(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Devonian year book"

l^ve^exdeh to 
of H}e 

Ptt&arsttg oi Toronto 

Professor John Satterly 
Department of Physics 
Universif/ of Toronto 



HANDBOUND 
AT THE 



UNIVERSITY OF 
TORONTO PRESS 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2007 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/19101912devonian00londuoft 



XX'^f 






The 

London Devonian 
Year "Book 

for the year 

t9t0. 




THE RIGHT HONOURABLE EARL FORTESCUE 

Lord Lieutenant of Devon 

{'President of the London 'Devonian Association) 



I 



THE 

London Devonian 
Year "Book 

for the year 

t910rlVl 



EDITED BY 

% HEARSE CHOPE, B,A. 



"Devon is the county of my chief love." 

Lorna. Doom. 



PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR 

THE LONDON DEVONIAN ASSOCIATION 

BY 

THE MENDIP PRESS. LTD., 

Amberley House, Norfolk Street, Strand, London, 







H 2 & 19S4 I 



i78734 

Page 

Calendar of Devon Saints, etc. _ _ - - 3 

The London Devonian Association — Officers and Com- 
mittee --------15 

Rules -------- 17 

'* Sociamur amore Devoniae " - - - - - 20 

Affiliated Societies ------ 26 

Other Devonian Societies - - - - - 28 

Learned and Scientific Societies in Devon - - - 33 

Libraries in Devon - - - - - - 34 

The Devon Regiment — an Appeal - - - - 35 

The Family of Fortescue - - - - - 36 

The Worthies of Devon - - - - - - 39 

A Devonshire Garland - - - _.- -91 

" Devon, Oh Devon "—a Poem - - - - 108 

The Folk-lore of Devon - - - - - -109 

The Origin of the Devonian Race - - - - 134 

Recent Devonian Literature - - - - - 144 

List of Members and Associates - - - - 147 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



1 


S. 


2 


s. 


3 


M. 


4 


Tu 


5 


W. 


6 


Th 


7 


F. 


8 


S. 


9 


s. 


10 


M. 


11 


Tu 


12 


W. 


13 


Th 


14 


F. 



23 


S. 


24 


M. 


25 


Tu 


26 


W. 


27 


Th 


28 


F. 



JANUARY. 

With laurel crown his brow was bound, 

Green ivy made his vest, 
And crimson holly-berries shone 

In clusters on his breast. 

Capern. 



Transl. St. Rumon, Tavistock. 



London Devonian Association XI v. Wren, Wim- 
bledon. 



Devon County School Dinner, Restaurant Frascati. 
Tivertonian Association Soiree, St. Bride Institute. 

15 S. London Devonian Rugby XV v. St. Thomas's 

Hospital. Away. 
Association XI v. Thurlow Park. Away. 

16 S. 

17 M. 

18 T. 

19 W. 

20 Th. 

21 F. St Agnes, Pilton Chapel. 

Ed. Capern h. 1819, Tiverton. 

22 S. London Devonian Rugby XV v. R.N. College. 

Away. 
Association XI v. Lynton. Wimbledon. 



B. R. Haydon h. 1786, Plymouth {d. June 22, 1846. 

London.) 



Sir Francis Drake d. 1596. 
London Devonian Lecture, " Bird Life of Devon," 
St. Bride Institute. 

29 S. London Devonian Rugby XV v. Streatham. Wim- 

bledon. 
Association XI v. Old Roans. Away. 

30 S. 

31 M. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



1 


Tu. 


2 


W. 


3 


Th. 


4 


F. 


5 


S. 


6 


s. 


7 


M. 


8 


Tu. 


9 


W. 


10 


Th. 


11 


F. 


12 


S. 



13 


S. 


14 


M. 


15 


T. 


16 


W. 


17 


Th. 


18 


F. 


19 


S. 


20 


s. 


21 


M. 


22 


Tu. 


23 


W. 


24 


Th. 


25 


F. 


26 


S. 


27 


s. 


28 


M. 



FEBRUARY. 

And then pale February came, 

A virgin dressed in white ; 
A snow-drop, by the maiden worn. 

Appeared her chief delight. 

Capern. 

St. Bridget, Bridestow and Virginstow. 

St. Blaize, Haccombe. St. Werburgh, Wembury. 
Old Ottregians' Social, St. Clement Dane's Parish Hall. 
Exeter Club Annual Meeting, George Hotel, Strand. 
London Devonian Rugby XV v. Civil Service, 

Away. 
Association XI v. Reigate St. Mary's. Wimbledon. 



London Devonian Association Whist Drive, St. 

Bride Institute. 
London Devonian Rugby XV v. Saracens. Away. 
Association XI v. Wren. Away. 
London Devonian Athletic Club and Exeter Club, 

Supper, George Hotel, Strand. 



Tivertonian Association Concert, St. Bride Institute. 

London Devonian Rugby XV v. R.N. College, Wim- 
bledon. 
Association XI v. Minerva. Away. 



St. Milbui^e, Bigbury Chapel. 

London Devonian Association Dance, Holborn Rest- 
aurant. 
London Devonian Rugby XV v. Leytonstone. Away. 
Association XI v. North Dulwich. Wimbledon. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



1 


Tu. 


2 


W. 


3 


Th. 


4 


F. 


5 


S. 


6 


s. 


7 


M. 


8 


Tu 


9 


W. 


10 


Th 


11 


F. 



MARCH. 

The next was March, a lusty lass, 

With violet-coloured eye ; 
She wore a primrose mantelet. 

With fringe of orange dye. 

Capern. 

St. David, Ashprington, Exeter, and Thelbridge. 
Sir Thos. Bodley h. 1544, Exeter. 
St. Winwaloe, Portlemouth. 

London Devonian Rugby XV v. London Irish. Away. 
Association XI v. St. Mary's Hospital. Away. 



Tivertonian Association Concert, St. Bride Institute. 
St. Constant! ne, Dunsford Chapel. 
London Devonian Association Bohemian Concert, 
Cannon Street Hotel. 
12 S. St. Gregory. 

Exeter Club Whist Drive. 

London Devonian Rugby XV v. St. Thomas's Hos- 
pital. Wimbledon. 
Association XI v. Armorum. Away. 



Devon County School Ladies' Social, St. Bride In- 
stitute. 

St. Patrick, Harford. 

St. Edward, Egg Buckland and Shaugh. 

London Devonian Rugby XV v. Dunstonians. Wim- 
bledon. 

Association XI v. Royal Dental Hospital. Wimbledon. 

London Devonian Athletic Club Supper, George Hotel, 
Strand. 

St. Cuthbert, Widworthy. 

London Devonian Lecture, " The Rivers of the Moor," 
St. Bride Institute. 



13 


S. 


14 


M. 


15 


Tu. 


16 


W. 


17 


Th. 


18 


F. 


19 


S. 



20 


S. 


21 


M. 


22 


Tu. 


23 


W^ 


24 


Th. 


25 


F. 


26 


S. 


27 


s. 


28 


M. 


29 


Tu 


30 


W. 


31 


Th 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



APRIL. 

A tear I saw in April's eye, 

A blue-bell on her breast ; 
And soon a lovely cuckoo came 

And sang her to her rest. 

Capern. 

1 F. 

2 S. London Devonian Association Whist Drive, St. Bride 

Institute. 

3 S. 

4 M. Dr. Ben. Kennicott h. 1718, Totnes. 

5 Tu. 

6 W. 

7 Th. St. Brannock, Braunton. 

8 F. 

9 S. 

10 S. St Hieretha, Chittlehampton. 

Old Ottregians' Meeting, 11 Bridge Street, Westminster. 

11 M. 

12 Tu. 

13 W. 

14 Th. 

15 F. St. Paternus, N. Petherwin. 

16 S. 

17 S. John Ford hap. 1586, Ilsington. 

18 M. 

19 Tu. 

20 W. 

21 Th. 

22 F. 

23 S. St. George. 

24 S. 

25 M. 

26 Tu. 

27 W. 

28 Th. 

29 F. Transl. St. Edmund, Dolton, Exeter, Kingsbridge, and 
Stoke Fleming. 



30 S. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



1 


S. 


2 


M. 


3 


Tu. 


4 


W. 


5 


Th. 


6 


F. 


7 


S. 


8 


s. 


9 


M. 


10 


Tu. 


11 


W. 


12 


Th. 


13 


F. 


14 


S. 


15 


s. 


16 


M. 


17 


Tu. 


18 


W. 


19 


Th. 


20 


F. 


21 


S. 


22 


s. 


23 


M. 


24 


Tu. 


25 


W. 


26 


Th. 


27 


F. 


28 


S. 


29 


s. 


30 


M. 


31 


Tu. 



MAY. 

Then daisy-kirtled May I met, 
With hawthorn on her head ; 

And, with a lover's warmest love, 
I wooed the bonny maid. 

Capern. 



John Wolcot (" Peter Pindar ") hap. 1738, Dodbrooke. 



St. Pancras, Exeter, Pancrasweek, Rose Down, and 
Widdecombe. 



Old Ottregians' Excursion to Home. 
St. Brendan, Brendon. 



Bp. Jewel h. 1522, Berrynarbor. 

St Augustine, Heanton Punchardon. 

Wm. Jackson h. 1730, Exeter. 



1 


W. 


2 


Th. 


3 


F. 


4 


S. 


5 


s. 


6 


M. 


7 


Tu. 


8 


W. 


9 


Th. 


10 


F. 


11 


S. 


12 


s. 


13 


M. 


14 


Tu. 


15 


W. 


16 


Th. 


17 


F. 


18 


S. 


19 


s. 


20 


M. 


21 


Tu. 


22 


W. 


23 


Th. 


24 


F. 


25 


S. 


26 


s. 


27 


M. 


28 


Tu. 


29 


W. 


30 


Th. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 
JUNE. 

" Lo ! here I come with happy days, 

The gayest of the year ; 
See, nature crowneth me with life, 

And joy is ever near." 

Capern. 



St. Petrock, Apostle of Devon and Cornwall, Newton 

St. Petrock, Petrockstow, etc. 
St. BonifacCi Apostle of Germany [h. Crediton). 
Joanna Southcott hap. 1750, Ottery St. Mary. 



Chas. Kingsley h. 1819, Holne. 



Sts. Cyriac and Julitta, Newton St. Cyres. 

St Nectan, Ashcombe, Ashton, Hartland, and Wel- 
combe. 

St. Marina, Mariansleigh. 



St. John Baptist 

John Churchill, D. of Marlborough, h. 1650, Ashe. 



St Peter, Exeter Cathedral, etc. 

John Gay h. 1685, Barnstaple. 

I^London Devonian Dinner to Captain Robert Scott, 
C.V.O., R.N. Chairman, Earl Fortescue. Arrange- 
ments incomplete. 1 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



JULY. 

A dress of white convolvulus, 

Inwove with new-shot com, 
With many a graceful grass and leaf 

By fair July was worn, 

Capern. 

1 F. St Theobald, Canonsleigh Chapel. 

2 S. 

3 S. 

4 M. 

5 Tu. 

6 W. 

7 Th. 

8 F. 

9 S. 

10 S. Old Ottregians* Summer Meeting, Kew Gardens. 

11 M. 

12 Tu. 

13 W. 

14 Th. 

15 F. St. Swithun, Littleham, Py worthy, Sandford, and 

Woodbury. 

16 S. Sir Joshua Reynolds, first P.R.A., h. 1723, Plympton. 

17 S. I 

18 M. 

19 Tu. 

20 W. St Margaret, Northam, Stoodleigh, Templeton, Tops- 

ham. 

21 Th. 

22 F. St Mary Magdalene, Barnstaple Priory, Chulmleigh, 

South Molton, etc. 

23 S. 

24 S. St Christina, Christow. 

25 M. St James. 

Devon County School Speech Day. 

26 Tu. St Anne, Axminster, Exeter, and Kentisbury Chapels. 

Devonshire Association meets at Cullompton. 

27 W. 

28 Th. 

29 F. St Olave, Exeter. 

30 S. 

31 S. St Germanus, Germans Week. 



10 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



AUGUST. 

When, lo ! a merry laugh I heard, 

And brown-faced August came. 
Panting beneath a load of fruit, 

A jolly-hearted dame. 

Capern. 

1 M. 

2 Tu. St. Sidwell, Exeter. 

3 W. 

4 Th. 

5 F. 

6 S. 

7 S. 

8 M. St. Cyriacus, S. Pool. 

9 Tu. 

10 W. St. Uwrence. 

11 Th. 

12 F. St. Clare, Hartland Chapel. 

13 S. 

14 S. 

15 M. 

16 Tu. St. Roch, Exeter Chapel. 

17 W. 

18 Th. St. Helen, Abbotsham. 

19 F. 

20 S. 

21 S. Andrew Brice b. 1692, Exeter 

22 M. 

23 Tu. 

24 W. St. Bartholomew, Coffinswell, E. Ogwell Nymet 

Rowland, and Yealmpton. 

25 Th. 

26 F. 

27 S. 

28 S. 

29 M. 

30 Tu. St Rumon, Tavistock Abbey, Romansleigh. 

31 W. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 11 

SEPTEMBER. 

Next came, with scarlet pimpernel, 

And purple scabious crowned, 
September, like a cottage girl, 

Red-kerchiefed and blue-gowned. 
Capern. 

1 Th. St. Giles, St. Giles in the Heath, Sidmouth, etc. 

2 F. 

3 S. 

4 S. St. Ida, Ide. 

5 M. 

6 Tu. 

7 W. 

8 Th. 

9 F. 

10 S. Last Fight of the " Revenge," 1591. 

11 S. 

12 M. St. Guy, East Buckland. 

13 Tu. 

14 W. 

15 Th. 

16 F. 

17 S. S. Piout h. 1783, Plymouth. 

18 S. 

19 M. 

20 Tu. St. Eustace, Tavistock. 

21 W. 

22 Th. St. Maurice, Plympton. 

23 F. 

24 S. 

25 S. 

26 M. 

27 Tu. 

28 W. 

29 Th. St. Michael. 

30 F. 



12 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



OCTOBER. 

October came with tawny face 
And rainbow-coloured head. 

She was a beauty, richly drest, 
And wore a courtly train. 

Capern. 

1 S. St Melor, Thorncombe. 

2 S. Old Ottregians' Meeting, 11 Bridge Street, Westminster. 

3 M. St. Wenn, Hartland Chapel. 

4 Tu. 

5 W. 

6 Th. 

7 F. 

8 S. 

9 S. 

10 M. 

11 Tu. 

12 W. 

13 Th. 

14 F. 

15 S. 

16 S. 

17 M. 

18 Tu. John^Dunning, Lord Ashburton, h. 1731 

19 W. 

20 Th. 

21 F. S. T. Coleridge b. 1772, Ottery St. Mary 

22 S. 

23 S. 

24 M. 

25 Tu. 

26 W. 

27 Th. 

28 F. 

29 S. Sir Walter Ralegh beheaded, 1618 

30 S. 

31 M. 



St. CalixtuSj'^Colytonyhapel. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 13 



NOVEMBER. 

November was .... 

A damsel tall and spare, 
Who wandering lovelorn in the woods, 

Breathed all her sorrow there. 
Capern. 

1 Tu. All Saints. 

2 W. 

3 Th. St. Winefred, Branscombe and Manaton. 

4 F. 

5 S. 

6 S. St. Leonard. 

7 M. 

8 Tu. 

9 W. 

10 Th. 

11 F. St. Martin. 

12 S. Sir J. Hawkins^. 1595. 

13 S. 

14 M. 

15 Tu. 

16 W. 

17 Th. 

18 F. 

19 S. 

20 S. St. Edmund, Dolton, Exeter, Kingsbridge. and Stoke 

Fleming. 

21 M. 

22 Tu. 

23 W. St. Clement, Kennerleigh and Powderham. 

24 Th. 

25 F. St. Catherine. 

26 S. 

27 S. 

28 M. . 

29 Tu. 

30 W. St. Andrew. 



14 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



DECEMBER. 

December wore a robe of snow, 
A necklace made of stars. 

Capern. 



Dr. John Kitto h. 1804, Plymouth. 

St. Nicholas. Geo. Monck, D. of Albermarle, b. 1608, 

Potheridge. 
Sir Redvers Buller h. 1839, Downes. 
St. BudOC, St. Budeaux. 



Old Ottregians' Annual Gathering, 11 Bridge Street, 
Westminster. 



1 


Th. 


2 


F. 


3 


S. 


4 


s. 


5 


M. 


6 


Tu. 


7 


W. 


8 


Th. 


9 


F. 


10 


S. 


11 


s. 


12 


M. 


13 


Tu. 


14 


W. 


15 


Th. 


16 


F, 


17 


S. 


18 


s. 


19 


M. 


20 


Tu. 


21 


W. 


22 


Th. 


23 


F. 


24 


S. 


25 


s. 


26 


M. 


27 


Tu. 


28 


W. 


29 


Th. 


30 


F. 


31 


S. 



St. Anthony, Hartland Chapel. 



St.^Thomas. 



St Stephen. 
St. John. 

Capt. John Davys killed near Malacca, 1605. 

St Thomas a Becket. 

St Sabinus, Barnstaple Chapel. 

St Sylvester, Chivelstone. 

Wm. Gifford (Ashburton) d. 1826. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 15 

The London Devonian Association, 
Officers and Committee, 

t909-t0. 



President. 

The Right Hon. Earl FORTESCUE, Lord Lieutenant of Devon. 

Vice-Presidents. 

The Right Hon. Lord CLIFFORD OF CHUDLEIGH. 

T. DYKE ACLAND, Esq., M.D.. F.R.C.P. {Columb-John). 

J. B. BURLACE, Esq. (Brixham). 

Colonel E. T. CLIFFORD, V.D. (Exeter). 

W. H. CUMMINGS, Esq., Mus.D., F.S.A., Hon.R.A.M. (Sjdbuyy). 

W. DOHERTY, Esq. (South Molton). 

H. E. DUKE. Esq., K.C. (Plymouth).. 

A. E. DUNN, Esq., M.P. (Exeter). 

H. T. EASTON, Esq. (Exeter). 

Rev. H. R. GAMBLE, M.A., (Barnstaple). 

ALLEN GILL, Esq., F.R.A.M. (Devonport). 

Sir GEORGE W. KEKEWICH, K.C.B., M.P. (Peamore). 

JOHN LANE, Esq. (West Put ford). 

J. LISCOMBE, Esq. (Plymouth). 

Sir HENRY Y.-B. LOPES, Bart. (Maristow). 

J. C. PILLMAN, Esq., J.P. (Plymouth). 

C. PINKHAM, Esq., J.P., C.C. (Plympton). 

Captain ROBERT SCOTT. C.V.O., R.N. (Plymouth). 

SYDNEY SIMMONS, Esq. (Okehampton). 

GRANVILLE SMITH, Esq., Master of the Supreme Court (Dartmouth). 

MICHAEL B. SNELL, Esq., J.P. (Barnstaple). 

HENRY TOZER, Esq. (Exeter). 

LiEUT.-CoL. Sir FREDERICK R. UPCOTT, K.C.V.O., C.S.I. (Cullompton). 

HENRY VIVIAN, Esq., M.P. (Cornwood). 

Rev. A. J. WALDRON (Plymouth). 

Rev. H. S. WOOLLCOMBE. M.A. (Northlew). 

JOHN WREFORD. Esq., M.B. (Exeter). 



16 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

COMMITTEE: 

Chairman : 
Colonel E. T. Clifford, V.D. {Exeter), QCr3J\\QY Gardens, South Kensington, 
S.W. 

Deputy Chairman : 

R. Pearse Chope, B.A. [Hartland], Patent Office, 25 Southampton 
Buildings, W.C. 

F. A. Bailey {Old Exonians), London Institution, Finsbury, E.C. 
R. S. Barnes {Yealmpton), 1 West Street, Finsbury Circus, E.C. 

G. S. BiDGOOD {Tiverton), 1 Royden Mansions, Junction Road, Hollovvay, N. 
A. J. Bromham {Barnstaple), Westward Ho, Wimbledon Common, S.W. 
N. Cole {Salcombe), 46 Melgund Road, Highbury, N. 

T. A. Darke {Lew Trenchard), Stock Exchange, E.C. 
H. GiLLHAM {Burlescombe), 222 Central Market, E.C. 
G. E. Lang {London Devonian Athletic Club), c/o Cook, Son, and Co., St. 

Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 
J. Lovell {Old Ottregians), 161 Eardley Road, Streatham, S.W. 
John Luxton {Coleridge), 184 Essex Road, N. 
W. Passmore {Tivertonian Association), 101 Elspeth Road, Clapham 

Common. S.W. 
C. R. S. Philp {Plymouth), Livesey Library, Old Kent Road, S.E. 
H. D. Powe {Plymouth), 13 Ellerby Street, Fulham, S.W. 
John Ryall {Exeter Club), 1 Camden Avenue, Peckham, S.E. 
W. H. Smart {Plymouth), St. Bride Institute, Ludgate Circus. E.C 
F. J. S. Thomson {Exeter), 31 Angell Road, Brixton, S.W. 
F. J. S. Veysey (Chittlehampton), 15 Trefoil Road, Wandsworth Comiron, 

S.W. 
H. Wreford-Glanvill {Exeter), 35 Strawberry Hill Road, Twickenham. 
F. G. Wright {Tiverton), 10 Old Deer Park "Gardens, Richmond. 

Hon. Auditors : 
J. Arnold Hill. C.A. {Holcombe Rogus), 19a Coleman Street. E.C. 
H. D. Vellacott, C.A. {Tawstock), 141 Fenchurch Street, E.C. 

Hon, Treasurer : 
H. Brinsmead Squire {Torrington) , London, County, and Westminster 
Bank, Ltd., 90 Wood Stieet, E.C. 

Hon. Secretary : 

John W. Shawyer {Devon County School O.B.A.), 5 Hemington Avenue. 
Friern Barnet, N. 

ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE. 

F. J. S. Thomson, Chairman. John W. Shawyer. 
W. Passmore. W. H. Smart. 

C. R. S. Philp. H. Brinsmead Squire. 

John Ryall. F. J. S. Veysey. 

R. S. Barnes, Hon. Secretary. 

YEAR BOOK COMMITTEE. 
R. S. Barnes. john W. Shawyer. 

G. S. Bidgood. W. H. Smart. 

C. R. S. Philp. r. Pearse. Chope, Hon. Secretary 

and Editor. 



u 




COLONEL E. T. CLIFFORD, K.D. 
[C/i airman of Committee, The London 'Devonian ^Association) 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 17 



RUIZES. 

Name. — ^The name of the Society shall be '' The London 
Devonian Association." 

2. Objects. — ^The objects of the Society shall be : — 

(a) To promote friendly intercourse amongst De- 
vonians residing in London and district, by means of 
meetings and social re-unions. 

(b) To foster a knowledge of the History, Folklore, 
Literature, Music, Art, and Antiquities of the County. 

(c) To carry out from time to time approved schemes 
for the benefit of Devonians residing in London and 
district. 

3. Constitution. — The Society shall consist of Life and Ordinary 

Members and Associates. * 

4. Qualification. — ^Any person residing in London or district 

who is connected with the County of Devon by birth, 
descent, marriage, or former residence, shall be eligible 
for membership, but such person shall be nominated by a 
Member and the nomination submitted to the Committee 
who shall at their first Meeting after receipt of the nomina- 
tion by the Hon. Secretary, decide by vote as to the accep- 
tance or otherwise of the nomination. 

5. Subscription. — ^The annual subscription to the Society shall 

be 5/- for gentlemen, and 2/6 for ladies and those under 
21 years of age. Members of other recognized Devonian 
Associations in London shall be admitted as Members on 
the nomination of their representatives on the Committee 
at an annual subscription of 2,6. The subscription for 
Life Membership shall be two guineas for gentlemen and 
one guinea for ladies. Subscriptions will be payable on 
election and each subsequent 30th September. The 
name of any Member whose subscription is in arrear for 
six months may be removed from the list of Members at 
the discretion of the Committee. 

The Committee have the power to elect as Associates persons not qualified for 
membership. 



18 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



6. Officers.— The Officers of the Society shall be a President, 

Hon. Secretary, and Hon. Treasurer, all of whom shall be 
elected at the Annual Meeting. 

7. Management. — ^The management of the Society shall be 

vested in a Committee, consisting of the President, Hon. 
Secretary, Hon. Treasurer, and fifteen other Members, 
and a representative elected by each of the other Devonian 
Associations in London, such representatives to be Members 
of the Society. 

8. Meetings of Committee. — ^The Committee shall meet at least 

once a quarter. Seven to form a quorum. 

9. Chairman of Committee. — ^The Committee at their first 

Meeting after the Annual Meeting shall elect a Chairman 
and a Deputy-Chairman from Members of the Association. 

10. Power of Committee. — ^The Committee shall be empowered 
to decide all matters not dealt with in these rules, subject 
to an appeal to a General Meeting. 

11. Auditors. — ^Two Members, who are not Members of the 
Committee, shall be elected at each Annual Meeting to 
audit the Accounts of the Society. 

12. Annual General Meeting.— The Annual General Meeting 
shall be held in the month of October, when all Officers, 
five Members of the Committee, and Auditors shall retire, 
but be ehgible for re-election. The business of the Annual 
General Meeting shall be the election of Officers, five 
Committee men, and two Auditors ; presentation of 
Annual Report and Balance Sheet for the year ending 
30th September ; and any other business, due notice of 
which has been given to the Hon. Secretary, according to 
the Rules. 

13. Special General Meeting.— A Special General Meeting shall 

be summoned by the Hon. Secretary within fourteen 
days by a resolution of the Committee, or within twenty- 
one days of the receipt of a requisition signed by 30 Mem- 
bers of the Society, such requisition to state definitely the 
business to be considered. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 19 

14. Notice of Meeting. — Seven days' notice shall be given of all 
General Meetings of the Society, the date of postmark to 
be taken as the date of circular. 

15. Alteration of Rules. — No alteration or addition to these 
Rules shall be made except at the Annual Meeting (when 
due notice of such alteration or addition must have been 
sent to the Hon. Secretary on or before 23rd September) 
or at a Special General Meeting. A copy of the proposed 
alteration or addition shall be sent to Members with notice 
of Meeting. 



The Association is affiliated to St. Bride Foundation Institute, 
Bride Lane, Ludgate Circus, E.C., and Members are entitled to 
free use of the Lending and Reference Libraries, *Reading and 
Recreation Rooms, and admission on easy terms to the Gym- 
nasium, Swimming Baths, Technical Classes, etc. 

Oak shields, with the arms of the Association painted in proper 
colours may be obtained from F. C. Southwood, 96 Regent St. W. 
Price, with motto, 6s., without motto, 4s. 6d. 

Badges, with the arms in enamel and gilt, price 4s. 3d., or 
brooches, price 3s. 3d., may be obtained from W. J. Carroll, 
33 Walbrook; E.C. Gold brooches, price 25s. 

* In this room Devonshire papers are placed daily. 



20 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



" Sociamur amore Devoniae." 

Devonians have always been noted for their intense love of 
their own county, a feehng which was so strong with Charles 
Kingsley, that he confessed — " The thought of the West Country 
will make me burst into tears at any moment ; wherever I am, 
it always hangs before my imagination as * home,' and I feel 
myself a stranger and a sojourner in a foreign land the moment I 
go east of Taunton Dean." " It is," he says, " a righteous and 
God-given feeling, the root of all true patriotism, valour, civiliza- 
tion." And, if it affected, to such a degree, one who was only a 
Devonian by accident of birth, what must it be to those whose 
ancestors for many generations have been Devonians, who are 
perhaps descended from the original Dumnonii, the earliest 
dwellers in our western peninsula ? 

These same Dumnonii have been described as " a brave and 
warlike race, haughty of heart, prodigal of life, constant in affec- 
tion, courteous to strangers, and greedy of glory and honour. 
That they were a civil and courteous people in those barbarous 
times we have had the testimony of Diodorus Siculus, and the 
same Diodorus represents them as patient in hunger and fatigue, 
temperate in their diet, living on barks and roots, but nourished 
chiefly by a certain confection, which they had the art of prepar- 
ing, and of which no more than about the quantity of a bean 
would free them from hunger and thirst for a considerable time. 
And being inured to labour and toil, and accustomed to brave all 
weathers, were a stout and puissant people, deriving courage as 
it were, from the soil itself ; and imbolden'd by the roughness of 
the country, inlets of the sea, and their own magnanimity, main- 
tained their ground against all invaders, so that they were not 
wholly subdued by the Saxons 'till at least 465 years after their 
first landing in Britain." 

As they were 1900 years ago, so they remain to-day, though 
in the meantime, they have received large admixtures of Saxon 
blood, and perhaps some from Danish, Norman, and other foreign 
sources. The result of this mixture has been that throughout 
these long ages, Devon can point to a record, of which any county 
might be justly proud. Its early history is focussed on its chief 
town. "Exeter," says Professor Freeman, "may well stand 
first on our roll call of Enghsh cities. Others can boast of a fuller 
share of modern greatness ; no other can trace up a life so un- 
broken to so remote a past." In British times it was a hill fort of 
the Britons, and later a Roman settlement. It was the scene of 
many a fierce siege by the Enghsh, Danes, and Cornish Britons. 



%o 



I 




JOHN IV. SHAll/YER 
{Hon. Secretary, The Loudon Devonian Association) 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 21 



In the tenth century the original inhabitants were driven into 
Cornwall and Wales by Athelstan, who founded an Abbey here in 
932, and after the Saxon Conquest Exeter became the capital of 
the West Country. In the time of Harold it was stubbornly held 
by his mother, Gytha, and in 1068 it was stormed by WilUam the 
Conqueror, who built a castle and imposed tribute to hold the city 
in subjection. In the civil war of the twelfth century it was held 
for Maud by the Earl of Devon, and was besieged for two months 
by the troops of Stephen. Royalist during the Puritan struggle, 
it was for a time the head-quarters of Charles's forces in the West. 
The aid of Devon, too, was sought by William of Orange, when he 
landed at Torbay to lead the revolution that was destined to alter 
the political and religious outlook of the Kingdom. 

It was, however, in the great and glorious reign of Elizabeth 
that Devon rose to the zenith of her fame and power. With 
pride she can scan the records of those stirring times, and claim to 
be the mother of the maritime prowess of England. Her ports 
were the busiest in the land, her sons were sailing the high seas, 
exploring the ends of the earth, and laying the foundations of the 
greatest Empire the world has ever known. Then came the great 
Armada, and with it the opportunity of -those old sea dogs of 
Devon, who, in their dauntless leadership of the gallant little 
English fleet, broke the back of Spain, and inscribed their names 
indelibly on the roll of fame. 

Nor need we tarry here. Her triumphs in the arts of peace are 
worthy her annals in war. Turn to the list of " Worthies of 
Devon " in this issue. " It includes such an illustrious troop of 
heroes as no other county in the kingdom, no other kingdom (in 
so small a tract) in Europe, in all respects is able to match, much 
less excel." And not only " heroes " — men like Ralegh. Drake, 
Hawkins, Grenville, and Gilbert — but artists like Turner, Rey- 
nolds, Haydon, Eastlake, Prout, Cosway, Hilliard, and Gandy — 
poets like Coleridge, Keats, Gay, and Wolcot (" Peter Pindar ")-^ 
authors like Hooker, Gifford, Froude, Kingsley, Blackmore, 
Milman, and Merivale — lawyers like Fortescue, Littleton, May- 
nard, Dunning, and Doddridge — scientists like Xewcomen. Bab- 
bage, Buckland, and Bentham — ecclesiastics like Boniface, 
Baldwin, Courtenay, and Jewel. 

To ev'ry land the wide world o'er, 

Some slips of the old stock roam, 
Leal friends in peace, dread foes in war, 

With hearts still true to home. 

Co-heirs in so proud a heritage, what wonder is it that, wherever 
Devonians are gathered together — London, Bristol, Birmingham, 



22 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Liverpool, Swansea, Cardiff, Newport, Eastbourne, Southampton, 
Isle of Wight, Redhill, Weston-super-Mare, Worcester, and 
Gloucester, at home, and in fields afar, Calcutta, Bombay. 
Hong Kong, Melbourne, Toronto, Vancouver, Cape Town, 
Pretoria, Johannesburg, Pietermaritzburg, Winnipeg, and 
Paris — some sort of organisation has been formed for nurturing 
the bond of fellowship. The first germ of the London Devonian 
Association may be traced to the usual form of a dinner, when, 
nearly 150 years ago, " the gentlemen of the Devonshire, at the 
Star and Garter, Pall Mall, desired the company of such gentle- 
men of the county as happen to be in town to attend with them 
on Friday, February 14th, 1766, it being the anniversary of their 
institution. Dinner on the table at 4 o'clock." Some twenty 
years ago, this festival was revived in the form of a public dinner 
of Devonians in London, which has been kept up annually ever 
since, and several towns and schools of the county have formed 
separate associations to support their own interests. But these 
appealed only to a limited number, and last year a general desire 
manifested itself for a society on the lines of a regular county 
association. A preliminary meeting was held at the City of Lon- 
don School on the 6th May, 1908, under the Chairmanship of Sir 
Francis Carruthers Gould, and at a second meeting on the follow- 
ing 30th September, it was decided to form the London Devonian 
Association. LTnder the motto, " Sociamur amore Devoniae " — 
We are bonded together by love of Devon — and the armorial 
device of the City of London impahng Redvers, the first Earl 
of Devon, the Association exists for mutual sympathy, entertain- 
ment, instruction, and assistance. The desirability of some 
cohesion between the existing organisations is obvious, and to 
this end each of them has been invited to elect a representative 
for the Committees. Among the earliest to respond were Devon 
County School Old Boys' Association, Exeter Club, London 
Devonian Athletic Club, Old Exonians, Old Ottregians' Society, 
and the Tivertonian Association. Soon it is hoped others will 
become affihated, and as the merits of the Association and the 
benefits accruing from membership develop and become more 
widely known, its meetings and social re-unions, its facilities for 
the acquisition of some knowledge of local history and art, and its 
beneficence may be worthy of the great county to which it owes 
allegiance. 

The first Committee were :— Messrs. H. B. Matthews (Chair- 
man), R. Pearse Chope, B.A. (Deputy Chairman), R. S. Barnes, 
A. J. Bromham, N. Cole, T. S., Kelly, John Luxton, C. R. S. 
Philp, J. W. Shawyer, A. Smart, W. H. Smart, J. P. Squire, F. 
J. S. Thomson, F. J. S. Veysey, F. G. Wright, H. B'. Squire (Hon. 



i 




By permission of "Black and IVhi'te.' Photo: Dover Street Studios. 

The London Devonian Association Committee, 1908-9- 

Reading from left to right — Front row : Messrs. A.J. Bromham, John W. 
Shawyer (Hon. Secretary), H. B. Matthews (Chairman), H. Brinsmead 
Squire (Hon. Treasurer), and R. Pearse Chope (Deputy Chairman). Second 
row : Messrs. C. R. S. Philp, Geo. Jeffery, T. S. Kelly, H. Wreford - Glanvill, 
R. S. Barnes, and F. A. Bailey, Back row : Messrs. John Luxton, F, J. 
S. Veysey, W. H. Smart, J. P. Squire, A. Smart, A. E. Bond, F. J. S. Thom- 
son, W. Passmore, N. Cole, and John Ryall. 



t 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 23 



Treasurer), H. Wreford-Glanvill (Hon. Secretary). Mr. W. A. 
Wannell was subsequently appointed Musical Director. 

The following gentlemen also served on the Committee during 
part of the year : — Messrs. F. A. Bailey, A. E. Bond, H. Gillham, 
George Jeffery, G, E. Lang, W. Passmore, H. D. Powe, John 
RyaU. 

Mr. T. S. Kelly, the well-known Rugby International forward, 
having received an appointment at Exeter, was compelled to 
retire. Our loss is the County's gain, for Mr. Kelly has since 
been elected Captain of the Devon Fifteen. 

Mr. Alfred Edward Bond was seized with an illness at a Com- 
mittee Meeting on 27th April, and died on 29th. He was born at 
Woodleigh, near Kingsbridge, in 1854, and, after spending some 
years at Paignton, migrated to London. He held an important 
position with the firm of Messrs. John Barker & Co., Ltd., where 
his services were highly valued, and he was esteemed and re- 
spected by all who knew him. A typical Devonian, he was a 
member of the Committee almost from its inception. His ripe 
experience, his enthusiasm, and his practical energy created a 
vacancy difficult to fill. He was a Director of the Provident 
Association of Warehousemen, Travellers, and Clerks, and a 
member of the Managing Committee of the Linen and Woollen 
Drapers' Association and Cottage Homes. He resided at Harles- 
den, and took a keen interest in local affairs. He was the district 
representative on the Middlesex Conservative Association, was 
for some years Chairman of the Harlesden Conservative Associa- 
tion, and a member of the Committee of the Harlesden Rate- 
payers' Association. He was also People's Warden of All Souls 
Church until a few months before his death, and associated 
himself with many branches of the Church's work. To quote 
from the Willesden Chronicle : — " Both he and Mrs. Bond were 
generous supporters of all good work in the parish, and amongst 
the many objects that claimed their sympathy was the National 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, the finances of 
which they assisted considerably in a number of ways. Mr. 
Bond will be greatly missed in a district which has benefited by 
his public spirit, and his genial and kindly nature will long be 
remembered by a very large circle of friends and acquaintances 
who will deplore his untimely death." 

Mr. George Jeffery, the representative member of the Old 
*Ottregians' Society, died on 14th September. A native of 
Woodford, near Ottery St. Mary, he left his native county over 
40 years ago, and, after spending several years of his life in 
Canada and the United States, settled at Highbury, where he 
carried on a verv successful business as a tea merchant. He 



24 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

became Chairman of the Old Ottregians' Society in 1907, and 
was closely identified ^^dth the well-known annual excursion to 
the Coleridge country. 

The programme for the first year was not an ambitious one, 
but it included a Bohemian Concert at St. Bride Institute on 
the 21st November, when Mr. H. B. Matthews presided over 
an audience of some 700. This was followed b}^ the x\nnual 
General Meeting on 7th December, also at the Institute, the 
Chairman of Committee again presiding. The Hon. Treasurer 
presented a financial statement, the rules of the Association 
were discussed and adopted, and Messrs. J. Arnold Hill, C.A., 
and H. J. Vellacott, C.A., were elected Hon. Auditors. 

On 23rd January, Mr. W. H. Maunder kindly gave a lecture 
entitled " A Tour through Devon," illustrated with limelight 
slides, in the Memorial Hall, Farringdon Street, E.C. Colonel 
E. T. Clifford, V.D., presided over an audience of about 600. 
The lecture — a highly interesting one — ^was interspersed by 
dialect readings, folk-lore stories, and vocal music. 

On 12th February the first Cinderella Dance ^^•as held at St. 
Bride Institute. The programme was capablv arranged by 
Mr. A. E. Bond, M.C., and Mr. W. H. Smart, Hon. Secretary of 
the Entertainment Committee, and there was an attendance of 
about 70 members and friends. » 

On 27th February a smoking concert — the only function 
during the year where ladies were excluded — took place at the 
Central Restaurant, New Bridge Street, E.C, under the presi- 
dency of the Rev. A. J. Waldron, Vicar of St. ^Matthews, Brixton, 
when about 150 members and friends thoroughly enjoyed them- 
selves, notwithstanding the inclemencj^ of the night. 

On 19th March a Whist Drive was held at St. Bride Institute, 
in which about 200 members and friends partook. 

On 17th April Mr. Chas. Pinkham, J. P., C.C, presided over a 
gathering of about 550 at a Bohemian Concert in the Great Hall, 
Cannon Street Hotel, E.C. An excellent progi'amme was arranged 
by the Hon. Musical Director, Mr. W. A. Wannell. 

On 3rd July, in response to a generally expressed desire, a 
Garden Party was held at Wimbledon in the ample grounds of 
the London Devonian Athletic Club, generously placed at the 
disposal of the Committee by the Club. Socially the function 
proved a success, but, owing mainly to the unpropitious weather* 
preceding the date and perhaps a little to the venue not being 
sufficiently central, it resulted in considerable financial loss. 
The prizes gained in the athletic contests, arranged by Mr. F. J. 
S. Thomson, Hon. General Secretary of the Athletic Club, and 



I 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 25 

his colleagues, were presented by Sir George Kekewich, K.C.B., 
M.P. The special Sub-Committee responsible for the arrange- 
ments were A. E. Bond (Chairman), T. S. Kelly, H. B. Matthews, 
C. R. S. Philp, J. W. Shawyer, W. H. Smart, H. B. Squire, J. 
P. Squire, F. J. S. Thomson, F. J. S. Veysey, and H. Wreford- 
Glanvill, with R. Stewart Barnes as Hon. Secretary. After 
Mr. Bond's decease Mr. N. Cole joined this Committee, and was 
appointed Chairman. 

Considering it was the first year of the Association's existence, 
it may be justly claimed that the gatherings were thoroughly 
appreciated by the members, successful, and enjoyable. It is 
the aim of the Committee, however, to make each of them, 
except those which are free, self-supporting. Some of the 
members have rendered yeoman service to the Committee not 
onty by inducing fellow Devonians to become members, but by 
enlisting the support and co-operation of their friends in various 
other directions, and it is hoped that their example will be followed 
by all who have the welfare of the Association at heart. The 
benefits of membership of the Association, with its several and 
varied functions and the opportunities afforded for making 
acquaintances which may ripen into valued and valuable friend- 
ships, only require to be widely known among the 80,000 De- 
vonians exiled in London, to make the Association the biggest 
and most successful of its kind. 




26 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Affiliated Societies* 

(For 1910 Fixtures, see Calendar). 

DEVON COUNTY SCHOOL OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION. 

(London Branch). 
Founded 1899. 
President : Comer Clarke, Esq., J. P. 

Chairman : Prof. T. A. Hearson, M.Inst.C.E., M.I.N.A., F.C.I.P.A. 
Hon. Secretary : F. J. S. Veysey, 15 Trefoil Road, Wandsworth Common, 

S.W. 
Objects : To keep Old Boys in touch with the school and with each other, 
to promote gatherings among Old Boys for pleasure and sport, and to 
further the interests of the School generally. 
Qualification : Education at the Devon County School. 
Subscription : 3s. 6d, per annum — life membership, one guinea. 
Meetings : Annual Dinner in London, and other social gatiierings during 
the winter months. 
The School magazine (free to members) is issued each term, containing 
news of Old Boys all over the world. 



THE EXETER CLUB. 
(London Branch). 
Founded 1880. 
President : J. Leat, Esq., B.A. 
Vice-President : D. Soames, Esq. 
Hon. Treasurer : N. Cole. 
Assistant Secretary : H. P. Kelly, 

Hon. Secretary : H. D. Powe. 13 Ellerby Street, Fulham, S.W. 
Objects : To promote friendly and social intercourse, to maintain the 
status of the Exeter Training College for schoolmasters, and to give 
opportunities for inter-communication for mutual assistance. 
Qualification : Training at Exeter Training College. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : Monthly, in addition to annual dinner and concert. 

In connection with this club is the old Exonians' Cricket Club, 
with the same Hon. Secretary. 



THE LONDON DEVONIAN ATHLETIC CLUB. 

President : The Right Hon. Earl Fortescue. 
Chairman : F. W. Chamberlain. 
Deputy Chairman : H. M. Mallett. 
Rugby Hon. Secretary : J. P. Squire. 
Association Hon. Secretary : H. P. Kelly. 
Cricket Hon. Secretary : A. O. Clarke. 
Tennis Hon. Secretary : A. Champion. 
Recreation Secretary : C. W. King. 
Minuting Secretary : C. Heath. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 27 



Hon. Treasurer : F. J. S. Veysey. 

General Hon. Secretary : F. J. S. Thomson, 31 Angell Road, Brixton, S.W. 

Objects : Sports and recreation. 

Qualification : Birth in Devon or of Devonian parentage on either side, or 

residence in Devon. 
Subscription : Football, 12s. 6d. Cricket, 15s. Tennis — gentlemen, 15s., 

ladies, 10s. For three sections, 30s., two, 20s. 
Meetings : General meetings in April and September, cricket and football 

matches every Saturday, and suppers occasionally. 
Head Quarters : The George Hotel, Strand, W.C. 

Ground : The London Devonian Athletic, Kingston Road, Wimbledon, S.W. 
Colours : Green and White. 



THE OLD EXONIAN CLUB. 

(London Section). 

Founded 1904. 

President : Mr. Justice Bucknill. 

Vice-President : J. H. Fisher, Esq., F.R.C.S. 

Hon. Secretary : G. C. Daw, 189 Sumatra Road, Hampstead, N.W, 

Objects : To renew acquaintance between Old Exonians living in London, 

and to arrange dinners and other entertainments. 
Qualification : Education at the Exeter School. 
Subscription : 3s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : Annual Dinner in London, and other gatherings from time to 

time. 
The School magazine (free to members) is issued each term. 



THE OLD OTTREGIANS' SOCIETY. 
( " Ottregians in London " ). 
Founded 1898. 
President : The Right Hon. Lord Coleridge. 
Vice-President : The Right Hon. Sir John H. Kennawav, Bart., C.B., 

M.P. 
Chairman : John Lovell. 
Vice-Chairman : F. H. Lovering. 
Assistant Secretary : W. H. Lang. 
Hon. Secretary and Treasurer : Sidney H, Godfrey, " Homeville," Merton 

Avenue, Chiswick, W. 
Objects : To renew old acquaintance, to strengthen the bond of friendship, 

to give advice and assistance to friendless Ottregians, to discuss home 

topics, and to publish home news. 
Qualification : Natives of the postal district of Ottery St. Mary, and persons 

who have lived for any length of time in the town. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings once in eight weeks at the Ottregian Room, 11 Bridge Street, 

Westminster, and once a year at Kew Gardens, an annual concert at 

St. Clement Danes' Parish Hall, and a special train on Whit-Mondays 

to Ottery St. Mary. 
A quarterly journal (free to members), containing news of Ottery people 
-all over the world. 



28 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

THE TIVERTONIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Founded 1909. 

President : Hon. Lionel Walrond, M.P. 

Vice-Presidents : Sir George Kekewick, K.C.B., M.P., Ian M. Amory, 

Esq., J. P., Rev. S. J. Childs-Clarke, M.A., G. E, Cockram, Esq., 

J. A. Eccles, Esq., H. Mudford. Esq., (Mayor of Tiverton) , R. Morgan, 

Esq., Rev. O. R. M. Roxby, E. J. Snell, Esq. 
Chairman : F. G. Wright. 
Hon. Treasurer : J. L. Wright. 
Hon. Secretary : W. Passmore, 101 Elspeth Road, Clapham Common, 

S.W 
Objects : To promote friendly intercourse amongst Tivertonians, to assist 

those in need, and to advise and influence young men starting on a 
. commercial or professional career. 
Qualification : Persons connected with the Tiverton Parliamentary Division 

by birth, descent, marriage, or former residence. 
Subscription : Ordinary members (ladies or gentlemen), 2s. per annum. 

Honorary members — gentlemen, 10s., ladies, 5s. 
Meetings : Concerts, whist drives, dances, and annual dinner during the 

winter months. 



Other Devonian Societies* 



BIRMINGHAM AND MIDLAND DEVONIAN SOCIETY. 
Founded 1891. 

President : Frank Huxham, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : The Right Hon. Jesse Collings, M.P., J. Winsor 
Bond, Esq., G. Bowden, Esq,. J. Barham Carslake, Esq., B.A., 
A. J. Collings, Esq., H. Eales, Esq., M.R.C.S., Dr. Heath, M. Hooper, 
Esq., T. W. Hussey, Esq., W. D. Hutchings, Esq., Lieut.- 
CoLONEL Halse, J.P., H. I. Ley, Esq., M.R.C.S., P. H. Levi, Esq., 
R. Mogford, Esq., R. A. Pinsent, Esq., J. D. Prior, Esq., 
A. G. Spear, Esq.. W. Voysey, Esq., J. F. Culley, Esq. 

Auditor : Thaddeus Ryder, F.C.A. 

Hon. Treasurer : C. Parkhouse. 

Secretaries, Entertainment Committee : A. F. Cerrito, F. E. Rowe. 

Hon. Secretary : T. W. Hussey, 30 Earlsbury Gardens, Birchtield, Bir- 
mingham. 

Objects : To maintain interest in the County, and to promote social inter- 
course among Devonians in Birmingham. 

Qualification : Natives of Devon, or connected with the County bv marriage. 

Subscription : Gentlemen, 5s., ladies, 2s. 6d. 

Meetings : Social gatherings during the winter months, annual meeting and 
dmner in January. 



TJie London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



29 



SOCIETY OF DEVONIANS IN BRISTOL. 
Founded 1891. 

President : J. S. Skewes. Esq. 

Vice-President : J. Friendship, Esq. 

Hon. Treasurer : A. Dodge. 

Hon. Secretary : F. E. R. Davey, 13 Cranbrook Road, Redland, Bristol. 

Objects : To promote friendly intercourse amongst Devonians in Bristol 
by social gatherings, and to assist benevolent or charitable objects, 
with a special regard to those in which Devonians are interested. 

Qualification : Natives and others connected with Devon. 

Subscription : 5s. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner, and concerts, etc., from time to time. 

The Society possesses a Presidential Badge, each past President con- 
tributing a link for a chain. 

DEVONIAN SOCIETY IN CALCUTTA. 

Founded 1901. 
President : Lieut. -Colonel Sir Frederick Upcott, K.C.V.O., C.S.I. 
Vice-President : W. H. Norman, Esq. 
Hon. Treasurer and Secretary : R. W. Chubb, Commercial Buildings, 

Calcutta. 
Objects : To promote a common County bond of friendship, and to render 

aid to Devonians in India. 
Qualifications : Birth or long residence. 
Subscription : £\ per annum. 
Meetings : Monthly. 

THE WEST COUNTRYMEN/S ASSOCIATION, CAPE TOWN. 
Secretary : J. D. Thomas, P.O. Box 1169, Cape Town. 

CARDIFF DEVONSHIRE SOCIETY. 

Founded 1906. 
President : Wm. Anning, Esq., J. P. 
Vice-President: Jas. Radlev, Esq., W. J. Tatem, Esq., Sir Robert 

Newman, Bart., Sir Harry T. Eve, George Lambert, Esq., M.P., 

General Kekewich, Hon. Stephen Coleridge. 
Chairman : Sir Wm. Crossman. 
Hon. Treasurer : A. Akenhead. 
Hon. Secretary : W. A. Be?:r, Charles St., Cardiff. 
Objects : To bring Devonians in Cardiff more closely together, to foster the 

traditions of the County, and to raise a fund to afford temporary relief 

to necessitous and deserving Devonians. 
Qualification : Birth or descent. 
Subscription : 5s. per annum. 
Meetings : Annual dinner. 



WEST COUNTRY ASSOCIATION, EASTBOURNE. 



Founded 1905. 

President : C. Davies-Gilbert, Esq., D.L. 

Vice-President : J. Adams, Esq.> M.D., W. Davies, 
J. P., Rev. E. G. Hawkins, H. Habgood, Esq., 
C. W. Mays. Esq., Leslie C. Wintle, Esq., W. 
M.D. 

Chairman : Leslie C. Wintle. 



Esq., S. N. Fox, Esq., 
M.D., Major Harris, 
G. Willoughby, Esq., 



30 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Vice-Chairman : W. G. Willoughby, M.D. 

Hon. Treasurer : C. O. Godfrey. 

Hon. Secretary : W. Percy Glanfield, Albemarle Hotel, Eastbourne. 

Objects : The promotion of friendl}' intercourse and good fellowship by 

holding meetings, social gatheiings, etc. 
{Qualification : Birth or parentage. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Concerts, games, tournaments, dinner, etc. 
Head Quarters : Albemarle Hotel, Eastbourne. 

THE DEVON AND CORNWALL SOCIETY. 

(Gloucester and District). 
Founded 1901. 
President and Chairman : James Hill, Esq. 
Vice-Presidents : James Pitts, Esq., Capt. B. J. Cox, Rev. J. Richards, 

A. C. Rule, Esq. 
Vice-Chairman : R. F. Pomeroy. 
Hon. Treasurer : J. Hill. 

Hon. Secretary : W. H. Bird, Elan House, Gladstone Road. Gloucester. 
Objects : To promote friendly intercourse by means of meetings and social 

reunions. Surplus funds devoted to benevolent or charitable objects. 
•Qualification : Birth, parentage, or marriage. 
Subscription : 3s. per annum. 
Meetings : Dinner, smoking concert, and dance once a year. 

DEVONIAN SOCIETY IN JOHANNESBURG. 

Hon. Secretary : R. Stokes, P.O. Box 1957, Johannesburg. 

DEVONIANS IN LIVERPOOL AND DISTRICT. 

Founded 1895. 
President : Judge J. F. Collier, J. P. 
Vice-Presidents : Professor H. A. Strong, M.A., LL.D., H. Cuming, 

Esq., H. Smith, Esq., G. R. Searle, Esq., A. Saunders, Esq., J. R. 

Watkins, Esq. 
Hon. Treasurer : J. Furze. 
Hon. Secretaries : Mr. and Mrs. W. Bullen, 13 York Avenue, Sefton 

Park, Liverpool. 
•Objects : Social intercourse. 

Qualifications : Birth, parentage on either side, re.sidence. or man iage. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : Annual dinner and picnic, social gatherings, whist drives, dances, 

children's parties, etc. 

DEVONIANS IN MANITOBA. 

President : J. Burridge, Esq. 

Chairman : J. Hooper. 

Hon. Secretary : H. J. Wheeler, Winnipeg. 

NEWPORT DEVON AND CORNWALL SOCIETY. 

Founded 1889. 
President and Chairman : W. E. Heard, Esq., J. P. 
Hon. Treasurer : A. C. Mitchell. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 31 

Financial Hon. Secretary : C. H. Adams. 

Assistant Secretary : J. Cowling. 

Hon. Secretary : Claude Martyn, 69 Dock Street, Newport, Mon. 

Objects : The promotion of good fellowship between West Countrymen, 

and the advancement and protection of their interests generally. 

Benevolent Fund. 
Qualification : Natives of Devon or Cornwall, and their sons. 
Subscription : Optional. 
Meetings : Annual Dinner in winter, and picnics in spring and autumn. 

REIGATE AND REDHILL AND DISTRICT DEVON AND 

CORNWALL ASSOCIATION. 

Founded 1907. 

President and Chairman : J. Trevarthen, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents: Geo. Gilbert, Esq., J. P., F. G. Pyne, Esq., Henry 

LiBBY, Esq., J. Saunders, Esq. 
Vice-Chairman : G. Gilbert. 
Hon. Treasurer : A. E. Cann. 

Hon. Secretary: Henry Libby, 1 18 Station Road, Redhill, 
I Objects : Social intercourse, and the advertisement of Devon and Cornwall. 
Qualification : Natives of Devon or Cornwall. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : July and December. 

THE ASSOCIATION OF WEST COUNTRYMEN IN HAMPSHIRE. 

President : Dr. C. P. Weekes. 

Hon. Treasurer : J. Ellen. 

Assistant Hon. Secretary : H. T. Venton. 

Hon. Secretary : A. Broomfield, 78 Atherley Road, Southampton. 

Objects : To promote social intercourse and to foster and encourage national 

sentiment, love of country, and everything pertaining to the honour and 

welfare of the three western counties. 
Qualification : Connected with Devon, Cornwall, or Somerset by birth, 

marriage, or adoption. 
Subscriptions : Is. per annum. 
Meetings : Annual dinner, and periodical social gatherings, 

SWANSEA DEVONIAN SOCIETY. 
Founded 1894. 

President : Chas. Newcombe, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : A. Bond, Esq., J. C. Kerswell, Esq. 

Chairman : W. Taylor. 

Hon. Auditor : Geo. Harvey. 

Hon. Treasurer : Swansea Savings Bank, 

Assistant Secretary : C. Easterbrook. 

Hon. Secretary : S. T. Drew, Public Library, Swansea. 

Objects : To promote fraternal feelings, social intercourse and entertain- 
ment, to purchase books on the history of Devon, and to render 
assistance in case of need. 

Qualification : Birth or descent. 

Subscription : Is. per annum. 

Meeting : Social gatherings, annual dinner, and an excursion in the summer. 



32 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



DEVONIAN SOCIETY OF TORONTO. 
Founded 1907, 

President : The Rt. Hon. Lord Northcote, of Exeter, P.C, G.C.M.G., 
C.I.E., C.B. 

Vice-Presidents : Sir William White, Hon. Lionel Walrond, M.P., 
G. Lambert, Esq., M.P., Major Gratwicke, A. E. Spender, Esq., 
R. A. J. Walling, Esq., H. E. Duke. Esq., K.C,, G. W. Beard- 
more,' Esq., Dr. Norman Allen. 

Chairman : W. C. Borlase, 

Vice-Chairman : C. Loveys. 

Hon. Treasurer : E. E. Graham. 

Assistant Secretary : W. A. McDonald. 

Hon. Secretary : C. W. Gigg, 35 Grange Avenue, Toronto. 

Objects : To renew old acquaintances and to form new ones with those who 
hold a common interest, to foster a knowledge of the traditions, litera- 
ture, folklore, etc., of Devonshire, and to promote the spirit of fraternity 
among Devonians in Canada. 

Qualification : Birth or descent. 

Subscription : One dollar per annum. 

Meetings : The third Wednesday in each month from May to October, and 
the first and third Wednesday from November to April — the first 
Wednesdays to be Social Evenings, No intoxicants allowed. 



DEVON AND CORNWALL CLUB, VANCOUVER. 

President : A. J. Ford, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : G. J. Dyke, Esq., J. L. Pratt, Esq., and J. W. Dawe, Esq. 

Auditors : J. W. Dawe, G. Mo watt. 

Treasurer : W. H. Carnsew. 

Assistant Secretary : E. Pearce. 

Secretary : H. Pearce. 

Head Quarters : 445 Richards Street, Vancouver, B.C. 



DEVONIANS IN WESTON-SUPER-MARE. 

President : Dr. Vickery. 

Hon. Treasurer : S. Pady. 

Hon. Secretary : T. J. Kerslake, Alexandra Parade, Weston-super-Mare. 

Object : Social intercourse. 

Subscriptions : 2s. 6d. and Is. 

Meetings : Annual dinner and conversazione. 



(It is believed that there are several other Devonian Societies, both at home 
and abroad. The Editor will be pleased to receive particulars of these 
for the next issue of the Year Book.) 



¥ 



I 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 33 

Devonshire Learned and Scientific 
Societies* 

(Compiled by H. Tapley-Soper, City Librarian, Exeter.) 

Architectural Society of Plymouth. E. C. Adams, Secretary, 
The Athenaeum, George Street, Plymouth. 

Devon and Exeter Architectural Society (in alliance with the 
Royal Institute of British Architects), Allan R. Pinn, 
A.R.I.B.A., Hon. Secretary, 5 Bedford Circus, Exeter, and 
E. Coath Adams, M.S. A., Hon. Secretary, Three Towns Branch, 
Bedford Chambers, Bedford Street, Plymouth. 

Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Litera- 
ture, and Art. Maxwell Adams and Robert Burnard, F.S.A., 
Hon. Secretaries, Huccaby House, Princetown. 

Devon and Cornwall Record Society. H. Tapley-Soper, F.R. Hist. S., 
Hon. Secretary and General Editor. Royal Albert Memorial 
University College, Museum, and Public Library, Exeter. 

Devon and Exeter Law /Association. T. W. Burch, Esq., Hon. 
Secretary, Palace Gate, Exeter. 

Exeter- Diocesan Architectural and Archaeological Society. 
Rev. R. M. Fulford and J. Jerman, F.R.LB.A., Hon. Secre- 
taries, College Hall, South Street, Exeter. 

Exeter Law Library Society. R. Arthur Daw, Hon. Secretary, 
8 The Close, Exeter. 

Exeter Literary Society. J. Isaac Pengelly, Hon. Secretary, 
Barnfield House, Exeter. 

Incorporated Law Society (Plymouth). R. B. Johns and B. H. 
Whiteford, joint Hon. Secretaries, 5 Princess Square, Ply- 
mouth. 

Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom Laboratory. 
Edgar J. Allen, D.Sc, Hon. Secretary, and Director of the 
Plymouth Laboratory, Citadel Hill, Plymouth. 

Plymouth Institution and Devon and Cornwall Natural History 
Society. Henry Penrose Prance and W'. C. Wade, Hon. 
Secretaries, The Athenaeum, George Street, Plymouth. 

Plymouth Medical Society. G. F. Aldous and Dr. W. L. Pethy- 
bridge, Hon. Secretaries, Athenaeum Chambers, Athenaeum 
Lane, Plymouth. 

Torquay Natural History Society. A. Somervail, Hon. Secretary, 
Babbacombe Road, Torquay. 

University College Field Club and Natural History Society. 
J. L. Sager, M.A., Hon. Secretary, University College, Exeter. 



34 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Libraries in Devonshire. 



Barnstaple. 

Athenaum Library ; 23,500 volumes (large local collection of 
books and manuscripts, including the Borough Records, 
the Oliver, Harding, and Incledon MSS., the Doddridge 
Hbrary, and the Sharland bequest). Thomas Wainwright, 
Secretary and Librarian. 

Bideford. 

Bideford Pubhc Library ; 5,900 volumes. E. B. L. Brayley, 
Librarian. 

Exeter. 

The Royal Albert Memorial University College, Museum, and 
PubHc Library ; 45,000 volumes and manuscripts (large 
local collection, including the collections of the late James 
Davidson, Esq., of Axminster ; P. O. Hutchinson, Esq., of Sid- 
mouth ; Edward Fisher, Esq., F.S.A.,Scot., of Newton 
Abbot ; and J. Brooking-Rowe, Esq., F.S.A., of Plympton). 
H. Tapley-Soper, F.R.Hist.S., Librarian. 

The Devon and Exeter Institution ; 40,000 volumes. J. 
Coombes, Librarian. 

The Cathedral Library ; 8,000 volumes and many manu- 
scripts. The Rev. Chancellor Edmonds, Librarian. 

The City Muniment Room, The Guildhall (collection of manu- 
script Records). H. Lloyd Parry, B.A., B.Sc, Town Clerk. 

The Exeter Law Library ; 4,000 volumes. H. Tapley-Soper, 
F.R.Hist.S., Librarian. 

Moretonhampstead. 

Moretonhampstead Public Library; 1,600 volumes. Messrs. 
S. H. Neck and A. Lancaster, Hon. Librarians. 
Newton Abbot. 
Newton Abbot Pubhc Library; 6,864 volumes. Wm. Mad- 
der n. Librarian. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth Public Library ; 82,000 volumes (large local collec- 
tion). W. H. K. Wright, F.R.Hist.S., Librarian. 

Plymouth Proprietory and Cottonian Library ; 42,000 volumes. 
J. L. C. Woodley, Librarian. 
Torquay. 

Torquay Public Library; 7,000 volumes. Joseph Jones, 
Librarian. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 35 



The Devon ^giment 



AN APPEAL FROM EARL FORTESCUE. 

• To THE Editor of the London|Devonian 
Year-Book. 

Dear Sir, — 

Will you allow me to make through your columns an 
appeal to your members which I am sure will not fall oh deaf 
ears ? 

Our Territorial Force in Devonshire has a satisfactory number 
of officers, but the 3rd Battalion, Devon Regiment, is short of 
subalterns. 

This, which is the " Special Reserve " Battalion, has taken 
the place of the old Militia, and its officers and men will in the 
event of war reinforce the 1st and 2nd — the Regular — Battalions. 

There are many young men who, though they do not care to 
make the Army their sole profession, would welcome the chance 
of seeing active service should the opportunity occur. The 
Special Reserve is designed to meet such ambitions. 

The course of training, which includes a period of doing duty 
with our distinguished 1st Battalion, is so arranged that it need 
interfere very little with University or Professional studies. 

Either the Officer Commanding the 3rd Devon Regiment at 
the Headquarters at Exeter, or I, will be happy to give all in- 
formation to any who desire to avail themselves of this oppor- 
tunity of rendering useful service to the Country. 

Yours faithfully, 

Fortescue. 
Castle Hill, ' 

South Molton, 

26 Nov., 1909. 



36 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



The Family of Fortescue, 



" Among the distinguished famihes in the county of Devon, 
the name of Fortescue will appear to have the most just claim to 
pre-eminence, when we consider the antiquity of its origin, and 
the multiplicity of respectable houses that have sprung from the 
original stock, as well in other districts, both of England and 
Ireland, as in their native county ; but especially when we advert 
to the illustrious characters which these families have supplied, 
as the best ornaments to the history of their country, and the high 
worth of the existing generation,- with the present venerable Earl 
at their head, held in such deserved estimation for the genuine 
benevolence of their spirit, the liberality of their principles, and 
their disinterested, as well as judicious exertions for the general 
welfare, whenever suitable occasion is presented." 

So wrote the Rev. Thomas Moore in his " History of Devon- 
shire " eighty years ago, but, with the exception of the one word 
" venerable," which our President would probably be surprised to 
see applied to himself, the same description is applicable to-day. 
The present Eari Fortescue, in addition to being Lord-Lieutenant 
of Devon, is A.D.C. to His Majesty, and has done excellent service 
as Colonel of the North Devon Yeomanry Cavalry, and as M.P. 
for Tiverton and West Devon. He was also for six years Master 
of the Devon and Somerset Staghounds. Two of his brothers 
hold high positions in His Majesty's household, viz., Captain the 
Hon. Seymour John Fortescue, R.N., C.M.G., C.V.O., who is 
Equerry in Ordinary, and the Hon. John William Fortescue, 
M.V.O., who is the King's Librarian at Windsor Castle. His 
youngest brother, Colonel the Hon. Charles Granville Fortescue, 
C.M.G., D.S.O., is in command of the 1st battalion of the Rifle 
Brigade. 

The traditional origin of the family name is well known. 
" Richard, surnamed Le Fort, a very strong man, a Norman 
Knight, and cupbearer to the Duke of Normandy, landed in Eng- 
land with his master in 1066, and, fighting in the great battle of 
Senlac or Hastings, saved the Duke, who had three horses killed 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 37 

under him, from the blows of his assailants, protecting him with 
his shield. In allusion to this deed of valour, Richard was hence- 
forth known as Richard le Fort-Escu, or the Strong Shield. After 
the Conquest, Richard Fort-Escu returned to Normandy, where 
his descendants, through a second son, flourished until the eigh- 
teenth century, leaving behind in England his eldest son, Sir 
Adam, who had also fought at Hastings, and who was the ancestor 
of the English Fortescues." 

The earliest historical records of the connexion of Fortescues 
with the County of Devon are a grant of land to Modbury Priory 
by Ralph Fortescue, who was living in 1 135, and was probably a 
son of Adam, and a grant by King John in 1209 (exactly 700 years 
ago) of Wimpston in Modbury to Sir John Fortescue, grandson of 
the above-mentioned Ralph. Let us quote Westcote's quaint 
account : — 

" It were blameworthy to leave Wimpston, alias Wymond- 
sham, which hath bred so many worthy personages unremembered. 
\\'impston, the first seat of the clarous name of Fortescue in this 
kingdom. (Which name, saith Mr. Hollenshed, is deduced from the 
strength of their shield, whereof it took name ; as if you would 
say (that I might explain it), forte scutum, salus ducum, his posy). 
There have been many famous and excellent men of this stirpe, 
both in arms and seat of justice, and separated into divers places 
in this county and elsewhere. In most of them they flourish in 
this age ; as Wear-Giifard, Fillegh, Buckland-Fillegh, Fallopit, 
Wood, Spurleston, Preston, and other ; to rank which in their 
seniority, and by delineating the descent, to give every man his 
due place, surpasseth, I freely confess, my ability at the present ; 
I will, therefore, only make choice of a few, selected of a far greater 
troop, which I have found most illustrious. Sir Henry Fortescue, 
knight ; a worthy and fortunate commander under that terror 
of France and mirror of martialists, King Henry V., by whom he 
was made Governor of the great city of MeauX in Berry. Then 
another Sir Henry, Lord Chief Justice of Ireland ; of great esti- 
mation for his many virtues, but especially for his sincerity in his 
high place of tempting authority. Sir John, Lord Chief Justice 
of England from the 20th of Henry VI. to the end of his reign ; 
who, in that laborious vocation, spent not his vacant hours (that 
could not be many) idly ; but, besides his continual employments, 
(which he discharged with rare wisdom and sincerity,) he penned 
a learned discourse of the laws of this land ; commending them 
to the hopeful prince, to infuse in him a desire to read and under- 
stand them. Sir Adrian and Sir John no less than three times 
sheriff of this country in the troublesome reign of Henry VI I. : 



38 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



a prince that well knew how to make choice of fit men for his 
service. What shall I speak of Polisborn in Hereford, Fiilborn 
in Essex, Sauldon in Buckinghamshire ; where Sir John Fortescue, 
that issued from this spring, a right honourable knight, hath 
builded a fair and lovely house : he that for his excellent learning, 
both in Latin and Greek, and approved wisdom, was overseer of 
the liberal studies of Queen Elizabeth, Master of her Wardrobe, 
Chancellor of the Exchequer and Duchy of Lancaster, and of the 
Privy-Council to Queen Elizabeth of famous and pious memory. 
I will enlarge no farther : Wimpston is lately alienated." 

The properties of Filleigh, Wear-Giffard, and Buckland Fil- 
leigh were all acquired by the marriage of Martin Fortescue, son 
and heir of Sir John, the Lord Chief Justice, with Elizabeth, 
daughter and heir of Richard Deynsell, but they were soon divided 
between the two sons of this marriage. Sir Hugh Fortescue, the 
representative of the elder branch in 1721, was summoned to 
Parliament as Baron Clinton, in right of his mother, and in 1746, 
he was created Baron Fortescue of Castle Hill and Earl Clinton. 
The Earl died without issue in 1751, when that title became 
extinct, while his barony of Clinton went to his sister Margaret, 
and after her death to Margaret Rolle, Countess of Oxford. Earl 
Clinton's half-brother, Matthew Fortescue, became 2nd Baron 
Fortescue, and was succeeded in 1785 by his son, Hugh, who, four 
years later, was created Viscount Ebrington and Earl Fortescue. 
The 1st Earl Fortescue died in 1841, and was succeeded by his son 
Hugh, who was made a K.G., and for a short time held the position 
of Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland. He died in 1861, and his son, the 
3rd Earl, in 1905. It is interesting to note that all the Earls have 
borne the name of Hugh, and that three of them have held the 
distinguished position of Lord-Lieutenant of Devon, a position 
also held by the above-mentioned Lord Clinton. 





The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 39 



The Worthies of Devon* 



HE following list is an attempt to provide an 
index to all the " Worthies of Devon " who have 
been considered of sufficient importance to be 
noticed in the " Dictionary of National Bio- 
graphy." This great work has been taken as 
the standard, and the enormous task of wading 
through its 66 volumes has been shared by a 
voluntary helper, Mrs. C. J. Bishenden, to whom the best thanks 
of the Association are due. 

Some difficulty has been experienced in deciding who were 
properly entitled to be included. According to Mr. Havelock 
Ellis, " a man's place of origin can most accurately be determined 
by considering the districts to which his four grandparents be- 
longed," so that a man could not be considered wholly Devonian 
unless his four grandparents belonged to Devon — meaning, I 
suppose, either born in Devon or of Devonian parents — but, with 
a feeling of pity for those who could not be wholly Devonian, I 
have included also those whose father or mother was a native of 
Devon, those who were born in the County, though not of Devon- 
ian parents, and those who lived at least ten years in the County. 
All these may be regarded as "of Devon," in the sense of being 
connected with Devon, though not strictly Devonians. It will be 
found that several of Prince's " Worthies " are omitted, either 
because there is no evidence to connect them with Devon, or 
because they are not included in the " Dictionary of National 
Biography." Some recent names will also be missed, such as 
Archbishop Temple and Sir Redvers Buller, but the reason for 
this is that the period covered by the " Dictionary " terminates 
with the death of Queen Victoria." " Worthies " who have been 
so unfortunate as to die since that date will have to wait for in- 
clusion in the list until the period is extended. It is intended, 
however, to insert notices of these in the Year Book fo;: 1911. 

As the list is intended to be an index to the biographies 
in the " Dictionary " itself, the notes are limited mainly 
to such particulars as calling, date and place of birth and 
of death, and, where necessary, parentage. Altogether 664 
names are included, and of these, 144 are divines, 143 
authors, 54 politicians, 54 lawyers, 52 artists, 41 scientists, 37 



40 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



soldiers, 33 sailors, 29 doctors, 16 musicians, while the remaining 
61 are of various miscellaneous calHngs. As it cannot be pre- 
tended that a large proportion of these are of the first rank of 
importance, I have endeavoured to draw up a separate hst of the 
forty most 'distinguished— " the Forty Immortals." In making 
the selection, I have been guided by the amount of space devoted 
to the separate biographies in the " Dictionary," although I have 
not strictly adhered to this scale. The names are indicated in 
the following Hst by an asterisk. 

It is especially interesting to London Devonians to note the 
large number — no less than 140 — of their distinguished fellow 
countymen who died or were buried in London. 
*Acland, Sir HenrY Went worth, K.C.B., F.R.S., physician, h. 

Killerton, 23 Aug., 1815. 4th s. of Sir Thomas Dyke Acland 

(1787 — 1871) (q.v.). Regius professor of medicine, Oxford, 

1858—94. d. Oxford, 16 Oct., 1900. 
Acland, Sir John, M.P., benefactor of Exeter College, Oxford. 2nd 

s. of John Acland of Acland in Landkey. d, 14 Feb., 1620. 

hur. Broad Clyst. 
Acland, John (fl. 1753—1796), poor law reformer. Rector of 

Broad Clyst. 
Acland, John Dyke, M.P., soldier and pohtician. 1st s. of Sir 

Thomas Acland and Elizabeth da. and h. of Thomas Dyke of 

Tetton, Som. d. Pixton Park, Dulverton, 22 Nov., 1778. hur. 

Broad Clyst. 

Acland, Sir Thomas Dyke, M.P., D.C.L., politician and philan- 
thropist, h. London, 29 March, 1787. d. Killerton, 22 July, 
1871. 

Acland, Sir Thomas Dyke, M.P., D.C.L., pohtician and educa- 
tional reformer, h. Killerton, 25 May, 1809. 1st s. of Sir 
Thomas Dyke Acland (1787—1871) (q.v.). Founded Oxford 
local exams, d. Killerton, 29 May, 1898. 

Acland, Sir Wroth Palmer, K.C.B., lieut. -general, h. Fairfield, 
Som., 1770. s. of Arthur Palmer Acland (h. Broad Clyst) and 
Elizabeth Oxenham (h. Oxenham). d. 8 March, 1816. 

Adams, William Henry Davenport, miscellaneous writer, b. 
London, 5 May, 1828. s. of Samuel Adams (h. Ashburton) and 
Elizabeth Mary Snell. d. Wimbledon, 30 Dec, 1891. 

/Elfthryth, Lat. Elfrida (945 ?— 1000), da. of Ordgar (q.v.), the 
ealdorman of Devon, mar. 1, iEthelwald, the ealdorman of 
the East Anglians, 2, King Eadgar. Mother of yEthelred II 
slew her step-son, Eadward. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 41 

Ainsworth, William Francis, F.R.G.S., F.S.A., geologist, b. Exeter, 
9 Nov., 1807. s. of Capt. John Ainsworth of Rostherne, 
Cheshire. ^.11 Wolverton Gardens, Hammersmith, 27 Nov., 
1896. 

''^Arthur, Sir George, bart , D C.L., Heut. -general, h. 1784. youngest 
s. of John Arthur of Norley House, Plymouth, d. 1854. 

AshwOOd, Bartholomew, puritan divine, b. Warwickshire, 1622. 
Minister at Bickleigh and Axminster. d. about 1680. 

AshwOOd, John, nonconformist minister, b. Axminster, 1657. s. of 
Bartholomew Ashford (q.v.). Minister at Exeter. d. 
Peckham, 22 Sept., 1706. 

Avery, John ? (fl. 1695), pirate, b. Plymouth ? d. Bideford ? 

'"Babbage, Charles, F.R.S., mathematician and scientific mechan- 
ician, h. near Teignmouth, 26 Dec, 1792. s. of a banker. 
Inventor of calculating-machine. Professor of mathematics, 
Cambridge, d. 1 Dorset St., Manchester Square, 18 Oct., 1871. 

BadCOCk, John (fl. 1816 — 1830), sporting writer. Prob. a native of 
Devon. Intended printing a continuation of Prince's ' Wor- 
thies. ' 

BadCOCky Samuel, theological and literary critic, b. South 
Molton, 23 Feb., 1747. Dissenting minister at Barnstaple 
1769—1778, and South Molton 1778—86. Curate of Broad 
Clyst 1787. " As a reviewer, ranks among the best known 
names of the century." d. Queen St., Mayfair, 19 May, 1788. 

Baker, Sir George, M.D., F.R.S., physician, b. Devon, 1722. 
s. of vicar of Modbury. Discovered cause of Devonshire 
colic. ^.15 June, 1809. bur. St. James's Church, Piccadilly. 

Baker, Philip, D.D. (fl. 1558—1601), divine, b. Barnstaple, about 
1524. Provost of King's College, Cambridge. 

Baker, Thomas, mathematician, b. 1625 (?) Vicar of Bishop's 
Nympton. d. 1689. 

Baker, Sir Thomas Durand, K.C.B., lieut. -general. b. 23 
March, 1837. s. of Vicar of Bishop's Tawton. Quartermaster- 
general to the forces, d. Pau, 9 Feb., 1893. bur. Bishop's 
Tawton. 

Baldwin of Moeles. 2iid s. of Gilbert, Count of Eu. Received at 
Conquest large estates in Devon, of which county he became 
Sheriff, d. 1100? 

Baldwin of Redvers, warrior, grandson of Baldwin of Moeles (q.v.). 
Earl of Devon and Baron of Okehampton. Raised revolts in 
Devon against Stephen. Benefactor of Plympton Priory, d. 
1155. 



42 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

Baldwin, Archbishop of Canterbury, h. Exeter, of poor parents. 
Preached crusade in Wales. Officiated at Richard I's corona- 
tion, d. Palestine, 19 Nov., 1190. 

Ball or Balle, Peter, F.R.C.P., F.R.S., physician, bro. of William 
Ball (q.v.). bur. Temple Church, 20 July, 1675. 

Ball or Balle, WiUiam, F.R.S., astronomer. 1st of 17 children of 
Sir Peter Ball, recorder of Exeter. Joint founder and first 
treasurer of Royal Society, hur. Temple Church, 22 Oct., 1690. 

Bampfield, Sir Coplestone, M.P., justice, h. Poltimore, 1636. 1st s. 

of Sir John Bampfield, 1st bart. d. Warlegh, near Plymouth, 

1691. hur. Poltimore. 
Bampfield, Francis, divine. 3rd s. of Tohn Bampfield of Poltimore. 

Preb. of Exeter, d. Newgate, 16 Feb., 1683-4. 

Bampfield, Thomas, M.P., speaker of House of Commons, s. of 
John Bampfield of Poltimore. Recorder of Exeter, d. 1693. 

Bampfylde, Coplestone Warre, landscape painter, s. of John 
Bampfylde, M.P. for Devon, d. Hestercombe, Som., 29 Aug., 
1791. 

Bampfylde, John Codrington, poet. h. 27 Aug., 1754. 2nd s. of 
Sir Richard Warwick Bampfylde of Poltimore. d. about 
1796. 

Bampton, John (fl. 1340), D.D., theologian, h. Bampton. 

Baring, Alexander, 1st Baron Ashburton, financier and statesman. 
h. 27 Oct., 1774. 2nd s. of Sir Francis Baring (q.v.). d. 
Longleat, 13 May, 1848. 

Baring, Sir Francis, M.P., London merchant and banker, b. Lark- 
bear, 18 April, 1740. s. of a cloth manufacturer. Founder of 
financial house of Baring Brothers & Co. ' The first merchant 
in Europe.' Director of East India Company, d. Lee, Kent, 
11 Sept., 1810. hur. Micheldever, Hants. 

Barkham or Barcham, John, antiquary and historian, h. Exeter, 
1572 (?) Preb. of St. Paul's, d. Bocking, Essex, 25 March, 
1642. 

Baskerville, Sir Simon, M.D., F.R.C.P., physician, hap. St. Mary 
Major, Exeter, 27 Oct., 1574. s. of an apothecary. Physician to 
James I and Charles I. d. 5 July, 1641. hur. St. Paul's Cathe- 
dral. 

Bastard, John PoUexfen, M.P. h. Kitley, near Pl>Tnouth, 1756. 

Col. of East Devon Militia, d. Leghorn, 4 April, 1816. hur. 

Yealmpton. 
Bathe or Bathonia, Henry de, judge of common pleas, h. Bathe 

House, North Tawton (?) d. 1260. 



I 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 43 

Battle, William, M.D., F.R.C.P., physician. h. Modbnrv, 1704. 

s. of the rector. Pres. R.C. P. Died worth £100,000. ^. 13 June, 

1776. bur. Kingston, Surrey. 
Beat, Samuel, D.C.L., Chinese scholar, h. Devonport, 27 Nov., 

1825. s. of a Wesleyan Minister. Professor of Chinese, Univ. 

Coll., London, d. Green's Norton, Northants, 20 Aug., 1889. 
Beeke, Henry, D.D., divine, h. Kingsteignton, 6 Jan., 1751. s. of 

a clergyman. Professor of modern history, Oxford. 

Dean of Bristol, d. Torquay, 9 March, 1837. 
Bennet or Bennett, William, musician, h. Combe-in-Teignhead, 

1767 (?) Organist of St. Andrew's, Plymouth, d. 1833 (?) 
Bennett, William Mineard, miniaturist and musician, h. Exeter, 

1778. d. Exeter, 17 Oct., 1858. 
Bentham, George, F.R.S., F.L.S., botanist, h. Stoke, near Ply- 
mouth, 22 Sept. , 1800. 2nd s. of Sir Samuel Bentham, inspector 

general of Navy Works. Author of ' Handbook of British 

Flora.' d. 25 Wilton Place, London, 10 Sept., 1884. 
Berry, Sir John, admiral, h. Knowstone, 1635. 2n^ s. of the vicar. 

Commissioner of Navy. d. Portsmouth, 14 Feb., 1689-90. 

hur. Stepney Church. 
Bidder, George Parker, engineer, h. Moreton Hampstead, 14 June, 

1806. s. of a stonemason. Exhibited when young as a ' calcu- 
lating phenomenon.' Constructed Victoria Docks, London. 

d. Dartmouth, 20 Sept., 1878. bur. Stoke Fleming. 
BidgOOd, John, M.D., F.R.C.P., physician, b. Exeter, 13 March, 

1623-4. s. of an apothecary. ^. Exeter, 13 Jan., 1690-1. bur. 

in Cath. 
Bidlake, John, D.D., divine and poet. b. Plymouth, 1755. s. of a 

jeweller, d. Plymouth, 17 Feb., 1814. 
Bidwill, John Carne, botanist and traveller, b. Exeter, 1815. d. 

New South Wales, 1853. 
Billington, Thomas, harpsichord and singing master, b. Exeter. 

d. Tunis, 1832. 
Blackall, John, F.R.C.P., physician, b. Exeter, 24 Dec, 1771. 

s. of Rev. Preb. Theophilus Blackall. d. Exeter, 10 Jan., 1860. 

bur. Holy Trinity Churchyard. 
Blackall, Samuel, divine, bro. of John Blackall (q.v.). d. 

Loughborough, 8 May, 1792. Mon. in Sidmouth Parish Church. 
*Blackmore, Richard Doddridge, novelist, b. Longworth, Berks., 

7 June, 1825. Educated at Blundell's, Tiverton, and Exeter 

College, Oxford. Author of ' Lorna Doone.' ' He did for 

Devonshire what Scott did for the Highlands.' d. Teddington, 

20 Jan., 1900. 



44 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Blundell, Peter, merchant, h. Tiverton, 1520. Of humble origin. 
Founder of BlundeU's School d. 18 April, 1601. hur. St. 
Michael Paternoster Church, London. 

Bodiey, Sir Josias, military engineer, h. Exeter, 1550 (?) 5th and 

youngest s. of John Bodley ; bro. of Sir Thomas (q.v.) and 

Lawrence (q.v.). Director-General of fortifications in Ireland. 

d. 1618. 
Bodley, Lawrence, D.D., Canon of Exeter, h. Exeter. 3rd s. of 

John Bodlev ; bro. of Sir Josias (q.v.) and Sir Thomas (q.v.). 

d. 19 April, 1615. 
*Bodiey, Sir Thomas, diplomatist and scholar, h. Exeter, 2 March, 

1544-5. 1st s. of John Bodley ; bro. of Sir Josias (q.v.) and 

Lawrence (q.v.). Founder of the Bodleian Library, Oxford. 

d. London, 28 Jan., 1612-13. 
Bogan, Zachary, author, b. Gatcombe, Little Hempston, near 

Totnes, 1625. 3rd s. of William Bogan. d. Oxford, 1 Sept., 

1659. 

*Boniface, Saint, the apostle of Germany, h. Crediton, 680. ' The j 
most conspicuous ecclesiastical figure in Europe.' Slain in 
Frisia, 5 June, 755. 

Borough, Christopher (fl. 1579—1587), traveUer. h. Northam (?) 
s. of Stephen Borough (q.v.). Wrote for Hakluyt an account 
of his journey to Persia and Media. 

Borough, Stephen, navigator, h. Northam, 25 Sept., 1525. Dis- 
covered Russia and named North Cape. Wrote accounts of 
his voyages for Hakluyt. Chief pilot in Navy. ^.12 July, 
1584. hur. Chatham Church. 

Borough, William, navigator and author, h. Northam, 1536. bro. 
of Stephen Borough (q.v.). Comptroller of Navy. Vice- 
Admiral under Drake in expedition to Cadiz. Commanded 
ship against Armada. Wrote accounts of his voyages for 
Hakluyt. d. 1599. 

Bowen, James, Rear- Admiral. 6. Ilfracombe, 1751. Master of 
Howe's flagship in battle of 1 June, 1794. d. 27 April, 1835. 

*Bowring, Sir John, M.P., LL.D., F.R.S., linguist, writer, and 
traveller, b. Exeter, 17 Oct., 1792. 1st s. of Charles Bowring 
of Larkbeare. Plenipotentiary to China, d. Exeter, 23 Nov., 
1872. 

Boyd, Archibald, D.D., divine, b. Londonderry, 1803. Dean of 
Exeter, 1867. Left ;f40,000 to societies and institutions in the 
diocese, d. Exeter, 1 1 Julv, 1883. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 45 

Bracton, Bratton, or Bretton, Henry de, ecclesiastic and judge, b. 
Bratton Clovelly, Bratton Fleming, or Bratton Court, near 
Minehead. Chancellor of Exeter Cath. Author of * De 
Legibus et Consuetudinibus Angliae,' " the first attempt to 
treat the whole extent of the law in a manner at once sys- 
tematic and practical." bur. Exeter Cath., 1268. 

Brancker or Branker, Thomas, mathematician, b. Barnstaple, 
1633. s. of head master of Grammar School, d. Macclesfield, 
1676. 

Brantingham, Thomas de, lord treasurer and Bishop of Exeter. 
Probably came from Brantingham, near Barnard Castle, 
Durham. Bishop of Exeter, 1370. d. St. Mary le Clyst, 1394. 
bur. Exeter Cath. 

Bray, Anna Eliza (nee Kempe), novelist, b. Newington, Surrey,, 
25 Dec, 1790. mar. 1st Charles Alfred Stothard, 2nd Rev. 
Edward Atkyns Bray, of Tavistock. Wrote local novels and 
the legends of the Tamar and Tavy. d. London, 21 Jan., 1883. 

Bray, Edward Atkyns, miscellaneous writer, b. Tavistock, 18 Dec, 
1778. s. of a solicitor. Vicar of Tavistock, 1812. d. Tavis- 
tock, 17 July, 1857. 

Bretland, Joseph, dissenting minister, b. Exeter, 22 May, 1742. 
s. of a tradesman. Minister of Mint Chapel, and at George's 
Meeting House, Exeter, d. Exeter, 8 July, 1819. 

Brewer, Briwere, or Bruer, William, Baron and Judge, b. Tor- 
Brewer (?) Sheriif of Devon. Founded Torr and DunkeswcU 
Abbeys. Signed Magna Charta. bur. Dunkeswell Abbey, 
1226. 

Brice, Andrew, printer, b. Exeter, 1690. s. of a shoemaker. 
Issued a * Grand Gazetteer.' d. Exeter, 7 Nov., 1773. bur. 
Bartholomew Churchyard. 

Bridgeman, Henry, D.D., Bishop of Sodor and Man. b. Peter- 
borough, 22 Oct., 1615. s. of Dr. John Bridgeman (q.v.), and 
bro. of Sir Orlando Bridgeman (q.v.). d. 15 May, 1682. bur. 
Chester Cath. 

Bridgeman, John, D.D., Bishop of Chester, b. Exeter, 2 Nov., 
1577. 1st s. of Thomas Bridgeman of Green way. Canon of 
Exeter. Chaplain to James I. mar. Elizabeth, da. of Dr. 
Helyar, Canon of Exeter and Archdeacon of Barnstaple, d. 
Morton Hall, Shropshire, 1652. bur. Kinnerley, near Oswestry. 

Bridgeman, Sir Orlando, Lord Keeper, b. Exeter, 1606 (?) 1st s. of 
Dr. John Bridgeman (q.v.). d. Teddington, 25 June, 1674. 

Brock, William, D.D., dissenting divine, b. Honiton, 14 Feb.^ 
1807. President of Baptist Union, d. 13 Nov., 1875. 



46 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



BrOGkedon, William, F.R.S., painter, author, and inventor. 6. 
Totnes, 13 Oct., 1787. s. of a watchmaker, who was a native of 
Kingsbridge. d. Bloomsbury, 29 Aug., 1854. 

Brooke, Charles, Jesuit, h. Exeter, 8 Aug., 1777. Superior of 
Stonyhurst College, d. Exeter, 6 Oct., 1852. 

Brooke, Charles, F.R.C.S., F.R.S., F.R.M.S., surgeon and in- 
ventor, h. 30 June, 1804. s. of Henry James Brooke (q.v.). 
d. Weymouth, 17 May, 1879. 

Brooke, Henry James, F.R.S., F.G.S., F.L.S., crystallographer. 
h. Exeter, 25 May, 1771. s. of a broadcloth manufacturer. 
Discovered 13 new minerals, d. 26 June, 1857. 

*Browne, William, poet. h. Tavistock, 1591. Author of 
' Britannia's Pastorals.' 

Nature's true poet, blest with fancies sweet. 
And voice as swift and changeful as our brooks. 
d. 1643 (?) 
Bruce, George Wyndham Hamilton Knight-, D.D., first Bishop of 
Mashonaland. h. Devon, 1852. 1st s. of Lewis Bruce Knight- 
Bruce and CaroUne Margaret EUza, da. of Thomas Newte of 
Tiverton, d. Bovey Tracey, 16 Dec, 1896. 

Bruce, Sir James Lewis Knight-, judge, h. Barnstaple, 15 Feb., 
1791. Youngest s. of John Knight of Fairlinch, Devon, and 
Margaret, da. of William Bruce of Llanbethian, Glam. Lord 
Justice of Appeal, d. Roehampton Priory, 7 Nov., 1866. 

Bryant, Jacob, classical scholar and antiquary, h. Plymouth, 1715. 
s. of an officer in the Customs, d. Farnham Royal, Bucks., 

14 Nov., 1804. 

Buckland, Francis Trevely an, naturalist, h. Oxford, 17 Dec, 1826 
s. of William Buckland (q.v.). Inspector of fisheries. Author 

• of ' Curiosities of Natural History.' d. 19 Dec, 1880. hur. 
Brompton Cemetery. 

Buckland, William, D.D., F.R.S., F.G.S., geologist. Dean of 
Westminster, h. Axminster, 12 March, 1784. 1st s. of Rev. 
Charles Buckland, Rector of Temple ton and Trusham, and 
Ehzabeth, da. of John Oke, of Combpyne. Professor of 
mineralogy, Oxford. President of Geological Society, d. 

15 Aug., 1856. 

Bucknill, Sir John Charles, F.R.C.P., F.R.S., physician, h. Market 
Bosworth, Leicestershire, 25 Dec, 1817. First medical super- 
intendent Devon County Asylum, d. Bournemouth, 19 July, 
1897. hur. Chfton-on-Dunsmore, near Rugby. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 47 

Budd, George, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.R.S., physician, b. North 
Tawton, 1808. s. of a surgeon ; bro. of William Budd (q.v.). 
Professor of medicine, King's College, London. Retired to 
Barnstaple, 1867. d. 14 March, 1882. 

Budd, William, M.D., F.R.S., physician, h. North Tawton, 1811. 
bro. of George Budd (q.v.). Made researches into conditions of 
zymotic diseases, d. Clevedon, 9 Jan., 1880. 

Budge, Edward, theological writer, h. Devon, 1800. s. of John 
Budge. Rector of Brat ton Clovelly. d. Bratton Clovelly, 
3 Aug., 1865. 

Budgell, Eustace, miscellaneous writer. 6. 19 Aug., 1686. s. of 
Gilbert Budgell, D.D., of St. Thomas, Exeter ; cousin of Addi- 
son. WYote in the ' Spectator.' d. London, 4 May, 1737. 

Buller, Sir Francis, judge, h. Downes, near Crediton, 17 March, 
1746. d. Bedford Square, London, 4-5 June, 1800. bur. St. 
Andrew's, Holborn. 

Bulteel, Henry Bellenden, theological controversiahst. b. Bellevue, 
near Plymouth, 1800. s. of Thomas Bulteel of Plymstock. d. 
Crescent, Plymouth, 28 Dec, 1866. 

Burgess, John, nonconformist, s. of a Devonshire clergyman. 

Rector of Ashprington. Ejected, bur. Ishngton, 7 Sept.. 

1671. 
Burt, William, miscellaneous writer, b. Plymouth, 23 Aug., 1778. 

s. of Joseph Burt. d. Plymouth, 1 Sept., 1826. 

Burthagge, Richard, theological writer, b. Plymouth, about 1638. 

d. 1694. 
Burton, John, D.D., classical scholar, b. Wembworthy, 1696. s. of 

the rector, d. 11 Feb., 1771. bur. Eton. 

Bury, Arthur, D.D., theologian, b. Heavitree (?), 1624. s. of Rev. 
John Bury (q.v.). Rector of Exeter College, Oxford, d. 1713. 

Bury, John, divine, b. Tiverton, 1580. Canon of Exeter. 
Rector of St. Mary Major, Exeter, d. 5 July, 1667. bur. 
Exeter Cath. 

Butter, John, M.D., ophthalmic surgeon, b. Woodbury, near 
Exeter, 22 Jan., 1791. Oculist at Plymouth, d. 1877. 

Calvert, Edward, artist, b. Appledore, 20 Sept., 1799. s. of a 
soldier, d. Hackney, 14 July, 1883. bin. Abney Park Cemetery 

Cann, Abraham, champion wrestler of Devon, b. Colebrooke, near 
Crediton, 2 Dec, 1794. d. Colebrooke, 7 April, 1864. 

Capern, Edward, poet. b. Tiverton, 21 Jan., 1819. Rural postman 
at Bideford. d. Braunton, 4 June, 1894. bur. Heanton. 



48 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

Cardmaker, alias Taylor, John, protestant martyr, h. Exeter 
(Prince). Vicar of St. Bridget's, Fleet St. Burnt at Smith- 
field, 30 May, 1555. 

Carew, Bamfylde Moore, King of the Gipsies, b, Bickley, near 
Tiverton, 1693. s. of the Rector, d. 1770 (?) 

Carew, Sir Edmund, soldier, h. 1464. s. of Sir Nicholas Carew, 
Baron Carew, of Mohuns Ottery. Drove Perkin Warbeck from 
Exeter, d. 22 June, 1513. 

Carew, George, ecclesiastic. 3rd s. of Sir Edmund Carew (q.v.). 
Dean of Bristol, Oxford, Windsor, and Exeter, d. 1583. 

Carew, George, Baron Carew of Clopton and Earl of Totnes, states- 
man, h. 29 May, 1555. s. of George Carew (q.v.). President 
of Munster. d. Savoy, London, 27 March, 1629. hur. Strat- 
ford-on-Avon. 

Carew, Sir John, justiciar in Ireland, h. Mohuns Otterv (Prince). 
d. 16 May, 1362. 

Carew, Sir Peter, soldier, h. Mohuns Ottery, 1514. 2nd s. of Sir 
William Carew of Mohuns Ottery, and Joane, da. of Sir Wil- 
liam Courtenay of Powderham. Sheriff of Devon. Suppressed 
Devonshire rising 1549. Constable of the Tower, d. Ross in 
Waterford, 27 Nov., 1575. hur. Waterford. Mon. in Exeter Cath. 

Carey or Cary, Sir George, treasurer at war in Ireland, Lord Justice, 
ft. 1541 (?) 1st s. of Thomas Carey of Cockington, and Mary, 
da. of John Southcott of Bovey Tracey. hur. Cockington, 
19 Feb., 1615-16. 

Carey, Wilham, D.D., Bishop of Exeter (1820-30) and St. Asaph, 
ft. 18 Nov., 1769. ^.1846. 

Carlile, Richard, freethinker, ft. Ashburtbn, 8 Dec, 1790. s. of a 
shoemaker, d. London, 10 Feb., 1843. 

Carpenter, John, divine, ft. Cornwall. Rector of Northleigh, near 
Honiton, 1587-1621. 

Carpenter, Lant, LL.D., unitarian, ft. Kidderminster, 2 Sept., 
1780. Minister at St. George's Meeting, Exeter, 1805-17. 
Drowned off Leghorn, 5 April, 1840. 

Carpenter, Mary, philanthropist, ft. Exeter, 3 April, 1807. Eldest 
child of Lant Carpenter (q.v.). Founded schools at Bristol. 
. Visited India, d. 14 June, 1877. hur. Bristol. 

Carpenter, Nathanael, D.D., author and philosopher, ft. Northleigh, 
near Honiton, 7 Feb., 1588-9. s. of John Carpenter (q.v.). d. 
Dublin. 1628 (?) f \h / 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 49 



Carpenter, William Benjamin, naturalist, h. Exeter, 29 Oct., 1813. 
4th child and 1st s. of Lant Carpenter (q.v.). Professor of 
physiology and forensic medicine, London, d. London, 19 Nov., 
1885. 

Carr, Sir John, traveller and author, b. Devon, 1772. d. London, 
17 July, 1832. 

Carr, William Hollwell, art connoisseur, h. Exeter, 1758. s. of 
Edward Holwell, apothecary. Vicar of Menheniot, Cornwall. 
d. London, 24 Dec, 1830. hur. Withycombe Raleigh. 

Carrington, Frederick George, journalist, h, Plymouth, 1816. 3rd 

s. of Noel Thomas Carrington (q.v.). d. Gloucester, 1 Feb., 
1864. 

Carrington, Noel Thomas, poet. h. Plymouth, 1777. s. of a grocer. 
Author of " Dartmoor." d. 2 Sept., 1830. 

Cartwright, Joseph, marine painter, h. Dawlish, 1789 (?) d. 
Charing Cross, 16 Jan., 1829. 

Cary, John, judge, h. Devon, s. of Sir John Cary. Warden of 
Devonshire ports. Chief Baron of the Exchequer, d. 1395 (?) 

Cary, Robert, D.C.L., chronologer. «6. Cockington or Berry 
Pomeroy, 1615 (?) 2nd s. of George Cary of Cockington, and 
Elizabeth, da. of Sir Edward Seymour. Rector of Portlemouth. 
Archdeacon of Exeter. ^.19 Sept., 1688. 

Caunter, John Hobart, miscellaneous writer, b. Dittisham, 21 July, 
1794. d. London, 14 Nov., 1851. 

Channell, Sir William Fry, judge, b. 31 Aug. , 1804. Of a Devon- 
shire family ; his father and grandfather, naval officers, d. 
Clarendon Place, Hyde Park Gardens, 26 Feb., 1873. 

Chappington or Chapington, John, organ-builder, b. South Molton. 
d. Winchester, 1606. 

Chappie, Samuel, organist and composer, b. Crediton, 1775. Of 
humble parentage. Organist of Ashburton Church, d. 
Ashburton, 1833. 

Chappie, William, topographer, b. Witheridge, 1718. Self-taught. 
d. 1 Sept., 1781. 

Chard, John Rouse Merriott, Colonel, V.C, hero of Rorke's Drift. 
b. Boxhill, near Plymouth, 21 Dec, 1847. d. Hatch-Beau- 
champ, near Taunton, 1 Nov., 1897. 

Chardon, Charldon, or Charlton, John, D.D., Bishop of Down and 
Connor. 6. Devon. Vicar of Heavitree. ^.1601. 



50 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Charles, Mrs. Elizabeth (n6e Rundle) , author, b. Tavistock, 2 Jan. , 
1828. da. of John Rundle, M.P. for Tavistock, mar. Andrew 
Paton Charles, 1851. Author of * Chronicles of the Schonberg- 
Cotta Family.' d. Hampstead, 28 March, 1896. 

Chesney, Sir George Tomkyns, General, Colonel-Commandant 
Royal (late Bengal) Engineers, h. Tiverton, 30 April, 1830. 4th 
s. of Capt. Charles CornwaUis Chesney. d. 27 Inverness Terrace, 
London, 31 March, 1895. hur. Englefield Green, Surrey. 

^Chichester, Arthur, Baron Chichester of Belfast, Lord Deputy of 
Ireland, b. Raleigh, 1563. 2nd s. of Sir John Chichester and 
Gertrude, da. of Sir William Courtenay of Powderham. d. 
19 Feb., 1624-5. bur. Carrickfergus. 

Chichester, Arthur, 1st Earl of Donegal, governor of Carrickfergus. 
b. 16 June, 1606. 1st s. of Edward, Viscount Chichester, and 
Anne, da. of John Coplestone of Eggesford ; nephew of Arthur 
Chichester (1563-1625). d. Belfast. 18 March, 1675. bur. 
Carrickfergus. 

Chichester, Sir Charles, Lieut.-Col. b. 16 March, 1795. 2nd s. of 
Charles Joseph Chichester of Calverleigh Court, d. Toronto, 
4 April, 1847. 

Chichester, Robert, Bishop of Exeter, b. Devon (?) ^.28 March, 
1155. ^«r. Exeter Cath. 

Chudleigh, Ehzabeth, Countess of Bristol, calling herself Duchess 
of Kingston, b. 1720. Only child of Col. Thomas Chudleigh, 
Lieut. -Governor of Chelsea Hospital, younger bro. of Sir George 
Chudleigh of Ashton, Devon, d. Paris, 26 Aug., 1788. 

Chudieigh, Sir George, M.P., Parliamentarian Commander, s. of 
John Chudleigh of Ashton. d. 1657. bur. Ashton. 

Chudleigh, James, Parliamentarian Major-General. 3rd s. of Sir 
George Chudleigh (q.v.). d. 1643. 

Hhudleigh, Mary, Lady (nee Lee), authoress, b. 1656. da. of 
Richard Lee of Winslade, Devon, mar. Sir George Chudleigh 
of Ashton. d. 1710. 

Chudleigh, Thomas (fl. 1689), diplomatist, s. of Thomas Chud- 
leigh, 2nd s. of Sir George Chudleigh of Ashton. 

Churchill, Charles, General, b. Ashe, Musbury, 2 Feb., 1656. 3rd 
surviving s. of Sir Winston Churchill (q.v.). d. 1714. 

Churchill, George, M.P., Admiral, b. 1654. 2nd surviving s. of Sir 
Winston Churchill (q.v.). d. 8 May, 1710. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 51 

"^Churchill, John, 1st Duke of Marlborough, General, h. Ashe, 
Musbury, 1650. 1st surviving s. of Sir Winston Churchill (q.v.). 
Victor at Blenheim, Ramilies, and Malplaquet. d. 16 June, 
1722. hur. Westminster Abbey, afterwards removed to 
Blenheim. 

Churchill, Sir Winston, M.P., politician, h. 1620 (?) d. 1688. 

^Clifford, Thomas, 1st Baron Clifford of Chudleigh, Lord High 
Treasurer, h. Ugbrooke, 1 Aug., 1630. d. 1673. hur. Ugbrooke. 

Clifford, William Kingdon, F.R.S., mathematician and meta- 
physician, h. Exeter, 4 May, 1845. Professor of applied 
mathematics, Univ. Coll., London, d. Madeira, 3 March, 1879. 
hur. Highgate Cemetery. 

Coffin (alias Hatton), Edward, Jesuit, h. Exeter, 1571. d. St. 
Omer, 17 April, 1626. 

Coffin, Sir Edward Pine, Commissary General, h. Eastdown, 20, 
Oct., 1784. 5th s. of Rev. John Pine and Grace, da. of James 
Rowe of Alverdiscott. d. Bath, 31 July, 1862. 

Coffin, John Pine, Major-General. h. Eastdown, 16 March, 1778. 
4th s. of Rev. John Pine and Grace, da. of James Rowe of Alver- 
discot. d. Bath, 10 Feb., 1830. hur. Timsbury, Som. 

Coleridge, Derwent, author, h. Keswick, 1800. 2nd s. of Samuel 
Taylor Coleridge (q.v.). d. Torquay, 1883. 

Coleridge, Hartley, author, h. Clevedon, 19 Sept., 1796. 1st s. of 
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (q.v.). d. Grasmere, 6 Jan., 1849. 

Coleridge, Henry James, D.D., divine. ^>. 20 Sept., 1822. 2nd s. of 
Sir John Taylor Coleridge (q.v.). d. Roehampton, 13 April, 
1893. hur. Ottery St. Mary. 

Coleridge, Henry Nelson, author, h. 25 Oct., 1798. s. of James 
Coleridge of Ottery St. Mary. Literary executor of Samuel 
Taylor Coleridge (q.v.). d. 26 Jan., 1843. 

Coleridge, Herbert, philologist, h. 1830. s. of Henry Nelson 
Coleridge (q.v.). d. 1861. 

Coleridge, James Duke, D.C.L., divine, h. 1788. 1st s. of James 
Coleridge of Ottery St. Mary. Vicar of Thorverton and Preb. 
of Exeter, d. Thorverton, 26 Dec, 1857. 

Coleridge, John, schoohnaster. h. 1719. Vicar of Ottery St. Mary, 
and Master of the Grammar School, d. 1781. 

Coleridge, Sir John Duke, 1st Baron Coleridge, F.R.S., D.C.L., 
Lord Chief Justice, h. Ottery St. Mary, 3 Dec, 1820. 1st s. 
of Sir John Taylor Coleridge (q.v.). d. 1 Sussex Square, W., 
14 June, 1894. hur. Ottery St. Mary. 



52 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Coleridge, Sir John Taylor, judge, h. Tiverton, 1790. 2nd s. of 
James Coleridge of Ottery St. Mary. Recorder of Exeter, d. 
Ottery St. Mary, 11 Feb., 1876. 
*Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, poet and philosopher, b. Ottery St. 
Mary, 21 Oct., 1772. Youngest of 10 children of John Cole- 
ridge (q.v.). d. Cambridge, 25 July, 1834. 

Coleridge, Sara, author, h. Keswick, 1802. da. of Samuel Taylor 
Coleridge (q.v.). mar. Henry Nelson Coleridge (q.v.). d. 1852. 

Coleridge, William Hart, D.D., Bishop of Barbados. ^>. 1789. Only 

s. of Luke Herman Coleridge of Thorverton, a bro. of Samuel 

Taylor Coleridge (q.v.). d. Ottery St. Mary, 21 Dec, 1849. 
Collier, Robert Porrett, 1st Baron Monkswell, M.P., judge, b. St. 

Budeaux, 21 June, 1817. 1st s. of John Collier of Plymouth. 

d. near Cannes, 27 Oct., 1886. bur. London. 
Collins, Arthur, author of the 'Peerage.' b. Exeter, 1690 (?) d. 

1760. 
Collins, David, Governor of Tasmania, b. Exeter, 3 March, 1756. 

d. 1810. 
Collins, Mortimer, miscellaneous writer, b. Plymouth, 29 June, 

1827; s. of a solicitor, d. Richmond, 28 July, 1876. 

Conant, John, D.D., theologian, b. Yettington, Bicton, 18 Oct., 

1608. Rector of Exeter Coll., Oxford. Regius professor of 

divinity. Vice-Chancellor. Archdeacon of Norwich. Preb. 

of Worcester, d. 12 March, 1693. bur. All Saints' Church, 

Northampton. 
Condy or Cundy, Nicholas, landscape painter in water-colours. 

b. Torpoint, 1793 (?) Resided at Plymouth, d. Plymouth, 

8 Jan., 1857. 
Condy, Nicholas Matthews, art-teacher at Plymouth, b. 1818. 

s. of Nicholas Condy or Cundy (q.v.). d. Union St., Plymouth, 

Conybeare, John, D.D., Bishop of Bristol, b. Pinhoe, 31 Jan., 
1691-2. s. of the vicar. Dean of Christ Church, Oxford. 
d. Bristol, 13 July, 1755. bur. in Cath. 

Cook, Samuel, water-colour painter, house-painter at Plymouth. 
b. Camelford, 1806, where his mother kept a bakehouse, d. 
1 June, 1859. 

Cookworthy, William, porcelain-maker, b. Kinesbrid^e, 1705. 
d. 16 Oct., 1780. 

Copleston, Edward, Bishop of Llandaff and Dean of St. Paul's. 
b. Offwell. 2 Feb., 1776. s. of the rector, d. 14 Oct., 1849. 
bur. Llandaff Cath. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 53 



Corey, John (fl. 1700 — 1731), actor and dramatist, h. Barns- 
taple. 

Cory, William Johnson, poet and master at Eton. h. Torrington, 
9 Jan., 1823. 2nd s. of Charles Johnson, and bro. of Arch- 
deacon Furse. d. Hampstead, 11 June, 1892. hur. Hamp- 
stead. 

Coryton, WiUiam, M.P., politician. 1st s. of Peter Coryton of 
Cory ton and Newton Ferrers. ^.1651. 

Cosway, Richard, R.A., painter, h. Tiverton, 1740. s. of a 
schoolmaster, d. Edgware, 4 July, 1821. bur. Marylebone 
Church. 

Cotton, William, Bishop of Exeter, 1598-1621. 1st s. of John 
Cotton of London. Rector of Silverton 1600-21. d. 1621. 

Courtenay, Edward, Earl of Devonshire, s. of Sir Hugh Cour- 
tenay of Boconnoc, and Margaret, da. of Thomas Carminow. 
Created Earl and granted large estates in Devon 1485. De- 
fended Exeter against Perkin Warbeck, 1497. d. 1509. 

Courtenay, Edward, Earl of Devonshire, h. Tiverton 1526 {}) 
Only s. of Henry Courtenay, Marquis of Exeter (q.v.) and 
Gertrude, da. of WiUiam Blount, Lord Mount] oy. Created 
Earl, 1553. d. Padua, 18 Sept., 1556. 

Courtenay, Henry, Marquis of Exeter and Earl of Devonshire. 
h. 1496 (?) s. of Sir Wilham Courtenay (q.v.) and Princess 
Catherine, da. of Edward IV ; cousin of Henry VHI. Be- 
headed Tower Hill, 9 Dec, 1538. 

Courtenay, Henry Reginald, Bishop and Archdeacon of Exeter, 
1797-1803. h. St. James, Piccadilly, 27 Dec, 1741. s. of 
Henry Reginald Courtenay, M.P., and Catherine, da. of Allen, 
1st Earl Bathurst. Rector of St. George, Hanover Square, 
1774-1803. d. 9 June, 1803. hur. Grosvenor Chapel, London. 

Courtenay, Peter, Bishop of Exeter and Winchester. 3rd s. of 
Sir Philip Courtenay of Powderham, and Elizabeth, da. of 
Walter, Lord Hungerford. K.G. d. 23 Sept., 1492. bur. 
Winchester (?) 

Courtenay, Richard, Bishop of Norwich. 1st s. of Sir Philip 
Courtenay of Powderham, and Anne, da. of Sir Thomas Wake. 
Chancellor of Oxford Univ. Envoy to France, d. Harfleur, 
1415. bur. Westminster Abbey. 

Courtenay, Thomas Peregrine, M.P., politician, b. 31 May, 
1782. Youngest s. of Henrj^ Reginald Courtenay (q.v.), and 
Lady Elizabeth Howard, da. of Thomas, 2nd Earl of Effingham. 
d. 8 July, 1841. 



54 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



*Courtenay, William, Archbishop of Canterbury, h. St. Martin's, 
Exeter, 1342 (?) 4th s. of Hugh Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon, 
and Margaret, da. of Humphry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford 
and Essex, d. Maidstone, 31 July, 1396. hur. Canterbury 
Cath. 

Courtenay, Sir William, K.B., courtier of Henry VH. s. of 
Edward Courtenay, Earl of Devonshire (d. 1509) (q.v.), and 
Elizabeth, da. of Sir Philip Courtenay of Molland. d. Green- 
wich, 9 June, 1512. 

Courtenay, William Reginald, 11th Earl of Devon, P.C, D.C.L., 
politician and philanthropist, b. Charlotte St., Bedford 
Square, London, 14 April, 1807. 1st s. of Wilham Courtenay, 
10th Earl, and Lady Harriet Leshe, da. of Sir Lucas Pepys, 
bart., and Jane Elizabeth, Countess of Rothes. Known as 
" the good Earl." d. Powderham, 18 Nov., 1888. 

Cousins, Samuel, R.A., mezzotint engraver, h. Exeter, 9 May, 
1801. d. 24 Camden Square, London, 7 May, 1887. 

Cowell, John, LL.D., civilian, h. Ernsborough, 1554. Author 
of * The Interpreter,' a law dictionary. Regius professor of 
civil law, Cambridge. Vicar-general of the Archbishop of 
Canterbury, d. Cambridge, 1611. 

Cowell, Joseph Leathley, actor (real name Hawkins Witchett). 
h. near Torquay, 7 Aug., 1792. d. 13 Nov., 1863. hur. Bromp- 
ton Cemetery. 

Cowell, Samuel Houghton, actor and singer, h. London, 5 
April, 1820. s. of Joseph Leathley Cowell (q.v.). d. Bland- 
ford, 11 March, 1864. 

Cowley, Hannah (nee Parkhouse), dramatist and poet. b. 
Tiverton, 1743. da. of a bookseller. Author of " The Belle's 
Stratagem." d. Tiverton, 11 March, 1809. 

Cox, Edward William, serjeant-at-law. b. Taunton, 1809. 1st 
s. of WiUiam Charles Cox of Taunton, manufacturer, and 
Harriet, da. of William Upcott of Exeter, d. MilfHill, 24 
Nov., 1879. bur. Colney Hatch cemetery. 

Cranch, John, painter, b. Kingsbridge, 12 Oct., 1751. Self- 
taught, d. Bath, 1821. 

Crane, Thomas, divine and theological writer, b. Plymouth, 
1631. s. of a merchant, d. Beaminster. 

CrealOCk, Henry Hope, soldier, artist, and author, b. 31 March, 
1831. 2nd s. of WiUiam Betton Crealock, of Langeston, 
Devon, d. 20 Victoria Square, London, 31 May, 1891. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 55 

Cross, John, painter, b. Tiverton 1819. s. of foreman in lace 
factory, d. Gloucester Place, Regent's Park, 27 Feb., 1861. 

Crosse, Richard, miniature-painter, h. Knowle, near CuUomp- 

ton, 24 April, 1742. A deaf mute. Painter in enamel to 

George III. d. Knowle, 1810. 
Cuming, Hugh, naturaHst. h. West Alvington, Kingsbridge, 

14 Feb., 1791. Collected shells and orchids in Pacific, d. 

Gower St., London, 10 Aug., 1865. 

Cussans, John Edwin, antiquary, h. Plymouth, 30 Oct., 1837. 
d. 46 St. John's Park, Upper HoUoway, 11 Sept., 1899. 

Cutcliffe, Rochetaillade, or De Rupescissa, John (fl. 1345), Fran- 
ciscan, h. Dammage, Ilfracombe (?) Author of books on 
alchemy and prophetical writings, burnt at Avignon (?) 

Davy, Edward, scientific investigator, b. Ottery St. Mary, 16 
June, 1806. s. of a surgeon. Invented needle telegraphy, 
1837. d. Malesbury, Victoria, 27 Jan., 1885. 

Davy, John, musical composer, b. Upton Hellions, 23 Dec, 
1763. illeg. s. ; brought up by a blacksmith. Composed 
" The Bay of Biscay." d. penniless in May's Buildings, St. 
Martin's Lane, 22 Feb., 1824. 

Davy, Robert, portrait-painter, b. CuUompton. d. John St., 
Tottenham Court Road, 28 Sept., 1793. 

Davy, WilHam, lawyer, b. Exeter. King's serjeant ; famous 
as a cross-examiner and humorist, d. Hammersmith, 13 Dec, 
1780. 

Davy, William, divine, b. Down House, Tavistock, 4 March, 
1743. Author of a ' System of Divinity,' part of which he 
printed himself. Vicar of Winkleigh. d. Winkleigh, 13 June, 
1826. 
*Davys, John, navigator, b. Sandridge, Stoke Gabriel, 1550 (?) 
Discovered Davys Strait, and explored Baffin's Bay. Killed 
off Singapore, 30 Dec, 1605. 

Dennis or Denys, Sir Thomas, privy councillor, b. Holcombe 
Burnell (Prince), 1480 (?) Custos rotulorum of Devon. Sheriff 
of Devon. Recorder of Exeter, d. 1560 (?) 

Dickson, Sir James Robert, K.C.M.G., D.C.L., Australian states- 
man, b. Plymouth, 30 Nov. 1832. d. Sydney, 10 Jan., 1901. 
bur. Brisbane. 

Doddridge or Doderidge, Sir John, judge, b. Barnstaple (?) 1555. 
s. of a merchant, d. Forsters, near Egham, 13 Sept., 1628. 
bur. Exeter Cath. 



56 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Donn or Donne, Benjamin, mathematician, h. Bideford, 1729. 
s. of a schoolmaster. Published map of Devon 1765, from a 
sm-vey taken by himself, d. Kingston, near Taunton, June, 
1798. 

Donne or Dunne, Gabriel, Cistercian monk. Belonged to the 
Donne family of Ralph Donne, Devon. Abbot of Buckfast- 
leigh. Benefactor of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, d. London. 5 
Dec, 1558. hur. St. Paul's. 

Downe, John, divine, b. Holsworthy, 1570 (?) Vicar of Wins- 
ford, Som. d. Instow, 1631. 

Downman, Hugh, physician and poet. h. Newton St. ,Cyres, 
1740. Medical practitioner at Exeter, d. Alphington, near 
Exeter, 23 Sept., 1809. 

Downman, John, A.R.A., portrait and subject painter, h. Devon. 
d. Wrexham, 24 Dec, 1824. 

Dowriche, Anne (nee Edgcumbe), poetess (fl. 1589). da; of 
Peter Edgcumbe, Sheriff of Devon, 1566. mar. Hugh Dow- 
riche (q.v.). 

Dowriche, Hugh (fl. 1596), author. Husband of Anne Dowriche 
(q.v.). Rector of Honiton. 

Drake, Sir Bernard, naval commander. 1st s. of John Drake of 
Ash, Musbury, and Amy, da. of Sir Roger Grenville of Stowe, 
Cornwall, d. Crediton, 10 April, 1586. 

'Drake, Sir Francis, circumnavigator and admiral, h. Tavistock, 
1540 (?) s. of a clergyman, d. off Portobello, 28 Jan., 1596. 

Drake, John Poad, inventor and artist, h. Stoke Damerel, 
July, 1794. d. Fowey, Cornwall, 26 Feb., 1883. 

Drew, Edward, M.P., recorder of London, h. Sharpham, Ash- 
prington, 1542 (?) 1st s. of Thomas Drew of Sharpham and 
Eleanor, da. of William Huckmore of Devon. Queen's 
Serjeant. Built Killerton. d. April 1598. hur. Broad" Clyst. 

Duck, Sir Arthur, LL.D., M.P., civihan. b. Heavitree, 1580. 
bro. of Nicholas Duck (q.v.). Chancellor of London, and 
Bath and Wells. Biographer of Archbishop Chichele. d. 
1648. hur. Chiswick. 

Duck, Nicholas, lawyer, h. Heavitree, 1570. 1st s. of Richard 
Duck of Heavitree ; bro. of Sir Arthur Duck (q.v.). Recorder 
of Exeter, d. Exeter, 28 Aug., 1628. hur. in Cath. 

Dunn, Samuel, mathematician, h. Crediton, where he kept a 
school till 1751. d. Boar's Head Court, Fleet Street, London, 
Jan., 1794. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 57 

Dunning, John, 1st Baron Ashburton, lawyer, b. Asburton, 18 
Oct., 1731. Younger s. of John Dunning, of Ashburton, and 
Agnes, da. of Henry Judsham, of Old Port, Modbury. d. 
Exmouth, 18 Aug., 1783. hur. Ashburton Church. 

D'Urfey, Thomas, poet and dramatist, b. Exeter, 1653. Of 
Huguenot descent. Author of ' An Antidote against Melan- 
choh'.' d. London, 26 Feb., 1723. bur. St. James's Church, 
Piccadilly. 

EastCOtt, Richard, writer on music, b. Exeter, 1740 (?) Chaplain 
. of Ijvery Dale, Devon, d. there, 1828. 

*Eastiake, Sir Charles Lock, P.R.A., F.R.S., D.C.L., painter. 
b. Plymouth, 17 Nov., 1793. 4th s. of George Eastlake, 
admiralty agent at Plymouth, and a da. of Samuel Pierce of 
Exeter. Secretary of the Fine Arts Commission. Com- 
missioner for the Great Exhibition, 1851. d. Pisa, 14 Dec, 
1865. bur. Kensal Green. 

Edgcumbe, Sir Piers, K.B., Sheriff of Devon, b. Milton Abbot, 
near Tavistock (?) s. of Sir Richard Edgcumbe (d. 1489) (q.v.). 
d. 14 Aug.. 1539. 

Edgcumbe or Edgecombe, Sir Richard, M.P., statesman, b. 
Milton Abbot, near Tavistock (?) Sheriff of Devon. Ambas- 
sador to Scotland, d. Morlaix, 8 Sept., 1489. bur. in Church 
of Friars-preachers there. 

Edgcumbe or Edgecombe, Sir Richard, country gentleman, b. 
Stonehouse, 1499. 1st s. of Sir Piers Edgcumbe (q.v.). Sheriff 
of Devon. Called " the good old knight of the castle." Built 
Mount Edgcumbe House, 1553. d. 1 Feb., 1562. bur. Maker 
Church. 

Edmondes, Sir Thomas, M.P., diplomatist, b. Plymouth 1563 (?) 
5th s. of Thomas Edmondes of Fowey, Cornwall, and Joan, 
da. of Antony Delabare of Sherborne, d. 20 Sept., 1639. 

Egerton, Sarah (nee Fisher), actress, b. 1782. da. of rector of 
Little Torrington. mar. Daniel Egerton (actor), d. Chelsea, 
3 Aug, il782. bur. Chelsea Churchyard. 

Elford, Sir William, M.P., F.R.S., banker, politician, and amateur 
artist, b. Bickham, Buckland Monachorum, May, 1749. 
1st s. of Rev. Lancelot Elford of Bickham, and Grace, da. of 
Alexander Willis of Kingsbridge. Recorder of Plymouth. 
Lieut.-Col. South Devon Mihtia. d. Totnes, 30 Nov., 1837. 
bur. in Parish Church. 



58 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Ellacombe or Ellicombe, Henry Thomas, divine and antiquary. 
h. Alphington, 1790. s. of the rector ; bro. of Sir Charles 
Greene EUicombe (q.v.). Rector of Clyst St. George. Wrote 
on campanology and antiquities, d. Clyst St. George, 30 
July, 1885. hur. Bit ton, Gloucestershire. 

Ellicombe, Sir Charles Greene, K.C.B., General, Royal Engineers. 
h. Alphington, 3 Aug., 1783. s. of the rector ; bro. of Henry 
Thomas Ellacombe (q.v.). d. Worthing, 7 June, 1871. 

Enty, John, Presbyterian minister at Plymouth, 1698. h. 1675 (?) 

s. of a travelling tailor in Cornwall, d. 26 Nov., 1743. 
Exeter, Walter of (fl. 1301), Cluniac monk. h. Exeter. Spent 

most of his days in his cell at St. Caroe, near Lostwithiel, and 

prob. died there. 
Exeter, William of (fl. 1330 ?),D.D., author, canon of Exeter. 

h. Exeter. 
Exeter, WiUiam of (fi. 1360 ?), physician, precentor of Lincoln. 

h. Exeter. 
Exeter, WilHam of (d. 1365 ?), author of sermons, h. Exeter. 

Fish acre, Fissalcre, Fishakle, or Fizacre, Richard de, Dominican 
divine, h. Devon (?) d, Oxford 1248. hur. among the Friars 
Preachers. 

Follett, Sir WiUiam Webb, M.P., attorney-general, h. Topsham, 
2 T)ec., 1798. d. Cumberland Terrace, Regent's Park, 28 
June, 1845. hur. Temple Church. Statue in Westminster Abbey. 

Foote, Maria, 4th Countess of Harrington, actress, h. Plymouth 
24 July, 1791 (?) da. of Samuel T. Foote, manager of the 
Plymouth Theatre, and afterwards of a hotel at Exeter, 
mar. Charles Stanhope, 4th Earl of Harrington, 1831. d. TI 
Dec, 1867. 

Ford, Sir Francis Clare, G.C.B., G.C.M.G., diplomatist, s. of 
Richard Ford (q.v.) of Heavitree. d. Paris 31 Jan., 1899. 

Ford, Sir Henry, F.R.S., Irish secretary, h. Bagtor, Ilsington, 
1619 (?) 1st s. of Henry Ford, and Katharine, da. of George 
Drake of Spratshays, Littleham. d. Nutwell. hur. Wood- 
bury Church. 

Ford, John, dramatist, hap. Ilsington, 17 April, 1586. prob. 
spent his last years in Devon, d. 1639 (?) 

" Deep in a dump John Ford alone was gat. 
With folded arms, and a melancholy hat." 
Ford, Richard, critic and author, h. Heavitree, 1796. Author 
of ' Handbook for Travellers in Spain.' d. 1858. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 59 



) 



Ford, Simon, divine, b. East Ogwell, near Newton Bushell, 
1619 (?) d. Old Swinford, Worcestershire, 7 April, 1699. hur. 
in the Church. 

Ford, Thomas, nonconformist divine, h. Brixton, Devon, 1598. 
d. Exeter, 1674. bur. St. Lawrence Church. 

Forster, Nathaniel, D.D., F.R.S., scholar, b. Stadscombe, 
Plymstock, 3 Feb., 1718. s. of Robert Forster, and Elizabeth, 
da. of Rev. John Tindal of Corn wood, Devon. Chaplain to 
George II. d. Craig's Court, Charing Cross, 20 Oct., 1759. 

ForteSGUe, Sir Edmund, royalist commander, b. Fallapit. bap. 
East Allington, 16 July, 1609. 1st s. of John Fortescue of 
Fallapit, and Sara, da. of Sir Edmund Prideaux of Netherton. 
Governor of Fort Charles, Salcombe. d. Delft, Jan. or Feb., 
1647. bur. New Church, Delft. 

Fortescue, Sir Faithful, royalist commander, bap. Wear Gifford, 
22 Aug., 1585. 3rd s. of John Fortescue of Buckland Filleigh, 
and Anne, da. of Walter Porter of Thetford, Norfolk, bur. 
Carisbrooke, 29 May, 1666. 

Fortescue, James, D.D., poetical writer, b. Ford, Milton Abbot. 

bap. 21 July, 1716. d. Wootton, Northants, 1777. 
''Fortescue, Sir John, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench and 
author, b. Devon (?), 1394. 2nd s. of Sir John Fortescue, 
governor of Meaux, and grandson of William Fortescue of 
Wimpston. Wrote * De Laudibus Legum Angliae.' d. 
1476 (?). 

Foster, James, D.D., nonconformist divine, b. Exeter, 16 Sept., 
1697. d. London, 5 Nov., 1753. 

Fowler, Henry, hymn-writer, b. Yeahnpton, 11 Dec, 1779. 
Minister of Gower St. Chapel, London, d. London, 16 Dec, 
1838. bur. New Bunhill Fields burying-ground, Islington. 
'''Froude, James Anthony, LL.D., historian and man of letters, b. 
Dartington, 23 April, 1818. s. of Robert Hurrell Froude, 
rector ; bro. of Richard Hurrell Froude (q.v.) and William 
Froude (q.v.). d. Kingsbridge, 20 Oct., 1894. bur. Salcombe 
Cemetery. 

Froude, Richard Hurrell, divine, b. Dartington, 25 March, 1803. 
s. of Robert Hurrell Froude, rector ; bro. of James Anthony 
Froude (q.v.) and WiUiam Froude (q.v.). d. Dartington, 
28 Feb., 1836. 

Froude, William, F.R.S., engineer and naval architect, b. Darting- 
ton, 28 Nov., 1810. 4th s. of Robert Hurrell Froude, rector ; 
bro. of James Anthony Froude (q.v.) and Richard Hurrell 
Froude (q.v.). d. Admiralty House, Simons Town, 4 May, 
1879. bur. Naval Cemetery. 



60 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Furneaux, Philip, D.D., independent minister, h. Totnes, 1726. 

d. 1783. 
Gale, Theophilus, nonconformist tutor h. Kmgsteignton, 1628. 

s. of Theophilus Gale, D.D., Preb. of Exeter. Author of ' The 

Court of the Gentiles/ a marvel of erudition, d. London, Feb. 

or March, 1678. huv. Bunhill Fields. 
Gandy, Henry, nonjuring bishop, h. 14 Oct., 1649. s. of John 

Gandy, ' doctor,' of South Brent, d. Scroop Court, Holborn, 

26 Feb., 1734. hur. St. Pancras Churchyard, 30 Feb. (sic). 
Gandy, James, portrait painter, h. Exeter (?), 1619. Pupil of 

Vandyck. One of the earhest native Enghsh painters, d. 

Ireland, 1689. 
Gandy, William, portrait painter, h. Ireland, s. of James Gandy 

(q.v.). d. Exeter. 14 July, 1729. htir. St. Paul's Church. 
Garlandj John (fl. 1230), grammarian and alchemist, h. Chulm- 

leigh (?) 1180 (?) d. Paris, 1252 (?) 
Gates, Sir Thomas, Governor of Virginia (fl. 1596—1621). h. Coly- 

ford (Westcote). 
*6ay, John, poet and dramatist, hap. Barnstaple, 16 Sept., 1685. 

Author of the " Beggar's Opera." d. London, 4 Dec, 1732. 

hur. Westminster Abbey. 

" Of manners gentle, of affections mild. 
In wit a man, simplicity a child." 
Gay, John, philosophical writer, h. Upton Pyne, 1699. 2nd s. of 

James Gay, rector, and Elizabeth, da. of Nicholas Hooper, of 

Fulbrook, Braunton. d. Wilshampstead, Beds., 18 July, 

1745. hur. Wilshampstead. 
Geare, Allan, nonconformist, h. Stoke Fleming, 1622. Minister 

of St. Saviour's, Dartmouth. Ejected 1662. d. 1662. 
Gee, John, anti-catholic writer, h. Dunsford, 1596. s. of the 

incumbent, d. Tenterden, Kent, 1639. 
Gee, Sir Orlando, registrar of Court of Admiralty, b. 1619. bro. 

of John Gee (q.v.). d. 1705. hur. Isleworth Church. 
GibbS, Sir Vicary, judge, h. Cathedral Close, Exeter, 27 Oct., 1751. 

2nd s. of George Abraham Gibbs, and Anne, da. of Anthony 

Vicary. Called " Vinegar Gibbs." d. Russell Square, London, 

8 Feb., 1820. hur. Hayes, Kent. 

GifFord, Humphrey (fl. 1580), poet. h. Halsbury, Parkham (?) prob. 
2nd s. of Anthony Gifford of Halsbury. 

Gifford, Robert, 1st Baron Gifford, judge, b. Exeter, 24 Feb., 
1779. Youngest s. of Robert Gifford of Exeter. Master of 
the Rolls and deputy-speaker of the House of Lords, d. Dover, 
4 Sept., 1826. hur. Rolls Chapel, Chancery Lane. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. , 61 

*Gifford, William, first editor of ' Quarterly Review.' b. Ashburton, 
April, 1756. s. of a glazier ; his mother, da. of a carpenter at 
Ashburton. d. 6 St. James's St., London, 31 Dec, 1826. bur. 
Westminster Abbey. 

^Gilbert, Sir Humphrey, navigator and founder of the first British 
colony in North America, b. Compton, near Dartmouth, 
about 1539. s. of Qtho Gilbert of Compton, and Katherine, 
da. of Sir Philip Champernowne of Modbury, and afterwards 
mother of Sir Walter Ralegh (q.v.). d. in a storm off the 
Azores, 9 Sept., 1583. 
Gilling, Isaac, presbyterian minister, b. Stogumber, Som., 
about 1662. s. of a baker. Ministered at Axminster, Silver- 
ton, and Newton Abbot, d. Newton Abbot, 20 or 21 Aug., 
1725. 
Glanvill, Joseph, F.R.S., divine, b. Plymouth, 1636. 3rd s. 
of Nicholas Glanvill of Halwell, Whitchurch, Devon. Rector 
of the Abbey Church, Bath. Author of ' Sadducismus Tri- 
umphatus : Philosophical considerations touching Witches 
and Witchcraft.' d. Bath, 4 Nov., 1680. bur. Abbey Church. 

