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OBITUARY RECORD 



GRADUATES OF YALE UNIVERSITY 



// 



DECEASED FROM JUNE, 1900, TO JUNE, 1910. 



PRESENTED AT THE ANNUAL MEETINGS 
OF THE ALUMNI, 



1900-1910 

en. 



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NEW HAVEN: 

THE TUTTLE, MOREHOUSE & TAYLOR CO. 
1910. 



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1^00 - 10 




OBITUARY RECORD 



OF 



GRADUATES OF YALE UNIVERSITY 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 
JUNE, 190U 



INCLUDING THE RECORD OF A FEW WHO DIED PREVIOUSLY, 
HITHERTO UNREPORTED 



[Presented at the meeting of the Alumni, June 25th, 1901] 



[No. 1 of the Fifth Printed Series, and No. (K) of the whole Record] 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GEADUATES OF YALE UNIVEESITY 

Deceased during the Academical year ending in 
June, 1901, 

Including the Record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported 

[Presented at the Meeting of the Alumni, June 25th, 1901] 

[No. 1 of the Fifth Printed Series, and No. 60 of the whole Record] 



YALE COLLEGE 

( academical department ) 

1824 

Benjamin Douglas Silliman, since 1893 the last survivor of 
his class, and since 1896 the oldest living graduate of Yale Col- 
lege, was born in Newport, R. I., on September 14, 1805. 

He was the son of Gold Selleck Silliman (Yale 1796), grandson 
of General Gold Selleck Silliman (Yale 1752), who was distin- 
guished in colonial times as King's Attorney for Fairfield County 
and during the Revolution for vigilant and patriotic service in 
behalf of freedom, and great-grandson of Judge Ebenezer Silli- 
man (Yale 1727). His mother, Hepsa (Ely) Silliman, was the 
daughter of Rev. David Ely, D.D. (Yale 1769), of Huntington, 
Conn., a Fellow and Secretary of the College and granddaughter 
of Rev. Jedidiah Mills (Yale 1722). 

At the close of the War of 1812 his father gave up his success- 
ful law practice in Newport and engaged in business in New 
York City, removing to Brooklyn in 1823, where he lived to the 
age of 90 years, dying in 1868, and where his son thereafter re- 
sided. 



For a year after graduation Mr. Silliman was at Yale as Assist- 
ant in Chemistry, under his uncle, Professor Benjamin Silliman 
(Yale 1796), and then studied law in New York Citj-, in the 
office of Chancellor Kent (Yale 1781) and his son (afterward 
Judge) William Kent, and was admitted to the bar in May, 1829. 
With the exception of a few interruptions for public service he 
continued in the active practice of his profession for over 71 
years. The sixtieth anniversary of his admission to practice was 
observed by a dinner given him by leading members of the bar in 
1889. For over half a century Mr. Silliman was counsel of the 
Union Ferry Company, of the National Bank of Commerce of 
Brooklyn, and of Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn. 

He always maintained an active interest in public affairs, and 
expressed his convictions through the press, but seldom accepted 
office. In 1838 he was a representative in the New York Legis- 
lature, in 1839 a member of the national convention at Harris- 
burg which nominated the first General Harrison for the Presi- 
dency. In 1865-66, by appointment of President Lincoln, he 
was TJ. S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, and in 
1872 was chosen a member of the commission to revise the State 
constitution. In 1842 he was nominated by the Whigs of the 
Second District for Congressman, but was defeated by a small 
majority, and in 1873 was the Republican candidate for Attorney 
General of the State. 

He was one of the founders of the Bar Association of New 
York City, and at one time Vice President. He served most ac- 
ceptably as President of the New England Society of Brooklyn 
for six years frdm its incorporation in 1880. He was a director 
of the Long Island Historical Society in Brooklyn, member of 
the Board of Managers of the House of Refuge for Juvenile Delin- 
quents in New York for many years, and identified with the 
management of other associations. He did much to promote the 
interests of Yale through the Yale Alumni Association of Long" 
Island, of which he was for many successive years President. 
His presence at many alumni gatherings elsewhere was highly 
appreciated. 

He was honored with the degree of LL.D. from Columbia 
University in 1873, and from Yale University in 1874. 

His health of body and vigor of mind were preserved in un- 
usual degree to the close of his long life, and his social and cheer- 
ful disposition, unfailing affability and courtesy, and kindness of 



heart, made bis companionship a delight to those privileged to 
share it. 

Mr. Silliman died of bronchial pneumonia, after an illness of a 
week at his home in Brooklyn, on January 24, 1901, at the age of 
95 years and four months. He was never married. He left a 
generous bequest to the University, in addition to a fund which 
was given in trust to him for Yale by his brother. 

1829 

Lemax Woodward Cutler died at his home in Watertown, 
Conn., on February 9, 1901, at the age of 93 years and nearly two 
months. For about two weeks following the death of Mr. Silli- 
man he was the oldest living graduate of the University. 

He was the son of Younglove Cutler by his second wife, 
Aurora (Woodward) Cutler, and was born on December 12, 
1807, at Watertown, Conn. His father was a successful mer- 
chant there, but died when the son was but eight or nine years 
old. He was fitted for college privately and at tlie school of 
Hezekiah Rudd (Yale 1806), in Huntington, Conn. 

After graduation he devoted his attention to farming for about 
twenty years. He did not study for a professional career, but 
during a large part of his life was engaged in public affairs. In 
1845 he was elected to the State Senate, and served again in 1856, 
and was ex-officio Fellow of Yale College. He was a member of 
the Connecticut House of Representatives for five terms from 
1861 to 1865, and again in 1866. From 1861 to 1865 he was also 
Comptroller of Public Accounts. 

He was Town Clerk of Watertown thirty-nine consecutive years, 
Town Treasurer ten years. County Commissioner six years, and 
Judge of Probate twenty-four years, retiring from this last ofiice 
on account of reaching the age limit of TO years. He was also 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Watertown Railroad Company 
while it was an independent corporation, and President of the 
Watertown Library Association thirty years. He united with 
the Congregational Church on profession of faith in January 
1873. 

He married, on October 31, 1831, Mary Elizabeth, daughter of 
Rev. Frederick Holcomb, D.D., who died in 1897. They had 
no children. 



1830 

Henry Barnard, son of Chauncey and Elizabeth (Andrus) 
Barnard, was born on January 24, 1811, in Hartford, Conn. 

Previous to entering college he had gained ah unusual knowl- 
edge of Greek literature and during his college course he read 
much more than required of the classical authors, and made a 
special study of Greek and Roman civilization. He also read 
English literature extensively, and won distinction as a ready 
debater and effective speaker. He was a member of the Linonian 
Society, its Librarian for two years, and President. 

After graduation he read law with Hon. Willis Hall (Yale 
1824), afterward Attorney General of New York State, and 
William Hungerford of Hartford, and studied a year in the Yale 
Law School, but during this time also systematically carried on 
a critical study of the best English and classical authors. After 
a brief experience in teaching at Willsboro, Pa., he passed the 
winter of 1832-33 in Washington, D. C, in close attendance upon 
the great discussions in the Supreme Court, and then devoted 
several months to visiting the Southern States. He was admit- 
ted to the Connecticut bar in 1835, and then spent about eighteen 
months abroad, traversing a large part of England, Scotland and 
Switzerland on foot, and studying the social conditions of the 
people. 

On his return to Hartford in 1837, he was elected to the Con- 
necticut House of Representatives and served three years. In 
1838 he originated and secured the passage by unanimous action 
of both houses of an act for the better supervision and improve- 
ment of the common schools. Although he surrendered brilliant 
prospects as a lawyer and statesman, Mr. Barnard was persuaded 
to become Secretary of the Board of Commissioners thus created, 
and his work and able reports were of great value to education in 
the State and elsewhere. In 1842, owing to political changes, 
the Commission was abolished, and Mr. Barnard spent fifteen 
months in travel throughout the United States, during which he 
spoke before the legislatures of ten states, and delivered lectures 
and conducted conferences in fifty cities, and collected a mass 
of information on early education. In 1843 he accepted the 
office of Superintendent of Schools of Rhode Island, and in five 
j-ears was able, through the complete change of views and habits 
of the people which he brought about, to thoroughly establish a 
system of free schools. When he retired in 1849, exhausted by 



his great labors, he received the unanimous thanks of the State 
Legislature, and a grateful testimonial from the teachers. During 
the short period of comparative rest which followed, he declined 
the Presidency of the Universities of Indiana and Michigan, and 
then, from 1850 to 1854, discharged the double duty of Principal 
of the newly established State Normal School of Connecticut and 
State Superintendent of Schools. During these four years the 
educational reforms which had been overthrown in 1842 were all 
thoroughly reestablished, and he left the schools of the State 
well organized. 

In 1858 he became Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin. 
His purpose in accepting this office was to bring into unity the 
whole system of state education and make it all free, but his work 
was interrupted in the spring of 1860 by severe nervous prostra- 
tion, from which he suffered for nearly two years. 

In 1866 he was elected President of St. John's College, Mary- 
land, but upon the organization of the U. S. Bureau of Education 
in 1867 he resigned to become the first U. S. Commissioner of 
Education, and held the office until 1870. 

Dr. Barnard's literary work was extraordinary in amount and 
of lasting value. In 1855 he began the publication of the Amer- 
lean Jbiir7ial of ^dttca(io7i, which exteuded to 31 volumes, and 
is a reliable record of the progress of education in the United 
States. He edited the Connecticut School Journal from 1838 to 
1842 and from 1851 to 1854, three volumes of the Journal of the 
Rhode Island Institute of Instruction, and four volumes of Re- 
2)orts of the TI. S. Bureau of Education. In 1886 he published 
a collective edition of his works in 52 volumes, and including over 
800 separate treatises. Of his "School Architecture," over 
130,000 copies were circulated. Dr. Barnard visited Europe 
seven times, and brought to this country the best thoughts of the 
world on education. 

In 1855 he was chosen President of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Education, which was started largely 
through his endeavors in 1849, and which he sought to inspire 
with a broad national policy. 

He helped forward almost every local enterprise designed to 
advance the literary and educational interests of his native city 
and state. He was one of the originators and first President of 
the Young Men's Institute, now the Hartford Public Library, 
and the first President of the Connecticut Historical Society. 



8 

He was also elected a corresponding member of the Rhode Island 
Historical Society in 1838, and was a member of many other 
historical, literary and scientific societies. 

He received the degree of LL.D. from Yale and Union in 
1852, Harvard in 1853, and of L.H.D. from Columbia in 1887. 

The 86th anniversary of his birth w^as fittingly observed in 
1897 in schools throughout the State, and by a notable gathering 
of distinguished educators in Hartford. 

Dr. Barnard died after an illness of several months from kidney 
and other troubles, in the home in which he was born, on July 5, 
1900, in his 90th year. He was the last survivor of his class. 

He married, on September 6, 1847, Miss Josephine Desnoyers, 
of Detroit, Mich., who died in 1891. Of his five children two 
daughters survive. A son died in 1884. 

1831 I 

DwiGHT M. Seward, son of Seth and Rhoda (Pickett) Sew- 
ard, w-as born in Durham, Conn., on July 31, 1811. 

After his gi-aduation he taught for a year at the Deaf and 
Dumb Asylum in New York, and then entered the Yale Divinity 
School. He was licensed by the New Haven East Association 
in 1834, and ordained Pastor of the First Church in New Britain, 
Conn., February 3, 1836. After a ministry of six years there he 
resigned, and supplied in Middlefield, Conn., for two and a half 
years. He was settled at West Hartford the following six years, 
and then served as Pastor of the Reformed ( Dutch ) Church in 
Yonkers, N. Y., until the formation of the First Presbyterian 
Church, which he organized in 1852. He w^as pastor of this 
church for eighteen years, resigning in 1870 on account of ill 
health. He resided in New York City for the next three years, 
preached at Schroon Lake, Moriah and Mineville from 1874 to 
1879, at New Providence, N. J., until June 1881, and w^as Pas- 
tor of Plymouth Church, Portland, Me., the following three 
years. In 1884 he removed to South Norwalk, Conn., preaching 
whenever his health would permit. In June, 1 900, he completed 
sixty-six years of ministerial service. He received the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity from New York University in 1862. 

Dr. Seward married on March 2, 1886, Lydia Huntington 
North, daughter of Colonel Simeon North, and granddaughter of 
Rev. Enoch Huntington (Yale 1759), Fellow and Secretary of 
Yale College. 



9 

Their golden wedding was celebrated in 1886. Mrs. Seward 
died in 1897, in her 84th year. A son, William Foote Seward 
( Williams 18 ), and a daughter, the widow of Rev. William H. 
Gleason, D.D. (Yale 1853), survive. 

Dr. Seward was vigorous and active up to the last year of his 
life. He died of the grippe at his home in South Norwalk, on 
January 17, 1901, in his 90th year. 

1832 

Joshua Huntington, son of Rev. Joshua Huntington (Yale 
1804), one of the founders of the American Education Society, 
and at the time of his death Pastor of the Old South Church in 
Boston, Mass., was born in that city on February 11, 1812. His 
mother was Susan (Mansfield) Huntington. The son's baptis- 
mal name was Joseph Eckley, but it was changed by legislative 
act in 1822. 

He entered Yale in the Junior Class after two years of study 
in Amherst College. 

After graduation he spent part of a year in Princeton Theolog- 
ical Seminary, taught French a year at New London, Conn., and 
began the study of medicine there, afterward attending lectures 
at Dartmouth Medical College, and then completed his course by 
a year in the Yale Medical School, receiving the degree of M.D. in 
1838. During these years he was also engaged in genealogical 
researches, the results of which were incorporated in the pub- 
lished records of the " Huntington Family." He was Assistant 
Surgeon in the U. S. Navy until 1845, when he resigned, owing 
to his distaste for medical practice. He then completed his theo- 
logical studies in Andover Seminary in 1849. He was licensed to 
preach by the Andover Association, on April 17, 1849, but was 
never ordained. From 1853 to 1864 he taught a private school 
for boys in Brooklyn, N. Y., and was then a clerk in the U. S. Treas- 
ury Department at Washington, D. C, until 1 876. He resided in 
that city until his death from heart failure following pneumonia, 
on March 23, 1900, at the age of 88 years. He was never married. 

When he went to Washington he was at first a member of St. 
John's Protestant Episcopal Church, but a few j^ears later became 
a Roman Catholic. 

He compiled a "New System for Teaching the French Verbs," 
and in 1868 published *• Gropings after Truth." 



10 

Edward Elbridge Salisbury, sonof Josiah Salisbury (Har- 
vard 1798) and Abigail (Breese) Salisbury, was born on April 
6, 1814, in Boston, Mass., the home of his ancestors for several 
generations. He completed his preparation for college at the 
Boston Latin School. 

After graduation he spent a year in private studies, and three 
years in the Theological Seminary in New Haven, and then went 
abroad. Although he did not enter the ministry, one definite pur- 
pose which he had in choosing oriental research for his life work, 
was to be of service to the missionaries in the East. He placed 
himself under the instruction of deSacy and Garcin de Tassy 
in Paris, and Bopp in Berlin, and after an absence of between 
three and four years returned to New Haven, and in 1841 was 
made Professor of the Arabic and Sanskrit Languages and Liter- 
ature. By the terms of his appointment he became the first Uni- 
versity Professor at Yale. Before entering on his duties in 1843 
he again went abroad and spent several months in Bonn, reading 
Sanskrit with Lassen, and studying with Burnouf in France. In 
the course of the next few years the province of both Arabic and 
Sanskrit became so enlarged as to be beyond the mastery of a 
single scholar, and he retired from the chair of Sanskrit in 1854 
in favor of his already distinguished pupil, William D. Whitney, 
for whose salary Prof. Salisbury himself made permanent provi- 
sion. He retained the Professorship of Arabic until 1856. In 
1869 he was urged, without success, to accept a similar chair at 
Harvard University. 

After his retirement Professor Salisbury visited Europe for a 
third time, and a year later returned to the pursuit of his literary 
and histoHcal studies at home. 

For eleven years he was the Corresponding Secretary of the 
American Oriental Society, and for ten years its President, and 
almost from the beginning its invaluable supporter. It was con- 
ceded that for some ten years he was virtually the society, so 
unreservedly did he give to it his time, labor, and means. 
Among his many papers read before the Society, that on ' the 
" History of Buddhism" (1844), on the "Science of Moslem Tra- 
dition" (1859), and his "Notice of the Book of Sulaiman's 'Mrst 
Bipe FruW " (1864), were regarded as of special scientific value. 
In accordance with his suggestion a classical section, for the pro- 
motion of classical learning in its various bearings on oriental 
subjects, was formed within the Oriental Society, and from this 



11 

the Philological Association was an offshoot some twenty years 
later. 

Professor Salisbury's scholarly attainments were recognized by 
his election as a member of the Asiatic Society of Paris in 1838, 
when he was but 24 years of age, a member of the Connecticut 
Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1839, a fellow of the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences in Boston in 1848, and a corre- 
ponding member of the Imperial Academy of Sciences and Belles 
Lettres at Constantinople in 1855, of the German Oriental Society 
in 1859, and of the American Antiquarian Society in 1861. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Laws from Yale in 1869, and 
from Harvard in 1886. 

Besides his contributions on oriental subjects, Professor Salis- 
bury treated topics of more general interest in a " Sketch of the 
Life and Works of Michael Angelo Buonarroti" in 1858, and 
in a lecture before the Yale Art School in 1877 on the "Princi- 
ples of Domestic Taste," both of which were published in the 
Nexo Englander. For the work, " Yale College " (1879), he wrote 
a biographical and historical paper on the Trumbull Gallery. 

In his later years he took a keen interest in genealogical 
studies, and printed in 1886 "Family Memorials", and in 1892 
"Family Histories and Genealogies" relating to the ancestry of 
his wife's family, in several large volumes remarkable for fulness, 
accuracy, and typographical excellence. 

In 1870 Professor Salisbury gave his very valuable collection 
of oriental books and manuscripts to the Yale Library, with a 
fund for additions. His aid made possible the completion of the 
"Old Library" building, and his gifts for special needs of the 
University Library were generous and frequent. His interest in 
art, and his friendly sentiment towards the Art School were 
shown in a similar manner. Toward the erection of East and 
West Divinity Halls he gave considerable sums. But among his 
most timely gifts were those which secured to the University the 
life-long services of Professors James D. Dana and William D. 
Whitney. In accordance with the provisions of his will it is 
expected that the University will ultimately receive large addi- 
tional amounts. 

Professor Salisbury was a deacon in the Center Church from 
1849 to 1862, and a member from 1840 to 1872, when he trans- 
ferred this relation to the Church in Yale College. He was a 
member of the Art Council of the School of Fine Arts from its 



12 

formation in 1865, and until a year before his decease a member 
of the Standing Committee-of the University Library. He was 
also the Secretary of his class for many years. 

In the spring of 1 836 he married his cousin, Abigail Salisbury 
Phillips, daughter of Edward Phillips, Esq., of Boston. She died 
in 1869, and their only daughter in 1875. On November 23, 
1871, he married Evelyn McCurdy, daughter of Judge Charles 
J. McCurdy (Yale 1817), of the Connecticut Supreme Court. 

Professor Salisbury died at his home from heart failure follow- 
ing an illness of about a week from pneumonia, on February 6, 
1901, having nearly completed his 87th year. 

Alfred Stille, son of John Stille, a prosperous East India 
merchant and Maria (Wagner) Stille, was born in Philadelphia, 
Pa., on October 30, 1813. At the age of fifteen he entered Yale, 
but his course was cut short in 1830, and he graduated from the 
University of Pennsylvania in 1832. In 1850 he received the de- 
gree of M.A. from Yale, and was then enrolled with his class. 

The year following his graduation at Philadelphia he began 
the studj^ of medicine, and received his degree of M.D. from the 
Universitj^ of Pennsylvania in 1836. He was at once appointed 
resident physician in the Philadelphia Hospital, but soon Avent 
abroad and pursued further studies for two years, mostly in 
Paris. He began to lecture on pathology and the practice of 
medicine before the Philadelphia Association for Medical Im- 
provement in 1844, and continued these lectures until 1850, in the 
meantime becoming a resident physician in the Pennsylvania 
Hospital. In 1851 he again went abroad for professional study, 
chiefly in Vienna. 

In 1854 he was appointed Professor of the Theory and Practice 
of Medicine in Pennsylvania Medical College, and ten years later 
was elected to a similar chair in the University of Pennsylvania, 
where his brother Charles (Yale 1839) was Professor and after- 
ward Provost. His instruction was held in high regard and at- 
tracted large classes. In 1884 he was made Professor Emeritus, 
and held this position during the remainder of his life. He was 
one of the visiting physicians of St. Joseph's Hospital from its 
organization in 1840 until 1877, and during the Civil War at the 
United States Satterlee Hospital. From 1865 to 1871 he was one 
of the physicians and clinical lecturers at the Philadelphia Hos- 
pital. 



13 

He was one of the founders of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, of which he was President in 1871. From 1859 to 1863 he 
was President of the Philadelphia Pathological Society, in 1862 
of the Philadelphia County Medical Association, and in 1883 of 
the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. He was a member of 
the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, a corresponding fellow of 
the New York Academy of Medicine, an honorary member of the 
New York Neurological Society, and of the medical societies of 
Rhode Island, New York, and California. He received the hon- 
orary degree of LL.D. from Pennsylvania College in 1876 and 
from the University of Pennsylvania in 1889. 

His contributions to medical literature were numerous and won 
him high repute in this country and abroad. Besides essays, re- 
views and translations he issued a number of elaborate treatises. 
His "Elements of General Pathology " (1848), "Therapeutics and 
Materia Medica," first published in 1860, and his "National Dis- 
pensatory," edited conjointly with Professor Maisch, and first is- 
sued in 1879, are standard works of great value. 

Professsor Stille married in 1841, Caroline Barnett, and had 
two sons who were physicians, and a daughter who married 
Robert S. Ives, M.D. (Yale 1864). After the death of his first 
wife he married, in June, 1899, Miss Katherine A. Blackstone, 
of Kent County, Md. 

He died after a brief illness at his home in Philadelphia, on 
September 24, 1900, in his 87th year. 

1833 

Frederick Ellsworth Mather, son of Ellsworth and Laura 
(Wolcott) Mather, was born on May 23, 1809, in Windsor, 
Conn. He was a lineal descendant of the nonconformist. Rev. 
Richard Mather, who came from England to Boston, Mass., in 
1635, and on his father's side he was the grandson of the sister 
of Chief Justice Oliver Ellsworth. His father died when he was 
five years of age, and he was reared as a farmer's boy by his 
grandfather, Colonel Oliver Mather. At the age of eleven years 
he rescued a man and boy from drowning in a freshet. After 
the death of his grandfather in 1829, he spent a few months in 
the office of Judge Miller, of Ellington, Conn., but desiring a col- 
lege training he soon commenced a preparatory^ course, and was 
admitted to Yale in the second term of Sophomore year. 



14 

After graduation he resumed the study of law in the office of 
Judge Parsons and of Governor Ellsworth of Hartford, and then 
entered the Yale Law School. Toward the close of 1835 he became 
law clerk in a New York office, and after his admission as Coun- 
selor at Law in 1838 he immediately began practice by himself. 
After thirty-five years of successful practice he partially withdrew 
from business in 1872. 

In 1845 he was a Democratic member of the New York State 
Assembly, from 1854 to 1857 a member of the Common Council 
of New York Cit}'-, and for a number of years inspector and later 
trustee of the public schools. 

Li 1837 he entered the 264th Regiment, 64th Brigade, New 
York State Infantry, of which he was commissioned successively 
First Lieutenant, Captain, Lieutenant Colonel, and in 1842 Gen- 
eral. 

For many years he devoted, much attention to the conduct of 
public charities, and was an officer of the Prison Association, the 
Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, the Sani- 
tary Association, the Rose Beneficent Association, and others. 
But he was most deeply interested in medical charities. From 1851 
to the close of 1889 he was President of the Demilt Dispensary, 
of which he was the originator. The results of a tour of inspec- 
tion of hospitals and dispensaries abroad were embodied in the 
25th Annual Report of this institution. He was one of the in- 
corporators of the Roosevelt Hospital, and served many years as 
a trustee. He aided in starting the Northeastern and Northwest- 
ern Dispensaries. 

He was a member of the American Geographical Society, of 
the Wisconsin Historical Society, and an officer of several im- 
portant business enterprises. 

He was one of the originators of the New York Yale Alumni 
Association, and assisted in the organization of the Yale Law 
School Alumni Association, and of the Association of the Bar of 
the City of New York. 

In 1882 he retired from his law practice entirely, and made a 
long visit abroad. 

General Mather died of paralysis at his home in New York 
City on November 9, 1900, in his 92nd year. He had been un- 
able to leave his house for six years, but had retained full pos- 
session of his faculties and a keen interest in current events until 
the last week. 



15 

He maiTiecl, in Hartford, Conn., on May 3, 1837, Ellen Pome- 
roy Goodrich, who died in 1871, by whom he had two sons and 
six dauerhters. He afterward married Charlotte Foster of Cum- 
berland County, England, who died in 1884. His daughters by 
the first marriage are all living. A brother graduated at Yale 
in 1837. 

1834 

Jeremiah Root Barnes, son of Eli Barnes, a ship carpenter, 
and Roxana ( Newell ) Barnes, was born on March 9, 1809, in 
Southington, Conn., but entered college from New Haven. He, 
united with the Center Church in 1827. 

After graduation he studied two years in Yale Theological 
Seminary. He was licensed by the New Haven West Associa- 
tion in 1836, and in October of that year he began preaching at 
Evansville, Ind. In October, 1838, he was ordained as an evan- 
gelist, at Salem, Ind., and on November 24, was settled over the 
First Presbyterian Church in Evansville. After a ministry of 
nine years he left there, and spent the next year at Marietta, O., 
as financial agent for Marietta College. He preached eighteen 
months at Piqua, O., and in 1850 established a Young Ladies' 
Seminary in the suburbs of Cincinnati which he conducted for a 
few years, and at the same time published The Western Maga- 
zine, In 1855-56 he supplied the church at Georgetown, O., 
then removed to Minnesota and supplied the First Presbyterian 
Church in St. Paul six months. He organized Congregational 
churches at Cannon Falls and Northfield, and was one of the 
founders of Carleton College in the latter place. In 1861 he 
went to New York City, and worked in the Freedmen's Bureau 
until the close of the Civil War. 

He published a few sermons, and occasionally contributed 
verses as well as prose to local papers, and assisted his brother- 
in-law, Jessie Olney, in the preparation of Olney's " Geography". 
He received the honorary degree of Master of Arts from Yale 
University in 1892. 

He married, August 7, 1836, Miss Catharine M. Piatt, of Pros- 
pect, Conn., who died in 1838. He afterward married, on Sep- 
tember 26, 1839, Miss Caroline M. Webster, of Newburyport, 
Mass., who was then teaching in Marietta. In 1890 he married 
for his third wife, Mrs. Eliza T. Drew, of Evansville, Ind. 



16 

Mr. Barnes died of old age, at Marietta, on January 1, 190 J, 
in his 92d year. He was the last survivor of his class. Four 
of his six children are living, of whom one is the wife of Profes- 
sor George R. Gear, of Marietta College. 

1835 

Samuel Henry Galpin, son of Samuel and Caroline (Wood- 
house) Galpin, was born in Wethersfield, Conn., on October 18, 
1812. 

For some years following graduation he taught in Glastonbury, 
Conn., and in Natchez, Miss. In pursuance of the plan of his life 
early formed, he then studied for the ministry, and graduated at 
the Theological Institute of Connecticut (then in East Windsor, 
now in Hartford), in 1844. It required, however, only two years 
of preaching to satisfy him that his health was unequal to this 
line of work; and he resumed teaching, living in Lexington, Ky., 
and Indianapolis, Ind., until 1863. Being then compelled by his 
health to seek still more active work, he entered the railroad serv- 
ice at Bristol, Conn. Thence he went in 1864 to the Treasury 
Department in Washington, where he remained until 1885. 
Thereafter he lived in quiet and in comfort in Washington until 
1898, when he took up his residence with his son in New Haven. 

He died at Savin Rock, near New Haven, Conn., on September 
12, 1900, in his 88th year. 

In his memory, his son has founded the Samuel H. Galpin Latin 
Prize, to be annually awarded to that member of the Fresh- 
man class who has shown the highest proficency in Latin at his 
entrance examination. 

In November, 1844, he married Miss Marianne Perrin, of East 
Windsor Hill, who died in 1891. Of the two sons, the younger 
died in infancy ; the elder, Samuel A. Galpin (M.A. Yale* 1880) is 
now in business in New Haven. He left also, an adopted daughter. 

1836 

Austin Isham, son of Ashur and Tryphena (Easton) Isham, 
was born in Hartford, Conn., on October 25, 1813. 

After graduation he studied theology one year with Rev. 
Nathan Perkins (Yale 1795), and then entered the Yale Seminary, 
completing his course in 1839. He was licensed to preach by the 
Litchfield South Association in 1838, and was installed Pastor of 



17 

the Congregational Church in Roxbiiry, Conn., June 5, 1839. 
This was his only settlement, and he continued with this church 
for twenty-four years. From 1878 to 1889, he was Acting Pastor 
of the Congregational Church at New Preston Hill, in the towii 
of Washington, Conn., after which he resided in Roxbury with- 
out charge, revered and beloved by all his people. 

He married in New Haven, on October 8, 1839, Sophia B., 
daughter of Asahel Strong, a teacher in Woodbury, Conn., and 
Elizabeth (Mallory) Strong. 

Mr. Isham died of heart failure at his home in Roxbury on 
January 19, 1901, at the age of 87 years. His widow, one of 
their two sons, and three daughters survive. 

Giles Meigs Porter, son of Rev. Dr. Noah Porter (Yale 
1803) and Mehitabel (Meigs) Porter, and younger brother of the 
late President Noah Porter, was born on April 2, 1815, at Farm- 
ington. Conn. 

After graduation he taught one winter in Farmington Academy, 
and a year each in Putnam, 0.,in Delaware, O., and in the Family 
School for Boys of Simeon Hart (Yale 1823), meantime having 
begun the study of theology. Later he spent a year in Yale 
Seminary, and was ordained Pastor of the Congregational Church 
in Green's Farms, Conn., December 25, 1844. In the spring of 
1850 he was dismissed, and for a few months assisted in editing 
the New York Observer. After supplying for a time the Congre- 
gational Church in Unionville, Conn., he was settled as pastor in 
October, 1852. Owing to ill health he resigned in 1856, and 
traveled in the West. He preached during the winter in Newaygo, 
Mich., and the following spring bought a farm in Garnavillo, 
Clayton Co., la., where he resided for thirty years, preaching 
much of the time in Garnavillo, and vicinity. In 1888 he removed 
to Minneapolis, Minn. 

He married, on January 10, 1845, Miss Sarah M., daughter of 
Aaron Jennings, of New York City, and had three daughters and 
two sons. 

Mr. Porter died at his home in Minneapolis, on February 1, 
1901, in his 86th year. His widow and five children survive. 



18 



1837 



Owen Brainerd Arnold, son of Jared Arnold, a sea captain, 
and Susannah (Brainerd) Arnold, was born in Haddam, Conn., 
on July 11, 1818. 

After graduation he taught in Oglethorpe University, Ga., until 
1840, then at La Grange High School in the same State until 1844. 
After an interval, spent in part in New Haven in further study, 
he was in New York until 1850. In 1855 he was chosen Cashier 
of the Bank of New England at East Haddam, and the follow- 
ing year to the same position in the Meriden (Conn.) National 
Bank. In 1891 he was elected President. He was a member of 
the first Board of Councilmen of Meriden in 1867, and represented 
the city in the Legislature in 1861 and 1874. He was a director 
in several business corporations, trustee of the State Reform 
School for a dozen years, and vestryman and for many years 
treasurer of St. Andrew's Church. 

Mr. Arnold died on August 30, 1900, after an illness of a few 
days resulting from nervous shock received from a fall while 
alighting from a trolley car. His age was 82 years. He was 
unmarried. 

Moses Mears Bagg, son of Moses Bagg, proprietor of Bagg's 
Hotel, and Sophia (Derbyshire) Bagg, was born on July 13, 1816, 
at Utica, N. Y. He was a student at Hamilton College for about 
two years, and then joined the class at Yale in Junior year. 

After graduation he taught one year in Mount Hope College, 
Baltimore, Md,, and then studied medicine in Utica and Phila- 
delphia, and at Geneva Medical College, from which he received 
the degree of M.D. in 1840. After a year's practice in Utica he 
spent about fifteen months abroad, chiefly pursuing medical 
studies in Paris. Soon after his return he was appointed the first 
City Physician. From 1851 to 1854 he was a member of the 
Board of Health, and during part of his time health ofiicer. In 
1 864 he spent a month among the wounded soldiers in Washing- 
ton, D. C. From 1865 to 1870 he was physician at the City 
Hospital, and prior to that conducted a private hospital. For 
nearly fifty years he was one of the visiting physicians at the Utica 
Oqjhan Asylum, of which his mother was one of the founders, 
and one of the first trustees of Faxton Hospital. From 1883 to 
1885 he was one of the Board of Examiners for Pension Claims. 
He was at one time President of the Oneida County Medical 



19 

Society. He was also one of the original trustees of the Utica 
Cemetery Association. 

In educational matters he was deeply interested. He was for 
six years trustee of the Utica Free Academy, and at one time 
instructor there in French for two years. He was one of the 
organizers of the Utica Female Academy, president of its board 
of trustees, and for several years an instructor. He was also one 
of the earliest members of the Mechanics' Association, and for 
two years chairman of the lecture committee. He received the 
honorary degree of Master of Arts from Hamilton College in 
1856. 

Besides other historical addresses, in 1871 he delivered a lecture 
on the " Men of Old Fort Schuyler," which after further research 
he expanded into a volume giving a sketch of the village up to 
1825, entitled "The Pioneers of Utica," and issued in 1877. In 
that year, principally through his influence, the Oneida County 
Historical Society was formed, of which Dr. Bagg was for many 
years Secretary, and from 1889 Librarian. For his untiring labors 
and great services to the Society he was held in the highest 
esteem. 

In 1892 he edited the "Memorial History of Utica," a large 
part of which he wrote, covering the history of the village and 
city from 1825 to 1892. 

He died after an illness of a few months at his home in Utica, 
May 2, 1900, in his 84th year. 

In early life Dr. Bagg was a member of the First Presbyterian 
Church, but in 1845 transferred his membership to the Dutch 
Reformed Church, which he served as deacon and elder, and 
represented in the General Synod. 

He married, on November 23, 1847, Maria R., eldest daughter 
of Samuel Farwell of Utica. Their golden wedding was cele- 
brated in 1897. Mrs. Bagg, two sons, and four daughters are 
still living. One daughter graduated at Yassar College in 1869. 

William Maxwell Evarts, son of Jeremiah Evarts (Yale 
1802) and Mehetabel Barnes Evarts, was born in Boston, Mass., 
on February 6, 1818. His mother was the daughter of Roger 
Sherman, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
Through his mother also he was a cousin of his classmate, John 
Hooker. He was named from his father's classmate, Hon. 
William Maxwell. 



20 

He was a member of the Linonian Society, and on the occasion 
of its centennial anniversary in July, 1853, he delivered an 
address on " Public Life." During his Senior year he was a 
member of the first board of editors of the Yale Literary Maga- 
zine. 

After graduation he taught school in Windsor, Vt., and began 
to read law, the next year continued his studies at Harvard Law 
School, and in 1839 entered the office of Daniel Lord, LL.D. 
(Yale 1814), in New York City. In 1814 he was admitted to the 
New York bar, and soon formed a partnership with J. Prescott 
Hall (Yale 1817). In 1856 he entered the firm of Butler, Evarts 
& Southmayd, which in 1859 became Evarts, Southmayd & 
Choate, and in 1884 Evarts, Choate &> Bearaan, in which he 
remained to the close of his life. 

In 1849 he was appointed Deputy U. S. District Attorney of 
the Southern District of New York under Mr. Hall, and while 
holding this office he prosecuted the case of the Cuban filibusters 
in the Cleopatra expedition. After his return to private practice 
in 1853 he was counsel for the slaves in the Lemmon slave case. 
In 1860 he was a delegate to the Chicago National Convention 
which nominated Abraham Lincoln for President of the United 
States, and although he had at first warmly favored William H. 
Seward he moved to make the nomination of Lincoln unanimous. 
In 1861 he was a candidate for XJ. S. Senator, with Horace Greeley 
as his chief competitor, but both withdrew from the contest. 
Later, in 1885, Mr. Evarts was elected to the U. S. Senate, and 
served for six years. During the Civil War he was employed by 
the U. S. government in many important legal cases, among them 
in the prosecution of Jefferson Davis. He also visited England 
and France in a semi-official capacity, and prevented intended 
assistance to the Confederacy. In the impeachment trial of 
President Johnson in 1868 he was leading counsel for the defend- 
ant. His argument occupied the attention of the Senate for three 
days, and showed the result of exhaustive research and great 
powers of logic and oratory. From July, 1868, until the close 
of the administration Mr. Evarts was Attorney-General in Presi- 
dent Johnson's cabinet. In 1871 he was appointed counsel for 
the United States before the Tribunal of Arbitration at Geneva, 
Switzerland, and rendered important public service by his power- 
ful plea in support of the Alabama Claims. He was the chief 
counsel of Henry Ward Beecher in the noted trial of 1874-75, 



21 

and his summing up of the defense lasted eight days. In 1877 
he was the leading counsel of the Republican party before the 
U. S. Electoral Commission, whose decision placed Mr. Hayes in 
the presidential chair. He was Secretary of State during the 
whole of President Hayes's administration, and conferred a pub- 
lic benefit by raising the standard of consular service. In 1881 
he was a delegate to the International Monetary Conference at 
Paris. 

Mr. Evarts delivered many notable orations on important pub- 
lic occasions, but only a few have been printed in permanent form. 
In 1873, at Dartmouth College, he pronounced an admirable 
eulogy on Chief Justice Chase, and in 1876 at Philadelphia the 
centennial oration, on " What the Age owes to America." He 
made the presentation address at the unveiling of the statue of 
Daniel Webster in Central Park, New York, and of the Bartholdi 
Statue of Liberty in New York harbor, and was the speaker at the 
dedication of statues of William H. Seward in Madison Square, 
New York, and in Auburn, N. Y. For many years he regularly 
spoke at the banquets of the New England Society and the 
Chamber of Commerce, and was a welcome speaker on the politi- 
cal platform. His last public address was in the Brooklyn 
Academy of Music during the presidential campaign in 1892. 

He was one of the founders of the Bar Association of the 
City of New York and its first President ; for many years 
President of the Union League club, and also of the New Eng- 
land Society ; a trustee of the Peabody Education Fund ; and a 
member of many other social and commercial bodies. 

He was a Fellow of the Corporation of Yale University from 
1872 to 1891. He received the honorary degree of LL.D. from 
Union College in 1857, from Yale in 1865, and from Harvard in 
1870. 

He died of pneumonia at his home in New York City, on February 
28, 1901, at the age of 83 years. For several years his health had 
been declining, and he had almost entirely lost his eyesight. 
During his college course he united with the College Church on 
profession, and in New York was connected with Calvary Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Evarts married, on August 30, 1843, Helen Minerva, 
daughter of Allen Wardner of Windsor, Yt. Their golden wed- 
ding was celebrated at their summer home in Windsor, Yt., in 
1893. Mrs. Evarts is still living, and of their seven sons and five 



22 

daughters, four sons and five daughters survive. Three sons, 
Alle'n W., Sherman and Maxwell, graduated at Yale in 1 869, 1881 
and 1884, respectively. 

JoHx Hooker, son of Edward Hooker (Yale 1805) and Eliza 
(Daggett) Hooker, was born on April 19, 1816, at Farmington, 
Conn. He was a lineal descendant in the sixth generation of 
Rev. Thomas Hooker, founder of Hartford Colony. He was 
named after his uncle, John Hooker (Yale 1796), and through his 
mother was a cousin of his classmate, Hon. William M. Evarts. 

During his boyhood he planted many of the trees which have 
since added much to the beauty of the streets, of his native 
village. 

He entered college with the class of 1836, but joined the class 
of 1837, during its Freshman year. Before the close of the 
Sophomore year he became a victim of typhoid fever, and did not 
complete his course, but received the degree of M.A. in 1842, 
when he was enrolled with his class. 

In consequence of serious injury to his eyes by a too early 
return to stud}^ he decided to follow an outdoor life, and made 
two sea voyages, one to the Mediterranean and one to China, both 
before the mast. After two years of life on the sea he took up 
the study of law in Hartford and in the Yale Law School. He 
was admitted to the Hartford County Bar in 1841, and practiced 
his profession in Farmington for ten years. During his residence 
there escaped slaves were frequently sheltered in the town, the 
Ainistad captives were brought there for education, and other 
events led him to a thorough study which convinced him of the 
justice of the Anti-Slavery cause. 

In 1850 he was elected by the abolition voters of the town to 
the House of Representatives in the State Legislature. In 1851 
he removed to Hartford, which was his home thereafter, and 
formed a partnership with Hon. Joseph R. Hawley (LL.D. Yale 
18S6). 

In January, 1858, he was appointed Reporter of the Supreme 
Court of the State, and held the office until his retirement in 
January, 1894. The thirty-eight volumes of " Reports " which 
he edited are models of thoroughness and accuracy. A friend of 
many years has said of his service : " 1 am glad that I came upon 
the Supreme Court in season to see Mr. Hooker in actual relation 
to his work there in the consultation room. It was probably more 



23 

important than if he had been, what he might have been, one of 
the judges, and did more to keep the court in an even and con- 
sistent course during the long period of his connection with it." 
He twice declined to have his name considered for nomination to 
a judgeship in the Superior Court. Previous to 1872 he was also 
Register in Bankruptcy, but resigned the office in order to go 
abroad. 

In ]899 he published a volume entitled "Some Reminiscences 
of a Long Life." He frequently wrote verses of a humorous 
character. 

For many years he was a member of the Park Congregational 
Church, and during most of that time one of its deacons, but in 
later years was connected with the Unitarian Church. During 
the last twenty years and more of his life he was a firm believer 
in spiritualism. 

Mr. Hooker died at his home from an attack of grip and the 
infirmities of age, on February 12, 1901, in his 85th year. 

He married on August 5, 1841, Isabella H., youngest daughter 
of Rev. Dr. Lyman Beecher (Yale 1797), and sister of Rev. 
Henry Ward Beecher and Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe. With the 
movement for woman suffrage, of which Mrs. Hooker is an 
earnest advocate, Mr. Hooker was in hearty sympathy. Their 
golden wedding anniversary in 1891 was a noteworthy social 
gathering and an occasion of public interest. Mrs. Hooker sur- 
vives her husband with two of their four children : a son, Edward 
B. Hooker (M.D. Boston Univ. 1877), and a daughter who is the 
widow of John C. Day (Yale 1857). 

Robert Hamilton Paddock, son of John and Lucy (Vaughan) 
Paddock, was born on February 18, 1814, in Woodstock, Yt., 
but entered college from Warsaw, N. Y., at the beginning of 
Junior year. 

After graduation he taught in Hopkins Grammar School in 
1838, and in New York City in 1839-40. In 1842 he began the 
study of medicine in New Haven, but obtained the degree of 
M.D. from Castleton (Vt.) Medical College in 1843 and Berkshire 
Medical Institute at Pittsfield, Mass., in 1844. From 1843 to 
1847 he was Professor of Anatomy and Physiology, and Dean of 
the Faculty at Willoughby Medical College, Ohio. In August, 
1849, he visited California, returning to Connecticut in Septem- 
ber, 1850. E\'om 1851 to 1853 he was Professor of Anatomy and 



24 

Chemistry in Starling Medical College, Columbus, O., and in 
1854-55 Professor of Anatomy and Physiology at Berkshire 
Medical Institute. He was at Rockford, 111., in 1855-56, but 
sold his farm at a great sacrifice during the financial crisis of 
1857, and remo\red to Chicago, where he practiced medicine and 
gave a course of popular lectures. He was in St. Louis, Mo., 
1859-60 ; Decatur, 111., 1861-62 ; in the U. S. Army at Springfield, 
III., and St. Louis, 1862-63 ; at the City Hospital in St. Louis, 
1864-65 ; again at Decatur, 1867-70 ; at Taylorsville, 111., 1870- 
73 ; and afterward in Detroit, Mich. For many years before bis 
death he was not actively engaged in any work. 

Dr. Paddock died at Detroit, Mich., on March 19, 1900, at the 
age of 86 years. 

He married, on February 14, 1838, Miss Cornelia A. Brooks, 
of Cheshire, Conn. He married again in 1861, Marion J. Kent, 
of Merod, 111., and had a daughter who died in her infancy. By 
his first wife he had three daughters, and a son, the latter a grad- 
uate of the Sheffield Scientific School in 1876. One of the 
daughters is the wife of M. W. Robinson, a graduate of Yale in 
1857. 

William Randolph Randall, son of William and Betsey 
(Bassett ) Randall, was born on August 14, 1816, in Cortland, 
N. Y., whither his father and uncle had removed in 1812 from 
Stonington, Conn., and where they became the leading merchants 
and land owners of the region. After completing his Freshman 
year at Hobart College, he joined the Sophomore class at Yale. 

Graduating on his twenty-first birthday, he at once began to 
supervise a part of his father's farming, mercantile, and milling 
interests. He subsequently studied banking, and in 1850 opened 
a private bank, known as the Randall Bank, which he conducted 
with success until 1870, when he retired from active business. 
He was one of the incorporators of the Cortland Savings Bank 
and President from its establishment in 1866 until 1874. His 
later years were devoted exclusively to the care of the family 
estates. He was by nature conservative and retiring, but to his 
friends he showed a keen mind with the power of felicitous ex- 
pression, and a rare appreciation of the beautiful. 

His physical vigor remained unabated almost to the close of 
his life. He died at his home, on February 3, 1901, in his 85th 
year. Two sisters survive him. He was never married. 



25 

William Smith Scarborough, son of Joel Scarborough and 
Liicretia (Smith) Scarborough, was born on August 2, 1814, in 
Brooklyn, Conn. 

While in college, with his classmate, William M. Evarts, he was 
one of the first board of editors of the Yale Literary Magazine. 

The year following graduation he entered the Law School of 
Transylvania University, at Lexington, Ky. In 1840 he was in 
western Missouri and in Havana, Cuba, and the next year began 
the practice of his profession in Thompson, Conn. He was State 
Senator from his district in 1846. In 1847 he removed to Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, where he continued in practice for thirty years, 
and was Treasurer of the Law Library Association twenty years, 
and a member of the School Board for twenty-two years. He was 
a deacon of the First Congregational Church, and a friend and 
neighbor of Dr. Lyman Beecher. He was offered a mission to the 
Sandwich Islands by President Hayes. About 1878 he returned 
to Thompson, and resided there until the death of his wife in 
1894, after which he made his home in New York City. He 
wrote many magazine articles and a number of poems which have 
not been published. 

He married, on September 10, 1845, Eliza Mitchell Coe, of 
Worcester, Mass., daughter of John and Hannah (Hodgkins) Coe, 
and had six sons and one daughter, of whom five sons survive. 
The second son, named after his classmate Evarts, died in early 
childhood. 

Mr. Scarborough died of pneumonia in New York City, on 
November 27, 1900, at the age of 86 years. 

1838 

James Tufts, son of Rev. James and Submit (Hayden) Tufts, 
was born on November 2, 1812, at Wardsboro, Vt. He began 
to teach at the age of 17, pursued the Freshman studies by him- 
self, and entered college at the close of the first term of Sopho- 
more year. 

After graduation he took charge of the academy at Fairfield, 
Conn., for two years, and then entered Andover Theological Sem- 
inary, but left in 1841 owing to chronic bronchial trouble. He 
was ordained in September, 1844, and preached more or less for 
two years until compelled by ill health to give it up. From 
that time his life was devoted to teaching. He taught in the 
seminary at Castleton, Vt., from 1845 to 1847 ; was Superintend- 



26 

ent of Schools of Windham County, Vt., from 1848 to 1850; 
and taught in Northampton, Mass., the next year. In 1852 he 
removed to Monson, Mass., where he was principal of the acad- 
emy until 1859, and then conducted a family school for boys 
until 1892. His 80th birthday, which occurred in that year, was 
celebrated by a reception at Monson Academy. His deep per- 
sonal interest in his pupils inspired many to high standards of 
achievement. He was a member of the school committee of 
Monson sixteen years. 

Among his frequent contributions to newspapers, his letters 
on educational topics were of especial interest. 

He died of old age and catarrhal jaundice at his home in Mon- 
son, on April 29, 1901, at the age of 88 years. 

He married, on March 21, 1855, Mary E. Warren, of Wards- 
boro, Vt., daughter of Dr. John P. and Lucy (Wheelock) Warren. 
She is still living, with one son, a graduate of Yale Theological 
Seminary in 1889. 

1839 

Eugene Edwards, son of Jonathan Walter Edwards ( Yale 
1789) and Elizabeth (Tryon) Edwards, and grandson of the 
younger President Edwards, was born on August 14, 1819, at 
Hartford, Conn., but entered college from Stonington, Conn. 

On graduation he studied law, but then settled as a farmer 
near Stonington. On July 11, 1849, he married Ellen, daughter 
of Charles H. Phelps of Stonington. Mr. Edwards lived a quiet 
life for many years in the attractive home which was built by 
Mrs. Edwards' grandfather. Dr. Charles Phelps. 

He had been in frail health for three years, and died at his 
home after eight weeks of suffering from heart disease, on Octo- 
ber 1, 1899, at the age of 80 years. One son survives, an only 
daughter having died in 1896, and Mrs. Edwards in 1897. He 
was the last survivor of six brothers who graduated at Yale Col- 
lege, two being in the class of 1828, and the others in 1819, 1820, 
and 1832. 

Elizur Wolcott, son of Elihu and Rachel (McClure) Wol- 
cott, was born on August 7, 1817, in South Windsor, Conn., but 
when he was fourteen years of age his father removed to Illinois 
and became one of the pioneers of Jacksonville. 

After graduation he spent the first winter among his books at 
Jacksonville, and the following summer in rambling in the In- 



27 

dian country about the headwaters of the Mississippi, a part of the 
time with his classmate Lewis Hall. The next winter he attended 
lectures at the Harvard Medical School, but did not complete 
his course. He then made a voyage South and to England as an 
ordinary seaman. On his return in the autumn of 1841 he bought 
a large farm near Jacksonville, which he was obliged by illness 
to leave in 1848, and moved into the town. On his recovery he 
was for ten years employed in several capacities on the Great 
Western (Wabash) Railroad, during its construction through 
Illinois, at one time being Assistant Superintendent. The unre- 
mitting activity and mental strain of these years broke down his 
health. After a gradual recovery, in 1862, he established a flour- 
ing mill. 

Circumstances enabled him to devote much of his energy to 
gratuitous public service. That in which he took most satisfac- 
tion was as the constructor and superintendent of the Jackson- 
ville Water Works. He was also a member of the Board of Edu- 
cation and Trustee of the Public Library for many years. 

He married, on July 15, 1846, Martha Lyman D wight, for- 
merly of Amherst, Mass., daughter of Daniel Dwight. They had 
two sons who died young, and two daughters, one of whom mar- 
ried Prof. Edward B. Clapp (Ph.D. Yale 1886) of the University 
of California. Upon the death of Mrs. Wolcott, about a year 
ago, Mr. Wolcott went to reside with his daughter at Berkeley, 
Cal., where his death occurred on March 13, 1901, hastened by a 
fall two weeks before. He was in his 84th year. 

1841 

Horace Andrews, third son, and fifth of the ten children of 
Professor Ethan Allen Andrews, LL.D. (Yale 1810), was born on 
April 27, 1819, in New Britain, Conn. His father was known as 
the author of Andrews' Latin Lexicon and one of the authors of 
Andrews and Stoddard's Latin Grammar, and other standard 
works. His mother was Lucy, daughter of Colonel Isaac Cowles 
of Farmington, Conn. He entered college from the Boston Latin 
School, and was Major Bully of the class until the middle of 
Junior year. 

After graduation he pursued graduate studies in New Haven 
for two years, and during the two years following was in the 
Yale Law School. He practised law in New Haven from 1845 to 
1850, and afterward in New York City, residing in Tarrytown 



28 

for many years after 1870. For ten years or more from about 
1882, he spent most of his time in London, England, engaged in 
financial operations. Subsequently he resumed his law practice in 
New York, and was daily at his office. Throughout his life he 
enjoyed good health, and his death occurred after an illness of 
only four days, from pneumonia, at his home in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
on February 13, 1901. He was in his 82d 5^ear. 

He published an edition of Vergil's Eclogues and Georgics in 
1863. 

Mr. Andrews married, on June 1, 1847, Julia Russell, daughter 
of William Johnson, Esq., of New Haven. She died in 1866, and 
he afterward married a daughter of Harmon Hoover, Esq., of 
New York City, Miss Anna Hoover, who survives him. The 
three sons by his first wife are living, the eldest of whom gradu- 
ated at Columbia Law School in 1869, and the two younger at 
the Sheffield Scientific School in 1871 and 1881. Of the seven 
children by his second wife three have died, leaving three sons 
and one daughter. 

Flavel Athington Dickinson, son of Abner Dickinson, a 
farmer, and Martha (Wells) Dickinson, was born on January 8, 
1820, in Preston, Chenango County, N. Y. His grandfather was 
Nathaniel Dickinson of Whately, Mass. He entered the class of 
1840 as a Sophomore, but joined the class of 1841 during the 
second term of its Freshman year. 

After graduation he taught in Delaware Academy, Delaware, 
O., then became connected with the preparatory department of the 
Ohio Wesleyan University at its opening, as teacher of Latin and 
Greek ; and later was Principal of Fayette Academy, Fayette- 
ville, Tenn., until the Civil War began, during which the property 
which he had accumulated was utterly lost. After the war he 
resumed his old position for two years, and was next for three 
years Principal of Bethany High School. Owing to the failure 
of his health, he rested a year or two, then for about three years 
was associated with Col. C. G. Rogers, as teacher of Latin and 
Greek in a school at Pulaski, Tenn., called Giles College. He 
afterwards taught a private academy in Nashville, Tenn., and then 
in a public school in Florida. During the last ten years of his life 
Mr. Dickinson's health prevented his actively engaging in any 
business, but about 1897 he removed to Silver City, N. M., the 
residence of a son, where his health decidedly improved. He died 



29 

there after an illness of three days, on January 22, 1901, at the 
age of 81 years. He was for many years a member of the Pres- 
byterian Church, and an elder after his removal to Silver City. 

He married in 1848, Amanda J. Smith, of Fayetteville, Tenn., 
daughter of Alfred Smith, who was for thirty-five years Clerk of 
the Circuit Court of Lincoln County in that State. Of their 
seven children, three sons and three daughters survive. 

Joseph Emerson, son of Professor Ralph Emerson, D.D. (Yale 
1811) and Eliza (Rockwell) Emerson, was born on May 28, 1821, 
at Norfolk, Conn., where his father was at the time pastor of the 
Congregational Church. In 1829 his father became Professor 
of Ecclesiastical History in Andover Theological Seminary, in 
Andover, Mass., and he was prepared for college at Phillips 
Academy in that place. During his Senior year in college he 
was one of the editors of the Yale Literary Magazine. 

After graduation he was Principal of the Union Academy in 
New London a year, spent two years in Andover Theological 
Seminary, and was then Tutor in Yale College from September, 
1844 to April, 1848. He was licensed to preach while Tutor, 
and was ordained a Congregational minister on February 22, 
1860. 

Receiving the appointment of Professor of Ancient Languages 
in Beloit College, Wise, he entered upon his duties in May, 
1848, after an eventful journey thither, which ended with a two 
days' ride in an open buggy across the prairie from Milwaukee. 
Five students formed the first Freshman class, and the material 
equipment consisted of an incomplete brick building. Professor 
Emerson's department was divided in 1855, and his chair was 
thereafter that of Greek. He was also Librarian for many years. 
By his students he was known as Zeus, so powerful was his influ- 
ence upon their characters as well as upon their scholarship. On 
the fortieth anniversary of his connection with Beloit College, in 
May, 1888, Professor Emerson was remembered with many letters 
and other testimonials from Beloit graduates and other friends. 
One gift bore an inscription from Xenophon's Memorabilia of 
Socrates, "Having caused many to set their hearts upon attain- 
ing a noble manliness of life." 

By quietly interesting friends in the college he secured 
altogether an addition of $150,000 to its funds, and to him and 
his classmate. Professor Bushnell, who assumed his duties at 



30 

Beloit only a few weeks earlier, much of the high repute and use- 
fulness of the college is undoubtedly due. 

In June, 1870, Professor Emerson went abroad, and spent over 
a year in travel and study in Europe, Palestine and Egypt. In 
November, 1888, on account of his health, he made another trip 
to Europe, remaining abroad a year and a half. After his return 
he did not resume his active duties, but resided part of the time 
in Beloit, and part of the time in Evanston, III. He was greatly 
interested in the development of the Art Department of Beloit 
College, which was started in 1892 by the gift of Mrs. Emerson's 
collections. 

He was the author of many addresses, sermons, lectures and 
magazine articles, several of which have been printed in pamphlet 
form. He issued in 1897, a volume of "Lectures and Sermons." 
He also revised and published the " History of Philosophy," left 
by his deceased brother-in-law. Prof. Joseph Haven, D.D. He 
was a member of the Connecticut and Wisconsin Academies of 
Arts and Sciences, and of the American Philological Association. 
He received the degree of D.D. from Yale in 1880, and of LL.D. 
from Beloit in 1897. 

He married at New Britain, Conn., on September 1, 1852, 
Mary Cordelia, daughter of Alvin North, Esq., and sister of the 
wife of his classmate, Samuel Brace, and of Hubert F. North 
(Yale 1843). She died in 1879, after many years of ill health. 

On July 9, 1884, he married Helen Frances, daughter of 
Harvey and Hannah Thirstin (Thompson) Brace, of Evanston, 
III., and formerly a teacher in Wellesley College. 

Professor Emerson died of general debility at his home in 
Beloit, on August 4, 1900, at the age of 79 years. His widow, 
and a son and daughter by his first wife survive. The son is a 
trustee of Beloit College and the daughter graduated at Welles- 
ley College in 1891. 

Daniel Addison Heald, son of Deacon Amos and Lydia 
(Edwards) Heald, was born on May 4, 1818, at Chester, Vt. He 
remained on the home farm till he was sixteen years of age, and 
was then fitted for college at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, 
N. H. During his Senior year in college he began to read law 
under Judge Daggett, and continued it after graduation for two 
years in the office of Judge Washburn, of Ludlow, Vt. He was 
admitted to the bar of Vermont in May, 1843, and commenced 
practice at Ludlow. 



31 

He was Cashier of the Bank of Black River, at Proctorsville, 
Vt., from 1846 to 1854. In 1850 he was a member of the Ver- 
mont House of Representatives ; in 1854, of the Vermont Senate. 
Soon after he commenced the practice of law he assumed the local 
agency of the ^tna and other Hartford Insurance Companies, 
and acquired a reputation as an underwriter. In 1856 the Home 
Insurance Compan}' of New York invited him to become their 
general agent in that city. After twelve years of service in that 
capacit}' he was elected Second Vice President in 1868 ; in 1883, 
Vice President; and in 1888, President. He was prominent in 
the 'Sew York Board of Underwriters for many years and twice 
its President. For the decade beginning in 1880 he was Presi- 
dent of the National Board of Fire Underwriters, the organization 
of which was largely due to his efforts. Several of his addresses 
before this association were regarded as masterly statements of 
the history and condition of fire insurance. He also wrote much 
for the press on this subject. 

He was closely identified with the laying out of Llewellyn 
Park in West Orange, N. J., which was his home for many- 
years. He was the last survivor of the originators of this enter- 
prise, and had been Secretary of its Board of Proprietors since 
1858. He was one of the nine original members of the New 
England Society of Orange and was twice its President. For 
fifteen years he was President of the Advisory Board of the 
Orange Memorial Hospital, and was one of the founders and a 
trustee of the Orange Valley Congregational Church. 

He married, on August 31, 1843, Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of 
Hon. Reuben and Hannah B. (Thacher) Washburn, and sister of 
Governor P. T. Washburn (Dartmouth 1835), of Vermont. Of 
their two daughters and three sons, but one son (Yale 1873) is 
living: one having died in 1880 during his Senior year in Yale, 
and the other in infancy. Mrs. Heald died in 1894, and Mr. 
Heald afterward married Miss Elizabeth Goddard, who survives 
him. 

Mr. Heald continued his business activity to the end of his life. 
He died of heart failure at his home in Llewellyn Park, on 
December 28, 1900, in his 83d year. 

Albert Paine, son of John and Betsey (Smith) Paine, and 
brother of Samuel C. Paine, M.D. (Yale 1828), was born on July 
21, 1819, in Woodstock, Conn. He united with the church in 
East Woodstock, on November 1, 1835. 



32 

After graduation he studied at Andover Theological Seminary, 
1841-2 ; at New Haven, 1843-4 ; and graduated at Auburn Sem- 
inary, N. Y., in 1845. He was licensed to preach by the Brook- 
field (Mass.) Association, October 2, 1844. He supplied the 
Presbyterian Church in Lancaster, Erie County, N. Y., in 1846, 
and was ordained Pastor of the Congregational Church at West 
Amesbury, Mass., on September 7, 1848, where he continued until 
1854. He was Pastor of the Congregational Church at North 
Adams, Mass., from December, 1856, to May, 1862. On leaving 
there he was appointed Resident Chaplain at Fortress Monroe, 
Ya., but on account of illness returned North the following Sep- 
tember, and lived for a time in Chelsea, Mass. In 1864 he went 
to Wisconsin, and was editor and proprietor of the Beloit Jour- 
nal, and afterward in business at Rockford, 111. After 1870 he 
resided in Boston, a part of the time in Charlestown district, and 
later in Roxbury district, supplying various pulpits, and from 
1875 to 1878 the Congregational Church at North Falmouth, 
Mass. In 1878 he suffered a sudden and serious impairment of 
his eyesight, which afterward entirely failed. 

He died of heart failure following pneumonia at his home in 
Roxbury, on May 14, 1901, in his 82d year. 

He married on November 20, 1849, Sarah, daughter of Patten 
and Dolly Sargent, of West Amesbury, Mass. Two sons and a 
daughter survive. 

1842 

Gideon Colton Clark, son of Ebenezer and Delia (Colton) 
Clark, was born on February 21, 1821, at Somers, Conn. 

After graduation he took the full course in East Windsor (now 
Hartford) Theological Seminary, and after his ordination in 1846, 
was appointed by the Missionary Society of Connecticut to service 
in Illinois. He was first settled as a minister two years and a half 
in Rockport, Pike County ; then preached five years in Win- 
chester, Scott County; nine years in Collinsville, Madison County; 
and six years in Woodburn, Macoupin County. In 1868 he went 
to Nokomis, Montgomery County, and the following year to 
Mount Yernon, Jefferson County, where he preached three years. 
In 1872 he removed to Indiana, and preached for two years in 
Fowler, Benton County. He then returned to Illinois, preached 
two years at Shipman, Macoupin County, and about 1876 was set- 
tled at Greenfield, Greene County. Later he returned to Indiana, 
and preached at Raub and Benton Ridge, Benton County. In 



33 

1884, on account of his wife's health, he went to eastern Tennessee, 
and for six years worked among the mountain whites and miners 
in Emory Gap, Robbins, Glen Mary and Glen Alice. In 1890, he 
retired from active work, and in 1892 removed to Harriman, 
Tenn. Two years later, upon the death of his wife, he removed 
to his daughter's residence at Hudson, Wise, and then to St. 
Paul, Minn., where he died of paralysis on February 10, 1900, 
having nearly completed his '79th year. 

Although a member of Alton (111.) Presbytery for fifty years, 
during much of the time he served Congregational churches. He 
was a delegate to the General Assembly in New York in 1865, 
and in Philadelphia in 1869. 

He married, on March 17, 1852, Miss Jane Alexander Smith, of 
Jacksonville, 111. Their three daughters survive. 

George Boardman Hubbard, son of Ezra Stiles and Eliza 
(Church) Hubbard, was born on February 16, 1822, at New 
Haven, Conn., where his father was a banker. 

After graduation he taught several months in Orange, Conn. 
In September, 1843, he entered the Yale Theological Seminary 
but left in January, 1846, and then spent a short time in Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary. In November, 1847, he went to Illi- 
nois, where he preached until 1885, the first two years as a mis- 
sionary at three different stations. He was ordained as an 
evangelist, April 16, 1848. In the autumn of 1849 he returned 
to his home in New Haven for a few months, after which he was 
pastor successively at Batavia, Lamoille, and Lowell, until 1858, 
and was then at the recently organized New England Church in 
Aurora until 1866. He was at Atlanta from 1866 to 1870, four 
years at Rantoul, three years at Pecatonica, and six years at 
Shirland, and two years in Nora. In 1885 he went to Wisconsin, 
first to Mazomanie, and three years later to Plymouth, where he 
was pastor for ten years, retiring from the active duties in 1898 
but continuing as pastor emeritus. His ministry of fifty years 
was fruitful, and his devoted and sympathetic life influenced a 
constantly widening circle. 

He died of Bright's disease at Plymouth on June 17, 1900, in 
his 79th year. 

Mr. Hubbard married on August 5, 1849, Miss Jane Beardsley, 
of Bristol, Kendall County, 111., who survives him with four of 
their six children, two daughters and two sons. The oldest son 
graduated at Beloit College in 1876 and Yale Divinity School in 
1881. 



34: 

Albert Kendall Teele, son of Benjamin and Miriam (Savels) 
Teele, was born on February 10, 1821, in the part of Charlestown, 
Mass., now called Somerville. 

After graduation he took the full course in Yale Divinity 
School, was licensed to preach by the Litchfield South Associa- 
tion in July, 1844, and was settled over the Congregational 
Church in Naugatuck, Conn., in June, 1845. He was dismissed 
on October 20, 1849, and preached for a time in Med way, Mass. 
Declining settlement there, he accepted a call to the First Con- 
gregational Church in Milton, Mass., and was installed December 
18, 1850. He continued in the active pastorate of this church 
until the twenty-fifth anniversary of his settlement and was then 
made pastor emeritus. 

He was for twenty-five years a member of the Milton school 
committee, and for forty years a trustee of the Milton Academy. 
He was chairman of the public library committee, and was greatly 
interested in the Liversidge Home for poor boys, which he was 
instrumental in establishing. 

He was the author of " Roted Men and Historical Narrations 
of Ancient Milton^' Mass., and by authorization of the town 
wrote a "Plistory of Milton, 1640 to ]88'7," which required many 
years of careful work, and has met with warm appreciation. In 
1874 he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Middle- 
bury College. 

He married, on August 21, 1845, Cornelia, daughter of Lucius 
and Harriet (Curtis) Curtis. 

Dr. Teele died after a brief illness at his home in Milton, on 
March 11, 1901. His widow and two married daughters survive. 

The income of the Teele Fund, given in 1896 by Dr. Teele, is 
distributed among needy and deserving undergraduates. 

1843 

Joseph Everett Bennett, son of Stephen and Hannah (Hogg) 
Bennett, was born on August 9, 1817, at New Boston, N. H. His 
father was a builder, and both parents were natives of that town. 
He entered the class from Waterville (now Colby) College, Me., 
but during the intervening period he had taught in Searsmont, 
Me. 

After graduation he returned to Searsmont, but in 1844 he 
went to Manchester, N. H., and worked as a mason, having 
learned that trade as a boy. In 1847 he became foreman for 



35 

J. F. Andrews of Nashua, N. H., and had charge of the construc- 
tion of large depots and mills in Manchester and Southbridge, 
Mass. In 1860 he returned to Manchester and worked for him- 
self. From 1865 to 1876 he was City Clerk of Manchester. In 
1851-52 he was a representative in the State Legislature. He 
was trustee of the Amoskeag Savings Bank for thirty years 
from 1868, and trustee of the Elliot Hospital for many years. 
He was a member of the First Baptist Church. 

His health had been excellent throughout his life, and his 
death, which occurred on February 20, 1900, was due to a fall on 
the stone steps of his house three weeks before. He was in his 
83d year. 

He married, on March 13, 1845, Susan, daughter of George 
Dyer, of Searsmont, Me. She died in 1883, and he afterward 
married Mrs. Mary (Eddy) Hart well, of Waterbury, Vt., who 
survives him, without children. 

Edward Whiting Gilman, son of William Charles and Eliza 
(Coit) Gilman, was born on February 11, 1823, in Norwich, 
Conn. 

After graduation he taught a year in a private academy at 
West Point and several years in private schools and in the gram- 
mar school of New York University in New York City, and 
meantime attended Union Theological Seminary two years. 
From 1847, he was Tutor in Yale College for two years, and dur- 
ing this time completed his theological studies in the Yale Divinity 
School. He was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church 
in Lockport, N. Y., on December 4, 1849. In 1856 he accepted 
a call to the Prospect Street Church, in Cambridgeport, Mass., 
where he remained two years. From January 13, 1859 to Octo- 
ber 8, 1863 he was pastor of the First Congregational Church in 
Bangor, Me., and after spending a winter in New Haven, was 
settled at Stonington, Conn. He closed his pastorate there, April 
23, 1871. 

He then entered upon a service of nearly thirty years as Secre- 
tary of the American Bible Society, and during most of this time 
was its guiding spirit from the side of scholarship and missions. 
In 1879 and 1888 he represented the society in notable gatherings 
abroad, and visited nearly every European capital. In his knowl- 
edge of the versions, literary history and circulation of the Bible 
in all lands, he had no equal. He contributed frequently to the 



36 

press, and several of his articles helped not a little to prepare the 
churches of the country to receive the Revised Version of the 
Scriptures. One of his last essays, presented at the Conference 
on Foreign Missions in New York City in April, 1900, briefly 
reviewed the steps in the preparation of copies of the Scriptures, 
which, largely as the result of the Christian study and labor of 
the century just closed, now circulate in more than four hundred 
languages. 

He was a frequent contributor to the religious press as well as 
to the New JEnglander^ and was especially interested in Church 
creeds and hymnology. He published a small " Guide to West 
Point " in 1849, and late in life a series of five booklets appropriate 
to the Lenten season, Easter and Ascension Day. 

Dr. Gilman died at his home in Flushing, L. L, N. Y., after an 
illness of four weeks due to general debility and heart disease, on 
December 4, 1900, in his VSth year. 

He married on June 5, 1850, Julia, the youngest daughter of 
Professor Benjamin Silliman, Sr. (Yale 1796). She died in 1892. 
Of their six children two unmarried daughters survive. Dr 
Gilman was a brother of President Daniel C. Gilman, of Johns 
Hopkins University (Yale 1852), and brother-in-law of Rev. 
Joseph P. Thompson, D.D. (Yale 1838). He received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from Yale College in 1874. 

Samuel Miller Parsons, son of Jothan Sewall and Olive 
(Greenleaf) Parsons, was born September 28, 1822, in Wiscasset, 
Lincoln County, Me., where his father was a ship builder and 
ship owner. He entered the class during Sophomore year. 

The year after graduation he was tutor in a Maryland family, 
and in the autumn of 1844 established a classical school in Wash- 
ington, D. C. In consequence of the failure of his health he gave 
up this school in the spring of 1846 and went to London. The 
beneficial effects of the sea voyage enabled him to enter vigor- 
ously upon the study of law, and he was admitted to the bar in 
the spring of 1848. He practiced his profession with success in 
New York City for about fifty years, and was recognized as an 
authority in questions of chancery. He declined a candidacy for 
judge. 

He wrote with force and effect on the Coinage, the Brooklyn 
Depressed Road, San Pedro Harbor and the Salt Lake Railroad, 
and other matters of national and local interest. 



37 

He was a practical worker in many charities, one of the organ- 
izers of the Young Men's Christian Association of Brooklyn, 
N. Y., and for many years an active and faithful member and 
officer of the Second Presbyterian Church in that city. In 1895 
he removed to Los Angeles, Cal., where he died of paralysis on 
December 13, 1900, at the age of 78 years. 

He married, March 2, 1848, Miss Virginia W. Whitwell, of 
Washington, D. C, daughter of George Whitwell, a merchant of 
Richmond, Ya. She died in 1869. Of the seven children, four 
survive : two sons and two daughters. 

George Taber Pierce, son of John and Sibyl T. Pierce, was 
born on May 5, 1821, at Salisbury, Conn. His father died when 
he was only a year or two old, and he entered college from Paw- 
ling, Dutchess County, N. Y. 

After graduation he studied in the Harvard Law School, and 
began practice in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., but during most of his 
life was a farmer. He was Representative from Dutchess County 
in the General Assembly in 1844, Senator from Ulster and Greene 
Counties in 1851-52, and again Representative in 1861-62, his 
right to a seat in the last case having been sustained by one vote 
after a six weeks' controversy. Among several speeches printed 
in pamphlet form was a Washington's Birthday Address in 1862. 
He was one of the original trustees of Vassar College. 

In 1867 he removed to Kansas, and lived for a number of years 
in Ottawa, and afterward in Centerville and Osawatomie. In 
1868 he was elected to the Kansas Legislature. He died of 
paralysis at Centerville, Kans., the home of his son, on March 16, 
1901, in his 80th year. 

He married on November 30, 1846, Miss Mary Ann Jackson of 
Fishkill, Dutchess County, N. Y., Avho died in 1875. Of their 
seven children three survive. 

John Wickes, fifth son and sixth of the ten children of Gen- 
eral Van Wyck and Eliza (Herriman) Wickes, was born on Feb- 
ruary 14, 1823, at Jamaica, Long Island, N. Y., but entered 
college from Troy, N. Y. 

After graduation he studied a year at Andover Seminary and 
completed his theological course at New Haven in 1846. He 
desired to go as a missionary to India, but his health was consid- 
ered unequal to the necessary hardships. He then passed a year 



38 

in travel and study at home, and was ordained, on June 25, 1848, 
pastor of the Congregational Church at Canaan Four Corners,. 
N. Y. After a pastorate of eight years there, he was for over 
four years at Brighton, N. Y., and on February 14, 1864, began 
an active service of twenty-five years with the Presbyterian 
Church in Attica, N. Y. Resigning in 1889, he continued to live 
among his people until his death on June 5, 1901. He was 78 
years of age. 

He married, on September 16, 1862, Miss Amy Moore of Brigh- 
ton, N. Y., and had a son and a daughter. Two brothers who 
were in the ministry studied in the Yale Divinity School, one 
of whom graduated at Yale College in the class of 1 834. 

1844 

Samuel Milks Brown, son of Isaac and Zumviah Brown, was 
born on March 8, 1820, at Fair Haven, in the town of East 
Haven, Conn. 

After graduation he taught six years in Fair Haven, at Port 
Colden, N. J., and for a year as tutor in a private family in 
Maryland. He intended to study law, but a pulmonary difficulty 
led to his relinquishing this plan. After sojourning at vari- 
ous mineral springs, he spent the years 1852 and 1853 in farming 
and building, and the next three or four years in the brokerage 
and other business. From 1857 to 1861 he was Postmaster, and 
from 1861 he was engaged in the grocery business for thirty-five 
years, after which he retired. 

He was a member of the school board for three years, and 
declined th^ nomination for Judge of Probate three times. He 
was for many years a member of St. James Protestant Episcopal 
Church. 

His health had been declining for some time, but the last two 
months he was confined to his home. He died of heart failure on 
April 2, 1901, at the age of 81 years, in the house in which his 
father had begun housekeeping. 

He married on December 23, 1861, Mary Jane, daughter of Hor- 
ace Warner, of Garrattsville, Otsego County, N. Y. Mrs. Brown 
died in November, 1900. A son and daughter survive. 

John Adams Dana, son of Caleb and Laurenda (Hartwell) 
Dana, was born in Princeton, Mass., March 10, 1823. 

After graduation he taught in Reading, Pa., till January, 1846„ 
and the next six months in Carlisle, Pa. While in Reading he 



39 

began the study of law and continued his studies in Worcester, 
Mass., where he was admitted to the bar, January 24, 1848. Be- 
fore the present system of trial justice courts was established, he 
had considerable practice in holding a justice's court for the trial 
of criminal offenders. He was assistant City Marshal for two 
or three years about the time of the Civil War. He was Assist- 
ant Clerk of Courts of Worcester County from 1866 to 1877, and 
Clerk of the same for five years following. After 1882 he de- 
voted himself to his law practice, giving much time to probate 
cases. He kept up his knowledge of Latin during his whole life 
and spoke it fluently. 

At one time he was a member of the city school board, and 
about 1850 Major in the State militia. 

He married, November 26, 1860, Mrs. Eliza Henshaw Smith, 
youngest daughter of Hon. Isaac C. Bates (Yale r802), of North- 
ampton, Mass. 

Mr. Dana died at his home in Worcester, after a year's invalid- 
ism followed by heart trouble, on September 6, 1900, at the age 
of 77 years. Mrs. Dana's death occurred the preceding spring. 
Of her three sons by her first marriage, one is living. 

William FewSmith, son of Joseph FewSmith and Maria 
Louisa (Lehman) FewSmith, was born on January 24, 1826, at 
Philadelphia, Pa. During his college course he won prizes for 
excellence in Latin and Greek. 

After graduation he entered on a long and successful career as 
teacher, and was for thirty years Principal of the FewSmith Clas- 
sical and Mathematical School in Philadelphia, where he fitted 
many boys for Yale. He was Superintendent of Schools in Cam- 
den, N. J., for seven years. He edited a " Grammar of the Eng- 
lish Language" and an "Elementary Grammar of English." 

He married, October 22, 1852, Miss Catharine A. Schenck, and 
had five children, of whom only one daughter is living. 

Mr. FewSmith died after an illness of seven years, at his home 
in Merchantville, N. J., on June 19, 1900, at the age of 74 years. 
He was an elder in the First Presbyterian Church in Camden 
for many years. 

John McLeod, son of Daniel and Catherine (Corgae) McLeod, 
was born at Philadelphia, Pa., on March 7, 1817. 

After graduation he took the course in Yale Divinity School, 
and on November 7, 1847, was ordained pastor of the American 



40 

Presbyterian Church in Montreal, Canada. In 1855 he visited 
Europe, Egypt, and Syria. Feeling the need of a temporary rest 
and a more congenial climate, he resigned after ten j^ears of 
effective service, and for the next ten years was District Secretarj'^ 
of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 
and was also pastor at Reeseville (now Berwyn), Pa. He then 
resumed full pastoral work, and on April 8, 1867, was installed 
over the Southwestern Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia. In 
1884 he was compelled by ill health to resign this charge, in 
which he had won high esteem, and was made pastor emeritus. 
Thereafter until 1895 he spent most of the time in European 
travel, and then took up his residence at Athol House, Burling- 
ton Place, Eastbourne, England, where he died on March 6, 1901, 
at the age of 84 years. 

Remarried, in 1856, Mrs. Elizabeth S. Frost, who died after 
his removal to Philadelphia. In 1883 he married Miss Mary 
Mills of Chiselhurst, near London, Eng., whose father, the late 
Honorable John E. Mills, was at the time of his death Mayor 
of Montreal. Mrs. McLeod and her three children survive, with 
two sons and a daughter by the first wife. 

John Potter Marshall, son of James Marshall, a carriage 
builder, and Mary (Dudley) Marshall, was born on August 11, 
1823, at Kingston, N. H. He was prepared to enter college at 
the age of 16, but upon the advice of his father he spent a year 
at home. 

After graduation he taught two years in the Baptist Academy 
at Effingham, N. H., and was Principal of the Lebanon (X. H.) 
Liberal Institute for an equal period. He then spent some time 
in the South with an invalid brother, and after a short interval 
of teaching in his native town was invited to the newly estab- 
lished High School in Danvers, Mass., from which he went in 
December, 1851, to the High School in Chelsea. While there he 
received a call to Tufts College in August, 1854. 

He was the most active assistant of Dr. Ballou in the organi- 
zation of Tufts College, of which he was the first Professor ap- 
pointed, and of the faculty of which, at his retirement in 1899, he 
was the senior member and Dean. The year following the death 
of Dr. Ballou he was Acting President. At the opening of the 
college Professor Marshall had charge of all the mathematics and 
natural science taught, but his duties were afterwards limited to 



41 

his favorite studies of geology and mineralogy. He brought 
with him a small private collection of minerals and fossils, which 
through his earnest efforts became the nucleus of the present 
large and valuable collection. His teaching life there continued 
forty-five years. His deep and personal interest in the students, 
especially in times of trouble and sickness, endeared him to two 
generations of graduates. 

During the Civil War he spent his vacations for two years in 
the service of the Sanitary Commission. In 1872 he sought a 
needed respite from his college duties, and spent fourteen 
months in England, Germany, and Italy, passing a winter in Ber- 
lin in the study of his favorite subjects. Two years later he 
made a journey through Switzerland. 

He married, on November 21, 1853, Miss Caroline Clement of 
Chelsea, Mass., and had one son and one daughter, of whom only 
the daughter survives. Mrs. Marshall died in 1895. 

Prof. Marshall died at his home, which he built on College 
Hill soon after entering upon his professorship, on February 5, 
1901, in his 78th year. 

William Manlius Smith, son of Azariah and Zilpah (Mack) 
Smith, was born on September 26, 1823, in Manlius, N. Y. He 
was a pupil in Manlius Academy from its opening in 1835, until 
he entered college in 1840. Of this academy his father was a 
trustee, as also of Hamilton College and Auburn Theological 
Seminary. 

The first and second winters after graduation he attended lec- 
tures at the Medical College in Albany, and for three summers 
took private instruction of Dr. William Tully in New Haven. 
During the winter of 1846-47 he was a teacher in Manlius. In 
October, 1848, he entered the Medical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, and received the degree of M.D., in 
March, 1849. The following June heopenedanofiicein Syracuse, 
N. Y., but in the fall of 1851 he returned to the homestead in 
Manlins, where with the exception of the years 1857 and 1858 he 
practiced medicine until 1872. 

In 1857-58 he was chemist in a manufacturing establishment in 
Utica, and lectured on chemistry. During the winter of 1872-73 
he lectured on pharmacy in the New York College of Pharmacy. 
For a few months afterward he was in a chemical business in 
Syracuse, and from May, 1874, until December, 1875, he was 



4:2 

Physician at the State Prison in Sing Sing, after which he 
resumed his business in Syracuse. In 1877 he was appointed 
Professor of Materia Medica in Syracuse University, and the fol- 
lowing year exchanged this chair for that of Chemistry, taking 
in addition the Professorship of Botany. 

While in Manlius he was trustee of the village, of the schools, 
and of Manlius Academy. He was secretary of the Onondaga 
County Medical Society for several years, and of the New York 
State Medical Society from 1877 to 1889, editing the Transactions 
of the latter society. 

He united with the College Church in 1841, and was for many 
years trustee, clerk, treasurer, and later elder, of the Presbyterian 
Church in Manlius. 

He married, on August 6, 1847, Miss Frances Louisa Hall, a 
native of Durham, Conn., and had seven sons and five daughters, of 
whom eight children survive. One son, Allen M., graduated 
from Amherst College in 1886, and from Syracuse Medical Col- 
lege in ] 889 ; one daughter received the degree of M.D. from 
Syracuse University in 1887, and another daughter in 1898. 

Dr. "Smith suffered for some years from malarial troubles, and 
died of pneumonia at his home in Syracuse, on May 4, 1900, in 
his 77th year. He was a younger brother of Rev. Azariah Smith 
(Yale 1837), missionary at Aintab, Syria. 

Hugh Brady Wilkins, son of Captain John Holmes Wilkin s, 
U. S. A., and Mary (Darragh) Wilkin s, was born at Madison 
Barracks, Sackett's Harbor, N. Y., on November 3, 1824. He 
entered the Junior class in Yale from the Western University of 
Pennsylvania. 

After graduation he studied law in Pittsburg, with his uncle, 
Hon. Cornelius Darragh, and with Charles S. Bradford, Esq., 
was admitted to the bar, December 11, 1846, and thenceforth 
practiced his profession in that city, making a specialty of con- 
veyancing. He was also engaged in the oil business. 

He married, April 13, 1848, Sophia, daughter of Dr. William 
H. Denny, the first Mayor of Pittsburg. Of their seven children, 
two sons survive. 

Mr. Wilkins died at the Western Pennsylvania Hospital, 
Pittsburg, September 28, 1900, at the age of 76 years. 



43 



1847 



Calvin Mason Brooks was born on April 9, 1825, in Prince- 
ton, Mass. 

After graduation he studied law, and in early years practiced 
in Worcester and Boston, Mass., and a short time in New York 
City. In Worcester he was chairman of the Board of Educa- 
tion. In 1887 he opened an office in Hartford, Conn., and made 
his home at Cottage Grove, in the town of Bloomfield. 

He died at the Hartford Hospital from the disabilities of age, 
on August 13, 1900, at the age of 15 years. He married Miss 
Priscilla Lazelle, but had no children. 

Thomas Monroe Finney, son of William and Jane (Lee) 
Finney, was born on July 13, 1827, in St. Louis, Mo., where his 
father had settled in 1819, and had been one of the founders of the 
Methodist Church of that place. He joined the class in Sopho- 
more year from St. Louis University, and was one of the 
earliest students in Yale College from west of the Mississippi 
River. 

After graduation he studied law with Gamble & Bates in St. 
Louis for two years, was admitted to the bar in 1849, and prac- 
ticed a year or more. He was licensed to preach by the Metho- 
dist Church South on July 1, 1850, and during the next two 
years preached at various stations on the Arrow Rock Circuit. 
He was ordained Deacon in 1852, and Elder in 1854, meantime 
preaching in Jefferson City. For the next two years he was at 
Lexington and Bellefontaine. 

In 1858 he returned to St. Louis and was from time to time 
pastor of important churches, but principally thereafter rendered 
efficient service as leader, administrator and organizer. From 
1861 to 1868, also from 1884 to 1892 he was Presiding Elder in 
St. Louis, where, under his administration, six Methodist churches 
were established. He was Presiding Elder of the Salem District 
in 1873-74, and of the Potosi District from 1877 to 1879. 

He was a member of the Cape May Commission for the adjust- 
ment of questions of ecclesiastical status and property between 
the Methodist church North and South, President of the Board 
of Missions of the Methodist Church South, President of the St. 
Louis Board of Church Extension and City Missions, and Super- 
intendent of the St. Louis Provident Association. He was a 
member of the St. Louis Conference for fifty years. 



44 

He was editor of the St. Louis Christian Advocate irom 1869 
to 1873, and in 1880 he wrote the '^Life and Labors of Bishop 
E. M. Marvin," of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He 
also contributed frequently to Methodist periodicals. 

He was one of the founders of Central College at Fayette, Mo., 
in 1855, and for forty years a director and from 1877 to 1880 
President of Bellevue Collegiate Institute at Caledonia, Mo. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the Southern 
University of Alabama, in 1870. 

Dr. Finney died at his home in St. Louis, after an illness of six 
months from general debility, on October 1, 1900, at the age of 
73 years. 

He married, in 1852, Mary Shackelford, who died in 1861. He 
afterward married Lucinda, daughter of Major Benjamin Edmon- 
stone, M.D., who survives him with five daughters and one son. 

George Clinton Williams, son of Judge John Fowler Wil- 
liams (Brown Univ. 1814) and Lucretia (Tracy) Williams, was 
born September 5, 1825, in West Woodstock, Conn. He entered 
college with the class of 1846, but joined the class of 1847 in 
Senior year. 

After graduation he studied law in his father's office in West 
Woodstock, and was admitted to the bar, but was never in active 
practice. 

In 1 855 he was appointed clerk in the Treasury Department at 
Washington, and two years later was transferred to the Navy 
Department, being private secretary to Governor Isaac Toucey, 
Secretary of the United States Navy. At the beginning of the 
Civil War he was for a time on the staff of Commodore String- 
ham, as private secretary, but resigned this position owing to 
ill health. During the war circumstances enabled him to give 
the Government valuable information concerning some of the 
Southern fortifications. In 1867 he was appointed Solicitor of 
the Bureau of National Currency, and Chief of the Division of 
Organization of National Banks. 

In 1869 he returned to his old home in West Woodstock, where 
he was engaged in settling estates, and discharging some official 
trusts, revising maps for the U. S. Government and private pub- 
lishers, and writing on current topics. He was clerk of the Con- 
gregational Society for many years. 

Mr. Williams died of apoplexy at his home, on January 1, 
1901, at the age of 75 years. He was never married. 



45 



1848 



James Bird, son of Isaac and Ann (Parker) Bird, was born 
September 28, 1826, in Beyroot, Syria, where his parents were 
missionaries of the American Board. Owing to the failure of 
his mother's health he came to America with his parents when 
he was nine years old, and entered college from Gilmanton, N. H., 
where his father was Professor in the Theological Seminary. 

Immediately after graduation he joined his father in carrying 
on the Pavilion Family School for boys in Hartford, Conn. In 
1869 he moved to Great Barrington, Mass., and continued the 
school under the name of Sedgwick Institute. Ten years later 
he removed to Auburndale, Mass., where he remained eight 
years, and during a portion of this time received a few young 
boys into his family and taught them. In 1887 he returned to 
Great Barrington, and resumed teaching in Sedgwick Institute 
with his nephew, Edward J. Van Lennep, who was then in 
charge. Later he was in the real estate and insurance business, 
and clerk of the district court of southern Berkshire. While on 
his way to the court house on the evening of May 17, 1901, he 
fell from a railroad trestle near his home and was killed. He 
was in his 75th year. He united wuth the Center Church in 
Hartford, Conn., in 1852. 

He married, on October 10, 1855, Elise D., eldest daughter of 
Rev. William Goodell, D.D. (Dartm. 1817), missionary to Turkey. 
Mrs. Bird died in 1895, and an only daughter at the age of 15 
years in 1876. On April 27, 1898, Mr. Bird married Cornelia 
Helen Pattison, of Great Barrington, who survives him, together 
with a sister in Great Barrington and a brother, Rev. William 
Bird (Dartm. 1844), who has been for forty-eight years a mis- 
sionary in Syria. A sister married Rev. Henry J. Van Lennep 
(Amherst 1837), formerly for thirty years a missionary in Turkey. 

Timothy Hopkii^^s Porter, son of Deacon Timothy and Annie 
(Todd) Porter, was born on February 16, 1826, at Waterbury, 
Conn. During his college course he was Vice President of the 
Brothers in Unity, and one of the board of editors of the Yale 
Literary Magazine. 

The year after graduation he taught the academy in Easton, 
Conn., and the next three years worked with Hon. Henry Barnard 
(Yale 1830) and Horace Mann in the interest of the common 
school system. In 1852 he entered Yale Theological Seminary, 



46 

but remained only a short time, and then went to Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, where he completed his course in 1855. In 
1856 he went abroad and spent three years in study in Germany 
and France and in travel. He was in Paris a year, during which 
he had charge of the American Chapel. 

After his return home in 1859 he occasionally preached in the 
Baptist Church in Stamford, Conn., but gave most of his atten- 
tion to financial matters. In 1866 he became senior partner in 
the banking house of Soutter & Co., and a few years later took 
up his residence in Stamford. Soon after his retirement from 
active business in 1883, he suffered a stroke of apoplexy, and in 
1887 a second stroke which completely paralyzed his left side. 
His death occurred at his home on Noroton Hill, Stamford, on 
January 1, 1901, in his Yoth year. For many years before his 
death he was involved in a succession of law suits. 

He married, in 1859, Agnes K. Soutter, who died in December of 
the following year. She was the eldest daughter of James T. 
Soutter, his business partner. In 1870 he married Marie Louise, 
eldest daughter of Joseph B. Hoyt of Stamford. She died in 
1891, leaving three sons, one of whom graduated at Yale in 1896* 
In 1894 Mr. Porter married Mabelle Hastings Earle, of Bridge- 
port, Conn., who survives him. 

1849 

Enoch George Adams, son of Rev. John Adams, a noted 
Methodist preacher, and Sarah (Sanderson) Adams, was born at 
Bow, near Concord, N. H., February 20, 1829. 

After graduation he taught successively in New Market, Strat- 
ford, and Durham, N. H. from 1850 to 1853, and elsewhere in 
New England during the next three years. From 1856 to 1858 
he was a teacher in Missouri. He then returned to New Eng- 
land, and was for three years in Newburyport, Mass., and Dur- 
ham, N. H. 

At the beginning of the Civil War he enlisted as a private in 
the Second New Hampshire regiment. October 1, 1861, he was 
appointed Sergeant ; May 1, 1863, Second Lieutenant; and May 7, 
1864, Captain. He fought at Gettysburg, and did efficient service 
throughout the war. He was seriously wounded at the battle of 
Williamsburg, Va. In 1864 his regiment was transferred to 
Fort Rice, then in Dakota Territory. There he had command 
during a portion of the year 1865, and engaged in successful con- 



47 

tests with the Indians under their noted chief, Sitting Bull. On 
March 13, he was bre vetted Major for gallant and meritorious 
services. 

After his discharge the following November, he edited the 
Frontier Scout at Fort Rice for a few months, but early in 
1866 removed to Oregon. During a considerable portion of the 
next two years he taught at Portland in that State. From 186& 
to 1871 he was editor of the Vancouver Register at Vancouver, 
Wash., and at the same time was Register of the Land Office. 
In 1872 he removed to St. Helen, Ore., which was his residence 
for fourteen years. From 1880 to 1886 he edited and published 
a newspaper called The Columbian. In 1887 he sold this paper 
and removed to South Berwick, Me., and devoted himself to 
writing and lecturing as his health permitted, in addition to 
caring for his large farm. 

Mr. Adams died of heart disease at his home in South Berwick, 
on November 4, 1900, at the age of 71 years. 

He married, on June 16, 1853, Sarah Cobb, daughter of Ebene- 
zer and Hannah (Adams) Plummer, of Newburyport, Mass., who 
died in 1858. May 23, 1 863, he married Mary Elizabeth, daughter 
of James and Elizabeth (Hayes) Libby, of Berwick. She sur- 
vives him with a daughter and son. 

1850 

Erastus Lathrop Ripley, son of Nathaniel and Fanny 
(White) Ripley, was born on February 14, 1822, in Weybridge, 
Vt., but entered college from Middlebury in that State, and 
joined the class of 1850 from the preceding class in the first term 
of Freshman year. 

After graduation he was in business in New York City, and 
then began the study of law in New Haven but gave it up, and 
for a year or more was connected with the Guilford Manufactur- 
ing Company. For the next seven years he was Principal of the 
Public Schools in Jackson, Mich., and for about the same length 
of time was Professor of Mathematics in the Michigan State Nor- 
mal School. In September, 1867, he became Principal of the 
College of Normal Instruction in the University of Missouri. 

His published works are "Ripley's Map Drawing" (1867), 
"English Grammar for Advanced Classes " (1873), " Elementary 
and Practical English Grammar," " Methods of Instruction in 
Arithmetic" (1874), and " Students' Chart of History." 



48 

In 1884 he removed to Kansas City, and was Principal of the 
Lathrop School for two years and the Bryant School for three 
years. He then retired and gave much attention to his favorite 
studies of mathematics and botany. 

He married first, in 1850, Miss Emily J. Isbell, of Meriden, 
Conn. ; second, Miss Helen E. Devoe, of Corning, N. Y. ; third, 
Mrs. Caroline A. Aldrich, of Penfield, Ohio. 

He died suddenly of heart disease, on September 11, 1900, at 
the age of 78 years. He had just returned with his wife from a 
trip to Colorado. Two sons and two daughters survive, of whom 
one daughter graduated from the University of Missouri in 1874. 

Heney Martyn Tupper, son of Rev. Martyn Tupper (Prince- 
ton 1826) and Persis Lomira (Peck) Tupper, was born on June 
10, 1830, at Hardwick, Mass., but entered college from East 
Longmeadow. 

After graduation he taught for about six months each in 
Monson (Mass.) Academy, and in Gates County, N. C, and then 
entered Union Theological Seminary, but owing to impaired 
health soon resumed teaching. He was Tutor in Illinois College 
for two years, and then returned to Union Theological Seminary 
for two years. He was licensed in April, 1856, and preached for 
a time in Woonsocket, R. I., but soon went West on account of 
ill health. Upon his recovery he taught in Illinois College and 
in Griggsville, III, until June, 1859. He was ordained pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Waverly, about 30 miles from 
Springfield, III, on October 12, 1859. After a successful pastor- 
ate of twelve years there, he was pastor at Ontario, Knox County, 
for thirteen years. In 1885 he removed to Joy Prairie, Morgan 
County, and remained there twelve years. Closing his work in 
the fall of 1897, he went to Florida to spend the winter with a 
daughter, but finding a life of inactivity unendurable, he fre- 
quently supplied vacant pulpits, and in June, 1899, accepted a 
call to Ormond in that State, where, after a year of faithful ser- 
vice, he died on September 12, 1900, at the age of 70 years. 

He married, on November 13, 1860, Maggie E., daughter of 
Walker Cree, a merchant, of Griggsville, III, and had two sons 
and three daughters, of whom the daughters with their mother 
survive. Two daughters and one son graduated at Knox College. 



49 



1851 



John William Hendrie, son of Charles Hendrie, a sea captain, 
and Hannah Maria (Lock wood) Hendrie, was born on November 18, 
1821, at Sound Beach, in the town of Greenwich, Conn. Until 
he was of age he worked on the farm, and to this experience he 
attributed his continued health. He then taught school and 
studied for four years, completing his preparatory studies at the 
Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven. During this time he 
added much to his income by engaging in the lobster industry 
and net fishing. By his earnings in vacations he was able to con- 
tinue his self-support through the college course. 

In the autumn after graduation he took charge of the Stam- 
ford (Conn.) Academy, and remained there nearly three years, and 
then sailed for California by way of Panama, in April, 1854. 
Reaching San Francisco just a month later, he at first bought and 
sold various kinds of goods for which he found a demand, and 
then withH. M. Lockwood, whom he had known as a merchant 
in New York, formed a partnership, under the name of Lockwood 
& Hendrie, for the sale of clothing and furnishing goods. They 
soon became manufacturers as well as dealers and started 
agencies in different parts of the State. Until the business was 
established he taught a night school in order to meet his notes, 
but he afterward began to invest as he could in real estate. After 
a prosperous career of less than ten years Mr. Hendrie w^as able 
to retire permanently, and sold his business to his partner in 1863. 
He afterward visited Europe twice, and usually spent the winter 
in California and the summer at his old home. 

Mr. Hendrie was the largest donor to the fund for the new 
building of the Yale Law School, which was named " Hendrie 
Hall " in his honor. He also contributed liberally for the 
encouragement of debating in the University. 

He died after an illness of several weeks, from general debility, 
at his home at Sound Beach, on November 25, 1900, at the age of 
79 years. He was never married. He received the degree of 
M.A. from Yale University in 1861. 

Horace Montague Smith, son of Justus Smith, was born in 
Ashfield, Mass., February 9, 1828. He was a student at Amherst 
College for three years, and joined his class at Yale in Senior 
year. 



50 

After graduation he studied in the Harvard Law School for 
one or two terms, and then entered the office of Benedict & 
Boardman, in New York City. But soon finding the legal pro- 
fession distasteful, in connection with his brother Justus (Harv. 
1851), he started a boarding school at Bergen Hill, N. J. After 
three years of teaching his health demanded a more active life, 
and in 1858 he took charge of the Baltimore branch agency of 
Tappan & McKillop of New York. This business was entirely 
broken up by the Civil War. In 1865 he began the manufacture 
and sale of gold pens and other articles connected with that 
trade, under the name of H. M. Smith & Co., and continued this 
business for twenty-five years. 

He died of paralysis on March 14, 1901, at New Haven, Conn. 
He was 73 years of age. He was twice married. 

George Starr Tuckerman, eldest son of George and Lydia 
(Starr) Tuckerman, was born at Richfield, Otsego County, 
N. Y., on November 29. 1824. He entered the class at the begin- 
ning of Sophomore year. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of Honorable 
William H. Seward (LL.D. Yale 1854) at Auburn, N. Y., a year, 
then attended a course of lectures at the Albany Law School, and 
was admitted to the bar in the spring of 1 852. He practiced a 
short time in Albany, and until October, 1853, in Cherry Valley, 
Otsego County. In 1855-56 he was assistant to the Corporation 
Counsel of New York. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War he helped raise a company in 
Otsego and Oneida Counties, known as the "Berdan Sharp- 
shooters." As Captain, under Colonel Berdan, he was in active 
service before Richmond and in the seven days' battle on the 
Chickahominy. On the last day of the fighting he was left on 
the field ill, And fell into the hands of the enemy, but escaped. 
After two years of service he resigned his commission on account 
of ill health, and was honorably discharged. Later, at Elmira, 
N. Y., and at Fortress Monroe, he looked after the exchange of 
prisoners, and gave important military information to Secretary 
Seward. 

After the war he became editor of the Rochester (N. Y.) 
Democrat and Chronicle, but when the ownership of the paper 
changed, he resumed his law practice and remained in Rochester 
about ten years. He then spent some time in Chicago, but on 



51 

account of failing health went to Jamestown, N. Y., where he 
died after an illness of six weeks, on January 18, 1901, at the 
age of 76 years. 

He possessed a fine tenor voice, and wrote several college 
songs. 

He married on "November 6, 1861, at Jamestown, N. Y., Miss 
Mary M. Hall, who survives him with two sons and two daugh- 
ters. 

1852 

Chaeles Heney Bareett, son of Ephraim and Louisa (Wood) 
Barrett, was born in Camden, Me., February 4, 1821. 

After graduation he immediatelj^ entered Union Theological 
Seminary and completed the course in 1855. He was licensed to 
preach but never ordained. From about 1855 to 1869 he was 
master of a merchant ship, and made many voyages to China and 
California, although he visited nearly every part of the world. 
During the war he was for a few months with the Christian 
Commission, and with the fleet at the taking of Fort Fisher. 
After 1870 he spent about two years in voyages to the West 
Indies, Liverpool, and Australia, and then owing to ill health 
retired from the duties of shipmaster. From 1876 to 1884 he 
resided in Oakland, Cal, and then came to New York, where he 
engaged in mission work. In 1892 Captain Barrett entered the 
Sailors Snug Harbor, on Staten Island, N. Y., where he died on 
October 7, 1900, at the age of 79 years. 

He married at New Haven, Conn., April 8, 1861, Elizabeth G., 
daughter of John W. Barber. Mrs. Barrett died at sea in 1862, 
and her daughter four months later. A volume of her poems was 
published after her death. In 1872 Captain Barrett married Miss 
Ella Josephine McCanon of Bennington, Wyoming County, N. 
Y., a graduate of the New York Homeopathic College for Women, 
and a practicing physician. She died in 1890. A daughter by the 
second marriage is the only survivor of his family. 

Heney Jacob Labatt, son of Henry J. and Caroline (Hyams) 
Labatt, was born on January 13, 1832, at New Orleans, La. He 
left college during Sophomore year, but received the degree of 
M.A. in 1865, and was enrolled with the class. 

After taking the law course in the University of Louisiana he 
was for a time, in 1865, in Nevada, and then until 1867 practiced 
his profession in San Francisco. During this time he published an 



62 

annotated Code and Digest of California Reports, and was an 
occasional correspondent of the New York Times. For the last 
thirty years his home was in Galveston, Texas, where he was 
City Treasurer, and editor of the Daily Dispatch, and at the 
time of his death in partnership with his son, Joseph, in the law 
firm of Labatt & Labatt. He was a Democratic member of the 
17th and 18th Legislatures of Texas. He married on June 1, 
1854, Miss Eleanor Block. 

In the Galveston flood of September 8-9, 1900, he was lost with 
his wife, daughter, one son and his family, and about one hun- 
dred others who had taken refuge in his house. Two sons are 
the only survivors of his family. Mr. Labatt was 68 years of 
age. He was a member of the Jewish church. 

Henry McCoemick, son of James McCormick (Princeton 1822) 
and Eliza (Buehler) McCormick, was born on March 10, 1831, in 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

After graduation he spent a year in reading law under the 
direction of his father, and then entered the iron business, which 
his father had largely developed in Central Pennsylvania. In 
185*7 he took the management of the Paxtang Furnace, and in 
1866 the Nail Works at Fairview, Cumberland County, which he 
continued for twenty-five years. After the death of his father, 
with his brother James (Yale 1853) he managed the great prop- 
erties of the estate. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War he gathered Company F, 
Twenty-fifth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, which served 
for three months in the vicinity of Washington and in the 
Shenandoah Valley. In the Antietam campaign, he was commis- 
sioned Colonel of the First Regiment of Pennsylvania Militia, 
and commander! the First Brigade of Pennsylvania Militia, in 
Maryland, under General John F. Reynolds. A year later he 
served on the staff of General W. F. Smith, in the Gettysburg 
campaign. 

In 1874 he was appointed a commissioner of the Pennsylvania 
State Geological Survey. Long before the building of the rail- 
roads across the continent he traversed the plains and mountains 
to the Pacific coast, and returned by way of the Isthmus of 
Panama. 

Mr. McCormick died after an illness of three years from paraly- 
sis at Rosegarten, his country seat in Cumberland County, Pa., 
on July 14, 1900, at the age of 69 years. 



53 

He married on January 29, 1866, Annie Criswell, who, with 
three of their six childen, survives. One of the sons graduated 
at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1893. 

William Leonard Rowland, son of William Maltbie and 
Clara Leonard (Wight) Rowland, was born on May 31, 1831, in 
Bristol, R. L, but removed with his parents to Augusta, Ga., in 
his childhood, and was there prepared for college at the Rich- 
mond Academy. 

After graduation he returned to Augusta and studied law, but 
it proved uncongenial and he never practiced. About 1855 he 
removed with his father to Rockford, 111., and assisted him in his 
various business interests. 

In 1857 a stock company was formed to maintain a public 
library in the town, and Mr. Rowland collected most of the sub- 
scriptions, and aided in selecting the books. This library flour- 
ished for a few years, but during the Civil War interest in it 
declined. In 1851 Mr. Rowland's uncle, Rev. John B. Wight 
(Brown 1808), introduced into the Massachusetts Legislature a 
bill authorizing cities and towns to establish and maintain public 
libraries. This bill was the foundation of the free public library 
system in this country. In 1872, when a similar law was passed 
in Illinois, Rockford immediately started its present Public 
Library. Mr. Rowland was chosen Librarian, and filled this 
position with faithfulness for twenty-eight years. He made the 
library known in the State as a model working library, and com- 
piled an excellent catalogue of its contents. His influence was 
most effective in stimulating young people to read the best books, 
and he gave willing aid to all who sought his help in their 
researches. 

He died after an illness of several weeks at Rockford, on Sep- 
tember 27, 1900, in his 70th year. He was never married. 

1853 

Andrew Cheves Dulles, son of Joseph Heatly Dulles (Yale 
1814), a retired merchant, and Margaret (Welsh) Dulles, and a 
descendant of Hon. Langdon Cheves of South Carolina, was born 
on July 1, 1832, in Philadelphia, Pa. His mother was a sister of 
Hon. John Welsh, former Minister to England. 

After graduation he returned to Philadelphia, studied law, was 
admitted to the bar in 1859, and practiced his profession in that 



54: 

business. He had a varied knowledge of men and things and 
excellent conversational powers. He was a communicant of St. 
Luke's Church. 

He died of pneumonia at his home in Philadelphia, on February 
22, 1901, in his 69th year. 

He married, on April 19, 1870, Miss Mary Bartow Crothers, of 
Philadelphia, and had a son and daughter, who are living. One 
brother graduated at Yale in 1839 and another in 1844. 

Albert Emmett Kent, son of Albert and Lucinda (Gillette) 
Kent, was born on September 1, 1830, in Suffield, Conn. 

After graduation he engaged in the grain and produce business 
with his brother in Chicago with success, but his health at length 
became so seriously impaired that he sought restoration in the 
climate of California. In 1871 he purchased a large estate at 
San Rafael, where he made his home, but business interests called 
him back to Chicago for part of the time. 

In 1885 he presented to the University funds for the erection 
of the Kent Chemical Laboratory, and by his will left a generous 
bequest for the enlargement of that building. 

He died at the home of his sister, in Genoa, Nebr., on January 
8, 1901, at the age of 70 years. 

He married, on July 28, 1857, Miss Adaline E. Button, of 
Springville, N. Y. She survives him with one son, a graduate of 
Yale in the class of 1887. A son and daughter died in early 
life. 

Joseph Ashley Welch, son of Jonathan Ashley Welch 
(Yale 1813) and Mary Devotion (Baker) Welch, was born in 
Brooklyn, Conn., on August 13, 1830. 

After graduation he studied law at Hartford and with his father 
in Brooklyn, Conn., at Boston and the Harvard Law School, and 
was admitted to the bar in Boston in 1855. The year following 
he practiced his profession in Detroit, Mich., the next year in 
Willimantic, Conn., and after 1858 in New York City, in part- 
nership with Charles T. Russell, Esq. In 1897 he was appointed 
Assistant District Attorney of New York, and the following year 
was appointed a member of the State Board of Examiners for 
the Bar. To the latter position he was reappointed for three 
years from January 1, 1901. 

Mr. Welch died after an operation for the removal of an 
abscess, in New York City, on April 11, 1901, in his 7 1st year. 



55 

He married, on May 19, 1857, Miss Mary A. Hotchkiss of New 
Haven, Conn., who died about a year ago. He had no children. 
He was a grandson of Rev. Moses C. Welch, D.D. (Yale 17'72)', 
who was a Fellow of Yale College, and for forty years pastor of 
the Congregational Church in North Mansfield, Conn., succeed- 
ing his father, Rev. Daniel Welch (Yale 1749), who had held the 
pastorate of the same church for thirty years, tie was also 
great-grandson of Rev. Jonathan Ashley (Yale 1730), for over 
forty-seven years the Congregational pastor in Deerfield, Mass. 

1854 

James Brown Olney, son of Jesse Olney, author of Olney's 
famous series of Geographies, and Elizabeth (Barnes) Olney, was 
born on July 20, 1833, in Hartford, Conn. 

He left college in Junior year, but received the degree of A.M. 
and was enrolled with his class in 1887. He went to Windham, 
Greene County, N. Y., studied law in the office of his cousin, 
Danforth K. Olney, and was admitted to the bar at Albany, on 
December 5, 1855. In May, 1856, he opened an office in Pratts- 
ville, Greene County, and was shortly afterward appointed Judge 
Advocate on the staff of Brigadier-General Bassett, and also a 
Commissioner of Deeds for the State of Pennsylvania. In 1859 
he was elected District Attorney of Greene County for three 
years, and reelected in 1862. While in Prattsville he was for a 
time connected with the Catskill Recorder, and later with the 
Prattsville News, as associate editor. In December, 1862, he 
removed to Catskill, and formed a partnership with his cousin, 
Danforth K. Olney. In January, 1865, they became associated 
with R. H. King, under the name of Olney, King & Olney, but a 
year later Mr. Olney resumed practice by himself, and so con- 
tinued during his life. 

He was for many years chairman of the Democratic County 
Committee, prominent in Congressional and State Conventions, 
and for ten years President of the School Board of Catskill. In 
1884 he joined the Republican party. 

He died at Catskill, on December 11, 1900, at the age of 67 
years. 

He married, on October 13, 1870, Julia Pratt, daughter of 
Hon. Malbone Watson, formerly Justice of the Supreme Court 
of New York. She died in 1886. One of their two sons sur- 
vives, and graduated at Yale in 1897. Mr. Olney was a nephew 
of Rev. Jeremiah R. Barnes, of the class of 1834. 



66 

1856 

Wilbur Johnson, son of Rev. Nathaniel Emmons Johnson 
(Brown 1825) and Sophronia (Wilbur) Johnson, was born at 
Genoa, Cayuga County, K Y., on March 1, 1831. 

The year following his graduation he taught in Plymouth Hol- 
low, Conn., and the next six months he studied mathematics in 
New Haven. He then taught a year in Rochester, Mass., and 
three years in Collinsville, Conn., and entered Yale Theological 
Seminary in December, 1861, but left at the end of Middle year. 
He was licensed to preach July 8, 1863. From about this date 
until the following January he was at Hartford, Pa., disabled 
by an injury to his left foot received in the Yale Gymnasium. 
From January to April, 1864, he preached at Montrose, Pa., the 
next year in New Milford, Pa., and the next two years was pastor 
of the Presbyterian Church in Great Bend. In the early part of 
the Civil War he was an efficient worker in the Union League in 
Pennsylvania. 

In December, 1867, he removed from Pennsylvania to Massa- 
chusetts, and had charge of the Calvinistic Church in Sandwich 
for about three years, but finding a change of climate necessary 
he then went to West Boylston. He was installed over the Con- 
gregational Church at Royalston, June 3, 1874. After nearly 
ten years of service he resigned, and for five years was pastor in 
Medfield. During this time the church enjoyed a steady growth. 
Owing to a fall in his garden which ruptured the cartilage in one 
of his knee joints, he was obliged to use crutches or an iron sup- 
port for two years. 

From Medfield he went to Slatersville, R. I., and from there in 
1895 accepted a call to the Orthodox Congregational Church at 
Brooklyn, Conn. This pastorate closed in May, 1898, and for a 
few months he resided in Danielson, Conn., without charge, but 
in January, 1899, he assumed the acting pastorate of the Congre- 
gational Church in Canterbury. 

He was working earnestly with this church in a fruitful 
revival, when he was laid aside, and after a brief illness from 
paralysis, died February 9, 1901, in his 70th year. 

He married, at Mattapoisett, in Mass., September, 1864, Sarah, 
daughter of Hon. Henry Barstow. Her death occurred in 1883, 
during his pastorate in Medfield. In 1888 he married Miss Mary 
C. Davis, granddaughter of Rev. Dr. Prentice, a former pastor 
of Medfield. She survives him without children. 



57 

• Benjamin Webb, son of Benjamin S. Webb, a dry goods mer- 
chant, and Jurusha (Brown) Webb, was born in New York City, 
on July 30, 1831. 

After graduation he taught for several years, first as a private 
tutor in Mississippi and Virginia, then as Principal of North 
Greenwich Academy, Conn., and two years at Washington 
Heights, New York City. 

From 1861 to 1863 he studied in the Berkeley Divinity School, 
Middletown, Conn., was ordained Deacon by Bishop Williams, 
May 2V, 1863, and Priest, July 28, 1864. The next three years 
he was Rector of St. Luke's Church, Somers, Westchester County, 
N. Y. 

He was connected with the Pacific Coast Mission, and Profes- 
sor in the Missionary College of St. Augustine, Benicia, Cal., in 
1867-68, and then missionary in the diocese of Albany, from 
1869 to 1872— at Fairfield, Norway, Newport, and Middleville, 
in Herkimer County, and afterward at Luzerne, Warren County, 
and Conklingville, Saratoga County. In the last mentioned place 
he organized St. John's Church and brought about the erection 
of a beautiful stone edifice. In 1873 he was a private tutor at 
Cedar Clijff, Huntington, L. I., and for the next fifteen years Rec- 
tor's Assistant at St. Ignatius' Church and All Angels' Church in 
New York, and Principal of All Angels' Church School. In 1889 
the failure of his voice compelled him to retire from public ser- 
vice, but he retained his connection with the parochial adminis- 
tration of All Angels' to the close of his life. 

He died of heart disease at his home in New York City, on 
November 18, 1900, at the age of 69 years. He was never mar- 
ried. 

1857 

Lyman Davis Hodge, son of Benjamin and Eliza (Patton) 
Hodge, was born at Black Rock, now within the city of Buffalo, 
N. Y., on November 1, 1835. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of Hon. Solomon 
G. Haven, and was admitted to the New York bar in 1859. The 
next two years he practiced law in Buffalo, and for four years 
was engaged in ship-building there. In 1865-66 he was a cotton 
planter in the South, and from 1867 to 1889 in business in St. 
Paul, Minn., where he founded the firm of Granger & Hodge, 
wholesale merchants, and also bankers. In 1891, on account of 
ill health, he removed to Mount Vernon, Wash., and w^as engaged 



58 

in the real estate business there until his death from apoplexy,, 
which occurred on May 30, 1899 ; but particulars have only re- 
cently been received. 

Most of his leisure time throughout his life he spent in his 
library, which was among the most valuable in the Northwest. 

He married, on February 18, 1869, Mary Norton, daughter of 
Warren Granger, of Buffalo. She survives him, with a son who 
graduated from Yale in 1 893. 

Moses Coit Tyler, son of Captain Elisha and Mary (Greene) 
Tyler, was born on August 2, 1835, in Griswold, Conn., but in 
1837 removed with his parents to Michigan, and in 1843 to 
Detroit. He entered Yale after a few months in the University 
of Michigan. 

After graduation he studied in the Yale Divinity School a year 
and afterward at Andover. He was ordained on August 24, 
1859, at Owego, N. Y., where he remained about a year; and 
was then pastor of the First Congregational Church in Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y. Owing to prolonged ill health he resigned and 
gave up preaching in October, 1862. 

He then spent four years in England, largely in literary pur- 
suits in London, and was a regular correspondent of The Nation 
during that time. In 1867 he was appointed Professor of Rhet- 
oric and English Literature in the University of Michigan, and con- 
tinued there until 1881, occupying the chair of English Language 
and Literature from 1873. In 1 873-74 he was also literary editor 
of the Christian Union. From 1881 to the close of his life he 
was Professor of American History in Cornell University. He 
was ordained Deacon in the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1881, 
in St. Andrew's Church, Ann Arbor, Mich., and Priest in 1883, in 
St. John's Church, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Professor Tyler was widely known by his literary works. Of 
these the principal are : *' History of American Literature during 
the Colonial Time" (1878), "Manual of English Literature'* 
with Henry Morley (1879), "Patrick Henry" in the American 
Statesmen Series (1887), "Three Men of Letters " (1895), "Lit- 
erary History of the American "Revolution" (1897), and 
"Glimpses of England" (1898). He also issued in 1868 a 
volume of essays on physical culture entitled the "Brawnville 
Papers," and contributed important articles to vaiious periodicals. 

