Purnell Franklin, the son of Henry and Mary 
(Purnell) Franklin, was born on January 18, 1831, in Berlin, 
Maryland, where he spent nearly the whole of his useful life. 
He entered College in the third term of the Freshman year. 

After graduation he read law in Snow Hill, Md., with the late 
Judge John R. Franklin, and in May, 1852, he was admitted to 
the bar. Being in delicate health throughout all this portion of 
his life, he never entered on the practice of his profession, but 
employed his time principally in farming near Berlin. In 1867 he 
represented Worcester County in the convention which framed 
the present Constitution of Maryland. He was elected in 1871 
to the House of Delegates from this county, on the Democratic 
ticket, and in 1877 to the State Senate, where he served in the 
sessions of 1878 and 1880. He was for years an elder in the 
Presbyterian Church of Berlin. He died at his home near Berlin, 
of typhoid fever, after an illness of two weeks, on April 9, 1888, 
in his 58th year. 

He married, February 9, 1853, Miss Sarah E., daughter of 
Thomas Chaney, Esq., of Issaquena County, Mississippi, who 
survives him with four of their seven children, — two daughters 
and two sons. 



< 



451 

Thomas Rogers Shearon was born in Alabama in April, 
1825, and entered college in 1846 as a resident of Harpetli Shoals, 
Williamson County, Tenn. 

He settled at graduation in Davidson County, Tennessee, as a 
farmer, but removed in April, 1852, to Dyer County, in the same 
State. In the fall of 1853 he entered the Law School of Harvard 
University, where he received the degree of LL.B. in July, 1855. 
After two years spent in practicing law and in teaching in the 
vicinity where he had last resided, he settled in April, 1857, in 
Troy, the county seat of Obion County, Tenn., where he contin- 
ued in the practice of his profession and in farming until his 
death. He served during the civil war as Major of the 4'7th Con- 
federate Tennessee Regiment. At a later date he was elected to 
the State Senate. 

He died in Troy, near the end of August, 1887, in his 63d 
year. 

He married in September, 1849, Miss Mary J. Lowe, by whom 
he had nine children. 

1850. 

James Johnston Waring, the eldest son of William R. War- 
ing, M.D. (Univ. of Pa. 1813), a distinguished physician of 
Savannah, Ga., and Ann (Johnston) Waring, was born in Savan- 
nah, August 19, 1829. 

He studied medicine in the University of Pennsylvania for 
two years, receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine in the 
Spring of 1852. During the following year he was assistant 
resident physician of the Blockley Hospital in Philadelphia, 

arly in 1853 he went to Europe, where he spent two years in 

avel, and in study in Dublin, London and Paris. In 1856 he 
ettled as a physician in Washington, D.C., and on May 23d of 
the same year he married Miss Mary B., daughter of Col. Thomas 
Pinckney Alston (Yale 1814), of Charleston, S. C. In 1857 he 
was^elected to the chair of Physiology and also to that of Ob- 
stetrics in the National Medical College. He had acquired 
an extensive and lucrative practice before 1861, when his family 
being in Savannah he went south to join them, and on his return 
was arrested with them by the Confederate authorities and re- 
manded on parole to Savannah. The result was that he remained 
there in the successful practice of his profession for the rest of 
his life. His public spirit was especially shown by his energy in 



452 

forwarding much needed sanitary reforms. He was a member of 
the City Council in 1868, and accepted a place on the Board again 
in 1877 for the express purpose of assisting in re-establishing the 
health of the city after the fatal epidemic of 1876. He died in 
Savannah, on the 8th of January, 1888, in his 59th year, after 
three months' illness. 

His children were four daughters and three sons; the eldest son 
was a member of the Class of 1881, Yale College; the death of 
the second son (Class of 1887) is noticed on a later page of this 
Record; and the youngest is a member of the Class just ending 
its Junior year. Mrs. Alston survives her husband. 



1851. 

Calvin Holmes Carter, son of Preserve W. and Ruth 
(Holmes) Carter, was born in Waterbury, Conn., May 19, 1829. 
He entered College in 1846, but left the class at the end of the 
Sophomore year, and joined the next class a year later. 

After graduation he spent a year in the Yale Law School, and 
was then for some months in the office of the Hon. Increase Sum- 
ner, of Great Barrington, Mass. He was admitted to the Massa- 
chusetts bar in March, 1853, and began practice in his native 
place in July, 1854. In 1861 he was appointed postmaster, and 
after this, although transacting some legal business, he Avas not 
actively engaged in his profession. In 1863 he resigned the post- 
mastership, to become the manager of the Waterbury Brass Com- 
pany, and was subsequently for several years president of that 
company. During his later years most of his time was given to 
the interests of the Detroit and Lake Superior Copper Company, 
of which he was the president. He was also much employed in 
the care of trust estates, for which his legal knowledge and his 
unswerving integrity especially qualified him. He took an act- 
ive interest in public affairs, and served for two terms in the 
State Legislature (1883 and 1885), besides filling various local 
offices of importance. He was one of the most active of the 
Board of Agents of the Bronson Library in Waterbury. 

He died, very suddenly, from apoplexy, at his home in Water- 
bury, September 18, 1887, in his 59th year. 

He married Miss Mary Jane Darrow, who died several years 
befor^e him. Of their seven children, three sons and a daughter 



453 

Edward Walter Cone died at his residence in Richmond, 
Va., on the 10th of October, 1886, in the 61st year of his age. 