Glanville, Sir John, the elder, M.P., judge, b. Tavistock, 1542. 
2nd s. of John Glanville. The first attorney who reached the 
bench. Built the mansion of Kilworthv, near Tavistock. 
d. 27 July, 1600. bur. Tavistock Church." 

Glanville, Sir John, the younger, M.P., D.C.L., serjeant. b. 
Tavistock, 1586. 2nd s. of Sir John Glanville, the elder (q.v.). 
Recorder of Plymouth. Speaker of the Short Parliament. 
d. 2 Oct., 1661. biir. Broad Hinton Church, Wilts. 

Gorham, George Cornelius, divine and antiquary, b. St. Neots, 
Hunts, s. of a merchant and banker. Rector of Brampford 
. Speke, 1847-57. d. there, June, 1857. 

Gosse, Philip Henry, F.R.S., zoologist, b. Worcester, 6 April 
1810. s. of a miniature-painter. Lived at St. Marychurch, 
Torquay, over 30 years. Author of ' A Naturalist's Rambles 
on the Devonshire Coast.' d. St. Marychurch, 23 Aug., 1888. 

Grenville, Denis, D.D., Jacobite divine, b. Kilkhampton, 
Corn., 13 Feb., 1637. s. of Sir Bevil Grenville, and Grace, 
da. of Sir George Smith of Exeter. Dean of Durliam. d. 
Paris, 18 April, 1703. bur. Holy Innocents Churchyard, Paris. 

Grenville, John, Earl of Bath. b. Kilkhampton, Corn., 26 Aug., 
1628. 1st surviving s. of Sir Bevil Grenville, and Grace, da. of 
Sir George Smith of Exeter. Lord Warden of the Stannaries. 
Governor of Plymouth. Lord-lieutenant of Cornwall and 
Devon. Privy councillor, d. 1701. 



62 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Grenville, or Greynvile, Sir Richard, M.P., naval commander. 6. 
Cornwall(?), 1541 (?) Resided at Bideford. Commanded for 
his cousin, Sir Walter Ralegh (q.v.), fleet for colonization of 
Virginia. Killed in the " Revenge," off Flores, Sept. 1591, 
after fighting during 15 hours 15 Spanish ships. 

Hakewill, George, D.D., divine and author, h. St. Mary Arches, 
Exeter, 1578. s. of a merchant. Rector of Exeter College, 
Oxford. One of the authors on whom Johnson formed his 
style, d. Heanton Punchardon, near Barnstaple, 2 April, 1649. 
hur. in the church there. 

Hakewill, William, M.P., legal antiquary, h. St. Mary Arches, 
Exeter, 1574. bro. of George Hakewill (q.v.). Master of 
chancery, d. Wendover, Bucks., 31 Oct., 1655. 

Hailett or Hallet, Joseph, I, ejected minister, h. Bridport, 
Dorset, 1628 (?) First presbyterian minister at Exeter, 1672. 
d. Exeter, 14 March, 1689. 

Hailett or Hallet, Joseph, II, nonconformist minister of Exeter. 
h. 4 Nov., 1656. s. of Joseph Hailett, I (q.v.). d. Exeter, 
1722. 

Hailett or Hallet, Joseph, III, nonconformist, h. Exeter 1691 (?) 
1st s. of Joseph Hailett, II (q.v.). Pastor at Exeter from 
1722. d. Exeter, 2 April, 1744. 

Hankeford, Sir Wilham, K.B., judge, h. Hankford, Bulk- 
worthy (?) Chief -justice of King's bench, d. Annery, Monk- 
leigh, 20 Dec, 1422. 

Hanmer, John, nonconformist minister, h. Bideford, 1642. s. 
of Jonathan Hanmer (q.v.). Pastor at Barnstaple, d. 
Barnstaple, 19 July, 1707. 

Hanmer, Jonathan, divine, h. Barnstaple, Oct., 1606. Vicar of 
Instow and Bishop's Tawton. Ejected 1662. Founded first 
nonconformist congregation at Barnstaple, d. Barnstaple, 
18 Dec, 1687. 

Harding, Thomas, divine, h. Combmartin, 1516. Became a 
Catholic, and carried on a long controversy with John Jewel 
(q.v.). d. Louvain, Sept., 1572. hur. St. Gertrude's Church. 

Harding, WiUiam, F.G.S., Lieut.-Col., historian of Tiverton. 
h. 16 Aug., 1792. 3rd s. of Robert Harding of Upcott, Devon. 
d. Barnstaple, 15 Jan., 1886. 

Harris, John, D.D., principal of New College, London, h. 
Ugborough, 8 March, 1802. 1st s. of a tailor and draper. 
Chairman of the Congregational Union, 1852. d. St. John's 
Wood, 21 Dec, 1856. hur. Abney Park Cemetery. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 63 



Harris, Sir William Snow, F.R.S., electrician, h. Plymouth, 
1 April, 1791. s. of a solicitor. Invented improved lightning- 
conductor, d. Plymouth, 22 Jan. 1867. 

Hart, Solomon Alexander, R.A., painter, h. Plymouth, April, 
1806. s. of a mezzotint engraver. Professor of painting, 
Royal Academy, d. 36 Fitzroy Square, London, 11 June, 
1881. 

Hawker, Robert, D.D., divine and author. 6. Exeter, 13 April 
1753. s. of a surgeon. Vicar of Charles, Plymouth. Popular 
preacher, d. Plymouth, 6 April, 1827. hur. Charles Church. 

Hawker, Robert Stephen, poet and antiquary, h. Stoke Damerel, 
3 Dec, 1803. s. of Jacob Stephen Hawker, doctor, and Jane 
Elizabeth, da. of Stephen Drewitt of Winchester ; grandson 
of Robert Hawker (q.v.). Vicar of Morwenstow, Cornwall. 
Author of ' Cornish Ballads ' and ' Footprints of Former 
Men in Far Cornwall.' d. 9 Lockyer St., Plymouth, 15 Aug., 
1875. bur. in cemetery there. 

"'Hawkins or Hawkyns, Sir John, naval commander, h. Plymouth, 
1532. 2nd s. of William Hawkins (d. 1554) (q.v.). Treasurer 
and comptroller of the navy. Rear-admiral against the 
Armada, d. off Porto Rico, 12 Nov., 1595. 

Hawkins or Hawkyns, Sir Richard, naval commander, b. 
Plymouth, 1562. s. of Sir John Hawkins (q.v.). Vice-admiral 
of Devon, d. London, 17 April, 1622. 

Hawkins or Hawkyns, William, M.P., sea-captain and merchant. 
b. Plymouth (?) s. of John Hawkyns of Tavistock. Mayor of 
Plymouth. Made voyages to Guinea and Brazil, d. Ply- 
mouth, Feb., 1554. 

Hawkins or Hawkyns, William, sea-captain and merchant, b. 
Plymouth (?) 1st s. of WiUiam Hawkins (d. 1554), (q.v.). 
Mayor of Plymouth. Helped to fit out seven ships against 
the Armada, d. Deptford, 7 Oct., 1589. bur. St. Nicholas Church. 

Hawkins or Hawkyns, William (fl. 1595), sea-captain and mer- 
chant. 1st s. of William Hawkins (d. 1589), (q.v.). 

*Haydon, Benjamin Robert, historical painter, b. Wimpole St., 
Plymouth, 26 Jan., 1786. s. of a printer and pubhsher. Com- 
mitted suicide 22 June, 1846. bur. Paddington Churchyard. 

Hayman, Francis, R.A., painter, b. Exeter, 1708. One of the 
founders of the Royal Academy, d. Dean St., Soho, 2 Feb., 
1776. bur. in the Parish Church (St. Anne's). 



64 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

Heard, Sir Isaac, Garter King-of-Arms. h. Ottery St. Mary, 
10 Dec, 1730. s. of John Heard of Bridgwater. Educated 
Honiton Grammar School, d. College of Arms, London, 29 
April, 1822. hur. St. George's Chapel, Windsor. 

Hearder, Jonathan, electrician and inventor, h. Plymouth, 1810. 
Electrician to South Devon Hospital, d. Plymouth, 16 July, 
1876. 

Heath, Benjamin, D.C.L., book-collector and critic, h. Exeter, 
20 April, 1704. s. of a merchant. Town Clerk of Exeter, d. 
Exeter, 13 Sept., 1766. hur. St. Leonard's Church. 

Heath, John, judge, b. Exeter, 1736. s. of an alderman. Re- 
corder of Exeter, d. 16 Jan., 1816. hur. Hayes, Middlesex. 

Heathcoat, John, M.P., inventor, h. Duffield, near Derby, 7 Aug., 
1783. s. of a farmer. Removed from Loughborough to Tiver- 
ton, 1816. Invented lace machines etc. d. Bolham House, 
Tiverton, 18 Jan., 1861. hur. St. Peter's. 

Hele, Sir John, M.P., serjeant-at-law. h. Devon, 1565. 4th s. of 
Nicholas Hele of South Hele, Devon, and Margery, da. of Richard 
Down of Holsworthy. Recorder of Exeter. Founded Boys' 
Hospital at Plymouth. Built mansion at Wembury, near 
Plymouth, d. 4 June, 1608. hur. Wembury Church. 

Henrietta or Henriette, Anne, Duchess of Orleans, h. Bedford 
House, Exeter, 16 June, 1644. 5th da. of Charles I. d. St. 
Cloud, 30 June, 1670. 

Herle, WiUiam de, judge, h. Leicestershire (?) Lived at Chamber- 
combe, near Ilfracombe, where he possessed estates through his 
wife, Margaret, da. of WiUiam Polglas. d. Chambercombe (?), 
1347. 

Herrick, Robert, poet. hap. St. Vedast, Foster Lane, London, 
24 Aug., 1591. 4th s. of Nicholas Herrick, a goldsmith in 
Cheapside, and Julian Stone. Rector of Dean Prior, 1629-47 
and 1662-74. hur. there, 15 Oct., 1674. 

Hilliard, Nicholas, first Enghsh miniature painter, h. Exeter, 
1 537. s. of Richard Hilliard, High Sheriff of Exeter. Engraver 
of Elizabeth's second Great Seal. Executed miniatures of chief 
contemporaries, exhibited at Royal Academy, 1879. d. St. 
Martin's-in-the-Fields, 7 Jan., 1619. hur. in the Parish Church. 
" A hand or eye 
By Hilhard drawn, is worth a history 
By a worse painter made." — Donne. 

HinckS, Thomas, F.R.S., zoologist, h. Exeter, 15 July, 1818. s. 
of William "Hincks, professor of natural history. University 
College, Toronto, d. Chfton, 25 Jan., 1899. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 65 

Hody, Sir John, M.P., judge, h. Nethaway, Brixham (?) s. of 
Thomas Hody of Kingston Magna, Dorset, and a daughter of 
John Cole of Nethaway. d. London, 1441. hur. Woolaving- 
ton, Som. 

Hole, Richard, poet. h. Exeter, 1746. s. of WiUiam Hole, Arch- 
deacon of Barnstaple. Rector of Inwardleigh. d. Exmouth, 
28 May, 1803. 

Holland, John, Duke of Exeter and Earl of Huntingdon, K.G. 
h. Dartington, 18 March, 1395. 2nd s. of John Holland, Duke 

^of Exeter. Constable of Tower of London. Governor of 
Aquitaine. d. 5 Aug., 1447. hur. St. Catherine by the Tower. 

Hooker, alias Vowell, John, antiquary, h. Exeter, 1526. 2nd 
s. of Robert Hooker, Mayor of Exeter. First chamberlain of 
Exeter, d. Exeter, Nov., 1601. hur. St. Mary Major's. 

* Hooker, Richard, theologian. " Judicious Hooker." h. Heavi- 
tree, March, 1554 (?) s. of Roger Hooker, alias Vowell, in poor 
circumstances ; nephew of John Hooker (q.v.). Master of the 
Temple. Author of ' The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity.' d. 
Bishopsbourne, Kent, 2 Nov., 1600. hur. in Chancel. 

Hooper, Edmund, organist and composer, h. Halberton, 1553 (?) 
First regular organist of Westminster Abbey, d. 14 July, 
1621. hur. in Cloisters. 

Hopkins, Charles, poet and dramatist, h. Exeter, 1664 (?) s. of 
Ezekiel Hopkins (q.v.). d. London (?), 1700. 

Hopkins, Ezekiel, D.D., Bishop of Raphoe and Derry. h. Pinne, 
Devon, 3 Dec, 1634. s. of the rector. Minister of St. Mary 
Arches, Exeter, d. 19 June, 1690. hur. St. Mary Alderman- 
bury, London. 

Hudson, Thomas, portrait-painter, h. Bideford (?), 1701. Master 
of Reynolds (q.v.). Painted Handel and George XL d. Twick- 
enham. 26 Jan., 1779. 

Humphry, Ozias, R.A., portrait-painter, h. Honiton, 8 Sept., 
1742. Lived in King St., Co vent Garden, and Rathbone Place, 
Oxford St. d. London, 9 March, 1810. hur. in ground of St. 
James's Chapel, Hampstead Road. 

Huxham, John, F.R.S., physician and author, h. Totnes, 1692. 
Practised at Plymouth, d. Plymouth, 11 Aug., 1768. hur. St. 
Andrew's Church. 

Incledon, Benjamin, genealogist, h. Pilton, Barnstaple, June, 
1730. Recorder of Barnstaple, d. Barnstaple, 7 Aug., 1796. 



66 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

Ireland, John, D.D., Dean of Westminster, b. Ashburton, 8 Sept., 

1761. s. of a butcher. Founded professorship and scholar- 
ships at Oxford, d. Westminster, 2 Sept., 1842. hur. South 

Transept of Abbey. 
Izacke, Richard, antiquary, h. Exeter, 1624 (?) Chamberlain and 

Town Clerk of Exeter, d. 1698. hur. Ottery St. Mary Church. 
Jackson, Abraham, divine and author, h. 1589. s. of a Devon 

clergyman. Preb. of Peterborough, d. 1646 (?) 
Jackson, William, musical composer. " Jackson of Exeter." b. 

Exeter, 28 May, 1730. s. of a grocer, d. 12 July, 1803. 
James, John Haddy, F.R.C.S., surgeon, h. Exeter, 6 July, 1788. 

s. of a retired Bristol merchant. Surgeon to Devon and Exeter 

Hospital, d. Exeter, 17 March, 1869. 
Jeffery, Thomas, nonconformist divine, b. Exeter, 1700 (?) d. 

1728. 
Jenkins, Thomas, painter and dealer in antiquities, h. Devon. 

Pupil of Thomas Hudson (q.v.). d. Yarmouth, 1798. 
Jermin or German, Michael, D.D., divine, b. Knows, Devon, 

1591. s. of Alexander Jermin, merchant and Sheriff of Exeter. 

Chaplain to Charles I. Rector of St. Martin's, Ludgate. i. 

Sevenoaks, 14 Aug., 1659. 
*Jewel, John, D.D., Bishop of Salisbury, b. Bowden, Berrynarbor, 

24 May, 1522. Author of ' Apologia pro Ecclesia Anglicana.' 

Built Cathedral Library at Salisbury, d. Monkton-Farleigh, 

23 Sept., 1571. 
John of Exeter, aHas John Gervays, Bishop of Winchester, b. 

Exeter, d. Rome, 20 Jan., 1268. 

Johns, Ambrose Bowden, painter, b. Plymouth, 1776. d. 
Plymouth, 10 Dec, 1858. 

Johns, Charles Alexander, F.L.S., author, b. Plymouth, 31 Dec, 
1811. d. Winchester, 28 June, 1874. 

Jones, John Pike, antiquary, b. Chudleigh, 1790. s. of a trades- 
man. Curate of North Bovey, and vicar of Butterleigh. d. 
Cheadle, 4 Feb., 1857. 

Joseph of Exeter (Josephus Iscanus), Latin poet (fl. 1190). b. 
Exeter. Accompanied Archbishop Baldwin to Palestine. 
'^'KeatS, John, poet. b. Swan and Hoop, 24, The Pavement, 
Moorfields, London, s. of a Hvery stableman, native of Devon 
or Cornwall, d. Rome, 23 Feb., 1821. 

Kemp, Joseph, musical composer and teacher, b. Exeter, 1778. 
Organist of Bristol Cathedral. Founded musical college at 
Exeter, d. London, 22 May, 1824. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 67 

Kemp or Kempe, William, writer on education. Master of 
Plymouth Grammar School, 1581-1605. 

Kempthorne, Sir John, vice-admiral, h. Widscombe, Ugborough, 
1620. s. of a Modbury attorney, d. Portsmouth, 19 Oct., 
1679. 

Kendall, George, D.D., theologian, h. Cofton, Dawlish. s. of 
collector of customs. Preb. of Exeter. Rector of Kenton. 
d. Cofton, 19 Aug., 1663. 

Kennaway, Sir John, 1st bart., diplomatist, h. Exeter, 6 March, 
1758. 3rd s. of William Kennaway, and Frances, da. of 
Aaron Tozer. First resident at Hyderabad, d. Escot, 1 Jan., 
1836. 

KenniCOtt, Benjamin, D.D., F.R.S., biblical scholar, h. Totnes, 
4 April, 1718. s. of a barber and parish clerk. Radcliffe 
librarian. Canon of Christ Church, Oxford, d. Oxford, 18 
Aug., 1783. hur. in Cath. 

Kenrick, John, classical scholar and historian, h. Exeter, 4 Feb., 
1788. d. York, 7 May, 1877. 

Kerslake, Thomas, bookseller and antiquary, h. Exeter, 1812. 
. Lived at Bristol, d. Clevedon, 5 Jan., 1891. 

Kidley, William, poet. h. Dartmouth, 1606 (?) 

King, John, painter, h. Dartmouth, 1788. d. Dartmouth, 12 
July, 1847. 

King, Peter, 1st Baron King of Ockham, Lord Chancellor, b. 
Exeter, 1669. s. of a grocer and drysalter. d. Ockham, 22 
July, 1734. 

King, Richard John, antiquary, h. Montpelier, Pennycross, 
Plymouth, 18 Jan., 1818. 1st s. of Richard King and Mary 
Grace Windeatt. d. Crediton, 10 Feb., 1879. 

*Kingsley, Charles, author, h. Holne, 12 June, 1819. s. of the 

rector. Author of ' Westward Ho ! ' Rector of Eversley, 
Hants. Professor of modern history at Cambridge. Canon 
of Westminster, d. Eversley, 23 Jan., 1875. 

KittO, John, D.D., author of * Pictorial Bible.' h. Plymouth, 

4 Dec, 1804. s. of a Cornish stonemason, d. Cannstadt, 

25 Nov., 1854. 
Kington, Sir William, 1st bart., M.D., keeper of the privy purse 

to George IV. h. Beer Ferris, 1776. d. Stratford Place, 

Oxford St., London, 11 Oct., 1836. 

Knill, Richard, dissenting minister. - h. Braunton, 14 April, 
1787. s. of a carpenter, d. Chester, 2 Jan., 1857. 



68 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

Lacy, Edmund, Bishop of Exeter for 35 years, h. Gloucester (?) 

d. Chudleigh, 18 Sept., 1455. hur. choir of Exeter Cath. 
Lake, Edward, D.D., Archdeacon of Exeter, h. Exeter 10 Nov., 

1641. d. London, 1 Feb., 1704. bur. St. Katharine, Tower 

Hill. 
Langdon, Richard, organist and composer, h. Exeter, 1730. 

Organist of Exeter, Bristol, and Armagh Cathedrals, d. 

Exeter, 8 Sept., 1803. 
Langton, Stephen, Archbishop of Canterbury and cardinal. 

h. Exeter (Prince) (?) d. 1228. 

Larkham, Thomas, puritan divine, h. Lyme Regis, 17 Aug., 

1602. Vicar of Northam 1626-40, and of Tavistock 1649-69. 

hur. Tavistock, 23 Dec, 1669. 
Lathy, Thomas Pike, novelist, h. Exeter, 1771. 
Lavington John, presbyterian divine, h. 1690 (?) Pastor of Bow 

Meeting, Exeter, 1715. Instituted a " Western Academy " 

at Ottery St. Mary. d. 1759. 

Leach, William Elford, M.D., F.R.S., naturalist, h. Plymouth, 
1790. Wrote on Crustacea, d. Italy, 25 Aug.. 1836. ' 

Leakey, Caroline Woolmer, religious writer, h. 1827. da. of 
James Leakey (q.v.). Lived in Tasmania, d. 1881. 

Leakey, James, artist, h. Exeter, 20 Sept., 1775. His father 
engaged in the wool trade, d. Exeter, 16 Feb., 1865. 

Lee, Alfred Theophilus, LL.D., D.C.L., miscellaneous writer. 
b. 1829. s. of Sir J. Theophilus Lee of Lauriston Hall, Tor- 
quay. Preacher at Gray's Inn. d. Ealing, 19 July, 1883. 

Lee, Frederick Richard, R.A., landscape painter, b. Barnstaple, 
1779. d. South Africa, 5 June, 1879. 

LeofriC, first Bishop of Exeter, b. Cornwall (?) Chancellor to 
Edward the Confessor. Had seal of bishopric removed from 
Crediton to Exeter, d. 10 Feb., 1072. bur. in crypt of Cath. 

Lethbridge, Joseph Watts, dissenting divine, b. Plymouth, 20 
Jan., 1817. d. 27 July, 1885. 

Lethbridge, Walter Stephens, miniature-painter. b. Charlton, 
near Kingsbridge, 1772. s. of a farmer, d. Stonehouse, 1831 (?) 

Letheby, Henry, analytical chemist, b. Plymouth, 1816. Author 
of a book on ' Food.' d. London, 28 March, 1876. 

Ley, James, 1st Earl of Marlborough, judge and pohtician. b. 
Teffont-Ewyas, Wilts(?), 1550. s. of Henry Ley of Ley, 
Devon. Created Baron Lev of Ley in Devonshire, 1624. d. 
1629. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



^Littleton, Sir Thomas, K.B., judge and legal author, b. Frankley, 
Worcestershire, 1402. s. of Thomas Westcote of Westcote, 
Marwood. Author of famous treatise on * Tenures.' d. 
Frankley, 23 Aug., 1481. 

Living or Lyfing, Bishop of Crediton, Abbot of Tavistock, Bishop 
of Worcester, d. 23 March, 1046. bur. Tavistock. 

Lloyd, Ridgway Robert Syers Christian Codner, physician and 
antiquary, b. Devonport, 20 Dec, 1842. s. of a doctor, d. 
St. Albans, 1 June, 1884. 

Loclce, Matthew, musical composer, b. Exeter, 1630 (?) Com- 
poser in ordinary to Charles II. d. London, Aug., 1677. 

Long, Thomas, the elder, divine, b. Exeter, 1621. Preb. of 
Exeter, d. Exeter, 7 Dec, 1707. 

Long, Thomas, the younger, divine, b. 1649. s. of Thomas 
Long, the elder (q.v.). Preb. of Exeter. Rector of Whimple. 
d. Exeter, bur. 28 July. 1707. 

Loosemore, George, Mus. Doc, organist and composer (fi. 1660). 
s. of Henry Loosemore (q.v.). Organist of Trinity College, 
Cambridge. 

Loosemore, Henry, organist and composer, b. Devon, 1600 (?) 
Organist of Exeter Cath. d. 1670. 

Loosemore, John, organ-builder, b. Bishop's Nympton or 
Exeter 1613 (?) bro. of Henry Loosemore (q.v.). Designed 
organ for Exeter Cath. d. 8 April, 1681. 

Lopes, Henry Charles, 1st Baron Ludlow, judge, b. Devonport, 
3 Oct., 1828. s. of Sir Ralph Lopes, bart., of Maristow. d. 
8 Cromwell Place, London, 25 Dec, 1899. 

Louis, Sir Thomas, rear-admiral, b. Exeter, 1759. d. at sea, 17 
May, 1807. 

Lucliombe, Philip, miscellaneous writer and conchologist. b. 
Exeter, d. 1803. 

Limy, Thomas, marine painter, b. London, 1759. Settled at 
Teignmouth, 1810. d. there, 30 Sept., 1837. 

Luscombe, Michael Henry Thornhill, D.C.L., bishop, b. Exetei', 
1776. s. of a physician, d. Lausanne, 24 Aug., 1846. 

Luxmoore, John, D.D., Bishop of Bristol, Hereford, and St. 
Asaph, b. Okehampton, 1756. ^.'St. Asaph, 21 Jan., 1830. 

Lye, Edward, Anglo-Saxon and Gothic scholar, b. Totnes, 1694. 
5. of Thomas Lve, vicar of Broadhempston and a schoolmaster 
at Totnes. d. Yardley, Hastings, 19 Aug., 1767. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



r/lacarthur or McArthur, Sir Edward, K.C.B., lieut. -general. 
h. Bath 1789. s. of John Macarthur (1767-1834) (q.v.) and 
Elizabeth, da. of R. Veal of Judgeworthy, Devon. Com- 
mander of the troops in Australia. Acting governor of Vic- 
toria, d. London, 1872. 

Macarthur, Hannibal Hawkins, Australian wool merchant, b. 
Plymouth, 16 Jan., 1788. nephew of John Macarthur (1767- 
1834), (q.v.). d. Norwood, 6 March, 1861. 

Macarthur, James, author and explorer, b. Camden, New 
South Wales 1798. s. of John Macarthur (1767-1834), (q.v.) 
and Elizabeth, da. of R. Veal of Judgeworthy, Devon, d. 
Sydney, 1867. 

Macarthur, John, chief-justice of New South Wales, b. 1794. s. 
of John Macarthur (1767-1834), (q.v.), and Elizabeth, da. of 
R. Veal of Judgeworthy, Devon. 

Macarthur, John, " the father " of New Squth Wales, b. Ply- 
mouth, 1767. Founder of the Australian wool and wine trades^ 
d. Camden, New South Wales, 10 April, 1834. 

Macarthur, Sir William, colonist, b. Paramatta, New South 
Wales. 1800. s. of John Macarthur (1767-1834), (q.v.), and 
Elizabeth, da. of R. Veal of Judgeworthy, Devon, d. 1882. 

Macbride, John David, principal of Magdalen Hall, Oxford, b. 
Plympton, 28 June, 1778. s. of John Macbride, admiral, d. 
24 Jan., 1868. 

Mallet, Robert, F.R.S., civil engineer and scientific investigator. 
b. Dubhn, 3 June, 1810. s. of John Mallet of Devonshire, d. 
Clapham Road, Surrey, 5 Nov., 1881. 

Manning, James, serjeant-at-law. b. 1781. s. of James Manning. 
Unitarian Minister, Exeter, and Lydia, da. of John Edge of 
Bristol, d. London, 29 Aug., 1866. 

Marriott, John, poet and divine, b. Leicestershire, 1780. Curate 
of Broad Clyst, and St. James and St. Lawrence, Exeter. Author 
of 'Marriage is like a Devonshire Lane.' d. London, 31 
March, 1825. 

Mirtin, Matthew, naturalist and philanthropist, b. Somerset, 
1748. Exeter tradesman, d. Blackheath, 20 Nov., 1838. 

Martin, Richard, M.P., Recorder of London, b. Otterton , 1570. 
s. of Wilham Martin, and Anne, da. of Richard Parker of 
Sussex. Celebrated as a wit. d. 31 Oct., 1618. bur. Temple 
Church, 



\ 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 71 



Martyn, William, M.P., lawyer and historian, b. Exeter, hap. 
St. Petrock's, Exeter, 19 Sept., 1562. s. of Nicholas Martyn of 
Exeter, and Mary, da. of Lennard Yeo of Hatherleigh. Re- 
corder of Exeter, hur. St. Petrock's, Exeter, 12 April, 1617. 

Maunder, Samuel, compiler of educational dictionaries, b. 1785. 
Of a Devon family settled near Barnstaple, d. Islington, 30 
April, 1849. 

Maurice, James Wilkes, rear-admiral, b. Devonport, 10 Feb., 
1775. d. Stonehouse, 4 Sept., 1857. 

^Maynard, Sir John, M.P., judge, h. Abbey House, Tavistock, 
1602. s. of Alexander Maynard, and Honora, da. of Arthur 
Arscott of Tetcott. d. Gunnersbury, 9 Oct., 1660. bur. 
Ealing. 

Mayne, Cuthbert, first seminary priest executed in England, b. 
Youlston, near Barnstaple. Executed Launceston, 29 Nov., 
1577. 

Mayne, Jasper, D.D., Archdeacon of Chichester and dramatist. 
b. Hatherleigh. bap. there, 23 Nov., 1604. Chaplain in or- 
dinary to Charles II. d. Oxford, 6 Dec, 1672. hur. Christ 
Church Cath. 

Mayne, Zachary, religious writer, h. Exeter, 1631. bap. St. 
Petrock's, Exeter, 1 Jan., 1632. Master of Exeter Grammar 
School, d. Exeter, 11 Nov., 1694. 

Mayo, Henry, D.D., LL.D., dissenting minister. " The Literary 
Anvil." b. Plymouth (?), 1733. Pastor of Independent 
Church, Wapping. d. London, 4 April, 1793. 

Merivale, Charles, D.C.L., historian and Dean of Ely. b. London, 
8 March, 1808. s. of John Herman Merivale (q.v.). Author of 
' History of the Romans under the Empire.' d. 27 Dec, 1893. 
hur. Ely. 

Merivale, Herman, C.B., D.C.L., under-secretary for India, b. 
Cockwood House, Dawlish, 8 Nov., 1806. s. of John Herman 
Merivale (q.v.). Professor of political economy at Oxford, d. 
South Kensington, 8 Feb., 1874. 

Merivale, John Herman, scholar and minor poet. b. Exeter, 
5 Aug., 1779. grandson of Samuel Merivale (q.v.). Bank- 
ruptcy commissioner, d. 25 April, 1844. bur. Hampstead. 

Merivale, Samuel, Presbyterian minister, b. 1715. Minister at 
Tavistock, 1743. Tutor at Exeter Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, 1761. d. \11\. 



72 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Merrifield, Charles Watkins, F.R.S., mathematician, h. London < 
(or Brighton), 20 Oct., 1827. s. of John Merrifield of Tavis- 
tock. Principal of Royal School of Naval Architecture and 
Marine Engineering, d. Brighton, 1 Jan., 1884. 

Milman, Sir Francis, 1st Bart., M.D., F.R.C.P., physician, h. East 
Ogwell, 31 Aug., 1746. s. of the rector. Physician to George 
III. d. Pinner Grove, Middlesex, 24 June, 1821. hur. Chelsea. 

Milman, Henry Hart, D.D., author and Dean of St. Paul's, h. 1 

London, 10 Feb., 1791. s. of Sir Francis Milman (q.v.). Pro- 
fessor of poetry at Oxford. Author of ' History of the Jews.' 
d. Ascot, 24 Sept., 1868. bur. St. Paul's. 

Milman, Robert, D.D., Bishop of Calcutta, h. Easton-in-Gordano, 
Somerset, 25 Jan., 1816. s. of Sir WilHam George Milman, 
bart., of Levaton, Devon, and grandson of Sir Francis Milman 
(q.v.). d. India, 15 March, 1876. 

Mitchell, Sir WilHam, maritime writer, h. Modbury , 1811. Intro- 
duced international code of signals for ships, d. Strode, near 
Ivybridge, 1 May, 1878. 

Modyford, Sir James, bart., merchant; colonial agent, deputy 
governor of Jamaica, h. Exeter (?) bro. of Sir Thomas Mody- 
ford (q.v.). d. Jamaica, 1673. 

Modyford, Sir Thomas, bart., governor of Jamaica, h. Exeter, 
1620 (?) s. of John Modyford, mayor of Exeter in 1622. ' Kins- | 
man ' or ' cousin ' of George Monck, Duke of Albemarle " 
(q.v.). d. Jamaica, hur, 2 Sept., 1679. 

Mogford, Thomas, painter, b. Exeter, 1 May, 1809. s. of a | 
veterinary surgeon at Northlew. d. Guernsey, 1868. 

Monck, Christopher, 2nd Duke of Albemarle, K.G. b. 1653. s. 
of George Monck (q.v.) and Ann Clarges. Earl of Torrington, 
1660-70. Lord-Lieutenant of Devon. Chancellor of Cam- 
bridge University. Raised Devon and Cornwall Militia against 
Monmouth. Governor-General of Jamaica, d. Jamaica, 1688. 

*Monck or Monk, George, 1st Duke of Albemarle, K.G. b. Land- 
cross, or Potheridge in Merton, 6 Dec, 1608. s. of Sir Thomas 
Monck, kt., and Elizabeth, da. of Sir George Smith of Mayd- 
ford. Completed conquest of Scotland. As Admiral, defeated 
Dutch off North Foreland. General-in-chief of land forces and 
joint-commander of Navy. Arranged restoration of Charles II. 
Kept order in London during the plague and the great fire. 
First Lord of the Treasury, d. Newhall, Essex. 3 Jan., 1670. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 73 

Monck or Monk, Nicholas, D.D., provost of Eton and Bishop of 

Hereford, h. Potheridge, Merton, 1610. bro. of George 

Monck (q.v.). Rector of Plymptree. d. Westminster, 17 Dec, 

1661. 6wr. in Abbey. 
Moore, George, M.D., physician and author. 6. Plymouth, 11 

March, 1803. s. of a dispenser at infirmary. Physician in 

London, d. Hastings, 30 Oct., 1880. 
Moore, Henry, unitarian minister and hymn-writer, b. Plymouth, 

30 March, 1732. His mother was da. of William Bellew of 

Stockleigh Court. Minister at Modbury. d. Liskeard, 2 Nov., 

1802. 
Moore, John, dissenting minister, h. Musbury, 1642 (?) Educated 

Colyton. Pastor of Christ Church Chapel, Bridgwater, d. 

23 Aug., 1717. 
Moreman, John, D.D., divine, h. South Hole, Hartland, 1490 (?) 

Principal of Hart Hall, Oxford. Vicar of Menheniot. Cornwall. 

Canon of Exeter, d. Menheniot, 1554. 

Morice, Sir Wilham, M.P., secretary of State and theologian, h. 
Exeter, 6 Nov., 1602. s. of Dr. Evan Morice, of Carnarvonshire, 
Chancellor of Exeter Diocese. High Sheriff of Devon. Founded 
almshouse at Sutcombe. d. Werrington, 12 Dec, 1676. 

Mortimer, George Ferris Whidborne, schoolmaster and divine, h. 
Bishopsteignton, 22 July, 1805. s. of a country gentleman. 
Head Master of City of London School, 1840—65. Preb. of 
St. Paul's, d. Hampton Wick, 7 Sept., 1871. 

Morwen, Moring, or Morven, John, divine, h. 1518 (?) " A Devon- 
shire man of good family." President of Corpus Christi College, 
Oxford. Preb. of St. Paul's. A famous Greek scholar, d. 
1561 (?) 

Mowbray (formerly Cornish), Sir John Robert, 1st bart., M.P., 
" Father of the House of Commons." b. Exeter, 3 June, 1815. 
s. of. Robert StribHng Cornish, d. Onslow Gardens, 22 April, 
1899. bur. Strathfield Mortimer. 

Mudge, John, F.R.S., physician, b. Bideford, 1721. s. of 
Zachariah Mudge (q.v.) and Mary Fox. d. Plymouth, 26 Mar., 
1793. 

Mudge, Richard Zachariah, lieut.-col., Royal Engineers, F.R.S. 
b. Plymouth, 6 Sept., 1790. s. of William Mudge (q.v.). d. 
Teignmouth, 24 Sept., 1854. bur. D/snbury. 

Mudge, Thomas, horologist. b. Exeter, 1717. s. of Zachariah 
Mudge (q.v.). Retired to Plymouth, 1771. Improved mari- 
time chronometers. King's watchmaker, d. Newington 
Place, Surrey, 14 Nov., 1794. 



74 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

Mudge, Thomas, horologist. h. 16 Dec, 1760. s. of Thomas 

Mudge (1717-1794) (q.v.). d. Chilcompton, near Bath, 10 

Nov., 1843. 
Mudge, William, major-general. Royal Artillery, F.R.S. h. 

Plymouth, TDec, 1762. s. of John Mudge (q.v.). Director 

of ordnance survey, d. 17 April, 1820. 

Mudge, William, naval commander, h. 1796. s. of William 
Mudge (1762-1820) (q.v.). Surveyed east coats of Africa 
and coast of Ireland, d. Howth, 20 July, 1837. 

Mudge, Zachariah, divine, h. Exeter, 1694, " of humble paren- 
tage." Master of Bideford Grammar School. Incumbent of 
Abbotsham and St. Andrew's, Plymouth. Preb. of Exeter. 
d. Cofileet, Devon, 2 April, 1769. 

Mudge, Zachary, admiral, h. Plymouth, 22 Jan., 1770. s. of 
John Mudge (q.v.). d. Plympton, 26 Oct., 1852. 

Musgrave, Samuel, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.R,S.. physician and classical 
scholar, h. Washfield, 29 Sept., 1732. s. of Richard Mus- 
grave, gent. Educated Barnstaple. " Had few superiors as 
a Greek scholar." d. Hart St., Bloomsbury, 4 July, 1780. 

Newcomen, Elias, schoolmaster, h. Bourne, Lines., 1550 (?) 
Incumbent of Stoke Fleming 1600. d. and hur. there, 1614. 

*Newcomen, Thomas, inventor of the atmospheric steam-engine. 
h. Dartmouth, hap. St. Saviour's, 28 Feb., 1663. great- 
grandson of Elias Newcomen (q.v.). An ironmonger or black- 
smith. Partner with Thomas Savery (q.v.). d. London(?), 
1729. 

Newcourt, Richard, the elder, topographical draughtsman, hap. 
Washfield. , s. of Philip Newcourt of .Tiverton, hur. Somer- 
ton, Som., 1679. 

Newcourt, Richard, the younger, author of ' Repertorium 
Ecclesiasticum.' s. of Richard Newcourt, the elder (q.v.). 
Principal registrar of London. ^.1716. 

Newte, John, divine, h. Tiverton 1655 (?) s. of Richard Newte 
(q.v.). Rector of Tidcombe and Pitt's portions, Tiverton. 
d. 7 March, 1716. 

Newte, Richard, divine, b. Tiverton, 24 Feb., 1613. s. of the 
town clerk. Rector of Tidcombe and Clare portions, Tiverton, 
and of Heanton Punchardon. d. Tiverton, 10 Aug., 1678. 

Newton, George, nonconformist divine, h. Devon, 1602. Vicar 
of Taunton, d. Taunton, 12 June, 1681. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 75 

NichollS, James Fawckner, F.S.A., antiquary and librarian, b. 
Sidmouth, 26 May, 1818. City librarian of Bristol, d. Fish- 
guard, 19 Sept., 1883. 

Nicholas, Sir Nicholas Harris, G.C.M.G., F.S.A., antiquary, b. 
Dartmouth, 10 March, 1799. s. of John Harris Nicholas, R.N. 
d. Boulogne, 3 Aug., 1848. 

NichollS, Mathias, jurist, b. 1630 (?) s. of Mathias Nicholls, 
' preacher to the town of Plymouth.' Compiled first code of 
laws in New York. Mayor of New York. First judge of com- 
mon pleas. New York. d. America, 22 Dec, 1687. 

Norman, John, presbyterian divine, b. Trusham, 1622. Vicar 
of Bridgwater, d. Bridgwater, bur. 9 Feb., 1669. 

North brooke, John, preacher and writer against plays (fl. 1568 — 
1579). b. Devon. 
*NorthCOte, James, R.A., painter and author, b. Plymouth, 22 
Oct., 1746. s. of a watchmaker, d. Argyll Place, London, 
13 July, 1831. bur. St. Marylebone Church. 

NorthCOte, Sir John, 1st bart., M.P., politician, b. 1599. s. of 
John Northcote of Hayne, Newton St. Cyres, and Susan, da. 
of Sir Hugh Pollard, bur. Newton St. Cyres, 24 June, 1676. 

*NorthCOte, Sir Stafford Henry, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh. b. London 
27 Oct., 1818. s. of Henry Stafford Northcote of Marylebone, 
and Agnes Mary, da. of Thomas Cockburn ; grandson of Sir 
Stafford Henry Northcote of The Pynes, Upton Pyne, and 
Jaquetta, da. of Charles Baring of Larkbear. Chancellor of 
the Exchequer. Foreign secretary, d. 10 Downing St., 
London, 12 Jan., 1887. bur. Upton Pyne. 

Northleigh, John, M.D., LL.D., physician, b. Hamburg or 
Cadeleigh, 1657. s. of John Northleigh of Exminster. Prac- 
tised at Exeter, d. Exeter, 17 Jan., 1705. 

Northmore, Thomas, F.S.A., miscellaneous writer and inventor. 
b. Cleve House, Devon, 1766. Discovered ossiferous nature 
of Kent's Cavern, Torquary. d. near Axminster. 20 May, 
1851. 

Ockley, Simon, orientalist, b. Exeter, 1678. Came of a "gentle- 
man's family " of Great Ellingham, Norfolk. Vicar of 
Swavesey. Author of ' History of the Saracens.' Professor 
of Arabic at Cambridge, d. Swavesey, 9 Aug., 1720. 

Odger, George, trade unionist, b. Roborough, 1820. s. of a 
Cornish miner. A shoemaker, d. \S11. 

Ogle, John, gamester and buffoon, b. Ashburton, 1647 (?) s. of 
respectable and well-to-do parents, d. 1685 (?) 



76 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Oliver, George, D.D., historian of Exeter, h. Newington, Surrey, 
9 Feb., 1781. Forty-four years Jesuit missioner at St. Nicholais 
Priory, Exeter. Author of ' Monasticon Exoniensis.' d. 
Exeter, 23 March, 1861. 

Ordgar or Orgar, ealdorman of Devon, h. Tavistock, d. 971. 

Oxenham, John, sea-captain, b. Plymouth or South Tawton. 
Expeditions to Central America, hanged Lima 1575. 

Palk, Sir Robert, 1st bart., M.P., governor of Madras, h. Am- 
brooke, Devon, 1717. Palk Strait named after him. d. 
Haldon House, Devon, 1798. 

Palmer, Sir James Frederick, Australian politician, h. Torring- 
ton, 1804. s. of the rector; great-nephew of Sir Joshua 
Reynolds (q.v.). First president of the Victorian legislative 
assembly, d. Melbourne, 23 April, 1871. 

Palmer, Mary (nee Reynolds), author, h. Plympton, 9 Feb., 
1716. sis. of Sir Joshua Reynolds (q.v.). mar. John Palmer, 
rector of Torrington. Author of ' Devonshire Dialogue.' 
d. 27 May, 1794. 

Parker, Edmund, 2nd Earl of Morley. h. 10 June, 1810. s. of 
John Parker, 1st Earl of Morley (q.v.). Deputy-warden of 
the Stannaries, d. 28 Aug., 1864. 

Parker, Henry Perlee, artist, h. Devonport, 15 March, 1795. 
s. of a drawing-master, d. London, 11 Nov., 1873. 

Parker, John, 2nd Baron Boringdon and 1st Earl of Morley, 
D.C.L., F.R.S. h. Saltram(?), 5 May, 1772. d. Saltram, 15 
March, 1840. 

Parker, Richard, mutineer, h. Exeter 1767 (?) s. of a baker and 
corn factor (?) President of the mutineers at the Nore. hanged 
30 June, 1797. 

Parr, Bartholomew, M.D., medical writer, h. Exeter, 1750. 
Physician to the Devon and Exeter Hospital, d. Exeter, 20 
Nov., 1810. 

Parsons, Ehza (nee Phelp), novehst and dramatist, h. Plymouth, 
da. of a wine merchant. Wrote over 60 vols, of novels, d. 
1811. 

Parsons, Elizabeth (nee Rooker), hymn-writer, h. Tavistock, 5 
June, 1812. d. of a congregational minister, d. Plymouth, 

Parsons, Gertrude (nee Hext), noveUst. h. Plymouth, 1812. 
d. 1891. ^ 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 77 

Parsons, James, M.D., F.R.S., F.S.A., physician and antiquary. 

h. Barnstaple, 1705. Practised in London, d. Red Lion 

Square, 4 April, 1770. 
Parsons, Robert, musical composer, h. Exeter. drowned 

Newark-upon-Trent, 25 Jan., 1570. 

Patch, Richard, murderer, h. Heavitree, 1770 (?) s. of a farmer. 
executed 8 April, 1806. 

Patch, Thomas, painter and engraver, h. Exeter (?) d. Florence, 

30 April, 1782. 
Patteson, John Coleridge, first missionary bishop in Melanesia. 

th. 1827. s. of Sir John Patteson, judge, and Frances Duke 
Coleridge. Brought up at Feniton Court, near Ottery St. 
Mary. Spoke 23 languages, killed at Nukapu, 16 Sept., 1871. 
Payne, William, water-colour painter (fl. 1776—1809). h. 
Devon (?) Lived at Devonport till 1790. Became the most 
popular drawing-master in London. Invented Payne's grey. 
Peacock, George, sea-captain and shipowner, h. Starcross, 1805. 
s. of a master in the navy. d. Liverpool, 6 June, 1883. hur. 
Starcross. 
Pearce, Samuel, hymn-writer, h. Plymouth, 20 July, 1766. s. 
of a silversmith. Baptist minister in Birmingham, d. Bir- 
mingham. 10 Oct., 1799. 

Peard, George, parliamentarian. 6. Barnstaple, 1594 (?) Assisted 
in defence of Barnstaple against Rupert, d. 1644. 

Pearl, Cora, courtesan (real name Emma Elizabeth Crouch). 
h. East Stonehouse, 23 Feb., 1842. da. of a musical director 
and composer of ' Kathleen Mavourneen,' ' Dermot As- 
thore,' etc. Resided chiefly in Paris, d. Paris, 8 July, 1886. 

Pearse, William, ejected minister, h. Ermington. hap. 26 
Jan., 1625. d. Ashburton, 17 March, 1691. 

Peirce, James, dissenting divine. 6. Wapping, 1674 (?) Minister 
at Exeter 1713-9. d. St. Leonard's, Exeter, 30 March, 1726. 

Pengelly, William, F.R.S., F.G.S., geologist, h. East Looe. 12 
Jan., 1812. s. of Richard Pengelly, captain of a coasting 
vessel, and Sarah Prout. Went to Torquay, 1836. d. there,. 
16 March, 1894. 

Peryam, Sir Wilham, M.P., judge, h. Exeter, 1534. s. of John 
Peryam of Exeter, and Ehzabeth, da. of Robert Hone of 
Ottery St. Mary. d. Little Fulford, near Crediton, 9 Oct., 1604. 

Petre, Sir Wilham, D.C.L., Seicretary of State, h. Tor-Newton 
in Torbrian, 1502 (?) s. of a tanner ? d. Ingatestone, Essex^ 
13 Jan., 1572. 



78 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Phelps, Samuel, actor, h. Devonport, 13 Feb., 1804. Produced 
34 of Shakespeare's plays at Sadler's Wells, Islington, d. 
near Epping, 6 Nov., 1878. bur. Highgate. 

Philipotts, Henry, Bishop of Exeter, 1830-69. b. Bridgwater, 6 
May, 1778. d. Torquay, 18 Sept., 1869. 

Pierce, Samuel Eyles, Calvinist divine, b. Up-Ottery, 23 June, 
1746. s. of Adam Pierce, a cabinetmaker of Honiton, and 
Susannah, da. of Joseph Chilcott, vicar of Up-Ottery. A 
popular London preacher, d. Acre Lane, Clapham, 10 May, 
1829. 

Pike or Pealce, Richard, adventurer (fl. 1620—1626). b. Tavis- 
tock. 

Pim, Bedford Clapperton Trevelyan, admiral, b. Bideford, 12 
June, 1826. d. Deal, 30 Sept., 1886. 

Pitts, Joseph, traveller, b. Exeter, 1663. PubHshed at Exeter 
(1704) the first authentic account by an Englishman of the 
pilgrimage to Mecca, d. 1735 (?) 

Poie, Sir Charles Morice, G.C.B., admiral of the fleet, b. 18 
Jan., 1757. s. of Reginald Pole of Stoke Damerel. d. Den- 
ham Abbey, Herts., 6 Sept., 1830. 

Pole, Sir WilHam, antiquary, b. Shute. bap. Colyton, 27 Aug., 
1561. Author of ' The Description of Devonshire.' d. 
Colcombe, Colyton, 9 Feb., 1635. 

Pollard, Sir Hugh, 2nd bart., M.P , royalist, s. of Sir Lewis 
Pollard, bart., of King's Nympton. Governor of Dartmouth, 
1645. Governor of Guernsey and comptroller of Charles H's 
household at the Restoration, d. 27 Nov., 1666. 

Pollard, Sir John, M.P., speaker of the House of Commons, s. 
of Walter Pollard of Plvmouth, and Avice, da. of Richard 
Pollard of Way. d. 1551. 

Pollard, Sir Lewis, judge, b. Devon 1465, (?) s. of Robert Pollard 

of Roborough, near Torrington. d. 1540. 
■Porter, Whitworth, major-general. Royal Engineers, b. Win- 

slade, near Exeter, 25 Sept., 1827. Author of ' History of the 

Corps of Royal Engineers.' d. 27 May, 1892. bur. St. 

Michael's Church, York Town, Surrey. 

Praed, Winthrop Mackworth, M.P., poet. b. 35 John Street, 
Bedford Row, London, 26 July, 1802. s. of William Mack- 
worth Praed of Bitton House, Teignmouth. d. Chester 
Square, 15 July, 1839. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 79 

Preston, Richard, M.P., legal author, h. Ashburton, 1768. s. of 
Rev. John Preston of Okehampton. Author of * Treatise on 
Conveyancing.' d. Lee House, Chulmleigh, 20 June, 1850. 

Prideaux, Sir Edmond, bart., M.P., lawyer and poUtician. h. 
Netherton in Farway, near Honiton. s. of Sir Edmond 
Prideaux, bart., lawyer. Attorney-general. Reformed postal 
service, d. 19 Aug., 1659. 

Prideaux, Frederick, conveyancer, h. 1 Portland Square, 
Plymouth, 27 April, 1817. Author of ' Precedents in Con- 
veyancing.' d. Taunton, 21 Nov. 1891. 

Prideaux, John, D.D., Bishop of Worcester, h. Stowford in 
Harford, near Ivybridge, 17 Sept., 1578. " Of mean origin." 
Regius professor of divinity and vice-chancellor, Oxford, d. 
Bredon, 29 July, 1650. 

Prideaux, John, brigadier-general, b. 1718. s. of Sir John 
Prideaux of Netherton, near Honiton. killed Fort Niagara, 
19 July, 1759. 

Prince, John, author of * Worthies of Devon.' h. Axminster, 
1643. ' Vicar of Berry Pomeroy, 1681-1723. d. there, 9 Sept., 
1723. 

Pring, Martin, sea-captain, h. Awliscombe, 1580. General of 
the East India Company's ships, bur. St. Stephen's Church, 
Bristol, 1626 (?) 

Prout, John Skinner, water-colour painter, b. Plymouth, 1806. 
nephew of Samuel Prout (q.v.). d. London, 29 Aug., 1876. 

Prout, Samuel, water-colour painter, b. Plymouth, 17 Sept., 
1783. d. Camberwell, 9 or 10 Feb., 1852. 

Prowse, William, rear-admiral, b. Devon 1752 (?) Of humble 
origin ; entered navy as an able seaman, d. 23 March, 1826. 

Prowse, WiUiam Jeffery, humorist, b. Torquay, 6 May, 1836. 
d. Cimiez, near Nice, Easter Sunday, 1870. 

Puilen, Robert, philosopher, theologian, and cardinal, b. Exeter 
(Camden). Chancellor of the Holy Roman Church, d. 1147 (?) 

Pulman, George Philip Rigney, antiquary, b. Axminster, 21 Feb., 
1819. Author of ' The Book of the Axe.' d. Uplyme, 3 
Feb., 1880. bur. Axminster. 

Quick, John, nonconformist divine, b. Plymouth 1636. d. 29 

April, 1706. 
Quivil or Quivel, Peter de, Bishop of Exeter, b. Exeter, s. of 

Peter and Helewisia Quivel. Rebuilt transept towers, d. 

1 Oct., 1291. bur. in Cath. 



80 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



RainoldS or Reynolds, John, president of Corpus Chnsti College, 

Oxford, h. Pinhoe, 1549. bro. of William Ramolds (q.v.). 

Took prominent part in Hampton Court conference, d. 21 

May, 1607. 
RainoldS, William, Roman Catholic divme. h. Pinhoe 1544 (.?) 

bro. of John Rainolds (q.v.). Professor of divinity and Hebrew 

at the English CoUege, Rheims. d. Antwerp, 24 Aug., 1594. 
Ralegh, Sir Carew, M.P., naval commander, ft. 1550 (?) bro. of 

Sir Walter Ralegh (q.v.). d. 1625 (?) 
Ralegh, Carew, M.P., politician, h. 1605. s. of Sir Walter 

Ralegh (q.v.). Governor of Jersey, d. 1666. 
* Ralegh, Sir Walter, military and naval commander and author. 

h. Hayes Barton, East Budleigh, 1552 (?) executed Old Palace 

Yard, Westminster, 29 Oct., 1618. hur. St. Margaret's Church. 
Ralegh or Raleigh, Walter, D.D., divine, h. 1586. s. of Sir 

Carew Ralegh (q.v.). Dean of Wells, d. Wells, 1646. 
Raleigh, William de. Bishop of Norwich and Winchester, h, 

Devon d. Tours, 1 Sept., 1250. 
Randall, William, musician (fl. 1584-1603). " In early hfe a 

Chorister of Exeter Cath." 
Rede or Reade, William, Bishop of Chichester, h. diocese of 

Exeter. Built Library at Merton College, Oxford, d. 18 Aug., 

1385. hur. Selsey. 
Rendel, James Meadows, F.R.S., engineer, h. near Okehampton, 

1799. s. of a farmer and surveyor. Constructed Torquay 

Breakwater, Birkenhead Docks, and Portland Harbour, d. 

10, Kensington Palace Gardens, 21 Nov., 1856. 
Rendle, John, divine, h. Tiverton, 1758. d. near Tiverton, 

22 May, 1815. 
Rennell, James, geographer, h. Chudleigh, 3 Dec, 1742. s. of a 

Captain in the Royal Artillery. Surveyor-General of Bengal. 

d. London, 29 March, 1830. hur. Westminster Abbey. 
Reynardson, Sir Abraham, Lord Mayor of London, b. Plymouth, 

1590. s. of a Turkey merchant, d. Tottenham, 4 Oct., 1661. 
Reynell, Edward, divine, h. West Ogwell, 1612. Rector of West 

Ogwell. Committed suicide there, 1663. 
Reynolds, John, author (fl. 1621—1650). A merchant of Exeter. 
^Reynolds, Sir Joshua, P.R.A., D.C.L., portrait-painter, h. Plymp- 

ton Earls, 16 July, 1723. s. of Rev. Samuel Reynolds, master 

of the Grammar School, and Theophila Potter. First President 

of Royal Academy. " The greatest portrait-painter that 

England has produced." d. Leicester Fields, 23 Feb., 1792. 

hur. in crypt of St. Paul's. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 81 

Rhodes, Hugh, author of the " Book of Nurture " (fl. 1550 — 1555). 
" Born and bred in Devonshire." 

Richards, Nathaniel, dramatist (fl. 1630—1654). h. Kentisbury. 
s. of the rector. 

Richards, Thomas, translator, h. Devon. Monk at Tavistock. 
Prior of Totnes, 1528. ^. 1564 (?) 

Ridgeway, Sir Thomas, 1st bart., 1st Baron Ridgeway, and 1st 
Earl of Londonderry, h. Tor-Mohun or Tor- Abbey (Prince), 
1565 (?) s. of Thomas Ridgeway of Tor-Mohun. Treasurer in 
Ireland, d. London, 1631. hur. Tor-Mohun. 

Rippon, John, baptist divine, h. Tiverton, 29 April, 1751. s. of 
a baptist minister ; bro. of Thomas Rippon (q.v.). Pastor in 
Carter Lane and New Park St., London, d. London, 17 Dec, 
1836. hur. Bunhill Fields. 

Rippon, Thomas, chief cashier of Bank of England, h. Tiverton, 
1761. s. of a baptist minister ; bro. of John Rippon (q.v.). d. 
at the Bank, 13 Aug., 1835. " During over fifty years' service 
he took but one holiday, which he abridged to three days." 

Risdon, Tristram, topographer, h. Winscot, St. Giles, 1580 (?) 
Author of * Survey of Devon.' d. 1640. 

Roger of Ford (fl. 1 170), author; called also Roger Gustun, Gustum, 
and Roger of Citeaux. Cistercian monk of Ford. 

Rogers, Sir Edward, M.P., comptroller of Queen Elizabeth's 
household, h. 1498 (?) s. of George Rogers of Lopit, Devon, d. 
1567 (?) 

Rogers, John, divine, h. Plymouth, 17 July, 1778. s. of John 
Rogers, M.P. Canon of Exeter, d. Penrose, 12 June, 1856. 

Rogers, Philip Hutchings, painter, b. Plymouth, 1786 (?) d. near 
Baden-Baden, 25 June, 1853. 

Roiie, Henry, M.P., judge, b. 1589 (?) s. of Robert Rolle of 
Heanton ; bro. of John Rolle (q.v.). Chief -just ice. Commis- 
sioner of exchequer. d. 30 July, 1656. bur. Shapwick, near 
Glastonbury. 

Rolle, John, M.P., merchant and politician, bap. Petrockstow, 
13 April, 1598. s. of Robert Rolle, of Heanton ; bro. of Henry 
Rolle (q.v.). bur. Petrockstow, 18 Nov., 1648. 

Rolle, John, Baron Rolle of Stevenstone. b. 16 Oct., 1750. s. of 
Denys Rolle of Bicton. M.P. for Devonshire, d. Bicton, 
3 April, 1842. 



82 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Rous, Francis, M.P., puritan, h. Dittisham, 1579. s. of Sir 
Anthony Rous and Elizabeth, da. of Thomas Southcote. 
Provost of Eton College. Speaker of Little ParHament, and 
member of Protector's Council of State, d. Acton, 1659. 

Rowe, John, nonconformist divine, h. Crediton, 1626. d. 
12 Oct., 1677. bur. Bunhill Fields. 

Rowe, John, unitarian minister, h. 17 April, 1764. s. of William 
Rowe of Spencecomb, near Crediton. Founded Western 
Unitarian Society, d. Siena, 2 July, 1832. hur. Leghorn. 

*Rowe, Nicholas, poet laureate and dramatist, h. Little Barford, 
Beds., 30 June, 1674. s. of John Rowe of Lamerton, Devon, 
serjeant-at-law. hur. Westminster Abbey, 19 Dec, 1718. 

Rowe, Samuel, topographer, h. 4 Nov., 1793. s. of Benjamin 
Rowe, yeoman, of Sherford Barton, Brixton. Vicar of Credi- 
ton. Author of * Perambulation of Dartmoor.' d. Crediton, 
15 Sept., 1853. 

Rundle, Thomas, D.C.L., Bishop of Derry. h. Milton Abbot, 
1688 (?) s. of Thomas Rundle, an Exeter clergyman, d. Dublin, 
14 April, 1743. 

Russell, John, " the sporting parson." b. Dartmouth, 21 Dec, 
1795. d. Black Torrington, 28 April, 1883. bur. Swymbridge. 

Rygge, Rigge, or Rugge, Robert, D.D., divine, b. Devon. Chan- 
cellor of Oxford Univ. Chancellor of Exeter Cath., and vicar- 
general for the Bishop, d. 1410. 

Salter, James, divine, b. 1650. s. of James Salter, plebeius, 
Exeter. Vicar of St. Mary Church, 1680. Master of Exeter 
Grammar School, 1684. d. 1718 (?) 

Salter, WilHam, painter, hap. Honiton, 26 Dec, 1804. Vice- 
president of Society of British Artists, d. Devon Lodge, West 
Kensington, 22 Dec, 1875. 

Sanford or Sandford, Joseph, scholar and book-collector, s. of 
George Sanford, of Topsham. Rector of Huntspill, 1739- 
1774. d. 25 Sept., 1774. 

Saunders, John, author, h. Barnstaple, 2 Aug., 1810. s. of John 
Saunders, bookseller and publisher, and Sarah Northcote of 
Exeter, d. Richmond, Surrey, 29 March, 1895. 

Saunders, John Cunningham, ophthalmic surgeon, b. Levis tone, 
10 Oct., 1773. s. of John Cunningham and Jane Saunders. 
Founded Roval London Ophthalmic Hospital, d. Ely Place, 
9 Feb., 1810. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 83 



Saunders, Katherine (afterwards Mrs. Cooper), novelist, b, 
London {?), 1841. da. of John Saunders (q.v.). d. 7 Aug., 
1894. 

Savery, Thomas, military engineer, h. Shilstone, near Modbury, 
1650 (?) s. of Richard Savery and grandson of Christopher 
Savery of Totnes. Inventor of first direct steam-pressure 
jte pump. Entered into partnership with Thomas Newcomen 
■ (q.v.). d. St. Margaret, Westminster, 1715. 

Savile, Bourchier Wrey, author. 6. 11 March, 1817. s. of Albany 
* Savile, M.P., of Okehampton, and Eleonora Elizabeth, da. of 
W Sir Bourchier Wrey, bart. Rector of West Buckland and 
B Dunchideock-with-Shillingford St. George, d. Shillingford, 
i 14 April, 1888. 

Scotti Henry Young Darracott, F.R.S., major-general. Royal 
Engineers, h. Plymouth, 2 Jan., 1822. Constructed Royal 
Albert Hall. d. Silverdale, Sydenham, 16 April, 1883. hur. 
Highgate. 

Scott, Robert, divine and scholar, h. Bondleigh, 26 Jan., 1811. 
s. of the rector. Master of Balliol College, Oxford. Dean of 
Rochester. Joint-author of Liddell and Scott's Greek-English 
Lexicon, d. Rochester, 2 Dec, 1887. 

Seagar, John, divine, h. Broad Clyst. Received living there, 
1631. d. Pitminster, Som., 13 April, 1656. 

Searle, Thomas, rear-admiral, h. 29 May, 1777. s. of James 
Searle of Staddlescombe. d. Kingston House, Portsea, 18 
March, 1849. 

Sedding, Edmund, architect and musician, h. 20 June, 1836. 
s. of Richard and Peninnah Sedding of Summerstown, near 
Okehampton ; bro. of John Dando Sedding (q.v.). d. Pen- 
zance, 11 June, 1868. 

Sedding, John Dando, F.R.I.B.A., architect, h. Eton, 13 April, 
1838. bro. of Edmund Sedding (q.v.). Diocesan architect for 
Bath and Wells, d. Winsford Vicarage, Somerset, 7 April, 
1891. 

Segar or Seager, Francis, translator and poet (fl. 1549-1563). 
Perhaps a member of the yeoman family of Seagar or Segar, of 
Broad Clyst. 

Seller, Abednego, nonjuring divine, h. Plymouth, 1646 (?) Vicar 
of Charles, Plymouth, d. London, 1705. 

^Seymour, Sir Edward, 4th bart., M.P., speaker of the House of 
Commons, h. Berry Pomeroy (?), 1633. s. of Sir Edward 
Seymour, 3rd bart. Comptroller of Queen Anne's household. 
d. Maiden Bradley, 17 Feb., 1708. 



84 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Sharpham, Edward, dramatist (fl. 1607). s. of Richard Sharp- 
ham, of " Colehanger," Devon. 

Shebbeare, John, political writer, h. Bideford, 1709. s. of an 
attorney and corn factor. Pilloried for pohtical libel, d. 
Eaton Square, Pimhco, 1 Aug., 1788. 

Short, Thomas Vowler, D.D., Bishop of Sodor and Man, and of 
St. Asaph, h. Dawlish, 16 Sept., 1790. s. of William Short, 
Archdeacon of Cornwall, and Elizabeth Hodgkinson. Incum- 
bent of Stockleigh Pomeroy. d.\S April, 1872. 

Shortland, Edward, writer on New Zealand, h. Courtlands in 
Charleton, near Kingsbridge, 1812. s. of Capt. Thomas George 
Shortland of Courtlands, and Elizabeth, da. of Peter Tonkin 
of Plymouth, d. Plymouth, 5 July, 1893. 

Shortland, Peter Frederick, vice-admiral, h. 1815. bro. of 
Edward Shortland (q.v.). Surveyed coast of Nova Scotia, d. 
Plymouth, 18 Oct., 1888. 

Shortland, Willoughby, colonial administrator, b. 1804. bro. of 
Edward Shortland (q.v.). Governor of Tobago, d. Court- 
lands, 7 Oct., 1869. 

Shower, Sir Bartholomew, lawyer, h. Northgate St., Exeter, 
14 Dec, 1658. s. of William Shower, merchant, and Dorcas, 
da. of John Anthony. Recorder of London. Counsel against 
seven bishops, d. Temple Lane, London, 4 Dec, 1701. 

Shower, John, nonconformist divine, hap. Exeter, 18 May, 1657. 
bro. of Sir Bartholomew Shower (q.v.). Pastor at Old Jewry, 
London.' d. Stoke Newington, 28 June, 1715. hur. Highgate. 

Shute, John, architect, limner, and author (fl. 1550-1570). b. 
Cullompton (Worth). 

Shuttleworth, Robert James, Ph.D., botanist and conchologist. 
b. Dawlish, 1810. s. of James Shuttleworth of Barton Lodge, 
Preston, d. Hyeres, 19 April, 1874. 

SIbthorpe, John, F.R.S., botanist, b. Oxford, 28 Oct., 1758. s. of 
Humphrey Sibthorpe, professor of botany, and Elizabeth, da. 
of John Gibbes of Instow. Professor of botany, Oxford. 
Endowed chair of rural economy at Oxford, d. Bath, 8 Feb., 
1796. bur. Bath Abbey. 

Simon du Fresne, Fraxinetus, or Ash, poet (fi. 1200). b. Devon 
(Prince). 

Slade, WiUiam, philosopher (fl. 1380). Monk of Buckfastleigh. 

Slanning, Sir Nicholas, M.P., royalist, b. Bickleigh, near Ply- 
mouth, about 2 Sept., 1606. s. of GamaHel Slanning, of 
Maristow, and Margaret Marler. General of ordnance in 
Hopton's Army. Mortally wounded at siege of Bristol, 1646. 



k 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 85 

Smith, Sir Montagu Edward, M.P., judge, h. Bideford, 25 Dec. 
1809. s. of Thomas Smith, solicitor and town clerk, d. 
322Park Lane, London, 3 May, 1891. 

Southcote, John, judge, h. Devon (Prince), 1511. s. of William 
Southcote and Alice Tregonnell ; grandson of Nicholas South- 
cote of Chudleigh. d. 18 April, 1585. bur. Witham, Essex. 

SouthCOtt, Joanna, fanatic, h. Gittisham. bap. Ottery St. 
Mary, 6 June, 1750. da. of a farmer. Domestic servant, d. 
38, Manchester St., Manchester Square, 27 Dec, 1814. 

Spratt, Thomas Abel Brimage, F.R.S., vice-admiral, hydrographer, 
and author, b. East Teignmouth, 11 May, 1811. s. of Commr. 
James Spratt. Made surveys in Mediterranean, d. Tun- 
bridge Wells, 10 March, 1888. 

Stafford, Edmund de. Bishop of Exeter (1395-1419). Lord 
Chancellor. Second founder of Stapeldon Hall, Oxford, the 
name of which was changed to Exeter College, d. Clyst, 3 
Sept., 1419. bur. Exeter Cath. 

Stapeldon, Walter de. Bishop of Exeter, 1307-26. b. Annery, 
Monkleigh, 1 Feb., 1261. Contributed largely to rebuilding of 
Exeter Cath. Founded Stapeldon Hall (afterwards Exeter 
College), Oxford. Lord High Treasurer, murdered Cheapside, 
15 Oct., 1326. bur. St. Clement Danes, but removed to Exeter 
Cath. 

Stephens, Edward Bowring, A.R.A., sculptor, b. Exeter, 10 Dec, 
1815. d. 110 Buckingham Palace Road, 10 Nov., 1882. 

Stevens, Francis, landscape-painter, b. Exeter (?) 21 Nov., 
1781. d. Exeter, 1823. 

Stone, Nicholas, the elder, mason, statuary, and architect, b. 
Woodbury, 1586. Designed and executed porch of St. Mary's, 
Oxford, and tombs of Bodley at Oxford, and Donne at St. 
Paul's, d. 1647. 

Stone, Nicholas, the younger, mason and statuary, s. of Nicholas 
Stone, the elder (q.v.). d. 1647. 

Stawford or Stouford, John, judge, b. Stowford in Westdown (?) 
1291 (?) d. 1372 '(?) 

Strode, William, M.P., politician, b. 1599 (?) s. of Sir WHliam 
Strode, of Newnham, and Mary, da. of Thomas Southcote 
of Bovey Tracey. Impeached by Charles L d. Tottenhani, 
1645, bur. Westminster Abbey, but disinterred, 1661. 

Strode, Wilham, poet and dramatist, b. Plympton, 1602. s. of 
Philip Strode and Wilmot Hanton. Canon of Christ Church, 
Oxford, d. there, 11 March, 1645. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Stucley or Stukely, Sir Lewis, vice-admiral of Devon, s. of John 
Stucley of Affeton, and Frances St. Leger. Appointed keeper 
of Ralegh, d. Lundy, 1620. 

Stucley or Stukely, Thomas, adventurer, b. 1525 (?) s. of Sir Hugh 
Stucley or Stukely of Affeton. killed Alcazar, 4 Aug., 1578. 

Sutcliffe, Matthew, LL.D., Dean of Exeter, 1588—1629. b. 
Hahfax, Yorks (?), 1550 (?) Member of Council for New Eng- 
land. Vicar of West Alvington, Harberton, and Newton 
Ferrers, d. 1629. 

Sweet, Robert, F.L.S., horticulturist, b. Cockington, 1783. d. 
Chelsea (?), 20 Jan., 1835. 

Swete or Tripe, John, antiquary, b. 1752 (?) s. of Nicholas Tripe, 
of Ashburton. Preb. of Exeter, d. 1821. 

Sydenham, Floyer, translator of Plato, b. Devon, 1710. s. of 
Humphrey Sydenham, of Combe, Som., and Kafherine, da. of 
WiUiam Floyer of Berne, Dorset, d. 1 April, 1787. 

Tarring, John, architect, b. Holbeton, near Plymouth, 1806. 
" The Gilbert Scott of the dissenters." d. Torquay, 27 Dec, 
1875. 

Tasker, Wilham, poet and antiquary, b. Iddesleigh, 1740. s. of 
the rector. Rector of Iddesleigh. d. there, 4 Feb., 1800. bur. 
in Church. 

Taylor, Reynell George, general of the Indian Arm}^ b. Brighton, 
25 Jan., 1822. s. of Thomas WiUiam Taylor of Ogwell. " The 
Bayard of the Punjab." d. Newton Abbot, 28 Feb., 1886. 

Taylor, Thomas Glanville, F.R.A.S., astronomer, b. Ashburton, 
22 Nov., 1804. s. of Thomas Taylor, first assistant at Green- 
wich Observatory. Director of Madras Observatory, d. 
Southampton, 4 May, 1848. 

Thomas, John Wesley, translator of Dante and Wesleyan minister. 
b. Exeter, 4 Aug., 1798. s. of a tradesman, d. Dumfries, 
7 Feb., 1872. 

Tindal, Matthew, deist, b. Beer Ferrers, 1653 (?) s. of the minis- 
ter, d. Coldbath Fields, 16 Aug., 1733. bur. Clerkenwell 
Church. 

Tindal, Nicholas, historical writer, b. Plymouth, 25 Nov., 1687. 
s. of the vicar of Cornwood ; nephew of Matthew Tindal (q.v.). 
d. Greenwich Hospital, 27 June, 1774. bur. Goddard's Garden. 

Tindal, WiUiam, antiquary, b. Chelmsford, 14 May, 1756. 
grandson of Nicholas Tindal (q.v.). Chaplain of the Tower of 
London. Committed suicide there, 16 Sept., 1804. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 87 

Tooker or Tucker, William, D.D., divine, h. Exeter, 1558 (?) 
Archdeacon of Barnstaple. Rector of Kilkhampton, West 
Dean, and Clovelly. Chaplain to Queen Elizabeth. Dean of 
Lichfield, d, Salisbury, 19 March, 1621. hur. in Cath. 

TowgOOd, Michaijah.rdissenting minister, h. Axminster, 17 Dec, 
1700. Pastor at Moreton Hampstead, Crediton, and Exeter. 
d. Exeter, 1 Feb.,^1792. 

Tozer, Henry, puritan royalist, h. North Tawton, 1602. d. 
Rotterdam, 11 Sept., 1650. hiir. in English Church there. 

Treby, Sir George, -M. P., judge, h. Plympton St. Maurice, 1*644 (?) 
s. of Peter Treby and Joan, da. of John SneUing of Chaddle- 
wood, Devon, d. Kensington Gravel-pits, Dec, 1700. hur. 
^ Temple Church. 

Trelawny, Sir Jonathan, 3rd .6art., Bishop of Bristol, Exeter 
(1689-1707), and Winchester, b. Pelynt, Cornwall, 24 March, 
1650. s. of Sir Jonathan Trelawny and Mary, da. of Sir Edward 
Seymour of Berry Pomeroy. One of the seven bishops, d. 
Chelsea, 19 July, 1721. 

Tremayne, Edmund, M.P., clerk of the Privy Council, s. of 
Thomas Tremayne of CoUacombe in Lamerton, and Philippa, 
da. of Roger Grenville of Stow. d. Sept., 1582. 

Tremayne, Richard, D.D., divine, b. Lamerton ; bro. of Edmund 
Tremayne (q.v.). Archdeacon of Chichester. Treasurer of 
Exeter Cath. Rector of Doddiscombleigh and Combmartin. 
d. Nov., 1584. bur. Lamerton. 

Trosse, George, nonconformist divine, b. Exeter, 25 Oct., 1631. 
s. of a counsellor-at-law. Minister at Exeter, d. there, 11 Jan., 
1713. bur. St. Bartholomew's Churchyard. 

*Turner, Joseph Mallord (or Mallad) William, land^ape-painter. 
b. Maiden Lane, London, 23 April, 1775. s. of a barber, native 
■ of South Molton. d. Chelsea, 19 Dec. 1851. bur. St. Paul's 
Cath. 

Tuttiett, Lawrence, hymn-writer, b. Cloyton, Devon, 1825. s. of 
a naval surgeon. Curate of St. Paul's, Knightsbridge. d. St. 
Andrew's, 21 May, 1897. 

Upham, Edward, F.S.A., orientalist and bookseller, b. Exeter, 
1776. s. of Charles Upham, mayor, 1796. Sheriff of Exeter, 
1807. Mayor, 1809. d. Bath, 24 Jan., 1834. 

Upton, Nicholas, writer on heraldry, b. Pprtlinch in Newton 
Ferrers, 1400 (?) s. of John Upton of Portlinch, and Elizabeth, 
da. of John Barley of Chencombe, Devon. Precentor of Salis- 
bury, d. 1457. bur. Sahsbury Cath. 



88 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Upton, Sir Nicholas, Knight of St. John at Malta, s. of John 

Upton of Lupton, Devon, d. Malta, 1551. 
Venn, Richard, divine, b. Holbeton, 7 Jan., 1691. s. of the 

vicar. Rector of St. Antholin's, London, d. 16 Feb., 1740. 

hur. in St. Antholin. 
Yenning, John, philanthropist, h. Totnes, 20 May, 1776. s. of a 

merchant. Advocated prison reform, d. Norwich, 11 April, 

1858. 
Yenning, Ralph, nonconformist divine, h. Kingsteignton (?), 

1621 (?) Lecturer at St. Olave's, Southwark, and preacher at 

Pewterers' Hall. d. London, 10 March, 1674. bur. Bunhill 

Fields. 
Yenning, Walter, philanthropist, b. Totnes, 15 Nov., 1781. bro. 

of John Venning (q.v.). Founder of St. Petersburg Society for 

Improvement of Prisons. <^. "St. Petersburg, 10 Jan., 1821. 
^ bur. there. 
Yilvain, Robert, M.D., physician, b. Goldsmith St., Exeter, 

March, 1575 (?) s. of Peter Vilvain, steward of Exeter in 1579. 

Practised in Exeter. Benefactor of Exeter College, Oxford, 

and Exeter Cath., Library, d. Exeter, 21 Feb., 1663. bur. in 

Cath. 
Yines, Richard, colonist, b. Bideford, 1585. Acting-governor of 

Massachusetts, d. Barbados, 19 April, 1651. 
Wadham, John, justice of the common pleas, b. Edge in Brans- 
combe, d. Edge, 1411. 

Wadham, Nicholas, founder of Wadham College, Oxford, b. 

Edge in Branscombe, 1532. mar. Dorothy Petre. Built 

almshouse at Ilton. d. Merefield, 20 Oct., 1609. bur. Ilmin- 

ster Church. 
*Waiciey. Tliomas, M.P., medical reformer, b. Membury, 11 July, 

1795. Founder of the ' Lancet.' Coroner of West Middlesex. 

Exposed adulteration of foods, d. Madeira, 16 May, 1862. bur. 

Kensal Green. 

Walker, John, D.D., ecclesiastical historian, b. Exeter, 1674. 
s. of Endymion Walker, mayor, 1682. Preb. of Exeter. Rector 
of St. Mary Major, Exeter, and Upton Pyne. Author of 
\ Sufferings of the Clergy.' d. Upton Pyne, June, 1747. bur. 
in Churchyard. 

Warelwast, WiUiam de. Bishop of Exeter, 1107-37. b. Nor- 
mandy. Envoy ^ to the Pope. Began rebuilding of Exeter 
Cath. Founded Plympton Priory. Refounded Launceston 
and Bodmin Priories, d. Plympton Priory, 20 Sept., 1137. 
hur. there. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Watkins, John, miscellaneous writer and schoolmaster (fl. 1792 — 
1831). h. Devon. Author of ' An Essay towards the History 
of Bideford ' and ' Universal Biographical and Historical 
Dictionary.' d. London (?) 

Westcote, Thomas, topographer, hap. Shobrooke, 17 June, 1567. 
s. of Philip Westcote of West Raddon, and Katherine, da. of 
George Waltham of Brenton, Exminster. Author of * A View 
of Devonshire ' and ' Pedigrees of Devonshire Families.' hur. 
Shobrooke, 1636. 

WestCOtt, George Blagdon, captain in the navy. b. Honiton, 
1745 (?) KiUed in battle of St. Vincent, 1798. Accorded 
public monument in Westminster Abbey. 

Weston, Stephen, F.R.S., F.S.A., antiquary and man of letters. 
hap. Exeter Cath., 8 June, 1747. grandson of Stephen Weston, 
Bishop of Exeter. Rector of Mamhead and Little Hempston. 
d. London, 8 Jan., 1830. 

Whiddon, Jacob, sea-captain and servant of Ralegh, h. Devon (?) 
Commanded the " Roebuck " against the Armada. Went to 
Guiana, d. Trinidad, 1595. 

Whiddon, Sir John, judge, h. Chagford. d. there, 27 Jan., 1576. 
hur. in Church. 

Whitbourne, Sir Richard, writer on Newfoundland (fl. 1579- 
1627). h. Exmouth. 

Wightwick, George, architect, h. Mold, Flintshire, 26 Aug., 
1802. Lived at Plymouth, 1829-1851. d. Portishead, near 
Bristol, 9 July, 1872. hur. in Churchyard. 

Wilis, William Henry, miscellaneous writer, b. Plymouth, 

13 Jan., 1810. s. of a shipowner. Member of original literary 

staff of ' Punch.' Sub-editor of ' Daily News ' under 

Dickens. Assistant editor of ' Household Words ' and ' All 

,the Year Round.' d. Welwyn, Herts., 1 Sept., 1880. 

Wills, William John, Australian explorer, h. Totnes, 5 Jan., 
1834. s. of a doctor. In expedition from Victoria to discover 
route to North across Australia, d. of starvation on the way, 
June, 1861. 

*WolCOt, John, M.D., satirist and poet, under name of " Peter 
Pindar." h. Dodbrooke, 9 May, 1738. s. of a surgeon, d. 
Somers Town, London, 14 Jan., 1819. hur. St. Paul's Church, 
Covent Garden. 



90 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Wood, Sir Matthew, 1st bart., M.P., municipal and political 
reformer, h. Tiverton, 2 June, 1768. Twice Lord Mayor of 
London. Received baronetcy from Queen Victoria, the first 
title she bestowed, d. Matson House, near Gloucester, 25 Sept., 
1843. hur. Hatherley Churchyard. 

Woodley, George, poet and divine, h. Dartmouth, hap. Town- 
stal Church, 3 April, 1786. Editor of ' Royal Cornwall 
Gazette.' d. Martindale, Westmorland, 24 Dee., 1846. 

Worth, Richard NichoUs, journalist and geologist, h. Devonport, 
19 July, 1837. s. of a builder, d. Shaugh Prior, 3 July, 1896. 
hur. in Churchyard. 

Wrey, Sir Bourchier, bart., M.P. h. Tawstock (?) s. of Sir 
Chichester Wrey and Anne, da. of Edward, 4th Earl of Bath. 
d. from wounds received in a duel at Falmouth, July, 1696. 
hur. Tawstock Church. 

Wrey, Sir Bourchier, 5th bart., M.P., dilettante, b. 1714. 
grandson of Sir Bourchier Wrey {d. 1696), (q.v.). Rebuilt pier 
at Ilfracombe. d. 13 April, 1784. hur. Tawstock Church. 

Yolland, William, lieut.-col., Royal Engineers, F.R.S., F.R.A.S. 

h. Merryiield, Plympton St. Mary, 17 March, 1810. s. of John 
Yolland, agent to Earl of Morley. Chief Inspector of Railways. 
d. Baddesley, Atherstone, Warwickshire, 5 Sept., 1885. hur. 
Kensal Green. 

Yonge, James, F.R.S., medical writer, h. Plymouth, 11 May, 
1646. s. of John Yonge, surgeon, and da. of Nicholas Blackaller 
of Sharpham. Practised at Plymouth. Mayor, 1694. d. there, 
25 July, 1721. hur. St. Andrew's Church. 

Yonge, Walter, M.P., diarist, h. Colyton, 1581 (?) Sheriff of 
Devon, d. Dec, 1649. hur. Colyton. 

Yonge, Sir William, 4th bart., M.P., K.B., F.R.S., LL.D., poli- 
tician, h. Colyton. s. of Sir Walter Yonge, M.P. Commis- 
sioner of treasury. Secretary at war. Joint vice-treasurer of 
Ireland, d. 10 Aug., 1755. hur. Colyton Church. 



(The Editor will be glad to receive additions or corrections for this list. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 91 

A Devonshire Garland. 

Culled by members of the London Devonian Association and their friends. 



PEERLESS DEVON. 

Hail thou, my native soil ! thou blessed plot. 
Whose equal all the world aflfordeth not ! 

W. Browne, Britannia's Pastorals, Book II, Song iii. 

ORIGIN OF "DEVONSHIRE." 
Mr. W. H. Venn, M.A. {Whimple). Brockley. 

I J, Well can witnes yet unto this day 

Ik The westeme Hogh, besprincled with the gor« 

W Of mighty Goemot, whom in stout fray 

■: Corineus conquered, and cruelly did slay. 

p And eke that ample Pitt, yet far renownd 

For the large leape which Debon did compell 
Coulin to make, being eight lugs of grownd, 
Into the which retouming backe he fell. 



In meed of these great conquests by them gott, 

Corineus had that Province utmost west . . 

And Debon 's shayre was that is Devonshyre. 

Spenser, Faerie Queene, II, x, 10-12. 

THE FLOWER OF THE WEST. 
Engineer-Commander W. D. Chope, R.N. (Hartland). 
Dorset, Somerset, Cornwall, Wales, 

May envy the likes of we. 
For the flower of the West, the first, the best. 
The pick of the bunch us be. 

H. Boulton, Glorious Devon. 

DROPPED OUT OF HEAVEN. 
Colonel E. T. Clifford, V.D. (Exeter). London. 

Fair, fair Devon ! glassed in Heaven as her lovers see — 
Doeth not Devon rhyme with Heaven ? So doe they agree 
God dropped Devon out of Heaven — Devon by the sea. 

THE GARDEN OF ENGLAND. 
Dr. S. J. Cole (Hartland). Bide ford. 

It is the rich cultivated country which has given Devonshire the name 
of the Garden of England. The north and south coasts of the county 
differ much in character and climate, the north being far the more bracing. 
Both have grand cliff and rock scenery, not exceeded by any in England or 
Wales, and, as a rule, the country immediately inland is of great beauty. 
The general verdure of Devonshire, and its broken character are the features 
which everywhere most strongly assert themselves. 

Encyclopedia Britannica. 



92 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



A GARDEN OF EDEN. 
Mrs. J. A. Chope. Rothes, N.B. 

When Adam and Eve were dispossess 'd 

Of the garden hard by Heaven, 
They planted another one down in the West, 
'Twas Devon, glorious Devon. 

H. Boulton, Glorious Devon. 

THE HOME OF HEROES. 
Mrs. Anna W. Couch Paignton. 

Thine is the region large, the pale renowned, 
Where worthies dwelt of old, and still abound. 

Joseph Cottle, To Devon. 



A QUEEN'S GARDEN. 
Mr. J. TowNSEND CooMBE {Plymouth). London. 

If all England is a park, Devonshire is a queen's garden. 

C. N. & A. M. Williamson. Set in Silver, p. 210. 

THE LAND AND MEN OF DEVON. 
Rev. J. F. Chanter, M.A. Parracombe. 

There is no land like Devon, 

Where'er the light of day be ; 
There are no hearts like Devon hearts. 

Such hearts of oak as they be. 
There is no land like Devon, 

Where'er the light of day be ; 
There are no men like Devon men. 
So tall and bold as they be. 

Tennyson, The Foresters (Adapted). 

BEAUTY OF DEVON. 
Mr. C. J. Tottenham {Hartland). Dublin. 

So irresistible is Devon in her beauty, that you fall in love at first sight ; 
and may be sure that, like every lovable maiden, the more you see of her, 
the more will her unobtrusive gentleness endear her to you. 

Rev. M. G. Watkins, Cornhill Mag., vol. ix. 

DEAR OLD DEVON ! 
Mr. T. Cann Hughes, M.A., F.S.A. {Hittisleigh) . Lancaster. 

Oh ! I love our dear old Devon 

For the poets we have reaied ; 
Like the lark they've lived near heaven. 
And her melody have shared. 

Oh ! I love our dear old Devon 

For the painters we possess, 
Who with loving hand have striven 

With the land's bright loveliness. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 93 



Oh ! I love our dear old Devon 
For the grand hearts we recall ; 

For the good men God has given, 
Oh ! I love it best of all. 



Frank Curzon. 



DEVON, OUR HOME. 

Mr. John W. Shawyer {Filleigh). Friern Bavnet. 

The Switzer may boast of his mountain home, 

The German his Fatherland ; 
The Southron may dream of his sapphire sea 
That breaks on the golden sand : 

But for us the fairest of spots upon earth 
Is Devon, dear Devon, the land of our birth. 
Though long may we wander and far may we roam, 
The dear old West Country is ever our home. 

'Tis there that the red deer run wild on the hills, 
And the speckled trout sport in the stream ; 

'Tis there that the salmon come in from the sea, 
'Tis the land of the cider and cream. 

And two sweeter things you may look for in vain — 

Than a Devonshire lass and a Devonshire lane. 

Sir F. Carruthers Gould. 

THE DEVON LAND. 
Mr. S. T. Drew {Barnstaple). Swansea. 

For me, there's nought I would not leave 
For the good Devon land. 

H. J. Newbolt. 

LAND OF THE MATCHLESS VIEW. 
Mr. C. Davis. Kew. 

Fair are the provinces that England boasts. 
Lovely the verdure, exquisite the flowers, 
That bless her hills and dales, — her streamlets clear. 
Her seas majestic, and her prospects all. 
Of old, as now, the pride of British song ! 
But England sees not on her charming map, 
A goodlier spot than our fine DEVON ; — rich 
Art thou in all that Nature's hand can give. 
Land of the matchless view ! 

N. T. Carrington, The Banks of Tamar, 1828. 

DEVON SCENERY. 
Miss Annie M. Cann {Hartland). Liscard. 

It is the simple truth to say that Devon contains scenery of a beauty 
which is not surpassed and of a variety which is nowhere equalled in all 
England. Hills, the beauty of whose outlines conceal their want of alti- 
tude ; deep and fertile valleys through which flow streams and rivers of 
extraordinary beauty, now flashing down swift and brown and foam- 
flecked from the moor, now gliding among richly wooded pasture, now 
issuing in harbours where the great tradition of sea power has lain un- 
questioned during untold centuries ; a coast line, which, when low, falls 



94 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



into sunny bays of exquisite charm, and when lofty rises into unmatched 
grandeur ; a stern and rugged upland of vast extent, all glorious with 
furze and fern and purple heather, a wonderland of tradition and romance, 
the background of almost every landscape in Devon — could anyone look 
out over such a noble country without some swelling of the heart, some 
sympathy with the pride of those who feel that it is their own land, the 
one in which both they and their fathers before them came to life ? And 
add to this the memory of all the mighty deeds which have come to pass in 
Devon, or which have been wrought by Devon men elsewhere, how vali- 
antly they fought, how greatly they upheld the honour of England . . . 
— why what need of words to make one sensible that the birthright of the 
west country is an inheritance in which the least imaginative man must 
exult, and over which it is easier to rhapsodise than to write soberly I 

A. H. Norway, Highways and Byways, 1898, pp. 2-3, 



THE CONCRETE PICTURESQUE. 

Mr. Edwin Couch. Paignton. 

All those who possess an intense love and faculty for perceiving what 
Carlyle called " the concrete picturesque " will be able to revel in a paradise 
whenever their lot shall lead them into delightful Devon. 

C. Gregory, Brixham in Devonia, 



SCENERY AND CHARACTER. 

Mr. Francis A. Perry {Tiverton). West Ealing. 

The secret of Devon colour is that it's not obvious — you can't fathom it ; 
and perhaps it's the secret of the Devon man — you will not get to the end 
of him. Stamina ! not that sort which holds stiff to the breaking point, 
and perishes, but holds to a point of bending, bends, and — rebounds. 

Sinjohn, Man of Devon, p. 101. 

THE LAND OF ARTISTS. 

Mr. John Lane {West Put ford). London. 

Just look at 'em, the great Sir Joshua from Plympton, as great in por- 
traiture as Turner in landscape ; Sam Prout, who dreamt dreams and saw 
visions in stone, and who loved the very timber and tiles he drew ; Calvert, 
the earth lover and dreamer of the golden age, from Appledore ; Thomas 
Hudson, Sir Joshua's master ; old Nicholas Hilliard, limner to Elizabeth 
and James, of whom Dr. Donne says — 

A hand or eye 

By Hilliard drawn, is worth a history 

By a worse painter made. 
Cousins, the prince of mezzotint engravers, from Exeter ; Richard Cosway, 
master of miniature, from Tiverton ; Haydon, Eastlake, and Northcote, 
dreamers of history, from Plymouth ; James Gandy. whom Sir Joshua 
found not inferior to the Venetians in colouring, and William his son, not 
far below him, whose names are mentioned in Gandy Street, Exeter. And 
the greatest of them all called himself a Devon man, for didn't Turner say 
to Cyrus Redding, " They may put me down among the Devon artists, for 
I was bom in Devon ? " 

M. P. Willcocks, A Man of Genius, 1908, pp. 60-61. 
To the above I would add Ozias Humphry, and Sir Francis Carruthers 
Gould, the greatest caricaturist of our time. — J. L. 



I 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 95 



THE COOMBES OF THE WEST. 
Mr. a. Kerr. Sheffield. 

Those delightful glens which cut the high table-land of the confines of 
Devon and Cornwall — each is like the other, and each is like no other 
English scenery. Each has its upright walls, inland of rich oak-wood, 
nearer the sea of dark green furze, then of smooth turf, then of weird black 
cliffs which range out right and left far into the deep sea, in castles, spires, 
and wings of jagged ironstone. Each has its narrow strip of fertile meadow, 
its crystal trout stream, its grey stone mill, its dark rock pools, its ridge of 
blown sand, its grey bank of polished pebbles. Each has its black field of 
jagged shark's-tooth rock, one rasp of which would grind abroad the 
timbers of the stoutest ship. To landward, all richness, softness, and 
peace ; to seaward, a waste and howling wilderness of rock and roller, 
barren to the fisherman, and hopeless to the shipwrecked mariner. 

Kingsley, Westward Ho ! Chap. vi. 

DEVON VALES. 

Mrs. Tottenham {Hartland). Dublin. 

Devon ! whose beauties prove, from flattery free, 
The happy theme where wranglers all agree ; 
When troubles press, or health, that blessing, fails, 
What joy to range thy renovating vales ! 

J. Cottle, Dartmoor and other Poems. 



DEVON LANES. 

Mr. William Bird. S'haldon. 

There are other lanes in England, 

There are nooks beside the sea, 
W^hich fascinate the traveller. 

Wherever he may be ; 
But to every true Devonian 
They'll never win a claim. 
While imagination's clinging 
To a Devonshire lane. 

M. Davidson, Lays and Lyrics, 1906, p. 13. 

Mr. W. Champion (Shaldon). London. 

I love all the flowers that throng them, 

Though far from their homes I have flown : 
My memories revel among them. 

And fondly I call them my own. 
The hope of a soul may soar higher, 

For joys that are followed by banes, 
But give me a sprig of sweetbriar. 

With love, from the dear Devon lanes. 

J. Gregory, in West-Comiiry Poets, p. 214. 

Rev. J. F. Chanter, M.A. Parracombe. 

The lovely lanes of Devon, how they glitter in the spring. 
When lady fern and hart's tongue o'er the banks their lustre fling. 
Where the primrose grows in clusters at the blackthorn's twisted root, 
And violets blink through the moss close by the old oak's foot. 

J. G. Maxwell, Sighs, Smiles, and Sketches, 1860. 



96 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



DEVON LANES. 
Miss W. E. Heard. London. 

Green lanes of sunny Devon, how beautiful they are, 
^Vhen first appear in hedgerows primroses' dainty star, 
And when the hawthorn blossoms, and loud the blackbirds sing, 
And banks are strewn with wild flowers that come with sunny spring ! 

Original. 

COTTAGE GARDENS IN DEVON. 
Mr. Ch. J. BiSHENDEN. London. 

I know not any county in England where the taste for a garden with the 
peasantry is more universal than in the West. A Devonshire cottage, 
if not too modern, is the sweetest object that the poet, the artist, or the 
lover of the romantic could desire to see. 

Mrs. Bray, Borders of the Tamar and Tavy, 1879 ed., vol. ii, p. 3. 

SPRING IN DEVON. 
Mr. C. H. Brodie, F.R.I.B.A. [Exeter). Croydon. 

The early coming of spring in this happy Devon gladdens my heart. I 
think with chill discomfort of those parts of England where the primrose 
shivers beneath a sky of threat rather than solace. . . . Here, scarce 
have I assured myself that the last leaf has fallen, scarce have I watched 
the glistening of hoar-frost upon the evergreens, when a breath from the 
west thrills me with anticipation of bud and bloom, 

G. Gissing, The Private Papers of Henry Ryecroft, 1903, p. 18. 

WINTER IN DEVON. 
Mr. C. H. Brodie, F.R.I.B.A. [Exeter). Groydon. 

Dark days are few in happy Devon, and such as befall have never brought 
me a moment's tedium. The long, wild winter of the north would try my 
spirits ; but here, the season that follows autumn is merely one of rest, 
Nature's annual slumber. . . . More often than not the winter day 
is blest with sunshine — the soft beam which is Nature's smile in dreaming. 
G. Gissing, The Private Papers of Henry Ryecroft, 1903, p. 262. 

DEVON TO ME ! 
Mr. W. a. Pike [Exeter). London. 

Where my fatheis stood watching the sea. 
Gale-spent herring boats hugging the lea ; 
There my mother lives — moorland and tree. 
Sight o' the blossom ! Devon to me ! 

J. Galsworthy. 

BALLAD OF DEVON. 
Mr. W. Inman [Stoke Gabriel). London. 

My song is of Devon, the cradle of free men. 

The shire of the meadow, the mountain, the moor. 
The home of that race of invincible seamen 
That harried the Spaniard on Mexico's shore. 

As the years float along so her glory-roll gathers 
And grows as a river that oceanward runs, 

For the spirit which prompted the deeds of the fathers 
GloAvs bright as of old in the breasts of the sons. 

T. H. Knight, in West-Country Poets, p. 301. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 97 



DEVONIA. 
Mr. F. W. Bryant. London. 

In my dreams, Devonia, thou and I 
Wander again mid elm-clad hills and dales, 

Where streamlets tinkle, wood-doves softly coo. 
Thy sweet voice falls like music from the sky ; 
Thy breathings are as Eden's sweetest gales, 

Thy lovely features such as angel eyes may view. 

J. Farmer, in West-Country Poets, p. 172. 

DEVONIANS. 

Mr. H. G. W. Herron, I.C.S. (retired). Newton Abbot. 

King Arthur honoured these Britons with the first charge in his battles, 
who, with the Cornish and Welshmen, by martial prowess, have challenged 
the prerogative of that regiment in the English army that should second 
the main battle. And suiely the same worthiness is of right due unto 
them hitherto ; for they maintain tnemselves a hardy, valoroas, and well- 
composed people in their constitutions, and apt to all good exercises ; and 
soon to be framed to any action, either civil or martial. In all travails, 
they be very laborious and patient to endure ; and in all actions, either 
of the body or of the mind, they be ordinarily comparable to the best : 
whereof some for martial service, others for the sea-service, some for learn- 
ing, others for the laws, have for many years adorned the seats of justice, 
from whom some of our chiefest families have obtained advancement. 

Risdon, Survey of Devon, ed. 1811, p. 9. 

THE REGISTER OF ETERNITY. 

Mr. W. A. Beer [Bideford). Cardiff. 

Think not, my noble countrymen, by your estates or pedigrees only 
(though for length and breadth they may vie with most others of your 
quality in the kingdom) , you will be able to fill the trump of fame : For these 
being delineated on parchment-rolls, and confined to your closets and 
the county, come to the notices of few, but yourselves and your heirs. 

Whereas your personal actions, which are great and brave, carry your 
honor round the universe ; inscribe your names into the register of eternity ; 
and you thereby raise tropliies to your memory, which shall out-last the 
mausolaean monument. 

Prince, Worthies of Devon [Epistle Dedicatory). 

MEN OF DEVON. 

Mr. T. Cann Hughes, M.A., F.S.A. {Hittisleigh) . Lancaster. 

We Devonshire men are proud of our past history and proud of our 
beautiful county. We love the balmy sweetness of the air. We love the 
perfume from the orchards. We love the briny breezes which blow from 
over the Atlantic. We love the wild heather of her moorland heights. 
We love her bracing hills and her sweet smiling valleys. We love the 
crystal purity of her streams. We love the richness of her wild bird and 
wild animal life. We love the story of her sons, the noble and the gentle, 
the heroic and the free. With postman -poet Capern we rejoice to celebrate 
The grand old men of Devonshire, 

How mighty is their name ! 
The glory of their deeds shall burn. 
An everlasting flame. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



The brave old men of Devonshire ! 

'Tis worth a world to stand 
As Devon's sons, on Devon's soil, 

Though infants of the band, 
And tell old England to her face 
If she is great in fame, 
' 'Twas good old heart of Devon oak 

That made her glorious name. 

Rev. Martin Anstey, Men of Devon. 

THE SEA KINGS OF DEVON. 
Mr. F/W. Dunn {South Molton). London. 

Time never can produce men to o'ertake 
The fames of Greenv-il, Da vies, Gilbert, Drake, 
Or worthy Hawkins. 

W. Browne. Britannia's Pastorals, Book II, Song iii. 

THE DEVON CHARACTER. 
Dr. Wilfred Kingdon (Colyton). 

Leal friends in peace, dread foes in war, 
With hearts still true to home. 

H. Boulton, Glorious Devon. 

Mr. Francis A. Perry {Tiverton). Ealing. 

That's the West-Countryman all over ! Never say you " nay." never 
lose an opportunity, never own he can't do a thing— a cross between 
independence, amiability, and an eye to the main chance. 

John Sinjohn, A Man of Devon (1901), p. 62. 

A WEST COUNTRY SONG. 

Miss M. E. Evans. Sheffield. 

It was among the ways of good Queen Bess, 

Who ruled as well as ever mortal can, sir. 

When she was stogg'd, and the country in a mess. 

She was wont to send for a Devon man. Sir. 

Kingsley, Westward Ho ! Chap. v. 

DEVONSHIRE MEN. 
Mr. W. E. Grills {Clawton). London. 

Bishop Stapeldon. 

Did he say 
I wasn't fit to be a Devonshire man ? 
First Countryman. 

Naw, naw ; 'e zaid that you was only vit 
Vur be a Devonsheare man. 
Bishop Stapeldon. 

No harm in that, 
Why, what else should I be, or wish to be ? 
Second Countryman. 

Ay, fathy, 'tis the foindest, bestest thing 
That mortial man cud be ; 'tis cruel 'ard 
Vur they poor volks 'ot can't be Devonsheare : 
Poor toads ! Naw, us wudn't 'ave 'e be. 
Not for warlds, wan of they. 

J. Pyke-Nott, Stapeldon : a Tragedy. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 99 



SONS OF DEVON. 
Mr. T. C. Burrow. Hartland. 

Sons of Devon, do and dare ! 
Help to swell her record fair ! 
Still the world has need of men 
To wield the sword and ply the pen ; 
Worthy common folk yet more, 
To plough the sea and toil on shore — 
Patriots, merchants, thinkers too ; 
Sons of Devon, up and do. 

T. C. B. 

DEVONSHIRE PEOPLE. 
Mr. a. J. Plaice. London. 

When Devonshire lanes and Devonshire lakes (streams) and Devonshire 
manners have all been swept away from the land, it will, I fear, be the 
worse for us, and not the better. As for me I am thankful to have known 
and loved them all, to have had a childhood bounded by so fair an horizon ; 
and to have passed by most active years amongst a people so gentle, so 
kindly, and so true. 

H. C. O'Neill, Devonshire Idylls. {Preface.) 

DEVON LADS. 
Mr. R. H. Chope {Hartland). Shepeld. 

For O ! its the herrings and the good brown beef, 

And the cider and the cream so white ; 
O ! they are the making of the jolly Devon lads, 
For to play, and eke to fight. 

Kingsley, Westward Ho ! Chap. i. 

DEVON MAIDENS. 
Mr. G. E. L. Carter, B.A. {Withycombe Raleigh). Exmouth. 

Where be you going, you Devon maid ? 
And what have you there in the basket ? 
Ye tight little fairy, just fresh from the dairy. 
Will ye give me some cream, if I ask it ? 

I love your hills and I love your dales. 
And I love your flocks a-bleating ; 
But oh, on the heather to lie together. 
With both our hearts a-beating. 

I'll put your basket all safe in a nook ; 
Your shawl I'll hang on a willow ; 
And we will sigh in the daisy's eye 
And kiss on a grass-green pillow. 

Keats. 

Miss N. A. Mountstephen, L.R.A.M. {Torquay). Leytonstone. 

I've wandered thro' England, thro' Scotland, and Wales, 

I've roamed o'er the Emerald Isle ; 
In fact, over Europe's plains, mountains, and dales. 

But, oh ! there was nought to beguile — 
So I sat myself down on a Dartmoor stone. 

And I looked away over the sea. 
And said, " Well ! I've had a good look, and I know 

'Tis the maidens of Devon for me ! " 



100 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



DEVON WIVES. 
Mr. H. E. Lugar [Plymouth) London. 

There's many a man '11 spaik ill of a woman, 

An' cal' 'er vile names when 'er's net in the wrong ; 
Back-bite 'er 'an slander an' ripperimand 'er, 

An' zay that 'er tongue is a little tu long ; 
But zee if thick man from 'is wive should be paarted, 

In a very short time 'ow 'is 'aid e'll 'ang down, 

'E'll wish that 'e'd got 'is wive back along with'n, 

For woman's the joy 'an the pride o' the Ian' 

Weeks, Bits a' Broad Devon, 1902 ed., pp. 70—71. 

AXMINSTER CHURCH. 
Mrs. I. M. Bishenden [Newton Abbot). London. 

Axminster Church was erected by -King Athelstan for seven priests to 
pray for the souls of certain persons buried there, among whom are said 
to be two Dukes, a Bishop and other persons of distinction who were 
slain in his army when he defeated the Danes during a battle in the neigh- 
bouring field, which, to this day, is called " King's Field " ; their monu- 
ments yet remain in the Church. The number of priests was afterwards 
changed to two, for whom a portion of ground was allotted, known as 
" Priest Aller." 

Gentleman's Magazine, Sept., 1792. 

BIDEFORD. 
Mr. H. H. Sanguin [Bide ford). London. 

Whene'er I pace old By-the-Ford, 
And cQnjure up this thought — 
" 'Twas here and here that Grenville trod. 
And there a Raleigh wrought " — 
My blood leaps up into my brain, 
And gallops through my heart ; 
• My soul throbs with the proud desire 

To play a patriot's part. 

E. Capem, Our Devonshire Worthies. 

COMBE MARTIN. 
Mrs. J. W. Shawyer. Friern Barnet. 

Thy orchards gemmed with milk-white bloom. 
Thy whispering woodland's grateful gloom. 
Thy towei, whose fair proportions rise, 
'Mid the green trees, to summer skies — 

Viewed thus afar, by one just fled 
From the vast city's restless tread. 
He well might deem, when gazing here, 
His footsteps pressed some lovelier sphere. 

A. Irwin, in The Shire of the Sea Kings, p. 177. 

Mr. Allen T. Hussell, F.R.I. B.A. Ilfracombe. 

The history of Combe Martin principally turns upon the history of its 
mines. There is a tradition of the existence of some early tin mines, 
whereof all trace has passed away, and the Phoenicians are said to have 
come here, as well as to Dartmoor, in quest both of tin and silver. They 
sailed round the " coast of Cornwall to the Severn sea " (Bristol Channel), 
in search of metals ; and their galleys, moored in the little harbour of 
Combe Martin, must have been a strange sight. 

K. M. Toms, Notes on Combe Martin, 1902, p. 5. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 101 



THE RIVER DART. 
Mrs. Inman [Stoke Gabriel). London. 

I've never known a fairer scene, 

A beauty matched with thine, sweet Dart ! 
Thou leav'st, hke some soft passing dream, 
An endless memory on the heart. 

S. Hodges, in West-Country Poets, p. 255. 

DARTMOOR. 
Mr. W. E. Heard, J. P. {Northam). Newport, Mon. 

Where the grey " Tor," as in ages of yore, 
Mocks the mad war of the storm on the " moor," 
Bravely exposing its huge granite crest. 
Or wrapt in a cloud like an angel at rest. 

Edward Capern, Song of the Devonian. 
" Wayside Warbles " (1865) p. 94. 

THE DARTMOUTH SAILOR. 
]Mr. R. Stewart Barnes (Y ealmpton) . London. 

A Shipman was there, woned far by west ; 
For aught I wot, he was of Darteniouth : 
He rode upon a rouncy as he couth, 
x\ll in a gown of falding to the knee. 
A dagger hanging by a lace had he 
About his neck under his arm adown : 
The hote summer had made his hue all broun : 
And certainly he was a good fellaw ; 
Full many a draught of wine he hadde draw 
From Bourdeaux ward, while that the chapmen sleep. 
Of nice conscience took he no keep. 
If that he fought and had the higher hand. 
By water be sent them home to every land. 
But of his craft to reckon well his tides. 
His stream es and his strandes trim besides, 
His harberow, his moon, and his lodemanage. 
There was none such from Hull unto Carthage. 
Hardy he was, and wise, I undertake ; 
With many a tempest had his beard been shake : 
He knew well all the havens, as they were. 
From Gothland to the Cape de Finisterre, 
And every creek in Bretagne and in Spain : 
His barge ycleped was the Magdalen. 

Chaucer, Prologue to Canterbury Tales, 390-412. 

DEVONPORT MARKETING. 
Mr, C. S. Coombes, B.Sc. [Stoke Damerel). London. 

The market at Saltash is very considerable for the sale of provisions ; 
it is held on Saturdays, and much frequented by the inhabitants of Ply- 
mouth dock (Devonport), who rather chuse to come hither by water to buy all 
their necessary provisions, than to go by land to Plymouth ; because Saltash 
market is most reasonalDle in point of price, and the town-boat carries 
whatever they buy home for them without any additional expence. 

Description of England and Wales, 1769. 



102 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



EXETER— ROUGEMONT. 
Mr. H. Wreford-Glanvill {Exeter). London. 

Richmond ! When I was last at Exeter, 
The mayor in courtesy show'd me the castle, 
And call'd it Rougemont : at which name I started, 
Because a bard of Ireland told me once, 
I should not hve long after I saw Richmond. 

Shakespeare, Richard III, iv, ii. 

HERCULES PROMONTORY. 

Mr. H. Haynes. Hartland Point. 

O ! deem it not but idle rhyme — 
And say not, history scorns to chime 

With wild romancers' rede ; 
True is it — in the olden time. 

On every coast — in every clime, 

Approved by glorious deed. 
Some hero lived — the theme of song, 

Who arm'd for right — and vanquish'd wrong — 
And left for record of his fame, 
Hill, stream, or rock, to bear his name — 
Lone boundary of his deeds ! — and this 

Our promontorium Herctilis. 

Anon. 

HARTLAND CHURCH. 

Rev. Ivon L. Gregory (Torquay). Hartland. 

How wildly sweet by Hartland Tower, 

The thrilling voice of prayer : 
A seraph, from his cloudy bower. 
Might lean to listen there. 

For time, and place, and storied days, 

To that great fane have given 
Hues that might win an angel's gaze, 

'Mid scenery of heaven. 

R. S. Hawker, The Cell by the Sea, 1840. 

HATHERLEIGH. 
Lieut.-Colonel L. Ed ye [Stoke Damerel). Montreal. 

At Hatherleigh exist two remarkable customs : — one, that every morning 
and evening, soon after the church bell has struck five and nine, a bell 
from the same steeple announces by distant strokes the number of the 
day of the month — originally intended, perhaps, for the information 
of the unlearned villagers : the other is, that after a funeral the church bells 
ring a lively peal, as in other places after a wedding ; and to this custom 
the parishioners are perfectly reconciled by the consideration that the 
deceased is removed from a scene of trouble to a scene of rest and peace. 

Hone's Every-Day Book, 29 Jan. 

MOUNT EDGCUMBE. 
Mr. C. R. S. Philp [Plymouth). London. 

This mount all the mounts of Great Britain surpasses, 
'Tis the haunt of the Muses, the Mount of Parnassus. 

David Garrick. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 103 



OTTERY ST. MARY. 

Mr. H.. Gillham {Ottery St. Mary). London. 

I dreamt 
Of my sweet birth-place, and the old Church Tower, 
Whose bells, the poor man's only music, rang 
From morn till evening, all the hot, fair day. 
So sweetly that they stirred and haunted me 
With a wild pleasure, falling on mine ear 
Most like articulate sounds of things to come ! 



Dear native Brook ! wild streamlet of the West ! 

How many various fated years have past, 

What happy and what mournful hours, since last 
I skimm'd the smooth thin stone along thy breast, 
Numbering its light leaps ! yet so deep impressed 
Sink the sweet scenes of childhood, that mine eyes 

I never shut amid the sunny ray, 
But straight with all their tints thy waters rise, 

Thy crossing plank, thy marge with willows grey, 
And bedded sand, that vein'd with various dyes, 
Gleam'd through thy bright transparence ! On my way. 

Visions of Childhood ! oft have ye beguil'd 
Lone manhood's cares, yet waking fondest sighs : 

Ah ! that once more I were a careless Child ! 

S. T. Coleridge. 

Mr. Sidney H. Godfrey {Ottery St. Mary). London. 

This delightful bond of union with the old home is a sort of thread of gold 
which runs through one's life, however far we travel. I believe from my 
heart that our country is the best country in the world. I believe that 
of the countie/ Devonshire is the best county, and I believe that of all the 
homes in Devonshire, Ottery St. Mary is the best home. 

Lord Coleridge, Speech, 1901. 

This clinging to the home ... is a cherished link which binds 
us all together. The old gray church, the cadence of the hills, the long 
unbroken chine of the East Hill, the sound of waters as they go to join the 
sea, the silence of the ways by night, all these are with us, though the 
skies be dark, and the roar of endless trathc fills our ears. 

Lord Coleridge, Preface to Report of Old Ottyegians' Society. 

PLYMOUTH. 
Mr. Charles Saunders. Watford. 

O the fair town of Plymouth is by the sea-side, 
The Sound is so blue, and so still, and so wide, 
Encircled with hills and with forests all green. 
As a crown of fresh leaves on the head of a queen, 

O dear Plymouth town, and O blue Pl5nmouth Sound ! 
O where is your equal on Earth to be found ? 

Rev. S. Baring-Gould, Songs of the West. 

PLYMOUTH HOE. 

Mr. W. E. Dommett {Stoke Damerel). Kingston-on-Thames. 

We may not forget the dehghtful place called the Hoe ; a high hill 

standing between the town and the sea ; a very delightful place for prospect 

and pleasant recreation, whereon there is an exceeding fair compass erected 



104 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



for the use of sailors ; and here the townsmen pass their time of leisure 
in walking, bowling, and other pleasant pastimes : in the side whereof is 
cut out the portraiture of two men of the largest volume, yet the one 
surpassing the other every way ; each ha\ang a club in his hand : these 
they name to be Corinaeus and Gogmagog : intimating the wrestling to be 
here between these two champions : and the steep, rocky cliff affording 
fit aptitude for such a cast. 

Westcote, View of Devonshire in 1630, p. 383. 

WITHYCOMBE RALEIGH. 
Rev. E. a. Luff, M.A. " Hartland. 

St. John's in the Wilderness. 
While through alien streets and fields you roam. 
Your thought will sometimes touch your native home ; 
And when remembering this house of prayer. 
Recall the lesson which we gathered there : 
What shadowy ends await our fondest schemes, 
How truth is hid or only shown in gleams, 
How evanescent are our joys and pains. 
And man may come and go, but God remains. 
With whom, when man's devices pass away, 
A thousand years are but as yesterday. 

H. G. K. in The Guardian, April, 1909. 

YEALMPTON AND MOTHER HUBBARD. 
Mr. R. Stewart Barnes {Yealmpton). London. 

At Kitley, Yealmpton, the seat of the Bastard family, is a small volume 
about 4in. square, illustrated with little woodcuts. Inside this book is this 
note : " Original Presentation copy of Mother Hubbard, written at Kitley 
b)y Sarah Catherine Martin and dedicated to John Pollexfen Bastard, M.P. 
Mother Hubbard was, as is believed, the housekeeper at^Kitle}'- at that 
time." Then follows the dedication : " To J. P. B., Esqr., M.P., County of 

, at whose suggestion and at whose House these notable 

Sketches were designed, this volume is witn all suitable deference dedicated 
by His Humble Servant, S.C.M." Published June 1, 1805. The correct 
title of the book is : " The Comic Adventures of Old Mother Hubbard and her 
X>og." 

Warner, History of Yealmpton. 

ST. BONIFACE. 
Rev. G. T. Llewellin, M.A. Sandford. 

A traveller through the pleasant valleys of Devonshire when he comes 
to the little town, scarcely more than a village, of Crediton, between its two 
overhanging hills, may reflect with interest that he beholds the birthplace 
of the man who, more than any other, brought about the entrance of the 
German nation into the family of Christian Europe. 

T. Hodgkin, Charles the Great, 1903, p. 58. 

SIR FRANCIS DRAKE. 
Mr. W. H. Smart {Plymouth). London. 

For the main, we say that this our captain was a religious man towards 
God and his houses (generally sparing churches where he came), chaste in 
his life, just in his dealings, true of his word, and merciful to those that 
were under him, hating nothing so much as idleness. 

Thos. Fuller, Holy State, B ii, C xxii. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 105 



SIR FRANCIS DRAKE. 
Major A, C. Shawyer, Putney. 

Drake nor devil nor Spaniard feared, 
Their cities he put to the sack ; 
He singed his Cathohc Majesty's beard, 
And harried his ships to wrack. 
He was playing at Plymouth a rubber of bowls 
When the great Armada came ; 

But he said, " They must wait their turn, good souls," 
And he stooped, and finished the game. 

H. Newbolt, Admirals All. 

Mr. R. Grigg, A.I.E.E. {Exmouth). London. 

Great Alexander, famed commander, 

Wept and made a pother 
At conquering only half the world, 
But Drake has conquer'd t'other, 

Kingsley, Westward Ho ! Chap, ii. 

DRAKE'S DRUM, 
Mr. J. A, Chope {Hartland). Rothes, N.B. 

Drake he was a Devon man, an' ruled the Devon seas, 

(Captain, art tha sleepin' there below ? ), 
Rovin' tho' his death fell, he went wi' heart at ease, 

An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. 
" Take my drum to England, hang et by the shore, 

Strike et when your powder's runnin' low ; 
If the Dons sight Devon, I'll quit the port o' Heaven, 

An' drum them up the Channel as we drummed them long ago." 

H. Newbolt. 

DRAKE AND HAWKINS. 

Mr. H, B, Squire [Torrington). London. 

Sir Francis was of a lively spirit, resolute, quick and sufficiently valiant : 
Sir John slow, jealous, and hardly brought to resolution . . , They 
were both of mamy virtues, and agreeing in some, as patience in enduring 
labours and hardness ; observation and memory of things past ; and 
great discretion in suddain dangers .... And in some other virtues 
they differed ; Sir John Hawkins had in him mercy, and aptness to forgive, 
and true of word : Sir Francis hard in reconciliation and constant in 
friendship ; he was withal, severe and courteous, magnanimous and liberal. 
R.M., Prince's Worthies of Devon (1810 ed.), pp.473-4 

FROUDE. 
Professor H. A. Strong, LL.D. (5^. Mary's Clyst). Liverpool. 

Perhaps our busy breathless age. 
That leaves unopened history's page, 
Had need of hands like his to strike 
Imperial chords, Tyrtaean like. 

Anon. 

SIR HUMPHREY GILBERT. 

Professor W, S, Abell, R,C.N,C,, M.I.N. A. {Exmouth). Liverpool. 

" Never, therefore, mislike with me for taking in hand any laudable and 

honest enterprise, for if through pleasure or idleness we purchase shame, 

the pleasure vanisheth, but the shame abideth for ever. Give me leave, 



106 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



therefore, without olience, always to hve and die in this mind : that he 
is not worthy to live at all that, lor fear or danger of death, shunneth his 
country's service and his own honour, seeing that death is inevitable and 
the fame of \'irtue immortal, wherefore in this behalf miitare vel tinier e 
sperno." 

Examination before the Queen's Majesty and the Privy Council in 
reference to the discovery of a North- West Passage (about 1576). 

CHARLES KINGSLEY. 
Mr. J. B. BuRLACE {Brixham). London. 

Greater than the curate, the poet, the professor, the canon, was the man 
himself, with his warm heart, his honest purposes, his trust in his friends, 
his readiness to spend himself, his chivalry and humility, worthy of a 
better age. 

Max Miiller, Preface to 'The Roman and the Teuton.' 

SIR WALTER RALEGH. 

Miss Jennie Burnell {Strete). Sheffield. 

God has made nobler heroes, but he never made a finer gentleman than 
Walter Ralegh. 

R. L, Stevenson, The English Admirals. 

SIR JOSHUA REYNOLDS. 
Mr. H. F. Chope (Hartland). Sheffield. 

Here Reynolds is laid, and to tell you my mind, 
He has not left a wiser or better behind ; 
His pencil was striking, resistless, and grand ; 
His manners were gentle, complying, and bland. 

Goldsmith, Retaliation. 

THE FIRST ENGLISH AVIATOR. 
Mr. Rhys Jenkins. London. 

In the churchyard of Budleigh parish a stone sheweth this inscription : 
Orate pro anima Radulphe Node. This, as tradition deUvereth, was the 
sepulture of one that presumed to fly from the tower with artificial wings, 
and brake his neck ; which phaethonical fa-ct of his deserves the name of 
Nody, be the inscription what it is. 

Risdon, Survey of Devon, p. 52. 

THE FIRST MAYOR OF PLYMOUTH. 
Mr. E. a. S. Elliot, M.R.C.S., M.B.O.U. Kingsbridge. 

" The first Mayor of Plymouth," says an old MS., "was William 
Kentherick, in the reign of Henry the Sixth. He was a little square 
man, remarkable for shooting with the long-Dow, and one of the greatest 
eaters of his time. He gave at the feast during his mayoralty a pie com- 
posed of all sorts of fish, flesh, and fowl that could be gotten ; it was 14ft. 
long and 4 ft. broad, and an oven was built on purpose for baking it." 
This would nou'adays be called a squab pie — though not a true squab 
pie, mind 3^ou ; for certain ingredients are wanting that to a true Devonshire 
man (apples) — and still more a true Cornish man' (onions) — would spoil the 
whole dish, 

J. L. W. Page, Coasts of Devon, 1895, p. 258. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 107 



DAMNONIAN PEWTER. 

Mrs. G. H. Radford, (Lydford). Ditton Hill, Surrey. 

The capacious Tankard of double-rack'd Cyder, or wholesome tho' home- 
brew'd October Beer, improved by the Addition of a nnt-brown Toast, are 
now rejected for a compleat Set of Tea-tackle and a Sugar-loaf ; the Bounties 
of Ceres and Pomona undervalued ; and the dispiriting Infusion of the Leaves 
of an Asiatic Shrub, preferr'd to the exhilerating Beverage derived from 
the red-streak Apple-tree or the Barley Mow. The glittering Rows of Plates 
and Platters which of yore adorn'd the Dresser and Shelves give Place to 
frangible Earthen Dishes and Saucers . . . The Country Squire to please 
tiis modish Madam . . . must prefer the Brittleness and Frailty of 
Dresden Porcelain [to the Solidity and Permanence of Damnonian 
Pewter. Chappie, Review of Risdon's Devon (1785), p. 97. 



MODBURY ALE. 
Mr. N. Cole (Salcombe). London. 

>Modbur\' hath two fairs, on St. George's and St. James' Day, and a 
market every Thursday, much frequented for divers commodities, and 
somewhat the more for that it is famous to ha^-e (and so indeed it hath) 
the nappiest ale that can be drunk. This is the ancient and peculiar drink 
of the Britons and Englishmen, and the wholesomest ; whereby many in 
elder times lived 100 years ; which being made into a huff -cap is held to be 
meat, drink, and cloth for warmth ; whereunto nor Derby ale, nor Webly 
ale in Herefordshire, nor St. Barnac's cows' thick milk in Bra,unton, our own 
country, may in an^^ wise compare. 

Westcote, View of Devonshire in 1630, p. 393. 



FOOTBALL IN DEVON. 

Mr. F. J. S. Veysey [Chittlehampton). London, 

Football is not wholly discontinued, and within our remembrance was a 
frecpient Exercise among the common People in divers parts of this county, 
not only on the principal Holidays, but sometimes (tho' seldom) two Parishes 
have engaged with each other, on a day tix'd on by mutual appointment, 
at a Football-match ; in which Game (if I mistake not) there is usually 
somewhat like the Cornish Hurting introduced, whenever any of the 
Players can catch up the Ball, and hurl it towards the Gole aim'd at by 
those of his o\\n Party. 

Chappie, Review of Risdon's Survey of Devon (1785) p. 38. 



DEVONSHIRE DIALECT. 

Mr. R. Pearse Chope, B.A. (Hartland). London. 

As in the southern parts of England, and particularly in Devonshire, 
the English language seems less agreeable, yet it bears more marks of 
antiquity, and adheres more strictly to the original language and ancient 
mode of speaking. 

Giraldus Cambrensis, Description of Wales, about 1200. 

The Devon speech is marked out among its West Saxon sisters by its 
own racy indi\ddualities of tone and idiom . . . Genuine dialect is as 
true and undefiled a tongue as the purest speech of Chaucer or Milton, 
something to be reverenced and conserved. 

The Bishop of Exeter, Devonshire Association, 1907. 



108 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

A WASSAIL CHORUS. 
Mr. F. T. Mercer {Ashhury). London. 

Christmas knows a merry, merry place, 
Where he goes with fondest face, 
Brightest eye, brightest hair ; 
Tell the mermaid where is that one place — 
Where ? 
Rahigh : " Tis by Devon's glorious halls, 

Whence, dear Ben, I come againe ; 

Bright of golden roofs and walls — 

El Dorado's rare domain — 

Seem these halls where sunlight launches 

Shafts of gold through leafless branches, 

Where the winter's feathery mantle blanches 

Field and farm and lane. 

T. Watts-Dunton. 
FAREWELL TO DEVON. 
Mr. a. G. Philips. London. 

Farewell to thy manifold glories and graces. 
Thou sweet heart of Devon, so wild and so free. 
Farewell to the peace, and the soft resting-places. 
My short sunny leisure owes solely to thee. 

Eden Phillpotts, in West Country Poets, p. 368. 

''"Devon, Oh "Devon/ ' 

Feathery gorse and flowers 

Scenting the moorland air. 
And the glad sun making ev'ry hour fairer and yet more fair ; 

Fir, and gnarled oak, and beech-tree 

Where the brown -eyed squirrels nest. 
Carry God's hall-mark on them, in Devon, away in the West. 

'Tis there the gales sigh softly 
Across the arching sky, 
Where the granite Tors in grandeur point, up to the Lord Most High ; 
Laughing, the azure wavelets 
Caress thy shores each day. 
The while " white horses " foam -flecked race to sands where children play. 

Oh Thou, Who mad'st the Country, 

And let man build the Town, 
I long for the breath of Devon, and the white gulls swooping down ; 

I yearn for the glades and valleys. 

And the drowsy hum of bees. 
And the Devon wind on the heather and a -whispering in the trees. 

But the city calls, and holds me 

Where countless thousands learn 
To forget the peace of the moorland, and fight for the wage they earn 

On the restless fevered pavements 

Where man with his brother strives, 
'Mid streets and courts and alleys, cramped as their narrow lives. 

Yet grant when the fight is over. 

And the call rings clear and low 
And I have to answer '■ Adsum," it may be where the brackens grow ; 

Where the wild birds' song, for requiem, 

Shall hush my soul to rest; 
And the good red earth enshroud me, in Devon away in the West. 

Frank Bunnie. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 109 

The Folklore of Devon. 

By R. PEARSE CHORE, B.A. 

A Lecture delivered at St. Bride Institute, October /stj igog. 



Folklore is not all " whitpot " — that is, all nonsense — as 
some of you may be inclined to think, seeing that it deals with 
pixy tales, witchcraft, cures for warts, and such like — things 
that no educated person would trouble his head about. But it 
can be shown that the belief in such things has in many cases 
been handed down by tradition from the remote past, and is 
often the decayed form of some part of the religion or philosophy 
of our savage ancestors far away in the misty prehistoric ages, 
when they dwelt in caves like Kent's Cavern at Torquay, or in 
bee-hive huts like those whose remains you can still see on Dart- 
moor. The systematic study of these traditional beliefs, customs, 
tales, and sayings, forms the science of folklore, and its importance 
has been so fully recognized by students of anthropology and 
comparative religion that a learned society, called the Folklore 
Society, has for many years past been engaged in the collection 
and scientific classification of such matter from all countries and 
peoples of the world. If we accept the poet Pope's statement 
that 

The proper study of mankind is man, 

then we must regard folklore as one of the most important of all 
subjects, for it forms a branch of the Science of Anthropology — 
the Science of Man — dealing more particularly with the mental 
and spiritual characteristics of the human race. 

In addition to its being important, the subject has the further 
advantages of being extremely interesting and of being in- 
telligible to everybody. I need hardly tell you that Devon is 
peculiarly rich in all sections of folklore, for you will all know 
people who have been '' pixy-led,'^ people who have been 
" auverlook'd " or " ill-wish'd," people who have been "strook" 
or " cured " by a '\ whit witch," or a so-called " doctor " — 
usually the seventh son or daughter of the family, — people who 
carry a " tetty " to ward off rheumatism, people who hang up 
horseshoes and wear charms for luck. I am told that amulets 
or mascots are recognized accessories of such modern contrivances 
as motor-cars and flying-machines, showing that " popular 
superstition," as it used to be called, is by no means a thing of 
the past. 



110 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



The general attitude c»( th* rustic mind on the subject is well 
illustrated in an account of a village lecture on '' Popular Super- 
stitions," as told by our great local folklorist, the Rev. S. Baring- 
Gould, in his amusing biography of the " Vicar of Morwenstow." 
He relates how a boy from Bratton Clovelly, who had been sent 
to the Exeter Training College, returned to his native village 
for a holiday and offered to give a lecture on this subject in the 
" skule-rume." " The paas'n '" took the chair, '' the rume waz 
chuck- vull o' vokes," and the young " skule-maister gie'd mun 
a gude discoose " against what he caal'd "the prevailing belief 
in witchcraft." At the end, up gets Farmer Brown, one of the 
principal farmers in the parish, and says : — 

" Mr. Lecturer, and all good vokes yer to-night, — You've had 
your zay agin' witchcraft, an' you zays that there id'n no zich 
thing. Now, I'll tell 'ee a thing or tu — facts ; an' a pinch o' 
facts is wuth a bushel o' raisins. There's my cow, Pimrose, 
the Garnsey, so gude a cow vor milk as ivver waz. \\^aal, tuther 
day, when my missis putt the milk on the vire to scaald 'un, it 
wud'n yett. Her putt on plenty o' vuzz an' brimmles, but 
twud'n yett no-how. An' her zays to me, when I com in : 'I 
tell 'ee 'ot tiz, Richard, Pimrose hath a-bin auverlook'd by old 
Betty Spry. Now, you go off so vast as you kin to the Whit 
Witch up to Ex'ter.' Well, off I went, an' when I com to the 
Whit \Mtch, 'ot hves home b}/ All Hallows on the Walls, I waz 
show'd into a rume, an' there waz anether farmer trapesin' 
up 'n down in a reg'lar tare. Zo I zays to'n : ' Be you waitin' 
to zee the Whit Witch ? ' ' 'Ees, I be,' 'e zaid, ' my old cow is 
cruel bad, an' wan't gie no milk fall.' ' Aw,' zays I, ' my old 
cow's milk wan't yett, tho' the missus hath a-putt any amount o' 
viring under 't.' ' Du 'ee suspicion anybody ? ' 'e zays. * Ees, 
fai,' I zays, ' old Betty Spry 'as got a hevil eye, an' her's the wan 
that hath din it, I'll warn.' Arter 'e'd zeed the Whit Witch, 
the maid shaw'd me into the next rume, an' d'rectly I got inzide 
the door, avore I aup'md my mouthe, mind, the Whit Witch 'e 
zays : ' I knaw 'ot you be come vor, avore you zay a word. 
Your cow's milk wan't scaldy. I'll tell 'ee why vor. Her'th a-bin 
auverlook'd by an old 'umman caal'd Betty Spry.' That's 'ot 
he zaid to me, so zure as eggs is eggs, an' I ad'n. nivver spauk 
wan word to'n. ' You go home,' he zays, * an' git sticks out o' 
vower differ'nt parishes, an' putt min under the milk, an' her'll 
boil purty zune.' Waal, I paid'n vive shilHn, an' then I com 
back, an' I vetch'd sticks vrom Lew Trenchard, an' vrom Stow- 
ford, an' vrom German's Week, an' vrom Broadwood Widger ; 
an' no zoonder waz they lighted under the pan than the milk 
boiled." 



k 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. Ill 



Then up got Farmer Tickle 'pon his hine legs, an' zays : " Mr. 
Lecturer, you've a-zaid that there ban't no zich things as sperrits 
an' ghostes. I'll tell 'ee zummat. I waz comin' auver Broad- 
bury wan night, when twaz zo dark's a zack, an' I loss' my way. 
1 waz terrible afeard o' gittin' stugg'd in the bog — you all knaw 
that bog, don't 'ee, by the old Roman castle ? But arter a bit I 
com' to an old quary pit, an' I thort there mid be zombody about, 
zo I baal'd out to the tap o' my voice, ' Farmer Tickle hev a-lost 
his way.' Waal, jis then a voice vrom the stones caal'd back, 
' Who ? who ? ' ' Farmer Tickle, I zay.' Then I yerd the voice 
again, ' Who ? who ? who ? ' 'Be 'ee 'ard o' yurrin' ? ' I 
baal'd. * I zays tiz Farmer Tickle 'ot liv'th to Southycott.' Zo 
imperent as posssible, the voice akshally ax'd again, ' Who ? 
who ? ' ' Tiz Farmer Tickle, I tell 'ee, an' eef you axes again, 
I'll com' along o' you wi' my ashen stick.' ' Who ? who ? 
who ? ' I rin'd to the quary, an' bait about wi' my stick, when 
all to wance a gurt whit thing rish'd out — " 

" Twas an owl," said the lecturer scornfully. 