He received the degree of M.A. from Yale in 1863, LL.D. 



59 

from the University of Wooster in 1875, and L.H.D. from 
Columbia in 1887. 

Professor Tyler died after an illness of four weeks from 
cystitis, at his home in Ithaca, on December 28, 1900, at the age 
of 65 years. 

He married, on October 29, 1859, Miss Jeannette Hull Gilbert 
of New Haven, who survives him with a son, and a daughter 
who is the wife of Willard Austen, Reference Librarian of Cor- 
nell -University. 

1858 

Edward Milo Mills, son of Harvey Mills, a farmer, and Polly 
Maria (Sherman) Mills, was born in Canton, Conn., June 26, 1834» 

After graduation he taught school two years in Salisbury Mills, 
N. Y., and Cornwall, Conn. In December, 1860, he entered 
the firm of A. S. Mills & Co., manufacturers of cabinet furniture 
in Unionville, a village in the tow^n of Farraington, Conn., and 
from October 1, 1866, continued the business alone. In Novem- 
ber, 1883, he moved to Northampton, Mass., and formed a busi- 
ness connection with S. Bent Bros., manufacturers of furniture, 
of South Gardner, Mass. He was a deacon of the First Congre- 
gational Church, 

He married, in Unionville, Conn., December 25, 1862, Angeline 
Z., daughter of Albert and Angeline Elizabeth (Tiffany) Hill. She 
died in 1868, and on February 5, 1870, he married Alice 
(Chidsey) Woodford, daughter of George and Maria M. (Wood- 
ford) Chidsey, of Nunda, Livingston County, N. Y. 

Mr. Mills died of apoplexy at his home in Northampton, oil 
October, 6, 1900, in his 66th year. His widow, son and two 
daughters by the first marriage, and two daughters by the second 
marriage, survive. Of the latter one daughter graduated at 
Smith College in 1893. 

1861 

William Henry Higbee, son of Dr. Charles and Caroline 
Higbee, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., on November 3, 1839. 
He entered the class at the beginning of Sophomore year from 
Trenton, N. J. 

In the autumn after graduation he began the study of law, but 
in the following January entered the United States Navy as Act- 
ing Assistant Paymaster. He was attached to the U. S. gun- 
boat Octorora, which belonged to the North Atlantic Squadron, 



60 

for about six months, a similar period to the West Gulf Squad- 
ron, and a year to the fleet cruising in the West Indies. During 
these cruises many prizes were captured. He was present at 
Vicksburg, Hampton Roads, and at battles off Grant's Pass, Fort 
Powell, Fort Morgan, and elsewhere. He resigned his commis- 
sion in April, 1864, and was engaged as a broker in New York 
City until the spring of 1866, after which he spent a year at 
Trenton, and a considerable time abroad. Later he was for many 
years a member of the firm of Brown, Seccomb & Co., fruit deal- 
ers, but retired several years ago. 

Mr. Higbee died after an illness of several months of chronic 
nephritis, at his home in New York City, September 21, 1900, in 
his 60th year. He was unmarried. He was a member of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. 

John Ellis Marshall, son of Orsamus Holmes Marshall 
(Union 1831) and Millicent Ann deAngelis, was born on August 
5, 1839, at Buffalo, N. Y. 

Immediately after graduation he entered the U. S. army as Sec- 
ond Lieutenant, Eleventh New York Volunteers (Fire Zouaves), 
and was detailed as Aid-de-camp on the staff of Brigadier General 
W. F. Barry, Chief of Artillery, Army of the Potomac. In this 
position he served through the Peninsular campaign. In the fall 
of 1862 he was promoted to be First Lieutenant, and transferred 
to the Second New York Artillery. In March, 1863, he was 
appointed Assistant Adjutant General of Volunteers, with the 
rank of Captain, and was assigned to duty as Adjutant General 
of the Artillery Bureau in Washington, but at his desire, in 
April, 1864, he was transferred to field service under General 
Sherman, and accompanied him through the Georgia campaign, 
and through the Carolinas. He was twice brevetted for gallant 
and meritorious services, first as Major, and then as Lieutenant. 
Once his horse was shot under him, but he passed through the 
war without receiving a wound. He continued in service a few 
months after the war, but tiring of inaction, offered his resigna- 
tion, which was accepted on November 11, 1865. 

On his return to Buffalo, he studied law for a short time, after 
which he was engaged in the Buffalo Envelope Manufactory. 

Colonel Marshall died in New York City on August 6, 1900, at 
the age of 61 years. 

He married in 1873, at Cincinnati, O., Miss Octavia S. Simpson, 
who died in New York City in March, 1894. 



61 



1862 



William Dexter Anderson, son of William S. Anderson, a 
dry goods merchant of Boston, Mass., was born on August 18, 
1840, at Derry, N. H., but in early life removed with his parents 
to Boston, and from there entered college. His mother was Har- 
riet Newell (Atwood) Anderson, of Bedford, N. H. 

After graduation he studied at the Yale Medical School, and 
received the degree of M.D. in 1865. From July, 1868, he prac- 
ticed as a homeopathic physician. 

For twenty years from the time of his entrance to college he 
was organist of St. Paul's Church, and his superior ability as a 
church musician was widely recognized. In 1878 he withdrew 
from this position in order to give his undivided attention to his 
profession, and, except for eight months while oiRciating in a 
similar capacity at Trinity Church, he thereafter declined musi- 
cal engagements. He was for many years a vestryman of Trinity 
Church. 

From 1876 to 1883 he was a member of the Board of Examin- 
ing Surgeons for Pensions at New Haven, and for five years 
President of the Homeopathic State Medical Society. 

Dr. Anderson was warmly interested in his class, and active in 
preparing for its reunions. In 1897 he had a long and serious 
illness, but resumed his practice and, although by no means well, 
continued his duties until about a week before the close of his 
life. He submitted to an unsuccessful surgical operation for 
intestinal trouble, and died at Grace Hospital on March 8, 1901, 
at the age of 60 years. 

He married on June 8, 1865, Carrie H., daughter of Samuel 
Daniels, of New Haven. She survives him without children. 

William Platt Ketcham, son of Tread well and Mary (Van 
Winkle) Ketcham, was born in New York City, on October 6, 
1841. 

After graduation he studied two years in Columbia Law School, 
received the degree of LL.B. in 1864, and practiced his profession 
for two or three years. From January, 1867, to July, 1874, he 
was in the banking business, but then resumed his law practice. 
For a number of years he resided in Yonkers, and was an alder- 
man of that city from 1880 to 1882. In 1887 he returned to New 
York City to reside. 

Mr. Ketcham died on shipboard near Gibraltar, while on his 



62 

way to Europe, on January 13, 1901, after an illness of two days 
from pneumonia. He was in his 60th year. 

He married on June 8, 1 864, Lydia Coit, daughter of Charles 
and Mary Hall (Terry) Collins, of Hartford, Conn. She survives 
him with a son and two daughters. Mr. Ketcham also left two 
sisters, one of whom, now deceased, was the wife of President 
Gilman of Johns Hopkins University, and the other is the widow 
of the late Professor Daniel C. Eaton of Yale University. 

Thomas Duncan Murphy, son of William and Mary Duncan 
Murphy, was born on September 6, 1838, in Holliday's Cove, Va., 
and entered college in Junior year from Freeport, Pa. 

After graduation he took a course in the Yale Divinity School, 
and was then minister fifteen years in Granby, Conn., where he 
was ordained on June 13, 1868. He was with the old church 
nearly seven years, and with the new church in South Granby 
until 1880. During several years he also conducted a flourishing 
school in Granby. From 1880 to 1883 he preached at Center- 
brook and Ivoryton, two parishes in Essex, Conn. He engaged 
in missionary work in Albuquerque, N. M., in 1883-84, and the 
next five years preached in San Buenaventura, Cal. He taught 
the academy at Santa Paula, Cal., in 1889-90, and at Freeport, 
Pa., from 1891 to 1893. In the latter year he settled in Chester, 
Mass., and died there after a long illness from Bright's disease 
with other complications, on May 18, 1901, at the age of 63 
years. 

He married, on May 24, 1864, Amelia Abigail Castle, of Rox- 
bury, Conn., who survives him with one son. 

Buchanan Winthrop, son of Henry Rogers Winthrop (Yale 
1830) and Margaret L. (Hicks) Winthrop, was born on Novem- 
ber 11, 1841, and resided during his life in New York City. He 
was a great-great-grandson of John Still Winthrop (Yale 1737), 
and a direct descendant of John Winthrop, first Governor of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1629. 

After graduation he took the course in Columbia Law School, 
receiving the degree of LL.B. in 1864. He at once began the 
practice of his profession, giving his attention almost entirely 
to the management of estates. 

In 1871 he founded the Winthrop prizes "for the mOist thor- 
ough knowledge of the Greek and Latin poets." From 1891 he 



63 

was a Fellow of Yale University, and for several years a mem- 
ber of the Prudential Committee. He was one of the founders 
of the University Club of New York, a trustee of the Met- 
ropolitan Museum of Art, a member of the vestry of Grace 
Protestant Episcopal Church, from 1889 Treasurer of the 
General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and an 
active trustee of several hospitals and charitable institutions. 

Mr. Winthrop died suddenly at his home in New York City, 
on December 25, 1900, from the effects of an operation for 
appendicitis. He was 59 years of age. 

He married, on June 4, 1872, Miss Sarah Helen Townsend of 
New York City, who survives him with a daughter and son, the 
latter a graduate of Yale University in 1898. 

1863 

Charles Jesup Akms, son of Rev. Hiram Phelps Arms, D.D. 
(Yale 1824), by his second wife, Abby Jane (Baker) Arms, was 
born on June 9, 1841, in Norwich, Conn. His father was a mem- 
ber of the Corporation of Yale College from 1866 to 1882, and 
pastor of the First Church of Norwich for over thirty-five years. 
He left college at the end of Junior year and at once enlisted in 
the U. S. Army, but received the degree of M.A. and was enrolled 
with his class in 1875. 

In August, 1862, he entered the Twentieth Regiment, Con- 
necticut Volunteers, as Adjutant. In June, 1863, he was trans- 
ferred to the staff of Brigadier General Harland, with the rank of 
Captain, and served with him in Virginia and North Carolina 
until he was mustered out of the service in June, 1865. 

He subsequently studied law in Norwich with Hon. John T. 
Wait (M.A. Yale 1871), and in New York City with Harri- 
son Oakley, Esq., and was admitted to the bar in the latter 
city on April 14, 1866. He practiced for a time in Lewistown, 
Pa., and was then connected with the Pittsburg Commercial for 
three years or more. He was afterward an editorial writer on 
the Philadelphia Times, and the Examiner and Express of 
Lancaster, Pa., for several years. In 1876 he was appointed 
Colonel on the staff of Governor Hartranft. Later he removed 
to Rhode Island, and was at first connected with the Providence 
Journal^ but from about 1885 he resided in East Greenwich, 
where he again took up the practice of law. In 1894 he repre- 
sented that town in the State Senate. He was at one time Superin- 



64 

tendent of the Public Schools, and President of the Free Library 
Association, and for several years a member of the vestry of St. 
Luke's Protestant Episcopal Church. 

Colonel Arms died at the Rhode Island Hospital in Providence, 
on March 9, 1901, in his 60th year. He had been a sufferer from 
a serious stomach trouble for several months. 

He married, on October 17, 1873, Miss Alice Avery, who sur- 
vives him with two sons and two daiighters. 

1865 

Simeon Olmsted Allen, son of Elain and Miranda (Olmsted) 
Allen, was born on December 23, 1837, at Enfield, Conn. 

After graduation he entered the Yale Divinity School, from 
which he received the degree of B.D. in 1868. He was licensed 
to preach by the New Hampshire Central Association in June of 
that year, and then returned to New Haven for a year of addi- 
tional study, after which he was for a time at Olivet College as 
Professor of Mathematics. He supplied Plymouth Congrega- 
tional Church at Lansing, Mich., from 1869 to 1871, and was 
ordained there on December 1, 1869. From Lansing he went to 
Pontiac, Mich., where he remained until 1874. He then returned 
East, and from February, 1875, supplied the Congregational 
Church in Wallingford, Conn.^ and then several churches in and 
near Springfield, Mass. He was for a year or two an editorial 
writer on the Spectator^ a leading insurance journal of New York 
City, and afterwards passed a year in study abroad. On his 
return he was pastor in Blandford, Mass., for four years. Upon 
his retirement in 1889 he removed to West Springfield, Mass., 
afterward occasionally filling local pulpits. He died at his home 
there of diabetes complicated with a carbuncle, on April 22, 1901, 
at the age of 63 years. 

He married, on July 1, 1878, Miss Jessie E. Goodsell, of Eliza- 
beth, N. J., who survives him with a son who is in the Senior 
class at Yale. Their other son died in infancy, and their daugh- 
ter in 1893. 

1866 

William Lester Geiswold, son of Horace S. and Louisa 
(Youmans) Griswold, was born on July 5, 1843, at Binghamton, 
N. Y. 

After graduation he entered the Albany Law School, com- 
pleted his course there in May, 1868, and at once began practice 



65 

at Binghamton, making a specialty of real estate and office prac- 
tice. He was Alderman in 1872, Supervisor of the County, and 
at the last election Republican candidate for Mayor of the city. 

While at work in his law office he had a stroke of apoplexy 
from which he died a few hours later, on February 6, 1901, at the 
age of 57 years. 

He married, on April 23, 1873, Miss Elizabeth J., daughter of 
Tracy G. Rich of Binghamton, and had one daughter who died 
in infancy. 

1867 

Henry Abel Chittenden, son of Henry Abel and Henrietta 
(Gano) Chittenden, was born on April 11, 1846, at Hartford, 
Conn. His father was a New York wholesale dry goods mer- 
chant, philanthropist, and lay preacher, and his mother was the 
daughter of Major Daniel Gano, the first white child born in* 
Cincinnati. His uncle, Simeon B. Chittenden (M.A. Yale 1871) 
was the donor of the Chittenden Library at Yale University. 

Immediately after graduation he took a short trip to Europe, 
and then entered the service of the Brooklyn Z/hion, a newspaper 
established by his uncle as a patriotic enterprise in the last days 
of the War, and when the morning edition was started he became 
its editor. Remaining in that position for two years, he at the 
same time attended the Columbia Law School, and graduated in 
1870. He was admitted to the bar, but never practiced. The 
next year he was connected with the New York Standard, suc- 
cessively as reporter, night editor, and editorial writer. He then 
went for the benefit of his health to visit his classmate, James 
G. Flanders, in Milwaukee, Wise, where he acquired an interest 
in the Journal of Commerce. He was joined in this enterprise 
by his classmate, William Henry Bishop, and his brother, Daniel 
G. Chittenden, and the paper became a political daily under the 
name Commercial Times. After an eventful experience of five 
years he merged the paper with the Milwaukee News, but about 
two years later sold his interest, and retired to his father's farm 
near Montclair, N. J. While in Wisconsin he made a strong 
impression upon the journalism of the State, and editorials of his 
are still quoted with admiration. 

After his year's rest he resumed editorial work, first on the 
New York Evening Telegram for three years, and was then con- 
nected in various capacities with the Herald for about a dozen 
years. While on this paper he won the first prize of $500 offered 



66 

for the most acceptable editorial paragraphs written by Herald 
reporters during six months. 

.In the spring of 1897, owing to the effects of a severe attack of 
pneumonia, Mr. Chittenden sought a more friendly climate and 
removed to Oakland, Cal., and the following September entered 
the service of the San Francisco Examiner^ writing also for other 
papers. He died of tuberculosis on September 9, 1900, at Berke- 
ley, Cal., at the age of 54 years. 

While in New York he was connected with the Business Men's 
Prayer Meeting, and for many years with all the work of the 
John Street Church. 

He married, on June 5, 1888, Mrs. Alice Westervelt Goldsmith, 
a writer of experience, who survives him with one son. 

1868 

Calyin Daniel Stowell, son of John C. and Marietta (Lord) 
Stowell, was born on January 25, 1846, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

Immediately after graduation he returned to Ithaca, and 
engaged with his father as a wholesale dealer in groceries and 
produce, in the firm of J. C. Stowell & Son, and continued the 
business with success. He was a director of the First National 
Bank, member and trustee of the Presbyterian Church, and 
trustee of several philanthropic institutions. 

He died of angina pectoris at his home in Ithaca on February 
26, 1901, at the age of 65 years. 

He married at Ithaca, December 18, 1873, Amelia W. Esty 
(Vassar 1871), daughter of Edward S. Esty. She survives, with 
a daughter (Vassar 1899), and two sous. The elder son is in the 
class of 1901 at Hamilton College. 

James Henry Wood, son of Charles Wood, a manufacturer 
of silverware, and Elizabeth (Morris) Wood, was born on Novem- 
ber 21, 1848, in New York City. 

After graduation he took the Columbia Law School course, 
received the degree of LL.B. in 1870, and at once began practice 
in New York City. In February, 1873, he formed a partnership 
with Walter S. Carter and Orrin Skinner, which continued with 
some changes for two years. After that he practiced alone for 
several years, and was for a time employed by the Hubbell Legal 
Directory Company, and later by the Westinghouse Electric 
Company. Little is known of his last years. 



67 

He died of consumption at St. Francis Hospital, New York 
City, on March 23, 1901, at the age of 52 years. 

He married, on April 26, 1877, Augusta E., daughter of Ex- 
Justice William Dodge, of New York City. Their two sons and 
one daughter survive. 

1869 

William Amasa Copp, son of Andrew James and Harriet A. 
(Eddy) Copp, was born in Oxford, Mass., on November 23, 1843. 
He was fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, and 
entered college from New England Village, in the town of Graf- 
ton, Mass., to which his parents had moved in 1851. 

While in college he twice won a prize in debate. He rowed on 
the university crews at Worcester four j^ears, and was stroke in 
1867, and captain in 1868. He was also an expert gymnast. 

After graduation he studied in Columbia Law School a year, 
and was admitted to the bar in March, 1870. He was about 
a year in the offices of Slosson, Hutchins & Piatt, and of Taylor 
& Andrews, but from the summer of 1871 practiced by himself in 
New York City. He was for a time Treasurer of the Yale 
Alumni Association of New York City. 

He died at his home in New York City on April 13, 1901, at 
the age of 57 years. 

He married in New, Haven, on July 25, 1871, Emily M., daughter 
of Caleb Smith and Mary (Foster) Maltby. A son and daughter, 
with their mother, survive. The son graduated at Yale in 1895, 
served as Second Lieutenant in the Spanish war in 1898, and 
afterward went to Manila. 

Heney James Dutton, son of Henry Augustus and Helen 
Frances (Hodges) Dutton, was born in Ellsworth, Me., on Decem- 
ber 6, 1845. 

After graduation he went to Austin, Texas, and was Assistant 
Sergeant-at-Arms, and afterward Assistant to the Adjutant Gen- 
eral of the State. He then for a time practiced law, in the firm 
of Higbee and Dutton, but soon took up mercantile pursuits, and 
later engaged in the stock and cattle business in the northern 
part of the State. 

About 1881 he removed to San Luis Obispo, Cal., where he 
continued to raise cattle and horses, and was also engaged in fruit 
growing, the manufacture of pressed brick, and other occupations. 
The last six years he was in the grocery business. 



68 

He died of pneumonia at his home in San Luis Obispo, February 
15, 1901, in his 56th year. 

He married, on September 20, 1878, Mary Melissa, daughter of 
Henry Hathaway, who survives him, without children. He was 
an elder and efficient worker in the First Presbyterian Church. 

Heney Hamilton Kerr, son of Rev. George Kerr (Williams 
1839) and Lucia M. (Hamilton) Kerr, was born on August 6, 
1846, at Schoharie Court House, Schoharie County, N. Y., but 
was prepared for college at Cooperstown, N. Y., by his father, 
who was then teaching in the Seminary in that place. He 
entered the class in Sophomore year. 

After graduation he had a brief experience in farming, and 
then taught in Mongaup Valley, and a year in New York City. 
During much of his subsequent life he was connected with the 
construction department of various railroads. He was Division 
Engineer on the St. Louis & Keokuk R R., and after a year in 
Hannibal, Mo., and a few months of lumbering in Wisconsin, he 
was for two years and a half in Beulah, Clayton County, la., as 
Superintendent of the narrow-gauge Iowa Eastern R. R. About 
May 1, ISVV, he took a position in the Railroad Division of the 
General Land Office at Washington, D. C. As the result of a 
competitive examination he was appointed Third Assistant Exam- 
iner in the TJ. S. Patent Office in February, 1878, and a year 
later Second Assistant Examiner. In March, 1880, he left the 
Patent Office, and traveled through the South in the interest of 
the Morse Cotton Compress. For two seasons he was Superin- 
tendent of the Brenham (Texas) Compress, and from June, 1882, 
Secretary and Manager of the Fort Worth Compress Co. During 
part of 1881 and 1882 he was Assistant Engineer on the Fort 
Worth & Denver City R. R. In the summer of 1886 he was 
Bridge Engineer of the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe R. R., having 
charge of the construction of the bridge over Trinity River, and 
in 1887 he was occupied in locating the Fort Worth and Denver 
City R. R., near Fort Worth. In May, 1890, he was appointed 
Engineer in charge of sewer construction in Fort Worth, and the 
next month City Engineer. To the latter office he was elected 
for two years in April, 1891. 

In 1893 he was appointed Receiver of the First National Bank 
of Brady, Tex., and closed its affairs with so much success that 
he was appointed, at the close of 1894, Receiver of the City 



69 

National Bank of Quanah, Tex. The latter receivership proved 
a perplexing undertaking as the bank was fraudulent in its 
origin, and was a main cause of his loss of health. 

From about this time he was a sufferer from locomotor ataxia. 
In January, 1897, he removed to Denver, Col., where he died 
on May 28, 1901, in his 55th year. From 1883 he was a Ruling 
Elder in the Presbyterian Church South, and frequently attended 
the Synod of Texas. He was an associate member of the Ameri- 
can Society of Civil Engineers. 

He married, near Croton, Delaware County, N. Y., on February 
18, 1889, Mary E. Payne, and had a son and a daughter. 

Adrian VanSinderen Lindsley, son of Adrian VanSinderen 
and Eliza M. (Trimble) Lindsley, was born in Nashville, Tenn., 
October 11, 1847. He joined the class during the first term of 
Sophomore year, after one term at Princeton College. 

After graduation he returned to Nashville, and entered the 
firm of A. y. S. Lindsley & Son, real estate, insurance and 
general agents. A few years later he was associated with James 
Trimble (Yale 1868), as an attorney and real estate agent, after 
which he continued in the same line of business by himself, and 
was then in partnership with his brother John. He wrote much 
for Southern newspapers in the interest of municipal improve- 
ment and other subjects. 

He died after an illness of four months at his home in Nash- 
ville, on December 28, 1900, at the age of 53 years. 

He married, on October 23, 1873, near Tuscumbia, Ala., Miss 
Rebecca Goodloe, who survives, with their two sons and four 
daughters. One son graduated at Yale in the class of 1897. 

1870 

Benjamin Silliman, only son and fourth of the seven children 
of Prof. Benjamin Silliman (Yale 1837) and Susan H. (Forbes) 
Silliman, was born on October 27, 1849, at Louisville, Ky., where 
his father was at the time Professor in the Medical Department 
of Louisville University. In 1854 he came to New Haven, where 
his father had been appointed Professor of Chemistry in Yale 
College and Medical School, and was fitted for college in the 
Hopkins Grammar School. 

After graduation he studied architecture at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology in Boston, and about two years and a 



YO 

half in Berlin, Germany. In the fall of 1873 he was apprenticed 
for a year with the firm of Vaux & Withers, and afterwards con- 
tinued in their employ for several years, taking charge, among 
other things, of their work on the capitol grounds in Washington, 
D. C, and of the Centennial buildings in Philadelphia. 

In 1877 he began the practice of his profession under the firm 
name of Silliman & Farnsworth, and from 1883 was in business 
alone. He was for some years a member of the Architectural 
Leasrue, and the American Institute of Architects. He was the 
architect of the Morse, Temple Court and other notable buildings 
in New York City and elsewhere. 

Mr. Silliman died at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York 
City, after an illness of about four months, from the effects of an 
operation, on February 4, 1901, at the age of 51 years. 

He married, on September 11, 1878, Miss Frances Elizabeth 
Wild, of Rheinbeck, N. Y., who survives him with two sons. 

1871 

Nathan Hart Whittlesey, son of Sheldon and Esther Maria 
(Hart) Whittlesey, was born on April 19, 1848, at New Pres- 
ton, in the town of Washington, Litchfield County, Conn. 

At graduation he ranked sixth in the class. He was chosen 
by his classmates class deacon and class historian. 

The year following his college course he was a teacher in 
Betts Academy, Stamford, Conn., and then entered the Yale 
Divinity School. He received the degree of B.D. in 1875, and 
on October 1, following, was ordained at Creston, la., remaining 
as pastor of the First Congregational Church there twelve years. 
Besides building up the church in numbers and spirituality, he 
formed a class of young men for classical study in preparation 
for college, was moderator of the General Association of Iowa 
in 1886, a delegate to the National Congregational Council the 
same year, and active in securing the enactment and enforcement 
of the State prohibition law. 

In May, 1887, he was settled over the Congregational Church 
in Evanston, 111. In all his ministry he aimed directly at con- 
version and character-building, and under him the church iti 
Evanston was greatly strengthened in numbers and in good 
works. He was also helpful in revival work elsewhere. He was 
a director of the Illinois Home Missionary Society, President of 
the Chicago Congregational Club in 1891-92, and again a dele- 



gate to the National Council. Although notably successful, five 
years of such strenuous labor seriously impaired his health, and 
he felt obliged to resign his pastorate. After several months of 
travel ahd rest abroad, in October, 1 892, he assumed the office of 
Secretary of the Ministerial Relief Fund of the National Council. 
The interest which he had aroused in his own and neighboring 
churches had already shown his fitness for this work. For seven 
years he preached and worked without interruption or vacation 
in behalf of the aged ministers, widows and orphans of the 
Congregational churches, and raised over $120,000 as a perma- 
nent fund for the relief of the needy among them. But so great 
did he feel this need to be, that he did not spare himself, often 
when on long journeys denying himself the ordinary comforts 
of travel that the fund for the comfort of others might be 
larger. In October, 1899, his strength suddenly failed, and he 
suffered nearly a year and a half from nervous prostration. 
While stopping in Washington, D. C, with his eldest son and 
daughter, on his return from a stay in the South, and apparently 
on the way to recovery, he was suddenly stricken down with 
Bright's disease, and died a few hours later, on February 20, 
1901, at the age of 52 years. All who knew him well will remem- 
ber the charm of his humor and the healthful influence of a 
religious life which was always bright. Illinois College con- 
ferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1890. 

He married, on June 29, 1876, Miss Harriet Warner Newell of 
New Haven, who survives him with one daughter and three sons, 
of whom the eldest son graduated at Yale in 1900, and is secre- 
tary of his class. 

1873 

Frederick William Adee, son of George Townsend Adee, 
of Westchester, N. Y., a well known merchant, afterward Vice 
President of the Bank of Commerce in New York City, was 
born in Westchester, N. Y., on April 19, 1853. His mother was 
Ellen Louise (Henry) Adee. He was fitted for college at the 
Preparatory School of Brainerd T. Harrington, Westchester, 
N. Y. During his college course he was a member of the Junior 
Promenade Committee, stroke of the Freshman crew and bow of 
the University crew, and at graduation held a First Colloquy 
appointment. 

After graduation he took the Columbia Law School course, 
received the degree of LL.B., and was admitted to practice in 



72 

1875. After having been connected with the firm of Lord, Day 
& Lord, as managing clerk, he practiced law alone with marked 
success for fifteen years. 

He died of heart failure induced by gastritis, after a short 
illness, at Edgewater, his home in Westchester, on August 25, 
1900, at the age of 47 years. He was unmarried. He was a 
member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He was a brother 
of George A. Adee, Philip H. Adee, Edwin M. Adee, Ernest R. 
Adee, graduates of the classes of 1867, 1873, 1881 and 1885, re- 
spectively, and a nephew of Augustus A. Adee, M.D., a graduate 
of the class of 1821, Fleet Surgeon in the United States Navy. 

Alfred Terry Bacon, son of Rev. Leonard Bacon, D.D. 
(Yale 1820) and Catherine Elizabeth (Terry) Bacon, was born on 
September 17, 1852, in New Haven, Conn. 

After graduation he spent a year as private tutor in Philadel- 
phia, and then began the study of medicine, but was obliged to 
give it up on account of ill health. In February, 1875, he made 
a voyage to the West Lidies, remaining three or four months, 
and in October of the same year sailed for Europe. In October, 
1878, as his health was not reestablished, he went to Greeley, Col., 
and spent the winter on a ranch, the summer camping out 
in the Rocky Mountains, and most of the next year in partner- 
ship with two practical cattle men on a ranch near Laramie Peak, 
Wyoming. In the autumn of 1881 he took charge of the pre- 
paratory department of Colorado College, and taught there for a 
year. The following June he returned to Greeley as Secretarj^ 
and Treasurer of the New England Live Stock Company, of 
which he had been one of the organizers, but soon turned his 
attention chiefly to dealing in Western investment securities. In 
April, 1889, he was elected Mayor of Greeley. In the spring of 
1892 he removed to Denver, which was afterward his home. He 
was an officer of Plymouth Congregational Church. 

On his return from Europe he contributed three papers descrip- 
tive of Sicily to LippincoW s Magazine^ and frequently wrote for 
the Christian Union, New York Evening Post^ Independent, 
and other leading periodicals. 

While on a bicycle ride in City Park, he was taken ill, and 
died a few hours later at his home in Denver, June 4, 1901, in 
his 49th year. 

He married, on June 17, 1885, Mary Prichard, daughter of 
the late President Woolsey. She survives him with two sons 
and a daughter. 



George Theodore Bliss, son of George and Catherine (San- 
ford) Bliss, was born April 19, 1851, in Manchester, England. 
He was fitted for college in the Hopkins Grammar School in New 
Haven. 

For three or four years after graduation he was connected with 
the London branch of his father's banking house, known as Mor- 
ton, Rose & Co. In 1877 he returned to America and emtered 
the firm of Morton, Bliss & Co., of which he was a member until 
its dissolution and the organization of the Morton Trust Co. 

He died at his home in New York City on March 24, 1901, in 
his 50th year. He had undergone an operation for appendicitis, 
but had been so weakened by a recent attack of the grippe that 
he did not rally from the operation. 

He married, on February 12, 1879, Miss Jeannette Atwater 
Dwight of New York City, who survives him with one daughter. 
By his last will he left a generous bequest to the University. 

William Webb Browning, son of Rev. William G. Brown- 
ing, a Methodist clergyman, and Susan Rebecca (Webb) Brown- 
ing, was born on March 1852, in Metuchen, Woodbridge town- 
ship, N. J. He prepared for college at Amenia (N. Y.) Seminary. 

In the autumn after graduation he entered Columbia Law 
School, and after receiving his degree in 1875 he practiced law 
in New York City until 1884, in partnership with A. C. Farnam. 
In the meantime he had began the study of medicine, and in 

1884 received the degree of M.D. from Bellevue Medical College, 
and thereafter was a practicing physician in Brooklyn. He was 
Demonstrator of Anatomy in Long Island College Hospital from 

1885 to 1894 ; Lecturer on Anatomy from 1886 to 1894 ; Adjunct 
Professor of Anatomy 1894-95 ; and afterward until his death 
Professor of Anatomy and of Clinical Orthopaedics. In 1893 he 
published " Modern Homoepathy ; its Absurdities and Inconsist- 
encies," and during the past few years a number of articles of 
his on Anatomy have appeared in the leading medical journals. 
He was a member of the American Academy of Medicine. In 
1895 he received from Yale University the honorary degree of 
Master of Arts. 

He married, on September 3, 1873, at New Haven, Conn., 
Sarah Wells Smith, daughter of Nathaniel S. Smith, and had four 
daughters and two sons. The eldest daughter is the wife of Rich- 
mond C. Holcomb, M.D., of the*U. S. Navy, the elder son is a 



74 

West Point graduate of the class of 1901, and the second 
daughter is a graduate of Cornell University in the class of 1899. 
Dr. Browning died of apoplexy at his home in Brooklyn, on 
October 3, 1900, at the age of 48 years. He was a brother of 
Professor Philip E. Browning of Yale University. 

1874 

Joseph Unangst Bkown, son of William Daniel Brown, a 
lumber merchant, and Susan Margaret (Unangst) Brown, was 
born on July 18, 1851, at Easton, Pa. He was prepared for col- 
lege at Claverack, N. Y., and joined the class at the beginning 
of its Junior year from the preceding class. 

After graduation he studied law at Easton, was admitted to 
the bar of Northampton County, Pa., in the winter of 18V6, and 
practiced his profession there until the fall of 1887, when he 
engaged in the lumber business at Mehoopany, Pa. There he 
met reverses, but engaged in the same business in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., until the summer of 1 895. He was then admitted to the bar 
of Lackawanna County, Pa., and practiced in Scranton until his 
death, which occurred on May 30, 1899, at the age of 47 years. 
He was unmarried. 

1876 

Philip Gray Russell, eighth of the ten children and fourth 
son of Gen. William Huntington Russell (Yale 1833) and Mary 
Elizabeth (Hubbard) Russell, was born on February .14, 1854, at 
New Haven, Conn. He was a descendant in the sixth genera- 
tion of Rev. Noadiah Russel of Middletown, one of the founders 
of Yale College, and of Rev. James Pierpont, also one of the 
founders of Yale College, whose daughter Mary married Rev. 
William Russell (the son of Noadi-ah) (Yale 1709), Fellow of the 
Yale Corporation from 1745 to 1761 and forty-six years pastor of 
the First Church in Middletown. All of his male ancestors have 
been graduates of Yale since the foundation of the college. His 
mother was the daughter of Dr. Thomas Hubbard, Professor of 
Surgery in the Yale Medical School. 

After graduation he entered the Yale Law School and received 
the degree of LL.B. in 1878, meantime teaching in the Collegiate 
and Commercial Institute founded and conducted by his father, 
where he had been himself prepared for college. 

In September, 1878, he went .to Washington, D. C, where he 
afterward resided and practiced his profession. For over three 



75 

years and until January, 1882, he was Examiner in the U. S, 
Patent Office. He then formed a partnership with George S> 
Prindle for the practice of patent law, under the name of Prindle 
& Russell, which continued during his life. He was prosperous 
in his profession, traveled extensively, and was much interested 
in scientific subjects outside of his professional work. 

Mr. Russell died at his home in Washington, D. C, on July 
21, 1900, from acute nephritis, his vigorous health having been 
previously impaired by appendicitis, requiring a severe operation. 

He married, on December 17, 1884, Lilean, daughter of John 
E. and Ellen T. Kendall of Washington. She died in 1886, 
leaving no children. 

James Adams Wells, son of Ralph and Sarah F. (Adams) 
Wells, was born on January 17, 1856, in New York City. 

After his graduation he took the course in the College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, receiving the degree of M.D. in 1879. 
Then for about two years he was Resident Physician in the 
Presbyterian Hospital, and in 1881-82 Attending Physician at 
the Northern Dispensary in New York. In September, 1882, he 
removed to Englewood, N. J., where he afterward practiced his 
profession. He was Attending Physician and Surgeon at the 
Englewood Hospital, and President of the Bergen County Med- 
ical Society. He wrote a number of articles on medical topics, 
some of which were republished in Europe. 

He died dt his home in Englewood, after an illness of a week 
from pneumonia, on May 21, 1901, at the age of 45 years. 

He married, on June 1, 1882, Janet Taylor, daughter of Rev. 
Thomas G. Wall, D.D. (Princeton 1848), at that time Superin- 
tendent of the Presbyterian Hospital in New York. She is liv- 
ing, but without children. A daughter died in infancy. 

1878 

JoHN^ Addison Porter, son of Professor John Addison Porter 
(Yale 1842) and Josephine Earl (Sheffield) Porter, daughter of 
the founder of the Sheffield Scientific School, was born on April 
17, 1856, at New Haven, Conn. He was fitted for college at the 
Hopkins Grammar School. 

The year after graduation he studied law with his uncle, 
William J. Boardman, in Cleveland, O., but not with the inten- 
tion of practicing that profession. On his return to Connecticut 



76 

be was a reporter on the New Haven Daily Palladium^ and for 
a brief time on tbe Hartford Gourant. After an extended tour 
in the West in 1880, he pursued a course of post-graduate study 
in American history in Yale University. For a year in 1882-83 
he was literary editor of tbe New York Observer, and contributed 
also to the Critic, New Englander and Century Magazine, He 
then continued literary work in Washington, D. C, and while a 
resident there served as Secretary to his uncle, William Walter 
Phelps (Yale 1860), at that time a member of the National House 
of Representatives, and was afterward clerk of the special Senate 
Committee on Indian affairs. He also organized and conducted 
the Oregon Publishing Company in 1886. In 1887 a severe 
illness compelled him to spend the winter in the South, and on 
his return in renewed health he purchased an estate in Pomfret, 
Conn., which was afterward his permanent home. In the autumn 
of 1888 he bought an interest in the Hartford Enening Post, and 
the following year became its main proprietor and editor-in-chief, 
and retained his control until he sold the paper in 1899. 

He was elected to the Connecticut Legislature as a Representa- 
tive from Pomfret in 1891, was a delegate to the Republican 
National Convention at Minneapolis in 1892, and was a prominent 
candidate for Governor in the Republican conventions of Con- 
necticut in 1894, 1896 and 1898. Having been appointed by Mr. 
McKinley Secretary to the President of the United States in 
February, 1897, on March 4 he assumed that office and applied 
himself closely to its duties, which proved very exacting, espe- 
cially during the Spanish war. His health was seriously impaired 
in the spring of 1899, but he continued to act as Secretary for a 
year longer. As it had become certain that he could not continue 
his duties, the President reluctantly accepted his resignation on 
May 1, 1900. Although he suffered much he bravely fought his 
malady, a malignant, intestinal disease, until his death, which 
came suddenly at his home in Pomfret, on December 15, 1900. 
He was 44 years of age. The funeral service and burial were in 
New Haven. 

He married, on December 28, 1882, Amy Ellen, daughter of 
George F. Betts (Williams 1844), and sister of Samuel Rossiter 
Betts (Yale 1875), and had two daughters and a son. One 
daughter died in early childhood. Mrs. Porter, in memory of 
her husband, has founded in Yale University the John Addison 
Porter Prize in American History. 



77 

Besides contributions to periodical literature, Mr. Porter edited 
in 1 885 " Sketches of Yale Life," prepared for the Johns Hopkins 
Historical Studies of 1885 a monograph on "The City of Wash- 
ington ; its Origin and Development," and wrote a pamphlet on 
"The Corporation of Yale College." 

He was deeply interested in all that concerned the University 
and unselfishly devoted to whatever he thought was for the 
highest good of Yale. 

1879 

John Lester Franklin, son of William and Clarissa B. (Sea- 
grave) Franklin, was born on March 19, 1856, in New Haven, 
Conn. He was well started in business with his father, who was 
a well-known merchant tailor in Kew Haven, when he felt it his 
duty to prepare for the ministry. He was fitted for college under 
a private tutor and in the Hopkins Grammar School in New 
Haven. 

After graduation he entered the Yale Divinity School, from 
which he received the degree of B.D. in 1882. He was ordained 
on September 12 of that year, at Lysander, N.*Y. After a pastor- 
ate of five years there, he was called in 1888 to Pilgrim Congre- 
gational Church, Buifalo, N. Y., and labored effectively in secur- 
ing its attractive house of worship. For over two years from 
1894 he was in Europe and the East for travel and study. Soon 
after his return he resigned his pastorate and went abroad for 
further study. In October, 1898, he took charge of Plymouth 
Chapel, a flourishing mission of the First Congregational Church 
of Buffalo, and served there faithfully until his death, from pneu- 
monia, on January 3, 1901, in his 45th year. 

He married, on June 9, 1896, Anna Cornelia, daughter of Nelson 
M. Clute, of Buffalo. She survives him with a son about three 
years of age. 

1881 

Arthur Eli White, son of John J. and Louisa Lawrence 
(Wetmore) White, was born on November 1, 1858, in New York 
City. He was prepared for college privately, and before enter- 
ing lived in various places in Europe. 

After graduation he traveled extensively abroad, but in March, 
1885, engaged in the banking business, and entered the firm of 
A. W. Durkee & Co. Later he was a partner in the firm of 
White & Hartshorne until the end of his life. From January, 



1 883, he was a member of Company K of the Seventh Regiment, 
in which he rose to be First Lieutenant. 

He died at his home in New York, on February 21, 1901, at 
the age of 42 years. He was unmarried. 

1882 

Fred John Brockway, only son of John G. and Amanda 
(Carroll) Brockway, was born in South Sutton, N. H., on Febru- 
ary 24, 1860. He entered college from Tilton (N. H.) Seminary. 

After graduation he taught two years in Stamford, Conn., and 
then entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New 
York, from which he received the degree of M.D. in 1887. For 
the two years following he was in the surgical department of 
Roosevelt Hospital, and then became the first resident surgeon 
at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Md. In the fall of 1890 
he returned to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New 
York as Lecturer and Demonstrator of Anatomy, and was later 
Secretary of the Faculty. He was a member of the American 
Museum of Natural, History, the American Association of Anat- 
omists, and many medical and other societies. 

He was the author of " Chemistry and Physics," and a '' Com- 
pend of Anatomy," and wrote in addition a number of valuable 
monographs on anatomical subjects. 

His death occurred at Brattleboro, Vt., on April 21, 1901, after 
an illness of several months which was largely the result of 
ceaseless devotion to his profession. His age was 41 years. He 
was a member of the Methodist Church. 

He married, in 1891, Marion L., daughter of A. M. Turner, 
cashier of the Union Mining Co., of Mount Savage, Md. Mrs. 
Brockway survives him with two children. 

1884 

Charles Edwin Bedell, son of Edwin F. and Caroline L. 
Bedell, was born at Brooklyn, N. Y., on May 19, 1863. In 1872 
he removed with his parents to Montclair, N. J., where he was 
prepared for college at the public schools. 

After graduating with high honor, he spent the summer in the 
Adirondacks and several months on cattle ranches in Indian Ter- 
ritory and Nebraska. In January, 1885, he entered the works of 
the New Jersey Steel and Iron Company, then controlled by the 
firm of Cooper, Hewitt & Co., of which his father was a mem- 



79 

ber, where he showed marked ability. He soon won recognition 
and was advanced to a responsible position as engineer. Daring 
the years of his service he superintended the erection of sections 
of the Brooklyn Elevated Railroad, the Park Avenue Viaduct, 
as well as many bridges, buildings, and other structures. Owing 
to the confidence felt in him alike by employees and employers, he 
was able in more than one instance to adjust difficulties and pre- 
vent, strikes. He was greatly interested in the welfare of his 
workmen, and took special precautions against accidents to them. 

At the time of his death he was the engineer in charge of the 
erection of the Brooklyn towers and land-span of the new East 
River Bridge. On September 28, 1900, he fell from a height of 
ninety feet in that structure, receiving injuries from which he 
died at the hospital shortly after. He was 37 years of age. 

He married, on July 11, 1894, Miss Elizabeth Trippett, who 
survives him with two young sons. A brother graduated at Yale 
in 1890. 

1885 

Edwin Fbanklin Norton, son of Llewellyn P. and Kath- 
erine (Goff) Norton, was born on February 15, 1861, at Scott, 
Cortland Count j^, N. Y., and was fitted for college at Homer 
Academy, Homer, N. Y. He joined the class in Sophomore 
year, after one year in Williams College. 

The year after graduation he taught at Freehold (N. J.) Insti- 
tute, and the two years following was principal of Morrisville 
(N. Y.) Union School. In 1888 he was appointed Professor of 
Modern Languages and Literatures in Olivet College, Olivet, 
Mich., and continued there with success until 1894. Meantime 
he had preached frequently, and had made special studies in 
philosophy, theology, and other subjects. He was ordained as a 
Congregational minister on July 24, 1894. During the next year 
he took a special course in Yale Divinity School. From 1895 to 
1897 he was pastor of the Congregational Church at Almont, 
Mich. He then returned to teaching, and the next two years 
was in Middleburg, Scoharie County, N. Y., becoming then Prin- 
cipal of Haverling High School, in Bath, Steuben County, N. Y. 
He received the degree of M.A. from Syracuse University in 
1888, and Ph.D. from Wooster University, Ohio, in 1894. 

He died of paralysis at his home in Bath, N. Y., on September 
23, 1900, in his 40th year. 



80 

He married, on December 22, 1885, Anna Marie Winne, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Josephine Coburn, of Whitewater, Wise, who sur- 
vives him with a daughter about ten years of age. 

1886 

Percy Edgar, son of Jonathan and Adriana A. Edgar, was 
born in New York City on March 10, 1865, and was prepared for 
college at the Siglar School, Newburgh, N. Y. 

Since his graduation he had been engaged in the fire insurance 
and real estate business in Newark, N. J., in the firm of Edgar & 
O'Gorman. He was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in 
Newark. 

He died at Battle, Carbon County, Wy., while visiting his 
brother, on November 1, 1900, in his 36th year. He was unmar- 
ried. 

1887 

John Bassett Keep, eldest of the four children of John Lester 
and Sarah Coit (Avery) Keep, was born on October 20, 1866, in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and was fitted for college at Adelphi Academy. 

After graduation he studied medicine for three years, but 
afterward devoted himself to commercial life. 

He died of pneumonia at his home in Brooklyn, on April 9, 
1901, in his 35th year. He was unmarried. 

George Francis Nesbitt, son of Abram Nesbitt, a banker, 
and Sara M. (Goodwin) Nesbitt, was born on January 24, 1865, 
at Kingston, Luzerne County, Pa., and fitted for college at 
Wyoming Seminary. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of E. P. & J. Y. 
Darling, in Wilkes-Barre, was admitted to the bar of Luzerne 
County in June, 1890, and practiced in Wilkes-Barre, residing in 
Kingston. 

In 1894, with a few friends, he presented an athletic field 'to 
Wyoming Seminary, and also established two annual prizes for 
the best original orations. 

While on a hunting trip he accidentally shot and instantly killed 
himself, on November 27, 1900, about three miles from the village 
of Mebane, N. C. He was 35 years of age. He was unmarried. 



81 

Frederick Roger Whittlesey, youngest of the six children 
of Francis Dwight Whittlesey, Town Clerk and Judge of Pro- 
bate of Southington, Conn., and grandson of Roger Whittlesey 
(Yale 178V), was born in Southington, on July 11, 1865. His 
mother was Laura (Barnes) Whittlesey, daughter of Julius S. and 
Laura (Lewis) Barnes. He was prepared for college at the 
Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven. 

The year following graduation he was Principal of the High 
School in his native town, but in December, 1888, he entered the 
employ of Bennett, Sloan & Co., importers and jobbers of teas, 
etc., with whom he continued, being for several years before his 
death manager of their tea department. 

He married at Bay Ridge, N. Y., on June iVth, 1890, Mary 
Bliss, daughter of George V. Kelly, formerly of Brooklyn. 

Mr. Whittlesey died of typhoid fever in Brooklyn, N. Y., on 
July 19, 1900, at the age of 35 years. His widow, two daughters 
and a son survive. 

1888 

Arthur White, son of Hon. Stephen Van Cullen White (Knox 
1 854) and Eliza M. (Chandler) White, was born on August 2, 
1865, in Brooklyn, N. Y., and was prepared for college at Brook- 
lyn Polytechnic Institute. 

After graduation he was associated with his father, the well- 
known Wall street broker, and gave his especial attention to the 
Chicago interests 'of the business. For ten years he had a seat 
in the New York Stock Exchange. In the autumn of 1900 he 
went West and spent several months on the Pacific coast, intend- 
ing to make a journey around the world. While on his way 
from Sydney, New South Wales, to Honolulu, and about three 
days' voyage from the latter, he died on April 19, 1901, at the 
age of 35 years. 

He married in 1888, at Orange, N. J., Miss Margaret Beecher, 
sister of his classmate, Harry Beecher, and daughter of Harry 
Barton Beecher, formerly an insurance broker in Yonkers, N. Y. 
His widow, a son and daughter survive. A daughter eleven 
years of age died last year. 

1891 

Elijah George Boardman, son of William J. and Florence 
(Sheffield) Boardman, was born on April 29, 1868, in Cleveland, 
O. He was a grandson of Joseph Earl Sheffield, founder of the 



82 

Sheifield Scientific School, and a nephew of Professor John A. 
Porter (Yale 1842). He was prepared for college at St. Paul's 
School, Concord, N. H. 

After graduation he studied two years in the Harvard Law 
School, and began practice in New York City as a member of the 
firm of Boardman & Childs. In the spring of 1 894 he returned 
to Cambridge for the examination, and received the degree of 
LL.B. After about two years of practice he dissolved partner- 
ship, and continued alone. 

He endured with cheerfulness physical infirmity, and while on 
a visit in Cleveland, O., died of heart failure, on July 21, 1900, 
at the age of 32 years. His gentleness of manner and unfailing 
courtesy impressed all whom he met. He was a member of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. 

1892 

Edwaed Buffett Mowbray, son of Jarvis Rogers Mowbray, 
M.D., and Ellen (Smith) Mowbray, was born on July 1, 1871, at 
Bay Shore, Long Island, N. Y., and was prepared for college 
at the Union High School in Huntington, L. I. 

After graduation he took the course at the New York Law 
School, receiving his degree cmn laude in 1894. He was 
admitted to the bar in May of the same year, and practiced in 
the office of Strong, Harrison & Mathewson, New York, until 
June 1, 1898, after which he divided his practice between Bay 
Shore and New York, with large promise of future success. 

He died at the Hotel Majestic, New York, after an illness of 
seven weeks from typhoid fever, on December 9, 1900, at the age 
of 29 years. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
Islip, L. I. 

He married, on April 28, 1900, Miss Louise Lovell Tilton, of 
Laconia, N. H., who, with an infant daughter, survives him. 

Horace Tracy Pitkin, son of Horace Woodbridge and Lucy 
Tracy (Yale) Pitkin, was born on October 28, 1869, at Philadel- 
phia, Pa. He was a nephew of Rev. Charles S. Sherman (Yale 
1835), missionary in Jerusalem, and his maternal grandfather was 
Rev. Cyrus Yale, D.D. (Williams 1811), who was for nearly forty 
years pastor in New Hartford, Conn. He was prepared for col- 
lege at Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H. 



83 

On coming to Yale he was President of the Freshman Debat- 
ing Society, and active in all college life. He organized a Boys' 
Club in the lower part of the city, which successive Freshman 
classes have since maintained, worked in the Grand Avenue Mis- 
sion, and started a foreign missionary band whose membership 
soon grew to twenty men. While attending a conference of 
students at Northfield, Mass., he formed the purpose of devoting 
his life to the cause of missions. 

After graduation he took the course in Union Theological 
Seminary, at the same time doing mission work, and planning 
various means for the relief of the poor. During 1894-95 he 
was Traveling Secretary of the Student Volunteer Movement for 
Foreign Missions, and rendered most effective service. While 
attending a convention of this body in Cleveland he impressed 
the members of the Pilgrim Congregational Church of that city 
so favorably, that they adopted him as their special representative 
in the missionary field. 

He married, on October 6, 1896, Miss Letitia E. Thomas, of 
Troj% O. ; on October 9, was ordained as a minister in Cleveland, 
O. ; and on November 11, sailed with his bride for China, under 
the auspices of the American Board. On the journey he visited 
many places of interest from a missionary standpoint, and reach- 
ing Tientsin on May 1, 1897, proceeded at once to Pao-ting-fu, a 
small town about one hundred miles southwest of Peking, and a 
station of the North China Mission. A large part of his life 
there was occupied in acquiring the language, but he, at length, 
had the satisfaction of preaching to the people in their native 
tongue. For the last year he had charge of the boys' boarding 
school. 

In the spring of 1900 came the terrible uprising of the natives 
against the missionaries and other foreigners as the enemies of 
China, led by the society of Boxers. After weeks of suffering 
and suspense, Pao-ting-fu was attacked, and on the morning of 
July 1, 1900, the mob, after spending some hours in pillaging the 
China Inland Mission, surrounded the premises of the American 
Board station. Mr. Pitkin attempted to save the lives of the 
women, and kept effective guard with his revolver at his house, 
which was nearest the gate. Finally, in driving away a boy who 
had shot at him from close by, he exposed himself, and immediately 
became the target for many guns, and fell mortally wounded. 
He is said to have died almost instantlv. The mob then rushed 



84 

in and beheaded him, but his body was recovered and afterward 
the head. Impressive memorial services in honor of him and of 
the other martyrs of that day, were held on March 24, 1901, 
and the remains were interred in a new cemetery, especially pro- 
vided, in Pao-ting-fu. Services in the memory of Mr. Pitkin 
were also held at Dwight Hall in Yale University, and at the 
Pilgrim Congregational Church in Cleveland, on November 18, 
1900. He was 30 years of age at the time of his death. His 
wife, on account of ill health, had left China in April, before the 
outbreak, with their two-year-old son, and reached America in 
safety. His devotion and unfaltering faith in the work for which 
he died were revealed in a last message to his wife, expressing 
the hope that when his boy was twenty -five years old he would 
come back to China to preach the Gospel in his place. 

1893 

Alfred Henry Jones, son of Hon. Charles Jones, a lawyer of 
St. Louis, Mo., and Emily T. (Yosti) Jones, was born in that city 
on April 17, 1868. He was fitted for college at Smith Academy, 
St. Louis. While in college he took much interest in baseball and 
other athletics, and was captain of the Freshman nine. 

After graduation he studied in the Washington University 
Law School, in St. Louis, received the degree of LL.B. in 1895, 
and after his admission to the bar practiced in his native city 
until ill health compelled him to cease. In June, 1900, he had 
pneumonia, after which consumption developed. He was taken 
to New Mexico, where he seemed to improve ; but early in Janu- 
ary he was seized with the grippe, and died a fortnight afterward, 
on January 15, 1901, at the age of 32 years. He was a Roman 
Catholic. 

He married, November 11, 1896, Miss Sophie Bates Johnson, 
of St. Louis, who, with a daughter and son, survives him. 

1894 

William Clayton Crafts, son of Hon. Clayton Edward and 
Cordelia Emily (Kent) Crafts, was born on January 18, 1873, at 
Austin, Cook County, 111., and entered college from Northwestern 
University, Evanston, III. 

After graduation at Yale, he studied law two years at North- 
western University, and was admitted to the bar of Illinois. In 
the fall of 1896 he began practice in Chicago with Crafts & 



85 

Stevens, but in 1898 went to Colorado on account of his health, 
and in 1899 was admitted to the bar there. He married, on 
December 19, 1899, at Colorado Springs, Miss Lucy H. Seeley, of 
Cairo, Mich. 

He died of consumption at Denver, Col., on January 7, 1901, 
in his 28th year. His widow survives him. 

Kirk Crawford McKinney, son of Crawford McKinney, 
was born on January 4, 1870, at Piqua, Miami County, O. He 
was fitted for Yale at Kempner College, Boonville, Mo., and 
under a private tutor. 

After graduation he went to Kansas City, Mo., where he was 
for two years an assistant to Dr. J. D. Griffith in St. Joseph's 
Hospital, and then House Surgeon there. After two years in that 
position he went to Chihuahua, Mexico, and was connected with 
one of the large mining companies. From Chihuahua he went 
to El Paso, Tex., and was associated with Dr. Horsley. There, 
for an unknown cause, he took his own life by shooting, on 
December 7, 1900. He was 30 years of age. While at St. 
Joseph's Hospital he is said to. have contracted tuberculosis from 
an accidental cut in an operation on a patient who had tubercu- 
losis. Two brothers and a sister survive him. 

Henry Bishop Perkins, Jr., youngest child of Hon. Henry 
Bishop Perkins and Elizabeth Giddings (Baldwin) Perkins, was 
born on May 1, 1871, at Warren, O., and was prepared for college 
at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. Early in his college course 
he took a position of influence in his class, and was Captain of 
the Freshman crew. 

After graduation he returned to Warren and had much of the 
care of his father's estate. For over a year he had been in ill 
health, and away from home most of the time, but his death was 
entirely unexpected. For some inscrutable cause he shot himself, 
on the river bank near his home, on October 19, 1900. He was 
29 years of age. He was unmarried. 

Walter Eugene Stewart, Jr., son of Walter Eugene and 
Anna G. Stewart, was born on Kovember 7, 1873, at Plainfield, 
N. J,, and prepared for college in the school of John Leal (Yale 
1874). 

In the autumn following graduation he entered the New York 
Law School, received the degree of Bachelor of Law in 1896, and 



86 

practiced his profession in New York ('ity until 1899, when he 
was commissioned as Second Lieutenant in the Third Infantry, 
U. S. Array. Soon afterward he was sent to Manila, where 
he served with gallantry, and received honorable mention for 
bravery in several actions. While engaged in landing horses 
from a transport, he was thrown from his horse, and so seriously 
injured in the head that he was confined to a hospital for several 
months. Finding upon his discharge that he would not be able 
to continue his duties and could not live in the Philippines, he 
received an honorable discharge from the service on January 31, 
1901. He arrived in San Francisco on February 28, and died 
there in a public park on March 5, from cerebral apoplexy, caused 
by his injuries, at the age of 27 years. He was iinmarried. A 
brother was a graduate of Yale University in the class of 1890. 

1897 

Burt Bronson Kauffman, son of John Wesley Kauffman, a 
retired flour manufacturer, and Nellie (Bronson) Kauffman, was 
born on June 10, 1872, at St. Louis, Mo., and was prepared for 
college at Smith Academy in that city. 

In the autumn after graduation he entered the Medical Depart- 
ment of Johns Hopkins University. During the vacation preced- 
ing his fourth year there, he was accidentally drowned while tak- 
ing a bath at Portsmouth, N. H., on August 23, 1900. He was 
28 years of age. He was a member of the Lindell Avenue 
Methodist Episcopal Church of St. Louis. He was unmarried. 
His brother, Harold Meredith Kauffman, graduated in the same 
class at Yale. 

DkWitt Linn Sage, son of William Henry Sage (Yale 1865), 
was born on February 3, 1875, in Brooklyn, N. Y. His mother 
was Jennie Gregg, daughter of ex-Governor Curtin of Penn- 
sylvania. He was fitted for college by private tutors, and 
entered from Ithaca, N. Y. 

After graduation he traveled for a time, and in the summer of 
1900 entered the banking house of Moore & Schley, New York 
City. 

He died, after a brief illness from pneumonia, at the home of 
his father, Menands Road, Albany, N. Y., on January 1, 1901, at 
the age of 25 years. A brother graduated at Yale in 1895, and 
another in 1896. His classmate. Dean Sage, Jr., was a cousin. 



87 

Alexander Wheeler, son of Alexander and Mary Lorena 
(Marks) Wheeler, was born on November 30, 1876, at Bridgeport, 
Conn., and was fitted for college at the Bridgeport High School. 
Early in life he showed the genuineness of character and earnest- 
ness of purpose which marked him later. In his Senior year at 
Yale he won the DeForest prize. 

After graduation he returned to Bridgeport and taught in the 
High School, where his instruction and even more his quiet 
power over the pupils came to be highly appreciated. In the 
social, intellectual, and religious life of the city he gained in a 
few years an unusual influence. 

He was drowned in the Housatonic River near Stratford, 
Conn., on March 30, 1901. He was 24 years of age. With a 
companion, he was returning from duck shooting, when a gust of 
wind upset their sail boat, and both were thrown into the water. 
His companion clung to the boat and was saved, but Mr. Wheeler 
tried to swim ashore for help and was drowned. He had been a 
member of the Presbyterian Church from his childhood. A 
brother graduated at the Sheffield Scientific School in 1894. 

1898 

Robert Callender, son of Walter and Ann Oswald Callen- 
der, was born on September 12, 1875, in Providence, R. I., and 
was prepared for college at the English Classical School in that 
city, and at Phillips Academy, Andbver, Mass. 

After graduation he went immediately into the house of 
Forbes & Wallace, in Springfield, Mass., to learn the dry goods 
business. In the summer of 1900 he made a business trip to 
South America, and since then had confined himself, perhaps too 
closely, to his duties. While visiting at home, in a fit of mental 
aberration caused by weeks of insomnia, he took his life by 
shooting, on December 31, 1900, at Cranston, just outside the 
limits of Providence. He was 25 years of age. From his estate 
a generous memorial gift has been made for a scholarship in the 
Academical Department. One brother graduated at Yale in 
1894, and another is a member of the class of 1902. 

1899 

CoBURN Dewees Berry, Jr., son of Coburn Dewees Berry 
(Yale 1868) and Amanda (Kirkman) Berry, was born on March 
19, 1877, at Nashville, Tenn., and was fitted for college at Black 

Hall Dnnn 



After graduation he was connected with the Cumberland Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co., but after a few months took a less 
confining position in the real estate business with A. M. Hazen & 
Co. of Nashville. 

He had never been in robust health, but in May, 1900, was 
taken with a severe hemorrhage, and after an illness of ten 
months from consumption, died at Asheville, N. C, on March 16, 
1901, in his 24th year. A brother graduated at Yale in 1896. 

John Perlin Camp, son of Joseph and Eliza Ann (Holcomb) 
Camp, ^\ as born on March 22, 1875, at Newington, Conn., and was 
fitted for college at the Mount Hermon School, Mass. 

After graduation he entered the office of Welles, Herrick & 
Hicks, New York City, and served with great acceptance. In 
January, 1900, he was attacked with tuberculosis, and after sev- 
eral months at home, went to Phoenix, Ariz., where his condition 
greatly improved, and he was looking forward to a return to 
active life. While staying at some distance from the main 
building of the sanitarium he attempted to give the customary 
signal for assistance with a revolver, and accidentally shot him- 
self. He died instantly, on May 20, 1901, at the age of 26 years. 
He was unmarried. He united with the Congregational Cliurch 
in Newington in 1890. 

John Francis Fltnn, son of F. B. Flynn, was born on April 
17, 1878, at Meriden, Conn., and fitted for college at the Meriden 
High School. 

At graduation he was the second scholar in his class, and dur- 
ing his course won many prizes. In Freshman year he took the 
Berkeley premium, first grade ; in Sophomore year second place 
in the Lucius F. Robinson Latin prize competition, and in Junior 
year first place in the same competition. • In the latter year he 
took the second Winthrop prize. 

After graduation he was a student of the classics in the Grad- 
uate Department, on the Clark scholarship and Larned fellowship. 
During the last year he was the first man to hold the Cuyler fel- 
lowship. 

Mr. Flynn died of typhoid fever at his home in Meriden, Conn., 
on April 17, 1901, the 23d anniversary of his birth. 



89 



1900 



Arthur Edgar Ely, son of Edgar S. and Jane M. Ely, was 
born on June 19, 1876, at East River, in the town of Madison, 
Conn., and fitted for college at the Morgan School, Clinton. His 
father died just after his entrance to college. 

The autumn after graduation, through extra study he was able 
to enter the second year class in the Yale Medical School. But 
in December, exhausted by overstudy and the additional strain 
of self-support, he was taken ill with what developed into a tumor 
on the brain, from which he died at the New Haven Hospital on 
January 6, 1901, in his 25th year. His mother, a sister and two 
brothers survive. He was a member of the Congregational 
Church in ^adison. 

Thomas Emlen Franklin, son of George Mayer Franklin 
(Yale 1858) and Sarah M. (Steinman) Franklin, and grandson of 
Hon. Thomas Emlen Franklin (Yale 1828), was born at Lancas- 
ter, Pa., on December 31, 1877. He was prepared for college at 
Phillips Academy at Andover, Mass. 

After graduation he entered the service of the First National 
Bank in New York, and remained there until about two weeks 
before his death, when he left his position and went home for a 
rest. For several months before he had suffered from intesti- 
nal troubles, but his recovery was expected. He died at Lancas- 
ter, October 20, 1900, in his 23d year. He was unmarried. Two 
brothers graduated from Yale in 1892 and 1895 respectively. 



90 



YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

1852 

James Hart Curry, eldest son of Rev. Benjamin and Susan 
(Hart) Curry, was born August 28, 1827, in New York City, but 
lived in Shrub Oak, Westchester County, N. Y., from early 
childhood. 

At graduation he was valedictorian of his class in the Yale 
Medical School and class president. He then returned to Shrub 
Oak, where he was in active practice of his profession for nearly 
fifty years. 

Dr. Curry was at his death the oldest member of the Westches- 
ter County Medical Society, had at different times been delegate 
of the New York State Medical Society to the Connecticut and 
other Societies, and had been President of the Yale Medical 
Alumni Association. During the Civil War he was Surgeon 
with the rank of Major in the Eighteenth New York Volunteers. 
He died at his home in Shrub Oak, on September 24, 1900, at the 
age of 73 years. 

He married, on February 24, 1853, Emily Manville, daughter 
of Truman Minor of Peekskill, N. Y. She died in 1888. Two 
sons, one of whom graduated at the Medical Department of New 
York University in 1898, and four daughters, survive. 

1864 

Moses Clark White, son of Roderick and Lucy (Blakeslee) 
White, was born on July 24, 1819, at Paris, Oneida County, N. Y. 

He graduated from Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., 
in 1845 ; studied in Yale Theological Seminary ; was ordained at 
Middletown on March 30, 1847 ; and was a missionary of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Foo Chow, China, from 1847 to 
1853, and conducted a public dispensary there from 1848 to 1852. 
On account of impaired health he returned to America, and after 
receiving the degree of M.D. at Yale, practiced his profession 
in New Haven. He was Instructor in Botany in the Sheffield 
Scientific School from 1861 to 1864 ; Instructor on Microscopy in 
Yale Medical School from 1862 to 1867 ; afterward Professor of 
Microscopy and Pathology, and of Pathology from 1880, becom- 
ing Professor Emeritus in 1900. He was Lecturer on Histology 
and Microscopy at Wesleyan University from 1864 to 1875. 



91 

For seventeen years he was Medical Examiner for the Coroner, 
and was recognized as an authority on medical jurisprudence, 
and greatly aided the criminal courts by utilizing scientific 
methods for the detection of crime. He was a member of the 
New Haven Medical Association from 1854, and President in 
1885. He was a member of the Medico-Legal Society of New 
York, and of the American Microscopical Society, and from 1864 
to 1876 Secretary of the Connecticut Medical Society. 

While in China Dr. White translated and published the " Gos- 
pel of Matthew " in the colloquial dialect of Foo Chow. This 
was the first Christian work ever published in that dialect. In 
1856 he published an "Introduction to the Study of the Spoken 
Language of Foo Chow," which was of great value to later 
students. He wrote the chapter on Optics in Silliman's Physics, 
and aided in editing two editions of that work. He also edited 
a revised edition of Prof. J. A. Porter's Chemistry, and wrote the 
finely illustrated monograph on Blood Stains in Wood's " Hand- 
book of Medicine." 

He died from the infirmities of age at his home, on October 24, 
1900, at the age of 81 years. 

He married, on March 13, 1847, Miss Jane Isabel Atwater, of 
Homer, Cortland County, N. Y., who died in Foo Chow in 
1848. He afterward married in Foo Chow, in 1851, Miss Mary 
Seeley of Onondaga, N. Y., who died in New Haven in 1887, 
leaving two sons, who are both living, and one of whom grad- 
uated at the Yale Medical School in 1881. 

1857 

Cortland VanRensselaer Creed, son of John William and 
Vashti Elizabeth (Duplex) Creed, was born in April, 1835, in 
New Haven, Conn. Part of his early education was obtained in 
the Lancasterian School in New Haven. His father was a col- 
lege janitor, steward of the Calliopean Society, and provided the 
Commencement dinner for the Yale alumni from about 1822 to 
1865. 

After graduation from the Yale Medical School Dr Creed 
settled in New Haven, and at one time had a large and successful 
practice. In later years he was unfortunate. He was appointed 
Assistant Surgeon of the Thirteenth Connecticut Volunteers in 
1863. After the Civil War he practiced for a short time in 
New York. 



92 

He died suddenly of Bright's disease in New Haven, on August 
8, 1900, at the age of 65 years. 

His first wife was Drucella Wright, by whom he had four sons, 
three of whom are living. By his second wife, Mary A. Paul, he 
had six children, of whom three daughters are living. 

1864 

Napoleon Bonaparte Kbnyon, son of Silas R. Kenyon, was 
born on February 17, 1840, at Richmond, R. I., and studied at 
East Greenwich Academy, R. I. He entered the Medical School 
from Providence. 

A few years after graduation he settled in the Pawtuxet val- 
ley, where he resided for nearly thirty years, and showed himself 
a skillful physician and a man of sterling character. In 1865 he 
was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the Rhode Island Militia. 
He was a member of the Rhode Island Medical Society thirty- 
six years. 

He died after a gradual decline at his home at River Point, 
R. I., on December 3, 1899, at the age of 59 years. 

He married, on September 26, 1867, Sarah Elizabeth, daughter 
of Elisha Smith, of North Smithfield, R. I., who with their 
only daughter survives. 

1867 

Julian Newell Parker, son of Charles Parker, a farmer, 
and Anna (Utley) Parker, was born on July 3, 1840, in Mansfield, 
Conn., and lived there until the Civil War broke out. His early 
education was received at the common school of his native village 
and at the Connecticut Literary Institute of Suffield, Conn. 

On July 16, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Company D, 
Twenty -first Regiment of Connecticut. He was at Fredericks- 
burg, and in the series of battles near Norfolk and Suffolk, and at 
Cold Spring Harbor. Later he was appointed hospital steward 
and then assistant surgeon. 

After the war he studied medicine with Dr. Brigham of Mans- 
field, and completed his studies in the Yale Medical School in 
1867. He went to Europe for further study, returning in 1868. 
He was settled in Mansfield for two years, and then removed to 
South Manchester, Conn., where he successfully practiced medicine 
for thirty years, receiving the appointment from the Coroner of 
Medical Examiner of Hartford County. 



93 

About fifteen years ago be contracted muscular atropby. Tbis 
increased in severity so tbat for several years be was nearly belp- 
less, but be was cbeerful and always a pleasant companion. Dr.- 
Parker died suddenly from tbe grippe and beart failure, combined 
witb muscular disease, at bis bome in Soutb Mancbester, on 
February 7, 1901, at tbe age of 60 years. 

He married, on May 8, 1868, Caroline Sbepard of New Haven, 
wbo witb one sister survives bim. 

1881 

Charles Warren Dana, son of Cbarles Hamilton Dana, 
M.D., and Jane (Warren) Dana, was born in Laporte, Sullivan 
County, Pa.,' on November 7, 1855. He studied at Wilkes-Barre, 
and at tbe Keystone Academy, Factoryville, Pa. During bis 
course in tbe Medical Scbool bis residence was in New Haven. 

Altbougb bis constitution was never robust, after graduation 
be commenced practice in Milford, Pa., but a tbroat trouble com- 
pelled bim to give it up. He was an efficient Probibition worker, 
and organized clubs in several of tbe soutbern counties of tbe 
State. 

Wbile rescuing borses in a burning stable be fell a victim bim- 
self to suffocation and flame, and died in Tunkbannock, Pa., on 
April 17, 1901, in bis 46tb year. He was unmarried. He early 
united witb tbe Presbyterian Cburcb. 

1898 

Frederick Walter Hulseberg, son of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Hulseberg, was born on June 20, 1874, in Poonab, India, wbere 
bis fatber was an Englisb Brigade Surgeon. 

He gained a scbolarsbip at tbe Maidstone Scbool -in London, 
but in 1887 came to tbe United States, and prepared for college 
at St. Austin's, on Staten Island, N. Y. At tbe age of 16 be 
entered tbe office of tbe Royal Insurance Co. in New York City, 
but left in order to take tbe Yale Medical Scbool course. 

After graduation be received an appointment in tbe New York 
Colored Hospital, but soon became ambulance surgeon at Bellevue 
Hospital. He successfully competed for tbe position of Interne 
in tbe New Haven Hospital, but as be was anxious for tbe experi- 
ence of surgical work in tbe U. S. Army, be passed tbe examina- 
tions, and was immediately afterward, April 20, 1900, ordered to 



94: 

Manila. Arriving in the Philippines on June 20, on the trans- 
port Logan, he served there till August 1, when he was shot 
through the heart and instantly killed by insurgents near Majajay, 
about sixty miles north of Manila. He was 26 years of age. At 
the time of his death he was Assistant Surgeon of the U. S. Army 
Hospital. 

He was unmarried. Four brothers served as officers in the 
British army in South Africa. One of them was killed about the 
time the Logan sailed from San Francisco. 



YALE LAW SCHOOL. 

1844 

Anthony VanWyck, son of Richard T. YanWyck, a land 
owner and farmer of LaGrange and Fishkill, Dutchess County, 
N. Y., was born in the first-mentioned town, on May 15, 1822. 
Before entering the Yale Law School he studied in Albany 
Academy, Albany, N. Y., and during his course in New Haven 
was a resident of Fishkill. 

After graduation he first settled in Davenport, la., and then 
removed to Kenosha, Wise. From 1862 to 1866 he was Senator 
from Kenosha County in the Wisconsin Legislature. From 1867 
to 1870 he was County Judge of Kenosha County, after which he 
became a resident of Marietta, Ga., for ten years. After his 
return to Kenosha he was again Judge from 1882 to 1898. He 
was Republican candidate for Governor of Wisconsin in 1868, but 
his nomination was defeated in the convention by one vote. 

He traveled extensively in Europe and the East from 1844 to 
1 849, and gathered the results of his observations and studies in a 
number of lectures, and descriptive and historical articles for cur- 
rent publications. In August, 1882, he contributed "Shires and 
Shire Towns in the South " to Xfippincotfs Magazine. 

In earlier years he was an elder of the Reformed (Dutch) 
Church, in Fishkill, while in Marietta a member of the Presby- 
terian Church and for several years an elder, and during his resi- 
dence in Kenosha a member and for nearly thirty years a deacon 
of the Congregational Church. 

He died of apoplexy at the home of his son in Milwaukee, 
Wise, on December 22, 1900, at the age of 78 years. 



95 

He married, on June 6, 1849, Margaret, daughter of Theron 
Skeel, a merchant, manufacturer and ship owner of Kingston, 
N. Y. She died in 1894. A daughter died in childhood, but a 
son who graduated at the Albany Law School in 1876, and a 
daughter who is the wife of William F. Bennett (Harvard 1868), 
survive. 

1846 

William Burr Wooster, son of Russell and Avis (Burr) 
Wooster, was born on August 22, 1821, at Oxford, Conn. His 
early life was spent on the farm and in teaching the village school. 

After graduation from the Yale Law School, he opened an 
office in Derby, Conn., where he practiced his profession with 
eminent success. He was a member of the Connecticut House of 
Representatives in 1851 and 1861, and in the latter year drafted 
several bills for the relief of soldiers and their families which 
were passed that session. He was a Senator from the Fifth Dis- 
trict in 1859, also an ex-officio Fellow of Yale College. 

When the Civil War broke out he organized a company of 
volunteers, and on August 22, 1862, was appointed Lieutenant- 
Colonel of the Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers. At the battle 
of Chancellorsville, May 2, 1863, two horses were shot under him, 
and he was captured, and shut up in Libby prison for three weeks. 
The sword which was given him by his townsmen was taken from 
him, but was recovered a year later. For distinguished gallantry 
in that battle he was made Colonel by brevet. He was exchanged 
in time to lead his regiment at Gettysburg. In March, 1864, he 
was appointed Colonel of the Twenty-ninth Connecticut Volunteer 
Infantry, colored, and his command was the first to enter Rich- 
mond. He resigned August 21, 1865. 

After the war he resumed his law practice for twenty years, at 
first in partnership with Hon. David Torrance (M.A. Yale 1883), 
afterward Judge of the Supreme Court. Later the firm became 
Wooster, Torrance & Gager, and on the promotion of Judge 
Torrance to the bench, it became Wooster, Williams & Gager. 
Colonel Wooster retired in 1887. 

He was President of the Derby Gas Co., and of the Birming- 
ham Water Co., and had been connected with other successful 
enterprises. 

He died of apoplexy at his home in Ansonia, Conn., on Septem- 
ber 20, 1900, at the age of 79 years. 



96 

He married in 1870, Miss J. A. Wallace, daughter of Thomas 
Wallace of Ansonia. She survives him without children. A 
brother graduated from the Yale Medical School in the class of 
1857. 

1860 

Francis Churchill Burgess, was born about 183 7, and entered 
the Law School from Port Tobacco, Charles County, Md. 

After graduation he returned to that place, but about 1872 
went West and probably practiced law for some time in Chicago. 
Later he was Assistant Editor of the Pioneer Press in St. Paul, 
Minn. He died of general paresis at the hospital in Rochester, 
Minn., on April 8, 1900, at the age of 63 years. 

Waldo Gray Perry, youngest son 6f John Greenwood Perry, 
was born on May 16, 1836, at Leicester, Yt. Before entering 
the Yale Law School he studied at Wesleyan Academy, Wilbra- 
ham, Mass. 

In 1865 he removed to Washington, D. C, where he held a 
clerkship in the Post Office Department until 1894. For a num- 
ber of years previous to his resignation he was Chief Clerk of 
the Dead Letter Office. Until failing health compelled him to 
give up active work he was prominently identified with various 
temperance organizations in Washington. 

He died of cerebral hemorrhage, at his home in Washington, on 
February 23, 1901, at the age of 64 years. 

He married at Willimantic, Conn., on April 3, 1861, Miss Mary 
Annot Hanover, who survives him with two daughters and a son. 
The son graduated as a Civil Engineer at Columbian University 
in Washington, in 1894. 

1877 

Edward Lee Linsley was a native of North Haven, Conn. 
After graduation from the Law School he entered public life. 
He was Town Clerk, Judge in the local court for several terms, 
Assistant Judge of the City Court of New Haven in 1883, and at 
the time of his death Prosecuting Agent for the towns of North 
Haven, East Haven, Hamden and Orange. He received the 
degree of Master of Laws from Yale University in 1878. 

He died after an illness of three weeks from typhoid fever at 
his home in North Haven, on October 18, 1900, at the age of 42 
years. His widow, who was Miss Grace Fitch of North Haven, 



97 

survives him without children. He left also a brother and two 
sisters. He was a member of the Congregational Church. 

1881 

Peter Doyle, son of Patrick and Margaret (Gorman) Doyle, 
was born in Myshall, County Carlow, Ireland, on December 8, 
1844, and went with his parents to Wisconsin in 1850, at first 
making his home at Franklin, Milwaukee County, and in 1865 
removing to Prairie du Chien. 

In early life he planned to enter the priesthood, but afterward, 
however, began the study of law in the office of Butler & 
Cottrill, and later entered the Yale Law School for his Senior 
year. 

Before coming to Yale he had declined the Democratic nomi- 
nation as the first mayor of Prairie du Chien. In 1872 he was 
Assemblyman from Crawford County, and the next year was 
elected Secretary of State, and reelected in 1875. At the expi- 
ration of his term of office he traveled extensively in Europe. 

After graduating from the Law School he went to Milwaukee 
to reside, and established a good practice. There he remained 
until the summer of 1900, when he removed to Jersey City, 
IST. J., and entered into partnership with H. J. Hoffman of that 
city. 

He delivered a number of addresses which were printed in 
pamphlet form, among them one at the Catholic Congress at the 
World's Fair in Chicago in 1893. 

Mr. Doyle died of pneumonia at Jersey City, October 27, 
1900, in his 56th year. Mrs. Doyle died before him, leaving no 
children. One sister survives him. 

1889 

William Reuben Mattison, son of William P. and Sarah 
C. (Stickle) Mattison, was born in South Shaftsbury, Vt., June 
28, 1862. He was prepared for College at Wesley an Academy, 
Wilbraham, Mass., and graduated from Amherst College in 1886. 
The following year he engaged in journalistic work in Water- 
bury, Conn., and became city editor of the Repuhlican. In 
1887-88 he was a law student in the office of Kellogg, Burpee 
& Kellogg in the same city, and then entered the Yale Law 
School. 



98 

After graduation he practiced his profession in Waterbury 
until 1896, holding also the office of City Clerk in 1893. 

On account of ill health he returned to his native place in 1896, 
and died there of general paresis, April 25, 1899, in the 37th year 
of his age. He was unmarried. 

1893 

David Thomas McNamara, son of Edmund McNamara, was 
born on August 26, 1859, at New Haven, Conn. In 1875 he 
became an apprentice in the printing trade, and before entering 
the Yale Law School worked on several New Haven papers. 

After graduation he practiced his profession in New Haven, 
and was respected for his sincerity of purpose and faithfulness to 
duty. 

He was a prominent member of the Typographical Union, and 
at one time president of the Trades Council. He was a member 
of the Board of Councilmen in 1889, and for the last two years 
was Examiner of Records in the Department of Public Works. 
From 1896 to his death he was Secretary of the Democratic 
State Central Committee. 

He died at his home in New Haven, after several months of 
illness from nephritis, on April 18, 1901, at the age of 41 years. 
He was unmarried. His mother, a brother and three sisters sur- 
vive him. 

1896 

Joseph Almeron Johnson, son of Almeron J. Johnson, was 
born on January 11, 1874, in Rochester, N. Y. His mother was 
Sarah Louise, daughter of Johnson F. Robins, a lumber merchant 
of that city. His preparatory course was taken at St. John's 
School in Manlius, N. Y. 

After his graduation from the Yale Law School, he went into 
the shoe manufacturing business with his father, but in 1898 he 
became a partner in the firm of Harding Sons & Johnson. 

During a tour abroad he contracted Roman fever early in the 
year, and died after an illness of three months at his summer 
residence, Irondequoit Manor, near Rochester, N. Y., on August 
26, 1900, at the age of 26 years. He was unmarried. He was a 
member of St. Luke's Protestant Episcopal Church in Rochester. 



99 



YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL. 



1876 



John Mason Dutton, son of Amasa Parmelee Dutton, was 
born on April 14, 1847, at East Craftsbury, Vt., and graduated 
at Dartmouth College in 1873. 

After completing the course in the Yale Divinity School, he 
was ordained on June 20, 1876, at Lebanon, ISI". H., and remained 
there as pastor nine years. From June 11, 1885, to January 
1, 1892, he was pastor at Great Falls, N. H., and during a 
portion of this time also Superintendent of Schools. For the 
seven years following he was pastor of the Central Congre- 
gational Church in Newtonville, Mass., and then went to the 
Congregational church at Newport, Vt. After a year's service 
there his robust health gave way and he became a victim of Bright's 
disease, from which he died six months later at Newport, on June 
17, 1900, at the age of 53 years. 

He married, on May 18, 1876, Flora Belle, daughter of E. 
Chapman Maltby, a manufacturer of silver ware at Birmingham, 
Conn. Mrs. Dutton survives, with one son (Dartmouth 1900). 



100 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1859 

Franklin Booth, son of Samuel and Carrie (Day) Booth, was 
born on October 18, 1836, in Hartford County, Conn., and 
pursued his preparatory course of study at Monson (Mass.) 
Academy. 

After graduation from the Sheffield Scientific School, he taught 
mathematics at the West Jersey Academy, Bridgeton, N. J., and 
began to study medicine with Dr. Potter. He continued with 
Dr. Frank H. Hamilton in New York City, and completed his 
studies at Bellevue Hospital Medical College, graduating there in 
1864. He was Assistant Surgeon in the U. S. Army throughout 
the Civil War. 

When peace was declared he started in practice at Holyoke, 
Mass., but after two years removed to Iowa. Two years later he 
went to Litchfield, Conn., where he practiced with success for 
four years. He then married Frances L., daughter of Rev. 
George Newcomb, of Dedham, Mass., and settled in Newtown, 
Long Island, N. Y., where he remained through life, a period of 
thirty years. He was also the health officer of the New York 
Board of Health for the Second Ward. 

Dr. Booth was struck by a trolley car, in the village of Elm- 
hurst, in Newtown, and so terribly injured that both legs had to 
be amputated. He died shortly after, at St. John's Hospital, on 
August 19, 1900. He was in his 64th year. He was a member 
of St. James Protestant Episcopal Church. His widow, two 
daughters and a son survive. The son graduated at Yale Uni- 
versity in 1898. 

1867 

VoLNEY Giles Barbour, son of Volney Giles and Ellen 
(Atkins) Barbour, was born on June 2, 1842, in Canton, Conn., 
but removed with his parents to Bristol, Conn. His preparatory 
course was taken at Suffield, Conn. 

The year after graduation he was Assistant in Engineering in 
the Sheffield Scientific School. In 1869 he was called to the pro- 
fessorship of Civil Engineering in tho University of Vermont, at 
Burlington, Yt., and filled that chair for thirty-one years. From 
1873, he was also superintendent of the buildings and grounds. 



101 

From 1886 to 1888 he was Special Professor of Sanitary Science 
in the Medical Department of the University. 

The city of Burlington owes much to his skill and wise coun- 
sel. He was City Engineer from 1871 to 1874, also in 1885-86. 
He superintended the construction of the Young Men's 
Christian Association building, and was school commissioner 
from 1896 to 1900. For many years he was a director of the 
Mary Fletcher Hospital, and one of the executive committee of 
the Home for Aged Women. He was active in the organization 
and support of the Berean Baptist Church, but later became 
a member of the College Street Congregational Church. He 
enlisted as a private in the Fifth Connecticut Regiment and 
served through the Civil War. 

For several months he had been unable to attend to his college 
duties, but recovered sufficiently to take the journey to Minne- 
apolis, Minn., the home of an adopted daughter. The change 
improved his health, and there was some hope that he would be 
able to resume his work in the fall. His death, which occurred 
on June 4, 1901, was the result of accident, and was caused by gas 
escaping from a stove used to warm the room in which he was 
sleeping. He was 58 years of age. He received the degree of 
Civil Engineer from the University of Vermont in 1887. 

His first wife was Julia Grout, of Fort Wayne, Ind. In 1892 
he married Anna, third daughter of Louis H. Wheeler, of Bur- 
lington. She died in 1895, leaving a son, who survives his 
father. 

1868 

Frank Morton Guthrie, son of C. B. Guthrie, .M. D., of 
Orange, ^N". J. ,was born on March 19, 1847. During his course 
in th^ Sheffield Scientific School his home was in Cincinnati, O., 
and New York city. 

After graduation he was in business in Baltimore and Cincin- 
nati, but for some time before his death he was agent of the 
Lehigh Valley R. R., at Duluth, Minn. 

He married on March 2, 1882, Jane, daughter of William 
Waddle, M.D., of Chillicothe, O. 

Mr. Guthrie died at Chillicothe, O., on December 21, 1900, at 
the age of 53 years. 



102 

1873 

Alvah Weed Brown, son of Josiah T. and Eliza A. (Weed) 
Brown, was born on July 2, 1854, in Brooklyn, N. Y., and was 
fitted for the Sheffield Scientific School at Columbia Grammar 
School. 

After graduation he became very successful as an insurance 
agent, and represented the Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
New York. 

His death occurred at Newport, R. I., on May 28, 1901, by his 
own hand. He had shot himself the previous night while on 
board the steamer Plymouth, but the second shot ended his life 
instantly. He was 46 years of age. 

He married, first, on June 14, 1888, Martha D., daughter of 
John Anderson, of Hackensack, N". J., and second, in 1898^ 
Hel^ne M. Ward, of N"ew York. He had no children by either 
marriage. 

1875 

Henry Mortimer Hastings, son of O. H. and Cassandra 
(Crane) Hastings, was born on November V, 1854, and gained 
his preparation for the Sheffield Scientific School at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass. 

After graduation he was connected with the milling firm of 
O. H. Hastings & Co., in his native place. 

His death occurred on April 29, 1901, at Oswego and was due 
to apoplexy. He was 46 years of age. 

He married, on July 20, 1881, Emma, daughter of J. Milton 
Wright, of Oswego, and had a son, who died at the age of three 
years. 

1881 * 

William Meeker Wood, son of Theodore F. Wood, a 
banker of Morristown, N". J., was born in that place on August 
5, 1868. He was prepared for Yale at Andover, Mass. During 
his course in the Scientific School he won prizes in mathematics 
aud English composition. 

While in Europe he was taken ill, and died in Paris on May 
29, 1900, in his 3 2d year. 

He married, in November, 1 893, Miss Grace Mosher, who sur- 
vives him without children. 



103 



1891 



George Pratt Starkweather, son of John Henry Stark- 
weather, Superintendent of the New Haven Hospital, and Hannah 
Elizabeth (Winchester) Starkweather, was born on July 12, 18V2, 
in New Haven, Conn. 

In tbe autumn after graduation he became Assistant in Draw- 
ing and Applied Mechanics in the Sheffield Scientific School, and 
in 1895 was advanced to the position of Instructor in the same 
branches. In 1900 he was appointed Assistant Professor of 
Applied Mechanics, and in this chair his mastery of his subject 
inspired the respect and admiration of his students. He received 
the degree of Mechanical Engineer in 1894, and of Doctor of 
Philosophy in 1898. 

He died suddenly at his home in New Haven, on March 21, 
1901, of valvular contraction of the heart, following an illness 
from mumps. He was 28 years of age. He was unmarried. He 
was quiet in his tastes, but to his friends he showed himself a 
stimulating companion. 

1892 

Sherman HoyI' Bouton, son of Christopher B. Bouton, was 
born on September 13, 1870, in Chicago, 111., and studied at the 
High School in Hyde Park, 111., and with a private tutor, before 
coming to the Sheffield Scientific School. During his course in 
New Haven he received honorable mention in Freshman year for 
excellence in all his studies, in Junior year for excellence in 
mathematics, and in Senior year for excellence in mechanical 
engineering. 

After graduation he entered the Northwestern University Law 
School, receiving the degree of LL.B. in 1896. He was then 
admitted to the bar and entered the firm of Heckman & Co. 
Owing to overwork he was compelled to give up his practice, and , 
spent most of the time during the last two years of his life in 
Colorado and southern California. He died at his winter home 
in Dunedin, Fla , on December 6, 1900, of catarrhal typhlitis. 
He was 30 years of age. He was a member of the Kenwood 
Evangelical Church, Chicago. 

He married, on December 30, 1896, Olive Julia, daughter of 
Oliver C. Ely, of Chicago. She survives him without children. 



104 

John Baker Winstandley, son of William C. and Alice 
(Mitchell) Winstandley, was born on November 5, 1871, at Bed- 
ford, Ind. Previous to entering Yale he was a student in Indiana 
University, Bloomington, Ind., also at the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, in Boston. 

During the two years following graduation he was in the build- 
ing stone business, afterward with Armour & Co., Chicago, two 
years, then with the Illinois Steel Co., three years, and subse- 
quently with the American Telephone and Telegraph Co., two 
years, holding the position of chief operator at Chicago at the 
time of his death. He was an energetic business man, and was 
held in high esteem by all his associates. 

He was drowned in Lake Michigan, near the entrance to Jack- 
son Park, Chicago, on May 18, 1901. He was 29 years of age. 
He was a member of the Christian Church. 

He married, on October 25, 1899, Helen, daughter of Frederick 
A. Brodhead of Chicago, and formerly of Syracuse. She sur- 
vives him without children. 

1893 

George Congdon Fouse, son of Lieutenant George Fouse, 
Chief Gunner in the U. S. Navy, retired, was born on February 
17, 1874, in Washington, D. C. His mother was Patty Congdon 
(Hammett) Fouse. He was prepared at Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and while at Yale received honorable mention for 
excellence in mathematics during Junior year. 

After graduation he was civil engineer in Boston for a year and 
a half, then returned to New Haven to study in the Graduate 
School, and afterward entered the Columbian Law School, in 
Washington, D. C. 

At the outbreak of the Spanish War he enlisted as a private in 
Company D, Fourth U. S. Volunteers. On account of severe ill- 
ness contracted during his service while stationed at Manzanillo, 
Cuba, he was honorably discharged at his own request in 1899. 
He then returned to the Columbian University, from which he 
received the degree of LL.B. in 1900, and was admitted to the 
bar. He received the degree of Civil Engineer from Yale Uni- 
versity in 1896. 

He died from the grippe complicated with lung trouble, at his 
home in Washington, on February 7, 1901, in his 26th year. He 
was unmarried. 



105 

William Buffum Thompson, son of Charles C. Thompson, a 
fruit grower, Avas born in Benton County, la., on May 19, 1870. 
He entered Yale from the Harvard Military Academy in Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

After graduation he studied law and later practiced for a time 
in New York City, but ill health compelled him to go West. He 
died of consumption, at Pasadena, Cal., on September 22, 1900, 
at the age of 30 years. He was unmarried. 

1895 

William King Duckworth, son of George K. and Lucy 
(Bishop) Duckworth, was born on November 17, 1873, at Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, where he received his preparation for college at 
a private school for boys. In his Senior year he was a member of 
the Yale Glee Club. 

After graduation he was connected with the Tootle-Weakley 
Wholesale Millinery Company, of St. Joseph, Mo. He died at 
Mt. Clemens, Michigan, of typhoid fever, after a brief illness, on 
June 15, 1900, in his 27th year. He was unmarried. 

1896 

George Harry Clark, son of George H. and Inez E. (Damon) 
Clark, was born on December 15, 1874, in New Haven, Conn., 
and completed his preparatory studies at the Hillhouse High 
School in 1893. 

After his graduation at Yale he took a year's post-graduate 
work, and was then an apprentice with Piatt & Whitney of Hart- 
ford, Conn., and with the Bullard Machine Tool Co., Bridgeport, 
Conn. During the last two years of his life he was employed in 
the drawing office of the Mechanical Department of the Consol- 
idated Railroad. 

He died in New Haven of typhoid fever, on January 12, 1901, 
at the age of 26 years. He left a wife and daughter. He mar- 
ried on May 30, 1898, Maud, daughter of Henry Hoyt, of Stam- 
ford, Conn. 

Clarence Alexander Mabie, son of William Henry and 
Nancy A. (Magee) Mabie, was born on March 4, 1874, at Tidioute, 
Pa., and was fitted for Yale at the Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. 

The year after graduation he spent at home in helping to close 
out his father's business, and in June, 1899, removed to Mabie, 



106 

W. Va., and engaged in business with the McClure-Mabie Lum- 
ber Co. 

He died of blood poisoning, caused by hemorrhage following a 
serious affection of the throat, at Elkins, W. Va., on October 11, 
1900, in his 27th year. 

Harry Edward Tuttle, son of Cyrus Warner Tuttle, a man- 
ufacturer of West Haven, Conn., was born in that borough, on 
January 1, 1876, and was prepared for Yale at the Hopkins Gram- 
mar School, New Haven. 

In the fall after graduation he was engaged in civil engineering 
in Hartford, Conn., but was obliged to give it up owing to ill 
health. In 1897 he went to Colorado and from there to Red- 
lands, Col., where he died of pulmonary tuberculosis, on Decem- 
ber 28, 1900, in his 25th year. He was unmarried. He was a 
member of the West Haven Congregational Church. 

1897 

George Robinson Tracy, son of David Dwight and Cath- 
erine Mary Tracy, was born on October 6, 1873, in Norwich, 
Conn., and entered the Scientific School from the Bulkeley School, 
New London, Conn. 

Upon his graduation he entered the employ of the Eastman 
Kodak Company of Rochester, N. Y. While conducting an 
experiment in film making in the department of which he was 
superintendent, he was instantly killed by an explosion of chem- 
icals, on June 1, 1900. He was in his 27th year. He was 
unmarried. 

1899 

Richard Steele Lamb, son of Charles Edward and Carrie 
(Pollard) Lamb, was born in Waterbury, Conn., June 8, 1878, 
and prepared for Yale at Riverview Military Academy, Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y., and under a private tutor. 

After graduation he entered the college of Physicians and 
Surgeons, Columbia University, New York. In the latter part 
of the summer of 1900 he returned to New York, and for some 
time worked as a staff doctor among the poorer classes in that 
city. While thus engaged he contracted typhoid fever, of which 
he died after an illness of two weeks at the Waterbury Hospital, 
on October 16, 1900, at the age of 22 years. He was a member 
of Trinity Protestant Episcopal Church. 



107 



1900 



Alfonzo Rockwell Cluett, son of George Bywater and 
Amanda R, (Fisher) Cluett, was born on December 2, IS'ZS, in_ 
Troy, N. Y. 

After graduation he was engaged in the extensive manufac- 
tory of Cluett, Peabody & Co. 

He died of typhoid fever at Troy, N. Y., on December 24, 
1900, at the age of 22 years. He was a member of St. John's 
Protestant Episcopal Church, and also of its choir. 

The gymnasium of St. Paul's School, Garden City, L. 1., where 
he was prepared for Yale, has been dedicated to him. 

Trumbull Kelly, son of Robert Kelly (Yale 1870), was born 
in New York City, on April 21, 1879. His mother was Mabel 
McLellan, daughter of Professor Benjamin Silliman, Jr. (Yale 
1837). He was prepared for Yale at Lawrenceville, N. J. 

At graduation from the Scientific School he received a Two- 
Year Honor for excellence in all the studies of Junior and Senior 
years. He was then employed in the engineers' department of 
the Cambria Steel Co., at Johnstown, Pa. He died at that place 
on November 30, 1900, from injuries received in a football game 
on Thanksgiving day. He was 21 years of age. 



&JJ l^ls/LJ^Tl'^ 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT 



(Yale College) 



ClaBB Name and Age 

1824 Benjamin D. Silliman, 95 

1829 Leman W. Cutler, 93 

1830 Henry Barnard, 89 

1831 Dwiglit M. Seward, 89 

1832 Joshua Huntington, 88 
1832 Edward E. Salisbury, 86 

1832 Alfred Stills, 86 

1833 Frederick E. Mather, 91 

1834 Jeremiah R. Barnes, 91 

1835 Samuel H. Galpin, 87 

1836 Austin Isham, 87 

1836 Giles M. Porter, 85 

1837 Owen B. Arnold, 82 
1837 Moses M. Bagg, 83 
1837 William M. Evarts, 83 
1837 John Hooker, 84 
1837 Robert H. Paddock, 86 
1837 William R. Randall, 84 

1837 William S. Scarborough, I 

1838 James Tufts, 88 

1839 Eugene Edwards, 80 
1839 Elizur Wolcott, 83 
1841 Horace Andrews, 81 
1841 Flavel A. Dickinson, 81 
1841 Joseph Emerson, 79 
1841 Daniel A. Heald, 82 

1841 Albert Paine, 81 

1842 Gideon C. Clark, 78 
1842 George B. Hubbard, 78 

1842 Albert K. Teele, 80 

1843 Joseph E. Bennett, 82 
1843 Edward W. Gilman, 77 
1843 Samuel M. Parsons, 78 
1843 George T. Pierce, 79 

1843 John Wickes, 78 

1844 Samuel M. Brown, 81 



Place and 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Watertown, Conn. 
Hartford, Conn. 
So. Norwalk, Conn. 
Washington, D. C. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York City 
Marietta, O. 
Savin Rock, Conn. 
Roxbury, Conn. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Meriden, Conn. 
Utica, N. Y. 
New York City 
Hartford, Conn. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Cortland, N. Y. 
New York City 
Monson, Mass. 
Stonington, Conn. 
Berkeley, Cal. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Silver City, N. M. 
Beloit, Wise. 
W. Orange, N. J. 
Roxbury, Mass. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Plymouth, Wise. 
Milton, Mass. 
Manchester, N. H. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Centerville, Kans. 
Attica, N. Y. 
Fair Haven, Conn. 



Time of Death 

Jan. 24, '01 

Feb. 9, '01 

July 5, '00 

Jan. 17, '01 

March 23, '00 

Feb, 5, '01 

Sept. 24, '00 

Nov. 9, '00 

Jan. 1, '01 

Sept. 12, '00 

Jan. 19, '01 

Feb. 1, '01 

Aug. 30, '00 

May 2, '00 

Feb. 28, '01 

Feb. 12, '01 

March 19, '00 

Feb. 3, '01 

Nov. 27, '00 

Apr. 29, '01 

Oct. 1, '99 

March 13, '01 

Feb. 13, '01 

Jan. 22, '01 

Aug. 4, '00 

Dec. 28, '00 

May 14, '01 

Feb. 10, '00 

June 17, '00 

March 11, '01 

Feb. 20, '00 

Dec. 4, 'OO 

Dec. 13, '00 

March 16, '01 

June 5, '01 

Apr. 2, '01 



109 



Class Name and Age 

1844 John A. Dana, 77 

1844 William FewSmith, 74 

1844 John McLeod, 84 

1844 John P. Marshall, 77 

1844 William M. Smith, 76 

1844 H. Brady Wilkins, 76 

1847 Calvin M. Brooks, 75 

1847 Thomas M. Finney, 73 

1847 G. Clinton Williams, 75 

1848 James Bird, 74 

1848 Timothy H. Porter, 74 

1849 Enoch G. Adams, 71 

1850 Erastus L. Eipley, 78 

1850 Henry M. Tupper, 70 

1851 John W. Hendrie, 79 
1851 Horace M. Smith, 73 

1851 George S. Tuckerman, 76 
1853 Charles H. Barrett, 79 

1852 Henry J. Labatt, 68 
1852 Henry McCormick, 69 

1852 William L. Eowland, 69 

1853 Andrew C. Dulles, 68 
1853 Albert E. Kent, 70 

1853 Joseph A. Welch, 70 

1854 James B. Olney, 67 
1856 Wilbur Johnson, 69 

1856 Benjamin Webb, 69 

1857 Lyman D. Hodge, 63 

1857 Moses Coit Tyler, 65 

1858 Edward M. Mills, 65 
1861 William H. Higbee, 59 

1861 John E. Marshall, 61 

1862 William D. Anderson, 60 
1862 William P. Ketcham, 59 
1862 Thomas D. Murphy, 63 

1862 Buchanan Winthrop, 59 

1863 Charles J. Arms, 59 

1865 Simeon O. Allen, 63 

1866 William L. Griswold, 57 

1867 Henry A. Chittenden, 54 

1868 Calvin D. Stowell, 55 

1868 James H. Wood, 52 

1869 William A. Copp, 57 
1869 Henry J. Dutton, 55 
1869 Henry H. Kerr, 54 

1869 Adrian V. S. Lindsley, 53 

1870 Benjamin Silliman, 51 



Place and 
Worcester, Mass. 
Merchantville, N. J. 
Eastbourne, England 
Medford, Mass. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Hartford, Conn. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
W. Woodstock, Conn. 
Great Barrington, Mass. 
Stamford, Conn. 
S. Berwick, Me. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Ormond, Fla. 
Sound Beach, Conn. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Sailor's Snug Harbor, N. 
Galveston, Tex. 
Eosegarten, Pa. 
Eockford, HI. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Genoa, Nebr. 
New York City 
CatskiU, N. Y. 
Canterbury, Conn. 
New York City 
Mt. Vernon, Wash. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Northampton, Mass. 
New York City 
New York City 
New Haven, Conn. 
At sea 

Chester, Mass. 
New York City 
Providence, E. I. 
W. Springfield, Mass. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Berkeley, Cal. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
New York City 
New York City 
San Luis Obispo, Cal. 
Denver, Col. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
New York City 



Time of Death 

Sept. 6, '00 

June 19, '00 

March 6, '01 

Feb. 5, '01 

May 4, '00 

Sept. 28, '00 

Aug. 13, '00 

Oct. 1, '00 

Jan. 1, '01 

May 17, '01 

Jan. 1, '01 

Nov. 4, '00 

Sept. 11, '00 

Sept. 12, '00 

Nov. 25, '00 

March 14, '01 

Jan. 18, '01 

Y. Oct. 7, '00 

Sept. 8, '00 

July 14, '00 

Sept. 27, '00 

Feb. 22, '01 

Jan. 8, '01 

April 11, '01 

Deo. 11, '00 

Feb. 9, '01 

Nov. 18, '00 

May 30, '99 

Dec. 28, '00 

Oct. 6, '00 

Sept. 21, '00 

Aug. 6, '00 

March 8, '01 

Jan. 13, '01 

May 18, '01 

Dec. 25, '00 

March 9, '01 

April 22, '01 

Feb. 6, '01 

Sept. 9, '00 

Feb. 26, '01 

March 23, '01 

April 13, '01 

Feb. 15, '01 

May 28, '01 

Dec. 28, '00 

Feb. 4, '01 



110 



Class Name and Age 

1871 Nathan H. Whittlesey, 52 

1873 Frederick W. Adee, 47 

1873 Alfred T. Bacon, 48 

1873 George T. Bliss, 49 

1873 William W. Browning, 48 

1874 Joseph U. Brown, 47 
1876 Philip G. Russell, 46 
1876 John A. Wells, 45 

1878 John A. Porter, 44 

1879 John L. Franklin, 44 

1881 Arthur E. White, 42 

1882 Fred J. Brockway, 41 

1884 Charles E. Bedell, 37 

1885 Edwin F. Norton, 39 

1886 Percy Edgar, 35 

1887 John B. Keep, 34 
1887 George F. Nesbitt, 35 

1887 Fred'k R. Whittlesey, 35 

1888 Arthur White, 35 

1891 Elijah G. Boardman, 32 

1892 Edward B. Mowbray, 29 

1892 Horace T. Pitkin, 30 

1893 Alfred H. Jones, 32 

1894 William C. Crafts, 27 
1894 Kirk C. McKinney, 30 
1894 Henry B. Perkins, Jr., 29 
1894 Walter E. Stewart, Jr., 27 
1897 Burt B. Kauffman, 28 
1897 DeWitt L. Sage, 25 

1897 Alexander Wheeler, 24 

1898 Robert Callender, 25 

1899 Coburn D. Berry, Jr., 23 
1899 John P. Camp, 26 

1899 -J. Francis Flynn, 23 

1900 Arthur E. Ely, 24 
1900 Thomas E. Franklin, 22 



Place and 


Time of Death 


Washington, D. C. 


Feb. 20, 


'00 


Westchester, N. Y. 


Aug. 25, 


'00 


Denver, Col. 


June 4 


'01 


New York City 


March 24, 


'01 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Oct. 3, 


'00 


Scranton, Pa. 


May 30 


'99 


Washington, D. C. 


July 21 


'00 


Englewood, N. J. 


May 21, 


'01 


Pomfret, Conn. 


Dec. 15 


'00 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Jan. 3, 


'01 


New York City 


Feb. 21 


'01 


Brattleboro, Vt. 


April 21, 


'01 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Sept. 28, 


'00 


Bath, Steuben Co., N. 


Y. Sept. 23 


,'00 


Battle, Wyo. 


Nov. 1 


'00 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


April 9 


'01 


Mebane, N. C. , 


Nov. 27 


'00 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


July 19 


'00 


At sea 


April 19 


'01 


Cleveland, 0. 


July 21 


'00 


New York City 


Dec. 9, 


'00 


Pao-ting-fu, China 


Julyl 


'00 


Las Vegas, N. M. 


Jan. 15 


'01 


Denver, Col. 


Jan. 7, 


'01 


El Paso, Tex. 


Dec. 7 


'00 


Warren, 0. 


Oct. 19 


'00 


San Francisco, Cal, 


March 5, 


'01 


Portsmouth, N. H. 


Aug. 23 


'00 


Albany, N. Y. 


Jan, 1, 


'01 


Stratford, Conn. 


March 30 


'01 


Cranston, R. I. 


Dec. 31, 


'00 


Asheville, N. C. 


March 16, 


'01 


Phoenix, Ariz. 


May 20, 


'01 


Meriden, Conn. 


April 17 


'01 


New Haven, Conn. 


Jan. 6 


'01 


Lancaster, Pa. 


Oct. 20, 


'00 



YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



1852 James H. Curry, 73 

1854 Moses C. White, 81 

1857 Cortland V. R. Creed, 65 

1864 Napoleon B. Kenyon, 59 

1867 Julian N. Parker, 60 

1881 Charles W. Dana, 45 

1898 Fred'k W. Hulseberg, 26 



Shrub Oak, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
New Haven, Conn. 
River Point, R. I. 
S. Manchester, Conn. 
Tunkhannock, Pa. 
near Majajay, P. I. 



Sept. 24, '00 
Oct. 24, '00 
Aug. 8, '00 
Dec. 3, '99 
Feb. 7, '01 

April 17, '01 
Aug. 1, '00 



Ill 



YALE LAW SCHOOL 



Class Name and Age 

1844 Anthony VanWyck, 78 

1846 William B. Wooster, 79 

1860 Francis C. Burgess, 63 

1860 Waldo G. Perry, 6.4 

1877 Edward L. Linsley, 43 

1881 Peter Doyle, 55 

1889 William E. Mattison, 36 

1893 David T. McNamara, 41 

1895 Joseph A. Johnson, 36 



Place and 
Milwaukee, Wise. 
Ansonia, Conn. 
Eochester, Minn. 
Washington, D. C. 
North Haven, Conn. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
S. Shaftsbury, Vt. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Irondequoit, N. Y. 



Time of Death 

Dec. 33, '00 

Sept. 30, '00 

April 8, '00 

Feb. 33, '01 

Oct. 18, '00 

Oct. 37, '00 

April 35, '99 

April 18, '01 

Aug. 36, '00 



YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL 
1876 John M. Dutton, 53 Newport, Vt. 



June 17, '00 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL 



1859 Franklin Booth, 63 

1867 Volney G. Barbour, 58 

1868 Frank M. Guthrie, 53 
1873 Alvah W. Brown, 46 
1875 Henry M. Hastings, 46 
1881 William M. Wood, 31 
1891 George P. Starkweather, 38 
1893 Sherman H. Bouton, 30 
1893 John B. Winstandley, 39 
1893 George C. Fouse, 35 

1893 William B. Thompson, 30 

1895 William K. Duckworth, 36 

1896 George H. Clark, 36 
1896 Clarence C. Mabie, 36 

1896 Harry E. Tuttle, 34 

1897 George E. Tracy, 36 

1899 Eichard S. Lamb, 33 

1900 Alfonzo E. Cluett, 33 
1900 Trumbull Kelly, 31 



Elmhurst, N. Y. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Chillicothe, O. 
Newport, E. I. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Paris, France. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Dunedin, Fla. 
Chicago, 111. 
Washington, D. C. 
Pasadena, Cal. 
Mt. Clemens, Mich. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Elkins, W. Va. 
Eedlands, Cal. 
Eochester, N. Y. 
Waterbury, Conn. 
Troy, N. Y. 
Johnstown, Pa. 



Aug. 19, '00 
June 4, '01 
Dec. 31, '00 
May 38, '01 

April 39, '01 

May 39, '00 

March 31, '01 

Dec. 6, '00 

May 19, '00 

Feb. 7, '01 

Sept. 33, '00 

June 15, '00 
Jan. 13, '01 
Oct. 11, '00 
Dec. 38, '00 
June 1, '00 
Oct. 16, '00 
Dec. 34, '00 

Nov. 30, '00 



The number of deaths recorded this year is 155, and the average age of 
the graduates of the Academical Department is nearly 63 years. 
The oldest living gi-aduate of the Academical Department is : 
Class of 1839, Prof. Samuel Porter, of Washington, D. C, bom Jan. 
13, 1810. 

The oldest living graduate of the Medical Department is : 
Class of 1831, Chauncey Ayres, of Stamford, Conn., born Aug. 14, 
1808. 



I isr ID E X 



Members of the Divinity, Law, Medical, and Scientific Schools are indicated by the 
letters d, I, m, and s, respectively. 



Class 




Page 


Class 




Page 


1849 


Adams, Enoch G. 


46 


1895 s 


Duckworth, William K. 


105 


1873 


Adee, Frederick W. 


71 


1853 


Dulles, Andrew C. 


53 


1865 


Allen, Simeon 0. 


64 


1869 


Dutton, Henry J. 


67 


1862 


Anderson, William D. 


61 


1876 d 


Dutton, John M. 


99 


1841 


Andrews, Horace 


27 








1863 


Arms, Charles J. 


63 


1886 


Edgar, Percy 


80 


1837 


Arnold, Owen B. 


18 


1839 


Edwards, Eugene 


26 








1900 


Ely, Arthur E. 


89 


1873 


Bacon, Alfred T, 


72 


1841 


Emerson, Joseph 


29 


1837 


Bagg, Moses M. 


18 


1837 


Evarts, William M. 


19 


1867 s 


Barbour, Volney G. 


100 








1830 


Barnard, Henry- 


6 


1844 


FewSmith, William 


39 


1834 


Barnes, Jeremiah R. 


15 


1847 


Finney, Thomas M. 


43 


1852 


Barrett, Charles H. 


51 


1899 


Flynn, J. Francis 


88 


1884 


Bedell, Charles E. 


78 


1893 s 


Fouse, George C. 


104 


1843 


Bennett, Joseph E. 


34 


1879 


Franklin, John L. 


77 


1899 


Berry, Coburn D. 


87 


1900 


Franklin, Thomas E. 


89 


1848 


Bird, James 


45 








1873 


Bliss, George T, 


73 


1835 


Galpin, Samuel H. 


16 


1891 


Boardman, Elijah G. 


81 


1843 


Gilman, Edward W. 


35 


1859 s 


Booth, Franklin 


100 


1866 


Griswold, William L. 


64 


1892 s 


Bouton, Sherman H. 


103 


1868 s 


Guthrie, Frank M. 


101 


1882 


Brockway, Fred. J. 


78 








1847 


Brooks, Calvin M. 


43 


1875 s 


Hastings, Henry M. 


102 


1873 s 


Brown, Alvah W. 


102 


1841 


Heald, Daniel A. 


30 


1874 


Brown, Joseph U. 


74 


1851 


Hendrie, John W. 


49 


1844 


Brown, Samuel M. 


38 


1861 


Higbee, William H. 


59 


1873 


Browning, William W. 


73 


1857 


Hodge, Lyman D. 


57 


1860 Z 


Burgess, Francis C. 


96 


1837 


Hooker, John 


22 








1842 


Hubbard, George B. 


33 


1898 


Callender, Robert 


87 


1898 m 


Hulseberg, Frederick W 


. 93 


1899 


Camp, John P. 


88 


1832 


Huntington, Joshua 


9 


1867 


Chittenden, Henry A. 


65 








1896 s 


Clark, George H. 


105 


1836 


Isham, Austin 


16 


1842 


Clark, Gideon C. 


32 








1900 s 


Cluett, Alfonso R. 


107 


1895 ^ 


Johnson, Joseph A. 


98 


1869 


Copp, William A. 


67 


1856 


Johnson, Wilbur 


56 


1894 


Crafts, William C. 


84 


1893 


Jones, Alfred H. 


84 


1857 m 


Creed, Cortland V. R. 


91 








1852 m 


Curry, James H, 


90 


1897 


KaufEman, Burt B. 


86 


1829 


Cutler, Leman W. 


5 


1887 


Keep, John B. 


80 








1900 s 


Kelly, Trumbull 


107 


1881 m 


Dana, Charles W. 


93 


1853 


Kent, Albert E. 


54 


1844 


Dana, John A, 


38 


1864 m 


Kenyon, Napoleon B. 


92 


1841 


Dickinson, Flavel A. 


28 


1869 


Ken-, Henry H. 


68 


188n 


Doyle, Peter 


97 


1862 


Ketcham, William P. 


61 



114 



Class Page I Class 

1852 Labatt, Henry J. 51 ! 1897 

1899 s Lamb, Eichard S. 106 

1869 Lindsley, Adrian V. S. 69 

1877 I Linsley, Edward L. 96 



1896 s Mabie, Clarence C. 105 

1852 McCormick, Henry 52 

1894 McKinney, Kirk C. 85 

1844 McLeod, John 39 

1893 I McNamara, David T. 98 

1861 Marshall, John E. 60 
1844 Marshall, John P. 40 
1833 Mather, Frederick E. 13 
1889 I Mattison, William E. 97 
1858 Mills, Edward M. 59 
1892 Mowbray, Edward B. 82 

1862 Murphy, Thomas D. 62 

1887 Nesbitt, George F. 80 

1885 Norton, Edwin F. 79 



1854 Olney, James B. 55 



1837 

1841 . 

1867 m 

1843 

1894 

1860 Z 

1843 

1892 

1836 

1878 

1848 

1837 
1850 
1852 
1876 



Paddock, Eobert H. 


23 


Paine, Albei-t 


31 


Parker, Julian N. 


92 


Parsons, Samuel M. 


36 


Perkins, Henry B. 


85 


Perry, Waldo G. 


96 


Pierce, George T. 


37 


Pitkin, Horace T. 


82 


Porter, Giles M. 


17 


Porter, John A. 


75 


Porter, Timothy H. 


45 



Eandall, William E. 24 

Eipley, Erastus L. 47 

Eowland, William L. 53 

Eussell, Philip G. 74 



1832 

1837 

1831 

1870 

1824 

1851 

1844 

1891s 

1894 

1832 

1868 

1842 
1893 s 
1897 s 
1851 
1838 
1850 
1896 s 
1857 



Page 

Sage, DeWitt L. 86 

Salisbury, Edward E, 10 

Scarborough, William S. 25 

Seward, Dwight M. 8 

Silliman, Benjamin 69 

Silliman, Benjamin D. 3 

Smith, Horace M. 49 

Smith, William M. 41 

Starkweather, George P. 103 

Stewart, Walter E., Jr. 85 

Stills, Alfred 12 

Stowell, Calvin D. 66 



Teele, Albert K. 
Thompson, William B. 
Tracy, George E, 
Tuckerman, George S. 
Tufts, James 
Tupper, Henry M, 
Tuttle, Harry E. 
Tyler, Moses C. 