He was born in Bristol, Conn., December 2, 1825, the son of the 
Rev. Jonathan Cone (Yale 1808) and Abigail Cleaveland (Usher) 
Cone. In his early childhood his father removed to Durham, 
Greene County, N. Y., and thence to New Haven in 1848, in 
which year the son entered College. 

In the autumn of 1851 he went to Richmond, Va., to enfirasre 
in teaching, and he soon after established there a classical and 
commercial school which he maintained for about eighteen years. 
By his success as an instructor he gained so thoroughly the confi- 
dence of the community, that when the present public school 
system of Virginia was established under the Constitution of 
1870 he was soon elected to one of the most important principal- 
ships of the Richmond schools. His last position was that of 
principal of the Bellevue school, which he held for several years, 
and for the four years next preceding his death in a condition of 
failing health ; but such was his strength of will and devotion 
to duty that he continued in the efficient discharge of his office 
until the close of the school session in June, 1886. 

He became a Christian while in College, and in Richmond 
connected himself with the Third Presbyterian Church, and from 
June, 1866, held the office of a ruling elder. 

He married, July 24, 1856, Mary Elizabeth Yarbrough, of 
Richmond, and had one daughter and three sons. 

RuFUS CowLEs Crampton, son of William and Esther 
(CowlesjT Crampton, was born in Farmington, Conn,, in 1828. 

He taught in his native town for a year after leaving college, 
and then after a brief engagement as a private tutor took charge 
of an academy in Montrose, Pa. In 1854 he accepted an appoint- 
ment as Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy in Illinois 
College, at Jacksonville, Illinois, where he continued to do excel- 
lent service until overcome by illness. In 1870 he assumed 
the financial management of the College ; and in 1877 he was 
made acting President, and held this position for four years. 
Meantime his health had given way, and though for six years 
longer he was able with difficulty to perform his duties as Pro- 
fessor, the closing year of his life was one of utter prostration. 
He died in Jacksonville on June 13, 1888, at the age of 60. He 
served during the Civil War as Lieutenant Colonel of tlie 145th 
Illinois Volunteers, called out for 100 days in 1864. 
4 



454 

He married, about the time of his removal to Jacksonville, 
Miss Adeline Hart, daughter of Simeon Hart (Yale, 1823), who 
survives him with their only child, a son, who was graduated at 
Illinois College. 

George William Gordon was born m Pensacola, Fla., in 
1831. 

In the November after graduating he sailed for California, 
with the hope of recruiting his health. On arriving he found 
employment as Deputy County Clerk of El Dorado County, at 
the same time reading law. In 1855-56 he spent a year in Mex- 
ico, and after his return was admitted to the bar at Sacramento. 

From about 1860 to 1866 he practiced law in Virginia City, 
Nevada, in partnership with the late Judge Frank Tilford. In the 
last named year he went to San Francisco, and remained there, en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession until a short time before 
his death, which occurred in the same city, on February 7, 1888, 
in his 57th year. He was never married. 

William Charles James Hall was born in Jamestown, 
Chautauqua County, N. Y., August 8, 1828, the son of William 
and Julia Hall. 

After graduation he spent -a year in the study of civil engi- 
neering, and was then employed for a short time in the survey of 
the Atlantic and Great Western (now the New York, Pennsyl- 
vania & Ohio) railway. He next taught an academy in Elling- 
ton, in his native county, and in the summer of 1854 engaged in 
business as a druggist and bookseller in Jamestown. In Septem- 
ber, 1862, Mr. Hall enlisted in the 1st Battalion of N.Y. Sharp- 
shooters, and while a 1 st Lieutenant was transferred (in January, 
1864) to a regiment of U. S. Colored Troops with the rank of 
Major. This latter period of service was most trying, and his 
health was so undermined that he never fully recovered. 

After the war he spent a year in European travel, and then 
accepted the position of superintendent of the public schools of 
the city of Meadville, Pa. He retired from this post to under- 
take a second European trip (in charge of a party of five young 
men), and on his return was induced by his father to take charge 
of certain interests connected with the erection of some worsted 
mills in Jamestown. He went to England, accordingly, to pur- 
chase machinery, and applied himself to the mastery of the de-J 



455 

tails relating to the proposed manufactures. For a long time he 
was superintendent of the manufacturing department, and he 
continued to be connected in various responsible capacities with 
the business (of which he was after his father's death the largest 
individual owner) until his death. His services to the community 
were not limited to his promotion of its advancement as a manu- 
facturing center, but extended to all its educational, religious, 
and philanthropic interests. He had a natural aptitude for 
teaching which widened his influence, and he had more than a 
local reputation as an expert microscopist. 

In 1886, with failing health and a desire to engage in out-door 
work, he purchased a six hundred acre farm near Norfolk, Va., 
and in the task of bringing it into proper condition overtaxed 
his strength. In October, 1887, he came North for rest, but died 
at Jamestown, of gastritis, after ten days' illness, on October 30, 
1887, in his 60th year. 

He married, August 31, 1852, Maria M. Woodhull, of James- 
port, in the township of Riverhead, L. I., who sui'vives him with 
the younger of their two sons and one daughter. 

Strong Wadsworth, son of Daniel Wadsworth, of Farming- 
ton, Conn., was born in Hastings, Oswego County, N. Y., on the 
10th of September, 1833. He removed in early childhood to 
Chicago, and in 1847 entered Beloit College, Wisconsin. He 
came to Yale at the beginning of the Senior year. 
. He studied law in Chicago with J. Young Scammon, Esq., and 
was admitted to the bar of Illinois in 1853. After practicing his 
profession for about a year he engaged in business as a real estate 
and stock broker in Chicago, and removing subsequently (about 
1866) to New York City became a member of the New York 
Stock Exchange, and so continued until his death. For a short 
period in 1875 he was financial editor of the Neio York Thnes. 