" A howl ! " zays Farmer Tickle. " I putt it to the mittin'. 
A man that zays that waz a howl, an' nat a pixie, wud ?ay any- 
thing ! " 

Then up gits Farmer Brown again, an' zays : — " Gentlemen, 
an' labourin' men, an' also wimmin. Til gi'e 'ee anether pinch 
o' facts. Avore I waz marri'd I waz gwain along by Culmpit 
wan day, when I mit old Betty Spry, an' her zays to me, ' Cross 
my hand wi' silver, my purty boy, an' I'll tell 'ee who your true 
love '11 be.' Zo I thinks I'd hke to knaw that, an' I gi'd her 
zixpence. Then her zays, ' You mark the fust maid that you 
mit wi' as you go along the lane that leads to Eastaway ; her's 
the wan that'll make you a wive.' Waal, I waz gwain along 
that way, an' the fust maid I mit waz Patience Kite. I thort 
her luki'd cruel smart an' peart ; zo, arter I'd got on a vew 
staps, I turn'd my 'aid auver my shoulder and luki'd back to 
her ; an' 'ot in the world shu'd her be doin' at the very zame 
minute seps lukin' back to me ! Then I went arter her, an' I 
zed, ' Patience,' I zed, ' will you be Mrs. Brown ? ' an' her zed, 
' I don't mind eef I be, I ban't no-ways partickler.' An' now 
her's my wive. Luky to her down there, zo raid as a turkey- 
cock ; there her zits, zo you may knaw my story's true. But 
'ow did Betty Spry knaw this avore ivver I'd a-spauk the words. 
That's wat licks me ! " 

Then up gits Farmer Tickle again, and says : — " Mr. Lecturer, 
Mr. Chairman, I putts it to you. I ax you, Mr. Chairman, being 
our paas'n, an' you, Mr. Lecturer, being a scholard, an' all you 
that have got Bibles, whe'er Holy Scripter dith'n zay : ' Thou 



112 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

shalt nat suffer a witch to live ' — whe'er Holy Scripter dith'n 
zay that the works o' the vlesh be idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, 
variance, emulations, an' sich like ? Now, eef zo be that witch- 
craft be all muneshine, then I reck'n zo be hatred, variance, and 
emulations too. Now, I putt it to the mittin, which o' thuse be 
true ? Which do 'ee vote vor, the Holy Bible an' witchcraft, 
or Mr. Lecturer an' his new-fangled logic ? Thuse in favour of 
Scripter an' witchcraft 'old up their hands." I need hardly add 
that witchcraft carried the day by a big majority. 

I have told this story in full because it indicates very fairly 
some of the commonest folklore beliefs at the present day. We 
will now consider some of them a little more closely, commencing 
with the pixies. 

These little elves are peculiar to our West-country folk- 
Pixies and jgre and have their home or headquarters on Dartymoor, though 
characteristics they are familiar in all parts of the county, as well as throughout 
Cornwall. We all know their propensity for mischief, chiefly in 
leading people astray by night, and we all know people who 
would not venture to cross a lonely moor in the dark without 
first turning their coats or pockets inside out. The reason for 
doing this is apparently that the pixies are such orderly little 
creatures that any disarrangement of the costume shocks them 
and keeps them at a distance. I remember that one of m\- 
father's labourers who had to cross a field to get to his cottage, 
once forgot the precaution of turning his pockets inside out, and 
he was caught — " pixy-led," as it is called. All through the night 
he wandered round and round the field, but was unable to find 
any way out, and the next morning at daybreak, when the 
pixies left him, he was utterly exhausted and in a bath of per- 
spiration. This state of perspiration is a feature, too, of horses 
that have been ridden by the pixies during the night, in addition 
to which they often have their manes plaited in a peculiar fashion 
into knots, which are known as " pixy-seats " or " pixy-stirrups," 
and cannot be untangled. 

Another effect of the work of the pixies is seen in the numerous 
" pixy-rings," which the scientific tell us are made by the natural 
growth of a sort of toadstool, but we all know that to step in- 
side one of these rings, or to pick one of the toadstools, is sure 
to bring ill-luck, if not death. 

But, you will ask, what are pixies ? And what are they Hke ? 
These questions are difficult to answer. 

By their works ye shall know them. 
For, strange to say, they are as a general rule invisible to human 
eyes unless struck with a certain magic ointment (about which 
I shall have something to say later on), and few indeed are the 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 113 



individuals who have been privileged to see them. Hardly two 
accounts agree as to their appearance. Most of them appear to 
say that they universally wear a green dress, though there is a 
rhyme that seems to indicate that they wear no clothes at all — 
Little pixy, fair and slim, 
Without a rag to cover him. 

One labourer declared they were " the purtiest little things he 
ever zeed," while an old woman described one she saw as about 
18 inches high, having '' a little odd hat, a pipe in his mouth, 
and an old jug in his hand — not like the jugs us uses now." 
Still another account describes them as being like bundles of 
rags. In the north of Devon and on the borders of Cornwall, 
they are thought to be " the ancient inhabitants — a dwarfish 
and malicious race, wearing dresses of dark green, and living 
within the pixy-rings " ; but in other parts they are thought to 
be the wandering souls of unbaptized children. 

But, whatever their origin, it is customary in all parts of the stories of 
county to leave basins or tubs of water for their use, and many their pranir^ 
tales are told of the work done by these little creatures while all 
the household lay asleep. Thrashing corn is one of their favourite 
tasks, but they are also partial to weaving, washing, and sweeping. 
But they must not be watched, and they must not be rewarded. 
At a farm on the borders of Dartymoor the people were dis- 
turbed at dead of night by the loud noise of a flail or drashel at 
work in the barn, and in the morning the farmer found a lot 
of his corn thrashed. The next night he kept watch, and saw 
six of them at their task. Seeing that they were ragged and 
dirty, he had new clothes made for them and placed where they 
might easily find them. The following night the farmer was 
accompanied by some neighbours, who took their guns with 
them. The pixies came as before, found the clothes, and began 
their usual dance and song — in the midst of which the farmers 
fired on them. Of course, no harm was done, but the pixies 
departed for ever, singing as they went — 

Now the pixies' work is done, 

We take our clothes and off we run. 

Many similar tales are told. I cannot refrain from giving one 
that was told in " Notes and Queries " by the Rev. S. Baring- 
Gould : — 

A farmer had three cows, Facey, Diamond, and Beauty. One 
morning, on going to the shippen, he found Facey looking cruel 
wisht and therl, with her skin hanging loose about her and cdl 
her flesh gone ; and, what more, the fire-place in the kitchen 
was one gurt pile of wood ash. Next morning his wife went to 
the shippen and found Diamond looking for all the world as 



114 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



wisht and therl as Facey ; nort but a bag of bones, all the flesh 
gone, and half the 'ood-rick gone too ; but the fire-place was 
piled up dree foot high with wood ashes. The third night he hid 
in a closet that opened out of the parlour, and watched. When 
he was nearly tired of waiting, the door flew open, and in rushed, 
may be, a thousand pixies, laughing and dancing, and dragging 
at the halter of Beauty till they had brought the cow into the 
middle of the room. The farmer thought he would have died of 
fright, but curiosity kept him alive. He saw the pixies throw 
the cow down, and fafl on her, and kill her, and then with their 
knives they ripped her open, and flayed her so clean as a whistle. 
Then out ran some of them, and brought in firewood, and made 
a roaring blaze, and cooked the meat. " Take care," said one 
who seemed to be the king, " let no bone be broken." When 
they had eaten every scrap of beef, they began playing with the 
bones, tossing them from one to another. One little leg bone 
fell close to the closet door, and the farmer was afeard lest the 
pixies should come searching for the bone and find him there, 
so he put out his hand and drew it into him. Then he saw the 
king stand on the table, and say " Gather the bones ! " Round 
and round flew the pixies, picking up the bones. " Arrange 
them ! " said the king ; and they placed them all in their proper 
positions in the hide of the cow. Then they folded the skin 
over them, and the king struck the heap of bones and skin with 
his rod. Whist! up sprang the cow, and lowed dismally. It 
was alive again, but now", as the pixies dragged it back to the 
shippen, it halted in the off fore foot, for a bone was missing. 

" The cock crew, 
Away they flew," 

and the farmer crept trembling to bed. 

And now a story to illustrate the use of the magic ointment. 
A wise woman was summoned to a cottage to attend the birth 
of a child. The messenger was a strange, squint-eyed, little, 
ugly old fellow, riding a large coal-black horse, with eyes like 
balls of fire. The midwife was given an ointment to strike the 
child's eyes with it, and she thought she would try the effect on 
her own. Immediately a transformation took place. The 
mother appeared as a beautiful lady attired in white ; the babe 
was seen wrapped in swaddling clothes of silvery gauze, while 
the other children became flat-nosed imps employed in making 
grins and grimaces, and pulling the lady's ears with their long 
hairy paws. Next market day at Tavistock the wise woman 
saw the same wicked-looking old fellow stealing things from 
the stalls. So she went up to him, and enquired for his wife 
and child. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 115 



" What ! " says the pixy thief, " do you zee me to-day ? " 

" Zee 'ee ! to be sure I do, zo plain as I zee the zun in the sky ; 
and I zee you'm busy into the bargain." 

" Oh. do you/' he zays, " with which eye do 'ee zee all this ? " 

" The right eye, to be zure," her zays. 

" The ointment ! the ointment ! " zays the old chap, " take 
that vor meddlin' with what did'n belong to 'ee ; I reck'n you'll 
nivver zee rrie no more." 

He struck her in the eye as he spoke, and the old woman was 
blind in her right eye from that hour to the day of her death. 

I hope I shall not bore you with still another story about the 
pixies. I don't want to occupy the whole of my lecture with 
them, because I have heaps of other interesting matter, but they 
really form such a large part of our folklore, and are so peculiar 
to the county, that I think I ought to devote a good bit of the 
lecture to them. 

This story is somewhat similar to the German animal legends 
or to the American " Brer Rabbit." A fox prowling about by 
night came unexpectedly on a colony of pixies. Each had a 
separate house. The first was of wood. " Let me in," said the 
fox. " I won't," said the pixy, " and the door is fastened." 
But the fox climbed to the top and pawed it down ; and then 
made short work of the pixy. The next was a stonen house. 
" Let me in," said the fox. " The door is fastened," said the 
pixy, and again the house was pulled down and the pixy eaten. 
The third was an iron house, and again the fox was refused. 
" But I bring 'ee gude news," said the fox. " No, no," said the 
pixy, " I knaw what you want, an' you shan't com in yer to- 
night." The fox attempted in vain to enter, and went away in 
despair. Next night he came again, and tempted the pixy by 
offering to show him the way to a field of turnips, of which pixies 
are particularly fond. The pixy agreed to meet him next morn- 
ing at four o'clock, but he went before and got the turnips long 
before the fox was out of bed. Then the fox thought of another 
scheme, and proposed to accompany the pixy to a fair in the 
neighbourhood. The pixy agreed, but again went before, and 
was returning home with his purchases — a clock, a crock, and a 
frying-pan — when he met the fox coming to meet him. He 
got inside the crock and rolled himself down the hill. The fox 
was unable to follow the scent, and went home in a rage. The 
next morning, the fox came again to the pixy's house and found 
the door open and the pixy in bed. He put the pixy in a box 
and locked him in. " Let me out," said the pixy, " and I will 
tell 'ee a wonderful secret." The fox was at last tempted to 
lift the cover ; and the pixy, coming out, threw such a charm 



116 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



over him, that he was forced to enter the box instead — and , 
there at last he died. 
The From the pixies it is not a far cry to the " Wish hounds " of 

wi8hTo°unds. Dartmoor, or the " Yeth hounds," or heath hounds, as they are 
called in North Devon. These are black, fire-breathing hounds 
that hunt the spirits of unbaptized children, so that they can 
find no resting-place in their graves. They can often be heard 
in full cry, and occasionally the blast of the hunter's horn on 
stormy nights. One night a moorman was riding home from 
Widecombe, when he was startled by the blast of a horn, and 
then past him swept without sound of footfall a pack of black 
dogs. However, he was not frightened, and when the hunter 
came up, he shouted out " Hey ! huntsman, what sport ? Give 
us some of your game." 

" Take that," answered the hunter, and flung him something 
which the man caught and held in his arm. What it was he could 
not guess. It was too large for a hare, too small for a deer. 
When he got home he called for a lantern, and, when it was 
brought, he raised it to throw a ray on the object he held in his 
arm — the game hunted and won by the Black Rider. It was 
his own baby, dead and cold. 

The hounds can be kept away by placing a crust of bread 
beneath the pillow of the sleeping child. Originally, no doubt, 
the bread was such as had been consecrated for Sacramental use, 
but there is apparently now no such restriction. 

Another tale is of an old woman, who, mistaking the time, 
started off in the middle of the night for market with her horse 
and panniers. Crossing the moor she heard a cry of hounds, 
and soon saw a hare running towards her. The hare stopped 
before her panting, and she got down, caught it, and popped 
it into one of her panniers. She had not gone far when she was 
terrified at the approach of a headless horse, bearing a black and 
grim rider, with horns sprouting from under a little jockey cap, 
and having a cloven foot thrust into one stirrup. He was accom- 
panied by a pack of hounds with horned heads and flaming 
eyes, and the air itself had a strong sulphurous smell. The 
huntsman politely asked her if she had seen the hare, and she 
promptly replied in the negative, whereupon he rode on with his 
hounds, not suspecting her deception. When he was out of 
sight, she perceived that the hare began to move, and to her 
utter amazement changed into a beautiful young lady dressed 
in white, who thus addressed her : " Good dame, I admire your 
courage ; and thank you for the kindness with which you have 
saved me from a state of suffering that must not be told to human 
ears. Do not start when I tell you that I am not an inhabitant 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 117 

of the earth. For a great crime committed during the time I 
dwelt upon it, I was doomed, as a punishment in the other 
world, to be constantly pursued either above or below ground 
by evil spirits, until I could get behind their tails, whilst they 
passed on in search of me. This difficult object, by your means, 
I have now happily effected ; and as a reward for your kindness 
I promise that all your hens shall lay two eggs instead of one, 
and that your cows shall yield the most plentiful store of milk 
all the year round ; that you shall talk twice as much as you 
ever did before, and your husband stand no chance in any matter 
between you to be settled by the tongue. But beware of the 
devil, and don't grumble about tithes ; for my enemy and yours 
may do you an ill turn when he finds out you were clever enough 
to cheat even him ; since, like all great impostors, he does not 
like to be cheated himself. Mind, he can assume all shapes, 
except the lamb and the dove." (These are, of course, hallowed 
by being symbols of Christ and the Holy Ghost). 

These hounds are not always in packs, for there are many 
legends of solitary black hounds. One is supposed to haunt 
the Dewerstone, and another a valley in the parish of Dean 
Prior. The famous Lady Howard was doomed to walk the earth 
as a black hound. Every night between midnight and cock- 
crowing she is compelled to run from the gateway of Fitzford, 
her former residence, to Okehampton Park, and bring back a 
single blade of grass in her mouth ; and this penance she is doomed 
to continue till every blade of grass is removed from the Park. 

One more instance : In the hamlet of Dean Combe once' lived 
a weaver of great fame and skill. After his death and burial 
he appeared sitting at the loom in his chamber, working as 
diligently as when he was alive. His sons applied to the Vicar, 
w^ho accordingly went to the foot of the stairs, and heard the 
noise of the weaver's shuttle in the room above. " Knowles," 
he cried, *' come down ; this is no place for thee." " I will," 
replied the weaver, " as soon as I have worked out my quill." 
" Nay," said the Vicar, '' thou hast been long enough at thy 
work ; come down at once." So when the spirit came down 
the Vicar took a handful of earth from the churchyard and threw 
it in its face. And in a moment it became a black hound. 
" Follow me," said the Vicar, and it followed him to the gate 
of the wood. And when they came there " it seemed as if all 
the trees in the wood were coming together, so great was the 
wind." Then the Vicar took a nutshell with a hole in it, and 
led the hound to the pool below the waterfall. " Take this shell," 
said he, " and when thou shalt have dipped out the pool with it 



118 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

thou mayest rest — not before ! " And at midday and at mid- 
night the hound may still be seen at its work. 

Some of you may remember the great excitement caused by 
mysterious footprints in the snow in the gi"eat snowstorm of 
1881. These footprints were not those of any known animal, 
they were at enormous distances apart, and neither hedges nor 
houses formed any obstruction. Parents were afraid to allow 
their children to go to school, and for some time the whole county 
was in a state of panic. The mystery has never been solved. 

And it is not only spectral hounds that appear. Judge Jeffrey's 
spirit, for instance, is said to haunt the court-room at Lydford 
in the form of a black pig, a Jewish pedlar haunts Cairn Top, 
Ilfracombe, in the form of a white rabbit, and you all know the 
song of " Widdecombe Fair," where we are told that 

When the wind whistles cold on the moor of a night 
Tom Pearse's old mare doth appear, gashly white, 

Wi' Bill Brewer, Jan Stewer, and the rest of the company. 
And all the long night you'll yur skirling and groans 
From Tom Pearse's old mare in her rattling bones 

And from Bill Brewer and the rest of 'em. 

There is a similar idea in the other Devon Folk-Song, " The 
Hunting of Arscott of Tetcott," but I rather suspect this is due 
to Mr. Baring-Gould himself — 

When the tempest is howlin', his horn you may hear. 
And the bay of his hounds in their headlong career ; 
For Arscott of Tetcott loves hunting so well, 
That he breaks for the pastime from Heaven — or Hell. 

Dotrish.***** The tales of ghosts are numerous, but many of them are not 
peculiar to Devonshire. However, I will tell you one or two. 
The estate of Dowrish, in the Parish of Sandford, adjoining 
Crediton, was long held by a family of that name, and the last of 
the family fell off his horse and was killed at a narrow bridge 
leading to the house. From that time his spirit has been gradu- 
ally advancing up the hill towards the house, at the rate of a 
" cock-stride " every morning. But he may not use the road. 
A bridge as narrow and as sharp as the edge of a sword, unroUing 
itself as he advances, is provided for the unfortunate squire. 
WTienever he falls off (and it is supposed this must frequently 
happen) he is obliged to return to the stream and begin again. 
His present position is therefore quite uncertain ; but there is 
no doubt that he will one day reach his own front door, and 
what will then happen no one can foresee. This " sharp sword " 
probably represents the " brig of dread," over which, according 
to the old northern belief, it was necessary for the spirit to pass 
before it could reach its place of rest. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



119 



This ae night, this ae night, 

Everie night and all 
To brig of dread thou comes at last, 
And Christ receive thy sawle. 

Another interesting example is vouched for by Mr. Baring- 
Gould himself. Lew Trenchard House is haunted by a White 
Lady, who goes by the name of Madam Gould, and is supposed 
to be the spirit of a lady who died there in 1795. She is heard 
walking along the corridor, and seen pacing up and down a long 
oak-tree avenue. In a gloomy valley near the house, she is to 
be seen, dressed all in white, standing by the side of the stream, 
with a phosphorescent light streaming from her face and her 
clothes ; and she stoops and takes up handfuls of water, 
which she allows to trickle down in sparkhng drops through her 
fingers. Sometimes she combs her long brown floating hair 
with a silver comb. When the Church was being repaired in 
1832, the carpenter one evening, out of curiosity, opened the 
vault, and finding the lady's coffin-lid loose, he proceeded to 
lift it. But the lady immediately opened her eyes, sat up, and 
rose to her feet. The carpenter, frightened out of his senses, 
rushed out of the Church, which was filled with light from the 
lady's body. For over a mile he ran to his house, and all the 
way his shadow was cast in front of him by the light from the 
spectral lady. When he reached his house, his wife also saw the 
apparition standing in the doorway, and the light from it was 
so strong that she said she could see by it a pin lying on the floor. 
Seven parsons met to lay the ghost, but apparently they did 
their work ineffectually. Some say that they conjured her into 
a white owl, which nightly flits to and fro in front of Lew House ; 
others doubt this. 

However this may be, parsons were generally called in to lay 
ghosts, for they were recognized as powerful conjurors, as we 
have seen in one of the tales I have already told you. Polwhele, 
the historian of Devon and Cornwall, tells us that, when he was 
living at Kenton, he became friendly with Sir Robert Palk of 
Haldon. On one occasion four clergymen were driven to Haldon 
in Sir Robert's own carriage, and the country folk imagined 
they had been sent for to exorcize evil spirits. It was said that 
one of them, after a long struggle, was successful in sending a 
devil through the roof, and another in locking up the arch-fiend 
himself in an iron chest. In one case the ghost of a Vicar's 
predecessor was laid in a beer-barrel, but a difficulty arose as to 
the disposal of the barrel and its mysterious tenant, for if the 
barrel were broached the ghost would be set free. Nothing 
occurred to the parsons but to roll the barrel into a corner of 
the room, and get the mason to wall it in. This made the room 



Madam 
Gould. 



Parsons as 
Conjurors. 



120 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



The Devil 
outwitted. 



Witches and 

White 

Witches. 



look rather odd, so the mason was instructed to block up the 
other three corners in the same way. The parsonage has never 
been haunted since. 

Some years ago, when repairing Marwood Church, near Barn- 
staple, the masons came across a small box in an excavation 
made in the rock under the Chancel pavement. It fell to pieces 
when discovered, and the builder supposed it might have con- 
tained the body of a still-born child. But the natives had another 
explanation. It appears that a young woman, being jeered at 
by her companions at not having a sweetheart, said she would 
go to Barnstaple Fair and not return without one, though it 
should be the Devil himself. However, she was apparently 
unsuccessful, but on her way home alone she was joined by a 
man who called himself Will Easton. He frequently visited 
her in the evenings, but always disappeared when a light was 
produced. Often he was heard singing ; and the farmer's wife 
once called out : " Thee'st a-got a butivul voice. Will ; I wish 
thee'd let us zee thy vaace," but her request was in vain. So 
the courtship went on, till one night a terrible noise was heard, 
as of a number of men thrashing on the roof ; and the unfortunate 
Molly was found wedged in between the bed and the wall, in a 
place where you could not get your hand. Ten men could not 
draw her out, and they were obliged to bring twelve parsons to 
conjure her, but in vain, till a thirteenth, the parson of Ashford, 
came ; who, being a great scholar, outwitted the enemy in this way : 
He asked the spirit whether he claimed immediate possession, 
or whether he would wait till the candle which they had lighted 
had burnt out. And the unwary spirit, either out of politeness, 
or fear of so many clergy, having consented to wait until the 
candle was burnt out, the parson immediately blew it out and 
put it into a box. This box, it was believed, had been built 
into the wall of Marwood Church, but, when the masons came 
upon the small box underneath the pavement, the people had no 
doubt that it was the identical box. A?id " sure enough," said 
the informant, " when they came to search, they found the 
snuff of the candle." A similar tale is told of Bridgerule Parish, 
where the candle is supposed to be walled up, but the piece of 
walling pointed out really indicates the position of the old rood- 
loft staircase. 

I must now pass on to the consideration of witches. No 
doubt you have all met old women reputed to be witches, or 
having the power of overlooking and working evil to persons and 
animals. I have known several. It was, however, more than 
200 years ago when the last Devonshire watches — three old 
women from Bideford — were executed at Exeter. One of them 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 121 



confessed that she had assumed the form of a cat, and a red pig, 
and that she had caused one woman to be pricked at nine places 
in her knee, as though it had been the prick of a thorn, simply 
by pricking a piece of leather nine times. They had overlooked 
the cows of a minister " so that those cows that used to give 
milk, when they came to be milked, they gave blood, to the 
great astonishment of the beholders," and they had caused 
several ships at sea to be cast away, and had been instrumental 
to the death of several persons and many cattle. They could 
■only say the Lord's Prayer backwards, and they confessed that 
" the Devil used to be with them on nights in several shapes, 
sometimes like a hound, but without doubt he hunted for souls." 

The most frequent form assumed by a witch is that of a hare, 
which can only be shot by a silver bullet. Many stories are 
told of such hares which have been hunted and wounded, and 
the witches being afterwards seen with injuries in a corresponding 
part of the body. 

The power of the evil eye is generally supposed to be inborn, 
but it may be acquired by performing certain rites. If any 
person present is desirous of acquiring this power and will 
solemnly promise to perform the rites, I will give him the neces- 
sary instructions. People of the highest rank and character 
are sometimes credited with it. The last Pope, for instance, 
was believed to have had it in a marked degree, and it is said that, 
when in his presence, many devout Roman Catholics were in 
the habit of putting the thumb of the right hand between the 
first two fingers in order to avert the ill-effects that were supposed 
to follow his blessing. 

When I was a little boy, I was greatly impressed by a threat 
made by a farmer in my hearing. Talking about an old woman 
who was supposed to have caused the death of many cattle by 
this mysterious power, he said : " Drat th' ould 'umman ! Eef 
I was to mit her wi' the gun under my arm, I'd shet her zo zoon 
a.s looky to her, blame me eef I wud'n." 

In some cases the angry glance of the person is supposed to be 
sufficient to cause disaster, but generally other means are em- 
ployed. To afflict a person with severe stabbing or pricking 
pains in any part of the body, a common way is to make a small 
wooden figure of him, stick pins into it at the parts to be afflicted, 
and whilst the figure is floating in a certain liquid contained in a 
cloamen pan, perform a solemn incantation. To inflict certain 
diseases, the image is made of clay, and to cause consumption, 
it is made of wax and placed before a fire. By a similar associa- 
tion of ideas, heart-disease is caused by taking a bullock's heart, 
sticking pins into it, and hanging it up in the chimney. Onions 



122 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



How to cure 
Fits and 
other 
Diseases. 



treated in the same way are used to produce stomach or intestinal 
complaints. 

For animals it is sufficient to draw a circle on the ground and 
perform an incantation. If any animal steps into this magic 
circle, it becomes lame or ill, and, in many cases, dies. Some 
years ago I was told that a certain farmer had lost so many 
cattle because a certain " witch " had " dra'd a circle agin 'n." 
Fortunately, it is often possible to restore a " witched " animal 
to health by hanging a wreath of " care " or mountain ash 
about its neck, as soon as it is observed to be " therl " and to 
lack appetite. Pigs, in particular, may be occasionally seen 
decorated in this manner. However, animals cannot always be 
cured so easily. If the " care " fails, and in all cases in which 
human beings are afflicted, it is necessary to draw blood from 
the witch, or to drive a " maiden nail " (i.e. a nail which has 
never been used) into her tracks or footprints. The former 
counteracts the ill-wishing, and the latter makes the witch lame. 
But you must first find your witch. Various means have been 
used for this purpose, but it is now usual to employ a " whit 
witch," or professional witch-finder. The whit witch, who is 
generally a man, goes through a performance, and finally dis- 
closes to the inquirer a method of ascertaining the culprit. These 
methods are ridiculously simple, and are always based on chance. 
He win say, for instance, that the " overlooker " is the first person 
you will meet on your way home, or the first person who will 
knock at your door after you get there. As the person thus 
discovered is generally a neighbour, and, as likely as not, a 
relative, it is obvious that more bad blood and ill-feeling are 
caused by these " whit witches " than b}^ the " witches " them- 
selves, who, indeed, are usually innocent of any offence. I have 
known instances of families being divided so that the members 
were never again on speaking terms, brother was set against 
brother, and in one case the mother was identified as the culprit. 
In other instances I have known serious damage done to the 
supposed culprit by attacks with pitchforks and hooks, solely 
by reason of the " whit witch's " identification. In fact, a 
veritable vendetta has been established. 

Folk-medicine is a large and important branch of folk-lore, 
but I have only time to-night to give a few samples. One of the 
best known cures is perhaps that for epileptic fits, and that is 
still practised in Devonshire. I quote from a letter written 
to the " Western Morning News " only three years ago by the 
Rev. F. G. Scrivener, Rector of Sutcombe : " A woman in the 
parish has of late been a sufferer from epileptic fits, and at the 
persuasion of a neighbour who 19 years ago had done the same 



TJie London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



123 



:hing and had not suffered from fits since, sfie went round the 
[parish and got 30 married men to promise to attend the parish 
church at the morning service. It was a gratifying sight to see 
[so large a congregation, drawn together out of sympathy for a 
neighbour and a desire to do anything she thought might help 
her. At the close of the service the Rector desired the selected 
men to pass out one by one, and as they passed through the 
porch they found the woman seated there, accompanied by the 
neighbour who had done the same 19 years ago (as many who 
were present remembered). Each man as he passed out put a 
penny in the woman's lap, but when the thirtieth man (the 
Rector's Churchwarden) came he took the 29 pennies and put in 
half-a-crown. A silver ring is to be made out of this half-crown, 
which the woman is to wear, and it is hoped that the result will 
be as satisfactory in her case as it was on the previous occasion. 
In a small parish (less than 300 population) it is not easy to find 
30 married men, but all were willing to help — farmers, labourers, 
and tradesmen — and the whole incident passed off very quietly, 
and all was done with the utmost reverence and decorum. The 
woman takes her seat in the porch when the preacher begins his 
sermon, and from the time she leaves her house until she returns 
she must not speak a word." This account differs from previous 
accounts in requiring " married men " instead of " young people 
of the opposite sex," and another interesting feature is the neces- 
sity for silence, but perhaps the most curious development is the 
fact that the Rector himself acted as master of the ceremonies. 
It is curious that, in none of the Devonshire examples of this 
well-known cure, was it regarded as important to have the ring 
made of sacrament money, although in a cure for paralysis 
given by Hunt in his " Popular Romances," the sufferer obtained 
the half-crown from the clergyman, in exchange for her 30 
pennies, and then walked three times round the communion 
table. 



Another cure is to get seven sixpences from seven maidens in 
seven different parishes, and have them melted down and made 
into a ring for the sufferer to wear. Mr. Baring-Gould relates 
that in his own Church many years ago a man stood up after 
the blessing had been pronounced and bawled out : " This yer 

is to give notice as how Sally J ago of Parish has got fits 

terrible bad, and as how her can't be cured unless her wears a 
silver ring made out o' zixpences or vourpenny. or dreepenny 
bits as come out of zebm parishes. This yer is to give notice 
as how I be gwain to ax vor a collection at the door in behalf o' 
Sally J ago as to help to make thicky there ring." 



124 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



The 

dead hand 
and other 
cures. 



Charms. 



Another well-known cure is for the King's evil or other super- 
ficial disease — striking the place with the hand of a person who 
had died an untimely death. The Vicar of Hartland a few years 
ago reported that after a wreck the hand of one of the drowned 
sailors was superstitiously used by a villager for striking for the 
King's evil. At a Coroner's inquest at Plymouth about 30 years 
ago a lad afflicted with the King's evil was brought to the Court 
by his mother to obtain permission to be " struck " by the man 
who had committed suicide. The virtue lies not in the actual 
contact, but in the fact that the hand will shortly decay, and 
as it decays the disease will pass away. This idea underlies 
most of the cures for warts — transferring the disease to matter 
that will soon decay. 

A cure for several diseases is to be laid for a short time in the 
newly-made grave of a female, and throat complaints are cured 
by throwing a white handkerchief that has been worn around 
the throat into the grave and upon the coffin of an unmarried 
person of the opposite sex. As the handkerchief decays, so 
will the complaint vanish. 

Infantile hernia is cured by passing the child at sunrise three 
times in the direction of the sun's motion through a maiden ash 
tree (i.e., one self-sown), split open for the purpose. The tree is 
then bound round, and plastered with mud or clay. If the two 
parts grow together, the complaint is cured, and, in any case, 
the child's health and physical condition are afterwards intima- 
tely connected with the health and condition of the tree. A 
man who had cut down one of such trees and presented it to a 
museum, was threatened by the father of the child for imperilling 
the infant's life. 

The essential feature of many cures is a word charm, either 
spoken or written. I have collected scores of such charms, but 
I have only time to quote a few as samples. One of the best 
known is for stopping the flow of blood : — 

Jesus was bom in Bethlehem, 
Baptized in river Jordan ; when 
The water was wild in the 'ude (wood). 
The person was just and gude (good) ; 
God spake, and the water stude (stood), 
And so shall thy blude (blood) — 
In the name of the Father, etc. 

Another is a text from Ezekiel xvi, 6 and 9 : " And when I 
passed by thee, and saw thee polluted in thine own blood, I 
said unto thee when thou wast in thy blood. Live ; yea, I said 
unto thee when thou wast in thy blood. Live. Then washed I 
thee with water ; yea, I thoroughly washed away thy blood 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 125 

from thee, and I anointed thee with oil." In all cases it is 
necessary to know the name of the person or animal to be cured ; 
if the patient has no name, the case is hopeless. 

For fever, the patient should go to a running stream and cast 
backwards nine pieces of wood into the water, at the same time 
saying — 

Fever, go away from me ; 

I give it, water, unto thee. 

Unto me thou art not dear. 

Therefore go away from here 

To where they nursed thee, 

Where they shelter thee, 

Where they love thee. 

Mashurdalo, help ! 

Who " Mashurdalo " may be, I cannot ever guess. 

For pain in the eyes, bathe the eyes with a lotion made from 
spring or well water and saffron, and say — 

Oh, pain in the eyes. 
Go into the water ; 
Go out of the water 
Into the saffron ; 
Go out of the saffron 
Into the earth — 
Into the spirit earth ; 
There is thy home, 
There go and eat. 

In each of these cases, the disease is personified, and is charmed 
out of the person into an inanimate object. By " saffron," 
probably " Devonshire saffron," i.e. dodder, is meant. 

An example of a written charm for the cure of fever is the 
following : "In the name of St. Exuperus and St. Honorius, fall- 
fever, spring-fever, quartian, quintian, ago, superago, consum- 
matum est." This must be written on a piece of parchment, 
and bound over the patient's heart, three Paters and three Aves 
being said during the latter process. The patient will recover 
after wearing the charm nine days. 

We have now to consider some animal and plant superstitions, some animal 
Some of you may think you know why Tews don't eat pork, but ^^^ pi».".t 
the rector of a small Devonshire parish received some enlighten- 
ment on this subject in visiting his sexton's cottage not long ago. 
He found the pig had been killed a fortnight earlier than was 
intended, and asked the reason. " The peg was get tin' to a 
wishtness, y'r reverence," said the sexton's better half, " an' tes a 
gude job us 'av 'ad 'n a-killed, 'cos 'e han't a-got no Jews' ears to 
his heart." " Jews' ears to his heart ! What are they ? " "Jews' 
ears ! an' you'm a passon, an' dawn't knaw that ! Well, I never ! 
Why, looky yer (pointing to the auricles closed up with fat), 'tis 



superstitions. 



126 . The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



the place where the devils went into when they was a-droved into 
the swine — ^you've a-raid about that, ha'nt ee ? — an' yer be the 
place (pointing to two little black marks on the fore legs) where 
they com'd out, an' they do zay that be why a Jew wan't titch 
pork to this day." 

Birds enter largely into folk-lore. Strange stories are told of 
the appearance of certain birds before death. A classic example 
is the " white bird " of the Oxenham family, referred to in " West- 
ward Ho ! " The raven is also generally considered a bird of ill 
omen, though the Rev. R. S. Hawker tells a story of two ravens 
saving the life of a notorious wrecker. It is usually said that if a 
raven flies around a house, a corpse will be carried out of it. At 
Hartland, it is said that if a jackdaw is seen on each pinnacle of 
the church tower on a Sunday, there will be a funeral before the 
following Sunday. If a hen crows, her head is immediately 
chopped off, for, if she crew a second time, some terrible disaster 
would happen to one of the household. A few years ago a woman 
at Hartland heard one of her hens crow three times, and within an 
hour her son fell from a ladder and was injured for life. Of 
course, you all know 

The robin and the wren 

Are God Almighty's cock and hen ; 

And that 

Eef you kill a robin or a wran 
You'll nivver prosper, boy nor man. 

In fact, the direct result of kilhng either, or even of " strubbing " 
their nests, is that the culprit gets the King's evil, or, according to 
some accounts, a crooked linger. 

You have probably heard that bees must always be informed 
of any death in the house, and their butts must be provided with 
mourning, or the insects will be offended and take their departure. 
It is usual to turn the butts before the funeral. On one occasion, 
a new servant was told to do this, but, not knowing what was 
meant, she turned the butts upside down, with most disastrous 
results to herself. Another prevalent belief is that the first 
butterfly seen must be killed, or ill-luck will result. 

With regard to plants I can say httle, though I have heaps of 
material. One of the most potent herbs is parsley, and to trans- 
plant it, or even to change the position of the bed, is sure to bring 
disaster. It is unlucky to burn elder, because the Holy Cross was 
made of this wood, and it is unlucky to bring hawthorn blossom 
into the house, because the crown of thorns was made from this 
plant. If you bring a single, or a few, Lent lilies or Lent roses 
(daffodils) into the house, the duckhngs will be few, but, if you 
bring a large bunch, they will be numerous. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 127 



We now come to one of the best known and most interesting of ^'^'^^ ^^"^ 



all our local customs — " crying the neck " at the end of harvest. 
This custom is probably carried out in somewhat different ways 
in different parts of the county, but in all essentials it remains the 
same. After the corn (and by " corn," of course wheat is meant) 
is all cut, some of the finest ears are selected and made into a sort 
of a small sheaf or " neck," as it is called. I have here some 
specimens which I have had made for the occasion. You will see 
that the main peculiarity is that it has a triple head, and is bound 
by three bands. The word " neck " probably means only a nitch, 
or small sheaf, though this is not certain. In some parts the 
" neck "is much more elaborate, and has plaited loops or lissoms 
at the top, besides being decorated with ribbons. In this form 
it is supposed to have some resemblance to a female figure, but I 
am sure no lady present to-night will admit any such resemblance 
in the specimens I have shown you. The " neck " is carried by 
one of the men to some elevated spot, and the remainder of the 
reapers form themselves into a ring around it. Each man then 
holds his hook above his head, and they all shout together the 
weird cry, " A neck ! A neck ! A neck ! We ha* un ! We ha' un ! 
We ha' un ! " This is repeated several times, with the occasional 
variation, " A neck ! A neck ! A neck ! God sa' un ! God sa* un ! 
God sa' un ! " After this ceremony, the man with the " neck " 
L has to run to the kitchen, and get it there dry, while the maids 
wait with buckets and pitchers of water to " souse " him and the 
" neck " as well. The " neck " is then hung up until the following 
harvest, and the evening is spent in feasting, dancing, and singing. 
This custom, or something very similar to it, is practised not 
only in Devon and Cornwall, but also in other parts of England, 
and in many widely separated districts on the Continent. The 
" neck " is known by many different names, but in most cases it is 
more or less in the form of a woman, and, in its origin, it undoubted- 
ly represented the spirit of the harvest or corn spirit, the Roman 
goddess Ceres. The main idea of the ceremony -seems to have 
been that, in cutting the corn, the spirit was gradually driven into 
the last handful, just as rabbits are driven into the last patch in 
these days of machinery. As it was needful to cut the corn and 
bury the seed, so it was necessary to kill the corn spirit in order 
that it might rise again in fresh youth and vigour in the coming 
crop. The shout " We ha' un ! " — ^We have her !'— indicates the 
capture of the corn spirit, the raised hooks the slaughter, and the 
wail is for the death. Sometimes the last handful cut is taken to 
make the " neck," and sometimes the hooks are actually thrown 
at the " neck " after it has been made, but I don't think either of 
these variants is practised in Devon. The drenching with water 



neck. 



128 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

is a charm for rain, to ensure fertility for the next crop, and the 
feasting in the evening perhaps represents rejoicings at the resur- 
rection of the spirit. Although this explanation may appear to 
be somewhat fanciful, there is a vast amount of evidence to pro\'e 
that it is substantially correct. The idea of sacrificing men and 
animals to ensure good crops is almost universal among savages, 
and even in Hartland within the last 50 or 60 years, three young 
cats have been buried brandiswise in a field to rid it of coltsfoot. 
The " sousing with water " is also practised on May-day, some- 
times called '' Ducking Day." A few years ago this custom led 
to a fatal accident. The water was thrown over a fence on a pas- 
sing carriage, frightening the horse, and causing the carriage to be 
overturned. One of the occupants was so injured that his leg had 
to be amputated, and, as a result of the operation, he died. 
Wassailing The custom of wassailing or " blessing " the apple-trees to make 
Apple-trees, them bear well seems to have quite died out. Lysons in 1822 
described it thus : " This ceremony at some places is performed 
on Christmas Eve ; in others, on Twelfth-day eve. It consists 
in drinking a health to one of the apple-trees with wishes for its 
good bearing, which generally turns out successful, as the best 
bearing tree in the orchard is selected for the purpose. It is 
attended with singing some verses applicable to the occasion ; 
beginning, 'Health to thee, good apple-tree.' The potation 
consists of cyder, in which is put roasted apples or toast : when 
all have drank, the remainder of the contents of the bowl are 
sprinkled over the apple-tree." In some places the ceremony 
was accompanied by the firing of guns, beating of pestles and 
mortars, and shouting, possibly with the idea of frightening away 
the evil spirits of blight and disease. The libations were ap- 
parently intended, on the other hand, to propitiate the spirit of 
the apple-tree itself, that is, the Roman goddess Pomona. This 
confusion between Christmas Eve and Old Christmas Eve dates 
from 1752, when, to the great dissatisfaction of the common people, 
eleven days were left out of the calendar. Not only did they 
beheve that they had been robbed of this period of time, but all 
their ceremonial dates were upset, because it could not be expected 
that the spirits would recognize such a change. " Superstition " 
then received a great blow, from which it has never recovered. 
People are still uncertain whether it is upon Christmas Eve or Old 
Christmas Eve* that the cows in the shippens go down upon their 
knees in adoration of the new-born Saviour. 
F^t ^^"^ ^ believe very few other festival customs survive, though I have 
*** ' myself seen the throwing of Lent sherds on Shrove Tuesday, and 

cock-kippiting on Good-a-Vriday, besides, of course, carol-singing 
and mumming at Christmas. One well-known May-day custom. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 129 



known as the " Holne Ram Feast/' related originally in " Notes 
and Queries," and frequently quoted by popular and even scientific 
writers, apparently owes its existence entirely to the imagination 
of the contributor, signing himself " An Old Holn Curate." At 
the village of Holne — which, by the way, is the birthplace of 
Charles Kingsley — is a field belonging to the parish, known as the 
" Ploy Field." In the centre of this stands a large stone 6 or 7 
feet high. On May morning, we are told, the young men assemble 
there before daybreak, and then proceed to the Moor, where they 
capture a ram lamb, bring it in triumph to the Ploy Field, fasten 
it to the stone, cut its throat, and then roast it whole, skin, wool 
etc. At midday a struggle takes place, at the risk of cut hands, 
for a slice, it being supposed to confer luck for the ensuing year on 
the fortunate devourer. The narrator concludes his story with 
the comment : " The time, the place (looking east), the mystic 
pillar, and the ram, surely bear some evidence of the Ram Feast 
being a sacrifice to Baal." 

A much prettier custom is that of little girls going round with Dty?^^^'^ 
their " May dolls," asking for pence. A doll is laid in a white] 
cardboard box, decorated and covered with flowers. This 
custom was also practised on 29th May, and a somewhat similar 
custom was practised by little boys on that day — ^hence called ' 
Garland-day. They made garlands formed of two crossed hoops : 
entwined with flowers and strung with birds' eggs in the middle j 
— every kind being admitted except that of the robin. The I 
boys dressed themselves up with ribbons round their arms and 
waists, and a cap on their heads made of pasteboard decorated 
with gold paper, and little points with a gilt border, finished 
with oak leaves intermixed. The leader carried the garland, 
and the others had drums, and whistles, and triangles, and 
swords of lath. The money collected was divided, and then the 
garland eggs were placed on some block or post, and the boys 
amused themselves by throwing stones at them. 

Query — ^What connexion has the May doll or the garland with 
►Charles II ? 

At Tiverton there was a still stranger custom on that day. 
King Charles II, represented by a youth, in a bower made of oak, 
and attended by his guards, dressed in 17th century costume, 
was carried about the town from house to house, the guards sing- 
ing a song composed for the occasion. Oliver Cromwell, repre- 
sented by a man whose hands and face were covered with a 
mixture of soot and grease, had a rope round his waist about 
30 feet long, which was held by a man behind him. Oliver, 
who carried a great club in his hand, came on howling and stamp- 
ing to attack King Charles, but was continually repulsed by the 



130 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Hunting- the 
Earl of Rone. 



Sir Francis 
Drake as a 
leg'en4ary 
hero. 



guards. All the time the crowd pelted " Old Oliver " with 
rotten eggs, oranges, tufts of grass, or any harmless missile they 
c(5uld find. OHver in his turn chased his assailants, and, if he 
caught any of them, smeared his face with smut. 

But the most elaborate of all these local customs was Hunting 
the Earl of Rone at Combmartin on Ascension Day. The Earl 
of Tyrone was supposed to have been a political refugee captured 
in a wood near that place. When found, he had a string of sea 
biscuits around his neck, on which he had been Uving. 

The characters or mummers represented were: The Earl of 
Rone himself, wearing a grotesque mask, a smock frock stuffed 
or padded with straw, and a string of twelve hard sea-biscuits 
around his neck. The hobby horse, masked and covered with 
gaily painted trappings, and armed with an instrument called a 
" mapper," which was shaped to represent the mouth of a horse, 
and was furnished with rude teeth and means for rapidly opening 
and closing its formidable jaws. The fool, also masked and 
gaudily dressed. A real donkey, decorated with flowers and a 
necklace of twelve sea-biscuits. A troop of grenadiers, armed 
with guns and wearing tall caps of coloured paper profusely 
adorned with bunches of ribbons. 

For a fortnight before the day, the hobby horse and the fool, 
in full dress, paraded the parish and levied contributions towards 
the expenses. On the day itself the grenadiers first marched 
to the wood, and discovered the fugitive Earl of Rone. They 
then fired a volley, and set their prisoner on the donkey with 
his face towards the animal's tail, and then conducted him in 
triumph to the village. There the hobby horse and fool joined 
in the procession. At certain points the grenadiers fired a volley, 
and the Earl fell from the donkey mortally wounded, whereupon 
there was great exultation by the grenadiers and much lamentation 
by the hobby horse and the fool. After much exertion, the 
latter always succeeded in healing the Earl of his wounds, after 
which the procession reformed and marched on as before. At 
every public house there was, of course, a stoppage for refresh-* 
ment. In case of refusal to contribute, the fool would dip his 
besom in the nearest gutter and besprinkle the offender, or the 
hobby horse would lay hold of his clothes with his ** mapper " 
and detain him prisoner till the required blackrnail was forth- 
coming. About nightfall the procession reached the sea, and 
the proceedings were brought to a close. 

Every country, and every county, has its local hero, whose 
history is thickly overlaid with legend. I need not tell you 
that our hero is the great Sir Francis Drake, but I think you will 
be surprised to hear how many legends are connected with his 
name. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 131 



Many of you have heard the story of how Drake brought the 
water to Plymouth. Having found a suitable spring on Dart- 
moor, he pronounced some magic words and galloped off towards 
Plymouth, and the stream followed him all the way. 

When he was away on one of his long voyages, it is said that 
his wife had given up all hope of his return and agreed to marry 
another man. The day of the wedding was fixed, and the parties 
had assembled in the Church, when Drake was informed by one of 
his famihars of what was taking place. It so happened that he 
was then at the very Antipodes, but he rose up in haste, charged 
one of his great guns, and shot off a cannon ball so truly aimed 
that it went right through the earth, and fell with a loud ex- 
plosion between the lady and her intended bridegroom. " It 
is Drake's signal," she cried, " and I am still a wife. There 
must be neither troth nor ring between thee and me." 

In the days of Drake many people considered the world to be 
formed of two parallel planes, the one at a considerable distance 
from the other. In reference to this space it was commonly 
said that Sir Francis had " shot the gulf," meaning that his ship 
had turned over the edge of the upper plane to pass on to the 
waters of the lower. There is a picture of Drake at Oxford, 
representing him holding a pistol in one hand, which, the guide 
used to inform strangers, was the very pistol with which Sir 
Francis shot the gulf. 

One day when he was playing kails or skittles on the Hoe (the 
game of " bowls " was not then played in Devonshire) he was 
told of the approach of the Spanish Armada. After he had 
finished his game, he ordered a block of wood and a hatchet to 
be brought to him. Cutting off chips, he threw them into the 
sea, and at his command every chip became a well-armed ship. 
In a short space of time a complete Navy was thus produced, which, 
as you know, completely vanquished the enemy. 

He was, indeed, a very powerful magician, and had considerable 
dealings with the Evil One. He is said even now to drive at 
night a black hearse drawn by headless horses, and urged on by 
running devils and yelping headless dogs, through Jump on 
the road from Tavistock to Plymouth. 

Most of you think of him lying " slung atween the round shot 
in Nombre Dios Bay," but there are folks in Devon who say 
that he lies under a blasted elm at Nutwell Court. He had 
permission from the Evil One to walk once a year, but he was 
bound not to go more than ten " cock strides." One year he 
overstepped the limits and walked right round the Park, but, 
when he got back, there was a great flash of lightning, a noise 
louder than the firing of the battery guns, and the tree was split 
from top to bottom and never bore a leaf afterwards. 



132 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 

When he built his gi'eat mansion at Buckland, he brought a 
large number of masons from Plymouth, Exeter, and Tavistock, 
who built up walls six feet from the foundation in one day. 
Next morning every stone was removed from its place and carried 
to a great distance. Sir Francis was very angry, but he ordered 
the masons to begin again. The following morning every stone 
had again been removed. A third time the walls were built, 
and this time Sir Francis hid himself in a tree and watched. At 
midnight the earth opened, and out came a number of little black 
devils, chattering and laughing. They carried off the stones 
with the greatest ease, and all the walls were demolished before 
cockcrow. Next day the masons built the walls for the fourth 
time. In the evening Sir Francis dressed himself all in white 
and hid in the tree as before. When the devils came underneath 
the tree, he flapped his arms, and shouted out " Kikkeriki ! " 
And the devils looked up and saw (as they thought) a great 
white bird crowing ; and they dropped all the stones and ran 
away, screaming with fright, thinking the end of the world had 
come. A modification of this legend represents the devil as 
building the mansion in three nights. The butler hid in the 
tree to see how it was done. At midnight the devil came, driving 
several teams of oxen ; and, as some of them were lazy, he 
plucked this tree from the ground and used it as a goad. The 
poor butler lost his senses and never recovered them. 

Such building legends are interesting, and often afford valuable 
evidence of a change of site. The fact that there has been a 
change is remembered, but the reasons for it and the circum- 
stances attending it are forgotten. I am not aware whether 
there has actually been any change in the position of Buckland 
House, but the former of these two legends seems to indicate 
such a change. The story of the removal of the stones in the 
night by devils or pixies is often told in connexion with Churches. 
It is told about Hartland Church, though there is another legend 
to account for the change of site in that case, viz. that St. 
Nectan, after being murdered at a place called Newton, carried 
his head in his hands as far as St. Nectan's well at Stoke, and 
there, after placing the head upon a certain stone, he died. As 
a proof of the miracle, the chronicler tells us that the marks of 
blood remained on the stone " to this day." 

Sorne years ago a small box was found in a closet at Buckland, 
containing, it is supposed, family papers, and the owner of the 
property went in his carriage to fetch it. The box was easily 
hfted into the carriage by one man, but the coachman in vain 
attempted to start the horses. They would not — they could 
not move. More horses were brought, and then the heavy farm- 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 133 



horses, and eventually all the oxen. They were powerless to 
I start the carriage. At length a mysterious voice was heard, 
(declaring that the box could never be moved from Buckland 
Abbey. It was taken from the carriage easily by one man, and 
a pair of horses galloped off with the carriage. A similar story 
is told of the cannon ball that Drake shot up through the earth. 
If it is removed from the estate, it always returns thither. 

But the best-known of all the Drake legends is that of his drum 
— the drum that accompanied him in his wonderful voyage 
round the world, and that sounded on the " Revenge " as she 
sailed into action against the Armada. This legend has been 
told in immortal verse by Henry Newbolt : — 

Drake he was a Devon man, an' ruled the Devon seas, 

(Capten, art tha sleepin' there below ?), 
Eovin' tho' his death fell, he went wi' heart at ease, 

An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. 
" Take my drum to England, hang et by the shore. 

Strike et when your powder's rinnin' law ; 
If the Dons sight Devon, I'll quit the port o' Heaven, 

An' drum them up the Channel as we drummed them long ago." 

This drum now hangs in Buckland Abbey, and it is said that, 
whenever England is in danger of invasion, '* one tap on Drake's 
drum will bring back the spirit of the man who would never 
brook his country's dishonour or defeat, to be reincarnated 
once more to vanquish England's enemies. Twice since Drake 
passed has the drum been sounded. Once his spirit found a 
tenement in Blake, who avenged the insult of the Dutchman 
who sailed up the Thames with a broom at his masthead, and 
thereafter carried a whip at his, as a sign that he had driven 
them off the English seas. The second time his spirit was sum- 
moned, Nelson arose and secured to England that supremacy 
at sea which she has never since lost." When will it be necessary 
for Drake's drum to be sounded again ? 

And now I have come to the end of my lecture, though not 
to the end of my tether, for the subject is almost inexhaustible. 
It is impossible in a single lecture to do more than call attention 
to a few of the most striking features, but I hope I have succeeded 
in convincing you of the truth of the statements I made at the 
beginning — that " Folk-lore is not all whitpot," and that it is a 
subject of great interest to everybody. In conclusion I would 
appeal to you by our motto " Sociamur amore Devoniae," to 
help in the work of collecting these scraps of old country lore 
before it is too late. I shall be glad to have a note in writing 
of any authentic instances of so-called " popular superstition," 
and I shall judge of your appreciation of my lecture by the 
number of such contributions I receive. 



134 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



The Origin of the T)evonian Race. 

By JOHN GRAY. B.Sc. 

Secretary of the Anthropometric Committee of the British Association, Treasurer to the Royal 
Anthropological Institute, Foreign Associate of the Society of Anthropology of Paris, 

A Lecture delivered at St. Bride Institute November 12th, igog. 

Modern science is able to ascertain with more or less precision, 
the course of the evolution of man in the remote ages of the past, 
long before the dawn of history. The study of his tools and 
weapons of stone, bronze, or iron, reveals the stage of culture 
which he has achieved ; and when we are fortunate enough to 
unearth his bones, we may determine by measurement his affinities 
with other races, whether extinct or still living. 

The laws of heredity tend to keep the average dimensions of 
race constant through vast periods of time. A remarkable 
example of this is the case of the Egyptian peasantry, who have 
been shown to have the same average head dimensions now as 
they had 10,000 years ago. This shows the importance of 
measuring living races in all countries, and comparing their 
dimensions with those of the skeletons of past races. We can 
thus detect the arrival of alien races and their probable origin. 

PALEOLITHIC MAN. 

The earliest type of man in Western Europe, of which we have 
any definite knowledge, is generally known as the Neanderthal 
Man. He lived in the Palaeolithic or Early Stone Age, that is 
to say, his tools and weapons were made of flint, and were of the 
crudest workmanship, showing that he had attained only to a 
very low state of culture. 

During the long ages that Neanderthal Man lived in Europe, 
its northern regions were covered by a great ice sheet, which at 
its maximum extension covered the whole of Britain down to 
the Thames Valley, the Continent of Europe as far south as the 
Harz Mountains, the whole of Scandinavia, and Eastern Russia. 
Since there were contemporaneous extensions of the glaciers of 
the Alps and the Pyrenees, the only habitable regions in Western 
Europe were central Germany and France, and England south of 
the Thames. It is here that the relics of Palaeolithic man have 
been found. 

The first specimen of a Neanderthal skeleton was found in the 
valley of the Neander, a tributary of the Rhine. Later two or 
three more specimens were found in Belgium, and last year two 
of the most perfect specimens have been found in central France. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 135 

The skull of the Neanderthal man approximated much more 
closely to that of the ape than that of modern man. He had 
heavy projecting eye-brows, large orbits, projecting lower jaw, 
and no chin. 

Several attempts have been made by anthropologists to clothe 
the dry bones of the Neanderthal man with flesh and reproduce 
his appearance when alive. His aspect is sufficiently forbidding. 

It is estimated that Neanderthal man first appeared in Europe 
about 100,000 years ago, and remained there for about 75,000 
years, down to the time when the great ice sheet had dwindled 
to a glacier known as the Baltic glacier, covering merely the 
Scandinavian peninsula. 

No indubitable Neanderthal skulls have been found in England, 
but many flint implements of the Palaeolithic type have been found, 
which make it highly probable that he peopled the habitable 
district south of the Thames. Fragments of two skulls, appa- 
rently of Palaeolithic age, have been found in the Cattedown 
Cave, near Plymouth, but they have not, as far as I can ascertain, 
been demonstrated to be of the Neanderthal type. 

NEOLITHIC MAN. 

About 15,000 years ago a new type of man appeared in Europe, 
known usually as the Neolithic or Late Stone Age Man. The 
measurements of his skull show that he belonged to a race quite 
different from the Neanderthal race. On the other hand there is 
so little difference between Neolithic man and some modern 
European races that we must regard these latter as his direct 
descendants. 

This Neohthic man was long-headed, i.e. the breadth of his 
head was less than 75 per cent, of its length, a feature which 
distinguished him from another race which entered Europe at a 
much later date and about which I shall have something to say 
further on. 

Dr. Arthur Evans fixes the date of the appearance of Neolithic 
man in Crete as early as 12,000 B.C., and it was in Crete that he 
first attained to a high degree of civilization. 

What is known as the Minoan or Mycenaean civilization origi- 
nated among the Neolithic race in Crete. 

Between 15,000 and 3,000 B.C., Neolithic man appears to have 
spread over the whole of habitable Europe, and to have com- 
pletely either exterminated or driven out the preceding race, i.e. 
the Neanderthal man. He was the earliest inhabitant of which 
we have found any trace in Britain, with the exception of the 
district south of the Thames. In Norway and Sweden, which 
during his early settlement in that neighbourhood, was being 



136 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



slowly uncovered by the retreat of the Baltic glacier, he was the 
earliest known inhabitant. He covered the whole of European 
Russia, the Balkan peninsula, and the lower valley of the Danube. 

Coming, as he did, originally from southern regions, Neolithic 
man may safely be assumed to have had dark hair and eyes. 
His descendants in the Mediterranean countries are still of dark 
complexion, but a remarkable transformation has taken place 
in the pigmentation of that section of the race that lived on the 
margin of the great Baltic glacier. 

Here, under the influence of the Arctic or semi- Arctic climate, 
the dark hair became blond, and the dark eyes, blue. As a 
consequence, the inhabitants of the Scandinavian peninsula 
are to this day the fairest race on earth. 

The Neolithic people made their tools and weapons from the 
same raw material as their Palaeolithic predecessors, namely, 
flint. But their technique had made a great advance. Their 
flint arrowheads were beautifully formed and polished, and 
their culture and civilization generally was a great advance on 
that of Neanderthal man. 

One stimulus still was necessary to enable the Neolithic race 
of Europe to take its highest flight in civilization, namely, a 
knowledge of the art of metal-working. 

This was brought to the Neolithic Cretans about 3000 B.C. 
by an alien race, a race of altogether different origin and physical 
and mental characteristics, viz. a Mongoloid race from Central 
Asia, which had already evolved a high grade of civilization in 
the valley of the Euphrates. 

BRONZE AGE MAN. 

Europe, as we have seen, was inhabited throughout the Neo- 
lithic or Late Stone Age by a long-headed race. Asia, con- 
temporaneously, in its central mountainous regions had been 
evolving a round-headed race. We have to infer this from the 
distribution of the head forms of the living population, because 
no prehistoric skulls have as yet been discovered in Asia. A 
map of cephalic indexes (i.e. ratios of breadth to length) shows 
that the great centre of round-headedness is somewhere about 
Tibet, from which it spreads east, north, and west, but never 
south of the Himalayas. It gets diluted with long-heads as it 
spreads out from the centre, and the round-headedness is 
thereby reduced. 

We are at present more immediately concerned with the 
migration that moved westward. An offshoot from this settled 
in the valley of the Euphrates, and by 4000 B.C. had achieved a 
high degree of civilization. This race had invented writing and 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 137 



jre great architects and engineers, as witnessed by the stone 
"monuments they left to us. They were known by the names 
of Sumerians or Akkads. A statuette of a Sumerian king, 
named David, recently dug up in Mesopotamia, illustrates the 
physical type of this race. It was evidently round-headed and 
of short stature. 

A western extension of this race into Asia Minor was known as 
the Kheta, or Hatti, a name which is familiar to us in the Old 
Testament as the Hittites. 

At the time of their greatest extension, in the 14th century 
B.C., the Hittites exercised political power over the whole of 
Asia Minor and Syria. 

Apparently about 3000 B.C. they settled in small numbers 
among the Neolithic race of Crete, and as bronze became known 
to the Cretans about this date, it is a natural inference that the 
great discovery of metal-working by the Cretans was due to 
contact with this Mongoloid race. 

The round-headed races of Asia Minor and Mesopotamia did 
not restrict their migrations to Crete. We find among the present- 
day populations of Europe a round-headed type. Its distribu- 
tion would be explained if we assume that the Mongoloids of 
Asia Minor migrated by sea to the eastern shores of the Adriatic, 
where they landed in the mountainous regions of the Balkan 
Peninsula to avoid the warlike Neolithic peoples who occupied 
the low countries of Europe. Hence they moved, on the one 
hand, north and west along the Carpathian range, and, on the 
other hand, east along the Alpine range as far as Switzerland 
and the Cevennes. 

This Mongoloid race appears also to have migrated by sea 
along the Mediterranean to the West of Europe, for we find 
isolated groups of round-heads in the south and north of Spain, 
which it is difficult to account for otherwise than as colonies of 
round-heads that came by sea. 

From recent evidence we are now almost certain that this 
same Mongoloid race, the Sumerians, Akkads, or Hittites, con- 
tinued their migrations by sea as far as the British Isles. 

The evidence that a Mongoloid race settled in Britain about 
the time of transition from the stone to the bronze culture, 
may now be regarded as indisputable. All the earliest skulls 
of the Neolithic Age found in the British Isles are of the long- 
headed type with the same average cephalic index as the ancient 
Cretans. 

The Mongoloid race which has been found in short cists* in 

* The short cists are prehistoric graves whose sides and covers are formed of flat slabs of 
stone. It is in this kind of grave, which was too short to permit of the full extension of the 
body, that the short round-headed skeletons have been found in Britain. 



138 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



various parts of Britain is extremely round-headed. It has a 
cephaHc index of 85, and it can be shown by statistical calcula- 
tions that it differs in type from all the other known prehistoric 
races of Britain. The nearest approach to the short-cist type 
in Europe is to be found among the prehistoric races of Switzer- 
land, but none of these races are so close as to support the view 
that our short-cist race migrated down the Rhine from Switzer- 
land to Britain. 

Only one plausible explanation of the origin of our short-cist 
Mongoloid type appears to be left to us, namely, that they came 
by sea from the most accessible country of round-heads, namely, 
Asia Minor or Syria. 

There can be little doubt that this race introduced the know- 
ledge of smelting and working bronze into Britain. This people 
probably knew the art before the date of their arrival, which for 
various reasons is fixed at about 2000 B.C., for we have seen that 
their appearance in Crete determined the introduction of bronze 
into that island nearly 1,000 years before the introduction of 
bronze into Britain. 

Some idea of the appearance of this Mongoloid man of the 
short cists may be obtained from the restorations by Prof. Reid. 
It will be seen that he has an expansive forehead. He was short 
in stature (average about 5ft. 3in.). His appearance suggests 
the Breton or Welsh type. A drinking- vessel is usually found 
buried with him in his grave of a shape which was widely spread 
over Britain and certain parts of the Continent in the early 
Bronze x\ge. 

THE DEVONIAN RACE. 

It will be of interest to make an attempt to ascertain the name 
by which the short-cist race was known in Britain. To do this 
we must resort to the somewhat dangerous evidence of place- 
names, which, however, if handled with caution, is very valuable. 

As the oldest of all modern place-names are usually river 
names, I shall make use of these only. The old river names in 
this country are generally derived from the names of the tribes 
who lived in the river valleys. 

We have also very old names of tribes who lived in Britain 
during the Roman occupation, mentioned by Roman and Greek 
writers. 

The number of short-cist skeletons found in Britain is as yet 
very small. Ten adult males have been found in Aberdeenshire 
and five in south Wales. Specimens have also been found in Angle- 
sea, in the Isle of Arran, in Banffshire, and in Caithness. This 
points to a route of migration from Cornwall and Devon to 



I'Z'i 



PRIMITIVE 
DEVONIAN 

(Front view) 




Restoration (latest) 

by 

Prof. K. W. Reid 

of the 

Short-cist Man. 





PRIMITIVE DEVONIAN 

(Front and side views) 
Restoration by Prof. R. W. Reid of the Short-cist Man. Ccphah'c index 85 ; stature, 5ft. v^in. 





MODERN DEVONIAN 

(From and Side views) 
This illustration shows the head of a modern Devonian for comparison with that of 
the Short-cist Man shown above. The cephalic index in this case is 82. and the stature 
5ft. Sin., which is quite within the limits of individual variation. The great resemblance 
between this modern Devonian and the primitive Devonian is obvious. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 139 



John o' Groat's, passing through Wales and the west of England, 
the west of Scotland as far as the Clyde, then across to the east 
:oast of Scotland, which is followed to Caithness. 

Now is there any common tribal name in the map of Roman 
Britain which is confined to this track ? 

If we look at the map in Rhys's Celtic Britain, we shall find 
lat Devonshire and Cornwall, with the exception of a small 
istrict round Land's End, was inhabited by a tribe named the 
)umnonii. A tribe with an identical name inhabited a district 
'of Scotland stretching from the river Doon in Ayrshire to the 
Tay in Perthshire. There can be little doubt that the modem 
name of Devon is derived from Dumnonii by the process of 
phonetic decay, because m naturally turns into v in this process, 
and, if confirmation of this is needed, we find it in the fact that 
there is a river Devon in the centre of the country of the northern 
Dumnonii. 

There are several other tribal names on the map vv^hich are 
phonetically equivalent to Dumnonii, namely, Dobunni, in 
Somerset and Gloster, Demetae, and perhaps Ordovices in Wales, 
and these lie along the track of the short-cist men. But when 
we look for river names with the same root as Dumnonii or 
Devon, we find the track of the short-cist men much better 
covered. Beginning at Devonshire we have in Devonshire, the 
Tamar, Tavy, Taw ; in Wales and W. England, the Severn, 
Teme, Taff, Tawe, Teifi, Dovey, Dee (North Wales), Dove, Tame, 
Dee (affluent of Lune) ; in W. Scotland, the Dee (Kirkcudbright), 
Doon ; in Mid-Scotland, the Devon, Tay (ancient Tavus) ; in 
E. Scotland, the Dee (ancient Deva), and Deveron. 

There are only a very few rivers, with the Devonian root, 
outside the short-cist area, as Thames, Teviot, and Tweed, and 
the upper parts of these rivers lie within the area. 

The distribution of river names derivable from the same root 
as Devon is shown on the accompanying map. 

We have seen that one of the early Mongoloid peoples of the 
Euphrates valley were the Sumerians, i.e. the inhabitants of 
the land or city of Sumer. A very easy and common phonetic 
change is the change of an S to a T or a D. This change converts 
Sumer into Tumer, or Dumer. Remembering that m and v are 
also phonetically interchangeable, it is easy so see that the 
original tribal name of Sumerian may readily change into any of 
the ancient river names we have cited above. 

This would suggest that the primitive Devonians were a colony 
of the Mongoloid Sumerians, who formed one division of the 



140 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



earliest known inhabitants of the Euphrates valley*. As I have 
already remarked, this people was probably of the same race as 
the Akkadians and the Hittites. The Akkadians were also 
located in the Euphrates valley. The original home of the 
Hittites appears to have been Cappodocia, in the south-eastern 
corner of Asia Minor and Northern Syria, though at the zenith 
of their power, in the 14th century B.C., their empire extended 
over the whole of Asia Minor, and down through S3n-ia as far as 
the northern frontiers of Palestine and Phoenicia. 

Now it may be asked, what could have induced these Mongoloid 
peoples living in countries bordering on the eastern Mediter- 
ranean to venture by sea to a country so remote as Britain. To 
account for this we have only to remember that these peoples 
had discovered the art of making bronze, and that to make 
bronze, tin is necessary. The Devonshire and Cornish tin mines 
were then the richest in Europe, and the tinstone was in the 
readily obtainable form of stream tin — no mining was necessary. 
Remains of ancient stream tin mining have been found in the 
Tavistock district of Devon, and in the St. Austell district of 
Cornwall. It is true that none of the round-headed short-cist 
skeletons have been found in Devon or Cornwall, with the excep- 
tion of one doubtful specimen at Harlyn Bay, near Padstow, 
but then it is known that cremation was almost universal in 
these districts in the Stone Age. 

But it has been objected if they came for tin and found it in 
the country of the Dumnonii, why did they migrate further 
north to Scotland, where there was no tin ? Did the Englishmen 
who went out to Austraha to dig for gold in Ballarat confine 
themselves to that district ? They did not, but spread over 
and settled in all the habitable parts of Australia. 

DOLMENS AND STONE CIRCLES. 

If it is true that the primitive Devonians were Sumerians or 
Hittites, we should expect to find some similar remains of their 
handiwork in the countries of their origin and in that of their 
adoption. We have, therefore, in the first place to inquire 
whether there are any ancient monuments characteristic of the 
area of Britain occupied by the primitive Devonians, and then 
to inquire whether any similar monuments are found in Asia 
Mmor or Syria. We should also expect to find these monuments 
all along the route by which the Devonians passed from Syria to 
Britain. 



=ol f^ . femarkable coincidence, if not a conhrmation of this view, that the Welsh Triads 
uLVr^- , A Tf "^ '■'"'? '^^'*;^ ""^"^^ ^° Britain." came from " land of Sumer." This has 
been pointed out to me. since this paper was written, by Mr. Hig^ns. 




I 



This map shows the geographical distribution in the British 
Isles of dolmens (shown by shade lines), stone circles (shown 
by black dots), and old place names derived from the same 
root as Devon. It will be observed that the area of the 
dolmens and stone circles is ahnost identical with that of the 
Devonian place names. The place names selected are river 
names, and names found in Greek and Roman writings. 




This map shows the geographical distribution of doknens 
(shown by shade Unes) , and of old Devonian place names in 
Europe (with the exception of the British Isles). In almost 
every case the Devonian place names are found in the same 
areas as the dolmens. The place names selected' are river 
names, and names found in Greek and Roman writings. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 141 

In the Devonian area in Britain as defined by the distribution 
of the short-cist skeletons and the place-names, we find a very 
remarkable type of prehistoric rude stone monuments, one kind 
of which is known as dolmens, and another as stone circles, the 
latter appearing to be a later development of the dolmen, in- 
vented in Britain. These rude stone monuments extend from 
Land's End to the Orkney Islands. Like the short-cist men, 
they are never found in the east of England north of the Thames. 

A fine example of a dolmen is to be found at Drewsteignton, 
Dartmoor, and another at Lanyon in Cornwall. One solitary 
example is found in Kent ; there is no other example of a dolmen 
so far east as this in England. 

In the northern part of the Devonian (in the wide sense of the 
word) area the stone circle is much more frequent than the 
dolmen. The largest number in a given area occurs in Aber- 
deenshire, and it is in this district that the largest number of 
short-cist skeletons have been found. A map of their distribu- 
tion in N.E. Scotland has been drawn by Mr. A. L. Lewis, one 
of the leading authorities on this subject. 

We have seen that dolmens and stone circles are intimately 
associated with a short-cist race in Britain. The question now 
arises : In what countries are similar monuments found, and 
are they found in the countries we have supposed, for other 
reasons, to have been the place of origin of the short-cist race ? 

The answer to the latter question as regards Syria, is certainly 
in the affirmative. A large number of dolmens have been found 
in Syria, but the dolmens extend further south than Syria, and 
are found in the whole district east of the Jordan and Dead Sea. 
A sketch of a dolmen found at Hebron, east of the Dead Sea, shows 
how like it is to the Devonshire and Cornish dolmens. 

No dolmens have been found in Judea, one or two only in 
Samaria, none in Crete. One could not readily imagine, there- 
fore, that the long-headed Cretan race were the builders of 
the dolmens in Britain. 

It is quite probable, however, that the Cretans, being a great 
maritime people about 2000 B.C., also came to Britain for tin, 
but if they settled in Britain, it must have been mostly in the 
Eastern Counties, out of the dolmen and short-cist area. Place- 
names in the map of Roman Britain, in the middle and east of 
England and west of Scotland, such as Coritani, Cerones, Carini, 
Cornavii, which are derivable from the same root as Crete, give 
some support to this view. 

We may be able to boast that the British race has Cretan as 
well as Hittite blood in its veins. And, although the Cretans 
had a bad reputation for veracity, they were undoubtedly the 



142 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



first great sea-power, and attained to a degree of excellence in 
sculpture and other fine arts which has never since been equalled. 
According to a recent theory propounded by Sir Norman 
Lockyer, the dolmens and stone circles were used as astronomical 
observatories, having for their object to fix the New Year's day, 
and regulate the calendar. This is quite in accordance with the 
view that these monuments were erected by the Sumerians or 
Akkads, who are known to have cultivated astronomy two or 
three thousand years B.C. 

THE TRACK OF THE SUMERIANS FROM SYRIA TO 

BRITAIN. 

The track of the Sumerians from Syria to Devon is marked out 
by dolmens. This may be seen on a map, such as that in Ferguson's 
Rude Stone Monuments. Dolmens are found in most of the islands 
of the Mediterranean, on the N. coast of Africa, on S. coast and 
N. coast of Spain, in Portugal. They are especially numerous 
on a track stretching from the Mediterranean to Brittany, which 
suggests that the Sumerians, after having at first taken the long 
sea route round Spain and Portugal, found at last a short cut 
across land to the British tin mines, and used this ever after. 

The dolmens do not stop at Britain, but are found on the north 
coast of Germany and in Denmark and Sweden, suggesting that 
the Mongoloid race settled to a certain extent in these countries 
in the Bronze Age. Measurements of the Bronze Age and living 
races of these dolmen districts, so far as they have gone, show 
that the heads are rounder than the average in adjacent areas. 

The dolmens in N. Germany are of quite similar type to those 
of Devonshire. 

THE PRESENT POPULATION OF DEVON. 

You might expect from -the arguments I have been submitting 
to you, that the present day population of Devonshire and 
Cornwall should have, hke the short-cist men, an average cephahc 
index of 85 and an average stature of 5ft. Sin. This we know is 
not the case. The reason for this is that the Mongoloid Sumerian 
is only one element in the present population. Before the 
Sumerians there was no doubt 'a sparse population of short dark 
long-heads of the Neohthic or Cretan type. Then, after the 
Sumerians came, the Goidels, Brythons, and Anglo-Saxons, who 
aU contained more or less of the fair, tall, long-headed race of 
northern Europe, as might be inferred from the fact that they 
spoke Aryan languages. The mixing and crossing of these 
races has produced the present-day Devonshire man. The 
two long-headed elements have reduced his average cephalic 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 143 

index from 85 to 80. The North European element has raised 
his stature from 5ft. Sin. to 5ft. 7in. 

The presence of the round-headed Mongoloid racial element 
in modern Devonians appears to be distinctly indicated by the 
few measurements that have been made of the living population. 
The cephalic index is more often above 80 than below it in the 
small number I have myself measured. Now the average index 
for England is 77 to 78, so that the inference seems inevitable 
that at some prehistoric epoch a round-headed element was 
added to the population of Devon. 

An immense amount of interesting and valuable information 
as to the racial elements and their proportions present in the 
modern Devonians would be obtained if the living population 
was measured. The cost would not be great. I commend the 
scheme to some patriotic Devonian. 

The conclusions to which I have arrived as to the origin of 
the Devonian race from the analysis of anthropometric data, 
and the distribution of place-names and rude stone monuments 
may be briefly summarized : — 

Devonshire was originally inhabited by a long-headed race of 
the Neanderthal type during the whole of the great Ice Age, i.e. 
approximately from 100,000 to 15,000 B.C. 

At the end of the Ice Age the Neanderthal race became extinct, 
or was driven out, and another long-headed race (the NeoUthic 
race) appeared and spread over the whole of Europe. This 
race attained a high level of civilization in Crete after contact 
with a round-headed Mongoloid race from Mesopotamia, S5Tia, 
and Asia Minor, known by various names, such as Sumerians, 
Akkadians, or Hittites. 

This same Mongoloid race reached Britain about 2000 B.C., 
where they came to work the tin mines of Devonshire and Com- 
waU. 

They spread thence by the W. of England and E. of Scotland 
as far as the Orkney Isles. They were the original builders of 
dolmens and stone circles, and have left their mark on the present 
population within their special area, in the form of rounder 
heads. 

FinaUy, the modern Devonian was produced by adding to 
previous elements, the later Aryan racial elements, namely, the 
Goidelic, Brythonic, and Anglo-Saxon. 



144 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Some Recent Devonshire Literature. 

(Compiled by H. Tapley-Soper, City Librarian, Exeter). 

Blackmore, R.D. " Lorna Doone " (Special Doone-land Edition, 
with notes, 51 illus., and 2 maps). 1908. (Sampson Low, 
7/6 net). 

Blackmore, R.D. "Lorna Doone" (Illus. in colours by Charles E. 
Brittain and C. E. Brock). 1909. (Sampson Low, 21/- and 63/- 
net). 

Bond, F. Bligh and Dom Bede Camm. *' Roodscreens and 
Roodlofts " (a considerable portion devoted to Devonshire). 
(Pitman, 2v., 32/- net). 

Brixey, A. " Story of Torbay." (H. W. Wood, 1/-) 

Brushfield, T. N. " Bibliography of Sir Walter Ralegh " (2nd 
Ed., illus., revised). (J. G. Commin, 10/6 net.) 

Butler, Lewis. "Sir Redvers BuUer." Illus. 1909. (Smith 
Elder, 3/6 net.) 

Chanter, J. F. " The Life and Times of Martin Blake, B.D." 
1909. (Lane, 10/6 net.) 

Chope, R. Pearse. " Story of Hartland." 2nd Ed. Illus. 
(1909. " Hartland Chronicle," 1/- net,) 

Cresswell, Beatrix F. " Barnstaple and North Devon." (Home- 
land Series, No. 77, 6d. and 1/- net.) 

Creswell, Beatrix F. " Bideford and its Surroundings." (Home- 
land Series, No. 76. 6d. and 1/- net.) 

Cresswell, Beatrix F. " Exeter Churches." Illus. 1908. (J. 
G. Commin, 7/6 net.) 

Clayden, A. W. " Footprints in the Lower Sandstone of the 
Exeter District." Illus. (pamphlet). 1908. (Reprinted from 
" Quarterly Journal Geological Society," v. 64). 

•Crossing, W. " Guide to Dartmoor." 1909. (" Western Morn- 
ing News," 3/-) 

Dodderidge, S. E. and H. G. H. Shaddick. " The Dodderidges of 
Devon." Illus. 1909. (Pollard & Co., 10/6 net.) 

" Exeter Diocesan Finance Year Book." 1909. (Townsend & 
Sons, 1/-) 

Fry, E. A. (Ed.). "Calendar of Wills and Administrations 
relating to Devon and Cornwall." 1908. (" Devonshire 
Association.") 

Gould, S. Baring-. " Devonshire Characters and Strange Events." 
Illus. 1908. (Lane, 21/- net.) 

GranviUe, Roger. " King's General in the West : A Life of Sir 
Richard Granville." 1908. (Lane, 10/6 net.) 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 145 

Granville, Roger, and W. E. Mugford. *' Abstracts of the existing 

transcripts of the lost Parish Registers of Devon, 1596 — 1644." 

Vol. I. A-Bra. 1908. 10/6. 
Gregory, Alfred T. (Ed.). " Devonshire Verbal Provincialisms." 

1909'. (Gregory & Son, 2/6 net.) 
Hughes, A. " Salmon Fishing, more especially with reference to 

the River Exe and such like streams." (Gregory & Son, 1/- 

net.) 
Hughes, A. " Trout Fishing for Beginners. " Specially for Devon 

Streams. (Gregory & Son, 1/- net.) 
Hussell, Allen T. " North Devon Churches : Studies of some of 

the Ancient Buildings." (" Herald " Press, Barnstaple, 10/6.) 
Jacson, M. " Record of a Regiment of the Line " (the Devons). 

Illus. 1908. (Hutchinson, 6/-) 
Lord, Mrs. F. "Tales from Exeter Cathedral." Illus. 1909. 

(Sampson Low, 1/- net.) 
Martin, E. C. " New Red Gravels of the Tiverton District." 

(Reprinted from the " Geological Magazine," 1908.) 
Moody, A. Penderel. " Devon Pillow Lace." Illus. 1908. 

(Cassell & Co., 5/-) 
Morgan, H. J. " Education in Exeter." Illus. 1908. (Exeter 

City Council.) 
Northcote, Lady Rosalind. " Devon : its moorlands, streams, 

and coasts." Illus. 1908. (J. G. Commin, 21/- net.) 
Parry, H. Lloyd. " Exeter Civic Seals." lUus. 1909. (J. 

G. Commin, 2/6 net.) 
Phillimore, W. P. W. (Ed.). " Devonshire Parish Registers, 

Vol. I : — Ipplepen, KingskersweU, Werrington, Countisbury, 

Trentishoe, Martinhoe, Uffculme (Marriages only). 1909. 

(PhiUimore, 10/6 net.) 
Prickman, J. D. ** West Country Wit and Humour." (Gregory 

& Son, 8d.) 
Raleigh, Sir Walter. " The Last Fight of the Revenge." Illus. 

Introduction by Henry Newbolt. 1908. (Gibbings & Co., 

7/6 net.) 
Salmon, Arthur L. "West Country Verses." 1908. (Black- 
wood, 3/- net.) 
Shaddick, H. G. Hastings. " Guide to the Reports and Trans- 
actions of the Devonshire Association." 1909. (Brendon 

& Son, 5/6 net.) 
Soper, H. Tapley-. " ' Borough ' Pocket Guide to Exeter." 

lUus. 1909. (E. J. Burrow, 3d.) 
Soper, H. Tapley-. " Exeter Illustrated." (Official Guide to 

the City), 3rd Ed. Illus. 1909. (Mates, 6d. net.) 



146 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Stabb, John. " Devon Church Antiquities. " Vol. I. Illus. 1909. 

(Simpkin Marshall, 6/- net.) 
Stabb, John. "Some Old Devon Churches." Illus. 1908. 

(J. G. Commin, 7/6 net.) 
Townsend, G. " Sketches of Bygone Exeter." 2 Pts. 1908-9. 

(" Exeter Flying Post," 9d. net.) 
Where to Stay in the West Country. Vol. I. L.S.W.R. Section. 

Vol. II. G.W.R. Section. (Homeland Reference Books, 6d. 

each, net.) 
Wreford, Reginald. " Bits of Broad Devon." (Gregory & 

Son, 4d. net.) 
Wright, W. H. K. "Story of Plymouth." Illus. 1908. 

(Wheaton, 1/- net.) 

PERIODICALS, ETC. 

Publications of the Devon and Cornwall Record Society. 
Works now in progress : — 

The Feet of Fines for Devon and Cornwall. Subsidy 
Rolls for the Parish of Constantine. Hooker's " History of 
Exeter." The Registers of Births, Marriages, and Deaths of 
Exeter Cathedral and the Parishes of Allhallows, Goldsmith 
Street, Exeter ; Branscombe ; Falmouth ; and Ottery St. 
Mary. (Annual Subscription, one guinea. H. Tapley-Soper, 
Hon. Secretary, Exeter.) 

" Transactions of the Devonshire Association." (Annual 
Subscription, 10/6.) 

"Devon Notes and Queries" (Quarterly). (Annual Sub- 
scription, 6/6. J. G. Commin, Exeter.) 

" Transactions of the Plymouth Institution and Natural 
History Society." (Annual Subscription, one guinea.) 




The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 147 



List of Members and Associates, 

An asterisk (*) indicates Life Members. 
A dagger (t) indicates Deceased Members. 
r A double dagger {%) indicates Associates. 

Acland, Theodore Dyke (Columb-John), M.D., 19 Bryanston Square, W. " 

Vice-President. 
Adams, A. A. (Werrington) , C.A., " Frankfield," Stanhope Road, Hornsey 

Lane, N. 
Adams, B. E. (Werrington), 44 UUeswater Road, Palmers Green, N. 
Adams. E. W. (Kingsbridge), 18 Fleet Street, E.G. 
Adams, Mrs. E. W. (Kingsbridge), 18 Fleet Street, E.C. 
Adams, H. G. (Crediton), 74 Royal Road, Kenningtonr Park, S.E. 
Adams, Miss L. (Brixham), " Frankfield," Stanhope Road, Hornsey 

Amery, J.' J. (Ashburton), 18 Fleet Street, E.C. 

Andrews, Mrs. Lilian (Plymouth), 3 Old Cavendish Street, Oxford Street, W. 

Andrews, R. (Culmstock), 90 King's Road, Chelsea, S.W. 

Avery, Miss, Scarsdale House, Kensington, W. 

Axhorn, Miss E. B. (Tiverton), 116 Heathwood Gardens, Charlton, S.E. 

Ayers, Mrs. Edith (Netherexe), 14 Cleveland Gardens, Barnes, S.W. 

Bailey, F. A. (Exeter), London Institution, Finsbury, E.C. Committee 

{Old Exonians). 
Banbury, H. (Devonport), Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C. 
Barnes, R. Stewart (Yealmpton), 1 West Street, Finsbury Circus, E.C. 

Comm,ittee. 
Bastin, T. W. (Exmouth), Messrs. Bastin, Merryfield, and Cracknell, Great 

Castle Street, W. 
Batten, W. B.. 147 Offord Road, N. 

Bazley, Miss Lucy (Starcross), 54 Avenue Road, Regents Park, N.\^^ 
Bazley, Miss M. (Starcross), 82 Uxbridge Road, West Ealing, W. 
Beckett, A. E. (Plymouth), 2 Caithness Road, Brook Green, W. 
Bennett, Samuel (Devonport), 6 Hemington Avenue, Friern Barnet, X. 
Berry, C. H. (Brixham), Devonia, Stopford Road, Upton Manor, E. 
Bidgood, G. G. (Tiverton), 12 Clifton Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Bidgood, G. S. (Tiverton), 1 Royden Mansions, Junction Road, Upper 
Holloway, N. , Committee. 

Bidgood, R. (Tiverton), 20 Beaconsfield Road, Friern Barnet, N. 

Birdseye, H. S. (North Tawton), 8 Montpelier Vale, Blackheath, S.E. 

Bishenden, C. J. (Newton Abbot), 105 New Oxford Street. W. 

Bishenden, Mrs. I. M. (Newton Abbot), 105 New Oxford Street, W. 

Blacking, A. (Exeter), Allington Lodge, Sheridan Road, Merton Park. 

Boden, R. H., 11 Derwent Road, Anerley, S.E. 

Bodley, A. H (Wltheridge) , 74 Calbourne Road. Balham, S.W. 
-fBond, A E. (Paignton), 36 Connaught Road, Harlesden, N.W. Committee. 

Bone, G. B. (Stoke Damerell), 4 Raymond Buildings, Grays Inn, W.C. 
♦Bourne, C. W. (Ilfracombe), 13 Trevor Road, Wimbledon, S.W. 

Bowden, T. R., 13 Waterford Road, Walham Green, S.W. 

Bridge, E. (Bow), 19 Kelmscott Road, Wandsworth Common, S.W. 

Bridge, Mrs. E. (Bow), 19 Kelmscott Road, Wandsworth Common, S.W. 

Bridgeman, G. E. (Ugborough), 185 Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, S.W. 
■ Bridgeman, Miss Jennie (Ugborough). 185 Fentiman Road, Vauxhall 
Park, S.W. 



148 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Bridgeman, Miss Mona (Ugborough), 185 Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park. 

S.W. 
Bridgeman, S. J. S. (Ugborough), 185 Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, 

S.W. 
Bridgman, Victor (Modbury), 36 Ravenscourt Gardens. W. 
Brimicombe, M. H. (Totnes), 22 Norfolk Street, Dalston, N.E. 
Broadbear, Miss G. L. (Teignmouth) , 4 Chapel Place, Cavendish Square, W. 
Brodie, C. H. (Exeter), F.R.I.B.A., 17 Sydenham Road North, Croydon. 
Bromham, Addison J. (Barnstaple), Westward Ho, Wimbledon Common. 

Committee. 
Brooks, Miss E. (Tiverton), Birkbeck House, Lancaster Road, Enfield. 
Broom, Miss Violet (Teignmoy th) , Staffordshire House, Store Street, W.C. 
Brown, A. S. (Sidbury), 61 Hubert Grove, Landor Road, Stockwell, S.E. 
Brown, Mrs. A. S. (Sidbury), 61 Hubert Grove, Landor Road, Stockwell, 

S.E. • 

Brown, W. H. (Exmouth), 35 Cumberland Park, Acton, W. 
Budd, E. H., 34 Poultry, E.C. 

Burgess, Miss L. (Tiverton), 6 Chapel Place, Cavendish Square, W. 
Burlace, J. B. (Brixham), 38 Corfton Road, Ealing, W. Vice-President. 
Burnett, Sydney (Cadeleigh), 16 Rebecca Terrace, Rotherhithe, S.E. 
Burrow, Miss L. L. (Tavistock), 11 Fitzroy Street. W. 
Burrows, R. (Honiton), 67 Peterborough Road, Fulham, S.W. 
Burton, E. Cave- (Exeter), 36 Jasper Road, Upper Norwood, S.E. 
Burton, Miss E. H. (Exeter), 36 Jasper Road, Upper Norwood, S.E. 

Campbell, R. J. P. (Exeter), 15 St. Margaret's Road, Plumstead. 

Carter, G. E. L. (Withycombe Raleigh), B.A., 13 Southmoor Road, Oxford. 

Champion, W. (Shaldon), 8 Homewood Gardens, Brixton Hill, S.W. 

Chard, G. M. (Devon County School), Berwen, Canonbie Road, Honor Oak 
S.E. 

Chettleburgh, Mrs., 38 Redcliffe Gardens, W. 

Chope, R. Pearse (Hartland), B.A., Patent Office, 25 Southampton Build- 
ings, W.C. Deputy Chairman. 

Churchward, Miss M., 409 Oxford Street, W. 

Clapp, W. K. F. (Exeter), 1 Rydal Road, Streatham, S.W. 

Clark, W. H. D. (Plymouth), Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, 

Clarke, A., 60 Stormont Road, Clapham, S.W. 
Clarke, H. L. (Torrington), The Bank, Wanstrow, Essex. 
Clarke, John (Honiton), 45 Marloes Road, Kensington, W. 
Clarke, T. (Ottery St. Mary), 41 Church Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Clatworthy, H. J. (descent), Amberley House, Norfolk Street, Strand. 
Clifford, Colonel E. T. (Exeter), V.D., 6 Cranley Gardens, S.W. Vice- 
President and Chairman of Committee. 
Clifford of Chudleigh, Rt. Hon. Lord (Ugbrooke). Ugbrooke Park, Chudleigh. 

Vice-President. ° 

Coad, R. L., 3 New Square, Lincoln's Inn, W.C 
Coker, E. C. (Plymouth), 60 St. Martin's Lane, W^C. 
Cole, Miss E. (Salcombe), 46 Melgund Road, Highbury N 
Cole. N. (Salcombe), 46 Melgund Road, Highbury, N. ' Committee. 
Cole, Mrs. N. (Salcombe), 46 Melgund Road, Highbury N 
? ^' S. J. (Hartland), M.R.C.S., 47 South Molton Street, W. 
Co es, W. Crosbie (Bideford), 78 Park Lane, Croydon. 
Co wi , Miss A. (Hatherleigh), Staffordshire House, Store Street, W.C. 
Colwill, C (North Petherwin), Pentire, Coombe Road, Croydon. 
Commm. Miss A. L. (Exeter), 96 Upper Tulse Hill S W 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 149 



Commin, E. G. (Exeter), 94 Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, Mrs. E. G. (Exeter), 94 Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, F. J. (Exeter), 96 Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, Mrs. F. J. (Exeter), 96, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, Miss M. O. (Exeter), 96 Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, R. G. (Exeter), 96 Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Congdon, A. R. (Hartland), 187a Brompton Road, S.W. 

Cook, Miss A. (Ottery St. Mary), 64 Atlantic Road, Brixton, S.W. 

Coombe, J. Townsend (Plymouth), 62 Shaftesbury Road, Ravenscourt 
Park, W. 

Coombes, C. S. (Devonport), Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C. 

Cornelius, V. A. (Dawlish), Fire Brigade, Southwark Bridge Road, S.E. 
JCouch, Mrs. A. W. (Brixham), 16 Palace Avenue, Paignton. 
JCouch, E. (Brixham), 16 Palace Avenue, Paignton. 

Couch, G. W. (Exeter), Vernon Lodge, Carshalton. 

Couch, Mrs. L. (Exeter), 6 Park View, Brisbane Road, Uford. 

Couch, W. H. (Totnes), 3 Gratton Terrace, Cricklewood. 

Couch, W. S. (Exeter), 6 Park View, Brisbane Road, Ilford. 

Cox, F., 74 Lansdowne Road, Clapham Park, S.W. 

Coysh, R. H. (Dartmouth), 17 Delafield Road, Charlton, S.E. 

Crang, W. (Ilfracombe), River Plate House, E. C. 

Crook, R. H. J. (Newton Abbot). 15 Bedford Street, Strand, W.C. 

Crossley, W. M. (Sidmouth), Bank of England, E.C. 

Cudmore, H. J. (Torrington), 36 Huntingdon Road, East Finchley, N. 

Cumming, Arthur A. F. (Ilsington), 9 Netheravon Road, Chiswick, W. 

Cumming, Miss Edith M, (Ilsington), 9 Netheravon Road, Chiswick, W. 

Cumming, Mrs. L. (Bovey Tracey), 9 Netheravon Road, Chiswick, W. 

Cummings, H. J. (Exeter), 61 Northcote Road, Croydon. 

Cummings, William Hayman (Sidbury), Mus.D. (Dub.), F.S.A., Hon. R.A.M., 
Principal of the Guildhall School of Music, E.C Vice-President. 

Darke, T. Anthony (Lew Trenchard), Stock Exchange, EC. 

Dart, A. (Tiverton), 37 Beresford Road, Canonbury, N.. 

Dart, J. A. (Ilfracombe), 19 Waldegrave Road, Hornsey, N. 

Dart, T. (Tiverton), 65 Seaton Street, Chelsea, S.W. 

Davan, Mrs. (Tiverton), 10 Old Deer Park Gardens, Richmond. 

Davey, G. W. (Sampford Spiney), 25 Bedford Row, W.C. 

Davey, J. F. (Exeter), 195 Camden Road, N.W. 

Defries, R. (Barnstaple), 59 Henslowe Road, East Dulwich, S.E. 

Dickson, Miss Florence (Dawlish), 22, Caroline Street Camden Town, N.W. 

Dimond, W. (Honiton), 297 Finchley Road, N. 

Distin, Frank (Totnes), 22 Carter Lane, E.C. 
♦Distin, Howard (Paignton), M.B., Holtwhite House, Enfield. 

Ditcham, A. (Mannamead), 156 Adelaide Road, Brockley, S.E. 

Dobell, J. S. (Newton Abbot), 104 Cricklewood Broadway, N.W. 

Dodridge, A. E., 37 Pelham Road, Beckenham. 

Doherty, W. (South Molton), 6 Great Newport Street, St. Martin's Lane, 
W.C. Vice-President. 

Dommett, W. E. (Devonport), The Elms, Milner Road, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

Drake, J. (Yealmpton), 36 Linacre Road, Willesden Green, W. 

Duke, H. E. (Plymouth), K.C., 1 Paper Buildings, Temple, E.C. Vice- 
President. 

Dunn, A. E. (Exeter), M.P., House of Commons, S.W. Vice-President. 

Dunn, F. W. (South Molton), 8 Westmount Road, Eltham, Kent. 

Easton, H, T. (Exeter), Union of London and Smiths Bank, Lombard 
Street, E.C. Vice-President. 



150 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



JEdye, Lieut. -Colonel L. (Hatherleigh), Stanley Court, Stanley Street, 

Montreal, Canada. 
Ellis, J. (Moretonhampstead), 31 Milton Street, E.C. 
Emberry, T. E. (Exeter), 133 Bennerley Road, Clapham Common, S.W. 
Enticott, Miss Hetty (Axminster), 102 Winstanley Road, Clapham Com- 
mon, S.W. 
♦Eveleigh, Miss Helen (Exeter), 186 S. James Court, Buckingham Gate, S.W. 

Foale, A. E. (Blackwater) , 4 St. Charles Square, North Kensington, W. 
Foale, Miss A. G. (descent), 29 Aldridge Road Villas, Westbourne Park, W. 
Foale, N.. 29 Aldridge Road Villas, Westbourne Park, W. 
Fortescue, Rt. Hon. Earl (Filleigh), Castle Hill, South Molton, N. Devon. 

President. 
Fox, Mrs. (Honiton), " Lord High Admiral," Church Street, Edgware 

Road, W. 
Eraser, Ernest (Exeter), 32 Hatton Garden, E.C. 
French, F. F. (Newton Abbot), 141 Auckland Road. Ilford. 

Gamble, Rev. H. R. (Barnstaple), M.A., Sloane Street, S.W. Vice-President. 
Gamlen, L. H. (Morchard), 64 Castlewood Road, Stoke Newington, N, 
Gibson, Thos. (Appledore), 2 Shottendane Road, Walham Green, S.W. 
Gill, Allen (Devonport), F.R.A.M., 5 Lincoln House, Dartmouth Park 

Hill, N.W. Vice-President. 
Gillham, H. (Burlescombe), 222 Central Market, E.C. Committee. 
Glanvill. H. Wreford- (Exeter), 110 Cannon Street, E.C. Committee. 
Godfrey, Mrs. F. A. (descent), Homeville, Merton Avenue, Chiswick, W. 
Godfrey, S. H. (Ottery St. Mary), Homeville, Merton Avenue, Chiswick, W. 
Goodfellow, J. G., 195 Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, S.W. 
Goodman, W. H. (Devonport), 160 Ardgorvan Road, Catford, S.E. 
Gosling, L. G. (Sidbury), " Sidbury," The Avenue, Chingford, Essex. 
Grant, Miss B. M. (Torrington), 42 Weymouth Street, Portland Place, W. 
Griffiths, B. H. Percy- (Plymouth), " Highcroft," Cottenham Park Road, 

Wimbledon. 
Grigg, F. E. (Plymouth), 40 Jersey Road, Ilford. 

Grigg, R. (Exmouth), 19 Avondale Avenue, Woodside Park, North Finchley. 
Grills, W. E. (Holsworthy), 524 Caledonian Road, N. 
Gulliford, W. (Exeter), 28 Danby Street, Peckham, S.E. 

Hancock, H. H. M. (Barnstaple), 56 Devereux Road, Wandsworth Com- 
mon, S.W. 

Handford, W. (Barnstaple), 92 Morshead Mansions, Maida Vale, W. 

Harger, A. C, 101 Sheen Road, Richmond. 

Harris. Mrs. Blanche (Plymouth), 96 Croxted Road, West Dulwich, S.E. 

Harns, Frank (Exeter), L.C.C. School, Orange Street, Southwark, S.E. 

Harris, G. W. (West Buckland), 233 Strand, W.C. 

Harris, T,, 78 Morshead Mansions, Maida Vale, W. 

Harry, Miss F. E. (Torquay). 16 Tanza Road. Hampstead Heath, N. W. 

Hawke. W. R. (North Petherwin), " Dunedin," Box Ridge Avenue, Plough 
Lane, Purley. 

Hayes, Mrs. B. (Sidmouth). 

Haynes, J T. (Hartland), J. P., 25 Montrell Road, Streatham Hill, S.W. 

Haynes Mrs. J. T. (Plymouth) ,25 Montrell Road, Streatham Hill, S.W. 
JHeard, W. E. (Northam), J. P., Winchester House, Newport, Mon. 

Hearson, Prof T. A.. (Barnstaple) M. Inst. C.E., 22 Southampton Bldgs.. W.C. 

HeaxsonW. E (Barnstaple), " Kippington," Sevenoaks, Kent. 

Heath. Chas. (North Tawton), 45 Mostyn Road, Brixton, S.W. 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 151 



Hesse, Mrs. N. (Tiverton), 75 Lombard Street, E.C. 

Hill, Mrs. E. (Bovey Tracey), 12 Homefield Road, Chiswick, S.W. 

Hill, H. W. (Exeter), 14 Highlever Road, North Kensington, N. 

Hill, J. A. (Holcombe Rogus), C.A., 19a Coleman Street, E.C. Hon. 
A uditor. 

Hobbs, W. H. (Bideford), 226 Southwark Park Road, S.E. 

Hockaday, F., 82 Geraldine Road, Wandsworth, S.W. 

Hodge, F. (Heavitree), " The Homestead," Bishop's Avenue, East Finchley. 

Hoey, H. (Exeter), 21 Lyndhurst Road, Peckham, S.E, 

Holmes, A. H., 32 King Street, Cheapside, E.C. 

Honey, A. (Exeter), 60 Flanders Road, Bedford Park, \N. 

Honey, Miss L. (Exeter), 60 Flanders Road, Bedford Park, W. 

Hopkins, Martyn (Silverton), 113 Burton Road, Brixton, S.W. 

Horton, A. J. B. (Morleigh), Matlock, Chudleigh Road, Crofton Park, S.E. 

Horwood, E. J. (Exeter), L.C.C. School, Gordonbrock Road, Lee, S.E. 

Howie, J. R. C. (Tiverton), 36 Pepys Road, Raynes Park, S.W. 

Howie, Mrs. J. R. C. (Tiverton), 36 Pepys Road, Raynes Park, S.W. 
♦JHughes, T. Cann (Hittisleigh), M.A., F.S.A., 78 Church Street, Lancaster. 
JHussell, Allen T. (Ilfracombe), F.R.I. B.A., Ilfracombe. 

Hutchings, L. W. (Okehampton), 22 St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 

Inman, W. (Stoke Gabriel), " Sherbourne," Langley Road, Tooting, S.W. 
Inman, Mrs. W. (Stoke Gabriel), " Sherbourne," Langley Road, Tooting, 

S.W. 
Ireland, Miss G. B. (Bradninch), 66 Sinclair Road, W^est Kensington, W. 

Jarvis, W\ T. (Torquay), 64 Coniger Road, Parsons Green, S.W. 

Jeffery, Frank C. (Exeter), Devon Lodge, Churchfield Avenue, North 

Finchley, N.W, 
tJeffery, G. (Ottery St. Mary), 31 Elwood Street, Highbury, N. Committee 

(Old Ottregians). 
Johns, F. P. (Devonport), Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C. 
Jones, Mrs. Rees, The Avenue, West Ealing. 

Kekewich, Sir G. W. (Peamore), K.C.B., M.P., House of Commons. S.W. 
Vice-President. 

Kelly, H. P. (Torquay), L.C.C. School, Fulham Palace Road, S.W. 

Kelly, T. S. (Tiverton), Custom ^House, Exeter. Committee {London 
Devonian Athletic Club). 

Kelly, W. F. (Tiverton), Lanka House, Maida Vale, W. 

Kendall, T. J. (Kingsbridge), 81a Temple Road, Cricklewood, N.W. 

Kerslake, J. (Exeter), 2 Caple Road, Harlesden, N.W, 

Kerslake, W. (Crediton), 23 Wells Street, Oxford Street, W. 

Keyse, W. G. (Plymouth), Messrs. Hitchcock, Williams & Co., 46 Pater- 
noster Row, E.C. 

Kingwell, G. L. (Brent), 246 Barcombe Avenue, Streatham Hill, S.W. 

Knight, F. (Exeter), 19 Hereford Road, Acton. 

Lane, John (West Putford), " Bodley Head," Vigo Street, W. Vice- 
President. 

Lang, Mrs. E. L. (Teignmouth) , 81 Cannon Street, E.C. 

Lang, C. E. (Teignmouth), 81 Cannon Street, E.C. 

Lang. G. E. (L.D.A.C), 130 Elborough Street, Southfields, S.W. Committee 
{London Devonian Athletic Club). 

Lang, H, W. (Stonehouse) , 7 Bayer Street, Golden Lane, E.C. 

Langley, Mrs. L. (Torquay), 52 Lancaster Gate, W. 



152 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



*Larkworthy, J. W., " Bucklands," Nether Street, North Finchley. 
*Larkworthy, Mrs. J. W., " Bucklands," Nether Street, North Finchley. 

Lawday, Miss K. ( Kings nympton), 45 Cambridge Terrace, Hyde Park. W. 

Leat, J. (Exeter), B.A,, Stoke Road, Slough. 

Lester, L. R. (Plymouth), 23 Neal Street, Long Acre, W.C. 

Lethbridge, C, 24 Great St. Helens, E.C. 

Lethbridge, J. (Tedbum St. Mary), 59 The Chase, Clapham Common, S.W. 

Lewin, G., jun., 8 Crooked Lane. E.C. 

Leyman, G. A. (Exmouth), 32 Moffatt Road, Palmers Green, N. 

Liscombe, J. (Plymouth), 49 Cavendish Road, Brondesbury, N.W. Vice- 
President. 

Lishmund, J. W. (Plymouth), 47 Sandmere Road, Clapham, S.W. 

Lisle, E. O. (Exeter), 8 Hamilton Gardens, St. John's Wood, N.W. 

Lisle, T. O. (Exeter), 8 Hamilton Gardens, St. John's Wood, N.W. 

Lock, W. G (Instow), 5 Copthall Buildings, E C. 

Lopes, Sir H. Y-B., Bart. (Maristow), Roborough, Devon. Vice-President. 

Lovell, J. (Ottery St. Mary), 161 Eardley Road, Streatham, S.W. Committee 
[Old Ottregians). 

Lugar, H. E. (Plymouth), 17 Lothian Road, Camberwell New Road, S.E. 

Luxton, J. (Coleridge), 184 Essex Road, N. Committee. 

McKenzie, Madame Marian (Plymouth), Princes House, Victoria Street, 

S.W. 
Martin, Frank C. R. (Exeter), 65 West Kensington Mansions, W. 
Matthews, H. B. (Devonport), 29 New Biidge Street, E.C. Chairman. 
Matthews, Mrs. M. (Dartmouth), 14 Chesham Street, Brighton. 
Maunder, W. H. (Staverton). 7 Somerfield Road, Finsbury Park, N, 
Mercer, F. T. (Ashbury), 10 Bush Lane, E.C. 
Metherell, C. (North Tawton), 22 St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 
Michelmore, Miss A. M. (Totnes), 53 Grand Avenue, Muswell Hill, N. 
Mortimer, G. P. (Dunsford), 241 Romford Road, Forest Gate, E. 
Mountstephen, A. J. (Torquav), 5, Fairlop Road, Leytonstone, E. 
Mountstephen, Miss E. J. (Torquay), 40 Hamilton Terrace, St. John's Wood. 

N.W. 
Mountstephen, Miss N. A. (Torquay), L.R.A.M.,5 Fairlop Rd., Levtonstone. E. 
Mudge, J. G. (Plympton), Oxford House, Bethnal Green, E. 
Mutten, A. W. (Devonport), 145 Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton,|E. 
Mutten, Mrs. A. W. (Devonport), 145 Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton, E. 
Mutten, C. R. (Devonport), 145 Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton, E. 
Mutten, Miss E. B. L. (Devonport), 145 Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton. E. 
Mutten, Miss L. S. (Devonport), 145 Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton E. 
Mutten, Miss N. E. (Devonport), 145 Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton, E. 
Mutten, Miss W. A. (Devonport), 145 Chatswortn Road, Lower Clapton, E. 

Newbery S. J..F. (Honiton), Haregrove, Cranham, Stroud, Gloucestershire. 
Noakes, F. W. (Totnes), 23 Ruskin Road, Lower Tottenham 

Oakley, R. O. (Beer), 54 Sydney Road, Homsey, N. 

Paine. C. F., 29 Vartry Road, Stamford Hill, N. 

Panter F. H. (Dawlish), Bank House, London, County, and Westminster, 

Aldgate, E. 
Parsons, T. 74 Union Road, Clapham S W 
Passmore. W. (Tiverton), 101 Elspeth Road, Clapham Common, S.W. 

committee (Ttvertoman Association) 
Patrick. F. (Exeter). 71 Sydner Street, Stoke Newington 



The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 153 



Payne, Samuel (Torquay), 122 Albert Mansions, Battersea Park, S.W. 

Peace, J. W. Graham, 61 Dynevor Road, High Street, Stoke Newington, N. 

Perrin, W. (Seaton), 67 Melrose Avenue, Cricklewood, N.W. 

Perry, F. A. (Tiverton), 4 Kirchen Road, West Ealing, W. 

Philp, C. R. S. (Plymouth), The Livesey Library, Old Kent Road, S.E. 

Philp, Mrs. E. L. (Plymouth), The Livesey Library, Old Kent Road, S.E. 

Philp, D. P. (Plymouth), 44 Homefield Road, Ctiiswick, W. 

Phipps, J. H. (Exeter), 18 Cambridge Road, Battersea, S.W. 

Pike, W. E. (Exeter), 37 Holmewood Gardens, Brixton Hill, S.W. 

Pillman, J. C. (Plymouth), J. P., The Cottage, Foots Cray, Kent. Vice- 
President. 

Pinkham, C. (Plympton), J. P., C.C, Linden Lodge, Winchester Avenue, 
Brondesbury, N.W. Vice-President. 

Pinn, F. G., 41 Bishop's Mansions, S.W. 

Pinn, Mrs., 41 Bishop's Mansions, S.W. 

Pomeroy, A. W. (Honiton), 24 Royal Avenue, Chelsea, S.W. 

Pope, W. S. (Sidmouth), 3 St. Ann's Villas, Holland Park, W. 

Popham, W. V. M. (Devon County School), 23 Moorgate Street, E. C. 

Potbury, T. R. (Sidmouth), M.A., 35 Park Parade, Harlesden, N.W, 

Powe, G. W., 44 Creswick Road, Acton, W. 

Powe, H. D. (Plymouth), 13 Ellerby Street, Fulham, S.W., Committee. 
f Pratt, Philip W. (Barnstaple), Stock Exchange, E. C. 

Pride, A. E. (Thorverton), Woodland, Horn Lane, Woodford Green. 

Pring. B. V. (Torquay), 83 Nova Road, West Croydon. 

Pring, H. R. (Exeter), M.R.C.S., 1 Highbury Place, N. 

Pullman, James, 8 Eastern Road, Wood Green, N. 

Quick. N. (Tavistock), 15 Grove Park Road, South Tottenham, N. 

Rawle, H. (Sidmouth), 41 Sandmere Road, Clapham, S.W. 

Rew, Miss G. E., 51 Buckingham Palace Road, S.W. 

Richardson. H. W. (Exeter), 140 Great Titchfield Street, W. 

Roberts, C. Wynne (Torquay), Dryden House, Oundle. 

Rose, Miss E. L. Smith- (Exeter), 39 Bark Place, Bayswater, W, 

Rose, Miss R. Smith- (Exeter), Postal Order Branch, G.P.O. 

Rose, Mrs. Smith- (Broadclyst) , 39 Bark Place, Bayswater, W. 

Russell, Miss E. F. (Sidmouth), 6 Castletown Road, West Kensington, W. 

Ryall, J. (Exeter), 1 Camden Avenue, Peckham, S.E. Committee {Exeter 

Club). 
Ryan, W. (Plymouth), 163 Queen's Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Salter. Mrs. A. J. (Axminster), 62 West Smithfield, E.C. 

Sampson, Miss G. L. (Aveton Giffard), 11 Fitzroy Street, W. 

Sanders, F., 21 Brandreth Road, Balham, S.W. 

Sandford, E. (Plymouth), 62 Clarendon Road, Putney, S.W\ 

Sanson, L. S. (Plymouth), Wyastone, Beedell Avenue, Westcliff-on-Sea. 

Scott, Capt. Robert (Plymouth), C.V.O., R.N., Admiralty, S.W. Vice- 
President. 

Screech, W. C. V. (Plymouth), 100 Netherwood Road, W. 

Seward, Mrs. Grace F. (descent), 15 Wolseley Gardens, Gunnersbury, W. 

Seward, W, R. (descent), 15 Wolseley Gardens, Gunnersbury, W. 

Shawyer, J. W. (Filleigh), Messrs. Kenny Mahon & Co., 30-32 Broad Street 
House, E.C. Hon. Secretary [Devon County School Old Boys' 
Association). 



154 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



Shawyer, Mrs. J. W., 5 Hemington Avenue, Friern Bamet, N. 

Sheer, J. (North Petherwin), 13 King's College Road, N.W. 

Simmons, Sydney (Okehampton), " Okehampton," Torrington Park, 
Friern Bamet, N, Vice-President. 

Simpson, Leslie (Stonehouse) , Bank House, King Street, Hammersmith, W. 

Skinner, G. E. (Parracombe) , 50 Cowley Road, Leyton, and 32 Sutton 
Court, Chiswick, W. 

Skinner, S. M. (Bradninch), 1 Hale Gardens, West Acton. 

Slade, H. J. (Torquay), 11 Maze Road, Kew, S.W. 

Small, A. (Barnstaple), 34 Goldsmith Road, Leyton. 

Small, Mrs. E. J. (Ilfracombe), 91 Portnall Road, Maida Hill, W. 

Smart, A. (Plymouth), 79 Gresham Street, E.C. Committee. 

Smart, Mrs. A. (Plymouth), 21 Columba Road, Ilford, Essex. 

Smart, E. C. (Plymouth), 79 Gresham Street, E.C. 

Smart, W. H. (Plymouth), 13 Marsden Road, East Dulwich, S.E. Com- 
mittee. 

Smith, E. Rivers, 10 Park Road, Uxbridge, W. 

Smith, Master Granville (Dartmouth), Master of the Supreme Court, Royal 
Courts of Justice, W.C. Vice-President. 

Smith, W. H. (Torquay), 11 Acfold Road. Fulham, S.W. 

Snell, M. B. (Barnstaple), J. P., 5 Copthall Buildings, E.C. Vice-President. 

Soames, D. (Exeter), 52 Manor Road, Brockley, S.E. 

Soper, Rowland (Stonehouse), 13 Morley Road, East Twickenham. 

Southwood, F. C. (Bideford), 105 Abbey Road, N.W. 

Spear, Arthur (Plymouth), 61 Asylum Road, S.E. 

Squire, H. Brinsmead (Torrington), London, County, and Westminster 
Bank, Wood Street, E.C. Hon. Treasurer. 

Squire, J. P. (North Tawton), 31 Angell Road, Brixton, S.W. Committee. 

Stanbury, H. (Plympton), St. Matthew's School, Westminster. 

Stanmore, Miss Florence (Exeter), Scarsdale House, Kensington, W. 

Steed, A. W. (Devonport), 25 Clavering Road, Aldersbrook, South Wan- 
stead, Essex. 

Steed, E. A. (Devonport), 12 Ravenscourt Gardens, Ravenscourt Park, W. 

Stevens, M. White (Plymouth), 9 Burlington Avenue, Kew Gardens. 

Stidworthy, G. F. Kendall- (Kingsbridge), Friern Barnet Road, Friern 
Bamet, W. 

Stradling, A. E. (Seaton), 49 Glengarry Road, East Dulwich, S.E. 

Streat, F. J. (Ottery St. Mary), 5 Ilminster Gardens, Lavender Hill, S.W. 
Striblmg, W. J. L. (descent), Bulstrode, Uxbridge Road, Slough. 

Stroulger, C. H., 46 Maddox Street, W. 

Stroulger, Mrs. C. H., 46 Maddox Street, W. 

Studley, Frank (Tiverton), Fairhaven, Cheam Common Hill, Worcester Park, 

Surrey. 
Studley, G. (Uffculme), Worcester Park, Surrey. 

Sturdy. A. M. (Plymouth), 40 Petherton Road, Highbury, N. 
Swigg, F. G. (Plymouth), 163 Queen's Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Talbot. Miss Mabel A. (Hockworthy) , 42 Weymouth Street, Portland Place. 

W. 
Tavemer, J. L., 24 High Street, Ealing, W. 
Taylor, A. F. (St. Mary Church), Ingleside, Hanwell. W. 
Thomas, JR. (Exeter), 112 Manor Park Road, Harlesden, N.W. 
Thomson, F. J. S. (Exeter), 31 Angell Road. Brixton, S.W. Chairman 

of hntertamment Committee. 
Thorn, H. B. (Exeter), 117 Dalston Lane, N.E 
Thorn, Miss L H. (Chagford), 9 Springwell Avenue, Harlesden, N.W. 






The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 155 



Thorn, R, (Chagford), 9 Springwell Avenue, Harlesden, N.W. i 

Titherley, A. (Exeter), Secretary's Office, Royal Hospital, Chelsea, 

Tolchard, W. D. 734 High Road, Leytonstone. 

Tolley, H. (Exeter), 316 Brixton Road, S.W. 

Tozer, Henry (Exeter), 1 Durham House Street, Strand, W.C, Vice- 
President. 

Train, J. W. (Chudleigh), 21 Gubyon Avenue, Heme Hill. 

Trehame, W. J. (Ilfracombe) , Abbotsford, The Grove, Church End, Finch- 
ley, N. 

Trist, C. J. S. (Plymouth), 49 Longhurst Road, Lewisham, S.E. 

Trott, R. H. (Uffculme), 5 Upwood Road, Lee, S.E. 

Tuck, Rev. E. H. (Newton Abbot), F.C.H., A.M.Inst.C.E., 142 High Street, 
Shoreditch, E.C. 

Tuck, Mrs. E. H. (Newton Abbot), 142 High Street, Shoreditch, E.C. 

Tucker, Thomas (Exeter), 49 Folburg Road, Stoke Newington, N.E. 

Tuckett, C. F., 40 Chatsworth Avenue, Merton Park. 

Turner, Mrs. M. A. (Ilfracombe), 28 Falmouth Road, New Kent Road, S.E. 

Twose, A. W. (Tiverton), 22 St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 

Twose, W. (Culmstock), 90 King's Road, Chelsea, S.W. 

Tyte, Miss A. L. (Barnstaple), 121 Lansdowne Road, Seven Kings, Essex. 

Tyte, H. (Barnstaple), 121 Lansdowne Road, Seven Kings, Essex. 

Tyte, Miss K. (Barnstaple), 75 Aberdeen Road, Highbury, N. 

Tyte, Miss M. A. (Barnstaple), 121 Lansdowne Road, Seven Kings, Essex. 

*Upcott, Lieut.-Col. Sir Frederick Upcott (Cullompton), K.C.V.O.. C.S.I., 

227 St. James Court, Buckingham Gate, S.W. 
♦Upcott, Lady (Cullompton), 227 St. James Court, Buckingham Gate, S.W. 

Vellacott, H. D. (Tawstock), C.A., 141 Fenchurch Street, E.C. Hon. 
A uditor. 

Venn, W. H. (Whimple), M.A., St. Peter's College, Manor Road, Brockley, 
S.E. 

Veysey, F, J. S, (Chittlehampton) , 15 Trefoil Road, Wandsworth Common,. 
S.W. Committee. 

Vibert, F. H. (Totnes), Rock Villa, Sevenoaks. 

Vibert, Herbert (Totnes), 104 Fore Street, E.C. 

Vinen, G. S. (descent), 11 Lombard Street, E.C. 

Vivian, Henry (Cornwood), M.P,, 6 Bloomsbury Square, W.C. Vice- 
President. 

Waghorn, Mrs. A. G. (Horrabridge) , 8 Glentner Road, Blackheath, S.E. 

Walden. Mrs. A. M. (Exmouth), 8 Parsons Green Lane, Fulham, S.W. 

Waldron, Rev. A. J. (Plymouth), St. Matthew's Vicarage, Brixton, Vice- 
President. 
♦Walker, F. (Drewsteignton), 68 Coleman Street, E.C. 

Walhng, F. W. (Exeter), 121 Endlesham Road, Balham, S.W. 

Walling, Mrs. F. (Exeter), 121 Endlesham Road, Balham, S.W. 

Walrond, Conrad M. (Cullompton), " Braeside," St. Catherine's Lane^ 
Eastcote. 

Walrond, H. W. (Cullompton), London County and Westminster Bank, 
Knightsbridge, S.W. 

Walters, W. G. (Exeter), 70 Thurleigh Road, Wandsworth Common, S.W. 

Walton, C. H. (Teignmouth), 54 Union Grove, Clapham, S.W. 

Wannell, W. A. (Plymouth), 76 Savernake Road, Hampstead, N.W. 
Hon. Musical Director. 

Wannell, Mrs. W. A. (Plymouth), 76 Savernake Road, Hampstead, N.W. 



156 The London Devonian Year Book, 1910. 



iWestaway, J., 22 Danes Inn House, 265 Strand, W.C. 

Western, J. R. (descent), New River Laundry, Drayton Park, N. 

White, F. N. (Teignmouth) , 33 St. Mary-at-Hill, E.C. * 

White, T. Jeston (Stockland), 8 Maldon Road, Acton, W. 

Whitley, H. Michell (Plymouth), Dalkeith House, Queen's Road, Richmond. 

Williams, F. (Otterton), 195 Fentiman Road, Clapham, S.W. 

Willis, C. A. (Combemartin), 28 Falmouth Road, Southwark, S.E. 

Willis, P. T. (Combemartin), 28 Falmouth Road, Southwark, S.E. 

Wills, R. G. (Shaldon), 168 Crofton Park Road, Brockley, S.E. 

Wilton, F. W. (Hartland), Glynn Villa, Ormond Road, Hornsey Rise, N. 

Woollcombe, Rev. H. S. (Northlew), M.A., Oxford House, Bethnal Green. 
E. Vice-President. 

Wollocombe, J. R. (Lewdown), Ingram House, Stockwell Road, S.W. 

Wreford, C. W. (Exeter), 1 Brooksville Avenue, Kilbum, N.W. 

Wreford, Mrs. C. W. (Exeter), 1 Brooksville Avenue, Kilbum, N.W. 

Wreford, J. (Exeter), M.B., 66 West End Lane, N.W. Vice-President. 

Wright, F. G. (Tiverton), 10 Old Deer Park Gardens, Richmond. Com- 
mittee. 

Wright. J. L. (Tiverton), 10 Old Deer Park Gardens, Richmond. 

Wright, W. T. (Exeter), 24 Pepys Road, New Cross, S.E. 

Wringe, F. (Plymouth), 79 Cadogan Terrace, Victoria Park, N.E. 

Yendole, Wm. (Newton St. Cyres), 14 Harbut Road, Clapham Junction, S.W. 
Yeo, James (Barnstaple), Woodhurst, Warlingham, Surrey. 



Members are earnestly requested to notify alterations of address, and place of 
association with Devonshire {in cases where this is omitted) , to the Hon. Secre- 
tary, John W. Shawyer, 5 Remington Avenue, Friern Barnet, N. 







ONE SHILLING NET 



DEVONIAN YEAR BOOK 
1911. 



i 



r 




THE RIGHT HONOURABLE LORD NORTHCOTE, 
G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., C.B. 

Late Govcnior-Gciicral of the ComnionwciiltJi of Australia 
(President of the London Devonian Association) . 



THE 



Devonian Year Book 



FOR THE YEAR 



1911 



(SECOND YEAR OF PUBLICATION). 



i 



Bt)itet) M 
R. PEARSE CHORE, B.A. 



Hail thou, my native soil ! thou blessed plot, 
Whose equal all the world affordeth not ! " 



Win. Broxvne of Tavistock, 



XouDon: THE LONDON DEVONIAN ASSOCIATION 

(JOHN W. SHAWYER, Hon. Sec), 
30-32, Broad Street House, E.G. 

SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, HAMILTON, KENT & CO. LTD. 
J3ri5tOl : JOHN WRIGHT & SONS LTD,. STONE BRIDGE. 

(/or the West of England and South Wales). 



JOHN WRIGHT AND SONS LIMITED,. 
PRINTERS, BRISTOL. 




IAN2&1SS4 

-S 7 f^ 7 *> K 




Contents. 



The London Devonian Association — Officers 


and Com- 


mittee ----- 


- 7 


l^ules ----- 


- 9 


The Year's Work 


- 12 


Affiliated Societies - _ - - 


- 21 


Otlier Devonian Societies - - - 


- 24 


List of Fixtures for 1911 - 


- 30 


The Family of Northcote - 


- 33 


Captain Scott's Antarctic Expedition 


- 36 


The King Edward Memorial Fund 


- 40 


'' Devon to Me ! " - - - 


- 41 


Prominent Living Devonians 


- 42 


The Map of Devon - - - - 


- 62 


The Rivers of the Moor 


- 69 


The Birds of our Leas and Estuaries 


- 76 


The Devonshire Regiment and Territorials 


- 86 


Devonian Epitaphs - - - 


- 101 


London and Devonian Proverbs 


- 106 


The Early History of Devon 


- 108 


Some Recent Devonshire Literature 


- 117 


Devonshire Fiction - 


- 119 


Devonshire Learned and Scientific Societies 


- 122 


Libraries in Devonshire _ - - 


- 124 


List of Members and Associates 


- 126 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



The London Devonian Association. 
Officers and Committee, 

1910-11. 



President : 

The Right Hon. Lord NORTHCOTE, G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., C.B. 

Past-President : 

The Right Hon. Earl FORTESCUE, Lord Lieutenant of Devon. 

Vice-Presidents : 

The Right Hon. Lord CLIFFORD OF CHUDLEIGH. 

T. dyke ACLAND, Esq., M.D., F.R.C.P. {Columh-John). 

J. B. BURLACE, Esq. {Brixham). 

JOHN COLES, Esq., J. P. {Tiverton). 

Sir EDWIN A. CORNWALL, M.P. {Lap ford). 

Colonel E. T. CLIFFORD, V.D. {Exeter). 

W. H. CUMMINGS,.EsQ., Mus.D. Dub., F.S.A. {Sidbury). 

H. E. DUKE, Esq., K.C. {Plymouth). 

A. E. DUNN, Esq. {Exeter). 

H. T. EASTON, Esq. {Exeter). 

Rev. H. R, GAMBLE, M.A, Ex-Mayor of Chelsea {Barnstaple). 

ALLEN GILL, Esq., F.R.A.M. {Devonport). 

Sir GEORGE W. KEKEWICH, K.C.B., D.C.L. {Peamore). 

JOHN LANE, Esq. {West Putford). 

J. LISCOMBE, Esq. {Plymouth). 

Sir H. Y-B. LOPES, Bart. {Roborough). 

P. E. PILDITCH, Esq., L.C.C. {Kingsbridge) . 

J. C. PILLMAN, Esq., J. P. {Plymouth). 

C. PINKHAM, Esq., J. P. [Plympton). 

Captain ROBERT F. SCOTT, C.V.O., R.N. {Plymouth). 

SIDNEY SIMMONS, Esq. {Okehampton). 

GRANVILLE SMITH, Esq., Master of the Supreme Court {Dartmouth), 

MICHAEL B. SNELL, Esq., J.P. {Barnstaple). 

Lt.-Col. Sir FREDK. UPCOTT, K.C.V.O., C.S.I. {Cullompton) . 

HENRY VIVIAN, Esq. {Cornwood). 

Rev. a. J. WALDRON {Plymouth). 

Rev. H. S. WOOLLCOMBE, M.A. {Northlew). 

JOHN WREFORD, Esq., M.B. {Exeter). 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



Committee : 

Chairman. 
Alderman C. Pinkham, J. P. {Plympton) , 
Linden Lodge, Winchester Avenue, Brondesbury, N.W. 

Deputy Chairman. 
R. Pearse Chope, B.A. (Hartland), 
Patent Office, Southampton Buildings, W.C. 

R. S, Barnes {Y ealmpton) , i, West Street, Finsbury Circus, E.C. 

A. T. BowDEN {North Tawton), 76, Newgate Street, E.C. 

G. S. BiDGOOD {Tiverton), 8, Hornsey Lane Gardens, Highgate, N, 

J, B. BuRLACE {Brixham), 38, Corfton Road, EaUng, W. 

N. Cole {Salcombe), 46, Melgund Road, Highbury, N, 

W. Crosbie Coles {Bide ford), 78, Park Lane, Croydon, 

H. Gillham {Burlescomhe) , 222, Central Market, E.C. 

H. H. M. Hancock {Barumites in London), 56, Devereux Road, Wands- 
worth Common, S.W. 

W. Inman {Stoke Gabriel), Sherbourne, Longley Road, Tooting, S.W. 

G. E. Lang {London Devonian Rugby Football Club), c/o Cook, Son & 
Co., St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 

J. LovELL {Old Ottregians), 161, Eardley Road, Streatham, S.W. 

W. Passmore {Tivertonians), loi, Elspeth Road, Clapham Common. 

F. A. Perry {Tiverton), 4, Kirchen Road, West Ealing. 

C. R. S. Philp {Plymouth), Livesey Library, Old Kent Road, S.E. 

H. D. Powe {Plymouth), 13, Ellerby Road, Fulham Palace Road, S.W. 

John Ryall {Exeter Club), 38, Hanover Street, Peckham, S.E. 

W. H. Smart {Plymouth), St. Bride Institute, Ludgate Circus, E.C. 

Hon. Musical Director. 
W. A. VoLK, L.R.A.M., 16, Mortimer Street, W. 

Hon. Auditors. 
J. Arnold Hill, C.A. {Holcombe Rogus), 19a, Coleman Street, E.C. 
H. D. Vellacott, C.A. {Tawstock), 141, Fenchurch Street, E.C. 

Hon. Treasurer. 
H. Brinsmead Squire {Torrington), London County & Westminster Bank. 
Ltd., 90, Wood Street, E.C. 

Hon. Secretary. 
John W. Shawyer {Devon County School O.B.A.), 5, Hemington Avenue. 
Friern Barnet, N. n j, b , 

Entertainment Sub-committee : 

N. Cole, Chairman. C. R. S. Philp. 

H. Gillham. John W. Shawyer. 

H. H. M. Hancock. W. H. Smart. 

Year Book Sub-committee : 

?■ I* 5^°^°°°' W. Crosbie Coles. 

J- ^- BuRLACE. John W. Shawyer. 

R. Pearse Chope, Hon. Secretary and Editor. 



1 




ALDERMAN C. PINKHAM, J. P. 

Chairman of the Willesdcn Urban District Council 
(Chairman of Committee, The London Dex'onian Association) . 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



RULES. 

Name. — ^The name of the Society shall be 
Devonian Association." 



The London 



2. Objects. — ^The objects of the Society shall be : — 

(a) To promote friendly intercourse amongst De- 
vonians residing in London and district, by means of 
meetings and social re-unions. 

(h) To foster a knowledge of the History, Folklore, 
Literature, Music, Art, and Antiquities of the County. 

(c) To carry out from time to time approved schemes 
for the benefit of Devonians residing in London and 
district. 

■3. Constitution. — The Society shall consist of Life and Ordinary 
Members and Associates.* 

4. Qualification. — Any person residing in London or district 
who is connected with the County of Devon by birth, 
descent, marriage, or former residence, shall be ehgible 
for membership, but such person shall be nominated by a 
Member and the nomination submitted to the Committee, 
who shall at their first Meeting after receipt of the nomina- 
tion by the Hon. Secretary, decide by vote as to the accept- 
ance or otherwise of the nomination. 

•5. Subscription. — The annual subscription to the Society shall 
be 5/- for gentlemen, and 2/6 for ladies and those under 
21 years of age. Members ot other recognized Devonian 
Associations in London shall be admitted as Members on 
the nomination of their representatives on the Committee 
at an annual subscription of 2/6. The subscription for 
Life Membership shall be two guineas for gentlemen and 
one guinea for ladies." Subscriptions will be payable on 
election and each subsequent 30th September. The 
name of any Member whose subscription is in arrear for 
six months may be removed from the list of Members at 
the discretion of the Committee. 

■6. Officers. — ^The Oflicers of the Society shall be a President, 
Hon. Secretary, and Hon. Treasurer, all of whom shall be 
elected at the Annual Meeting. 

* The Committee have the power to elect as Associates persons not (jualified for membership. 



10 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

7. Management. — The management of the Society shall be 

vested in a Committee, consisting of the President, Hon. 
Secretary, Hon. Treasurer, and fifteen other Members, 
and a representative elected by each of the other Devonian 
Associations in London, such representatives to be Members 
of the Society. 

8. Meetings of Committee. — The Committee shall meet at least 

once a quarter. Seven to form a quorum. 

9. Chairman of Committee. — The Committee at their first 

Meeting after the Annual Meeting shall elect a Chairman 
and a Deputy-Chairman from Members of the Association. 

10. Power of Committee. — ^The Committee shall be empowered 
to decide all matters not dealt with in these rules, subject 
to an appeal to a General Meeting. 

11. Auditors. — Two Members, who are not Members of the 
Committee, shall be elected at each Annual Meeting to 
audit the Accounts of the Society. 

12. Annual General Meeting. — The Annual General Meeting 
shall be held in the month of October, when all Officers, 
five Members of the Committee, and Auditors shall retire, 
but be ehgible for re-election. The business of the Annual 
General Meeting shall be the election of Officers, five 
Committee men, and two Auditors ; presentation of 
Annual Report and Balance Sheet for the year ending 
30th September ; and any other business, due notice of 
which has been given to the Hon. Secretary, according to 
the Rules. 

13. Special General Meeting. — A Special General Meeting shall 
be summoned by the Hon. Secretary within fourteen 
days by a resolution of the Committee, or within twenty- 
one days of the receipt of a requisition signed by 30 Mem- 
bers of the Society, such requisition to state definitely the 
business to be considered. 