1844 I VanWyck, Anthony 

1856 Webb, Benjamin 

1853 Welch, Joseph A. 
1876 Wells, James A. 
1897 Wheeler, Alexander 
1888 White, Arthur 
1881 White, Arthur E. 

1854 m White, Moses C. 

1887 Whittlesey, Frederick E. 

1871 Whittlesey, Nathan H. 

1843 Wickes, John 

1844 Wilkins, H. Brady 
1847 Williams, G. Clinton 
1892 s Winstandley, John B. 
1862 Winthrop, Buchanan 
1839 Wolcott, Elizur 
1868 Wood, James H. 
1881 s Wood, William M. 
1846 I Wooster, William B. 



34 

105 

106 

50 

25 

48 

106 

58 

94 

57 
54 
75 
87 
81 
77 
90 
81 
70 
37 
42 
44 

104 
62 
26 
66 

102 
95 






OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE UMIVERSITY 

Deceased during the Academical Year ending in 
JUNE, 1902, 



INCLUDING THE RECORD OF A FEW WHO DIED PREVIOUSLY, 
HITHERTO UNREPORTED 



[Presented at the meeting at the Alumni, June 24th, 1902] 



[No. 2 of the Fifth Printed Series, and No. 61 of the whole Record] 



/ 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GEADUATES OF YALE UNIVERSITY 

Deceased during the Academical year ending in 
June, 1902, 

Including the Record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported 

[Pbesented at the Meeting of the Alumni, June 24th, 1902] 

[No. 2 of the Fifth Printed Series, and No. 61 of the whole Record] 



YALE COLLEGE 

(academical department) 

1829 

Samuel Porter, eldest of the seven children of Rev. Dr. 
Noah Porter (Yale 1803) and Hetty (Meigs) Porter, and elder 
brother of President Noah Porter and of Rev. Giles M. Porter 
(Yale 1836), was born at Farmington, Conn., on January 12, 
1810. 

After graduation he taught a short time in the family of a 
Virginia planter, and from 1832 to 1836 in the American Asylum 
for the Deaf and Dumb in Hartford, Conn. For two years he 
was a student in the Yale Theological Seminary, but increasing 
deafness led him to abandon the idea of entering the ministry. 
From 1840 to 1842 he was associate editor of the Congregational 
Observer in Hartford, then until 1846 instructor in the New 
York Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, and for the next twenty 
years in his former position at Hartford. From 1854 to 1860 he 
was editor of the American Annals of the Deaf and Dumb. On 
the- formation of the National Deaf Mute College, now Gallaudet 
College, at Washington, D, C, he was appointed Professor of 
Mental Science and English Philology, and held the chair from 
1866 to 1884, when he was made professor emeritus^ continuing 



118 

Auburn Theological Seminary, and took his Senior studies at 
Princeton Seminary. He was licensed to preach by the Presby- 
tery of Geneva and began his ministry at Corning, Steuben 
County, N. Y., where he was ordained on September 23, 1840. 
From 1842 to 1845 he was pastor at Fredonia, Chautauqua 
County, and the next two years at Avon, Livingston County. 

In 1847 he was called to the chair of Ecclesiastical History and 
Church Polity in Auburn Theological Seminary, with which he 
was connected for lifty-four years, and during the more than 
forty-five years of his active work therein he exerted a most help- 
ful and stimulating influence upon many since eminent in the min- 
istry and upon the life of the church. He was constantly writing 
new lectures for his classes, and giving them the results of fresh 
study and vigorous thought. 

In 1866 he was Moderator of the Presbyterian General Assem- 
bly in St.Louis. He published two volumes, a " Manual of 
Church Polity," 1878, and a "Liturgy and Book of Common 
Prayer for the Presbyterian Church," 1883, 2d edition 1886; 
also wrote occasional articles in magazines and delivered addresses 
on many public occasions. 

He retained his youthful vigor and the healthful use of all his 
powers to the close of his life, and died at home from the grip 
on October 29, 1901, at the age of 88 years. 

He married on May 15, 1838, Mary Jane Hanson, daughter of 
Reuben Bostwick Heacock, a merchant of Buffalo, N. Y., and 
sister of Rev. Grosvenor Williams Heacock, D. D. (W. Reserve 
1840). Of his four sons (graduates of Hamilton College respect- 
ively in 1863, 1866, 1871 and 1872) three survive, together with 
a daughter, who married Rev. Myron Adams (Hamilton College 
1863). Mrs. Hopkins, died in January, 1885. 

1835 

JosiAH Abbott, third son and fifth of the eleven children of 
Josiah and Ruth (Estabrook) Abbott, was born in Fraraingham, 
Mass., on May 22, 1811. He was prepared for college at the 
academies in Exeter, N. H., and Amherst, Mass., and joined the 
class of 1 834 at the beginning of Sophomore year, but was soon 
obliged to leave owing to ill health. The following year he re- 
sumed his studies in the class of 1835. 

After graduation, he spent a year teaching in Bridgeport, 
Conn., and two years as a student in Yale Theological Seminary. 



119 

He was licensed to preach, and occasionally supplied pulpits, but 
was never ordained. 

He attended two courses of lectures in the Yale Medical School^ 
and completed his medical studies at the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons of the Western District of New York, located in 
Fairfield, N. Y., receiving his degree in January, 1840. He then 
spent a few months in the hospitals of Boston. His brother-in-law 
was Rev. Benjamin Schneider, D.D. (Amherst 1830), missionary 
at Broosa and Aintab, Turkey, and he had himself planned to be 
a medical raissionarj^, but relinquished his purpose and began 
practice in Marlborough, Mass. In September, 1 843, he removed 
to Rindge, N. H., where he enjoyed a successful practice for 
about twenty years. For ten years or more he was a member of 
the school committee, and in 1860 and 1861 represented the town 
in the New Hampshire Legislature. 

On October 24, 1864, he was appointed Assistant Surgeon of 
the 13th II. S. Heavy Artillery, then stationed at Smithland, 
Ky., serving much of the time on detached duty, and in April, 
1865, was commissioned Surgeon "of the 119th TJ. S. Colored 
Infantry, at Camp Nelson, Ky. While on duty there a severe 
attack of malarial fever unfitted him for further service, and he 
was discharged in September, 1865. 

So serious was the result of this illness upon his nervous system 
that he was unable to resume practice, but found employment in 
the care of a small farm. In 1874 he removed to Winchendon, 
Mass., where he afterwards resided, and where he died of apoplexy 
on November 27, 1901, at the age of 90 years and 6 months. 

He married, on January 5, 1842, Arminda R, daughter of Dea- 
con Joseph and Matilda (Davis) White, of West Boylston, Mass. 
Mrs. Abbott survives him without children. 

1839 

William Bestor Corby:n, son of Joseph Perrin and Margaret 
(Howard) Corbyn, was born in Woodstock, Conn., on June 1, 
1814. In 1815 his family removed to Monroe County, N. Y.,and 
he entered college from Henrietta in that county. He taught 
school before entering college, and during his college course sup- 
ported himself by teaching and other work. 

After graduation he was for four years an instructor in Phillips 
Academy, in Andover, Mass., where he had fitted for college. 
While teaching he was also studying to some extent in Andover 



120 

Theological Seminary. On completing his theological studies he 
took orders in the Protestant Episcopal Church, being ordained 
Deacon in Trinity Church, Boston, Mass., by Bishop Eastburn in 
1843, and Priest by Bishop Brownell, of Connecticut, in Novem- 
ber, 1844. He helped build up churches in Windsor and Man- 
chester, Conn., after which he went west, and for a year and 
a half was rector of St.Paul's Church, St.Louis, Mo. In Febru- 
ary, 1848, he was appointed to establish an institution of learning 
at Palmyra, Mo., which became St.Paul's College, and of which 
he was President until 1857. Under him many of the staunch 
churchmen of the Middle West received their training. For the 
five years following he was both preacher and teacher at Payson, 
111. In 1862 he was recalled to Palmyra, where he became rector 
of St.Paul's Church, and resumed the charge of St.Paul's Col- 
lege, and reestablished the preparatory department. During the 
Civil War college exercises were suspended and the buildings 
were occupied for military purposes. 

In 1871 he was called to the Church of the Good Shepherd, 
Quincy, 111., of which he continued as rector, and for the last few 
years as rector emeritus, until his death. In this church he intro- 
duced the first vested choir in the Mississippi Valley, and advo- 
cated with tact and success many church observances hitherto 
unknown there. He was also principal of the High School in 
Quincy for twenty-one years, delegating a part of his church 
duties during that time to an associate. 

While in St.Louis, he published in 1848, a pamphlet on "The 
Church: What is it, and Where is it?" He also contributed arti- 
cles on ecclesiastical subjects to religious papers and magazines, 
lectured most acceptably on Shakespearean and kindred topics, 
and wrote many poems which remain uncollected. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity from St.Paul's College in 1861. 

Dr. Corbyn died of hemorrhage of the bladder, after an illness 
of three years, at his home in Quincy, on March 28, 1902. He 
was in his 88th year. 

He married, on August 13, 1841, Harriet N., daughter of 
Deacon Joseph Wright (Yale 18t)4), and sister of his classmate, 
Rev. William S. Wright, also of Rev. James L. Wright (Yale 
1832). She died in 1843, leaving a son, now a clergyman in the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. In 1855 he married Mary Frances, 
daughter of Edward Charles McDonald, who survives him with a 
daughter. An older brother graduated in the class of 1838. 



121 

Lewis Hall, son of James and Mary (Cheney) Hall, was born 
on September 12, 1815, at Carroll,. Chautauqua County, N. Y. 

After. graduation he made a tour of scientific exploration up 
the Mississippi River to the Falls of St. Anthony, and then 
westward with a party of Sioux Indians. Afterwards, with a 
party of Chippewas, he followed the St. Croix to its sources, 
thence went across to Lake Superior, of whose mineral wealth he 
was one of the earliest explorers. 

Returning to Chautauqua County, he began the study of law, 
and continued it in St.Louis, Mo., where he was admitted to the 
bar in 1842, but never practiced. He was soon called home to 
take charge of the extensive land and lumber business of his 
father, whose health had suddenly failed. In 1849, after the 
death of his father, he removed to Jamestown, in the same 
county, which was afterward his home. He was engaged in 
various lines of business, but principally in the lumber trade. 
For a few years he was a member of the Board of Supervisors 
of Chautauqua County, but held no other oflBce. 

He died at his home in Jamestown, on April 1, 1902, in the 87th 
year of his age. 

Mr. Hall married, on May 4, 1843, Mary Augusta, daughter of 
Merritt Davis, of St.Louis, Mo., originally of Worcester, Mass. 
She is deceased, but a daughter survives him. A brother grad- 
uated in 1849, and a sister is the widow of George Starr Tucker- 
man of the class of 1850. 

Sylvester Southard, son of Zebulon and Catharine (Van 
Voorhies) Southard, was born on June 29, 1817, in Fishkill, N. Y. 

After graduation from college he returned to the farm, which 
he managed with success, and which was his home through life. 
From his early years he was a member of the Reformed (Dutch) 
Church, and for many years a deacon and elder. He was a 
director of the Fishkill National Bank for fifteen years, a trus- 
tee of the Fishkill Savings Bank from 1862 to 1877, and active 
in matters of public interest. About twenty-five years ago he 
began to lose his eyesight, and for the last fourteen years had 
been entirely blind. 

He died at home of Bright's disease, after a long season of 
feeble health, on November 6, 1901, at the age of 84 years. 

He married on June 17, 1876, Sarah Frances, eldest daughter 
of John V. and Jeannette (Woolley) Storm of Fishkill. She 
survives him with a daughter. An older brother graduated in 



122 

1841 

John Curwen, son of George F. and Elinor H. (Ewing) 
Curwen, was born in Lower Merion Township, Montgomery 
County, Pa., on September 20, 1821, and entered college at the 
beginning of Sophomore year. 

After graduation he at once began the study of medicine at the 
University of Pennsylvania, from which he received the degree 
of M.D., April 4, 1844. From September, 1843, to the following 
June, he was Resident Physician of Wills' Hospital for Diseases 
of the Eye in Philadelphia, and for over five years thereafter 
Assistant Physician of the Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane 
in the same city. He was then a practicing physician in Phila- 
delphia until his election, on February 14, 1851, as Superintendent 
and Physician of the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital, at 
Harrisburg, for a term of ten years. To this position he was 
twice reelected for the same period. After thirty years of work 
at Harrisburg he was chosen, on June 24, 1881, Physician-in- 
Chief and Superintendent of the State Hospital for the Insane at 
Warren, Pa., and continued there until his retirement in June, 
1900. He had devoted over fifty years to the service of the 
insane, and was highly esteemed for his thorough knowledge of 
the many forms of insanity and nervous diseases. He was a 
commissioner for the erection of the Hospital for the Insane at 
Danville, Pa,, in 1868, and for that at Warren in 1873. 

His annual reports of the work at Harrisburg and Warren, 
and a small volume, a '* Manual for Attendants in Hospitals for 
the Insane," have been published; also, in 1870, a "Report on 
the Proper Treatment of the Insane," made to the American 
Medical Association. He has written, besides, a History of 
the Association of Medical Superintendents of American Insti- 
tutions for the Insane, of which he had been Secretary since 
1858, and a number of memorials on the care of the insane, and 
delivered several addresses on mental disorders before the Medi- 
cal Society of the State of Pennsylvania. 

He was President of the Medical Society of the State of 
Pennsylvania in 1869, and was a member of the American Medi- 
cal Association, and an honorary member of the American 
Philosophical Society. He had been a trustee Of Lafayette 
College since 1865. 

Upon his retirement from the charge of the Hospital at Warren, 
he returned to Harrisburg to reside with his daughter. During 



123 

his former residence there he had been active in the organization 
of the Seventh Presbyterian Church and had been trustee and 
elder for many years. At the last Commencement time he 
attended and greatly enjoyed his class reunion in New Haven, 
but immediately after his return to Harrisburg he was prostrated 
by the extreme heat, and from the effects of that with partial 
paralysis he died suddenly on July 2, 1901. He was in the 80th 
year of his age. 

Dr. Curwen married, on August 2, 1849, Martha P., daughter 
of Hon. David Elmer, of Bridgeton, N. J. She died in 1873, 
and Dr. Curwen married in 1881, Miss Annie I. Wyeth, who 
died about three years ago, leaving no children. Of the children 
by the first marriage, only one daughter is living, four daughters 
and a son having died. 

John Foote Lay was born in Batavia, N. Y., on May 1, 1822. 
He was the eldest son of Hon. George Washington Lay (Ham- 
ilton College 1817, M.A. Yale 1836) and Olive (Foote) Lay, and 
grandson of John Lay (Yale 1780), a native of Saybrook, Conn. 
His father was a Representative in Congress, and from 1842 to 
1845 Charge d'Affaires at the Court of Sweden. The son entered 
Yale College with his brother George at the beginning of Sopho- 
more year. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of his uncle, Hon. 
Phineas L. Tracy (Yale 1806), in Batavia, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1844. He did not, however, practice extensively, but 
devoted himself to everything that would advance the public 
good. From 1871 to 1880 he was Secretary of the Board of 
Education, Trustee of the Batavia Union School, and the active 
member of the building committee which superintended the erec- 
tion of its fine building completed in 1874. This school is fur- 
nished with an excellent library of several thousand volumes, 
open free to every one in the district. He was afterwards 
appointed Regents' Examiner at the school. Under his supervi- 
sion a number of other school houses were erected, and he was 
constantly seeking the improvement of the school system in 
some direction. For many years he was Vice-President of the 
Batavia Cemetery Association, which during this time secured 
endowments for the perpetual care of many lots. He was a 
vestryman of St. James' Protestant Episcopal Church. As chair- 
man of the Board of Sewer Commissioners for several years, he 
rendered an important service to public health. He was deeply^ 



124 

interested in the history of his native village, and his mind was a 
storehouse of information and reminiscence relating to the early 
history of western New York. For a considerable time he had 
been engaged in preparing a genealogy of the Lay family, but 
did not complete it. 

He had not been well for several years, and was accustomed to 
spend the winter in a milder climate. Since his return from 
Philadelphia in the spring previous to his decease, he had been 
confined to the house the greater part of the time. He was not 
married, but made his home with his brother George in Batavia, 
and there he died, September 27, 1901. He was 79 years of age. 

1842 

Daniel Lyman Shearer, sixth son of John and Chloe (Baker) 
Shearer, was born on November 5, 1819, in Palmer, Mass., but 
early in life removed with his parents to the neighboring town of 
Ware, and from there entered college. 

After graduation he engaged in the wholesale furniture busi- 
ness in Boston, Mass., in company with his brother, Leonard 
Baker Shearer. Their business prospered, and in 1846 they 
located a branch house in Richmond, Va., of which he had general 
supervision, one in 1849 in New Orleans, La., and others later in 
New York and Chicago. Having a large business and prop- 
erty in New Orleans at the outbreak of the Civil War, he was 
compelled to remain there during that whole period, managing 
the business in complete separation from the northern branches. 

He w^as drafted into the Confederate service, but in three days 
deserted, and remained concealed several weeks in the city until 
the arrival of General Benjamin F. Butler, before whom he 
declared his allegiance to the United States Government. 

After closing up his business in New Orleans, he left there 
in 1870, and until 1874 took charge of the New York house. 
Thenceforward he remained most of the time in Boston, looking 
after his real estate interests there, making, however, frequent 
trips to western cities for a similar purpose. He had a warm 
interest in Yale, and was for many years a regular attendant at 
Commencement. Through his generous assistance a class letter 
had been issued annually by the secretary for nearly twenty 
years past. 

Mr. Shearer died at his home in Cambridge, Mass., of pneu- 
monia, on April 17, 1902, at the age of 82 years. He was never 
married, and was the last survivor of his family. 



125 

Nathan Witter Williams, son of Rev. Thomas Williams 
(Yale 1800) and Ruth (Hale) VYilliams, was born on March 12, 
1816, in Providence, R. I. His father was a pungent and power- 
ful Congregational preacher, who for thirteen years before his 
decease was the last survivor of his class, and for the last three 
years of his life the only living graduate of the eighteenth cen- 
tury. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Lucy (Witter) 
Williams. During Freshman year his home was in Harrington, 
R. I., and in Sophomore year in Hartford, Conn. 

The year after graduation he taught in East Greenwich, R. I., 
and the next five years conducted a private school in Philadel- 
phia, Pa. During this time he received instruction in theology 
in a private class from Rev. Albert Barnes, D.D., and other cler- 
gymen of that city, and was licensed to preach by the Fourth 
Presbytery of Philadelphia at Cedarville, N. J., on April 15, 1846. 
Leaving Philadelphia in July, 1848, he preached several months 
for the Congregational Church in South Kingston, R. I., and then 
became pastor of the Congregational Church in Shrewsbury, 
Mass., being ordained on February 28, 1849, and receiving dis- 
mission at his own request, after nine years of service, on April 
27, 1858. After a western journey occupying several months, 
on his return to Shrewsbury in November, he was elected by the 
Republicans a Representative in the Massachusetts Legislature 
from the Fifteenth District of Worcester County. 

From June, 1860, to October, 1863, he resided in Providence, 
R. L, supplying churches in Danielson and Plainfield, Conn., dur- 
ing a portion of this time. From August, 1863, until the autumn 
of 1867, he was in charge of the Congregational Church at Peace- 
dale, R. I. He then returned to Providence, which was after- 
wards his home, and was engaged in business, occasionally sup- 
plying pulpits in the city and vicinity. 

While a member of the Massachusetts Legislature he published 
a pamphlet, containing six sermons, under the title " Sovereign 
and Subject," and in 1877 issued a volume called "The Living 
God." 

In 1882 he succeeded Charles Fabrique as Class Secretary, and 
his service to the class and his annual Class Letters, continued as 
long as his health permitted, did much to promote good fellow- 
ship among the scattered classmates. 

Mr. Williams died of apoplexy at his home in Providence, after 
a decline of nearly four years, on April 16, 1902. He was 86 
years of age. 



126 

He married, on July 1, 1846, Frances, daughter of Joseph and 
Frances Barclay, of Philadelphia, and had two sons and two 
daughters, of whom one son and the daughters, with their mother, 
survive. The second daughter is the wife of Rev. James Budden 
Renshaw, a graduate of the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
at Amherst in 18 7 3 and of Oberlin Seminary in 18 "79. 

1843 

John Aveey, son of Robert Stanton and Sally (Crary) Avery, 
was born August 19, 1819, at Preston, New London County, 
Conn., his father's farm including a large part of Avery's Plains 
in that town. He entered college the second term of Freshman 
year. 

The year following graduation he was principal of the academy 
at Lyme, Conn., and at other times while obtaining his education 
taught school several terms. In 1844 he began his theological 
studies in the Yale Divinity School, and completed his course in 
1847. He was ordained on June 21, 1848, Pastor of the Exeter 
Congregational Church, in Lebanon, New London County, Conn., 
and completed a service there of twenty-five years. At the close 
of this pastorate in 1873, he transferred his ministry to the 
adjoining county of Windham, and was acting pastor at Central 
Village, in the town of Plainfield, five or six years, and at West 
Woodstock three years. In November, 1881, he accepted a call 
to Ledyard, New London County, where the church was much 
strengthened during his ministry of nearly eleven years. In April, 
1892, he retired from regular preaching, and removed to Norwich, 
Conn. He afterward frequently responded to calls for service, 
and continued in close relation with pastors, being for many years 
before his death Registrar of the New London County Associa- 
tion of Congregational Ministers. 

In 1898, fifty years after his ordination, he preached an anni- 
versary sermon in his old parish of Lebanon, and at the Bicenten- 
nial celebration of the First Congregational Church of Preston 
the same year he presented " Sketches of the Twelve Pastors." 
In 1901 he completed a " History of the Town of Ledyard," 
which contains this and other historical papers of much interest. 
He was actively interested in educational matters, and was for 
years a member of the Board of Education of the Falls district 
of Norwich. He was also an honorary trustee of the Bill Library 
at Ledyard. 



127 

Mr. Avery died of pneumonia, after an illness of ten days, at 
his home in Norwich, on April 23, 1902, in his 83d year. 

He married, on November 6, 1851, Susan Matson, daughter of 
Reuben and Betsey Burnham (Wait) Champion, of Lyme, Conn., 
who survives him with one of their three daughters. 

Benjamin Tucker Eames, son of James and Sarah (Mumford) 
Eames, was born in Dedhara, Mass., on June 4, 1818. His parents 
removed to Providence, R. I., in 1820, and from there he entered 
college. Before completing his preparation for college he spent 
four years in active business life. In his Senior year he was Pres- 
ident of the Brothers in Unity. 

After graduation he taught the academy at North Attleboro, 
Mass., for about six months, and devoted his leisure to the study 
of law under the direction of Chief Justice Samuel Ames (Brown 
1823). In the spring of 1844 he entered the office of Hon. Bel- 
lamy Storer (Bowdoin 1821), in Cincinnati, where he remained 
until the following winter, and was then admitted to practice in 
the courts of Kentucky. Shortly afterward he returned to Provi- 
dence, and in May, 1845, was admitted to the Rhode Island bar. 
Early in his career he declined the position of Judge of the 
Supreme Court of Rhode Island. 

From 1845 to 1850 he was recording and reading clerk of the 
House of Representatives of Rhode Island, and during part of 
that time reported the proceedings of the General Assembly for 
the Providence Daily Journal. In 1854 he was elected from 
Providence to the Senate of that State, and reelected to the same 
office the next two years, also in 1859, 1863, and 1884. He was 
a member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives in 1868 
and 1869, serving as Speaker in the latter year. In 1857 he 
was one of the Commissioners for the Revision of the Public 
Laws of the State. In 1860 he was a delegate to the Chicago 
convention which nominated Abraham Lincoln for the Presi- 
dency. In 1870 he was elected a Representative to the 42d 
Congress, and reelected to the three succeeding Congresses. He 
served on the committees on elections and Revolutionary claims, 
on patents and land claims, and later, during two terms, as a mem- 
ber of the committee on banking and currency. 

For a number of years past he had been in poor health, but 
continued an advisory practice at his law office in Providence. 
He died after an illness of several weeks from bronchial pneu- 



128 

monia, in East Greenwich, R. I., on October 6, 1901, at the age 
of 83 years. He was a member of the Congregational church. 

He married, in Warwick, R. I., on May 9, 1849, Laura S., 
daughter of Josiah and Asenath (Capron) Chapin, and had 
three sons and one daughter, of whom the daughter only sur- 
vives. Two of the sons died early in life, and the other son 
(Yale 1881) in 1894. Mrs. Eames died on October 1, 1872. An 
older brother graduated at Brown University in 1839. 

AsAHEL Augustus Stevens, son of George and Sarilla 
(Hitchcock) Stevens, was born on December 24, 1816, in Chesh- 
ire, Conn. His preparation for college was gained at Phillips 
(Andover) Academy. 

After graduation he began the study of theology, completing 
his course at Yale Seminary in 1847. He was ordained Pastor of 
the Center Church, Meriden, Conn., March 15, 1848. Owing to 
ill health he was dismissed from his charge, December 11, 1854, 
and during the two years following resided at Cheshire, Conn., 
and Newton, Jasper-County, Iowa. He was then able to resume 
ministerial duties, and in December, 1856, became Pastor of the 
Main Street Congregational Church in Peoria, 111. Ten years 
later he resigned, and found in farming needed respite from 
overwork; but in a few months he began to supply the Congre- 
gational Church in Lacon, Marshall County, and continued there 
for three years. He was then recalled to his work in Peoria. In 
January, 1875, the Main Street Congregational and Fulton 
Street Presbyterian Churches were united, and of the First 
Congregational Church thus formed he was pastor until Feb- 
ruary 1, 1882, when he became pastor emeritus. The corner- 
stone of the present stone edifice was laid by Mr. Stevens in 
1876. Two of his sermons were published. 

He died of heart failure at his home in Peoria, on July 16, 
1901, in the 85th year of his age. 

He married in September, 1847, Mary Comstock, daughter of 
Gideon and Julia (Parker) Bristol, of Cheshire, Conn., and sister 
of Rev. Sherlock Bristol (Oberlin 1839). Mrs. Stevens died soon 
after the celebration of their golden wedding in 1897. Three 
sons, two of whom graduated from the University of Michigan, 
respectively in 1870 and 1877, and a daughter, survive. 



129 

Douglas Kellogg Turner, fourth child of Bela and Mary 
(Nash) Turner, was born on December 17, 1823, in Stockbridge, 
Mass., but lived during most of his youth with his parents in 
Hartford, Conn. 

After graduation he taught a year in Hartford and studied 
theology one year each at the Seminaries in Andover and New 
Haven. He was licensed to preach by, the Hampden (Mass.) 
East Association in 1846, and in the autumn of that year began 
a service of eighteen months as teacher in the Classical and 
Select School in Hartsville, in the Township of Warwick, Bucks 
County, Pa. He was then called to the pastorate of the Nesham- 
iny Presbyterian Church in the same place, and was ordained on 
April 18, 1848. After an able and devoted ministry of twenty- 
five years, during which nearly two hundred and seventy-five 
members were added to the church, he resigned on account of 
ill health, and closed his work on April 20, 1873, but continued 
to reside in Hartsville. 

He published, in 1876, a *' History of the Neshaminy Presbyte- 
rian Church, 1726-1876," and a number of papers on historical 
topics. From 1883 to 1893, he was Librarian of the Presbyte- 
rian Historical Society in Philadelphia. 

Mr. Turner died of heart failure, at his home in Hartsville, on 
March 8, 1902, at the age of 78 years. 

He married on May 4, 1856, Sarah H., daughter of Robert and 
Catharine (Gait) Darrah, of Hartsville. After her death in 1863, 
he married her sister Rebecca, who survives him. There were 
no children by either marriage. 

George Welton Warner, son of Curtis and Minerva 
(Welton) Warner, was born in Roxbury, Conn., on May 8, 1821. 

For three years after graduation he taught an academy at 
Manning's Neck, Hertford County, N. C. Returning North in 
1846, he took a partial course in the Yale Law School, com- 
pleted his legal studies in Bridgeport, Conn., in the office of the 
Hon. James C. Loomis (Yale 1828), and was admitted to the bar 
in August, 1848. From November, 1849, until 1856, he was 
associated in business with his former instructor, under the 
name of Loomis & Warner, after which he practiced alone. 
He was City Attornej- in 1860 and 1861, Recorder for several 
terms between 1862 and 1868, and Judge of Probate in 1865. 
In 1860 and 1861 he was also President of the Bridgeport Li- 



180 

braiy Association. A few years since he was President of the 
Fairfield County Bar Association. 

Mr. Warner died of pneumonia at his home in Bridgeport, on 
December 24, 1901, at the age of 80 years. He was a member 
of the North Congregational Church. 

He married on October 12, 1864, Mary A., daughter of Cyrill 
and Eliza Pinchot, of Milford, Pike County, Pa. She survives 
him with one daughter. 

1844 

Charles Whittlesey Camp, son of Joel and Comfort (Whit- 
tlesey) Camp, was born at New Preston, Litchfield County, Conn., 
on October V, 1821. He was admitted to church membership in 
1837. He was class poet at graduation, and occasionally con- 
tributed verses to the Yale Literary Magazine. 

After graduation from college he entered Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City, and completed his course there in 1847. 
He then began a service to the Wisconsin churches of forty-seven 
years, supplying at first the churches at Genesee and Palmyra for 
about a year. He was ordained on January 28, 1848, after which 
he was at Genesee until 1853, and pastor at Sheboygan eleven 
years. From 1864 to 1868 he was pastor at Fond du Lac, from 
1868 to 1892 at Waukesha, and from 1892 to 1895 at Hartford. 
In 1895 he retired from the active ministry, and resided in 
Waukesha for one year without charge. He then removed to 
Sierra Madre, Los Angeles County, Cal., where he died of heart 
disease, on May 8, 1902, in his 8l8t year. 

He frequently wrote for the secular and religious press, espe- 
cially for The Puritan, a. church paper, and some of his sermons 
and addresses were printed, but not in permanent form. He 
was a charter director of Chicago Theological Seminary from its 
establishment in 1854 until 1891. He received the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity from Beloit College in 1894. 

Dr. Camp married, on October 27, 1847, Elizabeth Pamela, 
daughter of Deacon David and Rebecca (Smalley) Whittlesey, 
of New Britain, Conn., who died in 1895. Of their six children, 
a daughter and three sons are living, a son and daughter having 
died in infancy. The surviving daughter married George Patten 
Whittlesey (Yale 1878). 



131 



1846 



Joseph Willes Backus, son of Elijah Janes and Joanna 
Rudd (Ellis) Backus, was born on February 19, 1823, in Franks 
lin. Conn. 

After graduation he was a teacher for a year and a half in 
Buffalo, N. Y., the same length of time in Phillips (Andover) 
Academy, from 1849 to 1851 Tutor in Mathematics in Yale 
College, and at the same time a student in Yale Divinity School, 
where he completed his course in 1852. He was licensed to 
preach by the New Haven West Association in 1851, and 
ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in Blackstone, 
Mass., on September 29, 1853. In the spring of 1855 he 
resigned this charge on account of ill health in his family, and 
the following January was installed at Chaplin, Conn. Near the 
close of the next year he accepted a call to Leominster, Mass., 
from 1862 to 1866 was pastor of the John Street Church, Lowell, 
Mass., and from March, 1867, to 1879 at Thomaston, Conn. 
Afterward he was four years in Rockville, and then acting pas- 
tor in Plainville, retiring from the latter January 1, 1895, after 
an active service in the ministry of forty-two years. 

For about twenty -five years he was a corporate member of the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, a 
director of the Missionary Society of Connecticut, and trustee 
of the Fund for Disabled Ministers and their families. He was 
Moderator of the State Association of Ministers in 1881, and 
a delegate to the National Congregational Council in Detroit 
in 1877. In June, 1875, he was chosen a member of the Cor- 
poration of Yale University, resigning the office in 1899. He 
received the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from Olivet 
College in 1895. 

Besides a sermon preached at Lowell, Mass., on the " Prin- 
ciples and Results of Congregationalism," and several memorial 
and other sermons and occasional articles in the press, his pub- 
lished works include addresses on various occasions on "The 
Present Claims of the Clerical Profession on Christian Young 
Men," which was repeated by request in Battell Chapel, " Three 
Eras of Christian Life in America" (New Englander^ May, 1883), 
" A Ministry of a Hundred Years Ago " ( Connecticut Quarterly, 
1897), and the "Village Green," at Stockbridge, Mass., in 1889. 

Dr. Backus died of heat apoplexy at his home in Farmington, 
Conn., on July 4, 3 901, at the age of 78 years. 



132 

He married on August 19, 1852, Martha, daughter of Lucius 
and Lucia (Burr) Woodward, of Watertown, Conn,, and sister 
of Hon. Asa B. Woodward (Yale 1853), formerly an ex-officio 
Fellow of the Yale Corporation. Mrs. Backus survives him 
without children. 

Henry Baldwin Harrison, son of Ammi and Polly (Barney) 
Harrison, was born in New Haven, Conn., on September 11, 1821. 
At the early age of thirteen he began teaching the common school 
branches in Norwich in return for instruction in Latin. He was 
fitted for college under Rev. George Thacher, D.D., then a 
student in the Yale Divinity School, and afterward President of 
Iowa College, and at the same time assisted in teaching in the 
Lancasterian School, in which he had previously been a pupil. 
While in college he was editor of the Yale Literary Magazine 
and valedictorian of his class. 

After graduation he entered the Yale Law School and was at 
the same time a student in the office of Governor Dutton (Yale 
1818). He was admitted to the bar in 1848, and began practice. 
In 1855 he defended and secured the acquittal of Willard Clark, 
charged with murder, mainly on the then unusual plea of insanity. 
Later, he made a notable argument before the railroad committee 
on the petition of the Shore Line Railway Co. for power to 
bridge the Connecticut river. He soon established a reputation 
for the thorough preparation and effective presentation of his 
cases, and was especially successful as an advocate and a corpora- 
tion lawyer. 

In 1854 he was elected by the Whigs and anti-slavery men 
State Senator from the Fourth District, and was appointed chair- 
man of the committee on incorporations and temperance. His 
labors in the latter committee resulted in the passage of the pro- 
hibitory \\<\nov law. He also drafted the Personal Liberty Bill, 
which in effect nullified the Fugitive Slave Act of 1851. Upon 
the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill he acted with the Free 
Soil party until, in the winter of 1855-6, it was merged in the 
Republican party. Of the latter he was one of the organizers in 
Connecticut, and the following spring was its candidate for 
Lieutenant Governor. 

In 1865 Mr. Harrison was elected State Representative from 
New Haven, and, having declined the Speakership, became the 
leader on the floor of the House. During this session he won 



133 

distinction by advocating an amendment to the state constitution, 
which erased the word '* white " and thus opened the ballot to 
colored men. In 1873, and also ten j^ears later, he was again 
Representative from his native city, and in 1883 Speaker of the 
House. In 1885-6 he was Governor of Connecticut. 

In 1880 he gave up the active practice of his profession, but his 
advice was frequently sought in important legal matters ; and he 
delivered many commemorative addresses, distinguished for their 
eloquence and polished diction, notably those at the unveiling of 
the Buckingham monument at Hartford, in 1884, and at the 
dedication of the monument to the Twenty-seventh Connecticut 
Volunteers at Gettysburg, in 1885. 

He was a director of leading financial institutions, for many 
years a member of the vestry of Trinity Church, and a useful 
and influential member of the executive boards of the church. 

He was an Alumni Fellow of Yale University from 18Y2 to 1885, 
and in the latter year received from Yale the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Laws. 

Governor Harrison died at his home in New Haven, on October 
29, 1901, at the age of 80 years. 

He married, on June 3, 1856, Mary Elizabeth, sister of Arthur 
Dimon Osborne (Yale 1848), and daughter of Hon. Thomas 
Burr Osborne (Yale 1817), formerly of Fairfield, Conn., and 
afterward Professor in the Yale Law School. They had no 
children. Mrs. Harrison's death occurred in March, 1900. 

1847 

Henry [Martyn] Brace, son of Abel Brace, M.D., and 
Elizabeth (Doane) Brace, was born on May 20, 1828, in Catskill, 
N. Y. 

After graduation he taught school in his native place for three 
years, then studied law in an ofllice in New York City, and was 
admitted to the bar in November, 1851. He continued the active 
practice of his profession until feeble health necessitated his 
retirement. 

He died from acute bronchitis, at Catskill, on July 10, 1901, at 
the age of IS years. 

He married in 1855, Miss Emeline C. Demarest, and has a son 
living, a graduate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
New York (now a department of Columbia University) in 1881. 



134 

William Wells Carpenter, son of John Carpenter, M.D., 
and Axa (Reynolds) Carpenter, was born on June 16, 1823, at 
Granville, Washington Countj^ N". Y., and entered Yale from 
Oberlin College in Senior year. 

After graduation he was in New York City until 1861, teach- 
ing the first two years, and afterward being engaged in business. 
He then removed to South Granville, N. Y., where he continued 
in business until 1872, when he removed to Eatontown, Monmouth 
County, N. J. He afterward went to Marshfield, Or., where he 
was engaged in farming during the rest of his life. He gave 
much study to mineralogy. 

- He died at home after a long illness from Bright's disease, on 
May 13, 1902, in the YOth year of his age. 

He married, on August 28, 1851, Miss Maria Rogers, of Danby, 
Yt., who survives him with a daughter, their other daughter and 
a son having died. 

Nathaniel Alden Hyde, son of Nathaniel Hyde, an iron 
founder of Stafford, Conn., was born in that place on May 10, 
1827. His mother was Caroline (Converse) Hyde, a direct 
descendant of John and Priscilla Alden. 

After graduation he entered the Andover Theological Semi- 
nary, completed his course in 1851, and then preached in Cen- 
tral Village, in the town of Plainfield, and in Rockville, both in 
Connecticut. He was Assistant Secretary of the Children's Aid 
Society of New York City frota 1854 to 1856. The next year he 
was acting pastor at Deep River, Conn., and then supplied the 
First Congregational Church in Columbus, O., for several months, 
being ordained to the ministry on December 23, 1857. After a 
temporary service at the Seventh Street Congregational Church, 
Cincinnati, O., in 1858 he was called to the pastorate of Plymouth 
Church, Indianapolis, which had just been organized. Here his 
work was most successful, and his people reluctantly parted with 
him only in the larger interests of the denomination and of 
Christianity, when, in 1868, he became Superintendent of Mis- 
sions in Indiana. In 1873 he returned to pastoral work, and 
accepted a call from the Mayflower Congregational Church, in 
Indianapolis, and continued as pastor for fifteen years, and as pas- 
tor emeritus to the close of his life. 

He was a friend of every good cause, and was prominently 
connected with many societies for the promotion of their religious 



135 

and social welfare. He was for ten years President of the In- 
dianapolis Art Association, and Vice-President until his death ; 
member of the Indianapolis School Board ; member of the Marioji 
County Board of Children's Guardians, and President during his 
later years ; President of the New England Society of Indian- 
apolis and Secretary of the Congregational State Association from 
their origin; President of the Home Missionary Society of In- 
diana ; State Secretary of the Congregational Church Building 
Society ; corporate member of the American Board ; trustee of 
Chicago Theological Seminary and of Wabash College; President 
of the Yale Alumni Association of Indianapolis since its organiza- 
tion. In 1891 he was a delegate to the International Congrega- 
tional Council in London. He received the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Divinity from Marietta College in 1876. Besides occa- 
sional sermons and addresses, he published, in 1895, a "History of 
Congregationalism in Indiana." 

Dr. Hyde died from heart failure at his summer home in Lud- 
low, Vt., on July 19, 1901, at the age of 74 years. 

He married, on August 28, 1866, Laura Kip, daughter of 
Stoughton Alphonso Fletcher, founder of Fletcher's Bank in In- 
dianapolis. She survives him with an adopted daughter. 

1848 

Henry Hitchcock, son of Hon. Henry Hitchcock (University 
of Vermont 1813) and Anne (Erwin) Hitchcock, was born on 
July 3, 1829, at Spring Hill, six miles from Mobile, Ala. His 
father was a native of Burlington, Vt., Secretary of the Territory 
of Alabama, Attorney General and afterward Chief Justice of 
the State of Alabama, a man of the highest character, beloved 
throughout the State; and his grandfather, Samuel Hitchcock 
(Harvard 1777), who married a daughter of Ethan Allen, was 
United States District and Circuit Judge, drafted the charter of 
the University of Vermont, was Secretary of the same from 1790 
to 1800, and trustee from its beginning until his death in 1813. 
His mother was the daughter of Colonel Andrew Erwin, of Bed- 
ford County, Tenn. 

After the death of his father, his mother remov^ed with her fam- 
ily first to Kentucky, and then to Nashville, Tenn. There he en- 
tered the Junior class in the University of Nashville, and 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts in November, 1846. 
Immediately afterward, he came to New Haven and joined the 



136 

class then in its Junior year in Yale University, and graduated 
with the honor of an oration. 

From August to November, 1848, he was a law student in the 
office of Hon. Willis Hall (Yale 1824), Corporation Counsel of 
New York City, and was then assistant classical teacher in the 
Worcester (Mass.) High School for a year, after which he re- 
turned to Nashville and continued his legal studies in the office 
of Hon. William F. Cooper, LL.D. (Yale 1838), later a Justice 
of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. In September, 1851, he set- 
tled permanently in St.Louis, Mo., was admitted to the bar in 
October, and began practice. During the year 1852, he was as- 
sistant editor of the St.Louis Intelligencer, and represented that 
paper at the National Whig Convention in Baltimore, but after- 
ward devoted himself entirely to the practice of his profession. 

In 1872 he formed a partnership with George W. Lubke and 
John Preston Player, and the firm of Hitchcock, Lubke and 
Player, thus formed, continued until 1882, when Mr. Lubke was 
elected a Judge of the Circuit Court, soon after which Mr. 
Player died. 

Mr. Hitchcock then practiced alone for two years, and in 1884 
formed a limited partnership with Judge George A. Madill and 
Hon. Gustavus A. Finkelnburg, which expired in 1890. He con- 
tinued with the latter until July, 1891, and afterward again prac- 
ticed alone. He devoted himself especially to equity, corporation 
and constitutional law. 

For over forty years he was deeply interested in Washington 
University, St.Louis, of which he became a director in 1859, and 
Vice-President in 1886. In August, 1867, he helped organize its 
Law Department, known as the St.Louis Law School, and for 
the first twelve years was Dean. He was also Professor of various 
departments of law until his retirement in 1884. 

After Lincoln's debate with Douglas on the Kansas-Nebraska 
question, he joined the Republican party and became an active oppo- 
nent of slavery. In January, 1861, he was elected a member on the 
"Unconditional Union" ticket of the Missouri State Convention, 
which was called by the Secession Legislature to consider the re- 
lations of Missouri to the Union, but which disappointed expecta- 
tions, and deposed both Governor and Legislature, and for more 
than two years carried on a provisional State government. He 
took an active part in its proceedings, and attended all its sessions 
until its final adjournment on July 1, 1863. 



137 

He had earnestly desired active service in the war, and as soon 
as the Union interests in his own state permitted, he entered the 
army and was appointed Assistant Adjutant General, U. S. Vol- 
unteers, and from October 1, 1864, to the close of the war served 
as Judge Advocate on the personal staff of General Sherman. He 
was with the latter on the " March to the Sea," and in the subse- 
quent campaign through the Carolinas, and carried to Washington 
the dispatches announcing the "Sherman-Johnston truce." He 
was brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel, and honorably mustered out of 
service on June 23, 1865. 

After the war he spent four months in European travel. Five 
years later, owing to the failure of his health, he made a voyage 
to visit his brother, Ethan Allen Hitchcock, who was then engaged 
in business in Hong Kong, China, and is at present Secretary of 
the Interior. 

In August, 1871, he was one of the delegates who organized at 
Newport, R. I., the National Civil Service Reform League, and 
from that date was a member of its Executive Committee. He 
was one of the fourteen signers of the call which resulted in the 
formation, in August, 1878, at Saratoga, N. Y., of the American 
Bar Association, and served several years on standing and special 
committees, notably on the Committee on the Relief of the 
United States Supreme Court. He prepared the majority report 
advocating the plan afterward substantially followed by Congress 
in creating United States Circuit Courts of Appeal. He was 
elected President of the Association in 1889. 

In 1880 he helped organize the Missouri State Bar Association, 
of which he was President in 1881. 

In April, 1896, he was a delegate from Missouri to the Ameri- 
can Conference on International Arbitration, held at Washington, 
D. C, and took part in its debates, earnestly advocating an inter- 
national arbitration treaty with England. 

He delivered addresses on various subjects of professional and 
public interest, including the annual address before the New York 
State Bar Association in January, 1887, on "American State 
Constitutions," afterwards published in the series called "Ques- 
tions of the Day ; " the annual address before the American Bar 
Association the same year on " General Corporation Laws ; " in 
March, 1889, an address before the Political Science Association 
of the University of Michigan on the "Development of the Con- 
stitution as Influenced by Chief Justice Marshall," which, with 



138 

other lectures by well-known lawyers, was published in a volume 
entitled " Constitutional Law " ; and at the Centennial celebra- 
tion of the organization of the Supreme Court of the United 
States, in New York, in February, 1890, an address on "The 
Exercise of the Powers of the Court," a historical review of the 
principal decisions on Constitutional questions. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Laws from Yale College in 1874. 

Since the establishment of the Missouri Botanical Garden at 
St.Louis by bequest of Mr. Henry Shaw, in 1889, he had been 
Vice-President of the Board of Trustees. 

Mr. Hitchcock died at his home in St.Louis, after an illness 
of several weeks from heart disease, on March 18, 1902, in his 
YSd year. 

He married, on March 5, 1857, Mary, eldest daughter of George 
Collier, a prominent merchant of St.Louis, and had two sons, 
graduates of Yale respectively in 1879 and 1890, who, with their 
mother, survive. 

1849 

Isaac Eddy Carey, son of James and Elizabeth (Eddy) Carey, 
was born on July 29, 1822, at Locke, on the southern border of 
Cayuga County, N. Y. 

The year following graduation he was Tutor in Beloit College, 
and then entered Auburn Theological Seminary, completing his 
course in 1853. He united with the church in Kiantone,near the 
Pennsylvania border of Chautauqua County, N. Y., in 1836, and 
was licensed to preach in June, 1852. He preached for several 
months in 1853-4 in Springville, a village in Concord township, 
Erie County, N. Y., and was ordained to the ministry by the 
Presbytery of Buffalo in January, 1854. In July following he 
became pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Freeport, 111., and 
remained there until his removal in 1857 to Peoria, 111. There 
he founded the Fulton Street Church, of which he was pastor two 
years. From 1860 to 1862 he was settled over the First Presby- 
terian Church, in Keokuk, la., after which he returned to his for- 
mer charge in Freeport, and remained seven years, continuing to 
reside in Freeport until 1873. He then preached for two years 
at Waterloo, la., and eight years in Huntsburg, Geauga County, 
O. In October, 1883, he became pastor of the Congregational 
Church, in Claridon, in the same county. Closing this pastor- 
ate in September, 1890, he resided for three years in Chardon, 



139 

a neighboring town and the county seat, without charge, and 
afterward removed to Oberlin, O. 

He published several occasional sermons, and wrote for the 
Christian Union a series of articles on " The Curse of Christen- 
dom, or Sectarianism and its Evils." 

Mr. Carey died at Huntsburg, his former parish, after an illness 
of ten days from the grip, on March 6, 1902. He was 79 years 
of as:e. The burial was at Oberlin. 

He married, on January 1, 1851, Eliza Ann, daughter of 
Stephen and Ann (Swift) Wright, of Auburn, N. Y. She died in 
1871, and in 1873 he married Lucy Anna, daughter of John and 
Emily (Newton) Irwin, of Galesburg, 111., who survives him, with 
a daughter and twin sons, also a son and two daughters by his 
first marriage. One daughter is a graduate of Lake Erie College, 
another of Oberlin College, and the other is an undergraduate in 
Oberlin. 

Franklin Woodbury Fisk, son of Ebenezer and Hannah 
(Proctor) Fisk, was born on February 16, 1820, at Hopkinton, 
N. H. His middle name was the family name of his maternal 
grandmother. He was the youngest but one of seven children, 
and left home at an early age, working for a time in a factory in 
Lowell, Mass., and while preparing for college alternately study- 
ing at Phillips (Andover) Academy and teaching in various 
places. 

He graduated as valedictorian of his class, and immediately 
entered the Yale Divinity School. From 1851 to 1853 he was 
also Tutor in Yale University. Part of the following year he 
spent as resident licentiate at Andover Seminary, and then 
traveled in Europe. On account of an affection of the eyes 
he gave up the idea of taking a pastorate, declining several calls, 
and accepted the professorship of Rhetoric and English Litera- 
ture in Beloit College, which he held from 1854 to 1859. In Jan-, 
uary, 1857, he was appointed to the chair of Sacred Rhetoric in 
Chicago Theological Seminary, but was not inaugurated until 
April 28, 1859, when he was also ordained to the ministry. The 
active work of this professorship he retained until 1900, and was 
thus brought into close personal touch with a very large number 
of Congregational ministers now active. From 1887 he was 
President of the Faculty of the Seminary, and his service as 
administrator and builder was of the highest value. He was 
made professor emeritus the year before his death. 



140 

As a preacher he was highly esteemed. He was acting pastor 
of the Union Park Congregational Church from January, 1860, 
to October, 1866, and served the First Presbyterian Church for a 
year, also the Second Presbyterian Church for some time. 

In the winter of 1871-2 he attended lectures at the University 
of Berlin, and then visited Greece, Arabia, Egypt and Palestine. 
He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Olivet Col- 
lege in 1865 and from Yale in 1886, and the degree of Doctor of 
Laws from Beloit College in 1888. 

His " Manual of Preaching," issued in 1884, contains the sub- 
stance of his lectures for many years, and is used as a text-book 
in several institutions. 

Professor Fisk had been suffering from a serious stomach 
trouble for a long time, and spent the winter before his decease 
in California. He died at his home in Chicago on July 4, 1901, 
at the age of 81 years. The funeral service was held in Fisk 
Hall, one of the Seminary buildings named in his honor. 

He married, on March 29, 1854, Mrs. Amelia Allen (Bowen) 
Austin, of Woodstock, Conn. She died in 1881, leaving two 
sons, graduates respectively of Beloit College in 1878 and Yale 
in 1883, and a daughter who married Walter May Fitch, M.D. 
(Rush Medical College 1885). In 1886 Professor Fisk married 
Mrs. S. Jennette Hitchcock, widow of a Chicago physician, who 
survives him. 



Albert Gallatin Green, son of John and Catharine Huber 
(Bright) Green, was born at Reading, Pa., on December 6, 1828. 

After graduation he returned to Reading, read law in the office 
of Judge David B. Gordon, was admitted to the bar on Novem- 
ber 11, 1851, and acquired an extensive and lucrative practice, 
which he continued in his native city until the day of his death. He 
was for a time city auditor and for two years president of the Board 
of Education. He was interested in many matters outside of his 
profession, and active in securing legislation concerning fish and 
game. In his later years he devoted much time to research in 
local history, and published a " Historical Sketch of the Bright 
Family." He bad been president of the Berks County Historical 
Society since its reorganization in 1898. During the Civil War 
he served in the State Militia in the " Emergency Campaign " of 
September, 1862. 



141 

For some years past he had suffered from pulmonary trouble, 
but died suddenly at his home on May 22, 1902, at the age of 73 
years. 

He was a member of the First Universalist church (now the 
Church of Our Father), of which his father was one of the 
founders and for many years superintendent of the Sunday school. 

He married, on June 10, 1856, Rebecca, daughter of William 
P. and Elizabeth (Miller) Dickinson, of Reading, Pa., who sur- 
vives him with three sons and four daughters, a daughter having 
died in early childhood. Two sons graduated at Yale Univer- 
sity, respectively in 1877 and 1885, and a brother in 1852. 

William Huntting Jessup, eldest son of Judge William Jes- 
sup, LL.D. (Yale 1815), and Amanda (Harris) Jessup, of Mont- 
rose, Pa., was born in that town on January 29, 1830, and joined 
his class at the beginning of Sophomore year. 

After graduation, he immediately began the study of law with 
his father, and during a portion of the next two years was also 
engaged in teaching. In November, 1851, he was admitted to 
the bar, and at once to partnership with his father. His earnest- 
ness and thoroughness soon made him one of the most successful 
lawyers in that part of the state. In 1877 he was appointed Pre- 
siding Judge of the Thirty-fourth District of Pennsylvania, but 
retired from the bench in January, 1879, and resumed his prac- 
tice, which extended throughout the state. He was often coun- 
sel in cases before the appellate courts, where his grasp of legal 
principles, and accurate knowledge of common and statute law 
and decisions made him a powerful advocate. In 1889 he removed 
to Scranton, and was at first in partnership with Isaac J. Post 
(Yale 1860), and after the latter's death successively with Horace 
E. Hand and his son, William H. Jessup, Jr. (both Yale 1884), 
under the firm name of Jessup & Jessup. 

Although never a seeker for office, he was ever ready to serve 
his neighborhood, state, or country, and was early a member of 
the Borough Council, Town Clerk, Treasurer of the Corporation, 
and President of the School Board, of Montrose. From 1863 to 
1866 he was Assessor of Internal Revenue for his district. He 
assisted at the organization of the Republican party in his native 
town, and in every campaign his speeches were most effective. He 
was a delegate to the National Republican Conventions of 1864, 
1868, and 1884. 



142 

Upon the threatened invasion of Pennsylvania by the Confed- 
erate army he enlisted, in September, 1862, as a private in the 
" Rough and Ready Guard," of which he became Captain in 
June, 1863. During the same summer he was Major of the 28th 
Infantry Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, and from 1871 
to 1875 was Major-General of the Tenth Division of the National 
Guard of Pennsylvania. 

In early life he joined the Presbyterian Church in Montrose, 
and for over forty years was an elder, and for more than twenty- 
five years superintendent of the Sunday School of the same, and 
just previous to his death had accepted an appointment as teacher 
of a Bible class in the First Presbyterian Church in Scranton. 
He was frequently a delegate to the ecclesiastical councils of his 
denomination, and was interested in every enterprise of the church 
at home and abroad. 

Judge Jessup died suddenly of heart disease at his home in 
Scranton, after a day of active work in his law office, on Jan- 
uary 16, 1902, in the 7 2d year of his age. He was a man of 
intense energy and untiring industry. 

He married, on October 5, 1853, Sarah Wilson, daughter of 
Nelson Jay, of Belvidere, N. J., who survives him with four of 
their six children, — a son (Yale 1884) and three daughters. 
Two brothers (respectively B.A. 1851 and Hon. M.A. 1863) 
have for many years been missionaries at Beirut, Syria. 

William Brown Lee was born in Madison, Conn., on August 
30, 1828, and was the son of Jonathan Trumbull and Betsey 
Barnes (Judd) Lee. 

The year after graduation he taught in Branford, Conn., and 
then entered the Seminary at East Windsor (now Hartford), 
Conn., completing his studies there in July, 1853. 

He was licensed to preach by the Hartford North Association 
on June 1, 1852. On August 9, 1853, he was settled over the 
then recently organized Center (Congregational) Church in Fair 
Haven, in the town of New Haven, Conn., and remained there 
nearly seven years. This church ceased as a separate organiza- 
tion soon afterward. From Fair Haven he was called to the 
Genevan Presbyterian Church in Brooklyn, N. Y., of which he 
was pastor from 1860 to 1871. In 1864 he spent six months 
in Europe. From 1873 to 1875 he was pastor of the First Con- 
gregational Church in Portland, Conn., where he continued to 



143 

reside until 1879, when he accepted a call to the Presbyterian 
Church in Yaphank, Suffolk County, N. Y. Four years later he 
went to the Pacific Coast, and was settled over the First Presby- 
terian Church in Olympia, Wash. In January, 1890, he resigned 
this pastorate and went to Colorado for the benefit of his health. 
In July, 1891, he took up his residence at Mount Tabor, a suburb 
of Portland, Or., and engaged in evangelistic work, and in Sep- 
tember, 1901, removed with his wife to Spokane, Wash., to reside 
with their only daughter. 

He was Moderator of the Presbytery of Puget Sound in 1885, 
and delegate to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 
at Saratoga, N. Y., in 1894. He was actively interested in the 
management of the public schools during most of his residence 
in Fair Haven and Portland. He published " The Coming King- 
dom," " The Whole Counsel of God," and other sermons, and con- 
tinually contributed to the Presbyterian, Advance, Christian 
?7mow, and other papers. In 1888 the University of Washing- 
ton conferred upOn him the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Divinity. 

He died after a long illness from cerebral embolism at the home 
of his daughter in Spokane, Wash., on November 3, 1901, at the 
age of 73 years. 

He married, on June 7, 1854, Elizabeth Payson, daughter of 
Edward and Suviah (Marston) Howe, of Portland, Me. Of their 
seven sons and one daughter all are living except one son. Four 
of the sons graduated at Williams College, and three of these are 
Presbyterian pastors in Cincinnati, Ohio, the fourth being Presi- 
dent of Albany (Or.) College. 

Mark Burnham Moore, son of Andrew and Kuth (Burnham) 
Moore, was born at Bedford, Hillsboro County, N. H., on July 
4, 1821. During his college course his home was at Shelby, 
Orleans County, N. Y. 

After graduation he taught for two years in Meriden, Conn., 
and spent the next two years in the study of law in Lockport 
and Buffalo, N. Y. He was admitted to the bar on April 27, 
1852, and from July of that year until the following May was in 
the office of Haven & Smith in Buffalo. For nearly fifty years 
thereafter and until his death he practiced his profession in that 
city, and for about twenty-five years in partnership with Hon. 
George R. Babcock. 



144 

Mr. Moore died suddenly on May 27, 1902, while conversing 
with a friend whom he chanced to meet at Ocean Park, in the 
suburbs of Buffalo. He was in the 81st year of his age. He was 
for some years vestryman of St. Paul's Church, but was later a 
member of Trinity Church. 

He married, on May 13, 1856, Matilda C, daughter of Dr. 
Gardner Barlow (M.D. Yale 1845), of Meriden, Conn., who sur- 
vives him. They had no children. 

1850 

Albert Pierson Condit, second of three sons and fourth of 
the seven children of Stephen and Phebe S. (Pierson) Condit, 
was born on December 10, 1829, in Orange, N. J. His mother's 
grandfather was one of the corporators of the place in 1 783. 

After graduation Mr. Condit studied law in the office of Mr. 
Van Arsdale, and was admitted to the bar in November, 1853. 
At the outbreak of the Civil War he was intrusted with the 
practice of Hon. William Pennington (Princeton 1813), while the 
latter was absent in Washington as Speaker of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, and afterward practiced his profession in Newark 
until his retirement in 1890. He was at one time County Clerk, 
and was a member of the New Jersey State Legislature in 1866, 
1867, and 1871, in the last year being elected Speaker of the 
Assembly. His advice on business matters was highly valued, 
and he was a director of many of the leading financial and insur- 
ance corporations of Newark. He became a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Orange soon after graduation. 

For two years past his health had been poor, and he died of a 
complication of diseases, at his home in West Orange, on Decem- 
ber 14, 1901, at the age of 72 years. He was unmarried. Two 
brothers graduated from Yale in 1848 and 1856 respectively. 

John Alpheus Woodhull, son of Richard and Frances 
(Greene) Woodhull, was born on October 30, 1825, at Ronkon- 
koma, Suffolk County, N. Y. 

The year after graduation he studied at Bangor Theological 
Seminary, then at Yale, and graduated at Auburn Seminary in 
1853. He was licensed by the Long Island Consociation in 
January, 1852. He preached first at Union Center, Broome 
County, N. Y., and then a few months at the Presbyterian 
Church in Greenport, Suffolk County. In the autumn of 1855 he 



145 

took charge of the Congregational Church at Wadham's Mills, 
Essex County, N. Y., where he was ordained pastor, January 1, 
1856. In May, 1868, he closed his work there, and went to New 
Village, Suffolk County ; thence in August, 1859, to Commack, 
where he remained seven years, and in 1866 to Northfield, where 
he remained three years — also in his native county. From 1869 
to 1872 he was at New Preston, Conn., and from 1872 to October 
1, 1880, at Groton, Conn., where he was installed on December 
24, 1873, over the church of which his classmate. Rev. Samuel 
Watson Brown, was pastor at the time of his death in 1866. 
For the next live years he was again in Suffolk County, 
N. Y., this time at Baiting Hollow, then three years at 
Middlefield, Mass., and from 1889 to 1896 in Plainfield, 
Mass. At the close of his work in Plainfield, after an active ser- 
vice in the ministry of over forty years, he retired, and afterward 
resided in Chicago. He united with the Congregational Church 
in Mount Sinai, L. I., in 1888. In 1877 he published a "Review 
of the Congregational Church, Groton, Conn., with Sketches of 
its Ministers, from 1704-1876." 

Mr. Woodhull died at his home in Chicago, on February 1, 
1902, in his 77th year. 

He married, on July 20, 1853, Joanna, daughter of Deacon 
Joel Brown, a farmer of Rocky Point, in the town of Brook- 
haven, L. I., and had five sons and three daughters, of whom one 
son and two daughters have died. Two sons graduated at Yale in 
1880 and 1885 respectively, a brother in 1862, and a daughter at 
Smith College in 3 888. 

1862 

Henky Seymour Sanford, son of Hon. David Curtis San- 
ford, of New Milford, Conn., Judge of the Supreme Court of 
Connecticut, and Amelia Selina (Seymour) Sanford, was born on 
March 1, 1832, in Norwalk, Conn., but entered college from New 
Milford, Conn. 

After graduation he studied law with his father, also in Wash- 
ington, D. C, with his uncle. Chief Justice Origen S. Seymour 
(Yale 1824), then a Representative in Congress, and in the Yale 
and Harvard Law Schools. He was admitted to the bar on August 
16, 1854, and for ten years practiced his profession in New 
Milford. 



14(5 

In July, 1861, he received a severe injury of the spine, which 
resulted in paralysis, and disabled him from walking. His health 
was at length fully restored, but he still found it necessary to use 
a wheeled chair, and was accustomed to make his arguments while 
sitting. In 1864 he removed to Bridgeport, and soon acquired a 
large practice. Upon his retirement in 1893 he again made his 
home in New Milford. 

While temporarily living in New York, he wrote to the New 
York Times a widely published letter which led to the formation 
of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In 1871 
he drew up the scheme of the New Milford Village Improvement 
Society, which formed the model of many similar societies 
elsewhere. 

He died at his home in New Milford, on November 2, 1901, at 
the age of 69 years. 

He married, on June 13, 1865, Sophia Claflin, daughter of 
Samuel Daniels, of Brooklyn, N. Y., who died on April 2, 1897. 
Two sons, the younger a graduate of the Yale Law School in 
1895, and one of their two. daughters, survive. 

1853 

Henry Harper Babcock, son of Sidney and Susan (Thomp- 
son) Babcock, was born on July 24, 1833, in New Haven, Conn. 

For about four years after graduation he was a clerk for his 
father, who for many years conducted a book store on Chapel 
street. New Haven. In 1857 he engaged in business in New 
York, but in 1859 returned to New Haven and was for twenty 
years associated with his father in the Palladium Building on 
Orange street. After the retirement of his father in 1880, he 
continued the business, which included publishing as well as 
bookselling. In 1886 he was appointed Deputy Collector of 
Customs for the port of New Haven, and from 1895 to 1899 
was Collector of Customs. After his retirement from this office 
he contracted for considerable printing for parties in New York. 

Mr. Babcock had suffered for several months from cancer of the 
stomach, but was not confined to his house until a week before 
his decease, which occurred on December 2, 1901. He was 6,8 
j^ears of age. His acquaintance among Yale graduates was very 
large, and many remember his very frequent services to them 
in New Haven. He was never married. Two sisters survive 
him, one the widow of Eli Whitney Blake, M.D. (Yale 1839). 



147 

Albert Webb Bishop, son of Calvin and Emily (Webb) 
Bishop, was born on January 8, 1832, in Alden, Erie County, 
N. Y., but joined the class at the beginning of Sophomore year 
from Brooklyn, N. Y. 

The year after graduation he was principal of Cortland 
Academy, Cortland, N. Y. He then studied law two years in 
Buffalo, was for a time connected with the firm of Bowen & 
Rogers, and afterward practiced by himself until 1860, when he 
removed to LaCrosse, Wise. From there he enlisted in the U. S. 
Army in August, 1861, as Second Lieutenant of Battery A, 
First Wisconsin Light Artillery^ and was afterward Captain of 
the Second Wisconsin Cavalry Volunteers. He was then Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel of the First Arkansas Cavalry Volunteers, Chief 
of Cavalry of the District of Southwestern Missouri, and com- 
manded the post of Fort Smith, Ark. In 1864 he was appointed 
Adjutant- General of Arkansas, and in order to devote his atten- 
tion fully to the office, resigned from the Army in 1865. 

Two years later he became Register in Bankruptcy for the 
Second District of Arkansas, and held that office until 1873. In 
1871 the Arkansas Industrial Institute at Fayetteville was estab- 
lished by the Legislature, and General Bishop became Treasurer 
and one of its trustees, and from 1873 to 1875 was President. 
In 1875 he was again appointed Adjutant-General of the State, 
and the next year was the Republican candidate for Governor of 
Arkansas. During most of his residence in the State his home 
was in Little Rock, where beside his official duties he carried on 
his law practice. In 1879 he returned to Buffalo and continued 
the practice of his profession. He was a public-spirited man, 
and was one of the founders of the Young Men's Association, 
which preceded the Public Library. He was the author of 
'* Loyalty on the Frontier." 

General Bishop died suddenly of heart disease at Buffalo, on 
November 29, 1901, in his 70th year. 

He married on September 15, 1857, Maria L., daughter of 
Henry and Hannah (Hamlin) Woodard of Cortland, N. Y. She 
died in Buffalo in 1860, and in 1871 General Bishop married 
Kate Compton, of Little Rock, Ark. A daughter by the first 
marriage survives him. 

William Miller Hudson, son of William and Anna (Miller) 
Hudson, was born on March 14, 1833, in Hartford, Conn. He 



148 

was one of the first students to complete the course in the Hart- 
ford High School. 

Two years after graduation at Yale he received the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine from Jefferson Medical College, Philadel- 
phia, after which he devoted two years to medical study in 
Paris, taking special courses in surgery under Professors 
N61aton and Trousseau, and was afterward for a time in St. 
Bartholomew's Hospital in London. He then began practice in 
New York City, and was for some time connected with the 
Northern Dispensary there. In 1862 he was Assistant Surgeon 
in the United States Army. Upon the expiration of this ser- 
vice he followed his family to Hartford, which was afterward 
his home, and in which he practiced until 1869. In -that year bi 
was appointed State Fish Commissioner and held the office for 
twenty-five years. From 1881 to 1891 he was also a member of 
the Shell-Fish Commission. He was an auditor of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, representing particu- 
larly the stockholders, Vice-President of the American School 
for the Deaf at Hartford, and a member of the city, county 
and state medical societies, and of the Connecticut Historical 
Society. From 1867 to 1871 he served his city in the common 
council, being president for one term, and in 1872-3 was a mem- 
ber of the board of aldermen. 

He died, of appendicitis, at his home, after an illness of only a 
few days following his return from the Bicentennial celebration, 
October 30, 1901, at the age of 68 years. He was admitted to 
membership in the Center Church, Hartford, in 1849, and for a 
large part of the time since 1875 had been a member of its pru- 
dential committee. 

Dr. Hudson married, on May 4, 1858, Ellen Hieskell, daughter 
of Timothy Matlack and Elizabeth (Hieskell) Bryan of Phila- 
delphia, who survives him with two daughters and a son. Two 
daughters died in infancy. 

Kinsley Twining, son of Alexander Catlin Twining (Yale 
1820) and Harriet Amelia (Kinsley) Twining, and grandson of 
Stephen Twining (Yale 1795), was born on July 18, 1832, at 
West Point, N. Y. He entered college from Middlebury, Vt., 
where his father had been for a number of years Professor of 
Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, but in 1852 the family 
removed to New Haven. 



149 

After graduation he studied theology in the Yale Divinity 
School, was licensed by the New Haven Central Association in 
1856, was a resident licentiate at Andover Seminary in 1858, and 
on August 26 of that year was ordained and installed pastor of 
the Congregational Church in Hinsdale, Mass. On account of 
the illness of his wife, which soon proved fatal, he resigned this 
charge and went to California in 1864. He preached in the 
First Congregational Church, San Francisco, in 1864-5, after 
which he traveled to restore his own impaired health. Returning 
East, he was settled on September 1 2, 1867, over the First Congre- 
gational Church, Cambridgeport, Mass. This charge he resigned 
in the spring of 1872 to accept the call of the Union Church, 
Providence, R. I., which was then just completing its new house 
of worship. In November, 1875, he closed this pastorate, and 
spent several years in travel and residence in Europe. 

In September, 1880, he became literary editor of the New 
York Independent^ and continued in this congenial relation until, 
in 1899, he joined the staff of The Evangelist in a similar 
capacity. The high standard and evident sincerity and impar- 
tiality of his critical work made it more than usually valued. 

While in Providence he compiled '* Hymns and Tunes," which 
was an acceptable aid in promoting congregational singing, and 
he contributed to literary and scientific journals various essays 
and papers, the authorship of which was disclosed to few. In 
the study of Shakespeare he took especial delight. Having suc- 
ceeded Mr. Train as Class Secretary in 1888, he issued a "Sup- 
plementary History" in 1893, and a second one in 1899. 

His friendships were many and lasting, and his kindness to 
younger men will be long remembered. During the last twenty- 
one years of his life his home was in Morristown, N. J., where 
his interest was active in every good cause. In church work he 
was an efficient helper, and his occasional sermons were highly 
appreciated for deep spirituality, breadth of knowledge, and 
literary excellence. 

He received the degree of D.D. from Yale in 1884, and of 
L.H.D. from Hamilton College in 1893. Twin brothers grad- 
uated at Yale (respectively B.A. and Ph.B., 1859), his father's 
brother received the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1825, while 
one of his father's sisters married Rev. Seagrove W. Magill, D.D. 
(Yale 1831), and another became the wife of Prof. James Hadley, 
LL.D. (Yale 1842), the father of President Hadley. 



150 

Dr. Twining attended the Bicentennial celebration, but while 
in New Haven was suddenly taken ill, and died at the home of 
his sisters, on November 4, 1901, at the age of 69 years. 

He married, on June 3, 1861, Miss Mary R. Plunkett, of Hins- 
dale, Mass., who died at San Jose, Cal., on July 16, 1864, leaving 
no children. On August 25, 1870, he married Mary Ellen, 
daughter of Amos Delos Gridley, D.D. (Hamilton 1839), of Clin- 
ton, N. Y., a trustee of Hamilton College. Mrs. Twining survives 
him with two daughters and a son, his daughters having grad- 
uated at Smith College respectively in the classes of 1893 and 
1898. and his son and namesake at Yale in the class of 1901. 



1854 

Henry Baldwin, son of Life and Susannah Davenport (Dud- 
ley) Baldwin, was born on January 7, 1834, at Brighton, Mass. 
(now within the limits of Boston), where his father was for many 
years President of the National Market Bank. 

After graduation he taught school for six months in his native 
town, and then began his legal studies in the office of Bacon & 
Aldrich, at Worcester, Mass., continuing them in the Harvard 
Law School and during a winter spent in Savannah, Ga. He 
was admitted to the Suffolk County Bar in March, 1858, and a 
few years later to practice in the United States Courts. In 1862 
he was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. 
In 1874 he was appointed by the Governor, Presiding Judge of 
the Municipal Court of the Brighton District of the city of Bos- 
ton, and held this office until his death. For many years he was 
counsel for the Home Savings Bank, Boston, and for other cor- 
porations. His home was in that section of Boston known as 
Allston, and in 1887 he was one of the eleven founders of the 
Allston Congregational Church, which has had marked prosper- 
ity. He was warmly interested in the Yale Alumni Association 
of Boston, and w^as its presiding officer in 1883 and in 1900. 

Judge Baldwin died of apoplexy at his home in Allston, on 
January 22, 1902, at the age of 68 years. 

He married, on November 27, 1861, Harriet A., daughter of 
John Warren and Judith B. (Ward) Ilollis of Allston, and had a 
son and daughter, who, with their mother, are living. The son 
was a member of the class of 1885, but left college on account of 
ill health in the latter part of Junior year. 



151 

Charles Analdo Dupee, son of Jacob and Lydia A. (Weth- 
erbee) Dupee, and descended on his father's side from Jean 
Dupuis, a Huguenot who came to Boston about 1663, was born 
on May 22, 1831, in West Brooktield, Mass. 

Soon after graduation he went to Chicago, III., and for six 
months had charge of the Edwards Academy, a private school in 
that city. In November, 1855, he was appointed principal of the 
Franklin (Public) School. Upon the completion of the Chicago 
High School a yearjater he was chosen its first principal. After 
examining the systems in several of the leading cities, he organ- 
ized the Chicago school upon a plan and with a course of study 
which, with slight modifications, have since been retained. He 
continued in charge of the school four years, and for a consider- 
able part of this time also edited the Illiiiois Teacher. In July, 
1860, he resigned in order to devote himself to the practice of 
law, studied during a part of the next year in the Harvard Law 
School, then in the office of Gallup & Hitchcock in Chicago, and 
in September, 1861, was admitted to the bar in Chicago. After 
about a year he formed a partnership with Jacob A. Cram, Esq., 
under the name of Dupee & Cram, which was dissolved in 1864. 
He then entered the firm of Hitchcock, Dupee & Evarts, which 
continued until the retirement of Mr. Evarts in 1872, when the 
firm became Hitchcock & Dupee. In 1876 the firm of Hitchcock, 
Dupee & Judah was organized, and after the death of Mr. Hitch- 
cock in 1882, the firm of Dupee, Judah, Willard & Wolf origi- 
nated, of which Mr. Dupee was the senior member. His services 
were frequently retained by railroad, banking and insurance cor- 
porations. 

Mr. Dupee died at home, after an illness of four years from a 
chronic throat affection, on March 26, 1902, in his 7l8t year. 

He married, on December 29, 1863, Jennie, daughter of Henry 
G. Wells, one of the pioneer merchants of Chicago, and Harriet 
(Dorsey) Wells. Mrs. Dupee died in 1881, leaving three sons, 
two of whom are now living (Yale 1889 and 1890), and one 
daughter. In 1883 Mr. Dupee married Bessie, daughter of John 
and Helen Nash, by whom he had four daughters and a son who 
bears his father's name. 

1855 

Hiram Lowell Howard, son of Thompson and Irene (Sumner) 
Howard, was born on November 3, 1827, at Ware, Mass., but 
entered college from the adjoining town of Enfield. 



152 

After graduation he took the full course in Andover Theologi- 
cal Seminary, and preached for the Congregational Church in 
Pelham until April, 1860, during the next year in Ashfield, and 
two years in Burlington, all in his native state. 

He enlisted in the 59th Massachusetts Volunteers on April 3, 
1864; was ordained to the ministry on the 10th of that month ; 
was elected chaplain of the regiment, and went to the front on 
the 26th. He was in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, 
Cold Harbor, and others, until his resignation on February 11, 
1865. 

For a few months in 1865-6 he supplied the Presbyterian 
Church in Odessa, New Castle County, Del., and in 1867-8 was 
assistant pastor of the Church of the New Testament in Phila- 
delphia. He was then acting pastor successively of churches in 
Ohio, at Cambridge and Ruggles (1869); in Illinois, at Atkinson 
(1870-72), Aledo (1873), Lisbon (1874-77); in Kansas, at Fair- 
view (1878) and Centralia (1879-80) ; and at Leroy, Mich. He 
was without charge in Hiawatha, Kans., for a time from 1881, and 
afterward in Boston. He was preaching at Chester Center, Mass., 
in 1889, and was at Springfield, Mass., in 1891. About this time 
his health was completely broken down by an attack of the grip, 
from which he never fully recovered. In 1892 he v^as at the 
Soldiers' Home, in Chelsea, Mass., and during the last five or six 
years of his life at the Massachusetts State Hospital, Worcester, 
Mass. 

Mr. Howard died of pneumonia at Worcester, Mass., on July 
25, 1901, in his 74th year. 

He married, on April 8, 1861, Sarah, daughter of Samuel and 
Vesta (Beals) Snell, of Cummington, Mass. She died in 1863, 
leaving a son, who survives his father. Mr. Howard married, 
in 1869, Miss Ethel Steele, of Cambridge, O., from whom he 
was afterward divorced. 

Robert Charles Shoemaker, son of Honorable Charles Deni- 
son Shoemaker (Yale 1824) by his second wife, Mrs. Stella 
(Mercer) Sprigg Shoemaker, and younger brother of Austin 
Denison Shoemaker (Lafayette 1845 ; M.D. Yale 1849), was born 
on April 4, 1836, at Forty Fort, near Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and 
entered college in December of Freshman year. 

The year following graduation he was an instructor in Luzerne 
Academy at Troy, Luzerne County, Pa., and then for nearly 



153 

three years a student in his native place. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1859, and thereafter practiced his profession in Wilkes- 
Barre, continuing to reside at Forty Fort. He was active in, 
building up the Stella Presbyterian Church at Maltby, named in 
memory of his mother, and was an elder in the church. 

Mr. Shoemaker died suddenly of heart failure at his home at 
Forty Fort, on February 16, 1902, in his 66th year. 

He married, at Lexington, Va., on November 22, 1876, Mrs. 
Helen Lea Lonsdale, of New Orleans, La., daughter of Judge 
James N. Lea of the Supreme Court of Louisiana. Her death 
occurred in 1897. Two daughters survive. 

1856 

Levi Leonard Paine, son of Levi and Clementine (Leonard) 
Paine, was born at East Randolph, now Holbrook, Norfolk 
County, Mass., on October 10, 1832. 

After graduation he was in charge of the classical instruction 
in the Norwalk (Conn.) High School a year, teacher of Greek in 
Gen. William H. Russell's Collegiate and Commercial Institute 
in New Haven two years, and a student in the Yale Law School 
the next year. He then took a course in the Yale Divinity 
School, and from 1859 to 1861 was also tutor in Greek in Yale 
College. 

He was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in 
Farmington, Conn., on October 9, 1861, where he remained eight 
and a half years. Besides his parish work, he had about twenty- 
five pupils under instruction in the classics. Soon after leaving 
Farmington, in 1870, he was chosen Professor of Ecclesiastical 
History in Bangor Theological Seminary, where for thirty-two 
years he devoted himself with unusual success to his chosen 
work. He had rare ability in imparting knowledge and in 
stimulating his students to the best that was in them. He was 
also Dean of the Faculty. 

As a result of long study and exhaustive research he completed 
in 1900 "A Critical History of the Evolution of Trinitarianism, 
and its Outcome in the New Christology," and in 1901 "The 
Ethnic Trinities, and their Relation to the Christian Trinity," 
two unique volumes which are regarded as of high merit and 
have aroused wide interest. He left a third book about half 
completed. A Fast-Day sermon on the "Political Lessons of 
the Rebellion" (1862), and a sermon in memory of Rev. Noah 



154 

Porter, D.D. (Yale 1803), his immediate predecessor in the 
Farmington pastorate, have also been published. Besides these, 
he occasionally contributed to current periodicals. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Yale University in 1875. 
He was President of the Maine Missionary Society from 1888 to 
1894. 

In ISSY Professor Paine made a journey through Italy in com- 
pany with his classmate, Justice Henry B. Brown. For several 
months before his decease his health had not been good, but his 
death occurred after a serious illness of only a week, from pneu- 
monia, at his home in Bangor, on May 10, 1902. He was in his 
70th year. 

He married, on July 29, 1861, Jennette, daughter of George 
and Julia (Morehouse) Holmes, of Norwalk, Conn., and had 
three sons and four daughters, of whom two daughters died in 
early childhood. The eldest son graduated in 1886 from Stevens 
Institute of Technology, the second in 1888 from Yale University, 
where the youngest is also an undergraduate student. 

1857 

William Cullen Case, son of Dr. Jairus and Mary Theresa 
(Higley) Case, was born on February 17, 1836, in Granby, Conn. 

After graduation he taught part of a year in Harwinton, Conn., 
then spent a few months in Minnesota, and. in the fall of 1858 
entered the law office of Rockwell & Colt in Pittsfield, Mass. 
After a year there he returned to New Haven, spent several 
months in the Yale Law School, was admitted to the bar on 
March 1, 1860, and the following winter settled in Tariff ville. 
Conn. He returned to Granby in 1877, and resided there until 
his death. 

In 1874 he formed a partnership with Hon. Samuel A. York 
(Yale 1863) in New Haven, under the name of Case & York, but 
after the election of Mr. York as Judge of Probate, he became a 
partner with Hon. Lucius P. Deming (LL.B. Yale 1877), and 
later in the firm of Case, Ely & Webb, with which he continued 
his connectign during his life. Since 1889 his practice had been 
largely in Hartford, where he was also the senior member in the 
firm of Case, Bryant & Case until its dissolution in 1897. Mr. 
Case was widely known as a successful pleader in criminal trials. 
He also achieved distinction in civil suits, in one of the most 
important of which he was one of the counsel for the Republican 



155 

party in the quo loarranto proceedings growing out of the con- 
test for the Governorship of 1891-93. He was counsel for the 
New Haven & Northampton Railroad and the East Hartford 
Bridge Company, now under new corporate names. 

In his earlier years he twice represented the Democratic party 
of Simsbury in the House of Representatives, but in 1872 he 
became a Republican, and in that year and the two following 
years represented the latter party from Simsbury, and in 1881 
from Granby. In that year he was chosen Speaker. In 1884 
he was again elected from Granby, and was the leader of the 
House during that session through his chairmanship of the 
judiciary committee. At the Republican State Convention of 
the same year he made a masterly speech, which secured the 
nomination of Hon. Henry B. Harrison (Yale 1846) for Governor. 
In 1876 he was nominated for State Senator and, although not 
elected, greatly diminished the customary large Democratic 
majority of his district. 

Mr. Case had a great capacity for hard and continuous work, 
but for the last year or two of his life had been in poor health. 
He died of rheumatism, complicated with other troubles, at his 
winter home in Hartford, on December 23, 1901, in his 66th year. 

He married, on May 15, 1862, Margaret, daughter of James 
and Jean (Adam) Turnbull, of Tariffville, who survives him with 
two sons, one of them a graduate of Yale in 1885. 

Douglas French Forrest, son of Commodore French Forrest, 
afterwards Admiral in the Confederate Navy, and Emily Douglas 
(Simms) Forrest, was born in Baltimore, Md., on August 17, 1837. 
He was fitted for college at Mr. Abbott's school in Georgetown, 
D. C, and joined the class at the beginning of Sophomore year 
from Alexandria, Va. 

After graduation he was engaged in studying law at home, 
and, during 1859-60, at the University of Virginia, and had just 
begun the practice of law when he entered the Confederate ser- 
vice, at the beginning of the Civil War. He took part in the 
first battle of Bull Run, as Second Lieutenant, Company H,. 
Seventeenth Virginia Regiment ; was on the Merrimac in her 
combat with the Congress and Cumberland, being assigned to 
duty there by Buchanan as his "Aid and Secretary for the fight" ; 
and again in the army on Major-General Trimble's staff in Gen- 
eral Longstreet's corps. He was then appointed Assistant Pay- 



156 

master in the navy, and, on May 27, 1863, sailed in the blockade- 
runner Margaret and Jessie, as bearer of dispatches abroad, and 
after various escapes from United States cruisers and from 
storms reached Calais, France, where he expected to join his ship, 
the Rappahannock ; but he was detained by the French govern- 
ment, and only after an absence of two years succeeded in 
returning to America, reaching Galveston, Texas, in the spring of 
1865. He was then on the staff of Major-General J. A. Walker 
in the Trans-Mississippi Army until it was disbanded. After a 
severe attack of fever in San Antonio, he made his way to Rich- 
mond, Va. His own account of the Fight of the Merrimac was 
published in the Monroe Watchman^ of Union, W. Va., on Octo- 
ber 3, 1901. 

Early in 1866 he opened a law office in Baltimore in partner- 
ship with Joseph Packard, Jr. He was also active in religious 
work, and was ordained there as Deacon by Bishop Whittingham. 
After practicing a few years, while on a tour in the Holy Land, 
he decided to give up the law and to enter the ministry. Upon 
his return he studied in the Theological Seminary of Virginia, 
near Alexandria, in 1872, and was ordained Priest in 1873, by 
Bishop Johns of Virginia. He was successively Rector of St. 
John's Church, Howard County, Md.; Trinity Church, Washing- 
ton, D. C; Calvary Church, Clifton, near Cincinnati, Ohio ; 
Christ Church, Clarksburg, W. Va., and Christ Church, Coronado 
Beach, Cal. He then returned to Washington in failing health. 
For several years past he had spent the winters in Florida, taking 
temporary parish work while there. 

On his return from Florida he died suddenly of heart failure, 
at Ashland, Va., on May 3, 1902, in the 65th year of his age, and 
was buried in the Congressional cemetery at Washington. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from William and 
Mary College in 1879. He was well known as a genealogist and 
left unpublished a valuable genealogical work. 

He married, on January 9, 1873, Sallie Winston, daughter of 
William and Sarah (Sherrard) Rutherfoord, of Richmond, Va., 
.who survives him. They had no children. 

Edward William Hitchcock, son of Noah and Lucy (Hub- 
bard) Hitchcock, was born on May 1, 1833, at Homer, Cortland 
County, N. Y. 

After graduation he took the theological course in Auburn 
Seminary, and was licensed by the Presbytery of Cortland in 



157 

May, 1857. Having accepted a call to the Reformed (Dutch) 
Church of Tompkinsville, Staten Island, N. Y., he was ordained 
by the Classis of New York in 1860. After nearly six years of 
service there he was installed pastor of the Fourteenth Street 
Presbyterian Church, New York City, on April 6, 1866, where 
he also remained six years. From 18*72 to 1883 he was in charge 
of the American Chapel in Paris, France. While abroad he 
traveled extensively in Europe, Egypt and Asia Minor. After 
his return from France he acted as an evangelist, and lectured 
on evangelization in France. In 1879 he received the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Divinity from Hamilton College. 

He had been in poor health for a year past, and died on Sep- 
tember 17, 1901, in Saratoga, N. Y., whither he had gone ten 
days before from his summer home at Homer. He was 68 years 
of age. 

Dr. Hitchcock married, August 8, 1860, Eva, daughter of Isaac 
Hawley, of Homer. She died in 1866, and in 1882 he married 
Josephine Cattell, daughter of Joseph and Hetty (Cattell) 
Fithian, who died August 15, 1900. Three sons survive them. 

Samuel Scoville, second son of Jacob Scoville, a farmer and 
at one time Representative in the Connecticut Legislature, and 
Martha (IngersoU) Scoville, was born on December 21, 1834, 
in West Cornwall, Conn., where he was in part prepared for 
college at the school of Theodore S. Gold (Yale 1838). While 
in college he was President of the Linonian Society and Captain 
of the University crew. 

After graduation he spent a few months at home, and was then 
at Auburn Theological Seminary from the beginning of February 
to the end of Junior year. The next year he was at Andover, 
after which he immediately went abroad, spending a year in 
Italy, Germany and England. On his return he completed his 
theological studies in Union Seminary. In August, 1861, he 
became pastor of the Congregational Church, in Norwich, N. Y., 
being ordained on September 17 of that year. The church 
edifice was soon doubled in size, and his ministry there of 
eighteen years left a distinct mark upon the community. In 
1879 he accepted a call to the Congregational Church in Stam- 
ford, Conn., of which he was pastor twenty years. After a ser- 
vice of a year in Vineland, N. J., in September, 1901, he was 
appointed assistant pastor of Plymouth Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., 



158 

but five months later his health failed, and he died of heart 
disease at the Presbyterian Hospital, Philadelphia, on April 
15, 1902. He was 67 years of age. His deep and tender 
sympathy, especially for those in trouble, won the affection of 
all classes in the community wherever he dwelt. 

He married, on September 25, 1861, at Peekskill, N. Y., Harriet 
Eliza, daughter of Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, and had two sons, 
graduates of Yale respectively in 1893 and 1895, and two daugh- 
ters, one of whom graduated at Wellesley College in 1882. They 
all, with their mother, survive. 

With William C. Beecher he wrote a full biography of Henry 
Ward Beecher, which appeared in 1888. 

1858 

George Pierce Andrews, son of Solomon and Sybil Anna 
(Farnsworth) Andrews, was born at Bridgton, Me., on Septem- 
ber 29, 1835. His residence during his college course was in 
New Haven. 

For a few months after graduation he studied- law in the oflSce 
of Hon. William Fessenden, then United States Senator, and 
later Secretary of the Treasury, and from then until the follow- 
ing June was engaged in teaching in Carroll Parish, La. After 
that he continued his law studies in New York in the office of H. 
P. Fessenden, Esq., a relative of Senator Fessenden, and was 
also clerk in the office of the U. S. District Attorney, New York. 
He was admitted to the bar in May, 1860. In April, 1861, he 
was appointed Assistant U. S. District Attorney, and held the 
ofi^ce untilJuly 1, 1865, when he resigned, and practiced his pro- 
fession until December, 1872. He was then appointed Assistant 
Counsel to the Corporation, and ten years afterward Counsel to 
the Corporation. In this ofiice he was very successful in winning 
suits for the city, by which very large amounts were saved to 
the taxpayers. 

In 1883 he was elected Judge of the Supreme Court of the 
State of New York for a term of fourteen years. At the expi- 
ration of his term of ofiice he failed to receive a renomination, 
but the next year was renominated and reappointed for a further 
term of fourteen years from 1898. He was known for his devo- 
tion to his work, and for his master}^ of municipal and corpora- 
tion law. 



159 

Justice Andrews died suddenly of pneumonia at his home in 
New York, on May 24, 1902, in the GYth j^ear of his age. 

He married at Belgrave Chapel, London, England, on July 31, - 
1889, Mrs. Catharine M. (Garrison) Van Auken, daughter of 
Cornelius K. Garrison, who survives him, with two daughters by 
her former marriage. 

Robert Morris, second son of William Lewis and Mary 
Elizabeth (Babcock) Morris, was born in New York City, on 
August 22, 1838. 

The two years following graduation he spent at leisure and in 
travel in the West, and in October, 1860, entered Columbia Law 
School, but the following April he enlisted in the Seventh New 
York Regiment. After a month in the army at Washington he 
resumed his law studies, and was admitted to the bar in Novem- 
ber, 1861, but then returned to further service for his country. 
On January 11, 1862, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant, 
First New York Infantry, and was promoted to the rank of First 
Lieutenant in July, and of Captain in October. For nearly six 
months he was in camp at Newport News, Va., and was exposed 
to the shells from the Virginia and her companion war vessels 
when the Congress and Cumberland were destroyed. He was 
afterwards in the Army of the Potomac, and in the battles of 
Charles City Cross Roads, Oak Grove, Malvern Hill, Fredericks- 
burg and Chancellorsville. With his regiment he was mustered 
out of service on May 25, 1863. 

Subsequently he was in the law office of Bowdoin, Laroques & 
Barlow, in New York, but left there in the summer of 1865. 
The next year in company with an army friend he purchased 
over two thousand acres of land in Madison County, Miss., and 
planted extensively there for a few years, but in 1874 left the 
State, and lived several years in Kansas City, Mo. During 1880 
and the early part of 1881 he was in Colorado, New Mexico, and 
Arizona. After that time he made his home in San Francisco, 
Cal., where he had, however, no active employment, but spent 
much of his time in. study. 

For several years he had been subject to severe suffering at 
times, but his death occurred, on November 15, 1901, after only 
a day's confinement to his bed, and was due to cancer of the liver. 
He was 63 years of age. 

He married, in New York City, on December 14, 1864, Mrs. 
Marv E. Cortlandt. from whom he was afterwards senarated. 



160 



1859 



William Henry Anderson, second son of Francis D. and 
Jane (Davidson) Anderson, was born on January 12, 1836, at 
Londonderry, N. H., in the old homestead in which four previous 
generations of his family had lived. 

After graduation he taught in private families in Natchez, 
Miss., and New Orleans, La., until the fall of 1860, when he 
returned North and entered the law oflSce of Morse & Stevens, in 
Lowell, Mass. He was admitted to the bar in December, 1862, 
and formed a partnership with George Stevens, Esq., under the 
name of Stevens & Anderson, which continued until 1875, after 
which he practiced alone. 

He was a member of the school committee of Lowell for several 
years, member of the Common Council in 1868 and 1869, and in 
the latter year president of the same, director of the Merchant's 
National Bank of Lowell since 1870, and a member of the Massa- 
chusetts House of Representatives in 1871 and 1872. 

Mr. Anderson died of intestinal stoppage, after an illness of 
two weeks, at his home in Lowell, on April 14, 1902, at the age 
of 66 years. 

He married, on October 1, 1868, Mary A., daughter of Joseph 
and Elizabeth (Welton) Hine, of Springfield, Mass., who survives 
him with a daughter. 

Truman Augustus Post, son of Rev. Truman Marcellus Post, 
D.D. (Middlebury 1829) and Frances Alsop (Henshaw) Post, was 
born on December 10, 1837, in Jacksonville, III, where his father 
was at the time Professor of Languages and History in Illinois 
College. The son was for a time a student there, but entered 
Yale in Sophomore year from St.Louis, Mo., where his father had 
then begun his long and honored pastorate of the First Congre- 
gational Church. 

After graduation he began the study of law in the office of 
Glover & Shepley, and was admitted to the bar in 1862. At the 
commencement of the Civil War he joined the St.Louis Reserve 
Corps, and aided in the capture of Camp Jackson and in various 
operations about St.Louis, and later spent several weeks at Pitts- 
burg Landing and in that neighborhood, reporting his observa- 
tions to the Missouri Democrat. He also wrote for the New 
York Tribune of the siege and surrender of Vicksburg. On his 
return to St.Louis he was commissioned First Lieutenant of 



161 

Company K, 40th Missouri Volunteers, and Judge Advocate of 
the General Court Martial for the Department of Missouri, and 
held this position to the close of the war. He then resumed- 
practice. 

In 1870 he was nominated by the Republicans for President of 
the City Council, but was defeated owing to a party division. 
In 1872 and again in 1874 he was elected to the lower house of 
the State Legislature. In 1867 he was appointed Reporter of the 
Supreme Court of Missouri, and held the office for ten years, 
during which he edited twenty-three volumes of Reports. In the 
third volume of these he inserted for the first time an index of 
cases cited. But he took special pleasure in the preparation of a 
Biography of his father, which was published in Boston in 1891. 
'^ No labor, no care was omitted which . . . seemed necessary for 
the fit accomplishment of whatever he undertook to do." He 
conscientiously performed all the duties of an American citizen, 
both in war and in peace. 

He died suddenly of paralysis of the heart at his home in 
St.Louis, on January 10, 1902, at the age of 64 years. He was 
unmarried. Two brothers and two sisters survive him. He was 
an active member of the First Congregational Church from early 
youth. 

Alfred Judd Taylor, son of Horace and Mary (Clark) Tay- 
lor, was born April 4, 1833, in Huntington, Mass., where his 
father was a well-known woolen manufacturer. 

The year following graduation he was principal of Hinsdale 
Academy, at Hinsdale, Mass. He entered the Albany Law School 
in September, 1860, graduated, and was admitted to the bar 
in May, 1861. He continued in Albany in the office of Learned 
(Yale 1841) & Cook until September following, when he began 
practice in New York City. For a time he was in partnership 
with D. Cady Eaton (Yale 1860), and afterward practiced alone. 
His office was for thirty years at 257 Broadway. 

He was a director of the Merchants' Exchange Bank, and a 
member of the New York Historical Society, the American 
Geographical Society, and the American Academy of Science. 

He died at his country home in Huntington, Mass., on July 12, 
1901, at the age of 68 years. His death was due to diabetes, but 
was hastened by the extreme heat. 



162 

Mr. Taylor married, on May 15, 1879, Kathleen, daughter of 
Robert W. Kelley, one of the founders of the People's Line of 
Steamers on the Hudson River. Mrs. Taylor survives him with- 
out children. 

J860 

Lyman Benham Bunnell, son of Hezekiah and Amanda 
(Benham) Bunnell, was born on August 18, 1832, in Burlington, 
Hartford County, Conn. Almost unaided he worked his way 
through Williston Seminary, at East Hampton, Mass., and 
through college. 

After graduation he studied two years in the Yale Law School, 
and was at the same time Instructor in Gymnastics in the college. 
In November, 1862, he was admitted to the bar, and thereafter 
practiced his profession in New York City, having an office at 
170 Broadway until May, 1901, when he removed to 76 William 
street. For the last year his sons were associated with him. 

He died of pneumonia at his home on March 18, 1902, in his 
70th year. 

He married, on May 30, 1865, Jennie Y., daughter of Alfred 
A. and Nancy Ranney, of West Townsend, Yt., and had two 
sons, graduates of the New York Law School, and a daughter, 
who, with their mother, survive, two other daughters having died 
in infancy. 

The year in which he began practice he united with the Broad- 
way Tabernacle, and since that time had continuously been 
engaged in Sunday school work, sometimes having two classes at 
different hours. While living in Englewood, N. J., from 1869 to 
1881, he was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and after 
his return to New York in the latter year, was a deacon and later 
an elder of the Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church. During 
the last three years he was a member of the Lenox Presbyterian 
Church, near his home, and was chairman of its board of trustees. 

Chaeles Doijgharty Foules, son of William B. and Matilda 
Ann (Luse) Foules, and brother of Henry Luse Foules (Yale 
1857), was born on October 23, 1839, at Kingston, Miss. 

After graduation he studied medicine, but preferred the life of 
a planter. At the beginning of the Civil War he joined a Missis- 
sippi cavalry regiment, and served in Wade Hampton's command 
in the army of Northern Virginia. He remained in service dur- 
ing the whole war, but did not receive even a slight wound. He 



163 

then returned to his plantation. He represented his county in 
the State Legislature in 1882, 1884 and 1886. 

Mr. Foules died of heart trouble at his home in Kingston, on 
May 27, 1901, in the 62d year of his age. 

He married, on November 19, 1868, Martha Eugenia, daugh- 
ter of Alexander and Weltha Boyd, who survives him with a son 
and daiighter. 

1861 

John Hanson Mitchell, son of General Walter Hanson 
Jenifer and Mary (Fergusson) Mitchell, was born on June 25, 
1842, at Linden, near Port Tobacco, Charles County, Md. 

Alter graduation he spent a year at home and in Baltimore 
reading law, and three years in Heidelburg, Germany, attending 
lectures on law and studying German. He was admitted to the 
Maryland bar on April 19, 1866, after which he practiced his 
profession in Baltimore for four years, then, for a time, in Port 
Tobacco, near his former home, and afterward, at La Plata, in the 
same county. He was concerned in nearly all the important 
legal cases of the vicinity and in them he showed thorough mas- 
tery of the questions at issue. His courtesy and considerateness 
made him a favorite with his associates. 

For three years, beginning with 1872, he was school commis- 
sioner, and in 1897 was Democratic candidate for District Judge. 
He was for several years editor of the Port Tobacco Times, and 
was for fifteen years vestryman of Christ Protestant Episcopal 
Church, Port Tobacco. 

He delighted to spend his leisure among his books and flowers, 
and at work in the garden of " Hanson Hill," where he died very 
suddenly from heart disease on November 12, 1901, after a day 
spent in professional duties. He was 59 years of age. 

He married, on October 11, 1870, Eliza Trippe Campbell, 
daughter of Daniel and Mary E. (Risteau) Jenifer, of Good 
Hope, Baltimore County, by whom he had two sons and six 
daughters, all of whom, with their mother, are living. 

1862 
Charles Woolsey Coit, son of Daniel Wadsworth and Har- 
riet Frances (Coit) Coit, was born on December 14, 1840, in New 
Rochelle, N. Y., but entered college from Norwich, Conn. 



164 

For six months following graduation he was in Grand Rapids, 
Mich., and then for nearly three years in Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City. During this time he visited the 
South in the interest of the Sanitary Commission, and of the 
Christian Commission, with which his brother (Yale 1864) 
was also connected. During the next three years he was 
again in New York, teaching, attending lectures in the Columbia 
Law School, and occupied in general study. In 1869 he removed 
to Grand Rapids, where his father had real estate interests, the 
administration and development of which was thereafter his 
main occupation. He became a member of the Kent County 
Bar in 1869, but did not practice. Induced by the easy and 
liberal terms of payment which he made, many workingmen 
became owners of homes, and now form an important and elevat- 
ing element in the community. He was a deacon of the Park 
(Congregational) Church for eleven years, and a trustee of Olivet 
College for several years. 

He died of pneumonia after an illness of four days, at Milford, 
Conn., on October 23, 1901, in his 61st year. 

He married, on October 16, 1878, Clara Guernsey, daughter of 
Lucas Guernsey and Eunice (Nichols) Merrill, of Kenosha, Wise, 
who survives him with three sons, of whom the eldest is an 
undergraduate student in Yale University. 

Albert Benjamin Shearer, son of Benjamin and Harriet 
Shearer, was born on September 18, 1837, in Montgomery, Pa., 
but entered college from Doylestown, in that State. 

At the time of General Lee's threatened invasion of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1862, he was for a short time in the Eleventh Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Militia. He then taught in a classical school in 
Philadelphia for seven years, after the first year being principal. 
In 1869 he studied law in the office of Theodore Cuyler, Esq., 
in Philadelphia, and was admitted to the bar in November, 1870. 
Thenceforward for thirty-one years he practiced in Philadel- 
phia, winning the respect of his clients and professional asso- 
ciates. Early in 1901 his health failed, but he continued to visit 
his office until September. He died of paralysis at his home in 
Germantown, on October 25, 1901, at the age of 64 years. 

He married, on September 10, 1887, Sarah Breban, daughter of 
Edward and Cornelia N. Bedlock, of Philadelphia, who survives 
him without children. 



165 



1863. 



Charles Edward Sumner, son of Cheney and Mary Barker 
(Coy) Sumner, was born at Spencer, Mass., on December 29, 1836. „ 
He was fitted for college at Monson (Mass.) Academy. 

After graduation be taught in the Delaware Academy at 
Delhi, N. Y., a year, and was in charge of the academy at Wal- 
ton, N. Y., two years. In February 1868, he entered Andover 
Theological Seminary and completed his course there in 1870. 
From 1872 to 1876 he was pastor of the Lincoln Park Congrega- 
tional Church, Chicago, where he was ordained on February 27, 
1873. His ministry there was very successful. At the time of 
the great fire by heroic exertion he helped rescue and bury the 
organ and pulpit, which were thus saved and were afterwards 
recovered and used. After leaving Chicago he spent over a year 
in travel in Europe, Egypt and Palestine. Upon his return he 
was acting pastor at Raymond and then nearly four years at Lan- 
caster, N. H. He resided in Concord, N. H., for a year or more 
without charge, and then removed to Spencer, Mass. In 1883 
his health failed and he went abroad again, after which 
he was acting pastor successively at South wick, Mass., 
Loudon and Alton, N. H., Brooklyn, Conn., and Wilmot and 
Northwood Center, N. H. At other times he often preached as 
a temporary supply, and ofiiciated in the church in Spencer the 
Sunday before his death. A "Thanksgiving Day Sermon," 
preached while he was in Chicago, was published. 

While in Fitchburg, Mass., on business, he died suddenly of 
heart failure on March 26, 1902, at the age of 65 years. He was 
never married. Two sisters survive him. 

1864 

Charles Henry Burnett, son of Eli Seal Burnett, a mer- 
chant of Philadelphia, Pa., and Hannah Kennedy (Mustin) 
Burnett, was born in that city, on May 28, 1842. He was one of 
the class historians on Presentation Day. 

After graduation he entered the Medical Department of the 
University of Pennsylvania, and received the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in March, 1867. He spent a year as Assistant 
Physician in the Children's Hospital and Resident Physician in 
the Episcopal Hospital, in Philadelphia, and ten months in Euro- 
pean study, in Berlin, Vienna and Heidelberg. He was then 
connected with the Eye and Ear Department of the Philadelphia 
Dispensarv for about a vear, after which he spent another year 



166 

and a half abroad in the study of otology, which he chose as his 
specialty and in which he afterward attained high rank. 

Returningito Philadelphia in April, 1872, he had since prac- 
ticed his profession in that city, and held positions of honor in 
connection with hospitals, medical schools and associations. In 
18*72 he was chosen Aural Surgeon at the Presbyterian Hospital, 
in 1879 Consulting Aurist of the Pennsylvania Institution of the 
Deaf and Dumb, in 1883 Professor of Diseases of the Ear at the 
Philadelphia Polyclinic, and in 1885 Professor of Otology at the 
Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania ; and, later, Consult- 
ing Aurist to the Convent School of the Holy Child, Sharon 
Hill, Pa., to the Baptist Orphanage, St. Timothy's Hospital, the 
Hospital for Women, Dispensary of the Alumnae of the Woman's 
Medical College, the Hospital for Epileptics, and Bryn Mawr 
Hospital. 

In 1876 he became a member of the Philadelphia County 
Medical Society, in 1883 of the Medical Society of Pennsylvania. 
He was also a member of the Pathological Society of Philadelphia, 
vice-president of the American Otological Association from 
1872 to 1882, and president from 1883 to 1885, and fellow of 
the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, of the Otological 
Section of which he was vice-president from 1878 to 1882, and 
president from 1883 to 1885. 

He wrote many short articles in medical magazines, and pub- 
lished much in his special department, including the following 
volumes ; " A Treatise on the Ear," 1877 ; "Hearing and How to 
Keep it," one of the American Health Primers, 1879 ; "Diseases 
and Injuries of the Ear," 1889; the chapters on Otology in the 
" American Text-Book of Surgery," 1 896, also in the " Cyclopedia 
of Diseases of Children," 1890 and 1897, and in the "American 
Yearbook of Medicine and Surgery" for 1896 and 1897. He 
edited a " System of Diseases of the Ear, Nose and Throat," 
1893, and a Text-Book of the same subjects in 1901, and was 
also editor of the American Journal of Otology. 

Since 1883 Dr. Burnett had resided at Bryn Mawr, Pa., where 
he died on January 30, 1902, from pneumonia, after an illness of 
about two weeks. He was in the 60th year of his age. He was 
a member of the (P. E.) Church of the Redeemer. 

He married, on June 18, 1874, Anna Lawrence, daughter of 
William Henry and Emily (Talman) Davis, of Buffalo, N. Y., 
who survives him with three daughters and a son. Another son 
died in infancy. 



167 

Peter Rouse Cortelyou, son of Adrian Voorhees and Mary- 
Ann (Koster) Cortelyou, was born on February 11, 1843, in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and entered college from Hempstead, Long 
Island. 

After graduation he took the course in Bellevue Medical School 
and received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in February, 1867. 
After a service of eighteen months on the staff of Bellevue Hos- 
pital, he practiced his profession in Brooklyn until 18*75. During 
this time he was visiting physician at St. John's Hospital and the 
Brooklyn Orphan Asylum. In June, 1875, he was attacked with 
severe pulmonary disease, and after battling with the disease for 
nearly four years, during which he spent successive winters in 
Thomasville, Valdosta and Atlanta, Ga., in April, 1879, he re- 
moved to Marietta, Ga., where he recovered a fair measure of 
health and in time resumed the practice of his profession to a 
limited degree. In 1882 he was offered a professorship of the 
Practice of Medicine in the University of Cleveland, O., but his 
health was inadequate. For a number of years from 1884 he was 
president of the school board of Marietta, and from 1884 to 1893 
president of the Public Circulating Library of Marietta, which 
he was instrumental in establishing. He was a member of the 
American Medical Association, and in 1889 he was vice-president 
of the Georgia State Medical Association. He was an elder in 
the Presbyterian Church, and active in all church work. 

He died at Marietta, Ga., on February. 4, 1902, after an illness 
of four or five days, following a surgical operation to relieve a 
disease of the right mastoid. He was nearly 59 years of age. 

Dr. Cortelyou married, at Brooklyn, N. Y., on April 15, 1873, 
Miss Julia T. Chase, who survives him with a son and daughter. 
A brother graduated from the University in 1863. 

« 

1865 

JosiAH Hooker Bissell, son of Colonel Joseph W. Bissell, 
was born on June 1, 1845, in Rochester, ]^. Y., and began his 
college course in the University of Rochester but left during 
Sophomore year to enter the army. His mother was before mar- 
riage Miss Hooker. He was in the Army of the Tennessee as 
Second Lieutenant of Engineers, in the Engineer Department of 
the West, from November 17, 1862, to July 10, 1863, when he 
resigned. He took a creditable part in the campaign of General 



168 

Grant in Mississippi, erected the battery that first shelled Vicks- 
burg, and performed other notable services. 

He joined his class at Yale in November of Junior year, and on 
graduation went into business at Skipworth's Landing, Miss., 
remaining there exposed to considerable danger from guerrillas 
for a year and a half. In June, 1867, he began the study of law 
in Rochester, in the office of Judge Henry R. Selden (LL.D. Yale 
1857) and Theodore Bacon (Yale 1853), on December 4 of the 
same year was admitted to the bar, and practiced in that city 
until January, 1869. He then removed to Chicago, 111., and for 
several years was in partnership with Hon. James R. Mann. In 
1870 he was appointed Reporter of the United States Circuit and 
District Courts of the Seventh Judicial District, and while in 
office edited ten volumes of Reports. He had a wide acquaint- 
ance with chancery and real estate law, and issued a work on 
" Partition," and also contributed to legal journals. His literary 
and scientific knowledge was extensive, and he delivered many 
lectures before the Chicago Philosophical Society. 

Mr. Bissell was drowned in Lake Michigan, on November 6, 
1901, while traveling by steamer from Chicago to Grand Haven, 
Mich. He was 56 years of age, and never married. By his will 
Yale University was designated as one of the residuary legatees. 

Manning Force Stikes, son of Henry and Mary (Mathias) 
Stires, was born on June,5, 1838, in Clinton, N. Y. Both parents 
died before he entered college. He began his college course at 
Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., but came to Yale in 
Junior year. 

The year after graduation he was a dry goods salesman with 
S. B. Chittenden & Co., from 1867 to 1883 in the house of Hal- 
sted, Haines & Co., and afterward till his death with Sweetser, 
Pembrook & Co. For the last thirtj^-two years he resided in 
Jersey City, N. J., i"n that part which was formerly called Bergen, 
where he was an elder of the First Presbyterian Church for 
twenty-three years. 

His health had been failing for some time past, but his death, 
which occurred on February 6, 1902, was due to typhoid fever. 
He was in his 64th year. 

He married, on February 6, 1867, Ellen Drake, daughter of 
William B. and Elizabeth (Scudder) Fisher, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mrs. Stires and a son (Yale 1897) survive. Another son died in 
childhood, and a daughter in 1898. 



169 

Edwin Horace Wilson, son of Clark and Harriet (Halbert) 
Wilson, was born on October 4, 1839, in Westmoreland, Oneida 
County, N. Y. 

On graduation he taught two years at Guilford, Conn., a year 
at Bath, N. Y., and five years at Rochester, N. Y. From 1873 
to 1876 he was tutor in Yale College, after which he taught in 
the Hartford High School, and then was Superintendent of 
Schools and Principal of the High School at Middletown, and 
later at Norwalk, all in Connecticut. 

Mr. Wilson died of heart failure following congestion of the 
lungs, after an illness of only two days, at his home in Cambridge, 
Mass., on November 29, 1901, at the age of 62 years. He was an 
active member of the Congregational church. 

He married, on May 1, 1878, Jane, daughter of George and 
Jennette (Millard) Bidwell, of Manchester, Conn., who survives 
him with four sons and two daughters. The eldest son (Harv. 
1899, Ph.D. Yale 1901) is Instructor in Mathematics in Yale 
University, and the second son is an undergraduate in Harvard 
University. 

1866 

Alexander Dwight Anderson, son of Samuel D. and 
Eunice (Freeman) Anderson, was born October 28, 1843, in 
Mansfield, Conn. 

After graduation he studied law at the University of Michi- 
gan and received the degree of LL.B. there in 1868. He began 
practice in the firm of Wakefield & Anderson in St. Louis, the 
following year was appointed Assistant United States District 
Attorney and continued there until 1877. He then removed to 
Washington, D. C, where he made a specialty of Spanish- 
American subjects in their commercial and literary aspects as 
well as legal relations. 

He Was the author of several books, including " The Silver 
Country, or Great Southwest/' 1877, "The Mississippi and Her 
Tributaries," "The Tehuantepec Inter-Ocean Railroad," 1880, 
"Mexico from the Material Standpoint," 1884, "The Tehuan- 
tepec Ship Railway," " Our Foreign Commerce of the Second 
Century," and " The Mississippi and its Forty-Four Navigable 
Tributaries," the last of which was published by resolution of the 
Senate in 1890. 

In 1884 he was special commissioner of Spanish-American 
markets at the New Orleans Exposition. From this experience 



lYO 

originated his plan for a united exposition by the three Americas 
in celebration of the discovery of America by Columbus. When 
the plan was authorized by Congress the site of the exposition 
was changed from Washington to Chicago, and Mr. Anderson 
was appointed a commissioner. 

He was one of the earliest secretaries of the Washington 
Board of Trade, vice-president of the same from 1891 to 1893, and 
active in movements for the development and improvement of the 
national capital. 

For several years he had been afflicted with a complicated 
stomach trouble, suffering intensely at times. He died suddenly 
at Mount Vernon, Va., on November 24, 1901, at the age of 58 
years. 

He married, on August 17, 1869, Antoinette, daughter of Rev. 
Edward Osborn Dunning (Yale 1832) and Catharine (Bent) 
Dunning, of New Haven, who, with three sons and a daughter, 
survives him. One son was associated with his father in the 
real estate business. 

George Augustus Lockwood, second son of Rev. Clark and 
Harriet Fidelia (Seymour) Lockwood, was born on December 28, 
1843, in Clinton, Mich. He entered college from Southold, 
Long Island, N. Y., and during the last three years of the course 
his home was at Cutchogue, L. L, where his father, although a 
Presbyterian, was pastor of the Methodist church. 

The year after graduation he taught in Brooklyn, N. Y., and 
then entered Union Theological Seminary, from which he gradu- 
ated in May, 1870. On November 16, following, he was ordained 
pastor of the Congregational Church at Oxford, Maine, contin- 
ued there until May, 1879, and then for twenty years served the 
Union Congregational Church in Kennebunk, Me., where his 
work in the parish and in promoting moral and educational 
interests was fruitful in good results. At the close of this pas- 
torate in 1899 he was settled over the Second Congregational 
Church in Ossipee, N. H. 

He was a trustee of the Maine Missionary Society, member of 
the visiting committee of Bangor Theological Seminary, and for 
three years moderator of the York County (Maine) Conference. 
He was also chairman of the school committee and vice-president 
of the Public Library Association. Several of his addresses 
delivered on special occasions were published. 



in 

Mr. Lockwood died on September 29, 1901, at Ossipee, N. H., 
from heart disease, after an illness of several months. He was 
in his 58th year. The funeral service was held in his former 
church at Kennebunk, and in that town he was buried. 

He married on October 19, 1871, Mary Genelia, daughter of 
Silas P. and Elizabeth L. Hall of Oxford, Me. One son (M.D. 
Jefferson Medical College 1897) and three daughters, with their 
mother, survive. 

1869 

Alfred Bartow, second of the three sons of Alfred Field 
and Mary (Lathrop) Bartow, was born on September 20, 1846, at 
Leroy, Genesee County, N. Y., and was fitted for college at 
the Academic Institute in that place. 

After graduation he studied law in the Chicago Law School, 
was admitted to the bar in June, 1870, and entered the firm of 
Bartow, Hall & Co. After fifteen years of practice, with a 
desire for ch'ange, he left Chicago in June, 1885, and went to 
the then unsurveyed town of Chadron, Nebr., where he settled and 
practiced his profession. In the autumn of 1889 he was elected 
State Senator to fill an unexpired term, and two years later was 
elected Judge of the Fifteenth Judicial District of Nebraska 
for five years. He was active in building up Chadron Academy, 
of whose board of trustees he was president for several years. 
About a year after the expiration of his term as judge he 
removed to Colorado Springs, Col., and resided there in failing 
health until his death from Bright's disease on March 12, 1902. 
He was in the 56th year of his age. 

He married, at Omaha, Nebr., on April 22, 1889, Mrs. Mary A. 
Wright of Watertown, Wise, who survives him with a step-son. 

1870 

John Alexander Ross, son of Lewis Devval and Katherine 
(Gabaudan) Ross, was born on January 27, 1850, in Greenups- 
burg, Ky. His father died when he was about fifteen years old, 
and he was fitted for college by a private tutor in New Haven, 
where his mother was then living. 

After graduation he studied law in Sioux City, la., and Kansas 
City, Mo., and in the latter city made his permanent home. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1 872, and became a member of the 
firm of Tomlinson & Ross. During the last few years his time 
was chiefly occupied in the management of several large estates. 



172 

He was a member of the vestry and treasurer of Grace Episco- 
pal Church, and for many years was a chorister there. 

He died at home after a lingering illness of several years, on 
October 19, 1901, at the age of 51 years. 

He married, on December 27, 1876, Marie A., daughter of 
Allen G. and Martha A. Mansfield. Mrs. Ross and a daughter 
survive him. 

1873 

Edwakd Everett Gaylord, son of Colonel Horace and 
Mary A. (Davis) Gaylord, was born on June 5, 1849, at Ash- 
ford, Conn. He won a first mathematical prize in Freshman 
year, and was one of the Yale Courant editors in Senior year 
and one of the class historians at graduation. 

