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Full text of "Business screen magazine"

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Idwide sources of 

iness & television 

film production 

D.1 Vol.19 

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The next four minutes are yours ... to 
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With a four minute segment in Mod- 
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MODERN 

Talking Picture Service, Inc. 

TV Digests Division 
S E. HI, Street, Xew York 22, N. Y. 



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I VI ^^ INC.Ll||il 

20 West End Ave. (sotn St.) • New York 23, N. Y. . Circle 7-6110 



producers of distinguished motion pictures for 

industry and television for over 35 years 



ACCURACY 



This word, in film processing, is a very important 
word indeed. 




People tell you that one film processing job 

is as good as another, and what the heck, what's the 

measure of accuracy, anyway? 

Well. To answer that one would take a very long time. 

Suffice it to say here that it's summed up in 

all the operations of a processing job, where even 

the smallest details are of great importance. 

It shows everywhere, and it positively shines when 

the film appears on the screen. 

What we're talking about, of course, are the people 
and the operations at Precision Film Laboratories. 
Here attention to detail, sound, proven techniques 
are applied by skilled, expert technicians to 
assure you the accurate, exact processing your films 
deserve to justify your best production efforts. 

Accuracy is a must for TV -for industrials -for 
education — for all movies. 



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P R E G 



FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 
21 West ^eth Street, U e\N York 36, New York 

ADIVISIONOFJ.A. MAURER.INC. 



In everything, there is one best . 



in film processing, it's Precision 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



"BETTER FILMS FOR BUSINESS " 

It is our privilege to have important film 
communications projects in v/ork for: 

American Telephone & Telegraph Company 

Esso Standard Oil Company 

Manufacturing Chemists' Association, Inc. 

Richfield Oil Corporation 

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Inc. 

Union Carbide Corporation 

United Fruit Company 

United States Steel Corporation 

We apprec/afe fheir concrete expression of 
confidence in the creative ability of our 
organization to produce better films for business. 




■^-. 




^jr John Sutherland Productions, Incorporated 

LOS ANGELES NEW YORK 

201 North Occidental Boulevard 136 East 55th Street 

@ Los Angeles 26, California Dunkirk 8 5121 New York 22. New York PLaza 5 1875 



NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1951 




the creative viewpoint 

-K The annual preface to these 
Production Review issues 
are those brief but perti- 
nent expressions contributed 
by leading executives among 
the studios producing busi- 
ness and television films. 

This year's contributors 
include C. H. Bradfield, Jr., 
president of Wilding Picture 
Productions, Inc.; Frank 
K. Speidell, head of Audio 
Productions; Warren Sturgis 
of Sturgis-Grant ; Charles 
"Cap" Palmer of Parthenon 
Pictures; and Howard Lesser 
of Knickerbocker Produc- 
tions. Their comments appear 
on page six. 

Harry Lange , executive 
vice-president of Kling Film 
Productions, and John Hans, 
board chairman of Depicto 
Films, express views on page 
eight. Ted Cate, prexy of 
Gate & McGlone; Morton Read, 
Bay State Film Productions' 
head; Lawrence Mominee, chief 
at Atlas Film Corporation; 
Clifford Potts, head of 
Fordel Films; Brad Whitney 
of Condor Films; and Kon- 
stantin Kaiser, Marathon TV 
Newsreel exec, are Review 
viewpointers on page 14. 

Veterans Bill Ganz (page 
36) ; Henry Strauss (page 28) ; 
Thomas J. Barbre (page 46) ; 
Walter Lowendahl (page 60) ; 
Francis Carter Wood, Jr. 
(page 55) ; and Walter Colmes 
(page 74) round out these 
interesting pages. We're 
indebted to producer asso- 
ciation heads from New York 
and Chicago for their pieces 
on pages 48 and 50 . R^ 



BUSINESS SCREEN 

THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS JOURNAL OF AUDIO & VISUAL 
COMMUNICATION FOR INDUSTRY - EDUCATION AND TELEVISION 



preview of contents 

The Creative Viewpoint: Comments by Producer Executives. . 6 

Award Competitions for Business Films, begin on page 20 

Producer and Laboratory Trade Associations, page 33 ami. . . 34 
National Organizations in the Audio-Visual Field, begin on. . . . 40 

Why So Many Price Tags: a Commentary on Film Costs 66 

The Pictures of the Year: a Review of 1957 Productions 74 

Freedoms Awards to Business Pictures: American Engineer. . . 97 

The Producer's View by Nathan Zucker 48 

We Have What Business Needs by Mercer Francisco 50 

Our Most Neglected Weapon by Waller Lowendahl 60 

Case History: Youth's Future in the Sales Field 168 

A.T.&T. Sounds a Friendly Ring: Review of Sounds Familiar. . 169 

Francesca: Child of Our Time, the Foster Parents' Film 172 

Majors' Baseball Films Bring "The Game" to 250 Millions ... 1 76 

Business Screen Executive: News of Staff Appointments 182 

Men Who Make Pictures: Studio Appointments in the News. . 184 
New Audio-Visual Equipment for Production & Projection. . . 188 

The Annual Survey of Film Production Resources 

Alphabetical Index to Qualified Film Producers, begin on. ... 104 

Geographical Index to Film Producers in U.S. and Abroad. . . 105 

How to Use the Production Review Pages: a Key to Listings. . 107 

Plus: The National Directory of Visual Dealers 



Office of Publication: 7064 Sheridan Road, Chicago 26 

IN NEW YORK CITY 
Robert Seymour, Jr., Eastern Manager: 489 Fifth Ave. 

Riverside 9-0215 • MUrray Hill 2-2492 

IN HOLLYWOOD 
Edmund Kerr, Western Manager, 104 So. Carondeiet 

Telephone: DUnkirk 7-2281 



Issue One, Voliune Nineteen of Business Screen Magazine, published February 20, 1958. 
Issued 8 times annually at six-week intervals at 7064 Sheridan Road, Chicago 26, 
Illinois by Business Screen Magazines, Inc. Phone BRiargale 4-8234. O. H. Coelln. Jr., 
Editor and Publisher. In New York: Robert Seymour, Jr., 489 Filth Avenue, Telephone 
Riverside 9-0215 or MUrray Hill 2-2492. In Los Angeles: Edmund Kerr, 104 So. Caron- 
deiet, Telephone DUnkirk 7-2281. Subscription $3.00 a year; $5.00 two years (domestic); 
$4.00 and $7.00 foreign. Elntered as second class matter May 2, 1946, at the post office 
at Chicago, Illinois, under Act of March 3, 1879. Entire content copyrighted 1957 by 
Business Screen Magazines, Inc. Trademark registered U.S. Patent Office. Address 
advertising and subscription inquiries to the Chicago Office of publication. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




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NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



THE CREATIVE VIEWPOINT 

How Leading Producers of Films for Business Define Their Role 
in Helping Industry Achieve Its Important Objectives for 1958 



Our Screen Objective Is to 
Make Films Believable . . . 



What IS a Producer? 

IT ERE IS A Question which has been asked 
many times, and answered in as many 
ways. And yet. it continues to be a timely 
topic, and the answers continue to reflect the 
changing trends in our business. 

A Producer should be. first of all. a well- 
integrated orgunizcition. serving its clients as 
a specialist in Communications for Business. 

It must offer creative services in depth and 
have the ability to serve far beyond produc- 
tion alone. 

It should be staffed and equipped to re- 
search and analyze the customer's business 
needs and opportunities requiring action; to 
assist the customer in planning effective action 
that will lead to greater goodwill and profits 
for the customer's organization; to produce 
the necessary communications tools; and to 
follow up their use in a manner that will tend 
to assure the results the customer expects and 
requires. 

The producer's organization must be able 
to move into action for the customer in any 
one or all of these five areas of service. 

Experienced people in our business are like 
the family doctor — to be consulted regularly, 
not ju.st when the patient is seriously ill, and 
with sufficient experience in the patient's needs 
to guide and guard him to a healthy future. 

—by C. H. BraJfield, Jr. 

There Are Times When Pictures 
Aren't Worth a Thousand Words 

A Recent Article in a scientific journal 
■'*• of photography* starts with the unusual 
sentence: "One picture is not worth a thousand 
words." This statement makes a lot of sense 
to me. We are all too prone to quote the 
familiar Chinese proverb in its usual form, 
and feel that we have clinched the argument 
in favor of the visual medium of communica- 
tion. 

The trouble with this smug assumption is 
that it simply is not true. Its validity depends 
entirely on what is in the picture. Modern 
times have seen the growth of the "non-the- 
atrical" motion picture to the point where 
miles of film are exposed each day. True, a 
large percentage of this lands on the cutting- 
room fioor, but unfortunately a great deal too 
much unnecessary footage finds its way into 
completed productions. 

With the vast quantities of films being re- 



leased today, there has never been a time when 
producers have so needed to exercise critical 
ability and stern self-discipline during planning, 
writing, and especially while wielding the cut- 
ting scissors. 

So, let us do away with our smug proverb, 
and consider that even a thousand pictures — 
a mere 62' j feet of film — may be worth the 
one word: -DON'T". 

— by Warren Sturgis 

A Time to Re-Affirm Honest 
Goals and to Serve the Client 

■VX/hen Speakers are called upon to speak 
at various occasions, many of them first 
say the occasion reminds them of a story; then 
they tell a story which seldom has anything 
to do with the occasion. Eventually, they get 
on with the spiel. 

In somewhat the same way, the opportunity 
to do a short piece for Business Screen re- 
minds me of a story. 

Two producers and six martinis were talk- 
ing about this business. One of them said, "My 
company makes the highest priced films in this 
field." The other producer said, "We do the 
biggest volume in the industry." The martinis 
said nothing, having already spoken. 

Somewhere between the highest priced and 
the biggest volume, most of us in the business 
of producing sponsored motion pictures make 
our living. We do so by becoming as nearly 
as possible, or permitted, a part of each client's 
organization. We spend a client's money as if 
it were our own money. We seek extra values 
for each expenditure as if those extra values 
would enrich us beyond payment for the pro- 
duction. We treat each picture as if it were 
the only picture in the shop. We base our fu- 
tures squarely and solidly on repeat business. 
We hope and we pray, of course, but we think 
and we work so as to make the task of helping 
us a bit easier for Providence. 

In making the above statement, I speak only 
for myself. I do not imply that others in the 
industry hold a different view. I merely mean 
that no other viewpoint is either discussed or 
considered. Those attitudes toward each as- 
signment come naturally, regardless of price or 
volume, to all members of all good companies 
which have had a continuous operation for 
years and who look to the future like the man 
who said, "I am not worried about tomorrow 
because I have seen yesterday and I love 
today." 

—by Frank K. Speidell 



'-p HE Theatrical Film Producer's job is to 
-^ attract people — to the ticket offices of 
the theaters. 

But the job of the business-film Producer is 
to sway people — to cause them to learn some- 
thing, decide something, or feel something — 
about his client's product, operation, or cor- 
porate image. Since the desired new "attitude" 
must endure, his vehicle is not entertainment 
per se but interest; his goal is not applause, 
but belief. His medium could be print or speech 
or art; it happens to be film. 

True, the film medium has certain unique 
advantages and the Producer must know how 
to manipulate its intricate mechanisms to best 
effect: he must be able to procure the several 
components (script, cast, photography, edit, 
score, etc.) and shape them into an effective 
film tool at a feasible cost. But this part of 
his job is gear-shifting and throttle-pushing; 
the business-film Producer's essential function, 
whether he performs it himself or guides a 
writer, is to nail down the client's objective and 
figure out how to fulfill it. 

So he is first an Analyst, then a Merchan- 
diser — of skills, products, ideas, concepts, and 
attitudes — and finally, a Persuader. A Swayer 
— on film. 

— by Charles Palmer 
* * * 

A Man of Many Burdens — 
Producer Is Also a Missionary 

T T sually the Question, "What is a Pro- 
^-^ ducer?", is asked with a leer, a sneer, 
and total damnation in the line reading of the 
last word. 

In this day of total communication, every- 
one knows the functions of an atomic scientist 
and the aspirations of a space physicist. But 
no one knows what a producer is. 

A producer, another producer once told me, 
is a man who refutes the dictum concerning 
the last straw. Beautiful in his smiling serenity, 
he carries burdens that would have the average 
strong man whimpering in the showers. 

A producer is the buffer state between the 
sponsor and all the rest of the film industry. 
Without him, the fight for the view-finder would 
out-blood the greatest battles in history. 

A producer is also a missionary howling in 
the wilderness. With his sermons he must 
persuade business men to become patrons of 
an art. With those same sermons, he must 
keep his artists from becoming business men. 
This is called balancing the budget. 

It was easier in olden times. All a producer 
wanted was a comfortable seat in the amphi- 
theatre. The arena was reserved exclusively 
for the gladiators — and the lions. 

— by Howard Lesser 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1951 



A Film Producer is to a client what a fani- 
ily physician is to a family unit. Given 
the client's full confidence and trust, a film 
producer is in a position to make concrete 
suggestions which will do a better job in satis- 
fying the client's needs. 

Today's film producer extends himself to 
be a working arm of the client's organization. 
Fully oriented to the problems of the indus- 
try with which he is working, the producer 
can develop a film with utilization purposes 
far greater than the original thinking may have 
encompassed. 

This in effect reduces the per viewer cost 
and makes the film a more effective film as 
well. 

Today's film producer is a businessman with 
an investment and a reputation to protect. 
With television in even the remotest areas of 
America, the level of acceptability has risen 
greatly. Quality of writing and production 
cannot be tolerated at an unprofessional level, 
and so the producer must continually upgrade 
his personnel and equipment. He must keep 
up-to-date on new techniques as they develop, 
and find new ways to cut costs even as he im- 
proves quality. 

Today's film producer is a combination of 
Cecil B. DeMille and Harlow Curtice. He 



VIEWPOINT 



Today's Film Producer: an Arm 
of His Client's Organization 

must be a showman and a hard headed busi- 
ness executive ... yet he is a friend in need 
to the client ... in the best tradition, a friend 
who can be trusted with the most intimate 
"family" secrets. He is a friend who will uti- 
lize this information to supply sound, concrete 
advice. 

A client needs this kind of friend when he 
invests large sums of money for the produc- 
tion of films. I am proud that there are so 
many fellow, family style "film" doctors in 
my profession. 

— hy Harry W. Lciiti-e 

Acceptance of the Film Medium 
— a Goal Achieved and to Maintain 
\X/'' PRf^ucERS — who are among the pio- 
neers of the industrial and educational 
film business — who can look back over many 
years of gradual development — keenly appre- 
ciate the open acceptance with which our pow- 
erful medium is being received by so many 
enthusiastic sponsors today. 



Those who can best profit from the adop- 
tion of this powerful medium have come to 
recognize its dramatic, challenging and vigor- 
our potentialities for the presentation of new 
ideas, new techniques, new developments, for 
the initiation of new training programs, and 
the introduction of new products. 

We have come to see the artisans, the engi- 
neers, the researchists, the fighting men, the 
students, the doctors, the hard-hitting sales- 
men — yes, even the "top brass" — take greater 
pride in the performance of their daily tasks, 
produce better results for their organizations — 
because they have come to "see" themselves 
closely identified with the purposes and ideals 
of top management — and all this through the 
medium of the sponsored motion picture. 

And, since "the thoughts of men are widened 
by the process of the suns," we, the motion 
picture producers, will continue to dedicate 
our elTorts and channel all our talents and fa- 
cilities toward the betterment of our industry, 
that we in turn may better serve the needs of 
the film sponsor — to help him achieve the ful- 
fillment of his aims through a medium that 
surpasses all others in its proven ability to pro- 
mote good will, good fellowship — and good 
business. 

— by John Hans 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



problem : 



How to completely eliminate mislabeled 
or illegible leaders on any 16mm release 
print made in large quantities. 

solution : 

Automatic white opaque leader.* 



»i| i ii.mimiiini i »ai i n WIMH" 







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At CFI, hand labeling the head 
leaders on large quantities of release 
prints is obsolete. Now, from first print 
to the last, this important job is 
done automatically. 

Film title, production number, air date, 

and other essential information 

are inscribed only once on the negative. 

This data is "printed through" 

onto the head leader of each 

release print. This portion 

of film is then reinforced 

with white opaque cellophane 

tape. Since the head leader 

becomes an integral part 

of the film itself, there is no 

need for the usual splicing. 

The result is a more durable 

leader, which is 100% accurate 

and easy to read. 



Sid Solow, Vice President and 
General Manager of CFI Hollywood, 
shows how the new method of 

labeling leaders makes immediate 
identification of release prints 

easier and more accurate. 



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10 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



BETTER SELLING BUREAU 



announces 



A 



BRAND 



NEW 



CONCEPT 



for selling 

BUSINESS IIMSLRAIMCE 

A COMPLETE AUDIO-VISUAL PROGRAM . . c^ (^ai<n 
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NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1958 




The IVews of Business Pictures 



Nathan Zucker 

tucker Elected President of 
ilm Producers Association 

V Nathan Zucker, president of 
)ynamic Films, Inc., has been 
lected president of the Film Pro- 
lucers Association of New York, 
'ucker succeeds Harold E. Wond- 
el of Wondsel, Carlisle & Dunphy, 
no. 

Lee Blair, TV-Film Graphics, 
nc, was elected FPA vice-presi- 
ent; Mrs. Maxine Culhane, 
hamus Culhane Productions, Inc., 
/as chosen as secretary and 
:dward J. Lamm, The Pathescope 
'ompany of America, Inc., was 
lected treasurer. 

Elected to the FPA Board of 
)irectors are: Stephen Elliot, 
illiot, Unger & Elliot, Inc.; Walter 
.owendahl, Transfilm, Inc.; Peter 
. Mooney, Audio Productions, 
nc; David I. Pincus, Caravel 
ilms. Inc.; F. C. Wood, Jr., Sound 
lasters, inc. 

The Film Producers Association 
as incorporated in 1951. Its 
lember companies produce films 
)r industry, education, the govern- 
lent and television. 

Accepting his new post, Zucker 
ointed out that New York is a 
aditional center of the arts and 
ammunications. 

"More audiences are reached 

:ich year by films of New York 

roducers than by any other pro- 

uction area in the country," said 

ucker. He added that "you must 

ike into account the fact that 

jecial purpose films made for tele- 

ision, education, industry, govern- 

lent and promotional use receive 

Lindreds and thousands of show- 

igs." 9 

* * * 

^erling-Movies U.S.A. 
pens Office in Chicago 

Sterling-Movies U.S.A., distrib- 

or of sponsored motion pictures 

television, has opened an office 

Chicago. Announcement of 



New FPA President 

1^ Nathan Zucker, new presi- 
dent of the Film Producers As- 
sociation of New York, pro- 
gressed to the motion picture in- 
dustry through the helpful pas- 
sageways of engineering and 
commerce. 

Today, at 43, he is president 
and chairman of the board of 
Dynamic Films, Inc., and its 
five affiliated companies — Dy- 
namic Studios, Inc., Dynamic 
Film Productions Corp., Medi- 
cal Dynamics, Inc., Distribution 
Dynamics, Inc., and Alan Shilin 
Productions, Inc. 

After receiving his Bachelor 
of Arts Degree from Yale Uni- 
versity in 1935, Zucker com- 
pleted requirements for an 
engineering degree at Columbia 
University. Subsequently, he 
became a securities analyst in 

the new midwestern branch was 
made by Gordon Hempel, mana- 
ger of the office, which is located 
in room 910 at 100 West Monroe 
St., Chicago 3. 



Began as an Engineer 

Wall Street, later joining Nehe- 
miah Gitelson & Sons, interna- 
tional traders affiliated with 
Gartside, Ltd. of London. 

In 1941, Zucker co-founded 
Sono - Chrome Productions, 
which was formed to explore 
and develop audio-visual tech- 
niques and methods for com- 
munication and training. Since 
that time, he has produced and 
directed theatrical and televi- 
sion films on both coasts. 

He was one of the first pro- 
ducers to successfully apply 
audio tape to commercial film 
production. He produced the 
color film used in the F.C.C. 
hearings on the RCA and CBS 
color systems several years ago, 
and he produced the first color 
film to be telecast simultaneous- 
ly in color and in black and 
white on network television. 59" 

Occupying the office with Hem- 
pel and his stafT is Elliott Abrams, 
representing Sterling Television 
Co.. Inc., parent company of Ster- 
ling-Movies U. S. A. B' 



The objective 
determines the approach 
. . . the approach 
limits the means. 





WRITERS 

DIRECTORS 

EDITORS & 

PRODUCERS 

OF 

INFORMATION 

MOTION 

PICTURES 



^ 




FILM CENTER. 630 NINTH AVE., NEW YORK 3 6, N. Y. 



The "Why" of film editing is ex- 
plained lo MSC senior Louise 
Bniiiner by Dr. A. Nicholas Var- 
dac, instructor. 

Michigan State University 
Offers a Film Curriculum 

M An "evaluation of the position 
of the film in a free society" will 
be sought in a new motion pic- 
ture curriculum being launched at 
the Michigan State University. 

The university's new film pro- 
gram is being offered by the 
speech department and is directed 
by Dr. A. Nicholas Vardac, whose 
background includes motion pic- 
ture work for the U. S. Navy and 
Air Force and the U. S. Informa- 
tion Agency. Dr. Vardac devel- 
oped the film curriculum at Stan- 
ford University and was associate 
professor of motion picture pro- 
duction at Boston University. 

Graduate and undergraduate 
courses are provided in the Michi- 
gan State program. The courses 
include: Criticism and Evaluation 
of the Motion Picture; Film for 
Television; History of the Mo- 
tion Picture; The Documentary 
Film, and Motion Picture Produc- 
tion, a graduate course. 

The Documentary course deals 
with the writing in documentary 
and neo-realistic motion pictures. 
The history course features a se- 
ries of movie showings as studies 
of outstanding techniques. 

"We are more interested in ad- 
vancing a philosophy of film mak- 
ing appropriate to the ideals of 
our society than in creating a 
skilled mechanic," Dr. Vardac 
said. 

Though the university hopes to 
offer camera work, editing and 
other skills training. Dr. Vardac 
explained that such training would 
be incidental to the main goal — 
the "training of film writers, di- 
rectors and producers, as well as 
audiences, who will become in- 
creasingly aware of the nature of 
the social and artistic responsibili- 
ties of the film maker." jjf 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



THE CREATIVE VIEWPOINT 

How Leading Producers of Films for Business Define Their Role 
in Helping Industry Achieve Its Important Objectives for 1958 



C VERY Step in the complicated process of 
translating an idea into a finished screen 
production is the responsibility of the Film Pro- 
ducer. It follows, then, that he should be a 
man of many parts — an expert judge of story 
values, in preliminary treatment or finished 
script ... a competent critic of the director's 
art ... a wise and able editorial advisor . . . 
plus having an ear for sound, an eye for picto- 
rial quality and an exhaustive knowledge of 
many film processes and techniques. Above 
all, he should be a skillful Coordinator, able 
to inspire others to their best efforts, despite 
conflicting talents and temperaments. Finally, 
he must be a capable administrator, a man 
whose bible is the budget and who is com- 
pletely knowledgeable in all of the ways that 
a film dollar can be saved — or wasted. In 
the more specialized field of sponsored films, 
the Producer is also a man of broad experience 
in many phases of industry, and it is largely 
to his credit as a skilled professional that more 
and more business leaders are turning to the 
film medium as an aid in solving their prob- 
lems of human communications. 

— by Ted Ccite 



We Have Much in Common With 
Obstetrics in "Delivering" Ideas 

T F I May Make a comparison — a producer's 
opposite number in the medical world 
would be an obstetrician. He is faced with 
all the fears, uncertainties and whimsies of his 
dient during a creative process which seldom 
seems to make rhyme or reason. 

His job is to be sympathetic when neces- 
sary, firm when firmness is called for, and 
ibove all, willing to listen, evaluate and provide 
realistic, yet acceptable answers and procedures 
juring the entire film gestation and birth 
jeriod. 

Just as the world of births is peopled by 
he scrupulous and the unscrupulous of the 
Tiedical profession, so is the world of pro- 
iucers peopled by all types of the breed. In 
general, however, in films as in medicine, the 
louse is relatively clean; the client can depend 
jpon his producer even though there are times 
vhen it may seem that such dependence is 
ilind faith. 

And if the producer finds, as does the doctor, 
hat at times it is necessary to deny the client 
vhat amounts to a diet of pickles and whipped 
;ream, the client may take heart from the 
cnowledge that films are being born every day, 
»nd seldom, if ever, has the client been lost. 

- — by Morton Read 



Experience and Sound Finance 
Remain Basic Producer Assets 
A Film Producer is more than an organiza- 
tion capable of making films. He is a 
professional showman and stable (financially) 
economic unit that must function successfully 
to serve both his customer and his own in- 
dustry. 

For the client, the producer should supply 
sufficient experience to guide the client in mak- 
mg the wisest and or most expedient applica- 
tion of film to his problem, assuring him the 
maximum dollar value. This is where "Film- 
aturity," based on many years of successful 
production experience, plays a vital role. 

For the Film Industry the producer should 
operate on a sound financial basis, securing 
a fair profit and inspiring the confidence of 
both the client and the producer organization. 

A producer should contribute to raising the 
standards of the film art and science, and con- 
duct business and client relations in a fair 
and competitive manner which will gain the 
esteem of other producers. 

— by Lawrence Mominec 

Specific Goals for Pictures 
Dictate the Specialist's Role 
'T~'.iE Sponsored Film Producer makes mo- 
tion pictures to satisfy specific needs and 
to present specific points of view. The only 
reason for the production of the films is to 
present these points of view, and whether the 
producer agrees with them, or whether he 
thinks the public agrees with them, makes 
little difference. As a matter of fact, if the 
public already agreed, there would be little 
need to make the pictures. 

Thus, we find the sponsored film producer 
is really one who renders service — like an 
architect, a doctor, or a lawyer. The producer 
is retained by a sponsor to produce a film 
which will influence audiences according to the 
needs of that sponsor. The filmic methods of 
influencing the audience are left to the pro- 
ducer just as legal means are left to the lawyer. 

The industrial film producer, then, is one 
who renders service — a very specialized serv- 
ice — the creation of motion pictures designed 
to satisfy specific needs. 

— by Clifford Potts 

Films Are Basic in Hard-Sell 

— Have Earned Budget Status 

^ur Industry is entering a new era where 

business, faced with declining sales for the 

first time in a decade, is "cutting the frosting 

off the cake," especially where advertising and 



promotional budgets are concerned. The rec- 
ognized value of our medium is now paying 
off when budget-time rolls around. Film pro- 
grams are not a dispensable luxury to be cut 
off, but are considered a basic part of the new 
"hard sell" conditions. 

This means that films made to achieve defi- 
nite and practical purposes for specific audi- 
ences, as opposed to general institutional films, 
are now more successfully used and needed by 
our clients. 

We are continually discovering new places 
where such films can do a specific job better 
for the money spent by the client than other 
media previously used. Best of all, it proves 
that films are accepted as essential tools in the 
successful operation of business as it must be 
performed in early 1958 . . . when results 
alone count. 

— by Bradford Whitney 
* * * 

Informed in Client Affairs 
and Expert in His Own Field 

jS^ow That We here at Marathon have 
reached the ripe old age of ten years, I 
guess it is as good a time as ever to sort things 
out a bit and ask ourselves, on behalf of our 
clients, "What is a producer?" or "What should 
he be?" 

Most of all, I would think he should be a 
trusted member of the oflicial family. And 
trust must be earned — even if it is proffered 
right at the start of an association. He must, 
in spite of his own obvious need to make a 
profit, be concerned primarily with the client's 
need and well-being. We found that happily 
there is no paradox here. Serving the client 
and acting in his interest — even if it means 
turning down some easy revenue at times — 
makes for long association and, eventually, 
for a steady, profitable business relationship. 

Having earned this trust, and a place at 
the family council, makes it possible to advise 
the client from the very beginning on what to 
stress and how to go about telling the story 
that he needs to have published. Thus the pro- 
ducer must be very well informed in the affairs 
of the client as well as be expert in his own 
field. There are so many ways in which a 
given amount of footage can be used: as a 
public service feature to be distributed to TV, 
as a news story to be syndicated; or even as 
stock footage to be used by other firms and 
producers in their films, thus getting extra mile- 
age in someone else's vehicle. It is the pro- 
ducer's job to consider these opportunities on 
behalf of the client. 

So, aside from creativeness and the crafts- 
manship necessary to produce a film with which 
the client can proudly associate himself, the 
producer needs that element of character, of 
reliability and trustworthiness, in order to be 
listed in the column of those who are here to 
stay. 

— by Konstantin Kaiser 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




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corporate images and investment counseling 

suggestion s/stems 

jobber dealer merchandising 

retail sales customer relationships 

technical and conceptual skills 



• In Human Relations 

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intergroup community relations 

old age and retirement 

family life 

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• In Medicine and Science 

forensic medicine 

medicine, its background and origins 

psychiatric therapy 

psychiatric nursing 

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programming for closed circuit tv and special audiences 
dramatic adaptations of great short stories 
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• In Religion 

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NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1958 



17 



)F MOTION, SIGHT AND SOUND 
NOW IN ^ 

UN DARKEN ED 






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een. /nc/udej mogaj/ne (or repeti- 
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'SI Ouolite, provides large icn 
:tion and also TV-type pictures 
'n. folding screen. Holds up 
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The TSI Moviematic, with 
built-in, folding screen, wcifi^hs /e.s.v 
them 25 pounds includin<i the film. 
Use it in lighted and darkened 
rooms. Repeats the same film, black 
i~ icliite or color, without rewimlin''. 



The power of motion pic- 
tures is now vours to 
employ virtually anywhere. 
There's a TSI projector for 
every use — desk top, office, 
shop, or auditorium, with 
standard projection, repeti- 
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TSI users comprise a blue 
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wd llghl 

TECHNICAL SERVICE, INC. 

30865 Five Mile Road • Livonia, Miehigo 

Jew York Office: 14! East 44th Street, New York 17, New York 
st Coast Office: 4357 Melrose Avenue, Hollywood 29, Ce 



Along the Business IVewsfrants 



Paul Hance, N. Y. Producer, 
Dies After Auto Accident 

<r Paul D. Hance, Jr.. president 
of Paul Hance Productions, Inc.. 
New York City, died December 
20 in Binghamton City Hospital, 
after an automobile accident near 
Binghamton, New York, December 
1 1. Mr. Hance, who was 56 years 




liifc 



Paul D. Hance, Jr. 
old, lived in Morris Plains, N. J. 
In the film field since the 1920's 
Mr. Hance was active in the devel- 
opment of several improvements 
in photographic processes. Coop- 
erating with Eastman Kodak chem- 
ists and Precision Film Laborator- 
ies personnel, he developed a prac- 
tical system of making "opticals" 
on Kodachrome prints through 
the use of chemical dyes. 

He also helped build one of the 
first Kodachrome printers and pio- 
neered the "A and B" system of 
printing, which eventually facili- 
tated invisible splices on the print. 
After graduating from the Uni- 
versity of Illinois in 1925 as an 
electrical engineer, Mr. Hance did 
research work in sound at Bell 
Telephone Laboratories in New 
York. In 1929, he went to Aus- 
tralia to establish the sound film 
department of Fox - Movietone 
News. 

From 1932 to 1935, Mr. Hance 
was associated with the DeVry 
Corporation, where he worked on 
a variety of technical applications 
of 16mm film. Subsequently, Mr. 
Hance joined International Busi- 
ness Machines Corporation to or- 
ganize an experimental 16mm mo- 
tion picture department. He re- 
turned to newsreel work for a 
time when Newsreel Theatres, 
Inc., was considering a change 
from 35mm to 16mm film. 

In 1939, Mr. Hance formed his 
own company to engage in the 
production of informational mo- 
tion pictures. m- 



Wilding Picture Productions 
Moves Offices in New York 

' Wilding Picture Productions, 
inc., has moved its New York of- 
fices to larger space in a new build- 
ing at 405 Park Avenue. The 
move is part of Wilding's long- 
range expansion program. 

Sales and service for merchan- 
dising, sales training and promo- 
tion programs, industrial films, 
business shows and television will 
be centralized at the new location. 
Projection facilities will include 
equipment for showing almost 
every type of motion picture and 
slidefilm including anamorphic, 
both 35mm and 16mm interlock, 
and a variety of wide-screen pro- 
portions. 

Wilding Manhattan production 
facilities remain at 69th and Lex- 
ington Streets. ^ 

Du-Art Acquires Assets of 
Associated Screen News Ltd. 

^ Du-Art Film Laboratories, Inc.. 
through its subsidiary. Associated 
Screen Industries Ltd., of Mon- 
treal, Canada, has acquired the 
physical assets of Associated Screen 
News Ltd. of Canada, announces 
Al Young, Du-Art president. 

Associated Screen News, found- 
ed in 1920. specializes in theatri- 
cal release printing for most of the 
major American producers, and in 
industrial and tv work for Cana- 
dian and American producers. 
Young says. 

Young will be president of the 
new company, to be known as As- 
sociated Screen Industries Ltd. 
Other officers are: Irwin Young, 
vice president; Murray Briskin! 
secretary; and Jack Fellers, treas- 
urer. 

Briskin, formerly executive as- 
sistant to the president of Asso- 
ciated Screen News, will be execu- 
tive director of the company. ^ 



PRODUCER-CAMERAMAN 
TV & MOTION PICTURES 

15 years experience in motion 
pictures — 6 years producing 
Iv commercials. Desires posi- 
tion with progressive organi- 
zation in motion picture or tv 
production. Used to hard work 
and responsibility. Age 38 
years. 

Write Box BS-2A 
BUSINESS SCREEN 

7064 Sheridan Road • Chicago 26, III. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 









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AWARD COMPETITIONS FOR BUSINESS FILMS 



FREEDOMS FOUNDATION AWARDS 

Sponsored by the Freedoms Foundation 

Valley Forge, Pennsylvania 

Closing Date for Entries: November, 1958 

Categories : Consideration is given to all films 
produced or released during 1958, which are 
aimed at building a better understanding of 
the American Way of Life. 

Awards: A distinguished jury of State Su- 
preme Court jurists and other eminent citizens 
^elects one film for the top award and approxi- 
Tiately 10 others for the George Washington 
Honor Medal recognition. Awards will be 
innounced at Valley Forge on February 22, 
1959. 

ro Nominate: Nomination forms are avail- 
ible from Freedoms Foundation, Inc., at 
Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, attn : Dr. Kenneth 
IVells or W. C. (Tom) Sawyer. 



16TH ANNUAL 
SAFETY FILM CONTEST 

Sponsored by The National Committee 

on Films For Safety 

(Entries Close February, 1959) 

Sligible Films: All motion pictures and 
lound slidefilms produced or released during 
1958 whose primary objectives are safety or 
vhich have important accident prevention 
lequences. 

Categories: Motion pictures, theatrical and 
ion-theatrical (16mm) in each of four fields: 
.. Occupational. 2. Home. 3. Traffic and 
Pransportation. 4. General. Sound slidefilms 
ire judged separately. 

Awards: Bronze Plaques will be awarded to 
op winners in each of the four fields and to 
op sound slidefilms. Award of Merit Certifi- 
ates will be given to other films for special 
easons of subject treatment, production ex- 
ellence and/or unusual contribution to safety, 
^t the discretion of the judges, awards may 
le given separately for "Instruction-teaching" 
ind for "Inspirational" purpose films. 

'resentation : Films winning the Bronze 
^laque will be shown in October during the 
National Safety Congress and Exposition in 
/hicago. 111. Plaques will be presented at 
hat time to representatives of sponsors and/or 
iroducers of these films by the Committee's 
hairman. Certificate of Merit winners will 
eceive their awards immediately after the 
nal judging which is in March. All winners 
fiW be notified immediately after the final 
udging. 

IPECIAL Award: The David S. Beyer Trophy, 
ponsored by the Liberty Mutual Insurance 
Company, is awarded annually in special rec- 
gnition of the best theatrical production on 
ighway traffic safety. 

nformation on Awards Program : Write to 
i'^illiam Englander, Secretary, National Com- 
littee on Films for Safety, 425 North Michi- 
an Ave., Chicago 11, 111. 



National and International Events 
Reviewing & Judging Visual Media 



SIXTH ANNUAL AWARD 

COMPETITION FOR THE BEST 

VISUALS IN SELLING 

AND SALES TRAINING 

COMBINED WITH 

FOURTH ANNUAL 'DAY OF 

VISUAL PRESENTATIO>>l" 

M Sponsored by the National Visual Presenta- 
tion Association Inc., the 1958 Awards and 
Presentation events are in preparation, though 
the date and location have not been announced. 
Entries probably will be accepted through 
March. Heretofore the competition has been 
conducted on the following basis: 

Scope: Full day of talks and seminars on the 
production and use of visual presentations, 
combined with a showing of prize winners in 
the current competition. 

Classifications: d) Motion Pictures; (2) 
Films and Slides, excluding motion pictures; 
(3) Visual Presentations other than films 
(binders, flip charts, flannel boards, etc.). 

Categories: (1) Selling (any visual device 
used by salesmen to sell individual prospects; 
this excludes mass media) ; (2) Sales Training 
(any visual device used to train sales person- 
nel) ; (3) Sales Promotion (any visual device 
used to promote the sales of a product or 
service) . 

Awards: First and second place winner in 
each classification and category. First place 
winners are invited to make their presenta- 
tions at a meeting held by the sponsoring or 
co-sponsoring organization (last year the co- 
sponsor, the New York Sales Executives Club, 
held the presentation meeting) . 

Entries: For entrance information contact C. 
C. Sheppard, Committee chairman, Day of 
Visual Presentation, at the National Visual 
Presentatiap Association, Tn^ J^f* T^nv 14, 
Old Chelsea Station, New York 11, N.Y. 



EDINBURGH FILM FESTIVAL 

Sponsored by the Film Festival Council 

Edinburgh, Scotland 

August 24 to September 14, 1958 

(Entries close on May 31, 1958) 

Categories: Features, Documentaries, Cul- 
tural, Art, Experimental, Cartoon, Children's 
Films, Television Films. 

Awards: All films chosen for showing during 
the Festival Season are presented with a Cer- 
tificate of Participation. 

Entry Data: Send detailed data on films to 
Harold Wigren, Coordinator for Advisory 
Committee, Council on Non-Theatrical Events, 
1201-1601 16th St., N.W., Washington 6, D. C. 
See page 197. 



FIFTH ANNUAL 

INTERNATIONAL ADVERTISING 

FILM FESTIVAL 

Sponsored Jointly by the 

International Screen Advertising Services and the 

International Screen Publicity Association 

The Lido, Venice, Italy 

Saturday through Thursday 

September 20th to 25th, 1958 

Management Committee: A Joint Executive 
Committee has full responsibility for all policy 
matters in relation to the festival. Categories 
and awards will be planned by these repre- 
sentatives of both sponsoring organizations. 

Festival Director: Peter Taylor, 17 Berkeley 
Street, London, W.l, England. 

Entry Data and Deadlines: Write the Festi- 
val Director in London. An important restric- 
tion on entries is that no advertising film will 
be accepted for the Festival ivhich has been 
previously shoivn at any national festival or 
similar function run on competitive lines. 
Films entered in the Festival can, however, 
be entered in any other festivals or award 
competitions after they have been shown at 
the International Advertising Film Festival. 

Categories: Details on important changes 
affecting the number of entries per category, 
plus categories themselves, will be announced. 

Jury: An International Jury will be selected 
to judge motion pictures entered. Members 
of the various international and national ad- 
vertising associations and federations will 
compose this judging group. 



THIRD FILM FESTIVAL OF THE 

SEATTLE FILM ASSOCIATES 

Eagleson Hall, 1417 East 42nd Street. 

Seattle, Washington 

April 18, 1958 

w As in last year's festival, films from na- 
tional sources will be included in the program. 
Films will be shown in four rooms simultan- 
eously from 2:30 to 5:00 p.m. and from 7:00 
p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Categories are Lands and 
People; Art, Music, Literature and Experi- 
mental; Community Problems, and Business 
and Industry. 

No Awards: No attempt will be made to judge 
films; no awards will be given. 

Film Festival Committee: Jessie Wilson 
(Film Center, University of Washington), 
general chairman; Jennie R. King (Pacific 
Telephone & Telegraph Company), program 
chairman; George Shields (Pacific Telephone 
and Telegraph Company), chairman-finance 
committee; George Gadberry (Film Center, 
University of Washington), chairman-ar- 
rangements committee ; Richard Fisher (En- 
cyclopaedia Britannica Films Representative), 
chair man-puhlicity committee. 

Entry Information: Write Mrs. Jennie King, 
Program Chairman, c/o Pacific Telephone & 
Telegraph Company, 820 Fairview North, 
Seattle, Washington. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



UBLIC RELATIONS -TRAINING • TECHNICAL • MEDICAL* FARM 



ar 



Educational pictures (that is. teaching fihus) need not be 
preaching fihns. When they seem to be, they seem to miss 
the mark. On the other hand, a good many, good educa- 
tional films turn over the soil, plant the seeds, cultivate 
the crop and enable educators to reap a harvest. You can 
bring a lot out of the good earth. You can bring a lot out 
of eager minds. The methods are identical. There is excite- 
ment in learning when it's learning, and not being taught. 




Among our clients: 

American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. 

Babcock & Wilcox Co. 

Carborundum Company 

Cast Iron Pipe Research 
Association 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
& Company 

Ethyl Corporation 

Ford Motor Company 

General Motors Corp. 

McGraw-Hill Book Co. 

Merck & Co., Inc. 

— and many, 



National Board of Fire 
Underwriters 

National Cancer Institute 

Pennsylvania Railroad 

Sharp & Dohme 

E. R. Squibb & Sons 

The Texas Company 

Union Carbide & Carbon 
Corporation 

U. S. Navy 

Virginia-Carolina 
Chemical Corp. 

Western Electric Co. 
many others 



Audio Productions, in< 



FILM CENTER BUILDING 



630 NINTH AVENUE 
TELEPHONE PLaza 7-0760 



NEW YORK 36, N 






Frank K. Speidell, President Herman Roessle, Vice President P. J. Mooney, Secretary & Treas 

Producer-Directors: L. S. Bennetts H. E. Mandell Earl Peirc 

Alexander Gansell Harold R. Lipman Erwin Sch 
Sales Manager: Sheldon Nemeyer 



OPTICAL PRINTER 




FROM OXBERRY 



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feet. 

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4 to 1 blowup, 4 to 1 reduc- 
tion. 

4. Variable speed motors with 
high speed rewinds. 

5. Delivers 22,000 foot can- 
dles from 500 watt lamp: 
will also handle up to 1,000 
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6. Lens dial indicators cali- 
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8. Automatic and "Touch-key" 
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9. Aerial image projector per- 
mitting movine aerial 
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10. Will handle Cinemascope 
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11. Projector head has dial 
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12. Projector head will hold 
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ANIMATION STAND 

1. 35mm- 16mm by simple 
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2. Automatic dissolve, stop 
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3. Rack-over camera with auto- 
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4. Electric zoom with follow 
focus from 36 to 1 field. 

5. Electric platens, 12 and 18 
fields. 

6. Floating pegs with counters 
and controls. 



7. Inte rchangeable peg 
standards. 

8. Underlighting. 

9. N, S, E, W compound move- 
ments. 

10. No-play counter mechanism. 

11. Electric controls for all 
movements with master 
interlock — remote and/or 
panel. 

12. Rear projection for stop- 
motion or continuous 
motion images. 

13. 5-speed stop motion con- 
trols with high speed 
rewind. 



WRITE FOR NEW PRICE LIST AND SPECIFICATIONS 




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38 HUDSON STREET • NEW ROCHELLE, NEW YORK • NEW ROCHELLE 6-8138 



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BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




"Stay on the money" is an old motion picture principle, 
as you know. It's the producer's ability to keep attention 
focused on the main subject of the film. 

And that's what Fred Niles Productions does. It stays 
with the all-important purpose of the film . . . the reason 
why you are making a picture. A Fred Niles film tells your 
story, or imparts your idea, in the best possible manner. 

You can find this one factor— adhering to the purpose of 



the picture — in Fred Niles films, whether TV spots, sales 
training or highly technical industrial films. 

These are some of well-known companies currently 
doing business with Fred Niles Productions: Clearing 
Machine Corp., McCann-Erickson, Armour & Co., Admiral 
Corp., John W. Shaw, York Corporation, Quaker Oats 
Company, Leo Burnett, Lions International, Montgomery 
Ward, Edward H. Weiss, Sundstrand Aviation. 




FTtEID -A-. IsTILES Frod-Liotions, Ino. 
Motion pictures for theatre, television and industry 
22 W. HUBBARD STREET CHICAGO 10, ILLINOIS SUperior 7-0760 
In Hollywood: RKO Paths Studios, Culver City 



NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 







Along the Business JVewsfronts 



wiwm 




Join these companies who 
have already found all the in- 
gredients at one film pro- 
ducer to assure effective film 
programs. 

VISUAlL.SCOF»E 

incorporated 
103 PAFCK: A'VEIMUE 

new york, n. y. 



Kodak Pavilion a Feature 
of Brussels 1958 Exhibition 

In the universal language of 
color imagery, photography will 
speak for itself — and Eastman 
Kodak products — in the Kodak 
pavilion at the Brussels Univer- 
sal and International Exhibition 
of 1958. to be held April 17 
through October 19. Technical 
information on how to photograph 
effectively will be provided at the 
pavilion by six specialists who will 
answer questions in various na- 
tional languages. 

Expect 35 Million Visitors 

Located near the Esplanade 
Gate to the 500-acre fair-ground 
in Hysel Park. Kodak's pavilion, 
a 100- by 40-foot structure of 
glass, steel and wood, will be a 
neighbor to exhibit buildings main- 
tained by Pan American World 
Airways, International Business 
Machines Corporation and Bell 
Telephone Company. An esti- 
mated 35 million visitors are ex- 
pected at the fair. 

Inside the pavilion, three 40- 
square-foot color transparencies 
will depict subjects associated with 
simple camera snapshooting, mini- 
ature camera photography and 
home movies. Large color prints 
will demonstrate some of the ways 
photography serves mankind and 
show Kodak's plants and people. 
Kodak products will be on dis- 
play but not for sale. 

Overseas Firms Joint Project 

The Kodak pavilion is a project 
of Kodak Pathe, Paris; Kodak 
Ltd.. London; Kodak A. G.. Stutt- 
gart, and the parent company. 
Eastman Kodak Company. Roch- 
ester. New York. Other Kodak 
distributing companies around the 
world will send representatives to 
the photographic information cen- 
ter. S" 



Films Help U. 5. Agency 
Tell Our Story to World 

'< Films are an important means 
used by U.S. Information Agency 
to bring the facts about the United 
States to the people of Europe. 
Latin America and the Near and 
Far East. 

USIA employs 1 200 Americans 
at 200 posts in 79 countries to 
carry out its mission of promoting 
a better understanding of United 
States policies and objectives, and 
to combat Communist anti-Ameri- 
can propaganda. 58' 



142 Films Entered for 
Canadian Film Awards 

■A A total of 142 motion pictures 
have been submitted for the 10th 
annual competition of the Cana- 
dian Film Awards. This year's 
entry total is more than twice the 
number entered in the last com- 
petition. 

The films will be judged in Ot- 
tawa. Montreal and Toronto. It 
is expected that the presentations 
will take place in May. The Cana- 
dian Film Awards is jointly spon- 
sored by the Canadian Association 
for Adult Education, the Canada 
Foundation and the Canadian Film 
Institute. 

A record total of 88 non-theatri- 
cal and theatrical films are compet- 
ing in this year's program and a 
new Television Commercial cate- 
gory has 55 entries. 

Total entries for the various 
classes and categories of films are; 
Theatrical: Shorts — 3; Non- 
Theatrical: Arts & Experimen- 
tal — 7, Children's — 7. General In- 
formation — 15, Public Relations 
— 14, Sales & Promotion — 8. 
Training & Instruction — 7. Travel 
& Recreation — 7; Television Films 
— 16. TV Commercials— 55. 9 



This modern pavilion will house Kodak exhilni at Brussels Fair. 




PARTHENON PICTURES 
-Hollywood- 

A FILM PROGRAM FOR 
THE BORDEN COMPANY 

"HAIL THE HEARTY"— Enough 
of the right foods for everybody 
— a century of progress in mass 
nutrition. (Sterling-Movies, 

U.S.A.) * , * 

"ELSIE & CO."— An I. R. film to 
bring scattered employees into 
unity by showing them the whole 
company. 40 min. Color. 

"GREAT BIG BIRTHDAY" — A 

special-occasion film for the em- 
ployees' parties inaugurating The 
Centennial Year, featuring Elsie 

in the boardroom. 15 minutes. 

* * * 

"THE SECOND AMERICAN 
REVOLUTION"— A one-occasion 
tool, quickly and cheaply pro- 
duced to stand in for an officer's 
personal appearance at an im- 
portant Convention. 18 minutes. 

AND A LETTER FROM 
THE BORDEN COMPANY 

New York, Oct. 14. 1957 

TO: 

Parthenon Pictures, 
Hollywood. 

Dear Cap: 

Here's a long overdue letter to get 
on the record some observations on 
our recent experiences in the film- 
making business. It is overdue be- 
cause three films in a year — with no 
prior experience in this activity — 
is quite an experience, and it takes 
time for recovery. In addition, the 
new job has kept me hopping. 

First, let me say that we are 
happy — all of us. Everyone likes all 
three pictures. That's quite an ac- 
complishment in a complicated 
company like this . . . 

Second, we all liked doing busi- 
ness with you. This is due partly, I 
believe, to the initial policy of know- 
ing what we wanted but giving you 
a pretty free hand in developing it. 
The fact that we now have what we 
wanted is largely because you have 
a sound grasp on what a business 
should spend money for, and can 
develop it without violating the in- 
tegrity of a picture. 

Finally, we liked working with you 
and your group, and there's a fine 
difference between doing business 
with someone and working with 
him. I shall miss these script con- 
ferences, and the lively encounters 
with all of you — Palmer, Stoney, 
Meakin, Millington and the sundry 
Hollywood characters who bright- 
ened our days. So will my colleagues 
in the Executive Suite, as well as 
those in this Department. 

The miracle of it. my friend, is 

that we spent so much time and so 

much money without any blow-ups 

or anyone going home mad. Quite 

an accomplishment! Should you 

need testimonials at any time, steer 

your prospects our way and we shall 

testify cheerfully and without fee. 

Sincerely, 

Milton Fairman 

(Asst. V.P.— Adv. & P.R.) 

PARTHENON PICTURES 

Cap Palmer Unit 

Documentary Films ■for Business 

2625 Temple St. • Hollywood 26 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



i 





35mm Eastman color release prints 
(^ Kodachrome printing 

"Blow-ups" from l6mm Kodachrome 
to 35mm Eastman color negative 



CORPORATION J ^ 



(a subsidiary of Du Art Film Labs., Inc.) 
245 West 55th St., New York 19, N. Y. • PLaza 7-4580 



NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1958 



AWARD COMPETITIONS FOR BUSINESS FILMS 



THE TENTH ANNUAL 

SCHOLASTIC TEACHER 

FILM AND FILMSTRIP AWARDS 

Sponsored by Scholasfic Teacher Magazine 
(Program and award dates fo be announced) 

Entry Deadline: September I, 1958 

JOARD OF Judges: Judges are drawn from a 
anel of 75 outstanding audio-visual education 
xperts — teachers, city and state supervisors, 
nd college teachers. They are nominated by 
udges on the panel and by Editors of Scholas- 
ic Teacher. For impartiality, their names 
re kept secret. Chairman: Mrs. Vera Falcon- 
r. Scholastic Teacher Film and Filmstrip 
;ditor, 66 West 87th Street, New York, N.Y. 
iLiGiBLE Films and Filmstrips: All films 
nd filmstrips produced for school use ( other 
han college) between September 1, 1957 and 
eptember 1, 1958. 

L WARDS AND CATEGORIES: Certificates are 
warded as follows: 10 for sponsored films 
or grades kindergarten through 12th; 7 for 
1ms for grades 3 to 7; 7 for films for grades 
through 12; 7 for filmstrips for grades 3 to 
; 7 for filmstrips for grades 7 through 12. 
'ilms and Filmstrips must be suitable for 
;hool use and fit into school curriculums for 
rades 3 through 12. Films produced origin- 



(also see pages 20, 190, 192, 194, 197) 
ally for television have received awards in 
recent years. 

Entry Information: Write Mrs. Vera Fal- 
coner, Scholastic Teacher Film and Filmstrip 
Editor, 66 West 87th Street, New York City. 

EIGHTH INTERNATIONAL DISPLAY 

OF CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR 

PUBLICITY. INDUSTRY AND 

TECHNICS USE 

Sponsored by the 

International Milan Samples Fair, Milan, Italy 

April 12-27, 1958 

Categories: Publicity Films; advertising 
products, services, etc. Industrial and Tech- 
nique Dnriimentary Films; achievements of 
industry, manufacturing operations and appli- 
cations. 

Entry: Address requests for information to 
Dr. M. G. Franci, The Secretary General, 
Milan Fair, International Display of Cinema- 
tography for Publicity, etc., Ente Autonomo 
Fiera Milano — Via Domodossola, Milano, Italy. 
Juries: The President of the Milan Fair will 
appoint two different juries to award prizes 
to films admitted in the Display; one for the 



Advertising Category and one for the Indus- 
trial and Technical Category. The Jury for 
the Advertising Category will consist of a 
film director, two publicity technicians, a 
cinematography critic, one Milan Fair Exhibi- 
tor, and a private citizen representing the 
public. The Jury for the Industrial and 
Technical Category will consist of a film direc- 
tor, publicity technician, three Milan Fair 
Exhibitors, a merchandise Commissioner of 
the Fair, a newspaperman of the technical 
press, and a private citizen. 

Awards: Prizes will be awarded according to 
the film's purpose. A print of each award 
winning film will be granted by the entrant 
to the Fair Archives of prized films. 



SIXTH ANNUAL 

CARTOONISTS" FILM FESTIVAL 

Sponsored by the Screen Cartoonists Guild 
(Entry deadline, date and locale to be announced) 

Entry Information: Write to Lawrence L. 
Kilty, business manager. Screen Cartoonists 
Guild, 2700 No. Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood 28, 
California. The festival will take place in 
the fall of 1958 in September or October. It 
will be held in Los Angeles. 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE HUNDRED NINETY-TWO) 



Sometimes We Overlook The Obvious! 

The nationally recognized quality built into Calvin production work is 
available to you — as a Calvin services customer. Our standard of quality 
in 16mm film* is a PLUS value — a producer's understanding of other pro- 
ducers' needs. Just one reason v/hy we are working in partnership with 
hundreds of other producers today! 

V^ Complete Productions 

V^ All Production Services 

^ B/W or Color Printing and Processing 

V^ Projection Equipment 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Everything under the Svn 
to translate SCRIPTS 




ff/tn 




16MM Professional Film Viewer — 

Makes film editing a breeze. Easy threading, portable, will not 

scratch film. Enables editor to view film from left to right on 

large 6" x AV2" brilliantly illuminated screen. Sound Reader and/or 

Counter can be easily attached. Available in 35mm model. 

16mm Professional Film Viewer $350.00. 35mm Model $500.00 



As every Pro knows, Ceco carries just about 
every quality product under the photographic sun. 

But you need more than cameras, tripods, 
dollies and recorders — you need more than 
lenses, viewers, blimps, generators and lights. 

You need answers to important questions — 
how to successfully translate scripts into film. 
No one man knows all the answers. 
That's why Cbco employs a staff of experts 
in every category of film-making — cameras, 
recording, lighting and editing. Collectively 
we have all the answers to help make you an 
outstanding producer, director or cameraman. 

You owe it to your career to use Ceco service 
for Sales, Rentals, Repairs . . . and advice. 



CECO Small Gyro Tripod 

Features "controlled 
action" with slow and 
fast speeds for both 
panning and tilting. 
Weighs only 19 lbs. 
Ideal for 16mm 
Maurer, Mitchell. 
B & H Eyemo and 
similiar cameras. 
$650.00 






Aurlcon Cine — Voice Conversion 



Cine — Voice Camera modified to 
accept 1200-ft, 600-ft. and 400-ft. 
magazines; has torque motor for 
take-up. Also includes Veeder 
footage counter and 3-lens turret. 
Conversion only — $450.00 less mag- 
azine. 



GROVER Grip 

Holds a light wherever space is 
tight. No springs, no slip. Has 8" 
spread. Both ends padded against 
marring. Weighs less than 2 lbs. $6.85 



R-15 FILMLINE Developer 

Develops reversal and negative-positive film 
at 1200 ft. per hour. Has variable speed 
drive. Permits complete daylight operation. 
Exclusive overdrive eliminates film breakage. 

$2,995.00 



ALES • SERVICE • RENTALS 



FRANK C. ZUCKER 



(Tflm^Rfl €ouipm€nT (o.jnc. 

Dept. S 31 S West 43rd Street, New York 36, N. Y. 



TE>A^E Directors View Finder Model C 

For academy aperture, wide screen, cin- 
emascope, vistavision and lO TV cameras. 
Zoom type with chain & leather case 
$100.00. 



ADDITIONAL PRODUCTS 

Camera Equipment Company offers the world's 
largest and most compretiensive line of pro- 
fessional cameras, accessories, lighting and 
editing equipment. The quality product isn't 
mode that we don't carry. See our Splicers, 
— exposure meters — projectors — screens — 
marking pencils and pens — editors gloves — 
editing machines, rocks, barrels, and fables — 
stop watches. 




anctJiiMt; 7^'- 



put more 




into your MOTION PICTURE with 
Color Reproduction Co. 
16mm Color Prints 




Color Reproduction Company in 
its 19 years of special iziiig exclu- 
sively in 16 mm Color Printing, 
has earned a reputation for giuir- 
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ard of the 16mm Motion Picture 
Industry. 



!BIlII>!H(£)Dl]r€TII>M COMPANY 

W6 Santa Monita Blvd., Hollywood 46, Caliiornia 

ilephone: OLdfield 4-8010 



Communication: 
a Way to Win 

by Henry Strauss* 

T N Our Field the proportion of 
■*- "Unfinished Business" is far 
greater than any amount that can 
be considered "finished." This 
would have to be so in any field 
that deals as much with the un- 
known composition of the human 
mind and emotions as ours does. 
I'd like to touch on one area 
that is not only unfinished but 
hasn't yet even become clarified — 
an area that can well be a life or 
death struggle for our society and 
industry as a part of that society. 
Sputnik has provided a glimpse 
of a war worthy of mankind, one 
that will be a war of competition 
requiring the finest statesmanship; 
the highest developed individual 
creativity in our population; the 
greatest intelligent deduction, and 
the most dynamic, effective in- 
dividual productive drive. 

Success will require a well in- 
formed, flexible public, capable of 
accepting rapid change. It will 
demand the greatest number of 
individuals and industries with 
initiative and drive, capable of 
breaking through conformity and 
the safety of meaningless routine. 
It will get its strength and momen- 
tum from the developed attitudes 
of industrialists, educators, work- 
ers, and all who make up this 
country. 

This job, in the short days 
ahead, will be dependent upon well 
developed communication channels 
here and abroad, and the most 
powerful internal and external 
communications media. 

Somewhere in this picture lies 
our own — the film media. It will de- 
pend on us as producers, working 
with our clients, to constantly ex- 
periment, test, and determine how 
important the film medium can be 
in increasing inititiative, produc- 
tivity with the least waste of natural 
and human resources, and under- 
standing of our common needs and 
goals. 



•Hank Strauss is head of his own com- 
pany, Henry Strauss &; Co.. Inc. of New 
York City. A world traveller on projects 
for his many clients, he brings a fresh, 
\ igorous point of view to the vital tasks 
of attitude-building films and other me- 
dia created within recent years. This 
piece was jotted on airline stationery as 
he was cnroiite from Rome to New Zea- 
land via San Francisco, 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



fx^-f,\:' 




The tradition of the New England Yankee 

is to give, and receive, a quality dollar 

value for a dollar. We have never seen fit 

to depart from this principle in the film 

business. Perhaps this is why a list of 

our distinguished clients looks like this: 



American Brass Company 

American Optical Company 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Division of Employment Security 

DATAmatic Division, 

Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co. 

Delco-Remy Division, 

General Motors Corporation 

Electric Companies of the 

Connecticut Valley 

Emhart Manufacturing Company 

The Fuller Brush Company 

General Electric Company 

Jones & Lamson Machine Company 

Kaman Aircraft Corporation 

Massachusetts Department of 

Commerce 

Monsanto Chemical Company 

New Departure Division, 

General Motors Corporation 

New England Mutual Life 

Insurance Co. 

State of New York, 

Division of Employment 

Pratt & Whitney Company, Inc. 

Raybestos-Manhattan, inc. 

Rust Craft Publishers 

Simplex Time Recorder Company 

Sylvania Electric Products, Inc. 

Vermont State Development 

Commission 

United States Marine Corps 



Leadership is fashioned from experience. Men and machines 
make motion pictures but talent and technique build a business. 
Our permanent staff, incidentally one of the largest in the East, 
is thoroughly prepared to offer complete creative and technical 
services. You'll find a business like attitude towards your budget 
and quality standards. 



<^ 




r '.«^. ' 



•'^-^r^.as. ^iC^^fe/?^' 



mMS^ 



?®j 




^i^^i ■••^^- 




BAY STATE FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

BOSTON • SPRINGFIELD • MASS. 




NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1958 




Alonq the Business IVewsfrnnts 



At the 1957 International Film Exhibition 
in Rome, in which 28 countries participated, 
the "SILVER ROBOT" for the best 
science film was awarded to "In the Beginning" 
produced for General Petroleum Corporation 
by Gate & McGlone. This is the 
seventh major honor accorded this film, 
which now becomes the brightest star in a long 
list of award-winning motion pictures 
bearing this trademark.. 




■■^SP 




GATE & McGLONE 

Films for Industry 
1521 CROSS ROADS OF THE WORLD • HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIFORNIA 



30 Million Saw Ford Pix 
in 1957, Company Reports 

it Upwards of 30 million persons 
saw Ford Motor Company motion 
pictures during 1957. The Ford 
films were shown more than 412,- 
000 times to audiences in the 
United States last year. 

More than 22,000 other show- 
ings were made outside the U.S. 
Additionally, millions of persons 
viewed the films on network and 
local television. 

A reported audience of approx- 
imately 120 million persons have 
seen Ford films in the last five 
years. An accurate estimate can- 
not be made of the television 
audience during the five-year pe- 
riod but the nearly 13,000 screen- 
ings of Ford films probably drew 
viewers in excess of the reported 
audience, the sponsor notes. 

Safety Films Popular 

Driver education and highway 
safety were the most popular sub- 
jects among the variety of subjects 
treated in Ford pictures shown in 
1957. The Ford films' content 
ranges from auto styling to sport 
lessons. The driving and safety 
films accounted for more than 
8,500,000 of the total reported 
audience and, in addition, these 
films had more than 200 public 
service tv showings. 

43 Films Are Available 
The Ford Film catalog is cur- 
rently accommodating film users 
with a listing of 43 subjects, in- 
cluding three new 1958 vacation 
film releases. The new films are: 
West to the Tetons — depicting the 
grandeur of Wyoming's Grand 
Teton National Park; Okefenokee 
Interlude — a pictorial boat trip 
through Okefenokee Swamp, and 
What a Vacation! — which high- 
lights the tourist attractions of New 
York City. Since 1950, Ford films 
have received 34 awards for ex- 
cellence in American and Euro- 
pean film festivals. 

One of the oldest documentary 
sponsors in the nation. Ford Com- 
pany started its motion picture pro- 
gram in 1914, producing 35mm 
films. Ford now offers 16mm color 
and black white films on free loan 
to schools, churches, farm and 
youth groups, civic organizations 
and company dealers. 

Ford films are distributed 
through company libraries in Dear- 
born, Michigan, New York City 
and Oakland, California. » 



NAVA Convention, Exhibits 
Set for Chicago, July 26-29 

1^ Six audio-visual organizations 
plan to meet concurrently during 
the 1958 National Audio-Visual 
Convention and Exhibit, to be held 
in Chicago, July 26-29, at the Mor- 
rison Hotel. An announcement of 
the NAVA Convention was made 
by P. J. Jaffarian, convention 
chairman for the National Audio- 
Visual Association, chief sponsor 
of the event. 

Groups which have announced 
plans to participate in the NAVA 
Convention are: the Educational 
Film Library Association, with Dr. 
Fritz White, Bureau of A-V In- 
struction, University of Wisconsin, 
as chairman; the Audio-Visual 
Conference of Medical and Allied 
Sciences, with Daryl 1. Miller, of 
the American Medical Association, 
in charge; the Agricultural A-V 
Workshop, under the direction of 
Gordon Berg, editor of "County 
Agent and Vo-Ag Teacher" maga- 
zine; the Religious Audio-Visual 
Workshop, with Mrs. Mae Bahr, 
Religious Film Libra' ies, Chicago, 
as chairman; and the Workshop for 
Industrial Training Directors, 
headed by Richard Crook of Ab- 
bott Laboratories, Chicago. 

Members of the six groups par- 
ticipating in the NAVA Conven- 
tion will be able to attend meet- 
ings and specialized workshops 
which will explore practical solu- 
tions to a-v problems. Leaders in 
a wide variety of a-v areas will 
be presented in group meetings 
and the general sessions. R" 



MOVIOLA 

FILM EDITING EQUIPMENT 
16MM-35MM 

• PICTURE 

• SOUND 
Photo and 
Magnetic 

• SYNCHRO- 
NIZERS 

• REWINDERS 

One of the 
new series 20 
Moviolas for 




Dept. B 



MOVIOLA MANUFACTURING CO. 

1451 Gordon St. • HoUvwood 28. Calif. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



HIGH 

(in audience appeal) 




AND MIGHTY 




(in audiences reached) 



Firestone's biography of a missile, "THE CORPORAL STORY," is 
off the ground and climbing fast . . . with 1,258 telecasts and com- 
munity showing:s racked up during the past eight months, to an 
audience exceeding 11,000,000 viewers! 

For 25 years. The Firestone Tire and Rubber Company has used 
the services of Association Films to reach school, community and 
(for the past 11 years) TV audiences . . . today, there are 16 differ- 
ent Firestone subjects in active release, several of which are in the 
"Golden Circle" of most-widely-seen sponsored films ever made! 

Fresh, imaginative promotion and a network of distribution 
extending from coast-to-coast (virtually an imprint of U. S. popula- 
tion patterns) helps companies such as Firestone (and some 150 
others) get the best coverage and most mileage from their public 
relations films— and at surprisingly low cost, per-viewer, per- 

exposure! ,,.„■ „ ,, 

Send for vour personal copy of "The Vteu-ing Millwnx, the 
storv of Association Films' services to sponsors, and receive each 
month, an interesting informal film newsletter, "Audiences." Just 



ASSOCIATION FILMS INC. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICES: 347 Madison Avenue, New York 17, New York . Telephone: MUrray Hill 5-8573 



RIDGEFIELD, N. J. 
Broad at Elm 



FILM DISTRIBUTION CENTERS IN: 

LA GRANGE, ILL. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 

561 Hillgrove Ave. 799 Stevenson St. 

America's First Distributor of Films from Industry — for the Nation! 



DALLAS, TEXAS 
1108 Jackson St. 



Here are a feu, of the companies who have heen with us continuously for 15 years or more : METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE ^'^^'^'li:^'j:"^;^;il^^^^^^ 
COMPANY (34 years), ARMOUR AND COMPANY ,21 years), THE GREYHOUND CORPORATION (20 years), NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL (19 years), BALTIMORE AND OHIO 
years), GENERAL FOODS CORPORATION (17 years), JOHNSON & JOHNSON (15 years) and the BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM (15 years). 



NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



FILM AT I 




the wealth of mature film 

sense, skilled judgment 

achieved only through 

many years of actual 

production 

experience 



now 

starting 

our 45th year 

of applying Filmaturity 

in producing better films 

which produce better for clients. 



ATLAS FILM CORPORATION 

Producers of Quality Motion Pictures, Sound Slidefilms, Theatrical Shorts, TV Commercials 

nil SOUTH BOULEVARD • OAK PARK, ILLINOIS 



^./^ f^//i, rMAn^ - tJiPAi. rV2^ u^ / 



CHICAGO PHONE: AUSTIN 7-8620 

Offices in Chicago, Washington, D. C, and f-lollywood 



32 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



^RODUCER^LABORATORY TRADE ASSOCIATIONS 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 
OF FILM PRODUCERS, INC 

Dffice: 7064 Sheridan Road, Chicago 26, Illi- 
nois. Address: Executive Secretary. 
Officers : Mercer Francisco ( Francisco 
Films), president; James Kellock (Wilding 
Picture Productions, Inc.), vice-president; 
Harry Lange ( Kling Film Productions), sec- 
retary; Mervin LaRue ( Mervin LaRue, Inc.), 
treasurer. Lawrence Mominee I Atlas Film 
Corporation); Frank Balkin ( Reid H. Ray 
Film Industries); Charles Beeland (Charles 
Beeland Films), directors-at-large. 
Purpose: By mutual cooperation to educate 
business, government and institutional groups 
to the advantages and values of films and re- 
lated audio-visual aids; to foster and promote 
continued ethical relationships in all matters 
between producers and clients; to advance the 
creative and technical arts and crafts of this 
specialized industry in which member com- 
panies serve. 

Publications: A news-letter for all member 
companies is being initiated as part of a re- 
activated 1958 program; cooperation with 
civic groups under way; a Code of Ethics 
adopted by the organization is universally 
recognized as setting high standards within 
the industry and among its clientele. 

Member Companies: Atlas Film Corporation; 
Beeland Films; Cinecraft Productions; Con- 
dor Films; Francisco Films; Kling Film Pro- 
ductions; Mervin W. LaRue, Inc.; Producers 
Film Studios; Reid H. Ray Film Industries; 
Sarra, Inc.; Wilding Picture Productions. 
Meetings: Monthly meetings are planned dur- 
ing 1958. 9 



INTERNATIONAL SCREEN 
PUBLICITY ASSOCIATION 

Office: 11 Hill Street, London, W.I., England. 

Contact: Lionel Gale, general secretary. 

Officers: Jean Mineur (France), president; 
Friedrich-Georg Amberg (Germany), Gerard 
Hold-sworth (Great Britain), Massimo Momig- 
liano (Italy), vice-pi-esidents. 

Members: Chas. E. Blanks Pty, Ltd. (Aus- 
tralia) ; Belgique Cine Publicite (Belgium) ; 
Jean Mineur Publicite (France) ; Deutsche 
ISPA (Germany ) ; Rank Screen Services Ltd. 
(Great Britain); Cefima-Film (Holland); 
United Film Makers (India) ; 0. Pu. S., S.P.A. 
(Italy) ; Norsk Filmreklame (Norway) ; 
Cyrenaica Cinema Co. (Lybia) ; Central-Film 
(Switzerland) ; Filmlets (S.A.) Ltd. (Union 
of South Africa). 

Purpose: To develop members' business in 
foreign countries and in their own countries, 
and to exchange information, ideas, film 
scripts, publications and all other matters of 
interest to members. To represent and pro- 
mote interest and advancement of members 
both in their own countries and abroad. 
Meetings: Executive Committee meetings 
held quarterly. All-Member meeting in end 
of May to coincide with the Brussels World 
Fair in Brussels, Belgium. 9 



National & International Organizations 
Serving Filnn Producers & Laboratories 

FILM PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION 

OF NEW YORK, INC. 

Office: 39 Broadway, New York 6, N.Y. 
(WHitehall 3-7376). 

Public Relations: Wallace A. Ross, 15 East 
48th Street, New York 17, N. Y. ( PLaza 
1-1920). 

Officers: Nathan Zucker (Dynamic Flms, 
Inc.), president; Lee Blair (Film Graphics, 
Inc.), vice-president; Mrs. Maxine Culhane 
( Shamus Culhane Productions, Inc.), secre- 
tary; Edward J. Lamm ( Pathescope Company 
of America, Inc.), treasurer. 

* * * 

Directors: Above officers and Stephen Elliot, 
(Elliot, Unger & Elliot, Inc.) ; Walter Lowen- 
dahl ( Transfilm, Inc. ) ; Peter J. Mooney 
(Audio Productions, Inc.); David I. Pincus 
(Caravel Films, Inc.) ; F. C. Wood, Jr. (Sound 
Masters, Inc. ) 

* * * 

Past Presidents: Peter J. Mooney (Audio 
Productions, Inc.) ; Walter Lowendahl (Trans- 
film, Inc.) ; Leslie Roush (Leslie Roush Produc- 
tions, Inc.); Robert L. Lawrence (Robert 
Lawrence Productions, Inc.) ; Harold E. Wond- 
sel ( Wondsel, Carlisle & Dunphy, Inc.). 

* « * 

Members: (As of Feb. 1, 1958): Academy 
Pictures, Inc.; Audio Productions, Inc.; John 
Bransby Productions; Caravel Films, Inc.; 
Thomas Craven Film Corp.; Shamus Culhane 
Productions, Inc.; Depicto Films, Inc.; Dy- 
namic Films, Inc.; Elliot, Unger & Elliot, Inc.; 
Filmways, Inc.; Fordel Films, Inc.; Gold Medal 
Studios, Inc.; Gray-O'Reilly Studio; Hartley 
Productions, Inc.; Robert Lawrence Produc- 
tions, Inc.; MPO Productions, Inc.; Owen 
Murphy Productions, Inc.; Pathescope Com- 
pany of America, Inc.; Robert Yarnall Richie, 
Inc.; Leslie Roush Productions, Inc.; Sarra, 
Inc.; Fletcher Smith Studios, Inc.; Sound 
Masters, Inc.; Henry Strauss & Company, Inc.; 
Bill Sturm Studios, Inc.; Television & Film 
Graphics, Inc.; Transfilm, Inc.; UPA Pictures, 
Inc.; Video Pictures, Inc.; Roger Wade Pro- 
ductions, Inc.; Wondsel, Carlisle & Dunphy, 

Inc. 

* * * 

Purpose: At monthly meetings and through 
active committees, this organization works to 
advance the motion picture production indus- 
try in all its branches; to establish and main- 
tain a high standard of ethics among produc- 
ers, their employees, their suppliers and their 
clients; to distribute accurate information 
with regard to technical improvements; to 
advise the general public on the importance 
of the film industry in the nation's economy; 
to encourage responsible people to enter the 
industry; to promote, stabilize and coordinate 
all elements of the industry. 

* * * 

Associates: In February, 1958, the organiza- 
tion voted to open its ranks to Associate Mem- 
bers from other segments of the motion 
picture industry with whom the future of film 
production is identified, reserving the privilege 



of a vote on matters pertinent to producers 

alone. 

» * * 

1958 Activities: Events ahead are to include 
a Showcase of TV Commercials and Tech- 
niques for advertising agencies and their 
clients; a speakers bui-eau; screenings for 
members and clients of outstanding film pro- 
ductions, both theatrical and non-theatrical; 
open meetings on important film developments; 
stabilization of industry-wide labor relations 
through a permanent labor relations commit- 
tee; and a campaign for the authentic recog- 
nition of achievements in the industrial film 
and television film field. R" 



FILM PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION 

OF MINNESOTA 

Officers: William Yale (Empire Photosound), 
president; Cliff Sakry (Promotional Films, 
Inc.), secretary; Tony Lane (Anthony Lane 
Film Studios, Inc.), treasurer. Reid H. Ray 
(Reid H. Rav Film Industries), manager, 2- 
year term; Ralph Perry (Film Productions 
Co.), manager, 1-year term. 

Members: Anthonv Lane Film Studios; Con- 
tinental Films; Thos. Countryman Film Pro- 
ductions; Empire Photosound, Inc.; Film Pro- 
ductions Co.; George Ryan Films. Inc.: Grif- 
fith B. Wren Films, Inc.; Promotional Films, 
Inc. 

Purpose: The advancement of the arts and 
crafts of film production, for imnroved client 
relations and the exchange of technical infor- 
mation. 
Meetings: Monthly meetings planned during 

Hi 

vear. w 



ASSOCIATION OF 
CINEMA LABORATORIES. INC. 

Office: 1905 Fairview Ave., N.E., Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Officers: Reid H. Ray (Reid H. Ray Film 
Industries, Inc.), president; Leon C. Shelly 
(Shelly Films Limited), vice-president; 
George W. Colburn (George Colburn Labora- 
tory), secretary; Kern Moyse (Peerless Film 
Processing Corp.), treasurer. 

Board of Directors: Don M. Alexander 
(Alexander Film Co.); 2 year terms: Spence 
W. Caldwell (Caldwell Films Limited) ; Louis 
Feldman (Du Art Film laboratories): Kern 
Moyse; Byron Roudabush (Byron, Inc.); Sid- 
ney Solow (Consolidated Film Industries); 
and Reid H. Ray. 

Meetings; Next meeting to be held April 21st 
during Society of Motion Picture & Television 
Engineers' convention in Los Angeles. 

Activities: A recent publication defining film 
laboratory standards is available on letterhead 
request from the Association ofl[ice. Nine defi- 
nitions of nomenclature terms were adopted 
at recent annual meeting in New York City. 

(CONTINUED on THE FOLLOWING PAGE) 



NUM BER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



33 



PRODUCER'LABORATORY TRADE ASSOCIATIONS 



ASSOCIATION OF MOTION PICTURE 

PRODUCERS AND LABORATORIES 

OF CANADA 

OKKICE (of the President » : 21 GrenviUe St., 
Toronto 5, Ontario. 

Office lot the Secretary-Treasurer): 2121 
Knightsbridge Rd., Ottawa 3, Ontario. 
Officers: Arthur Chetwynd iChetwynd Films. 
Ltd., Toronto I. iJirsideut ; Graeme Fra.'ser 
iCravvlev Films Ltd., Ottawa i, past president; 
Spencer Caldwell CS. W. Caldwell Ltd., 
'lorontoi, first vice-president; Gerald S. Kedey 
(Motion Picture Centre, Toronto), secotul 
vice-president; D. M. McClymont (2121 
Knightsbridge Rd., Ottawa), secretary-treas- 
urer. 

Board of Directors : Henry Michaud (Omega 
Productions. Inc.. Montreal i : Lew Parry 
( Parry Films Ltd., \'ancouver, B.C. ) ; Gordon 
Eraser (Shelly Films, Toronto, Ont.) ; Rev. 
Anson Moorehouse ( Berkeley Studios, United 
Church of Canada, Toronto, Ont. ) ; Two more 
Directors to be appointed. 

Membership: Canadian firms, partnerships, 
and corporations engaged in motion picture 
production or laboratory work. Membership 
4.5. 

Purpose: To promote and conserve the com- 
mon interest of those engaged in the motion 
picture industry in Canada by maintaining the 
highest possible standards in the production 
of motion pictures for commercial, theatrical 
or television release and in all laboratory pro- 
cessing; to correct abuses; secure freedom 
from unjust and unlawful exactions; encour- 
age cooperation in the industry and with other 
associations. 