14. Notice of Meeting. — Seven days' notice shall be given of all 
General Meetings of the Society, the date of postmark to 
be taken as the date of circular. . ^ 

15. Alteration of Rules. — No alteration or addition to these 
Rules shall be made except at the Annual Meeting (when 




° ^- - ■ 

*^ oj o:=:0 

■- ^ "i ^ffi 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 n 

due notice of such alteration or addition must have been 
sent to the Hon. Secretary on or before 23rd September) 
or at a Special General Meeting. A copy of the proposed 
alteration or addition shall be sent to Members with notice 
of Meeting. 



The Association is affiliated to St. Bride Foundation Institute, 
Bride Lane, Ludgate Circus, E.C., and Members are entitled to 
free use of the Lending and Reference Libraries, * Reading and 
Recreation Rooms, and admission on easy terms to the Gym- 
nasium, ' Swimming Baths, Technical Classes, etc. 

Oak shields, with the arms of the Association painted in proper 
colours may be obtained from F. C. Southwood, 96, Regent 
Street, W. Price, with motto, 6s., without motto, 4s. 6d. 

Badges, with the arms in enamel and gilt, price 4s. 3d., or 
brooches, price 3s. 3d., may be obtained from W. J. Carroll, 
33, Walbrook, E.C. Gold brooches, price 25s. 

A few copies of the London Devonian Year Book for 1910 
remain in stock. Price 2s., by post 2s. 3d. 

* In this room Devonshire papers are placed daily. 



i 



12 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



The Year's Work. 

During the second year of the Association's existence the 
Committee, under the able and enthusiastic direction of its 
co-opted Chairman, Colonel E. T. Clifford, V.D., have con- 
tinued their efforts to bring their exiled fellow-countymen into 
one bond of union in accordance with their motto, " Sociamur 
amore Devonise," and to provide them with instruction and 
entertainment. These efforts have been so successful that the 
membership of the Association has increased by nearly 100, 
another London Devonian Association — " The Barumites in 
London" — has become affiliated to it, and several additional 
provincial Associations have furnished particulars of their 
organizations for publication in the Year Book. One of these 
Associations — '' Devonians in Portsmouth " — has been good 
enough to supply a list of its members and a portrait group of 
its committee, for insertion at the end of the Year Book, and 
it is hoped that in future years others will follow this excellent 
example. In this way all Devonians throughout the world who 
were members of any local organization connecting them with 
their native county, would feel that they were members of one 
central organization, and would in many cases be enabled to 
communicate with friends whom they had perhaps lost sight of 
for many years. 

The annual general meeting of the Association was held at 
St. Bride Institute on October 18th, 1909, when the chair was 
taken by J. B. Burlace, Esq., one of the Vice-Presidents. The 
Kight Hon. Earl Fortescue, Lord-Lieutenant of Devon, was 
re-elected President. 

The entertainments provided during the year 1909-10 were 
four lectures at St. Bride Institute, two Bohemian Concerts 
at Cannon Street Hotel, a Cinderella Dance at the Holborn 
Restaurant, and a Whist Drive at ''Ye Mecca Cafe," Ludgate 
Hill. 

The opening lecture was given on October 1st by R. Pearse 
Chope, Esq., B.A., Deputy-Chairman of Committee, on "The 
Folklore of Devon," and proved both amusing and instructive. 
The chairman was the Rev. S. J. Childs Clarke, M.A., Minor 
Canon of St. Paul's Cathedral. The next lecture, on November 
12th, by John Gray, Esq., B.Sc, Secretary of the Anthropo- 
metric Committee of the British Association, propounded a novel 
and ingenious theory of '' The Origin of the Devonian Race." 
The chair on this occasion was occupied by W. J. Treharne, Esq., 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 15 

President of " Devonians in Swansea." Both these lectures 
were printed in full in The London Devonian Year Book for 1910. 

The other two lectures were given in the early part of 1910 — 
one on January 28th, on " The Leas and Estuaries of Devon, 
and their Birds," by E. A. S. Elliot (of Kingsbridge), Esq., 
M.R.C.S., M.B.O.U., when Sydney Simmons, Esq., one of the 
Vice-Presidents, was chairman ; and the other on March 22nd 
on " The Rivers of the Moor," by Cecil R. M. Clapp (of Exeter), 
Esq., M.A., L.L.M., late Hon. Sec. of the United Devon Associa- 
tion, when Colonel E. T. Chfford, V.D., Chairman of Committee, 
presided. Each of these lectures was illustrated by a beautiful 
series of lantern slides. Brief summaries appear in the present 
Year Book. Unfortunately, neither Mr. Elliot nor Mr. Clapp 
was able to attend personally to deliver his lecture, but an 
excellent substitute was on each occasion found in Mr. R. 
Pearse Chope. 

The first Bohemian concert was held on November 2nd, in the 
Great Hall of Cannon Street Hotel, and was presided over by 
H. E. Duke, Esq., K.C., M.P., one of the Vice-Presidents. An 
excellent programme was arranged by Mr. F. J. S. Thomson, 
Hon. Musical Director, and was much appreciated by the large 
audience. Miss Winifred Burlace, a daughter of one of the 
Vice-Presidents, sang *' My Dear Soul " very sweetly, and was 
warmly applauded. Mr. Charles W. Wreford, as usual, caused 
roars of laughter by his excellent stories in the Devonshire dialect, 
and some very fine songs were finely sung by two other Devonians, 
Mr. Charles King, a prominent and popular member of the 
London Devonian Athletic Club, and Mr. Sam Payne, a native 
of Exeter. 

At the second concert, on March nth, the chairman was 
Lieut. -Col. Sir Frederick Upcott, K.C.V.O., C.S.L, President of 
" The Devonian Association of Calcutta," and one of the Vice- 
Presidents of the London Devonian Association. The pro- 
gramme, as before, was arranged by Mr. F. J. S. Thomson, and 
he himself took part in a duet with Mr. Charles King. The 
dialect recitations were on this occasion provided by Miss Daisy 
Pullen, a young Somerset lady, who proved herself a good 
substitute for Mr. Charles W. Wreford. 

The Cinderella dance was held on December loth, in the Crown 
Room, Holborn Restaurant. Unfortunately the attendance 
was not so good as had been expected, but those who came 
thoroughly enjoyed themselves. The Committee, however, con- 
sidered it advisable to abandon the second dance, which had 
been arranged for February 25th. 

On February 12th a whist drive took place at "Ye Mecca 



14 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Cafe," Ludgate Hill, and was attended by about 300 persons. 
In fact, it proved so popular that the Committee decided to 
make arrangements for the second whist drive to take place in 
a larger hall. The Baltic Restaurant was engaged for the 
purpose on April 2nd, but, owing to the attitude of the City 
poHce, it was found necessary to cancel this engagement almost 
at the last moment. 

The final and chief event of the year was a complimentary 
dinner on June i6th, in the Grand Hall of the Hotel Cecil, to 
our distinguished Vice-President, Captain Robert F. Scott, 
C V.O., R.N., on the eve of his departure in command of the 
British Antarctic Expedition. As Commander of the British 
National Antarctic Expedition, 1901-4, he had succeeded in 
planting the British flag at the most southerly point then 
reached, and he was now departing again, fully resolved to 
reach the goal of so many ambitions — the South Pole itself. 
For an object so well calculated both to uphold our country's 
reputation and to extend our scientific knowledge, such an 
occasion could only be regarded as an event of national 
importance, and the Committee seized the opportunity of doing 
honour to so worthy a successor of the great Devonian navigators 
of the past — Steven Borough, Humphrey Gilbert, John Davis, 
John Hawkins, Francis Drake, and \^'alter Raleigh. The 
following account of the dinner, taken from The Illustrated 
Western Weekly Neivs of June 25th, will be read with interest : — 

FAREWELL DINNER TO CAPTAIN SCOTT. 

" The Devonian Association's send-off dinner to Captain Scott 
on Thursday last was a great success. Captain Scott being a 
Vice-President of the Association, his expedition to the Antarctic 
is naturally a matter of great interest to Devonians. At the 
dinner Earl Fortescue, the President of the Association, occupied 
the chair, and was supported by Captain and Mrs. Scott, Lord 
Clifford of Chudleigh, Colonel Clifford, V.D. (chairman of the 
committee), and Mrs. Clifford, Mr. H. E. Duke, K.C., M.P., Mr. 
A. J. and Mrs. Bromham, Mr. J. Carpenter (Portsmouth), Mr. and 
Mrs. Crosbie Coles, Mr. J. Gieve (Portsmouth), Rev. H. R. 
Gamble, M.A., Professor T. A. Hearson, Mr. G. H. Radford, M.P. 
and Mrs. Radford, Mr. M. B. Snell, J.P., Mr. and Mrs. J. C. 
Skewes (Bristol), Mr. S. Simmons, J.P., and Mrs. Simmons, 
Mr. T. Thorne (Bristol), Mr. P. G. D. Winter (Portsmouth). 

" The general company included : — 

" Mr. W. A. Ackland, Captain J. W. Acland. 

" Mr. J. J. and Mrs. Bate, Mr. and Mrs. S. Bennett, Mr. W. F. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 15 

Beste, Mr. G. S. and Mrs. Bidgood, Mr. and Mrs. R. Bidgood, 
Mr. Brown, Mr. C. H. Brodie, Mr. A. G. E. Barnes, Mr. S. W. 
Bryant, Mr. H. Bryant, Mr. Kenneth Butterfield, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. B. Burlace, Miss W. Burlace, Mr. L. Burlace, Mr. C. Boon, 
Mr. G. Bowman. 

" Mrs. A. Chettleburgh, Mr. R. P. Chope, the Misses Clifford, 
Mr. W. Clare, Mr. A. Clare, Mr. and Mrs. N. Cole, Mr. Joseph 
Cowen, Mr. R. H. Coysh, Mr. R. F. Coysh, Mr. Crabtree, Mr. 
Vivian J. Cummings, Mr. R. J. P. Campbell. 

'' Miss Dalton, Mr. G. W. Davey, Mr. J. A. Dixon, Mr. C. P. 
Dickins, Mr. F. A. and Mrs. Dinham. 

" Mr. and Mrs. Edy. 

'' Mr. and Mrs. Forman, Mrs. M. A. Fodt. 

" Mr. H. Gillham, Mr. W. R. B. Glass, Mr. L. Glass, Mr. H. 
Glass, Mr. Sidney H. and Mrs. Godfrey, Miss Gordon, Mr. John 
Gray, Mr. W. GulHford. 

" Mr. H. Haines, Mr. H. H. M. and Mrs. Hancock, Mr. J. and 
Mrs. Arnold Hill, Mr. H. Holman, Miss D. A. Holman, Mr. A. W. 
Holman, Mr. and Mrs. Horton, Mr. J. Horwood, Mr. J. N. Hunt, 
Mr. F. Hobbs. 

'' Mr. and Mrs. W. Inman. 

" Mr. and Mrs. Newton Jacks, Mr. F. C. Jeffery, Mr. H. R. 
Jones, Mr. Joint. 

" Dr. W. Kingdon, Mr. T. G. Kendall. 

'' Mr. J. H. Linscott, Mr. Frank I. Lyons, Mr. A. Long. 

'' Mr. R. Metherell, Mr. J. W. Mahone, Mrs. Medcraft. 

" Mr. H. O'Leary. 

" Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Parr, Mr. F. A. Perry, Mr. and Mrs. 
C. R. S. Philp, Mr. J. C. Pillman, J.P. (Plymouth), Mr. J. H. 
Pillman, Mr. F. G. Pinn, Mrs. Pinn, Mr. C. Pinkham, J.P., 
Mrs. Pinkham, Mr. W. V. M. Popham, Mr. Popham (friend), 
Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Powe, Mr. J. Pullman, ]\Ir. E. ElHot Pyle. 

" Mr. Allan Ramsay, Mr. J. Ryall. 

" Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Scown, Mr. J. W. Shawyer (hon. 
secretary), Mr. John Sheer, Mr. J. Shapcott, Mr. Shurmer 
Sibthorp, Mr. W. H. Smart, Mr. and Mrs. David Soames, Mr. 
and Mrs. F. C. Southwood, Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Southcombe, 
Mr. A. Spear, Mr. H. B. Squire. 

"Mr. Thorne, Mr. Tickell, Mr. and Mrs. H. Tatlow, Mr. 
Hurford Tatlow, Mr. F. Townsend, Mr. Harold Travers, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. J. Treharne. 

" Mr. F. H. Vibart, Mr. W. A. Volk. 

" Mr. H. M. Whitley, Mr. A. F. Wilson, Mr. J. L. Wright, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. R. Western, Mr. and Mrs. A. White, Mr. C. W. 
Wreford. 



i6 The Devonian Year Book, 1911 

Devon's Good Wishes. 

" Earl Fortescue, proposing ' Our guest,' said he hoped Captain 
Scott would not look on the present gathering in quite the same 
light as some of the entertainments which had been offered him 
by more august and learned bodies than the London Devonian 
Association. They would wish him to regard this more as a 
family gathering — (applause) — a send-off by natives of his 
county, who desired to offer to the Devonshire sailor, selected to 
lead a great enterprise, their congratulations on the distinction 
and their good wishes for his success. (Applause.) He expected 
Captain Scott was at this moment the most envied man in the 
British Navy. Arctic expeditions were comparatively familiar, 
but the Antarctic was not geographically only at the opposite 
Pole. For centuries explorers had sought to solve the riddle of 
the North ; but the public had made up its mind that the 
veritable heart of the Antarctic was to be reached within a few 
years of the first attempt to attain it. (Applause.) Before 
their guest lay a heavy responsibiUty. The lives and welfare of 
his companions depended on his leadership, and there would be 
many ready to find fault if he failed to accomplish everything 
that everybody rightly or wrongly thought to be within his 
power. The difficulties w^ere very great, but the Royal Navy 
was always ready to do its best, and its best was very good. 
(Applause.) As to success, they were sure, come what might, 
that Captain Scott would deserve it. (Applause.) While most 
earnestly hoping that he would accomplish his heart's desire, 
they would still be ready with a sympathetic welcome if he had 
to return reporting that he could not do all he wished. (Applause.) 
They were sure that the honour of his county and of his profession 
was safe in his hands, that what man could do he would do, and 
by God's blessing he would do a good deal. (Applause.) They 
hoped that in the anxious times in front of him, in the long 
nights of the Antarctic winter, and in the hardships and privations 
of his sledge journeys, he would be cheered and encouraged by 
the thought that he had the good wishes and sympathies of all 
his countrymen, and most particularly of those who, like him- 
self, came from the county of Devon. (Applause.) 

The Task and the Cost. 

" Captain Scott, acknowledging a very enthusiastic reception, 
said one thing of which he felt proud was that he was bom and 
bred in Devon. (Applause.) He often wondered why Devon- 
shire had not such a port as Cardiff. His ship went down the 
Bristol Channel the other day, and he as a Devonian would have 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 17 

been delighted to call at any port on the North coast if one 
existed. He was glad to be able to say that the previous day 
the Terra Nova had left. He was proud of the fellows who had 
gone out in that ship, and the spirit which was in them. 
(Applause.) It had been his privilege to select them, and there 
was now in that ship a band of brothers and a set of seamen who 
had rarely been equalled in any ship. It was his privilege to 
be the leader, and it was one of the proudest privileges a man 
could possibly have. (Applause.) They were men from all 
parts of the world, for a very curious feature of Antarctic 
expeditions was the varied character of the men. In Devonshire 
everybody had a certain amount of tact, and that must be the 
quality he must make use of. They were entering upon a long 
and arduous task. There was a great deal of exaggeration 
about the Pole, such as the talk of the long winter nights, but 
undoubtedly when people were cut off from civilization and 
were living together a certain strain was put upon the amenities 
and conventions of life, and that made it necessary that the 
party should have the right spirit in them, and he believed all 
his men had that. (Applause.) Some of the newspapers said 
they were bound to be successful. That was very nice of them. 
(Laughter.) They were going to do their best. He had got the 
people who would do it if it could be done, and he had got the 
equipment, but the task was not half so easy as a few journals 
imagined it to be. It was dependent on the seasons and on luck, 
for there were many possible accidents that might cause failure. 
Captain Scott added a reference to the financial side of the 
expedition. He pointed out that in addition to the cost of the 
equipment, allotments had to be made to the wives and families 
of the men. Unfortunately all the necessary money had not 
yet been subscribed. 

Devonian Explorers. 

" Lord Clifford of Chudleigh proposed ' Devon, our county.' 
He hoped the thought and memories of his native county might 
afford some solace to Captain Scott in the dreary journey he was 
about to undertake. His struggles to achieve the great end 
before him would be watched with interest and sympathy 
throughout his native county, and when he returned, they hoped 
victorious, no welcome would be warmer than that which would 
come from the hearts of the men and women of Devon. 
(Applause.) 

" Mr. H. E. Duke, responding, pointed out that the men of 
Devon had always been explorers. The first Englishmen to 
break the ice south of the Equator were Devon men, and they 

2 



i8 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

sailed from those missing ports to which Captain Scott had 
referred. (Laughter and applause.) Captain Scott was going 
to add his name to the glorious roll containing the names of 
the heroes of Devon, and whether he was going to find the South 
Pole they did not know, but he was going to make the best try 
a man could make. 

" Colonel E. T. Clifford, V.D., proposing the toast ' Our 
chairman,' said : I am sure his lordship's presence here to-night 
must be a source of gratification to all — particularly to the 
members of the Association. I feel that it would be difficult 
adequately to express the pleasure and honour felt by our 
Association when Lord Fortescue consented to be its first 
President, for his position in Devon and as a Devonian is second 
to none. It must be remembered that this Association is, so to 
speak, a new venture, and few, especially those in the responsible 
position Lord Fortescue holds, would care to be associated with 
a new venture unless they could be assured of its success. But 
there is this to be said, and perhaps Lord Fortescue himself felt 
it, that if he but gave us the benefit of his great name, success 
was assured from the first, and if we only take into consideration 
the evidence before us to-night, we may all say that the results 
have justified his view. There are many Devonian Societies 
in London, all of them, I have no doubt, doing good work in 
their own individual and particular way, and while we have no 
wish to interfere with the work and objects of all these other 
societies and associations, it was recognized that it would be 
desirable and possible to create some common centre which 
could be regarded as the representative association in London 
for all Devonshire men and women, and we submit that for this 
purpose the London Devonian Association, with its representative 
personnel and its excellent and energetic honorary secretary, 
Mr. Shawyer, who has done such good work, should be supported. 
You will probably be surprised to hear that we have lately been 
requested to regard ourselves as the common centre for all 
Devonian societies — not merely in other towns in England, 
but in all parts of the world. If the committee are assured that 
the want is general, and that they will be supported, you may 
be quite sure that, in the interests of such a cause, the committee 
are willing to undertake the work and responsibility attached to 
such a development, even to the South Pole. My own personal 
view is that a recognized headquarters and the Devonian Year 
Book — ^which has been so ably edited by Mr. Pearse Chope, has 
proved a great success, and ought to be in the hands of every 
Devonian in all parts of the world — are the keys to the situation. 
As a Hterary work and as a work of reference, I venture to say 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 19 



that our Year Book has no equal among year books issued by 
other county associations, and I sincerely hope that its field 
will be extended, and that Mr. Chope may remain with us many 
years to continue his editorship. I need not dwell upon the 
objects of the Association ; they are set forth in the Year Book, 
and we have endeavoured, and I think successfully, during the 
past year, to act up to our professions. It only remains for me 
to add that if the ideals which are held by the leading men 
connected with the various Devonian societies are to be realized, 
particularly in London, some sort of general affiliation will be 
necessary. This is not a case of 'Divide and govern.' This is 
a case of ' Unity is strength,' and I appeal to all in this room to 
do their best to promote that unity which, I am sure we shall 
hear from our noble chairman, is an object that every Devonian 
should aim at, so that our good work may be continued and 
extended. (Applause.) 

Subscription List Opened. 

" Earl Fortescue acknowledged the compliment, and stated 
that the financial announcement of Captain Scott came as a 
surprise to them. The committee of the Association had 
immediately held an impromptu meeting to announce that they 
proposed to start a fund under the auspices of the Association, 
having for its object the repairing of the defect mentioned by 
Captain Scott. (Applause.) He believed the appeal was likely 
to meet with a substantial response. It was proposed to ask 
the co-operation of all Devonians and of the Devonian Associa- 
tion in various parts of England." 

Details of the progress of this fund will be found on p. 36. 
During the evening an excellent musical programme was 
provided by Mr. W. A. Volk, L.R.A.M., who had been appointed 
to succeed Mr. F. J. S. Thomson as Hon. Musical Director. The 
most interesting item was Mr. John Galsworthy's fine poem, 
" Devon to me ! "* and which had been set to music as a song 
expressly for this occasion by Mr. Clifford Courtenay, and 
dedicated by permission to the President, Vice-Presidents, and 
Members of the London Devonian Association. It was sung 
extremely well by Mr. Wilfrid Piatt (Devonport), who was 
accompanied by the composer himself, and it was received with 
rounds of applause. Other interesting items were contributed 
by Miss Molly Hamley Clifford (Exeter), who sang " My Dear 
Soul," Mr. Robert Wright (Plymouth), who gave " Glorious 

* The words of this song are given on page 41. 



20 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Devon," Mr. W. A. Volk (Stoke), '' Widdicombe Fair," and Mr, 
Charles W. Wreford (Exeter), who related in dialect Jan Stewer's 
laughable account of '' The North Pole." 

During the summer arrangements were made in connection 
with the proposed Festival of Empire at the Crystal Palace, to 
have three days allotted for special excursions from the three 
western counties, and to give special terms and facilities to 
members of the London Devonian Association to witness the 
great Pageant of London, but the death of King Edward 
unfortunately caused the Festival to be postponed until the 
summer of 1911, when it is hoped that the arrangements made 
will be renewed. 

It only remains to note the changes of officers. At the Annual 
General Meeting on October 31st, the Right Hon. Lord Northcote, 
G.C.M.G., G.C.LE., C.B., was elected President for the coming 
year, in succession to the Right Hon. Earl Fortescue. The 
following gentlemen have during the past year been added to 
the list of Vice-Presidents : John Coles, Esq., J. P. (Tiverton), 
Sir Edwin A. Cornwall, M.P. (Lapford), P. E. Pilditch, Esq., 
L.C.C. (Kingsbridge). As Colonel Clifford is going abroad on a 
long tour, he has been reluctantly compelled to resign his posi- 
tion as Chairman of Committee, and Alderman C. Pinkham, J. P. 
(Plympton), one of the Vice-Presidents, has been elected to 
succeed him. The following members of the committee have 
resigned : Messrs. F. A. Bailey, A. J. Bromham, T. A. Darke, 
John Luxton, F. J. S. Thomson, F. J. S. Veysey, H. Wreford- 
Glanvill, and F. G. Wright ; and the following new members 
have been elected : Messrs. A. T. Bowden, J. B. Burlace, 
W. Crosbie Coles, H. H. M. Hancock (representing *' Barumites 
in London "), W. Inman, F. A. Perry, and C. Pinkham. 



2^ 




R. PEARSE CHORE, B.A. 

(Editor of the Devonian Year Book) . 
From a Drawing by Vernon Hill. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1911 21 



Affiliated Societies 

(For 191 1 Fixtures, see p. 30), 



BARUMITES IN LONDON. 
Founded 1893. 

President : E. J. Scares, Esq., M.P. 

Vice-President: J. W. Davie, Esq. 

Hon. Secretary : F. Gabriel, Roborough, Park Avenue South, Crouch 

End, N. 
Qualification : Connection with Barnstaple or its neighbourhood. Limited 

to men. 
Meetings : Annual dinner in London. 



DEVON COUNTY SCHOOL OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION. 

(London Branch.) 

Founded 1899. 

President : J. W, Shawyer, Esq. 

Chairman : Prof. T. A. Hearson, M.Inst.C.E., M.I.N.A., F.C.I.P.A. 

Hon. Secretary : W. V. M. Popham, 23, Moorgate Street, E.G. 

Objects : To keep Old Bo3^s in touch with the School and with each other, 

to promote gatherings among Old Boys for pleasure and sport, and 

to further the interests of the School generally. 
Qualification : Education at the Devon County School. 
Subscription : Life membership, half a guinea. 
Meetings : Annual dinner in London, and other social gatherings during 

the winter months. 
The School Magazine (2s. per annum) is issued each term, containing 
news of Old Boys all over the world. 



THE EXETER CLUB. 

(London and District Branch.) 

Founded 1880. 

President : A. Soames, Esq. 

Vice-President : J. C. Copplestone, Esq. 

Hon. Treasurer : N. Cole. 

Assistant Secretary : H. P. Kelly. 

Hon. Secretary : H. D. Powe, 13, Ellerby Street, Fulham, S.W. 

Objects : To promote friendly and social intercourse, to maintain the 
status of the Exeter Training College for schoolmasters, and to give 
opportunities for inter-communication for mutual assistance. 

Qualification : Training at St. Luke's College, Exeter. 

Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Monthly, in addition to annual dinner and concert. In con- 
nection with this Club are the Old Exonians' Cricket Club, with 
the same Hon. Secretary, and the Exonian Lodge, No. 3415, the Hon. 
Secretary of which is C. W. Wreford, 42, Dyne Road, Kilburn, N.W. 



22 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

THE LONDON DEVONIAN RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB. 
Founded 1899. 
President : The Right Hon. Earl Fortescue. 
Chairman : A. T. Bowden. 
Deputy Chairman : F. Parkhouse. 
Captain 1st XV. : G. T. Butcher. 
Vice-Captain 1st XV. : R. Shapland. 
Captain A XV. : W. E. Morris. 
Vice-Captain A XV. : R. H, Boden. 
Captain B XV. : F. Parkhouse. 
Vice-Captain B XV. : H. A. C. Richards. 
Hon. Treasurer : F. J. S. Veysey. 

Hon. Secretary : J. P. Squire, 31, Angell Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Objects : Sport and recreation. 
Qualification : Birth in Devon or of Devonian parentage on either side, 

or residence in Devon. 
Subscription : Playing members 12s. 6d. ; hon. members 5s., admitting 

to all home matches. 
Meetings : General meetings in April and September, committee meetings 

every Monday evening during the football season, football matches 

every Saturday, and suppers occasionally. 
Head Quarters : The George Hotel, Strand, W.C. 
Ground : Norwood Club, Lancaster Road, Norwood Junction, 
Colours : Green and white. 



THE OLD EXONIAN CLUB. 

(London Section.) 
Founded 1904. 
President : Mr. Justice Bucknill. 
Vice-President : J. H. Fisher, Esq., F.R.C.S. 

Hon. Secretary : G. C. Daw^, 189, Sumatra Road, Hampstead, N.W. 
Objects : To renew acquaintance between Old Exonians living in London, 

and to arrange dinners and other entertainments. 
Qualification : Education at the Exeter School. 
Subscription : 3s. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner in London, and other gatherings from time to 
time. 
The School Magazine (free to members) is issued each term. 



THE OLD OTTREGIANS' SOCIETY. 
(" Ottregians in London "). 
Founded 1898. 
President : The Right Hon. The Lord Coleridge. 
Vice-President : The Right Hon. Sir John H. Kennaway, Bart., C.B, 
Chairman : Arthur William Godfrey. 
Vice-Chairman : John Lovell. 
Assistant Secretary : W. H. Lang. 
Hon. Secretary and Treasurer : Sidney H. Godfrey, " Homeville," Merton 

Avenue, Chiswick, W. 
Objects : To renew old acquaintance, to strengthen the bond of friendship, 
to give advice and assistance to friendless Ottregians, to discuss home 
topics, and to publish home news. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 23 

Qualification : Natives of the postal district of Ottery St. Mary, and persons 
who have Hved for any length of time in the town. 

Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum ; ladies is, 6d. 

Meetings : Once in eight weeks at the Ottregian Room, 11, Bridge Street, 
Westminster, and once a year at Kew Gardens, an annual concert at 
St. Clement Danes Parish Hall, and a special train on Whit-Mondays 
to Ottery St. Mary. 
A Benevolent Fund. 

A quarterly journal (free to members), containing news of Ottery 
St. Mar}', and of Ottery people all over the world. 

THE TIVERTONIAN ASSOCIATION. 
Founded 1909. 
President : Hon. W. Lionel C. Walrond, M.P. 
Vice-Presidents : Sir Robert Newman, Bart., D.L., J. P., Sir George 

W. Kekewich, K.C.B., D.C.L., Ian M. Heathcoat-Amory, Esq., J. P., 

Rev. S. J. Childs-Clarke, M.A., Colon*el E. T. Clifford, V.D., 

G, E. Cockram, Esq., J. A. Eccles, Esq., Thos. Ford, Esq., J. P., 

E. V. HuxTABLE, Esq., R. Morgan, Esq., H. Mudford, Esq., A. R. 

Parkhouse, Esq., Allan Ramsay, Esq., Rev. O. R. M. Roxby, 

Granville Smith, Esq., E. J. Snell, Esq., W. Thorne, Esq. (Mayor 

of Tiverton), Harold Travers, Esq. 
Chairman : F. G. Wright. 
Hon. Musical Director : Charles Wigg. 
Hon. M. C. : F. W. Hesse. 
Hon. Treasurer : J. L. Wright. 
Hon. Secretary : W. Passmore, ioi, Elspeth Road, Clapham Common, 

S.W. 
Objects : To promote friendly intercourse amongst Tivertonians, to assist 

those in need, and to advise and influence young men starting on a 

commercial or professional career. 
Qualification : Persons connected with the Tiverton Parliamentary 

Division by birth, descent, marriage, or former residence. 
Subscription : Ordinary members (ladies or gentlemen), 2s. per annum; 

hon. members — gentlemen, los., ladies, 5s. 
Meetings : Concerts, whist drives, dances, and annual dinner during the 

winter months. 



24 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



Other Devonian Societies 



BIRMINGHAM AND MIDLAND DEVONIAN SOCIETY. 
Founded 1891. 

President : Frank Huxham, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : The Right Hon. Jesse Collings, M.P., J. Winsor 
Bond, Esq., G. Bowden, Esq., J. Barham Carslake, Esq., B.A., 
A. J. Collings, Esq., H, Eales, Esq., M.R.C.S., Dr. Heath, M. 
Hooper, Esq., T. W. Hussey, Esq., W. D. Hutchings, Esq., Lieut,- 
Colonel Halse, J. p., H. I. Ley, Esq., M.R.C.S., P. H. Levi, Esq., 
R. MoGFORD, Esq., R. A. Pinsent, Esq., J. D. Prior, Esq., A. G. 
Spear, Esq., W. Voysey, Esq., J. F. Culley, Esq. 

Auditor : Thaddeus Ryder, F.C.A. 

Hon. Treasurer : C. Parkhouse. 

Secretaries, Entertainment Committee : A. F. Cerrito, F. E, Rowe. 

Hon. Secretary : T. W. Hussey, 21, First Avenue, Selly Park, Birmingham. 

Objects : To maintain interest in the County, and to promote social inter- 
course among Devonians in Birmingham. 

Qualification : Natives of Devon, or connected with the County by marriage. 

Subscription : Gentlemen, 5s., ladies, 2s. 6d. 

Meetings : Social gatherings during the winter months, annual meeting and 
dinner in January. 

SOCIETY OF DEVONIANS IN BRISTOL. 
Founded 1891. 

President and Hon. Treasurer : A. Dodge, Esq. 

Vice-President : J. S. Skewes, Esq. 

Hon. Secretary : F. E. R. Davey, 13, Cranbrook Road, Redland, Bristol. 

Objects : To promote friendly intercourse amongst Devonians in Bristol 
by social gatherings, and to assist benevolent or charitable objects, 
with a special regard to those in which Devonians are interested. 

Qualification : Natives and others connected with Devon. 

Subscription : 5s. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner, and concerts, etc., from time to time. 

The Society possesses a Presidential Badge, each past President con- 
tributing a link for a chain. 



DEVONIAN SOCIETY IN CALCUTTA. 
Founded 1901. 

President : Lieut.-Colonel Sir Frederick Upcott, K.C.V.O., C.S.I. 

Vice-President : W. H. Norman, Esq. 

Hon. Treasurer and Secretary : R. W. Chubb, Commercial Buildings, 

Calcutta. 
Objects : To promote a common County bond of friendship, and to render 

aid to Devonians in India. 
Qualifications : Birth or long residence. 
Subscription : £1 per annum. 
Meetings : Monthly. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 25 

CARDIFF DEVONSHIRE SOCIETY. 
Founded 1906. 
President : Wm. Anning, Esq., J. P. 
Vice-Presidents : Hon. Stephen Coleridge, Sir Harry T. Eve, General 

Kekewich, George Lambert, Esq., M.P., Sir Robert Newman, 

Bart., Jas. Radley, Esq., W. J. Tatem, Esq. 
Chairman : Sir Wm. Crossman. 
Hon. Treasurer : A. Akenhead, 

Hon. Secretary : W. A. Beer, Charles Street, Cardiff. 
Objects : To bring Devonians in Cardiff more closely together, to foster the 

traditions of the County, and to raise a fund to afford temporary relief 

to necessitous and deserving Devonians. 
Qualification : Birth or descent. 
Subscription : 5s. per annum. 
Meetings : Annual dinner. 

WEST COUNTRY ASSOCIATION, EASTBOURNE. 
Founded 1905. 

President : C. Davies-Gilbert, Esq., D.L. 

Vice-Presidents : J. Adams, Esq., M.D., W. Davies, Esq., S. N. Fox, 
Esq., J. P.; A. L. Franklin, Esq., C. Godfrey, Esq., H. Habgood, 
Esq., M.D., Major Harris, Rev. E. G. Hawkins, C. W. Mayo, Esq., 
S. Oxenham, Esq., J. Routly, Esq., L. C. Wintle, Esq., W. G. 
Willoughby, Esq., M.D. 

Chairman : Rev. E. G. Hawkins. 

Hon. Treasurer : C. W. Mayo. 

Hon. Secretary : W. Percy Glanfield, Albemarle Hotel, Eastbourne. 

Objects : The promotion of friendly intercourse and good fellowship by 
holding meetings, social gatherings, etc. 

Qualification : Birth or parentage. 

Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Concerts, games, tournaments, dinner, etc. 

Head Quarters : Albemarle Hotel, Eastbourne. 

DEVON AND CORNWALL SOCIETY. 
(Gloucester and District.) 
Founded 1901. 
President : Rev. James Richards, M.A. 
Vice-Presidents : Capt. B. J. Cox, T. Peagam, Esq., James Pitts, Esq., 

A. C. Rule, Esq. 
Hon. Treasurer : J. Hill. 

Hon. Secretary : W. H. Bird, Elan House, Gladstone Road, Gloucester. 
Objects : The benefit and interest of natives of Devon and Cornwall. 
Qualification : Birth, parentage, or marriage. 
Subscription : 3s. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual meeting in Januar}^, annual dinner, and other meetings 
for social enjoyment. 

DEVONIANS IN LIVERPOOL AND DISTRICT. 
Founded 1895. 
President : Judge J. F. Collier, J. P. 

Vice-Presidents : H. Cuming, Esq., A. Saunders, Esq., G. R. Searle, 
Esq., H. Smith, Esq., Professor H. A. Strong, M.A., LL.D., J. R. 
Watkins, Esq. 



26 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Hon. Treasurer : J. Furze. 

Hon. Secretaries : Messrs. Roberts and Smith, 14, Elliot Street, Liver- 
pool. 

Object : Social intercourse. 

Qualifications : Birth, parentage on either side, residence, or marriage. 

Subscription : 2S. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner and picnic, social gatherings, whist drives^ 
dances, children's parties, etc. 

DEVONIAN SOCIETY, MANCHESTER AND DISTRICT. 

President : Marshall Stevens, Esq. 

Chairman : R. G. Evans. 

Hon. Secretary and Treasurer : W. E. Sanders, 14, Parsonage Road, 

Heaton Moor, Stockport. 
Object : To promote social intercourse among Devonians. 
Qualification : Birth, parentage or marriage. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : Whist drives, and an annual dinner. 

MANITOBA DEVONIAN SOCIETY. 
Founded 1907. 
President : A. Kingdom, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : H. Godfree, Esq., H. Wheeler, Esq. 
Chairman : James Hooper. 
Vice-Chairman : A. Burridge. 
Hon. Treasurer and Secretary : A. J. Bartlett, 472, Elgin Avenue, 

Winnipeg. 
Qualification : Devonian by birth. 
Subscription : 2 dollars per annum. 
Meetings : Monthly, in Shakespeare Hall. 

DEVON AND CORNWALL SOCIETY. 
(Newport, Mon., and District). 
Founded 1889. 
President and Chairman : C. H. Adams, Esq. 
Hon. Treasurer : A. C. Mitchell. 
Financial Hon. Secretary : C. H. Adams. 

Hon. Secretary : J. Cowling, 3, Annesley Road, Maindee, Newport, Mon. 
Objects : The promotion of good fellowship between West Countrymen, 
and the advancement and protection of their interests generally. 
Benevolent Fund. 
Qualification : Natives of Devon or Cornwall, and their sons and grandsons. 
Subscription : is. minimum, 5s. maximum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner, whist drives and lectures in winter, and picnics 
in summer. 

DEVONIANS IN PORTSMOUTH. 

Founded 1906. 
President : Jas.' Carpenter, Esq. 
Vice-President : R. Kelland Niner, Esq. 
Hoit. Treasurer : C. S. Parker. 
Assistant Hon. Secretary : W. Butland. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 27 

VHoh. Secretary to Entertainment Committee : D. H. Wiseman. 
IHon. Secretary : P. G. D. Winter, 70, Elm Grove, Southsea. 
Objects : To bring together Devonians residing in Portsmouth and district 
by a common bond of friendship and social or personal acquaintance; 
iQualification : Birth, parentage, or ten years' residence ; lady members 

(honorary), the same qualifications ; wives of members eligible. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : Annual dinner, whist drives, trips to Devon, etc. 

Badge of office for President bears arms of Devon and Portsmouth 
in enamel, and a link is given annually by the President for the 
year, bearing his name and the date. 

REIGATE AND REDHILL AND DISTRICT DEVON AND 
CORNWALL ASSOCIATION. 
Founded 1907. 
President and Chairman : J. Trevarthen, Esq. 
Vice-Presidents : Geo. Gilbert, Esq., J. P., Henry Libby, Esq., F. G. 

Pyne, Esq., J. Saunders, Esq. 
V ice-Chairman : G. Gilbert. 

Hon. Secretary and Treasurer : Henry Libby, 118, Station Road, Redhill. 
Objects : Social intercourse, and the advertisement of Devon and Cornwall. 
Qualification : Natives of Devon or Cornwall. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : July and December. 

THE DEVONIAN SOCIETY OF RHODESIA. 
President : E. Basch, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : F. W. Cary, Esq., P. B. S. Wrey, Esq. 
Chairman : W. Bridgman. 
Hon. Secretary and Treasurer : Herbert H. Keen, Bulawayo. 

THE ASSOCIATION OF WEST COUNTRYMEN IN HAMPSHIRE. 

President : A. Broomfield, Esq. 

Vice-President : G. Crocker, Esq. 

Hon. Treasurer : J. Ellen. 

Hon. Secretary : W. T. Venton, 68, Stafford Road, Southampton. 

Objects : To promote social intercourse, and to foster and encourage 
national sentiment, love of country, and everything pertaining to 
the honour and welfare of the three Western Counties. 

Qualification : Connected with Devon, Cornwall, or Somerset by birth, 
marriage, or adoption. 

Subscription : is. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner, and periodical social gatherings. 

THE WEST COUNTRY ASSOCIATION, SOUTHEND-ON-SEA. 

President: J. H. M. Kirkwood, Esq., M.P. 

Treasurer : W. T. Darke. 

Hon. Secretary: F. T. Fisher, 44, Alexandra Street Southend-on-Sea. 

Objects : To promote friendly intercourse among West-country men and 
women residing in Southend and district, to foster a knowledge of the 
history, folk-lore, literature, music, art, and antiquities of the three 
counties, and to carry out approved schemes for the benefit of West- 
country men and women residing in Southend and district. 

Subscription: Gentlemen, 5s., ladies, 2s. 6d. per annum. Life member- 
ship — gentlemen, 3 guineas, ladies, ih guineas. 



28 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

DEVON, CORNWALL, AND WEST COUNTRY ASSOCIATION FOR 
THE COUNTY OF SURREY. 
Founded 1908. 

President : Sir Edwin Durning Lawrence, Bart. 

Vice-Presidents : J. J. Brewer, Esq., Sir A. T. Quiller Couch, Rev, 
G. Dandridge, M.A., W. J. Davey, Esq., J, H. Dennis, Esq., W. E, 
HoRNE, Esq., M.P., Rev. E. C. Kirwan, M.A., G. Lambert, Esq. 
M.P., H. F. Luttrell, Esq., M.P., G. H. Morgan, Esq., M.P., Rev. 
T. N. H. Smith-Pearse, W, T. Pilditch, Esq., G. H. Radford, 
Esq., M.P., S. P. Rattenbury, Esq., Sir Wm. Treloar, J. P., 
Aneurin Williams, Esq., Rt. Rev. The Lord Bishop of 
Winchester. 

Hon. Treasurer : W. J. Davis. 

Hon. Secretary : R. Snodgrass, 56, Agraria Road, Guildford. 

Objects': The promotion of friendly intercourse and mutual interest 
among the members ; the provision of social and literary entertain- 
ment. 

Qualification : Natives of Devon, Cornwall, or the West Country, and 
their families. 

Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner, socials, and picnics. 



SWANSEA DEVONIAN SOCIETY. 
Founded 1894. 

President : VJ. Harding, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : A. Bond, Esq., W. A. Ford, Esq., J. Jones, Esq., 
J. C. Kerswell, Esq., C. H. Newcombe, Esq., J. B. Reed, Esq. 

Chairman : S. Daniel. 

Hon. Auditor : G. H. Harvey. 

Assistant Secretary : C. Easterbrook. 

Hon. Secretary : S. T. Drew, Public Library, Swansea. 

Objects : To promote fraternal feelings, social intercourse and entertain- 
ment, to purchase books on the history of Devon, and to render 
assistance in case of need. 

Qualification : Birth or descent. 

Subscription : is. per annum. 

Meetings : Social gatherings at intervals, summer excursion in August, 
annual dinner in November. 



DEVONIAN SOCIETY OF TORONTO. 
Founded 1907. 

President : The Rt. Hon. Lord Northcote, G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., C.B. 

Vice-Presidents : Dr. Norman Allen, G. W^ Beardmore, Esq., H. E. 
Duke, Esq,, K.C., Major Gratwicke, G. Lambert, Esq., M.P., 
A. E. Spender, Esq., R. A. J. Walling, Esq., Hon. Lionel 
Walrond, M.P., Sir W. H. White, K.C.B. 

Chairman : W. C. Borlase. 

V ice-Chairman : C. Loveys. 

Hon. Treasurer : E. E. Graham. 

Assistant Secretary : W. A. McDonald. 

Hon. Secretary : C. W. Gigg, 35, Grange Avenue, Toronto. 



The Devofttan Year Book, 191 1 29 

Objects : To renew old acquaintances and to form new ones with those who 
hold a common interest, to foster a knowledge of the traditions, litera- 
ture, folklore, etc., of Devonshire, and to promote the spirit of 
fraternity among Devonians in Canada. 

Qualification : Birth or descent. 

Subscription : One dollar per annum. 

Meetings : The third Wednesday in each month from May to October, and 
the first and third Wednesday from November to April — ^the first 
Wednesdays to be Social Evenings. No intoxicants allowed. 

DEVON, CORNWALL, AND SOMERSET CLUB, VANCOUVER. 

President : J. Hoskins, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : J. W. Dawe, Esq., G. J. Dyke, Esq., A. J. Ford, Esq., 

J. L. Pratt, Esq. 
Auditors : J. W. Dawe, G. Mo watt. 
Treasurer : W. H. Carnsew. 
Assistant Secretary : E. Pearce. 
Secretary : Ernest J. Down. 
Head Quarters : 445, Richards Street, Vancouver, B.C. 

DEVONIANS IN WESTON-SUPER-MARE. 

President : Dr. Vickery. 

Hon. Treasurer : S. Pady. 

Hon. Secretary : T. J. Kerslake, Alexandra Parade, Weston-super-Mare 

Object : Social intercourse. 

Subscriptions : 2s. 6d. and is. 

Meetings : Annual dinner and conversazione. 

DEVONIANS IN THE ISLE OF WIGHT. 
Founded 1905. 
President and Chairman : R. Stew^art Savile, Esq. 
Vice-President and V ice-Chairman : Dr. M. L. B. Coombs. 
Hon. Treasurer and Secretary : W. Ormsby Rymer, 33a, Holyrood Street, 

Newport, I.W. 
Objects : Social intercourse. 

Qualification : Born in Devon or of Dev^onian parents. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : Annual and occasional. 

The Isle of Wight and Devon are connected by an ancient link in the 
Patron Lady, Isabella de Fortibus, Countess of Devon and Lady of 
the Isle, A.D. 1 3 10. 

(It is believed that there are several other Devonian Societies, both at home 
and abroad. The Editor will be pleased to receive particulars of 
these for the next issue of the Year Book.) 



30 The Devonian Year Book, 1911 



List of Fixtures, 

1911. 

January. 
7 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 
K.C.S. Old Boys. Home. A XV v. KC.S. Old 
Boys. Away. B XV v. K.C.S. Old Boys. Away. 

12 Th. London Devonian Association Whist Drive, St. 

Bride Institute. 

13 F. Devon County School Old Boys' Association, Annual 

Dinner, Frascati's Restaurant. 
Tivertonian Association, Grand Concert, St. Bride 
Institute, 7.30. 

14 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

Park House. Home. B XV v. Devas Institute. 
Home. 
Western Counties' Cinderella Dance, Freemasons' 
Tavern, Great Queen Street, W.C. 

18 W. Association of West Countrymen in Hampshire, 
Annual Meeting and Smoking Concert, Bedford 
Hotel, Southampton, 7.30. 

21 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 
Royal Naval College. Home. A XV v. Royal 
Naval College A. Away. B XV v. Upper Clapton 
B. Home. 

27 F. Exeter Club, General Meeting, George Hotel, Strand, 

7.30. 

28 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

Customs. Away. A XV v. Customs A. Home. 
B XV V. Catford Bridge B. Home. 

February. 

2 Th. Old Ottregians' Society, Concert and Social Evening, 

St. Clement Danes Parish Hall, 8.0. 

3 F. Devon and Cornwall Society, Newport (Mon.) and 

District, Annual Dinner. 

4 S. Exeter Club, Whist Drive. 

London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 
Civil Service. Away. A XV v. Civil Service A. 
Home. B XV v. Ilford Wanderers B. Away. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1911 31 

9 Th. Devon County vSchool Old Boys' Association, Social 
Evening, Sweasey's Restaurant, 7.30. 

11 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 
Royal Military College. Away. B XV v. Twicken- 
ham A. Home. 

15 W. Association of West Countrymen in Hampshire, Annual 

Banquet, South Western Hotel, Southampton, 7.0. 

16 Th. Tivertonian Association, Annual Dance, St. Bride 

Institute, 7.30. 

17 F. Devon, Cornwall, and West Country Association for 

the County of Surrey, Annual Dinner, Guildford. 

18 S. London Devonian Association, Cinderella Dance, 

Council Chamber, Holborn Restaurant. 
Exeter Club, Supper and Smoker, George Hotel, 

Strand, 7.0. 
London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

Customs. Home. A XV v. Royal Mihtary College 

A. Away. B XV v. Civil Service B. Home. 

25 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

Leytonstone. Home. A XV v. Leytonstone A. 

Away. B XV v. Leytonstone B. Away. 
28 Tu. London Devonian Association, Lantern Lecture by 

R. Pearse Chope, B.A., on " The Historical Basis 

of Kingsley's Westward Ho I " St. Bride Institute, 

8.0. 

March. 

4 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 
Ilford Wanderers. Away. A XV v. City Albion. 
Home. B XV v. Lennox B. Home. 

9 Th. Devon County School Old Boys' Association, Social 
Evening, Sweasey's Restaurant, 7.30. 

11 S. London Devonian Association, Dinner, Throne Room, 
Holborn Restaurant. 
London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV 
V. St. Thomas's Hospital. Away. B XV v. 
Customs B. Home. 
18 S. Exeter Club, Supper or Inter-College Whist Drive, 
George Hotel, Strand. 
London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 
K.C.S. Old Boys. Away. A XV v. K.C.S. Old 



32 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

March 

18 S Boys A. Home. B XV v. K.C.S. Old Boys B. 

Home. 
Tivertonian Association, Whist Drive, St. Bride 

Institute, 7.30. 
Association of West Countrymen in Hampshire, Whist 
Drive, Shirley Assembly Rooms, Southampton, 6.30. 

24 F. London Devonian Association, Whist Drive, St. 

Bride Institute. 

25 S. Devon County School Old Boys' Association, Whist 

Drive, St. Bride Institute, 7.30. 

31 F. Tivertonian Association, Annual General Meeting, 
St. Bride Institute, 7.30. 

April. 

9 Sun. Old Ottregians' Society, Meeting at 11, Bridge 
Street, Westminster, 4.30. 

June. 

3 S. Tivertonian Association, Week-end Excursion to 

Tiverton. 

4 Sun. Old Ottregians' Society Visit to Home, Special train 

leaves Waterloo at 12.5 midnight, returning from 
Ottery St. Mary at 6.0 p.m. 

July. 

25 Tu. Devonshire Association meeting at Dartmouth. 

August. 

13 Sun. Old Ottregians' Society, Summer Gathering at Kew 
Gardens, 4.0. Tea at '* Danebury House," Kew 
Green, 4.30. 

October. 

1 Sun. Old Ottregians' Society, Meeting at- 11, Bridge Street, 
Westminster, 4.30. 
28 S. Devon and Cornish Festival, Queen's Hall, 8.0. 

December. 

10 Sun. Old Ottregians' Society, Annual Gathering at 11, 
Bridge Street, Westminster, 4.30. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 33 



The Family of Northcote. 

The family tree of the Northcotes is one of the oldest in 
Devonshire, extending to within half a century of the Norman 
Conquest. In 1103 one Geoffrey (Galfridus) de Northcote, 
knight, held the lands of Northcote, in the parish of East Down, 
near Combmartin, from which the family name is derived. At 
that date the estate included, probably in a complete form, a 
remarkable series of rude stone monuments of unknown anti- 
quity — menhirs, rows, and circles — of which the only stone 
remaining in position is the huge menhir on Haddock's Down — 
one of the two described by Westcote in 1630 as " great stones 
in nature or fashion (though not curiously cut) of pyramids." 
These stones were 147 feet apart, and parallel to the line joining 
them, 66 feet off, was a row of 23 smaller ones. Tristram 
Risdon (of whom, by the way, the present Earl of Iddesleigh 
is the representative) speaks also of " certain stones, circular- 
wise, of more than the height of a man, which may seem to be 
purposely set for a memorial of some notable achievement there 
performed, the truth whereof time hath obliterated ; only the 
field is known by the name of Madocks-Down ; which many 
conjecture was in memory of one Madocke there vanquished ; 
for no man will think that they were there set in vain." 

It would be tedious to trace the pedigree in detail, but it is 
interesting to note that a John de Northcote was Sheriff of 
the County in 1354. As new estates were acquired by marriage 
or purchase, the family frequently changed its seat. In the 
middle of the sixteenth century, Walter Northcote, grandfather 
of the first baronet, was living at Uton, in the parish of Crediton. 
Walter was succeeded by his son John, and John Northcote 's 
eldest son, Walter, married the heiress of Edmund Drew of 
Hayne, in the parish of Newton St. Cyres, which place then 
became the principal seat of the family. This \\'alter Northcote 
died young, and was succeeded by his brother John, father of 
the first baronet. John was a justice of the peace for the County 
at the end of the reign of Elizabeth, sheriff of Devon in 1627-8, 
and survived till 1632. By his second wife, Susan, daughter of 
Sir Hugh Pollard of King's Nympton, he had twelve sons and 
six daughters. 

The fourth, but eldest surviving, son, John, was created a 
baronet in 1641, and is best known on account of the Note- 
Book he kept in the House of Commons in 1640 and in 1661. 
He sat for Ashburton in the Long ParUament in 1640, and he 

3 



34 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

represented Devonshire in Richard Cromwell's Parliament and 
in the Convention ParHament, but from 1667 till his death in 
1676, he sat for Barnstaple. He had been sheriff of the County 
in 1626-7, and in 1643 he served in Devon at the head of a 
regiment of 1200 men, took part in the defence of Plymouth 
and the battle of Modbury, and was in Exeter at its capitulation. 

His descendants prior to the eighth baronet — best known to 
us as Sir Stafford Northcote, and at the end of his life first Earl 
of Iddesleigh — '' made no particular figure in history, and the 
honourable record of their days need not be dwelt on," but it 
is necessary to indicate the reason for the adoption of the name 
of Stafford — a name belonging to another ancient Devonshire 
family. This is due to the marriage of Sir Henry Northcote, 
fifth baronet, M.P. for Exeter, to Bridget Maria, only daughter 
and heiress of Hugh Stafford of Pynes, in the parish of Upton 
Pyne, the present seat of the head of the family. Hugh Stafford 
was noted as an enthusiastic apple-grower and lover of cyder, 
and he wrote a " Dissertation of Cyder and Cyder-Fruit." 
Hugh Stafford's great grandfather married a daughter and co- 
heiress of Hugh Osborne, of Iddesleigh, and it is presumably 
from this connection that the title is derived. 

Sir Stafford Henry Northcote, eighth baronet, and first Earl 
of Iddesleigh, was born at 23, Portland Place, London, on 27 Oct., 
1818. He was the eldest son of Henry Stafford Northcote, 
eldest son of Sir Stafford Henry Northcote, seventh baronet. 
His mother was Agnes Mary, only daughter of Thomas Cockburn, 
of the East India Company's service. After a distinguished 
career at Oxford, he became private secretary to Mr. Gladstone, 
and was one of the secretaries of the Great Exhibition in 1851, 
for which he was made a C.B. He received the degree of D.C.L. 
in 1863. He became M.P. for North Devon and President of 
the Board of Trade in 1866, Secretary for India in 1867, Chair- 
man of Hudson's Bay Company in 1869, a Commissioner for 
the settlement of the Alabama Claims in 1871, and Chancellor 
of the Exchequer from 1874 to 1880. His second Budget was 
remarkable for the application of an annual sinking fund to the 
reduction of the national debt. He became leader of the house 
in 1876, and was leader of the opposition to Mr. Gladstone's 
Government from 1880 to 1885. In the latter year he took his 
seat in the House of Lords as Earl of Iddesleigh and Viscount 
St. Cyres, and in 1886 he became Foreign Secretary, but resigned 
six months later, dying suddenly on the day of his resignation. 

" He was perhaps the most pure-minded politician that has 
taken part in English public life since Lord Althorp." " He 
seemed," said Mr. Gladstone," to be a man incapable of resenting 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 35 

an injury ; a man in whom it was the fixed habit of thought 
to put himself wholly out of view when he had before him the 
attainment of great public objects." " He was an ardent 
Devonian, and took pleasure, without excelling, in country 
pursuits." 

He married Cecilia Frances, C.I., the daughter of Thomas Farrer, 
and sister of the first Lord Farrer, and had seven sons and three 
daughters. The eldest son, Walter Stafford, born 7 Aug., 1845, 
succeeded him as second Earl. He acted as private secretary 
to his father, and afterwards became a Commissioner of Inland 
Revenue, and was made a C.B. He is an author of some repute, 
and his literary talents are shared by his only son and heir, 
Viscount St. Cyres, and his eldest daughter. Lady Rosalind 
Lucy Northcote, whose book on " Devon" is one of the most 
charming descriptions of our beautiful County that has ever 
been published. The Countess of Iddesleigh is Elizabeth Lucy, 
eldest daughter of Sir Harry S. Meysey-Thompson, Bart. 

The second son, Henry Stafford, Lord Northcote, born 18 Nov., 
1846, was created a baronet in 1887, and a baron in 1900. He 
is also G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., and C.B. After acting as private 
secretary to Lord Salisbury and to his own father, he became 
in succession financial secretary to the War Office, surveyor- 
general of ordnance, and a charity commissioner. He was 
M.P. for Exeter from 1880 to 1899, Governor of Bombay from 
1899 to 1903, and Governor-General of the Commonwealth 
of Australia from 1903 to 1908. He has been Provincial Master 
of Devonshire Freemasons since 1896. He married Alice, C.I., 
adopted daughter of Lord Mount Stephen, but has no issue. 

The third son. Rev. the Hon. John Stafford Northcote, A.K.C.L., 
born 3 Jan., 1850, has been Vicar of St. Andrew, Westminster, 
since 1889, and is a Prebendary of St. Paul's Cathedral and 
Honorary Chaplain to the King ; and the fourth son, Rev. the 
Hon. Arthur Francis Northcote, born 2 Nov., 1852, is Vicar of 
St. Gregory, Canterbur\^ 



36 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Captain Scott's Antarctic Expedition. 

An Appeal to Devonians. 

The following letter appeared in The Times of July 20th, 1910 : — 
To THE Editor of '' The Times/' 

*' Sir, — Sir Edgar Speyer has written to the daily papers 
stating that nearly £8,000 is still required to make up the balance 
necessary to place Captain Scott's Expedition Fund on such a 
basis as to relieve the gallant explorer and his brother-officers 
from monetary anxiety before leaving New Zealand on their 
perilous undertaking. 

" Captain Robert Scott being a Devonian, the moment is 
therefore opportune for the London Devonian Association to 
make known what they are doing in connexion with this fund, 
and we have much pleasure in asking you. Sir, to give publicity 
to the following facts and accompanying appeal : — 

" On June i6th the London Devonian Association gave a 
' send-off ' dinner to Captain Robert Scott, who is a native of 
Devon, on the eve of his ship, the Terra Nova, leaving England. 

" In acknowledging the toast of his health and the hearty 
good wishes of the company for the success of his spirited enter- 
prise. Captain Robert Scott referred to the financial side of his 
undertaking, and mentioned that, whilst he had received 
assistance from practically every county in the kingdom to 
supplement the grant from the Government, he had not so far 
sought aid from his native county. Captain Scott added that 
he was chiefly concerned about the fund which it was necessary 
to complete in order that during the absence of the expedition 
a proportion of the wages of the crew should be paid to their 
wives and children left at home. At the present moment this 
fund was not as large as it should be by something like £8,000. 

" Later in the evening the chairman. Earl Fortescue, announced 
that Captain Scott's statement with respect to the fund had 
come as a surprise, but the committee had at once held an 
impromptu meeting, and he was now authorized to state that a 
subscription list would be immediately opened with a view of 
augmenting the fund for the purpose in question, and ^t was 
confidently anticipated that Devonians in Devonshire as well as 
Devonians in London and in other parts of the country would 
gladly contribute. A considerable sum was immediately 



The Devonian Year Book, 1911 37 

promised from those present, including Earl Fortescue (the Lord 
Lieutenant of the county) and Lord Clifford of Chudleigh ; and 
since then other public and representative county gentlemen 
have sent us donations. This preliminary subscription list 
embraces the names of Earl Fortescue, Lord Clifford of Chudleigh, 
Viscount Sidmouth, Lord Northcote, G.C.M.G., G.C.LE., Hon. 
W.F.D. Smith, Admiral Sir W. H. Fawkes, K.C.B., Admiral R. F. 
Hammick, Engineer Vice-Admiral Sir H. J. Oram, K.C.B., Sir 
Thomas Acland, Sir Charles H. Radford, M.P., Sir W. A. Ferguson 
Davie, Sir Thomas Hewitt, K.C., Major Clive Morrison Bell, M.P., 
Colonel Lucius Carey, Colonel E. T. Clifford, V.D., Messrs. F. L 
Lyons and Co., A. G. Duncan, Esq., J. P., S. Sanders Stephens. 
Esq., D.L., M. B. Snell, Esq., J.P., J. B. Burlace, Esq., J. C, 
Pillman, Esq., J. P., R. P. Chope, Esq., B.A., Sydney Simmons, 
Esq., J.P. 

" The committee are now anxious that this appeal should be 
regarded as applying to Devonians generally, whether resident 
in their native county or elsewhere. It is unnecessary for us 
to emphasize the claims of this fund, the object of which must 
surely come home very strongly to the heart of every Devonian ; 
for, whilst uncertainty as to the ultimate result of this daring 
enterprise must of necessity for a time hang over it, there should 
be at least the one certainty connected wdth it — viz., that the 
families of the brave men under Captain Scott should be 
adequately provided for in any event. 

" Cheques or postal orders should be made payable and sent 
direct to the hon. treasurer of the London Devonian Association, 
Mr. H. B. Squire, manager of the London, County, and West- 
minster Bank, Wood Street, E.C. ; or, in cases where a fund 
may be opened by the Mayor or chairman of the local council, 
to the local hon. treasurer. 

We are. Sir, yours faithfully, 

E. T. Clifford, Chairman of the London Devonian 
Association. 

H. B. Squire, Hon. Treasurer of the London 
Devonian Association. 

John W. Shawyer, Hon. Secretary of the London 
Devonian Association. 

5, Hemington Avenue, Friern Barnet, N., 

July igth. 

Devonians have ever been to the front in the field of Polar 
exploration. The pioneer of English voyages of discovery was 



38 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Steven Borough,* of Northam, who in 1553 was master of the 
Edward Bonaventure, that attempted, under the command of 
Sir Hugh Willoughby, the North-East Passage to Cathay (China). 
He it was who named the North Cape, discovered Muscovy 
(Russia), and on a subsequent expedition attempted to reach the 
great river Ob, and actually passed through " Borough's Straits " 
(now known as Kara Gate) into the Kara Sea. The latitude 
that he reached would not now be considered a very high one — 
it was not, in fact, higher than that of the North Cape — but a 
generation passed away before it was exceeded, and then by 
another Devonian, John Davis, of Sandridge, in the western 
hemisphere, in an attempt to discover a north-west passage to 
India. 

In three voyages made in the years 1585, 1586, and 1587 John 
Davis surveyed the western coast of Greenland as far north as 
Sanderson's Hope (72° 12' N.), and the coast of Labrador; he 
explored the sea known as Davis Strait, and he discovered the 
three great openings to the west, now known as Cumberland 
Sound, Frobisher Bay, and Hudson Strait. In the words of Sir 
Clements R. Markham : " His true-hearted devotion to the 
cause of Arctic discovery, his patient scientific research, his 
loyalty to his employers, his dauntless gallantry and enthusiasm, 
form an example which will be a beacon-light to maritime 
explorers for all time to come." 

In the southern hemisphere the great discovery of the most 
southerly point of the American continent was made by our 
Devonian hero — Sir Francis Drake — on Oct. 28th, 1578. Driven 
southwards by a storm that lasted fifty-two days, he reached 
" the uttermost cape or headland, standing near in 56 deg., 
without which there is no main nor island to be seen to the 
southwards, but the Atlantic Ocean and the South Sea (the 
Pacific) meet in a most large and free scope." " In his exultation 

* The following is the inscription on a small brass plate over his grave 
in~"Chatham Church : " Here lieth buried the bodie of Steven Borough 
who departed this hfe ye xijth of July in ye yere of our lord 1584, and 
was borne at Northam in Devonshire ye xxvth of September 1525, he in 
his life time discovered Muscovia by ye Northerne sea pa.ssage to St. 
Nicholas (Archangel) in the yere 1553 : At his settinge foorth of England 
he was accompanied with two other shippes, Sir Hugh Willobie beinge 
Admirall of ye fleete, who with all the Company of ye said two shippes 
were frozen to death in Lappia (Lapland) ye same winter. After his 
discoverie of Roosia and ye Coastes there to adioynnige, to wit Lappia 
Novazemla and theCountrie of Samoyeda &c. : hee frequented ye trade to 
St. Nicholas yerlie as chief e pilot for ye voyage, untill he was chosen for 
one of ye foure principall masters in ordenarie of ye Queen Matis. royall 
Navy, where in he continued beinge imployed as occasion required in 
charge of sondrie sea services till time of his death." 



II 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



39 



he landed on the farthest island, and walking alone with his 
instruments to its end, he laid himself down, and with his arms 
embraced the southernmost point of the known world." 

On January ist, 1903, Captain Robert F. Scott carried the 
British flag to 82° 17' S., the highest southern latitude then 
attained, but this record has since been beaten by his companion, 
Sir Ernest Shackleton, who in 1909 reached the latitude of 88° 
23' S. — only a little more than 100 miles from the South Pole. 
This point Captain Scott now hopes to reach, and the hearty 
good wishes, not only of his fellow Devonians, but also of all 
patriotic Britons, will accompany him in his gallant attempt to 
plant the British flag at the Pole itself. 

First List of Subscriptions. 

The Right Hon. Earl Fortescue 

The Right Hon. Lord Northcote, G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., C.B. 

The Hon. W. F. D. Smith 

Michael B. Snell, Esq., J. P. 

Sir C. Thomas Dyke Acland, Bart. 

Lady Markham 

The Right Hon. Viscount Sidmouth 

The Right Hon. Lord Chfford of Chudleigh 

Sir Thomas Hewitt, K.C. 

J. B. Burlace, Esq. 

R. Pearse Chope, Esq. 

J. C. Pillman, Esq., J. P. 

Alderman C. Pinkham, J. P. 

Sir William H. White, K.C.B. .. 

Colonel Lucius Gary . . 

S. Sanders Stephens, Esq., D.L. 

Western Morning News, Co., Ltd. 

Engr. Vice- Admiral Sir Henry J. Oram, K.C.B. . . 

Colonel E. T. Chfford, V.D. 

Admiral Sir Wilmot H. Fawkes, K.C.B., K.C.V.O. 

Sir Charles H. Radford 

J. Carpenter Garnier, Esq. 

Society of Devonians in Bristol 

John Yeo, Mayor of Plymouth 

F. A. Edelsten & Co., per The Daily Graphic 

Sir W. A. Ferguson-Davie, Bart., C.B. , . 

A. F. Bernard, Esq. . . ^ . . 

A. G. Duncan, Esq., J. P. 

Admiral R. Hammick., 

Professor T. A. Hearson, M.Tnst. C.E. 

Frank I. Lyons & Co. 

Masonic Lodge Friendship, No. 202, Devonport . . 

Isaac Pearse, Esq., J. P. 

A. Edmund Spender, Esq., Ex-Mayor of Plymouth 

Swansea Devonian Society 

Lt.-Col. W. Raleigh Trevelvan, per The Daily Graphic 

Mrs. A. Chettleburgh . . ' . . 

^'Drake's Drummer" .. 



£ 


s. 


d. 


10 


10 





10 








50 








20 








10 








10 








5 


5 





5 


5 





5 


5 





5 


3 





5 


3 





5 


3 





5 


5 





5 








5 








5 








5 








3 


3 





3 


3 





2 


2 





2 


2 





2 


2 





2 


2 





2 


2 





2 




































































































_^I98_ 


M 






40 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Sir Clements R. Markham, K.C.B., F.R.S., wrote : " Lady 
Markham desires me to forward to you a cheque for £10 as her 
subscription to the Scott Antarctic Fund of the London Devonian 
Association. Lady Markham is a Chichester of Arlington, co. 
Devon, and a friend of Captain Scott. I have already sub- 
scribed £100 to the Scott Antarctic Expedition, but Lady 
Markham wishes to subscribe as a Devonian." 

The contribution from " Drake's Drummer " was accom- 
panied by the following interesting letter : " My sister and I 
have the honour of descent on one side from a gentleman- 
adventurer who sailed round the world with Drake, and on the 
other from a Devon captain who ' together with those five stout 
gentlemen, his sons,' had manned and officered and armoured 
a ship to add to their town's gift against the Armada. We wish 
we could offer towards the Scott Expedition Fund more than 
this postal order and our good wishes." 

Further subscriptions will be gratefully received by the Hon. 
Treasurer, Mr. H. B. Squire, London, County, and \\^estminster 
Bank, 90, Wood Street, E.C. 



King Edward VII 
Devon County Memorial Fund. 

Resolutions passed at the Public Meeting held by the Lord- 
Lieutenant of the County of Devon at the Castle of Exeter, on 
the 6th October, 1910 :— 

1. " That subscriptions be invited from all Devonl\ns 
towards a Memorial to his late Majesty King Edward VI L : the 
contributions so received to be devoted to directly benefiting 
the Sick Poor of the County. 

2. " That all subscriptions so obtained form a Fund to be 
called 'The King Edward VI L Memorial Fund,' and such 
Fund shall be administered by the Council of * The Devon 
Queen Victoria Commemoration Fund,' it being an instruction 
to the Council to allocate such portion of this Fund as they think 
ht in support of District Nursing Associations within the 
County, which are affihated to the Queen Victoria Jubilee 
Institute for Nurses, and in Combating Tuberculosis within 
the County." 

Subscriptions should be sent to the Hon. Treasurer, T. Snow, 
Esq. (Union of London and Smith's Bank, Exeter), or the Clerk 
to the Lieutenancy (H. Ford, Esq., 25, Southernhay, Exeter). 



1 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 41 



/ 



Devon to Me ! 

A SONG OF THE WEST COUNTRIE. 
Words by John Galsworthy. Music by Clifford Courtenay. 

Composed for, and dedicated by permission to, the President, 
Vice-Presidents , and Members of the London Devonian Association, 
and sung for the first time by Mr. Wilfrid Piatt, at the Associa- 
tion's Complimentary Dinner to Captain Robert F. Scott, 
C.V.O., R.N., at the Hotel Cecil, on Thursday, 16 June, 1910. 

Where my fathers stood watching the sea, 
Gale-spent herring-boats hugging the lea. 
There my mother lives — moorland and tree. 
Sight o' the blossom ! Devon to me ! 

Where my fathers walked, driving the plough, 
Whistling their hearts out — ^Who whistles now ? 
There my mother burns fire-faggots free. 
Scent o' the wood-smoke ! Devon to me ! 

Where my fathers sat passing their bowls — - 
They've no cider now — God rest their souls ! 
There my mother feeds red cattle three. 
Taste o' the cream pan ! Devon to me ! 

Where my fathers sleep, turning to dust. 
This old body throw when die 1 must ! 
There my mother calls, wakeful is she ! 
Sound o' the y^est wind ! Devon to me ! 

Where my fathers he, when I am gone, 
Who need pity me dead ? Never one ! 
There my mother clasps me. Let me be ! 
Feel o' the red earth ! Devon to me ! 

Published by Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew, Ltd., by kind permission 
of the Author and the Daily Mail. 



42 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



Prominent Living Devonians. 

(Compiled from " Who's Who.") 

The list of " The Worthies of Devon " that appeared in the 
London Devonian Year Book for 1910 (pp. 39-90) was compiled 
from the '' Dictionary of National Biography," which does not 
include any persons who have died since Queen Victoria. It 
was intended to continue this list of deceased " worthies " in 
the present number, but it has been found necessary to postpone 
its publication for another year, and in the meantime a list is 
given of prominent living Devonians, who are regarded, or 
who regard themselves, as candidates for inclusion in a subse- 
quent edition of the great work. The present index list has 
been compiled from the pages of '' Who's Who," to which refer- 
ence should be made for further details. The definition of 
" Devonian " remains as before, that is, it includes those whose 
father or mother was a native of Devon, those who were born 
in the County, though not of Devonian parents, and those who 
have lived at least ten years in the County. A list compiled 
in this way must necessarily be imperfect, but the editor will 
be glad to receive additions or corrections to be embodied in 
any future issue. If it appears to be of sufficient interest, it 
is possible that such a list may form a permanent feature of the 
Year Books. 

Abbott, Lieut. -Colonel Frederick ^^llliam, D.S.O. ; New Zealand 

Defence Forces ; b. Devon, 1865. 
Abell, Westcott Stile, M.Inst. N.A., Professor Naval Architecture, 

Liverpool University ; h. Exmouth, 1877. 
Ackland, ^^'illiam Alfred, managing Editor " Daity Graphic " ; 

h. Plymouth, 1875 ; mar. Mabel Frederica, dau. of John F. 

Lethbridge, of Plymouth. 
Acland, Rt. Hon. Arthur Herbert Dvke, P.C, M.A., LL.D. ; 

3rd son of Rt. Hon. Sir T. D. Acland, 11th Bart. ; h. 13 Oct., 

1847. 

Acland, Sir Charles Thomas Dyke, 12th Bart., M.A., J.P., D.L., 
Killerton, Exeter ; 1st son of Rt. Hon. Sir T. D. Acland, 
11th Bart.; h. 16 July, 1842; mar. Gertrude, dau. of Sir 
John W. Walrond. 

Acland, Francis Dyke, late Financial Secretary of War Office ; 
son of Rt. Hon. A. H. D. Acland ; h. 1 March, 1874. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 43 



rAcland, Reginald B. D., K.C., Recorder of Oxford, Judge- 
Advocate of the Fleet ; 6th son of Sir Henry W. Acland, 1st 
Bart. (b. Killerton) ; h. 18 May, 1856. 
Acland, Theodore Dyke, M.A., M.D., F.R.C.P., Physician to St. 
Thomas's Hospital ; 3rd son of Sir Henry W. Acland, 1st 
Bart. (b. Killerton) ; b. 14 Nov., 1851. 

Acland, Admiral Sir Wilham AUson Dyke, 2nd Bart., C.V.O., 
J. P. Devon ; 1st son of Sir Henry W. Acland, 1st Bart. 
(b. Killerton) ; b. Oxford, 18 Dec, 1847. 

Addington, Hon. Gerald Anthony Pellew Bagnall ; Up-Ottery ; 
1st son of 3rd Viscount Sidmouth ; b. 29 Nov., 1854. 

Anderson, Rt. Rev. E. A. See Riveiina, Bishop of. 

Angel, Capt. T. Lumbard, D.S.O. ; b. Torquay, 10 Jan., 1867. 

Applln, Capt. Reginald V. K., D.S.O. ; 1st son of Capt. Vincent 
Jesson Applin ; b. Alphington, 11 April, 1869. 

Baird, Mrs. Edith Elina Helen, '' Queen of Chess " ; dau. of 
T. Winter Wood, of Hareston. 

Baker, Andrew Clement (Arthur Clements), literary editor of 
" Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News " ; b. Heavitree, 
1842. 

Baldry, Alfred Lys, artist ; son of Alfred Baldry, of Bourne- 
mouth ; b. Torquay, 1858. 

Balfour, Col. John Edmond Heugh, D.S.O., J. P., Devon, Lieut. - 
Col. Royal 1st Devon Imperial Yeomanry ; son of George 
Edmond Balfour, of Sidmouth ; b. 1863. 

Balfour, Major Kenneth Robert, J. P. Dorset ; 2nd son of George 
Edmond Balfour of Sidmouth ; b. 1863. 

Bampfylde, Hon. George ^^'entworth Warwick ; 1st son of 3rd 
Baron Poltimore ; b. 23 Sept., 1882. 

Baring, Hon. Cecil, brother and heir presumptive of 2nd Baron 
Revelstoke ; son of 1st Baron and Louisa Emily, dau. of 

John Bulteel, of Lyneham ; b. 12 Sept., 1864. 
Baring, Lieut. -Col. the Hon. Everard, C.V.O. ; 3rd son of 1st 

Baron Revelstoke ; b. 5 Dec, 1865. 
Baring, Hon. Hugo, banker ; 6th son of 1st Baron Revelstoke ; 

b. 6 Oct., 1876. 

Baring, Hon. Maurice, journaHst and author ; 4th son of 1st 
Baron Revelstoke ; b. 1874. 

Baring-Gould, Rev. Sabine, M.A., J. P., author ; son of Edward 
Baring-Gould, Lew-Trenchard ; b. Exeter, 28 Jan., 1834. 



44 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Barnes, Major Reginald \\'alter Ralph, D.S.O. ; son of Preb, 

R. H. Barnes, of Stoke Canon ; h. 13 April, 1871. 
Barry, John Arthur, journaHst ; Sydney ; b. Torquay, 1850. 

Bartlett, Sir Herbert Fogelstrom, Kt., I.S.O., Commissioner of 
Inland Revenue ; son of G. T. Bartlett, Plymouth ; h. 1847. 

Barttelot, Sir Walter Balfour, 3rd Bart. ; son of 2nd Bart, and 
Georgiana Mary, dau. of George E. Balfour, of Sidmouth ; 
h. 22 March, 1880. 

Bastard, Rev. William Pollexfen ; son of Edmund PoUexfen 
Bastard, M.P. ; h. 12 Jan., 1832 ; mar. Caroline, dau. of 
Admiral Woollcombe. 

Batson, Col. Herbert, C.B. ; Stoke Rivers; h. 22 Oct., 1854. 

Baulkwill, Rev. WilHam Robert Kellaway ; United Methodist 

Church; h. Shebbear, 28 May, 1860. 
Belfield, Henry Conway, C.M.G., Resident of Selangor ; 1st 

son of John Belfield, of Primley Hill, South Devon ; h. 1855. 

Bellamy, Sir Joseph Arthur, Kt., J. P. ; Mayor of Plymouth 
1901-2 ; h. 6 Sept., 1845 ; mar. Susan Wills, dau. of WilHam 
Saul Wills, of Plymouth. 

Beresford, His Honour Cecil Hugh W., County Court Judge ; 

Wear Gifford. 
Besley, Rev. Walter PhiUp, M.A., Minor Canon, Librarian, and 

Junior Cardinal of St. Paul's ; h. Barnstaple, 10 Feb., 1870. 
Bickford, Admiral Andrew Kennedy, C.M.G. ; 2nd son of ^^^ 

Bickford, of Newport House, South Devon ; h. India, 16 July, 

1844. 
Blakeney, Capt. Robert Byron Drury, D.S.O., Deputy General 

Manager Egyptian State Railways ; son of William Blakeney, 

R.N., of Westward Ho ; h. 18 April, 1872. 

Body, Rev. George, D.D., Canon of Durham ; h. Cheriton 

Fitzpaine, 7 Jan., 1840. 
Boles, Rev. Richard Henry, Canon of Truro ; son of Rev. James 

Thomas Boles, of Exmouth ; h. 30 March, 1855 ; mar. 

Florence Lucy, dau. of Admiral Edward Phillipps Charlewood, 

of Port Hill, North Devon. 
Bond, Rt. Hon. Sir Robert, P.C, K.C.M.G., LL.D., Premier and 

Colonial Sec, Newfoundland ; son of John Bond, of Torquay ; 

h. 25 Feb., 1857. 

Bone, Rev. Frederic James, M.A., Canon of Truro ; son of 
Allan Belfield Bone, solicitor, and Jane Anne, dau. of John 
Scobell, of Holwell, Tavistock ; h. 1844. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 45 

Berwick, Sir Robert H., Kt., J. P. ; son of George Borwick, 

of Morven, Torquay ; h. 2\ Jan., 1845. 
Bosworth, Colonel William John, Founder and. Principal of 

Roehampton Military College ; h. Stoke, Devonport, 1858. 

Bovey, Henry Taylor, F.R.S., D.C.L., LL.D., late Rector of 
Imperial College of Science and Technology ; h. Devon. 

Bowring, Edgar Alfred, C.B. ; son of Sir John Bowring ; /;. 
26 May, 1826. 

Bowring, Lewin Bentham, C.S.L, J. P. Devon ; 3rd son of Sir 

John Bowring ; h. Hackney, 15 July, 1824. 
Boyce, Rev. Canon Francis Bertie, Rector of St. Paul's, Sydney ; 

h. Tiverton, 6 April, 1844. 

Boyle, Rev. Wm. Skinner, Preb. of Exeter ; h. 17 Feb., 1844. 

Brown, Frederick, LS.O., late Principal Clerk, Admiralty ; son 
of Joseph Brown, Devonport ; h. 27 Nov., 1843. 

Bucknill, Hon. Sir Thomas Townsend, Judge of the High Court ; 
2nd son of Sir J. C. Bucknill, F.R.S., of Exeter ; h. 18 April, 
1845. 

Buzacott, Charles Hardie, Consulting Editor of '' Daily Mail," 
Brisbane ; son of James Buzacott, of Great Torrington ; h. 
3 Aug., 1835. 

Calgary, Bishop of, Rt. Rev. William Cyprian Pinkham, D.D., 
D.C.L. ; son of Wilham Pinkham, T.eignmouth ; h. 1844. 

Carpenter-Garnier, John, M.A., D.L., J. P. ; only son of John 
Carpenter, of Tavistock ; h. 28 Feb., 1839 ; mar. Hon. Mary 
Louisa, dau. of 19th Baron Clinton. 

Cator, John, J. P. ; 1st son of Albemarle Cator and Mary Moles- 
worth Cordelia, dau. of C. A. Mohun-Harris of Hayne ; h, 
24 Sept., 1862. 

Cave, Sir Charles Daniel, 1st Bart., D.L., J.P. ; 3rd son of Daniel 
Cave, of Sidbury ; h. 17 Sept., 1832. 

Chanter, Hon. John Moore, M.H.R., J. P., AustraHa ; son of 
John Chanter of Bideford^ and Elizabeth Moore, Devon ; b. 
Adelaide, 11 Feb., 1845. 

Chichester, Lt.-Col. Arlington Augustus, D.S.O. ; son of Major- 
Gen. J. O. Chichester, of Chudleigh ; h. 2 July, 1863. 

Chichester, Sir Edward George, 10th Bart., Tieut. R.N. ; Barn- 
staple ; h. 22 Jan., 1883. 

Clarke, Rev. S. J. Childs, Minor Canon of St. Paul's Cathedral ; 
son of Rev. S. Childs Clarke, of Thorverton ; h. 18 Jan., 1876. 

Clayden, Arthur William, M.A., Principal of Royal Albert 



46 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Memorial College, Exeter ; b. Boston, Lincolnshire, 12 Dec, 

1855. 
Clifford of Chudleigh, 9th Baron, Lewis Henry Hugh Clifford, 

B.A., D.L. ; h. 24 Aug., 1851. 
Clifford, Ethel (Mrs. Fisher Wentworth Dilke), authoress ; dau. 

of W. K. Clifford, F.R.S., of Exeter. 
Clifford, Hon. WiUiam Hugh ; brother and heir presumptive of 

9th Baron Clifford of Chudleigh ; h. 17 Dec, 1858. 
Clinton, 21st Baron, Charles John Robert Hepburn-Stuart- 

Forbes-Trefusis, D.L., J.P. ; h. 18 Jan., 1863. 
Coleridge, 2nd Baron, Bernard John Seymour Coleridge, Judge 

of the High Court; Ottery St. Mary; h. 1851. 
Coleridge, Christabel Rose, novelist ; dau. of Rev. Derwent 

Coleridge ; b. Chelsea, 1843. 
Coleridge, Ernest Hartley, M.A., author ; son of Rev. Derwent 

Coleridge ; b. 8 Dec, 1846 ; mar. Sarah Marj^, dau. of William 

Bradford, Newton Abbot. 
Coleridge, Hon. Geoffrey Duke ; onl}^ son of 2nd Baron Cole- 
ridge ; b. 23 July, 1877. 

Coleridge, Hon. Gilbert James Duke, M.A., Assistant Master 
Crown Office, Royal Courts of Justice ; son of Lord Chief- 
Justice Coleridge ; b. London, 15 Feb., 1859. 

Coleridge, Lt.-Col. Hugh Fortescue, D.S.O. ; son of Rev. F. J. 
Coleridge, of Cadbury; Tiverton ; b. l\ Jan., 1859. 

Coleridge, Hon. Stephen, M.A., artist, author ; son of Lord 
Chief -Justice Coleridge ; &. 31 May, 1854. 

Collier, Hon. John, artist ; 2nd son of 1st Lord Monkswell ; 
b. London, 27 Jan., 1850. 

Collier, John Francis, Judge of County Court, Liverpool ; 4th 
son of John Collier, of Plymouth ; b. Plymouth, 19 June, 1829. 

Collings, Rt. Hon. Jesse, P.C, M.P. ; son of Thomas CoUings, 
Littleham-cum-Exmouth ; b. 1831. 

Cook, Theodore Andrea, M.A., F.S.A., author and journalist ; 
b. Exmouth, 28 March, 1867. 

Cornish, Rev. Ebenezer Darrel, President of United Methodist 
Free Churches, 1898 ; son of John Lawrence Cornish, of 
Launceston ; b. Exeter, 7 March, 1849. 

Cornish, Rt. Rev. J. R. See St. Germans, Bishop of. 

Cornish, Vaughan, D.Sc, F.G.S., F.C.S., F.R.G.S. ; son of 
Rev. C. J. Cornish, and grandson of C. J. Cornish, D.L., J. P., 
of Salcombe Regis ; b. Debenham, Suffolk, 22 Dec, 1862. 



I 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 47 

Cornwall, Sir Edwin, Kt., M.P., L.C.C., D.L., J.P. ; 2nd son of 

Andrew Cornwall, of Lapford. 
Coryndon, Robert Thorne, Resident Commissioner for Swazi- 
land ; son of Selby Coryndon, of Plymouth ; h. Oueenstown, 

Cape Colony, 2 April, 1870. 
Couchman, Rev. Reginald Henry, M. A., Principal of Diocesan 

Training College, Exeter ; son of Rev. Henry Couchman, of 

Haileybury College ; h. 20 June, 1874. 
Courtenay, Col. Edward Reginald, C.B. ; 1st son of Major G. H. 

Courtenay, of Kenton ; h. 1853. 
Courtenay, Hon. and Rev. Henry Hugh ; 2nd son of Henry 

Reginald, Lord Courtenay ; h. \ Aug., 1872. 
Courtney, Rt. Rev. Frederick, D.D., Rector of St. James's, 

New York ; son of Rev. S. Courtney, of Charles, Plymouth ; 

h. Plymouth, 1837. 
Cowie, Capt. Henry Edward Colvin, D.S.O. ; son of H. G. Cowie, 

of Tiverton ; h. 17 Dec, 1872. 
Crabbe, Herbert Ernest, Secretary of the Positivist Society ; 

son of William Glanville Crabbe, of Briclestowe ; Z^. 1 1 Feb., 1867. 
Crediton, Bishop of, Rt. Rev. Robert Edward Trefusis, Canon of 

Exeter ; 2nd son of Capt. Hon. George Walpole RoUe 

Trefusis, R.N. ; h. Wear Gifford, 24 Jan., 1843. 
Croft, Sir Alfred Woodley, K.C.I.E., J.P. ; son of C. W^ Croft, 

Plymouth; h. 1841. 
Cummings, William Hayman, Mus.D., F.S.A., Hon. R.x\.M. ; 

late Principal Guildhall School of Music ; h. Sidbury, 22 Aug., 

1831. 
Dangar, Rev. James George, V.D., D.D., Preb. of Exeter ; b. 

London, 20 Nov., 1841. 
D'Arcy, William Knox, son of William Francis, of Newton Abbot, 

and Elizabeth Baker, dau. of Rev. Robert Bradford, of 

Wolborough; h. 11 Oct., 1849. 
Davey, Henry, M.Inst.C.E., F.G.S., engineer ; son of Jonathan 

Davey, Lew Trenchard ; h. 1843. 
David, Rev. Albert Augustus, M.A., Head Master of Rugby 

School ; son of Rev. William David, Priest Vicar of Exeter 

Cathedral ; h. Exeter, 19 May, 1867. 
Davie, Major Arthur Francis Ferguson-, CLE., D.S.O. ; son of 

Sir W. A. F. Davie, of Crediton , h. \\ July, 1867. 
Davie, Sir William Augustus Ferguson-, 3rd Bart., C.B., M.A. ; 

Creedy Park, Crediton ; 2nd son of Sir H. Ferguson-Davie^ 
1st Bart. ; b. 13 April, 1833. 



^8 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



Davies, Major Charles Henry, D.S.O. ; son of Maj.-Gen. F. J. 

Davies, of Teignmouth ; b. 20 Nov., 1867. 
Davy, Richard, F.R.C.S., F.R.S.E. ; son of John Croote Davy, 

of Chulmleigh; h. 1838; mar. Edith, dau. of George Cutdiffe, 

of Witheridge. 
Derry, Captain Arthur, D.S.O. ; son of Wilham Derry, of 

Houndiscombe, Plymouth ; h. 14 Oct., 1874. 
Desborough, Maj.-Gen. John, C.B. ; 2nd son of Henry Des- 

borough, of Pilton ; h. 24 Jan., 1824. 

Deshon, H. F., late Resident of Sarawak ; son of Rev. H. C. 

Deshon, of East Teignmouth ; h. West Ashton, \\'ilts, 24 

April, 1858. 
Devon, 14th Earl of, Charles Pepys Courtenay ; grandson of 

13th Earl ; h. 14 July, 1870. 

Dobson, Henrv Austin, LL.D., F.R.L.S., author ; h. Plymouth, 

18 Jan., 1840. 
Douglas, Sir Robert Kennaway, Kt., Prof, of Chinese, King's 

College, London ; late Keeper of Oriental Books at British 

Museum ; son of Rev. Philip W. Douglas ; h. Devon, 23 Aug., 

1838. 
Doveton, Frederick Bazett, author ; son of Capt. Doveton, 

Royal Madras Fusihers ; h. Exeter, 1841. 

Dowell, Admiral Sir William Montagu, G.C.B., D.L., J. P. ; 

Bideford ; 2nd son of Rev. W. Dowell, of Holme Lacy ; h. 
2 Aug., 1825. 

Drake, Sir Francis George Augustus Fuller-Elliott-, 2nd Bart. ; 

Nutwell Court, Exeter ; only son of Capt. Rose Henry Fuller, 

R.N. ; h. 1837. 
Drummond, Sir James Hamlyn Wilhams-, 4th Bart, C.B. ; 

Lord-Lieut, of Carmarthen ; son of 3rd Bart, and dau. of 

Sir James Hamlyn Wilhams, 3rd Bart. ; h. Clovelly, 13 Jan., 

1857. 
Duke, Henry Edward, K.C., Recorder of Devonport ; h. near 

Plymouth, 1855. 
Dunn, Albert Edward ; 1st son of Wilham Henry Dunn, J. P., 

of Exeter ; h. 13 Feb., 1864. 

Dunning, Sir Edwin Harris, Kt., J. P. Devon ; Stoodleigh ; son 
of Richard Dunning, of Exeter ; h. 8 April, 1858. 

Durston, Sir Albert John, K.C.B., late Engineer-in-Chief R.N. ; 

&.^Devonport, 25 Oct., 1846. 
Earle, Rt. Rev. Alfred. See Marlborough, Bishop of. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 49 



iEasterbrook, James, M.A., Chairman Federal Council of Second- 
ary Schools' Associations ; h. Dean Prior, 1851. 
Ebrington, Viscount, Hugh William Fortescue ; 1st son of 4th 
Earl Fortescue ; ^.14 June, 1888. 
Edgcumbe, Sir Edward Robert Pearce, Kt., LL.D., J. P., D.L., ; 
son of Edward Pearce, of Somerleigh, Dorchester, and Clara 
Jane, dau. of Rev. Canon Palmer, of Great Torrington ; 
representative of the Lamerton branch of the Edgcumbes of 
Edgcumbe, near Tavistock ; &. 13 March, 1851. 

Edmonds, Rev. Walter John, B.D., Canon of Exeter Cathedral ; 
b. Penzance, 6 Oct., 1834. 

Edwards, Capt. WilUam Frederick Savery, D.S.O. ; son of Rev. 
N. W. Edwards, of Dowland, near Dolton ; h. 27 July, 1872. 

Ellis, Sir Herbert Mackay, K.C.B., LL.D., F.R.C.S., J.P. ; 2nd 
son of John Ellis, of Chudleigh ; b. 5 May, 1851 ; may. Mary 
Lily Grace, dau. of George Ellicombe, of Chudleigh. 

Elwes, Maj. Lincoln Edmund Cary, D.S.O. ; 3rd son of R. J. C. 
Elwes, of Wahand Car}^ near Bideford ; b. 10 June, 1865. 

Eve, Hon. Sir Harry Trelawney, Kt., Judge of the High Court ; 

Bovey Tracey ; b. London, 13 Oct., 1856 ; mar. Beatrice 

Wright, dau. of H. Strangwells Hounsell, M.D., of Torquay. 
Exmouth, 5th Viscount, Edward Addington Hargreaves Pellew ; 

Canonteign ; son of 4th Viscount ; 6. 12 Nov., 1890. 
Follett, Sir Charles John, Kt., C.B., B.C.L., M.A. ; son of John 

Follett, of Countess Wear ; b. 1838. 

Follett, Colonel Robert Wilham Webb ; 1st son of Sir Wilham 
Webb Follett, M.P., of Culm Davy ; b. 1844. 

Follett, Capt. Spencer, 7th Dragoon Guards ; only son of Charles 
Follett, C.B. ; b. near Exeter, 27 July, 1866. 

Foote, John Alderson, K.C., Recorder of Exeter ; 1st son of 
Capt. John Foote, R.N. ; b. Plymouth, 15 Dec, 1848. 

Fortescue, 4th Earl, Hugh Fortescue, Lord-Lieut, of Devon ; 

Castle Hill North Devon ; 1st son of 3rd Earl ; b. 16 April, 

1854. 
Fortescue, Colonel Hon. Charles Granville, C.M.G., D.S.O. ; 

6th son of 3rd Earl Fortescue ; b. 30 Oct., 1861. 

Fortescue, Hon. John Wilham, M.V.O., Librarian at Windsor 
Castle ; 5th son of 3rd Earl Fortescue ; b. 28 Dec, 1859. 

Fortescue, Capt. Hon. Seymour John, R.N., C.M.G., K.C.V.O. ; 
2nd son of 3rd Earl Fortescue : b. 10 Feb., 1856. 



50 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Foulerton, Alexander Grant Russell, F.R.C.S., Sanitary Medical 

Officer and Bacteriologist to Middlesex Hospital ; 1st son of 

Capt. Alex. Foulerton, H.M. Indian Navy ; h. Exeter, 22 

April, 1863. 
Foweraker, A. Moulson, B.A., R.B.A., artist ; only son of Rev. 

E. T. Foweraker, Priest- Vicar of Exeter Cathedral ; h. 1873. 
Francis, Augustus Lawrence, M.A., Head Master of Blundell's 

School, Tiverton ; h. Hurley-on-Thames, Berks., 16 Jan., 1848. 
Froude, Ashley Anthony, G.M.G., B.A., J. P. Devon ; only son 

of James Anthony Froude ; h. 28 June, 1863. 
Froude, Robert Edmund, C.E., F.R.S. ; 3rd son of WilUam 

Froude, C.E., F.R.S. ; h. Devon, 22 Dec, 1846. 
Furneaux, Very Rev. WilHam Mordaunt, D.D., Dean of Win- 
chester ; 1st son of Rev. W. D. Furneaux, of Swilly, Devon ; 

h. 29 July, 1848. 
Furse, John Henry Monsell, sculptor ; 1st son of Charles Wel- 
lington Furse, of Halsdon, Archdeacon of Westminster ; 

h. 6 March, 1860. 
Furse, Rt. Rev. M. B. See Pretoria, Bishop of. 
Furse, Lieut-Col. William Thomas, D.S.O. ; son of Archdeacon 

of Westminster ; h. 21 April, 1865. 
Garratt, Col. Francis Sudlow, C.B., D.S.O. ; 1st son of Rev. 

Sudlow Garratt, of Merifield, Devonport ; h. 18 June, 1859 ; 

mar. Frances Lucy, dau. of Col. Troyte, of Huntsham Court, 

Devon. 
Garratt, Lieut.-Col. John Arthur Thomas, D.L., J.P., Capt. 

1st Devon Yeomanry Cavalry ; Master Devon Foxhounds ; 

h. 1842. 
Garvice, Charles, author ; late of Bradworthy. 
Garvice, Capt. Chudleigh, D.S.O. ; son of Charles Garvice, of 

Bradworthy ; h. 12 Jan., 1875. 
Gerrans, Henry Tresawna, M.A., F.R.A.S., F.C.S., F.S.A. ; 

Fellow of Worcester College, Oxford ; Sec. to Delegates of 

Local Exams. ; h. Plymouth, 23 Aug., 1858. 
Gervis, Henry, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.S.A., J.P., Consulting Physician 

to St. Thomas's Hospital ; 1st son of F. S. Gervis, J.P., of 

Tiverton; h. 1837. 
Gifford, Charles Edwin, C.B. ; late Paymaster-in-Chief, R.N. ; 

h. Milton Abbot, 8 April, 1843. 
Gill, Allen, F.R.A.M., musician ; h. Devonport. 
Glanville, Ernest, author ; parents both Devonians ; h. Wynberg, 

South Africa, 1856. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1911 51 

Godwin-Austen, Lieut-Col. Henry Haversham, F.R.S., F.Z.S., 

F.R.G.S., J.P. ; 1st son of Robert A. C. Godwin- Austen, F.R.S. 

h. Teignmouth, 6 July, 1834. 
Gosse, Edmund, LL.D., author. Librarian to House of Lords ; 

only son of P.,H. Gosse, F.R.S. , of Torquay; h. London, 21 

Sept., 1849. 
Gould, Alec Carruthers, R.B.A., artist ; 1st son of Sir F. C. 

Gould ; h. ^^ oodford, Essex, 17 March, 1870. 

Gould, Edward Blencowe, LS.O., Consul at Alexandria ; son 

of Rev. John Nutcombe Gould ; h. Stokeinteignhead, 1847. 
Gould, Sir Francis Carruthers, Kt., caricaturist ; 2nd son of 

R. D. Gould, architect ; h. Barnstaple, 2 Dec, 1844. 
Granville, Rev. Sub-Dean Roger, M.A. ; lived in Devon since 

1878 ; son of Bernard Granville, of Wellesboume, Warwick ; 

h. 6 Feb., 1848. 

Gratwicke, Major George Frederick, V.D., journaUst ; h. Broad- 
cast, 24 March, 1850. 

Gribble, Francis Henry, author ; h. Barnstaple, 1862. 

Haggerston, of Haggerston, Sir John de Marie, 9th Bart. ; 1st 
son of 8th Bart, and Sarah, dau. of Henry Knight of Axminster ; 
b. Axminster, 27 Nov., 1852. 

Hale, Lieut. -Col. George Ernest, D.S.O. ; 1st son of G. W. Hale, 

of Paignton ; h. 13 June, 1861. 
Halsbury, 1st Earl of, Hardinge Stanley Giffard, F.R.S., M.A., 

P.C., J. P., late Lord Chancellor ; son of Stanley Lees Giffard, 

LL.D. (descended from the Giffards of Halsbury and Bright- 

leigh, Devon) ; h. London, 3 Sept., 1825. 

Hammick, Col. Sir St. Vincent Alexander, 3rd Bart. ; h. Devon, 

10 April, 1839. 
Harris, Charles, B.A., Asst. Financial Sec, War Office ; 2nd son 

of John Harris, of Iv^^bridge. 
Harris, James Rendel, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D. ; h. Plymouth. 
Harrison, Mary St. Leger (Lucas Malet), novelist ; dau. of 

Charles Kingsley ; h. Eversley Rectory ; mar. Rev. William 

Harrison, Rector of Clovelly (d. 1897). 

Head, Ernest, News Editor, '' Pall Mall Gazette " ; son of 
Rev. A. T. Head, of Ford, Devonport. 

Heath, Francis George, author; h. Totnes, 15 Jan., 1843. 

Heathcoat-Amory, Sir John Heathcoat, 1st Bart., D.L., J.P. ; 
son of Samuel Amory, of Homerton, and Anne, dau. and co-heir 
of John Heathcoat, of Bolham, Devon ; h. 4 May, 1829. 



52 The Devonian Year Book, 1911 

Heaven, Rev. Hudson Grosett, M.A., Lord of the Manor of 

Lundy ; son of W. H. Heaven, of Lundy ; h. 1826. 
Heberden, Charles Buller, M.A., Principal of Brasenose College, 

Oxford ; son of Rev. W. Heberden, of Broadhembury ; h. 

1849. 
Heberden, WilHam Buller, C.B., J. P. Devon, late Sec. of Inland 

Revenue Dept. ; son of Rev. W. Heberden, of Broadhembury ; 

h. 6 July, 1838. 

Hedgeland, Rev. PhiHp, Preb. of Exeter ; son of Samuel L. 

Hedgeland, of Exeter ; h. 1825 ; mar. Lucy H., dau. of 

Thomas Furlong, of Exeter. 
Hodge, Frederick Webb, author ; h. Plymouth, 28 Oct., 1864. 

Holley, Major-Gen. Edmund Hunt, J. P. Devon, Lord of the 
Manor of Okehampton ; 4th son of J. H. Holley, of Okehamp- 
ton ; h. 24 May, 1842. 

Holt, Colonel William John, C.B. ; h. Plymouth, 14 Jan., 1839. 

Hooper, Major Richard Grenside, D.S.O. ; h. Plymouth, 8 Nov. 
1873. 

Hoskin, John, LL.D., K.C., D.C.L., one of the Governors of 
University of Toronto ; h. Holsworthy, May, 1836. 

Hunt, Maj.-Gen. Robert Augustus Carew, J. P. Devon ; Sal- 
combe Regis ; son of Henry Carew Hunt, of Stoke Gabriel ; 
h. Hamburg, 1838. 

Iddesleigh, 2nd Earl of, Walter Stafford Northcote ; Pynes, near 
Exeter ; h. 7 Aug., 1845. 

Ilbert, Sir Courtenay Peregrine, K.C.B., K.C.S.I., CLE., Clerk 
of the House of Commons ; h. 12 June, 1841. 

Inglefield, Brig.-Gen. Norman Bruce, C.B., D.S.O. ; son of Rear- 
Admiral V. O. Inglefield ; h. Devonport, 6 Dec, 1855. 

Jackson, Frank Stather, Assistant Judge of the Mayor's Courts ; 
son of J. H. Jackson, of SaUsbury ; h. Torquay, Nov., 1853. 

Jackson, George, F.R.C.S., J.P. ; Plymouth ; h. 23 Aug., 1843. 
Jackson, Rev. Percival, M.A., Preb. of Exeter ; living in Devon 

since 1871 ; h. Sheffield, 1845. 
Jane, Fred. T., author ; 1st son of Rev. John Jane, of Upottery ; 

h. 6 Aug., 1870. 
Johnston, Rev. J. O., M.A., Principal of Cuddesdon Theological 

College ; son of Rev. George Johnston and Elizabeth, dau. 

of James Gordon Morgan, M.D., of Barnstaple ; h. Barnstaple, 

1 Nov., 1852. 



1 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 53 

Julian, Lieut. -Col. Oliver Richard Archer, C.M.G. ; son of Capt. 

Thomas Archer Julian, of Ivybridge ; h. 26 July, 1863. 
Kane, W. F. de Vismes, D.L., J.P., M.R.I.A., F.E.S., author ; 

h. Exmouth, 1840. 
Karslake, Sir WiUiam Woollaston, Kt., K.C. ; 1st son of Rev. 
W. H. Karslake, J.P. Devon, and Preb. of Exeter ; h. 10 June, 
1834. 
Kekewich, Sir George William, K.C.B., D.C.L., J. P., late Sec. of 
Board of Education ; 4th son of S. T. Kekewich, of Peamore, 
Exeter, and Louisa, dau. of Lewis WilHam Buck, of Hartland ; 
h. 1 April, 1841. 
Kekewich, Maj.-Gen. Robert George, C.B. ; 2nd son of Trehawke 

Kekewich, of Peamore, Exeter ; h. \1 July, 1854. 
Kekewich, Trehawke Herbert, Recorder of Tiverton ; 1st son 
of Trehawke Kekewich, of Peamore, Exeter \ h. \\ July, 1851. 
Kennaway, Rt. Hon. Sir John Henry, 3rd Bart., C.B., P.C. ; 

Ottery St. Mary ; h. 1837. 
Kenney, Colonel Arthur Herbert, C.M.G., D.S.O. ; 2nd son of 

Capt. E. H. Kenney, R.N. ; h. Plymouth, 4 Jan., 1855. 
Kernahan, Coulson, author ; 1st son of Dr. James Kernahan, 

M.A., F.G.S. ; h. Ilfracombe, 1 Aug., 1858. 
Kingsford, Charles Lethbridge, M.A., F.S.A., F.R.Hist.S., Asst. 
Sec. of Board of Education ; 3rd son of Rev. Sampson Kings- 
ford, of St. Hilary, Cornwall, and Helen, dau. of \Mlliam 
Lethbridge, of Kilworthy, Tavistock ; b. Ludlow, 25 Dec, 
1862. 
Kinloch, Maj.-Gen. Alexander Angus Airlie, C.B., D.L., J.P. ; 
1st son of Colonel John Grant Kinloch, of Logic and Kilrie ; 
h. Sidmouth, 27 Dec, 1838. 
Kirkwood, Col. Carleton Hooper Morrison, D.S.O. ; son of J. T. 

Kirkwood, of Yeo Vale, Bideford ; h. 4 Feb., 1860. 
Kirkwood, Captain John Heneley Morrison, J. P., M.P. ; only son 

of J. N. Kirkwood, of Yeo Vale, Bideford ; h. 1877. 

Knowling, Hon. George, Leader in Upper House, Newfoundland ; 

h. Exeter, 15 Sept., 1841 ; mar. Elizabeth Upham, of Silverton. 

Knowling, Rev. Richard John, D.D., Canon of Durham and 

Professor of Divinity ; 1st son of Preb. Knowling, of ^^^ellington, 

Somerset ; h. Devonport, 16 Sept., 1851. 

Lambert, George, M.P., Civil Lord of the Admiralty ; h. Devon, 

25 June, 1866. 
Lane-Jackson, Nicholas, sporting author ; son of Nicholas 
Lane- Jackson (old South Devon family). 



54 The Devonian Year Book, 1911 

Langley, Madame Beatrice (Beatrice Cordelia Auchmuty Langley 

— Mrs. Basil Tozer), violinist ; 1st dan. of Colonel W. S. 

Langley ; h. Chudleigh. 
Langman, Sir John Lawrence, 1st Bart. ; son of Joseph Langman, 

of Plymouth and London ; h. 24 June, 1846. 
Lethbridge, Lieut.-Colonel Sir Alfred Swaine, K.C.S.L, J.P. ; 

son of W. F. Lethbridge, of Woolborough, and Susan, dau. 

of Robert Swaine, of Musbury ; h. Tirhoot, Bengal, 30 Sept., 

1844. 
Lethbridge, Sir Roper, K.C.LE., D.L., J.P., Lord of the Manor 

of Exbounie ; h. Devon, 23 Dec, 1840. 

Lilly, \^'illiam Samuel, M.A., J. P., author ; 1st son of William 
Lilty, of Windout House, near Exeter ; h. 10 July, 1840. 

Lindsay, Leonard Cecil Colin, F.S.A., Private Chamberlain to 
the Pope ; Sec. of the New Gallery, Regent Street ; 4th son 
of Hon. Colin Lindsay, of Honiton ; h. 23 June, 1857. 

Llewellyn, Colonel Evan Henry, D.L., J.P. ; son of L. Llewellyn, 
of Buckland Filleigh ; h. 1847. 

Lockyer, Nicholas Colston, I.S.O., Acting Comptroller of Cus- 
toms, Australia ; son of Edmund Lockyer, of Wembury ; h. 
Sydney, 6 Oct., 1855. 

Lopes, Sir Henry Yarde BuUer, 4th Bart., J.P. ; Roborough ; 

only son of 3rd Bart, and his 1st wife Bertha, dau. of 1st Lord 

Churston ; h. 1859. 
Lowe, George Shortland, sporting author ; 2nd son of Peter 

Stanley Lowe, of Churchstow, Devon ; h. 1840. 

Lyte, Sir Henry Churchill Maxwell-, K.C.B., M.A., F.S.A., 
Deputy Keeper of the Records ; son of J. W. Maxwell-Lyte, 
of Berry Head, Devon ; h. London, 29 May,' 1848. 

McKenzie, Marian, F.R.A.M., singer and teacher; 1st dau. of 
Capt. Joseph McKenzie ; h. Plymouth ; mar. Richard Smith 
Williams. 

Mallet, Claude Coventry, C.M.G. ; 3rd son of Hugh Mallet, of 
Ash, Devon ; h. 20 April, 1860. 

Mallock, \\. H., author ; son of WlUiam Mallock, of Cockington, 

and 1st dau. of Ven. R. H. Froude, Archdeacon of Totnes. 
Marker, Richard, D.L., J.P. Devon ; son of Rev. T. J. Marker. 

of Gittisham ; h. 10 Aug., 1835. 
Marlborough, Bishop of, Rt. Rev. Alfred Earle, D.D., Dean of 

Exeter ; son of Henry Earle, F.R.C.S., Surgeon in Ordinary 

to Queen Victoria ; h. 1827. 



\ 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 55 



I Martin, George Peter, C.B., R.N., J.P. ; 2nd son of John Martin, 
R.N.. of Stoke Damerel ; h. 10 Oct., 1823. 
Martin, John, journalist ; h. Devon, 2 Oct., 1847. 
Martyr, Lieut. -Col. Cyril Godfrey, D.S.O. ; son of Joseph 
Martyr of Stoke Fleming ; h. 5 Aug., 1860. 
May, Col. William Allan, C.B. ; h. Devonport, 18 Sept., 1850. 
Mellor, Rt. Hon. John William, P.C, D.L., K.C. ; 1st son of 
Rt. Hon. Sir John Mellor, of Otterhead, Devon, Judge of 
the High Court ; b. London, 26 July, 1835. 

Michel], Hon. Sir Lewis, Kt. ; Director British South Africa Co. ; 
son of John Michell, of Ilfracombe ; h. Plymouth, Aug., 1842. 

Mildmay, Francis Bingham, M.P., J.P. ; 1st son of H. B. 
Mildmay, of Flete, Ivybridge ; h. London, 26 April, 1861. 

Miles, Alfred Henry, I.S.O., Collector of Customs, etc., for 
Jamaica ; 3rd son of George Miles, of Budleigh Salterton ; 
h. 15 July, 1855. 

Morley, 4th Earl of, Edmund Robert Parker, J.P. ; Saltram, 
Plympton ; h. 19 April, 1877. 

Mowbray, Sir Robert Gray Cornish, 2nd Bart., D.L., J.P. ; 
1st son of 1st Bart. [h. Exeter) ; h. London, 21 May, 1850. 

Nation, \A'illiam Hamilton Codrington, Lord of the Manor of 
Rockbeare ; h. Exeter, 1843. 

Norcock, Vice-Admiral Charles James ; 2nd son of Commander 
John Henry Norcock, R.N. ; h. Plymouth, 30 Sept., 1847. 

Norris, \Mlliam Edward, novelist ; Torquay ; son of Sir William 

Norris, Chief Justice of Ceylon. 
Northcote, 1st Baron, Henry Stafford Northcote, G.C.M.G., 

G.C.I.E., C.B. ; late Governor-General of AustraUa ; 2nd son 

of 1st Earl of Iddesleigh ; h. 18 Nov., 1846. 

Northcote, Rev. the Hon. John Stafford, Hon. Chaplain to the 

King, Preb. of St. Paul's ; 3rd son of 1st Earl of Iddesleigh ; 

h. London, 3 Jan., 1850. 
Northcote, Lady Rosalind Lucy, authoress ; 1st dau. of 2nd 

Earl of Iddesleigh ; h. Dec, 1873. 
Odgers, William Blake, LL.D., K.C. ; son of Rev. W. J. Odgers, 

Unitarian minister ; h. Plymouth, 15 May, 1849. 
Oram, Engineer Rear-Admiral Sir Henry J., K.C.B. ; Engineer- 

in-Chief of the Navy ; son of J. J. Oram, Plymouth ; h. 1858 ; 

mar. Emily Kate, dau. of J. Bardens, Plymouth. 
Owen, James George, journalist ; Exeter ; b. 29 Aug., 1869. 



56 The Devonian Year Book, 1911 

Palmer, Capt. Arthur Percy, D.S.O. ; son of J. T. Palmer, of 

Seaton ; b. 4 Sept., 1872. 
Parr, Robert John, Director of National Society for Pre\^ention 

of Cruelty to Children ; b. Torquay, 12 April, 1862. 
Parsons, Maj.-Gen. Sir Charles, K.C.M.G., C.B., F.R.G.S. ; 1st 

son of John Parsons, of Ringmore, Shaldon ; b. 9 May, 1855. 
Paterson, WilHam Bromfield, F.R.C.S., L.D.S., dental surgeon ; 

son of William Paterson, of Stockland. 
Peek, Sir Wilfrid, 3rd Bart. ; Rousdon ; b. 9 Oct., 1884. 
Perring, Rev. Sir Phihp, 4th Bart. ; Exmouth ; 6. 15 July, 1828. 
Peters, Maj.-Gen. William Henry Brooke, J. P. ; 1st son of 

W. H. Peters, of Harefield, Lympstone, Devon; b. \\ Nov., 

1842. 

Phillpotts, Capt. Arthur Stephen, R.N., J.P. ; 2nd son of Henry 
Phillpotts, of Torquay, grandson of Henry Phillpotts, late 
Bishop of Exeter ; b. Torquay, 13 Oct., 1844. 

Phillpotts, Eden, novelist ; 1st son of Capt. Henry Phillpotts ; 
b. Mount Aboo, India, 4 Nov., 1862. 

Phillpotts, James Surtees, M.A., B.C.L. ; son of Archdeacon of 
Cornwall, and Louisa Buller, of Downes, Crediton ; grandson 
of Henry Phillpotts, late Bishop of Exeter. 

Pilditch, Phihp Edward, L.C.C., architect; b. Plymouth, 1861. 

Pine-Coffin, Major John Edward, D.S.O. ; 1st son of J. R. 
Pine-Coffin, of Portledge, Bideford ; b. 24 Dec, 1866. 

Pinkham, Rt. Rev. W^ C. See Calgary, Bishop of. 

Pitman, Charles Edward, CLE., F.R.G.S. ; only son of Capt. 

J. C. Pitman, R.N., of Guildford ; b. Plymouth, 14 May, 1845. 
Pole, Sir Edmund Reginald Talbot de la, 10th Bart. ; Shute, 

Axminster ; ist son of 9th Bart. 
Poltimore, 3rd Baron, Coplestone Richard George \^^arwick 

Bampfylde, D.L., J.P. ; Poltimore, Exeter, and North 

Molton ; b. 29 Nov., 1859. 

Ponsonby, Rev. S. G., M.A., Preb. of Exeter; son of Capt. 
Charles Ponsonby. 

Porter, Brig.-Gen. Thomas Cole, C.B., J.P. ; son of Rev. E. J. 

Porter, of Welcombe, Devon ; b. 3 Aug., 1851. 
Portsmouth, 6th Earl of, Newton Wallop, D.L., J.P., F.S.A. ; 

Eggesford ; b. 19 Jan., 1856. 
Pretoria, Bishop of, Rt. Rev. Michael Bolton Furse, M.A. ; 4th 

son of Charles \\'ellington Furse, of Halsdon, Archdeacon of 

Westminster. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 57 

BadcliiTe, Major Jasper Fitzgerald, D.S.O. ; son of W. C. Rad- 

cliffe, of Warleigh ; h. 18 Aug., 1867 ; mar. Emily Maude, 

dau. of Rev. E. C. Orpen, of Starcross. 
Radford, Sir Charles Horace, Kt. ; 3rd son of George David 

Radford, of Plymouth ; h. 31 May, 1854 ; mar. Bessie, dau. 

of William May, of Devonport. 
Radford, Edward, A.R.W.S., artist ; 4th son of William Radford, 

of Buglawton, Cheshire ; h. Devonport, 22 April, 1831. 
Radford, George Heynes, M.P., J. P. ; 1st son of George 

David Radford, of Plymouth ; h. 1851 ; mar. Emma Louise, 

dau. of Daniel Radford, J. P. 
Ravenscroft, Edward William, C.S.I., J. P. ; Torquay ; h. 1831 ; 

mar. Laura Stanfell, dau. of T. B. Sanders, of Exeter. 
Raymont, Thomas, M.A., Vice-Principal of Training Dept., 

Goldsmiths' College ; h. Tavistock, 27 Sept., 1864. 
Read, Herbert James, C.M.G., M.A. ; Principal Clerk, Colonial 

Office ; son of Charles Read, of Honiton ; h. 17 March, 1863. 
Reichel, Rev. Oswald Joseph, M.A., B.C.L., F.S.A., author and 

antiquary ; Lympstone ; 1st 'son of Rev. Samuel Rudolph 

Reichel, of Ockbrook, Derbyshire ; h. 2nd Feb., 1840. 
Rendel, 1st Baron, Stuart Rendel, J.P. ; 3rd son of James 

Meadows Rendel, F.R.S. (h. near Okehampton) ; h. 2 July, 1834. 
Rendel, Sir Alexander Meadows, K.C.LE. ; son of James 

Meadows Rendel, F.R.S. ; h. 1829. 
Rendell, Rev. Arthur Medland, M.A., Canon of Peterborough ; 

son of Commr. John Rendell, R.N., of Tiverton, and Sophia 

Medland, of Exeter ; h. Steyning, Sussex, 7 March, 1842. 
Revelstoke, 2nd Baron, John Baring, P.C. ; son of 1st Baron 

and Louisa Emily, dau. of John Bulteel, of Lyneham, Devon ; 

b. 7 Sept., 1863. 
Rickards, Rev. Marcus Samuel Cam, F.L.S., poet and naturalist ; 

son of R. H. Rickards, J. P., of Llantrissant, Glamorganshire ; 

h. Exeter, 28 April, 1840. 
Ripper, W., Prof, of Engineering, University College, Sheffield ; 

h. Plymouth, 1853. 
Riverina, Bishop of, Rt. Rev. Ernest Augustus Anderson, D.D. ; 

h. Milton Damerel Rectory, 24 March, 1859. 
Rivers, Ven. Arthur Richards, M.A., Archdeacon of the ^^'ide 

Bay and Burnett, Queensland ; h. Teignmouth, 1858. 
Rogers, Leonard, M^D., B.S., F.R.C.P., F.R.C.S., Prof, of 

Pathology, Calcutta ; son of Henry Rogers, R.N., of Plymouth; 

h. 1868. 



58 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Rothes, 19th Earl of, Norman Evelyn Leslie ; only son of 
Martin Leslie Leslie and Georgina Frances, dau. of H. Studdy, 
of \\'addeton Court, Brixham ; h. 15 July, 1877. 

Rundle, Lieut. -Gen. Sir (Henry Macleod) Leslie, K.C.B., 
K.C.M.G., D.S.O. ; Governor and Commander-in-Chief, 
Malta; 2nd son of Capt. J. S. Rundle, R.N. ; h. Newton 
Abbot, 6 Jan., 1856. 

St. Cyres, Viscount, Stafford Harry Northcote ; only son of 2nd 

Earl of Iddesleigh ; h. 29 Aug., 1869. 
St. Germans, Bishop of, Rt. Rev. John Rundle Cornish, D.D. ; 

b. Tavistock, 7 Oct., 1837. 
Saunders, William, C.M.G., Director of Canadian Experimental 

Farms ; h. Devon, 16 June, 1836. 

Savile, Col. George Walter Wrey, D.S.O. ; Exeter ; son of 
Lieut.-Col. J. W. Savile ; h. 14 March, 1860. 

Savile, Col. Henry Bourchier Osborne, C.B. ; 3rd son of 
Albany Savile, of Oaklands, Devon, and Eleanor Elizabeth, 
dau. of Sir Bourchier Wrey, 7th Bart. ; h. 5 May, 1819. 

Scoble, Rt. Hon. Sir Andrew Richard, K.C.S.L, P.C, K.C. ; 

2nd son of John Scoble, of Kingsbridge ; h. London, 25 Sept., 

1831. 
Scott, Owen Stanley, Curator of Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle ; 

h. Devonport, Sept., 1852. 
Scott, Capt. Robert Falcon, R.N., C.V.O., F.R.G.S. ; h. Outlands, 

Devonport, 6 June, 1868. 

Seaton, 3rd Baron, John Reginald Upton Colborne, D.L., J. P. 

Devon ; Plympton ; h. 4 July, 1854 ; mar. Elizabeth Beatrice, 

dau. of Sir F. G. A. Fuller-Elhot-Drake, 2nd Bart. 
Shelley, Sir John, 9th Bart., D.L., J.P. ; Shobrooke, Crediton ; 

h. 31 Aug., 1848. 
Sherlock, Frederick, author ; 5th son of Thomas Bernard 

Sherlock, of Liverpool ; h. Haberton Ford, Devon, 17 Jan., 

1853. 

Sherwell, Arthur, M.P., author ; son of John Viney Sherwell, 
of Modbury ; h. London, 1 1 April, 1863. 

Sidmouth, 3rd Viscount, ^Mmam Wells Addington, D.L., J.P. ; 

Upottery ; h. Scotsbridge, Rickmansworth, 1824. 
Simmons, Arthur Thomas, B.Sc, author ; 2nd son of Thomas 

Simmons, of Southampton ; h. Devonport, 26 June, 1865. 
Smith, Granville, Master of the Supreme Court ; h. Dartmouth, 

17 May, 1859. 



\ 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 59 

Inow, Philip Chicheley Hyde, CLE. ; 2nd son of Thomas 

]\Iaitland Snow, of Cleve House, Devon ; h. Weirdiff, Exeter, 

17 Oct., 1853. 
ioares, Ernest Joseph, M.A., LL.D., M.P., Lord of the Treasury ; 

Upcott, Barnstaple ; h. 1864. 
lomerset, 15th Duke of, Algernon St. Maur ; Berry Pomeroy ; 

h. 22 July, 1846. 
Soper, H. Tapley-, F.R.Hist. S., City Librarian, Exeter; h. Stoke 

Gabriel, 22 Dec., 1876. 
Spear, John Ward, J.P., M.P. ; Tavistock; h. 1848; mar. dau. of 

John Willcock, of Kingsbridge. 

Spicer, Robert Henry Scanes, M.D. ; 1st son of R. H. S. Spicer, 

M.D., of North Molton ; h. 18 Jan., 1857. 
Spragge, Lieut.-Col. Basil Edward, D.S.O., J. P. ; son of F. H. 

Spragge, J.P., of Paignton ; h. 9 Oct., 1852. 

Spragge, Col. Charles Henry, C.B., J.P. ; son of F. H. Spragge, 
J.P., of Paignton ; h. 8 March, 1842. 

Statham, Rev. George Herbert, Preb. of Exeter ; h. Liverpool, 
3 Sept., 1842. 

Steer, P. Wilson, artist ; Kingsbridge ; b. Birkenhead, 1860. 

Strong, Herbert A., M.A., LL.D., Prof, of Latin, University of 
Liverpool ; son of Rev. Edmond Strong ; h. St. Mary's 
Clyst. 

Strutt, William, R.B.A., F.Z.S. ; h. Teignmouth. 

Stucley, Sir (Wilham) Lewis, 2nd Bart. ; Hartland ; h. 27 Aug., 

1836. 
Tarring, Sir Charles James, Kt., late Chief Justice of Grenada, 

West Indies ; son of John Tarring, architect (b. Holbeton, 

near Plymouth) ; b. London, 17 Sept., 1845. 
Temple, Rev Wilham, M.A. ; son of Archbishop Temple; b. 

Exeter, 15 Oct., 1881. 
Tetley, Ven. James George, D.D., Archdeacon of Bristol ; son of 

James Tetley, M.D., F.R.C.P., and Sarah Anne, dau. of 

Wilham Longmead, of Elfordleigh ; b. Torquay, 6 July, 1843. 

Tiverton, Viscount, Hardinge Goulburn Giffard ; 1st son of 

1st Earl of Halsbury ; b. 20 June, 1880. 
Tozer, Basil John, journalist ; son of John Helh^er Tozer, of 

Teignmouth ; mar. Beatrice Langley (q.v.) 
Tozer, Rev. Henry Fanshawe, M.A., F.R.G.S., author ; only son 

of Capt. Aaron Tozer, R.N., of Plymouth ; b. 18 May, 1829. 



6o The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Trefusis, Col. Hon. John Schomberg, C.M.G., D.L., J. P. ; Bovey 
Tracey ; son of 19th Baron Clinton ; h. 24 June, 1852. 

Trefusis, Rt. Rev. Robert Edward. See Crediton, Bishop of. 

Trelawny-Ross, Rev. John Trelawny, D.D. ; 1st son of Rev. 
William Ross, Canon of Londonderry, and Caroline Matilda, 
dau. of Lieut. Arthur Luce Trelawny Collins, R.A., of Ham, 
Devon ; h. 1852. 

Triscott, Col. Charles Prideaux, C.B., D.S.O. ; son of Joseph 
Blake Triscott, of Plymouth ; b. 2 Sept., 1857. 

Tucker, Lieut. -Gen. Sir Charles, G.C.V.O., K.C.B. ; son of 
Robert Tucker, of Ashburton ; h. 6 Dec, 1838. 

Underdown, Emanuel Maguire, K.C. ; son of Emanuel Under- 
down, of Sidmouth. 

XJpcott, Rev. Arthur Wilham, D.D., Head Master of Christ's 
Hospital ; 4th son of J. S. Upcott, of Cullompton ; h. Cul- 
lompton, 6 Jan., 1857. 

Upcott, Sir Frederick Robert, K.C.V.O., C.S.L, M.Inst.C.E. ; 
2nd son of J. S. Upcott, of Cullompton ; h. 28 Aug., 1847. 

Vanbrugh, Irene, actress ; dau. of Rev. R. H. Barnes, of Heavi- 
tree, Preb. of Exeter ; h. Heavitree ; mar. Dion Boucicault. 

Vanbrugh, Violet, actress ; 1st dau. of Rev. R. H. Barnes, of 
Heavitree, Preb. of Exeter ; h. Exeter ; mar. Arthur Bour- 
chier. 

Vivian, Henry ; h. Corn wood, 1870. 

Vosper, Sydney Cimiow, A.R.W.S., artist ; h. Stonehouse, 1866. 

Walcott, Col. Edmund ScopoH, C.B., D.L, J.P. ; Chudleigh ; 

b. Castle Caldwell, Fermanagh, 1842. 
Waleran, 1st Baron, of Uffculme, Rt. Hon. Sir Wilham Hood 

Walrond, P.C, D.L., J.P. ; b. 26 Feb., 1849. 
Walker, Ernest Octavius, CLE., M.LE.E. ; b. Teignmouth, 

16 July, 1850; mar. Rosa, dau. of Rev. H. C. Deshon, of 

East Teignmouth. 
Waller, Mary Lemon, artist ; dau. of Rev. Hugh Fowler, j\LA. ; 

b. Bideford. 
Walling, Robert Alfred John, journalist; b. Exeter, 11 Jan., 

1869. 
Wallop, ^on. John Fellowes ; Morchard Bishop ; bro. and 

heir pres. of 6th Earl of Portsmouth ; b. 27 Dec, 1859. 
Walrond, Col. Henry, J.P. ; 1st son of Bethell Walrond of Cul- 
lompton ; b. Paris, 9 Nov., 1841 ; mar. Caroline Maud, dau. 

of W. J. Clark, D.L., J.P., of Buckland Tout Saints. 



I 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 61 

Walrond, Hon. W. Lionel Charles, M.P. ; Bradfield, CiiUompton ; 
only son of 1st Baron Waleran ; b. 22 May, 1876. 

Watts, Francis, C.M.G., D.Sc, Imperial Commissioner of 
Agricultm-e for the West Indies ; son of John Watts, of 
Ilfracombe ; h. 1 Nov., 1859. 

Watts, J. W. H., R.C.A., artist-architect ; h. Teignmouth, 1850. 

Whitby, Beatrice Jeanie, authoress ; of Staffordshire family ; 
h. Ottery St. Mary ; mar. Dr. Philip Hicks. 

White, Sir William Henry, K.C.B., F.R.S., LL.D., D.Sc, late 
Director of Naval Construction ; h. Devonport, 2 Feb., 1845. 

White-Thomson, Major Hugh Davie, D.S.O. ; son of Col. Sir 
R. T. White-Thomson, of Broomford ; b. 6 Sept., 1866. 

White-Thomson, Rev. Leonard Jauncey, M.A., Canon of Canter- 
bury ; 3rd son of Col. Sir R. T. White-Thomson, of Broom- 
ford ; b. 1863 ; mar. Hon. Margaret Adela Trefusis, dau. of 
20th Baron CHnton. 

White-Thomson, Col. Sir Robert Thomas, K.C.B., D.L., J. P. ; 
Broomford, Jacobstowe ; 1st son of Robert Thomson, of 
Renfrew ; b. Glasgow, 21 Feb., 1831 ; mar. Fanny Juha, dau. 
of Gen. Sir. H. Ferguson Davie, 1st Bart. 

Williamson, Charles Norris, journalist and author ; son of Rev. 
Stewart Williamson ; b. Exeter, 12 Dec, 1859. 

Wodehouse, Rev. Phihp John, M.A., Preb. of Exeter Cathedral ; 
son of Col. Philip Wodehouse, of Bewdlev, Worcestershire ; 
b. Malvern, 6 Oct., 1836. 

Wreford, George, late Official Receiver in Bankruptcy ; b, 
Exeter, 3 Feb., 1843 ; mar. Susan Annie, dau. of Robert 
Churchward, of Exeter. 

Wreford, Wihiam, J.P., journalist ; b. Exeter, 24 Sept., 1841 ; 
mar. Mary Churchward. 

Wrey, Sir Bourchier Robert Sherard, 11th Bart., D.L., J.P. ; 
Tawstock ; b. Sidmouth, 23 May, 1855. 

Wright, William Henry Kearley, librarian and author ; b. 
Plymouth, 15 Sept., 1844. 

Young, Sir George, 3rd Bart., J. P., late Charity Commissioner ; 
1st son of 2nd Bart., and Susan, dau. of William Mackworth 
Praed, of Bitton, Teignmouth ; b. Cookham, 15 Sept., 1837. 

Young, Sir Wilham Mackworth, K. C.S.I. ; 3rd son of Capt. Sir 
George Young, R.N., 2nd Bart. ; b. 1840. 



62 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



The Map of Devon, 

By G. E. L. CARTER. B.A., I.C.S. 

The following brief notes are not intended to convey a com- 
plete picture of our home county, but to suggest a few of the 
aspects in which the region may be studied. 




R.YEO 



DREWSreiCNTON- 

R.TEICN 

Rngle BridgeJ 

CRANBROOK CASTLE 

R.BOVEY 

DARTMOOR 

(Bonehill Down) 



R.OART 1 

Holne Bridge, 

BUCHFASTLEICH 



^^ 



BOLT HEAD 




CONFIGURATION 



Section from the Foreland to Bolt 
Head, showing the central plain. Verti- 
cal scale twenty, times horizontal scale. 



The County may be 
roughly divided into three 
broad parallel belts, very- 
unequal in area : — 

(4 Northern belt : Ex- 
moor, and the hills sup- 
porting it on the west. " 

(b) Midland plain, with 
no high hills, but deeply 
eroded by countless 
streams. 

(c) Southern uplands, 
including Dartmoor. 

This division is based 
partly on the geology of 
the County, for the '* Dev- 
onian " rocks of South 
Devon are continuous 
with those of North 
Devon, although this is 
not obvious on the sur- 
face, for in early times 
the County participated 
in the earth movements 
which threw up the Pen- 
nine mountains and those 
of South Ireland, taking 
for itself the form of a 
broad trough. 

The south-eastern part 

of the County, i.e., east of 

the lower Exe, was formed 

in reality constitutes a fourth division, in 

" in- 



at a later date, and m reanty constitutes a 

which all the geological features run from north to south, 

stead of from east to west. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 63 

The presence of these two groups of main features give the 
county a great value as a training-ground for the study of land- 
forms. The weakness caused by the arching of the land in 
Carboniferous times led to a great upwelling of plutonic rocks, 
which have been exposed by the denuding action of rain, and 
now stand out as Dartmoor, while the presence of the rocks of 
secondary age in the south-eastern part of the County, not only 
constitutes the most westerly of those broad escarpments which 
run from the south coast to Yorkshire, but, by introducing a 
new trend in the surface features, complicates in an extraordinary 
manner the river system. 

Much of the beauty of the County depends primarily on its 
geological structure. The wooded valleys of the central " plain " 
are a direct result of the hardness of the rocks, which, on account 
of their resistance to erosion by rain, have been cut up into 
small disconnected hills, with sides so steep that ploughing 
operations have become unprofitable. The escarpments of the 
south-east are equahy useless for cultivation by reason of their 
sandy stony soil, and hence the long lines of fir plantations 
which are the main feature of the landscape. Of the glories of 
heather and gorse little need be said ; for who has not seen the 
summer garb of both Exmoor and Dartmoor ? 

One further point is worthy of notice. At the time when the 
chalk deposits of south-eastern England were being laid down 
in a sea which covered the greater part of Europe, Devon dis- 
appeared for a time below the encroaching sea. Everything 
except Dartmoor and Exmoor was reduced to below sea-level, 
and the land was razed as if by a plane. When the sea finally 
receded, the land rose with no inequalities on its surface, save 
only in the north and south. With the exposure of the new 
land-area to atmospheric conditions, a river system was 
immediately formed to carry off the rain, and river channels 
soon dissected the surface. But to this day all the hills are of 
a uniform height, and no hill — in Central Devon — can be seen 
higher than the one on which the observer is standing, thus 
aftording obvious proof of the original levelness of the County. 

THE RIVERS. 

The river system is now so complex that it is at first sight a 
hopeless task to attempt to resolve them into a simple grouping. 
The task becomes easier if we remember certain primary facts, 
viz. : — 

(a) Rivers not only erode their banks, but are continually 
washing away their watersheds. They even eat away gradually 



64 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



the land around their head waters, and ultimately the head 
stream will work its way through this land into the adjoining 
river-basin and divert some of this neighbouring river. The 
process will obviously be facilitated if the underlying rocks at 
the source are comparatively soft. i \ 

(b) In Tertiary times, when the County rose for the last time 
from the sea, the high lands of Dartmoor and Exmoor were the 
natural watersheds of the river system of Devon. 