His death, which occurred at his home in Stapleton, Staten 
Island, on the 1st of July, 1887, was the result of a bony tumor 
on the head, caused by a random blow from a peach-pit thrown 
by a stranger across the street in New York City; the growth 
was slow, covering a period of thirteen years, and by gradual en- 
croachment upon the brain produced great suffering, most painful 
to those who watqhed him, while he with perfect resignation 
awaited the time of release; though conscious that there was no 
hope of recovery, he was never heard during his entire illness to 
utter a word of complaint. 



456 

His wife, formerly Miss Marion C. Phelps, of Delavan, Wise, 
survives him with one daughter and one son. 

1862. 

Francis Miller, son of Robert H. and Anna Miller, was born 
in Alexandria, Va., July 31, 1829. He was prepared for college 
in that city at the school of which Mr. Benjamin Hallo well was 
Principal, and entered Yale at the beginning of the Sophomore 
year. 

He married, September 23, 1852, Miss Caroline Hallo well, 
daughter of his preceptor, and for the next six years he was as- 
sociated with his father-in-law in the conduct of the school at 
Alexandria. He was afterwards principal of a private school in 
Sandy Spring, Montgomery County, Md., until 1867. He then 
studied law with A. G. Riddle, Esq., of Washington, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in May, 1868, and thenceforward practiced his 
profession in that city, though retaining his residence at Sandy 
Spring. In November, 1876, he was appointed Assistant United 
States District Attorney, which office he held for one year, when 
he was selected by the Attorney for the District of Columbia 
(Mr. Riddle) as his Assistant, and so continued until his resigna- 
tion in 1885. 

He was a member of the convention which nominated Grant 
for President, and was thereafter a staunch supporter of Repub- 
lican principles, though under discouraging circumstances. He 
was at one time nominated for the position of Chief Judge of 
the Sixth Judicial Circuit of Maryland, in 1885 for that of 
Comptroller, and in 1887 for that of Attorney General. In his 
professional career he won for himself a high position in the re- 
gard of his associates, and his personal character secured the 
honor and warm regard of all his fellow-citizens. 

He died at his residence, " Stanmore," near Sandy Spring, Md., 
February 2, 1888, in his 59th year. He was brought home the 
week before from New York City, where he had been for several 
weeks under the treatment of eminent physicians for what was 
supposed to be cancer of the stomach. 

Mrs. Miller survives him with four of their six children, — three 
sons and a daughter. 

1854. 
Jedidiah Kent Burnham, son of Jedidiah and Sophia (Bid- 
well) Burnham, was born in Kinsman, Trumbull County, Ohio, 



457 

June 1, 1827. The first two years of his college course were 
spent at Western Reserve College, Ohio. 

While studying law in Warren, Ohio, in 1855, he was elected 
public engineer and surveyor of Trumbull County, for three 
years, and he continued to carry on this business after his admis- 
sion to the bar in 1857. In 1860, he removed to Jamestown, just 
across the Pennsylvania border, and while practicing there joined 
the 76th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers in September, 1863. 
In March, 1 864, he was transferred to the Signal Corps. 

He returned to Jamestown after the close of the war, but sub- 
sequently removed to Arkansas and died at Fort Smith, Sebastian 
County, on October 5, 1887, in the 61st year of his age. 

Erastus Lyman DeForest, younger and only surviving son 
of Dr. John DeForest (Yale, 1826) and Lucy S. (Lyman) De- 
Forest, was born in Watertown, Conn., June 27, 1834. 

For two years after graduating he was a student in engineering 
in the Yale Scientific School, and received the degree of Ph.B. in 
1856. Li January, 1857, he went to California aiid after a year 
spent there in teaching removed to Melbourne, Australia, where 
he remained for two and a half years engaged in the same occu- 
pation. 

Subsequently he returned home, and with the exception of two 
visits to Europe the rest of his life was mainly passed in Water- 
town and in New Haven, where he occupied himself with study 
especially in the higher mathematics. 

After the death of his father, in March, 1885, he remained 
more constantly in Watertown, occupied with the care of his 
property and prostrated by enfeebled health. After a gradual 
decline, he was found dead in his bed on the morning of the 6th 
of June, 1888. He was unmarried. 

A short time before his death he gave 825,000 for a public 
library in Watertown. About the same time he gave $10,000 to 
this college for the endowment of a mathematical chair. 

William Woodruff Stone, son of Sidney M. and Abigail 
(Treat) Stone, was born in New Haven, Conn., November 11, 
1832. 

After graduation he was employed for some months in survey- 
ing, and was subsequently enrolled in the Yale Scientific School 
as a student of analytical chemistry, but finally devoted himself 



458 

to the study of law, in the office of Charles Robinson, Esq., of 
New Haven, and in the Yale Law School, and in Ma}^, 1857, was 
admitted to the bar and settled in practice in his native city. In 
May, 1859, he was elected clerk of the Connecticut House of 
Representatives, and after serving for two years was made clerk 
of the State Senate for a single year. He was for two years 
(1862-64) a member of the Common Council of the city, and 
for five years from July, 1864, deputy collector of customs for 
the port of New Haven. In 1878 he was obliged by poor health 
to retire from the practice of his profession, and removed to the 
adjoining town of Orange, where he died on January 13, 1888, in 
his 56th year. 

He married, September 10, 1862, Miss Sarah C, daughter of 
John A. Blake, of New Haven, who survives him, with two 
daughters; two older children died in infancy. 

