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II I I I I II I lil: III I II 

3 1833 01274 7207 



1913-1914 

Kossuth 
Mississippi 

Alcorn County 
Agricultural 
High School 



Donated by: Fredra Wilbanks 
Indexed by: Vicki Burress Roach 



Allen County Public Library 

900 Webster Street 

PO Box 2270 

Fort Wayne, IN 46301-2270 



-A- 




Adair Ruby 


23 


Adair Rubv 


25 


Alcorn Stock Farm 




Anderson F F 




Anderson Hal 


3 


Anderson Hal 


5b 


Anderson Hal 


x 


Auten G L 




-B- 




Bass James 


24 


Bass James 


25 


Biggers J D 


5b 


Boyd R P & Son 




Bramlitt Hardware Co 




Brewer Millard 


23 


Brewer Millard 


25 


Brooks Howard 


25 


Bucy James 


25 


Bucy Jim 


23 


Burgess Lida 


23 


Burgess Lida 


25 


-C- 




Callendar Fannie 


5b 


Callendar Fannie 


14 


Callendar Fannie 


7? 


Cannon Luther 


23 


Cannon Luther 


25 


CatesJ R 


5b 


Cates Joe 




Corinth Bank & Trust 




Corinth Coca-Cola 




Corinth Drug Co 




Corinth Furniture Co 




CoxJP 


25 


Cox Lester 


25 


CoxWL 


25 


Cross Robt 


24 


Cross Robt 


25 


Curry Oscar 


24 


Curry Oscar 


25 


-D- 




Dickson A.M. 




Dickson's Store 





Dilworth Charles 


24 


Dilworth Charley 


26 


Dixon T J 


25 


Doggett J W 




Doggett May 


23 


Doggett Ruth 


25 


-E- 




East R A 




Estes R T 




-F- 




Faire Ollie 


23 


Faire Ollie 


25 


First National Bank 




Forsight Lonnie 


23 


Forsight Lonnie 


25 


-G-~ 




Garrett 


25 


Garrett 


25 


Garrett Curtis 


25 


Garrett Onnie 


25 


George Gro Co 




Gift J.E 




Ginn Kate V 


23 


Glissen Stanley 


24 


Glissen Stanley 


25 


Grahams C S 




Green Hillie 


23 


Green Hillie 


25 


Green Ice F 


25 


Green Jessie 


25 


Green Joe F 


23 


Green Ruth 


24 


Green Ruth 


25 


-H- 




Hale Marvin 


21 


Hamm A B 




Hancock Jack 


25 


Hancock Jaco 


23 


Hancock Lillie 


24 


Hancock Lillie 


2^ 


Hanley B 


2^ 


Harrison Flossie 


24 


Harrison Flossie 


2S 


Harrison Julia 


25 



Harrison Julia 


25 
24 


McClintock 


2b 


Henderson Pittman 


McClintock Martin 


23 


Hensley Schlev 


25 


McClintock Martin 


26 


Hillman Virgie 


25 


McClintock OUie 


23 


Hines Alma 


25 


McClintock OUie 


26 


Hines Jack 


25 


McClintock Sylvanus 


24 


Holley J B 


25 


McClintock Sylvanus 


26 


Holley J B 


25 


McCord W A 


5b 


Holley J L 




McCord's Studio 




Holman Tom 




McDowell Almus 


23 


Honnell Velma 


24 


McElhannon Bermce 


24 


Hopkins Dedrick 


23 


McElhannon Ethel 


24 


Hopkins Dedrick 


25 


McElhannon Volma 


24 


Hughes Claude 


25 


McHatTey Eugene 


26 


Hughes Geo 


24 


McHalffey Anna 


24 


Hughes Geo 


25 


Meeks Anna 


24 


Hughes Jessie 


24 


Meeks Clyde 


26 


Hughes Jessie 


25 


Meeks Mamie 


26 


-J- 




Miller Eugene 


24 


Jackson Fried 


25 


Miller Eugene 


26 


Jameson Carl 


25 


Mills 


26 


Jones Bessie 


25 


Mills Acton 


24 


Jones Lottie 


24 


Mills Albert 


25 


Jones Lottie 


25 


Mills Ella 


24 


Jones Mack 


24 


Mills Lena 


24 


-K- 




Morns Tom 


26 


Keith John Y 
Keith John Y 
-L- 


24 
25 


Morrison Bessie 
Morrison Robt 
Morrison Rosebud 


24 
24 

24 


Lambert Birdie 
Lambert Burdie 
Lambert Clarence 
Lambert Loretta 
Lancaster Ruben 