The first two years after graduation he taught Greek in the 
Hopkins Grammar School, and the next year resumed a course 
previously begun in physiological chemistry in the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School. During these three years he also read medicine 
with his brother Charles (Yale 1865), and in October, 1876, 
entered the Yale Medical School. 

^ Immediately on receiving the degree of M.D. in 1878, he 
sailed for Europe for travel and study. He began practice in North- 
ampton, Mass., in 1879, and the next year went to the adjoining 
village of Florence. He was for four years town physician 
and for two years member of the board of health. In Decem- 
ber, 1884, he removed to West Woodstock, Conn., and the fol- 
lowing May to Woodstock. Here he added the cultivation of a 
farm to his duties as physician. 

Early in 1890, in order to recover from the effects of pro- 
tracted illness, he went to California for three months, but in 
the fall removed permanently to Pasadena in that State. Here he 
lived for eleven years and practiced as he was able, although seri- 
ously ill at times. His death occurred on November 2, 1901, and 
was directly due to paralysis, with which he was stricken early 
in the previous year. He was 52 years of age. He was known 
for his genuineness and thoroughness. He was a vestryman and 
treasurer of All Saints' Church. 

Dr. Gaylord married on May 12, 1881, at Chicopee, Mass., 
Alice E., adopted daughter of Henry B. and Cordelia S. Kendall, 
of Chicopee, Mass. She survives him with three sons and three 
daughters. 



173 

He assisted in making the " Catalogue of the Flowering 
Plants and Higher Cryptogams growing without cultivation 
within thirty miles of Yale College," which was published by 
the Berzelius Society in 1878. 

William Clarke Stewart, son of Orlando L. and Mary E. 
(Porter) Stewart, was born in New York City on December 5, 

1852, and was fitted for college by a private tutor at Englewood, 
N. J. 

After graduation he spent part of the first year in the Columbia 
Law School, but on April 1, 1874, he was appointed clerk of the 
Courts of General Sessions and Oyer and Terminer in New York 
City, and held the position until October 1, 1879, when he be- 
came a member of his father's law firm of Stewart & Yickery. 
After this his practice was mostly advisory in its nature. He 
was admitted to the bar in September, 1876. 

Mr. Stewart died of pneumonia, at the Racquet Club in New 
York City, on January 5, 1902, after an illness of only two days. 
He was 49 years of age. He was never married. 

1876 

George Henry Benton, son of Rev. William Austin Benton 
(Yale 1843) and Loanza (Golding) Benton, was born on July 20, 

1853, at Bhamdun, a missionary station on Mount Lebanon, 
Syria. He came to the United States in July, 1869, and was 
fitted for college at New London and Stamford, Conn. In Senior 
year he won the W. W. DeForest prize for excellence in French. 

After graduation he was appointed Professor of Ancient and 
Modern Languages at St. John's College, Little Rock, Ark., con- 
tinued teaching for two years and a half, and at the same time 
studied law. In November, 1877, he was admitted to the bar of 
Arkansas, and for four years practiced in Little Rock. He then 
became assistant attorney of the St.Louis, Iron Mountain & 
Southern Railway Co., and resided at St.Louis until January, 
1884, when he moved to Poplar Bluff, Butler County, Mo. In 
1890, after nearly ten years of service with the railway company, 
he resigned and went to Minneapolis, Minn., and began business 
by himself. He was a deacon in the First Congregational 
Church. 

He died at home, on November 16, 1901, at the age of 48 years. 

He married, on June 24, 1890, Miss Jeannette Lyall, who sur- 
vives him with two children. Two brothers graduated from 



174 

Edward Wells Southworth, son of Hon. Wells and Harriet 
(Gillett) Southworth, was born on January 14, 1854, in West 
Springfield, Mass., but the same year removed with his family to 
Kew Haven, Conn. He was a member of the class of 1874 until 
the end of Junior year, when he made a journey around the 
world.' On his return he completed his college course with the 
class of 1875. 

He received the degree of Bachelor of Law at Columbia Law 
School in 1877, and was admitted to the bar, after which he con- 
tinued his legal studies at Yale, and received the degree of 
Master of Laws in 1878. Returning to New York, he spent the 
next year in the office of Lord, Day & Lord, and the year follow- 
ing as managing clerk for Erastus New, Esq. In November, 1880, 
he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law. Colonel George 
S. Hastings, but retired from practice in 1888. With his class- 
mate, D wight Arven Jones, he published, in 1884, "A Treatise 
on the New York Manufacturing Act of 1848, and the Business 
Corporation Act of 1875." 

He gave generously to many private charities, but his sympa- 
thies were especially enlisted in behalf of prison reform and dumb 
animals. At different times he made gifts to the University 
Library, including funds for the purchase of certain needed addi- 
tions to the collection of English poetry, and at his death left to 
it by bequest a valuable residuary estate. 

Mr. Southworth married, on June 14, 1881, Emily M., daughter 
of William H. and Elizabeth (Bennett) Alexander, of Syracuse, 
N. Y. Her death in 1888 was a blow from which he never 
recovered. He died after a protracted illness from nervous pros- 
tration at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, on April 
20, 1902, at the age of 48 years. He had no children, but a sister 
survives him. He had been a member of the United (formerly 
North) Church in New Haven since 1866. 

1876 

Bradbury Bedell, son of Abram Bedell, a manufacturer, and 
Sarah W. (Sanderson) Bedell, was born on February 8, 1856, at 
Athens, N. Y., and gained his preparation for college at Markham 
Academy in Milwaukee, Wise, and at Swarthmore, Pa. 

After graduation he studied at the Albany (N. Y.) Law School 
and in Philadelphia, Pa. In the latter city he was admitted to 
the bar in the autumn of 1877, and for two years was with 



175 

Richard P. Ashhurst, Esq. He then established an office by him- 
self, where during twenty-three years of practice he met with 
unusual success, and accumulated from his professional earnings 
a fortune. He traveled extensively, and made many trips abroad. 

He died of pneumonia on May 23, 1902, at the home in Phila- 
delphia which he built in 1890. He was 46 years of age. 

He married, on May 22, 1879, Emmeline Shinn, daughter of 
Dr. Thomas S. and Mary (Woodnut) Reed, of Philadelphia, and 
sister of Charles Henry Reed, M.D. (Yale 1872), and had two 
children who died in early life. Mrs. Bedell survives him. 

William Buehler Lamberton, son of Hon. Robert Alexan- 
der Lamberton, LL.D. (Dickinson Coll. 1843) and Annie (Bueh- 
ler) Lamberton, was born March 14, 1855, at Harrisburg, Penn., 
and was fitted for college at Harrisburg Academy, and at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass. In Freshman and Senior years he 
won prizes for excellence in Mathematics. 

After graduation he began his law studies in the office of his 
father, who was for many years one of the leaders of the bar of 
Dauphin County, but in May of the following year went abroad 
for study and travel, and attended lectures at the University of 
Leipzig. He returned home in August, 1878, was admitted to 
the bar of Dauphin County on November 25, and was again in 
his father^s office until April, 1880, when Dr. Lamberton accepted 
the presidency of Lehigh University. He then practiced alone 
until the fall of 1881, when he formed a partnership with his 
brother (Yale 1878), under the name of W. B. &> J. M. Lamber- 
ton, which continued until the latter removed from Harrisburg 
in September, 1887. He was admitted to practice in the Supreme 
Court of Pennsylvania in May, 1882, and in the Supreme Court 
of the United States in April, 1890. For several years he was a 
member of the Board of Examiners for admission to the Bar of 
Dauphin County. He was elected a member of the American 
Bar Association in 1893, and was one of the originators of the 
Pennsylvania Bar Association in 1895. Although engaged, in 
general practice, he gave special attention to corporate taxation, 
and in 1880 succeeded his father as counsel at Harrisburg for the 
Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Company and allied corpor- 
ations. 

He was a member of the Dauphin County Historical Society, 
member of the Board of Trade of Harrisburg, for some years a 



176 

director of the Harrisburg Opera House Association and of the 
Harrisburg Bridge Company, also secretary of the Harrisburg 
Benevolent Association, and a member of the Board of Managers 
of the Harrisburg Hospital from 1887 to 1895, resigning upon his 
appointment as member of the Board of Public Charities of 
Pennsylvania. For a number of years he was vestryman and 
treasurer of St. Stephen's Protestant Episcopal Church, and fre- 
quently represented that parish at the Diocesan Convention of 
Central Pennsylvania. In 1884 he declined the Democratic 
nomination to Congress from his district. 

Mr. Lamberton never entirely recovered from a serious illness 
of 1893. In September, 1895, he went abroad for treatment, but 
returned the next spring without material benefit, and was unable 
to resume his work. He died at Primol, Pa., from heat exhaus- 
tion, on July 5, 1901, at the age of 46 years. He was not married. 

1877 

William Ewing Whitney, son of Samuel and Caroline A. 
(Puffer) Whitney, was born on August 9, 1856, at North Read- 
ing, Mass. His father was a paper manufacturer in Ashland and 
Fitchburg, Mass., also in Bennington, N. H. 

After graduation he formed a partnership with his brother 
Clarence, under the name of Whitney Brothers, for carrying on 
the wholesale paper business in Boston, Mass., previously estab- 
lished by his brother. 

He died of typhoid pneumonia at the Hotel Brunswick, Boston, 
on January 13, 1902, in his 46th year. 

He married, on October 5, 1878, at Boston, Mass., Mary E., 
daughter of James and Elizabeth Fenn, who survives him with- 
out children. 

1879 

James Webster Eaton, son of James Webster and Eliza 
(Benner) Eaton, was born on May 14, 1856, in Albany, N. Y. 

After graduation he spent one term in Columbia Law School, 
but completed his legal studies in the office of DeWitt & Spoor, 
and of Parker & Countryman, in Albany, and at the same time 
gave instruction in Latin and German in the Albany Boys' Acad- 
emy. He was admitted to the bar of New York State on May 4, 
1 882, and in the spring of the following year formed a partner- 
ship with his classmate Kirchwey, under the firm name of Eaton 



177 

& Kirchwey, whicli continued until the removal of Mr. Kirchwey 
in 1891 to become Professor of Law in Columbia University. 
He was District Attorney of Albany County for three years from 
January, 1892, and in this office gained the confidence and respect 
of the entire community irrespective of party. 

In 1889 Mr. Eaton was appointed Professor of Real Property 
and Wills in Albany Law School, his subjects of instruction after- 
ward being Evidence, Contracts and Bankruptcy. In addition to 
his professorship he had been Treasurer of the School since 1895. 
During the winter of 1900-01 he was also Lecturer on Equity 
Jurisprudence in the Boston University Law School. 

His published works include a revised edition of Reeves on 
"Domestic Relations," 1888, an annotated edition of "The 
Negotiable Instruments Law of the State of New York," 1897, 
and a revised edition of Collier "On Bankruptcy," 1900; and 
just before his death he had completed the manuscript of a work 
on Equity. He was also editor of the " American Bankruptcy 
Reports." He had been for many years a member of the com- 
mittee on law reform of the New York State Bar Association, 
and a member of the executive committee of the Albany County 
Bar Association. 

Mr. Eaton died of 'typhoid fever, after an acute illness of only 
three days, at his home in Albany, on August 1, 1901, at the age 
of 45 years. On the Saturday previous he argued a contested 
action in the Supreme Court at Albany. He 'was a communicant 
of St. Peter's Protestant Episcopal Church. 

He married, on September 25, 1893, Miss Florence Cady, of 
Lockport, N. Y., who died after a brief illness on December 9 of 
the same year. On July IV, 1894, he married Mrs. Hortense 
Willey Yibbard, of Dansville, who with four children — one of 
them a daughter by her previous marriage — survives him. 

1880 

George Dana White, son of Nathan Curtis and Delia (Dana) 
White, was born on April 27, 1859, at Utica, N. Y., but removed 
with his parents to Norwood, N. J., and was prepared for college 
at the neighboring town of Englewood. During Freshman year 
he won the First Berkeley Latin Premium, and in Senior year the 
Cobden Club Mfedal for proficiency in Political Economy. 

Since graduation he had devoted himself to newspaper work, 
and was successively on the staffs of the JS/'eio York Tribune, 



178 

Mail and Express, and Graphic. For two years he was night 
reporter for the Associated Press, and during this time attended 
the Columbia Law School, graduating in 1883. He was admitted 
to the bar, but did not practice. From November of that year he 
was night city editor in the office of the Associated Press for 
nearly a year, but found the work too severe, and soon became 
financial and later associate editor of the Mail and Express. He 
was a member of the Seventh Regiment National Guard of New 
York State. 

Owing to overwork Mr. White had been an invalid for three 
years. He died of paresis at Utica, N. Y., on May 2V, 1901, at 
the age of 42 years. He was not married. 

1883 

William Hamilton Stockwell, son of William Hamilton and 
Mary (Strange) Stockwell, was born in Boyle Co., Ky., on 
November 18, 1863. He was fitted for college at the Hopkins 
Grammar School in New Haven. 

After graduation he entered the office of Sprague, Warner & 
Co., wholesale grocers in Chicago, in December, 1883, but the 
following summer left the firm to commence the study of law in 
the office of Edmund Coffin (Yale 1866) in New York City. He 
was also a member of Columbia Law School for a year, but did 
not complete the course there. He was admitted to the bar on 
March 30, 1886, and began practice in New York immediately. 
Since 1892 he had been attorney for the Title Guarantee and 
Trust Company of New York. 

He died at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, on 
May 20, 1902, in the 39th year of his age, after an illness of a 
week from pneumonia. He was unmarried. His mother and a 
sister survive him. 

1886 

Cornelius Gardner Bristol, only son of Phineas Stowe and 
Elizabeth (Gardner) Bristol, was born in Milford, Conn., on Octo- 
ber 16, 1863. 

After graduation he entered Berkeley Divinity School at Mid- 
dletown, finished the course in 1889, and on June 5 of that year 
was ordained Deacon by Bishop Williams. Aftor his ordination 
as Priest in May, 1890, he became Rector of St. Alban's Church, 
Danielson, Conn. Under his leadership the parish was inspired 



1Y9 

with renewed energy and built a new church edifice. From there 
he was called to Hartford, and on September 17, 1893, entered 
upon a service of eight years as Rector of the Church of the Good 
Shepherd. Under his care the parish work expanded in many 
directions through his ability to enlist new workers and make 
them share his own enthusiasm. His interests were not, however, 
limited to his own parish, but he was in sympathetic relations 
with the pastors of all denominations, and was a cordial sup- 
porter of every movement for the welfare of the city. 

For the last three years he was one of the assistant secretaries 
of the diocese, and he edited the parochial reports in the Journal 
of 1901. He was elected treasurer of the Berkeley Divinity 
School in 1901, and completed an endowment for the professor- 
ship in the School previously held, without salary, by Bishop 
Williams. In 1894 he was made secretary and treasurer of the 
Church Scholarship Society, and as executive ofiicer largely 
increased the available funds of the Society, through the return 
of money given to earlier candidates for the ministry. He was 
chairman of the Hartford Archdeaconry, also a member of the 
Church Building Fund Commission. 

He was vice-president of the Yale Alumni Association of Hart- 
ford, and many Yale friends will cherish the memory of his genial 
and unselfish friendliness and Christian manhood. 

Mr. Bristol had long suffered from weakness of the heart, but 
his death followed two surgical operations for obstruction in the 
gall bladder. He died at his home on November 30, 1901, at the 
age of 38 years. 

He married, on January 28, 1891, Carrie E., daughter of Henry 
H. and Myra C. G. Lowrie, of Plainfield, N. J., who survives him 
with a son and daughter. Two other children died in infancy. 

1887 

Franklin Adams Meacham, son of Frank Meacham, M.D., 
Surgeon in the TTnited States Army during the Civil War, and 
Ellen Bruce (Adams) Meacham, was born at Cumberland Gap, 
Ky., on October 28, 1862. During his college course his home 
was at Fort Douglas, Utah. 

After graduation he entered the Medical Department of the 
University of Virginia and completed the three years' course in 
one year, receiving the degree of M.D. in June, 1889. He then 
settled in Salt Lake City, Utah, and achieved unusual success in 



180 

his profession. The following spring he was elected City Physi- 
cian, being the first "Gentile" ever chosen to that position, and 
in June, 1892, became a member of the Territorial Board of 
Health. In 1894-5 he took an advanced course of study in 
bacteriology and surgical pathology in Johns Hopkins Hospital. 
He was for a time Associate Surgeon of the Holy Cross Hospital 
of Salt Lake City, and on April 6, 1896, was appointed Chief 
Surgeon of the same, and also President of the Board of United 
States Pension Examining Surgeons of Utah. Shortly afterward, 
on April 28, he was chosen Surgeon of the Utah National Guard, 
with the rank of Major, and at the outbreak of the Spanish war 
was placed in command of the Hospital Corps of that Guard. 

In June, 1898, he was appointed Senior Surgeon of the Second 
Regiment, U. S. Volunteer Engineers, with the rank of Major, 
and was with them through unusual exposure and hardships. He 
served at Camp Wikoff and in Savannah, went to Havana, 
November 19, 1898, and the following April was assigned to 
duty as Chief Operating Surgeon, Pathologist and Bacteriologist 
of the Military Hospital, No. 1, in that city. He was then 
ordered to the Philippines, and on October 21, 1899, was 
appointed Brigade-Surgeon in General McArthur's Division, on 
the staff of General Joseph Wheeler, First Brigade, and served 
in many engagements of the brigade during its advance north 
from Angeles to Dagupan. On April 15, 1900, he was appointed 
Chief Surgeon, Third Military District, Department of Northern 
Luzon, with headquarters at Dagupan, and in December, was 
assigned to the duty of President of the Board of Health of 
Manila. 

Dr. Meacham died at Manila, P. I., on April 14, 1902, of heart 
failure caused by overwork among cholera patients. He was in 
his 40th year. He was a devoted soldier and highly esteemed by 
his comrades and all who knew him. 

He was a member of the American Medical Association, the 
Rocky Mountain Interstate Medical Association, and the Utah 
State Medical Association ; and in 1896-7 was vice-president of 
the Salt Lake County Medical Society and of the Utah Micro- 
scopical Society. 

Dr. Meacham contributed a number of papers to medical jour- 
nals, and published a "Synopsis of Clinical Surgery," containing 
an account of the surgical cases treated in the Holy Cross Hos- 
pital in 1892. 



181 

He married, on February 18, 1896, Sarah Grace, daughter of 
Samuel W. and Anna C. Thomson, of New York City, who sur- 
vives him with twin daughters. 

1888 

James Howard McMillan, son of Hon. James and Mary L. 
(Wetmore) McMillan, was born at Detroit, Mich., on September 
17, 1866. He was prepared for college by a private tutor. 

The year after graduation he spent as a student in the Yale 
Law School, and then entered the law office of W. H. Wells 
(Univ. Mich. 1874), afterward senior partner in the firm of Wells, 
Angell, Boynton & McMillan, of which Mr. McMillan became a 
member on January 1, 1891. He was admitted to the Michigan 
bar in March, 1890, and practiced his profession until the out- 
break of the Spanish war. 

He entered the U. S. Volunteer service as Captain and Assist- 
ant Quartermaster on June 1, 1898, and two days afterward 
was commissioned Brigadier Quartermaster on the staff of Gen- 
eral H. M. Duffield, and stationed at Camp Alger, Falls Church, 
Va. During the hurried expedition to Cuba he showed unusual 
executive ability and consideration for the comfort of the men in 
his charge. He reached Siboney on June 27, and was with the 
Thirty-Third Michigan Volunteers at Aguadores on July 1. For 
meritorious service in this engagement he was nominated for 
appointment as Major. On July 18, he was assigned to duty 
under Colonel C. H. Humphrey as Chief Quartermaster of the 
Santiago expedition. He was relieved from this duty on August 
25, 1898, after all troops on the original expedition had been sent 
North. He was subsequently honorably discharged, and returned 
to his law practice. He was a member of the Detroit and 
American Bar Associations. 

On his return from Cuba he was attacked by malarial fever, 
from which he did not fully recover. The last year of his life 
he spent in Arizona, California and Colorado, and was at Colorado 
Springs with his family for several months. His condition was 
considered favorable until a week before his death, when he was 
taken with a hemorrhage. After this he failed rapidly, and died 
of tuberculosis, on May 9, 1902. He was 35 years of age. 

His residence was at Grosse Pointe Farms, of which he was 
for some years village trustee. He was vice-president and direc- 
tor of the Detroit & Cleveland Line of Steamers, also vice-presi- 



dent of the Michigan Malleable Iron Co., and of the Wabash 
Portland Cement Co., and director of the Marine Savings Bank. 
He was a member and for some time trustee of the Jefferson 
Avenue Presbyterian Church. 

He married, on June 18, 1890, Julie Yilier, daughter of Alex- 
ander and Elizabeth J. (Ingersoll) Lewis, who survives him with a 
daughter, his son having died at Colorado Springs one month 
previous. Three brothers have graduated from Yale, respec- 
tively, B.A. 1884 and 1894 and Ph.B. 1897. 

Alfred Raymond, son of Rossiter Worthington Raymond, a 
mining engineer of New York City, and Sarah Mellen (Dwight) 
Raymond, was born on August 31, 1865, at Lakeville, Conn., and 
was fitted for college at the Brooklyn (N. Y.) Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, and at the Hill School, Pottstown, Pa. 

While in college he was a member of the University Glee 
Club, a contributor of prose and verse to the Yale Literary 
Magaziney and a skillful illlustrator of the Yale Record. 

After graduation he took the course in architecture in the 
Columbia School of Mines, in New York, receiving the degree of 
Ph.B. in 1891, and was then in office work in New York for a 
year and a half. He was a member of the Twenty-third Regi- 
ment of Brooklyn, but was not called into active service except 
at the time of the Buffalo strike and other scenes of disorder. 

In February, 1893, in company with a Columbia classmate, he 
sailed for Naples, and after a year of travel, entered the Ecole 
des Beaux Arts in Paris, in March, 1894. During the following 
summer he visited Normandy, Brittany, and the Isle of Jersey, 
and in the fall set out from Paris on a more extensive trip, 
including Italy, Sicily, Greece, Austria and Hungary, as well as 
the more frequented countries of Europe. In the spring of 1895 
he returned to Paris, and in July sailed for home. 

On May 1, 1896, he opened an office for the practice of archi- 
tecture, with Henry Hornbostel, Ph.B., a classmate and later 
Lecturer in Columbia University. Both as a member of this 
firm and individually, he was engaged in several professional 
undertakings, chiefly in the design and construction or recon- 
struction of city and country residences. In 1899, he became 
the assistant of his father in editing the Transactions of the 
American Institute of Mining Engineers. 



i 



183 

Mr. Raymond died at his home in Brooklyn, N. Y., of typhoid 
fever, on October 28, 1901, at the age of 36 years. He was 
unmarried. He was president of the Young Men's League and 
of the Plymouth League, both connected with Plymouth Church, 
of whieh he was an active member and officer, 

1889 

Leopold Hernandez Francke, seventh of the eight sons of 
Jonas Robert Francke, a sugar merchant in the Cuban trade, 
and Fabiana (Hernandez) Francke, was born at Havana, Cuba, on 
March 14,1867. 

After graduation he was in the office of J. H. Winchester & 
Co., ship brokers in New York City, four months, and then with 
the New York and Cuba Steamship Co. a year. He then studied 
stock brokerage in a number of New York offices, and, in 1892, 
became a member of the New York Stock Exchange. In Janu- 
ary, 1894, with his brother Albert (Yale Ph.B. 1891), he estab- 
lished the firm of L. H. & A. Francke, stock brokers, with 
offices in Exchange place, and recently in William street. His 
home was at Lawrence, Long Island, N. Y. 

Mr. Francke died at Roosevelt Hospital, New York City, on 
April 16, 1902. He had been ill for three weeks with appendi- 
citis followed by pneumonia, but his death was immediately due 
to paralysis. He was 35 years of age. 

He married, on April 20, 1892, Elise Irving, daughter of 
Charles R. and Mary I. Huntington, of New York City, and had 
two daughters, who, with their mother, survive. Besides his 
brother Albert, who was his partner, five other brothers are liv- 
ing, one being a graduate of the Sheffield Scientific School in 
1876, another of the Academical Department in 1886 and another 
of Columbia University in 1880. An older brother (Yale Ph.B. 
1877) is deceased. 

Elmer Francis Letcher, son of Francis O. Letcher, a farmer 
and member of the First Connecticut Heavy Artillery in the 
Civil War, and Dilana (Houghton) Letcher, was born on Septem- 
ber 28, 1866, in Union, Conn. In 1872 he moved with his parents 
to Southbridge, Mass., and was fitted for college in the high 
school in that place. 

After graduation he studied a year in the Yale Theological 
Seminary, and engaged in teaching in South Dakota, where he 



184 

was principal in the high schools successively at Mellette, St. 
Lawrence and Clark. He read law in the office of T. H. Null, 
Esq., at Huron, was admitted to the South Dakota bar, May 
9, 1893, and on November 9, 1896, to practice in the Supreme 
Court, but continued to devote much of his time to teaching. 
He removed to Flandreau, Moody County, where, in 1898, he 
taught during the winter, and the following spring took a posi- 
tion in the Grand Rapids High School. He afterwards returned 
to Moody County, and was establishing a successful practice, 
when taken with a fatal illness. He died at the home of his 
parents in Southbridge, Mass., on August 31, 1901, in his 35th 
year. He was unmarried. He was a member of the Christian 
Church at Sioux Falls, S. D. 

1891 

Matthias Charles Arnot, son of John Arnot, a member of 
Congress, banker and first Mayor of Elmira, N. Y., was born in 
Elmira on October 22, 1867. His mother was Anne Elizabeth, 
daughter of Charles Hulett, of Horseheads, N. Y. He was fitted 
for college under Mr. J. Ernest Whitney (Yale 1882) in New 
Haven. 

After graduation he entered the Chemung Canal Bank in 
Elmira, founded by his grandfather in 1833, and at the time of 
his death was Cashier and First Vice-President. He had gained a 
wide knowledge of scientific subjects, and during each of his 
visits to Europe he made a special study of some scientific prob- 
lem. He was for a time President of the Elmira Academy of 
Science. 

He died of meningitis following an operation for appendici- 
tis, on July 31, 1901, in his 34th year. He was undemonstrative 
in manner, but exerted an unusual influence for good in the com- 
munity by his quiet but manly example. He was a member of 
Trinity Church. 

He married on April 19, 1897, Miss Alice Hale, daughter of Dr. 
Thaddeus D. Up de Graff, of Elmira, who died in March, 1898. 
He afterward married Elizabeth Burr, daughter of Charles E. 
and Harriet (Burr) Thorne of Auburn, N. Y. She survives him 
without children. A brother graduated from Yale University in 
the class of 1885 and an uncle in 1856. 



185 



1892 



George Lawton Coit, son of George Mumford and Emily 
A. (Kilbiirn) Coit, was born in Hartford, Conn., on September 
12, 1869. He was fitted for college at St. John's Military- 
School, Manlius, N. Y., and Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H. 
During and after his college course his home was in Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

For a few months immediately following graduation he was 
with the New York and New Jersey Telephone Company, and 
from November, 1892, to October, 1894, with the Franklin 
Trust Company, both in Brooklyn, N. Y. Since then he had 
been an insurance broker in New York. 

He served five years in Company A of the Twenty-third Regi- 
ment of New York. He was a communicant of Trinity parish, 
New York, and was active in mission work. 

Mr. Coit had not been in good health for some time, but no 
cause was known for taking his own life, which he did by shoot- 
ing himself in the grounds of Packer Institute, Brooklyn, on May 
24, 1902. He was 32 years of age and unmarried. 

Donald Rose Hinckley, son of Henry Rose Hinckley (Yale 
1859) and Mary Wright (Barrett) Hinckley, and great-grandson 
of Jonathan Huntington Lyman (Yale 1802), was born on Sep- 
tember 18, 1869, in Northampton, Mass. He was fitted for col- 
lege at the Waltham New Church School, Waltham, Mass. 

After graduation he entered the Medical School of Harvard 
University, from which he received the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine in 1896. He sei'ved for eighteen months in the Boston 
City Hospital, after which he began practice in New Haven. In 
1899 he was appointed Assistant in Physical Diagnosis in the 
Yale Medical School, and was just entering his third year in this 
service. 

While at his father's home in Northampton he accidentally 
shot himself with a revolver which he was examining, and died 
half an hour after, on October 14, 1901, at the age of 32 years. 

A brother graduated at Yale in the same class, and three 
others respectively in 1889, 189V and 1900. 



186 
1896 

Max. Howard Kershow, son of Jeremiah Kershow, a native 
of Philadelphia, Pa., and afterward engaged in the real estate 
and mining business in Denver, Col., was born in the latter city 
on April 24, 1872. His mother was before marriage Elizabeth 
Monroe Kehler, of Shepardstown, W. Va. He was fitted for 
college at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., and Cheltenham 
Academy, Ogontz, Pa. His home during his college course was 
Philadelphia. 

After graduation he was a student at the Harvard Law School 
from 1895 to 1897, and then went to California for the benefit of 
his health. He died of paresis at San Francisco, Cal., on June 
27, 1901, at the age of 29 years. He was unmarried. 

1897 

William Stone Hubbell, Jr., son of Rev. William Stone 
Hubbell, D.D. (Yale 1858) and Caroline (Southmayd) Hubbell,. 
and grandson of Rev. Stephen Hubbell (Yale 1826), was born 
on November 8, 1874, in Somerville, Mass., where his father was 
pastor of the Franklin Street Congregational Church. In 1881 
the family residence was removed to Buffalo, N. Y., from which 
he entered college. 

After graduation he began a course in the Harvard Law School, 
but at the outbreak of the Spanish war in 1898, he enlisted in 
Battery A, First Artillery Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers. 
He spent the summer in camp at Niantic, and was mustered ou t 
of service on October 25. During the next year he was in the 
office of Hollister & Babcock, brokers,' in New York City, after 
which he engaged in the mining business in Rapid <5ity. 
South Dakota. He then returned East, and became an assistant 
civil engineer for the Long Island (N. Y.) Railroad Company. 
After only a month of service in this capacity, on June 11, 1901, 
he accidentally stepped in front of an approaching train and 
received a compound fracture of the skull, of which he died a 
few hours later at St. Mary's Hospital, Brooklyn. He was in 
the 27th year of his age. A brother graduated at Wesleyan 
University in 1898. 

Clarence Marsh Reed, second son of Stephen E. Reed, Sec- 
retary of the Stamford Manufacturing Co., and Jennie (Calhoun) 
Reed, was born on May 30, 1876, at Stamford, Conn., and was 



187 

fitted for college at King's school at that place. While in college 
he stood high in scholarship. He was also a member of the Uni- 
versity baseball nine. 

After graduation he entered the New York Law School, from 
which he received the degree of Bachelor of Law in June, 1899. 
He was admitted to the New York bar the same month, and had 
since been in the real estate department of Alexander & Green 
in that city. 

Mr. Reed died at his home in Stamford, on May 24, 1902, of 
heart failure following pneumonia, after an illness of about two 
weeks. He had nearly completed his 26th year, and was unmar- 
ried. He was a member of St. Andrew's Protestant Episcopal 
Church. A brother graduated from the Sheffield Scientific 
School in 1895. 

Carl Herman Schultz, son of Carl Herman Schultz (Lissa 
1849) and Louise (Eisplatt) Schultz, was born on August 3, ISYS, 
in New York City, and was prepared for college at Dr. Sachs' 
Scliool. 

After graduation he entered the business of Carl H. Schultz, 
manufacturer of artificial mineral waters in his native city, and 
after its incorporation in 1897, was secretary and treasurer of 
the company until his death. In 1899 he began a course of 
study in chemistry at Johns Hopkins University, but was obliged 
to give it up on account of failing health. He died at home in 
New York after an illness of several months of Bright's disease, 
on May 27, 1901, in his 26th year. A brother graduated at the 
Sheffield Scientific School in the class of 1897. 

1898 

Adelbert Stone Hay, son of Hon. John Hay, LL.D., (Brown 
1858), and Clara (Stone) Hay, was born in Cleveland, O., on 
November 1, 1876, and was fitted for college at Westminster 
School, then at Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 

For several months after graduation he acted as secretary to 
his father, when the latter was Ambassador to Great Britain and 
afterwards when he became Secretary of State in the cabinet of 
President McKinley. He then made a trip to the Philippines as 
a passenger on an army transport, and took part as a volunteer 
in several engagements. In December, 1899, he was appointed 
United States Consul at Pretoria, in South Africa. There he 
discharged the peculiarly delicate and exacting duties of his 



188 

office with rare tact and good judgment, and won the confidence 
and esteem of both Boers and British. Through the siege he 
remained at his post, but when quiet was restored and American 
interests were believed to be safe again he availed himself of the 
leave of absence granted him some time before, and in Novem- 
ber, 1900, he sailed for home, spending some time in London on 
the way. In April, 1901, soon after reaching Washington, he 
resigned the consulate, and accepted the office of Assistant Sec- 
retary to the President of the United States, and would have 
assumed those duties on July 1, 1901. 

On the evening of June 22, the Saturday before Commence- 
ment, he reached New Haven to attend the Triennial Reunion 
of his class, for which he was one of the committee of arrange- 
ments. He had a room on the third floor of the New Haven 
House. It is supposed that before retiring early on the morning 
of June 23d, he sat in his window, and that he was either over- 
come by drowsiness or in some other way lost his balance, and 
fell to the pavement below. He was' instantly killed. He was 
unmarried, and in his 25th year. His tragic death saddened the 
exercises of the Commencement season, and part of the festivi- 
ties of his class reunion were given up. His brief career had 
the mark of worthy service, and the promise of future achieve- 
ment was unusually brilliant. 

1899 

Hugh Moffat Bissell, son of Edward Watson Bissell, a mer- 
chant of Detroit, Mich., was born in that city, on March 1, 1877, 
and was prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass. His mother's name was Margaret H. (Moffat) Bissell. 

After graduation he entered Columbia Law School, and was in 
his Senior year, when he contracted typhoid fever and died after 
an illness of three weeks at St. Luke's Hospital, New York City, 
on November 8, 1901, in the 25th year of his age. He was a 
member of the Fort Street Presbyterian Church of Detroit. 

1900 

Sidney Gray Bristol, son of William Franklin and Annie L. 
Bristol, was born on August 14, 1876, at Mt. Pleasant, Racine 
Countj^, Wise, and was prepared for college at Racine and 
Phillips (Andover) Academies. In 1896 he entered Williams 
College and remained until May, 1898, when he enlisted in the 
Second New York Volunteers, and was in camp for severa 



189 

months at Chickamauga, Tampa, and elsewhere. He was mus- 
tered out of service on October 26, and then joined the Junior 
class in Yale, his home being at Battle Creek, Mich. 

The year after graduation he studied at the Harvard Law 
School, and was devoting the summer vacation to business. 
While thus engaged in southern Vermont he stopped in Brattle- 
boro, and was passing the night with a classmate. He had risen 
from bed in his sleep, as is supposed, and in returning accident- 
ally aroused his classmate, who mistook him for a burglar and 
shot him with a revolver which he was accustomed to keep within 
reach, the charge entering the abdomen and severing the iliac 
artery. Mr. Bristol died in about half an hour, on July 19, 1901. 
He was in his 25th year. His ideals were high and his life was 
exemplary. 

1901 

Norton Myron Skiff, son of Myron and Lissie (Sage) Skiff, 
was born on November 12, 1877, at Tyrone, Schuyler County, 
N. Y., but removed to Dundee, Yates County, and was fitted for 
college in the high school of that place. He supported himself 
during his course at Yale by his own earnings and was much 
respected by his classmates. 

He spent the summer after graduation in the office of the Sec- 
retary of the University, where he was specially engaged in 
work on the Directory of Living Graduates. He also rendered 
valuable service to the Bicentennial Executive Committee. In 
the autumn he entered the Junior class of the Law School, also 
acting as Assistant Registrar of that department of the Uni- 
versity. 

Mr. Skiff died after an illness of two weeks from pneumonia, 
at the Yale Infirmary, on January 30, 1902, in his 25th year. 

Charles Ai Thomas, son of Homer J. and Elsie A. (Parmelee) 
Thomas, was born on January 5, 1873, at Gaylordsville, in New 
Milford, Conn., and was fitted for college at Williston Seminary, 
Easthampton, Mass. 

After graduation he entered the offices of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad, in New Haven. During his college 
course he had suffered from stomach trouble, but toward the end 
of November, 1901, he was taken with appendicitis, of which he 
died in New Haven, on December 3. He was 28 years of age, 
and unmarried. He was a member of the Congregational Church 
in New Milford. 



190 



YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

1852 

Nathaniel Marston Freeman, son of Rev. Nathaniel Free- 
man (Yale 1805), and Mary Baron (Fox) Freeman, was born at 
Weston, Fairfield County, Conn., on October 25, 1821, and 
before entering the Medical School, studied in Greenfield 
Academy, Fairfield, Conn. His residence while a student in 
New Haven was Easton, Conn., where his father was for some 
time pastor of the Congregational Church. 

After graduation he settled in New York City, where he prac- 
ticed his profession with success until his retirement some years 
ago. 

His health had been good, and he died at home suddenly of 
cardiac disease, on April 18, 1902, at the age of 80 years. He 
was an elder of the Prospect Hill (Dutch) Reformed Church. 

He married, on March 16, 1854, Vestiana, daughter of Abraham 
Quackenbush, of New York City, whose death occurred in Octo- 
ber, 1901. A son (B.S. and C.E. New York Univ. 1876), and a 
daughter survive. 

1863 

Frank Benjamin Tuttle, son of Zopher and Nancy (Sherman) 
Tuttle, was born in June, 1840, at Prospect, Conn. Before enter- 
ing the Yale Medical School he studied in the Naugatuck (Conn.) 
High School and in Canton Academy, Canton, N. Y. 

After graduation he settled in Naugatuck, Conn., where he had 
since practiced his profession. He was visiting physician to the 
Waterbury Hospital, and at the time of his death President of 
the New Haven County Medical Society. 

Dr. Tuttle died at his home in Naugatuck on April 21, 1902, 
in his 6 2d year. He was a member of St. Michael's Protestant 
Episcopal Church. 

He married on February 20, 1868, Ella Augusta, daughter of 
Emory D. Mann of Naugatuck, who died in 1893. He afterward 
married Anne M. A., daughter of James Sloan of Rochester, 
N. Y. By the first marriage he had a daughter and son, of 
whom the former is deceased. The son is a physician in 
Naugatuck. 



191 



YALE LAW SCHOOL. 

1884 

George Nelson Frazine, son of Newton and Emeline (Hamil- 
ton) Frazine, was born on August 25, 1860, in the town of Sugar 
Grove, Warren County, Pa. He graduated from the State Nor- 
mal School in Fredonia, N. Y. 

In the summer of 1880 he entered the law office of Brown & 
Stone in Warren, Pa., was admitted to the bar in 1883, and then 
entered the Yale Law School for Senior year. 

After graduation he returned to practice in Warren, and on 
March 1, 1885, formed a partnership with James Wiggins, Esq., 
under the name of Wiggins & Frazine, which continued until 
October, 1893. The following April he moved to Buffalo, N. Y., 
where he afterward practiced. Early on the morning of January 
16, 1902, he went on business to the neighboring town of Tona- 
wanda, where he was instantly killed by a locomotive. He was 
41 years of age. 

He married, on September 26, 1889, in Buffalo, N. Y., Matilda, 
daughter of Martin and Magdalena Schaefer, of Warren, Pa., who 
died in 1892, leaving a son. A 'few days before his death he 
married Hattie Almeda, daughter of William and Sarah (Stepp) 
Miller, of Buffalo. 

1893 

John Joseph Clerkin, son of Thomas Clerkin, a clock maker, 
and Julia (Lynch) Clerkin, was born in New Haven, Conn., on 
May 19, 1856. With the design of becoming a priest he received a 
college education at Holy Cross College, Worcester, Mass., tak- 
ing the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1877. His tastes, how- 
ever, led him to other work, and he entered the Yale Law School. 

After graduation he went into partnership with his classmate 
David T. McNamara (now deceased), in New Haven, and under 
the name of McNamara & Clerkin practiced his profession until 
about three years before his death, when he was obliged to lay- 
aside his work on account of serious illness, from which he did 
not recover. Besides his law practice he was clerk in the office 
of the Town Clerk, from 1887 to 1889. Mr. Clerkin died at 
Middletown, Conn., on October 1, 1901, at the age of 45 years. 

He married, on July 3, 1882, Elizabeth R., daughter of Michael 
Walsh, of New Haven, who survives him with a daughter. 



192 



YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL. 

1872 

Edwin Bailey Burrows, son of Edwin Augustus and Martha 
Maria (Grant) Burrows, was born on June 30, 1841, in Mayville, 
Chautauqua County, N. Y. At the age of twenty he entered 
the army and served through the Civil War, gaining the rank of 
Major in the Quartermaster's Department. After his discharge 
he began his theological studies in Lane Seminary, but entered 
the Yale Divinity School at the beginning of Senior year. 

In the autumn after graduation, October 11, 1872, he was 
ordained pastor of the Congregational Church in Lebanon, O., 
where he remained two years. He was then pastor successively 
at Mount Vernon, O., from 1875 to 1879 ; at Springfield, Mo., 
about two years; at Webster Groves, Mq., from 1883 to 1888 ; 
and at Jamestown, in his native county, from 1889 to 1893. In 
1893-4 he was General Missionary in Western New York. In 
1896 he became editor and manager of the New Hampshire 
Record^ in Concord, N. H., and, besides rendering valuable ser- 
vice to the churches, had nearly brought the paper to a paying 
basis when he was suddenly stricken with an illness, from which 
he never fully recovered. While editing this paper, he also 
served the church in Dublin, and afterward in Penacook. 

He died in Hillsboro, N. H., on January 15, 1902, in his 61st 
year. His widow survives him without children. 

1880 

Frank Theodore Clark, son of William A. and Elizabeth 
Clark, was born on March 7, 1857, in Buckland, Mass. 
. After completing his course in the Yale Divinity School, he 
went as a Home Missionary to Washington (Ty.), and was 
ordained at Cheney on December 18, 1881, after which he was 
at Spokane until some time in 1882. He was living in Colville, 
Wash., without charge, in 1888, and some time later went to 
British Columbia. He left the ministry, studied law, and is said 
to have practiced in Boston, and at one time to have been in 
business with a brother. 

His death occurred in February, 1901, at a sanitarium in El 
Paso, Texas. He was in the 44th year of his age. His wife is 
also deceased. 



193 



1890 



Joseph Jansex Spencer, son of Rev. William and Mary 
(Shaffer) Spencer, was born in Somerset, Perry County, O., on 
September 6, 1862, graduated from Otterbein College, Wester- 
ville, O., in 1884, and three years later entered the Yale Divinity 
School. 

He was ordained in October, 1890, and after serving the church 
at Freetown, Bristol County, Mass., a year, he was pastor of the 
Union Congregational Church in North Brookiield, Worcester 
County, Mass., until 1900. In June of that year he took orders 
in the Protestant Episcopal Church, and had been chosen as one 
of the clergy of Grace Church, New York City, when ill health 
compelled him to seek a change of climate. He died at Los 
Angeles, Cal., on July 1, 1901, in his 39th year. 

He married, on April 24, 1894, Mary, daughter of Daniel 
Hoffman, of New York City, who survives him. Their only 
child, a son, died in infancy. 

1894 

William Llavtddog Evans, son of James and Sara (Thomas) 
Evans, was born on May 16, 1868, in Penybryn, Llanfihangel- 
arath, County of Carmarthen, Wales. He graduated at the 
Presbyterian College, Carmarthen, in 1891, and at once came to 
the United States, and entered the Yale Divinity School. 

Immediately after receiving his degree at the latter he began 
to supply the Congregational Church in Plymouth, Pa., was 
ordained on September 3, 1894, and continued as pastor there to 
the close of his life. He died on September 26, 1900, from 
typhoid fever, but his decease has not been previously reported. 
He was 32 years of age. 

Mr. Evans married, on June 2, 1898, Gertrude, daughter of 
John C. and Rachel (Jones) Jones, of Plymouth, Pa., who sur- 
vives him. 

Samuel George Heckman, only son of Rev. John and Kath- 
erine (Schramm) Heckman, was born on June 3, 1869, at Mosel, 
on the shore of Lake Michigan, near Sheboygan, Wise. He 
moved with his parents in 1873 to Cincinnati, O., where his 
father organized and has been for the past thirty years pastor of 
the German Reformed Church. After graduating from the 



194 

University of Cincinnati in 1891, he entered the Yale Divinity 
School. 

During a part of his Seminary course he supplied at Lysander, 
N. Y., and on December 28, 1894, was ordained pastor of Eman- 
ual Congregational Church, Watertown, N. Y., where he worked 
for five years with unusual success. In 1899 he resigned his 
pastorate on account of his father's serious illness, but on his 
father's recovery he accepted a call to Newport, Ky., where, as 
in his former charge, he soon gained a strong hold on the com- 
munity. He was president of the Licking Valley Christian 
Endeavor Society. 

In the fall of 1900, he was forced to leave his work, suffering 
from exhaustion and from a severe cold, from which he never 
rallied. He died at Cincinnati, after an illness of about a year 
from bronchitis, on August 13, 1901, at the age of 32 years. He 
was not married. 



195 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1853 

GiLBEET EzEKiEL Palen, SOD of Rufus and Eliza (DeWitt) 
Paleti, was born on May 3, 1832, in Palenville, Green County, 
N. Y., but entered the Sheffield Scientific School in 1852 from 
Saugerties, in the adjoining county of Ulster. He took the 
courses in applied chemistry and engineering. 

After graduation he entered the Albany Medical School, from 
which he received the degree of M.D. in 1855. He then went to 
Pennsylvania, and practiced a number of years each in Canaden- 
sis, Monroe County and Tunkhannock, Wyoming County. In 
ISYY, he moved to Germantown, now a part of Philadelphia, and, 
after continuing medical practice for a time, began the manu- 
facture of the widely-known compound oxygen, as a member of 
the firm of Starkey & Palen. He was president of the Overland 
Telegraph Company and of the Wayne Chemical Company, 
and treasurer of the Ocean City (N. J.) Association. He had 
large financial interests in Florida and the West. 

He was an active member and trustee of the First Methodist 
Episcopal Church of Germantown. He had been identified with 
the Prohibition party since its formation. He received the degree 
of LL.D. from the American University of Harriman, Tenn., in 
1900. 

Dr. Palen died of pneumonia at his summer home in Ocean 
City, on July 28, 1901, at the age of 69 years. He had been ill 
for several weeks from a complication of troubles, but his decease 
was entirely unexpected. 

He married, on September 19, 1860, Elizabeth, daughter of 
John Burr and Mary (More) Gould, of Roxbury, N. Y., and 
sister of Mr. Jay Gould. Mrs. Palen, their daughter and one of 
their three sons, survive. The daughter graduated from Wellesley 
College in 1888 and the son from Haverford College in 1892, and 
from Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1895. 

1862 

Clarence King, only son of James Rivers and Florence 
(Little) King, was born in Newport, R. I., on January 6, 1842. 
Until after his student days his name was Clarence Rivers King. 
His great-grandfather, William Little, graduated at Yale College 



196 

in 1777. His grandfather was one of the pioneer merchants in 
the Chinese trade, and to this business his father with three 
brothers succeeded, but died in 1848 in Araoy, China. During 
the financial crisis of 1857, the family property which had 
remained in the business was lost. After the death of her hus- 
band Mrs. King devoted herself to the education of her son, 
studying ancient and modern languages in order to teach them 
to him. His school education was mainly in Hartford, Conn. 
Early in life he showed a fondness for the study of natural 
phenomena, and this was further developed during the summer 
vacations among the Green Mountains. 

During the winter following graduation he was a student of 
glaciology under Agassiz, and of art under Russell Sturgis. In 
the spring of 1863, in company with his friend James Terry 
Gardiner (Hon. Ph.B. 1868) he started on a horseback journey 
from the Missouri River across the continent. He crossed the 
Sierra Nevada Mountains on foot, and on reaching California 
joined the California Geological Survey as a volunteer assistant. 
Before the close of the year, with Professor William H. Brewer, 
then in charge of the field work of the Survey, he explored the 
region about Mount Shasta, and during the following winter 
made a study of the Mariposa gold mines, and discovered in the 
slates of the gold belt fossils which solved the problem of their 
age. The next j'ear he explored the southern Sierra Nevadas, 
climbed to the summit of the lofty Mount Whitney, which he 
named, and during the winter began an exploration of Arizona, 
which was interrupted by his capture by hostile Apaches. He 
was rescued, however, just in time to escape torture. 

In 1866 he returned east, and in 1867 was appointed by Con- 
gress Chief of the United States Geological Exploration of the 
40th Parallel, covering the topography, geology and natural his- 
tory along that parallel from the eastern slope of the Rocky 
Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. In his capacity of organizer 
and for ten years director of this undertaking, he laid the founda- 
tions of a systematic survey of the country and raised the stand- 
ard of geological work. He made a study of the geological rela- 
tions of the ore deposits of the region surveyed, the direct 
application of which to the development of the mineral wealth 
of the country was shown in 1870 in "Mining Industry," a work 
written jointly by himself and Mr. James D. Hague. In that 
year he discovered on the slopes of Mt. Shasta the first glaciers 
actually known to exist in the United States. 



197 

In 1872 he rendered a service of the highest value to the finan- 
cial world by his exposure of the diamond fraud, in which a cer- 
tain district in Wyoming in the territory of his survey had been 
"salted" wdth diamonds. The field work of this survey was 
completed in 1873, and was described in "Professional Papers of 
the Engineering Department, U. S. A." Of this series Mr. King 
wrote the first volume, which appeared in 1878, and is entitled 
" Systematic Geology." It is still considered a masterly summary 
of the principles of the science. 

In March, 1879, on the recommendation of the National Acad- 
emy of Sciences and on lines laid down by himself, a law was 
passed by Congress consolidating the national surveys in the 
field, and establishing the United States Geological Survey as a 
bureau of the Interior Department. Mr. King was appointed the 
first director, and showed rare judgment in selecting for the 
various branches men fitted to maintain the high standard which 
he set. He prepared the First Annual Report of the Survey 
(1880) and the paper "On the Physical Constants of Rocks" in 
the Third Report (1883). After thoroughly organizing the Sur- 
vey on broad lines, and most efficiently guiding its activities for 
two years, he presented his resignation, which was regretfully 
accepted by President Garfield on March 12, 1881. 

Circumstances compelled him to devote most of his time there- 
after to the more directly remunerative occupation of mining 
engineer. In his examination of mines he visited nearly every 
part of the American continent, and so thorough was his knowl- 
edge of the subject that he acted as legal as well as scientific 
adviser in many important mining suits. 

On assuming charge of the Survey he at once established a 
laboratory of experimental physics. An important result of this 
was his paper on the "Age of the Earth," which was printed in 
the American Journal of Science of January, 1893, and which 
takes high rank among modern scientific memoirs. He had 
acquired an exceptional familiarity with the phenomena of the 
interior of the earth, and had not given up his plans for future 
geological investigations on an extensive scale. He had formu- 
lated in his mind a new theory of the earth, which he hoped to 
work out at leisure. 

For the United States Census of 1880 Mr. King planned and 
supervised the collection of full and accurate statistics of the 
precious metals, the high value of which has resulted in the 



198 

annual collection of statistics of the mineral resources of the 
United States by the Geological Survey since then. 

At the anniversary of the Sheffield Scientific School in June, 
IS'Z'Z, he delivered the address on " Catastrophisra and the Evo- 
lution of Environment," which was printed in the American 
Naturalist. He also wrote other scientific papers, which appeared 
in the American Journal of Science^ and one on Glacial Phe- 
nomena in the Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural His- 
tory (1876). Besides these he contributed twx) or three articles 
of timely interest to the Forum, 

In 1870, as a result of his early experiences in California, he 
published "Mountaineering in the Sierra Nevada," a volume of 
scenic description which was especially appreciated in England, 
where it was esteemed by far the best work of its kind that had been 
written. Two articles in the Century Magazine, on the " Helmet 
of Mambrino " and the " Biographers of Lincoln " are regarded, 
however, as showing more than anything else he wrote the exqui- 
site delicacy of his literary touch. He had a charming personal- 
ity, attractive on many sides, wit of rare refinement as well as 
quickness, and remarkable conversational powers. 

Mr. King was elected a fellow of the Geological Society of 
London in 1874, and a fellow and member of the council of the 
American Geographical Society in 1877. He was also a life 
member of the American Institute of Mining Engineers. He 
received the degree of Doctor of Laws from Brown University in 
1890. 

He had shown through life wonderful powers of physical 
endurance, but in the early part of 1901, after making an exami- 
nation of some mining property during very inclement weather, 
he was taken with pneumonia. On his recovery from this it was 
discovered that he had contracted tuberculosis, probably during 
a visit to the Klondike the previous summer. He tried several 
changes of climate in the vain hope of relief, and a few months 
later died in Phoenix, Ariz., on December 24, 1901. He was in 
the 60th year of his age, and was never married. His mother 
survives him at Newport, and there the burial took place. 

1871 

John Wool Griswold, son of John Augustus and Elizabeth 
(Hart) Griswold, was born in Troy, N. Y., on August 30, 1850. 
He was a grand-nephew of General John Ellis Wool, a soldier in 



199 

the War of 1812, the Mexican and Civil Wars. His father was 
an iron and steel manufacturer, trustee of Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute, Mayor of Troy, member of Congress, and a friend 
whose aid to Captain John Ericsson at a critical time secured the- 
construction of the Monitor. 

The son studied three years in the Sheffield Scientific School, 
taking the special course, but received the degree of Bachelor of 
Philosophy and was enrolled with his class in 1898. 

After finishing his course at New Haven he engaged in special- 
ties in iron manufacture, having works at Troy and Sterling, 111; 
He was elected in 1890 a trustee of the Troy Savings Bank, and 
of the Troy Orphan Asylum. He was a member and trustee of 
the Second Street Presbyterian Church in Troy. For some time 
past his residence had been in Bennington, Vt. 

He died suddenly of heart disease at Chicago, 111., on January 
2, 1902, in his 52d year. 

He married in 1878 Sara Noyes, daughter of George M. Tib- 
bits, of Troy, N. Y. After her decease he married in 1885 Sarah 
Perry, daughter of Charles R. Randall, of New Bedford, Mass. 
The latter survives him with two daughters and a son, the son 
being an undergraduate at Williams College. 

1872 

Charles Lewis Johnson, son of David Treat Johnson, a con- 
tractor and builder and during the Civil War Captain of the 23d 
Connecticut Volunteers, was born in Ansonia, Conn., on March 
15, 1850. His mother's maiden name was Sarah Lindley. He 
had hoped to enter West Point and follow his father's footsteps 
into the army, but failed to secure an appointment. He was then 
at once admitted to the Sheffield Scientific School. 

For a few months after graduation he was a clerk in the post 
office at Ansonia, but the following spring entered the office of 
the Candee Rubber Company, in New Haven, with which he 
was continuously connected thereafter. His ability was soon 
recognized, and a year later he became Secretary of the company, 
and in 188V Treasurer, with a general oversight of the selling 
department. In 1892, when the United States Rubber Company 
was formed, he was elected Secretary and Director in Charge of 
Sales, and in May, 1901, to the important and very responsible 
position of General Manager. He was also a member of the 
executive committee and director of the compan}^, and director 



200 



of other companies for the manufacture of rubber and other 
goods. The office of Treasurer of the Candee Company he con- 
tinued to hold to the close of his life, but resigned that of Secre- 
tary of the United States Rubber Company in 1896. He was 
devoted to his business, and usually took but short vacations, but 
in the summer of 1898 enjoyed an extended trip abroad. He 
frequently wrote articles for the trade journals. 

During the spring and early summer of 1901 Mr. Johnson had 
not been at all well, but continued his official duties, and later in 
the summer steadily improved in health, and his death was en- 
tirely unexpected. It occurred at his home in New Rochelle, 
N. Y., from hemorrhage of the brain, on October 8, 1901. He 
was 51 years of age. He was known for his integrity and for an 
uncommon equability of temperament. 

He married, in Paris, France, in June, 1899, Bertha, daughter 
of H. P. Moorhouse, for many years the representative of the 
Candee Company on the continent. Mrs. Johnson survives him 
with a young son. 

1877 

James Blair Murray, son of Stewart and Jane (Oatley) 
Murray, was born on June 17, 1856, at Preston, Conn., and en- 
tered the Sheffield Scientific School in the Junior class. 

After graduation he taught school in Scotland and Poque- 
tanuck, Conn., and during the last eight years was bookkeeper 
for the United States Finishing Co., at Greenville, a suburb of 
Norwich, Conn. 

He died at his home in Greenville on January 4, 1902, after an 
illness of three hours from heart disease. He was 45 years of age. 

He married, on March 19, 1890, Jennie L., daughter of Joseph 
and Emeline (Williams) Perry, who survives him without chil- 
dren. 



1884 

Elwood Harvey Allcutt, son of Wallace P. and Anna 
(Temple) Allcutt, was born in Milwaukee, Wise, on June 21, 
1861. After a preparatory course at Phillips Academy, Ando- 
ver, Mass., he entered the Sheffield Scientific School from Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Upon graduation he returned to Kansas City, where he was 
engaged in the packing business with his father until ill health 



201 

obliged him to seek a change of climate. He went first to 
Arizona and then to Pasadena, Cal., where he died of consump- 
tion on April 18, 1902, at the age of 40. years. 

He married on April 12, 1887, Adeline Russell, daughter of 
Wallace Pratt (Union 1849), a lawyer of Kansas City. Mrs. 
Allcutt, with a daughter and son, survives. 

1893 

Geoege Albert Hutchinson, son of George C. and Charlotte 
A. (Foley) Hutchinson, was born on May 28, 1872, in Chicago, 
111., and fitted for the Sheffield Scientific School at the Manual 
Training School in that city, and under a private tutor. 

Upon graduation he entered the firm of W. H. Hutchinson & 
Son, in Chicago, manufacturers of patent bottle stoppers, and 
after the death of his father in 1897 became the sole manager of 
the business. 

He died at home after an illness of less than a day from pto- 
maine poison, on September 13, 1901, at the age of 29 years. He 
was unmarried. He was a member of the Church of the Epiphany. 

1894 

Morgan Prout Brooks, son of Edwin Andrew and Hermione 
(Deane) Brooks, was born in New Haven, Conn., on January 25, 
1874. He prepared for the Sheffield Scientific School at the 
Hopkins Grammar School, and took the Select Course. 

Alter graduation he entered the firm of Brooks & Co., import- 
ers and dealers in hats, furs and leather goods, at the corner of 
Chapel and State streets, in the store of which his father became 
proprietor in 1 874. He was successful in business, but evidences 
of consumption compelled him in November, 1898, to seek change 
of climate in the Adirondaftks and^ among the pines of North 
Carolina, and for the last winter and spring in California. The 
sojourn on the Pacific coast was apparently beneficial, but the end 
came suddenly at the ranch near Santa Barbara where he was stay- 
ing with his family. He died on May 13, 1902, at the age of 28 
years. He was unusually refined in his tastes, and was a member 
of St. Paul's Church. 

Mr. Brooks married, on November 14, 1899, Elizabeth, daughter 
of John G. Stetson, a merchant of New York City, who survives 
him with an infant son. 



202 

1894 

Joui!i Ckist Peck, son of Jonathan Crist and Susan J. 
(Wood) Peck, was born on April 4, 1874, in Newburgh, N. Y., 
where his father was a furniture dealer. He studied at the Siglar 
Preparatory School in that city and then took the course in 
mechanical engineering in the Sheffield Scientific School. 

For about three years after graduation he was head draughts- 
man for the Betts Machine Company of Wilmington, Del., and 
the following year was Instructor in Mechanical Engineering in 
Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa. 

He died at his home in Newburgh on December 28, 1901, after 
an illness of three years from consumption. He was 27 years of 
age and unmarried. He was a member of the American Re- 
formed Church. 

1895 

Robert Austin Hamlin, son of John Austin Hamlin, a promi- 
nent manufacturer and proprietor of the Grand Opera House in 
Chicago, 111., and Mary Eleanor (Hart) Hamlin, was born in Chi- 
cago on September 3, 1874. After preparation at the Hill School, 
Pottstown, Pa., he entered the Sheffield Scientific School, where 
he was business manager of the Scientific Moiithly, a member of 
the Yale Banjo Club, and class historian, and was active in social 
life. 

Several months following graduation he spent in the study of 
German in Munich and French in Paris, and in travel; and then 
from 1896 to 1900 was a student of architecture in the Ecole des 
Beaux Arts in Paris, where he won unusual distinction. When he 
had nearly completed his course, on reaching Paris from a tour 
of examination of the architectural monuments of Italy, he was 
taken seriously ill, and although able to return to this country, 
nothing could be done to arrest the disease, and he died of quick 
consumption about a month after reaching Phoenix, Ariz., on 
December 10, 1901. He was 27 years of age and unmarried. 

Three brothers graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School 
respectively in 1887, 1888 and 1892. 

1896 

John Harkness Wray, Jr., son of John Harkness Wray, a 
retired merchant, and Elizabeth (Sloane) Wray, was born on 
October 20, 1875, in New York City. After preliminary study 



203 

at the Cutler School in that city he entered the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School and took the course in civil engineering. 

After graduation he entered the wholesale drygoods house of 
a relative in New York City. 

While driving across the tracks of the Erie Railroad at 
Highland Mills, Orange county, N. Y., he was killed by the cars 
on the morning of August 29, 1901. He was 25 years of age 
and unmarried. A brother graduated from the Sheffield Scien- 
tific School in 1899. 

1897 

Charles Russell Bement, son of George W. and Helen F. 
(Brotherton) Bement, was born on April 16, 1S15, in Terre Haute, 
Ind., and fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. 

After graduation from the Scientific School he went into the 
grocery business with his father. On June 12, 1901, while 
returning home on horseback from a ride in the country his horse 
shied at a passing trolley car and sprang in front of another car, 
which knocked the horse down. Mr. Bement was thrown under 
the horse and was so crushed that he died without regaining con- 
sciousness. He was 26 years of age. He was unmarried. 

Barclay Ward Kountze, son of Luther and Annie Parsons 
(Ward) Kountze, was born on February 27, 1876, in Paris, France, 
and was fitted for college at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. 

After graduation he went into the banking business with his 
father in New York City, and was soon afterward admitted to 
the firm of Kountze Brothers. Owing to overwork his health 
failed and he was planning a long rest, but was taken down with 
typhoid fever and pneumonia, of which he died three weeks later, 
at the summer home of his parents in Morristown, N. J., on 
August 29, 1901, in his 26th year. He was unmarried. A brother 
graduated from the Academical Department in 1899. 

1900 

Harry Albert Chask, son of George Franklin and Augusta 
Ann (Staples) Chase, was born on March 2, 1876, in Boulder, 
Col. After studying at the Colorado State Preparatory School 
there, he entered the University of Colorado, and received the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in 1899. The following autumn 
he joined the Senior class in the Sheffield Scientific School and 
took the course in civil engineering. 



204 

Upon completing his studies at Yale he was for a short time 
connected with the Burlington and Missouri Railroad, and then 
entered the service of the Liberty Bell Gold Mining Co., near 
Telluride, Col. *He had just been advanced from the position of 
Chief Assayer to that of Assistant Superintendent. 

Mr. Chase met his death on February 28, 1902, while attempt- 
ing to rescue victims of a snow slide on Smuggler Mountain, 
near Telluride, being himself overwhelmed by the snow. He 
was in his 26th year and was unmarried. His brother (B.A. 
University of Colorado 1866 ; Ph.D. Yale 1891) is Assistant 
Astronomer at the Yale Observatory. 

William Pukviance Irwin, son of William Henry and 
Mary I. (Purviance) Irwin, was born on October 4, 1879, in 
Allegheny, Pa., and spent the two years preceding his entrance 
to the Sheffield Scientific School at the Lawrenceville (N. J.) 
School. 

After graduation he engaged in engineering work, but had 
recently become associated with his brother in the management 
of the Rosedale Foundry in Allegheny. 

He died of typhoid fever at his home at Edgeworth, Pa., 
twelve miles west of Pittsburg, on September 30, 1901, having 
nearly completed his 22d year. He was quiet and thorough, and 
of much promise. A brother and two sisters survive him, both 
parents being deceased. 

1901 

Robert Morse Chamberlin, son of Humphrey B. and Alice 
(Packard) Chamberlin, was born in Oswego, N. Y., on May 8, 
1880. His father was a native of Manchester, Eng., and at the 
age of 10 years the son removed with his family to London, 
where his father was in the insurance business. His preliminary 
training was at Craigmore College, Clifton, Eng. 

While a student in New Haven he was president of the Shef- 
field Debating Club, editor of the Tale Scientific Monthly, class 
treasurer and secretary, and won a Two- Year Honor for excellence 
in all the studies of Junior and Senior year. 

Mr. Chamberlin died of typhoid fever at his home in New 
Haven immediately after graduation, on July 2, 1901, at the 
age of 2 1 years. His inother and sister survive him. 



BXJl^'l^^J^TR.ir 



ACADEMICAL DEPAETMENT 



(Yale College) 



Name and Age 
Samuel Porter, 91 
Milo N. Miles, 94 
Samuel M. Hopkins, 88 
Josiah Abbott, 90 
William B. Corbyn, 87 
Lewis Hall, 86 
Sylvester Southard, 84 
John Curwen, 79 
John F. Lay, 79 
Daniel L. Shearer, 82 
Nathan W. Williams, 86 
John Avery, 82 
Benjamin T. Eames, 83 
Asahel A. Stevens, 84 
Douglas K. Turner, 78 
George W. Warner, 80 
Charles W. Camp, 80 
Joseph W. Backus, 78 
Henry B. Harrison, 80 
Henry [H.] Brace, 73 
William W, Carpenter, 78 
Nathaniel A. Hyde, 74 
Henry Hitchcock, 72 
Isaac E. Carey, 79 
Franklin W. Fisk, 81 
Albert G. Green, 73 
William H. Jessup, 71 
William B. Lee, 73 
Mark B. Moore, 80 
Albert P. Condit, 72 
John A. Woodhull, 76 
Henry S. Sanford, 69 
Henry H. Babcock, 68 
Albert W. Bishop, 69 
William M. Hudson, 68 
Kinsley Twining, 69 
Henry Baldwin, 68 
Charles A. Dupee, 70 
Hiram L. Howard, 73 
Eobert C. Shoemaker, 65 



Place and 
Farmington, Conn. 
DesMoines, la. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Winchendon, Mass. 
'.Quincy, 111. 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Fishkill, N. Y. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Batavia, N. Y. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Providence, E. I. 
Norwich, Conn. 
East Greenwich, E. I. 
Peoria, 111. 
Harts ville, Pa. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Sierra Madre, Cal. 
Farmington, Conn. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Catskill, N. Y. 
Marshfield, Or. 
Ludlow, Vt. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Huntsburg, O. 
Chicago, 111. 
Eeading, Pa. 
Scranton, Pa. 
Spokane, Wash. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
West Orange, N. J. 
Chicago, 111. 
New Milford, Conn. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Hartford, Conn. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Allston, Mass. 
Chicago, 111. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Forty Fort, Pa. 



Time of Death 

Sept. 3, '01 

July 4, '01 

Oct. 29, '01 

Nov. 27, '01 

March 28, '02 

April 1, '02 

Nov. 6, '01 

July 2, '01 

Sept. 27, '01 

April 17, '02 

April 16, '02 

April 23, '02 

Oct. 6, '01 

July 16, '01 

March 8, '02 

Dec. 24, '01 

May 8, '02 

July 4, '01 

Oct. 29, '01 

July 10, '01 

May 13, '02 

July 19, '01 

March 18, '02 

March 6, '02 

July 4, '01 

May 22, '02 

Jan. 16, '02 

Nov. 3, '01 

May 27, '02 

Dec. 14, '01 

Feb. 1, '02 

Nov. 2, '01 

Dec. 2, '01 

Nov. 29, '01 

Oct. 30, '01 

Nov. 4, '01 

Jan. 22, '02 

March 26, '02 

July 25, '01 

Feb. 16, '02 



206 



Class Name and Age 

1856 Levi L. Paine, 69 

1857 William C. Case, 65 
1857 Douglas F. Forrest, 64 
1857 Edward W. Hitchcock, 68 

1857 Samuel Scoville, 67 

1858 George P. Andrews, 66 

1858 Eobert Morris, 63 

1859 William H. Anderson, 66 
1859 Truman A. Post, 64 

1859 Alfred J. Taylor, 68 

1860 Lyman B. Bunnell, 69 

1860 Charles D. Foules, 61 

1861 John H. Mitchell, 59 

1863 Charles W. Coit, 60 

1862 Albert B. Shearer, 64 

1863 Charles E. Sumner, 65 

1864 Charles H. Burnett, 59 

1864 Peter E. Cortelyou, 58 

1865 Josiah H. Bissell, 56 
1865 Manning F. Stires, 63 

1865 Edwin H. Wilson, 63 

1866 Alexander D. Anderson, 58 
1866 George A. Lockwood, 57 

1869 Alfred Bartow, 55 

1870 John A. Boss, 51 
1873 Edward E. Gaylord, 53 
1873 William C. Stewart, 49 
1875 George H. Benton, 48 

1875 Edward W. Southworth, 48 

1876 Bradbury Bedell, 46 

1876 William B. Lamberton, 46 

1877 William E. Whitney, 45 

1879 James W. Eaton, 45 

1880 George D. White, 43 
1883 William H. Stockwell, 38 

1886 Cornelius G. Bristol, 38 

1887 Franklin A. Meacham, 39 

1888 James H. McMillan, 35 

1888 Alfred Eaymond, 36 

1889 Leopold H. Francke, 35 
1889 Elmer F. Letcher, 34 
1891 Matthias C. Arnot, 33 
1893 George L. Coit, 33 
1893 Donald R. Hinckley, 33 
1895 Max H. Kershow, 39 
1897 William S. Hubbell, 36 . 
1897 Clarence M. Reed, 35 
1897 Carl H. Schultz, 35 



Place and 
Bangor, Me. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Ashland, Va. 
Saratoga, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York City 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Lowell, Mass. 
St.Louis, Mo. 
Huntington, Mass. 
New York City 
Kingston, Miss. 
Port Tobacco, Md. 
Milford, Conn. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Marietta, Ga. 
Lake Michigan 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Mount Vernon, Va. 
Ossipee, N. H. 
Colorado Springs, Col. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Pasadena, Cal. 
New York City 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
New York City 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Primos, Pa. 
Boston, Mass. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Utica, N. Y. 
New York City 
Hartford, Conn. 
Manila, P. I. 
Colorado Springs, Col. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
New York City 
Southbridge, Mass. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Northampton, Mass. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Stamford, Conn. 
New York City 



Time of Death 

May 10, '03 

Dec. 33, '01 

May 3, '02 

Sept. 17, '01 

April 15, '03 

May 34, '03 

Nov. 15, '01 

April 14, '03 

Jan. 10, '02 

July 13, '01 

March 18, '03 

May 37, '01 

Nov. 13, '01 

Oct. 33, 

Oct. 35, 

March 26, 

Jan. 30, 

Feb. 4, '02 

Nov. 6, '01 

Feb. 6, '02 

Nov. 29, '01 

Nov. 34, 

Sept. 39, 

March 13, 

Oct. 19, 

Nov. 3, 

Jan. 5, 

Nov. 16, 

April 30, '03 

May 33, '03 

July 5, '01 

Jan. 13, '03 

Aug. 1, '01 

May 37, '01 

May 30, '03 

Nov. 30, '01 

April 14, '03 

May 9, '03 

Oct. 38, '01 

April 16, '03 

Aug. 31, 

July 31, 

May 34, 

Oct. 14, 

June 37, 

June 11, 

May 34, 

May 37, 



'01 
'01 
'03 
'01 
'01 
'03 
'01 



'01 
'01 
'03 
'01 
'01 
'01 
'03 
'01 



207 



Class 


Name and Age 


Place and 


Time of Death 


1898 


Adalbert S. Hay, 24 


New Haven, Conn. 


June 23, 


'01 


1899 


Hugh M. Bissell, 24 


New York City 


Nov. 8, 


'01 


1900 


Sidney G. Bristol, 24 


Brattleboro, Vt. 


July 19, 


'01^ 


1901 


Norton M. Skiff, 24 


New Haven, Conn. 


Jan. 30, 


'02 


1901 


Charles A. Thomas, 28 


New Haven, Conn. 


Dec. 3, 


'01 




YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL 






1853 


Nathaniel M. Freeman, 80 


New York City 


April 18, 


'02 


1863 


Frank B. Tuttle, 61 


Naugatuck, Conn. 


April 21, 


'02 




YALE LAW SCHOOL 






1884 


George N. Frazine, 41 


Tonawanda, N. Y. 


Jan. 16, 


'02 


1893 


John J. Clerkin, 45 


Middletown, Conn. 


Oct. 1, 


'01 




YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL 






1872 


Edwin B. Burrows, 60 


HiUsboro. N. H. 


Jan. 15, 


'03 


1880 


Frank T. Clark, 43 


El Paso, Texas 


Feb., 


'01 


1890 


Joseph J. Spencer, 38 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


July 7, 


'01 


1894 


William L. Evans, 32 


Plymouth, Pa. 


Sept. 26, 


'00 


1894 


Samuel G. Heckman, 32 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Aug. 13, 


'01 




SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL 






1853 


Gilbert E. Palen, 69 


Ocean City, N. J. 


July 28, 


'01 


1862 


Clarence King, 59 


Phoenix, Ariz. 


Dec. 24, 


'01 


1871 


John W. Griswold, 51 


Chicago, 111. 


Jan. 2, 


'03 


1872 


Charles L. Johnson, 51 


New Eochelle, N. Y. 


Oct. 8, 


'01 


1877 


James B. Murray, 45 


Greenville, Conn. 


Jan. 4, 


'02 


1884 


Elwood H. AUcutt, 40 


Pasadena, Cal. 


April 18, 


'03 


1893 


George A. Hutchinson, 29 


Chicago, 111. 


Sept. 13, 


'01 


1894 


Morgan P. Brooks, 28 


Santa Barbara, Cal. 


May 13, 


'03 


1894 


John C. Peck, 27 


Newburgh, N. Y. 


Dec. 28, 


'01 


1895 


Eobert A. Hamlin, 27 


Phoenix, Ariz., 


Dec. 10, 


'01 


1896 


John H. Wray, 25 


Highland Mills, N. Y. 


Aug. 29, 


'01 


1897 


Charles E. Bement, 26 


Terre Haute, Ind. 


June 12, 


'01 


1897 


Barclay W. Kountze, 25 


Morristown, N. J. 


Aug. 29, 


'01 


1900 


Harry A. Chase, 25 


Telluride, Col. 


Feb. 28, 


'03 


1900 


William P. Irwin, 21 


Edgeworth, Pa. 


Sept. 30, 


'01 


1901 


Eobert M. Chamberlin, 21 


New Haven, Conn. 


July 2, 


'01 



The number of deaths recorded this year is 118, and the average age of the 
graduates of the Academical Department is nearly 61 years. 
The oldest living graduate of the Academical Department is : 
Class of 1831, Eev. Joseph S. Lord, of Laingsburg, Mich., born April 26, 
1808. 
The oldest living graduate of the Medical Department is : 
Class of 1831, Chauncey Ayres, of Stamford, Conn., bom August 14, 1808. 



I isr ID E X 



Members of the Divinity, Law, Medical, and Scientific Schools are indicated by the 
letters d, U m, and «, respectively. 



Class Page 

1835 Abbott, Josiah 118 

1884 s Allcutt, Elwood H. 200 

1866 Anderson, Alexander D. 169 

1859 Anderson, William H. 160 

1858 Andrews, George P. 158 

1891 Arnot, Matthias C. 184 

1843 Avery, John 126 



1853 Babcock, Henry H. 146 

1846 Backus, Joseph W. 131 

1854 Baldwin, Henry 150 
1869 Bartow, Alfred 171 
1876 Bedell, Bradbury 174 
1897 s Bement, Charles R. 203 
1875 Benton, George H. 173 
1853 Bishop, Albert W. 147 

1899 Bissell, Hugh M. 188 
1865 Bissell, Josiah H. 167 

1847 Brace, Henry [M.J 133 
1886 Bristol, Cornelius G. 178 

1900 Bristol, Sidney G. 188 
1894 s Brooks, Morgan P. 201 
1860 Bunnell, Lyman B. 162 
1864 Burnett, Charles H. 165 
1872 d Burrows, Edwin B. 192 

1844 Camp, Charles W. 130 

1849 Carey, Isaac E. 138 
1847 Carpenter, William W. 134 
1857 Case, William C. 154 

1901 s Chamberlin, Robert M. 204 
1900 s Chase, Harry A. 203 
1880 d Clark, Frank T. 192 
1893 I Clerkin, John J. 191 
1862 Coit, Charles W. 163 
1892 Coit, George L. 185 

1850 Condit, Albert P. 144 
1839 Corbyn, William B. 119 
1864 Cortelyou, Peter R. 167 
1841 Curwen, John 122 



1854 Dupee, Charles A. 151 

1843 Eames, Benjamin T. 127 

1879 Eaton, James W. 176 

1894 d Evans, William L. 193 



Class 

1849 Fisk, Franklin W. 

1857 Forrest, Douglas F. 

1860 Foules, Charles D. 

1889 Francke, Leopold H. 

1884 I Frazine, George N. 

1852 m Freeman, Nathaniel M. 

1873 Gaylord, Edward E. 

1849 Green, Albert G. 

1871 s Griswold, John W. 

1839 HaU, Lewis 

1895 s Hamlin, Robert A. 

1846 Harrison, Henry B. 
1898 Hay, Adelbert S. 
1894 d Heckman, Samuel G. 

1892 Hinckley, Donald R. 
1857 Hitchcock, Edward W. 
1848 Hitchcock, Henry 
1832 Hopkins, Samuel M. 
1855 Howard, Hiram L. 
1897 Hubbell, William S. 

1853 Hudson, William M. 

1893 s Hutchinson, George A. 

1847 Hyde, Nathaniel A. 

1900 s Irwin, William P. 



1849 Jessup, William H. 

1872 s Johnson, Charles L. 

1895 Kershow, Max H. 

1862 s King, Clarence 

1897 s Kountze, Barclay W. 

1876 Lamberton, William B. 
1841 Lay, John F. 

1849 Lee, William B. 

1889 Letcher, Elmer F. 

1866 Lockwood, George A. 

1888 MoMillan, James H. 

1887 Meacham, Franklin A. 

1831 Miles, Milo N. 

1861 Mitchell, John H. 

1849 Moore, Mark B. 

1858 Morris, Robert 

1877 s Murray, James B. 



Page 
139 
155 
162 
183 
191 
190 

172 
140 
198 

121 
202 
132 
187 
193 
185 
156 
135 
117 
151 
186 
147 
201 
134 

204 

141 
199 

186 
195 
203 

175 
123 
142 
183 
170 

181 
179 
116 
163 
143 
159 
200 



210 



Class 




Page 


Class 


1856 


Paine, Levi L. 


153 


1890 d 


1853 s 


Palen, Gilbert E. 


195 


1843 


1894 s 


Peck, Jolin C. 


202 


1873 


1829 


Porter, Samuel 


115 


1865 


1859 


Post, Traman A. 


160 


1883 • 
1863 


1888 


Raymond, Alfred 


182 


1859 
1901 

1843 


1897 


Reed, Clarence M. 


186 


1870 


Ross. John A. 


171 








1863 m 


1852 


Sanford, Henry S. 


145 


1853 


1897 


Schnltz, Carl H. 


187 




1857 


Scoville, Samuel 


157 


1843 


1864 


Shearer, Albert B. 


164 


1880 


1842 


Shearer, Daniel L. 


124 


1877 


1855 


Shoemaker, Robert C. 


152 


1842 


1901 


Skiff, Norton M. 


189 


1865 


1839 


Southard, Sylvester 


121 


1850 


1875 


Southworth, Edward W 


174 


1896 s 



Page 

Spencer, Joseph J. 193 

Stevens, Asahel A. 128 

Stewart, William C. 173 

Stires, Manning F. 168 

Stockwell, William H. 178 

Sumner, Charles E. 165 

Taylor, Alfred J. 161 

Thomas, Charles A. 189 

Turner, Douglas K. 129 

Tuttle, Frank B. 190 

Twining, Kinsley 148 

Warner, George W. 129 

White, George D. 177 

Whitney, William E. 176 

Williams, Nathan W. 125 

Wilson, Edwin H. 169 

Woodhull, John A. 144 

Wray, John H. 202 




31 



193T -,. 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE UNIVERSITY 

Deceased duringf the Academical Year ending in 
JUNE, 1903, 



INCLUDING THE RECORD OF A FEW WHO DIED PREVIOUSLY, 
HITHERTO UNREPORTED 



[Presented at the meeting: of the Alumni, June 23d, 1903] 



[No. 3 of the Fifth Printed Series, and No. 68 of the whole Record] 



212 

1862 to 1865. At the opening of the present building in 1893, he 
delivered the Commemorative Address. He was esteemed as an 
antiquarian, and was often consulted regarding early landmarks 
and local history. He assisted in the compilation of several gen- 
ealogies. On the death of his classmate, Rev. Edward E. Atwater, 
in 1887, he became Class Secretary, having previously been one 
of the permanent Class Committee. 

'He united with the College Church in 1835 and had been a 
member of the Center Church since 1 846. With the late Judge 
William W. Boardman (Yale 1812) he was largely instrumental 
in securing from the State Legislature an annual appropriation 
for the New Haven Hospital. 

Mr. Day died from the infirmities of age aggravated by uraemic 
poisoning at his home on College street where he had lived for 
thirty-five years, on July 22, 1902, in the 86th year of his age. 

He married, on November 20, 1844, Sarah Rice, daughter of 
Heman and Sarah C. (Rice) Seaver, a native of Montreal, Canada, 
and subsequently a resident of Marlboro, Mass. Of their three 
sons and three daughters, the youngest son and the two younger 
daughters survive. Mrs. Day died in 1898. Mr. Day's only 
brother graduated from Yale College in 1833 and has been Profes- 
sor of the Hebrew Language and Literature in the Yale Divinity 
School since 1866. 

James Bulloch Dunwody, son of John Dunwody (Yale 1807) 
and Jane (Bulloch) Dunwody, was born in Washington, Wilkes 
County, Ga., on September 24, 1816. 

After graduation he devoted himself to the study of law for 
two years, after which he turned his attention to theology, fin- 
ished the regular course at the Presbyterian Seminary in Colum- 
bia, S. C, in October, 1841, and then spent a year in England. 
He first labored as a missionary in the Cherokee region of 
Georgia, was ordained in Charleston, S. C, in 1845, and then 
resided in Pocotaligo, Beaufort County, S. C, serving churches 
in the vicinity for a dozen years. In 1859 he was pastor in Barn- 
well, S. C, and the next three years in Washington, Ga. He 
then removed to Walterboro, S. C, which was thereafter his 
home. 

Mr. Dunwody died after an illness of three weeks at his home 
in Walterboro, on June 26th, 1902, in his 86th year. 

He married in 1842 Laleah, daughter of Rev. Horace and Jane 



213 

(Wood) Pratt. She died in 1853, and he afterward married Miss 
Ellen Martin, daughter of a planter in Beaufort County, S. C, 
who died in 1857. His third wife, who died in 1894, was Caroline, 
daughter of Dn James O. Hagood. By his first wife he had five 
children and by his third eleven. Two sons and three daughters 
survive. One of the sons graduated from Washington and Lee 
University in 1871. 

1839 

Henet Laueens Dawes, eldest of the three sons of Mitchell 
and Mercy (Burgess) Dawes, was born on October 30, 1816, at 
Cummington, Hampshire County, Mass. In the intervals of farm 
labor he fitted himself for college, and before entering had also 
taught school in Windsor, a Berkshire hill town adjoining Cum- 
mington. 

On finishing his college course he taught for a term in Fishkill, 
N. Y., and then studied law in the office of Samuel Stevens, Esq., 
in Albany, N. Y., teaching three hours a day to defray expenses. 
During the next two years he continued alternately teaching and 
studying law, the latter in the office of Hon. Daniel Wells (Dart- 
mouth 1810) of Greenfield, Mass., who was afterward Chief Jus- 
tice of the Massachusetts Court of Common Pleas. At the same 
time he wrote editorials for the Greenfield Gazette and Courier, 
He was admitted to the bar at Northampton in August, 1842, 
and immediately opened an office in North Adams, where he re- 
sided until April, 1864, when he removed to Pittsfield. For some 
years he also edited the North Adams Transcript. 

In November, 1847, he was elected to the Massachusetts House 
of Representatives, and was reelected the next year. In 1849 he 
was elected to the State Senate but declined a reelection the fol- 
lowing year, and in 1851 was again elected to the lower House. 
He was a delegate to the National Whig Convention at Baltimore 
in 1852, and in the spring of 1853 to the State Constitutional Con- 
vention at Boston. In December of that year he was appointed 
District Attorney for the Western District of Massachusetts, and 
held the office three years. 

In 1857 he entered the National House of Representatives at 
the opening of the Thirty-fifth Congress. For ten years, and 
during a period of the most bitter contests, he was Chairman of 
the Committee on Elections, and his Reports were recognized as 
documents of convincing reasonableness and of singular skill in 



214 

construction, and are of permanent value. He then became Chair- 
man of the Committee on Appropriations, and was courageous in 
protecting the financial interests of the Nation and opposing 
lavish expenditures of all kinds. Through this committee he 
fostered the scientific work of the government to a notable degree 
in many directions, and among other things established the 
Weather Bureau and the Fish Commission. He was also for 
four years at the head of the Ways and Means Committee, dur- 
ing which he did much work upon the various tariff measures, 
and at one time by unusual parliamentary skill carried through 
a bill of his own construction for a new tariff which remained the 
law for some years. 

In 1875 he was elected to the United States Senate, and served 
continuously in that body until his voluntary retirement in 1893. 
As Chairman of the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds 
he recommended the first appropriation for the completion of the 
Washington Monument, and as a member of the Senate Com- 
mittee on Appropriations, and in various other positions in that 
body, he influenced legislation to a large extent. 

In 1877 he became Chairman of the Committee on Indian 
Affairs, where he remained for sixteen years. In this he applied 
himself with conscientious thoroughness to the interests of the 
Indian, and brought the Nation to try the experiment of treating 
the Indian with justice, and of " making something out of him." 
In 1887 he was the author of the law known as the Severalty Law, 
by which the land of the Indians was allotted to them individ- 
ually and they became citizens of the United States. On his re- 
tirement from the Senate he was appointed by President Cleve- 
land Chairman of the Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes of 
Indian Territory, and to work in behalf of the Indian he gave 
his constant interest and oversight in his later years. 

Senator Dawes lived during the lifetime of all the Presidents 
of the United States except the first three, was one of Lincoln's 
most trusted advisers and supporters, and a warm personal friend 
of his successors. His service in Congress covered the period of 
the Civil War, the era of construction, and the admission of six- 
teen new states into the Union. 

He believed fully in the principles of the Republican party, 
but was courteous to his opponents. The very high regard in 
which he was held was shown when he left Washington, his as- 
sociates in the Senate, without regard to party, gathering at a 



215 

notable dinner in his honor. At Pittsfield his fellow citizens to 
the number of two thousand welcomed him home. 

During his career he twice declined the office of Judge of the 
Supreme Court of Massachusetts. 

Mr. Dawes had a high ideal of citizenship and never lost an 
opportunity to advance the interests or contribute to the welfare 
of his city. 

He gave a large number of addresses on special occasions and 
many of a political and professional nature, and made frequent 
contributions to the magazines. From 1893 to 1898 he was 
Lecturer at Dartmouth College on United States History during 
and since the Civil War. 

He married, on May 1, 1844, Electa A., daughter of Chester 
and Anna (Allis) Sanderson, of Ashfield, Mass., and their golden 
wedding anniversary was celebrated in 1894. They had one 
daughter and five sons, of whom three sons died in early child- 
hood. The death of Mrs. Dawes occurred in 1901. 

Senator Dawes died at his home in Pittsfield on February 6, 
1903, at the age of 86. He suffered from an attack of the grip 
early in December, from which he had nearly recovered when a 
sudden relapse occurred about two weeks before his death. Two 
sons, graduates of the Academical Department, respectively in 
1876 and 1884, and a daughter, survive him. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Laws from Williams College in 1869 and 
from Yale University in 1889. 

Ja.mes Osborne Putnam, son of Hon. Harvey and Myra 
(Osborne) Putnam, was born at Attica, Wyoming County, N. Y., 
on July 4, 1818. He entered Yale from Hamilton College at the 
beginning of Junior year and left at the close of that year, but 
in 1865 he received the degree of M.A. and was enrolled with 
the class. 

After leaving college he studied law with his father, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1842, and for two years was in partnership 
with Hon. George R. Babcock. In 1844 he was made Secretary, 
and in 1846 Attorney and Counselor, of the Attica, Buffalo & 
Rochester Railroad Company, and held the position until the 
absorption of the line by the New York Central Railroad. In 
1851 he was Postmaster of Buffalo. In 1854-55 he was State 
Senator, and was the author of the bill requiring the title to real 
estate consecrated to religious uses to be vested in trustees. This 



216 

was bitterly contested but became a law in 1855. In 1857 he was 
nominated by the American party for Secretary of State, and 
worked zealously for the union of the American party with the 
Republican party, which had then just been organized, to resist 
the slave interest. In 1860 he was a State elector at large on the 
Republican ticket. 

By appointment of President Lincoln in 1861 he was made 
United States Consul at Havre, and held the position during the 
Civil War. He wrote the Address of American Citizens Abroad 
to their Government on the Death of Lincoln, and delivered the 
Oration in Paris on Washington's Birthday, 1866, after the 
close of the war, both included in a volume of " Orations, 
Speeches and Miscellanies," 1880. In 1880 he was appointed 
United States Minister to Belgium, and while on this mission, 
was a delegate of the United States Government at the Inter- 
national Industrial Property Congress in 1881. 

Mr. Putnam was connected with Buffalo University for over 
fifty years, having been chosen a member of the Council in 1846. 
For many years he was Vice-Chancellor and then Chancellor, 
resigning the latter office in 1902. He was for a time a trustee 
of the State Agricultural College in Ovid, Seneca County, of 
Houghton Seminary in Clinton, and of the State Normal School 
in Buffalo, and for years a trustee of Calvary Presbyterian 
Church in that city. 

Mr. Putnam died of paralysis at his home in Buffalo, on April 
24, 1903, in the 85th year of his age. 

He married, on January 5, 1842, Harriet, daughter of George 
Palmer, of Buffalo. She died in 1853, and in 1855 he married 
Kate Frances, daughter of Rev. Worthington Wright, at the time 
pastor of the Congregational Church in Charlestown, N. H, and 
previously of Woodstock, Vt. By the first marriage he had one 
son and two daughters, and by the second three sons and one 
daughter, all of whom are living. Mrs. Putnam died February 
19th, 1895. One of his sons graduated at Amherst College in 
1890 and Yale Divinity School in 1893, and another son graduated 
at the Medical department of the University of Buffalo in 1882. 

1840 

Charles Roberts Ingersoll, son of Hon. Ralph Isaacs Inger- 
soll (Yale 1808) and Margaret Eleanora (Van den Heuvel) 
Ingersoll, was born in New Haven, Conn., on September 16, 



217 

1821. His father was Speaker of the Connecticut House of 
Representatives, Representative in Congress, Mayor of New 
Haven, State's Attorney for New Haven County, and United 
States Minister to Russia. He was grandson of Judge Jonathan 
IngersoU (Yale 1766), and great-grandson of Rev. Jonathan 
Ingersoll (Yale 1736), of Ridgefield, Conn. 

After graduation he spent two years abroad with his uncle by 
marriage, Captain Ralph Voorhees, Commander of the U. S. 
Frigate Prehle, and upon his return studied in the Yale Law 
School, and was admitted to the bar in December, 1844. He at 
once began practice in his father's office, and was associated with 
him a large part of the time until his death in 1872. 

Like his father, he early gave attention to public affairs, and in 
1846 was Clerk of the Connecticut House of Representatives. 
He was chosen a Representative to the State Legislatures of 1856- 
1858, 1866 and 1871, but declined a nomination to the Senate. 
In 1864 he was a member of the National Democratic Conven- 
tion at Chicago, and in 1872 at Baltimore, and in 1876 was a 
Presidential elector. He was elected Governor of Connecticut 
in 1873, and served by reelection until 1877, when he declined a 
renomination, and resumed the practice of his profession, in 
which he attained an acknowledged leadership. He was distin- 
guished for his thorough knowledge of legal principles, the force 
of his arguments and an unusual aptness of expression. One of 
his most important cases before the United States Supreme Court 
involved the determination of the law of reissue of patents. He 
was many times retained as counsel by Yale University, — in 1893 
in its suit against the Connecticut Agricultural College involving 
the disposition of the Congressional appropriation for Agricul- 
tural and Mechanical Colleges. 

He was an incorporator of the Connecticut Savings Bank in 
New Haven,, the last survivor of the original charter members and 
a director of the New Haven Colony Historical Society from its 
formation in 1862, and for many years a vestryman of Trinity 
Church. 

He was an ex-officio Fellow of Yale University during the 
period of his Governorship, and in 1874 received from Yale the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws. 

Governor Ingersoll died at his home in New Haven, on January 
25, 1903, at the age of 81 years. He contracted pneumonia the 
previous spring, from which he only partially recovered. 



218 

He married, in Brooklyn, N. Y., on December 18, 184'7, 
Virginia, daughter of Rear- Admiral Francis H. Gregory, U.S.N., 
and had six children, of whom one son (a graduate of the 
Academical Department in 18'74), and three daughters are living. 
Mrs. Ingersoll died in 1898. 

1843 

William Augustus Durbie, son of John and Clarissa (Clark) 
Durrie, was born on July 21, 1822, in New Haven, Conn., where 
his father was a bookseller and publisher of a number of college 
text-books, of the firm of Durrie & Peck. 

After graduation he took a course in the Yale Medical School, 
completing it in 1846. He then devoted a year to the study of 
homoeopathy in the office of Drs. Gray & Hull in New York 
City, and in 184*7 opened the first office of the homoeopathic 
school in Jersey City. He was one of the founders, and the 
third President, of the State Homoeopathic Medical Society of 
New Jersey. For five years he was physician to the Alms 
House of the city. In 1884 he removed to East Orange, N. J., 
retiring from the practice of his profession. His death occurred 
on April 8, 1903, in the 8l8t year of his age, and was due to 
Bright's disease. He was a member of the Tabernacle [First 
Congregational] Church during his residence in Jersey City, and 
after 1884 of the Brick Presbyterian Church in East Orange. 

Dr. Durrie married, on February 5, 1851, Emma, daughter of 
Stephen Ball Ailing, Esq., a manufacturer of jewelry in Newark, 
N. J., and had three sons and two daughters, of whom the eldest 
son died in childhood. One of the sons graduated from Yale 
University in 1876. 

Mills Bordwell Gelston, son of Rev. Maltby Gelston 
(Yale 1791), for nearly sixty years pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Sherman, Conn., was born in that town on August 27, 
1817. His mother was Jane Mills, daughter of Rev. Joel Bord- 
well (Yale 1756), of Kent, Conn. 

After graduation he studied theology a year at Andover Semi- 
nary and two j^ears at New Haven. He was ordained as an 
evangelist at Somerset, Mich., in April, 1847. In the previous 
autumn he accepted a call to the Presbyterian Church at Albion, 
Mich., and remained there nine years, after which his brother 
(Yale 1827) continued the work for five years. In 1855 he began 



219 

a service as pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Naples, Ontario 
County, N. Y., which lasted twenty-one years. Since then he 
had resided in Ann Arbor, Mich., supplying a parish a few miles 
distant. 

Mr. Gelston died at his home in Ann Arbor, on February 28, 
1 903, in the 86th year of his age. 

He married, in Rushville, N. Y., on September 10, 1851, 
Caroline Elizabeth, daughter of William and Catharine Fanning, 
and had two sons and three daughters, all of whom with their 
mother are living, and four of whom are graduates of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

Frederick Munson, eldest of the seven children of Norman 
and Wealthea (Thompson) Munson, was born in Bethlehem, Conn., 
on April 25, 1818. 

After graduation he studied in the Theological Seminary at 
East Windsor (now Hartford) two years and at New Haven one 
year, meantime teaching at South Britain, Conn., and elsewhere 
during vacations. On receiving his license, in 1846, he began 
preaching at North Greenwich, Conn., where he was ordained 
pastor, September 22, 1847. He remained there until the spring 
of 1856. In September of that year he was installed over the 
First Congregational Church at East Windsor, where he con- 
tinued until 1865. He was then pastor about three years at 
Brookfield, Conn., and six years at Patchogue, Long Island, N. Y, 
Owing to impaired health he then took a smaller parish, serving 
the church at Haddam Neck, Conn., from 1875 to 1884. Since 
that date he had resided in Brooklyn, N. Y., without charge, but 
was engaged on the staff of the Insurance Critic^ most of the 
time as Associate Editor. 

Mr. Munson died of heart disease at his home in Brooklyn, 
October 16, 1902, at the age of 84 years. 

He married, on June 28, 1848, Clarissa A., daughter of 
William Clarke, of Cornwall, Conn., who survives him. Of their 
three daughters, two are living. 

1844 

Thaddeus Foote, son of Thaddeus and Polly (Forward) 
Foote, was born in South wick, Hampden County, Mass., on April 
27, 1821. 

After graduation he studied a year in Harvard Law School, was 



220 

admitted to the bar on April 9, 1847, and practiced for a time in 
Canfield, Mahoning County, O. About 1850 he removed to Grand 
Rapids, Mich., and was Prosecuting Agent of Kent County for 
four years. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted in the Union 
Army, and was appointed Major of the 6th Michigan Cavalry on 
October 13, 1862, and Colonel of the 10th Cavalry on September 
5, 1863. He resigned from disability on July 25, 1864, and was 
honorably discharged. 

After the war he was Pension Agent in Grand Rapids eight 
years (1869 to 18*77). From 1879 to 1881 he was in partnership 
with George P. Wanty (LL.B. Univ. of Mich. 1878), afterward 
U. S. District Judge, and later was associated with Edward W. 
Withey, Esq. Several years ago failing health compelled him to 
withdraw f jom active business. 

Colonel Foote died of old age at Grand Rapids on February 3, 
1903, in his 82d year. 

He married, on May 31, 1847, Harriet M., daughter of Henry 
Ward Betts, of Lebanon Springs, N. Y., and had three sons, of 
whom two are living. Mrs. Foote died in 1898. 

Alfred Hasbroitck, son of Joseph and Jane (Hasbrouck) 
Hasbrouck, was born in Guilford, Ulster County, N. Y., on July 
17, 1820. His father was the great-grandson of Abraham Has- 
brouck and his mother the great-great-granddaughter of Jan 
Hasbrouck, Huguenots and brothers, who were two of the twelve 
patentees and original settlers of New Paltz, N. Y., in 1677. 

After graduation he studied medicine with Dr. John Barnes, 
in Poughkeepsie, and at the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
in New York City, receiving from the latter the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine in 1848. He then settled in Poughkeepsie, where 
he practiced his profession until his retirement a few years ago. 
He was for many years Almshouse Physician, for several terms 
Health Officer, and after the Civil War Medical Examiner of the 
district for the U. S. Pension Bureau. During his whole career 
he was on the medical staff of St. Barnabas' Hospital, and was 
for a number of years Vice-President of the Medical Board of 
Vassar Hospital. He was strongly Republican in his sympathies, 
but never held political office. 

Dr. Hasbrouck died at his home in Poughkeepsie after an ill- 
ness of a week, starting from a chill, on May 9, 1903, in the 83d 
year of his age. 



221 

He married, on September 28, 1848, Margaret Ann, daughter 
of William Manning, of Poughkeepsie, a descendant of Baltus 
Van Kleeck, the original settler of that place, also of Hugo 
Freer, one of the twelve patentees of New Paltz. They had 
four sons and four daughters, of whom one daughter is deceased. 
Mrs. Hasbrouck died in 1889. One son graduated from Harvard 
University in 1872, and another from West Point in 1883. 

Ira Lewis, son of Ira and Phebe (Coleman) Lewis, was born 
at Lyn, Leeds County, in the province of Ontario, Canada, on 
May 5, 1820. He entered the class in Sophomore year from 
Brockville, but during Senior year his home was Lewisville, in 
the province of Ontario. 

Upon graduation he went to Toronto, Can., where in October, 
1845, he received the same degree from the University of King's 
College, now included in the University of Toronto, and in 1848 
the degree of Bachelor of Civil Law. He had meantime studied 
also in the office of Hon. Robert Baldwin. In 1847 he re- 
moved to Goderich, Huron County, where for fifty-five years he 
continued in vigorous and successful practice. In 1855 he was 
Mayor of Goderich, and in 1859 he was appointed a member of 
the Senate of the University of Toronto, and from then until his 
death was Crown Attorney of the county. 

He died of heart failure at his home, after an illness of a few 
days, on January 13, 1903, in the 83d year of his age. 

He married, on August 27, 1849, Julia, daughter of William 
and Elizabeth (Doolittle) D wight, of New Haven, Conn., and had 
three sons and one daughter, of whom one son died at an early 
age. Mrs. Lewis died on December 13, 1898. 

Charles Henry Meeker, son of Samuel and Martha (Har- 
bech) Meeker, was bom at Rahway, N. J., on August 13, 1824. 

After graduation he pursued medical studies in Germany, and 
afterward received the degree of Doctor of Medicine from the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. He estab- 
lished a hydropathic institution near Newark, which he conducted 
until 1850, and then practiced for a time i» College Springs, O. 
About 1865 he engaged in farming near Rahway, N. J., and for 
the last thirty years had passed part of the year at Port Orange, 
Fla., cultivating an orange grove. 

In 1855 he published a work on Hydropathy, translated from 
the German of J. H. Rausse. 



222 

Dr. Meeker had been in poor health for a number of years, but 
died quite suddenly at Rah way on October 2, 1902, at the age of 
78 years. 

He married, on February 29, 1860, Mary E., daughter of Na- 
thaniel E. Wood, of New York City. Mrs. Meeker survives him 
without children. A brother graduated from Yale with the 
class of 1842. 

James Roe Mershon, son of Cornelius and Anna Louise 
(Henderson) Mershon, originally from Newark, N. J., was born 
in Fleming County, Ky., on April 19, 1815. He was prepared 
for Yale while teaching in Cincinnati College and under the tui- 
tion of Professor (then Tutor) Thomas A. Thacher. 

After graduation he studied theology two years in the Yale 
Seminary and a year at Andover. He was ordained on April 27, 
1848, preached two years at Durham Center, Conn., in 1850 
organized the First Congregational Church at Ansonia, Conn., 
which he served for a year, and supplied at Colebrook and Mid- 
dlefield, Conn., the next year. In 1858 he went to Iowa, and 
preached for a year in Marion, Linn County. Failure of his voice 
and health then compelled him to retire from the ministry, but 
he continued to do pioneer work. In 1856 he organized a Con- 
gregational church in Newton, Jasper County, where he made 
his home for the rest of his life, and where he built, and for many 
years operated, the Newton Roller Mills. From 1883 to 1884 he 
was in Oakland, Cal., and from 1887 to 1889 in Europe. 

Mr. Mershon died at Newton, Iowa, on July 19, 1901, at the 
age of 86 years. 

He married, at Nashville, Tenn,, on October 15, 1844, Susan 
M., daughter of Ira At water, of New Haven, and sister of the 
first wife of Samuel Estey Baldwin, of the class of 1848. She died 
in 1853, and of the children by this marriage only one daughter 
survives. In 1855 he married Mrs. Elizabeth Chapman, widow 
of George A. Chapman, the founder and editor of the Indianapo- 
lis Sentinel, After her death he married, in 1863, Mrs. Marga- 
ret A. Manfull, by whom he had one son and two daughters. One 
of these daughters di^d in infancy, and the mother in 1868. Mr. 
Mershon married, in 1872, Mrs. Jennette E. Baldwin, of Meriden, 
Conn., who survives him. 

Arthur Ward, son of Samuel L. Ward, M.D., and Caroline 
(Bruen) Ward, was born on December 23, 1823, at Belleville, 
Essex County, N. J. 



i 



223 

After graduation he studied medicine with his father, and two 
years with Dr. Thomas Cock, then Vice-President of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, and received hi« 
dii)loma October 18, 1847. Until 1865 he practiced his profession 
in his native town, but after that date in Newark, N. J. At his 
decease he had been in continuous practice for fifty-five years, 
and longer than any other physician in the city. Many of the 
poor were cured by his skill without charge, and his gifts to 
charitable objects were very large. He was one of the attending 
physicians of St. Barnabas' Hospital from its organization until 
his death. 

For a number of years he contributed monthly observations 
and reports on the weather to the Newark Daily Advertiser, 
under the signature of " W., Jr." 

Dr. Ward died at his home in Newark, on July 6, 1902, in the 
79th year of his age. He was an Elder of the North Reformed 
(Dutch) Church in Newark. 

He married, on October 25, 1854, Anna C, daughter of Robert 
Lee, of Rahway, N.- J., who died about six months before her 
husband. 

1846 

John Henbt Glover, son of John and Debby Ann (Sheaff) 
Glover, was born on May 22, 1827, in New York City, but in 
1836 moved with his parents to Fairfield, Conn., where he was 
fitted for college, partly by Rev. James Tufts (Yale 1838). 

After graduation he studied a year in the Harvard Law School, 
and then in the office of Francis B. Cutting, Esq., of New York 
City. He was admitted to the bar of New York in 1849, and to 
the bar of the United States in the Supreme Court at Washing- 
ton about 1850. For a time he was in partnership with his class- 
mate, David Hawley, Esq., and later, in 1883, founded the firm 
of Glover, Sweezy & Glover, in which his son (LL.B. Columbia 
1879) was the junior partner. 

Until 1871 he resided in his old home in Fairfield, where he 
was a warm supporter of St. Paul's Protestant Episcopal Church. 
In 1861 he was elected to the Connecticut Legislature, and again 
in 1868. He visited Great Britain and the Continent in 1865, 
and was again in Europe in 1871. After hia return from Europe 
in 1874 he removed to New York City, where he resided until 
his death on August 4, 1902, at the age of 75 years. 



224 

He married, on March 16, 1852, Helen Otis, daughter of Jacob 
and Charlotte (Otis) Le Roy, of New York. She survives him, 
with one of their two sons, and two daughters. *• 

1847 

Henry Griswold Jesdp, second son of William Henry Jesup, 
by his second wife, Mary Hannah (Riley) Jesup, was born in the 
village of Saugatuck, in Westport, Conn., on January 23, 1826. 

The year after graduation he went to Georgia, where he taught 
and traveled until 1850. He then entered Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City, and upon completing his course, in 
August, 1853, began preaching at Stanwich, a village in Green- 
wich, Conn., where he was ordained and installed pastor on April 
26, 1854. Owing to ill health he resigned there in 1862, and 
after a year spent in Minnesota took up his residence in Amherst, 
Mass., and devoted himself to the study of Natural Science until 
1876, when he was appointed Professor of Natural History in the 
Chandler Scientific Department of Dartmouth College and in the 
New Hampshire College of Agriculture and "the Mechanic Arts, 
in Hanover, N. H. From 1893 until his resignation in 1899 he 
was Chandler Professor of Botany in Dartmouth College. He 
was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science in 1891. 

Professor Jesup died at Hanover, N. H., on June 15, 1903, at 
the age of 77 years. He was never married. His only brother 
graduated from Yale College in 1840. 

He was the author of " Edward Jesup and his Descendants," 
1887, and the " Flora and Fauna within Thirty Miles of Hanover, 
N. H.," 1891, and a number of articles in periodicals on gene- 
alogy and botany. 

1848 

Samuel Estet Baldwin, son of Captain Samuel and Abigail 
Baldwin, was born on July 24, 1822, at Winchendon, Mass. 

After graduation he entered the Harvard Law School, received 
the degree of LL.B. and was admitted to the bar in 1850, and in 
company with Samuel Henry Shreve (Princeton 1848 ; LL.B. 
Harvard 1850), opened a law office in Milwaukee, Wise, and later 
with his partner established at Depere, Wise, the Depere Adver- 
tiser which he conducted for a year. 

He died of heart failure at Depere on December 29, 1902, at 
the age of 80 years. 



225 

Mr. Baldwin married on May 18, 1850, Emilie E., daughter of 
Ira and Roxanna (Woodruff) At water of New Hav^n, and sister 
of the wife of James Roe Mershon of the Class of 1 844, and had 
four children. After her death, he married, in 1867, Kate, daugh- 
ter of George G. and Catherine Hannan of Depere. She survives 
him with one daughter. Three sons and one daughter have died. 

Henry Blodget, eldest son and fourth of the eight children of 
Dea. Bliss and Mary (Thurston) Blodget, was born on July 13, 
1825, in Bucksport, Me. He united with the Congregational 
church there in 1837, and while in college was a class deacon. 

After graduation he studied in Bangor Theological Seminary 
until the early part of 1850 when he went to Andover. In the 
autumn of that year he became Tutor in Yale College, and at 
the same time continued his theological studies in the Yale Divin- 
ity School. At the end of his term as Tutor in 1853, he declined 
a call to a pastorate in Beloit, Wise, and offered himself to the 
American Board as a missionary to China. 

He was ordained in Bucksport on January 25, 1854, and with 
his classmate, William Aitchison, sailed from New York on April 
11, reaching Shanghai on September 1. There he remained nearly 
four years, but in March, 1860, the state of his health necessitated 
a change, and he went first to Yokohama, Japan, and then to the 
Taku forts, where war was then imminent. After the battle of 
Taku, and the consequent opening of North China, he went to 
Tientsin, where he was the first Protestant missionary in the 
province of Chili. A little more than three years later he removed 
to Peking, where he was a faithful missionary for thirty-three 
years, making a total of forty years of service in China. He was 
repeatedly urged to become Secretary of the American Legation 
in Peking, but refused to give up the work to which he had de- 
voted his life. 

Besides regular preaching and pastoral work, oversight of 
schools and native helpers, he superintended the Mission Press 
for six years, and was one of a company of five missionaries who 
translated the New Testament into Mandarin, the language 
spoken by three-fourths of the people of China. This work was 
finished in 1872, after eight years of labor. In 1890 he was ap- 
pointed to prepare a memorial, in the nature of an Apology for 
Christianity, which was presented to the Emperor, and was also 
printed in English in the Chinese Recorder. At the same time he 



226 



was chosen one of a committee to prepare a version of the entire 
Bible, and ^as occupied in this work when he returned to Amer- 
ica in 1894. He translated about two hundred hymns into Chi- 
nese, and after much study wrote several essays on subjects of 
interest, which were printed in English. In 1899 a paper 
on the " Worship of Heaven and Earth by the Emperor of China '* 
appeared in the Journal of the American Oriental Society. In 
1896 he delivered a course of ten lectures on " Missions in China " 
in Andover Theological Seminary. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Yale College 
in 1872. He was a life director of the American Bible Society, 
and an honorary member of the Council of the Yale Missionary 
Association. 

Dr. Blodget died at his home in Bridgeport, Conn., on May 
24, 1903, in the 7 8th year of his age. 

He married, on January 17, 1854, Sarah Franklin, daughter of 
Franklin and Charlotte (Barrett) Ripley, of Greenfield, Mass., 
and had a son (Yale 1875) and a daughter (the wife of Rev. 
William Rogers Richards, D. D., also Yale 1876), who with their 
mother survive him. 

Chables Mason Ctjllen, son of Hon. Elisha D. Cullen, one 
of the leaders of the bar in Sussex County, Del., and a member of 
Congress, was born at Georgetown, Del., on June 14, 1828. His 
mother was Margaret Cullen, daughter of Robert West, of 
Lewes, Del. He joined the class as a Sophomore in December, 
1846. 

After graduation he studied law in his father's office, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in October, 1852, and was in partnership with 
his father until the latter's death in 1862. In September, 1890, 
he was chosen Associate Judge of the Supreme Court of 
Delaware. 

He died of pneumonia at his home in Georgetown, Del., on 
February 1, 1903, at the age of 74 years. He was a member of 
the Presbyterian church. 

Judge Cullen married, on May 6, 1853, C. Virgia, daughter of 
Rev. Beverly Waugh, Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and Catherine (Bushly) Waugh, who survives him with two sons 
and two daughters. 

James Crane Hinsdale, son of Rev. Charles James Hinsdale 
(Yale 1815) and Catharine Bowen (Crane) Hinsdale, was born 
in November 25, 1825, at Meriden, Conn. \ 



227 

After graduation he studied law with Henry Morris, Esq., in 
Springfield, Mass., was admitted to the bar in November, 1851, 
the following May opened an office in Chicopee, and afterward in - 
Blandford, in the same State. In 1868 he removed to Meriden, 
Conn., where he resided, engaged in farming, until his death, 
which occurred suddenly from apoplexy at the threshold of his 
home, on January 21, 1903. He was 11 years of age. 

He married, on November 18, 1856, Elizabeth A., daughter of 
Aaron and Betsey Pratt of Meriden, and after her death, in 1872, 
Maria L., daughter of William and Nancy Tuttle. By the first 
marriage he had three daughters and a son, and by the second 
four sons and a daughter. His widow survives him with three 
sons and one daughter, and three of the children by the first 
marriage. 

1849 

Edwin Augustus Buck, second of the seven children of James 
and Lydia (Treat) Buck, was born at Bucksport, Me., on May 
31, 1824. 

After graduation he entered Bangor Theological Seminary, 
took his second year at Andover Seminary, and returned to 
Bangor to complete his course, graduating in 1851. In Septem- 
ber, 1852, he entered upon his work as a preacher in Pownal, Me., 
where he remained until May, 1854. On May 31, he was ordained 
and installed pastor of the First Congregational Church in Bethel, 
Me. After five years of service he was dismissed, and settled over 
the Congregational Church in Slatersville, R. I. In December, 
186 7, he was appointed Missionary of the Fall River [Mass.] City 
Missionary Society. This work soon came to be supported by the 
Central Church alone. In 1892 he published a most interesting 
Report of the work accomplished during twenty-five years of 
whole-hearted service, largely among those outside of the churches. 
He was instrumental in establishing in that city the Young Men's 
Christian Association and the Boys' Club, and the Pastors' Min- 
isterial Association. For the last few years he had been Mission- 
ary Emeritus. 

Mr. Buck died of pneumonia at his home in Fall River, on 
March 9, 1903, in his 79th year. He had won in the fullest meas- 
ure the love and esteem of all classes in the community. 

He married, on January 19, 1853, Elmira Rebecca, daughter of 
Dean and Rebecca (Wright) Walker, of Medway, Mass., and 
sister of his classmate. Rev. Augustus Walker. Mrs. Buck died 



228 

m 1877, and of their seven children five daughters and one son 
survive. The son graduated at Williams College in 1888 and 
from the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania 
in 1892, and one of the daughters graduated from Wellesley Col- 
lege in 1892. 

Mr. Buck published a Historical Discourse delivered at the 
Semi-Centennial Anniversary of the Slatersville Congregational 
Church, and a Tribute to the Memory of Mrs. Ruth Slater, also a 
small book on Infant Baptism. 

1850 

Henry Phelps Sanford, son of Peleg Phelps Sanford (Yale 
1820) by his second wife, Ann Elizabeth (Phelps) Sanford, was 
born in Painesville, O., on November 7, 1829, and entered the 
class the first term of Junior year from Western Reserve 
College. 

The year after graduation he studied law in the Yale Law 
School, and then returned to Painesville, where he engaged in 
manufacturing, and was for many years at the head of the 
Geauga Stove Co. He retired about ten years ago, and during 
the last five years resided in Cleveland, O., where he died of apo- 
plexy on May 28, 1903, in the 74th year of his age. For over 
thirty years he was Clerk of the Village Council and of the Board 
of Education at Painesville, and for forty years was Junior War- 
den of St. James' Protestant Episcopal Church there. 

He married, on December 24, 1851, Emilie J., daughter of 
Henry Huggins, of New Haven, Conn., and had two daughters 
and three sons, of whom two sons, with their mother, survive. 

1851 

Daniel Hiram Solomon, only son of Joel and Mary (Strick- 
ler) Solomon, was born on January 4, 1827, on a farm near Har- 
risonburg, Rockingham County, Va. After freeing their slaves, 
his parents moved in 1832 to a place near Urbana, Champaign 
County, Ohio, five years later to Illinois, and in 1840 settled in 
Lewistown, the seat of Fulton County, 111. He entered Yale from 
Illinois College. 

For three months after graduation he taught a district school, 
and before school hours instructed a class of ten boys. In the 
autumn of 1851 he began to read law in the office of Browning &> 
Bushnell, of Quincy, 111., at that time one of the ablest firms in 
the State. He was admitted to the bar in Lewistown in June, 



229 

1853, and opened an office at Glenwood, Iowa, opposite the mouth 
of the Platte River, where he at first also had a school of Mormon 
children. For years he was retained in nearly every lawsuit tried 
within a hundred miles. 

In the fall of 1854, as chairman of a Committee on Resolutions 
at a political meeting, he recommended division of the territory 
west of the Missouri River by extending westward the boundary 
between Missouri and Iowa, — a provision which a few days after- 
ward was introduced in the Kansas-Nebraska bill. 

In January, 1856, he was a delegate to the State Democratic 
Convention at Iowa City, and in June following a delegate to the 
Democratic National Convention at Cincinnati, and in January, 
1857, a member of the Committee on the Judiciary of the Conven- 
tion called to frame a State Constitution for Iowa. 

