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Full text of "World's Fair : under the auspices of Rockton Agricultural Society, will be held at Rockton Tuesday and Wednesday Oct. 8th and 9th, 1912. --]"



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OCTOEEk 8 AND 9 






ON 



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-,^^. ' A. iU' .^ fee* 



I im HiiBiiii I ■niiMi II 



he Canadian Eink of t ommerce 



Greater Effort 
is Required 



On our part to engage the attention of small 
depositors than the larger. 

Very many customers to large financial trans- 
actions know of and avail themselves of our 
service. 

But those whose banking is limited, or to 
whom the o cation is rarely presented can 
avail themselves just as wel with every assur- 
ance of careful attention and courtesy extended 



THE TRADERS BANK 

OF CANADA 

21-23 KINCx ST. WEST 
WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT-King Street West, Hamilton 

Office Hours as Usual and Saturday Evenings 
A. B. ORD, Manager. 



Send for a Copy -Now 




EATON^S 

I 

Fall and Winter 

CATALOGUE 






No. 104. 



191213. 



FREE FOR THE ASKING' 



YOUR GUIDE FOR GREATER ECONOMY. 

Don't be without a Copy of this Catalogue in your home. 
It lists almost every home need at prices which means a great 
saving to you. Send us a trial order wiih our guarantee, as 
ycur protection which says :- 

SATISFACTION ASSURED OR YOUR MONEY BACK. 

Every purchase, no matter how sciail, brings with it our 
guarantee You need not hesitate to order freely with sogreat 
an assurance of no personal loss cr disappoiniment. 

A HELPFUL FREE DELIVERY OFFER. 

All heavy goods listed are sent freight paid at the prices 
given in our catalogue, other goods are sent free delivery with 
all 25.00 orders or over. Note our low prices and then you 
will better appreciate the goodness of our free deliveiy olfer 



<^T. EATON G<2 

TORONTO 



NirrED 
CANADA 



^VWWWW S ^^ ^ ^^ A ^ N ^^A^^^A^AA^^^^^A^^ 




E880N 

FOR PICTURES 

IN 
PHOTOGRAPHY 



"ATELIER" 
Preston Ontario 

Telephone Connection 
Street Cars pass the door 



The Hamilton Provident and 
Loan Society 

FOUNDED 1871 

Capital Prid Up - $1,160,000 

Reserve Fund and Surplus Profits - $760,294 
Total Assets - - -$4,587,000 

Money is Received on Deposit Call and Get Rates 

4 per cent Interest payable htM yearly on our 
Debentures to run one, two, three or five years 



SE URirV— ABS )LUTE 

Office : Cor. King and Hughson Street 

C. FERRIR, Treasurer 



Hamilton 



^^^^V^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ A ^ W^ ^^/^^VVM V >AAAA» 



THE ATELIER 

20^22 West King Street 

HAMILTON ONTARIO 



The leadincj store for ladies'. 

Ready-to-wear garments. 

Perfect fit by practical fitters. 

Good quality-we have nuihing 
else. 

Style exclusive and up to the 
minute/ 

In our ordered department 
your choice from liurope's 
finest mills, in all the latest 
colorines. 



E. A. BARTMANX 

LADIEH' TAILOR 




1912 

Municipal 

Council 

Clerk and 
Trearurer 

Beverly 

Township 




CHARLES SPARKS, Reeve 



JAMES THOMPSON Deputy-Reeve 





Epliraim McPhirson, Councillor 



Sti-plion Moffat. Councillor 




^ 







f ran': C. Bigrs, C.uncillor 



VVilli'a n Wood, Jr.. Clerk and Treas 




(registered) 

Canadian Furs. 

Furty years' experience in Manufacturing Fine 
Furs in Canada, has made the name of 
FAIRWEATHERS a pledae of distinctive 
style and a guarantee of quality. 

FUfR and FU^ LIJNEQ GJfRMEUTS. 
Sets and Single Pieces. 

Russian and Hudson Bay Sable, 
Mink, Ermine, Lynx, Chinchilla, 
Persian Latub, Fox, Fislier, 
Alaska Sable, Raccooti, etc. 

MOUNTED HEADS AND FUR RUGS. 



Visitors are very cordially invited to inspect our Fur Show Rooms 
which are open the year round. 



Send for our Illustrated Fur Catalogue, 

FAIRWEATHERS 

LIMITED, 

84-86 YONGE STREET. 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG 



FORMER PRESIDENTS OF THE WORLDS' FAIR 

WILLIAM DICKSON, President, 1853 to I860 inclusive 
[never had photograph taken] 





WILLIAM HEXDERSON, Sr. 

President i36i-2-,s-4.i.6-8-9 



JOHN P, LAWRASON 

President 1867 




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PEERLESS ORNAMENTAL FENCING 

Made by THE BANWELL HOXIE WIRE FENCE CO . Ltd., Hamilton 

6 



Gilbert J. Clayton 



DEAL E R IN 

BOOTS 



AND 



SHOES 



Careful buying assures you of wear and 
comfort at a reasonable price. 

Do not forget the number 

25 McNab Street N., Hamilton 





ROBERT HENDERSON 

President 1 870-1 



CHRISTOPHER RICKER 

President 1872,3-3 



SHEARER'S PERFECT BURNER 

FOR LAMPS AND LANTERNS 
No Odor No Smoke Perfect Combustion; 

Every Burner Guaranteed 





Lamp Burner Lantern Burner 

The best Ligbt in the world toiwork or read by is a kerosene lamp or 
^antern equipped with one of our burners. 

Gives a surprisingly large, clear, white flame— 32 candle power. 

As much light as three ordinary lamps. 

Why use three lamps when one will do the work ? 

Simple in construction, durable, eflicient. Nothing to get out of order. 
PRICE 15c EACH. 

THE PERFECT BURNER CO., 154-156158 Yerk St., Hamilton 



ARE YOU DEAF? 

If you are hard of hearing come in and see our latest 
Electrical device for aid to hearing 

THE HEAR-O-PHOINE . 

It is away in advance of others, and has the advantage of 
being so construe. ed as to allow for change of loudness. 

We will be pleased to demonstrate this instrument to those 
interested. It is neat and very handy. 

WATCHES. 

We offer you some big values in Watches 

Gold Filled Ladies' or Gent's Watches 6.50 

Gold Filled Waltham Watch, 8.00 

15 Jewel Waltham Watch, .. 7.50 

See our special movements, they give the best satisfaction, and 
have many points of superiority over others, let us show them to you* 
Ther« are prices from 7.00 to 50.00. 

FOR WEDDINGS. 

When you want a Wedding Ring or a Marriage License we 
can furnish it and our prices are right. Marriage License 2.00. 

COLLINSON 

Jeweler and Graduate Optician, 

Ey«s Examined Free. Expert RepairiDg^ 

Post Office Block, DUNDAS. 




DAVID PATTERSON 

President 1875 





ROBERT FERGUSON 

President 1876 



■H. 



^ IT. 



f/;/ ■ H# 




i ' 



RICHARD BANNEN 
President 1877 



ROBERT YOUNG 

President 1878 



CHRISTIE BISCUITS 

are the Purest of all Pure Foods 
Over 500 Varieties, 

CHRISTIE, BROWN & CO., Limitei 

TORONTO. 



10 



USE 



COMFORT 
SOAP 




44 



IT'S ALL RIGHT" 



SA^^ THE ^VRAPPERS 




HENRY BUGNER 
President 1879 





EDWIN GRAY 
President 1881 



HENRY HOWARD 
President 1882 



RiORDON Plating W^orks 

We silver plate Knives, Forks, Spoons, Tea Sets, Cake, 
Baskets, Trays, Etc. 

Brass Kettles converted into beautiful Jardinieres. 
We also Nickle Plate Stove Parts. 



13 PARK ST. N. HAMILTON: 

PHONE 904 




-y^k. your ^eeAery^or 

^ T>E^cmpTiVEjpooi^ET. 

or Wrife direct" fb tfee n^anii/^cfurer^.* 

OfRE 'BliOS.&O. t^"^B>- PRESTON 





WILLIAM MENZIES WILLI aM 15AIRD 

President 1883 Pie.iieut 1S84 

JW. LAWRASON now of Eundas, was for many years a resident of 
Beverly, and has many re:ative9 and fiienrls in the Townbliip. His 
* grandfather, John P. Law- 
rason, one of Beverly's 
pioneers in the olden days, 
took an active interest in the 
Beverly Agricultural Society, 
being its president in 1867. Mr. 
Lawrason is a son of James Miller 
Lawrason who succeeded John 
P. Lawrason on the old Lawrason 
homestead near Troy where he 
died in 1878. 

The subject of this sketch 
sueceeded Mr. David Bell, tlu 
society's worthy secretary, a.' 
Teacher of School Section No. 6 
Beverly. After teachinjj for Jpu; 
years he joined the legil fratern- 
ity graduating from Osgood e 
H 11, Toronto, in. 1899. Since 
that date he has been practising 
his chosen profession in JJundas 
where he has by his honest and 
business like methods b .ilt up a 
large practice He takes an active 
part in pub ic matters hav ng ser- 
ved as Chairman of the Board of p/-i»t r» • 
Education, and for the years 1909 J. W. LAWRASON, Barrister, &C«. 
1 ,^r „ AT„. ^- „f r\ i„„ 




and 1910 as Ma) or of Dundas. 



DUNDAS. 



14 



J. M. KnowWSon 

Furniture 
Undertaker 

Best Values in Wentvvorth 
Cash or on Easy Payments 



Funeral Director 

Continuous Business Over 60 Years 
Everything New and Up-to-Date 



J. M. Knowles' Son 

DUNDAS, ONT. 



15 





HENRY CHAMBERS 
President 18&5 




ANGUS McKELLAR 
President 18S6 



SOCIAL 7^^ 



COFFEE 



Cpvp I A I BAKING POWDER 



ARE THE BEST VALUE SOLD 



COUPONS IN ALL SOCIAL GOODS 

In Exchange for Coupons we give handsome premiums 



Social Tea Co. 



:doyou jersey cream yeast cakes? i^\\^^ 

16 



USE 



A PROPOSITION that is worth while, one that 
will pay you to look into. Are you interested ? 
You are, here are the details, when in need of 

DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 
BOOTS ^ SHOES, Etc., . . 

:go to the . . 

Maple Leaf Store, 

LYNDEN, 

where a complete stock will be found up-to-date, 
and at prices that will defy competition. 

HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR 
ALL KINDS OF PRODUCE. 

Fair and Honest Dealing to all. 

BzLL PHONE 102. 

AUTO 49, 1 Long 1 Short. 

GEO. PIRIE. 

17 




THOM\s McQueen 

President 1887 



EMERSON CLEiMKNT 

President SSS 



Poultry Fencing that is 

Stronger than Seems Necessary 

We make our poultry fencing dose enough to turn small fowl — 
then we make it extra strong, so it will last for years and keep 
the cattle out. The hea\y, hard steel top and bottom wires 
hold it taut and prevent it from sagging. 

POULTRY FENCE 
SAVES EXPENSE 



It is well galvanized so as to protect it from rust. It makes 
such a firm, upstanding fence that it requ'res less than 
half the posts needed for the ordinary poultry fence, and 
that means a big saving to you. Write for particulars 
We make farm and ornamental fences and gates of 

exceptional quality. Agents wanted where not now represented. 

The Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Co., Ltd. 

Dapt. C Winnipeg, IMan. Hamilton, Ont. 



18 




Japanese Laborotories 

HAMILTON CANADA 

Our Goods are all Leaders 

One Second Shoe Polish 
Japanese Shoe Polish 
Japanese Shoe Dressing 
Japanese Ammonia PoNA/der 
Autolene Metre Polish 
Magic French Polish F; 



I or "' 
urniture 



You money will be cheerfully refunded 
if any of the above lines do not give 
you satisfaction on trial. 



19 




JOHN A. CORNELL 

President iSS . 



MORRIS SHELLARD 
l'ii'-i>iei)l ihq-) 




LORNE MAIN, M.W/ 
DUNDAS, ONT. 

PHONE 153. 

An old Beverly Boy and son 
i)f Aaron Main, Sheffield, Ont. 



R. McKay & Co. 

Hamilton's Progressive Store. 

We Select, Sell our Merchandise, and treat our 
patrons, with a view to have them come a^ain — wish 
them to come to this Store at all times, feeling it's 
their Store. 

It Pays to Shop at McKay's 

For all . . . 

Dry Goods 
Carpets 
Ready to Wear Garments 
Furs 

imillitvery 
m:ex's Furnishings, Etc. 

R. McKAY ^ CO., 

In the Heart of Hamilton. 



ai 





G. H. WULHOLIw VND 
PresiJeut 1S91 



T. S. HENDERSON 
President 1802 




J. W. Dickson 

AUCTIONEER 
and 
REAL ESTATE AGENT 



.ist Your Farms with 
Me 



KING STREET 

DUNDAS 



When in Dundas 

Call at Webbers 

FOR YOUR 

Tin and Qraniteware 

Builders' & Farmers' Hardware 

Paints, Oils, etc. 

Agents for 

Martin Senour 100% Pure Paints 

McClary's Famous Stoves &- Heaters 

Pandora Ranges 

Plymouth Binder Twine and Rope 

Chapman &- Stikney Gasoline Engines 

Beaver Board something new in tke Building 
Line, takes the place of Lath and Plaster. 

Webber Hardware Co., 

King Street, DUNDAS. 



Phone 68 

as 





JOHN BOYLB 
President 1893 



REUBEN WEDGE 
President 1894 



ESTABLISHED FIFTY-ONE YEARS 

Watches Rings Jewelry 

The largest stock of the finest quality 
goods at lowest prices. Buy at 

THOMAS I.EES 

And be sure of the Quality. 
EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 

THOMAS LEES 



Reliable Jeweler 
5 James Street North 

24 



HAMILTON 



RAPHAEL & CO. 



Clothing of Quality 
for Men, Women 
and Children 



FURS 



36-38 West King Street 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



*S 







^ 


ife 


, — ^ ■ V ■< 


W i^TSt^-- 




-V 




W. R. BOYLE 
President 1895 



JOHN O'CONNOR 
President 1896 




34 King St. West. 

MebbiriG Cakes anb 
jfine Canbies. 



26 



"Victor Soap 



We all use soap and of course all want to 
get the be!t, bcth in quality and value 



ff 



You get this \ / I r^ "T^ /^ D It is ihe best 
when you Duy ▼ 1 ^^ 1 V^ 1\ value in Can- 
ada to-day. If you are not already using it, try a bar 
and see for yourself. 

VICTOR SOAP is made of the best material 
that money cap buy, v\ith the latest Improved Machinery, 
undtr the personal supervision of one of the firm, and 
f;very bar of it is guaranteed. 

The Premiums you get in exchange for "Victor" 
Wrappers are all of the best. 

A visit to the show-room, yy Emerald Street 
South, which is open daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
(Saturday close i p.m.) will repay you. 



David Morton &- Sons 

LIMITED 
VICTOR SOAP WORKS 

HAMILTON Canada 

«7 





DANIEL WRAY 
President 1897 



DENNIS DWYER 
President i8q8 



The Molsons Bank 



Capital 
Rest Fund 



?4, 000, 000 
$4,600,000 



Has 86 Branches in Canada and Agents and Corres- 
pondents in all the principal cities of the world. 

A General Banking Business Transacted. 
Savings Bank Department in all Branches, 
Interest allowed at highest current rates. 

Two Branches in Hamilton— James St. South and Market Square 

W. S. CONNOLLY, Manager 
a8 



BE A JUDQE---BUV A POUND 

OF OUR 

Indo-Ceylon Tea 

And your own judgment will ask you to co^e back for more. 
The young, tender leaf of the early plant contains that delicious 
flavor that appeals to all. Strictly our own blends. Cannot be 
purchased elsewhere. 

25c., 30c. and 40c a pound. 

Always the same. 



Bell Baking Powder 



Best for Cakes or Pastry. 
15 cents pound tin. 



JOHN 0. CARPENTER 

10 Market Square, Hamilton. 
29 




ARCH. FKRi-.USSUN 
President 1S99 




JAMES GEORGE 
President 1900 



JOHN W. rSEWITT 

A WELL KNOWN AND SUCCK.-«SFUL 

Butcher 



and 

Cattle Merchant 

was burn in Duiida-. He 
sucLctdcd his lather in the 
busint-ss some twenty three 
)easago. Hut in reality 
has l)eeii all his life in the 
bu iness, being wi h his 
father before he stalled for 
himself. It is one of the 
oldest business places in: 
the town of Dundas. 




John Newitt. 



30 



Diarrhoea, Dysentery, Colic, Stomach 
Craps, Cholera Morbus, Cholera Infan- 
tum, Seasickness, Summer Complaint 
and all looseness of the Bowels may be 
rapidly and effectually cured by the use of 

Dr. Fowler's Extract of 
Wild Strawberry 

The medicine with a record of cures extending over 65 years. 
You don't experiment when you buy it. 

Do not be imposed on by any unscrupulous dealer who wishes to 
substitute the so-called Strawberry Compounds for " Dr. Fowler's," a& 
these no-name, no reputation substitutes may be dangerous to your health. 
Always keep it in the house. 

^^ Proved it again and again'* 

Mr. John R. Childerhouse, Orillia, Ont. writes : — "When in Fort 
William, last summer, I was taken sick with diarrhoea, and became so 
weak and suffered such great pain, I had to quit work. Our Manager 
advised me to try Dr. Fowler's Extract of Wild Strawberry, so on my 
way home I bought a bottle, and after taktng four doses I was cured. 
We always keep a bottle in the house. We have also used it for our 
children, and find it an excellent remedy for summer complaint." 

The Original is Manufactured only by 

The T. MILBURN CO., Limited 

Toronto, Ontario 

Price 35c 

31 





WM. McCLURE 
Presideut 1901 



STEl'UhN NlSiiiU' 
Presidt-ui jyo2 



ESTABLISHED 1840. 

Just think of it, over 70 YeaPS agO, in the same block on 
James Street South, and nothwithstanding that the Grocery Busi- 
ness is very well done in the City, in fact competition as delight- 
fully keen, our business is increasing every year. 

Tels, 786, 830 

JAMES OSBORNE & SON 

Importers of Groceries, 
Wines and Liquors, . . 

13 & 14 JAMES ST. SOUTH 

Hamilton. 



32 



BrantfordGasoleneEngines 

Wt hue the largest and most up-tc-date facto ) in 
Canaci*^ ; nd manufacture the most complete line. 




Brantford 

Windmills 



are the standard of t (Ticiency. 

Towers girted cviiy live feet 
and doiib e li.aed. 



\Vc m liuf-JClure complete lii.t s • I 
ORAIN GRINDERS 

PUMPS, TANKS, 

WATER BOXES, 

STEEL SAV/ FRAMES, 

POWER SPRAYING OUTFITS, 
Etc. 

S^nd for Catalogue or call 
ai F.iCtory if interested. . 

(joold Shapley & Muir Co., uimted, 

BRANTFORD, Ont 

33 





JAMES NICHOLSON 
Fresident 1903 




WILLIAM THOMPSON 
President 1905 




JOHN McQueen 

President 1904 




JOSEPH BETZNER 

Presidei't 1906 



f-^M^^^?"^ 



ELECTRIC GRINDING IVORKS 



TAYfaOl BROS. " '^"tir '"""' 

Manufacturer and dealer in all kinds of New Cutlery 

Scissors, Razors and Knives Ground. Razors Concaved. 

Tailors' and Barbers' Shears Ground. Hair Clipper?- and Horse Clippers 

Sharpened. Lawn Mowers Sharpened and Rep.tired^ 



34 




A GOOD ONE. 



THE BOSS 



Over 2o,oco sold in Ontario and the West. 
You should be in this. Tr) one. 



Walter Woods & Co. 



Hamilton and Winnipeg 



-''■ 35 -^'- 






THjMA^ McNlCEIOL, 
Pres dent 1908 




WM. J. BURGi:S6 
President 19 9 



ANTHONY GARROCH 
President i.,lo 



WILKINSON & KOMPASS 

Wholesale C »rnage and Wagon Hardware. 
B It* !ron and Steel 

\2Z to 32 McNab Srreet South HAMILTON 

We sell to lie ir«de only and ship promptly 
^Branches at Toronto, O.it., Wmmpeg, Man. 

36 



ESTABIF! TD 
1839 







SjjfflLy jLilL 



fii^'^W^ 



... 




Gore District Mutual Fire Insurance Company 

Patronize Your Independent Home Company 
SECURITY UNDOUBTED 

Total Assets to pa> looses 1763.193 70 Lo'^ses Paid 52,667,572.11 

J. N. McKENDRICK, Se-'y.Treas. 

AGENTS— F SUTER. Dundas THO-:, McNichol, Dundas^ 

BL\KE & AITKIN. Gait DaVID BKLL, Rockton 

37 





\\ M S\t.E^, icsiuiiit J911 



JOHN MALCOLM, President 1912 




RGBKRr A INKSELLER 
1st Vice President 1912 



iJANIEL BADGER 
and Vice-President 1912 



WM. McDonald Usuer of Mamage Ucensu 
ROCKTON - ONT. 

38 



The Four MAPLE LEAF Braxds 

BINDER TWINE 

Provides a choice of four lengths — 

Oilt Edge, 650 ft. per lb. Pure manilla 
Gold Leaf, 600 ft. per lb. Manilla 
Silver Le-f, 550 ft per lb. Standard Manilla 
Maple Leaf, 500 ft. per lb. Standard] 

Adapted for Binders of all makes and 
conditions, if properly adjusted 

The Fibres we use are the longest, 
strongrst and cleanest obtainable. 

Our machinery is the most modern. 

Our operators are experienced. 



Our factory is under expert supervision 
and th - most perfect manufacturing 
system. 

All combine to make the Four 
Brands of Binder Twine the 
best on the market. 

Do net be persuaded that other]Twines are 'just as good' 
Every bale of our Twine is solid vane-no paper or waste material 

Product of Canadian Capital and Industry Satisfaction Guaranteed 

If your local dealer cannot supply you, 

write direct to us 

THE 

BRANTFORD CORDAGE Co., 

BRANTFORD, ONT. Limitea 

ROPE AND CORDAQE OF ALL KINDS. 




39 




WORLD'S 

FAIR 
SECRETARIES 

AND 
ASSISTANT 
SECRETARY 




JOHN ARMSTRONG 

Secretary 18 years 



WALLACE Mcdonald 

Secretary 6 years 





DAVID B.LLv 
Secr-etary 36 years 



WILLIAM Mcdonald 

Assistant Secretary 26 years 



Gri 



ler son's Candf" ^""^ 



lies Good 



M. GRIERSON 

164 King Street East, Hamilton 

Candy and Ice [Cream IVfanufacturer 

40 



SOCLEAN 




Solves 

THE 

Cleaning 
Problem 



The scientifically prepared compound that makes 
sweeping possible without raising dust. Saves scrubb- 
ing^ kills the dust and germs, brightens up your 
carpets and rugs and keeps your floors neat and clean 

Used on fleers, ti es. linoleums, oil cloths, carpets 
and rugs, and possesses properties that firmly grip the 
dust and dry cleans them. Contains no heavy sub- 
stance that will settle in floor cracks and carpets, or 
stain them. 

Sold at all first class grocers, in 25c,, 50c. and 
$1 00 pails, also in barrels for buildings 

SOCLEAN Limited, 



Manufacturers 



TORONTO 



41 




MATTHEW JACKSON 
Director since 1885 




WM. COWIE. Director 1864, 1865, 1893 
and every year since 





MAlyACHI SAGER. Director 1887 to 1908 JOHN McPHAIL 

1st President 1904 Director from 1893 to 1903 



W. HARDY, Harness in all Varieties. 

Trunks. Valises, Whips, Sweat Pads, Dusters, Fly Nets, Saddles, 
Bridles. See our Si 5 Harness per set. Repairing promptly done 



KING STREET 



DUNDAS 



42 




EVERY BALD MAN 

who considers his health and takes 

pride in his appearance, should wear 

"A Dorenwend Sanitary Patent Toupee." 

The superior qualities of this toupee, 
natural appearance, its wearing power*, 
ventilation, perfection in construction, 
makes it the only perfect Toupee in the 
World to=day 



To all Visiting 
♦Toronto, we ex- 
tend an Invita- 
tion, to pay us a 
visit for 
A Free Demonstration, and to those who 
-cannot call, we will send on request Litera- 
ture and Handsome Illustrated Catalogue. 

Perfect satisfaction guaranteed 
on all MAIL ORDERS. 
WRITE NOW TO 

The Dorenwend Coy. of Toronto Ltd., 

(The House of Quality Hair Goods), 
103-105 Yonge Street, TORONTO 




Golden Syrup Vinegar 

Beautiful Golden Color— Rich Flavor 

For Pickling purposes and Table use is far superior to White 
Wine or Cider Vinegar and costs no more. 

TRY A SAMPLE BARREL. 

Your Customers wiil be delighted with it 

Manufactured under government supervision - only by 

ThejWilson, Lytle, Badgerow Co., Limited 

TORONTO 

The Largest Vinegar Works in America 



43 




WILBER SWEET 
Director since 1898 





CHARLES BOYLE 
Director since 1899 



^r^ 


vt^^^^l 


^§ 


M 


m^ 


fl 


HMIi^i 


Hi 



SAM. J HLASTOW 
Director since 1900 



JOHN ALLAN 
Director since 190 1 



CRISP 



BICYCLE REPAIRER 
AND LOCKSMITH 



Safes and Vault Door Locks Repaired. All kinds of Lccks Repaired 

and Keys Fitted Charges moderate Wheels for sale or hire 

A bankrupt stock of hardware at half regular price 

36 YORK ST., HAMILTON. 



44 



The Machine 
that is difftrrent 
from all others. 



The 'Melotte' 



Has a larger sale 
than any other 
Cream Separator 
in the British 

CREAM SEPARATOR Empire. 

is yearly replacing thousands of other makes of Cream Separators. 
The "Melotte'^ is always purchased by those who know its value 

The Reason Why 



It lasts 

It skims 

clean. 

It pleases 
the user. 

It gives gen- 
uine satis- 
faction. 