24 
26 
24 
24 

24 


-o- 

Overton Anna 
Overton Anna 
Overton Hanie 
Overton Hattie 


24 
26 
25 
26 


Lancaster Ruben 


26 


-P- 




Looney Mvrtle 


25 


Parker Carl 


26 


-M- 




Payne Howard 


24 


Martin S B 


5h 


Payne Howard 


26 


Martindale Sid 


26 


Pittman Henderson 


24 


Mathis Roy 


2d 


Pittman J H 


26 


Mathis Rufus 


26 


Powers J W 


5 


Mathis Virdie 


26 


-R- 




McAmis H M Drug 




Randolph Gertrude 


24 


McCalfey Lawrence 


24 


Randolph Irma 


24 


McCann Tine 




Randolph Irva 


24 


McClamroch Ada Dee 


24 


Richey John 


26 



Richey S J & Co 




Wiggs Earl 


26 


Rogers Edd 


23 


Wiggs Keith 


26 


Rogers Edd 


26 


Williams Mae Bell 


5b 


Romine J B 


5b 


Williams Mae Belle 


12 


Rubel Abe 








-S- 








Scott Etta 


26 






Sego W F 


26 






Sego William 


24 






Sherrod Bedford 


24 






Sherrod Bedford 


26 






Skillman W D 








Small H G 








Smith Cletus 


26 






Smith Willie 


26 






Storey's Store 








Stout Mabel 


26 






Strickland E 


5b 






Strickland E 


in 






Strickland Helen 


24 






Strickland Lottie B 


26 






Strickland Viola 


24 






Stutts Lonnie 


24 






Stutts Lonnie 


26 






Surratt Sidney 


23 






Surratt Sidnev 


26 






-T- 








Thompson Roy 


23 






Thompson Roy 


26 






Tucker John 


26 






Turner C A 








-V- 








Voyles 


26 






Voyles 


26 






-W- 








Waits E F 








Walker Brooks 


24 






Walker Grace 


24 






Walker Grace 


26 






Walker HE Drug 








Walker Lollie 


26 






Whitehurst Monta 


24 






Whitehurst Monta 


26 






Whitehurst Neoma 


24 






Whitehurst Neoma 


26 






Wiggs Earl 


24 







C^lc^Ul C*< &KJ^L<^c^£rcOZy i 



CATALOG AND ANNOUNCEMENTS 



ALCORN COUNTY AGRICULTURAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 



Kossuth, Mississippi 
1913-14 



TO THE PUBLIC AND PATRONS. 



We call particular attention to the matter contained in 
this catalogue. The success of the schools will depend 
largely upon the good will, harmony and support that 
exist between patrons and teachers, and it. is confidently 
believed that this condition will only broaden and deepen 
ns both parents and teachers learn more clearly how much 
each needs the intelligent aid and sympathy of the other in 
shaping the destiny of the child. For a parent to criticise 
the teacher in the presence of a child is to do the child 
an irreparable injury. You cannot afford to do this, if 
you are working for the best interest of your child. If you 
have grievance or complaints to make, the proper thing to 
do would be to go to see the teacher about them. Many 
u disturbance could be amicably settled if the patron would 
only take the time to investigate and see the teacher. 

The teachers employed in this school are God-fearing, 
honest, conscientious men and women, and will spare no 
effort to advance your children as rapidly as possible, both 
mentally and morally. But their success must be based on 
your confidence, your sympathy and your co-operation. 
They do not ask this for their own sakes, but for that of 
the children. 

Parents and friends are invited to visit the schools as 
frequently as possible. Let all join hands in building up 
the best school at Kossuth to be found in the State. 



Yours truly, 
HAL ANDERSON, Principal. 



HISTORY. 
The public-minded citizens of Alcorn County, realizing 
the necessity of practical work in schools and more espe- 
cially the importance of proper training along agricultural 
and industrial lines, availed themselves of the opportunities 
offered by the laws of the State and established the Alcorn 
County Agricultural High School. 

The first session of the school opened in October, 1909. 
A few days after the opening of the school the old law 
was declared unconstitutional. However, we continued to 
work, running a free school open to ,jll grades. After 
the Legislature corrected the mistakes made, work was 
resumed on our new building, this being completed in time 
for the school to move into new quarters before the close 
of the first session. The second session was a gwat success 
in every way. 

On February 19th, 1912, the school building was con- 
sumed by fire. The good people of Kossuth threw open 
their homes to the hoarding pupils until the Hoard of 
Trustees leased the hotel for a dormitory, On the 22d of 
the same month school was resumed in the old Kossuth 
free school building, with the hotel as dormitory. The 
remainder of the session the school was good and the 
attendance held up better than was expected. 

In May the Board of Supervisors issued $5,000.00 in 
bonds and the Board of Trustees, under an act of the last 
Legislature, borrowed $5,000.00 ami it is hoped that by 
September two new buildings, by far suprnssing the old 
one, will have been constructed. 

Because of delay on the part of the contractors, we did 
not move to our new buildings until the middle of Decem- 
ber, 1912. The school opened after Christmas with renewed 
vim and determination, and things moved on well until 
the close, May 27th, the attendance holding out better than 
in the past, and our splendid graduating class setting a 
precedent high in grade attainments and moral behavior. 
The climax came in the speech of Hon. J. W. Powers and 
all ended well. 



FACULTY" 



Haf Anderson _ _ „ J. _ Principal 

E. Strickland . — ..Principal Literary Department 

Miaa Fannie Callendar_ ..Domestic Science Department 

Hiss Mae Befl Vf HfTams.._ _ Music Teacher 

Miss Pearl Reed „ Intermediate Department 

Mrs. Van Hale_ — Primary Department 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J. R. Cates, President 

W. A. McCord, Secretary 

J. D. Sogers, S. B. Martin. 

J. B. Romine 



CALENDAR 



Opening ~ September 1, 1913 

First Term Examinations From Nov. 24th to 28th 

Second Term Begins December 1st 

Second Term Examinations..-. >. February 

School Closes May 5, 1914 

Holidays 

Two Days Thanksgiving 

Ten Days Christmas 

Two Days the First of May Teachers' Association 



LOCATION. 

Kossuth is very near the geographical center of Alcorn 
County, nine miles from Corinth, the intersecting point of 
the Illinois Central, Southern and M. & 0. Railroads.. 