1958 Activities: 1. Continuation and e.xpan- 
sion of functions of the Association. 2. To 
acnuaint industry, advertising agencies, tele- 
vision networks and other potential sponsors 
with the work of Canadian film producers. 3. 
Make a Constitutional change whereby the 
Executive structure will have two vice presi- 
dents and six directors. 4. Form a new com- 
mittee to study all phases of the film industry 
in Canada. 5. Investigate a proposed move of 
the Head Office to Toronto and appoint a sec- 
retary-treasurer. 6. Continue the distribution 
of the booklet "The Motion Picture in Busi- 
ness" which is directed to executives in all 
types of Canadian business. 1^^ 



INTERNATIONAL SCREEN 

ADVERTISING SERVICES 

Founded, 1935 

Office of the Secretary: 17 Berkeley Street, 
vindon W. 1., England. 

* » « 

Officers: Ernest Pearl (Pearl & Dean Over- 
seas Ltd., Great Britain), president; .Jacques 
Zadok (Cinema et Publicite, France), vice- 
president; Dr. E. Martini Mauri (SIPRA 
S.p.A., Italy), vice-president; Peter Taylor 
( ISAS), secretary. 

* * * 

Purpose: The promotion and development of 



National & International Organizations 
Serving Film Producers & Laboratories 

(Continued from Preceding Page 33) 



cinema screen advertising internationally and 
the promotion of interests of screen advertis- 
ing contractors on an international level. The 
organization also provides a central informa- 
tion service for its members, and promotes 
trade among them by pooling distribution 
facilities. 

Members: Lowe Argentina S.A.I.C. (Argen- 
tina ) ; Filmads Proprietary Ltd. ( Australia ) : 
Kino-Reklame GmbH i Austria ) : Publi-Cine 
I Belgium ) ; Times Theatre Advertising Ltd. 
I Canada ) ; Emelco Chilena ( Chile ) ; Corafilm 
(Colombia); Gutenberghus Reklame Film 
(Denmark); Societe de Publicite S.A.E. 
( Egypt ) ; Finlandia Kuva Oy ( Finland ) : 
Cinema et Publicite ( France) ; Deutsches Com- 
merciale Filmwerbung GmbH ( Germany ) : 
Pearl & Dean (Overseas), Ltd. (Great Brit- 
ain) ; Bureau voor Theatre Reclame (Hol- 
land) ; Blaze Advertising Service (India & 
Celon ) ; SIPRA S.p.A. ( Italy ) ; Screens 
Advertising Ltd. ( New Zealand ) ; Sverdrup 
Dahl A S ( Norway ) ; Belarte ( Portugal ) : 
Alexander Films (S.A.) ) PTY ) Ltd. (South 
Africa); Movierecord S.A. (Spain); Associa- 
tion of Theatre Screen Advertising Companies 
( United States of America ) . 

1958 Activities: The 5th International Ad- 
vertising Film Festival, September 20-25. the 
Lido. Venice. Italy. Regular meetings dealing 
with problems of international screen advertis- 
ing, particularly in the light of the establish- 
ment of the European Common Market and 
subsequent operation of the Free Trfd? 
Araa. 1^' 



BOLOGICAL PHOTOGRAPHIC 

ASSOCIATION. INC. 

Headquarters: Box 1668. Grand Central Post 
Office, New York 17, N.Y. (Office of the 
Secretary ) . 

Officers: Leo C. Massopust, Sr. (School of 
Medicine, Marquette University), president; 
Verlin Y. Yamamoto ( Medical Instruction 
Service, V.A. Administration Center, Des 
Moines, Iowa), rice-president ; .Jane H. Waters 
(Biological Photographic Association, Inc.). 
secretary; Albert Levin (University of Pitts- 
burgh, Magee Hospital, Audio-Visual Labora- 
tory ), treasurer. 

E.\ Officio: Leo C. Massopust, Sr. (School 
of Medicine, Marquette University), editor of 
Journal; Laurence B. Brown (Harvard School 
of Dental Medicine), cliairman. Chapters Com- 
mittee; H. Lou Gibson (Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany), past-president : 1936-.t~; Warren Stur- 
gis ( Sturgis-Grant Productions, Inc.), past- 
president: 19.5Jt-.55; C. Graham Eddy i Medical 
Illustration Div., Veterans Administration, 
Washington, D.C.), past-president: 1952-53. 



Directors: Harold C. Caitz (Medical Illustm 
tion Service, V.A. Hospital, Buflfalo, N.Y. * 
Capt. Stephen P. Dittmann ( Medical Audi( 
Visual Dept., Walter Reed Army Institute of 
Re.search ) ; John A. Gaughan ( Dept. of Medi- 
cal Photography, University of Rochester 
Medical Center) ; Robert A. Kolvoord (M. D. 
Hospital and Tumor Institute, University of 
Texas); David Lubin i Medical Illustration 
Lab., V.A. Hospital, Bronx, N.Y'. ) ; Thomas 
S. Masterson ( UCLA School of Medicine, 
Visual Aids Dept. ) ; Howard E. Tribe ( Div. 
of Medical Illustration, University of Utah 
College of Medicine ) ; Lloyd E. Varden 
iA-1105. 200 E. 66th St.. New York, N.Y'. >. 

* * -A- 
Membership: The Biological Photographic 
Association is composed of medical doctors 
engaged in practice and research; photogra- 
phers in medical centers, scientific technicians. 

* * * 

Purpose: Dedicated to the science and tech- 
nioues "pertaining to the photographing of 
all things which live or which have lived." 

s * * 

Convention: The 28th Annual Convention 
will be he'd August 18-21, 1958, at the Shore- 
ham Hotel in Washington, D.C. 

•if * * 

Official Publication: The Journal of the 
Biological Photographic Association. R' 



UNIVERSITY FILM 
PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION 

Office: Of the Secretary, Daisy B. Sickles, 
c o Department of Photography, Ohio State 
University, Columbus 10, Ohio. 

Officers : 0. S. Knudsen ( Iowa State College ) , 
president; Charles N. Hockman (University 
of Oklahoma), rice-president; Daisy B. Sick- 
les (Ohio State University), secretary; Oscar 
E. Patterson ( University of California at Los 
Angeles), treasurer. 

Committees: Sherman A. Wilson, Curricu- 
lum; Stanley E. Nelson. Xomenclaturc ; 
Charles N. Hockman, Public Relations; Floyd 
G. Walters, Equipment; J. W. Watson, Jr., 
Personnel; James Dunderstadt, Television; 
Frank R. Paine. Membership; Robert W.Wag- 
ner, Publications; Don G. Williams, Interna- 
tional Relations; Frank Neusbaum, Festivals 
and Contests; Hugh M. Dix, Distribution; J. 
Edward Oglesby and Woodrow Wentzy, 
Twelfth Annual Conference. 

Publications: The quarterly Journal of the 
University Film Producers Association ( sub- 
scription to non-members $2.00 per year). 
Other special reports and papers published at 
intervals for member guidance, including a 
recent International Calendar of Film Festi- 
vals. The Association is represented annually 
Kt Film Festivals and at the International 
Sc-hools of Cinema Meetings. 

Annual Conference: Twelfth Annual Con- 
ference to be held September 1-5, 1958 at Col- 
lege Station, South Dakota, with South Dakota 
State College as host. Sf 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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Missiles can span oceans and continents. 
But ideas^good or bad — can travel as f ar . . . 

as fast . . . and with equally decisive impact. 

The greatest need of a free society is .j 

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In this way, as well as through building 
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FILM ECONOMY 

Pictures That Do Their Job 

Remain Industry's "Best Buy" 

by William J. Ganz* 

P conomy! That's the Keynote for 1958. 
^--' This year, industry will be specially pres- 
sured to keep down costs. 

But what is economy? For the purchaser of 
a business film it means a picture that does 
the job for which it is designed. 

Frequently, we in the business film indus- 
try read articles in the trade press describing 
"How we made our own business film — and 
saved!" Track down these stories to their un- 
happy endings, however, and you'll find that 
all too often "home-made" films are highly 
thought of by the amateurs who create them, 
but poorly received by the audience for which 
presumably they are intended. 

Companies experienced in buying films have 
learned to regard their producer as a practi- 
tioner as ethical and as knowledgeable about 
his profession as accountants, lawyers and doc- 
tors are about theirs. These firms confide in 
their film producer. The result is films that 
deliver the message eflfectively and give the 
client full value for his money. 

Unfortunately, to the economy-minded com- 
pany having films made for the first time, and 
to the prospective purchaser who has been 
"burned" by a poor or mediocre business film 
in the past, all film producers are naturally 
suspect. 

Understandably, it is difficult to gauge a pro- 
ducing film-maker's ability before he has done 
a job for the prospective purchaser. 

That is why your Buyer's Guide to Qualified 
Film Producers is a valuable aid to prospec- 
tive purchasers of business films. The listed 
records are a good gauge of the quality of 
producers under consideration. Prospective 
film buyers can be sure that the film-producing 
firms named in your publication are outfits 
with records for delivering films that pay their 
way — the kind that are a true economy in 1958 
or any time. 



•Bill Ganz has headed his own New York studio for the 
past 39 years, is one of this industry's experienced vets. 




PARTHENON PICTURES 
-Hollywood- 

A FILM PROGRAM FOR 

CONN. GENERAL LIFE 

INSURANCE CO. 

"OUTSIDE THAT ENVELOPE" 

— (Golden Reel '57)— for the em- 
ployees who won't read those 
booklets; the several benefits of 
Group Insurance and Retirement 
dramatized in Case Histories, in 
an interesting story frame. To 
create that "Better Employee 
Understanding." Color, 39 min- 
utes. (Modern TPS) 

* * # 

"THE LIFETIME LOOK" — the 

same Case Histories, but an en- 
tirely new story frame, to show 
the employer how his business 
can profit from that "Better Em- 
ployee Understanding." An 
agent's selling tool. Color, 44 
minutes. (Modern TPS) 

* * * 

IN PROCESS — Individualized 
adaptations of "Envelope" for C. 
G. clients. 

* * * 

AND A LETTER FROM 
CONNECTICUT GENERAL 

TO: 

Parthenon Pictures, 
Hollywood. 

Dear Cap: 

We sat through the first of the 
working showings of OUTSIDE 
THAT ENVELOPE today. In the 
next few days the entire company 
will see it as part of the Home Of- 
fice BEU. 

It was just like the first time for 
me; a tremendously impressive job. 

The audience I was with was 
probably the most sophisticated, 
since it consisted of officers and 
supervisors. The laughs were all in 
the right places, the attention was 
close and the understanding was 
high. The new-building replacement 
sections looked marvelous and I 
think everyone who was there 
agrees with the judges who gave it 
the Golden Reel. 

Thanks once more for an excel- 
lent piece of work. 

Sincerely. 

W. K. Paynter 

(Director, Adv. & P.R.) 



OTHEH PARTHENON CLIENTS 
(PICTURES IN PROGRESS) 

American Petroleum Institute 

Socony Mobil Oil Company 

American Tel. & Tel. Company 

and others 



PARTHENON PICTURES 

Cap Palmer Unit 
Documentary Films for Business 

2625 Temple St. • Hollywood 26 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




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NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1958 



37 




One Call for all You Need 



LIGHTING EQUIPMENT RENTALS 



ANYTIME, ANYVYHERE 

For quick service, expert advice 
and one low price for equipment, 

installation and removal, call on 
one of the nation's largest suppliers 
of temporary lighting facilities — 
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SIGHT & SDimD 

Bell System Premieres 
"Unchained Goddess" on TV 

r /"/;(' Lliuiiainecl Goddess, the 
fourth in the Bell System's Science 
Series, had its nationwide premiere 
in color over NBC Television on 
February 12th. The last of four 
films produced for Bell by Acad- 
emy Award winner Frank Capra. 
the hour-long production features 
Richard Carlson (who also di- 
rected the film ) as "Fiction Writer" 
and Dr. Frank Baxter as "Dr. Re- 
search," in the story of weather. 
In the cast of animated charac- 
ters (supplied by Shamus Culhane 
Productions) are Meteora, God- 
dess of Weather, and her court, 
consisting of Thor (thunder), 
Boreas (wind), the Three Marutas 
(rain, snow, and hail), and Cirrus 
(clouds). 

Tells Story of Weather 

Following the pattern of Bell's 
three previous science films. Our 
Mr. Sim, Heiiio the Magfiificent, 
and The Strange Case of the 
Cosmic Rays, the story of weather 
is told in terms of its effect on 
mankind, the scientific knowledge 
gained by research and observa- 
tion, its action and causes, methods 
of prediction, and the progress be- 
ing made in attempts to control it. 
Animation is used to simplify com- 
plicated scientific concepts and 
humanize abstract terms and ideas. 
Dramatic concept is supplied by 
Fiction Writer and Dr. Research 
deals with the scientific knowl- 
edge and data. 

The action of wind and its for- 
mation, clouds and rain, snow and 
hail, lightning and thunder, are all 
pictured and discussed. How 
weather scientists collect data, ana- 
lyze and study it for accurate pre- 
dictions, track tornados and hurri- 
canes, and attempt to control the 
actions of all factors making up 
bad weather, lack of rain, heavy 
snows, etc., are amply featured. 

How to Borrow This Film 

Immediately after its TV pres- 
entation, 16mm prints were de- 
posited in local Bell Telephone 
Company business offices for use 
by schools and other organizations 
on a free loan basis. Requests for 
prints should be directed to the at- 
tention of the local Manager or 
i:)irector of Public Relations, f^ 

Index of Sponsored Films 

• A complete listing of all films 
featured in Busines.s Screen dur- 
ing 1957 will appear in the next 

issue. No. 2, I95S. i'^ 



Calvin 16mm Workshop in 
Session from March 17-19 

ir The Calvin Company has an- 
nounced the presentation of an- 
other 16nim Motion Picture Pro- 
duction Workshop, to be held on 
their sound stages on Monday, 
Tuesday and Wednesday, March 
17 through 19, in Kansas City, 
Missouri. The workshop will con- 
sist of special sessions in addition 
to the Calvin staff screen talks on 
various phases of 16mm film pro- 
duction. 

Included in the special sessions 
are discussions and demonstra- 
tions of problems of producing 
wildlife films, led by Charles W. 
Schwartz of the Missouri Conser- 
vation Commission and of prob- 
lems and results achieved in mis- 
sile and rocket photography pre- 
sented by Air Force personnel. 

A visual presentation on Com- 
munications will be made by either 
Joseph W. Coffman, president, or I 
Larry K. Hamilton, vice-president, i 
of the Tecnifax Corporation. Also > 
to be presented is a showing of 
notable and recent 16mm films. i 

There is no registration fee or 
obligation for attending the ses- 1 
sions. Those wishing to partici- ' 
pate are asked only to arrange j 
their own transportation and hotel | 
reservations. The Calvin Com- ; 
pany will be happy to send com- ■ 
plete details to anyone inte-ested. • 



FOR PRODUCERS 
OF VISUAL SELLING 
IN MOTION PICTURES 
SLIDE FILMS 
TV COMMERCIALS 



ills berg wl 

Tplete production servi 



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hot press titles 

type catalogue 
on request 

421 WEST 54th STREET, NEW YORK 19,N.Y. 
PLAZA 7-1525 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 





And THE COMBINATION "^^^ ^^ F Packaged programs 
for SALES and TRAINING... combining film production 
and film utilization, using the new Xm Repeater 
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MEMBER 



SOUND MASTERS 



165 WEST 46TH STREET, N.Y. 36, N.Y. PLAZA 7-6600 



II 



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K) 



OF NEW YORK 



SOCIETY OF MOTION PICTURE AND 

TELEVISION ENGINEERS 

Office: 55 West 42nd Street, New York 36, 
N.Y. 

Officers: Barton Kreuzer (Director, Product 
Planning, Eadio Corporation of America), 
president; Norwood L. Simmons (Eastman 
Kodak Company), executii'e vice-president; 
Dr. John G. Frayne (Westrex Corporation), 
past president; Axel G. Jensen (Bell Telephone 
Laboratories), engineering vice-president; 
Glenn E. Matthews (Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany), editorial vice-president; John W. Serv- 
ies (National Theatre Supply), financial vice- 
president; G. Carleton Hunt (General Film 
Laboratories'!, convention vice-president ; 
Ethan M. Stifle (Eastman Kodak Company). 
sections vice-president; Wilton R. Holm ( E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc.) ; secretarii; 
Reid H. Ray (Reid H. Ray Film Industries, 
Inc.), treasurer; Charles S. Stodter, executive 
secretary. 

Local Section Chairmen (for contact) : 
Atlanta— B. M. Loden, Box .37, North Side 
Branch, Atlanta, Ga.; Canadian — R. J. 
Beaudry (Shelly Films, Ltd.), Toronto, On- 
tario; Chicago — Howard H. Brauer, Box 430, 
Evanston. 111.; Dallas-Fort Worth— R. K. 
Keitz (Keitz & Herndon), 7123 Westbrook 
Lane, Dallas, Tex.; Hollywood — John W. 
DuVall. 1429 Cartwright, North Hollywood, 
Calif.; New York— Burton F. Perry, 5 Hilltop 
Road, Port Washington, N.Y.: Rochester — T. 
Gentry Veal, 81 Shellwood Drive, Rochester, 
N.Y.; San Francisco— Werner H. Ruhl, 415 
Molimo Drive, San Francisco, Calif.; Wash- 



PROFESSIONAL FILM 
AND TELEVISION GROUPS 



(also see pages 33, 34, 42, 86, 88, 90) 

ington, D.C. — James A. Barker ( Capitol Film 
Laboratories), 1005 Fairview Ave., N.E., 
Washington, D.C. 

Purpose: The Society works toward the im- 
provement, along technical lines, of film pro- 
duction and e.xhibition, television and equip- 
ment and film manufacture. Published reports, 
standards and specifications are made available 
through the Society and derive fi'om the work 
of various committees. 

Conventions: 83rd Semi-Annual Convention, 
April 21-26, Ambassador Hotel, Los Angeles, 
Calif.; 84th Semi-Annual Convention, Oct. 
20-24, Sheraton-Cadillac Hotel, Detroit, Mich. 



NATIONAL TELEVISION FILM 
COUNCIL: NEW YORK CITY 

Office: 1639 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 

Phone: COlumbus 5-0756. 

Chief Officer: Robert Gross (American Film 
Producers), president. 

E.xecutive Secretary: Bernie Haber (Batten, 
Barton, Durstine & Osborn). 

Meetings: The Council meets on the fourth 
Thursday of each month (except July and 



August) in New York City, where its active 
membership is primarily located. 

Activities: Quarterly forums on subjects of 
industry-wide interest; symposiums on tele- 
vision-film problems; talks by members and 
guest speakers ; annual awards to outstanding 
TV-film personalities in recognition of their 
encouragement of the use of film on TV. 

Purposes: To act as "United Nations" of the 
TV-film industi-y, providing a clearing house 
for all segments of the trade and a place for 
solving mutual industry problems ; to improve 
technical and commercial operations in TV- 
film broadcasting; to provide a means for 
various segments of the industry to settle 
differences through amicable compromise and 
cooperation. ^ 



INDUSTRY FILM 
PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION 

Office: Membersliip Committee Chairman H. 
Eugene Burson, Jr., Hughes Aircraft Co., 
Supervisor, Systems Film Group, Room 1119, 
Bldg. 12, Hughes Aircraft Co., Culver City. 
California. 

Officers : Daniel D. Downer ( Aerojet General 
Corp.), president; Jay E. Gordon (Autonetics, 
Div. of North American Aviation), vice-presi- ■ 
dent; Robert J. Gunther (North American 
Aviation), secretary; Julian D. Ely (Lockheed! 
Aircraft Corp.), treasurer. 
Committees: Program — Rudolph Carlson 
(Northrop Aircraft, Inc.); Standard.s — John 
D. Rogers (Autonetics); Publicity — Betty J. 
Williams (Lockheed Aircraft Corp.) . ^Sf 



DilTfoNARY- "COMPREHENSIVE: LARGE IN SCOPE AND HAVING THE POWER OF FULL UNDERSTANDING." 

C^omprelteniive .Jiervice" is dei/oted to the ZJ-uil Mnderilandin^ of our customers' needi and problems." 



"27TH YEAR OF SERVICE TO THE USER OF MOTION PICTURES' 



REELS • CANS 
SHIPPING CASES 

* A A 
MOTION PICTURE i 

EQUIPMENT ( 
ACCESSORIES 

* -ft * 

DISTRIBUTOR OF S 

GOLDBERG BROS. | 

PRODUCTS J 



COMPREHENSIVE 

FILMTREAT 

REJUVENATION OF 

16MM a 3SMM FILM 




COMPREHENSIVE SERVICE CORPORATION 



CALIFORNIA BRANCH 

6674 SANTA MONICA BLVD. 

LOS ANGELES 38 



245 WEST 55TH STREET 
NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 

















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^0^ p/r7z^^£r >iMffD ro qu results 



Aiming pictures to get results for clients * is a business in 
itself, requiring specialized personnel, complete facilities 
and all of the more than 25 years of experience we offer 
for your next assignment. 

Every sponsored motion picture, to be successful, must 
be custom-made for the exact pmpose intended. Whether 
in the vital business of today's selling needs, or to create 



a better climate for management, to help develop inspired 
interest of young people in the opportimities of totnorrow 
. . . YOUR next picture is OUR most important. 

*General Electric, Ford, IBM, General Motors, Kraft Foods, 
International Paper, Richfield Oil, American Meat Institute, 
Hotpoint, Chamber of Commerce of U. S., Moore Business 
Forms, Chrysler, Etc. 



P.S. Write today on your letterhead for a previeiv print of "COMING ATTRACTIONS' OUR story on 16mm sound film. 



A 



r 



STUDIOS, INC. ^^ 



5631 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. Phone; HOIIywood 7-6126 
CHICAGO: 2103 Orrington Ave., Evanston. Phone: DA 8-7236 



NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



AUDIO-VISUAL COMMISSION ON 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

Office: Room 2230, 250 West 57th Street. 
New York 19, N.Y. 

Officers: Harold E. Hill (National Associa- 
tion of Educational Broadcasters, Urbana. 
Hlinois), cliairmaii; Charles F. Schuller 
(Audio-Visual Center, Michigan State Univer- 
sity, East Lansing, Michigan), vice-chairman; 
Emily S. Jones (Educational Film Library 
Association, New York, N.Y.), secretary. 

Executive Committee (in addition to offi- 
cers) : Anna L. Hyer (Department of Audio- 
Visual Instruction, NEA, Washington, B.C. ) ; 
Don White (National Audio-Visual Associa- 
tion, Fairfax, Virginia). 

* * * 

Purpose: A joint committee of nine national 
organizations concerned with the improvement 
of instruction through wider and better use 
of audio-visual materials and methods. The 
Commission has prepared and distributed 
several publications including "Telling Your 
A-V Story," "Gateway to Learning," and "A 
Crisis in Education." Currently to be re- 
leased is The Case of the CurioH.-< Citizen, a 
color slidefilm tape recorded presentation of 
a good audio-visual program in action. 



Special Projects : Among projects in process 
are a special bulletin for school administrators, 
a folding piece on "Audio-Visual Facilities 
for New School Buildings," "A-V on the Air," 
a booklet for audio-visual directors interested 
in using radio and TV facilities, and a series 
■of taped radio broadcasts. A series of articles 
prepared for the Commission will appear in 
the April issue of "Better Schools." 1^' 



AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICE COMMITTEE 

OF THE ASSOCIATION OF NATIONAL 
ADVERTISERS, INC. 

AUDIO-VISUAL GROUP 

Office: 155 East 44th Street, New York 17. 
N.Y. 

OFFirER.s: Paul B. West, president; Lowell 
McElroy, vice-president; Herbert A. Ahlgren, 
administrative secretary, Attdio-Visval Service 
Committee. 

Membership: Willis H. Pratt, -Jr. (American 
Telephone & Telegraph Company), chairman; 
W. M. Bastable (Swift & Company) ; F. G. 
Beach (^ Remington Rand Division, Sperry 
Rand Corporation ) : Leo P.eebe ( Ford Motor 
Company) ; Eyre Branch (Standard Oil Com- 
pany of New Jersey) ; George J. Dorman 
(United States Steel Corporation); Robert 
DanieLson (Encyclopaedia Britannica Films, 
Inc.) ; Harold F. Driscoll (Bell & Howell Com- 
pany) ; Agnew Fisher (Trans World Airlines, 
Inc.) ; John Flory (Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany) ; John Ford (General Motors Corpora- 
tion) ; William Hazel (Standard Brands In- 
corporated) ; J. W. King (American Can 
Company) ; John T. Madden. Jr. (Seagram- 
Distillers Company); Kenneth Penney (Min- 
nesota Mining & Manufacturing Company i ; 
O. H. Peterson (Standard Oil Company of In- 
diana) ; H. A. Richmond (Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Company); Frank Rollins (E. R. 



NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 
IN THE AUDIO-VISUAL FIELD 



(also see pages 33, 34, 40, 86 a)id 88) 
Squibb & Sons Division, Olin Mathieson 
Chemical Coi-poration) ; Virgil Simpson (E. I. 
du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc.) ; Stanley F. 
Withe (Aetna Casualty & Surety Company). 

* * * 
Purpose: The Committee initiates and e.\- 
ecutes projects which will provide the 612 
Audio-Visual Group members with cost, tech- 
nical, distribution and other information about 
business films and related audio-vi.sual mate- 
rials. 

The Committee has recently completed and 
distributed a report entitled "Responsibilities 
of the Film Producer and Sponsor." This re- 
port, which pi-esents a comprehensive analysis 
of sponsor and producer responsibilities in 
the planning and production of non-theatrical 
films, is designed to assist both the producer 
and sponsor to reach a better understanding 
and to secure a more satisfactory product. 

Current projects of the Committee include 
the preparation of an A.N. A. Audio-Visual 
Handbook, a report on the use of Business 
Films on Television, and the establishment of 
an ANA Audio-Visual Clinic to review mem- 
ber films and advise on production and distri- 
bution problems. 



AUDIO-VISUAL CONFERENCE OF 
MEDICAL AND ALLIED SCIENCES 

Officers: Daryl L. Miller (Assistant Director 
of Motion Pictures and Medical Television, 
American Medical Association), cliairman pro 
tern; Dr. Donald A. Washburn (Director, 
Bureau of Library and Indexing Service. 
American Dental Association), r'ice-chairman 
pro tern; Audrey Skaife (Administrative 
Assistant, Medical Audio-Visual Institute, 
Association of American Medical Colleges, 
2530 North Ridge Avenue, Evanston. Illinois), 
secretary-treasm-er pro tern. 

Membership: Medical, dental and allied agen- 
cies. 

Purpose: To exchange information regarding 
programs of the member organizations; to 
discover, collect, disseminate and e.xchange 
descriptive and evaluative information on 
audio-visual media as related to their applica- 
tion to education in the medical and allied 
sciences. 

Annual Conference: Held during the Na- 
tional Audio-Visual Association Convention in 
Chicago. 



INDUSTRIAL AUDIO-VISUAL 

ASSOCIATION 

Founded, 1946 

Office (of the Secretary) : Alan W. Morrison, 
Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc., 150 East 
42nd Street, New York 17, N.Y. 

Officers: Frank S. Rollins (E. R. Squibb & 



Sons), President; Frank B. Greenleaf (U. S. 
Steel Corp. Subsidiaries), First Vice-Presi- 
dent; John T. Hawkinson (Illinois Central 
Railroad Company), Second Vice-President; 
Charles B. Gunn ( New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad), Treasnrer; Alan W. Mor- 
rison (Socony Mobil Oil Company, Inc.), 
Secretary; Raymond W. Roth ( U. S. Steel 
Corporation), Assistant Secretary. 

Principal Committees and Chairmen 
Membership: Stanley W. Puddiford (Michi- 
gan Bell Telephone Company), Chairtnan; 
Marshall F. Hosp (General Mills, Inc.), Pro- 
f/ram chairman — Western; Don Y. Pendas 
(Charles Pfizer & Company), Program cliair- 
man — Eastern; Bernard A. Bailey (Mytinger 
& Casselberry ) , Publicity cliairman; Roy R. 
Mumma (U. S. Steel Corporation), Technical 
chairynan; W. B. Reynolds (Ohio Bell Tele- 
phone Company), Constitution chairman; 
James Craig (General Motors Corporation), 
Historian; William B. Cox (Santa Fe Rail- 
way), Past President chairman. 

Purpose: To study all means of audio-visual 
communications including creation, produc- 
tion, appreciation, use and distribution; to 
promote better standards and equipment and 
to establish a high concept of ethics in the 
relations of members with associated interests. 

Annual National Meeting: April 29. .30 and 
May 1, 1958, Minneapolis, Minn. (Members 
only, but qualified guests from sponsoring 
companies may apply to the Secretary for 
admission) . 



NATIONAL VISUAL PRESENTATION 
ASSOCIATION. INC. 

For Information : Write to Norman Bebell, 
secretary-treasurer, or Phil Patterson, pro- 
gram chairman, at: Post Office Box 14. Old 
Chelsea Station, New York 11, N.Y. 

Officers: Jacques Megroz (Life Magazine), 
■president; Philip E. Dodge (F. W. Dodge Cor- 
poration ) , vice-president (user) ; Charles Corn 
(Admaster Prints, Inc.), vice-president 
I trade); Norman L. Bebell (Bebell & Bebell 
Color Labs.), secretary-treasurer. 

C'lMMiTTEE Chairmen: Theodore N. Trett 
(Direct Advertising Associates), membership 
cliairman; Phil Patterson (Sales Management 
Magazine), program chairman; C. C. Sheppard 
( Woi-thington Corp.). Day of Visual Presenta- 
tion chairman. 

Board of Directors: Phil Patterson (Sales 
Management Magazine ) ; Dr. Robert Cantor 
(Ronson Corp.) ; Jeanne P. Conlon (Crawford, 
Immig and Landis); Janet R. Wilkins (Na- 
tional Association of Manufacturers) ; Theo- 
dore N. Trett (Direct Advertising Asso- 
ciates) ; Renita Johnson (Design Lab.) : C. 
C. Sheppard (Worthington Corp.); Porter 
Henry (Porter Henry & Co.); Lou Kaye 
(Sloves Mechanical Binding Co.); Charles 
Behymer (H. D. Rose & Co., Inc.). 
Purpose; To encourage better selling through 
better methods. 

Meetings: Luncheon meetings are held once 
a month at Toots Shor's, 51 West 51st Street, 
New York City. 

Annual Awards Competition; Day of Vis- 
ual Presentation : To be held next fall, 1958. 
Date and entrv deadlines to be announced. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




It's 

the 

picture 

that 

counts 



MOTION PICTURE 

(20 to 30 minutes) 

currently 

in produciion 

for: 

American Physical 
Therapy Associatio 

Chemstrand 
Corporation 

Eli Lilly and Compon 

Ford Motor Compan) 

General Motors 
Corporation 

Kaiser Aluminum 
& Chemical Corp. 

Monsanto Chemical 
Company 

New York Central 
Railroad 

Remington Arms 
Company, Inc. 

Reynolds Metals Co. 

U. S. Air Force 

U. S. Army 



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NEW YORK 22 
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THE FLIP-TOP stars at desk-side sales 
presentations. Dramatically tells a hard-sell 
story without mess or set-up time, without room 
darkening. Record and film simply slide into slots. 
Polacoat rear-projection screen for startling clarity 
in color or black-and-white. Top voice fidelity. 



FULLY AUTOMATIC 

THE MICROMATIC is the industry's 

standard for quality and performance. 

Film advances automatically — always 

on cue— triggered by standard 30-50 

impulse. DuKane "Redi-Wind" eliminates 

film rewinding forever! Shadow-bo.i screen 

built into carrying case, plus plenty of 

power for big-screen projection. 





AUDITORIUM SIZE POWER 

THE AUDITORIUM COMBINATION brings 
you fully automatic sound slidefilm projection. 
The high powered projector with 1200-watt 
capacity combined with the high powered 
auditorium sound unit produces large, brilliant 
pictures and fills any auditorium with .sound. 
Entire combination packs into two compact, 
attractive carrying cases. 



There's a DuKane sound slidefilm projector especially made 
to bring your message to any audience, from one to thousands! 
DuKane's top quality and rugged dependability give you 
sparkling pictures and bell-clear sound, now and for many years 
of hard use. Simple to operate, even by inexperienced personnel. 
For a demonstration in your own office, send in the coupon. 



CORPORATION 



DuKane Corporation, Dept. BS-28 , St. Charles, Illinois 

I am intr-rpsted in iParninK morn ahoul DuKani- sound slidefilrr 
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NAME 



COMPANY- 
ADDRESS— 

CITY 



MnnsantD Aids Science Education 

1 6mm Release of Televised "Conquest" Series Begins 
With Three-Part Film to Motivate Young Scientists 



DUKANE products are sold and serviced by a nation-wide network of audio-visual experts 



ii Monsanto Chemical Company, 
through their film distribution 
agency. Modern Talking Picture 
Service, Inc., have announced the 
release of the 60-minute film. Con- 
quest No. 1, first of the com- 
pany's current Television Science 
Series, for general distribution to 
high schools and interested adult 
groups on a free-loan basis. 

Produced by CBS Television and 
telecast nationally on time paid 
for by Monsanto as a public ser- 
vice, the series has been widely 
acclaimed by critics of such papers 
as the New York Herald-Tribune, 
the Philadelphia Inquirer, the 
Washington Post and Times Herald 
as one of the best presentations of 
scientific facts and data now on 
television. The series was plan- 
ned with the advice of the Ameri- 
can Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, The National 
Academy of Sciences, and the Na- 
tional Research Council. 

"The Edge of Life" 

Complete with commercials, 
which are extensions of the scien- 
tific theme of the film. Conquest 
No. 1 is subdivided into three 
sequences of action. The first. 
The Edge of Life, pictures the 
world of micro and submicro- 
organisms through the eyes of a 
powerful electron microscope. 
Wobbly, shapeless viruses through 
which man discovers the secrets 
of life, and the frightening action 
of cancer cells at work are dra- 
matically exposed. 

Knowledge from Sea Floor 

The second phase. The Ocean's 
Bottom, takes the viewer to the 
floor of the sea, along the valleys 
and peaks of its floor. The knowl- 
edge gained from this craggy bed 
hints to scientists that a great ice 
cap could cover most of the pop- 
ulated earth in a few years rather 
than the centuries originally be- 
lieved. In the last sequence. The 
Edge of Space, the blackness of 
the void and the brightness of our 
world in it are shown through the 
rocket camera's eyes. 

Eric Sevaried, Director of NBC's 
News Bureau, narrates the pro- 
gram. In the final moments, he 
and two leading scientists stress 
the urgent need, through their dis- 
cussion on the state of science in 
Russia and the U.S., for a genera- 



tion of young scientists developed 
in a climate of intellectual freedom. 
Prints are available from Modem 
Talking Picture Service, Inc., 45 
Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, 
N.Y. They request a month's 
advance notice prior to the book- 
ing date. Prints will be scheduled 
by their regional exchanges nearest 
the user. 

* :): * 

Illinois Welfare Dept. Holds 
Film Conference in Chicago 

■jV Featuring motion pictures on 
mental health, a one-day film con- 
ference for some 250 representa- 
tives of Chicago labor, manage- 
ment and religious groups was 
sponsored by the Illinois Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare in Chi- 
cago's Congress Hotel, January 31. 

The purpose of the conference 
was to acquaint group representa- 
tives with the availability of Wel- 
fare Department films for use in 
their own organizational programs. 
Because of the response from at- 
tending representatives, the Wel- 
fare Department plans to conduct 
conferences annually — or possibly 
semi-annually on a sectional basis. 

Films were shown in morning 
and afternoon sessions at the con- 
ference. Relating to various as- 
pects of mental health, the films 
included: Anger at Work, Person 
to Person Commimication, Mr. 
Findley's Feeling, Boy with a 
Knife, and The Family Circus. 
Also shown was a filmstrip on the 
volunteer services of the Illinois 
Department of Welfare. A dis- 
cussion period followed each film 
presentation. 

As Ye Sow, a film depicting the 
care of the mentally disturbed in 
Illinois State Mental Hospitals, was 
presented at a conference luncheon 
meeting addressed by Dr. Otto L. 
Bettag, M.D., director of the 
Department of Welfare. W 



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BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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PROCESSING CORPORATION 

165 WEST 46th STREET, NEW YORK 36, NEW YORK 
959 SEWARD STREET, HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIF. 








next an- dates . . 
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The above 10 points give a quick picture of the 
advanced features you should expect in a modern 
16 mm sound projector. Only a Victor brings you 
aU of them. And with every Victor you also get 
the "standard" features of all quality sound pro- 
jectors, including 2 speeds for sound and silent 
film, still picture, and reverse projection. 

Particularly important is Victor's new red, 
white and blue color-coded threading. Color lines 
on projector clearly show where to thread and the 
sequence of threading. Other time-proven fea- 
tures—exclusive with Victor— are safety film 
trips, top-mounted reels, and power rewinding 
with no change of belts or reels. 

Victor was first to develop 16 mm projectors 
and tlirough the years Victor has been first to 
perfect improvements that assure finest pictures 
—finest sound— easiest operation. Victor long has 
been the choice of A-V experts in 73 countries. 



NEW VICTOR VIEVS^ER 



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coated. 



Victor Assembly ID — Lightweight projector for small 
audiences. Amplifier operates at 10 watts continuous output, 18 
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VICTOR.. 



ANIMATOGRAPH CORPORATION 
EST. 1910 



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A DIVISION OF KALART 

Producers of precision photographic equipment 
PLAINVILLE. CONNECTICUT 




THE LOGIC 
of Film Results 

by Thomas J. Barbre* 

IF YOU HAVE a prospective cli- 
ent who looks upon you, the 
motion picture producer, as a sort 
of animated portrait photographer, 
you'd better change his thinking or 
get yourself another client. 

We are not still-life shutter 
jockeys. We are experts in the 
matter of knowing what keeps 
motion picture audiences glued to 
their seats and what bores them 
near to tears. Most of us have 
devoted our lives to the business. 
The best of us has produced a 
lemon or two. 

Staying out of the lemon busi- 
ness is, of course, our first order 
of business. We at Barbre Pro- 
ductions have a method which we 
think works pretty well. Cer- 
tainly we are not unique. 

The first thing we do is to try 
and sell ourselves to the client, not 
by any high-pressure huckstering, 
but by means of thoughtful, well 
considered logic. We establish 
ourselves in much the same light 
as the client's lawyer, his doctor, 
or his insurance counsellor. 

We try to ascertain ( 1 ) what is 
the story the picture is to tell, (2) 
what is the purpose the picture 
is to accomplish, and (3) to what 
audience or audiences the picture 
must appeal. 

Given these facts, we submit an 
outline. At an outline conference, 
perhaps the most crucial in all 
negotiations, we draw out the client 
as to his ideas of what should be 
presented within the context of the 
three points above. 

If we cannot agree with him, we 
tell him so, and we tell him why. 
We feel that a poor picture will 
harm us as much as it will him. 
We have been thanked more than 
once for thus guiding the course 
of a picture. 

If the client insists on leaving 
in the lemon extract, we do so, 
ever so sadly. The client usually 
sees the error in time for a revi- 
sion job before final recording. 
« * « 

*Mr. Barbie is head of Ihe Denver film 
oigiini/ation ihat bears his name. Found- 
ed in liMO. Barbre I'rocUictions now oc- 
cupies a modern studio building recently 
completed in this important, growing 
center of niounlain stales iiuliislry and 
agriculiuic. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



ff 



what 

does it take 
to ignite 
a critic? 




A scene from "Energeticaliy Yours." a humorous color film 

about mankind and energy. A Transfilm Production, designed 

by Ronald Searle for Standard Oil Company (New Jersey) 



VV ENORMOUSLY IMAGINATIVE"-New York Herald Tribune :{« "TRULY A MASTERPIECE"-New York Daily News * 
"SUPER-SOPHISTICATED"-Pittsburgh Post Gazette Jjc "BRILLIANT'-Atlanta Journal i^: "WONDERFUL SATIRE"-Boston 
Herald ^ "A LITTLE CLASSIC'-Philadelphia Bulletin ^ "UTTERLY CHARMING"-San Diego Union^^ and scores more. 



'Energetically Yours" has received more critical acclaim — including a spread in LIFE- 
than any other sponsored motion picture this year. 

What did it take to produce a film like this? The same talent and technical 
skill that goes into every Transfilm production. 



nmB 



Each job is an important job at Transfilm. 

Why not consult us about your next film? 



PRODUCERS OF QUALITY FILMS TO FIT EVERY BUDGET 
EAST: 35 WEST 45th STREET, NEW YORK 36, N.Y, | |^f^ MIDWEST: THE CARLTON HOUSE. PITTSBURGH 19. PA. 



NUMBER 1 . VOLUME 19 • 1951 





from tuba toots to bassoon booms . . . 



f ilmsovncls I for the 



most complete library of 



music and sound effects 



Honks! Blares! Brays! 
Blasts! Whizzers! Catcalls! 

And all the sounds in-between! Plus an unsurpassed 
range of talent and technical knowhow — for scoring, 
editing, recording, dubbing and mixing sounds and music 
for TV Films, Animation, Slide Films, Documentaries, 
industrial Films and Feature Productions. 

Detailed rate schedule and additional information available 
upon request. Call ENright 9-1300 collect, or write: 



f ilmsownds, inc. 

105 East 106th Street, New York 29, N. Y. 



Ihe Praducer's View 



by Nathan Zucker, President 

Film Producers Association of New York 



/^ NE OF THE Problems we continually face in our industry 
^"^^ is that of trying to find the proper language to describe 
new techniques, functions and concepts. 

For example, we have no words in "communications" to 
distinguish properly between the device, either mechanical 
or electronic, and the art. Television, film, tape are 
transmission or transcription devices. Their skillful use 
to inspire, instruct, or inform can be described as communication. 

I qualify this last statement because here, too, we often 
confuse communication with propaganda. 
We disregard all of our motivational and educational 
experience if we believe we communicate with people by 
telling them or persuading them. We achieve a state of 
communication with people when they participate in the 
process of exchange of ideas or emotions. 

All this is by way of leading up to the fact that "producer" 
is a cloak of many colors that covers many functions as 
well as individuals and organizations. It can describe a function 
and a business enterprise. It can apply to both the concept 
of creative catalyst and the responsibility of getting a job done. 

We at the Film Producers Association of New York, with a 
membership of thirty-five producing companies, have had 
to define what we mean by a producer. This doesn't 
mean that we disagree with all other variations on the theme, 
but, as in viewing some kinds of contemporary art, one 
has to draw the line somewhere. 

The film producer is a responsible organization whose primary 
business is the production of motion pictures. This 
organization must have been in business for at least a year 
and in its application for membership in the FPA must submit 
evidence of its creative and technical competence and of its 
financial responsibility. Membership involves adherence 
to a code of ethics. 

We who are engaged in the sponsored film field have been 
merchandising, on the part of our clients, confidence, quality, 
services and responsibility. It would seem that our clients 
have a reasonable right to expect the same qualities 
from their suppliers. 

This does not mean that we want to minimize the creative 
function of the producer in communications. But the 
many services related to this function must be done well and 
with responsibility. 

Our industry is growing. Like our clients, we have a 
past, present, and a future. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




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WRITE FOR COMPLETE LITERATURE 



We Have What Business IVegiIs 

Producer Leadership With Unity Can Make a Real Contributloi 

by L. Mercer Francisco 
President, American Association of Film Producers 



^>i 



S. G. SALTZMAN, INC. 

SALES DISTRIBUTORS for CAESAR MANUFACTURING, INC. 
480 lexlnglon Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. 



MARKETING, PRODUCTION. AD- 
MINISTRATION — these and 
other activities present increasingly 
difficult problems to the Manage- 
ment of today's large business 
organization. 

The toughest of all these tough 
problems is universally conceded 
to be those involving the human 
factor in business. The larger the 
organization the more complex 
such problems are. 

In its attack upon these prob- 
lems, the Management of modern 
business has, since only World 
War II, given more attention to 
"human relations" than have all 
the conquerors and kings, and all 
the captains of industry and mer- 
chant princes, in all past history. 

The Key Is Communication 

The key to successful "rela- 
tions" — customer, public, indus- 
trial, trade, employee, community, 
governmental, or what — has 
proved more and more to be in 
effective communication. 

Witness the growing interest in 
semujitics and empathy — two 
words that, up till a few years ago, 
were found only in unabridged dic- 
tionaries. Today they are bandied 
about in many a business confer- 
ence. And the increasing use of 
the conference is itself, recognition 
of the need for communication — 
the need to understand and to be 
understood. 

To achieve better communica- 
tion in business. Management is 
turning with increasing confidence 
to the use of films, of one form or 
other, since films have proved to 
be the instrument without equal 
for disseminating information, for 
inducing thinking, and for influenc- 
ing emotions and behavior. 

Management Would Invent It 

Films, particularly sound films, 
as an instrument of communica- 
tion, meet so effectively and so 
efficiently the needs of today's 
large scale business organization 
that, if they did not already exist. 
Research and Development engi- 
neers would undoubtedly be set to 
work inventing them for Manage- 
ment's use. 

If the Management of the busi- 
ness enterprise or other institution 
faced with communication prob- 
lems has not made as much use of 
the film as its values warrant, it is 



because the skilled practitioners in 
film making have not adequately 
explained those values. The task 
of winning a place for the film as 
an instrument of communication 
equal to that enjoyed by the oral 
and written word, is, however a 
herculean task and one with which 
no single film producer can hope 
to cope with complete success. 

Three Areas for Cooperation 

He needs help! Help in the 
form of the collective effort of all 
professional film producers work- 
ing in collaboration in behalf of the 
filmic medium rather than in hot 
competition for film orders. That 
effort should be directed along 
three basic lines: 

First, .studying the intrinsic na- 
ture of the sound film as an instru- 
ment of communication, to the end 
that its myriad elements may be 
used to increase the already extra- 
ordinary effectiveness of the 
medium. 

Second, striving to promote har- 
monious relations between pro- 
ducer and producer as well as 
between producer and sponsor, to 
the end that the ethical standards 
of the industry may approach those 
of the professions. 

Use the Medium Itself 

Third, using the film itself, and 
all other media of communication, 
for promoting a better understand- 
ing of the nature and uses of the 
film, on the part of producers and 
sponsors alike, to the end that the 
use of films may become as stand- 
ard a part of the business operation 
as advertising, personal sellini',, 
sales promotion, merchandising, 
and public relations. 

Professional film producers, by 
working together can, without 
question, achieve these objectives 
to a far greater degree and in much 
less time than they have been 
gained to date by producers going 
their separate ways. In such col- 
lective eft'ort it is definitely true 
that the whole is greater than the 
sum of its parts! ^ 

Editor's Note: Mr. Francisco, 
with several decades of profes- 
sional experience as senior execu- 
tive of leading film companies and 
head of his own Chicago concern. 
was recently re-elected head of the 
American Association of Film 
Producers for the 1958 term. ©■ 



BUSINESS SCKEEN MAGAZINE 



Boston 
Film Festival 

Edinburgh 
Film Festival 

Golden Reel 
Film Festival 

Harrogate 
Film Festival 

Rome 
Film Festival 

Scholastic 

Teacher 

Film Festival 

Stamford 
Film Festival 

Venice 
Film Festival 




iA 



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ff.. 



tangible 



results in sales 



and good will paid 
for the picture 
many times over.-^- 



KNICKERBOCKER 

PRODUCTIONS, INCORPORATED 

1600 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y 
Telephone: Circle 5-6710 



NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1958 



51 




YOU CAN'T POUR KNOWLEDGE 

into the mind of a student like milk out of a pitcher. Learn- 
ing requires motivation and participation, and educators 
have found that for the absorption and retention of infor- 
mation the silent filmstrip is an outstanding teaching tool. 

Silent filmstrips, by their nature, compel the student to 
inquire and to think. They combine visual and intellectual 
stimulation v/ith such effectiveness that today filmstrip 
projectors outnumber motion picture projectors almost 
two-to-one in American schools. 

Using the filmstrip medium, your budget will 
reach an audience twenty times as large as the 
same amount of money spent on a motion picture. 

With a stafF of fourteen specialists, Filmfox has produced 
more than 1000 filmstrips. This background of experience 
and the best equipment in the industry is available to you 
if you have a message to convey to America's youth. 

FILMFAX PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



Office 
10 EAST 43rd STREET 
NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



Studio 

STATION PLAZA 

BEDFORD HILLS, N. Y. 




WoRivSHOP PLANNERS (left to right) L. Paul Flory, assi. chief; C. Graham 
Eddy, chief. Medical Illustration Div., Veterans Administration: Neal 
Keehn, Calvin Co. vice-pres.; Dr. David Ruhe, audio-visual director, 
Kansas University Medical School. 



Medical Film Workshop at 
Calvin Week of April 14th 

w The Calvin Company has an- 
nounced their plans to again assist 
in the presentation of a special- 
subject motion picture Workshop 
in the fields of health and medi- 
cine. 

The Second Annual Medical 
Motion Picture Production Work- 
shop will be held during the week 
of April 14th in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri. Consisting of three days of 
small group workshop sessions, 
talks, and demonstrations, it will 
end with a Workshop banquet. 
The total fee for participation will 
be $60.00, including a banquet.. 

Anyone interested in this subject 
is welcomed. Contact the Calvin 
Company, 1105 Truman Road, 
Kansas City, Missouri for complete 
details on the program and for 
registration. ^ 

Dental & X-Ray Techniques 
Shown Via Closed-Circuit 

i^ Dental surgery and X-Ray tech- 
nique, demonstrations emanating 
from Walter Reed Army Medical 
Center in Washington, D. C. were 
presented to medical audiences in 
Chicago recently via closed-circuit 
television. 

The suruical technique demon- 



strations were telecast in color and 
shown to the Chicago sessions on 
big screens through the facilities 
of Closedcircuit Telecasting Sys- 
tem, Inc., New York City. 

On January 29, a 4-hour close- 
up-camera demonstration of den- 
tal surgery at Walter Reed Hos- 
pital was beamed to 850 dental 
students and faculty members of 
the Northwestern University Den- 
tal School in Chicago. A two-way 
audio-hook-up enabled the North- 
western audience to discuss the 
presentation with the participating 
dental surgeons at Walter Reed. 

On February 8, the latest X-Ray 
techniques were colorcast from 
Walter Reed to more than 400 
radiologists attending the three- 
day convention of The American 
College of Radiology in Chicago's 
Drake Hotel. 

The Washington - Chicago 
closed circuit visualizations fol- 
lowed the linking of Washington 
and New York City for a medical 
demonstration on December 12, 
1957. In this instance, CTS tele- 
vised a demonstration of mouth 
surgery and tooth repair at Walter 
Reed Hospital to an audience of 
1,700 dentists at the Greater New 
York Dental Meeting in the Stat- 
ler Hotel. * 




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BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



We Salute 
THE FILM PRODUCERS 



who have so effectively produced more 

than 1,000 motion pictures, slide films, and 

meeting programs planned and written by our 

creative staff in the 11 years we've been m business 



American Film Producers 
Atlas Film Corporation 
Audio Productions, Inc. 
Barlen, Inc. 
Bray Studios, Inc. 
Byron, Inc. 
Capital Film Studios 
Cineffects, Inc. 
Cinevision, Inc. 
Condor Films, Inc. 

Dallas Jones 

Productions, Inc. 

DeFrenes Company 

Depicto Films, Inc. 

Empire Photosound, Inc. 

Farrell & Gage Films, Inc. 

Fletcher Smith Studios, Inc. 



New York 

Chicago 

New York 

Pittsburgh 

New York 

Washington 

Washington 

New York 

Easton, Md. 

St. Louis 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

New York 

Minneapolis 

New York 

New York 



Fordel Films, Inc. 
Galbreath Picture 


New York 


Reid H. Ray 

Film Industries, Inc. 


St. Pau 


Productions, Inc. Ft. 


Wayne, Ind. 


Robert Yarnall Richie 




General Motors Photographic 
Gulf Coast Films, Inc. 


Detroit 
Houston 


Productions, Inc. 
Roland Reed Productions, Inc. 


New Yor 
Hollywoo 


Herbert Kerkow, Inc. 
The Jam Handy 

Organization, Inc. 


New York 
Detroit 


Sound Masters, Inc. New Yor 
Tantamount Pictures, Inc. Richmond, Vj 
Texas Industrial Film Company Housto 


John Bransby Productions 


New York 


Unifilms, Inc. 


New Yor 


Leslie Roush Productions, Inc. 


New York 


U. S. Department 




Loucks & Norling Studios, Inc. 


New York 


of Agriculture 


Washingto 


McLarty Picture Productions 
Meridian Films Corporation 
Mervin W. La Rue, Inc. 


Buffalo 

Pittsburgh 

Chicago 


U. S. Naval 

Photographic Center 

Universal International Studios 


Washingto 
Hollywoo 


Mode-Art Pictures, Inc. 
Paul Hance Productions, Inc. 
The Princeton 


Pittsburgh 
New York 


Wilding Picture 

Productions, Inc. 

Willard Pictures, Inc. 


Chicag 

New Yoi 


Film Center, Inc. Princeton, N.J. 


William J. Ganz Company, Inc. 


New Yoi 



''" "GiM/edr (jHmducei, 

CREATIVE PLANNING FOR VISUAL CR ESE NT AT I ONS 

3408 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. • Washington 16, D. C. • Emerson 2-8200 



NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1958 



When you produce your next slide film, 

remember . . . UCA VICTOR SOUND 

makes the picture complete! 







lor Custom Recording covers more ground — faster — 
other service of its kind. Our engineers" superior skill, 
1 by years of experience and the most up-to-date tech- 
id equipment, makes RCA Victor the constant leader 
d. 

tor also supplies the most extensive library of musical 
for slide films - at no extra cost. First quality record- 
'ul handling, and fast delivery go hand-in-hand with 
er. 

:A Victor Custom Record Sales provide you with its 



famous "one-stop" service — recording, editing, pressing, and 
shipping — for greater quality, economy, and results! 

RCA Victor custom record sales ^t) 

Neiv York 10, 155 East tUh St MVrray Hilt »-7t00 

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In Canada, call Record Department, RCA Victor Company. Ltd.. its 
Mutual Street, Toronto. Ontario. For iniormation concerning other foreign 
countries, write or phone RCA International Division. SO Rockefeller Plaza. 
Neiv York tO, N. Y.-JU 6-SSOO. 



Byers Film on Wrought Iron 
Going Strong After 12 Years 

A Wrought iron was what the man- 
agement of A. M. Byers Company 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., had in mind 
when they named their industrial 
motion picture Eternally Yours, 
12 years ago. In choosing the 
title, the wrought iron manufac- 
turers also appear to have accu- 
rately gauged the metal of the 
film itself. Eternally Yours re- 
cently was slated for its lO.OOOth 
showing. 

In terms of durability and dis- 
tribution. Eternally Yours is a 
noteworthy example of an informa- 
tive sponsored film's long-term 
sales potential. Eternally Yours 
has increased its bookings each 
successive year since its release. 
Currently, the film is being booked 
an average of 100 times per month. 
During its first two years, the 
film was exhibited exclusively to 
engineers and although the audi- 
ence has been broadened to in- 
clude vocational and college stu- 
dents, foremen's clubs and other 
groups, plus television viewers, 
the film still draws its initial target- 
audience — designing and specify- 
ing engineers. 

Produced by Wilding Picture 
Productions. Inc.. Eternally Yours 
was planned for longevity. His- 
torically and scientifically accu- 
rate, it became an accepted educa- 
tional supplement, of value to the 
student engineer and the practic- 
ing graduate engineer. It has be- 
come a standard film for many 
schools, colleges, company and 
fraternal groups. Twenty prints of 
Eternally Yours are on permanent 
loan to schools and colleges. 

A 31 -minute black white narra- 
tive. Eternally Yours pictorializes 
the discovery of wrought iron, its 
history, properties and uses. Re- 
counting how, in biblical times, 
man learned that he could forge 
metal for weapons, the film scans 
the technological evolution which 
has kept iron economically impor- 
tant to artisans, architects and de- 
sign engineers for more than 1900 
years. 

Portrayed are the discoveries of 
the Egyptians, who found that the 
metal would melt faster when a 
crudely conceived forced-air draft 
was introduced to the fuel. Im- 
provements brought about by early 
Asiatic smelters, by the Spanish, 
the English and by Americans are 
chronicled. 

Climactically, the film depicts 
the development of the Aston- 
Story process which eliminated 
(continued on page 56) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Top Quality 

TV Commercials 
Educational 
Sales Training 
and Industrial 
Films 



Lhtrty-one years 
of professional 
experience together 
with completely 
integrated studio 
and laboratory 
facilities plus 
top-flight personnel 



Chicago Film Studios 

56 East Superior Street 

CHICAGO . 11 
Phone WHitehall 4-6971 



Let Us Define 
Responsibility 

Ly Francis Carter Wood, Jr.* 

N My Estimation a motion pic- 
\ tine producer is a man with a 
dual responsibility. He has a re- 
sponsibility to his cHent and a re- 
sponsibility to the motion picture 
industry. To the extent that he 
meets these responsibilities to his 
fullest capacity, he may be con- 
sidered a conscientious and ethical 
producer. 

The established producer has a 
heavy investment in experience, 
equipment and overhead. He is 
in constant competition with in- 
dividuals who would like to achieve 
the same position in the industry. 
In his relations with his client the 
producer is to a great extent deal- 
ing in intangibles — ideas. It is in 
the execution of these ideas that 
the motion picture is born. It is 
a rare client who knows enough 
about motion pictures to evaluate 
what he is going to get for what 
he is willing to spend. 

For this reason the prospective 
client is often beguiled by the in- 
dividual who promises more than 
he is able to deliver. Such a pro- 
ducer serves neither his client nor 
the motion picture Industry. 

The established producer wel- 
comes competition from either in- 
dividuals or small organizations 
who give the client what he wants 
and needs. A satisfied clientele 
enlarges the use of the medium on 
which we all depend for our liveli- 
hood. The unethical producer 
serves neither himself, his client 
nor the industry. Opportunism has 
no place in our business and gains 
no lasting rewards for its practi- 
tioners. 

*Mr. Wood is president of Sound Mas- 
ters, Inc.. New York film producers and 
an experienced creator of pictures in his 
own right. SM is now in its eleventh 
year. 




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THE DISTRIBUTOR'S GROUP, Inc. 
204 • 14th St.. N.W. ATLANTA 13, GA. 




E, X, PA N S f I 10|Nr 




NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 




Coming soon 

to serve you with 

TV^ICE the processing 
facilities 

• New Neg.-Pos. Color 

• New 35 mm Black-and-White 
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T^VICE the printing facilities 
T^VICE the editorial facilities 
TV^ICE the sound services 

• Both RCA and Westrex 




CAPITAL 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

1905 Fairview Ave. N.E., 
Washington 2, D. C. 
LAwrence 6-4634 




(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 54) 

hand-puddling, a back-breaking, 
dangerous job. Then the film ex- 
plains the many uses to which 
wrought iron is put by industry 
today. 

Educational content, subtle-sell 
and an accent on selective distri- 
bution are regarded by the sponsor 
as the factors which have estab- 
lished a wrought iron record for 
Eternally Yours. In recent years, 
television coverage has grown as 
something of a bonus for A. M. 
Byers Company. Eternally Yours 
has been telecast in a number of 
cities and one print, cut to 27' _; 
minutes, is on file with a major 
network. m> 

Asbestos-Cement Siding Use 
Shown in "Man from Missouri" 

; • How leading builders through- 
out the United States are using 
Asbestos-Cement siding to in- 
crease the sales of medium and 
higher priced homes is shown in 
The Man from Missouri, a new 1 8- 
minute color motion picture spon- 
sored by Asbestos-Cement Prod- 
ucts Association. 

Designed for showings to build- 
ing industry groups, The Man from 
Missouri features three large 
builders in the east — Frank 
McClatchey, McClatchey Building 
Corporation, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Bob Scarborough, Haddonfield, 
N. J., and Max Fink, Margate, 
N. J. 

The Man from Missouri was 
produced by Hartley Productions, 
Inc., New York City, from a script 
by Newton Meltzer, whose cred- 
its include several industrial and 
television productions. The film 
is being distributed on a free loan 
basis from the Asbestos-Cement 
Products Association, 509 Madi- 
son Avenue, New York 22. N. Y. 



Fisher Co. Names 
Advertising Mgr. 

•w" Walter K. von 
Schonfeld has been ap- 
pointed a d V e r t i si n g 
manager and public re- 
lations director of Os- 
car Fisher Company, 
Newburgh, N. Y., man- 
ufacturers of automatic 
photographic process- 
ing equipment. 

Von Schonfeld has 
many years of experi- 
ence, was associated 
with General Electric 
and Indian Motorcycle 
in the U. S. B^ 



The Giant Redwoods Star 
in This New Color Film 

-ft The Forever Living Forests, a 
27-minute color film produced by 
W. A. Palmer Films, Inc., San 
Francisco, for the California Red- 
wood Association, has been re- 
leased for viewing by the lumber 
industry and schools, clubs and 
other groups. 

Directed by Dave Buder, the 
film was made in Humboldt and 
Mendocino counties in the North- 
ern California redwood region dur- 
ing the spring, summer and fall of 
1957. Photography was done by 
cameraman Joe Dieves and assist- 
ant cameraman Dick Fowler. Bar- 
ney Petty did the script. 

The film gives a general view of 
modern logging and lumbering in 
the redwood industry, from selec- 
tive cutting and tree farming meth- 
ods, to modern mill practices which 
enable even the bark of redwood 
logs to be utilized as byproducts. 

Ideal Picture Corp. is handling 

the nationwide release of the 

movie. Black and white prints are 

available for tv use. ^' 

* * * 

Playhouse Pictures Opens 
Midwest Office in Chicago 

i" Peter Del Negro has been ap- 
pointed niidwestern representative 
for Playhouse Pictures, Hollywood, 
California by Adrian Woolery, 
president of the animation studio. 

Del Negro's appointment estab- 
lishes Playhouse Pictures" first 
midwest representation. The new 
midwest offices are located at 360 
North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 
1. Illinois. The Chicago office 
phone is STate 2-3686. 

Before joining Playhouse Pic- 
tures, Del Negro was general man- 
ager of UPA Pictures, Chicago. 
Previously, he had been associated 
with Gene Peters Associates, San 
Francisco, and had operated his 
own commercial art studios in 
New York City. ^ 



•5f 

FILMS 

IMPRESSING 

THE MIND'S EYE 

EDWARD FEIL PRODUCTIONS 

1514 PROSPECT AVENUE 
CLEVELAND 15, OHIO 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Vidicam pictures corp 

motion picture producers 

210 EAST 5th STREET, NEW YORK 3, N. Y. 
TELEPHONE Algonquin 4-71 02 



NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



MEW SERVICE 
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\£ BUYERS READ AND USE 
ISINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Five Exec Appointments 
Announced at Wilding Studio 

"■ Five executive promotions at 
Wilding Picture Productions, Inc.. 
have been announced by C. H. 
Bradlieid, Jr.. the company's presi- 
dent. 

C. B. Hatcher, formerly secre- 
tary-treasurer, now is vice-presi- 
dent in charge of tinance. F. F. 
Palac has been appointed treasur- 
er and L. A. Backey is secretary. 
W. H. Tinkham has been nameJ 
vice-president in charge of produc- 
tion and J. M. Constable has been 
made vice-president and e.xecutive 
producer. 'j9' 

Rinker Appointed Vice-Pres. 
at Kling Film Productions 

•:V Edward W. Rinker has been 
promoted to the position of vice- 
president at Kling Film Produc- 
tions. Chicago. He previously was 
a Kling account executive. 

Rinker, who has over 20 years 
in the graphic arts field, moved 
into the motion picture industry 
from a career as a magazine photo 
illustrator. After serving as direc- 
tor of photography for an educa- 
tional film producer, he entered the 
film sales field as an account exe- 
cutive for a commercial studio. '^' 



Promotion of the 
theatre screen adver- 
tising medium is dis- 
cussed by (I to r) Reid 
H. Ray. Ted Caiii;er. 
Gordon Winkler and 
Frank Havlicek at re- 
cent meetiiii; in Minne- 
apolis (see below) 



Theatre-Screen Ad Bureau 
Will Promote This Media 

•u Formation of Theatre-screen 
.'\dvertising Bureau, to make avail- 
able facts on theatre screen adver- 
tising as a major advertising media. 
has been announced by Gordon 
Winkler, information director for 
the organization. The bureau is 
supported by the companies en- 
gaged in production and distribu- 
tion of filmed commercials design- 
ed for motion picture theatres. 

Winkler, a member of the firm 
of Daniel J. Edelman & Associates, 
will head up both research activ- 
ities and information for the 
bureau. The agency has offices 
in New York City and Chicago. 

According to a recent research 
report, theatre screen advertising 




is used in about 94 per cent of the 
19,209 theatres in the United 
States. Winkler said. Commercials 
vary from 40 to 90 seconds. 

The bureau's program will in- 
clude brochures, news releases, 
newsletters and films. A speakers' 
bureau also is planned. \'§; 

Film on Refugee Camps 
Produced for Church Groups 

iV The Long Stride, a new 16mm 
sound film reporting factually on 
conditions in world refugee camps, 
has been released by the Broad- 
casting and Film Commission of 
the National Council of Churches 
and is available to local churches. 
The film was commissioned by the 
council's relief agency. Church 
World Service. 



I^iJmlMMi ^ 



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E. Ray Am, president of Film Associates, (with more 
than a decade of experience in continuous film process- 
ing) has this to say about his Fihnline R-90 processor:* 

"Now that wc have over a year of service with almost 
two million feet of reversal film processed, I feel I 
can give you a good picture of our feeling regarding 
our p'ilmlinc processor, h is a pleasure to run day 
after day without keeping our fingers crossed. Our 
other self-contained processor was a continual head- 
ache, in troubles with clutches, bad rollers, and ris- 
,ing elevators. We have found with other processors 
we've owned in the past, that troubles usually begin 
after four to six months of service. 
You are to be conmiended on your fine products, and 
you may rest assured that we are most happy with, 
and most heartily endorse Filmlinc processors." 



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Dw the World's Largest Motion Picture Studios s 
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Dur Most IVeglected Weapon 

Why Don't Our Film Exports Tell America's True Story? 

by Walter Lowendahl, President, Transfilm, Inc. 



W/ HAT Has The United States, 
* * with the world's greatest 
film industry at its command, done 
to utilize the tremendous poten- 
tialities of the film? 

Very little. 

Each year hundreds of Holly- 
wood films are sent abroad by 
individual film distributors. We 
may well ask what these pictures 
are saying about America. 

Here are a few examples from 
popular American films. 

Delightful as it appeared to us. 
Oklahoma! struck the French as 
unbelievably naive. Judged with 
a clear eye, it will be seen that 
the film really does not repre- 
sent anything but a sentimental, 
stylized and imaginary America. 
Marty is closer to truth because it 
neither falsely praises nor deni- 
grates the average urban Ameri- 
can. But, in reality, how many 
American Marty's are there? 

We are sending The Glass 
Menagerie to the Brussels World's 
Fair — -but, like most of Tennessee 
Williams' views of life, this one is 
singular and neurotic. It certainly 
cannot be considered representa- 
tive of American family life. 

All Pictures are Propaganda 

When Blackboard Jungle was 
shown overseas, it made a deep — 
and damaging — impression upon 
the wife of an important Asian 
government official. Shortly after- 
ward, when her husband was as- 
signed to Washington, she dreaded 
to accompany him. Later she 
confided apologetically to Ameri- 
can friends that she had been 
afraid to send her children to an 
American school. 

This woman, remember, is 
educated. If she failed to com- 
prehend that Blackboard Jungle 
depicted only a very small segment 
of our schools, what can be ex- 
pected of less educated audiences 
in other parts of the world? 

The fact is, like it or not, all 
pictures and plays that go abroad 
propagandize America. It is not 
the policy of our government to 
scrutinize entertainment for sub- 
liminal messages; nevertheless, un- 
noticed and sometimes unintended 
messages are embedded in every 
film. Intentionally or not, they all 
say something about American life. 
Obviously, in allowing pictures to 
go abroad that show us to be a 



nation of teen-age werewolves, 
wealthy gangsters, dope addicts 
and neurotic women, we are doing 
ourselves a disservice. These films 
propagandize against our own 
interests. 

People of other nations, more- 
over, can scarcely believe that any 
government would permit such 
films to be exported // they were 
not true. Therein lies the danger. 
We should not assume that for- 
eigners understand our customs, 
either governmental or popular. 
Our only recourse is to show the 
other side of the story. 

The Other Side of the Story 

What is the other side? Merely 
what we Americans have been tak- 
ing for granted for years ... in- 
dustrial America, labor unions and 
labor laws, factory working con- 
ditions, the factories themselves, 
the astounding variety of products; 
Americans helping one another. 
Red Cross volunteers, welfare or- 
ganizations, safety and health; 
American farms — land, equipment 
and methods; Americans at play 
in its oceans, mountains, lakes and 
parks; America's traditions, its 
heritage, its culture; American 
schools and varied education; 
America's religions living in har- 
mony. . . . 

Hollywood rarely gives any oi 
these subjects dispassionate film 
treatment. If they are mentioned, 
they are used in connection with 
characterization or plot and made 
to serve a purpose . . . humorous, 
glamorous, villainous, dull ... al- 
ways guided specifically by the 
boxoffice. 

Yet, on all these subjects depict- 
ing the true America, there already 
exists a vast library of films in 
which the approach is documen- 
tary, honest and sincere. These 
are the industrial, commercial, 
organizational and public service 
films . . . films which have been 
made to show to other Americans, 
films that dare not embody over- 
statement and flamboyance lest 
they antagonize the sensitivities of 
increasingly discriminate American 
viewers. 

These are the films we ought to 
export as counter-propaganda not 
only to some of our own Holly- 
wood products but to what is in- 

( CONTINUED ON PAGE 62) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 




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(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 60) 

finitely more dangerous — the care- 
fully selected propaganda films of 
our political antagonists. 

Why Don't We Do So? 

The reason we are not doing so 
seems to be lack of encouragement 
and facility. Free sponsored films 
require the same innumerable 
forms, the same duties, the same 
rigamarole as Hollywood produc- 
tions, all of which militates against 
sending these films overseas. The 
death stroke is the sponsor's aware- 
ness that his film was not designed 
expressly for these markets and 
these people. Certainly, very few 
of such films get overseas. Even 
to enter them in international fes- 
tivals, where there is often no 
reimbursement at all, the expense 
greatly outweighs the honors. 

Yet this vast library of pictures 
could be invaluable to America. 
Without too much strain, it may 
be said that it could tilt the bal- 
ance in the propaganda war for 
men's minds in the neutral world. 
To counter the Hollywood image 
of ourselves as self-satisfied cigar- 
smoking moguls in penthouses, we 
can present the picture of the aver- 
age American man in his three- 
room apartment or lowcost Levit- 
town house. Against the whoopee 
musicals about American colleges, 
we can show countless serious stu- 
dents at work in classrooms and 
laboratories. 

Let's Show America As It Is 

Against the picture of the ex- 
ploited workman, we can show 
laborers at home with refrigerators, 
tv sets, washing machines or 
driving to work in their own auto- 
mobiles. By all means, let us show 
the commonplace supermarket 
which so intrigued the Queen of 
England during her recent visit 
here. 

As producers of these films, we 
should have a strong desire to see 
them serve the purposes of good 
government and good international 
public relations. What better way 
than this to preserve the American 
way of life which has given us the 
opportunity to make these films? 
We can do this by simply show- 
ing America as it is. 

Recently the United States In- 
formation Agency has been con- 
sidering the value of facilitating the 
export of such films through a 
committee formed expressly for 
this purpose. Let's hope that little 
more time is wasted in putting to 
use this powerful but most-neg- 
lected weapon for America to- 
day ... the sponsored film. ^ 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




PATHESCOPE PRODUCTIONS 

The Pathescope Company of America, Inc. 



You are cordially Invited to visit our studios 
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NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



63 




New Product Development 
Outlined in AMA Film Kit 

i-T An explo.atory outline to aid 
companies in the successful devel- 
opment of new products is visual- 
ized in a Product Pioneering 
Slidefilm Kit produced by the Re- 
search and Development Division 
of the American Management 
Association. 

The training package's slide- 
film was given a premiere showing 
at New York's Roosevelt Hotel 
during the AMA new product con- 
ference, January 13. 

Supplementing the 92-frame 
sound slidefilm are two copies of 
the basic script — provided for the 
narrator and projectionist, a de- 
tailed narration script for the dis- 
cussion leader, entitled "What 
Management Wants to Know," and 
25 copies of a handbook, "Finding, 
Screening and Appraising New 
Products." 

Based on the recent experience 
of more than 100 companies, the 
AMA slidefilm, running about 20 
minutes, presents questions which 
should be asked by research, engi- 
neering, manufacturing and sales 
executives about the product a 
company intends to develop. Ques- 
tions applicable to all companies 
are emphasized, the material being 
arranged in the most probable se- 
quence for the majortiy of organi- 
zations. 

The Product Pioneering kit is 
designed as a lead-in device for a 
discussion of and training in new 
product development. The slide- 
film can be shown with the re- 
corded (33 1/3 LP) narration by 
Tex Antoine, radio and television 
commentator, or the discussion 
leader may narrate personally, 
using the "What Management 
Wants to Know" script. This 
script contains additional informa- 
tion on each part of the slidefilm 
and olTers points which can be 
used for discussion. 

The handbook, "Finding, 
Screening and Appraising New 
Products, supports the slidefilm 
motivation with selected articles 
intended to increase the audience's 
understanding of the problems in- 
volved in product development. 

The complete Product Pioneering 
Slidefilm Kit is available to AMA 
members for $95.00; to nonmem- 
bers for $135.00 Additional cop- 
ies of the handbook may be ob- 
tained. Companies interested in 
the Product Pioneering kit may 
contact the Visual Education De- 
partment, American Management 
Association, 1515 Broadway, 
Times Square, New York 36. f^ 



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BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




American Sheep Producers Council Joins 

UNITED WORLD'S "Blue Chip" Sponsor Group 

With a Brand New Film Package 



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The American Sheep Producers Council, dedicated to expanding the demand 
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N 

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Iew audiences are constantly being 
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today. No other company can offer you 
this "plus" distribution! If you now have or 
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A DIVISION OF 

UNIVERSAL PICTURES COMPANY. INC. 



43 



UNITED WORLD FILMS, 



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65 



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Why So Many Price Tags? 



A Producer Discusses the Baffling Question of Film Costs 
and Explains Why Bids Vary; How Those "Bargains" Are Born 

P VERY Buyer of motion pic- 
•'-^ tures has run into the neces- 
sity for selecting a producer on the 
basis of widely varying bids — all 
made, apparently, on the same 
carefully detailed job, or script. 

It's a little confusing. 

And every producer of motion 
pictures has had one of these reac- 
tions to his price quotation — 

"When? How can yoii jii.siify 
such a price? Why, I can buy that 
stuff myself for $10 a roll — a three 
minute roll!" 



"Mm-htn . . . I see. Well, you're 
a little high, Mr. Jones. This other 
firm's price is just half yours." 
or 
"That's rather a surprising figure, 
Mr. Smith. It's so much lower than 
these other bids we've received. 
Are you-uh-sure you-uh-have in- 
cluded everything?"* 

There was the request for quota- 
tion on a government project, a few 
years back, with 25 producers bid- 
ding. Each bidder was provided 
with the complete script and full 
particulars regarding locations, etc. 
The bids ranged from $8,000 to 
$44,000. 

Why? 

There was the fine chinaware 
manufacturing firm that asked two 
producers to quote on a 15 minute 
film to show table settings, with the 
manufacturer's staff demonstrator 
as the sync sound narrator-demon- 
strator. One quotation was for 
$12,000 and the other for $800. 

How Come? 

Then there was the midwest 
producer who did a local and 
regional business, and had been 
operating successfully over the 
past 20 years — with steady repeat 
business. He almost went broke 
over a one year period, before win- 
ning back his old customers. These 
customers had participated in a 
Community Promotion Project 
sold by an outside film outfit, 
which included their own individ- 
ual company films at a very low 

• Or, in other words, do you know what 



Reprinted by special permission of 
the Calvin Company from its ex- 
cellent journal. The Aperture, 
in which this original mss. recent- 
ly appeared. 



rate — about one fourth the rates 
these firms had been paying the 
local producer. 

What's the Explanation? 

Well, of course, there are rea- 
sons for these variations. Some of 
the reasons don't make very good 
sense, but they are reasons. 

Let's comment on the three 
puzzlers listed above. 

On the government bid request, 
most bids received were in the 
$16,000 to $22,000 bracket— in 
this case generally admitted to be 
a fair price. The very high bidder 
didn't want the job anyhow. The 
low bidder got the assignment, shot 
the scenes, and wasn't able to com- 
plete the film. A year after the 
original request, another one went 
out — how much to view and edit 
the film, etc., etc.? Final, actual 
cost was probably within the fair 
price range mentioned above. 

The table setting variation was 
based on interpretation of the re- 
quirement. What kind of picture 
do you want? The high bid price 
was based on a color film to be 
shot, scene by scene, utilizing 
close-ups, orientation shots, careful 
attention to lighting, etc. The low 
bid was based on the assumption 
the producer was only to photo- 
graph the customer's usual demon- 
stration, using multi-camera tech- 
nique, in 5-minute takes. No 
scripting. No responsibility for di- 
rection and production. Either 
price was a fair price for the prod- 
uct in mind — depending on what 
the manufacturer wanted. 

On the third case history, the 
local producer involved admits he 
is somewhat puzzled himself. His 
customers got their money's worth, 
in a sense, from the outside pro- 
ducer — who used high speed films 
to shoot the normal factory or 

(continued ON PAGE 68) 



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^ producers Chosen 







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NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 195i 



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Why So Many Price Tags? 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 66) 

business operations in sequence, 
and delivered a newsreel type of 
coverage. The local producer 
could do this too. but most assign- 
ments call for more analysis, re- 
searching, scripting, careful light- 
ing and planning, etc., etc. — pro- 
duction "details" that use up time, 
call for special abilities, and cost 
more money. 

In going over these three cases 
we've picked up some clues, 
haven't we? 

Some Reasons Prices 'Vary 

Even though the same script, or 
film project, is the basis for esti- 
mating costs, the cost may vary 
widely on — 

1 . Type of production. 

2. Degree of producer respon- 
sibility. 

In addition, price may vary on — 

1. Efficiency in operation, or 
business basis of the producer. 

2. Margin of profit the pro- 
ducer wants to operate on. 

3. Method of pricing. (Cost 
plus or total bid. ) 

We saw the variation in price 
that was based on different types 
of production. In general, the 
multi-camera television-type film- 
ing of material that is ready for 
the camera should obviously cost 
considerably less than the planned, 
carefully-researched and thought- 
fully-produced film which is 
"created" from a multiplicity of 
choices. 

Different Types Set Costs 

Similarly, the newsreel type of 
film production — whether exterior 
or interior — with high speed film 
or little or no extra lighting — costs 
less to produce than the film which 
requires extensive use of lighting 
units, careful direction, and over- 
all production responsibility. 