1855. 

Sterne Chittenden, the second son of Asahel Chittenden, Jr., 
and Harriet (Treat) Chittenden, was born in Columbus, O., Jan- 
uary 1, 1833, and entered the class with his younger brother at 
the beginning of the Sophomore year. 

He studied law after graduation with Judge N. H. Swayne, in 
Columbus, and w^as admitted to the bar of Ohio in December, 
1856. He practiced his profession at home until March, 1861, 
when he removed his office to New York City, where he acquired 
a considerable fortune. His health failed from overwork, and 
his friends were finally obliged (in January, 1887) to place him in 
an asylum. On July 9, 1887, while visiting at a brother's house 
in Paradise, Pa., insanity returned and he put an end to his life, 
in the 55th year of his age. He was never married. 

1857. 

Joseph Alonzo Chkistman, son of Isaac and Eleanor (Missi- 
mer) Christman, was born in Evansburg, a village in Limerick 
township, Montgomery County, Pa., September 1, 1838, and 
entered college in October, 1854, as a resident of Phoenixville, 
Chester County, where his mother was then living with her sec- 
ond husband. 

After graduation he was engaged in teaching, mostly at the^ 
South, until about the time of the beginning of the Civil WarJ 
In i861 he enlisted as a private in the 6th Regiment Ohio Volun-J 



469 

teers, and was severely wounded at the battle of Pea Ridge, 
Arkansas (March, 1862). He was honorably discharged soon 
after on account of his wound, but was able to serve as clerk in 
the Commissary Department for a year or more longer. In 1804 
he began the study of law in Louisville, Ky., where he was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1865. He went to San Francisco in the 
spring of 1866, and is said to have been there appointed U. S. 
Assistant District Attorney. 

He finally returned to the East, with a considerable fortune, 
and afterwards became interested in a banking house in Paris, 
France, where he died on April 5, 1888, in his 50th year. He 
was unmarried. 

During a part of his college course he had received aid from 
the treasury for the payment of his tuition, and in recognition of 
this assistance he left by his last will, dated in 1885, the sum of 
$25,000 to Yale College, after his mother's death, as a fund for 
the aid of needy and meritorious students. 

1868. 

Addisox Lewis Clarke, son of Benjamin and Lucy (Howe) 
Clarke, was born in Marlboro, Mass., August 19, 1836. His col- 
lege residence was in Worcester, Mass. 

From 1858 to 1860 he was in the employ of a wholesale leather 
house in Boston ; and in 1861 he went to Hong Kong, China, to 
accept a business position, which occupied him until November, 
1863. He then removed to Foochow, where he remained for 
nearly two years, at first as Vice-Consul of the United States, and 
afterwards as Consul. He returned to America in December, 1865, 
and was married, June 12, 1866, to Miss Mary F., daughter of John 
C Potter, of Newton, Mass. On January 1, 1867, he engaged in 
the wholesale hardware business in Boston, as a member of the 
firm of Hogan, Clarke & Sleeper. Soon afterwards his health 
failed, and he was obliged in December, 1867, to try a trip to 
Europe for rest. He remained abroad for nearly a year at this 
time, and in February, 1876, sailed again for Europe, not to 
return until May, 1882. He spent the winter of 1884-85 in 
Florida, on account of his wife's health; and the succeeding win- 
ter in Washington. In September, 1886, he took his family to 
Santa Barbara, California; and finding the atmosphere congenial 
for his invalid wife, he built a house there. 

In November, 1887, symptoms of Bright's disease appeared. 



460 

He drove out daily until January 24th, inclusive, and died on the 
next day, in Santa Barbara, aged 51 years. 

His wife survives him with their two daughters. 

Edgar Laing Heermance, son of Henry and Catharine Edgar 
(Laing) Heermance, was born in New York City, April 30, 1833. 
He was at first in business in New York, but entered the class of 
1857 at the beginning of Sophomore year, and left college in 
June, 1856, to travel abroad. He returned a year later and en- 
tered the next class. 

After graduation he studied theology, for the first two years 
in the Yale Divinity School, and for the third year in Andover. 
On the 12th of November, 1861, he was ordained pastor of the 
Reformed Dutch Church in Castleton, N, Y., and on May 14, 
1863, he married Miss Agnes Woolsey, the eldest daughter of 
President Woolsey. At the end of September, 1869, he resigned 
his pastorate in Castleton, and for the next few years made his 
home in New Haven, with an interval of foreign travel. On 
February 1, 1874, he was settled over the Presbyterian Church 
in White Plains, N. Y., where he continued to reside until his 
death, on April 29, 1888, though having resigned his pastorate in 
the preceding February. He had struggled at different times 
with serious mental depression, which overcame him at the last. 
His wife survives him with their three children, two sons and a 
daughter. 

1859. 

Charles Henry Hatch, son of Charles C. Hatch, was born 
in New York City in 1839, and died there of pneumonia, April 4, 
1888, at the age of 49. 

After graduation he remained in New York City, engaged at 
first in teaching, and in study in the Law School of Columbia 
College, where he received the degree of LL.B. in 1862. In Feb- 
ruary, 1863, he entered the army, as Captain of the 13th New 
York Volunteer Cavalry, and in 1865 was transferred to the 3d 
Provisional N. Y, Cavalry, in which he held the rank of Major 
when mustered out of service in September, 1865. During the 
rest of his life he practiced law in New York City. 

He was married in 1874. 

Elijah Frank Howe was born in Grafton, Mass., Sept. 19, 
1832, 'the youngest child of Lemuel and Sally (Jones) Howe. 