Kossuth is a healthful little town and has a citizenship 
that is enthusiastic over the prospects of our school. They 
are careful to see that the town is free from those contami- 
nating and demoralizing influences so often found in our 
towns. 

The school grounds are located on the highest point iu 
Kossuth. "We are supplied with an abundance of pure well 
water, pumped from a well 200 feet deep, this well having 
been bored through about 100 feet of impervious strata 
assures us of good pure water for all time to come. 

The general lay of the land slopes in all directions from 
the building, thus giving us absolute drainage. In fact, had 
the School Commissioners searched the whole country over 
it would have been hard to have found a more suitable 
location. 

DISCIPLINE. 

We believe in training a child in the way we would 
like to see him go, and that we cannot start too soon. It is 
ruinous to a child in the undeveloped state to leave him 
without a guiding and restraining hand in his daily conduct. 
In order that the teachers may be responsible to parents for 
the discharge of duty, they must have absolute control of 
the pupils from the time they enter the school until they 
stop. Parents are requested to aid the teachers in the dis- 
cipline of their children, and if they are not willing for 
their children to be controlled, they are kindly requested to 
send them to another school. Our discipline shall be firm, 
but not harsh. All rules must be obeyed. In order to 
learn to govern and control, one must first learn to be 
governed and controlled ; to command respect, one must 
also respect others. The generals who have made the best 
officers were once boys who willingly submitted to being 

6 



disciplined. Hence, the true object of discipline is nut 
merely to secure obedience and courteous deportment. but 
to develop in the child power to govern himself. By put- 
tin" upon the child every responsibility lie can bear, self- 
relinnce, self-respect, and self-control wi;l be encouraged 
and developed. The grown pupils will be treated as ladies 
and gentlemen until they have proved themselves other- 
wise. Children will be corrected when necessary. The 
relation between pupil and teacher, as far as possible, Will 
he one of mutual confidence and respect. 



GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS AND PLANS. 

BOARDING DEPARTMENT. 

The Agricultural High School Building will be able to 
care for seventy-five to eighty-five boarders. All hoarders 
entering this department will be expected to comply with 
all requirements of the department. 

AH pupils in the boarding department will be expected 
to do at least one hour's work each day. The girls will be 
expected to attend to the cooking, the dining room work, 
cleaning up their own rooms, etc. This work will be so 
arranged that each girl will have only the required amount 
to do each day. It is not our intention to force any work 
on any girl that she is not capable of standing, but merely 
to make the total expense as small as possible. 

The boys will be required to do the work about the 
place that is ordinarily expected of boys at home on the 
farm. They will be required to get the water, wood, etc., 
to look after the stock, lot, garden, field, help in building 
up the place in general. They will also be required to keep 
their own rooms clean and in perfect order. 

In addition to the regular work each day in the school 
"week, the boys will be given an opportunity to work every 
Saturday morning on the place, for which they will receive 
compensation, this compensation to go first to paying for 
their laundry, which will be done by hired help, and in 



<a«e tfiere is any bafnnct? it will 6c applied to the Board 

In case there are boys and girls who wish to work their 
way through, there will be provisions made for same. Any 
wishing to avail themselves of tins" opportunity should, see- 
the Principal at' once. 

We propose to put a: f7 ret -class" education within the: 
reach erf a If. It will be' your own fault in case you fail. 




PHOT. HAL ANDEaSON, 
PHIMCIPAI. 



REQUIREMENTS OF BOARDING PUPILS. 

All pupils in the boarding department will be required 
fo be in their rooms each night at 7:00 and study till 9:00, 
and will be required to retire at 10:00. During this time 
one of the teachers will visit the department and require 



each pupil to spend two hours in actual preparation of 
the work for the next day. This applies to five nights in 
the week. 

No pupils will be allowed to visit in town except at the 
discretion of the Principal in charge. 

No hoarders will he allowed to leave the building at 
nicht except at the discretion of the Principal in charge. 

Boarders will not be allowed to receive visitors in t heir 
rooms. 

No girls will be allowed to receive boys as company 
during the session. 

The boys will not be allowed to loaf around the stores 
or town. We have a school ground of twenty-six acres, 
sufficient to allow any boy all the exercise necessary to 
develop him physically. We feel sure that he will gain 
nothing mentally or morally by such loafing. 

.All boarders will be required to furnish the following 
nrticlees: 6 towels, 2 sheets, 2 pillow cases, 2 quilts or 
blankets, 4 table napkins, comb and brush, toilet soap, I 
pillow, 1 chair, 1 bucket, 1 mirror, 1 drinking cup. Any 
pupil failing to bring the above will be required to get same 
at once or the articles will be bought, and charged to their 
accounts. 

All boarders will be required to attend Sunday School 
and preaching each Sunday. We have Sunday School at 
three churches: Baptist, Methodist and Presbyterian. 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 

COST OF BOARD. 

Board will be furnished at actual cost. A deposit of 
$10.00 will be required of each pupil entering the boarding 
department to pay for the first month. At the end of each 
month a bill will be given each pupil, showing the actual 
cost for that month. Within rive days the pupil will be 
required to deposit with the manager of the boarding de- 
partment the amount called for on the board bill. This 



will allow tiie manager to keep all board paid in advance 
and no pupil will have to suffer for bad collections. Any 
pupil failing to make the* required deposit within the 
required time will be dismissed from the school till such 
deposit is made. Any balance due such pupil will be repaid 
at the end of hist month when the cost for board shall have 
been prorated. 