(c) At this period of emergence the County was level and 




Present River System. 

covered with soft chalky deposits, which had been laid down 
during submergence. 

We may, therefore, construct a hypothetical system in which 
the main stream runs from west to east, with tributaries running 
from the north and the south. 

This system prevailed at a time when the Bristol and Enghsh 
Channels were not yet in existence, and when the main stream 
drained into a branch of the receding " chalk " sea in south-east 
England. With the development of the Bristol Channel, fresh 
streams began to work inwards from the sea, and the Taw and 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



65 



'orridge river-basins began to shape themselves ; while on the 
south the inroads of the English Channel led to the formation 
of the Exe basin. Thus the course of drainage became entirely 
altered, for the main streams now run from north to south, or 
from south to north, while most of the tributaries flow east and 
west. Applying this hypothesis to particular cases, we may in 
this way only explain : — 

{a) The pecuhar shape of the Torridge, which consists of two 
tributaries and a part of the original main stream ; these have 




Original River System (Hypothetical). 



been " captured " by a development of the present lower 
Torridge. 

(6) The relation between the Taw and the Bray, for the Taw 
has " captured " the Bray and the upper Taw, two streams 
flowing in opposite directions as tributaries of the original main 
stream. 

(c) The development of the Exe on the soft clays of south- 
east Devon. The presence of these enabled the Estuary to 
capture successive portions of the original river, on account of 

5 



66 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

the river rapidly wearing down its bed on the clay, and conse- 
quently increasing the " fall " of the bed of its higher streams, 
thus also increasing their erosive power. 

Whether such a hypothetical river existed precisely as the 
accompanying maps suggest is a matter for speculation, but it 
seems that it is only by adopting some such theory that one can 
comprehend the devious ways of the rivers in question. 

HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY. 

One further point remains for discussion : " How far has 
the topography of the County influenced its settlement and 
history ? " 

Of the prehistoric inhabitants of Devonshire only the faintest 
traces occur on the map. A few hut-rings, a few burial mounds, 
and the tale is exhausted. Yet from these, even, we may infer 
that an ancient map of Devon would be the very converse of a 
present-day map. Dartmoor, now devoid of habitation, was 
then dotted with tin-streaming camps — a veritable El Dorado. 
Elsewhere burial mounds are found almost wholly on hill-tops, 
strangely distributed. In the Exe basin, for instance, there are 
very few tumuli ; but on its watersheds there is a succession of 
such tumuh across the County. This seems to suggest that ,. 
prehistoric men chose prominent places for burying their dead, | 
partly for the dignity of the place, partly perhaps as landmarks ' 
or signalling stations ; and that life was centred round the hill- 
tops, both because they were easily fortified, and, though not 
fertile, because they were more easily ploughed than the low- 
lying swamps of undrained valleys. 

The difficulty of entering and conquering the county was 
experienced by both Romans and Saxons. The former race, 
spreading the blessings of civilization with no sparing hand, 
found little to tempt them in Devon. Consequently the map 
shows few traces of Roman work. Exeter and a few miles of 
road, which have been dubbed Roman on account of their 
straightness in a land of winding lanes, are all that now remain. 

The Saxon conquest was more sure and lasting, and it is 
certain that, except for the names of the larger natural features, 
the present map is primarily due to Anglo-Saxon work. At the 
time of reaching Devon the strength of the conquerors had been 
considerably weakened by two centuries of fighting, and also 
apparently by conversion to Christianity. The invasion seems 
to have been carried out by small bodies of well-armed farmers, 
who seized and fortified what lands they could. Their chief 
route seems to have been from Somerset via Tiverton, a fact 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 67 

which explains the number of *' stocks " on the hills to the west 
of that town, where the Saxons stockaded themselves in a hostile 
country. That they were not numerous may also be inferred 
from a comparison of a map of Devon with a map of (say) Oxford- 
shire. In the latter case the map shows typical German 
settlements in large villages, each of which is surrounded ])y 
large areas of agricultural land. In Devonshire, however, the 
whole face of the land is dotted with scattered houses and small 
villages, and generally speaking the hamlet is the real unit of 
settlement. This feature is due not only to the survival of the 
Celts, who lived in smaller groups than the Germans, but also to 
the fact that, owing to disparity in numbers, the Saxons were 
unable completely to evict the original owners of the land. In 
short, the map affords conclusive proof of the overlapping of 
Celtic and Teutonic civilizations. 

With the Saxon conquest the history of the County was only 
begun. Remoteness from the centre of government developed 
an independence and tradition which later led to a clashing with 
the royal power. The first important problem was to come to 
terms with marauding Danes, a problem solved after much fight- 
ing by incorporating the Danish blood with the older stocks, 
for the place-name '' beare " is now taken to represent a Danish 
agricultural settlement. 

To the Norman Conquest, Exeter and the neighbouring 
country offered at first a most determined resistance ; but the 
menacing approach of William I. led the city to seek favourable 
terms, which were granted, perhaps on account of the distance 
of the city from William's base of operations in London, and 
also ot the importance of having a friendly centre in a strange 
and difficult country. Evidence that the country was restless 
ma}^ be found in the appointment of the earliest-known Justice 
of Assize to tour in Devon and Cornwall in 1095. 

During the Middle Ages the County was primarily agricultural. 
Its development was early and complete, for the open-field 
system of cultivation broke down before the 15th century, and 
farm cultivation took its place. Perhaps the system had never 
taken root in the County, but it is to this date or earUer that the 
hedges and lanes must be ascribed, while the mere labour of 
making the hedges shows that there must have been a large 
population and reserve of wealth in the County. 

In the expansion of England in Tudor and Stuart times, 
Devonshire led the van. Circumstances favoured them in this, 
for the County was wealthy, it possessed a large and important 
cloth manufacture, which rivalled that of Norfolk, and it 
possessed a coast, which was not only admirably suited for 



68 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

providing harbours for sailing ships, but which was also the best 
school for sailors. Not only had the Venetians all through the 
Middle Ages called at Dartmouth on their voyages from the 
Mediterranean to the cities of the Hanseatic League, but the 
actual traditions of seamanship had been handed down from at 
least as early as Edward III.'s reign, when the Exe Estuary 
had furnished a small fleet to aid in the French wars, and when 
Chaucer's typical sailor came from Dartmouth. 

The 16th century, then, must be termed the golden age of 
Devonshire, with a culmination of its glory in Elizabeth's reign. 
To this day the parish churches show what extensive alterations 
took place in this period. The wool trade was a mark of great 
economic prosperity, and the churches reflect this. Chantries 
and chapels, windows, bench-ends, tombs — all features which 
beautify the church— still show how grateful merchants con- 
tributed to favouring parish interests. Equally significant are 
the endowments of almshouses and schools at this date. 

In the 17th century the settlement of Newfoundland, and the 
exploitation of its fisheries, contributed further to the wealth of 
the County ; while the ships of the East India Company, from its 
earliest days in 1600, were freighted with Devonshire kersies and 
cloths, which the factors were specially urged to sell, as their 
manufacture was the means of much employment at home, 
particularly at a time when the County not only made the cloth 
but supplied its own wool. During the 18th century the manu- 
facture of wool was hard pressed by competition, and it was 
only by strenuous efforts that it lasted till the Industrial 
Revolution. The century was, however, noticeable for the 
growth in favour of cider as a drink, and the planting of new 
orchards increased the agricultural value of the land to such an 
extent that the farmers claimed exemption from the Cider Tax 
of 1763, on the grounds of having increased the Land Tax. 

With the removal of manufactures to the north after the 
invention of the steam-engine, the County has returned to its 
former agricultural condition. But the advent of the railway 
has added it to the other southern counties as the playground 
of England, and new interests have now been created, which 
depend solely for their prosperity on the geographical peninsular 
position of our Home-land. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 69 



The Rivers of the Moor. 

By CECIL R. M. CLAPP, M.A., LL.M., Late Hon. Secretary 
of the United Devon Association. 

An Epitome of a Lecture delivered at St. Bride Institute, March 22nd, 19 10. 

A SCIENTIST has recently said that water is the finest chisel 
Nature has ever supplied. If he had added snow and frost, sun 
and wind, he would have spoken the whole truth. 

John Trevena, in his inimitable book, '' Furze the Cruel " — and 
every Devonian should possess and read again and again his 
books, commencing with " Arminel of the West," and ending 
with *' Heather," for sweeter Devon talk surely never was written 
^tells of a delightful conversation which took place in Tavy 
Cleave between the little primordial protoplasm in the shape of 
a small piece of jelly, the forerunner of the prehistoric Dartmoor 
man, and the little rain-drops which had been drippetty drapping 
for millions and millions of years, reducing the great mass of 
granite to tors and hills and rivers, and thus tells the same truth 
of the workings of Nature and her great Unseen Creator. 

This article on " The Rivers of the Moor " has been prompted 
by a set of lantern slides and an explanatory lecture presented 
to the now defunct United Devon Association by the late Colonel 
Amery, of Ashburton, illustrative of Devon's grandest inland 
scenery and the effect of countless ages' work of the elements. 

The Editor of the Year-Book has kindly suggested that a 
shorter and more concise account of the rivers than was given 
in the lecture may be of interest to Devonians ; but its shortness 
must detract largely from its value ; while on the other hand, 
it may lead readers to wish to visit the spots, and prior thereto, 
or afterwards, to hear the lecture and see the slides, which are 
at the disposal of all Devonians and secretaries of kindred 
societies.* 

It may be assumed that every Devonian and lover of Devon 
has some knowledge of the main rivers of the County, at any 
rate of their estuaries ; his knowledge may also extend some 
miles inland, but possibly the true enthusiast alone has searched 
them to their source. If so, the latter alone has seen their beauty 
in its fullness, and been able to appreciate the marvellous work- 

* Application should be made to Cecil R. M. Clapp, 2, Bedford Circus, 
Exeter. The only conditions are that care must be taken both in hand- 
ling and packing, to prevent damage, and the carriage must be paid both 
ways. 



70 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



ings of nature, to dwell upon the great ageless history which has 
passed beyond, and to realize the grandeur of the Moor — for to 
a Devonian there is but one Moor — and the " call " of the river. 

The Rivers of the Moor are those which take their rise in the 
higher bogs and great peat deposits on the northern part of the 
Forest of Dartmoor — that great urn and mother of rivers, 
Cranmere. 

These rivers are the Dart, Teign, Tavy, Okement, and TaWy 
the sources or heads of which lie within a small area of about 
two square miles. 



OKEHAMPTON ^^f^^'"^"^'^*".,,,^^ 








^^^^.^roi^ 3^ 


Sticklepath 






j^>—CAsn, . \BCiiTosr--^^ 


%5^ 






/f Ho>.u.u\ r 


^^& — 






jCe^Oon ( 


^'*'^'**=a 






'Jl'wduct V 


iBetetpJe 




1 




f WestM./S'"^/ flSSS'n'' 


\ 5 ,nsUr ""f '*'*J"<="''<'« 


^ r 


' Tor 


S \To» 


THROiyUICH 


W" ^ -^%^^ 


. f ^ 


Y,s Tor 


s r"''" 




BmxSTOWC // *Jr\ Black Mioh V. J 


CIDLtlCH M,rehJL/ \«"* CltAMtlKKM 




T± if ^ 




-'^chacfordX 


; V 


DartH,Oil S 


-•'BatAorthy ( 


MORETON^k^ 


LYDFORO I 


fC 




.^y^ 




^vrx*oyC 




y 


/ Not Tor) 






y 


/ yliillBr^g* 


y^ 


^ 




%\ V\ 


^ 


] 


\ / 


< / 


S^tflr-di;. 


s 


ff)piTCKTAn 


2\1to^5^ / 


] 


« 




3 J 


( 


*V(OECaWB£.)| 




) X 




mTHcmOOH fZ 






\ 


it 




TWoBrui^l^ 


\ 


/ 


^VISTOCK 




K/.^^v?*'"-'''^ 


( 




^ ' Ht>,.crtJ,yBn^^yfs^ 


1^ \ ?^^^^-~' 




f '^^''y'o^tti^ 


fl \/x 




/ 


Bene/. \ ll ^,../ 1 




/ 


Tor 


^US^^^^^fl^ 




SCALE 




9 . . 1 i 


9 a s«. 


" 




*'-f«'^ ASHBU^ONj;?^ 







In describing each, we shall start from the Moor gates, or 
where the Moor proper really begins, and cultivated countr}^ is 
more or less left behind. 

, For traversing the Dart, Ashhurton will be found a con- 
venient centre, and in a walk of 6 J- miles we reach Holne 
Bridge (a.d. 1413), noticing the pot holes near the piers of 
the bridge as an evidence of the working of water in distant 
ages. We here enter the lovelv district of Holne Chase 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 71 

(granted by Edward III. to his daughter, who married Bourchier 
Count D'Eu), and see the river rush through a gorge, above 
which hes Buckland-in-the-Moor. On the left look out for the 
Cleft Rock, and the evidences of ancient tin-mining and smelting 
works. Next observe the rapids caused by a hard band of 
metallic strata stretched across the bed of the river, ending in a 
lovely salmon pit. Here, too, the gigantic Osmunda ferns may 
be seen in all their beauty. Next take a peep at the '' Lover's 
Leap," a high crag on the eastern bank, where the river forms 
an elbow around its perpendicular face — a lovely view up and 
down the river from an eminence 70 feet high. Then passing 
over a quaint little moss-grown bridge, we come to Buckland 
Lodge, a picturesque little rough granite building nestling among 
the trees, the plan of which is stated to have been suggested by 
the artist Turner. Entering the public road we soon come to 
the junction with the Wehhurn,. flowing from Widecombe by a 
deep valley with moss-clad rocks and thick coppice. vStill 
following the Dart, we come again across a ridge of hard metallic 
rock, a continuation of the bar we saw in Holne Chase, here 
forming a ridge up the face of the hill-side, giving a most rugged 
profile, split and tossed about in wild confusion. Often the 
sport of lightning, the rocks are doubtless metallic, and become 
magnetic loadstone, and will reverse the compass. They are 
known as Leigh Tor, having a fine view from the summit of 
the wide valley about New Bridge and the islands in the 
river. Next we come to New Bridge (a.d. 1790), carrying the 
main road from Ashburton to Tavistock, and notice near by 
an extensive bog famous for the richness of the colour of the bog 
plants in summer, and the home of those imps of wickedness, the 
pixies. Entering another deep gorge, where for some distance 
huge water-worn granite boulders of wondrous hue nearly 
choke the stream, which rushes and leaps along, creating the 
" Cry of the Dart," we pass beneath a steep ridge with room only 
for a fisherman's path, and enter on the Moor proper, guarded 
by Sharp Tor, with a small farmstead (Rowbrook) among ancient 
enclosures on its top, and Lucky Tor, another pixie haunt. 

At the next turn we see Lucky Tor from the other side, with 
the long ridge of Benjay or Bench Tor. 

Above, the river widens, and we arrive at the farm of Combe- 
stone, and then that most lovely spot, Dartmeet, where we enter 
the Forest of Dartmoor. Here the East and \\Qsi Dart join. 

Following the West Dart, we cross the old stepping-stones, 
notice the aged oak trees and pixie caves, and observe the lovely 
view down the river with the steep hillside of Yar Tor in the 
distance. Passing on towards Hexworthy, we shall observe, a mile 



72 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

below that hamlet, Week Ford and stepping-stones at a most 
romantic bend in the river, and the remains of very ancient tin- 
smelting works, known as Jews' Houses. Hexworthy Bridge is 
one of the finest of Dartmoor bridges, and close by among the 
fields we shall see tucked away one of the ancient tenements, 
Huccahy. From there we pass on to Two Bridges and the 
Saracen's Head, known to all lovers of Dartmoor for its hospitality, 
and thence on to Princetown, not forgetting to visit Wislman's 
Wood and Crockern Tor. 

Pursuing the East Dart from Dartmouth, we come to Brimpts 
Wood, where the trees were cut which could not be carried away, 
for reasons told in Baring -Gould's " Kitty Alone." \Miere the 
Wallabrook joins the East Dart is a typical Dartmoor scene of 
a small triangle of green grass between the streams, offering a 
tempting attraction to the Moor ponies, with Brimpts Woods 
on the right and Yar Tor in front. At Post Bridge we find the 
finest example of an ancient clapper bridge, which carried the 
pack-horse traffic. Far away up the river we see Sittajord Tor 
just at the parting of the Dart and Teign basins, and near the 
stone arch known as the Grey Wethers, and then we come to a 
head of peat six feet high, with a small pan of water with white 
granite sandy bottom, from which trickles a tiny rivulet of clear 
olive-brown water, and we have hunted the Dart home to its 
cradle among the rushes. 

For the Teign, Chagford should be made our centre, unless 
Murchington, Gidleigh, or Throwleigh, adjacent pretty villages, 
are preferred. Don't forget to visit the old '' Three Crowns " 
hotel at the first named. 

Fingle Bridge and gorge, flanked by Prestonbury and Cranbrook 
Castle, remains of ancient earthworks, will naturally be our 
first place of visit, with the Drewsteignton Cromlech (Spinsters' 
Rock) near at hand. Passing along the fisherman's path we shall 
see Sharp Tor, then Whiddon Park and Hunt's Tor, Sandy Park 
Bridge, Holy Street (alas ! the old mill has perished by fire), 
Leigh Bridge (where North and South Teign join) up the river, 
with Gidleigh Castle and Chase on the right, Batworthy on the left, 
and then the Holed Stone cut by the action of the water, though 
also attributed to Druidical working, and a cure for rheumatism 
and sure harbinger of good luck to those who pass through it 
upwards. Then we come across a very good clapper bridge 
formed by one block of granite, where the Wallabrook joins the 
Teign. 

To the south, across Gidleigh Common, we find the Longstone 
or Menhir, 12 feet high, at the end of a stone avenue, with Castor 
Rock in the background, with its fine rock basin on the summit. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 73 

Striking the South Teign at Fernworthy, across the common we 
find another good clapper, and, a short distance off, Fernworthy 
Circle, 60 feet in diameter, now consisting of twenty-five stones 
with traces of an avenue and cairn. On Assy combe Hill we 
find a cairn, kistvaen, menhir, and stone circle in the wild 
surroundings, rendering this one of the most striking and weird 
scenes on the Moor. On the higher water of the South Teign 
we cross another clapper bridge, 27 feet by 8 feet wide, and 
reach one of the " ancient tenements," used as a shepherd's 
house. On the hill we see Watern or Thirlestone Tor, a fine 
specimen of the effect of weathering and disintegration. 

For the Tavy we have a choice of centres, Tavistock, Peter 
Tavy, Lydford, or Bridestowe. A couple of miles up from Peter 
Tavy we reach the limit of cultivation at Hill Bridge, and a few 
hundred yards above notice the junction of the granite with the 
slate formation. We enter the glorious Tavy Cleave at Wills- 
worthy stepping-stones — part of the Lich way or " Corpse Path " 
from Postbridge to Lydford Church — the great width being to 
permit the bearers and coffin to pass over abreast. An infantry 
camp with rifle range across Willsworthy now nmch detracts, 
during summer months, from the safety and pleasure of this 
trip, but, by observing the signalling-flags, danger may be 
avoided. 

Nat Tor is our first introduction to the tors in the Cleave. 
Then we see Ger Tor ahead, with its waterfall. 

The next turn brings us to a huge mass of boulders brought 
down by successive floods (for which the Tavy is ever famous), 
which shift them downwards from time to time. Passing 
through the Cleave, which must be visited to be realized, we 
find ourselves on a high undulating plateau with deep valleys, 
through which run the tributaries of the Tavy. Broad or Brai 
Tor (also known as Widgery's Cross), carrying a huge granite 
cross to commemorate the late Queen Victoria's 1887 Jubilee, 
is in the distance on the left. Turning north-east we follow an 
ancient trackway over the desolate Moor, and in the distance 
see Fur Tor, surrounded by desolate waste. In this district we 
come across the great peat deposit. We make our way to Cut 
Hill, a pass across the highest peat deposit, visible for miles, 
and so on to Fur Tor, and find ourselves amid 

" Crags, rocks, and stones confusedly hurled — ■ 
The iragments of an earlier world," — 

a very fine group of rocks. From the top we get the finest view 
of the great central Moor and tors and the valley, and of the 
larger rivers running away from Cranmere. 



74 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 ■ 



For the Taw and Okement, Okehampton is the natural centre, 
but Sticklepath and Belstone are equally, if not more, con- 
venient. 

At Sticklepath we have a peep at the Old Bridge at the farther 
end of the village below Cawsand, and at Ladywell with its 
inscribed stone, a Christian monument of the 6th or 7th century. 
Following the Taw up Belstone Gorge, we pass Ivy Tor, and 
reaching Belstone have a charming view down the cleave up 
which we have come. 

Notice the inscribed Celtic cross in the wall near the Rectory, 
and granite posts for the stocks on the green. Don't forget to 
look up " Willum," guide, philosopher, wise man, scholar, manor 
reeve, photographer, and general factotum. Get into an 
argument with him, and egg him on to tell you to " Shake an ass 
and go," meaning, " Have your own opinion on it," a local 
corruption of the French prisoners' " Chacun a son gout " — a 
truly beautiful specimen of corrupted language. 

Taw Marsh is a truly lovely place, full of " worts," and the 
river holding excellent trout. Clamber up to Belstone Tor, 
watch the artillery practice, but beware to keep outside the 
danger screens, and so on up Steeperton and away up to Tawhead, 
whence a military road ('* varmint ") will take you right into 
Cranmere. 

Sticklepath is a good start from which to mount Cawsand. 

The Okement — consisting of East and West — is best visited 
from Okehampton (Oketon). See the Castle, dating from Norman 
times, and the old market. Pass alongside the railway line to 
Meldon Viaduct, under which you follow the West Okement up 
to the Isle of Rocks, a long ridge of boulders around which sweeps 
the river. Notice the dwarf trees on the island. 

Above, the valley widens, and we reach the foot of Black Tor, 
with its copse of dwarf oak trees on the west — a miniature 
^^lstman's Wood. Leaving the river we ascend behind Black 
Tor to Dinger Tor, and get a fine view of Lints (or Lynx) Tor. 
We now have to cross the bog, which takes some care in crossing 
at all times. Jump from hillock to hillock, and beware of 
seemingly safe but treacherous ground. 

Cranmere is now in view, though not easy to strike ; still, a 
careful search will enable you to reach it by this route. Dis- 
appointed you will probably be when you see only a little mound 
of peat, with a zinc box containing a visitors' book, in which you 
must inscribe your name and address, with date, post a letter 
or card, remove those already in the box, and post them at the 
first Government pillar-box you strike. There is no pool ; 
it has drained away, for which the millers of Okehampton are 



The Devonian Year Book, igii 75 

held responsible. Look out for the spirits and ghosts of all evil- 
doers, and listen to their shrieks in anguish, and donH get caught 
in a mist. We make our way back over High Willhays, the 
highest point on the Moor (2040 feet), Yes Tor, West Mill Tor, 
and so back to Belstone — but take care to keep clear of the 
artillery range. Pass down by Watchet Farm, along the East 
Okement, to see the Waterfall and Halslock Woods, and so again 
under the railway line, bending to the left, into Okehampton. 

Thus end our journeyings up the rivers. Illustration by 
slides, or ocular personal demonstration, is needed to make all 
their beauties plain; but if this " bald, uninteresting" chatter 
engenders a longing in those who do not know their beauties, 
to cure that fault, the writer has been well repaid. 

Devon folk are ever hospitable, ever glad to meet other 
Devonians or stranger folk, and many a hearty laugh can be 
had from their store of good tales, made all the more acceptable 
by genuine honest " trade," as their cider and clotted cream — • 
not forgetting the whortleberries — are called. 



Dartmoor. 

I LOVE to tread 
Thy central wastes when not a sound intrudes 
Upon the ear, but rush of wing, or leap 
Of the hoarse waterfall. And oh 'tis sweet 
To list the music of thy torrent-streams ; 
For thou, too, hast thy minstrelsies for him 
Who from their Hberal mountain-urn delights 
To trace thy waters, as from source to sea 
They rush tumultuous. Yet for other fields 
Thy bounty flows eternal. From thy sides 
Devonia's rivers flow ; a thousand brooks 
Roll o'er thy rugged slopes ; — ^'tis but to cheer 
Yon Austral meads unrivall'd, fair as aught 
That bards have sung, or Fancy has conceived 
'Mid all her vain imaginings. \Miilst thou, 
The source of half their beauty, wearest still, 
Through centuries, upon thy blasted brow. 
The curse of barrenness. 

—N. T. Carrington. 



^6 The Devonian Year Book, igii 



The Birds of Our Leas and Estuaries. 

By E. A. S. ELLIOT, M.R.C.S., M.B.O.U. 

Extracts from a Lecture delivered at St. Bride Institute, January 2Sth, 1910. 

Beginning to the eastward of our south coast of Devon — the 
estuary of the Exe — we will work down and so around to the 
north coast. 

Of the twenty-six species of Gulls and Terns that are indigenous 
to Great Britain, or have been obtained as casual visitors, 
twenty-fpur have occurred in our Devonshire estuaries. 

Some of the species are, of course, exceedingly rare visitors to 
our shores. The Great Black-headed Gull of the Mediterranean 
Sea has only occurred once in England, and that was on the 
Exe. The Sabines Gull is also rare, but about ten examples 
have been obtained, two of which I recognized by their forked 
tail and shot, one at Bantham, the other in Start Bay. 

Another black-headed species, and perhaps the commoner 
of our estuarine gulls, is the Black-headed Gull. The black 
head is, of course, the assumption of nuptial plumage. When 
they are most numerous with us, in the winter, they have 
no black head, and it is interesting to watch in the early spring 
the gradual growth of the black hood, which, as soon as com- 
pleted, seems to warn the bird it is time to be off to its breeding 
quarters in the North of England. Thousands of dozens of 
eggs of this bird are sent to the London markets and sold as 
plovers' eggs, and in consequence find a ready sale. '' Where 
ignorance is bhss, 'tis folly to be wise." 

There are some fifty-three species of gulls in the world, and 
these are divided into five genera — one species each as Ross's 
Rosy Gull and the Ivory Gull form separate genera, two each in 
Sabines Gull and the Kittiwake do likewise, the species of the 
Kittiwake in the Old World having black legs, and in the New 
red ; whilst all the remaining species are referred to the 
genus Lams, from which we may gather, I think, that the gulls 
are sprung from some progenitor of rather recent date, i.e. 
geologically speaking recent. The gulls are undoubtedly nearly 
allied to the waders, a fact which was first suggested by the 
similarity of the coloration and the pattern and shape of the 
eggs of the two orders. 

The great point of interest of the Teign estuary to the bird 
lover is that this is the great centre for the Nightingale in Devon. 
If we look through all the records of this species west of the river 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 77 



Axe, we shall quickly see that they are all sporadic or accidental, 
and it is only within the last few years we have definitely ascer- 
tained that here in this valley of the Teign the noted songster 
lias established a permanent breeding haunt, and has become 
known as a summer visitor here for at any rate the last thirty 
years. Any one interested in the matter has only to visit Trusham 
Station in the middle of May, and stand on the platform, and 
very soon he will have nightingales singing all round him, often 
two or three at a time. 

Slapton Ley is far and away the most important of our fresh- 
water sheets of water in Devonshire, and not only affords a 
happy hunting-ground for sportsmen for both fish and fowl, but 
to the botanist, entomologist, and fresh-water mollusc and 
insect scientist. 

Of the number of wild fowl it contains in winter I can hardly 
exaggerate, coot being the bird most in evidence. A few years 
ago I was at one of the annual battues, and although we were 
only four guns, we bagged several hundred of these birds — 2,200 
odcl is, I believe, the record bag for a day — besides various 
wild fowl. 

No doubt the long yellow strip of shingle attracted the 
Pallas's Sand Grouse, when it made its erratic flight from 
Eastern Tartary in 1863, for some specimens were shot at that 
time close to the Sands Hotel. The eccentric migration of this 
species presents a still unsolved problem. They occur in count- 
less flocks on the sandy steppes of Northern China and Thibet, 
and it has been suggested that the flocks that periodically visit us 
are simply crowded out owing to a restricted food supply. 

The Common Bittern is a winter visitor to our leas. In severe 
weather it occurs in tolerable numbers, for in the winter of 1891 
twelve were shot on the Ley. Such useless destruction is 
rendered impossible now by stringent protection. 

On December 19th, 1899, a bittern was shot in Thurlestone 
Ley, much to my regret. Three bitterns were seen on Slapton 
Ley and were not molested — two on the Exe Marshes and one 
on the Tamar. The birds rise heavily like a cochin china fowl, 
thus proving an easy mark to the gunner. The boom of the 
Bittern is well known in the fen country, and it is said when the 
bird utters his note the whole quagmire quakes whereon he 
stands. Burns refers to this when he calls on the feathered 
host to mourn for the loss of his friend : — 

" Mourn, sooty coots and speckled teals, 
Ye fisher herons watching eels : 
Ye duck and drake, wi' airy wheels 

Circling the lake ; 
Ye bitterns, till the quagmire reels, 

Rair for his sake," 



^8 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

We often wish Burns had said more about birds, as he must 
have been a close observer and well acquainted with their habits. 

Naturally I have found great difficulty in compressing my 
remarks about the birds in the Kingsbridge estuary, for, ex- 
cepting very few species, the whole of the Devonian marine 
avi-fauna has been obtained on the fair bosom of its waters or 
along its shores. We must, then, briefly consider a few of its 
most interesting products. 

The broad, spatulate bill of the Spoon-bill instantly proclaims 
its surface-feeding habits, but in the Scooping Avocet we get 
another surface-feeding bird, with a bill so attenuate and so 
utterly unhke that of the Spoon-bill, that it must give pause to 
the most unreflective mind, and make us wonder and admire 
the divine fitness of things that causes a bird's bill, which is 
hand and mouth in one, to be so modified. 

The Wigeon is the commonest wild fowl to be met with in 
our estuaries during the winter months, and any evening they 
may be seen flocking in from the sea, where they have sought 
sanctuary by day, their forms clearly silhouetted against the 
darkening sky. 

The connection of Kingsbridge with the Bernicle Goose is that a 
small flock may sometimes be found harbouring under lee of the 
bar in severe weather. All species of wild geese are amongst 
the most wary and knowing of birds, yet the word goose, as 
applied to men and women, is a term of ridicule ; nor must we 
forget that the grey goose feather winged the deadly cloth-yard 
shafts which on many a hard-fought field against overwhelming 
odds brought victory to the side of England. 
I' Only once in my experience have I had an opportunity of 
collecting golden plover in their full nuptial attire, as they 
generally leave us for their breeding quarters in the north before 
this is attained ; but on the 16th of April, a year or two since, 
I found a large flock of quite 200, pitched right in the middle of 
the marsh, and quite unapproachable in the ordinary way, as 
there was no cover. I thought the matter over, as I was very 
anxious to procure specimens, and as there were some cattle 
grazing near the flock, went boldly amongst them and selected 
what I considered a nice, good-tempered beastie to use as a 
stalking-horse, or rather cow. We got on splendidly for a- time, 
she walking right in the direction of the flock and taking an 
occasional nibble at the grass, but just as we were getting within 
striking distance, without any warning the brute suddenly 
bolted, leaving me the laughing-stock of the birds, which of 
course rose, but after circhng for some time in the air, settled 
in the middle of a large ploughed field on the left of the picture. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 79 



I had to make a wide detour to get to them, and as I had to 
negotiate several hedges and ditches, took my cartridges out, 
careful man that I am. When I got to the field the same 
difficulty occurred : how could I get within gunshot — for they 
were at least ten off any hedge ? I had read they could be 
approached sometimes by walking round them in ever-decreasing 
circles, and I found the plan act admirably, for I got so close that 
I could see their large, clear, limpid eyes quite clearly ; so, 
stifling the qualms of conscience I felt, I pulled both triggers, 
but to my extreme disgust the only result was a click, chck from 
each barrel ; I had forgotten to put my cartridges in again. 
The flock rose, and after being more than an hour on the wing 
settled under a hedge a long way off. Here at last I got on 
terms with them, and secured sufficient specimens to satisfy 
even the most greedy collector. Contrary to what I have seen 
in recently published accounts of this bird's plumage in spring 
obtained in England, these birds were in the pink of perfection, 
not a single white feather being visible in the jet-black breast. 

Thurlestone, with the lea beyond, is famous for its having 
harboured a small flock of Rufe and Reeves in the spring of 
1900. Of course it is the haunt of numerous wild fowl, and 
excellent sport is obtained, especially in stormy weather, when 
the birds cannot keep at sea. It was just off here that I saw a 
pair of adult Smew in the summer of 1897, it being the only 
recorded case of Mergus alhellns visiting Western Europe at 
this season. 

At Milton Lea I realized one of my long-cherished wishes on 
a spring morning, for I shot here a beautiful Blue-headed ^^'ag- 
tail. Just above the Point I made one of the largest shots at 
wigeon with an ordinary twelve-bore gun I ever did. It was 
blowing great guns, and the birds had taken shelter close under 
the lee fence, and as the lea was quite full of water owing to an 
abnormal rainfall, a close approach was obtained, and I picked 
up twenty-two birds as the result of both barrels. 

It was here one day, standing on the beach in one of the 
wildest gales in October that I remember, I watched thousands 
of Grey Phalaropes feeding in the high-running surf. It was 
interesting to see how they would allow themselves to be drifted 
in until the breakers dashed with thundering crash on the shore, 
and float back to the comparatively unbroken water, ever and 
anon a score or so flitting across the sands and seeking shelter 
and food in the leas. As Professor Newton writes in his 
Dictionary of Birds : "A more entrancing sight to the 
ornithologist can hardly be presented than by either the Red- 
necked or Grey Phalarope. Their graceful form, their lively 



8o The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

coloration, and the confidence with which both are famiharly 
displayed in their breeding quarters can hardly be exaggerated, 
and it is equally a delightful sight to watch these birds gathering 
their food in the high-running surf, or when that is done, peace- 
fully floating outside the breakers." 

Another incident connected with the place and at the same 
time, namely, October 14th, 1891, may be quoted here respecting 
one of the parasitic gulls, the smallest of the family, Buffon's 
Skua : — 

" Just as dayhght was waning, with the storm which had been 
blowing continuously for forty-eight hours at its height, a large 
flock of Buffon's Skua suddenly came in from the sea and settled 
on the sands, well out of reach of the incoming tide. They 
appeared quite exhausted and allowed a near approach, getting 
up one by one, flying a short distance, and settling again. Many 
birds were secured, and were found to vary much in plumage. 
Two or three were assuming adult plumage, and one was 
chocolate-brown all over. All the specimens were carefully 
preserved, either mounted or as skins, and sent to various 
interested correspondents, and in response to a wire from the 
Natural History Museum, South Kensington, the stomachs of all 
were examined, as it was suggested they had followed the 
Phalaropes on their migration to prey on them, but no sign of a 
feather could be found ; the stomachs were entirely empty." 

At the mouth of the Avon estuary a white-breasted form of 
the Brent Goose was picked up badly injured a few years ago. 
This form is rare on this side of the Atlantic ; it is the North 
American form. Our form has the belly smoke-grey, whilst 
further east in Russian Siberia we get a form with the belly 
entirely black. You will notice I speak of forms and not species, 
and the point is this, that in Kolguev, where the Samoyedes slay 
their thousands, when the birds are incapable of flight owing to 
having shed their flight feathers, Mr. Trevor Battye found all 
three forms, wdth specimens showing every intergradation 
between them ; so really the Brent Goose consists of one species 
with three forms, modified by geographical distribution. This 
argument applies to scores of other birds, but for the purposes of 
classification it is convenient to regard these distinct forms as 
good species. 

There is one denizen of our leas I had almost forgotten to 
mention, and that is the Reed Warbler. He is a sprightly little 
fellow, with such a sweet note that it would be a sin not to draw 
attention to him. He often sings at night, and on that account 
a curate at Torcross, hearing him whilst burning the midnight 
oil, flew into the Press and recorded there were nightingales at 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 81 



Torcross. They go by the name of Torcross nightingales to this 
day. The nests are artfully woven into the growing reeds, and 
deep enough to keep the eggs from rolling out when swayed by 
the wind. It is a very favourite nest for the cuckoo to deposit 
its egg in. 

Two or three years ago I found a sparrow-hawk's nest in 
Kneighton Wood, and climbed up to it, and found it contained 
five eggs ; then to my dismay I discovered I had left my collect- 
ing-box with cotton-wool at home, so I had to think of some 
way of conveying my treasures to the ground. I packed three 
of them safely away in my handkerchief, but for the life of me 
I couldn't think what to do with the other two, when suddenly 
I remembered that when at school, thirty years ago, I used to 
carry them down in my mouth, but I had quite forgotten the 
fact that I used to take them down one at a time. Before I got 
to the bottom of the tree the inevitable result ensued : one broke, 
and it was addled. Oh ! that mouthful ; I can taste it now. 

A great deal has been written in the Press about the depreda- 
tions of cormorants in tidal waters and rivers, and hideous 
slaughter of these birds at their breeding quarters has been the 
result. The colony breeding in the cliffs near the mouth of the 
Exe was totally exterminated two years ago, over three hundred 
birds having been destroyed at the rate of a shilling a head. 
Execution dire and oft has been meted out to these unfortunate 
birds on other rivers in Devon, but it cannot be too widely known 
that there are two species of cormorant, and this bird, the Green 
Cormorant, has had to pay the penalty in common with the 
sinner, his first cousin, the Black Cormorant. It should be 
known that it is these latter birds that commit most of the 
mischief, for they ascend the rivers even to the heart of Dart- 
moor ; I have had specimens from there, and have sometimes 
found a half-pound trout in their stomachs. The Green 
Cormorant is a truly marine species, and although frequenting 
our estuaries in bad weather, is more often found outside our 
harbours at all times of the year. Both species in Devon breed 
in colonies in the cHffs together, but the Black Cormorant often 
breeds in trees, miles from the sea. The voracity of the 
cormorant is proverbial, which possibly prompted Milton to 
select this bird as emblem of the Evil One — 

" On the tree of life, 
The middle tree, and highest there that grew, 
Sat like a cormorant." 

But all sea birds require a great deal of fish for food, for reasons 
too lengthy to be entered into here, and it is believed every sea 
bird consumes daily its own weight of fish, in the main immature. 

6 



82 The Devonian Year Book, 1911 

Let it be remembered that every trawler that sails from any 
port in Devon destroys at each lifting of the trawl as mucli 
immature fish as would keep a score of cormorants daily ; and 
goodness knows how much more mischief goes on whilst the 
trawl is down on the bed of the ocean. To attribute the scarcity 
of fish to the depredations of this bird, whilst its congeners — the 
gulls, which breed in millions along our cliffs, murres, gannets, 
puffins, etc. — are protected up to the hilt, passes my com- 
prehension. 

As touching the wading birds of our estuaries, there has been 
a noticeable decrease in the numbers entering them as compared 
with a quarter of a century ago, a decrease I am totally at a loss 
to account for. In speaking of these favourites of mine — because 
I have spent so much of my time amongst them — I have found 
great difficulty in selecting a few to represent the large number 
of species to be found in our county, but have picked out those 
that I thought would be most interesting to you. Tradition 
derives the name of the Knot from one of our early kings, who 
is popularly supposed to have had a decided taste for it as a 
table bird, as well as for the edge of the sea — the Latin form, 
Tringa canutiis, from his, the vernacular from the Scandinavian 
form, knot or knud. In the nuptial plumage we seldom see it 
in our estuaries ; but in the autumn it arrives usually in large 
numbers, and is one of the most guileless of birds, for it comes 
from its breeding quarters so far north that the foot of man has 
never trod there, and its egg is still unknown. 

The Kentish plover represents the group of ringed plover, and 
is easily recognized by its interrupted black collar. The ringed 
plovers derive their generic title Mgialitis, a dweller on the sea- 
shore, from ^gialeus, who in heathen mythology was cut to pieces 
by his sister Medea in her flight, and who scattered his remains 
along the seashore. Any one who sees a flock of ringed plovers 
drop in on the sands, and watches them radiating in every 
direction, will recognize the appropriateness of the title. Few 
prettier sights are to be seen than a flock of oyster-catchers 
resting on the sands, with head tucked away amongst their 
dorsal plumage, after they have been driven from their feeding- 
ground by the rising tide. Equally interesting is it to see those 
small birds, dunlin and ringed plover, on the wing, when flocks, 
hundreds strong, present a beautiful sight as they skim along 
over the sands ; at one instant presenting all their pure white 
underparts to view, and in the next, with a simultaneous twist, 
giving' themselves a more sombre appearance as they disclose 
their darker backs and upper wing coverts. 

The Bar-tailed Godwit presents so many features of interest 



I 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 83 

which I fully pointed out in a paper in The Ibis some years ago, 
that I can only touch on two here very briefly. The bird verily 
flits from pole to pole ; for in the breeding season he will be found 
well within the Arctic circle, whilst, the parental duties over, he 
swiftly finds his way as far south as New Zealand. The other 
point is, his congener, the Black-tailed Godwit, is of much more 
sedentary habits, and its whole structure points to this. In 
North America the order of things is reversed ; it is the Black- 
tailed that makes the long migration, and the Marbled Godwit 
is the stay-at-home. Now, how can we account for this ? for 
it is an accepted fact that all of these well-marked families had 
a common progenitor. Why, it is the effect of environment, 
for the more roving species has to find its food according to tide, 
whilst the other seeks it in the ever-present marsh. 

The Turnstone gains its name from the curious way it has of 
turning over the stones and pebbles along the shore in search of 
insects, and it bears this name in almost every language, for it is 
of almost cosmopolitan habitat. They make interesting pets in 
confinement, and one I had soon came to take his food out of my 
hand, though he preferred searching for it underneath the pebbles 
on the floor of the aviary. I gave him his liberty one day on 
the estuary, and for a long while afterwards could call him up 
near the boat by my whistle. The specific title interpres, some 
have thought means that Linnaeus indicated this bird was a 
Warner or explainer to other birds ; but it is a peculiarly silent 
bird ; I think the great naturalist used the word in its broadest 
sense, that of a broker, or one who obtains his living between 
two persons or things. 

When speaking of these beautiful birds, it seems to me a 
remarkable thing that two of what I might call our spiritually- 
sided senses are appealed to by birds more than by any other 
work in the whole of Creation. 

The senses of hearing and of sight are perhaps the most 
cherished of all man's natural gifts, and these are gratified to 
an extraordinary degree by a study of ornithology. 

Even the most casual observer, as he watches the tiny hum- 
ming-bird, with hues so bright and sparkling, that make even 
the lapidary envious, or sees a kingfisher, like a flash, pass 
over the silvery pool, or in the gathering twilight listens to the 
dulcet strains of mavis or of merle, must have borne in upon him 
the truth that there are more things in heaven and earth than 
are dreamt of in his philosophy ; and it is remarkable that we 
seldom find combined those wonderful gifts, beauty of plumage 
and power of song. If a bird has the former, his only notes are a 
hoarse croak ; and if the latter, his plumage is of sombre hue. 



84 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

When we notice the Shorelark in full nuptial attire by the 
open sea, one's mind reverts to the month of May, when the 
hawthorn buds are peeping, when the bluebells carpet our 
woods and smother the primroses in the hedgerows, when the 
cuckoo's loud note fills the verdant combes ; then, as we stand 
on the shimmering sands, with blue sky o'erhead, we may see at 
the edge of the rippling tide the little flocks of sanderling that 
have this morning crossed the Channel, with here and there a 
dunlin, ringed plover, or turnstone in his gay nuptial attire, and 
perhaps a grey plover with his silvery back and jet-black breast, 
running nimbly backwards and forwards with the ebb and flow 
of each wave, whilst out at sea the noisy herring gulls drown 
the heaven-inspired song which faintly reaches us from far above, 
and which we know to be the sweet, love-betokened song of the 
skylark ; whilst ever and anon the laughter-loving shriek of a 
kestrel denotes the merry gambol of the male bird as he dives 
playfully at his mate sitting on her nest in the cliff close by. 

On the further side of the sand-dunes, on the grassy slopes that 
run down to the foot of the Leys, a number of Yellow Wagtails 
are eagerly chasing the flies, whilst the Wheatears jauntily flit 
from stone to stone. 

Here, in a spot that one may almost cover with a tablecloth, 
we notice a little flock of Whinchats year after year, and this is 
the only spot within miles where they will be found. A specimen 
or two may be obtained without any harm being done, for we 
know that though they are here to-day they will be gone to- 
morrow. The Peewits gaily pirouetting on winnowing wings 
over their sitting mates in the marshes, and the Uttle Reed 
^^^arblers running up and down the reeds singing as if their very 
throats would burst with song, all lend a charm that must be 
whispered rather than spoken, a charm unknown to all but 
Nature's own. 

Coming to our last estuary, and the only one on the north 
coast of Devon— that at Bideford— we find at Braunton Burrows 
one of the few breeding-places of the Sheldrake in Devonshire, 
where it nests in the rabbit-holes. 

The Gannets come into our estuaries in stormy weather, and 
few more interesting sights are there than watching a flock of 
these birds fishing, plunging perpendicularly with closed wings, 
as they do from a height of one hundred feet or more, into the 
shoals of fish beneath, and making the water splash like a 
miniature torpedo. Should a flock or even one of these noble 
birds come into view in the midst of our contemplation as we 
wander along the tor-strewn cliff, then the chff, the sky, and the 
sea would all be forgotten, and our attention would be wholly 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 85 

and irresistibly absorbed by the bird. Even the dismal sand, 
where the land and sea are equally devoid of interest, save the 
melancholy interest produced by the bleaching fragments of 
ships, which remain to mark the spots where they were stranded, 
and, it may "be, their crews enshrouded by the flood : even there 
the scream of a curlew, the whistle of a sandpiper, or the wail of 
some sea bird on the wing, will bring you back to animated 
nature, and your imagination will soon people the dreary waste 
with subjects of pleasure and admiration. Go where you will, 
be the scene and season what they may, be the sky serene or be 
it in storms, there is always a bird to be found, and that bird 
never fails to be interesting, as well to the unlearned as to the 
learned. Thus the study of birds is not only one of the best and 
most certain sources of rational enjoyment, but it is one which 
leads more directly than any other to the love, and consequently 
to the study and the knowledge, of all nature, and of nature's 
Author. 



To the Cuckoo. 



Cuckoo, cuckoo, singing mellow. 
Ever when the fields are yellow ; 
Cuckoo, cuckoo, w^andering ever, 
Like a wavelet on a river ; 
Breathing on the gentle wind. 
Tones as soft as mothers' kind ; 
Rivalling, with thy simplest rote, 
Birds of richer, rarer note ; 
Something more than fantasy. 
Scarcely a reality ; 
Now an echo, who knows where ? 
Now a flying song in air ; 
Ringing now in solemn dell, 
Nature's holy temple-bell. 

— E. Capern. 



86 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

The Devonshire Regiment and 
Territorials. 

By R. PEARSE CHORE, B.A. 

I.— THE DEVON TERRITORIALS AND THE ARMADA. 

" Stand to it, noble pikemen, 
And look you round about ! 
And shoot you right, you bowmen, 

And we will keep them out ; 
You musket and calliver men. 

Do you prove true to me, 
And I'll be foremost in the fight," 
Says brave Lord Willoughby. 

Ballad of Brave Lord Willoughby {c. 1588). 

The gallant deeds of the navy in preventing the threatened 
invasion of England by the great vSpanish Armada robbed the 
land forces of their hope of glory, but it should never be forgotten 
that, even if the navy had been defeated, a territorial army of a 
hundred thousand men, well officered and equipped, was ready 
and anxious to resist the invaders, and we know that the expe- 
rienced Prince of Parma himself was " very far from confident 
of the ultimate result." It is true that the army consisted 
entirely of volunteers and militiamen, for " the hundred beef- 
eaters at Court constituted the only permanently existing force 
in the service of the Government," but many of them had gained 
experience in Flanders, France, and Ireland, and for several 
years the militia had been carefully trained in the use of modern 
weapons. If the invasion had actually taken place, we might 
have had the names of the military commanders, Grenville and 
Ralegh, Gilbert and Fortescue, Courtenay and Dennis, Pollard 
and Monke, occupying a position in the roll of fame beside those 
of the famous sea kings of Devon — Drake and Hawkins. The 
first two, Grenville and Ralegh, had other opportunities of 
winning undying fame for themselves, but the rest had only the 
consolation that 

" They also serve, who only stand and wait." 

Grenville and Ralegh, to whom was entrusted the general 
organization of the defence of the two western counties, were 
kinsmen and friends. Grenville, it will be remembered, was in 
command of the great expedition of seven ships to Virginia in 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 87 

1585, which was undertaken at the sole cost of Ralegh, and 
effected the first Enghsh settlement in the United States. As 
the old chronicler tells us, ' ' for the love he bore unto Sir Walter 
Ralegh, together with a disposition that he had to attempt 
honourable actions worthy of honour, he was willing to hazard 
himself in this voyage." In 1586 Grenville went again with 
three ships from Bideford, in 1587 Captain John White was sent 
out with three more ships, and in 1588 another expedition was 
being fitted out at Bideford when the ships were stopped by 
order of the Government in order to take their part in " Britain's 
Salamis." The two kinsmen were both members of the Council 
of War appointed *' to consider the means fittest to be obtained 
for the defence of the Realm in order to withstand any invasion." 
As early as March 8th, 1587, Grenville had been appointed by 
her Majesty " to survey the maritime defences and review the 
trained bands in Devon and Cornwall," and a few days after- 
wards the Privy Council sent letters to the Earl of Bath, Lord- 
Lieutenant of Devon (who resided at Tawstock, near Barnstaple), 
and the Deputy-Lieutenants of Cornwall (Ralegh himself being 
Lord- Lieutenant of that County), informing them of the appoint- 
ment, and stating more fully that Sir Richard was not only to 
" take a view of the places of descent " in the two counties, but 
also to " take a view of the trained bands, and of their armour 
and furniture, and to see them mustered and exercised in his 
presence, to the end he may be able to bring a true and sound 
report as of the choice of persons and the sufficiency of their 
armour, as also of the profit they have made by the exercise of 
training in the use of the several weapons they are appointed 
unto, and of such defects as he shall find in persons, furniture or 
skill, that order may be taken for repairing of the same." On 
Dec. 7th, 1587, the Privy Council sent a letter to Sir Walter 
Ralegh " for the government of Cornwall, and also for other 
necessary services in Devon," and on Dec. 21st Ralegh rephed 
that he had attended the Earl of Bath, and conferred with the 
Deputy-Lieutenants of Devon for the drawing together of 2000 
foot and 200 horse, and he enclosed an estimate for the cost of 
training for 16 days. 

Since the beginning of Ehzabeth's reign the Lord-Lieutenant 
had replaced the Sheriff as the chief mihtary authority in each 
county. His duty was " to give orders for the raising of 
beacons," to assess the number of men to be supplied from each 
hundred and parish, '' to appoint captains for the horse and 
foot," " to consider the dangerous places on the coast, and make 
the inhabitants put up bulwarks of earth." From the time of 
Edward L every parish in England had been bound to keep 



88 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

ready for use a certain amount of armour, and a certain number 
of men properly trained to the use of this armour. WilUam 
Harrison, writing only a few years before the date of the Armada, 
says : " Certes there is almost no village so poor in England (be 
it never so small) that hath not sufficient furniture in a readiness 
to set forth three or four soldiers, as one archer, one gunner, one 
pike, and a billman at the least."* The armour was usually 
kept in the church, and was hence frequently known as " The 
Church Armour." Every year it had to be taken to the train- 
ing ; and twice a year it had to be viewed by the Constable of 
the Hundred, and its condition reported to the justices. 

I am not aware that there is any map or record of the precise 
arrangement of beacons for the County of Devon, as there is for 
Kent, but in the Cottonian Library is preserved " A plott of all 
the Coast of Cornwall and Devonshire, as they were to be fortified 
in 1588 against the Landing of any Enemy." According to 
this map the whole of the south coast was to be provided at 
frequent intervals with fortifications and troops, but nothing is 
shown on the north coast between Boscastle and Croyde Bay. 
There are representations of a continuous fortification from 
Croyde Bay to Ilfracombe, a small one on Hillsborough, and 
one on each side of the valleys at Combmartin and Lynmouth. 
These were apparently to be defended by eight companies of 
soldiers. Presumably, the unfortified portion of the coast was 
considered to be sufficiently defended by its own cliffs, although 
in 1558 the militia of North Devon, under the command of 
Sir John Chichester, were appointed to defend Hartland, Clovelly, 
Woolacombe Sands, Ilfracombe, and Combmartin, and '' all 
the creeks and landing-places." 

According to the muster rolls made in April, 1588, the land 
forces of Devon were divided into three Divisions — East, North, 
and South — and these were again subdivided into companies — 
the East Division into two, and the North and South into three 
each. Each Division had about 1216 trained men, 70 horsemen, 
and 850 untrained men, while the total number of '' able men " 
in the county was 10,000. In CornwaU there were five com- 
panies, containing altogether 1500 trained men, 100 horsemen, 
and 2100 untrained men, out of a total of 7760 '' able men." 
The general command of the Devonshire forces was apparently 
given to Sir WiUiam Courtenay, of Powderham, the Captain of 

* The following comment on the above speaks for itself : " At a meet- 
ing of the Devon Territorial Committee, Earl Fortescue presiding, ... a 
return was made of 227 parishes or townships in Devonshire in which not a 
single Territorial had been raised." — North Devon Journal, March 25th, 1909. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 89 

the first company of the East Division, while the commander 
of the Cornish forces was, of course, Sir Richard Grenville him- 
self, who also had a separate company under his charge. The 
■Captains of the North Division were Hugh Fortescue of Filleigh 
(ancestor of the present Earl Fortescue), Hugh Pollard of King's 
Nympton (Sheriff of the County), and Anthony Monke of 
Potheridge (grandfather of the famous Duke of Albemarle) ; 
and the captains of the South Division were Sir John Gilbert of 
Greenway, Richard Champernon of Modbury, and Thomas 
Fulford of Fulford. With regard to the last two mentioned, it 
seems probable that they were replaced respectively by Sir 
Edward Seymour of Torre Abbey, and George Gary of Cock- 
ington. This is the George Gary of Prince's " Worthies of 
Devon," who was afterwards knighted and became in succession 
Treasurer and Lord Deputy of Ireland. It is interesting to note 
that Sir John Gilbert's lieutenant was his brother Adrian, who 
had attempted to re-open the old silver mines at Combmartin. 
The lieutenants of the North Division were William Stowford, 
Arthur Gifford, and William Yeo, all members of old county 
families. The horsemen of the three Divisions were commanded 
respectively by Roger Courtenay, Lewis Pollard (brother of 
Hugh), and Gawen Champernon of Dartington. 

The companies of the North Division were approximately of 
•equal strength, so we will confine our attention to Captain Hugh 
Fortescue's. He had altogether 409 trained men, of whom 157 
were armed with firearms— 134 callivers and 23 muskets — 112 
with pikes, 90 with bows, and 50 with bills, the remaining 40 
being pioneers. There were 134 " horses for carriages," and 45 
" nagges for shotte." The former entry apparently refers to 
baggage horses, and the latter to horses for mounting some of the 
calliver-men and musketeers, who are grouped together under 
the name " shotte." These mounted men might be regarded 
as mounted infantry, for their weapons could not be used on 
horseback. The horsemen consisted of 50 '' light horse," armed 
with lances, and 17 " petronelles," armed with small carbines 
which were fired with the stock against the breast. Each com- 
pany had about 337 lb. of powder, '' match," and bullets. The 
untrained men for the whole North Division numbered 851, of 
whom 240 were calliver-men, 69 pikemen, 92 bowmen, 450 
bill-men, and 120 pioneers, and they had 400 horses and 133 
*' nagges." At Barnstaple were stored 1200 lb. of powder and 
250 lb. of " match " ; at Torrington, 600 lb. and 150 lb. ; at 
Bideford, 300 lb. and 60 lb. ; and at South Molton, 400 lb. and 
100 lb. 

We see that there were four distinct types ofjoot soldiers, 



go The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

in addition to the pioneers. The musketeer or calHver-man 
wore a doublet or jacket of soft leather, and, if he could get it, 
a helmet known as a morion, which was an open iron cap turned 
up at the edges and peaked in front. The musket was a match- 
lock, fired by the lighted end of a twisted " match " or cord, 
prepared with saltpetre, and brought down on the priming by 
a lever. It was a heavy, clumsy weapon, and, when being 
fired, was supported upon a forked " rest " stuck into the 
ground. The musketeer either carried a powder flask, or wore 
a bandolier or shoulder-belt, on which hung a row of little wooden 
cases containing each a charge of powder ; and at his right side 
he carried a bag of bullets and a "touch-box," containing 
lighted tinder. He was also provided with a dagger. The 
calliver was a lighter form of musket, and was fired from the 
shoulder without the support of a ** rest." The pikeman wore 
more complete body armour, known as a corselet, comprising 
breast and back plates with a gorget or collar around the neck 
and tasses or pieces for protecting the thighs, and a morion 
for the head. His weapon, the pike, was a plain ash staff from 
12 to 18 feet in length (whence the proverb, " Plain as a pike 
staff "), with a narrow spear-head of iron or steel. He was also 
armed with a short straight sword. The billman was armed 
with a sort of halberd, similar to that still carried by the beef- 
eaters at the Tower of London, consisting of a staff with a blade, 
hooked like a woodman's bill-hook, and with a spike both at 
the back and at the top. The bowman or archer needs no 
description. He was, of course, armed with that famous weapon 
of the Enghsh yeoman, the long-bow, by which the battles of 
Cressy and Agincourt had been won. These bows were made of 
yew, and were over six feet in length, and so great was the skill 
and strength of the archers that the ordinary range was 300 
yards. But the days of both the long-bow and the bill were 
already numbered. The former had long been giving way 
to the musket and calliver, and the latter was vastly inferior 
to the pike. On Nov. 28th, 1595, in accordance with an order 
of the Privy Council, *' the Earl of Bath, Mr. Pollard, Mr. Carey 
[of Clovelly], and Mr. Abbot [of Hartland Abbey], justices, sat 
at the Guildhall [Barnstaple], where they had called all the 
constables of the North division to give notice to those that were 
set to arms to be in readiness, and that the bills should be changed 
into pikes, and the bows and arrows into muskets and callivers." 
The pioneers were apparently provided with bills and swords in 
addition to their spades and pickaxes. " When drawn up in 
battle order, the billmen took post in the centre, to guard the 
standard of the company, the pikes stood on each side of them. 



^ 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 91 

then came the bowmen in two halves, flanking the pikemen, 
and finally the men with callivers or muskets formed up at the 
two extremes of the line." 

We must imagine, then, the different companies waiting for 
the lighting of the beacons which should signal the approach 
of the enemy. Five thousand men of Devon and Cornwall 
were stationed at Plymouth, forming part of the general army 
for defending the south coast, besides the force of the Stannaries, 
which Ralegh himself commanded as Lord Warden, and which 
was composed of the miners, who were not liable to serve in the 
militia. Portland also was under Ralegh's charge, but this was 
armed both by fortification and with troops from Dorset and 
Wiltshire under the command of Ralegh's brother, Carew Ralegh. 
Two thousand of the Devon troops were detached to form part 
of the army for guarding the Queen's person, under the com- 
mand of another Devonian, Henry Carey, Lord Hunsdon, while 
the rest of the forces of Devon and Cornwall remained in the'^^e 
counties '' for the guard of the coasts." According to his 
biographers, Ralegh himself, seeing that all danger of an invasion 
of Devonshire was past, joined the fleet off Portland and took 
part in the subsequent fighting against the Armada, although 
his name does not appear in any official account, and he could 
only have acted as a volunteer. His kinsman, Grenville, was 
at Stowe on the day of the first fight off Plymouth (21st July — 
old style), as we see from the following interesting entries in the 
'* Records of Blanchminster's Charity," at vStratton :— - 

to Harry Juell the 21st of July to runne to Stow with a letter in post 
hast for her majesties service iiijd. 

to Richard Juell of Lunston (and 5 others) for there horses to go in post 
to Launceston for Sr. Richard Greinvile to ride to Plimouth when the 
Spaniards were Come before Plimouth, 8d. for every horse iiijs. 

Hakluyt has been credited with the statement that Grenville 
was " personally commanded not to depart out of Cornwall," 
but I have been unable to trace the reference. At any rate, he 
must have arrived at Plymouth too late to join the fleet, if he 
had any such intention, but the object of his journey was more 
probably to take command of the land forces which were, as we 
have seen, stationed at that port. At any rate, we may be 
sure that he, as well as all the other commanders, would, in his 
own dying words, have done their duty, as they were bound to 
do, and, if they had had the opportunity, would have fought for 
their country. Queen, religion, and honour, and left behind 
them the everlasting fame of valiant and true soldiers. 



^2 The Devonian Year Book, 1911 



II.— A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE DEVONSHIRE REGIMENT. 

Valour of England gaunt and whitening, 

Far in a South-land brought to bay. 
Locked in a death-grip all day tight'ning. 

Waited the end in twilight gray. 
Battle and storm and the sea-dog's way ! 
Drake from his long rest turn'd again, 
" Victory lit thy steel with lightning, 

Devon, O Devon, in wind and rain ! " 

Henry Newholt. 

It is a far cry from Gravelines to Waggon Hill — over 300 
years — ^but, as the above quotation indicates so eloquently, 
the character of the Devonshire men has not changed in the 
long interval. Now, as then, they were distinguished by their 
coolness, their determination, their doggedness, " the sea-dog's 
way." Now, as then, they were favoured by the elements. 
Now, as then, they were regarded with special favour by their 
Queen. 

The Devonshire Regiment, under its present name, dates only 
from 1881, when the 1st and 2nd battalions of the 11th or North 
Devon Regiment, and the 1st and 2nd Devon Militia, were 
formed into a new " territorial " regiment, which included also 
five volunteer battalions. But the 11th has always been 
" territorial," from the time that it was first raised in 1685 by 
the Duke of Beaufort among the loyal men of Devon, Somerset, 
and Dorset. Its first service was in Ireland, where it fought 
with credit under the personal command of Wilham III. at the 
battle of the Boyne. In 1703 it was sent abroad to take part in 
the campaigns of the famous Duke of Marlborough, himself a 
Devonshire man, and it was engaged in the capture of various 
fortresses and towns held by the French. It suffered severely 
with other regiments in the fierce battle of Almanza, 1707. In 
1715 it returned to Scotland, and fought at the battle of 
Dunblane, which practically ended the rebellion of that year, 
and in 1719, at Glenshiel, it defeated and captured a body of 
400 Spaniards who had invaded Scotland on behalf of the 
Pretender. 

The word '' Dettingen " on the colours of the regiment records 
a victory, important in its results, and memorable as being the 
last battle in which a British monarch was personally engaged. 
This was in 1743, and two years later the regiment shared in the 
defeat at Fontenoy. The following year, at Roncoux, it was 
ordered with another regiment to hold a hollow way agairist a 
French force six times as great as their own ; they were success- 
ful in spite of numerous attacks, and their thinned ranks bore 



The Devo7iian Year Book, 191 1 q^ 

eloquent testimony to the noble way in which they had carried 
out their orders. We next find the regiment campaigning in 
Germany, 1760-3 ; and in 1793 it was engaged in the Toulon 
expedition. 

During the Peninsular War, 1809-14, under the great Duke 
of Wellington, it won great distinction, and had the following 
honours added to its flag : " Salamanca," " Pyrenees," 
" Nivelle," " Nive," " Orthes," '' Toulouse," " Peninsula." In 
all these victories the 11th played a gallant part ; but, perhaps 
the greatest gallantry was displayed at Salamanca, where it 
advanced with the 61st at a critical moment, when the fate of 
the battle was trembling in the balance, and, fighting desperately 
against artillery, cavalry, and infantry, forced the French to 
give way. So fierce was the struggle that only 4 oificers and 
67 men could be mustered at the close of the action, to hear 
words of praise seldom addressed to an individual regiment. 

" One exploit of the regiment towards the close of the war 
deserves special mention. On the night of 16 Jan., 1814, the 
British army was lying in front of Bayonne, one of the advanced 
picquets being composed of 2 officers and 40 men of the Devon- 
shire regiment. In the front of this picquet was a barrack in 
which was stationed a French out-post, the men of which had 
piled their arms outside, trusting to the watchfulness of the 
sentries they had posted. The Captain of the Devonshire 
regiment resolved to attempt to surprise them, and accordingly 
sent forward a small party, who cautiously approached the 
French sentries and effectually quieted them, when the remainder 
of the picquet dashed forward and secured the arms of the 
French. After a short resistance the French surrendered, and 
upwards of 200 prisoners were triumphantly marched into the 
British fines by the 40 Devonshire men. At the battle of 
Toulouse, as at Salamanca, the Devonshire Regiment was called 
upon at a critical moment of the fight, when things were looking 
black for the British, and again it responded nobly. With the 
two other corps of their brigade they charged with a terrible 
shout, and after a short but desperate strife the French turned 
and fled, and the victory was secured. This was the second 
time during the war that the regiment had the distinguished 
honour of sharing the supreme effort which turned the tide of 
victory, wlien everything was in confusion in the other parts of 
the field." 

After the Peninsular War the Devonshire Regiment had 
little fighting to do for more than half a century, but in 1851, 
when it was serving in Austraha, the men proved the truth of 
their motto, '' Semper Fidehs," in such a remarkable manner 



94 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

that the incident is worth recording. It was the time of the 
gold craze, and it became necessary to send a detachment of 
troops to keep order at the diggings ; but it was prophesied on 
all sides that the temptations to desert were so great that the 
detachment would soon vanish. However, the Devons soon 
showed the stuff of which they were made ; they re-established 
order, and marched back without the loss of a single man. 

The next war service was in Afghanistan in 1878-9, where 
the hardships and privations the regiment sustained in this 
bleak and rocky country were rewarded by the addition of 
'' Afghanistan " to their colours. From 1890 to 1892 the 
regiment was in Burma, engaged in dispersing and capturing 
the numerous bands of Dacoits that over-ran the country on 
the disbandment of the Burmese army. In 1895 a detachment 
was sent to the North- West Frontier of India, and in 1896 a 
detachment was furnished to accompany the expedition to the 
West Coast of Africa. For the service in Burma, and for that 
in India a medal with clasp was awarded, and for that 
in Africa a bronze star. In 1897 the regiment formed part of 
the celebrated Tirah Field Force, which was engaged in one of 
the most arduous campaigns ever undertaken by Indian troops 
against the warlike tribes of the North- West Frontier of India, 
and was rewarded with the distinction of " Tirah " on its colours. 

Both battalions were engaged in the Boer War, and went 
through it with a reputation for gallantry second to none. The 
1st battalion had been summoned from India, and, when war 
was actually declared, it was stationed at Ladysmith. Its first 
engagement with the enemy was at Elandslaagte on 21 Oct., 
1899. The Boers had taken up a position on a ridge which rose 
some 800 feet above the plain, and our troops had to climb this 
height in the face of a very heavy fire. At the moment of the 
final advance a torrent of rain lashed into the faces of the men, 
and " amid the hissing of the rain there came the fuller, more 
menacing whine of the Mauser bullets, and the ridge rattled 
from end to end with the rifle fire. Men fell fast, but their 
comrades pressed hotly on. The line of advance was dotted 
with khaki-clad figures, some still in death, some writhing in 
their agony." The cool and steady advance of the Devons was 
much admired, and the gallantry of the troops was rewarded 
by the complete defeat of the Boers, who lost 450 in killed, 
wounded, and prisoners, including their leader, Koch. 

On 24 Oct. the Devons were again in action at Rietfontein to 
prevent the Boers from interfering with the march of General 
Yule's force from Dundee to Ladysmith, and on 30 Oct. they 
took part in the battle of Ladysmith. Following this, the siege 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 95 

of that town began, and here for four calendar months the 
Devons and their comrades resisted every effort of the immensely 
superior Boer force, suffering much from the scarcity of supplies 
and the harassing and often deadly shell fire. Horse-flesh was 
boiled down to make " chevril," eggs cost 4s. each, vegetable 
marrows 28s., a pot of jam 32s. 6d., tobacco lis. per oz., and 
whisky £12 per bottle ! One day the Devons had 9 officers 
killed and w^ounded by one shell alone. 

On 6 Jan., 1900, the Boers made their most determined attack 
on the defences of Ladysmith — " An onfall so gallantly made 
and gallantly met that it deserves to rank among the classic 
fights of British military history." Eighteen heavy guns were 
trained upon the ridge, 3 miles long, one end of which was called 
Caesar's Camp and the other Waggon Hill. At both ends the 
night attack came as a complete surprise. The outposts were 
shot or driven in, and the stormers were on the ridge almost as 
soon as their presence was detected. The line of rocks blazed 
with the flash of their guns. For hours desperate, and often 
hand-to-hand, fighting ensued. At four o'clock a huge bank of 
clouds which had towered upwards unheeded by the struggling 
men burst suddenly into a terrific thunderstorm, with vivid 
lightnings and lashing rain and hail. '' Up the greasy hillside, 
foul with mud and with blood, came the Boer reserves, and up 
the northern slope came our own reserve, the Devon Regiment, 
fit representatives of that virile county." For 130 yards they 
had to advance over perfectly flat open ground, fired into at 
short range from right, left, and front. The fire of the Boers 
was " Hke the crackle of a piece of gorse in a blazing fire." All 
the officers, except the Colonel, were put out of action, and the 
companies were led by non-commissioned officers. Captain 
Lafone was wounded and died, Lieuts. Walker and Field were 
both shot through the head, while Lieut. Masterton, who had 
volunteered to return across the 130 yards of blazing fire in 
order to deliver an essential message to the Imperial Light 
Horse, was severely wounded in both thighs, but crawled on and 
succeeded in his task before he fell exhausted in the trench, for 
which brave action he received the V.C. The Devons continued 
to advance, and swept the Boers before them. The cheers of 
victory heartened the weary men at Caesar's Camp to a similar 
effort, and that position was also cleared. '' Wet, cold, weary, 
and without food for twenty-six hours, the bedraggled Tommies 
stood yelling and waving, amid the litter of dead and dying." 
Queen Victoria cabled : " Greatly admire conduct of Devonshire 
regiment." It was a near thing. Had the ridge fallen, the 
town must have followed, and history, perhaps, have been 



q6 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

changed. After this defeat, the Boers did not again venture 
on an attack, but restricted themselves to the daily bombard- 
ment. 

Meanwhile, the 2nd battalion had arrived in Natal, and with 
the gallant army under Sir Redvers Buller had been making 
heroic efforts to get through to the relief of their beleaguered 
comrades in Ladysmith. It took part in the battle of Colenso 
on 15 Dec, 1899, and two companies under Colonel Bullock 
made a vain attempt to save the guns which caused such a 
terrible loss of life, including that of Lord Roberts' only son, and 
were finally abandoned to the enemy. Undaunted by this 
reverse, the Devons shared in the Spion Kop and Vaalkranz 
operations, and took a leading part in the capture of the hill of 
Monte Christo on 18 Feb., 1900, which was the first step in the 
final operations that opened the way to Ladysmith, as it forced 
the Boers to abandon their position at Colenso. 

On 27 Feb. the battle of Pieter's Hill was fought, and the 
Boers with a loss of some 500 men fled northwards, and the relief 
of Ladysmith was practically accomplished. On 3 March the 
relieving force marched through the shell-swept streets between 
the lines of the emaciated garrison, and the two battalions of 
Devons met under conditions which can be more easily imagined 
than described — one exhausted by hunger and privation, the 
other exhausted by fighting and marching. " The relief of 
Ladysmith," says Sir Conan Doyle, " stirred the people of the 
Empire as nothing, save perhaps the subsequent relief of Mafeking, 
has done during our generation." 

Subsequently, the Devons took part in Buller's operations at 
Laing's Nek and Belfast, and distinguished themselves by the 
capture of the Mauchberg, a formidable ridge near Lydenburg. 
Some 300 of them also, under Colonel Bullock, gallantly defended 
themselves at Honing Spruit for seven hours against a furious 
attack by De Wet with 700 riflemen and 3 guns. 

Sir Conan Doyle speaks of the Devons as " quiet, business- 
hke, and rehable," and Lieut-General W. Kitchener, their 
commander for many months, says : "I cannot call to mind 
any single occasion on which the Devons were ever flurried or 
even hurried. Their imperturbability of temper, even under 
the most trying conditions, could not be surpassed. They were 
essentially a ' self-help ' corps, and a Devon man was always 
clean. A more determined crew I never wish to see, and a 
better regiment to back his orders a General can never hope to 
have." 



I 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 97 



III.— THE PRESENT ORGANIZATION. 

(A).— THE DEVONSHIRE REGIMENT. 

Badge and Motto. — The Castle of Exeter. " Semper fidelis." 

Battle Honours. — " Dettingen," " Salamanca," " Pyrenees," " Nivelle," 
" Nive," " Orthes," " Toulouse," " Peninsula," " Afghanistan, 1879-80," 
" Tirah," " South Africa, 1899-1902," " Defence of Ladysmith/' " Relief 
of Ladysmith." 

Uniform. — Scarlet, Lincoln green facings. 

Co/.— Maj.-Gen. Hon. Sir S. Mostyn, K.C.B. 

REGULAR AND SPECIAL RESERVE BATTALIONS. 

1ST AND 2ND BATTALIONS (lITH FoOT). 

Lf.-Cols.—W. T. Bartlett ; G. M. Gloster. 

Majors.—]. O. Travers, D.S.O. ; E. G. Williams ; L. J. Bols, D.S.O. ; 
H. S. L. Ravenshaw ; J. F. Radcliffe ; C. S. Warwick ; J. P. Law. 

Captains. — E. C. Wren ; C. C. M. Maynard, D.S.O., bt. maj. ; E. M. 
Morris, bt. maj. ; J. E. I. Masterson, F.C., bt. maj. ; E. D. Young; W. 
M. Goodwyn ; N. Luxmoore ; J. D. Ingles ; N. Z. Emerson, D.S.O. ; T. 
C. B. Holland; A. J. E. Sunderland; H. B. W. Gardiner; E. J. F. 
Vaughan ; G. H. I. Graham ; C. A. Lafone ; T. B. Harris ; G. N. T. 
Smyth-Osbourne ; E. Hewlett ; G. I. Watts ; D. H. Blunt ; H. R. 
Gunning ; S. T. Hayley ; H. I. Storey ; B. H. Besly ; G. F. Green ; 
W. E. Scafe ; J. F. A. Kane ; R. J. Milne ; C J. Spencer. 

Adjutants. — D. H. Blunt, capt. ; E. D. Young, capt. 

Quarter-Masters. — C. Birch, hon. maj. ; E. Mumford, Jion. capt. ; G. E. 
Mitchell, hon. It. 

Headquarters. — Exeter. Stations. — Tidworth and Malta. 

3RD BATTALION (ist DEVON MILITIA). 
(Special Reserve Battalion.) 

Hon. Col.—F. H. Mountsteven, C.M.G. 

Lt.'Col.—D. F. Boles. 

Majors. — E. G. Williams ; C. H. Chichester. 

Captains.— B. V. Mitford ; W. F. S. Edwards, D.S.O. ; R. F. W. Hill ; 
T. B. Harris ; E. Hewlett ; C. Granville; G. I. Watts; A. B. Bramwell ; 
H. A. Chichester ; H. de L. Sprye. 

Adjutant. — Capt. W. M. Goodwyn, Devon R. 

Quarter- Master. — C. Birch, hon. maj. 

Headquarters. — Exeter. 

(For 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th Battalions, see under " The Devon Terri- 
torials — Infantry.") 

(B).— THE DEVON TERRITORIALS. 
THE DEVON TERRITORIAL FORCE ASSOCIATION. 

President.— Col. Earl Fortescue, A.D.C., T.D., R. N. Devon Yeo. {Lord 
Lieutenant) . 

Military Members. — Col. J. E. H. Balfour, D.S.O., R. i Devon Yeo. ; 
Maj. W. E. P. Bastard, Devon Fort. R.E. ; Maj. A. S. Browne, D.L., 
late R.N. Devon Yeo. ; Col. Lord Clifford, A.D.C., V.D. ; Capt. M. C. 
Collier, Devon & Corn. Brig. Co., A.S. Corps ; Lt.-Col. G, J. Ellicombe, 
7 Bn. Devon R. ; Lt.-Col. R. W. Fox, 5 Bn. Devon R. ; Col. W. N. 

7 



98 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Hoare, T.D., R.N. Devon Yeo. ; Lt.-Col. E. B. Jeune, Devon R.G.A. 
Col. C. Marwood Tucker, 4 Bn. Devon R. ; Col. A. F. Seldon, V.D., 6 Bn 
Devon R. ; Lt.-Col. G. R. Fitz R. Talbot, 4 Wessex Brig., R.F.A. ; Col 
J. R. Thomas, M.D., V.D., A.M.O., Wessex Div. 

Representative Members. — Col. Earl Fortescue, A.D.C., T.D./ R.N 
Devon Yeo. [President) ; Col. E. S. Walcott, C.B., T.D., 6 Bn. Devon R. 
F, Ward, Esq. ; Col. J. P. Goldsmith, V.D. ; T. Glanfield, Esq. ; E. F. 
Anthony, Esq. ; E. E. Square, Esq. 

Secretary. — Col. H. W. Smith-Rewse, C.V.O., 57, High Street, Exeter. 

YEOMANRY. 
Royal ist Devon. 

Hon. Co/.— Sir J. Shelley, Bt., T.D. 

Lt.-Col.—]. E. H. Balfour, D.S.O., hon. col. 

Majors.— A. D. Acland, T.D., hon. It.-col. ; R. Coleridge ; Hon. W. F. 
D. Smith ; M. R. A. Wyatt-Edgell ; J. G. B. Lethbridge ; R. H. St. Maur. 

Captains. — H. Goodwyn ; Lord Vivian ; Hon. T. C. R. Agar-Robartes. 

Adjutant.— Capt. G. H. Watson, 3 D.G. 

Medical Officer.— Lt. A. C. Bird, R.A.M.C. 

Chaplain. — Rev. E. J. G. Dupuis, M.A. 

Battle Honours. — "South Africa, 1900-01." 

Headquarters. — Exeter. 

Uniform. — Scarlet, blue facings, scarlet and white plume, scarlet busby- 
bag. 

Royal North Devon (Hussars). 

Hon. Co/.— Col. Earl Fortescue, A.D.C., T.D. 

Lt.-Col.— W. N. Hoare, T.D., hon. col. 

Majors.— R. A. Sanders ; J. Bayly ; G. H. St. Hill ; Capt. Sir B. R. 
S. Wrey, Bt., hon. It.-col. ; M. J. Greig. 

Captains.— E. J. A. Clarke ; J. H. M. Kirkwood ; A. C. Thynne, D.S.O. ; 
N. Deakin. ' y > > 

Adjutant. — Capt. C. L. Wood, 18 Hrs. 

Quarter- Master. — C. E. Everett, hon. It. 

Medical Officers.— Ma]. J. R. Harper, R.A.M.C. : Lt. S. R. Gibbs, 
R.A.M.C. J f , , 

Chaplain. — Rev. A. B. S. Wrey, M.A. 

Battle Honours. — "South Africa, 1900-01." 

Headquarters. — Barnstaple. 

Uniform. — Blue, scarlet facings and busby-bag, scarlet and white plume. 

ROYAL ARTILLERY. 
4TH Wessex Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. 
Hon. Col.— Col. C. H. Spragge, C.B. 
Lt.-Col.— G. R. FitzR. Talbot. 
Adjutant.— Capt. E. W. M. Cuninghame, R. Art 
Medical Officer.— Ma]. J. H. Harris, R.A.M.C. 
Chaplain.— Rev. Hon. H. H. Courtenay. 
Headquarters. — Exeter. 

1ST Devonshire Battery, Exeter. Maj.—M. H. D. Parsons ; 

Capt. E. H. B. Norris. 

2ND Devonshire Battery, Paignton. Ma/.— J. N. Tephson. 

3RD Devonshire Battery, Tavistock. Maj.—E. R. Phillips 

4TH Wessex Ammunition Column, Exeter. Capt.—E. J. Harbottle 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 qo 

Devonshire Royal Garrison Artillery, 
(2 Heavy Batteries and 4 Companies). 
Hon. Co/.— Col. Lord St. Levan, C.V.O., C.B. 
Lt.-Col. — E. B. Jeune. 
Majors. — A. Bellamy ; C. W. Blundell. 

Captains.—]. C. Wing ; H. E. P. Moon, T. D. ; W. Field ; T. Vosper ; 
A. O. Ellis; A. J. P. Scaife. 

Adjutant. — Lt. R. Arnott, R. Art. 

Medical 0/^cey5.— Surg.-Maj. J. P. S. Ward ; Surg.-Lt. G. D. Kettlewell. 
Chaplains. — Rev. S. G. Ponsonby, M.A., V.D. ; Rev. J. A. Sidgwick, M.A. 
Headquarters. — Devonport. Batteries — Ilfracombe and Devonport ; 
Companies — Devonport and Plymouth. 

ROYAL ENGINEERS. 
Devonshire Fortress Engineers. 
Hon. Col. — Gen. Sir R. Harrison, G.C.B., C.M.G., Col. Comdt. R. Eng. 
Major.— W. E. P. Bastard. 
Adjutant. — Lt. C. E. Evans, R. Eng. 
Chaplain. — Rev. B. R. Airy, M.A. 
Headquarters . — Plymouth . 
Works Cos., Exeter. Capts. — W. H. Goodman ; J. H. Commin ; H. A. 
Garrett. Quarter- Master. — C. H. Clode, hon. It. 
Electric Lights Cos., Plymouth. Capts.- — G. Hooper ; S. E. Moon, 
Wessex Divisional Telegraph Co., Exeter. Capt. — E. H. Varwell. 

INFANTRY. 

4TH Battalion, Devonshire Regiment. 

Hon.-Col.—^t. Hon. Sir J. H. Kennaway, Bt., C.B., V.D. 

Lt.-Col. — C. Marwood Tucker. 

Majors. — H. L. Acland Troyte ; A. Anstey. 

Captains. — E. C. Nicholetts, V.D., hon. maj. ; F. R. S. Cosens ; C. P. 
Tremlett ; H. Townsend ; L. Pollard ; F. J. Harvey ; W. G. Forward ; 
W. H, Percy-Hardman ; R. Y. Anderson-Morshead. 

Adjutant. — Lt. J. R. Cartwright, Devon R. 

Quarter- Master. — C. H. Deeks, hon. capt. 

Medical Officer.— Cs^^t. O. Eaton, R.A.M.C. 

Chaplains. — Rev. R. Turner, M.A. ; Rev. R. H. Couchman, 

Battle Honours.— '' Sonth. Africa, 1900-01.' 

Headquarters. — Exeter. 

Uniform. — Green, black facings. 

5TH (Prince of Wales's) Battalion. 

Hon. Co/.— Col. Rt. Hon. Earl of Mount Edgcumbe, G.C.V.O., V.D. 

Lt.-Col.—^. W. Fox. 

Majors.— ¥. K. Windeatt ; J. Griffin, V.D., hon. It.-col. ; E. B. Hawker. 

Captains.— F. A. Clark ; W. J. T. Carder ; W. E. M. Corbett ; F. J. 
Davis ; H. S. Phillips ; J. Windeatt ; J. B. Wood ; G. D. Vicary ; R. B. 
Berry ; J. D. Sparrow ; E. Roseveare ; E. M. Leest ; H. R. C. Butler. 

Adjutant. — Lt. R. B. Featherstone, Devon R., Capt. 

Quarter-Master. — E. W. Greenslade, hon. capt. 

Medical Officers.— Surg.-MsL]. E, P. A. Mariette, M.B. ; Capt. W. 
Fitzpatrick, R.A.M.C. 

Chaplain. — Rev, E. G. Cocks. 



100 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Battle Honours. — "South Africa, 1900-01." 

Headquarters. — Plymouth. 

Uniform. — Scarlet, Lincoln green facings. 

6th Battalion. 

Hon. Col.— Col. E. S. Walcott, C.B., T.D. 

Lt.-Col. — A. F. Seldon, V.D., hon. col. 

Major. — W. H. Speke. 

Captains. — J. Tucker ; N. S. Manning ; G. W. F. Brown ; B. B. New- 
combe, hon. maj. ; O. P. Boord ; J. G. Macindoe ; G. G. Pearse. 

Adjutant. — Lt. P. R. Worrall, Devon R. 

Quarter -M aster . — C. Lock, hon. capt. 

Medical Officers.— C^i^t. F. W. Kendle, R.A.M.C. ; Lt. W. A. Valentine, 
R.A.M.C. 

Chaplain. — Rev. E. C. Atherton, M.A. 

Battle Honours. — " South Africa, 1900-01." 

Headquarters.— 'B2irnst3,^\e. 

Uniform. — Scarlet, Lincoln green facings. 

7TH (Cyclist) Battalion. 

Lt.-Col.— Lt.-Col. G. J. Ellicombe. 

Major. — ^Maj. G. W. G. Sanders. 

Captains.— U. S. Hibberd ; G. H. Martin ; C. H. Bird ; A. Goodridge : 
W. F. Ball. 

Adjutant. — Capt. C. J. Spencer, Devon R. 

Quarter-Master. — A. J. Godwyn, hon. It. 

Medical Officers.— Lt. T. H. Ward, M.D., R.A.M.C. ; Lt. L. H. Moiser, 
M.B., R.A.M.C. 

Chaplain. — Rev. H. F. Tracey. 

Headquarters. — Exeter. 

Uniform. — Scarlet, Lincoln green lacings. 

ARMY SERVICE CORPS. 
Devon and Cornwall Brigade Co. 
Captains. — M. C. Collier ; H. G. Shorto. 
Headquarters. — Plymouth. 

ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS. 

Wessex Field Ambulances. 
Hon. CoZ.— Sir F. Treves, Bt., G.C.V.O., C.B., F.R.C.S. 

1ST Wessex. 
Lt.-Col.— Li. Pickard, M.D. 
Captains.— A. W. F. Sayres ; L. R. Tosswill. 
Transport Officer. — E. F. Squire, hon. It. 
Quarter- Master. — J. H. Maunder, hon. It. 
Chaplain. — Rev. J. H. Prince. 
Headquarters. — Exeter. 

2ND Wessex. 
Lt.-Col.— A. B. Soltau, M.D. 
Captain. — F. C. Whitmore. 
Transport Officer.— L. J . Miller, hon. It. 
Quarter-Master.— G. S. Garland, hon. It. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 loi 

4TH Southern General Hospital. 
Lt.-Col.—C. E. R. Rendle, F.R.C.S., V.D. 
Major.— R. W. Webber, F.R.C.S. 
Quarter-Master. — W. H. Scrase, hon. It. 
Headquarters. — Plymouth. 

OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS. 

All Hallows' School, Honiton. Lt. — H. G. Tyler. 

Blundell's School, Tiverton. Capt. — E. G. Pierce. 

BucKLAND School (Devon County School), West Buckland. 

Capt. — Rev. E. C. Harries. 

Exeter School. Lt. — A. C. Maples. 

Kelly College, Tavistock. Capt. — A. O. V. Penny. 

Plymouth College. Capt. — C. W. Dodson. 



Devonian Epitaphs. 

Selected by C R. S. Philp- 
At Crediton : — 

On EADULPH, BISHOP OF DEVON {d. 932). 

Christ ! bear me witness, that this stone is not 

Put here t'adorn a body, that must rot ; 

But keep a name, that it mayn't be forgot.. 

Whoso doth pass, stay, read, bewail, I am 

What thou must be ; was what thou art the same ; 

Then pray for me, ere you go whence you came. 

In Tiverton Church : — 

On the tomb of EDWARD COURTENAY, third Earl of Devon, com- 
monly called " The blind and good Earl." He died in 141 9, and his 
countess was Maud, daughter of Lord Camoys. 

Hoe ! hoe ! who lies here ? 

I, the goode Erie of Devonshere ; 

With Maud, my wife, to mee full dere, 

We lyved togeather fyfty-fyve yere. 

What wee gave, wee have ; 

What wee spent, wee had ; 

What wee left, wee loste. 



At Tavistock 



On queen ELIZABETH. 
If ever royal virtues ever crown 'd a crown, 

If ever mildness shin'd in majesty. 
If ever honour honoured true renown. 

If ever courage dwelt with clemency, 
If ever princess put all princes down 

For temperance, prowess, prudence, equity, 
This I this was she, that in despight of death 
Lives still adored, ador'd Elizabeth. 



102 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

On sir FRANCIS DRAKE {d. 1596). 
Though Rome's religion should in time return, 

Drake, none thy body will ungrave again ; 
There is no fear posterity should burn 

Those bones, which free from fire in sea remain. 

These lines were upon his corpse when cast out of the ship in which he 
died, into the sea. 

In the ''English Hero," as quoted in Prince's Worthies of Devon, the 
following lines are given as the Epitaph of Sir Francis Drake : — ■ 

Where Drake first found, there last he lost his name. 

And for a tomb, left nothing but his Fame : 

His Body's buried under some great wave ; 

The Sea, that was his glory, is his Grave. 

On whom an Epitaph none can truly make, 
For who can say, Here lies Sir Francis Drake ? 

On sir WALTER RALEIGH (beheaded 161 8). 
(By himself.) 
Even such is time, which takes in trust 
Our youth and joyes, and all we have. 
And payes us but with age and dust, 
Which in the darke and silent grave, 
When we have wandered all our wayes, 
Shuts up the story of our dayes : 
And from which earth, and grave, and dust, 
The Lord shall raise me up, I trust. 

At Exeter :— 

On the rev. WILLIAM COTTON, D.D., 

Bishop of Exeter {d. 162 1). 

Whom th' queen from Paul to Peter did remove ; 

Him God with Paul and Peter plac'd above. 

At Kentisbeare : — 

On the rev. GEORGE SCOTT {d. 1830). 
To youth, to age, alike, this Tablet pale 
Tells the brief moral of its tragic tale. • 

Art thou a parent ? Reverence this bier, 
The parent's fondest hopes lie buried here. 
Art thou a youth, prepared in life to start, 
With opening talents and a generous heart, 
Fair hopes and flattering prospects all thine own ? 
Lo ! here their end — a monumental stone. 
But let submission tame each sorrowing thought, • 

Heaven crown'd its champion ere the fight was fought. 

At Exeter : — 

On SIR JOHN DODDERIDGE {d. 1628). 
Learning adieu, for Dodderidge is gone 
To fix his earthly to an heavenly throne. 
Rich urn of learned dust ! scarce can be found 
More worthy inshrin'd, within six foot of ground. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 103 

In St. Paul's Cathedral : — 

To JOSHUA REYNOLDS 

Prince of the Painters of his age, 

and in the splendour and harmony of his colouring, 

bringing forth in turn the varieties of light and shade, 

scarcely second to any of the ancient Masters : 
who, while invested with the highest glories of his art, 
became yet more honourable by suavity of manners, 
and urbanity of life ; 
who found his art languishing and decaying over the earth, 
and revived it by the force of his admirable example, 
illustrated it by rules exquisitely framed, 
and delivered it to the hands of posterity corrected and 
polished. 
The friends and guardians of his fame 
placed this statue, in the year of salvation, 181 3. 
He was born July i6th, 1723. 
Died February 23rd, 1792. 

At King's Teignton : — 

On RICHARD ADLAM {d. 1670). 

Richardus Adlam hujus ecclesiae 

Vicarius, obit Feb loth, 1670. Apostrophe ad Mortem 
Damn'd tryrant ! can't profaner blood suffice ? 
Must priests that offer be the sacrifice ? 
Go tell the genii that in Hades lye. 
Thy triumphs o'er this sacred Calvary, 
Till some just Nemesis avenge our cause, 
And force this kill-priest to revere good laws. 

At Ashburton Church :— 

On ELIZABETH IRELAND {d. 1779). 
Here I lie, at the chancel door, 
Here I lie because I'm poor ; 
The farther in, the more you pay ; 
Here lie I as warm as they. 

At Tawton Church : — 

On rose dart {d. 1652). 
A Rose springing Branch no sooner bloom'd, 
By Death's impartial Dart lyes here intombed. 
Tho' wither'd be the Bud, the stock relyes 
On Christ, both sure by Faith and Hope to rise. 

In Barnstaple Church : — 

On grace MEDFORD {d. 1627). 
Scarce seven years old this Grace in glory ends. 
Nature condemns but Grace the change commends ; 
For Gracious Children tho' they die at seven, 
Are heirs apparent to the Court of Heaven. 
Then grudge not nature at so short a Race, 
Tho' short yet sweet, for surely 'twas God's Grace. 



104 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

In Alphington Churchyard :— 

On one STONE who is said to have Hved 120 years. 
Grand Salem's curse shall never light on thee ; 
For here a stone upon a stone I see. 

At Highgate : — • 

On SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE [d. 1834, aged 61). 
(By himself.) 
Stop, Christian passer-by ; stop, child of God, 
And read, with gentle breast. Beneath this sod 
A poet lies, or that which once seemed he ; 
O, lift a prayer in thought for S. T. C. ! 
That he who many a year with toil of breath, 
Found death in life, — may here find life in death ; 
Mercy for praise, — to be forgiven, for fame : 
He asked, and hoped through Christ. Do thou the same. 

In Barnstaple Churgh : — 

On JOHN BOYSE {d. 1684, aged 5). 
Blest was the prophet in his heavenly shade 
But oh ! how soon did his umbrella fade. 
Like our frail Bodies wch being born of Clay 
Spring in a Night and wither in a Day. 

At St. Andrew's, Plymouth : — 

Here lies the body of James Vernon, Esq., only 
surviving son of Admiral Vernon : died 23rd July, 1753. 

In Dartmouth Churchyard [d. 1714) '. — 
Thomas Goldsmith, 
Commander of the Snap-dragon, a privateer, in the 
reign of Queen Anne. In which vessel he turned 
pyrate, and amassed much riches. 

Men that are virtuous fear the Lord, 
And the devil's by his friends adored ; 
And as they merit, get a place 
Amidst the blest, or hellish race ; 
Pray then, ye learned clergy, show 
Where can this brute, Tom Goldsmith, go ; 
"Whose life was one continued evil. 
Striving to cheat God, man, and devil. 

In West Allington Churchyard : — 

An avaricious minister receives reprobation in the following, at West 

Allington Churchyard, Devonshire, in which county it is the custom 

to pay a fee to the clergyman when a corpse is carried into the 

church. The youth died of virulent small-pox : — 

" Here lyeth the body of Daniel Jeffery, the son of Michael Jeffery, 

and Joan his wife. He was buried the 2' day of September, 1746, and 

in ye 18' yeare of his age. This youth, When in his sickness lay, did 

for the Minister send that he would come and with him pray. But he 

would not attend. But When this young man Buried was the Minister 

did him admit he should be carried into Church that he might money get. 

By this you See what man will dwo to geet money if he can Who did 

Refuse to come and pray By the Foresaid young man." 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 105 

In Mary Tavy Churchyard [d. 1721) : — 
Thomas Hawkins. 
Here buried some Years before 
His two Wives and Five Children more, 
One Thomas nam'd whose fate was Such 
To lose his Life by Wrestling much 
Which may a Warning be to all 
How they into Such Pastimes fall. 
Elizabeth and William and 
Hannah, and yet Pray understand 
A second nam'd Elizabeth 
All these were taken off by Death 
For which Prepare You Readers all 
We must away When God doth Call. 

In Lidford Churchyard : — 

Here lies in Horizontal position 

The outside case of 

George Routleigh, Watchmaker, 

Whose abilities in that line were an honour 

To his profession : 

Integrity was the main-spring, 

and Prudence the Regulator 

Of all the actions of his life : 

Humane, generous, and liberal, 

His hand never stopped 

Till he had relieved distress ; 

So nicely regulated were all his movements 

That he never went wrong 

Except when set-a-going 

By People 

Who did not know 

His Key : 
Even then, he was easily 
Set right again : 
He had the art of disposing of his Time 
So well 
That his Hours glided away 
In one continual round 
of Pleasure and Delight, 
Till an unlucky Moment put a period to 
His existence ; 
He departed this Life 
November 14, 1802 
Wound up, 
In hopes of being taken in Hand 
By his Maker, 
And of being 
Thoroughly cleaned, repaired, and set-a-going 
In the World to come. 



io6 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



London and Devonian Proverbs 

From Bohn's ^^ Handbook of Proverbs."" 



LONDON. 

A London jury ; hang half and save 
half. 

Some affirm this of an Essex, 
others of a Middlesex, jury ; and 
my charity believes it equally true, 
that is, equally untrue, of all three. 
It would fain suggest to credulous 
people as if Londoners, frequently 
impannelled on juries, and loaded 
with multiplicity of matters, aim 
more at dispatch than justice, and 
to make quick riddance (though no 
haste to hang true men), acquit 
half, and condemn half. Thus 
they divide themselves in cBquilibrio 
between justice and mercy, though 
it were meet the latter should have 
the more advantage, etc. 

The falseness of this suggestion 
will appear to such who, by perus- 
ing history, do discover the London 
jurors most conscientious in pro- 
ceeding secundum allegata et pro- 
bata ; always inclining to the 
merciful side in saving life, when 
they can find any cause or colour 
for the same. 

London lick-penny . 

The countryman coming up 
hither, by his own experience, will 
easily expound the meaning thereof. 



DEVONIAN. 

First hang and draw, 

Then hear the cause by Lidford Law. 

Lidford is a little and poor (but 
ancient) corporation in this county, 
with very large privileges, where a 
court of Stannaries was formerly 
kept. This libellous proverb 
would suggest unto us, as it the 
townsmen thereof (generally mean 
persons) were unable to manage 
their own liberties with necessary 
discretion, administering pre- 
posterous and preproperous justice. 
In Westcott's History of Devon- 
shire, the curious may read some 
droll verses written on this town. 



A Plymouth cloak. 

That is, a cane or staff ; whereof 
this is the occasion. Many a man 
of good extraction, coming home 
from far voyages, may chance to 
land here, and, being out of sorts, 
is unable, for the present time and 
place, to recruit himself wath 
clothes. Here (if not friendly 
provided) they make the next wood 
their draper's shop, where a staff 
cut out serves them for a covering. 
For we use, when we walk in cuerpo, 
to carry a staff in our hands, but 
none when in a cloak. When this 
proverb was introduced, great 
coats were not worn. 



I A London Cockney. 
This nickname is more than four 
hundred years old ; for when Hugh 
Bigot added artificial fortifications 
to his naturally strong castle of 
Bungay, in Suffolk, he gave out 
this rhyme, therein vaunting it for 
impregnable : 

Were I in my castle of Bungay, 

Upon the river of Waveney, 

I would ne. care for the King of 

Cockney. 
Meaning thereby King Henry II., 
then quietly possessed of London, 
whilst some others places did resist 
him ; though afterwards he so 
humbled this Hugh, that he was 
fain with large sums of money, and 
pledges for his loyalty, to redeem 
this his castle from being razed to 
the ground. I meet with a double 
sense of this word Cockney : (i) 
One coax'd and cocquer'd, made a 
wanton or nestle-cock, deliberately 
bred and brought up, so as when 
grown up, to be able to endure no 
hardship. (2) One utterly ignor- 
ant of country affairs, of husbandry, 
and housewifery, as there practised. 
The original thereof, and the tale of 
the citizen's son, who knew not the 
language of a cock, but called it 
neighing, is commonly known. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



107 



To Devonshire or Denshire land. 

That is to pare off the surface or 
top turf thereof, and to lay it up 
in heaps and burn it ; which ashes 
are a marvellous improvement to 
battle barren land, by reason of 
the fixed salt which they contain. 
This course they take with their 
barren, spongy, heathy land in 
many counties of England, and call 
it Denshiring. Land so used will 
bear two or three good crops of 
corn, and then must be thrown 
down again. 



io8 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

The Early History of Devon as told in 
the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 

With Notes from other Sources Selected hv 

R. PEARSE CHORE. B.A. 



FIRST PERIOD-THE ANGLO-SAXON CONQUEST. 

[545. Constantine, King of Domnonia, reproved by Gildas for 
murder and adultery.] 

577. In this year Cuthwine and Ceawlin [his father, King of 

Wessex, 560-591] fought against the Britons, and they slew 

three kings, Commail, Condidan, and Farinmail, at the place 

which is called Deorham [Dyrham in Gloucestershire], and 

took three cities from them, Gloucester, Cirencester, and Bath. 

[This important battle finally separated North Wales, 

or Wales proper, from West Wales or Domnonia. One 

of the three British kings was probably a successor of 

Constantine.] 

[601 . The King of Domnonia granted the land called Inesw3^trin, 
in vSomerset, to the old church of' Glastonbury. — Birch, 
Cariularmm Saxonicum, Nos. 835, 836.] 

[603. At a conference at Aust, in Gloucestershire, between 
Augustine and seven bishops of the Britons and many learned 
men, i\ugustine threatens the Britons that, " if they would 
not preach the way of life to the English nation, they were 
likely to find death from the English sword." — Bede.] 

682. In this year Centwine [King of Wessex, 676-685] drove 
the Brito- Welsh as far as the sea [presumably the Bristol 
Channel]. 

[687. Winfrith, afterwards St. Boniface, the apostle of the 
Germans, who was born at Crediton in 680, was sent to school 
at the age of seven to the Saxon monastery at Exeter, under 
Abbot Wolfhard.] 

[693. The code of laws of Ine, King of Wessex, 688-726, provides 
for Welsh subjects and even Welsh royal officials.] 

[705. Aldhelm, Abbot of Malm.esbury, and in this year made 
first bishop of Sherborne, wrote a letter " to the most glorious 
lord of the western kingdom. King Gerontius (Geraint), and 
to all the priests of God scattered throughout Domnonia," in 
which he complains that the Welsh priests will not associate 
with the English.] 

710. In this year Ine, and Nunna his kinsman, fought against 
Geraint, King of the Welsh [i.e., West \^^elsh]. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 ioq> 

[This battle is supposed to have been fought on the Blackdown 
Hills, near Taunton.] 
722. In this year queen iEthelburh destroyed Taunton, which 
Ine [her husband] had previously built. 
[It is supposed that Taunton had been taken by the enemy,, 
and was recaptured and destroyed by ^thelburh on her 
husband's behalf.1 
733. In this year ^thelbald [King of Mercia, 716-757] captured 

Somerton [in Somerset]. 
[739. 10 April, ^thelheard. King of Wessex, 726-740, grants 
to Forthhere, Bishop of Sherborne, land at Greedy, in Devon, 
for building a monastery. — Birch, Cart. Sax., No. 1331.] 
755. Cynewulf [King of Wessex, 757-786] fought very many 
battles against the Brito-Welsh, and about thirty-one winters 
after he had the kingdom, he would expel an atheling who was 
named Cynehard. This Cynehard was brother of Sigebert 
[King of Wessex, 756-757]. [After murdering Cynewulf, 
Cynehard was himself slain by the king's thanes, and was 
buried at Axminster in 786.] 
813. In this year King Egbert [King of W^essex and of All 
England, 802-839] harried in West Wales from eastward to 
westward. 
823. In this year there was a fight of the Welsh and Devonians 
at " Gafulford " [usually identified with Camelford]. 
[The real date of this battle was apparently August, 825, 
according to grants of land made by Egbert at " Creodan 
treow " (probably Crediton). — Birch, Cart. Sax., Nos. 389, 
390.] 

SECOND PERIOD— THE VIKING RAIDS. 

835. In this j^ear a great naval force [of Danes] came to the 
W>st Welsh, and they combined together, and warred against 
Egbert, King of the West Saxons. When he heard that, he 
went thither" with an army, and fought against them at 
Hingston Down [near Plymouth], and there put to flight 
both the Welsh and the Danes. 

851 . In this year the aldorman Ceorl,with the men of Devonshire, 
fought against the Danes at *' Wicganbeorg " [apparently 
Wigborough, near South Petherton, and not Wembury], and 
there made great slaughter, and gained the victory. 

876. In this year the army [of the Danes] stole away to Ware- 
ham [in Dorset], a fortress of the West Saxons ; and after 
that the King [Alfred, 871-900] made peace with the army ; 
and they gave to the king as hostages those who were most 
honourable in the army, and they then swore oaths to him 



no The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

on the holy ring, which they before would not do to any 
nation, that they would speedily depart from his kingdom ; 
and notwithstanding this, the mounted body stole away from 
the army by night to Exeter. 

877. In this year the army came to Exeter from Wareham ; 
and the naval force sailed west about ; and then a great storm 
met them at sea, and there perished a hundred and twenty 
ships at Swanage. And King Alfred, with his force, rode after 
the mounted army as far as Exeter, but could not overtake 
them before they were in the fastness, where they could not 
be come at. And they there gave him as many hostages as 
he would have, and swore great oaths, and then held good 
peace. And then, in the autumn, the army went into the 
Mercians' land, and divided some of it, and gave some to 
Ceolwulf [King of Mercia]. 

878. In this year, at midwinter, after Twelfth night, the army 
stole itself away to Chippenham, and harried the West Saxons' 
land, and settled there, and drove away many of the people 
over sea, and of the remainder the greater portion they harried, 
and the people submitted to them, save King Alfred, and he, 
with a little band, withdrew to the woods and moor-fastnesses. 
And in the same winter [Hubba], the brother of Ingwar and 
of Halfden, was in Wessex, in Devonshire, with twenty-three 
ships, and he was there slain, and with him eight hundred and 
forty men of his force. And there was the standard taken 
which they call the Raven. 

[Asser's account of this battle is as follows : "In the same 
year the brother of Ingwar and Halfden, with twenty-three 
ships, after much slaughter of the Christians, came from the 
country of Demetia (South Wales), where he had wintered, 
and sailed to Devon, where, with twelve hundred others, he 
met with a miserable death, being slain while committing his 
misdeeds, by the King's servants (under Odda, aldormen of 
Devon), before the castle of " Cynuit" (perhaps Kenwith, near 
Bideford), into which many of the king's servants, with their 
followers, had fled for safety. The pagans, seeing that the 
castle was altogether unprepared and unfortified, except that 
it had walls in our own fashion (i.e., mereh^ a stockade and 
ditch), determined not to assault it, because it was impregnable 
and secure on all sides, except on the eastern, as we ourselves 
have seen, but they began to blockade it, thinking that those 
who were inside would soon surrender, either from famine or 
want of water, for the castle had no spring near it. But the 
result did not fall out as they expected, for the Christians, 
before they began to suffer from want, inspired by Heaven, 



The Devonian Year Book, 1911 iii 

judging it much better to gain victory or death, attacked the 
pagans suddenly in the morning, and from the first cut them 
down in great numbers, slaying also their king, so that few 
escaped to their ships ; and there gained a very large booty, 
and amongst other things the standard called Raven ; for 
they say that the three sisters of Ingwar and Hubba, daughters 
of Lodobroc, wove that flag and got it ready in one day. 
They say, moreover, that in every battle, wherever that flag 
went before them, if they were to gain the victory a live crow 
would appear flying on the middle of the flag ; but if they 
were doomed to be defeated, it would hang down motionless, 
and this was often proved to be so."] 

And the Easter after, Alfred, with a little band, wrought a 
fortress at Athelney, and from that work warred on the army, 
with that portion of the men of Somerset that was nearest. 
Then in the seventh week after Easter he rode ... to 
Ethandun, and there fought against all the army, and put 
it to flight, and rode after it as far as their fort ; and there 
he sat fourteen nights. And then the army gave him 
important hostages and many oaths that they would leave 
his kingdom, and also they promised him that their King 
[Guthrum] would receive baptism ; and that they accordingly 
fulfilled. 

891. In this year three Scots came to King Alfred in a boat 
without any oars [query a sailing boat] from Ireland, whence 
they had stolen away, because they desired, for love of God, 
to be in a state of pilgrimage, they recked not where. The 
boat in which they came was wrought of two hides and a 
half, and they took with them food sufficient for seven nights ; 
and on the seventh night they came to land in Cornwall, and 
then went straightways to King Alfred. Thus were they 
named : Dubslane, Macbeth, and MaeHnmun. 

894. In this year those who dwell with the Northumbrians 
and with the East Angles gathered some hundred ships and 
went south about ; and some forty ships north about, and 
besieged a work in Devonshire by the north sea ; and those 
who went south about besieged Exeter. When the King 
heard that, he turned west towards Exeter with all the force, 
save a very powerful body of the people eastwards, . . . and 
when he had arrived there, they went to their ships. 

897. On a certain time in this year, there came six ships to 
the Isle of Wight,^ and did there much evil, both in Devon 
and elsewhere on the sea-shore. 

901. In this year died Aethelred, who was aldorman of Devon, 
four weeks before King Alfred. 



112 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

[Aethelred had married Aethelflaed, Alfred's eldest daughter. 
The correct date of Alfred's death seems to be 26 Oct., 900. 
By his will he bequeathed to his elder son, Edward, the land 
at Stratton in Triggshire, Cornwall (" Straetneat on 
Triconsire "), and Hartland in Devon ("Heortingtunes "), 
together with other lands in Somerset and elsewhere, and to 
his younger son, Aethelweard, lands at the following places 
in Devon, besides others elsewhere: Axmouth, Branscombe, 
Cullompton, Tiverton, Milborne (in Silverton), Exminster^ 
Lustleigh ('* Sutheswyrthe "), and Lew Trenchard {" Liew- 
tune ") — " that is, all that I have among the Welsh race, 
excepting Triggshire."] 

[904. King Edward grants to Asser, Bishop of Sherborne, lands 
at Wellington, West Buckland, and Bishop's Lydeard, in 
Somerset, in exchange for the monastery of Plymton, in 
Devon. — Birch, Cart. Sax., No. 610.] 

[905. In this year, or thereabouts, the see of Crediton was 
founded ; and three manors in Cornwall (Pawton, Callington, 
and Lawhitton), were, by a Canterbury Synod, given to 
Eadulf, the first bishop, in order that from thence he might 
annually visit the Cornish race, for the purpose of extirpating 
their errors.] 

915. In this year there came a great naval force over hither 
from the south, from Brittany, and went west about until 
they arrived in the mouth of the Severn ; and they harried 
on the North Welsh [i.e., the people of Wales] everywhere by 
the sea, where it pleased them. . . . And the King [Edward] 
had contrived so that his force sat opposite to them on the 
south side of the mouth of the Severn, west from the Welsh 
(shore) [i.e. Cornwall], as far as the mouth of the Avon east, so 
that they durst not anywhere attack the land on that side. 
Then, nevertheless, they stole away by night on two occasions ; 
once to the east of Watchet, and the other time to Porlock. 
But they were beaten on both occasions, so that few of them 
got away, save those only who swam out to the ships ; and 
these settled out on the island of Flat Holme [some versions 
give Steep Holme] until such time as they were quite destitute 
of food ; and many men died of hunger, because they could 
not obtain any food. They then went to Wales, and then 
out to Ireland. 

926. In this year King Athelstan [924-940] assumed the 
kingdom of the Northumbrians ; and hg subjugated all the 
kings who were in this island : first, Howel King of the West 
Welsh, and Constantine King of the Scots, and Owen King 
of Gwent, and Ealdred son of Ealdulf of Bamborough ; and 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 113 

they confirmed the peace with pledge and with oaths, in the 
place which is called Eamot, on July 12th, and renounced 
every kind of idolatry ; and after that they departed in peace, 
[William of Malmesbury says : "He compelled the rulers of 
the northern Welsh, that is, of the North Britons, [the people 
of Wales] to meet him at the city of Hereford, and after some 
opposition to surrender to his power. . . . Departing thence, 
he turned towards the Western Britons, who are called the 
Cornwallish. Fiercely attacking, he obliged them to retreat 
from Exeter, which, till that time, they had inhabited with 
equal privileges with the Enghsh, fixing the boundary of 
their province on the other side of the river Tamar, as he had 
appointed the river Wye to the North Britons. This city 
then, which he had cleansed by purging it of its contaminated 
race, he fortified with towers and surrounded with a wall of 
squared stone." Howel apparently became sub-king or vice- 
roy, for he signs Athelstan's charters from 928 to 937 as 
" regulus " or " sub-regulus." The witenagemot was held 
at Exeter in 928, and in 930 Athelstan granted land at Sandford 
to Bishop Eadulf and the family at Crediton.] 

[936. The British Bishop Conan recognized by King Athelstan, 
and nominated by him to the Cornish see at Bodmin, 5 Dec] 

937. In this year King Athelstan and Edmund, his brother, led 
a force to " Brunanburh," and there fought against Olaf, and, 
Christ aiding, had the victory ; and they there slew five 
kings and seven earls. 

[The site of this battle has not been identified with certainty, 
but local tradition fixes it at Axminster, and records that 
Athelstan gave the church as a perpetual endowment for 
seven priests to celebrate the obits of the seven earls 
(nothing is said of the five kings) who were slain and 
were buried in the church.] 

[937. Athelstan grants land at Topsham to St. Peter's Church, 
Exeter. — Birch, Cart. Sax., No. 721.] 

[938. Athelstan grants land at Stoke Canon to the " Church 
of the Monastery of St. Mary at Exeter," at Culmstock and 
Monkton to '' Saints Mary and Peter at the monastery called 
Exeter," and at Newton St. Petrock to " the Monastery of 
St. Petroc " at Bodmin.— Birch, Cart. Sax., Nos. 721, 723, 
724, 725, 726. ] 

962. In this year died Aelfgar, the king's kinsman, in Devon. 

965. In this year King Edgar took ^Ifthryth [Elfrida] for his 
queen ; she was the daughter of the aldorman Ordgar. 
[The stories of her wooing by Aethelwold, and the murder of 
her step-son, King Edward, are well known.] 

8 



114 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

977. In this year was the great mote at KyrtUngton, after 
Easter ; and there died Bishop Sideman, by sudden death, 
on April 30th. He was bishop of Devonshire, and he desired 
that his body's resting-place might be at Crediton, at his 
episcopal see. Then commanded King Edward and Arch- 
bishop Dunstan that he should be conveyed to St. Mary's 
monastery that is at Abingdon ; and so it was done. 

981. In this year was " St. Petroces stow " [probably Bodmin, 
not Padstow] ravaged ; and in the same year great harm was 
done ever5Avhere by the sea-coast, both in Devonshire and 
in Wales. 

988. In this year Watchet was ravaged, and Goda, the Devon 
shire thane, slain, and with him great slaughter made. 

997. In this year the army went about Devonshire into the 
mouth of the Severn, and harried there, as well in Cornwall 
as in North Wales and in Devonshire ; and then landed at 
Watchet, and there wrought great evil by burning and by 
man-slaying ; and after that they returned round the Land's 
End, on to the south side, and wended into the mouth of the 
Tamar, and then went up until they came to Lidford, and 
burnt and slew everything they found ; and they burnt 
Ordulf's monastery at Tavistock, and brought unspeakable 
booty with them to their ships. 

[Lidford was one of the four boroughs and mint towns in 
Devonshire, the three others being Exeter, Barnstaple, and 
Totnes. At the time of the Domesday Survey there were 
twenty-eight burgesses within the borough and forty-one 
without. Ordulf was the son of Ordgar, and thus uncle of 
the King, Aethelred II, 978-1016. He was famed for his 
gigantic size and enormous strength. The monastery was 
begun by Ordgar in 961, and completed by Ordulf.] 

1001. In this year there was much strife in the land of English 
through the naval force, and everywhere they harried and 
burned, so that at a certain time they went forward until they 
came to Alton, and then came against them the men of Hamp- 
shire and fought against them. And then they went thence 
west until they came to Devonshire, and there came Palhg to 
meet them, with the ships that he could gather ; because he 
had fled from King Aethelred, against all the plighted troth 
that he had given him ; and the king had also well gifted him 
with lands, and with gold and silver. And then burnt Teignton, 
and also many other goodly vills which we cannot name ; 
and afterwards peace was made there with them. And then 
they went thence to the mouth of the Exe, so that they went 
up at a certain time until they came to Pinhoe ; and there 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 115 

were Cola, the King's high reeve, and Eadsige, the King's reeve, 
opposed to them with the force which they could gather ; and 
they were there put to flight, and many were there slain, and 
the Danish had possession of the place of slaughter. And on 
the morning after, they burnt the vihs at Pinhoe and at Clyst, 
and also many goodly vills which we cannot name ; and then 
went again east until they came to the . Isle of Wight ; and 
soon after this they were treated with and made peace. 

1003. In this year Exeter was taken by storm, through the 
French count Hugo, whom the lady [Aelfgifu Emma, daughter 
of Richard, Duke of Normandy, queen of Aethelred II] had 
appointed her reeve ; and the army then totally ruined the 
town, and took great booty there. 

1013. And thither [to Bath] came the aldorman Aethelmaer 
[of Devon], and the western thanes with him, and they all 
submitted to Swegen and gave him hostages. 

1017. In this year was slain Brihtric, son of Aelfheah, in 
Devonshire. 

THIRD PERIOD— THE NORMAN CONQUEST. 

1047. In this year died Lyfing, the eloquent bishop, on March 
23rd ; and he had three bishoprics, one in Devonshire, and 
one in Cornwall, and one in Worcester. Then Leofric [the 
King's priest] succeeded to Devonshire and to Cornwall, and 
Bishop Aldred to Worcester. 

1049. While earl Godwine and earl Beorn lay at Pevensey with 
their ships, there came earl Swegen with guile and prayed earl 
Beorn [who was his uncle's son] that he would be his companion 
to the king at Sandwich, saying that he would swear oaths 
to him, and be faithful to him. Then Beorn fancied that, on 
account of their kinship, he would not deceive him. He then 
took three companions with him and they rode to Bosham, 
as if they would go to Sandwich, where Swegen's ships lay. 
And they immediately bound him and led him to a ship, and 
then went to Dartmouth [some versions have Exmouth], and 
there he caused him to be slain and deeply buried. But his 
kinsman Harold fetched him thence, and conveyed him to 
Winchester, and there buried him by King Cnut, his uncle. 

[1050. Leofric, after governing the Sees at Crediton and St. 
German's for four years, was installed 1st Bishop of Exeter by 
King Edward the Confessor and Edith his queen.] 

1051. Then Odda was placed as earl over Devon, and over 
Somerset, and over Dorset, and over Wales [i.e. Cornwall]. 

1052. In this year earl Harold came from Ireland with [nine] 
ships to the mouth of the Severn [and landed at Porlock], near 



ii6 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

to the boundary of Somerset and Devon, and there ravaged 
greatly ; and the country people gathered against him, both 
from Somerset and from Devon, and he put them to flighty 
and slew there more than thirty good thanes, besides other 
people, and immediately after he went round the Land's End. 
[It was perhaps at this time that the nine manors in the 
neighbourhood of Kingsbridge were " laid waste by Irishmen," 
as recorded in Domesday Book.] 

1053. In this year died Aelfric, Odda's brother, at Deerhurst ; 
and his body rests at Pershore. 

1056. In this year died earl Odda, and his body lies at Pershore ; 
he was ordained monk before his end, a good man and pure, 
and very noble ; and he died on Aug. 31st. 

1067. In this year the King [William the Conqueror] set a 
heavy tax on the poor people ; and, nevertheless, caused to be 
harried all the land that they passed over. And then he 
went to Devonshire, and besieged the town of Exeter for 
eighteen days, and there many of his army perished ; but he 
promised them well, and performed ill. And they surrendered 
the town because the thanes had deceived them. And in this 
year Gytha, Harold's mother, went out and the wives of many 
good men with her, to Flat Holme, and there abode some 
while ; and so went thence over sea to St. Omer's. And in 
the same time came one of Harold's sons from Ireland, with 
a great naval force, into the mouth of the Avon unawares, and 
immediately harried over all that part. 

[Domesday Book, 1086, records that 48 houses in Exeter had 
been laid in ruins since King WiUiam had England. Accord- 
ing to Professor Freeman this was to make room for the castle, 
but we find that in Lidford also 40 houses had been laid in 
ruins, and in Barnstaple 23. The fourth borough, Totnes, 
was then in possession of Juhel, and does not seem to have 
suffered in this way.] 

1068. After this came Harold's sons from Ireland, at Midsum- 
mer, with sixty-four ships, into the mouth of the Taw, and 
unwarily landed there ; and earl Brian [son of Eudes, count 
of Brittany] came against them unawares with no small force, 
and fought against them, and slew there all the best men 
that were in the fleet ; and the others in a small body fled to 
the ships. And Harold's sons went back again to Ireland. 

1135. In this King's time [Stephen's] all was strife, and evil, 
and rapine ; for against him soon rose the powerful men who 
were traitors. The first of all was Baldwin de Redvers, who 
held Exeter against him; and the King besieged it, and 
then Baldwin capitulated. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 117 

Some Recent Devonshire Literature.* 

(Compiled by H. Tapley-Soper, City Librarian, Exeter). 

Bearne's Exeter Year Book. 1910. (Bearne Bros., 1/-). 
Browne, C. G. *' Chat about Lympstone Church and Parish." 

(Issued by the Rector of Lympstone in aid of the Church 

Funds, 6d.) 
Browne, G. F., '' Boniface of Crediton, and His Companions." 

(S.P.C.K., 6/-.) 
Chanter, J. F. '* Life and Times of Martin Blake, B.D." 

(Lane, 10/6 net.) 
Chick, Elijah. *' Tucker's Hall, Exeter." [Flying Post 

Office, Exeter.) 
Collins, J. H. '' Observations on the West of England Mining 

District," 1910. (Published by the author, 21/-.) 
Cox, J. Mercer. " Plympton St. Mary : the Priory, the Church 

and the Parish." (Roughton, Plympton.) 
Davey's Devon Herd Book. Vol. 33. 1910. (Pollard & Co., 

3/-.) 
Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries. Vol. 6. Parts 1, 2, 3, 4. 

(Commin, Exeter, 6/6 per annum.) 
Devon and Cornwall Record Society Transactions. Parts 10 

and 11. (One guinea per annum.) 
Devonshire Association Transactions for 1910. (Brendon, 

Plymouth, 10/6.) 
Exeter Cathedral Registers of Births, Marriages and Deaths. 

Trans, and Ed. by W. U. Reynell-Upham and H. Tapley-Soper. 

(Devon and Cornwall Record Society.) 
Exeter Diocesan Finance Year Book. 1910. (Townsend, 1/-.) 
" Frankhn, George. Memoir of an Exeter Philanthropist." 

(Privately printed.) 
Harper, C."^ G. '' North Cornish Coast." (Chapman & Hall. 

7/6 net.) 
Harper, C. G. " South Cornish Coast." (Chapman & Hall, 

7/6 net.) 
Heath, Sidney. ''South Devon and Dorset Coast." (Fisher 

Unwin, 6/-.) 
Home, Beatrice and Gordon. " North Devon, with West 

Somerset." (Homeland Pocket Books, 2/6 net.) 
King, Arthur Steele. " Branscombe : Its Church and Parish." 

(Southwood & Co., 1/-. Issued in aid of the Church Restora- 
tion Fund.) 

* Publishers are invited to send to the compiler of this list, copies of 
new books for notice in future issues of the Year Book. 



ii8 The Devonian Year Book, 1911 

Knight, F. A. and L. M. (Knight) Button. ''Devonshire." 

(Cambridge County Geographies. Cam. Univ. Press, 1/6 net.) 
Moorman, F. W. "Robert Herrick." (Lane, 16/-.) 
Prideaux, E. K. and G. R. Holt-Shafto. " Bosses and Corbels 

of Exeter Cathedral." (Commin, 7/6 net.) 
Salmon, A. L. '' Cornwall Coast." (Fisher Unwin, 6/- net.) 
Smith, C. Felton. " Records of the Church and Parish of 

Crediton." (Barnes, Crediton, 6d.) 
Stawell, G. D. '' Quantock Family, A : The Stawells of Cothel- 

stone and their Descendants, the Barons Stawell of Somerton, 

and the Stawells of Devonshire and the County Cork." (Barni- 

cott & Pearce, 42/- net.) 
Stawell, Mrs. Rodolph. " Motor Tours in the West Country." 

(Hodder & Stoughton, 6/- net.) 
Watkin, Hugh H. " Torre Abbey." (Colonel Carey, Torre 

Abbey, Torquay, issued in aid of the funds of the Torquay 

Hospital, 1/-.) 

PERIODICALS, Etc. 

Publications of the Devon and Cornwall Record Society. 
Works now in progress : — 
The Feet of Fines for Devon and Cornwall. Hooker's 
" History of Exeter." The Registers of Births, Marriages, 
and Deaths of Exeter Cathedral and the Parishes of St. Pancras, 
Exeter ; Branscombe ; Falmouth ; Truro ; and Ottery St . 
Mary. (Annual Subscription, one guinea. H. Tapley-Soper, 
Hon. Secretary, Exeter.) 

" Transactions of the Devonshire Association." (Annual 
Subscription, 10/6.) 

" Devon Notes and Queries " (Quarterly). (Annual Subscrip- 
tion, 6/6. J. G. Commin, Exeter.) 

" Transactions of the Plymouth Institution and Natural 
History Society." (Annual Subscription, one guinea.) 

The following colleges and schools publish Magazines at irregular 

intervals : — 
Exeler : The University College ; Exeter School ; Hele's School ; 

Mint School. 
Dartmouth : The Royal Naval College. 
Honiton : All Hallows School. 
Newton Abbot : Newton College. 
Ply mouth : Plymouth and Mannamead College. 
Tavistock : Kelly College. 
Tiverton: Blundell's School. 
West Buckland : Devon County School. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1911 ng 



Devonshire Fiction.* 

(Compiled by H. Tapley-Soper, City Librarian, Exeter.) 

Adye, F. " Queen of the Moor." 

Austen, J. '' Sense and Sensibility." 

Baker, J. " By the Western Sea." (Lynton and District.) 

Barnes, James. '' Drake and his Yeomen." (Juvenile.) 

Batcheler, M. '' Six Devonshire Dumplings." 

Blackmore, R. D. " Christowell." " Clara Vaughan. '' Lorna 

Doone" (1685). "Maid of Sker " (George III.). " Perly- 

cross." " Tales from the Telling House." 
Bowdler, H. M. " Pen Tamar ; or the History of an Old Maid." 
Braddon, M. E. " The World, the Flesh, and the Devil." 
Bray, Mrs. | " Hartland Forest : a Legend of North Devon." 
Brown, Ohver Madox. " Dwale Bluth." '' Yeth-hounds : a 

Legend of Dartmoor." 
Carr, M. E. '' George Goring's Daughters " (Dartmoor.) 
Chanter, G. " Witch of Withyford." 
Chesson, Thos. W. H. " Bell and the Arrow." 
Clarke, Mrs. Henry. '' Lad of Devon " (Juvenile). 
Corelli, Marie. '* Mighty Atom " (Clovelly). " Treasure of 

Heaven." 
Corbett, Julian. ''For God and Gold" (Juvenile). 
Dawson, W. J. " Story of Hannah." 
De la Pasture, Mrs. H. " Man from America." *' Peter's 

Mother." 
De Lisle, J. " Ghost of an Englishwoman." 
Dickens, Charles. " David Copperfield " (Exeter, Dartmoor, 

Plymouth). 
Doyle, Sir A. Conan. " Hound of the Baskervilles " (Dartmoor.) 
Drake, Maurice. " Lethbridge of the Moor." 
Eden, C. H. "At Sea with Drake " (Juvenile). 
Fenn, George M. " Cutlass and Cudgel " (Juvenile). " Devon 

Boys" (Juvenile). "Quicksilver^' (Juvenile). 
Fisher, A. O. " Withy foM." 
Ford, G. " Larramys." " 'Pestle Farm" 
Fortescue, J. W. " Drummer's Coat " (Juvenile). 
Francillon, R. E. " Ropes of Sand." 



* The compiler will be pleased to receive notes fiom readers of any 
novels omitted from this list, which have their scenes laid in Devonshire 
or which in any way refer to the County. 

t The majority of Mrs. Bray's novels contain local references, but 
unfortunately they are all '' out of print." 



120 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Francis, M. E. '' Manor Farm." 

Garvice, Charles.* " In Wolf's Clothing " (West Devon, Porlock 
Way, Lundy Island). " Modern JuHet " (Bradworthy Moor- 
land district). " Once in a Life " (Barnstaple and Estuary 
of the Tor district). '' Queen Kate " (Mid-Devon). " Rugged 
Path " (Bude district).'^ 

Gerard, M. " Lieutenant of the King " (Pitt & Bonaparte). 

Gissing, G. " Private Papers of Henry Ryecroft " (Exeter). 

Gould, S. Baring-. " Court Royal " (Victoria, Kingsbridge) . 
" Dartmoor Idylls." *' Eve " (George IV., Morwell on the 
Tamar). " Furze Bloom " (Dartmoor). " Gaverocks." 
'' Guavas the Tinner " (Elizabeth, Dartmoor). " John Her- 
ring " (George IV., Near South Zeal). " Kitty Alone " (Early 
Victorian. Monks of the Teign. Bishops Teignton). '' Mar- 
gery of Quethir " (Modern, Brentor). " Red Spider." '' Royal 
Georgie " (George IV., W^idecombe). " Urith " (James II., 
Peter Tavy and L3^dford). " Winefred " (George III., Smug- 
gling, Axmouth and Seaton). 

Grogan, W. E. " Dregs of Wrath " (Courtenay family at the 
Court of Charles II.). 

Hare, C. *' Down the Village Street." 

Harper, Charles G. " Love in the Harbour." (Teignmouth). 

Harris, W. Gregory. " Down along o' We " (West Country 
Sketches, Stories, and Verses). " Sketches of the West 
Countree." 

Hatton, Joseph. " White King of Manoa." 

Hawker, Bessie. '' Overlooked." 

Henty, G. A. '' Under Drake's Flag " (Juvenile). 

Hewett, Mrs. " Nummits and Crummits " (Dialect). *' Peasant 
Speech of Devon " (Dialect). 

Hitchens, J. " Which Side gave in, and Other Stories." 

Hocking, Joseph. '' Follow One Gleam " (CromweUian period). 
" Man who Rose Again " (Modern.) 

Hocking, Silas K. " Who shall Serve ? " (Modern, the district 
between Newton Abbot and Plymtree). 

" Homely, Josias " (John Bradford). '' Tales of the Moor." 

Hooper, J. '' Minister's Conversion." 

Jane, F. T. " Ever." '' Lordship, the Passen, and We." 

Kingsley, C. " Two Years Ago " (Clovelly). " ^^^estward Ho ! " 
(Elizabeth). 

Kingsley, Henry. '' Geoffrey Hamlyn." 

Kipling, Rudyard. '' Stalky & Co " (Juvenile, Westward Ho !). 

Leighton, Robert. '' Haunted Ship " (Juvenile). 

*To enumerate all Mr. Garvice 's novels would take more space than we 
have at our disposal. We can almost say that nearly all his novels have a 
Devonshire background. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1911 121 

Lovett, Richard. " Drake and the Dons " (Juvenile). 

'' Malet, Lucas." (Mrs. M. St. Leger Harrison). " Wages of vSin " 
(Clovelly). 

Mallock, W. H. " Heart of Life." 

'' Manton, W." (WilHam Cotton). " Bank Manager, and How 
he was Duped)." 

Meade, L. T. '' Palace Beautiful " (Juvenile). 

Melville, G. J. Whyte-. " Katerfelto " (George HL, Exmoor). 

Mockler, Geraldine. " Girls of St. Bede's " (Juvenile). 

Mortimer, G. " Tales from the Western Moors." 

Mules, P. H. *' George Doggett : a Story of a Devonshire 
Manor Thirty Years Ago." 

Niven, F. " Island Providence." 

Norway, A. H. "Parson Peter" (18th Century). 

O'Neill, H. C. '' Devonshire Idylls." " Told in the Dimpses." 

Parr, Mrs. '' Dorothy Fox." 

Parr, L. " Loyalty George " (Coast. 18th Century). 

Parr, Olive K. '* Voice of the River " (Juvenile). 

Peard, F. M. '' Prentice Hugh." 

Phillpotts, Eden. '' Affair at the Inn." " American Prisoner." 
" Children of the Mist." " Down Dartmoor Way." " Farm 
of the Dagger." " Fun of the Fair." '' Good Red Earth." 
" Haven." " Knock at a Venture." " Mother." " My 
Devon Year." " Portreeve." *' River." " Secret Woman." 
" vSome Every-day Folks." '' Sons of the Morning." '' Strik- 
ing Hours." '' Thief of Virtue." '' Three Brothers." "Vir- 
gin in Judgement." " Whirlwind." " Wild Fruit." (Poems, 
many in dialect.) 

Pinkerton, T. A. " French Prisoner " (Dartmoor). 

'' Q " (Sir A. T. Ouiller Couch). " Adventures of Harry Revel " 
(Smuggling). 

Reynolds, Stephen. " Alongshore." " Holy Mountain." 
" Poor Man's House." 

Rogers, Eva C. " Magic Mist and other Dartmoor Legends." 

Rugg, W. H. J. " Hope Wins : a Devonshire Tale." 

Sharland, E. Cruwys. " Ways and Means in a Devonshire 
Village " (Juvenile). 

Shorthouse, J. H. " Blanche, Lady Falaise." 

Sinjohn, J. " Man of Devon." 

Smart, H. " Without Love or Licence." 

Speight, T. W. " Galleon of Torbay." 

Stimson, F. J. " King Noanett : a Story of Devon Settlers 
in Old Virginia and Massachusetts Bay." 

Thackeray, William M. " Pendennis " (Exeter and Ottery St. 
Mary). 



122 The Devonian Year Book, 1911 

Thomas, B. " House on the Scar." 

Thornton, W. H. and F. W. Hobbs. *' Two Countrymen in 
Council, Arcadians both." 

Thynne, A. C. " Sir Bevill " (1595-1632). 