I 



461 

After graduation he spent one year in the Yale Divinity School, 
and a second year in the Princeton Theological Seminary. In 
1861 he began to preach in the Congregatiooal Church in (South) 
Canaan, Conn., where he was ordained as pastor, Dec. 17, 1862. 
He left Canaan, Dec. 1, 1865, to supply the puljjit of the Congre- 
gational Church in Terre Haute, lud., where he continued until 
July, 1876, when he resigned in impaired health. He recovered, 
however, sufficiently to accept a call in the next October to the 
Central Congregational Church, Newtonville, Mass. Here he 
endeared himself greatly to his people by his warm sympathy 
and Christian spirit. He left this charge for the 1st Congrega- 
tional Church in Peoria, 111., where he was installed Sept. 17, 1 882 ; 
but after having struggled for years with pulmonary disease, and 
having taxed his strength especially in the labors incident to 
receiving large additions to his church in the winter of 1885-86, 
was obliged to resign his pastoral charge early in 1887. He vis- 
ited Colorado and California without benefit, and died in Peoria, 
August 11, 1887, in his 55th year. 

He married, Sept. 23, 1861, Miss Frances F., daughter of Eras- 
mus Gates, of Monson, Mass., who died November 11, 1882, leav- 
ing two sons and two daughters ; one son was graduated at this 
college in 1887. He was again married, October 26, 1885, to 
Mrs. Sarah Proctor, daughter of Charles Storrs, of Peoria, who 
survives him. 

William Henry Mather was born in that part of Windsor, 
Conn., now included in the town of Windsor Locks, on the 15th 
of March, 1834, the youngest son of Timothy and Fanny (Olcott) 
Mather, and a descendant of the Rev. Richard Mather. In 1841 
his father removed to Suffield, Conn., where the son was prepared 
for college. 

After graduation he attended one course of lectures in the 
Berkshire Medical College, at Pittsfield, Mass., and subsequently 
two courses in New York City, where he received his degree 
from the Medical Department of the University of the City of 
New York in March, 1862. In the following May he opened an 
office for the practice of medicine in Brooklyn, L. I. Soon after 
he accepted the position of Assistant Surgeon in the 173d Regi- 
ment New York Volunteers, and sailed with Gen. Banks's Expe- 
dition to New Orleans. He remained with this Department until 
February 22, 1867 — a longer period of service than that of any 



462 

other surgeon in the Department. In March, 1865 (while con- 
nected with the 10th U. S. Colored Artillery) he was commis- 
sioned by Congress as Surgeon and Brevet Lieut. -Colonel. 

Coming North in 1867 he settled in Bethel, Conn., and resumed 
practice. He removed to Suffield in the spring of 1871, occupy- 
ing his paternal homestead, and also having an office in the ad- 
joining town of Windsor Locks. He continued the successful 
practice of his profession in both towns until his last illness. 

He died of a sarcomatous tumor in the left armpit, on the 2 2d 
of May, 1888, having endured a painful illness of five months 
with soldierly fortitude. At the time of his death he was a di- 
rector of the Public Library Association of Suffield, in which he 
felt a deep interest ; a member of the Board of Education and 
Acting School Visitor, — offices which he had filled with marked 
ability and fidelity for several years ; and Post Surgeon of the J 
local Post of the Grand Army of the Republic at Windsor Locks. 

He married on Sept. 15, 1868, Miss Elizabeth Beebe, daughter 
of Azel Beebe, of Bethel, who with three sons and three daugh- 
ters survives him. 

1860. 

George Engs, the second son of Samuel and Elizabeth Engs, 
of Newport, R. L, was born in that city, February 25, 1840. 

After graduation he entered at once on the study of medicine 
in New York City, and was graduated in 1863 from the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons; after which he served for two years 
on the medical staff at Bellevue Hospital. He then returned to 
Newport, and engaged in private practice for nearly two years, to 
which followed a visit of about eighteen months to Vienna, 
Prague and Paris, for further study. The rest of his life was 
spent m Newport, where he died very suddenly, of heart-disease, 
on the 7th of July, 1887, in the 48th year of his age. As long as 
his health permitted he was a successful practitioner and was es- 
pecially beloved by the poor who benefited by his professional 
services. 

1861. 

Sidney Fortescue Shelbourne died in New York City, No- 
vember 9, 1887, at the age of 51. His name was originally 
Sylvester Franklin Schoonmaker, and he was born in Albany, 
N. Y., November 5, 1836. He entered college with the class of 



463 

1859, but remained only through the Freshman year. In 1859 he 
re-entered college, as a Junior. 

After graduation he began the study of theology at the Union 
Seminary in New York City, and on August 3, 1862, was or- 
dained in New Jersey with a view to serving as a chaplain in the 
Union Army. In the following February he obtained an ap- 
pointment as chaplain of the 34th Regiment New York Volun- 
teers, and continued with them until the expiration of their term 
of service at tlie end of June. He remained with the Army of 
the Potomac until October, 1864. 

During the ensuing year he was interested in the petroleum 
trade in New York City, and in some improvements in machinery 
for pumping oil from the wells in Pennsylvania. 

In the early part of 1866 he went to Europe, and in October, 
1866, on the death of his father, he made the change of name 
above mentioned. He returned to America in May, 1868, and 
spent the rest of his life in New York City and the vicinity, en- 
gaged as an inventor and contractor. In September, 1868, he ob- 
tained the contract under a Congressional appropriation for re- 
moving obstructions at Hell Gate, in New York Harbor; and this 
occupied him for about two years, ending in disastrous failure. 
For some years after March, 1871, he was more successfully oc- 
cupied in the management of a series of government contracts 
for the improvement of rivers and harbors. 