0f 




PROF. E. 'STRICKLAND. 
PRINCIPAL LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



Tuition in all High School grades for students from 
Alcorn County will be free. A tuition of $2.00 per month 
will be charged all pupils outside of Alcorn County. 



10 



fS TSCIDKN'TAL. 

All pupils will be required to pay an incidental fee of 
$1.00. This fee is due tire first day of "School, and no pupil 
will be entered upon the register of the sch.:ol till this fee 
is paid. We ask all patrons to attend to this, so as to avoid 
unnecessary trouble. Any balance on hand at the end of 
'the session will be used to improve the interior of the 
j k 'recitation room. 

TtEQTJTREMENTS FOU AIO, PUPILS. 

No student will be admitted to this school without satis- 
factory evidence of a good moral character. 

Pupils will be required to observe all rules and regula- 
tions of the school. 
! No cigarette smoking will he allowed upon the school 

premises. We have little hopes for the boy who has bis 
brain filled with nicotine. In case your boy smokes cigar- 
ettes and has your consent to do this, it would be beter to 
keep him at home. 

No profane language will he allowed by or between 
pupils. 

Any pupil having contagious disease will be required 
to remain away from school, at the discretion of the faculty. 

No pupil will be allcrwgd to deface or mutilate the build- 
ings or grounds. AnyTJppil doing this will be required to 
compensate Epr same or else replace the damaged part. 

Any pupil bringing books, papers or other reading mat- 
ter to the school other than text-books, will do same at his 
own risk. The teachers will be expected to take up such 
reading matter and destroy same at their discretion. 

Separate playgrounds have been provided for the boys 
and girls, and under no conditions will either be allowed 
to infringe upon the grounds of the other. 

Association between the boys and girls is strictly pro- 
hibited, except as they may be thrown together during 
recitations. 

Continual or malicious violation of any of the rules, 

11 



Indoleace, profanity, obstinancy, or any ungentlemanly or 
nnlady-like conduct, shall subject the offender to suspension 
or expulsion. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS OF RESIDENT PUPILS AND PUPILS 
BOARDING IN PRIVATE HOMES. 

4-11 pupils shall be required to come direct from home 
to school and return direct home from school. Each pupil 




MISS MAE BELLE WILLIAMS 
MUSIC DIPAaTMlNT 



is under the control of the faculty from the time he leaves 
home till he returns home. To this end we appeal to the 
patrons to assist us in carrying out this provision. 

Pupils will be held strictly acountable to the faculty for 
any misconduct while going to or from school. 



12 



! >' 



All pupils shiill be expected to be present at the chapel 
exercises each morning. 

We make this an earnest appeal tn the parents to stop 
all Friday night frolics and let. the children spend the 
session in careful study. You cannot expect us to accom- 
plish anything if you allow your boys and girls to go out 
to frolics, parties, etc., during the session. In case you 
expect your girl to succeed, then stop her from receiving 
company during the session. 

Again, we ask for the co-operation and help of the 
patrons in making this school a success. 



During the past session we have added more than 100 
volumes of standard literature, an Encyclopedia, a Dic- 
tionary and two nice book cases to our Library. We hope, 
with the aid of concerts, suppers and the regular fee of 
50 cents required of each pupil, to do even more the com- 
ing session. 

We realize the absolute necessity of an abundance of 
reference books, and our-aim is to give our pupils the very 
best, of everything. 



At the end of each month the teachers shall make out 
regular reports, showing the attendance, deportment, and 
general progress of each pupil in each recitation. These 
reports shall be signed by the parent or guardian and 
returned to the teacher. Each teacher shall be expected to 
make a copy of the report on the general report register 
prepared for this purpose. This register shall become a 
part of the history of the school. 

ATTENDANCE. 

Realizing the importance of punctual attendance', we 
request the patrons of the school to assist us in this. It 
is impossible for your children to do the work we expect 
of them if you allow them to remain at home two or three 

13 



days eacli week. It not only throws the pupil behind, but 
puts him as a stumbling block in the path of progress of 
others. We therefore urge that you make any sacriri ■:• 
within reason to keep the pupils in regularly. 




MISS FA-NTJIE CAIXENDlfi, 
DOMESTIC SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 



ATHLETICS. 

We believe that well-directed physical exercise preserves 
the health of the student, stimulates his mental activity 
and elevates the moral tone of the student body. Mischief 
is only misdirected energy, and the teacher is often the 
cause of a student's misconduct. The school that develops 
the mental side of the pupils to the neglect of the physical, 

14 



I 



is foiling in its mission to mankind. Therefore, our school 
lins made ample provisions in this respect for both sexes. 

'.'he harm lies not in the athletics, but in the abuse of 
it and in the athletes. We will encourage the boys to play 
baseball and basket ball, the girls to play tennis and basket 




GIRLS BASKET BALL TEAM 



ball, yet the Boards have placed the following restrictions 
on the athletes: All teams must be under the supervision 
of the Superintendent. No games will be played with other 
teams without the Superintendent or some other teacher 
present. Match games will be limited to school teams. No 
pupii will be permitted to play in a match game who does 
not make a general average of SO per cent, on his or her 
daily recitations and a monthly average of S5 per cent, on 
deportment. 

15 




16 



a 



THE PURPOSES OF THE AGRICULTURAL 
HIGH SCHOOL. 



First — It supplies a missing link between the old system 
anil life. 

Second— It qualifies its students to fulfill their mission 
in life. 

Third — It helps to keep the boys and girls in the country 
by dignifying .country life and employments. 