We're talking about diff^erences 
in price, not necessarily variations 



in value. If the $500 film bid will 
do the job, and do it well, there's 
no point in paying a higher price. 
But, it's well to understand the 
differences before making the de- 
cision. 

The comparative efficiency of ' 
difi'erent producers is a cost factor, 
but not a major one. Competi- 
tion in time takes care of this, or, 
growing sophistication of the film 
buyers. 

Margin of profit expected can be 
quite a factor. The man who 
wants to retire wealthy in ten years 
charges more than the man who 
considers himself in a lifetime busi- 
ness operation. But this too tends 
to get taken care of as film buyers 
become more knowledgeable. Price 
must be justified over and beyond 
personal retirement plans. 

Pricing Method a Factor 
The method of pricing can be a 
considerable factor. First, there is 
the cost plus basis, as opposed to 
the total bid. Second, there is the 
bid worked out on each single film 
project, versus the pre-pricing that 
is based on annual volume. The 
Calvin Company operates on the 
latter basis, with prices listed in a 
Production Procedure form. 
(Available on request, naturally!) 
We figure our profit on the year's 
total production business, and this 
makes it possible to price our pic- 
tures in advance. 

Finally, the degree of producer 
responsibility is THE big factor. 
Price is necessarily higher in direct 
ratio to the degree of responsibility 
assigned the producer. If he con- 
tracts to shoot a day of outside 
photography, his responsibility is 
limited to delivering the desired 
scenes in good exposures. If he 
shoots a sync sound scene for 
newsreel use, acceptable lighting 
and sound are added to his respon- 
sibilities. 

And so it goes, step by step, as 
additional responsibilities are 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 70 ) 




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,"''!,':, "-^L*::'";-'" Whals ^ew in Business PiclurGs 



(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 68) 

added. The ultimate is the assign- 
ment to the producer of complete 
responsibility for analysis, script- 
ing, arrangements, and production. 
Then it's his job to create a product 
designed to do a certain job — to be 
responsible not only for all parts 
of the project, but for the whole 
project. And. in motion picture 
non-theatrical film production, the 
whole is greater than the total of 
its parts. 

So, what can we advise the 
potential film sponsor? "Let the 
buyer beware"? 

No. but let the buyer understand 
the various factors that go into 
producing a film, the various ways 
of interpreting the same subject, 
and let him buy pictures with the 
same informed intelligence he ap- 
plies to other purchasing. 

Motion picture production is 
not "cheap", under any set of cir- 
cumstances. 

But. neither need it be expen- 
sive, when measured in relation to 
how well the film product is de- 
signed to do a job worth the 
doing. lij' 

* * * 

Pix Briefs Aussie Dealers 
on Ford Auto Parts Sales 

■sir The Difference That Counts, a 
25-minute color motion picture, 
has been sponsored by Ford Motor 
Company of Australia Pty. Ltd.. 
to help develop Ford's parts and 
accessories business in Australia. 
The film is being made available 
to the Ford Australia distributing 
organization for showings to motor 
men at dealer parties and sales 
training sessions. 

Emphasizing the importance of 
merchandising and selling genuine 
Ford parts and accessories for 
Ford vehicles. The Difference 
That Counts enacts its message 
from a competitive script: 

Fred Evans gets his share of 
Ford vehicles in for repair at his 
service station but he figures he's 
making bargains on purchases of 
non-genuine spare parts so he 
doesn't have a firm policy of using 
only genuine Ford parts to make 
his repairs. What Fred loses on 
customer service and goodwill he 
hopes to make up on his "extra 
profit" purchases, which in sonic 
cases turn into extra losses. 

Several slip-ups occur on vari- 
ous repair jobs — wrong parts, in- 
correct service information, broken 
promises. Fred Evans nearly loses 
his good friend and regular cus- 
tomer through a misinterpretation 



of electrical parts. Finally Fred 
seeks the help of his local Ford 
dealer. 

Dealer Harry Thompson advises 
Fred on his problems and explains 
the benefits available to a garage 
operator who adheres to a policy 
of using genuine Ford parts lor 
Ford vehicles. 

The quality of genuine Ford 
parts is shown in plant laboratory 
sequences and animation clarifies 
the comprehensive Ford parts-and- 
accessories supply and distribution 
system. 

Cambridge Film & T.V. Pro- 
ductions Pty. Ltd., of Carlton. 
Australia, produced The Difjer- 
ence Thai Counts under the tech- 
nical supervision of Claire JefTerv. 
parts sales training manager of 
Ford Motor Company. Direc'ed 
by Dave Bilcock. the film utilizes 
Australian locales and a full-size 
parts and accessories department 
built by Ford in the Cambridge 
studio. 8' 



Film Shows Progress 
on the Illinois Tollway 

ir Tollroad. a 15-minute color mo- 
tion picture documenting the con- 
struction of the Illinois Tollway 
has been released for public show- 
ings. The film's availability was 
announced by Charles L. Dearing, 
executive director of the state's 
tollway commission. 

Reporting on several phases of 
the 187-mile tollway. the film ob- 
serves work progress on a tri-level 
interchange near Chicago's O'Hare 
airfield, the building of a pre- 
stressed concrete bridge over the 
Fox River near Elgin. Illinois and 
construction of a $7.5 million 
b-id<ie over the Milwaukee road's 
yards at Bensenville. 

The film is available on request 
to the Illinois State Toll Highway 
public relations department, 20 N. 
Wacker Drive, or to the Modern 
Talking Picture Service. Inc. li- 
brary at 216 E. Superior Street in 
Chicaso. R" 



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and FEATURE Motion Pictures 

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"Industry's Decisive Decade" 
Offers Visual Look at Future 

■¥■ Of all the changes taking place in 
the United States economy today, 
believe the editors of Fortune, 
none is more important than that : 
taking place in the industrial mar- 
ketplace. 

In Industry's Decisive Decade, 
an animated motion picture in full 
color, these changes are examined, 
at the management level, to pro- 
vide industrial marketers with an 
insight into the opportunities that 
lie ahead in the coming decade. 

Among the questions asked and 
answered in the film are: 

Will the present high level of 
industrial sales be maintained? 

Why are industrial producers 
considered the most crucial seg- 
ment of our economy? 

How "depression-proof" is our 
economy? 

What are the primary factors, 
new and old, influencing industrial 
sales today? 

Will U.S. productivity continue 
to increase at its present rate? 

How has industrial selling 
changed? 

What marketing opportunities 
are there for industrial producers 
in the long-range plans of such 
consumer goods manufacturers as 
Chrysler, Coca Cola, Kroehler 
Furniture, General Electric, Soco- 
ny Mobil? 

Running time of the 16mm fiJm 
is 15 minutes, making it adaptable 
for management training, sales 
meetings, marketing seminars, and 
for showings to distributor and 
supplier groups. 

The film was produced by 
Animation, Inc., under the direc- j 
tion of Earl Klein. Prints are 1 
available at $275 each from For- j 
tune Films, 9 Rockefeller Plaza, 
New York 20, N.Y. ^ 

* .f * 

Films Recognized as Vital 
Sales and Training Tool 

7^ A 1957 A.N.A. report titled 
Departmental Responsibilities jar 
Proniotional Functions discloses 
that: 

85';- of the A.N.A. member 
companies use films and audio- 
visual materials for advertising, 
public relations, sales and sales 
promotion. 

8 1 "^r use films for training sales- 
men and dealers. 

In only nine out of 209 com- 
panies (4%) the purchasing de- 
partment determines film specifica- 
tions. 

In 16% of the companies, the 
purchasing department does the 
buying. f- 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



GOING PLACES! 



I F t^ I went p/aces" in 1957 
will go further in 19581 

In one short year of operation, IFPI's progress has 
been remarkable — based on one simple 
merchandising fundamental — 



"SATISFIED CUSTOMERS ARE HARD TO LOSE" 




In only one year. IFI'I lias built up 


an inipressi> e list 


of satisfied customers: 




Anthracite Iiiiorination Bureau 


Blue Coal Corporation 


Borden Food Products Conipany 


Colfiate-l'alniolive Company 


('.ongoleuni-Nairn, Inc. 


Dancer-Fitzficra Id-Sample, Inc. 


Ethyl Corporation 


General Telephone (Corporation 


The Okonite ConipauN 


Ofii Ivy-Benson-Mather, Inc. 


Personnel Institute 


RCA Electron Tube Division 


Arthur Schmidt & Associates, Inc. 


Select Mafiazines, Inc. 


Sharon Steel (Corporation 


Westinghouse Electric Corporation ■ 



Ask any of IFPFs customers what they think of 

1 _ IFPFs QUALITY 

2 — IFPFs PRICES 

They will tell you that IFPI produces effective 

MOTION PICTURES • SLIDE FILMS • VISUAL AIDS 



at prices that don't tear your heart out . . . 
productions that reflect the 




of IFPFs executive, creative and production staffs. 

Why not coll Al Eians. Bill Alley 
or .hick Lane ri<jht now? 



IIFPI 



^ Industrial Pilm Producers, Inc. 



624 Madison Ave. 



New York 22, N. Y. 



ELdorado 5-5677 



NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



71 




SIGHT & SDUJVD 



or 16mm. Film — 400' to 2000' Reeli 

Protect your films 
Ship in FIBERBILT CASES 

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Production Review Copies 

ii- Extra copies of this 8th Annual 
Production Review Issue are avail- 
able at $2.00 each, postpaid if 
check accompanies order, while 
the limited supply lasts. Included 
at no extra cost with annual sub- 
.scription $3.00 a year; $5.00 for 
two years. 



Industry Film Producers 
Cite First Film Awards 

■•'r The Industrial Film Producers 
Association, a recently organized 
group of professionals in the mo- 
tion picture production field em- 
ployed within various industries in 
Southern California, have an- 
nounced the winners of their first 
award program. 

Winning films represented the 
best entry for each of five cate- 
gories; public relations, training, 
sales promotion, indoctrination, 
and technical reporting. Repre- 
sentatives of the sponsoring com- 
panies were presented with the 
IFPA award plaques in a program 
given February 6th at the Institute 
of Aeronautical Sciences in Los 
Angeles. 

The best Indoctrination film was 
Ramo-Wooldridge Corporation's 
Security Is Your Responsibility: 
Atomic International's Sodium 
Reactor Experiment Fabrication 
was the best in Technical Report- 
ing; Autonetics received the Sales 
Promotion award for their Brains 
—Who Needs Them With Re- 
comp?; the Training award went 
to North American Aviation for 
F-lOO Spin Indoctrination; and 



Rocketdyne got the Public Rela- 
tions award for Road to the Stars. 
Warner Bros. Studios' starlet, 
Joanna Barnes, presented the 
plaques. The key speaker was 
Virgil Pinkley, news analyst, who 
stressed the importance of visual 
and graphic materials as the 
bridge to any communications 
barrier, anywhere in the world. 
Emcee for the evening was Art 
Balinger, radio and television an- 
nouncer-narrator. ^ 

1958 Tele-Sell Presented 
to Audiences in 62 Cities 

•k Twice as big as its 1957 fore- 
runner, the 1958 Tele-Sell, live 
sales training telecast, was pre- 
sented in 62 cities in the United 
States and Canada on the evenings 
of March 4, 5 and 6. 

With the script by Richard C. 
Borden, nationally known sales- 
trainer, this year's show included a 
novel form of audience participa- 
tion in the actual telecast. 

First night covered new tech- 
niques and ideas in general and 
wholesale selling; the second night 
was devoted to retail over-the- 
counter selling. The third night, an 
innovation in the Tele-Sell method, 
dramatized new developments in 
management training. 

Technical equipment and facil- 



ities in the 62 participating cities 
again was provided by Tele- 
prompter, Inc.. under the super- 
vision of its president, Irving Kahn. 
Organizations such as the Sales 
Executives Club or the Jaycees 
sponsored the event in the various 
cities in the closed-circuit network. 
The program emanated from 
New York City; and the Visuals 
Division, Communications Institute 
of America, produced the show. 
Founders of Tele-Sell are Arthur 
H. Motley, president of Parade 
Publications, Inc., and Morris I. 
Pickus, founder of Personnel In- 
stitute. 5f 
* * * 

If You're Looking for a 
Chicago Screening Site . . . 

■A' Looking for a location for your 
Chicago film premiere? The 8th 
Street Theatre announces that it 
is currently available for day or 
evening use on Sundays and week- 
days, with some Saturdays also 
open. 

Directly back of the Conrad Hil- 
ton Hotel, the theatre seats 1255 
people, is air conditioned, and has 
16mm and 35mm projection equip- 
ment. It is probably best known 
as the home (since 1932) of the 
WLS National Barn Dance broad- 
casts, ff 



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We wish fo express our gratitude for the 
whole-hearted cooperation of the diplomatic 
and home officials of the following countries: 



ENGLAND 


AFGHANISTAN 


FRANCE 


PAKISTAN 


SWITZERLAND 


INDIA 


ITALY 


BURMA 


YUGOSLAVIA 


MALAYA 


GREECE 


THAILAND 


TURKEY 


CAMBODIA 


IRAN 


SOUTH VIET NAM 


UNITED STATES 


NUMBER 1 . 


VOLUME 19 



The World Highways Expedition, organized for the Ford Motor Company and 
J. Walter Thompson Company by Filmways, ha-s just completed its history- 
making, round-the-world test drive of the 1958 Ford car. A distinguished series 
of television commercial films and a major documentary film, "One Road," will 
soon bring the exciting story of this expedition to millions of people the world over. 

WORLD HIGHWAYS EXPEDITION. Inc. is a wholly-owned subsidiary of 



FILMWAYS 



INCO»»O«AT£0 



STREET 



YORK 



73 




The PICTURES of the YEAH 

Science, Safety and Salesmanship Were Vital Concerns in 1957 



PRODUCERS OF . . . INDUSTRIAL FILMS . . . 

TV COAAMERCIALS AND SOUND SLIDE FILMS 

SINCE 1946 

COMPLETE FACILITIES . . . STUDIO . . . EDITING . . . 

. OXBERRY STAND . . . ANIMATION ... ART DEPT 

ROGER W^ADE PRODUCTIONS. INC. 

15 W. 46th ST., NE\A^ YORK 36, N.Y. CI 5-3040 

MEMBER OP NEW YORK FILM PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION 



THE Year of Sputnik and of 
Jupiter brought science re-ap- 
praisal into worldwide focus. 1957 
brought notable films to help in- 
struct and motivate for science; it 
was also a time of urgent need for 
better selling and inspired sales- 
men. 

Human relations and safety edu- 
cation were other dominant film 
themes. The U.S. Steel program 
Knowing's Not Enough set an ex- 
ample of integrated media; Repub- 
lic Steel registered important sales 
results with its broad-scale Order 
Makers" Institute programs. 

Film audiences continued to 
make sharp gains as both 16mm 
group showings and public-service 
release via television brought grat- 
ifying large viewing totals to spon- 
sors. 

An outstanding film of 1957, 
presenting a panorama of modem 
achievement, is American Engi- 
neer, the Jam Handy Organiza- 
tion production for the Chevrolet 
Division of General Motors Cor- 
poration. 

First released in Super Scope 
(wide-screen) Technicolor, it was 
shown as a short subject (29 min- 
utes) in 5,000 theatres through- 
out the country. Then it was re- 
leased in 16mm for general use. 

The documentation of the far- 
flung work of engineers was so 
well thought of by professional en- 



gineers that, during National Engi- 
neers' Week last year, some 300 
prints were reserved by the Na- 
tional Society of Professional Engi- 
neers for showings by their local 
chapters. 

Theme of American Engineer 
is a factual report on the dra- 
matic miracles of our time made 
possible by the skill of the engi- 
neer in all of the various fields of 
that work, often combined with 
scientific research and develop- 
ment. Aerial and surface views of 
the world's first atomic submarine, 
the floating oil platforms in the 
Gulf of Mexico, and other seem- 
ingly impossible structures and ma- 
chines are seen. The Betatron 
smashing atoms, the radio tele- 
scopes transmitting sound from 
sun and stars, the electron micro- 
scope magnifying a molecule 100,- 
000 times; these are all part of the 
dramatic story of what has been 
done by the engineer in the United 
States. A quick look at things to 
come is given the viewer before 
the film ends. 

As an inspiration to young peo- 
ple to give serious thought to en- 
gineering as a career, and as an 
awakening to millions of Ameri- 
cans to the challenges met and 
those which will be met by the en- 
gineer, the film has and will con- 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 78) 



Responsibility and the Client 

by Walter Colmes* 

^HERE HAS BEEN a great deal 
said and written about the 
producer's responsibility to his 
client and we know that above all, 
this responsibility means that the 
producers must deliver a film that 
does its job. But what about the 
client's responsibility to the pro- 
ducer? 

Making a motion picture, like 
painting a portrait or writing a 
novel, is unfortunately not basical- 
ly a "Democratic Process." The 
creation of a motion picture should 
be done by "committee action." 

From the producer's standpoint, 
it is the client's responsibility to 
select a producer whose taste and 
creative abilities he respects, then 
to arm the producer with the facts 
and concepts which he wants com- 
municated. His further responsi- 
bility is to then let the producer 



carry on this task in the so-called 
"undemocratic manner" which the 
job calls for. 

Although an industrial motion 
picture difi'ers completely from a 
Hollywood entertainment film (es- 
pecially when it comes to matters 
of accuracy and integrity) it still 
is a basically creative job and must 
have all the elements of drama and 
interest whether the hero is a man 
riding a horse or operating a 
diesel engine. 

The combination of a respon- 
sible film producer plus a client 
who meets his responsibilities, can 
go a long way toward the ultimate 
goal of reaching the full potential 
of a motion picture in any given 
situation. 9 



*Mr. Colmes is well known in educa- 
tional, business and television films. His 
Chicago company, Colmes Wcrrenralh 
Productions, Inc., is active in all three 
liclds. 



74 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



McyiM o/Tul Sfc^iee^Afem 



/( 




'¥ 



Motion picture scripts for producers 
of institutional, educational and 
public service sponsored films 



Studio: Summer Workshop: 

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NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1958 





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LOCAL FILM COUNCILS 

Promoting Regional Interest in Films 

THE FILM COUNCIL OF 

GREATER COLUMBUS 

Office: Columbus Public Library, 96 South 
Grant Avenue, Columbus 15, Ohio. 

Officers: Dr. D. F. Prugh (Director, Frank- 
lin County Historical Society), president; D. 
D. Fulmer (President, Columbus Movie 
Makers,, vice-president; Mary A. Rupe, 
secretary-treasurer. 

Trustees: Margaret Carroll (Librarian, Col- 
umbus Public Library) ; Edgar E. Dale 
(Director of Audio- Visual, Ohio State Uni- 
versity) ; Clyde Miller (Director of Audio- 
Visual, State Department of Education). 
Purpose: To promote a greater interest in 
the production and use of films by schools and 
universities, public service organizations, civic 
groups, and business firms and industries. The 
use by these organizations of film producers 
in the Columbus area and the State of Ohio 
is also stressed. 

1958 Activities: The Sixth Annual Columbus 
Film Festival, an award program featuring 
the "Chris" Award, from April 17 to 18. A 
season of Film Classics for adults and children 
— 10 outstanding motion pictures shown on 
various evenings starting September 25 and 
continuing through April 24, 1959. 



SEATTLE FILM ASSOCIATES 

Office (of the Secretary) : 5514 University 
Way, Seattle 5, Washington. 

Officers: George Shields (Pacific Telephone 
& Telegraph Company), chairman; Carolyn 
Sullivan (National Dairy Council), treasurer; 
Edith Rarig (Rarig Motion Picture Company), 
secretary. 

Board: Fred Cochran (Audio-Visual Center, 
Seattle Public Schools), Dave Cecarrelli (Gen- 
eral Electric Company). 

Purpose: The discussion and review of new 
films by representatives from schools and 
universities, film distributors, producers, li- 
braries, business firms and industries — to pro- 
mote the production and use of audio-visual 
aids and materials in the Pacific Northwest. 

1958 Activities: The Third Film Festival of 
the Seattle Film Associates, April 18, 1958. 



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(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 74) 

tinue to prove its worth as a pub- 
lic service offering by the sponsor. 

That Useful Bell Series . . . 

The Bell Telephone System's 
series of scientific films for televi- 
sion (and later released for gen- 
eral distribution) is another exam- 
ple of a sponsor contributing to 
the general knowledge of the pub- 
lic for the benefit of the country's 
future. The two 1957 releases, 
Hemo the Magnificent and The 
Strange Case of the Cosmic Rays. 
produced by Frank Capra (famed 
for his World War II motivational 
films) have been seen by an esti- 
mated TJ million people (other 
than tv viewers) of which more 
than 6 million were students in 
grade schools through college. The 
tv reception was, statistically 
speaking, extremely good, with 
Trendex ratings on both films 
higher than those of opposing 
shows of national renown. 

The purpose of the films is to 
inspire young people and adults 
to enter scientific careers, as well 
as raise young minds to a surface 
acquaintance (and subsequent en- 
suing interest) in science. The 
artful combination of fine anima- 
tion with live action (and profes- 
sional acting) makes the presenta- 
tion of the subject matter of these 
hour-long, color films both enter- 
taining as well as instructional. 

Of Blood and Cosmic Rays 
In Hemo the Magnificent the 
circulatory system and the blood 
of man is explored. What man has 
learned, and what he still has to 
learn, about life's fluid is illus- 
trated. The Strange Case of the 
Cosmic Rays delves into our 
search for the origins of cosmic 
rays and the effects of these on 
man. 

Aside from the artistic quality 
of the productions, the extensive 
use of animation as a means to 
explain complicated and mysteri- 
ous natural processes in a simple, 
understandable manner points out 
a trend toward the use of this 
technique by many industrial and 
business sponsors. Such non- 
sponsored productions, as Walt 
Disney's Man in Space and Our 
Friend the Atom, and Encyclo- 
paedia Britannica's A Trip to the 
Moon, all 1957 relea.ses, use sim- 
ilar combinations of live action 
and full or semi animation for 
such subject matter. 

Another sponsored film, A 
Moon is Born, produced by Trans- 
film, Inc., for International Busi- 
ness Machines Corporation, used 




The Pictures of the Year . . . 



animation entirely to portray the 
eventual launching of an earth 
satellite. The film was distributed 
to 225 television stations in 12 
countries last year, with a specially 
edited version for tv newsreels 
distributed by United Press TV. 
and also used by Movietone News 
and Universal-International News- 
reel. The complete version, in 
color and running 4 minutes, was 
requested by many theatres. 

The film depicts the launching, 
orbiting, and travel of the earth 



satellite with mention of the elec- 
tronic computers and other equip- 
ment IBM is making for the proj- 
ect. 

Sponsors also found films useful 
last year for recruiting purposes. 
Reaction Motors, Inc., organized 
in 1941 and concentrating on re- 
search until recently, last year 
started gearing for full-scale rocket 
production. Their need for engi- 
neers to fulfill their commitments 
as suppliers of rocket engines and 
allied devices became acute. The 



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LINOTYPE 



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DAVIDSON CORPORATION 

^A Subsidiary of Mergenlfto/er Linotype Company 

> RTIRSON StRlfT, BROOKLYN S, NEW YORK 



film. This is RMI, has been assist- 
ing them in filling the need. 

Produced by Audio Productions, 
the 16mm color film brings engi- 
neers inside its doors to see the 
opportunities available to them in 
the company. Much attention is 
devoted to the ideal location of 
its plant in the rural section of 
New Jersey, near enough to New 
York City for the engineers to en- 
joy many of the advantages of that 
city's life and activities. The film 
was and is being shown to engi- 
neering groups, and to men in en- 
gineering schools throughout the 
country. 

The Navy Recruits Doctors 
The Navy's Bureau of Medicine 
and Surgery also used the motion 
picture as a tool for recruiting 
qualified young doctors into that 
service, and also to keep them 
there. MD-USN, produced by Dy- 
namic Films, Inc., used a docu- 
mentary, theatrical technique to 
portray the role of the Naval doc- 
tor in his many activities. Camera 
crews were sent to foreign ports 
to get footage required to show 
the doctor's career overseas. 

The success of the 42-minute. 
black & white film is in the follow- 
up showings, particularly to groups 
of doctors taking their degrees 
under Navy supervision. Showings 
in medical schools and colleges 
have also been scheduled and 
made. Possibilities of having the 
film shown to junior college and 
senior high school students, where 
the decision for a career is often 
made, is being considered. The 
Navy hopes the film will stimulate 
the further development of mo- 
tion pictures as motivational tools 
in the armed services. 

Careers in Agriculture . . . 

Another well-known sponsor of 
motion pictures, The American 
Petroleum Institute, used the mo- 
tion picture to stimulate young 
people to enter careers in the field 
of agricultural service. With some 
15,000 technical jobs in agriculture 
going unfilled each year because 
of a lack of Agriculture college 
graduates, A New Word for Farm- 
ing has a big recruiting chore 
ahead of it. Colburn Film Serv- 
ices, Inc., produced the 25 min- 
ute, color production for API, 
which distributes it through their 
regional offices. The story is di- 
rected to the high school student, 
both boy and girl, and presents a 
convincing picture of the pros- 
pects of such careers. 

Much was done last year to 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 80) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



there's no 

LIMIT 





hxq piduu dbfVmi 



Probably that's why the State 

Department and an inter-industry 
committee selected our 'TABST 
SALES CALL" as the outstanding film 
program to represent America in 

the 'Tilms in the Service of Industry" 
festival in Harrogate, England. 



DALLAS JONES PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1725 N. WELLS ST. • CHICAGO, ILL 
MOhawk 4-5525 



19 




The Pictures nf the Year . . . 



(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 78) 

assist doctors in their work through 
the motion picture. A very im- 
portant contribution was made by 
the Wm. S. Merrell Company, one 
of the leading pharmaceutical 
manufacturers in the country. With 
the cooperation of the American 
Medical Association and the 
American Bar Association, the 
sponsor had Dynamic Films, Inc. 
produce the first in a series of 
six films on the subject of Medi- 
cine and the Law. 

Since medical testimony is re- 
quired in from sixty to eighty per- 
cent of all cases litigated in Ameri- 
can courts, in this case the pro- 
ducer recognized the need for some 
tool to help doctors know their 
responsibilities, legal obligations 
and how to prepare and present 
testimony most effectively. The 
producer found support for the 
project from a regular client, the 
Wm. S. Merrell Company, which 
obtained the endorsement and co- 
operation of both AMA and ABA. 

The first film deals with presen- 
tation of medical testimony in 
court. Entitled The Medical Wit- 
ness, it discusses preparation of 
testimony and its presentation in 
court. The right and wrong way 
to offer such testimony is pictured 
by showing two physicians giving 
it in a suit by a railroad worker 
against his company for injuries 
sustained on the job. 

Legal Aid to the Doctor 

Distribution of this film was 
backed by the AMA and ABA, 
both recognizing the tremendous 
value of this and the productions 
to come as teaching tools in areas 
of tremendous importance to both 
lawyers and physicians. The Mer- 
rell Company was particularly 
careful to avoid any implication 
of advertising in the film. They 
presented it as complete public 
service to the two cooperating or- 
ganizations and the intended audi- 
ence. 

When the series is completed, 
it will be an audio-visual package 
of tremendous value to the AMA 
and ABA and should do much to 
insure a positive public relations 
attitude toward the sponsor. 

The AMA also sponsored two 
productions last year, one directed 
to the doctor and one to the com- 
munity of which the doctor is a 
major part. 

The Case of the Doubting Doc- 



tor, produced by the Centron 
Corp., explains the AMA to the 
doctor and dispels certain falla- 
cies often believed about the or- 
ganization by doctors who either 
don't know or resist knowing how 
the organization works for them. 
The other film. Even For One, was 
produced by Dynamic Films, Inc. 
and tells the community about the 
vital role the doctor plays in it, 
not only as a physician, but an 
active, interested member of it as 
well. The AMA distributes the 
first subject, but had Sterling 
Movies, U.S.A. distribute the sec- 
ond and has secured TV showings 
throughout the country. 
* * * 

Film Notes an Anniversary 
■>^ Many companies made films as 
part of anniversary programs last 
year. Two prime examples are 
The Borden Company's Hail the 
Hearty, a public service produc- 
tion, and Kaiser Aluminum and 
Chemical Corporation's The Next 
Ten, the story of their development 
and future. 

Borden's Hail the Hearty traces 
the significant progress made by 
our country in solving the prob- 
lems of nutrition. Use of film 
graphics to portray life in America 
a hundred years ago makes the 
film interesting and entertaining. 
Authenticity was achieved by bas- 
ing material on authentic docu- 
ments and objects of the times 
from libraries, museums and pri- 
vate collections. 

The historical development of 
nutrition and mass availability of 
foods made the film an important 
(continued on page 82) 



Complete Facilities " 
Under One Rooj 

• PHOTOGRAPHY 

Titles and Animation 

• SOUND RECORDING 
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22 Years Experience 
Highesf Quality 
Technical Ability 

W. A. PALMER FILMS, inc. 

6n Howard St., San Francisco 



M 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



I 



ways the 
picturephone 

can save you money 




First cost is not the only thing to think about 
when buying Sound Slide-filin equipment. 

What else do you have to buy? 

Where else do you have to spend money? 

Are you getting the showings you pay for? 

Are you going to have accidents? 

Will delivery delays eat into your profits? 

THE PICTUREPHONE IS A SMART BUY 
BECAUSE . . . 

You don't have to buy a zipper bag. 

You don't have to buy a shipping container. 

You don't have to buy a screen unless 
your audience is over twelve people. 

You don't have to buy replacement screens because 
the Picturephone screen is built-in and can't get lost. 

You don't have to buy a spare lamp because 
it is furnished with the machine. 

You don't have to buy a record carrying case 
unless you want to carry more than eight records. 

You save on airplane excess baggage. 

You save on repairs. 

You get the showings you pay for because 

light weight is insurance against salesmen reporting 

that they ran a program when they didn't. 

You save money because there is no immediate danger 
from plugging into direct current. 

You save money because films cannot come out 
of cans in transit and be damaged. 

You save money because records are protected 
against damage in transit. 

You save money because you do not have to pay damages 
caused by side latches scraping furniture and door frames. 
The Picturephone has no side latches. 

You save money because you don't lose business 
while waiting for delayed deliveries. 

But the biggest economy of all is that you put on the 
most brilliant program with a machine that is 
strictly professional in every way. 

You don't pay for a lot of machine that you don't need. 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 




0. J. McCLURE TALKING PICTURES 

I I 151/2 West Washington Blvd. 
Chicago 7, III. Canal 6-4914 



81 



yQ^uatitu - (I5i 



The Pictures of the Year . . . 



FILM SHIPPING CASES 

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built these new cases with more 
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See your nearest dealer or write 
direct to manufacturer for catalog. 

WM. SCHUESSLER 

361 W. SUPERIOR ST. 
CHICAGO 10, ILLINOIS 



(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 80) 

contribution to public knowledge 
of nutrition and its progress. 

Borden premiered the film at its 
1 00th birthday anniversary cele- 
bration, then turned distribution 
over to Sterling-Movies, U.S.A. 
The 28-minute. color film was pro- 
duced by Charles Palmer and 
Parthenon Pictures. 

The Next Ten started out as a 
dual-purpose film, for in-plant and 
general public showings for Kaiser 
.Aluminum. Aware that such films 
can be deadly because of the to- 
tally dilTerent audiences. Kaiser 
decided to avoid at all costs filmed 
speeches by company executives. 

Together with Parthenon and 
Charles Palmer, supervising con- 
sultant Jack Hennessey came up 
with a production which presented 
the growth and development of 
the company, its key personnel, 
and its future, without being trite 
or dull. The final, 52-minute ver- 
sion was shown to all plant person- 
nel and their families as often as 
possible. The film was then 
shortened to a more suitable ver- 
sion for public showings and as- 
signed to Modern Talking Picture 
Service Inc., for distribution. The 



film has met with enthusiasm from 
all types of audiences, can be 
cited as an example of a dual-pur- 
pose film filling both purposes well. 

A Prize Safety Package 

■ An extremely successful 1957 
visual safety campaign was built 
around the motion picture Know- 
ing's No! Enough, U. S. Steel's 
film on the proper attitude toward 
safety, produced by Wilding Pic- 
ture Productions, Inc., 

When first released, U. S. Steel 
showed the film in all of their 
plants, presenting it as part of a 
complete program which included 
posters, leaflets, pamphlets, ban- 
ners, and other reminders, all of 
which were designed from particu- 
lars from the film. 

Since the film was planned for 
community as well as industrial 
use, it was necessary to make the 
theme motivational rather than in- 
structional. Three "retention and 
recall" devices were therefore 
built into the film to act as re- 
minders for the audience. One 
was a five-note musical theme, re- 
peated over and over when the 
track announcer (some of the be- 
ginning action takes place during 
a sport's car race) bumps his rec- 




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ord player when he becomes ex- 
cited over the crash. The second 
device, most easily adapted to a 
wide variety of uses, was the yel- 
low flag used by track officials to 
signal "Emergency — Hold your I 
places — reduce speed — no passing 
— exercise Caution!" The third 
device was the creation of four 
IMPS signifying four main rea- 
sons why safety rules, although 
known, are often ignored in poten- 
tially dangerous situations — IM- 
Provising, IMPatience, IMPulsive- 
ness, and IMPunity. 

Use of Integrated Media 

In the action of the 28-minute, 
color film, each time one of the 
main characters is about to take 
a chance or do a job un-safely, he 
hears the five-note musical theme, 
sees both an IMP urging him on 
and a yellow flag warning him of 
the danger. 

The yellow flag and the IMPS 
were the two devices most used 
in the material designed to be used ; 
with the film. Flags, posters, 
Scotchlite for automobile bumpers, 
all used either the IMPS or the , 
yellow flag as their symbols. A 
record was made of the musical 
theme for loudspeaker use near 
plant gates and other heavy traflBc 
areas. 

By the middle of 1957, cover- 
age with the sponsor's plants was 
almost 100%. By that time, too, 
outside industries began discover- 
ing the usefulness of the film for 
their safety programs. U. S. Steel 
made the other materials available 
to these industries at nominal 
cost, so the complete program 
could be used. As an "across the 
board" general attitude film, . 
Knowing's Not Enough has been I 
widely accepted by community 
groups and other non-business or- 
ganizations. 

The sponsor stresses the fact 

(CONTINUEDON PAGE 84) j 



82 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




van praag production!! 



NEW YORK 
1600 BROADWAY 



DETROIT 
2301 DIME BLDG. 



MIAMI 
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HOLLYWOOD 
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PRODUCERS OF 



COMMERCIAL, THEATRICAL, AND INDUSTRIAL MOTION PICTURES 
SLIDE FILMS • TELEVISION • STAGE SALES PRESENTATIONS 



NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1958 



PARTHENON PICTURES 
-flollywood- 

A "FIRST" FOR 
THE HILTON HOTELS 



"A HOTEL IS BORN"— The very 
human story of a great hotelman. 
Designed for general distribu- 
tion, plus special showings to 
promote convention bookings. 
Unusuallv active on free-time 
TV. Color, 28 minutes, (Sterling- 
Movies USA"). 



AND A LETTER FROM 
THE HILTON PRESIDENT 

Beverly Hills, Dec. 13, 1957 

TO: 

Parthenon Pictures, 
Hollywood. 

Dear Cap: 

I thought you'd be interested in 
a report on "A Hotel Is Born" in- 
asmuch as nearly a year has gone 
by since we started using it. 

The results have been excellent, 
thanks to the excellent job you 
did. As you know, this was our 
first film. When we started it we 
were amateurs. We still are, for 
that matter. Without your inge- 
nuity, your perseverance, and your 
fine experience it is quite possible 
that we might have come up with 
an amateur film. 

That we did not is indicated in 
the reports we get from the show- 
ings. The audience report cards 
are unanimously complimentary. 
People seem to like the "plot," the 
photography, the color — every- 
thing. You were responsible for 
all of these qualities I am sure. 

Almost 100,000 people have seen 
it in showings to various groups 
in ten months time. In the seven 
months the film has been available 
to television, an estimated audi- 
ence of almost five million has 
seen "A Hotel Is Born." I am sure 
we could not have achieved such 
results unless we had an excellent 
production. 

Sincerely yours, 
Conrad N. Hilton 
President 

PARTHENON PICTURES 

Cap Palmer Unit 

Documentary Films -for Business 

2625 Temple St. • Hollywood 26 



The Pictures of the Year . . . 



(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 82) 

that the film itself is not a com- 
plete safety program. It must be 
accompanied by a constant follow- 
up keeping alive the important 
points in the minds of the audi- 
ences. The continued success of the 
film is evident in the increasing 
demand for the film and accom- 
panying materials by more and 
more business and public groups. 
It has also stimulated other com- 
panies to produce their own safety 
films to deal with specific prob- 
lems or as public service presenta- 
tions. 

* * * 

Competition in U.S. Business 

■m The problem of intense compe- 
tition as it affects company man- 
agement was treated in the Na- 
tional Association of Manufac- 
turers' Crises in Lindenville, a 
dramatic production by Henry 
Strauss & Company. The story is 
about a small-town tool factory 
suddenly faced with several ur- 
gent problems all endangering its 
existence. The president of the 
factory is faced with a minority 
stockholder wanting to sell out to 
a large manufacturing company; 
aggressive competition from a 
hardware manufacturer which just 
entered the tool field threatening 
his largest account; the need for 
financing to modernize his plant 
and retool for a new line. How 
he solved these problems and how 
these very problems lead to better 
products and greater security for 
his employees makes up the film. 
NAM, for 45 years the sponsor 
of many educational films on in- 
dustry and business, offers the 
audience the chance to sit with 
management as it faces its many 
problems. The 15 minute, black 
and white film instructs while it 
entertains and presents a different 
viewpoint of industrial manage- 
ment for the audience to consider. 
* * * 

A "Better" Labor Film 

M- Another example of a different 
viewpoint was found in the pro- 
duction sponsored by the Hotel and 
Restaurant Employees and Bar- 
tenders International Union. Origi- 
nally intended as a filmed memento 



of a display of culinary art by the 
450 members of the Cooks Local 
88 at the Conrad Hilton Hotel in 
Chicago, Hail to the Cook was 
extended into a public relations 
film with a three-fold purpose. 

First, it was designed to give 
the public a chance to see the 
skilled chef at work and the prod- 
ucts of his efforts. Second, it was 
to encourage "dining out" to bol- 
ster the businesses its members 
serve, and third, it was to en- 
courage young men to consider 
professional cookery as a good 
career. 

Aside from their own use, the 
Union is urging joint boards and 
larger locals to purchase prints 
and arrange public showings. They 
are also urging its use in high 
schools and by civic organizations. 
It is hoped that this effort will at- 
tract other Internationals to spon- 
sor films of similar nature as a 
public service, as well as fulfill the 
purposes of the film. 

The New Farm Markets . . . 

i^ An excellent example of a 
business trend film was Bright 
Promise of the American Farm 
Market, offered by Fortune Films 
and produced by Transfilm, Inc. 
Using crisp modern color anima- 
tion, the subject is directed to 
marketing personnel and industries 
serving the farm market, plus those 
that will be. 

The film tells the story of the 
tremendous growth of farm pro- 
ductivity and the increased demand 
for manufactured goods of both 
consumer and industrial equip- 
ment types. Noting that less than 
half the nation's farmers account 
for most of the cash sales and pur- 
chases from industry, the film goes 
on to predict the increase in this 
trend. The farmers making a go- 
ing business of agriculture and also 
producing most of our food at a 
profit to themselves will be want- 
ing more and more manufactured 
equipment, more electricity, more 
advances in agricultural techniques 
and animal husbandry, and many 
other factors are shown and dis- 
cussed which promise a rich 
harvest for both the farmer and 
the industries serving him. R* 




PARTHENON PICTURES 
-Hollywood- 

A FILM PROGRAM 
FOR KAISER ALUMINUM 

"THE NEXT TEN" — feature- 
length version ... A Tenth-An- 
niversary film to help weld the 
fast-grown employee family into 
a feeling of oneness. Color, 55 
minutes. 

* * * 

"THE NEXT TEN"— short docu- 
mentary version (Golden Reel 
'57) . . . for public release, the 
story of an American business 
and the five men who built it 
from zero to greatness in ten ex- 
citing years. Color, 32 minutes. 
(Modern TPS) 

In process: 

"BASIC REFRACTORIES" 



AND A LETTER FROM 

KAISER ALUMINUM & 

CHEMICAL 

Oakland, May 2, 1957 
TO: 

Parthenon Pictures, 
Hollywood. 

D^ar Cap: 

For the lack of space at the top, 
I left out lots of names to whom 
this letter should be addressed, 
but I am sure that you will let 
everyone we worked with on THE 
NEXT TEN know how tremen- 
dously pleased we are with THE 
NEXT TEN'S winning an indus- 
trial "Oscar." 

It's nice to get our feet wet this 
way, but I don't think we would 
be swimming yet if it hadn't been 
for the fine group of people who 
made the picture for us. It's one 
thing to have a story but a dif- 
ferent one to tell it. No one could 
have told it better than you did. 

I think the most pleasing thing 
to me was the fact that you were 
the only producer in America to 
win two awards, and we were 
mighty lucky to ride with you on 
this trip. 

Our thanks to everyone and 
best wishes for your continued 
success and good fortune in the 
film field. 

Sincerely yours. 
Kaiser Aluminum & 
Chemical Corp. 
Robert E. Rouse 
Public Relations 

PARTHENON PICTURES 

Cap Palmer Unit 
Documentary Films for Business 

2625 Temple St. • Hollywood 26 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




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FILM MVSH Inc. JUdson 6-6673 



NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 
IN THE AUDIO-VISUAL FIELD 



First in Service to Business 

i< For two decades, Business Screen has 
provided more useful data, key editorial 
features to film sponsors than any other 
publication. 



(ai':o cee pages 33. 34. 40. 42 and 88) 

NATIONAL AUDlO-ViSUAL 

ASSOCIATION, INC. 

National Office: Fairfax, Virginia. 

Contact: Don White, executive vice-presi- 
dent; Henry C. Ruark, Jr., director of infor- 
mation. 

Officers: William W. Birchfield (Alabama 
Photo Supply), Montgomery, Alabama, presi- 
dent; P. H. Jaffarian (Audio-Visual Center, 
Inc.), Seattle, Washington, first vice-presi- 
dent; William G. Kirtley ( D. T. Davis Co.), 
Louisville, Kentucky, second vice-president; 
Ray Swank (Swank Motion Pictures, Inc.), 
St. Louis, Missouri, secretary; Harvey W. 
Marks (Visual Aid Center), Denver, Colorado, 
treasurer. 

Regional Directors: G. S. Follis (Stanley 
Winthrop's, Inc.), Quincy, Massachusetts; 
James W. Bell, Jr. (Calhoun Co., Inc.), At- 
lanta, Georgia; Eleanor Bell (Kansas City 
Sound Service), Kansas City, Missouri; Ty 
Sidener ( Ty Sidener Co.), Sacramento, Cali- 
fornia; Harrison Harries, Hartford, Connec- 
ticut; Robert P. Abrams (Williams, Brown & 
Earle, Inc.), Philadelphia, Pa.; Larry Skeese 



(Films Unlimited), Mansfield, Ohio; M. G. 
Gregory (Sound Photo Equipment Company), 
Lubbock, Texas; Bernard Tessier (Center 
Audio-Visuel, Inc.), Trois-Rivieres, Quebec. 

Directors-At-Large : Mahlon Martin (M. H. 
Martin Co.), Massillon, Ohio; E. F. Burke 
(Burke's Motion Picture Co.), South Bend, 
Indiana: L. C. Vath ( L. C. Vath A-V Aids), 
Sharpsville, Pennsylvania; H. A. Fischer 
(Photosound of Orlando), Orlando, Florida; 
Frank S. Bangs (Frank Bangs Company), 
Wichita, Kansas; Jasper Ewing, Jr. (Jasper 
Ewing & Sons ), Alexandria, Louisiana. Execu- 
tive Vice-President: Don White (NAVA), 
Fairfax, Virginia. 

Membership: NAVA is a trade association of 
audio-visual equipment dealers, service agen- 
cies, commercial film libraries and suppliers 
to school, church, industrial and community 
users of these materials and equipment. An 
advisory membership consists of producers of 
classroom and religious materials and prin- 
cipal audio-visual equipment and accessory 
manufacturers. The Association holds an 
annual Audio-Visual Selling Institute in as- 
sociation with Indiana University, in Bloom- 
ington, the week before the Association Con- 
vention. 

National Convention An" Trads Show: 
July 26-29, 1958, at the Morrison Hotel, 
Chicago. Guests admitted by registration fee. 

Publications: A Membership Directory list- 



(CONTINUED on PAGE EIGHTY-EIGHT) 





OAL DUNN STUDIOS 

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BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




MIRROR REFLEX SHUTTER 



BEAM SPLITTER REFLEX 



The great advantages of a reflex viewing system In a movie camera are obvious: 
No parallax, no finders to match, no rackover inconvenience 
but continuous focusing and viewing through the taking lens. 

There are two ways in which reflex viewing can be accomplished: 



By means of a mirror reflex shuffer which rotates at 45 ' 
between lens and film plane. 

The great advantage of this system is the fact that 1 00 % 
of the light goes to the film and the eye infermittantly. 
When the shutter is open there is no interference be- 
tween film and lens. When the shutter is closed, its mirror 
surface reflects all of the light to the eye. Result: Easy 
focusing and viewing on a bright crisp ground glass 
image even in dim light, or when the lens is stopped 
down. 

The Arriflex — designed for the professional — uses the 
mirror reflex shutter, which of course is a much more 



2. By means of a beam spliUing mirror or prism which is 
mounted between lens and film. This reflects some of the 
light (about 20%) to the eye and transmits the balance 
to the film. 

The disadvantages of this system are: 
The light reflected to the eye is so weak that it is difficult 
to focus or even sight, unless the lens is wide open and 
the scene brightly illuminated. In dim light, or if the lens 
is stopped down, the finder image is so weak it is prac- 
tically useless. But the light going to the finder is taken 
away from the film, requiring the f stops of the taking 
lens to be specially adjusted. The beam splitter perma- 
nently in the light path, and close to the film plane, 
frequently accumulates dust and other foreign matter 
which may ruin the picture. 



costly design. 

Don't take our word for it! Try it yourself. Take an Arriflex 16 and a 
"beam splitter reflex" and look at the same scene, through similar focal 
length lenses, at various f stops from wide open to f22. You will exclaim 
with us: Vive la difference! 

Write for 16-page Arriflex catalog. Free if requested on your business letterhead,- otherwise 10c to cover hondling. 

SOLE U. S. DISTRIBUTOR 

KXaXUKrG- FHOTO OOrtFOPLA-TION" 

257 FOURTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 10, N. Y. • 7303 MELROSE AVENUE, LOS ANGELES 46, CALIF. 

In Canada: Gevaert (Canada) Ltd., 345 Adelaide St., West, Toronto 




NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



87 



(CONTINUED FROM PAGE EIGHTY-SIX) 

ing audio-visual dealers across the country is 
available upon request. The Association pub- 
lishes the authoritative guide for equipment 
purchasers, The Audio-Visual Equipment Di- 
rectory, presently in its fourth edition; avail- 
able from the Association, Fairfax, Virginia. 



NATIONAL COMMITTEE 

ON FILMS FOR SAFETY 

Founded, 1937 

Office (of the Secretary) : 425 North Michi- 
gan Ave.. Chicago 11, 111. 

Officers: John B. McCullough (Motion Pic- 
ture Association of America), chairman; 
William Englander ( National Safety Council), 
secretary. 

Member Organizations: Motion Picture Asso- 
ciation of America, National Safety Council, 
American Association of Motor Vehicle Ad- 
ministrators, American Automobile Associa- 
tion, American Public Health Association, 
American National Red Cross, American So- 
ciety of Safety Engineers, American Stand- 
ards Association, Association of Casualty & 
Surety Companies, Association of Safety 
Council Executives, Automotive Safety Foun- 
dation, Council on Industrial Health of the 
American Medical Association, Inter-Industry 
Highway Safety Committee, International 
Association of Chiefs of Police, National Asso- 
ciation of Manufacturers, National Associa- 
tion of Automotive Mutual Insurance Com- 
panies, National Association of Mutual 
Casualty Companies, National Fire Protection 
Association, National Retail Farm Equipment 



NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 
IN THE AUDIO-VISUAL FIELD 



(also see pages 33, 34. 40. 42 and 90) 

Association, U.S. Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Army, U.S. Navy. 
U.S. Bureau of Public Roads. 

Purpose: A co-sponsored group of national 
organizations, with active interest in accident 
prevention through use of films, who wish to 
accomplish the following objectives: 1. To 
stimulate production and use of safety films. 
2. To raise the quality of films produced. .'!. 
To establish film evaluation standards. 4. To 
recognize film excellence in an awards program. 

1958 Activities: March meeting of the Com- 
mittee as a Board of Judges to screen and 
finally judge entries in their 15th Annual 
Safety Film Awards Program. October eve- 
ning showing of top winning films and pre- 
sentation of awards to representatives of 
sponsors and/or producers (during the Na- 
tional Safety Congress and Exposition in 
Chicago, 111.). 



CATHOLIC AUDIO-VISUAL 

EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION 

Address: Box 618, Church Street P. O., New 
York 8, N.Y. 

Officers: Very Rev. Monsignor Leo McCor- 
mick, Ph.D., president; Reverend Michael 
Mullen, CM., vice-president; Reverend Sister 



Ignatia, C.S.J., secretary; Reverend Brother i 
Raymond Glemet, S.M., treasurer. 

Purpose: To further the use of Audio-Visual 
equipment and materials in Catholic education 
and to encourage production of suitable films 
for Catholic school use. 

Annual Convention: CAVE is coordinating 
its seventh Annual Convention with the Na- 
tional Catholic Educational Association na- 
tional convention April 8-11, 1958 in Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Audio-Visual equipment and 
materials may be exhibited at this joint con- 
vention. No registration fees are required. 

Official Publication : The Catholic Educator. 



DEPARTMENT OF 

AUDIO-VISUAL INSTRUCTION 

NATIONAL EDUCATION 

ASSOCIATION 

Office: 1201 16th Street, N.W., Washington 6, 
D.C. 

Contact: Anna L. Hyer, E.recutive Secretary 

Officers: Dr. Charles Schuller (Director, 
Audio-Visual Center, Michigan State Univer- 
sity), President; Charles F. Schuller (Direc- 
tor, Audio-Visual Center, Michigan State 
University), Vice-President; The Executive 
Committee : Walter Bell ( Director, Audio- 
Visual Education, Atlanta Public Schools) ; 
Margaret W. Divizia ( Supervisor, Audio- 
Visual Aids Section, Los Angeles City Board 
of Education), Elizabeth Golterman (Director, 
Division of Audio-Visual Education, St. Louis 

(continued on page ninett) 




(7]'^U\ 



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to tell the dramatic story 
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FILM PRODtCTIOIMS, IIMC. 

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160(1 Hroadway, New ^■o^k 19. N.Y. JUdson 2-J7:in 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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Many companies look with envy at super film productions 
sponsored by large organizations with what seem to be limitless 
budgets — and wish they could do the same. 



Haig and Patterson, Inc. lists as clients some of the most widely 
known names in business and industry and takes pride in their con- 
tinuing patronage. But with equal pride, it lists numerous smaller 
companies whose film investments must show immediate doUars- 
and-cents return in the form of increased sales or reduced manage- 
ment and sales costs. 



Tf^ 



Regardless of the size of the company, Haig and Patterson, Inc. 
holds firmly to the principle that a sound slidefilm or motion picture 
need cost no more than the worth of the job to be done, and has 
held its clients year after year through proven results. 

Films do many jobs that can be done in no other way — or at 
a lower cost than by any other means. We invite your inquiry on 
what films can do for you. No obligation, of course. 



14aig an(l'l?itterson,lnc. 



DETROIT 

IS EAST BETHUNE AVE. 

DETROIT 2, MICHIGAN 
PHONE: TRinity 3-0283 



DAYTON 

131 NORTH LUDLOW ST. 

DAYTON 2, OHIO 
PHONE: BAIdwin 3-9321 



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Write for our booklet, "How 
Much Should A Film Cost?" You 
may find it will help you to make 
profitable use of films. 



NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 19 • 1958 



(CONTINUED FROM PAGE EIGHTY-EIGHT) 

Public Schools) ; L. C. Larson (Director, 
Audio-Visual Center, Indiana University ) ; J. 
J. McPherson (Director, Audio-Visual Mate- 
rials Consultation Bureau, Wayne State 
University) . 

Peincipal Committees: The program of 
DAVI is carried out primarily through stand- 
ing committees, such as: Evaluation of Sec- 
ondary School AV Programs, F. Edgar Lane. 
chairman: Adult Education, Kenneth Mclntyre, 
chairman; Archives, Abraham Kraskei-, chaii-- 
man; Buildings and Equipment, A. J. Foy 
Gross, chairman; College and University Pro- 
grams, Ernest Tieman, chairman; County and 
Cooperative Progi-ams, Lee Champion, chair- 
man; AV Instructional Materials, T. W. 
Roberts, chairman; Legislative, Irving Boerlin. 
chairman; Professional Education, L. C. Lar- 
son, chairman; Radio and Recordings, Ralph 
Hall, chairman; Research, W. C. Meierhenry, 
chairman; School Service Corps., Fred Win- 
ston, chairman; Teacher Education, William 
Fulton, chairman; Television, Emma Fantone. 
chairman; Armed Forces Section, Lawrence 
Braaten, chairman. 

Purpose: The improvement of instruction 
through the better and wider use of audio- 
visual equipment, materials and techniques. 
The membership consists primarily of direc- 
tors and specialists in audio-visual in colleges 
and universities, state departments of educa- 
tion, and county and city school systems. 
School supervisors, classroom teachers and 
audio-visual specialists in the armed forces, 
in industry, and among religious gi-oups are 
included in the membership. 



I NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 
IN THE AUDIO-VISUAL FIELD 



(also see pages 33, 34, 40, 42 and 88) 

Activities In 1958 : National Convention with 
exhibits, April 21-25, Leamington Hotel, Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota. Series of leadership con- 
ferences and workshops on educational televi- 
sion ; a field service program which provides 
consultants to assist school systems and col- 
leges and universities in the improvement of 
their instructional materials programs. Con- 
tinuing series of publications in the area of 
administration of audio-visual programs, 
school buildings, television and research. 

Publications: The Department issues two 
regular publications. Audio-Visual Instruc- 
tion, 9 issues, September to May inclusive — a 
magazine intended to help the audio-visual 
specialist and the classroom teacher. Audio- 
Visual Communication Review, a scholarly 
quarterly reporting the latest trends, research 
needs, developments, and research projects in 
the field of audio-visual communications. 
"Graphic Communication and the Crisis in 
Education," a special issue of Audio-Visual 
Communication Review, analyzes barriers to 
effective use of audio-visual methods and ma- 
terials and integrates the findings from A-V 
communication research into the organization 
of a theory learning. Other important publi- 
cations of the Depai'tment are the series 
Planning Schools for Use of Audio-Visual 
Materials; National Tape Recording Catalog, 



Second Edition; Evaluative Criteria for 
Audio-Visual Instruction Materials Services; 
The School Administrator and His Audio- 
Visual Program, 1954 Yearbook; and A Direc- 
tory of Graduate AV Programs for the Pro- 
fessional Education of Audio-Visual Super- 
visors, Directors and Building Coordinators. 



EDUCATIONAL FILM 

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, INC, 

Office: 250 West 57th Street, New York 19. 
N.Y. 

Officers: Erwin C. Welke, president; Elliot 
Kone, vice-president; Mrs. Carol Hale, secre- 
tarii; Emily S. Jones, executive secretary. 

Committees: Evaluations — Lynn Weiss; 
Nominations — Mrs. Carol Hale; Membership 
—Elliot Kone. 

Membership: (Constituent) — 438 nonprofit 
educational institutions; (Service) — 45 com- 
mercial oi'ganizations and interested individ- 
uals; 4 international members — government 
agencies, film groups of other countries ; 31 
submemberships; 79 personal memberships. 

Purpose: To encoui-age and improve the pro- 
duction, distribution and utilization of educa- 
tional films. EFLA conducts a film evaluation 
service. 
1958 Meeting Dates: July 25-27, Chicago. 

Publications : For members — Evaluations, 
EFLA Bulletin, Service Supplements. A cata- 
log containing descriptions of EFLA "Gen- 
eral" publications is provided by the 
Association. B" 



MOBILUX 



The only, really new motion picture 
art-form in 25 years." 



"For the firsf timer animated picture 
and sound are blended into a single, 
compelling, aesthetic force." 



With the final granting of U.S. Patent No. 2,821,393 to Jjhn Hoppe on January 31, 1958, covering basic methods and 
techniques, MOBILUX is now available to sponsors of conrnercial, industrial, and training films exclusively through: 



ROBERT DAVIS PRODUCTIONS, INC 



21 EAST 63 STREET 



NEW YORK 21, NEW YORK 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




The Finest Sound Stage in the Washington, D. C, Area 

Allied Motion Picture Center, Inc. has leased the sound stage of the Sheraton-Park 
Hotel, Washington, D. C, formerly occupied by NBC -TV. 

Allied Motion Picture Center, Inc. also has a complete line of professional motion 
picture cameras — 33mm and 16mm — electrical and grip equipment. After April 
13, 1938 the stage and facilities are available for rent to producers 

ALLIED MOTION PICTURE CENTER, INC. 



AFTER April 15, 1958: 

Sheraton-Park Hotel, Washington 8, D. C. 

8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



Hudson 3-3715 





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quality points to . . . 


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An technique (by Visimlscope) captures oil dealer's varyini^ inuods . . 

Wide-Screen Look at Dealer Attitudes 



Dow Visualizes a Motivation Study of Service Stati( 



i^ The attitudes of the service sta- 
tion dealer toward himself, his 
company and his customers is the 
subject of a new wide-screen sound 
siidefilm presentation sponsored by 
the Dow Chemical Company as a 
marketing service to its oil com- 
pany customers. 

Titled A Bill of Particulars, the 
film was produced by Visualscope. 
Inc., from a motivation study of 
service station dealers recently 
completed for Dow. 

The study. The Service Station 
Dealer, A Motivation Study of 
Dealer Attitudes, provides an 
unusual insight into the hopes, as- 
pirations, stresses and frustrations 
of the man who runs the corner 
service station. 

Through Art Director Manny 
Rey's interesting, Picasso-like tech- 
nique in the use of unusual colors, 
forms and lines, the film captures 
the inner and outer mood of the 
dealer under varying situations 
which arise during his daily activ- 
ities. 

The wide-screen siidefilm ver- 
sion will be available for viewing 
by petroleum marketing manage- 
ment. These screenings are pre- 
sented by Dow sales people with 



Dealers 

projection 



special anamorphic 
equipment. 

A 1 6mm filmograph version has 
been prepared for inclusion in 
petroleum marketers" training pro- 
grams. 

Arrangements for showings of 
A Bill of Particulars may be made 
by companies concerned with 
petroleum marketing through Anti- 
freeze Sales, The Do.v Chemical 
Company, Midland, Michigan. 9' 

* * * 
Churches to Spend a Million 

■^" A million-dollar budget has been 
voted by the board of managers of 
the Broadcasting and Film Com- 
mission of the National Council of 
Churches to finance mass commu- 
nications operations, including films 
and tv, during 1958. 51' 

* * * 

NYU Workshop Hears Wade 
^ Roger Wade, president of Roger 
Wade Productions Inc., was a 
speaker at a recent New York 
University publicity workshop. He 
discussed the steps necessary to 
produce a successful motion pic- 
ture, and screened two films dem- 
onstrating two main objectives in 
industrial film-making: direct sales 
and public relations. <^ 



Below: at Dow preview (see above) are (I to r) John R. Rose, Jr., presi- 
dent, Visualscope, Inc.; Dr. Percy Black, pres. Social Attitude Survey: 
Garland Fitts. Ted Caldwell, Dow Antifreeze Sales executives. 




PARTHENON PICTURES 
-Hollywood- 

A FILM PROGRAM FOR 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

"MAN WITH A THOUSANE 

HANDS" — multiple award win- 
ner. Story of the great machines' 
which are opening hitherto for- 
bidden areas of the earth tc 
human use. Color, 55 minutes 
and 35 min. Told bv Ravmond 
Massey. (Modern TPS) 

IH FILMS IN PROCESS: 

"COLLECTORS' ITEM" 

"KITIMAT TODAY" 

•THE DEDICATED MEN" 

"WATER FOR ARID LANDS" 

(Upper Colorado Project) 

AND A LETTER FROM 

INTERNATIONAL 

HARVESTER 

Chicago, Nov. 21. 195T 

TO: I 

Parthenon Pictures, 

Hollywood. 

Dear Cap: 

With the prospect of two more 
Parthenon-Harvester pictures in the 
immediate future, it occurs to us 
that your records should have the 
following information on two pic- 
tures now circulating. 

"Day in Court" continues its 
phenomenal widespread acceptance 
The latest distribution report shows 
an aggregate audience of 5,133,519 
We are seriously considering the 
television adaptation, and that will 
be on our agenda to discuss with 
you next month. 

"Day" still stands as the all-time 
popularity winner in the Company's 
40 years of picture making, and it 
continues to help sell trucks. 

Both versions of "Man With a 
Thousand Hands" are also circulat- 
ing at capacity in the United States 
and. as you know, this picture has 
gone abroad through Harvester's 
foi-eign operations and the Alumi- 
num Company of Canada. The 
United Nations is developing a ver- 
sion of it for further world distri- 
bution. 

With every showing, its reputa- 
tion continues to grow as one of the 
great industrial documentaries in 
our experience. 

The way you made those pictures 
for us is legendary now in the Com- 
panv. and we're looking forward 
with keen anticipation to making 
the legend grow. 

Sincerely. 

W. O. Maxwell 
Manager. Consumer 
Relations Dept. 

PARTHENON PICTURES 

Cap Palmer Unit 
Documentary Films for Business 

2625 Temple St. • Hollywood 26 



92 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




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ANSEL FILM STUDIOS 45 WEST 45TH STREET NEW YORK CIRCLE 70049 



JTH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 




Film on Heart Care High 
On TV Popularity List 

:A- Some months ago. Association 
Films compiled its "Golden Circle" 
of most-televised industrial films. 
Second on the list, with 1,110 
telecasts was a quarter-hour film 
on the fight against heart disease, 
A Matter of Time, produced by 
Unifilms. Inc. 

In easily-understood layman's 
language it tells of the amazing 
discoveries and progress in medi- 
cine's search for the causes and 
the cures for the four major types 
of heart disease. The film offers 
some suggestions on extending the 
life span by working and relaxing 
moderately and sensibly. 

Each year the film is given spe- 
cial attention during February, na- 
tional heart month. It is offered 
to stations on a free-loan basis for 
use on public service programs. 
Presented in the public interest by 
the Institute of Life Insurance, A 
Matter of Time has been scheduled 
by a number of stations for special 
showings this month. Prints are 
available from all Association 
Films' tele-exchanges. 58" 

4: ^ ^ 

Two Eastman Film Divisions 
Now Part of Sales Service 

A The non-theatrical films divi- 
sion and the informational films 
division of Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany now are part of the com- 
pany's sales service division, man- 
aged by Glenn W. Mentch. An- 
nouncement of this reorganization 
was made by James E. McGhee. 
Kodak's vice-president in charge 
of U. S. sales and advertising. 

The non-theatrical films divi- 
sion disseminates information on 
the application of Kodak prod- 
ucts in the production of motion 
pictures by industry, the govern- 
ment, churches and other organi- 
zations. 

Kodak's informational films di- 
vision produces motion pictures 
used in the company's informa- 
tional and training program. ^ 
* * * 

Fred Riebel Dies; Long 
Active in I.A.V.A. Affairs 

ii Fred Riebel, of the Motion Pic- 
ture Bureau, Aetna Life Affiliated 
Companies, Hartford, Connecticut, 
died suddenly on November 19. 
He was for many years active in 
the affairs of the Industrial Audio- 
Visual Association. He was 
scheduled to retire on January 1 
of this year. 

He is survived by his widow, 
Mrs. Helen Riebel, of 12 Brook- 
field Road, Hartford, Connect- 
icut. 9 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Standards Bureau Film Tells 
Measurement's Science Role 

.•^ Scientific achievement results 
I from the discovery and utilization 
!of measurements. To interest 
young people in science, the Na- 
Itional Bureau of Standards, the 
■government's measuring house, has 
I sponsored a motion picture drama- 
tizing the measuring processes in- 
I volved in man's efforts to harness 
' the sources of energy. 
' The new film, Unclerstandini> the 
I Physical World Through Measure- 
; ment, is a 33-minute color version 
I of a lecture-demonstration wit- 
I nessed by some 6,000 high school 
' science and mathematics students 
who attended the Bureau's Guest 
1 Week Program last May. 
t Understanding the Physical 
World . . . traces the development 
I of means for utilizing energy 
1 sources — from the muscles of pre- 
; historic man to the steam engines 
' and to contemporary uraninum 
I fission and free radicals. The ne- 
; cessity of physical measurement in 
this advance is illustrated by ex- 
[ periments which duplicate the im- 
. portant scientific discoveries that 
I reveal new energy sources. 
j Shows Energy in Action 

The film depicts the transforma- 
tion of several kinds of energy — 
mechanical, chemical, thermal, 
electricil and nuclear — from one 
form into another. In one exam- 
ple the Bureau's radiation balance 
is used to measure the heat energy 
generated by radium in its disinte- 
gration. 

The energy released by fission 
of uranium-235 atoms under neu- 
tron bombardment is shown on an 
oscilloscope screen, where it can 
be compared with the lesser energy 
released by the radioactive disin- 
tegration of the more common 
uranium-238 atoms. 

Storage of chemical energy is 
illustrated bv the green glow of 
highly reactive molecular frag- 
ments, known as free radicals, cap- 
tured and kept at -450 degrees, 
a temperature near absolute zero. 
This spectacular experiment shows 
one of the most concentrated 
forms of chemical energy yet dis- 
covered by science. 

Understanding t h e Physical 
World Through Measurement is 
available from the Office of Tech- 
nical Information, National Bu- 
reau of Standards, Washington 25, 
D. C, or from the Bureau's Boul- 
der Laboratories, Boulder, Colo- 
rado. The film has been distributed 
among selected educational audio- 
visual centers serving school sys- 
tems throughout t h e United 
States. If 




Ever feel like saluting a good idea? 

We have, hecause we know how hard tjiey are to come hy. 

Having good ideas that will go to work for you and 

produce, is our husiness. But handling a good idea with 

technical competence— "know-how"— isn't enougli 

to guarantee that your product story, sales promotion 

campaign or training film will do the job you 

want it to. It takes '"care-how", too. 

In our hook, "care-how" is the counterpart of 
"know-how." It's your assurance that you can ride your 
good idea all the way home. 

Should you use film? A live shoic? Printed material? 
We can send you booklets that may help you find 
some of the answers. No obligation. Write Regan Film 
Productions, 19730 Ralston, Detroit 3, Michigan. 




RODUCTIONS 



Detroit 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



95 



films shcGild be made 




jLm ^'•^ 



UNLESS they have a real purpose 

there is a problem to be solved 
there is an idea to communicate 



if you want FILMS THAT DO THE JOB* 

and you are not self-conscious about 
getting away from the high cost 
of "formula" films, then you 
should contact . . . 



[Dlmes-uiBrrenrath productions, inc 



offices at 540 north lake shore drive • Chicago 11, illinois 




* 





ask some of 


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1037 woodland drive 


SEARS ROEBUCK 


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WHIRLPOOL 




ADMIRAL 




HARNISCHFEGER 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Freedoms Awards to Business Pictures 

Distinguished Jury Presents George Washington Honor Medal to "American Engineer" 
as "Tinnely and Farsighted Contribution to the Advancement of the Nation's Defense" 



A Great Engineer and a great 
!**• and timely film about engi- 
neers were among the top award 
winners of 1957 Freedoms Foun- 
dation Awards, announced Feb- 
, ruary 22 in ceremonies at the 
Foundation's headquarters in Val- 
,ley Forge, Pa. 

I Former President Herbert 
Hoover, a professional engineer, 
received the Foundation's highest 
award, the George Washington 
Award, as an "elder and exemplar 
of free men;" and American Engi- 
neer, the film tribute to engineers 
produced for the Chevrolet Divi- 
sion of General Motors by the Jam 
Handy Organization, won the en- 
cased George Washington Honor 
Medal, highest award among 16- 
I mm motion pictures. 

TCU President is Chairman 
• Presentation of the award to 
I American Engineer was made by 
I Dr. M. E. Sadler, chairman of 
: Freedoms Foundation and presi- 
dent of Texas Christian University. 
The award was accepted by K. 
■ E. Staley, executive assistant gen- 
eral sales manager of Chevrolet 
and Jamison Handy, president of 
the Jam Handy Organization. 

Dr. Kenneth D. Wells, president 
of Freedoms Foundation, termed 
the film "a timely and farsighted 
contribution to the advancement of 
American defense." 

In the Foundation's official 
awards report booklet, American 
Engineer was described as "a pre- 
sentation of the vast, unlimited 
field offered Americans to engineer 
the freedoms of America's future 

Below: radio telescopes broadcast 
the sound of sun and the stars in 

the film "American Lw^mecr." 



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Pictured at award ceremony for "American Engineer" are (left to right) 
Dr. Kenneth D. Wells, Freedoms Foundation: K. E. Staley of Chevrolet, 
who accepted encased medal: Jamison Handy, head of the Organization 
which produced prize film: and Dr. M. E. Sadler, president, Texas 
Christian University, chairman of the Freedoms Foundation. 



and the advancement of the nation 
through engineering, by those who 
have, and will — conceive, design 
and help develop our American 
Way of Life." 

American Engineer, presented 
in Superscope Technicolor for "a 
better appreciation of American 
engineering," has been seen by 
more than 1 1 million persons in 
theatres since its introduction. It 
is now being distributed to schools 
and other interested groups 
through JHO facilities. 

Medal to U. S. Steel Film 

Another film with engineers as 
its principal characters, Jonah and 
the Highway, produced for United 
States Steel Corp. by John Suther- 
land Productions. Inc., was one of 
eight other films, and a film series, 
honored with George Washington 
Honor Medal awards. 

Jonah and the Highway, the 
Sutherland production, dramatizes 
the construction of our great na- 
tional highway systems, and the 
importance of the engineers re- 
sponsible for their completion. 

Other award winners in the 16- 

mm motion picture division were: 

San Franci.sco, sponsored by the 

^Atchison, Topeka and Sante Fe 

•Railway and produced by Ernest 



Kleinburg. This film tells the 
story of San Francisco as seen 
through the eyes of a tugboat 
captain. 

For God and My Country, spon- 
sored by the Pure-Pak Division of 
Ex-Cell-O Corp. and produced by 
Robert Enders; a documentary of 
the 1957 International Boy Scout 
Jamboree at Valley Forge. 

Broken Mask, sponsored by the 
National Council of the Churches 
of Christ in the U.S.A. and pro- 




Above: the atom-powered sub, 
USS Nautilus, appears in a dra- 
matic scene from "American En- 
gineer." produced by Jam Handy. 

duced by Paul F. Heard. Inc. This 
film tells the story of the develop- 
ment of tolerance and racial 
understanding. 

Other 16mm Film Winners 

The Year Nobody Gave, spon- 
sored by the Allegheny County 
(Pittsburgh) United Fund. 

This is Your Union, sponsored 
by the United Steelworkers of 
America. 

Defense Against Enemy Propa- 
ganda, a film prepared for the 
Troop Information Division, De- 
partment of the Army. 

The Boyhood of George Wash- 
ington, a film for classroom use 
produced by Coronet Instructional 
Films. 

America's Heritage, a series of 
eight films on U.S. history pro- 
duced by News Magazine of the 
Screen. 

Called "Americana Awards" 
Officially, the citations of 1 6mm 
motion pictures are known as 
Americana Awards. They are part 
of a broad category which includes, 
besides motion pictures, advertis- 
ing, company employee publica- 
tions, and radio and television 

(CONCLUOED ON PAGE 99) 



Below: winner of an honor medal award at Valley Forge last month was 
the U. S. Steel-sponsored motion picture "Jonah and the Highway," 
aimed to stir interest in highway needs: produced by John Sutherland. 




8 T H ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



9f 



motion pictures with a message. . . 



YOUR MESSAGE! 




WRITTEN BY MELVIN SHAW, 

a credit that gives YOUR motion picture 
the integrity of eighteen years 
BUSINESS film writing — exclusively ! 



]ust Released: -low pressure squeeze cementing" 



Second in a series of engineering orientation 
films for the Humble Oil and Refining Company.* 



In Production: -people, products and progress' 



An "open house" public relations film sponsored 
jointly by Delco-Remy and Guide Lamp. 




— a personalized counselling, planning and writing service for sponsors and producers 

— business films exclusively! 

LOCATED IN THE MOTION PICTURE CAPITAL OF THE WORLD 
P. O. BOX 24724, VILLAGE STATION LOS ANGELES 24, CALIFORNIA 

•First film, "Pcrmanfnl Well Completion Operations" — written by Mclvin Shaw 



98 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINI 



Freedoms Awards: 

I — 

[(continued from page 97) 

programs. Separate awards are 
made in each of these divisions. 

Awards are made "for current 
programs or activities which create 
or support a better understanding 
of our great fundamental American 
traditions in their application to 
the every day lives of citizens of 
our Republic." 

The Jam Handy Organization 
also won a George Washington 
Honor Medal Award for The 
Battle for Liberty and Famous 
Americans discussion kits, includ- 
ing slide films, records and group 
leaders" guides, pointing up the 
personalities, facts and forces in 
our country's development. 

Significance of the awards is in- 
dicated by the prominent persons 
who serve as members of the Na- 
tional Awards Jury, and who 
determine which of the thousands 
of nominations submitted for eval- 
uation should be selected and 
cited. 

Distinguished List of Jurors 

Among the members of this 
Jury are: 

Chief Justices Hon. John R. 
Dethmers, Supreme Court of 
Michigan; Hon. Wm. D. Keeton, 
Supreme Court of Idaho; Hon. 
Levi S. Udall, Supreme Court of 
Arizona; Hon. William C. Perry, 
Supreme Court of Oregon; Hon. 
Matthew W. Hill. Supreme Court 
of Washington; H. Park Arnold, 
president. Kiwanis International; 
Millard A. Beckum. past national 
president, the National Exchange 
Club; Mrs. Gertrude Carr. presi- 
dent. Catholic War Veterans Aux- 
iliary; Russell P. Dey, general 
president. The General Society, 
Sons of the Revolution; Conrad 
A. Falvello. International director. 
Lions International; Paul E. Fred- 
erick. Jr.. national commander, 
Disabled American Veterans; Mrs. 
Edith W. Nelson, president. Al- 
trusa International. Inc.; Stuart J. 
Satullo, national commander, Am- 
vets; and Mrs. Dawn Wilber, na- 
tional president. Mothers of World 
War II, Inc. » 



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Camera Eye: IVgws -Trends in Focus 

A Credo for Film Buyers; Today's Audience Opportunity; Films in the Limelight 



THROUGH THE RIGORS of a hard 
winter and the creative efforts of a very 
large family of advertisers throughout these 
United States and abroad, we have ultimately 
emerged with this 8th Annual Production Re- 
j view issue. Its pages carry the largest number 
' of experienced film producing companies ever 
assembled for the sponsor's detailed reference 
i use; many other useful features provide a com- 
prehensive view of the industry's organizations, 
awards programs and its outstanding films of 
the past year. 

The prologue for this issue was written 
. many years ago and bears repeating. In the 
, opening page of an issue published a decade 
! ago, we quoted the first edition of a "Check- 
List of Producer and Sponsor Responsibilities 
j in Film Production" of the Association of Na- 
I tional Advertisers. These simple truths still 
1 serve the film buyer: 

! "How much should the picture cost? The 

I sponsor should consider this question carefully. 

I Good pictures cost money. It is better not to 

I make a picture at all than to make a poor one. 

I In the final analysis the amount of the budget 

\ should be determined by the importance of 

the problem which the picture is supposed to 

solve." 

An Approach to Selecting the Producer: 

"The sponsor's first responsibility in select- 
ing a producer is to himself. He cannot afford 
to make the selection on the basis of personal 
friendship, the affability of a sales representa- 
tive or a "catchy" idea. Often such an idea 
involves only one sequence in a picture. He 
should look to these general standards: 
; (a) Business integrity 

(b) Experience in picture-making as demon- 
i strated by samples of films actually pro- 
duced. 

(c) Financial stability 

(d) Creative and technical staff 

' (e) Production facilities and equipment 
I (f) Length of time in business." 

Today's Audience: a Sponsor Opportunity 

i" The sponsor of a "public relations" motion 
picture has never had a greater audience po- 
tential than is offered by the following chan- 
nels of circulation open to him: 

( 1 ) 529 television stations, serving over 40 
million homes now equipped with receivers 
(some two or three apiece), are welcoming 
short films, from two or three to 27 minutes 
in length. Their major criteria are maximum 
"public interest" and good creative quality suf- 
ficient to hold their audience. 

(2) From 450.000 to 500,000 16mm sound 
projectors have gone into schools, churches. 



community organizations (clubs, lodges, 
PTA's), grange and union halls, industrial 
plants and all types of institutions. This self- 
equipped audience has a voracious appetite for 
interesting new films on a wide variety of sub- 
jects. 

( 3 ) Despite all that you hear about the 
decline of movie theatres, the drop in "hard- 
top" buildings has been more than matched 
by the rise in drive-in theatres. A sponsor 
with a wide-screen short subject in one of 
today's brilliant color processes has only to 
match theatrical quality and make the film 
interesting for nationwide bookings. Ameri- 
can Engineer, for example, recently played 
5,000 houses for its sponsor, Chevrolet. 

(4) As the summer season approaches, a 
special phenomenon of the distribution field 
called "road-shows" opens another large audi- 
ence to sponsored films. These are free 
"movie-nights" in the theatre-less towns of the 
farm country, conducted by traveling film pro- 
jectionists from May 1 to September 30. 

The average audience per town, reported by 
Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc. (a spe- 
cialist in this field) is about 440 people, about 
50% of them adults. In 1957 Modern certified 
16,041 road-show bookings with oyer 4\-> 
million viewers. 

These New Films Will Make News 

7-r The prime factor in every aspect of this 
field is the quality of new pictures which con- 
tinue to come into distribution. On a single 
recent afternoon in St. Paul last month we 
saw two such films, just being completed, which 
are surely destined to be among the best of 
1958. 

The first of these is a soon-to-be-released 
Navy film. Sixth Fleet — Force for Peace, a fit- 
ting successor to the wartime Fighting Lady. 
Every American, young and old, should see 
this factual documentary of the Sixth Fleet 
on guard in the Mediterranean. Reid H. Ray 
Film Industries' cameramen have captured sea 
action and shore leave sequences of thrilling 
and dramatic interest. This picture should be 
a "must" for theatrical release. 

> Out of the same studio is the Minnesota 
State Centennial Commission's 26-minute saga 
of that state's pioneers titled An Agricultural 
Portrait. This story of the land and its people 
is unfolded with beauty and meaning. Filmed 
in Eastman Color, it will be welcomed by 
audiences everywhere it is shown. 