Towle, George M. " Drake, the Sea King of Devon " (Juvenile). 

Trevena, J. " Arminel of the West." " Bracken." ** Dartmoor 
House that Jack Built." "Furze the Crael." "Granite." 
" Heather." " Pixie in Petticoats." " Tales of Tenements." 
" Written in Rain." 

TroUope, Anthony. " He knew he was Right " (Exeter). 

Villings, H. " Paulette Dr. Esteme " (Artist). 

Watson, Helen H. " Andrew Goodfellow : a Tale of 1805 
(Plymouth). " Captain's Daughter " (Plymouth). " Love 
the Intruder " (Lancaster and the Borders of Dartmoor). 

Watson, H. B. Marriott. " Captain Fortune " (Civil War). 

Walling, R. A. J. " Flaunting Moll, and other Stories." 

Willcocks, M. P. " Man of Genius " (Hartland). " Way Up " 
(Exeter and district). " Widdicombe." " Wingless Victory." 

" Zack " (Gwendoline Keats). " On Trial." " Tales of Dun- 
stable Weir." " White Cottage." 



Devonshire Learned and Scientific 
Societies.* 

(Compiled by H. Tapley-Soper, Cit}^ Librarian, Exeter.) 

Architectural Society of Plymouth. E. C. Adams, Secretary, 
The Athenaeum, George Street, Plymouth. 

Dartmouth Technical and Scientific Society. S. G. Hearn, 
Hon. Secretary. 

Devon and Exeter Architectural Society (in alliance with the 
Royal Institute of British Architects). Allan R. Pinn, 
A.R.LB.A., Hon. Secretary, 5, Bedford Circus, Exeter, and 
C. Cheverton, Hon. Secretary Three Towns Branch, 64, 
Chapel Street, Devonport. 

Devon and Exeter Benevolent Medical Society; E. Down, 
F.R.C.S. (Edin.), M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., Hon. Secretary, Wing- 
field House, Stoke, Devonport. 

* The compiler requests that alterations of address, and appointment 
of new officers, should be notified. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 123 

Devon and Exeter Medico-Chirurgical Society. R. V. Solly, 
M.D.; Secretary, 40, West Southernhay; Exeter. 

Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Litera- 
ture, and Art. Maxwell Adams, Hon. Secretary, c/o Messrs. 
H. S. King & Co., 9, Pall Mall, London, S.W. 

Devon and Cornwall Record Society. H. Tapley-Soper, 
F.R.Hist.S., Hon. Secretary and General Editor. Royal 
Albert Memorial University College, Museum, and Public 
Library, Exeter. 

Devon and Exeter Law Association. T. W. Burch, Esq., Hon. 
Secretary, Palace Gate, Exeter. 

Exeter Diocesan Architectural and Archaeological Society. 
Rev. S. M. Nourse, Hon. Secretary, Shute Vicarage, Kilming- 
ton S.O. 

Exeter Camera Club. A. J. Tucker; Hon. Secretary, Barnfield 
House, Exeter. 

Exeter Law Library Society. R. Arthur Daw, Hon. Secretary, 
8, The Close, Exeter. 

Exeter Literary Society. J. Isaac Pengelly, Hon. Secretary, 
Barnfield House, Exeter. 

Incorporated Law Society (Plymouth). R. B. Johns and B. H. 
Whiteford, joint Hon. Secretaries, 5, Princess Square, Ply- 
mouth. 

Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom Laboratory. 
Edgar J. Allen, D.Sc, Hon. Secretary, and Director of the 
Plymouth Laboratory, Citadel Hill, Plymouth. 

Plymouth Institution and Devon and Cornwall Natural History 
Society. Henry Penrose Prance and W. C. Wade, Hon. 
Secretaries, The Athenaeum, George Street, Plymouth. 

Plymouth Medical Society. H. ^^^ W^ebber, Hon. Secretary. 
Dr. A. B. Soltau, Hon. Librarian, Athenaeum Chambers, 
Atlienaeum Lane, Plymouth. 

Plymouth Photographic Society. Charles F. Ford, Hon. Secre- 
tary, The Athen?eum, George Street, Plymouth. 

Teign Naturalists' Field Club. 

Torquay Medical Society. H. K. Lacey; M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., 
Secretary, " Melita," Torquay. 

Torquay Natural History Society. Major E. V. Elwes, Hon. 
Secretary, Babbacombe Road, Torquay. 

LTniversity College Field Club and Natural History Societ}^ 
Miss Aviolet, Hon. Secretary, University College, Exeter. 



124 -^^'^ Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



Libraries in Devonshire. 

Barnstaple. 

Athenaeum Library ; 23,500 volumes (large local collection of 
books and manuscripts, including the Borough Records, 
the Oliver, Harding, and Incledon MSS., the Doddridge 
Library, and the Sharland Bequest). Thomas Wainwright, 
Secretary and Librarian. 

Bideford. 

Bideford Public Library ; 5,900 volumes. E. B. L. Brayley, 
Librarian. 

Clovelly. 

Village Library ; 500 volumes. Mrs. Hamlyn, Hon. Librarian. 

Devonport. 

Free Public Library, Duke Street ; 24,443 volumes. William 
D. Rutter, Librarian. 

Exeter. 

The Royal Albert Memorial University College, Museum, and 
Public Library ; 45,000 volumes and manuscripts (large 
local collection, including the collections of the late James 
Davidson, Esq., of Axminster ; P. O. Hutchinson, Esq., of 
Sidmouth ; Edward Fisher, Esq., F.S.A. Scot., of Newton 
Abbot ; and J. Brooking-Rowe, Esq., F.S.A., of Plympton). 
H. Tapley-Soper, F.L.A., F.R.Hist.S., Librarian. 

The Devon and Exeter Institution ; 40,000 volumes. J. 
Coombes, Librarian. 

The Cathedral Library ; 8,000 volumes and many manu- 
scripts. The Rev. Chancellor Edmonds, Librarian. 

The City Muniment Room, The Guildhall (collection of manu- 
script Records). H. Lloyd Parry, B.A., B.Sc, Town Clerk. 

The Exeter Law Library ; "^4,000 volumes. H. Tapley-Soper, 
F.R.Hist.S., Librarian. 

The Medical Library, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, 
East Southernay. 

Moretonhampstead. 

Bowring Library; 2000 volumes. W. T. Hutchings and 

A. G. Blackmore, Hon. Librarians. 
Newton Abbot. 

Newton Abbot Public Library; 7,171 volumes. Wm. Mad- 

dern, F.L.A., Librarian. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 125 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth Public Libarry ; 82,000 volumes (large local collec- 
tion). W. H. K. Wright, F.L.A., F.R.Hist.S., Librarian. 

Plymouth Proprietary and Cottonian Library ; 42,000 
volumes. J. L. C. Woodley, Librarian. 

Plymouth Institute and Natural History Society ; 6,000 
volumes. 

St. Giles-in-the-Wood, Torrington. 

St. Giles' Library ; 300 volumes. S. J. Daniels, Hon. Libra- 
rian. 

Tavistock. 

Tavistock Library, Abbey Buildings ; 15,000 volumes. John 
Quick, Librarian. 

Torquay. 

Torquay Public Library ; 8,000 volumes. Joseph Jones, 
F.L.A., Librarian. 

Totnes. 

South Devon Library, 12, High Street ; 3,000 volumes. 
Samuel Veasey, Librarian. 

Yealmpton, Plymouth. 

Yealmpton Institute Library ; 450 volumes. 



126 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



List of Members and Associates. 

An asterisk (*) indicates Life Members. 
A double dagger (%) indicates Associates. 

:f Abell, Westcott Stile (Exmouth), M.I.N. A., Professor of Naval Architec- 
ture, University of Liverpool. 49, Croxteth Road, Sefton Park, 
Liverpool. 

Acland, Theodore Dyke (Colomb-John), M.D., 19, Bryanston Square, W., 
Vice-President. 

Adams, A. A. (Werrington), C.A., Frankfield, Stanhope Road, Hornsey 
Lane, N. 

Adams, B. E. (Werrington), 44, UUeswater Road, Palmers Green, N. 

Adams, E. W. (Kingsbridge), 18 Fleet Street, E.C. 

Adams, Mrs. E. W. (Kingsbridge), 18, Fleet Street, E.C. 

Adams, H. G. (Crediton). 

Amery, J. J. (Ashburton), 18, Fleet Street, E.C. 

Andrews, Mrs. Lilian (Plymouth), 3, Old Cavendish Street, Oxford St., W. 

Andrews, R. (Culmstock), 90, King's Road, Chelsea, S.W. 

Askham, F. W. (Princetown), Horseguards, Whitehall, S.W. 

Avery, Miss, Scarsdale House, Kensington, W. 

Axhorn, Miss E. B. (Tiverton), 116, Heathwood Gardens, Charlton, S.E. 

Ayers, Mrs. Edith (Netherexe)., 

Bailey, F. A. (Exeter), London Institution, Finsbury, E.C. 

Baker, Fred. (Ottery St. Mary), 33, Colbourne Road, Balham, S.W. 

Banbury, H. (Devonport), Patent Ofhce, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C, 

Barnes, R. Stewart (Yealmpton), 53, Moorgate Street, E.C. Committee. 

Barnes, Mrs. R. S. (IBrixham), 9, Russell Road, Crouch End, N. 

Bastin, T. W. (Exmouth), Messrs. Bastin, Merryfield and Cracknell, Great. 
Castle Street W. 

Bate, J. J. (Sutcombe), 87, High Road, Kilburn, N.W. 

Bazley, Miss Lucy (Starcross), 54, Avenue Road, Regent's Park, N.W. 

Bazley, Miss M. (Starcross), 82, Uxbridge Road, West Ealing, W. 

Beckett, A. E. (Plymouth), 61, Westbury Road, Wembley. 

Bell, Miss Annie (Kingsbridge), 11, Tresillian Crescent, St. John's, S.E. 

Bennett, Samuel (Devonport), 6, Hemington Avenue, Friern Barnet, N. 

Berry, C. H. (Brixham), Devonia, Stopford Road, Upton Manor, E. 

Bidgood, G. G. (Tiverton), 12, Clifton Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Bidgood, G. S. (Tiverton), 8, Hornsey Lane Gardens, Highgate, N. 
Committee. 

Bidgood, R. (Tiverton), 20, Beaconsfield Road, Friern Barnet, N. 

Bird, Wm. (Shaldon), 89, Walm Lane, Willesden Green. 

Birdseye, H. S. (North Tawton), 8, Montpelier Vale, Blackheath, S.E. 

Bishenden, C. J. (Newton Abbot), 105, New Oxford Street, W. 

Bishenden, Mrs. I. M. (Newton Abbot), 105, New Oxford Street, W. 

Blacking, A. (Exeter), AUington Lodge, Sheridan Road, Merton Park. 

Boden, R. H., 11, Derwent Road, Anerley, S.E. 

Bodley, A. H. ( Witheridge) , 74, Calbourne Road, Balham, S.W. 

Bond, Mrs. Douglas (Tavistock), 22, Surrey Street, Victoria Embank- 
ment, W.C. 

Bone, G. B. (Stoke Damerell), 4, Raymond Buildings, Grays Inn, W.C. 

Bourne, C. W. (Ilfracombe), 19, Fairlawn Road, Wimbledon, S.W. 

Bowden, A. T. (North Tawton), 76, Newgate Street, E.C. Committee. 

Bowden, T. R., 13, Waterford Road, Walham Green, S.W. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 127 

Bradford, S. J. (Plymouth), 41, Nigel Road, Peckham Rye, S.E. 
Bridge, E. (Bow), 19, Kelmscott Road, Wandsworth Common, S.W. 
Bridge, Mrs. E. (Bow) 19, Kelmscott Road, Wandsworth Common, S.W. 
Bridgeman, G. E. (Ugborough), 185, Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, S.W. 
Bridgeman, Miss Jennie (Ugborough), 185, Fentiman Road, Vauxhall 

Park S.W. 
Bridgeman, Miss Mona (Ugborough), 185, Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, 

S.W. 
Bridgeman, S. J. S. (Ugborough), 185, Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, 

S.W. 
Bridgman, Victor (Modbury), 36, Ravenscourt Gardens, W. 
Brimicombe, M. H. (Totnes), 22, Norfolk Street, Dalston, N.E. 
Britton, John (Bratton Fleming), 139, Hartfield Road, Wimbledon, S.W. 
Broadbear, Miss G. L. (Teignmouth), 4, Chapel Place, Cavendish Square, W. 
Brodie, C. H. (Exeter), F.R.I.B.A., 77, Park Lane, Croydon. 
Bromham, Addison J. (Barnstaple), Westward Ho, Wimbledon Common. 
Brookes, Miss Mattie (Lifton), Tudor Lodge, Albert Road, Stroud Green. 
Brooks, Miss E. (Tiverton), Birkbeck House, Lancaster Road, Enfield. 
Broom, Miss Violet (Teignmouth), Staffordshire House, Store Street, W.C. 
Brown, A. S. (Sidbury), 61, Hubert Grove, Landor Road, Stockwell, S.E. 
Brown, Mrs. A. S. (Sidbury), 61, Hubert Grove, Landor Road, Stockwell 

S.E. 
Brown, W. H. (Exmouth), 35, Cumberland Park, Acton, W. 
Budd, E. H., 34, Poultry, E.C. 
Burlace, J. B. (Brixham), 38, Corfton Road, EaUng, W. Vice-President) 

Committee. 
Burnett, Sydney (Cadeleigh), 16, Rebecca Terrace, Rotherhithe, S.E. 
Burrow, Miss L. L. (Tavistock), 11, Fitzroy Street, W 
Burrow^s, B. (Honiton), 67, Peterborough Road, Fulham, S.W. 
Burton, E. Cave- (Exeter), 36, Jasper Road, LTpper Norwood, S.E. 
Burton, Miss E. H. (Exeter,) 3 6, Jasper Road, Upper Norwood, S.E. 

Campbell, R. J. P. (Exeter), 15, St. Margaret's Road, Plumstead. 

Cann, C. E. (Barnstaple), 55, Dyne Road, Brondesbury, N.W. 

Carnell, John (Ottery St. Mary), 83, Philhmore Mews, High Street, 

Kensington. 
Champion, W. (Shaldon), 8, Homewood Gardens, Brixton Hill, S.W. 
Chard, G. M. (Devon County School), Berwen, Canonbie Road, Honor Oak, 

S.E. 
Chettleburgh, Mrs., 38, Redcliffe Gardens, W. 
Chope, R. Pearse (Hartland), B.A., Patent Office, 25, Southampton 

Buildings, W.C. Deputy-Chairman. 
Churchw^ard, Miss M. (Torquay), 409, Oxford Street, W. 
Clapp, W. K. F. (Exeter), i, Rydal Road, Streatham, S.W. 
Clark, W. H. D. (Plymouth), Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, 

W.C. 
Clarke, Arthur (Sidmouth), 13, Culmstock Road, Clapham Common, S.W. 
Clarke, H. J., Town Hall, Upper Street, Islington, N. 
Clarke, H. L. (Torrington), The Bank, Wanstrow, Essex. 
Clarke, John (Honiton), 45, Marloes Road, Kensington, W. 
Clarke, T. (Ottery St. Mary), 41, Church Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Clatworthy, H. J. (descent), Amberley House, Norfolk Street, Strand. 
Clifford, Colonel E. T. (Exeter), V.D., 6, Cranley Gardens, S.W. Vice 

President. 
Clifford of Chudleigh, Rt. Hon. Lord (Ugbrooke), Ugbrooke Park, Chud- 

leigh. Vice-President. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 



Coad, R. Lawson, 27 and 28, Old Jewry, E.G. 

Coker, E. G. (Plymouth), 60, St. Martin's Lane, W.C. 

Cole, N. (Salcombe), 46, Melgund Road, Highbury, N. Committee. 

Cole, Mrs. N. (Salcombe), 46, Melgund Road, Highbury, N. 

Cole, S. J. (Hartland), M.R.C.S., 47, South Molton Street, W. 

Coles, John (Tiverton), J. P., 4, Kensington Park Gardens, W. 
Vice-President. 

Coles, W. Crosbie (Bideford), 78, Park Lane, Croydon. Committee. 

Colwill, Miss A. (Hatherleigh). 

Colwill, C. (North Petherwin), Pentire, Coombe Road, Croydon. 

Commin, Miss A. L. (Exeter), 96, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, E. G. (Exeter), 94, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, Mrs. E. G. (Exeter), 94, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, F. J. (Exeter), 96, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, Mrs. F. J. (Exeter), 104, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, Miss M. O. (Exeter), 96, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, R. G. (Exeter), 96, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Congdon, A. R. (Hartland), 187a Brompton Road, S.W. 

Cook, Miss A. (Ottery St. Mary), 64, Atlantic Road, Brixton, S.W. 

Coombe, J. Townsend (Plymouth), Simla, Bampfylde Road, Torquay. 

Coombes, C. S. (Devonport), Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, 
W.C. 

Copp, S. (Barnstaple), 22, Woburn Place, Russell Square, W.C. 

Cornwall, Sir Edwin A. (Lapford), M.P., L.C.C., 3, Whitehall Court, S.W. 
Vice-President. 

Cornelius, V. A. (Dawlish), Fire Brigade, Southwark Bridge Road, S.E. 
i Couch, Mrs. A. W. (Brixham), 16, Palace Avenue, Paignton. 
jCouch, J. (Brixham), 16, Palace Avenue, Paignton. 

Couch, G. W. (Exeter), Vernon Lodge, Carshalton. 

Couch, Mrs, L. (Exeter), 6, Park View, Brisbane Road, Ilford. 

Couch, W. H. (Totnes), 3, Gratton Terrace, Cricklewood. 

Couch, W. S. (Exeter), 6, Park View, Brisbane Road, Ilford. 

Cox, F., 74, Lansdowne Road, Clapham Park, S.W. 

Cox, Mrs. F., 74, Lansdowne Road, Clapham Road, S.W. 

Coysh, R. H. (Dartmouth), 17, Delafield Road, Charlton, S.E. 

Crang, W. (Ilfracombe), River Plate House, E.C. 

Crook, R. H. J. (Newton Abbot), 15, Bedford Street, Strand, W.C. 

Crossley, W. M. (Sidmouth), Bank of England, E.C. 

Cudmore, H. J. (Torrington) . 

Cumming, Arthur A. F. (Ilsington), 9, Netheravon Road, Chiswick, W. 

Cumming, Miss Edith M. (Ilsington), 9, Netheravon Road, Chiswick, W. 

Cumming, Mrs. L. (Bovey Tracey), 9, Netheravon Road, Chiswick, W. 

Cummings, V. J., 33, Clifden Gardens, Twickenham. 

Cummings, William Hayman (Sidbury), Mus.D. (Dub.), F.S.A., Hon. 
R.A.M., Sydcote, Dulwich, S.E. Vice-President. 

Dart, A. (Tiverton), 37, Beresford Road, Canonbury, N. 

Dart, J. A. (Ilfracombe), 19, Waldegrave Road, Hornsey, N. 

Dart, T. (Tiverton), 65, Seaton Street, Chelsea, S.W. 

Da van, Mrs. (Tiverton), 10, Old Deer Park Gardens, Richmond. 

Davey, G. W. (Sampford Spine y), 16, John Street, Bedford Row, W.C. 

Davey, J. F. (Exeter), 195, Camden Road, N.W. 

Dickson, Miss Florence (DawHsh), 22, CaroHne Street, Camden Town, N.W. 

Distin, Alban G., 11, Melrose Terrace, Shepherd's Bush, W. 

Distin, Frank (Totnes), 22, Carter Lane, E.C. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 129 

♦Distin, Howard (Paignton), M.B., Holtwhite House, Enfield. 

Dobell, J. S. (Newton Abbot), 104, Cricklewood Broadway, N.W. 

Dodridge, A. E, (Plymouth), 37, Pelham Road, Beckenham. 
JDoe, G. M. (Torrington), Enfield, Torrington, North Devon. 
JDoe, G. W. A. (Tonington), Enfield, Torrington, North Devon. 

Doherty, W. (South Molton), 6, Great Newport Street, St. Martin's Lane, 
W.C. Vice-President. 

Dommett, W. E. (Devonport), The Elms, Milner Road, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

Down, E. W. (Ottery St. Mary), 26, Rossetti Buildings, Millbank Estate, 
Vauxhall, S.W. 

Duke, H. E. (Plymouth), K.C., i. Paper Buildings, Temple, E.G. Vice- 
President. 

Dunn, A. E. (Exeter), 70, Victoria Street, S.W. Vice-President. 

Dunn, F. W. (South Molton), 8, Westmount Road, Eltham, Kent. 

Dymond, W. (Honiton), 297, Finchley Road, N. 

Easton, H. T. (Exeter), Union of London and Smiths Bank. Lombard 
Street, E.G. Vice-President. 

Edgar, H., 20, Bucklersbury, E.G. 

Edy, G. W. (Tiverton), 18, Kew Road, Richmond. 

Edy, Mrs. G. W. (Tiverton), 18, Kew Road, Richmond. 
JEdye, Lieut. -Golonel L. (Hatherleigh), Stanley Gouit, Stanley Street, 
Montreal, Ganada. 

Ellis, J. (Moretonhampstead), 31, Milton Street, E.G. 

Emberry, T. E. (Exeter), 133, Bennerley Road, Glapham Gommon, S.W. 

Enticott, Miss Hetty (Axminster), 102, Winstanley Road, Glapham Gom- 
mon, S.W. 
♦Eveleigh, Miss Helen (Exeter), 186, S. James Gourt, Buckingham Gate, 
S.W. 

Farrant, H. G. (Hemiock), J. P., 3, Paper Buildings, Temple, E.G. 
Foale, A. E. (Blackwater), 4, St. Gharles Square, North Kensington, W. 
Foale, Miss A. G. (descent), 29, Aldridge Road Villas, Westbourne Park, W. 
Foale, N., 29, Aldridge Road Villas, Westbourne Park, W. 
Foale, W. E. (descent), 29, Aldridge Road Villas, Westbourne Park, W. 
Fortescue, Rt. Hon. Earl (Fiileigh), Gastle Hill, South Molton, N. Devon. 

Past President. 
Fox, Mrs. (Honiton), " Lord High Admiral," Ghurch Street, Edgware 

Road, W. 
Eraser, Ernest (Exeter), 32, Hatton Garden, E.G. 
French, F. F. (Newton Abbot), 141, Auckland Road, Ilford. 

Gamble, Rev. H. R. (Barnstaple), M.A., Sloane Street, S.W. Vice- 
President. 

Gamlen, L. H. (Morchard). 

Gibson, Thos. (Appledore), 

Gill, Allen (Devonport), F.R.A.M., 5, Lincoln House, Dartmouth Park 
Hill, N.W. Vice-President. 

Gillham, H. (Burlescombe), 222, Gentral Market, E.G. Committee. 

Gillham, Miss Daisy (Torquay), 315, Upper Richmond Road, East Sheen. 

Gillham, Miss Mabel (Torquay), 315, Upper Richmond Road, East Sheen. 

Gillham, Mrs., 90, Blenheim Gardens, Gricklewood, N.W. 

Glanvill, H. Wreford- (Exeter), no, Gannon Street, E.G. 

Glass, W. R. B. (North Loo), 60, Pennaid Road, Shepherd's Bush, W. 



130 The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Godfrey, Mrs. F. A. (descent), Homeville, Merton Avenue, Chiswick, W. 
Godfrey, S. H. (Ottery St. Mary), Homeville, Merton Avenue, Chiswick,^W. 
Goodfellow, J. G., 195, Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, S.W. 
Goodman, W. H. (Devonport), 160, Ardgorvan Road, Catford, S.E. 
Gosling, L. G. (Sidbury), " Sidbuiy," The Avenue, Chingford, Essex. 
Gough, Mrs.. E., 46, Melgund Road, Highbury, N. 

Grant, Miss B. M. (Torrington) , 42, Weymouth Street, Portland Place, W. 
Granwood, J. Northcott (Plymouth), 235, Barry Road," East Dulwich. 
Griffiths, B. H. Percy- (Plymouth), " Highcroft," Cottenham Park Road, 

Wimbledon. 
Grigg, F. E. (Plymouth), 40, Jersey Road, Ilford. 
Grigg, R. (Exmouth), 19, Avondale Avenue, Woodside Park, North 

Finchley. 
Grills, W. E. (Holsworthy), 524, Caledonian Road, N. 
Gulliford, W. (Exeter), 28, Danby Street, Peckham, S.E. 
Guy, G. W. V. (West Putford), 26, Harboro Road, Streatham, S.W. 

Hancock, H. H. M. (Barnstaple), 56, Devereux Road, Wandsworth 
Common, S.W. Committee. 

Handford, W. (Barnstaple), 92, Morshead Mansions, Maida Vale, W. 

Hammick, Miss Daisy (Stoke Gabriel), 60, Thirsk Road, Clapham Com- 
mon, S.W. 

Harger, A. C, 10 1, Sheen Road, Richmond. 

Harris, Mrs. Blanche (Plymouth), 96, Croxted Road, West Dulwich, S.E, 

Harris, Frank (Exeter), L.C.C. School, Orange Street, Southwark, S.E. 

Harris, T. M., 78, Morshead Mansions, Maida Vale, W. 

Harry, Miss F. E. (Torquay), 16, Tanza Road, Hampstead Heath, N.W. 

Hayes, Mrs. B. (Sidmouth). 

Hayncs, J. T. (Hartland), J. P., 25, Montrell Road, Streatham Hill, S.W. 

Haynes, Mrs. J. T. (Plymouth), 25, Montrell Road, Streatham Hill, S.W. 
t Heard, W. E. (Northam), J. P., Winchester House, Newport, Mon. 

Hearson, Prof. T. A. (Barnstaple), M.Inst. C.E., 22, Southampton 
Buildings, W.C. 

Hearson, W. E. (Barnstaple), " Kippington," Sevenoaks, Kent. 

Heath, Chas. (North Tawton). 

Hesse, Mrs. N. (Tiverton), 5, Moorgate Street, E.C. 

Hill, Edmund J. (Dartmouth), 19, Becmead Avenue, Streatham. 

Hill, Mrs. E. G. (Dartmouth), 19, Becmead Avenue, Streatham. 

Hill, H. W. (Exeter), 14, Highlever Road, North Kensington, N. 

Hill, J. A. (Holcombc Rogus), C.A., 19a, Coleman Street, E.C. Hon. 
A uditor. 

Hobbs, Frank (Molland), 119, Upper Richmond Road, Putney. 

Hobbs, W. H. (Bideford), 226, Southwark Park Road, S.E. 

Hockaday, F., 82, Geraldine Road, Wandsworth, S.W. 

Hodge, F. (Heavitree), " The Homestead," Bishop's Avenue, East Finchley. 

Hoey, H. (Exeter), 21, Lyndhurst Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Holmes, A. H., 32, King Street, Cheapside, E.C." 

Honey, A. (Exeter), 60, Flanders Road, Bedford Park, W. 

Honey, Miss L. (Exeter), 60, Flanders Road, Bedford Park, W. 

Hopkms, Martyn (Silverton), 113, Burton Road, Brixton, S.W. 
*Hooppell, Rev. J. L. E. (Aveton Gifford), St. Peter's Vicarage, Hoxton 
Square, N. 

Horton, A. J. B. (Morleigh), Matlock, Chudleigh Road, Croften Park, S.E. 

Horwood, E. J. (Exeter), L.C.C. School, Crordonbrock Road, Lee, S.E. 

Howie, Mrs. J. R. C. (Tiverton), 36, Pepys Road, Raynes Park, S.W. 

JHughes, T. Cann (Hittisleigh), M.A., F.S.A., 78, Church Street, Lancaster, 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 131 

Hunter, Mrs. J. P. (Plymouth), 5, Shaftesbury Villas, Allen Street, 
Kensington, W. 
JHussell, Allen T. (Ilfracombe), F.R.I.B.A., Ilfracombe. 
Hutchings, C. F, H, (Exeter), 10, Old Devonshire Road, Balham, 
Hutchings, Miss Louie (Torquay), 205, Shirland Road, W. 
Hutchings, L. W. (Okehampton), 22, St. Paul's Churchyard, E.G. 

Inman, Miss Melina (Stoke Gabriel), Sherbourne, Longley Road, Tooting. 
Inman, W. (Stoke Gabriel), " Sherbourne," Longley Road, Tooting, 

S.W. Committee. 
Inman, Mrs. W. (Stoke Gabriel), " Sherbourne/' Longley Road, Tooting, 

S.W. 
Ireland, Miss G. B. (Bradninch), 66, Sinclair Road, West Kensington, W. 

Jarvis, W. T. (Torquay), 64, Goniger Road, Parsons Green, S.W. 
Jeffery, Frank G. (Exeter), Devon Lodge, Ghurchfield Avenue, North 

Finchley, N.W. 
Johns, F. P. (Devonport), Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, W.G. 
Johnson, J. G. (Devon County School), 24, Rood Lane, E.G. 
Joint, E. G. (Plymouth), 22, Clarissa Road, Chadwell Heath. 
Jones, Mrs. Rees, The Avenue, West Ealing. 

Kekewich, Sir G. W. (Peamore), K.G.B., D.G.L., St Albans, Feltham, 

Middlesex. Vice-President. 
Kelly, H. P. (Torquay), L.G.G. School, Fulham Palace Road, S.W. 
Kelly, W. F. (Tiverton), Lanka House, Maida Vale, W. 
Kendall, T. J. (Kingsbridge), 81 a. Temple Road, Cricklewood, N.W. 
Kerslake, J. (Exeter), 2, Gaple Road, Harlesden, N.W. 
Kerslake, W. (Grediton), 23, Wells Street, Oxford Street, W. 
Keyse, W. G. (Plymouth). 

Kingwell, G. L. (Brent), 246, Barconibe Avenue, Streatham Hill, S.W. 
Kinsey, F. M. (West Buckland), Florence Villa, Harrow View, Wealdstonc. 
Knight, F. (E.Kcter), 19, Hereford Road, Acton. 

Lane, John (West Putford), " Bodlev Head," Vigo Street, W. Vice- 
President. 

Lang, Mrs. E. L. (Teignmouth), 81, Gannon Street, E.G. 

Lang, G. E. (Teignmouth), 81, Gannon Street, E.G. 

Lang, G. E., 130, Elborough Street, Southfields, S.W. Committee. 

Lang, H. W. (Stonehouse), 7, Bayer Street, Golden Lane, E.G. 

Langley, Mrs. L. (Torquay), 52, Lancaster Gate,W. 

Larkworthy, H. S. (Kinton), 175, Hartfield Road, Wimbledon. 
♦Larkworthy, J, W., " Bucklands," Nether Street, North Finchley. 
♦Larkworthy, Mrs. J. W., " Bucklands," Nether Street, North Finchley. 

Lascelles, W. H. (Exeter), 28, Barclay Road, Croydon. 

Launder, A. G. M. (Plymouth), 6, Holmwood Gardens, Brixton Hill. 

Lawday, Miss K. (Kingsnympton), 45, Cambridge Terrace, Hyde Park, W. 

Lawrence, R. L. (Gullompton) , 182, Russia Road, Milk Street, E.G. 

Leat, J. (Exeter), B.A., Stoke Road, Slough. 

Lester, L. R. (Plymouth), 23, Neal Street, Long Acre, W.G. 

Lethbridge, G., 24, Great St. Helens, E.G. • 

Lethbridge, ^. fTedburn St. Mary). 59. The Chase, Clapham Common. 
S.W. 

Lewin, G., jun., 8, Crooked Lane, E.G. 

Leyman, G. A. (Exmouth), no, Milton Avenue, East Ham„ 



132 The Devonian Year'^'Book, 191 1 

Liscombe, J. (Plymouth), 49, Cavendish Road, Brondesbury, N.W. Vice- 
President. *^ 
Lishmund, J. W. (Plyxnouth), 47, Sandmere Road, Clapham, S.W. 
Lisle, E. O. (Exeter), 8, Hamilton Gardens, St. John's Wood, N.W. 
Lisle' T. O. (Exeter), 8, Hamilton Gardens, St. John's Wood, N.W. 
Lock, W. G. (Instow), 5, Copthall Buildings, E.G. 

Lopes, Sir H. Y-B., Bart. (Maristow), Roborough, Devon. Vice-President. 
Lovell, J. (Ottery St. Mary), 161, Eardley Road, Streatham, S.W. Com- 

Lugar, H. E, (Plymouth), 17, Lothian Road, Camberwell New Road, S.E. 

Lugard, Colonel Edward. 

Lugard, Mrs. 

Luke, T. R. (Shebbeai), National Liberal Club, Whitehall. 

Luxton, J. (Coleridge), 184, Essex Road, N. 

Lyons, Frank I. (Stonehouse), 23, Harley House, Regent's Park, N.W, 

McKenzie, Madame Marian (Plymouth), PrincesTHouse, Victoria Street, 

S.W. 
Mallett, H. M. (Crediton), 49, Menard Road, Catford, S.E. 
Martin, Frank C. R. (Exeter), 65, West Kensington Mansions, W. 
Masters, Miss Jessie (Yealmpton), 51, Berkeley Square, W. 
Matthews, H. B. (Devonport), 14, Chesham Street, Brighton. 
Maunder, W. H. (Staverton), 7, Somerfield Road, Finsbury Park, N. 
Melluish, G. (Ottery St. Mary), 4, Little Pulteney Street, Shaftesbury 

Avenue, W. 
Mercer, F. T. (Ashbury), 10, Bush Lane, E.G. 
Metherell, C. (North Tawton), 22, St. Paul's Churchyard, E.G. 
Michelraore, Miss A. M. (Totnes), 53, Grand Avenue, Muswell Hill, N. 
xMorris, R. Burnet (South Molton), 24, Bramham Gardens, S.W. 
Mortimer, G. P. (Dunsford), 241, Romford Road, Forest Gate, E. 
Mudge, J. G. (Plympton), Oxford House, Bethnal Green, E. 
Miiller, Miss Alice, 9, Talby Road, Tufnell Park, N. 
Miiller, Miss NelHe, 9, Talby Road, Tufnell Park, N- 
Mutten, A. W. (Devonport), 145, Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton, E. 
Mutten, Mrs. A. W. (Devonport), 145, Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton,E 
Mutten, C. R. (Devonport), 145, Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton, E. 
Mutten, Miss E. B. L. (Devonport), 145, Chatsworth Rd., Lr. Clapton, E. 
Mutten, Miss L. S. (Devonport), 145, Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton, E. 
Mutten, Miss N, E. (Devonport), 145, Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton, E, 
Mutten, Miss W. A. (Devonport), 145, Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton, E. 

Noakes, F. W. (Totnes)., 23, Ruskm Road, Lower Tottenham. 
Noriish, A. J. H. (Bideford), Toronto House, Forest Hill, S.E. 
Northcote, Rt. Hon. Lord (Exeter), G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., C.B., 25. St . 
James's Place, S.W. President. 

Oakley, R. O. (Beer), 54, Sydney Road, Hornsey, N. 
Oaicley, Mrs. F. E. (Ottory St. Mary), 54, Sydney Road, Hornsey, N. 
Oakley, R. K. (Ottery St. Mary), 54, Sydney Road, Hornsey, N. 
fOwen, W. A., King William's Town, South Africa. 

Paine, C. F., 29, Vartry Road, Stamford Hill, N. 

Panter, F. H. (Dawlish), Bank House, London, County and Westminster, 

Aldgate, E. 
Parsons, T., 74, Union Road, Clapham, S.W. 
Parkhouse, Frank, Lordora, Rayleigh Road, Wimbledon. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 133 

Passmore, W. (Tiverton), loi, Elspeth Road, Clapham Common, S.W. 

Committee. 
Patton, Charles (Paignton), 145, St. Alban's Tor, Bedford Park, W. 
Patrick, F. (Exeter), 71, Sydney Street, Stoke Newington. 
Payne, Samuel (Torquay), 122, Albert Mansions, Battersea Park, S.W. 
Peace, J. W. Graham, 61, Dynevor Road, High Street, Stoke Newington, N. 
Pearce, J. Cyprian (Kingsbridge), 70, Gauden Road, Clapham, S.W. 
Penny, A. J. (Ottery St. Mary), 118, Cromwell Road, Wimbledon. 
Perry, F. A. (Tiverton), 4, Kirchen Road, West Ealing, W. Committee. 
Philp, C. R. S. (Plymouth), The Li vesey Library, Old Kent Road, S.E. 
\,j^Committee. 

Philp, Mrs. E. L. (Plymouth), The Li vesey Library, Old Kent Road, S.E. 
Philp, D. P. (Plymouth), 44, Homefield Road, Chiswick, W. 
Pike, W. A. (Exeter), 37, Holmewood Gardens, Brixton Hill, S.W. 
Pillman, J. C. (Plymouth), J.P., The Cottage, Foots Cray, Kent. Vice- 

Pycs'idcytt 
Pilditch, PliiHp E. (Plymouth), L.C.C., 2, Pall Mall East, S.W. 

Vice-President. 
Pinkham, Alderman C. (Plympton), J. P., Linden Lodge, Winchester 

Avenue, Brondesbury, N.W. Vice-President: Chairman of Committee. 
Pinn, F. G., 41, Bishop's Mansions, S.W. 
Pinn, Mrs., 41, Bishop's Mansions, S.W. 

Pomeroy, A. W. (Honiton), 24, Royal Avenue, Chelsea, S.W. 
Pope, W. S. (Sidmouth), 3, St. Ann's Villas, Holland Park, W. 
Popham, Mis. L. M., 81, Elgin Crescent, W. 

Popham, W. V. M. (Devon County School), 23, Moorgate Street, E.C. 
Potbury, T. R. (Sidmouth), M.A., 35, Park Parade, Harlesden, N.W. 
Powe, G. W., 44, Creswick Road, Acton, W. 

Powe, H. D. (Plymouth), 13, Ellerby Street, Fulham, S.W. Committee. 
Piatt, Fiank (Cullompton), 104, Fore Street, E.C. 
Pride, A. E. (Thorverton), Woodland, Horn Lane, Woodford Green. 
Pring, B. V. (Torquay). 

Pring, H. R. (Exeter), M.R.C.S., i, Highbury Place, N. 
Pullman, James, 8, Eastern Road, Wood Green, N. * 

Quick, Francis, 78, Gillespie Road, Highbuiy, N. 

Quick, N. (Tavistock), 15, Grove Park Road, South Tottenham, N. 

Rawle, H. (Sidmouth), 41, Sandmere Road, Clapham, S.W. 

Reader, F. W. (Bainstaple), 51, Hayden Park Road, Wimbledon. 

Rew, Miss G. E., 51, Buckingham Palace Road, S.W. 

Roberts, C. Wynne (Torquay), Dryden House, Oundle. 

Rose, Miss E. L. Smith- (Exeter), 39, Bark Place, Bayswater, W. 

Rose, Miss R. Smith- (Exeter), Postal Order Branch, G.P.O. 

Rose, Mrs. Smith- (Broadclyst), 39, Bark Place, Bayswater, W. 

Ryall, J. (Exeter), 38, Hanover Street, Peckham, S.E. Committee. 

Ryan, W. (Plymouth), 163, Queen's Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Salter, Mrs. A. J. (Axminster), 62, West Smithfield, E.C. 

Sampson, Miss G. L. (Aveton Giffard), 11, Fitzroy Street, W. 

Sanders, F., 21, Brandreth Road, Balham, S.W. 

Sandford, E. (Plymouth), 62, Clarendon Road, Putney, S.W. 

Sanson, L. S. (Plymouth), Wyastone, Beedell Avenue, WestcLxi-on-Sea 

Sansom, W. (Tiverton), 92, Vansittart Road, Forest Gate, E. 

Scott, Capt. Robert F. (Plymouth), C.V.O., R.N., Admiralty, S.W. 

Vice-President. 
Seward, Mrs. Grace F. (descent), 15, Wolseley Gardens, Gunnersbury, W. 



134 -^^^ Devonian Year Book, 191 1 

Seward, W. R. (descent), 15, Wolseley Gardens, Gunnersbury, W. 
Sharland, A. W. (Exeter), " Edgecumbe," Ashburton Road, E. Cioydon. 
Shaw, E. Harved, 22, St. Paul's Churchyard, E.G. 
Shawyer, J. W. (Filleigh), Messrs. Kenny, Mahon & Co., 30-32, Broad 

Street House, E.C. Hon. Secretary. 
Shawyer, Mrs. J. W., 5, Hemington Avenue, Friern Barnet, N. 
Sheer, J. (Norh Petherwin), 13, King's College Road, N.W. 
Snephard, H, J. (Exeter), Sunningdale, Westbouine Grove, Westcliff- 

cn-Sea. 
Sillek, Miss B. (Torquay), 28, Hamilton Terrace, St. John's Wood, N.W. 
Simmons, Sydney (Okehampton) , " Okehampton," Torrington Park, 

Friern Barnet, N. Vice-President. 
Simpson, LesHe (Stonehouse), Bank House, King St., Hammersmith, W. 
Skinner, G. E. (Parracombe), 50, Cowley Road, Leyton, and 32, Sutton 

Court, Chiswick, W. 
Skinner, S. M. (Bradninch), i Hale Gardens, West Acton. 
Slade, H. J. (Torquay), 11, Maze Road, Kew, S.W. 
Small, A. (Barnstaple), 34, Goldsmith Road, Leyton. 
Small, Mrs. E. J. (llfracombe), 91, Portnall Road, Maida Hill, W. 
Smart, A. (Plymouth), 79, Gresham Street, E.C. 
Smart, Mrs. A. (Plymouth), 21, Columbia Road, Ilford, Essex. 
Smart, E. C. (Plymouth), 79, Gresham Street, E.C. 

Smart, W. H. (Plymouth), 13, Marsden Road, East Dulwich, S.E. Com- 
mittee. 
Smith, E. Rivers, 10, Park Road, Uxbridge, W. 
Smith, Master Granville (Dartmouth), Master of the Supreme Court, 

Royal Courts of Justice, W.C. Vice-President. 
Smith, W. H. (Torquay), 11, Acfold Road, Fulham, S.W. 
Snell, M. B. (Barnstaple), J. P., 5, Copthall Buildings, E.C, Vice-President. 
Soames, D. (Exeter), 52, Manor Road, Brockley, S.E. 
Soper, Rowland (Stonehouse), 13, Morley Road, East Twickenham. 
Southwood, F. C. (Bideiord), 105, Abbey Road, N.W. 
Spear, Arthur (Plymouth), 61, Asylum Road, S.E. 
Squire, H. Brinsmead (Torrington), London, County and Westminster 

Bank, Wood Street, E.C. Hon. Treasurer. 
Squire, J. P. (North Tawton), 31, Angell Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Stanbury, H. (Plympton), St. Matthew's School, Westminster. 
Stanmore, Miss Florence (Exeter), Scarsdale House, Kensington, W. 
Steed, A. W. (Devonport), 25, Clavering Road, Aldersbrook, South 

Wanstead, Essex. 
Steed, E, A. (Devonport). 
Steer, Rev. W. H. Hornby (Woodleigh), M.A., 52, Avenue Road, Regent's 

Park, N.W. 
Stid worthy, G. F. Kendall- (Kingsbridge), Friern Barnet Road, Friern 

Barnet, W. 
Stradling, A. E. (Seaton), 49, Glengarry Road, East Dulwich, S.E. 
Strange, OHver (Tiverton), 2a North Avenue, Kew Gardens, S.W. 
Strange, Mrs. Oliver (Tiverton), 2a. North Avenue, Kew Gardens, S.W. 
Streat, F. J. (Ottery St. Mary), 5, Ilminster Gardens, Lavender Hill, S.W. 
Stribhng, W. J. L. (descent), Bulstrode, Uxbridge Road, Slough. 
Stroulger, C. H., 46, Maddox Street, W. 
Stroulger, Mrs. C. H., 46, Maddox Street, W. 
Studley, Frank (Tiverton), Fairhaven, Cheam Common Hill, Worcester 

Park, Surrey. 
Studley, G. (Uffculme), Worcester Park, Surrey. 
Sturdy, A. M. (Plymouth), 40, Petherton Road, Highbury, N. 
Swigg, F. G. (Plymouth), 163, Queen's Road, Peckham, S.E. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 1 135 

Talbot, Miss Mabel A, (Hockworthy), 42, Weymouth Street, Portland 

Place, W. 
Taverner, J. L., 24, High Street, Ealing, W. 
J Taylor, A. (West Buckland), Devon County School, West Buckland, 

North Devon, 
Taylor, A. F. (St. Mary Church), Ingleside, Hanwell, W. 
Taylor, J. H. (Northam), The Lodge, Old Deer Park, Richmond. 
Thomas, J. E. (Exeter), 112, Manor Park Road, Harlesden, N.W. 
Thomson, F. ]. S. (Exeter), 31, Angell Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Thorn, H. B. (Exeter), 117, Dalston Lane, N.E. 

Thorn, Miss I. H. (Chagford), 9, Springwell Avenue, Harlesden, N.W. 
Thorn, R. (Chagford), 9, Springwell Avenue, Harlesden, N.W. 
Titherley, A. (Exeter), Secretary's Office, Royal Hospital, Chelsea. 
Tolchard, W. D., 734, High Road, Leytonstone. 
Toll, A. E. J. (Torquay), 22, St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C, 
ToUey, H. (Exeter)', 316, Brixton Road, S.W. 
Tonquin, Miss Ada (Newton Abbot), 5, Upper Brook Street, W. 
Tozer, Henry (Exeter), i, Durham House Street, Strand, W.C. 
Tczer, J. R. K. (Paignton), 6, Cannon Street, E.C. 
Train, J. Wilfred (Chudleigh), Secretaries' Office, H.M. Customs and 

Excise. Lower Thames Street, E.C. 
Treharne, W. J. (Ilfracombe), Abbotsford, The Grove, Church End^ 

Finchley, N. 
Trist, C. J. S. (Plymouth), 49, Longhurst Road, Lewisham, S.E. 
Trott, Thomas (Kentisbeare), 27, Knowle Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Tucker, Thomas (Exeter), 49, Folburg Road, Stoke Newington, N.E. 
Tuckett, C. F., 40, Chatsworth Avenue, Merton Park. 
Turner, Mrs. M. A. (Ilfracombe), 28, Falmouth Road, New Kent Rd., S.E. 
Twose, A. W. (Tiverton), 22, St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 
Twose, W. (Culmstock), 90, King's Road, Chelsea, S.W. 
Tyte, Miss A. L. (Barnstaple), 121, Lansdowne Road, Seven Kings, Essex. 
Tyte, H. (Barnstaple), 121, Lansdowne Road, Seven Kings, Essex. 
Tyte, Miss K. (Barnstaple), 75, Aberdeen Road, Highbuiy, N. 
Tyte, Miss M. A. (Barnstaple), 121, Lansdowne Road, Seven Kings, Essex. 

*Upcott, Lieut.-Col. Sir Frederick Upcott (Cullompton), K.C.V.O., C.S.I. , 
227, St. James Court, Buckingham Gate, S.W. Vice-President. 

*Upcott, Lady (Cullompton), 227, St. James Court, Buckingham Gate, 
S.W. 
Upham, W. Reynell- (Bicton), 13, Constantine Road, Hampstead, N.W. 

Vellacott, H. D. (Tawstock), C.A., 141, Fenchurch Street, E.C. Hon. 
Auditor. 

Venn, W. H. (Whimple), M.A., St. Peter's College, Manor Road, Brockley, 
S.E. 

Veysey, F, J. S. (Chittlehampton) , 15, Trefoil Road, Wandsworth Com- 
mon, S.W. 

Vibert, F. H. (Totnes), Rock Villa, Sevenoaks. 

Vibert, Herbert (Totnes), 104, Fore Street, E.C. 

Vinen, C. S. (descent), 11, Lombard Stieet, E.C. 

Vivian, Henry (Comwood), 6, Bloomsbury Square, W.C. Vice-President. 

Volk, W. A. (Plymouth), 16, Mortimer Street, W, Musical Director. 

Vospei, Thos. (Plymouth), 2, Garden Court, Temple, E.C. 

Waghorn, Mrs. A. G. (Horrabridge), 8, Glentner Road, Blackheath, S.E. 
Walden, Mrs. A, M. (Exmouth), 8, Parson's Green Lane, Fulham. S.W. 



136 The Devonian Year Book, 1911 

Waldron, Rev. A. J. (Plymouth), St. Matthew's Vicarage, Brixton, S.W- 

Vice-Pyesident. 
Walker, F. (Drewsteignton), 68, Coleman Street, E.C. 
Walling, F. W. (Exeter), 121, Endlesham Road, Balham, S.W. 
Waning, Mrs. F. (Exeter), 121, Endlesham Road, Balham, S.W. 
Walrond, Conrad M. (Cullompton), " Braeside," St. Catherine's Lane, 

Eastcote. 
Walrond, H, W. (Cullompton), London, County and Westminster Bank, 

Knightsbridge, S.W. 
Walton, C. H. (Teignmouth), 54, Union Grove, Clapham, S.W. 
Westaway, J., 22, Dane's Inn House, 265, Strand, W.C. 
Western, J. R. (descent), Rosario, Holly Park Gardens, Finchley, N. 
White, F. H. (Teignmouth), 33, St. Mary-at-Hill, E.C. 
White, T. Jeston (Stockland), 39, Burne Street, N.W. 
White, — (Exeter), Crabtree, Riverside. Fulham, S.W. 
Whitley, H. Michell (Plymouth), Dalkeith House, Queen's Road 

Richmond. 
Williams, F. (Otterton), 195, Fentiman Road, Clapham, S.W. 
Willis, C. A. Combemartin), 28, Falmouth Road, Southwark, S.E. 
Willis, P. T. (Combemartin), 28, Falmouth Road, Southwark, S.E. 
Wills, R. G. (Shaldon), 168, Crofton Park Road, Brockley, S.E. 
Wilton, F. W. (Hartland), Glynn Villa, Ormond Road, Hornsey Rise, N 
Wollocombe, J. R. (Lewdown), Ingram House, Stockwell Road, S.W. 
Woollcombe, Rev. H. S. (Northlew), M.A,, Vice-President. 
Wreford, C. W. (Exeter), i. Brooks ville Avenue, Kilburn, N.W. 
Wreford, Mrs. C. W. (Exeter), i, Brooksville Avenue, Kilburn, N.W. 
Wreford, J. (Exeter), M.B., 66, West End Lane, N.W. Vice-President. 
Wright, F. G. (Tiverton), 10, Old Deer Park Gardens, Richmond. 
Wright, J. L. (Tiverton), 10, Old Deer Park Gardens, Richmond. 
Wright, W. T. (Exeter). 
Wringe, F. (Plymouth), 22, Christie Road, South Hackney, N.E. 

Yendole, Wm. (Newton St. Cyres), 14, Harbut Road, Clapham Junction, 

Yeo, James (Barnstaple), Woodhurst, WarUngham, Surrey. 

Zellerg, J. H. (Exeter), 31, Radipole Road, Fulham, S.W. 



Members are earnestly requested to notify alterations of address, and place 
of association with Devonshire {in cases where this is omitted), to the Hon. 
Secretary, John W.^Shawyer,^^, Hemington Avenue, Friern Barnet, N. 



iZC> 







/S7 



The Devonian Year Book, 1911. 



IMembers of the Portsmouth Devonian Society. 

Baker, Thos. (Zeal Monachorem), 6 Melbourne Place, Southsea. 

Bevis, Arthur (Exeter), West Street, Havant. 

Bevis, Mrs. West Street, Havant. 

♦Bidwell, Robert (Teign mouth), 2 Osborne Street, Southsea. 

Blamphey, J. A. (Dittisham), 21 Dover Road, Copnor, Portsmouth. 
*Bovey, R. (Kingsteignton), 1X2 King Street, Southsea. 

Bowden, A. (Totnes), 64 Clive Road, Fratton, Portsmouth. 
*Brid]e, Ernest (Lympstone), 7 St. Ursula Grove, Southsea. 

Bridle, Mrs, 7 St. Ursula Grove, Southsea. 

Butland, H. E. (Dittisham), 30 Cranleigh Road, Buckland, Portsmouth. 

Butland, W. (Dittisham), 101 Clive Road, Fratton, Portsmouth. Asst. Hon. Sec. 

Burridge, Walter (Torquay), 64 Queen Street, Portsea. 

Canterbury, A. H. C. (South Molton), 52 Balfour Road, North End, Portsmouth. 
Carpenter, James (Tiverton), "Bradley," Stubbington Avenue, North End, 

Portsmouth President. 
Carpenter, Mrs. "Bradley," Stubbington Avenue, North End, Portsmouth. 

Cox, G. M. (Hawkchurch), High Street, Gosport. 
Cox, Mrs. (Exeter), High Street, Gosport. 
Crosse, Reg. S. (South Molton), 6 Kenilworth Road, Southsea. 

Dart, H. A. (Bampton), Capital & Counties Bank, Portsmouth. Hon. Auditor. 
Davies, W. J. (Brixham), 6 Hercules Street, Portsmouth. 
Dyson, Mrs. " Plymleigh," Albany Road, Southsea. 

Ekers, W. W. (Paignton), "St. Lucia," Lyndhurst Road, Portsmouth. 
Emmett, R., M.D. (Paignton), " Winton," London Road, Portsmouth. 
England, Mrs. (Bideford), 24 Festing Grove, Southsea. 

Finch, Geo. (Ottery St. Mary), " Silverton," Oriel Road, Portsmouth. 
Finch, Mrs. (Devonport), " Silverton," Oriel Road, Portsmouth, 
Foster, E. A. (Exeter) 39 Marmion Road, Southsea. 
Fry, Norman (Torquay), 60 Highland Road, Southsea. 

Gale, Jas. (Tiverton), Outram Villa, Outram Road, Southsea. 
Gale, Mrs, (Columpton), Outram Villa, Outram Road, Southsea. 
Gale, Harry King's Road, Southsea. 

Gibbs, Ed, (Beer), "The Yorkshire Grey," Commercial Road, Southsea. 
Gieve, John W., j,P, (Chumleigh), The Hard, Portsea, Past Presidetit. 
♦Grossmith, H, W, (Tiverton), Grafton House, Commercial Road, Portsmouth, 

*Harris, W. (Devonport), " Maristow," 1:3 Laburnum Grove, Portsmouth. 

Harris, Mrs. (Devonport), "Maristow," 133 Laburnum (kove, Portsmouth. 

Hawkins, Frank Chichester Road, Portsmouth. 

Hazeland, J. M. (Exeter), Cuthbert House, 5 Nightingale Road, Southsea. 
*Hine, H. C, (Exeter), 25 Nelson Road, Landport, Portsmouth. 

Hine, Mrs. 25 Nelson Road, Landport, Portsmouth. 

Hodder, P. C. (Aveton Gilford), 19 Chitty Road, Southsea. Hon. Auditor. 

Hodder, Mrs. 19 Chitty Road, Southsea, 

Hodges, H, M, 9 Pier Mansions, Southsea, 

Holman, H. (Torquay), 61 Belmont Street, Southsea. 

Loman, Fred T. (Exeter), Naval School Master, H.M.S. Fisgard, Portsmouth. 
Lovell, Mrs. (Plymouth), Weston's Holel, Queen Street, Portsea. 

Marshall, J. N. (Budleigh Sallerton), " Rockleaze," Nightingale Road, Southsea. 

Marshall, C. H. (Budleigh Salterton), Norfolk Street, Southsea. 

Marshall, Mrs. Norfolk Street, Southsea. 

Mitchelmore, H. (Kingsbridge), 72 Manners Road, Southsea. • 



The Devonian Year Book, 1911 



*Nesling, A. Bruce, Lieut. R.N. (Devonport), 13 Oriel Road, Portsmouth. 
Nesling, Mrs. 13 Oriel Road, Portsmouth. 

Niner, R. K. (Torquay), 12 Palmerston Road, Southsea. Vice-President. 
Niner, Mrs. (Dartmouth), 12 Palmerston Road, Southsea. 
Niner, Geo. 12 Palmerston Road, Southsea. 

Niner, Miss D. 12 Palmerston Road, Southsea. 

Parker, C, S. (Exeter), 57 Campbell Road, Southsea. Hon. Treasurer. 
Parker, Mrs. 57 Campbell Road, Southsea. 

Pook, R. E. (Exeter), 40 Commercial Road, Southsea. 

Reynolds, A. (Devonport), 126 Percy Road, Southsea. 
Richards, E. J. (Plymouth), 479 Commercial Road, Portsmouth. 
*Rider, T. (Plymouth), " Sandhurst," Goldsmith Avenue, Southsea. 
Rider, Miss W. (Plymouth), "Sandhurst," Goldsmith Avenue, Southsea. 
Rihll, C. Louis (Exeter), 10 Elm Grove, Southsea. 
Rihll, Mrs. 10 Elm Grove, Southsea. 

Saunders, Miss G. (Torquay), 44 Chetwynd Road, Southsea. 

Selway, A. (Plymouth), 13 Northbrook Street, Portsmouth. 
*Shipcott, W. R. (Talaton), 49 Frensham Road, Southsea. 

Shipcott, Mrs. 49 Frensham Road, Southsea. 

Smith, Miss Ada (Ditlisham), 16 Campbell Road, Southsea. 

Smith, Miss E. A. (Dittisham), 16 Campbell Road, Southsea. 

Smith, J. F. (Devonport); 112 St. Augustine Road, Southsea. 
*Squires, Jas. (Barnstaple), Sergt. -Major R.M.A., Eastney Barracks. 

Squires, Mrs. Eastney Barracks. 

Thorne, L. C. (Topsham), 40 London Road, Portsmouth. 
Tipper, Mrs. 21 Albany Road, Southsea. 

Tozer, H. (Dittisham), 140 Newcome Road, Portsmouth. 
Trawin, F. J. (South Molton), 24 Osborne Street, Southsea. 

*Weeks, A. E. (Barnstaple), 48 King's Road, Southsea. 

Weeks, Mrs. Rose (Bideford), King's Road, Southsea. 

Weeks, Oscar (Exeter), King's Road, Southsea. 

Weeks, Mrs. O. King's Road, Southsea. 

Weston, Mrs. (Plymouth), Weston's Hotel, Queen Street, Portsea. 

Williams, Alfred (Brixham), 71 Sultan Road, Landport. 

Winter, P. G. D. (Torquay), 70 Elm Grove, Southsea. Hon. Sec, 

Winter, Mrs. 70 Elm Grove, Southsea. 

*Wiseman, D. H. (Torquay), 13 King's Road, Southsea. 

Wiseman, Mrs. (Dawlish), 13 King's Road, Southsea. 

* Indicates a member of Committee. 







HALF-A-CROWN NET 



DEVONIAN YEAR BOOK 
1912 



\ 




THE RIGHT HON. THE EARL OF HALSBURY, P.C. 

(President of the London Devonian Association). 



THE 



Devonian Year Book 



FOR THE YEAR 



1912 



(THIRD YEAR OF PUBLICATION) 



R. PEARSE CHORE, B.A. 



Drake he was a Devon man, 
An' ruled the Devon seas." 



Henry Newbolt 



XonDon: THE LONDON DEVONIAN ASSOCIATION 

(JOHN W. SHAWYER, Hon. Sec.) 
30-32, Broad Street House, E.G. 

SIMPKIN, MARSHALL. HAMILTON, KENT & CO. LTD. 
JBrl6t0l : JOHN WRIGHT & SONS LTD.. STONE BRIDGE 

(Jbr the West of England and South Wales), 



JOHN WRIGHT AND SONS LIMITED, 
PRINTERS, BRISTOL. 




IAN 2 9 IS 
5(78736 




Contents. 



PAGE 



The London Devonian Association — Officers and Com- 
mittees ------_7 

The Year's Work - - - - - - 9 

The First Annual Dinner - - - - - 13 

The Brixham Fishing Fleet Disaster - - - 21 

" Drake's Drum " — Henry Newbolt - - - 23 

The Federation of Devonian Associations — Colonel E. T. 

Clifford - - - - - - - 24 

The Family of Giffard - - - - - 29 

The Worthies of Devon — x\ddenda - - - - 32 

"The Aged Trees" — Eden Phillpotts - - - 42 

Eden Phillpotts, Poet and Novelist— W. H. K. Wright - 43 
The Coasts and Forests of Devon, and their Birds — 

E. A. S. Elhot - - - - - - 69 

" A Fisher- Wife's Lullaby " — Arthur L. Salmon - - 83 

The Historical Basis of Kingsley's " Westward Ho ! " — 
R. Pearse Chope - - - - - - 84 

The Mythical History of Devon — I. The Legend of Bnitus 
the Trojan ___--_ 107 

Recent Devonian Literature - - - - 112 

Affiliated and other Devonian Societies _ _ - 115 

Learned and Scientific Societies in Devonshire - - 124 

Libraries in Devonshire - - - - - 126 

Rules of the London Devonian Association - - 128 

List of Fixtures for 1912 ----- 131 

List of Members and Associates - - - - 134 



The Devonian Year Book, igi2 



The London Devonian Association. 
Officers and Committee. 

1911-12. 

President : 

The Right Hon. the Earl of HALSBURY, P.C. 

Past-Presidents : 

The Right Hon. Earl FORTESCUE, Lord Lieutenant of Devon. 
The Right Hon. Lord NORTHCOTE, G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., C.B. 

Vice-Presidenfs : 

The Right Hon. Lord CLIFFORD OF CHUDLEIGH. 

The Right Hon. Lord S EATON. 

T. DYKE ACLAND, Esq., M.D., F.R.C.P. {Columb-John). 

Canon W. P. BESLEY, M.A. (Barnstaple). 

J. B. BURLACE, Esq. [Brixham). 

Colonel E. T. CLIFFORD, V.D. [Exeter). 

JOHN COLES, Esq., J. P. (Tiverton). 

Sir EDWIN A. CORNWALL, M. P. (Lap ford). 

W. H. CUMMINGS, Esq., Mus.D. Dub., F.S.A. (Sidbury). 

H. E. duke, Esq., K.C, M.P. (Plymouth). 

A. E. DUNN, Esq. (Exeter). 

H. T. E ASTON, Esq. (Exeter). 

Rev. H. R. GAMBLE, M.A. (Barnstaple). 

ALLEN GILL, Esq., F.R.A.M. (Devonport). 

Sir GEORGE W. KEKEWICH, K.C.B., D.C.L. (Pearnore)'. 

J. H. M. KIRKWOOD, Esq., M.P. (Yeo Vale, Bideford). 

GEORGE LAMBERT, Esq., M.P. (Spreyton). 

JOHN LANE, Esq. (West Putford). 

Sir H. Y-B. LOPES, Bart. (Rohorough). 

Sir WILFRID PEEK, Bart. (Roiisdon). 

R. J. PARR, Esq. (Torquay). 

EDEN PHILLPOTTS, Esq. (Exeter). 

P. E. PILDITCH, Esq., L.C.C. (Kingsbridge). 

J. C. PILLMAN, Esq., J. P. (Plymouth). 

C. PINKHAM, Esq., J. P. (Plympton). 

G. H. RADFORD, Esq., M.P. (Plymouth). 

Captain ROBERT F. SCOTT, C.V.O., R.N. (Plymouth). 

SIDNEY SIMMONS, Esq.. J. P. (Okehampton). 

GRANVILLE SMITH, Esq., Master of the Supreme Court (Dartmouth). 

MICHAEL B. SNELL, Esq., J. P. (Barnstaple). 

Sir JOHN W. SPEAR, M.P. (Tavistock). 

Lt.-Col. Sir FREDK. UPCOTT, K.C.V.O., C.S.I. (Cullompton). 

HENRY VIVIAN, Esq. (Cornwood). 

Rev. a. J. WALDRON (Plymouth). 

Sir W^ H. WHITE, K.C.B. (Devonport). 

Rev. H. S. WOOLLCOMBE, M.A. (Northlew). 

JOHN WREFORD, Esq., M.B. (Exeter). 

Chairman of the Association : 

Colonel E. T. CLIFFORD, V.D. (Exeter). 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



Committee : 

Chairman. 
Alderman C. Pinkham, J. P., C.C. {Plympton), 
Linden Lodge, Winchester Avenue, Brondesbury, N.W. 

Deputy Chairman. 

R. Pearse Chope, B.A. {Havtland), 

Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, W.C. 

A. T. BowDEN {North Tawton), 76, Newgate Street, E.C. 

G. S. BiDGOOD {Tiverton), 8, Hornsey Lane Gardens, Highgate, N. 

J. B. BuRLACE {Brixham), 38, Corfton Road, Eahng, W. 

Colonel E. T. Clifford, V.D. {Exeter), 6, Cranley Gardens, South 
Kensington, S.W. 

N. Cole {Salcomhe), 46, Melgund Road, Highbury, N. 

W. Crosbie Coles {Bide ford), 78, Park Lane, Croydon. 

H. GiLLHAM {Burlescombe) , 222, Central Market, E.C. 

H. H. M. Hancock {Barumites in London), 56, Devereux Road, Wands- 
worth Common, S.W. 

F. W. Hesse {Tivertonians) , 5, Moorgate Street, E.C. 

W. Inman {Stoke Gabriel), Sherbourne, Longley Road, Tooting, S.W. 

G. E. Lang {London Devonian Rugby Football Club), c/o Cook, Son & 

Co., St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 

F. A. Perry {Tiverton), 4, Kirchen Road, West Ealing. 

C. R. S. Philp {Plymouth), Livesey Library, Old Kent Road, S.E. 
H. D. Powe {Plymouth), 13, Ellerby Road, Fulham Palace Road, S.W. 
John Ryall {Exeter Club), 38, Hanover Street, Peckham, S.E. 
W. H. Smart {Plymouth), St. Bride Institute, Ludgate Circus, E.C. 
J. Summers {Old Ottregians), 44, Grove Hill Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Hon. Musical Director. 
W. A. VoLK, L.R.A.M. {Devonport), 16, Mortimer Street, W. 

Hon. Auditors. 
J. Arnold Hill, C.A. {Holcombe Rogus), 19a, Coleman Street, E.C. 
H. D. Vellacott, C.A. {Tawstock), 141, Fenchurch Street, E.C. 

Hon. Treasurer. 
H. Brinsmead Squire {Torrington), London County & Westminster Bank, 
Ltd., 90, Wood Street, E.C. 

Hon. Secretary. 
John W. Shawyer {Devon County School O.B.A.), 5, Hemington Avenue 
Friern Barnet, N. 

Executive Council : 

Alderman C: Pinkham, Chairman, J. B. Burlace, R. Pearse Chope, 
Colonel E. T. Clifford, G. W. Davey, A. H. Holmes, John W. 
Shawyer, W. H. Smart, H. Brinsmead Squire, 

Entertainment Sub>committee : 

N. Cole {Chairman), H. Gillham, H. H. M. Hancock, C. R. S. Philp. 
John W. Shawyer, W. H. Smart {Hon. Secretary), 

Year Book Sub-committee : 

G. S. Bidgood, J. B. Burlace, W. Crosbie Coles, John W. Shawyer, 

R. Pearse Chope {Hon. Secretary and Editor). 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



The Year's Work. 

It is encouraging to be able to report steady progress during 
the year, and it is noticeable that the names of several distin- 
guished Devonians appear in our membership list for the first time. 
A perusal of these pages, and of Colonel Clifford's admirable 
article in particular, will show that the Committee is alive not 
only to the ordinary functions of a county society but also to the 
great possibilities which He before this Association, representing, 
as it does, in " the Hub of the Empire," a county so prolific of 
bygone worthies and so rich in historical traditions. 

It is with deep regret that the Association has to record the 
loss incurred by the death of Lord Northcote, the President of 
the Association. Born in 1846, he was created a baronet in 1887 
and a baron in 1900. He was also G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., and C.B. 
During his political career he acted as private secretary to the 
Marquis of Salisbury, and to his own father, the Earl of Iddes- 
leigh. He also became in succession Financial Secretary to the 
War Office, Surveyor-General of Ordnance, and a Charity 
Commissioner. He was M.P. for Exeter from 1880 to 1899, 
Governor of Bombay from 1899 to 1903, and Governor-General 
of the Commonwealth of Austraha from 1903 to 1908. He took 
an active interest in Freemasonry, and had been Provincial 
Master of Devonshire Freemasons since 1896. In addition to the 
distinction which he earned during his life's work in the service 
of his country and of the empire, he also won a lasting place 
in the affections of all with whom he was associated, and par- 
ticular]}^ of his fellow county men both at home and abroad. 

The Association is to be congratulated on having secured the 
veteran, the Right Honourable the Earl of Halsbury, as his 
successor, and, in view of the effort that is now being made to 
establish the Association as the rallying point for Devonians 
throughout the world, the choice could not have fallen on a more 
typical or more distinguished representative of the county. 

We also record with regret the death of Mr. John Liscombe. 
Born at Sheepstor, he entered the service of the London and 
South Western Bank in 1868, and during his long and honourable 
connection with it, he held many responsible positions, including 
the managership of several of the larger branches of the Bank, 
ultimately becoming General Manager in 1907, which position he 
held until ill-health compelled his retirement in the early part of 
the present year. 

The following additions were made to the list of Vice-Presidents 
of the Association : — The Rt. Hon, Lord Seaton, Canon W. P. 
Besley, M.A., J. H. M. Kirkwood, Esq., M.P., George Lambert, Esq. 



10 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

M.P., R. J. Parr, Esq., Sir Wilfrid Peek, Bart., Eden Phillpotts, 
Esq., G. H. Radford Esq., M.P., Sir John W. Spear, M.P., Sir 
William H. White, K.C.B. 

It is interesting to note that one of our Vice-Presidents, the Rev. 
H. R. Gamble, M.A., Rector of Holy Trinity, Chelsea, has been 
appointed an honorary chaplain to His Majesty the King, and 
has been nominated as select preacher of Oxford University. 

The Association is much indebted to Mr. R. Pearse Chope, 
to whose ability and untiring energy the excellence of the Year 
Book is mainly due. The present number will no doubt meet 
with the same general appreciation among Devonians throughout 
the world as the previous issues have done, but the question of 
the cost of the production is a serious one to the Association. 
The price of the current issue has been increased, and an effort 
has been made to increase the number of advertisements, but, 
unless some additional financial assistance is given, it will be 
impossible to maintain its present high standard. 

Several of the London Societies representing local districts, 
towns, and schools in Devonshire, including the Barumites in 
London, the Devon County School Old Boys, the Exeter Club, 
the London Devonian Rugby Club, the Old Exonian Club, the 
Old Ottregians Society, and the Tivertonian Association, remain 
affiliated to the Association; but there are one or two others of 
some importance which are not yet represented. 

It will be remembered that, on the occasion of the send-off 
dinner given by the Association to Captain Scott, who is one of 
our Vice-Presidents, just prior to his departure in quest of the 
South Pole, the London Devonian Antarctic Fund was opened, 
to assist the gallant explorer to complete the amount he then 
required. This fund now amounts to £207 18 0, having been 
augmented during the year by the following subscriptions : — 
The Loyal Lodge of Industry (421) South Molton . . £1 5 
Henry Wippell, Esq., Ex-Mayor of Exeter .. 10 10 

Interest on Deposit at Bankers . . 3 9 

The Committee of the British Antarctic Expedition Fund has 
just made a further appeal for another £15,000 in consequence 
of extensive damage to the ship caused by the bad weather, and 
the cost of new stores to replenish those lost on the voyage South. 
The money at present in their hands will barely suffice for the 
payment to the end of March, 1912, of the allowances to the wives 
of officers and men of the expedition. In the course of his 
remarks to those present at the dinner. Captain Scott stated that 
appeals had been made in most of the counties, but none in his 
native county of Devon. Our own fund was the immediate 
result, and £200 has already been handed over to the main 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 11 

Committee, but, in view of the further requirements and the 
renewed appeal, the Committee of the Association would hke to 
give its own members another opportunity of contributing to our 
fund before closing the Hst. There is also in the field a Norwegian 
expedition, whose avowed intention it is to make a dash for the 
Pole in advance of Captain Scott. Those who met our own 
explorer must have been impressed, not only with the confidence 
he felt of success, but also of the sincerity of his desire to provide 
for the dependants of his companions, who are left at home. 
Let us not forget that, when the discovery of the North Pole was 
claimed by our American cousins, it was felt throughout the 
Empire that Britain should not lag behind in attempting to 
attain the last great goal of adventurous exploration. Shackleton 
had only recentty returned from " furthest south," and all eyes 
turned to Captain Scott. Right gallantly he responded : he 
left his comfortable Admiralty berth, and a thrill of pride ran 
through the veins of his countrymen. He is in the Polar Region 
now, and it is for Britishers at home to help him to finish his 
heroic task. A form is inserted herewith, which, it is hoped, will 
be filled up and returned to the Hon. Treasurer of the Association, 
who will gladly acknowledge it. 

The Annual General Meeting was held on the 16th of October, 
when the chair was taken by Colonel E. T. Clifford, in the regret- 
table absence of Alderman C. Pinkham, who was suddenly called 
to Devonshire through a family bereavement. The following 
additions were made to Rule 2, enlarging the objects of the 
Association : — 

(a.) To encourage the spirit of local patriotism, " that righteous 
and God-given feeling which is the root of all true patriotism, 
valour, civilization " — the spirit that animated the great 
Devonian heroes who defeated the Spanish Armada, and laid the 
foundations of the British Empire. 

(h). To form a central organization in London to promote 
Devonian interests, and to keep Devonians throughout the world 
in communication with their fellows at home and abroad. 

The Entertainment Committee was responsible for arranging 
a Bohemian Concert, two Whist Drives, and a Cinderella Dance. 
At the concert which was held on the 7 th of December, the chair 
was taken by Alderman C. Pinkham. Among the artists were 
Misses Maude Niner, Edith Cole (Salcombe), Daisy Pullen (Stoke 
St. Gregory, Somerset), and Miss Smith-Rose (Exeter), and 
Messrs. T. Gibson (Appledore), Harold Vernon (Plymouth), 
J. Row (Plymouth), Robert Wright (Devonport), H. Thomas, 
and Courtney Mayverne. 

The Cinderella Dance was not well supported, and, conse- 



12 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

quently, the Committee decided not to include a dance fixture in 
the programme for the current season. 

Doctor E. A. S. ElUot's lecture on " The Coasts and Forests of 
Devon and their Birds," was given on the 17th of November. In 
the absence of Dr. Elliot, it was read by Mr. N. Cole, and a supple- 
mentary lecture on " The vScenery of Devonshire " was given 
by Mr. R. Pearse Chope. In February Mr. Chope also gave us a 
lecture on " The Historical Basis of Kingsley's Westin'ard Ho ! " 
All the lectures were illustrated with excellent lantern slides, 
and were much appreciated by members and their friends. 

The past year is notable for the institution of the first Annual 
Dinner of the Association, under the chairmanship of Lord 
Northcote. The Committee had hitherto hesitated to inaugurate 
a dinner, in the hope that it would have been able to join forces 
with the Dinner Committee of " Devonians in London." Efforts, 
however, in that direction have so far met with no further 
success, and, as such a happy event seemed as far distant as ever, 
and there was obviously a feeling among the members that a 
dinner constituted one of the most favourable opportunities for 
foregatherings of old county friends, the Committee could no 
longer resist the general demand for such a function. Though 
it must be regarded as regrettable that two annual Devonian 
Dinners should be held in London, the experiment of an Associa- 
tion Dinner at a reasonable price was tried, and the successful 
result of the venture is fully reported on following pages. It is 
hoped, however, that the efforts of all Devonians in London will 
be exercised in the direction of unity, and that we may soon con- 
gratulate ourselves on having one representative dinner under 
conditions acceptable to all. 

Another departure was the arrangement of the Western 
Counties Cinderella Dance in the Connaught Rooms, under the 
joint auspices of the Cornish Society, Somerset Men in London, 
and this Association. The result was eminently satisfactory, 
and it is hoped that the experiment will be repeated. 

An effort is to be made to organize at least one function 
annually by the co-operation of all Devonian Societies in London, 
and it is the intention of our committee to invite representatives 
of each of the other Societies to attend a meeting to consider the 
best means for carrying out the idea. 

Mr. R. Stewart Barnes, who for a short period rendered the 
Association excellent service as Hon. Secretary of the Entertain- 
ment Committee, resigned his seat on the General Committee 
during the year, and the vacancy was filled by the re-election of 
Colonel E. T. Chfford, who had retired prior to his extensive 
African tour. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 13 



The First Annual Dinner. 

The Association's first annual dinner was held at the Holborn 
Restaurant on Saturday, March 11th, when the President, the 
Right Honourable Lord Northcote, G.C.M.G., G.C.I. E., C.B., 
presided over a company of upwards of two hundred ladies and 
gentlemen. His lordship was supported by Sir G. W. Kekewich, 
K.C.B., Mr. y. W. Spear, M.P., Mr. Shirley Benn, M.P., Mr. H. 
St. Maur, M.P.. Mr. J. H. M. Kirkwood, M.P., Mr. G. H. Radford, 
M.P., Mr. C. Pinkham, Mr. M. B. Snell, Mr. C. Colwill, Mr. A. 

E. G. Copp, Mr. S. A. Gumming, Mr. H. Davey, Mr. H. T. Easton, 
Rev. J. L. E. Hooppell, Mr. A. H. Holmes, and Mr. Granville 
Smith. There were also present Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Brodie, Mr. 
A. L. Baker, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Burlace, Mr. L. Burlace, Miss W. 
Burlace, Mr. C. Bowman, Mr. R. S. Barnes, Mr. G. S. Bidgood, 
Mr. W. F. Beste, Mr. W. Champion, Mrs. C. Colwill, Mrs. A. 
Chettleburgh, Mr. R. H. Coysh, Mr. J. Clarke, Mr. R. P. Chope, 
Mr. W. Crosbie Coles, Mrs. Cumming, Mr. A. R. Congdon, Miss 
Churchward, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Cann, Mrs. A. Clare, Miss Colman, 
Mr. J. A. Dixon, Mr. E. S. Eraser, Mr. and Mrs. Handford, 
Mrs. Hooppell, Mrs. Hesse, Mr. F. Hockaday, Mr. J. A. Hill, 
Miss D. Hammick, Miss M. Hammick, Mr. F. E. Harry, 
Mr. and Mrs. H. H. M. Hancock, Mr. and Mrs. H. Hickson, 
Miss Hutchings, Mr. Norman Ingall, Mr. W. Inman and Miss 
Inman, Mr. F. C. Jeffery, Mr. and Mrs. Newton Jacks, Mr. J. W. 
Larkworthy, Mr. G. E. Lang, Mr. Cecil J. Lethbridge, Miss K. Law- 
dry, Mr. A. W. Mutten, Mr. G. Melhuish, Mr. J. W. Mahon, Miss M. 
Owen, Mr. F. G. Finn, Mrs. A. T. Finn, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Perry, 
Mr. W. V. M. Popham, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Powe, Mr. Parkyn, 
Mr. N. Quick, Mr. H. Rawle, Mr. Scott Smith, Mr. G. Smith, Miss 
K. Sexton, Mr. S. Simmons, Mr. W. H. Smart, Mr. and Mrs. F. C. 
Southwood, Mr. J. W. Shawyer, Mr. H. B. Squire, Mr. H. Tucker. 
Mr. W. Thorn and Miss Thorn, Miss Tonkins, Mr. T. Vosper, Mr. 
H. D. Vellacott, Mr. E. J. S. Veysey, Mr. W. A. Volk, Mr. A. F. 
Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Western, Mr. Woodley, and Mr. J. Yeo. 
Apologies for absence were received from Earl Fortescue, Earl 
of Portsmouth, Earl of Devon, Viscount Sidmouth, Sir John 
Kennaway, Sir Henry Lopes, Sir Frederick Upcott, Sir George 
Sherston Baker, Sir Roper Lethbridge, Sir F. C. Gould, Sir 
Bourchier Wrey, Sir Edwin Cornwall, Mr. Justice Bucknill, Mr. 

F. B. Mildmay, Mr. H. E. Duke. Mr. J. W. Mellor, Dr. Blake 
Odgers, Dr. A. A. David, Dr. W. H. Cummings, Rev. H. R. 
Gamble, Mr. J. Coles, and Mr. Astor. 



14 The Devonian Year Book, igi2 

After the loyal toast had been duly honoured, the Chairman, 
in proposing the toast of the evening, " Devon, our county," 
said : "In thanking you for your kind welcome to-night I recall 
with pride and pleasure the fact that this is not the first occasion 
on which I have had the honour to occupy the chair at a Devonian 
dinner and of proposing the toast of the evening, ' Prosperity to 
Devon/ (Hear, hear.) Since I last had the honour I have been 
in a good many parts of the world, and I can say that, whether I 
have been in the United States or Canada, India or Austraha, I 
have found everywhere evidence that the men and women of 
Devon have done themselves and the old county credit, and 
have filled prominent positions in the life of the territories to 
which they have migrated. I can also say from own personal 
experience that, sorry though we must be to lose the stout 
hearts and fair faces of the Devon lads and lasses, yet there is 
ample opportunity for them in the new countries which are 
parts of our great Empire, to do well for themselves and to main- 
tain the credit of the old country. (Applause.) Go where you 
will in Australia you are met upon every hand with the old 
familiar names of the city, towns, and rivers of our dear old 
county ; and you cannot go far without coming across Devon 
men and women who are playing a prominent part in the life of 
Australia. On more than one occasion I found myself in a new 
Exeter when in New South Wales, and when I was approached 
on the subject of a subscription to local objects I could hardly 
believe I was 11,000 miles away from my old constituency. 
(Laughter.) 

" I am not going to-night to rake out of their honoured graves 
either William the Conqueror or Henrietta Maria, or even our 
old and respected friends Queen Elizabeth, Ralegh, and Drake. 
Let us give them a year off. (Laughter and applause.) They 
have stood friends of these societies for many and many a long 
year, and I think we owe them something. Indeed, I may say 
that it is thanks to the sagacity of the great Tudor Queen and 
the valour of such Devonians as Drake and Ralegh, that we are 
able to meet here to-night and enjoy our dinner as a Devonian 
Society. (Hear, hear.) Neither do I intend to weary you with 
statistics as to the products and resources of Devonshire — as to 
how much cream we produce or how many apples we grow, 
because I do not know, and I don't beheve you do. (Laughter.) 
Neither shall I talk about our green lanes or red earth ; nor even 
discourse on the attractiveness of our picturesque scenery, 
because the railway companies and hotel proprietors will do 
that far better than I can do. (Laughter.) 

" I think, however, it is very necessary that every opportunity 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 15 

should be taken to dispel the delusion that the county of Devon- 
shire and its citizens are somewhat easy-going and somewhat 
slack, and not entirely up to date. I can assure any of our 
neighbouring counties or any of the counties of the North, that 
they never were more egregiously mistaken in their Hves. (Hear, 
hear.) I have been figuring it out, and I find that Devon is just 
99 years ahead of any other part of the United Kingdom. 

" I was reading the other day an account of an election held 
in 1812 for the borough of Ide. (Laughter.) The borough of 
Ide is a sort of off-shoot to the city of Exeter, which I know so 
well, but I must confess it is true that the absurd jealousies of 
Westminster have denied a representative of Ide the privilege 
of sitting in Parhament. Nevertheless, I submit that that is 
Devon's misfortune, not her fault ; for the fact that Devon is 
progressive is clearly proved by the addresses of the three 
candidates. I invite special attention of one moiety of my 
audience to the first candidate's address, in which he proclaimed 
his intention on being elected to secure Letters Patent from the 
King by which every widow in Ide would be entitled to two 
husbands, and every fair girl to one lover. (Laughter.) The 
candidate was apparently a mixture of romance and business, 
because he pointed out that this would ensure that all the 
maidens and widows in England would flock to Ide, and conse- 
quently everybody having lodgings to let would be able to do so 
with considerable profit to themselves. (Laughter.) But I do 
not think the gentleman confined himself to such limited ideas, 
and I cannot but feel that he foreshadowed the delicate and 
difficult questions which we have now before us in connection 
with female suffrage, I am perfectly certain that, if his policy 
had been adopted at the time, the suffragist and anti-suffragist 
lionesses would now be lying peacefully down together, dividing 
the spoil of the male lamb. (Laughter and applause.) The 
policy of the second candidate was that every voter who did 
not agree with him should be knocked down and placed in irons 
upon his father's ship. (Laughter.) Again, did not that fore- 
shadow the fact that Governments, whether Conservative or 
Liberal, might be called upon in their time to deal with obstruc- 
tion ? Therefore, had his policy been adopted by a far-seeing 
Government of the day, there would now have been no question 
of all-night sittings or any forms of political obstruction. 
(Laughter.) The third candidate's programme was that the 
ordinary sessions of Parhament should be Hmited to six weeks. 
We hear nowadays something of the possible shortening of 
the sessions of Parliament ; but again I say Devonshire, as 
ever, was in the van in formulating proposals which would 



l6 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

satisfy the most thorough-going reformer of the present day. 
It will thus be seen that, so far from Devonshire being a reac- 
tionary and unprogressive county (Laughter), we are really in a 
sort of suspended animation, waiting for the rest of the country 
to catch us up. (Laughter and applause.) Whether they ever 
will do so I do not know, but I am confident that, whatever 
great public questions may come before the nation, Devonshire 
men and Devonshire women will never forget the traditions of 
their old county. They will give neither a silent voice, a silent 
vote, nor impotent support to whatever may be for the greatness 
of our country." 

The toast was drunk with much enthusiasm. 

Sir George W. Kekewich, K.C.B., responding, said it always 
gave him great gratification to speak up for Devon, for 
he was as proud as any man could be of belonging to that 
great county. (Hear, hear.) He was himself pure Devon 
without any cross. (Laughter and cheers.) He wa? proud of 
the parish from which he came — Exminster — and he was proud 
of the city close by, the dear old city of Exeter, which he had 
the pleasure of representing for four years in Parliament. (Hear, 
hear.) It was very gratifying to be able to meet together 
irrespective of creed or politics. He contended that the men of 
Devon were as successful to-day in the army and navy, law, and 
other professions as they were in the days of old. The Devon 
men, too, were always courteous, and he recalled with pleasure 
the fact that he visited 9,500 people in Exeter, and never had a 
discourteous word from beginning to end. (Hear, hear.) He 
called on one man, and hoped he would have his vote. The man 
looked up, and said : ' I've on'y wan question to ax. Be you 
evangelical ? ' * Of course,' I replied, * ten times over.' ' All 
right, then,' he says, ' I'll vote vor 'ee.' (Laughter.) There 
were, however, three great products of Devon, viz., beautiful 
ladies, beautiful cider, and beautiful cream, and, amid roars of 
laughter, Sir George admitted he didn't know which he liked 
best ! Then there was the delightful language. This he had 
learnt to talk before he talked EngHsh, and he could talk it yet. 
(Laughter.) They all loved their county, and they all firmly 
believed that it was the only county in England that had not a 
single defect of any kind. (Loud cheers.) 

The next toast was " The London Devonian Association," 
which was proposed by Captain J. H. Morison Kirkwood, M.P. 
for the Southend Division of Essex. He expressed his indebted- 
ness to the Association for giving a lead to the Division which 
he had the honour to represent, for the Devonians in Southend 
had now started an Association on the same lines, in a very 



The Devonian Year Bcok, 1912 17 

humble way, although they hoped to achieve the same amount 
of success as had already been achieved by the parent Associa- 
tion. The homing instinct was strongly developed in all 
Devonians, and those who were, through no desire or fault of 
their own, in exile from their beloved county, extended its 
boundaries in their imagination until it included their present 
abode, and these imaginary boundaries proved just as forcible 
to the mind as the physical boundaries did to the eye. Wher- 
ever a Devonian lived there was a bit of Devon. (Cheers.) It 
was an excellent thing that they should meet together, imbued 
with the common sentiment of love for their county, and that 
they should be able to feel that they were members of a county 
whose glorious traditions were read in the history of their country, 
and whose beauty was the theme of poets and painters in all 
ages. (Cheers.) 

Alderman C. Pinkham, J.P., in responding, congratulated the 
members of Parliament present on looking so well after their 
all-night sittings in the House. (Laughter.) He reminded the 
company that the Association was a young one, and that this 
was their first dinner, but he thought that the representative 
gathering that evening fully justified its formation. (Hear, 
hear.) It had been felt by very many Devon men in London 
that something ought to be done — more than was already being 
done— to bring Devonians together in this great city. They 
felt that simply dining together once a year was not enough, and 
he was glad to say that this had now been proved. (Hear, hear.) 
He had to inform the company, and especially the ladies, that 
they had a series of very good dances, and they had also whist 
drives, concerts, and educational lectures. He would also call 
their attention to the excellent Devonian Year Book, which 
was edited by Mr. Chope, and would be a pass-word for Devonians 
throughout the world. He thought he could claim that the 
London Devonian Association had already done good. The 
members had given no less a sum than £200 to Captain Scott 
towards the cost of his great Antarctic expedition. (Cheers.) 
Again, when last December a terrible gale swept over the Devon 
coast, and two of the Brixham fishing-smacks went down, they 
raised a sum of £30, which would be gratefully received and 
faithfully applied on behalf of the widows and orphans. (Loud 
cheers.) He thought the scope of the organization ought to be 
enlarged. (Hear, hear.) They ought to have a fund to assist 
those Devonians who fell by the way. (Hear, hear.) And he 
implored the members to put their hands into their pockets for 
the cause. He was sure that such gatherings as the present 
would be of great advantage to their county. Members had 



i8 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

the opportunity of bringing their children to them, and thus 
instiUing into them that love of the county which they themselves 
possessed. (Hear, hear.) People might talk about patriotism 
and loyalty, but the mainspring of this feeling and the strongest 
link of union were love of the county from which they came. 
(Loud cheers.) 

The duty of proposing the health of the Chairman was under- 
taken by Mr. J. W. Spear, M.P. He thought he would only 
be echoing the desire of the entire company if he at once wished 
Lord Northcote all good things — good health and continued 
success in life — with true Devonian enthusiasm. (Loud cheers.) 
Lord Northcote was a member of a family that for sixteen 
generations had devoted its best efforts to promoting the wel- 
fare of Devon, and not only of Devon, but also of the Kingdom 
and the Empire. (Hear, hear.) They were proud of him as the 
son of his father, whom Devon men placed in the forefront of 
Devon worthies, and they were proud of him for the services he 
had himself rendered to the Empire. His work as Governor of 
Bombay showed the tact and perseverance that were charac- 
teristic of a Devonshire man, and his success as Governor-General 
of Australia, and the way in which he won the confidence of their 
brethren across the sea, filled them with pride. (Applause.) 

The toast was received with musical honours. 

The Chairman, replying, said that the number of letters of 
apology for non-attendance were much too numerous to read. 
There was one telegram, however, which they would all like him 
to read, which was from their senior representative of Devon- 
shire in the House of Lords, Lord Sidmouth. (Applause.) His 
lordship wired: " Please express my regret for non-attendance 
owing to infirm health. Wishing prosperity to the Devonian 
Association.' (Applause.) He wished to thank Mr. Spear not 
only for his very kindly reference to himself, but still more for 
the reference which he made to the services which his father 
endeavoured to render to his county and country, which reference 
touched him very deeply. He could only say there was nothing 
of which he was more proud than the kindly spirit which Devon- 
shire folk cherished for the memory of his father. He trusted at 
the end of his career he would be found not unworthy to be the 
son of such a father. (Hear, hear.) Thanking them for their 
welcome, his lordship wished the Association success and pros- 
perity. (Applause.) 

The toast of " The Visitors " was proposed by Mr. G. H. 
Redford, M.P. He congratulated the Association that this, 
their first dinner, was such a great success. They had started 
well, and he hoped the dinner was only the precursor of many 



The Devonian Year Book, 19 12 19 



equally brilliant and successful functions. They had several 
visitors that evening, among whom he noticed the Member for 
Exeter and the Member for Plymouth. Sir George Kekewich 
had spoken of Exeter as a great city, but he (the speaker) thought 
Plymouth was a greater one — perhaps because he was a Plymouth 
man. (Laughter.) At any rate they were all pleased to have 
the visitors there, and he would not argue about the priority of 
one city or the other, but would propose the health of the visitors, 
couphng with the toast the names of Mr. Shirley Benn, M.P., 
and Mr. H. St. Maur, M.P. 

Mr. Shirley Benn, M.P., in reply, said it gave him great 
pleasure to address the London Devonian Association. Although 
he could not claim to be a Devonian by birth, still he was one by 
adoption — by the people of Plymouth. (Loud applause.) He 
confessed to a great admiration for the county ; for Devonshire — 
the garden of England, so celebrated for its hills and dales and 
grand moorlands — had done more to make the Empire than any 
other county in England. (Applause.) Not only were Devon- 
shire people foremost in promoting everything for the well- 
being of the country, but they were the most courteous people 
it is possible to find anywhere. He would like to say something 
of his own experiences in Plymouth. He had never met fairer 
foes, nor had he met men who, after the election had been fought, 
were more free to hold out the hand of friendship than the 
Liberals of Plymouth. (Loud applause.) These county associa- 
tions were great things for England. Those who promoted them 
ought to be congratulated, for they unquestionably increased 
provincial patriotism as opposed to provinciahsm — that provin- 
cial patriotism that led them to look back to the homes of their 
youth, to their boyhood days, that encouraged a love of locality, 
and stimulated also the love of country. It was such patriotism 
as that which was calculated to promote the best interests of the 
Empire. (Applause.) 

Mr. H. St. Maur, M.P., also wished the Association every 
prosperity. Although, Hke Mr. Shirley Benn, he was not 
Devon born, he had received every courtesy from Devonians. A 
good deal was often said about the respective merits of Exeter 
and Plymouth. They must remember, however, that Exeter 
was the capital city. Besides, there was a great difference in 
the character of the inhabitants, for whereas Plymouth found it 
necessary to send two representatives to voice its opinions 
in Parhament, Exeter found it could do capitally with one. 
(Laughter.) Seriously speaking, these gatherings did much 
good. For instance, he was exceedingly pleased to meet 
Mr. Spear. In the House of Commons last Thursday, Mr. 



20 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

Spear came forward from his side of the House in ParUament 
and assisted him in a matter which he wanted to see through. 
He was very much obUged to him for his kindness. The incident 
showed that the members of ParUament for Devon could, irre- 
spective of pontics, do a good deal by combination for the benefit 
of the county. (Applause.) 

Mr. J. W. Shawyer, the honorary secretary of the Association, 
in proposing a vote of thanks to the artistes, said that he 
wished particularly to convey the thanks of the Association to 
Mr. F. C. Southwood, who had very kindly given them the 
beautiful menu cards. (Cheers.) With regard to the Associa- 
tion, they had already 500 members, which was not bad for two 
full years' existence, but it was not good enough. The Associa- 
tion had been somewhat late in coming into the field, and certain 
towns and districts in Devon had not been able to wait for the 
formation of a County Association, but had formed Associations 
of their own, which were still going on. It is true that they sent 
to the committee of the London Devonian Association represen- 
tatives who gave it very valuable support, but at the same time 
the County Association wanted more assistance from these 
sectional bodies. (Cheers.) He appealed to gentlemen who 
belonged to those other Societies to use their influence to get 
their members to support the London Devonian Association. 
They had an excellent committee, who were anxious to make 
suitable arrangements for social and other gatherings, such as 
the example they had had that night, and if they could only get 
the support they ought to have, the London Devonian Associa- 
tion would prosper, and would become one of the best County 
Associations in London. (Loud applause.) 

The musical portion of the programme was certainly a feature 
of the evening's enjoyment. Mr. W. A. Volk, A.R.A.M., ren- 
dered valuable service as hon. musical director and accompanist. 
Miss Cassie Crang, who has a magnificent voice, sang " Clovelly " 
exceedingly well, and for her dialect song, " Just 'cos," she was 
deservedly encored. Mr. Norman Ingall gave a spirited render- 
ing of " Glorious Devon," and later sang " Young Tom o' 
Devon." Miss Marsden Owen possesses a really fine voice, which 
was heard to great advantage in "II Bacio." She also sang 
" Love was meant to make us glad." Mr. Lyell Johnston sang 
very finely indeed the Association's song, " Devon to Me ! " (set 
to music by the Association's musical director). As a last item 
Mr. Norman Ingall and Mr. John Dixon gave an exceedingly 
good rendering of " Watchman, what of the Night ? " The 
grand piano was kindly lent by Messrs. Ascherberg, Hopwood, 
and Crew. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



21 



The Brixham Fishing Fleet Disaster. 

During the fearful gale of December 16th, 1910, in the Bristol 
Channel, four Brixham smacks — Eva, Speedwell, Marjorie, and 
Vigilance — were totally lost with all hands, and two hands were 
swept overboard from the smack Friendship and drowned. The 
total loss of hfe was thus eighteen, of whom ten men were married, 
leaving to mourn their loss ten widows, and thirty children under 
fourteen years of age. There were many casualties to other 
boats belonging to the fleet, the total loss of property being 
estimated at about £6000. In response to an appeal for help 
issued by the local Relief Committee, the following contributions 
were sent through the Hon. Treasurer of the London Devonian 
Association : — 







£ 


s. 


d. 


Lady Anne Marsham . . 


5 


5 





J. B. Burlace, Esq. 


5 








Rowland Ward, Esq. , , 


5 








M. A. W. . . 


2 


2 





Paymaster, Hon. Sec, and Treasurer Canteen 








Committee, H.M.S. Talbot, Malta . . 


2 








Capt. E. J . Garston . . 




I 


I 





" In Memoriam," A. S. 




I 








G. Y. 




I 








" A Lady " . . 




I 








R. Pearse Chope, Esq. 




I 








M. N. Jocks, Esq. 







10 


6 


W. G. Rayner, Esq. . . 







10 


6 


N. Meaden, Esq. 







10 


6 


W. Inman, Esq. 







10 





G. F. Gubbin, Esq. . . 







10 





Sums under los. 


. 


2 


17 






£2g 16 6 
^ The Friendship and her two apprentices were saved by the 
heroic efforts of Capt. A. S. Gempton and the third hand, Tid- 
marsh, of the Brixham trawler Gratitude, who have both been 
awarded the silver medal for gallantry. The Friendship was on 
the port tack off Lundy about 3 p.m., when the sea swept Capt. 
Richard Foster and his mate, Charles Stokes, to a watery grave. 
The two apprentices, Keatings and Cheadle, managed to hold 
on, and hour after hour they laboured at the pumps in fear that 
the smack would founder. At 3 a.m. Capt. Gempton observed 
the Friendship with only a piece of the mizzen sail standing, 
and he manoeuvred his craft close to the derelict. Above the 
tumioil was heard the cry from the apprentices : " We are 
sinkkjg — can you save us ? " The pleading was immediately 



22 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



\ 



answered by Capt. Gempton : " I'll try my best, with God's 
help." The third hand, Tidmarsh, volunteered with that 
alacrity which characterized his skipper. The boat was launched, 
and each took a lifebuoy. Before entering the boat Capt. 
Gempton kissed his son Samuel (who was on his first fishing 
voyage), and said : " Good-bye, you may not see your dad 
again ; I am going to try to save two lives." The Gratitude was 
manoeuvred into a windward berth, and the boat dropped down 
to the Friendship, the sea being mountains high at the time. 
Once the boat was washed right on to the derelict's rail, and 
twice she nearly filled with water. But the rescuers found no 
response to their labours. The lads, prostrated through pump- 
ing, had abandoned all hope. The stentorian call, " Come on, 
my sonnies, we are come to save you," aroused them. They 
repHed : " Thank God for that ! " They were soon in the boat, 
and were thankful when they reached the Gratitude. With the 
aid of the Varuna's crew, the Friendship was then boarded, 
the pumps set to work, and preparations made to tow her to 
Brixham, which proved to be a lengthy and difficult task. 
This was the third occasion on which Skipper Gempton rendered 
similar service. During the famous bhzzard of March, 1891, 
he saved nine sailors from the perils of the sea, and two or three 
years ago he gallantly snatched a French trader from drifting 
ashore in Bigbury Bay, and towed her safe to Brixham harbour. 



The Three Fishers. 

Three fishers went sailing away to the West, 

Away to the West as the sun went down ; 
Each thought on the woman who loved him the best, 

And the children stood watching them out of the town ; 

For men must work, and women must weep, 

And there's little to earn, and many to keep. 
Though the harbour bar be moaning. 

Three corpses lay out on the shining sands 
In the morning gleam as the tide went down, 

And the women are weeping and wringing their hands 
For those who will never come home to the town ; 
For men must work, and women must weep. 
And the sooner it's over, the sooner to sleep ; 

And good-bye to the bar and its moaning. 

Charles Kingsley. 




DRAKE'S DRUM. 

From " 'J'lie Family and Heirs of Sir Fraiicis Drake" by permission oj 
Lady Eliott-Drake ajui Messrs. Smith, Elder ^^ Co. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 23 



Drake's Drum, 



Drake he's in his hammock an' a thousand mile away, 

(Capten, art tha sleepin' there below ?), 
Slung atween the round shot in Nombre Dios Bay, 

An' dreamin' all the time o' Plymouth Hoe. 
Yarnder lumes the Island, yarnder lie the ships, 

Wi' sailor lads a dancin' heel-an'-toe, 
An' the shore-lights flashin', an' the night-tide dashin'. 

He sees et all so plainly as he saw et long ago. 

Drake he was a Devon man, an' ruled the Devon seas, 

(Capten, art tha sleepin' there below ?), 
Rovin' tho' his death fell, he went wi' heart at ease. 

An' dreamin' all the time o' Plymouth Hoe. 
" Take my drum to England, hang et by the shore. 

Strike et when your powder's runnin' low ; 
If the Dons sight Devon, I'll quit the port o' Heaven, 

An' drum them up the Channel as we drummed them 
long ago." 

Drake he's in his hammock till the great Armadas come, 

(Capten, art tha sleepin' there below ?), 
Slung atween the round shot, listenin' for the drum, 

An' dreamin' all the time o' Plymouth Hoe. 
Call him on the deep sea, call him up the Sound, 

Call him when ye sail to meet the foe ; 
Where the old trade's plyin' an' the old flag flyin', 

They shall find him ware an' wakin', as they found him 
long ago ! 

Henry Newbolt. 



The words, of this poem are given by kind permission of Mr. Newbolt. 
There are two excellent musical settings, one by Sir C. V. Stanford, in his 
" Songs of the Sea," and the other by Mr. W. H. Hedgcock. The poem 
is, also, most effective as a recitation. — [Editor.] 



24 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



The Federation of Devonian 
Associations. 

A New Departure for 1912. 
By COLONEL E. T. CLIFFORD, V.D. 

Chairman of the London Devonian Association. 

When the Annual Meeting of the London Devonian Association 
was held in October last, a new note was struck which will, 
I trust, wake an echo in every Devonian heart. On that occasion 
I, as chairman, voiced the feelings of the Committee in calling 
upon all members to enlarge the area of their influence, by 
extending the objects of the Association and thus forming a 
central organization in London, not to supplant, but to second 
the efforts of, the Devonian Associations which have arisen in 
every English-speaking community throughout the world, to 
bring Devonians into touch with one another and so to foster 
the spirit of local patriotism which is the root, first of national, 
and afterwards of imperial feeling, that Devonians ever as of 
yore may be in the vanguard of Empire-builders. The con- 
viction that something must at once be done to focus these rays 
of enthusiasm had already been entertained by several of the 
Devonian Associations, not only in London but also in other 
parts of the United Kingdom ; and the same view was greatly 
strengthened by what I reported I had with astonishment and 
pleasure witnessed in the course of my recent visits to various 
parts of Africa — notably in Cape Colony, at Johannesberg, at 
Bulawayo, and at Cairo. Nor is there the slightest reason to 
doubt that numerous groups of Devonians in various parts of 
America would most heartily welcome, and in every way aid in 
promoting, so timely and inspiriting a movement as that which 
we now advocate. 

Men of Devon ! link your hands 
Across the seas, across the lands. 

The conception is a noble one, and the Council which was 
formed at the last meeting of the Association to carry it into 
effect, will surely rise to the occasion, and lay deep and strong 
the foundations of this, the first and great original Federation 
of County Local Associations. EngUshmen already regard the 
growth and ramifications of Devon Associations with friendly 
admiration and almost with envy. Only the other day a well- 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 25 

known peer, whilst deploring in the case of his own, a northern 
county, a certain lack of local pride and county enthusiasm, 
pointed the contrast by referring first and foremost to " Glorious 
Devon," with her roH of worthies, and her records of achieve- 
ments, as a very model and prototype of what a united county 
might be. 

For the nucleus of such a federation as is contemplated, 
no other spot so central as London can be found. As all roads 
led to Rome, so nowadays do every travelHng route and cable 
converge on the metropohs ahke of Great and of Greater Britain. 
And this forms the reason why the London Devonian Association 
may most fittingly and conveniently become the basis for the 
new departure. Its objects need only to be widened ; instead 
of " London and district," we should read " in every clime and 
every land " : it would benefit groups of Devonians precisely 
as the existing Associations benefit individual Devonians. 

Associations might become affihated to the Federation, and 
any Devonian who might find it impracticable to join a local 
group would find in it a body to which he might become attached. 
Again, the Devonian Year Book, so ably edited by our Deputy- 
Chairman, Mr. R. Pearse Chope, and now in its third year of 
publication, would then be appreciated at its true value, as a 
strong bond of union and a record of all Devonian interests in 
every quarter. 

But behind the measures which I have just sketched in 
outhne, above and beyond the particular means I have sug- 
gested in order to accomplish the noble end we have in view, 
there is the plan by which I hope and trust we may keep alive, 
or rouse if dormant, that patriotic fire with which each true 
Devonian heart is ever warm. Here too I find an admirable 
lead given on the occasion to which I have already referred, 
and on which it was sought to foster " the spirit that animated 
the great Devonian heroes who defeated the Spanish Armada 
and laid the foundations of the British Empire." 

How best to fan the embers into flame had long been the 
anxious care of Devonian friends in council, and we were not 
slow to see that by far the best way, and indeed the only simple, 
because easily practicable, plan would be to bring about the 
celebration of an Anniversary on which every Devonian Society 
throughout the world should meet, commemorating Armada 
Day, even as we all honour Trafalgar Day, and glorifying Drake 
just as we all extol Nelson. In one aspect indeed the defeat of 
the Spanish Armada was even more significant than the victory 
of Trafalgar : the latter ended no war, though it destroyed a 
fleet — ^the French army with wonderful enthusiasm went on from 



26 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

strength to strength for many a year. But the failure of the 
Great Armada ended a world movement — ^the expansion and 
domination of the Holy Empire: the tree still stood, but its 
leaves were seared and its trunk was sapless. 

The hero of the counter-movement was, of course, Drake ; but 
Drake was more than a hero of an occasion : for twenty years 
he had been preparing the way. He was indeed the life and 
soul of the Navy which, with Ralegh's support in council, turned 
gloomy fears and mortal forebodings into rejoicing and triumph. 
He it was who cleared the ground for the upbuilding of the 
grandest empire that the world has seen. To the formation of 
that empire other eras had and have contributed by feats of 
arms and deeds of peace ; but none so signally, on sea at least, 
as the Devonian heroes of the Elizabethan age, and amongst 
these Drake stands pre-eminent, uniting sublime audacity and 
Titanic energy with the keen foresight of the statesman and the 
inspiration of the prophet. He revolutionized naval strategy. 
Against the floating fortresses, the glorified pontoons of the 
day, he brought mobile squadrons, able by sheer pace to out- 
manoeuvre, and by gunnery to cripple and even to sink them — 
and yet to bear off so quietly as to elude their fire. 

Of the "Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World" one only, 
that in which Drake played the leading part, was exclusively a j 

sea campaign ; and of the three great admirals whose triumphs 
are our country's chief est pride, one only set himself to save 
England almost in spite of herself. Blake had behind him the 
tremendous force of a Cromwell ; Nelson, the support of a 
powerful monarchy : Drake in one kind of moral courage stands 
quite alone and need fear no rivalry — ^the power of undaunted 
action towards an end which all the world beside could not but 
regard as chimerical, the destruction of the huge over-seas 
empire which was under Spanish domination. 

But with mere destructiveness Drake was by no means con- 
tent ; he was no common-place freebooter or privateer, but was 
both practical and religious. He saw looming on the horizon 
" potentiahties beyond the dreams of avarice," visions of a 
" sea-united Empire " whereof his beloved isle should be the 
home- and mother-land. He held an intermediate place between 
Hawkins, the prince of privateers, and Ralegh, whose influence 
prevailed on a wavering monarch and a fickle court to adopt 
" sea defence " in place of the outworn scheme of land defence. 
How history repeats itself ! Drake's experience, which had been 
gained in years of "hair-breadth scapes " as a ship-boy, ship-mate, 
ship-master, inspired him with the feeling amounting to convic- 
tion, that the colossal empire of Spain across the seas was but an 



%(> 




SIR FRANCIS DRAKE. 

From the Painting at Buckland Abbey attributed to Abrani Jannsens. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 27 

ill-compacted fabric, whose overlord was — as Bismarck said of the 
third Napoleon — " a mass of misunderstood incapacity." What 
Spain with consummate ease had won from unwarlike tribesmen 
of the golden West might be no less easily wrested from her 
feeble grasp. 

With a fleet of one hundred tons in all, and crews of seventy- 
three men, he captured two of the greatest strongholds held by 
Spanish arms in America. At a later date, under royal patronage, 
he circumnavigated the globe — the first of a long line of English- 
men to bear the flag of England round the world. Knighted 
by his queen, he won at the hands of PhiHp the high distinction 
of having the price of £40,000 set upon his head. That head 
would have been "good cheap" at a million, for within a few 
years the Bank of Seville had to close its doors, and the credit of 
the one-time richest potentate on earth was so shaken that King 
Phihp failed to raise a loan of a paltry half a milnon ducats ! 
Soon in command of a squadron as Admiral of the fleet, he was 
commissioned to destroy every Division of the Spanish fleet then 
fitting at her various arsenals. Yet even then, such was the 
prestige of the might of Spain, his orders were revoked, and 
had he not anticipated his recall by promptly sailing out from 
Plymouth, never would he, in all likelihood, have been able 
within a few weeks to boast that he had " singed the king's 
beard in Cadiz harbour." There twelve thousand tons of shipping 
were burnt or sunk ; and this raid was followed by swooping 
attacks on the foemen's ships in every port. So terrified did 
they become, that, when at length their huge fleet set sail, no 
longer did they hope to land on our coasts, but merely aimed 
at convoying from Dutch shores a flotilla of transport barges. 
In this aim also they failed. How, by a rapid succession of 
staggering blows, Drake and his compeers shattered the Great 
Armada, let history's pages bear witness. No Devonian needs 
to study them afresh. 

If, then, our new-formed Devonian Federation seeks, as I 
feel it must seek, some outward and visible sign of our heart- 
felt union, we must call up from our glorious past some heroic 
form bearing aloft, as on a banner, a noble and inspiriting blazon. 
And if ever men were justified in singHng out one of their fellows 
for a hero, and indulging in a sane hero-worship, those men 
are Devonians, and their hero is Sir Francis Drake, in whose 
person we may find united a watchword — " The Sea-United 
Empire of Greater Britain," an Anniversary — Armada Day, and 
a hero — Drake. 

I yield to no man in admiration of Nelson, whose genius in 
naval strategy was equalled only by his magnificent bravery and 



28 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

unsullied patriotism. Nelson and Trafalgar are indissolubly 
blended in our memories. Yet Trafalgar did but cement an 
Empire, which, though it extended, it did not found. I revere 
Blake, the pure-hearted warrior from Somerset, whose brief sea 
career taught Europe that fleets could control kingdoms ; who 
made France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, and Holland bow before 
England, and whose cannon awakened the echoes of the Baltic 
and the Mediterranean Seas, of Algiers and Teneriffe, of New- 
foundland and Jamaica. Both these heroes were accredited 
agents of a great power. But with Tennyson we must think 
of Drake as a divinely gifted " man, whose life in low estate 
began, who breaks his birth's invidious bar . . . who makes 
his force by merit known, and lives to shape the whisper of 
the throne." 

Some day I hope to see a public memorial to our hero, raised 
up in London, as already at Plymouth ; a statue at whose feet 
we loyal Devonians in meetings assembled might on Armada 
Day lay our tribute of laurel wreaths. Meanwhile I may perhaps 
propose that we should, amongst our first endeavours, secure 
as fitting emblems to deck our Federation rooms, twin busts — 
the one, of our Sailor-King : the other, of the hero Drake. 

A song, too, we might adopt as a vocal symbol of bur har- 
monious union, to be sung on Armada Day — " Drake's Drum," 
by Henry Newbolt. To ensure that every Devonian group 
may know where to find both words and music, each copy of 
the Devonian Year Book should contain them. 

By way of epilogue I venture to summarize, as follows, the 
objects I have in view : — 

1. A Central Federation of Devonian Associations. 

2. An Anniversary — Armada Day (say July 31) — on which all 

Devonian Associations might meet, and be invited to 
send messages or wreaths in honour of Drake and other 
heroes of that day. 

3. The Devonian Year Book, in which every Devonian Associ- 

ation should have a record of its Officers and Meetings. 

4. A song — "Drake's Drum" (in the Year Book) — to be sung on 

Armada Day celebrations. 

5. The erection of a pubhc Memorial Statue to Drake in the 

heart of the Empire for which he strove, and not in vain. 



2.^ 




DRAKE'S STATUE ON PLYMOUTH HOE. 

By Sir J. E. Bockm, R.A. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 29 



The Family of Giffard, 

The ancient family of Giffard traces its descent back to the 
period of the Norman Conquest, when one Walter, nicknamed 
" Gifard," literally " the Giver," was a distinguished soldier and 
one of Wilham the Conqueror's most trusted counsellors. At 
the Conquest of England he played a conspicuous part, con- 
tributing a hundred knights and thirty ships to the expedition. 
Through his mother he was a near blood relation, not only to 
the Conqueror himself but also to King Edward the Confessor, 
and through his daughter Rohaise, who married Richard Fitz 
Gilbert, he was the ancestor of Robert Bruce, the Royal House of 
Scotland, and the present Royal House of England. As a 
reward for his services, he received from the hands of his great 
kinsman William, an immense estate in the land which he had 
helped to conquer, and became the progenitor of a race from 
which the noblest famihes in England may be proud to trace 
their descent. 

There are few famihes of which the members have risen to so 
many high offices in the State, or have been distinguished in so 
many spheres of hfe. Walter Giffard, the patriarch of the race, 
was created Earl of Buckingham when earldoms were few and 
hardly won. His son, another Walter Giffard, was one of the 
Commissioners appointed for the compilation of " Domesday 
Book." Wilham Giffard, brother of this Walter, was Bishop 
of Winchester and Chancellor under the first three Norman Kings 
of England. Richard Giffard was a justiciary appointed under 
the Constitutions of Clarendon in the reign of Henry H. Godfrey 
Giffard was Bishop of Worcester and Chancellor to Henry HI. 
Walter Giffard, his brother, was Archbishop of York and Chan- 
cellor to the same king. Sir Hugh Giffard was Constable of 
the Tower of London and guardian to the King's children. Sir 
Alexander Giffard was specially distinguished in the crusade of 
1 249. John Giffard, of the Brimsfield line, played a distinguished 
part in the Welsh wars of Edward I, and to his generalship must 
probably be attributed the final overthrow of Llewellyn, Prmce 
of Wales. Wilham Giffard, an eminent English Jesuit, rose to 
the position of Archbishop of Rheims and Duke and Peer of 
France in 1622. The Giffards of ChiUington and Whiteladies 
played a conspicuous part in the preservation of Charles H after 
the battle of Worcester. A member of the same house. Dr. 
Bonaventure Giffard, was the first Vicar Apostohc of England. 
The Giffards of Devonshire— and among these, prmcipally. 



30 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



Colonel John Giffard of Brightleigh — were distinguished for 
their great services and unswerving loyalty to King Charles I. 
Robert Giffard, of Exeter, rose to the position of Chief Justice of 
the Common Pleas in 1824, and was elevated to the rank of a 
Baron in the same year ; and at the present day a Giffard, 
lineally descended from the Giffards of Halsbury and Brightleigh, 
has been raised to the rank of an Earl, and has held the post of 
Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain under two Sovereigns 
and during five Administrations. 

The pedigree of the Devonshire Giffards has been traced back 
by Mr. Hardinge F. Giffard to within fifty years of the date of 
" Domesday Book." The chief seat of the family was then at 
Weare Giffard, but the family estates included also the manors 
of Aveton Giffard, Whitchurch, Lamerton, and Clovelly. In 
1241 Clovelly was held by Sir Roger Giffard as sub-tenant of 
Sir Walter Giffard of Weare Giffard, who left no male issue. In 
1254 Walter Giffard, a younger son of Sir Roger, held Chfford in 
Hartland, and it is from him that the Giffards of Halsbury 
are descended, for the Clovelly family became extinct in the 
next gei;:ieration. As Risdon says : " Chffard was the lands and 
dwellings of the Giffards before they wrote themselves of 
Hallesbery," and it was for centuries owned by the Halsbury 
family. 

The first Giffard of Halsbury, which is in the parish of Parkham, 
near Bideford, was Bartholomew, grandson of Walter Giffard of 
Chfford. He married Joan, daughter and heiress of Peter de 
Halsbury, and thus founded a family that, during its long tenure 
of that property, amassed an immense estate in the county of 
Devon, and threw off several branches, one of which was destined 
to continue the male representation of the family to the present 
day. This branch descends from Sir Roger Giffard, son of 
Thomas Giffard of Halsbury, by Anne Coryton, his second wife. 
He married one of the richest heiresses in Devon, viz. Margaret, 
daughter and heiress of John Cobleigh of Brightleigh, in the 
parish of Chittlehampton, and, according to Risdon, made 
Brightleigh " a dainty seat, with a park thereunto belonging." 
Some generations later, John Giffard of Halsbury, upon the 
death in his lifetime of his only son Thomas, settled that ancient 
property upon Roger Giffard, second son of Colonel John Giffard 
of Brightleigh, the celebrated Cavalier of the Civil Wars ; and 
in this way the vast estates of the Giffards of Halsbury passed 
to the Brightleigh branch of the family, which had separated 
from the parent stem in the reign of Henry VIII. In the middle 
of the eighteenth century, another Roger Giffard was compelled, 
through extravagance and the needs of a numerous progeny, 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 31 



to ^ell the ancient patrimony which had been in the Giffard 
family for about five centuries. This Roger Giffard, the last 
of the name who owned Halsbury, was uncle to the then head 
of the Giffard family, the grandfather of the present Earl of 
Halsbury. 

By an unjust settlement of the property, the male issue 
of the eldest son were debarred from the succession to the 
Brightleigh estates, but John, the rightful heir, was left by his 
grandfather " a very comfortable estate in Atherington and 
High Bickington, with a residence at Wotton," all of which 
were lost by foreclosure of a mortgage. John visited Ireland 
as a witness in the great Annesley peerage case, and there 
married Mrs. Robinson, by whom he left a son, John, who 
at the date of his father's death was a baby in arms. Being 
deprived of his mother and grandmother six years later, he 
was adopted by Counsellor Ambrose Hardinge, a friend of his 
father. He had, however, to seek his own fortune, and became 
Accountant-General of the Customs in Ireland. Of his iour 
sons, two died young, and the others were Sir A. Hardinge 
Giffard, Chief Justice of Ceylon, father of Admiral Sir George 
Giffard, K.C.B., and Stanley Lees Giffard, LL.D,, barrister-at- 
law, father of Lord Halsbury. 

His lordship was born in London on 3rd Sept., 1825, and 
entered life under the names Hardinge Stanley Giffard. He 
was educated at Merton College, Oxford, of which College he is 
an Honorary Fellow, and obtained his B.A. degree in 1852. 
Called to the bar at the Inner Temple in 1850, he went to the 
South Wales Circuit, and took silk in 1865. He twice contested 
Cardiff in the Conservative interest, in 1868 and 1874, and was 
without a seat in the House when, in 1875, Mr. Disraeli made him 
Sohcitor-General with the honour of knighthood. After several 
more unsuccessful attempts he was returned for Launceston in 
1877, and held office until 1880, when the ministry resigned. In 
1881 he was elected treasurer of the Inner Temple. In 1885 he 
became Lord Chancellor, with a peerage as Baron Halsbury, 
and held that office during all the Conservative administrations 
until 1905. In 1898 he was created Earl of Halsbury and 
Viscount Tiverton. He also holds the distinguished positions of 
President of the Royal Society of Literature, Senior Grand 
Warden of Enghsh Freemasons, Constable of Launceston Castle, 
and High Steward of the University of Oxford. He married, 
first, Caroline Louisa, daughter of William Conn Humphreys, of 
Wood Green, and, second, Wilhelmina, daughter of Henry 
Woodfall of Stanmore, by whom he has issue one son and one 
■daughter. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



The Worthies of Devon. 

Addenda. 

In the London Devonian Year Book for 1910, an attempt was 
made to provide an index to all the " Worthies of Devon " who 
have been considered of sufficient importance to be noticed in 
the " Dictionary of National Biography." The following list 
gives additional names compiled from Prince's " Worthies of 
Devon," from the Reports of the Devonshire Celebrities Com- 
mittee of the Devonshire Association, and from other sources. 
The names which appear in the " Dictionary of National 
Biography" are indicated by a dagger (f), and those which 
appear in Prince by the letter P. Several of the former were 
previously omitted because there was no definite evidence given 
in the Dictionary to connect the holders with Devon, but a few 
were omitted through oversight. A list of those who have died 
since Queen Victoria, is held back until the Supplement to the 
" Dictionary of National Biography " has been issued. 

Acland, Baldwin, treasurer Exeter Cathedral ; h. Exeter, 

1608; d. 1672. P. 
Adams, William, seaman ; h. Paignton, 1612 ; d. 1687. P. 
^Ifric, bishop of Devon (Crediton), 977-988. P.- 
^Ifwold, bishop of Devon (Crediton), 953-973 ; said to have 

been a native of Devon. P. 
^Ifwold II., tishop of Devon (Crediton), 988-1012; said to 

have been a native of Devon. P. 
fAlley, WiUiam, bishop of Exeter, 1560-70; h. Chipping 

Wycombe, Bucks, 1510 (?) ; d. Exeter, 15 April, 1570. 
Astley, Herbert, dean of Norwich ; h. Plymouth ; d. 1681. P. 
Atwell, Hugh, divine and physician ; h. Exeter ; d. 1617, 

aged 91. P. 
jAudley, James de, soldier, one of the original Knights of the 

Garter ; h. Dartington or Barnstaple (P), 1316 (?), (D.N.B.), 

prob. 1st son of Sir James Audley, of Stretton Audeley, 

Oxon. (D.N.B.) ; d. 1386. P. 
Avant, Philip, vicar of Salcombe circa 1680 ; wrote poetry. 
fBabington, Gervase, bishop of Exeter, 1595-7 ; said to have 

been born at Ottery St. Mary (P), 1550 (?) ; a native of 

Notts (Fuller) ; d. Worcester, 1610. P. 
•fBaker, George, musician ; h. Exeter, about 1773 ; d. Rugeley, 

19 Feb., 1847. 
Ball, Sir Peter, lawyer ; h. Mamhead ; d. 1680, in his 82nd 

year. P. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 33 

fBarclay, Alexander, poet, scholar, and divine ; h. 1475 (?) ; 

said to have been born at Ottery St. Mary (P.) ; probably 

of Scottish birth (D.N.B.) ; priest in college of Ottery St. 

Mary ; d. Croydon, 1552 ; bur. 10 June. 
Baring, John, founder of the house of Baring Brothers ; h. 

Exeter, 1730 ; M.P. Exeter, 1776-1803 ; d. 1816. [As his 

son. Sir Francis (q.v.), was born 1740, these dates must be 

incorrect. According to D.N.B., John seiiled at Larkbear, 

near Exeter.] 
Barry, Robert de, fl., 1175, warrior, son of William de Barry„ 

and bro. of Philip (D.N.B.) . P. 
tBartholomew, divine ; h. Exeter (P.) ; native of Brittany 

(D.N.B.); bishop of Exeter, 1161; d. 1184. P. 
fBartlet, John, nonconformist divine ; rector of St. Thomas's 

and St. Mary Major, Exeter ; ejected 1662. 
fBartlet, William, independent minister ; lecturer at Bideford 

1649 ; ejected 1662 ; d. Bideford, 1682. 
Basset, Arthur, royahst soldier ; h. Heavitree Court, about 

1597 ; d. 1672. P. 
Bastard, William, raised volunteer force in 1779 ; h. Kitley, 

1727; d. 1782. 
Bawceyn, Sir Stephen, soldier ; h. prob. Yardbury ; leader in 

Welsh wars of Henry II. P. 
Beal, William, Wesleyan minister and author ; h. Devonport, 

1785; d. Liskeard, 1872.. 
Beaumont, Richard, Lord Viscount Main, soldier ; in " mighty 

credit and fame " with Henry II. ; h. Yolston, Sherwell. P. 
Bellamy, J. C, surgeon and writer on natural history ; h. 

Plymouth, 1812; d. 1854. 
Blondy, Richard, bishop of Exeter, 1245-57 ; h. Exeter ; 

d. 1257. P. 
Bluet, Francis, royahst soldier ; h, Holcombe Rogus, 1582 ; 

lulled Lyme, 1644. P. 
Bonvill, Lord WiUiam, prominent Yorkist ; h. Shute ; beheaded 

after second battle of St. Albans. P. 
Bowen, Wilham, first master of Barnstaple Grammar School, 

1535 ; said to have been born in Devon. 
Brewer, WiUiam, bishop of Exeter, 1224-44 ; b. Tor Brewer (?) ; 

d. 1244. P. 
Brian, Lord Guy, soldier ; b. Tor Brian (?) ; d. 1391. P. 
jBrit, Brytte, or Brithus, Walter, fl. 1390; mathematician, 
scholar and disciple of Wychff (P.) ; b. Staddiscombe, near 
Plymouth (P.) ; a layman of the diocese of Hereford (D.N.B.). 
P. 
Bronscombe, Walter, bishop of Exeter, 1258-80 ; b. Exeter ; 
d. 1280. P. 3 



34 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



Budockshed,. Robert, said to be founder of St. Budeaux Church 

in 1566. P. 
fBurehard, Saint, first Bishop of Wiirzburg ; said to be a native 

of Devon (P.) ; reputed of English origin (D.N.B.) ; d. 2 Feb. 

754. P. 
Burgoin, William ; d. 1623. P. 
Burley, or Burleigh, John, royalist officer ; h. Modbury (P.) ; 

of good family in Isle of Wight (Clarendon) ; beheaded, 

Winchester, 10 Feb., 1647-8. P. 
Calwodeley, Thomas, benefactor ; h. Devon ; d. 1492. 
Carew, Sir Gawen ; b. Mohuns Ottery ; d. 1583. 
fCarew, Sir Thomas, soldier in the services of Henry IV. and 

Henry V.; grandson of Sir John Carew [q.v.] ; d. 1431. P. 
Carew, Thomas ; b. Mohuns Ottery ; killed Flodden. P. 
Carwithen, Rev. J. B. S., B.D., Bampton lecturer ; b. Manaton, 

10 April, 1781 ; d. Sandhurst, 1832. 
Gary, George, dean of Exeter ; 6. Clovelly, 1611 ; d. 1680. P. 
Cary, John (? James), bishop of Exeter for six weeks; d. 

Florence, 1419. P. 
Gary, Sir Robert ; b. prob. North Lew ; son of John Cary, 

judge [q.v.] ; gained favour of Henry V. by vanquishing 

an Arragonese knight in Smithfield. P. 
Ghampernowne, Sir Arthur; b. Modbury; fought in Ireland 

under Essex, temp. Elizabeth. P. 
Ghanter, John le [Fitz-Duke], -bishop of Exeter, 1186-91; 

b. Exeter. P. 
Ghard, Thomas, D.D., abbot of Ford ; b. Awliscombe, temp. 

Henry VII. P. 
Ghard, Thomas, suffragan to Bishop Oldham ; d. about 1543. 

P. 
Gheare, Abraham, nonconformist ; b. Plymouth ; d. Drake's 

Island, 1668. 
Ghilcott, Robert ; b. Tiverton ; nephew of Blundell. P. 
Ghilde, said to have owned Plymstock, and to have perished 

on Dartmoor. P. 
Ghudleigh, or Ghidley, John, navigator, temp. Elizabeth ; 

b. Chudleigh ; d. Straits of Magellan. 
Goeke, William, naval captain ; b. Plymouth ; the only English- 
man of note who fell in the fight with the Armada, 1588. P. 
Goffin, Sir William ; b. Portledge ; d. 1538. P. 
Goleridge, James, lieut.-col. in East Devon Militia ; b. South 

Molton, 15 Dec, \1Q0; mar. Frances Duke Taylor, of 

Otterton. 
Golleton, Sir John, bart,, royalist, leading merchant of Exeter ; 

b. Devon, 1608 ; created bart., 1661. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 35 

Copleston, John ; h. 16th century, Copleston. P. 

Cotton, Edward, D.D., treasurer of Exeter Cath. ; h. Whimple 

or Silverton, 1608 ; d. 1675. P. 
Courtenay, Lord Hugh, Earl of Devon, temp. Edward III. ; 

d. 1377. 
Courtenay, Sir Peter, soldier ; bro. of Archbishop Courtenay ; 

d. 1409. P. 
Crewys, Sir Robert, soldier ; ^. Cruwys Morchard ; fought at 

Cressy. P. . 

fCridiodunus, Fridericus (St. Frederick), bishop of Utrecht ; 

said to have been a nephew of St. Boniface (Malmesbury) , 

but without authority (D.N.B.) ; murdered 838. P. 
Crocker, Sir John, soldier ; b. Lyneham ; cup-bearer to 

Edward TV. P. 
"fDavidson, James, antiquary and bibliographer ; h. Tower Hill, 

London, 15 Aug., 1793 ; lived at Axminster ; author of 

Bibliotheca Devoniensis " ; d. Axminster, 29 Feb., 1864. 
"fDavidson, James Bridge, miscellaneous writer; h. Axminster, 

1824 ; son of jfames Davidson [q.v.] ; d. London, 8 Oct., 1885. 
Davie, Edmund, M.D. ; h. Canon Teign, 1630 ; d. 1692. P. 
Davils, Henry, soldier ; h. Merland, Petrockstow ; killed 

Ireland, 1579. P. 
Denham, Sir John. See Dynham. 
Devon, Richard, Franciscan Iriar, 13th century. P. 
Devonius, «/iVzs de Forda, John, abbot of Ford ; d. about 1217. 

P. 
Drake, Robert, benefactor ; h. Spratshays, Littleham ; d. 1628 

P. 
fDyer, Gilbert, antiquary and bookseller ; h. Widdecombe, 

1743 ; bap. 14 Sept. ; son of schoolmaster ; d. Exeter, 

19 Oct., 1820. 
fDymond, Jonathan, quaker moralist ; b. Exeter, 19 Dec, 1796 ; 

d. 6 May, 1828. 
Dynham, Sir John, Lord High Treasurer; b. prob. Nutwell ; 

d. 1502, aged 72. P. 
Eadulph, first bishop of Devon (Crediton) ; b. about 860; 

d. about 932. P. 
Ealphage, a learned priest of Plymouth, /cw/). William II. 
jEliot, Sir John, patriot ; b. Port Eliot, St. Germans, 20 April, 

1592 ; " of a family of old Devonshire descent " ; d. Tower 

of London, 27 Nov., 1632. 
tElys, Edmund, divine and poet ; b. Haccombe, 1634 (?) ; 

son of Edmund Elys, and Ursula, dau. of John Carew, of 

Haccombe ; rector of East Allington, 1659-89 ; living \101. 
Ethelgar, bishop of Devon (Crediton), 934-53. P. 



36 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

Fitz, John, lawyer ; h. near Tavistock, 15th cent. P. 
Fitz, John, of Fitzford, lawyer, temp. Elizabeth. P. 
fFitzralph, Richard, archbishop of Armagh ; h. prob. at Dundalk 

(D.N.B.) ; d. prob. 16 Nov., 1360. P. 
Flay, Thomas ; h. prob. Collumpton ; d. 1634. P. 
Floyer, William ; h. Floiers Hays ; served in France, 1474. P. 
fFoliot, Gilbert, bishop of London ; h. prob. Tamerton Folio t 

(P.) ; of Norman family (D.N.B.) ; opponent of Thomas a 

Becket; d. 1187-8. P. 
fFoliot, Robert, bishop of Hereford ; related to Gilbert FoHot 

[q.v.]; d. 1186. P. 
Ford, Thomas, martyr in Roman calendar ; executed 1582. P. 
Forde, Maurice de, monk. Ford Abbey; 12th century. P. 
Fortescue, Hugh, Earl, Lord-Lieutenant of Devon, and of 

Ireland; h. 1783; d. 1861. 
Fowler, Thomas, inventor ; h. Torrington, 1777. 
fFulford, Francis, D.D., first bishop of Montreal ; h. Sidmouth, 

3 June, 1803 ; 2nd son of Baldwin Fulford of Great Fulford, 

and Anna Maria, dau. of William Adams, M.P. for Totnes ; 

d. Montreal, 9 Sept., 1868. 
Fulford, Sir William, judge temp. Richard H. ; h. Fulford. P. 
fFurneaux, Tobias, circumnavigator ; h. Swilly, near Ply- 
mouth, 21 Aug., 1735 ; d. Swilly, 19 Sept., 1781. 
Gandy, John, D.D., preb. of SaHsbury ; b. Exeter ; d. 1672, 

aged nearly 70. P. 
Gervais, Walter, founder of Exe Bridge ; h. prob. Exeter, 

13th cent. P. 
Gifford, John, colonel ; h. Brightly, Chittlehampton, 1594 ;. 

d. about 1666. P. 
Gifford, Humphrey, poet temp. EHzabeth ; h. about 1550. 
Gilbert, Sir Adrian, bro. of Sir Humphrey [q.v.]. 
Giles, Sir Edward, soldier ; h. Totnes, about 1580 ; d. 1637. P. 
fGorges, Sir Ferdinando, military and naval commander and 

coloniser ; h. 1566 (?) ; son of Edward Gorges, of Wraxall, 

Somerset ; governor of Plymouth, 1595 ; d. 1647. 
Gould, James, merchant and royahst ; h. Staverton, 1602 ; 

d. 1659. P. 
tGranville, or Grenville, Sir Bevil, governor of Barbados, 

grandson of Sir Bevil Grenville [q.v.] ; d. at sea, 1706. 
•fGranville, or Grenville, George, Baron Lansdowne, poet and 

dramatist ; h. 1667 ; bro. of Sir Bevil [q.v.] ; d. Hanover 

Sq., London, 30 Jan., 1735. 
Greenway, John, benefactor to Tiverton, 16th century ; h. 