In September, 1865, while driving a span of horses of his own 
raising, he received serious internal injuries, which, it was thought, 
would prevent further use of his voice in court. In order to re- 
gain his health and secure a summer retreat he bought an entire 
section of land, one mile square, in Mills County, la., thirty acres 
of which he planted with fruit and forest trees. In 1879 he was 
successful in securing the construction of a railway line from St. 
Louis to Omaha, thus gaining ready access to market. 

In 1885 he severed his connection with the Wabash, St. Louis 
& Pacific Railway, and spent about a year in Washington, 
studying the diplomatic relations of the United States with the 
nations of Central and South America. He planned to seek a 
charter for the construction of a railway line through Venezuela, 
but lack of confidence in the President of that country and 
local strifes prevented him from raising the necessary capital. 

Since July, 1892, he had made his home in St. Louis, Mo., but 
while visiting his daughters at Owensboro, Ky., died on July 7, 
1902, from a fall down some steps at the railroad station, caused 
by sunstroke. He was 75 years of age. 

He married in Chicago, 111., on April 5, 1868, Elizabeth Hardin, 
daughter of Marcus Aurelius Chinn, of Lexington, Ky., a civil 
engineer and later a physician, and had five daughters and three 
sons. 

1853 

William Frederick Vincent Bartlett, third of the eight 
children and second son of William and Mary (Crie) Bartlett, 
was born in Portland, Me., on August 20, 1831. During his 



230 

Senior year he left college on account of ill health for a sea 
voyage, then taught for a time in Natchez, Miss., and in 1856 en- 
tered Union Theological Seminary, having that year received his 
degree, and been enrolled with his college class. 

After completing his course in Union Seminary, he took charge 
of Jefferson College, at Washington, Miss. During the Civil 
War he was Chaplain of the First Alabama Regiment (Confeder- 
ate), and was at the siege of Port Hudson when the garrison was 
taken by the Union army in July, 1863. He was ordained to the 
Presbyterian ministry on December 26, 1864, and took charge of 
the Prytania Street Church in New Orleans, La., but his health 
soon failed owing to the privations and hardships of the war, and 
he spent several years in travel, supplying, however, for varying 
periods, churches in Boston and Brookline, Mass., and elsewhere, 
and part of a year in Concord, N. H. 

After his return from Europe he became Professor of Latin in 
Oakland College, Miss., a Presbyterian institution whose resources 
had been greatly reduced by the war and which afterward became 
Alcorn University. He also preached in the churches of that 
vicinity. In 1874 he began a service as pastor of the First Pres- 
byterian Church in Lexington, Ky., which continued with widen- 
ing influence for over twenty-five years, during which he became 
greatly beloved by citizens of all ranks. He received the degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from Central University, Ky., in 1876. 

In October, 1900, Dr. Bartlett suffered an apoplectic shock, 
which laid him aside from all work. Another stroke ended his 
life at his home in Lexington, on April 15, 1903, in the 72d year 
of his age. 

He married, on July 26, 1859, Miss Mary Jane Moore, of Pine 
Ridge, near Natchez, Miss., and had five sons and two daughters, 
of whom one daughter died in infancy. One son graduated as a 
Bachelor of Science from the State College of Kentucky in 1888, 
another as a Bachelor of Law from the University of Virginia in 
1894, and a third son from the University of Kentucky in 1897. 
Mrs. Bartlett died in September, 1898. 

Jeremiah Evarts Greene, son of David Greene (Yale 1821), 
for many years Secretary of the American Board of Commission- 
ers for Foreign Missions, and Mary (Evarts) Greene, and grand- 
son of Jeremiah Evarts (Yale 1802), was born in Boston, Mass., 
on November 27, 1834. Soon after his birth the family removed 



231 

to Roxbury, and about 1848 to Westborougb, Mass. In 1849 be 
entered New York University, but a year later joined tbe Sopbo- 
more class at Yale. 

Tbe year following graduation be taugbt in tbe Episcopal 
Academy at Cbesbire, Conn., and tbe next year in Keosauqua, la., 
and was tben occupied for two years in tbe survey for tbe U. S. 
Government of public lands in Kansas. He returned to Massa- 
cbusetts in 1859, was admitted to tbe Worcester County bar less 
tban a year later, and settled in Nortb Brookfield. 

At tbe outbreak of tbe Civil War be was tbe first from tbe 
town to enlist, and aided in raising tbe 15tb Regiment of Massa- 
cbusetts Volunteers, of wbicb be was commissioned First Lieu- 
tenant, August 1, 1861. Witb otber ofiicers be was taken 
prisoner at tbe battle of Ball's Bluff, Va., October 21, 1861, and 
beld at Ricbmond until February 2, 1862, wben be was released 
on parole. He was commissioned Captain in tbe 15tb Regiment, 
June 17, 1862, but resigned on October 23 following. 

Returning to bis law practice, Mr. Greene remained in Nortb 
Brookfield until May 1, 1868, wben be removed to Worcester. 
He became associated witb Hon. Jobn D. Baldwin in tbe editor- 
sbip of the Worcester Spy, and continued as leading editorial 
writer of tbat paper for twenty-tbree years. 

In 1891 be was appointed Postmaster at Worcester and during 
bis service of over ten years conducted tbe office entirely witbout 
partisanship and witb an efficiency wbicb was signally recognized 
at Washington and throughout the Post Office department. 

He was twice President of tbe Board of Directors of tbe Wor- 
cester Free Public Library, and a member of tbe council of the 
American Antiquarian Society. His life was one of singular 
unselfishness. 

Mr. Greene died on November 8, 1902, of softening of tbe 
brain, at Plainfield, N. J., while on a visit to his sister, the wife 
of Jeremiah Evarts Tracy, Esq., (LL.B. Yale 1857). He bad 
nearly completed bis 68tb year. 

He married, on April 14, 1864, at New Haven, Conn., Mary 
Anna, daughter of Jobn G. and Henrietta C. (Kirtland) Bassett, 
of New York City, and granddaughter of Rev. Amos Bassett, 
D.D. (Yale 1784). Mrs. Greene died after many years of suffer- 
ing in 1897. They had no children. 

One of Mr. Greene's brothers graduated at Williams College 
in 1852 and was killed in tbe attack on Arkansas Post in 1863; 
and two younger brothers graduated at Dartmouth College. 



232 

Joel Sumner Smith, son of David Hume and Tirzah (Howe) 
Smith, was born on September 11, 1830, in Paxton, Worcester 
County, Mass. Thence the family removed to Easthampton, 
Mass., where his preparation for college was completed in 1847. 
Another removal now intervened, to Wisconsin, with the result 
that Mr. Smith spent the next two years in teaching music in a 
Young Ladies' Seminary in Racine. 

After graduation he remained in New Haven, and for more 
than twenty years devoted himself with success to the thorough 
study of music and to its teaching as a profession. 

While still thus engaged his interest in musical history led 
him in 1 874 to undertake (without compensation) an exhaustive 
catalogue of the Lowell Mason Library of Church Music, which 
had just been placed in the Yale Divinity School. This employ- 
ment led happily to a closer connection with the university, 
which began in July, 1875, when he was put in charge of 
the Linonian and Brothers Library. His activity and precision 
in this partial occupation proved so invaluable that he was soon 
induced to withdraw entirely from his former profession and give 
all his time to the Library. His position remained nominally 
the same until 1894, but after that date he was wholly occupied 
in the University Library, with the rank of Assistant Librarian, 
which had virtually been his position for many years before. His 
duties were mainly those of a cataloguer, which called into play 
and developed his remarkable exactness and capacity for minute 
labor and thorough research. 

To fit himself more fully for his work he took up at an early 
date the study of Russian, to which he added subsequently a 
knowledge of other Slavonic languages. One fruit of these 
studies was the publication in 1886 (and second edition in 1887) 
of "Red-nosed Frost," an anonymous version in the original 
metres of a poem by N. A. Nekrasov — a difficult piece of work, 
admirably executed. 

His studies also led him to the task of collecting a library of 
about six thousand volumes of representative Russian literature, 
selected with rare judgment ; and in 1896 he printed (in Leipzig) 
a careful catalogue of this collection, to accompany its transfer 
to the university. By his strict injunction the source of this 
large gift was kept a secret, as was also his subsequent devotion 
of a considerable portion of his income to supplying the wants of 
the musical department of the Library. It can now be said that 



233 

these benefactions amounted to nearly $12,000. His best gift, 
however, which could not be hidden, was his shining example of 
loj^al, ungrudging service and the lavish devotion of all his. 
powers to the duties entrusted to him. 

In the summer of 1901 his health began to fail perceptibly, 
and in the spring of 1902 he was forced to accept the offer of 
partial relief from daily service ; after a few final months of pain- 
ful retirement he died suddenly at his home in New Haven, on 
February 13, 1903, in his V3d year. 

He was married, on May 28, 1854, in New Haven, to Miss 
Elizabeth Mary Davis, of this city, who survives him with their 
only child (Y. C. 1879). 

1856 

Hasbrouck DuBois was born at Fishkill, N. Y., on Novem- 
ber 27, 1832, and was the son of Charles L. and Catharine (Has- 
brouck) DuBois. He entered college with the class of 1855, 
but lost a year through ill health, and joined the class of 1856 
in its Freshman year. In Senior year he was one of the editors 
of the Yale Literary Magazine. 

After graduation he entered the Theological Seminary of the 
Reformed (Dutch) Church at New Brunswick, N. J., and imme- 
diately after finishing his course, in 1859, became pastor of the 
North Reformed Church in Newark, N. J. After two and a half 
years of service he resigned on account of ill health, and spent a 
year in rest and travel in Europe, Egypt and the East. For 
three years after his return he was pastor of the Reformed Church 
at Bloomingburg, Orange County, N. Y., and for twenty-one 
years (from 1866) of the Reformed Church at Mott Haven, 
Westchester County, N. Y., for fourteen years of that time sup- 
plying also the Union Church at High Bridge. In 1887 he 
resigned from this pastorate, and since then had lived at Woody 
Crest, High Bridge, New York City, where he died of acute indi- 
gestion, on August 5, 1902, in the 70th year of his age. 

He married, on April 12, 1871, Katharine Schuyler, daughter 
of Smith W. and Harriet A. (Schuyler) Anderson, of High 
Bridge, N. Y. Mrs. DuBois survives him with their adopted 
son. 

George Cary Dunham, son of Ebenezer and Martha B. (Cary) 
Dunham, was born in Pittsfield, Mass., on October 11, 1832. 
During the greater part of his college course he served as Chapel 



234 

organist, and was leader of the Beethoven Society. In Senior 
year he also organized a class orchestra which furnished music on 
Class Day. 

The year after graduation he was in Cleveland, O., and then 
for four or five years he devoted himself to practicing and teach- 
ing music in Pittsfield. In 1862 he was appointed U. S. Deputy 
Collector for the Tenth District of Massachusetts, in 1865 Assist- 
ant Assessor of the same district, and four years later. Assessor. 
He subsequently held other government positions until 1879, 
when he removed to Middletown, Conn., and entered the service 
of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. For a 
short time he was a conductor on the " Branch " road, but for 
the past nineteen years had been local freight agent. In 1885 
he was, elected a member of the Common Council, and from 
1887 to 1891 served as Alderman. 

Mr. Dunham died of heart failure at his home in Middle- 
town, on April 1, 1903, in the 71st year of his age. He was a 
vestryman of Holy Trinity Church. He never entirely gave up 
his music, and for many years was organist in that city, and from 
1879 to 1886 of St. James (P. E.) Church and afterward of the 
Second (Congregational) Church, both in Fair Haven, now 
included in New Haven. 

He married, on October 19, 1857, Melissa, daughter of Nehemiah 
and Jane E. (Rowe) Smith, of Fair Haven. She survives him 
with their five daughters, of whom the eldest is the wife of Willard 
Knowlton Dyer, M.D. (Harvard 1876) and the third is the wife 
of Rev. Harry Harvey Beattys (Wesleyan 1888). 

.Wager Swatne, son of Hon. Noah Haynes Swayne, LL.D. 
(Yale Hon. 1865), Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of 
the United States, and Sarah Ann (Wager) Swayne, was born in 
Columbus, O., on November 10, 1834. He was at first a member 
of the Class of 1855, but a dangerous illness caused him to leave 
college for a time and he joined the Class of 1856 at the begin- 
ning of Sophomore year. 

On graduation he entered the law office of Swayne & Baber, 
and also studied in the Cincinnati Law School, completing his 
course in the latter in the spring of 1859. The following autumn he 
formed a partnership with his father, under the name of N. H. & 
W. Swayne. At the outbreak of the Civil War he promptly 
offered his services to the National Government, and helped 



235 

raise the 43d Ohio Volunteers, of which he was at first commis- 
sioned Major, but in October, 1861, was made Lieutenant-Colonel. 
He was with Gen. Pope in the Missouri campaign, assisted in the 
capture of New Madrid and Island No. 10, and after the battle 
of Corinth was promoted to the rank of Colonel. He was Pro- 
vost Marshal at Memphis, Tenn., for three months in 1862-63, 
but at his request was returned to active service. On the expira- 
tion of their three years' term seven-eights of his regiment 
reenlisted, and after taking a furlough with them he was again at 
the front. While on duty during the northward advance of 
Sherman's army from Savannah to the Sea, in a skirmish at Salke- 
hatchie Bridge, South Carolina, on February 2, 1865, he received 
a wound which necessitated the amputation of his right leg. 
He was immediately brevetted Brigadier-General "for gallant 
and distinguished services," and a month later was made full 
Brigadier. 

In June, 1865, he was appointed Assistant Commissioner of 
the Freedraen's Bureau, and was stationed at Mobile, Ala., and 
in June, 1866, the military command of the forces in that State 
was added to his charge, his headquarters being at Montgomery. 
He opened the first elementary schools the colored people of the 
South had had, and aided in establishing permanent educational 
institutions at Montgomery, Mobile, Talladega and elsewhere. 

In May, 1866, he was appointed Major-General, and in August 
of the same year was transferred to the regular army as Colonel 
of the 45th Infantry, one of the four regiments known as the 
"Veteran Reserve Corps." In March, 1867, he was brevetted 
Major-General. Subsequently he was in the War Department 
investigating claims growing out of the war, but finding depart- 
ment work distasteful he resigned, and was placed upon the 
retired list in June, 1870. 

He then settled in Toledo and resumed his law practice in 
partnership with John R. Osborn, Esq. (Ohio Univ. 1831), under 
the firm name of Osborn & Swayne. He was active in develop- 
ing the railroad facilities and promoting the educational interests 
of the city, serving as a member of the Board of Education from 
1872 to 1876. His success in obtaining in the Supreme Court of 
the United States an ultimate negative decision on the question 
of the constitutionality of a law designed to tax National Banks 
out of existence, attracted the attention of leading financial cor- 
porations. In 1881 he removed to New York City and for about 



236 

nine years was in partnership with Judge John F. Dillon, in the 
firm of Dillon & Swayne. After practicing alone for a time he asso- 
ciated with himself his eldest son, under the name of Swayne & 
Swayne, and later of Swayne, Swayne, Morris & Fay. 

He was counsel of the Western Union Telegraph Co., the 
Wabash Railway Co., the Associated Press, and other great 
corporations. He was a director of the North American Trust Co. 

He was always warmly interested in Christian enterprises and 
benevolent and reform movements. He was a member of the 
executive committee of the American Tract Society, President of 
the American Church Missionary Society, and a devoted worker 
for the Protestant Episcopal Church Temperance Society. After 
coming to New York City he was at one time vestryman of St. 
George's Church, but later attended St. Bartholomew's. 

For the larger part of the time during the last two years 
General Swayne had been unable to walk with his crutches but 
had been confined to his rolling chair. His death occurred at his 
home in New York City, on December 18, 1902, from heart 
trouble caused by diabetes, but traceable to conditions resulting 
from his wound. He was 68 years of age. 

He married, on December 22, 186a, Ellen, daughter of Alfred 
Harris, Esq., a leading lawyer of Louisville, Ky., and had three 
sons and two daughters, who with Mrs. Swayne survive him. 
Two of his sons graduated from Yale University in 1892 and 
1893, respectively, and three brothers in 1868, 1870 and 1872, 
respectively. He received the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws, 
from Kenyon College in 1879. 

1857 

Benjamin Franklin Barge, son of Christian Barge, a farmer, 
and Elizabeth (Schlosser) Barge, both of whom are deceased, 
was born in Lockport, Northampton County, Pa., on May 30, 
1832, and was prepared for college at Vandever Classical Semi- 
nary, Easton, and Tremount Seminary, Norristown, both in 
Pennsylvania. He was a member of the Sophomore class in 
Dartmouth College, after which he entered Yale, his residence at 
the time being Cherryville, Northampton County. 

For a few years after graduation he was engaged in teaching. 
He then entered business, and was for many years purchasing 
agent of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co. He had been ablei 
to satisfy his desire for extensive travel, and spent nearly a year 



237 

abroad during his last tour. While out walking at Bad-Nauheim, 
Germany, where he was sojourning for the benefit of his health, 
he died very suddenly on October 30, 1902, at the age of 70 years. 
He was never married. 

Mr. Barge had excelled in mathematics while a student, and 
in 1900-1901 he established in Yale University the Benjamin F. 
Barge Fund for prizes in mathematics in the Sophomore and 
Freshman classes of the College, and by his will left an endowment 
for the "Benjamin F. Barge Chair of Romance Languages and 
Literature," also a fund for scholarships for deserving students 
in any class or department of the University. 

Nathan Dana Wells, son of Nathan and Jane (Gorrill) 
Wells, was born at Northfield, N. H., on June 17, 1831. 

After graduation he taught two years in Phillips (Andover) 
Academy, where he had gained his preparation for college, and 
then studied law in the office of Judge William Emerson (Harvard 
1818), an elder brother of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and at that 
time in the firm of Emerson & Prichard. He was admitted 
to the bar in May, 1860, and practiced in New York City. From 
1861 to 1865 he also taught in Cooper Institute. His home was 
for many years in Brooklyn, N. Y., and since 1880 he had been 
counselor of the Brooklyn (N. Y.) Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children. He was retained in a number of *' Cotton 
Cases," in which claims were presented for cotton used by the 
Union army. 

Mr. Wells died of pneumonia at Haverhill, Mass,, on October 
30, 1902, at the age of 71 years. He was a member of the 
Church of the Pilgrims (Congregational) in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

He married, on June 26, 1867, Sara Schelley, daughter of 
Abram Clemmer, a merchant of Harper's Ferry, Va., and had a 
son and daughter, of whom the son graduated at Columbia 
University in 1893, and received the degree of Electrical Engineer 
in 1896. 

1858 

JosiAH WiLLAED GiBBS, son of Josiah Willard Gibbs, LL.D., 
(Yale 1 809) and Mary Anna (Van Cleve) Gibbs, was born in New 
Haven, Conn., on February 11, 1839. His father, eminent as a 
philologist and Biblical critic, was Professor of Sacred Literature 
in Yale Theological Seminary from J 824 until his death in 1861, 



238 

and until 1843, also Librarian of Yale College. He was a descend- 
ant of Hon. Josiah Willard (Harvard 1698), of Boston, Secretary 
of the Province of Massachusetts Bay. His mother was the 
daughter of John Van Cleve, M.D. (Princeton 1797), a trustee of 
Princeton College. 

Besides other honors during his college course Mr. Gibbs won 
the First DeForest Mathematical Prize, and the Bristed and Clark 
Scholarships. 

After graduation he continued his studies in New Haven for 
five years, and was then Tutor, the first two years in Latin, and 
the third in Natural Philosophy. In 1866 he went abroad, and 
studied successively in Paris, Berlin, and Heidelberg, returning 
home in June, 1869. In 1871 he was elected Professor of Mathe- 
matical Physics in Yale, and filled this chair for the remainder of 
his life with distinguished honor to himself and to the University. 

He died after a brief illness on April 28, 1903, at the age of 64 
years. He was never married. He was admitted to the College 
Church at the close of Freshman year, and remained a member of 
it till his death. 

Prof essor Gibbs was most widely known for his work in thermo- 
dynamics. His first published investigation appeared in the Trans- 
actions of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1873 
under the titles " Graphical Methods in the Thermodynamics 
of Fluids" and "A Method of Geometrical Representation of the 
Thermodynamic Properties of Substances by means of Surfaces," 
— the second of which attracted the world-wide attention of 
physicists. These were followed in 1875 and 1878 by "The 
Equilibrium of Heterogeneous Substances," in which he applied 
the principles of thermodynamics to the conditions of equilibrium 
between substances differing in chemical nature as well as in 
physical state, and anticipated by purely theoretical considera- 
tions a large number of the discoveries since made in physical 
chemistry. 

After his achievements in thermodynamics Professor Gibbs 
turned his attention to the subject of the vector analysis, the 
Elements of which he published in 1881 and 1884. This subject, 
with its subsequent applications to the electro-magnetic theory of 
light and to the computations of orbits, was presented first of all 
before the Mathematical Club of the University. He was the 
founder of this club and its executive officer for ten years. He 
was deeply interested in all its proceedings and his contribu- 



239 

tions to its discussions were most valuable. At its twenty-fifth 
anniversary, which was observed in January, 1903, he delivered 
an address on Values, setting forth the ideals which he considered 
should characterize the scientific investigator. In the Physical 
Club of the University and other organizations with which he was 
connected his influence was felt in maintaining a high standard of 
work. 

His book entitled "Elementary Principles of Statistical 
Mechanics," published in the Yale Bicentennial series, opened to 
the investigator in mathematical physics a new field of the great- 
est promise. 

The work of Professor Gibbs as a teacher was mainly with those 
who were fitting themselves for advanced teaching, and to these 
his lectures were most inspiring. All with whom he came into 
close contact were impressed with his originality, extraordinary 
intuitive powers, breadth of view, and the swiftness with which 
he drew conclusions. Mathematicians and physicists and advanced 
students in all lands are adopting more and more his conclusions 
and methods in their own investigations. 

In addition to his services in the University he was for twenty- 
two years a trustee of the Hopkins Grammar School in New 
Haven, and for seventeen years its Secretary and Treasurer. 

Professor Gibbs received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
from Yale in 1863 and from the University of Erlangen in 1893, 
of Doctor of Laws from Williams College in 1893 and from 
Princeton University in 1896, and of Doctor of Mathematics from 
the University of Christiania in 1902. He was also the recipient 
of high honors from learned societies in many lands. In 1879 he 
was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences, 
Washington, in 1880 Fellow of the American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences of Boston, and the following year was the Rumford 
Medalist of that society. He was a Foreign member of the Dutch 
Society of Sciences, Haarlem, and of the Royal Society of London, 
and Copley Medalist of the last in 1901 ; Honorary Member of 
the Royal Institution of Great Britain, the Cambridge Philo- 
sophical Society, the London Mathematical Society, the Manches- 
ter (England) Literary and Philosophical Society, and the Physical 
Society of London ; Corresponding Member of the Royal Society 
of Science, Gottingen, the Berlin Academy, and the Bavarian 
Academy of Sciences ; and Correspondent of the French Institute. 



240 

Elawson Carry More, son of Elijah and Sarah Caroline 
(Owens) More, wa8 born on December 27, ISST, in Little Rock, 
Ark. After study in Paris, Hanover and Berlin, and in New 
Haven under Mr. James M. B. Dwight (Yale 1846), he joined the 
class during the second terra of Junior year. 

After graduation he studied law at Cumberland University, 
Lebanon, Tenn., received the degree of LL.B. on April 27, 1861, 
and was admitted to practice in Tennessee. The following year 
he was in the mountains of Colorado, and three years in St. Louis, 
Mo. In the spring of 1865 he went to Montana, and practiced 
law in Helena until November, 1866. He then returned by way 
of Oregon, California and Central America to Missouri, and the 
next spring resumed practice in Columbia, in that State. About 
August, 1872, he gave up practice, and began farming near by. 
In 1878 he was President of the Board of Agriculture of Missouri. 
He was also interested in the culture of coffee on the Isthmus of 
Tehuantepec, Yera Cruz, Mexico. 

From February, 1887, to October, 1889, he was United States 
Consul General in the City of Mexico. In 1889 and 1891 he 
traveled extensively in Eiirope. 

He was a delegate to the National Democratic Conventions of 
1876 and 1892, and a Democratic elector of Missouri in 1884. 

In April, 1897, he formed a partnership with Wellington 
Adams, under the name of More & Adams, for the practice of 
patent, trade -mark and copyright law, with an office in St. Louis, 
and soon afterward removed to that city. 

Mr. More married in Nashville, Tenn., in 1862, Julia, daughter 
of William and Julia (Lytic) Nichol, by. whom he had two 
daughters and a son. He was divorced from her in 1869, and in 
1873 married Mrs. Elizabeth A. (Hunton) Taylor, daughter of 
Judge Logan and Mary Jane (Mose) Hunton. 

Mr. More died of Bright's disease at Peoria, III, on July 24, 
1902, in his 65th year. His widow and the son by the first 
marriage survive. 

Walter Stanley Pitkin, son of Walter Pitkin, formerly of 
Hartford, Conn., but afterward for many years a resident of Wash- 
ington, D. C, and Catharine Bogart (Stanley) Pitkin, was born 
in East Hartford, Conn., on October 12, 18 37. 

The year following graduation he studied law in the office of 
the State Attorney in Hartford, and the next year at the Harvard 



241 

Law School. He was admitted to the bar in Boston in July, 
1860, and in New York in November of the same year. From 
the latter date until May, 1863, he continued his studies in New 
York, and spent the remainder of the year in travel. In 1864 he 
began the practice of law in Hartford, and was a member of the 
Connecticut Legislature the same year. In 1866 he returned to 
New York, and in May, 1867, became a member of the firm of 
Torrance & Pitkin, which was dissolved in 1872. After this Mr. 
Pitkin, owing to impaired health, gradually withdrew from prac- 
tice. In 1882 he built a house in Washington, D. C, and con- 
tinued to make that city his winter home. In 1894 he made a 
tour abroad. 

Mr. Pitkin died of apoplexy at the Hamilton, in Washington, 
on April 18, 1903, at the age of 65 years. 

He married, in Flushing, N. Y., on October 27, 1869, Julia, 
daughter of Walter and Julia Almira (Niles) Jaggar, who sur- 
vives him without children. 

By his will he left to Yale University a bequest to found a 
scholarship in memory of his uncle, Anthony Dumond Stanley, 
M. A. (Yale 1830), who was Professor of Mathematics in Yale 
College from 1836 until his death in 1853. 

1860 

William Lockwood Bradley, son of Leonard and Charlotte 
Selleck (Lockwood) Bradley, was born on October 11, 1837, in 
New York City, but since 1842 had resided in New Haven. 

For a year or so after graduation he was employed in the book 
store of Mr. Thomas H. Pease, and then entered the Yale Medi- 
cal School, but after a few months left to assume the duties of 
Medical Cadet at McKim's Mansion Hospital in Baltimore. In 
the fall of 1862 he entered Bellevue Hospital, New York City, 
but went abroad in the following February, and spent eleven 
months among the hospitals of Paris, and three months in travel 
and medical observation on the Continent and in Great Britain. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Medicine at Yale in 1864; 
in May, 1865, returned to New Haven to reside, and in June 
began the practice of his profession, making a specialty of obstet- 
rics and gynecology. From 1865 to 1877 he was Demonstrator 
of Anatomy in the Yale Medical School. 

From 1866 to 1869 Dr. Bradley was Secretary and Treasurer 
of the New Haven Medical Association. He was chosen one of 



242 

the attending physicians and surgeons of the General Hospital at 
New Haven in 1871, a Director in 1878, and afterward a member 
of the Prudential Committee and Vice-President. In 1874 he 
delivered the first of an annual course of lectures before the 
Connecticut Training School for Nurses, and in 1876 was elected 
a member of the Prudential Committee of the School. In 1875 
he was made a Fellow of the Connecticut Medical Society. 

The year before entering college he united with the Center 
Church, and was always interested in religious and philanthropic 
work. In 1877 he prepared a paper on the " Origin of the First 
Mission School and the First Organization of a Sabbath School 
in New Haven,'^ and he occasionally contributed to the medical 
press. For many years after 1867 he was Class Secretary, and 
his work upon the Class Records received the warm approval of 
his classmates. 

Dr. Bradley died very suddenly of heart disease at his home 
on Orange street, on June 12, 1903, in the 66th year of his age. 
His health had failed somewhat during the last three years, but 
there was no indication that the end was near. He was never 
married. A brother (deceased in 1898) was a graduate of the 
College in 1855. 

1861 

Willi A.M Henry Fuller, son of Calvin P. and Sarah Jane 
(Van Tuyl) Fuller, was born at Barry ville, Sullivan County, N. Y., 
on November 6, 1836. While in college he was an editor of the 
Yale Literary Magazine, and was chosen to make the Wooden 
Spoon presentation. 

After graduation he made his permanent home in New York 
City, received the degree of LL.B. from Columbia Law School 
in 1863, and practiced his profession until the summer of 1867, 
when he became a member of the firm of Frederick Beck & Co., 
manufacturers of paper hangings. Later, Warren, Fuller & Co., 
succeeded to the business, in which Mr. Fuller continued until his 
retirement in 1892, when he became a director of the National 
Wall Paper Company. He was a leader in organizing the present 
methods of manufacture of wall paper in the United States. 
He enjoyed a remarkably successful business career and accumu- 
lated large wealth. 

Mr. Fuller was a superior judge of the fine arts, especially of 
painting, and made many trips abroad, spending much time in 



243 

the galleries and studios of Europe. In 1898 he sold a choice 
and valuable collection of paintings, mainly for the pleasure of 
making a new collection. He was active in arranging several 
loan exhibitions at the Union League Club of New York, in 
Pittsburg, and elsewhere. In connection with these exhibitions 
he published the monographs entitled : " Two Barbizon Paint- 
ers," 1895; "Early English Painters," 1899; "Claude Monet 
and His Paintings," 1899, and "Claude Monet," 1902. He also 
wrote an occasional letter on art topics for the New York Even- 
ing Post. 

Mr. Fuller died at his home in New York City of congestion 
of the lungs, after a brief illness, on November 26, 1902, at the 
age of 66 years. He had never married. 

1862 

Frederic Augustus Ward, eldest of the three sons of 
Augustus Ward, a farmer and banker, and Susan (Cowles) Ward, 
was born at Farmington, Conn., on April 1, 1841. 

After graduation he took a course in Columbia Law School 
and received the degree of LL.B. in May, 1864. He had been 
admitted to the bar the previous December, and had supple- 
mented his studies in the office of Mott, Murray & Harris, in 
New York. In September, 1865, he became the junior partner of 
Hon. Grenville Tudor Jenks (Amherst 1849), under the name of 
Jenks & Ward, and so continued until the death of Mr. Jenks in 
August, 1870. He was then for two years partner with Hon. 
George Greenwood Reynolds, LL.D. (Wesleyan 1841). In 1878 
he admitted to partnership his step-son, Almet Francis Jenks 
(Yale 1875), who had previously been his managing clerk, but 
since 1883 he had practiced alone, with large success, in New 
York and Brooklyn. 

In November, 1898, he was appointed by the Governor of the 
State of New York a Justice of the Supreme Court for the Sec- 
ond Judicial District to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation 
of Hon. Augustus VanWyck. He was already the Republican 
candidate for the full term, but the success of his party was not 
sufficient to overcome the usual adverse majority, and he failed 
of election. His judicial work during his brief term, however, 
won the hearty commendation of the bar and the appellate 
judges. 

At various times he acted as counsel for the Manhattan Ele- 



24:4 

vated Railroad, New York Central Railroad, Union Ferry Com- 
pany, National Bank of Commerce, and other leading corpora- 
tions, and was the attorney for several large estates. He was 
often employed as counsel to represent in the Brooklyn Courts 
the most eminent lawyers in New York City. 

He was President of the Yale Alumni Association of Long 
Island from 1894 to 1896, President of the Greenwood Cemetery 
Association, Director of the Brooklyn Library Association and 
the Philharmonic Society, Director and Secretary of the Long 
Island Historical Society, and an officer in business corporations. 
Several of his addresses before the Bar Association, New England 
Society, Hamilton Club and other bodies have been printed. 

Judge Ward died of valvular heart trouble and Bright's disease 
at his home in Brooklyn, N. Y., on April 29, 1903, at the age of 
62 years. By his will he left a bequest to Yale University. 

He married, on September 3, 1871, Mrs. Persis S. (Smith) 
Jenks, widow of his former partner, Hon. Grenville T. Jenks, 
and daughter of Gen. Roland and Lucy (Snow) Smith. She died 
in 1879, and on June 8, 1881, he married Jessie Littlejohn, daugh- 
ter of Dr. Richard M. and Anna M. (Littlejohn) Thompson, of 
Albany, N. Y., who survives him. He had no children by either 
marriage. One brother (deceased) graduated from the Sheffield 
Scientific School in 1862, and another brother from the Academ- 
ical Department in 1880. 

1863 

Henry Barzillai Waterman, son of George and Phoebe A. 
(Millard) Waterman, was born on May 18, 1842, at Belvidere, 
IlL He entered college with the class of 1862, but left toward the 
end of Junior year, and joined the class of 1863 in its Junior 
year. 

For six months after graduation he served in the 134th Illinois 
Regiment, and spent the winter of 1863-64 in St. Louis as Aide- 
de-camp to Governor Yates. 

In 1864 he commenced the study of law in the old University 
of Chicago, from, which he received the degree of LL.B. the fol- 
lowing year. In the fall of 1805 he entered the Chicago (Con- 
gregational) Theological Seminary, but, after a tour in Egypt 
and the Holy Land, completed his course at Newton (Baptist) 
Theological Institution, graduating in 1869. In July of that year 



245 

he was ordained to the ministry in the First Baptist Church, New 
Haven, after which he was pastor of Baptist churches in Illinois, 
serving at Moline and Mt. Carroll for a year each, at Wheaton 
three years, and at Normal from 1883 to 1886. During this period 
he also continued the study of law in Chicago, and went abroad 
again in 1872 and a third time in 1878. From 1886 to 1888 his 
home was in Griggsville, and the next three years in Carthage, 
111. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from La 
Grange (Mo.) College in 1890. 

In 1890-91 he made a tour around the world, visiting mission- 
ary stations. For several summers he lectured at Chautau- 
qua, N. Y., on Palestine, and in 1895 published "A Hand- 
book of the Holy Land." During the last twelve years he resided 
in Chicago, and was pastor of the Maplewood Avenue Baptist 
Church from 1897 to the close of his life. 

Dr. Waterman died after a three days' illness from pneumonia 
at his home in Oak Park, on January 14, 1903, in the 61st year of 
his age. 

He married, on August 21, 1877, at Belvidere, 111., Auronette 
M., daughter of Osman H. and Huldah (Ingersoll) Sherman, and 
had two daughters, who, with their mother, survive. 

Joel Tuttle Wildman, son of Albert Boardman and Abigail 
(Graves) Wildman, was born at Guilford, Conn., on March 28, 
1841. 

For two years after graduation he was Acting Assistant Paymas- 
ter in the United States Navy, andfor several years thereafter in the 
employ of the Pennsylvania Central Railroad Company. He then 
settled in Guilford and was engaged in the service of the New York, 
New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company. At the time of his 
death he was Postmaster of Guilford. He was treasurer of the 
Connecticut State Museum at the " Old Stone House " of Henry 
Whitfield from its organization until his death. 

Mr. Wildman died of a complication of diseases at his home in 
Guilford, on March 11, 1903, having nearly completed his 6 2d 
year. 

He married, in Philadelphia, on January 13, 1865, Harriet Rose, 
daughter of James Monroe, of Guilford. He afterward married 
Kathleen, daughter of Dr. Hiram Ingersoll and Sarah (Pott) Fisk, 
who survives him with four daughters and a son by the first 
marriage. 



246 



1865 



Charles Edward Lockwood, second son and third of the six 
children of William Selleck and Catherine (Hawley) Lockwood, 
was born in Norwalk, Conn., on December 31, 1842. 

After graduation he entered the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, New York (now included in Columbia University), and 
received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1868. He then 
spent eighteen months successively as Assistant and House Sur- 
geon in Bellevue Hospital. After practising a short time with 
his brother in Norwalk, and in Oswego, N. Y., he settled in New 
York City. In 1870 he was Visiting Physician at the Central 
Dispensary, and Attending Physician in the Outdoor-Poor De- 
partment of Bellevue Hospital. He was also for a time Attend- 
ing Physician of the Northwestern Dispensary in New York 
City. In April, 18V3, he was appointed Assistant Inspector 
of the New York Board of Health. Two years later he became 
Inspector, and held that oflSce until his resignation, January 1, 
1888. 

He died, after a lingering illness, at White Plains, N. Y., on 
July 28, 1902, in the 60th year of his age. 

He married, on February 12, 1867, Mrs. E. Leila B. Mackin- 
tosh, daughter of Commodore Edward and Hester M. Shubrick. 
She died in Mount Vernon, N. Y., in December of the same year, 
leaving a daughter who is still living. 

1866 

Sherman Hart well Chapman, son of Timothy Pitkin and 
Rachel Thompson (Hart well) Chapman, was born in New Haven, 
Conn., on February 22, 1846. His home during the first three 
years of his college course was in New York City, and during 
Senior year in Bridgeport, Conn. 

He studied medicine in the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
(Columbia University), New York, from which he received the 
degree of M.D. in 1869, with honorable mention of his thesis. 
He began practice in Bridgeport, Conn., but the next year went 
abroad for two years and studied at the Universities of Berlin 
and Vienna. Returning in 1872 he settled in New Haven, where 
he established a large and successful practice. He made a 
specialty of diseases of the throat and ear, and lectured on this 
subject in the Yale Medical School from 1879 to 1885. He was 
for some time Physician to the Connecticut State Hospital, and 



247 

Physician and Secretary of the New Haven Dispensary. He was 
Vice-President of the American Laryngological Society, and an 
honorary member of the Paris and Berlin Larjmgological Societies. 

At the thirty-fifth anniversary of graduation his home was the 
very pleasant headquarters of his class. 

Dr. Chapman died at his home in New Haven of congestion of 
the brain and heart disease, on April 15, 1903, at the age of 67 
years. 

He married, on June 17, 1869, Maria Louise, daughter of Rev. 
"William Tappan Eustis, D.D. (Yale 1841), and had a daughter, 
who was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1871, and died in Brooklyn 
in March, 1888. Mrs. Chapman was fatally burned in her home 
in April, 1901. Dr. Chapman afterward married Miss Helen 
Baldwin of Danbury, Conn., who survives him. One brother 
graduated from the Academical Department in 1868, and another 
from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1876. 

1867 

William Henry Ingham, son of Jonathan and Harriet 
Howell (Sinnickson) Ingham, was born at Great Springs, Bucks 
County, Pa., on December 11, 1844, but entered college from 
Salem, N. J. 

For five or six years after graduation he was engaged in the 
iron business in Easton, Pa., but from about 1873 was in the coal 
commission business in Philadelphia. 

His fidelity to duty was manifest in all his relations in life, 
and he was long an officer of St. James' [P. E.] Church as vestry- 
man and later warden, and also superintendent of the Sunday 
School. About 1895 he transferred his connection to St. Peter's 
Church. Through his efforts as a member of the Church Club of 
Philadelphia a building was erected and equipped where instruc- 
tion and amusement is provided for over seven hundred boys 
from the mill district of Kensington. 

Mr. Ingham died of Bright's disease at his home in Philadel- 
phia on January 16, 1903, at the age of 58 years. 

He married, on January 28, 1869, Mary E. Maxwell, daughter 
of John and Elizabeth Green (Clarke) Maxwell, of Easton, and 
had two daughters and two sons, all of whom are living. One 
son graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1897, and 
the other is an undergraduate in the same department. 



248 

1869 

William Lawrence McLane, son of Rev. James Woods 
McLane, D.D. (Yale 1829), and Ann Huntington (Richards) 
McLane, was born on August 1, 1846, in that section of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., then called Williamsburgh, where his father was pas- 
tor of the First Presbyterian Church. 

The year after graduation he tutored in Tarrytown, N. Y., and 
the next year studied architecture in Boston. He then entered 
the woolen house of E. H. Vanlngen & Co., in New York, with 
which he was connected for about ten years. Since then he had 
been with the house of Jeremiah Skidmore's Sons, coal dealers, 
of which he was the chief owner and manager. 

Mr. McLane rendered an important service to the University 
as treasurer of the fund for the construction of the present gym- 
nasium. 

In 1895 he was thrown from his bicycle at the foot of Fort 
Lee Hill, on the west shore of the Hudson River opposite New 
York, and sustained a compound fracture of his left thigh, which 
necessitated many operations. The last operation was a serious 
one, from which he died at Roosevelt Hospital, New York, on 
May 15, 1903, in his 57th year. 

He married, on October 19, 1876, Annie, daughter of James 
and Eliza (Richards) Haughton, who survives him without 
children. His brother (Yale 1861) is Dean of the Faculty of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Medical Department of 
Columbia University. 

By his will Mr. McLane left a liberal bequest which will ulti- 
mately come to Yale University. 

1870 

Edward Perkins Clark, sK)n of Rev. Perkins Kirkland 
Clark (Yale 1838) and Hannah Smith (Avery) Clark, was born 
on October 21, 1847, in Huntington, Mass., but spent his boy- 
hood in Hinsdale, South Deerfield and West Springfield, Mass., 
towns in which his father was pastor. While in college he dis- 
tinguished himself as a writer, and in Senior year he was a mem- 
ber of the board of editors of the Yale Literary Magazine. 

After graduation Mr. Samuel Bowles, then at the head of the 
Springfield Republican^ offered him a position upon that paper, 
of which he soon became Managing Editor. He had expected to 
study law, but turned aside, as it proved permanently, to news- 



249 

paper work. After about seven years in the office of the Hepuhli- 
can, in January, 1879, he became an editorial writer on the 
Philadelphia Times, and a year later Washington correspondent 
of the Springfield Republican and Philadelphia Press. For a 
time in 1881 he was on the Milwaukee Sentinel, but in 1882 went 
to New York and was at first connected with the Worlds and 
then for two years on the staff of the Brooklyn Standard- Union. 
Early in 1885he joined the editorial staff of the New York Evening 
Post, and found there a congenial position, in which he labored 
unremittingly and with constant aim to uphold what is highest 
and best in the national life. He was a thorough student of 
American political history and was minutely acquainted with the 
politics of the day. It was generally conceded that his continued 
efforts against the Blair Educational Bill and the Dependent 
Pension Bill were an important factor in their defeat. The 
results of special researches concerning national questions he 
occasionally presented with great clearness in the magazines and 
reviews, but his daily editorial work was his first care. 

Mr. Clark died of consumption at his home in Brooklyn, after 
an illness of five months, on February 16, 1903, in his 56th year. 

He married, on January 1, 1874, Kate P. Upson, daughter of 
Edwin and Priscilla (Maxwell) Upson and granddaughter of 
Sylvester Maxwell (Yale 1797), then a teacher in Cleveland, O., 
who had already begun to be known as a writer, and who survives 
him with their three sons, graduates of Yale College respectively 
in 1897, 1899 and 1901. The eldest son is a Tutor in Latin in 
Yale University. 

Henry Learned Hutchins, son of James Spalding and Julia 
Maria (Morrill) Hutchins, was born in Brooklyn, Conn., on Febru- 
ary 8, 1845. During his boyhood his home was in Springfield, 
Mass., but later the family removed to Cleveland, O. While pre- 
paring for college at the High School in that city he laid aside 
from his own earnings over a thousand dollars toward his college 
expenses, and during his course at Yale supported himself. 

After graduation he continued his studies in the Yale Divinity 
School, and a few days after completing the course was ordained 
pastor of the Taylor (Congregational) Church in New Haven, 
May 27, 1873. He remained there until the close of 1879, when, 
on account of his health, he went to Michigan and took charge 
of young and growing churches at East Tawas and Tawas City, 
on Saginaw Bay. In 1881 he removed to Gunnison, Colo., and 



250 

after two years went to Boston, Mass., where he was engaged in 
city mission work for a year, and was then acting pastor at North 
Chelmsford, Mass., for five years. From 1889 to 1891 he was 
preaching at Kensington, a parish in the town of Berlin, Conn., 
after which he returned to New Haven, and for five years was 
again with the Taylor Church. 

In 1897 he entered upon his work as Agent of the Connecticut 
Bible Society, which he continued, with tireless activity, to the 
close of his life, finding therein an ample field for the exercise of 
the consecration and practical abilities which were especially his. 
A few days before his death he presented a report before the New 
Haven Federation of Churches describing the depraved conditions 
existing in some of the rural communities of the State, which led 
to much comment in the press and some adverse criticism. 

Mr. Hutchins died of apoplexy on February 26, 1903. During 
the morning he had apparently been in good health, but while 
calling in West Divinity Hall he suddenly became unconscious, 
and expired a few minutes later. He was 58 years of age. 

He married, on May 22, 1873, Mary Alwildia, daughter of Louis 
Christian and Elizabeth Mary (Snyder) Heckman, of Cleveland, 
O., and had eight children, of whom four died within four weeks, 
in Gunnison, of scarlet fever. Mrs. Hutchins survives him, with 
three sons and a daughter. The eldest son is a student in the 
Sheffield Scientific School. 

Perry Trumbull, son of Hon. Lyman and Julia (Jayne) 
Trumbull, was born at Alton, 111., on January 26, 1851, but 
moved with his parents to Chicago at the age of twelve years, 
and was a student in the old University of Chicago before enter- 
ing Yale. 

For two years after graduation he acted as private secretary to 
his father in Washington and also studied law in his father's 
office. He was admitted to the bar on January 9, 1873, and 
later became a member of the firm of Trumbull, Church & 
Trumbull. After the death of his father in 1896 he practiced 
independently. In 1890 he was a candidate on the Democratic 
ticket for Judge of the Illinois Supreme Court. 

Mr. Trumbull died of hemorrhage of the lungs at his home in 
Edgewater, Chicago, on December 10, 1902, in his 5 2d year. 

He married, April 16, 1879, Mary Caroline, daughter of Judge 
Ebenezer and Caroline (Walker) Peck. She died in 1895, but a 
daughter and three sons survive. 



251 



1871 



Francis Johnson, whose name appears in the Class Register 
as Frank Smith Johnson, son of Hon. Robert Ward Johnson, 
U. S. Senator from Arkansas from 1855 to 1861, and Sarah (Smith) 
Johnson, was born in Little Rock, Ark., on September 5, 1847. 
At the beginning of the Civil War he was a student in the Vir- 
ginia Military Institute, at Lexington. All the older boys joined 
the Confederate army, while he was detailed to guard the school 
until it was burned by the Federal forces. During the next win- 
ter he was in the University of North Carolina, and in 1865 he 
joined the Third North Carolina Junior Reserves Infantry as a 
private, afterward becoming Adjutant. He finished his prepa- 
ration for Yale in the classical school of Rev. Henry M. Colton 
(Yale 1848) in Middletown, Conn. 

After graduation he completed the course in Columbia Law 
School in one year, and then practiced his profession for nine 
years in San Francisco, first in partnership with his cousin, James 
A. Johnson, Congressman from California and in 1876 Lieutenant- 
Governor of that State, and afterward with Judge J. Lamar. 

In October, 1881, he returned to Little Rock, and became Assist- 
ant Attorney for the St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern Rail- 
way, now a division of the Missouri Pacific. With his older 
brother he was in the firm of Dodge & Johnson. 

He died suddenly of heart disease at his home in Little Rock, 
on September 23, 1902, at the age of 55 years. 

He married, on October 14, 1873, May Fulton, daughter of 
James M. and Sophie (Fulton) Curran, and granddaughter of 
William Lavin Fulton, last Territorial Governor of Arkansas and 
U. S. Senator from 1836 to 1844. One daughter is deceased, but 
two daughters and a son, with their mother, survive. 

1872 

Francis XJrquhart Downing, son of Lemuel T. Downing, a 
lawyer, and Caroline Lucy Downing, was born on December 12, 
1850, near Columbus, Ga. 

After graduation from the Academical department he joined 
the Senior class in the Sheffield Scientific School and received the 
degree of Bachelor of Philosophy in 1873. He continued his stud- 
ies there until 1875, when he took the degree of Mechanical En- 
gineer. For a time he was Assistant in Mechanical Drawing. 



252 

He then returned to Columbus, which was thereafter his resi- 
dence almost continuously. For a few years he was Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Gas Light Company of Columbus, but a large 
share of his time was devoted to making for others drawings and 
specifications of devices intended to be patented, and to profes- 
sional work as a mechanical engineer and draughtsman in his own 
and other cities of the State. 

He died of heart failure after an illness of ten hours at his home 
in Columbus, on January 29, 1902, in his 52d year. He was un- 
married. He was a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Samuel Watson Grierson, son of Samuel and Susannah 
(Watson) Grierson, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., on July 9, 1850. 
He entered the class of 1870, but in order to obtain more thorough 
preparation studied for a year and a half at Williston Seminary 
and joined the class of 1872 at the beginning of its course. 

After graduation he was in the publishing department of the 
Christian Union for a few months, and then assistant editor of 
an insurance paper. In 1873 he took a position in the actuary de- 
partment of the Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York City. 
He afterward entered the New York University Law School, 
graduated in May, 1880, and in June was admitted to the bar. 
In 1893 he was appointed Assistant Solicitor of the Title Guar- 
antee Trust Co. of New York. For the last ten years he had 
been in charge of the law department of this company in Brook- 
lyn, and was regarded as an unusually able real estate lawyer. 

Mr. Grierson died of apoplexy at St. John's Hospital in Brook- 
lyn on September 27, 1902, at the age of 52 years. 

He married, on May 31, 1892, Ida, daughter of J. and Mary 
Y. (Carron) August. She survives him with a son, who bears his 
father's name. 

1873 

Edward Rodolph Johnes, son of William Pierson Johnes, a 
wholesale dry goods merchant of New York City, and Anne 
Louise (Gold) Johnes, was born at Whitesboro, Oneida County, 
N.Y., on September 8, 1852. His father died in 1853, and his 
mother afterward married Rev. J. S. Shipman, D.D., who was 
later for many years Rector of Christ Church, in New York City. 
In 1859 the family moved to Mobile, Ala., and then to Lexington, 
Ky., and from there he entered college. 



_J 



253 

The year following graduation he spent in travel, then took 
a course in Columbia Law School, and received the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws and was admitted to the bar in ISlQ. He was 
at first in the office of W. G. Peckham, Jr. ; then two years in 
company with William P. Hillhouse, a classmate in the Columbia 
Law School; for over twelve years with Henry C. Willcox, Esq., 
under the firm name of Johnes & Willcox; from December, 1892, 
until some time in 1893, with Hon. Thomas Fitch; and in 1901 
with Hon. Edwin T. Taliaferro, under the name of Taliaferro & 
Johnes. 

He gave special attention to corporation and international law, 
and was engaged in cases involving interests of unusual financial 
magnitude. After his service as counsel for Venezuela in her 
boundary contest with Great Britain, he received from the Vene- 
zuelan government the decoration and star of the Order of Bol- 
ivar. He was retained in the Nicaragua-Costa Rica boundary 
dispute, in the suit of Canon Bernard involving the Pope and the 
King of the Belgians, in obtaining an injunction for the Consoli- 
dated Exchange of New York against the Stock Exchange, in the 
Crouse Will case, and by the State of New York in the purchase 
of Fire Island. In some of these litigations he was associated 
with ex-Secretary Benjamin Tracy, Col. Robert G. Ingersoll and 
ex-Governor John T. Hoffman. 

He was active in many business enterprises, being among the 
first to develop the graphite quarries of New Jersey and the coal 
mines of central Texas, and was one of the organizers of the 
Nicaragua Canal Construction Company, helping to obtain its 
charter. He was also a member of the Executive Committee 
in charge of the Dewey Arch in New York City. For services 
in obtaining and tabulating information for the French govern- 
ment regarding scientific methods of coal mining in the United 
States he received the diploma of an " officier d' Academic." 

Mr. Johnes was the author of " Briefs by a Barrister," New 
York, 1879, which included verses written during his college 
course, "The Johnes Family of Southampton, L. I., 1629-1886," 
N. Y. 1886 ; pamphlets on " The Anglo- Venezuelan Controversy 
and the Monroe Doctrine," 1888, and "Circumstantial Evidence 
of the Immortality of the Soul," 1899, also contributions to the 
Albany Law Journal. 

He gave the original plans of the Yale Gymnasium, thereby 
saving to the University an expense of $3,500. 



254 ' 

Mr. Johnes died at his home in New York City from gangrene, | 

following the cutting of a corn, complicated with diabetes, on , 

March 28, 1903. He was 50 years of age. i 

He married first, at Louisville, Ky., on April 18, 1883, May, ; 
daughter of Theodore Harris, President of the Louisville Bank- 
ing Co. On April 2G, 1892, he married Winifred Wallace, ■ 
daughter of Henry F. and Elizabeth, M. Tinker, who survives j 
him with a son, also a son by the first^ marriage. j 

Charles Addison Russell, son of Isaiah Dunster and Nancy 

Maria (Wentworth) Russell, and a descendant of Henry Dunster, i 

the first President of Harvard College, was born on March 4, j 

1852, in Worcester, Mass., and was prepared for college under | 
the tuition of Rev. Harris R. Greene (Brown 1854). 

After graduation he became a reporter on the Worcester Press, < 

then just established, and soon afterward City Editor. On the i 

discontinuance of this paper in 1878, he was connected for several \ 

months with the Worcester Spy, and the following spring entered j 

the employ of Sabin L. Sayles, manufacturer of woolens, in Day- ] 

ville, in Killingly, Conn., and became a partner in January, 1882. | 

In October, 1883, the Sabin L. Sayles Company was organized, of ' 

which Mr. Russell was Treasurer until the death of Mr. Sayles, \ 

when the corporation was reorganized as the Dayville Woolen ] 

Company, with Mr. Russell as Secretary. About two years later 1 
he resigned, in order to devote his time more fully to public 

duties. j 

He was Aide-de-camp on the staff of Governor Bigelow in | 
1881-82, in 1883 represented the town of Killingly in the Con- 
necticut House of Representatives, and for two years from 1885 > 
was Secretary of State. In 1887 he entered the Fiftieth Congress 
as the Republican Representative from the counties of Windham , 
and New London, and by reelection served eight successive 
terms, and had been renominated for a ninth term. He had been 
longer in service than any other New England member of the i 
House, and had early won the esteem of his colleagues and the ' 
affection of his constituents by his faithfulness and unselfish devo- 
tion to the duties of his office. He served on many different com- 
mittees, but his work upon the Ways and Means Committee, of '< 
which he had been a member since 1895, was especially produc- ; 
tive of valuable results. He took an important part in framing | 
the tariff bill of 1897. I 



255 

Mr. Russell died at his home in Killingly on October 23, 1902, 
at the age of 50 years. He had been ill for several months with 
a complication of diseases following an attack of the grip. 

He married, in Dayville, on May 14, 1879, Ella Frances, daugh- 
ter of Hon. Sabin L. Sayles, who survives him with a son and 
daughter. 

GusTAvus Henry Wald, son of Henry and Betty (Mayer) 
Wald, was born on March 30, 1853, in Cincinnati, O., where his 
father was for many years a merchant. Both his parents were 
natives of Bavaria. 

After graduation he entered the Harvard Law School, from 
which he received the degree of LL.B. in 1875. He was admit- 
ted to practice by the Supreme Court of Massachusetts, and at 
once returned to Cincinnati, where he was for a time in the office 
of Hon. George Hoadley (B.A. Western Reserve 1844, LL.D, 
Yale 1884). He then formed a partnership with Charles B. 
Wilby (B.A. Harvard 1870, LL.B. Cincinnati 1872), under the 
name of Wilby & Wald, and soon became one of the leaders of 
the bar. He was intensely in earnest in everything, and delighted 
in thorough study of the principles governing the cases before him, 
but his learning and skill were never at the service of wrong or 
injustice. He took no active part in politics, but was deeply inter- 
ested in questions which involved the well-being of the State, and 
as a member of the State Bar Association exerted a salutary 
influence in the matters of State legislation. He was nominated 
by the Democratic Convention for Judge of the Supreme Court 
of Ohio in 1891, but, with the balance of his ticket, he failed of 
election. He was one of three lawyers chosen by the Governor 
of Ohio who, by injunction, prevented a prize-fight proposed in 
that city in 1901. 

From 1882 to 1884 he lectured before the Cincinnati Law 
School upon the Law of Corporations and Extraordinary Reme- 
dies. On the establishment of the Law Department of the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati in 1896, he became Professor of Contracts 
and Quasi-Contracts, and upon the resignation of Judge Taft in 
March, 1900, Professor Wald was appointed to succeed him as 
Dean of the School. He received the degree of Doctor of Laws 
from the University of Cincinnati in 1898. 

He was the editor of two editions of Pollock's " Principles of 
Contracts," and these received the approval of the English au- 



256 

thor and soon became an accepted authority in this country. He 
made important contributions to law magazines, and wrote many 
interesting papers of high literary quality. 

Dean Wald died at his home in Cincinnati after an illness of 
only a few hours, on June 28, 1902. He was 49 years of age and 
unmarried. 

In his memory his mother and brother endowed the " Gustavus 
Henry Wald Professorship of the Law of Contracts" in the 
Law School which he had so devotedly served. 

1874 

Valentine Marsh, son of Theodore Williamson Marsh, a 
merchant of New York City, was born in that city on February 
15, 1852. His mother was Harriet Anne (Peters) Marsh. 

After graduation he took the course in Columbia Law School 
and received the degree of LL.B. in 1876. In May following he 
entered the firm of Crowell & Marsh, and was engaged in the 
general practice of law. 

He was Second Lieutenant of the 9th New York Heavy Artil- 
lery from 1877 to 1882, First Lieutenant of the 159th New York 
Infantry in 1898 and 1899, and Commander of Company G, 
109th Regiment U. S. V., New York, during the Spanish war. 
From 1895 to 1902 he was President of one of the District 
Republican Associations in Yonkers, N. Y., and in 1901 was 
President of the Board of Health of that city. 

Mr. Marsh died from apoplexy after an illness of several 
months, at Yonkers, on October 1, 1902. He was 50 years of age. 

He married, on April 24, 1878, Alice Wilson, daughter of 
Nelson Henry and Sarah (Hurdis) Chase, of Albany, N. Y., who 
survives him with a daughter. 

Ellis Mendell, son of Ellis and Catharine A. Mendell, was 
born at Acushnet, Bristol County, Mass., on April 27, 1851. 

After graduation he took the course in Yale Theological Semi- 
nary, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in 1877, soon 
after which he spent six months in California. In 1878 he was 
invited to supply the Congregational Church at Norwood, Mass., 
where he was ordained and installed on June 4, 1879. After 
a pastorate of ten years he was called to the Boylston Con- 
gregational Church, Jamaica Plain, Boston, where he labored 
with untiring devotion and marked effectiveness until his death 
from typhoid pneumonia on May 20, 1903, at the age of 52 years. 



257 

He married, on May 1, 1879, Clara Eliza, daughter of Deacon 
Charles Barnes Whittlesey (M. D. Yale 1843) and Esther Antoi- 
nette (Wilcoxson) Whittlesey, of New Haven, and had two 
daughters and a son, who with their mother gorvive. The elder 
daughter graduated from Vassar College in 1901, and the wm i« 
an undergraduate student in Yale College. 

1876 

JoHS deWitt [Hamilton] Allen, son of Lucius Hamilton 
Allen (West Point 1842) and Sarah (deWitt) Allen, was bom in 
Peekskill, Westchester County, N. Y., on August 28, 1853, but 
the greater part of the time until 1870 he passed in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Soon after graduation he returned to San Francisco, and early 
in 1877 engaged in business with his father, of the firm of 
Allen <fc Lewis, commission merchants and wholesale grocers. 
About 1890 he retired from business, and was afterward largely 
occupied with the care of his property. Although he seldom 
came East he retained a strong attachment to the memories and 
friendships of his undergraduate days. He was greatly interested 
in everything relating to club management and life. 

During his last years he suffered much from ill health, and 
died at Riverdale, N. Y., on November 8, 1902, at the age of 
49 years. He was never married. 

John Flayel Gatlobd, son of Ebenezer Haskell and Harriet 
Jane (Phelps) Gaylord, was bom at Amherst, Mass., on October 
22, 1852. He was fitted for college at the Hopkins Grammar 
School, his father being at the time in business in New Haven. 

Upon graduation from the Academical Department he entered 
the Medical School, received the degree of M.D. in 1878, and 
then went abroad for further study, spending the winter at the 
University of Wuerzburg, and the following spring attending 
clinics at the Charity Hospital in Berlin. In 1880 he began the 
practice of medicine in Cincinnati, and the next year was 
appointed Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics in the 
College of Medicine and Surgery in that city. In 1887 he was 
chosen Assistant Health Officer. After a residence of ten years 
in Cincinnati, in 1889 he returned to his native State, and settled 
in Plymouth, where he continued in practice until his death. 
This occurred on April 14, 1903, and was due to diabetes. He 
was 50 years of age. 



258 

He married, at Plymouth, Mass., on September 12, 1894, Susan 
Mary, daughter of William R. and Susan (Holmes) Drew of that 
town, who survives him. 

1878 

Henry Alexander Barling, Jr., son of Henry Alexander 
and Elizabeth A. (Tonge) Barling, was born on March 22, 1856, 
in Baltimore, Md., but when about a year old moved with his 
parents to Brooklyn, N. Y. He entered college with the class of 
1877, but joined the next class at the opening of the winter term 
in Sophomore year. 

After graduation he was for a time in the brokerage business 
in New York City, but in 1885 he settled in St. Augustine, Fla., 
and was engaged principally in the shipping and sale of North- 
ern merchandise in that city. In 1896 he v^nt to Rivas, Nica- 
ragua, to superintend the building of a railroad and obtained 
from the government a large concession, but the breaking out of 
war and other causes frustrated his plans. He then went to 
Costa Rica and remained a year and a half, but as the climate 
did not agree with him, he returned to the United States. For 
a few months he was State Agent for the Provident Savings Life 
Assurance Society of New York, but in 1890 he became con- 
nected with the North American Trust Company at Cienf uegos, 
Cuba, was two years manager of a bank there, and then Special 
Accountant in the Department of Charities for the United States 
Government until the island was turned over to the Cubans. 

Mr. Barling died of typhoid pneumonia at Cienfuegos, on July 
28, 1902, at the age of 46 years. 

He married, April 15, 1879, Marian E., daughter of Silas K. 
and Harriet (Jones) Everett, of Englewood, N. J., who survives 
him with five daughters and two sons. A son and a daughter 
died in infancy. 

William Passmore Belden, son of Rev. William Webster 
Belden, D.D., and Elizabeth Passmore (Tabor) Belden, was born 
in Bozrah, adjoining Norwich, Conn., on December 28, 1855, and 
was prepared for college in the Hartford High School. While a 
student at Yale he was one of the first board of editors of the 
Yale Daily News. 

After graduation he engaged in newspaper work in Amster- 
dam, N. Y., and Holyoke, Mass., after a time becoming editor. 



259 

and later part owner, of the Amsterdam Evening Recorder. In 
1889 he took the editorship of the Morning Sentinel of that 
city, but from March, 1891, to October, 1893, was clerk in the 
United States Sub-Treasury in New York City. Since then he 
had been one of the editors of the Daily Democrat in Amster- 
dam, combining editorial work with a deputy clerkship in the 
State Senate at Albany, to which he was chosen in 1896. He 
had been Alderman in Amsterdam, was Secretary of the Republi- 
can City Committee for four years, and held a prominent posi- 
tion among the Republicans of Montgomery County. 

Mr. Belden died of paralysis at Albany, N. Y., on April 6, 1903, 
at the age of 47 years. 

He married, on November 28, 1889, at Amsterdam, Jennie, 
daughter zi Solomon Pulver and Esther (Groat) Heath. 

Frederick Bennett Dubach, son of David and Emma (Ben- 
nett) Dubach, was born on March 30, 1857, at Davenport, Iowa. 
He entered college from Hannibal, Mo., where his father had a 
large lumber business. 

After graduation he engaged in the same business, and was for 
a time general manager of D. Dubach & Co., of Hannibal. In 
April, 1894, he moved to Eau Claire, Wise, to become Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Dells Lumber Co. He conducted an extensive busi- 
ness there and owned tracts of forest in Minnesota and Wis- 
consin, and mining properties in Montana. After the supply 
jof white pine became too limited he purchased fifty thou- 
sand acres of land in the State of Louisiana, situated in Lincoln 
Parish, established there a manufactory, and laid out the town of 
Dubach. He built the D'Arbonne Valley Railroad, about twenty 
miles in length, which he retained in his private ownership. His 
large schemes were almost uniformly successful, but the close 
attention he gave his affairs injured his health, and for several 
years he suffered from a nervous trouble. He died of paralysis 
at St. Louis, Mo., which had been his home for three years, on 
January 11, 1903, in his 46th year. 

He married, February 17, 1897, in St. Louis, Emma, daughter 
of Dr. Samuel Temple Chandler. She survives him with a son 
and daughter. 

1881 

John Mowe Drysdale, son of William and Margaret (Mer- 
cer) Drysdale, was born on November 4, 1859, at Whitewater, 



260 

Walworth County, Wise, but was taken at an early age to Ben- 
nington, Vt. In 1872 he went to Dollar, in Scotland, where he 
attended school two years, after which he completed his prepara- 
tion for college in Meriden, Conn. 

Soon after graduation he entered the law office of Chittenden, 
Townsend & Chittenden, in New York City, and later became 
their managing clerk. He then practiced by himself, but after a 
time was again associated with James M. Townsend, Esq. (Yale 
1874). Until October, 1889, he resided in New York City, but 
since then in Montclair, N. J., and Piermont, N. Y. 

He died of consumption, after a short illness, at the home of 
his parents in Peace Dale, R. I., on February 11, 1903, at the age 
of 43 years. He was unmarried. 

1882 

David Andeeson Chenault, son of W. O. and Talitha Che- 
nault, was born at White Hall, near Richmond, Madison County, 
Ky., on October 23, 1858. He joined the class at the beginning 
of Sophomore year. 

For two years after graduation he was a member of the firm 
of Isaac Brinker & Co., commission merchants and wholesale 
fruit and produce dealers at Denver, Colo., and then engaged in 
farming at his home in Whitehall for a year. For some time 
from 1885 he carried on the livestock business, in connection 
with farming, at DeGraff, Kans. Afterward he conducted a 
private school, known as the University School, at Louisville, Ky.- 
For three years he lived in Lexington, Ky., and was engaged 
in the insurance business, until his health began to fail, when he 
removed to the country. 

He died of pneumonia at Pine Grove, Clark County, Ky., on 
January 21, 1903, at the age of 44 years. He was a member of 
the Baptist church. 

Mr. Chenault married, on July 17, 1883, Bettie Baker, daugh- 
ter of T. S. and Henrietta Byonston, of Richmond, Ky., who 
survives him with a son and a daughter. 

1883 

Francis Gibbons Beach, son of John Sheldon Beach, LL.D. 
(Yale 1839) and Rebecca (Gibbons) Beach, was born in New 
Haven, Conn., on February 28, 1861. 

After graduation he took the course in the Yale Law School, 



261 

received the degree of LL.B. in 1 885, and was at once admitted 
to the bar. He began practice in his father's office, later was 
with his brothers, and recently in the office of Bristol, Stoddard, 
Beach & Fisher. In 1891 he compiled Beach's "Joint Stock 
Laws," and issued new editions under the title, "Connecticut 
Corporation Law," in 1893 and 1901. 

For several years his law practice was interrupted by public 
service. In 1894 he was appointed Postmaster of New Haven by 
President Cleveland, and held the office until the expiration of 
his term of four years. At the beginning of the Spanish War 
he formed a company of volunteers, afterwards known as Battery 
C, First Artillery, Connecticut Volunteers, to the command of 
which he was appointed, and spent the entire summer in camp at 
Niantic, Conn., drilling his troops and preparing them for action. 
In October he received a commission as Captain of Company H, 
Third Connecticut Volunteers, and went to Camp Meade, Pa. 
In November the regiment was ordered to Camp Marion, Sum- 
merville, S. C, where the winter was spent. Captain Beach being 
on provost duty. On March 20, 1899, at the close of the war, he 
was mustered out of service, having had no opportunity for active 
participation in the war in Cuba. He then returned to his law 
practice in New Haven. 

Captain Beach died at the New Haven Hospital on December 
30, 1902, from a wound self-inflicted on December 4th while tem- 
porarily deranged, as is supposed, as the result of an attack of 
the grip. He was in his 42d year. 

He married, on June 1, 1886, Elizabeth Charnley, daughter of 
Rev. Thomas Bucklin Wells, D.D. (Yale 1859) and Susan Fitch 
(Charnley) Wells, and had two sons and one daughter. Only 
Mrs. Beach and the older son survive. 

An older brother graduated from the Academical Department 
in 1877, and a younger brother (Yale 1887) died of typhoid fever 
while in service in the war in Cuba. 

1886 

Henry Townsend Nason, son of Henry Bradford Nason, Ph.D., 
LL.D. (Ph.B. Amherst 1855), who was for thirty years Professor 
of Chemistry and Mineralogy in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
in Troy, N. Y., was born in that city on August 13, 1865. His 
mother was Frances Kellogg, daughter of Hon. Martin Ingham 
Townsend, LL.D. (Williams 1833), Regent of the University of 
the State of New York, and member of Congress. 



262 

After graduation he took the course at Columbia Law School, 
received the degree of Bachelor of Law in 1888, and the follow- 
ing year became a member of the firm of Townsend, Roche & 
Nason in Troy. In 1896 he was elected County Judge of Rensse- 
laer County, and was reelected for a second term in 1902. He 
was a trustee of the Troy Public Library, to which he be- 
queathed his own library, and a trustee of the First Presbyterian 
Church. 

Judge Nason had suffered for a year from insomnia, and since 
the recent deaths of his mother (December 9, 1902) and grand- 
father (March 8, 1903), who composed his whole family, he had 
been greatly depressed. On Monday, March 30, 1903, he suddenly 
disappeared, and the following Friday his body was found in an 
unfrequented wood near Kenwood, a suburb of Albany. The 
evidence indicated that he probably died Monday, and that he 
ended his life by the use of laudanum and chloroform. He was 
37 years of age, and unmarried. 

Sheffield Phelps, son of Hon. William Walter Phelps, 
LL.D. (Yale 1860) and Ellen (Sheffield) Phelps, and grandson of 
Joseph Earl Sheffield (M.A. Yale 1871), founder of the Sheffield 
Scientific School, was born on July 24, 1864, in New Haven, 
Conn., but since early childhood the family residence had been at 
Englewood, N. J. 

After graduation he went to Colorado, first to Manitou for a 
time, and then to Colorado Springs, where he did editorial work 
on the Gazette, and at the same time read law in the office of Sen- 
ator Campbell. He was admitted to the bar of Colorado, and 
practiced for a short time in the firm of Armit & Phelps, and later 
in that of Lunt, Armit & Phelps. 

In 1890 Mr. Phelps came to New York and joined the staff of 
the World, and six months later was made New England corre- 
spondent of the same, with an office in Boston. In 1891 he re- 
turned to New York and was engaged on the Mail and Express, 
rising rapidly from the position of Telegraph Editor to that of 
Acting Editor. In December, 1895, he bought the Evening Jour- 
nal of Jersey City, and the following May he purchased the 
Newark Daily Advertiser, of both of which he had entire edi- 
torial control. In 1899 he sold both papers, and made an extended 
tour abroad, but continued his interest in public affairs and especi- 
ally in the politics of his own State. 



263 

His permanent home was at Teaneck, N. J., and when there, 
as always, he delighted in exercising a generous hospitality. He 
died after a short illness from typhoid fever at his winter home 
in Aiken, S. C, on December 9, 1902, at the age of 38 years. 

He married, on June 1, 1892, Claudia Wright, daughter of 
Preston Lea, a banker of Wilmington, Del., and had a son and 
two daughters, who with their mother survive him. A brother 
graduated from the Academical Department in 1883. 

1887 

Arthur Reed Pennell, son of Captain John D. and Abbie 
J. (Reed) Pennell, was born on December 18, 1864, in the 
South Pacific Ocean, on board the Deborah Pennell^ a ship which 
his father commanded. He spent much of his boyhood in 
long voyages on his father's ships, but after his father's death re- 
turned to the family home at Brunswick, Me., where he remained 
until he began his college preparation at Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass. During his college course he supported himself. 

After graduation he took the course in the Yale Law School, 
and received the degree of LL.B., cwm laude, in 1889. The fol- 
lowing year he was in the office of Sprague, Morey, Sprague & 
Brownell, in Buffalo. He was admitted to the bar in 1890, and in 
April, 1891, formed a partnership with his classmate, Thomas 
Penney, which was dissolved by mutual consent in 1894. Since 
that time he had practiced alone. 

He married, on October 15, 1891, Carrie B., daughter of 
Winslow M. and Alice M. (Clark) Lamb, of New Haven. 

While riding with his wife in his automobile on March 10, 
1903, in Buffalo, the machine suddenly turned from the road and 
plunged into a near-by quarry, crushing him beneath it. He was 
instantly killed, and Mrs. Pennell died from her injuries the fol- 
lowing day. He was 38 years of age. They had no children. A 
brother graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1890. 

1891 

Samuel Colgate, son of Samuel and Elizabeth Ann (Morse) 
Colgate, was born at Orange, N. J., on December 12, 1868. His 
father was widely known as a philanthropist and benefactor of 
Colgate University. 

After graduation he took the theological course in the Semi- 
nary at Hamilton, graduating in 1894. In the summer of that 



264 

year he went abroad for further study and entered Berlin Univer- 
sity. He lived at Berlin and Dresden two years. In the fall of 
1896 he returned to America, and for a year took charge of 
Emmanuel Baptist Church in New York City, during the absence 
of the pastor. He continued to do mission work in that city until 
prostrated by a very severe attack of typhoid fever, after which he 
was unable to work for a year. Ten months of this time he spent 
in California. In 1899 he joined the Presbyterian Church, and 
in September of that year became pastor of the First Presby- 
terian Church at East Aurora, N. Y., where he accomplished an 
unusually successful work. 

He died at Sea Gate, Long Island, N. Y., on July 26, 1902, in 
his 34th year. 

He married at Buffalo, N. Y, on June 22, 1894, Edith Bucking- 
ham, daughter of Edward J. and Mary (Hoey) Hall, of Buffalo, 
N. Y. His wife and one daughter survive him. Five brothers 
have graduated from Yale, respectively in 1877, 1883, (two) 1886, 
and 1896. 

1893 

Hariiy Llewellyn Bixby, son of Jotham and Margaret Wins- 
low (Hathaway) Bixby, was born at Los Cerritos, near Long 
Beach, Los Angeles County, Cal., on December 20, 1870. His 
father was prominently connected with farming and real estate 
interests. 

After graduation he spent a year at Long Beach, and then en- 
tered the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia Univer- 
sity. Poor health, however, compelled him to give up professional 
study at the end of two years, and he engaged in sheep-raising in 
Arizona. There he died, at Phoenix, after a brief illness from 
appendicitis, on October 20, 1902, in the 32d year of his age. 

He married, in November, 1900, Miss Juliette Winston Graham, 
who survives him with a son who bears his father's name. A 
brother graduated from Yale College in 1886. 

Feank Howard Button, son of William E. and Louise L. 
(Fokkes) Button, of Peekskill, N. Y., was born at Summit, N. J., 
on December 24, 1868. 

After graduation he studied law in the New York Law School, 
and was admitted to the New York bar in September, 1895. 
Since that time he had practiced in Buffalo, N. Y., as a member 



265 . 

of the firm of Button & Kean, making a specialty of commercial 
law. His home continued to be in Peekskill, where he died of 
quick consumption on November 1, 1902. He was in his 34th 
year. 

Mr. Button married, on June 25, 1895, Maude, daughter of 
Henry and Martha F. Sultzbach, a farmer of Patterson, Kans. 
She survives him with one daughter. 

1894 

Gtjy Bryan Miller, son of Charles Griffin Miller, a banker, 
and Emily (Bryan) Miller, was born in New Rochelle, N. Y., on 
February 23, 1872, and entered college with the class of 1893, but 
joined the class of 1894 at the beginning of Sophomore year. 

After graduation he studied medicine in the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, New York City (Columbia University), 
received the degree of M.D. therefrom in 1898, was House 
Physician in St. Luke's Hospital, and then went abroad for 
further study. He died of peritonitis in Paris, France, on April 
7, 1903, at the age of 31 years. Two brothers graduated at the 
Sheffield Scientific School, respectively in 1885 and 1888. 

1895 

Clifford Semple Cook, son of Theodore Cook, formerly 
President of the Cincinnati Southern Railway and prominent in 
public enterprises for the improvement of Cincinnati, was born 
at Clifton in the suburbs of that city, on July 27, 1873. His 
mother was Anna (Semple) Cook. 

After graduation he was for a time with the firm of F. G. Tul- 
lidge & Co., of Cincinnati, then with the Peninsular Car Co. in 
Detroit, Mich., and afterward in office of the same company in 
Pittsburg, Pa. For the last two years he was connected with the 
Sharon Steel Co., at Sharon, Pa., where he died of pneumonia, on 
January 4, 1903, in the 30th year of his age. He was unmarried. 

1896 

William Hall Brokaw, son of William Bergen and Mary 
Alice (Hall) Brokaw, was born at Newburgh, N. Y., on January 
16, 1874. 

After graduation he entered the Union Theological Seminary 
and graduated there on May 16, 1899. During the Spanish- 



, 266 

American war he had charge of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation at Camp Alger, in Virginia, besides assisting in the sani- 
tary work. After finishing his theological course he immediately 
went to Brownsville, Tex., where in the midst of a population 
four-fifths of whom were' Mexicans he held the only religious 
services in English. His hearers represented nearly every denom- 
ination, and the work was very interesting. But his health imper- 
atively demanded a change of climate, and in May, 1900, he started 
North. He had been ordained Deacon in the Protestant Episco- 
pal Church by Bishop Johnston on January 7, and while resting 
in San Antonio, Tex., was ordained Priest on May 20. He spent 
nearly a year in the Adirondacks, a summer in Liberty, N. Y., 
and the next winter in San Antonio, but his health improved very 
little. He was still, however, able to preach occasionally. Early 
extreme heat forced him northward, and he died of consumption 
at the home of his parents in New York City, on July 13, 1902, 
atfthe age of 28 years. 

He married, on June 15, 1899, Annetta, daughter of George 
Kerr, of Yonkers, N. Y. She died suddenly on October 28, 
1900. 

1898 

George Minot Ripley, son of Lyman Baldwin Ripley, an 
iron merchant of St. Louis, Mo., and Margaret Cranch (Dawes) 
Ripley, was born in that city, on January 3, 1876. 

After graduation he was instructor in Smith Academy, St. 
Louis, where he had been fitted for college, and at the same time 
studied law at the St. Louis Law School. He received the degree 
of LL.B. from the latter in June, 1900, and was admitted to 
practice in the Missouri courts. For the sake of his health, how- 
ever, he was compelled to seek a different climate, and removed 
to Salt Lake City, Utah, early in 1901, where he commenced the 
practice of his profession. In January, 1903, he formed a partner- 
ship with Dana T. Smith, Esq., of that city, under the firm name 
of Smith & Ripley. Soon afterward he was taken seriously ill 
and brought to St. Louis early in April for surgical treatment 
and placed in the Rebekah Hospital. For a while he seemed to 
improve, but the disease could not be stayed, and he died of 
tuberculosis, on May 16, 1903, at the age of 27 years. He was 
not married. Before entering college he united with the Pilgrim 
Congregational Church, St. Louis. 



267 



1899 



Sullivan Dorr Ames, son of Captain Sullivan Dorr, U. S. N., 
and Mary (Townsend) Ames, was born on January 5, 1878, in 
Boston, Mass., but was prepared for college in Providence, R. L, 
where his mother resided after the death of his father. He was a 
grandson of Chief Justice Samuel Ames (Brown 1823), and a 
direct descendant of Thomas W. Dorr, Governor of Rhode Island 
during the Dorr Rebellion. 

Alter graduation he made a tour around the world with his 
classmate, Ord Preston, but did not f ull}^ recover from an illness 
during his college course. He, however, entered the Harvard 
Law School after his return, but, owing to overwork, had to with- 
draw at Thanksgiving. He made a second trial, but as he was still 
suffering nervously, he was persuaded to enter the sanitarium at 
Cromwell, Conn., where he improved slightly, but on Sunday, 
February 22, 1903, died very suddenly, it is supposed from the 
bursting of a blood vessel at the base of his brain. He was 25 
years of age and unmarried. 

He had early won the regard of his classmates for high quali- 
ties of mind and heart. 

Charles Francis Doyle, son of Charles Francis and Celia A. 
(Mills) Doyle, was born on November 21, 1878, at Cohoes, N. Y., 
and was prepared for college at Albany (N. Y.) Academy. 

After graduation he studied in the Albany Law School, was 
admitted to the bar, and became a member of the firm of Mac- 
Lean & Doyle. 

Mr. Doyle died of typhoid fever at his home in Cohoes, N. Y., 
on December 16, 1902, at tbe age of 24 years. He married on 
the 22d of the previous October, Ida Lydia, daughter of Dr. 
Albert Mott, of Cohoes. 

Charles Philip Leonard, son of Charles and Belle (Wheeler) 
Leonard, was born in Niantic, Conn., on November 15, 1875. 
During his college course he won Two- Year Honors in the Nat- 
ural Sciences. 

In the summer following graduation, as during his summer 
vacations, he was station agent at Crescent Beach, a summer 
resort near Niantic, and since 1899 had also been Postmaster there. 
In the fall of 1899 he entered the Medico-Chirurgical College in 
Philadelphia. While there his high ideals of Christian manhood, 



268 

his energy and faithfulness, exerted a marked influence in many 
directions. The membership of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation of the college during the two years of his presidency in- 
creased from about twenty-five to over two hundred. He received 
the degree of M.D. in May, 1902, and was appointed House Sur- 
geon in the hospital connected with the college, entering upon his 
duties in October, 

Dr. Leonard died of peritonitis, after an operation for appendi- 
citis, in Philadelphia, on November 21, 1902. He was unmarried. 
He was a member of the Niantic Congregational Church. 

1900 

James Waeren Payton, son of Philip A. and Annie (Rives) 
Pay ton, was born on July 30, 1877, in Westfield, Mass., and was 
fitted for college in the High School in that place. 

The year following graduation he spent in tutoring in West- 
field, and in the fall of 1901 became Professor of Greek and 
Latin in Wiley University, Marshall, Texas. He was about to 
return to his work for a second year when he was stricken with 
typhoid fever, of which he died at his home in Westfield, on 
October 15, 1902, at the age of 26 years. He had planned to 
enter the legal profession eventually. 



269 



YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

1831 

Chauncey Ayres, son of Frederick and Rebecca (Seymour) 
Ayres, was born on August 14, 1808, in New Canaan, Conn. 

After graduation from the Yale Medical School Dr. Ayres first 
opened an office in Greenwich, Conn., but soon went to New 
York City, where, in 1832, he was one of the surgeons of the 
Cholera Hospital. Later he was surgeon of the United States 
Coast Survey. In 1834 he settled in Stamford, Conn., where he 
established a good practice, and resided for sixty-nine years. 

He was one of the early Clerks of the Borough of Stamford, 
and Warden for three years from about 1855. 

Dr. Ayres died at his home in Stamford from the natural ex- 
haustion of his physical powers, on April 14, 1903, in the 95th 
year of his age. In November preceding he was seized with a 
fainting spell, and since that time had been confined to the house. 
Since the death of Dr. Nelson Isham of the class of 1828 in 1895, 
he had been the oldest living graduate of the Medical School. 

He married, on August 14, 1831, Deborah A., daughter of Dr. 
Warren and Sarah (Street) Percival, of Middlesex Parish, now 
Darien, Conn., by whom he had a son and three daughters. 
After her death he married, in 1840, in Stamford, Mrs. Julia A. 
Simpson, of Brooklyn, N. Y., by whom he had two sons and one 
daughter. His second wife died in 1897, but his eldest son (who 
was Chief Engineer in the U. S. Navy, and recently retired), 
and two daughters by the first marriage, and one daughter by 
the second, survive. 

1850 

Henry Clinton Bunce was born in Manchester, Conn., on 
January 17, 1825, and was the son of Heman and Phila (Sy- 
monds) Bunce. 

A few years after graduation from the Medical School he re- 
moved from Manchester to the neighboring town of Glastonbury. 
He enlisted in the First Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers, 
Heavy Artillery, October 10, 1862, was soon made Assistant Sur- 
geon, and served in the Civil War until October 19, 1863, when 
he was obliged to retire owing to a severe sunstroke. He subse- 
quently reenlisted, but his health was too much impaired to allow 



270 

him to remain in the service. For a number of years he was 
Medical Examiner and Post Surgeon for the town of Glastonbury, 
where he had a large practice, and was esteemed both as a phy- 
sician and surgeon. 

For several months previous to his decease he had suffered 
from a complication of troubles, and died on April 15, 1903, at 
the age of 78 years. 

Dr. Bunce married, on November 6, 1850, Eliza A., daughter 
of George Rich and Anna (Slate) Rich, of Manchester, and the 
fiftieth anniversary of their wedding was observed, in 1900, at 
Glastonbury. Mrs. Bunce survives her husband with two sons 
and a daughter. The elder son graduated from the Sheffield 
Scientific School in 1875. 

1898 

Julius Stirling Loomis, son of RoUin Hoyt and Maria 
(Robeson) Loomis, was born on May 20, 1876, at Springfield, 
Mass., and entered the Yale Medical School from the High 
School in that city. 

After graduation he was in the emergency ward of one of the 
Hospitals in New York, but while there his health failed. He 
afterward began the practice of his profession and in 1902 was 
located in South Windham, Conn. 

He died at the Springfield (Mass.) Hospital on June 6, 1903, at 
the age of 27 years. 

He married at New Haven, on December 24, 1902, Helen, 
daughter of George and Lucretia (Hinsdale) Bean, who survives 
him. 



271 



YALE LAW SCHOOL. 

1847 

Samuel James Clarke, son of Captain Samuel James and 
Elizabeth Hill (Jacocks) Clarke, was born in New Haven, Conn., 
on April 25, 1825, received his preparatory training in the school 
of Stiles French (Yale 1827) in New Haven, and graduated from 
Trinity College, Hartford, in 1845. 

On completing the course in the Yale Law School he began 
practice in New Haven, but about 1848 led an overland expedition 
to the gold fields of California, and became a permanent resident 
of that State. He was elected to fill a vacancy as a member of 
the first Legislature o^ California, which met at San Jose in 
1849. From 1867 to 1878 he was Register in Bankruptcy, and 
for several years afterward continued settling such matters as had 
been before him. He was an original member of the Society of 
California Pioneers. In early life he was a Democrat, but before 
the Civil War became a Republican. 

He died at Geneva, N. Y., on December 26, 1902, at the age of 
77 years. He was never married. 

1850 

Richard William Hart Jarvis, eldest son and fourth of the 
nine children of Rev. William Jarvis (Union Coll. 1818) and 
Elizabeth Miller (Hart) Jarvis, and grandson of Major Richard 
William and Elizabeth Hart, of Saybrook, Conn., was born on 
November 30, 1829, in Portland, Conn., where his father was 
then Rector of Trinity Church. He was a great-great-grandson 
of Rev. John Hart, the first actual student of Yale College who 
received the Bachelor's degree. The father of Mr. Jarvis was a 
nephew of the Rt. Rev. Abraham Jarvis, D.D. (Yale 1761), the 
second Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Connecticut. 

After graduation from Trinity College in 1848, he entered the 
Yale Law School, and received the degree of LL.B. in 1850. He 
began the practice of his profession in New York City, but soon 
•went to Arizona to look after mining property of Colonel Samuel 
Colt. Returning East and resuming his law practice for a short 
time, in 1860 he became associated with Colonel Colt (who had 
married his sister in 1856) in the management of his armory in 
Hartford, Conn. Colonel Colt died in 1862, and three years 



272 

afterward Mr. Jarvis became President of the Colt Patent Fire 
Arms Manufacturing Company, and continued at the head of that 
corporation until its reorganization in 1901. 

He was a Trustee of Trinity College from 1864 to 1897, suc- 
ceeding his father in that office, also a director in important busi- 
ness corporations. 

For fourteen years Mr. Jarvis had suffered from a complication 
of diseases, and for the last two years had been mostly confined 
to the house. He died at the residence of his sister, Mrs. Colt, 
on January 21, 1903, at the age of 73 years. He had never 
married. 

1856 

Ralph Partridge Emilius Thacher, youngest son of Hon. 
Stephen Thacher (Yale 1795) and Harriet (Preble) Thacher, was 
born at Lubec, Washington County, Me., on September 7, 1826, 
and before entering the Yale Law School was a student at Phil- 
lips (Andover) Academy. He devoted much time to the cultiva- 
tion of music, and while in New Haven was organist in one of 
the churches. 

After graduation from the Law School, he was associated for 
several years in successful practice with his brother (Bowdoin 
1831) in Rockland, Me., but his career was interrupted by a lin- 
gering illness from spinal disease, which disabled him for ten or 
twelve years. When he finally regained his health he decided to 
enter the ministry, and graduated from the Boston School for the 
Ministry in 1869, and from the Harvard Divinity School in 1871. 
He was ordained as a Unitarian in Boston on December 11, 1873, 
and preached about a year each in Sturbridge, Mass., and Lan- 
caster, N. H., four years in Barnstable, Mass., and a year in 
Sterling, Mass. He then pursued philosophical and theological 
studies at the University of Leipzig, Germany, for about a year 
and a half, and expected to take a degree there, but the illness 
and death of a brother called him to Zumbrota, Minn., where the 
care of his property required him to reside thereafter. He died 
at a private hospital in Reading, Mass., on June 29, 1902, in the 
76th year of his age. He was never married. 

He received the degree of Master of Arts from Yale in 1870, 
and of Bachelor of Sacred Theology from Harvard in 1882. 



273 



1866 



William Edgar Simonds, secoDd son and youngest of the 
three children of John and Tryphena (Converse) Simonds, 
was born in CoUinsville, in the town of Canton, Hartford 
County, Conn., on November 25, 1841. His father died 
when he was only three years of age, but through the 
efforts of his mother he received a good elementary education, 
and with his own earnings in a cutlery manufactory was able 
to take a course of study in the New Britain 'Normal School, 
which he completed in 1860. He then taught school for two 
years. 

In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company A of the 25th Regi- 
ment, Connecticut Volunteers, and was soon advanced to the 
rank of Sergeant-Major. He served with his company in the 
department of the Gulf, and for distinguished gallantry in the 
battle of Irish Bend, La., April 14, 1863, was appointed Second 
Lieutenant of Company I. He was mustered out of service with 
his regiment on August 26, 1863, and inimediately became a stu- 
dent in the Yale Law School. 

After graduation he opened an office in Hartford, Conn., and 
soon attained an excellent standing in his profession. After two 
years of general practice he made a specialty of patent and trade- 
mark law, in which he became widely recognized as one of the 
most eminent authorities. His works on this subject include 
"Design Patents," 1874 ; ** Digest of Patent Office Decisions," 
1880; '' Summary of the Law of Patents," 1883 ; and "Digest of 
Patent Cases," 1888. From 1884 to 1893 he was Lecturer on 
Patent Law in the Yale Law School, and from 1891 to 1893 Pro- 
fessor of the Law of Patents in Columbian University, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

In 1883 Mr. Simonds was elected a Representative in the 
Connecticut Legislature from Canton on the Republican ticket, 
and as chairman of the standing committee on railroads was the 
originator of the " short haul " bill, the bill for the elimination of 
grade crossings, and other measures of importance. In 1885 he was 
reelected to the House, and was chosen Speaker. He was an 
earnest advocate of the bill establishing the Storrs Agricultural 
College, of which he was trustee for several years, being repeat- 
edly reappointed to that office. 

From 1889 to 1891 he was a member of thd National House 
of Representatives, and during this time was successful in his 



274: 

efforts to secure the passage of the first international copyright 
law. Although unanimously renominated for Congress, with 
many other Republicans he failed of reelection, but the follow- 
ing year he was appointed United States Commissioner of Pat- 
ents, and held the office two years. He received the degree of 
Master of Arts from Yale University in 1890. 

He delivered an oration on ex-Governor Marshall Jewell in 
1883, and a notable speech on the Gettysburg appropriation in 
1885, also many Memorial Day addresses in various cities and 
towns of the State and at Arlington, Va. Besides his other writ- 
ings he prepared important articles on commercial and labor 
questions. 

Mr. Simonds had been in ill health for several months from a 
complication of troubles, but continued his practice until Feb- 
ruary, when he was attacked by pleurisy, of which he died at his 
winter home in Hartford, on March 14, 1903, at the age of 61 
years. 

He married, on October 17, 1867, Sarah J. Mills, daughter of 
Hon. Addison O. Mills, and Jane Maria (Case) Mills of Canton. 
Mrs. Simonds survives him with a son. 

1869 

Timothy John Fox, son of Patrick and Elizabeth (Byrne) Fox, 
was born at Lethram, Ireland, on December 24, 1847. His 
parents resided at Westville, Conn., but were on a visit to their 
native land when the son was born. Before entering the Yale 
Law School he studied in Saint Francis Xavier College, New 
York City. 

He was admitted to the bar in May, 1869, and soon became 
active in the politics of New Haven. He was City Clerk in 1872- 
73, and in 1880 was offered a nomination as Democratic Repre- 
sentative in the State Legislature, but declined at that time in 
favor of Governor James E. English. He was elected, however, 
to that position in 1882. In 1876-77 he was City Attorney, and 
was reappointed in 1893. In 1891 he was chosen to the State 
Senate, and was a leader in that body during the deadlock of 
that year in the Legislature which resulted in the continuance 
of Governor Bulkley in office until the next election. Mr. Fox 
was an earnest supporter and warm friend of Governor Morris. 
He was reelecte(J to the Senate in 1893, and was Chairman of the 
Judiciary Committee. He had held no office for ten years past, 



276 

but had devoted himself to his law practice. Daring his earlier 
years he made a specialty of criminal and probate practice. 

Mr. Fox died of double pneumonia at his home in New Haven, 
on March 29, 1903, in the 56th year of his age. He had not been 
in good health for some time, and did not recover from the de- 
pression resulting from the death of Mrs. Fox about three months 
previous. He was a member of St. John's (R. C.) Church. 

He married, on June 28, 1875, Beza T., daughter of Michael 
Healy, a contractor of New Haven, and left three sons and three 
daughters, of whom the eldest son graduated from the Yale Law 
School in 1901, and one of the daughters is an undergraduate in 
Smith College. One daughter died in childhood. 

1873 

Julius Colton Cable, son of Nathaniel J. and Phebe (Law- 
rence) Cable, was born in Newtown, Conn., on October 11, 1849. 
Previous to his coming to New Haven he taught school in his 
native town and in Unionville, Conn., and in Ithaca, N. Y. At 
the last place he was a student for a time in Cornell University. 
While in the Yale Law School he also studied in the office of 
Hon. George H. Watrous (Yale 1853). 

On taking his degree, he was admitted to the bar in June, 
1873, and for about fifteen years was connected in legal matters 
with Hon. H. Lynde Harrison (LL.B. Yale 1860), and Hon. Dex- 
ter R Wright (LL.B. Yale 1848), and for eight years with 
Wright & Harrison. In 1876 he was a member of the Common 
Council, later Clerk of the City Court, and from 1883 to 1887 
City Attorney. In 1893 he was appointed Judge of the City 
Court, and continued in that office four years. In 1901 he became 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, and was doing honored 
service in this capacity at the time of his death. 

Judge Cable had suffered greatly for two or three months from 
a swelling of the glands of the neck, and an operation was per^ 
formed at the Post-Graduate Hospital, New York City. His 
progress appeared favorable for a time, but he died there instan- 
taneously the next afternoon, June 9, 1903, in the 54th year of 
his age. He was a member of the Grand Avenue Congregational 
Church. 

He married, on January 1, 1874, Alathea B., daughter of 
Horace and Olive (Hart) Woodruff, of Avon, Conn., and had 
two sons, who with Mrs. Cable survive him. 



276 

RuFUS Starr Pickett, son of Ruf us Henry and Betsey (Par- 
sons) Pickett, was born at Ridgefield, Conn., on February 28, 
1829. Owing to his father's ill-health, he gave up his studies and 
devoted himself for six years to the care of his father's business. 
In 1850 he came to New Haven, and for over seven years was 
employed by the New York and New Haven Railroad Company 
in the construction and repair of locomotives. During the Lin- 
coln campaign he was an active worker, and made several 
addresses in New Haven and vicinity. Soon afterward he was 
appointed United States Inspector of Customs and also Weigher 
and Ganger at New Haven, and held these positions for several 
years. 

While thus engaged he resumed study and entered the Yale 
Law School. During his course he won the Jewell Prize, then 
just established, for the best examination in the studies of Middle 
year. After his admission to the bar, in 1873, he entered on the 
practice of his profession, and from 1877 to 1883 he was City 
Attorney. In 1885 he was appointed Assistant City Judge, and 
two years later Judge of the City Court. He retired from the 
Judgeship in 1893 and returned to private practice. His decisions 
on the early boycott cases were widely circulated and were after- 
ward substantially confirmed by the higher courts. He was 
esteemed for his integrity and his kindness of heart. 

Judge Pickett died of paralysis at his home in New Haven, oh 
June 9, 1903, at the age of 74 years. 

He married, on October 16, 1849, Catharine, daughter of Silas 
Keeler, and after her decease he married, in New Haven, on 
November 29, 1871, Sarah E., daughter of Edward S. and Sarah 
(Bates) Read. By the first marriage he had two sons and two 
daughters, and by the second a son (Yale 1899), all of whom, with 
Mrs. Pickett, survive, except one daughter, who married Rev. 
Franklin Countryman (Yale 1870), and died shortly after 
marriage. 

1893 

Brent Kelley Yates, son of Lee Roy Yates, a druggist, and 
Udora Belle (Brown) Yates, was born at Stanford, Lincoln 
County, Ky., on June 27, 1871, but entered the Yale Law School 
from Hiawatha, Kans. 

In September following graduation he was admitted to the bar 
of Nebraska, and practiced his profession in Omaha, Neb., for 
several years. 

He died at Hiawatha from a shooting accident on July 12, 
1902, at the age of 31 years. He was unmarried. 



277 



1895 



Frederick Chunn, youngest son of Mark Bourne and Annie 
M. (Dent) Chunn, was born at Chaptico, St. Mary's County, Md., 
on December 22, 1874, and graduated from Charlotte Hall 
Academy, in that county. 

After graduation from the Yale Law School he was admitted 
to the bar, and practiced his profession in Baltimore and Phila- 
delphia for about two years, and then returned to his native county, 
where he taught school for a time. 

In September, 1900, he was appointed Assistant Paymaster in 
the U. S. Navy, with the rank of Ensign, and after a short 
period of service at Norfolk, Va., was assigned to duty on the U. S. 
battle ship Frolic among the Philippine Islands. For his effi- 
ciency an order was issued promoting him to service on shore a 
year in advance* of the usual time, and stationing him at Cavite. 
But before the order reached him he contracted typhoid fever, of 
which he died at the Naval Hospital at Cavite on April 1, 1902, 
without knowing of his promotion. He was 27 years of age. He 
was buried with military honors in the National Cemetery at 
Arlington, Va. 

He married, on September 4, 1899, Blanche, widow of Wood 
Garner and daughter of John H. Waters, of St. Mary's County, 
Md., who survives him, without children. 

Two brothers are graduates of the Yale Divinity School, respec- 
tively in 1886 and 1889, and a sister is the wife of Nehemiah 
Candee, Esq., a graduate of the Academical Department in 1893 
and of the Law School in 1897. 



278 



YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL. 

1872 

Austin Hull Norris, son of William C. and Rachel (Hull) 
N orris, was born in Essex, Conn., on August 3, 1845. 

After graduation from the Yale Divinity School he was ordained 
on December 23, 1872, at Farwell, Mich., where he was pastor 
four years, and then four years at Clare, in the same county, 
laboring largely among the lumbermen. From 1880 to 1882 he 
was at Ada, in the vicinity of Grand Rapids, the next year at 
Richmond, in the eastern part of the State, from 1883 to 1887 at 
Newaygo, and from 1887 to 1889 at Ithaca. The following year 
he was General Missionary of the American Home Missionary 
Society, residing at Lansing. December 1, 1892, he became act- 
ing pastor of the Congregational church at Torringford^ Conn. 

Mr. Norris was struck by a special train and instantly killed on 
January 4, 1903, as he was driving across the railroad track on 
his way from Torringf ord to preach in the chapel at Burrville. 
He was 57 years of age. 

He married, on September 30, 1 874, Mary, daughter of Jere- 
miah and Cornelia (Dudley) Peck, of Northfield, Conn. She 
died in 1897, leaving two daughters, students at Bryn Mawr 
College. A son died in 1899 as he was ready to enter Yale 
College. 

1877 

John Nathaniel Lowell, son of Jeremiah and Lucy Mary 
(Fernald) Lowell, was born in Newburg, Me., on September 20, 
1846. He graduated from Bowdoin College in 1873, and in Sep- 
tember of that year entered Andover Theological Seminary, but 
in November of the following year left his studies to preach at 
Milton, N. H., and continued there through the next summer. 

After this he joined the Middle Class in Yale Seminary, and on 
completing his theological course returned to the church in Mil- 
ton. He was ordained as pastor there on November 22, 1877, 
and dismissed on July 30, 1880. On October 21, following, he 
was installed over the West Church, Haverhill, Mass., where he 
remained in faithful service until his death. His people had lately 
declined to accept his resignation, and he was to have given an 
address on Memorial Day, but he died of pneumonia on that day. 
May 30, 1903, in the 57th year of his age. 



279 

He married, at Rowley, Mass., on July 5, 1877, Hattie Bishop, 
daughter of Edward and Sarah J. (Appleton) Richardson, but 
had no children. Mrs. Lowell died in 1901. 

1878 

CnA.ELEs Feancis Graves, son of David and Susan (Lancton) 
Graves, was born in Burke, Franklin County, N. Y., on July 15, 
1845, and was a private in the Second New Hampshire Volun- 
teers in 1863-64. He graduated as Bachelor of Arts from the 
University of Vermont in 1874. 

Upon his graduation from Yale Seminary he immediately went 
into Home Missionary work in Nebraska, and was ordained as a 
Congregational minister at Sutton, Clay County, March 14, 1879. 
After serving this church about two years, he was at Weeping 
Water in the same State from 1880 to 1883, then two or three 
years at Argentine and Louisville in Kansas. In 1886 he became 
a Presbyterian, and was stationed successively for two or three 
years each at Atkinson, Valentine, and Ponca, and for five years 
from 1893 at Shelton,— all in Nebraska. From 1888 to 1893 he 
was Superintendent of Sunday School work of Niobrara Presby- 
tery. In 1898 he became Pastor at Large of the Kearney 
Presbytery. 

Mr. Graves died after a short illness from typhoid fever at hi^ 
home in Shelton, Nebr., on November 20, 1902, at the age of 57 
years. 

He married at New Haven, Conn., June 19, 1879, Louise S., 
daughter of Edwin and Mary (Benjamin) Merwin. Mrs. Graves 
survives him with three sons and two daughters. 

1898 

Walter Bullard Street, son of Oscar Dickenson and 
Marietta E. (Brewer) Street, was born in Lee, Berkshire County, 
Mass., on February 6, 1870. 

After graduating from Williams College in 1892, he was 
Secretary of the Young Men's Christian Association at Water- 
town, N. Y., for a year, and then entered the Yale Divinity 
School, but after a year he was persuaded to become a teacher and 
physical director at the Lawrenceville (N. J.) School, where he 
remained two years. 

He then completed his theological course at New Haven and 
directly after graduating went to Hope Church, Anderson, Ind. 



280 

He was ordained as an evangelist at Lee, Mass., on July 19, 1898. 
Just as his church at Anderson was reaching self-support on its 
tenth anniversary he was prostrated by illness and resigned his 
charge. On his way to his Berkshire home for rest he stopped 
to witness the graduation of his brother from the Medical 
Department of the University of Michigan. There his condi- 
tion became so serious that an operation was deemed imperative, 
but he died shortly afterward at the Hospital of the University 
of Michigan, Ann Arbor, on July 2, 1902. He was 32 years of 
age, and was unmarried. 

He was wholly consecrated to his work, and his pastorate of 
four years at Anderson was one of unusual energy and fruitful- 
ness. 



281 



SHEFFIELD SCIEIS^TIFIC SCHOOL. 

1867 

Joseph Thompson Whittelsey, son of Henry Newton and 
Elizabeth A. (Wilson) Whittelsey, was born in New Haven, 
Conn., on October 20, 1843. He was a great-grandson of Rev. 
Chauncey Whittelsey (Yale 1738), for thirty years pastor of the 
Center Church. 

After graduation from the Sheffield Scientific School he was 
for a number of years, with a brother, engaged as a crockery 
merchant in Waterbury, Conn., and after his removal to New 
Haven was for a time in the same business with the house founded 
by his father in 1 836. Later, he was a dealer in real estate. He 
was widely known as an authority in athletic matters, in which 
he took a deep interest, and while a student was stroke oar of his 
class crew. He had spent much time in travel. 

Mr. Whittelsey died of paralysis at Old Point Comfort, Va., 
on June 16, 1903, in the 60th year of his age. He had been a 
member of the Center Church, New Haven, since 1878. 

He married, on September 27, 1871, Sarah Alathea, daughter of 
John Mitchell Lamson Scovill, a pioneer manufacturer of Water- 
bury, and Sarah A. (Merriman) Scovill, and had two daughters, 
who survive him. The elder (Radcliffe Coll. 1894) received the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Yale University in 1898. 
Mrs. Whittlesey died in 1877. 

1874 

Allen Beewer Howe, son of James H. Howe, a merchant of 
Troy, N. Y., and Honor Maria (Kasson) Howe, was born in Troy, 
on November 20, 1854. 

The year after graduation from the Sheffield Scientific School 
he continued his studies in the Graduate Department, and during 
the year 1875-76 was Assistant in Analytical Chemistry. He 
then studied in the University of Strassburg, and received the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1879, after which he was 
Instructor in Analytical Chemistry in the Sheffield Scientific 
School until 1884. Later he studied painting in Paris and 
Holland, and exhibited three pictures in the Paris Salon from 
about 1890 to 1893. 



282 

Mr. Howe died of paralysis at Brewster, Mass., where he had 
resided for five years past, on October 10, 1902, in the 48th year 
of his age. 

He married, on September 15, 1897, Amy, daughter of A. C. 
Rose, of New York City. She survives him with one son. A 
brother graduated from the Academical Department in 1871. 

1885 

Daniel Delevan Mangam, Jr., son of Daniel Delevan and 
Deborah (Horton) Mangam, was born at Sing Sing (now Ossin- 
ing), in the town of Mt. Pleasant, Westchester County, N. Y., 
on July 16, 1863. He took the select course in the Shefiield 
Scientific School. 

After graduation he engaged in business with his father in the 
firm of D. D. Mangam & Co., grain dealers, in New York City. 
Since his marriage he had resided in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. Mangam died of appendicitis after an illness of a month at 
Clifton Springs, N. Y., on August 15, 1902, at the age of 39 
years. 

He married May Mortimer, daughter of Rev. T. DeWitt Tal- 
mage, D.D., who survives him with two daughters. 

1892 

George Flavius Campbell, son of George and Frances (Noble) 
Campbell, was born on June 30, 1870, in Pittsfield, Mass., and 
acquired his preparation for the Sheffield Scientific School in the 
public schools of that city. 

After graduation he returned to New Haven and was Assistant 
and Instructor in Chemistry in the Scientific School, holding each 
position for a year, and from the fall of 1894 until December 1, 
1900, was an analytical chemist at the Connecticut Agricultural 
Experiment Station in New Haven. He then had charge of the 
laboratory of the Waterbury (Conn.) Manufacturing Company 
until September, 1901, when he resigned on account of his health 
and went to Arizona, but after a year's struggle he died of tuber- 
culosis at Peoria in that Territory, on November 7, 1902, at the 
age of 32 years. He was not married. 

Fred Mold, son of James Henry and Lucy Ann (Dewgan) 
Mold, was born at Gloversville, Fulton County, N. Y., on October 
2, 1869, and was fitted for the Shefiield Scientific School at the 



283 

Mansfield (Pa.) State Normal School and Hopkins Grammar School 
in New Haven. 

After graduation he became a civil engineer, and for about three 
years past had held a position as a draughtsman in Philadelphia, 
but in the hope of benefit to his health he undertook outdoor work 
in West Virginia. He was soon, however, prostrated by typhoid 
fever, and died after an illness of three weeks at Welch, W. Va., 
on November 11, 1902, at the age of 33 years. He was unmar- 
ried. A brother is a member of the class of 1903 in the Sheffield 
Scientific School. 

1897 

Jacob Adolph Koenig, son of Adolph Koenig, an advocate, 
and Rachel (Breiterman) Koenig, was born at Belaja-Zerkow, in 
the state of Kiev, Russia, on December 14, 1876. He was pre- 
pared for the Sheffield Scientific School in New Haven, and while 
there took the engineering course. 

After graduation he was for some time in the employ of the 
Bemis Bag Co., of St. Louis, Mo., but from there went to the 
Philippine Islands, where he was at first clerk of the Court of 
First Instance, in the district of Zamboanga, but after a few 
months became a teacher at Bambam. 

In July, 1902, he was attacked with typhoid fever, from which 
he partially recovered, but two months later he suffered a relapse, 
and died on September 29, at the age of 25 years. He was buried 
in Zamboanga. An uncle graduated as a physician from Colum- 
bia University in 1887. 

1899 

Francis Sherman Hunn, son of Francis Edwin and Grace 
Dickinson (Sherman) Hunn, was born at Watertown, N. Y., on 
October 31, 1876, but removed to New Haven and was fitted at 
the Hillhouse High School for the ShefiSeld Scientific School, 
where he took the course in mechanical engineering. 

During Junior year he enlisted in the First Division, Connect- 
icut Naval Battalion. He entered the U. S. Navy on March 26, 
1898, was ordered to the receiving ship Minnesota on June 15, 
and was honorably discharged on May 27, 1899. 

After graduation he entered the works of the General Electric 
Company at Schenectady, N. Y., where he remained about a 
year, and after a year in the office of the same company at 



284 

Atlanta, Ga., was transferred to their office at New Orleans and 
made Assistant Manager there. 

Mr. Hunn died of typhoid fever at New Orleans, on October 
16, 1902, in his 26th year. He was a member of Trinity Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church in New Haven. He was unmarried. 

1900 

Frederic James Carnell, son of Frederick William Carnell, 
a mechanic, and Eliza D. (Steele) Carnell, was born in New 
Britain, Conn., on December 23, 1880, but in December, 1883, 
removed with his parents to New Haven and in 1897 to Bristol, 
Conn. He received his preparatory training at the Hillhouse 
High School, New Haven. 

In the Sheffield Scientific School he took the course in electrical 
engineering, and gained a prize at the end of Freshman year for 
excellence in all studies. At graduation he won Two-Year 
Honors for excellence in all the studies of Junior and Senior year, 
and was awarded a graduate scholarship. The following autumn 
he returned to New Haven to continue his studies, and was also 
Laboratory Assistant in Physics. In June, 1902, he obtained 
through a competitive examination the Loomis Fellowship, then 
awarded for the first time. 

His death was the result of a shooting accident. With a 
friend he had gone for an afternoon of duck shooting off Short 
Beach. Landing near Umbrella Island, he jumped from the boat 
to a rock and was drawing his gun towards him by the muzzle 
end when the trigger caught and the charge of shot passed into 
and lacerated his right arm. He was removed to the New Haven 
Hospital, where the arm was amputated, but he rallied only 
slightly and died before midnight on November 15, 1902. He 
was in the 22d year of his age. He was a member of Calvary 
Baptist Church in New Haven. 

1901 

Herbert Lucker, son of Henry and Jennie M. (Quaile) 
Lucker, was born on July 9, 1880, in Cincinnati, O., and was 
prepared for the Sheffield Scientific School at the Hughes High 
School in that city. While in New Haven he made a special 
study of natural history, and won a Two-Year Honor for excel- 
lence in all the studies of Junior and Senior year. 



285 

He was one of the three recommended by the officers of Yale 
University to the* Philippine Commission as teachers in the 
Philippine Islands, and in the autumn after graduation he entered 
with great hopefulness and enthusiasm upon his difficult task. 
He devoted himself unreservedly to the service of the people, 
who soon gave him their respect and affection. His school was 
regarded as the best graded and disciplined in the province, and 
the work therein a model of arrangement. 

Mr. Lucker died of Asiatic cholera at San Miguel, Ilocos Horte, 
Luzon, Philippine Islands, on August 6, 1902, at the age of 22 
years. He was a member of the North Presbyterian Church in 
Cincinnati. 



GKADUATE SCHOOL. 



1876 



Nathan Willabd Harris, son of Nathan Coy Harris (M.D. 
Bowdoin 1842), a physician of Addison and Auburn, Me., and 
Harriet Ann (Woodbury) Harris, was born at Minot, Androscog- 
gin County, Me., on January 9, 1853, and graduated from Bates 
College in 1873. 

The following autumn he entered the Graduate Department of 
Yale University and received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
in 1875. He then settled in Auburn, Me., as a lawyer, where he 
was especially esteemed as a counsellor. He was a member of 
the School Board, Councilman for one term, Alderman for two 
terms, and Mayor for three successive terms, City Solicitor for 
several terms and at the time of his death. He was a Represen- 
tative in the State Legislature in 1900 and 1901, and State Sena- 
tor at his decease. He was also Register of Probate, and a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees of the Public Library. He was 
parish clerk of the Universalist Church, and once or twice Presi- 
dent of the Universalist State Convention. 

Dr. Harris died at his home in Auburn, Me., of valvular disease 
of the heart, on September 16, 1902, at the age of 49 years. 

He married in September, 1878, Manilla Hubbard, daughter of 
David H. Smith, a farmer of New Hampton, N. H. He after- 
ward married, in 1887, Edith S., daughter of Benjamin Conant, 
a furniture dealer, of Auburn. She survives him with two 
daughters and a son. 



BTJls/Lls/LJ^Tlir 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT 



(Yale College) 



Class Name and Age 

1836 Horace Day, 85 

1836 James B. Dunwody, 85 

1839 Henry L. Dawes, 86 

1839 James 0. Putnam, 84 

1840 Charles R. IngersoU, 81 
1843 William A. Durrie, 80 
1843 Mills B. Gelston, 85 

1843 Frederick Munson, 84 

1844 Thaddeus Foote, 81 
1844 Alfred Hasbrouck, 83 
1844 Ira Lewis, 82 

1844 Charles H. Meeker, 78 

1844 James R. Mershon, 86 

1844 Arthur Ward, 78 

1846 John H. Glover, 75 

1847 Henry G. Jesup, 77 

1848 Samuel E. Baldwin, 80 
1848 Henry Blodget, 77 
1848 Charles M. Cullen, 74 

1848 James C. Hinsdale, 77 

1849 Edwin A. Buck, 78 

1850 Henry P. Sanford, 73 

1851 Daniel H. Solomon, 75 
1853 WilUam F. V. Bartlett, 71 
1853 J. Evarts Greene, 67 
1853 J. Sumner Smith, 72 
1856 Hasbrouck DuBois, 69 
1856 George C. Dunham, 70 

1856 Wager Swayne, 68 

1857 Benjamin F. Barge, 70 

1857 Nathan D. Wells, 71 

1858 J. Willard Gibbs, 64 
1858 Elawson C. More, 64 
1858 Walter S. Pitkin, 65 

1860 William L. Bradley, 65 

1861 William H. Fuller, 66 

1862 Frederic A. Ward, 62 

1863 Henry B. Waterman, 60 



Place and 
New Haven, Conn. 
Walterboro, S. C. 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
East Orange, N. J. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Goderich, Ont., Canada 
Rahway, N. J. 
Newton, la. 
Newark, N. J. 
New York City 
Hanover, N. H. 
Depere, Wise. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Georgetown, Del. 
Meriden, Conn. 
Fall River, Mass. 
Cleveland, O. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Lexington, Ky. 
Plainfield, N. J. 
New Haven, Conn. 
New York City 
Middletown, Conn. 
New York City 
Bad-Nauheim, Germany 
Haverhill, Mass. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Peoria, 111. 
Washington, D. C. 
New Haven, Conn. 
New York City 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Oak Park, 111. 