Fourth — It tends to break down castes or lines of dis- 
tinction in society. 

Fifth— it^will tend to create a sympathy between the 
poor and the wealthy. 

Sixth — It will serve to keep a dissatisfied class of boys 
and girls in school by giving {hem something that they 
have an interest in. 

Seventh — It will serve to promote the health of pupils, 
not only by exercise it will afford, but by habits formed. 



, COURSE OF STUDY 



FIRST YEAR. 

English Grammar 5 hours 

Mississippi History and Civics 5 hours 

Arithmetic and Algebra ...'." 5 hours 

Physical Geography_and Physiology 5 hours 

Agriculture (boys)u . .*: ■ 3 hours 

Bench "Work (boys) 2 hours 

Sewing (girls)....-. ,.. ;_ 2 hours 

SECOND YEAR. 

Composition and Rhetoric 5 hours 

Algebra ,- 5 hours 

English History. .' 5 hours 

Physics and Botany 5 hours 

17 




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m 

?! 






1, '.' • 



!- ' 

i ■ 

! ; 



: 



Agriculture (boys) 3 hours 

Cooking and Sewing (girls) 5 hours 

THIRD TEAR. 

English Literature 5 hours 

Ancient HistGry 5 hours 

Algebra 3 hours 

Geometry 2 hours 

Chemistry . . 3 hours 

Advanced Agriculture (boys) . .5 hours 

.Sewing and Household Decorations (girls) ."•'.5 hours 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Literature and Themes ' T . . .5 hours 

Modern and American History 5 hours 

Plane Geometry ,. . .'.:■■ 5 hours 

Agriculture (boys) .b .hours 

Sewing and Household Decorations (girls') 5 nours 

> 1.1*. ' A . 

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. >*>- 

HAL ANDERSON, PRINCIPAL. 

This course includes the following subjects: ^Agricul- 
ture, Physics, Botany, Chemistry and Mathematics. 

The first year in agriculture will be bulletins pertaining 
to the formation and character of soils; how to build thern 
up and how to prevent their destruction. 
The second year will be a text on plant life. 
The third year will include, besides a book on care and 
feeding of farm animals, a course in bulletins pertaining to 
.the various breeds of animals. 

The fourth year will be a thorough course in farm man- 
agement. 

Four hours per week in the field will be required each 
• year; the work in the year will be outlined from the class 
! room work. This' -work will be given to train and to teach 
! the pupils the practical side of farm life. 

r 

19 




20 






'Physics will hi- in tin* second and third year In those 
lwo courses we will st inly I ho laws of physics and will »K.» 
perform the experiments to illustrate- ihe laws. 

Botany nonius In Ihc second year. Bailey's, text will bo 
:iuscil ami 2~> species nnisi he studied in the laboratory. 

Chemistry will be in the fourth year. We will have » 
"nlct laboratory in winch all of the experiments will be per- 
formed. Chemistry will be studied in relation to the soil 
aind to plant life -as far as possible. The laws which under- 
lie composition .and decomposition will be studied. 

M AT11 KMATK'S 

First Year — Arithmetic and Algebra in factors. 
Second Year— Algebra to quadriatics. 
"lliird Year — C(nu|)letc Algebra and rli->i book Ceumetry, 
Four!}] Year — Complete Plane (lei metre 



LITERACY DEPARTMENT. 

Departments of English, Latin and Hisiorv Will Etc- rnd&r 
M S Trick land. 



It will be the purpose of the instructor in the first year 
of English to give a thorough course in the principles that 
underlie technical liraimnar, giving .special attention to 
the analysis of sentences. 

The second year's work will be mainly composition work 
in connection with the study of short stories as to their 
construction, form, style and devices used in description. 

The third year's work will be a more extensive study of 
literature in connection with the histor\ of Knglish and 
American literature. 

The fourth year will be a continuation of the work of 
the previous year with the addition of themes. 

21 



Latin will be optional, and will begin in the second year. 

The first year of Latin will be a study of Latin forms, 
short sentences to read, alternated with Latin prose compo- 
sition. Bennett's First Latin Book will be used as a tej 

The second year Latin course will be a completion of 
Bennett's First Latin Book. Read the first book of Caesar, 
giving special attention to all construction, with frequent 
references to grammar. 

The third year course will be to read three books of 
Caesar and four of Cicero's Orations. The study of form 
and construction will be emphasized and weekly prose com- 
position exercises will be given. 



The first year's History will be a course' in Mississippi 
History in connection with library reading and reports of 
Historical Society. 

The second year will be a course in English History. 
Special note will be taken of the development of English 
Institutions and their bearing on American History. 

The third year will be a course of Ancient History.. 
Man will be traced from his savage state through varying 
stages of development. Special attention will be given to 
such events as may be classed as world history. 

The fourth year will consist of a four months course in 
Mediaeval and Modern History, and a five months term of 
American Historv. 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE DEPARTMENT. 

MISS FANNIE CALLENDAR, INSTRUCTOR. 

The first year's work will be a course in hand and 
machine sewing. Each girl will be expected to furnish her 
own material. No text-books will be used, but directions 
will be given and girls are required to keep a note book. 

22 



In the second year the sewing will be a more advanced 
course than the first. In cooking, a text-book, Theory and 
Practice of Cooking, will be used. 

The third and fourth years will include sewing and a 
course in household decoration, sanitation, etc., a subject 
that has ben very much neglected. Text-books and bulle- 
tins will be used for this. 



PAY SCHOOL. 