There ore the '"Melotte" is the cheapest Cream St^paraior to buy. 
Proof Names of Users in your neighborhood sent you for the .asking 

THE 'IISTER" GASOLINE OR GAS ENGINE (English Made) 





For simplicity, 
quality ai d finibh 
The "LISTER" 
Gasoline Enjiine 
has Dvj equa? ai.dfor 
low c< St I f running 
and upkeep there is 
roothing like ii in 
the world. 




The "LISTER" 
Gtisuline Engine is 
preeminently suit- 
id for Mecnauic's 
shop, or for any 
work on the farm, 
ani cannot be put 
to a wroug use 
witLin its power. 



Full Parlicu ars, Catalogues, Ltc , fite. Write us. 
EVERY MACHINE OUARANTEEU bV L.S. 

R. A. LISTER dr COMPANY LIMITED, 

197 Princess St., 58-60 Stewart St., 82 Water St., 

"Winnipeg. Man. Toronto, Om- Su John, N.B.' 

STUART A. Ll^TiiR, Ak.aasrr. 




JAMES McCORMACK, Sr. 
Director from 1902 to 1906 





JAMES BURT 
Director since 1902 




(; r ML^KNER 
DireLtor since 1902 



CHARLES SP RKS 
Director since 1902 



P. B. NEWTON & SONS rBmDER 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Flour and Feed 

Horses and Cattle Spifes and all kinds of Poultry Supplies, Baled Hay,. 
Straw, Portland Cement and Breakfast Cereals. 

^%ing Street, Dundas. Telephone 42; 



V i^ 






46 




The "Lister Bruston" 

Automatic Lighting Plant 

The light you want at 
your Farm Residence, 
or Summer Cottage. 
Splendidly suited for 
Country Churches, in 
fact any isolated lighting 

Starts Itself 

Stops Itself 

You simply switch on the Lights No Mechanic required 

All the advantage of City Lighting at Less Expense 

Will last a Lifetime 
MAKE YOUR HOHE LIGHT AND CHEERFUL 

Be sure you see the "LISTER BRUSTON" in 
operation wher at the CANADIAN NATIONAL 
EXHIBITION, Toronto, Aug. 24th to Sept. 9th. 

FULL PARTICULARS FOR THE ASKING. 

R. A. LISTER & CO., Ltd., 

58 60 Stewart St:, TORONTO, Ont. 

Branch Pftices— 197 Princess Street, Winnipeg, Man. 
C^S2 Water street, St. John, JV.BL 

STUART* A. LISTER, Manager. 

47 





JOHN A. McDONOUGH 
Director Since 1902 



ALEX A. STEWART 

Dircclcr Since 1903 





MALCOLM McDonald 

Director Since 1904 



EDWIN McKNIGHT 

Director Since 1906 



D.VVID MAXMKLL 6i t^^ONS 

Sr. MARYS, ONT. 

Opsr. Back Binders, Movers, Hey Loaders, SD. Rakes, Disc Harrows, Tedders, 

Pu'pers, Sc jffers, Ra'ce-, C \u i s, Buggies, Wegons, Washers, Wringers, Etc. 

Send Per Descriptive Catalogue 

125 John Street Fouth 



Hr milt on Wareroom: 



W. Gricknhii.l, agent 



48 




THE PREMIER 

CREAM SEPARATOR 

THE WORLD'S LATEST AND BEST. 

The machine that does the work 

Try out the merits of the 
" PREMIER " 

before you buy a Cream Separator 
Turn it, wash it, use it then decide. 

IT SKIMS CLEAN. It will please yoa 
The Simplest Construction known. 

Book of users, letters sent on request. 

The "PREMIER' will be sent to YOUR FARM 
FOR THE ASiiNG TO PROVE ITS VALUE. 

Our Guarantee goes with each Mackine 

The ^Tremier^^ Cream Separator 

659-661 King St. West, TORONTO Company 




199 Princess St,, 
WINNIPEO, Man 



147 Princess William 5t » 
5T. JOHNS, N.B. 



49 





GEO. N. HAliRIS 
Director since 1906 



JAMES S. HENDERSON 
Director since 1906 





RUSSELL IRELAND 

Director since 1907 



JAMES M, McCORMACK 
Director since 1907 



SM;ITH . ^be ipbotograpber 

If you w.iut a photo ui yourself or family in first-class style and 
up-to-date try SMITH. Family Groups a Specialty. 

KODAKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Give us a call. New Studio right up-to-date. Bring the Babies 



Ainslie Street South, 

so 



Gait, Ont, 



Quality Always the Best 

Quaiitv is the founda- 
tion of the sh e and is 
more essential than st) le.* 

Our Sh)es h-ive style 
and comfort built on the 
foundation of " Quality '*^ 
a combination unbeatab'e 
and sure to please. 

Best by Test 

Is what we claim f)r our 
Shoes and further we 
guar.ntee satisfactio: . 

We ciinnot have, and never will have dissatisfied 
patrons 

And — What is of vital interest to you our prices are 
lower (for the same quality of shoes) than city price?* 

Why? Because we do not pay high rentals and our 
selling- expenses are less than city stores. 

See our Display at the Fair, and make our store 
your headquarters when in Dundas. 

HARRY C. CLARKFj shoeman. 

Phone 99 

Builder's Block DUNDAS, Ont. 

51 






JOhN JACKSON 
Director since 1907 



JAMES HUMPHREY 
Director since 1907 



TRY 



PATERSON'S 

QUEEN SODA BISCUITS 



THEY ARE THE BEST. 



THE WM. PATERSON SON CO. 

LIMITED 

Brantford . Canada 



52 



Ask for 




Tooth and Toilet Preparations.^ 

Sanitol Tooth Powder- - 25c 

Saniiol Face Cream - - 25c 

Sanirol Tooth Pa^tc - - 25c 

Sanitol Toilet (Talc.) Powder 25c 
Sanitol Liquid Antiseptic 25c &- 50c 

Sanitol Bath Powder - - 25c 

Sanitol Tooth Brush - - 25c 

Sanitol Violet-Elite Soap - ^5c 

Sanitol Toilet Water - " . ^^c 

Sanitol Face Powder - - 25c 

Sanitol Shavin;? Stick - - 25c 

Sanitol L'quid Shampoo - 50c 

Sanitol Hair Tonic - - 50c 

Sanitol Hygienic Toact Soap 25c 

Sanitol Children's Tooih Brush 25c 

Eac'a has its every'day 
use in your home. 

The Full SANITCL Lire 




They represent 

THE BEST 

of th ir kinJ and the most 
Sitisf^c'.ory 

FOR YOU R 
USE 

There is nothing 

^^Just cis Good'* 

while ;in inferior substitute 
costs you the saa.e. 

IXSIST ON 
SANITOL 

Science has clearly proved 
that much of the suffering due 
to ill tealth is directly caused 
by neglect to the teeth. 

You can secure absolute 
and lasting cleanliness of the 
teeth and niouth by nsing the 
Sanitol Tooth Preparations. 

You can add to the comfort 
and beauty of the body through 
the services of the elegant 
Sanitol Toilet Preparations. 

Select them at your drug- 
gist or any toilet counter. 



Sanitol Chemical Laboratory Co. 

St. Louis, Mo. Toronto, Ont. 



53 





• GEORGE ilinV: Director since 1909 A. J. GEORGE Director since 1909 





NATHAN SAGER Diuctor since 1909 GEO. A. HOWARD Director since 1909 





WILLIAM MXGNALD Diiector since 1910| JOHN K. JONE5 Director since 1910 



The School Trsdning of every boy in particular 
should make of him a 




'(Sf/}t€M 



ability and integrit>\ Girls au^e qualifying for Business as well in these 
days^^and their services are much prized in nearly all business offices. 

The great wo'rk of our several schools, commonly known sis 

Shaw's Business Schools 

is? to train young men and women in business methods and customs and 
to J qualify them for positions as Bookkeepers and Stenographers, or for 
the! Railway Service. 

Our schools are now located as follows: 

1 . Main School, Yonge and Gerrard Streets, 

P. MclNTOSH. Principal 

2. West Toronto School, Keele and Dundas Streets, 

J. FRANK FOSTER. Principal 

3. College Street School, Grace and College Streets, 

THOS. TANTON. Principal 

4. Riverdale School, Jones and Gerrau-d Streets, 

J. A. McKONE. Principal 

5. The Beaches School, Queen and Lee Avenue, 

V. D. SMITH. Principal 

6. The Centred Telegraph School, 3 Gerrard St. East, 

T. J. JOHNSTON. Principal 

7. The Shaw Correspondence School, 393-397 Yonge Street, 

C. W. CH.ANT, Secretary 

8- Shaw's English and Civil Service School, 395 Yonge Street, 

B. JENNETT. Principal 

Our graduates au-e able to do good work and cany 
our reputation into the best business offices of this city 
and country. There is no trouble about situations for 
graduates. We look after that for them. Write for 
our general catalogue. 

ADDRESS- 

W. H. SHAW, President, 

Head Offics : 

Yonge and Gerrard Streets. TORONTO 
55 






NELSON CULH AM Director 1911-12 SAMUEL GEORGE Director 1911-12: 





DAVID RICKER Director 1912 HENRY WATSON Director 1912 



MAITLAND YOUNG & SON 

RALPH E. YOUNQ, F.C.A , 

Chartered Accountants, Auditors, 

TELEPHONE MXI>' 5140 

Canada Life Building TORONTO, Canada 

56 



Pub ishers' Proof of Simplicity of 30-Day Syl-la-bic Shorthand 

Study Plate No i for a few ii.iuutes and then look at Plate 2, and you 
will be surprised to find ibat yoa v\ill read 30-Day Sylla-bic Shorthand as- 
easily as longhanii 

PLATE 1. 

It sh St op in th en Cl 
.( / ^ / r. _-^/- 
on fl or at en os ov is 

A Free Course will be given the first pers.-n ^euiiin^ m a correst transla- 
tion of the following Siio. ihaud sentences : 



PLATE 2. 



C ) 



-^ y 



- J 



_. J 



— ii 



- n 



-/- 



xvr.ie out I'ae Lou^h^ud lor ibe above bhuitijaud sentences and 

send it to us immediately. 

FREE COURSE— To the first person sending in the correct translation of 

ihe above shorthand sentences will be niven a free course in ^oDay 

Svl-la-bic Shorthand, Typewriting. Business Correspondence Letter 

Writins; Spe'ling, Punctuaiiou, Practical Office Routine Etc. Regular 

Price $35 
To each of the next five will be given the above course for One Third of 

the rejiu'ar price or the sum of f 12 
To etch of the nrxt ten will be :/iven the above course for One Half of the 

regular price or J18 
To each of the next ten will be'given the above course for Two Thirds of 

the reguhr price or the sum of $^4 

The Free Course Offered in last contest was won by Miss Myrtle McCracke» of 6 Rose Avenue 

Toronto 

THE MOON BUSINESS COLLEGE 



Phone Main 3706. 
N.B. 



282-284 Yonge Street Opposite Wilton Avenue. 

Take Elevator 



We are the owners of CDpyright in ,^o-day Syl-la-bic Shorthand 
for Canada and publishers of all works thereon. 



57 




JOSEPH BOYLE Sr. 
Director 1856. 'bl, 'SB, 78 to 1882 



JOHN RUfHERFORD 

Judge on Cattle and Sheep at firs! Show held at 
Rocktcn 1853 



A Clean Cut Argument 

In your favour is the use of good printing. It starts things off in your 
favor. People read your arguments, reasons, conclusions, when 
attractively presented. It carrys weight. Enterprising men use GOOD 
printing because it gets BUSINESS. If you don't already know our icind 
of printing, let us show you. It's an even chance we can save you 
^noney, too. 

The Banner Printing Company. 



58 




SAMUEL HUNTER 
Director 1877, "78 and i8:5 to 1894 



WM. NlSBEr 
Dirx.oi .859. "61 . Vice-President 1862 and 63 



Of Lessons Taught in Books at School 

We 50oa forget both word and rule ; but solid fa<:is and reason why, re- 
main with us as years goes by. Good prin ing makes impressions Lcep 
to fasten facts where bes; tliey'il keep. For what you say, though poorly 
said, in proper garb is Muely read. Our printing fine, the price O.K.;' 
delivery's made without delay. See us to-day ; and you'll admit good 
priming always make^ a hit 

The Banner Printing Company, 

DUXDAS. 



59 




WM. HENDERSON, Sr., 8 years 




World's 

Fair 

Auditors 



WM. WOOD. Sr.. 29 years 

f 





JOHN IRELAND, 16 yeare 




JAMES B. PLASTOW. 16 years 




ALEX BELL, Jr., 2 years 



JOHN CLEMENT, 5 years 






DANIEL V/RAY. Auditor 1908-9-10 FRANK BOYLE, Auditor 1911 




JOHN SUTTON. Preston 
Judge on horses at the 1st Fair held in 
Rockton, 1853 



Ex-CouncUlor WILLIAM D. RIDDLE 



i=9. F. AVASHINGTOIV, K.C. 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary Public 

Offices-Hamilton Provident Chttmbers HAMILTON 

Solicitor for Bank of British North America 



6i 



These Entries are in a Class 
by Themselves 




2 in 1 

SHOE POLISH 

has proven its super- 
iority over al! other 
Shoe Polishes, and to- 
day stands the most 
popular Shoe Polish 
on the market. 




Black 
Knight 

Stove Polish is the 
hijjhest type of Stove 
shining' material 
Gives the highest g^loss 
with less labor, and is 
the most satisfact( ry to 
the housewife 



62 



THREE GREAT 

MEDICINES 

Which we are Authorized Agents for 
T. T. T. T,, FOUR Ts. 

This man ellous medicine is the best, quickest and safest preparation 
ever compounded for the cure of coughs and colds. During the last five 
years more than half a million bottles have been sold in Ontario, and have 
clearly proven that Four Ts cure a cough in 24 hours, and breaks up a 
bad cold in two days If you have a chronic hacking cough try the Four 
T's. Cures coughs, colds, bronchitis, asthma, and all throat and lung 
affections. Price 25c. per bottle 

Merrill's Wizard Lightning 

So named because it cures pain inside or out of man or beast in five 
minutes. Composed of gums and oils of remarkable power. No need to 
use mustard or belladonna plasters, as Merrill's Wizard Lightning produces 
the effect of either in a few minutes Try it for neuralgia, toothache, 
colic or cramps, female padns, lumbago, chilblains, gas on the stomach, or 
indigestion. Many a person has saved a veterinary bill by giving sick horses 
or cattle half a bottle of Wizard Lightning, followed by a pint of raw oil. 
Price 25 c. per bottle 

Merrill's System Tonic 

This great medical triumph hcis been used by a great many people in 
and about here, who all praise it in the highest terms. System Tonic 
purifies the blood, builds up the system, strengthens the nerves and cures 
constipation. It cures a vast range of diseases, for 90 per cent, of ordinary 
diseases hinge on one of four great causes mentioned above as being cured 
by System Tonic. Try it as a permanent cure for dyspepsia, rheumatism, 
skin diseases, liver trouble, etc. Take it when you are weak, pale and 
nervous. It will surely cure you Each fifty-cent bottle contains fifty 
pleasant-to-take doses. Also in tablet form. Price, 50 cents per box of 
50 tablets. 

We recommend these preparations to our customers, as we know the 
manufacture to be one of the most successful druggists in Toronto. Sold at 
all drug and general stores. 

63 




Rev. THOMAS CHRISTIE. Pioneer Missionary 

Settled 1832 

Founder of the Presbyterian Church at Christie Pastor for 38 years 

Died at age of 87 years 



MXIarys 

DIAMOND 
JUBILEE 

!S PASSED 



It is a far call to the first Rockton 
Fair and few who read this will remem- 
ber, but hew long ago as it is Mr. John 
McClary was then in business and was 
making Stoves. He is still in good 
health and in active management of the 
great national enterprise which bears his 
name. A name that has always re- 
presented Quali y, Enterprise and Hon- 
est Dealings. 



THE PANDORA RANGE 



•Comfort in the Kitchen and all 
over the House. 



THEY LAST A LIFETIME. 



SUNSI INE 
FURNACE 



Coal or '^, 
Wood 





MXIary's 

Cor. Bay and York Streets 

HAMILTON 



THOS. KIVEL, LYNDEN 
WEBBER HARDWARE CO., 

DUNDAS 

65 



LADY DIRECTORS 





M^^^^N^SI 



Miss H. ELIZA PLASTOW since 1895 Miss MINNIE BOYLE since 1900 





Miss SARAH PATTERSON since 1906 Miss ANNIE ROBINSON 1905 to 1910' 





MissA.COWlE 1911-12 Miss B. M. THOMPSON 1910-11-12 



The Royal Bank of Canada 

ESTABLISHED 1869. 

President — General Manager — 

H. S. HOLT, MONTREAL E. L. PEASE, MONTREAL 

Capital and Reserve Aggregate Assets 

over $16,000,000 * 1 20,000,000 

Are Your Present Banking Facilities Satisfactory ? 

If you contemplate a change, a communication to this bank 
will receive prompt and careful attention. 

INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS OF $1.00 OR MORE 

OFUCE- 

38 JAMES ST. SOUTH 

HAMILTON 

Phone No. 3498 C. A. GRAY, Manager 

THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA will shortly be merged with 
the TRADERS BANK OF CANADA, and will occupy the office 
now occupied by the Traders Bank, King Street, West 

67 



LADY directors-Continued 





MsssC.M. WRAY, 1911-12 



Miss J. MENZIES 1911-12 





Mrs. R. J. JOHNSTON 1895 to 1903 Miss LIZZIE STEWART 1900 to 1905 

TEMPLE'S 
Livery and Boarding Stables 

46 48 Caihcirine St. N., HAMILTON 



igh class Horses and 




1 our in-hand for ■ 


arriages for hire, . . 


PHONE 52 


Party driving 




68 


: 



^ Neponset Roofings 

The Standard of the Canadian Pacific. Canadian 
Northera Railways, and leading railroad systems, ami 
such corporations as the Dominion Sugar Co , Canadiaa 
Car and Foundry Co., Diamond Glass Co. 

There are different Neponset Roofings for different 
purposes. 

Neponset Proslate for residences, Neponset Paroid for 
farm and factory buildings, Neponset Red Rope for low 
cost and temporary buildings 

When you use Neponset Prostate or Neponset Paroid 
you insure your building against fire. Both are fire re- 
sistant and outlast the best shingles. 

F. W. BIRD & SON, Makers, 

HAAIILTON, Ont 

DAVID BELL, ROCKTON. Agent 

69 




ROBERT CAMP, Pioneer. 



What's in a Name? 



There is an endosement in every name that was ever 
inscribed on our rolls — an endorsemant of this school, 
its character, its principles, its performance. They are 
names of men at the head of our bigges. financial 
institutions ; names of men whom you know, or know 
of. by reputation. True we did not make these men 
what they are to-day. But we are proud to say that we 
helped to lay the foundation for their making, and we 
are prouder of their loyal allegiance to their old school, 
to which they turn in confidence for all office help 
which they may require. Can you afford to ignore the 
weight and cumulative strength of endorsement in 
these names ? You will find them in our handsomely 
illustrated prospectus. Write for it to-day. 



British American Business College 

Limited, 

Y. M. C. A. BUILDING, TORONTO. 

Established i860. T. M. WATSON, Principal. 

71 




ROBERT £CHUN, Pioneer IZrSTJSd ADAM THOMPSON, Sr , Plone-r 




WM. THOMPSON Sr Pioneer. Director ROBERT INKSETTER, Sr., Pioneer. At 

lttt)l-62-63. organization of Beverly Show, 1853 



National Business College 

Clyde Block — Cor. Kiog and Haghson 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



A School of Strength and Character. 

A, J. MACDOUGALL, President ROBT. KING, Principal 

A High-Grade, Modern Business School situated in the centre 
of Hamilton's popular business section. Highly qualified stafif of 
Canadian teachers which with best of equipment and unexcelled 
Premises makes the NATIONAL one of the most up-to-date schools 
in Canada, 

Day and Night Classes are conducted in all Commercial and 
Shorthand Subjects. Thoroughness is our corner stone and we aim 
^o make every graduate a success. We have trained thousands of 
young people from all parts cf Canada and can p'ace you on the 
road to success. Each student works individually and consequently 
you may enter any day or night. 

HOHE STUDY. 

Many young people find it impossible to attend a Business 
School for iix months. We have a department especially adapted 
for Home Study under the management of competent instructors. 
You receive the same lessons and use the same text-books as the 
students at the college. It gives ambitious students an opportunity 
" to learn while they earn " You may study a complete course at 
Home or partly at Home and Finish at College, thus saving time and 
expense. 

Write us stating what course you are interested in and we will 
be pleased to furnish you with particulars. 




\XM IRELAND, Sr.. Pioneer. 



WALl ER ROBERlSON, Pioneer, Set.led in I8i9 
Eornin :,9, i : Scotland. Died in 1864. Aged /3 years 




STEPHEN NISBET, Pioneer 
At organiz.tion cf Bev.rly SKow, 1853 



IHOS. NICHOL. Pioneer 
At organization ot Beverly Show, 1353 



ESTABLISHED NEARLY A CENTURY. 

The Quebec Bank 

Founded under Royal Charter 
Granted by His Majesty King George the Third, A.D. 1818 

A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED 

-Accounts may be opened in the 

Savixgs Department 

with a Deposit of One Dollar and interest will be 
paid thereon at current rates. 

JOINT ACCOUNTS may be opened in the 
names of two persons and if desired so arranged that 
either person may withdraw monies so deposited 

Hamilton Branch — 

17 KING ST. WEST, 

S. B. MARTIN, Manager. 
75 




ROBERT PA i 1 i:.in:jwN, Sr., Pioneer ANTHONY GEORGE, Sr.. Pioneer 

Settled in Beverly 1834 Died in 1870, aged 69 yrs 




JOHN STEWART, Sr., Pioneer 



ADAM NISBET, Pioneer 




OSCAR MAIN Principal 

THE CANADA 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Y.M.C.A. BUILDING, HAMILTON 

It will pay you to take a thorough course of Business 
and Shorthand Training in Hamilton's oldest, larg- 
est and best equipped Business ColLge 
Experienced teachers, up-to-date courses of 
study, the finest premises and fifty years of success- 
ful training, enab'e us to do more for our students 
than any other business college in the ' ity. 
Our graduates are in dem?.nd. 

Particulars cheerfully given. Call and see us before 
deciding. 

OSCAR MAIN, Principal. Phone 51. 




THOMAS THOMPSON. Sr., Pioneer 
Director 1864-65. 



GEORGE WRAY. Sr. 

At organization of Beverly Show, 1853. 




CHAS. PATTERSON, Direct r 1878 to 1885 JOHN LAWSON, Sr . Pioneer. 



The Dominion Bank 

Head Office - Toronto. 

ESTABLISHED 1871. 

Capital .. .. .. ... §4,700,000 

Reserve Fund and Undivided Profits $6,200,000 
Total Assets .. .. $70,000,000 

A General Banking Business transacted. 

Accounts of Farmer?, Market Gardeners, and Stock Raisers 
invited. We give special attention to this class of business. 

Farmers' Sale Notes collected and advances made thereon at 
lowest rates. 

Banking may be transacted by mail. 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

We allow interest on all deposits of $1 and upwards at the high- 
est current rate, 

JOINT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

Accounts may be opened in the names of two or more persons. 
Withdrawals can be made by one of the number or by the survivor. 

HAMILTON BRANCHES 
Main Office - Cor. King St, W. and McNab St. 
East End Branch, Cor. King St. E. and VVentworth St 

C. A. ROSS, Manager. 

79 




DAVID CHRISTIE Pioneer 



ADAM MARTIN Pioneer 




JAMES SPENCE Pioneer 



DAVID GIBSON Pioneer 



TheOntario Portland 
Cement Co. Limited 



MANUFAJ URERS OF THE FAM0U5 



BLUE LAKE BRAND 



i;F 



PORTLAND CEMENT 



WORKS AND TARL BEDS 



Blue Lake, Ont> 



HEAD OFFICE: 



Brantford. Ont. 



r 

Si 




JOHN WEIR 
A Judge at many of the Rockton Fairs 



DAVID BETZNER 
Judge at many of the Fairs Died at age of 70 yearK 





JOHN PATERSON, Pioneer 
Director 1872 to 1884 Died at age 79 



Capt. AND. McKNlGHT. Pioneeir 
Director 1859-60-61-62 



BANK OF HAMILTON 

HEAD OFFICE: HAMILTON 



Capital Paid Up ' - .^l5.ooo,ooo 

ReserTe Fund and Undivided Profits - - - - -$3 500,000 

Total Assets Over ------- ?45. 000.000 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

HON. WM. GIBSON, President 

J. TURNBULL, Vice President and General Manager 

CYRUS A. BIRGE 

COL. THE HON. JOHN S. HENDRIL,. C.V.O 

GEO. RUTHERFORD CHAS. A. D ALTON, Toronto 

W. A. WOOD 



BRANCHES IN HAMILTON 

DEERINO BRANCH— Sherman Avenue and Baiton Steet 
EAST END BRANCH— Wellington and King Streets 

NORTH EAST BRANCH— Barton and James S'.eets 
WEST END BRANCH- Queen and York Streets 



Branches in Vicinity of Hamilton 

Ancaster Beamsville Brantford Brantford Fast End Branclfe 

Dnndas Dunville Grimsby I'agersville 

Milton Niagara Falls Niagara Palis Soutit 

130 OFFICES IN ALL IN CANAL \ . _ 



Correspondents in Great Britain : 

NATIONAL PROVINCIAL BANK OF ENGLAND, Limited. 

Correspondeats in all the Principal Cities of the t'riited States 



SAVINGS DEPARTMENT IN ALL OFFiCES 

J>eposits of |i.oo and npwrrds received and 't>'- res; allovAcd 
Correspondence solicit d 




HUGH ARMSTRONG, Pio.eer 





Zit:!, Pioneer 
ag.,- 65 yaars 



DANIEL WRAY. ^r., F Id leer 
Setded in 1832 Died in 1856 Aged 62 years 




DONALD J. McKENZIE. Pioneer 
Se.tled 1 83 1 Died aged 80 years 



VISITORS AT 

THE WORLD'S FAIR 

ARE WELCOME ALSO AT 

THE BIG STORE 

HAMILTON 




Displays of New Fall 
Goods are now at their best. 
Merchandise from all parts 
of the Globe is now ready 
for your inspection. 