His last employment was as President of the New York Elec- 
tric Lines Company, which secured in April, 1883, from the Board 
of Aldermen the right to use the streets of New York City to 
lay conduits for electric wires. 

On the evening of November 9, 1887, he visited the American 
Institute fair, in New York, and while examining incautiously 
some machinery in operation was caught by the fly-wheel of an 
engine and instantly killed. 

He was never married. 

1863. 

William Burr Dunning, son of Hermon and Flora (North- 
rop) Dunning, was born on Decem])er 22, 1842, in Peekskill, 
N. Y. 

In the winter after graduation he was employed on the Detroit 
Daihj Advertiser cmcl Tribune, after which he went into business 
in Williarasport, Pa. A disastrous fire ended this experience in 



464 

the fall of 1866, and the next five years he spent in teaching, for 
most of the time in New York City. He was also from 1867 a 
student of medicine in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
where he was graduated in 1871. He was then on the surgical 
staff of the Bellevue Hospital until the fall of 1872, when he 
began practice in his native place. In 1877 he left Peekskill and 
settled in Hartford, where he was successful in his profession, 
until compelled in the fall of 1884 to remove to Colorado, on ac- 
count of incipient pulmonary trouble, the result of a severe cold 
which seized him when physically depressed by overwork. He 
remained in Denver until early in 1887, when he returned to the 
East; and after the experience of another winter in Connecticut 
had shown that he might hope to live safely in this climate, he 
made arrangements in March, 1888, to settle in Lebanon, N. J.; 
but his very sudden death, the result of disintegration of the 
brain, occurred there on April 20, in the 46th year of his age. 

He married, February 19, 1872, Emma A., daughter of C. J. 
Bancroft, of Huntington, L. I., who survives him with two sons 
and one daughter. 

1867. 

Frederick Richard Seward Drake, the only surviving child 
of Frederick A. and Mary H. (Seward) Drake, was born in 
Windsor, Conn., August 31, 1846. He left his class at the end of 
Freshman year, but received his degree from the college in 1883. 

He pursued medical studies in New York City, and was grad- 
uated from the Medical Department of the University of the 
City of New York in 1871. For the next three years he was the 
attending physician of the Department of Out-door Poor at 
Bellevue Hospital, and for several years from 1872 assistant to the 
Professor of the Practice of Medicine in the University of the 
City of New York, in which he held at the time of his death the 
chair of Clinical Medicine. He rose rapidly to prominence 
among the members of the profession in New York, and in the 
Medical Society of the State. At the time of his death he was 
Visiting Physician to Bellevue Hospital, and had been for two 
years President of the Alumni of the Medical Department of the 
University. He died at his home in New York City, on March 
9, 1888, in his 42d year, after a short illness, from an attack of 
quinsy complicated with heart trouble. 



465 

He was married to Miss Katharine E. Fyfe, daughter of 
William Fyfe, of New York City, April 15, 1874; she survives 
him with a daughter and a son. 

1868. 

Oscar Harger, the son of Alfred Harger, of Huguenot de- 
scent, was born in Oxford, New Haven County, Conn., January 
12, 1843. From his father, a farmer and land surveyor, he in- 
herited remarkable physical endurance and decided mathematical 
talents. He was obliged throughout his college course to main- 
tain himself by teaching and mathematical work, and he perhaps 
injured his health permanently by the severe economy which he 
practiced at that time. 

In his boyhood he had been an enthusiastic student of botany, 
and his success in this department of natural history led him on 
graduation to take up the study of zoology with Professor Yer- 
rill of the Sheffield Scientific School. He had already shown his 
special aptitude for original work and had begun important in- 
vestigations, when he accepted in 18*70 the position of Assistant 
in Paleontology under Professor Marsh, which he retained until 
his death. He continued, however, his investigations in inverte- 
brate zoology, as long as his health allowed; of his publications 
in this field the most important is a valuable Report on the 
Marine Isopoda of New England and the adjacent waters (in the 
Report of the United States Commissioner of Fish and Fisheries 
for 1878). His best work and highest attainments, however, were 
in the department of vertebrate paleontology. His remarkable 
logical powers and habits of accurate observation gave him an 
unusual grasp of the details of his subject, and he showed equal 
keenness in the application of principles to facts. 

In 1879 he was attacked by a cardiac trouble, which increased 
from year to year. With indomitable will he continued cheerfully 
engaged in his regular duties, until prostrated by cerebral hem- 
orrhage on Monday, October 31, 1887. He died on the following 
Sunday, November 6, in his 45th year. 

He married. May 13, 1875, Miss Jessie Craig, of New Haven, 
who survives him without children. 

1872. 

John Tweed Stewart was born in Cincinnati, O., July 25, 
1849, the son of Kennedy Frazier Stewart, M.D., and Ellen Van 
Dyke Stewart. 



466 

He was engaged in business in Cincinnati from the time of his 
graduation. For somewhat over a year he was employed in the 
Franklin Bank, of which his step-father, Mr. B. F. Brannan, was 
President; and then for about the same period was connected 
with the establishment of Galway, Semple & Co., stove manu- 
facturers. He finally in 1876 entered the office of Yan Antwerp, 
Bragg & Co., school-book publishers, and remained with them 
until his death, being connected for most of the time with the 
editorial department of the business. 