Tiverton. P. 
Grenville, Hon. Bernard, monk's messenger to Charles IL ; 

d. 1701. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 37 

fGrenville, Sir Bevil, royalist ; h. St. Withiel, Cornwall, 23 

March, 1595-6 ; killed at Lansdowne, 5 July, 1643 ; bur. 

Kilkhampton, 26 July. 
fGrenville, Sir Richard, royalist ; h. 1600 ; hap. Kilkhampton, 

26 June ; bro. of Sir Bevil [q.v.] ; d. Ghent, 1658. 
Grenville, Sir Theobald, one of the founders of Bideford Bridge ; 

14th century ; h. Bideford. P. 
Gribble, Joseph Besly, author of Memorials of Barnstaple ; 

b. Barnstaple, 1790 ; d. Cleveland, Ohio, 1878. 
Halse, John, judge ; ? Devonian. P. 
Halse, John, bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, 1459-1490 ; 

b. Sherford ; son of preceding ; d. nearly 90 years of age. P. 
Harris, Sir Edward, Lord Chief Justice of Munster ; son of 

Thomas Harris [q.v.]. P. 
Harris, John, serjeant-at-law, recorder of Exeter ; b. Stowford ; 

d. 1548. P. 
Harris, Thomas, serjeant-at-law ; b. prob. West Corn worthy ; 

d. 1610. P. 
Hawley, John, merchant of Dartmouth, 14th cent. ; d. 1408. P. 
Haydon, John, lawyer ; b. Topsham ; d. 1587. P. 
Heale, Sir John, serjeant-at-law, recorder of Exeter ; d. 1608, 

aged 66. P. 
Heath, Benjamin, D.D., head master of Harrow ; b. Exeter, 

1739 ; son of Benjamin Heath [q.v.] ; d. 1817. 
Heath, George, D.D., head master of Eton; b. Exeter, 1745 ; 

son of Benjamin Heath [q.v.] ; d. 1822. 
Hele, EUze, benefactor, b. Worston, Brixham ; d. 1635. P. 
fHieron, Samuel, Puritan divine ; b. Epping, Essex, 1572 (D.A.) ; 

incumbent of Modbury ; d. 1617. 
Hieron, Samuel ; b. Modbury about 1608. 
Hill, Sir John, judge, 1400 ; b. Exeter. P. 
Hill, Sir Robert Hill, judge temp. Henry IV., V., VI. P. 
fHody, Sir WilUam, chief baron of the Exchequer, 1486 ; 2nd 

son of Sir John Hody [q.v.] ; d. 1522 (?). P. 
Holland, Joseph, " the famous Devonshire antiquary " {Hearne). 
Hooper, WilHam Harvey, sec. to Greenwich Hospital, and 

Polar explorer ; b. Totnes, 1792 ; d. Paignton, 1833. 
Howard, Nathaniel, poet, translator of Dante ; b. Plymouth. 
Huddesfield, Sir William, attorney-general and judge; b. 

Honiton; d. 1499. P. 
Jones, Pitman, solicitor and antiquary ; b. Exeter, 1785 ; 

d. 1860. 
fKean, Charles John, actor; b. Exeter, 1815; Waterford, 

18 Jan., 1811 [D.N.B.] ; 2nd son of Edmund Kean ; d. 

London, 1868. 



38 The Devonian Year Book, 191^ 

fKeats, Sir Richard Goodwin, admiral ; h. Chalton," Hants, 

16 Jan., 1757 ; son of Richard Keats, afterwards head 

master of Blundell's School, Tiverton, and rector of Bideford ; 

d. Greenwich, 5 April, 1834. 
Kebie, surnamed Corinaeus, saint, and bishop of Anglesey ; 

d. 370. P. 
fKendall, John, architect ; h. Exeter, 1766 ; subsequently 

settled there [D.N.B.] ; d. Exeter, Oct., 1829. 
Kendall, William, architect and poet ; b. Exeter, 1768 ; bro. 

of John Kendall [q.v.] ; d. 1832. 
Kerswill, Sir William, soldier, temp. Henry V. and VI. P. 
Kirkham, Sir John, benefactor, temp. Henry VHI. ; b. Blagdon, 

Paignton. P. 
fLavington, George, bishop of Exeter, 1747-62 ; b. Mildenhall, 

18 Jan., 1683-4 ; son of Rev. Joseph Lavington, rector of 

Mildenhall ; d. Exeter, 13 Sept., 1762 ; bur. 19 Sept. in Cath. 
Lethbridge, Christopher, mayor of Exeter at the Restoration ; 

b. Wolston, Clannaborough. P. 
Lovelace, Jacob, mechanician ; b. Exeter, 1656. 
Lyde, George, vicar of Widdecombe; ft. Berry Pomeroy; d. 1673. P. 
Lye, Sir Edmund, sailor temp. Elizabeth ; b. Totnes. 
Lye, Sir Edward ; b. Totnes, 1553 ; d. 1625. 
MoUe, John, prisoner 30 years in Italy ; b. South Molton ; 

d. about 1638. P. 
fMonck, Mary, poetess ; b. 1680 ; dau. of Robert Molesworth, 

first Viscount Molesworth ; mar. George Monck, of Dublin ; 

d. 1715. [Not Devonian.] 
Moore, Edward, M.D., writer on natural history, etc. ; b. 

Plymouth; d. 1858. 
Moxhay, Edward, architect ; b. Exeter, 1788 ; d. 1849. 
jNeckam, or Necham, Alexander, scholar ; b. St. Albans, Herts., 

Sept., 1157; supposed to have been prior of St. Nicholas, 

Exeter, but of this there is no proof (D.N.B.) ; d. Kempsey, 

Worcestershire, 1217 ; bur. Worcester. 
•f Nelson, Richard John, major-general. Royal Engineers, and 

geologist ; b. Crabtree, near Plymouth, 3 May, 1803 ; d. 

Devonport, 17 July, 1877. 
Ordulph, ealdorman of Devon ; son of Ordgar [q.v.] ; one of 

the founders of Tavistock Abbey. P. 
Osborne, John, Puritan divine ; b. Crediton, about 1618 ; d. 

about 1665. 
fParr, John, dissenting minister; 6. Silverton, 1691 ; d. \119. 
jPeele, George, dramatist ; said to have been born at Exeter, 

but was the " son of a London citizen and Salter " (D.N.B.) ; 
; b. 1558 (?) ; d. 1597 (?). 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 3q 

Peryam, Sir John, benefactor to Exeter Coll., Oxford ; h. 

Exeter ; d. Upton Hellions, 1616, 
fPollexfen, Sir Henry, judge ; h. 1632 (?) ; 1st son of Andrew 

Pollexfen, of Stancombe, Sherford ; chief justice of Common 

Pleas, 1689 ; d. London, 15 June, 1691 ; bur. Woodbury. 
fPoUexfen, John, merchant and economic writer ; h. 1638 (?) 

bro. of Sir Henry Pollexfen [q.v.]. 
fPolwhele, Rev. Richard, misc. writer; h. Truro, 6 Jan., 1760 

author of History of Devonshire; curate of Kenton 

1782-93 ; d. Truro, 12 March, 1838. 
Pomeroy, Sir Henry, partisan of John against Richard I. 

h. Berry. P. 
fPratt, Sir John, Lord Chief Justice ; h. Bishop's Nympton, 

1657 ; son of Richard Pratt, of Standlake, Oxon., and 

grandson of Richard Pratt, of Carswell Priory, near Col- 

lumpton ; d. Great Ormond Street, London, 24 Feb., 1724-5. 
Prideaux, Sir Edmond, bart. ; h. Holsworthy, 1554 ; d. 1628. 

P. 
Prideaux, John, chemist ; h. Plymouth, 1787 ; d. 1859. 
Pridham, Thomas Lawrence, surgeon ; h. Topsham, 1803 ; 

author of Celebrities of Devon; d. 1872. 
Prout, Ebenezer, F.G.S., nonconformist minister ; b. Plymouth, 

1802; d. 1871. 
Rennell, Thomas, painter and poet; b. Chudleigh, 1718; d. 

19 Oct., 1788. 
Reynell, Richard^ active in suppressing the Western rebellion ; 

b. East Ogwell, 1519. P. 
Risdon, Thomas, lawyer ; b. Parkham ; d. 1614. P. 
fRobsart, Amy ; wrongly stated to have been born at Lidcote, 

near Barnstaple ; b. 1532 (?) ; dau. of Sir John Robsart, 

of Siderstern, Norfolk ; d. 1560. 
Rolle, Dennis ; b. Bicton, 1614 ; d. 1638. P. 
Row, John, serjeant-at-law; b. Totnes ; d. 1592, aged over 

80. P. 
Russell, Margaret ; b. Bedford House, Exeter, 1560 ; 3rd dau. 

of Francis, 2nd Earl of Bedford ; d. 1616. 
Saunders, Richard, nonconformist divine ; b. Payhembury ; 

d. 1692. 
Shillingford, John, mayor of Exeter, 1447-50; believed to 

have been born at ShilHngford, near Exeter. 
fShore, John, 1st Baron Teignmouth, governor-general of 

India ; b. St. James's St., Piccadilly, 8 Oct., 1751 ; son of 

Thomas Shore, of Melton Place, near Romford ; 1st Pres. 

of British and Foreign Bible Society ; d. Portman Sq., 14 

Feb., 1834 ; bur. Marylebone Church. 



40 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

Sibthorpe, Humphrey, M.D., M.A., botanist ; h. Instow, 1712 ; 
d. 1797. 

fSmith, James, D.D., divine and poet ; h. Marston-Morteyne, 
Beds., 1605 ; archdeacon of Barnstaple and rector of Ex- 
minster ; d. 1667. 

fSpeke, John Hanning, African explorer and discoverer of the 
source of the Nile ; h. Orleigh Court, Bideford, 1827 {Trans. 
Dev. Assoc.) ; Jordans, near Ilminster, Som., 4 May, 1827. 
(D.N.B.) ; d. Neston Park, near Bath, 18 Sept., 1864. 

fSprat, Thomas, D.D., bishop of Rochester and dean of West- 
minster ; h. Talaton, 1635 (Trans. Dev. Assoc.) ; Beaminster, 
Dorset (D.N.B.) ; son of Rev. Thomas Sprat, of Beaminster, 
who in 1652 was in charge of Talaton ; d. Bromley, 20 May, 
1713 ; bur. Westminster Abbey. 

fStanbury, Stanbery, or Stanbridge, John, D.D., bishop of Here- 
ford ; 2nd son of Walter Stanbury, of Morwenstow, Corn- 
wall (D.N.B.); d. Ludlow, 11 May, 1474; bur. Hereford 
Gath. P. 

fStrachan, Sir Richard John, 4th bart., K.C.B., admiral ; b. 
27 Oct., 1760 ; d. Bryanston Sq., 3 Feb., 1828. 

Tapper, Samuel, nonconformist divine ; b. Exeter, 1636 ; 
minister at Lympstone ; d. 3 March, 1709. (Moore's Hist, 
of Dev.) 

Tolley, David, M.A., Prof, of Physic, 16th cent. ; b. Kings- 
bridge, about 1500. 
fTowson, John Thomas, watchmaker ; b. Devonport, 8 April, 
1804 ; d. Liverpool, 3 Jan., 1881. 

Traies, WilHam, landscape artist ; b. Crediton, 1788 ; d. 1872. 

Trelawny, Robert, M.P. ; b. Plymouth, 1598 ; d. 1644. 

Tremayne, Thomas ; b. Lamerton, temp. Henry VHL P. 

Trewman, Robert, founder of the Exeter Flying Post ; b. 
Exeter, 1738 ; d. Exeter, 1802. 

Trowbridge, Sir Thomas, admiral ; b. Asher (?), 1750 ; d. 1810. 

Turner, Robert, D.D., Roman Catholic divire; b. Barnstaple ; 
d. Gratz in Styria, 28 Nov., 1599. 

Wadham, Dorothy ; b. 1534 ; dau. of Secretary Petre ; mar. 
Nicholas Wadham (q.v.). Co-founder of Wadham College, 
Oxford; d. 1618. P. 

Walter, John Rolle, M.P. Exeter and Devon ; d. 1779, aged 66. 
tWatson, Sir Thomas, 1st bart., M.D., F.R.C.P., physician ; 

. b. Montrath, near Collumpton, 7 March, 1792 ; 1st son of 
Joseph Watson, of Thorpe-le-Soken, Essex; d. l\ Dec, 
1822. 

Westcott, John, Augustinian canon ; b. Westcott, Marwood, 
about 1270. P. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 41 



fWey, or Way, William, traveller and author ; h. Devon, 1407 (?) ; 

d. Edingdon, Wilts, 30 Nov., 1476. 
fWeymouth, or Waymouth, George (/?. 1605), voyager ; native 
of Devon. 
Wilford, William, seaman ; h. near Plymouth ; made successful 

descent on French coast, 1403. 
f Williams, Thomas, speaker of the House of Commons ; h. 
1513 (?) ; 1st son of Adam WilUams, of Stowford, and Alice, 
dau. of Thomas Prideaux of Ashburton ; d. 1 July, 1566 ; 
hur. Harford Church. 
Woollcombe, Henry, F.S.A., founder of the Plymouth Institu- 
tion ; h. 1778 ; d. 1847. 
Woollcombe, Robert, clergyman temp. Elizabeth and 

James I. P. 
Woollcombe, William, physician, editor of Risdon and Prince ; 

b. 1773; d. 1822. 
fYalden, Thomas, poet ; b. Exeter, 1670 (Trans. Dev. Assoc.) ; 

Oxford, 2 Jan., 1669-70 (D.N.B.) ; d. 16 July, 1736. 
Yarde, Richard, high sheriff, Henry VI. ; b. Bradley. P. 
Yeo, WilHam, high sheriff, 1358. P. 
tYonge, Sir George, 5th bart., M.P., K.B., governor of Cape of 
Good Hope; b. 1731 ; son of Sir William Yonge [q.v.] ; 
Lord of Admiralty ; Vice-treasurer for Ireland ; Secretary 
for War ; Master of Mint ; d. 1812. 



Our Devonshire Worthies. 

The grand old men of Devonshire, 

How mighty is their name ! 
The glory of their deeds shall burn. 

An everlasting flame. 
Right sturdy, stalwart sons were they. 

And won a brave renown — 
The brightest, purest, gems of fame, 

In England's matchless crown. 

The brave old men of Devonshire ! 

'Tis worth a world to stand 
As Devon's sons, on Devon's soil, 

Though infants of the band ; 
And tell old England to her face. 

If she is great in fame, 
'Twas good old heart of Devon oak 

That made her glorious name. 

C a pern. 



42 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



The Aged Trees, 



Haggard and grey they creep above the hill, 

Riven and shattered, yet endued with life ; 

The pioneers of pines that feel no strife, 

Far, far below, where leaps a laughing rill, 

And song and sunlight home within the valley still. 



II. 

Here all is battle ; fallen trunk and bough 
Declare eternal siege, and the long sigh 
Of war-worn branches, buffeted on high, 
Scarce ceases day or night upon the brow 
Of this sad solitude, but lifts and lulls, as now. 



III. 

Yet have I seen the trees at eventide 

Rapt in a magic hour of silent rest. 

With dim red gold about each beaten crest. 

Where the last garland of the sunset died ; 

And through the drowsy wood, night spread her purple wide. 

IV 

Forgotten yet enduring, here they dwell 

Until their time is told and they return 

Into the universal, sacred urn — 

Type of the secret great that win no knell. 

Whose strenuous story none shall ever know or tell. 

£den Phillpotts. 

Two Bridges, Dartmoor. 
Sept., 191 1. 



w 




EDEN PHILLPOTTS, ESQ. 

(A Vice-President of the London Devonian Association). 

From a Photograph by Rose A'. Durrani &= Son, Tot quay. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 43 



Eden Phillpotts, Poet and Novelist. 

A Lecture by W. H. K. Wright, F.L.A., F.R.Hist.Soc, 
Borough Librarian, Plymouth. 

If we were asked to name the most popular and widely-read 
West Country writer of to-day in the domain of fiction, I think 
we should unhesitatingly award the verdict to Eden Phillpotts, 
for his pen is never idle, and his works come from the press in 
such rapid succession that we can hardly assimilate one before 
another claims our attention. 

Although not a Devonian by birth, he has nevertheless a 
strong claim to be of our kith and kin, his family having been 
connected with the west of England for generations ; and the 
famous Henry Phillpotts, Bishop of Exeter, was his grand-uncle. 

He was educated at Plymouth, and spent some happy years 
at Mannamead School, then carried on by Dr. Peter Holmes 
and Mr. Pollard. His experiences, of course somewhat exag- 
gerated, he has skilfully woven into his two books, " The Human 
Boy," and " The Human Boy Again." 

At the age of seventeen he went to London, and there entered 
the clerical staff of the Sun Fire Insurance Company, but his 
spare hours were chiefly devoted to literature, for which he felt 
that he had a special aptitude. 

For some years he was on the literary staff of Black and 
White, for which he wrote many charming sketches and short 
stories. 

At the office of that paper, in one of the narrow streets leading 
off Fleet Street, I used occasionally to meet him and his colleague 
and friend, Mr. H. D. Lowry, a Cornish writer, and the chief, 
Mr. Nicoll Dunn, afterwards editor of the Morning Post, and now 
holding one of the leading positions in the journaHstic world. 
Our chats were invariably about West Country literature and 
associations. 

Of late years, Mr. Phillpotts has settled down at Torquay, 
which he finds suited to his state of health ; and here he writes 
incessantly, evolving new plots for his great scheme of Dart- 
moor stories ; beguiling his leisure with his favourite hobby, 
gardening — for he is a passionate lover of Nature in all her 
moods. This is abundantly evident in his works, which are 
full of delightful descriptions of Devonshire, and particularly 
Dartmoor, which he seems to have annexed as his own ; for 
no living writer, in fact no writer since Carrington, the Dartmoor 



44 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

poet, has invested that romantic region with such a glamour 
as Eden Phillpotts. 

Besides his novel writing, with which we shall deal presently, 
he has given the world several delightful books of an entirely 
different character, as well as some charming books of song. 

" My Devon Year," an exquisite volume, is made up of Nature 
studies, poems in prose. The mere titles of the chapters suggest 
poetic fancies. Here are a few of them : " The Secret of the 
Day," " Granite and Sorrel," " Harmony in Blue," " Young 
Tamar," " The Home of the West Wind," " Harmony in Gold," 
" Harmony in Silver," etc., etc. A most appreciative paper 
in this volume is entitled, " Where Herrick lies," and is descrip- 
tive of that picturesque old graveyard at Dean Prior, near 
Ashburton, where the mortal remains of the " Cavalier Vicar " 
rest in an unknown grave. Space alone prevents my giving 
a short quotation from this delightful chapter. 

In " My Garden," the author gives his personal experience^ 
of experiments in flower and plant culture, in which he is an 
enthusiastic expert. This book, like " My Devon Year," is 
beautifully illustrated. 

Two volumes of short poems — " Up-along and Down-along " 
and " Wild Fruit " — testify to his love for the Muses and his 
facility in writing charming verse. Several of the poems are 
in the Devonshire dialect. Here are one or two typical pieces : 

Us. 

Us was sitting on a gate — me an' her — 
In a very coorious state — me an' her. 
When the moon beginned to shine, 
^ took both her hands in mine ! 
We was going of it fine — me an' her. 

'Peared us hadn't nought to say — ^him an' me. 

Telhng wadden in our way — him an' me. 

But he heaved a sort o' groan, 

An' I gived a Httle moan, 

While us pitched theer — all alone — ^him an' me. 

Us continued on the gate — ^him an' me — • 

'Till it growed a trifle late. Him an' me 

Hearkened to the owls a-bawling, 

Listened to the cats a-wauling — 

Then the church clock chimed. 'Twas calling — him an' me. 

Back along us slowly went — me an' her, 

Feeling very well content — me an' her. 

Come her evening out 'tis plain 

Us shall do as I ordain : 

Sit 'pon thicky gate again — me an' her. 

From " Wild Fruit." 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 45 



Man's Days. 
A sudden wakin', a sudden weepin' ; 
A li'l suckin', a li'l sleepin' ; 
A cheel's full joys an' a cheel's short sorrows, 
Wi' a power o' faith in gert to-morrows. 

Young blood red hot an' the love of a maid ; 

Wan glorious hour as'll never fade ; 

Some shadows, some sunshine, some triumphs, some tears ; 

An' a gatherin' weight o' the fiyin' years. 

Then auld man's talk o' the days behind 'e ; 
Your darter's youngest darter to mind 'e ; 
A li'l dreamin', a li'l dyin', 
A li'l lew corner o' airth to lie in. 

From " Wild Fruit." 

Where my Treasure is. 

Eternal mother, when my race is run, 
Will that I pass beneath the risen sun. 
Suffer my sight to dim upon some spot 
That changes not. 

Let my last pillow be the land I love. 
With fair infinity of blue above ; 
The roaming shadow of a silver cloud. 
My only shroud. 

A little lark above the morning star. 
Shall shrill the tidings of my end afar ; 
The muffled music of a lone sheep-bell 
Shall be my knell. 

And where stone heroes trod the Moor of old ; 
Where ancient wolf howled round a granite fold ; 
Hide thou, beneath the heather's new-born light. 
My endless night. 

From " Wild Fruit." 
No comment is necessary upon the above. 

Time would fail me to call attention to the numerous articles 
and short papers which have appeared during the past twenty 
years Irom Mr. Phillpotts' pen ; many of them will be found, 
as I have already hinted, in the early volumes of Black and White, 
and many other later productions in the popular monthly 
magazines. 

My object is mainly to refer in detail to his works of fiction, 
as in this department of literature he has certainly gained 
high distinction. 

I must, however, hark back a little to record an incident of 
more than ordinary interest, 

A few months since I chanced upon a little paper-covered 
volume or pamphlet of some sixty pages, bearing the name of 



46 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

Eden Phillpotts "upon its title-page. The date was 1888, and 
the story was entitled, " My Adventure in the Flying Scotsman : 
a Romance of London and North-Western Railway Shares." 
Not a very promising subject for a work of romance. 

I mention this, although it had no local connection, because 
it was the first literary effort of this writer, whose fame is now 
world-wide, and whose books are to be found in nearly every 
library in our own country, as well as in many cities and towns 
in America and the Colonies. 

One can realize the delight of the young author (he was then 
twenty-six), on receiving his first commission, an offer of eight 
pounds for ten thousand words about railway shares ; how, as 
he says in a private letter : "I stood on air as I left Paternoster 
Row, and I felt that things I could write were at last actually 
worth money." It was not long after this that he started 
in that course of literary efforts in which he has achieved such 
signal success. 

Mr. Phillpotts' scheme of work, to quote his own words, has 
been "to tell the story and paint the life of the Moor folk, and 
the theatre in which they play their parts. This story (which 
is all one as I see it) is divided into books or novels. They 
each cover a different tract of Dartmoor and display a different 
centre round which the narrative turns. Four more books 
will complete my scheme, and the work of twenty years will 
be finished. My attitude to human life is that of a humanist." 

It should be mentioned in passing that this statement refers 
to his scheme of Dartmoor stories as distinct from his other 
works. 

We will now follow him through the course of his writings, 
treating the various books in the order in which they were 
published, but passing over very briefly those which have no 
local interest, as they do not come directly within the scope 
of our present inquiry. In 1891 appeared a little work entitled 
" Folly and Fresh Air." It can hardly be called a novel, nor 
does it come within the category of a book of adventure or 
travel ; it is, in fact, simply a record of trout fishing on Dart- 
moor, taking Horrabridge (or Tavybridge in the novel) as its 
centre, and the minor adventures which befel the narrator. 
Nevertheless the interest of the story (slight though it is) is 
kept up to the end, and the word pictures of Dartmoor which 
are given are truly delightful. 

Here is a brief typical passage from this book : " To me this 
Dartmoor region reflects some of the secrets of man's life, even 
as man himself in the ancients' estimation was but a microcosm 
of the great world. Here are to be found rugged mountain and 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 47 

bleak wilderness in sight of fertile valleys and sweet pasturages ; 
here sunshine and shadow, hght and darkness for ever mys- 
teriously blend and mingle ; here wild tempests hurry and 
scream, though the corn grows yellow and the apple red ; here 
birds sing while angry torrents roar, and cruel rocks cut man's 
weary feet, but cooUng fountains are always at hand to bathe 
them in ; here, finally, as in Nature and in Life, winter must 
surely conquer summer, and as surely yield to spring." 

This was followed, shortly afterwards, by another little essay 
entitled " Some Every Day Folks." Here again we have a 
book without much in the nature of a plot or story. The scene 
is laid (if it can be said that there is a scene) at Heatherbridge, 
a quite imaginary place the author tells me, but with a shght 
stretch of imagination it would answer for Tavistock. The 
incidents are woven so deftly that one almost recognizes the 
characters of these " Every Day Folks." " A Storm in a Tea- 
cup," is perhaps the liveliest chapter in this interesting volume. 

His next essay was a book of short stories with the general 
title " Down Dartmoor Way." This volume contained some 
of the author's best writing ; and several of the stories have a 
peculiar fascination for us, seeing that they describe places 
familiar, but by no means commonplace. 

None surpasses in interest " Two Primitive Maids." The 
stories are essentially tales of the moorland and sea-board life, 
and are thorough out-of-door topics. 

In " A Curse Half-Spoke " we have two scenes in a mariner's 
life : at home in Devon, and cast away on the ocean — an idyll 
poetizing a bit of superstition. 

Another tragic anecdote is " Brake Fern Weir," a story 
told by a water-bailiff to an angler on the Dart ; another, " Chil- 
dren of the Mist," is an equally tragic story, being the brief 
career and self-immolation of a lion-hearted boy. 

In his next novel, " Lying Prophets," Mr. Phillpotts gives 
the result of a brief sojourn in West Cornwall, the scene being 
laid in the fishing villages of Newlyn and Mousehole, and the 
artists' colony in and around Mount's Bay. The characters 
are essentially Cornish, there is a spice of tragedy in the tale, 
and the local colour is excellent. He is somewhat severe upon 
the members of a small but select and exclusive set of religious 
enthusiasts, whom he dubs " Luke Gospellers." 

We now come to the first of the long series of Dartmoor stories 
to which reference has already been made. He adopted the 
title given to one of his short stories, issued in the volume already 
mentioned, " Down Dartmoor Way/' viz. " Children of the 
Mist." 



48 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

It is a story of Nature and countiy-life on Dartmoor and in 
the beautiful region round about Chagford. The hero, a son of 
the gipsies, is a very unfortunate youth, whose Hfe is believed 
by his superstitious neighbours to be under a spell. His love 
affairs get him into trouble, his farming does not prosper, he 
loves his child, and is arrested as a deserter ; but after many 
ups-and-downs, we leave him happy and contented and married 
to a good wife. The representation of country life is faithful, 
without unpleasant realism; the broad Devon dialect gives 
point to the occasional humour, and the scenery is abundantly 
illustrated. In fact, it is a story somewhat in the manner of 
Thomas Hardy, in which the loves and hates, the petty jealousies 
and bitter heart-searchings of ordinary country people on the 
edge of Dartmoor are given with singular faithfulness. 

As a pleasant interlude between his more serious Dartmoor 
books, Mr. Phillpotts issued a series of sketches of school life, 
under the striking title, " The Human Boy." The incidents are 
intensely diverting, especially those which relate to class routine 
and the practical jokes played by the scholars upon the masters 
and teachers. Although it is to some extent reminiscent of the 
author's own school-days at Mannamead School, one fails to 
recognize in Dr. Dunstan, the erudite head master, with his 
coquettish daughter, any resemblance to the sage and reverend 
Dr. Holmes, who for so many years presided over that seminary, 
named in the novel the Merivale School. It is essentially a 
book for boys, and will be enjoyed by them equally with Kip- 
ling's " Stalky (Sr Co.," which is a school story of Westward Ho ! 
College, where the author was educated. 

Back to Dartmoor again in 1900, and after that the output 
of the series of local stories was steady and continuous. 

" Sons of the Morning " is a story bearing a close resemblance 
to " Children of the Mist." In this we have again the village 
rustics and their doings. There are three principal characters — 
a yeoman's daughter, who manages her own farm ; a pair of 
contrasted lovers, and the drama played out by the three ; the 
misunderstandings, the jealousies, and weaknesses involve 
much tragedy and some happiness. Here we have again the 
same fatalistic feeling which is a characteristic feature in the 
majority of Phillpotts' stories ; as well as an admixture of 
rustic humour and charming descriptions of Dartmoor scenery. 

The following year saw the production of two works by our 
versatile author, viz., "The Good Red Earth" and "The 
Striking Hours." The former is a short story remarkable for 
the manner in which the idea of Mother Nature, as embodied in 
the fields, trees, and lanes of the apple country in Devonshire, 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



49 



predominates over the merely human part. The scene is laid 
for the most part at Compton Castle, a picturesque ruin near 
Paignton, the home of the family of the Gilberts in the spacious 
days of Queen Ehzabeth, a place of great and romantic interest. 
Sir Walter Ralegh, who was half-brother to Sir Humphrey 
Gilbert, must often have sojourned in this fine old castle, now a 
partial ruin. The author, in a most interesting chapter, deals 
with the historical associations of the place ; but the chief 
charm of the book rests in the descriptive matter, for the book is 
pervaded by a deep and observant love of Nature, especially 
noticeable in such chapters as " Glory in the Orchards " and 
" The Mother of the Apples." 

In the latter chapter is a good description of cider making as 
practised in Devonshire. It is too long to introduce here in its 
entirety, but the following brief extract may not be uninteresting, 
especially for the bit of rustic philosophy which it displays. 

" Mr. Newte dipped a horn mug and drank of the juice spar- 
ingly. Then he sniffed the air — heavy and sweet as honey, 
marked the sweating men with the brown mock spattered about 
them, sat him down upon a barrel, and addressed the company. 
My friends,' he said, ' apples are very much Uke human 
beings — no, not another drop, Mr. Wonnacott ; it acts too 
sharply upon the system taken in this way. I'll have a sip of 
old cider from your runlet presently. Apples, I say, are like 
men and women. For some you've got to squeeze before you 
know what they are made of ; some you can tell by looking at 
their faces whether they are sweet or sour ; and some you can't 
tell before you taste. Oh, my friends, let us carry our characters 
in our faces, like the honest Tom Putts ; let it not be said of us 
that we gave any man a soul ache, that he came to us for nour- 
ishment or for sympathy, that he found sourness when he had a 
right to look for sweetness.' " 

'Twas a apple what Eve gived to Adam, by all accounts, 
Maister,' ventured Tim Blake. ' I s'pose 'tweern't no little auld 
scrubby cider-apple as grawed there, but a brave, sweet sort for 
the table ? Else the man wouldn't have gived way to her. 
Though God knaws I doan't judge un. I be such a cruel 
hungerer for 'em that if I'd got a wife an' her fetched along a 
gude, sizable, sweet apple in the heat of the day, I'd be sartain 
sure to have ate un, clothes or no clothes.' " 

" Striking Hours " contains a series of fourteen short stories 
all concerning a village (Gidleigh) near " Dartymoor," told by 
old Devonian worthies in modified vernacular, and ranging in 
motive from tragic to broadly humorous. Of the tragic, " Sam 
of Sorrow Corner " is the most powerful. " Right of Way," a 

4 



50 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

funeral story, is, strangely enough, racy and full of broad fun. 
"' The Red Rose " is a tender idyll of courtship ; while " The 
Devil's Tight Rope " is an admirable epitome of the author's 
general literary style. 

Next appeared " The River." This, in my opinion, is one of 
the best of Mr. Phillpotts' early books ; it certainly was the best 
up to that time, and it is still one of the most popular. 

It is a story of the Dart — for of all the rivers of Devonshire 
Mr. Phillpotts loves the Dart the most — and the burden which 
seems to run through it, is the tradition relating to that river, 
so well versified by Mortimer Collins in the poem beginning — 

" River of Dart ! O. River of Dart ! 
Every year thou claimest a heart." 

The tale opens in the neighbourhood of Wistman's Wood ; 
we get peeps of Two Bridges, Longaford Tor, Bellaford Tor, and 
other well-known spots. In fact the book is full of powerful 
descriptions of places every native Devonian knows well, and 
the characters are among the best that the genius of the writer 
has ever brought into being. " The River " is a book that can 
be read and re-read with pleasure. 

I mention the next book, " Transit of the Red Dragon and 
Other Stories," merely to say that it is dedicated to " The 
Human Boy ", and that it is a book suitable for the rising 
generation. It contains one Devonshire story; the rest are 
located in different parts of the world, where the author has 
at one time or another resided. 

It is doubtful if any of Mr. Phillpotts' books has been more 
widely read on both sides of the Atlantic, than " The American 
Prisoner." In this story we are carried back in a realistic 
manner to the time of the great Naval War of 1812-1813, when 
we were fighting the combined fleets of France and the United 
States ; the story of which has been so graphically given by 
ex-President Roosevelt. The great prison at Princetown, then 
recently erected, was crowded with poor unfortunate prisoners 
who had been sent thither from the hulks at Plymouth Dock to 
await ransom or exchange, or, as many of them did, to succumb 
to the rigours of the climate. 

The groundwork of the story is undoubtedly taken from " A 
Prisoner's Memoirs," written by Charles Andrews, who related 
his own experiences in a book published in New York in 1852, 
a copy of which I was able to secure for Mr. Phillpotts. In the 
story we get a gruesome account of the horrors of prison life at 
Dartmoor ; of various attempts made by prisoners to escape, 
and especially of one organized effort made by a large number 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 51 

of prisoners, French as well as American. A desperate fight 
ensued between the troops and the rioters ; many were killed, 
and many others desperately wounded. Here and there some 
humorous characters and incidents are introduced, to counter- 
balance in a small degree the sad and sombre details which are 
necessary to the story. On the whole, however, the book, 
though tragic, is readable ; the stoiy, though gloomy, is well 
told, and the interest is sustained unabated to the end. 

Somewhat the same incidents, certainly the same period, are 
introduced into another story issued about the same time, 
entitled, " The Farm of the Dagger." 

Another highly dramatic work is " The Secret Woman," 
the scene of which is laid at Belstone, near Okehampton. It is 
more tragic than " The River," and more interesting than " The 
American Prisoner," yet it seems to combine certain charac- 
teristics of these, as well as of the earlier works, "Children of the 
Mist " and " Sons of the Morning." It is Dartmoor through 
and through. One reviewer says of this book : " We do not 
hesitate to say that it is the most finished work of a serious 
character that has yet come from the author's pen, and it reveals 
him to us more and more as a disciple of Thomas Hardy." 

Apart from the story, which is brimful of humanity, we have 
charming descriptions of Dartmoor scenery ; life-like impersona- 
tions of moor men and women, such as no other West Country 
writer gives us. The opening chapter, " Wind-flowers," gives, 
in two or three pages, Dartmoor, austere, primeval, unsubdued ; 
Dartmoor as an embodiment of reality and a theatre of elemental 
force. 

In his descriptions we seem to be brought face to face with 
the reality until we can see the colour of the gorse and heather, 
smell the perfume of the moor, and hear the song of the birds 
and the music of the rivers. 

As a set-off against the more serious book last noted, we have, 
in the same year, another volume of short tales, entitled " A 
Knock at a Venture." These are laid in the neighbourhood of 
Postbridge. The rustic characters are excellent types. It may 
be of interest to note, by the way, that this work is dedicated 
"To my friend Wilham Crossing, first living authority on pre- 
historic and mediaeval Dartmoor." 

" The Portreeve " is another highly dramatic story, the 
incidents of which centre round Okehampton and Bridestowe, 
Lydford Gorge, Kit's Steps, the Meldon Viaduct, Cranmere 
Pool, and the River Oke. The principal human characters in 
the story are the usual two women and a man, and the compHca- 
tions — ^jealousies and heart-burnings — which ensue. There is, 



52 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

perhaps, less scenic writing in this book than in any of its prede- 
cessors ; and yet there is no lack of short touches that are, as it 
were, condensed pictures which give great charm to the work 
as a whole. A typical instance is the chapter headed, " The 
Island of Rocks," from which I make the following brief extract : 

" The day smiled clear and cool, touched with hazes of east 
wind, that tempered the sunlight but cast no shadow. This 
aerial condition brought the huge composition of Nature together, 
in a translucent and lilac light that leavened, without altering, 
the proper colours here harmoniously mingled. The brooding 
eyes of the woman saw Oke plunge through a glen beneath and 
part into twin cascades that foamed away to right and left of an 
island. Set in a ring of broken and dancing water, this islet 
shone. Trees, shrubs, grasses, ferns, and plutonic rocks were 
cast together here in the lap of the hills, like a single jewel of 
many verdant hues — of sallow, silvery and glittering birch, of 
golden red rowan, and glaucous fern already touched to sudden 
gold in splashes. The grey boulders shone between ; their 
granite ruled the living things, spread in tables, jutted in peaks, 
and finally massed into a tumult and riot of lovely rock forms, 
where the river joined her arms again, and peeped and twinkled 
amid mighty stones, with spout and thread and glassy convexity 
of prisoned light. Below were pools, little beaches of sand, and 
bogs dripping to the edge of the river, all lighted by the lamps 
of the asphodel, brightened by the red rosettes of the sundew, 
and the tiny butterwort's livid leaves ; made beautiful by the 
pimpernel and the least bell-flower where they twined their pink 
and azure together. The water-ouzel bobbed beside the river 
and, aloft, the ring-ouzel uttered a note like the striking of 
flints, and showed his sooty plumage and the white half-moon 
upon his neck. Far distant on steep places, many rivulets 
flashed sun-messages as they leapt downwards to join the river. 
Their ghnt and movement added hfe to the texture of the 
mountain-side ; while branches also waved, dead grasses shivered 
in paly sheets of hght upon the open spaces, and brake-fern 
threw a slow movement of brightness over the hollows. Seen 
close, their spring and motion were very manifest. Every tall 
stem swayed an inch or two, carrying the waves of light as corn 
carries them ; and each upspringing frond had worn a hole in 
the herbage under pressure of varying winds. 

" A faint and faded radiance still spread upon the western 
hills, where the ling now died ; and above them, in shapes 
uncouth and monstrous, here huddled close, here scattered wide, 
like a herd of feeding dinosaurs or dragons from the earth's 
morning, there towered the hooded battlements and masses of 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 53 



Shilstone Tor. With tumultuous outlines it broke the sky, and 
behind it, higher still, in shape of greater simplicity, the bosom 
of Corn Ridge flung its huge curve. Wrapped in a milky lustre 
as of pearl, it ascended and sank from south to north, and only 
one dim detail crowned the summit where stood the tumulus 
of a stone-man's grave. 

" Now all this gathered ripeness and fruition waited, in the 
brief splendour of autumn, for the rain to drown it, and the frost 
to destroy. The pageant waxed as the year waned. Soaking 
desolation was near that would end all ; winds were waking 
that would tear their gold from birch and ash, and send it 
whirling on a thousand eddies of air and water, hurled by the 
elements back to the elements again." 

Those who know will recognize the absolute accuracy of this, 
and those who do not will be charmed by its poetry. To the 
pedestrian lover of the moor, the way in which its streams, its 
tors, its villages are named and brought into play, make the 
theme more realistic than if fictional titles had been coined for 
them. This is perhaps the reason why these stories take hold 
of Devonshire people — and others — because one can mentally 
place the characters and their surroundings. 

Although the story is intensely tragic, there are not wanting 
here and there touches of a lighter vein, as well as rustic philo- 
sophy. Among the characters is an aged man — Old Barkell — 
who is given to offering advice, and taking life philosophically, 
and there is much wisdom in what he says. He is at his dinner. 
A visitor says — 

Lord, how your father do dawdle over his good things.' 
You're right, I do, Ned. 'Tis a hfe-long habit, an' I've 
always done the same whether 'twas eating, drinking, courting, 
sleeping, or any other delight of life. Once when I was a little 
boy, my mother promised me a lolHpop if I was so good as gold 
all day long. An' I won it ; but by a fatal accident I let the, 
sweetie slip down my throat right away, an' so missed all the 
long-drawn-out comfort of un. 'Twas a bitter loss to me, an' 
my mother, being a hard woman, wouldn't give me another. So 
I've took darned good care to chew my pleasures since then, and 
make 'em go as far as they'll carry.' " 

In his next story, " The Poacher's Wife," Mr. Phillpotts goes 
farther afield for his scenes and characters ; for although the 
tale opens in Devon, it wanders away to the West Indies, where 
the author seems quite as much at home as he does on Dartmoor. 
The locale of the story is Moretonhampstead ; Plymouth comes in 
for a share of attention, and then away Westward Ho ! 

There is perhaps in this book more humour than usual, and 



54 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

the touch is Hghter. It is a book that holds the interest of the 
reader steadily to the end. The central figure is Minnie Sweet- 
land, the preacher's wife, and she is characterized with a masterly 
hand. She is a woman of splendid spirit, and works out the 
theme to its close. Her husband is a good, strong, young 
country-man, whose ideas as to property in game are " broad," 
though he is not bad at heart. There is a deep sly villain, 
posing as the honest and true friend — one Titus Sim, and Johnny 
Beer, landlord of the Warren Inn. The latter is a decidedly 
good character, whose rhyming prose is quite a revelation, with 
its lilt and, now and again, its philosophy. 

We get less of local colour in this volume ; the word-pictures 
are not so numerous, but they are always true to Nature ; and 
we do not get so much of the good broad Devonshire dialect as 
usual, the characters speaking in a kind of modified vernacular. 
But on the whole the book compares favourably with " Children 
of the Mist," " Sons of the Morning," and " The Secret Woman." 

Next in order comes " The Whirlwind." Lydford with its 
ancient castle and grim associations, stands out boldly in this 
somewhat tragic story. The principal characters are Daniel 
Brendon, a veritable son of the moor, and Sarah Friend, equally 
a daughter of the moor. Sarah's father is caretaker at an 
abandoned peat works in a desolate place on the moor, near 
Bridestowe ; and these works have in a sense eaten into the 
spirit of the old man, so that he can think and talk of nothing 
but peat. 

Another character is Woodrow, a farmer, the employer of 
Brendon and a rival for the affections of Sarah. Around these 
three all the interest of the story revolves. 

Towards the end of the book is introduced a wonderfully 
realistic account of a mock burial performed at night, in which 
some of the actors in the story are represented in effigy ; they 
having, in the opinion of a section of their fellow-villagers, 
transgressed the code of morality then and there prevailing, 
and are thus made to pay the penalty of their lapse from moral 
rectitude, by their vindictive neighbours. However, some of 
the wiser and unbiased people of the neighbourhood interfere, 
and the unholy game is stopped. It is a powerful though not 
a pleasant story, and depicts, as it is intended to do, the most 
extreme passions of humanity. 

The year 1908 witnessed the pubhcation of no fewer than three 
books by Mr. Phillpotts, viz., " The Mother," " The Virgin in 
Judgment," and " The Human Boy Again." Taking the last 
first, it is sufficient to say that it is practically a second instal- 
ment of the school happenings as told in " The Human Boy." 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 55 

The incidents are equally amusing and just as improbable, but 
quite as suitable for boys' reading. It is dedicated, by the way, 

" To my dear Friend, 
Mark Twain, 
father of ' Tom Sawyer,' and 
' Huckleberry 'Finn ', 
those Human Boys, 
with sincerest Regard." 

The next book in the Dartmoor series of stories to which I 
wish to draw attention, is " The Mother," one of the most 
successful of Mr. Phillpotts' novels. In it we get Dartmoor, 
wild, grand, undiluted, and untameable"; for the heart of that 
desolate region is again the scene of operations. The characters 
are all of the moor, and their horizon is circumscribed. Conse- 
quently we get a story of life as found amongst the small farmers 
and scattered moormen and labourers of a district which has its 
centre at Vixen Tor and Merivale Bridge ; and the scope of the 
tale rarely goes beyond that hmit. 

Mrs. Pomeroy (the "mother" of the book) is a delightful speci- 
men of womanhood ; she has a scapegrace son, whom she shields 
time and again from the results of his crimes and misdemeanours, 
and in the end, after a great deal of self-sacrifice on her part, 
effects his reformation. Avisa and Ruth Rendle are equally 
good characters, while Moleskin, the poacher, is wonderfully well 
drawn. Ives Pomeroy, the son of " The Mother," is a fiery 
headstrong fellow, whose character is very complex. Much of 
the incident in this story is worked out in the bar parlour of the 
inn at Merivale, where discussions on religion, philosophy, and 
politics seem to hold incessant sway amongst the wordy wise- 
acres of the district. 

I may here pause in my comments upon Mr. Phillpotts' works 
to interpolate a few thoughts respecting his methods in regard 
to the construction of his stories and the delineation of his 
characters, over and above what was stated in the opening 
sentences of this paper. 

When Mr. Phillpotts has fixed his locality — the stage for the 
operations of his play — he invariably settles down at some 
central point, and there works out his plot, taking in the local 
colour, mixing with the people, studying their eccentricities, 
picking up bits of local lore and legend, and generally assimilat- 
ing the daily and ordinary Hfe and habits of those amongst whom 
he is temporarily sojourning. Thus, at one time we find him at 
Sheepstor, at another at Princetown, Twobridges, Postbridge, 
Bridestowe, Lydford, Okehampton, Chagford, or Moretonhamp- 
stead, or anywhere else according to the necessity of the occasion. 



56 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

He is always on or close to the moor, always in touch 
with the people, the ordinary people he wishes to portray. He 
seldom, if ever, brings in the squire or the parson ; wealth and 
high station have no allurements for him ; but the farmer, rough 
and illiterate though he may be, and the moorman, still more 
rough and uncouth, these and their families and their dependents 
are the heroes and heroines of his stories. Thus, although his 
pictures of men and women may at times seem to the reader to 
be grotesque, though their talk may at times appear to us as 
extravagant, and though his scenes may be somewhat highly 
coloured, we may take it for granted that he has somewhere 
met the counterpart of his principal characters, and heard them 
speak in the language he puts into their mouths. 

One's own experience proves this, for we have only to drop 
into the bar parlour of a village inn to hear the loud-voiced 
blatant politicians holding forth, especially during election times, 
on the topics of the day. It is amid such scenes and amidst 
such people that our author evolves the conversations and 
heated discussions which generously fill his pages, and these are 
the sorts of people he delights to portray. It may be of interest 
to get behind the scenes, in fact to get behind the author himself, 
and to learn at first hand his methods. 

" No," he says, in answer to a question, " I do not take 
individuals and copy them, but help myself to traits of character, 
forms of expression, habits of thought. My people are compo- 
site — a little taken here, and a little taken there, from living 
folk. Very seldom indeed it happens that I bodily transfer a 
living man or woman to a novel — though once or twice I have 
done so. My method is to go with empty mind to the theatre 
of the new story — ^to wander through it day after day, and let 
the novel rise up like a mist into my heart from the place and 
the people who dwell in it. " Next week," he continues, " I go 
thus empty-handed to Widecombe, that I may find what story 
that village has to offer me. Last year I was occupied entirely 
with a great wood, and haunted it at all times and seasons, so 
that the hfe of it in its manifold phases might, through the 
channels of feeling, be reflected in my work. Reason is beggared 
at every turn when one is up against the mysterious ways of 
Nature. It is only through feeling we can dimly appreciate and 
understand it ; and it is only through fellow-feeling and a sym- 
pathy kept in bounds and not suffered to degenerate into pity, 
that we can appreciate and understand the children of men." 

But to return to our narrative. The next work to be con- 
sidered is " The Virgin in Judgment." 

The scene of this story is laid in mid-Dartmoor, at or near 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 57 

Ringmoor Down and the banks of the river Plym. The central 
incidents take place in the little village of Sheepstor, the district 
being eloquently described. Rhoda Bowden ("the virgin ") is a 
tall and attractive damsel, with great strength of mind, an iron 
will, and a disinchnation for the society of men, except her own 
brothers. 

" Rhoda seldom smiled upon men ; yet, on the other hand, 
she never scowled at them. Her attitude was one of high 
indifference, and none saw much more than that ; yet much 
more existed, and Rhoda' s aloof posture, instead of concealing 
normal maiden interest in the opposite sex, in reality hid a 
vague general aversion from it." 

One chapter is devoted to a lengthy description of a prize 
fight, supposed to have taken place in the bull-ring at Sheepstor, 
in which David, Rhoda's brother, was pitted against a lad of his 
own age, and came off victorious. On this occasion the "virgin" 
entered the ring and acted as bottle-holder for her favourite 
brother, an unprecedented event. I believe that the author 
has here woven in a contemporary account of the last prize fight 
held in this country under the old conditions, and has described 
in the most minute manner all the circumstances which attended 
that, to many, important function. 

Considerations of time and space alone forbid my entering 
into anything like a general outline of the story, or a detail of the 
principal characters. Suffice it to say that it points one moral, 
amongst others, and that is, that it is unwise to start house- 
keeping with a sister-in-law in the house. One reviewer, speak- 
ing of this story, says : " It is no mean praise to say that it 
revives reminiscences of ' Lorna Doone.' " 

In his next story, " The Haven," Mr. Phillpotts leaves his 
Dartmoor for awhile, and sets his story in the fishing-harbour of 
Brixham. It is in a sense a refreshing change, for the author 
knows his seafarers as intimately as he does the moormen and 
farmers of mid-Devon, and he is able to interest his readers from 
the outset in the hves and fortunes of the toilers of the sea, as 
well as in the moor-folk who have figured in so many of his works. 
John Major, the owner of the Jack and Lydia, a fine dandy- 
rigged trawler, is a character admirably conceived and drawn 
out, worthy to be placed beside the portraits Of the " Three 
Brothers," whom we shall have to consider shortly. In fact 
Mr. Phillpotts is particularly happy in depicting this sturdy sort 
of man, with a sound and sterling piety and a rugged faith. The 
whole of the characterization in this book is as clever as usual, 
and as sincere, which is not always the same thing. 

There is plenty of picturesqueness here, and the elements of 



58 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

romance are prominent as always with the writer. The chief 
theme of the book is the revolt of John Major's son against 
following the sea, and his ultimate surrender. We leave them, 
father and son, saihng for the fishing-grounds in company, on 
the deck of the Jack and Lydia. One of the most interesting 
chapters in the book is the vivid account of trawling on the 
" Scruff." This is, I understand from Mr. Phillpotts, a sub- 
marine bank of shell and sand that stretches out into the Channel, 
and begins some few miles south of Berry Head. It is a good 
trawling ground, and patronized by the Brixham fishermen. 

Under Mr. Phillpotts' cunning hands this description becomes 
more interesting than many a narrative of action, and strongly 
reminds one of Rudyard Kipling's account of cod-fishing off the 
coast of Newfoundland in " Captains Courageous," or some of 
Frank Bullen's adventures on the deep sea. 

Of " The Three Brothers," his next Dartmoor book, the 
Athenceum reviewer says : " Mr. Phillpotts remains faithful to 
Dartmoor, and manages to keep his material and his methods as 
fresh as ever. It is a considerable feat that this, his latest 
novel of the district, should be in some ways more interesting 
than any of its predecessors. It is in a more sober key than 
previous books, and perhaps is all the better for lacking the 
exuberance which is wont to characterize the author. The 
colours are greyer, not so vivid, and the result is restful for the 
reader, perhaps weary of grappling with Titanic passions. The 
Three Brothers are elderly men, named Baskerville, one 
being over the allotted span of years, and they are of the yeoman 
class, which Mr. Phillpotts loves to depict. The characters are 
drawn most carefully and without exaggeration or weak lines. 
Nathan, the amiable and untrustworthy ; Vivian, the robust ; 
Humphrey, the cynical and shrewd, the misunderstood. All 
the people in Shaugh (where the scene is laid) one seems to know 
famiharly as Mr. Phillpotts proceeds, and certainly it is not his 
fault if we are not uplifted by the picturesque scenery of the 
moor. Mr. Phillpotts' luxuriance of style paints this for us with 
loving generosity. He is never tired of pointing out its beauties, 
of recording its features at all times and seasons. Dartmoor is 
his peculiar territory, as clearly as Wessex was Mr. Hardy's ; 
and it seems as if the fount of his inspiration were inexhaustible." 

When referring to this book at a pubHc lecture in Plymouth 
some time ago, a speaker in the discussion which followed 
hazarded the guess that the Three Brothers were really the 
counterparts of men he (the speaker) had known about thirty 
years before. They resided at Hoo Meavy, within the radius 
covered by the action of the story. Upon this point Mr. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 50 

Phillpotts says : " No ! The Three Brothers are composite 
figures, and have no direct inspiration in any men I have met 
at Hoo Meavy or elsewhere." 

A series of short stories, entitled " Fun of the Fair," came 
next. These were mostly of the humorous order, and are good 
reading, appertaining to the neighbourhood of Belstone on the 
moor. In one of these stories, " Great Uncle Gaunter," we get 
a brief history of the great prison at Princetown, at the time 
when Sir Thomas Tyrwhitt — ^the Lord Warden of the Stannaries, 
and a very great man in every Dartymoor mind — projected the 
establishment of a war prison there. 

In this book may also be found two stories, entitled " The 
Cairn " and " The Crock of Gold " respectively, which refer to 
the search for treasure in the ancient habitations of man on the 
moor ; there are also an amusing sketch, entitled " The Parson 
and the Clerk," and several others of the most entertaining 
character. 

The tragi-comedy of Mr. Haycraft, the quarryman, who at 
the age of seventy suddenly conceived himself famous, is a good 
example of Mr. Phillpotts' treatment. The book is full of 
observation, of knowledge, of sympathetic understanding, of a 
sense of proportion, and of humour. In this, as in several other 
works, Mr. Phillpotts has shown that he is at his best in short 
stories ; and that he is one of the foremost writers of short 
stories of the day is generally admitted. Those just cited are 
models of their kind. 

In reviewing " The Thief of Virtue," a reviewer says : " We 
are strongly inclined to put Mr. Phillpotts' latest novel at the 
head of his works. His manner, though still florid, has been 
mellowed by experience, and his methods are more reticent. 
Thus he avoids the open and frank ' Titanism ' of his early 
books, such as ' The Secret Woman ' and ' The Whirlwind.' We 
noticed a new spirit, more chastened, and therefore more service- 
able and more artistic, in ' The Mother,' and after that increas- 
ingly in ' The Three Brothers.' " 

" The Thief of Virtue " exhibits the new Phillpotts at his best. 
No praise can be too great for the self-denial the author has 
shown in turning his back upon an obvious and inviting tragedy. 
It would have been at once an easy and effective performance, 
the discovery by a devoted father that his wife's son was not 
his. Mr. Phillpotts selects another course for his narrative, 
which is more true and quite as effective. The plot is composed 
of simple, even of primitive elements. Of two suitors for her 
hand a Dartmoor maiden prefers the younger and poorer, but 
accepts the older and richer. The characters of both men are 



6o The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

well drawn, that of Philip Ouldsbroom, the husband, being a 
very live and actual portrait. His life is a tragedy in itself, 
without the interposition of that discovery to which reference 
has been made. Mr. Phillpotts makes the tragedy arise out of 
the growing dissimilarity of the supposed father and son, instead 
of out of the shock of a revelation ; and his powerful novel is a 
credit to contemporary literature. 

',' Tales of the Tenements," issued in 1910, consists of a series 
of short stories of Dartmoor, appertaining to the deserted home- 
steads and mediaeval farms that date from Tudor times, and lie 
chiefly in those sheltered and fertile regions beside the twin 
arms of Dart. They were owned originally under copy of Court 
Roll by Customary Tenants, and they existed independently of 
the Duchy. The tales are thirteen in number, and alternate 
from tragic to humorous. Mr. Phillpotts has written nothing 
more readable than these short stories, in the telhng of which 
he is a master. We shall not soon forget such characters as 
Tozer Grigg, whose vindictive folly sent him and his harmonium 
" snuffling and wheezing into middle age " ; the wise woman of 
Walna, whose witchcraft differed but Httle from the methods of 
many a modern financier ; Jane Northweye, who had a tragic 
romance with a French prisoner ; Fagg and Blackadder, the 
highwaymen, and a dozen more. Some of the tales are grue- 
some — gruesome enough for Edgar Allan Poe — but about them 
all clings the smell of the heather, and in them hes a dry spon- 
taneous humour which gives them the vigour of the winds that 
blow across the combes of " Dartymoor." 

In the early part of this paper I have mentioned several of 
Mr. Phillpotts' lighter works, but I omitted to include " My 
Laughing Philosopher," chiefly because it had no West Country 
connection. Let me make up for the omission. Mr. Eden 
Phillpotts purchased his " Laughing Philosopher " in Wardour 
Street, " for the paltry sum of one guinea." It was a bronze 
bust, as ancient as Democritus, with a battered nose and a 
whimsical expression ; and one night, when " anchored " on a 
bracket in its owner's study, it suddenly began to speak, being 
endowed with that miraculous gift for fifty nights on end once 
in every five hundred years. Consequently, for fifty nights 
Mr. Phillpotts discoursed with this philosopher on every sort of 
subject — on his friends, on his cats, on Egypt and China, on 
buttons and servants, on rooks and nests, on actors and ballets, 
and on all the mysteries and eccentricities of life — in a series of 
discursive chapters, not always coherent, but generally readable, 
observant, and amusing. Mr. Eden Phillpotts is so clever a 
writer, and has so facile a command of words, that he can make 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 61 

his light talk palatable diet for a passing hour, although we 
inchne to think that this kind of literary work requires to be 
exceedingly well done to live, and is better fitted for occasional 
or serial papers than for a volume by itself. As a specimen of 
the easy if not profound philosophy which the ancient bust 
expounded from the wall, we will quote a passage from the 
admonitions contained in the last chapter of the book : — 

" ' I take my leave,' said the Laughing Philosopher, ' willingly 
enough, for to me this age is painful above all other ages my eyes 
have opened upon. To-day landmarks are vanishing with 
mournful rapidity ; certainties grow fewer ; theories flood the 
world in a deluge worse than Deucalion's. Knowledge cows all 
mankind. It is a lighthouse — a star-glimmer serving to show 
the awful darkness of the delta that tends towards Truth. I 
use the word ' delta ' of set purpose. There is no straight road 
or river leading to Truth, but a delta of a thousand arteries. 
Science plods here. Religion there ; and all the arteries are 
very meet to be explored ; all command exploration ; all are 
fuU fraught with danger of whirlpool and rock on the wave, 
blind alley, precipice, and morass upon the shore.' " 

This book was published in 1896. I mention it here because 
it gives me the opportunity of introducing another work in the 
lighter vein, published only a few months ago. I refer to " The 
Flint Heart ; a Fairy Story," a deHghtful fantastic story for 
boys and girls, reminding one somewhat of Kipling's " Puck of 
Pook's Hill," or a more recent work by the same author, 
" Rewards and Fairies." I would not for a moment imply that 
Mr. Phillpotts was in any way influenced or inspired by Kipling's 
books ; he and the " Fhnt Heart " of his creation can stand 
alone, and the plot is quite original. 

In the opening chapter we are introduced to prehistoric 
Dartmoor — ^the New Stone Age, the age of flint weapons and 
flint implements, long before the discovery of metals ; long before, 
as the author whimsically tells us, the arrival of the first pin on 
Dartmoor. A luminous description of Dartmoor as it might 
have been five thousand years ago, and of the primeval and war- 
like races which then inhabited that wide tract of land, is given. 
These are the people, we are informed, who erected the mono- 
liths, the kistvaens, the stone rows and the hut villages, as to 
whose characteristics history is silent ; all is conjecture and 
mystery. But Mr. Phillpotts peoples these desolate wastes 
with savage life, and it is under these conditions and amongst 
these primitive dwellers in the Dartmoor of the long, long past 
that the Fhnt Heart makes its appeal ance, and in the nature 
of a charm works woe to its possessor. 



62 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

In the next chapter, by a great leap of time, we are brought 
down to our own days, and the FHnt Heart again puts in its 
sinister appearance. 

We are brought into close touch with some ordinary every- 
day mortals at Merripit Farm ; anon we find ourselves in Fairy- 
land, and revel in the delights of the " little people." And here 
we get much out-of-the-way information. " Pixies," we are 
informed, " are the same as fairies, and their first cousins are 
the brownies and the elves, and the kobolds and the trolls, and 
the fays and the sylphs, and the sprites and the gnomes ; and 
their second cousins are the bogies and the bogles," and a host 
more that he enumerates. " And, finally," he says, " if you 
don't believe in these folk, I can only say that you are making 
a mistake, and you'll live to find it out sooner or later. All the 
very best people, including Mr. Stead and Sir Oliver Lodge, 
believe in spooks, if they don't believe in other things ; and it 
seems to me unkind and silly to make such a fuss about the 
spooks, and write whole books about them, and take no notice 
of all the others. As for me, I know Dartmoor pretty well, 
and I believe in everything that happens there. I have seen 
Jack-o'lantern with my own eyes, and I can't say more than 
that. And not to believe in Devonshire pixies — well, you 
might just as well not believe in Devonshire cream or Devon- 
shire mud, or any other of the fine things that belong to Devon- 
shire." 

This is very excellent fooHng, and there is much more of it in 
this entertaining book. 

In the story we are carried through no end of pranks and 
strange adventures illustrative of fairy lore. 

And then, above all this, the book is amusingly instructive, 
for there are woven into it bits of history, snatches of literature, 
touches of botany and natural history, and kindred topics, all 
calculated to draw the mind of the young reader to study these 
engrossing subjects. And through it all the Flint Heart, fashioned 
of old by Fum, a man of mystery, is revealed from time to time, 
bringing disaster upon each person who possesses it, until it is 
finally destroyed by order of the king of the Fairies, through 
the instrumentality of Charles, the Human Boy. 

With this, my original consideration of Mr. Phillpotts' stories 
ended ; but since that time other works have come into my 
hands which demand more than a passing notice ; and, which is 
quite as much to the point, bring my little literary history 
up to date. 

The first of these new works is " Demeter's Daughter," a 
somewhat ambiguous title, but one fully justified in the course of 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 63 

the story. This is another chapter in that great epic of Dart- 
moor which has been engaging Mr. Phillpotts' attention for the 
last twenty years ; and the story presents abundant evidence 
that the inspiration of the district is far from exhausted. 

As to the title, Demeter, the Earth Mother, is another name 
for Ceres, the goddess of plenty and agriculture. 

Demeter's daughter of the novel is Alison Cleave, a moorland 
woman, who lives with her progeny in a rackety, tumble-down 
hut, far from human habitation. She is a fine character, with 
the true mother-spirit ; the ideal wife, the selfless soul capable of 
any sacrifice for those she loves. It is a great descent from this 
ideal type of womanhood to her dissolute husband, Aaron 
Cleave ; a selfish, self-centred loafer, the supreme egoist, and 
yet a man with such a belief in himself that he is utterly ignorant 
of his true character, or of comprehending the axiom, " seeing 
ourselves as others see us." 

He is ever retailing his own grievances. He met with an 
accident some years before, and that accident, although not 
really preventing him from working, has been his stock-in-trade 
ever since. He is ever appeahng to his cronies at the village 
ale-house for sympathy and support, and fails to see how utterly 
they disbelieve in him and his protestations. Our author has 
pictured no finer character in all his books than this " super- 
man " among the brotherhood of Philander. 

Another prominent character is farmer Hamlyn, a strong and 
impressive figure. Years before he had asked Alison to become 
his wife, but she chose the other, and much misery was the 
result. 

Here I am tempted to borrow a few sentences from a review 
which appeared in a local paper, for the authorship of which I 
have not far to seek. 

" Ah son Cleave, having fearlessly lived a hard and thankless 
hfe in the joyful pursuit of duty and natural affection, having 
been disillusioned by experiences, bereaved of her best-loved 
son (killed in the South African war), betrayed by her worthless 
husband, perishes in an endeavour to save the worthless being 
from drowning after a carouse. As for him, the Providence 
which assoils drunken men of the results of their folly, pulls him 
to the bank of the dark and swollen river Dart, into whose flood 
his obstinacy has plunged them. He returns to his petty hfe of 
mean joys and soiled dehghts, and goes down toward the Valley 
of Death the sordid and ignoble thing that he is. Alison's poor 
body is cast upon a shingle bank ; her memory is a perfume, a 
star." 

Upon these two Mr. Phillpotts has concentrated all his force. 



64 l^e Devonimi Year Book, 191 2 

The study of heredity, of environment, of temperament in 
Aaron and AHson Cleave is a very fine piece of work. There is 
less mechanical plot even than usual in the book ; but it abounds 
in poetry, in eloquence, in humour. 

Mr. Phillpotts' rural folk discoursing at large upon men and 
things, whether on roadside or farmstead, or in the village inn, 
are a sheer delight. His Dartmoor pictures are unrivalled, and 
his minor characters invariably fill the setting. 

The old man, nicknamed " Hay-corn-roots," is surely a 
study from the life, with his lore of weather and of crops, his 
passion for Mother Earth, and his almost sensual joy in her 
increase. A touch of comedy is introduced into the orderly 
process of events in Holne (where the scene is mostly laid) , by 
the apparition of the spruce barber from Swindon, courting 
Alison's daughter. 

Teddy Grills, the baker of Holne, is a rich entertainment in 
himself. Mr. Angel had been philosophizing on the necessity of 
taking the rough with the smooth in a Christian country, and 
abiding by the church, " ' Where it pinches 'em as well as where 
it don't.' 

That,' said Teddy, ' was just what the weaker members 
don't see. Them that fancy their singing like the hymns ; and 
them that haven't no music — they say organs be in vain. But 
a proper Christian goes the whole hog and swallows the jam 
and the powder both — as we all should ; for 'tis the powder in 
this world as will put a flavour to the jam in the next. We 
shouldn't know how good Heaven tastes if we hadn't sucked in 
a lot of the nasty medicine of earth.' " 

In " Demeter's Daughter " then, Mr. Phillpotts has written 
a very fine and impressive story, exceptional even among his 
later works for the penetrating quahty of its analysis, the beauty 
of the material, and the skill with which the artist has fashioned 
it. 

Further, more than in most of his books, Mr. Phillpotts in 
this story dwells on the seamy side of the moorland hfe. He 
shows that the struggle for existence, the squalor of poverty, the 
problem of unemployment, and the moral costs of loose living 
can be as acute amid the natural glories of Dartmoor as in a 
London slum. Nature's loveHness makes no difference to ugly 
human turmoil — the turmoil that still goes on " where every 
prospect pleases and only man is vile." 

A serial story by Eden Phillpotts was recently running in 
the Windsor Magazine. It is entitled " The Plume of Feathers," 
the scene being laid in the romantic village of Widecombe-in-the- 
Moor, and, as its title impUes, " The Plume " is the village mn, 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 65 

the meeting-place of the village gossips, who here tell their tales 
and carry on their discussions over pots of ale and drops of gin. 

Mr. Phillpotts' latest book (published in August, 1911) is 
entitled " The Beacon " (Cosdon, sometimes known as Cawsand 
Beacon). It is essentially a study of elemental passions. The 
scene is laid in a Dartmoor village, and the three principal 
characters are a London girl who has come to serve in the inn, 
and two farmers who both fall in love with her. The story, 
which ends in a tragedy, turns on her relations with these two 
men, one a weak, the other a strong character. There is much 
analysis of character in the book, and it has, as a whole, a rugged 
strength and a simplicity that make it the most notable, perhaps, 
of all Mr. Phillpotts' West Country stories. The Athenceum, 
reviewing this book, says : " It is difficult to see how a literary 
judgment which has hailed Mr. Hardy is to deny Mr. Phillpotts 
a place next him. The Wessex novelist has deeper subtlety 
and greater variety ; there is also in him what Bacon said of the 
most excellent beauty, ' some strangeness in the proportion.' 
Mr. Phillpotts might claim greater soundness, greater sanity even, 
but he must be content to lack the indefinable quality we have 
mentioned. His work, however, falling short of Mr. Hardy's, is, 
nevertheless, a remarkable accomplishment of our time. In 
breadth and knowledge, in thought, and in sense of character, 
it goes farther than any other work except that of a few whose 
genius is recognized. It is always a pleasure to read these 
Dartmoor stories. Mr. Phillpotts may seem in danger of repeat- 
ing himself, but he never does ; he only reproduces the same 
atmosphere, which is a veritable exposition of the moor. . . . 
The tale in its mingled tragedy and comedy is admirable, and 
holds the attention. Perhaps, as before, Mr. Phillpotts makes 
his humble characters talk too much Phillpotts. So did Mere- 
dith, and so do Mr. James and Mr. Hewlett. But however they 
talk, the people are ahve and arresting. One criticism on the 
heroine we offer, namely, that she should have shown her definite 
change of affection at least to the reader before the crisis. That 
sin lies at the door of the author. Probably he wanted to sur- 
prise us. This book ranks high — though not on the exact level 
of ' The Thief of Virtue ' and ' Demeter's Daughter ' and ' The 
Mother.' " 

I have now passed in review nearly all the works of this 
author, excepting those (and they are not many) which have no 
connection with the West Country. I have appended a chrono- 
logical list of his published works, with a brief bibhographical 
note respecting some of them, and a few references to short 
stories and other articles which have appeared in periodicals ; 

5 



66 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

but their name is legion, and the Ust is therefore far from 
complete. 

I would now conclude with the following paragraphs from 
"The Flint Heart," in which our author summarizes Dartmoor 
as it has all these years appealed to him. 

" Then came the solemn moment when the Flint Heart was 
to be changed and administered in small doses to earth and air 
and water. Charles struck him three times, and at the third 
blow, behold ! a httle pile of grey dust took the place of the 
glittering, hard, black flint stone. And then the king took the 
first pinch and flung it into the air, and the birds gave a mighty 
sneeze ; and the queen took a pinch and flung it into the river, 
and the fish became immensely excited, and dashed about as 
though a freshet was coming ; and the Lord High Chancellor 
took the last pinch, and flung it upon the earth, and the beasts 
coughed and snorted. But the effect upon all the creatures was 
the same ; the dust of the FHnt Heart braced them up, made 
them brisk and cheerful, and acted like a tonic upon every one 
of them, whether they wore fins or fur or feathers ; whether they 
breathed water or air. 

" And that is the real grand reason why Dartmoor is so 
stinging and bracing, and puts such life into you, and makes you 
feel so hungry and so jolly. That is why Dartmoor water is so 
foaming and refreshing, so cold and brisk ; and why Dartmoor 
earth is so tough and elastic and springy, that you can walk or 
run all day upon it, and never grow tired. There is a touch of 
the Fhnt Heart still about Dartmoor, and the people who live 
there need it, I assure you ; for you must be pretty hard and 
strong and ready for anything, up among the high tors and 
heather, especially when winter comes and the great North 
Wind spreads his snowy wings, and the East Wind shows his 
teeth there. 



Which ends the story, and I am sorry that it is finished. But 
if it takes you to Dartmoor next summer that will be well ; and 
when you do go, may the Fairies of the morning welcome you 
also, and bring new laughter to your lips, new light to your 
eyes, and joy to the hearts of you all." 

It may be added further that Mr. Phillpotts has now in the 
press a small book of verse and prose, entitled " Dance of the 
Months," and that early in 1912 will appear another Dartmoor 
story, " The Forest on the Hill." About the same time will be 
published by Mr. John Murray a long and serious poem — a 
blank verse work on one of the world's greatest tragedies. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



67 



Chronological List of the Published Works of 
EDEN PHILLPOTTS. 

1888. " My Adventure with the Flying Scotsman." A Romance of 

London and North- Western Railway Shares. 

1 89 1. " Folly and Fresh Air " (Novel). 

1 891. " End of a Life " (Novel). 

1892. " Tiger's Cub " (Novel). 

1893. " Some Every Day Folks " (Sketches of People, Places, and 

Things — Devonshire) . 

1894. " Down Dartmoor Way " (Short Local Stories). 
1896. " Deal with the Devil " (Comic Novel). 

1896. " My Laughing Philosopher " (Whimsical Story). 

1897. " Lying Prophets " (Story of Life in a Cornish Fishing Village — 

Newlyn) . 

1898. " Children of the Mist " (First of the Dartmoor Stories — Chagford). 

1899. " Loup Garou " (Short Stories, not Local). 

1899. " The Human Boy " (School Life at Plymouth). 

1900. " Sons of the Morning " (Dartmoor Story). 

1 901. " Fancy Free " (Sketches of Outdoor Life). 

1901. " Good Red Earth " (Devonshire Story, locality Compton Castle, 
near Paignton). 

1901. "Striking Hours" (Fourteen Short Stories, locality Gidleigh, 

Dartmoor) . 

1902. " The River " (Dartmoor Story of the River Dart). 

1903. " Transit of the Red Dragon " (Short Stories for Boys). 

1903. " Golden Fetish " (Short Stories). 

1904. "American Prisoner" (Story of Dartmoor Prison and its 

Neighbourhood) . 

1904. " Farm of the Dagger " (Dartmoor Story). 

1904. " My Devon Year " (Nature Studies — Illustrated). 

1905. " Secret Woman " (Dartmoor Story, locality Belstone). 
1905. " Up-along and Down-along " (Devonshire Poems). 

1905. " Knock at a Venture " (Short Stories, locality Postbridge). 

1906. " My Garden " (Nature Studies, finely illustrated). 
1906. " Portreeve " (Dartmoor Story, locahty Okehampton). 

1906. " Poacher's Wife " (Dartmoor Story, locahty Moretonhampstead). 

1907. " Folk Afield " (Sketches of Outdoor Life). 

1907. " The Whirlwind " (Dartmoor Story, locahty Lydford). 

1908. "Virgin in Judgment" (Dartmoor Story, locahty Sheepstor).^ 
1908. " The Human Boy Again " (School Life). 

1908. " The Mother " (Dartmoor Story, locality Vixen Tor and Merivale). 

1908. " The Unlucky Number " (Short Stories). 

1909. " Fun of the Fair " (Short Humorous Dartmoor Stories), 
1909. "Three Brothers" (Dartmoor Story, locality Shaugh). 

1909. " The Haven " (Devonshire Story, locahty Brixham). 

1910. " Tales of the Tenements " (Short Dartmoor Stories). 
1 910. " Thief of Virtue " (Dartmoor Story). 

1910. " FUnt Heart" (Fairy Story of Dartmoor). 

191 1. "Wild Fruit" (Collected Poems). 

191 1. " Demeter's Daughter" (Dartmoor Story, locality Heine). 

191 1. "The Beacon" (Dartmoor Story, locahty Cosdon). 

191 1. " Dance of the Months " (Sketches and Poems). 



68 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

List of Newspapers and Magazines to which 
Mr. Eden Phillpotts has Contributed. 

Daily and Weekly Papers. — Academy: Answers; Athenceum ; 
Black and White ; Country Life ; Daily Chronicle ; Daily Express ; Eye- 
Witness ; Graphic ; Hearth and Home ; Literary Guide ; Literature 
(defunct) ; Morning Post ; New Age ; Pall Mall Gazette ; Pearson's 
Weekly ; People ; Queen ; Royal ; St. James's Gazette ; Sporting and 
Dramatic News ; To-day ; Tribune (defunct) ; Westminster Gazette : 
Western Daily Mercury ; Western Times ; etc., etc. 

Magazines and Reviews. — Belgravia (defunct) ; Chapman's ; Cornhill ; 
Cornish Magazine (defunct) ; Devonia (defunct) ; English Review ; 
Fortnightly Review ; Idler ; Longman's (defunct) ; London ; London 
Society (defunct) ; Ludgate ; Nash's ; Pall Mall Magazine ; Pearson's ; 
Red Magazine ; Strand ; T.P.'s Magazine ; Tramp ; Windsor. 

American Periodicals. — Bookman ; Century ; Harper's ; Lippincott's ; 
McClure's ; Scrihner's ; Woman's Home Journal ; Youth's Companion ; 
etc., etc. 



Dartmoor. 



The giant tors, like sleeping lions, spread 

Their Titan forms beneath the stooping clouds ; 

Or, like some fortressed city, silent, dread. 
The opal mist each kingly crest enshrouds ; 

Whence rushing streamlets, to the song of bees. 

Meet in the vale, and go to seek the seas. 

The heather's purple veil rests o'er the moors. 
And bracken turns from green to russet brown. 

Waving its stately plumes to the distant tors ; 
The clear, keen breezes blow from sea to down, 

And cotton grasses hide the deadly swamp, 

Hung o'er the wanderer's grave, a starry lamp. 

O land of mystic breath, silent, apart, 

Where prison walls face grim old rocks of grey, 

Where littleness falls off like some false art. 

Where souls are born, where Nature holds her sway- 

O land where hope revives and sorrows cease. 

Abiding place of Beauty and of Peace ! 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 69 



The Coasts and Forests of Devon, and 
their Birds. 

By E. A. S. ELLIOT. M.R.C.S.. M.B.O.U. 

A Lecture delivered at St. Bride Institute, November i-jth, 1910. 

The neighbourhood of Seaton presents us with many features 
of exceptional variety and interest. First, there is its landsHp, 
involving many acres of once good arable land and thousands of 
tons of chalky cliff gone to glory. 

It was here in the sixties, as a schoolboy at Honiton, I found 
a pair of Montagu's Harriers nesting in the tangled mass of ivy 
and fohage far up in the cliff, but I was not allowed to climb to 
the nest on account of the crumbling nature of the cHff. 

This bird of prey is not so scarce in the West Country as some 
people suppose. I often see them around our cliffs, quartering 
the fields, like any hound, in search of eggs or small reptiles. 

I remember a few years ago watching a bird for hours under a 
wall, quartering a big grass field in the month of May, evidently 
searching for larks' eggs— it was in the zenith of my collecting 
days — and presently she fell a victim to my zeal, and I found 
her stomach full of larks' eggs, " dux femina facti." 

Melanism, or indeed dimorphism, is not uncommonly met 
with in the order of Accipitres, and in September, 1846, a black 
variety was shot on the cUffs at Pravvle, and would undoubtedly 
have been left there had not the farmer who shot it casually 
remarked to the Kingsbridge birdstuffer three weeks afterwards, 
that he had shot a black hawk. A reward was offered for its 
recovery, and it came to hand, and was with difficulty preserved. 

The causes of dimorphism are in many cases entirely unknown. 
Why, for instance, should you get in Australia an albino variety 
of a bird of prey, whereas in North America you get in the counter- 
part of the same species a form entirely black ? Why should 
the bill, as showing structural dimorphism, of the female Huia be 
so very different from that of the male ? Or, again, that of the 
Hornbills, when the male dehberately seals up in the hollow of the 
tree trunk its mate and feeds her assiduously during the period 
of incubation ? This is one side of the question, but dimorphism 
as a sexual character as regards plumage we can quite under- 
stand, and we, as ordinary mortals, congratulate the male sex 
in birds as having evolved in the great majority of instances a 



70 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



more gorgeous effect in their plumage than the females, whilst 
in other instances we sympathize with the sterner sex when 
their better half has the best of them in size, and also in plumage, 
as seen in the Phalaropes. Rousdon, the seat of Sir Wilfrid 
Peek, lies on top of the cliff, and the mansion contains a beautiful 
collection of British birds, representative only, of course, but 
capitally mounted by the well-known taxidermist, Swaysland, 
of Brighton. With the exception of Haccombe, near Teign- 
mouth, Rousdon is the smallest parish, not only in Devonshire 
but also in England. 

Devonshire can boast then of having the smallest, and the 
largest, parish in England, for Lydford embraces the whole 
forest of Dartmoor. 

By some writers Seaton is supposed to be the Muridunum of 
the Romans, but this walled city was much more likely to have 
been a fine old hill fort near Honiton, about ten miles distant to 
the north-west, and known now as Hembury Fort, but to us 
boys at the Grammar School as Dumdun, which seems mighty 
like a corruption of the Latin name. 

Proceeding westwards we come to cliffs of an entirely different 
formation, one of the oldest, I believe, known to geologists as 
the New Red Sandstone, which, with its intimate contrasts of 
green and golden herbage and blue sea, is the heritage of only 
a true Devonian. Rightly, indeed, has Dawlish, or Doflisc, " a 
fruitful mead by the river side," been named. 

Geology is not what mathematicians would call an exact 
science, ahd the discussions about the Old and the New Red 
Sandstone are endless and classical. I remember one such 
taking place in Horswell quarry, near Thurlestone, amongst 
members of the London Geological Society, when I was afraid 
every moment I should have enacted before my very eyes a 
repetition of that scene told by Mark Twain — or wns it Bret 
Harte ? — of the Massachusetts geologists, " W^hen suddenly a 
chunk of Old Red Sandstone struck him in the abdomen, and the 
subsequent proceedings interested him no more." 

The Parson and Clerk rocks are no doubt well known to you, 
but the origin of their name not so well, perhaps. The story 
goes that once upon a time a Bishop of Exeter — it might have 
been Leofric himself — lay ill at Dawlish. To visit him there 
frequently came a wicked priest from the other side of the cathe- 
dral city, who thought that some day he might be the Bishop's 
successor. One day he started as usual, accompanied by his 
clerk ; but, as luck would have it, they got too far out on Haldon, 
and, night coming on, lost their way. So the priest called on 
the Devil to help him. A peasant appeared and led them to 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 71 

what seemed to them a neighbouring manor house, where they 
were bidden to supper. But as they sat at meat the fish before 
them appeared to swim, the sea roared in their ears. Presently 
they were informed that the Bishop was dying from poison, 
and they set out on their homeward journey. Suddenly the 
demon house vanished amid screams and wild laughter as of 
fiends mocking, and the foam burst over their heads. Two horses 
were found straying in the morning on the shore, and two huge 
loosened masses of sandstone became at once the riders' grave 
and monument. In stormy weather the shrieks of the parson 
and his clerk are still heard above the gale. 

The cliffs around here are a great stronghold for the Stock 
Dove, a near relative of the Rock Dove and Wood Pigeon. The 
birds find convenient nesting-sites in the honeycombed sand- 
stone, it being one of the characteristics of this species to build 
in holes, preferably in stumps or stocks of trees, whence the 
name. Of late years there has been a noticeable increase in 
the numbers of this bird, and, as all pigeons are the greatest 
sinners the agriculturist has to contend against, no effort should 
be spared to keep them in check — admire these birds as we do 
for sentimental as well as other — gastronomic — reasons. 

Berry Head is of interest mainly on account of its associa- 
tion with Brixham and its trawlers. Here, in the summer of 
1881, was shot a Rose-coloured Pastor with eggs just ready to 
be laid, and again in the spring of 1883 another was shot ; but I 
have little doubt this latter specimen was one of eight biids I let 
loose on my return from India, from which country I had brought 
them. I set them free, hoping they would breed, but the experi- 
ment was a failure. On the other side of the bay Hes Orestone rock, 
where the late Dr. Andrew Tucker, a contemporary of Montagu's, 
stated a hundred years ago that he took Kittiwake's eggs ; but 
as he described the eggs laid as four or five in number with no 
nest, he was doubtlessly mistaken, as this species never lays 
more than three in a clutch, and builds a huge nest. 

Start lighthouse is one of the most familiar landmarks in the 
English Channel, for every vessel voyaging to the Orient and the 
land of the Southern Cross starts from here, and, Ukewise, vessels 
coming across from Ushant pick up the land here. 

It must not be imagined, however, that the headland takes 
its name from that reason. The name is derived from the Anglo- 
Saxon steort, meaning a tail (you get the same name in birds, as 
the Red-start or Fire-tail), for the promontory of the Start juts 
out into the Channel and, excepting Prawle Point, is the most 
southerly cape in England. Woe betide any ship embayed m 
Start Bay with an easterly gale; and many a tragedy of 



72 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



shipwreck has been caused by vessels trying to pick up the 
hght and hugging the shore too closely. 

Perhaps the most terrible of these took place on the nights of 
March 9th and 10th in the blizzard of 1891, when four ships were 
dashed to pieces on the rocks and fifty-two lives lost. Some poor 
fellows managed to get ashore, and climbed the cliffs, and sought 
shelter under the hedges from the piercing blast, but, overcome 
by fatigue and hunger, fell asleep never to wake again in this 
life, and their bodies were not discovered until days afterwards, 
when the snow melted. 

Her rattling shrouds, all sheathed in ice, 
With the masts went by the board ; 
Like a vessel of glass, she stove and sank : 
Ho ! Ho ! the breakers roared ! 

Such was the wreck of the Hesperus 

In the midnight and the snow ; 

Christ save us all from a death like this, 

On the reef of Norman's Woe. — Longfellow. 

The light, too, is responsible for tragedies of an avian character, 
but the loss of life is not so serious now that the light has been 
changed to an occulting one. Birds, particularly on migration, 
seem fascinated by a Hght, and, hke moths at a candle, not only 
singe their wings, but lose their lives by dashing against the 
glass. An instance of this occurred on the night of May 11th, 
1861. The keeper on duty was surprised at discovering a great 
number of birds flying around and against the lantern of the 
building, and dropping either dead or much exhausted. The 
wind at the time was blowing strong from the north-east with 
rain. After some time it became much calmer, the birds con- 
tinuing to rush against the lantern, increasing in numbers as 
the gale went down, and finally reaching the immense number 
of 692. The keeper had the curiosity to weigh them, and they 
amounted to about thirty-four pounds, consisting chiefly of sky- 
larks, house-sparrows, and several varieties of the smaller kinds 
of birds, amongst which was a cuckoo. 

Now that so much interest and attention are given to migra- 
tion, what one would have given to have been present so as to 
have been able to identify the species, for I am bound to confess 
that to a good many people all small birds are sparrows. 

Here the Herring Gull has a colony every nesting- season, and, 
without wishing to cast any reflection on the bird's character, 
as to which he is to the manner born, would point out he is just 
in his own way as voracious as a cormorant or any other sea bird. 
Just let me relate one instance, and you can draw your own 
conclusions. A pair of these birds were reared from the nest 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 73 

by a cottager in Kingsbridge. I am sorry to say an undue 
familiarity with the genus homo brought out some most undesir- 
able traits in these birds, which it is to be hoped have not been 
communicated to any of their congeners, with whom they com- 
mingled in their hours of ease on the estuary. Happening to 
pass the cottage, I noticed in the street at the front door a gull 
being fed with scraps from the house, which were mopped up 
with avidity, until a cat came on the scene and thought to join 
in the feast ; but, like a flash, the gull, with the most diabohcal 
hisses and gurgles I ever heard coming from a bird, ran at the 
cat with outstretched wings, and caused it to beat a hasty 
retreat. 

It appears both gulls and the cat had been brought up together 
from babyhood, feeding from the same saucerful of bread and 
milk, and lying down together in the same hay-lined basket at 
night ; but the gulls were always masters of the situation. 

Too much familiarity bred contempt, and the gulls turned 
inveterate chicken stealers ; and, after clearing several runs, met 
an ignominious fate. 

Bolt Head, or rather Sharp-i-tor — for the true Bolt is farther 
out on the other side of this bay. Stare Hole — is considered by 
many one of the finest in the English Channel, and between here 
and the Bolt tail are many points of interest. Just below lies 
Salcombe bar, and, as the poem — " Crossing the Bar " — was 
composed shortly after a visit of the late poet laureate to his 
friend at the Moult, we may infer it inspired those beautiful 
lines — 

" Sunset and Evening Star, 
And one clear call for me, 
And may there be no moaning of the bar 
When I put out to sea." 

In heavy weather from the south-east, truly mountainous 
seas break over the bar, and in such weather a flock of Barnacle 
Geese may sometimes be seen, seeking shelter. Not many years 
ago a French barque was wrecked in the bay, the only survivor 
of the crew managing to climb to the top of the cliff, nearly 500 ft. 
high, and of course in the dark missing the Lady Courtenay 
Walk, which would have saved him a dangerous, if not seemingly 
impossible, climb. 

Between here and Bolt tail lies a country, upland we may say~ 
for it is mostly uncultivated— full of interest, so much so that 
it is almost impossible for me to do the subject justice in the 
short time at my disposal. First, all this plateau was the settle- 
ment of the See Wares, or dwellers by the sea, vulgarly corrupted 
into sewers at the present day, and they apparently were the 



74 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

last to suffer at the hands of the Irishmen and the sons of Harold 
after the Norman invasion, for these raiders descended on the 
South Hams in 1069 to revenge themselves on Judhael de Totnes, 
who held many manors in this district, as mentioned in Domes- 
day Book. There is an interesting cavern here, which is said to 
communicate with one at Splat's cove in Salcombe harbour,, 
and the story is that a black bull went in at one end and came 
out white at the other. Like the Prisoner of Chillon, his hair 
blanched. 

The precipitous cliffs here, I am glad to say, are still a strong- 
hold of the Buzzard and the Peregrine Falcon, and I have on 
more than one occasion seen pairs of Montagu's Harriers in the 
chffs. 

A buzzard, which was taken from the nest the same year as I 
was born, lived for thirty years, and was the dreaded tyrant of 
the garden. Boy-hke I was fond of apples, and this bird got so 
artful that he used to lay wait behind the rows of peas, and 
shuffle quickly out and dig his talons into my legs as I ran 
down to pick up the forbidden fruit. I got artful at last, and 
took to another path. This bird used to build a nest on the 
ground every year under a certain tree — an English stubbard — 
and decorate it with Scotch marigolds, solanum berries, and 
onions. I have often seen him with an onion in each claw. 
Rats and mice were his favourite tit-bits, and he would pick 
up a live rat and kill it quicker than any terrier. 

Peregrine Falcons are perhaps the boldest of all our birds of 
prey, and a few years ago a gamekeeper's wife in the neighbour- 
hood, hearing a commotion in the poultry run, ran out and 
found a peregrine entangled in the wire netting, which he had 
struck after he had captured a fowl and was rising with it. The 
falcon met the same fate as its victim. 

All along this plateau may be found relics of a prehistoric 
time, flint arrow-heads, stone rubbers, flint scrapers, and cairns, 
one of which, composed entirely of white stones, known locally 
as Whitacre, may be conjectured to belong to a chieftainess. 

At the Bolt tail are indications of an old earthwork, whilst 
beyond it are to be seen huge chasms in the top of the cliff, known 
as Vincent's Pits, which are said to reach from the top to the 
bottom of the cliff. Here is the abode of the pixies, and any 
naughty child in the village of Hope is threatened with the pits 
if its naughtiness continues. 

Devonshire people, as a rule, are very superstitious ; and I 
myself confess to a dislike to see the new moon for the first 
time through glass, and I always throw spilt salt and an old 
piece of iron picked up in the road, over my left shoulder ; so 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 75 

there is no wonder some people do consider themselves really 
pixy-led. 

A well-known gamekeeper in the neighbourhood, who has seen 
more summers than I care to mention, is a great believer in 
pixies. Once, when returning from Kingsbridge fair, where he 
had imbibed the flowing bowl not wisely but too well, he got 
overcome and lost his hat on the road, and, on nearing his native 
village, with " I'm bothered," staggered into the hedge, fell 
down, and went fast asleep. His master happened to be driving 
that way some time after, and, seeing his henchman in such a 
parlous state, determined to get him home, so with the assistance 
of the coachman he was got into the carriage with master's hat 
on and driven to his cottage, and with difficulty put to bed with 
all his clothes on. On waking in the morning he was quite at a 
loss as to where he was, or what he had been doing, but at last it 
dawned upon him : " What ! Me in bed with my boots on and 
master's hat ; why surely now I've been pixy-laid ; I'm 
bothered if I havn't been pixy-laid." 

The two hamlets, Inner and Outer Hope, should really be 
Ope, Anglo-Saxon for the haven under the hill] but the true 
Devonian dearly loves the aspirant, so the H was tacked on. 
The Hope, often pronounced " Whoap," is the sheltered part 
or hollow of the hill. Hoff, howff, haaf, and haven, are all 
modifications of the same word, according to Scott's " Guy 
Mannering." 

Burrow Island well deserves its name, for it is honeycombed 
not only with rabbit burrows but also with what I believe to be 
those of the Manx Shearwater. I have not been able definitely 
to prove this yet, but I have had curious corroborative evidence, 
for one day, when our ground men where repairing a very bad 
spot on our golf links at Thurlestone, not far away, they forked 
up three or four white eggs — many more may have been broken — 
deep down in what were considered rabbit scrapes. The eggs 
were found singly, many feet apart, and everything points to 
this spot having harboured a colony of these birds. These birds 
are seldom or never seen on the land, because it is their habit 
not to come to land till nightfall, and to leave again at daylight. 
What gave me the clue to thinking these birds bred on Burrow 
Island was, that a gentleman who once camped out there told 
me he could not sleep at night on account of the wailing of the 
sea. birds. The birds are known as ghost birds where their 
colonies are well known. That the Oyster-catcher breeds here 
sometimes I have no doubt, as I have seen eggs taken from 
there by persons who were ignorant of the harm they were doing. 
No prettier sight on the sandy beach is afforded than by a flock 



76 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



I 



of these birds, standing at high water on one leg and with head 
tucked away in the dorsal plumage waiting for the turn of the 
tide. 

This island was the seat of an important industry — pilchard 
fishing — as described by Montagu a hundred years ago. In an 
original MS. I have of his, he says : " In the early part of the 
month of August were taken about 1,000 hogsheads in one net 
at one enclosure on the west side of Burrow Island ; these com- 
puted at 2,000 to a hogshead amount to 2,000,000 of fishes. 
These sold on the spot at the rate of three shillings a maund, 
calculated to hold about 300 fishes, making about a shilling 
per hundred fishes." 

This represents £1000 at one haul. Would that it could be said 
our fishermen could get that now, for the curing-houses, nets 
and all are a thing of the past. In early summer the island is a 
mass of blue, being carpeted with the blue squill (Scilla maritima). 

On the cliffs bordering the Yealm river will be found a colony 
of the Green Cormorant nesting ; and I was once shown the 
hammer of an old flint gun which was taken from the nest of one 
of these birds. It is just possible the bird picked it up from the 
bottom of the sea some little distance further up the coast, where 
H.M.S. Ramillies went down one stormy night in October, 1760, 
having mistaken the Bolt tail for Rame Head ; and more than 
700 brave fellows were swept into eternity. 

All along the coast from Start to Stoke Point the Raven has 
many a nesting-site to my own personal knowledge, and being 
early breeders they are much in evidence along the cliff at this 
time. They are a very bold and audacious bird, and frequently 
beat off the Buzzard from a favourite niche in the overhanging 
cHff. A story, indeed, is told of one bird being annoyed at a 
ball pitching near him on one of the greens on our golf links, 
and that he took the ball up in his bill, ran with it to the 
hole, and dropped it in ; a most exasperating proceeding for the 
opponent : — 

" I shot a golf ball into the air ; 
It fell to earth I know not where ; 
Long I sought it, and in the end 
I used a word I can't defend. 

" Not long after, into the hole 
I found the ball had chanced to roll, 
And the word I can't defend 
I found again in the mouth of a friend." 

(With apologies to Longfellow and Lady Balfour). 

The coast line of North Devon, though not so extensive as 
that on the South, is just as grand and romantic. The famous 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 77 



Braunton Burrows are a nesting-place of that fine and handsome 
duck, the Burrow Duck or Sheldrake. I once obtained one of 
these birds in curious circumstances. It was a very cold winter, 
and even the river Avon was frozen over, except for a mere 
trickle in the middle ; and walking along the bank I saw one 
of these birds on the ice with its head tucked away over its 
back, fast asleep as I thought ; but as I approached the bird 
made no effort to rise. It was dead, frozen to death in its last 
long sleep. Let us trust its dreams were happy ones. 

To die : — to sleep : — 

To sleep ! perchance to dream : — aye, there's the rub : 
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come, 
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil. 

At any point along this coast one may chance to see the Chough, 
though more especially perhaps at Hartland, and between Bull 
Point and Lynmouth. When staying at Woolacombe a few 
years ago — a most delightful seaside resort, I may say, with two 
miles of splendid sands — I often used to see and hear them, for 
the bird was very famiharto me, I having had many opportunities 
of observing them five and twenty years ago at Padstow, in 
North Cornwall, where they were tolerably numerous ; indeed, I 
counted seventeen in a field on the St. Minver side of the river, 
and took a nest at Pentire Point. On the south coast they have 
entirely disappeared, the last pair of nesting birds having been 
shot, I am sorry to record, on Folly cliffs in 1885. In Montagu's 
time the bird was quite common on the south coast. There is 
little doubt that the almost total disappearance of this species 
has been caused by the enormous increase in the numbers of the 
Jackdaw, the lusset-pated Chough of Shakespeare. As I 
pointed out in a paper read to the members of the Devonshire 
Association at Ashburton : " Jackdaws have increased enor- 
mously, and are a positive nuisance in some instances, blocking 
up chimneys with their building material, and ousting other 
species of birds from well- and old-established nesting-sites, and 
eating the eggs and young of all those they can find. It is, 
therefore, quite an open question whether their bad traits are 
counterbalanced by their good ones. It is more than a coinci- 
dence that, with the increase of this species, breeding indifferently 
in chff or tree, house or spire, the Chough or Cornish Daw 
should have been practically banished from the county. The 
persecution by the collector will not alone account for it ; the 
shortened food supply, the usurpation of nesting-sites by the 
allied but hardier species, as well as the probable destruction of 
eggs and young by this bird, may have more to do with the 
disappearance of the Chough than most of us imagine." After 



78 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

several years' further observation I am more confirmed than ever 
in my opinion. 

On Lundy Island we find the Puffin — whence the island takes 
its name, from the Icelandic lunde, a puffin — breeding in 
thousands in the rabbit holes, contesting each one with the coney 
himself or a Manx Shearwater. Here, too, we find both species 
of Cormorant, especially near the dreaded Shutter Rock; Herring 
Gulls, Kittiwakes, Greater and Lesser Black-backed Gulls, 
Razor-bills, and Guillemots. 

I may tell you rather an amusing story, which won't hurt any- 
body now, for it happened many years ago, when I was deter- 
mined to get some guillemot's eggs on Lundy. A friend and I 
walked across to the east end of the island, where this species 
mostly congregates, and, arriving there, asked to go over the 
hghthouse ; this we were permitted to do, and the courteous 
attendant explained all the details of the lantern. But this was 
not what we came for, and I am afraid I rather abruptly asked 
him the easiest place to get some eggs. " Dear me," said he, 
" I cannot show you how to get any eggs ; they are all protected 
and we must not touch them." " How about those on the 
kitchen dresser ? " replied I — for I had spotted a huge dish of 
the eggs in the kitchen on my way up the gangway. " Bless 
my soul," said the keeper, " take as many of those as you like, 
and I will show you how to get as many more as you want." 
We only took a few eggs, but they were the most interesting 
varieties I have ever had — blues and greens without a blotch, 
and chocolate browns, almost worth a king's ransom to the 
zoologist. 

At the Forth Mizzen cliffs at Padstow these birds bred in 
myriads, and the coachman and I one day determined to make 
a raid ; so going out early one morning with a barrow, a huge 
coil of rope, and a crowbar, we reached the frowning precipice, 
fixed the bar, fastened the rope, and flung it over the 300 odd 
feet of cliff. I, as captain of the expedition, began the 
descent, but after getting some little distance down, found my 
companion following all too quickly, shuffling earth and stones 
in the most unpleasant fashion in my face and on my head. At 
last I could stand it no longer, and made him get up again, and 
I soon stood alongside of him, for the puffins skurrying from their 
nests close to my head, and the breakers roaring beneath, had 
an awe-inspiring effect. 

We did not like to be beaten, and presently the thought came 
to us, we might throw down the rope into a mine shaft about a 
hundred yards from the edge of the cliff, and which we knew 
communicated with the face of it. This we did, and got to the 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 70 

bottom, and found a tunnel which we crept through, it being 
low tide. Once on the face of the chff we soon got to work 
raking out the eggs from clefts in the rock with crooked sticks 
brought for the purpose. Our baskets soon began to get heavy, 
when I was startled by a shout from my companion : " Look 
sharp, sir, the tide is through the hole." 

Sure enough, the incoming tide had nearly filled the tunnel, 
and the scramble through can easily be imagined, half-drowned 
as we were by every succeeding billow. We got to the bottom 
of the shaft more dead than alive, with half our spoil smashed, 
but we were glad to see the sun shining over our heads again, and 
presently to stand on top of the cliff. 

Having made the perambulation of our coasts, we turn inland 
to our forests, or, perhaps, as I should have described them, our 
woods. But, although the description of our sylvan glens as 
forests, is ambitious, the term is not so ill-advised, as without it 
I could not have touched on that wild wide waste— 

" Where the fox loves to kennel, the buzzard to soar 
All boundless and free o'er the rugged Dartmoor," 

which is at once the pride and boast of the Devonian. 
Here, in the remoter regions — 

" Nothing that has life 
Is visible : — no solitary flock 
At will wide ranging through the silent moor 
Breaks the deep-felt monotony : and all 
Is motionless, save when the giant shade 
Flung by the passing cloud, glides swiftly o'er 
The grey and gloomy wild." 

Nearly seven hundred years have passed since the document 
was written — the charter of 1204, by which King John dis- 
afforested all Devon, except Dartmoor and Exmoor. Wist- 
man's Wood is the only remaining bit of timber which may have 
■covered the moor, but this is more than doubtful, for prehistoric 
men who lived here used peat for their fuel. The stunted 
growth of the trees is due to the direction of the prevailing wind 
and its force in this wild unsheltered spot. 

The birds which really belong to the moor are extremely few 
in number ; they instinctively shun the wildness of its wastes, 
and although the list of Dartmoor birds given by some authors 
is a lengthy one, very many of them indeed may be relegated 
to poetic imagery, or may have been merely " said to have been 
seen " on Dartmoor. 

That fine bird, the Blackcock, is absolutely struggling for 
existence, for although in my recollection it was no uncommon 
thing to bag sixteen or seventeen brace, now a quarter the 



8o The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



number would be considered a good day's sport. Swaling in the 
nesting-season, destruction by foxes of the sitting hens, and 
the increase of Duchy gun hcences account for the sad diminution 
of its numbers. 

Drawing your attention to another good sporting bird, I am 
still convinced the Red Grouse would do well on Dartmoor if 
the initial effort was carried out with a becoming knowledge of 
the habits of this species. The neighbourhood of Hexworthy 
would make an ideal spot for one centre, and I could mention 
many more. 

But it seems useless to say or write any more on the subject, 
for, although one's hopes are sometimes flattered by an interest- 
ing correspondence in the Western Morning News, they are, like 
withered leaves, ultimately destined to fall fast and flutter to 
the ground unmarked. The cries of the Grouse for a foothold on 
Dartmoor are, indeed, voices crying in the wilderness. 

The weird and desolate spot known as Cranmere Pool is the 
source of the Dart, the Taw, and the Torridge. I remember once 
having to negotiate this bit of moor in a walk from Chagford to 
Okehampton, and trying work it was jumping from tuft to tuft, 
knowing if you missed your footing you would land in the bog, 
probably up to your neck. There is a story told of a yokel who 
once ran to a far-away farmstead on the moor, and implored the 
inmates to come out and help his master, who had fallen into a 
bog. " How far in is he ? " asked the farmer. " Up to his 
ankles," was the reply. " Oh ! he will easily get out then," 
quoth the farmer. " Well, I don't know about that," said the 
yokel, " he is in head first." 

Here in the breeding season may be heard the shrill cry of the 
Curlew which has been disturbed from her nest, putting every 
bird on the alert within a mile or two against the daring intruder. 

If we want an excuse for a forest we must hie to the banks of 
the Dart, where the woods are thickest, and assuredly here we 
shall find scenes of unparalleled beauty, and revel in glades of 
Osmunda regalis and Mountain Ash. As to the bed of the river, 
geologists hesitate to offer an opinion as to what time has elapsed 
since this deep gorge was made in the effort of the impounded 
flood to make its way to the ocean. 

Out over is a steep descent of 500 feet to Dartmeet, and half- 
way down the hill is the Cofhn Stone, on which five crosses are cut, 
and which is split in half — the story goes, by lightning. On this 
it is customary to rest a dead man, on his way from the moor 
beyond Dartmoor to his final resting-place at Widecombe. When 
the cofiin is laid on the stone, custom exacts the production of 
the whisky bottle and a Hbation all round to the manes of the 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 81 

deceased. One day, a man of very evil life, a terror to his 
neighbours, was being carried to his burial, and his corpse was 
laid on the stone whilst the bearers regaled themselves. All 
at once, out of a passing cloud, shot a flash, and tore the coflin 
and the man to pieces, consuming them to cinders and splitting 
the stone. The moral being, as the " Ingoldsby Legends " say : 
" Do not drink too much whisky, or play too much loo, 

Or be sure that old Nick will Hey after you ; 

Hey up the chimney-pot, Hey after you." 

Another view on the Dart shows where a magnificent gorge 
has been cut, grander to my mind than the one at Fingle Bridge. 
The mind fails to grasp the immensity of time that has elapsed 
since the gorge first began to be formed. We are apt to think 
of eternity as a future state, but it seems to me the past has 
an eternity too. 

Not long ago I had sent me a melanistic variety of the Honey 
Buzzard, which was shot in the woods not far from here. Its 
feeble claws and bill proclaim it a harmless bird from the game- 
preserver's point of view ; but, I am sorry to say, every hawk to 
a keeper is a villain, and is invariably treated as such. 

These great woods harbour large numbers of that fine sporting 
bird, the Pheasant, whose natural habitat ranges from the 
Caspian to South-East Asia ; it was most probably introduced 
into England by the Romans. 

It is interesting to note that there are no fewer than twenty 
species and sub-species of Phasianus, and when two overlap, 
hybrids are often the result, and they are prolific. Another 
point is, that the farther north they are met with the more white 
do you find in their plumage. 

Apropos of this bird, I was the witness of an amusing 
scene many years ago. There was a steamer excursion from 
Plymouth to the Yealm river one spring day, when the passen- 
gers, young and old, donned their best attire. After landing they 
all scattered, as is their wont, to seek the sylvan glen or the 
pebbly beach, each to his own choice. By and by a gentleman in 
an immaculate frock coat happened on a nest of a pheasant, with 
many eggs in it. " Oh ! " quoth he, " these are as good to eat 
as gleannies' eggs," — and forthwith he annexed them, and 
stowed them away in his tail-coat pockets. Presently the 
steamer's whistle warned all passengers of her departure, and 
our friend hurried on board, and, perfectly oblivious of the cargo 
he had in his coat tails, sat down — with results which must be 
to every one obviously disastrous, as the deck was soon swim- 
ming in a sticky mess, and the language used sufficient to 
petrify an ancient golfer. 

6 . 



82 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

The Hobby Drive at Clovelly looks an ideal spot for Woodcock, 
and I believe good bags are annually made here. I was shooting 
alone in a big, bracken-strewn brake — possibly treading in the 
very same footsteps made by that father of British ornithology, 
Colonel Montagu, who had the same privilege of shooting in 
these woods a hundred years ago as I have now — ^when I flushed 
a woodcock. I brought him down, when just as I was about 
to pick him up, he flew off again, much to my surprise. However, 
the other barrel brought him down again. But I had made a 
mistake ; there was my first woodcock lying dead, close to my 
feet. The second bird was, I suppose, so terrified at a dead 
woodcock falHng so near, that he lay very close and allowed me 
almost to put my hand on him. 

This reminds me of another incident connected with these 
birds. Two ancient Nimrods, bosom friends, were shooting in 
a small spinney, when a woodcock rose and was promptly 
brought down. The first sportsman, whom we will designate as 
A, went forward to pick up the bird, when B cut in with, " Here, 
that's my bird ; I shot that bird." " Indeed you didn't," said 
A, " and anyhow I am going to put him in my pocket." High 
words would probably now have ensued and a lifelong friendship 
been severed, but on turning round, the retriever was found with 
another woodcock in his mouth. The fact was two birds must 
have risen at the same moment, and both sportsmen had fired 
simultaneously, neither knowing that the other had fired. 

My last picture shows the sportsman bagging the last Snipe 
for the year, for the season is late, and the rosy tint in the western 
sky denotes the setting sun, and warns me also to bring my 
remarks to a conclusion. Even as the tiny rivulet, which, 
springing from the moorland side but gathering volume by the 
way, rushes on its course to the sea, through quicksands, boulders, 
shallows, and deeps, till lost in the billowy ocean, so my effort to 
give a brief description of our Coasts and Forests may have led 
me into unsuspected dangers, which I trust your criticism will 
alloy, beheving, as I do, we are all influenced by the example of 
Longfellow's " Village Blacksmith " — 

" Toiling, rejoicing, sorrowing, 
Onward through hfe he goes ; 
Each morning sees some task begun. 
Each evening sees it close ; 
Something attempted, something done, 
Has earned a night's repose." 



The Devonian Yeur Book, 1912 83 



«F ■ -"^ 






^ i 



A Fisher- Wife's Lullaby. 

Sleep, ma dearie, sleep : 
Dawntee fret now, dawntee weep now ; 
Shut your eyes an' go to sleep now. 
Mother sits an' sings a-near 'ee, 
In tha dimpsy-light, ma dearie ; 

Sleep, ma dearie, sleep. 

Sleep, ma dearie, sleep : 
Dawntee luke so wide awake now ; 
Go to sleep for gudeness' sake now. 
Is it for your dad you're wishin'. 
Far upon tha sea a-fishin' ? — 

Sleep, ma dearie, sleep. 

Sleep, ma dearie, sleep : 
Sleep until the break o' day now. 
While I sit beside an' pray now — 
Pray that He who guides tha weather 
Keep you safe, my two together ; 

Sleep, ma dearie, sleep. 

Sleep, ma dearie, sleep : 
Dawntee Usten to the sea now — 
Shut your eyes and let-a-be now. 
Some day it may call an' wake you, 
Some day it may call an' take you 1 — 
Sleep, ma dearie, sleep. 

Arthur L. Salmon. 
(From " A New Book of Verses," Blackwood.) 



84 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

The Historical Basis of Kingsley*s 
"Westward Ho!'' 

By R. PEARSE CHOPE, B.A. 

A Lecture delivered at St. Bride Institute, February 28th, 1911. 

Our Devonian historian, Froude, has said that, in his opinion,. 
" the most perfect Enghsh history which exists is to be found in 
the historical plays of Shakespeare. In these plays, rich as they 
are in fancy and imagination, the main bearings of the national 
story are scrupulously adhered to, and, wherever attainable, 
verbal correctness. Shakespeare's object was to exhibit as 
faithfully as he possibly could, the exact character of the great 
actors in the national drama — the circumstances which sur- 
rounded them, and the motives, internal and external, by which 
they were influenced." Another Devonian, the famous Duke of 
Marlborough, read Shakespeare for Enghsh history, and read 
nothing else. The supreme merit of the dramatist is that he 
represents real life. All his characters stand before our imagina- 
tion as living men and women. All their actions are true to 
actual experience. 

The same quality of essential truth is to be found in the best 
historical novels, in the front rank of which must unquestionably 
be placed Charles Kingsley's stirring story of " the spacious 
days of good Queen Bess." The story is, indeed, better as 
history than as fiction. As a novel it is loosely constructed, 
weak, and unconvincing ; but as a representation of the spirit 
of the times, it is unrivalled. The story, as you all know, relates 
to the Armada and its heroes. " It is in memory of these men, 
their voyages and their travels, their faith and their valour, 
their heroic lives and no less heroic deaths," says its author, 
" that I write this book." 

On the whole he has done his work extremely well, and it is 
no exaggeration to say, that a better knowledge of the history 
of Elizabeth's reign can be obtained from a study of " West- 
ward Ho ! " than from most professed histories of the 
period. But the book has some very grave faults. It con- 
tains many small errors in details, and several glaring 
anachronisms. The author frequently obtrudes his own 
personality and opinions, and thereby mars the effect of reality, 
and makes the book too obviously a story about the times^ 
written by a modern writer, rather than a story of the times^ 



?y 




3« 

o I 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 85 

written by one of the characters. In this respect it is decidedly 
inferior to Blackmore's " Lorna Doone," for example. Kingsley, 
indeed, does not hesitate to trace the subsequent history of his 
characters, to discuss — and show his ignorance of — the theory 
of evolution, and even to introduce references to the Crimean 
War. But in spite of these faults, the book remains great. 
History and fiction are so cleverly blended that it is not always 
easy to distinguish one from the other. Several of the actual 
events are described in the words of the original narrators, 
while the fictitious wanderings of Amyas Leigh in South America 
might almost have been paraphrased from the pages of Hakluyt. 
The historical basis of the novel rests mainly upon a few well- 
known sources, such as Hakluyt's " t^rincipal Navigations, 
Voyages, Trafhques, and Discoveries of the EngHsh Nation," 
Camden's " Annals of Elizabeth," Prince's " Worthies of Devon," 
Fuller's " Worthies of England," Ralegh's " Discovery of 
Guiana" (Schomburgh's edition), and Prescott's "Conquest of 
Peru," and no great research is shown. Kingsley himself 
admitted that he wrote the book " without any access to town 
records, or to State papers, chiefly by the light of dear old 
Hakluyt," and that he obtained the suggestion for the novel and 
much of the material from his brother-in-law, Froude, although 
the historian's great work had not then been published. The 
fact that Froude' s history resembles Kingsley' s fiction in dis- 
playing some carelessness in handling evidence, is pointed out 
in a bitter epigram attributed to the supreme historian of the 
severer and less picturesque school, Bishop Stubbs : — 

" Froude informs the Scottish youth 
That the clergy speak no truth ; 
The Reverend Canon Kingsley cries 
That history is a pack of lies. 

" Whence accusations so malign ? 

This simple statement solves the mystery : 
Froude reckons Kingsley a divine, 

And Kingsley goes to Froude for history." 

I propose first to separate the sheep from the goats, to point out 
which of the principal characters are imaginative and which 
historical, and then, after introducing you to Ehzabeth and her 
court, to sketch, as far as possible in the words of contemporary 
writers, some of the main incidents described in the novel. 

As one would expect, the characters who enter most closely 
into the plot of the story are all fictitious — the Leighs, Salvation 
Yeo, John Brimblecombe and his father, Will Cary, Soto, Rose 
Salterne and her father, Ayacanora, and Lucy Passmore. It 
is true that, a few [years later, there was a family named Leigh 



The Devonian Year Boo k^igiz 



living at Burrough, and at that time there was a family named' 
Gary at Clovelly, but their pedigrees are well known, and no 
individual member in either case would tit into the tale. The 
name ^' Amyas " and some of the hero's adventures were* 
apparently borrowed from Amyas Preston, to whose valiant 
action in taking St. Jago de Leon Kingsley alludes in the follow- 
ing words: "The history of the British navy tells no more 
Titanic victory over nature and man than that now forgotten 
raid of Amyas Preston and his comrade, in the year of grace 
1595." The character of Frank Leigh is obviously modelled 
upon that perfect gentleman. Sir Philip Sidney, "the idol of 
his time," whose friend he is represented as being, and it is 
suggested by Kingsley himself that Eustace Leigh was the! 
conspirator Ballard, who was afterwards hanged for his share 
in Babington's conspiracy. It is interesting to note that an 
entry in the Devon Quarter Sessions records for 1605 — " It is 
by some thought that four score or 100/. should rest in the hands 
of Mr. Lee of Northam as a remain of a greater sum collected for 
the charges of a ship in the late Queen's days " — ^seems to 
indicate that a Leigh of Northam probably did provide a ship 
to fight against the Armada, although this was not known 
to Kingsley. Thomas Leigh of Northam married Agnes, the 
heiress of Burrough of Burrough, two brothers of which family 
were distinguished navigators of the time, though they are not 
mentioned in the novel. Stephen was master of the only 
successful ship of the ill-fated expedition of Sir Hugh Willoughby 
to Russia, and became chief pilot of the navy ; while William, 
became comptroller of .the navy, vice-admiral under Drake in 
1587, and commander of a ship -against the Armada. It is 
interesting also to find a connexion between Sir Walter Ralegh 
and the Leighs of Burrough, for, although there is an estate 
called Ralegh in the parish of Northam, I am not aware that 
Sir Walter ^has hitherto been identified with it. In 1564 the 
manor of , Northam was granted by Queen Elizabeth to the 
collegiate church of Windsor, but it appears to have been held 
under the church by Sir Walter Ralegh, for we find that he 
granted by copy of court roll the reversion of an enclosure called 
Passage (probably the landing-stage for the ferry at Appledore) 
to Agnes Leigh, the wife of Thomas Leigh, and to WiUiam and- 
Mary, their children. 

Of the other local characters, there was certainly a " WiUiam 
Gary" of Glovelly at the timfe, but he was only four years old 
when the " Brotherhood of the Rose " is supposed to have been 
founded, while there does not appear to have been a " Thomas. 
Goffin " in that generation of the Goffin family. There Was no: 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 87 

Countess of Bath at the date given (1580), for the Earl of Bath 
did not marry till 1582, and the previous Countess died in 1561. 
The first mayor of Bideford under the new charter obtained by 
Sir Richard Grenvile in 1574, was named " John Salterne," but 
Kingsley is so careless about the name of Rose Salterne' s father 
that at the beginning of the book he calls him " Simon," and 
later on, " William." It is perhaps hardly necessary to warn 
you against the statement made in guide-books that a portrait in 
the Royal Hotel, Bideford, represents "John Strange, the 
grandfather of Rose Salterne," seeing that John Strange died 
in 1646 ; or the equally absurd statement on the front of the old 
Newfoundland Inn (now named The Ship), that this is the place 
where the " Brotherhood of the Rose " was founded. With 
regard to the so-called Armada guns, all that can be said is that 
they are probably guns of that period — though there is no 
evidence that they had any connexion with the Armada. 

The relative importance of Bideford at this time is un- 
doubtedly exaggerated by Kingsley. We know from the Parish 
Registers that it was only a small place, with a population 
of fifteen hundred, about one-third the size of Barnstaple 
and considerably smaller than Hartland, though we are told 
by Leland that, even in Henry VHI.'s time, it had east 
the water " a praty quik streat of smithes and other occupiers 
for ship craft e." The greatest part of the town then, as now^ 
was the other side of the river, but it was practically bounded 
by High Street, Grenville Street, and Bridge Street, although 
there were other houses scattered about beyond this area. 
It was not until a century later that Bideford became important 
by reason of the tobacco trade with Virginia, and the cod 
fisheries in Newfoundland, to which she sent more ships than 
any port in England except London and Topsham. In 1699 
Bideford sent out 28 ships and 146 boats to Newfoundland, 
Plymouth sent only 5, Bristol 12, Liverpool 3, Southampton 2. 
From 1700 till about 1755 Bideford imported more tobacco than 
any other port in England except London, and in some years it 
even surpassed that port. The Quay was constructed in 1663, 
and Bridgeland Street was gradually built on the site of orchards 
and gardens from 1684 onwards. 

The bridge is very ancient, though the history of it given in 
the novel is mainly fictitious. Sir Theobald Grenvile, the 
reputed founder, died about 1380, but the earUest known mention 
of the bridge is in 1396, when Bishop Stafford granted an 
indulgence to all true penitents who should assist in the building 
or reparation of the long bridge of Bideford. A seal of the 
borough attached to a deed of 1475 shows two buildings on the 



88 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

bridge — one at each end. These are supposed to be the ancient 
toll house at the town end, and a chapel on the south side east- 
the-water, dedicated to St. Anne — not St. Thomas Becket as 
is generally stated. However, Leland describes it as "a fair 
chapel of our Lady," and he says, " there is a fraternite in the 
town for preservation of this bridge." In the middle there was 
a Maltese cross, with the representation of the Virgin and Child. 
A decree in Chancery in 1608, stating that part of the rents of 
the bridge lands had been " paid out for the private occasions 
of the feoffees, as by entertainment of strangers, and in 
banqueting and often feasting between themselves, as also for 
the seeing of stage plays acted within the Town of Bideford," 
throws some light on two of the chapters of the novel, viz., one 
describing " How Bideford Bridge dined at Annery House," 
and the other describing the pageant enacted when Amyas came 
home from his voyage round the world. The popular drama 
was one of the most striking features of the period, and inspired 
Shakespeare to write his wonderful plays. The bridge was 
originally only about ten feet wide, for it was constructed to 
accommodate pack-horse traffic only. At low water carts used to 
cross over the sands above it. It was not until 1810 that the 
bridge was first widened to accommodate vehicular traffic ; 
this was done by providing at the sides additional semicircular 
arches, which can still be seen underneath the footways ; and at 
the same time new parapets of hewn stone were built. The 
bridge was further widened by constructing the footways on 
brackets, and the parapets of iron were built, about 1863. 

Two other buildings of special interest to us are the Church 
and the Grammar School. Of the old Church nothing remains 
except the tower, the Norman font, at which the Indian 
" Ralegh " was baptized, and the tomb of Sir Thomas Grenvile, 
the great-great-grandfather of Sir Richard. It was through his 
marriage with a Gilbert, as is shown by the impaled coat of 
arms on the tomb, that Sir Richard was related to Sir Humphrey 
Gilbert, Ralegh's half-brother. With regard to the School, we 
have no record of any before 1657, and apparently the Grammar 
School was not permanently endowed until still later. It was 
repaired, with the addition of a new brick front, in 1780, and 
its site is now occupied by the new Bridge Buildings. 

Having cleared the board of the imaginative characters, we 
are ready to consider the real historical ones, and what a 
galaxy we find ! — Sir Richard Grenvile and John Oxenham, 
Drake and Hawkins, Ralegh and the Gilberts, Spenser and 
Sidney, Parsons and Campian, Lord Grey of Wilton and Lord 
Charles Howard of Effingham. Mention is also made of a host 



<rz 




THE SEA KINGS OF DEVON. 

" Time never can produce men to o'ertake 
The fames of Grenvile, Ralegh, Gilbert, Drake, 
And worthy Hawkins.'' 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 89 

of subsidiary historical personages — about one hundred and fifty 
in all — who can hardly be reckoned as characters in the novel. 
Two particularly fine scenes — the feast on board the Pelican at 
Deptford, and the game of bowls on Plymouth Hoe — introduce 
us to a whole gallery of " England's forgotten worthies," but 
unfortunately these scenes have no historical support, and are 
hardly within the range * of probability, though they are 
described with much verisimilitude. The long list of European 
celebrities supposed to have been seen by Frank Leigh, suffers 
from a similar defect ; and it is amusing to find that Frank 
" had listened, between awe and incredulity, to the daring 
theories of Galileo," who was then about ten years old. 

Before you can rightly appreciate the historical setting of the 
novel, it is necessary for you to know the character of Elizabeth 
herself. "During the reign of Mary and her bigoted husband, 
Phihp II. of Spain, the fortunes of England had sunk to a very 
low ebb, and the accession of Elizabeth in 1558 was hailed with 
a burst of enthusiastic joy. She was then in her twenty-fifth 
year. She had much of her mother's beauty, and she was a 
bold horsewoman, a good shot, a graceful dancer, a skilled 
musician, and an accomplished scholar. She was, however, 
exceedingly vain and fond of flattery. Her dresses were 
innumerable and costly, though she was in other respects 
extremely parsimonious. " Her character," says the modern 
historian. Green, " like her portraits, was utterly without shade. 
Of womanly reserve or self-restraint she knew nothing." The 
extravagance of the flattery she received is well shown in an 
allegorical picture at Hampton Court representing her as astonish- 
ing by her beauty the three goddesses who were the competitors 
for the golden apple inscribed " To the fairest." This was 
painted in 1569, when she was 36, but when she was nearly 60 
we find Ralegh writing in the following strain : "I that was 
wont to behold her riding hke Alexander, hunting like Diana, 
walking hke Venus, the gentle wind blowing her fair hair about 
her pure cheeks Hke a nymph, sometime sitting in the shade 
like a goddess, sometime singing like an angel, sometime 
playing like Orpheus ; behold the sorrow of this world ! 
once amiss hath bereaved me of all." And it is not only 
from courtiers like Ralegh that she received this flattery. 
The title-page of Dr. John Dee's " Art of Navigation," 1577, 
represents a light from heaven streaming down upon Elizabeth 
as she sits at the helm of the ship Europa, which she is steering 
towards the Tower of Safety ; a figure kneeHng on the island- 
shore holds a scroll with the legend, " Fleet is ready," and points 
towards Victory, who stands on the summit of a rock holding 



90 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

but a "wreath to the Queen, while an angel wdth a flaming sword 
hovers protectingly over the ships in the background. 

The fact that such gross adulation was considered her due 
appears to us as by no means creditable to her courtiers, for, 
although she had many good qualities, she was known to be 
mean, capricious, unjust, and — in her old age — ugly. As Froude 
says, " Wherever in the history of these times the Queen's hand 
is visible, there is always vacillation, infirmity of purpose, and 
generally dishonesty." She was, however, extremely fortunate 
in her choice of ministers, whose able services she repaid with 
base ingratitude. The chief of these was the Lord High Treasurer, 
Wilham Cecil, Lord Burghley, and he Was ably seconded by the 
Secretary of State, Sir Francis Walsirigham. ' Among the 
courtiers may be mentioned the Queen's cousin. Lord Hunsdon, 
Sir Phihp Sidney, Sir Walter Ralegh, the Earl of Leicester, and 
the Earl of Essex. 

The novel rightly lays emphasis upon the rehgious character 
of the great struggle between England and Spain, but it must be 
borne in mind that there were three distinct influences at work — : 
the commercial, and the political, as well as the rehgious — 
represented respectively by America, the King of Spain, and the 
Pope. The first was really the most important in bringing 
about the crisis, but the last was the one that animated the 
people. These three influences appealed to different people in 
different degrees. Burghley, for instance, was affected entirely 
by the political aspect, while Walsingham was affected also by 
the commercial view. Hawkins was concerned with both the 
commercial and the political aspects, and Drake with the 
commercial and religious. The Queen herself cared nothing 
about the rehgious aspect, but was governed by the political 
and commercial elements. It has been supposed that Kingsley 
shows an unfair bias against the Cathohcs, but it cannot be said 
that he in any way exaggerates the intensity af the feeling 
displayed in contemporary literature. 

' The opening scene in the novel is dated 1575, but as many 
events of earlier date are described, it is proposed, instead of 
following the order in the book, to take the chief historical 
incidents in chronological order. 

Some years before Columbus discovered the West Indies, the 
merchants of Bristol had sent out ships to discover the " Island 
of Brazil," which was marked in early maps ; but, so far as we 
know, the first Enghshman who actually traded with Brazil 
was John Hawkins' father, Wilham, " a man for his wisdom, 
valour, experience, and skill in sea causes much esteemed and 
beloved of King Henry VIII." Martin Cockeram relates in 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 (^t 

Hakluyt's Collection how he went with WiUiam Hawkins to 
Brazil in 1530, and was left behind for two years as hostage for 
the safety of one of the savage kings, who accompanied Hawkins 
to England and was presented to King Henry. Cockeram was 
living within a few years of the date of Hakluyt's book (1589), 
and is represented in the noVel as being present on Plymouth 
Hoe in 1588. The statement that he went with Sebastian Cabot 
to the River Plate in 1527 is without authority, for, although 
two Enghshmen did go with him, we are told that they were 
" somewhat -learned in cosmography," which presumably 
Cockeram was not. The claim attributed to Cockeram of having 
seen Columbus and Vasco de Gama must also be taken with a 
pinch of salt, for the date referred to is apparently 1497— more 
than ninety years before— and Cockeram was then " about a 
ten year old." It was in this year that Sebastian Cabot sailed 
with his father and brothers from Bristol and discovered the 
mainland of America, though it was not till 1553, when Sir Hugh 
Willoughby attempted the North- East Passage to India, and 
perished with all his crew at Arzina, in Lapland, that the era of 
English exploration really began. 

Just about the time of the second voyage of Wilham Hawkins 
(1532), Pizarro was starting on his conquest of Peru, many 
incidents of which are described by the Spanish hermit supposed 
to have been found by Amyas Leigh (chap. xxv.). These 
incidents are taken from Prescott's fascinating history, " The 
Conquest of Peru." Pizarro -first reached the coast of that 
country in 1527, when the city of Tumbez was described to him 
as having a temple covered with plates of gold and silver, and 
convent gardens glowing with imitations of fruit and vegetables 
in pure gold and silver. In 1532 he found the country in a 
state of civil war, of which he was ready to take the fullest 
advantage. He was accompanied by Hernando de Soto, the 
supposed grandfather of the villain of the novel, although the 
real Soto had no legitimate children. Some of the incidents in 
which he bore a share are described in the book. Soto, indeed, 
honourably supported the Irica's demands for freedom, and it 
was during his absence that the Inca was basely murdered by 
Pizarro. Pizarro himself was assassinated in 1541 by the 
followers of his associate, Almagro, who the next year was 
defeated by Vaca de Castro, and beheaded. Soto had pre- 
viously left Peru and returned to Spain, and in 1539 he led 
an expedition to Florida, and in four years fought many battlesi 
to little purpose, and advanced into the interior as far as the 
Mississippi, on the banks of which he died. 

Bishop Las Casas, " the Protector of the Indians," says of 



92 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

Soto, " Sure he is one of the notoriousest and best experimented 
amongst them that have done most hurts, mischieves, and 
destructions," and his reputation for cruelty seems to have been 
well deserved, for we read in one place of his burning a captive 
Indian to make his comrades give him information, and in 
another of his cutting off the right hands of thirty who had 
been sent to him with a present of fish, but whom he suspected 
of treachery. Las Casas' " History of the Indies " is a terrible 
indictment of his fellow-countrymen. He asserts that more 
than twelve millions had been " done to death " by the 
" diveUish doings of the Spaniards." Kingsley speaks of the 
book as having been, in 1575, " lately done into EngUsh under 
Ihe title of ' The Cruelties of the Spaniards,' " but from the title 
page it is evident that it was not translated into English until 
1583, and the title was " The Spanish Colonic." However, in 
justice to Kingsley it should be said that the translation was 
made from the French edition of 1579, which does bear such a 
title. 

From the days of WiUiam Hawkins no English fleet ventured 
into the Spanish sphere until his son John, " having informed 
himself by dihgent inquisition of the state of West India, and 
being assured that negroes were very good merchandise in 
Hispaniola, and that store of negroes might easily be had upon 
the coast of Guinea, resolved with himself to make trial thereof." 
The first voyage was made in 1562, and Hawkins had no difficulty 
in " making vent of the whole number of his negroes " (300 at 
least). The second voyage, in 1564, was on a much larger scale, 
and brought him wealth and reputation, enabling him to obtain 
his well-known grant of arms, with the crest of " a demi-moor, 
bound and captive." On his way home he relieved the French 
colony in Florida, and sailed along the coast to Newfoundland — 
thus making the pioneer voyage by Englishmen along coasts 
afterwards famous in history through English colonization. On 
his third voyage, in 1567, he was accompanied by a young kins- 
man, Francis Drake, in command of his own vessel, the Judith, 
of fifty tons. On this occasion occurred the disaster at St. Juan 
de Ulloa, alluded to in the novel. Hawkins arrived only a day 
before the Spanish navy, " which, though he might easily have 
kept from entering the haven, yet suffered he them to enter, 
compounding for security to him and his upon certain conditions, 
lest he might seem to have broken the League. The Spaniards 
being let in, who scorned to have conditions given them within 
their own dominions, watched their opportunity, set upon the 
EngHsh, slew many, took three ships, and pillaged the goods : 
yet got they not the victory without blood." Two ships only 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 93 

escaped — the Judith, which, Hawkins says, " forsook us in our 
great misery," and the Minion, the smaller of the two navy 
ships. The latter was so overcrowded that Hawkins had to 
land half the men in Mexico, and make the best of his way home 
with the rest. He concludes his account with the words : "If 
all the miseries and troublesome affairs of this sorrowful voyage 
should be perfectly and thoroughly written, there should need a 
painful man with his pen, and as great a time as he had that 
wrote the lives, and deaths of the Martyrs" (i.e. John Fox). 
Two of those who were put ashore — Job Hortop and Miles 
PhilHps (whom Kingsley calls " Phihp Miles ") — wrote narratives 
of their adventures, which are published in Hakluyt and alluded 
to in the novel. Kingsley's reference to the " greasy sea-stained 
garments " of this " old tarry-breeks of a sea-dog " is in strange 
contrast with the evidence of the supercargo, that " he saw 
Master Hawkins wear, in this voyage, divers suits of apparel of 
velvets and silks, with buttons of gold, and pearl." 