Our liberal policy for re- 
funding Railway Fares is 
sure to appeal to you. 



TheGJ.RobinsonGo., 




HAMILTON, Ont. 



85 




WALTER ARMSTRONG Pioneer Capt. THOS. HARBOTTLE pioneer 





DA VI J MAIN. Pioneer 



THOS. BADGER, Pioneer 



IMPERIAL BANK 

OF CANADA; 

Capital (Authorized) $10,000,00 
Capital (Pajd Up ) §6,425,000 Reserve Fund $6,425,000 

DIRECTORS: 

D. R. WILKIE, President Hon. R. J AFFRAY, Vice-President 

WM. RAMSAY ELIAS ROGERS J. KERR OSBORNE 

PELEG HOWLAND CAWTHRA MULOCK 

WM. WHYTE (Winnipeg) Hon. RICH. TURNES. (Quebec) 

•WM. HAMILTON MERRITT, D.M. (3t. Catherines) W. J. GAGE 

tHEAD OFFICE, TORONTO 

D. R. WILKIE, General Manager E. HAY, Assistant General Manager 
W. MOFFAT, Chief Inspector 

Branches in the Provinces of 
ONTARIO, QUEBEC, MAMIOBA. ALBERTA, 
SASKATCHEWAN, and BRITISH COLUMBIA 



r^roffc ^/^l/^ Available in all parts of Canada, the United 
l^Idllb OOIU States and Europe 

Letters of Credit '^^"^'' ^'''''''''l^Z""' '"' "' ''"" 
Savings Department ^!:T r:^:^''!:^':::! 

date of opening of account and credit half-yearly 
DEBENTURES-Hunicipal and other Debentures Purchased 

A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED. 



F. S. QLAS5C0, Manager HAMILTON 

87 




WM, CLARK 
Judge for years at Rockton Fair 




AND. BLACK 
Aced as Judge at Fair 




^' ^^ \ 




Born m Ireland Director 1874-5 Died 89 years first directors of Fair in 1853-54-55^ 




4 4 



VERIBRITE 



V EN OIL" 

The Magic Finish 



P or all varnished surfaces renews the 
old Varnish to its original color and 
lustre. A 25c. bottle will cover more 
surface than a gallon of varnish. No 
brush required; only a piece of cheese- 
cloth. Will work on the finest piano or 
the roughest kitchen chair. A child can 
use it. 

Use "ST AON" 

Liquid Stove Polish 



No Dust 



No Ruct Pat np in eight ounce bottle 

Sold by all Dealers 



Manufactured by . 



The Domestic Specialty Co. 



HAHILTON, CANADA. 



r 




"WM. HENDERSON, jr., orom-nent prize-winner JAMES DAVIDSON, Pione 




JOHN JAMIESON. Pioneer 
Settled 1829 D ed aged 87 years 




H N LEE. Sr., Pioneer 



NURSERY STOCK 

True to Name and Canadian Grown. 



Headquarters in Canada for High-Grade Trees, 
all grown in choicest parts of Niagara Peninsular, 
on farms covering 850 acres, in the following 
districts : Stoney Creek, Winona, Beamsvilie, Jor- 
dan, Port Dalhousie. 



Apple Trees, Plum, Pear, Standa'-d and Dwarf: Cherries 
Sour and Sweet ; Peach, Grape Vines, Small Fruits, 
Ornamentals in unlimited qualities. 

Write for catalogues and prices which are furnished 
free of charge. Expert landscape gardener on hand to 
advise our customers on matters of planting and plan^ 
ning, etc. 

E. D. SMITH 

Nurseryman Landscape Architect, Etc., 

Helderleigh Nurseries 

\A/inona Ont. 

91 




JOHN BAIRD Donator to Fair 

:^ • 



Dr. J. L. ADDISON Donator to Fair 





JOHN GILBERT, Sr.. Pioneer Died at age 104 ELIJAH MYERS, Pioneer Died at age 101 



The Metropolitan Bank 



Capital Paid Up 
Reserve Fund 
Undivided Profits 



$i,oo ,coo oo 

81,250 000.00 

$i38;046 68 



Head Office - TORONTO 

S. J. MOORE, President W. D. ROSS, General Manager 



A General Banking Business transacted 

Farmer's Salo Note discounted at lowest rates. 



SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT— 

Deposits of 81,00 and upwards received and interest allowed at 
highest current rates Joint Accounts a specialty 



The Metropoitan Bank has e<fcabli5hed a Branch in 
Hamilton at 72-74 James St North {>un Life 
Building), Partie? trading at the Market will find 
this a convenient place at which 10 transact their 
financial business. 

E B. MACKENZIE, Manager. 



93 




SOLOMON WOCD. Pioneer 



^ 



j*^ *s, ■* 



JOHN ROBB, Prize Winner 



f - 





DAVID PEREGRINE, Pioneer 
Vice-President Fair 1856 



ABRAM BETZNER. Pioneer 
Dirctor 1874 



'^-^^^^^ CUTS' 
__wx*i-^ -BRUISES' 
ZS>^ SORES- BURNS- I 
|tfS-PIMPl£S ECZ£?W' /' 
N;SCI«1CA 84D lEGS- / 
'^""■CHAPPED tttNOS:^ 



JUST ONCE! 

If you have any 
sore place — ulcer, 
eczema, burn, cut 
or cold sore, be 
well advised! Try 
Zam-Buk. 

Druggists sell more Zam-Buk than any 
other salve. 

Their profit on it is no greater than on 
others— is less than on many. Do you think 
Zam-Buk would be so much more widely 
used than any other salve if it were not so 
much better? 

Sentiment and advertising might make 
first sales, but only QUALITY can pro- 
duce repeat orders. 

More and more Zam-Buk is being sold 
every month, because the quality is there. 

How about the children's sores and skin 
troubles? Don't you think they deserve 
the best remedy^ you can get? 

That's Zam-Buk. 



rn 


[WORLDS GREAT HEA 


^ 


E 




Rev. GEORGE CHRYSTAL, Pastor Rev. S. W. rISHER. P:s:or 

Presbyterian Church at Christie for 6 years Pie.byterian Church it C' r^sie, 29 \ears 





Rev. GEORGE PLOWMAN, Pioneer Missionary Rev. ISRAEL SLOAN 

Preached many years in U.B. Church, Sheffield Pioneer Missionary 

Died aged 82 years Preached in Sheffie.d 
96 



What 
School ? 

You will come to 
The STANDARD 
if you investigate I 







^-cdd^/tdi-ceiZ ^ca^/'/^i 'if.ijttt. 



tu^H 



I 



■at 



e ^t-a 



The Standard Can Help You 

This School hais a reputation for thorough work ; its graduates ao'e found in 
the Leading Banks, Law Firms, and Manufacturing Establishments. 

Bookkeeping, Business and Legal Fcrms. Penmanship, Business Corres- 
pondence, Arithmetic. Rapid Calculations, Business Practice and Office Routine, 
Loose Leaf Systems, Shorthand, Typewtiting (Touch), Manifold Billing, Letter 
"Copj-ing, Punctuation, Plain English. Indexing 

STANDARD BUSINESS COLLEGE 

LISTER CHAMBERS Opposite Ciiy Hall 

Car James a id Kinj William Streets 

Prospectus Free 97 J. SWINTCN, Principa 




THOS PATRICK Pnze Winner ADAM THOMPSON Prize Winner 




(Chief) ROBERT RIDDLE, Sr., Pioneer 
Gate-Keeper _t '^ orld's Fair for 20yearsDied 9 . years old 




ANDREW SMITH Pioneer 




1853 ^2a=»ic2>^ 1912 



NO BETTER CLOTHING 

Is made or can be made than that which is prcduced at 
at the factory of . ' '• 

GRAFTON & CO., Ltd. 

It goes from our work shops directly to our customers 
with but one profit added to the cost of production, con- 
sequently when you buy from us you get 

r 

SPLENDID APPEARANCE 

LATEST 5TYLE and 

SATISFACTORY SERVICE 

at a price from one quarter to one third less than may he 
asked elsewhere 

GRAFTON & CO., Ltd, 

Factory and Warehouse - DUNDAS 

Stores: Hamilton, Londor, \\'oodj»i<)ik, Hraniford, 
Peterboro, Owen Sound, Dundas \ 

99 






Rev. AARON W. BEN50N 



Rev. ALEX. NICHOL 





JOHN WELLS. Pioneer 
Bora .80. Silded .83j DLa-t^-a.sold 



ALEX. BELL. Sr.. 

Bomin Ireland iSo hetJed in Ca ada I j)34 Died at ' 
age y3 years Juds- on Penmauhip -t vV.il J': Faix 




SHOES 



You can always 
be assured of the 
smartest and . , 
snappiest styles 
if you come here. 



Phone 2486 



CHAS. D. 
JONES, 

119 King St. East 



0pp. Waldorf Hotel 





THOMXb SWINTON, 

Bjrn in Edinbjrsh. Scoilar.d. Sailed 
for Americd in 852. Jetted in Bev- 
erly in i8 j4 Di?d in 76:li year Woa 
many First hii.^s in the Rowing 
Matches in coanectijn with Beverly 
ShjAf 



I. B. BARCLAY. Judg; on Fins Arts at World's Fair 





EDWIN BOND. Pioneer. WM WILLARD 

General Merchan'. Shs.iieV, died 64 years of age Born in England Settled in Canada 

1832 Built the U.B. Church at 
I02 Sheffield 




THE KERR MILLING CO., Ltd. 

DUXDAS 

Millers and Grain Dealers 

When you have Wheat to Sell remember we pay the 
Highest Market Price. 

OUR FEEDS ARE ABSOLUTELY PURtE 

Our "THISTLEDOWN" is the last word in a High 
Grade Blended Flour 

QUALITY BEFORE PRICE 

If you find our goods selling for more than others, its 
because they are worth it. It will pay you to inquire 
why. We can confirm this statement 

103 



Cfl V) 




I 



A Quartette of Beauties 




Illustrating four lines made by "Empress' 
shoe-makers. There is beauty in every line 
and every detail is perfected by experts. 
Made in Canada. We are "Empress" agents. 

Men's Long Boots, Direct from Best Makers, 
$2 50, $3.0 . $3 50 and $4.00 

Solid Leather Sc hx)l Boots the best at closest prices 

RUBBERS — The best quality. Close prices 

Satisfaction guaranteed 

W. H. BATES - DUNDAS 

PHONE 102 



if^5 



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(3 t/) 
TO O 

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P 1h 
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B 

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' Ford-i-fy" yourself agjainst excessive automobile expenses. 
First and last the Ford is an econony. Seventy-five 
'thou land painstaking buyers have purchased new Ford cars 
this year — because the Ford is ridiculously low in first cost — 
and \\ onderfully economical in after cost 

A : 'Is are Model T's— all alike except the bodies. The two passenger 
ruuabout.cosis $775 — the five passenger touring car #850 — the delivery car 
own car .$1 100— f.o.b. Walkerville, Ont., completely equipped. 

TAKE YOUR HOTOR CAR TO THE 

DUNDAS GARAOE 

For BOWSER FILTERED GASOLINE, 

ACCESSORIES, OVERHAULINO. . . . 

AND ALL CLASSES OF REPAIRS. . 

AGENTS— 

JEROME & BAWTINHEIMER. 



107 






U-; 



iM^: 




ROBT. McDonald 

Pioneer, Died agr 76 




ROBT. PENTLANIX 
Pioneer, Died age 80 




JOHN LINDSAY 
Director 1881 tu 1888 




ALEX HARVIE 
rioneer Died aged 79. 



108 



i 




. 'S SURE GUR^ 
v^he Horse's Friend 

f .Safe, Permanent and Reliable WM^ I 

^•« Tendons, Curb*, SplirHo, Bot M**"* | 

■ g;. i, - ^*''' Sprainj ^^ t 

'S.Knesi, Wind Puffs, CapH "* | 

,. ; Scriiches, Pavemeirt Scr»»t»- . » 

ft^'Stme. Hip, Shoulder or ««» .- I 

,. "w» Seated Lamenesi. or BtoodWff «,.- J 

""" *"»l"« upliln for wMt ft i» r**^'^' t 

""'•i^afcn s, worlMd •*!!* t^H ^. l 

*■' ■ . with "Sun Cvrc" -. ' ~-' | 

- ^ >WCE itoe P€B C«I^^J__^_ I 

•WTUP^^IYBY I 

. ^^ -B;. BAXTER ^ 

■Umiltok, out. 




109 





THOMAS BARLOW, Pioneer 



WM. PArrtiRSON 

Born in Scotland. Settled in Beverly 
1840 on the old hoiJie=tead 7th con. 
Was always a regular attender cf 
World's Fair. 





■■^s,^^^' 




SQUIRE JOHN TEkPLE JOHN HUMPHREY, Pioneer 
Pioneer.' Born in Pennsylvania Born 1814. Arrived in Canada 1834. 
Died at nge 72 years. Settled in Beverly 184: uied in 1880 



HO 




SITUATIONS 

Waiting for you 
as soon as you 
qualify as a Book- 
keeper or Steno- 
grapher at 



CENTRAL 

Business College, 

HAMILTON, ONT. 

A. P. GIBBON, I. A., Principal. 
Write for particulars 





JOHN VALliNS, I'ioneer DK'. j B. i U\'I)V 

Died at aue 8s J^orn in CaUd^u Se.i.td i.i SlKffit;lJ 1850 

Moved to Gait I S78 lUturued lo I'reiton 
1887 Died aged 7S yea is 





THO\ McKN.GHT Pioneer JAS. SHA\ ER Pioneer 

112 




C. E. SPARKS Reeve cf Bev. ly and County CouncUlcr 

Charles E. Sparks was bora in the Towas'.iip of Da-va in the year 1871, and with 
Tiis fatlier's family moved to Beverly quite a number of years ago. He received his 
education at Aberfoyle Public School, Harristoa High School and the Gait Model School 
He was Principal of the Hunter's Comers' School fo; four years and also taught the West- 
over Public School for a short time. 

On retiring from the teaching profession he took up thp noble fKofession of " Tiller of 
the Soil " and for the past fourteen years he has been lecogaised ea one of the most success- 
ful and up-to-date men of modem times. In 1902 he was elected a directwof the great 
" World's Fair," on which board he is still an ac'dve member. He was elected a Member 
of the Township Council in 1905 and since that time has almost continuously been *. 
member of that Council, occupying the position of Reeve at the present time. He is a 
member of the Methodist Church at We«tover, an acrive worker in the Sabbath School and 
Recording Steward of tie Sheffield Circuit. Alt'tiough he is a busy man, looking after the 
requirements of work on his farnn, and the needs cf the church, he is always ready and 
"willing, where the demands of the itate require his jsersonal a'.tention, to use up a gallon or 
two of gasoline in hurrying to the place where duty cal.s. 

By his geniality and imp>aitiality combined wiS tact es.d gocd judgemer.t he hus won 
or hira • host of fr ends throughout t\c country. 



"i 





WM. RIDDLE, Pioneer, settled 1831 DAVID MARTIN, Pioneer, settled 1834 





GEORGE JONES, Pioneer 
settled 1808 Lh<-] aged 91 years 



JACOB COPE. Pioneir. settled I80O' 



114 




lii't tkit tkt fairest offtr jti 

CTtr MW ? 

Y«a cti lew hmj a 

"KING EDWARD" 
VACUUM CLEANER 

•1 a tci daja' frte trial baiit. 



The price heretofore has been mwntaincd at a figure designed to protect the dealer, 
but. IN JUSTICE TO THE CONSUMER we have decided to sell our machine 
DIRECT FROM OUR FACTORY TO YOU. giving you the benefit of the middle- 
man I profit, and at the same time giving jrou tha same machine, equal in every way, foe 
which you would formerly have paid you dealer a good margin of profit 

THE GREATEST OF LABOR SAVERS in house-work is the "KING 

EIDWARD " Vacuum Cleaner. It saves all sweeping, all dusting after sweeping, gets all 
the dirt, and by USING IT ONCE EVERY WEEK OR TEN DAYS, saves your 
wife endless hard work, and keeps your carpets and rugs cle*ner. sanitary, and safer for your 
children to play on. 

ABSOLUTELY PREl TRIAL IN YOUR HOME FOR TEN DAYS 

To prove that we have the utmost confidence in the results to be attained by the use 06 
our machine, we will send one to your home on ten days' free trial, at our expense. If it 
does not do all we claim for it. return it at our expense. If you like it and keep it, then p«f 
us for it. The price is $16.00. 

We are saving you the middleman's profit, and we ABSOLUTELY DEFY COM- 
PETITION AT ANY PRICE. 

(GU.\R.\STEE) 
We hereby guarantee this Vacuum Clean- 
er, bearing our name, and manufacturea 
THE . . *>>■ "»• *° *>« perfectly constructed, ot food 

material, and pertect in workmanship. W» 
fullv warrant «t, under fair usage, agaiMt 
anv defects of workmanship or material 
fo." the term of FIVE YEARS FROM 
DATE. 
Should any defect occur, not the result of 

WOODSTOCK, ONTARIO. K!Lr;r:;:::ri^:.TeTo:r^J.i^:'rr- 

replace it with a new one. 

THE GEO. H KING CO.. LTD^ 

\Vi->od«tock. Ontario. 



GEO. H KING CO. Ltd 



Manufacturers of Hand. Electric, Water-Motor and Gasoline Power 
Vacuum Cleaners. 



"5 





THOS. NICCL, Pioneer, settled 1836 AARON CORNELL, Pioneer, settled 1813 





ALEX WEIR. Pioneer, settled 1823 ADAM MISENER, Pio^er. settled 1818 



>I« 



RALPH & WILSON'S 

Hardware Store DUNDAS 

The right place to buy 
Hardware Tools, Stoves, Tinware, Woodenware, Silver- 
ware, Lamps, Lamp Goods, China and Glassware. 

Agents for 

Keen Kutter Tools. Sherwin WiUiams Paints and Varnishes. 
Chi-Namel. Pittsburg Perfect Fence. 

REMEMBER 

We keep a full stock of Silverware, C lass and China 

suitable for Presents 

HOLIDAY GOODS 

You will find here a Large Stock of Goods specially 
selected for Christmas Presents 

RALPH & WILSON, 

Hardware 

KING STREET DUNDAS 

117 





JAMES U'lLSON, Pioneer 
setiitd 1836 



WM. T. ANDERSON, Pioneer 
settled 1828 





BENONl VANSICKLE. Pioneer MALACHl SAGER. St., Pioneer 

Settled 1808 Settled 1826 

Ii8 



I 




TERRYBERRVS BAKERY. DUNDAS 

When you want fresh home-made 
Pastry, Cakes, Bread and Buns 

ORDER THEM FROM 

A. E. TERRYBERRY, 

VALLEY CITY BAKERY. 

All goods made to order on the premises from first class 

material 

Wedding Cakes a speciality 

119 





JAMES B. KEACHIE, Pioneer 
settled 1828 



GILLIS McBEAN, Pioneer 
settled 1834 





WM, ALKINS. Pioneer 
DIkI 79 years old 



ENOS SKINNER. Pioneer: 
DieJ 87 years old 



I20 




DAVID PATTERSON 
7th President of the World's Fair, Rockton 

DAVID PATTERSON was bom in the County of Antrim, Ireland in 1830 
emd in 1838 the family settled in Beverly town«hip on lot 26, con. 3, which at 
that time wets an unbroken forest. He assisted in clearing a number of farms in 
that neighbourhood. He took a deep interest in promoting the interests of the 
Beverly Shov^f, being elected a director in 1872 and was re-elected in '73. la 
In 1874 he was elected vice-president, and in 1873 became president, and was 
subsequently elected each year a director until his removal to his present home 
home near Dundas. He was a director of the Great Central Fair at Hamilton 
during its existence, and lately at the Dundas Fair. In 1878 he was elected a 
Councillor of the Township of Beverly, re-elected in '79 and '80 and in 1880 
was elected to the position of 2nd deputy reeve. He had also held the positioa 
of Councillor in the township of West Flamboro. 



The Three Survivors out of 181 members who Joined the Show 60 y6arsago 





ANDREW KERNIGHAN 

(Khan's Father) Aged 90 years 

The bearer of this well-knov.'n name is one of thetown- 
ship oldest pioneers. He has passed his nineteeth mile 
stone sound and hearty, and there is nothing to prevent 
him hvidg to enter the centenarian class 

H? has lived a quiet and uneventful life on the farm 
where he has resided continuously for seventy-six years. 
He is a link bmding the far past and the frequant 
presen'. 

Mr. Kernighan distinctly remembers the meeting 
called to organize an Agricultural Society in Beverly and 
has seen the annual event increase in importance every 
year. The old pioneers grow fewer every year and the 
subject of this sketch finds himself much alone. 

His old neighbours and comrades crossed the dark 
valley long ago and one does not make many new 
acquaiatences when one is past ninety. 

He is spending his last years serei.ely proud of the 
country that he helped to build and assured that it is one 
.of he finest lands in all the earth. 



ROBERT CHRISTIE 

Aged 86 years N dw living in Toronto 

Formerly MP. P. for North Wentworth 

Elected a director 1 854 Vice-President 1855 

The only prize winner living who took a prize 

at first fair 60 years ago. He took 1 st prize oa 

sheep. 




ROBERT ROBINSON 
Aged 82 years. 




JAMES SOMER\ ILLE 

^Who named Beverly Township Show "The \X'orld's Fair" in the "Dimdas 

True Fanner." 

From 1854 to 1858 Editor of "The Ayr Observer "in Waterloo 
■County ; from 1858 to 1888 Editor of the "Dundas True Banner." 

Served as School Trustee, Councillor, Deputy Reeve, Reeve, Mayor 
of Dundas, and Warden of the County of Wentworth. 

Represented North Bramt, which included part of Wentworth, in the 
Dominion Parliament horn 1 882 to 1 90 1 .. 

Never defeated in any Municipal or Parliamentary Ellection and nevex 
-asked a man for his vole except on a public platform. 




HON THC/^iAS EAIN. ^x.Speakcr of House of Commons. 

ta4 



i 



GOOO VALUE FOR bVERY CEM YOU SPEND. 

CLOKE'S 

Large afiJ Good Stock, all marked in plain figures at low prices 

BOOKS 

C->-^7-or 0,000 "XTol-VM.TXx^m 

The best va uts bclecied from the be.^t publishers 

BIBLES PRAYER BOOKS HYMN BOOKS 

In ali sizes and 5t>le3 (.f binding 

S T A T I O X ER Y 

of all kinds for home and office use Our 25c Box of Fine Note 
Paper and Envelopes is the best ever offered. Ask for it. 

WALL PAPER, MOULDINGS 

Etensive and Select Stock of the Latest and Best Decorative Styles 
^t prices a- low as poorer grades that don't make as good rooms 

SOLID SUBSTANTIAL MAKES OF 

TRUNKS, SUIT CASES, HAND BAGS, 

all at prices that can't be beat 
Always glad to hace you call and see our stock. 

CLOKE & SON, 

16 WEST KING STREET. HAMILTON. 

"J 






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i 



JOHN A. HARRIS Pioneer 



HENRY BINKLEY 
Judge for many years at World's Fair. 




STEPHEN MAIN 

Bom and lived all Kis life in Sheffield 

Died at age 82. 




WM. CONNELL Pioneer 



126 




JAMES GRAY. 

James Gray, who was one of the first directors of the World's Fair, was born iit 
Hawick, Roxburghshire, Scodand, July 1st, 1803. moved to Northumbeilaix]. 
England, in 1811. was Married May I3lh, 1833, and sailed from Liveipool for 
Canads on the 18th of the same month. Had a long and tedious voyage bong thir- 
teen weeks in the vessel. On reaching Toronto he bought Lot 28, con 4 Beredy^ 
from the Canada Company for £75 . He arrived in Beverly on September 4th, and 
immediately proceeded to cut down trees and build a house. His wife died the 
following year and he endured all the lonliness and hardships of pioneer life, be married 
aigain in 1847, died in 1882. One daughter. Mis. William Henderson, wiio resides 
on the homestead surrires. 

He was an active worker in the Presbyterian Church. West Flamb«ro, being an 
dder for forty-eight years. 

««7 




JOHN CO>X^ IE one of tSe first cirectors of tSe Fair. 

^/k. John Cowie wes a native of Haddingtdh, Scotland. When quite a young man, 
he like many of our fore fathers, became ambitious to make a home in distant America 
and sailed with his partner in life across the Atlantic, settling near Hamilton in what is 
now know &s Taplejrtown. After a few years he took possession of the two hundred 
acres now known as "Mellow Lees Farm," and occupied by his son William, on the 
Ninth Concession of Beverly. 

Like the early pioneers he shared the hardships and privations of early settlers, yet 
they had their joys as well as sorrows. A family of four daughters and one son blessed 
their'home, and years of prosperity came to reward hira for his perseverance. 

He took an acrive part in local affairs and during his active years was never absent 
^from the Annual World's Fair. 

In religion he was a staunch Presbyterian and in 1 890 died at a ripe old age. 

Sailed for this country in 1834; died in 1890. 



mS 



..-^^' 




JOHN McKNIGHT 

Born in Ireland Settled in Beverly 1833 
Died at age of 67 




CHAS. FLEMING, Pioneer 



FORSYTHEofDUNDAS 

an Artistic Photographer 

and a regular attendant at the World's 
Fair for the past 1 7 years 

Mr. Forsythe's work is well-known through 
the country 

No work leaves our Studio unless it is in 
every way satisfactory 

You can make no mistake in going to 

Forsythe's Studio for anything you may 

waat in the line of Photos, be they large 

or small, taken at your home or in the 

•tudio which is on 

KING STREET. DUNDAS. next 
door to Post Office. 




W. W. FORSYTHE. Dundw 



JOHN IRA FLATT, Ex-M.L.A. 