He was married, on October 19, ISSV, to Miss Terese Black- 
burn, the eldest daughter of the Hon. Joseph C. S. Blackburn, 
United States Senator from Kentucky. At the time of his mar- 
riage Mr. Stewart's health was somewhat iijipaired, and a leisurely 
trip to a milder climate was undertaken for his benefit. From 
Las Vegas, New Mexico, he was taken to Los Angeles, California, 
and while staying at the Long Beach Hotel near that place, an 
acute attack of pleurisy aggravated his consumptive tendencies, 
and he died there on the 16th of January, 1888, in his 39th year. 

William Platt Wood was born in Norwalk, Conn., April 28, 
1849, the son of Noah and Eliza Jane (Gorham) Wood, and was 
fitted for college by Mr. Edward Olmstead (Yale, 1845), of Wil- 
ton, Conn. 

On graduation he took up his residence in Jersey City, N. J., 
and began the study of law in the office of Messrs. Scudder & 
Yredenburgh, and at the same time entered the Law School of 
Columbia College, New York. On graduating from the Law 
School in 1874 he began the practice of his profession in Jersey 
City, and in 1876 was married to Carrie F. Lovell, of that city, 
by whom he had two sons and a daughter ; the two sons are still 
living with their mother. 

In 1879 being afflicted with a partial deafness, which interfered 
materially with his practice, he visited Colorado with the inten- 
tion of engaging in some mercantile business there, but after 
about six months' experience finding his infirmity aggravated by 
the climatic conditions he returned to New York City and entered 
the employ of the American Express Company, taking up his 
residence again in Jersey City ; while a resident of New Jersey 
he was a member of the 4th Regiment National Guard and at- 
tained the rank of Captain and Judge Advocate ; he was also 
captain and crack shot of the Regiment's representative rifle 
team. 



467 

In January, 1882, he was put in charge of the American Ex* 
press Company's local office in Hudson, N. Y., where he remained 
until his death there on August 16, 1885, in his 37th year. 

1873. 

Frank Cowan Goode, the only son of the Hon. James S. and 
Mary A. (Cowan) Goode, was born in Springfield, Ohio, Septem- 
ber 12, 1853. He entered College as Freshman in January, 1869, 
but left the class during Sophomore year, and returned to the 
next class in January, 1871. 

Immediately upon graduation he began the study of law in his 
father's office, and in March, 1876, was admitted to the bar, and 
settled in practice in his native place. He had already gained an 
enviable position in his profession, when he contracted typhoid 
fever, while engaged in the trial of a cause in the Federal Court 
in Cincinnati, and after four weeks' illness died at his residence 
in Springfield, November 23, 1887, in his 35th year. 

He was married, December 8, 1881, to Miss Jennie McKnight, 
daughter of the Rev. Dr. Wm. J. McKnight (Hanover College, 
Indiana, 1851), of New Brunswick, N. J., but formerly of Spring- 
field. She survives him with their only child, a daughter. 

1874. 

Edward Emerson Swallow, son of the Rev. Joseph E. Swal- 
low (Dartmouth College, 1843) and Maria E. (Gibson) Swallow, 
was born on the 20th of July, 1852, in Wilmington, Mass., where 
his father was then settled as pastor. During the most of his 
college course his father was in charge of the Congregational 
Church at Falls Village, in the town of Canaan, Conn. 

On graduation he began a course of study in the Yale Divinity 
School, but was induced three months later to take charge of the 
High School in Pottsville, Pa. He continued to teach in Potts- 
ville until 1878, and was then similarly employed for a few months 
in Garden City, L. I. He then began medical studies at the 
Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, where he was graduated 
in 1880. In January, 1881, he began the practice of medicine in 
Waltham, Mass., and on the 15th of the following October, mar- 
ried Miss Mary Louise Sewall, of Waltham. He afterwards 
spent three years (1884-87) in study in Vienna and Paris, and on 
his return went to Wilmington, North Carolina, with the idea of 
settling there permanently. His health, which had been delicate. 



468 

failed so rapidly that he died in Wilmington, on the last day of 
the year 1887, in the 36th year of his age. His wife and one son 
survive him. 

1876. 

David Hyde Kellogg, son of David H. and Harriet N. Kel- 
logg, was born in Tarrytown, N. Y., October 31, 1853, and entered 
College from Spuyten Duyvil, N. Y. 

After graduation he studied law for a year in the Columbia Col- 
lege Law School, and subsequently in the office of Lord, Day & 
Lord, in New York City. He was admitted to the bar in February, 
1879, and was employed in the real-estate department of Lord, 
Day & Lord, until October, 1885, when he took charge of the 
real-estate business of Messrs. Turner, Lee & McClure, in the 
same city. By close application to business his mind became 
affected, and he was obliged to stop work in June, 1 886. He 
took his own life, in a fit of derangement, while in New London, 
Conn., on the 21st of October, 1887, at the age of 34. He was 
unmarried. 

Joseph Howard Marvin, son of Charles R. and Elizabeth 
(Howard) Marvin, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., March 17, 1853. 

After graduation he studied law at the Law School of Colum- 
bia College (receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1878) and 
in a law office. He was admitted to practice, and opened an 
office in New York City, but being independent in his means 
sought little business. 

On the evening of Sunday, August 21, 1887, while returning 
to his home from Manhattan Beach, he received severe injuries 
by being thrown from a railway car in East New York. He was 
taken to a hospital, and on the Thursday following (August 26) 
was removed to his mother's house ; but the transfer proved to 
be more than he could bear, and he died the same evening, in the 
35th year of his age. He was not married. 

1877. 