The next expedition to be noticed is that of Drake to Nombre 
de Dios in 1572, which forms the basis of so much in " Westward 
Ho ! " A long and detailed account of it was written by Philip 
Nichols, Preacher, revised by Drake himself, and probably 
presented by him in manuscript to the Queen as a New Year's 
gift on 1 Jan., 1592-3, but it was not until 1626 that it was 
printed, with the title, " Sir Francis Drake Revived." There is, 
however, a short account in Hakluyt by a Portuguese named 
Lopez Vaz, and an abridgment of Nichols' account in Prince's 
" Worthies." Nombre de Dios was then " the granary of the 
West Indies, wherein the golden harvest, brought from Panama, 
was hoarded up till it could be conveyed into Spain." There, 
in the Governor's house, the Enghsh found " a vast heap of 
wealth, consisting of bars of silver, piled up against the wall,"" 
and Drake told them : " He had now brought them to the 
mouth of the treasury of the world ; which, if they did not gain, 
none but themselves were to be blamed." " After this, he 
commanded his brother, with John Oxnam and their company, 
to break open the treasure-house, in which there was more gold 
and jewels than all our four pinnaces could carry," but Drake 
being dangerously wounded, they had to leave it behind, "only 
to preserve their Captain's life." It was on this expedition that 
Drake ascended the big tree, from which he could see both 
Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and " besought God to give him 
Hfe and leave once to sail an Enghsh ship in those seas. And 
then calhng up all the rest of the men, he acquainted John Oxnam 
especially with his petition and purpose. Who understanding it, 
presently protested, that unless our Captain did beat him 



^4 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

from his company, he would follow him, by God's grace." It 
was on this expedition too that Drake captured the mule train 
coming from Panama to Nombre de Dios, which incident is 
utilized by Kingsley in his description of a similar capture 
by Amyas Leigh of the mule train from Santa Fe to Carta- 
gena. 

The opening scene of " Westward Ho ! " represents John 
Oxenham and Salvation Yeo two years after this, recruiting for 
another expedition. This ended in disaster, though it obtained 
for Oxenham the renown of being the first Englishman to sail 
the South Sea, or Pacific Ocean. A full account of it is given 
in the novel, as narrated by Yeo to Sir Richard Grenvile and 
Amyas Leigh. The account in Hakluyt is written by the same 
Lopez Vaz who wrote about Drake's expedition, but in this no 
mention is made of the fair Spanish lady. She apparently is 
first mentioned in Sir Richard Hawkins' " Observations," 
published in 1622. Oxenham was captured by one Diego de 
Frees (not Trees, as in the novel), and executed at Lima. 

It was in this same year that the Inquisition was introduced 
into the Indies, the horrors of which created such a feeling of 
hatred against both Spaniards and Catholics. The execution of 
its sentences was preceded by a peculiar ceremony known as 
auto-da-fe, or Act of Faith. This consisted of a procession of 
the condemned, bare-footed and dressed in " certain fools' coats, 
called in their language san benitos," having ropes about their 
necks and great green wax candles in their hands unlighted. 
They were preceded by a double file of Dominican brothers, 
before whom was carried the banner of the Holy Office, and they 
were followed by the spies of the Inquisition and the executioner. 
There were three kinds of san henito : the first, for heretics who 
escaped burning by making a confession before being sentenced, 
consisted of a yellow coat with a red St. Andrew's cross ; the 
second, for those who escaped being burnt alive by making a 
confession after they had been condemned, consisted of a similar 
coat with tongues of fire pointing downwards, indicating that 
the wearer was to be strangled before being placed on the burning 
pile ; the third, for those who refused to confess, had at the 
lower end the head of a man in the midst of fire, and above it 
grotesque figures of demons, and tongues of fire pointing upwards, 
as a token that the heretic would be burnt alive. The con- 
demned also wore a round pyramid-shaped cap called coroza, 
of the same material as the coat, and similarly ornamented. 
The above-mentioned Miles Philhps and his companions . were 
among the first victims of the Inquisition in Mexico, and he has 
given a graphic account of their sufferings. It wiU be remembered 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 95 

that Rose Salterne and Frank Leigh are represented as being 
burnt together in the Inquisition at Lima. 

Of Drake's great and glorious voyage round the world, 1577-80, 
it is not necessary to say much. You all know the main incidents 
— ^how Doughty was executed ; how Winter deserted ; how the 
little Pelican (for she was only 100 tons) became the Golden 
Hind, in compHment to Drake's patron, Sir Christopher Hatton, 
afterwards Lord Chancellor ; how she was driven by a furious 
gale to the south of Cape Horn ; how Drake embraced with his 
arms the southernmost point of the known world ; how he went 
from port to port capturing ships and treasure until the climax 
was reached by taking the great treasure ship, the Cacafuego ; 
how the Golden Hind was repaired and refitted in a bay near 
San Francisco, which country Drake took possession of and 
named " New Albion ; " how she sailed across the Pacific to the 
Moluccas ; how she ran upon a rock in Celebes and nearly 
perished ; how she rounded the Cape of Good Hope ; and how she 
arrived at Plymouth after being absent nearly three years. A 
long account, compiled from the notes of Master Francis Fletcher, 
Preacher, was edited by Drake's nephew, and published in 1628 
with the title, " The World Encompassed," but Kingsley 
probably used the short account in Hakluyt. The incident 
relating to the southernmost point first appears in Sir Richard 
Hawkins' " Observations," 1622, but it is of great importance, 
because prior to Drake's voyage it was believed that a great 
continent stretched from Magellan's Strait to the south. There 
is no doubt of its accuracy, because Fletcher has a chart in his 
notes, showing clear sea to the south of the island which he calls 
Elizabeth Island, and this chart was adopted by subsequent 
cartographers. To Drake, then, is due the discovery of Cape 
Horn. 

It will be interesting to see the account of him given by the 
Spanish gentleman, Don Francisco de Xarate, who is no other 
than the old man described in the novel as " the ape of Panama." 
He gave Drake " a falcon of gold with a great emerald in the 
breast thereof, for his favourable dealing with him." " The 
English general," he wrote, " is the same who took Nombre de 
Dios five years ago. He is a cousin of John Hawkyns, and his 
name is Francis Drake. He is about 35 years of age, of small 
size, with a reddish beard, and is one of the greatest sailors that 
exist, both from his skill and from his power of commanding. 
His ship is of near 400 tons (sic) ; sails well, and has 100 men, 
all in the prime of life and as well trained for war as if they 
were old soldiers of Italy. He treats them with affection, and 
they him with respect. He has with him nine or ten gentlemen, 



96 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

younger sons of the leading men in England. He has no privacy ; 
those of whom I speak all dine at his table. The service is ot 
silver, richly gilt, and engraved with his arms ; he has too all 
possible luxuries, even to perfumes, many of which, he told me, 
were given him by the queen. None of these gentlemen sits 
down or puts on his hat in his presence without repeated per- 
mission. He dines and sups to the music of violins." In an 
Appendix to the Hakluyt Society's edition of " The World 
Encompassed " there is a curious story relating to the author, 
which may have suggested to Kingsley the incident of the 
rebuke administered to Jack Brimblecombe for his cowardice. 
It is said that, when the ship was on the rock, Fletcher began to 
talk about retribution for the execution of Doughty ; so, when 
all danger was past, Drake proceeded to hold judgment against 
the poor parson. " Sitting cross-legged on a chest, and a pair 
of pantoffles (slippers) in his hand," he ordered him to be chained 
by the leg to the deck, and then proceeded to excommunicate 
him and " denounce him to the devil and all his angels." He 
also " caused a posy to be written and bound about Fletcher's 
arm, with charge that if he took it off he should then be hanged." 
And the posy was : " Francis Fletcher, ye falsest knave that 
liveth." 

Drake at once became a popular hero. It was thought that 
his ship ought to be preserved as a national memorial, and one 
enthusiast suggested that it should be placed on the top of St. 
Paul's Cathedral in place of the spire which had recently fallen 
down. It was ultimately laid up in Deptford dockyard, and it 
became a recognized banqueting place. In a comedy called 
" Eastward-hoe," by Ben Jonson and others, one of the 
characters says, " We'll have our supper on board Sir Francis 
Drake's ship, that hath compassed the world." EHzabeth 
herself visited the ship on 4th April, 1581, banqueted on board, 
and knighted " the master thief of the unknown world." The 
ship at length fell into decay, and from its planks was made a 
chair, which was presented to the University of Oxford, and is 
now in the Bodleian Library. With some of the spoil obtained 
on this voyage — " the comfortable dew of Heaven " as he called 
it — Drake bought Buckland Abbey from Sir Richard Grenvile, 
and it is here that his drum is still preserved in a glass case 
— ^the drum that accompanied him in his famous voyage, and 
is alluded to in Henry Newbolt's stirring poem : — 

" Take my drum to England, hang et by the shore. 

Strike it when your powder's runnin' low ; 
If the Dons sight Devon, I'll quit the port o' Heaven, 

An' drum them up the Channel as we drummed them long ago." 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 97 

In 1570 Pope Pius V. caused his famous Bull of Excommunica- 
tion and Deposition of the Queen to be set up upon the gates of 
the Bishop of London's palace. Prior to this no Catholic had 
suffered in England for his rehgious opinions. But, as Camden 
says, " this fair weather turned by little and little into clouds 
and tempests, and caused a law in the year 1571 against those 
who should bring into the realm any such Bull, Agnus Dei's, or 
consecrated grains, as private tokens of papal obedience, or 
should reconcile any man to the Church of Rome. The first 
that was convicted by this law was one Cuthbert Maine, a priest, 
who being an obstinate maintainer of the Pope's power against 
his Prince, was put to death at Saint Stephen's Fane (commonly 
called Launston) in Cornwall ; and Trugion, a gentleman that 
had harboured him, was turned out of his estate, and condemned 
to perpetual imprisonment." Maine was hanged, drawn, and 
quartered in 1577, and it is interesting to note that one of the 
quarters of his body was sent to be set up at Barnstaple, " where 
he was born." He had been a student at the Catholic college 
at Douay, founded in 1568 by William Allen, a distinguished 
member of the University of Oxford, afterwards a Cardinal. 

It was largely through the efforts of Allen that a number of 
such colleges, known as seminaries, were organized for the 
purpose of training young men to be sent into England and 
Ireland to teach the Catholic religion, and at the same time stir 
up the people to rebellion against the Queen. To stop this 
influx, a proclamation was issued in 1580, requiring that who- 
soever had any children, wards, kinsmen, or other relations in 
the parts beyond the seas, should after ten days give in their 
names to the ordinary, and within four months call them home 
again. 

In the previous year Nicholas Sanders, another distinguished 
member of the University of Oxford, had been sent into Ireland 
as papal nuncio or legate to excite rebeUion, and now two 
other Oxford scholars — Robert Parsons and Edmund Campian 
— were sent into England as the heads of a Jesuit mission. 

This is what their contemporary, Camden, says about them : 
" This Parsons was of Somersetshire, a violent, fierce-natur'd 
man, and of a rough behaviour. Campian was a Londoner, of 
a sweet disposition, and a well-poUshed man. Both of them 
were by education Oxford men, whom I myself knew, being of 
their standing in the University. Campian, being of St. John's 
College, bare the office of Proctor of the University in the year 
1568, and being made deacon made a show of the Protestant 
rehgion till he withdrew himself out of England. Parsons was 
of Balliol College, wherein he openly professed the Protestant 

7 



98 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



religion, until he was for his loose carriage expelled with disgrace, 
and went over to the papists. These two coming privately into 
England travelled up and down through the country and to 
popish gentlemen's houses, covertly and in the disguised habits, 
diligently performing what they had in charge, both by word 
and writing. Parsons, who was constituted superior, being a 
man of a seditious and turbulent spirit, and armed with a con- 
fident boldness, tampered so far with the papists about deposing 
the Queen, that some of them thought to have delivered him 
into the magistrate's hands. Campian, though more modest, 
yet by a written paper challenged the ministers of the English 
Church to a disputation, and published a neat well-penn'd book 
in Latin called ' Ten Reasons ' in defence of the doctrine of 
the Church of Rome : and Parsons put out another virulent 
book in English against Chark, who had soberly written against 
Campian' s challenge." 

The success of the Jesuit mission was at first amazing ; but 
as soon as the Queen decided that the laws must be enforced, 
the Jesuits were tracked by Walsingham's spies, dragged from 
their hiding-places, and sent in batches to the Tower. Parsons 
fled across the Channel, but Campian was captured, taken to the 
Tower, and after having his limbs dislocated on the rack, was 
tried with others on the charge of treason, found guilty, and 
sentenced to death. They were lashed on hurdles, and dragged 
by horses along the road to Tyburn, the site of which is now 
marked by a triangle in the road near the Marble Arch. Campian 
was the first to be executed, praying in his last words for 
" Elizabeth, your Queen and mine, to whom I wish a long quiet 
reign and all prosperity." 

" Through the Catholic population of England," says Froude, 
" there rose one long cry of exulting admiration. An arm of 
Campian was stolen as a relic from the place where it had been 
hung. Parsons secured the halter, and died with it about his neck 
thirty years after at Valladolid. The Pope had the passion of 
the martyrs painted on the walls of the English College at Rome 
(of which Parsons himself became Rector in 1597), to ' stir the 
emulation of the rising students," 

And now let us see what was happening in the meantime in 
Ireland. Although the country was in a state of almost constant 
insurrection, there had hitherto been no religious persecution. 
" But," says Camden, " Thomas Stukeley, an Englishman, a 
ruffian, a riotous spendthrift, and a notable vapourer, (who 
having consumed his estate had fled into Ireland,) being dis- 
appointed of his hope of the stewardship of Wexford, after he 
had first vomited forth most undeserved disgraces against his 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 99 

Princess, to whom he was extraordinarily bounden, and being 
a man of small account, and therefore unable to raise commotions, 
slipped out of Ireland into Italy, to Pius Quintus, Bishop of 
Rome ; where incredible it is how great grace and favour he 
wrought himself by his flatteries with that old man, who breathed 
after the destruction of Queen EUzabeth, making great boasts 
and promises, that with 3000 Itahans he would drive the English 
out of Ireland, and fire the Enghsh fleet." His history is given 
in chaps, i. and v. of " Westward Ho ! " including an account of 
his death at the battle of Alcasar in 1578 : — 

" A fatal fight, where in one day was slain 
Three kings that were, and one that would be fain." 

The following year James Fitz-Morris with Sanders and his 
consecrated banner and a small Spanish force, arrived at Smer- 
wick in three ships ; " which ships Thomas Courtney, an English 
gentleman, who lay by chance at anchor in a road hard by, 
soon after set upon, took and carried away, and deprived the 
Spaniards of the benefit of the sea." Kingsley's account of 
this, and the murder of Henry Davils, follows Camden almost 
word for word, though Kingsley attributes the murder to the 
wrong brother, and gives Davils' native place as Marsland 
instead of Peter's Marland. 

The next yeax (1580) was signaHzed by the terrible tragedy 
of Smerwick, related in chap. ix. of " Westward Ho ! " About 
700 Itahans and Spaniards, under the command of San Josepho, 
an Itahan, had arrived at the same place as Fitz-Morris and 
Sanders the previous year, and had erected fortifications, which 
they named the Fort del Or. Kingsley's account is apparently 
taken from Camden, who makes excuses for the massacre, and 
says it was resolved upon " against the mind of the Lord Deputy, 
who shed tears thereat," and that " the Queen wished it had 
not been done, detesting from her heart such cruelty, though 
necessary, against persons who had yielded themselves ; and 
hardly did she allow of the reasons for the slaughter committed." 
However, we have Lord Grey's own account of it in a long letter 
he wrote to the Queen two days afterwards, and in this there are 
no signs of compunction or regret. The Queen, too, apparently 
regretted only that the officers had not shared the fate of the 
rank and file. She replied that she would have been better 
pleased if the choice of justice or mercy had been left to her, 
in which case " their treatment would have served for a terror 
to such as might hereafter be drawn to be the executioners of 
so wicked an enterprise, when they should hear that as well the 
heads as the inferiors had received punishment according to 



100 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

their demerits." Grey's description of the actual massacre is 
as follows : " Morning come, I presented my companies in battle 
before the fort, the colonel comes forth with ten or twelve of 
his chief gentlemen, traihng their ensigns rolled up, and presented 
them unto me with their lives and the fort. I sent straight 
certain gentlemen in, to see their weapons and armours laid 
down, and to guard the munition and victual there left for spoil. 
Then put I in certain bands, who straight fell to execution. 
There were 600 slain. Those that I gave life unto, I have 
bestowed upon the captains and gentlemen whose service hath 
well deserved. So hath it pleased the Lord of Hosts to deliver 
your enemies into your Highness' hands, and so too, as, one 
only excepted, not one of yours is else lost or hurt." 

It will be recollected that it is in connexion with this affair that 
Kingsley skilfully introduces a literary discussion between 
Ralegh and Spenser. Spenser had recently come across from 
England with the new Lord Deputy, to act as his private 
secretary, and he remained a resident in Ireland for the rest 
of his life. The " Shepherd's Calendar " had already been 
pubHshed, but it was in Ireland that he wrote not only " The 
Faerie Queene " and other poems, but also a prose account of 
" The Present State of Ireland." He had to lament that his 
master, the Lord Deputy, " regarded not the Hfe of the queen's 
subjects no more than dogs." 

The Earl of Desmond, " that infamous rebel and traitor to 
his country," as Camden calls him, having "scaped the hands of 
the victorious English for almost two years by lurking here and 
there in corners, was now by a common soldier found out in a 
httle cottage, though unknown to him, till having his arm 
almost cut off he discovered himself, and was slain by being run 
through the body in many places. His head was sent over into 
England, and set upon a pole upon London Bridge." " Nicholas 
Sanders, very near at the same instant of time, was miserably 
famished to death, when, forsaken of all, and troubled in mind 
for the bad success of the rebelHon, he wandered up and down 
amongst woods, forests, and mountains, and found no comfort 
or relief. In his pouch were found several speeches and letters 
made and written to confirm the rebels, stuffed with large 
promises from the Bishop of Rome and the Spaniard." And so 
ended for the time the Irish rebeUion. Both Spenser and Ralegh 
received grants from Desmond's confiscated estates. 

It is to Ralegh and his half-brother. Sir Humphrey Gilbert,, 
that the first efforts at English colonization are due. Gilbert, 
whom Kingsley calls " the philosopher of Compton Castle," was 
a singularly noble character. In 1576 he had published a 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 loi 



learned " Discourse of a Discovery for a new Passage to Cataia," 
ending with these words, " Give me leave without offence, 
always to live and die in his mind. That he is not worthy 
to live at all, that lor fear or danger of death, shunneth 
his country's service, and his own honour : seeing that death 
is inevitable, and the fame of virtue immortal." In 1578 he 
obtained a charter " to discover, find, search out, and view such 
remote, heathen and barbarous lands, countries and territories 
not actually possessed of any Christian prince or people, as to 
him shall seem good." His first voyage was a failure, and in 
1583 he started with five ships on his expedition to colonize 
Newfoundland, with the lamentable result so graphically 
described in the novel in the words of Hakluyt's contributor, 
Mr. Edward Haie. 

It was directly after this voyage that Amyas Leigh and his 
company are supposed to have started on their long expedition 
to South America. You will recollect how they got to La 
Guayra, how they fought the Spanish ships, how they landed 
at Higuerote, and, having burnt their ship, marched inland over 
the Caraccas mountains and wandered three years in search of 
the golden city of Manoa and the treasure of the Incas, how 
they took the gold train, and finally arrived at Carthagena in 
1586, just after Drake had sacked it. The stories of Manoa are 
taken by Kingsley from Ralegh's " Discovery of Guiana," 1595 
and the marvellous descriptions of South American scenery from 
Humboldt. 

Of Ralegh himself — the brilliant favourite, the soldier, the 
explorer, the daring sea-captain, the founder of plantations 
across the ocean, the poet, the historian, the ready and eloquent 
orator— it is difficult to know what to say. "He is among the 
most dazzling personalities in English history, and the most 
enigmatical." He was a man of the very highest intellectual 
gifts, but his moral nature was decidedly inferior to them. He 
was at any rate, as Camden says, " a man never sufficiently to 
be commended for the great pains he took to discover remote 
countries, and to advance the glory of English navigation." 
To him is generally attributed the introduction into England of 
potatoes and tobacco. The former, according to the narrator 
of Hawkins' Second Voyage, 1564, " be the most delicate rootes 
that may be eaten, and doe farre exceed our passeneps or carets." 
Hawkins is beheved to have brought home tobacco at the same 
time, but it was Ralegh who did most towards popularizing these 
new products. He grew both on his estates in Ireland, and his 
example soon made tobacco-smoking fashionable. His case of 
pipes is still preserved in the Wallace Collection. 



102 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

In 1583 he obtained a royal licence to hold any remote 
heathen and barbarous lands which he might discover within 
the next six years, so in 1584 he dispatched two vessels under 
Captains Amadas and Barlow to take possession of the region 
north of Florida. They landed on the isle of Wokoken, off the 
North Carolina coast, and proclaimed the Queen's sovereignty. 
In response to their inquiry for the name of the country, the 
natives replied " Wynganda coia," meaning " You wear good 
clothes," and the new possession was named accordingly, but 
on the return of the expedition to England, the Queen herself, 
it is said, gave it the name of Virginia. 

In 1585 a second expedition of seven ships sailed from 
Plymouth under the command of Sir Richard Grenvile. Ralph 
Lane, one of the Queen's equerries, was to be governor of the 
colony, and Captain Amadas his deputy. Thomas Cavendish, 
the future circumnavigator, Thomas Hariot, a famous mathe- 
matician. Sir John Arundell, and others were among the colonists. 
Hariot was commissioned to survey and report, and John White 
to make maps and drawings. The two Indians, Manteo and 
Wanchese, who had been brought to England with the first 
expedition, now returned. The first English colony in America 
was established at Wokoken with 107 settlers. On the return 
voyage Grenvile captured a richly laden Spanish ship by boarding 
her " with a boat made of boards of che'sts, which fell asunder 
and sunk at the ship's side as soon as ever he and his men were 
out of it." Grenvile's character, as portrayed by Kingsley, is 
hardly borne out by contemporary writers. Linschoten, the 
Dutchman, tells us that he was " of nature very severe, so that 
his own people hated him for his fierceness, and spake very 
hardly of him." Lane himself complained bitterly of the 
tyrannical conduct of Grenvile from first to last, of his intolerable 
pride, insatiable ambition, and proceedings towards them all 
and himself in particular, and desired "to be freed from the 
place where he was to carry any authority in chief." These 
disagreements did not augur well for the future success of the 
little colony, and it was perhaps one of the reasons that induced 
them to return to England the following year with Drake, who 
visited them at this critical period on his way home from the 
sack of the cities of St. Domingo, Carthagena, and St. Augustine 
in Florida. Only a fortnight after the colonists had been taken 
off, Grenvile arrived with three ships and a stock of provisions, 
and found the place deserted. Leaving fifteen men on the 
neighbouring island of Roanoke, he returned to England. It 
was probably on this occasion that he brought with him the 
Indian who was baptized in Bideford Church as " Ralegh." 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 103 

The following spring (1587) Ralegh sent a fourth expedition 
under the command of White. No trace was found of Grenvile's 
fifteen men, and Lane's fort had been razed to the ground. 
SuppHes failed, and White came home for more, leaving behind 
him eighty-nine men, seventeen women, and two children, 
including his own daughter, Eleanor Dare, and her infant, 
Virginia, the first English child born in America. He arrived 
in England at an inopportune moment, when an embargo had 
been laid on all shipping in expectation of the Spanish invasion. 
By Ralegh's influence, however, he obtained two vessels to 
carry supphes to Virginia, but instead of going on this service, 
they chased some Spanish ships, were defeated, and came back 
to England shattered. The poor colonists were left to their 
fate, and it was afterwards learnt that the whole of them had 
been murdered by the Indians. 

And now we come to the " last scene of all, that ends this 
strange eventful history " — the defeat of the Spanish Armada. 
EHzabeth's rival, Mary, Queen of Scots, was found guilty of 
complicity in Babington's conspiracy, in which Kingsley suggests 
that Eustace was implicated under the name of Ballard. Ehza- 
beth signed the death warrant with apparent reluctance, and 
flung it on the floor with other papers, but the Council took on 
themselves the responsibihty of executing it. The death of 
Mary had the effect of putting an end to the divisions of the 
English Catholics, and causing Philip to hasten his preparations 
for the conquest of both England and Holland. But before 
PhiHp advanced " with his leaden foot," Drake had set sail with 
thirty small barks, and, in the words of Kingsley, had " destroyed 
a hundred sail in Cadiz alone, taken three great galleons with 
immense wealth on board, burnt the small craft all along the 
shore, and offered battle to Santa Cruz at the mouth of the 
Tagus." This he playfully called " singeing the Spanish king's 
beard." 

By the next year, which " the German chronologers presaged 
would be the Climacterical Year of the World," a new Spanish 
navy had been built and furnished, " such a mighty navy as 
never the like had before that time sailed upon the Ocean sea," 
and Parma had gathered 30,000 men in Flanders, and collected 
a fleet of flat-bottomed transports at Dunkirk. The Pope 
Sixtus V. had issued another bull of excommunication against 
EHzabeth, and had created Allen a cardinal, with the See of 
Canterbury in prospect. Kingsley' s account of the great event 
is taken mainly from the translation in Hakluyt of the history 
by the Dutch writer. Van Meteran, and is on the whole fairly 
accurate. The English fleet was under the command of Lord 



104 ^^^ Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

Howard of Effingham on the Ark Royal, with Drake on the 
Revenge as Vice -Admiral, and Hawkins on the Victory as Rear- 
Admiral. Hawkins was Treasurer and Comptroller of the Navy, 
and had got the fleet into a state of great efficiency. " He it 
was," says Froude, " who turned out the ships in such a con- 
dition that not a hull leaked, not a spar was sprung, not a rope 
parted at an unseasonable moment, and this at a minimum of 
cost." Among the other commanders were Martin Frobisher, 
Lord Sheffield, Lord Thomas Howard, the Earl of Cumberland, 
Richard Hawkins, and John Davis. Howard's ship, the Ark 
Royal, was built for Ralegh, and bought from him for the Navy. 

Ralegh himself and his kinsman. Sir Richard Grenvile, were 
in charge of the land forces of the west, and took no part in the 
fight, though Ralegh's biographers assert that he went on board 
the fleet from Portland with other gentlemen volunteers. Both 
were, however, instrumental in sending the North Devon con- 
tingent of five ships, which, according to the diary of the Town 
Clerk of Barnstaple, " went over the bar to join Sr. F. D. at 
Plym°." These ships all formed part of the intended squadron 
for Virginia, and Kingsley's statement that they were furnished 
by the gentry and merchants of Bideford is without authority. 
The date, too, that he gives for the sailing of the little fleet from 
Bideford — 21st June — is incorrect, for we know from the Privy 
Council papers that this must have taken place some time 
between 30th March and 9th April, and that on 16th May the 
three largest were with Drake's squadron at Plymouth. Ralegh 
with difficulty obtained a release for the other two, which were 
only small pinnaces, on condition of their taking colonists and 
stores to Virginia, but they fell in with pirates near Madeira and 
failed to accomplish their purpose. The three large ships were 
the Galleon Dudley, the Virgin, God save her, and the Tiger, while 
a fourth, the John, " of Barnstaple," joined the fleet " after the 
coming of the Spanish forces upon our coast." The towns of 
Barnstaple and Torrington had been ordered to provide two 
ships and a pinnace, but they pleaded " extreme poverty," 
whereupon the Privy Council promptly caused the Seraphim, a. 
ship well manned and victualled for a voyage to Newfoundland, 
to be seized and made to serve at their expense. 

The headquarters of the main fleet was at Plymouth, which, 
as Kingsley says, was then only a small place, but, as I have 
said, there is no contemporary authority for the famous meeting 
on the Hoe, so graphically described in the novel and pictured 
by Seymour Lucas. 

The progress of the fight is well shown in a series of engravings 
from tapestry hangings which were specially made for Lord 



/^v 







THE ENGLISH FLEET OFF PLYMOUTH. 
DRAKE CAPTURES VALDEZ. 

F?o>H Pine's I£iii;7az<i7igs of (he Tapestries in the old house of Louis. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 105 



Howard and were afterwards placed in the House of Lords, but 
were unfortunately burnt in the fire in 1834. The first picture 
shows the Spanish fleet off Fowey, in crescent formation, before 
any engagement had taken place. The English ships had 
managed to get to the windward, and were preparing for the 
attack. In the first engagement the Spanish ship, St. Catharine, 
which Kingsley represents as Soto's, was so much torn and 
battered that she had to be taken into the midst of the fleet to 
be repaired. She was afterwards wrecked at a little creek, since 
known as " St. Catharine's Dub," to the north of Aberdeen, 
and not on Lundy Island. The second picture is particularly 
interesting to us because it shows the taking of the galleon of 
Don Pedro de Valdez by Drake, assisted by the Roebuck and the 
Galleon Dudley. You will recollect that she fell foul of another 
ship, and had her foremast and bowsprit broken. " Valdez for 
his honor's sake caused certain conditions to be propounded 
unto Drake ; who answered Valdez that he was not now at 
leisure to make any long parle. Upon which answer Valdez 
and his company understanding that they were fallen into the 
hands of fortunate Drake, with one consent yielded themselves, 
and found them very favourable unto them." Proceeding up 
the Channel, there were engagements off Portland and off the 
Isle of Wight, and at the end of a week the Spaniards " rode at 
anchor within sight of Calais, intending to hold on for Dunkirk, 
expecting there to join with the Duke of Parma, without which 
they were able to do little or nothing." But they were not 
allowed to remain there. By the Queen's order, it is said, " eight 
of the worst and basest ships were filled with gunpowder, pitch, 
brimstone, and with other combustible and fiery matter," and 
were sent with the wind and tide against the Spanish fleet, which 
" put the Spaniards into such a perplexity and horror," that 
they cut their cables and " betook themselves very confusedly 
unto the main sea." " They feared lest they were like unto 
those terrible ships, which Frederic Jenebelli three years before, 
at the siege of Antwerp, had furnished with gunpowder, stones, 
and dreadful engines, for the dissolution of the Duke of Parma 
his bridge, built upon the river of Scheldt," when the bridge 
was shattered and a thousand Spaniards were blown into the air. 
Then came the final fight at GraveHnes, and the flight of the 
Spaniards to the North Sea. The Enghsh commanders resolved 
to follow and pursue them to the Firth of Forth, " with further 
protestation that, if our wants of victuals and munition were 
supplied, we would pursue them to the furthest that they durst 
have gone." But further pursuit was needless. The storms 
finished the work. The coasts of Scotland and Ireland were 



io6 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

dotted with wrecks, and only a small remnant of the mighty 
fleet returned to Spain. 

Great were the rejoicings throughout the land. " Queen 
Elizabeth commanded public prayers and thanksgiving to be 
used throughout all the Churches of England : and she herself, 
as it were going in triumph, went with a very gallant train of 
noblemen through the streets of London, which were all hung 
with blue cloth, being carried in a chariot drawn with two 
horses to Paul's Church (where the banners taken from the 
enemy were hung up to be seen), and gave most hearty thanks 
to God, and heard a sermon, wherein the glory was given to 
God alone." Numerous medals were struck, both in England 
and Holland, commemorating the event. 

" Thus," in Hakluyt's words, " the magnificent, huge, and 
mighty fleet of the Spaniards (which themselves termed in all 
places invincible) vanished into smoke, to the great confusion 
and discouragement of the authors thereof." 



The Sea Kings of Devon. 

Grenvile's last words .- " Here die I, Richard Grenvile, with a joyful 
and quiet mind, for that I have ended my Hfe as a true soldier ought to do, 
that hath fought for his country, Queen, religion, and honour, whereby 
my soul most joyful departeth out of this body, and shall always leave 
behind it an everlasting fame of a valiant and true soldier, that hath done 
his duty, as he was bound to do." 

Ralegh's last words .- "It matters little how the head lies, provided 
the heart is right. What dost thou fear ? Strike, man ! " 

Gilbert's last words ; " We are as near to heaven by sea as by land.'* 

Drake's character : A religious man towards God and his houses, chaste 
in his life, just in his dealings, true of his word, and merciful to those that 
were under him, hating nothing so much as idleness (Fuller). 

Hawkins' character : A very wise, vigilant, and true-hearted man (Stow). 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 107 

The iMythical History of Devon. 

I.— THE LEGEND OF BRUTUS THE TROJAN. 

Although there are two versions of this legend in Nennius' 
History of the Britons, written at the end of the eighth century, the 
first detailed account, which connects it more particularly with 
Devon, occurs in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings 
of Britain, dating from the middle of the twelfth century. This 
work was denounced by Geoffrey's contemporaries as impudent 
lies, but it met with a great success, and for a long time was 
accepted as true history. Geoffrey represents Brutus as the 
son of Sylvius and the grandson of ^Eneas. At the age of fifteen 
he killed his father accidentally while hunting, was expelled from 
Italy, and settled in Greece. Here the scattered Trojans placed 
themselves under his command, and, led by him, defeated the 
Greeks. In accordance with the terms of peace, the Greeks 
provided a fleet laden with all kinds of provisions, and the Tiojans 
sailed away from Greece to seek their fortune. An oracle ot 
Diana foretold their future success as follows : — 

" Brutus ! there lies beyond the GalUc bounds 
An island which the western sea surrounds, 
By giants once possessed ; now few remain 
To bar thy entrance, or obstruct thy reign. 
To reach that happy shore thy sails employ ; 
There fate decrees to raise a second Troy, 
And found an empire in thy royal line, 
Which time shall ne'er destroy, nor bounds confine." 

Voyaging amidst perils, they found on the shores of the 
Tyrrhenian Sea four nations of Trojan descent under the rule 
of Corineus, " a modest man in matters of council, and of great 
courage and boldness, who, in an encounter with any person, 
even of gigantic stature, would immediately overthrow him, 
as if he were a child." Uniting their forces, the Trojans sailed 
to the Loire, where they defeated the Gauls and ravaged 
Aquitaine with fire and sword. Corineus " lost his sword, but, 
by good fortune, met with a battle-axe, with which he clave 
down to the waist every one that stood in his way." 

Brutus then " repaired to the fleet, and loading it with the 
riches and spoils he had taken, set sail with a fair wind towards 
the promised island, and arrived on the coast of Totness." 

" The island was then called Albion, and was inhabited by 
none but a few giants. Notwithstanding this, the pleasant 
situation of the places, the plenty of rivers abounding with fish 



io8 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

and the engaging prospect of its woods, made Brutus and his 
company very desirous to fix their habitation in it. They 
.therefore passed through all the provinces, forced the giants to 
fly into the caves of the mountains, and divided the country 
among them. Brutus called the island after his own name 
Britain, and his companions Britons ; but Corineus, in imitation 
of his leader, called that part of the island which fell to his share, 
Corinea, i.e., Cornwall, and his people Corineans, after his name. 
He preferred this country to the other provinces, for it was a 
diversion to him to encounter the said giants, which were in 
greater numbers there than in all the other provinces that fell to 
the share of his companions. Among the rest was one detestable 
monster, named Goemagot, in stature twelve cubits, and of such 
prodigious strength that he pulled up an oak as if it had been a 
hazel wand. In a certain day, when Brutus was holding a 
solemn festival to the gods, in the port where they at first landed, 
this giant with twenty more of his companions came in upon the 
Britons, among whom he made a dreadful slaughter. But the 
Britons at last assembhng together in a body, put them to the 
rout, and killed them every one but Goemagot. Brutus had 
given orders to have him preserved ahve, out of a desire to see 
a combat between him and Corineus, who took a great pleasure 
in such encounters. Corineus, overjoyed at this, prepared 
himself, and throwing aside his arms, challenged him to wrestle 
with him. At the beginning of the encounter, Corineus and the 
giant, standing, front to front, held each other strongly in their 
arms, and panted aloud for breath ; but Goemagot presently 
grasping Corineus with all his might, broke three of his ribs, 
two on his right side and one on his left. At which Corineus, 
highly enraged, roused up his whole strength, and snatching him 
upon his shoulders, ran with him, as fast as the weight would 
allow him, to the next shore, and there getting upon the top of a 
high rock, hurled down the savage monster into the sea ; where 
falling on the sides of the craggy rocks, he was torn to pieces, 
and coloured the waves with his blood. The place where he fell, 
taking its name from the giant's fall, is called Lam Goemagot, 
that is, Goemagot's Leap, to this day." 

Thus far Geoffrey, but our local chroniclers add some interesting 
particulars. Prince, in his Worthies of Devon (1701), tells us that 
" there is yet remaining towards the lower end of the town of 
Totnes, a certain rock called Brute's stone, which tradition 
here more pleasantly than positively says is that on which Brute 
first set his foot when he came ashore. The good people of 
Totnes, so it is said, have had it handed down to them by their 
fathers from a time beyond the memory of man that Brutus, when 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 109 

he sailed up the Dart, which must consequently have been a river 
of notable pretensions, stepped ashore upon this stone, and 
exclaimed, with regal facility of evil rhyme- 
Here I stand, and here I rest, 
And this place shall be called Totnes ! " 

Risdon, writing about 1630, says " he called this place ToiU 
aV esse, which interpreted in our vulgar tongue (as some will have 
it) is all at ease ; and in tract of time, without any great alteration, 
hath been changed into Toutaness, now contracted Totnes. 
This conjecture would I embrace, could I believe Brute spake 
as good French, or that the French tongue was then spoken at all ; 
therefore I am the more easily persuaded to lean to the other 
opinion, that would have it called Dodonesse, which signifieth 
the rocky town, according to the learned antiquary Leland ; for 
its situation hath the ascent of an hill both stony and rocky 
dechning to the river." Mr. R. N. Worth's derivation of the 
name from Dod-ynys, " the projecting island," in which he has 
been followed by the Rev. S. Baring-Gould, is equally fanciful, 
though in the early French romances, as well as in Geoffrey of 
Monmouth's History, the name is applied to a country or district 
rather than a town. 

" Goemagot's Leap " has been identified with Plymouth Hoe, 
which, to sustain this identification, must be considered " on 
the coast of Totnes," for Geoffrey says the wrestling took place 
" in the port where they at first landed," and, in support of it, 
Westcote, in his View of Devonshire in 1630, says : "In the side 
thereof is cut the portraiture of two men of the largest volume, 
yet the one surpassing the other every way ; each having a club 
in his hand : these they name to be Corineus and Gogmagog : 
intimating the wrestling to be here between these two champions : 
and the steep rocky chff affording fit aptitude for such a cast. 
These pictures are here continually renewed by the townsmen, 
as I am informed." And there they remained until the Citadel 
was built in 1671. 

A quaint and spirited description of the great wrestling match 
between Corineus and Gcemagot is given by the poet, Michael 
Drayton, in his " Poly-Olbion," which was finished in 1622. 
The following is an extract, with the spelHng modernized : — 

Then, foraging this Isle, long promised them before, 
Amongst the ragged cliffs those monstrous giants sought : 
Who (of their dreadful kind) t' appal the Trojans, brought 
Great Gogmagog, an oak that by the roots could tear : 
So mighty were (that time) the men who lived there : 
But, for the use of arms he did not understand 
(Except some rock or tree, that coming next to hand 



no The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



He raz'd out of the earth to execute his rage),. 

He challenge makes for strength, and offereth there his gage, 

Which Corin taketh up, to answer by and by, 

Upon this son of Earth his utmost power to try. 

All doubtful to which part the victory would go, 

Upon that lofty place at Plymouth, call'd the Hoe, 

Those mighty wrastlers met ; with many an ireful look 

Who threatened, as the one hold of the other took : 

But, grappled, glowing fire shines in their sparkling eyes. 

And, whilst at length of arm one from the other lies. 

Their lusty sinews swell like cables, as they strive : 

Their feet such trampling make, as though they forced to drive 

A thunder out of earth ; which stagger'd with the weight : 

Thus, cither's utmost force urg'd to the greatest height. 

Whilst one upon his hip the other seeks to lift, 

And th' adverse (by a turn) doth from his cunning shift, 

Their short-fetch'd troubled breath a hollow noise doth make. 

Like bellows of a forge. Then Corin up doth take 

The giant twixt the grains ; and voiding of his hold 

(Before his cumbrous feet he well recover could) 

Pitch'd headlong from the hill ; as when a man doth throw 

An axtree, that with sleight delivered from the toe, 

Roots up the yielding earth : so that his violent fall 

Struck Neptune with such strength, as shoulder'd him withall ; 

That where the monstrous waves like mountains late did stand, 

They leap'd out of the place, and left the bared sand 

To gaze upon wide heaven : so great a blow it gave. 

For which, the conquering Brute, on Corineus brave 

This horn of land bestow'd, and marked it with his name ; 

Of Corin, Cornwall call'd, to his immortal fame. 

Edmund Spenser, too, had referred to this mighty contest 
in his " Faerie Queene " (1589), and had introduced another 
hero, called Debon, and another giant, called CouHn, in order 
to account for the origin of Devonshire, as well as Cornwall : — 

Well can witness yet unto this day 

The western Hoe, besprinkled with the gore 
Of mighty Goemot, whom in stout fray 

Corineus conquered, and cruelly did slay. 
And eke that ample pit, yet far renowned 

For the large leap which Debon did compel 
Coulin to make, being eight lugs of ground, 

Into the which returning back he fell. 

******** 

In meed of these great conquests by them got, 
Corineus had that province utmost west. 
And Debon's share was that is Devonshire. 

After he had thus conquered the western part of the island, 
Brutus fulfilled the prediction of the oracle by building a 
city, which he called New Troy, which became corrupted into 
Trinovantum ; afterwards King Lud renamed it after himself, 
Kaer-Lud, i.e., the city of Lud, and it is now called London. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 11 1 

Brutus left three sons, Locrin, Albanact, and Kamber, of whom 
the eldest married Corineus's daughter, Gwendolen, by whom 
he had a son, named Maddan ; but he also fell in love with a 
beautiful virgin, named Estrildis, by whom he had a daughter 
named Sabrina. When Corineus was dead, Locrin divorced 
Gwendolen, and advanced Estrildis to be queen. Gwendolen, 
provoked beyond measure at this, retired into Cornwall, where 
she assembled together all the forces of that kingdom, and began 
to raise disturbances against Locrin. At last both armies joined 
battle near the river Sture, where Locrin was killed by the 
shot of an arrow. After his death, Gwendolen took upon her 
the government of the whole kingdom, retaining her father's 
furious spirit. For she commanded Estrildis and her daughter 
Sabrina to be thrown into the river now called the Severn, and 
published an edict throughout all Britain, that the river should 
bear the damsel's name, hoping by this to perpetuate her memory, 
and by that the infamy of her husband. Gwendolen reigned 
fifteen years after the death of Locrin, and then advanced her 
son Maddan to the throne, contenting herself with the county 
of Cornwall for the remainder of her life. 

It is unnecessary to follow step by step the Hne of kings from 
Brutus to Arthur, but it is interesting to note that King Lear's 
second daughter, Regan, married Henninus, Duke of Cornwall, 
and their son, Cunedagius, eventually succeeded to the whole 
kingdom. Later on, a long civil war oppressed the people, 
until " at length arose a j^outh of great spirit, named Dunwallo 
Molmutius, who was the son of Cloten, King of Cornwall, and 
excelled all the Kings of Britain in valour and gracefulness of 
person. This prince established what the Britons call the 
Molmutine laws, which are famous among the Enghsh to this 
day." His son, Belinus, " summoned all the workmen of the 
island together, and commanded them to pave a causeway of 
stone and mortar, which should run the whole length of the 
island, from the sea of Cornwall to the shores of Caithness." 
And so the Hne continued until the invasion of the island by 
Julius Caesar, at which time Tenuantius, a younger son of King 
Lud, and a nephew of Cassibellaun, is represented as Duke of 
Cornwall. He succeeded Cassibellaun as King of Britain, and 
was in turn succeeded by KymbeHnus, Shakespeare's Cymbeline, 
in whose days Jesus Christ was born. 



112 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



Recent Devonian Literature.* 

(Compiled by H. Tapley-Soper, City Librarian, Exeter.) 

Arber, E. A. Newell. " Coast Scenery of North Devon." 1911. 

(Dent & Sons, 10/6.) 
Bickley, Francis. "Where Dorset Meets Devon." (Constable 

& Co., 7/6 net.) 
Cave, John. " Queen of the Fiord and other Poems." 1910. 

(Kegan Paul, 5/-.) 
Chick, Elijah. " Castle of Exeter." (Flying Post Office, Exeter.) 
Crosslegh, C. " Bradninch : being a Short Historical Sketch." 

1911. (A. Moring, 7/6.) 
Crossing, W. "Folk Rhymes of Devon." 1911. (J. G. 

Commin, 4/6 net.) 
Drake, Lady Eliott. " Family and Heirs of Sir Francis Drake." 

2 vols. 1911. (Smith, Elder, 31/6.) 
Dymond, C. W. " Memoir, Letters, and Poems of Jonathan 

Dymond." 1911. (The Author.) 
Findlater, M. " Blind Birds' Nest." (Collins, 7d.) 
Garvice, Charles. " A Farm in Creamland." 19n. (Hodder 

and Stoughton, 7/6.) 
Hancock, F. " Wif lea's Combe : a History of the Parish of 

Wivehscombe." (Barnicott & Pearce, 10/6.) 
Harper, Sydney. " History of Barnstaple for Boys and Girls, 

Past and Present." (Sydnev Harper & Sons, Barnstaple and 

Bideford, 2/-.) 
Hooker, John [John Vowell]. " Account of the Sieges of Exeter, 

the Foundation of the Cathedral Church, and the Disputes 

between the Cathedral and City Authorities." Transcribed 

by W. J. Harte. 1911. (J. G. Commin, 10/6.) 
Houghton, C. A. " Problems of Life." 1911. (Macmillan, 

3/- net.) 
Hutchinson, Horace G. " When Life was New." (Smith, Elder, 

6/- net.) 
James, Dorothea. Belstone : Some Account of the Parish, Past 

and Present. 1911. (Warren, Winchester, 1/6 net.) 
Koch, E. H. A. " Leaves from the Diary of a Literary Amateur : 

John Hermann Merivale." 1911. (Priory Press, 2/6.) 
Ley, J. W. " From Youth Upwards." {Mid-Devon and Newton 

Times Office, Newton Abbot, 3/6.) 



* Publishers are invited to send to the compiler of this list copies of 
new books for notice in future issues of the Year Book. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 11^ 

Masefield, J. " Jim Davis." (Wells, Gardner, 6/-.) 

Morris, T. D. " Grouped and Annotated Subject Index to St. 

Paul's Epistles." (The Author, 5/- net.) 
Northcote, Lady RosaHnd. "Book of Herbs." 1903. (Lane, 

2/6.) 
Pearce, C. E. " Amazing Duchess : being the Romantic History 

of Ehzabeth Chudleigh." 2 vols. (Stanley Paul, 24/-.) 
Phillpotts, Eden. " Beacon." (Fisher Unwin, 6/-.) 
Phillpotts, Eden. " Demeter's Daughter." (Methuen, 6/-.) 
Prideaux, E. K. " Branscombe Church Architecturally Con- 
sidered." 19n. (J. G. Commin, 1/6.) 
Reynolds, S., and Bob and Tom Wooley. " Seems so ! A 

Working-class View of Politics." 19n. (Macmillan & Co., 

5/- net.) 
Russell, G. H. " Ivor : a Romance of N. Devon." (Murray, 

6/-.) 
Russell, G. W. E. " Harry Drew : a Memorial Sketch." 

(Oxford University Press, 2/6 net.) 
Seymour, A. " Express, The : containing the Life and Writings 

of Joanna Southcott." 2 vols. 1909. (Simpkin, Marshall, 

9/- net.) 
Shorto, A. M. "Story of Exeter." 2nd ed. 1911. (J. G. 

Commin, 3/6.) 
Snell, F. J. " North Devon." 1906. (A. & C. Black, 6/-.) 
Stabb, J. "Some Old Devon Churches." Vol. 2, 191 L 

(Simpkin, Marshall, 7/6.) 
Torr, C. " Wreyland Documents." 1911. (The Author.) 
Trevena, J. " Keeper of the Saints." (Alston Rivers, 6/-.) 
Tylee, E. S. " Witch Ladder." 1911. (Duckworth, 6/-.) 
Valhngs, H. " Enter Charmian." (Smith, Elder, 6/-.) 
Wells, L. S. A. " Choice of the Jews." (Methuen, 2/- net.) 
Wiggin, K. D:, J. & M. Findlater, and A. Allan. " Robinetta." 

(Gay & Hancock, 6/-.) . 

ERRATA. 
P. 121 of the lyii edition of The Devonian Year Book: the "Affair 
at the Inn "• was written by " Four American Ladies," not by Mr. Eden 
Phillpotts as stated. "Tales of the Tenements," attributed to' Mr. J. 
Trevena (p. 122), should have been included in Mr. Phillpotts' list. 

PERIODICALS, Etc. 

PubHcations of the Devon and Cornwall Record Society. 
Works now in progress : — 
Feet of Fines for Devon and Cornwall. Hooker's " History 
of Exeter." 

8 



114 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

Registers of Births, Marriages, and Deaths of the Parishes of 

St. Paul's, Exeter ; Branscombe ; Falmouth ; and Ottery St. 

Mary. (Annual Subscription, one guinea. H. Tapley-Soper, 

Hon. Secretary, Exeter.) 
" Transactions of the Devonshire Association." (Annual 

Subscription, 10/6.) 
" Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries " (Quarterly). (Annual 

Subscription, 6/6. J. G. Commin, Exeter.) 
" Transactions of the Plymouth Institution and Natural History 

Society." (Annual Subscription, one guinea.) 

The following Colleges and Schools publish Magazines at irregular 

intervals : — 
Exeter : The University College ; Exeter School ; High School ; 

Hele's School ; Central School ; Mint School. 
Dartmouth : The Royal Naval College. 
Honiton : All Hallows School. 
Newton Abbot: Newton College. 
Plymouth : Plyinouth and Mannamead College. 
Tavistock : Kelly College. 
Tiverton : Blundell's School. 
West Buckland : Devon County School. 



On Plymouth Hoe. 

Drake nor devil nor Spaniard feared, 

Their cities he put to the sack ; 
He singed his Cathohc Majesty's beard, 

And harried his ships to wrack. 
He was playing at Plymouth a rubber of bowls 

When the Great Armada came ; 
But he said, " They must wait their turn, good souls, 

And he stooped, and finished the game. 

Henry Newbolt. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 115 

Affiliated Societies . 

(For 191 2 Fixtures, see p. 131). 



BARUMITES IN LONDON. 
Founded 1893. 
President : Dr. Mark Jackson. 
Hon. Secretary : F. Gabriel, Roborough, Park Avenue South, Crouch 

End, N. 
Qualification : Connection with Barnstaple or its neighbourhood. Limited 

to men. 
Meetings : Annual dinner in London. 



DEVON COUNTY SCHOOL OLD BOYS' ASSOCIATION. 
(London Branch.) 
Founded 1899. 

President : T. R. Potbury, Esq., M.A. 

Vice-Presidents : H. H. Hilton, Esq.; P. E. Wells, Esq. 

Chairman : Prof. T. A. Hearson, M.Inst.C.E., M.I.N. A., F.C.I.P.A. 

Hon. Secretary : W. V. M. Popham, 23, Moorgate Street, E.C. 

Objects : To keep Old Boys in touch with the School and with each other, 

to promote gatherings among Old Boys for pleasure and sport, and 

to further the interests of the School generally. 
Qualification : Education at the Devon County School. 
Subscription : Life membership, half a guinea. 
Meetings : Annual dinner in London, and other social gatherings during 

the winter months. 
The School Magazine (2s. per annum) is issued each term, containing 
news of Old Boys all over the world. 

THE EXETER CLUB. 

(London and District Branch.) 

Founded 1880. 

President : J. C. Copplestone, Esq. 

Vice-President : G. W. Cocks, Esq. 

Hon. Treasurer : N. Cole. 

Hon. Secretary : H. D. Powe, 13, Ellerby Street, Fulham, S.W. 

Assistant Secretary : H. P. Kelly. 

Objects : To promote friendly and social intercourse, to maintain thfe 
status of the Exeter Training College for schoolmasters, and to give 
opportunities for inter-communication for mutual assistance. 

■Qualification : Training at St. Luke's College, Exeter. 

Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Monthly, in addition to annual dinner and Bohemian concert. 
In connection with this Club are the Old Exonians' Cricket Club, 
with the same Hon. Secretary, and the Exonian Lodge, No. 3415, the 
Hon. Secretary of which is C. W. Wreford, 42, Dyne Road, Kilburn, 
N.W. 



ii6 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



THE LONDON DEVONIAN RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB. 
Founded 1899. 
President : The Right Hon. Earl Fortescue. 
Chairman : J. P. Squire. 
Captain 1st XV. : A. L. Tooze. 
Vice-Captain ist XV. : L. W. Hutchings. 
Captain A XV. : S. E. Lidstone. 
Vice-Captain A XV. : C. J. Holdsworth. 
Hon. Treasurer : C. T. Ley. 

Hon. Secretary : F. W. Winter, 7, Kenwyn Road, Clapham, S.W. 
Objects : Sport and recreation. 
Qualification : Birth in Devon or of Devonian parentage on either side> 

or residence in Devon. 
Subscription : Playing members 12s. Od. ; hon. members 5s., admitting 

to all home matches. 
Meetings : General meetings in April and September, committee meetings 

every Monday evening during the football season, football matches 

every Saturday, and suppers occasionally. 
Head Quarters : The George Hotel, Strand, W.C. 
Ground : Dulwich Common. 

Dressing Accommodation : Grove Hotel, Lordship Lane, S.E. 
Colours : Green and white. 



THE OLD EXONIAN CLUB. 
(London Section.) 
Founded 1904. 
President : Mr. Justice Bucknill. 
Vice-President : J. H. Fisher, Esq., F.R.C.S. 
Hon. Secretary : A. Goff, 2, Royal Exchange Avenue, E.C. 
Objects : To renew acquaintance between Old Exonians living in London,, 

and to arrange dinners and other entertainments. 
Qualification : Education at the Exeter School. 
Subscription : 3s. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner in London, and other gatherings from time to- 
time. 
The School Magazine (free to members) is issued each term. 



THE OLD OTTREGIANS' SOCIETY. 

(" Ottregians in London "). 

Founded 1898. 

President : The Right Hon. The Lord Coleridge. 

Vice-Presidents : The Right Hon. Sir John H. Kennaway, Bart., C.B. ;. 

The Hon. Stephen Coleridge ; The Hon. Gilbert Coleridge ; 

The Hon. Geoffrey Duke Coleridge. 
Chairman : William Sheppard Huxtable. 
Vice-Chairman : Arthur William Godfrey. 
Assistant Secretary : W. H. Lang. 
Hon. Secretary and Treasurer : Sidney H. Godfrey, " Homeville," Mertoni 

Avenue, Chiswick, W. 
Objects : To renew old acquaintance, to strengthen the bond of friendship, 

to give advice and assistance to friendless Ottregians, to discuss home 

topics, and to pubhsh home news. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 117 

Qualification : Natives of the postal district of Ottery St. Mary, and persons 
who have hved for any length of time in the town. 

Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum ; ladies, is. 6d. 

Meetings : Once in eight weeks at the Ottregian Room, 11, Bridge Street, 
Westminster, and once a year at Kew Gardens, an annual concert at 
St. Clement Danes Parish Hall, and a special train on Whit-Mondays 
to Ottery St. Mary. 
A Benevolent Fund. 

A quarterly journal (free to members), containing news of Ottery 
St. Mary, and of Ottery people all over the world. 



THE TIVERTONIAN ASSOCIATION. 
Founded 1909. 

President : Hon. W. Lionel C. Walrond, M.P. 

Vice-Presidents : Sir George Kekewich, K.C.B., Sir Robert Newman, 
Bart., D.L., J. P., Colonel E. T. Clifford, V.D., Ian M. Heathcoat 
Amory, Esq., J. P., Rev. W. P. Besley, M.A., Rev. S. J. Childs- 
Clarke, M.A., G. E. Cockram, Esq., John Coles, Esq., J. P., J. A. 
Eccles, Esq., Thos. Ford, Esq., J. P., E. V. Huxtable, Esq., The 
Mayor of Tiverton (W. Thorne, Esq.), R. Morgan, Esq., H. 
Mudford, Esq., J. P., A. R. Parkhouse, Esq., G. H. Radford, 
Esq., M.P., Allan Ramsay, Esq., Rev. O. R. M. Roxby, Granville 
Smith, Esq., E. J. Snell, Esq., Harold Travers, Esq., F. G. 
Wright, Esq. 

Chairman : S. Burnett. 

Vice -Chairman : S. Finch. 

Hon. M.C. : F. W. Hesse. 

Hon. Treasurer : J. L. Wright. 

Hon. Secretary : W. Passmore, ioi, Elspeth Road, Clapham Common, 
S.W. 

Assist. Secretary : E. T. Clarke. 

Objects : To promote friendly intercourse amongst Tivertonians, to assist 
those in need, and to advise and influence young men starting on a 
commercial or professional career. 

Qualification : Persons connected with the Tiverton Parliamentary 
Division by birth, descent, marriage, or former residence. 

Subscription .* Ordinary members (ladies or gentlemen), 2S. per annum; 
hon. members^gentlemen, los., ladies, 5s, 

Meetings : Concerts, whist drives, dances, and annual dinner during the 
winter months. 
The Association has been affiUated to St. Bride's Institute. 



ii8 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



Other Devonian Societies. 



BIRMINGHAM AND MIDLAND DEVONIAN SOCIETY. 
Founded 1891. 

President : T. W. Hussey, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : The Right Hon. Jesse Collings, M.P., J. Winsor 
Bond, Esq., Alderman Bowden, J. Nelson Bond, Esq., J. Bapham 
Carslake, Esq., A. J. Collings, Esq., T. F. Culley, Esq., H. Eales, 
Esq., M.R.C.S., H. Frost, Esq., F. Huxham, Esq., Dr. A. Douglas 
Heath, Lieut.-Colonel Halse, J. P., H. J. Ley, Esq., M.R.C.S., 
R. C. MoRCOM, Esq., R. A. Pinsent, Esq., J. D. Prior, Esq., C. 
Parkhouse, Esq., F. C. Rowe, Esq., A. G. Spear, E.sq., W. Voysey, 
Esq. 

Hon. Auditor : Thaddeus Ryder, F.C.A. 

Hon. Treasurer : C. Parkhouse. 

Hon. Secretary : G. W. Hussey, 20, Earlsbury Gardens, Birchfield. 

Objects : To maintain interest in the County, and to promote social inter- 
course among Devonians in Birmingham. 

Qualification : Natives of Devon, or connected with the County by marriage. 

Subscription : Gentlemen, 5s., ladies, 2s. 6d. 

Meetings : Social gatherings during the winter months, annual meeting and 
dinner in January. 



SOCIETY OF DEVONIANS IN BRISTOL. 
Founded 1891. 

President : W, Pitchford, Esq. 

Hon. Treasurer : A. Dodge. 

Hon. Secretary : F. E. R. Davey, 13, Cranbrook Road, Redland, Bristol. 

Objects : To promote friendly intercourse amongst Devonians in Bristol 
by social gatherings, and to assist benevolent or charitable objects, 
with a special regard to those in which Devonians are interested. 

Qualification : Natives and others connected with Devon. 

Subscription : 5s. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner, and concerts, etc., from time to time. 

The Society possesses a Presidential Badge, each past President con- 
tributing a Hnk for a chain. 



DEVONIAN SOCIETY IN CALCUTTA. 
Founded 1901. 
President : W. H. Sparkes, Esq. 
Vice-Presidents : J. Cattle, Esq., Dr. Pearse. 

Hon. Secretary and Treasurer : R. E. Josland, 3, Mangoe Lane, Calcutta. 
Objects : To promote a common County bond of friendship, and to render 

aid to Devonians in India. 
Qualifications : Birth or long residence. 
Subscription : £1 per annum. 
Meetings : Monthly. 



Jhe Devonian Year Book, 1912 iig 



CARDIFF DEVONSHIRE SOCIETY. 
Founded 1906. 
President : Wm. Anning, Esq., J. P. 
Vice-Presidents : Hon. Stephen Coleridge, Sir Harry T. Eve, General 

Kekewich, George Lambert, Esq., M.P., Sir Robert Newman, 

Bart., Jas. Radley, Esq., W. J. Tatem, Esq. 
Chairman : Sir Wm. Crossman. 
Hon. Treasurer : A. Akenhead. 

Hon. Secretary : W. A. Beer, Charles Street, Cardiff. 
Objects : To bring Devonians in Cardiff more closely together, to foster the 

traditions of the County, and to raise a fund to afford temporary relief 

to necessitous and deserving Devonians. 
Qualification : Birth or descent. 
Subscription : 5s. per annum. 
Meetings : Annual dinner. 

WEST COUNTRY ASSOCIATION, EASTBOURNE. 
Founded 1905. 

President : C. Davies-Gilbert, Esq., D.L. 

Vice-Presidents : J. Adams, Esq., M.D., W. Davies, Esq., S. N. Fox, 
Esq., J. P., A. L. Franklin, Esq., C. Godfrey, Esq., H. Habgood, 
Esq., M.D., Major Harris, Rev. E. G. Hawkins, C. W. Mayo, Esq., 
J. Routly, Esq., L. C. Wintle, Esq., W. G. Willoughby, Esq., M.D 

Chairman : Rev. E. G. Hawkins. 

Hon. Treasurer : C. W. Mayo. 

Joint Hon. Secretaries : W. Percy Glanfield and E. Akery, Albemarle 
Hotel, Eastbourne. 

Objects : The promotion of friendly intercourse and good fellowship by 
holding meetings, social gatherings, etc. 

Qualification : Birth or parentage. 

Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Concerts, games, tournaments, dinner, etc. 

Head Quarters : Albemarle Hotel, Eastbourne. 

DEVONIANS IN LIVERPOOL AND DISTRICT. 

Founded 1895. 

President : Judge J. F. Collier, J. P. 

Vice-Presidents : H. Cuming, Esq., G. R. Searle, Esq., H. Smith, Esq., 
Professor H. A. Strong, M.A., LL.D., J. R. Watkins, Esq. 

Hon. Treasurer : J. Furze. 

Hon. Secretaries : Messrs. Roberts and Smith, 14, Elliot Street, Liver- 
pool. 

Object : Social intercourse. 

Qualifications : Birth, parentage on either side, residence, or marriage. 

Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner and picnic, social gatherings, whist drives 
dances, children's parties, etc. 

DEVONIAN SOCIETY, MANCHESTER AND DISTRICT. 

President : H. M. Gibson, Esq. 
Chairman : R. G. Evans. 

Hon. Secretary and Treasurer : J. E. R. Holman, Beech Lawn, Whalley 
Range, Manchester. 



120 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



Object : To promote social intercourse among Devonians. 
Qualification : Birth, parentage, or marriage. 
Subscription.: 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : Whist drives, and an annual dinner. 



MANITOBA DEVONIAN SOCIETY. 

Founded 1907. 

President : A. Kingdom, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : H. Godfree, Esq., H. Wheeler, Esq, 

Chairman : James Hooper. 

Vice-Chairman : A. Burridge. 

Hon. Treasurer and Secretary : A. J. Bartlett, 472, Elgin Avenue 

Winnipeg. 
Qualification : Devonian by birth. 
Subscription : 2 dollars per annum. 
Meetings : Monthly, in Shakespeare Hall. 



DEVON AND CORNWALL SOCIETY. 

(Newport, Mon., and District). 

Founded 1889. 

President and Chairman : H. Hammer, Esq. 

Hon. Treasurer : A. C. Mitchell. 

Financial Hon. Secretary : C. H. Adams. 

Hon. Secretary : J. Cowling, 3, Annesley Road, Maindee, Newport, Mon. 

Objects : The promotion of good fellowship between West Countrymen, 

and the advancement and protection of their interests generally. 

Benevolent Fund. 
Qualification : Natives of Devon or Cornwall, and their sons and grandsons. 
Subscription : is. minimum, 5s. maximum. 
Meetings : Annual dinner, whist drives and lectures in winter, and picnics 

in summer. 



DEVONIANS IN PORTSMOUTH. 

Founded 1906. 

President : R. Kelland Niner, Esq. 

Vice-President : P. G. D. Winter, Esq. 

Hon. Treasurer : C. S. Parker, Esq. 

Hon. Secretary : W. Butland, ioi, Clive Road, Fratton. 

Objects : To bring together Devonians residing in Portsmouth and district 

by a common bond of friendship and social or personal acquaintance. 
Qualification : Birth, parentage, or ten years' residence ; lady members 

(honorary), the same qualifications ; wives of members eligible. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : Annual dinner, whist drives, trips to Devon, etc. 

Badge of office for President bears arms of Devon and Portsmouth 

in enamel, and a link is given annually by the President for the 

year, bearing his name and the date. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 12I 



REIGATE AND REDHILL AND DISTRICT DEVON AND 
CORNWALL ASSOCIATION. 
Founded 1907. 
President and Chairman : J. Trevarthen, Esq. 
Vice-Presidents : Geo. Gilbert, Esq., J. P.', Henry Libby, Esq., F. G. 

Pyne, Esq., J. Saunders, Esq. 
Vice-Chairman : G. Gilbert. 

Hon. Secretary and Treasurer : Henry Libby, 118, Station Road, Redhill. 
Objects : Social intercourse, and the advertisement of Devon and Cornwall. 
Qualification : Natives of Devon or Cornwall. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : July and December. 

THE DEVONIAN SOCIETY OF RHODESIA. 

President : E. Basch, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : F. W. Gary, Esq., P. B. S. Wrey, Esq. 

Chairman : W. Bridgman. 

Hon. Secretary and Treasurer : Herbert H. Keen, Bulawayo. 

THE ASSOCIATION OF WEST COUNTRYMEN IN HAMPSHIRE. 

President : A. Broomfield, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : G. Crocker, Esq., J. Ellen, Esq. 

Hon. Treasurer : A. Hill. 

Hon. Secretary : W. T, Venton, 68, Stafford Road, Southampton. 

Objects : To promote social intercourse, and to foster and encourage 
national sentiment, love of country, and everything pertaining to 
the honour and welfare of the three Western Counties. 

Qualification : Connected with Devon, Cornwall, or Somerset by birth, 
marriage, or adoption. 

Subscription : is. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner, and periodical social gatherings. 

THE WEST COUNTRY ASSOCIATION, SOUTHEND-ON-SEA. 

President : J. H. M. Kirkwood, Esq., M.P. 

Treasurer : W. T. Darke. 

Hon. Secretary : F. T. Fisher, 44, Alexandra Street Southend-on-Sea. 

Objects : To promote friendly intercourse among West-country men and 
women residing in Southend and district, to foster a knowledge of the 
history, folk-lore, literature, music, art, and antiquities of the three 
counties, and to carry out approved schemes for the benefit of West- 
country men and women residing in Southend and district. 

Subscription: Gentlemen, 5s., ladies, 2s. 6d. per annum. Life member- 
ship — gentlemen, 3 guineas, ladies, i^ guineas. 

DEVON, CORNWALL, AND WEST COUNTRY ASSOCIATION FOR 
THE COUNTY OF SURREY. 
Founded 1908. 

President : Sir Edwin Durning Lawrence, Bart. 

Vice-Presidents : J. J. Brewer, Esq., Sir A. T. Quiller Couch, Rev. 
G. Dandridge, M.A., Hon. Arthur J. Davey, W. J. Davey, Esq., 
W. E. Horne, Esq., M.P., Rev. E. C. Kirwan, M.A., G. Lambert, 
Esq., M.P., H. F. Luttrell, Esq., M.P., G. H. Morgan, Esq., M.P., 
W. T. Pilditch, Esq., G. H. Radford, Esq., M.P.. S. P. Rattenbury, 
Esq., Sir J. Ward Spear, M.P., J. St. Loe Strachey, Esq., Sir 
Wm. Treloar, J. p. 



122 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



Hon. Treasurer : W. J. Davis. 

Hon. Secretary : R. Snodgrass, 56, Agraria Road, Guildford. 

Objects : The promotion of friendly intercourse and mutual interest 
among the members ; the provision of social and literary entertain- 
ment. 

Qualification : Natives of Devon, Cornwall, or the West Country, and 
their families. 

Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 

Meetings : Annual dinner, socials, and whist drives. 

SWANSEA DEVONIAN SOCIETY. 
Founded 1894, 

President : J. C. Kerswell, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : A. Bond, Esq., S. Daniel, Esq., W. A. Ford, Esq.„ 
J. Jones, Esq., C. H. Newcombe, Esq., J. B. Reed, Esq., E. Serle,. 
Esq., Hy. Salter, Esq. 

Chairman : L. Williams, Esq. 

Hon. Auditor : G. H, Harvey. 

Assistant Secretary : C. Easterbrook. 

Hon. Secretary : S. T. Drew, Public Library, Swansea. 

Objects : To promote fraternal feelings, social intercourse and entertain- 
ment, to purchase books on the history of Devon, and to render 
assistance in case of need. 

Qualification : Birth or descent. 

Subscription : is. per annum. 

Meetings : Social gatherings at intervals, summer excursion in August, 
annual dinner in November. 

DEVONIAN SOCIETY OF TORONTO. 
Founded 1907. 

President : 

Vice-Presidents : Dr. Norman Allen, G. W. Beardmore, Esq., H. E. 
Duke, Esq., K.C., Major Gratwicke, G. Lambert, Esq., M.P., 
A. E. Spender, Esq., R. A. J. Walling, Esq., Hon. Lionel 
Walrond, M.P., Sir W. H. White, K.C.B. 

Chairman : W. C. Borlase. 

Vice-Chairman : C. Loveys. 

Hon. Treasurer : E. E. Graham. 

Assistant Secretary : W. A. McDonald. 

Hon. Secretary : C. W. Gigg, 35, Grange Avenue, Toronto. 

Objects : To renew old acquaintances and to form new ones with those who 
hold a common interest, to foster a knowledge of the traditions, litera- 
ture, folklore, etc., of Devonshire, and to promote the spirit of 
fraternity among Devonians in Canada, 

Qualification : Birth or descent. 

Subscription : One dollar per annum. 

Meetings : The third Wednesday in each month from May to October, and 
the first and third Wednesday from November to April — the first 
Wednesdays to be Social Evenings. No intoxicants allowed. 

DEVON, CORNWALL, AND SOMERSET CLUB, VANCOUVER. 

President : J. Hoskins, Esq. 

Vice-Presidents : J. W. Dawe, Esq., G. J. Dyke, Esq., A. J. Ford, Esq., 
j. L. Pratt, Esq, 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 123 

Auditors : J. W. Dawe, G. Mowatt. 

Treasurer : W. H. Carnsew. 

Assistant Secretary : E. Pearce. 

Secretary : Ernest J, Down. 

Head Quarters : 445, Richards Street, Vancouver, B.C. 

DEVONIANS IN WESTON-SUPER-MARE. 

President : Dr. Vickery. 

Hon. Treasurer : S. Pady. 

Hon. Secretary : T. J. Kerslake, Alexandra Parade, Weston-super-Mare. 

Object : Social intercourse. 

Subscriptions : 2s. 6d. and is. 

Meetings : Annual dinner and conversazione. 

DEVONIANS IN THE ISLE OF WIGHT. 
Founded 1905. 
President and Chairman : R. Stewart Savile, Esq. 
Vice-President and Vice-Chairman: Dr. M. L. B. Coombs. 
Hon. Treasurer and Secretary : W. Ormsby Rymer, 33a, Holyrood Street, 

Newport, I.W. 
Objects : Social intercourse. 

Qualification : Born in Devon or of Devonian parents. 
Subscription : 2s. 6d. per annum. 
Meetings : Annual and occasional. 

The Isle of Wight and Devon are connected by an ancient link in the 
Patron Lady, Isabella de Fortibus, Countess of Devon and Lady of 
the Isle, A, D. 1 3 10. 

{ It is believed that there are several other Devonian Societies, both at home 
and abroad. The Editor will be pleased to receive particulars of 
these for the next issue of the Year Book.) 



A Ballad of Devon. 

My song is of Devon, the cradle of free men, 

The shire of the meadow, the mountain, the moor, 
The home of that race of invincible seamen 

That harried the Spaniard on Mexico's shore. 
******** 
As the years float along so her glory-roll gathers 

And grows as a river that oceanward runs, 
For the spirit which prompted the deeds of the fathers 

Glows bright as of old in the breasts of the sons. 

T. H. Knight. 



124 ^^^ Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

Learned and Scientific Societies in 
Devonshire. 

(Compiled by H. Tapley-Soper, City Librarian, Exeter.) 

Architectural Society of Plymouth. E. C. Adams, Secretary, 

The Athenaeum, George Street, Plymouth. 
Bradninch Literary and Debating Society. P. Warren, Secretary, 

Bradninch. 
Dartmouth Technical and Scientific Society. S. G. Hearn, Hon. 

Secretary, 5, Victoria Terrace, Dartmouth. 
Devon and Cornwall Record Society. H. Tapley-Soper, 

F.R.Hist.S., Hon. Secretary and General Editor, Royal 

Albert Memorial University College, Museum, and Public 

Library, Exeter. 
Devon and Exeter Architectural Society (in alhance with the 

Royal Institute of British Architects). Allan R. Pinn, 

A.R.LB.A., Hon. Secretary, 5, Bedford Circus, Exeter, and 

C. Cheverton, Hon. Secretary Three Towns Branch, 64, 

Chapel Street, Devonport. 
Devon and Exeter Law Association. T. W. Burch, Hon. 

Secretary, Palace Gate, Exeter. 
Devon and Exeter Medico-Chirurgical Society. R. V. Solly, 

M.D., Secretary, 40, West Southernhay, Exeter. 
Devon Philosophical Society. Miss L. Wheaton, Secretary, 

19, Bedford Circus, Exeter. 
Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, 
f Literature, and Art. Maxwell Adams, Hon. Secretary, 12, 
^ South Parade, Southsea. 
Exeter Camera Club. A. J. Tucker, Hon. Secretary, Barnfield 

House, Exeter. 
Exeter Diocesan Architectural and Archaeological Society. Rev. 

S. M. Nourse, Hon. Secretary, Shute Vicarage, Kilmington, S.O. 
Exeter Law Library Society. J. Radcliffe, Hon. Secretary, 

8, The Close; Exeter. 
Exeter Literary Society. J. Isaac Pengelly, Hon. Secretary, 

Barnfield House, Exeter. 
Exeter Pictorial Record Society. F. R. Rowley and H. Tapley- 
Soper, Hon. Secretaries, Royal Albert Memorial University 

College, Museum, and Public Library, Exeter. 
GalUa : French Literary Society. Secretary, A. S. Treves, 

University College, Exeter. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 125 

Germania : German Literary Society. Secretary, Miss Dorothy 

Drayton, University College, Exeter. 
Incorporated Law Society (Plymouth). R. B. Johns and 

B. H. Whiteford, Joint Hon. Secretaries, 5, Princess Square, 

Plymouth. 
Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom Laboratory. 

Edgar J. Allen, D.Sc, Hon. Secretary and Director of the 

Plymouth Laboratory, Citadel Hill, Plymouth. 
Plymouth Institution and Devon and Cornwall Natural History 

Society. Henry Penrose Prance and W. C. Wade, Hon. 

Secretaries, The Athenaeum, George Street, Plymouth. 
Plymouth Medical Society. H. W. Webber, Hon. Secretary, 

Dr. A. B. Soltau, Hon. Librarian, Athenaeum Chambers, 

George Street, Plymouth, 
Plymouth Photographic Society. Charles F. Ford, Hon. 

Secretary, The Athenaeum, George Street, Plymouth. 
Teign Naturalists' Field Club. 
Torquay Medical Society. H. K. Lacey, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., 

Secretary, " Melita," Torquay. 
Torquay Natural History Society. Major E. V. Elwes, Hon. 

Secretary, Babbacombe Road, Torquay. 
University College Field Club and Natural History Society. 

Miss Aviolet, Hon. Secretary, University College, Exeter. 



A Chapter of Admirals. 

Lord Effingham kicked the Armada down ; 
And Drake was a fighting the world all round. 
Gallant Ralegh lived upon fire and smoke ; 
But Sir John Hawkins's heart was broke. 

Yet, barring all pother, 

The one and the other 
Were all of them lords of the main. 

Sir Humphrey Gilbert was lost at sea ; 
And frozen to death was poor Willoughby. 
Both Grenvile and Frobisher bravely fell ; 
But 'twas Blake who tickled the Dutch so well. 

Yet, barring all pother, 

The one and the other 
Were all of them lords of the main. 

Old Sons. 



126 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



Libraries in Devonshire. 

Barnstaple. 

Athenaeum Library ; 23,500 volumes (large local collection of 
books and manuscripts, including the Borough Records, 
the Oliver, Harding, and Incledon MSS., the Doddridge 
Library, and the Sharland Bequest). Thomas Wainwright, 
Secretary and Librarian. 

Bldeford. 

Bideford Public Library ; 5,900 volumes. E. B. L. Brayley, 
Librarian. 

Clovelly. 

Village Library ; 500 volumes. Mrs. Hamlyn, Hon. Librarian. 

Devonport. 

Free Public Library, Duke Street ; 23,426 volumes. William 
D. Rutter, Librarian. 

Exeter. 

The Royal Albert Memorial University College, Museum, and 
Pubhc Library ; 45,000 volumes and manuscripts (large 
local collection, including the collections of the late James 
Davidson, Esq., of Axminster ; P. O. Hutchinson, Esq., of 
Sidmouth ; Edward Fisher, Esq., F.S.A. Scot., of Newton 
Abbot ; and J. Brooking-Rowe, Esq., F.vS.A., of Plympton). 
H. Tapley-Soper, F.L.A., F.R.Hist.S., Librarian. 

The Devon and Exeter Institution ; 40,000 volumes. J. 
Coombes, Librarian. 

The Cathedral Library ; 8,000 volumes and many manu- 
scripts. The Rev. Chancellor Edmonds, Librarian. 

The City Muniment Room, The Guildhall (collection of manu- 
script Records). H. Lloyd Parry, B.A., B.Sc, Town Clerk,. 

The Exeter Law Library ; 4,000 volumes. H. Tapley-Soper, 
F.R.Hist.S., Librarian. 

The Medical Library, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, 
East Southernay. 

Moretonhampstead , 

Bo wring Library ; 1600 volumes. W. T. Hutchings and 
A. G. Blackmore, Hon. Librarians. 

Newton Abbot. 

Newton Abbot Public Library; 7,171 volumes. Wm. Mad- 
dem, F.L.A., Librarian. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 127 

Plymouth. 

Plvmouth Public Library ; 62,000 volumes (large local collec- 
tion). W. H. K. Wright, F.L.A., F.R.Hist.S., Librarian. 

Plymouth Proprietary and Cottonian Library ; 42,000 
volumes. J. L. C. Woodley, Librarian. 

Plymouth Institute and Natural History Society ; 6,000 
volumes. 

St. Giles-in-the-Wood, Torrington. 

St. Giles' Library ; 300 volumes. S. J. Daniels, Hon. Libra- 
rian. 

Tavistock. 

Tavistock Library, Abbey Buildings ; 15,000 volumes. John 
Quick, Librarian. 

Torquay. 

Torquay Public Library ; 10,000 volumes. Joseph Jones, 
F.L.A., Librarian. 

Totnes. 

South Devon Library, 12, High Street ; 3,000 volumes. 
Samuel Veasey, Librarian. 

Yealmpton, Plymouth. 

Yealmpton Institute Library ; 450 volumes. 



Dear Old Devon. 

Oh ! I love our dear old Devon 
For the heroes we have bred ; 

Our blood is better given 

For the bright blood they have shed. 

Oh ! I love our dear old Devon 
For the poets we have reared ; 

Like the lark they've lived near heaven, 
And her melody have shared. 

Oh ! I love our dear old Devon 
For the painters we possess, 

Who with loving hands have striven 
With the land's bright loveliness. 



Frank Ciirzon. 



128 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

Rules of the London Devonian 
Association. 

1. Name. — The name of the Society shall be "The London 

Devonian Association." 

2. Objects. — The objects of the Society shall be : — 

{a) To encourage the spirit of local patriotism — " that 
righteous and God-given feehng which is the root of 
all true patriotism, valour, civilization " — the spirit 
that animated the great Devonian heroes who defeated 
the Spanish Armada and laid the foundations of the 
British Empire. 

(h) To form a central organization in London to promote 
Devonian interests, and to keep Devonians throughout 
the world in communication with their fellows at 
home and abroad. 

(c) To promote friendly intercourse amongst De- 
vonians residing in London and district, by means of 
meetings and social re-unions. 

{d) To foster a knowledge of the History, Folklore, 
Literature, Music, Art, and Antiquities of the County. 

(e) To carry out from time to time approved schemes 
for the benefit of Devonians residing in London or 
elsewhere. 

3. Constitution. — The Society shall consist of Life and Ordinary 

Members and Associates.* 

4. Qualification. — Any person residing in London or district 

who is connected with the County of Devon by birth, 
descent, marriage, or former residence, shall be eligible 
for membership, but such person shall be nominated by a 
Member and the nomination submitted to the Committee, 
who shall at their first Meeting after receipt of the nomina- 
tion by the Hon. Secretary, decide by vote as to the accept- 
ance or otherwise of the nomination. 

5. Subscription. — The annual subscription to the Society shall 

be 5/- for gentlemen, and 2/6 for ladies and those under 

21 years of age. Members of other recognized Devonian 

» 

* All Devonians (whether by birth, descent, marriage, or residence) not at present 
rasiding in London or district are eligible as Associates. The subscription is 2 6 per 
annum, or two guineas for life, and each Associate receives a copy of the Year Book. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 129 

Associations in London shall be admitted as Members on 
the nomination of their representatives on the Committee 
at an annual subscription of 2/6. The subscription for 
Life Membership shall be two guineas for gentlemen and 
one guinea for ladies. Subscriptions will be payable on 
election and each subsequent 30th September. The 
name of any Member whose subscription is in arrear for 
six months may be removed from the list of Members at 
the discretion of the Committee. 

6. Officers. — The Officers of the Society shall be a President, 

Hon. Secretary, and Hon. Treasurer, all of whom shall be 
elected at the Annual Meeting. 

7. Management. — The management of the Society shall be 

vested in a Committee, consisting of the President, Hon. 
Secretary, Hon. Treasurer, and fifteen other Members, 
and a representative elected by each of the other Devonian 
Associations in London, such representatives to be Members 
of the Society. 

8. Meetings of Committee. — The Committee shall meet at least 

once a quarter. Seven to form a quorum. 

9. Chairman of Committee. — The Committee at their first 

Meeting after the Annual Meeting shall elect a Chairman 
and a Deputy-Chairman from Members of the Association. 

10. Power of Committee. — The Committee shall be empowered 
to decide all matters not dealt with in these rules, subject 
to an appeal to a General Meeting. 

11. Auditors. — ^Two Members, who are not Members of the 
Committee, shall be elected at each Annual Meeting to 
audit the Accounts of the Society. 

12. Annual General Meeting. — The Annual General Meeting 
shall be held in the month of October, when all Officers, 
five Members of the Committee, and Auditors shall retire, 
but be eligible for re-election. The business of the Annual 
General Meeting shall be the election of Officers, five 
Committee men, and two Auditors ; presentation of 
Annual Report and Balance Sheet for the year ending 
30th September ; and any other business, due notice of 
which has been given to the Hon. Secretary, according to 
the Rules. 



130 The Devonian Year Book, 191 : 



13. Special General Meeting. — A Special General Meeting shall 
be summoned by the Hon. Secretary within fourteen 
days by a resolution of the Committee, or within twenty- 
one days of the receipt of a requisition signed by 30 Mem- 
bers of the Society, such requisition to state definitely the 
business to be considered. 

14. Notice of Meeting. — Seven days' notice shall be given of all 
General Meetings of the Society, the date of postmark to 
be taken as the date of circular. 

15. Alteration of Rules. — No alteration or addition to these 
Rules shall be made except at the Annual Meeting (when 
due notice of such alteration or addition must have been 
sent to the Hon. Secretary on or before 23rd September) 
or at a Special General Meeting. A copy of the proposed 
alteration or addition shall be sent to Members with notice 
of Meeting. 



The Association is affiliated to St. Bride Foundation Institute, 
Bride Lane, Ludgate Circus, E.C., and Members are entitled to 
free use of the Lending and Reference Libraries, *Reading and 
Recreation Rooms, and admission on easy terms to the Gym- 
nasium, Swimming Baths, Technical Classes, etc. 

Oak shields, with the arms of the Association painted in proper 
colours, may be obtained from F. C. Southwood, 96, Regent 
Street, W. Price, with motto, 6s., without motto, 4s. 6d. 

Badges, with the arms in enamel and gilt, price 4s. 3d., or 
brooches, price 3s. 3d., may be obtained from W. J. Carroll, 
33, Walbrook, E.C. Gold brooches, price 25s. 

A few copies of the Devonian Year Books for 1910 and 1911 
remain in stock. Price 2s. 6d., by post 2s. 9d. 

* In this room Devonshire papers are placed daily. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 131 



List of Fixtures. 

1912. 

January. 

3 W. Devonians in Portsmouth, Smoking Concert, Sussex 

Hotel, 8.0. 
6 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : A XV v. 

Walton-on-Thames. Home. 
8 M. Devonians in Portsmouth, Whist Practice, Sussex 

Hotel, 8.0. 

10 W. Devonians in Portsmouth, Whist Drive, " The 

Mikado," 7.30. 

1 1 Th. London Devonian Association Whist Drive, Anderton's 

Hotel, Fleet Street, E.C. 
Tivertonian Association, Annual Dance, St. Bride 
Institute, 7.30. 

12 F. Devon County School Old Boys' Association, Annual 

Dinner, Frascati's Restaurant, Oxford Street, W. 

13 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

Leytonstone. Home. A XV v. Leytonstone A. 

Away. 
15 M. Devonians in Portsmouth, Social, Small Albert Hall, 

7.30. 
17 W. West Countrymen in Hampshire, Annual Meeting and 

Smoking Concert, Bedford Hotel, Southampton, 

7.30. 
20 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

Old Dunstonians. Away. A XV v. Old Dun- 

stonians A. Home. 
25 Th. Devonians in Portsmouth, Annual General Meeting. 
27 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

H.M. Customs. Away. A XV v. H.M. Customs 

A. Home. 
31 W. Devonians in Portsmouth, Inter-County Whist 

Tournament, Fratton Hotel. 

February. 

2 F. London Devonian Association, Lantern Lecture by 

Sir F. Carruthers Gould, on " The Fox in Art and 
Literature," St. Bride Institute, 8.0. 

3 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

Civil Service. Away. A XV v. Civil Service A. 
Home. 



132 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

5 M. Devonians in Portsmouth, Whist Match, Sussex Hotel, 
8.0. 

7 W. Devonians in Portsmouth, Limelight Lecture, " Dart- 

moor and her Rivers," Large Albert Hall, 8.0. 
9 F. Old Ottregians' Society, Concert and Social Evening, 

St. Bride Institute, 7.30. 
10 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 
Park House. Away. 

14 W. Devonians in Portsmouth, Whist Drive, " The 

Mikado," 7.30. 
West Countrymen in Hampshire, Annual Banquet, 
South-Western Hotel, Southampton, 7.30. 

15 Th. Tivertonian Association, Whist Drive, St. Bride 

Institute, 7.30. 

16 F. West Country Association for Surrey, Annual Dinner, 

Guildford. 

17 S. London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

H.M. Customs House^ A XV v. Park House A. Away. 
19 M. Devonians in Portsmouth, Social, Small Albert Hall, 

7.30. 
24 S. London Devonian Association, Bohemian Concert, 

Crown Room, Holborn Restaurant. 
London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

R.M. College (Sandhurst). Away. A XV. v. R.M. 

College A. Home. 
28 W. Devonians in Portsmouth, Inter-County Whist 

Tournament, Fratton Hotel, 8.0. 

March. 

2 S. London Devonian Association, Annual Dinner, Throne 

Room, Holborn Restaurant. 
London Devonian Rugby Football Club: 1st XV v. 

R.M. Academy (Woolwich). Away. A XV v. 

Royal Naval College A. Away. 
4 M. Devonians in Portsmouth, Whist Match, Sussex 

Hotel, 8.0. 

8 F. Devon County School Old Boys' Association, 

Bohemian Concert, St. Bride Institute, 8.0. 

9 S. Barumites in London, Annual Dinner, Holborn 

Restaurant. 
London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 
St. Thomas's Hospital. Away. A XV v. London 
French A. Home. 
13 W. Devonians in Portsmouth, Whist Drive, " The 
Mikado," 7.30. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 



133 



March. 

16 S. 



18 xM. 



23 S. 



27 \Y. 



28 Th. 
30 S. 



London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

R.N. College (Greenwich). Home. A XV v. Old 

Leysians A. Away. 
West Countrymen in Hampshire, Whist Drive, Shirley 

Assembly Rooms, Southampton, 6.30. 
Devonians in Portsmouth, Social, Small Albert Hall, 

7.30. 
London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

Bedford. Away. A XV v. Twickenham. Home. 
Devonians in Portsmouth, Inter-County Whist 

Tournament, Fratton Hotel, 8.0. 
Tivertonian Association, Grand Concert, St. Bride 

Institute, 7.30. 
London Devonian Association, Whist Drive, 

Anderton's Hotel. 
London Devonian Rugby Football Club : 1st XV v. 

Saracens. Away. A XV v. Saracens A. Home. 



April 
21 



Sun. Old Ottregians' Society, Meeting at 11, Bridge Street, 
Westminster, 4.30. 



May. 
27 M. 



Old Ottregians' Society, Visit to Home, Special train 
leaves Waterloo at 12.5 Sunday midnight, returning 
from Ottery St. Mary at 6.0 p.m. 



July. 

24 W. 

28 Sun. 



Devon County School Speech Day. 

Old Ottregians' Society, Summer Gathering at 

Gardens, 4.0. Tea at Pitt's Restaurant, 

Green, 4.30. 



Kew 
Kew 



September. 

29 Sun. Old Ottregians' Society, Meeting at 11, Bridge Street, 
Westminster, 4.30. 

December. 

15 Sun. Old Ottregians' Society, Annual Gathering at 11. 
Bridge Street, Westminster, 4.30. 



134 -^^^ Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



List of Members and Associates. 

An asterisk (*) indicates Life Members. 
A double dagger {%) indicates Associates. 

JAbell, Westcott Stile (Exmouth), M.I.N. A., Professor of Naval Architec- 
ture, University of Liverpool. 49, Croxteth Road, Sefton Park, 
Liverpool. 

Acland, Captain J. W (Columb-John), 182, Portsdown Road, Maida 
Vale, W. 

Acland, Theodore Dyke (Columb-John), M.D., 19, Bryanston Square, W. 
Vice-President. 

Adams, A. A. (Werrington), C.A., Frankfield, Stanhope Road, Hornsey 
Lane, N. 

Adams, B. E. (Werrington), 44, Ulleswater Road, Palmers Green, N. 

Adams, E. W. (Kingsbridge), 18 Fleet Street, E.C. 

Adams, Mrs. E. W. (Kingsbridge), 18, Fleet Street, E.C. 

Amery, J. J. (Ashburton), 18, Fleet Street, E.C. 

Andrews, Mrs. Lilian (Plymouth), 3, Old Cavendish Street, Oxford St., W, 

Andrews, R. (Culmstock), 90, King's Road, Chelsea, S.W. 

Askham, F. W. (Princetown), Horseguards, Whitehall, S.W. 

Avery, Miss, Scarsdale House, Kensington, W. 

Axhorn, Miss E. B. (Tiverton), 116, Heath wood Gardens, Charlton, S.E. 

Bailey, F. A. (Exeter), London Institution, Finsbury, E.C. 

Baker, A. C. ( ), 172, Strand, W.C. 

Banbury, H. (Devonport), Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, W.C. 

Barnes, R. Stewart (Yealmpton), 53, Moorgate Street, E.C. 

Barnes, Mrs. R. S. (Brixham), 9, Russell Road, Crouch End, N. 

Bastin, T. W. (Paignton), Messrs. Bastin, Merryfield and Cracknell, Great 
Castle Street W. 

Bate, J. jr(Sutcombe), 87, High Road, Kilburn, N.W. 

Bazley, Miss Lucy (Starcross), Hope Cottage, Starcross, South Devon. 

Bazley, Miss M. (Starcross), 82, Uxbridge Road, West Ealing, W. 

Bearne, C. ( ), 73, Esmond Road, Chiswick, W. 

Beckett, A. E. (Plymouth), 61, Westbury Road, Wembley. 

Bell, Miss Annie (Kingsbridge), 58, Humber Road, Blackheath, S.E, 

Bennett, Samuel (Devonport), 6, Hemington Avenue, Friern Barnet, N. 

Besley, Canon W. P. (Barnstaple), M.A., 9, Amen Court, St. Paul's, E.C. 
Vice-President. 

Bidgood, G. G. (Tiverton), 12, Clifton Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Bidgood, G. S. (Tiverton), 8, Hornsey Lane Gardens, Highgate, N. 
Committee. 

Bidgood, R. (Tiverton), 20, Beaconsfield Road, Friern Barnet, N. 

Bird, Wm. (Shaldon), 89, Walm Lane, Willesden Green. 

Birdseye, H. S. (North Tawton), 8, Montpelier Vale, Blackheath, S.E. 

Bishenden, Mrs. I. M. (Newton Abbot), 105, New Oxford Street, W. 

Boden, R. H., 11, Derwent Road, Anerley, S.E. 

Bodley, A. H. (Witheridge), 74, Calbourne Road, Balham, S.W. 

Bond, Mrs. Douglas (Tavistock), 22, Surrey Street, Victoria Embank- 
ment, W.C. 

Bone, G. B. (Stoke Damerell), 4, Raymond Buildings, Grays Inn, W.C. 
^Bourne, C. W. (Ilfracombe), 19, Fairlawn Road, Wimbledon, S.W. 

Bowden, A. T. (North Tawton), 76, Newgate Street, E.C. Committee. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 135 

Bowden, T. R., 13, Waterford Road, Walham Green, S.W. 

Bridgeman, G. E. (Ugborough), 185, Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, S.W. 

Bridgeman, Miss Jennie (Ugborough), 185, Fentiman Road, Vauxhall 

Park S.W. 
Bridgeman, Miss Mona (Ugborough), 185, Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, 

S.W. 
Bridgeman, S. J. S. (Ugborough), 185, Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, 

S.W. 
Bridgman, Victor (Modbury), 36, Ravenscourt Gardens, W. 
Brimicombe, M. H. (Totnes), 22, Norfolk Street, Dalston, N.E. 
Britton, John (Bratton Fleming), 139, Hartfield Road, Wimbledon, S.W. 
Broadbear, Miss G. L. (Teignmouth), 4, Chapel Place, Cavendish Square, W. 
Brodie, C. H. (Exeter), F.R.I, B.A., 77, Park Lane, Croydon. 
Bromham, Addison J. (Barnstaple), Westward Ho, Wimbledon Common. 
Brookes, Miss Mattie (Lifton), Tudor Lodge, Albert Road, Stroud Green. 
Brooks, Miss E. (Tiverton), Birkbeck House, Lancaster Road, Enfield. 
Broom, Miss Violet (Teignmouth), Staffordshire House, Store Street, W.C. 
Brown, A. S. (Sidbury), 61, Hubert Grove, Landor Road, Stockwell, S.E. 
Brown, Mrs. A. S. (Sidbury), 61, Hubert Grove, Landor Road, Stockwell 

S.E. 
Brown, W. H. (Exmouth), 35, Cumberland Park, Acton, W. 
Budd, E. H., 34, Poultry, E.C. 
Burgoyne, Mrs. S. (Devonport), Hillside, Mount Pleasant Lane, Upper 

Clapton, N.E. 
^Burlace, J. B. (Brixham), 38, Corfton Road, Ealing, W. Vice-President 'y 

Committee. 
Burnett, Sydney (Cadeleigh), 16, Rebecca Terrace, Rotherhithe, S.E. 
Burrow, Miss L. L. (Tavistock), 11, Fitzroy Street, W 
Burrows, B. (Honiton), 67, Peterborough Road, Fulham, S.W. 
Burton, E. Cave- (Exeter), 46, Kenilworth Road, Penge, S.E. 



Campbell, R. J. P. (Exeter), 15, St. Margaret's Road, Plumstead. 
Cann, C. E. (Barnstaple), " Fairhght," Regent's Park Road, Finchley, N. 
Carnell, John (Ottery St. IN-Iary), 83, Phillimore Mews, High Street, 

Kensington. 
Champion, W. (Shaldon), 8, Holmewood Gardens, Brixton Hill, S.W. 
Chard, G. M. (Devon County School), Berwen, Canonbie Road, Honor Oak, 

S.E. 
Chettleburgh, Mrs., 38, Redcliffe Gardens, W. 
= Chope, R. Pearse (Hartland), B.A., Patent Office, 25, Southampton 

Buildings, W.C. Deputy-Chairman. 
Churchward, Miss M. (Torquay), 409, Oxford Street, W. 
Clapp, W. K. F. (Exeter), i, Rydal Road, Streatham, S.W. 
Clark, W. H. D. (Plymouth), Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, 

W.C. 
Clarke, Arthur (Sidmouth), 13, Culmstock Road, Clapham Common, S.W. 
Clarke, H. J., Town Hall, Upper Street, Islington, N. 
Clarke, H. L. (Torrington), London & South- Western Bank, Wanstead, 

Essex. 
Clarke, John (Honiton), 45, Marloes Road, Kensington, W. 
Clarke, Miss E. E. (Descent), 41, Church Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Clarke, T. (Ottery St. Mary), 41, Church Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Clatworthy, H. J. (descent), Amberley House, Norfolk Street, Strand. 
Chfford, Colonel E. T. (Exeter), V.D., 6, Cranley Gardens, S.W. Vice 

President. Chairman of the Association; Committee. 



136 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

^Clifford of Chudleigh, Rt. Hon. Lord (Ugbrooke), Ugbrooke Park, Chud- 
leigh. Vice-President. 

Coad, R. Lawson, 27 and 28, Old Jewry, E.C. 

Coker, E. G. (Plymouth), 60, St. Martin's Lane, W.C. 

Cole, N. (Salcombe), 46, Melgund Road, Highbury, N. Committee. 

Cole, Mrs. N. (Salcombe), 46, Melgund Road, Highbury, N. 

Cole, S. J. (Hartland), M.R.C.S., 47, South Molton Street. W. 
*Coles, John (Tiverton), J. P., 4, Kensington Park Gardens, W. 

Vice-President. 
"Coles, W. Crosbie (Bideford), 78, Park Lane, Croydon. Committee. 

Collings, J. A. (Plymouth), 273, Uxbridge Road, W. 

Colwill, Miss A. (Hatherleigh) . 

Colwill, C. (North Petherwin), Pentire, Coombe Road, Croydon. 

Commin, Miss A. L. (Exeter), 96, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 
. Commin, E. G. (Exeter), 94, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, Mrs. E. G. (Exeter), 94, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, F. J. (Exeter), 96, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, Mrs. F. J. (Exeter), 104, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, Miss M. O. (Exeter), 96, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Commin, R. G. (Exeter), 96, Upper Tulse Hill, S.W. 

Congdon, A. R. (Hartland), 187a Brompton Road, S.W. 

Cook, Miss A. (Ottery St. Mary), 64, Atlantic Road, Brixton, S.W. 

Coombes, C. S. (Devonport), Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, 

Copp, A. E. G. (Barnstaple). 21, Trinity Road, Wimbledon. 

Copp, S. (Barnstaple), 22, Woburn Place, Russell Square, W.C. 

Cornwall, Sir Edwin A. (Lapford), M.P., L.C.C., 3, Whitehall Court, S.W. 
Vice-President. 

Cornelius, V. A. (DawHsh), Fire Brigade, Southwark Bridge Road, S.E. 
JCouch, Mrs. A. W. (Brixham), 16, Palace Avenue, Paignton. 
JCouch, J. (Brixham), 16, Palace Avenue, Paignton. 

Couch, G. W. (Exeter), Vernon Lodge, Carshalton. 

Couch, Mrs. L. (Exeter), 6, Park View, Brisbane Road, Ilford. 

Couch, W. S. (Exeter), 6, Park View, Brisbane Road, Ilford. 

Cox, F., 74, Lansdowne Road, Clapham Park, S.W. 

Cox, Mrs. F., 74, Lansdowne Road, Clapham Road, S.W. 

Coysh, R. H. (Dartmouth), 17, Delafield Road, Charlton, S.E. 

Crang, W. (llfracombe). River Plate House, E.C. 

Cregoe, P. J. ( ) 

Cronford. C. H. ( ). Admiralty, S.W. 

Crook, R. H. J. (Newton Abbot), 15, Bedford Street, Strand, W.C. 

Crossley, W. M. (Sidmouth), Bank of England, E.C. 

Cudmore, H. J. (Torrington) ; 

Cumming, Arthur A. F. (Ilsington), 9, Netheravon Road, Chiswick, W. 

Gumming, Miss Edith M. (Ilsington), 9, Netheravon Road, Chiswick, W. 

Cumming, Mrs. L. (Bovey Tracey), 9, Netheravon Road, Chis\Mick, W. 
*Cummings, V. J., 33, Clifden Gardens, Twickenham. 

Cummings, William Hayman (Sidbury), Mus.D. (Dub.), F.S.A., Hon. 
R.A.M., Sydcote, Dulwich, S.E. Vice-President. 



Dart, A. (Tiverton), 37, Beresford Road, Canonbury, N. 

Dart, J. A. (llfracombe), 19, Waldegrave Road, Hornsey, N. 

Dart, T. (Tiverton), 65, Seaton Street, Chelsea, S.W. 

Da van, Mrs. (Tiverton), 10, Old Deer Park Gardens, Richmond. 

Davey, G. W. (Sampford Spine y), 16, John Street, Bedford Row, W.C. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 137 

Davey, J. F. (Exeter), 195, Camden Road, N.W. 

Dickson, Miss Florence (Dawlish), 22, Caroline Street, Camden Town.N.W. 
♦Distin, Alban L. G. (Paignton), 11, Melrose Terrace, Shepherd's Bush 
Road, W. 

Distin, Frank (Totnes), 22, Carter Lane, E.C. 
♦Distin, Howard (Paignton), M.B., Holtwhite House, Enfield. 

Dobell, J. S. (Newton Abbot), 104, Cricklewood Broadway, N.W. 

Dodridge, A. E. (Plymouth), Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, 

tDoe, G. M. (Torrington), Enfield, Torrington, North Devon. 
jDoe, G. W. A. (Torrington), Enfield, Torrington, North Devon. 
Doherty, W. (South Molton), 6, Great Newport Street, St. Martin's Lane. 

W.C. 
Dommett, W. E. (Devonport), The Elms, Milner Road, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 
Duke, H. E. (Plymouth), K.C., M.P., i. Paper Buildings, Temple. E.C. 

Vice-President. 
Dunn, A. E. (Exeter), 70, Victoria Street, S.W. Vice-President. 
Dunn, F. W. (South Molton), 8, Westmount Road, Eltham, Kent. 

Easton, H. T. (Exeter), Union of London and Smiths Bank. Lombard 
Street, E.C. Vice-President. 

Edy, C. W. (Tiverton), 18, Kew Road, Richmond. 

Edy, Mrs. C. W. (Tiverton), 18, Kew Road, Richmond. 
JEdye, Lieut. -Colonel L. (Hatherleigh), Stanley Couit, Stanley Street, 
Montreal, Canada. 

Ellis, J. (Moretonhampstead), 31, Milton Street, E.C. 

Emberry, T. E. (Exeter), 133, Bennerley Road, Clapham Common, S.W. 

Ehdicott, Miss Hetty (Axminster), 102, Winstanley Road, Clapham Com- 
mon, S.W. 
*Eveleigh, Miss Helen (Exeter), 186, S. James Court, Buckingham Gate, 
S.W. 

Everett, W. J. (Plymouth), 100, Devonshire Road, HoUoway, N. 

Farrant, H. G. (Hemlock), J. P., 3, Paper Buildings, Temple, E.C. 

Foale, Miss A. G. (descent), 29, Aldridge Road Villas, Westbourne Park, W. 

Foale, N., 29, Aldridge Road Villas, Westbourne Park, W. 

Foale, W. E. (descent), 29, Aldridge Road Villas, Westbourne Park, W. 

Ford, C. (Plymouth), 17, High Street, Harlesden, N.W. 

Ford. J. (Plymouth), 49, Nicol Road, Harlesden, N.W. 

Fortescue, Rt. Hon. Earl (Filleigh), Castle Hill, South Molton, N. Devon. 

Past President. 
Fox, Mrs. (Honiton), " Lord High Admiral," Church Street, Edgware 

Road, W. 
Eraser, Ernest (Exeter), 32, Hatton Garden, E.C. 
French, F. F. (Newton Abbot), 141, Auckland Road, Ilford. 

Gamble, Rev. H. R. (Barnstaple), M.A., Sloane Street, S.W. Vice- 

Pys s idc ft t 
Gamlen, L. H. (Morchard). 64. Castlewood Rd., Stoke Newington. N.E. 
Gibson, Thos. (Appledore). 2, Shottondane Rd., Walham Green, W. 
Gill, Allen (Devonport), F.R.A.M., 5, Lincoln House, Dartmouth Park 

Hill, N.W. Vice-President. 
Gillham, H. (Burle scorn be), 222, Central Market, E.C. Committee. 



138 The Devonian Year Book, 1912 

Gillham, Miss Daisy (Torquay), 315, Upper Richmond Road, East Sheen. 
Gillham, Miss Mabel (Torquay), 315, Upper Richmond Road, East Sheen. 
Gillham, Mrs., 90, Blenheim Gardens, Cricklewood, N.W. 
Glanvill, H. Wreford- (Exeter), 35, Strawberry Hill Road, Twickenham. 
Glass, W. R. B. (North Loo), 60,'Pennard Road, Shepherd's Bush, W. 
Godfrey, Mrs. F. A. (descent), Homeville, Merton Avenue, Chiswick, W. 
Godfrey, S. H. (Ottery St. Mary), Homeville, Merton Avenue, Chiswick, W. 
Goodfellow, J. G., 195, Fentiman Road, Vauxhall Park, S.W. 
Goodman, W. H. (Devonport), 160, Ardgorvan Road, Catford, S.E. 
Gosling, L. G. (Sidbury), " Sidbuiy," The Avenue, Chingford, Essex. 
Gough, Mrs.. E., 46, Melgund Road, Highbury, N. 

Grant, Miss B. M. (Torrington), 42, Weymouth Street, Portland Place, W. 
Granwood, J. Northcott (Plymouth), 235, Barry Road, East Dulwich. 
Griffiths, B. H. Percy- (Plymouth), " Highcroft," Cottenham Park Road^ 

Wimbledon. 
Grigg, F. E. (Plymouth), 40, Jersey Road, Ilford. 
Grigg, R. (Exmouth), 19, Avondale Avenue, Woodside Park, North 

Finchley. 
Grills, W. E, (Holsworthy), 524, Caledonian Road, N, 
Gulhford, W. (Exeter), 28, Danby Street, Peckham, S.E. 

Halsbury, The Rt. Hon. the Earl of (Parkham), 4, Ennismore Gardens, W. 

President. 
Hancock, H. H. M. (Barnstaple), 56, Devereux Road, Wandsworth 

Common, S.W\ Committee. 
Handford, W. (Barnstaple), 92, Morshead Mansions, Maida Vale, W. 
Hammick, Miss Daisy (Stoke Gabriel), c/o Mrs. Inman, " Sherbourne," 

Longley Road, Tooting, S.W. 
Harris, Mrs. Blanche (Plymouth), 96, Croxted Road, West Dulwich, S.E. 
Harris, Frank (Exeter), L.C.C. School, Orange Street, Southwark, S.E. 
Harris, T. M., 78, Morshead Mansions, Maida Vale, W. 
Harry, Miss F. E. (Torquay), 16, Tanza Road, Hampstead Heath, N.W. 
Haynes, J. T. (Hartland) J.P., 22, Knollys Road, Streatham, S.W. 
JHeard, W. E. (Northam), J. P., Winchester House, Newport, Mon. 
Hearson, Prof. T. A. (Barnstaple). M.Inst. C.E., 22, Southampton 

Buildings, W.C. 
Hearson. W. E. (Barnstaple), " Kippington," Sevenoaks, Kent. 
Heath, Chas. (North Tawton). 

Hesse, F. W. (Tiverton), 5, Moorgate Street, E.C. Committee. 
Hesse, Mrs. N. (Tiverton), 5, Moorgate Street, E.C. 
Hill, Edmund J. (Dartmouth), 19, Becmead Avenue, Streatham. 
Hill, Mrs. E. G. (Dartmouth), 19, Becmead Avenue, Streatham. 
Hill, H. W. (Exeter), 14, Highlever Road, North Kensington, N. 
HiU, J. A. (Holcombe Rogus), C.A., 19a, Coleman Street, EX. Hon. 

A uditor. 
Hobbs, Frank (Molland), 119, Upper Richmond Road, Putney. 
Hobbs, W. H. (Bideford), 226, Southwark Park Road, S.E. 
Hockaday, F., 82, Geraldine Road, Wandsworth, S.W. 
Hodge, F. (Heavitree), " The Homestead," Bishop's Avenue, East Finchley. 
Holmes, A. H., 32, King Street, Cheapside, E.C. 
Honey, A. (Exeter), 60, Flanders Road, Bedford Park, W. 
Honey, Miss L. (Exeter), 60, Flanders Road, Bedford Park, W. 
*Hooppell, Rev. J. L. E. (Aveton Gifford), St. Peter's Vicarage, Hoxton 

Square, N. 
Hopkins, Martyn (Silverton), 113, Burton Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Horton, A. J. B. (Morleigh), Matlock, Chudleigh Road, Crofton Park, S.E. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 139 



Horwood, E. J. (Exeter), L.C.C. School, Gordonbrock Road Lee S E 
Howie, Mrs. J. R. C. (Tiverton), 36, Pepys Road, Raynes Park, S.W * 

*|Hughes, T Cann (Hittisleigh), M.A., F.S. A., 78, Church Street, Lancaster. 

JHussell, Allen T. (Ilfracombe), F.R.LB.A., Ilfracombe. 
Hutchings, C. F. H. (Exeter), 10, Old Devonshire Road, Balham 
Hutchings, Miss Louie (Torquay), 205, Shirland Road, W. 
Hutchings, L. W. (Okehampton), 22, St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 

Inman, Miss Melina (Stoke Gabriel), " Sherbourne," Longley Rd. Tooting 
Inman, W. (Stoke Gabriel), "Sherbourne," Longley Road, ' Tooting' 

S.W. Committee. 
Inman, Mrs. W. (Stoke Gabriel), " Sherbourne," Longley Road, Tooting, 

Ireland, Miss G. B. (Bradninch), 66, Sinclair Road, West Kensington, W. 

Jarvis, W. T. (Torquay), 64, Coniger Road, Parsons Green, S.W. 
Jeffery, Frank C. (Exeter), Devon Lodge, Churchfield Avenue, North 

Finchley, N.W. 
Johns, F. P. (Devonport), Patent Office, 25, Southampton Buildings, W.C. 
Johnson, J. C. (Devon County School), 24, Rood Lane, E.C. 
Joint, E. G. (Plymouth), 22, Clarissa Road, Chadwell Heath. 
Jones, Mrs. Rees, The Avenue, West Ealing. 

Kekewich, Sir G. W. (Peamore), K.C.B., D.C.L., St Albans, Feitham, 

Middlesex. Vice-President. 
Kelly, H. P. (Torquay), L.C.C. School, Fulham Palace Road, S.W. 
Kelly, W. F. (Tiverton), Lanka House, Maida Vale, W. 
Kendall, T. J. (Kingsbridge). 

Kerslake, J. (Exeter), 2, Caple Road, Harlesden, N.W. 
Kerslake, W. (Crediton), 23, Wells Street, Oxford Street, W. 
Keyse, W. G. (Plymouth). 

Kirkwood, J. H. M. (Yeo Vale, Bideford), M.P. Vice-President. 
Kinsey, F. M. (West Buckla'nd), Florence Villa, 16, Harrow View, 

Wealdstcno. 
Knight, F. (Exeter), 19, Hereford Road, Acton. 

Laing, Mrs. H. B. ( ), 4, Heath Hurst Road, Hampstead, N.W. 

Lambert, George, M.P. (Spreyton), 34, Grosvenor Road, Westminster, 
S.W. Vice-President. 

Lane, John (West Putford), " Bodley Head," Vigo Street, W. Vice- 
President. 

Lang, Mrs. E. L. (Teignmouth), 81, Cannon Street, E.C. 

Lang, C. E. (Teignmouth), 81, Cannon Street, E.C. 

Lang, G. E., 130, Elborough Street, Southfields, S.W. Committee. 

Lang, H. W. (Stonehouse), 7, Bayer Street, Golden Lane, E.C. 

Langley, Mrs. L. (Torquay), 52, Lancaster Gate,W. 

Larkworthy, H. S. (Kinton), 171, Hartfield Road, Wimbledon. 
♦Larkworthy, J. W., " Bucklands," Nether Street, North Finchley. 
♦Larkworthy, Mrs. J. W., " Bucklands," Nether Street, North Finchley. 

Lascelles, W. H. (Exeter), 28, Barclay Road, Croydon. 

Lawday, Miss K. (Kingsnympton), 45, Cambridge Terrace, Hyde Park, W. 

Lawrence, R. L. (CuUompton), 182, Russia Road, Milk Street, E.C. 

Leat, J. (Exeter), B.A., Stoke Road, Slough. 

Lester, L. R. (Plymouth), 23, Neal Street, Long Acre, W.C. 

Lethbridge, C, 24, Great St. Helens, E.C. 

Lethbridge, J. (Tedburn St. Mary). 59, The Chase, Clapham Common, S.W 



140 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 



Lewin, G., jun., 8, Crooked Lane, E.C. 

Leyraan, G. A. (Exmouth), no, Milton Avenue, East Ham 
Lishmund, J. W. (Plymouth), 47, Sandmere Road, Clapham, S.W, 
Lisle, E. O. (Exeter), 8, Hamilton Gardens, St. John's Wood, N.W. 
Lisle, T. O. (Exeter), 8, Hamilton Gardens, St. John's Wood, N.W. 
Lock, W. G. (Instow), 5, Copthall Buildings, E.C. 

Lopes, Sir H. Y-B., Bart. (Maristow), Roborough, Devon. Vice-President. 
Lovell, J. (Ottery St. Mary), 161, Eardley Road, Streatham, S.W. Com- 
mittee. 
Luke, T. R. (Shebbear) , National Liberal Club, Whitehall. 
Luxton, J. (Coleridge), 184, Essex Road, N. 
*Lyons, Frank I. (Stonehouse), 23, Harley House, Regent's Park, N.W. 

McKenzie, Madame Marian (Plymouth), Princes House, Victoria Street 
S.W. 

Mallett, H. M. (Crediton), 49, Menard Road, Catford, S.E. 

Martin, Frank C. R. (Exeter), 65, West Kensington Mansions, W. 

Matthews, H. B. (Devonport), 14, Chesham Street, Brighton. 

Maunder, W. H. (Staverton), 7, Somerfield Road, Finsbury Park, N. 

Melluish, G. (Ottery St. Mary), 4, Little Pulteney Street, Shaftesbury 
Avenue, W. 

Metherell, C. (North Tawton), 22, St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 

Michelmore, Miss A, M. (Totnes), 53, Grand Avenue, Muswell Hill, N. 

Miller, Mrs. A. J. ( ), 5, Fairholme Road, West Kensington. 

*Morris, R. Burnet (South Molton), 24, Bramham Gardens, S.W. 

Mortimer, G. P. (Dunsford), 241, Romford Road, Forest Gate, E. 

Mudge, J. G. (Plympton), Oxford House, Bethnal Green, E. 

Mutten, A. W. (Devonport), Hillside, Mount Pleasant, Upper Clapton, N.E. 

Mutten, Mrs. A. W. (Devonport), Hillside, Mount Pleasant, Upper 
Clapton, N.E. 

Mutten, C. R. (Devonport), Hillside, Mount Pleasant, Upper Clapton, N.E 

Mutten, Miss E. B. L. (Devonport), Hillside, Mount Pleasant, Upper 
Clapton, N.E. 

Mutten, Miss N. E. (Devonport), Hillside, Mount Pleasant, Upper Clap- 
ton, N.E. 

Mutten, INIiss W. A. (Devonport), Hillside, Mount Pleasant, Upper Clap- 
ton, N.E. 

Noakes, F. W. (Totnes), 23, Ruskin Road, Lower Tottenham. 
Norrish, A. J. H. (Bideford), Toronto House, Forest Hill, S.E. 

Oakley, R. O. (Beer), 54, Sydney Road, Hornsey, N. 
Oakley, Mrs. F. E. (Ottery St. Mary), 54, Sydney Road, Hornsey, N. 
fOwen, W. A., King William's Town, South Africa. 
Owen, W. D. (Axmouth), The Poplars, Somerset Road, Brentford. 

Paine, C. F., 29, Vartry Road, Stamford HiU, N. 
Parkyn, H. (Okehampton) , 413, Oxford Street, W 
Parkhouse, Frank, Lordora, Rayleigh Road, Wimbledon. 
*Parr, R. J. (Torquay), 40, Leicester Square, W.C. Vice-President. 
Parsons, T., 74, Union Road, Clapham, S.W. 

Passmore, W. (Tiverton), loi, Elspeth Road, Clapham Common, S.W. 
Paterson, Miss Edith (Honiton), 16, Kingsgate Mansions, Red Lion 

Square. 
Patton, Charles (Paignton), 145, St. Alban's Tor, Bedford Park, W. 



The Devonian Year Book, 1912 141 



Patrick, F. (Exeter), 71, Sydney Street, Stoke Newington. 

Payne, Samuel (Torquay), 122, Albert Mansions, Battersea Park, S.W. 

Peace, J. W. Graham, 61, Dynevor Road, High Street, Stoke Newington, N. 

Pearce, J. Cyprian (Kingsbridge), 63, Gauden Road, Clapham, S.W. 

Peek, Sir Wilfrid, Bart. (Rousdon), 22, Belgrave Square, S.W. Vice- 
President. 

Penny, A. J. (Ottery St. Mary), 118, Cromwell Road, Wimbledon. 

Perrin, W. (Seaton), 42, Sneyd Road, Cricklewood, N.W. 

Perry, F. A. (Tiverton), 4, Kirchen Road, West Ealing, W. Committee. 

Philp, C. R. S. (Plymouth), The Livesey Library, Old Kent Road, S.E. 
Committee. 

Philp, Mrs. E. L. (Plymouth), The Livesey Library, Old Kent Road, S.E. 

Philp, D. P. (Plymouth), 44, Homefield Road, Chiswick, W. 

Phillpotts, Eden (Exeter), Eltham, Torquay. Vice-President. 

Pike, W. A. (Exeter), 37, Holmewood Gardens, Brixton Hill, S.W. 

Pillman, J. C. (Plymouth), J.P., The Cottage, Foots Cray, Kent. Vice- 
r^ys ^'tdpytt 
*Pilditch, PhiHp E. (Plymouth), L.C.C., 2, Pall Mall East, S.W. 
Vice-President. 

Pinkham, Alderman C. (Plympton), J. P., Linden Lodge Winchester 
Avenue, Brondesbury, N.W. Vice-President ; Chairman of Committee. 

Pinn, F. G., 41, Bishop's Mansions, S.W. 

Pinn, Mrs., 41, Bishop's Mansions, S.W. 

Pocock R. W. (descent) 51, Radnor Road, Harrow. W. 

Pope, W. S. (Sidmouth), 3, St. Ann's Villas, Holland Park, W. 

Popham, Mis. L. M., 81, Elgin Crescent, W. 

Popham, W. V. M. (Devon County School), 23, Moorgate Street, E.C. 

Potbury, T. R. (Sidmouth), M.A., 35, Park Parade, Harlesden, N.W. 

Powe, G. W., 44, Creswick Road, Acton, W, 

Powe, H. D. (Plymouth), 13, Ellerby Street, Fulham, S.W. Committee. 

Pratt, Frank (CuUompton), 104, Fore Street, E.C. 

Pride, A. E. (Thorverton), Woodland, Horn Lane, Woodford Green. 

Pullman, James, 8, Eastern Road, Wood Green, N. 

* Quick, Francis, 78, Gillespie Road, Highbury, N. 
Quick, N. (Tavistock), 15, Grove Park Road, South Tottenham, N. 

Radford, G. H., M.P. (Plymouth), Chiswick House, Ditton Hill, Surrey. 

Vice-President. 
Rawle, H. (Sidmouth), 41, Sandmere Road, Clapham, S.W. 
Reader, F. W. (Barnstaple), 51, Haydons Park Road, Wimbledon. 
Rew, Miss G. E., 51, Buckingham Palace Road, S.W. 
Roberts, C. Wynne (Torquay), Dryden House, Oundle. 
Rose, Miss E. L, Smith- (Exeter), 39, Bark Place, Bayswater, W. 
Rose, Miss R. Smith- (Exeter), Postal Order Branch, G.P.O. 
Rose, Mrs. Smith- (Broadclyst), 39, Bark Place, Bayswater, W. 
Ryall, J. (Exeter), 38, Hanover Street, Peckham, S.E. Committee. 
Ryan, W. (Plymouth), 163, Queen's Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Salter, Mrs. A. J. (Axminster), 62, West Smithfield, E.C. 

Sandford, E. (Plymouth), 62, Clarendon Road, Putney, S.W. 

Sansom, L. S. (Plymouth), Wyastone, Beedell Avenue, Westcliff-on-Sea 

Sansoni, W. (Tiverton), 92, Vansittart Road, Forest Gate, E. 

Scott, Capt. Robert F. (Plymouth), C.V.O., R.N., Admiralty, S.W. 

*Seaton, The Rt. Hon. Lord (Plympton), Beechwood, Plympton. Vice- 

. President. 
Schick Miss B., 28 Hamilton Terrace, St. John's Wood, N.W. 



I42 The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 

Seward, Mrs. Grace F. (descent), 15, Wolseley Gardens, Gunnersbury, W. 
Seward, W. R. (descent), 15, Wolseley Gardens, Gunnersbury, W. 
Sharland, A. W. (Exeter), " Edgecumbe," Ashburton Road, E. Cioydon. 
Shaw, E. Harved, 22, St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 
Shawyer, J. W. (Filleigh), Messrs. Kenny, Mahon & Co., 30-32, Broad 

Street House, E.C. Hon. Secretary. 
Shawyer, Mrs. J. W., 5, Hemington Avenue, Friern Barnet, N. 
Sheer, J. (North Petherwin), 13, King's College Road, N.W, 
Shelley, F. H. (Swimbridge), National Provincial Bank of England, 

Bishopsgate, E.C. 
Simmons, Sydney (Okehampton), " Okehampton," Torrington Park, 

Friern Barnet, N. Vice-President. 
Simpson, Leslie (Stonehouse), Bank House, King St., Hammersmith, W. 
Skinner, G. E. (Parracombe), 50, Cowley Road, Leyton, and 32, Sutton 

Court, Chiswick, W. 
Skinner, S. M. (Bradninch), i Hale Gardens, West Acton. 
Slade, H. J. (Torquay), 11, Maze Road, Kew, S.W. 
Small, A. (Barnstaple), 34, Goldsmith Road, Leyton. 
Small, Miss Kathleen ( ), 42, Weymouth Street, W. 

Small, Mrs. E. J. (Ilfracombe), 91, Portnall Road, Maida Hill, W. 
Smart, A. (Plymouth), 79, Gresham Street, E.C. 
Smart, Mrs. A. (Plymouth), 21, Columbia Road, Ilford, Essex. 
Smart, W. H. (Plymouth), St. Bride Institute, Ludgate Circus, E.C. 

Committee. 
Smith, E. Rivers, 10, Park Road, Uxbridge, W. 
Smith, Master Granville (Dartmouth), Master of the Supreme Court, 

Royal Courts of Justice, W.C. 
Smith, W. H. (Torquay), 11, Acfold Road, Fulham, S.W. 
Snell, C. Scott (Barnstaple), Gravesend House, Ridgeway, Wimbledon. 
'Snell, M. B. (Barnstaple), J. P., 5, Copthall Buildings, E.C. Vice-President. 
Snell, Mrs. C. S. (Budleigh), Gravesend House, Ridgeway, Wimbledon. 
Snell, J. (Axminster), Hanger Hill Farm, Eahng. 
Snow, R. J. B. ( ), War Office, Whitehall, S.W. 

Soames, D. (Exeter), 52, Manor Road, Brockley, S.E. 
Soper, Rowland (Stonehouse), 13, Morley Road, East Twickenham. 
Southwood, F. C. (Bideford), 105, Abbey Road, N.W. 
Spear, Arthur (Plymouth), 61, Asylum Road, S.E. 

Spear, Sir John W. (Tavistock), Venn, M.P. Tavistock. Vice-President. 
Squire, H. Brinsmead (Torrington), London, County and Westminster 

Bank, 90, Wood Street, E.C. Hon. Treasurer. 
Squire, J. P. (North Tawton), 31, Angell Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Stanbury, H. (Plympton), St. Matthew's School, Westminster. 
Stanmore, Miss Florence (Exeter), Scarsdale House, Kensington, W. 
Steed, A. W. (Devonport), 25, Clavering Road, Aldersbrook, South 

Wanstead, Essex. 
Steer, Rev. W. H. Hornby (Woodleigh), M.A., 52, Avenue Road, Regent's 

Park, N.W. 
Stidworthy, G. F. Kendall- (Kingsbridge), Friern Barnet Road, Friern 

Barnet, N. 
Stradhng, A. E. (Seaton), 49, Glengarry Road, East Dulwich, S.E. 
Strange, Oliver (Tiverton), -za North Avenue, Kew Gardens, S.W. 
Strange, Mrs. Oliver (Tiverton), 2a. North Avenue, Kew Gardens, S.W. 
Streat, F. J. (Ottery St. Mary), 5, Ilminster Gardens, Lavender Hill, S.W. 
Stribhng, W. J. L. (descent), Bulstrode, Uxbridge Road, Slough. 
Stroulger, C. H., 46, Maddox Street, W. 
Stroulger, Mrs. C. H., 46, Maddox Street, W. 



The Devonian Year Book, 191 2 143 

Studley, Frank (Tiverton), Woodside, Hampton Road, Worcester Park, 

Surrey. 
Studley, G. (Uffculme), Worcester Park, Surrey. 
Sturdy, A. M. (Plymouth), 40, Petherton Road, Highbury, N. 
Summers, J. (Ottery St. Mary), 44, Grove Hill Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Committee. 
Swigg, F. G. (Plymouth), 163, Queen's Road, Peckham, S.E. 

Talbot, Miss Mabel A. (Hockworthy), 42, Weymouth Street, Portland 

Place, W. 
Tarring, F. W., F.R.I.B.A. (Harberton), 26,Coolhurst Road, Crouch End. N 
Taverner, J. L.. 24, High Street, Ealing, W. 
+ Taylor, A. (West Buckland), Devon County School, West Buckland, 

North Devon. 
Taylor, A. F. (St. Mary Church), Ingleside, Hanwell, W. 
Taylor, J. H. (Northam), The Lodge, Old Deer Park, Richmond. 
Thomas, J. R. (Exeter), 112, Manor Park Road, Harlesden, N.W. 
Thomson, F. J. S. (Exeter), 31, Angell Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Thorn, H. B. (Exeter), 117, Dalston Lane, N.E. 

Thorn, Miss I. H. (Chagford), 9, Springwell Avenue, Harlesden, N.W. 
Thorn, R. (Chagford), 9, Springwell Avenue, Harlesden, N.W. 
Titherley, A. (Exeter), Laurence Villa, Boston, Lines. 
Tolchard, W. D., 734, High Road, Leytonstone. 
Toley, A. (Stockland), The Grove, Hanwell. 
Toll, A. E. J. (Torquay). 22, St. Paul's Churchyard, E.G. 
Tolley, H. (Exeter)', 316, Brixton Road, S.W. 
Tonkin, Miss Ada (Newton Abbot), 5, Upper Brook Street, W. 
Tozer, Henry (Exeter), i, Durham House Street, Strand, W.C. 
Tczer, J. R. K. (Paignton), 6, Cannon Street, E.C. 
Train, J. Wilfred (Chudleigh), Secretaries' Office, H.M. Customs and 

Excise, Lower Thames Street, E.C. 
Treharne, W. J. (llfracombe), Abbotsford, The Grove, Church End, 

Finchley, N. 
Trist, C. J. S. (Plymouth), 49, Longhurst Road, Lewisham, S.E. 
Trott, Thomas (Kentisbeare), 27, Knowle Road, Brixton, S.W. 
Tucker, G. H. L. ( ), 83, Ham Park Road, West Ham, E. 

Tucker, Thomas (Exeter), 49, Folburg Road, Stoke Newington, N.E. 
Tuckett, C. F., 40, Chatsworth Avenue, Merton Park. 
Turner, Mrs. M. A. (llfracombe), 28, Falmouth Road, New Kent Rd., S.E. 
Twose, A. W. (Tiveiton), 22, St. Paul's Churchyard, E.C. 
Twose, W. (Culmstock), 90, King's Road, Chelsea, S.W. 
Tyte, H. (Barnstaple), 121, Lansdowne Road, Seven Kings, Essex. 
Tyte, Miss K. (Barnstaple), 7a, Morgan Mansions, Holloway Road, N. 

*Upcott, Lieut.-Col. Sir Frederick Upcott (Cullompton) , K.C.V.O., C.S.L, 
227, St. James Court, Buckingham Gate, S.W. Vice-President. 

■*Upcott, Lady (Cullompton), 227, St. James Court, Buckingham Gate, 
S.W. 
Upham, W. Reynell- (Bicton), 13, Constantine Road, Hampstead, N.W. 

Vellacott, H. D. (Tawstock), C.A., 141, Fenchurch Street, E.C. Hon. 

A uditor. 
Venn, W. H. (Whimple), M.A., St. Peter's College, Manor Road, .Brockley, 

S.E. 
Vibert, F. H. (Totnes), Rock Villa, Sevenoaks. 
Vibert, Herbert (Totnes), 104, Fore Street, E.C. 



144 -^^^ Devonian Year Book, 1912 

Vinen, C. S. (descent), 11, Lombard Stieet, E.C. 

Vivian, Henry (Coinwood), 6, Bloomsbury Square, W.C Vice-President. 
Vivian, Miss Doris, (Devonport), 31. Penwortham Road, Streatham, S.W. 
Volk, W. A. (Plymouth), 16, Mortimer Street, W. Musical Director. 
Vospei, Thos. (Plymouth), 2, Garden Court, Temple, E.C. 

Waghorn, Mrs. A. G. (Horrabridge), 3, Westcombe Park Road, Black- 
heath, S.E. 
Walden, Mrs. A. M. (Exmouth), 8, Parson's Green Lane, Fulham. S.W. 
Waldron, Rev. A. J. (Plymouth), St. Matthew's Vicarage, Brixton, S.W. 

Vice-President. 
^Walker, F. (Drewsteignton) , 68, Coleman Street, E.C. 
Walrond, Conrad M. (Cullompton), " Braeside," St. Catherine's Lane, 

Eastcote. 
Walrond, H. W. (Cullompton), London, County and Westminster Bank, 

Knightsbridge, S.W. 
Walton, C. H. (Teignmouth), 54, Union Grove, Clapham, S.W. 
Westaway, J., 22, Dane's Inn House, 265, Strand, W.C. 
Western, J. R. (descent), Rosario, Holly Park Gardens, Finchley, N. 
White, A. ( ), s, Aberdeen Court, Aberdeen Park, N. 

White, F. H. (Teignmouth), 33, St. Mary-at-Hill, E.C. 
*White, Sir WilHam H., K.C.B. (Devonport), Cedarscroft, Putney Heath. 

Vice-President. 
White, T. Jeston (Stockland), 39, Burne Street, N.W. 
White, W. A. (Exeter), Crabtree, Riverside, Fulham, S.W. 
Whitley, H. Michell (Plymouth), Dalkeith House, Queen's Road, 

Richmond. 
Williams, F. (Otterton), 195, Fentiman Road, Clapham, S.W. 
Willis, C. A. Combemartin), 28, Falmouth Road, Southwark, S.E. 
WiUis, P. T. (Combemartin), 28, Falmouth Road, Southwark, S.E. 
Wilton, F. W. (Hartland), Glynn Villa, Ormond Road, Hornsey Rise, N 
Wollocombe, J. R. (Lewdown), c/o Rev. G. Sampson, Ramsdell Vicarage, 

Basingstoke, Hants. 
Woodly, E. T. B. (Ashburton), 4, Alexandra Avenue, Wood Green, N. 
Woollcombe, Rev. H. S. (Northlew), M.A., Vice-President. 
Worth, A. J. (Devonport), London County & Westminster Bank, Mary- 

lebone Road, W. 
Wreford, C. W. (Exeter), 42, Dyne Road, Brondesbury, N.W. 
Wreford, Mrs. C. W. (Exeter), 42, Dyne Road, Brondesbury, N.W. 
Wrelord, J. (Exeter), M.B., 66, West End Lane, N.W. Vice-President. 
Wright, F. G. (Tiverton), 10, Old Deer Park Gardens, Richmond. 
Wright, J. L. (Tiverton), 10, Old Deer Park Gardens, Richmond. 
Wright, W. T. (Exeter). 

Yendole, Wm. (Newton St. Cyres), 14, Harbut Road, Clapham Junction, 

S.W. 
Yeo, James (Barnstaple), Woodhurst, Warlingham, Surrey. 

Zellerg, J. H. (Exeter), 31, Radipole Road, Fulham, S.W. 



Members are earnestly requested to notify alterations of address, and place 
of association with Devonshire {in cases where this is omitted), to the Hon. 
Secretary, John W. Shawyer, 5, Hemington Avenue, Friern Barnet, N. 



O 



CJ 



DA The Devonian year book 
675 

1910-12 



PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE 
CARDS OR SLIPS FROM THIS POCKET 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LIBRARY