The name of John Ira Flatt is one of the best known in Western 
Canada in connection with the limber trade. He was born in the town- 
ship of Bast Flamboro, and up to the age of sixteen he attended the 
common school at Waterdown, and then for four years , ore he worked 
steadily on his father's farm. The succeeding ten years he worked for 
himself on a rented farm and to t is he added the lumber business in 
1865. Six years later he formed a partnership with the late Robert 
Thompson of Lynden, with whom he operated for five years, and then 
a dissolution takinp place, the firm of Flatt & Bradley, one of the 
most noted in the at mis ot the lumber trade, was formed. For sixteen 
years they carried on ihe tms'ness with great success, enlarging the original 
field of every towtish p hioui;d Hamilton until to-day Mr. Flatt. at the 
head of the firm of J & W. Flati in which his sons Jacob, William and 
Daniel are associated wiih him. is carrying on a very extensive bnsiness in 
heavy timber en I masts, oj e almg in ntarly all the States of the Union, 
p^ ^11 -,-. -NT rih^fti Ontur-o. tbf* '»^ief centres being Sidnaw, Mich ; 

^' Toledo, Ohio.; and Parkersburgh, 
'(^J'V West Virginia, their production 
' always commanding the highest 
prices in Quebec, Liverpool, Lon- 
don, Gl; a^ow and all the great 
timber markets of the world. In 
brief, if may be said that, west 
of Toronto, no house in Canada 
carries on lumbering operations 
so extensively, or enjoys a better 
reputation than the firm of J. & 
W. Flatt. In public affairs Mr, 
Flatt has always borne his part 
worthily and well. In i860 he 
was elected a member of the 
West Flamboro Council in which 
he served for seven years con- 
tinuously. During the years x886- 
87-88 he was reeve of East Flam- 
boro township, and in the last 
held the honorable position of 
warden for the county of Went- 
worth . In politics Mr. Flatt is a 
Liberal in tke highest sense and 
\\as honored by the Reform party 
JOHN lUA. EL,A.TT in being elected representative to 

to the Ontorio Legislation on the 26th June, 1894, for North Went- 
worth; he has become widely known as an active advocate of progressive 
legislation and especially by the passing of his famous Toll Road Bill 
In religion from his youth up he has been connected with the Methodist 
Ch\irch, and for the past 35 years he has been a leader or assistant 
leader in the Millgrove Church, and occasionally a delegate to the 
General Conference of the Methodist body. In his private life as well 
as in his whole business career Mr. Flatt has been distinctly a man amo8g 
men, and his record is one upon which his family, as well as his 
thousands of friends, may look with pride. Mr. Flatt is now retired and 
resides at ■'254 Bay street south, Hamilton, Ont., and is still hale and: 
hearty in his Sotli year. 




130 




THOMAS McQueen, 19th President World's Fair. Rockton 

Thomas McQueen, son of the late James McQueen, was bom near Kirk- 
wall, on lot 19. con. 7, township of Beverly, in the year 1838. When he 
had reached the age of 2 1 he set out for the gold diggings in California, and 
his indomnitable perseverance and pluck gained for him the great object for 
which he set out, and it'is said he came back laden with gold'nuggets. The tales 
of the wild west told in his inimitable style have caused roars of laughter or 
struck the listeners dumb with horror and dismay. In 1867 he bought the 
farm known as the John Mulholland farm, on which he has lived ever since- 
He wields great influence in the tovraship, being very ix>pular with all 
parties. He was elected councillor in 1870, served for the next seven 
years deputy reeve and then was placed in the highest seat in municipail 
affairs in 1 8 78. In 1 880 he was elected a director of the Beverly Agricultural 
Society, and was re-elected each year up to 1886, when he was elected 
vice-president, and in 1887 became president and has every year since been 
an active director. After leaving Sheffield in 1 896 he went to Hamilton and 
*ook charge of the Asylum farm there for about thirteen years ahd then took 
a trip to the Pacific Coast and saw the wonderful changes that had taken 
place since 1 86 1 when he was there and came home dowTi through the great 
west, and is now living in the historic town of Dundas trying to spend the 
baJance cf his time. 

'31 




The Merchant's Bank of Canada 



Capital Paid Up $6, 00,000 

Reserve Fund - $5458,878 

184 BRANCHES IN CANADA 

Interest at Current Rates allowed on Deposits 

ST. GEORGE BRANCH: 

W. ROSS WETHERMAN, Manager 

i3« 




THOMAS McNlCHOL. 



Tht ab«ve is an excellent likeness of Tk«mas McNichol, the 
well-known insurance a^tnt, who moved with his parents when about 
thrae years of age, intD Beverly, when that towaship was ptactically 
a wilderaess. Mr. McNichel has known the hardships •f pioneer life^ 
having cleared from the natural forest the farm on which he lived thir 
greater part of his life. 

Always deeply interested in the education of the young he 
acted as trustee of the public school at Hunter's Corner for many 
years. He iias been a director of the great World's Fair since 1894- 
and in 1908 was elected to the position of president. He has always 
been a willing worker to ajdvance its interests. 

About 8 years age Mr. McNichol sold his farm to his son and 
moved to Dundas, where he follows the business of fire insurance 
agent, representing a number of the best stock and mutual companiea 
of EnglaiKi and Canada. He was appointed a justice of the peace 
for Wentworth iit 1905 by the commission issued by the Ontario 
gOTernment at that time. 

»33 

































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Lt.-Col. W. E S. KNOWLES. 

Lieut.-Col. W. E. S. Knowl« has been practising as a Barrister and Solicitor during 
the last 28 years. During that period he has taken part in municipal politics and has filled 
the p>ositions of School Trustee, Councillor, Reeve and Mayor of the town- Ll-CoL 
Knowles has been identified with military matter* for the past twenty-three years and 
commanded the Dundae company as captain until his promotion to the rank of Major. 
He has been in Command of the Regiment for 3 years and during that time the Regi- 
ment won First Place in the London and Toronto Districts. In his profession at 
Barrister and Solicitor Lt.-Col. Knowles has bwj eminently successful, having built up 
a large and successful practice by his fair dealing and promptness. He . has recently 
erected a Fire-Proof Office near the Bank of Hamilton where iie ctores cEenl's papert 
free of charge. 

'34 




R. A. THOMPSON. 

R. A. Thompson, Proprietor Lynden Flour Mills and General 
<Grain, Coal and Produce Merchant, born at Orkney in the Township 
•of Bev«rly in i860. Was educated at the Orkney and West Flamboro 
Public Schooli with a term at The Canada Business College at 
Hamilton, and has for about 30 years carried on a large buiiness in 
Lynden in Flour, Grain, Coal and Turnips, 

His first public position was that of Township Conncillor in 
Beverly, to which he was elected in 1895 and again in 1896 auA ^ku 
te-elecled by acclamation Deputy Reeve in 1897 and 1898 and also to 
Reeve in 1890 and 1900. Served in the County Council for the 
years 1901 and igoj. He was then elected to the Ontario Legisla- 
ture on May 29, 1902, and again in January 15, 1905, scrring these 
two terms. 

He has been intimately associated with the Presbyterian Chutc^ 
since it was first organized in 1885 and has been Secy.-Treai., and * 
Manager since that time. Has represented the Hamilton Preibytety 
«t the General Assembly at Halifax, St. John and London. He is 
now and has been Supt. of the Sunday School and has also been Presi- 
dent of the Beverly S.S. Association and North Wentworth Association. 
Ho leads a very busy, active and useful life. 

134 




Judging the Babies at World's Fadr. 




Testing the Weight of Babies. 
136 



In the final reckoning when results are proven 
When merit is measured ; When quality is rewarded. 




Flour will stand supreme. 

Bread, Buns, Biscuits, and Pastry are 

Delicious, Nutricious and Wholesome 

when '' Gold Medal '' Flour is used. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR FEED 

Cash for all kinds of Grain. 

THE WOOD MILLING GO. 

D. B. WOOD, Manager. 

Phone 46aO and 4621. 

«37 




. Mr. W. O. Sealey, Ex-MP. for Wentworth, 
was born in the township of East Flamboro, on 
the 26th of January, 1 859. He attended the 
Waterdown public and high schools until he 
was -twelve years of age. He then worked on 
the farm for four years, and at the age of sixteen 
he bought out a general store business in Water- 
down. This he conducted successfully for four 
years, and then, selling out, began farming again. 
His early experience in agricultural p)ersuits gave 
him a knowledge and interest which have been 
very profitable. Som.e years ago he became 
interested in the lumber business and in this he 
has also been most successful as have been all 
his business interests. 

He early took an active interest in elections, 
both municipal and political. He was elected 
reeve of East Flamboro and was a member of 
the county council of Wentworth. He was a 
strong advocate of "goods roads," "free roads," 
" free markets," " economical management of 
public affairs " and " reduction of taxes." He 
had a great deal to do vvith abolishing tolls from 
four of the leading roads of the country. He 
was instrumental in getting the county council to 
unite with other county councils- in having a 
petition presented to the Legislature to have 
market fees reduced, which jsetitions were 
successfully . He also took an active pjurt 
against the unsatisfactory ure of the grain tester 
and against the unfair practice of deducting two 
W. O. SEALHY, Ex-M P. pounds of the weight of hogs when 'the 

producer w»s selling. He has always taken a great and intelligent interest in the farmers, fruit 

and vegetables growers, and this pKjlicy he will continue to develop. 

Mr. Sealey wais first chosen as candidate for the House of Commons in June, 1900, by 
the Liderals of South Wentworth on the retirement of the Hon. Thomeis Bain. He, however, 
was defeated by Mr. E. D. Smith, as owing to the gerrymandar. South Wentworth wis 
largely Conservative. On the readjustment of the Wentworths to their former boundaries, Mr. 
Sealey received the nomination to contest Wentworth at the approaching dominion elections 
and was declared elected by a small majority, but on a recount an inegularity was discoTered on 
the part of a deputy relurning officer by mistake, and he lost the election. At the by-dection 
Tieldin 1905 he suffered defeat by a small majority, Mr. E. D. Smith again being successful. 
At the Reform Corivention of November, 1907, Mr. Sealey received an enthusiastic nominatioii 
and on the 26th of October, 1908, he was elected by a majority of 346 over Lieut-Col. W. H. 
Ptolemy, the Conservative candidate. 

His active career in the House of Commons during his parliamentary term is well-known to 
most people in Canada and his efforts along aigricultural lines, as well as matters of Trade and 
'Commerce, have brought excep>tionally good and lasting results. 

He was defeated with the Government on September 21st, 191 1. 



«38 




DR. JAMES McQueen. 

Dr. James McQueen conferred a ftivor on the township of Beverly 
in 1868 in being barn there, near Sheffield. He is the son of Mr. 
Thomas McQueen, one of Beverly's best known citizens. The doctor's 
public school education was found at Sheffield. He then attended 
the Gait Collegiate Institute, where he was distinguished as a brillinnt 
-•tudent and a good athlete. He was a meoiber of tne junior champion 
football team of Ontario and was a strong and swift forward. 

Ho took hit medical course at Trinity Viedical College and gradu- 
ated in 1 89 1. He then practised his profession at Lampton Mills for 
-a short time, then succeeded Dr. Metheral at Freelton in 1893. He 
imfflediately entered upon an extensive practice which has been 
steadily growing ever since. He is recognized as one of the leading 
men of his profession, and his reputation is a most enviable one. The 
doctor is an active citizen in everything that pertains to the best 
interests of the community. He has been an elder of the Presbyterian 
Church for seventeen years and is a most useful member. He has 
always taken an active part in politics in the interests of the Liberal 
4)trtjr and in February, 191 1, was chosen as their candidate in the 
coming Provincial Election at whicti he was elected as the represen- 
tative of Wentworth. He is a splendid public speaker and is much 
in demand on occassions of entertainment and instruction. He i» 
most unselfish and unsparing in his efforts to benefit the community 
in which he resides and is one of Wentwotth's most worthy and most 
anfiuential citizens 139 




BEVERLY'S COUNCILLORS IN THE YEAR 1875. 

Central figure — Peter Wood, Reeve Top one — Wallace McDonald, Clerk 

Bottom one - Benoni Cornell, Treas. 
Figures between top and centre, left — Thos. McQueen, 1st Deputy Reeve 
" " " " right — Wm. Menzies, 2nd " " 

" " centre and bottom, left— Jas. Smith, Councillor 

" " " " right — Richard Bannen, Councillor 




WM. J. BURGESS 

Mr. Burgess is a Beverly man out and out, being born in Beverly 
in 1854, educated in Beverly and filled many important positions of 
<nnt ia Beverly. For many years he followed the occupation of 
butcher, he owns a farm near Rockton, and now farming is his chief 
"basiness. He is an enthusiastic Sunday school worker and has been 
connected with the Sunday school at Rockton for forty years. He 
has held many positions in the school and the last 6 years Superin- 
tendent. In 1904 he was president of the Beverly Sunday School 
association. He has been a director of the World's Fair since 1898 
and was elected president in 1909. He was elected a councillor of 
Beverly in 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906 and 1907. He was 
elected Reeve in 1909. He is quite a society man, being a Mason, 
an Odd Fellow and Workman. His affability and originality have wo« 
<'or him the esteem of his fellow citizens. Now a member of the board 
-of health of Beverly Township. 

141 




VIEW AT WORLD'S FAIR 




■».'. fir-- .-^'.•>-- 






VIEW AT WORLD'S FAIR 
142 




WM. G AHAM, Postmaster at Dundas. 

' Wm. Graham who has given the citizens of Dimdas and surrouadlng 
vicinity such good service a^ Postmaster for -21 years, still beais his 
«ige well and looks apparently good for many years of active service. 
He was born in Dundas in 1833 and forj7 years was connected with the 
grocery trade. He was an alderman in Dundas for i year and for 15 
years has given good service on the school board in connection with 
the Public and High School. 

M3 




VIEW AT WORLD'S FAIR 







-^t^iidiV**!* • 



/. i Jl. 



VIEW AT WORLD'S FAIR 
144 




D. DWYER 

One_orthe best known men in the County of Wentworth is D. Dwyer, 
"^nose genial good nature has won for him hosts of friends. For fifty years 
^le has lived on the same farm Mr. Dwyer had the hardships of the early 
pioneer but being strong in body and determined in mHid, he saw the great 
• change from'the log cabin to the beautiful home he now occupies. He has 
always taken a keen interest in the public affairs of the community in which 
-ne_ lived. He became a director of the World's Fair in and its presi- 
dent in 1898. He has been a Director of the Beverly Plowing Match 
since [its beginning and a License Commissioner since 1905. He took 
deep interest in the movement to abolish the tool gates in Wentworth and 
along with R. L. Biggs, Thos. McQyeen, the late Jas. McCormack and 
the late Wm. Menzies formed a committee who strove to interest the"differ- 
ent:municipalities in free roads, they held meetings at Gait, Dundas and 
Toronto, and finally succeeded in purchasing the Dundas and Waterloo 
Road from the Mowat Government, and we have ever since then enjoyed 
free roads. Mr. Dwyer has been distinctively a man among men, and hi» 
record is one on which his family as well as many fciends, may look with 
jpride. 



MS 




JOHN MALCOLM of St. George 
President of The Diamond Jubilee World's Fair 

Mr. Malcolm was born in the Township of Beverly in the year 1 849L 
In 1873 he purchased the Farm on which he was born and brought up,, 
from his father, it being 300 acres. Later on in the year 1 883 he removed 
to Gait, and engaged in the Wood, Coal and Lumber business, which he 
earned on successfully for 7 years, when he sold out and moved back on 
to his iaim. He afterwards purchased the Sheffield Cheese and Butter 
Factory, which has been carried on successfully ever since. A few years 
later he also purchased the St. George Cheese and Butter Factory which 
he operated for 2 years, when he decided to go into the manufacture of 
Condensed Milk, which at first was a failure, on account of the glutted mar- 
ket at the time, but not losing faith in the business, and being of a deter- 
mined spirit, he succeeded in getting his goods introduced on the meurket, 
and by increased up-to-date machinery, and turning out a first-class article^ 
he has succeeded until to-day he cannot bein to fill his orders and the 
Brands of St. George milk are known in every town and city from HzJifax 
to Vancouver. He has also been President of the Hamilton Dairy Co. for 
7 years, which has increased its business, until this year, they have had to 
bmld a $20,000 plant with all the latest improvements fo take care of their 
trade. Mr. MaJcolm also had considerable Municipal experience, for some 
years, until the ratepayers honored him with the Reeveship for 4 consecu- 
tive years, until he retired and moved to St. George. 



I 




SCHOOL INSPhCi^'K J. H. SMITH. 

Blr. Smith is a native of Wf-ntworth courty, and is of U. E. Loyalist 
descent. Ilis grandparents settled near Dundas in 1793, and they and thei»- 
descendentc have resided on the same farm since 1796. When the Public School*^ 
Act created tve office of Public School Inspector he was appointed to it by the 
Bounty coun?il, and has held it continuously since that time. Previously he had 
taught school in the counties of Wentworth, Halton and Huron. He received hi» 
Jlementary education in S. S. No. 6, West Flamboro, his principal teacher beins 
Mr. W. N. Donprlas, an under graduate of Aberdeen university. In the Dunda» 
Grammar School he studied under John King, M..\., of Trinity College, Dublin, 
from wkich school he entered Victoria college. This was followed hy a^ Special 
eotirse taken at a private schofol in Dundas, taught by Mr. McGonagal. Having 
ftnished thi^ course and siicoes^a^ly passed the required examinations, he entered' 
the teaching profession, takinir charge o: the rural school at Millgrove. Ontario. 
Desirous of obtaining the high?st qualifications emd training as a teacher, he en- 
tered the Toronto Normal School,' attending the 26th and 26th sessions. He- 
S:Taduated from there in 1861. taking with highest hoiicr- a first-class Grade A. 
«wiificaie. 

147 



MenWestBakingPowder 

ONE POUND TINS SELLS FOR 15c 

•Quality guaranteed Once used You will have no others 



TEAS 

That will suit you becau<=e they are carefully selected 
i"rom the best stock. Our Special Indo-CeyUn Blend 
at 40c is pleasing to all who try it 



COFFEE 

-Mocha and Java Blend. Our favorite. Sells at 

40c per lb. 

The Celebrated Tea and Coffee Store 

W. R. BtJDGE, 

25 York Street, Hamilton 

X48 




ROBERT THOMPSON. 



Bob«rt Thompson was born at Thompson's Comers in 1S23. He did no*. 
kav« many advantages of school in these early days except in the school of 
•rperience. He took part in the early pioneer life in the district asd helped to 

titv the farms so long as his health continued but was, however, compelled 
♦hroQga ill health to sive iP the work on the farm and entered im the biui- 
■ecs of gapplying the Great Western Railway with wood for their engiaei, the first 

•ontract being for 200 cords. He continued to supply them until they changed- 

ikeir engine* from wood to coal. His last contract was to supply them with. 
12,000 cords delivered at Lyaden and Copetown. He then combimed lumbering 
wHh the wood business, goin^ into partnership with John I. Flatt, now Ex 
MJ^.P. His partnership continued for quite a few years when it waa dissolved 
by, muttial consiut Mr. Thompson continued the saw mill and wood business for 

quite a number of years until the wood and timber was nearly exhausted from 
'ihis district. In 1881 he secured the Lynden Flour Mill, which waa ' remodelled to 
the roller process in 1885, and conducted this business with the assistance of his 
■on until his death in October, 1890. 

He was always interested in the public affairs and took an active part la 
ikem but could not be persuaded to accekt any public office except one year- 
■km he served as Township Councillor in 1853. He was also o»e of the firs* 
Bireetors of the World's Fair, being present at the organization meeting in 1853. 
He was an active member of the Presbyterian church, taking an energetie 
fart in the church at Fiamboro until his removal to Lynden m iS83, wh»a he 
Vu chiefly instrumental in establishing the congregation and in building the new 
•torch im 1889. In 1856 he married Barbara, daughter of the late Rev. Thomas- 
OfcrlstJe, of Flamboro, who sul-vived him, dying in April, 1909. There were two 
iMDdreB, Barbara (Mrs. Dr. Addison) of St. George, and, Robert of Lynden. H»- 
mM a generous, whole-hearted, kind man, honest and opright in all his deaHngS- 
■•i rtri highly respected by all who knew him. 




GEO. H. MULHOLLAND. 

George H. MulhoUand, native of th Township ol Beverly, was bom on lot 
No. 16, Concession 2, in the year 1838. lie was a resident of Beverly for about 
sixteen years when he moved with his parents to the Township of West Flajnboro 
where he lived until 1872, w n li^' !o hr lot No. 13, in the second concession 
on the Troy Road, where he lived until 1894, when he retired from active farm- 
iMg life and moved to Lyiiden. 

He was for many years activilv id iit fi d with the public lile of the town- 
ship and was first elected Township Councillor in 1883 and Deputy Reeve in 
1884, 1885 and 1886 and was elected R?eve in 1887. He was elected three time* 
by acclamation. When living ^in Lynden h: was el cted police trustee ol the Village 
•of Lynden for a term. He w >> al-o j r Trineiitl • idntifi(d with the North Dum- 
fries and South Waterloo Insurance Co., being Director for many years and al»o 
ftlled the office of Vice Fr s!d rUt and President. He was elected Director of the 
Beverly Agricultural S; ci 'ty in l^'d. T,, 1890 he was unanimously elected Vice- 
Prtaident and was Prcnidcnt in 1'^' I. 

He Was Very successful in lii-J career as a busini ss man, beins: very ener- 

■getic, persevering and thoroughly upright and honarable. He brought all the«B 

gnalities to bear on his life as a public man and always used his utmost en- 

Seavoi^ to fill any trust imposed upon him in a satisfactoijy tfftmaee. H« died 

ia 1908. 

15® 



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151 




DANIEL JACKSON HIMSELF 
Oldest exhibitor of Carriages and Wagons at the World's Fair 

A STRAIOHT TIP I 

WHEN BUYING A WAGDN YOU WANT 
THE BEST AND MOST IMPROVED. . 

THE JACKSON WAGON 

Has all the good points cf its compttitors, and many special 
improvenjents not found on any other wagon made in Canada. Yew 
attention is called to ten points cnly— the lackson Pat«nt Truii, 
Sand Proof Arm, Steel Hounds, Riveted ^Nhe 1, i^ in. Box Bottom, 
Rivettd Box Cleats, Clipped Bolster Plate , Safety Pole Cap, ConcaY* 
Rub Irons. 

Our Illustrated Catalogue will tell you all. Yourt for the asking. 
Notice — Special attention to Repairs. 

Tires re-set — Buggy, fi.5'»; Wagon, $2.cc 

Wheels cut down. New rims and tir«s put ou -3-in. $[6.00, airin-. $14.00- 

Highest Prices Paid for Timber. See us before selling. 

We want to see you at the Fair. 

JACKSON WAGON CO., Limited 

ST. GEORGE ONTARIO 



»J« 




THOS. PATTERSON. 



Kz Major Thomas Patterson ia an old Beverly boy, going into 
Is Gah in 1899, was elected to the Council in 1903, -was chairman of theBoonb- 
at Works in 1005 and 1906, was elected mayor in 1903 and 1909. H« was- 
riMted in Montreal Vice President of the Canadian Union of MonidpaUtlM ioc 
DMailo for 1908 and was again elected as Vica President in 1909 in the CH^- 
■f Calgary. Ho is at the present time doing one of the largest laal estats b«l* 
■MMS in Western Ontario, with offices at No. 18 Dickson street. Gait, Oni.> whef» 
Bi la ahrayv plaased to welsome his old Beverly friends and discuss the iBerit»^ 
irf the great World's Fair, having attended it for thirty-eight years. 



153 



fe 




THOS. S. HENDERSON. 

Thomas S. Henderson, an ex President of the World's Fair, eldest aon 61 
-41m late William Henderson. He was born in the Township of West Nissoorl, 
County of Oxford, on the 28th day of Ma^, 1843 and came to Beverly in De- 
«einber, 1846. He received his education at the common school on the sixth con- 
cession, MoKnIght's, and at Eockton public school. He was elected to the coun- 
cil in 1884, re-elected councillor 'inl885-87-88, was 2nd deputy reeve in 1889, first dep- 
uty reeve 1892 and reeve 1893«94, and again a county councillor in 1896-97. He 
Was a director of the World's Fair for about forty years, was Vice-President in 
1891 and President in 1892. He is now an honorary director. Be took an aotivo 
Interest in the Beverly and North Wentworth Farmers' Institutes as Director, 
Vice President and President, writing etsays and speaking. Was President of the 
~ Vanners' Association and was a delegate to the Fairs Association and othsr 
■^tm meetings and conventions and was for twenty years treasurer of the A. Of 
V. W. and a delegate to Grand Lodge. He was returning officer at three Tieo- 
~>4k>ns for North Wentworth. He has also been a school trustee. 



IS4 




J AS. McQueen. Sr- 

BSeeted a dirTotor of the World's Fair in 1853 and was a great sapportar of 
HUe fair all hi* life. He was a man of eood judgment and e^eai executive abil- 
itj. Wa« reeve of Beverly iSo4-3o-56-57-5S-59. Born in Scotland in 1807. Settled 
^ Beverly in 1833 on lot nineteen, seventh concession of Beverly. Predominant 
•hwiiiiea good health, moral ourage, determination to succeed, made tha tontt 
h taoma a fmitftil field. He died at the age of 83. 




SETH HOLCOMB. 

Stth Holcomb wa« chairman at the meeting held to ort^oaiac ik« B ^lT«^ ^y 
4K|>fe«ltnral Sooiety cixty years ago and always took a de7p interwi im iti •d' 
maBMNBi BO long a> he lived' in Beverly. He was Beverly '• first rHT« ia ItSO ; 
■h rt ed agaia in 1852-53. Had stores in ^e£eld, St. George and Routes ia* 
• fco tt i MTeniaen ytart. He waa Justice of the Peace, PostmaJter at fllnliilil. Co m 
-4idaioMr for taking affidavit* in the Queen's Bench. Notwitliataadiac a& Ua 
^cflUaaey k* l9T«d a horM trade. 