^■^ What the United Steelworkers' president 
David J. McDonald calls "sixty-seven minutes 
of soul-searchina" is that union's new film 




Burden of Truth. This picture set the theme 
for the recent National Conference on Human 
Rights in Philadelphia. It deals with what 
its sponsors call "the gravest challenge threaten- 
ing our democratic concept — racial discrimina- 
tion still prevalent in varied degrees in the 
community life of our nation." Burden of Truth 
is a drama of one American Negro as he seeks 
ways to make positive adjustments to life 
today. 

'' The supply of new films for 1958 is un- 
diminished, matching some critical needs for 
public guidance and some acute special prob- 
lems. Motivating youth to careers in science 
are two major sponsors: the Bell System with 
its continuing Science Serie.s and Monsanto 
Chemical with its Conquest films. 

Champion's New Film on Productivity 

M In these days when the word "productivity" 
raises spectres of over-supply, automation and 
speed-up. the impending release of a new 30- 
minute motion picture dealing forthrightly with 
this vital subject is indeed news! 

Following up its widely-shown 1956 film. 
Production 5118, which dealt with the prob- 
lems of communication, the Champion Paper 
& Fibre Co. has just completed 1104 Sutton 
Road. The general theme, as in Production 
5118, is understanding. "But this time." says 
Champion's president Reuben B. Robert- 
son. Jr., "the specific goal is understanding of 
productivity. The topic needs a clarification 
that ought to prove pretty useful to industry 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 103) 

On the Make: a new film for New York's 
Manufacturers Trust Cotnpany is being created 
by this crew frotn United States Productions. 
(See page 168 for case history.) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 




.'■y*H»- 




This Production Review 
Speaks for Dedicated Men 

How shall we dedicate this largest of Annual Production Review 
issues? This authentic guide to the film sponsor's most 
dependable sources of production brings a detailed listing of 
the recent experience, staff personnel and physical facilities of 
some 284 film companies in the United States. Canada and 
abroad. In a sense, it is already dedicated by the existence of 
this strong nucleus of experienced, specializing organizations 
serving business, education and governments. But the films they 
have listed and which we have often reviewed in depth this past 
year have already spoken for their creators on millions of screens, 
viewed by countless other millions in worldwide audiences. 
Many of these pictures have earned our commendation and, more 
important, the favorable judgment and awards of special 
groups and of their viewers. All of these films and the sponsors 
who made them possible must share this dedication. 
Behind each production are the specific goals for which these 
informational, educational, religious, training films were made. 
Their purposes give the film production industry and its people 
the vital satisfaction of equally great purpose. For these 
films have the power to achieve understanding, to improve human 
relations, to save lives and lessen the toll of accidents and 
disease. Films are playing an important part in moving the goods 
and services of the free world's production lines. They have 
the power to move mens minds, too. Dedicated to this useful work 
are the many thousands of men and women behind the desks, 
cameras, sound consoles and laboratory equipment of this vast 
production industry. A vital link are those who bridge the gap 
between the studio and the millionfold audience for these films. 
The substance is that we are altogether part of an inter-related, 
inter-dependent industry . . . dedicated to the great work of 
serving mankind through our chosen instrument . . . the film. 

— OHC 




The News in Focus: 

(continued from page one hundred one) 

and related groups, education and the world 
at large." Wilding Picture Productions. Inc. 

was the producer. 

* * * 

Encouragement for Films in Mathematics 
■m Science is a fascinating subject for the mo- 
tion picture but the cold facts of mathematics 
on which all science revolves have thus far been 
neglected on the screen. Giving encourage- 
ment and offering guidance to prospective 
sponsors of mathematics' films is the Film 
Evaluation Board. Division of Mathematics of 
the National Academy of Sciences. 

Its December, 1957 study just released. 
"Films and Television in Mathematics." sum- 
marizes the discussions and recommendations 
of this group of professional mathematicians 
who are convinced that films can play an im- 
portant part in this basic subject. 

* * * 

Two-Third of World's Television Sets in U.S. 

t!r On a preceding page, we referred to the 
529 television stations now operating in the 
U.S., serving some 47 million receivers. The 
rest of the world has 527 stations, not includ- 
ing the 31 operated by the U.S. military at 
isolated bases throughout the globe. 

In the 49 other countries who have TV, 
there are another 21 million sets; the United 
Kingdom has 24 stations and 9 million re- 
ceivers; Canada has 50 stations and about 
3 million sets in use. West Germany accounts 
for another 69 stations; the Soviet Union has 
56 stations reaching 2i-j million set owners. 

Japan's 187 Producers Turn Out 753 Films 
■^ From a post-war (1947) output of only 
125 films by some 27 producers, Japan's educa- 
tional (short film) makers have increased in 
number to 187 in 1956. These companies 
turned out 753 films, comprising 1688 reels. 
That country's Educational Film Producers 
Association compiled its first international 
catalog in 1956; issued a more complete, illus- 
trated book in October. 1957. Orders for 
Japanese short films from the United States, 
England, Canada, Latin America, Europe and 
the Asian countries have "substantially in- 
creased" in recent years. 

Among the Film Producer Associations 

M San Francisco's active regional Film Pro- 
ducers Association, working in cooperation 
with the University of California, is helping to 
arrange a short course for business film users 
to be held at Berkeley in late May. O. H. 
Coelln, editor of Business Screen, will pre- 
sent a one-hour review of film distribution 
methods. 

* New York's very active Film Producers 
Association is taking a leading role in current 
negotiations with the Screen Actors Guild for 
a new contract on television commercial rates. 
it A new association of Minnesota Film Pro- 
ducers, comprising all active companies in the 
Twin Cities, is holding monthly meetings. Ken 



Mason, Eastman Kodak midwest Film De- 
partment executive, addressed a recent Febru- 
ary session at which O. H. Coelln, editor of 
Business Screen, also gave a brief review of 
association activities in other regions. 
■A: Members of the American Association of 
Film Producers, meeting in Chicago on Feb- 
ruary 21st, elected L. Mercer Francisco as 
their president. James Kellock. Wilding Picture 
Productions, Inc. exec, is vice-president elect. 
James Holmes, Dallas Jones Film Productions, 
is the new secretary; Mervin LaRue, veteran 
medical film-maker, is the new treasurer. ^ 

Canada's Film Producers Learn 
to Unify and Diversify . . . 

TT ere in Canada we have been learning 

■'• two lessons — Unite and Diversify. 

A few years ago Canadian producers were 
fiercely competitive one with another, some- 
times even committing the cardinal sin of 
knocking their competitors. 

Now we have realized that most of the time 
when making a presentation for a film pro- 
gram that the competition is not another pro- 
ducer at all — but another medium, another way 
of telling the sponsor's story. 

Despite the fact that we have only one-tenth 
of the population of the United States spread 
across a much larger country, we have been 
able to build a truly national trade association 
of all the leading producers and laboratories 
from coast to coast — 43 companies. Its worth 
is proven by the regular attendance at meet- 
ings of producers from Newfoundland in the 
east to British Columbia in the west. 

Active committees meet with Canadian Film 
Awards, with Unions, with the Canadian Broad- 
casting Corporation, with the National Film 
Board, and with Federal Government officials 
on such matters as taxes, customs duties and 
depreciation write-offs. This new feeling of 
union within the film production industry here 
has now resulted in a 16-page booklet being 
prepared and sent by the Association to all 
advertisers and agencies. 

The other lesson we are learning is to diver- 
sify, and many different types of films are 
coming out of the same studios — films for 
merchandizing, public relations and training — 
theatrical shorts and television commercials — 
with several companies now beginning produc- 
tion of half-hour films for television. 

This means a healthier industry with over- 
head spread across more jobs and with the 
diverse experience of classroom films being 
applied to industrial production, with sponsored 
experience being applied to TV series. 

With smaller markets, smaller budgets and a 
smaller industry than in the United States, 
Canadian producers have to employ a great 
deal of ingenuity and learn their lessons 
quickly. 

Two of these lessons are to Utiite and to 
Diversify! 

— bv Graeme Fraser 



COMING ATTRACTIONS 

A Preview of Editorial Features 
in Business Screen Next Month 

COPYRIGHT PROCEDURES FOR 
MOTION PICTURES & FILMSTRIPS 

An authentic, long-needed feature by 
Evelyn Dunne, U.S. Coyright Office. 



SCIENCE CHALLENGES THE 
SPONSORED MOTION PICTURE 

An urgent need still exists for useful 
science films, says Jay E. Gordon. 

* * * 

THE MODERN STORY 

The saga of the nation's great specialist 
in sponsored film distribution is told in 
a 20-year perspective . . . 

MEDICINE AND THE LAW 

The important new series sponsored by 
the Wm. S. Merrell Co. is "detailed" 
in terms of distribution results . . . 

* * * 

MEET THE UNION PACIFIC 
R.R. IN "COMPANY MANNERS" 

An inside look at public relations re- 
flected in an important picture. 

* * * 

"IT'S ALL IN THE CARDS" 

The American Playing Card Mfrs. go 
to the screen with their story . . . 

* * =!■ 

'THEODORE ROOSEVELT: AMERICAN' 

A review of an important new picture. 

* * * 

BETHLEHEM STEEL: FILM-MAKER 

Behind the scenes in film production 
and utilization at Bethlehem Steel. 



A T & T'S "FLOOR SHOW" 

Another useful picture joins the Bell 
System's major library . . . 



"MARVEL AT YOUR FINGERTIP" 

General Telephone Corp. pictures its 
basic story in a new film . . . 



"CHAIN SAW SAFETY PAYS OFF" 

The hlomelite Saw Co. brings rural 
America a useful new picture . . . 

* * * 

FORD'S WORLDWIDE 

ADVENTURE IN PICTURES 

A picture story on the making of those 
Ford "Round the World ' commercials. 



SALES TRAINING FILMS 

A complete checklist of motion pictures 
and slidefilms for sales managers. 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO PRODUCER LISTING S 



r.MTEI) STATES 

Pi-ockicers Page No. 

Academy Films 151 

Academy Film Productions, Inc 137 

Academy Pictures, Inc 109 

Acorn Films of New England. Inc 107 

Affiliated Film Producers, Inc 109 

Allend'or Productions 151 

Allen, Gordon, Schroeppel & Redlich, 

Inc 137 

Alley, Paul Productions 109 

All-Scope Pictures, Inc 151 

Altschul, Gilbert, Productions, Inc 137 

American Film Company* 126 

American Film Producers* 109 

American Film Services 125 

Animalic Productions. Ltd 109 

Ansel Film Studios. Inc 110 

Atlas Film Corporation 137 

Audio Productions, Inc 110 

Barbre, Thos. .1.. Productions 149 

Bay State Film Productions, Inc 107 

Becker. Marvin, Films 150 

Bovey, Martin, Films. Inc 108 

Bransby, John, Productions 110 

Bray Studios, Inc 110 

Cahill, Charles, & Associates 151 

Calhoun Studios, Inc 110 

Calvin Company, The 145 

Campbell Films 109 

Campus Film Productions, Inc 110 

Canyon PMlms of Arizona 148 

Capital Film Service 134 

Caravel Films, Inc 110 

Cate & McGlone 151 

Centron Corporation, Inc 144 

Chicago Film Studios 137 

Christensen-Keniiedy Productions 146 

Churchill-Wexler Film Productions 152 

Cinecraft Productions, Inc 134 

Cine'Pic Hawaii 156 

Clipper Film Productions, Inc Ill 

Colburn, John, & Associates 138 

Coleman Productions Ill 

Colmes-Werrenrath Productions, Inc. . . . 138 



Producers Page No. 

Commerce Pictures 129 

Condor Films, Inc 145 

Continental Films 144 

Continental Film Productions 

Corporation 130 

Craven Film Corporation Ill 

Creative .4rts Studio, Inc 125 

Culhane, Shamus, Productions, Inc Ill 

Davis, Robert, Productions, Inc Ill 

DeFrenes Company 127 

Dekko Film Productions, Inc 108 

Dephoure Studios, Inc 108 

Depictorama 112 

Depicto Films Corporation Ill 

Desilu Productions, Inc 152 

Discovery Productions, Inc 112 

Donovan, Kevin, Films 107 

Douglas Productions 138 

Dowling, Pat, Pictures 152 

D.P.M. Productions, Inc 112 

Dudley Pictures Corporation 152 

Dunn, Cal, Studios 138 

Dynamic Films, Inc 112 

Editorial Films, Inc 112 

Elms, Charles, Productions Inc 112 

Empire Films Corporation 156 

Empire Photosound Incorporated 144 

Engel, Walter, Productions, Inc 113 

Fairbanks, Jerry, Productions 

of California, Inc 152 

Farrell & Gage Films, Inc 113 

Feature Story Productions 128 

Fell, Edward, Productions 136 

Fidelity Films, Inc 152 

Film Arts Productions, Inc 146 

Film Associates Inc 136 

Film Associates of Michigan, Inc 132 

Filmfax Productions, Inc 113 

Film (Graphics Inc 113 

Filmways, Incorporated 113 



Note; bold-face listings above indicate display advertising 
elsewhere in this issue. *Asterisk following listing indicates 
incomplete reference data furnished. 




Producers Page No. 

Fiore Films 126 

Flagg Films, Inc 152 

Florez, Incorporated 132 

Fordel Films, Inc 113 

Fotovox, Inc 130 

Francisco Films 139 

Frink Film Studio 130 

Funt, Allen A., Productions 114 

Galbreath Pictures Inc 130 

Ganz, William J., Company, Inc 114 

Gerald Productions, Inc 114 

G & G Film Corporation 143 

Glenn, Jack, Inc 114 

Glover, Ozzie, Productions 153 

Golden Key Productions, Inc 153 

Golden State Film Productions 150 

Graphic Films Corporation 153 

Guggenheim, Charles, & Associates, Inc. 145 

Gulf Coast Films, Inc 148 

Haig & Patterson, Inc 132 

Hance, Paul, Productions, Inc 114 

Handy, Jam. Organization. Inc.. The .... 133 

Hardcastle Film Associates 145 

Harris-Tuchman Productions 153 

Hartley Productions, Inc 114 

Harvey, Neil, Productions 127 

Henning & Cheadle, Inc 132 

Holland-Wegman Productions 124 

Huber, Louis R., Productions 156 

Industrial Film Producers, Inc 115 

Industrial Motion Pictures, Inc 136 

Information Productions, Inc 115 

Instructional Arts, Inc 133 

International Sound Films, Inc 129 

Jamieson Film Company 148 

Jones. Dallas, Productions. Inc 139 

Kayfetz, Victor, Productions, Inc 115 

Keith Film Productions 146 

Keitz & Herndon 148 

Kerbawy, Haford, & Company 132 

Kerkow, Herbert, Inc 115 

Key Productions, Inc 115 

Klaeger Film Productions, Inc 115 

Kling Film Productions 139 

Kluge Film Productions 146 

Knickerbocker Productions, Inc 116 

K & S Films Inc 134 

Lane, Kent, Films, Inc 129 

La Rue, Mervin W., Inc 1.39 

Lasky Film Productions, Inc 134 

Lawrence, Robert, Productions, Inc 116 

Lewis & Martin Films, Inc 139 

Love. James. Productions, Inc 116 

Loucks & Norling Studios. Inc. 

(Lawrence) 116 

Lux-Brill Productions. Inc 116 

Marathon TV Newsreel, Inc 116 

Master Motion Picture Company 108 

Mayer, Charles. Studios, Inc 136 

McHugh, Fenton, Productions, Inc 140 

McLarty Picture Productions 124 

(ALPHABETICAL LISTINGS CONTINUE ON PAGE 106) 
I.cfl: ii1h.i,iiii(iuI;iki.' Iiy (.(mioii Rav 



DGRAPHICAL INDEX 
PRODUCER LISTINGS 



NEW ENGLAND REGION 

mnecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont 1 07 

METROPOLITAN NEW YORK 

stings begin on page 1 09 through page 124 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC REGION 

;w York State, District of Columbia, Maryland .... 124 
;w Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia pages 126 to .... 128 

SOUTHEASTERN REGION 

orida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Tennessee. . . 128 

EAST CEXTRAL REGION 

diana, Michigan and Metropolitan Detroit .... 130-134 
fiio Cities: Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dayton 134-136 

METROPOLITAN CHICAGO 

Stings begin on page 137 through page 143 

WEST CENTRAL REGION 

inois, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, pages .... 143-145 
jbraska, Wisconsin 146 

SOUTHWESTERN REGION 

'kansas, Arizona, Texas 148 

MOUNTAIN STATES REGION 

)Iorado 1 49 

WEST COAST REGION 

ilifornia (San Francisco and Bay Area) 150-151 

METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES 

Stings begin on page 151 through page 156 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION 

egon, Washington and Hawaii 1 -"^6 

BUSINESS SCREEN INTERNATIONAI, 

inada, listings begin on page 157 through page .... 160 
itin-America Countries: Mexico. South America ... 161 
irope: England, France, Germany, Scandanavia ... 162 
ain . . . 164; Africa (Sudan) . . . 167; Australia ... 166 
pan 167 




National 



Survey 



of 



m 



Production 



in the U.S 



and Canada 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO PRODUCER LISTINGS 



UXITEI) STATES 

(CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE 104l 

Producers Pa<re No. 

Medical Dynamics, Inc 117 

Medical Film Guild, Ltd 117 

MGM-TV 117 

Midwest Film Studios 140 

Milner Productions, Inc 125 

Mode-Art Pictures, Inc 127 

Monumental Films & Recordings, Inc. . . 126 

Motion Picture Service Company 150 

Moulin Studios 150 

MPO Productions. Inc 117 

Muller, Jordan & Herrick 117 

Mundell Productions 148 

Murphy. Owen, Productions, Inc 117 

National Film Studios, Inc 125 

Neal, Stanley, Productions, Inc 118 

Nemeth, Ted, Studios 118 

New World Productions 15.3 

Niles, Fred A., Productions, Inc 140 

North American Film Corporation 127 

Norwood Studios, Inc 125 

Olympus Film Productions, Inc 1.S4 

On Film, Inc 126 

Orleans, Sam, Productions 1,30 

Pacific Productions 150 

Packaged Programs, Inc 127 

Palmer. Alfred T.. Productions 150 

Palmer. W. A. Films. Inc 150 

Pan American Films 130 

Paragon Pictures, Inc 140 

Parthenon Pictures— Hollywood 1.53 

Pathescope Productions 118 

Pelican Films, Inc 118 

Pictures for Business I54 

Pilot Productions. Inc 140 

Pinney, Roy, Productions, Inc 118 

Playhouse Pictures I54 

Pocket Films Hg 

Polaris Pictures, Inc I.54 

Premier Film & Recording Corporation 145 
Producers Film Studios 142 

Q.E.D. Productions Inc 118 

Rainbow Pictures, Inc 128 

Rarig Motion Picture Company 156 

Ray. Reid H.. Film Industries. Inc 144 

Reed, Roland, Productions Inc 154 

Regan Film Productions. Inc I33 

Richie, Robert Yarnall, Productions, 

„.I"''* 119 

Rinaldo, Ben, Company, The I54 

Rippey, Henderson, Bucknum & Company 149 

Riviera Productions ". 154 

de Rochemont, Louis, Associates 119 

Rocket Pictures, Inc I55 

Rockett, Frederick K., Company [ 155 

Rolab Studios ' IO7 

Roush, Leslie. Productions. Inc 119 

Roy, Ross, Inc I33 

Ryan, George, Films, Inc I45 

Sarra, Inc 119_ 142 

Science Pictures Inc 119 

Seminar Films, Inc 119 

Smith, Fletcher, Studios, Inc 120 

Note: bold-face listinRS above indicate display advertising 
elsewhere in this issue. 'Asterisk followine listing indicates 
incomplete reference data furnished. 



Producers Page No. 

Smith, Warren R., Inc 127 

Sonochrome Pictures 149 

Soundac Productions, Inc 128 

Sound Masters, Inc 119 

Southwest Film Industries, Inc 148 

Southwest Film Center 149 

Star Informational Films 126 

Stark-Films 126 

Strauss, Henry, & Company. Inc 120 

Studio Sixteen 128 

Sturgis-Grant Productions, Inc 120 

Sturm, Bill, Studios. Inc 120 

Sutherland. John. Productions. Inc 155 

Swanson, Rudy, Productions 146 

Tantamount Pictures, Incorporated .... 128 

Telecine Film Studios, Inc 142 

Telepix Corporation 155 

Telic, Inc 120 

Terrytoons, Division of C.B.S. 

Television Film Sales, Inc 120 

Texas Industrial Film Company. Inc 149 

Tiesler Productions 121 

Tomlin Film Productions, Inc 121 

Training Films. Inc 121 

Transfilm Incorporated 121 

Trident Films, Inc 121 

Tri-J Film Productions 124 

Unifilms, Inc 122 

United Film & Recording Studios, Inc. . . 142 

United States Productions. Inc 122 

UPA Pictures, Inc I55 

Van Praag Productions 122 

Vavin Incorporated 122 

Video Films 134 

Vidicam Pictures Corporation 123 

Viguie Film Productions, Inc. 

( Puerto Rico ) I6I 

Visualscope. Incorporated 123 

Wade, Roger. Productions. Inc 123 

Walker, Gene K., Productions 151 

Washington Video Productions, Inc 125 

Western Cine Service, Inc 149 

Wilding Picture Productions, Inc 143 

Willard, Frank, Productions 129 

Willard Pictures Inc 123 

Winik Films Corporation 123 

Wolff, Raphael G.. Studios. Inc 156 

Wondsel. Carlisle & Dunphy, Inc 123 

Worcester Film Corporation 108 

World Acquaintance Films 129 

Wright, Norman, Productions, Inc.* .... 156 

Wurtele Film Productions 129 

Wylde Studios, Inc 124 

Zweibel, Seymour, Productions. Inc 124 




CANADA 

Producers Page No 

Benoit, Real, Film Productions 151 

Caldwell. S. W.. Ltd 151 

Chetwynd Films Limited 15i 

Crawley Films Limited 15' 

Fletcher Film Productions Limited .... 151 

Hirst Film Productions 15' 

Klenman-Davidson Productions Ltd. ... 15! 

Lawrence, Robert, Productions, Ltd. ... 15! 

Les Documentaires Lavoie 16( 

Master Film Studios Ltd 15' 

Motion Picture Centre Ltd 15! 

Omega Productions Inc 15! 

Peterson Productions 151 

Phillips-Gutkin & Associates Limited ... 151 

Showcase Film Productions 15J 



PRODUCTION REVIEW 
INTERNATIONAL 

Producers Page 



No, 



Audiovicentro 161 

Australian Instructional Films Pty. Ltd. 166 

Birmingham Commercial Films Limited. 162 
Boehner-Film 163 

Cambridge Film & T.V. Productions 

Pty., Ltd 167 

Cine Comercial, S.A 161 

Cinesound Productions Pty., Ltd 166 

Estudios Cinematograticos Rosello 162 

Estudios Moro, S.A 164 

Forberg-Film AB 164 

Halas & Batchelor Cartoon Films, Ltd.. . 162 

International Motion Picture Co., Inc. . . 167 

Kommunes Filmcentral 164| 

Laux Studios KG 16c 

Les Analyses Cinamatographiques 16? 

Minerva-Film AS le'' 

Norsk Film AS Hi- 

Perier Productions Pty., Ltd 16t 

Statens Filmsentral 16^ 

Sudan Publicity Company, Ltd 161 

Svekon Film 16-: 

Viguie Film Productions, Inc 161 

World Wide Pictures Limited 16i 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINll 



!«. ^ n jJL Af en 



NEW ENGLAND 



Connecticut 



•5f 



KEVIN DONOVAN FILMS 

208 Treat Road, Glastonbury, Connecticut 
Phone: MEdford 3-9331 

Date of Organization : 1953 

I Branch: 15 West 44th St., New York, N.Y. 
Phone: YUkon 6-6049. John Bennewitz, 
in charge. 

Kevin Donovan, Owner 

John Bennewitz, Executive Producer 

James Benjamin, Writer 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms; pub- 
ic relations, industrial and medical films. 
'"'AGILITIES : 16 and 35mm Mitchells; 16mm 
jine Special, 16mm Arrifiex, Magnasync sound 
equipment. Complete 16 and 35mm editing 
equipment including Moviola. 

iECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

VIOTION Pictures: Center of Industrial A7ner- 
ca, revision (Ohio Edison); Hospitals Are 
^eople (Grace-New Haven Community Hospi- 
;al) ; Building for Tomorrow (Connecticut 
General Life Insurance Company) ; DEWline 
—Annual Re-Supply ( Fedei'al Electric Com- 
)any); Elective Rhinoplasty ( Schering Cor- 
)oration). 



ROLAB STUDIOS 
(Rolab Photo-Science Laboratories) 

Walnut Tree Hill, Sandy Hook, Connecticut 
Phone: GArden (Newtown) 6-2466 

Date of Organization : 1928 

Henry Roger, Owner-Director 
E. H. Roger, Secretary 

Services: Complete production (sound stage 
vith equipment), full & part productions, incl. 
;ervices to producers, motion picture consult- 
mts to industrial and scientific organizations. 
Specialists in scientific camera work; time- 
apse, macro- and microscopic work, research 
md engineering. Facilities: Recording and 
jrojection rooms with remote controls, direc- 
or's and dressing rooms, lounge, carpentry 
md instrument shops. Research laboratories ; 
)ptical-electrical-photographic etc. 

IECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

.^ILMSTRIPS: Boring Tools for Woodworking. 
line subjects (Stanley Tools); Partial Den- 
:ure Construction (The J. M. Ney Co.) ; Slide- 
'"ILMS: Four travel: Germany; Austria; Italy; 
?'rance. Subcontracts: 16mm and 35mm 
Assignments for producers. 



Massachusetts 
(Boston, Massachusetts Area) 

ACORN FILMS OF NEW ENGLAND, INC. 

465 Stuart St., Boston, Mass. 
Phone: CO-6-3507 

Date of Organization: 1952 
Date of Incorporation: 1956 

Branches: 168 West 46th St., New York, 
N.Y. Phone: JUdson 6-2272. Eugene 
Perewa, Mgr.; Elliott Butler, in chg. of 



Production. 

215 N.E. 117th St., Miami, Florida. Phone: 

Plaza 4-4330. George Contouris, in chg. of 

Production. 

John V. Rein, Jr., President 
Hazel Frost, Treasurer 
James Murphy, Clerk 
Julian Olansky, Cameraman 
Len Spaulding, Cameraman 
Jack Cryan, Lab. Manager 

Services: Motion picture film production, spe- 
cializing in public relation films for TV. Full 
time staff for TV news films. Facilities: 
Sales oflices, cutting rooms, projection room, 
complete lab. for negative processing; Bell & 
Howell printer. Specializing in 16mm film 
processing. Reversal processing facilities 
available on special request. Full complement 
of 16mm equipment for production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Making of a Trooper 
(Mass. Public Safety) ; Mayflower the 2nd 
( Mayflower Commission ) ; Lancers Go South 
(City of Lawrence) ; Atomic Cannon (Henry 
Louden Agency) ; A Netv Drug (Paul Stevens 
P.R.) ; A Day in the Life of Mrs. Furcolo 
(Comm. for Better Mass.) ; Largest Clambake 
in World (W.B.Z.-TV) ; Highways of the Fu- 
ture (Mass. Dept. Public Works). TV Com- 
mercials: for Gillette Safety Razor Co.; 
Massachusetts Heart Fund; Jimmy Fund. 



4S- 

BAY STATE FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

35 Springfield Street, Agawam, 

Massachusetts 
Mail Address: Box 129, Springfield, Mass. 
Phone: REpublic 4-3164 

Branches: 80 Boyleston Street, Boston, 

Mass. 

Phone: HAncock 6-8904. David Doyle, 
Vice-President, in charge. 707 Nicolet 
Avenue, Winter Park Florida. Phone: 
Midway 7-3817. Eugene Bunting, 
Vice-President, in charge. 

Date of Organization : 1943 

Morton H. Read, President 
David Doyle, Vice-President, Sales 
Harold 0. Stanton, Vice-President, TV 
Francis N. Letendre, Vice-President, 

Laboratory 
Eugene N. Bunting, Vice-President 
Winifi'ed Pettis, Treasurer 
Lowell F. Wentworth, Account Executive 
Edward R. Knowlton, Script Director 

Services: 16 and 35mm motion pictures; in- 
dustrial, scientific, public relations, training, 
sales, religious, documentary; television com- 
mercials and programs; sound slidefilms; 
foreign language narratives. Sei'vice avail- 
able to other producers in photography, sound 
recording, printing, processing, editing, scor- 
ing, cutting, intei'lock screening, use of sound 
stage. Facilities: Mitchell and Maurer cam- 
eras; lighting; AC & DC portable generators; 
Maurer 16mm multiple track optical record- 
ing; 16mm and 17V2mm syncronous magnetic 
recording; 14" magnetic recording; 2 printing 
labs for color and B & W, Depue and Peterson 
printing equipment, electronic cueing; 16mm 
B&W processing, positive, negative, reversal; 

(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



Keys to the Effective 
Use of the Film Sponsor's 
Dependable Buyer's Guide 

LISTING STANDARDS DEFINED 

THE BASIC PURPOSE of this 1958 Annual 
Production Review Issue and of the listings 
which appear on the following 59 pages is 
to furnish film sponsors with the most 
dependable, comprehensive Buyer's Guide to 
reputable, experienced producers of motion 
pictures, slidefilms and other audio-visual 
media for business, government, and tv use. 

There is no other complete source available 
to business and advertising buyers. The many 
hundreds of unchecked "studio" names which 
embellish the pages of city directories are 
in sharp contrast to the complete data on staff, 
facilities, and current client references 
which these firms have willingly supplied 
for your safe passage in this important field. 

244 companies in the United States and 
1 4 leading companies in Canada have 
complied with our minimum prerequisites 
for an unqualified listing. No charge or 
obligation of any kind was imposed on 
companies for listing in these pages, excepting 
to fulfill our minimum reference request. 

A few U.S. companies are designated by 
the asterisk ( * ) in the Alphabetical Index 
on the opposite page. This usually indicates 
insufficient client references furnished after 
three requests. For the guidance of the 
buyer, we required that a minimum of five 
business motion pictures and/or slidefilms be 
listed by title and sponsor as evidence of the 
producer's recent experience and clientele. 

Some 1380 persons are listed in the 247 
U.S. companies, serving in various executive 
capacities; branch offices of all producers 
are also provided. Such large centers of 
production as New York City, Detroit, Chicago 
and Los Angeles (among others) are 
represented in depth. Every possible source 
of production names available to us was 
used in the preliminary surveys and all were 
sent listing requests. Any bona-fide 
producer able and willing to comply with 
minimum prerequisites has been listed. 

The Editors acknowledge the growing 
volume of work done by our companies in the 
field of television commercials and other 
television films. Companies specializing in 
this type of work are clearly identified. 

The huge volume of work required to 
complete this issue is amply repaid by its 
widespread acceptance and use among more 
than 10,000 companies and advertising 
agencies in the U.S. and Canada this year. 9 



NEW ENGLAND: Massachusetts 

BAY STATE FILM: Cont'd. 

screening room; cutting rooms: Moviola; 
sound readers; animation department; art 
department; carpenter shop; set designing; 
complete music library; 3,000 ft. sound stage; 
permanent staflf of 20 technicians, art and 
script specialists. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Bo.rmaster (United Shoe 
Machinery Corporation); Lytron 680 (Mon- 
santo Chemical Co., Plastics Div. ); Disaster 
Plan (Henry Heywood Hospital); Electric 
Power & Common Sense (The Electric Com- 
panies of the Connecticut Valley); Progress 
Report w; and »2 ( Sylvania Electric Prod- 
ucts, Inc.); A Neiv Adventure in Cooking 
(General Electric Company) ; The 1958 Brake 
Story ( Raybestos Div., Raybestos-Manhattan, 
Inc.); Show Window of the East (Eastern 
States Exposition, 1957) ; You and Your Uni- 
form (U.S. Marine Corps); Wired for the 
Future (Wiremold Company); A Long Step 
Forward (Walks Foundation); The Value of 
Ideas ( Emhart Mfg. Company); Prescription 
for Grinding Progress ( Bay State Abrasive 
Company); Magnificent Miniatures (Minia- 
ture Precision Bearing Company) ; The Tra- 
jector System ( Trans-Sonics, Inc.); dealer 
promotion film for High Adventure With 
Lowell Thomas ( Delco-Remy Div., General 
Motors Corp.) ; The Pressure of Light (Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology). Slide- 
films : Blueprint for Sales (Rust Craft Greet- 
ing Cards, Inc.); Rondike (Genei-al Electric 
Company). TV Commercials: for General 
Electric Rotisserie; Columbia Bicycles; Les- 
toil; Hood Milk Company; Western Massachu- 
setts Electric Company; Connecticut Bank and 
Trust Company; Connecticut Milk Producers 
Association; Girls Clubs of America, Inc.. 
Hartford Gas Company. 



^2. 

DEKKO FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

126 Dartmouth Street, Boston 16, Mass. 
Phone: KEnmore 6-2511 

Date of Organization; 1946 

Affiliate: Rockwell Films, 26 Church St., 
Cambridge, Mass. Paul Rockwell, Mgv. 

•loseph Rothberg, President 

George W. Sloan, Jr., Sales Manager 

Charles Rockwell, Production Manager 

Paul Rockwell, Unit Manager 

Marie Pierce, Editor 

Plynn E. Williams, Art Director 

Dorothv Watson, Office Manager 

Elvin Car'ni, Production Assistant 

Marvin Rothbert, Production Assistayit 

Services: 16 and .35mm production and sound 
slidefilms. Complete services available to out- 
side industrial producers. Facilities: 2 com- 
plete sound stages, screening rooms, narration, 
editing rooms; animation and art dept.; 10- 
position custom mixing console; magnetic and 
optical recorders, interlock dubbers; music 
library. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Aircraft Fire Test Blood 
Discrasias ( Schering Corporation ) ; City in a 
Shadow (Westinghouse Broadcasting) ; Keep- 
ing Pace irith Progress (Trans-Sonies, Inc.) ; 
Football Highlights (Harvard University Ath- 



letic Association ) ; Rail Test Car ( Sperry Prod- 
ucts, Railroad Division) ; Slenderizing (H. W. 
Frank Agency); Testing (Nuclear Metals); 
Baseball Hand Signals ( Gillette Safety Razor 
Company i ; Cabinets by Gregg ( Gregg & Son) . 
Slidefilms: Be the Competition. Research and 
You (Wirthmore Feeds). TV Commercials: 
For Publix Markets, Nepco Products (Tarler 
& Skinner Advertising); Soapine. Ironwear 
Hosiery ( Jerome O'Leary Agency ) ; General 
Electric ( Hoag & Provandie, Inc.); Father 
John's Medicine ( Hermon W. Stevens 
Agency ) ; Summer Show Spots ( WBZ-TV, 
Westinghouse Broadcasting); Program Spots 
( WJZ-TV, Westinghouse Broadcasting) ; Sim- 
monds Upholstering Company ( Chambers, 
Wiswell, Shattuck, Cliflford & McMillan). 



DEPHOURE STUDIOS 

782 Commonwealth Ave., Boston 15, Mass. 
Phone BEacon 2-5722 

Date of Organization: 1935 
Date of Incorporation: 1956 

Joseph Dephoure, President & Treasurer 
Milton L. Levy, Vice-President 
Fstelle Davis, Office Manager 
David F. Dowling, Sales 

Services; Complete film production, 16mm and 
35mm. Industrial, documentary, business, 
public relations and training films, slidefilms; 
slides; television commercials & productions; 
hot press titles; printing; processing. FACILI- 
TIES: Sound stage, studio lights; 35mm cam- 
era; 3 16mm sound cameras; 3 16mm portable 
cameras; Houston processing machine: high 
speed processing machine; 2 16mm synchro- 
nous recorders; 17V2mm synch recorder; 
Maurer 6 track film recorder; crane dolly & 
tracks; projection room; 16mm & 35mm pro- 
jectors, optical and magnetic JAN ; 3 editing 
rooms; color & b&w printing, artwork, anima- 
tion, script department; television kinescop- 
ing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Polaroid Camera (Polaroid 
Corp.); A Chosen Career (Mass. State Po- 
lice); Dartmouth Football Revue (Dartmouth 
College); Profit Package (Cryovac Co.); 
Progress Report ( Avco Research); Hockey 
Higlilights (Boston Bruins). TV COMMER- 
CIALS: Northeast Airlines, Jordan Marsh Co., 
Narragansett Brewing Co., Teddie Peanut 
Butter, Schrafft Chocolates, Liquid Barcolene, 
Bleach Tabs, Carousel Cigarettes, J. A. Cigars, 
63 Cigars, United Farmers, Homemaker 
Beans. 



Victor Kayfetz Productions, Inc. 

18 Geoi'ge Aggott Road, Needham, 

Massachusetts 
Phones: Hlllcrest 4-9289, 

commonwealth 6-0800 

H. Jeff Forbes 
( See complete listing under New York area) 



"iv this symbol, appearing over a 
producer's listing, indicates that display adver- 
lising containing additional reference data ap- 
pears in other pages of this 8th Annual Pro- 
duction Review Issue of 1958. 



MASTER MOTION PICTURE COMPANY 

50 Piedmont Street, Boston 16, Mass. 
Phone: HAncock 6-3592 

Avner Rakov, President 

Irving Ross, Production Manager 

Alfred Gross, Lab Supervisor 

Services: 16mm and 35mm film production 
for television, theatres, industrial and docu- 
mentary film; laboratory sei-^'ices and slide- 
films. Facilities: Complete production equip- 
ment for 35 and 16mm motion pictures. Sound 
studios. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures : CP-Cerebral Palsy ( United 
Cerebral Palsy Association of Mass. ) ; Hy- 
Du-Lignum ( Hy-Du-Lignum Company ) . Slide- 
films: Count Your Blessings (United Fund 
Drive, Portland, Maine) ; The Shocking Swm- 
mer Story (Edison Electric Institute); Pro- 
gram for Harvard (Harvard University). 



Chelmsford, Massachusetts 
MARTIN BOVEY FILMS, INC. 

115 High Street, Chelmsford, Mass. 
Phone; GLenview 2-9755 (Lowell Exch.) 

Date of Organization : 1949 

Martin Bovey, Jr., President & Treasurer 
Martin K. Bovey, Director 

Services: Industrial, business, public rela- 
tions, educational, documentary, travel, sport 
and wildlife motion pictures from script to 
screen. Writing, photography, animation, ed- 
iting and recording services. Subcontracting 
work. Facilities: 16mm equipment for "on 
location" color sound motion picture produc- 
tion. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Science of the Sea (Woods 
Hole Oceanographic Institution) ; Minnesota: 
Star of the North (First National Bank of 
Minneapolis) ; Subcontract: sporting photog- 
raphy for Coca-Cola Bottling Co. ; skiing pho- 
tography for John Jay films. 



Worcester, Massachusetts 

WORCESTER FILM CORPORATION 

131 Central Street, Worcester 8, Mass. 

Phone : PL 6-1203 

Date of Organization: 1918 

Weld Morgan, President 

Linwood Erskine, Jr., Vice-President & 
Secretary 

Floyd A. Ramsdell, Treasurer & Gen. Mgr. 

Carleton E. Bearse, Sales Manager 
Services: Production of motion pictures. 
Facilities: 16mm cameras both motion pic- 
ture and still; 35mm still 3-D and motion 
picture cameras; GMC truck used to generate 
own electricity; complete crew including script 
writers, animation men, cameramen, directors, 
and all editing equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Dimensional Gaging with 
Dimensionair (Federal Products Corpora- 
tion); Fire Protection Through Research 
(Grinnell Corporation); Centalign Grinder 
( Bryant Chucking Grinder) ; The Millers That 
Use Their Heads (W. H. Nichols Company); 
Model 163 Center Drive Lathe (New Britain 
Machine Company). 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



NEW ENGLAND: Vermont 



I CAMPBELL FILMS 

I Academy Ave., Saxtons River, Vt. 

Phone: 3604 
I Date of Organization : 1947 

Robert M. Campbell, Executive Producer 
' Fred J. Brown, Production Manager 
Warren T. Johnson, Sales & Producer 
Jean S. Chivers, Editorial 
Beth M. Campbell, Animation 

Services: Public relations, industrial, docu- 
mentary, and educational motion picture pro- 



duction in color, from script to screen. Slide- 
films. Facilities: Cameras, lighting, sound 
equipment for location and studio production. 
Animation .stand. Editing rooms and record- 
ing studio with three channel magnetic mix- 
ing. Westrex Editor. Bell & Howell 16mm. 
J. C. printer. 16mm interlock screening. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Perkins Story ( Perkins 
School for the Blind) ; Jimmy Golden (Grand 
Union Food Stores) ; The Right Instruction 
of Youth (Wagner College); Dartmouth Col- 
lege Case — 1958 (Dartmouth College); Your 
Job with Grand Union, second version (Grand 
Union Food Stores). 



u^ 4f □ .!» Af a ift.*fa 



METROPOLITAN NEW Y O R 10 



ACADEMY PICTURES, INC. 

49 West 45th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 7-0744 

Branch: 433 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles 
36, Calif. William Lightfield, Manager. 
Phone: WEbster 1-8156 

Date of Incorporation : 1949 

C. Morey Foutz, President 
' William Tytia, Vice-President 
I Nicholas D. Newton, Director of Sales 

Services: Producer of live-action and ani- 
mated films for television and industry. 
Facilities: Staff of 40 artists and animators, 
live-action directors, script writers, editing 
department, optical department, photographic 
equipment, stage, 35mm projection and distri- 
bution service. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: 0«e Thousand Years (Tim- 
ken Roller Bearing Company) ; Ford Trucks 
( Ford Motor Company ) . Slidefilm : Wonder 
Bread (Continental Baking Company). TV 
Commercials: For Kool-Shake (General 
Foods ) ; Giselle MacKenzie Show ( Schick 
Razor) . 



Acorn Films of New England, inc. 

168 West 46th St., New York, N.Y. 
Phone : JUdson 6-2272 

Eugene Pererwa, Manager; Elliott Butler 

in charge of Production 
(See complete listing under Boston area) 

AFFILIATED FILM PRODUCERS, INC. 

164 East 38th Street, New York 16, N.Y. 
Phone : MUrray Hill 6-9279 

Date of Organization : 1946 

Willard Van Dyke, Secretary 
Irving Jacoby, Treasurer 

Strvices: Script to finished film. Specialties: 
documentary and educational films. Facili- 
riES: Production equipment; editing depart- 
ment; directors and script writers. 

'DECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Sy»i phony of the Senses 
(NBC); Kid Brother, Bright Side (Mental 
Health Film Board); American Adventure 
( McGraw-Hill ) . Production services for 
Lowell Thomas Television series. 



Allend'or Productions 

60 West 46th Street, New York 36 
Phone: Circle 5-0770 
( See complete listing in Los Angeles area) 

PAUL ALLEY PRODUCTIONS 

619 West 54th Street, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phones : JUdson 6-2393-4 
Date of Organization: 1949 

Paul Alley, President 
Barrett Alley, Vice-President 
M. R. Alley, Treasurer 
William Cotton, Office Manager 

Services: Production of public relations, ad- 
vertising, sales training, television and doc- 
umentary films in 16mm & 35mm black & white 
and color. Facilities: Screening room, edi- 
torial rooms, laboratory, all on one floor; stu- 
dios as required; 16 and 35mm cameras, sound, 
lights, camera car. platform top. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures; Tlte Mayflower Story (Aero 
Mayflower Transit Co. ) ; Semana de la Patria; 
Man and the Land (Republic of Venezuela) ; 
Venezuela Today (Fox Movietonews Release) ; 
Workers Paradise (Cromocine-Caracas). 

AMERICAN FILM PRODUCERS 

1600 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 7-5915 
Date of Organization: 1946 
Robert Gross, Executive Producer 
Lawrence A. Glesnes, Executive Producer 
Sheldon Abromowitz, Production Control 
Madeline Stolz, Office Manager 
Services: Motion pictures, 16mm and 35mm 
color and black and white; and slidefilms. 
Specialties: industrials, sales, public relations, 
television, education, training, medicals, doc- 
umentary and merchandising. Facilities: 
Complete 16mm and 35mm camera, lighting 
and sound production equipment; three cutting 
rooms, screening room, shooting stage ; special 
effects; animation; storyboard personnel, 
script writers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

TV Commercials: Esso Standard Oil Com- 
pany; Westinghouse Electric Corporation; 



Mayor's Committee for Pedestrian Safety; 
The Mennen Company ( McCann Erickson, 
Inc.); Progres.so; Stella D'Oro f Carlo Vinti 
Advertising) ; Medigum; Chooz (Doherty, 
Clifford, Steers & Shenfield, Inc.). Other spon- 
sor names as submitted in reference (motion 
pictures) ; U.S. Navy; U.S. Military Academy; 
Binney & Smith, Inc.; Women's Medical 
Specialist Corps. 



A? 



ANIMATIC PRODUCTIONS, LTD. 

15 West 46th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: JUdson 2-2160 

Date of Organization: 1949 

Tasker G. Lowndes. President 

Reese Patterson, Vice-President & Creative 

Director 
David E. Weller, Account Executive 
Leonard B. Elliott, Account Executive 
William S. Murphy, Art Director 
Robert Kain, Art Director 
Terry Colasacco, Production Coordinator 

Services: Specialists in creation of sound 
slidefilms, filmographs, limited animated mov- 
ies and television commercials. Facilities: 
Complete art department; animation stand: 
16mm, 35mm and still cameras; editing and 
projection equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Slidefilms: Seven Doorways to Death (Amer- 
ican Gas Association) ; Let's Sell Shoes (J. J. 
Newberry Company) ; The Lucky Whip Story 
(Lever Brothers Company ) ; This Too Is Boston 
( Boston Herald and Traveler) ; Operation- 
Moving More Boxes (W. A. Taylor & Company, 
Inc) ; The Story of Dynel (Union Carbide Cor- 
poration) ; The Celanese Sextet (Celanese 
Corporation of America) ; Best Buy— 1957 
(Radio Corporation of America); The Art- 
carved P.V.P. Story (J. R. Wood & Sons, Inc.) ; 
The Independent Way (Gibson Refrigerator 
Company) ; The Best Years (Fueloil & Oil 
Heat Magazine) ; Progress In Plastics (Con- 
goleum-Nairn, Inc.) ; Satellite— Fall 1957 
(Scripto, Inc) ; The D'Con Story (D'Con Com- 
pany) ; Will Success Spoil Roger Beaver (The 
Coca-Cola Company) ; Mr. Creative Thinker 
(Metropolitan Life Insurance Company; The 
Bayer Album of Familiar Facts (Sterling 
Drug Company); SIiow Me (Dole Hawaiian 
Pineapple Company, Ltd.). Widescreen & 
FiLMSTRiFS: for The Texas Company; William 
Esty & Company; The Procter & Gamble Com- 
pany; Railway Express Agency; H. K. Porter 
Company, Inc.; The Borden Company; Zenith 
Radio Corporation ; General Electric Company ; 
Western Electric Company; Ronson Corpora- 
tion ; American Radiator & Standard Sanitary 
Corporation ; Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical 
Company, Inc. Filmographs & TV Commer- 
cials: Wildroot Company; American Tobacco 
Companv, Lucky Strike; Nature's Remedy, 
Lewis-Howe Company; ThriftiCheck Service 
Corporation; Porter-Cable Machine Company; 
The Bai-basol Company; and John H. Dulany 
& Son, Inc. 



"V^ this symbol, appearing over a 
producer's listing, indicates that display adver- 
tising containing additional reference data ap- 
pears in other pages of this 8th Annual Pro- 
duction Review issue. 



TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



METROPOLITAN NEW YORK: 



ANSEL FILM STUDIOS, INC. 

45 West 45th St., New York, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 7-0049 

Date of Organization: 1956 

Jerome V. Ansel, President 
Ruth Ansel, Vice-President 

Services: Production of motion pictures and 
slidefilms. Facilities: Complete art depart- 
ment; 16mm and 35mm animation stand and 
cameras. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Spantde Sustained Release 
Oral Medication (Smith Kline & French 
Labs) ; The Sphi/nx Thinks, The Moon Rocket 
(Pepsi-Cola Company) : ANIMATION SE- 
QUENCES: For The Big Switch (International 
Paper Company) ; American Cyanamid; E. R. 
Squibb & Sons; U.S. Air Force; U.S. Army; 
U.S. Navy; American Typographers Associa- 
tion; International Business Machines; Amer- 
ican Air Filters; Ford Tractor Division; 
Ladies Home Journal; Glamorene, TV Spots 
for American Cancer Society. 



^ 



INC. 



AUDIO PRODUCTIONS, 

Film Center Building 

630 Ninth Avenue, New York 36, N.Y. 

Phone : PLaza 7-0760 

Date of Organization : 1933 

Frank K. Speidell, President 

Herman Roessle, Vice-President 

Peter J. Mooney, Secretary & Treasurer 

Sheldon Nemeyer, Sales Manager 

PRODUCER-DIRECTORS 

L. S. Bennetts H. E. Mandell 

Alexander Gansell Earl Peirce 

Harold R. Lipman Erwin Scharf 

SERVICES: Motion pictures only, all commercial 
categories. Specialties: public relations, sales 
promotion, merchandising, training, medical, 
technical and educational motion pictures. 
Facilities: Both silent and sound studios; six 
cameras and lighting equipment; mobile units 
for location work with tape recorders; per- 
manent staff in all departments, writing, direc- 
tion, editing, animated drawing and optical; 
16 & 35mm projection room; two optical 
printers; editing equipment; zoom stand for 
trick work; machine shop; extensive film and 
music library cleared for television. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Sounds Familiar (Ameri- 
can Telephone & Telegraph Co.) ; Mission 
BuU's-Eye (American Bosch Arma Corp.) ; 
Time and Tivo Women (American Cancer So- 
ciety) ; Paper for a Purpose (Brown Com- 
pany; ; Mixing Plant Maintenance (Ethyl Cor- 
poration) ; Speech Series (McGraw-Hill Book 
Co.) ; Cotton — Nature's Wonder Fiber (Cotton 
Council International — U.S. Dept. of Agricul- 
ture) ; This is RMI (Reaction Motors, Inc.); 
Better Typing at Your Fingertips (Smith- 
Corona, Inc.) ; Hydraulic Oils (Texas Co.) ; 
Arctic Mission (Western Electric Co.) ; Con- 
tinuing Series of Technical Films (U.S. Navy) . 
TV Commercials: For N. W. Ayer & Son, 
Benton & Bowles, Cunningham & Walsh, 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample. J. Walter Thomp- 
son, Young & Rubicam, and others. 



JOHN BRANSBY PRODUCTIONS 

1860 Broadway, New York 23. N.Y. 
Phone: JUdson 6-2600 
Date of Organization: 1936 

John Bransby, Executive Producer 

Mae Reynolds, Treasurer 

Jack Campbell, Production Manager 

Philip Santry, Art Director 

Tom Draper, Director of Photography 

Services: Production of industrial, travel, 
sales and training films: 16mm or 35mm, color 
or black and white. Facilities: Location 
equipment for photography and sound. Full 
equipment for industrial and location lighting. 
Animation photography, complete film editing 
service. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Pennsylvania; A Date with 
West Virginia (Esso Standard Oil Co.) ; 
Caronia World Cruise (Cunard Steam-Ship 
Company, Ltd.); St. Lawrence Project; St. 
Lawrence Power Marketing ( Power Authority 
of State of New York) ; Asphalt Paves the 
Way (Standard Oil Company, N.J.). SLIDE- 
FILMS: Mileage for Sale (Esso Standard Oil 
Company) . 



4e- 

BRAY STUDIOS, INC. 

729 Seventh Avenue, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone : Circle 5-4582 
Date of Organization: 1911 

J. R. Bray, President 

P. A. Bray, Vice-Pres. & General Mgr. 

M. Bray, Treasurer 

Max Fleischer, Director of Animation 

Wm. Gilmartin, Production 

B. D. Hess, Distribution Manager 

Services: Production and distribution of 
health and general educational subjects, indus- 
trial, sales and job training motion pictures; 
technical and cartoon animation; television 
films; foreign language translations. FACILI- 
TIES: Studio equipment for all types of motion 
pictures; slidefilms in sound and color; ani- 
mation department; production crews, anima- 
tion artists, script writers and library. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Harbor Defense, 4 films; 
Transistors, 3 films; Target Designation, 4 
films; A.S.W.; TV Deflection Circuits, 2 films 
(U.S. Navy); Sales film (Schenley Import 
Company). 

CALHOUN STUDIOS, INC. 

266 East 78th Street, New York 21, N.Y. 
Phone: LEhigh 5-2120 

Date of Organization : 1930 
Brian Calhoun, President 
Paul A. Goldschmidt, Vice-President 
Dietlinde Ruber, Secretary-Treasurer 
Howard A. Kaiser, Director of Production 
Services: Production of TV series, industrial- 
educational, TV film commercials, slidefilm 
productions. Facilities: 35' x 70' sound stage 
(air conditioned), 16 & 35mm cameras, projec- 
tion room, cutting rooms, completely equipped 
sound control room with H" Ampex tape re- 
corder, 16mm Magnasync tape & 16mm Maurer 
film recorder. Fearless Dolly, MR boom, all 
lighting equipment. Fully equipped still 
department. 



RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Salt Water Acrobatics; 
Kamloop Trout; Salmon All Summer; 
Glimpses of History; Gala Events; Vacation 
Fun; Fishing Waters; Shoreland Playground; 
Four Seasons (Series for World Outdoors, 
Inc.). 

CAMPUS FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

14 East 53rd Street, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 3-3280 

Date of Organization: 1934 

Nat Campus, President 

Robert Braverman, Executive Producer 

Jules Krater, Supervising Editor 

Don Gundrey, Service Manager 

Edward P. Hughes, Photography 

Sylvia Rabenstock, Distribution Coordinator" 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms for 
business, government and social agencies; also 
various film services separately; including 
translations, sound tracks; editing and finish- 
ing service for company photographed films; 
distribution service. Facilities: Complete 
studio, on-location equipment and creative 
staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: To Your Very Good Health 
(Institute for Public Information, Inc.) ; 
Rubber from Oil (Esso Research & Engineer- 
ing Company); The Key (National Associa- 
tion for Mental Health, Inc.) ; Dynamic Power 
on Wheels (Brown and Sites Company, Inc.); 
In Your Hands (Southern Railway System); 
The "Meti" steroids in Veterinary Medicine 
(Schering Corporation); Block Play (Play 
Schools Association) ; Hip Arthrography in 
Children (St. Charles Hospital). Foreign 
Adaptations: An Aid to Therapy, Spanish, 
French, German; Stress and the Adaptation 
Syndrome, Spanish, French, German, Portu- 
guese, Italian; Nephrosis in Children, Italian 
(Pfizer International, Inc.) ; Dynamic Power 
071 Wheels, Spanish (Brown and Sites Com- 
pany, Inc.). TV Commercials: For Greater 
New York Fund, Boys' Clubs of America. 



CARAVEL FILMS, INC. 

20 West End Avenue, New York 23, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 7-6100 

Date of Organization: 1921 

Studio: Hempstead, Long Island 

David I. Pincus, President and Treasurer 

Calhoun McKean, Vice-Pres., Charge TV 

F. B. MacLeary, Vice-President 

Thelma L. Allen, Vice-Pres. 

Claire V. Barton, Secretary 

Mauri Goldberg, Production Manager 

David Kreeger, Studio Manager 

Jack Semple, Head, Animation Dept. 

Lawrence Kreeger, Editing Mgr. 

Charles Moore, Manager. Still Photography 

Sylvester Priestley, Head Construction Dept. 

Services: Sales, dealer and vocational train- 
ing motion pictures; public relations, personnel 
relations, educational, religious films ; tele- 
vision commercials; slidefilms, transparencies, 
stage presentations, field surveys, documen- 
taries. Facilities: Motion picture stages at 
20 West End Avenue. Complete facilities; 
slidefilm, studio editing and screening rooms, 
art, animation and optical effects department, 
26,000 square feet of production space. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



ECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

lOTiON Pictures: The Gordon's Story, Conn- 
er Points (Cluett Peabody & Co., Inc.) ; Take 
Viree Hearts (American Heart Association) ; 
'peaking English Naturally (U.S. Information 
Agency) : Cold Facts. Zerone & Zerex sales 
neeting film (E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co., 
nc.l : training films for Bureau of Aeronau- 
ics Navy Department; film program for 19.57 
neetings, No Margin for Error (Socony Mobil 
)il Co., Inc.). TV Commercials: For Ameri- 
an Standard, DuPont, General Electric, Hit 
'arade, Trig Deodorant, U.S. Steel (BBD- 
lO) : Aeroshave, Griffin (Geyer Advertising) ; 
American Can, Dash, Procter & Gamble, 
Jocony Mobil (Compton Advertising) ; Bal- 
antine Ale & Beer, Winston (Wm. Esty & 
^o.) ; Bufferin, Remington Shaver, Royal 
Pypewriter, White Owl Cigars (Young & 
lubicam) ; Ford (J. Walter Thompson) ; Gem 
lazor, Lysol, Mayor's Committee — Pedestrian 
^ampaign, Westinghouse, ( McCann Erick- 
lon) ; Geritol, Sominex, Williams Lectric 
shave, Zarumin, ( Parkson Advertising) ; 
joodyear, Texaco ( Kudner) : Heet, Minute 
tfaid (Ted Bates & Company) ; Hood, R.C.A. 
^'hirlpool, Nabisco Shredded Wheat ( Kenyon 
i, Eckhardt); Gillette (Maxon); Johnson & 
Fohnson (N. W. Ayer) ; Maidenform (Norman 
>aig & Kummel) ; Ronzoni (Emil Mogul & 
2o.) ; Filter Tip Tai-eyton (Laurence Gum- 
linner Advertising) ; White Rose Tea (Ander- 
son & Cairn). 



CLIPPER FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1666 45th Street, Brooklyn 4, New York 
Phone: ULster 4-2858 

Date of Organization : 1957 
Jules Zuch, Promotional Director 
Bernard Zuch, Chief Cameraman 
Susan Enaid, Secretary, Treasurer 
Services: Production of motion pictures for 
industry, television commercials, conventions, 
training programs, sales meeting presenta- 
tions. Facilities: Complete editing and 
screening facilities. All others leased. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Story of the Inner Tube 
( Carlisle Tire & Rubber Company ) ; A New 
Kind of Light (Sun Ray Fluorescent Corpora- 
tion) ; The Mueller Story (Mueller Brass Com- 
pany) ; Small But Powerful (Redmond Elec- 
tric Motor Corporation) ; Working in Style 
(Brown & Morse OflSce Furniture Corpora- 
tion ) . 

Colmes-Werrenrath Productions, inc. 

\ 52 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
! Phone: MUrray Hill 3-6977 
Rod Gibson, Manager 
(See complete listing under Chicago area) 

COLEMAN PRODUCTIONS 

56 West 45th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 7-9020 

Date of Organization : 1935 

Harry L. Coleman, President 

John Peterson, Director of Photography 

William Moeller, Editor 

J. Brown, Sound 

E. S. Seeley, Jr., Scripts 

G. K. David, Sales Co-ordinator 



Services: Complete production of 16mm and 
35mm motion pictures from script to final 
print for industry, medical, travel and tele- 
vision use. Facilities: Small studio available 
with lights, camera, sound equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Of Men and Machines (F. 
H. McGraw & Company, Inc.) ; Look to the 
Sky (Pan American Airways); Destination 
Nassau (Nassau Trade Development Board); 
Fun Across the Sea (Italian Line) ; Void La 
France (Pan American World Airwavs). 



CRAVEN FILM CORPORATION 

446 West 43rd Street, New York .36, N.Y. 
Phone: BRyant 9-7256 

Date of Organization: 1950 

Thomas Craven, President 

Harvey C. McClintock, Vice-President 

Marvin Barough, Comptroller 

D. William Robinson, Production Mayiager 

Morton S. Epstein, Supervising Editor 

Anne B. Rauppius, Office Manager 

Services : Motion pictures for government, 
industry, religion, and education; live-action 
and animated TV commercials; live programs 
for meetings and conventions; filmed series 
shows for television. Facilities: Air condi- 
tioned sound stage with construction facilities; 
camera, sound and lighting equipment; fully 
equipped editing and projection rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Asian Artists in Crystal 
(Steuben Glass) ; Land of Bengal (Indian Jute 
Mills Association) ; The People's Heritage 
(National Parks Service) ; Near East Adven- 
ture (Near East Foundation) ; The Washing- 
ton Mosque (U.S.I.A.). TV COMMERCIALS: 
For General Mills, Carter Products Company, 
Procter & Gamble, Inc., The Brand Names 
Foundation, The Nestle Company, Republic 
Shirtings, Inc., Welch's Grape Juice Products 
Company, Inc. 



SHAMUS CULHANE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

207 E. 37th Street, New York 16, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 2-6812 

Branch OflSce: Chicago, 203 N. Wabash Ave. 
Branch Office: Hollywood 28, 6226 Yucca 
St., Dave Lurie, in charge. 

Date of Organization : 1945 

Shamus Culhane, President 
Maxine Marx, Secretary, Treasurer 
Peggy Kenas, Dir. Sales Planning & 

Research 
Leonard Key, Sales Manager 
Dave Lurie, E.rec. Prod. (Hollywood) 
Rodell Johnson, Director, Animation 
Irwin Wallman, Director, Live Action 

Services: Full production facilities for ani- 
mation and live action in 16 & 35mm motion 
pictures for industry, public relations, sales 
training; TV commercials, progi-am films and 
feature motion pictures. Facilities: New 
York and Hollywood studios, with 80 anima- 
tion stands, sound stages, recording studios; 
editing and foreign language facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Unchained Goddess, 
The Strange Case of Cosmic Rays (Bell Tele- 
phone Company). Slidefilm : Hottest Thing 



Al^4f cuiJ^Af a 



NEW YORK 



in Town (Prudential Insurance Company of 
America). TV Commercials: For Peter Paul 
Almond Joy, Mounds ( Dancer Fitzgerald & 
Sample); National Trust Company, Molson's 
Ale, Marguerite Cigars, H. J. Heinz of Canada 
(MacLaren Advertising); Ballantine Beer 
(William Esty); Marlboro Cigarettes (Leo 
Burnett ) ; Alka-Seltzer, One-A-Day Vitamins, 
VO-5 Rinse Away (Goeffrey Wade); Poll 
Parrot Shoes ( Krupnick Associates); Feen-a- 
mint, Chooz ( Doherty, Clifford, Steers & 
Shenfield ) ; Vel Beauty Bar, Halo Shampoo 
(Carl S. Brown Co.); Esquire Shoe Polish 
(Emil Mogul); Red Cap Ale (McKim Adver- 
tising); Frigidaire (Kudner); Quaker Puffed 
Wheat & Rice, Sugar Puffs (Wherry, Baker 
& Tilden) ; Scotties & Towels, Lux Soap & 
Whisk (J. Walter Thompson) and others. 

ROBERT DAVIS ASSOCIATES, INC. 

21 East 63rd Street, New York 21, N.Y. 
Phone: TEmpleton 8-8410 

Date of Organization : 1952 

Robert F. Davis, President, Exec. Producer 
Jay Bonafield, Vice-President 
Henwar Rodakiewicz, Director 
Theodore Lawrence, Supervising Director 
John Hoppe, Vice-President 
Mabel Henderson, Office Manager 
Services: Motion picture production includ- 
ing industrial, documentary, TV commercials 
and entertainment films. Animation-by-Mo- 
bilux, exclusive producers. FACILITIES: Mo- 
bilux studio; completely equipped editing 
rooms; sound equipment, camera, lights neces- 
sary for 35mm and 16mm production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The 1958 Chevrolet (Chev- 
rolet). TV Commercials: for Olympia Beer, 
Standard Oil Company of Indiana, Wilson & 
Company, Avon and Kellogg. 

DEPICTO FILMS CORPORATION 

254 West 54th Street, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: COlumbus 5-7620 

Date of Organization: 1942 

John Hans, Chairman of the Board 

J. R. von Maur, President 

Charles S. Hans, Vice-President & Secretary 

Carl V. Ragsdale, Vice-President 

Ray B. Helser, Vice-President 

Services: Specialists in the creation and pro- 
duction of sales training and sales promotion 
programs: includes research, consultation, edi- 
torial and full production services for motion 
pictures, sound slidefilms, filmstrips, slides, 
Vu-Graphs, transparencies, television film com- 
mercials. Facilities: Studio, art, technical 
animation, cutting and editing rooms, dark- 
rooms, typesetting. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Big Game (Sinclair 
Refining Company) ; Value Engineering, Basic 
Nursing Care — 4 films (U.S. Navy) ; Adver- 

(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



111 



METROPOLITAN NEW YORK: 

DEPICTO FILMS: Cont'd. 

tisbig at Work r American Cyanamid Com- 
pany) ; Phone Power (American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co.) ; How to Train. Two Ways to 
Train (Standard Brands, Inc.) ; Automotive 
Trouble Shooting, Automotive Data Process 
Systems (U.S. Army) ; Diamonds Internation- 
al (DeBeers Consolidated Mines). Slide- 
films: Something New Afoot (Collins-Aik- 
man) ; Projecting a World Wide Image. Mak- 
ing Frietids for Coca-Cola (Coca-Cola Com- 
pany) ; How to Prepare Better Newspaper 
Advertising (N.A.E.A. N.R.D.G.A.) ; What 
Makes It Sew. Let's Do It Right, New Slant 
on Swing (Singer Sewing Machine Company) : 
Selling Today's Bread Today. How To Sell 
Fresh Bread (Continental Baking Company) ; 
Molded Masters of the B.T.TJ. (M.I.M.A.); 
Voice of Your Business (Bell Telephone Com- 
pany) ; Let's Get Together ( Westinghouse 
Electric Corporation) ; Buried Treasure, Cher- 
cliez La Femme (Post Cereals Div. General 
Foods) : The Finishing Touch (Chicago 
Printed String Company) ; Clear the Road for 
Profits (Food Topics); Pitch on Premier 
(Broyhill Furniture Company) ; 5 Minutes to 
Midnight. Tour Sales Training (Transworld 
Airlines) ; Five Building Blocks of Value 
(James Lees And Sons Company). Film- 
strips: Third Graders Learn (National Dairy 
Council) ; Streamliner (Westinghouse Electric 
Corp.) ; Regal Oils (The Texas Company) ; 
Spring Dealer Campaign (Sinclair Refining 
Company) ; Good Grooming (Bristol-Myers 
Company) ; 9 Reasons Why (^Standard Brands 
Company); Fall — 1957 'Speed Charge Service 
(The Texas Company) ; Jet Plane (U.S. Rub- 
ber Company) ; Twin-Pack (The Borden Com- 
pany). TV Commercials: For Sylvania 
Bulbs, Ford Company, Michigan Blue Cross 
(J. Walter Thompson Company ) ; Yuban 
Coffee (Benton & Bowles); Chef-Boy-Ar-Dee, 
Borden Contest (Young cfe Rubicam) ; Christ- 
mas Club 1958, Arm & Hammer Sal Soda 
(Brooke, Smith, French & Dorrance) ; G. E. 
Telechron (N.W. Ayer & Son, Inc.). 



DEPICTORAMA 

("Showmanship in Business") 

254 West 54th Street, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 7-0086 

Date of Organization : 1957 

Joseph F. Kilmartin, Vice-Pres.. Gen. Mgr. 

Services : Specialists in group communications 
— devoted to sales meetings and presentations 
for top level management. Facilities: Com- 
plete staging, lighting, set designing, prompt- 
ing and cueing services; also complete prepara- 
tion for meetings, including script, artwork, 
mechanical production, staff directoi-s; full 
projection facilities for all types of motion 
pictures, sound slidefilms, Vu-Graph and slide 
presentations (rear projection and carbon 
arc ) . 

(For complete data see Depicto Films listing, i 



Your Most Dependable Buyer's Guide 

* The pages of this Annual Production Re- 
view provide reference data attested for ac- 
curacy by executives of all listed companies. 
Client and film references are provided as 
warranty of recent experience in business film 
production during the past yeai-. Ijij^ 



DISCOVERY PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

261 Fifth Avenue, New York 16, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 3-7211 

Date of Incorporation: 1954 

Rudy Bruner, President 

David Epstein, Vice-President, in charge of 

Production 
Mary Lang, Secretary 

Services: Industrial, educational, public af- 
fairs and sales films. Facilities: Shooting 
and cutting facilities for 16 and 35mm; staff 
personnel for every phase of production from 
writing to distribution. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Lookout for Comfort (Rod- 
ney Metals, Inc. and Modern Venetian Blinds, 
Inc.) ; Fundamentals of Bowling, series of 4 
quarter-hour films distributed on television 
and to non-theatrical groups (American Ma- 
chine & Foundry Company). Filmed TV 
Programs: Bowling Time, series of 26 one- 
hour programs currently telecast on more than 
200 stations (American Machine & Foundry 
Company) . 



Vi 

Kevin Donovan Films 

15 West 44th Street, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: YUkon 6-6049 

John Bennewitz, in charge 

(See complete listing under New England) 

D.P.IM. PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

62 West 45th Street. New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 2-0040 

Date of Organization: 1946 

Maurice T. Groen, President 

Ronald T. Groen, Vice-President. Pi-oduction 

Services: Industrial, public relations, inter- 
national travel; sales promotion and horticul- 
tural motion pictures, TV shorts and com- 
mercials ; color stock shots. Facilities : Cam- 
era crews in New York, Los Angeles, Sweden 
Austria, South Africa and Malaya. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Winter in the French Alps 
(French Government Tourist Office) ; The 
Swedish Way to Sunshine Splendor (Swedish 
American Line) ; High Above a Cloud (Scan- 
dinavian Airlines System) ; Yours to Protect, 
Pheasant Island (Carling Brewery). 

DYNAIVIIC FILMS, INC. 

112 W. 89th Street, New York 24, N.Y. 
Phone: TRafalgar 3-6221 

Date of Organization: 1946 

Nathan Zucker, President 
Lee R. Bobker, Vice-President 
Lester S. Becker, Executive Producer 
Maury J. Glaubman, Director, Public Affairs 

Division 
Sol S. Feuerman, Director, Medical Division 
Gerald Carrus, Comptroller 
James Townsend, Director Technical 

Services 
J. J. Fitzstephens, Director Creative 

Services 
Irving L. Oshman, Fditorial Supervisor 



Seymour Weissman, Director Creative 

Services 
Murry Schlesinger, Director Distr. 

Dynamics 
Michael Paul, Studio Manager 

Services: Producers and distributors of all 
audio-visual materials including films, film- 
strips, sound slidefilms, tape and easel pre- 
sentations for industry, public relations, sales 
training, employee relations and specialized 
visual aids. Also theatrical features and short 
subjects, television programming, special for- 
eign language versions, foreign film production, 
etc. Facilities: Sound stages, recording and 
dubbing studios, editing facilities for all 16- 
mm and 35mm audio-visual production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Major Vertebral Conduc- 
tion Anaesthesia (Winthrop Laboratories); 
Victory Circle (Perfect Circle Corporation); 
The .500 Mile Adventure (General Petroleum 
Corp.) ; 8th Annual Darlington, Southern 500 
(Wynn Oil Company) ; The Doctor Defendant 
(William S. Merrell Company); Wheels of 
Gold { Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc.) ; M.D. — 
U.S.N. ( United States Navy) ; Vaginitis 
(Ortho Pharmaceutical Corp.) ; Sand Barrier 
( The Pure Oil Company) ; Common Enemy 
(Anahist Company, Inc.) ; To Build a Dream 
(Mercury Division, Ford Motor Company) ; 
The Big Challenge (Chevrolet Div., General 
Motors Corp.) ; An American Girl (Anti Defa- 
mation League); On the Threshold (United 
Church of Christ) ; Wheels of Change (Evan- 
gelical & Reformed Church). TV Commer- 
cials: For Bulova Watch Company, Inc. 
(McCann, Erickson) ; Charles Antell, Inc. 
(Paul Venze Associates) ; Firestone Tire & 
Rubber Co. (Vickers & Benson) ; Socony Mobil 
Oil Company, Inc. (Compton Advertising) and 
directly for Comfy Manufacturing Company, 
Pan American World Airways, Inc., Police 
Athletic League, Muscular Dystrophy Associa- 
tion of America, Boys Clubs of America. 



EDITORIAL FILMS, INC. 

10 East 40th Street, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 6-3773 

Babette J. Doniger, President 
Dwight Godwin, Production Manager 

Services: Complete production services; 
scripts, shooting, editing, for public relations 
films for television and educational purposes. 
Promotion and distribution of films to televi- 
sion stations. Facilities: Fully equipped 
editing rooms. Film cleaning and handling 
for distribution. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Are You This Man 
(McCall's Magazine — Shoe Association) ; 
Young Living (Seventeen Magazine) ; Care- 
less Cash (American Express Company) ; Fun 
With Frosting (Procter & Gamble — Crisco) ; 
Medical Milestones ( Crest — Benton & Bowles ) . 



CHARLES ELMS PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

25 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York 17, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 6-8877 

163 Highland Ave., No. Tarry town, N.Y. 
Phone: MEdford 1-3363 

Date of Incorporation: 1952 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Charles D. Elms, President 

Charles D. Elms, Jr., Vice-President 

Ruth M. Elms, Secretary 

Robert B. Bacon, Vice-Pres. & Treasurer 

Services : Producer of 16 & 35mm motion pic- 
tures; 70mm "Bonel" (wide screen profes- 
sional and commercial presentations) ; slide 
motion; sound slidefilms; slide presentations; 
training manuals and charts. FACILITIES: 
Studio and technical laboratory, mobile unit, 
"Bonel" camera. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Tliat Little Black Box, 
This Is Spernj ( Sperry Group of Sperry 
Rand) ; Production Planning & Control in 
U.S. Navj Shipyards (U.S. Navy); The New 
Stero-Vac (Crown Cork & Seal Company); 
Mid-Season { Philip Morris, Inc. ) . Slidefilm : 
What's the Answer on Cigarettes (Philip 
Morris, Inc.). TV Commercials: 13 for Andre 
Richard Inc (Richard Henne Inc.). 



WALTER ENGEL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

20 West 47th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: JUdson 2-3170 

Date of Organization: 1937 

Walter Engel, President 

Robert L. Marx, Vice-President 

Joseph T. Williams, Exec. Head of Camera 

& Editing Dept. 
Lorraine Knight, Production Coordinator 

and Casting Supervisor 

Services: Industrial, documentary, education- 
al, sales training & TV commercials, motion 
picture productions; limited and full anima- 
tion 16mm & 35mm. Facilities: Complete 
studio facilities. Location film & sound unit. 
Animation and editing departments. Single 
and double sound recording. All self-contained 
operations. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Brown 'N Serve (Merita 
Bread); Roland & Roger Spot Series (Mack- 
intosh Candy Company)'; Norelco Speedshaver 
Show (Norelco Speedshaver) ; Success Story — 
USA (Sunbeam Bread); Bold Journey 
(Pillsbury Mills). 



•5f 

FARRELL & GAGE FILMS, INC. 

213 East 38th Street, New York 16, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 3-8358 

Date of Organization: 1951 

Matt Farrell, President & General Manager 
I G. Lillian Farrell, Secretary 
I William McAleer, Vice-President & Director 
I of Photography 
I Joseph Faro, Production Manager 
I Carlos Orta, Film Editor 

'Services: Production and distribution of sound 
! motion pictures and sound slidefilms for busi- 
j ness and industry. Facilities : Complete 16mm 
and 35mm motion picture and slidefilm pro- 
duction in black and white and color, including 
I sound studio, magnetic film recording, editing 
I services, script, foreign language, art work, 
1 animation. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Blasting Vibrations (Her- 
I cules Powder Company); Modern Miracle 
! Makers ( Manufacturing Chemists' Assn., Inc.) 



Handling Ships' Boats and Heavy Cargo in 
the Transport Area ( U.S. Navy) ; Natural Gas 
for Appalachian Markets (New York State 
Natural Gas Corp.) ; Half -Second Butyrate 
Lacquer (Eastman Chemical Products, Inc.). 



•5f 

FILMFAX PRODUCTIONS 

10 East 43rd Street. New York 17, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 7-7758 

Studio and Laboratory: Station Plaza, Bed- 
ford Hills, N.Y. Sewell Booth, in charge. 

Henry Clay Gipson, President 

Eloise Walker, Vice-President and Secretary 

Virginia Blount, Scripts 

John Lencicki, Art Director 

Services: Educational filmstrips and indus- 
trial slidefilms, color, black and white, silent, 
sound; color slides. Facilities: Specialized 
equipment for filmstrip production, 35mm 
standard Bell & Howell animation stand for 
filmstrips, special custom built equipment for 
Kodachrome duplication. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Filmstrips: silent educational filmstrips for: 
American Iron & Steel Institute, New York 
Times, Hartford Fire Insurance Company, 
Grocery Manufacturers of America, Joint 
Council for Economic Education, Empire Sales 
Training, Museum Extension Service. 



FILM GRAPHICS INC. 

245 West 55th Street, New York, N.Y. 

Phone JUdson 6-1922 

Date of Incorporation: 1946 

Lee Blair, President 

Bernie Rubin, Director 

Donald Towsley, Director of Animation 

Sidney Greenhaus, Production Manager 

Cal Schultz, Chief Editor 

Roger Rothstein, Charge of Studio ^ 

Services: Complete motion picture production, 
35 mm and 16 mm; live action, animation and 
special effects. Facilities: 50' x 100' studio 
in New York city; two 35mm B.N.C. Mitchell 
cameras; complete sound recoi'ding facilities; 
36mm Mitchell rear screen projector; editing 
equipment and facilities; 4 animation stands; 
optical facilities; 40 permanent production 
employees. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Using DuPont Aircraft 
Rivets (E.I. DuPont deNemours & Company) ; 
Refining of Copper (International Nickel Com- 
pany) ; Man Learns to Heal (U.S. State De- 
partment) ; The Magic Moment (C.I.T.) ; 
classified projects for U.S. Navy. 



ii^vr criiJ^Af a 



NEW YORK 



Nick Webster, Vice-President, Creative 
Richard Sage, Secretary 

Services: Complete production of 35mm and 
16mm color and black and white motion pic- 
tures, slide films, film strips, telops of all kinds. 
Facilities: Two complete studios in New York 
City, one in Hollywood, and worldwide location 
facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

TV Commercials: for Ford Motor Company, 
Eastman Kodak (J. Walter Thompson) ; Col- 
gate-Palmolive, Brown and Williamson (Ted 
Bates) ; Liggett and Myers (McCann-Erick- 
son) ; General Foods, Procter & Gamble (Ben- 
ton & Bowles) ; Chrysler Corporation (N. W. 
Ayer) ; Lever Brothers (Foote, Cone & Beld- 
ing) ; Sunshine Biscuits (Cunningham & 
Walsh); Bristol-Myers (BBD&O); American 
Tobacco (Sullivan, Stauff'er, Colwell and 
Bayles) ; Procter & Gamble (Compton) ; Gen- 
eral Foods (Young & Rubicam). 