All pupils below the Eighth Grade will be charged a 
tuition fee, as follows: First, Second and Third Grades, 

.$1.50 per month; Fourth and Fifth Grades, $2.00 per 
month; Sixth and Seventh Grades, $'2.50 per month, until 

_ the free schools open, and the Name nU.e will be in effect 
after free school closes. 

% . 



CATALOGUE OF PUPILS FOR SKSSION 1912-1913 

I; • i.iiwkr KiGrTii GRAnu. 

Name. Address. 

.;-.' I uther Cannon Kc3S.'th. .Miss. R. F. i' 

I? 1 Millard Brewer Rienza, Miss 

53 Jim Bucy Saltillo. Miss 

.,' Hillle Green Rienza. Miss 

Joe F. Green Rienza, Miss 

.- Jack Hancock Rienza, Miss 

Dedrlck Hopkins 

1 Martin McCMntcck Ccrinth, Miss.. R 

Kdd Rogers Tippah County 

: Sidney Surratt Winnesoga, Miss 

, Roy Thompson Corinth, Miss 

''.' Lonnle Forslght 

„ t AlmiiR McDowell Kossuth, Miss 

Ollle McCllntock Corinth. Miss.. R 



'- 



FIRST YEAR HIGH SCHOOL. 



Ruby Adair Booneville. Miss, 

Llda Burgess Corinth, Miss.. R. 

May Doggett Kossuth, Miss. 

( - Ollle Falre Corinth, Miss., R. 

i Kate V. Ginn Kossuth, Miss. 

23 



Lottie Jones -- Pocahontas, Tenn. 

Lillie Hancock ~ K \T™\ M ' 9 D S ' 

Jessie Hughes Kos,-th, Miss R. 

Bernice McElhannon 3llth . -Miss. 

Ethel McElhannon Kossuth, Miss. 

Becsie Morrison Kossuth, Miss. 

Rosebud Morrison Kossuth, Miss. 

Pl la _Miu s Kossuth, Miss. 

Anna' Meeks.'Z.' Kossuth, Miss. 

rrma Randolph Kossuth, Miss. 

frva Randolph Kossuth. Miss. 

Oscar Curry : Pocahontas, Tenn. 

James Bass • ••-•; ;■-; 

Charles Dilworth Rienza, Miss. 

Stanley Glissen 

Mark .Tones Kossuth, Miss. 

Howard Payne Saltillo, Miss. 

Brooks Walker : Kossuth. Miss. 

Eugene Miller Saltillo, Miss. 

Birdie Lambert Corinth, Miss., R. 

SKCOND YEAR HIGH SCHOOL. 

Grace Walker Kossuth, Miss R. 

Volma McElhannon Kossuth, Miss. 

I oretta Lambert Corinth, Miss., R. 

Clarence Lambert Corinth, Miss., R. 

Anna Overton Kossuth, Miss. 

Sylvanus McClintock Corinth, Miss., R. 

Tohn Y Keith Essary Springs, Tenn. 

r onnie Stutts Booneville, Miss. 

Earl Wiggs Chalybeate, Miss. 

Lawrence McCalfey Kossuth, Miss. 

Monta Whitehurst Corinth, Miss. 

Viola Strickland Kossuth, Miss. 

Ruth Green Rienza, Miss. 

Robt. Cross Kossuth, Miss., R. 

Robt! Morrison Kossuth, Miss. 

Geo. Hughes Rienza. Miss. 

Velma Honnell ■• Kossuth, Miss. 

Bedford Sherrod Kossuth, Miss. 

William Sego Corinth, Miss., R. 

Henderson, Pittman Corinth, Miss. 

THIRD YEAR HIGH SCHOOL. 

Ada Dee McCIamroch : Kossuth, Miss. 

Gertrude Randolph Kossuth, Miss. 

Helen Strickland Kossuth, Miss. 

Lena Mills Kossuth, Miss., R, 

Acton Mills Kossuth, Miss., R, 

Flossie Harrison Corinth, Miss., R 

Ruben Lancaster Wenasoga, Miss 

Marvin Hale Kossuth, Miss 

Neoma Whitehurst Houston, Miss 

Anna McHalffey Kossuth, Miss 



2-1 



FOURTH YKAIi IIK'.Il SCHOOL. 

•If 

Bessie Jones Kossuth, Miss. 

Ruth Doggett Kossuth, Miss. 

f% Julia Harrison Corinth, Miss., R. 

: 'j Hattie Overton Kossuth, Miss. 

''■': Myrtle l.ooney Kossuth, Miss. 

■5 Albert Mills Kossuth. Miss., R. 

f' Claude Hughes Kossuth, Miss., R. 



BOARDING PUPILS KOI? SESSION 1H12-1J113. 

Ruby Adair Booneville, Miss. 

i- James Bucy Salt il lo. Miss. 
' James Bass Pocahontas. Tenn., R. 
-^ Howard Brooks 
.'- Millard Brewer Rienza. Miss. 
. p I. Ida Eurgess Corinth, Miss., R . jp 

• Oscar Curry Pocahontas, Tenn. ,*».^.', 

Kobt. Cross Kossuth, Miss., R ,'*^fVj; 

Luther Cannon Kossuth, Miss., Ky ' • ^ 

■ , \V. I.. Cox Tippah, Mlai^ 

.'. P. Con Tippah, MisB. 

'» I ester Cox Tippah. Mla's. 