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TAKEN AT WORLD'S FAIR 



158 



THE ST. GEORGE 

CONDENSARY 



Th« St. Georgt Condansary, which is owned and optrated by 
J. Malcolm & Son, wat started by Mr. Malcolm 4 years ago. After 
going over to tke Unit«d States, and securing a good condensing 
maa, ke protteded to install the expensive machiaery used in a con- 
densing plaat. After getting the machinery installed, and the plant 
in operation, he discovered that there was no sale for his goods ; his 
goods being unknown in a market glucted, and after filling the factory 
with condensed goods, he had to shut down. Not to be diicotiraged 
or daunted, he had faith in the future of the Condensed business, 
and by his perseverance aud stick-to-it-ivBes3, he succeeded in getting 
his goeds oa to the market, and by putting in more expensive and up 
to date machinery, and turning out a first class product, he has paihed 
his goods ahead until to-day he cannot begin to fill his orders, and 
his special lines known as the St. George Evaporated Cream, and 
The Banner, and Princess Milk, are known in every town and city 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The St. George Cendensary is the 
only Condensary in the Dominion which is run as an Independent 
Factory, all other Coadensaries being run by large Corporatioas. 



159 




TAKEN AT WORLI/S FAIR 




TAKEN AT WORLD'S FAIR 



1 60 




JOHN K. JONES. 



Mr. John K. Jones, of BfVerly township, was bom near Orkney, fifty-fiv» 

.^fsars ago. His father wis thv late George Jones, J. P., who for many year* wa» 

« member of Beverly township council. Mr. Jones' entrance to public life was in. 

January, 1903, when he was elected to the council of his native township. For 

- lour years he retained hi.< s at in the council. He served as Deputy Beeve for 1910 

and 1911. 

Mr. .Jones is a member of the Methodist congregation which recently erected 
a splendid new church buildiog at Copetown. 

Ht haE been eminently successful in the pursuit of his chosen calling, as is 
evidenced by the fact that he owns a splendid 125 acre farm near Lynden in ad- 
dition to the valuable farm near Christie's Corners. He has built a beautiful house 
in Lynden, where he has n'tired for the present. Mr. Jones has always be«i an 
^enthusiastic supporter of frate rnal stxeties, and is at present a member of the 
..^.O.U.W., K.O.T.M. and a Past Master of Dufferin Masonic Lodge. He has had the 
, honor of being elected the first Worshipful Master of the new Masonic lodge ^a* 
Lynden. " '■ 

l6i 




JOSEPH BETZNER. 



Xr. Betzner, son of Abram Betzner, waa born in Beverly in 1869, on ih* 
fum on which he now lives. He received bis education at the pnbUe school in 
OAnej, Ontario. Farming has been his occupation all his life. He Was a fireotoc 
•ad Tioe-president of the Lynden cheese factory. He was elected a councillor of 
Bererly In 189?, 1898, 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1902, and reeve in 1903 and 1904, 
■Uh a iMi at the county council. He was elected a repreKntative of difltrlot 
■nnber oae (Beverly) in the county of Wentworth for the years 1905 and 1906. 
H* is praaident of the North Dumfries and South Waterloo Fire Insurance Ca 
Ba was aleoted in 1909 to fill the vacancy made by the death of G. H. Mulhol- 
laad. H« baeame a director f the World's Fair in 1891 and ita President bt 
1906. Ha haa taken quite an active part in the plowing match, annually hdd bk 
Baivarljr and waa Fliesident of same in 1906. Everyone in the township likea goodr— 



Joa. 



i62 




Deputy-Reeve JAMES THOMPSON. 



Jamw Tkomp«<m is a native of Beverly, being bom on lot 24, in tha no- 
<Rid oonn— tnit. Mr. Thompson is a very busy man for he owns and works two 
kvndred aOFM ci land, rons a saw mill for . a few months each year and t<x ■ 
many years has done a grealkiaal of threshing for the farmers in that loealiiy. 
H* was eleot«d a councillor of Beverly in 1893 and 1894 ; second deputy r««ve in 
1896 and 1896, having a seat at the county council 1895-96. He was elected a 
•MndHlor of Baverly in l907'8-9-10-ll and in 1912 was ele«ted Deputy Beave. 
B* was a dirseier of the Lynden chefese factory for many years and for two • 
fwrs was Hm presideBt and salesman. He is a member of the PreBbyt«r,an ohnzdk.- 
•I Lgmdeo wtd has a lovely home not far from that village. 



163 




COUNCILLOR E. MACPHERSON, Jr. 

E. MacPherson, Jr. was born in tho Township of Beverly in the year 1869. 
^e received his education at the Orkney public school from which he graduated at 

the Age of seventeen with a non-professional teacher's certificate. Later on he took 

up the profession of farming, and he now owns one of the best {arms in the 
rsouth end of the township. He started his public career as councillor of his native 

township in 1909. He was re-ekoted in the years 1910-11-12. As a councillor he 
-has made good and has provci himself worthy of the trust the people jdaocd !d 

4iiBi. 



164 




COUNCILLOR STEPHEN MOFFATT. 

Mr. MoCait wm bom half a mile east of Sheffield, in 1862. He ia th« oklwi 
(OB d tin late Adam HoiTit% who died when he was quite yoong and ha cloflf 
wHa hia motlwr had to take charge of the farm, and was snooesBfnl in kaaping 
Ita faaaily together until tlicy grew up to man and womanhood. In the year 1894 
Ha aazxiad and moTed to the farm where he now resides, formerly owned by lCr« 
BolMri OUrar. 

Ia 1909 he wa« elected councillor for the Township of Beverly, and tha «la»- 
ton el tba iownahip bestowed upon him the honour of polling thelargeet nnmbiV 
■I Totw arer polled by a new candidate. He elected in 1910. By aodamatioo, 
ki 1911, 1912. He headed the polls in 1912. 



■65 




Councillor FRANK C. BIGGS. 

Frank C. Biggs, son of R. L. Biggs who was a representative ia 
council for many years, was born in Brantford, September 1 3th, 1 88 1 , and 
moved the same fall to Beverly Township. He now resides on the farm, 
formerely owned by the Christie family. He is deeply interested in Agri- 
culture zund especially in the dairy business. He aJso owns and runs a «aw- 
miil part of the year. In 1912 he was elected a Councillor of Beverly* 
He is a young man of good ability aad should rise to higher honors. 



1 65 



iH'fff^ 




WILLIAM H. HENDERSON. 

Wm. H. Henderson, son of Thomas S. Henderson, was bom at Rocktott Ob 
Hay 18,1876. Jleoeiv^id n's t-rimary education at the Rockton public s'lhool, fooic 
kic course tiiroueh i »e (J.-iit Collegiate Institute, received a seconJ-sIass c^^i^fr'aft* 
"to teach. Taught the Rocktonpoblic achool for five years then went to th« To 
aonio University, took an arts course and got a B. A. degree. He was employwi 
by the Y.M.C.A. of Montreal for a time, then took one year in the Presbyteifaa 
Theological College, Montreal, and two years in the Westminster Hall, VanoonT», 
fie became qualified as a preacher of the gospel and is now one of the teczvt arleC 
ol the Montreal Y.M.C.A. He kiiows all about farm work, having gone tIiroQ(lk 
All kinds of it on his father's iam. 



167 




SHERIFF J T MIDDLETON 



Wentworth county has b«en favored in the class of men who have filled H*' 
B, by displaying loyalty o the interests of the community, and being prompt 
and faithful in the discharge of the duties devolving upon them. Of these J. T. 
IQddleton is a worthy representatibe and at the present is capably filling the offiae 
vi county sheriff. He was bom November 28, 1840, in Alloa, Scotland. In 1851 
ihe family arrived in New York on the third of July, goinlg on to St. CathariBM, 
Ontario, where he attended the grammar school. At the age of sixteen he b^;ail 
clerking in a general store in Smithville, where he also engaged in bnsinen OB 
Ua own account as u-jrchant and farming. He was secretary of the High Sdiool 
Bo«rd and also of the Grimsby Agricultural Society and a member of the ToWB- 
■hip Council of Grimsby. In 1875 he came to Hamilton and began business hi; 
Biaible and granite monuments and is still interested in this line of business. 

For a long period he was President of the South Wentworth Liberal AssonJM' 
'Hen, and at the election of 1891, he unsuccessfully contested South Wentworth fcje^ 
Ihe House of Commons against- Major Frank Carpenter, being defeated by only ons 

vote. In 1894 he was elected a member of the Provincial Legislature representfalj^ 
ihe constituency of East Hamilson for one term. In 1898 he was defeated by H. 

Carscallen, K.C. In 1899 he was appointed sheriff for the county of Wentwortt 

He has many arduous and trying duties to fulfill in the office of sheriff, ■ad' 
.iriiile punishment is required fo the criminal he considers reforming them is iks- 
llBst preventative against crime- For the large and varied population of this OOOi* 
%jt. tt stands well in this Province as being a safe, progressive and prosperoo* 
aty for which some credit is due to its ofiBcials. 



i68 




D. B. WOOD 



liak your memory up with things as they were in Beveriy and St. G«acs»~ 
tidrty odd years ago. D. B. Wood was at that time an apprentice boy i& 
ibe '»*TWt»|^ btuia^s at SK. G?orge. His chief asset was a fair shara of brawn» 
■niada snd iDtellR<:i. B^vnrly farmers were at that time, as they are today, oon- 
■iiiered Us beet frisnds and bnsiness aJitociitf^s. 

D. B. Wood {ilways reached ont for the farmer's trade and wSi fortunate la 
getting A £Ood share of it. His extended business career carried him to the titf 
ct Brantiord, where he became active in business, municinal and other pursoitfl^ 
and afterwards to Beverly's county seat— the city of Hamilton, where he resides si 
present. He is manager of the splendid business of the Wood IfQIUag Co. there, 
and we ste rn manager of the Dominion Floor Mills Co. Ltd., who have mills now 
in St. George, Brantford, Hamilton and Montreal, as well as a very wids and 
flonsiantly growing bnsineas in grain and produce elsewhere. It is a pleasure for- 
Um to look bctok to the boyhood days at St. George and from time to timeooa* 
tinoe to wield the golden links of friendship with his Beverly friends. He has par- 
fi^M a wider aaqtialntanee than any other business man in Brant and Wentwortik 
eoanties, aad yet he believes in the standard trueism that "old friends are bosi."^ 
He and Us milling and grain business have be.'n so closely allied with Beverly for- 
•O many years that we almost claim him as a Beverly man in tUs osr Qoldsik. 
JvbSae. ... 



169 




JOHN MALCOLM. Sr. 



Mr. John Malcolm, Sr., Father of the Present President of the 
World'i Fair, was one of the Beverly Pioneers, came to Beverly from Scot- 
land in the year 1843, and settled on Lot 1 2, Con. 6, where he continued 
lo reside until his death, which took place, in the month of Decembers 
1 882, at the age of 76 years. He was a man who always took an interest 
m the advancement of the Township, and was for some yews, both Town- 
•hqj and County Councillor. In religion he was a strong Presb}rtenan, 
bdng an Oder of the Kirkwall Presbyterian Church, from its inc^tioa 
vntil the time of his death. He was also always interested in the Rocktmi 
xair, and wm one of its early Directors. 




G. C. WILSON. M.P. 

G. C. Wilson was elected Member of Parliament for Wentworth 
County in the last Dominion Election. Formerly he represented North 
Wentworth in the Ontario Legislative Assembly- 



i?! 




SMITH. Ex-M P. 



K D. Smith, Ex.-M.P., botn December 8th, 1853, in Saltfleet, son of Sylvertar 
Smith, farmer, whose grandfa ther was a United Empire Loyalist, and of Damoris 
Isabella, grand-daughter of George McGee, who was a Loyalist colonial volunteer- 
in Lancey*! famous brigade of >Jew York, who when the war waa over was awardod 
land in New Brunswick, on the St. John river, above Woodstock, for his faitlifali 
services to the British Crown. 

Mr. Smith sat for Wentworth in the House of Commons from 1900 to 1904,. 
majority being 156. When the constituencies were redistributed and the present 
constituencies were formed it was supposed to be an impossible constituency for & 
Conservative, but Mr. Smith was declared elected by a small majority, but a* 
twenty-five votes were thrown out at the recount on account of having been Im- 
properly initialed by the deputy returning officer, a protest was entered and Wf 
year was occupied, during which Mr. Smith did not offer to take his seat, finally 
a new election was ordered and Mr. Smith was elected by a majority of seventeOL 
andheld the seat until the close of the parliament of 1908, when he retired from. 
politics on account of a breakdown in health, which has since been largely ngaiar 
ed. 

Mr. Smith is engaged in various industries. Farming eight htmdred acree d 
choice land, growing mostly fruit and nursery stock on iy. He oarriee on a v»Pf 
extensive nursery business through agents, having about four hundred on the road. 

He started a fruit business in 1882 and ever since that time has been the moti 
extensive shipper and dealer in fruits grown in the Niagara District, handling as 

much as five hundred carloads per annum. In 1904 he started making pur« IniU 

Jams and now has the largest jam factory in Canada, the output reaching alxmi 
♦600,000 per anntim.Ha is also heavily engaged in canning at Beam^vflle, Wlnoaa 

and Fetrolea. 



I 




J. H. FISHER. MP. for Brant 

^•'^ Bom in Paris, and educated at Paris PubLc ani High Schools. 
Has been Alderman, Reeve, N'ayor (f.ve terms), and Wairden of 
Brant County. 

Elected to Legislature in 1905, and re-elected in 1908, resigned 
seat in Legislature in 1 9 1 1 , to contest Riding for the House of Commons, 
and was elected, defeating Hen. Wm. Paterson, Minister of Customs, 




GEO A. CLARE, M.P. 

Mr. Geo. A. Clare has been South Waterloo's popular repn s .nlative ia 
die Dc minion Parliament for the la»t twelve years. 



»74 



i 




FL KIRKLAND; KERNIGHAN. 



of Mr. Eernighan from ib» last edMoB oC^ 

London, Cng. : 



Wfl oopy the foHowing sketch 
HWb Who, paUiabed by The Times, 

KenigliMl, Bob«t KirkLuid. "The Khan of Ehanada" ; < om Rashdale Pftmi, 
! Wf ti r o c U i ya—t y, Oatario, Canada, 25 April, 1857, son of Acdrow aad Jane 
Kwighan ; Is aniaarriad ; educated Rockton public school i a free lanoe iMWipsB- 
aman aU ov«r ibe North American continent. PabUcationa : "The Khan's Obs- 
tfeles," a book of poems. Recreations : Tree planting. Address The Wigwam, I hi ih 
9ak Parm, Boskion P.O., Ontario, Canada. 



175 





Ex-Warden J. WALTER GAGE, County of Wentworth 

J. WALTER OAGE 

THE •WELL KNOWN 

REAL ESTATE DEALER 

SPECIALITIES : 
Factory Sites and development of Surburban Properties. 



Head Office: CHANCERY CHAMBERS 
.32, 34 and 36 Main St. East HamiitoB, Ont 

Phone 781. 

Iffiranch Offices-- iBgersell, Montreal, P. Q. and Rochciter, N. Y. 

176 



MEET ME AT 

THE WORLD'S FAIR 



We are making special arrangements to have a very fine 
exhibit of Hcintiman & Co.'s Pianos this year. New 
designs of ipedal casts. These instruments are now 
being intshed at our factory. If you are thinking of 
buying an Initrumtnt don't fail to see our display. 



OUR REMOVAL SALE 

is now on, Instr«A*nM art narked away down in price, 
Our new building will soon be ready and every piano 
must be sold. 



To OMi tmi Orifbal Firm of 

HEINTZMAN & CO., 

71 KiBf Eoil (N«rth tidoX HAMILTON. 



A. L. QARTHWAITB, M«n«r«r. 



Th« 



Campbell Lflbri mating Gi. 

MANUFACTURBKS OF ALL QBADBS OF 

Lard Oil and Special Lard Oil 

also Wool Oils 



Lubricating Oils: 

Cylinder G«« Engine Separmtor 

ARD MACHINIR OILS OF ALL DESCUPTIOlfS 

British Axle GrcMt Never Slid Belt Dressing 

Compression Grease 

Harness Oil Blackening and Harness Oil 



19 EAST STUART STREET 

Hamilton,! Ontario. 




VIEW AT WORLD'S FAIR. 



ROBT. HICKOK 

ST. GEORGE 



Manufacturer of and dealer in all kinds of 

Tinware, Coal and Wood Stoves, Etc. 

Eavf troughing and H»t Air Farnaces a Specialty 
Repairing neatly done with promptnesf and dispatch 



177 





GEORGE HUNTER Director from 1894 to 1905 SAMUEL CORNELL, Pioneer 



GRANITE 
MONUMENTS 

Of the Best Granites and finish to 
select froD.. LARGEST STOCK IN 
THE CITY. 

Wood Mantels 

Onyx Marble and Tile Facings, Gas 
or Coal Grates, Interior Marble and 
Tile, oui specialty. Having exper- 
ienced ■workmen, our work guaranteeti 
satisfaction. Prices low. Inspection 
invited of our latest de>igns. 

The MiddktoD, Mable and Gr nite Co Ltd. 

J. T. MIDDLETON, President. FURNISS & EASlMAN. Managers 

232, 234, 236, 238 King Sf. East, Hamilton. 

178 




SHERIFF J. T. MIDDLETON 




W. H. BROOKING 
A Judge for 40 years at World's Fair 



GEO. MILLEN. War:ea Ccurly cf \ entwottl* , 





H. REGAN. Mi-. A.. South Weatworth 



CHIEF CLAFK 

High Constable cf Ccunty of Wentworth 



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Best Turn- Out at World's Fair. 



Meivin A. Secord 

BARRISTER 
^ALT - - ONTARIO 

Gore Pire Insurance Building 

Loans Negctiaitd 



Daizell & Barrie 

Barristers, Solicitors, 

Conveyancers, Notaries, Etc. 

QALT - - ONTARK 

Commercial Building 
Money to Loan 



i8o 



I 



HE GALT HORSE SHOW ASSOCIATION (!NCC RFCRATED> 

Patron — 
Sir J. M. GIBSON, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario 

Hon. Presidents — 
R. O. McCULLOCH. Esq. M. N. TODD, Esq. 

H. F. MACKENDRICK, Esq., M.D. JAS CROMARTY, Em^. 

Officers 1912 : 




JAMES WETHERILL, Esq.. Piesident W. A HUNTER. Esq , Vice-President 




T. T. AITKIN, Esq , Secretary 



F S JARVIS. Esq., Treasurer 




VIE V TAKEN AT U<^KL 'S F.vlK 




i 



WILLIAM MEN2I S. Rjeve of Beverly 1884-85 

William Menzios was bo n in Dumfriesshire, Scotland, . in 1833. He came 

-to Canada when he was only three years of age. His parents settled on the 

-seventh concession, lot sixteen, in the Township of Bevirly, and on that same 

lot he lived all his lif-. When he, was a i^d ib re -uere no", vhe same chains 

of aCqai'ii' -in . I :r!,ti<>n :./■ exist at the present time. The time .spent at school 

was limited to a few months in tht; year and the system of education was very 

imperfect. All of his cducat'oii Aas received in. this section. His ability was soon 

recognized and in 18l 2 he was el. ci»>d a Councillor, again re-el. •ct' d in 1873, 1874- 

In 1875 he became s cpnd Deputy Reeve, a position which he h<.ld till 1878, when 

he became first Deputv Re-ve. He was first ;Deputy Reeve in all for five years, 

and then was placed in the Reeve's chair. In, 1867 he married Lou-sa Forsyth. 

•He, held man V offices of trHst in connection , with the Presbytwan church, in 

Kirkwall. In 1875 he was eh cted a director of the Beverly Agricultural Society, 

-vice-president in 1882, and president in 1883. He died in 1911, 





HON. JAMES YOUNG 

Ex. -Provincial Treasurer, who has identified 
himself with many forward movements for 
the betterment of his home town. The first 
reporter at the World's Fair 60 years ago. 



Mayor F. STEWART SCOTT 

An ardent supporter and exhibitor at the 
Gait Horse Show and World's Fair. 



dXUcb^in^ Unvitations 

DONE IN CORRECT STYLES 
FROM THE LATEST TYPES 

C £. Iknowlee 



Iftne printer 



fRain Street 



(Bait, ©ntarlo 



Over R. Struthers' Dry Goods Store 
Phone No. 150 



183 




DAVID BELL 

David Bell, young-est son of the late Alexander Bell, sr., was born on tb*" 
27tli of August, 1851, ut (itrman's Corners, three miles west ol '-t. Oeorgo. n« 
received his ».arlv oAi-.y-ion -..t the public school in Sheffield. Inl86o he moved 
to Gait, where he worked in Attwood's shingle mill, Blain's stave factory and 
Craig's grocery store. For -,1 short time he attended the Gait public school. Hf 
moved to Rockton the 1st of July, 1867, and attended the public school there 
one and one-half years. In September, 1869, he received a teacher's certificate. In. 
January, 1871, he commenced to teach the public school in S. S. No. 6, Beverly, 
generally called Woodhill school, and, with the exception of 1874, when ho at- 
tended Rockwood Academy, taught there till the close of 1889, or in all 18 year*. 
He discharged the duties of Secretary of the Wentworth Teachers' Association for 
1877, 1878, 1879. He was elected president of the Wentworth Teachers' Assoda^ 
tion for the year 1887. He was elected anauditor of Beverly Agricultural Sooieey 
In 1876 and a director in 187 6. For thirty-six years he has been Secretary- Trea»» 
^tirer of the Beverly Agricultura 1 Society, commonly known as the World's Fair. b»* 
hg elected to that position in-January, 1877. For fifteen years he was an auditor 
d the Township of Beverly and was an auditor of the County of W?ntwortK 
lor three years. He is most widely known in this district as the Seoretary-Troa* 
■urer and manager of the World's Fair at Rockton. 



184 




J. p. JAFFRAY 
Editor oi Reporter, Gait. Elected Reeve of Gait inJ912- 
Director of Gait Horse Show. 
He is Chairman of the Board of Works of Town Council. 



185 




VIEW AT WORLD'S FAIR. 




VIEW AT WORLD'S FAIR. 



i86 




RICHARD BLAIN 



•V r* 



> 




;^'?^: 




PRESERVED COOLEY 



He was Secretary at the South Waterloo He was one of the first Directors of the World't 
Agricultural Society and connected with Fair in 1853, and always took a deep interest 
the society for over half a century. in the society a< long as he lived . 



WHITE & CO., Limited 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Foreign and Tropical Fruits 
Fish and Oysters 

A Specialty 

32 & 34 York Street Hamilton 

TBLBPHONES 27aS and 2780 

I8r 




WALLACE McDonald, 2nd Secy.-Treas., World's Fair. Rockton 

Wallace McDonald was bom on the 23rd of June A.D. 1822, in a villagw 
called Eaton, near Utica, in Oneida County, New York. Hia parents werr na- 
tives of Glasgow, Scotland, but came to Canada in the year 1820, and then moved 
*o New York in the sprin^f of 1821, and remained ther' until 1836, when they 
«ame to Canada again with their family, settling on a bush lot near Vttlens 
P.O., in Beverly. Wallace received his education at a common school before h» 
was twelve years of age. 

After coming to Canada he was actively engaged in bush life and farming- 
until the year 1857. He was elected a municipal councillor and was then appointed 
a Justice of the Peace and a"gain elected Councillor in 1858 and 1859, was elected 
Beeve for 1860 and 1861, and was requested to be a candidate again, but de- 
clined, preferring to retire into private life, which he did and remained so until 
December 1st, 1862, when he was selected Division Court Clerk for Beverly, and in 
October, 1863, he was appointed Township Clerk. He then moved with his family 
io Rockton, and held the position for 42 years. He was Secretary of the Beverly 
Agricultnral Society from 1870 until 1876, when he resigned owing to the preasur^ 
of other business. The society flourisdtd under his management. He died in 190& 
. in his eighty-fourth year. 



i88 




JOHN ARMSTRONG. Itf Secy.-Tfcv. WorkTs Fak. Rocktoo 

Jcdm Axmstrong was bom in Cnmberiand, Whgimii!, on October 99ru% 1811. 
^BOgisted to CsDAda wiib his pMrentB in 1831. and aeitod on lot ■iirMiliiiB. m« 
•ceniaa fovr, Bercrirf. At tliat time this weticn of ths e o mury warn a doMe ft>r> 
-•■t. there not boins even a bnish hee^t to be meen. Then wen tmiy ^kna 

hooaes or rather hnU along what is now tiie Dondas mi Vatodoo stone road, 
-one oi theae was whtn iHBiamHngill now Uvea, another at tha BfKtag &ed^ — ^^ 

Boeicton, and the thizd at the .ancient village of Bomnliia, ivar tte 'viDaga of 
-fOwrflWd Kr. Axmatzong'a father took vip 200 acres of laad and isirlwl hia xoogk 

dwdling near when the late T. B. Axmatzong lived. When John took to faiv 

aelf m, wile his fathet gave him the sonth half of the 200 actea and on that 
-fazm he Hved most of his days. The sobjeet of osr aketeli had reeaived a good 

ednaatian and that eoaptad with good fndgaait and a nadf pea, gave him a da- 

cided advantage over his fdlow dtisois. Befere Diviaton Coorls wen rslaTiBihid 
dn this part the people had a Oomndaaion Court and John Armstrong was aieak 

•dt that eont. He was also Oerk of Beverly towasliq> dming thesreara 1842-43- 
^44 and 45. Mr. Axmstroog wa elected eecretary^-treaanror at tlw organisation of 

4he Beverly Agriealtnral Society in 1853, and held tha poaitkn for «^fktaan yaan. 



189 




Andrew McKni^ht T. S. Henderson John J. Stewart 

Men who attended every Rockton Fair from 1853 to 1911, a period of 59 yearss 

HARRY D. PETRIE 

BARRISTER, SOLICITOR. ETC. 
Spectator Building - 28 James St- South, Hamilton, Ont.. 

UONBY TO LOA\ 



LYMAN LEE 



JOHN G. FARMER. 



LEE €r FARMER 



Barristers, Solicitors, Etc-, 
CANADA LIFE CHAMBERS, HAMILTON, ONT. - PHONE No. 280? 