Fiore Films 

Room 1103, 332 West .52nd St., 
New York, N.Y. 

William Kohler, Executive in charge 

(See complete listing under New Jersey area) 



•H- 



FILMWAYS, INC. 

18 East 50th Street, New York City, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 1-2500 
Date of Organization: 1952 

Martin Ransohoff, President 

Mickey Dubin, Vice-President, in charge of 

Sales 
Lee Goodman, Vice-President, in charge of 

Production 



FORDEL FILMS, INC. 

1187 University Avenue, New York 52, N.Y. 
Phone: WYandotte 2-5000 

Date of Organization: 1941 
Cliflford F. Potts, Pres. & Exec. Producer 
Enid Borde, Secretary-Treasurer 
Don Livingston, Director Producer 
Richard A. Kent, Director of Sales 
Herbert F. Lowe, Prod., Religious Films 
Walter G. Snowden, Spec. Asst. to President 
James M. Logan, Production Manager 
Michael Livesey, Director of Photography 
W. Edward Downton, Account Executive 
Dennis Gunst, Research 
William V. Martin, Comptroller 
Reginald McMahon, Editorial Supervisor 

Services: Public relations; sales promotion; 
training; educational; scientific and medical 
motion pictures and slidefilms ; TV shorts and 
commercials; complete responsibility, includ- 
ing planning, production & printing; special- 
ists in color, live and animated. FACILITIES: 
Sound studio; complete cameras, lights, and 
sound equipment for studio and location pro- 
duction; animation stand; cutting rooms; re- 
cording rooms; 16mm magnetic and optical 
interlock screening facilities ; color printing 
lab; machine shop; mobile units. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: A Report on Compazine 
Therapy in Psychotic States (Smith, Kline & 
French Laboratories) ; The Sheep That Count 
(American Cyanamid Co.) ; Vanishing Vita- 
mins (E. R. Squibb & Sons); Preparation of 
Material for Needle Injection (U.S. Navy) ; 
Aurofac Facts (American Cyanamid Interna- 
tional) . 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



METROPOLITAN NEW YORK: 



ALLEN A. FUNT PRODUCTIONS 

White Gates, Croton-oii Hudson. X.Y. 
Phone: CRoton 1-8847 

Date of Organization : 1946 

Allen A. Funt, President 

Services: Producers of concealed "Candid 
Camera" motion pictures for industrial and 
sales training, promotion and public relations, 
theatricals, television shows and commercials. 
Facilities: Mitchell NC cameras, synchronous 
tape recorders; special equipment and tech- 
niques for concealment; full production facili- 
ties through associates in London, Paris: pro- 
jection, cutting rooms; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: "Candid Camera" subjects 
only for: Minneapolis-Honeywell Company. 
Curtis Publishing Company, Ronson Corpora- 
tion. Nash-Kelvinator Corporation. 



WILLIAM J. GANZ COMPANY, INC. 

(A Division of the Institute 
of Visual Training, Inc.) 

40 East 49th Street, New York 17, N.Y. 
Phone: ELdorado 5-1443 

Date of Organization: 1919 

William J. Ganz, President 
Herbert R. Dietz, Production Manager 
Vincent J. Capuzzi, Distribution Manager 
Jane Page, Comptroller 

Services: Producer and distributor of 16 and 
35mm motion pictures, tilmstrips, sound slide- 
films, visual presentations for education, ad- 
vertising and television. Production from 
script to sci'een. Motion pictures 16 and 35- 
mm, b&w and color. Slidefilms — 35mm b&w 
and color. Films for public relations, indus- 
trial, television, documentary, travel, educa- 
tional, scientific, merchandising, and orienta- 
tion, animation. Sound recording, editing and 
re-editing films, minute movies. Distribution 
for all films and TV commercials. Facilities: 
Studio equipment; creative staff, development 
of story ideas and merchandising campaigns, 
editing room fully equipped for film and tape. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: From The Heart of Town, 
Cardiac Resuscitation, Spanish and Portuguese 
version ( E. R. Squibb & Sons ) ; A Repott to 
the Armed Forces, On the Job for Yoit ( Amer- 
ican Red Cross). 



GERALD PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

421 West 54th St., New York, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 7-2125 

Date of Organization : 1955 

Gerald Auerbach, Exec. Producer 
William V. Adams, Director of Sales 
Hampus Morner, International Dept. 
Alfred Traum, Business Manager 
Diana Paul, Casting 
Melrick Landen, Public Relations Dept. 
Stuart Grant, Suprv. Editor 
Jaroslaw Momstyrsky, Creative Director 

Services: All aspects motion picture produc- 
tion for theatre, television, public relations 



and industry. Facilities: Complete produc- 
tion facilities, editing, sound, two stages, re- 
cording, projection theatre. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: .4 World Alone. The ordeal 
of Thomas Moon (Smith, Kline & French 
Labs); The Maltese Cross (Muscular D.vs- 
trophy Association of America) ; What Is a 
Network, series (National Broadcasting Com- 
pany) ; Banners Over Valley Forge ( Boy 
Scouts of America). 



JACK GLENN, INC. 

207 East 37th Street, New York 16, N.Y. 
Phone: OXford 7-0121 

Date of Incorporation: 1953 

Jack Glenn, President 

A. J. Hill, Vice-President 

Bernice Trefman, Art Director 

Services: Production, writing, direction and 
editing of special-purpose and entertainment 
motion pictures; commercials and slidefilms; 
specializing in the institutional business film; 
films for p.r., promotion, orientation, educ, 
designed with either fiction or documentary 
format. A corporation of services contracting 
separately for script-writing and or directing. 
Contract or sub-contract. Facilities: Wall, 
Bell & Howell, Mitchell cameras; lighting' 
sound equipment; studios and scenic shops; 
projection and cutting rooms in New York 
City and in Irvington-On-Hudson, Westchester 
County, N.Y. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Ho)ne of the Braves (Na- 
tional Council of Y.M.C.A.s) ; Militarij Govern- 
ment (U.S. Army) ; Information Plus, script 
only (Muller, Jordan & Herrick — McGraw- 
Hill). Slidefilm: The Y's the Way (National 
Council of Y.M.C.A.s). TV Commercials: 
for New York City Y.M.C.A. and National 
Council of Y.M.C.A.s. In preparation: Little 
FisI/ Are Sweet and Friday Is for Love (Mal- 
mon Productions). 



Halas & Batcheior Cartoon Films, Ltd. 

11 West 42nd Street, Room 1146, 

New York 35, N.Y. 
Phone: LOngacre 4-3346 

Miss Irene Lee, Sales Representative 

(See complete listing in International Section, 
under England) 



Real Facts for Sponsors 

— evidence of good jaith 

M The detailed listings given specializing 
producers of business motion pictures and 
slidefilms furnish the buyer of sight/sound 
media with solid evidence regarding any 
prospective supplier. Listing data requests 
emjjhasized the need for both film and 
sponsor references and it is this area of 
each listing which indicates the recent ex- 
perience of each listed company. 

While TV commercials have grown in 
volume and production quality, these were 
not considered as sufficient evidence by 
themselves of experience with complete 
program films for business sponsors. R" 



PAUL HANCE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1776 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 5-9140 

Date of Organization: 1939 

Paul Hance, Jr., President & Treasurer 
Dermid Maclean, Vice-President. Sales 
J. Allen Julier, Vice-President 
Kenneth Murray, Secretary 

Services: Research, writing and all other 
phases of 16mm motion picture production by 
permanent technical staff. Facilities: Com- 
plete camera, sound and lighting equipment for 
all types of field and location photographv. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Monthly and Quarterly 
Progress Reports (Bell Telephone Laborator- 
ies, Inc.) ; Machining Stainless Steels (Armco 
Steel Corporation); Soups, Sauces and En- 
trees (General Foods Corporation) ; Pyroce- 
ram Corning Glass Works) ; The Nature of 
Glass — to be released (Corning Glass Works). 



The Jam Handy Organization, Inc. 

1775 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: JUdson 2-4060 

W. J. Riley, in charge 

Complete oflFice facilities and projection room 
with service staff for Eastern clients 

(See complete listing under Detroit area) 



HARTLEY PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

339 East 48th Street, New York 17, N.Y. 
Phone: ELdorado 5-7762 

Date of Organization : 1940 

Irving Hartley, President 
Elda Hartley, Secretary-Treasurer 

Jean Brooks, Vice-President, in charge of 

Distribution - 

Wm. F. Bryant, Jr., Executive Producer ■ 

James B. Gahan, Director-Writer ^ 

Services : Specialty is writing and producing 
sponsored public service films for television 
and distribution to TV stations throughout 
the United States and Alaska through Hartley 
Film Distributors, Inc. Facilities: Studio A, 
street level, drive-in loading dock; Studio B, 
permanent kitchen set. Equipped with 16mm 
Mitchell camera, 16mm Mitchell blimp, 16mm 
& 35mm Arriflex cameras, Fearless dollies. 
Mole Richardson boom (with perambulator), 
6 channel mixing console with full equaliza- 
tion, 17y2mm & V4" magnetic recording and 
dubbing, Rangertone and Fairchild pic sync, 
16mm and 35mm optical recording, 16mm and 
35mm interlock projection. Complete lighting 
equipment. Two completely equipped editing 
rooms and screening room. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Room With a Future 
(Monsanto Chemical Co.) ; Award Winning 
Ideas for Your Home (American Viscose 
Corp.) ; Diamonds from the Rough (DeBeers 
Diamond Company) ; Man From Missouri 
(Asbestos-Cement Products Association) ; 
Wings to Hawaii, In Every Man's Heart (Pan 
American World Airways, Inc.) ; Bimini Blues 
(Museum of Natural History, Houston) ; IBM 



BIISINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Progress Report (Film Counselors, Inc.) ; 
Asbestos Trailer (National Gypsum Com- 
pany) ; Revolution Underfoot (Firth Carpet 
Company). TV Commercials: for Seai-s Roe- 
buck & Company, American Viscose Corpora- 
tion and Firth Carpet Company. 



INDUSTRIAL FILM PRODUCERS, INC. 

624 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N.Y. 

Phone: ELdorado 5-5677 

Date of Organization: 1957 

Alfred M. Evans, President 

William Alley, Executive Vice-President 

Jack Lane, Vice-President 

Services: Sales training, sales promotion and 
public relations motion pictures and slidefilms ; 
glass slides; visual aids of all types. Facili- 
ties: Complete production facilities, company 
owned or leased; art department and cutting 
room on premises. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Profits in Progress (West- 
inghouse Electric Corp.) ; Steel Valley (Shar- 
on Steel Corporation). Slidefilms: Hoiv To 
Put Sales Power Into Your Business (Blue 
Coal Corp.) ; The Marvel At Your Finger Tips 
(General Telephone System) ; The Storij of 
Gasoline (Ethyl Corporation) ; Three Way 
Everyday, The 1958 Line Plan (Colgate Palm- 
olive Company) ; A Review Of The Coffee 
Business (Borden Food Products Co.) ; In- 
crease Your Sales Power (Congoleum-Nairn, 
Inc.). Slides and other visual aids for: An- 
thi'acite Information Bureau; Blue Coal Cor- 
poration; Ethyl Corporation; RCA Electron 
Tube Division; Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, Inc.; 
The Personnel Institute (Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample, Inc.) and Select Magazine. 



4S- 

INFORMATION PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

(See United States Productions, Inc.) 

5 East 57th Street, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 1-1710 

Date of Organization : 1951 

For complete data see United States Pro- 
ductions, Inc. listing in Metropolitan New 
York area. 



VICTOR KAYFETZ PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1780 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 
Studio: 415 West 55th St., New York 19, 

N.Y. 
Phone : Circle 5-4830 

Date of Organization : 1947 

Branches : 18 George Aggott Road, Need- 
ham, Massachusetts. Phones : Hlllcrest 
4-0289, commonwealth 6-0800. H. Jeff 
Forbes. 1200 Westfall Road, Rochester 18, 
N.Y. Phones: Hillside 5-0883, GReenfield 
3-3000, ext. 534. Don Lyon. 

Victor Kayfetz, President, Exec. Producer 
Seymour Posner, Assistant to the Producer 
Abe Blashko, Animation Director 
Leo Levko, Mech. Production Supervisor 
Sylvia Gerson, Golden Snoichall TV Plan 
Bertil Carlson, Engineer & Equipment 
Designer 



Irene Siegel, Production Assistant 
Donald Armstrong, Production Assistant 
Celeste lannazzo. Production Assistant 

Services: Motion picture production, combin- 
ing live cinematography and animation. Spe- 
cialty is designing and producing sponsored 
"Public Service" films in color for television 
and distributing them on TV through Golden 
Snowball Division of the company. Special 
consulation and script preparation in coor- 
dination with sponsors' public relations and 
advertising efforts; assist with preparation 
of film promotion and distribution plans. 
Trairing, indoctrination and sales promotion 
films. Facilities: Solely owned 16mm and .35- 
mm equipment for live shooting: 35mm Eclair 
Camerette, B&H 70 #2DR. 16mm Camerette. 
Studio flats, backgrounds, table tops, machine 
shop and carpentry facilities. Slidefilm and 
2x2 slide production cameras. For anima- 
tion shooting: 35mm Model L DeBrie 
and 16mm Cine Special both completely 
adapted for animation. Animation stand (16- 
mm and 35mm) with compound table. Com- 
plete art and animation department. 16mm 
and 35mm sound Moviolas. 35mm interlock 
and 16mm projectors in booth of screening 
room. Complete accessory equipment: tripods, 
high hat, dolly, location lighting equipment, 
cables, two station wagons, cargo trailer. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Chahi Saw Safety Pays 
Off, Chain Saws Pay Off on the Farm (Home- 
lite, Div. Textron Inc.) ; Fabrication of High 
Temperature Steam Systems, 3 parts. Intro- 
duction, Bending & Stress Relieving, Welding 
and Installing (U.S. Navy) ; Trailer Sailois 
(National Association of Engine and Boat 
Manufacturers) ; Graphic-57 (Consolidated In- 
ternational Equipment and Supply Corpora- 
tion) ; The Age of Discovery (Young America 
Films). TV Commercials: Cortal (Win- 
throp Products, Inc.) ; 1958 National Motor 
Boat show (National Association of Engine 
and Boat Manufacturers) ; 1957 United Fund 
Campaign (United Fund of Greater Boston) ; 
Homelite movie ad and TV campaign (Home- 
lite, division of Textron, Inc.) ; Parakeet TV 
spots (R. T. French Company). 

HERBERT KERKOW, INC. 

480 Lexington Avenue, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 1-1833 

Date of Oi'ganization : 1937 
Date of Incorpoi-ation : 1946 

Herbert Kei'kow, President and Treasurer 
Rosemond Kerkow, Secretary 

Services : Production from original reseai-ch 
to finished film; for public relations, education- 
al, training, industrial, documentary, sales 
training and sales presentation films. Facili- 
ties: Sound stage, set building department, 
pi'ojection room, sound recording and re- 
recording; editing and animation facilities; 
four cameras (Bell & Howell and Eclair Cam- 
erette, 35mm and Maurer and Arriflex, 
16mm). 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Annual Fashion Show — 

"Sv" this symbol, appearing over a 
producer's listing, indicates that display adver- 
tising containing additional reference data ap- 
pears in other pages of this 8th Annual Pro- 
duction Review Issue of 1958. 



il^vr cDiJ^Af a 



N.EW YORK 



1957 (Warner Brothers Company) ; Progress 
Reports #2 (fe #.3; Prototype (Bell Telephone 
Laboratories, Inc.) ; Pursuit of Happiness; 
Teaching English to Spanish Speaking People; 
Teaching English to Arabic Speaking People 
(U.S. Information Agency). 



4f 

KEY PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

527 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: ELdorado 5-2180 

Date of Incorporation: 1948 

James D. Kantor, President 
William M. Kahn, Vice-President 
James E. Patrick, Secretary 

Services: Specializing producers of motion 
pictures and filmstrips for sponsorship by com- 
mercial organizations, such as newspapers, 
banks and insurance companies. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Filmstrips: "Current Affairs" series (1957- 
1958) including these titles: Words as 
Weapons; The Middle East — An Economic 
Overview; The Nexv Japan; The Geophysical 
Year; The Transportation Revolution; Central 
Africa— Focus on Liberia and Ghana; Water 
Resources — American Faces a New Problem; 
Outer Space — The Neiv Frontier. Sponsors 
include 35 newspapers in the United States 
among which are the New York Journal Amer- 
ican, Cleveland Press, Indianapolis Times, 
Buffalo Evening News, Houston Chronicle, 
Honolulu Advertiser, Baton Rouge State- 
Times, Worcester Telegram and Detroit Times. 



KLAEGER FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1600 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone : JU 2-5730 

Date of Organization: 1957 

Robert H. Klaeger, President 
John J. Fenton, Vice-President 

Services : Permanent staff in all phases of 
motion picture production; production, cam- 
era, scenic design, editorial and animation. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Filmed Television Shows: Wide Wide World 
(General Motors — McManus, John & Adams) ; 
Navy Log {U.S. Rubber— Fletcher D. Rich- 
ards) ; Steve Allen Show (Greyhound — Grey 
Advertising). TV Commercials: for Camel 
Cigarettes, Ballantine, Winston Cigarettes 
(Wm. Esty) ; Savarin, Imperial Margarine, 
Nebs (Foote, Cone & Belding) ; National Dis- 
tillers, Vel, Newport Cigarettes (Lennen & 
Newell) ; Lucite Auto Finish (E. I. DuPont 
de Nemours); Westinghouse (McCann-Erick- 
son) ; Scripto (Donahue & Coe ) ; Anacin (Ted 
Bates) ; Pontiac (McManus, John & Adams) ; 
Tide (Benton & Bowles) ; Desert Flower, Old 
Spice, Friendship's Garden (The Wesley Asso- 
ciates) ; Scotchgard (McManus, John & 
Adams) ; Automatic Pinspotter, Voit Sports 
Equipment, DeWalt Power Shop, Wheel Goods 
(Fletcher D. Richards). 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



115 



METROPOLITAN NEW YORK: 



4f 

KNICKERBOCKER PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1600 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 5-6710 

Date of Organization : 1947 

Howard A. Lesser, President 

Frank Beckwith, Vice-President, in Charge 

of Production 
Thomas S. Dignan, Vice-President 
Renzo Olivieri, Vice-President 
Ann Serra. Secretary 
Joseph Du.shock, Editorial Chief 
Byron Rabbitt, Art and Animation 

Services: Production from original research 
to finished film. Specialty: documentary, 
training and public relations motion pic- 
;ures and slidefilms. Facilities: Production 
equipment, editing, animation and slidefilm 
iepartments. 

tECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Ideas To Help You Sell 
I Sales Communication, Inc.) ; Sujicrior Insula- 
'ioji at Low Cost (Owens Corning Fiberglasl ; 
rhe House That Pablo Built, A Man's Castle 
[Ibec Housing Corporation) ; Key Posts for 
Key Men (U.S. Air Force). TV Commercials: 
i^or Lennen & Newell; Sullivan, Stauffer, Col- 
vell &. Bayles; Reach McClinton & Co. 



ROBERT LAWRENCE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

418 West o4th Street, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: JUdson 2-5242 
Teletype : NY 1-1554 

Date of Organization: 1952 

AflSliate: Grantray - Lawrence Animation, 
Inc., 716 North La Brea, Hollywood 28, 
Cal. Phone: WEbster 6-8158. Ray Pat- 
terson, President; Robert L. Lawrence, 
Vice-President; Grant Simmons. Secre- 
tary, & Treasurer. 

Lawrence-Schnitzer Productions, Inc. 
1040 N. Las Lalmas, Hollywood 38 
Phone: HOllywood 2-5577 
Gerald Schnitzer, Exec. Vice-President 

Loucks & Norling Studios, Inc. 

418 W. 54th St., New York 19, N.Y. 

Phone: Circle 7-2.366 

Howard Lawrence, Business Manager 

Foreign Office : Robert Lawrence Pi-oductions 
(Canada) Ltd., 32 Front Street, West; 
Toronto 1, Ontario, Canada. Phone Em- 
pire 4-1448. John T. Ross, Vice-President, 
& General Manager. 

Robert L. Lawrence, President 

Louis Mucciolo, Vice-President, in charge 

of Studio Operations 
Henry Trainman, Vice-President, in charge 

of Editorial Operations 
Philip Kornblum, Treasurer 
Martin L. Low, Vice-President in charge of 

Sales 
John Gilmour, Staff Director 
Jerry Maticka. Production Supervisor 
Doris Reichbart, Production Supervisor 
Audrey Sammons, Casting Director 
Roy Townshend, Assist. Studio Mgr. 
Bill Bernal, Creative Supervisor 
Peter Cooper, Mgr. of Animation Operations 



Sal Scoppa, As.'iistant Director 
Glenn Botkin, Production Supervisor 
Torben Johnke, Director of Photography 

Services: Produce industrial and sales promo- 
tion films, TV programs, TV commercials. Fa- 
cilities: Two air-conditioned sound stages, 
editing rooms, screening room, carpenter 
shop, production offices. Toronto production 
facilities are complete, including 60' x 125' stu- 
dio. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Birth of a Promotion 
iGerber Products Company) ; The Hope That 
■Jacli Built, Inresting With a Purpose (Na- 
tional Association of Investment Companies) ; 
Prelude to Plenty (American Cyanamid) ; 
Seven Days to Live (Black & Decker); The 
Sound of Power ( Koppers Industrial Sound 
Control Division). TV Commercials: For 
Alcoa (Fuller, Smith & Ross) ; American Beer 
(Van Sant Dugdale) ; American Can Company 
(Compton) ; Atlantic Gasoline ( N. W. Ayer) ; 
Bayer Aspirin (Dancer, Fitzgerald, Sample); 
Campbell Soup ( Cockfield Brown); Canada 
Dry (Mathes); Cheer (Young & Rubicam, 
Toronto): Delsey (Foote, Cone & Belding) ; 
DuMaurier Cigarettes ( Vickers & Benson); 
P. F. Flyers ( McCann-Erick.son ) ; Gerber 
Baby Foods (D'Arcy) ; Hoppers (Ted Bates) ; 
Ideal Toy (Grey); Jello (Baker); John.-^on & 
Johnson (Young & Rubicam); Kings Men 
(Edward H. Weiss); Pall Mall (Sullivan, 
Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles) ; Reynolds Alumi- 
num (Clinton E. Frank) ; Texaco (Ronalds) ; 
Winston Cigarettes (William Esty) and 
others. 



JAMES LOVE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

115 West 45th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: JUdson 2-4633 

Date of Incorporation : 1952 

James A. Love, President 
C. Austin Love, Sales Manager 
James Wille, Production Supervisor 
William D. Henry, Editorial Supervisor 

Services: Complete motion production serv- 
ices, including script writing, animation, art 
and photography. Facilities : New York pro- 
duction offices. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Happy Mowing (0. M. 
Scott Company) ; Tlie Tiger (Gruman Aircraft 
Company); Hawli Reports #i and #2 (Ray- 
theon Manufacturing Company) ; Teaching by 
Guided Discussion (U.S. Air Foi-ce ) . 



LUX-BRILL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1733 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 7-1540 

Date of Organization: 1950 

Richard S. Dubelman, Client Liaison, 

Production Sup vr. 
Victor Kanefsky, Production Coordinator 
Herbert D. Brown, Editorial Department 
Donald Holtzman, Studio Manager 
Anne L. Bauer, Office Manager 

Services: Complete production of live and oi- 
animated motion pictures and slidefilms from 
idea to stage to screen stage. Editing and re- 



editing company films; integration of motion 
pictures and live television; all types of rear 
projection photography. FACILITIES: Complete 
animation department; fully equipped studio 
for live shooting; location equipment; editing 
and screening rooms; complete creative and 
technical staff'. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures : Francesca ( Foster Parents' 
Plan, Inc.) ; Mayihattan Shirt Tale (Manhattan 
Shirt Company); Your Air Force Reserve 
(U.S. Air Force) ; This /.s Barrington (Amer- 
ican Can Company); Mr. Toy Dealer ( Remco 
Toy Company); Magic Heart of Copper 
(Bridgeport Brass Company). TV Commer- 
cials: For Procter & Gamble's Crisco, Dash 
and Ivory Soap; General Foods; The Nestle 
Company, Standard Oil Company, Atlas, 
Uniflo, Esso Divisions; Prudential Insurance 
Company, for 20th Century Program; Sterling 
Drug Company; New York Stock Exchange; 
Oakite; Tangee; The Nationwide Insurance 
Companies; Burgess Company and others. 



•55- 

MARATHON TV NEWSREEL, INC. 

10 East 49th Street, New York 17, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 8-0985 

Date of Organization: 1948 

Branch: Marathon News, 73 Delamere Road, 
London, W-5., England. Maurice Ford in 
charge. Marathon Newsreel, 117 bir rue 
Ordener, Paris 18, France. Jean Magny, 

in charge. 

Konstantin Kaiser, Pres. & Exec. Producer 
Kenneth Baldwin, Vice-President and 

Supervisor of Production 
Charles Van Bergen, Director of News and 

Special Events 
Jean Hauck, Director of Administration 
Cindy Karp, Distribution & Traffic Manager 

Services: Public information films, world- 
wide news service, company newsreels, sjjecial 
events coverage for industry, film editing, 
commercials, stock shots, etc. Facilities: 
Complete 16mm and 35mm production and 
editing facilities. Correspondent cameramen 
in all countries of the world and large U.S. 
cities. Foreign offices in London, Paris & 
Berlin. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: This Way Up (Sikorsky 
Aircraft); Fire Miles West (Volkswagen); 
Talos (Radio Corporation of America); The 
Calculated Delivery ( E. F. Hauserman Com- 
pany ) ; Mobilgas Economy Run ( Socony Mobil 
Oil Co.) ; NACA Story (International Busi- 
ness Machines) ; Outlook — Automation (NBC- 
TV). Newsreels: for Sikorsky Aircraft, 
Socony Mobil Oil Co., Trans World Airline, 
Inc., International Business Machines and 
Volkswagen. TV COMMERCIALS: For Chrysler 
Corporation ( McCann-Erickson, Inc. ) ; U.S. 
Steel Corporation ( Batten, Barton, Durstine 
& Osborn, Inc.) ; Socony Mobil Oil Company 
(Compton Advertising, Inc.). 



Your Dependable Reference Source 

•k Producers whose listings appear in this sec- 
tion have voluntarily supplied the minimum 
client and film I'eferences for your reference 
ust'. Five business-sponsored motion picture or 
slidefilms were the niinimiim requested for an 
unqualified listing. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



•5f 



MGM-TV, Division of Loew's, inc. 

1540 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: JU 2-2000 

1 Date of Organization : 1956 
i (Parent company — 1924) 

' Branches: 1625 Central Parkway Blvd., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. Arthur Breider, in charge. 

I 360 North Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illi- 
nois. Dick Lewis, iri charge. MGM Studios, 

I Culver City, California. Maurice Gresham. 

Buzz Ellsworth, Executive Producer 
Elmer Wilschke, Business Manager 
j Richard Harper, Sales Manager 
I Richard Brand, Neic York Sales Manager 

Services: Producers of industrial films and 
TV commercials, both live action and animated. 
[Facilities: 187 acre Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
Studios in Culver City, California. 30 sound 
stages, including world's largest; 5 outdoor 
lots with lakes, forests, etc. Complete labora- 
tory, editing and animation facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

TV Commercials: for RCA Victor (Kenyon 
& Eckhardt, Inc.) ; Eastman Kodak, Sehlitz 
(J. Walter Thompson Company); Pure Oil 
Company, Kellogg Cereals ( Leo Burnett Com- 
pany, Inc.) ; Standard Oil Company of Indiana 
(D'Arcy Advertising Company); Bell & 
Howell ( MeCann-Erickson, Inc.); Houbigant 
Perfumes ( Ellington & Company ) ; Toni Divi- 
sion of Gillette ( North Advertising Company, 
Inc.); Maybelline, Helene Curtis (Gordon 
Best Company) ; Richard Hudnut, Junket Di- 
vision of General Foods ( Sullivan, Stauffer, 
Colwell & Bayles) ; Duncan Hines Cake Mix 
(Compton Advertising, Inc.) ; Pillsbury 
(Campbell-Mithun, Inc.) ; Johnson's Wax 
(Foote, Cone & Belding, Inc.) ; Scripto Pens 
(Donahue & Coe). 



MEDICAL FILM GUILD, LTD. 

506 West 57th Street, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 7-0510 

Date of Organization : 1930 

Joseph P. Hackel, President, Producer, 

Director 
Lucille S. Hackel, Secretary & Treasurer 
Helvi Bell, Gladys Nemens, Writers 
John Malinowski, Photography 
Eve Madsen, Art Director 
J. Del Rivero, Distribution Dept. 

Services : Motion pictures, sound slidefilms 
and TV commercials, 16mm or 35mm. Facili- 
ties: Permanent sets for medical use; sound 
stage, including 35mm Debrie, Akeley, Bell 
& Howell and 16mm Maurer, 16mm Cine 
Kodak Special, sprocketed tape and optical 
film recorders; photographic and animation 
setup; art department, workshop, dressing, 
cutting rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Tl/e Human A'o.sp — Wliaf 
Makes It Different (Alcon Laboratories, Inc.) ; 
Affeciones des Sistema Vascular Periferico 
(U.S. Vitamin Corporation) ; Bilateral Fim- 
broplasfy — A Bilateral Salpingostomy for 
Clubbed Tubes (New York Medical College) ; 
An Arthroplasty of the Hip for Congenital 
Dislocation in Children (University of Penn- 



sylvania) ; The Doctor's Secretary! The Girl 
Who Controls the Sale.i7nan's Destiny! part 
III of sales training program (collaboration 
between Pharmaceutical Industry and Medical 
Film Guild, Ltd.). 

MEDICAL DYNAMICS, INC. 

405 Park Avenue, New York 22, N.Y. 

Nathan Zucker, President 
Lee R. Bobker, Vice President 
Sol S. Feuerman, E!:ecutive Director 
Lester S. Becker, Secretary 

(See complete listing under Dynamic Flms, 
Inc.) 

MPO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

15 East 53rd Street, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone : MUrray Hill 8-7830 

Date of Organization : 1947 

Mid-West Sales Office: 6560 Cass Ave., 
Detroit 2, Michigan. Ross M. Sutherland, 
Sales Manager 

Judd L. Pollock, President 

Lawrence E. Madison, Vice-President 

Marvin Rothenberg, Vice-President 

Arnold Kaiser, Secretary & Treasiirer 

Gerald Hirschfeld, Vice-President 

Zoli Vidor, Director of Photography 

William E. Huston, Sales & Promotion Mgr. 

Victor Solow, Producer 

Joseph Moncure March, Scenario Editor and 

Producer 
Ira Marvin, Joe Kohn, Lewis Jacobs, 

Producers 
Gerald Kleppel, Supervisor of Editing 

Department 
Sanford Greenberg, Business Mgr. 
Mickey Schwarz, Producer-Director 
Burton Rowles, Writer-Producer 
Max Glanbard, Producer-Director 
Jack Safran. Lab. & Print Control 

Services: Complete production of films for 
sales promotion and training; public relations; 
information and training films for U. S. forces 
and gov't agencies; color sportsmen's and con- 
servation films. Distribution service to TV 
stations, club groups, schools, etc. Facilities: 
16mm and 35mm cameras, lighting, sound 
truck, camera cars, etc. Latest magnetic sound 
equipment. Cutting and projection rooms. 
Five shooting stages, set construction shop, 
dressing rooms, etc. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Man in the Doorway 
(American Cyanamid) ; The Stylist (Ford 
Motor Company) ; Bay at the Moon (Reming- 
ton Arms Company) ; A Horse, A Calf & an 
Egg (Eli Lilly & Company) ; A New Shade of 
Green (U.S. Air Force). TV COMMERCIALS: 
For Philip Morris, Newport Cigarettes ("N.W. 
Ayer) ; Arrid, Sperti, Heet, Kripton, Freezone, 
M & M Candies (Ted Bates & Company); 
Gayla Soap, Hit Parade, Scotch Tape, U.S. 
Steel, Wisk (^BBD&O) ; Gaines Dog Food. 
Ivory Snow, Post Cereals, Schick Shavers and 

W this symbol, appearing over a 
producer's listing, indicates that display adver- 
tising containing additional reference data ap- 
pears in other pages of this 8th Annual Pro- 
duction Review Issue of 1958. 




Lighters, Tide, Johnson's Wax, Parliament, 
Whirl (Benton & Bowles); Kellogg's, Marl- 
boro (Leo Burnett) ; United Motors, American 
Safety Council (Campbell-Ewald) and others. 



MULLER, JORDAN AND HERRICK 

235 East 50th Street, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 1-3460 

Date of Organization: 1955 

Frank B. Muller, Partner 

John T. Jordan, Partner 

William F. Herrick, Partner, chg. A-V Dept. 

Nicholas Dancy, Producer-Director 
Services: Motion picture production; re- 
search, script, photography, editing through 
to answer print. Also handle print distribu- 
tion and promotional work. Slidefilm produc- 
tion; complete sound slidefilms from idea, 
through research, script, storyboard, visualiza- 
tion, supervised art production, photography, 
narration, sound recording, to the finished film 
strip. Facilities: Editing; 2 staff writers; 
staff director; staff art director and complete 
art studio. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Atom Comes to Town 
(U.S. Chamber of Commerce) ; An American 
Industrial Park (Socony Mobil Oil Company, 
Inc. for Brussels Fair). Slidefilms: This 
Business of Numbers, Personnel on File (Rem- 
ington Rand) ; Inside Ad Agency (Advertising 
Agency Magazine ) . 



OWEN MURPHY PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

723 Seventh Avenue, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 7-8144 

Date of Organization : 1946 

Owen Murphy, President & Exec. Producer 
Savington W. Crampton, Vice-President & 

Associate Producer 
Paul Cohen, Production Manager 
Eric Lawrence, Chief, Editorial Department 
Walter Early, Pittsburgh Representative 

Services: Motion pictures for industry and 
television; complete production; scripts, 
cinematography, editorial, recording; live and 
animation. Special editorial service for indus- 
trial photographic departments. Facilities : 
Full production facilities including 35mm & 
16mm cameras; lighting equipment; magnetic 
sound recorders; mobile location unit; cutting 
rooms; recording room and insert stage. Per- 
manent creative staff — writers, directors, 
cameramen, editors and supervisors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: This Is New Jersey (New 
.Jersey Bell Telephone Co.); The Word Is 
Spreading; Proof of Performance (Firestone 
Tire & Rubber Co.) ; Don McNeill Sells Acro- 
nize (American Cyanamid Co.) ; The Big 
Three (Field & Stream Magazine). TV Com- 
mercials: Voice of Firestone, series. Closed 
Circuit TV: Firastone Annual Sales Conven- 
tion. 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



METROPOLITAN NEW YORK: 



STANLEY NEAL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

475 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
Phone : MUrray Hill 3-6396 

Date of Organization: 1936 

Sales Offices : 8 East Huron St., Chicago, 111. 
Phone: SUperior 7-5616. John Newell, 
Repr.; Munsey Bldg., Washington, D.C. 
Phone: STerling 3-0918. A. A. Ulin, Repr. 

Donald J. Lane, President 

Robert Gumming, Executive Vice-President 

Sobey Martin, Vice-President, Charge of 

Production 
Edith Martin, Creative Head 

Services: Motion picture and slidefilm produc- 
tion; scripts, counsel on production and dis- 
tribution, 16mm and 35mm color and black 
and white. Facilities: Offices, cutting and 
projection room in New York. 

RECfNT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Catch Yonr Fish; Begin 
With Bread ( National Association of Mar- 
garine Mfgrs. ) ; Can We Solve the Farm Prob- 
lem; American Imports (Twentieth Century 
Fund); Slidefilm: The Arab World-Bridge 
of Centuries (Arab Information Center). 



TED NEMETH STUDIOS 

729 Seventh Avenue, New York 21, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle -5-5147 

Date of Organization: 1935 

Ted Nemeth, Executive Producer 
M. E. Bute, Associate Producer 

Services: Motion picture production services 
in 35mm b&w and color for theatre and tele- 
vision. Facilities: Sound stage recording; 
35mm motion pictui-e photography; stop mo- 
tion; animation equipment; optical printer; 
cutting, editing and projection equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Trip at Noon (First Na- 
tional Bank of N.Y.) ; Timkin Bearing (Tim- 
kin) ; Mood Contrasts, Abstronic (M.E. Bute). 
Only 1957 references submitted. 



New World Productions 

49 West 12th Street, New York, N.Y. 

P. Robinson, sales 

(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



On Film, Inc. 

10 East 49th Street, New York 17, N.Y. 

Phone : PLaza 9-2330 

Malcolm Scott, Manager 

(See complete listing under New .Jersey area) 



Sam Orleans Productions 

550 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: ENright 9-2002 

Editorial Department: Pathe Building, 105 
East 106th St., New York, N.Y. 

(See complete listing under Tennessee area) 



•5€- 



PATHESCOPE PRODUCTIONS 

(The Pathescope Company 
of America, Inc. ) 

Office: 10 Columbus Circle, New York 19, 

N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 7-5200 

Studio: 21-29 45th Road, Long Island City 
Phone : PLaza 7-5200 

Date of Organization: 1914 

Edward J. Lamm, President 
William M. Nelson, Executive Producer 
James Pierce, Production Control 
Dale Walker Brown, Writer & Producer 
John Ball, Studio Manager 

Services: Research production and distribu- 
tion of public, industrial relations, sales and 
job training and educational motion pictures 
and filmstrips ; training and documentary films 
for U.S. Armed Forces and television commer- 
cials and programs. Facilities: Studio with 
completelv sound proofed shooting stage, full 
complement of lighting equipment, sound room, 
synchronous tape equipment including studio 
microphone boom. Background projection unit 
and process screen. Carpentry and paint shops, 
make-up room, dressing rooms and prop rooms. 
Editing and projection equipment, 16 & 35mm 
facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: To Serve the Living 
(Better Business Bureaus, in cooperation with 
National Funeral Directors' Association) ; 
High Places of the Mind, Small Town U.S.A., 
Peaceful Atom (U.S. LA., European Televi- 
sion Division) ; Share a Proud Tradition (U.S. 
Marine Corps) ; 3 films for U.S. Navy; 5 public 
relation films for the New York Stock Ex- 
change. Slidefilms: The Baffin Saies Story 
(Daffin Manufacturing Company) ; Fall Fash- 
ion Magic, Spring Fashio7i^ (Ladies' Home 
Journal). TV Commercials: For Interna- 
tional Latex, National Council of Protestant 
Episcopal Church, Blair Walliser. 



4f 

PELICAN FILMS, INC. 

46 West 46th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 6-1751 

Date of Organization : 1954 

Joe Dunford, President 

A. J. Zander, Vice-President 

Services: Animated and live motion pictures 
for sales promotion, public relations and ed- 
ucation; TV spots; slidefilms. Facilities: 
Fully staffed and equipped animation studio; 
sound stage, recording, and lab facilities on 
lease basis. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: You Earth People (Better 
Heating-Cooling Council) ; The Inside Storii 
of a Chicken Gizzard Grinding (Granite Grit 
Inst.-Wildrick & Miller) ; Kingsbiiry Thrust 
Bearings (U.S. Navy) ; Wind& The Navigator 
(U.S. Air Force) ; Making Soybeans Pay With 
Chemical Weed Control (U.S. Rubber). TV 
Commercials: For Robert Hall Clothes; (N. 
W. Ayer); Marathon Gas (N.W. Ayer) ; 
Lucky Strike, Campbell Soup, Wildroot (BBD 
&0); Hostess Cup Cakes, Twinkles (Ted 
Bates) ; Folgers Coffee (Cunningham & 



Walsh ) ; Ipana, Mum Mist, Ammens Medicated 
Powder, 4 Fisherman Fishsticks (Doherty, 
Clifford, Steers & Shenfield, Inc.) ; Nucoa 
(Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, Inc.); Parliament 
Cigarettes (Benton & Bowles); Joy (Leo 
Burnett) ; Kinney Shoes (F. B. Stanley) ; Cin- 
zano Vermouths (Burke Dowling & Adams). 



ROY PINNEY PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

149 East 69th Street, New York 31, N.Y. 
Phone: TRafalgar 9-2224 

Date of Organization: 1946 

Roy Pinney, President 

Doris Pinney, Treasurer 

Walter Kienzle, Production Manager 

Janet White, Sales Representative 

William Ward Beecher, A7-t Director 

Services: Documentary, educational, sales 
training, product promotion, nature and travel 
films. Facilities: Three story building with 
25' X 80' studio; 16 & 35mm cameras, mag- 
netic recorder, projection, dressing, cutting 
rooms; production offices, etc. Lab for b&w 
& color processing of stills. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Mexican Holiday; Station 
Wagon Camping (Dodge Motor Cars — Grant 
Adv. Agency) ; Cub Scout (Photo & Film 
Library, N.Y.C.) ; Nature Hobbies (Womans 
Day Magazine) ; Secrets of Nature (Ivan 
Sanderson, Inc. N.Y.C.) 



POCKET FILMS 

505 Fifth Avenue, New York 17, N.Y. 
Phone: TR 4-6493 

Date of Organization: 1957 

Gladys E. Townsend, President 

Robert R. Grauch, Executive Vice-President 

Marguerite V. Pohek, Educational Director 

Services: Complete production of silent film- 
strips and sound slidefilms for business, in- 
dustry, education and health and welfare 
organizations. Translation into all languages 
of film and filmstrip scripts. Consultation on 
use of filmstrips as an educational and inter- 
pretative medium. Facilities: Creative staff 
only. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Slidefilms: Children Need Parents (Save the 
Children Association of Finland) ; Accent on 
Abilities (Dictaphone Corporation) ; More 
Than a Job (National Board of the YWCA). 
Seven additional productions in process for 
release first half of 1958. 



Q. E. D. PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

45 West 45th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: JUdson 2-4291 

Date of Organization: 1953 

Robert Baron, Executive Producer, Director 
Frank X. Murphy, Sales Manager 
John F. Hughes, Supervising Editor 
Henry Berger, Production Manager 
James Shute, Script Supervisor 

Services: Producers and creators of indus- 
trial, educational, public relations and televi- 
sion motion pictures and TV commercials. 
Facilities: Fully staffed and equipped with 
16mm and 35mm cameras. Complete sound 
stage. 16mm and 35mm magnetic recording 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



equipment, set construction. Camera car and 
' complete location unit (cameras, lighting, 
sound) . 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Promise of Water 
(Worthington Pump Corporation) ; The Motel- 
, Hotel Story (American Telephone & Telegraph 
(Company); This Is Avianca (Colombian Na- 
tional Airlines); TPA Sales Review (Televi- 
sion Programs of America) ; Bridge on the 
Hirer Kwai. documentary trailer ( Columbia 
Pictures). 



Roland Reed Productions 

215 East 60th Street, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: TE. 3161 

Hamilton MacFadden, Vice-President 

(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



ROBERT YARNALL RICHIE 
PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

666 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 6-0191 

Date of Organization : 1939 

Branch : Gulf Coast Films, Inc., Oil & Gas 
Bldg., Houston 2, Texas. CApitol 5-3018. 

Robert Yarnall Richie, President 
Virginia G. Richie, V.P. & Treas. 
Dorothy Donahue, Secretary 

Services: Motion picture production, tele- 
vision — industrial, documentary, 16mm and 
35mm black and white and color; slide-motion; 
strip film; scripts and story board treatments. 
Counsel on film production and distribution. 
Facilities: Completely self-equipped for all 
phases of motion picture photography; em- 
ploying Mitchell cameras, Magnicorder sound 
on location ; shooting staff for sets and special 
effects. Complete lighting for large industrial 
interiors; location truck. The company oper- 
ates its own aircraft — Beechcraft I3onanza. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

No data submitted for 1957 activity after 
three requests. For most recent reference 
data available see preceding 7th Annual Pro- 
duction Review Issue. 



LOUIS de ROCHEMONT ASSOCIATES 

380 Madison Avenue, New York 17, N.Y. 
Phone : OXf ord 7-03.50 

Date of Organization: 1948 

Louis de Rochemont, Executive Producer 

F. Borden Mace, President 

Thomas Orchard, Producer 

Lothar Wolff, Producer 

Martin J. Maloney, General Manager 

Services: Production of industrial, educa- 
tional, theatrical and television motion pic- 
tures; distribution of theatrical features, short 
subjects and 16mm films. Facilities: 16 and 
35mm motion picture equipment, lighting 
equipment; cutting rooms. Studio and com- 
plete facilities for production in the Cine- 
miracle process at Mt. Eden Theatre, Bronx, 
N.Y. Assoc, with Halas & Batchelor Cartoon 
Films, Ltd., England for production of an- 
imated and puppet films. 



RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Windjammer (National 
Theatres. Inc.); The Living Church (United 
Lutheran Church of America); In the Years 
of Our Lord (RIVA of Germany) ; The Story 
of American Whiskey (Calvert Distillers Co.) ; 
Norway Today (Bjorke, Tresselt Assoc, 
Oslo). 



Ross Roy, Inc. 

214 E. 31st Street, New York 16, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 5-1440 

•J. A. Roche, Manager 

( See complete ILsting under Detroit area) 



•5f 



LESLIE ROUSH PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

130 Herricks Road, Mineola, L.I., N. Y. 
Phone: Pioneer 2-8130 

Date of Incorporation: 1944 

Leslie M. Roush, President 
Jules K. Sindic, Vice-President 

Services: Production of motion pictures and 
slidefilms of every type for industry, educa- 
tion, government and television. Facilities: 
Complete studio and equipment for any kind 
of production including mobile units for 
location. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Steel in Concrete (Bethle- 
hem Steel Company) Sports Review Sections 
(Seagram Distillers); Classified film reports 
( U.S. Government ) ; Program openings (Beth- 
lehem Steel Company). 



SARRA, INC. 

200 East 56th Street, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 8-0085 

16 East Ontario Street, Chicago 11 
Phone: WHitehall 4-5151* 

Date of Organization: 1937 

(At New York City Studios) 

Valentino Sarra, President 
Morris Behrend, General Manager 
John Henderson III, Sales Manager 
Rex Cox, Creative Director 
Robert Jenness, Director 
Stanley Johnson, Director 
George Altman, Cliief Editor 
David Fletcher, Art Director 

Services : Photographic illustration ; motion 
pictures; TV commercials and sound slidefilms. 

* (complete details on services, facilities and 
recent productions in Chicago area listing) 



SCIENCE PICTURES, INC. 

(See United States Productions, Inc.) 

5 East 57th Street, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 1-1710 

Date of Organization : 1950 

For complete data see United States Produc- 
tions, Inc. listing in Metropolitan New 
York area. 



.llLifa/Jk Af a 



NEW YORK 



SEMINAR FILMS, INC. 

480 Lexington Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 1-5077 

Date of Organization: 1953 

J. R. Bingham, President 

R. K. Daker, Executive Vice-President 

A. L. Fredrick, Vice-President & Treasurer 
C. W. Freeburn, Vice-President in charge of 

Project Development 
J. H. Barwick, Sales Manager 

B. B. Kirkland, Assistant Sales Manager 
Services: Consultant designers and producers 
of skill training programs based on motion 
picture loop films exclusive with this company. 
Facilities: Fully staffed with specially trained 
researchers, designers, script writers and film 
production specialists. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Close (Chrysler Cor- 
poration) ; Selling DuPont Zerone-Zerex Anti- 
freeze ( DuPont de Nemours Company ) ; Sell- 
ing Schlitz by Merchandising (Jos. Schlitz 
Brewing Company); Selling Chef Size Soups 
(H. J. Heinz Company) ; Money When You 
Need It (Berkshire Life Insurance Company) ; 
Selling Bird & Son Floors & Walls (Bird & 
Son Company). 



•5f 



SOUND MASTERS, INC. 

165 West 46th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 7-6600 

Date of Organization: 1937 

W. French Githens, Chairman 
Francis Carter Wood, Jr., President 
Howard T. Magwood, Vice-President — TV 
John H. Tobin, Vice-President — Industrial 

Films 
Stella K. Beeders, Treasurer 
Marian L. Price, Secretary 
Wallace Worsley, Jr., Production Manager 
Robert Rosien, Chief, Recording Dept. 
Donald Woelfel, Mgr., Repeater Projector 

Dept. 
Charles R. Senf, Editorial Dept. 

Services: Production of motion pictures for 
theatrical and industrial use; sales, public re- 
lations and training films; TV subjects and 
spots; slidefilms; dubbing, recording and re- 
recording services ; sale and lease of repeater 
projectors with Sound Masters "Lift-Off" 
magazine. Facilities: Sound stage fully 
equipped with 35mm and 16mm cameras; 
complete lighting equipment; sound recording 
facilities and dolly, high speed slow motion 
cameras and sound equipment for location use. 
Two recording studios fully equipped with 
35mm and 16mm optical tracks, 35, 16mm 
and 1/4" magnetic recording. Projection fa- 
cilities for 35mm and 16mm interlock. Four 
fully equipped cutting rooms with Moviolas 
and sound readers for film and tape available 
to all producers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: CO, Inflatable Lifeboats; 



(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



METROPOLITAN NEW YORK: 



SOUND MASTERS: Cont'd. 

Boat Davita for HandUny Landing Craft 3 
films (U.S. Navy); Golfs Longest Hour 
(United States Golf Assoc.) ; Challenge of the 
Future (Sun Oil Company). TV Commer- 
cials: for Red Cross, LaRosa, General Electric 
Lamps, Borden, Nestles, Dash Dog Food, 
Diamond Briquettes. Royal Typewriter, Ponds, 
Plymouth, Revlon Dolls. Sanka, Borden's In- 
stant Coffee, Pontiac, Spic & Span, Milk Bone 
Dog Biscuit, Kent Cigarettes. Cheer, Gleem. 
Crisco, Mental Health, Vaseline Hair Tonic. 



FLETCHER SMITH STUDIOS, INC. 

319 East 44th Street, New York 17, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 5-9010 

Date of Organization : 1930 
Fletcher Smith, President 
Peter Caldera, Secretary-Treasurer 
Services: Motion pictures, television film com- 
mercials, industrials and television film series; 
live and animated. 16mm and 35mm, black 
and white or color. Slidefilms: anamorphic 
and sound; also slides. Live stills or artwork. 
Recording: wild and to picture. Facilities: 
Projection room, both 16mm and 35mm. Re- 
cording facilities. Art and animation staflf: 
editing facilities and staff. Animation cam- 
eras, both 16mm and 35mm. Hot press titling. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Return of Phileas Fogg 
(United Fund of Pittsburgh) ; New World of 
Metals, iXew Girl in Town, Legend of Ama- 
quois Valley ( Westinghouse ) ; African Holiday 
(Tembo Productions) ; Birth of a Station (M. 
W. Kellogg Company). Slidefilms: The 
VJ.P. in Camping (Y.M.C.A.); Seeing Is 
Believing ( Permutit Company); Why Buy 
G.E. TV in 195S (General Electric); Growth 
of Electric Power ( Edison Electric j . 



4f 

HENRY STRAUSS & CO., INC. 

31 West 53rd St., New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 7-0651 

Date of Organization: 1951 

Henry Strauss, Executive Producer 

Walter Raft, Vice-Pres. 

Robert Wilmot, Vice-Pres. 

Jerry Alden, Story Editor 

Marvin Dreyer, Production Supervisor 

William Hagens, Training Coordinator 

John von Arnold, Media Development 
Services: Internal and external communica- 
tions, including: public, community, customer 
and industrial relations; sales promotion; 
sales training; employee attitude development; 
supervisory and staff training, through the 
medium of programmed motion pictures, (ex- 
cluding TV commercials) slidefilms, cartoons, 
printed and recorded material, training 
cour.ses and guides; other coordinated audio- 
visual tools. Facilities: All necessary for 
research, planning, programming and the 
creation and production of these media. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Harry's Hat Hangs High; 



By Their Needs You'll Know Them (U.S. 
Army) ; No One Ansiver; Four Steps to Sales; 
Sales Case Histories (American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co.) ; Something's Come Up; Man- 
agement Case Studies; Castles and Castinets; 
Moment of Departure; Information Please 
(Pan American World Airways); Report 
From the Home Country ( House & Garden 
Magazine); They Ask For Joey; The Other 
Side of the Witidshield (Gulf Oil Corpora- 
tion ) ; Crisis in Lindenville ( National Associa- 
tion of Manufacturers). Slidefilms: The 
Best of Circles; Your Station Is Showing 
(Gulf Oil Corporation); New Dimensions in 
Management (Nations Business Magazine) ; 
People Are Our Business (Health Insurance 
Institute). 



STURGIS-GRANT PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

322 East 44th Street, Now York 17, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 9-4994 
Date of Organization: 1948 
Warren Sturgis, President, Exec. Producer 
Benedict Magnes, Vice-Pres., Gen. Manager 
A. E. Snowden, Secretary-Treasurer 
Sidney Milstein, Production Manager 
Eleanor Frommelt, Assistant Production 
Manager 

Services: Medical, technical, educational and 
industrial films & filmstrips; animation of all 
t.ypes; scripts and storyboards; TV commer- 
cials; foreign language adaptations. Facili- 
ties : Live-action and animation cameras ; com- 
plete facilities for 16 and 35mm production; 
script-writing staff; full art studio; sound 
stage, recording studio; sets; editing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Agetiesis of the Vagina 
(Parke Davis); Diaphragmatic Hernia 
(Columbia-Presbyterian); Esophageal Hiatal 
Hernia (Winthrop Laboratories) ; Exeneration 
of the Orbit (Algernon Reese, M.D.) ; Human 
Gastric Function (Smith, Kline & French); 
Neraval Anesthesia in Oral Surgery (Schering 
Corporation); Normal Development of the 
Heart (Squibb); Room for Recovery (The 
Seeing Eye, Inc.); Safe Electro-Convulsive 
Shock Therapy (Schering Corporation); Use 
of Intratnuscular Varidase ( Lederle Labora- 
tories). Slidefilms: At the Carnival. Rhythms 
in Nature (Stratco Audio Visuals Ltd.). TV 
Commercials: For American Diabetes Asso- 
ciation; N. W. Ayer & Sons; Belk Stores; 
Curtis Advertising; The Getschal Company; 
Goldenthal Agency. 



BILL STURM STUDIOS. INC. 

723 Seventh Avenue, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: JUdson 6-1650 

Date of Incorporation : 1950 
William A. Sturm, President, Tech. Dir. 
Robert J. Hassard, Chairman of the Board 
Albert D. Hecht, Treas. (Oust. Relations) 
Orestes Calpini, Secretary (Creative Head) 
John E. Allen, Production Manager 
Kenneth Walker, Animation Director 
Walter Bergman, Editor 
S. J. Horton, Manager, Print Dept. 
Services: Film production, including live ac- 
tion, animation, stop motion, animated stop- 
motion puppets. Facilities: Live action 



studio; animation stands; stop motion puppet 
stage; editing dept. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

TV Commercials: For RCA Whirlpool, Na- 
bisco ( Kenyon & Eckhardt ) ; Ronson, Speidel 
(Norman, Craig & Kummel ) ; Glamur Prod- 
ucts (Grey Advertising) ; Coca-Cola (McCann- 
Erickson); Lambert Pharmacal (Lambert & 
Feasley) : Niagara Mohawk (BBD&O) ; Asso- 
ciation of Apple Growers (Charles W. Hoyt ) ; 
Uncle Ben's Rice, M & M Candies (Ted 
Bates) ; MGM (Donahue & Coe) ; RCA Tubes 
(Al Paul Lefton) and others. 



John Sutherland Productions, Inc. 

136 East 55th Street, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 5-1875 
MacDonald MacPherson, Vice-President 
(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



■5f 



TELIC, INC. 

Film Center, 630 Ninth Avenue, New York 

35, N.Y. 
Phone: JUdson 2-3480 
Date of Organization: 1956 

Elwood Siegel, President, Executive 
Director 

Edward F. Boughton, Vice-President, Prod. 
Supvr. 

David Mower, Assist. Prod. Supvr. 

Julius Shulman, Hollywood Representative 
Services: Producers of information motion 
pictures, tape and disc programs, slidefilms, 
and film commercials for industry, agriculture, 
government, education, television and theater; 
domestic and foreign. Creative editorial 
services for industrial photographic depart- 
ments. Facilities: Complete production fa- 
cilities; 35mm and 16 mm cameras, sprocket 
and 14" magnetic tape recorders, 35mm and 
16mm Moviolas, lighting equipment, location 
production unit, screening rooms, recording 
rooms, insert and anigraph photography, edi- 
torial department. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Counter Revolution, Ceil- 
ings Unlimited. House of Tomorrow, The Ma- 
con Tree Farm, A Salesman's Life, The 36th 
Convention (Armstrong Cork Company); 
Super Baling ( New Holland Machine Com- 
pany ) ; Gyrofin { Sperry Gyroscope Company) ; 
The Decisive Years (Franklin & Marshall 
College); Condition Critical (The Lancaster 
General Hospital). TV Commercials: For 
Sullivan, Staufl'er, Colwell & Bayles; New Hol- 
land; N. W. Ayer & Son; Foltz-Wessinger 
Inc.; BBD&O; Marts & Lundy; S & H Green 
Stamps; Rise; Hum; LaRosa: Beauty Curl; 
Noxema; Tandy Takes; and Armstrong Circle 
Theatre. 



TERRYTOONS 
(Division of CBS Television Film Sales, Inc.) 

38 Centre Avenue, New Rochelle, N.Y. 
Phone: NE 2-.3466 

William M. Weiss, Vice-President & General 

Manager 
Gene Deitch, Creative Supervisor 
Newell T. Schwin, Sales Manager 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



I Frank Schudde, Production Manager 
I Philip A. Scheib, Music Director 

Services: Animated cartoons, commercials, in- 
dustrials, theatricals. Facilities: Story and 
idea department, musical director-composer, 
recording studio. 8 animation cameras, Ox- 
berry optical printer, darkroom for still pro- 
duction, 4 cutting rooms, screening room with 
theater size screen and magnetic sound. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Depth Study (CBS Tele- 
vision Network) ; Tom Terrific (CBS "Captain 
Kangaroo Show" ) ; Juggler of Our Lady 
(Twentieth Century-Fox) ; Bert & Harry Piel 
'Commercialfi (Young & Rubicam) ; WCBS ID 
spots (CBS Radio). 



Telepix of Hollywood 

420 Madison Avenue, New York 17 
Paul F. Fitzpatrick, Jr., in charge 
(See complete listing in Los Angeles area) 

TIESLER PRODUCTIONS 

112 West 44th Street, New ^ork 36, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 5-1274 

Date of Organization: 1957 

Hans Tiesler, Owner 

Services: Complete production services for 
industrial and special purpose business films. 
Specialists in public relations, sales promo- 
tion, educational and sales training motion 
pictures. Facilities: Offices, projection and 
cutting room with personnel for scriptwriting, 
direction, editing, technical animation and 
production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Producing Phosphate for 
Agriculture and Indtistry, Aeroprills, Bad 
Xews for Bugs, Insect Control (American Cy- 
anamid Company) ; Serving Industry (H. K. 
Porter Company Inc.) ; Industrial Rubber 
Products (Quaker Pioneer Rubber Company) ; 
Expanded Service to the Electric Industry 
(Delta-Star Electric Company); A Better 
Method of Burning Refuse (Combustion En- 
gineering Company) . 



TOMLIN FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

480 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone: PLaza 8-3070 

Date of Organization : 1939 
Date of Incorporation: 1946 

Frederick A. Tomlin, President 
Carl A. Tomlin, Vice-President 
Mary D. Tomlin, Secretary-Treasurer 
Harry L. Flynn, Sales Manager 

Services : Production of sales promotion, in- 
stitutional and industrial motion pictures, 
sound slidefilms, widescreen slides and film- 
strips, regular filmstrips and slides, slide mo- 
tion pictures. Special emphasis on color con- 
trol. Facilities: Photographic studio, art 
department, editing room, dark room, Oxberry 
animation stand with Oxberry 16mm-35mm 
Camera; 16mm-35mm motion pictures cam- 
eras; still photographic equipment; projection 
equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Advertising in an Ex- 



panding Economy (Young & Rubicam, Inc.) ; 
The Big Step ( Pei'sonal Products Corpora- 
tion). Filmstrips: Aircraft Gas Burner Sys- 
tems (Pratt & Whitney Aircraft) ; Solar Heat 
(Gulf Oil Corporation) ; The New 209W Class 
(Singer Sewing Machine Company); 1957 
Holiday Festival (General Cigar Company); 
This Is TV Inc. (TV Stations Inc.). Wide- 
screen Slidefilms: Our Living Future 
(Life-Time, Inc.); Annual Report (General 
Foods Corporation); Fifth Annual Teen-Age 
Dressmaking Contest (Singer Sewing Machine 
Company); Gulf Annual Meeting (Gulf Oil 
Corporation); Filter Flow (General Electric 
Company); Picture and Pattern Promotion 
(Personal Products Corp.). 



TRAINING FILMS, INC. 

150 West 54th Street, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: COlumbus 5-3520 

Date of Organization: 1947 

Ralph Bell Fuller, President 

Robert A. Lightburn, Vice-President 

Services : Filmstrips, filmographs, slides, 
easels, booklets, presentations. Specialists in 
business-sponsored filmstrips for schools; film- 
strips on employee orientation, methods and 
sales training; sales promotion. Counsel on 
all phases of audio-visual presentation and 
equipment pi'oblems. Originators of 3-screen 
panoramic filmstrips. Facilities: Staff re- 
searchers, writers, artists and photographers. 
Complete art department, projection room and 
photo studio. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Slidefilms: The Coats & Clark's Automatic 
Re-Order System (Coats & Clark's, Inc.) ; 
Borden's Cottage Cheese (The Borden Com- 
pany) ; Profitable Beef Product io7i (Charles 
Pfizer & Co., Inc.); Air Filter Facts (Puro- 
lator Products, Inc.) ; Toward Better Govern- 
ment at Less Cost (Tax Foundation, Inc.) ; 
The 63-D Universal Weathermaker; The Car- 
rier Heat Pump Weathermaker; The Carrier 
9H Evaporative Condenser ( Carrier Corpoi'a- 
tion). 



TRANSFILM INCORPORATED 

35 West 45th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: JUdson 2-1400 

Date of Organization : 1941 

Branch: The Carlton House, Pittsburgh 19, 

Pa. Phone: GRant 1-6627. Ralph Mait- 

land. Manager 
William Miesegaes, Chairman of the Board 
Walter Lowendahl, President 
William Burnham, Vice-Pres. Chg. of Sales 
Pud Lane, Vice-Pres. Chg. of Slidefilms 
Michael A. Palma, E.rec. Vice-President, 

Treasurer 
Albert Boyars, Public Relations Dir. 
Karl P. Fischl, Vice-President, Sales 
Morrie Roizman, Dir. Editorial Services 
John Cuddy, Mgr. Animation Dept. 
Joop Geesink, Co-Producer, Dollywood 

Studios, Amsterdam, Holland 

Services: Live action, animated, stop-motion 
films for business, theatrical and television use. 
Sound slidefilms and still photography. Spe- 
cialists in films for public relations, sales 



iB. vr cj iiLjL$> a 



NEW YORK 



training and attitude motivation. Create and 
execute entire audio-visual programs for in- 
dustry. TV commercials. Complete editorial 
and recording services. Staff public relations 
service for trade and consumer film exploita- 
tion. Facilities: Air-conditioned sound stage 
and screening rooms. Animation art depart- 
ment; two animation camera stands, optical 
printer, extensive editing facilities and sound 
slidefilm studio. Complete prop and scenic 
departments plus fully equipped shop. Still 
photography studio and laboratory. Equipped 
for 16 and 35mm photography and tape re- 
cording; optical and tape interlock projection. 
Print service dept. for inspection and shipping. 
Film advisory counselling service, research 
and script writing. Complete staff, admin- 
istrative offices and facilities under one roof 
in Transfilm Building (N.Y.). 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Earth Is Born, Calling 
All Retailers (Life Magazine); Energetically 
Yours (Standard Oil Company, N.J.) ; A Moon 
Is Born, Bank Demand Deposit Accounting 
System (International Business Machines); 
Industry's Decisive Decade, Bright Promise of 
the American Farm Market (Fortune Maga- 
zine) ; People, Profits and You (Bureau of 
Advertising, ANPA) ; What Kind of Day Has 
It Been ? ( Greater New York Fund ) ; Build 
for Profits ( E. I. du Pont de Nemours) ; From 
Neighbor to Neighbor (Shell Oil— Red Cross 
Fund Drive); Murphy's Law (U.S. Navy). 
Slidefilms: Planning the Storage Laijout, 
Principles of Stock Positioning (U.S. Navy) ; 
Our New Look ( Noland Company ) ; You and 
Labor Law (Elric) ; Science and Cyanamid 
( American Cyanamid ) ; Plastics in Home 
Furnishings (Society of Plastics); You and 
Your Field Manager (Fuller Brush); The 
Time-Life Scanner (Printers Developments 
Inc.); Lifeline Promotion (Chase Copper & 
Brass); B. Altman Turnpike (B. Altman) ; 
Having a Baby (Maternity Center Associa- 
tion). TV Commercials: For Dutch Boy 
Paint, Genesee Beer ( Marshalk & Pratt ) ; 
Scripto Satellite Pens, Cut-Rite Waxpaper (J. 
Walter Thompson); Mazola Salad Oil (C. L. 
Miller); Anacin (Ted Bates); Blue Cheer, 
Lipton Tea ( Young & Rubicam ) ; Geritol, Van 
Heusen Shirts, RCA Victor Record Albums, 
Mennen, Lilt, Hoffman Beverage, R. H. Macy 
& Co., Samsonite Luggage, Greyhound Bus 
(Grey); Tidewater Oil, Air France, Am-Par 
Records (Buchanan); Camel (Esty); Saran 
Wrap, Cadillac, Scotch Tape ( McManus, John 
& Adams); G-E Radio (Maxon); Kelvinator, 
Nash, Rambler (Geyer); Venus Pencils 
(Doyle, Dane & Bernbach) ; Acronized 
Chicken (Cunningham & Walsh); Robert 
Hall Men's Clothes (Frank B. Sawdon ) ; Kin- 
ney Shows ( M. B. Scott ) ; and others. 



TRIDENT FILMS, INC. 

510 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 9-3580 

Date of Organization: March, 1947 

Charles F. Schwep, President 

(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



METROPOLITAN NEW YORK: 



TRIDENT FILMS, INC.: Cont'd. 

Guy K. Benson, Vice-President 

B. C. Oswald, Secretary 

Vinton Freedley, Jr., Sales Manager 

Services: Program development from original 
research to finished film. Institutional, com- 
mercial, documentary and training films; spe- 
cializing in public attitude films for general 
TV and special audiences. Marionette film 
production. Overseas production services. 
Facilities: 16mm and 35mm cameras, light- 
ing equipment. Air-conditioned editorial and 
screening rooms. Library of animated mari- 
onettes, props. Music libi-ary. Permanent 
creative, directional and editing staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Man Made Forest 
(Continental Cam; Leisure, Professional 
People, Costumes, Weather, Agriculture and 
others, part of series ( U. S. Commissioner 
General to Brussels World's Fair 1958). 
Filmed Television Programs: Believe It or 
Not (U. S. Information Agency); Ma7i To 
Man, series of 13 (National Council of 
Churches). TV Commercials: For Revlon, 
Breck Shampoo (Canada), Ogilvie Flour M'lls, 
MacDonald Tobacco Company. 



UNIFILMS, INC. 

329 East 47th Street, New York 17, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 8-9325, 8-9326 

Date of Organization: 1949 

Charles E. Gallagher, President 
Arline Garson, Vice-President, Supv. Edi- 
tor 
Zella Finley, Treasurer 
Richard Maury, Senior Writer 
Robert Stringer, Senior Director 
Newton Avrutis, Senior Engineer 

Services: Business and Television films; 16 
and 35mm Slidefilms and filmographs. Live art 
and cartoon. Specialty: The Narrative Drama. 
Facilities: Staff of seventeen, and 8,000 
square feet in Midtown Manhattan. 90 foot 
sound stage. Permanent kitchen; 10 channels 
of tape; Art department; dressing rooms; 
Kodachrome printer; vault; Editing rooms; 
50,000 watts of studio lighting. Animation 
stand. Music library. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: So Little for Eve (New 
York State Bankers Association) ; Tour Tips 
(Shell Oil Company) ; Meet Me at the Fair 
(Swift and Company); Great Performance 
(Mercury Motor Cars) ; Forecast (Congoleum- 
Nairn ) ; Man from Missouri, Fedic, 5 Aces 
(Federal Pacific Electric Company); The Big 
Sivitch ( International Paper Company ) . 
Slidefilms: Dr. Heckle & Mr. Pride (Junior 
Achievement ) ; Forecast (Congoleum-Nairn ) . 
TV Commercials: For Pyrex, JFD, Cocoa- 
Marsh, Blessings, Pontiac, Fluff-o-matic Rice, 
Tidewater, Pennsylvania Railroad, American 
Council on NATO. 



UFA Pictures, Inc. 

60 East 56th Street, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone : PLaza 8-1405 

Eli Feldman, Sales Executive 

(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



4f 

UNITED STATES PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

Divisions: Information Productions, Inc.; 

Science Pictures, Inc. 

5 East 57th Street. New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 1-1710 

Date of Organization: 1955 

Branch Ofliice: 4000 Massachusetts Avenue, 
Washington, D. C: John Holman, in chg. 
Tom Carroll As.sociates, 116 Washington 
Avenue, Albany, N. Y. Thomas G. Car- 
roll, in charge. 1714 Huldy, Houston 19, 
Texas. Mrs. Barbara Atwell, in charge. 
Francis C. Thayer, President 
Thomas H. Wolf, E.recutive Vice-President 
];pne Bras, Vice-Pres.. Creative Services 
Alfred Butterfield, E.recutive Producer 
Kills Sard, A.'isociate Producer 
.\rthur Zegart, Associate Producer 
■Tohn L. Thayer, Service Manager 
Philip Landeck, Production Manager 

Services: Production of theatrical, television 
and industrial motion pictures, sound slide- 
films, filmstrips and TV commercials. Facili- 
ties: Complete facilities for 35mm or 16mm 
liv° or animated motion pictures and sound 
slidefilms; including studio, animation stands 
and recording equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Inside Story (Manufac- 
turers Trust Company) ; Art School for Every 
One (Famous Artists Schools, Inc.) ; The 
Chocolate Tree (The Nestle Company) ; Here's 
to Your Health (New York State Department 
of Health Services); Holiday Kaleidoscope 
(Holiday Magazine); Assistive Devices, Res- 
pirator Center ( National Foundation, Infantile 
Paralysis) ; All Dressed Up (Ladies Home 
Journal) ; Extensible Paper (West Virginia 
Pulp & Paper Company) ; Brazilian Railroad 
(Foley Brothers); Fun Ideas, Christmas 
Magic (McCalls Magazine); Someone is 
Watching (New York State Department of 
Commerce). Filmstrips: Key to Research, 
Health Council (National Foundation, Infan- 
tile Paralysis) ; Annual Report (Western 
Printing). Filmed Television Programs: 
Air Power, Twentieth. Century, Conquest 
(CBS Television). TV Commercials: For 
Cities Service (Ellington Company); Pan 
American World Airways (J. Walter Thomp- 
son ) ; Johnson & Johnson ( L. W. Frohlich ) ; 
Bethlehem Steel Company. 

VAN PRAAG PRODUCTIONS 

1600 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 7-2687 (TWX: NY 1-2687) 
Branches: 2301 Dime Building, Detroit 26. 
Phone: WOodward 2-4896. Fred T. Frink, 
Gen. Mgr.; 3143 Ponce de Leon Blvd., 
Coral Gables, Miami Florida. Phone: 
Highland 4-3191. Harry Walsh, Vice- 
Pres.; 1040 N. Las Palmas Ave., Holly- 
wood 38, Calif.; Phone: HOllywood 
2-1141. Hugh S. Hole, Vice-President 
Date of Organization: 1950 
William Van Praag, President 
Marc S. Asch, Executive Vice-President 
Gilbert M. Williams, Vice-President 
Hugh S. Hole, Vice-President. Hollywood 
Harry Walsh, Vice-President, Miami 
Fred F. Frink, General Manager, Detroit 



William Gargan, Jr., Account Supervisor 
William E. Schappert, Administration 
Anita M. Palumbo, Business Manager 
Robert Van Praag, Distrihution 
Oscar Canstein, Chief Editor 
Daniel Karoff, Production Manager, N.Y. 
Gene Harrison, Production Manager, 

Hollywood 
Lois Gray, Acccounting 
N. Jay Norman, Chicago Representative 

Services: Theatrical, documentary, commer- 
cial, television and industi-ial films in black & 
white and in color; distribution. FACILITIES: 
Complete sound studios and mobile units. 
Creative, art, casting, editorial and distribu- 
tion services. Film vaults, projection and 
other related facilities and services. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: 195S Official Orange Bowl 
Highlights Film (Orange Bowl Committee). 
TV Commercials: for RCA Whirlpool, RCA 
TV sets, Mercury (Kenyon & Eckhardt); 
Holiday Cigarettes (Reach, Yates & Matoon) ; 
Grape Nuts Flakes, Studebaker, Schick 
Shavers ( Benton & Bowles ) ; Flagg Shoes, 
Delco Batteries, Chevrolet (Campbell-Ewald) ; 
Aluminum, Ltd., Ford (J. Walter Thompson); 
Bulova, Westinghouse TV sets, Chrysler Corp. 
(McCann-Erickson) ; Dodge (Grand Advertis- 
ing) ; D-X Boron ( Potts- Woodbury ) ; Kreisler 
Lighters (The Zlowe Company); Puriton, 
Isetta Cars (Norman Gladney Company); 
Marvel Cigarettes (Aitkin Kynett) ; Schmidts 
Beer (Al Paul Lefton) ; Eastern Airlines 
(Fletcher D. Richards); Aluminum Co. of 
America ( Fuller & Smith & Ross ) ; Texaco 
(Cunningham & Walsh); Helme Snuff (CBS 
Terrytoons) ; Wonder Bread (Ted Bates Com- 
pany, Inc.); Richfield Gasoline (Hixson & 
Jergensen, Inc.) ; United Nations (Advertis- 
ing Council, Inc.) ; Mutual of Omaha (Boswell 
& Jacobs, Inc. ) ; and U.S. Information Agency. 



VAVIN, INC. 
(Video & Visual Information Films) 

134 East 57th Street, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone : MUrray Hill 8-5897 

Date of Organization: 1948 

Branch Offices: 72 Boulevard Raspail, Paris 
XVI, France. Mme. Yvonne Oberlin, 
Manager. 9 Blumenstrasse, Buderich- 
Dusseldorf, Germany. N. Z. Moreno, 
Vice-President and Manager. 

Richard de Rochemont, Pres., Ch. of Board 
Gerald E. Weiler, Executive Vice-Pres. 
Helen B. de Rochemont, Vice-President 
Ruth Teksmo, Secretary, Asst. Treasurer 
N. Z. Moreno, Vice-President 
Joseph Stultz, Vice-President 

Services: Production of documentary, indus- 
trial, pub. relations and travel films for theat- 
rical, non-theatrical and television. Production 
of closed-circuit presentations. Facilities: 
Production and editorial for 35mm and 16mm 
color and black & white in U.S. and overseas 
locations. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Art of Intarsia (Piazza 
Montici ) ; Su7idae Party, Sick Care (Paper 
Cup & Container Institute) ; France for Fun 
1957 { French Government Tourist Office) ; 
series of Tourist Films ( Moroccan Tourist 
Office ) ; Public Relations series for Reader's 
Digest Association, Life Magazine, Sports 
Illustrated and TV Guide; commercial film 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



(American Institute of Men's & Boys' Wear). 
Scripts for American Express and American 
Society of Travel Agents. 



•5f 



VIDCAM PICTURES CORPORATION 

210 East 5 Street. New York, N.Y. 
Phone: AL 4-7102 

Date of Organization : 1950 

AI Justin, President 

Andrew L. Gold, Vice-President & Exec. 

Prod. 
James M. Rose, Production Manager 
David Reisman, Production Supervisor 
William Shriner, Art Director 
Joe Valenti, Studio Manager 
James MacLean, Supervising Editor 
Telsa Albee, Business Manager 

Services: Creation and production of indus- 
trial, documentary, and training motion pic- 
tures and television commercials for private 
industry and government agencies in 35mm, 
16mm, black and white and color. Facilities: 
Two buildings contain four floors each of fully 
equipped studios with scene docks, carpenter 
shops, property rooms, paint shops, make-up 
rooms, dressing rooms, cutting rooms, screen- 
ing rooms, film vaults and offices. Full equip- 
ment for any motion picture activity. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Today's Highways, White 
Christmas (United States Steel); Business 
Relations (General Electric) ; Miss American 
1957 (Florida Citrus Commission) ; Helicop- 
ter-Arctic (U.S. Air Force). TV Commer- 
cials: For BBD&O; Young & Rubicam; 
Compton Advertising; Benton & Bowles; C. 
J. LaRoche; Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & 
Bayles; Kenyon & Eckhardt, Leo Burnett. 



VISUALSCOPE, INCORPORATED 

103 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 
Phone : MUrray Hill 3-3788 

Date of Incorporation: 1955 

John H. Rose, Jr., President 
Manny Rey, Vice-President, Art Director 
Robert VanHouten, Sales Manager 
Robert G. Taylor, Secretary-Treasurer, 

Production Manager 
Peter Schlenker, Controller 

Services: Audio-visual presentations includ- 
ing the Visualscope wide-screen slide or film- 
strip, standard filmstrip and slides, Vu-Graphs, 
slide motion pictures. Facilities: Complete 
art department, photographic studio, staff 
script writer, projection equipment and record- 
ing facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Slidefilms: Room Air Conditioners (Westing- 
house International) ; World Premiere — Four 
Roses Gin (Four Roses Distillers) ; These Are 
Your Products (Youngstown Kitchens); Mag- 
azines and People (The Borden Company); 
Let's Keep the Record Straight (Esso Stand- 
ard Oil Co.). Motion Slide Film: A Bill of 
Particulars (Dow Chemical Co.) . Widescreen 
Slidefilms: Vacations Around the World 
(Pan American World Airways) ; 1957 Mobil- 
gas Special (Socony Mobil Oil Co.) ; Opera- 



tion Opportunity 1958 — series of 17 films 
(Colgate Palmolive Co.) ; We'll Manage Some- 
hoiv (Association of National Advertisers) ; 
Post and Consequence (Saturday Evening 
Post) ; Time Travel; America's Best Custom- 
ers; The Job Is Bigger Now (Time Maga- 
zine) ; Open Me First (Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany) ; DC Power With Semiconductors (Gen- 
eral Electric Company) ; Plastic's Today and 
Tomorrow; A Bill of Particulars; Additional 
Extended Coverage (Dow Chemical Com- 
pany ) ; Borden's Magazines & People { The 
Borden Company); Winter Set and Summer 
Set (Procter & Gamble) ; New GE Tliin-line 
Room. Units (General Electric Company) ; and 
others. 