. T. J. Dixon 

Ollie Faire Corinth, Miss., R. 

l.cnnie Forslgtit 

Stanley Glissen Kossuth, Miss., R. 

i u ' Ruth Green Rienza, Miss. 

I ?ji| Jessie Green ...Rienza, Miss. 

: '- .Ice F. Green Rienza, Miss., R. 

•' ':'* Hillle Green Rienza, Miss., R. 

Onnle Garrett Corinth, Miss., R. 

Curtis Garrett Corinth, Miss., R. 

— Garrett 

— Garrett 






: m 



B. Hanley Corinth, Miss., R. 

I.lllie Hancock Reinza, Miss. 

Jack Hancock Rienza, Miss. 

.-.J; Schley Hensley Wenasoga, Miss. 

| Dedrlck Hopkins 

I Jake Hlnes , Walnut, Miss. 

"' Alma Hines Walnut, Miss. 

V Geo. Hughes Rienza, Miss. 

Julia Harrison Corinth, Miss., R. 

Flossie Harrison Corinth, Miss., R. 

Vlrgie Hillman Walnut, Miss. 

J. B. Holley Kossuth, Miss. 

Jessie Hughes Kossuth, Miss., R. 

Lottie Jones Corinth, Miss., R. 

, _ Carl Jameson Tippah. 

Fried Jackson Walnut, Miss. 

John Y. Keith Essary Springs, Tenn. 

I " 25 



y 



Ruben Lancaster Wenasoga, Miss, 

Roy Mathis Walnut, Mi3S, 

r.nfis Mathis Walnut, Miss. 

VirJie Mathis Walnut. Miss. 

F -ene Miller Saltillo, Miss., R. 

Tcm Morris Rienza, Miss. 

Mamie Meeks Walnut. Mis;. 

Clyde Meeks Walnut, Miss. 

Sid Martindale '...'. Corinth, Miss., R. 

Eugene McHaffey Corinth. Miss.. R. 

*nna Overton Kossuth, Miss. 

Hattie Overton Kossuth. Miss. 

Howard Payne Saltillo, Miss. 

Carl Parker . . Rienza, 'Miss. 

J. H. Pittman Corinth, Miss. 

.John Richey Saltillo, Miss., P.. 

Edd. Rogers Tippah. 

Willie Smith Walnut. Miss. 

Cletus Smith Walnut, Miss. 

Etta Scott 

Lottie B. Strickland _ Corinth, Miss. 

Sidney Surratt Wenasoga, Miss. 

Lonnie Stutts Boone ville, Miss. 

Mabel Stout Jackson, Tenn. 

Bedford Sherrod Sherrod, Miss. 

W. F. Sego Corinth, Mi3s.. R. 

Roy Thompson Corinth, Miss. 

John Tucker Boone ville, Miss. 

Voyles Macon. Okla. 

Voyles '... Macon. Okla. 

Earl Wiggs Chalybeate. Miss. 

Keith Wiggs Chalybeate, Miss. 

Mont a Whitehurst Corinth, Miss. 

N'eoma Whitehurst Houston, Miss. 

Burdie Lambert Corinth. Miss. 

Sylvanus McClintock Corinth, Miss. 

Martin McClintock Corinth, Miss. 

Ollie McClintock Corinth, Miss. 

McClintock Corinth, Miss. 

Charley Dilworth > Rienza, Miss.- 

Mills : Sherman, Miss. 

Grace Walker ; Kossuth, Miss. 

I.ollie Walker Kossuth, Miss. 



26 



Your Grocery Bill 



Will be cut about half in two if you do 
your buying at our store 

WE ARE HERE FOR BUSINESS 

and we assure you we can please. We want 
your business Come in today 

\ George Grocery Co. ( 



,* 


— > 










R. 


P A 


BOYD & 


SON 


' 




Wagons, 


HARDWARE 


d Bridles 




Juggies, Harness, Saddles an 


Also 


complete 


n 

line Farming Implements, Ch 


an pion Mowing 


! 




Machir 


ies and Rakes. See us before 


buying. 





r' 



Corinth Furniture Co. 

K. T. ESTES, MANACiKW 

FURNITURE OF ALL KINDS 

Glass, Pictures, Etc. Picture Frames made to order 

PHONE 188 



J 



-4 



BRAMLITT 

HARDWARE CO. 



1 



HajgJ Jgire, Buggies, Wagons, 

ivoves, Agricultural 

Implements. 



CO 



RINTH, MISS. 



J. W. DOGGETT, 



. Dealer in 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

i - A 

We Carry a Full Lin« of .School Supplier Call to tee them. 

For Made-to-Measure Clothing we can serve 
you— guarantee a fit at very reasonable price 






t 



m-*i 



Buy Your Watches, Clocks 
and Jewelry 

FROM 

E. F. WAITS 

YCUR JEWELER 

Take all of your Repairing there too 

CORINTH, MISS. 




DRINK 

Coca-Cola and Soda Water 

IN BOTTLES 



orintH Coca-Cola 
Bottling WorKs 



M 



1- 

v ■ i 

• i 



■■vt 



U. 5. DEPOSITORY ^ 

For Postal Saving Funds 

Interest Paid on Saving Accounts 

We wish to extend you a cordial invitation to make this 
YOUR banking home. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF CORINTH, MISS. 
Total Resources One-half Million Dollars 



■>-*"> r> O O «"">• €">- -r» <~» <~* -<r> o <-» <-»<-» .<-» x-» .<-»<-» <-» .<■> 

(Torintl) ~2Drug (LompanY 

S1GMAN BROS., Props. 
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY 



Drugs, Sundries, Cigars, Soda Water, School Tablets 
and Pencils 

' O »_> «_>• O «_> «_> «_> €_> *_>• C^- «_> O 



C. A. TURNER 

Saves you Money on Hats, Clothing, Shoes and 
all kinds of Groceries 



GET MY PRICES 



CORINTH. MISS. 