Time of Death 

July 22, '02 

June 26, '02 

Feb. 5, '03 

April 24, '03 

Jan. 25, '03 

April 8, '03 

Feb. 28, '03 

Oct. 16, '02 

Feb. 3, '03 

May 9, '03 

Jan. 13, '03 

Oct. 2, '02 

July 19, '01 

July 6, '02 

Aug. 4, '02 

June 15, '03 

Dec. 29, '02 

May 24, '03 

Feb. 1, '03 

Jan. 21, '03 

March 9, '03 

May 28, '03 

July 7, '02 

April 15, '03 

Nov. 8, '02 

Feb. 13, '03 

Aug. 5, '02 

April 1, '03 

Dec. 18, '02 

Oct. 30, '02 

Oct. 30, '02 

April 28, '03 

July 24, '02 

April 18, '03 

June 12, '03 

Nov. 26, '02 

April 29, '03 

Jan. 14, '03 



288 



Class Name and Age 

1863 Joel T. Wildman, 61 

1865 Charles E. Lockwood, 59 

1866 S. Hartwell Chapman, 57 

1867 WUliam H. Ingham, 58 

1869 William L. McLane, 56 

1870 Edward P. Clark, 55 
1870 Henry L. Hutchins, 58 

1870 Perry Trumbull, 51 

1871 Francis Johnson, 55 

1872 Francis U. Downing, 51 

1873 Samuel W. Grierson, 52 
1873 Edward R. Johnes, 50 
1873 Charles A. Russell, 50 

1873 Gustavus H. Wald, 49 

1874 Valentine Marsh, 50 
1874 Ellis Mendell, 52 
1876 John deW. Allen, 49 
1876 John F. Gaylord, 50 
1878 Henry A. Barling, 46 
1878 William P. Belden, 47 
1878 Frederick B. Dubach, 45 

1881 John M. Drysdale, 43 

1882 . David A. Chenault, 44 

1883 Francis G. Beach, 41 
1886 Henry T, Nason, 37 

1886 Sheffield Phelps, 38 

1887 Arthur R. Pennell, 38 
1891 Samuel Colgate, 33 
1893 Harry L. Bixby, 31 

1893 Frank H. Button, 33 

1894 Guy B. Miller, 31 

1895 Clifford S. Cook, 29 

1896 William H. Brokaw, 28 

1898 George M. Ripley, 27 

1899 Sullivan D. Ames, 25 
1899 Charles F. Doyle, 24 

1899 Charles P. Leonard, 27 

1900 James W. Pay ton, 25 



Place and 
Guilford, Conn. 
White Plains, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York City 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Chicago, 111. 
Little Rock, Ark. 
Columbus, Ga. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
New York City 
Killingly, Conn. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 
Boston, Mass. 
Riverdale, N. Y. 
Plymouth, Mass. 
Cienfuegos, Cuba 
Albany, N. Y. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Peace Dale, R. I. 
Pine Grove, Ky. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Kenwood, N. Y. 
Aiken, S. C. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Sea Gate, N. Y. 
Phoenix, Ariz. 
Peekskill, N. Y. 
Paris, France 
Sharon, Pa. 
New York City 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Cromwell, Conn. 
Cohoes, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Westfield, Mass. 



Time of Death 

March 11, '03 

July 28, '02 

April 15, '03 

Jan. 16, '03 

May 15, '03 

Feb. 16, '03 

Feb. 26, '03 

Dec. 10, '02 

Sept. 23, '02 

Jan. 29, '02 

Sept. 27, '02 

March 28, '03 

Oct. 23, '02 

June 28, '02 

Oct. 1, '02 

May 20, '03 

Nov. 8, '02 

April 14, '03 

July 28, '02 

April 6, '03 

Jan. 11, '03 

Feb. 11, '03 

Jan. 21, '03 

Dec. 30, '02 

March 30, '03 

Dec. 9, '02 

March 10, '03 

July 26, '02 

Oct. 20, '02 

Nov. 1, '02 

April 7, '03 

Jan. 4, '03 

July 13, '02 

May 16, '03 

Feb. 22, '03 

Dec. 16, '02 

Nov. 21, '02 

Oct. 15. '03 



YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



1831 Chauncey Ayres, 94 
1850 Henry C. Bunce, 78 
1898 Julius S. Loomis, 27 



Stamford, Conn. 
Glastonbury, Conn. 
Springfield, Mass. 



April 14, '03 

April 15, '03 

June 6, '03 



4 



289 



YALE LAW SCHOOL 



Class Name and Age 

1847 Samuel J. Clarke, 77 

1850 Eichard W. H. Jarvis, 73 

1855 Ralph P. E. Thaclier, 75 

1866 William E. Simonds, 61 

1869 Timothy J. Fox, 55 

1873 Julius C. Cable, 53 

1873 Rufus S. Pickett, 74 

1893 Brent K. Yates, 31 

1895 Frederick Chuim, 37 



Place and 
Geneva, N. Y. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Reading, Mass, 
Hartford, Conn. 
New Haven, Conn. 
New York City 
New Haven, Conn. 
Hiawatha, Kans. 
Cavite, P. I. 



Time of Death 

Dec. 26, '02 

Jan. 21, '03 

June 29, '02 

March 14, '03 

March 29, '03 

June 9, '03 

June 9, '03 

July 12, '02 

April 1, '02 



YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL 



1872 Austin H. Norris, 57 

1877 John N. Lowell, 56 

1878 Charles F. Graves, 57 
1898 Walter B. Street, 32 



Torringford, Conn. 
Haverhill, Mass. 
Shelton, Nebr. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 



Jan. 4, '03 
May 30, '03 
Nov. 20, '02 

July 2, '02 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL 



1867 Joseph T. Whittelsey, 59 

1874 Allen B. Howe, 47 

1885 Daniel D. Mangam, Jr., 39 

1892 George F. Campbell, 32 

1892 Fred Mold, 33 

1897 Jacob A. Koenig, 25 

1899 Francis S. Hunn, 25 

1900 Frederic J. Carnell, 21 

1901 Herbert Lucker, 22 



Old Point Comfort, Va. 
Brewster, Mass. 
Clifton Springs, N. Y. 
Peoria, Ariz. 
Welch, W. Va. 
Zamboanga, P. I. 
New Orleans, La. 
New Haven, Conn. 
San Miguel, P. I. 



June 16, '03 

Oct. 10, '02 
Aug. 15, '02 

Nov. 7, '02 
Nov. 11, '02 
Sept. 29, '02 

Oct. 16, '02 
Nov. 15, '02 

Aug. 6, '02 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
1875 Nathan W. Harris, 49 Auburn, Me. 



Sept. 16, '02 



The number of deaths recorded this year is 102, and the average age of 
the graduates of the Academical Department is about 593^ years. 
The oldest living graduate of the Academical Department is : 
Class of 1831, Rev. Joseph S. Lord, of Laingsburg, Mitfh., born April 26, 
1808. 
The oldest living graduate of the Medical Department is : 
Class of 1837, Gurdon W. Russell, bom April 10, 1815. 



I ISr ID E x 



Members of the Divinity, Law, Medical, Scientific and Graduate Schools are indicated 




by the letters d 


, ?,m, 


s, and dp, respectively. 




Class 




Page 


Class 




Page 


1876 


Allen, John deW. 


357 


1840 


Ingersoll, Charles R. 


316 


1899 


Ames, Sullivan D. 


267 


1867 


Ingham, William H. 


347 


1831m 


Ayres, Chauncey 


269 


1850 i 


Jarvis, Richard W. H. 


371 


1848 


Baldwin, Samuel E. 


224 


1847 


Jesup, Henry G. 


334 


1857 


Barge, Benjamin F. 


236 


1873 


Johnes, Edward R. 


353 


1878 


Barling, Henry A. 


258 


1871 


Johnson, Francis 


251 


1853 


Bartlett, William F. V. 


229 








1883 


Beach, Francis G. 


260 


1897 s 


Koenig, Jacob A. 


283 


1878 


Belden, William P. 


258 


1899 


Leonard, Charles P. 


367 


1893 


Bixby, Harry L. 


264 


1844 


Lewis, Ira 


331 


1848 


Blodget, Henry 


225 


1865 


Lockwood, Charles E. 


346 


1860 


Bradley, William L. 


241 


1898 m 


Loomis, Julius S. 


370 


1896 


Brokaw, William H. 


265 


1877 d 


Lowell, John N. 


378 


1849 


Buck, Edwin A. 


227 


1901s 


Lucker, Herbert 


384 


1850 m 


Bunce, Henry C. 


269 








1893 


Button, Frank H.' 


264 


1869 


McLane, William L. 


348 


1873 « 
1892 s 
1900 s 
1866 
1883 
1895 Z 
1870 . 
1847 « 
1891 


Cable, Julius C. 
Campbell, George F. 
Carnell, Frederic J. 
Chapman, S. Hartwell 
Chenault, David A. 
Chunn, Frederick 
Clark, Edward P. 
Clarke, Samuel J. 
Colgate, Samuel 


275 

282 
284 
246 
260 
277 
248 
271 
263 


1885 s 

1874 

1844 

1874 

1844 

1894 

1893 s 

1858 

1843 


Mangam, Daniel D. 
Marsh, Valentine 
Meeker, Charles H. 
Mendell, Ellis 
Mershon, James R. 
Miller, Guy B. 
Mold, Fred 
More, Elawson C. 
Munson, Frederick 


383 
356 
331 
356 
333 
365 
383 
340 
319 


1895 


Cook, Clifford S. 


265 


1886 


Nason, Henry T. 


361 


1848 


CuUen, Charles M. 


226 


1873 ci 


Norris, Austin H. 


378 


1839 


Dawes, Henry L. 


213 


1900 


Payton, James W. 


368 


1836 


Day, Horace 


211 


1887 


Pennell, Arthur R. 


363 


1873 


Downing, Francis U. 


251 


1886 


Phelps, Sheffield 


363 


1899 


Doyle, Charles F. 


267 


1873 ? 


Pickett, Rufus S. 


276 


1881 


Drysdale, John M. 


259 


1858 


Pitkin, Walter S. 


240 


1878 


Dubach, Frederick B. 


259 


1839 


Putnam, James 0. 


215 


1856 


DuBois, Hasbrouck 


233 








1856 


Dunham, George C. 


233 


1898 


Ripley, George M. 


266 


1836 


Dunwody, James B. 


212 


1873 


Russell, Charles A. 


254 


1843 


Durrie, William A. 


218 


1850 


Sanford, Henry P. 


228 


1844 


Foote, Thaddeus 


219 


1866 i 


Simonds, William E. 


273 


1869 Z 


Fox, Timothy J. 


274 


1853 


Smith, J. Sumner 


232 


1861 


Fuller, William H. 


242 


1851 


Solomon, Daniel H. 


228 


1876 


Gaylord, John F. 


257 


1898 d 


Street, Walter B. 


279 


1843 


Gelston, Mills B. 


218 


1856 


Swayne, Wager 


234 


1858 


Gibbs, J. Willard 


237 


1855 I 


Thacher, Ralph P. E. 
Trumbull, Perry 


274 


1846 

1878 d 


Glover, John H. 
Graves, Charles F. 


333 
379 


1870 


250 


1853 


Greene, J. Evarts 


230 


1873 


Wald, Gustavus H. 


355 


1872 


Grierson, Samuel W. 


252 


1844 


Ward, Arthur R. 


333 


1875 dp 
1844 
1848 
1874 s 
1899 s 


Harris, Nathan W. 
Hasbrouck, Alfred 
Hinsdale, James C. 
Howe, Allen B. 
Hunn, Francis S. 


286 
320 
226 

381 
383 


1863 
1863 
1857 
1867 s 
1863 


Ward, Frederic A. 
Waterman, Henry B. 
Wells, Nathan D. 
Whittelsey, Joseph T. 
Wildman, Joel T. 


343 
344 
337 

381 
345 


1870 


Hutchlns, Henry L. 


349 


1893 « 


Yates, Brent K. 


376 



DEC 31. 1931^ 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE DNIVERSITY 

Deceased during the Academical Year endingf in 
JUNE, 1904, 



INCLUDING THE RECORD OF A FEW WHO DIED PREVIOUSLY, 
HITHERTO UNREPORTED 



[Presented at the meeting of the Alumni, June 28th, 1904] 



[No. 4 of the Fifth Printed Series, and No. 63 of the whole Record] 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GEADUATES OF TALE UNIYEESITY 

Deceased during the Academical year ending in . 
June, 1904 

Including the Record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported 

[Presented at the Meeting of the Alumni, June 28th, 1904] 

[No. 4 of the Fifth Printed Series, and No. 63 of the whole Eecord] 



YALE COLLEGE 

(academical department) 

1831 

Thomas March Clark, the last survivor but one of his class, 
son of Thomas March and Rebecca (Wheelwright) Clark, was 
born in Newbury port, Mass., on July 4, 1812, and entered Yale 
from Amherst College during Sophomore year. 

After graduation he taught two years in the Lowell (Mass.) 
High School, and then studied two years in Princeton Theologi- 
cal Seminary. He was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of 
Newbury port in 1835, and for a few months was in charge of the 
Old South Church, Boston, but at the close of the year he changed 
his connection to the Protestant Episcopal Church, in which he 
was ordained Deacon by Bishop Griswold on February 3, 1836, 
and Priest on November 6 of the same year. He was for seven 
years Rector of Grace Church, Boston, which had then just been 
consecrated, and from 1843 to 1847 Rector of St. Andrew's 
Church, Philadelphia, Pa. He was then Assistant at Trinity 
Church, Boston, until 1850, and Rector of Christ Church, Hart- 
ford, Conn., until 1854, when he was chosen Bishop of Rhode 
Island. He was consecrated on December 6, 1854, in Grace 
Church, Providence, and held the office of Bishop for nearly fifty 
years, during the first twelve of which he was also Rector of 



292 

Grace Church. In 1897 his official duties was lightened by the 
appointment of Rev. William N. McYickar, D.D. (Columbia 
1865), as Bishop Coadjutor. 

During the Civil War he was an active member of the Sani- 
tary Commission. He was also Chaplain of the First Light 
Infantry Regiment of Providence, which gave the first contri- 
bution toward the chime of bells in Grace Church tower. 

Upon the death of Bishop Williams, in February, 1899, he 
became by official seniority Presiding Bishop of the House of 
Bishops, and by adoption of the new constitution in 1901 Pre- 
siding Bishop of the Church. 

He was an earnest and eloquent preacher, an able and tactful 
administrator, and was greatly beloved as a pastor. He was 
much sought after as an orator on important occasions, and in 
the early years of his bishopric, when the diocese was small, he 
delivered a great number of lectures on a wide range of subjects 
in all parts of the country. His lecture on " The Living Machine " 
was given three hundred and fifty times. 

Bishop Clark was a student and writer through life, and his 
published works include the following : " Lectures to Young Men 
on. the Formation of Character," 1852 ; "The Efficient Sunday 
School Teacher," 1869; "Primary Truths of Religion," 1869; 
"Readings and Prayers for Aid in Private Devotion," 1888 ; 
"Reminiscences," 1895 ; and many Charges, Addresses and Occa- 
sional Sermons. Among the last was a Memorial Sermon on his 
friend, Phillips Brooks, and a Commemorative Sermon at the 
Semi-Centennial of the Consecration of Christ Church in Hart- 
ford. 

From 1874 to 1884 he was a weekly contributor to the New 
York Ledger^ and from the proceeds of these articles he built " Bon 
Ledge," his country home at Middletown, on the shore of Nar- 
ragansett Bay. He had a fine sense of humor, and is reputed to 
have been the author of the humorous tale, "John Whopper, 
the Newsboy." 

He received the honorary degree of Master of Arts from 
Trinity College in 1851, of Doctor of Divinity from Union Col- 
lege in 1851 and Brown University in 1860, and of Doctor of 
Laws from Cambridge University, England, in 1868. 

Bishop Clark died suddenly of heart disease at his summer 
home in Middletown, R. I., on September 7, 1903, at the age of 
91 years. 



293 

He married, on October 3, 1838, Caroline, daughter of Benja- 
min Howard, Senior Warden of Grace Church in Boston. Mrs. 
Clark died in 1884, and their eldest child in 1851, at the age of 
eleven years, but two sons, graduates of Brown University with 
the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy in ]865 and 1876, respec- 
tively, and a daughter, survive him. Two brothers graduated 
'from Yale College in 1838 and 1843, respectively. 

1832 

Cassius Marcellus Clay, sixth of the seven children of 
General Green Clay, commander of the Kentucky militia in the 
Revolutionary War and delegate to the Virginia Convention 
which ratified the Constitution of the United States, was born on 
October 19, 1810, in the family home on the ancestral estate near 
Richmond, Madison County, Kentucky. His mother was Sally 
(Lewis) Clay. His early education was obtained under private 
tutors, and in Centre College, the Jesuit College of St. Joseph 
and Transylvania University, Kentucky. From the last he came 
to Yale, and joined the class in Junior year. When he came from 
the south he hated slavery, but regarded it as other evils of 
humanity, " as the fixed law of Nature or of God," but after 
hearing William Lloyd Garrison speak in one of the New Haven 
churches, and the subsequent debate, he resolved, when able, to 
fight slavery with all his power. During his Senior year he was 
chosen b}^ the students to deliver an oration on the centennial 
anniversary of the birthday of Washington. 

After graduation, in order to prepare himself for political life, 
he studied law in the Transylvania Law School, but did not prac- 
tice. As soon as he was eligible, in 1835, he was elected to the 
Kentucky House of Representatives from Madison County, also 
in 1837, and advocated free schools, internal improvements, and 
a better, jury system. Removing to the city of Lexington, he was 
elected to the Legislature from Fayette County in 1840. The 
same year he was a delegate to the National Whig Convention at 
Harrisburg, Pa., which nominated Harrison and Tyler for Presi- 
dent and Vice-President. In 1841, owing to his anti-slavery 
views, he was not reelected to the Legislature. In 1844 he made 
an extensive tour in the Northern States, advocating Henry Clay 
for the Presidency, and the latter's defeat increased his opposi- 
tion to slavery. The following year he started in Lexington The 
True American^ a paper favoring gradual emancipation. So 



294 

violent were the threats against him that he fortified the office, but 
during his ilhiess the press was seized and sent out of the State 
to Cincinnati. There he continued to print the paper every week, 
and distributed it throughout Kentucky. For this seizure he 
afterward recovered damages from the State. 

In June, 1846, he volunteered for service in the Mexican War, 
and was chosen Captain of General Harrison's " Old Infantry," 
then mounted. He was captured on a scouting expedition and was 
carried to Toluca, but was exchanged after the taking of the City 
of Mexico. At the close of the war, in December, 1847, he 
returned to Lexington, where he was received with high honor, 
and presented with a sword by his fellow citizens. 

In 1851 he became a candidate for Governor of Kentucky, and 
received about five thousand votes. In 1853 he bought a large 
tract of land in the Kentucky mountains with the intention of 
keeping it forever free from slavery, and on this land was after- 
ward established Berea College. 

After the election of Lincoln he expected to be made Secretary 
of War, but in March, 1861, was appointed Minister to Russia. 
Meanwhile the Civil War had begun, and before departing he 
raised a volunteer force for the defence of the city of Washing- 
ton till the troops from New York and Massachusetts arrived. 
He was recalled from St. Petersburg in 1862, and received the 
appointment of Major-General of Volunteers in the Federal 
Army. In the autumn of that year he was sent by President 
Lincoln on a private mission to learn the sentiments of Kentucky 
regarding the emancipation x)i the slaves by the General Govern- 
ment. In March, 1863, he returned to Russia as Minister Pleni- 
potentiary, and continued in that capacity until September, 1869. 

After that time he held no prominent political office although 
still active in politics, but lived quietly at his mansion at White 
Hall, where he continued his interest in various branches of farm- 
ing. The year of his return to the United States he was made 
President of the Cuban Aid Society. 

At the first annual meeting of the Kentucky Historical Society 
in 18*79, he was chosen Vice-President, and he was a member of 
many literary and scientific societies in America, France, and 
Russia. He received the degree of Doctor of Laws from Tran- 
sylvania University. 

In 1886 he published the first volume of his "Life, Memoirs, 
Writings and Speeches," which he designed to complete in two 
volumes. 



295 

He married, on February 18, 1833, Mary Jane, daughter of Dr. 
Elisha and Maria (Barr) Warfield, and had ten children, of whom 
two sons and a daughter died in childhood. He was divorced 
from her in 1870. In November, 1894, he married a "peasant 
wife," Dora Richardson, seventy years his junior, but in 1898 he 
,was granted a judicial separation from her. 

From early life he was frequently involved in duels, several of 
them political feuds, in more than one of which he was severely 
wounded while his antagonist was killed. During the last years 
of his life his faculties failed, and his mind was under a cloud. 
He died at his home on July 22, 1903, in the 93d year of his age. 

1836 

Frederick Lewis Durand, son of Samuel and Eloise (Lewis) 
Durand, was born on September 25, 1816, in Cheshire, Conn., 
but during his boyhood removed with his parents to Berlin, 
Conn. 

After graduation he was a teacher in the South for six years, 
the first three years teaching the classics in Brownwood Institute, 
near La Grange, in western Georgia, and during the later years 
being Principal of an academy for young men in eastern Ala- 
bama. He occupied his spare time in historical studies, and then 
in the study of law. To the latter he devoted his time entirely 
from 1842, and early in 1843 was admitted to practice in the 
courts of Alabama. In order to gain a more thorough prepara- 
tion for his profession and a knowledge of New York practice, 
he studied a year and a half in Troy, was admitted to the bar of 
New York in 1845, and settled in practice in Rochester, N. Y., 
where he resided to the close of his life. In 1850 he was Com- 
missioner of Schools, and during 1854 City Attorney. 

Mr. Durand died at his home in Rochester, on August 9, 1903, 
in the 87th year of his age. 

He married, on August 24, 1852, Lydia W., daughter of 
Charles and Clarissa (Ewing) Powers, and had three sons and 
a daughter. The second son graduated from Yale College in 
1876, and was for twenty-five years his father's law partner. 
Mrs. Durand died in 1860. 

1837 

Elisha Woodbridge Cook, son of Rev. Elisha Baldwin Cook 
(Williams Coll. 1811) and Esther Hills (Woodbridge) Cook, was 
born on July 28, 1816, in Manchester, Conn., where his father 



296 

was the zealous and most successful pastor of the Congregational 
church. 

After graduation he taught successively in Newtown, on Long 
Island, N. Y., and in South Glastonbury and Brooklyn, Conn., 
and in 1840 entered Andover Theological Seminary. The next 
year he taught at Dudley, Mass., after which he resumed his 
theological studies at New Haven, and completed the course in 
1845. He was ordained pastor of the Congregational church at 
Haddam, Conn., on November 18, 1846, and dismissed in April, 
1852, after which he spent two years in missionary work in New 
York City. He was then pastor at Haydenville, Mass., four 
years, at Townsend, Mass., a year and a half, and at Hopkinton, 
N. H., nearly four years. In the fall of 1864 he removed to 
Ripon, Wise, where he was pastor until March, 1868, and where 
he continued to reside until 1886. For a time he was in the 
employ of the American (now Congregational) Home Missionary 
Society, being stationed at Yankton, So. Dak., Stockbridge, New 
Lisbon and Hudson, Wise, and elsewhere. Returning East he 
preached at Mansfield, Conn., and Toms River, N. J., until 1893, 
when he retired from the ministry, and resided in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., until his death, on January 4, 1904, after an illness of 
nearly two years from paralysis. He was in the 88th year of his 
age. 

He married, on June 2, 1847, Martha M., daughter of Rev. 
Noah Smith (Dartmouth 1818), previously the Congregational 
minister in South Britain, Conn., and Loura (Parmelee) Smith, of 
South Britain, Conn. She died in 1886. Five of their six daugh- 
ters and one of the three sons are living. A daughter graduated 
from Ripon College in 1868, and a son in 1879. In 1888 Mr. 
Cook married Miss Clarissa A. Welch, of Hartford, Conn., who 
survives him. 

He was the author of "A Theory of the Moral System," 1855, 
" Law and Penalty Endless in an Endless Universe " (published 
anonymously), with an Introduction by Rev. John P. Gulliver, 
D.D. (Yale 1840), " The Endless Future," 1890, and "The 
Origin of Sin," 1899, besides contributing discussions of theolog- 
ical and other topics to periodicals. 

1839 

Hamilton Lanphere Smith, son of Anson and Amy C. (Beck- 
with) Smith, was born in New London, Conn., on November 5, 
1818. During the latter part of his college course his home was 



297 

in Ohio City, then a suburb of Cleveland, Ohio, but afterward 
included in that city. 

For a number of years after graduation he was a flour mer- 
chant in Cleveland, but devoted much time to scientific studies, 
and at length withdrew entirely from business. From 1854 to 
1868 he was Professor of Astronomy, Natural Philosophy and 
Chemistry in Kenyon College, and then for thirty-two years 
Professor of Astronomy and Natural Philosophy in Hobart Col- 
lege. In the year 1900 he retired from active service and was 
appointed Professor Emeritus. During thej^ear 1883-84, preced- 
ing the induction of Rev. Eliphalet Nott Potter, he was also 
Acting President of Hobart College. 

In 1842 he published a "Natural Philosophy for Schools," and 
in 1845 "The World ; First Lessons, in Science and Astronomy," 
and from 1842 to 1844 was editor of the Annals of Science, a 
semi-monthly periodical. He also contributed many papers to 
the American Journal of Science and other scientific journals, 
chiefly on diatomaceoe and marine algae, which won him distinc- 
tion at home and abroad. While still a college student, he made 
observations of nebulae with a telescope constructed by himself. 
He was among the first in this country to produce daguerreo- 
types, and is said to have invented the tintype. 

He was President of the American Microscopical Society, Fel- 
low of the Royal Microscopical Society of London, and honorary 
member of the Belgian and Edinburgh Microscopical Societies, 
also honorary member of other scientific societies. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Laws from Trinity College in 1871, and 
of Doctor of Science from Hobart College in 1900. 

Dr. Smith died at New London, Conn., where he was accus- 
tomed to spend the summer, on August 1, 1903, from the effects 
of a fall received about two weeks previously. He was in the 
85th year of his age. 

He married, in 1841, Susan, daughter of Captain Benjamin 
Beecher and Welthia (Parmale) Beecher, of New Haven. She 
lived but a year after marriage, but left a daughter, now deceased. 
On October 6, 1847, he married Julia, daughter of Judge Arora 
Buttles, of Columbus, O., by whom he had two sons, one an elec- 
trician and one a physician, and both deceased. Mrs. Smith died 
in Geneva, N. Y., on October 28, 1891. 



298 



1840 



John Clark Hollister, son of Marinas Willett and Hannah 
(Burton) Hollister, was born in Manchester, Vt., on June 2, 1818. 

After graduation he studied law with Bates & Huntington in 
Northampton, Mass., and in the Yale Law School, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar at New Haven in September, 1842. In 1844 
and 1846 he was Grand Juror for New Haven, in 1848 Clerk of 
the Connecticut Senate, and in 1854-55 Adjutant General of the 
State. From about 1850 to 1865 he was Justice of the Peace* 
and as such Acting , Judge of the City Court of New Haven. 
During this time most of the civil cases were brought before him, 
the court then not having criminal jurisdiction. 

Judge Hollister was one of the founders of Saint Paul's parish 
in 1845, from that date until 1852 was Vestryman and Clerk, in 
1853-54 Junior Warden, and from 1855 to the close of his life — a 
period of fortj^-eight years — Senior Warden. From 1864 to 1875 
he was also Treasurer of the parish, and from 1852 for fifty-one 
years Superintendent of the Sunday-school. He was the main sup- 
port of successive rectors in the upbuilding of Saint Paul's Church 
and. their aid in bearing its burdens, and his service was tireless 
and always unselfish. He long represented the parish as a mem- 
ber of the Committee on Canons and as Treasurer of the Aged 
and Infirm Clergy Fund in the Diocesan Convention, and was a 
delegate in 1871 to the General Convention. 

He died of paralysis at his home in New Haven, on August 29, 
1903. He was 85 years of age, and the oldest member of the 
New Haven County Bar. 

He married, on February 17, 1841, Martha L., daughter of 

Jared and Grace Bradley, of New Haven, and had two sons (one 

of whom died in infancy), and a daughter. After her death he 

married in 1850, Sarah S., daughter of Charles K. and Mary A. 

Shipman, of New Haven, who died on December 3, 1898. Of 

the three children by this marriage, the two sons died in early 

life, but a daughter survives, also a son and daughter by the first 

marriage. 

1841 

iJosEPH FoLGER Barnard, sixth of the ten children of Fred- 
eric Barnard, Captain of a Nantucket (Mass.) whaling vessel, was 
born in the town of Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., N. Y., on Sep- 
tember 18, 1823. His mother was Margaret (Allen) Barnard. 
During his early years his father retired from sea life and settled 



299 

in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where the son attended the Dutchess 
County Academy. 

After graduation he returned to Poughkeepsie, studied law 
with Davis & Johnson, and was admitted to the bar in May, 1844. 
He was President of the City Bank of Poughkeepsie for many 
years from its organization in 1860, and on January 1, 1864, be- 
came Justice of the Supreme Court of New York for the Second 
Judicial District, at first for a term of eight years. This office 
had been held previously by his classmates Dean and Birdseye. 
Although always a Democrat he was twice reelected Justice for 
terms of fourteen years b}^ both political parties, being held in 
high regard by all as an able and upright official. His decisions 
in the Dutchess County election cases in 1891, and. his injunction 
against John T. McKane in Gravesend, Kings County, became 
celebrated. He retired in December, 1893, on account of age 
limit, and afterward lived quietly at his home. By various forms 
of vigorous exercise he maintained unusually good health. He 
was the owner of many farms in his own and other counties, 
and these he put into the best of order, taking much pleasure in 
their personal management and in the outdoor life involved, and 
from frequent walks he knew well all the roads within miles of 
his home. Throughout his life he kept fresh his interest in Latin 
and Greek classics, and was an excellent Shakespearean scholar. 

Judge Barnard died of chronic muscular rheumatism at his 
home in Poughkeepsie, on January 6, 1904, in his Slst year. 

He married, on January 7, 1862, Emily, daughter of Abraham 
Bruyn Hasbrouck (Yale 1810), of Kingston, N. Y., Representa- 
tive in Congress, and for ten years President of Rutgers College, 
and had a son (Yale 1885) and a daughter, the wife of James 
Lenox Banks (Columbia 1882), who, with Mrs. Barnard, survive 
him. Three of his brothers graduated from Yale, respectively in 
1837, 1847 and 1848, and three brothers from Union College. 

Luther Fitch Beecher, son of David and Prudence Scam- 
mel (Chadbourne) Beecher, was born in Goshen, Conn., on Feb- 
ruary 25, 1813. His father was a half brother of Rev. Lyman 
Beecher, D.D. Before entering college he was apprenticed to a 
tradesman, and before finishing his course he was a recognized 
preacher. 

In the fall after graduation, on October 28, 1841, he was or- 
dained to the Baptist ministry, in Trenton, N. J., and during the 



300 

next year was pastor of the Baptist church in that city. He then 
accepted a call to the first Baptist Church in Portland, Me., where 
he remained seven years, after which he was settled over the 
Pearl Street Baptist Church, in Albany, N. Y. In October, 1853, 
he gave up preaching on account of throat trouble, and for about 
two years was editor and proprietor of the New York Recorder, 
residing during that time in Brooklyn, N. Y. In August, 1855, he 
went to Saratoga Springs, N. Y., and established the Temple 
Grove Institute, of which he was Principal for thirteen years. 
During part of this time he was also in charge of the Baptist 
church in that place. After selling the Institute property in 
1868, his home was in Boston or its immediate vicinity. For about 
two years he was pastor of the Bunker Hill Baptist Church, at 
Charlestown, Mass., but since then preached only occasionally. 
He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Union Col- 
lege in 1850, and in 1851 delivered before the Theological Society 
of that college an address, " On the Choice of a Profession," which 
was published. 

Dr. Beecher died at his home in Brookline, Mass., from the in- 
firmities of age, on November 5, 1903, at the age of 90 years. 

He married, on April 16, 1844, Mary S., daughter of Jonathan 
and Hannah (Sawyer) Carleton, of Boston, Mass., and had a 
daughter and two sons, of whom mie son died in infancy. Mrs. 
Beecher's death occurred in Brookline on February 18, 1893. 

JoHN^ Camden Downer, son of John and Mary (Cheney) 
Downer, and grandson of Abiel Cheney (Yale 1771), was born on 
April 2, 1811, in Bozrah, Conn., but entered college from the ad- 
joining town of Norwich. 

After graduation he took the three-year course in Yale Theo- 
logical Seminary, was licensed to preach in October, 1843, and 
ordained as an evangelist by a council from the New London 
County Consociation at Norwich, on March 26, 1845. In May 
following he went to Illinois, where he was stationed for two 
years as a Home Missionary among the miners of Elizabeth, near 
Galena, and was then pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in 
Freeport for about four years. In the winter of 1850-51 an ex- 
tensive revival occurred in his congregation and in the town. He 
then acted as Financial and Missionary Agent of the Synod of 
Peoria for a year, and the year after preached in Connecticut. In 
the fall of 1855 he settled in Carlinville, III., where he was for 



301 

nearly eleven years Secretary and General Agent of Blackburn 
Theological Seminary, continuing for some time longer as Secre- 
tary and Trustee of the institution. During part of these years 
he was also preaching in the vicinity, and from 1859 to 1862 
in charge of the Preparatory Department connected with the 
Seminary. 

In March, 1867, he removed to De Soto, Jefferson County, Mo., 
where his impaired health was soon reestablished. He supplied 
the Presbyterian Church in De Soto for about three years and a 
half, after which he preached at three small churches and as many 
stations of a missionary circuit in the county for some ten years, 
helping to lay the foundations of churches. The first three years 
of his work in Missouri he held a Home Missionary commission ; 
the remainder of the time his pecuniary compensation was very 
small. 

Mr. Downer died from the infirmities of age at his home in De 
Soto, on February 23, 1904, in his 93d year. He was the oldest 
member of his class. 

He married, on February 12, 1845, Julia A. C, daughter of 
Dr. Jacob Linsley, of Middlebury, Conn., and niece of Rev. 
Ammi Linsley (Yale 1810). Her death occurred a month before 
that of Mr. Downer. One daughter and three sons survive. One 
of the sons graduated from Iowa College in 1882. 

William Henry Moore, son of John and Emily (Crane) 
Moore, was born on August 24, 1820, on the ancestral farm in 
East Lyme, Conn., but in 1822 his parents removed to West- 
brook, then a parish of Saybrook. He was fitted for college in 
the neighboring town of Madison. 

After graduation he took the course at Yale Theological Semi- 
nary, was licensed to preach by the New Haven West Associa- 
tion on April 13, 1845, and was ordained pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church at Torringford, Conn., on September 30, 1846. 
After a ministry there of eight years, he edited The Examiner, 
a religious paper in Norwich, Conn., for a year, preaching in the 
meantime principally at Central Village and Lebanon. During 
the following winter and early spring he preached at Cornwall, 
and was then settled over the Congregational Church in New- 
town for six years. 

From the close of this pastorate in 1862 he performed for 
many years with efticiency and faithfulness the duties of impor- 



302 

tant offices in the societies of the church. He was State Mission- 
ary of the Missionary Society of Connecticut from 1862 to 1897, 
and Secretary of that Society from 1867 to 1899 ; Statistical Sec- 
retary of the General Association of Connecticut from 1859 to 
1869, and of the General Conference of the Congregational 
Churches of Connecticut from 1869 to 1898; Treasurer of the 
General Association from 1 859 to 1899, and Registrar of the same 
from 1866 ; Registrar of the General Conference since 1869 ; 
Registrar of the National Council of Congregational Churches 
from the Oberlin meeting in 1871 to 1901, Secretary of its Trus- 
tees from 1886, and for two years Secretary of its Committee on 
Ministerial Relief ; Secretary of the Trustees of the Fund for 
Ministers since 1864. He was a Director of the Connecticut 
Bible Society and the Connecticut Temperance Union. 

In his reports and addresses at the councils of the Church he 
showed a minute and thorough knowledge of ecclesiastical mat- 
ters and of the condition of every church in the State from early 
times to the present. In 1891 he was a delegate to the first Inter- 
national Congregational Council held in London, England, where 
he delivered an address. 

Mr. Moore moved from Newtown to Berlin in 1863, and from 
there to Hartford, which was his home from February, 1876. 

For some time his physical powers had been gradually wearing 
out, but his mind remained clear, and he died without suffering 
after a fortnight's final illness, on August 22, 1903, having nearly 
completed his 83d year. At the time of his death he was a mem- 
ber of the Asylum Hill Congregational Church, Hartford. 

He married, on September 15, 1846, Mary Elizabeth, daughter 
of Ebeo and Sarah Sturges (Gray) Redfield, of Clinton, Conn., 
who died in 1861. In 1863 he married Jeanie Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of David Sanford (Yale 1829) and Emily Augusta (Townsend) 
Sanford, of Newtown. She died in 1867. In 1869 he married 
Mary Ballantine^ daughter of Seth and Anne Moore King, of 
Suffield, who died in 1893. By the first marriage he had a son 
and a daughter, of whom the son survives ; by his second mar- 
riage a son, who died in 1887 ; and by the last marriage a daugh- 
ter and two sons, of whom the younger son died in 1899, while 
a Junior in the Sheffield Scientific School. The elder of these sons 
graduated from the Academical Department in 1895, and from 
Yale Divinity School in 1898. 



303 

William Grey Woolfolk, son of John and Margaret (Col- 
lier) Woolfolk, was born in Augusta, Ga., on July 11, 1822. 
While in college his home address was Cusseta, Ga., during his 
Sophomore and Junior years, and then Columbus, Ga., where his 
father owned about fifteen miles of river front on the Georgia 
side of the Chattahoochee. 

The winter following graduation he read law, but was after- 
ward an extensive planter near Columbus, his home being at 
Wynnton, a suburb of that city. For a short time he was a cotton 
merchant at Apalachicola, Fla. He contributed liberally to the 
cause of the South during the Civil War, and served for a lime 
in the Confederate army. He became a member of Trinity Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church, Columbus, in 1848 or 1849, and during 
most of the time since had been a vestryman of that parish. 

He died after an illness of five weeks at his home, on October 
2, 1903, at the age of 81 years. 

He married, on January 16, 1846, Maria Byrd Nelson, of Co- 
lumbus,, daughter of Major Thomas M. Nelson, an officer of the 
War of 1812, and had nine sons and one daughter, all living 
except one son who died in 1891. Mrs. Woolfolk also survives. 

1842 



Albert Mathews, son of Oliver and Mary (Field) Mathews, 
was born in New York City on September 8, 1820. During Sen- 
ior year he was one of the editors of the Yale Literary Magazine. 

The first year after graduation he studied in the Harvard Law 
School, and then two years in New York City, where he was admit- 
ted as an Attorney in May, 1845, and Counselor in May, 1848. He 
opened an office in partnership with Nathaniel Bowditch Blunt, 
and soon acquired an extensive practice, winning the esteem of 
the bar by his skill and legal attainments, and being regarded as 
a formidable opponent. He was the trustee and the official attor- 
ney of the North River Savings Bank, and in 1886 was Vice- 
President of the New York Bar Association, of which he was one 
of the founders. 

He was a warm friend of Nathaniel Parker Willis (Yale 1827) 
and aided him in establishing the Home Journal, for a number of 
years contributing regularly to its columns. Under the pen-name 
of " Paul Siegvolk " he wrote for the Neio York Mirror from 1845 
to 1860, the Knickerbocker Magazine from 1850 to 1862, and later 
for the New York Evening Post, New York Times, and New York 



304 

Home Journal. His " Reminiscences of Yale " appeared in 1885, 
and "Suggestions as to Early Training for Extemporaneous 
Speaking" in the TJnwersity Magazine. His story, "Walter Ash- 
wood," was published in 1859, "Incidental Protection a Sole- 
cism" about 1877, "A Bundle of Papers," of which several 
editions were issued, in 1879, "Thoughts on the Coditication of 
the Common Law" in 1R81, "Memorial of Bernard Roelker " in 
1889, '' Ruminations " in 1893, and *' A Few Verses " in 1896. 

Mr. Mathews was Vice-President of the Yale Alumni Associ- 
ation of New York in 1881. He was always helpful of class 
interests, and a contributor to the literary feast at class reunions. 
His death occurred at Lake Mohonk, N. Y., on September 9, 
1903. He was 83 years of age. 

He married, on December 12, 1849, Louise Mott, second daugh- 
ter of Nathaniel WoodhuU Strong, Esq., of New York City. She 
died in 1857, and in 1861 hie married Mrs. Cettie M. Gwynne, 
widow of Abram E. Gwynne (Yale 1839) of Cincinnati, O., and 
younger daughter of Hon. Henry C. Flagg, formerU^ mayor of 
New Haven, who is also deceased. He had no children. 

John Andrew Peters, second son of Andrew Peters, a lum- 
ber merchant largely interested in shipping, was born at Ells- 
worth, Me., on October 9, 1822. His mother was Sally (Jordan) 
Peters, and from her he inherited the fine sense of humor and the 
warm and ready sympathy which characterized his entire life. 
He entered the class at the beginning of the Sophomore year. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of Hon. Thomas 
Robinson in Ellsworth, and during the year 1843-44 in the Har- 
vard Law School. He was admitted to the Hancock County Bar 
in August, 1844, and began practice in Bangor in partnership with 
Hon. Joshua W. Hathaway (Bowdoin 1820), but after the ap- 
pointment of the latter as Judge of the District Court in 1849, 
he continued by himself until 1868, when he became associated 
with Franklin Augustus Wilson, M.A. (Bowdoin 1854), afterward 
President of the Maine Central Railroad. His thorough knowl- 
edge of the law, unusual foresight in the preparation of cases, and 
clearness in presentation were early recognized. His time was 
mostly given to large civil and equity cases, but he would never 
allow a person whom he believed to be innocent of a crime to go 
undefended in the courts. 

He was a member of the Maine Senate in 1862 and 1863, and 
of the House of Representatives in 1864, and Attorney- General 



305 

of the State from 1864 to 1867. His speech in 1864 in opposition 
to the proposed removal of the State capital from Augusta to 
Portland was regarded as most important. From 1867 to 1873 
he was a Representative in Congress, and during that time ac- 
quired an unusual personal influence among his fellow members. 
During his third term he was a member of the Judicial Commit- 
tee and Chairman of the Committee on the Congressional Library. 
His eulogy on Senator Samuel Fessenden was considered of spe- 
cial merit. 

In May, 1873, he was appointed Associate Justice of the Su- 
preme Court of Maine, and ten j^ears later Chief Justice of the 
same. In these positions he enjoyed the absolute confidence of 
all classes until his retirement, January 1, 1900. A banquet, ten- 
dered by the Penobscot bar in his honor, on February 1, is said 
to have surpassed anything of a similar nature previously held 
in the State. He was succeeded as Chief Justice by his nephew, 
Hon. Andrew Peters Wiswell (Bowdoin 1873). 

Judge Peters was elected a member of the Maine Historical 
Society in 1866, of the New England Historic-Genealogical Soci- 
ety in 1896, and a trustee of Bowdoin College in 1891. He 
received the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from Colby Col- 
lege in 1884, from Bowdoin in 1885, and from Yale in 1893. 

His health had been declining for several years, but he died at 
his home in Bangor, Me., after a final illness of a few days, on 
April 2, 1904, in the^82d year of his age. . . 

He married, on September 2, 1846, Mary Ann Hathaway, 
daughter of his partner, Judge Hathaway. She died in 1847, 
leaving an infant who also died at the age of fourteen months. 
In 1857 Judge Peters married Fannie E., daughter of Hon. Amos 
M. Roberts, and CharlottTe (Barker) Roberts, of Bangor, who sur- 
vives him with their two daughters. 

Samuel Wolcott Skinner, son of Rev. Newton Skinner 
(Yale 1804), Pastor of the First Congregational Church of New 
Britain, Conn., was born in that place on June 19, 1820. His 
mother was Ursula, a daughter of Samuel Wolcott of South 
Windsor, and granddaughter of Judge Erastus Wolcott (hon. M.A. 
Yale 1790). After his father's death in 1825 the family removed 
to East Windsor, and from there, after preparatory studies in Gor- 
ham (Me.) Academy, he entered college. 

After graduation he began the study of medicine at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons (now a part of Columbia University), 



306 

New York City, but completed his course at the Yale Medical 
School, and received his degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1846. 
From then until the outbreak of the Civil War he practiced his 
profession at Windsor Locks, Conn. In May, 1861, he was com- 
missioned a Surgeon of the Fourth Connecticut Regiment, which 
was afterwards organized into the First Connecticut Heavy Artil- 
ler3^ Much of the time he was on duty at Brigadier or Division 
Headquarters as Surgeon-in-Chief. He was with his regiment in 
all the campaigns between Washington and Richmond until the 
surrender of Lee's forces. On retiring, after serving four years 
and five months, he was commissioned Brevet-Lieutenant Colonel. 
Soon after his return from the war he removed to Toledo, O., 
where he practiced during the remainder of his life. He was for 
several years Health OflScer there, and for many years Consulting 
Surgeon of St. Vincent Hospital. 

Dr. Skinner died of old age and general breaking down of the 
physical system, on August 16, 1903, at the age of 83 years. He 
was a member of the First Congregational church in Toledo. 

He married, on September 16, 1846, Dorianie, daughter of 
James and Pamela (Warner) Fuller, of Hampton, Conn., and had 
two sons and two daughters. One son died in 1891, but the other 
son and the daughters, with Mrs. Skinner, survive him. 

1844 • 

Virgil Maro Dow Marcy, son of Dr. Samuel Sumner Marcy 
{hon. M.D. Yale 1842) and Thankful (Edmunds) Marcy, was 
born at Cold Spring, Cape May County, N. J., on January 5, 
1823. At ten years of age he was sent to school in Berlin, Conn. 

After graduation he studied medicine with his father and with 
Dr. Edmund L. B. Wales, spent the year'l 845-46 in the Yale Med- 
ical School, and completed his medical studies at the University 
of Maryland in Baltimore, where he received the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine in 1847. He practiced about three years in 
Glouce!?ter County, Va., but in 1849 returned to Cold Spring, 
N. J., where he took up his father's practice and resided until 18.76. 
He then removed to Cape May City, where he was for many years 
a practicing physician and druggist with Dr. James Mecray. He 
became a member of the Presbyterian church in Cold Spring in 
1840, and was an elder there for tifty years. 

Dr. Marcy died suddenly of congestion of the lungs at his home 
in Cape May, on January 21, 1904, at the age of 81 years. 



307 

He married, on May 19, 1848, Mary Jane, daughter of Abra- 
ham and Sarah C. Bennett, of Cold Spring. Mrs. Marcy survives 
him, with five of their six sons and their two daughters. 



1845 

William Elijah Downes, son of Horatio Downes, a cabinet 
maker, and Nancy (Smith) Downes, was born on August 22, 1824, 
in Milford, Conn. Through his mother he was directly descended 
from Rev. Samuel Andrew, one bf the founders of Yale College 
and President 79?'C> tempore from 1707 to 1719. 

The year after graduation he suffered from throat trouble, but 
the following year studied law with Honorable Alfred Blackman 
(Yale 1828), completed his course in the Yale Law School in 
1847, and was admitted to the bar in Danbury, Conn., in the 
summer of 1848. In December of that year he began practice in 
Birmingham, now Derby, Conn., and continued until 1863, when 
he was persuaded to take the place of his father-in-law in the 
general management of the Howe Manufacturing Co., in the 
making of pins. After applying himself closely to business for 
twelve years, an attack of nervous prostration caused his retire- 
ment from the active management, although he held the office of 
President of the company from the year 1884 until his death. 

Mr. Downes was one of the incorporators of the New Haven 
and Derby Railroad, one of the founders of the Derby Gas Co., 
President of the Derby Savings Bank, and Director of the Bir- 
mingham National Bank. With Colonel William Burr Wooster 
(LL.B. Yale 1846) he obtained the charter of the Birmingham 
Water Company in 1859, and he was President of the Ousatonic 
Water Company from 1^94 to 1900. He was a Representative 
in the Legislature in 1855, 1882 and 1883, and was active in 
securing the establishment of the Board of Pardons in 1889 and 
the passing of an act for the benefit of insane persons. He also 
served for several years as a member of the Board of Education. 
In 1877 he made an extended trip abroad, spending three months 
each in Paris and in Italy, and a few weeks in Egypt. Since 
1887 his home had been in New Haven. He contributed an article 
on Robert Burns to the- Knickerbocker Mag azme of January, 1853. 

Mr. Downes died o{ angina pectoris at Deland, Fla., where he 
had been spending several weeks, on February 1, 1904, in the 
80th year ot his age. 



308 

He married, on June 24, 1851, Jane Maria, only child of John 
Ireland Howe, M.D., and Cornelia Ann (Ireland) Howe, who sur- 
vives him with two sons and two daughters, one child having 
died in infancy. One of the sons graduated in 1898 from the 
Yale School of Fine Arts, of which he is Librarian. 

1846 

David Hawley, youngest of the four sons of David and 
Bethia (Buck) Hawley, was born at Arlington, Bennington 
County, Vt., on April 14, 1820, entered college with the class of 
1845, but at the end of Freshman year illness compelled him to 
withdraw, and he spent a year reading law in the office of Har- 
mon Canfield, Esq., in his native town. Upon his return to col- 
lege in the fall of 1843 he joined the Sophomore class. 

After graduation he resumed his law studies in the office of 
Orsamus Bushnell, Esq., in New York City. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1848, and in May, 1850, formed a partnership with 
his classmate, John Henry Glover, which continued for tw^elve 
years. His practice was mostly confined to the management of 
large estates. In 1870 he became counsel for Isaac M. Singer, 
the sewing machine inventor and manufacturer, and three years , 
later relinquished general practice to take charge of Mr. Singer's 
interests at home and abroad. He was the sole executor of his 
estate, and was for many years a director in the Singer Manufac- 
tnring Company. He was in Paris at the beginning of the French 
and German war, being a witness of the exciting scenes of the 
time, and he subsequently made many other trips abroad. 

Mr. Hawley resided in Yonkers, N. Y., for forty years, and 
died there at his home of old age, on November 25, 1903, in his 
84th year. He was Vice-President of the Westchester Historical 
Society, at one time Water Commissioner and at another a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education of Yonkers. He was a member 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

He married, on August 14, 1851, Miss Louisa Maria Whiteside, 
of Cambridge, N. Y. (who died in 1860), and October 8, 1861, Miss 
Catherine Ann Brown, of New York City. By the first marriage 
he had one daughter, and by the second one son, both of whom, 
with Mrs. Hawley, survive him. His son graduated from the 
Sheffield Scientific School in 1884. A brother graduated from 
Union College in 1840. 



309 

Stephen Wright Kellogg, eldest of the four children of 
Jacob Pool and Lucy Prescott (Wright) Kellogg, was born on 
April 5, 1822, at Shelburne, Franklin County, Mass. After 
spending two terms at Amherst College he entered Yale in the 
third term of Freshman year. 

After graduation he taught the academy at Winchendon, 
Mass., during the fall term, and then entered the Yale Law 
School, teaching during his course in the school of Hon. A. N. 
Skinner (Yale 1823) in New Haven. He did not graduate from 
the Law School but was admitted to the bar in June, 1848, and 
began practice in Naugatuck, New Haven County, Conn. In 1851 
he was Clerk and in 1853 a member of the State Senate, The 
following year he was elected Judge of Probate of the W^ater- 
bury District, and held the office for seven years. From 1854 
his home was in Waterbury, and he represented that town in the 
Connecticut House of Representatives in 1856. In 1804 he was 
appointed Judge of the New Haven County Court, and from 
1866 to 1869, also from 1877 to 1883, was City Attorney. 

He was a delegate to the National Republican Conventions of 
1860, 1868 and 1870, and was a member of the committee which 
drew up. the platform on which Abraham Lincoln was first elected 
President. In 1869 he was elected as a Republican to the House 
of Representatives in Congress in a strongly Democratic district, 
and reelected in 1871 and 1873. In the Forty-second Congress 
he was Chairman of the Naval Expenditures Committee, and in 
the Forty-third of the Civil Service Reform Committee, and did 
effective work as a member of other committees. After his 
retirement from Congress he continued the practice of his profes- 
sion, in which his ability and enthusiasm for its work won many 
successes at home and in the courts at Washington. 

In 1860 he was captain of a company of " Wide Awakes," 
which greatly helped in the election of a Republican Governor. 
He was active during the Civil War in raising troops and sup- 
porting the government, and from 1863 to 1866 was Colonel, and 
from 1866 to 1870 Brigadier General of the Second Regiment, 
Connecticut National Guard. In 1900 he was a Presidential 
Elector. 

He was always devoted to the mterests of his own State, and 
especially to those of his own city. He was one of the Board of 
Agents of the Bronson Library from its organization in 1868 to 
the close of his life. He was a deacon of the Second Congrega- 
tional Church from 1888 until his death. 



310 

General Kellogg died of congestion of the lungs after an ill- 
ness of about a week, at his home in Waterbury, on January 27, 
1904, in the 82d year of his age. 

He married, on September 10, 1851, Lucia Hosraer, daughter 
of Major Andre Andrews and Sarah Mehitable (Hosmer) Andrews, 
of Buffalo, N. Y., and granddaughter of Chief Justice Hosmer 
(Yale 1782), of Middletown, Conn. Mrs. Kellogg, with three of 
the four sons and three daughters, survive. A brother. Col. John 
Kellogg, graduated from West Point in 1849. The eldest son 
graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1879, the 
second son from Yale College in 1882 and the Yale Law School 
in 1884, and the youngest son from Yale College in 1890 and the 
Law School in 1893. The second daughter graduated from 
Vassar College in 1875, and married Edwin H. English of New 
Haven, for a time a member of the class of 1876 at Yale, and the 
youngest daughter married Irving H. Chase, a graduate of Yale 
in 1880. 

1847 

Robert Perry Farris, son of Robert Patishall and Catharine 
(Cross) Farris, was born on September 6, 1826, in St. Louis, Mo., 
and entered college in Sophomore year. He had previously 
studied in St. Louis Universit}', and received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts from St. Xavier College, Cincinnati, in 1844. 

After graduation he began the study of law, but after a year 
abandoned it for theologj^, spending two years at Princeton 
Theological Seminary, and a year in Cincinnati. After supplying 
at Bonhomrae, Mo., he was ordained as an evangelist in St. Louis, 
on November 14, 1852, and was then acting pastor of the Park 
Avenue Church in that city for a year. From 1853 to 1859 
he was pastor of the Second Church in Peoria, 111., and from 1860 
to 1868 of the First Church at St. Charles, Mo. During part 
of 1859 and 1860 he was Agent of Chicago (McCormick) Theo- 
logical Seminary, and Missionary Secretary of the Old School 
Synod of Missouri from 1866 to 1874. He was Moderator of the 
General Assembl}' of the Southern Presbyterian Church in 1881, 
and Permanent Clerk from 1885. He was one of the founders, in 
1866, of the Missouri (afterward the Saint Louis) Presbyterian, 
of which he continued as editor until 1895. He received the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from Westminster Col- 
lege (Mo.) in 1866. 



311 

Mr. Farris died of stricture of the oesophagus at his home in 
St. Louis on August 28, 1903, in his 71th. year of his age. 

He married, on August 3, 1848, Eliza Seymour, daughter of. 
Captain Aaron S. Bowen, U. S. A., of Cincinnati, and had seven 
children, of whom two sons and one daughter are living. 

James Fitch, son of Gurdon and Hannah Warner (Peck) 
Fitch, was born on April 23, 1821, in Cherry Valley, Otsego 
County, N. Y., but when he was five years of age his parents 
moved to Cleveland, O., then a place of only 800 inhabitants. 

After graduation he studied law in Philadelphia with Judge 
Mallory, but after two years returned to Cleveland, where he was 
for a short time in the ofKce of Hitchcock, Willson & Wade. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1849, and was then in partner- 
ship with Leonard Case, Jr., from 1850 to 1856, after which he 
practiced alone, until infirmity obliged him to retire in 1902. He 
died after an illness of two years, on February 16, 1904, in the 
83d year of his age. He had been a member of the Cleveland 
Bar Association longer than any one else living, and in 1853 
was City Solicitor. 

Mr. Fitch married, in Cleveland, on December 5, 1855, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of John Gould and Alethea (Owen) Sanburn, of 
Knoxville, 111., and adopted daughter of her maternal aunt, Mrs. 
Eliza A. Weddell, of Cleveland. She survives him with their 
children — one son and six daughters. The son is a graduate of 
Western Reserve University in 1879. 

1848 

Samuel Clarke Perkins, son of Samuel Huntington Perkins 
(Yale 1817), and grandson of Samuel Perkins (Yale 1785), was 
born on November 14, 1828, in Philadelphia, Pa., of which he 
was a life-long resident. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of his father and 
at the University of Pennsylvania, receiving the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws in 1852. He was admitted to the Philadelphia 
bar in 1851, to practice in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania 
in 1853, and in the Supreme Court of the United States in 1874. 
In 1854 he was President of the Law Academy of Philadelphia, 
in 1857 a member of the Common Council, and for many years 
from 1876 Solicitor to the Commissioners of Fairmount Park. 

In April, 18G1, he enlisted as a private in Company A, First 
Regiment of Artillery, Philadelphia Home Guards, was made 



312 

First Lieutenant of Landis' Light Battery, Pennsylvania Inde- 
pendent Artillery, in 1863, and was in action at Sporting Hill, 
near Harrisburg, on June 30, and at Carlisle on July 1, of that 
year. 

Mr. Perkins was chosen in 1870 one of the original Commis- 
sioners for the erection of the Public Buildings, and had been 
President from 1872 until the Commission was abolished in 1901. 

He rendered many and important services to the Presbyterian 
Church. From 1856 to 1870 he was Trustee of the First Presby- 
terian Church, and Elder from 1870 ; member of the Presbyterian 
Publication Committee from 1858 to 1870, after the latter date a 
member of the Presbyterian Board of Publication, and President 
of its Trustees from 1870 to 1874, and since 1877 ; Trustee of the 
General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States since 1870, and Vice-President since June, 1887 ; President 
of the Trustees of the Presbyterian House, Philadelphia, since 
1874 ; Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Presbyte- 
rian Church three times; and Delegate to the General Council 
of the Presbyterian Alliance in Belfast, Ireland, in 1884. 

He was President of the Yale Alumni Association of Phila- 
delphia from 1878 to 1893, of the Alumni Association of the Law 
Department of the University of Pennsylvania from 1877 to 

1892, and of the University Club of Philadelphia from 1883 to 

1893. In addition, he was a member of many historical and 
social societies. 

He delivered an address at the " Ceremonies of Dedication of 
the New Masonic Temple, September 20, 1873," and at the 
"Laying of the Corner Stone of the New Public Buildings of 
Philadelphia, July 4, 1874," and contributed from time to time to 
the New York Observer, American Law Register, and to local 
papers and other periodicals. 

Mr. Perkins died of uraemia at his home in Philadelphia, on 
July 14, 1903, at the age of 74 years. 

He married, on April 12, 1855, Mary Hooker, daughter of 
Frederick A. Packard, LL.D., of Philadelphia, and Elizabeth 
Dwight Packard. Their three children died in infancy, and Mrs. 
Perkins in 1900. 

1849 

William Darius Bishop, son of Alfred and Mary (Ferris) 
Bishop, was born in Bloomfield, N. J., on September 14, 1827, but 
entered college from Bridgeport, Conn. 



313 

For two or three years after graduation he was chiefly occu- 
pied in the settlement of his father's large estate, and afterwards 
in the railroad business. He was a contractor, Superintendent, 
and Chief Engineer for a few years, from 1856 to 1866, and from 
1866 to 1879 President of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad Co., continuing as Vice-President of the Board of 
Directors until the close of his life, also from 1883 to 1904 Pres- 
ident of the Naugatuck Railroad Co. 

He was a member of the Common Council of Bridgeport in 
1852-53, and again in 1868, delegate from Connecticut to the 
National Democratic 'Convention in Cincinnati in 1856, member 
of the House of Representatives, U. S. Congress, from 1857 to 
1859, and chairman of the Committee on Manufactures, U. S. 
Commissioner of Patents from May, 1859 to 1860, member of the 
State Senate in 1866 and again in 1877 and 1878, and of the Con- 
necticut House of Representatives in 1872. 

Mr. Bishop died of heart disease at his home in Bridgeport, on 
February 4, 1904, at the age of 76 years. 

He married, on October 21, 1850, Julia Ann, daughter of Rus- 
sell and Martha Maria Tomlinson, and had one daughter and five 
sons. The daughter and four of the sons with their mother sur- 
vive. One son graduated from the Academical Department in 
1880, and one from the Law School in 1890. 

Thomas Scranton Hubbard, son of George and Electa (Bron- 
son) Hubbard, was born at Upper Middletown, now Cromwell, 
Conn., on September 25, 1825. 

For two years after graduation he was a manufacturer of 
japanned ware in Meriden, and for the next three years agent 
of a joint-stock company in the same business at Durham, Conn. 
From June to November, 1854, he resided in Warren, O., and 
then removed to Urbana, 111., where he was a private banker for 
two years, cashier of the Grand Prairie Bank the next five years, 
and then a grocer and hardware merchant for the same length of 
time. From 1866 to 1869 he again lived in Cromwell, occupied 
as a manufacturer and farmer, but then returned to Urbana and 
resumed the hardware business. He was an influential citizen of 
that place, was for several years an alderman, and had been an 
elder of the Presbyterian Church from its organization in 1857. 
He was a delegate to the Centennial General Assembly of the 
Presbyterian Church at Philadelphia in 1888. 



314 

Mr. Hubbard died at his home in Urbana, on May 26, 1902, at 
the age of 76 years, but information was not received until some 
time later. 

He married, on November 14, 1849, Jane Eliza, daughter of 
Dr. Wyllys Woodruff, of Meriden, Conn., and had three sons 
and two daughters, of whom the eldest son died in infancy. 

1850 

Heney Chase, son of General Epaphras Ball and Louisa 
(Baldwin) Chase, was born in Lyndon, Vt., on October 10, 1827, 
and entered Yale after a term at the University of Vermont. 

The winter following graduation he studied law in the office of 
Hon. Thomas Bartlett in his native town, and the next fall en- 
tered the Harvard Law School, but owing to the entire failure of 
his health a few months later, he spent three and a half years at 
home. In the fall of 1855 he went to Sycamore, DeKalb County, 
III., and was admitted to the bar on April 22, 1857. He was Attor- 
ney and Clerk of the town until February, 1859, when he removed 
to Chicago, where he was a partner in the firm of Eastman, Bever- 
idge & Chase. On account of his father's failing health he 
returned to Lyndon in 1860. He represented the town in the 
Vermont Legislature in 1865, was Centennial Commissioner for 
Vermont in 1876, and the same year was appointed a member 
of the Vermont Board of Agriculture. He was also President 
of the National Bank of Lyndon for ten years, Selectman for 
several years. President of the Board of Trustees of Lyndon 
Academy, and U. S. Immigrant Inspector at Newport, Vt., from 
1893 until 1901. 

For the last three years he was stationed at Portland and 
Calais, Me. He died of typhoid pneumonia at the latter place, 
on February 12, 1904, at the age of 76 years. 

Mr. Chase married, on February 25, 1869, Sarah Weir, daugh- 
ter of James and Georgette A. (Roberts) Robinson, of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., and had two sons and three daughters, who with their 
mother survive. The elder son graduated from Yale College in 
1895, and the younger is an undergraduate in the College. 

Robert Coit, son of Robert and Charlotte (Coit) Coit, was 
born in New London, Conn., on April 26, 1830. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of Hon. William 
C. Crump (Yale 1836), in New London, and in the Yale Law 



315 

School, each for a year. He was admitted to the bar in New 
London in November, 1852. From 1856 to 1860 he was Judge of 
Probate for the District of New London, and in 1867 was 
appointed Register in Bankruptcy of the United States District 
Court for Connecticut, serving while the act remained in force. 

In the same year he was made Treasurer of the New London 
Northern Railroad, was Vice-President a few years later, and 
President from 1872. 

He was elected Mayor of New London in 1879, and was twice 
reelected to the position. In 1879 he was also elected a member 
of the Connecticut House of Representatives, and in 1880 and in 
1882, State Senator, being also President ^:>ro tempore of the Sen- 
ate during the second term. Besides filling these offices he was 
President of the Union Bank of New London, Vice-President of 
the Savings Bank of New London, President of the New London 
Gas and Electric Company, and Vice-President of the New Lon- 
don Steamboat Company, and held other positions of trust. 

Mr. Coit died of heart trouble following the grip, at his home 
in New London, on June 19, 1904, at the age of 74 years. 

He married on August 1, 1854, Lucretia, daughter of William 
Fowler Brainard (Yale 1802) and Sarah A. (Prentis) Brainard, 
and had a daughter, who died in early childhood, and a son 
(Ph.B. Yale 1884). Mrs. Coit and the son survive him. Two 
brothers graduated from Yale College, respectively in 1853 and 
1856. 

Martin Kellogg, a native of Vernon, Conn., where his father, 
Allyn Kellogg, was for fifty years deacon of the First Congrega- 
tional Church, a farmer, and Representative in the Connecticut 
Legislature, was born on March 15, 1828. His mother was Eliza 
(White) Kellogg. He was a nephew of Rev. Ebenezer Kel- 
logg (Yale 1810), for more than thirty years Professor of Ancient 
Languages in Williams College, also great-grandson of Rev. 
Ebenezer Kellogg (Yale 1757), for nearly fifty-five years pastor 
of the Congregational Church in Vernon (then North Bolton), 
Conn. He was Valedictorian of his class. 

After graduation he began the study of theology in Union 
Theological Seminary, spent his second year at Andover, and 
returned to Union Seminary to complete his course. He was 
licensed to preach in the spring of 1854, and then spent a year as 
a Resident Licentiate in Yale Seminary. He was ordained at 



316 

Vernon, on October 2, 1855, President Woolsey preaching the 
sermon, and on October 20 sailed for California as a home mis- 
sionary. From December of that year until June, 1857, he was 
stationed at Shasta, Cal., and for three years following was pas- 
tor at Grass Valley. 

In 1859 he was elected Professor of Latin in the College of 
California, at Oakland, and when that institution was merged into 
the University of California, ten years later, he was appointed 
Professor of Ancient Languages, and spent several months in 
Europe in travel and study. This chair was afterward divided, 
and from 1876 to 1894 his professorship was of the Latin Lan- 
guage and Literature. In 1888 he went abroad for a needed rest, 
and was absent two years. He was Chairman of the Academic 
Council in 1890, from 1890 to 1893 Acting President, and on 
March 28, 1893 was inaugurated President of the University. 
After iive years of service he presented his resignation, but it was 
not accepted until March, 1899. On his retirement he made a 
tour around the world, but in September, 1900, returned to the 
University as Professor Emeritus of Latin. Yale University 
conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws in 1893. He 
was the editor of Ars Oratoria, Selections from Cicero and Quin- 
tilian, in 1872, and of the Brutus of Cicero, in 1889. 

President Kellogg died from an operation for bladder trouble 
at San Francisco, on August 26, 1903, at the age of 75 years. 

He married, on September 3, 1863, Louisa Wells, daughter of 
Hon. John Hall Brockway (Yale 1820) and Flavia Field (Colton) 
Brockway, of Ellington, Conn., who survives him. A son and a 
daughter died in infancy. A brother (Williams Coll. 1846) took 
the theological course in Yale Seminary. 

1851 

Asa French, son of Jonathan and Sarah Brackett (Hayward) 
French, was born on October 21, 1829, in Braintree, Mass., where 
his ancestors had lived since before the incorporation of the town 
in 1640. 

After graduation he studied law, first at the Albany Law 
School and in the office of Pruyn & Reynolds, and completed his 
course in the Harvard Law School, -from which he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1853. The same year he was ad- 
mitted to practice in the Supreme Court of New York, and after- 
ward in Boston. After a period in the office of David A. Sim- 



317 

mons and Harvey Jewell, he entered into a partnership with Hon. 
George White (Yale 1848), which continued until 1858. In 1870 
he was appointed District Attorney for the Southeastern District 
of Massachusetts to fill a vacancy, and held the office by succes- 
sive reelections until his resignation in October, 1882. In the lat- 
ter year he declined an appointment to the Superior Court bench 
of Massachusetts. From January 10, 1873, to January 7, 1882, 
he served on the State Board of Commissioners on Inland 
Fisheries. 

In July, 1882, he was appointed one of the judges of the Court 
of Commissioners of Alabama Claims, sitting at Washington, 
D. C, and continued in that capacity until the business of the 
court was finished, on December 31, 1885. On returning to Bos- 
ton, he resumed his practice, residing, as previously, in Braintree. 
In October, 1886, he was associated with Hon. E. Rockwood 
Hoar, LL.D. (Harvard 1835), as counsel for the complainants in 
the prosecution of five professors of Andover Theological Semi- 
nary on charges of heresy. 

He was active in local affairs, representing Braintree in the 
State Legislature in 1866, and also serving on the school commit- 
tee for many years as President of the Board of Trustees of 
Thayer Academy and of the Thayer Public Library in that 
town. 

From 1866 to 1868 he was Secretary and Treasurer of the Yale 
Alumni Association of Boston, and in 1884 was appointed by 
President Arthur a member of the Board of Visitors at the West 
Point Military Academy. 

Mr. French died at his home in Braintree, on June 23, 1903, at 
the age of 73 years. 

He married in June, 1855, Miss Ellen Clizbe, of Amsterdam, 
N. Y., who died the following September. In October, 1858, 
he married Sophia Briggs, daughter of Simeon and Mary (Cald- 
well) Palmer, of Boston, Mass., and had one son (Yale 1882) and 
four daughters, one of whom is deceased. 

Erastus Root Green, son of John Green, a merchant of 
Reading, Pa., and Catherine (Bright) Green, was born in that 
place, on May 7, 1830. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of his brother 
(Yale 1849) in Reading, and w^as admitted to the bar at the end 
of two years. On September 20, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, 



318 

Third Regiment of Missouri Infantry, and on December 10 of the 
same year was transferred to the Tenth Regiment, but the rec- 
ords accessible do not show the length of his service. 

He afterward practiced law in Norristown, Pa., and then made 
his home in Chicago, 111., where he was for some time Secretary 
of the Security Title and Trust Company. 

He married, in 1864, Julia A., daughter of Rev. S. P. Ives, of 
St. Louis, Mo., and died in Chicago, on February 5, 1904, in the 
74th year of his age. His wife died of heart trouble within 
twenty-four hours after her husband. One daughter survives. 

William DeForest Manice, son of DeForest and Catherine 
Maria (Booth) Manice, elder brother of Edward Augustus Man- 
ice (Yale 1858), was born in New York City, on July 11, 1830. 

The year following graduation he spent abroad, pursuing the 
study of civil law at Berlin a part of the time. On his return 
home he continued the study of law, was admitted to the bar in 
New York City in May, 1854, and practiced his profession there 
until his gradual retirement about 1885. He was the owner of 
valuable property in the city, and at Queens, Long Island. 

Mr. Manice died suddenly of heart failure on September 6, 
1903, at Tuxedo Park, N. Y., where he had spent the summer. 
He was 73 years of age. 

He married, in April, 1862, Josephine Learned, daughter of 
Edward Learned, of Troy, New York, and had two sons and six 
daughters, of whom one son and four daughters are deceased. 
The other son received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Co- 
lumbia University in 1886, and of Bachelor of Laws in 1888. 

Enos Nelson Taft, son of Leonard and Martha (Comstock) 
Taft, was born in Mendon, Worcester County, Mass., on August 
12, 1826. Previous to entering college he taught in a district 
school for three successive winters, and the financial aid received 
during his college course he afterward repaid with interest from 
his professional income. 

After graduation he entered the Yale Law School, and while 
there, by acting as Librarian of the School and teaching in Gen- 
eral Russell's Collegiate and Commercial Institute, he paid most 
of his expenses from his own earnings. He received the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws, and was admitted to the New Haven bar in 
1853. The following February he was admitted to the New York 



319 

bar, and began practice in New York City in partnership with 
his classmate, George Washington Mead. After remaining to- 
gether for about nine years Mr. Taft practiced alone for the same 
length of time, but on May 1, 1872, he formed a partnership with 
Erastus C. Benedict (Williams 1821), Chancellor of the Univer- 
sity of the State of New York, and Robert D. Benedict (Univ. 
Vt. 1848), nephew of the former, under the firm name of Bene- 
dict, Taft & Benedict, and so continued for fifteen years. For the 
next three years he again practiced by himself, after which his 
eldest son, Theodore Munger Taft (B.A.Williams 1886, LL.B. 
Columbia 1889), became his partner, and the firm of E. N. & T. 
M. Taft continued until May 1, 1903, and after that he was coun- 
sel to the firm of Taft & Sherman, composed of Theodore M. Taft 
and P. Tecumseh Sherman (Ph.B. Yale 1888), In 1890 he was 
appointed United States Commissioner for the Southern District 
of New York, where many important admiralty cases came before 
him. 

Mr. Taft was a lifelong Republican, but his influence was 
always for the highest interests of the city and his hearty support 
for the best candidates. He never held nor sought office for him- 
self. He was prominent in the establishment of Adelphi Acad- 
emy (now Adelphi College), of which he was a trustee until 1898, 
active in the early history of the Brooklyn Young Men's Christian 
Association and one of its Board of Directors, and for many years 
interested in the Long Island Historical Society and a life mem- 
ber of the same. He was for thirty years a trustee of the Amer- 
ican Seaman's Friend Society. During the earlier years of his 
residence in Brooklyn he was a member of the Clinton Avenue 
Congregational Church, but he was afterward for many years a 
vestryman of the (P. E.) Church of the Incarnation. 

Mr. Taft died of pneumonia at his home in Brooklyn, on Decem- 
ber 19, 1903, at the age of 77 years. 

He married, on September 5, 1860, Julia M., daughter of Fred- 
erick T. and Elizabeth (Lockwood) Peet, and sister of his class- 
mate. Rev. Robert Barfe Peet, and had eleven children, five sons 
and six daughters, of whom two sons and three daughters, with 
their mother, survive. 

Roger Welles, son of Roger and Electa (Stanley) Welles, 
grandson of General Roger Welles (Yale 1775), and great-grand- 
son of Solomon Welles (Yale 1739), was born in Newington, then 



320 

a parish of Wethersfield, Conn., on March 7, 1829. Before en- 
tering college he taught a district school in West Hartford, and 
completed his preparation at Williston Seminary. 

After graduation he taught for a short time in the Collegiate 
and Commercial Institute of General William H. Russell (Yale 
1833), in New Haven, and then entered the office of his uncle, 
Hon. Martin Welles (Yale 1806), in Hartford, where he remained 
as a law student for three years, during part of the time teaching 
in Newington and Madison, Conn. In October, 1854, he was 
admitted to the bar of Hartford County, and began practice, but 
in the fall of 1855 went to St. Paul, Minn., and formed a partner- 
ship with William P. Murray, Esq. On account of illness he 
came East the next summer, but in the spring of 1857 returned 
to Minnesota, and became a partner with Martin J. Severance, 
Esq., at Henderson, Sibley County. 

Upon the death of his father, he came back in 1860 to the fam- 
ily home in Newington, and for nearly thirty years practiced 
his profession in Hartford, for a time with his uncle, and later 
with Hon. William W. Eaton, U. S. Senator, under the firm name 
of Welles & Eaton. In IMay, 1889, he became Financial Clerk 
of the U. S. Patent Office at Washington, D. C, and in Septem- 
ber, 1902, in compliance with his request, was transferred to the 
office of the Assistant Attorney-General as Law Clerk. In July, 
1903, he returned to Hartford and resumed the practice of law. 
For about fifteen years he was a member of the examining com- 
mittee of the Hartford County Bar, and during the latter part of 
that time chairman of the committee. He was especially inter- 
ested in studying and working out difficult legal problems. Mr. 
Welles represented his native place in the Connecticut Legisla- 
ture in 1864 and 1871, in the latter year being the almost unani- 
mous choice of Republicans and Democrats, because of his advo- 
cacy of the separation of Newington from Wethersfield and its 
incorporation as an independent town. He drafted the act of in- 
corporation, which became a law. While in Minnesota he was a 
Republican candidate for Senator in the Territorial Legislature. 
He was later nominated for Judge of Probate of the Hartford, 
Conn., District on the Republican ticket, but was defeated. 

For some years he was clerk and deacon of the Congregational 
Church in Newington, and for twenty years clerk of the Ecclesi- 
astical Society. In 1874 he printed the "Annals of Newington," 
containing the most ancient records of the church and society en- 



321 

tire, and extracts from those of later date. In 1876 he published 
" An Historical Address." lie also wrote a Sketch of the Consti- 
tutional History of Connecticut, the account of Newington in the 
Memorial History of Hartford County, and various essays on local 
history, and recently the article on Newington in the History of 
Wethersfield. He was elected a member of the Connecticut His- 
torical Society in 1887. 

Mr. Welles died of acute pneumonia at his home in Newington 
after an illness of two days, on May 15, 1904, at the age of 75 
years. 

He married, at Prairie du Chien, Wise, on June 16, 1858, Mercy 
D., daughter of Captain Lemuel S. and Sarah (Coffin) Aiken, of 
Fairhaven, Mass., and sister of Rev. William Pope Aiken (Yale 
1853), at the time pastor of the Congregational Church in New- 
ington, and had three daughters (of whom one died at the age of 
six years) and four sons. Six children with Mrs. Welles survive 
him. Two of the sons graduated from Yale in 1882 and 1893, re- 
spectively, and one of the daughters from Smith College in 1883. 

1852 

Jacob Coopee, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Walls) Cooper, 
was born near Somerville, Butler County, O., on December 7, 
1830. He joined the class at the beginning of Junior year after 
three months at Hanover (Ind.) College. 

After graduation he studied theology a year at Oxford, O., was 
licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Oxford on August 17, 
1853, but immediately went abroad for special study in philology 
and philosophy at Berlin, Halle, and Edinburgh. He received 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Gottingen in 1854, and 
then returned to the United States, and from October, 1855, to 
July, 1866, excepting during 1862-63, was Professor of the Greek 
Language and Literature at Center College, Danville, Ky. He 
was ordained by the Presbytery of Pennsylvania on April 26, 
1862, and during that year and the following was Chaplain of the 
Third Kentucky Regiment, U. S. Volunteers, and afterward min- 
ister of Harmony (Presbyterian) Church near Danville. In 1866 
he was elected Professor of Greek in Miami University, but ac- 
cepted the offer of the same chair at Rutgers College, offered at 
the same time. In 1883 he declined a Professorship of Philoso- 
]»hy and Ethics in the University of Michigan, and remained at 
Rutgers, where, since 1893, he was Collegiate Church Professor 
of Logic and Metaphysics. 



322 

Professor Cooper received the degree of Doctor of Civil Law 
from the University of Jena in 1873, Doctor of Sacred Theology 
from Columbia University in 1874, and Doctor of Laws from 
Tulane LTniversity in 1895. He was elected a member of the 
Philosophical Society of Berlin in 1854. 

He was the author of many pamphlets, including his disserta- 
tion, "Eleusinian Mysteries," 1854; " The Loyalty Demanded by 
the Present Crisis," 1862; "Creation, a Transference of Power," 
1899; "The Passage from Mind to Matter," 1901; "Vicarious 
Suffering the Order of Nature," 1903; and Biographies of George 
Duffield, D.D. (1889), President Woolsey (1899), and President 
William Preston Johnston (1900). While at Danville he was as- 
sociated with others in conducting The Danville Review, a vig- 
orous supporter of the Union cause. From 1866 to 1880 he wrote 
for the Princeton Review, and afterward for the Reformed Quar- 
terly Review and the Methodist Review, and contributed regularly 
to the BiUiotheca Sacra. He was an ardent Republican, and 
wrote continuously and vigorously on matters of municipal and 
national interest. 

Professor Cooper died of heart failure at his home in New 
Brunswick, N. J., on January 31, 1904. He was 73 years of age. 

He married, on May 31, 1855, Caroline, daughter of Hugh and 
Grizel (Brown) Macdill, of Oxford, O., who died in 1857, leaving 
one daughter. On July 20, 1865, he married Mary, daughter of 
William and Mary (Downs) Linn, of Cincinnati, O., by whom he 
had one daughter and four sons. Two of the sons graduated 
from Rutgers College in 1892, and a third in 1896, the latter 
receiving the degree of Master of Arts from Yale in 1898. 

Vincent Maemaduke, son of Meredith Miles Marmaduke, 
Governor of Missouri in 1844, and Lavinia (Sappington) Marma- 
duke, was born at Arrow Rock, Saline County, Mo., on April 14, 
1831, and entered Yale in January of Junior year from the 
Masonic College, Lexington, Mo. 

After graduation he studied law for a year. He did not, how- 
ever, enter the profession, but engaged in farming, mining, and 
other pursuits. 

At the beginning of the Civil War he was elected a member of 
the Missouri State Convention in opposition to secession, and ad- 
hered to the Union until after the occupation of the State by Fed- 
eral troops, when he was arrested on a charge of disloyalty and 



323 

sent South. Soon afterward he joined the Confederate army, and 
while in charge of artillery at the battle of Corinth he was made 
Colonel. A little later he was commissioned by President Jeffer- 
son Davis to buy arms and ammunition in Europe to carry on the 
war, and accomplished the task with skill and tact. 

After his return he was conspicuous in the great Chicago Con- 
spiracy of 1864, in which, by a release of the poorly guarded Con- 
federate prisoners in the Northwest and a simultaneous uprising 
of the IsTorihern friends of the Confederacy, it was planned to 
recall Sherman from his March to the Sea to save the North. 
Colonel Marmaduke was arrested for his part, but after a military 
trial was released as not guilty. 

He afterward resided in St. Louis for a time and was editor of 
the Journal of Agriculture in that city. He was several times 
talked of as Governor of the State, but declined the nomination on 
account of ill health. He was elected to the Missouri Legisla- 
ture in 1882 and 1883. 

Colonel Marmaduke died of pneumonia at the home of his 
daughter, Mrs. William Harrison, in Marshall, Mo., on March 25, 
1904, in the 73d year of his age. 

He married, on July 5, 1853, Miss Eakin, who died in 1861, 
leaving two daughters, who are still living. He afterward mar- 
ried Mrs. Aimes, widow of Major Henry Aimes, of St. Louis. 
Colonel Marmaduke's l^rother, John Sappington Marmaduke 
(U. S. Mil. Acad. 185V), Brigadier-General in the Confederate 
array, was a member of the class of 1854 during Sophomore 
year, and died in 1887 w^hile Governor of Missouri. 

William Baldwin Ross, son of Samuel Tufts and Mary 
(Brown) Ross, was born on November 13, 1831, in New York 
City. He was admitted to college in 1847, but before returning 
to his studies spent nearly two years as a clerk in an importing 
house, joining the class during the last term of Freshman year. 

After graduation he studied in the Albany Law School from 
September, 1852, to March, 1853, and was then admitted to the 
bar. He spent six months in the office of Benjamin D. Si.lliman, 
LL.D. (Yale 1824), in New York City, and after a year of fur- 
ther study in the Harvard Law School received the degree of 
BRchelor of Laws in 1854. He began practice with Mr. Silliman, 
but a few years later established his own office on Wall street, 
and occupied offices on that street until his death. During the 



32i 

Civil War he was in service on Fort Federal Hill in Baltimore in 
1862 as a member of the Seventh Regiment New York State 
Guard. He was a member of the American Geographical Soci- 
ety and New York Historical Society, and of several recreation 
and social clubs. He was one of the organizrers and for many 
years one of the Executive Committee of the Yale Alumni Asso- 
ciation of New York, and took a prominent part in its manage- 
ment. 

Mr. Ross died from a complication of diseases, on January 14, 
1904, at the Knickerbocker apartments, where he had resided 
for twenty years past. He was 72 years of age. He had never 
married. By his will he left a very generous bequest to Yale 
University, which, by vote of the Corporation, is to be used in 
connection with the University librarj^ 

1853 

Henry Thachee Hoyt, son of Eli Thacher and Mary Matilda 
( Wildman) Hoyt, was born on March 2, 1832, in Danbury, Conn., 
w^hich was his residence during his whole life. He joined the 
class at the beginning of Sophomore year. 

After graduation he was in mercantile business in Danbury 
until 1893. In 1867 he was also Inspector of Internal Revenue, 
and in 1868 Supervisor of Internal RevQpue for Connecticut and 
Rhode Island. Since 1893 he had been Cashier of the Gas and 
Ele.ctric Light Company. His death was due to liver complaint, 
and occurred at his home on April 15, 1904. He was 72 years 
of age. 

He married, on September 9, 1862, Frances, daughter of Rev. 
Enoch S. Huntington (Amherst 1831), formerly pastor of the 
Second Congregational Church in Danbury, and had one son and 
two daughters, who, with Mrs. Hoyt, survive him. 

Charlton Thomas Lewis, son of Joseph J. and Mary Sinton 
(Miner) Lewis, was born on February 25, 1834, in West Chester, 
Pa. He was Class Poet, and was especially distinguished in 
mathematics during his college course. 

After graduation he studied law in his father's office in West 
Chester until the spring of 1854, when he entered the ministry of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was appointed by the Phil- 
adelphia Conference to the Newark Circuit. He was stationed 
first in Wilmington, Del., in March, 1855, and the following year 



325 

at the Broad Street Churcb, Philadelphia. He then accepted an 
appointment as Professor of Languages in the State Normal 
University of Illinois, at Bloomington. After a year there, he 
was Professor of Mathematics a year, and then Professor of 
Greek in Troy (N. Y.) University. He was Acting President of 
the latter institution in 1^62. In December of that year he 
became pastor of an Independent Methodist Church in Cincin- 
nati. 

In 1863-64 he was Deputy Commissioner of Internal Revenue 
at Washington, and then removed to New York City, where he 
remained afterward engaged in the practice of law. He began 
his New York career in association with Hon. Samuel S. Cox, in 
the firm of Lewis & Cox, which devoted itself largely to suits 
arising in the construction of Internal Revenue Laws. After the 
reduction of Internal Revenue to a peace basis, he gained a high 
reputation as an authority on insurance law, and for more than 
twenty years was counsel to the Mutual Life Insurance Company 
of New York. In 1898 he lectured at Cornell University on the 
Principles of Insurance, and in 1899 at Harvard and Columbia 
Universities on Life Insurance. From 1873 to 1878 he was 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Chamber of Life Insurance of the 
United States. He was also a Director in the International Bell 
Telephone Company, North American Trust Company, United 
States Mortgage and Trust Company, and other business corpo- 
rations. 

For many years he made a study of the question of treatment 
of criminals, and did most effective service in behalf of reform in 
the administration of prisons and public charities. From 1881 
he was Chairman of the Executive Committee of the New York 
Prison Association, and from 1893 President of the Association, 
annually reelected. He was Delegate of the United States to the 
International Prison Congress at Paris in 1895, in the same year 
Chairman of the Commission to Revise the Penal Laws of New 
Jersey, Vice-President of the National Prison Association in 
1897, and Delegate of New Jersey to the National Prison Con- 
gress at Philadelphia in 1901. He was a member of the Board 
of Managers of the New Jersey State Reformatory in 1901, and 
was reappointed in 1903. During the last ten years he was also 
President of the State Charities Aid Association of New Jersey. 

He was a brilliant classical scholar and spent many jaars in 
the preparation of "Harper's Latin Dictionary," 1879; new 



326 

edition 1896. With this as a basis he also published " The Latin 
Dictionary for Schools," 1889, and "The Elementary Latin Dic- 
tionary," 1891. He translated Bengel's "Gnomon of the New- 
Testament," 2 vols., 1861-63, which has been often republished 
as the Tract Society's " Critical English New Testament," and 
wrote "A History of Germany," founded on David Mtiller's 
"History of the German People," 18Y4. In 1895 he edited 
"Harper's Book of Facts," and in 1901 a translation of "The 
Letters of Prince Bismarck to his Wife." Besides these he wrote 
literary essays, poems, anniversary addresses, and contributions 
to journals and newspapers. In 1870-71 he was Managing 
Editor of the New York Evening Post. 

He was one of the most steadfast members of the Greek Club 
of New York, which has met at stated intervals every winter for 
forty years to read Greek together, and during this time has been 
in course more than once through the entire range of Greek liter- 
ature. He was also a member of the New York Historical 
Society, the American Mathematical Society, the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art, and many social and literary clubs. He gave 
little time to politics, but was a Delegate from New Jersey to 
the National Democratic Convention in 1896. He received the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy from New York University in 
1877, and Doctor of Laws from Harvard University in 1903. 

Dr. Lewis cared little about personal fame but sought every 
kind of knowledge for its own sake, and after mastering it 
delighted in changing his field of study. The night and morn- 
ing before his sudden illness he passed at Columbia University 
Library pursuing studies in Dante, in which he had been greatly 
interested in his last years. 

For many years Dr. Lewis resided at Morristown, N. J., and 
there he died, of cerebro-spinal meningitis, on May 26, 1904. 
He was 70 years of age. 

He married, on July 25, 1861, Nancy Dunlap, daughter of 
Joseph and Elizabeth (Farley) McKeen, of Brunswick, Me., who 
died in 1883. He afterward married Margaret P., daughter of 
Rev. Thomas Sherrard and his wife, Valeria G. Sherrard, of 
Tecumseh, Michigan. Of the four children by the first marriage 
three are living. The elder son (Yale 1883) died in 1887. The 
younger son (Yale 1886) is Emily Sanford Professor of English 
Literature in Yale University. One of the daughters graduated 
from Smith College in 1895. By the second marriage he had a 
son and a daughter, who, with their niother, survive. 



32T 



1854 



Bennet Jason Bristol, son of Hiel and Anna C. (Potter) 
Bristol, was born at Naugatuck, Conn., on September 15, 1833. 

After graduation he taught two years at SufReld, Conn., a year 
at Bedford, N. Y., two years as Principal of the High School at 
Geneva, N. Y., and two years as teacher of natural science at the 
Connecticut Literary Institution, Suffield, Conn. During the 
school year 1861-62 he was principal of the High School and 
Superintendent of Schools of Racine, Wise, but from July, 1862, 
devoted his time entirely to medical study. He attended lectures 
at Ann Arbor, Mich., during the winter of 1862-63, and in March, 
1863, went to Freeport, 111., where he continued his medical studies 
and occasionally practiced until June of that year, when he was 
sent with others by the Illinois Sanitary Commission to Vicks- 
burg. Miss., to care for sick and wounded soldiers. He then went 
to Memphis, where he was appointed Acting Assistant Surgeon, 
U. S. A., and ordered to hospital service. In August, 1863, he 
was appointed First Assistant Surgeon of the 59th Regiment, 
IT. S. Colored Infantry, which was in service in Tennessee and 
Mississippi, and two years later was appointed its Surgeon, and 
served until mustered out on January 31, 1866. 

He then attended medical lectures at the Long Island College 
Hospital, and received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1866. 
Returning to Freeport, 111., he intended to settle there perma- 
nently, but in April, 1867, he moved to Webster Groves, Mo., a 
suburb of St. Louis, then ten miles distant from the city. He 
was one of the founders of the place, for ten years a member of 
its School Board, and for most of that time President of the 
same. In 1878 he was elected Coroner of St. Louis County, but 
declined a renomination. He was a deacon and trustee of the 
Congregational church for many years, and member of the stand- 
ing committee from 1866 till the time of his death. 

Dr. Bristol died at his home on November 28, 1903, after an 
illness of five weeks originating from the grip. He was 70 years 
of age. 

He married, on November 21, 1855, Emma Jane, daughter of 
Ruel and Enieline Carrington, of New Haven, Conn. She died 
on January 2, 1857, leaving an infant son, who died in 1859. Dr. 
Bristol married again, in 1859, Henrietta, daughter of Ralph and 
Charlotte (Watterman) Swift, of Geneva, N. Y., and had two 
sons and three daughters, of whom one daughter died in child- 



328 

hood. Mrs. Bristol died on February 27, 1903. One son grad- 
uated with the degree of Bachelor of Science from Washington 
University, St. Louis, in 1896. 

1855 

Frederick Alvord, son of Martin and Martha Burleigh 
(Clark) Alvord, was born in Bolton, Tolland County, Conn., on 
December 5, 1828. 

Before entering college he taught district schools, and for three 
months following graduation he taught in an academy at North 
Scituate, R. I., and then began his theological course at East 
Windsor (now Hartford Theological Seminary), from which he 
graduated in 1857. He was licensed to preach by the Hartford 
Fourth Association on September 23 of that year, and supplied 
the pulpit of the church at Byfield, Mass., until the following 
April. On July 21, 1858, he was ordained and installed pastor 
at Chicopee Falls, Mass., but in November, 1 860, was dismissed 
on account of impaired health, after which he resided six years in 
Monson, Mass., to care for his wife's parents, in the njean time 
preaching as his health would allow, successively in Ludlow, 
Mass., West Stafford, Conn., and Walpole, N. H. To the last 
he received a call, but felt obliged to decline. He was settled 
over the church at Darien, Conn., on December 26, 1866, and was 
dismissed on June 8, 1869, in order to accept a call from the First 
Congregational Church in Nashua, N. H. During his pastorate 
there of nearly fourteen years two hundred and ninety persons 
were added to the membership. Soon after the close of his work 
there he spent a year in New Haven, and in April, 1885, became 
acting pastor of the church in Canton Center, Conn., whose call 
he had declined in 1857. He remained there four years, and after- 
ward preached for varying periods at Rochester, Mass., and South 
Windsor and Vernon Center, Conn. After a delightful expe- 
rience of nearly forty-two years as a minister he retired in 1897, 
and since 1900 had lived in Newton Center, Mass., the home of two 
of his sons. There he died of general debility on December 27, 
1903, at the age of 75 years. 

He married, on October 21, 1857, Susan Gridley, daughter of 
Rev. Alfred Ely (Princeton 1804), for sixty years pastor of the 
Congregational church in Monson, Mass., and Susan (Gridley) Ely. 
Mrs. Alvord died in 1902, but their three sons and three daugh- 
ters all survive. Two of his sons graduated from Amherst Col- 
lege, respectively, in 1884 and 1887. 



329 

Mr. Alvord was the author of a "History of the Church of 
Christ in Dunstable, now the First Congregational Church in 
Nashua, N. H.," 1876, and a " Historical Sketch of the Congre- 
gational Church and Parish of Canton Center, formerly West 
Simsbury" (Conn.), 1886. He delivered a number of memorial 
sermons, in 1887 wrote an article for the Neio Englander and 
Yale Review on " The Bible," and occasionally contributed to the 
newspapers. A tract on "The Church and Church Going" was 
widely circulated. 

Lyman Dennison Brewster, son of Daniel and Harriet 
(Averill) Brewster, was born in Salisbury, Conn., on July 31, 1832. 
He was a descendant in the sixth generation from Elder Brews- 
ter of the Plymouth Colony. He prepared for college at Wil- 
liams Academy in Stockbridge, Mass. 

After graduation he began the study of law at Danbury with 
Hon. Roger Averill, subsequently Lieutenant-Governor of the 
State. In 1857 he traveled in England, Switzerland, and Italy, 
and after his return was admitted to the Connecticut bar, Jan- 
uary 21, 1858. He formed a partnership with Elias Fry under 
the firm name of Brewster & Fry, and was later associated with 
his former preceptor, Mr. Averill. In 1871 he became associated 
with Samuel Tweedy (Yale 1868), and in 1878 Howard W. Scott 
was admitted to the firm, then known as Brewster, Tweedy & 
Scott. This firm was dissolved in 1892, and the following year 
Samuel A. Davis (LL.B. Yale 1893), and in 1899 his nephew, J. 
Moss Ives (LL.B. Yale 1-899), came into the business with him, 
the title of the firm being Brewster, Davis & Ives. 

He confined himself closely to the practice of his profession 
and became very successful as a trial lawyer. His thorough prep- 
aration of cases and the clearness of his briefs were generally 
recognized. He was counsel in many important cases in his own 
county, but his success in the suit invalidating the will of Hon. 
Samuel J. Tilden (Yale 1837) brought wide reputation. 

In 1868 he was Judge of Probate, and in 1870 he was ap- 
pointed the first Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Fair- 
field County and served four years. In 1870, 1878, and 1879 he 
represented Danbury in the lower house of the State Legislature. 
In the latter years he served on the Judiciary Committee, and in 
1878 also as chairman of the Committee on Constitutional 
Amendments and as a member of the Committee on a Reformed 



330 

Civil Procedure, whose work resulted in the drafting and adop- 
tion of the present Practice Act. In 1880 and 1881 he was a 
member of the State Senate and chairman of the Judiciary Com- 
mittee. 

Judge Brewster devoted much time during the later years of his 
life to the movement for uniform state laws and was largely 
instrumental in securing the general adoption of the Negotiable In- 
struments Act. From 1890 to 1903 he was chairman of tl^e Com- 
mittee on Uniform State Laws of the American Bar Association, 
and in 1896 was elected President of the National Conference 
of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws, being reelected each 
year until his resignation in 190L He was an earnest advocate 
of the codification of all branches of Commercial Law, and his 
last work was the preparation of a paper on " A Commercial 
Code," which he read before the New York State Bar Associa- 
tion at its meeting in Albany in January, 1903. Almost imme- 
diately after reading this paper he was stricken with paralysis, 
but recovered to a large degree. He died in sleep at his home in 
Danbury on February 14, 1904, in the 72d year of his age. 

He was identified with the Danbury Public Library, the Dan- 
bury Relief Society, the Danbury Hospital, and other local 
institutions. 

He was the poet of his class, and both in college and since 
graduation wrote a number of poems which were recently gath- 
ered in a booklet entitled *■' Youth and Yale." 

He married, on January 1, 1868, Sarah Amelia, daughter of 
George W. and Sarah (Wilcox) Ives of Danbury, who survives 
him. They had no children. 

Edaiund Woodward Brovtn, son of Edmund and Harriett 
(Woodward) Brown, was born at Burdett, Schuyler County, 
N. Y., on November 3, 1831. 

In the September after graduation he entered Andover Theo- 
logical Seminary, but the following February he went to Union 
Seminary, where he completed his course in 1858. He began 
preaching in July, 1858, at Cornwall, Conn., during the early 
part of 1859 supplied the Second Presbyterian Church at Alex- 
andria, Va., and for the remainder of that year in his native 
place. From then until 1865 he was at West Dresden, Yates 
County, and on January 9, 1861, was ordained by the Presby- 
tery of Geneva. After a year's work as missionary of the Synod 



331 

of Utica he served successively the churches at Carthage two 
years, North Bergen a year, Wellsville about two years, Peach 
Orchard in 18V3, and his earlier charges, Burdett and West 
Dresden, five years. For a number of years he resided in Ithaca, 
but in 1895 removed to Palo Alto, Cal., where the following year 
he built a home. 

In 1885 he published *' The Life of Society," and in 1895 "The 
Divine^Ind welling." He contributed articles to the New Eng- 
lander and Popular Science Monthly^ and after settling in Cali- 
fornia became Associate Editor of The Occident, a Presbyterian 
paper of San Francisco. 

Mr. Brown died of heart failure at San Francisco, Cal., on 
May 29, 1902, in the Vlst year of his age. 

He married, on February 2, 1860, -at Goldsboro, N. C, Martha 
Day, daughter of Rev. John Calkins Coit (Yale 1818), who was 
for many years pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Cheraw, 
S. C, and had six daughters and two sons, all of whom are liv- 
ing. A son graduated in 1890 and a daughter in 1882 from Cor- 
nell University, another son and daughter from Syracuse Univer- 
sity, respectively in 1885 and 1890, and two daughters from 
Leland Stanford Junior University in 1898 and 1902, respect- 
ively. 

Hart Gibson, son of Tobias and Louisiana Breckenridge 
(Hart) Gibson, A^as born on May 22, 1835, at Shawnee Springs, 
Mercer County, Ky., but was prepared for college by a private 
tutor on his father's large plantation in Terrebonne Parish, La., 
and entered Yale from Transylvania University. 

After graduation he studied law part of a year in Harvard 
Law School, then went abroad with his brothers, and during the 
next three years traveled widely. On his return he entered the 
law office of Breckenridge & Beck in Lexington, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in the fall of 1859. He did not practice, how- 
ever, but devoted himself to farming in the adjoining county of 
Woodford. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War he joined the Confederate 
army on September 2, 1861, with authority to raise a regiment of 
cavalry, and just a year later was commissioned Colonel of Cav- 
alry. He served as Adjutant-General in General Buford's Ken- 
tucky Cavalry throughout the Kentucky campaign, and remained 
with him until after the battle of Murfreesboro. He was then 



332 

Adjutant-General with rank of Major in General John H. 
Morgan's Cavalry Division during the expedition through Indi- 
ana and Ohio. He was captured near New Lisbon, O., on July 
26, 1863, and imprisoned with other Confederate officers eight 
months in the State prison at Columbus. On March 27, 1864, he 
was transferred to Fort Delaware, and the next October was ex- 
changed, reaching home on October 17. He was afterwards 
Inspector-General on the staff of General Echols in West Vir- 
ginia and East Tennessee, served with gallantry under General 
Jubal Early, and surrendered with General Johnston in North 
Carolina in April, 1865. He received his parole at Greensboro, 
on May 1, 1865. Five of his brothers were in the Confederate 
service, one of whom graduated from Yale in 1853. 

From 1867 to 1869 he was. a member of the Kentucky House 
of Representatives, and afterward was occupied in farming and 
stock raising in Kentucky, and sugar planting in Louisiana. 
From 1870 to 1876 he was editor of the Daily Press of Lexing- 
ton. 

He was especially well-read in history, but deeply interested in 
current questions. He was without political ambition, preferring 
the life of a private citizen. He was a Trustee of Kentucky 
State College. During the last twenty-five years he resided at 
*'Ingleside," Lexington. While visiting at the home of his 
daughter, Mrs. Harrison G. Foster, in St. Paul, Minn., he died of 
heart failure on January 3, 1904, at the age of 68 years. 

He married, at Duncannon, near Lexington, Ky., on September 
22, 1859, Mary, daughter of Major Henry T. and Eliza (Pyke) 
Duncan, and had four sons and three daughters, of whom the 
daughters and two of the sons with their mother survive. 

Granville Toucey Pierce, son of Erastus and Elosia (Piatt) 
Pierce, was born in South Britain, in the town of Southbury, 
Conn., on September 28, 1834. 

After graduation he studied law in Cleveland, O., for a year, 
and after an interval practiced that profession for a year. He 
was a member of the U. S. Navy for several years, making a 
cruise as an Assistant Engineer in the U. S. Frigate Roanoke in 
1856-57 ; was appointed Purser, with the rank of Lieutenant, 
November 4, 1858, and was then Paymaster until September, 
1862. Before the Civil War he was stationed in the Caribbean 
Sea and Gulf of Mexico, the West Indies, and along the South 



333 

American coast, afterward blockading Pensacola, Mobile, and 
New Orleans, and having charge of the Naval Depot at Key 
West. From March, 1865, he lived in Cheshire, Conn., engaged 
in farming, but in 1872 removed to South Britain. In 1867 he 
was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives, and 
was for several years Town Clerk, and also held other local 
offices. In 1887 he removed to Somerville, Mass., and with his 
son was engaged in entomological work in the service of the 
State of Massachusetts, especially in connection with the exter- 
mination of the gypsy moth. 

Mr. Pierce died of heart failure at Somerville, on April 10, 
1904. He was in the 70th year of his age. 

He married, on December 14, 1864, Henrietta L., daughter of 
Truman W. and Anthanette (Hurlbut) Judson, of Roxbury, 
Conn., and had a daughter and a son. Mrs. Pierce and the son 
are living, but the daughter died in 1890. 

Alfred Perkins Rockwell, son of John Arnold and Mary 
Watkinson (Perkins) Rockwell, was born in Norwich, Conn., on 
October 15, 1834. In Sophomore year he pulled an oar in the 
first regatta between Yale and Harvard. 

After graduation he studied chemistry two years in the Sheffield 
Scientific School, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy 
in 1858, also the same year the degree of Master of Arts in 
course. He studied mining a year in the Museum of Practical 
Geology in London, and a year in the School of Mines in Frei- 
berg, Saxony. 

He then returned to the United States, and at the outbreak of 
the Civil War he joined a regular United States Battery (Tid- 
ball's), and served as a volunteer Second Lieutenant. On January 
21, 1862, he was commissioned Captain of the First Connecticut 
Light Battery, went with his command to South Carolina, and 
served on the Atlantic coast for over two years. He was espe- 
cially mentioned in reports for his part in the attack on the Con- 
federate fort at Secessionville, June 16, 1862, and in actions on 
James Island in 1863. In April, 1864, he joined the Army of 
tlie James, and in June he was commissioned Colonel and took 
command of the Sixth Connecticut Infantry, with which he 
Served until he retired in 1865. 

The actions in which Colonel Rockwell's command received 
si)ecial mention, during this time, were the reconnoissance, Octo- 



334 

ber 1, up under the defences of Richmond, the battles in the 
same month on the Darbytown and Newmarket Roads, and the 
capture of Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865. In November he- 
commanded one of the Brigades in Hawley's provisional divis- 
ion in the expedition to New York for the preservation of order. 
Upon the expiration of his three years of service (on March 13, 
1865), he was brevetted by the President, Brigadier-General of 
U. S. Voliinteers. In June, 1865, he served on the board of 
visitors to the U. S. Military Academy at West Point. 

In July, 1865, he was appointed Professor of Mining in the 
Sheffield Scientific School, but in 1868 accepted a similar position 
in the Massachusets Institute of Technology,which he held for five 
years. From 1873 to 1876 he was Chairman of the Board of Fire 
Commissioners of Boston, and from 1876 to 1879 President of 
the Eastern Railroad Co. In 1879 he became Treasurer of the 
Great Falls (N. H.) Manufacturing Co., and retained that office 
until his retirement from active business in 1886. In the spring 
of 1888 he went abroad, and spent two years in various parts of 
Europe and in Egypt, and in 1894 again went abroad for a year 
of scientific study. In 1896 he published " Roads and Pave- 
ments in France." He was one of the trustees of the Military 
Historical Society of Massachusetts, to which he contributed a 
valuable paper entitled " Operations against Charleston." He 
also edited Vols. Ill and IV of the Society's Papers. 

At the Millenary Celebration ot King Alfred the Great at 
Winchester, England, in September, 1901, he was the official 
representative of Yale University, and replied to the toast for 
the American Ambassador, at his request. For many years his 
home in winter was in Boston and in summer in Manchester, 
Mass. 

He was a member of the Geological Society of France, the 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Boston Natural 
History Society, and of various social clubs in Boston. 

General Rockwell died suddenly of heart failure soon after 
reaching New Haven for a holiday visit, on December 24, 1903. 
He was 69 years of age. 

He married, on June 20, 1865, Katheriue Virginia, daughter 
of Samuel E. and Elizabeth (Elliott) Foote, of New Haven. Mrs. 
Rockwell died in 1902, and of the four children — three daughters 
and one son — but one daughter survives. 



I 



335 



1856 



Charles Edward Fellowes, son of Francis Fellowes (Am- 
herst 1826) and Mary (Colton) Fellowes, was born in Hartford, 
Conn., on June 17, 1834. 

After graduation he was engaged in teaching in Bloomfield, 
N. J., two years, then studied law in his father's office in Hart- 
ford a year, and was admitted to the bar on July 26, 1859. With 
his brother and classmate, Frank, he was for some time in part- 
nership with his father in the firm of Francis Fellowes & Sons, 
and from 1866 to 1869 in the firm of Hamersley & Fellowes. In 
1866-67 he was Executive Secretary to Governor Hawley, and in 
1872-73 was City Auditor of Hartford. On September 1, 1869, 
upon the organization of the Court of Common Pleas of Hartford 
County, he was appointed Clerk, and performed his duties with 
accuracy and intelligence for over thirty years, until compelled 
by ill health to resign on March 6, 1900. He continued his law 
practice for a time after this appointment, but the duties of the 
office so increased as to absorb all his time. In 1872-73 he as- 
sisted John Hooker, Esq. (Yale 1837), in preparing for publication 
the Reports of the Supreme Court. For the last three years he 
resided with his son (Yale 1888) in Derby, Conn., where he 
died of Bright's disease, on February 29, 1904, in the 70th year 
of his age. 

Mr. Fellowes married, on June 20, 1861, Emily Clarissa, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Therun Baldwin (Yale 1827) and Caroline (Wilder) 
Baldwin, and sister of Theron Baldwin (Yale 1861) and Henry 
Baldwin (Yale 1871). A son and a daughter are living. The 
latter married the Rev. Frank I. Paradise (Yale 1888). Mps. Fel- 
lowes died in 1901. 

1857 

Henry Powers, son of Samuel Powers and Elizabeth (War- 
ner) Powers, was born in Hadley, Mass., on December 28, 1833. 
Owing to ill health he left college near the end of Sophomore 
year, and sailed for Europe, spending about a year and a half in 
Germany, mostly in Dresden, and in the spring of 1857 journey- 
ing to Turkey and Asia Minor. He returned to the United Stales 
in the fall of that year, and entered the Theological Institute of 
Connecticut at East Windsor (now Hartford Theological Semi- 
nary). Upon graduation in 1860 he also received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts from Yale College, and was enrolled with his 
class. 



336 

He was licensed to preach by the Hartford Fourth Association 
and was installed pastor of the Congregational Church in Mitti- 
neague (West Springfield), Mass., in October, 1860, and remained 
there until the spring of 1863, when he became Field Agent of 
the U. S. Christian Commission and served in that capacity with 
the armies of the Cumberland, Potomac and James till the end 
of the Civil War. In July, 1865, he was installed over the Second 
Congregational Church in Danbury, Conn., but resigned in 
March, 1869, and was then pastor of the Elm Place Congrega- 
tional Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., for about three years, when he 
resigned on account of a fundamental change in his theological 
views. 

Having adopted the Unitarian belief, he was installed Pastor 
of the Second Congregational Unitarian Church, in New York 
City, known as the Church of the Messiah, on November 24, 1872, 
and during his pastorate of two years brought the church back 
to harmony and prosperity. He then accepted a call to the Uni- 
tarian Church in Manchester, N. H., and also took charge of the 
missionary work of the denomination in New Hampshire. He 
succeeded in largely increasing the strength and numbers of the 
churches in the State, but in 1883 a series of family misfortunes 
and losses compelled him to give up the ministry and go into 
business. 

From this date until 1892 he was actively engaged as a broker 
in Wall street. New York City, but devoted his leisure to the 
study of social and political economy under American conditions. 
He took part in the City Municipal League campaign in 1890, lec- 
tured in the Public School Evening Courses, was employed by 
the Republican National Committee as a campaign speaker in 
1892 and 1900, and since 1892, when he returned to Boston, had 
devoted all his time to writing and speaking on social, industrial, 
and political subjects. 

Mr. Powers died of a periurethral abscess at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital in Boston, on December 12, 1903, having nearly 
completed his 70th year. 

He married, on August 21, 1861, Julia Maria, only child of 
Colonel Samuel Tudor Wolcott, of South Windsor, Conn., and had 
two sons, the elder of whom was a member of the class of 1886 
in Harvard University, and graduated from the Harvard Law 
School in 1898. Mrs. Powers died, after many years of invalid- 
ism, on October 14, 1891. 



337 

William Boyd Wilson, son of Alexander Culbertson and 
Catherine (Stine) Wilson, was born at Lewistown, Mifflin County, 
Pa., on April 3, 1834, but entered college from Philadelphia. 

After graduation he was connected with the early development 
of Ceredo, Wayne County, W. Va., and in the fall of 1857 started 
tho Ceredo Crescent^ which he edited for two years. In Decem- 
ber, 1859, he leased the paper, but was afterward for many years 
occupied in the business management of the Louisville Courier- 
Journal. He also engaged in farming, and in 1864 purchased a 
farm of two hundred acres at Middletown, near Lexington, Ky. 

His life was very active, and he uniformly enjoyed the best 
health. His death was due to heart failure, and occurred at his 
home near Louisville, Ky., on August 23, 1903, at the age of 69 
years. For most of his life he was deacon, elder, or trustee of 
the Presbyterian church. 

He married, on January 10, 1860, Sallie L., daughter of Basil 
and Tabitha (Mackoy) Waring, of Greenup County, Ky., who 
survives him with two sons and two daughters. One daughter 
died in 1862. One son is a graduate of the Law School of Wash- 
ington and Lee University. 

1858 

Abner Weyman Colgate, son of Robert and Cornelia Frances 
(Weyman) Colgate, was born in New York City on August 30, 
1838. 

After graduation he spent six months in travel in Europe, and 
then engaged in manufacturing white lead and linseed oil, at 
first as a clerk, but from 1861 as a partner with his father in the 
firm of R. Colgate & Co. in New York City, founders of the 
Atlantic White Lead Co., which had an extensive manufactory 
in Brooklyn. He retired from active business in the firm in 
1878, but retained his private office until 1895. 

He made many trips abroad, and on account of delicate health 
spent his winters for some ten years in the South and more 
recently in California, where he died suddenly of heart failure at 
Pasadena, on March 20, 1904. He was in his 66th year. Upon 
entering business he resided for a time in the family home at 
Riverdale, N. Y., then again in New York City, but since 1895 
his home had been in Morristown, N. J. There he carried on 
astronomical study in his well-equipped observatory, and showed 
much skill in water-color painting and in architectural design. A 



338 

number of his works were seen at exhibitions of the American 
Water Color Society and Architectural League. He was a mem- 
ber of the American Museum of Natural History, the Metropoli- 
tan Museum of Art, and the American Geographical Society. 

Mr. Colgate married in New York City, on November 23, 
1860, Charlotte Elizabeth, daughter of Stephen M. and Elizabeth 
A. (Hoyt) Blake. She died in 1880, and in 1883 he married 
Margaret, daughter of George and Eliza P. (Kernochan) Garr, 
who survives him. He had no children. He was a member of 
Saint Peter's Protestant Episcopal Church, Morristown. 

Ralph Hastings Cuttek, son of John Hastings and Susan 
(Pool) Cutter, was born in Louisville, Ky,, on November 4, 1835. 
During the third term of Freshman year he left Yale College and 
took his Sophomore and part of Junior year at Harvard, but in 
January, 1857, he returned to New Haven and completed his 
course with the class. 

After graduation he spent two months in the office of Hon. 
Rufus Choate (Bartm. 1 819) in Boston, and later studied law in 
Burlington, Vt., but for over ten years he suffered greatly from 
ill health. He was at home in Hollis, N. H., for a time, and 
made a sea voyage to California, but for about six years his mind 
was seriously affected. In 1869 he fully recovered his health, 
and after three years of study was admitted to the bar in Nashua, 
N. H., in May, 1872, and practiced there until the autumn of 
1877. x^fter spending a few months in Boston, he went to 
Georgia, where he practiced several years in Bainbridge, and 
short periods in Barnesville and Gainsville. In March, 1883, he 
was appointed United States Circuit Court Commissioner for the 
Northern District of Georgia, for the trial of offenders against 
the revenue laws, and for a year he held an executive position in 
Dawson (Ga.) College. Afterward his health again failed, but 
life on a farm restored his vigor. Later he practiced in Boston 
for three or four years, and was then in Nashua, N. H., for sev- 
eral years. He died of paralysis, in Taunton, Mass., on February 
19, 1904, at the age of 68 years. He w^as much interested in 
theology and a frequent writer for magazines. 

Mr. Cutter married, in Bainbridge, Ga., on February 21, 1878, 
Mrs. Mildred Middleton (Dickenson) Hines, daughter of James 
E. and Ellen (Middleton) Dickenson. Of their children — one, 
son and three daughters — the youngest daughter died in earlyj 
childhood. The son and eldest daughter were twins. 



E 



339 



ENRY RoYER, SOU of Ilon. Joseph Royer, Associate Judge of 
the Courts of Montgomery County, and Elizabeth (Dewees) 
Royer, was born in Trappe, Pa., on July 9, 1837. 

After graduation he took up the study of law, and in Feb- 
ruary, 1859, entered the office of Hon. Francis W. Hughes in 
Pottsville, Pa. He continued there over two years, and was 
then admitted to the bar. 

On Septeniber 23, 1861, he was made First-Lieutenant of Com- 
pany H, 96th Pennsylvania Infantry, and on March 4, 1862, 
became Captain of the same company. He resigned on January 
11, 1863, but on July 6 of the same year was made Colonel of 
the 53d Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia. Six weeks later this 
regiment was mustered out of service, and he resumed his prac- 
tice in Pottsville. In December, 1864, he retired from the law 
and engaged in the dry goods business in Pottsville as a member 
of the firm of Whitfield & Royer. 

In 1865 he purchased a farm in Schuylkill County, Pa., and to 
this he devoted his exclusive attention from 1872 to 1875. He 
then resumed the dry goods business, and in 1890 admitted his 
son to partnership, the firm thereafter being H. Royer & Son. 
Unremitting application to work broke down his health, and in 
September, 1893, he went to Denver, Col., where he remained 
until the spring of 1897. His health seeming then to be entirely 
reestablished he returned home, but in the latter part of the same 
year he again went to Denver, where he died suddenly of heart 
failure on February 12, 1903. He was in the 66th year of his 
age. / 

He married in Hagerstown, Md., on October 13, 1862, Mary 
M., daughter of Joseph and Ellen (Dornan) Whitfield, of Potts- 
ville, Pa., and had one son and two daughters, of whom the elder 
daughter graduated from Smith College in 1895. Mrs. Royer's 
death preceded his own by one year. One son and two daughters 
survive him, also two brothers, one of whom graduated from 
Princeton College in 1842, and both of whom received the degree 
of M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania — in 1843 and 1845, 
respectively. 

George Edward Street, son of Colonel Thaddeus and Mar- 
tlia Davenport (Reynolds) Street, was born in Cheshire, Conn., 
on June 18, 1835. 

After graduation he taught the High School in Stonington, 
Conn., two years, .and then entered Andover Theological Semi- 



340 

nary, graduating therefrom in 1863. From the middle of Febru- 
ary to the last of April of that year he was in the service of the 
LT. S. Christian Commission, mostly at Potomac Creek and 
Stoneman's Switch, near Fredericksburg, Va. He was prevented 
from accepting the chaplaincy of the 63d Pennsylvania Infantry 
by an attack of diphtheria. 