Edwin Oscar Perrin, Jr., the second son of Edwin O. and 
Rachel (Stanton) Perrin, was born on July 17, 1854, in Memphis, 
Tenn., where his parents were then residing. He entered college 
from Albany, N. Y. 

He spent nearly two years after graduation in Europe, engaged 
in the study of some of the languages and in travel, and then 



469 

returned home for a course in law, receiving the degree of LL.,B. 
at the Albany Law School in 1880. For a few months he was 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Dale Tile Company in New York 
City, but in the fall of 1880 he went to Stanton, Florida, where 
he made some investments in land, and was variously occupied, 
— in real estate business, as a fruit-grower, as a lawyer, and as a 
magistrate — until his death. In the last-named capacity he had 
won general regard for his public spirit, his impartiality, and his 
high sense of honor. 

On the 28th February, 1888, he crossed Lake Weir, on the 
shores of which he lived, with a friend in a canoe ; on the return 
trip, in rough weather, the same evening, the young men were 
both drowned, and their bodies were not recovered until the 8th 
of the following month. He was never married. 

Geoege Huxtington Thomas was born in Northampton, 
Mass., July 31, 1853, and died of consumption in Columbus, O., 
September 20, 1887, in his 35th year. 

He studied law in New Haven, receiving his degree from the 
Yale Law School in 1879. He practiced his profession in Colum- 
bus, O. (his residence while in College), until 1883, when the 
state of his health obliged him to remove to Bartow, Florida, 
where he remained until near the time of his death. 

Andrew Britton YanHorne was born in Jersey City, N. J., 
April 22, 1856, and entered college in 1872. He was, however, 
obliged to leave New Haven on account of poor health in the 
spring of 1875, and at his return in the ^nsuing fall joined the 
next class. 

Immediately upon graduation he entered on the study of medi- 
cine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, in New York 
City, where he received the degree of M.D. in 1880. He then 
obtained by competitive examination a position as house-surgeon 
at the New York Charity Hospital, and in 1881 began practice 
in the city ; but symptoms of pulmonary disease soon showed 
themselves, and he removed to Colorado Springs in 1882. After 
two years' rest he established himself in 1884 on a sheep-growing 
ranch near Granger, Colorado, where he spent most of the time 
until he returned to his home in the early spring of 1888, to die. 
He died at Orange, N. J., on March 31, 1888, in his 32d year. 
5 



470 



1879. 



Louis Judson Swinburne, son of the Hon. John Swinburne, 
M.D. (Albany Medical College 1847), and Harriet (Judson) Swin- 
burne, was born in Albany, N. Y., August 24, 1855. In 18V0 he 
went abroad with his family, and passed through many interest- 
ing and exciting experiences with his father, who was in charge 
of the camp hospital service attached to the French army about 
Paris; he printed for private circulation in 1875 a volume entitled 
Paris Sketches, narrating the incidents of his life during the 
siege. In 1872 he returned to Albany, where he completed his 
preparation for College in 1874. 

He was seriously hindered by ill-health during his last year in 
College, and late in 1880 he went West in search of health. He 
remained for the rest of his life (with the exception of a few 
brief visits to the east) in Colorado, where he died, of hemorrhage 
of the lungs, at Colorado Springs, December 9, 1887, in his 33d 
year. He was not married. 

He had devoted himself since graduation to literary pursuits, 
and had contributed numerous papers to the reviews. He had 
also rewritten his Paris Sketches, and had completed for early 
publication a volume of essays and an important work on English 
Romanticism. His powers as a critic and a writer promised 
much larger results if his life had been spared. 

Henry James TenEyck, the only son of Philip and Caroline 
E. (Crane) TenEyck, was born in Albany, N. Y., July 25, 1856. 
His preparation for College at the Albany Academy was com- 
pleted in 1874, but he remained at home for a year to secure rest 
and strength. 

Immediately after graduation he entered the office of the Albany 
Evening Journal, in the management of which his father had for 
some years been interested. He rose through the various grades 
of service to the position of managing editor (in October, 1883), 
and for the last two years of his life he acted also as city editor. 
In addition to office work, he served as correspondent for various 
newspapers in other cities, and was an occasional contributor to 
magazine literature. In these relations he had shown himself a 
writer of unusual force and breadth, and an executive officer of 
brilliant Capacity. In the city of Albany he was deservedly 
prominent in all intellectual and social interests, and as a personal 
friend he was widely and tenderly beloved. He died in Albany, 



471 

NoA^ember 29, 1887, of typhoid fever, after a week's illness, in the 
32d year of his age. He was unmarried. 

1880. 

Grant Alexander Smith, son of William E. and Mary B. 
Smith, was born at Fox Lake, Wisconsin, February 27, 1859. 
Seven years later his family removed to Madison, Wisconsin, and 
thence in 1872 to Milwaukee, where he was prepared for College. 

In the September after graduation he began his business career 
in the wholesale grocery house of Roundy, Peckham & Co., of 
Milwaukee, but in June, 1881, his father, who was then Governor 
of the State, called upon him for his aid as Private Secretary, 
which office he filled for one year, or until the expiration of his 
father's term. In 1882 he entered upon the wholesale grocery 
business in Milwaukee, in connection with his father's firm of 
Smith, Mendel & Co., the name of which was altered to Mendel, 
Smith & Co., after Governor Smith's death in February, 1883. 

His health giving way from overwork in the fall of 1883, he 
sought relief by an eight months' tour, during which he visited 
nearly every section of the United States. After his return he 
was married, December 31, 1884, in Milwaukee, to Marion, daugh- 
ter of Sherburn S. Merrill, General Manager of the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. In Ap