TINE M C CANN 
Practical Horse-Shoeing aid Repair Work, Automobile Repairing, 

Rubber Pads, Shoes »nd Tires. Hand-Made Shoes a Specialty 
Filmore and Tate Sts. 




MISS. 



| CORINTH 


BANK 


& 


TRUST 


CO.- 


' 


CORINTH , 


MISS. 




OfFtCfSKS J E <;• 
3d V-Prts., J I.. 


/ I'r.i . z 4bt 1 

Hollt r . Cash,,,. 


ahtl. 

F. h. 


1st Zl-4>t*s., A 

Andtrten. Am. 


. -H. Hamm, 
Cathitr 


MKECTORS 4t> 

II E. 


« Ruhtl. A. II Hamm. 
Ray. IV. F. Elgin. A. 


F. C. Sharp. J. 
M. Dickson. 


E Gill. 


\ Capital $100,000 00 


Surplus an 


d Un 


divided Profits 


$50,000 00 


! If you are not a cm 


lomtr, thit it 


your 


invitation to b 


ecome one 



H. G. SMA 



Wholesale and Retail 

HARDWARE 

Sole Agent For ,. 

John Deere Plows, Avery Plows; 

Pittsburg Perfect 
Electric Welded Fencing, 

Kentucky Delight Cook Stoves, 

McCormick Mowers and Rakes, 

New Way Gasoline Engines 



My prices are ru*ht and I will ap- 
preciate your trade. 



** 



AUTO FOR HIRE rM 

TRIPS TO SHILOH NATIONAL PARK 
Joy Riders and Drununeri Our Specialty 

Call TOM HOLM AN 

Both Phones Corinth, Miss. 



W. D. Skillman Livery Co. 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 



Buggiet a»d Haxneai for Sale 



Both Phones 49 



CORINTH, MISS. 



There is a tide carrying Shrewd Buyers to 

DICKSON'S STORE 
WHY? 

BECAUSE he is better than ever prepared for business 
with a stock of Reliable Merchandise and Low Prices 
are not surpassed by anyone is why you have no 
trouble'trading there. 

WE SELL EVERYTHING good to eat and give 16 
ounces to the pound. Guaranteed prices on every- 
thing sold. If you want more say so and you shall 
have .it; • ■ Yours for business, 



A. 



DICKSON 



KOSSUTH, MISS. 



t 



,\ Alcorn vStooKVi Far 



i 



m 



JOE CATE.S, Pr^p Vi 



MULES, CATJLE % D 
HOGS. ' " 



C 



KOSSUTH, 



MISSISSIPPI 



•CJ^^M^ 



t 




>^s 



G. L. AUTfEN, 

Practical Horse-Shoeing and ;Repair Work. 

Treating Umt Honei and Hame-made 
Shoe* a Specialty. ' 

KOSSUTH, MfS/s. 



R. A. EAST, 

UKAf.KR ITU ': - 

Men's Furnishing Goods, Clothing, Hats, 
Shoes, Trunks and Suit cases. 

The Croiwitt Shoe "Mikn'Uft'i .Walk Eaiy." 

CORINTH. MISS. :.i 







''.*&:* 



c. 



o 

KL_J. 



GRAHAM'S 

6lG STORE' 



■ S Dealer in 

Dry Goo^s, Notions, Gent's Furnishings, 

Hosiery, Vndervre^r, Cloihing, 

«»ats &fid 5Kcx?3 

Mco'i mjxi Ladies' Hv.li % ■■» J .a Footwear a Speci-vl'.j 

CORINTH, ' .M!SS.\ 



■ ■ ■ ■■ , ■ ' • ~ ■ ■ ! 1 I ■ — | 

DRUG CO. 




THE R£*ALL 

V STORE 



-■■&.„ * BOTH PHONES : 

f'Starionery, Perfume* and Tciiet Articl«* 



o=e= 



=*»» I ' ■ g pg 



Pmju« or Tmi XjLMsrw Pmummr, Co«int« m •» 



•:*■. 



•huJjulU 6u dL Zl'jL&*-*K4 



H. E. Walker Drug Co. 

State Agents for School Books 

OUT OF TOWN ORDERS FILLED SAME DAY 
RECEIVED. BY PARCEL POST. 

PHONE 23 



M c CORD'S STUDIO 

W. F. McCORD. Proprietor 

THE LEADING PHOTOGRAPHER 

Guaranteed to Be the Best 



S. J. RICHEY & CO. 

THE MAN'S SHOP 

Leaders in Gents' Furnishings 

pbof%# 325 CORINTH. MISS. 



Storey's 5, 10, 25, 50 Cents Store 

Headquarters for 5, 10, 25, 50 cents goods and i,t pays to buy at 
headquarters. I buy to have what you want at lowest prices. 

Clothing, HotloRS of all kinds, Candies, Toys, Enamel Ware, 
Stationery, Jewelry, Fruit Jars and all sizes of 5c. Hose. 

Don't forget to call on us. CORINTH, MISS. 



: 






Hf.ckman. 

S D B R T ' 

MAY 01 

MANCHESTER. INDIANA 46962 J