190 




VIEW AT RACE TRACK AT WORLD'S FAIR 




JOHN CLEMENT, Reeve of Beverly for 1866. 1868. 1869. 1871. 1872. 1873. 1874 

Was bom in the Peirlsh of Langtree, County of Devon, Elnglanh, in 1804. Ha 
eame to Canada 1832 and «ttled in Toronto TowiwMp, where he remained three 
years. He settled in Beverly on Lot 17, Con. 2, in 1835. His first appearance 
at the Council Chamber was in 1857,. when he was elected Councillor. He was 
afterwards elected three times Councillor, four times aa Deputy-Reeve, and seven 
times as Reeoe. He retired from the active duties of public life when he 
reached the a^e of three score years and ten. He took quite an interest in the 
Beverly Aericultural Society and did much to advance its interests. He died 
at the age of ninety-one. 

191 




a.'^gc. •-a .^HT'i ^^^" 



A PAIR OF PRIZE WINNER- 



ii 



International Patent Agency'^ 



Established 1868 

InTentiont protected in all countries. Caveats Filed 

Trade Marks, Designs, Labels and Copyrights Registered 

ALFRED T. BRATTON 

SOLICITOR OF PATENTS 
17 ^ King Street East Hamilton Canada 

Registered in Great Britain hy Examination, and in U. S. A. as 
Patent Attorney. 



DIAMOND JUBILEE SOUVENIR 

'^Oth t^?V^ ^ ^ PRIZE LIST SECTION 




\/^M»*-\-V\N^ M Wednesday, 




OCTOBER 8 AND 9 
1912 

JOHN MALCOLM. President 

R A INKSETTER, DANIEL BADGER 
1st Vice-President 2nd Vice-President 

DAVID BF.1 .1 .. Secy -Treas and Manager 



Brewester & Heyd 

BARRISTERS, ETC. 

BRANTFORD ONTARIO 

Branch Office . ST. GEORGE 
Open Every Thui-sday 

Solicitors for 
THE ROYAL LOAN SAVINGS CO. 
THE BRANTFORD TRUST CO. 
THE BANK OF HAMILTON 

W. S. BREWSTER, KC. 
-OEORQE D. HEYD. 



THE 

LADIES' STORE 

For Up-to-date 
Jackets and Furs, Tailor- 
Made and Shirt Waist 
Suits, Separate Skirts, 
Shirt Waists, Hosiery, 
Gloves, Neckwear, Cor- 
sets, and all Ladies' Fur- 
nishings 

W. L. HUGHES 

127 COLBORNE STREET 

Brantford Oatario 



»93 



THE WORLD'S FAIR 

Under the auspices of 

ROCKTON AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 
will be held at 

]^/'\/^|>^'T'/^lWT Tuesday and Wednesday, 
IVV/V^IV 1 KJr% OCT. 8th and 9th, 1912 

Wh«n prizes will be efFered for 

Stock, Poultry, Agricultural Products, Implements, Manufacturers. 

Ladies' Work, Fine Arts, Etc., Etc. « 

COMPETITION OPEN TO THE WORLD. 



Officers of Reckton Agricultural Society for 1912 

JOHN MALCOLM, R. A, INKSETTER, DANIEL BADGER,, 

President 1 st Vice-President 2nd Vice-President 

DAVID BELL, Secy.-Treas. and Manager. 



R. Wedge 
■Wm. J-. Burgess 
Wm. Sager — 
D. Dwyer 
JaB. Humphrey 
W. B. Boyle 
Anthony Garrooh 
James Burt 
John Allen 
Chas. E. Sparks 
Daniel Wray '^ 
Uorris Shellard 
Jamas George 
Joa^h Betzner 
James Nicholson 
Wm. MaClure 



Wm. Thompson 
Henry Chambers 
Henry Howard 
John McQueen 
Thos. MoNichol 
Matthew Jackson 
Wm. Cowie 
■VWlber Sweet 
Jas. Vansickle 
Chas. Boyle 
S. J. Plastow "* 
G. T. Misener 
J. A. McDonough 
A. A. Stewart 
Malcolm McDonald 
George N. Harris 



Edwin McKnight 
Jas. S. Henderson 
John Jackson 
Rtissel Ireland 
Jas. M. McCormiok 
George Smith 
A. J. George ^ 
Nathan Sager 
Geo. A. Howard * 
Wm. McDonald 
John K. Jones 
Nelson Culham 
Sam George 
David Ricker 
Henry Watson 



LADY DIRBCTORS— Miss H. E. Plastow, Miss Minnie Boyle, Miss Sarah PaV 
terson. Miss B. M. Thompson, Miss C. M. Wray, Mrs. (Dr.) Gibson, Miss J^ 
Mflbz&as, Hiss A. Cowie. Auditors— John Ireland and Frank H. Boy la. 



194 



HONORARY DIRECTORS. 

Hon. Thomas Bain, Hon. Wm. Paterson, Hon. Mr. Yoang, Dr. Mc- 
Queen, M.L.A., J. T. H. Regan, M.L.A., J. H. Fisher, M.P., James 
Somerville, Lieut.-Col. J. J. Grafton, John I. Flatt, Thomas McQueen, 
John Dickenson, Daniel Eeed, R. A. Thompson. J. C. Deitrich, E. D. 
Smtih, W. 0. Sealey, G. Wilson, M.P., T. S. Henderson. Wm. Wood, 
Sr., Emerson Clement, Mayor Geo. Lees, Mayor E. A. Woodhouse, Mayor 
F. 'Stewart Scott, Warden G. W. Milne. 

COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT FOR THE DAYS OF THE FAIR. 

Specitd Attractions and Trials of Speed — E. Wedge, James Burt, W. 
R. Doyle, D. Dwer, John Malcolm, Wm. McDonald, Wm. Sager. H. D. 
and Agricultural Horses — A. Garroch. Morris Shellard, 'John Allen, John 
McQueen. Carriage Horses — Wm. Thompson, Joseph BeBtzner, Daniel 
Badger, G. T. Misener. Roadster Horses — Wm. McClure, Jas.;Vansickle, 
J. Humphrey, John K. Jones. Cattle — Henry Watson, Sam George, Jas. 
McCormick. Sheep — Wm Cowie, David Ricker, Edwin McKnight. Pigs- 
— Jaa Nicholson, A. A. Stewart, W. Sweet. Poultry — Charles Boyle, 
George Smith, S. J. Plastow. Grain and Seeds — H. Chambers, Geo. A. 
Howard. Roots and Vegetables — Robt. A. Inksetter, John Jackson, John 
A. McDonough, Geo. N. Harris, Nelson Culham. Cheese and Butter — 
Chas. E Sparks, Wm. J. Burgess, James George. Fruit — ^Nathan Sager, 
Thomas McNichol, H. Howard. Bread and Honey — Matthew Jackson, 
Russell Ireland. Home Manufactures — ^D. Dwyer, Miss Plastow, ^Miss 
Sara Patterson, Miss J. Menzies. Ladies' Work — Jas. S. Henderson, Miss 
Boyle, Miss Thompson, Miss C. M. Wray, Mrs. vDr.) Gibson, Miss A. 
Cowie. Admission Tickets to Grounds — A. J. George. Grievances and 
Protests — Jas. George, W. R. Boyle, R. Wedge. Supt. of HaU — Daniel 
Wray. Supt. of Show Grounds — ^Malcolm McDonald. Assistant Supt. — 
Sam. J. Plastow. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

1. Each subscriber of $1.00 per annum, paid by the first of Oc- 
tober, shall be a member for the year and shall receive four admission 
tickets. After that only two admission tickets will be given. 

2. All entries of articles and stock intended for exhibition must be 
made on printed forms, filled up and signed by the exhibitor or his agent. 
The forms will be furnished on application to the Secretary. 

3. AU entries are requested to be made not later than 7:30 p.m. on 
the oth day of October. Any entries made after that time and date will 
be charged 10c.. extra for each entry. This rule will be strictly enforced. 

4. All stock must be bona fide property of the exhibitor at the time 
of entry to entitle him to receive a premium ; all grain, roots, seeds, fruits 
and dairy produce must be the property of the exhibitor, the growth or 
make of the present year, and the production of the farm or holding; and 
the manner of curing and culture set forth in the entiy if required. 

5. On Tuesday everything excepting live stock must be on the 
grounds not later than 10 a.m. Judges will commence making their 
awards at 1 p.m. AU live stoiek must be on the grounds by 10 a.m. on 
Wednesday, after which the grounds and hall will be open for exhibition. 

6. Cattle are construed GGrade which are under Thoroughbred, and 
exhibitors of Thoroughbred Cattle when making entries, must give num- 
ber of pedigree, excepting calves of 191*2, which must show the regis- 
tered number of dam in the Herd Book. 

'9^ 



RULES AND REGU LATIONS.— (Continued.) 

7. Bulls must have a ring or a screw in the nose and be carefully 
secured to prevent the possibility of an accident. 

8. Should there be onl yone competitor, the judges may use their 
•own discretion in giving a premium or othrwise. 

9. The stcx^k in the show ground shall be only known to the Judges 
■by ticket and number. 

10. No article will be admitted with name or initial or distinguish- 
ing mark thereon. 

11. Any person interfering by conversation or otherwise, with the 
judge-s until the judgment is passed, shall have no prize adjudged him. 

12. .-. The Managing Committee consists of the President, Vice-Presi- 
dents and Directors. 

13. The Managing Committee will be in attendance at 9 a. ra. on each day and give 
information that may be required. 

14. No person will be allowed to enter for exhibition more than 
one specimen of any class. This rule does not apply to animals, but to 

•all ki^ds of grain, vegetables, products, fruit, manufactured articles, etc. 

• ■• 15. Manufactured articles and specimens of ladies' work must be 
the bona fide property of the exhibitor, to be made or worked at the ex- 
pense of. the exhibitor by regular employees or members of his family. 

16. No article in the Drill Shed will be allowed to be removed there- 
from until 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday. 

17. Upon the discovery of any fraud, deception or dishonest prac- 
tice, either in the praparation, ownership or any representation concern- 
ing any. article exhibited which may have affected, or may have intended 
to affect the decision of the Judges, the Board shall have power to with- 
hold the payment of an yprize awarded and may prohibit any such party 
-or parties exhibiting, in any one class for one or more years, and may also 
publish the names of such persons or not, as may be deemed expedient. , 

18. Exhibitors shall, if required by the Committee on Gievances and 
'Tests, make a statutory declaration that the articles exhibited by them 

are exhibited in. accordance with the Rules and Regulations of the As- 
sociatitm; and in case an yexhibitor refuses to make such declaration on 
being requested, all premiums awarded him, her or them shall be for- 
feited. 

' 19. The Treasurer will be ready to commence paying the premiums 
on Saturday, !'2th October, at 10 o'clock a.m., at this office, Rockton, 
and parties who have prizes awarded to them are particularly requested to 
apply for them on that day. or leave a written ordei^ with someone to re- 
ceive them, stating articles for which prizes are claimed. 

20. All persons to whom a prize or prizes are awarded must apply 
to the Secretary of the Association for payment thereof before the thir- 
tieth da yof November in the year in which such was awarded, or shall 
forfeit such prize or prizes. , ,. 

21. The admission fee to the grounds will be: Adults, 25 cents; 
children between 10 and 15 years of age, 10c. ; under 10 years, free; con- 
veyances, 25 cents. Each member who pays previous to October 1st will 
be furnished with four tickets, after that date oiily two admission tickets 
will be niven. 

196 



RULES AND REGULATIONS.— (Continued.) 

22. The exhibition will be open to the public on Wednesday morn- 
ing and will remain ojpen until 4:30 o'clock that day. 

23. For the convenience of the public, checks will be given for in- 
gress and egress to the grounds, but no checks will be given after 1:30 
p .m. 

24. The Society agrees to pay its usual cash prize for ftny special 
prize order that will not be honored by being personally presented to the 
honor thereof. 

23. This Society will not be responsible for an lossy, damage or 
accident occurring to any person or property on the ground during the 
Fair. 

26. While the Directors will take every possible precaution under 
the circumstances to secure the safety of articles sent to the exhibition, 
the owners themselves must take the risk of exhibiting. Should any 
article be accidentally injured, lost or stolen, the Directors will give all 
the asisstance in their power toward the recovery, but will not make any 
payment for the value thereof. 

27. Any exhibitor lodging a protest must make it in writing, and 
it must be delivered to the Secretary or his assistant within three days 
of the cause of protest it must state plainly the cause of complaint or 
appeal and must be accompanied by a deposit of two dollars, which sum 
shall be forfeited to the Association if the protest be not sustained. The- 
Board of Directors, however, earnestly hope that the exhibitors will not 
enter protests without the strongest grounds for so doing, as much an- 
noyance and unpleasantness is often caused by protests of a frivolous 
nature. 

25. All protests will be decided by the Committee on Grievances 
and their decision shall be final. 

29. In order to stop the growing practice of sending exhibits in 
care of the Superintendent of the department, the following order will 
be invariably adhered to: Whilst every possible assistance will be most 
cheerfully given in placing exhibits, no package or case oi an ykind 
whatsoever will be opene dunless accompanied by the exhibitor or some 
one sent specially in charge. 

30. The entrance fee must in all cases accompany the entry. J^o 
entrv will be accepted unless this is done. Fees should be sent by Post 
office Order, Postal Note, or in bills in Registered Letter and not XQ. 
postage stamps. 



197 



PRIZE LIST 



HORSES— HEAVY DRAUGHT. 

Government Judges for Horses. 
Directors in Charge— A. Garroch, M. Shellard, John Allan, John McQueen. 

Judging to commence at 12:30 o'clock on Wednesday. 
Clam 1st 2nd 3rd 

1 Gelding or Filly, 3 years old $4 00 $3 00 $2 00 

2 Gelding or Filly, 2 vears old -4 00 3 00 2 00 

3 Gelding or Fillv, l\ear old 400 300 200 

4 Brood Mare, with Foal by her side 4 00 300 200 

6 Foal of 1912; 1st, a Racer cross cut saw, $6.00, 

by Shurley & Dietrich. Gait : 200 100 

6 Span of Heavy Draught Horses, Geldings or 

Mares . . . . " 10 00 7 00 5 00 

7a Single Dray Horse, in harness 500 300 2 00 

7b Best Colt, 2 vears old and under, sired by Stal- 

Hon Gladiator, by Jas. Riddle. Rockton . . 5 00 3 00 2 OO 
AGRICULTURAL HORSES. 
Directors in Charge— A. Garroch, M. Shellard, J. Allan, John McQueen, 
Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 

8 Gelding or Filly, 3 3years old $4 00 $3 00 $2 00 

9 Gelding or Filly, 2 vears old 2nd prize 100 lbs. 

Eoval Gold Flour, $3.00, by the Brant Mill- 
ing Co.. St. George ... . 4 00 .... 2 00 

10 Gelding or Filly. 1 year old 4 00 3 00 2 00 

11 Brood Mare with Foal by her side, 3rd, goods 

$3, by J. McNeilly & Co., St. George 4 00 3 00 .... 

12 Foal of 1911 300 200 100 

13 Span of Agricultural' Horses 10 00 7 00 5 00 



J. W. TYRRELL J. E. JACKSON, O.L.S. ; D.L S. 

C.E.O. aud D.L T. O. R. BLANDY, O.L S. 

Men. Can. Soc. C.E. 

J. W. TVRREL & CO., 

Ontario and Dominion Land 3urveyors. Coal and Mining^ 

Engineers. Municipal and Bridge Engineers. 
C Engineers for Country of Wentworth and Six Townships 

7 Hugheson St. South Hamilton 

198 



Grafton & Co., Limited 



SPECIAL PRIZE LIST 



CLASS 13C— GENERAL PURPOSE HORSES 

For the Three Best Teams of General Purpose Horses, the horsefly 
-wagons and harness to be considered in awarding the prizes, harness 
and wagon not necessarily new, but having been kept in No 1 con- 
dition sho\^ing that they have had care and attention. 

First Prize, best Tweed Suit value $10.00 

Second Prize, best Worsted Pants " 5.00 

Third Prize, best Tweed Pants " 3.00 



Grafton & Co., Limited 

Manufacturers of High-Grade Clothing 
UNION MADE 

Factory — Dundas. 

Branches — Hamilton, London, Dundas, Brantford, Peterboro, 

Owen Sound, Woodstock, 



An order from the Secretary will be given to the winners of these 
prizes to call at Grafton & Co.'s store for the same. 



As the Fairs are mostly open to the world, and as we give prizes 
to from six to twelve different Fairs in the County, we feel, in justice 
to aH, that any competitor securing first prize at any one of the Fairs 
Will not be entitled to a first prize if entering at the others, but may. 
Win second or third prize. Any person that has won first prize for 
Itwo or more seasons will be debarred from entering the same team to 
-Compete for first prize, but may compete for second or third prise. 

199 



ROADSTER HORSES. 

Directors in Charge — Wm. McClure, Jas. Yansickle, William Sager, John 

K. Jones. 
Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 

14 Gelding or Filly, 3 years old, to harness 400 800 200 

15 Gelding or Fillv, 2 years old, 3rd prize by Dr. 

Charlton Gait 400 300 200 

16 Gelding or Filly, 1 year old 4 00 3 00* 2 00 

17 Brood Mare, with Foal by her side 400 3 00 200 

18 Foal of 1912, 3rd prize, a halter, $1.50, by J. A. 

Bannister. St. George 300 200 

19 Span of Roadster Horses, Geldings or Mares, 

for those who earn their livelihood by farm- 
ing, and engaged in no other pursuits. ... 10 00 7 00 5 GO 

20 Single Horse. Gelding or Mare,' any height, for 

those who earn their livelihood by farming 
and engaged in no other pursuits, 3rd prize 
by A. E. Buchanan, Gait 400 300 200 

21 Saddle Horse, Gelding or Mare, for those who 

earn their livelihood by farming and en- 
gaged in no other pursuits. 1st prize Dalzell 
& Barrie, Gait 3 00 2 OQ 

22 Span of Eoadster Horses, Geldings or Mares, 

open, entry fee $1, extra to members 10 00 7 00 5 CO 

23 Single Horse, gelding or mare, 15.2 or over, 

open, entry fee $1, extra to members 8 00 5 00 3 00 

24 Saddle Horse, Gelding or Mare, open, entry fee 

oOc, extra to members 400 300 100 

26 Single Horse, Gelding or Mare, under 15.2, open, 

entry fee $1, extra to members... 8 00 5 GO 3 oa 

26a Best Colt, 2 years old and under, sired by Stal- 
lion Ormybv, by W. D. Cowan, V.S., Gait 5 00 .... .... 

PONY CLASS. 
Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 

26 Pony in harness, 13 hands and under $3 00 $2 00 $1 OO 

27 Span of Ponies in harness, 13 hands and under 5 00 3 00 2 OO 

28 Pony under saddle, 13 hands and under 3 00 2 00 1 00 

CARRIAGE HORSES. 
Directors in Charge — Wm. Thompson, Joseph Betzner, D. Badger, G. T. 

Misener. 
Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 

29 Gelding or Filly, 3 years old, 3rd by Harry Ray- 

ner, Gait $4 00 $3 00 $2 OO 

80 Gelding or Filly, 2 years old 4 00 3 00 2 rx> 

81 Gelding or Filly, 1 year old 400 3 00 200 

82 Brood Mare, with Foal by her side 400 300 2 00 

83 Foal of 1912, 3rd, clothing, $2.50, by Oak Hall, 

Hamilton 300 2 00 100 

64 Span of Carriage Horses, Geldings or Mares, 
for those who earn their liveUhood by farm- 
ing and engaged in no other pursuits 3rd by 

^ Merchants Bank, Gait 10 00 7 00 6 GO 

66 Single Carriage Horse, Gelding or Mare, for 
those who earn their livelihood by farming 
and engaged in no other pursuits, 3rd, cloth- 
• ing, value $2.50, by Oak Hall, Hamilton .... 400 300 .... 

200 



36 Span of Carriage Horses, Geldings or Mares, 

open, entry fee $1, member's ffee $1 10 00 7 (kj 5 00 

37 Single Carriage Horse, Gelding or Mare, open, 

entry fee $1, member's fee $1 8 00 5 00 3 •)(> 

38 Single Carriage Horse, Gelding or Mare, under 

15.2, open, entry fee $1, member's fee $1.. 8 00 5 00 3 OO 
CHAMPION CLASSES. 

39 Best Roadster Colt of the Fair. 3 years old and under, to be shown 

on the Hne. Silver medal bv the Canadian Bank of Commerce, 
Gait. 

40 Best Carriage Colt of the Fair, 3 years old and under, to be showa 

on the Une. Silver medaJ. 

41 Best Heavy Draught Colt of the Fair, 3 years old and under, to be 

shown on the hne. Silver medal. 

42 Best Agricultural Colt of the Fair, 3 years old and under, to be 

shown on the line, a silver medal. 

43 Best Horse of the Fair shown in harness or under saddle. Silver 

medal by the Canadian Bank of Conamerce, Dundas. 

Krst and second prize winners in the several classes only eUgible in 
the Champion Classes. 

Xo horses wiU be allowed to compete in more than one class, except 
when competing for the Champion Classes, the Open Classes, the horses 
for which prizes are given by Jas. Riddle and W. D. Cowan. V.S.. and 
all 3-year-old horses in all classes, including brood mares, be allowed m 
harness on payment of extra entrv fee, single horse 50 cents, double $1. 
In_ each of the classes 6, 13, 13c, 19, 26, 27, 34, 36, 37, 38, 40 and 45. S. 
Minors, Dundas, gives a 75c. whip in addition to the Society's first prize. 
The judges to use their own discretion as to the height of Carriage and 
Roadster Horses. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Entries for prizes on this page will be taken on the grounds sec- 
ond day. The decision of the committee in charge will be final. En- 
trance fee must be paid by all. members or non-members. 

LADY DRIVER, OPEN. 
Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 

44 Lady Driver with single horse, entrance fee $1. $5 00 $300 $2 0(y 

BEST TURN-OUT, OPEN. 

45 Best Single Four-wheeled Turn-out. horse, har- 

ness p.nd vehicle to be considered. The 
driver to be accompanied by a lady; horse 
50 per cent., carriage and appointments 50 

per cent. Entry fee $1... '. 10 00 7 00 5 00 3 00 

The judging on classes 44 and 45 will take place not later than 4 p.m. 

46 Quick Hitch Up. Each competitor to run 50 

yards, harness and hitch his horse to his 
bpggy, torn his rig around and trot or pace 
his hor?e once around the track. Entrance 
ffee $1.00 5 00 3 00 2 OO 

47 Jubilee Tug-of-War between the Township of Beverly and the Town 

of Dundas on one side, and the Township of South Dumfries and 
the Town of Gait on the other. Seven men on each side. Prizes, 
$15.00 to winners and $10.00 to losers. James E. McDonough- 
will captain the Beverly side, and Peter H. Patterson the Dum- 
fries side. Time, 3 o'clock. 

20I 



BOYS' RACES. 

-48 Boys under 16 years. Once around the track. 

No entrance fee 3 00 2 00 1 00 

49 Boys' Race under 12 years, 100 yards, Beverly 

boys only. No entrance fee... 200 150 100 

MEN'S FOOT RACES. 
-60 Men's Foot Race, 100 yards. Entrance fee 25c., 

four to enter 300 200 100 

SL Men's Foot Race, once around the track, four 

to enter. Entrance fee 25c 300 200 100 

TRIALS OF SPEED. 

^Directors in Charge — R. Wedge, James Burt, W. R. Boyle, D. Dwyer, 
John Malcolm, Wm. McDonald, Wm. Sager. 
Trials called in the order they appear below. First trial to be cajled 
not later than 1 o'clock sharp, Wednesday. 

The committee in charge reserves the right to declare off any event 
not properly filled, or, in event of bad weather, to declare one or all of 
the trials off. The green horses and the Beverly horses to go twice 
axound the track, best 3 in 5. The 2:40 class and the open class to go 
three times around the track, best 3 in 5. The committee in charge shall 
have full control as to all entries and conditions of such. Entries for prizes 
on this page will be taken on the grounds the second day. Entrance "ee 
must be paid by all — members or non-members. The decision of the 
judges will be final. No record of time will be given. 
Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 
62 Green Race, for horses that have not 
won first prize previous to Sept. 1, 
1912. Matinee horses allowed. En- 
trance fee $2 $15 00 $1000 $7 00 $5^3 

•63 Single Horse to Harness, trot or pace, 
open. No horse that has a record of 
2:40 allowed to compete. Horses eleg- 

ible Sept. 1, 1912. Entrance fee $2.50. 20 00 12 00 7 00 4 00 
64 Trot or Pace, for horses owned in Bev- 
erly. Entrance fee $1.50 12 00 8 00 o 00 2 00 

55 Single Horse to Harness, trot or pace, 

open to any horse. Entrance fee $2.50 25 00 15 00 8 00 4 00 

1st 2nd 33ra 
■65a Hunter Lightweight, to give exhibition over 
jumps. Entry fee 50 cents. Prizes by Geo. 

Paterson, M.P., Preston 5 00 300 20O 

CATTLE. 
Directors in Charge — Henry Watson, Sam. George,. Jas. M. McCormack. 
In making entries the owner's name and address in full and the 
exact name of the animal and its name with registration number of he 
animal, and the name of the dam and sire, must be given on the entry 
sheet, otherwise it will not be accepted. Each cow shown must have 
had a calf since show of 1911 or be visibly in calf. 

SHORTHORN. 
Olass. 1st 2nd 3rd 

66 Bull, aged $4 00 $3 00 $2 00 

67 Bull, two vears old, 1st prize, barrel of flour, 

value $6, by R. A. Thompson, Lynden 300 200 

58 Bull, one year old 4 00 300 200 



CATTLE— Continued. 

60 Cow 300 200 100 

59 BuU calf, under one year 200 150 100 

61 Heifer, two years old 3 00 2 00 1 00 

62 Heifer, one year old ._ 3 00 2 00 1 00 

63 Heifer Calf, under one year, 2nd prize, $1 by 

James Buckberrough, St. George 1 50 1 00 50 

AYRSHffiES. 