ROGER WADE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

15 West 46th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 5-3040 

Date of Organization : 1946 

Roger Wade, President 

Anne Koller, Vice-President 

Wm. Buckley, Production Supervisor 

C. D. McCormick, Art Director 

Services: Production of industrial motion pic- 
tures (b&w and color); sound slidefilms; TV 
commercials. Facilities: Studio, editing 
rooms, dark rooms, Oxberry 16/ 35mm, anima- 
tion stand, complete equipment and processing 
facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Security Regained (City- 
Bank Farmers Trust Co.) ; White Magic of 
Milk (Milk Industry Foundation) ; Cargo 
Handling (U.S. Navy). Slidefilms: Heart 
Fund — County, Community (American Heart 
Association) ; Permanent Personal Registra- 
tion (Westchester County, N.Y.). 



WILLARD PICTURES, INC. 

45 West 45th Street, New York 36, N.Y. 

Phone: JUdson 2-0430 

Branch Office: Editorial, Cutting, Projec- 
tion, Recording, Animation : 550 Fifth 
Avenue, N.Y. 

Date of Organization : 1932 

John M. Squiers, Jr., President 
S. A. Scribner, Jr., Vice-President 
S. H. Childs, Treasurer 

Services: Industrial, medical, educational, 
sales and job training motion pictures and 
slidefilms; training films for U.S. Armed 
Forces and Governmental agencies: theatri- 
cals; television film shows and commercials. 
Facilities : Mitchell NC cameras and camera- 
top station wagons, portable generators, field 
sound recording instruments ; pioneer in in- 
dustry techniques and equipment; color pro- 
duction in East and South America for theat- 
rical producers; animation department; pro- 
jection and cutting rooms ; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Agricidture's World Series, 
The Monza Challenge (Firestone Tire & Rub- 
ber Co.) ; Swiss On White (Swissair) ; Geigy 
USA (Geigy Chemical Corporation) ; The 
Birds of Venezuela (Creole Petroleum Corpor- 
ation), training films for U.S. Navy, U.S. Air 
Force, etc. TV Commercials: For various 
clients and agencies. 



IB. vr Q iM. A# a 



NEW YORK 



WINIK FILMS CORP. 

250 West 57th Street, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 6-7360 

Date of Incorporation: 1939 

Branches: 20 North Wacker Drive, Chicago 
6, 111. Al Levine, in charge. 611 N. Tilla- 
mook Street, Portland 12, Oregon. Mer- 
riman Holtz, in charge 

Leslie Winik, President, Sales 
Richard Winik, Vice-President, Production 
Estelle Rosen, Secretary, Comptroller 
Marty Glickman, Narration 

Services: Produce and distribute filmed tele- 
vision shows; specialize in sports stock shots; 
produce industrial films and TV commercials. 
Facilities: Personnel and equipment for 
above services. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Robinson-BasilHo Fight 
(United Ai'tists) ; Madison Square Garden 
1957 (Seagrams) ; Basketball 1957 (Converse 
Rubber); Basketball Fundamentals (U.S. 
Rubber); Football 1957 (Princeton Univer- 
sity); All Stars 1957 (National Basketball 
Assoc); Pro Football 1957 (N.Y. Football 
Giants) ; Globetrotters World Tour (Saper- 
stein Associates). 



WONDSEL, CARLISLE & DUNPHY, INC. 

1600 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: Circle 7-1600 

Date of Organization : 1957 

Harold E. Wondsel, President 

Robert Carlisle, Vice-President in charge of 

Production 
Thomas Dunphy, Vice-President in charge 

of TV activities 
Walter Kullberg, Secretary-Treasurer 

Services: Complete facilities and staff per- 
sonnel for the production of all types of mo- 
tion pictures including theatrical, industrial, 
documentary and television. Facilities: Our 
own large air-conditioned studio, 14 " and 
35mm tape recording, complete camera, light- 
ing and all other photographic equipment. 
Editing and film storage facilities on our own 
pi'emises. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Convention Sales Film 
( Seagram Distiller Company) ; Eye-Witness 
Report (Sun Oil Company); African Safari 
( Fritsche Brothers); Officer Conference 
Films, Series for Dept. of Defense ; Dr. Ralph 
Bunche on organization of United Nation.'^ 
Police Force, Middle East; Charles Malik, 
Lebanon, Middle East problems; General 
White on Air Force; Dan Shorr, CBS corres- 
pondent in Moscow — life in Moscow and real- 
politics. TV Commercials: for Columbia 
Phonograph, Nestle Eveready Cocoa, Pond 
Vaseline Lip Ice, Mennen Skin Bracer, Esso 
Standard Oil Co. (McCann-Erickson) ; Argus 
Camera, General Electric Appliances, Royal 
McBee Typewriters, Bufferin, General Foods 



(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



123 



METROPOLITAN NEW YORK: 

WONDSEL, CARLISLE & DUNPHY: Cont'd. 

Corp., Borden Dairy Products, Chef Boy-Ar- 
Dee Food.s, Esterbrook Pens ( Young & Rubi- 
cam); Vicks Vaporub i Morse International): 
Gaines Dog Biscuit & Meal ( Benton & 
Bowles) ; Chase & Sanborn Instant Coffee. 
Crisco, Big Top Peanut Butter, Duncan Hines 
Cake Mix (Compton) ; Hazel Bishop Lipsticks 
(Raymond Spector) ; Johnson Baby Lotion, G. 
E. Telechron Clocks, Armour Turkeys & 
Frankfurters i N. W. Ayer & Son); DuPont 
Tynex Nylon Bristles, Lucky Strike Cigarettes 
(BBD&d); Hudson Toilet Tissue, Selchow & 
Righter Co. ( Norman, Craig & Kummel, Inc. ) : 
Uneeda Instant Fizz ( Ted Bates ) : Woodbury 
Shampoo, Jergens Hand Lotion ( Cunningham 
& Walsh I ; Alcoa ( Fuller & Smith & Ross ) ; 
Max Factor Cosmetics i Doyle, Dane, Bern- 
bach, Inc.); Florists Telegraph Delivery 
(Grant); Carac Corporation (Donahue & 
Coe) ; Playtex Dryper, Carter Crew Hair 
Tonic (Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell, & Bayles) ; 
Carbona Products Corp. (Norman Gladney). 



Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

40.5 Park Avenue, New York City, N.Y. 
Phone: PLaza 9-0854 

T. H. Westerman, Vice-President, in charge 
(See complete listing under Chicago area) 

WYLDE STUDIOS, INC. 

41 West 57th Street, New York, N.Y. 
Phone: PL 1-6970 

Date of Organization: 1957 

Harvey Patterson, President 
Fred Levinson, Vice-President, Treasurer 
Robert Bean, Vice-President, Secretary 
Beverly O'Reilly, Director of Sales 

Services: Art and animation of all types, 
motion pictures, motionslides, and slidefilms 
for industry, education, training and tele- 



vision; storyboards, character design, scripts 
and jingles. FACILITIES: Creative and pro- 
duction staff, complete art studio, animation 
and editing departments with 16 and 35mm 
Oxberry camera, screening room. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Greatest Thrills in 
Sports (Calvert Distillers Company); Buddy 
Hackett Interview (National Broadcasting 
Company); Kungsholm Arrival ( Swedish- 
American Lines ) . Slidefilms: Watchmarkef 
Study (Watchmakers of Switzerland) ; An 
Kvening witli Playtex (International Latex). 
Motionslide, General Foods Advertising Meet- 
ing ( Foote, Cone & Belding). TV Commer- 
cials: For Shell Oil (J. Walter Thompson) ; 
National Broadcasting Company, National 
Telefilm Associates, RKO Radio Pictures. 



SEYIVIOUR ZWEIBEL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

11 East 44th Street, New York 17, N.Y. 
Phone: Murray Hill 2-4450 

Date of Organization: 1948 

Seymour Zweibel, President, Executive 

Producer 
Susan Wayne, Vice-President, Producer, 

Director 
Lillian Klass, Secretary 

Services: Production of industrial and thea- 
trical sound motion pictures and sound slide 
films. Facilities: Complete 35mm and 16mm 
motion pictures and sound slidefilm produc- 
tion. Still and sound photo studios, art de- 
partment for both slidefilms and animation, 
editorial service, sound recording, b&w & color 
laboratory. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Birds Eye-View of Econom- 
ics (General Motors Corp.); Univac (Rem- 
ington Rand). Slidefilms: 10 sound slide- 
films in color ( W. T. Grant Company) ; In- 
fluencing the Unseen fDun and Bradstreet) ; 
Finer Offices ("Security Steel). 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 



New York State 

^\ 

HOLLAND-WEGMAN PRODUCTIONS 

197 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo 2, N.Y. 
Phone: MAdison 7411 

Date of Organization: 1952 

Sheldon C. Holland, Partner 
Edward .1. Wegman, Partner 
James I. Allan, Editorial Chief 
Paul G. Ent, Director of Photography 
Andrew J. MacGowan, Jr., 

Senior Writer-Director 
John V. Gates, Cinematographer 
Nancy A. Getman, Production Coordinator 
Gordon J. Christopherson, Art Director 
Floyd G. Stratton, Laboratory Manager 
Norman Tolson, TV Creative Driector 
William Garroni, Cinematographer 
Richard A. Floberg, Sound Chief 

Services: 16 and 35mm films for business, in- 
dustry and television : Sales promotion, public 
relations, educational, medical and scientific. 
Commercials and programs for television, in 



color or black and white. Facilities: Complete 
creative, production and laboratory facilities. 
2,000 sq. ft. sound stage, blimped Mitchell 16 
and 35mm studio cameras; 3 magnetic film re- 
corders, 4 channel magnetic film mixing, 14 
inch magnetic sync recorder; animation and 
art department; Acme animation stand; crea- 
tive staff; music library; laboratory for 
processing, printing and edge numbering; 
fireproof film vault; Fearless Panoram dolly, 
Worral head, M-R mike boom. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Report Card (Bausch & 
Lomb Optical Company) ; The Fourth Sea- 
coast. Chapter II, second of five films (St. 
Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation ) ; 
Frontier Yai-d, (General Railway Signal) ; 
Poured Gypsimi Roof Decks (National Gyp- 
sum Company) ; Speno Train (The Carborun- 
dum Company); You Were There (Rochester 
Community Chest) ; Neighbors (Buffalo Com- 
munity Chest) ; The 100 Line (General Electric 
Company). Slidefilms: Tale of Two Farms, 
How to Sell Unico Paint (United Coopera- 
tives) ; The Story of Hetron (Hooker Electro- 
chemical Company) ; Speed Reading. TV 



Holland-Wegman Productions: Cont'd. 

Commercials: For Wildroot Company Inc., 
International Breweries, Inc., Keebler Biscuit 
Company, Kendall Refining Corporation, John 
LaBatt, Ltd, Oil Heat Institute, Fanny Farm- 
er, General Motors and others. 



McLARTY PICTURE PRODUCTIONS 

45-47 Stanley Street, Buffalo 6, N.Y. 
Phone: Taylor 0332 

Date of Organization: 1934 

Henry D. McLarty, Oumer and Exec, Prod. 
Gerald A. Gurss, Director of Photography 

Services: Exclusively 16mm industrial, scien- 
tific and educational films; 16mm short sub- 
jects and spots for television. Facilities: 
Sound stages, Maurer cameras. Stancil-Hoff- 
man magnetic recording system. J. A. Maurer 
opticrl recording system, mobile truck facil- 
ities for industrial coverage. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Operation Tips For the 
#411 Bauer Refiner (The Bauer Brothers 
Company) ; Open Primary Election. General 
Election Party Lever, General Election Indi- 
vidual Pointer, Selective Primary Election, Be- 
hind the Freedom Curtain (Automatic Voting 
Machine Corporation) ; What's the Difference 
(Buffalo China, Inc.); Currently in produc- 
tion, Transmission Towers by Union Metal 
( Union Metal Manufacturing Company ; Re- 
searches in High-Altitude Brushes (Stackpole 
Carbon Company). 



TRI-J FILIM PRODUCTIONS 

15 Penfield Street, Buffalo, N.Y. 
Phone : GArfield 6644 

Date of Organization : 1956 

Jerome J. Joseph, Owner, Exec. Producer- 
Director 
Irwin Green, Sales Manager 

Services: Complete production of motion pic- 
tures, live or animated and slidefilms from 
storyboard to screen to serve all needs. Facili- 
ties: 40' x 50' sound stage, 16mm synchronous 
cameras and sound recording unit, studio 
and portable lighting equipment, editing de- 
partment, animation facilities. Portable equip- 
ment for location shooting anywhere. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Automation, The SllO 
(Sylvania Electric) ; The Key to Your Success 
f Duo-Temp Corporation) ; The Second Chance 
( Protecto-Matic Corporation); Ti-ainorama 
(Buffalo Community Chest); Operation Wake 
Up Buffalo (Erie County Democratic Party). 
TV Commercials: For Unico ( Barber & Drul- 
lard); "57 & '58 Buffalo Auto Show ( Roizen 
Advertising ) ; Batavia Downs ( Hart-Conway 
Agency) ; Arpeako Franks (Saeger Advertis- 
ing) ; Blue Cross and Blue Shield (Comstock 
& Co.). 



Victor Kayfetz Productions, Inc. 

1200 Westfall Road, Rochester 18, N.Y. 
Phones: Hillside 5-0883, GReenfield 3-3000, 

Ext. 534. 
Don Lyon. 
(See complete listing in New York area) 



BITSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIN 



4€- 

United States Productions, Inc. 

Tom Carroll Associates, 116 Washington 
Ave., Albany, New York. 

Thomas G. Carroll, in charge. 

(See complete listing in New York City area) 

District of Columbia 

AMERICAN FILM SERVICES 

2153 K Street, N.W., Washington. D.C. 
Phone: Federal 3-1800 

Date of Organization: 1946 

Henry V. Hoagland, Py-esident 

Services: Producers of 16mm sound films 
specializing in public relations films for col- 
leges and universities for fund raising, alumni 
relations ; also producers of sport films for in- 
struction and entertainment. Distribution out- 
lets throughout United States using some 25 
regional educational film libraries. Facilities: 
Contract for sound and editing with companies 
specializing in that work. CNone owned.) 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Tltat They May Serve 
(Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
Chicago); Where Freedom Grows (Hastings 
College, Hastings, Nebraska) ; Sxnunoned to 
Seri'e ( Andover-Newton Theological School, 
Newton Centre, Mass. ) ; four productions in 
final editing stage. 



Atlas Film Corporation 

714 Warner Building, 501 13th Street, N.W., 
Washington 4, D.C. 
(See complete listing under Chicago area) 



CREATIVE ARTS STUDIO, INC. 

814 H Street, N.W., Washington 1, D.C. 
Phone: REpublic 7-7152 

Date of Incorporation: 1942 

Milton R. Tinsley, President 
George W. Snowden, Vice-President 
Lloyd B. MacEwen, Treasurer 
Ai-thur C. Iddings, Production Director 
Melvin M. Emde, Account Executive 
W. Wilson Taylor, Account Executive 
Martin S. Konigmacher, Animation Dept. 
Frank S Stewart, Technical Art Dept. 
Frank M. Harding, Art & Design Dept. 
John J. Poland, Photography Dept. 

Services : Motion pictures — commercial, train- 
ing, educational and informational; TV com- 
mercials ; slidefilms and slides ; charts ; ai't 
work of all types; scripts; creative exhibits 
design; kit matei-ials, etc. FACILITIES: 35mm 
and 16mm animation, still photography, 
titling, research and writing, designing and 
complete art service. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Better Small Engines 
(Army Engineers) ; Facility Inventory (Bu- 
reau of Yards & Docks ) ; Leave and Pass 
Policies (U.S. Air Force) ; Civil War, Part 1; 
Spanish-American War; Position Classifica- 
tion. Pre-Stressed Concrete (William G. Beal, 
Inc.) ; National Housing Center Report 



(NAHB); Gulf Oil, Constant Quest; Alcoa, 
Piggy Goes to Market; Joy, Automation Comes 
to Coal; ThermalaMic; Allegheny Ludlum 
(Mode-Art Pictures, Inc.); Hail the Hearty 
(Borden Co.-Parthenon Pictures) ; Seven Day 
Food; Prevent Home Fires; Protection 
Against Tornadoes; Home Nursing; Hurri- 
canes; Floods (FCDA) ; Refugee Film (ORO- 
Johns Hopkins); History of Navy Uniform; 
History of Army Uniform (Potomac Film 
Productions ) ; and 29 films for the Martin 
Company). 



NATIONAL FILM STUDIOS, INC. 

( formerly Capital Film Studios ) 
105 11th Street, S.E., Washington 3, D.C. 
Phone: Lincoln 6-8822 

Date of Organization: 1953 

Harold A. Keats, President 

F. William Hart, Vice-President cfe 

Treasurer 
Edward W. Alfriend, IV, Secretary 
Anne H. Norman, Production Assistant 

Services: Complete 35mm and 16mm motion 
picture production. Facilities : Completely 
equipped studio including air conditioned 
sound stage; equipment and personnel for 
studio or location production; RCA Sound 
Recording supplied by Capital Film Labora- 
tories, Inc. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Foreign language versions 
of Report From America ( U.S. Information 
Agency) ; This Is the I. U. E. (Henry J. Kauf- 
man & Associates) ; International Geophysical 
Year Report (U.S.I.A. and the B.B.C.) ; Studio 
facilities for Tomorrow Today series (Robert 
J. Enders, Inc., for Federal Civil Defense Ad- 
ministration) ; First Aid Tips (Washington 
Video Productions for American National Red 
Cross) ; The I.B.E.W. Story (Norwood Studios 
for International Bi-otherhood of Electrical 
Workers). Television Films: The Twentietli 
Century (CBS-TV). TV Commercials: for 
Chrysler (McCann-Erickson). 



^ 



NORWOOD STUDIOS, INC. 

1536 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washing- 
ton, D.C. 
Phone: CO 5-2272 

Date of Organization : 1951 

Philip Martin, Jr., President, Executive 

Producer 
Lydia M. Pugh, Secretary-Treasurer 
Carlyle F. Robinson, Production Supervisor 
Glenn Johnston, Camera Department 
Donn F. Bates, Supervising Editor 
Marion Sanders, Script Supervisor 
William H. Clements, Jr., Mechanical De- 
partment 
Jack Ballard, Production Control 

Services: Production of motion pictui-es for 
theatrical, non-theatrical and TV. FACILITIES: 
35 and 16mm Mitchell cameras, lighting and 
grip equipment and transportation equipment. 
Editorial and projection facilities. Westrex 
and RCA sound recording. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Port Security (U.S. Coast 



jf rn iHj/it) 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC 



Guard); The Greatest Treasure (U.S. Infor- 
mation Agency — IMS); Dartmouth Story, 
Origins of Jazz (U.S.I.A. — I.B.S.); Shotving 
the Way (International Co-Operation Adm.). 

Stanley Neal Productions, Inc. 

Munsey Building, Washington, D.C. 
Phone: STerling 3-0918 

A. A. Ulin, representative 

(See complete listing in New York City area) 

United States Productions, Inc. 

4000 Ma.ssachusetts Avenue, Wa.shington, D.C. 

John Holman, in charge 

(See complete listing in New York City area) 



•K- 



WASHINGTON VIDEO PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1536 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Washington 

6, D.C. 
Phone: A Dams 4-5737 

Date of Incorporation: 1948 

Branch Offices: Tokyo, Mr. Ian Mutsu. 
London, Mr. Howard Connell. 

George F. Johnston, President 
John T. Gibson, Vice-President 
Joseph D. Womack, Sales Manager 

Services: Produce 35mm and 16mm color, 
black and white, silent and sound. Facilities : 
Large stage, complete lighting, grip and 
camera equipment for 16mm and 35mm pro- 
duction. Cover U.S.; overseas production ex- 
perience, with emphasis on Far East. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: First Aid Tips (American 
National Red Cross) ; Loran (United States 
Coast Guard); Kill Only the Ivy (League of 
Women Voters) ; Green Are the High Moun- 
tains (Republic of China) ; Our National 
Treasures (Republic of Korea). 



Maryland 



MILNER PRODUCTIONS, INCORPORATED 

3800 Liberty Heights Ave., Baltimore 15, 

Maryland 
Phones: MOhawk 4-4221-22 

Date of Oi'ganization: 1956 

Ervin M. Milner, President 
Robert T. Fenwick, Vice-President 
Hobart Wolf, Jr., Sales Manager 

Services: Infoi-mational motion pictures fm 
industry and government. TV commercials 
and full animation. Complete service in re- 
search, scripts and finished products. Facili- 
ties: Complete sound studio. 35mm equip- 
ment. Animation stand. Complete production 
staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Beltsville Film (NBC) : 



(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



8 T H ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES: 
Maryland: Continued 

MILNER PRODUCTIONS: Cont'd. 

When Xeed Is Xear (Community Chest. Balti- 
more ) : XAPG Stori/ ( National Association of 
Plumbing Contractors) ; Cooking With Savoir 
(U.S. Fish & Wildlife) : The Lion and Albert, 
self sponsored. Filmed TV Program: Johns 
Hopkins TV Series (Johns Hopkins University 
and Ford Foundation). 

MONUMENTAL FILMS & 
RECORDINGS, INC. 

2203 Maryland Ave., Baltimore 18, Maryland 
Phone: CHesapeake 3-2549 
Date of Organization: 1950 

John D. A'Herns, President & General 

Manager 
Max Brecher, Vice-President & Technical 

Director 
C. Wilbur Taylor, Supervisor Sound Dept. 
William Muth, Director of Public Relations 
Thomas Hook, Executive Producer 
Edouard Hilbert, Animation Director 

Services: Motion pictures, slidefilms and radio 
transcriptions for advertising, public relations, 
training and television. Facilities: 2 sound 
stages, 35mm BNC Mitchell, 3 Arriflex and 
Bell & Howell cameras, 1200 ft. 16mm Auri- 
cons. Cine Specials, dollies, blimps, script 
prompter, etc. : complete stage and location 
lighting; art department, animation stand; 
separate recording studio complete with inter- 
lock projection and 16mm magnetic tape, Vi" 
Ampex and Presto tape machines. Western 
Electric eight channel mixer, music library, 
etc.; complete Kinescope picture and sound 
facilities including off the air monitor; com- 
plete cutting rooms equipped with 16mm and 
35mm Moviolas and hot splicers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures; Canal Dredge (Ellicott 
Machine Co.) ; Harwood Hills (Reynolds Metal 
Co.) ; Civil Defense Report (Baltimore 
County) ; Point of Contact (Montgomery In- 
dustrial Park); Education for Survival 
(Prince Georges County, Maryland); Come, 
to Jamaica (Reynolds Mining Ltd.) ; Rehabili- 
tation Thru Work (Dept of Correction). 
Slidefilm: Pacesetters 1957 (Black & Decker 
Mfg. Co.). TV Commercials: Esskay Meats 
( Vansant Dugdale Adv. ) ; National Brewing 
Company, Phillips Packing Company (W. B. 
Doner & Co. ) ; Gunther Brewing Company 
(Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayliss ) ; Owens 
Yacht Company (S. A. Levyne Company). 

STARK-FILMS 

537 N. Howard Street, Baltimore 1, Md. 
Phone; LE. 9-3391 

Date of Organization: 1920 

Milton Stark, President 

Rose S. Stai-k, Secretary 

Casper Falkenhan, Production Mgr. 

Harold Elkin, Purchasing, Personnel Mgr. 
Services: Produce 16mm color, b&w silent and 
sound films. Sound, silent color slidefilms. 
Facilities; Small studio; complete 16mm 
camera and production equipment; cover 
Eastern U.S. region. Unused selection stock 



footage U.S. Naval Academy. Washington, 
D.C., Baltimore. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: IndokUm (University of 
Maryland); We Build A Temple (,Har Sinai 
Congregation ) ; Wash in g ton- International 
(Laurel Race Course); Working Together 
(Maryland Port Authority); Memories That 
Will Lire Forever (Camp Louise, Cascade, 
Md.]. 



New Jersey 

FIORE FILMS 

128 Mallory Avenue, Jersey City 4, N.J. 
Phone; HEnderson 2-4474 

Date of Organization; 1951 

Branch: Room 1103, 332 West 52nd St., 
New York, N.Y. William Kohler, Exec- 
utive in charge. 

M. A. Fiore, Sr., Executive Director 
Al Fiore, Production 
Will Kohler, Photography & Sound 
Kay Kafouros, Distribution 

Services: 16 and 35mm educational and doc- 
umentary, public service films, black and 
white or color, for industry, television, pub- 
lic relations, religious and civic organizations. 
Sound slidefilms; animation; television com- 
mercials. Facilities: Complete 16 and 35- 
mm filming equipment, including 70' x 110' 
sound stage. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Adventures of Johnny 
Glove (Riegel Textile Corporation) ; Tex An- 
toine's Chalk Talk (Standard Motors, Inc.); 
Chasing Chills (E. I. du Pont de Nemours Co. 
Inc.) ; Typewriter Techniques (Lane & Young, 
Inc.) ; Vigo Ham Cookbook (Can Meat Cor- 
poration). 

ON FILM, INC. 

33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, N.J. 
Phone: WAlnut 1-7800 

Date of Organization : 1951 

Branches: 10 East 49th Street, New York 
City. Phone: PLaza 9-2330. Malcolm 
Scott, Manager. 101 Investment Building, 
Pittsburgh 22. Phone: COurt 1-0121. 
John Thompson, Manager. 

Robert Bell, President 
Frederick Johnston, Jr., Treasurer 
Tracy Ward, Executive Producer 
Malcolm Scott, Director of Sales, East 
John Thompson, Director of Sales, Midwest 
Alfred Califano, Production Coordinator 
Mary Fairley, Assistan,t Production 

Coordinator 
Gustave Eisenmann, Associate Producer 
Joseph Cole, Writer-Director 
Mel London, Writer-Director 
Carlo Arcamone, Supervising Editor 
Yngvar Haslestad, Director of Distribution 
Services: Creation, production and distribu- 
tion of motion pictures, sound slidefilms and 
TV commercials for industry, government, 
agriculture and television. Public relations, 
sales promotion, special purpose, merchandis- 
ing, medical and training films. Facilities: 
16mm and 35mm cameras, 5500 sq. ft. sound 
stage, animation stand and camera, magnetic 



recorders, art department, staff writers, direc- 
tors, editors and artists. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures; Conversation Crossroads 
( American Telephone & Telegraph Company ) ; 
In the Suburbs ( Redbook Magazine); Com- 
municative (Newsweek Magazine); The Re- 
laxed Wife (Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc.) ; This Is 
Micarta { Westinghouse Electric Corporation ) . 
TV Commercials; For RCA Victor (Grey 
Advertising Agency, Inc.); Instant Sanka 
Coffee (Young & Rubicam, Inc.). 



STAR INFORMATIONAL FILMS 

240 West Front Street, Plainfield, N.J. 
Phone: Plainfield 5-8343 

Date of Organization: 1955 

Arthur Krienke, Owner and Exec. Prod. 
Services ; Industrial, sales and scientific films 
from script to screen. Facilities; 16mm 
Mitchell and Cine Special cameras; stop mo- 
tion, time-lapse equipment; special camera 
stands, tape and synchronous magnetic re- 
corders; title, special effects stand; synchro- 
nous and interlock projection; editing facili- 
ties; lighting equipment; special effects shop. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Corraling Shipping Fever; 
Healthy Hens, Healthy Profits; Pfizer. RFD; 
Careers in Agriculture (Chas. Pfizer & Co., 
Inc.) ; Atlas 1958 Point of Sale Program 
(Commercial Photo Co.) ; The Garden Ceme- 
tary (Lake Nelson Memorial Park) ; Bill Botch 
(Worthington Corp.). 

Pennsylvania 
AMERICAN FILM COMPANY 

1329 Vine Street, Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 
Phone: WA 2-1800 & 1801 

Date of Organization: 1940 

Ben Harris, President 
Irma Weyhmiller, Secretary 

Services; Public relations, industrial, medical 
and other subjects made through individual 
requests by organizations. Selling, advertis- 
ing, booking, shipping, inspection, and storage 
of every kind of film plus exhibition. Facili- 
ties : No data provided. 

RRCENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Untitled films for Metro- 
politan Life Insurance Company; Water and 
Highway Department of Pennsylvania; As- 
sociated Hospital Service, Pennsylvania; 
American Red Cross; Republican Administra- 
tion of Philadelphia. (Incomplete). 

Colmes-Werrenrath Productions, Inc. 

Penn Sheraton Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Phone: GRant 1-3696 

George Held, Manager. 

( See complete listing under Chicago area) 



W this symbol, appearing over a 
producer's listing, indicates that display adver- 
tising containing additional reference data ap- 
pears in other pages of this 8th Annual Pro- 
duction Review Issue of 1958. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



1 DeFRENES COMPANY 

I 1909 Biittonwood Street, Philadelphia 30, 

I Pennsylvania 

I Phone: RIttenhouse 6-1686 

! Date of Organization: 1916 

1 Joseph DeFrenes, President, Treasurer 

': Richard DeFrenes, Seeretary 

i Francis Heininger, Writer-Director 

[ Michael Levanios, Writer-Director 

I Lee David, Writer-Director 

\ Henry McKee, Artist 

Darwood Taylor, Artist 
' Charles Williams, Artiiit 
' Peter Montefusco, Cameraman 

Robert Smith, Cameraman 
i Joseph Leier, Cameraman 

Frank Pugliese, Cameraman 

James Fabio, Cameraman 

Paul Litecky, Sound Engineer 

Irwin Gordon, Sound Eyigineer 
Services: Complete motion picture and slide 
film production from script to finished film. 
Specialists in the production of motivation, 
TV and training films for business, associa- 
tions and government agencies. 27 full time 
staff employees. Facilities: 2 completely 
equipped sound stages and complete location 
equipment for 16mm and .35mm color or B&W 
production; art department; animation de- 
partment with 3 animation stands; special 
effects department; five 35mm magnetic or 
optical RCA sound channels; lighting equip- 
ment available for rental; music library; film 
storage vault ; carpenter shop. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Ice Cream, An American 
Tradition (Abbott's Dairies) ; Grinding 
Wheels and Their Application (Simonds Abra- 
sive Company) ; Meat Progress Through Qual- 
ity Achievement (Eskay Meats) ; Safety at 
the Crossroads (Reading Railroad) ; Ground 
Guidance Computer (Burrough's Corpora- 
tion); Brainpower for Airpower (General 
Electric Company) ; Cryptorchidism (E. R. 
Squibb & Sons); What Christ Means to Me 
(Evangelical Foundation); One Man Opera- 
tion of Two Reading lOO's (Reading Textile 
Machine); Naval Officer Candidate School 
(U.S. Navy) ; Missile Master (Glen L. Martin 
Company) ; Air Proving Ground (U.S. Air 
Force). TV Commercials: For Atlantic Re- 
fining Company (N. W. Ayer & Sons) ; Wil- 
berfs Fresh Pine, Buten's Paints Company, 
Figure Builder Girdles (Philip Klein Agen- 
cy) ; Margo Wines (Bauer & Tripp). 

NEIL HARVEY PRODUCTIONS 

Suite 1118-20-22 Broad Locust Building 
Philadelphia 2, Pennsylvania 
Phone: KIngsley 6-0123 

Date of Organization 1953 

Neil Harvev, Owner, Executive Producer, 

Sales 
Lloyd N. Newman, Director of Operatioyis 
George Grossman, Production Manager 
Sidney G. Hantman, Story, Direction, 

Editing Dept. 
Adelphia Associated, Promotion & Public 

Relations Council 

Services: Create documentary films from 
initial idea to finished product; industrial, 
sales, public-relations, fund-raising films, 
Sound track production. Television spots. 
Narration service. Facilities: 3 fully 
equipped sound stages, lighting equipment. 



blimped Arriflex 35, Auricon 1200, Auricon 
Pro 200, Cine-Special, Auricon 1200 Sound- 
On-Film, Stancil-Hoffman 16mm magnetic 
recorder, Magnecorder V4" tape synchronous 
recorder, Magnesync Dubbers, Telefunken 
WE 639 A, Altec Lipstick mikes; mike booms; 
editing rooms; B & H hot splicers, Moviola 
synchronizer, Editola editing machine; inter- 
lock projection. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Daddy, I Love You, Fight 
for Life (Deborah Sanatorium & Hospital, 
Browns Mills, N. J.) ; Time Out for a Hobby 
(Hobby Industry Association of America) ; 
The Allied Tank Story (Allied Tank Truck 
Company); Sunday in Philadelphia (Commit- 
tee Against Sunday Sales) ; Tliis Is The Eden 
(The Eden Summer Camp, Winterdale, Pa.). 
TV Films: Can-Can Campaign (Deborah San- 
atorium & Hospital) ; series for fall campaign 
(National Cystic Fibrosis Foundation). Sound 
Track Production for Binder Cooperage Com- 
pany. 



MODE-ART PICTURES, INC. 

1022 Forbes Street, Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 
Phone: EXpress 1-1846 

Date of Organization : 1938 

James L. Baker, President 

Robert L. Stone, Executive Vice-President 

H. John Kemerer, Vice-President 

Florence E. Baker, Secretar-y & Treasurer 

Louis Sisk, Editorial 

August A. Borgen, Recordist 

Services: 16mm and 35 mm educational, pub- 
lic relations, sales promotion and TV produc- 
tion. Facilities: 16mm and 35mm optical and 
Va,", 35mm magnetic recording and projection, 
complete editorial, camera, lighting and mo- 
bile equipment including 1800 Amp. genera- 
tors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Automation Comes to Coal 
(Joy Manufacturing Company) ; The Constant 
Quest (Gulf Oil Corporation); Futures in 
Steel (Bethlehem Steel Company) ; Piggy Goes 
to Market (Aluminum Cooking Utensil Com- 
pany) . Slidefilm : Portrait of a Perfect 
Marriage (Aluminum Cooking Utensil Com- 
pany). 



NORTH AMERICAN FILM CORPORATION 

106 E. 10th Street, Erie, Pa. 
Phone: 2-6493 

Date of Organization : 1953 

Don Lick, President & Producer 

Charles R. Bick, Vice-President & Producer 

Don Okel. Production Chief 

Jack Bullock, Cameraman 

John Hartman, Cameraman 

Roland Hall, Laboratory Manager 

Janet Turban, Office Manager 

Services: Complete 35mm and 16mm produc- 
tion service from planning to finished project. 
16mm and 35mm and slidefilms, black and 
white or color. 16mm negative — positive and 
reversal processing. 16mm Kinescope. Facil- 
ities: Two 16mm Auricons. 35mm Bell and 
Howell studio camera, two animation stands 
(35mm and 16mm), complete recording facil- 
ities for lip sync and post recording, editing, 
A & B printing with fades & dissolves, two 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES: 

Pennsylvania: Continued 

Bridgamatic processing machines, script 
writers and artists. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Smooth Landings (Cleve- 
land Pneumatic Tool Company) ; Sales Talks 
(General Electric Company) ; Electronic Rail- 
roading (General Railway Signal Company) ; 
Hopi Indian Ceremonials (M. W. Billingsley 
Organization); Stop the Drip in Seconds 
(Snap-Faucet Inc.); Turret Indexing, Ma- 
chines (Swanson-Erie Inc.) ; Pennsylvania's 
Perfect Playground, new edition (Conneaut 
Lake Park). Slidefilm: The Packaged Air 
Conditioner (General Electric Company) . TV 
Commercials: For General Electric Com- 
pany, Larson Laboratories, Koehler Beer, Ster- 
ling Milk, Mutual Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation, United Oil, Dad's Dog Food, Welch 
Grape Juice and others. 



On Film, inc. 

101 Investment Building, Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 

Phone: COurt 1-0121 

John Thompson, Manager 

(See complete listing under New Jersey area) 

PACKAGED PROGRAMS, INC. 

634 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh 22, Pennsylvania 
Phone: GRant 1-4756 

Date of Organization: 1945 

M. E. Fierst, General Manager 
F. S. Di Fiore, Technical Director 
J. H. Ware, Associate Producer 

Services: Motion picture production in 35mm 
& 16mm B&W and color for theatre, indus- 
try and television ; also processing, printing 
and recording services. Facilities: 35mm 
& 16mm photography; sound recording; 
16mm B&W processing, printing, cutting and 
projection. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Ohio River Pilgrimage 
(Gulf Oil Corp.) ; Estimatics in Action (Vale 
Technical Institute) ; The Boy Inside (Penn- 
sylvania Junior Republic); Building For To- 
morrows (Jesuit Seminary) ; My Heart Goes 
Out (Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh). 



45- 

Frederick K. Rockett Company 

1022 Forbes Street, Pittsburgh 19, Pa. 
Phone: EXpress 1-1846 

(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 

WARREN R. SMITH, INC. 

210 Semple Street, Pittsburgh 13, Pennsyl- 
vania 
Phone: MUseum 3-6300 

Date of Organization : 1952 

Warren R. Smith, President 
J. K. Ross, Vice-President 

(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



!TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES: 



Pennsylvania: Continued 

WARREN R. SMITH: Cont'd. 

J. K. Walker. Trea.sKrcr 
Patricia Taylor, Sales 
John Freeman, Production Manager 
Dale Thompson, Animation Director 
John Zwergel. Laboratory Manager 
Jay B. Gould, Editorial Director 
Services: 35 and 16mm photography and 
animation, 16mm laboratory, all visual aids 
services. Facilities: Sound stages, 35 and 
16mm cameras, editorial and projection fa- 
cilities, Oxberry animation stand, music li- 
braries, 16mm laboratory, radio recording, 
slide and filmstrip art and production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Metals, Mills and Men 
(Pittsburgh Steel); The Secret's in the Cen- 
ter (Westinghousei ; Packages of the Future 
I Alcoa); Hold That Roof! (Ohio Brass Com- 
pany) ; Vacuum Melting ( Universal Cyclops 
Steel) . 



Transfilm Incorporated 

The Carlton House (Room 214), Pittsburgh 

19, Pa. 
Phone: GRant 1-6627 
Ralph Maitland, Man<iger 
(See complete listing in New York City area) 



Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

3 Gateway Center, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Phone: GRant 1-6240 

Quin Short, District Manager 

(See complete listing under Chicago area) 



STUDIO SIXTEEN 

27 Hawthorne Road, Wyomissing Hills, 

Reading, Pa. 
(Mailing addre.ss: Box 1161, Reading Pa.) 
Phone: ORchard 8-7950 

Date of Organization: 1953 

Woodbury Conkling, Partner and Creative 
Supervisor 

Roger A. Clark, Jr., Partner and Technical 
Supervisor 

Gene Dobson, Production Assistant 
Services: Production of 16mm fund-raising, 
industrial, education, public relations motion 
pictures from script to screen. Also produc- 
;ion of 35mm color sound filmstrips. Facili- 
riES: 16mm cameras, synchronous recording, 
ighting and editing equipment for studio or 
ocation work. Sound stage 50' x 100' avail- 
ible. Complete 35mm equipment for film- 
;trips. 

lECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

WOTION Pictures: Crashes for Safety's Sake 
Parish Pressed Steel Div., Dana Corp.) ; 
^he Storij of "V" (United Fund of Berks 
vounty) ; Time Out for Jimmy (localized ver- 
ions for United Foundation of Detroit, 
Jnited Fund of Boston and Philadelphia^ 
:^amde County Community Chest j. Slide- 



films: Shifting Tides of Xewspaper Adver- 
tising (Pittsburgh Post Gazette) ; Department 
Store Presentation (Philadelphia Inquirer 
through Al Paul Lefton, Inc.) 



Virginia 

TANTAMOUNT PICTURES, INC. 

108 N. Jefferson St., Richmond, Virginia 
Phone: Milton 8-5841 

Date of Incorporation: 1954 

Donald T. Martin, President, Treasurer 

Daniel Grice, Vice President 

Alfred S. Traynham, Secretary 

C. L. Gillespie, Assistant Producer 



B. L. Jennings, Production Co-ordinator V 
Services: Complete production service 16mm 
and 35mm; business and industrial films, tele- 
vision commercials and films for television. 
Facilities : Completely equipped sound stage 
size 2,000 square feet; photographic, sound,' 
art, animation, script and production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Lexington and Natural 
Bridge (Natural Bridge Corp. & Lexington 
Chamber of Commerce) ; The Heltzel Story 
(Hetzel Steel Form & Iron Co.) -,2-5 Dialing 
(C & P Telephone Co. of Virginia); High- 
lights of 1956-1957 (Southern States Co-Op- 
erative); Adventures in Engineering (Philip- 
Morris Company). 



SOUTHEASTERN 



STATES 



Florida 
Acorn Films of New England Inc. 

215 N.E. 117th St.. Miami Florida 
Phone: PLaza 4-4330 

George Contouris, in charge of Production 

(See complete listing under Boston area) 



45- 

Bay State Film Productions, Inc. 

707 Nicolet Avenue, Winter Park, Florida 
Phone: Midway 7-3817 

Eugene Bunting, Vice-President, in charge. 

(See complete listing in Boston area) 



FEATURE STORY PRODUCTIONS 

Post Office Building, Clermont, Florida 
Phone: EXeter 4-5511 

Date of Organization: 1955 
Rosemary Young, Owner, Producer 
Calmer Koester, Chief Cameraman 
Joe Sanchez, Scenario 
Lucille Young, Distribution Manager 
Services: Production of color, b&w 16mm 
sound films, also all types of still photography 
and film strips. Sales promotion, training, 
educational, documentaries; travel and public 
relations films. Facilities: Complete equip- 
ment for above including a completely 
equipped darkroom. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures : Florida Products Festival 
(Haines City, Florida, Chamber of Com- 
merce); They Moo for More (Suni-Citrus 
Cattle Feed Co.) ; Port Richey Cruise-A-Cade 
(Port Paradise Hotel, Crystal River, Florida) ; 
Salute To All States ( Clermont, Florida, Cham- 
ber of Commerce). 



RAINBOW PICTURES, INC. 

5711 S. Dixie Highway, S. Miami 43, Florida 

Phone: MOhawk 5-3524 

Date of Organization : 1948 

Walter Resce, President 

Ruth B. Resce, Sec.-Treas., Scripts 

Frank Brodock, General Sales Manager 

Willard Jones, Production Chief 

Oscar Barber, Editing and Direction 

Charles S. Rock, Account Supervisor 



Services: 35mm, 16mm production of indus- 
trial, educational and television films. Writing, 
editing and supervision. Complete 35mm and 
16mm color, b&w animation. Facilities- 
35mm BNC Mitchell, 35mm NC Mitchell. 
16mm Mitchell. 35mm Arriflex, 35mm RCA 
magnetic sound; 16mm magnetic sound. Two 
air-conditioned studios; complete 16 and 
35mm editing services with double picture and 
double track head Moviolas, both 16mm & 
35mm animation. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: 1957 Florida Derby (Gulf- 
stream Race Track); Who's Handicapped 
(U. S. Air Force) ; Royal Castle; National Air- 
lines (Southern Advertising Agency) ; Life's 
Secrets (Dr. John Lee Baughman). 



Producers Film Studios 
(Jack Lieb Productions) 

10281 E. Bay Harbor Drive, Miami Beach 

54, Florida. 
Phone: UNion 6-3009 

(See complete listing under Chicago area) 



SOUNDAC PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

2133 N.W. 11th Avenue, Miami 37, Florida 
Phone: FR 4-2655 

Date of Organization: 1951 

Robert D. Buchanan, President, Gen. Mgr. 
Jack Schleh, Jr., Production Manager 
Robert G. Biddlecom, Technical Director 
Francis J. Noack, Art Director 

Services: 16mm motion pictures for business, 
industry, television. Complete sound record- 
ing. Syndicated programs and features for 
television. Complete animation service. Fa- 
cilities: 16mm motion picture and sound re- 
cording equipment; sound stage; editing facil- 
ities; complete animation facilities; two ani- 
mation cameras. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: A Dozen and One, North- 
ern; A Dozen and One, Southern (F. S. Roys- 
ter Guano Co.) ; The Earth From Outer Space; 
Scratch and the Sputnick; The Prehistoric 
Present; and others (Richard H. Ullman, 
Inc.). TV Commercials: for Good & Plenty 
Candy (Bauer & Tripp, Inc.); General Elec- 
tric (Brown Agencies, Puerto Rico) ; L & M 
Cigarettes (West Indies Advertising); Pan 
American Airlines (J. Walter Thompson) ; 



I 



128 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Ideal Bread (Wm. F. Finn & Assoc.) ; Stop & 
Shop Super Markets (Arnold & Company); 
National Brotherhood Week (RKO Telepic- 
tures, Inc.). 



Van Praag Productions, Inc. 

3143 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coi-al Cables, Fla. 
Phone: Highland 4-3191; TWX MM-494 

Harry Walsh, Vice-President 

(See complete listing in New York City area) 

WORLD ACQUAINTANCE FILMS 

6118 S.W. 61st Street, South Miami, Florida 
Phone: MO 7-8207 

Date of Organization: 1953 

Arlene vonZimmerman, Oumer, President, 

Executive Producer 
Robert vonZimmerman, Vice-President, 

Charge of Production 
Jean M. McKinney, Production Assistant 

Services: Travelogue specialists for steam- 
ship, airlines, foreign governments and muni- 
cipalities. Intimate working knowledge of 23 
countries and possessions. Cultural films of 
classic and artistic value. Facilities: 16mm 
color and sound. New York affiliate with ex- 
tensive editing, music library and recording 
facilities. Art staff prepares color story- 
boards for approval before shooting. Guaran- 
teed distribution to 300 TV stations. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Adventure in the Sun 
(West Palm Beach Chamber Commerce) ; 
Highway to Cuba (West India Fruit & Steam- 
ship Company) ; Ail-American Family (H. C. 
Slaughter Company); Cuban Holiday (Cuban 
Tourist Commission) ; Land of Eternal Spring 
(Guatemalan Tourist Bureau). 



WURTELE FILM PRODUCTIONS 

2302 Diversified Way, Orlando, Florida 
P. 0. Box 504, mailing addi-ess 
Phone: GArden 2-9755 

Date of Organization : 1938 

Harold S. Wurtele, Oumer, Executive Prod. 
Elizabeth G. Wurtele, Production Assistant 
M. A. McDaniels, Jr., Production Assistant 
Wynk Boulware, Art Department 

Services: Producers of 16mm sound motion 
I pictures — black and white and color — Com- 
' mercial, educational, industrial, institutional, 
I promotional and television. Facilities : Sound 
i .stage, screening room, editing room, camera 
I truck. Equipment: Auricon-Pro sound cam- 
j era; Maurer professional camera; Cine Kodak 
I special cameras ; Filmo-70 cameras ; Maurer 
] 16mm recording system: magnetic film and 
I tape recorders; location lighting equipment, 

etc. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Annual Outboard Regatta 
I (Sanford Boat and Ski Club) ; Bowling Alleys 
\ (United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
I ers of America); Football Highlights 1957 
I (University of Tampa) ; Homes for the Dis- 
[ criminating (Flint Engineering, Inc.); An 

Invitation to Winter Park (Chamber of Com- 
I merce ) . 



Georgia 



4€- 



Jamieson Film Company 

936 West Peachtree Street, N.W. 
Atlanta 9, Georgia. 
Phone: TRinity 4-6625 

Chester D. Gleason, Manager 

(See complete listing under Dallas, Texas) 



Teiepix Corporation 

Whitson, Murry & Associates, 

35th & Abercorn, Savannah, Georgia 

Owen J. Murry and Vin Whitson, Represen- 
tatives 

(See complete listing in Los Angeles area) 



INTERNATIONAL SOUND FILMS, INC. 

26 E. Andrews Dr., N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 
Phone: CEdar 7-0844 

Date of Incorporation : August, 1952 

George M. Kirkland, President, Treasurer, 

Exec. Producer 
Evelyn E. Kirkland, Vice-President 
Hubert A. Janicek, Secretary 
Don Nixon, Research & Script Dept. 
W. Brockford Gordon, Vice-President, Pro- 
duction 
Ernest L. Kirkland, Sound Engineer 
Sally Haimsohn, Office Manager 
Jayne Lumpkin, Manager Birmingham 

Office 
George Enloe, Composer & Musical Director 

Services : Production of 16mm color, b&w mo- 
tion pictures; industrial, geographic, sales 
training, educational, documentary and TV 
films. Creative script department with re- 
search facilities, studio or location work. Re- 
cording and dubbing service for 16mm and 
35mm. Facilities: Film production facili- 
ties and equipment, field and studio camera 
ci'ews, sound track personnel, sound studio 
and fully equipped air conditioned sound stage, 
music libraries, editing rooms, screening and 
conference room, carpenter shop, location 
trucks and portable lighting equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Land of flie Cherokee 
( Georgia Dept. of Commerce ) ; Valley of 
Promise (Coosa- Alabama River Improvement 
Assoc. Inc.) ; Alabama, Land of Industrial Op- 
portunity, Recreation Unlimited (Alabama In- 
dustrial Development Board) ; Birmingham — 
Youngest of the World's Great Cities (City of 
Birmingham) ; The Fabrication and Distribu- 
tion of Steel (O'Neal Steel, Inc.) ; East 
Point's 70th Birthday (East Point, Georgia 
Chamber of Commerce) ; Profit of a City, 
Gateway to the Smokies (Knoxville, Tennes- 
see Chamber of Commerce) ; City of Oppor- 
tunity (San Antonio, Texas, Chamber of Com- 
merce) ; Poultry Production in the South, 
Dairying in Dixie (Security Mills, Inc.) ; The 
Magnolia State (Mississippi Agricultural & 
Industrial Board) ; The Dynamic Triangle — 
North Kansas City, Mo. (North Kansas City, 
Mo., Chamber of Commerce). TV Commer- 
cials: For Republic Steel Corporation, Gads- 
den, Alabama. 



SOUTHEASTERN STATES 



FRANK WILLARD PRODUCTIONS 

3223-B Cain's Hill Place, N.W., Atlanta. 

Georgia 
Phone: CEdar 7-2970 

Date of Organization : 1952 

Frank Willard, Owner 

Charlie R. Cannon, Production Manager 

Lamar Tutwiler, Editor 

Sam Cravitz, Sound Engineer 

Facilities: 16mm edge track magnetic re- 
cording, 1/4" Ampex tape recording, eleven 
channel sound, center or edge track dubbing; 
sound stage and lighting equipment; editing 
rooms; projector interlock for post dubbing; 
underwater 16mm camera; location equipment 
wild or sync sound. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Ever Since Oglethorpe 
(Georgia State Dept. of Commerce) ; This Is 
Delta (Delta Air Lines) ; It All Adds Up 
(Southern Bell Telephone Co.) ; The Big Pay- 
off (Colonial Stores) ; The Face of the South 
(Board of Christian Education, Presbyterian 
Church in USA). 



Kentucky 

KENT LANE FILMS, INC. 

1253 So. Third St., Louisville 3, Kentucky 
Phone: Melrose 6-3911 

Date of Organization : 1947 

Kent Lane, President & Producer 
Dorothy Ellenberg, Production Manager 
Tom Mulvey, Assistant Producer 
Hugh K. Miller, Director, Still Photography 
Eric Wehder, Jr., Art Director 

Services: Merchandising, sales promotion, 
public relations and training films. Television 
commercials, slidefilms, still illustrations, edi- 
torial service and story boards. Facilities: 
Sound stage, recording studio, art and anima- 
tion department, editing rooms, interlock mag- 
netic film recording and playback, 35mm and 
16mm cameras, dolly, all necessary equipment 
for studio or location film production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Do You Know; Clean Up 
(City of Louisville) ; Duchess Paints the Toivn 
(Devoe & Reynolds) ; Dust Control (American 
Air Filter); Training film (Kex National 
Service) . 



Louisiana 
COMMERCE PICTURES 

525 Poudras Street, New Orleans, La. 

Phone: MA 5026 

Date of Incorporation: 1941 

Robert Wiegand, President 
Services: Motion picture production for 
theatre, industry, education and television. 
Facilities: 35mm and 16mm studios; lab- 
oratories; film vaults; art and title depart- 
ment; camera crew and lights for production 
on location; theatre distribution. 



(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



129 



I 



SOUTHEASTERN STATES: 



Louisiana: Continued 

COMMERCE PICTURES: Cont'd. 
RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Automatic Voting Ma- 
chine, Schoup Voting Machine ( State of Louisi- 
ana) ; The Symbol of Service, The Symbol of 
Quality (Rountree Olds — Cadillac Promotions 
Inc.) ; Boyce Boats ( Boyce Marine Supplies) ; 
Autocrat Chef ( Autocrat Foods — Arthur Ad- 
vertising) ; Chinito Rice (Aubrey Williams 
Advertising Inc.); World Sew-Vac Stores 
(A. M. Simcock Agency). 



PAN-AMERICAN FILMS 

735 Poydras Street, New Orleans 
Phone: J A 5-4895 

Date of Organization: 1950 

Frank Richard, Partner, Management 
John M. LeBlanc, Partner, Production Man- 
ager 
Walter Rivet, Chief Photographer 
Joseph LeBaron, Chief Editor 
William Delgado, Manager. Film Processing 

Services: Production of motion pictures, 
documentary, industrial, educational. Editor- 
ial services, recording and dubbing facilities. 
Cutting & projection rooms. Complete 16mm 
laboratory services negative-positive or re- 
versal. Facilities: for the above listed serv- 
ices; not itemized. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Closed Door Opens. An 
Investment in Futu7-es (Department of Wel- 
fare, State of Louisiana) ; One in Five 
(United Fund, New Orleans) ; Operation Co- 
operation (American & Foreign Power Co. 
Inc.) ; 23rd Annual Sports Calendar (New 
Orleans Mid-Winter Sports Association). 



Tennessee 

CONTINENTAL FILM 

PRODUCTIONS CORP. 

539 Vine Street, Chattanooga, Tennessee 
Phone: AMherst 7-4302 

Date of Incorporation : 1953 

James E. Webster, Pres. & Exec. Producer 

Gene A. Carr, Vice-Pres. & Exec. Director 

H. L. Thatcher, Treasurer 

Thomas Crutchfield, Secretary 

Harold M. Walker, Dir. Art & Animation 

Services: 16 and 35mm color and black and 
white, live and animated motion pictures; 
sound slidefilms : and industrial sales, sales 
and personnel training, documentary, public 
relations, medical, educational, and TV films. 
Producers also of FilmoRama productions 
(16mm version of Cinemascope), color stills 
for display, and Stereo presentations. Facili- 
ties: Production facilities, including 16 and 
35mm cameras, sound stage and recording 
rooms, mobile location unit, synchronous re- 
corders, single system cameras, FilmoRama 
lenses, over 125,000 watts of lighting equip- 
ment, and complete art and animation depart- 
ment with Oxberry animation stand. Perma- 
nent creative staff — writers, directors, 
cameramen, editors, artists, sound engineers, 
and musical director. 



RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Progress Report 1957 
( Bowaters Southern Paper Corp. ) ; Change of 
Pace (Fontana Village, N. C.j ; Slidefilms: 
Superspun Story (Combustion Engineering, 
Inc.); Operation Giant Step (Mead Johnson 
Company — Pablum Products) ; There IS a Dif- 
ference ( General Electric Company ) ; TV 
Commercials: For Hesmer Foods, American 
National Bank & Trust Company, Lay Meat 
Products, Spra-Kill, Fleetwood Coffee, White 
Lily Flour. 



^ 



FOTOVOX, INC. 

1447 Union Avenue, Memphis 4, Tenn. 
Phone: BRoadway 5-3192 

Date of Organization: 1951 
Date of Incorporation : 1955 

Elston Leonard, Jr., President 
Peter Harkins, Vice-President 
F. M. Leonard, Secretary, Treasurer 

Services: Research, scripting and production 
of motion pictures, slidefilms and special pre- 
sentations for business and industry; adver- 
tising, public relations, education, religion, 
training and entertainment. Television com- 
mercials and series productions. Studio or 
location. Animation, live-action, documentary. 
Sub-contracting for other producers. Foi'eign 
production crew. FACILITIES : Drive-in sound 
stage 50 x 75, second stage 18 x 30; theater 
with projection room equipped for intei'lock 
screening; standing sets and scene dock; prop 
room; construction shop; talent file; art and 
animation department; 4 editing rooms. Mo- 
viola equipped; 5 magnetic channels and 
mixer, Stancil-Hoffman recorder and dum- 
mies; portable sync recorder; limiter ampli- 
fier, equalizers; sound effects library and 4 
music libraries; Mitchell, Auricon and Cine 
Special camera equipment; multicam remote 
control; hydraulic Crab dolly; Telefunken and 
EV microphones; Mole-Richardson mike boom 



and perambulator; M-R and McAlister light-| 
ing equipment; grip equipment and sun re- 
flectors; small background projection screen; 
still equipment, 35mm, 2^4 x 214. 4x5 and 
8 X 10. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Little Rock Case 
(Southwestern Bell Telephone Company); 
Little Man in the Black Suit, One Vote Worth 
Millions, This Land Is Ours, A Trojan Horse 
(Campaign for the 48 States). TV Commer- 
cials : for Freeman-Kat's engine heater. Five 
Star Manufacturing Company, Birmingham 
Paper Company (Keegan Advertising Agen- 
cy) ; Shainberg's Black & White Stores, Union 
Planters National Bank (Lake, Spiro, Sher- 
man, Inc.); Blue Cross, Blue Shield (Frank 
Wills Company) ; TV Super Log. 



SAM ORLEANS PRODUCTIONS 

211 W. Cumberland Ave., Knoxville 15, 

Tenn. 
Phones: 3-8098 and 7-6742 
Branch: 550 Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C., N.Y. 
Phone: ENright 9-2002. Editorial De- 
partment: Pathe Bldg., 105 E. 106th St., 
N.Y.C., N.Y. 
Date of Incorporation : 1946 
Sam P. Orleans, Executive Producer 
Lawrence Mollot, Associate Producer 
Services: Public relations, training, surgical 
and medical films; television films; slidefilms, 
documentary films. Producer of TV series: 
Rural America Review. FACILITIES: Studios, 
production equipment; cutting rooms (New 
York and Knoxville) ; portable synchronous 
tape recorder. Projection and recording room. 
Transportation equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: This Is T.V.A. (Tennessee 
Valley Authority); Deep Sea Survival (U.S. 
Air Force) ; Radiac Equipment, Nos. 1 and 2 
(U.S. Navy); To Keep Them Well (National 
Health Council) ; Common Heritage (Tennes- 
see State Librarv & Ai-chives). 



EAST CENTRAL STATES 



Indiana 

Alien, Gordon, Schroeppel & Redlich, Inc. 

1835 South Calhoun, Fort Wayne, Indiana 
Robert G. Cecka, Vice President 
(See complete listing in Chicago area) 

FRINK FILM STUDIO 

1414 Thornton Street, Elkhart, Indiana 

Phone: 3-0503 

Date of Organization: 1950 

Maurice Frink, Jr., Owner 
Services: Sound motion pictures and film- 
strips, color and b&w; TV commercials. Fa- 
cilities: Sound stage, animation, 16mm cam- 
eras; double-system magnetic sound recording; 
magnetic film and tape; dubbing, mixing, ed- 
iting; script writing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Striking Facts About 
Lightening (Independent Protection Co.); 
Yours Is the Hand That Helps (United Fund, 
Elkhart County) ; Color Clues for Better Liv- 
ing, 1957 revision (O'Brien Paint Co.) ; The 
Inside Story, 1957 revision (Stewart Coach 



Co.). Slidefilms: Speedclene (Bendix Prod- 
ucts Div., Bendix Aviation) ; 1957 Instrument 
Line ( C. G. Conn) ; Bendix Power Brake avd 
Carburetor (Bendix); and for Penn Controls. 
TV Commercials: Shurfine Foods, Zephyr 
Gasoline ( Norman Navan Advertising Agen- 
cy). Television Slides: series for MacDon- 
ald Cook Advertising Agency. 

GALBREATH PICTURES, INC. 

2905 Fairfield Avenue, Fort Wayne, Indiana 

Phone: Harrison 4147 

Date of Organization : 1942 

Branch: 141 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4. 

Phone : HArrison 7-7447. Clyde L. Krebs, 

Jr., Manager 
Richard E. Galbreath, President 
Clyde L. Krebs, Jr., Vice-President 
E. W. Gaughan, Executive Vice-President 
John D. Shoaff, Secretary-Treasurer 
Guy Fitzsimmons, Production Manager 
Claude Cole, Photographic Director 
Allen C. Moore, Mgr., Recording Dept. 
Wallace Swander, Set, Carpenter Dept. 

[LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




"When brightness range is extreme 



and good color quality is a must, there's only one film that really 
knowledgeable cinematographers turn to. It's 16mm Anscochrome 
Professional Camera Film Type 242. This new and exciting emulsion 
was specifically designed to produce low contrast color positives 
with the ultimate in print-through characteristics. 

Actually, tests have proven that pictures shot on Type 242 
(indoors or out) and printed on Ansco Type 238 Color Duplicating 
film have superior color rendition in reds and fiesh tones, exhibit- 
ing overall quality that is the finest ever attained on a multilas er 
color emulsion. 

Test it. You will see the difference where it counts ... in the 
screen image! Ansco, Binghamton, New York. A Division of 
General Aniline and Film Corp. 



TECHNICAL 


DATA 




Anscochrome Professional Camera | 




Film Type 


242 




EXPOSURE INDEX 10 3200K tun 


gsten illu- 


mination. 8 


daylight w 


th 83 filte 


r. 


FILTER RECOMMENDATIONS 




Light source 


Filter for light Filter 


(or camera 


3200K 


none 




none 


Photoflood Ion 


nps none 




81A 


■•CP" lamps 








(3350K) 


none 




8IA 


Carbon Arcs 


Brigho 


I) Y-1 


83 


M.R. TYPE 40 








40AmpereDuArc Florent 


ne 


83 




Gloss 






Daylight 


None 




83 


AVAILABILITY I6mm x 


100, 200 


400 and 


1200 foot 1 


engths 







Ans^ 



Type 21A 



3TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



EAST CENTRAL: INDIANA 



GALBREATH PICTURES: Cont'd. 

Services: Public relations, sales, industrial 
and training motion pictures; sound slide- 
films; still illustrations; custom and pack- 
age television programs and commercials, ani- 
mations. Facilities: Mitchell cameras (.35 
and 16mm) and 200,000 watt lighting equip- 
ment, synchronous sound and RCA re-record- 
ing equipment; sound stages; laboratory; 
printing; editing and projection rooms; music 
library; carpenter shop; permanent creative 
staff; animation camera and stand: locatioi^ 
equipment caravan, including 50,000 watt 
Diesel generator. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Homen for a Growhuj 
America (National Homes Corporation); 
Marvelous Milk ( National Dairy Council ) ; 
Everybody Knows ( Borg-Warner ) ; Return to 
Elegance (Dunbar Furniture Corporation); 
Apples for the Teacher, revision (Phillips 
Petroleum Corporation ) . 



Metropolitan Detroit Area 

FLOREZ INCORPORATED 

815 Bates Street, Detroit 26, Michigan 
Phone : WOodward 2-4920 
Sound Studio: 25305 John R Road, Madison 
Heights 

Date of Organization: 1931 

Genaro A. Florez, President, Cliainnan. of 

the Board 
Paul A. Kelcourse, Treasurer, General Mgr. 
Hans A. Erne, Vice-Pres., Secretary 
J. Raymond Cooper, Vice-Prcs., Prod. Mgr. 
.John H. Kleene, Vice-Pres., Creative Dir. 
Robert W. Keller, Editorial Manager 
Thomas E. Smith, Business Manager 
Clark E. Pardee, .Jr., Coordinator, Client 

Services 
Harry R. Roehrig, Manager, Visual Presen- 
tation Div. 
Herbert E. Ihrig, Staff Consultant, 

Manpower Development 
Ernest D. Nathan, Staff Consultant, 

Program Planning 
Clark E. Broderick, Ray M. Belding, .John 

N. Kirkwood, B. H. Priehs, .Account E.vec- 

utives 

Services: Complete sales training organiza- 
tion, staffed to analyze training, manpower 
development problems; consultation, planning 
service, creating, producing programs to fit 
needs. Plan, write, visualize and produce 
meetings, conferences; specialized staff guid- 
ance for conference leadership, presentation 
techniques. Create and produce presentations 
from desktop visuals to national conventions 
using live talent, closed-circuit TV, motion 
pictures, .sound slidefilms, Cellomatic projec- 
tion, manuals, printed materials. Plan and 
produce Video-graph (flannelboard ) presenta- 
tions, Vu-Graph (overhead projection) ; Cello- 
matic front, rear-projection programs. Fran- 
chised suppliers of Cellomatic equipment, 
trained projectionists (Michigan & Ohio). 



Stock and supply Videograph equipment, ac- 
cessories. Facilities: Six-story main building, 
equipped and staffed for: research, planning, 
writing, editing, all media; layout, art, illus- 
tration, technical rendering; motion picture 
photography, 16mm or 35mm, sound or silent 
black-and-white or color; still photography, 
glamour shots, selling scenes, technical illus- 
trations, exploded views; photographic labora- 
tories, developing, printing, enlarging, copy- 
ing, color duping and processing. Preparation 
and production of transparencies and special 
effects for Cellomatic and overhead projection; 
Ozalid reproduction, slidefilm animation; ar- 
rangements for typesetting, letterpress print- 
ing, offset lithography, silk screening, gra- 
vure; film titles. Madison Heights sound 
studio, 4000 sq. ft. completely equipped. Mit- 
chell camera equipment. Reeves magnetic 
sync sound. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Meet the E.rperts (AC 
Spark Plug Division, General Motors Corpora- 
tion ) ; The Power of Participation (Sinclair 
Refining Company) ; Your Caddie, Sir (West- 
ern Gold Association). Slidefilms: The Best 
of Both (American Motors Corporation ) ; The 
Priceless Ingredient (Cadillac Motor Car Divi- 
sion, General Motors) ; A Call Is What You 
Make It (Detroit Controls Corporation); The 
Best Seat in the Hou.se (C. F. Church Division, 
American-Standard) ; Fundamentals of Lubri- 
cation (Sinclair Refining Company). 



FILM ASSOCIATES OF MICHIGAN, INC. 

4815 Cabot Avenue, Detroit 10, Michigan 
Phone: LUzon 2-6200 

Date of Organization : 1947 

W. B. Chase, President & Treasurer 
Paul H. Croll, Secretary 
Robert L. Crawford, Production Manager 
Grover F. Seyfried, Production Manager 

Services: Producers of motion pictures and 
slidefilms for public relations, sales promotion, 
industrial training and special purposes. Also 
available: production planning, supervision or 
film counseling. Facilities: Acoustically- 
treated studio; cutting rooms, Maurer and 
Auricon cameras ; Reevesound recorders and 
dubbers; complete vehicle-mounted location 
facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Styrofoam Low Temper- 
ature Movie, Penta (Dow Chemical Com- 
pany); Reducing Windshield Worries (Shat- 
terproof Glass Corp. ) ; Roll In Universal Light- 
ing (Bulldog Electric); In Tune With the 
Times (American Motors Corporation). 



HENNING & CHEADLE, INC. 

lOGO West Fort Street, Detroit 26, Michigan 
Phone: WOodward 1-7688 

Date of Incorporation: 1945 

Branch: Chicago, 1140 S. Michigan Ave., 
Wabash 2-0570, F. E. Harrold. Produc- 
tion, editorial and distribution services. 
L. A. Henning, President 
George R. Cheadle, Vice-President 
Louis Manos, Production Manager 



Services: VisualCast presentations; sounq 
slidefilms; motion pictures, literature; cor 
plete programs. Facilities: Equipment an^ 
staff for black and white, Ektachrome anfl 
color separation, including studio, cameral 
lighting, etc. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSOR! 

Slidefilms: Meet the Champ (General ElecJ 
trie Co.); Packaging With A Purpose (Geni 
eral Foods Co.); Competition Rears Its Ugl% 
Head ( Ford Motor Company ) ; Replacing Ed- 
sel Windshield (Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co.); 
The "Eyes" Have It (Diamond Crystal Sail 
Co.). 



HAIG & PATTERSON, INC. 

15 E. Bethune Avenue, Detroit 2, Michigan 
Phone: TRinity 3-0283 

Date of Organization : 1937 

Branch: Dayton 2, Ohio, 131 N. Ludlow St., 
BAldwin 3-9321, 

J. T. Patterson, Chairman of the Board 
Earl E. Seielstad, President 
C. W. Hinz, Vice-President, Secretary 
J. M. Saunders, Vice-President, Editorial 

Services: Industrial sound slidefilms, motion 
pictures, meeting guides, instruction manuals 
and lecture charts. Facilities : Complete film 
studio, permanently staffed with writers, art- 
ists, photographers and technicians. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Generation 5, An Engi- 
neering Report on Coal Cutting Tools (Metal- * 
lurgical Products Division, General Electric 
Company) ; David's Journey Back (The Fund 
for Crippling Diseases) ; Made for the Earth 
(Price Brothers Company) ; Training for To- 
morrow (R. K. LeBlond Machine Tool Com- 
pany) ; The Miracle of Electronics (National 
Cash Register Company). Slidefilms: The 
Fifth Echelon of Accuracy (The Shefliekl Cor- 
poration) ; For the Ma.vimum in Frying, 
Straighten Up and Fry Right (Procter & 
Gamble Company) ; Capside Training Course 
( L. M. Berry & Company) ; Round Table \ 
Series,. The Final Touch (Cadillac Motor Car ! 
Division). 



HAFORD KERBAWY & COMPANY 

554 Buhl Building, Detroit 26, Michigan 
Phone: WOodward 3-0201 

Date of Organization: 1956 

Haford Kerbawy, Producer 

Lester T. Davis, Jr., Business Manager 

Victor F. Radcliffe, Account Executive 

Services : Producers of motion pictures, stage 
shows and closed-circuit telecasts for industry. 
Facilities: None owned. Associated studios 
in New York, Cleveland, Detroit and Los An- 
geles. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Why I Married Mabel, 
Package for Peggy, G-2 (American Stand- 
ard); Practical Dreamer (U.S. Steel Corp.); 
Dodge Dealer Fifth Forum ( Dodge Division) ; 
Golden Moments, film and management con- 
ference (AC Spark Plug). Closed-Circuit 
Telecast: Edsel Meeting to 24 Cities ( Edsel 
Division, Ford Motor Company). 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



THE JAM HANDY ORGANIZATION, INC. 

2821 East Grand Blvd., Detroit 11, Michigan 

Phone: TRinity 5-2450 

Date of Organization: 1917 

Jamison Handy, President 

Oliver Horn, Executive Vice-President 

Everett F. Schafer, V. P., Service Devel. 

George B. Finch, Vice-Pres., Sales Devel. 

John A. Campbell, V. P., Govt. Contracts 

William G. Luther, Vice-President, Contact 

Avery W. Kinney, Secretary 

Allan E. Gedelman, Treasurer 

BRANCH OFFICES 

New York : 1775 Broadway, New York 19, 
N.Y. Phone: JUdson 2-4060. W. J. 
Riley, in charge. 

Chicago: 230 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 
1, Illinois. Phone : STate 2-6757. Harold 
Dash, in charge. 

Hollywood: 1402 N. Ridgewood Place, Holly- 
wood 28, California. Phone: Hollywood 
3-2321. Thomas G. Johnstone, in charge. 

Services: Motion picture production: commer- 
cial, industrial and sales promotion ; personnel, 
customer relations and public relations ; minute 
movies ; three-minute screen advertisements ; 
sponsored shorts ; safety, educational, health 
films: television commercials, theatrical and 
non-theatrical distribution service. Filmstrip 
and slide film production: commercial, indus- 
trial, sales training and shop training, cus- 
tomer relations and public relations ; merchan- 
dising; training; cartoon. Glass slides, trans- 
parencies, slide racks, opaque materials. 
Meetings assistance: staging and projection 
service, convention programs, live shows. Fa- 
cilities: Complete studio. Sound stage, re- 
cording, set construction, direction, casting, 
scene design, mock ups, miniature, stage man- 
agement, field reconnaissance, animation stu- 
dios, music direction and orchestra, rear pi'o- 
jection, prop department, speech and acting 
coaching, slidefilm studio, film processing lab- 
oratories, art department, location equipment, 
creative staff. Projection equipment sales and 
service. Special devices: suitcase projectors. 
Shopper Stoppers, continuous loop projection, 
projectors, synthetic training devices. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Challenge (United 
States Marine Corps) ; That's What They Say 
(Chevrolet Motor Division); Another Fram 
First (Fram Corporation); Spicer Synchro- 
Master Twelve (Dana Corporation) ; Service 
Beyond (Motors Insurance Corporation) ; 
Navy Wings of Gold (U.S. Navy) ; Dealer to 
Dealer (General Motors Acceptance Corpora- 
tion); Opening the Sale ( Dartnell Corpora- 
tion) ; U.S. Royal Master Tires Takes to the 
Air (United States Rubber) ; Treatment of 
Edema in Congestive Heart Failure (G. B. 
Searle) ; New Dimensions in Sownd (RCA 
Victor) ; The Production of U.S.S. Steel 
Sheets (U.S. Steel); The Time of Your Life 
(Oldsmobile Division of General Motors) ; The 
Mail-Flo System (U.S. Post Office); The Na- 
tional Post-Tronic ( National Cash Register 
Company) ; The Underground Story of Nat- 
ural Gas (Columbia Gas Company). Slide- 
films: The Curious Case of the Missing 
Benefits. Tweeter, Woofer and Wow (Radio 



Corporation of America) ; The Day Nei-o 
Burned (Buick Motor Divi.sion, GMC) ; Alli- 
son Power with a Lockheed Electra (Allison 
Division of General Motors ) ; Better Than 
Gold (Beryllium Corporation) ; What the Cus- 
tomer Wants (Oldsmobile Division of General 
Motors); What Do You Do? (The Hoover 
Company); A Salesman's Best Friend ( Pon- 
tiac Motor Division, General Motors) ; 20,000 
Volts Under tlie Hood ( Delco-Remy ) . SCHOOL 
Service Slidekilms: The Battle for Liberty, 
Asiatic Lands and People, Growth of the 
United States, Famous Americans, People and 
Goods Travel, Autumn is Here, Insects Around 
Us. 



INSTRUCTIONAL ARTS, INC. 

16210 Meyers Road, Detroit 35, Michigan 
Phone: UNiversity 2-3932 

Date of Organization : 1946 

Nicholas J. Beck, President 

James W. Atkinson, Vice-Pres. & Treas. 

Harry B. Rottiers, Secretary 

Services : creative and production staff for 
slidefilms, motion pictures, slides, instructional 
manuals, catalogs, artwork and photography. 
Audio-visual equipment sales. FACILITIES: art 
department, 40' x 50' photographic stage. 
Equipment for still and motion photography; 
16 and 35mm animation stand; recording 
studio ; hot press title department ; still lab- 
oratories. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Breakthrough (Ralston- 
Purina Company). Slidefilms: Parts In- 
ventory Control, Torqmatic Transmission, Air 
Suspension (GMC Truck and Coach Division) ; 
The 1958 Kelvinator Air Conditioner (Ameri- 
can Motoi's Corporation) and others. 



MPO Productions, Inc. 

6560 Ca.ss Avenue, Detroit 2, Michigan 
Ross M. Sutherland, Sales Manager 
(See complete listing in New York area) 



4C- 

REGAN FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

19730 Ralston, Detroit 3, Michigan 
Phone: TUlsa 3-4334 

Date of Organization : July, 1950 

Lawrence M. Regan, President 

Warren Hart, Vice-Pres., Charge Production 

Services: Complete programs for training, 
sales promotion, public relations and educa- 
tion, including sound motion pictures, sound 
slidefilms. printed materials, stage presenta- 
tions and TV spots. Facilities: Studio de- 
signed and built for sound filming (1955). 
Sound stage 4,000 sq. ft. Still photography 
stage, laboratory, art studio, magnetic record- 
ing, 35mm & 16mm cameras, cutting and 
screening rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Action. Edsel in Action, E.vecutives, Product 
Motion Pictures: This Is the Edsel, Style in 
Development, Advertising, Once in a Lifetime 
(Edsel, Ford Motor Company). Slidefilms: 
Getting a Head Start, This Is the Edsel, 1958 



Af cm M%- 4f rn 



EAST CENTRAL 



Metropolitan Detroit Area 

Advertising (Edsel, Ford Motor Company) ; 
The Silvertown 125 Tubeless Tire, The Life- 
saver Silvertown Tubeless Tire, 1957 Fall Staff 
Meeting, Dealer Finance Plans, Good Meeting 
Procedures (B. F. Goodrich Company); Com- 
ing Our Way ( Wyandotte Chemical ) ; Do It 
Right, Quiz Skits series I and II (Lincoln- 
Mercury). TV Commercial: For Gro-Pup 
(Kellogg Sales Company ) . Live Show : Once 
In a Lifetime — product announcement (Edsel, 
Ford Motor Company ) . 



ROSS ROY, INC. 

2751 E. Jefferson, Detroit 7, Michigan 
Phone: LOrain 7-3900 

Date of Organization: 1926 

Branch Ofl[ices: 214 E. 31st Street, New 
York 16, N.Y. Phone: MUrray Hill 5-1440 
J. A. Roche, Manager. 1680 N. Vine, 
Hollywood 28, Calif. Phone: HOllywood 
9-6263. Joseph G. Mohl, Vice-President, 
in charge. Also Ross Roy of Canada, Ltd., 
Windsor, Ont. 

Ross Roy, President 

T. G. McCormick, Executive Vice-President 

C. F. Sullivan, Vice-Pres., Acc't Supvr. 

Robert R. Roy, Asst. to President 

W. H. Gerstenberger, Vice-Pres., Acc't 
Supvr. 

W. W. Shaul, Vice-Pres., Acc't Supvr. 

J. W. Hutton Vice-Pres., Art Director 

J. B. Gray, Vice-Pres., Editorial 

K. S. Loring, Vice-Pres., Dir. Product Anal- 
ysis 

M. G. Vaughn, Vice-Pres., Business Devel- 
opment 

R. S. Freeman, Mgr., Radio & TV Dept. 

R. E. Riordan, Research Director 

Services: facilities for creation and produc- 
tion of sound slidefilms, motion nictures. live 
meetings or shows; closed-circuit TV meet- 
ings, and corollary materials. Facilities: per- 
manent staff of copywriters, product and mar- 
ket research men. creative and mechanical 
artists, photographers: studio and darkroom. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: McCahill Tests the 1958 
Chrysler & the 1958 Imperial (Chrysler Div., 
Chrysler Corporation) ; You're on the Test 
Track (DeSoto Division, Chrysler Corpora- 
tion) ; The Story of Torsion-Aire (Chrvsler 
Corporation). Slidefilms: Minit Heat-New, 
Hot & E.rclusive (Stewart-Warner Corpora- 
tion, South Wind Div.) ; From Dark to Dawn 
(Chrysler Corporation of Canada, Ltd.) ; Put- 
ting the Deal on Wheels (Chrysler Corpora- 
tion, Sales Training Dept.) ; E.rtra Great 
News (Dodge Division, Chrvsler Corpora- 
tion) ; Plymouth Leads the Way (Plymouth 
Division, Chrysler Corporation"). 