After preaching several months at Wiscasset, Me, he was 
ordained pastor of the Congregational church on April 6, 1864, 
and remained there until February 28, 1871. On March 30, he 
was installed over the Second (now Phillips) Congregational 
Church in Exeter, N. H., beginning a pastorate which continued 
most happily for twenty-eight years, when he was made pastor 
emeritus and granted the free use of the parsonage for life. He 
left a permanent impress upon the lives of many of the students 
of Phillips Academy, and was deeply interested in the higher 
life of the community. He did much to secure the improvement 
of Gilman Park, of which he was trustee, and at the two 
hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the town, in 1888, secured 
the erection of a monument marking the spot where White- 
field preached his last sermon. Through ecclesiastical gather- 
ings and in other ways he exerted a wide influence in the State, 
and was the first President of the Piscataqua Congregational 
Club. 'In 1897 he was elected a (^orporate member of the Ameri- 
can Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. He received 
the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from Dartmouth 
College in 1900. 

He made several trips abroad, spending a year, in 1883-84, in 
Europe and Palestine, and in 1891 attending the International 
Congregational Council in London as a delegate. He frequently 
described his travels in letters in the local press, to which he 
also contributed articles on topics of special interest. He pub- 
lished a number of biographical sermons, among them memo- 
rial addresses on Rev. Erasmus D. Eldridge, Amos Tuck and 
John Phillips, D.D., also a '* Commemorative Discourse on the 
Fifty-seventh Anniversary of the Reorganization of the Second 
Church, Exeter," 1889, and had completed for early publication, 
" Mount Desert, in History, Literature and Modern Life," having 
had for many years a summer home at Southwest Harbor on that 
island. 

Dr. Street died of heart disease at the home of his son-in-law, 
Rev. William W. Ranney, in Hartford, Conn, on December 26, 
1903, at the age of 68 years. 



341 

He married, on September 7, 1865, Mary Evarts, youngest 
daughter of Rev. Rufus Anderson, D.D., LL.D. (Bowdoin 1818), 
for nearly thirty-five years Foreign Secretary of the American 
Board, and Eliza (Hill) Anderson, and had one son and three 
daughters, of whom the son and one daughter, with their mother, 
survive. The son graduated from the Academical Department 
in 1891. 

1859 

HE>fiiY MA.RTYN BoiES, SOU of Joscph Miltou and Electa Caro- 
line (Laflin) Boies, was born at Lee, Mass., on August 18, 1837, 
but entered the class from Saugerties, N, Y. He passed a portion 
of the first term of the previous year as a Freshman in the pre- 
ceding class. 

Part of the year after graduation he spent in Chicago, where 
he joined the Zouaves, organized by Colonel Elmer E. Ellsworth, 
and then returned to Saugerties. During the next four or five 
years he was engaged in the freighting and forwarding business in 
the firm of Silver & Boies. Part of this time he resided at 
Tivoli, on the opposite bank of the Hudson River, where he was 
also Postmaster. In the fall of 1865 he settled in Scranton, Pa., 
and entered the firm of Laflin, Boies & Turck, which, in 1869, 
was consolidated with the Moosic Powder Company, and of this 
he was President for over 30 years. In order to prevent the 
many fatal accidents due to careless handling of cartridges by 
lamplight, he invented a cartridge package which was extensively 
used. In 1882 he became President of the Dickson Manufactur- 
ing Company, which he reorganized, enlarging and improving its 
property, and four years later built the Boies Steel Car Wheel 
Works for the manufacture of an improved steel-tired car wheel 
of his own invention. He was also President of the Enterprise 
Powder Manufacturing Company, and a director of other leading 
manufacturing companies, one of the incorporators and for ,ten 
years director of the Third National Bank, and in 1887 was 
elected President of the Board of Trade of Scranton. He was 
a member of the executive committee of the Municipal League, 
a trustee of the Scranton Public Library, and at one time a mem- 
ber of the City Board of Public Instruction. In 1884 he was a 
delegate to the Republican National Convention in Chicago. 

During the labor troubles of 1877 he organized the City Guard, 
of which he was chosen Commander, and when this body was 
mustered into the National Guard he became Major. In 1878 



342 

the independent companies were consolidated with the battalion 
to form the Thirteenth Regiment, and of this he was appointed 
Colonel. He brought the regiment to a high degree of efficiency, 
but at the end of live years business duties compelled him to 
decline a reelection. 

Colonel Boise was appointed a member of the Board of Public 
Charities of Pennsylvania in 1886, serving on the executive com- 
mittee and committee on lunacy. He was a member of the 
National Prison Association, and various other philanthropic 
societies. As a result of thorough study of crime and pauperism 
he published, in 1893, " Prisoners and Paupers," and in 1901, 
" The Science of Penology." He wrote lor Harper's Magazine 
(1880) on the National Guard, and occasionally contributed to 
trade periodicals. 

He ti'aveled widely and gathered many curiosities and a choice 
collection of orchids. With the religious interests of the city and 
state he was actively identified, having been President of the Trus- 
tees of the Second Presbyterian Church since 1884, Secretary and 
Trustee of the Lackawanna County Bible Society, Trustee of the 
Young Women's Christian Association, Trustee of the Young 
Men's Christian Association and President of the same from 
1870 to 1874, and from 1888 to 1890; member for many years of 
the State Executive Committee of the Young Men's Christian 
Association. While on his way home from a mission to Wash- 
ington in behalf of the State Convention of that association which 
was to be held in Scranton, he was taken ill on the train and 
died of angina pectoris in Wilkes-Barr6, on December 12, 1903. 
He was 66 years of age. 

He married, on December 26, 1861, Emma G., sister of his 
classmate, Thomas Chalmers Brainerd, and daughter of Rev. 
Tliomas Brainerd, D.D,, and Mary (Whiting) Brainerd, of 
Philadelphia, by whom he had a son and daughter. After the 
death of his first wife, in 1870, he married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Thomas and Mary (Marvine) Dickson, of Scranton. By this 
marriage he had six children — three daughters and three sons. 
A son by the first marriage (Yale 1888), and two daughters and 
one son (a member of the Senior class in Yale College) by the 
second marriage, survive him. 

Burton Norvell Harrison, son of Jesse Burton Harrison, of 
the New Orleans bar, but formerly of Virginia, and of Frances 



343 

(Brand) Harrison, was born on July 6, 1838, in New Orleans, La., 
and entered Yale the second term of Freshman year from the 
University of Mississippi. 

In the autumn after graduation, at the invitation of President 
Frederic A. P. Barnard, he became Assistant Professor of Physics 
and Tutor in Mathematics and Astronomy at the University of 
Mississippi. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War he resigned 
his position to enlist in the Confederate army, but was intercepted 
by a telegram from Jefferson Davis, asking him to become his 
Private Secretary at Richmond. He accepted, and remained 
with Mr. Davis to the end of the war. He was captured in April, 
1865, and imprisoned for nine months. For two months he was 
kept in solitary confinement in the Naval Prison of the Arsenal 
at Washington, but in January, 1866, through the intervention 
of Francis P. Blair with President Johnson, he was released. A 
narrative of his capture, written by himself, was published in 
the Century Magazine in 1883. 

Mr. Harrison had commenced the study of law in the Univer- 
sity of Mississippi, and during the- latter part of his imprison- 
ment at Fort Delaware was able to continue it with books sent 
him by his classmates Eugene Schuyler and Samuel D. Page. 
After a journey to Europe he entered the law office of Judge 
Fullerton in New York City, was admitted to the bar in Decem- 
ber, 1866, and since 1867 had practiced in that city. A brief 
partnership with his friend and former college mate (Charles 
H. Wesson, Yale 1863) was terminated by the death of the 
latter, after which he practiced alone. He was a wise coun- 
selor, and conspicuously successful before juries and in the 
higher courts. He always took an active interest in political 
matters and was Secretary to Mayor Wickham in 1875-76, and 
did effective service in the prosecution of the Tweed ring. Dur- 
ing Mr. Cleveland's second administration he declined the 
appointment of Ambassador to Rome, and afterward that of 
First Secretary of State. 

Mr. Harrison died of heart failure, at Washington, D. C, on 
March 30, 1904, in the 66th year of his age. 

He married, on November 25, 1867, Constance, daughter of 
Archibald and Monimia (Fairfax) Cary, of Virginia, and had 
three sons, who are graduates of the Academical Department, in 
1890, 1895, and 1898, respectively. Mrs. Harrison is well known 
as an author. 



344 

I860 

Erastus Chittenden Beach, son of Charles and Fanny 
(Mansir) Beach, was born in the town of Barker, Broome County, 
N. Y., on July 24, 1834. 

After graduation he devoted much of his life to teaching, first 
for about a year at West Chester, Pa., a short time at Coopers- 
town, N. Y., and then a year or more at Albion, Wise. In Se})- 
tember, 1864, he became Principal of the Cortland Village 
(N. Y.) Academy, and in July, 1866, of the Plainfield (N. J.) 
High School. In 1868 he taught at Whitney's Point, N. Y., and 
then turned his attention to fruit raising in Yineland, N. J. 
After an experience of a year or two in this, he resumed teach- 
ing, removing to Hanover, Pa. In 1875 he engaged in the drug 
business at Newport, Pa., but in 1885 moved to Cortland, 
N. Y., where he afterward resided, and where he died after an 
illness of over three years from paralysis, on May 17, 1903, in 
the 69th year of his age. He was a member of the Presbyterian 
Church from earlj'^ manhood. 

He married, on July 12, 1865, Mary C, daughter of Martin 
and. Margaret (Keep) Merrick, of Cortland, N". Y., who survives 
him. His only child died while a senior at Cornell University in 
1893. 

1861 

Theron Baldwin, son of Rev. Theron Baldwin, D.D. (Yale 
1827) and Caroline (Wilder) Baldwin, was born on March 12, 
1837, in Jacksonville, 111., where his father was at the time sta- 
tioned as Agent of the American Home Missionary Society for 
Illinois. His father was active in procuring the charter of Illi- 
nois College, and for nearly twenty years was Corresponding 
Secretary of the Society for the Promotion of Collegiate and 
Theological Education at the West. During his Senior year in 
college the son was President of the Beethoven Society. 

After graduation he was for nearly thirty years engaged in 
different lines of business in New York City, also residing there 
after about 1876, but previous to that date making his home in 
Orange, N. J. The year after graduation he was in the United 
States Quartermaster's office, and the next four years Deputy 
Collector in the Eighth Internal Revenue District. Early in 1867 
he entered the printing establishment of John F. Trow, and in 
May of the same year formed a partnership with him in the firm 
of John F. Trow & Co. In the fall of 1869 he became corre- 



345 

sponclent for Tiffany & Co., Union Square, remaining there until 
the summer of 1872, when he entered the firm of R. W. Smith & 
Co., bookbinders. In 1878-79 he was connected with the Chase 
National Bank, in 1880-81 with the New York, New England 
and Western Investment Company, and then became a bond and 
stock broker, with an ofiice on Pine street. He afterward returned 
to Tiffany & Co. as chief correspondence clerk, and remained 
with them until about 1898, when his health began to fail, and 
he was subsequently unable to engage in any permanent business. 
After an illness of ten months from Bright's disease he died at 
the hospital in Bryn Mawr, Pa., on October 24, 1901, at the age 
of 64 years. 

He married, on September 27, 1862, Mrs. Julia T. Cooley, 
daughter of Dr. Charles Steele Thomson (M.D. Yale 1822), of 
New Haven, Conn. Mrs. Baldwin died in 1898, and one daughter 
only survives, a younger daughter and son having died. 

Francis Ritter Schmucker, son of Jacob and Mary Ann 
Schmucker, was born in the township of Oley, near Reading, 
Pa., on May 24, 1838. He entered college from Reading with 
the class of 1860, but in Junior year joined the class of 1861. 

Upon graduation he at once began reading law with Charles 
Davis, Esq., of Reading. In the summer of 1862 he answered the 
call to the service of his country, and on August 15 was commis- 
sioned First Lieutenant, Company A, One Hundred and Twenty- 
eighth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. The day before 
the regiment left Harrisburg he was admitted to the bar. In 
September he took part in the battle of Antietam. On Feb. 1, 
1863, he was made Captain, and in May following was in the 
battle of Chancellorsville. At the expiration of his nine months' 
term of service he was mustered out, but when General Lee made 
a second invasion of Pennsylvania, he again volunteered, and was 
elected Captain of Company C, Forty-second Regiment, Pennsyl- 
vania Militia, but shortly afterward (on July 6, 1863) accepted 
the more agreeable appointment of Adjutant, with rank of First 
Lieutenant. On August 1 2 he retired from service, and for a few 
years afterward practiced law in Reading. 

Then, his health having failed, he took up the study of medi- 
cine at the New York Homeopathic Medical College and grad- 
uated in 1873. Beginning the practice of this profession in Pitts- 
burg, Pa., in 1874 he returned to Reading, where he continued in 



346 

practice for twenty-eight years, winning higli esteem for his skill, 
and beloved by all with whom he came in contact. He was a fre- 
quent contributor to American and English medical journals, and 
at the first graduation of the Training School for Nurses con- 
nected with the Homeopathic Hospital of Reading he gave an 
address on Hospitals and Professional Nursing. 

For nearly forty years he was a member of the First Presby- 
terian Church of Reading, and for many years an elder. He 
suffered more or less from ill health for several years, but died 
after an illness of four weeks from tuberculosis of the bowels, on 
March 2, 1902. 

He married, on August 31, 1865, Emma C, daughter of 
William S. and Sarah A. Young, of Allentown, Pa., and had five 
sons and four daughters. The daughters all died at an early age, 
but the sons, with their mother, survive. 

1862 

William Henry Harrison Murray, son of Dickinson and 
Sally (Munger) Murray, was born on April 23, 1840, in Guilford, 
Conn. 

After graduation he entered an advanced class in the Theo- 
logical Institute of Conneeiicut, at East Windsor (now Hartford 
Theological Seminary), and, after spending a year there, contin- 
ued his studies under Rev. Edwin F. Hatfield, D.D.,in New York 
City, where he also acted as the latter's assistant in the ministry 
for a short time. He then preached in Connecticut for five years, 
serving the First Congregational Church, Washington, Litchfield 
County, the Second Congregational Church, Greenwich, and the 
Second Congregational Church, Meriden, and receiving from each 
of these churches a call to the pastorate at the termination of his 
engagement. From Meriden he went to the Park Street Church, 
Boston, Mass., where he acquired a wide reputation as a pulpit 
orator. In 1874 he left the work at Park Street to take charge 
of the Music Hall Independent Congregational Church, and for 
three years drew great audiences. 

He then left the ministry and for about seven years devoted 
himself to rest, travel, and study. During a part of this time he 
lived in Texas, and was engaged in various business enterprises. 
Afterward he returned to the old homestead in Guilford, where 
he had since resided. He always. had an especial fondness for 
horses, and was a breeder of thoroughbred stock on his farm. 



I 



347 



[Mr. Murray became famous as a writer, by the publication of 
his "Adventures in the Wilderness " in 1868. These were first 
written as vacation letters for a local paper, and brought to many 
their earliest knowledge of the beauties of the Adirondacks. His 
other works include: "Music Hall Sermons," two series, 1870-'73 ; 
"Park Street Pulpit," two series, 1870-71; "The Perfect Horse," 
1873; "Adirondack Tales," 6 vols., 1877-97; "Daylight Land," 
1888, "Mamelons" and "Ungava," two Canadian idylls, 1890 ; 
"Holiday Tales," 1897; " Appletree's Easter," 1900, and other 
tales. During many years he had marked success as a lecturer, 
and during later years very frequently read in public his story, 
" John Norton's Christmas." 

Mr. Murray was a sufferer from kidney trouble for two years, 
and died at his home in Guilford, on March 3, 1904, in the 64th 
year of his age. 

He married, August 8, 1862, Miss Issie M. Hull, of Oxford, 
Conn., who separated from him in 1886. He then married Miss 
Frances Mary Rivers, of New Brunswick, Canada, by whom he 
had four daughters, who, with their mother, survive him. He 
devoted himself with great interest to the education of his daugh- 
ters, describing his methods in a volume published in 1901. 

William Wallace Seelt, son of John Holcroft and Louisiana 
(Coburn) Seely, was born on August 17, 1838, at Ludlow, Morgan 
County, O., but entered college from Beverly, Washington 
County, in the same State. 

He graduated from the Medical College of Ohio in March, 1864, 
after which he was Demonstrator of Anatomy there for about two 
years, meanwhile giving special study to the eye and ear, and then 
continuing these studies in Vienna, Berlin and Paris. In 1866 he 
was elected Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology in the Medical 
College of Ohio, — a chair which was created for him, — and in 1867 
entered upon the duties for which his thorough knowledge, pro- 
gressive spirit, and enthusiasm as a teacher fitted him, and which 
he discharged with great acceptance till his resignation in 1900. 
In 1881 he was made Dean of the Faculty, and so remained until 
1900, four years after its absorption in the University of Cincin- 
nati. From 1879 to 1882 he was also Lecturer on Ophthalmology, 
and from 1882 to 1889 Professor of the same in the Medical 
Department of Dartmouth College, delivering his lectures at 
Hanover yearly in August. He made many trips abroad for 
study and travel. 



348 

He was Oculist at the Cincinnati Hospital a number of years, 
and at the Samaritan Hospital from 1866. He was a mem- 
ber of the Ophthalmological and Otological Societies from their 
formation, and for these and for medical publications he wrote 
many reports and articles. He was identified with other interests 
outside of his profession, being a Director of the Cincinnati Col- 
lege of Music and the Cincinnati Museum, and he was twice 
President of the Yale Club of Cincinnati, in 1880-1 and in 1888-9. 

Dr. Seely died of angina pectoris at his home in Cincinnati, O., 
on November V, 1903, at the age of 65. 

He married, on April 28, 1870, Helen, daughter of Michael H. 
and Elizabeth David (Kilham) Simpson, of Boston, Mass., who sur- 
vives him with their three daughters. The eldest daughter mar- 
ried Arthur Espy (Yale 1890). 

1863 

Robert George Stephen McNeille, son of Perry R. and 
Hannah (Shepherdson) McNeille, was born on April 1, 1841, at 
Philadelphia, Pa. During Sophomore year, in the fall of 1860, 
with Rev. Thomas J. Brown, D.D. (Yale 1865), he started Bethany 
Sunday school, in Oak street. New Haven, the conduct of which 
has remained largely with the students since then. 

In the fall after graduation he entered the law office of George 
M. Wharton, Esq., in Philadelphia, and was admitted to the bar 
in that city in January, 1866. With Jesse Cox, Esq., of Chicago, 
he formed the law firm of McNeille & Cox, but in January, 1868, 
he retired from the bar. He then entered the Yale Theological 
Seminary, and received the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in 
1«870. He was licensed to preach by the New Haven West Asso- 
ciation in 1869, and on May 12, 1870, was ordained the first pastor 
of the East (now Humphrey Street) Congregational Church, where 
he remained a year and a half. From April, 1872, to Novem- 
ber, 1877, he was pastor of the Porter (Congregational) Church 
in Brockton, Mass., and for fifteen years afterward of the Second 
Congregational Church in Bridgeport, Conn. Both churches were 
greatly strengthened during his pastorate. From 1882 to 1887 
he was Chaplain of the Fourth Regiment, Connecticut National 
Guard. Upon leaving Bridgeport he resided in New Haven and 
at his Southern home at Pine Bluff, N. C, until 1899, when he 
resumed preaching at the Congregational Church in Union ville, 
Conn. 'J'here he continued as acting pastor until February, 1902, 



I 



349 



en ill health obliged him to give up ministerial work. Since 
then he had lived at Roselle, N. J., where he died of heart trouble, 
on October 19, 1903, at the age of 62 years. 

He married, on May 16, 1871, Ellen Louisa, daughter of Wat- 
son V. and Louisa (Bacon) Coe, of New Haven, who, with four 
sons and one daughter, survives him. One son graduated from 
Yale College in 1897. 

Haklan Page Parmelee, son of Charles Rollin and Susan 
(Dickenson) Parmelee, was born on July 17, 1838, at Naperville, 
111., but entered college from Morris, in that State. 

After graduation he spent a year teaching in Lisbon, Kendall 
County, 111., and then, in October, 1864, entered the Harvard Law 
School. During the vacations of his law course he taught at 
West Dedham, Mass., and North Stonington, Conn. From Cam- 
bridge he went to Chicago, where he was in the law office of 
Storrs & Johnston (the latter his classmate) for a year, and then 
practiced by himself, until failing health caused his removal to 
Denver, Col. There he was elected City Clerk in 1877, and re- 
elected in the two following years. He then returned to Illinois, 
and resided in Decatur for a short time, but found it advisable to 
go back to Denver, where he established himself as a real estate 
lawyer. He died there on December 8, 1903, at the age of 65 
years. 

He married, on February 15, 1872, Marietta, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Eliza Osborn, of Chicago, who survives him with two 
daughters, the sons having died. 

William Collins Whitney, son of General James ScoUy 
Whitney, for many years a Democratic leader in Massachusetts, 
was born in Conway, in that State, on July 5, 1841, but entered 
college from Springfield, Mass., where his father was at the time 
Superintendent of the United States Armory. His mother was 
Laurinda (Collins) Whitney. 

After graduation he took a course at the Harvard Law School, 
then entered the office of Hon. Abraham R. Lawrence, afterward 
Justice of the Supreme Court of New York. On his admission 
to the bar he began practice in 1865 with his classmate, Henry 
Farnam Diraock (who married Mr. Whitney's sister), under the 
firm name of Dimock & Whitney. Mr. Dimock withdrew in 
1870, and the following year Mr. Whitney formed a partnership 



350 



with Frederic H. Belts, LL.D. (Yale 1864) under the name of 
Whitney & Betts, which continued until ISVG. Among many 
important cases in which he was counsel was the action for libel 
brought by Charles Reade against the editor of The Hound Table 
on account of a criticism of the novel " Griffith Gaunt." In this 
he successfully conducted the defense. He was early sought as 
counsel of life insurance companies, railroads, and other large 
corporations. 

In 1871 he was one of the oj'ganizers of the Young Men's Dem- 
ocratic Club, and was active in the movement which overthrew 
the Tweed Ring. In 1872 and for some years following he 
was school trustee in one of the wards of the city. He was 
appointed Counsel to the Corporation of the City of New York, 
on August 9, 1875, and was twice reappointed, resigning the office 
November 6, 1882, two years before the expiration of his term, 
after a service of marked efficiency and great benefit to the pub- 
lic interest. He became a leader in the direction and policy of 
the County Democracy, and at the Chicago Convention in 1884 
he skillfully exerted a powerful influence for Mr. Cleveland. 

He continued in the practice of his profession until March, 
1885, when he became Secretary of the Navy, and held the posi- 
tion until the close of President Cleveland's administration in 
1889. Believing that in the matter of naval construction the 
United States should be independent of all other countries, he 
brought about such improvements in steel manufacture that it 
became possible for the first time to fully equip American war 
vessels with an armament produced at home. The additions to 
the Navy made under his direction brought the United States to 
a high rank among the nations as a naval power. In recognition 
of his services to the country he received the degree of Doctor of 
Laws from Yale University in 1888. 

On Mr. Whitney's retirement from the Cabinet, he devoted 
himself to private business interests, and immediately became 
prominent as a financier and promoter of vast enterprises. Re- 
turning to New York, he turned his attention to the problem of 
urban railway transportation. Within a few years he developed 
from a single company, by reorganization and consolidation, the 
Metropolitan Street Railway, which bought out its only rival, and 
was in turn merged into the Interurbau Street Railway Co. 
Although tor several years he held no visible office or connection 
with the system, he controlled its operations and secured the re- 



351 

suits he sought through others. His judgment in selecting men 
to carry out his plans was unerring. 

In 1902 he retired from active business, but continued to influ- 
ence by his counsels most important and varied interests. He 
was a trustee of the Consolidated Gas Co., a director in the Met- 
ropolitan Opera and Real Estate Co., Metropolitan Steamship 
Co., New York Loan and Investment Co., Manufacturing Invest- 
ment Co., Mergenthaler Linotype Co., the Guggenheim Explora- 
tion Co., the Cuba Co., various local banks, and other business 
corporations, and a member of many of the prominent political, 
business, and social organizations of the city. 

With the great increase in his wealth he took pleasure in the 
purchase and development of immense estates, and for the last 
six years he had striven with success for a higher standard in all 
matters connected with the turf. 

Mr. Whitney died at his home in New York of peritonitis and 
blood poisoning following an operation lor appendicitis, on Feb- 
ruary 2, 1904. He was in the 63d year of his age. 

He married, on October 13, 1869, Flora, daughter of Honora- 
ble Henry B. Payne (Hamilton 1832), U. S. Senator from Ohio, 
and sister of his classmate, Oliver Hazard Payne, and had two 
sons and three daughters, of whom one daughter died in early 
childhood. The sons graduated from Yale in 1894 and 1898, re- 
spectively. Mrs. Whitney died in- 1892, and in 1896 Mr. Whit- 
ney married Mrs. Edith S. (May) Randolph, widow of Colonel 
Arthur Randolph of the British Army, and daughter of Dr. J. F. 
May, of Baltimore. In February, 1898, while riding at Aiken, 
S. C, she received injuries from striking a bridge from which she 
died in May, 1899. 

1864 

Daniel Judsox Holden, son of Horace and Catherine Plant 
(Judson) Holden, was born on January 15, 1844. 

After graduation he entered the Columbia Law School, from 
which he received the degree of Bachelor of Law in May, 1866. 
Upon his admission to the bar the same year he began practice in 
the oflice of Mann & Parsons, was then by himself for a time, and 
fiom 1881 onward was a member of the firm of Coudert Brothers. 

He married, on September 1, 1885, Katharine Veghte, daugh- 
ter of Rev. John Pray Knox, D.D. (Rutgers Coll. 1830), of New- 
town, Long Island, N. Y. 



352 

His death occurred at his home in New York City, on June 21, 
1903. He was 59 years of age. His widow and a daughter sur- 
vive him, a son having died in infancy. 

At the age of 14 years he became a member of the Brick Pres- 
byterian Church in New York City. For thirty years — and 
until his death — he was a member of its Board of Trustees, and 
a ruling Elder from 1886 until 1897. He then transferred his 
membership to Christ Church, an affiliated organization, where 
he was a ruling Elder and where he labored with unceasing inter- 
est and activity to the last day of his life. 

1865 

Roderick Byington, son of Roderick Byington, M.D., and 
Caroline (Linn) Byington, was born in Belvidere, Warren County, 
N. J., on March 13, 1844. He entered college during the second 
term of Freshman year. 

After graduation he studied law in his native place with Hon. 
David A. Depue, LL.D. (Princeton 1846), until the latter's 
appointment as Judge of the Supreme Court of New Jersey, and 
then with Richie & Emery at Trenton. He was admitted as an at- 
torney in November, 1868, and as a counselor four years later. He 
practiced with Thomas H. Schaffer, Esq., a year in Rahway, N. J., 
and then sfettled in Newark, where his career was one of devotion 
to duty and right. In the spring of 1875 he was appointed 
Assistant Prosecutor of the Pleas of Essex County, and Special 
Master in Chancery, and in the latter capacity secured the convic- 
tion of many who were leagued together for evil-doing in differ- 
ent parts of the State. At the time of his death he was counsel 
for the Lake Hopatcong Association in opposition to the pro- 
posed abandonment of the Morris Canal as a waterway, a matter 
of such importance as to have become a State issue. 

Mr. Byington died suddenly from Bright's disease at Newark, 
on February 1, 1904, in the 60ih year of his age. 

He married, on January 22, 1896, Mrs. Emma (Nishwitz) Paul, 
widow of Dr. J. M. Paul, and daughter of Frederick Nishwitz 
and Doris Nishwitz, of Millington, N. J. She survives him with- 
out children. 

Robert Portbr Keep, son of Rev. John Robinson Keep 
(Yale 1834), was born in Farmington, Conn., on April 26, 1844, 
but in 1852 the family removed to Hartford, where his father was 



353 

for over twenty-five years a successful teacher in the American 
Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb. His mother was Rebecca, 
daughter of Rev. Noah Porter, D.D. (Yale 180;^), and sister of 
President Noah Porter. 

The year after graduation he continued his studies at Yale on 
the Berkeley and Clark Scholarships, and the following year 
taught the children of the U. S. Military Academy in the Post 
School at West Point. ,The next two years be was Tutor 
in Greek in Yale College, and in 1869 received the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. The same year he was appointed U. S. 
Consul at Athens, but resigned this office in 1871, remaining 
abroad, however, until 1874. In 1872-73 he studied Sanskrit 
and attended lectures in the University of Berlin, and spent the 
next winter in Italy. From 1876 to 1885 he taught in Williston 
Seminary, Easthampton, Mass., and was then Principal of the 
Norwich (Conn.) Free Academy, which under his administration 
enjoyed a remarkable growth and wide development of its educa- 
tional work. In 1903 he resigned from the Academy, and as 
trustee of the estate and school of his aunt. Miss Sarah Porter, he 
removed to Farmington. 

Dr. Keep died after a brief illness from double pneumonia at 
his home in Farmington, on June 3, 1904, at the age of 60 years. 

He married, on December 23, 1879, Margaret Vryling, daugh- 
ter of Richard T. and Frances (Wilder) Haines, of Elizabeth, 
N. J., and had three sons and a daughter, of whom the eldest son 
(Yale 1903) and the daughter survive him. Mrs. Keep died in 
1893, and in 1897 Dr. Keep married Elizabeth V., daughter of 
Robert Safford and Lovina (Stone) Hale, of Elizabethtown, 
N. Y., who survives him. There were no children by the latter 
marriage. 

In 1876 Dr. Keep completed the translation of Autenrieth's 
"Homeric Dictionary." He was the author of "The Essential 
Uses of the Moods in Greek and Latin," 1882, and other text- 
books, edited " Stories from Herodotus," Book 1-VI, of the Iliad, 
and was an occasional contributor to, and reviewer for. The 
Nation and other periodicals, chiefly on Greek or educational 
topics. 

1866 

William George Bussky, son of George A. Bussey, a civil 
engineer, and Mary (Sippell) Bussey, was born on February 17, 
1846, in Utica, N. Y., and joined his class at Yale in the begin- 



354 

ning of Senior year, coming from Hamilton College, where he had 
spent two years, entering that institution as a Sophomore from 
Ulica Academy. 

After graduation he was at first employed as a civil engineer 
at Fort Edward, N. Y., but in 1868 entered the Columbia Law 
School, and the following year was admitted to the bar in New 
York City, where he afterward practiced his profession, travel- 
ing much for some years in the South and West and in Cuba on 
law business. His home was in New York City, and since 1898 
in Mount Vernon, N. Y., where he died of a hemorrhage on 
Januaiy 10, 1904, in the 58th year of his age. 

He married, on December 8, 1875, Grace F., daughter of David 
B. and Martha R. Trufant, of Lynn, Mass., and had four daugh- 
ters, who, with their mother, survive. 

Frank Smith Chapin, son of Oliver Colton and Frances M. 
(Smith) Chapin, was born on April 21, 1843, at East Bloomfield, 
Ontario County, N. Y., and entered the class at the beginning of 
Sophomore year. 

After graduation he engaged in manufacturing, also for sev- 
eral years in fruit growing with his father, as a member of the 
firm of O. C. Chapin & Son at East Bloomfield. Owing to the 
ill health of his wife he removed to California in June, 1872, 
where he taught for a time in San Francisco, then traveled 
northward, acting as a newspaper correspondent, but in 1874 he 
took up the business of fruit evaporating at Vacaville, Cal. 
From 187(3 to 1880 he had charge of the fruit department of 
Kancho Chico, and of the wholesale nursery business of W. R. 
Strong & Co., of Sacramento, Cal. In the spring of 1881 he 
returned East and entered the office of R. G. Chase & Co., nur- 
serymen, of Geneva, N. Y., but in the fall of the following year 
he took charge of a creamery at Mason City, la., removing the 
business in May, 1886, to Sheldon in the same State. Subse- 
quently he traveled and wrote for the Pacific Rural Press, and 
lectured in behalf of the Grange, of which that paper was the 
Pacific Coast representative, residing at Tulare, and afterward in 
Bakersfield, Cal. 

He married, on June 20, 1867, Clara Hawes, of East Bloomfield, 
who died in Vacaville, Cal., on December 26, 1875. Afterward, 
in 1882, he married, at Geneva, N. Y., Anna M. Hurlburt. By 
the first marriage he had two sons (who died in infancy) and two 



355 

dauohters, and by the second marriage two daughters, one of 
whom, with her mother, survives him. A brother graduated 
from Yale College in 1872. 

Mr. Chapin died at Los Angeles, Cal., on October 9, 1902, from 
injuries received on that day in a runaway accident which 
occurred while he was inspecting some street improvements for 
which he was the contractor. He was 59 years of age. Soon 
after his graduation he became a member of the Congregational 
Church at East Bloomfield, N. Y. 

Henry Burniiam Mead, son of Francis K, and Clara (Burn- 
ham) Mead, was born at Littleton, N. H., on January 27, 1839. 
Entering the class of 1865 from Hingham, Mass., at the begin- 
ning of Sophomore year, he left at the end of Junior year and 
taught a yesir in the Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, 
and then completed his college course with the class of 1866. 

Upon graduation, he entered the Yale Theological Seminary, 
and received the degree of Bachelor of Divinity in 1869. He 
supplied the Congregational Church at Falls Village, Conn., for 
a year, and spent a year as a Resident Licentiate at Andover 
Seminary, and on June 7, 1871, was ordained pastor of the Con- 
gregational Church in Terryville, Conn., where he remained 
three years. From January, 1875, to May, 1880, he was pastor 
of the Second Church, Westbrook (formerly Saccarappa), Me., 
and for over five years thereafter at Stonington, Conn. During 
the following three years he was pastor successively at Cornwall, 
Conn., Stockbridge, Mass., and Jacksonville, Fla. He then 
resided a year in Falls Village, Conn. From 1889 to 1893 he 
was pastor at Brookfield, Conn., and for the last ten years of his 
life at Scotland, Conn. He had been in failing health for some 
time, although still able to perform his pulpit duties, but toward 
evening, on June 13, 1903, while at work in his garden, he 
expired almost instantly of heart disease. He was 64 years of 
age. 

He married, at Falls Village, Conn., on June 14, 1871, Hattie 
E., daughter of Cornelius Brown, who, with two of their three 
sons and one daughter, survives him. The second son is a student 
in the Yale Law School. 

He published a little book called "The Wonderful Counselor," 
and made frequent contributions to periodicals. 



356 



1867 



Luther Hart Kitchel, son of the Rev. Harvey Denison 
Kitchel, D.D. (Middlebury 1835), and Ann Smith (Sheldon) 
Kitchel, was born in Plymouth Hollow (now Thomaston), Conn'., 
on November 6, 1845. The last two years of his preparation for 
college were spent at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. In 
college he was a member of a notable class crew, and was 
regarded as one of the best athletes as well as one of the best 
scholars in the class. 

After graduation he was a student of medicine in the General 
Hospital at Buffalo, N. Y., from 1867 to 1869, and during part 
of this time taught in the Heathcote School in that city. In 1869 
he spent some time in the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
New York City, and was House Physician and Surgeon in the 
Buffalo General Hospital in 1 869 and 1870. He practiced medi- 
cine at Warsaw, Olean and Alden, N. Y., from 1870 to 1877, 
then removing to Hamilton, Hamilton County, Texas, practiced 
there until June, 1885, when he came North and settled in 
Genesee County, N. Y., — first at Pembroke for a year, and then 
at Corfu, where he resided until 1896. After this his home was in 
Alden, N. Y., where he died on April 20, 1903, from an injury of 
the spinal cord received in a fall on an icy sidewalk. He was 57 
years of age. 

He was an ardent student and enthusiastically devoted to his 
profession, and it was his devotion to duty and his readiness to 
respond to all the calls upon his attention which led to the early 
breaking down of his health, and disabled him from practicing 
during the last ten years of his life. 

He married, August 7, 1873, Miss Mary H. Durkee of Alden, 
N. Y., who survives him with one of their four daughters. 

1868 

Horace Phillips, son of Jonathan Dickinson and Luciana 
(Greene) Phillips, and a descendant in the fourth generation of 
Rev. Jonathan Dickinson (Yale 1706), President of the College 
of New Jersey (Princeton), was born in Dayton, O., on April 9, 
1847. 

After graduation he built the Dayton & Southeastern Railroad, 
and had charge of it from 1876 to about 1886, residing at Dayton.j 
After a year or more abroad, in 1889, he undertook the placin| 
of all telephone wires in Chicago underground, but on account ol 



357 

ill health gave up the work and moved to Seattle, Wash,, and for 
eleven years was engaged in engineering on the coast. 

He died at his home on May 7, 1904, at the age of 57 years. 
He had been suifering for two years from nervous prostration. 

He married, at Dayton, on January 7, 1876, Nannie E., daugh- 
ter of Horace and Sarah Louise (Belville) Pease, who survives 
him with two sons and three daughters, one son having died. 

Samuel Watson, son of Samuel Watson (Brown 1825) and 
Charlotte (Morton) Watson, and grandson of Governor Morton 
(Brown 1804) of Massachusetts, was born at Sycamore, near 
Nashville, Tenn., on July 11, 1846. 

After graduation he entered the Harvard Law School, and upon 
graduation thence, in 1870, he at once began practice in Nash- 
ville, where he became a leader in his profession and as a citizen. 

He was a member of the Tennessee Senate in 1881, serving on 
the Judiciary Committee, and for several years from 1884 was 
Chairman of the State Executive Committee of the Republican 
party. In 1886 he was a candidate for Justice of the Supreme 
Court of the State, but was defeated with the rest of the Repub- 
lican ticket. For many years he was a Trustee of the University 
of Nashville. 

Mr. Watson died of locomotor ataxia at St. Louis, Mo., on 
October 5, 1903, at the age of 57 years. A brother graduated 
from Yale College in 1869. 

1869 

Wilson Shannon Bissell, son of John and Isabella Jeannette 
(Hally) Bissell, was born on December 31, 1847, in New London, 
Oneida County, N. Y., but at the age of five years removed with 
his parents to Buffalo, N. Y., where his father was a forwarding 
merchant, shipping large quantities of grain eastward by the 
Erie Canal. 

A few weeks after graduation he began the study of law in 
Buffalo, in the office of Laning, Cleveland & Folsom, was admitted 
to the bar on September 17, 1871, and remained with that firm as 
managing clerk until the fall of 1872, when he formed a partner- 
ship with Hon. Lyman K. Bass. In 1874 Hon. Grover Cleveland 
joined the firm, which then became Bass, Cleveland & Bissell. 
In 1879 Mr. Bass withdrew on account of ill health, and in 1881, 
when Mr. Cleveland became Mayor of Buffalo, a new member, 
George J. Sicard, Esq., was admitted, and the firm of Cleveland, 



358 

Bissell & Sicard was formed. On January 1, 1883, upon becom- 
ing Governor of New York, Mr. Cleveland withdrew from the 
firm, which was reorganized as Bissell, Sicard & (Charles W.) 
Goodyear. Further changes in the raembership of the firm were 
made in 1897 to Bissell, Carey & Cooke, but Mr. Bissell continued 
at the head of the firm and devoted himself uninterruptedl}'^ to 
his practice, except during his service in President Cleveland's 
cabinet. He was distinguished as a counselor, and gave his 
attention especially to corporation and railroad business. He was 
President of the Buffalo & Southwestern R. R. from 1883 to 
1895, and of the Buffalo & Geneva R. R. 

He was a delegate to several Democratic State Conventions, 
and in 1888 was elected to the Democratic National Convention, 
after declining the nomination as Presidential Elector at Large. 
During President Cleveland's first term he declined offers of 
several positions in the public service, but in 1893 he accepted 
the office of Postmaster General, which he held for two years, 
retiring from the Cabinet in March, 1895. 

In 1886 he was a member of the Board of Visitors to the West 
Point Military Academy, and in 1890 of the commission to pro- 
pose amendments to the Judiciary Article of the Constitution of 
the State of New York. From 1879 to 1881 he was President of 
the Young Men's Association of Buffalo, conducting a large pub- 
lic library, also a trustee of the Buffalo Historical Society, and a 
vestryman of Trinity Church. In 1895 he was chosen Vice- 
Chancellor of the University of Buffalo, and Chancellor in 1902, 
succeeding in the latter office James Osborne Putnam (Yale 1839). 
In 1893 he received the degree of Doctor of Laws from Yale 
University. 

Mr. Bissell died at his home in Buffalo after several months' 
illness from a complication of diseases, on October 6, 1908, in the 
56th year of his age. 

He married, on February 6, 1890, Louisa Fowler, daughter of 
Edward and Anna (Fowler) Sturges, of Geneva, N. Y., who sur- 
vives him with a daughter. A brother graduated from the Aca- 
demical Department in 1867. 

EowA-RD GusTEN CoT, SOU of Edward Gustin and Elizabeth 
(Brown) Coy, was born in Ithaca, N. Y., on August 23, 1844. 

After graduation he taught a year at Chickering Institute, 
Cincinnati, and Greek and Latin two years at Williston Semi- 



359 

nary, Easthampton, Mass., where he had received his preparation 
for college. During the next year he was Tutor of Latin in 
Yale College, and in September, 1873, became Instructor in Greek 
and Latin in Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., where he con- 
tinued with marked success for nearly twenty years. He spent 
the year 1883-84 in study in Berlin, Munich and Rome, and in 
travel and archaeological study in Greece. In 1889 he declined 
the position of Principal of Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H., 
but was Head-Master of the Hotchkiss School, in Lakeville, Conn., 
from its establishment in 1892. 

Mr. Coy was Secretary of the Head-Master's Association of 
the United States, a member of the executive committee of the 
New England Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools, 
and a member of the executive committee of the Connecticut 
Association of Classical and High School Teachers. He was also 
President of the Litchfield County University Club. 

He presented a number of papers on the Classics before educa- 
tional associations, and one before the Boston Yale Club on " The 
Relation of Yale College to the Educational Progress of the 
Age." He published "Greek for Beginners," 1880, and "First 
Greek Reader," 1881, besides an edition of a part of " Xeno- 
phon's Cyropaedia " for the School Classics. 

Mr. Coy died oi cystitis at the home of his wife's mother, Mrs. 
Harris, in New Haven, on May 26, 1904, in the 60th year of his 
age. He had not been well for about two years! 

He married, in New Haven, on November 25, 1873, Helen 
Eliza, daughter of Rev. Samuel Dexter Marsh (Yale 1844), 
formerly a missionary in South Africa, and Mary Sherman (Skin- 
ner) Marsh, who afterward married Rev. Samuel Harris, D.D., 
LL.D. (Bowdoin 1833), for nearly thirty years Professor of Sys- 
tematic Theology in the Yale Divinity School. Mrs. Coy sur- 
vives him with a daughter and two sons, of whom the elder 
son graduated from the Academical Department in 1901. A 
brother was a graduate in the class of 1870. 

1870 

George Egleston Dodge, son of William Earl Dodge, Sr., 
and Melissa (Phelps) Dodge, was born in New York City, on De- 
cember 1, 1849. 

After graduation he spent a year in travel abroad, and then en- 
tered the lumber business in Jersey City in the firm of Dodge, 



360 

Meigs & Dodge, which later became Dodge, Meigs & Co., with 
offices in New York City. He was a partner in the firm for many- 
years. He was active in philanthropic work, and was a member 
of the advisory board of Lincoln Hospital, formerly Secretary of 
the Presbyterian Hospital, and for several years a member of the 
State Board of Commissioners on Lunacy. 

Mr. Dodge had been spending several months in London and 
on the Continent, and had driven his coach from London to 
Brighton, but soon after reaching the latter suffered from an acute 
weakness of the heart, which was followed by unconsciousness. 
From this he did not rally, but passed away, on April 14, 1904, 
at the age of 54 years. 

He married, on February 20, 1875, May, daughter of Frederick 
H. and Catharine (Andrus) Cossitt, of New York, who survives 
him with one daughter, his other daughter having died in infancy. 

George Francis Lincoln, son of George S. and Elizabeth 
Barnard (Packard) Lincoln, was born in Hartford, Conn., on 
February 16, 1850. He was prepared for college in the private 
school of Rev. Joseph D. Hull (Yale 1837), but before entering 
made a voyage to Europe on a German steamer in order to become 
familiar with that language. He was a member of the class of 
1869 till the end of Junior year. 

After graduation he spent a year and a half in Hartford 
engaged with his father in the Phoenix Iron Works, a year 
abroad, pursuing medical studies for a time in Germany, and 
on his return was in the actuary department of the Connecticut 
Mutual Life Insurance Company. He then entered the Columbia 
Law School, graduated in 1875, was in the office of Evarts, 
Southmayd & Choate, and afterward in partnership with his 
classmate, Curran, in the firm of Curran & Lincoln, residing at 
New Rochelle, N. Y. When Hon. William M. Evarts was made 
Secretary of State, Mr. Lincoln was appointed Consul at Stettin, 
Germany by President Hayes, and later was connected with] 
the consulate at Aix-la-Chapelle. He was appointed Consul at 
Antwerp, Belgium, by President Harrison, but during the next! 
administration was removed from office, and upon recovering 
from an illness of six months in the Antwerp hospital, he 
returned home and was admitted to the Hartford County bar. 
After the election of President McKinley he was again sent as ^ 
Consul to Antwerp, and was later made Consul General, holdingl 



■ 361 

at office until his death. In 1894 he received from the French 
government the decoration of " Palmes acadomiques." He was 
an accomplished linguist and an able writer on commercial 
matters. 

Mr. Lincoln died of quick consumption at Antwerp, on July 
23, 1903, at the age of 53 years. 

He married, on September 4, 1879, Mrs. Ella W. Lockwood, 
formerly Miss French, who survives him with a son by her ear- 
lier marriage. 

Edward Geiffin Selden, son of Colonel Joseph and Caroline 
(Lord) Selden, was born on June 9, 1847, at Hadlyme, Conn., but 
in 1856 moved to Saybrook, Conn., and two years later to Nor- 
wich, Conn., and from there entered college. 

After graduation he spent one year in the Chicago Theological 
Seminary and two years at Andover, completing his course in 
1873. On December 16 of the same year he was ordained pastor 
of the First (Hanover Street) Congregational Church in Manches- 
ter, N. H., and remained there until 1885, when he was installed 
over the South Congregational Church in Springfield, Mass., as 
active pastor in association with Rev. Samuel G. Buckingham, 
D.D. (Yale 1833). In 1893 he was called to the pastorate of the 
Madison Avenue Reformed (Dutch) Church in Albany, N. Y., 
where he became a leader in the religious and philanthropic life 
of the city. 

He died of heart failure at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., on June 3, 
1904. He had nearly completed his 57th year. In December he 
suffered from pleuro-pneumonia and did not regain his strength. 

He married, on June 11, 1873, Ella, daughter of William H. 
Jennings, of Norwich, Conn., who died in November, 1898. He 
afterward married Abby Spencer, daughter of Mrs. Charles B. 
Lansing, whose family had long been identified with the Madison 
Avenue Church, and who survives him. A brother graduated 
from Amherst College in 1878, and from Andover Seminary in 
188J. 

1872 

Dana Harmon, son of John Brown Harmon, a lawyer of Oak- 
land, Cal., and Mary (DeNeale) Harmon, was born in New 
Orleans, La., on February 27, 1849. 

After graduation he went at once to California, studied law for 
a time, and was for a year in the office of the Secretary of State. 



362 

He suffered long from an affection of the eyes, but at length re- 
covered. For a while he was on a large sheep ranch, and from 
about 1885 was Principal of the Tucson, Ariz., Public School for 
two years. At different times he addressed the Mining students 
of the University of California on mining. 

As^ mining engineer he led a roving life from Montana to 
Mexico, but lived for many years in Nevada City, Cal., removing 
to Oakland,* where he died almost instantly from an (jina pectoris^ 
on July 10, 1903. He was 54 years of age. He was Vestryman 
and Treasurer of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Tucson, and 
later Vestryman of Trinity Church, Oakland. 

Mr. Harmon married, on November 22, 1883, Mrs. Mary Ann 
(Harrison) Summerfield, daughter of William Henry and Sarah 
Virginia Harrison, and had two sons and three daughters. Mrs. 
Harmon, with the daughters and one son, survives him, the elder 
son having died in January, 1894. 

Charles Sherwood, son of David Walker Sherwood, for 
many years a prominent resident of Bridgeport, Conn., and Laura 
(Nichols) Sherwood, was born in Easton, Conn., on February 4, 
1848. He was prepared for college in Bridgeport, but during 
Freshman year his home was Fairfield. 

After graduation he took the course in Columbia -Law School, 
and received the degree of Bachelor of Laws in May, 1874. 
He at once entered the oftice of Morris & Billings, and soon 
became managing clerk, but the following spring returned to 
Bridgeport, where he had since practiced his profession, and was 
a most useful citizen. From November, 1877, to April, 1886, he 
was associated in business with Hon. Amos S. Treat, and after- 
ward for about a year with Nathaniel W. Bishop, Esq. (LL.B. 
Yale 1890), but the remainder of the time he practiced by 
himself. 

He was councilman of the city in 1879 and 1880, alderman in 
1881, and from July, 1883 to July, 1884, city attorney for the 
civil business of the city. On the establishment of the Free 
Public Library and Reading Room he was chosen director, and 
served as Secretary of the board for over twenty-two years. In 
1886 he became connected with the Bridgeport Hydraulic Com- 
pany, a private corporation organized to furnish the city with 
water, and in 1888 became President and General Manager of the 
compan3^ He was also Secretary of the Bridgeport and Port 



363 

Jefferson Steamboat Company, and of the Bridgeport Patent 
Leather Company. 

Mr. Sherwood died after a lingering illness at his home in 
Bridgeport, on June 17, 1904, at the age of 56 years. 

He married, on January 12, 1881, Miss Emma C. Patterson, of 
Bridgeport, who survives him with their son, — an only child. 

1873 

Chaeles Livingston Hubbard, son of Lester Samuel Hubbard, 
a grain merchant and banker, and Jane Patterson (Livingston) 
Hubbard, was born on April 28, 1851, in Sandusky, O. He w^as 
a student in Kenyon College during Freshman year, and then 
entered the class of 1872 in Yale, but at the end of the second 
term of Junior year he joined the class of 1873. 

During the autumn following graduation he was for a time 
Chicago general agent of a rolling mill, but on account of the 
financial panic returned to Sandusky. During the next autumn 
he attended the Yale Law School, and, continuing his studies in 
the office of Judge E. B. Sadler at Sandusky, was admitted to 
the bar March 30, 1875. Since then he had practiced his profes- 
sion in his native place, except from about 1881 to 1884, when he 
was Secretary of the Sandusky Rolling Mill and Manufacturing 
Company. He took much pleasure in mathematical study, and 
devoted many leisure hours to helping in their Latin and Greek 
those who were preparing for college. 

Mr. Hubbard died at Sandusky, on May 20, 1904, at the age of 
53 years. 

He married, on October 18, 1877, Miss Jennie M. West, who, 
with three of their four daughters, survives him. 

1875 

Benjamin Wood Davis, son of Lewis and Amelia (Legrange) 
Davis, was born on January 15, 1853, in New York City, but en- 
tered college from Cincinnati, O. 

After graduation he entered the Law School of Harvard Uni- 
versity, from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
in 1878, was admitted to the Middlesex (Mass.) County bar, and 
practiced in Boston until 1889, when he retired. Since then he 
had resided in Cincinnati, Ohio, but was not in active business. 
He was a frequent contributor of verse to newspapers and maga- 
zines, and he gathered in a volume for private circulation a num- 



364 

ber of his poems under the title of " Sea Weed and Sand." At 
the first meeting of the Yale Alumni Association of Boston he 
recited a poem called "The Ivy of Yale." 

Mr. Davis died suddenly of heart disease on January 24, 1904, 
near Pittsburg, Pa., while traveling by train from Cincinnati, O., 
to New York City. He was 51 years of age. He gave liberally 
for the advancement of musical culture in Cincinnati, and to 
philanthropic and educational institutions. 

He married, on June 1, 1901, Miss Alice Crouch, who survives 
him with a daughter born May 25, 1902. 

William Sumner Hungerford, son of William E. and Ellen 
(Sumner) Hungerford, was born in East Haddam, Conn., on 
August 3, 1854. 

In the autumn after graduation he went to Freiberg, Saxony, 
and studied mining engineering two years in the Royal Saxon 
School of Mines. Soon after his return to the United States he 
went to Lumpkin County, Ga., and for a year and a half was in 
charge of a gold mine, was then engaged in general mining and 
engineering in the iron region of upper Michigan, for a time 
with the Euremet Mining Co., and in September, 1880, became 
Superintendent of the Sunshine Mining Co., at Sherman, Col. 
He continued his work of expert mining engineer in Colorado 
and contiguous territory for two years, and then returned East. 
In 1884 he was with the Low Moor Mining Co., at Low Moor, 
Ya., and afterward in other engineering work in Yirginia until 
1889, when he was appointed Manager of the business of W. 
Ames & Co., of Jersey City. 

Mr. Hungerford died at Arlington, N. J., on June 17, 1904, in 
the 50th year of his age. 

He married, on October 29, 1890, Miss Cora M. Paxtou, of 
Lexington, Ya. 

1876 

Frank Clifford Lyman was born at Easthampton, Mass., on 
October 6, 1854. He was the son of Theodore Lyman, but was 
under the guardianship of Josephus Craft of Northampton when 
he entered college. 

The year after graduation he returned to Yale for graduate 
study in political science, philosophy, and history, and then taught 
the classics at Peekskill (N. Y.) Academy for two years. 



365 

In October, 1879, he went to New York City, which was his 
residence for fourteen years. The following year he entered 
Columbia Law School, from which he received the degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws in 1882. During his law course he did much private 
tutoring. The summer of 1881 he spent in Colorado recovering 
from a very severe attack of typhoid fever. After some office 
experience, he practiced law by himself for about two years, and 
then passed a winter in Georgia and a year in Garden City, Long 
Island. For several years from 1888 he was part owner and prin- 
cipal of the Mount Morris School, in New York City. Failing 
health at length compelled him to abandon this school, and he re- 
turned to New England, where the remaining years of his life 
were spent principally in or near Cambridge, Mass., in the work 
of a private tutor. His later days were much clouded by im- 
paired health, both physical and mental. He died at Worcester, 
Mass., on January 27, 1904, in the 50th year of his age. He was 
never married. 

During his life in New York he was actively interested in social 
and religious matters, and arranged a service in memory of Phil- 
lips Brooks. 

1877 

George Ward Foote, son of Joseph A. Foote, a hotel propri- 
etor of New York City, and Frances J. (Foote) Foote, was born 
in New Marlboro, Mass., on June 9, 1850, but entered college 
from Colchester, Conn. 

After graduation he studied law in the Albany Law School, 
was admitted to the Connecticut bar in 1880, and began practice 
in New London. About 1891 he removed to Seattle, Wash., 
where he resided several years, being in partnership with Daniel 
L. Bugbee. Later he returned to Connecticut, and made his home 
in New London and New Haven until shortly before his death, 
which was caused by paralysis, and occurred at Groton, Conn., 
on November 17, 1903. He was 53 years of age. 

He married, in New York City, on February 8, 1890, Amelia, 
daughter of Lewis M. Lawrence, a merchant of Franklin, N. J., 
and Amanda (Carr) Lawrence. She survives him with a son and 
daughter. 

1878 

Frank Baldwin Wesson, son of Andrew and Sarah Louise 
(Lewis) Wesson, was born on Julj^ 24, 1 856, in Yonkers, N. Y. 



366 

After graduation he took a partial course in Columbia Law 
School and then went into the insurance business, in which he was 
thereafter engaged, being a member of the firm of Gibson & 
Wesson. 

Mr. Wesson died at Watch Hill, R. I., on September 11, 1903, 
at the age of 47 years. 

He married, on November 12, 1885, Elizabeth Seymour, daugh- 
ter of Sherman Willard Knevals (Yale 1853) and Anna DeWolf 
' (Hotchkiss) Knevals, who survives him. 

1879 

Howard Wortley Hayes, son of David Abbott Hayes 
(Amherst 1830) and Caroline (Davis) Hayes, was born in Newark, 
N. J., on May 9, 1858. He passed his examination for the class 
of 1878, but as he was then but 16 years old he did not enter 
college until the following year. 

After graduation he entered Columbia Law School, and receiv- 
ing thence the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1882, was admitted 
as an attorney to the New Jersey bar immediately, and as a 
counselor three years later, and to the New York bar in 1901. 
He steadily ' practiced his profession in his, native city, and 
in New York and London, where he also had offices, making a 
specialty of patent law. He was personal counsel for Thomas A. 
Edison, and general counsel for the Edison Manufacturing Com- 
pany. He was also Judge of the First Criminal Court of Newark 
from 1891 to 1893, and Assistant United States District Attor- 
ney for New Jersey from 1888 to 1890. 

Mr. Hayes died at his home from the effects of an operation 
for the removal of gall stones, on November 26, 1903. He was 
45 years of age. He was a member of the First Presbyterian 
Church. 

He married, on April 19, 1899, Mary, daughter of Eugene 
Vanderpool, President of the Howard Savings Institution. She 
survives him without children. 

He published " Annotations on the General Insurance Act of 
New Jersey " and historical notes on " Home Lots of the First 
Settlers of Newark." He was Treasurer of the Essex Park Com- 
mission. 

Willis Edson Story, son of Hiram F. and Nancy Maria 
(Tichenor) Story, was born at Wauwatosa, then a village five 
miles west of Milwaukee, Wise, on March 13, 1857. 



367 

After graduation he studied law with the firm of Wells, 
Brigham & Upham in Milwaukee until 1883, and from his admis- 
sion to the bar in October of that year practiced his profession 
in that city until the death of his father in 1887, and since then 
with his brother conducted a stone quarry, under the name of 
Story Brothers. Mr. Story died suddenly from Ijeart disease, 
while sitting with his family on the evening of March 21, 1904. 
He was 47 years of age. 

He married, on November 12, 1884, Alice Louise, daughter of 
Isaac P. Tichenor, a commission merchant in Milwaukee, and 
Mary (Love) Tichenor. Mrs. Story survives him with a son 
and a daughter. From childhood he was a member of the 
Grand Avenue Congregational Church, and a trustee of the 
society for many years. 

He was a skillful fisherman and hunter, and the founder of 
several gun and rifle clubs. 

Louis DuPont Syle, second son of Rev. Edward William 
Syle, D.D., a missionary in China and Japan, was born in 
Slianghai, China, on August 2, 1857. His mother was- Jane 
Mary Winter (Davis) Syle, only sister of Hon. Henry Winter 
Davis, for many years Representative in Congress from Balti- 
more. At the age of four years he was sent to the United 
Slates, and at about the age of eleven to London, England, 
where he remained at school until 1872. He then joined his 
father in Japan, and for two years was employed in a Yokohama 
tea house, after which he returned to America and spent a 
year in Trinity College, and then entered Yale at the beginning 
of Sophomore year. He was one of the speakers at Junior Exhi- 
bition, won a Townsend premium in Senior year, and at gradua- 
ation was Class Poet. 

After graduation he taught for a term in St. Paul's School, Con- 
cord, N. H., but in 1 880 he returned to Yale, having been awarded 
the Clark and Larned Scholarships. He relinquished these, how- 
ever, before the close of the year, but received the degree of 
Master of Arts upon examination in 1888. On leaving New 
Haven he started for Cuba and Mexico, acting as a special cor- 
respondent, but at Vera Cruz he was taken ill and during the next 
year suffered many misfortunes. In September, 1881, he resumed 
teaching, becoming instructor in the Episcopal Academy, Phila- 
delphia, but on May 22, 1882, he was appointed by President 



368 

Arthur consul at Madeira. While acting in that capacity he 
prepared several interesting reports on the climate, industries and 
resources of the islands. In February, 1884, he resigned the 
office, and the following June became Instructor in Rhetoric and 
English in the University of Pennsylvania for a year, and then 
Principal of the High School in Winona, Minn., but poor health 
made a change of climate necessary. He was then Professor of 
Political Economy and History in the University of Colorado 
for a year, but in 1890 moved to California, where he was at first 
Principal of the Santa Barbara High School, then Superintendent 
of the Grass Valley schools. 

From 1892 to 1902 he was Assistant Professor of English Lit- 
erature in the University of California. He had made a special 
study of Eighteenth Century literature, and the large classes 
which elected his courses found his instruction most suggestive 
and helpful. He took great interest in the general college life, 
and in addition to his regular work wrote or revised the plays 
which were presented for a number of years on Charter Day. 
. These were given, under his supervision, with rare skill, dignity 
and tinish. 

From 1898 to 1900 Professor Syle was dramatic critic of the 
San Francisco Examiner^ and then of the San Francisco Call. 

He was the author of "Essays in Dramatic Criticism," 1898, 
several plays and translations from the French, and a romantic 
opera, *' Villiers," and was editor of critical editions of several 
masterpieces of literature. 

After leaving the University of California he made a trip to 
Europe, but returned to California in the spring of 1903. He 
died of pneumonia at his home in Oakland, on November 14, 
1903, at the age of 46 years. 

He married, on June 17, 1882, Miss Edith Clara Wilkinson, of 
Philadelphia, who survives him with a daughter, a son having 
died in infancy. A brother graduated at Yale in 1869 and died 
in 1890. 

1880 

William Palmer Allen, son of William and Sarah P. Allen, 
was born in Auburn, N. Y., on March 12, 1857. He joined the 
class at the beginning of Junior year, having entered college as a 
member of the preceding class. 

After gi-aduation he read law in Auburn, was admitted to the 
New York State Bar at Rochester, in October, 1882, and for the — 

I 



369 

following eighteen months was in the West in search of health, 
mostly in St. Paul and Denver. He began practice in St. Paul, 
and was in the office of the U. S. Attorney there for a short time. 
Returning to his native place, he practiced his profession until 
1887, and since then had been engaged in literary work, but ill 
health prevented the accomplishment of his purposes. For a few 
months he edited a paper called The Auburn^ and was afterwards 
for some years Secretary of the Auburn Board of Trade. He 
died at his. home after a lingering illness, on March 20, 1904, at 
the age of 47 years. 

He married, on February 3, 1885, Miss Mary P. Welles, who 
survives him with a son. 

1881 

George Park Fisher, son of Professor George Park Fisher, 
D.D., LL.D., of Yale University, and Adeline Louise (Forbes) 
Fisher, was born in New Haven, on January 26, 1861. He was 
prepared for college at the Hopkins Grammar School, New 
Haven. 

After graduation he resided about four years in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., and two years in New York City, and during part of this 
time was in the employ of R. W. Forbes & Son, export merchants 
in the latter city. After this he was employed in civil engineer- 
ing, and for several years in the service of the Aetna Iron and 
Steel Company of Ohio, his headquarters being at Mingo Junc- 
tion, near Steubenville, in that State. He was then with the 
Pittsburg (Pa.) Steel Company. He had been abroad several 
times on business and pleasure. While in Detroit, Mich., he was 
taken ill, and died from dropsy of the heart, on October 20, 1903. 
He was 42 years of age, and was never married. 

1883 

Maurice Edwards Dunham, son of Edward R. Dunham, a 
contractor and builder, and Nancie (Edwards) Dunham, was born 
in Edgartown, Dukes County, Mass., on June 1, 1860. 

After graduation he taught in a private school in Richmond, 
Madison County, Ky., for a time, and then pursued a course pi 
study at home under the direction of the Yale Faculty, for which 
he received the degree of Master of Arts in 1886. For two or 
three years he was engaged in teaching, and in 1889 was ap- 
pointed Instructor in Latin and Mathematics in the University of 



370 

Colorado. The following year he was elected Professor of Greek, 
and continued there until 1899, when he was granted leave of ab- 
sence. He died of acute nephritis at Edgartown, on November 
10, 1903, at the age of 43 years. He married Miss Jennette Ben- 
nett, of Lima, N. Y., but had no children. He was a class-leader 
and steward in the Methodist church. 

1885 

Ernest Rufus Adee, youngest son of George Townsend 
Adee, a well known merchant and afterward Vice-President of 
the Bank of Commerce of New York City, was born in West- 
chester, N. Y., on October 7, 1863. His mother was Ellen Louise 
(Henry) Adee, daughter of Philip Henry, an old New York mer- 
chant and soldier of the War of 1812. 

After graduation he entered the service of the Mercantile Trust 
Compan}^, passing successively through the positions of clerk, 
Assistant Treasurer and Secretarj^ to that of Vice-President, which 
he held during the last year. His attractive personal qualities 
added much to his efficiency as a business man. 

Mr. Adee died of peritonitis, at his residence in Tuxedo Park, 
N. Y., on December 13, 1903, at the age of 40 years. He had 
been ill for five weeks. 

He married, on November 24, 1896, Geraldine, daughter of 
General Louis and Gelyna (Ver Planck) Fitzgerald, who survives 
him with two children. Four brothers have graduated from 
Yale, respectively in 1867, 1873 (two, 0)ieof whom died in 1901), 
and 1881. 

1890 

Charles Dussler, son of George Dussler, was born in the 
village of Clyde, township of Galen, Wayne County, N. Y., on 
August 10, 1866, and finished his preparation for college at the 
Hopkins Grammar School, in New Haven. 

After graduation he studied law from 1891 to 1893 i?i the office 
of Dr. L. Stowe in his native place, and in 1892 was elected 
Clerk of the village. Afterward he entered the office of Manley 
& Wadley at Long Island City, N. Y., and in January, 1894, was 
admitted to the bar of New York State, and gained a high 
standing among the younger members of the Queens County bar. 

He married, on November 24, 1903, Miss Catherine Wheeler, of 
New York City. Soon after returning from his wedding trip he 



I 



371 

was seized with pneumonia and died after a brief illness, at his 
home in Long Island City, on March 5, 1904, in the 38th year of 
his age. 

1892 

Charles Peabody Pierce, son of Rev. Charles Morgan Pierce 
(Williams 1857) and 'Elizabeth M. (Peabod}-) Pierce, was born on 
October 19, 1869, in Middlefield, Mass., where his father was at 
the time Congregational pastor, and was prepared for college at 
Worcester and Phillips Andover (Mass.) Academies. 

After graduation he took a special course in chemistry at the 
Amherst Summer School, was then Principal of the High School, 
Machias, Me., for two years, and then entered the Yale Theologi- 
cal Seminary. After receiving license to preach in April, 1896, 
he supplied the pulpit of the First Congregational Church, Mid- 
dletown, N. Y., during the following summer. In the summer of 
1897, after graduation from the Divinity School, he preached 
in the Second Congregational Church, East Douglas, Mass., in 
September was called to the pastorate, and was ordained on 
November 16, 1898. In April, 1900, he also assumed the care of 
the First Congregational Church at Douglas. The same year he 
was elected to the School Board, also Treasurer and Chairman 
of the Purchasing Committee of the Public Library. 

Mr. Pierce died of congestion of the brain caused by a carbun- 
cle, at his home in East Douglas, on October 30, 1903, at the age 
of 34 years. 

He married, on January 23, 1900, Mrs. Laura J. (Hill) Bowles, 
who survives him without children. 

1894 

Pendleton Miller, son of William Winlock Miller, who set- 
tled in Washington Territory about 1851, was twice mayor of 
Olympia, and in 1860 Superintendent of Indian Affairs of the 
Territory, was born in Olympia, on December 21, 1871. His 
mother was Mary, daughter of Hon. Obadiah B. McFadden, 
Chief Justice of Washington, and Delegate to Congress. After 
the death of his father in 1876 the family moved to Seattle. He 
was prepared for college in the Belmont (Cal.) School. 

After graduation he returned to Seattle, where he was princi- 
pally engaged in the management of his father's estate, being a 
member of the firm of Mary Miller & Sons, a corporation holding 



372 

valuable business properly in Seattle, and farms and timber lands 
in other sections of the State. He had a strong physique, but be- 
came a victim of pneumonia, dying after a brief illness on April 
7, 1904, in the 33d year of his age. He was unmarried. A brother 
graduated at Yale in the same class. 

• 

Joseph Earl Sheffield, son of George St. John Sheffield 
(Yale 1863) and Mary (Stewart) Sheffield, and grandson and 
namesake of the great benefactor of the Sheffield Scientific 
School, was born in New York City, on November 16, 1871, but 
in 1889 Attleboro, Mass., became the family home. He was pre- 
pared for college at the Hopkins Grammar School and Lawrence- 
ville (N. J.) School. 

After graduation he went into the banking business in New 
York with Charles Hathaway & Co., and was admitted to the 
firm on January 1, 1900. In 1898 he received the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts from Yale University upon examination. 

Mr. Sheffield died after an illness of three weeks from typhoid 
fever at his home in New York, on October 16, 1903, in the 32d 
year of his age. With force of character he united an unusual 
charm of manner and sweetness of disposition. 

He married, on April 19, 1903, Louise R., daughter of Edward 
T. and Julia (Blatchford) Potter, ot Newport, R. 1., and niece of 
Bishop Henry Codman Potter of New York. Mrs. Sheffield sur- 
vives him. A brother graduated from the Sheffield Scientific 
School in 1894. 

1895 

Arthur Hibbert Eggleston, son of Julius Whiting and 
Katherine (Percy) Eggleston, was born in New London, Conn., 
on May 30, 1872. 

For two years after graduation he was a private tutor in New 
York City, and the next two years an instructor in English and the 
Classics in the Bulkeley School in New London, at which he was 
prepared for college. He was then for a time in the service of 
the Massachusetts Mutual Lisurance Co., leaving that company to 
become associated with his father-in-law in the real estate busi- 
ness. In 1900 he was elected a member of the Board of Educa- 
tion of New London for three years. 

He was a sincere and earnest member of the Second Congrega- 
tional Church of New London, and since 1899 Assistant Superin- 



373 

tendent of the Sunday school. In 1902 he was one of six 
Yale men who were consulted as to whether they would become 
members of the original band to go to North China to establish 
a Yale Mission. 

He married, on April 6, 1898, Mary Eliza Borrodell, daughter 
of Pdeg and Eliza (Strickland) Williams, of New London. Mrs. 
Eggleston died in May, 1903, two days after the death of an infant 
son, and the deaths of her stepmother and father occurred in Jan- 
uary and August, 1902 — the four deaths having come within 
eighteen months. After these sorrows he tried to take up his 
work, but finding himself on the verge of nervous prostration he 
made a trip to the White Mountains, and then to Burlington, Vt., 
where he determined to enter the Mary Fletcher Hospital for a 
few weeks' treatment. It was not known that he was subject to 
pulmonary trouble, but he died there suddenly from hemorrhage 
of the lungs, on August 20, 1903, at the age of 31 years. Two 
brothers graduated from the Academical Department, in 1892 
and 1900, respectively. 

Ervin Edward Osgood, son of Dauphin William Osgood, 
M.D. (N. Y. Univ. 1869), a medical missionary in China, was born 
in Foochow in that empire, on April 5, 1871. His mother was 
Helen W., daughter of Moses and Harriet Cristy. He was pre- 
pared for college at the High School in New Britain, Conn., and 
entered from that city. He was the Class Statistician and com- 
piler of the Class Book in Senior year. 

After graduation he taught for three years in the Berkeley 
School, New York City, and was then private secretary to Mr. 
Norman B. Ream, of Chicago. In 1901 he became connected 
with the New York Export and Import Company, and in 1902 
started on a business trip around the world. While in Bombay 
he was taken ill, and on his recovery abandoned his trip and 
decided to continue work for the same company in Calcutta. On 
May 1, 1903, he was appointed United States Vice- and Deputy- 
Consul General at Calcutta, and afterward made his home in that 
city. 

His death occurred at the Calcutta General Hospital, on Decem- 
ber 25, 1903, from a gastric ulcer. He was 32 years of age, and 
unmarried. He was a member of the Broadway Tabernacle, New 
York City. A brother graduated from the Sheffield Scientific 
School in 1899. 



3Y4 

Raymond Sandford White, son of Andrew Jndson White 
(M.D. Yale 1846; hon. M.A. 1894) and Eleanor (Verplanck) 
White, was born on July 1, 1874, in Ponghkeepsie, N. Y., but 
lived, except for the first few years of his life, and was prepared 
for college in New York City. During his college course he 
was a member of the board of editors of the Courant, Reeord 
and Yale Literary Magazine, and it wns at his suggestion that his 
father furnished rooms for the various college periodicals in White 
Hall, the dormitory which he presented to the University in 1894. 

After graduation he entered the New York Law School, reci ived 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws therefrom in 1897, was admitted 
to the bar on June 28 of that year, and, after sei-ving a clerk- 
ship for three years, on March 1, 1900, formed a partnership with 
his college roommate, Roger S. Baldwin, under the firm name of 
Baldwin & White. On the death of his father in 1898 important 
business responsibilities came to him, and to these he added 
others. He was a director in the Union Typewriter Company, 
the firm of D. O. Hajmes & Co., publishers of the New York 
Commercial, t\\Q National Addograph Company, Richard Hud- 
nut's pharmacy, and the McVickar Realty Trust Company, and 
showed unusual executive power and unceasing energy in the 
conduct of every enterprise with which he was connected. 

Mr. White was injured in an automobile accident at Bay 
Shore, Long Island, N. Y., and died two days afterward, on 
December 21, 1903, at the age of 29 years. 

He married, on February 17, 1898, Sadie Henrietta, daughter 
of Theodore Crane, who survives him with two daughters. 

1896 

Geoege Hatward Schuyler, son of Henry N. and Adeline 
(Hay ward) Schuyler, was born on January 8, 1875, in Pana, 111., 
of which his father was Mayor from 1874 to 1878. He entered 
Yale from Northwestern Universitj^ 

After graduation he spent four months in European travel and 
a year in the banking business with his father in Pana, and then 
entered the Law School of Harvard University, from which he 
received the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1900. Since then 
he practiced his profession in New York City, and since Decem- 
ber, 1901, was Counsel of the Legal Aid Society. During the 
last two years he resided at the Yale Club. His summer vaca- 
tions he passed mostly in sailing off the New England coast, but 



375 

one summer hunted in the Rocky Mountains north and east of the 
Yellowstone Park and journeyed through the Park. 

Mr. Schuyler died in New York City after an operation fol- 
lowing a few days' illness from appendicitis, on February 22, 
1904, at the age of 29 years. He was unmarried. 

Marius Joseph Spinello, whose name while a student was 
written Joseph Marius Spinello, son of Giovanni Batista Spinello, 
a decorator, and Maddalina Spinello, was born in St. Arsenio^ 
in the Province of Salerno, Italy, on October 28, 1871, but came 
to the United States with his parents in his boyhood, and to 
New Haven in 1887. While employed with his brother as a bar- 
ber, he was prepared for college under Rev. J. Lee Mitchell 
(Harvard 1884; Ph.D. Yale 1896), then pastor of the Grand 
Avenue Congregational Church. 

After graduation he taught Latin, Greek and French for three 
years in St. John's Military Institute, Manlius, N. Y., in 1899 
received the degree of Master of Arts from Yale University, and 
the following year returned to New Haven for post-graduate 
study. Early in the summer of 1900, with the permission of the 
faculty, he went abroad for farther study, at first for three 
months in Bonn, and then in Paris. At the close of the academic 
year he returned to New Haven with seriously impaired health, 
and spent the winter in Georgia recuperating and doing much 
private tutoring. In 1902 he went to the University of Califor- 
nia, as assistant in the Romance Languages, and the following 
year was made Instructor in French and Italian. So great was 
his success in teaching that he had been promised a professorship. 
He translated Hawthorne's "Scarlet Letter" into Latin, and 
wrote frequently for the magazines. 

As he was attempting to get on a moving car of an electric 
train at Berkeley, he was thrown under the wheels and received 
injuries of which he died soon afterward, on May 24, 1904. He 
was 32 years of age. 

He married, on June 18, 1902, Alice Frederica, daughter of 
William Boone, of Syracuse, N. Y. Mrs. Spinello survives him 
without children. 

Edward Livingston Trudeau, son of Edward Livingston 
Trudeau, M.D. (Columbia 1871; M.S. 1899), eminent as an 
authority on tuberculosis, and founder of the sanitarium and lab- 



376 

oratory at Saranac Lake, 1^. Y., for the treatment and study of 
that disease, was born in New York City, on May 18, ]873. His 
mother was Charlotte G. (Beare) Trudeau. He was prepared for 
college at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. While in college he 
did excellent work in physiology, and was distinguished for his 
pitching on the Yale nine in Junior and Senior years. 

After graduation he entered the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of Columbia University, and received the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in 1900. He won third place in the com- 
petitive examination for the house staff of the Presbyterian 
Hospital in New York City, w^here he rose to the position of 
House Surgeon. On the completion of his hospital service in 
1903, he went to the Adirondacks and assisted his father in the 
medical practice of the St. Regis Lake region. At the close of 
the summer he went abroad for a short vacation, and on his 
return became the assistant of Dr. Walter B. James (Yale 1879) 
in New York City. 

Dr. Trudeau contracted pneumonia, but was recovering from 
it when an attack of embolism caused his death, on May 3, 1 904, 
about two weeks after the beginning of his illness. He had 
nearly completed his 3 1st year. 

He married, on December 28, 1903, Hazel, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. E. J. Martin, of Chicago, 111. 

Dr. Trudeau came from many generations of distinguished 
medical men, and showed brilliant promise in his chosen profes- 
sion, his attractive personality making him a particularly welcome 
visitor in the sick room. He was a man of fine Christian char- 
acter, very loyal to his friends, and with a high sense of service. 
He was a vestryman of the Episcopal Church at Saranac. He 
was devoted to the Adirondacks, where most of his life was 
spent, and had the reputation of being one of the best sportsmen 
in the woods. 

1898 

John Lawrence Thurston, son of Rev. John Rogers Thurs- 
ton (Yale 1851) and Caroline Augusta Wells (Storey) Thurston, 
was born on August 4, 1874, at Whitinsville, Mass., where his 
father has been the Congregational pastor for over thirty years. 
He was prepared for college at Worcester (Mass.) Academy. 
During Freshman year he became identified with the Student 
Volunteer Movement, and throughout his course he was active in 



377 



Iromoting the cause of Christian missions in the college and in 
eighboring churches. 
The year after graduation he was with the Yale Missionary 
Band, .nearly all his own classmates, and visited the principal 
cities in the East and Middle West, where the young people of 
the churches were aroused to a new interest and enthusiastic sup- 
port of foreign mis!>ions. In the fall of 1899 he entered Auburn 
Theological Seminary, and two years later went to Hartford 
Seminary for his Senior year, receiving from the latter the degree 
of Bachelor of Divinity in 1902. On September 9, 1902, he 
married Miss Matilda S. Calder, of Hartford, Conn., who had 
taught nearly two years in a mission school at Marash, Turkey. 
Mr. Thurston was ordained at Whitinsville on September 26, and 
on October 6, sailed with his wife from Vancouver for China, as 
the first missionary sent out by the Yale Foreign Missionary 
Society, in the organization of which he had been largely instru- 
mental. It was his life ambition to give to the people of China 
the advantages which he had received at Yale. As neither the 
form of the work nor the location of the Yale Mission had been 
fully settled, on reaching China he devoted himself to the inves- 
tigation of these questions and to the study of the language. A 
few months made it clear that there was no adequate opening in 
North China, and therefore attention was turned to the Yangtse 
valley. In June the Society was invited by missionaries in the 
newly opened province of Hunan to establish in the capital, 
Changsha, the Union Christian College for the entire province 
and for the numerous societies at work there, and in September 
the offer was accepted. 

The year's work was scarcely completed when it was found 
that he had developed tuberculosis, probably through infection, 
and in consequence returned to America in December, 1903. He 
passed the winter comfortably in San Bernardino, Cal., and had 
recently gone to Claremont, not far distant. His health had been 
apparently steadily improving, and his death, which occurred at 
Claremont on May 11, 1904, was unexpected. He was in the 30th 
year of his age. Besides his widow, his parents, a brother (Yale 
1895) and two sisters survive him. 

1899 

William Hervy Rood, son of Harmon J. and Ann (Nichols) 
Rood, was born in Sutton, Mass., on October 28, 1875. While in 
college he supported himself largely by tutoring. 



3Y8 

After graduation he started for California on a bicycle trip, 
but, being taken ill at St. Louis, he went directly to his father's 
home in Princeton, 111. He was soon ad vised by physicians to go 
for his health to Colorado, where improvement began at once. 
After a year of out-door life he entered the Denver Law School, 
but soon found the work too confining, and entered the service of 
the Colorado Iron & Fuel Co., at Pueblo. In the summer of 1901 
he was called to New York on business, and in the fall entered 
the Columbia Law School, from which he would have graduated 
in June, 1904. For special studies in Columbia University in 
constitutional history and economics he received the degree of 
Master of Arts in 1903. 

Mr. Rood died of typhoid fever at St. Luke's Hospital, New 
York City, on November 1, 1903. He was 28 years of age, and 
unmarried. 

Edwaed Thomas, son of Walter A. and Sarah (Woodward) 
Thomas, was born at Thomaston, Conn., on August 24, 1876. 

After graduation he entered the service of the Seth Thomas 
Clock Company, at Thomaston, and at the end of two years was 
made Assistant Manager of one of the departments with the most 
favorable auguries for a successful business career. Close atten- 
tion to his work and the confinement seriously impaired his 
health, however, and on the advice of his physician he went to 
Pinehurst, N. C, but while there he contracted pneumonia, which 
developed into tuberculosis. He went to Maine and spent several 
months in Florida, but nothing could be done to check the disease. 
After a brave fight for many months he died at his home on Feb- 
ruary 16, 1904, in the 28th year of his age. He was unmarried. 

1900 

HoBART Moore, son of Hon. William Henry Moore and Ada 
(Small) Moore, was born on August 1, 1879, in Chicago, III., and 
was prepared for college at the Harvard School in that city. 

After graduation he spent a year at the Harvard Law School, 
and then assumed a position in the First National Bank in New 
York Citj. Soon, however, consumption developed, and he took 
a cottage at Saranac Lake, where, after an illness of eighteen 
months, he died on March 3, 1904, at the age of 24 years. On 
the preceding Sunday, February 28, 1904, he married Ruth Win- 
throp, daughter of J. Frank Emmons, of the banking house of 



379 

H. L. Horton & Co., and President of the Staten Island Rapid 
Transit Company. He gained the sincere attachment of a large 
circle of friends. 

1901 

Robert Lewis Atkinson, son of Robert Atkinson, a general 
commission and shipping merchant, and Florence (Lewis) Atkin- 
son, was born at St. Charles, Mo., on August 6, 1879, but before 
he came to college the family residence had been changed to St. 
Louis, where he took his preliminary course. In rowing and in 
the social life of the college he was active, and his ready sympa- 
thy and lovable qualities won for him the high regard of his 
classmates. 

After graduation he entered the St. Louis Law School, but after 
a term of study symptoms of tuberculosis appeared and he went 
to Arizona and later to Colorado Springs, where he spent the last 
year and a half of his life, and died on December 28, 1903. He 
was 24 years of age, and unmarried. 

Charles McLean, son of Captain Thomas C. McLean (U. S. 
Nav. Acad. 1868) and Emily Chapman (Gordon) McLean, and 
grandson of Alexander Blucher Gordon (Yale 1834), was born at 
" Oatlands," near Leesburg, Ya., on July 20, 1878, and was pre- 
pared for college at the Westminster School, Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 

After graduation he entered the Medical School of the Univer- 
sity of Yirginia, at Charlottesville, Ya., but was taken with 
typhoid fever, and died at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Balti- 
more, Md., on October 14, 1903, at the age of 25 years. 

1902 

John Clute McDowell, son of George H. and Elizabeth C. 
(Clute) McDowell, was born on January 1, 1879, at Cohoes, 
N. Y., where his father was a manufacturer. He prepared for 
college at the Cascadilla School in Ithaca, N. Y. 

Since graduation he had been studying at the Albany Law 
School. He died after a brief illness from a complication of dis- 
eases, at his home in Cohoes, on November 18, 1903, in the 26th 
year of his age. He was unmarried. A brother graduated in the 
same class. 



380 



1903 



Irving McDonald, son of John Irving McDonald (Yale 1878), 
a manufacturer of men's furnishings, and Frank H. (Fanning) 
McDonald, was born in St. Joseph, Mo., on November 5, 1881, 
and was prepared for college at Taft's School, Watertown, Conn. 

After graduation he returned to St. Joseph and engaged in 
street engineering and construction. On the morning of Novem- 
ber 15, 1903, while with a group of acquaintances he became 
a witness of an altercation between two men whom he had 
met for the first time but an hour before. When one of the par- 
ticipants drew a revolver Mr. McDonald sprang forward to dis- 
arm him, and in the struggle which ensued received a wound 
which caused his death in a few hours. He was 22 years of age, 
and unmarried. 



381 



YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

1843 

George Whiting Burke, son of Joseph Chester and Jane 
(Whiting) Burke, was born in New Haven, Conn., on June 27, 
1821, but moved at an early age to Middletown, and graduated 
from Wesleyan University in 1839. He then taught school in 
Hartford and in New York State until 1841, when he began the 
study of medicine with Dr. Brigham, then Superintendent of the 
Retreat for the Insane at Hartford. 

After graduation from the Yale Medical School he practiced 
his profession in Palmer, Mass., until 1852, and in Middletown, 
Conn., until 1881. From 1867 to 1887 he Tvas Medical Examiner 
of the Travelers' Insurance Company of Hartford, and held the 
same position with several other insurance companies. 

From 1859 to 1878 he was Secretary of the Middletown City 
Board of Education, and from 1869 to 1881 was United States 
Deputy Collector of Customs for the District of Middletown. 
He was also at different times Alderman, Assessor and Town 
Clerk. He was the author of a few medical papers, which were 
printed in the Proceedings of the Connecticut Medical Society. 

Dr. Burke died of enteritis at his home in Middletown on June 
4, 1904, at the age of 82 years. He had been a member of the 
First Methodist Episcopal Church in Middletown since 1852, and 
for eleven years previous of the First Methodist Church in 
Hartford. 

He married, on May 13, 1844, Ann Parish Benjamin, step- 
daughter of Oliver Parish, of Hartford, Conn., who died in 1853. 
He afterward married Jane E., daughter of Joseph and Eliza 
(Walkley) Tobey, of Middletown, who survives him with two 
sons and a daughter by the first marriage, two sons having died. 

1850 

Richard Pierce Evans, son of Otho Evans, M.D., and Ann 
(Cummings) Evans, was born in Franklin, O., on March 8, 1829, 
and began the study of medicine with his father and at the Ohio 
Medical College, and completed his course at the Yale Medical 
School. 

Soon after graduation he returned to his native place, and 
built up a large practice, continuing there to the close of his life. 



382 

During the cholera epidemic in 1849 his service was most valua- 
ble, and he was always ready to minister to those who were 
unable to compensate him. In his early practice his visits were 
made on horseback. 

He was a leader in every good cause in the community. He 
was for many years a member of the Board of Education, and 
for a long time President of the Board of Trustees of the Frank- 
lin Cemetery. He was a Trustee of the Presbyterian Church for 
more than forty years, and President of the Board during most 
of that period, and when the new edifice was erected he was 
Chairman of the Building Committee. He was also for a time a 
Director of the First National Bank. 

Dr. Evans died at his home on May 31, 1903, at the age of 74 
years. He had been in failing health for two years or more. 

He married, on July 2, 1850, Elizabet|^ Light, daughter of 
David Combs Bergen, qf Harrodsburg, Ky. Mrs. Evans and one 
son and one daughter are deceased, but a son and a daughter 
survive him. The son graduated from Miami Medical College, 
Cincinnati, in 1873, and with a grandson practices medicine in 
Franklin. 

1864 

Erastus Bradley Bills, son of Henry B. and Harriet Gordon 
(Bartholomew) Bills, was born in Northford, Conn., on August 
16, 1828, and began the study of medicine in the office of Dr. 
Blakesley in New Haven. 

After graduation from the Yale Medical School he settled in 
Durant, Iowa, where he continued in the practice of his profes- 
sion until the close of his life. In 1862 he was Captain of the 
Hawkeye Guards. In 1887 he was elected as a Democrat to the 
State Senate, and served two terms. He was one of the first 
Trustees of Saint Paul's Church in Durant. 

Dr. Bills died of heart failure on October 15, 1902, at the age 
of 74 years. 

He married, on July 2, 1863, Cecelia, daughter of James M. 
Gillespie, of Durant, formerly a carpet dealer in New York. 
Mrs. Bills died in October, 1901, and their son in 1894 at the age) 
of 25 years. > 

1857 

Asa Hopkins Churchill, son of Hiram Churchill, a shoe 
dealer of Litchfield, Conn., was born in that town on September^ 



383 

8, 1832, and before beginning his medical course studied three 
or four years in the Hopkins Grammar School. 

Directly after graduation from the Yale Medical School he 
began practice in New Haven, but after two years removed to 
Meriden, where he practiced until 1881. Owing to the failure of 
his health he then gave up his profession, and thereafter was in 
the insurance business. 

Dr. Churchill died, after an illness of seven weeks, in Meriden, 
on October 17, 1903, at the age of 71 years. 

He married, in 1854, Miss Harriet A. Smith, who survives him. 
Their adopted son died in 1890. 

1860 

Edwaed Prindle Woodward, son of Asa Curtiss Woodward, 
M.D., and Amanda (Warner) Woodward, was born on Feb- 
ruary 5, 1837, in Litchfield, Conn., where his father was at the 
time a practicing physician. He first attended lectures in the 
Boston University School of Medicine, but completed his medical 
studies at the Yale Medical School. 

After graduation he began practice in Cheshire, Conn., but a 
few years later removed to Bethany, where his father was then 
practicing. In the spring of 1868 he settled in Bristol, and there 
he gained the esteem and confidence of all classes, and for 
twenty-five j^ears had a large practice. 

Upon the organization of Bristol as a borough in 1893, Dr. 
Woodward was elected the first Warden and reelected the next 
year. 

In the fall of 1900 he suffered a stroke of paralysis, but at 
length rallied sufliciently to be about the\streets. He died at the 
home of his daughter, the wife of Dr. Benjamin B. RobbinSj in 
Bristol, on March 19, 1904, at the age of 67 jeavs. 

Dr. Woodward was married four times. He first married Dolly 
Eliza Sperr}^, of Bethany, who died in 1864, leaving two daugh- 
ters. His second wife. Miss Antoinette Bassett, died six weeks 
after marriage. He afterward married Mary Ann, daughter 
of Burr B. Atwood, of Woodbury, Conn., who left one daughter 
(Mrs. Robbins). His last wife was Mrs. Frances Clark Ellis, 
widow of William H. Ellis, of Middlebury, Vt., who, with the 
two daughters by the first marriage and the daughter by the 
third marriage, survives him. He was a member of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church. 



384 



1866 



Charles Ferris Morgan, son of Charles Morgan, a farmer 
of Wilton, Conn., was born in that town on October 6, 1845. 
His mother was Electa M. (Betts) Morgan. 

Soon after graduation he settled in the practice of his pro- 
fession in Greenyille, Mich., and was Mayor of the city several 
times. He was a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 
He married, in June, 1875, Gertrude, daughter of William H. 
Ellsworth, M.D., of Greenville, and died after a protracted 
illness at Traverse City, Mich., on April 29, 1902. Pie was 56 
years of age. Mrs. Morgan and one daughter survive him. 

1896 

MiLO HoTCHKiss Jones, son of Leander P. Jones, M.D. 
(N. Y. Homeop. Med. Coll. 1870), and Fanny (Hotchkiss) Jones, 
was born at Berlin, Conn., on February 26, 1875. 

After graduation from the Yale Medical School he was for two 
years at Bellevue Hospital, New York City, and then went to 
Greenwich to assist his father in his practice. He had been suc- 
cessful in treating many serious cases of typhoid fever, but 
became a victim of the disease himself, dying at Greenwich on 
July 27, 1903, at the age of 28 years. He was unmarried. 

1897 

Arthur Leslie Hov/ard, son of Edward Howard, a merchant 
of the West Indies and New York City, was born in St. Thomas, 
West Indies, on January 17, 1876, and was a student in Cooke 
College, Antigua, W. I. 

After graduation from the Yale Medical School he went to 
England, where he was Second Doctor at the Liverpool East 
Dispensary for several months. Having passed his final exam- 
inations he went for rest to Vroncysylite, Wales, where he died 
on May 3, 1904, at the age of 28 years. His health had been 
failing for some time. His mother, Mrs. C. H. Howard, sur- 
vives him. 



385 



YALE LAW SCHOOL. 

1851 

Joseph Andrew Treat, son of Andrew and Marietta Newton 
(Treat) Treat, was born on June 15, 1827, in Tallmadge, O. His 
parents were from Orange (then North Milford), Conn., and set- 
tled in Tallmadge in 1824. Before entering the Yale Law School 
he studied for a year in the Sheffield Scientific School. 

After graduation he did not practice his profession but engaged 
in the lumber business and farming, and devoted much time to 
scientific problems, sometimes lecturing. He invented some use- 
ful devices. 

Mr. Treat died of chronic intestinal catarrh at his home in 
Cleveland, O., on September 22, 1903. He was 76 years of age. 
His widow, Mrs. Mary E. Treat, survives him. They had no 
children. 

1863 

Horace Atwell Brown, fifth son of Joseph and Mary Eliza- 
beth (Hunt) Brown, was born on February 15, 1842, in Bridgton, 
Me., and was a pupil at Bridgton Academy previous to entering 
the Yale Law School. 

After graduation he settled in Brandon, Wise, but in 1872 was 
appointed an instructor in the Preparatory Department of Wash- 
ington University, in St. Louis, Mo., and remained there till the 
summer of 1886, when on account of ill health he resigned, and 
removed to California. At Los Angeles he founded Belmont Hall 
(a school for girls) and the Eaton School (for boys), of which he 
continued in charge until his retirement from active business. 

While spending the winter at Rock Stream, Yates County, 
N. Y., on account of the delicate health of his wife, he died 
of apoplexy, on December 28, 1903. He was in the 62d year of 
his age. 

He married, at Brandon, Wise, on September 6, 1866, Henri- 
etta, daughter of John and Eunice (Taft) Coon, of Salem, Wash- 
ington County, N. Y, who died at Rock Stream less than three 
months after him, leaving three sons. An elder brother gradu- 
ated at Bowdoin College in 1854, and a younger brother at Yale 
College in 1867 and the Yale Divinity School in 1870. 



386 

Mr. Brown was a deacon in the First Congregational Church 
in St. Louis and Superintendent of its Sabbath school for many 
years, and up to the time of his removal to California. After- 
ward he was deacon in the First Congregational Church in Los 
Angeles until his death. 

J 877 

John Parker Bronk, son of Peter Bronk and Mary (Hub- 
bard) Bronk, and a lineal descendant of Jonas Bronk, who 
owned the land lying in the Bronx District of New York, was 
born in Brooklyn, N. Y., on January 24, 1855, and graduated 
from Wesleyan University in 1875. The next year he began the 
study of law in Boston University, and finished his course in the 
Yale Law School in 1877. 

Soon after graduation he was appointed Counsel of the Travel- 
ers' Insurance Company of Hartford. In 1880 he was sent by 
the company to Denver, Col., where he represented its legal inter- 
ests for ten years. While in Hartford he was, in 1879, President 
of the Board of Councilmen, and while in Denver he was chosen 
President of the Colorado Land and Loan Company, and was 
identified with other financial organizations of that State. About 
1890 he retired from active business and settled in New Balti- 
more, Greene County, N. Y. In 1897 he had an attack of typhoid 
fever, from the effects of which he never recovered, and from the 
results of which lie died at Bridgeport, Conn., on January 22, 
1904. He was nearly 49 years of age. He was a member of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

He married, on August 24, 1878, Anna Tucker, daughter of 
Enoch Cornwall and Mary Ann (Wright) Roberts, of Hartford, 
Conn. He afterward married in Delaiid, Fla., Mrs. Lillie L. 
(Piatt) Bennett, widow of George U. Bennett, of Bridgeport, 
and daughter of Jerome and Martha (Joyce) Piatt. A son by 
the former marriage survives him. 

1880 

John Martin Murdoch, son of Thomas and Jane Murdoch, 
was born on August 3, 1858, in Middletown, Conn., where his 
father was a machinist. 

After graduation from the Yale Law School he was admitted 
to the bar and began practice. From 1888 he was Judge of Pro- 
bate of Chatham District, including the towns of Chatham and 



387 

Portland, and he was State's Attorney of Middlesex County 
from 1895, residing in Portland. 

Judge Murdoch died suddenly of heart disease at Middletown, 
on January 9, 1904, in the 46th year of his age. He had been 
a member ot the North Congregational Church in Middletown 
since 1878. 

He married, on March 26, 1885, Ella Dorcas, daughter of Asaph 
and Harriette Strong, of Middletown, who survives him. They 
had no children. 

1886 

Frederick Adriance Osborn, son of John Joel Osborn, for 
many years a carriage manufacturer in New Haven, Conn., was 
born in that city on February 28, 1860. His mother was Char- 
lotte, daughter of Ezekiel Gilbert, of New Haven. He entered 
the Sheffield Scientific School in 1877, but left during Senior 
year. He was a traveling salesman for the Amesbury (Mass.) 
Carriage Co. for about two years, and then entered the Yale Law 
School. 

After graduation he practiced his profession in New Haven for 
about four years, then went to Anniston, Ala., where he continued 
the practice of law and engaged in the real estate business for 
several years, but for the last ten years had been in the service 
of the Equitable Life Insurance Company in New Haven, Spring- 
field, Mass., and New York City. While on a business trip for 
the company in Boston, Mass., he died suddenly of congestion of 
the brain, on September 8, 1903. He was 43 years of age and 
unmarried. One of his brothers graduated from the Academical 
Department in 1877, and another from the Sheffield Scientific 
School in 1888. 

1889 

Albert Jacob Wise, son of Jacob Wise, a merchant of Lima, 
Ohio, and Helen (Lichtenstader) Wise, was born in that place, 
on September 24, 1869. 

After graduation from the Law School he entered the office 
of L. S. Quackenbush, Esq., of New York City, and later formed 
a partnership with him under the name of Quackenbush & Wise, 
making a specialty of real estate law. He was also President of 
the Bunnell Electrical and Telegraphic Co., operating factories 
in New York and Milford, Conn. 



388 

Mr. Wise died in New York City on December 10, 1903, at 
the age of 34 years. 

He married, on April 8, 1896, Gertrude Van Duzer, daughter 
of Jesse H. Bunnell, a manufacturer of electrical supplies and an 
inventor. Mrs. Wise survives him without children. 

1901 

John Hillabd, son of Rev. Elias Brewster Hillard (Yale 
1848), who was for twenty years pastor of the Congregational 
Church at Plymouth, Conn., was born in that town on August 
13, 1877. His mother was Julia, daughter of Judge Frederick 
Whittlesey (Yale 1822), of Cleveland, O. He had resided for a 
number of years in Waterbury, Conn., but entered the Yale Law 
School from Farmington. 

After graduation with high honor he entered the law office of 
White, Daggett & Tilson in New Haven, and during two years' 
practice had shown unusual promise in his profession, but in 
August, 1903, he was taken down with typhoid fever, of which 
he died at the Hartford Hospital on September 27, at the age of 
26 years. He was unmarried. A brother graduated from the 
Yale Law School in 1887. 



I 



389 



YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL. 



1875 



Henry Martin Ladd, son of Rev. Daniel Ladd (Middlebury 
1832), thirty years a missionary of the American Board of Com- 
missioners for Foreign Missions in Turkey, was born in Broosa 
in that country, on November 10, 1849. His mother was Char- 
lotte Holley (Kitchel) Ladd, sister of Rev. Harvey Denison 
Kitchel (Middlebury 1835, hon. M.A. Yale 1865), who was 
President of Middlebury College from 1866 to 1873. His home 
for about fifteen years was in Smyrna, after which he spent a 
year in Robert College, Constantinople. In the summer of 1867 
he came to the United States, and, after a year of preparatory 
study, took the course in Middlebury College, graduating as 
Valedictorian in 1872. 

In the autumn after graduation from the Yale Divinity School, 
October 6, 1875, he was ordained Pastor of the First Congrega- 
tional Church of Walton, N. Y., and performed most acceptable 
service until February, 1881, when he became Foreign Superin- 
tendent of the American Missionary Association, and started 
upon a tour of inspection of the west coast of Africa. After an 
absence of four months he returned, and was commissioned to 
make explorations in Central Africa with a view to establishing 
a mission in the basin of the Upper Nile. At the head of a party 
of about twenty-five he reached Khartoum, and then penetrated 
six hundred miles into the heart of Africa, up the Sobat River 
and beyond, until he was stopped by the insurrection of Moham- 
med Achmet, by whom he was twice waylaid, and nearly lost his 
life. After nine months of hazardous experiences he made his 
way back to Alexandria. The Association, however, transferred 
its foreign work to another society about this time, and on account 
of the unsettled state of the country, the Arthington mission 
which he planned to establish on the Upper Nile had to be given 
up. He wrote many articles on Egypt and the Soudan, on which 
he was a recognized authority. He received the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Divinity from Middlebury College in 1882. 

Soon after his return to the United States he was called to the 
Euclid Avenue Congregational Church, in Cleveland, O. He was 
installed there on May 29, 1883, and during his pastorate of four- 
teen years the church became thoroughly united, largely increased 



390 

its membership and benevolence, erected a line edifice, and devel- 
oped a strong missionary work in the eastern part of the city. 
He was afterward acting pastor of the First Congregational 
Church at Ravenna, O., and for two years was also General 
Agent of the New York Life Insurance Co., and later President 
of the Ohio Color Photo Co. 

Dr. Ladd died of heart failure at the home of his daughter, 
Mrs. Fred N. Hogen, in Cleveland, on February 12, 1904, at the 
age of 54 years. He had been ill nearly a month with bronchial 
pneumonia. 

He married on June 16, 1875, Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of 
James and Mary (Rice) Harvey, of Danbury, Conn., who survives 
him with three daughters and two sons. 

1880 

Henky Tarrant, son of William and Mary Tarrant, was born 
at Easterton, Wilts County, England, on November 15, 1846, 
and graduated from Owens College, at Manchester, in 1873. He 
came to the United States in 1878. 

After graduation from the Yale Divinity School he was ordained 
Deacon in the Protestant Episcopal Church by Bishop Williams 
in 1880 and Priest in 1881, and after service at Hamden, East 
Haven and Stratford, Conn., he was rector from 1883 to 1885 in 
Huntington and a year in Highland, N. Y., and in 1887-88 was 
assistant at Saint George's Church, in Newburgh, N. Y. He was 
then at Rock Spring, Md., and two years assistant to Bishop 
Paret in Baltimore. During 1892 and 1893 he was rector of 
Saint Mark's Church, Pittsburg, Pa., then in Westfield, Mass., 
and in 1899 he went to Saint John's Church, Pine Meadow, Conn. 
There he continued until his death, on December 6, 1903, after 
an illness of four months. He was 57 years of age. He was 
filled with the missionary spirit and was especially attentive in 
the care of the poor. 

He married on November 16, 1881, Avis Sophia, daughter of 
Birdseye N. Boothe, who survives him with a son and daughter. 

1883 

Henry Lewis Richardson, son of Lewis and Caroline Rich- 
ardson, was born on December 1, 1854, in Marion, Waupaca 
County, Wise, and spent his youth at Berlin, some forty miles 
south, in Green Lake County. He received the degree of 



391 

Bachelor of Arts from the University of Wisconsin in 1880, was 
a student in Oberlin Seminary for a year, and entered Yale 
Divinity School in Middle year. 

After finishing his Divinity course he returned to Wisconsin, 
and was ordained on May 31, 1883, at DePere, Wise, where he 
continued until the close of 1886. After this he was acting pas- 
tor at Ripon, in the same State, for eleven years, also from 1888 
to 1891 Superintendent of Schools there. From December, 1899 
to June, 1901, he was pastor in Racine, Wise. Since the summer 
of 1901 he had been taking post-graduate studies in the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, from which he expected to receive the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy in June. Meanwhile he was preaching at 
Whiting, Ind., where under his leadership the church had just 
cleared itself of debt. 

Mr. Richardson was a victim of the Iroquois Theatre fire in 
Chicago, on December 30, 1903. He was 49 years of age. 

He married on October 4, 1883, Lizzie, daughter of Richard 
Smith. She died in Philadelphia, in 1895, but a son survives him. 

1888 

John CnuECHwooD Wilson, son of Thomas and Ruth Anna 
(Coy) Wilson, was born on May 9, 1852, in Philadelphia, Pa., 
and graduated from Amherst College in 1885. 

Immediately after graduation from the Yale Theological Sem- 
inary he was ordained, on May 23, 1888, pastor of the First Con- 
gregational Church in Stonington, Conn., where he continued 
four years. He then served the Centre Church in Meriden until 
January, 1896, when he accepted a call to the Puritan Congrega- 
tional Church in Brooklyn, N. Y., but after five years of effective 
work there, on account of ill health, he felt impelled to take a 
position of less responsibility, and since June, 1901, he had been 
associate pastor with Rev. A. J. Lyman, D.D., of the South Con- 
gregational Church in Brooklyn. 

Mr. Wilson died at his home in Brooklyn, on July 9, 1903, 
from accidental gas poisoning resulting from a defective connec- 
tion in a small gas stove. He was 41 years of age. 

He married on April 25, 1888, Lilian Avis, daughter of Thomas 
Maitland Barton, M.D., and Caroline Lucile (Canfield) of Brook- 
lyn. Mrs, Wilson survives him with one daughter. 

Mr. Wilson received the degree of Master of Arts from Amherst 
College in 1888, and in 1902-1903 was President of the Alumni 
Association of Yale Divinity School. 



392 

1890 

Charles Dow Crawpokd, son of Charles W. and Sallie M. 
(Jernigan) Crawford, was born at Keetsville, afterward called 
Washburn, Barrie County, in southwestern Missouri, on May 6, 
1860, but shortly afterward moved with his parents to Spring- 
field, Mo., where he resided until he graduated from Drury 
College in 1887. 

After finishing his course in the Yale Divinity School, he con- 
tinued his studies in the Seminary the next year, and had since 
then been especially interested in historical study. In December, 
1892, he took up the work in Crested Butte, Col., and was 
ordained to the ministry on May 25, 1893, continuing in charge 
of the church until October, 1895. From December 7, 1895, 
until February, 1897, he was pastor of Plymouth Congregational 
Church, Kansas City, Mo., and from September, 1898, to October, 
1902, pastor at Little Compton, R. I. In 1903 he was called to 
Meadville, Pa. 

He was spending a few weeks in New York City, intending 
soon to visit his former home in Missouri, but was taken with 
pneumonia and died after an illness of six days at Bellevue Hos- 
pital, on May 7, 1904, at the age of 44* years. He had never 
married. 



393 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL. 

1871 

Russell Wheeler Davenport, son of Rev. James Radcliffe 
Davenport, D.D. (Yale 1830), and Mehitable W. (Newell) Daven- 
port, and grandson of John Alfred Davenport (Yale 1802), was 
born in Albany, N. Y., on November 26, 1849. 

The year after graduation he was Instructor in Chemistry in 
the Sheffield Scientific School, and then went to Germany, where 
he made a special study of metallurgy and blast metal processes 
in Berlin. In 1874 he entered the service of the Midvale Steel 
V\^orks at Nicetown, in the suburbs of Philadelphia, as chemist, 
and in 1882 became Superintendent. In 1888 he was appointed 
Assistant Superintendent, in 1893 Vice-President, and in 1898 
Superintendent of Manufacture of the Bethlehem (Pa.) Iron 
Works, where he successfully introduced the " open hearth " 
process for the manufacture of steel armor. In 1899 he was 
made General Superintendent of the Bethlehem Steel Works, and 
in October, 1903, became General Manager and Director of 
William Cramp & Son's Ship and Engine Building Company in 
Philadelphia. For his acquirements as a metallurgist, and his 
services to the public in the work of building up the U. S. Navy 
and in gun work for the Army, he received the honorary degree 
of Master of Arts from Harvard University in 1894, and the 
same degree from Yale in 1 898. 

He lectured at Lehigh University in 1896 on Ship Armor 
Making, contributed to the American Journal of Science, and 
wrote valuable pamphlets on Iron and Steel Manufacture. 

Mr. Davenport died of pneumonia at his home in Philadelphia, 
on March 2, 1904, at the age of 54 years. 

He married, on June 1, 1897, Cornelia Whipple, daughter of 
Charles and Elizabeth (Whipple) Farnum, and granddaughter of 
Bishop Whipple. Mrs. Davenport survives him with a son. An 
elder brother (Yale 1861) died in 1890. 

1872 

James P. Bogart, son of John and Henrietta M. (Candee) 
Bogart, was born in New Haven, Conn., on February 28, 1852. 

For three years after graduation he was occupied in surveying 
and engineering for the city of Bridgeport, and then had charge 



394: 

of a party in the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey about New 
Haven. In May, 1891, he was appointed Engineer of the Connect- 
icut Shell Fishery Commission and served in that capacity until 
1892. He was the first engineer chosen by the Commission after 
its organization, and completed an extensive system of triangula- 
tion of the coast from Guilford to the State line at Greenwich. 
In 1887 he also surveyed the boundary line between Connecticut 
and Rhode Island for the Inter-State Commission. Since 1892 
he had been employed in private professional work. In 1895 he 
was elected a member of the American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers. 

From his youth he was a member of the First Methodist 
Church, an officer of the Sunday school, and for some time a 
member of the Official Board, but during later years he attended 
Saint Paul's Protestant Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Bogart died of pneumonia at his home in New Haven, on 
December 24, 1903, in the 52d year of his age. 

He married, on April 18, 1888, at Bridgeport, Conn., Helen, 
daughter of Warren H. and Eliza H. Day, who survives him with 
two daughters. 

1876 

Hermon Beardsley Butlek, son of Cyrus and Marrion Webb 
(Beardsley) Butler, was born in New York City, on August 4, 
1856. He left the Sheffield Scientific School the first term oi 
Senior year, but by vote of the Corporation received his degree 
in 1889 and was enrolled with his class. 

Upon leaving New Haven he returned to New York Cityi 
where he was for several years a metal broker, but in 188^ 
removed to Chicago, 111., and entered the iron business with his 
classmate, Edward L. Ryerson. Later he was chosen Vice-Presi- 
dent and Treasurer of the corporation of Joseph T. Ryerson <fe] 
Son, and was instrumental in building up a very large jobbim 
business in heavy iron. 

Mr. Butler was one of the founders, and in 1900-01 President^j 
of the Merchants Club, an effective agency for the improvement] 
of the city, also an officer of many charitable boards, and greatlyi 
beloved by all classes of people. He was a warden of St. Peter'sj 
(P. E.) Church. 

His death occurred at his home in Chicago from pneumonia,! 
on February 10, 1904. He was in the 48th year of his age. 



395 

Mr. Butler married, on June 10, 1886, Harriet Jessie, daughter 
of Francis Bolles Peabody (Trinity Coll. 1848) and Harriet Cut- 
ter (Ten Broeck) Peabody, of Chicago, who survives him with 
three sons and a daughter. 

1877 

Ferriek John Martin, son of Reune Martin, was born in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., on July 20, 1857. His father died before he 
came to the Sheffield Scientific School, which he entered from 
Orange, N. J. 

Until his retirement from business in 1901, he was connected 
with the Hartford Carpet Co., with his office on Union Square, 
New York City. He died in that city on January 5, 1903, at the 
age of 45 years, and left a widow and two children. A brother 
graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1898. 

Francis Cooper Lawrance, son of Francis Cooper and 
Frances Adelaide (Garner) Lawrance, was born in New York 
City, on August 11, 1858. 

After graduation he took the course in Columbia Law School, 
receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1880, but never 
practiced his profession. He afterward studied in Stuttgart, 
Germany. 

Mr. Lawrance died of a sudden attack of Bright's disease at 
Pau, in southern France, on March 18, 1904, at the age of 45 
years. 

He married Sarah Eggleston, eldest daughter of Charles and 
Sarah (Eggleston) Lanier, who died in the spring of 1893. He 
afterward married Susan Wridgeway, daughter of Edward S. 
Willing, of Philadelphia, who survives him with his son and two 
daughters. The son is an undergraduate in the Academical 
Department. 

In memory of his brother, Thomas Garner Lawrance (Yale 
1884), who died before graduation, Lawrance Hall was erected 
in 1885-86 through the gift of his mother. 

1881 

Benjamin Franklin Koons, son of Abraham and Jane (Mills) 
Koons, was born on September 8, 1844, at Sulphur Springs, Craw- 
ford County, O. In 1862, he enlisted in the United States Army, 
being the youngest member of Company H, 123d Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, of which he became Sergeant. During a service of three 



396 

years he was engaged in seventeen battles, including those of 
Winchester, Cedar Creek and Appomattox. After the war he 
supported himself during his course through Oberlin College, 
from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1874, 
and then taught school two years in Chattanooga, Tenn., and 
about a year each in Mobile, Ala., and Savannah, Ga. During 
several years following he was in the service of the United 
States Fish Commission, being stationed during much of the 
time at Woods Hole, Mass. He then studied two years in the 
Graduate Department of the Sheffield Scientific School, from 
which he received the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy in 1881. 

He was at once appointed Professor of Biology, Geology and 
Zoology in the Storrs Agricultural School, at Mansfield, Conn. 
Two years later he was made Principal of the institution, and in 
1893 President of the newly-named Storrs Agricultural College. 
On the reorganization of the college as the Connecticut Agricul- 
tural College, in 1898, he continued as Professor of Natural His- 
tory and Curator of the Museum until the close of his life. He 
issued several Bulletins on natural history. 

In 1892 he visited the Yellowstone Park, and in 1898 Alaska, 
embodying the results of his geological studies of those regions 
in lectures which he delivered in many parts of the State. 

Professor Koons died at Storrs, Conn., on December 17, 1903, 
at the age of 59 years. He was a deacon in the Second Congre- 
gational Church. 

He married on December 25, 1882, Jennie H., daughter of; 
Thomas and Judith (Hover) Stevenson, who survives him with a 
son and daughter. His first daughter died in infancy. A brothei^'j 
and sister graduated from Oberlin College, the former having*] 
received also the degree of Doctor of Medicine from Jefferson^ 
Medical College in 1883. 

1884 

Russell Sargent, son of Hon. Joseph Bradford Sargent, 
formerly Mayor of New Haven, and Elizabeth Collier (Lewis) | 
Sargent, was born in New Haven on August 31, 1864, and took 
his preparatory course at the Hillhouse High School. 

Soon after graduation he entered the hardware manufactory of i 
Sargent & Co., where he continued during the rest of his life,!] 
rising to the position of Assistant Treasurer of the company, and 
winning unusual esteem from those under him. His life wasj 



397 

full of quiet and unselfish service to others, and those who knew 
him best enjoyed his keen wit, which he never used unkindly. 
Since graduation he had been Secretary of his class. 

Mr. Sargent went to Boston, Mass., on a brief visit, and 
was apparently in perfect health, but while there was suddenly 
taken with cerebro-spinal meningitis, of which he died in less 
than a week, on April 16, 1904. He was in the 40th year of his 
age. 

He married on April 19, 1894, Margaret Berrien, daughter of 
Ellis Loring and Annie Louise (Lobdell) Motte, of Boston. Mrs. 
Sargent survives him with a son and daughter. 

Mr. Sargent's death was the first among eleven children who 
lived to maturity. His five brothers were all students in the 
Sheffield Scientific School, and four of them graduates, respec- 
tively in 1871, 1880, 1881 and 1894. 

1885 

Daniel Tuthill Pratt, son of Daniel R. Pratt, a banker, and 
Isabella Graham (Murdoch) Pratt, was born at Elmira, N. Y., on 
December 14, 1862, and took his preparatory course at the Elmira 
Free Academy and at Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Mass. 

After graduation he was for several years in the wholesale hard- 
ware house of Pratt & Co., but in 1890 was made Manager of the 
Elmira Building Co., and in 1893 became agent for the Phoenix 
Life Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. He was at one 
time elected alderman by the Republicans of Elmira. 

Mr. Pratt died of hemorrhage of the kidney at Elmira, on June 
26, 1901, at the age of 38 years. He married on December 7, 
1887, Gertrude, daughter of Henry Loring, a wholesale grocer of 
that city, and had a son and a daughter, who with Mrs. Pratt 
survive him. A brother graduated from the Sheffield Scientific 
School in 1883. 

1889 

Louis CoEET DuBois, son of Samuel Thorn DuBois, a retired 
merchant, and Celia (Judson) DuBois, was born in Hudson, N. Y., 
on August 22, 1868. 

After graduation he was for a time a member of the engineer- 
ing corps of the Southern Pacific Railway in California, and was 
then interested in an orange ranch at Riverside in that State. 
Later he took a course in assaying and mining engineering in 
San Francisco, and in 1895 became manager of the cyanide 



398 

department of the Delamar (Nev.) Mill, where he remained two 
years. In 1897 he went to Colorado to live and attend to mining 
interests, and died there of pneumonia at Salida, on December 25, 
1903. He was 35 years of age. 

He married, on July 7, 1900, Helen Peake, daughter of Joseph 
S. and Helen Peake Farrand, who survives him with a son. 

1891 

Robert Gibson Hilton, son of John and Anna L. Hilton, was 
born in Newburgh, N. Y., on June 26, 1869, and took his prepara- 
tory course at Phillips Academy, Exeter, IST. H. 

After graduation he was engaged as a civil engineer, and since 
1902 had been in the office of the United States Engineer at 
Savannah, Ga. While suffering from intermittent fever he 
jumped from a balcony of the hospital in Savannah where he 
had gone for treatment, and was killed instantly, on May 19, 
1903. He was in the 34th year of his age, and unmarried. 