64 Bull, aged 300 200 100 

65 Bull, two years old 3 00 2 00 1 00 

66 Bull ,one year old 3 00 2 00 1 00 

67 BuU CaK, under one year 1 50 1 00 50 

68 Cow. 3rd bv Geo. Fields, Gait 300 200 100 

69 Heifer, two years old .... 3 00 2 00 100 

70 Heifer, one year old 3 00 2 00 1 00 

71 Heifer Calf, under one year 300 200 100 

HOLSTEIN. 

72 Bull, aged 300 200 100 

73 Bull, two years old 300 200 100 

74 Bull, one year old 300 200 100 

75 Bull CaK. under one year 1 50 1 00 50 

76 Cow... 3 00 2 00 100 

77 Heifer, two years old 3 00 2 00 1 00 

78 Heifer, one year old 3 00 2 00 1 00 

79 Heifer Calf, under one year 150 100 50 

♦ GRADE CATTLE. 

80 Cow 200 150 100 

81 Heifer, two years old 2 00 1 50 1 00 

82 Heifer, one year old 200 150 100 

83 Heifer Calf, under one year, 2nd, a neckyoke, 

$1.25, by M. Homing, St. George 150 .... 50 

DAIRY AND BEEF COW. 

1st 
83a Best Dairy and Beef Cow, any breed. Cash by Dr. McQueen, 

M.L.A *> 00 

SHEEP. 

LEICESTER SHEEP. 
Directors in Charge — ^Wm. Cowie. James Humphrey, Edwin McKnight. 

"Claes. 1st 2nd 3rd 

84 Aged Ram $2 00 $1 50 $1 03 

85 Shearling Ram 200 150 100 

86 Ram Lamb 150 100 50 

87 Ewe. two shears and over, had lambs in 1912. . 2 00 1 50 1 00 

88 Shearhng Ewe 2 00 1 50 1 00 

89 Ewe Lamb 200 150 10} 

90 Pen of Sheep, consisting of one ram or ram 

lamb, one ewe, two shears and over, one 

shearling ewe, and one ewe lamb 200 100 

"91 Special by Long & Bisby, Hamilton, for the exhibitor of the largest 
number of breeding ewes from his farm and exhibited at fair, 
cash, $2. Sheep shown in other classes mav compete in this as 
well. 

■03 



SHROPSHIRE SHEEP. 

Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 

92 Agetl Ram $2 00 $150 $100 

93 Shearling Ram 2 00 150 100 

94 Ram Lamb 150 100 60 

95 Ewe, two shears and over, had lambs in 1912. . 2 00 1 50 IK) 

96 ShearUng Ewe % 2 00 1 50 1 00 

97 Ewe Lamb 2 00 150 100 

98 Pen of Sheep, consisting of one ram or ram 

lamb, one ewe, two shears or over, one 

shearling ewe and one ewe lamb 200 100 

SOUTHDOWIs. 

Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 

99 Aged Ram $2 00 $1 50 $1 

100 Shearling Ram 2 00 1 50 1 ^,0 

101 Ram Lamb 1 50 1 00 50 

102 Ewe, two shears and. over, had lambs in 1912.. 2 00 1 50 1 00 

103 Shearling Ewe 200 150 100 

104 Ewe Lamb 200 150 100 

105 Pen of Sheep, consisting of one ram or ram 

lamb, one ewe, two shears or over, one 
shearling ewe, two shears or over, and one 

ewe lamb 2 00 1 00 .... 

OTHER DOWNS. 

106 Ram 150 100 1 ,0 

107 Shearling Ram 200 150*0') 

108 Ram Lamb 200 150 100 

109 Ewe, two shears and over, had lambs in 1912. . 2 00 1 50 1 00 

110 Shearling Ewe 200 150 100 

111 Ewe Lamb 2 00 150 100 

112 Pen of Sheep consisting of one ram or ram 

Iamb, one ewe, two shears or over, one 
shearling ewe, two shears or over and one 

ewe lamb 150 100 .... 

PIGS. 

Directors in Charge — ^James Nicholson, A. A. Stewart, W. Sweet. 

Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 

BERKSHIRES. 

113 Boar, over 1 year $2 00 $150 $100 

114 Sow, over 1 year 200 150 100 

115 Boar, under 1 year 1 50 1 00 60 

116 Sow, under 1 year 150 100 60 

TAMWORTH. 

117 Boar, over 1 vear 200 150 100 

118 Sow, over 1 year 2 00 150 100 

119 Boar, under 1 year 1 60 1 00 50 

120 Sow, under 1 year 1 50 1 00 60 

YORKSHIRE. 

121 Boar, over 1 year 200 150 100 

122 Sow, over 1 year 2 00 1 50 1 00 

123 Boar, under 1 year 160 100 60 

124 Sow, under 1 year 160 100 50 

BACON HOG 

125 Best four Bacon Hogs, each weighing not less 

than 160 lbs., nor more than 220 lbs .... 6 00 4 00 2 00 



POULTRY. 

Directors in Charge — S. J. Plastow, Charles Boyle, George Smith. 

(No company, unless duly registered as such, allowed to enter as a 

Company.) 

FIVE CENTS FOR EACH ENTRY. 

Class. 1st 2nd 

126 Dorkin, cock 50 25 

127 Dorkin, hen 50 25 

128 Dorkin. cockerel 50 25 

129 Dorkin. pullet 50 25 

130 Brahma, cock 50 25 

131 Brahma, hen 50 25 

132 Brahma, cockerel 50 25 

13^3 Brahma, nullet 50 25 

134 Plymouth Rock, barred, cock 50 25 

135 Plymouth Rf)ck. barred, hen 50 25 

ia% Plymouth Rock, barred, cockerel 50 25 

137 Plymouth Rock, barred, pullet 50 25 

138 Plymouth Rock. A. O. V., cock 50 25 

139 Plymouth Rock, A. O. V., hen 50 25 

140 Plymouth Rock. A. O. v., cwkerel 50 25 

141 Plymouth Rock. A. O. Y., pullet 50 25 

142 Leghorn, brown, cock 50 25 

143 Leghorn, brown, hen 50 25 

144 Leghorn, brown, cockerel 50 25 

145 Leghorn, brown, pullet 50 25 

146 Leghorn. A. O. Y., cock 50 25 

147 Leghorn, A. O. Y., hen 50 25 

148 Leghorn. A. O. Y., ctickerel 50 25 

149 Leghorn. A. O. Y.. pullet 50 25 

150 Wyandotte, golden or siher, cock 50 25 

151 Wyandotte, golden or siher. hen 50 25 

152 Wyandotte, golden or silver, cockerel 50 25 

153 Wyandotte, golden or silver, pullet 50 "25 

154 Wyandotte. A. O. Y., cock or pullet 50 25 

155 Wyandotte, A. O. V., hen 50 25 

156 Wyandotte, .A. O. Y.. cockerel 50 25 

157 Wyandotte. A. O. Y.. pullet 50 25 

158 Minorca, C(x:k 50 25 

159 Minorca, hen 50 25 

160 Minorca, cockerel 50 25 

161 Minorca, pullet 50 25 

162 Game, cock 50 25 

163 Game, hen 50 25 

164 Game, cockerel 50 25 

165 Game, pullet 50 '25 

166 Bantam, game, cock 50- 25 

167 Bantam, game, hen 50 25 

168 Bantam, game, cockerel 50 25 

170 Rhode Island Red. cock 50 25 

171 Rhode Island Red. hen 50 25 

172 Rhode Island Red, cockerel 50 25 

173 Rhode Island Red. pullet 50 25 

174 Orpington, cock 50 25 

175 Orpington, hen .50 25 

176 Orpington, cockerel 50 25 

205 



POULTRY— ContiBued. 

. Class. 1st 2nd 

177 Orpington, pullet 50 25 

178 Langshan, cock 50 25 

179 Langshan, hen 60 25 

180 Langshan, cockerel 50 25 

181 Langshan, pullet 50 25 

182 Cochin, cock 50 25 

183 Cochin, hen 50 25 

184 Cochin, cockerel 50 25 

185 Cochin, puUet .'.... 50 25 

186 Turkey, male, old 50 25 

187 Turkey, female, old 50 25 

188 Turkey, male, of 1912 50 25 

189 Turkey, female, of 1912 50 25 

190 Geese, white, male, old: 50 25 

191 Geese, white, female, olrd 50 25 

192 Geese, white, male, of 1912 50 25 

193 Geese, white, female, of 1912 50 25 

194 Geese, colored,^ male, old 50 25 

195 Geese, colored,' female, old 50 25 

196 Geese, colored, male, of 1912 50 25 

197 Geese, colored, female, of 1912 50 25 

198 Ducks, white, male, old 50 25 

199 Ducks, white, female, old 50 25 

200 Ducks, white, male, of 1912... 50 25 

201 Ducks, white .female, of 1912 50 25 

202 Ducks, colored, male, old 50 25 

203 Ducks, colored, female, old 50 25 

204 Ducks, colored, male, of 1912 50 25 

205 Ducks, colored, female, of 1912 50 25 

GRAIN AND SEEDS. 

Directors in Charge — Hy. Chambers and Geo. A. Howard. 

Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 

206 Bushel Winter Wheat, white $100 $0 75 $0 50 

207 Bushel Winter Wheat, red. 1st by the Steel- 

Briggs Seed Co., Hamilton 100 75 50 

208 Bushel Six-rowed Barley, white 1 00 75 50 

209 Bushel Peas, small 100 75 50 

210 Bushel White Oats 1 00 75 50 

211 Bushel Black Oats, 1st by Steel-Briggs Co., 

Hamilton 1 00 75 50 

212 Half bushel Indian Corn in ear, 8-rowed, yellow 75 50 25 

213 Half bushel Indian Corn in ear, 12-rowed 75 50 25 

214 Half bushel White Indian Corn 75 50 25 

215 Peck of White Beans 75 60 25 

216 One bushel of Buckwheat 75 50 25 

217 Half dozen stalks Ensilage Corn 75 50 25- 

217a One bushel of Rye 75 50 25 

ROOTS AND VEGGETABLES. 
Directors in Charge— Robert A. Inksetter, John Jackson, John McDon- 

ough, George N. Harris, Nelson Culham. 

Class. ' 1st 2nd 3rd 

218 Early Potatoes, any variety, half bushel 1 00 75 50 

219 Potatoes, Green Mountain Type, half bushel... 100 75 50 

206 



220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
290 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
245 

246 



247 



248 
249 



Potatoes, Elephant Type,, half bushel 1 00 

Carman type class 1 00 

Potatoes, other kinds, half bushel 1 00 

Collection off Potatoes, six varieties only. ... 1 00 

Five Field Carrot-s 75 

Five wedish Turnips . . . S 75 

Five Turnips, other kinds 75 

Six roots of Celery 75 

Six Mangel Wortzel, longg 75 

Six Mangel Wurtzel, globe 75 

Six Mangel Wurtzel, yellow, intermediate 75 

Six Table Carrots, long 75 

Sis Table Carrots, short 75 

Six Beets, long 75 

Six Beets, short 75 

Six Onions, red 75 

Cauliflower, 2 heads 75 

Cabbage, early, 2 heads 75 

Cabbage, late. 2 heads 75 

Two Citrons 75 

Two Sauashes 75 

Two Pumpkins 75 

Six Eadishes 75 

Six Tomatoes 75 

Six Sugar Beets, for feeding purposes 75 

ROOTS AND VEGETABLES— Continued. 
Six Bruce' s Giant Feeding Sugar Beets, rose or 
white, $1 by John A. Bruce & Co., Hamil- 
ton 1 00 

Nine Bruce's New Century Purple Top Swede 
Turnips, $1 by John A. Bruce & Co.. Ham- 
ilton 1 00 

Six Bruce's GGiant Yellow Mangels, $1 by John 

A. Bruce & Co., Hamilton 1 00 

Ten Hall Westburv Purple Top Turnips, 1st 

$1.25, 2nd 75c., by ]Vlihie & Glenocie, GaGlt 1 25 



76 


59 


76 


50 


75 


50 


75 


50 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 


50 


25 



75 



We are buyers of, and will pay the Highest Market 
Price for the following 

Live Hogs Dressed Hogs Cattle 

Poultry Sheep Lambs 

Calves Butter 

Call and Lee us ©r have our buyers call 

F. W. FEARMAN, COMPANY 

LIMITED 

P*rk Packers 17 McNAB ST. HAMILTON: 



20J 



LARGE ROOTS AND VEGETABLES. 

Olass. 1st •2nd 3rd 
2-50 Larj,'est Potatoes, any kind, or mixed, half 

bushel, 1st, goods by Woods & Taylor, Gait.. 1 00 75 50 

251 Swede Turnips, six varieties 75 5(1 25 

252 Turnips, other kinds, six varieties 75 -50 25 

253 Field Carrots, six largest 75 50 25 

254 Mangel Wurtzel ,six largest 75 50 25 

255 Mangel Wurtzel, globe, six largest 75 50 25 

256 Mangel, yellow, intermediate, six largest .... 75 5<» 25 

257 Pumpkins, two largest 75 5() 25 

258 Squashes, two largest 75 50 25 

259 Tomatoes, 12 heaviest 75 50 25 

260 Best Beets for feeding purposes, six largest ... 75 5<) 25 

261 Six largest Mangels, yellow, from sood pur- 

chased from Robt. Clark, whii) 1 50 

DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Directors in Charge — Chas.^ E. Sparks, Wm. J. Burgess, James George, 

John Malcolm. 

CHEESE. 

■262 Cheese, factorv made, anv weight 200 150 100 

263 Cheese, dairy made, any weight 200 150 100 

BUTTER. 

B3- those using a Cream Separator. 
In each class the first prize butter is retained, except where the 
Society gives the prize. The Society gives in each class a .-econd prize 
•of 50 cents and a third prize of 25 cents. Butter that is retained must 
be delivered by th prize-winners to donors as soon as possible after the 
Exhibition. 

264 3 lbs. in rolls or prints 1 00 

"265 5 lbs. in rolls or prints 1 00 

266 6 lbs. in rolls or prints, clothins, by Fralick & C(\. Hamilton 2 50 

267 10 lbs. in crock, one barrel of St!?r Flour, by C?.nadi?.n Cereal 

and Millini: Co., Gait 7 00 

BUTTER M.\DE BY THOSE NOT USINGG CREAM SEPARATOR. 

In each class the first prize butter in retained, except where the 
Society gives the prize. The Society, gives in each class a second prize 
of 50 cents and a third prize of '25 cents. Butter that is retained must 
be delivered by the prize-winners to donors as soon as possible after the 
Exhibition. 

268 Five lbs. in 1-lb. rools, $H ca'=h, by R. Struthers, Gah. 

269 Ten lbs. in crock, gniceries. $5, by P. Radigan, GGalt. 

270 Twelve lbs. in crock, gniceries. $6, by John H. Laird, Gait. 

■271 Five lbs. in prints, shoes, $-2. .50, by F. A. Hamilton & Son, Gait. 
272 Five lbs. in pound rolls, cash. $2. bv Thos. Pattersson, GGalt. 
■273 Twenty lbs. in crock, goods, $8, by J. C. Windell, Gait. 

BUTTER. 

Open to all. First prize butter retained. 
"274 Twenty lbs. in crock, goods, $8, by R. A. Briscoe, Gait. 
:274a Five lbs. in rclh or prints. Prize, silver butter dish, $5, by G. C. 
Wilson, M.P. 



H. G. HANNAM 

GALT. ONTARIO 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Harness, Collars, Vv^hips, Trunks, 
Valises, Combs, Brushes, Etc. 

Repairing Promptly Attended To. All Work Guaranteed 

Established 1854 

HOWARD BROS, Tailors 

Dyers and Cleaners of Ladies' and Gent's Garments of every description 

Telephone 810. 22 Rebecca St., HAMILTON. 

GO TO 

Junor's China Palace 

FOR 

Dinner Sets, Tea Sets, Toilet Sets. 

62 King Street East HAtaLTON 

2o8a 



WILLIAM DICKSON 

William Diokson, first President of the World's Fair, Rockton, waa elected^ 
Beeve of Beverly in 1861. He nship better. He was the first president of ?he Bev. 
a whoh scaled geceroos-lieai^ Scotchman, and took an active part in every- 
thing tending to make the tow nship better. H? was the first president of the Bev- 
erly Agricultural Society, and was one of the leading spirits in its organization in 
1868. He held the position of president of the above named society in all eight 
years, viz. 1853,1854, 1855, 1866, 1867,1868, 1859,1860. At the annual meeting 
Jaxmary 10th, 1861, ol said society th. following resolution was unanimously 
passed : "That this meeting dasires to express regret that William Dickson is oblig- 
ed to retire from bein^ an active member of the Beverly Agricultural Society, and 
further that a hearty vote of thanks be tendered to Mr. Dickson for the very 
valuable services he has rendered to the society." 



J. M. IRWIN, 

BAJSKKR 
S. WATER ST. - GALT 

Money Loaned on Real Estate. 
Note« Discounted Notes and Accounts Collected, Etc. 

ROBERTSON BROS. Ltd. 

TORONTO 

Wholesale Confectioners 

Hamilton Branch - 12, 14, 16 Mary Street 

Chocolates Creams Licorice Gums 
Agents for Christie's Biscuits 

Atk fot R»Wrti«i'f- They are tkt B«st 

aoSs 



«READ, CAKES, ETC. 

Directors in Charge — M. Jack>on and Russell Ireland. 

Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 

275 Loaf of Bread, hop yeast S2 00 $1 00 $0 50- 

276 Loaf of Bread, salt yeast 2 00 1 00 50 

277 Loaf of Home Made Bread ... 2 (X» 100 50 

278 Loaf of Bread, hop veast, by a girl undtT lo 1 00 50 ... . 

279 Home Made Biscuits 100-50 .... 

280 Bre^d made from Purity Flour, retained by 

Struthers & Church. Gait 2 W 1 (>i .... 

231 Half dozen plain Oatmeal Cakes 1 W 

2«28 Best Laver Cake with Icing 2 ':<<'} i .nil -o*, 

283 Be.st Layer Cake; no icing 2 'xi 1 'hi .5<» 

283a Best Cherry Pie, retained by Inksett. i-Mvrr- 

Go.. Hamilton 1 '>' 5<' 

283b Best Apnle Pie, retained by Inksetter-^Mvers 

Co., Hamilton 1 0<j " ... 

283c Best Pumpkin Pie, retained by Inksetter-Myers 

Co., Hamilton 1 00 ' ■"■ 

283d Best collection of pies. Not less than three 

varieties. Pies to be retained by F. J. Magee, 

Hamilton 3 00 .... .... 

2a3e Best half dozen Scons 1 00 -50 .... 

283f Best pair Dressed Chickens 1 00 75 50 

28.3g One dozen Hens'Eggs, "double yolk barred" 1 (KJ on 

HONEY, ETC. 

284 Four lbs. Comb Honey 75 -50 25 

See Moon's Business CoIlejjeAdvertisement, Page 57 

"lOUR GUARANTEE OF QUALITY^ 

"SALADA" 

on a sealed lead package of Ceylon Tea, is your 
safeguard and guarsintee. 

** SALAD A" means freshness, purity, exquisite 
aroma^ delightful flavor. 

** SAL AD A" means purity, healthfulness, satis- 
faction. 

BLAOK. eREEN Ol* MIXED <»» 



209 



"285 Hoiie;^, extracted], 5 lb. jar, retained, 1st by S. J. 

Plastovv. Rocklon 150 100 50 

^66 Maple Sugar, 5 lbs * .... 75 50 25 

^7 Maple rSyrup. half-gallon jar 75 50 25 

'288 (3oHection of Pickles 1 00 75 50 

j> FRUIT. 

Directors in Charge— Nathan Sager, Thomas McNichol, Hy. Howard. 
(Fruit to be correctly named.) 

Class. 1st 2nd 3rd 
289 Bight varieties of Apples, five of each, fom* 

varieties Winter and four varieties Fall.. . . 1 25 1 00 75 
:290 Six varieties of Apples, five of each, four Winter 

Cooking, and two Fall Dessert 1 00 75 50 

,•291 Eight Snow Apples 100 75 50 

' 292 'Eight St. Lawrence Apples 75 50 25 

1293 Eight Gravenstein 75 50 26 

294 Eight anv other varietv of Fall, not specified. 75 50 25 

295 Eight Baldwins " 75 50 25 

ii96 Eight Northern Spy 75 50 25 

297 Eiglit Rhotle Island Greenings 75 50 25 

.-298 Eight King of Tompkins 75 50 25 

299 Eight any other variety Winter Apples, not 

specified 75 50 25 

-300 Ten largest and heaviest Apples, any variety or 

varieties, 1st, goods, $1, bv W^oods Taylor, 

Gait ." 1 00 50 25 

-301 Six Peaches, white or yellow flesh 75 50 25 

302 Six Pears, Beurre de Anjou 75 50 25 

•303 Six Pears, any other variety 75 50 25 

304 Red Grapes, three clusters 75 50 25 

-305 White Grapes, three clusters 75 50 25 

-306 Black Grapes, three clusters 75 50 25 

-307 Best barrel of Northern Spy Apples, retained, 

$5.00. bv John Simpson, of Rockton; 2nd 

and 3rd 'by Society 2 00 100 

-308 Best barrel of Northern Spy Apples, retained, r 

$5.0). by David Bell Rcx;kton; 2nd and 3rd 

by Society 200 100 

HOME MANUFACTURES. 

All work ^^ill be received by the Directors in charge at the door of 
the hall and will be judged before being put in. 

Direct<;rs in Charge — D. Dwyer, Miss Plastow, Miss Sara Patterson, 
-and Miss ]\Ienzies. 

Class. 1st 2nd 

309 Quilt, Japanese, or crazy patch work $1 50 $1 00 

-310 Quilt, log cabin, patchwork, silk 150 100 

311 Quilt, log cabin, patchwork, cloth 150 100 

312 Quilt, cotton patchwork 150 100 

313 Quilting, tancv 1 50 1 00 ■ 

314 Quilt, crochet, fine 100 75 

315 Quilt, crochet, coarse : 100 75 

-316 Counterpane, knitted, fine 100 75 

-317 Counterpane, knitted, coarse 100 15 

3t c .Moon's Business CoHtgt- Auvertiseiriint. Page. 57. 



HOME MANUFACTURES— Contiuued. 

318 Ladies' Underclothing, hand made, three pieces 1 (Xi 50 

319 Ladies' Underclothing, machine made, three pieces 1 00 50 

320 Nightgown, wool, machine made, three pieces 1 00 50 

321 Nightgown, cotton, machine made 100 50 

322 Embroidered Bed Spread 100 60 

322a Embroidered Sheet 100 50 

323 Woollen Socks, coarse, hand made 7a 50 

324 ^\'oollen Socks, fine 73 50 

325 Woollen Stockings, coarse, hand made 75 50 

326 Woollen Stockings, fine, hand made ,. . . . 75 50 

327 Woollen Gloves, coarse , . ^ 7a 60^ 

328 Woollen Gloves, fine, hand made 75 50^ 

329 Woollen Mittens, coarse 73 50 

330 Woollen :Mitts, fine 75 60 

331 Cotton Socks, hand knit, plain 75 50 

332 Darned Sock or Stocking 75 50 

a33 Scarf, knitted 75 50 

334 Fascinator 75 60 

335 Rag Carpet 75 50 

336 Rag Mat 75 50 

337 Button Holes in garment 75 50 

33S Darning on table Unen 75 50 

339 One Patched Garment 75 50 

340 Sofa Afghan 75 50 

341 Silk Rag Portier 75 50 

342 Plain Hand Sewing, one article 75 50 

LADIES' WORK. 
(See Rule 3.J 
All work will be received by the Directors in diarge at door of hail 
and will be judged before being put up. 

Directors in Charge — ^James S. Henderson, Miss Boyle, Mias Robinson, 
Miss Thompson. Miss 0. M. Wray. Miss Cowie, Mrs. (Dv.) Gibson. 

Class. Ist 2nd 

343 Piano or Table Scarf 1 00 50 

344 Drawn Work 100 50 

345 Knitted Work, fan«fy 100 50 

346 Knitted Work, cotton, fancy 1 00 .50 

347 Crochet Slippers : 1 00 50 

347a Irish Crochet 100 50 

347b Crochet Lace 100 50 

348 Five O'Clock Tea Cloth 1 00 50 

349 Trav Cloth 100 50 

350 Eyelet Embroidery, Centre Piece 100 60 

351 Wallachian Embroidery, Centre Piece 100 50 

352 Battenburg Lace Centre Piece 100 50 

353 Centre, any other kind 100 50 

354 Table Doviies, six. French Embroidery 100 50 

365 Table DoyUes, six. Point Lace 100 50 

355a Table Doylies, six. Knitted 100 50 

356 Table Doylies, six, other kind 100 50 

867 Outline Work, one piece 100 50 

368 Tea Cosey, knitted 100 50 

See Moon's Business College Advertisement, Page 57. 



359 Tea Cosev, other kind 100 50 

360 Wallachian Embroidery Shirt Waist 100 50 

361 Point Lace. Photo Frame 100 50 

362 Embroidery Photo Frame 100 50 

363 Pillow Cases, Embroidered 100 50 

364 Embroidered Towels, one pair 100 60 

365 Embroidered Towels, guest, one pair 100 50 

365a Swedish Weaving 1 00 50 

366 Stencilling 100 50 

367 Wallachian Embroidery, shirt waist 100 60 

368 Shadow Embroidery, shirt waist 100 50 

369 Eyelet Embroidery, shirt' waist 100 50 

370 French Embroidery, shirt waist 1 00 50 

371 Sideboard Scarf...' 100 50 

372 Applique work on plush, silk, satin or otherwise 1 00 50 

373 Lace Work, Point or Honiton 100 60 

374 Pillow Lace 100 50 

375 DucheFs Lace 1 00 50 

376 One Set Table Mats 100 50 

377 Embroidery on siz Table Napkins 100 60 

■378 EmbroiderV xin Silk 100 50 

379 Embroidery in Cotton 100 50 

380 Embroidery in Bolting Cloth 1 00 oQ 

381 Sofa Pillow, embroidered 100 50 

382 Sofa Pillow, burnt leathe*- 100 50 

383 Sofa Pillow, other kinds 100 50 

4384 Embroidered Tabk' Linen in white, consisting of table 

cloth, six napkins, different designs, one carving 
cloth and trav cloth. 1st by BBank of Montreal, 

Hamilton 2 00 1 00 

384a Embroidery punched work 1 00 60 

Jamieson 's Confectionery 

Gait's Leading Confectioner 

Manufacturers of Fine Chocolates and Pan Toffie?. 
Oysters and Fruit in Seas^ 

54 MAIN STREET - ^ - GALT, ONT. 

IF YOU WISH TO BUY 

Paroid Roofing (Bird's) Washing Machines (The Boss) 

Extension Ladders (The Steel Wire Double Truss) 

Down Draft Drums (Dobbin's) 

^, Write or sec 

Bavtd Belt - Fibcrfcton 

For he has the goods in stock md will sell cheap. 