Van Praag Productions, Inc. 

2.301 Dime Building, Detroit 26. Mich. 
Phone: WOodward 2-4896; TWX DE-161 
Fred F. Frink, General Manager 
( See complete listing in New York City area ' 



ITH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



EAST CENTRAL: DETROIT AREA 

VIDEO FILMS 

1004 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit 7, Mich. 
Phone : WOodward 2-3400 

Date of Organization: 1947 

Clifford Hanna, Partner 
William R. Witherell. Jr., Partner 
Gary F. Galbraith, Photographic Dept. 
Robert G. Kirkpatrick, Editing Dept. 
William E. Lane. Production Manager 
Henry Mengeringhausen, Sound Department 
Sandra Weber, Distribution 

Services: public relations, sales and training 
films; television commercials, color & b&w; 
animation or live. Editing and recording serv- 
ices for industrial clients. Facilities: sound 
studio 40' X 25'; Maurer, Cine-Special and 3 
Bell & Howell cameras. Animation stand. 
Stancil-Hoffman, Magnecorder studio record- 
ers. Rek-0-Cut turntables; Capitol music li- 
brary. Three editing rooms; screening room 
with interlock facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Huck (Huck Manufactur- 
ing Company) ; Enrico Fermi Progress Report 
#2 (Detroit Edison Company); Redwing 
Hockeii Highlights ( Stroh Brewery Com- 
pany) ; Dust Off Your Goggles. Clear the Run- 
way (Monroe Auto Equipment Company); 
Silicone Protectors ( Dow Corning Corpora- 
tion; Regional Sales Reports (2) (American 
Motors). TV Commercials: For numerous 
clients in 1957. 



Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

4925 Cadieux Road, Detroit, Michigan 
Phone: TUxedo 2-3740 

Dean Coffin, Vice-President, in charge 

(See complete listing under Chicago area) 



East Lansing, Michigan 

CAPITAL FILIM SERVICE 

224 Abbott Road, E. Lansing. Michigan 
Phone: 2-3544 

Date of Organization: 1942 

James Robert Hunter, Owner 
Joseph E. Ceterski, Business Manager 
Services: Ifimm color, black and white proc- 
essing and printing; sound recording; photog- 
raphy; editing; animation: TV commercials; 
radio tran.scriptions; kine.scoping and com- 
plete script to .screen productions. Facili- 
ties: Sound studio, projection room, editing 
rooms, art room, color and black and white 
processing labs, printing labs, shipping and 
receiving room. All types of motion picture 
equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Greenland i'.)->7 ( Sipre, 
Corps of Engineers); African Trophies 
(Williams GunSight Company) ; Gunner Prog- 
ress (Gunner Mines, Ltd.) ; The Truth About 
Fluoridation (Michigan Dental Association); 
Preview at the Proving Grounds (Motor 
Wheel). 



OHIO CITIES: Cincinnati 

K & S FILMS INC. 

5819 Wooster Pike, Cincinnati 27, Ohio 
Phone: BRamble 1-3700 

Date of Organization: 1948 
Jack R. Rabius, President 
S. Harry Wilmink, Vice President 
Roma L Rabius, Secretary-Treasurer 
O. Ross Bellamy, Executive Producer 
Peggy Zach, Creative Director 
John Hamill, Art Director 

Services: Specializing in industrial motion 
pictures, sales training films, sound slidefilms, 
animated and live TV commercials. Facili- 
ties: 2400 sq. ft. production studio, 1200 sq. 
ft. sound recording studio, 16mm Synchro- 
nous sound recording equipment, V4" Ampex 
tape recording equipment, art & animation de- 
partment, complete editing facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Mr. Zesta & His Toy Train 
(Strietmaiin Bi.scuit Co.) ; Spirit of the Times 
( Cincinnati Times-Star) ; Don^t Sell Me Win- 
dow Shades (Clopay Corp.) ; Fashion in Food; 
Kahn College for Weiners (Kahn Packing 
Company) ; TV Interference (Crosley Corp. 
Div. of Avco). TV Commercials: For Ash- 
land Oil, Kahn Packing Company, H. H. Meyer 
Packing Company, Hudepohl Brewing Com- 
pany, and Globe-Wernicke Company. 



LASKY FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

3705 Lonsdale Street, Cincinnati 27, Ohio 
Phone: BRamble 1-5833 

Date of Organization: 19.39 

Date of Incorporation: 1956 

Max Lasky, President, Executive Producer 

Daniel P. Geeding, Vice President, Sales 

Elizabeth Peters, Secretary & Treasurer, 

Prod. Assist. 
Marc Siegel, Script Supervisor 
Jack A. Robertson, Production Manager 
Services: Producers of motion pictures for 
industry and television. Specialists in color 
photography. Facilities: Completely equipped 
sound studio and mobile unit for 35mm and 
16mm production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: A Better Way; Under 
These Stars (Procter & Gamble Company); 
The Day They Came to Tolliver Street (Bald- 
win Piano Company) ; The Filter Flo Story 
(General Electric Company); Family Album 
(Cincinnati Milling Machine Co.); A Form 
of Perfection (The Cincinnati Shaper Com- 
pany). 



OLYMPUS FILM PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

2222 Chickasaw Street, Cincinnati 19, Ohio 

Phone: Parkway 1-2184 

Date of Organization: 1948 

James B. Hill, President 

Margaret J. Bolger, Secretary & Treasurer 

Services: Motion pictures: industrial; person- 
nel, customer, and public relations; sales train- 
ing; fund raising; educational, medical, 
safety; documentaries. Sound .slidefilms: sales 
and job training; commercial; educational. 



Script writing and production consultation. 
Facilities: Creative staff: complete studio: 
4500 sq. ft. sound stage;. 45,000 watts studio 
or location lighting; Maurer cameras; com- 
plete sound recording; editing facilities; ani- 
mation studio; set construction; complete fa- 
cilities for food storage and preparation and 
two permanent kitchen sets. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Qjiiet Crowd (Procter 
& Gamble) ; Cover Story; The Night of Octo- 
ber .31st; The Man Who Walked Through Wall<: 
(The Kroger Company) ; Success Story 
(United Appeal Campaign Committee). 



MGM-TV, Division of Loew's, Inc. 

1625 Central Parkway Blvd., Cincinnati, 
Ohio 

Arthur Breider, in charge. 

(See complete listing under New York City) 



Wilding Picture Productions, inc. 

617 Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Phone : GArfield 1-0477 

R. L. McMillan, District Manager 



Cleveland, Ohio Area 

CINECRAFT PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

2515 Franklin Blvd., Cleveland 13, Ohio 
Phone: SUperior 1-2300 

Date of Organization: 1937 

Ray Culley, President 

Paul Culley, Production Manager 

Donald L. Mitchell, Comptroller 

Services: Complete motion picture production, 
sound slidefilm production, convention and 
lecture material, television commercials and 
television shows, multi-camera shooting. 
Facilities: 4800 sq. ft. sound stage; record- 
ing studio; RCA sound system; 35mm and 
16mm Mitchell cameras; Teleprompter; art 
department and animation studio. Complete 
location shooting equipment, 150 KVA light- 
ing generator truck, portable sound. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: A Place in the Sun ( Libbey- 
Owens-Ford Glass Company) ; Get a Line on 
Transformers ( Westinghouse Electric Corpo- 
ration). Slidefilms: The Three of Us (Alum- 
inum Company of America) ; The Otiier Fel- 
low (World Insurance Company). FILMED 
Television Programs: The Ohio Story, 143 
shows ( Ohio Bell Telephone Company ) . 



Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

1010 Euclid Building, Cleveland. Ohio 
Phone: TOwer 1-6440 

Larry Young, District Manager 

(See complete listing under Chicago area) 



(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



B U .S I N E S S SCREEN M A (i .\ Z I N E 



KODAK SOLVES 

ANOTHER PROJECTOR 

WEAR PROBLEM 

New Kodak Pageant 16mm Sound Projector, Type II, adds 
new wearproof pulldown tooth to other long-life features: 



Five years ago, Kodak made the 
first in a series of important 16mm 
motion picture projector innova- 
tions . . . permanent pre-htbricatioii. 
Since then, you've never had to oil 
a Pageant, never had to worry 
about improper oiling, or having 
one run dry. Solved: the most 
common source of projector trou- 
ble. Ended: the threat of poor 
presentations because of projector 
failures caused by improper lu- 
brication. 

Now, Kodak introduces another 
Pageant long-life feature ... a new 



material for the pulldown arm that 
moves the film — a tooth that's 
virtually wearproof. Of tungsten 
carbide, this new tooth withstands 
indefinitely the relentless wear of 
daily use. (See magnified photo at 
right.) 

Other NEW features of the 
Pageant, Type II, are 1200-watt 
lamp capacity and universally ap- 
proved 3-wire power cord. Write 
for all the facts, illustrated in 
Kodak's 6-page catalog on Pag- 
eant Projectors. 



For AUDITORIUM use, longer throws, hard- 
to-dorken rooms, NEW 1200-wott lamp 
capacity gives 16% more screen brilliance 
than projectors limited to 1000-watt output. 





NEW Kodak Pageant Sound Projector, Type II, has 8-inch speaker in 
baffled enclosure . . . 15-watt amplifier . . . sets up easily with folding 
reel arms and belts attached. 



MUNICIPAL electrical codes calling for 
ground wire are satisfied by new 3-wire 
power cord. Cord has adapter for 2-wire 
outlets also. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, 
Dept.V-8, Rochester 4, N.Y. 





^"^Z^. 



Magnil'ied phofo of the new turgsten carbide 
tooth of the Pageant Projector pulldown tested 
over 2,000 hours. Tooth shows only slight polish- 
ing — no grooving or flattening. 



©dial 



TRADE-MARK 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



135 



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SAFE! 



PRODUCTS CORP. 



250 West 57th Street 
New York 19, New York 

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EAST CENTRAL: OHIO CITIES 



EDWARD FEIL PRODUCTIONS 

1514 Prospect Avenue, Cleveland 15 
Phone: PRospect 1-0655 

Date of Organization: 1953 

Edward R. Feil, Executive Producer 

Services: Production of industrial, institu- 
tional sales, public relations and promotion 
films; television commercials, live and ani- 
mated. Facilities: Scripts, camera, editing, 
and sound recording available for location or 
studio production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Automatic Radial Draw 
Former & Tangent Bending, High Speed Roll 
Former (The Cyril Bath Company): With 
Heart to God and Hand to Man ( The Salvation 
Army of Greater Cleveland); Recreation in 
Our Town (Recreation Department, Euclid, 
Ohio); A College Meets a Challenge ( Fenn 
College). TV Commercials: For Thistle- 
Down & Cranwood Race Tracks (Gerst, Syl- 
vester & Walsh Inc.) ; Gold Bond Beer, Mer- 
cury Dealers of Cleveland (Wyse Advertis- 
ing Agency) ; White Sewing Machine Corpora- 
tion (Fuller & Smith & Ro.ss, Inc.); Gray 
Drug Stores, Inc., Ohio Bell Telephone Com- 
pany Yellow Pages (McCann Erickson, Inc.) 



INDUSTRIAL MOTION PICTURES, INC. 

1706 East 38th Street, Cleveland 14, Ohio 
Phone: EXpress 1-3432 

Date of Organization: 1945 

A. P. MacDermott, President-Treasurer 

D. E. MacDermott, Secretary 

E. B. Meyers, Production Matiager 

J. L. Micuch, Director of Photography 
Services: Motion pictures, slidefilms, slides, 
stills; sound recording, script. Specialists in 
location work for heavy industry. FACILITIES : 
Station wagon with portable generator; 2 
sound stages, lighting; studio cameras; 5- 
channel 16mm and V4" tape recording; sound 
recording equipment; Arriflex & Auricon cam- 
eras. Editing and animation depts. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: A Neiv Face for Casey 
(Special Transportation Committee Ohio As- 
soc, of Railroads); The Wean Flying Press 
( The Wean Equipment Corp. ) ; The Big T Try 
(The H. 0. Gillis Co.) ; Memo to the Winning 
Contractor; Iron Ore Stockpiling (Euclid Di- 
vision, General Motors Corp.). 



Roland Reed Productions 

2307 Chester Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 
George Oliva Jr., Vice-President 
(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



Riviera Productions 

566 Birch Drive, Cleveland 23, Ohio 
Phone: REdwood 1-6076 

Pat Rancati, Eastonn Represe7itative 

(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



Akron, Ohio 

< CHARLES MAYER STUDIOS, INC. 

Bowery at Center Street, Akron 8, Ohio 
Phone: JEfferson 5-6121 

Date of Organization : 1934 

C. W. Mayer, Sr., Chairman of the Board 

C. W. Mayer, Jr., President 

M. M. Barton, Secretary 

George Peacock, Comptroller 

Vic Wysotzki, Chief Camera Man, Still Dept. 

Charles Koza, Script Department 

Services : Scripts, research, production of mo- 
tion pictures and sound slide films, filmstrips, 
animation, slides of all types, merchandising 
displays and exhibits, printing and binding, 
manufacturers of ring binders and sample 
cases. Facilities: Three Audio Visual plants 
with latest equipment for production of all 
types of meeting materials. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Slidefilms: 25 recruiting films (U.S. Air 
Force) ; It's Time for More Profits— The UR 
Way (Universal Rundle Corporation); 1958 
Service Developments Clinic (Socony Mobil 
Oil Company) ; Selecting Successful Dealers 
(Cities Service Oil Company) ; Selling Truck 
Tires (Kelly-Springfield Tire Company). 



Dayton, Ohio 



FILM ASSOCIATES, INC. 

4600 So. Dixie Highway, Dayton 39 
Phone: AXminster 3-2164 

Date of Organization : 1937 
Date of Incorporation: 1946 

E. Raymond Am, President-Treasurer 
Mildred G. Am, Vice-President 
Clement V. Jacobs, Secretary 
Edward R. Lang, General Manager 
Charles Stucker, Laboratory Supervisor 
Rolland Beech, Printing Supervisor 
George Whalen, Jr., Editorial Head 
David Bartholomew, Ai-t Director 
Eleanor Croy, Office Manager 

Services: 16mm color, b&w motion pictures 
for industrial, educational and television use. 
Complete production services for other pro- 
ducers and industrial photo departments. 
Facilities: New studio and laboratory build- 
ing with two large sound stages, precision 
machine processing under rigid control for 
all black & white films. Automatic printers 
for sound and picture reproduction. Multiple 
recording and re-recording channels of Altec 
& Cinema Engineering components for tape, 
magnetic film, optical film and disc. Maurer, 
Standi Hoff'man, Ampex and Presto recorders. 
Kinescope recordings. Art and animation de- 
partment including complete Ox'oerry stand. 
Two Maurer cameras, two Auricon Super 
pros. Cine Specials, Zoom lenses. Peerless 
panorama dolly and complete lighting equip- 
ment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: \eu' Kitchen Ideas for 
195S; New Look for Old Kitchens ( Frigidaire 
Div. G.M.C.) ; 1957 renewals of Hamhletonian 
& Little Broivn Jug (U.S. Trotting Assn.); 
The Great Montgomery County Fair (Coca 



BirSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Cola Company); Holiday in the Tropics 
(Cappel McDonald Company). TV Commer- 
cials: Hudepohl Brewing Co. (Stockton West 
Burkhart) ; Bob Evans Farms, Wagner Brew- 
ing Company (Byer & Bowman) ; Top Value 
Stamps (Top Value Enterprises); Chevrolet 
(Leonard Sive & Associates) ; Gen. City Sav- 
ings (Kircher Helton & Collett). 



Reid H. Ray Film Industries, Inc. 

384 West 1st St., Dayton 2, Ohio 
Phone: BAldwin 2-5174 

A. Merritt Simpson, Vice-President Eastern 

Sales 
See complete listing under St. Paul, Minn.) 



•5f 

Haig & Patterson, Inc. 

131 North Ludlow Street, Dayton 2, Ohio 
Phone: BAldwin 3-9321 
(See complete listing under Detroit area) 



Steubenvllle, Ohio 

Colmes-Werrenrath Productions, Inc. 

WSTV, Inc., Steubenvllle, Ohio 
Phone: AT 2-6265 
John Laux, Vice President 
(See complete listing under Chicago area) 



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Af ri 



a/9> n 



METROPOLITAN CHICAGO AREA 



ACADEMY FILIVI PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

123 West Chestnut St., Chicago 10, Illinois 
Phone : Michigan 2-5877 

Date of Incorporation : 1950 

Bernard Howard, Pres. & Exec. Producer 
Bernard Kurlan, Secretary-Treasurer 
Morris Alexander, Vice-President 
Ted Liss, Sales Manager 

Services : Creation and production of motion 
pictures, slidefilms, slides and wide-screen pre- 
sentations for TV, conventions, meetings, sales 
lids for broadcast and industry. Editing, 
rt^riting, recording, titling for outside pro- 
lucers. Complete writing, directing, produc- 
;ion service for agencies and industrial firms 
n creating and producing audio-visual aids of 
ill types. Live shooting as well as animation. 
Facilities : Cameras, lights, cables, booms, 
•nikes, dolly, recorders. 30' x 45' sound stage 
)r location. 

(ECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Mechanical Handling of 
^afkaged Lumber, Sterling Lumber (Acme 
Steel Company) ; The Air Line Pilot (Air Line 
Pilots Association) ; Derelict Men (The Salva- 
|;ion Army) . Slidefilm : The Case of the Miss- 
'ng Sale (Wells-Lamont Corporation). TV 
Commercials: For Holsum Products Com- 
pany, Wisconsin Independent Oil Company, 
Dhesty Foods, Kowalski Meat Products, Mar- 
|ioefer Meat Products, Old Reliable Coffee, 
l-Melody Hill Wines, Coco-Wheats and others 



(fc Beds ( National Association of Bedding 
Manufacturers) ; The Kimberly-Clark Story 
(Kimberly-Clark Corporation) ; Machine's with 
Aerosol Know-How (Mojonnier Associates)' 
Top Secret (Norren, Inc.). Slidefilms: This 
Is CUNA Mutual (CUNA Mutual Insurance 
Soc.) ; Safety Is Up to You (Bastian Blessing, 
Inc.). Visual Presentations: For Creamery 
Package Mfg. Company, The Crane Company, 
and Blast-Freeze, Inc. Filmed TV Programs: 
Discovery, 13 programs ( Educational Televi- 
sion and Radio Center). 



ALLEN, GORDON, SCHROEPPEL & 
REDLtCH, INC. 

178 W. Randolph St., Chicago 1, Illinois 
Phone: FRanklin 2-8888 

Date of Organization : 1947 

Branch: 1835 South Calhoun, Fort Wayne, 
Indiana. Robert G. Cecka, Vice-President 

W. Walton Schroeppel, President 
Arthur C. Allen, Vice-President 
Aaron Gordon, Secretary-Treasurer 

Services: Photography and advertising art. 
2x2 and 31/4x4 slides; strip film. Facilities: 
art department and all the necessary equip- 
ment necessary for production of slide services. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Vu-Graph and Visual Presentations: for 
International Harvester Company; National 
Advertising Co.; Whirlpool-Seeger Corp.; 
Phelps Dodge Corporation; Reynolds Metals 
Company. 



ISILBERT ALTSCHUL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

I 2441 W. Peterson Ave., Chicago 45, Illinois 
1 Phone: UPtown 8-2595 

I Date of Organization: April, 1954 

i Gilbert Altschul, Pres. & Executive Prod. 

I Bruce Colling, Vice-President & Prod. Mgr. 

i L. B. Sager, Vice-President & Sales Manager 

' Esther Altschul, Secretary-Treasurer 

Services: Production of motion pictures and 
jilidefilms for industry, education and govern- 
•nent. Facilities: Production stage as well as 
Inditing, recording and animation facilities. 

t ECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

iVIOTiON Pictures: Mrs. America Plans a 
l^ome (The Celotex Corporation) ; Bees, Birds 

*TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



ATLAS FILM CORPORATION 

1111 South Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois 
Phone: AUstin 7-8620 

Date of Incorporation : 1945 

Branches: (Sales) 228 No. La Salle St., Chi- 
cago; 714 Warner Bldg., 501 13th St., N. 
W., Washington 4, D.C.; 6331 Hollywood 
Boulevard, Hollywood, California. 

L. P. Mominee, President 
Albert S. Bradish, Vice-Pres., Production 
Frederick K. Barber, V. P., Director 
Advertising, Sales Promotion 



Edward Schager, V. P., Director of Sales 
Jack D. Danielson, Director of Television 
James L. Herman, Public Relations Films 
Louis E. Wilder, Slidefilm Department, 
Charles Lager, As.it. Production Mgr. 

Services: 16mm and 35mm public relations 
and training motion pictures and slidefilms; 
color and sound ; TV commercials ; short sub- 
jects ; theatrical shorts, packaged programs. 
Facilities: Cameras, 16mm and 35mm, RCA 
35mm and 16mm direct positive sound record- 
ing; art department; time-lapse photography; 
two sound stages; laboratory; animation; ed- 
iting; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Why Do They Choo.se a 
Station, The Pencil and the Plow (Sinclair 
Refining Company) ; For the Love of Life 
(American Hospital Association) ; The Air 
Force Takes Care of Its Own, Eject & Live 
(U.S. Air Force) ; ECM (U.S. Navy). Slide- 
films: Payload Pacemakers (General Mo- 
tors); Accent on Action (International Har- 
vester); A Busy B ( Bucyrus-Erie Company). 
TV Commercials: For Hamilton Beach Com- 
pany and others. 



•5f 

CHICAGO FILM STUDIOS 

56 E. Superior Street, Chicago 11, Illinois 
Phone: WHitehall 4-6971 

Date of Organization: 1928 

A. G. Dunlap, President 
Robert D. Casterline, Director of Sales 
Russell T. Ervin, A.S.C., Production Mgr. 
Walter Rice, Laboratory Mgr. 

Services : 16mm and 35mm color and black and 
white motion pictures for advertising, sales 
promotion and job training, educational and 
travel ; slidefilms ; television commercials. Fa- 
cilities: Two sound stages; Mitchell, Bell & 
Howell and Maurer cameras ; art and anima- 
tion ; optical effects ; RCA 35mm sound record- 
ing on film or 35mm magnetic tape; projection 
theatre; laboratory; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: World Series of 1957, 20 
Years of World Series Thrills (American & 
National Leagues of Professional Baseball 
Clubs) ; Sales films for Oliver Corporation, 
Quaker Oats, General Foods, Borg-Warner, 
Hobart Manufacturing, Parker Pen and 
others. Slidefilms: A Bright New Day 
(General Electric) ; Aircraft Handling (Borg- 
Warner) ; and others for Farm Equipment 
Institute, Crane Company, National Cylinder 
Gas. TV Commercials: for Standard Oil 
Company (D'Arcy) ; Johnson Wax, All deter- 
gent. State Farm Insurance (Needham, Louis 
and Brorby) ; Reynolds Metals, North Woods 
Coffee (Clinton E. Frank) ; Paper-Mate, Kraft 
Foods (Foote, Cone & Belding) ; Norge Re- 
frigerator, Preso (Donahue & Coe, Inc.) ; 
Quaker Oats, Oscar Mayer (Wherry, Baker 
& Tilden) ; Rath Packing (Earle Ludgin) and 
others. 



(LISTINGS CONTINUED ON FOLLOWING PAGES) 

TC this symbol, appearing over a 
producer's listing, indicates that display adver- 
tising containing additional reference data ap- 
pears in other pages of this Review. 



1 



METROPOLITAN CHICAGO: 



JOHN COLBURN & ASSOCIATES 

1122 Central Avenue, Wilmette, Illinois 
Phone: ALpine 1-8520 

Date of Incorporation: 1953 

John E. Colburn, President 
Henry Ushijima, Vice-President 
R. Robert Luce, Studio Manager 
Suzanne B. Clarke, Director, Advertising 
awrf PR 

Services: Industrial motion pictures; sound 
slidefilms and complete production services 
available to other producers. Writers, artists 
and technicians. Facilities: Large sound 
stage permanently staffed; equipped for either 
16mm or 35mm production. 16mm, IT^ornm 
or 35mm magnetic recording and re-recording 
channels. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Afield icith The Flying A, 
From Powder to Plane (Aeroquip Coi-pora- 
tion) ; NRECA (Allis Chalmers! ; Bottom 
Dump Traitor PD 20! (Athey Products Cor- 
poration ) ; Speaking of Air Power ( Bendix 
Aviation Corporation); 1960 World Premiere 
(J. I. Case Company); Hybrid of Greatness 
(Funk Brothers, Inc.); 1957 Coffin Award 
( General Electric Corporation ) ; Syringes and 
Needles, Becton-Dickinson (Mervin W. La- 
Rue) ; Handling the Harvest, Pure and Simple 
(Link Belt Company); i-H Tractor Trails 
(National 4-H Committee); Lutheran World 
Federation — 3i-d Assembly (National Luther- 
an Council); Mechanical Dish Removal and 
Food Delivery ( Olson Manufacturing Com- 
pany) ; Sooner or Later (Peterson Brothers) ; 
Masters of the Steel Steeds (Standard Oil of 
Indiana); Eyes on Africa, New Guinea, Our 
China Story, 30 Year Man (Society of the 
Divine Word ) ; sales presentation for Babson 
Brothers, Inc.; Presentation by W. A. Patter- 
son, United Airlines ( Cate and McGlone). TV 
Film: 131/2 minute film for Funk Brothers, 
Inc. (E. H. Brown Advertising Agency). 
Slidefilms: Priceless Asset (Loyola Univer- 
sity); Lutheran Brotherhood and the Farm 
Family, Lutheran Brotherhood and Your Child 
(Lutheran Brotherhood Insurance). TV Com- 
mercial: For Alcoa ( Wentzel, Wainwright, 
Poister & Poore ) . 



/\ 

COLMES-WERRENRATH 

PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

540 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago 11. 111. 
Phone: Michigan 2-7470 

Date of Organization: 1955 

Branches: 52 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York, 
N.Y. Phone: MUrray Hill :V6977. Rod 
Gibson, Manager. Penn Sheraton Hotel, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. Phone: GRant 1-3696. 
George Heid, Manager. WSTV, Inc. Steu- 
benville, Ohio. Phone: AT 2-6265. John 
Laux, Vice-President. 

Walter Colmes, President, Exec. Producer 

MP 
Reinald Werrenrath, Exec. Vice-President, 

Exec. Producer TV 
Jack N. Berkman, Chaii-mav of the Board 



John Laux, Vice-President 
Lawrence Goldberg, Secretary-Treasurer 
John Reese, Supv. Film Editor 
Joyce Markstahler, Film Librarian 
Robert Keigher, Production Manager 
Judith Friedman, Script Supervision 
Fred Bloch, Director of Client Relations 
Betsy Haas, Sales Promotion 
Charles Zoi-nig, Creative Director 

Services: Creators, producers and consultants 
for motion pictures and slide films, for busi- 
ness, industry and education. Television pro- 
duction, live and film programs and commer- 
cials. Also U.S. representative for creation 
and production of animation and live action 
films in Paris, France. FACILITIES: Studio, 
Glenview. III. 15,000 sq. ft.; main stage 130 x 
70 with 45' ceiling, complete 35mm and 16mm 
production equipment. Chicago offices, com- 
plete editing and projection facilities for 
35mm and 16mm productions. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Starting with Sears, An- 
nual Report, Custom Workroom and others 
(Sears Roebuck & Company); Diesel Power 
( Harnischfeger Corporation) ; Introduction of 
193S Ranges. Introduction of 1958 Air Condi- 
tioners (Admiral Corporation); Decision for 
Tomorrow, A Thing of Value (Whirlpool Cor- 
poration ) ; Foliar Feeding of Plants ( Michi- 
gan State University and Atomic Energy 
Commission); convention film (American 
Home Laundry Mfg. Association ) and others. 
Slidefilms: for Whirlpool Corporation, 
Brunswick Balke Collender, Futorian Strat- 
ford Company. TV Commercials: for Ad- 
miral TV, Sears Roebuck, Nuwood, SlimVims, 
Jacobson Lawnmower, Bosch Beer, Norge Re- 
frigerator, York Air Conditioners, State Farm 
Insurance and others. 



Shamus Culhane Productions, Inc. 

203 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago 1, 111. 

Phone: ANdover 3-4971 

( See complete listing in New York City area) 



^ 



DOUGLAS PRODUCTIONS 

1425 So. Racine, Chicago 8, Illinois 
Phone: HAymarket 1-0409 

Date of Organization: 1945 

Branch: 734 N. Jefferson, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Phone: BRoadway 3-5680 

Fred C. Raymond, President 
Arthur R. Jones III, Exec. Vice-President 
Douglas P. Raymond, Vice-Pres. Chg. Prod. 
Frank M. Miller, Dir. of Photography 
Larry Tickus, Asst. Cameraman 
Sherwin Becker, Production Manager 
Wm. Bielicke, Lab. Manager 

Services: Creation and production of motion 
pictures, slidefilms, TV commercials and 
trailers for business, industry and education. 
Industrial film laboratory services. Equipped 
and staffed for both studio and location pho- 
tography in motion picture and still fields. 
Facilities: Complete laboratory facilities, in- 
cluding color and b&w printing. Two sound 
stages; administrative and creative offices; an- 
imation and art departments ; magnetic and 
optical sound recording; film storage vaults; 



editing, conforming and final processing of in- 
dustrial visualizations. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Road to Profits ( Fairbanks- 
Morse Co.); Tale of a Tub (Maytag Co.); 
Profit in the Stars; Tomorrow's Products from 
Today's Research (Armour & Co.); Design 
for Logging (International Paper Co.) ; Ether 
Trails ( National Safety Council ) ; Sunscope 
( Sun Electric Co. ) ; Cold Extrusion ( Verson 
All-Steel Press Co.); Big as all Outdoors 
( Heineke & Co.). Slidefilms: Shower Up 
(Powers Regulator Co.) ; Work Miracles With 
Merchandising ( Institutions Magazine ) ; Rex 
Roller Chain (Chain Belt Co.) ; Service Makes 
the Difference (Fairbanks-Morse Co.); Doivn 
Go Your Wrapping Costs (H. P. Smith Paper 
Co.). TV Commercials: For Wrigley Gum 
( Arthur Meyerhoff & Co. ) ; Beltone Hearing 
Aids (Olian and Bronner); Chicago Title & 
Trust Co. ( The Buchen Co, ) ; Kitchen Klenzer 
(R. Jack Scott) ; Piggly Wiggly Stores; Chi- 
cago Federal Savings (Critchfield & Co.). 



•5f 

CAL DUNN STUDIOS 

159 E. Chicago Ave., Chicago 11, Illinois 
Phone: WHitehall 3-2424 

Date of Organization : 1947 

Cal Dunn, President 

Joseph G. Betzer, Vice-President 

"Yar" Yarbrough, Executive Art Producer 

Bob Boehmer, Art Director 

Bob O'Reilly, Art Director 

Tom Terry, Art Director 

Mrs. Dorothy Brebner, Stylist 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms for 
sales promotion, training, product information 
and employee indoctrination; TV commercials 
and productions. Facilities: Creative, art, 
photographic, animation, editing and super- 
visory staffs; 16mm and 35mm motion and 
slidefilm cameras; 16mm and 35mm editing 
and sound equipment; distribution facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Falls Are No Fun, How to 
Follow Safely, Don't Be a Sitting Duck, Stay 
Right— Stay Safe, What Right-of-Way? Tin 
Art of Being Passed, How to Pass Safclij 
(National Safety Council). Slidefilms: 
There's Always a Better Way (Mead Johnson 
& Co.) ; The Man I'll Forget to Remember 
(American Express Company) ; The Secret 0/ 
How to Close More Sales, The Case of th> 
Kicked-Away Sale ( National Life & Accident 
Insurance Company) ; The New Approach to 
Wizard Sales, Sell Pride as Well as Prici 
(Western Auto Supply Company) ; The Ncir 
Approach to Co-Op Sales ( Co-Op Stores) ; Thr 
New Approach to Zenith Sales (Marshall 
Wella) ; The New Approach to Tru-Cold Salts 
(Montgomery Wai-d and Company); Through 
Two Pairs of Eyes, It's Up to You, A Day in 
the Life of a Super-Market Operator, Dear 
So.s.s (Campbell Soup). TV Commercials: for 
Shell Oil Company; Swift & Company; Wilkiiis 
Coffee, Omar Bakeries; Arcade-Sunshine; 
Strathmore Company; Beatrice Foods Com- 
pany. 



7S" this symbol, appearing over a 
producer's listing, indicates that display adver- 
tising containing additional reference data ap- 
pears in other pages of this Annual Review. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Jerry Fairbanks Productions 

520 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 11, 111. 

Phone: WHitehall 4-0196 

Robert Kemper, representative 

(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



FRANCISCO FILMS 

185 No. Wabash Avenue, Chicago 1, Illinois 
Phone: STate 2-0798 

Date of Organization: 1942 

L. Mercer Francisco, Proprietor 

John R. Macdonald, Production Manager 

Services: Production of sound motion pic- 
tures, sound slidefilms, filmstrips, stop-motion 
sound films. Research and creative work in 
development of selling procedures and sales 
training programs. FACILITIES: Complete 
photographic facilities for production of slide- 
films and other filmic forms, motion picture 
photography and other filming and studio 
services. 

RECEN1 PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: untitled production for 
Cummins Engine Company, Saturday Evening 
Post, Helene Curtis Industries, Inc., Stewart- 
Warner Corporation. Slidefilms: for Cum- 
mins Engine Company, Sherwin-Williams 
Company. 



Galbreath Pictures. Inc. 

141 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 4, 111. 
Phone: HArrison 7-7447 
Clyde L. Krebs, Jr., Manager 
(See complete listing under Indiana area) 



The Jam Handy Organization, Inc. 

230 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, 111. 
Phone: STate 2-6757 
Harold Dash, in charge 

(See complete listing under Detroit area) 



Henning & Cheadle, Inc. 

1140 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 
Phone : WAbash 2-0570 
F. E. Harrold, in charge 

(See complete listing under Detroit area) 



•5f 



DALLAS JONES PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1725 No. Wells Street, Chicago 14, Illinois 
Phone: MOhawk 4-5525 

Date of Organization: 1947 

Dallas Jones, President 

Marilou Jones, Vice-President & Treasurer 

G. Richard Bowen, Secretary 

James E. Holmes, Director of Sales 

Oz Zielke, Director of Production 

Jack Conrad, Executive Assistant 

Paul Jensen, Script Supei-visor 

Edwin G. Hogan, Production Manager 

Marvin Goessl, Art Director 

Carl Sandin, Editing Department 

Gerhard Kugel, Sound Department 



Services: A complete specialized training and 
sales promotion service, including field re- 
search, writing, and production of all audio- 
visual and printed materials. Motion pictures, 
slidefilms, filmstrips, slides, flannel boards, 
complete meeting packages. Facilities: Sound 
and silent stages for motion pictures and slide- 
films. Highly mobile location equipment. 16- 
mm and .'55mm Mitchell cameras. Five chan- 
nel magnetic recording. Complete staff of 
directors, artists, editors and writers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: A Study in Space (Kel- 
logg) ; Through a Rear View Mirror, Com- 
fortably Yours, Rubber Unlimited (Firestone 
Tii-e and Rubber Company) ; Uncle Henry 
Saves the Play (Dow Chemical Company) ; 
More Than Meets the Eye, 10,000 Partners 
(U.S. Gypsum Company) ; Homart 600 Water 
Heaters (Sears Roebuck & Company). Slide- 
films: 1958 Room Weather makers (Carrier 
Corporation); The Ghost of Sam Foumes 
(National Wholesale Druggists Association) ; 
195S Product Films (Hotpoint Company) ; All 
Roads Lead to Speevy's (National Advertising 
Company) ; More Than a Million (Stewart 
In-Ra-Red, Inc.); ^5 Seconds for Life (Mo- 
torola) ; Swimming series (Athletic Institute). 
TV Commercials: for Sunbeam, Montgomery 
Ward, Johnson Motors, Quaker Oats. 



KLING FILM PRODUCTIONS 

1058 W. Washington Blvd., Chicago 7, 111. 
Phone: SEeley 8-4181 

West Coast production and sales: 1416 N. 
LaBrea, Hollywood, Cal. Phone: HOllywood 
3-2141. 

Date of Organization : 1928 

Robei-t Eirinberg, President 
Harry W. Lange, Executive Vice-President 
Hilly Rose, Vice-President, Sales/Creative 
H. Richard Hertel, Executive Producer, 

Industrials 
Len Levy, Executive Producer, Television 
Manny Paull, Art Director 
AI Levine, Director of Syndication 
Wayman Robertson, Recording Supervisor 
Carl Nelson, Supervising Editor 
David Savitt, ASC, Director of Photography 

Services : 35mm and 16mm color and b&w mo- 
tion, slide and slide-motion pictures, live and 
animated, wide screen, 3-D and conventional. 
Cinemascope. Industrial, public i-elations, 
sales training, educational and technical films. 
Custom and syndicated TV commercials. 
Package, syndicated and live TV shows. Fa- 
cilities : Chicago — 90,000 square feet of floor 
space, two studio buildings including four 
large sound stages and complete production 
facilities with latest equipment. Hollywood — 
Complete production facilities; three sound 
stages; 20 administrative and production 
buildings; complete animation facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Three Rings for Action. 
The 1958 Sheer Look Plus in Refrigerators, 
The 1958 Sheer Look Plus in Ranges; 
The 1958 Sheer Look Plus in Washers and 
Driers, Competitive Study of Home Laundries 
( Frigidaire, Div. of GMC ) ; Siving 'n Sell 
(Norge Sales Corporation) ; Adventure in 
Space, The Big Promise (General Electric) ; 



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Af" 



CHICAGO AREA 



Qualify Across the Board (Westinghouse) ; 
Hotv to Live With an Air Force Contract (U.S. 
Air Force) ; Training film (U.S. Navy). Slide- 
films: The New Sheer Look Plus in Air Con- 
ditioners, The Neiv Sheer Look Plus in Food 
Freezers, Lint Comparison Study, Wrinkles 
Away (Frigidaire, Div. of GMC) ; Swing Out 
and Sell ( Norge Sales Corporation ) ; Ideas 
for Bedroom-Bathroom Beauty (Meredith 
Publishing Company); 1958 Hamilton Wash- 
ers and Driers (Hamilton Manufacturing 
Company). TV COMMERCIALS: for Toni, 
Papermate, Wonder Bread, Pet Milk, Kraft, 
Purina, Duncan Hines, Joy, Quaker Oats, 
Oklahoma Oil, Standard Oil (Indiana), Wilson 
Ham, RCA— Whirlpool, Meadow Gold, Marl- 
boro, Clark Candy, Evinrude, Du Maurier 
Cigarettes, Kellogg Company, Kemper Insur- 
ance, Bell Telephone, Busch Bavarian, Ameri- 
can Bakers Association, National Safety 
Council, American Dairy Association. 



MERVIN W. La RUE, INC. 

159 E. Chicago Avenue, Chicago 11, Illinois 
Phone: Superior 7-8656-7 

Date of Incorporation: 1947 

Mervin W. La Rue, Sr., President 
Joanna La Rue, Vice-President 
Charles C. Hard, Secretary-Treasurer 

Services: Primarily consultants in planning, 
production and utilization of audio-visual aids 
in medical field exclusively. Distributor of 
audio visual equipment in this field only. 
Facilities: Exception for work in this field — 
explosion proof camera and lighting equipment 
for surgery — special macroscopic and micro- 
scopic motion camera equipment — animation 
stands — time lapse — recording, etc., in addi- 
tion to conventional equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Care & Sterilization of 
Syringes & Needles (Becton, Dickinson & 
Co.) ; Care & Sterilization of Surgeons' Gloves 
(Wilson Rubber Company) ; Stress Incontin- 
ence in the Female; Surgical Correction of 
Sterility in the Male (Dr. Vincent O'Conor — 
Northwestern University) ; Surgical Correc- 
tion of Post-Traumatic Laryngeal Stenosis 
(Dr. Paul Holinger — University of Illinois); 
Repair of Diaphragmatic Hernia (Dr. John 
Dorsey — Davis & Geek) ; Transposition of the 
Great Vessels, another in Pediatric Surgery 
series. 



LEWIS & MARTIN FILMS INC. 

1431 N. Wells Street, Chicago 10, 111. 
Phone: WHitehall 4-7477 

Date of Organization: 1947 

Herschell G. Lewis, President 

Arthur Kaplan, Executive Vice-President 

Robert Henning, Production Manager 

Dick Hawley, Director of Photography 

Richard Price, Chief Animator 

Tony LaPietra, Editorial Supervisor 

John Mackenzie, Creative Director 

(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOV^ING PAGE) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



METROPOLITAN CHICAGO: 



LEWIS & MARTIN FILMS: Cont'd. 

Betty Lou Taylor, Studio Manager 
Sanford Greenlaw, Art Director 

Services: Producers of industrial, sales, 
training, and public relations motion pictures; 
slidefilms; television programs and commer- 
cials; script service; studio rental; technical & 
figure animation and art: filmographs. Facili- 
ties: Two stages, 50 ft. x 100 ft. and 60 ft. x 
100 ft.; animation stand and artists; 35mm 
and 16mm photographic and sound equipment; 
creative staff; 35mm and 16mm editing equip- 
ment; still department and laboratory; slide- 
film animation camera; large standing sets. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Story of the U.S. Mail, 
Lift Safely (Post Office Dept.) ; The Clarkhill 
Project (U.S. Corps of Engineers) : Thyroidec- 
tomy under Hypoanesthesia (William Kroger, 
M.D.) ; Their Future Is in Your Hands (Spas- 
tic Children's Center) ; Cornelia Otis Skinner 
Monologues (Disabled American Veterans) ; 
Jerry Tales (Marshall, l,ee and Richards). 
Slidefilms: the Easy Way (Serta Associates, 
Inc.) ; It's More Than Beer (Goetz Brewing 
Company). TV Commercials: for Blue Cross 
(Bozell and Jacobs) ; 0-Cedar (Turner Adver- 
tising) ; U. S. National Bank (Allen and 
Reynolds) ; Allstate Insurance (Leo Burnett) ; 
Norge (Donahue and Coe ) ; Serta Mattress 
(Erwin, Wasey, Ruthrauff and Ryan) ; Tru- 
Ade (Cunningham and Walsh) ; and others. 



FENTON McHUGH PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

518 Davis Street, Evanston, Illinois 
Phone: UNiversity 4-3021 

Date of Organization: 1956 

Fenton P. McHugh, President 

Ernest A. Lukas, Executive Vice-President 

.James R. O'Riley, Production Manager 

Services: 16mm and 35mm motion pictures 
for business, industry and television. Facili- 
ties: 16mm and 35mm motion picture and 
sound recording equipment; sound stage; ed- 
iting facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: From Start to Finish 
(Johnson's Wax) ; Twenty Four Hours (Cath- 
olic Archdiocese) ; A Penny Saved (Credit 
Union National Association). Filmed TV 
Programs: Su-mn's Show- — 13 segments (Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting System). Slidefilm : 
The Story of Chocolate (Robert A. Johnston 
Co.). 



MIDWEST FILM STUDIOS 

6808 No. Clark Street, Chicago 26, Illinois 
Phone: SHeldrake 3-1239 

Date of Organization: 1947 

Alfred K. Levy, Production Manager 

Services: Motion picture and slidefilm produc- 
tion; research, writing, photography, editing, 
etc. Facilities: Motion picture and slidefilm 
equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Point of Sales (Standard 
Oil) ; A New Dimension (Magill). Slidefilms: 



Why Eat a Good Breakfast (Cereal Institute 
Inc.) ; Ohmite Story (Ohmite) ; Sales Meeting 
(Dietzgen). 



MGM-TV, Division of Loew's, Inc. 

360 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 

Illinois 
Dick Lewis, in charge 
(See complete listing under New York City) 



Stanley Neai Productions, Inc. 

8 East Huron St., Chicago 11, Illinois 
Phone: SUperior 7-5616 
John Newell, Representative 
(See complete listing in New York City area) 



FRED A. NILES PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

22 West Hubbard Street, Chicago 10, 111. 
Phone: SUperior 7-0760 

Date of Organization: December, 1955 
Branch: Fred Niles Films, Hollywood, RKO- 

Pathe Studios, Culver City, California. 

Chris Peterson, Jr., Vice-President. 

Fred A. Niles, President & Oivner 

Chris Petersen, Jr., Vice-Pres., Chg. H'uwod 

Thomas R. Ryan, Vice President, Production 

Lou Kravitz, Vice-President, Sales 

R. W. Pat O'Brian, Director of Marketing 

William E. Harder, Editing Dept. Super. 

Frank Richter, Chief Sound Engineer 

Ruth Ratny, Creative Director 

Edward E. Katz, Controller 

Lloyd Bethune, Thomas Rook, Charles Ticho, 

John Ertmann, Directors 

Jack Whitehead (B.S.C.), Supvr. of 

Photography 
Howard Siemon, Head Cameraman 
Frances Metelko, Administrative Assistant 

Services: Motion picture production of TV 
commercials; industrial, public relations and 
sales training films; theatrical releases; TV- 
film series. Live action photography and ani- 
mation. Full creative services : scripts, story- 
boards, industrial shows, sales training meet- 
ings. Facilities: Soundproof shooting stages; 
technical crews for production in studio and 
location with multi-camera equipment; color 
or black & white. Complete sound facilities; 
recording, dubbing, mixing (with nine chan- 
nels). 14-man editing department, completely 
equipped. Animation executed by Niles' own 
staff of animators in Hollywood. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: She Wears 10 Hats (Na- 
tional Presto Industries); Harvey Dilemma 
(U.S. Savings & Loan League) ; Whither Thou 
Goest (Leader Dogs for the Blind — Lions In- 
ternational) ; Homemakers' Quiz (West Bend 
Aluminum Co.) ; Automation Comes of Age 
(Clearing Machine Corp.) ; Two Hour Miracle 
(DuPont, Excelsior & Detrex Companies). 
Slidefilms: Operation Space Command — 
series of 4 (York Corporation) ; A Dream of 
a Deal (Krim-Ko Corporation). TV Commer- 
cials: For Quaker Oats Co. (John W. Shaw) ; 
Montgomery Ward; Kraft Margarine (Need- 



ham, Louis & Brorby) ; Presto Industries: 
(Donahue & Coe) ; Hudepohl Beer (Stockton, 
West & Burkhart) ; Stag Beer (EWR&R); 
Shaeffer Pens (Russel M. Seeds) ; Paper-Mate 
Pens (Foote, Cone & Belding). Filmed TV 
Programs: Oral Roberts Evangelistic Associa- 
tion — half -hour programs ; Cross-Country, 
half -hour agricultural programs. 



PARAGON PICTURES, INC. 

2540 Eastwood Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 
Phones: DAvis 8-5900; BRiargate 4-3711 

Date of Organization: 1948 
Robert Laughlin, President 
J. Edgar Kelly, Secretary 
Catherine M. Laughlin, Treasurer 
Samuel J. Needham, Production Manager 

Services: Industrial motion pictures, slide- 
films and TV commercials. Facilities: Fully 
equipped sound stage 40 ft. x 80 ft., magnetic 
and variable density optical recording systems, 
conference and screening rooms, editing and 
still laboratory facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Ti-ue Facts (Motor Wheel 
Corp., Duo-Therm Heaters) ; The Silent 
Enemy (Rust-Oleum Corp.). SLIDEFILMS: 
What Are You Driving At; At Your Service; 
Check and Double Check; Keep It Safe (Zurich 
Insurance Co.). TV Commercials: Duo- 
Thei-m Heaters (Young & Rubicam Adv.) ; 
Pabst Beer, Kelloggs Corn Flakes (Leo 
Burnett Adv.) ; Turns (Ruthrauff & Ryan). 



PILOT PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1819-23 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, Illinois 
Phones: AMbassador 2-4141; DAvis 8-3700 

Date of Organization: 1940 
Date of Incorporation : 1952 

C. Robert Isely, President 

M. E. O'Brien, Exec. Vice-President, 

Treasurer 
A. E. Boroughf, Secretary 
William Kirshner, Dir. Sales Promotion 
Hal Childs, Dir. of Photography 
Malcolm Rippeteau, Dir. & Writer 
Ken Kracht, Dir. of Illustrative 

Photography a 

Connie Andersen, Slidefilm Dept. * 

John Goulden, Set Designer. Studio Mgr. 

Services: Complete creative and production 
facilities for motion pictures, slidefilms, and 
stripfilms. Research, writing, photography, 
sound recording, editing, and stripfilm services 
for industrial and business films. FACILITIES: 
10,000 sq. ft. 3,700 sq. ft. shooting stage with 
14 ft. clearance under cat-walks; 16mm 
Mitchell camera equipment; gasoline generator 
& battery packs for field work; Ampex and 
Magnasync recording equipment; double sys- 
tem projection facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND S P O rs S O R S 

Motion Pictures: Progressive Processing 
(Universal Oil Products Co.); Principles of 
Frequency Response ( Instrument Society of 
America) ; Moving Mountains; A Load Off 
Your Mind (Clark Equipment Company) ; Five 
Keys to Success (Tyler Refrigeration Corpora- 
tion). Slidefilms: T-2i Excavator Crane 

(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




«» 



Good action shots in any light 
with 'Superior' 4 film" 



says Don Malkames, A.S.C. 

The high speed 'ind extreme latitude of Du Pont 
Superior® 4 Motion Picture Fihn made it the 
choice of Don Malkames, Director of Photog- 
raphy for Louis Kelman's production. "The 
Burglar," released through Columbia Pictures. 
Shot largely on location in Atlantic City. 
N. J., "The Burglar" posed some serious prob- 
lems. Like the scene above. Filmed at night, 
with bright lights shining into the lens, this shot 
still shows good contrast, fine definition in 
darker areas— made possible by the use of 
Du Pont '"Superior" 4. 



"On location, I know I can't miss with 
'Superior' 4," says Mr. Malkames. "For set 
work. Du Pont 'Superior' 2 lets me get just the 
lighting effects I want . . . without danger of 
under-exposure. 

"The service we get from the Du Pont Tech- 
nical Representative. J. T. Dougherty, the inter- 
est he takes and the technical information he 
furnishes . . . that's very important, too." 

For more information about Du Pont Motion Picture 
Films, contact tlie nearest Sales Office, or write 
Du Pont. Photo Products Dept.. 2420-2 Nemours 
Building. Wilmington 98. Del. In Canada: Du Pont 
Company of Canada (1956) Limited, Toronto. 



Better Things for Better Living . . . through Chem'isiry 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



141 



METROPOLITAN CHICAGO: 



PILOT PRODUCTIONS: Cont'd. 

(Clai'k Equipment Company >; Flexidyne 
(Dodge Mfg. Co.) ; Sew Dimensions for Sales 
(Voice of Music Corp.) ; Flat. Wide & Hand- 
some ( Electro- Voice Co.) ; The Big One (Chi- 
cago Community Fundi. 



Playhouse Pictures 

360 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago 1, 

Illinois 
Phone : STate 2-3686 

Peter Del Negro, Maimgev & Representative 
(See complete listing in Los Angeles area) 



PRODUCERS FILM STUDIOS 
(Jack Lieb Productions) 

540 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 
Phone: WHitehall 3-1440 

Date of Organization : 1946 

Branch : 10281 E. Bay Harbor Drive. Miami 
Beach 54, Florida. Phone: UNion 6-3009. 

Jack H. Lieb, President 

Warren H. Lieb, Vice-President & 
Production Sitprv. 

Walter A. Hotz, Chief Sound Engineer 

John Jast, Recordist & Music Librarian 

Charles A. Click, Sales Manager 

Elsie Kerbin, Head Editor 

Elaine Badis, Office Manager 

Services: Motion picture production; indus- 
trial, theatrical, television; sales promotional, 
institutional and sales training; specialists in 
travel promotion films, television productions, 
spots and shows. Film strips and sound slide- 
films. Consultant on all motion picture prob- 
lems. Facilities: Complete studios, 2 sound 
stages, RCA 35mm and 16mm magnetic and 
optical recording. Specialists in hi fidelity 
magnetic mixing. Original music scores and 
music libraries including Capital "Hi Q" 
series. Complete editing facilities with optical 
and magnetic Moviolas. Interlock projection, 
35mm, 16mm, optical or magnetic. Animation 
and title production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Kaiser Dome at Virginia 
Beach (Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical 
Sales); Hail to the Cook (Hotel, Restaurant 
and Bartenders International Union AFL- 
CIO) ; Blade Lake, Caland at Steeprock ( Con- 
.struction Aggregates Corporation) ; The Eyes 
Have It ( Plastic Contact Lens Company ) . 



■3f 



Reid H. Ray Film Industries, Inc. 

208 South LaSalle Street, Chicago 4, Illinois 
Phone: Financial 6-0897 

Frank Balkin, Vice-President. Mid-West 
Sales 
(See complete listing under St. Paul, Minn.) 

Rudy Swanson Productions 

7715 Oglesby Avenue, Chicago 49, Illinois 
Thomas Fenton, Sales Representative 
(See complete listing Appleton, Wisconsin) 



SARRA, INC. 

16 East Ontario Street, Chicago 11, Illinois 
Phone: WHitehall 4-5151 

200 East 56th Street, New York 22, N.Y. 
Phone: MUrray Hill 8-0085 

Date of Organization: 1937 

(At New York City Studios) 
Valentino Sarra, President 
Morris Behrend, General Manager 
John Henderson III, Sales Manager 
Rex Cox, Creative Director 
Robert Jenness, Director 
Stanley Johnson, Director 
George Altman, Chief Editor 
David Fletcher, Art Director 

(At Chicago Studios) 
Robert L. Foster, Manager 
Marvin Bailey, Production Manager 
Karl Oeser, Photography 
Norman Schickedanz, Director 
Harry Holt, Creative Director 
John Brix, Assistarit Prod. Mgr. 
Helen Krupa, Scenario Supervisor 
George DeDecker, Art Director 
Harold Lignell, Laboratory Manager 
Victor Cosgrave, Sales 
Hal Toleman, Sales 
Bill Newton, Sales 

Services : Creation and production of motion 
pictures, slidefilms and television commercials 
for sales, sales training, product promotion 
and information, employee training and indoc- 
trination, safety training and promotion, pub- 
lic information, Armed Forces training sub- 
jects. Facilities: Sound stage, 16mm and 35- 
mm motion picture cameras; still photographic 
equipment and personnel; 16mm and 35mm 
editing; 16mm and 35mm processing labora- 
tory; art and animation; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

(All references for television commei'cials ) 
TV Commercials: For Pet Milk Company 
( Gardner Advertising Company ) ; Rheingold 
Beer ( Foote, Cone & Belding); Molson"s Ex- 
port Ale ( Cockfield, Brown & Company, 
Limited); Bulova Watch Company, National 
Biscuit Company ( McCann-Erickson, Inc.); 
Camay Soap, Brading's Ale (The F. H. Hay- 
hurst Company Limited); Timken Roller 
Bearing Company (BBD&O); Campbell Tag- 
gart Associated Bakeries; Salada Tea (Sulli- 
van, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, Inc. ) ; Chock 
Full O'Nuts Coffee (Grey); Richard Hudnut 
Sportsman Grooming Essentials ( Norman, 
Craig & Kummel, Inc.); Birds Eye Frozen 
Fish ( Young & Rubicam, Inc. ) ; Schoenling 
Beer ( Rollman Advertising Agency); Breck 
Hair Set Mist ( H. B. Humphrey, Alley & 
Richards); Breck Banish and Shampoo (N. 
W. Ayer & Son) ; Knox Gelatine (Charles W. 
Hoyt Company ) ; and others. 

Telepix-Anderson, Inc. 

6620 Diversey, Chicago 35, Illinois 
Stanley Anderson, in charge 
410 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago 4, Illinois 
Robert F. Edmonds, in charge 
(See complete listing in Los Angeles area) 



UPA Pictures, Inc. 

360 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, Illinois 
Phone: ANdover 3-7566 
Jerry Abbott, Sales Executive 
(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



TELECINE FILM STUDIOS, INC. 

100 S. Northwest Highway, Park Ridge, 111. 
Phone: TA 3-1418 
Chicago Line RO 3-5818 

Date of Organization: 1952 

Byron L. Friend, President 
June A. Friend, Secretary-Treasurer 
Henry Ball, Facilities Manager 
Hans Graff, Supervising Editor 
Helen Leber, Talent Contact 

Services: Motion pictures for industry and 
television, color or b&w; 35mm or 16mm, stu- 
dio or location. TV commercials, complete 
packaging service, editing, re-recording, mix- 
ing, interlock screening and recording; script 
writing; animation; consultation. Hi-speed 
photography for observation and analysis; 
time-lapse films. Facilities: Multiple camera, 
continuous shooting picture equipment, 35mm 
or 16mm cameras; magnetic sound recorders; 
sound stage 30' x 45', five-channel re-i-ecording 
and mixing ; selsyn interlock. Gasoline and i 
battery-driven generators for location ; wire- ' 
less microphones. Lighting equip, for studio 
and location; editing equipment, including 35- 
mm, 16mm Moviolas. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Great Enterprises (Chicago 
Metropolitan YMCA ) ; Ideas and Film ( Bell 
& Howell Company); Chicago Youth Rally 
( Coca-Cola Company) ; Bill's Better Breakfast 
(Cereal Institute); Tlie Adventurers (Willis 
Butler). Filmed Television Programs: Zoo 
Parade, World Safari ( National Broadcasting 
Company). TV Commercials: for Lyttons, 
Cooking Magic, Ding Dong School, Papermate, 
Healthknit. 



UNITED FILM & RECORDING 
STUDIOS, INC. 

301 East Erie Street, Chicago 11, Illinois 
Phone: SUperior 7-9114 

Date of Organization : 1928 
Date of Incorporation: 1933 

William L. Klein, President & Exec. 
Producer 

Elliot Schick, Film Director 

John Bruun, Creative Director 

Larry Wellington, Creative Musical Uirecior 

Bryan Wright, Chief, Engineering Dept. 

Howard Alk, Head of Editing Dept. 

Marilyn Friedel, Sales Development (Si- 
Traffic Coordination 

Ed Hanson, General Sales Manager 

Services: Creators and producers of motion 
pictures, slidefilms, radio & TV commercials 
and related materials for a complete custom- 
made package in all branches of business and 
industry. Facilities: Modern, fully equipped, 
air conditioned studios, 16mm and 35mm fea- 
turing Western Electric and RCA sound, 
Mitchell cameras, Ampex, etc. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: As Ye Soiv (State of Illi- 
nois); Because Men Dream (Jewish Federa- 
tion of Chicago); Quality House (Lathing 
Foundation of Chicago); More Money in 
Meat; The Holly mat ic Story (Hollymatic 
Corporation ) . 

"JS" this symbol, appearing over a 
producer's listing, indicates that display adver- 
tising containing additional reference data ap- 
pears in other pages of this 8th Review. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



WILDING PICTURE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1345 Argyle Street, Chicago 40, Illinois 
Phone: LOngbeach 1-8410 

Date of Organization: 1914 
Date of Incorporation: 1927 

BRANCH OFFICES 

New York : 405 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 

Phone: PLaza 9-0854. T. H. Westermann, 

Vice-President. 
Detroit: 4925 Cadieux Road, Detroit, Mich. 

Phone: TUxedo 2-3740. Dean Coffin, 

Vice-President. 

Cleveland: 1010 Euclid Bldg., Cleveland, 
Ohio. Phone : TOwer 1-6440. Larry Young, 
District Manager. 

Pittsburgh: 3 Gateway Center, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. Phone: GRant 1-6240. Quin Short, 
! District Manager. 

I Cincinnati: 617 Vine St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Phone: GArfield 1-0477. R. L. McMillan, 
District Manager. 

Chicago: 1345 Argyle Street, Chicago 40. 

Hugh Gage, District Manager. 
, St. Louis: 3920 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 
Phone: JEfferson 5-7422. Jack Robertson, 
District Manager. 
[Hollywood: 5981 Venice Blvd., Hollywood, 
' California. Phone: WEbster 8-0183. 

I Frank MuUaney, in charge. 

i 

i C. H. Bradfield, Jr., President 
I J. A. Kellock, Vice-Pres. & General Mgr. 
Jack Rheinstrom, Vice-President, Sales 
C. B. Hatcher, Vice-President, Finance 
A. J. Henderson, Vice-Presldeyit, Creative 
[ Services; Wilding-Henderson, Inc. 
1 J. E. Parrott, Vice-President & General 
Manager, Wilding-Henderson, Inc. 
Walter Tinkham, Vice-President, in charge 

of Production 
Norman B. Terry, V ice-Pr evident , Sales; 

Wilding-Henderson, Inc. 
G. Duncan Taylor, Prod. Mgr., Slidefilm 

Dept. 
William J. Morris, Production Mgr., 

New York 
Charles O. Dennis, Production Mgr., Detroit 
Morgan W. Gibney, Product Development 
James M. Constable, Vice-President & 

Executive Producer 
Russ Raycroft, Director, Television Division 
A. J. Bradford, Director, Customer Services 
Jerome C. Diebold, Executive Producer, 

Government Services 
Hai-old A. Witt, Executive Producer, 

Government Services 
Harold Kinzle, Laboratory Superintendent 
Gilbert Lee, Art Director 
James E. Dickert, Recording Director 
Jack A. Krieger, Advertising & Sales 

Promotion 
J. B. Morton, Sales Co-ordinator 

Services: Creators and producers of motion 
pictures and slidefilms for business and in- 
dustry; television commercials; complete live 
shows and presentations for conventions and 



sales meetings. Facilities: Four nationwide 
studio and service operations, detailed as fol- 
lows : 

Chicago: Home office and main studios: 60,000 
sq. ft. of floor space — 27,000 sq. ft. in three 
sound stages — 200' x 75' ; 100' x 70' and 100' x 
50' ; remainder to administrative, service and 
creative offices; still and motion laboratories; 
optical and animation departments ; art depart- 
ment; screening rooms; sound i-ecording de- 
partment; film vaults; carpenter shop and 
other departments. Wilding Customer Serv- 
ices department located at 5137 Broadway, 
Chicago in one-story building of 14,000 sq. ft. 
It provides stage of 3,500 sq. ft. for slidefilm 
production; remainder for servicing and stor- 
age of industrial show equipment and demon- 
stration area. 

» * » 

Detroit: Studio operations are housed in mod- 
ern building especially constructed for motion 
picture production. New building contains 
administrative, sales and service offices; graph- 
ic arts department; two sound stages, totaling 
8,000 sq. ft., and screening rooms. Wilding- 
Henderson, Inc., is a new addition to national 
organization, offering training, sales promo- 
tion and merchandising services. Its modern 
building at 13535 Livernois St. houses own 
staff of planning, merchandising, editorial and 
creative personnel. 



New York : In addition to sales and service 
offices listed above. Wilding now provides com- 
plete motion picture and television production 
facilities at 157 E. 69th St. The new studio 
puts all eastern production personnel under 
one roof; provides two sound-proof stages 
totaling 3,000 sq. ft.; a carpenter shop; sound 
recording equipment; cutting and projection 
facilities and administrative offices. Easy ac- 
cessibility from 69th St. for handling auto- 
mobiles, trucks and large appliances. 



Hollywood: Sales and service facilities, sound 
stage, screening room and all other equipment 
for motion picture production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: 1958 New Car and Truck 
Announcement Pictures ( Ford Motor Com- 
pany); Ace Ranchero (Deere & Company); 
For Immediate Action (A.T.&T.); Color 
Magic (Interchemical Corporation); White 
Magic ( Morton Salt Company ) ; Path ways to 
Yesterday (Illinois Bell Telephone) ; Asbestos, 
A Matter of Time (Johns Manville ) ; The Road 
Ahead (General Electric); The Big Change 
( Standard Oil of Indiana ) ; Spring Dealer 
Meeting (Goodyear); Order Makers Institute 
(Truscon Steel Div. of Republic Steel Cor- 
poration); Jet Aircraft Rendezvous (U.S. 
Navy); A Product of the Imagination (Al- 
coa); Bread on the Water (Sinclair); You 
Decide (Ohio Oil); Space, Time and Steel 
( Armco) ; llOi Sutton Road (Champion Paper 
and Fibre Company); The Story of Main 
Street (Dun and Bradstreet); Paint for the 
Pictures of Tomorrow ( Rinshed-Mason ) . 
Slidefilms: Ask for the Business (Financial 
Public Relations Association) ; The Ford 
Seminar (Ford Motor Company) ; The Follow 
Tlirough, Fixtures, Light for Easy Seeing, 
Lighting for Comfort, Light for Living (Gen- 
eral Electric) ; Assured Accumulator (New 
York Life) ; Timken Heavy Duty AP Railroad 



if' □ iJL ^ ri 



WEST CENTRAL 



Bearing (Timken Roller Bearing); Tips on 
Using Tools, Demonstration Towmotor (Tow- 
motor Corporation ) ; Miracle for Milady 
(Whirlpool Corporation). Wide Screen slides 
and slidefilms for Morton Salt. Slides, road 
show-slides and slidefilm for Kellogg Company. 
TV Commercials: for Alcoa (Fuller and 
Smith and Ross ) ; Pure Oil Company ( Leo 
Burnett); Pontiac ( McManus, John & 
Adams); Plymouth (N. W. Ayer); Ford (J. 
Walter Thomp.son ) ; Standard Oil of Indiana 
(D'Arcy); Union Carbide (J. M. Mathes) ; 
Western Auto Supply (Bruce B. Brewer); 
Cities Service (Ellington & Company) ; R.C.A. 
Whirlpool (Kenyon & Eckhart) ; Lincoln 
(Young & Rubicam) ; Quaker Oats (Needham, 
Louis & Brorby); Peters Shoe Company 
(Henri, Hurst & McDonald); Kelvinator 
(Gayer); Colgate (Lennon & Newall ) ; Trix 
( Tatham-Laird ) ; Pabst (Lester M. Malitz); 
Hit Parade Cigarettes (BBD&O); Camels 
( William E.sty ) ; A.M.F. Bowling Stars 
(Fletcher D. Richards) and others. Indus- 
trial Shows: for Standard Oil of Indiana; 
Ford Motor Company; American Kitchens; 
Butler Manufacturing Company; Motorola 
Corporation; Admiral Corporation; Electric 
Auto-Lite Company; Dodge, DeSoto, Ply- 
mouth, Chrysler Imperial and Dodge Truck 
Divisions of Chrysler Corporation. 



4e- 

Raphael G. Wolff Studios, Inc. 

2103 Orrington Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

Phone: DAvis 8-7236 

Carl Wester, in charge 

(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



Illinois 

G & G FILM CORPORATION 

113 North Market Street, Champaign, 

Illinois 
Phone: FLeetwood 6-4266 

Date of Organization : 1955 

Perry Gliessman, President 
George Grubb, Vice-President 
Gordon Grubb, Secretary-Treasurer 
Lee Stark, General Manager 
Bill Godsey, Production Manager 
Gene Wilder, Art Director 
Services: Scripts and storyboards, live action 
and animation including articulated dolls; 
complete production of 16mm sales, training, 
public relations, educational and indu.strial 
films, also Television commercials. Facilities: 
Multiple camera, continuous shooting picture 
equipment, 16mm cameras; sound recorders; 
new studio with 3,200 sq. ft. of floor space 
including sound stage and narration booths; 
five-channel re-recording and mixing. Complete 
personnel and equipment for studio and loca- 
tion; complete 16mm editing equipment. Three 
man art department. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Windows (Ponderosa Pine 
(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



WEST CENTRAL: Kansas, Minnesota 



G & G FILM CORP.: Cont'd. 

Woodwork Association) ; Panelized A & W 
Stand (A & W Root Beer Co.) ; Pork People 
Like (University of Illinois) ; A Voice in the 
Market Place (Illinois Grain Corporation) ; 
The Farmer Makes Policy (Illinois Agrciul- 
tural Association) ; Parrish Hall Construction 
(Creative Building Inc.). TV Commercials: 
for Illinois Bell Telephone Co. (N. W. Ayer & 
Son, Inc.); Monogram Heaters (The Biddle 
Co.) ; Smith Oil & Refining Co. (R. E. Holl- 
ingsworth & Assoc); Smith-Douglass Com- 
pany, Inc. (Richard Crabb Associates) ; Holly- 
wood Candy Co. (Grubb-Petersen Advertis- 
ing). 



New World Productions 

1224 N. Glenwood Street, Peoria, 111. 
(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



Kansas 



CENTRON CORPORATION, INC. 

West Ninth at Avalon Road, Lawrence, 

Kansas 
Phone: Viking 3-0400 

Date of Organization : 1947 

Arthur H. Wolf, President and Exec. Prod. 
Russell Mosser, Executive Vice-President 

and Treasurer 
Norman Stuewe, Vice-President 
Charles Lacey, Secretary and Director of 

Production 
Maurice Prather, Motion Picture 

Photography 
Margaret Travis, Script Supervision 
Jerry Drake, Script 
Harold Harvey, Director 
Gene Courtney, Director 
Robert Rose, Still Photography 
Dan Palmqui.st, Editing 
Oscar Rojas, Art Director 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms for 
public relations, sales, training, education and 
television. Subcontracting. Specialized sports 
photography. Specialized color and/or black 
and white still assignments. Animation and 
recording service. Facilities : New studio and 
office facilities include 60' x 100' x 27' sound 
stage, voice studios, editing rooms, sound 
rooms, etc.; Mitchell and Cine Special cam- 
eras; complete lighting and sound equipment 
for studio and location. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Whitehall u-isoo (Ameri- 
can Medical Association) ; Eye to the Sky; 
T37 Engineering; Engineering Problems on 
the 620 (Cessna Aircraft Company) ; Trans- 
portation by Land; Transportation by Air; 
Transportation by Water; Seasonal Changes 
in Plants; How Seeds Are Scattered; Animals 
and Their Homes; Animals Through the Win- 
ter; Let's Try Choral Reading; and others 
(McGraw-Hill Young America) ; Basketball 
Hilites of 1957 (University of Kan.sas). Film- 
strips: School Helpers Series; Federal Gov- 
ernment Series; Elementary Science *6' 



(McGraw-Hill Young America ) . Slidefilms : 
The Name is G-B Duct (Gustin-Bacon Mfg. 
Co.) ; What Changed Charley? (Board of Lay 
Activities, The Methodist Church). 



Minnesota 

CONTINEMTAL FILMS 
(Div. of Midwest Radio-Television, Inc.) 

47 South Ninth St., Minneapolis 2, Minn. 
Phone: FE 8-6301 

Date of Organization : 1954 

Robert Ridder, President 
F. Van Konynenburg, Executive Vice-Pres. 
Paul D. Rusten, E.vecutive Producer 
Richard C. Polister, Production Director 
Wallace N. Kammann, Head Cameraman 
Ben C. Goldenberg, Sales 

Services: Writing, direction and production 
of color and black and white motion pictures 
for business, education, religion and television. 
Complete production staff. Facilities: .30' x 
60' sound studio; Arriflex, Mitchell cameras; 
editing, interlock projection; synchronous 
magnetic film sound recording and mixing; 
film music library. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Your Future (Humboldt 
Institute) ; It's Easy to Bend (O'Neil-Irwin) ; 
Trackmaster (Owatonna Tool) ; Automation in 
Passenger Tire Building (United States Rub- 
ber) ; They Called It Minnesota C Minnesota 
Centennial Commission). Slidefilms: The 
Retarded Child — Planning His Future (Min- 
nesota Welfare) ; Eugene of Paris (Rayette, 
Inc.). TV Commercials: King Koil (United 
States Bedding) ; .lanney Best Paints (Erwin, 
Wassey, RuthraufF & Ryan, Inc.). 



•H- 



EMPIRE PHOTOSOUND INCORPORATED 

1920 Lyndale Ave. South, Minneapolis 5, 

Minn. 
Phone: FRanklin 4-5040 

Date of Incorporation: October, 1945 

William S. Yale, President 
Charles B. Woehrle, Secretary-Treasurer 
Catherine Running, Business Manager 
Richard Jamieson, Production 
Arthur Nicol, Director of Slidefilms & 

Animation 
Gwen Wohlfeil, Assist. Production Mgr. 
John Raddatz, Chief Cameraman 
Frank Punchard, Editor 
Sam Sabean, Sound Engineer 

Services and Facilities: Completely equipped 
production facilities for motion pictures, sound 
slidefilms, television commercials and sales 
meeting presentations. 16mm Maurer camera. 
Time-lapse, slow motion equipment. Editing, 
and interlock projection. Animation, sound re- 
cording studio 40' X 60' sound stage. Tape and 
magnetic film recording, disc and tape music 
libraries. Process screen and arc rear pro- 
jection. High fidelity public address system. 
16mm Eastman arc projector. Strong Arc 
projector for 3*4 x 4 slides and filmstrips, 
8 ft. X 10 ft., 8 ft. X 20 ft., 12 ft. X 30 ft. and 
20 ft. X 20 ft. projection screens, available 
for conventions, sales meetings, etc. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Truly Yours, A Promise 



I Farmers Union Central Exchange); The 
Land Leveler (The Farmhand Company); 
Empire on Parade, Glorioiis Glacier Park 
(Great Northern Railway Company) ; An In- 
troduction to the Hossfeld Universal Bender 
(Hossfeld Manufacturing Company) ; Prog- 
ress Report, Out of the Earth, Spanish and 
Japanese versions (International Minerals & 
Chemical Corporation) ; Growing Places (Min- 
nesota Mining & Manufacturing Company). 
Slidefilms: Batter Breads, Better Biscuits, 
Muffin Making, This Is My Life (General 
Mills, Inc.) ; Double-tested House Paint (Mar- 
shall Wells Company i ; Permanent Hair Color, 
Hair Bleaching (Rayette, Inc.). TV COMMER- 
CIALS: for Farmers Union Central Exchange, 
The Farmhand Company, Minnesota Mining & 
Manufacturing Company. 



REID H. RAY FILM INDUSTRIES, INC. 

2269 Ford Parkway, St. Paul 16, Minnesota 
Phone: Midway 9-1393 

Date of Organization : 1910 

Branch Offices: 208 S. LaSalle St., Chi- 
cago 4, 111. Phone : Financial 6-0897. Frank 
Balkin, Vice-President Mid-West Sales. 384 
West 1st St., Dayton 2, Ohio. Phone: BAld- 
win 2-5174. A. Merrit Simpson, Vice-Presi- 
dent Eastern Sales. 716 No. LaBrea, Holly- 
wood. Phone: WEbster 5-3737. Anatole 
Kirsanoff, Animation Director. 

Reid H. Ray, President 

William H. Ringold, Vice-President 

R. V. Jeffrey, Vice-President, General Sales 

Frank Havlicek, Sales Mgr., Film Ad. Div. 

Robert E. Whitney, Asst. to the President 

Ellsworth H. Polsfuss, Production Manager 

Clive Bradshaw. Laboratory Supervisor 

Gordon Ray, Director 

Robert H. Winter, Chief Film Editor 

R. B. Nelson, Director 

Services: Motion pictures, slidefilms, TV films 
and commercials (live or animated). Screen 
advertising for theatres (local, regional, na- 
tional). Facilities: Creative department; 
studio, laboratory, opticals, titles; animation; 
16 & 35mm production equipment with sound 
recording in studio or on location; RCA mag- 
netic or optical sound 35 & 16mm. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Where Law and Practice 
Meet (West Publishing Company); Write 
Your Own Ticket (Gale Institute) ; Cotton 
Meets the Challenge, So You're Going to Buy 
a Combine (International Harvester) ; On the 
Practical Side, Investing for Better Living 
( Masonite Company) ; 1/3 Mile per Hour, 
Highways Unlimited (Harnischfeger Corpora- 
tion ) ; Saucepan Sorcery ( Swift & Company) ; 
Miracle in Nebraska, It Can't Be Done, Whafs 
New for '.58 (Deere & Company) ; Sea Power, 
series. Sixth Fleet — Force for Peace (U.S. 
Navy). Slidefilms: Checker Bagger, Opera- 
tion Meat Department, Operation Gross Profit 
(IGA); The Value of Specialty Advertising 
(Harrison-Smith); There's a Big Difference 
(Butler Manufacturing Company) ; Window 
Beauty Can Help Sell Homes (Andersen Cor- 
poration). TV Commercials: for Hamms: 
Top Value Stamps; Northern States Power; 
Scott- Atwater; Toro; Glass Wax; Kerr- 
Magee; Pillsbury and Tecnique. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



I GEORGE RYAN FILMS, INC. 

\ 210 South Seventh St., Minneapolis 2, 
Minnesota 
Phone : FEderal 5-8864 

Date of Organization : 1955 

George M. Ryan, President 

Henry K. Knoblauch, Vice-President, 

Treasurer 
Wayne A. Langston, Vice-President, Gen. 

Manager 
David E. Westphal, Camera-Editing Depts. 
Donald J. Egerstrom, Sound Dept. 

Services: 16 and 35mni for motion pictures, 
television film commercials, sound slidefilms. 
Facilities : 1000 sq. ft. sound stage plus silent 
shooting stage approximately 750 sq. ft. with 
two working kitchens; miscellaneous 16mm 
cameras, 35mm blimped Arriflex, Magnasync 
tape recorder, ^4" Ampex tape recorder, 16 
and 35mm Moviola with complete editing 
facilities: screening room. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Code Gl5 MF 7, Warehous- 
ing Operations (Pillsbui-y Mills, Inc.); Hot 
Breads 'Round the Clock (General Mills, Inc.) ; 
Diagnosis: Overload (United Hospital Fund). 
TV Commercials: for various clients in 1957. 



Kansas City, Missouri 



THE CALVIN COMPANY 

1105 Truman Road, Kansas City 6, Missouri 
Phone: HArrison 1-1284 

Date of Organization: 1931 

Branch Office: G. S. Kedey, Mgr. Motion 
Picture Centre, Toronto, Canada — Cana- 
dian Representative. 

Forrest 0. Calvin, President 

Lloyd Thompson, Executive Vice-President 

Larry Sherwood, Vice President 

Neal Keehn, Vice President 

Frank Barhydt, Vice President 

Betty C. Calvin, Secretary-Treasurer 

Richard Bulkeley, Production Manager 

James Y. Hash, Comptroller 

Leonard Keck, Operations Manager 

William D. Hedden, Laboratory Siipt. 

Maxine Covell, Office Manager 

Services: 16mm color, sales and sales training 
films; service work and laboratory facilities 
for other producers, universities and indus- 
trial photographic departments. Facilities: 
Two sound stages, area 19,000 sq. ft.; location 
equipment; laboratory with output of 25,000,- 
000 ft. black and white, 20,000,000 ft. color a 
year; Kodachrome and 16mm negative-positive 
color printing and processing. 14 editing 
rooms; two sound studios with six channels, 

1 eight phono, recording equipment for film, 
tape, wax, magnetic film; eight full-time di- 

I rectors; creative staff; complete animation 
music facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Alertness Avoids Accidents 
■ (AAA); In the Middle, The Grapevine, Hoiv 
I Much Cooperation, The Follow Through 
I (McGraw-Hill and Alcoa) ; Your Future with 
I Caterpillar, The Road Ahead (Caterpillar) ; 

Enemy Underground (Dow Chemical) ; To- 
I morrow's Fuel — Today (D-X Sunray) ; Mur- 
j der on the Screen (Eastman Kodak) ; Streak 



of Luck (Kansas City United Fund); New 
Roads to Profits (LeTourneau — Westing- 
house); Football for Millions (Official Sports 
Films Service) ; Buried Treasicre, Blessed 
Event (Phillips Petroleum Company) ; Opera- 
tion Understanding (Pittsburgh Plate Glass 
Company) . 