George Wylie Mercer, son of Samuel David Mercer (M.D. 
Berks. Med. Coll. 1886), and Lizzie Covert (Hulst) Mercer, of 
Omaha, Nebr., was born in that city on August 13, 1871, and 
took his preparatory studies in the Peekskill (N. Y.) Military 
Academy. 

After graduation from the Sheffield Scientific School he traveled 
in Mexico, Central and South America, and was then engaged 
with his father in the Mercer Chemical Company until the sale of 
the business several years ago. He was a member of the City 
Council for a term. 

Mr. Mercer died after an illness of a few hours, at his home 
in Omaha, on April 16, 1904, in the 33d year of his age. 

1896 

Franklin Wells Allts, son of Wells AUis, a builder, and 
Lucy (Tomlinson) Allis, was born in Stamford, Conn., on Novem- 
ber 25, 1874, but entered the class fr»m Wallingford, where he 
obtained his preparation in the High School. 

After graduation he entered the service of the Columbus Tele- 
phone Company, of New York, and had risen to the position of 
general manager. At the time of the Spanish-American War he 
enlisted in Battery C, First Connecticut Heavy Artillery, but 
did not go to the front, spending the summer in camp at Niantic 
and being discharged in the fall. 



I 



399 



r. Allis died of pleuro-pneumonia after an illness of about 
two weeks at the Presbyterian Hospital, New York City, on 
October 23, 1903. He had undergone an operation for the 
removal of abscesses. He was in the 29th year of his age, and 
unmarried. 

John Metcalfe Polk, younger son of William Mecklenburg 
Polk, M.D., LL.D., Dean of Cornell University Medical College, 
and Ida (Lyon) Polk, and grandson of the Rt. Rev. Leonidas 
Polk, D.D., LL.D., tirst Bishop of Louisiana, and one of the 
founders of the University of the South, was born at Demopolis, 
Ala., on May 6, 1875. While in the Sheffield Scientific School he 
was Vice-President of the University Club, and a member of the 
Class Committee at graduation. 

After graduation he took a course in the Cornell University 
Medical School, in New York City, receiving the degree of M.D. 
in 1899. He then entered Bellevue Hospital as interne on the 
Medical Side and served two years. He spent 1902 mainly in 
Vienna, studying pathology and medical diagnosis. In January, 

1903, he entered upon his duties as Instructor in Medicine and 
Physical Diagnosis in Cornell Medical College. In this connec- 
tion, he was appointed Adjunct Assistant Visiting Physician to 
Bellevue Hospital. 

While studying in Europe, Dr. Polk became specially interested 
in the blood changes produced by infectious diseases, particularly 
influenza, and the pneumonias associated with influenza. Con- 
tinuing his studies in this direction, he had succeeded, at the time 
of his death, in making observations of mucb value, his paper 
upon the subject being included in the original articles published 
annually by the Pathological Department of the Medical School. 
He had already shown himself to be an instructor of great 
efficiency. 

While making an autopsy he became chilled, acute pneumonia 
developed in a few hours, and from this he died, on March 29, 

1904, in the 29th year of his age. 

1899 
William Walker, son of James H. and Grace (Rogers) 
Walker, was born at High Bridge, N. J., on February 6, 1878. 
His grandfather. Rev. Ebenezer Piatt Rogers, D.D. (Yale 1837), 
[was for the last twenty years of his life pastor of the South 



400 

Reformed Church in New York City. His father died during his 
boyhood and the family moved to Montclair, N. J., where he took 
his preparatory studies at the High School. 

He chose the Select Course in the Sheffield Scientific School, 
and won a prize for excellence in all studies, also in physics in 
Freshman year, and German in Junior year. In Senior year he 
was business manager of the Scientific Monthly, and was a mem- 
ber of various class committees. 

After graduation he entered the New York Law School, but 
on account of absences which he was unable to make up he did 
not receive his degree. He passed both Law School and Bar 
examinations, however, and began practice in the office of Dexter, 
Osborn & Gillespie. He was making a specialty of bankruptcy 
proceedings and had shown unusual ability in the analysis of 
complicated cases. 

Mr. Walker died of typhoid fever in Westminster Hospital, 
London, England, on July 27, 1903. He was 25 years of age, 
and unmarried. He was a member of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Montclair, N. J. 



J 



401 



GKADUATE SCHOOL. 

1874 

August Hjalmar Edgren, son of A. H. and J. H. (Berger) 
Edgren, was born at Ostana, Wermland, Sweden, on October 18, 
1840. He graduated from the Lyceum of Stockholm in 1858, 
entered the Swedish army the same year, and graduated from 
the Royal Military School of Sweden in 1861. On the outbreak 
of the Civil War he came to the United States and joined the 
Union army, enlisting in the 99th Regiment, New York Volun- 
teers, and was in many engagements with the Army of the Poto- 
mac. He was promoted to the office of Second Lieutenant in 1862, 
and, for meritorious conduct, to that of First Lieutenant in 1863, 
and served as engineer of the fortifications at Yorktown. While 
stationed at Hampton Roads he witnessed the fight between the 
Monitor and Merrimac. At the close of the war he returned and 
entered the 22d Regiment of the regular Swedish army as Sec- 
ond Lieutenant. In 1867-68 he obtained leave of absence for 
study in France and Germany. On his return to Sweden he was 
advanced to the rank of First Adjutant, but not desiring the life 
of a soldier longer, he resigned from the army, and coming back 
to America entered Cornell University, then just opened, for 
work in science, and received the degree of Bachelor of Philoso- 
phy there in 1871. The following year he taught science in the 
Military Academy at Riverview-on-the-Hudson, and then entered 
the Graduate Department of Yale for philological study under 
Professor Whitney, receiving the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
in 1874. 

From 1873 to 1880 he was Instructor in French in the Shef- 
field Scientific School, and during the absence of Professor Whit- 
ney abroad in 1878-79 taught his classes in Sanskrit and Philol- 
ogy. In 1880 he was privat-docent in the University of Lund, 
and then studied in Berlin. In 1885 he accepted the chair of 
Modern Languages in the University of Nebraska, and during the 
summers of 1886 and 1888 lectured at Chautauqua. In 1891 he 
was again called back to his native land as Professor of Germanic 
Languages in the University of Gothenburg, where he was also 
elected Rector the same year, but afterward returned to the 
University of Nebraska as Professor of Romance Languages. 
Later he took charge of the instruction in Sanskrit and Compara- 



402 

tive Philology, and in 1896 was made Dean of the Graduate 
School. His whole service at the University of Nebraska covered 
fourteen years, and his enthusiasm and sympathy with his students 
made him most successful as a teacher. He continued there until 
1900, when he accepted the high honor of membership in the 
Nobel Institute of the Swedish Academy. This necessitated his 
return to Sweden. 

From 1874 to 1877 Dr. Edgren was the able and efficient assist- 
ant of Professor Whitney in the preparation of his German Dic- 
tionary, and in 1878 made a most important contribution to 
philology, " On the Verbal Roots of the Sanskrit Language and 
the Sanskrit Grammarians," which was published in the Journal 
of the American Oriental Society. He was the author of San- 
skrit, German, French, Italian and Spanish Grammars, and editor 
of masterpieces of literature and text-books in several languages. 
He wrote many poems in his native tongue, and his versions in 
Swedish of Longfellow's Evangeline, Kalidasa's Hindoo Drama 
Shakuntala, and selections from Tennyson and other poets possess 
much literary merit. He also contributed many valuable papers 
to scientific and educational periodicals. 

Dr. Edgren died very suddenly of heart disease at his home at 
Djursholm, near Stockholm, Sweden, on December 9, 1903, at the 
age of 63 years. 

He married Miss Steendorf, who survives him with a son and 
two daughters. 

1889 

Charles Emerson Beecher, son of Moses and Emily E. 
(Downer) Beecher, was born on October 9, 1856, in Dunkirk, 
N. Y., prepared for college in the High School in Warren, Pa., and 
graduated from the University of Michigan with the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in 1878. For ten years following he was an 
assistant to Professor James Hall of the Geological Survey of 
New York, and his success as a collector and his ingenuity and 
skill in preparing and mounting invertebrate fossils were early 
shown in the many specimens now in the State Museum at 
Albany. 

In 1888 he came to New Haven to take charge of the collections 
of invertebrate fossils in the Peabody Museum, and for three years 
was Assistant in Paleontology. The next year he was Instructor 
in Paleontology, and during the illness of Professor James D. Dana, 
conducted his classes in geology for him. From 1892 to 1897 he 



403 

was Assistant Professor of Historical Geology in the Sheffield 
Scientific School, and was then appointed Professor of Historical 
Geology and a member of the Governing Board of the Sheffield 
Scientific School. In 1902 his title was changed to that of Uni- 
versity Professor of Paleontology. In 1899 he succeeded Pro- 
fessor Marsh as Curator of the Geological Collections, and as a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the Peabody Museum. 
Later he was chosen Secretary of the Board of Trustees and a 
member of the Executive Committee. In the same year he was 
elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a corre- 
sponding member of the Geological Society of London, and a 
fellow of the Geological Society of America. In 1900 he was 
chosen President of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sci- 
ences, and filled this office for two years. For a number of years 
he was assistant editor of the American Geologist. 

He devoted many of his summer vacations mainly to the 
increase of the collections of the Museum, and gathered treas- 
ures of great scientific interest. In 1889, soon after he became 
connected with the University, he personally obtained, in Con- 
verse County, Wy., one of the large Triceratops skulls now in the 
Museum. In 1903, the last summer of his life, he made impor- 
tant collections in Canada. One summer he studied the collections 
in the British Museum, and in other years visited the Yellowstone 
Park and the Grand Canyon of the Colorado. In 1899 he pre- 
sented his entire collection of fossils, containing over one hun- 
dred thousand specimens, to the Peabody Museum. 

Professor Beecher contributed " Studies in Evolution " to the 
Yale Bicentennial series of publications, and assisted in the transla- 
tion of Zittel's "Text-book of Paleontology." His first paper on 
fossil forms was published by the Geological Survey of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1884, and was a study of a rare class of Crustacea called 
PhyllocMvida^ based principally on specimens which he found 
about Warren in that State. He afterward returned to the same 
subject, and in 1902, in a paper published b}^ the Geological 
Society of London, included all that is known of the Upper 
Devonian Phyllocarida of Pennsylvania. He gained high rank 
among biologists and paleontologists, and was especially distin- 
guished by his work on Brachiopoda and Trilobita. Of eleven 
papers on the former the most important was the "Development of 
the Brachiopoda." Of perhaps even greater scientific value were 
his studies and classification of Trilobita resultins: from discoveries 



404 



in the Lower Silurian shale deposits near Rome, N. Y., of specimens 
preserving antennae, legs and other organs. These studies were 
embodied in thirteen papers on Triarthras and Trinucleus. He 
planned a thorough treatment of this subject later. A philo- 
sophical paper of special worth was entitled "The Origin and Sig- 
nificance of Spines ; a Study in Evolution." In all, his scientific 
papers number about sixty -five. 

Professor Beecher died very suddenly of heart disease at his 
home, on February 14, 1904, at the age of 47 years. 

He married, on September 12, 1894, Mary Salome, daughter of 
Salome and Lawrence (Deming) Galligan. Mrs. Beecher sur- 
vives him with two young daughters. 



SXJlS^lVI-^R.ir 





ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT 






(Yale College) 




Class 


Name and Age 


Place and 


Time of Death 


1831 


Thomas M. Clark, 91 


Middletown, R. I. 


Sept. 7, '03 


1832 


Cassius M. Clay, 92 


Whitehall, Ky. 


July 22, '03 


1836 


Frederick L. Durand, 86 


Rochester, N. Y. 


Aug. 9, '03 


1837 


Elisha W. Cook, 87 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Jan. 4, '04 


1839 


Hamilton L. Smith, 84 


New London, Conn. 


Aug. 1, '03 


1840 


John C. Hollister, 85 


New Haven, Conn. 


Aug. 29, '03 


1841 


Joseph F. Barnard, 80 


Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 


Jan. 6, '04 


1841 


Luther F. Beecher, 90 


Brookline, Mass. 


Nov. 5, '03 


1841 


John C. Downer, 92 


De Soto, Mo. 


Feb. 23, '04 


1841 


William H. Moore, 82 


Hartford, Conn. 


Aug. 22, '03 


1841 


William G. Woolfolk, 81 


Columbus, Ga. 


Oct. 2, '03 


1842 


Albert Mathews, 83 


Lake Mohonk, N. Y. 


Sept. 9, '03 


1842 


John A. Peters, 81 


Bangor, Me. 


April 2, '04 


1842 


Samuel W. Skinner, 83 


Toledo, 0. 


Aug. 16, '03 


1844 


Virgil M. D. Marcy, 81 


Cape May City, N. J. 


Jan. 21, '04 


1845 


William E. Downes, 79 


Deland, Fla. 


Feb. 1, '04 


1846 


David Hawley, 83 


Yonkers, N. Y. 


Nov. 25, 'OS 


1846 


Stephen W. Kellogg, 81 ' 


Waterbury, Conn. 


Jan. 27, '04 


1847 


Robert P. Farris, 76 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Aug. 28, '03 


1847 


James Fitch, 82 


Cleveland, 0. 


Feb. 16, '04 


1848 


Samuel C. Perkins, 74 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


July 14, '03 


1849 


William D. Bishop, 76 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


Feb. 4, '04 


1849 


Thomas S. Hubbard, 76 


Urbana, 111. 


May 26, '02 


1850 


Henry Chase, 76 


Calais, Me. 


Feb. 12, '04 


1850 


Robert Coit, 74 


New London, Conn. 


June 19, '04 


1850 


Martin Kellogg, 75 


San Francisco, Cal, 


Aug. 26, 'OS 


1851 


Asa French, 73 


Braintree, Mass. 


June 23, '03 


1851 


Erastus R. Green, 73 


Chicago, 111. 


Feb. 5, '04 


1851 


William D. Manice, 73 


Tuxedo Park, N. Y. 


Sept. 6, '03 


1851 


Enos N. Taft, 77 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Dec. 19, '03 


1851 


Roger Welles, 75 


Newington, Conn. 


May 15, '04 


1852 


Jacob Cooper, 73 


New Brunswick, N. J. 


Jan. 31, '04 


1852 


Vincent Marmaduke, 72 


Marshall, Mo. 


March 25, '04 


1852 


William B. Ross, 72 


New York City 


Jan. 14, '04 


1853 


Henry T. Hoyt, 72 


Danbury, Conn. 


April i5, '04 


1853 


Charlton T. Lewis, 70 


Morristown, N. J. 


May 26, '04 


1854 


Bennet J. Bristol, 70 


Webster Groves, Mo. 


Nov. 28, '0£ 


1855 


Frederick Alvord, 75 


Newton Centre, Mass. 


Dec. 27, '0? 


1855 


Lyman D. Brewster, 71 


Danbury, Conn. 


Feb. 14, '0^ 



406 



Name and Aye 


Place and 


Time of Death 


Edmund W. Brown, 70 


San Francisco, Cal. 


May 29, 


'02 


Hart Gibson, 68 


St. Paul, Minn. 


Jan. 3, 


'04 


Granville T. Pierce, 69 • 


Somerville, Mass. 


April 10, 


'04 


Alfred P. Eockwell, 69 


New Haven, Conn. 


Dec. 25, 


'03 


Charles E. Fellowes, 69 


Derby, Conn. 


Feb. 29, 


'04 


Henry Powers, 69 


Boston, Mass. 


Dec. 12, 


'03 


William B. Wilson, 69 


Louisville, Ky. 


Aug. 23, 


'03 


Abner W. Colgate, 65 


Pasadena, Cal. 


March 20, 


'04 


Ralph H. Cutter, 68 


Taunton, Mass. 


Feb. 19, 


'04 


Henry Royer, 65 


Denver, Col. 


Feb. 12, 


'03 


George E. Street, 68 


Hartford, Conn. 


Dec. 26, 


'03 


Henry M. Boies, 66 


Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 


Dec. 12, 


'03 


Burton N, Harrison, 65 


Washington, D. C. 


March 30, 


'04 


Erastus C. Beach, 68 


Cortland, N. Y. 


May 17, 


'03 


Theron Baldwin, 64 


Bryn Mawr, Pa. 


Oct. 24, 


'01 


Francis R. Schmucker, 63 


Reading, Pa. 


March 2, 


'02 


William H. H. Murray, 63 


Guilford, Conn. 


March 3, 


'04 


William W. Seely, 65 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Nov. 7, 


'03 


Robert G. S. McNeille, Q2 


Roselle, N. J. 


Oct. 19, 


'03 


Harlan P. Parmelee, 65 


Denver, Col. 


Dec. 8, 


'03 


William C. Whitney, 62 


New York City 


Feb. 2, 


'04 


Daniel J. Holden, 59 


New York City 


June 21, 


'03 


Roderick Byington, 59 


Newark, N. J. 


Feb. 1, 


'04 


Robert P. Keep, 60 


Farmington, Conn. 


June 3, 


'04 


William G. Bussey, 57 


Mt. Vernon,' N. Y. 


Jan. 10, 


'04 


Frank S. Chapin, 59 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


Oct. 9, 


'02 


Henry B. Mead, 64 


Scotland, Conn. 


June 13, 


'03 


Luther H. Kitchell, 53 


Alden, N. Y. 


April 20, 


'03 


Horace Phillips, 57 


Seattle, Wash. 


May 7, 


'04 


Samuel Watson, 57 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Oct. 5, 


'03 


Wilson S. Bissell, 55 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


Oct. 6, 


'03 


Edward G. Coy, 59 


New Haven, Conn. 


May 26, 


'04 


George E. Dodge, 54 


Brighton, England 


April 14, 


'04 


George F. Lincoln, 53 


Antwerp, Belgium 


July 23, 


'03 


Edward G. Selden, 56 


Saratoga Springs, N. 


Y. June 3, 


'04 


Dana Harmon, 54 


Oakland, Cal. 


July 10, 


'03 


Charles Sherwood, 56 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


June 17, 


'04 


Charles L. Hubbard, 53 


Sandusky, 0. 


May 20, 


'04 


Benjamin W. Davis, 51 


near Pittsburg, Pa. 


Jan. 24, 


'04 


William S. Hungerford, 49 


Arlington, N. J. 


June 19, 


'04 


Frank C. Lyman, 49 


Worcester, Mass. 


Jan. 27, 


'04 


George W. Foote, 53 . 


Groton, Conn. 


Nov. 17, 


'03 


Frank B. Wesson, 47 


Watch Hill, R. I. 


Sept. 11, 


'03 


Howard W. Hayes, 45 


Newark, N. J. 


Nov. 26, 


'03 


Willis E. Story, 47 


Wauwatosa, Wise. 


March 21, 


'04 


Louis D. Syle, 46, 


Oakland, Cal. 


Nov. 14, 


'03 


William P. Allen, 47 


Auburn, N. Y. 


March 20, 


'04 


George P. Fisher, 42 


Detroit, Mich. 


Oct. 20, 


'03 



40' 



Name and Age 
Maurice E. Dunham, 43 
Ernest E. Adee, 40 
Charles Dussler, 37 
Charles P. Pierce, 34 
Pendleton Miller, 32 
Joseph E. Sheffield, 31 
Arthur H. Eggleston, 31 
Ervin E. Osgood, 32 
Eaymond S. White, 29 
George H. Schuyler, 29 
Marius J. Spinello, 32 
Edward L. Trudeau, 30 
J. Lawrence Thurston, 29 
William H. Eood, 28 
Edward Thomas, 27 
Hobart Moore, 24 
Eobert L. Atkinson, 24 
Charles McLean, 25 
John C. McDowell, 24 
Irving McDonald, 22 



Place and 
Edgartown, Mass. 
Tuxedo Park, N. Y. 
Long Island City, N. Y. 
East Douglas, Mass. 
Seattle, Wash. 
New York City 
Burlington, Vt. 
Calcutta, India 
Bay Shore, L. I., N. Y. 
New York City 
Berkeley, Cal. 
New York City 
Claremont, Cal. 
New York City 
Thomaston, Conn. 
Saranac Lake,*N. Y. 
Colorado Springs, Col. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Cohoes, N. Y. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 



Time of Death 
Nov. 10, '03 
Dec. 13, '03 
March 5, '04 
Oct. 30, '03 
April 7, '04 
Oct. 16, '03 
Aug. 20, '03 
Dec. 25, '03 
Dec. 21, '03 
Feb. 22, '04 

- May 24, '04 

May 3, '04 

May 11, '04 

Nov. 1, '03 

Feb. 16, '04 

March 3, '04 

Dec. 28, '03 

Oct. 14, '03 

Nov. 16, '03 

Nov. 15, '03 



YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL 



George W. Burke, 82 
Eichard P. Evans, 74 
Erastus B. Bills, 74 
Asa H. Churchill, 71 
Edward P. Woodward, 67 
Charles F. Morgan, 56 
Milo H. Jones, 28 
Arthur L. Howard, 28 



Middletown, Conn. 
Franklin, O. 
Durant, la. 
Meriden, Conn. 
Bristol, Conn. 
Traverse City, Mich. 
Greenwich, Conn. 
Vroncysylite, Wales 



June 4, '04 

May 31, '03 

Oct. 15, '02 

Oct. 17, '03 

March 19, '04 

April 29, '02 

July 27, '03 

May 3, '04 



YALE LAW SCHOOL 



Joseph A. Treat, 76 
Horace A. Brown, 61 
John P. Bronk, 48 
John M. Murdoch, 45 
Frederic A. Osborn, 43 
Albert J. Wise, 34 
John Hillard, 26 



Cleveland, 0. 
Eock Stream, N. Y. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Middletown, Conn. 
Boston, Mass. 
New York City 
Hartford, Conn. 



Sept. 22, '03 
Dec. 28, '03 
Jan. 22, '04 
Jan. 9, '04 
Sept. 8, '03 
Dec. 10, '03 

Sept. 27, '03 



YALE DIVINITY SCHOOL 



Henry M. Ladd, 54 
Henry Tarrant, 57 
Henry L. Eichardson, 49 
John C. Wilson, 41 
Charles D. Crawford, 44 



Cleveland, 0. 
Pine Meadow, Conn. 
Chicago, 111. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
New York City 



Feb. 12, '04 
Dec. 6, '03 

Dec. 30, '03 
July 9, '03 
May 7, '04 



408 



SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL 



Class Name and Age 

1871 Eussell W. Davenport, 54 

1872 James P. Bogart, 51 

1876 Hermon B. Butler, 47 

1877 Fen-ier J. Martin, 45 
1877 Francis C. Lawrance, 45 
1881 Benjamin F. Kooiis, 59 

1884 Eussell Sargent, 39 

1885 Daniel T. Pratt, 38 
1889 Louis C. DuBois, 35 
1891 Robert G. Hilton, 33 
1891 George W. Mercer, 33 
1896 Franklin W. Allis, 28 
1896 John M. Polk, 29 
1899 William Walker, ^5 



Plade and 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Chicago, 111. 
New York City 
Pau, France 
Storrs, Conn. 
Boston, Mass. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Salida, Col. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
New York City 
Demopolis, Ala. 
London, England 



Time of Death 

March 2, '04 

Dec. 24, '03 

Feb. 10, '04 

Jan. 5, '03 

March 18, '04 

Dec. 17, '03 

April 16, '04 

June 26, '01 

Dec. 25, '03 

May 19, '03 

April 16, '04 

Oct. 23, '03 

March 29, '04 

July 27, '03 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



1874 August H. Edgren, 
1889 Charles E. Beecher, 



47 



Djursholm, Sweden 
New Haven, Conn. 



Dec. 9, '03 
Feb. 14, '04 



The number of deaths recorded this year is 143, and the average age of 
the graduates of the Academical Department is nearly 61 years. 
The oldest living graduate of the Academical Department is : 
Class of 1831, Rev. Joseph S. Lord, of Laingsburg, Mich., bom April 26, 
1808. 

The oldest living graduate of the Medical Department is : 
Class of 1837, Gurdon W. Russell, born April 10, 1815. 



I 3Sr ID E X 



Members of the Divinity, Law, Medical, Scientific and Oraduate Sclwnls are indicated 
by the letters d, I, m, s, and dp, respectively. 



Page 

Adee, Ernest R. 370 

Allen, William P. 368 

Allis, Franklin W. 398 

Alvord, Frederick 328 

Atkinson, Eobert L. 379 

Baldwin, Theron 344 

Barnard, Joseph F. 398 

Beach, Erastus C. 344 

Beecher, Charles E. 402 

Beecher, Luther F. 299 

Bills, Erastus B. 382 

Bishop, William D. 312 

Bissell, Wilson S. 357 

Bogart, James P. 393 

Boies, Henry M. 341 

Brewster, Lyman D. 329 

Bristol, Bennet J. 327 

Bronk, John P. 386 

Brown, E. Woodward 330 

Brown, Horace A. 385 

Burke, George W. 381 

Bussey, William G. 353 

Butler, Hermon B. 394 

Byington, Roderick 352 

Chapin, Frank S. 354 

Chase, Henry 314 

Churchill, Asa H. 382 

Clark, Thomas M. 291 

Clay, Cassius M. 293 

Coit, Robert 314 

Colgate, Abner W. 337 

Cook, Elisha W. 295 

Cooper, Jacob 321 

Coy, Edward G. 358 

Crawford, Charles D. 392 

Cutter, Ralph H. 338 

Davenport, Russell W. 393 

Davis, Benjamin W. 363 

Dodge, George E. 359 

Downer, John C. 300 

Downes, William E. 307 

DuBois, Louis C. 397 

Dunham, Maurice E. 369 

Durand, Frederick L. 295 

Dussler, Charles 370 

Edgren, August H. 401 

Eggleston, Arthur H. 372 

Evans, Richard P. 381 



Class 
847 
856 
§81 
847 
877 
851 

855 
851 

872 

859 

846 

879 

901 I 

891 .s 

864 

840 

897 ^ 

853 

873 

849 

875 



Farris, Robert P. 
Fellowes, Charles E. 
Fisher, George P. 
Fitch, James 
Foote, George W. 
French, Asa 

Gibson, Hart 
Green, Erastus R. 

Harmon, Dana 
Harrison, Burton N. 
Hawley, David 
Hayes, Howard W. 
Hillard, John 
Hilton, Robert G. 
Holden, Daniel J. 
Hollister, John C. 
Howard, Arthur L. 
Hoyt, Henry T. 
Hubbard, Charles L. 
Hubbard, Thomas S. 
Hungerford, William S. 



896 m Jones, Milo H. 

865 Keep, Robert P. 

850 Kellogg, Martin 
846 Kellogg, Stephen W. 
867 Kitchen, Luther H. 
881 s Koons, Benjamin F. 

875 d Ladd, Henry M. 

877 .s Lawrance, Francis C. 

853 Lewis, Charlton T. 

870 Lincoln, George F. 

876 Lyman, Frank C. 

903 McDonald, Irving 

902 McDowell, John C. 

901 McLean, Charles 

863 McNeille, Robert G. S 

851 Manice, William D. 
844 Marcy, Virgil M. D. 

852 Marmaduke, Vincent 

871 s Martin, Ferrier J. 
842 Mathews, Albert 

866 Mead, Henry B. 
891 s Mercer, George W. 
894 Miller, Pendleton 
900 Moore, Hobart 
841 Moore, William H. 



Tage 
310 
335 
369 
311 
365 
316 

331 
317 

361 
342 
308 
366 
388 
398 
351 
298 
384 
324 
363 
313 
364 

384 

352 
315 
309 
356 
395 

389 
395 
324 
360 
864 

380 
379 
379 
348 
318 
306 
322 
395 
303 
355 
398 
371 
378 
301 



410 



Class 

1866 m Morgan, Charles F. 

1880 I Murdoch, John M. 

1862 Murray, William H. H. 

1886 I Osborn, Frederick A. 

1895 Osgood, Ervin E. 

1863 Parmelee, Harlan P. 
1848 Perkins, Samuel C. 
1842 Peters, John A. 
1868 Phillips, Horace 
1892 Pierce, Charles P. 
1855 Pierce, Granville T. 

1896 s Polk, John M. 

1857 Powers, Henry 
1885 s Pratt, Daniel T. 

1883 d Richardson, Henry L. 
1855 Rockwell, Alfred P. 
1899 Rood, William H. 
1852 Ross, William B. 

1858 Royer, Henry 

1884 s Sargent, Russell 

1861 Schmucker, Francis R. 
1896 Schuyler, George H. 

1862 Seely, William W. 
1870 Selden, Edward G. 



Page 


Class 




Page 


384 


1894 


Sheffield, Joseph E. 


372 


386 


1872 


Sherwood, Charles 


362 


346 


1842 


Skinner, Samuel W. 


305 




1839 


Smith, Hamilton L. 


296 


387 


1896 


Spinello, Marius J. 


375 


373 


1879 


Story, Willis E. 


366 


349 
311 


1858 


Street, George E. 


339 


1879 


Syle, Louis D. 


367 


304 


1851 


Taft, Enos N. 


318 


356 


1880 d 


Tarrant, Henry 


390 


371 


1899 


Thomas, Edward 


378 


332 


1898 


Thurston, J. Lawrence 


376 


399 


1851 I 


Treat, Joseph A. 


385 


335 


1896 • 


Trudeau, Edward L. 


375 


397 








390 
333 
377 
323 
339 


1899 s 


Walker, William 


399 


1868 


Watson, Samuel 


357 


1851 


Welles, Roger 


319 


1878 


Wesson, Frank B. 


365 


1895 


White, Raymond S. 


374 


1863 


Whitney, William C. 


349 


396 


1888 d 


Wilson, John C. 


391 


345 


1857 


Wilson, William B. 


337 


374 


1889 Z 


Wise, Albert J. 


387 


347 


1860 m 


Woodward, Edward P. 


383 


361 


1841 


Woolfolk, William G. 


303 






OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GRADUATES OF YALE DNIYERSITY 

Deceased dtiringf the Academical Year endingf in 
JUNE, 1905, 



INCLUDING THE RECORD OF A FEW WHO DIED PREVIOUSLY, 
HITHERTO UNREPORTED 



[Presented at the meeting of the Alumni, June 27th, 1905] 



[No. 5 of the Fifth Printed Series, and No. 64 of the whole Record] 



OBITUARY RECORD 

OF 

GEADUATES OF YALE UjSTIYEESITY 

Deceased during the Academical year ending in 

June, 1905 

Including the Record of a few who died previously, hitherto unreported 

[Presentbd at the Meeting of the Alumni, June 27th, 1905] 

[No. 5 of the Fifth Printed Series, and No. 64 of the whole Eecord] 



YALE COLLEGE 

(academical department) 

1836 

Newton Barrett, son of Simon and Lydia (Mascraft) Barrett 
was born at Washingtonville (then called Richland), Oswego 
County, N. Y., September 28, 1812, but during his early years his 
parents removed to Woodstock, Conn., and from there he entered 
.college. 

After graduation he visited his parents in their new home in 
Michigan (Territory), intending to return to New Haven and 
enter Yale 71ieological Seminary in the autumn ; but financial 
necessity changed his plans, and he taught a select school at Mid- 
dlebury (afterward East Akron), O., a year, spent the following 
year in theological study at Hudson, O., and while continuing his 
studies taught a year in Euclid Academy, eight miles south of 
Cleveland, and in the Preparatory Department of Western Re- 
serve College, then at Hudson. He was licensed to preach by the 
Presbytery of Portage in September, 1840, and began preaching 
at Brecksville, a few miles northwest of Hudson, and at Atwater 
in the adjoining county of Portage. From 1841 to 1848 he was 
settled in Brecksville, and then accepted a call to Milan, O., where 
he remained until the spring of 1852. He supplied the Congre- 
gational Church at Hudson from 1853 to 1856, and at Mendota, 



412 

111., the following jear. In the latter place he organized a New- 
School Presbyterian Church, to which he ministered till 1861, a 
part of the time also preaching at Paw Paw Grove. He then be- 
came pastor of the New School Presbyterian Church at Knoxville, 
111., and remained there two and a half years, going thence to 
Dunton (afterward Arlington Heights), Cook County, 111., where 
he was pastor nine years. He continued to reside there until 1881, 
and then for two years was pastor of the Congregational Church 
at Elkhorn in the neighborhood, which during this time erected a 
new house of worship. 

Mr. Barrett died of acute gastritis at the home of his son in 
Chicago, 111., August 9, 1904, in the 92d year of his age. 

He married, September 14, 1840, Emily, daughter of Asa and 
Theodora (Curtiss) Bugbee, and had three sons and two daughters. 
One daughter died in infancy, and the eldest son (Knox Coll. 
1866) and youngest son (Beloit 1871), both clergymen, are also 
deceased. Mrs. Barrett died in Elkhorn, Wise, November 5, 1889. 

1837 

James Cowles, one of the eleven children and youngest son 
of Deacon Samuel and Olive (Phelps) Cowles, was born in Cole- 
brook, Conn., February 18, 1815. 

After graduation he was a student in the Yale Theological 
Seminary in 1837-38 and 1841-42, in the interval holding the 
office of Tutor for two years in Oberlin college (where his brothers, 
Kev. Henry Cowles, D.D., and Rev. John Phelps Cowles, both 
Yale 1826, were professors for many years), and in 1840 teaching 
in Elyria, O. He did not complete his theological course, but in 
1842 took a position in the Canton (O.) Boys' School, where he 
taught three years, and the same length of time in Painesville, 
O. From 1848 to 1857 he was occupied in teaching music in 
Akron. He then spent a year in Topeka, Kans., using his influ- 
ence while there against slavery. The following two years he 
was Superintendent of Schools in Springfield, O., the next year in 
charge of a public school in Farmington, and four years Principal 
of the Academy in Farm Ridge, the two latter places in Illinois. 
He was in New Jersey, at Tuckahoe, from 1866 to 1868, and 
Cedarville, in 1868-69, at Mariner's Harbor, Staten Island, N. Y., 
a year, and in Rye, N. Y., three years. In 1873 he returned to 
Connecticut and was Principal of Winchester Institute four years, 



413 

and then spent six years in his native town. After this he 
returned to Akron, O., and since then had been well known as 
a teacher of music. 

He was a life-long Republican and suffered much for his aboli- 
tion principles during the Civil War. 

Mr. Cowles died from exhaustion at his home in Akron, July 
20, 1904, at the age of 89 years. He was a member and deacon 
of the Congregational church. 

He married, September 7, 1842, Rhoda, daughter of Eli S. and 
Mary (Root) Barnum, a farmer of Florence, Erie County, O. 
Mrs. Cowles survives him with two sons, one of them a graduate 
of the United States Naval Academy in 1875. Their only daugh- 
ter died in 1895. 



1841 

Sherman Millek Booth, son of Selah and Orra (Fuller) 
Booth, was born September 25, 1812, in Davenport, Delaware 
County, N. Y., and worked on his father's farm till he was 21 
years of age. Having determined to gain an education, he then 
studied in Jefferson Academy, Jefferson, Schoharie County, 
N. Y., afterward assisting in teaching there, and then teaching 
several winters elsewhere. In 1837 he lectured as an agent of 
the New York State Temperance Society in the Hudson River 
towns between Albany and New York, and for his services for 
four months received what was then the large sum of |$400. He 
completed the Freshman studies by himself, and entered college 
at the beginning of Sophomore year, supporting himself by 
teaching and by managing two students' clubs. During the 
summer and fall of 1840 he helped organize the Liberty party in 
New Haven, and in February, 1841, called a State Convention at 
Hartford, at which a Liberty party State ticket was nominated. 
He was appointed chairman of the State Central Committee, and 
the following month attended an Anti-Slavery Convention for 
Eastern Connecticut, which held its exciting sessions at Willi- 
mantic. In Senior year he taught the Amistad African captives 
daily at Westville, and after they were declared free, at Farm-, 
ington, where he continued with them until the following Octo- 
ber. Soon after this they were sent home to Africa. 

After graduation he devoted his time until 1848 to organizing 
the Liberty party and making a great number of speeches in its 



414 

behalf, and at the same time was associate editor of the Chris- 
tian Freeman at Hartford, the title of which was soon changed 
to The Republican. In May, 1848, Mr. Booth removed to Mil- 
waukee, Wise, to take charge of the American Freeman., an 
anti-slavery newspaper. Of this he soon became proprietor, and 
after the organization of the Free Soil party changed its name to 
Fh'ee Democrat. During the early years of the Civil War he 
established the Daily Life., which was subsequently merged in 
the Fvening Wisconsin. 

He was secretary of the Buffalo Convention which nominated 
Martin Van Buren and Charles Francis Adams for President and 
Vice-President, and secretary of the National Convention at 
Pittsburg which nominated John P. Hale for President. He was 
an able and convincing speaker, and fearlessly and ceaselessly 
advocated the abolition of slavery until the Emancipation Procla- 
mation ended the call for his activity. 

He disclaimed all part in the forcible rescue of Joshua Glover 
from prison in 1854, but his course in the case and his opposition 
to the Fugitive Slave Act attracted national attention, and in- 
volved him in nineteen trials extending through thirteen years, 
three imprisonments, and heavy financial loss. 

In 1868 he went to Chicago to represent the Chicago News- 
paper Union, which, with the Chicago Tribune, he also repre- 
sented at the Centennial Exposition. He resided in Philadelphia 
from 1876 to August, 1879, and during the latter year worked 
successfully for the defeat of the Riot Bill, designed to levy the 
cost of property destroyed upon the State instead of the County 
in which the loss occurred. Several buildings which he owned in 
Chicago remained untouched during the great fire of 1871. 

In 1879 he returned to Chicago, and lived there for the remain- 
der of his life. He contributed to the Chicago Tribune, was 
Superintendent of House Removals for two years from May, 
1887, and in April, 1890, was appointed United States Deputy 
Collector of Internal Revenue at Chicago for the First District 
of Illinois. 

In 1897 he delivered the Memorial Day address in Milwaukee, 
and in 1903 spoke before the Wisconsin Editorial Association. 
For a number of years he was busy preparing a history of his 
life and times, but did not complete the work. 

He died at his home August 10, 1904, in the 92d year of his 
age. 



415 

He married, May 19, 1842, Miss Margaret Tufts, of New Haven, 
who died in 1849. His second wife was Miss Mary Humphrey 
Corss, of Hartford, a writer of poems and translator. She died 
in 1865, and in November, 1867, he married Miss Augusta A. 
Smith, of Burnett, Wise, who survives him with a son and four 
daughters, also a daughter by the second marriage. Five chil- 
dren are deceased. 

William Hinman Gilbert was born in that part of Weston, 
Conn., which is now Easton, February 12, 1817, and was the son 
of Ezra and Rebecca (Minor) Gilbert. He soon removed to 
Colebrook, Conn., and from there entered college. 

He received his theological training at Andover and Yale Sem- 
inaries, and was ordained at Westminster, Vt., in 1846. Resign- 
ing this charge in 1851, pastorates of five years at Ashfield, 
Mass., and eight years at Granby, Conn., followed, after which he 
was for several months in the joint service of the American Bible 
Society and the Christian Commission, being Superintendent of 
Bible Distribution in the Army of the Potomac and having his 
headquarters successively at Washington, D. C, Baltimore, Md., 
and Richmond, Va. 

From the fall of 1865 to January, 1869, he was in charge of 
the work of the American Bible Society in Vermont. He was 
then Superintendent of the work of that Society in New Eng- 
land eight years, and Secretary of the Connecticut Bible Society 
over twenty years, taking up the latter office in April, 1878, and 
continuing to do faithful and efi*ective work until his retirement, 
April 3, 1900, shortly before his removal to the Pacific coast. 
His home for nearly twenty years at different periods was in 
Hartford and New Haven, and for twelve years in South Nor- 
walk. Conn. 

In the fall of 1 900 he settled in the fruit belt of Sacramento 
County, California, joining the colony at Fair Oaks, where he 
found pleasant surroundings and an agreeable climate, which 
lengthened his life. He died there after a fortnight of great 
suffering, April 28, 1905, at the age of 88 years. 

Mr. Gilbert married, December 29, 1845, Elizabeth, daughter 
of James Moseley, of Westfield, Mass. She died the following 
year, leaving a son who died in 1899. In 1849, he married Mary, 
daughter of Joseph and Roxana (Edwards) Goodridge, of West- 
minster, Vt., who died in 1895. By his second marriage he 



416 

had twin sons (Yale 1878), one of whom died in 1879 and the 
other in 1881, and two daughters who survive him. 

William Law Learned, son of Ebenezer Learned (Yale 1798) 
by his second wife Lydia (Coit) Learned, and grandson of Amasa 
Learned (Yale 1772), member of Congress from 1791 to 1795, was 
born in New London, Conn., July 24, 1821. During his college 
course he took special interest in classical literature, and at grad- 
uation was Salutatorian of his class. 

He declined a nomination as Tutor, and the year after gradua- 
tion studied law at New London with William F. Brainard, Esq. 
(Yale 1802), continuing his studies for two years following with 
George Gould, Esq. (Yale 1827), at Troy, N. Y. He was admitted 
to the bar at Rochester, N. Y., in the fall of 1844, and the follow- 
ing winter removed to Albany, where he formed a partnership 
with Gilbert L. Wilson, Esq. (Union 1842). After the retire- 
ment of Mr. Wilson, Mr. James C. Cook (Union 1853) was a part- 
ner for a few years; but after the latter's withdrawal in 1867 
Mr. Learned continued his practice alone until 1870, when he was 
appointed a Justice of the Supreme Court. He was elected to 
the same office in the fall of that year for fourteen years, the first 
justice elected under the change of the Constitution which 
lengthened the term. He was appointed in 1875, by Governor 
Tilden, Presiding Justice of the Supreme Court ; was reelected 
Justice of that court in the fall of 1 884, and by Governor (after- 
wards President) Cleveland was reappointed Presiding Justice 
the same year. He was retired from office under the Constitu- 
tional restriction, by reason of age, December 31, 1891. After 
his retirement from the bench, he resumed the active practice of 
his profession. 

Judge Learned was closely identified with the educational 
interests of the city. For many years he was Professor of Equity 
Jurisprudence, the Civil Law, and the Trial of Causes in the 
Albany Law School, and for ten years President of its Board 
of Trustees and of its Faculty. He was a Governor of the 
Albany Medical College, President of the Board of Trustees of 
the Albany Female Academy, President of the Board of Trustees 
of the Albany Academy, President of the Board of Public 
Instruction of Albany until the adoption of the new charter, and 
President of the "Albany Institute and Historical and Art 
Society." He was also a member of the Board of Governors of 



417 

He presided at the annual meeting of the Alumni of Yale Col- 
lege in 1876, and received the degree of Doctor of Laws at the 
Yale Commencement of 1878. He was the first President of the 
Yale Alumni Association of Northeastern New York and served 
from the time of its organization in 1880 for about twenty years. 

Judge Learned edited "Madam Knight's Journal" and " Earle's 
Microcosmography," and compiled "The Learned Genealogy" 
(second edition 1898), in part from the manuscripts of Joseph G. 
E. Larned (Yale 1839). He also contributed to law and other 
periodicals. 

Judge Learned died of heart failure at his law office in Albany, 
September 20, 1904, at the age of 83 years. 

He married. May 29, 1855, Phebe Rowland, daughter of Alex- 
ander and Mary E. (Pepoon) Marvin, of Albany. She died in 
1864, and he afterward married Katharine, daughter of Clinton 
DeWitt, a distinguished lawyer of New York City, and of Elsie 
(YanDyck) DeWitt, who survives him. Of the three daughters 
by the first marriage but one is now living, the wife of General 
John H. Patterson, of Albany, N. Y. One daughter was the 
wife of John DeWitt Peltz (Rutgers 1873), and mother of Wil- 
liam Law Learned Peltz (Yale 1904), Judge Learned's only sur- 
viving grandson. 

1842 

Samuel Witt Eaton, \son of Eben Eaton, for over half a 
century deacon of the Congregational church in Framingham, 
Mass., was born on the ancestral farm in that town December 25, 
1820. His mother was Sally Chad wick (Spofford) Eaton, who 
was educated at Bradford (Mass.) Academy. 

After graduation he studied theology one year in Union Semi- 
nary, two years in Yale Seminary, and one year in Andover 
Seminary. He was licensed to preach in September, 1844, and 
while at Andover was stated supply in Montgomery, Mass. Hav- 
ing determined to devote his life to work in the new West then 
opening up in the Mississippi valley, he settled at Lancaster, the 
county seat of Grant County, Wise, a fertile region abounding 
in lead mines. He was ordained as an evangelist January 28, 
1848. After several years of arduous pioneer work the failure of 
his health compelled him to return East for rest, and he spent 
most of the year 1857 in European travel. Returning to Lan- 
caster, his work was again interrupted in the second year of the 
Civil War by his acceptance of the chaplaincy of the Seventh 



418 

Wisconsin Volunteers, one of the regiments of the " Iron Brigade." 
In this service he continued to the close of the war and gained 
the devoted friendship of soldiers and officers. He was on duty 
at the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, before Petersburg, 
and at Appomattox Court House on the surrender of General 
Lee. After resuming his pastorate the church was enlarged, and 
then replaced by a new structure, but at the end of twenty years' 
further service, and forty from the beginning of his pastorate, 
the church yielded to his request for release, and in 1886 he 
accepted the call of the Congregational church at Roscoe, 111. 
His service there was also notable in character and results and 
continued for sixteen years. In 1902 he resigned from the pas- 
torate, but at the desire of his people continued in the parsonage 
several months. In the autumn of 1903 he removed to Beloit, 
Wise, the home of his son, President Eaton. 

Since 1866 he had been a Trustee of Beloit College, from which 
he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1883. From 1881 
to 1899 he was a Corporate Member of the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and was recognized as a 
wise leader in church councils. Two of his sermons — one at the 
ordination of his eldest son in 18*73 — were published. 

Dr. Eaton died after six months of extreme weakness, at the 
residence of his son. Dr. Samuel L. Eaton (Yale 1 877), in Newton 
Highlands, Mass., February 9, 1905, at the age of 84 years. 

He married. May 20, 1847, Catharine Elizabeth, daughter of 
Rev. James and Mary (Schoonmaker) Demarest, of Napanoch, 
Ulster County, "N. Y. Their golden wedding was an occasion of 
unusual interest. They had four sons — all living — of whom the 
eldest, Rev. James D. Eaton, D.D. (Beloit 1869), has been for 
over twenty years a missionary in Mexico, the second. Rev. 
Edward D. Eaton, D.D., LL.D. (Beloit 1872, B.D. Yale 1875), 
has been President of Beloit College since 1886, and the two 
younger are physicians. Mrs. Eaton died in February, 1904. 

William Ellis, son of William and Thankful (Dickinson) 
Ellis, was born February 4, 1821, at New Britain, Conn. 

After graduation he studied medicine two years in New York 
City, receiving his degree in 1846. After teaching a short time 
in Jackson, Miss., he practiced his profession in Wisconsin, at 
Wafihinorfon Harbor a fftw vears. then at Grppn Bav until the 



419 

He then acquired a large tract of farming land in Kansas, and 
settled near Mound City, Linn County, but a succession of crop 
failures and other misfortunes decided him to remove to the 
Pacific country. After a journey of two weeks with his family 
he reached Astoria, Or., at the end of September, 1875, and spent 
six months at Westport, thirty miles above Astoria on the 
Columbia River, and a year at Oregon City. He then settled in 
the Willapa Valley, in the present State of Washington, making 
his home for the remainder of his life near Willapa, Pacific 
County, where he died January 23, 1905, in the 84th year of his 
age. 

Mr. Ellis married February 29, 1852, Phebe Jane, daughter 
of Adam and Mary (Weaver) Boyce, of Canton, Onondaga 
County, N. Y., and had three sons and five daughters, all of 
whom except one daughter survive him. Mrs. Ellis is also 
living. 

Lewis Grout, eldest of the eight sons and nine children of 
Deacon John and Azubah (Dunklee) Grout, was born January 
28, 1815, in Newfane, Vt., but in 1836 removed to West Brattle- 
boro, and after studying and teaching three years entered 
college. 

After graduation he taught two years in Professor Kinsley's 
Classical and Mathematical School at West Point, N. Y., then 
spent two years at 'Yale Seminary, and completed his theological 
course at Andover in 1846. October 8 of that year he was 
ordained as a missionary at Springfield, Vt., and at the same 
time married Miss Lydia Bates of that place. Two days later, 
under appointment from the American Board of Commissioners 
for Foreign Missions, Mr. and Mrs. Grout sailed from Boston to 
join the Zulu Mission. Reaching Natal in February, 1847, he 
opened a new station at Ilmsunduze, and for fifteen years devoted 
himself to pioneer work. He made an exhaustive study of the 
Zulu and other languages, and in 1859 issued "The Isizulu; a 
Grammar of the Zulu Language," for which the Natal Govern- 
ment furnished the publication funds, and of which a revised 
edition was issued in 1893. While in Natal he prepared " Zulu- 
land" (Philadelphia, 1864), also a "Sketch" of the history of 
the native tribes, and many papers for the Journal of the Arner^ 
ican Oriental Society. Of this Society he was elected a cor. 
responding member in 1849. 



420 

On account of impaired health he returned to America in 1862, 
and after resting for a time served as pastor of the Congrega- 
tional church at Saxton's River, Vt., a year and at Feeding 
Hills, Mass., two years. In 1865 he became Secretary and Agent 
for New Hampshire and Vermont of the American Missionary 
Association, continuing in this service until 1884 and residing in 
West Brattleboro. The following year he spent collecting funds 
for Atlanta University. For three years he was pastor at Sud- 
bury, Vt., but retired on account of infirmities in 1888, and since 
then had continued his activity in the discussion of historical, 
philological, and ethnological questions. 

He was a member of the advisory council of the Auxiliary on 
African Ethnology of the World's Congress of the Columbian 
Exposition, for which he wrote "An Essay on the Place and 
Power of each Family of African Languages as Factors in the 
Development of Africa." He contributed many articles to the 
"Encyclopaedia of Missions," N. Y., 1890, and besides able 
papers on the Christian ministry, and missionary and other 
addresses, in 1876 and 1894 prepared two valuable discourses on 
the History of the Congregational Church of West Brattleboro, 
covering its first fifty years, also a monograph on "The Olden 
Times of Brattleboro," 1899. His publications numbered in all 
over ninety. 

Mr. Grout died of paralysis at his home in West Brattleboro, 
Vt., March 12, 1905, at the age of 90 years. Mrs. Grout died in 
1897. Their only son died at an early age in Natal, and their 
only daughter, who was for many years a useful teacher at 
Atlanta University, Ga., and elsewhere, died in 1901. A brother 
survives him. 

Nathaniel Shaw Perkins, son of Nathaniel Shaw Perkins 
(Yale 1812; hon. M.D. 1829), a highly esteemed physician of 
New London, Conn., was born in that city April 19, 1822. His 
mother was Ellen (Richards) Perkins. 

For about fifteen years after graduation he was engaged in the 
whaling business in New London, as a member of the firm of 
Perkins & Smjth. In 1850 he spent several months in California, 
having at the time extensive whaling interests in the North 
Pacific Ocean. From 1856 to 1863 he was in the business of 
furnishing ship supplies in Chili, South America, and in the sum- 
mer of 1877 he went again to South America, returning in 1881. 



421 

During the intervening years he was in business in his native 
place. He was greatly interested in the affairs of his city, and 
served at one time as alderman. At the time of his death he 
was President of the Board of Trustees of the Bulkeley School. 
Mr. Perkins died at the Shaw mansion, w^hich had been in 
possession of his family for a century and a half, in New Lon- 
don, February 8, 1905, in the 83d year of his age. He was the 
last but one of fourteen children, a sister alone surviving him. 
He was never married. 

1843 

Da^id Judson Ely, son of David and Priscilla (Sturges) Ely, 
was born in Fairfield, Conn., May 29, 1820, but entered college 
at the beginning of Sophomore year from Rochester, N. Y. 

Ever since graduation he had been an invalid, and never 
engaged in active business. He lived in Rochester until his death, 
which occurred at the home of his nephew, February 18, 1905. 
He was in the 85th year of his age, and had never married. A 
brother graduat^^d in the same class, and an older brother, with 
whom he lived many years, graduated from the Medical Depart- 
ment in 1834. 

1846 

Rensselaer Russell Nelson, son of Hon. Samuel Nelson, 
LL.D. (Middlebury 1813), Justice of the Supreme Court of the 
United States from 1845 to 1872, and of Catherine Ann (Russell) 
Nelson, was born in Cooperstown, N. Y., May 12, 1826. 

After graduation he studied law with James R. Whiting, 
sometime District Attorney of New York, and with Hon. George 
A. Starkweather in Cooperstown. He was admitted to practice 
in 1849, and the same year went to Buffalo, N. Y., intending to 
settle there, but the following year went to St. Paul, Minn., then 
a town of six hundred people. In 1 854 he moved to Superior, 
Wise, and in 1854-55 was District Attorney of Douglas County, 
in that State. He then returned to St. Paul, and in April, 1857, 
was appointed Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the 
Territory of Minnesota, and on the admission of Minnesota as a 
State in 1858 he was appointed by the President, Judge of the 
United States District Court, and held the office until his retire- 
ment from age limit in 1896. 

For a year his health had been poor, but at length his illness 
assumed so serious a form that he was removed to St. Luke's 



422 

Hospital in St. Paul, where he died ten days later, October 15, 
1904. He was 78 years of age. He was for eleven years Presi- 
dent of the Church Club of Minnesota. 

Judge Nelson married, November 3, 1858, Mrs. Emma F. 
Wright, daughter of Washington T. and Sarah A. (Fuller) 
Beebe, and had two daughters, of whom the younger is deceased. 
Mrs. Nelson died in 1886. 

John Butler Talcott, brother of George Talcott (Yale 1855), 
and son of Seth and Charlotte Stout (Butler) Talcott, was born 
September 14, 1824, in Enfield, Conn., but at four years of age 
removed with his parents to West Hartford. • 

At graduation he was Salutatorian of the class. He then 
began the study of law in the office of Francis Fellows, Esq., 
defraying his expenses by teaching in the Hartford Female Sem- 
inary, and serving as clerk in the Probate Court. The following 
year he was Tutor in Middlebury College, and from 1848 to 1851 
Tutor in Greek in Yale College. He was admitted to the Con- 
necticut bar in the winter of 18 48, after which he continued his 
studies with the expectation of practicing that profession, but 
circumstances induced him to enter active business. 

In 1851 he went to New Britain and became an important 
factor in the development of that citj^ He engaged in the man- 
ufacture of knit goods with Mr. Seth J. North. The latter's 
interests were afterwards consolidated with the New Britain 
Knitting Company, of which Mr. Talcott was manager for fourteen 
years. In 1868 he organized the American Hosiery Company, of 
which he was Secretary and Treasurer and then President to the 
close of his life. He was actively interested in many other 
business corporations, being President of the Mechanics' National 
Bank of New Britain, and director of the New Britain Savings 
Bank, the Connecticut General Life Insurance Co., and the P. & 
F. Corbin Hardware Co. 

As a citizen he was honored with many offices. In 1876 he 
was a member of the Common Council, from 1877 to 1879 of the 
Board of Alderman, and for two terms was Mayor, his adminis- 
tration being considered one of the best in the history of the 
city. He was one of the original incorporators of the New 
Britain Institute, of which he was for many years President, and 
to which he also gave the "Talcott Art Fund." He was the 
first President of the New Britain Club. In many ways his 



423 

public spirit and high ideals were shown. He was for several 
years Vice-President of the Young Men's Christian Association, 
and from 1884 to the time of his death Deacon of the South 
Congregational Church. As a recreation from business he daily 
read Plato, Horace, or other favorite Greek or Latin author. 

Mr. Talcott died after many months of illness at his home in 
New Britain, February 21, 1905, in the 81st year of his age. 

He married, September 13, 1848, Miss Jane Croswell Goodwin, 
of West Hartford, who died in 1878. Of three sons and a 
daughter by this marriage, one son (Yale 1891) only is living. 
In 1880 Mr. Talcott married Miss Fannie Hall Hazen, who with 
two daughters survives him. 

1847 

John Carpenter Angell, son of Amasa and Mary (Ward) 
Angell, was born in Pleasant Valley, Dutchess County, N. Y., 
November 10, 1818, but entered college with his class from Clyde, 
Wayne County, N. Y. 

After graduation he spent a year in traveling in the interests 

of the American Journal of Science for Professor Silliman, 

later prepared statistical and other matter for Hunfs Merchant's 

Magazine^ and was for a time an assistant editor of the N'ew 

York Whig Review. 

In January, 1849, in company with Mark Hopkins, Dr. J. B. 
Stillman and others, he sailed by way of Cape Horn from New 
York to San Francisco, reaching there in August, after a voyage 
of one hundred and ninety-four days. He prospered as a mer- 
chant, but returned East after the fire of 1852. For the next 
twenty years he was in business in New York City. He was 
President of the Bell & Heath Coal Mining Co., and Trustee of 
the Clifton Iron Works and Clifton Steel Co., but met reverses 
and in 1876 returned to California. For a number of years he 
was General Manager for the Pacific Coast of the Mutual Reserve 
Fund Life Association of New York. In 1885 and 1890 he was 
a Commissioner to the Presbyterian General Assembly. He was 
also influential in religious matters, being a Director of the 
Young Men's Christian Association of San Francisco, Trustee of 
the California Bible Society, and for nearly fifteen years conduct- 
ing a large Bible class. He was a Ruling Elder in the Calvary 
Presbyterian Church, San Francisco, Cal. 



424 

Mr. Angell died without disease or suffering at Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., October 5, 1904, in the 86th year of his age. Several 
winters previous he had spent in Washington, D. C, and crossed 
the continent twelve times. 

He married, October 19, 1854, Elizabeth Leonard, daughter of 
Stephen West Hyde, a merchant and farmer of Palmyra, N. Y., 
and granddaughter of Rev. Alvan Hyde, D.D. (Dartmouth 1788), 
of Lee, Mass., Vice-President of Williams College. She died in 
1863 leaving two' sons and a daughter, who survive. In Decem- 
ber, 1868, he married Amelia, daughter of Lewis Ludington, of 
Carmel, Putnam County, N. Y., who died in 1870 leaving no 
issue. 

Sylvanus Pratt Marvin, son of John and Lydia Hull (Pratt) 
Marvin, was born March 17, 1822, at Lyme, Conn., but at the age 
of 14 years moved with his father's family to Deep River, in Say- 
brook, on the opposite bank of the Connecticut River, and from 
that place entered college. 

After graduation he took the course in the Yale Divinity 
School, at the same time teaching in the Collegiate and Commer- 
cial Institute of General William H. Russell (Yale 1 833). June 25, 
1851, he was ordained pastor of the First Congregational Church, 
Jamestown, N. Y., and remained there six years. Although 
declining settlement at Franklin, N. Y., he labored there three 
years, and at one time sixty persons united with the church. 
During his stay there he was instrumental in bringing the Con- 
gregational churches of the vicinity together into the Delaware 
Association. He was then at Torrington, Conn., for about four 
years, and February 22, 1865, was installed over the Congrega- 
tional Church in Woodbridge, Conn., where he continued as 
pastor nearly forty years. In promoting the higher life of the 
community he was always an efficient helper, and he was espe- 
cially loved as a pastor and friend. 

His sermons on the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Anniver- 
sary of the Woodbridge Congregational Church and on the 
Twenty-fifth Anniversary of his Pastorate there, also his Funeral 
Oration on Rev. James L. Willard of Westville, Conn., were 
printed. n 

Mr. Marvin died after a brief illness at the parsonage in Wood- 
bridge, November 24, 1904, at the age of 82 years. 



425 

He married May 27, 1851, Sylvina, daughter of Miles and 
Lucinda (Plumb) Buell, of Clinton, Conn. Mrs. Marvin died in 
Woodbridge January 20, 1902, but one of their two sons sur- 
vives. 

1848 

George Langdon, son of Edward and Emeline (Gates) Lang- 
don, was born August 4, 1826, at Plymouth, Conn. 

The year after graduation he went into business with Mr. L. P. 
Porter in Colchester, Conn., and in 1854 with four others started 
the Novelty Rubber Company, of which he was Secretary and a 
director, and which in 1855 located in New Brunswick, N. J. 
After residing in the latter place two years he returned to Ply- 
mouth. In 1869 he was one of the incorporators of the Plymouth 
Woolen Company, and Secretary, Treasurer, and a director. He 
was also a founder and director of the Thomaston Knife Com- 
pany. 

While living in Colchester he was elected one of the Board of 
School Visitors, and in 1853 a member of the Legislature, and 
after his return to Plymouth he was Acting School Visitor eight 
years, Selectman ten years, also Town Treasurer, and served the 
town in other offices. He was Deacon and Clerk of the Con- 
gregational Church, and Superintendent of the Sunday School. 

For many years he was occupied with various forms of service 
to the State. Daring the Civil War he was appointed by Gov- 
ernor Buckingham a commissioner to secure the enlistment of 
colored men in Connecticut regiments. In 1872 and 1873 he was 
a trustee of the Reform School at Meriden. Having joined the 
Connecticut Sunday School Association upon its organization in 
1859, for over forty years he was an efficient worker in the Asso- 
ciation, assisting in starting many Sunday Schools and at numer- 
ous conventions. He was County Secretary, Chairman of the 
Executive Committee, and during his later years an honorary life 
member of the Executive Committee. 

Mr. Langdon died of chronic gastritis at his home in Plymouth 
May 28, 1905, in the 79th year of his age. 

He married, September 3, 1851, Elizabeth A., daughter of 
Russell and Anna (Stevens) Carrington, of Colchester, who sur- 
vives him with two of their five sons and one daughter. The 
eldest son graduated from Yale University in 1877. 



426 

Thomas Ruggles Gold Peck, son of John Peck, a merchant 
of New York City, and Mary S. Peck, residing in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., was born at the home of his grandfather, Hon. Thomas 
Ruggles Gold (Yale IV 86) in Whitesboro, N. Y., February 28, 
1827. 

After graduation he studied at Princeton Theological Seminary 
over a year and at Union Seminary two years, and then spent a 
year abroad. He was ordained by the Reformed (Dutch) Classis 
of New York on April 18, 1854, and for five years thereafter was 
pastor of the Reformed (Dutch) Church in Richmond, Staten 
Island, N. Y., and then for about the same length of time of the 
Huguenot Church, Charleston, S. C. During. the last year of the 
War he ran the blockade, and coming North, was for seventeen 
years pastor at Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. Closing his work 
there in 1882, he was for ten years pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church at Waterville, Oneida County, N. Y. After this he 
supplied the pulpit of the Memorial Presbyterian Church in St. 
Augustine, Fla., for a time, and since 1894 had been pastor of the 
Presbyterian Church in Port Jefferson, N. Y. 

Mr. Peck had crossed the Atlantic Ocean about forty times, 
and lived for several months in Palestine, Egypt and Greece, and 
visited Iceland, Morocco, and the Sandwich Islands. He wrote 
descriptions of his journeys for newspapers, and in his earlier life 
contributed to Harper's Magazine, Frank Leslie's and The Inde- 
pendent, and was Associate Editor of the JVev^ York Observer for 
a time. 

He died after an illness of five weeks at the Methodist Episco- 
pal (Seney) Hospital in Brooklyn, N. Y., January 18, 1905, in 
the 78th year of his age. 

He married September 8, 1859, Susan J., daughter of Barnet 
and Susan (Conklin) Egbert, of Richmond, Staten Island, N. Y., 
and had three sons, who with Mrs. Peck survive him. 



Thomas Cicero Pinckaed, son of William and Sarah Spratlin 
(Calloway) Pinckard, was born in Forsyth, Ga,, August 23, 
1826, and entered the Junior class from Trinity College, Chapel 
Hill, N. C. 

After graduation he resided in Tuskegee, Ala., until 1868, 
except for about two years from 1860 to 1862, when he was in 
Montgomery. In 1868 he removed to Greenville, Ala. 



427 

He studied law with Hon. William P. Chilton, was admitted 
to the bar in October, 1848, and practiced until the end of 1854. 
He then opened a private school for boys, which he conducted 
for twenty years. Since 1873 his home had been in Opelika, 
Ala,, where he served for eight years as a member of the Board 
of Education, and four years as Mayor. He was an elder in the 
Presbyterian Church about thirty years. 

Mr. Pinckard died at Opelika October 16, 1904, at the age of 
IS years. 

He married, June 22, 1852, Mary Ellen, daughter of Edward 
F. and Catherine (Irby) Comegys, of Montgomery, and had four 
sons and three daughters, of whom two sons and one daughter 
are living. 

During the Civil War Mr. Pinckard served in the Fourteenth 
Alabama Regiment, and one son (Univ. Ala. 1886) was Major of 
the Second Regiment, United States Volunteer Engineers, in the 
Spanish-American War in 1898. 



1849 

Augustus Brandegee, son of John and Mary Ann (Deshon) 
Brandegee, and brother of Rev. John Jacob Brandegee, D.D. 
(Yale 1843), was born at New London, Conn., June 15, 1828. 

After graduation he spent a year in the law office of Hon. 
Andrew C. Lippitt (Amherst 1837) in New London, studied in 
the Yale Law School for a year, and then practiced in partnership 
with Mr. Lippitt until 1854. In 1887, his son (Yale 1885) 
became his partner, and in 1892 he formed the law firm of Bran- 
degee, Noyes & Brandegee. 

Mr. Brandegee held many important political positions. In 
1854 he was elected a Representative in the Connecticut Legisla- 
ture, of which he continued a member until 1857. After two 
years of service as Judge of the City Court of New London, he 
was again a member of the House of Representatives till 1861, 
in the latter year being Speaker of that body. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War he was active in raising 
troops, and was an effective speaker at patriotic gatherings. 
From 1863 to 1867 he was a member of the National House of 
Representatives at Washington. In 1871 and 1872 he was Mayor 
of New London, and in 1886 was City Attorney. In 1860* he 
was a State Presidential Elector, in 1864,1880, and 1884 a del- 



428 

egate to the Republican National Conventions, at the two latter 
being Chairman of the Connecticut Delegation. 

Mr. Brandegee died after an illness of several months, at his 
home in New London, November 10, 1904, at the age of 76 
years. 

He married, in September, 1854, Miss Nancie Christina Bos- 
worth, of Lee, Mass., and had two sons and two daughters. 
Mrs. Brandegee died March 27, 1881, and one son and one 
daughter are also deceased. I'he surviving son was formerly 
Speaker of the Connecticut House of Representatives, and has 
been elected Senator in the Congress of the United States. 

1850 

Thomas Dyer Conyngham, son of Hon. John Nesbitt 
Conyngham, LL.D. (Univ. Pa. 1817), President Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas of Luzerne County, Pa., from 1850 to 
1871, was born at Wilkes-Barr6, the capital of that county, 
December 11, 1831. 

For two years after graduation he was a civil engineer on the 
Pennsylvania (Central) Railroad, and for four years in the same 
capacity on the Northern Pennsylvania Railroad, residing succes- 
sively at Coopersburg, Helentown and Easton. For many years 
from 1857 he was engaged in the coal business, and was a mem- 
ber of the firm of Broderick & Co., who were large operators in 
coal and iron in Pennsylvania, Virginia and New Jersey. During 
a portion of this time his home was at Wilkes-Barre. In later 
years he was in business in New York City, living at New 
Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y., where he died November 7, 1904, 
in the 73d year of his age. 

He married, June 5, 1856, Harriet McKee, daughter of Peter 
S. Michler, of Easton, Pa., and had two sons and two daughters, 
of whom one son died in infancy. Mrs. Conyngham died at 
New Brighton, S. I., November 11, 1899. A brother graduated 
from Yale College in the class of 1846. 

1851 

Henry Dyer White, eldest of the seven sons of Henry 
White (Yale 1821) and Martha (Sherman) White, was born 
September 24, 1830, in New Haven, Conn. 

After graduation he studied law in the office of his father, and 
of General Dennis Kimberly (Yale 1812) and John S. Beach 



429 

LL.D. (Yale 1839), and a year in the Yale Law School. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1854, and since then had practiced 
his profession in New Haven, for many years in partnership with^ 
three of his brothers, continuing the system of abstracts of land 
titles started by his father and regarded as authoritative upon 
the ownership of land in New Haven. He was the friend and 
trusted counselor of many, and was especially occupied with the 
settlement of estates and the care of trust funds. Mr. White 
was a trustee of the New Haven Savings Bank for fifty years 
and its attorney, also a director of the New Haven County 
National Bank. He was Class Secretary from graduation. 

Although in ill health f6r three years past, he was able to 
attend to his business until a few days before his death, which 
occurred from heart disease at the' home of his daughter, May 
4, 1905, in the VSth year of his age. 

Mr. White married, June 4, 1863, Julia Flew welling, daughter 
of John Parker and Eliza (Tallmadge) White, of Philadelphia, 
who died August 16, 1875. One of their two daughters, with 
whom he spent two years in Colorado, died there in 1891. The 
other daughter survives him. Five brothers, all graduates of 
Yale College, in 1854, 1859, 1860, 1864, and 1866, respectively, 
are also living. 

1852 

David Skinner Bigelow, son of Jonathan Gates and Hope 
(Skinner) Bigelow, was a lifelong resident of Colchester, Conn., 
and was born in that part of the town called Westchester, April 
3, 1829. 

After graduation he returned to Colchester, where he had 
since carried on an extensive grazing farm. In 1863 he repre- 
sented the town in the State Legislature. He served the town 
as Selectman, and as school visitor from the year after graduation 
for forty years, and was also chairman of the board of trustees 
of Bacon Academy. He was a trustee of the Colchester Savings 
Bank and a director of the National Bank of New England at 
East Haddam. In 1863 he united with the Westchester Congre- 
gational Church, was clerk of the society thirty years, and super- 
intendent of the Sunday School nineteen years. 

Mr. Bigelow died, May 8, 1905, at the age of 76 years, from 
the effects of an injury received about twenty-five years previ- 
ously while riding. 



430 

He married, November 9, 1852, Abby Mandana, daughter of 
Revilo Cone and Mandana (Robbing) Usher, and had four sons, 
of whom three with Mrs. Bigelow survive him. The eldest son 
is the Class Boy of 1852. 

Cyrus Lyman Hall, son of Daniel and Philena (Lyman) 
Hall, was born in Perry, Wyoming County, N. Y., September 
17, 1824. He prepared himself for college while teaching school, 
and entered at the beginning of Sophomore year. 

After graduation he taught at Woodbury, Conn., and Ford- 
ham, N. Y., at the same time studying law, and was admitted to 
the bar at Brooklyn, N. Y., October 1, 1854. He began the 
practice of his profession in Batavia, N". Y., but in 1856 removed 
to Hudson, St. Croix County, Wise. In 1858-59 he was District 
Attorney for that county, and from 1862 to 1870 County Judge. 
On his return to practice he gave special attention to real estate 
matters. In 1892 he entered the United States Bureau of Pen- 
sions at Washington, D. C, engaging in work for which his 
experience as judge and lawyer had especially fitted him. He 
continued his labors in the midst of congenial surroundings until 
August, 1904, when he left Washington for a visit to the home 
of his son in Owen, Clark County, Wise, where he died the 
following month, September 22, 1904, at the age of 80 years. 

He married, May 1, 1854, Josephine Bacon, daughter of Theo- 
dore Walter Walker, of Woodbury, Conn., and had two sons, 
— of whom the elder died in infancy, — and one daughter. Mrs. 
Hall died December 4, 1897, after many years of invalidism. 

Moses Smith was born in Hebron, Conn., August 16, 1830, the 
youngest of the five children of Deacon Nathan and Jerusha 
(Ashley) Smith. 

After graduation he taught in Westfield (Mass.) Academy, 
where he had received part of his preparation for college, and 
in Chester, Conn., for three years, and then entered Andover 
Theological Seminary. He spent a year in the Yale Theological 
Seminary under Dr. Nathaniel W. Taylor, after which he 
returned to Andover and graduated in 1859. He was licensed to 
preach in May, 1857, and during the revivals of that year and 
the following labored with much success at Ansonia and Farm- 
ington. Conn. At the latter he declined the associate pastorate 
with Rev. Dr. Noah Porter (Yale 1803), and began the study of 



431 

medicine with a view to missionary work in Africa, but his 
health proved inadequate for that. On September 22, 1859, he 
was ordained and installed pastor of the Congregational church 
in Plain ville, Conn. Feeling it his duty to enter the army in 
defence of the Union, he was given leave of absence by the 
church, and in August, 1863, was enrolled in Company A, 8th 
Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He declined the offer of a 
lieutenancy, and enlisted as a private, but in December was unan- 
imously elected Chaplain. In this position he served two years, 
always accompanying his regiment on the march or in the Held. 
He was in front of Richmond in 1864, and entered that city with 
the first troops in April, 1865, and he shared in the battles of 
Bermuda Hundred, Drury's Bluff, Cold Harbor, and Fort Har- 
rison. In the summer of 1865 he was on detached service under 
the Freedman's Bureau, and then returned to Plainville, where 
he continued as pastor until March 31, 1869. 

He was installed as the first pastor of the Leavitt Street Con- 
gregational Church, Chicago, 111., on May 3 of that year, and 
remained until the close of 1873, the membership of the church 
greatly increasing during that time. During two years of this 
pastorate he was Secretary of the Western Education Society. 
In the "Great Fire "of October, 1871, all the members of the 
church except two were burned out. Mr. Smith took an active 
part in the relief w^ork of the city. 

He declined a unanimous call to the Tabernacle Church in 
Chicago, and on January 1, 1874, became pastor of the First 
Congregational Church, Jackson, Mich. After five years of ser^ 
vice there, he was settled over the Woodward Avenue Church, 
in Detroit, where he remained nearly nine years, and for the 
years following was at Glencoe, a suburb of Chicago, leaving to 
the great regret of all only after he had entirely lost his sight. 
He subsequently served as pastor at Garden Prairie, 111., about 
eighteen months. He was an active temperance worker, and in 
his churches and in the army organized temperance societies. 
He was a Trustee of Olivet College from 1876 to 1878, and of 
Chicago Theological Seminary from 1885 to 1891, and a corporate 
member of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions since 1876. 

He was Moderator of the State Association of Michigan in 
1882, three times a delegate to the National Council of Congrega- 
tional Churches, and a delegate from the Chicago churches to 



432 

the unveiling of the memorial tablet to Rev. John Robinson, in 
Leyden, Holland. 

He was the author of the volumes "A Voice in the Great Con- 
flict," Hartford, 1863, and "Questions of the Ages," Chicago, 
1888, but besides these only two or three sermons and addresses 
were printed. 

Mr. Smith died at his home, which he had built in Chicago, 
November 30, 1904, at the age of 74 years. 

He married, June 12, 1860, Emily Austin, daughter of Deacon 
Marcus White, a merchant of Marengo, McHenry County, 111., 
who survives him. She is a trustee of Mount Holyoke College. 
Their only child, a son, died in infancy in 1875, but they brought 
up three orphan children. 

1853 

Charles Ferdinand Dowd, son of Wyllys Wedworth and 
Rebecca (Graves) Dowd, was born in Madison, Conn., April 25, 
1825. His father's business failure in 1842 delayed his prepara- 
tion for college, and with the exception of two winters of district 
school teaching he worked for his father at the trade of shoe- 
making until he became of age, after which he studied under 
Rev. William W. Woodworth, D.D. (Yale 1838), then pastor in 
Berlin, Conn. He entered the class of 1852, but at the close of 
the first term his resources failed, and he did not return to college 
until the following year, then joining the next class. His course 
was much interrupted by teaching during the winters, but he 
received the degree of Master of Arts and enrollment with his 
class in 1856. 

In the fall of 1853 he became Principal of the Preparatory 
Department of Newton University, Baltimore, Md., and later 
Professor of Mathematics in his Collegiate Department. From 
1855 to 1857 he was Superintendent of the city Schools in Water- 
bury, Conn., and Principal of the High School. The next year 
he was Associate Principal of the State Normal School in New 
Britain^ and then returned for another year as Superintendent in 
Waterbury. From 1860 to 1868 he was Principal of the North 
Granville (N. Y.) Ladies' Seminary, and since then President, 
and until his retirement also Principal, of Temple Grove Sem- 
inary, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

While engaged in teaching he pursued theological studies and 
in February, 1863, was licensed to preach by the Troy (N. Y.) 



433 

Presbyterj^, and just two years later was ordained by the same 
Presbytery as an evangelist ; but with teaching he found no 
time for a pastorate. He received the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy from New York University in 1888, and the same 
year was made a Fellow of the Society of Science, Letters and 
Arts of London. 

In the fall of 1869 he presented the subject of Standard Time 
to a convention of railway officials in New York City, and after- 
wards to other similar conventions in Boston, Atlanta and else- 
where, and by characteristic persistency succeeded in having the 
system as originated and worked out by him adopted by the 
railroads in 1883. He wrote several works on the subject. 

Dr. Dowd was instantly killed by a railway train at a street 
crossing in Saratoga Springs, November 12, 1904. He was in the 
80th year of his age. He united with the Congregational Church 
in Madison, Conn., at the age of 12 years. 

He married, October 6, 1852, Harriet Miriam, daughter of 
Edmund and Maria (Wilcox) North, of Berlin, Conn., and a 
graduate of Mount Holyoke Seminary in 1851. Their golden 
wedding was celebrated in 1902. Mrs. Dowd survives him, also 
four sons and two daughters. 

One son graduated from Williams College in 1879, and another 
in 1885, and a grandson from the Sheffield Scientific School in 
1900. A daughter is the widow of Lewis A. James (Williams 
1885), the other daughter the wife of Colonel James W. Lester 
(Union 1899). 

In his memory a bronze tablet has been placed on the interior 
wall of the Second Presbyterian Church of Saratoga Springs 
by the Temple Grove Association. 

William Thacher Gilbert, son of Luther and Mary Ana 
(Thacher) Gilbert, was born May 16, 1829, in New Haven, Conn. 

After graduation he studied theology three years in the Yale 
Divinity School, and then entered the ministry of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. In 1857 he was admitted to the New York 
East Conference, and the same year began his service at West 
Granby, Conn. After a year he was stationed at East Granby, 
and then successively at Wilton, South Britain, and Burlington, 
Conn.' During 1864 and 1865 he was engaged in missionary and 
educational work at New Orleans, La. For the next twenty 
years he was pastor at Cheshire, Warren, Naugatuck, Southbury, 



434 

Nichols' Farm, Cornwall Bridge and New Milford, Conn., and 
Pound Ridge, N. Y. From 1886 to 1889 he was at Stepney, 
Conn., 1889 to 1891 at Pleasant Valley and Colebrook River, 1891 
to 1893 at Stamford, and 1893 to 1895 at Newtown, Conn. In 1895 
he retired from active work in the ministry, and had since resided 
with his daughter at New Milford. In 1902 he preached the 
semi-centennial sermon in the Methodist Church there. During 
his later years he was treasurer of the church, and occasionally 
rendered pastoral service. He was a member of the Connecticut 
House of Representatives from Southbury in 1868, and in 1868-69 
was Town Clerk of that town. 

Mr. Gilbert died of apoplexy at his home in New Milford 
October 1, 1904, at the age of 75 years. 

He married, March 6, 1856, Harriet L., daughter of Elias and 
Lavinia (Newman) Gilbert, of Ridgefield, Conn., and had four 
daughters, all of whom survive him. Mrs. Gilbert died in 1894. 

Joseph Olds, son of Hon. Edson Baldwin Olds, Speaker of 
the Ohio Senate in 1848, and Representative in Congress from 
1849 to 1855, and of Anna Maria (Carolus) Olds, was born April 
16, 1832, in Circleville, O. 

After graduation he studied law a year in Circleville, then 
entered the Harvard Law School, from which he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1856. He began practice in Cir- 
cleville, and resided there until May, 1873, during the last five 
years of that time being Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of 
the Fifth Judicial District. On retiring from office he removed 
to Columbus, O., and practiced there until his death, January 31, 
1 905, in the 73d year of his age. 

He married, December 30, 1858, Miss Eliza P. Scott, of Ports- 
mouth, O., who died the following summer, leaving no children. 

In 1866 he married Mary, daughter of William Marshall and 
Eliza (McAuthur) Anderson, of Chillicothe, who died in 1897. 

Their two sons and four daughters are all living. 

Henrt Putnam Stearns, son of Asa and Mary (Putnam) 
Stearns, was born April 18, 1828, in Sutton, Mass. 

After graduation he studied a year each in the Harvard and 
Yale Medical Schools, receiving the degree of Doctor of- Medi- 
cine from the latter in 1855. He spent a year in further study 
in Paris and Edinburgh, becoming House Surgeon at the Royal 



435 

Infirmary in the latter city. In the autumn of 1857 he began 
practice in Marlboro, Mass., and in 1860 removed to Hartford^ 
Conn. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War he was appointed Surgeon of 
the First Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers, and was at the 
first battle of Bull Run. After the expiration of the three 
months' service he was appointed Brigade Surgeon of Volunteers 
in the Department of the West. He was Medical Director on 
the staff of General Grant during the winter of 1861-62, and the 
following spring became Medical Director of the right wing of 
the Army of the Tennessee. He was with General Grant at the 
battles of Belmont, Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and Shiloh. He 
was afterward on detached duty as Inspector of United States 
Hospitals at St. Louis, and then Medical Director at Paducah, 
Ky. He built and equipped a hospital at Jeffersonville, Ind., and 
was then made Medical Director of the north wing of the Army 
of the Tennessee at Nashville, where he had an average of 10,000 
patients under his charge. At the end of the war he was mus- 
tered out of service with the rank of Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel. 
He declined a permanent position in the medical department of 
the United States Army, and in January, 1866, returned to Hart- 
ford and resumed a general practice, which constantly increased 
during the next eight years. 

In January, 18V4, he was appointed Physician and Superin- 
tendent of the Retreat for the Insane, and in the performance of 
his exacting duties showed conscientiousness, wisdom, energy, 
and a progressive spirit. After a service of over thirty-one years 
he retired on account of age, March 31, 1905, but continued as a 
director of the Retreat. He held a leading place among the 
speci<alists of the country on mental diseases, and appeared as an 
expert in many medico-legal cases. He was Lecturer on Insanity 
in the Yale Medical School from 1876 to 1897. 

Dr. Stearns was the author of the two volumes, " Insanity ; 
its Causes and Prevention " and " Mental Diseases," a pamphlet 
entitled "Expert Testimony in the Case of the United States 
against Guiteau," portions of the " Medical and Surgical History 
of the War of the Rebellion," and monog-i-aphs on a variety of 
topics. He compiled most of the records of the Increase Stearns 
family. 

He was President of the Connecticut Medical Society, of 
the Hartford Medical Society, and of the American Medico- 



436 

Psychological Association, an honorary member of the British 
Medico-Psychological Association, and President of the Yale 
Medical Alumni Association. He was a Director of the Con- 
necticut Fire Insurance Co., the Travellers Insurance Co., the 
Hartford Electric Light Co., and the Connecticut Humane 
Society, and Trustee of the Hartford Trust Co. and the Con- 
necticut Institute for the Blind. For thirty years past he had 
been a Deacon of the Center Church, and was also a member of 
the prudential committee. 

Dr. Stearns died after several months of failing health at his 
home in Hartford, May 27, 1905, at the age of 77 years. 

He married, September 29, 1857, Annie Elizabeth, daughter of 
Captain James and Elizabeth Storer, of Dumfries, Scotland, and 
had two sons and a daughter, of whom the latter died in child- 
hood. The elder son was graduated from Williams College in 
1881 and from the Yale Law School in 1884. 

1854 

Edward Payson Buffett, son of Judge William Piatt Buf- 
fett (Yale 1812) and Nancy (Rogers) Buffett, was born at Smith- 
town, Long Island, N. Y., November 7, 1833. 

After graduation from Yale he took the course in the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, and received therefrom 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1857. The following year he 
settled in Bergen, N. J., which later became a part of Jersey 
City, and had since continued in practice there. For over fifteen 
years he was visiting physician and surgeon of the Hudson 
County (now Christ) Hospital, and for nearly twenty years visit- 
ing surgeon of the City Hospital of Jersey City. He was a mem- 
ber of the Bergen and Jersey City Boards of Education for a 
number of years, and an Elder in the Reformed (Dutch) Church. 

Dr. Buffett died of heart disease at his home in Jersey City, 
September 9, 1904, in the 71st year of his age. 

He married, April 26, 1864, Catherine Lewis, daughter of 
Walter M. Smith, of New York City, but her death occurred less 
than six months later. In June, 1872, he married Alletta, daugh- 
ter of Cornelius C. V.an Reypen, of Jersey City Heights. She 
died in 1873, leaving a son, who graduated from Stfevens Insti- 
tute of Technology in 1894, and from the New York Law School 
in 1897. 

Dr. Buffett was the author of one book, a work of fiction, and 
of occasional masrazine articles on professional and other topics. 



437 

Edward Cornelius DuBois, son of Cornelius and Julia A. 
(Moore) DuBois, was born in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, 
N. Y., February 2, 1831. 

After graduation he was a Civil Engineer on the Great West- 
ern Railroad of Canada for the first two years, and then on the 
Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad. In the fall of 1857 he went to 
Chili, where he was engaged in engineering work for eight years. 
After a short stay in the United States he was employed on public 
works in Mexico, but owing to disturbed conditions in that 
country he was obliged to spend the first year in the City of 
Mexico. In 1868 he again returned home, and after remaining 
two years went to Panama, where he was occupied in bridge esti- 
mates for the Panama Railroad, and was later Superintendent. 
After another visit to the United States he spent the remainder 
of his life in Peru, where he devoted himself most successfully to 
railroad building and management, and built a stately residence 
in Lima. He retired from active work as an engineer some ten 
years ago, but continued to reside in Lima until his death, May 
25, 1903, at the age of 72 years. He was buried in Lima. He 
was a Roman Catholic for many years. 

Mr. DuBois married, August 2, 1873, Manuela Emilia Gon- 
zales y Orbegaso, daughter of Vincente Gonzales Pinellos, and 
had five daughters and a son, who with their mother survive him. 
The four elder daughters and son received their education in the 
United States. 

Edward Wilberforce Lambert, son of William Gage and 
Sarah (Perley) Lambert, was born in Boston, Mass., February 15, 
1831. When fifteen years of age he entered a store in Boston, 
but after three years of experience in business went to North- 
ampton, Mass., where he was prepared for college in the classical 
school of Lewis J. Dudley (Tale 1838), and joined the class at 
the beginning of Sophomore year. During Senior year his father 
removed to New York City. 

After graduation he at once began the study of medicine at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons (now a department of Colum- 
bia University). In 1856 he spent six months in European travel, 
and received his medical diploma in the spring of 1857. During 
the succeeding fifteen months he served as assistant and House 
Physician in Bellevue Hospital. On September 1, 1858, he began 
the general practice of medicine in New York City, and acquired 



438 

a high reputation as a physician. For some years he was an 
attending physician at St. Luke's Hospital and the Nursery and 
Child's Hospital, and was President of the Medical Board and 
one of the governors of the Society of the Lying-in Hospital of 
New York City. His home for over thirty years was at 2 East 
37th street, but in 1902 he removed to 126 East 39th street. 
During most of this time he had also a summer residence at New 
Canaan, Conn. 

Upon the organization of the Equitable Life Assurance Society 
in 1859, he was appointed Medical Examiner, and had since con- 
tinued at the head of that department of the company. For a 
time he was also examining physician for other insurance com- 
panies, but later he was made Medical Director of the Equitable 
Life Assurance Society, with supervision of all examiners at home 
and abroad, and gave his entire time to the work. 

Dr. Lambert died after a week's illness from heart disease, at 
his home in New York City, July 17, 1904, at the age of 73 years. 
He was a member of the Broadway Tabernacle. 

He married at Dorchester, Mass., September 9, 1858, Martha 
Melcher, daughter of Samuel W. Waldron, and had four sons and 
six daughters, of whom the sons and four of the daughters are 
living. The sons graduated from Yale College, respectively, in 
1880, 1884, 1886 and 1893, and three of them are practicing 
physicians in New York City. One daughter married Dickinson 
W. Richards (Yale 1880). Another married William Ransom 
Barbour (Yale 1880), and a third married Knight Dexter Cheney 
(Yale 1892). 

Adrian Yan Sinderei^, son of William Henry and Lydia 
Matilda (Howard) Yan Sinderen, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
April 13, 1833. 

After graduation he studied law in New York City, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in February, 1857, and for nearly thirty-five 
years practiced his profession in that city, and was for many years 
an honored citizen of Brooklyn. He was for twenty-five years 
Director of the Brooklyn Library and for eight years President 
of the Board, also for three years a member of the Board of 
Education of that city. Since 1891 he had lived abroad. He 
died of pneumonia in Berlin, Germany, February 7, 1905, in the 
72d year of his age. * 



439 

He married, January 22, 1856, Laura Boorraan, daughter of 
George Leslie and Martha J. (Watson) Sampson of Brooklyn. 
She died in February, 1872, after a long -period of failing health,, 
during which Mr. Van Sinderen spent nearly three years in Europe 
with her without permanent benefit to her condition. Two sons 
survive, the younger being a graduate of the Columbia School of 
Mines in 1881 and of the Columbia Law School in 1883. 

1855 

John Anketell, son of John Anketell and Augusta Abigail 
(Mills) Anketell, was born on the present site of the Yale Law 
School in New Haven, Conn., March 8, 1835. 

After graduation he studied over a year in Yale Theological 
Seminary and was licensed to preach March 4, 1857, and then 
spent a year in Germany at the University of Halle. After a 
year at Andover Theological Seminary and further research he 
entered Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn., and was 
ordained Deacon in the Protestant Episcopal Church by Bishop 
Williams December 29, 1859, and Priest December 22, 1860. 
From that time until 1868 he was rector of St. Luke's, Darien, 
Conn., St. Paul's, Windham, Conn., St. James's, Winsted, Conn., 
and St. Paul's, Havana, New York. While rector at Havana he 
was also Professor of Languages in the Masonic College in that 
place. 

In 1868 he revisited Germany, and was the founder and first 
rector of St. John's (American) Church, at Dresden, Saxony. 

On his return to the United States he was for some time in 
charge of the Church of the Advent in Boston, was rector of 
St. Peter's Church, Oxford, Conn., and for two years assistant 
rector of St. Thomas's Church, New York City, resigning the 
latter charge to become Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exegesis 
in Seabury Divinity School, Faribault, Minn. From 1878 to 
1880 he was rector of Christ Church, Austin, Minn., from 1880 
to 1882 of St. Mark's Church, Newcastle, Mt. Kisco, New York, 
from 1884 to 1886 Chaplain at St. Barnabas' Church, New York 
City, and in 1886-87 at Bellevue Hospital. He continued to 
reside in New York City until 1891, when he became rector of 
St. Luke's Church, Fair Haven, Vt., resigning to accept a call to 
St. Andrew's Church, Walden, New York. In 1 903 he was 
appointed rector of Christ Church, West Burlington, New 
York. 



440 

Mr. Ankelell was known as a hymnologist, linguist and poet. 
His hymns and translations were first published largely in the 
Church Standard of Philadelphia, The Living Church, Mil- 
waukee, and the Church Eclectic of New York, and his transla- 
tions into English of the hymns for the Moravian Church in 
The Moravian of Bethlehem, Pa. He published "Gospel and 
Epistle Hymns for the Christian Year " in 1 890 and *' Student 
Life in Germany " in 1894. His prize essay on **Marriage and 
its Impediments" was published in the Church Eclectic in 1886. 
He was the author of the Centennial Poem for the celebration 
of the capture of Major Andre at Tarry town, N. Y., in 1880, of 
the "Inauguration Hymn" of President Cleveland in 1885, and 
of many articles and poems in magazines and papers. 

For the last fifteen years of his life he was associate editor of 
the Christian Year Calendar, and his translations from the Greek 
for the Calendar of the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom and the 
Liturgy of St. James were highly commended by able scholars. 
He was regarded as an authority on the subject of liturgies. 
Mr. Anketell died of pneumonia at West Burlington, Otsego 
County, N. Y., March 9, 1905, the day after his birthday anniver- 
sary, at the age of 70 years. 

He married at St. Thomas's Church, New Haven, Conn., April 
24, 1860, Marie Louise, daughter of Joseph D. and Susan M. 
(Sutton) Butterfield, of Montrose, Pa. Mrs. Anketell died one 
week after the death of her husband. They had two sons (of 
whom the elder died in infancy), and one daughter. A brother 
graduated from Yale College in 1864. 

Henry Anderson Dickinson, son of Henry Anderson and 
Julia (Ferry) Dickinson, was born at Granby, Mass., June 27, 
1833. 

After graduation he taught a year each in West Hartford, 
Conn., New York City, and Binghamton, N. Y., and then 
entered Andover Theological Seminary. Graduating thence in 
1861, he was for over a year acting pastor at Wellesley, Mass., 
and from the spring of 1863 to 1865 at Vermilionville, 111. He 
was ordained at Tonica, 111., October 16, 1863. In 1867 he was 
installed pastor of the Congregational Church at Chester Center, 
Mass., where he continued for ten years, and during the five 
years following was acting pastor of the Second Congregational 
Church, Huntington. Ill health then forced him to give up 



441 

preaching for two or three years, but he continued to reside in 
Huntington, and was afterward able to preach, temporarily- 
supplying the pulpits of several different churches in neighboring' 
towns. He was always active in all the higher interests of the 
community. 

Mr. Dickinson died of heart disease at his home in Huntington 
July 14, 1904, at the age of Vl years. 

He married, December 12, 1865, at Vermilionville, 111., Sarah 
A., daughter of James S. Bullock, M.D., and Nancy (Barrows) 
Bullock, and had four sons, all of whom survive him. Mrs. 
Dickinson died June 1, 1902. 

Jarvis King Mason, son of John and Achsah (Terry) Mason, 
was born at Enfield, Conn., November 8, 1831. 

After graduation he taught a year and a half in Buffalo, 
N. Y., Bucyrus, 0., and Richmond, Tex., during the vacations 
traveling extensively in the West and Southwest, and then spent 
two years in charge of the Male Academy in Carthage, Miss., 
and also began the study of medicine. 

On returning North he continued his medical studies with Dr. 
Clarke, of Whitinsville, Mass., and Dr. William Warren Greene 
(M.D. Univ. Mich. 1855) of Portland, Me., and meanwhile also 
attended two courses of lectures in the Medical Department of 
Harvard University, from which he received his medical degree 
in March, 1861. Two months later he began the practice of 
medicine and surgery in Suffield, Conn., which he continued 
there for forty-three years. 

He was appointed Medical Examiner of the town under the 
statute of 1883 and so remained to the close of his life, was 
health officer for ten years from 1893 and town physician for 
several years from 1895. He was also Medical Examiner for a 
number of leading insurance companies. He was* President of 
the Hartford County Health Oflicers' Association in 1897 and 
1898, and President of the Hartford County Medical Association 
in 1897, Fellow of the Connecticut Medical Association, and a 
delegate from Hartford County to the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. He was a frequent contributor to medical journals. 

He was active in forwarding public improvements, and had 
been a director of the Kent Library Association from its founda- 
tion in 1SS4». He was a member of the First Congregational 
Church. 



442 

Dr. Mason married, at Monson, Mass., June 23, 1863, Mrs. 
Mrya R. Reynolds, widow of James L. Reynolds, Jr., and 
daughter of Jonathan and Caroline (King) Homer, who died the 
following spring. In September, 1873, he married Clara K., 
daughter of Edward and Clarissa (Kendall) Halliday, of Suffield, 
Conn. She die^ in 1876, and in October, 1877, he married Mary 
L., daughter of Rev. Lucius R. Eastman (Amherst 1833) and 
Sarah (Belden) Eastman, of Amherst, Mass., who survives him. 
By the second marriage he had two daughters, one of whom is 
living, and by his last marriage two daughters and a son, all 
living, the son having graduated from Trinity College in 1901. 

Dr. Mason died of paralysis at his home in Suffield, April 8, 
1905, at the age of 73 years. 

1856 

David Plunket Richardson, son of William Plunket Rich- 
ardson, M.D. (Union 1811) and Mary (Porter) Richardson, was 
born in Macedon, Wayne County,, N. Y., May 28, 1833, and 
entered the class at the beginning of Sophomore year. 

After graduation he taught in Angelica, Allegany County, 
N. Y., till April, 1859, and then entered the law office of Rawson 
& Stebbins, in Rochester, N. Y., where he was admitted to the 
bar in December of the same year and practiced for nearly two 
years. He then enlisted in the Union Army, was made First 
Lieutenant of the Sixth New York Cavalry, and during the last 
two years of the Civil War was a member of the staff of the 
Corps Commander. In this position he took part in most of the 
battles of the Army of the Potomac under Generals Stoneman, 
Pleasanton, and Gregg, and received the thanks of each for his 
skill, energy and bravery. 

After the war he practiced law in Cincinnati, O., as a member 
of the firm of Richardson & Lloyd, but in 1866 removed to 
Angelica, Allegany County, N. Y., and was for many years the 
acknowledged leader of the bar of that county. He was a mem- 
ber of the Forty-sixth and Forty-seventh National Congresses, 
in the former serving on the Civil Service Reform Committee, 
and in the latter on the Committees on Indian Affairs and on 
Rivers and Harbors. 

Mr. Riichardson was an attractive and forcible speaker, with a 
rich, melodious voice, and delivered many able addresses on 
Memorial davs and other occasions. 



443 

He died of heart disease in Angelica, June 21, 1904, at the age 
of Vl years. 

He married, September 30, 1863, at Angelica, Julia Starr, 
daughter of Honorable Ransom Lloyd, for many years Presiding 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, and Julia (Starr) Lloyd, 
and had three sons, who with Mrs. Richardson survive him. The 
sons are Law School graduates, respectively of Cornell, Colum- 
bian (now George Washington), and Buffalo Universities. 

1857 

William Edward Hulbert, elder son of William Edward 
Hulbert (Yale 1824) and Mary Gray (Huntington) Hulbert, was 
born in Middletown, Conn., May 19, 1834. He entered college 
with the class of 1856, but was obliged to leave at the close of 
the second terra of Sophomore year. He reentered college in May 
of the next year, and completed his course with the class of 1857. 

After graduation he taught in the Collegiate and Commercial 
lustitute of General William H. Russell (Yale 1833) in New 
Haven four years, and then in a private school in Middletown 
till the spring of 1869. For ten years following he was Secretary 
and Treasurer of the J. & K. Stevens Manufacturing Company of 
Cromwell, Conn., and then was for five years engaged in manufac- 
turing in Middletown. From 1884 to 1887 he was Superintendent 
of Public Schools in Middletown, and afterwards Secretary of the 
Silver-Plated Ware Association, with office at Cromwell. 

Mr. Hulbert died of paralysis at his home in Cromwell, Novem- 
ber 12, 1904, at the age of 70 years. 

He married, June 3, 1869, Jessie, daughter of Dr. Robert Mathi- 
son (Wesley an 1841) and Rebecca (Disbrow) Mathison, who 
survives him without children. Two nephews graduated from 
the University in 1898, one from the Sheffield Scientific School 
and the other from the Medical Department. 

1858 

Leavitt Howe, son of Fisher and Elizabeth (Leavitt) Howe, 
was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., November 24, 1836. 

After graduation he spent several months studying agriculture 
in West Cornwall, Conn., and April 1, 1859, began farming on a 
tract of one hundred and forty acres near Princeton, N. J., which 
he improved with rare skill and taste. This continued to be his 
home. In January, 1885, he was chosen Vice-President of the 



444 

Princeton Bank. He was a trustee of the First Presbyterian 
Church. 

Mr. Howe died of heart failure, July 19, 1904, at the age of 67 
years. 

He married, April 11, 1866, Rosalie, daughter of Colonel Alex- 
ander McWhorter and Emily (Hornblower) Cumming, and grand- 
daughter of Chief Justice Joseph C. Hornblower of New Jersey, 
who survives him. Of their two sons and two daughters, one 
son and one daughter are deceased. 

1860 

William Edward Bradley, son of Ed son and Sarah Frances 
(Scribner) Bradley, was born at New Canaan, Conn., May 27, 
1840. 

During the year after graduation he taught school in South- 
port, but in the fall of 1861, upon his enlistment in the United 
States army, he was appointed First Lieutenant of Company B of 
the Thirteenth Connecticut Volunteers, in October, 1853, was 
promoted to the rank of Captain, and after four years of service 
was honorably discharged, August 24, 1865. He was on duty at 
Ship Island, New Orleans and Port Hudson, accompanied Banks's 
ill-fated expedition up the Red River, was transferred to the 
Shenandoah Valley, then in turn to Savannah, Newburn and 
Augusta, Ga., wl;iere he resigned. 

During the winter after the war he made a business trip to 
Louisiana and Texas for his father, with whom he was engaged 
for several years afterward in the sale of foreign and domestic 
woolens in New York City. Soon after 1870 he removed to 
Frankfort, Ky., and became General Manager of the W. A. 
Gaines Co. Corporation, doing a wholesale whiskey business, and 
continued with the company and' its successors till the close of 
his life. He was also Assistant Treasurer of the Kentucky Dis- 
tilleries and Warehouse Company from the time of its formation 
in 1899. He devised improvements in distilling which have been 
generally adopted in the business. 

Mr. Bradley died suddenly of heart disease at his home in 
Frankfort, February 16, 1905, in the 65th year of his age. 

He married, in 1872, Miss Tedesco Hall, of Perth Amboy, 
N. J., who died in 1889, leaving no children. He afterward mar- 
ried Mary L., daughter of Thomas Theodore and Mary (Weir) 
Hawkins of Frankfort, who survives him with two sons. 



445 

John Howard, son of Davis Howard, of West Bridgewater, 

^Mass., and Martha (Southworth) Howard, was born in Boston, 

Mass., February 22, 1838. He was the seventh of nine children, 

five of whom died in childhood. His father died when he was 

eight years of age. 

After graduation he taught music in Bath, Me., and Wood- 
stock, Yt., and then served for about six months in the Union 
army, as a private in the Twelfth Massachusetts Regiment. He 
spent part of the years 1867 and 1868 in Germany, studying 
music in Leipsic, and on his return was organist of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Utica, N. Y., and then resided for a number 
of years in the West, part of the time in Kansas City, Mo., and 
about 1870 in Fort Wayne, Ind., and then for a number of years 
in Boston, where he taught in a conservatory. After a tour 
through the southern states he settled in New York City, teach- 
ing music and also using a system of correspondence lessons. 
Under the guidance of his classmate. Dr. Francis Delafield, he 
made a thorough study of anatomy as bearing on voice produc- 
tion, and as a result of his investigations read before the Music 
Teachers' National Associatix)n in 1879 and 1882 papers on "The 
Vocal Process" and ''Respiratory Control." He published in 
1886 his "Physiology of Artistic Singing," and just before his 
death had corrected the last chapters of a new volume, ''.Expres- 
sion in Singing." He also wrote a few songs, and for a number 
of years was a critic for the Musical Courier. 

While crossing 60th street, near Broad wa}^. New York City, Mr. 
Howard was knocked down by a truck, receiving a compound 
fracture of the skull from which he died at Roosevelt Hospital, 
October 3, 1904, at the age of 66 years. 

He married, April 23, 1867, in Leipsic, Germany, Anna Bonom, 
daughter of John and Jane (Bonom) Hawood, of London, Eng. 
She died in Joppa Village, Elm wood, Mass., in February, 1868, 
and their infant daughter a few months later. In 1880 he married 
Miss Cicily C. Carbaniss, of Williamson County, Tex., who died 
in 1889, leaving three daughters and a son, who survive him. 

A brother graduated from the Harvard Medical School in 1873 
and died in 1878, and a sister was the wife of his classmate, Dr. 
Richard Baxter Brown. 

William Henry Hurlbut, son of Henry Augustus Hurlbut, 
founder of the Hurlbut Scholarship in Yale College, and Susan 



446 

Rebecca (Kennedy) Hiirlbut, was born June 17, 1840, in 'New 
York City. He joined the class in the second term of Freshman 
year. 

After graduation he was at first a broker in the firm of Brown 
& Hurlbut, but in 1863 entered the firm of Dickinson & Hurlbut, 
manufacturers and wholesale dealers in hats, and continued in 
that business until 1892. He was afterward engaged in looking 
after important private interests. From 1895 to' 1897 he was a 
member of the New York City Board of Education, and active 
in measures for the maintenance and improvement of the schools. 
During the Civil War, as a member of the Seventh Regiment of 
New York, he went twice to the defense of Washington. For 
several years past he had been in ill health and lived a retired 
life, but died quite suddenly of pneumonia at St. Augustine, Fla., 
February 18, 1905, in the 65th year of his age. 

He married, December 2, 1863, Margaret H., daughter of Theo- 
dore and Margaret Crane, who survives him with two daughters. 

In his memory Mrs. Hurlbut has made a generous gift to the 
University to be used as a fund for the Infirmary. A room in 
this building is to be named in memory of Mr. Hurlbut. 

George Rice, son of Martin and Betsey (Gibbs) Rice, was 
born September 28, 1837, at Natick, Mass., and entered the class 
during the second term of Junior year, after about two years of 
study in the Medical Department. At the same time he continued 
his medical studies and received the degree of Doctor of Med- 
icine from the Yale Medical School in 1861. 

He then began practice as a physician at Framingham, Mass., 
but in October, 1864, he enlisted in the United States Army and 
was appointed Hospital Steward and assigned to duty in the 
Surgeon General's oflice. Bureau of Surgical Records, at Wash- 
ington, where he was engaged on the Medical and Surgical 
History of the War of the Rebellion. He was later appointed 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, and received an honorable discharge 
in July, 1869. 

In 1 872 he opened a pharmacy in South Framingham, which 
he conducted till his retirement in August, 1900. He was an 
earnest worker, a frequent contributor to the local press, and for 
some time past had been writing the history'- of the Framingham 
volunteers, in the Civil War, but this he had to give up on account 
of ill health. He was a member of Grace Congregational Church, 



U7 

and active in the Sunday School, of which he was Superintendent 
for some time. 

Mr. Rice died of apoplexy at South Framingham, April 18, 
1905, in the 68th year of his age. 

He married June 14, 1871, Almira Emily, daughter of William 
M. and Ann (Belfield) Appleton, of Bentonsport, Iowa, who 
survives him with one son. 



1861 

Ebenezer Buckingham Convees, son of Charles Cleveland 
Buckingham, Justice of the Supreme Court of Ohio, and Cath- 
arine (Buckingham) Convers, was born in Zanesville, O., Septem- 
ber 14, 1840, His mother was a descendant of Rev. Thomas 
Buckingham, one of the founders of Yale College. 

For three or four years after graduation he was in business in 
New York City, but then studied law, was admitted to the bar 
in May, 1865, and a year later received the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws from Columbia University, delivering the Valedictory 
address. Soon after his return from a visit to Europe he formed 
a law partnership with his classmate Samuel Hinckley Lyman, 
under the name of Convers & Lyman, which continued 
until 1878, when Mr. Lyman was appointed Clerk of the 
United States District Court for the Southern District of 
New York. Mr. Convers then made a specialty of admiralty 
cases, practicing alone, until 1889, when he formed a part- 
nership with Mr. J. Parker Kirlin, under the name of Convers 
& Kirlin, which continued until the death of Mr. Convers. 

Since 1872 he had resided at Englewood, N. J., where he was 
one of the incorporators of the Citizens' National Bank and 
a director since its organization, a member of the Englewood 
Hospital Association and a generous contributor from its begin- 
ning in 1888, also a member of its Board of Governors since 
1893. His public spirit and constant devotion to the welfare of 
others were felt by all, and he held the confidence and esteem of 
the whole community. For about thirty years he was a vestry- 
man of St. Paul's Church in Englewood. He was a member of 
the Executive Committee of the New York Law Institute, and of 
the American Seaman's Friend Society. 

He died of cerebro-spinal meningitis, March 10, 1905, in the 
65th year of his age. 



448 

He married at Columbus, O., October 8, 1868, Jane Gwynne, 
daughter of Honorable John Whiting Andrews (Yale 1830) and 
Lavinia (Gwynne) Andrews, who survives him without children. 

John Dresser Tucker, son of Erastus Tucker, by his second 
wife, Emma Augusta (Dresser) Tucker, was born in Scotland, 
Windham County, Conn., December 19, 1838. He was prepared 
for college at the Hartford High -School, and entered the class 
the second term of Sophomore year. 

After graduation he taught school for a short time in his 
native town and about a year in Ellington, Conn., and in 1863 
began the study of law in the office of Welch & Shipman in 
Hartford. He was admitted to the bar in 1865, and practiced 
his profession for four years, but since then had been in the 
wholesale paper and twine business, at first with a brother and 
since the latter's death, in 1879, continuing with the old firm 
name E. Tucker's Sons. For a number of years he was clerk of 
the school district in which he resided, and for two years a coun- 
cilman. 

Mr. Tucker died of apoplexy at his home in Hartford, Decem- 
ber 3, 1904, in the 66th year of his age. He was a vestryman of 
Christ Church for sixteen years. 

He married, in Hartford, June 3, 1869. Sarah Louise, daughter 
of James and Sarah (Bancroft) Ingraham, of Vergennes, Vt. 
She died March 8, 1872, leaving an infant daughter who died in 
September, 1874, October 8, 1879, Mr. Tucker married Miss 
Katharine Abbott Fox, of Brooklyn, N. Y., daughter of 
Nathaniel Breed and Arathusa (Ingalls) Fox. She survives him 
without children. 

1863 

Joseph Fitch Gaylord, son of Anson and Almeda (Fitch) 
Gaylord, was born at Norfolk, Conn., November 4, 1836. 

After graduation he entered Union Theological Seminary, 
finishing his course in May, 1866. He was ordained as a minister 
of the Gospel November 7, 1867, and preached for two years in 
the Congregational Church at Torringford, Conn. He was then 
for three years pastor at Worthington, Mass., and five years 
pastor of the First Congregational Church in Manistee, Mich., 
resigning from the latter in 1878. The following year he accepted 
a call to the Congregational Church in Barre, Mass., where he 



449 

served the church with acceptance for twenty-one years, and 
enjoyed the high esteem of the whole community. 

In August, 1900, he retired from active pastoral work and 
removed to Worcester, Mass., where he died after an illness of 
several months, April 10, 1905, in the 69th year of his age. 

He married, January 7, 1873, Lorea Standish, daughter of 
John and Mary Ann (Bryant) Adams, of Worthington, Mass., 
who died in 1885. He afterward married Helen Irene, eldest 
daughter of Harding Woods, of Barre, who survives him with a 
son and a daughter, also two sons by the first marriage, one of 
whom graduated from Amherst College in 1896 and from Hart- 
ford Theological Seminary in 1899. 

George Edward Lounsbury, son of Nathan and Delia 
(Scofield) Lounsbury, was born in Poundridge, Westchester 
County, N. Y., May 7, 1838, but during the first year of his life 
his parents removed to the neighboring town of Ridgefield, 
Conn. He entered college with the class of 1862, but after 
finishing the first half of the course was out of college two 
years. He then reentered as a Senior in the class t)f 1863, and 
graduated with a Philosophical Oration. 

After graduation he was an instructor in New Brighton (Pa.) 
Episcopal Academy for a year, began theological study by him- 
self, and then entered the Senior class in Berkeley Divinity 
School, at Middletown, Conn. On completing his studies in 1866 
he was ordained Deacon by Bishop Williams, and for several 
months officiated in the Protestant Episcopal Church, Thompson- 
ville, Conn., but on account of protracted throat trouble declined 
ordination as Priest. In 1886 he was transferred from the 
Diocese of Connecticut to Nebraska, where he continuously pro- 
vided for the salary of a clergyman as his substitute. 

In 1867, with his brother Honorable Phineas C. Lounsbury 
(Governor of Connecticut in 1887-88), he established a manufac- 
tory of shoes in New Haven, Conn., removing it to South Nor- 
walk. Conn., in 1869, the firm from 1884 being Lounsbury, 
Mathewson & Co. He was also President of the First National 
Bank of Ridgefield from its organization to his death. 

In 1894 he was elected State Senator and reelected two years 
later by unprecedented majorities, serving as Chairman of the 
Committee on Finance in 1895, and of that on Humane Institu- 
tions in 1897. In 1898 he was elected Governor of Connecticut, 



450 

filling the office during the years 1900 and 1901. Wesleyan 
University conferred on him the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Laws in 1900. 

Since his retirement from the Governorship he had devoted 
himself to his varied business interests, includinsr the manage- 
ment of his large farm at Farmingville, in Ridgefield, where he 
died August 16, 1904, at age of <5Q years. 

He married, November 29, 1894, Mrs. Frances Josephine 
Whedon, daughter of Joseph J. Potwin, of Amherst, Mass., who 
survives him. 

George Wilson Osborn, son of Walter and Mary Jane 
(Remer) Osborn, was born June 17, 1839, at Guilford, Conn. 

After graduation he spent two years in the study of law, part 
of this time in the Yale Law School, was admitted to the State 
bar, and for a few years devoted himself entirely to the practice 
of his profession in New Haven. In October, 1868, he formed a 
partnership under the firm name of Barnum & Osborn, for the 
transaction of a real estate business, which he continued until 
January, 1884, when he made a voyage to California by way of 
Cape Horn for the benefit of his health. He resided in San 
Francisco in improved health for over eight years, principally 
engaged in the real estate business, after which he returned to 
New Haven and continued the same business. 

Mr. Osborn died of sarcoma at his home in New Haven, July 
31, 1904, at the age of 65 years. 

He married, June 8, 1870, his cousin, Kate Gilbert, daughter 
of Minott Augur and Catharine Sophia (Gilbert) Osborn, and 
had one son, Lt. Allan M. Osborn, who died in 1898 of typhoid 
fever contracted in camp service during the Spanish war. His 
widow survives him. 

1864 

Charles Dennis Ingersoll, son of Hon. Charles Anthony 
IngersoU (M. A. Yale 1827), Judge of the United States District 
Court of Connecticut, and Henrietta (Sidell) Ingersoll, was born 
in New Haven, Conn., January 15, 1843. He was grandson of 
Hon. Jonathan Ingersoll, LL.D. (Yale 1766), Judge of the 
Supreme Court and Lieutenant-Governor of Connecticut, also 
ex officio Fellow of Yale College, and great-grandson of Rev. 
Jonathan Ingersoll (Yale 1736), of Ridgefield, Conn. Two 



451 

brothers graduated from Yale College, respectively in 1865 and 
1868. 

He entered college with the class of 1863 but left at the end 
of the second term of Sophomore year, returning the following 
fall and completing his course with the class of 1864. 

In the autumn after graduation he spent two months in the 
Yale Law School, and then became a member of the Albany 
Law School, receiving the degree of LL.B. from there in Novem- 
ber, 1866. The same month he was admitted to the New York 
bar, and entered the office of Owen, Gray & Owen. Since then 
he had continued the practice of law in the firm of Owen & 
Ingersoll, later with his brother (Yale 1865) as C. D. & T. C. 
Ingersoll,- and then alone. In 18*75, 1883 and 1894 he was 
appointed United States Loan Commissioner for the City and 
County of New York, his term in the last case continuing until 

1904. In 1879 he was appointed Civil Justice of the Seventh 
District Court of. New York City, for an unexpired term. 

He was one of the early members of the University Club of 
New York City, and one of the founders of the Bar Association 
of the City of New York in 1869. He was for several years 
Vice-President of the Young Men's Democratic Club. 

Mr. Ingersoll died at his home in New York City, January 8, 

1905, in the 62d year of his age. 

He married, June 2, 1885, Katharine Corse, daughter of 
Edward Angell and Eliza L. Saunders, and had one son and two 
daughters, who with Mrs. Ingersoll survive him. 

Lewis Frederick Whiti]^, son of Charles Pinckney and Sarah 
Jane (Halliday) Whitin, was born at Whitinsville, Mass., January 
20, 1844. 

On his twenty-first birthday he was appointed Acting Assistant 
Paymaster of the United States Navy, being stationed at Hamp- 
ton roads, and served from January to November. In January, 
1866, he began his life work as a dry-goods commission merchant, 
at first as a member of the firm of Collins, Atwater & Whitin, 
which was succeeded by Collins, Whitin & Co., and later Whitin 
& Collins, first in Franklin street and then at 112 Worth street. 
In June, 1902, he was suddenly attacked by a severe illness, which 
necessitated complete rest from business. For over twenty years 
his home was at West New Brighton, on Staten Island, but more 
recently within a few doors of his classmates Borden and Owen 



452 

of New York City. He was at one time President of the Mer- 
chants Club of New York, and for several years he was Class 
Agent of the Yale Alumni Fund Association. 

Mr. Whitin died of Bright's disease in New York City, Sep- 
tember 29, 1904, at the age of 60 years. He united with the 
Congregational Church in Whitinsville in 1859, and in 1867 
transferred his relationship to the Madison Square Presbyterian 
Church, New York City. 

He married, in New York City, April 16, 1872, Lucy A., daugh- 
ter of Isaiah Morgan of Selma, Ala., and had two daughters 
who with their mother survive, and two sons, both deceased, 
the younger, a member of the Academical class of 1897, dying 
in September, 1894, just before the beginning of his Sophomore 
year. 

1865 

Thomas Jefferson Brown, the son of English parents, Thomas 
Burgess and Hannah (Bains) Brown, was born- in Philadelphia, 
Pa., July 23, 1840. 

After graduation he took the course in Union Theological 
Seminary, and on its completion became pastor of the Logan 
Square Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia, where he was 
ordained June 9, 1868, and ministered three years. He then suc- 
ceeded Samuel Ware Fisher, D.D., LL.D. (Yale 1835), as pastor 
of the Westminster Church in Utica, N. Y., and continued there 
during the remainder of his life, his service extending through 
thirty-three years. During this pastorate fifteen hundred mem- 
bers were added to the church, and two branches grew to be 
strong