384b Embroidery, hard, auger 100 50 

385 Ribbon Work 100 60 

386 Best Made Child's Dress 100 50 

387 Display of Ladies' Fancy Work, Beverly only 3 00 50 

388 Pillow Cases, Embroidered 100 50 

389 Pillow Cases, any other kind 100 30 

390 Pillow Shams, embroidered 100 50 

391 Pillow Shams, any other kind 100 50 

392 Whisk Holder 100 50 

393 Netting 1 00 50 

394 Fancy Apron, any kind 100 50 

395 Burnt Work, wood or leather 100 50 

396 Painting on silk or bolting cloth 100 50 

397 Braiding in Cotton, by hand 100 50 

FINE ARTS. 

Class. 1st and 

398 Water Color, landscape '2 00 1 00 

399 Wat^r Color, flowers 2 00 1 00 

400 Water Color, figure 200 100 

401 Original Water Color, landscape 200 100 

402 Original Water Color, fignre 200 100 

403 Landscape in Oils, 2nd bv T. H. A. Begue 2 00 1 00 

404 Marine Views in Oils 200 100 

405 Fruit in Oils 2 00 1 00 

4CG Figure in OUs 2 00 1 00 

407 Animals in Oils 200 100 

408 Painting on China. 3 cups, 3 saucers. 3 plates 2 00 1 00 

409 Pen and Ink Drawing 2 00 1 00 

410 Original Pen and Ink... 2 00 100 

411 Gibson Drawing on card or fabric 2 00 1 00 

412 Pencil and Cravon Drawing 2 00 1 00 

413 Charcoal Drawing 200 100 

414 Wash Drawing, black and white brush 200 100 

415 Collection Oil Paintings 2 00 1 00 

PECNMANSHIP FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN. 

Class. 1st 2nd 

416 Boys under 10 years, certified by school teacher 1 00 50 

417 Girls under 190 years, certified by school teacher 1 00 50 

418 Boys under 16 years, certified by school teacher 1 00 50 

419 Girls under 16 years, certified by school teacher 1 00 50 

PLANTS AND FLOWERS. 

Class. 1st 2nd 

420 Begonia, anv kind 100 60 

421 Colens 1 00 50 

422 Fuschia 100 60 

423 Geranium 100 50 

424 Fern 1 00 50 

425 Foliage or Decorative Plant 100 50 

426 Hanging Basket 100 60 

427 Collection of different plants, six varieties 1 00 60 

42^^ Dahlias, three varieties 100 50 

420 Gladioli, six varieties 100 50 

430 Pansies, sis varieties 100 50 

431 Boquet of Cut Flowa-s 1 00 50 

ai3 



GRAND SAWING CONTEST. 

Director in Charge — John Jackson. 
Class. 

432 ]st prize, $6.0(); 2nd prize, $3.00; 3rd prize, $2.00. Contestants will 

furnish their own saws. The contest will take place at. 8.30 
p.m. on second day of Fair, on a stand on the Fair Grounds. No 
entrance fee. Entries taken at stand. 

BABY SHOW, ETC. 

Director in Charge — Joseph Betzner. 

Class. 1st 2nd 

433 Baby Boy, under two years old, 1st, household scales by 

Gurney Scale Co 400 100 

434 Baby Girl, under two years, 1st, fancy gate, by Frost 

Wire Fence Co 4 00 1 00 

Every baby welcome. No entrance fee. 

The judging on classes 433 and 434 will take place on a stand near 
the exhibition hall about 3 o'clock p.m., second day of Fair. No entrance 
fee. 



Time Table 



12:30 o'clock, Three-yeaf-olds, all classes. 
12:60 o'clock. Two-year-olds, all classes. 

1 :10 o'clock. One-year-olds, all classes. 

1 :30 o'clock. Brood Mares, all classes. 

1:60 o'clock. Foals, all classes. 

2:10 o'clock, Champion Colts on the line. 

2:30 o'clock. Span H. D. Horses. 

2:60 o'clock, Span Agricultural Horses. 

3:10 o'clock. Span General Purpose Horses. 

3:30 o'clock, Span Roadster Horses. 

3:60 o'clock, Single Carriage Horses. 

4:10 o'clock, Single Eoadster Horses. 

4:30 o'clock. Span Carriage Horses. 

4 :00 o'clock. Best Turn Out. 

4:30 o'clock. Saddle Horses. 

4:50 o'clock, Champion Horse of the Fair. 



5pecial Prizes 



The Directors of the World's Fair take pleasure in publishing the- 
following list of special subscriptions and desire to express their obliga- 
tions to those persons whose liberal contributions haave enabled them to 
mate such valuable additions to their prize list. 

The number placed after the donor's name denotes the page of Prize 
List • 

Bank of Montreal, Hamilton, cash (213) $2 00 

John A. Bruce & Co., Hamilton cash (208) 8 00 

Steele Briggs Seed Co., Hamilton, cash (207) 2 80 

IVaKck & Co., Hamilton, retains butter, clothing (208) 2 50 

Oak Hall, HamUton, clothing (200) 5 OO 

•M 



Gm-uev Scale Co., scales (215) 5 OO 

Geo. Pattinson. M.P., Preston (202) 10 00 

Dr. McQueen, M.L.A., cash (203) 5 00 

W. O. S^ley. M.P., Hamilton, silver cup and plate (201) 

Long (fe Bisby, Hamilton, cash (203) 2 00 

Frost Wire Fence Co., gate (215) 5 00 

F. S. Jarvis, Mgr. Merchants Bank, Gait, cash (200) 5 00 

Shurlv & Dietrich, Saw Manufacturers, Gait, saw (198) 6 00 

Daizell & Barrie, Barri.?ters, Gait (200) 3 00 

R. Struthers, Dry Goods, Gait, retains butter (209) _ 3 00 

F. L. Hamilton & Sons, merchants. Gait, pair shoes, retains butter 

(209) 2 50 

P. Radigan. Grocer, Gait, goods, retains butter (209) 5 00 

S. Minors, Dundas, whips (201) 9 00 

Inksetter-Myers Co., Hamilton, cash (210) 3 00 

Struthers & Church, flour and feed, retains bread (210) 3 00 

John H. Laird, Grocer, Gait, retains butter (209) 6 00 

R. A. Briscoe, Merchant, Gait, goods, retains butter (209) 8 00 

A. E. Buchanan, Livery, Gait, cash (200) 2 00 

Woods & Tavbr, Dry Goods, Gait, goods (208), (211) 2 00 

Dr. Charlton, Gait, cash (200) 2 00 

Milne & Glennie, Gait, cash (208) 2 00 

Harry Rayner, Blacksmith, Gait, cash (200) 2 00 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce, GaJt, medal (201) 

Dr. Cowan. Y.S., Gait (2<X)) 5 00 

F. J. Magee, Hanulton, cash (210) 3 00 

Canadian Cereal & Milling Co., Gait, 1 bbl. Star Flour, retains 

butter (208) 7 00 

Geo. Field, Merchant Tailor, Gait, cash (203) 1 00 

Thos. Patterson, Gait, cash, retains butter (209) 2 00 

J. C. WindeU. Clothier. Gait, retains butter, goods (209) 8 00 

Grafton it Co.. Merchants. Dundas. Clothing (199) 18 00 

G. C. Wilson & Co., Dundas (209) 5 OO 

Bank of Commerce. Dundas. silver medal (201) 

T. H. A. Begufc. Dundas, cash (214) 100 

Dr. Addison, St George, cash .... 2 00 

J. McNeiUv. Merchant. St. George, goods (198) 2 00 

The Brant Milling Co.. St. George, 100 lbs. flour (198) 3 00 

J. A. Banmst«r, Harness Maker. St. George, halter (200) 1 50 

James Buekberrough, Carriage Builder, St. George woodwork (202) 1 00 

M. Homine. Blacksmith. St. George, neckvoke (203^ 1 25 

R. A. Thompson, Lvnden Flour MiUs. flour (2(^) 6 00 

Robt. Clark, Merchant, Troy, whip (208) 1 50 

Sam. J.Plastow. Rockton, cash, retains honey (210) 1 50 

John Simpson, Merchant, retains apples, cash (211) 5 00 

David Bell. Manager World's Fair, Rockton, retains apples, cash (211) 5 00 

Jas. Riddle. RrK-ktou, cash (198) 10 00- 

Telephone 946 

DR. J. LEICH 

DENTI3T 

1 6 Market Square Hamilton 

(OVER MOLSON'S BANK) 
215 



Armstrong, T. B 36 

Armstrong, John 40, 189 

Allen, John 44 

Armstrong, Hugh 84 

Armstrong, Walter 86 

Addison, Dr. J. L 92 

Anderson, Wm. T 118 

Atkins, Wm 120 

Aitkin, T. T 181 

Bartmann, E. A 3 

Biggs, P. C 4, 166 

Ban well Hoxie Wire Fence Co., 6, 18 

Bannen, Richard 10 j 

Bugner. eHnry 12 ; 

Baird, Wm 14 

Boyle, Johi} /. . . .24 

Boyle, W. R 26 

Betzner, Joseph 34 

Burgess, Wm. J 36 

Badger, D 38 

Bell. David 40, 184 

Boyle, Charles 44 

Burt. James 46 

Bell. Alex., Jr ..60 

Boyle, Frank 61 

Boyle. Jos., Sr 58 

Boyle. Miss Minnie 66 

Bird, F. W. & Son 69 

British American Business College 71 

Betzner, David 83 

Bank of Hamilton 83 

Badger, Thos 86 

Black, Andrew 88 

Baird, John 92 

Betzner, Abram 94 

Benson, Rev. Aaron W 100 

BBell, Alex., Sr 100 

Barclav, T. B 102 

3ond, Edwin 102 

Barter. W. H 105 

Baird. W. H 106 

Bovle, Chas. J 106 

Blain. GeGo 106 

Baxter, A. B 109 

Barlow, Thos 110 

Bain. Hon. Thos 124 

Binkley, Henry 126 

Beverly Councillors in 1875 140 

Banueu, Richard 140 

Burgess, Wm. J 141 

Betzner, Jos 162 

Brooking, W. H 179 

Blain. Richard 187 

Bratton, Alfred T 192 

Brewster & Hfeyd 193 



Banner Printing Co 68 

Bell, David 212 

Briscol, R. A 218 

Brown, W. E 220 

Brantford Business College .. ..222 
Budge, W. R 148 

Clayton, Gilbert J 7 

Collinson, J. G 9 

Christie, Brown & Co 10 

Comfort Soap 11 

Cornell, Brewin 12 

Clare BrBos 13 

Chambers, Henry 16 

Clement, Emerson 18 

Cornell, John A.. 20 

Crawford's Confectionery 26 

Carpenter, John 29 

Clark, H. C 51 

Cowie, Wm 42 

Crisp, J 44 

Culham, Nelson 56 

Clement, John 60, 191 

Christie, Rev Thos 64 

Cowie, Miss Aggie 66 

Camp. Robt .. 70 

Canada Business College 77 

Christie, David 80 

Clark, Wm 88 

Cook, Thos 88 

Coleman, Wfn 88 

Chrystal. Rev. Geo 96 

Case , John 106 

Central Business College Ill 

Cope. Jacob 114 

Cornell, Aaron 116 

Christie, Robt 122 

Cloke & Sons 125 

Cornell, Wm 126 

Cowie, John 128 

Cornell, Benoni 140 

Clare, Geo. A. M.P 174 

Cornell, Samuel 178 

Clark, Chief 179 

Cooley Preserved 187 

Dickson, J. W 22 

Dwver. D 28, 146 

Daliey, F'. F. & Co 62 

Dominion Bank 79 

Davidson, Jas 90 

Donald, Jas 104 

Dalvell & Barrie 180 

Dickson, Wm 208D 

Eaton Co., T 1 



3l6 



Esson's Atelier 2 

Echlin, Robt 72 

^airweather's 5 

Pergusson, Robt 10 

Fergusson, Arch 30 

Fisher, Rev. S. W 96 

Fleming, Chas 129 

Forsythe, W. W 129 

Flatt, John Ira 130 

Fisher, J. H., M.P 173 

Fearman, F. W 206 

Gray, Edwin 12 

George, James 30 

Gould, Shapley & Muir 33 

Garroch, Anthony 36 

Grierson, H 40 

Gore Ins. Co 37 

George, A. J 54 

George, Samuel 56 

George. Anthony, Sr 76 

Gibson. David 80 

Gilbert. John, Sr 92 

Grafton & Co 99 

George, Jas 104 

Gibbon's College Ill 

Gray, Jas 127 

Grafton & Co 132, 199 

Graham, Wm 143 

Gage, J. Walter 185 

Henderson, Wm., Sr 6, 60 

Henderson, Robert 8 

Howard, Henrv 12 

Henderson, T. S... 22, 104, 154, 190 

Hardy, W 42 

Harris. GeGo. N 50 

Henderson. James S 50 

Humphrey, James 52 

Howard, Geo. A 54 

Harbottle, Capt. Thos 86 

Henderson, Wm., Jr 90 

Hanes, Frank 104 

Harvie, Alex 108 

Humphrey .John 110 

Harris, John E 126 

Holcomb, Seth 155 

Henderson, Wm. H 167 

Hickok, Robt 177 

Hunter, Geo 178 

Hunter. W. A 181 

Hughes, W. L 193 

Hunter. Samuel 59 

Hannam H. G 208C 

JHoward Bros 208C 



Inksetter, R A 38, 104 

Ireland, Russel 50 

Ireland, John 60 

Inksetter, Robt., Sr 72 

Ireland, Wm., Sr 74 

Imperial Bank 87 

Irwin, J. M 208D 

Jackson, Matthew 42 

Jackson, John 42 

Jones, John K 54, 161 

Johnston, Mrs. R. J 68 

Jamieson, John 90 

Jerome & Bawtiniieimer 95 

Jones, Chas. D 101 

Johnston, Edward 106 

Jones, Geo 114 

Jackson, Daniel 152 

Jafffray, J. P... 176 

Jarvis, F. S 181 

Jamieson's Confectionery .. ..212 

Junor's 208O 

Knowle's, J. M. Son 15 

Kerr Milling Co 103 

Kinnaird. Dundas 104 

Keachie. Jas. B 120 

Kernighan. Andrew 122 

Knowles, Lt.-Col. W. E. S 134 

Kernighan, R. Kirkland 175 

Knowles, C. E 183 

La^vrason, J. P 6 

Lawrason, J. W 14 

Lees, Thos 24 

Lister, R. A. & Co 45, 47 

Lawson. John, Sr 78 

"Lee, John, Sr 90 

Lawson. John 104 

Lindsay, John 108 

Lundv,' Dr. J. B 112 

Lee & Farmer 190 

Leitch, Dr. J 208 

Moffat, Stephen 4, 165 

Menzies, Wm 14, 140, 182 

Main, Dr 20 

MulhoUand, Geo. H 22 

■; Morton, David & Sons 27 

I Malcohn, John 38, 146 

Misener. G. T 46 

Maxwell. David & Sons 48 

Maitland Young & Son 56 

Merrill Medical Go. 63 

Menzies. Miss J 68 

Martin, Adam 80 

Main, David 86 



217 



The Little Giant 

GALT'S Leading Dry Goods Store 

In Bcots and Shoes, Dress Goods, Linoleums, 
Rubbers, Oil Cloths, Roller Blinds, Carpets, Mattings, 
Chenille and Tapestry Curtains 

OREAT STOCK OF 

Ladies' and Men's Furs of Latest Styles 

Men's Furnishings, Ladies',Men's Underwear,Children's 
Underwear, Linens and Towels, Sheetings, Cottons and 
Pillow Slips, Ladies' Ready-to-wear Garments; Hosiery, 
Gloves, Corsets, Ladies' Suits and Fall Jackets — finest 
and best ard lowest prices. 

Rain Coats for Ladies and G 

R. A. BRISCOE 

-BARGAIN KING*' 

2lS 



Sutton. John ..61 

Stewart-. Miss Lizzie 68 

Stewart^, John, Sr 76 

Spence. Jas 80 

Smith. E. D 91 

Sloan, Rev. Israel 96 

Standard Busine.ss College 97 

Smith. And.. 98 

Swinton. Thos 102 

Shaver. Jas 113 

Sparks, C. E 113 

Sager. Malachi. Sr 118 

Skinner. Enos 120 

Somer\ille 123 

Sealev. W. 138 

Smith. Jas 140 

Smith. Inspector J. H 147 

St. George Condenserv 159 

Smith, E. D ' 172 

Secord. Melvin A 180 

Scott. Mayor F. Stewart ISa 

Stewart. J. J 190 

Salada 209 

Simpson, Robt. Co., inside back 
cover. 

The Hamilton Pro\ident & Loan So- 
ciety 2 

Thompson. James 4 

The Molsons Bank 28 

The T. Milburn Co 31 

Thompson. Wm 34 

Taylor Bros .34 

The Brantford Cordage Co 39 

The Dorenwend Co 43 

The Wilson. Lvtle & Badgerow Co. 

43 

The Premier Cream Separator Co. 

49 

The Wm. Pteerson Son Co 52 

The Moon Business College .. ..57 

The McClarv Mfg. Co 65 

Thompson. Miss B. M 66 

The Royal Bank 67 

Temple's Livery 68 

Thompson. Adam. Sr 72 

Thompson. Wm.. Sr 72 

The Quebec Bank 75 

Thompson. Thos.. Sr. ^ 78 

The G. W. Robinson Co 85 

The Dome-stic Specialty Co 89 

Thompson. Adam 98 

Thomp-on. Thos.. Jr 104 

Thompson. J. F 104 

Thompson. R. A 106, 135 

Teeple. Squire 110 

The Geo. H. King Co 115 

Terrvberrvs Bakerv 119 

The Wood Milling Co 137 

Thompson. Robt 149 



The Merchant* Bank 151 

Thompson, Deputy Reeve Jas. ..163 
The Gait Horse Shov? Associatioii 

Incorporated .. 181 

Tyrrell. J. W 198 

The Bank of Toronto 224 

The World's Fair Directors, 1877... 

151B 

Valens. John 112 

Vansickle, Benoni 118 

Views, Judging Babies 136 

Views, Testing Weight of Babies. 136 

Views at World's Fair 142 

Views at World's Fair 144 

View of Sheep at World's Fair. .151 
View of Women's Institute Conven- 
tion 156 

View at World's Fair 158 

View at World's Fair 158 

View at World's Fair 160 

View" at World's Fair 160 

View at World's Fair 177 

View Best Turn Out at World's Fair 

180 

View at World's Fair 182 

View Race Track at World's Fair.. 

191 

Views at World's Fair 186 

View, A Pair of Prize Winners. 192 

W'ood. Wm.. Jr 4 

Webber's Hardware 23 

Wedge, Reuben 24 

Wray. Daniel 28, 104, 61 

Wilkinson & Kompass 36 

Wo<ids, Walter & Co 35 

Watson. Henrv 56 

Wood. Wm., Sr 60 

Washington.- S. F 61 

Wrav. Miss CM 68 

Wray. Geo., Sr 78 

Vveir. John 82 

Wray. Daniel. Sr 84 

Wood, Solomon 94 

Wells, John 100 

Willard. Wm 102 

Weir. .\lex 116 

Wilson. Jas 118 

Wood. Peter 140 

Wood. D. B 169 

Wilson, G. C M.P 171 

\N^therill. Jas ISl 

White & Co 1S7 

Young, Robt 10 

Young. Hon. Jas 183 

Zam-Buk Co 107 




Mr. W. E. BROWN. 
THE GALT BUSINESS COLLEGE 

has during the past fifteen yeeirs become one of the leading Business Train- 
ing Schools in Canada. It employs a strong staff of trained and experienced 
teachers, two of whom are excellent penmen. The equipment is the best 
that money can provide, and the courses are kept right up to date. You 
may begin a course with us at any time. Write for our Catalogue. 

THE GALT BUSINESS COLLEGE 



Main St., Gait, Ont. 



W. E Brown, Principal 



Myers, Elijah 92 

Metropolitan Bank 93 

Morrison, H. C 106 

Martin, David 114 

Mi.^ner. Adam 116 

Main, Stephen 126 

Mulholland. Geo. H 150 

Merchants Bank 157 

Middleton. Sheriff J. T 168 

Malcolm, John, Sr 170 

Middleton Marble & Granite Co..l78 
Millen, Geo 179 

McPherson, E 4 

McKellar, Arch 16 

McQueen. Thos 18 

McKay. E. & Co 21 

McClure, Wm 2Q 

McQueen. John 34 

McXichol, Thos 36 

McDonald, Wm 38, 54. 40 

McDonald, Wallace.. ..40, 140. 188 

McPhail, John 42 

McCormack, James, Sr 46 

McDonough,"^ John A 48 

McDonald, Malcolm 48 

McKnight, Edwin 48 

McCormack, James M .50 

McKnight, Capt. And 82 

McKenzie, Simon 84 

McKenzie, Donald J 84 

McDonald, Robt IQS 

McKnight. Thos 112 

McBean. GilUs 120 

McKnight. John 129 

McQueen, Thos 131 

McNichol, Thos 133 

McQueen, Dr. Jas ...139 

McQueen, Ttos 140 

McQueen, Jas., Sr 155 

MacPherson. E.. Jr., Councillor. 164 
McKnight, And 190 

Newitt, John 30 

Kiibet, Stephen 32 

Nicholson. James 34 

Newton. P. B. & Sons.. 46 

Nisbet, Wm 59 

National Business College .73 

Nisbet, Stephen, Sr 74 

Nicol, Thos 74 

Nisbet, Adam 76 

Nichol, Rev. Alex 100 

Nisbet. Stephen 106 

Nicol, Thos 116 



O'Connor, John 26 

Osborne, James & Son 32 

Ontario Portland Cement Co 81 

Patterson, David 10, 121 

Pirie, Geo 17 

Permanent Ink Co 19 

Plastow, S. J 44 

Pla&tow. Jas. B 60 

Plastow, Miss H. E 66 

Patterson, Miss Sara 66 

Patterson, Rotb,. Sr 76 

Patterson. Chas., Sr 78 

Patterson. John .■s'2 

Peregrine, David 94 

Plowman. Rev. Geo 96 

Patrick, Thos 98 

Patterson, Adam 104 

Pentland. Robt 108 

Patterson, Wm 110 

Patterson, Thos 153 

Petrie, Harry D 190 

Ricker. C 8 

Riordon Plating Works 12 

Raphael & Co 25 

Ralph. The RexaU Store 59 

Ricker, David 56 

Riddle, Wm. D ...61 

RRutherford. John 58 

Robinson, iEss Annie 66 

Robertson. Walter, Sr 74 

Robb. John 94 

Riddle. Robt., Sr 98 

Rous. Ben. G 106 

Riddle, Wm 114 

Ralph & Wilson 117 

Robinson. Robt 1^ 

' Regan. H 179 

i Robertson Bros 215 

I Sparks, Chas. E 4 

I Shearer. Thos 8 

! Social Tea Co 16 

j Shellard Morris 20 

! Sager. WilUam 38 

SoUean. Ltd.. 41 

Sager. Malachi. Jr 42 

Sweet. Wilber 44 

1 Sparks. Charles E 46 

48 

50 

Sanitol Chemical Co 53- 

Smith, Geo 54 

Siager, Nathan 54 

Shaw's Business Schools 55- 



I Stewart, A. A. 
' Smith. T. H.. 



^ai 



BRANTFORD BUSINESS COLLEGE 

STUDYthelNTERESTS 

OF YOUR BOYS AND GIRLS 

by giving them all the advantages of a good practical Business Education. 
The College which offers the best facilities available should receive your 
attention, and you are therefore invited to obtain all particulars about our 
splendid school. 

WE INVITE 

Every parent, young man or young women who is interesred in a 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

T^o write for a copy of our handsome new catalogue ; it explains ^ 

our work fully. 

ENsER ANY TIME. 




A.E.Day. Principal 



Grafton €r Co. 



LIMITED 

Manufacturers of 



BOYS and YOUTHS' 
CLOTHING. 



The Bank of Toronto 

GALT, ONTARIO. 

SOLICITS THE SAVING ACCOUNT of the 
FARMER, Joint account may be kept in names of 
two or more parties. Interest is added in May and 
November at current rates. 

FARMERS' SALE NOTES are discounted by this 
Bank on favorable terms. Your Banking business of 
whatever nature is solicited by this Bank. 

BY DECEMBER, 1912, the Bank expects to be 
located in their new and commodious office at the corner 
of Main and Water Streets and you are invited to make 
this your Banking Home. 

This Bank has been in business for 57 years and has 
always had capital management, no Branches through- 
oat Canada. 

CAPITAL 14,600,000 REST $5,606,000 

ASSETS 157,000.000 vj 

•~° . ^ 

D. McLennan, Manager. 



4\^^%> THE 

Simpson Shoe 

FOR MEN 

$4.00, $4.50 and $5.00 a Pair. 




We own and control it. No other store sells Victor 
Shoes. Ii's our own brand. 

No middle-men. 

No commercial travellers. -^ 

No expensive round-about retailing. 

U'e seH it with only one profit added to the cost 
of making. 

That's why you get a good stylish, manly, up-to-date 
boot at these prices wh-n you buy the Victor. 

All popular styles and widths. 



The Robert Simpson Co. Limited 

TORONTO 



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