St. Louis, Missouri 

CONDOR FILMS, INC. 

1006 Olive Street, St. Louis 1, Missouri 
Phone; MAin 1-8876 

Date of Organization: 1951 

Bradford Whitney, President 

Edgar F. Stevens, Vice-President 

Dean Moore, Production Manager 

Mildred Smith, Secretary 

Charles L. Harris, Jr., Cinematographer 

Eddie Moore, Still Photographer 

Services: Producers of 16mm and 35mm sound 
motion pictures and slidefilms for sales promo- 
tion, advertising, public relations, training, tv. 
Complete creative, writing and production 
staffs. Productions from script to screen or 
service work; i.e., editing, adding sound and 
music to films already shot. Facilities: Air- 
conditioned sound stage with heavy-duty 
lighting. Maurer, Bell & Howell cameras. 
Stancil-Hoffman synchronous magnetic record- 
ing 16mm, 17V2mm, quarter-inch. Multiple 
channel synchronous interlocked mixing. 
16mm, 17y2mm and 35mm Moviolas (picture 
and sound). 16 and 35mm (arc) interlock 
projection. Music and sound effects library. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Tivine Making in the Land 
of the Mayas (Midwest Cordage Company) ; 
Hot Sticks on Rural Lines; Keeping 'Em Hot 
on 3Jf5,000 Volts; Making Good Connection 
(A. B. Chance Co.) ; Wagner Air Brake Sys- 
tems (Wagner Electric Company) ; Memories 
of Lucy Wortham James (The James Founda- 
tion) ; Highlights of 1957 (Eli Lilly and Com- 
pany). Slidefilms: Bwifc //awdhwg' (Ralston- 
Purina Company) ; The Story of D. Q. Joe 
(Dairy Queen Co.) ; Gridiron 1957. ana- 
morphic slide presentation (Advertising Club 
of St. Louis) ; Industrial Development, slide 
presentation (Chamber of Commerce of St. 
Louis). TV Commercials: for Union Electric 
Company, Anheuser-Busch, Inc., Creamo Mar- 
garine, Ralston-Purina Company, etc. 



CHARLES GUGGENHEIM & 
ASSOCIATES, INC. 

3330 Olive Street, St. Louis, Missouri 

Phone: JE 5-9188 

Date of Organization: 1956 

Charles Guggenheim, President 
Jack A. Guggenheim, Vice-President 
Jack A. Guggenheim, Jr., Secretary 
Thomas Guggenheim, Treasurer 

Services: Production of theatrical and non- 
theatrical motion pictures. Facilities: Com- 
plete 16 and 35mm editing, projection, sound 
recording, mixing, dubbing, interlock, camera, 
and lighting facilities. 



WEST CENTRAL: Missouri 



RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: A City Decides (Fund for 
the Republic) ; The Big City (City of St. 
Louis) ; World of One (Chicago Joint Appeal) ; 
The Man Who Called (National Council of 
Catholic Men) ; The Saint Louis Bank Robbery 
(self -produced for Guggenheim & Assoc). 



HARDCASTLE FILM ASSOCIATES 

7811 Carondelet Ave., St. Louis 5, Mo. 
Phone: Parkview 6-0202 

Date of Organization: 1930 

J. H. Hardcastle, Producer 
C. E. Talbott, Photography 
Richard Hardcastle, Editorial 
Richard Hardcastle, Jr., Production 

Services: Motion pictures, slidefilms, and TV 
commercials; advertising, public relations, 
sales, industrial training, civic, religious, fund 
raising films. Facilities: 35mm and 16mm 
equipment, sound stage, editing rooms, port- 
able lighting and recording equipment for lo- 
cation production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures; Presidents' Nig lit (South- 
western Bell Telephone Company ) ; Sam Sad- 
sack (Krupnick, Inc.) ; Expecting (Social 
Science Films) ; Dairy System (Farm Films, 
Inc.). Slidefilms: Multi Luber #J (Lincoln 
Engineering Company, Lincoln-Mercury Div.) ; 
Multi Luber #2 (Lincoln Engineering Com- 
pany, Edsel Division) ; Summer Highways & 
Buy ways (The Seven Up Company). TV 
Commercials: for Chicago Auto Wreckers 
(Robert Lurie, Inc.) ; Haase Olives (Rutledge 
& Lilienfeld, Inc.) ; Hamiltonian Savings and 
Loan. 



PREMIER FILM 

AND RECORDING CORPORATION 

3033 Locust Street, St. Louis 3, Missouri 
Phone: JEflferson 1-3555 

Date of Organization: 1936 

Theodore P. Desloge, President and Exec. 

Prod. 
Wilson Dalzell, Vice-President and Assoc. 

Prod. 
Roger E. Leonhardt, Production Manager 
Charles Kite, Editorial Supervisor 
H. Stewart Dailey, Director of Photography 
Robert Hoover Kirven, Creative Director 
James E. Darst, Director of Sales 

Services: Creators and producers of business, 
industrial, religious, documentary, theatrical 
and television motion pictures and sound slide- 
films — 16 or 35mm sound, black and white or 
color. Facilities: Air conditioned studios, 
sound stage, 35 and 16mm screening rooms. 
Mitchell, Bolex, B & H, 35 and 16mm cameras, 
Fearless dolly, M-R mike boom, complete light- 
ing facilities, mobile generator; complete re- 
cording, mixing, scoring facilities; tape, disc, 
magnetic film, interlock system; complete 
effects and music library; complete editing 
department, writers, directors, editors; record 
processing and pressing plant. 

(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



WEST CENTRAL: Mo., Neb., Wise. 



PREMIER FILM & RECORDING: Cont'd. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Tin- Cardinal Tradition 
(Anheuser-Busch, Inc.); Bud Half Qi(arts. 
Pick-A-Pair of Six Packs ( D'Arcy Advertis- 
ing Company); Bu.sch Bavarian Story 19.58 
(Gardner Advertising Company). Slidefilms; 
Perspective (Missouri Historical Society) ; 
The Living Christ Series, 7, The Blessings of 
the Christ Child (Concordia Publishing 
House); Falls City Beer sales training film 
(Horan-Daugherty, Inc.). TV Commercials: 
For Reisch Beer ( Oakleigh R. French & Asso- 
ciates) ; Budweiser (D'Arcy Advertising Com- 
pany) ; Busch Bavarian Beer, Monsanto Chem- 
ical (Gardner Advertising Company) ; MauU's 
Barbecue Sauce (George Nagel & Associates) ; 
Siegler Heaters (Siegler Corporation). 



Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

.3920 Lindell Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 
Phone: .JEfTerson 5-7422 
-Jack Robertson, District Manager 
(See complete li.sting under Chicago area) 



Nebraska 

CHRISTENSEN-KENNEDY PRODUCTIONS 

.'5.5.53 Farnam Street, Omaha, Nebraska 
Phone: AT 2977 

Date of Organization : 1956 

Ray Christensen, Partner. Producer- 
Director 

Dennis M. Kennedy, Partner, Producer- 
Director 

Herb Hellwig, Representative 

Kenneth C. Dunning, Art Director 

Services: Industrial, public relations, training 
and sales films; slide film strips; animation; 
visual aids work; and TV commercials. Facili- 
ties: Equipment for the production of all types 
of 16mm films, equipment for animation, edit- 
ing, B&W processing, .'55mm color slides and 
film strips. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Hcli) and Hope (Martin 
Luther Home for Retarded Children, Beatrice, 
Nebr. ); Faahion Show (The Clarkson Hospi- 
tal). Slidefilms: Selling Group Plans (Mu- 
tual Benefit of Omaha); How to Do Magic 
Tricks ( Paxton & Gallagher Co., Buchanan- 
Thomas Adv.) ; A New Benefit Plan for Em- 
plogees (Omar, Inc.). 



KEITH FILM PRODUCTIONS 

2820 Harney Street, Omaha, Nebraska 
Phone: .lAck.son 35.59 

Date of Organization: 1953 

.fames C. Keith, Owner 

E. LaMont Williams, Production Mgr. 

Helen W. Gloeb, Art & Animation Director 

Services ; Production of motion pictures, 
16mm for advertising and sales purposes for 
industry, education and television. Including 
creative art and script services, photography, 



live and animation. Specialists in agricultural 
farm equipment sales films. Facilities: 16mm 
Cine Special, Auricon and Bell & Howell cam- 
eras, animation stands, large sound stage, 
portable lighting, editing and viewing studios. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Dowyi to Earth (The Soil- 
Mover Co. ) ; The Big Dipper ( Kooiker Mfg. 
Co.) ; The Big Difference (Wind King Electric 
Mfg. Co.); Forage Chopping ( Lundell Mfg. 
Co.); Profits Cut and Dried ( Behlen Mfg. 
Co.). TV Commercials: for Old Home 
Bread, Metz Baking ( Amundsen Bolstein 
Adv.); Cooper Feeds, Fairmont Foods (Allen 
& Reynolds); Alamito Dairy (Ayers, Swan- 
son, Omaha) ; Habco Mfg. Co. (Ayers, Swan- 
son, Lincoln ) ; Metropolitan Utilities District 
(Bozell & Jacobs, Inc) ; Union Pacific Railroad 
(Caples & Co., Adv.); Kitty Clover Potato 
Chips ( Floyd Mellen, Adv. ) ; Blue Bunny Ice 
Cream ( W. D. Lyon Company). 



Wisconsin 

FILM ARTS PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1700 South 19th Street, Milwaukee 4, 

Wisconsin 
Phone: Mitchell 5-0523 

Date of Organization: 1927 

Harlan P. Croy, President 
Walter E. Immekus, Director, Photographij 
C. Oscar Lindquist, Still Photography 
Alfred M. Zemlo, Chief Sound Engineer 

Services: Creation and production of motion 
pictures and slidefilms for industry; TV com- 
mercials; slide presentations; script prepara- 
tion. Facilities: New studios; sound stage 
66 ft. X .50 ft.; recording studios 22 ft. x 14 ft. 
and 11 ft. X 14 ft.; editing rooms; laboratory; 
complete 16mm; complete lighting equipment 
for location and studio work. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Out of This World ( Har- 
ley-Davidson Motor Company); Fall House- 
cleaning ( S. C. Johnson & Sons); Take It 
Away ( Macwhyte Company); 195S Conven- 
tion ( National Junior Chamber of Commerce). 
Slidefilm: Behind Your Speed Queen Fran- 
chise (Speed Queen Corporation). 



Douglas Productions 

734 N. Jefferson, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Phone : Broadway 3-5680 

Fred C. Raymond, Clierit Contact 

(See complete listing under Chicago area) 



KLUGE FILM PRODUCTIONS 

3200 N. Richards Street, Milwaukee 12, 

Wisconsin 
Phone: FRanklin 2-0191 

Date of Organization: 1952 

Donald R. Kluge, Sales Manager 
Douglas W. Kluge, Production Manager 

Services: Scripting and production of 16mm 
motion pictures for business, industry and 
television. Facilities: Equipped for studio 
and location photography and recording; edit- 



ing; interlock projection, recording and 
mixing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Resistance Welding (Re- 
sistance Welder Mfgr.'s Assoc.) ; The Story of 
Henri's (Henri's Food Products Co., Inc.); 
The Electronic Secretary — (Theory of Opera- 
tion i (Electronic Secretary Industries, Inc.); 
Understanding High Fidelity (Hi-Fi House. 
Inc.); Rotary Cutter and Stacker (Alfa Ma- 
chine Co.) ; Junior Red Cross (American Red 
Cross, Milwaukee Chapter). 



Riviera Productions 

230 Westmoor Blvd., Milwaukee 14, 

Wisconsin 
Phone: SUnset 2-8815 
Robert Zens, Midwest Representative 
(See complete listing in Los Angeles area) 



RUDY SWANSON PRODUCTIONS 

1616 Lehmann Lane, Appleton, Wisconsin 

Phone : REgent 3-6272 

Date of Organization: 1939 

Branches: Route 2, Janesville, Wisconsin, 
Harlon Long, Sales Representative; 7715 
Oglesby Ave., Chicago 49, Illinois. Thomas 
Fenton, Sales Representative. 

Rudy Swanson, E.veciitive Producer 
Robert W. Swanson, Production Supervisor 
Richard Casperson, Production A.'fsistant 
Gordon Daily, Sound Recording 
David Porter, Studio Crew Head 
Services: Creators and producers of all ele- 
ments of 16mm sound, color, sales, sales train- 
ing, documentary, public relations, and televi- 
sion films. Facilities: Company owned mo- 
tion picture center with two sound stages, 
offices, projection, recording and editing facili- 
ties. Main stage 40' x 60' with complete 
kitchen, office and household sets. Complete 
color lighting, thi'ee 16mm cameras, 16mni 
magnetic synchronous recording and multi- 
channel mixing; music and art facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Your Fair Share (Milwau- 
kee Community Chest) ; You Can't Put a Pric, 
on It; Versamatic (Supreme Products Co. > ; 
These Few Seconds (Wisconsin Wire Works) : 
The Gorton Story (Gorton-Pew Fishing Co.) ; 
The Red Arrow Story (Wisconsin National 
Guard); Sunny-Pak; Versatility in Volume: 
A Study of Automation for Fish Sticks; Ad vac 
( Marathon, Div. of American Can Co. ) ; The 
Morning Glory Story (Consolidated Badger, 
Inc.). 



This 8th Annual Review Issue 

Is Your Most Reliable Reference Source 

• Producers whose listings appear in this sec- 
tion have voluntarily supplied the minimum 
client and film references for your reference 
use. Five business-sponsored motion pictures 
or slidefilms were the minimum requested for 
an unqualified listing. Television commercials 
ai-e also listed for companies specializing in 
this type of production work. 9 

(LISTINGS CONTINUE ON FOLLOVVING PAGE] 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Integrated for Performance: TECHNIRAMA and TECHNICOLOR 



Now a new dimension is added to tine magic of COLOR BY 
TECHNICOLOR. It is TECHNIRAMA-the Technicolor single camera, 
large screen photography system. This triumphant combination 
signals a new era in motion picture entertainment. 



TECHNICOLOR CORPORATION • Herbert T. Kalmus, President and General Manager • Technirama and Technicolor are registered trademarks 



iTH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



Texas 



Si. 



Arkansas 

Telepix Corporation 

Delaplaine, Arkansas 

Jim Vaughn, Representative 

(See complete listing Los Angeles area) 

Arizona 



CANYON FILMS OF ARIZONA 

834 North Seventh Ave., Phoenix, Arizona 
Phone: ALpine 2-1719 

Date of Organization : 1953 

Raymond Boley, Owner-Production Manager 
Bob Allen, Oivner-Director of Photography 
John E. Evans, Creative Production 
Wally Bruner, TV Commercial Production 

Services: Motion picture producers for indus- 
try, television, advertising and education. TV 
spots; sound slidef51ms. Contract shooting or 
editing for outside producers. Art, animation 
and script services. Facilities: Two sound 
stages, sound recording facilities (magnetic 
film or tape) ; disc cutting. Set lighting and 
complete portable lighting. Synchronous cam- 
eras, recorders and dubbers. Editing dept., 
including sound cutting. Interlock projection 
and recording. Set construction. 16mm or 
35mm production. Complete location equip- 
ment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Alpine Line (Interna- 
tional Metals") ; Winter at the San Marcos 
(San Marcos Resort) ; The Arabian Horse 
(Arabian Horse Assoc, of Arizona). Slide- 
films: Your Invitation (Paradise Memorial^ 
Trust); Rest haven Mausoleum (Tech Memo-^rt 
rial Trust). ? 

SOUTHWEST FILM INDUSTRIES, INC. 

806 Roosevelt Street, Tempe, Arizona 
Phone: WOodland 7-5413 

Date of Incorporation: 1954 

Joel A. Benedict, President 
Robert M. Wachs, Vice-President 
T. T. Crance, Secretary, Treasurer 
Elmer F. Felton, Public Relations 
Sherwood Strickler, Cinematographer 
Stanley Womer, Technical Consultant 
Ronald Holloway, Director of Music 
Richard Bell, Script Writer 

Services: Motion picture productions, busi- 
ness, industrial, educational; kinescoping; TV 
commercials; processing and printing 16mm 
film. Facilities: 16mm film production studio 
and 16mm film processing laboratory. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The All-American County 
(Maricopa County, Arizona) ; Trends in Ari- 
zona Living (John J. Long, Phoenix); Crea- 
tures of the Desert, Irrigation (McGraw-Hill) ; 
Naked Came I, Our Versatile Forest (Arizona 
State College). 

Extra Production Review Copies 

Additional copies of this 8th Annual Review 
available at $2.00 each while supply available. 



Jerry Fairbanks Productions 

219 Majestic Building, San Antonio, Texas 

Phone: CApital 4-8641 

Jack Mullen, representative 

(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



GULF COAST FILMS, INC. 

Oil & Gas Building, Houston 2, Texas 
Phone: Blackstone 5471. Cable: Gulfilm 
Robert Yarnall Richie, President 
V. G. Richie, Secretary-Treasurer 
Services: Motion pictures, Richie-Graphs, 
slidefilms and still photography, b&w or color! 
Scripting and story board treatments ; counsel 
on distribution. Facilities: Mitchell camera, 
complete lighting. 

RECFNT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

(See complete listing under Robert Yarnall 
Richie in Metropolitan New York area) 



JAMIESON FILM COMPANY 

3825 Bryan Street, Dallas 4, Texas 
Phone: TAylor 3-8158 

Date of Organization: 1916 

Branch: 936 W. Peachtree St., N.W., At- 
lanta 9, Georgia. Phone: TRinity 4-6625. 
Chester D. Gleason, Manager 

Bruce Jamieson, Partner & Business 

Manager 
Hugh V. Jamieson, Jr., Partner & 

Prodiiction Manager 
Jerry Dickinson, TV Production Manager 
Taylor Branch, TV Program Supervisor 
Robert Redd, Production Services Manager 
Bill Stokes, Sales Manager 
Larry Buchanan, Writing 
Robert Alcott, Camera 
John Beasley, Animation 
Paul Jamieson, Laboratory 
Barbara Guild, Accounting 
Sherald Brownrigg, Sound 

Services: Industrial, educational, training and 
public relations motion pictures, 16mm and 
35mm; filmed television programs and TV 
commercials; sound recording laboratory and 
printing services for industrial, educational, 
or producer organizations. Facilities: 15,000 
sq. ft. studio, sound stage and laboratory; 
complete 35mm & 16mm production equip- 
ment; RCA 16mm and 35mm sound channels; 
editing, printing and processing 16mm and 
35mm; color printing with scene-to-scene color 
correction; animation, creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Land Is Yours (At- 
lantic Seaboard Conference of American Title 
Assoc.) ; Solid Propellant Rocketry (Thiokol 
Chemical Corp.); Railroading With Radar 
(Southern Pacific Railroad); Adventure at 
Our Door (Texas State Park Boards) ; Search 
for Oil in Panama (Champlin Oil Co.) ; classi- 
fied films for: Chance Vought Aircraft (3) 
and Convair (3). Television Films: Texas 
in Review~52 half hour programs for Humble 
Oil & Refining Co. 'McCann-Erickson) ; Con- 
fession—I half-hour programs for Confession, 
Inc. TV Commercials: For Old Judge Coffee 



( Hirsch, Tamm & Ullman) ; Humble Oil i 
Refining (McCann-Erickson); Borden, Fritot 
Haggar Slacks (Tracy-Locke) ; Sessions Pea 
nut Butter, Jesse Jewell Frozen Foods (Craw 
ford & Porter) ; Tenilhist (Pams) ; Mercantil 
National Bank (Ratcliffe) ; Morton Food 
(Crook Adv.) ; Bunker Hill Foods (Cargill ,> 
Wilson); Red Goose Shoes (D'Arcy & Co.) 
Neuhoff's Meats (C. Wendell Muench ) ; Stat 
Fair of Texas (W. W. Sherrill). 



KEITZ & HERNDON 

4409 Belmont, Dallas, Texas 
Phone: TAylor 4-2568 

Date of Organization: 1950 

Larry F. Herndon, Jr., Sales Mgr. 

Rod K. Keitz, Production Mgr. 

Tom Young, Art Director 

Bob Dalzell, Production Supervisor 

John Bronaugh, Photography 
Services: Complete 35mm and 16mm motioi 
picture services, both live photography am 
animation. Facilities: 35mm and 16mn 
production units. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSOR! 

Motion Pictures : De leer ( Standard Oil Com. 
pany of Indiana) ; Vornado Service (O. A 
Sutton Corporation) ; Red Ball Jets (Misha 
waka Rubber & Wool Company) ; Fountain 
Service (Dr. Pepper Company) ; LSB (Lone 
Star Brewing Company) . 



MUNDELL PRODUCTIONS 

4207 Gaston Avenue, Dallas 10, Texas 
Phone : TAylor 1-0770 

Date of Organization: 1956 

Jimmie Mundell, Owner and Director of 

Production 
Tom Journeay, Sales Manager 
Jeff Mundell, Business Manager 

Services: Industrial, sales promotion, public 
relations, political and TV news release serv- 
ice. Facilities: 16mm and 35mm cameras, 
silent and sound ; studio and location ; synchro- 
nous magnetic recording; M.R. lights & grip 
equipment; preparation & editing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Unfinished Business (Citi- 
zen's Charter Association) ; It's Courage That 
Counts (Senator Ralph Yarborough) ; Rest- 
land of Dallas (Restland Memorial Park) ; 
Texas Labor Unites (Texas State AFL-CIO) ; 
Stewardess College (American Airlines). 



Robert Yarnall Richie Productions, Inc. 

Oil & Gas Building, Houston 2, Texas 
(See listing of Gulf Coast Films, Inc.) 

United States Productions, Inc. 

1714 Huldy, Houston 19, Texas 
Mrs. Barbara Atwell, in charge 
{ See complete listing in New York City area) 

Winik Films Corporation 

4300 Druid Lane, Dallas 5, Texas 

Ray Jones, in charge 

(See complete listing in New York City area) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



^ 



^ g 



4fri 



SOUTHWEST FILM CENTER 

(Film production facilities of 

SOUTHWEST FILM LABORATORY, INC.) 

3024 Fort Worth Ave., Dallas, Texas 
Phone: WHitehall 6-2184 

Date of Organization : May, 1950 
Irvin Gans, Executive Producer- 
Jack A. Hopper, Laboratory Manager 
Lloyd B. Abernathy, Producer Services 
Robert E. Rogers, Editorial Supervisor 
Robert Arch Green, Script 
Marty Young, Director 
Bill Mitchell, Set Design 
Joe Harris, Animation 
Oliver H. Oliver, Sound 

Services: Producer services, script to screen 

or any phase of production. TV film series; 

TV commercials; business and educational 
j films; animation. Facilities: 3200 sq. ft. 

sound stage ; sound recording studio ; multiple- 
f channel dubbing; music scoring. Complete 
■laboratory featuring additive scene-to-scene 
I color correction printing. New animation 

department. 

Irecent productions and sponsors 
'Motion Pictures: A Better Way (Tyler Pipe 
I& Foundry Co.) ; Men and Milk (North Texas 
! Milk Producers Assn.); The Next Hundred 
j Fears (Louisiana State University) ; The Bus 
land Us (Texas Educational Agency); Saw 
[Angela (San Angelo Industries, Inc.); The 
\ Answer (Waco United Fund). 



TEXAS INDUSTRIAL FILM COMPANY 

2528 North Boulevard, Houston, Texas 
Phone : JAckson 9-4377 

Date of Organization : 1945 
Date of Incorporation : 1956 

N. Don Macon, President 

S. Macon, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. Tyler, Production Manager 

Services : Industrial training and sales promo- 
tion motion pictures, 16mm and 35mm sound, 
color; 35mm sound slidefilms. Facilities: 
16mm and 35mm cameras, lighting equipment; 
air-conditioned sound stage; disc, 16mm mag- 
netic tape and 16mm optical sound recording; 
picture and sound editing; printing equip- 
ment for 16mm motion pictures and 35mm 
slidefilms. Personnel for writing, direction, 
editing and sound recording. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Safe Work on Poles (Amer- 
ican Telephone & Telegraph Co.) ; Southwest 
Conference Football, Highlights of 1957; Let's 
Sell Golden Esso; Service (Humble Oil & Re- 
fining Co.) ; Fill It Up With Service (Con- 
tinental Oil Company) . 



The Film Buyer's Basic Guide 

i^ Experienced users of visual communications 
in business, industry and government look to 
the Annual Production Review listing pages 
for basic reference data, carefully collated and 
complete as a primary step in the selection 
of a competent film producer. Only companies 
supplying minimum client reference data are 
given unqualified listing in these pages. Look 
to Business Screen for the best buyer's guide 
reference data in 1958. 5^ 



MOUNTAIN STATES 



Colorado 



4f 



THOS. J. BARBRE PRODUCTIONS 

2130 So. Bellaire St., Denver 22, Colorado 
Phone : SKyline 6-8383 

Date of Organization: 1940 

Thos. J. Barbre, Otvner, Manager, Producer 
Anita T. Barbre, Assistant Manager 
Paul Emrich, Recording Director 
Harold J. Anderson, Director of Photog- 
raphy 
Lowell B. Switzer, Writer-Director 
Services: Complete production of all types of 
business films. Sales, training, public rela- 
tions, advertising, educational. Color and black 
and white. TV commercial and TV entertain- 
ment films. Producer services. Facilities: 
Sound stage, theater, editing rooms, voice stu- 
dio, interlock projection. Maurer cameras. 
100,000 watts of lighting equipment. Maurer 
six-track optical recording. Magnetic film re- 
cording. Tape recording, Sound truck and 
generator. Editing, animation and titling 
rooms, equipment and staff. Recorded music 
libraries. Staff organist. Editors, script 
writers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures : High Country (Adolph 
Coors Company) ; What's Inside? (Holly-Gen- 
eral Company) ; By Their Deeds (U. S. Bu- 
reau of Reclamation) ; Cool, Clear Water (Wy- 
oming Game & Fish Dept.) ; Acroiv V.Form 
System (Acrow, Inc.) ; Green and Gold (Col- 
orado State University) ; Quick-Set Dado 
(Consolidated Machy. & Supp. Co., Ltd.) ; 
Let's Talk It Over (Great Western Sugar Co.) ; 
Safari (Adolph Coors Company). TV Com- 
mercials: For Gates Rubber Company and 
Adolph Coors Company. 

RIPPEY, HENDERSON, BUCKNUM & CO. 

909 Sherman Street, Denver 3, Colorado 
Phone: AComa 2-5601 

Date of Organization: 1943 

Arthur G. Rippey, Managing Partner 

Gilbert Bucknum, Partner, Producer 

Clair G. Henderson, Partner 

Harry A. Lazier, Partner 

Robert R. Powell, Production Supervisor 

Robert G. Zellers, Chief Cameraman 

Kenneth C. Osborne, Film Editor 

Services: Industrial and civic relations mo- 
tion pictures, color and sound, both voice-over 
and lip synchronization ; sound slidefilms, black 
and white and color. Facilities: Sound stu- 
dio, 16mm cameras, lighting, recording and 
editing equipment; creative staff; art depart- 
ment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: One Mile Closer to Heaven 
(Mountain States Telephone) ; News for the 
Cities by the Sea (Norfold Newspapers, Inc.) 
Frontier Vacationland (Frontier Airline) 
Idaho Legend (Idaho First National Bank) 
River of Enterprise (Idaho Power Company) 
The Greatest of These (National Benevolent 
Association of the Christian Church) ; Selling 
Big Aggie Land (Radio Station WNAX). TV 
Commercials: for Bennett's Paints, Denver 
Post, Rockmont Envelope Co. 



SONOCHROME PICTURES 

2275 Glencoe Street, Denver 7, Colorado 
Phone: EAst 2-3192 

Date of Organization : 1942 
Branch: Multichrome Laboratories 
760 Gough Street, San Francisco, California 
R. B. Hooper, Owner-Producer 
George E. Perrin, Director of Photography 
Herbert McKenney, Owner, Multichrome 
Laboratories 
Services: Motion picture and television pro- 
ducers. Sound recording, titles, TV Spots, 
color release prints. Facilities: Animating 
and title machines; synchronous 16mm mag- 
netic and optical recorders. Mobile power 
plant, Mitchell 16mm cameras, 35mm (400 ft.) 
Eymo. Special effects department 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Safety in Action—Trans- 
portation; Safety in Action—Mechanical; Use 
Your Head, second section (Denver & Rio 
Grande Western R.R.) ; Submerged Welding 
Techniques (Burkhardt Steel Corp.); Opera- 
tions Petroleum Peak (Kostka & Associates 
Agency) ; Mr. Dodds Goes to Colorado on Denr- 
ver Zephyr (Burlington Railroad Company) ; 
U. S. Air Force— ARDC-ML Experimental 
Series. TV Commercials: for Denver & Rio 
Grande Western RR— 38, Denver & Rio 
Grande Western RR and Missouri Pacific RR 
—4 (Ball-Davidson Agency) ; Burlington Rail- 
road Company — 2. 



WESTERN CINE SERVICE, INC. 

114 E. 8th Ave., Denver, Colorado 
Phone: AMherst 6-3061 

Date of Organization: September 1, 1952 
Herman Urschel, President 
John Newell, Executive Vice-President 
Noel Jordan, Secretary -Treasurer 
Mike Cook, Vice-President — Sales 
Harry Barnes, II, Laboratory Manager 
Tom Harvey, Sound Recording Manager 
Stan Phillips, Titling & Animation Manager 
Services : 16mm motion picture and television 
production ; complete 16mm lab. for color and 
b&w processing, printing and editing; com- 
plete sound recording for tape, disc and film. 
Sound slidefilm production. Facilities: Ani- 
mation and title stand, color & b&w processing 
machines, printer, editing facilities, Maurer 
Magnasync & Magnacord recorders, synchro- 
nous cameras, professional equipment dept., 
rental & sale and special effects dept. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Heritage of Hope (National 
Jewish Foundation for Asthmatic Children) ; 
Colorado Cares (Colorado State Dept. of Pub- 
lic Health) ; Salute to Sales (Shwayder Broth- 
ers — Samsonite) ; Skimeister, D. U. Football 
Highlights (University of Denver) ; The 
Closed Loop (Martin Company) ; Air Force 
Academy Football Highlights (Air Force 
Academy). Slidefilms: The Investment of 
Today (Realty Development Company) ; No- 
reen Shampoo Sales (Bradley Lane Agency) 
TV Commercials: for Frontier Airlines, Mis.s 
America (Lotito Agency) ; Luby Chevrolet 
(Prescott & Pilz Agency) ; American Cancer 
Society (Thomas & Wade) ; Hungarian Flour 
(Clair & Meyer) ; D. U. Hockey (University 
of Denver) ; Denver United Fund (United 
Fund Committee). 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



1J^^ □ iB.4f a 



WEST COAST 



San Francisco and Bay Area 

MARVIN BECKER FILMS 

915 Howard Street, San Francisco 3, Calif. 
Phone: EXbrook 2-1655 

Date of Organization : 1952 

Marvin E. Becker, President 

Frank E. Wulzen, Production Manager 

Dick Ham, Writer-Director 

Ann Becker, Secretary-Treasurer 

Jack Halter, Studio Manager 

Services: Industrial, documentary, business, 
public relations and educational motion pic- 
tures and slidefilms. Television films and com- 
mercials, newsreel coverage. Franchised 
Reeves Magna-Stripling service. Hi-speed 
photography. Facilities: Creative staff, 16 
and 35mm production equipment, music li- 
brai->', sound stage, lights, sets, carpenter shop, 
machine shop, art department, complete ani- 
mation department and camera. Editing and 
projection rooms and multi-channel dubbing. 
Wide-screen production equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Decades of Progress (Vic- 
tor Equipment Company) ; San Francisco Bay 
Model, Tetrapods on Guard (U.S. Corps of 
Engineers); Tumble-Tubs ( Allwork Mfg. 
Company); Living Fences (Ginden Nurser- 
ies). Television Films: Concrete Castings 
(Forni Products Company) ; Granny Goose 
Potato Chips (Granny Goose Company); 
Breatheasy (Pascal Products Company); 
Concrete Progress ( Permanente Cement); 
Prime Mitiister Visits San Francisco (Japan- 
ese Government); Preparations for VIII 
Winter Olympic Games (Olympic Committee). 
TV Newsreels: for San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce, CBS-TV, NBC-TV. 

GOLDEN STATE FILM PRODUCTIONS 

49 Stevenson Street, San Francisco 
Phone: YUkon 6-6550 

Date of Organization: 1950 

John L. Siegle, Oivner 
Services: 16mm motion pictures for industry, 
business, documentary and training. Facili- 
ties: Full editing facilities, .sound recording. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Hail to California ( Uni- 
^■ersity of California); Italian Swiss Colony 
Wiues (Italian Swiss Colony Winei-y); So- 
nora Pass Vacationland ( Tuolumne County, 
California ) ; Let's Ski ( Dodge Ridge Ski 
Slopes, Inc.); Youth Behind the Badge 
(Berkeley California Police Department). 



Harris Tuchman Productions 

110 Sutter Street, San Franci.sco 4, Cali- 
fornia 
Phone: Garfield 1-69.36 
John ^Palmer, in charge. 
< See complete listing in Los Angeles area) 

HE BUYERS READ BUSINESS SCREEN 



MOTION PICTURE SERVICE COMPANY 

125 Hyde Street, San Francisco 2, Calif. 
Phone: ORdway 3-9162 

Date of Organization : 1935 

Gerald L. Karski, President, Gen. Manager 
Harold A. Zell, Vice-Pres. in Chge. of Prod. 
Boris Skopin, Mgr. Title & Trailer Dept. 
Gerald Patterson, Mgr. Laboratory Dept. 

Services: Industrial, commercial and public 
relations films; special announcement and ad- 
vertising trailers for theatres, business. TV 
film.s, spot commercials. Facilities: Maurer 
& Cine Special 16mm cameras; 3 studio 35mm 
cameras; 2 title 35mm cameras; 16mm & 35- 
mm laboratory ( developing, printing and re- 
duction), art dept.; magnetic & optical re- 
cording; dubbing equipment; sound stage; 
editing equipment; title & animation equip- 
ment; script-to-release print service; screen- 
ing room equipped for CinemaScope, 35mm 
and 16mm projection. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

TV Commercials: For Portland Gas & Coke 
(Cole & Webber Advtg., Portland) ; Standard 
Oil of Calif (BBD&O); Oil Heat Institute 
( Pacific Nat'l Advtg., Seattle ) ; Idaho Adv. 
Comm. I Botsford, Constantine & Gardner, 
Portland ) ; California Wine Advisory Board, 
Roman Meal Company (Roy S. Durstine, 
Inc.) ; Roma Wines ( Foote Cone & Belding ) ; 
Granny Goose Potato Chips (Brooke, Smith, 
French & Dorrance ) . 



MOULIN STUDIOS 

181 Second St., San Francisco, California 

Phone: YUkon 6-4224 

Ray Moulin, President 

Thomas Moulin, Vice-President 

George Riekman, Mgr., Motion Picture Div. 

Myron Wagner, Sales Manager 

Services : Producers of 16mm and 35mm B&W 
and color features, TV commercials, slide 
films. Facilities: two music libraries, com- 
plete animation facilities, sound recording 
studios, tape & disc. 

(DECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Enchanted Hills (National 
Foundation for the Blind); Convention Film 
(Lions International); Water (Water Devel- 
opment Inc.); Foundry Production (Sequoia 
Metalcraft). Slidefilm : Sales film for Na- 
tional Motor Bearing 



PACIFIC PRODUCTIONS 

414 Mason Street, San Francisco 2, Calif 
Phone: YUkon 2-3986 

Date of Organization: 1938 

Donald M. Hatfield, Ph.D., President 
Fred P. Barker, General Manager 
Russell Westdal, Production Manager 

Services; Sponsored public relations, sales, 
documentary and training films ; medical films ; 
slidefilms; filmstrips; cinettes. Facilities: 
Maurer and Eastman cameras; synchronous 
tape recording; lighting; sound and silent 
stages; 35mm & 16mm editing equipment; ani- 
mation department. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: As Boys Grow (Medical 
Arts Productions, Inc.) ; Choice of Method; 



Inspection and Testing (U. S. Navy) ; Sprin- 
kler Irrigation (Kaiser Aluminum & Chemi- 
ical Corp. ) ; Speeding Reading, Series (Visual 
Education, Inc.). 



45- 

ALFRED T. PALMER PRODUCTIONS 

130 Bush Street, San Francisco, California 
Phones: Douglas 2-8177-8 

Date of Organization : 1931 

Alfred T. Palmer, Owner, Exec. Producer 
Alexa H. Palmer, Co-Owner, Office Mgr. 
Pauline C. Hase, Secretai-y 
William Thorp, Associate Producer 
Lawrence E. Williams, Associate Producer 
Herbert M. Johnson, Associate Producer 
M.P.S. Van Lier, Associate Producer 
David H. Palmer, Sound 
Mark Young, Laboratory 
Julia Palmer, Editorial 
Donald A. Palmer, Production 
Charles Niewenhous, Camera Dept. 
Nikola Drakulic, Still Dept. 

Services : Production largely centered in mari- 
time and overseas subjects related to the pro- 
motion of human understanding through trade 
and travel. Facilities: Complete production 
and sound studios, reproduction laboratory, 
distribution facilities and theatre. Also color 
and black and white still. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Energy to Live (Standard- 
Vacuum Oil Company) ; American Shipping 
in Today's World (The Propeller Club of the 
U.S. ) ; Proud Neiv Presidents, Ports of Call 
(American President Lines); Beyond the 
Horizon (World Family Forum Films). Pro- 
ducers of Americans Look at the World, Ex- 
plore the World, Teen-Age Magellan, Your 
World Today, World Trade Films (No spon- 
sors listed). 



W. A. PALMER FILMS, INC. 

611 Howard Street, San Francisco 5, Calif. 
Phone: YUkon 6-5961 

Date of Organization: 1936 
Date of Incorporation: 1947 

W. A. Palmer, President 

H. B. Butler, Vice-President, Treasurer 

C. DeY. Elkus, Jr., Secretary 

Florence H. Dieves, Executive Producer 

John Corso, Jr., Laboratory Manager 

Stewart A. Macondray, Sound Engineer 

Joseph P. Dieves, Camera 

Forrest E. Boothe, Recording Manager 

E. S. Douglass, Jr., Business Manager 

Services: Industrial public relations, educa- 
tional films, and sales training films; sound' 
slidefilms; television films and spot commer- 
cials; Palmerscope 16mm and 35mm television 
recording. Facilities: Studio and location 
protography; Westrex recording (photograph- 
ic and magnetic, 16mm and 35mm) ; disc and 
tape recording, including stereophonic; mul- 
tiple channel dubbing and interlock; color, 
black-white printing, 16mm optical printing, 
35mm to 16mm reduction printing; animation 
and title camera. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Forever Living For- 
ests (California Redwood Association) ; Penny 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



A Pound (Calaveras Cement Co.) ; The Wines 
of California ( Almaden Vineyards) ; Give Ua 
This Day (United Bay Area Crusade) ; Weath- 
er (Pacific Gas & Electric Co.). Television 
Films: The Measure of Man. with Dr. John 
W. Dodds; Tempest in a Test Tube, with Dr. 
Harry Sello ( KOED-TV, National Education- 
al Radio & Television Center) ; Rocks and 
Trees (Omnibus — TV Radio Workshop). 

Sonochrome Pictures 

760 Gough Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
(See complete listing under Colorado area) 

GENE K. WALKER PRODUCTIONS 

465 California Street, San Francisco 4, Calif. 

Phone: YUkon 6-2891 

Studio at 627 Commercial Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Phone: YUkon 2-4181 



Date of Organization: 1938 

Gene K. Walker, President 

Claire McNamara, Secretanj-Treasnrer 

II. F. Scott, Studio Manager 

Stedman Chandler, Service Manager 

George Halligan, Prod. Supervisor 

Services : Complete production services, 16mm 
& 35mm film, sound slidefilms and filmstrips. 
Facilities: 2-story studio building, fully 
equipped for recording, editing, titling and 
small-set photography, 4 recording channels. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Achievement Supreme 
(Standard Oil Company, California); Will It 
Work for Me, Refinery on the Delaware (Tide- 
water Oil Company) ; Wine and Its Blessings 
(California Wine Institute) ; Taproots to Liv- 
ing Waters ( East Bay Municipal Utility 
District). 



j^ I I MIL. Jp rn ^JL ^ I — I 



METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES 



ACADEMY FILMS 

800 N. Seward St., Hollywood 38, Calif. 
Phone: HOllywood 2-0741 

Date of Organization: 1946 

James A. Larsen, President 
Mrs. Elizabeth R. Larsen, Vice-President 
Frank Putnam, Treasurer & Comptroller 
David Johnson, Laboratory Supt. 
Ralph Larsen, Laboratory & Sound 

Technician 
JoAnne L. Gainor, Exec. Secretary 

Services : Facilities and experienced personnel 
for production of motion pictures in color 
or bw for public relations, advertising sales 
training, research, employee education and 
other business, industrial purposes. Scripts, 
photography, artwork and animation. Sound 
recording & re-recording, editing and both 
color and bw lab work in our studio. Facil- 
ities: 60' X 100' sound stage, small recording 
studio; Westrex sound recording channel. 
35mm, 16y2mm or 16mm. Ampex recorder 
for 14" tape; Mitchell & Cine-Kodak Special 
cameras; Bell & Howell printing equipment; 
interlock motors on all i-ecording equipment. 
Film vaults, editing and projection rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Futures (Fluor Corpora- 
tion) ; Leaders (General Telephone Company) ; 
Therapy (California Rehabilitation Center): 
Radioplane Story ( Radioplane Company ) ; 
Production Facilities (GulfiUan Brothers) ; 
Let's Celebrate (Huntington Park, Calif. 
Chamber of Commerce); Concrete Carts & 
Buckets (Garbro Manufacturing Company). 
Slidefilm : Bible Sea Adventures (Gospel 
Light Press ) . 



Academy Pictures Inc. 

433 South Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles 36, Cal. 
Phone: WEbster 1-8156 

William Lightfield, Manager 
Louis Huot, Sales 

(See complete listing in New York City area) 



4e- 

ALLEND'OR PRODUCTIONS 

607 North La Brea Avenue, Los Angeles 36 
Phone: WEbster 8-2191 

Date of Organization: 1951 

Branch: 60 West 46th Street, New York 

36, N.Y. Phone: Circle 5-0770 
Algernon G. Walker, President 
J. L. Siegal, Vice-President 
W. A. Blanchard, Sales Manager 
J. Reid Rummage, Production Manager 

Services: Documentary, educational and in- 
dustrial films. TV commercials. Television 
newsfilm service through our newsreel organi- 
zation, Spotlite News, Inc. Facilities : 16mm 
and 35mm studio and editorial facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Burden of Truth (United 
Steelworkers of America ) ; Tivelve to Go 
( American Oil Company ) ; Watercolor and 
Printers Ink (Ford Motor Company) ; Towers 
of Truth ( Crusade For Freedom — Radio Free 
Europe) ; The Princess Takes a Holiday (Re- 
nault, Inc.). TV Commercial: for IceCapades, 
Inc. 



ALL SCOPE PICTURES, INC. 

Commercial Film Division 
20th Century Fox Television 

1417 N. Western Ave., Hollywood 27 
Phone: HOllywood 2-6231 

Date of Incorporation : 1946 

Gordon S. Mitchell, President 
C. D. Owens, Vice-President 
T a Nell B. Mitchell, Secretary-Treasurer 
Norman McCabe, Animation Director 
Charles Van Enger, Dir. of Photography 
Art Seid, Film Editor 
S;:rvices: Industrial, public relations, educa- 
tional and training films. TV commercial and 
theatre ad films. Live action, animation and/ 
or stop motion picture production. Facilities: 
Studios of 20th Century Fox (both Western 
Ave. and Foxhills). 



RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Fortune in Two Old 
Trunks (Sunsweet Growers, Inc) ; Boats and 
Motors (Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp.). 
TV Commercials: Chesterfield Cigarettes 
(McCann Erickson, Inc.) ; Petri Wine (Young 
& Rubicam, Inc.) ; Luzianne Coffee (Walker 
Saussy Agency); Shaeffer Pens (Keyes Mad- 
den & Jones) ; Greyhound Bus (Grey Adver- 
tising, Inc.) ; Rainier Beer (Miller MacKey 
Hoeck & Hartung) ; Gallo Wine (Doyle Dane 
& Bernbach). 

Atlas Film Corporation 

603 Guaranty Building, 6331 Hollywood 

Boulevard, Hollywood, California 
(See complete listing under Chicago area) 

CHARLES CAHILL AND ASSOCIATES 

6060 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, California 
Phone: HO 7-3555 

Date of Organization : 1956 

Charles H. Cahill, Owner 
Emil Carle, Associate Producer 
Richard Bansbach, Production Manager 

Services : Industrial and television motion 
picture production ; production coordination 
and editorial services rendered to production 
companies, advertising agencies, and indus- 
trial accounts. Facilities: 16mm and 35mm 
editorial and studio facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Impact (University of 
California and American Motors Corp. ) ; 
Battlefield Surveillance (Radioplane Com- 
pany); Lands of the Good Earth (Kaiser 
Aluminum and Chemical Corp.) ; This is Fas- 
tair ( Wollensak Optical Company ) . Slide- 
film : Times Have Changed (Farmers Insur- 
ance Group). TV Commercials: For Gener- 
al Petroleum, McCulloch Motors, Plymouth 
Dealers ( Stromberger, LaVene & McKenzie ) ; 
Socony Mobil Oil (Compton). 



GATE & McGLONE 

1521 Cross Roads of the World, 

Hollywood 28, California 
Phone: HOllywood 5-1118 

Date of Organization : 1947 

T. W. Gate, President 

E. D. McGlone, Vice-President, Treasurer 

Walter Wise, Writer-Director 

Richard Soltys, Production Manager 

Services: Motion pictures in the field of 
human communications; industrial relations, 
public relations, sales-promotion, sales train- 
ing, travelogues, TV productions and commer- 
cials, color stock library, including extensive 
aerial coverage of many areas in the U.S.A. 
Facilities: 16mm photographic equipment, 
portable lighting equipment, camera car, 
creative staff for writing, photographing, di- 
recting and editing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Flight Plan '57, wide screen 
(United Air Lines) ; Two For the Road (Gen- 
eral Petroleum Corp. ) ; Workirig With Skydrol 
(Monsanto Chemical Company); Operation 
Heartbeat (Douglas Aircraft Company); and 
several classiflfted films on aircraft and missile 
projects. 



8 T H ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES: 



CHURCHILL-WEXLER FILM PRODUCTIONS 

801 N. Seward Street, Los Angeles 38 
Phone: HO 9-1576 

Date of Organization: 1947 

Sy Wexler, Partner 

Robert B. Churchill, Partner 

Services: Informational, documentary, med- 
ical and teaching films. Facilities: 16 and 
;35mm photographic and editing equipment. 
Shooting stage, animation department, cam- 
era; 16mm color release printing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Human Cell & the 
Cytotechnolologist (Committee for Careers in 
Medical Technology) : After Mastectomy (Ore- 
gon Cancer Society) ; Strokes; Coronary Heart 
Disease; High Blood Pressure (American 
Heart Association). 



Shamus Culhane Productions, Inc. 

6226 Yucca Street, Hollywood 28, Calif. 

Phone: Hollywood 4-1128 

Dave Lurie, in charge. 

(See complete listing in New York City area) 



RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Life in Norivay; The 
Tankship; The Service Station; City High- 
ways; Treasure in Books. (Produced for sale 
of prints to schools and film libraries.) 



DESILU PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

780 North Gower, Hollywood 
Phone: Hollywood 95911 

Date of Organization : 1950 

Desi Arnaz, President 

Martin Leeds, Executive Vice-President 

Edwin Holly, Treasurer 

Argyle Nelson, V. P., Charge Production 

Richard Mulford, Director, Commercial Div. 

Bernard Weitzman, Dir. Biisiness Affairs 

Services: Production of motion pictures for 
all uses. Facilities: Three complete lots in- 
cluding ;55 stages, 16mm & 35mm photogra- 
phy, recording, editing, optical work, pro.iec- 
tion rooms, stock library, etc. 

TELEVISION PROGRAMS AND SPONSORS 

Filmed TV Programs: December Bride (Gen- 
eral Foods — Benton & Bowles i ; Danny Thom- 
as Shotv (Post Cereals — Benton & Bowles) ; 
Walter Winchell File (Revlon— C. J. La- 
Roche) ; Desi Arnaz-Lucille Ball Show (Ford 
— J. Walter Thompson) ; Eve Arden Show 
(Shulton — Wesley Assoc). TV Commercials: 
For Toni, Deep Magic, (North Advertising) ; 
Baker's Coconut (Young & Rubicam, Inc.) ; 
Shaeffer Pens (Keyes, Madden & Jones); 
Ford (J. Walter Thompson ) ; and Chevrolet 
(Campbell-Ewald Co.). 



PAT DOWLING PICTURES 

1056 S. Robertson Blvd., Los Angele.s 35, 

California 
Phone: CRestview 1-1636 

Date of Organization : 1940 

Pat Dowling, Owner 

Thos. J. Stanton, Production Manager 
Services: Production of motion pictures and 
slidefilms for industry; educational films for 
.sale to schools. Editorial and sound work for 
company-made films. Facilities: Studio, art 
and camera department, editorial facilities. 



DUDLEY PICTURES CORPORATION 

9908 Santa Monica Blvd., Beverly Hills, Cal. 
Phone: CRestview 1-7258 

Date of Organization: 1945 

Carl Dudley, President 
Richard Goldstone, Vice-President 
Bruce Newbery, Vice-President 
Eugene Barnes, Secretary-Treasurer 

Services: producers of industrial, theatrical, 
television and educational films. Facilities: 
studio and offices. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Lifelines — USA (Commit- 
tee of American Steamship Lines) ; Mainline 
— USA (Association of American Railroads) ; 
New Horizons (Seaboard Airline Railroad) ; 
The Fabtdous Land (Universal — Int.) ; Cine- 
rama South Seas (Stanley-Warner Cinerama 
Corporation). 



^4. 

JERRY FAIRBANKS PRODUCTIONS 
OF CALIFORNIA 

1330 N. Vine St., Hollywood 28 
Phone: Hollywood 2-1101 

Branch : 520 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Robert Kemper, representative. Phone 
WHitehall 4-0196 

Branch: 219 Majestic Bldg., San Antonio, 
Texas. Jack Mullen, representative. 
Phone: CApital 4-8641. 

Date of Organization: 1929 

Jerry Fairbanks, President 

Charles Salerno, Jr., Vice-President 

Robert Scrivner, Studio Manager 

John McKennon, Production Manager 

Leo Rosencrans, Story and Creative Head 

Services: Industrial, theatrical and television 
motion pictures. Facilities: Full studio fa- 
cilities; 2 sound stages; 18 camera units; 16- 
mm and 35mm including MultiCam process: 
16mm, 35mm and magnetic sound recording 
and re-recording; editing; animation; Duo- 
plane Process; 16mm & 35mm opticals; film 
and music libraries; technical, art, creative 
and music staffs. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: U.S.A.F. Flight Test 
School ( U.S. Air Force) ; A House in Order 
(Rose Hills Memorial Park) ; Charlie's Haunt 
(American Telephone & Telegraph Company) ; 
Chrysler Tests, 2 (Ross Roy, Inc.). SLIDE- 
FILMS: Airport Qualification, 3 (Trans World 
Airlines ) . TV Commercials : for Albers Mill- 
ing, White King Cleanser, White Star Tuna 
(Erwin, Wasey & Company); Corn Products 
(C. L. Miller & Company) ; Oldsmobile (D. P. 
Brother & Company) ; Alcoa Aluminum 
(Fuller & Smith & Ross) ; Rival Dog Food, 
Swift ( McCann-Erickson, Inc. ) ; Reddi-Whip, 
Atlas Tire (D'Arey Advertising Company); 
Miller Beer (Mathisson & Associates) ; Nic-L- 
Silver Battery (Johnson & Lewis); Quaker 
Oats Masa Harina (Thomas F. Conroy, Inc.) ; 
General Electric Ranges. 



FIDELITY FILMS, INC. 
(Formerly Ed Johnson Fitms) 

6612 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28 
Phone: HOllywood 2-7484 

Date of Organization: 1950 
Date of Incorporation : 1958 

Ed Johnson, President, General Manager 
Albert Buffington, Vice-President, 

Production Mgr. 
Tom Baron, Director of Animation 
Joanne Roberts, Art Director 

Services: Production of filmed live and ani- 
mated television commercials and business 
films. Facilities : Complete art, editorial and 
projection facilities. 16mm camera equip- 
ment. Stage for inserts. 35mm camera and 
titling stand. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Toivard One World (Green 
Spot, Inc.). Slidefilms: The Hoffman Story, 
The Sound of Tomorrotv (Hoffman Electron- 
ics) ; The Friskies Team, Raising Calves Into 
Better Coivs (Carnation Company). Theatre 
Commercials: six 35mm color, live action, 
sound (Green Spot, Inc.). TV Commercials: 
123 animated and live on film for various 
agencies. 



FLAGG FILMS, INC. 

5907 West Pico Blvd., Hollywood 35. Cali- 
fornia 
Phones: WE 8-2101 NO 3-6524 

Date of Organization: 1946 

Don Flagg, President 

Toni Flagg, Vice-President 

Larry Raimond, Production Manager 

Tom Borden, Art Director 

Services: Feature films, TV entertainment 
and spots. Industrial, public relations and edu- 
cational films. Facilities: Stage, cutting 
and projection rooms, 35mm and 16mm Mit- 
chell equipment; Westrex and Stancil-Hoff- 
man sound equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Around the Supermarkets 
in 56 Days (San Francisco Chronicle, KRON- 
TV) ; Cement-Stone of the Ages (Kaiser Per- 
manente Cement) ; 100% Oxygen in Cardiac 
Surgery (Stanford University Hospital); 
Tuna Progress (Van Camp Seafood Co.). 
Filmed TV Program : Parole, 39 half hour 
series (Los Angeles Times, KITV). 



GANTRAY-LAWRENCE ANIMATION, INC. 

(Affiliate of Robert Lawrence Productions, 
Inc.) 

716 North LaBrea, Hollywood 28, Calif. 

Phone: HOllywood 9-7968 

Teletype: LA-1463 

Ray Patterson, President 

Robert L. Lawrence, Vice-President 

Grant Simmons, Secretary & Treasurer 

(See complete listing in New York City area) 



vv this symbol, appearing over a 
producer's listing, indicates that display adver- 
tising containing additional reference data ap- 
pears in other pages of this Annual Review. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



OZZIE GLOVER PRODUCTIONS 

j 1159 N. Highland, Hollywood 38 
Phone: Hollywood 2-6061 

Date of Organization : 1952 

1 Ozzie Glover, Producer-Director 
Sanford Greenwald, Production Manager 
Joe Garner, Director of Sales Promotion 
Guy Halferty, Script Department 
Margie Baisden, Distributor 

lERViCES: Production of documentary, sales 
raining, industrially-sponsored TV public 
,ervice motion pictures; TV commercials; TV 
lews films. Subsidiary Company, National 
■Tewsfilm Associates: production and national 
listribution of television newsfilm. Facili- 
lES: Production facilities, lighting equipment, 
ocation unit, camera and sound equipment, 
diting rooms. Moviolas and projection 
facilities. 

lECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

tlOTiON Pictures: Party Line Problems 
Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company) ; 
naugural Flights (Western Airlines); Gate- 
vay to the Wo7id (Los Angeles Harbor De- 
mrtment) ; Up To Noiv (City of Lakewood) ; 
Is We Grow (Los Angeles Department of 
\irports). 



GOLDEN KEY PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1921 Hillhurst Ave., Hollywood 27 
Phone: NOrmandy 3-1121 

Date of Incorporation: 1953 

Dr. Gene Spiller, President 
David Rose, Secretary-Treasurer 
Dr. P. R. Deville, General Manager 
Ruth Binz Spiller, Film Librarian 

Services : Script to screen production ; spe- 
cializing training and promotional films on 
■cientific, technological subjects. Staff with 
;cience background. Film distribution. Fa- 
ULITIES : 16mm production and recording ; cut- 
ing rooms, titles, miniatures, etc. Micro and 
nacro-photography. 

tECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Nutrition for the Modern 
i.ge (Nu-Age Biorganic Products) ; The Ever- 
changing You (Supra-Vite Sales Internation- 
d) ; Treasure at Panaca (G & J Distributors, 
Inc.); Our Living Soil (Natural Food Asso- 
;iates) ; Home at Last (Wright Feeds). Slide- 
?iLMs: series for Manamin Pharmacel Com- 
oanv. 



GRAPHIC FILMS CORPORATION 

1618 N. Las Palmas Ave., Hollywood 28 
Phone: Hollywood 7-2191 

Date of Organization : 1941 

Lester Novros, President 
William B. Hale, Vice-President 
Virginia Dumont, Treasurer 
Anthony Vellani, Production Manager 
Jo Andersen, Secretary 
Guy Halferty, Chief, Sales Division 
Richard Kendall, Chief, Camera Division 
Ugo d'Orsi, Animation Director 

Services : Production of animated and live ac- 
tion films for industry and government. De- 
sign and publication of booklets, brochures 
md visual presentations. Facilities: Anima- 
tion department including stand for 16mm and 



35mm ; 35mm Bell & Howell Standard camera ; 
16 & 35mm Arriflex camera; 16 & 35mm Mo- 
violas; cutting and screening rooms; perma- 
nent animation and live action staffs. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Keep It Pcrsonnl; Spatial 
Disorientation in Flight (U.S. Air Force); 
F-lOJfA Introduction to Normal Flight Pro- 
cedures; F-lOiA Introduction to Emergency 
Flight Procedures (Lockheed Aircraft) ; Jug- 
gler of Our Lady (Graphic Films Corp.). TV 
Commercials: for Budweiser (Gould/ 
D'Arcy) ; Clorox (Honig-Cooper) . 



The Jam Handy Organization, inc. 

1402 N. Ridgewood Place, Hollywood 28. Calif. 
Phone: Hollywood 3-2321 
Thomas G. Johnstone, in charge 
Service office and production. 

(See complete listing under Detroit area) 

HARRIS-TUCHIVIAN PRODUCTIONS 

715 N. Highland, Hollywood 38. 
Phone : WEbster 6-7189 

Date of Organization: 1950 

Branch: 110 Sutter Street, San Francisco 
4, California. Phone: GArfield 1-6936. 
John Palmer, in charge. 

Ralph G. Tuchman, General Matiager 
Fran Harris, Creative Director 
Fred Golt, Production Supervisor 

Services: Creative writing, planning, pro- 
duction of motion pictures and sound slide- 
films for business, industry, sales talks on 
film, promotion films for television, and TV 
commercials, live action or animation. Facil- 
ities : Creative writer and artists, fully 
equipped stage, complete working kitchen, all 
editing facilities for 35mm and 16mm, anima- 
tion department, projection, music library, 
stock film library. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Destination Indianapolis 
(South California Muffler Company & A. P. 
Motor Parts Corporation) ; Sanitation (Inter- 
state Bakeries) ; Glamour on Ice, This is Ice 
Follies. Sport of Ice Skating (Shipstads & 
Johnson Ice Follies). TV Commercials: For 
Carnation Co. (Erwin Wasey, Inc.); Kaiser 
Aluminum (Young & Rubicam, Inc.); Max 
Factor & Co. (Anderson-McConnell Adv.); 
Colgate Palmolive ( Lennen & Newell. Inc. ) ; 
Tidewater Oil Co. (Buchanan Co.) ; Standard 
Oil of Texas (White & Shuford Adv.); Ari- 
zona Savings & Loan Company (Arthur Mey- 
erhoff & Co.); Lever Brothers (BBD&O); 
Shipstads & Johnson Ice Follies (Walter Mc- 
Creery, Inc. i ; Stauffer Home Reducing Plan 
(Stauffer Systems Inc.). 

Kling Film Productions 

1416 North LaBrea, Hollywood, Calif. 
Phone: Hollywood 3-2142 
(See complete listing under Chicago area) 

MGM-TV, Division of Loew's, Inc. 

MGM Studios, Culver City, California 
Maurice Gresham, in charge 

(See complete listing under New York City 
area) 



ji^ a ma jjf m 



LOS ANGELES 



4C- 

LAWRENCE-SCHNITZER 
PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

(Affiliate of Robert Lawrence Productions, 

Inc.) 
1040 North Las Palmas, Hollywood 38 
Phone: HOllywood 2-5577 
Gerald Schnitzer, Executive Vice-President 
(See complete listing in New York City area) 

NEW WORLD PRODUCTIONS 

13273 Ventura Blvd., North Hollywood 
Phone: ST. 7-0674 

Branches: 1224 N. Glenwood St., Peoria, 
Illinois, Sales. 49 West 12th Street, New 
York, N. Y., P. Robinson, Sales. 6011 
38th St., N.E. Seattle, G. Newton, Sales. 
Date of Organization: 1939 
Ted Robinson, in Charge of Production 
Tom Atkins, Prodtiction Manager 
Phil Robinson, Director 
Art Moore, Animation Director 
Sterling Barnett, Head Camera Department 
Rod Yould, Robt. Hemmig, Camera 
Loren Steadman, Technical Director 
Services: 16mm & 35mm motion pictures & 
sound slidefilms. Live action. Animated car- 
toons. Documentary, industrial & feature 
films. Facilities: Studio, camera and light- 
ing equipment. Animation creative depts. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: A City And A Neivspaper 
(Los Angeles Times); Thor Reports (Doug- 
las Aircraft). Television Films: King Algy 
Series (animated); Recordtoons Series (ani- 
mated) ; Israeli — series of half-hour documen- 
taries. 

Fred Niles Films, Hollywood 

RKO Pathe Studios, Culver City 

Chris Petersen, Jr., Vice-President 

All types of animation executed by Niles' 

own animation staff. 

(See complete listing Fred A. Niles 
Productions, Chicago) 



PARTHENON PICTURES HOLLYWOOD 

2625 Temple St., Hollywood 26 
Phone: DUnkirk 5-3911 

Date of Organization: 1954 

Charles (Cap) Palmer, Executive Producer 
John E. R. McDougall, Associate Producer 

& Senior Director 
Jack Meakin, Assoc. Producer, Music Dir. 
Ted (W. T. ) Palmer, General Manager 
Sam Farnsworth, Business Manager 
Robert J. Martin, Head Camera Department 
Kent Mackenzie, Head Documentary Unit 

Services: Cap Palmer Unit: documentary 
films for business. (No TV Series or com- 
mercials). Theatrical production in Lasky- 
Parthenon Unit. Public service documentary, 
in Kent Mackenzie Unit. Facilities: Own 
sound stage (main stage 80' x 90' x 22' head- 
room) ; office building and projection i-ooms 
adjacent. Usual professional equipment in 

(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



STH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



153 



METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES: 



Parthenon Pictures: Cont'd. 

camera, sound, editorial; 16mni and 3.5mm. 
Access to all Hollywood resources. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Hail the Hearty; Elsie 
& Co. (The Borden Company); Fire and the 
Wheel (Socony-Mobil) ; Basic Refractories 
(Kaiser Chemicals Div.); pictures in process 
for American Telephone & Telegraph ; Bell 
Telephone Labs; Hilton Hotels; International 
Harvester and American Petroleum Institute. 



•5f 



PICTURES FOR BUSINESS 

704 N. Gardner St., Hollywood 46 
Phone: WEbster 4-5806 

Date of Organization: 1951 

Bill Deming, Executive Producer 
Ann Deming, Associate Producer 
H. Keith Weeks, Producer-Director 
A. H. Holywell, Administration 
Bill Helms, Director of Photography 
Bob Mobley, Art Director 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms for 
business and government. Television program 
production and packaging (live and film) . 
Animated and live TV spot production. Con- 
sultation and creative planning services. Fa- 
cilities: Studio and location equipment; 
animation department, complete from planning 
through photography. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Frac-Assist Equipment; 
Frac-Assist Demonstration (B. J. Service). 
Slidefilms: PB Rubber (BJ-PB Rubber); 
The Right Way with BJ (Byron Jackson 
Pumps); Vibration Testing (Ling Electron- 
ics); Ball Fracturing Procedure ( B. J. Serv- 
ice ) ; Selling Signs ( Foster & Kleiser ) ; script 
only (Navy Nurse Corps) ; The Ne^v BJ Cen- 
tralizer (BJ Tools); Barrett Project (Byron 
Jackson ) ; script only ( Hoffman Television ) ; 
The Dixi Sixty ( MBI Import & Export ) ; Part- 
nership for Profit; The Priceless Ingredient 
(Belco Products). 

PLAYHOUSE PICTURES 

1401 No. La Brea Avenue. Hollywood 28, 

California 
Phone: HOllywood .5-2193 

Date of Organization : 1952 
Date of Incorporation : 1957 

Branch: 360 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 
1, Illinois. Phone: STate 2-3686. Peter 
Del Negro, Manager 

Adrian Woolery, President 
Mary Mathews, Secretary 
Bill Melendez, Producer Supervisor 
A. H. Halderson, Business Manager 
Pat Matthews, Animation Director 
Chris Jenkyns, Creative Story Director 
Sterling Sturtevant, Layout & Design Di- 
rector 
George W. Woolery, Director of Public Re- 
lations 

Services; Animation specialists in business, 
public relations, entertainment, educational 
films and television commercials. Facilities: 
Complete studio facilities for the production 
of animated films from story through camera, 
with exception of laboratory. 



RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Energetically Yours (for 
Transfilm, Inc., Standard Oil Co. of N. J.); 
12 recruiting trailers ( U. S. Navy). TV Com- 
mercials : For '57 and '58 Ford Cars, Trucks, 
Station Wagons: Tennessee Ernie Ford Show- 
Openings; Schlitz Beer (J. Walter Thompson ) ; 
Northern Pacific Railroad; Burgermeister 
Beer (B.B.D. & O.) ; Commonwealth Edison 
Little Bill; Eastside Old Tap Lager Beer (Leo 
Burnett Company ) ; Lanvin Parfums ( North 
Advertising); Richfield Oil Company (Hixson 
& Jorgenson ) ; Drewry's Beer (MacFarland & 
Aveyard ) ; Mobilgas, Socony Vacuum ( Comp- 
ton Advertising i ; Big Boy Food Products 
( Wian Enterprises, Inc.); Ideal Bread (Wm. 
T. Finn Associates ) ; Falstaff Beer Old Pro 
spots ( Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample ) . 



POLARIS PICTURES, INC. 

5859 W. Third Street, Los Angeles 36 
Phone: WEbster 8-2181 

Date of Organization: 1946 

Perry King, President 

J. C. King, Vice-President 

James G. Halverson, Assistant to President 

Art Scott, Director of Animation 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms for 
advertising, public relations, training and tel- 
evision. Facilities: Live action and anima- 
tion production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Leadership, series (U.S. 
Air Force); Project Pinwlieel ( Rotorcraft 
Corporation) ; The F4D Sliyray (Douglas Air- 
craft Corporation); Higlilights of 1957 
( Southern California Edison Company ) ; All- 
Star Football (Shrine Football Committee). 

ROLAND REED PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

650 No. Bronson Ave., Hollywood 
Phone: HOllywood 2-6877 

Date of Incorporation: 1947 

Branches: 215 E. 60th St., New York City. 
Phone: TE 3161. Hamilton McFadden, 
Vice-President. 2307 Chester Ave., Cleve- 
land, Ohio; George Oliva, Jr., Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

Roland D. Reed, President 

Arthur Pierson, Exec. V. P., Chg. Prod. 

James G. Fay, Secretary-Treasurer 

Services: Producer of sponsored motion pic- 
tures from creating stories, through produc- 
tion to delivery of master answer print — 
including animation. Facilities: Nine sound 
stages in California, facilities in New York. 
Equipment for location shooting anywhere. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: A Family Affair (Westing- 
house); Tlte Aluminum Man (Alcoa); Bank- 
ing on Farmers (American Banking Assoc.) ; 
For God & Country (American Legion); 
Progress Parade (American Petroleum Insti- 
tute ) . 



•55- 



Reid H. Ray Film Industries, Inc. 

716 North LaBrea, Hollywood 28 
Phone: WEbster .5-3737 

Anatole Kirsanoff^, Animation Director 
( See complete listing under St. Paul, Minn.) 



THE BEN RINALDO COMPANY 

6926 Melrose Ave., Hollywood 38, Californi; 
Phone: WEbster 8-854i 

Date of Organization : 1946 

Ben Rinaldo, Producer 

Saki, Art Department 

Fred Irwin, Scenario 

Geri Stone, Assistant to Producer 

Services: Producers exclusively of sounc 
slidefilms. Facilities: Complete organize 
tion for production of sound slidefilms for al 
purposes. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSOR! 

Slidefilms: Play Ball (The Squirt Companj 
— Little Leagues of America); Get in th( 
Swim (Catalina Swim Wear) ; Give 'Em Fit.' 
(Hollywood Maxwell Brassieres); The Heaiu 
of the Problem (Don Baxter Pharmaceuti 
cals); Planning for Tomorrow (National Me- 
morial Services Inc.). In preparation Welcome 
Matt; Mr Dowling's Dilemma (Carnatioi 
Company) ; Wake Up, Willie Doodle (Karl'i- 
Shoes) ; Family Album (Los Angeles Board oi 
Education); untitled sales film (Catalina 
Swim Wear). 

RIVIERA PRODUCTIONS 

29 Miraleste Plaza, Los Angeles (San Pedro, 

P.O.) 
Phone: DAvenport 6-7676 

Date of Organization: 1947 

Branches: 230 Westmoor Blvd., Milwaukee 
14, Wisconsin. Phone: SUnset 2-8815. 
Robert Zens, Midwest Representative. 566 
Birch Drive, Cleveland 23, Ohio. Phone: 
REdwood 1-6076. Pat Rancati, Eastern 
Representative. 

F. W. Zens, Executive Producer 

Hal MacDaniel, Director of Sales 

Jack Kelly, Associate Producer 

A. W. Stephenson, Head, Travel Film.^ 

Bert Hunt, Associate Producer 

Joe Tomchak, Writer 

Jim Barnes, Head of Religious Films 

Services: Complete motion picture production 
from script to final prints for industrial, edu- 
cational, public relations, advertising, sales, 
religious, technical motion pictures. TV pro- 
grams and spots. Facilities: Executives 
offices; studios; editing rooms; projection 
room; sound recording and mixing. Location 
equipment; musical library; sound effects and 
complete departments for film production. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The VisoMatic (R. C. Allen 
Business Machines, Inc. ) ; Operation Facelift 
(Barksdale Valves); Fabulous Filon (Filon 
Plastics Corporation); Life in the Sea (En- 
cyclopaedia Britannica Films); Serra, 1957 
(Serra International) ; Ceramic Moods, 
(Sascha BrastoflF Products, Inc.); The Trans- 
land Aq-2 (Hi-Shear Rivet Tool Company); 
The Curtition Story (Curtition Corporation); 
Santa's Village (Santa's Village); Kernville 
Story (Kernville Chamber of Commerce). 

Ross Roy, Inc. 

1680 N. Vine, Hollywood 28, Calif. 

Phone : HOllywood 9-6263 

J. G. Mohl, Vice-President, in charge 

(See complete listing under Detroit area) 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



1 ^4. 

I ROCKET PICTURES, INC. 

i 6108 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood 38 
I Phone: HOllywood 7-7131 

Date of Incorporation: 1943 
1 Dick Westen, President, General Manager 

Harlow Wilcox, Vice-President, Treasurer 
I Edward D. Robison, Sales Director 
I Courtney Anderson, Creative Director 

Don Bartelli, Production Manager 
I Kay Shaffer, Ass't to the President 

(Services: Consultants, creators and producers 
for business and industry. Specialists in per- 
sonnel recruiting, indoctrination, technical 
and/or service training, sales development, 
consumer selling, public relations and mer- 
chandising. Audio-visual programs for sales 
promotions including booklets; manuals, sound 
.slidefilms); complete meetings; training 
easels, charts. Single-step services from ideas 
to results. Facilities: Shooting stage, sound 
recording, art and animation, creative writing 
staff, camera department, editing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Scientific Selling (Beck- 
man Instruments Inc.) ; A Better Life (Peck- 
ham Corp.) ; How About You? ; The Problem 
of Life (Pacific Mutual Life Ins. Co.); The 
Question Is . . . (Better Selling Bureau). 



•5f 

FREDERICK K. ROCKETT CO. 

6063 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28 
Phone: HOllywood 4-3183 

Date of Organization: 1925 

Branch: 1022 Forbes Street, Pittsburgh 
19, Pa. Phone: EXpress 1-1846. 

Frederick K. Rockett, General Manager 
Alfred Higgins, Production Manager 
Lyle Robertson, Script Department 
Jay Adams, Camera Department 
James Lipari, Stage Mayiager 

Services: Production of motion pictures and 
slidefilms. Facilities: Complete 16mm and 
35mm camera equipment. Large sound- 
proofed stage. Western Electric sound record- 
ing equipment and truck. Equipped cutting 
rooms. Location trucks. Preview theatre. Full 
time stafi's. An affiliated animation company. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Keep America Beautiful; 
Appearance and Maintenance; Pump Island 
Service; Market Development ; What Is Boron; 
Youth Economy Run (Richfield Oil Corpora- 
tion) ; Curves And Figures (E. K. Williams 
& Co.); Report to Employees (Kaiser Steel 
Corp.) ; J.U.T. (Lockheed Aircraft Corp.) ; 
Close Order Drill; Marine Rifle Platoon; Ac- 
cident Prevention; Transportation Manage- 
ment (U.S. Navy). Slidefilm : Lesson *3 
(Cannon Electric Corp.). 



See Advertising Pages for Helpful Data 

i^ Producers whose advertisements appear on 
other pages of this Annual Review Issue carry 
this special designation ( * ) over listing text. 
Refer to the convenient "Index to Advertisers" 
on the last page of this issue for page number. 
The "Blue Chips" of film production advertise 
regularly in the pages of Business Screen. 



JOHN SUTHERLAND PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

201 No. Occidental Blvd., Los Angeles 26 
Phone: DUnkirk 8-5121 

Date of Organization: 1943 

Branches: 136 East 55th St., New York 22. 
Phone: PLaza 5-1875. MacDonald Mac- 
Pherson, Vice-President. 

John E. Sutherland, President, General 

Manager, Writer, Producer 
MacDonald MacPherson, Vice-President 
True Boardman, Writer, Associate Prod. 
Daniel Kulerman, Trea.Hurer 
Charles Bordwell, Vice-President 
Irma Lang, Executive Assistant 
George Gordon, Director, Animation 
Howard Roessel, Production Manager, 

Live-Action 
Earl Jonas, Production Manager, Animation 

Services: Complete production of live-action 
and animation films from research and script 
through release printing. FACILITIES: Motion 
picture studio. Completely-staffed animation 
department, fully equipped, including cameras. 
Live-action stage with electrical, grip and 
sound equipment. Set inventory, mill, paint 
shop, etc. Modern sound recording rooms and 
equipment. Editorial department equipped 
for 35mm and 16mm. Projection theatre 
equipped for 35mm and 16mm. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Voice of Your Busi- 
ness, Pacific Pathivays (American Telephone 
& Telegraph Company) ; Life of a Salesman 
(E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company) ; One 
Market West (Don Lee Broadcasting Com- 
pany) ; Something Wonderful Happens (Gen- 
eral Electric Company) ; You Ought to Drain 
Your Auto in the Atdumn (National Carbon 
Company) ; There Is Spring in the Air (Olds- 
mobile Division, General Motors Corp. ) ; Ba- 
nanas? Si Senor!, The Living Circle (United 
Fruit Company ) ; Jonah and the High way 
(United States Steel Corporation). 



TELEPIX CORPORATION 

1515 N. Western Ave., Los Angeles 
Phone: HOllywood 4-7391 

Date of Organization : 1948 

Branches: Telepix-Anderson, Inc., 6620 Di- 
versey, Chicago. Stan Anderson, in 
charge. Telepix-Anderson, Inc., 410 S. 
Michigan Ave., Chicago. Robert F. Ed- 
monds, in charge. Telepix of Hollywood, 
420 Madison Ave., New York. Paul F. 
Fitzpatrick, Jr. in charge. Telepix- 
ARVE, 806 Wilcox Building Portland. 
H. S. Jacobson, in charge. Southern Rep- 
resentatives, Jim Vaughn, Delaplain, Ar- 
kansas ; Whitson, Murray & Associates, 
35th & Abercorn, Savannah, Georgia. 

Robert P. Newman, President 
Martin Weiner, Vice-President, Sales 
Charles Deane, Head of Sound 
Pat Shields, Head of Production 

Services: TV commercials; industrial and 
audio-visual motion pictures and slidefilms; 
stage rentals and recording service. Facili- 
ties: Studio: 52' x 95'; truck entrance 14' 
high. Interlocked magnetic recording chan- 
nels; mixing-dubbing; projection room, three- 



i9- jfcf '^ ^^ ^ ri 



LOS ANGELES 



channel stereophonic magnetic recording; pro- 
ducers' editing rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Mankind Is My Business 
(United Fund of Indianapolis) ; The Base Rate 
Story (Sears Roebuck & Company); Rocket 
Motors, 7 film.s ( Aerojet-General Corpora- 
tion) ; Power of Chief Joseph (U. S. Corps of 
Engineers, Seattle). Slidefilms: Your 
Priceless Possession (Vi-San Food Supple- 
ments) ; Sales Safari, Sell-Up Products, series 
(Helene Curtis). TV Commercials: for 
Reddi-Whip, Max Factor, Skippy Peanut But- 
ter, Mattel Toy Guns, Champagne Foam, In- 
viso No-Line Glasses, Lawry's Salad Dressing, 
Pyramid Stone , Nutritonic, Coast Federal 
Savings, Wedgewood & Western Holly Stoves, 
Breast O'Chicken Tuna, Gaviota Plant Foods, 
National Paint, Regal Pale Beer, Pretty Feet, 
Magi-Nail, Mayflower Pride Pack, Red Devil 
Fireworks, Truth or Consequence Show, 
Johnson's Pies, Citizens National Bank. 



UPA PICTURES, INC. 

4440 Lakeside Drive, Burbank, Calif. 
Phone: THornwall 2-7171 

Date of Incorporation : 1945 

Branches: 60 E. 56th St., New York 22. 
Phone: PLaza 8-1405. Eli Feldman, Sales 
Executive. 360 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 
1, 111. Phone: ANdover 3-7566. Jerry 
Abbott, Sales Executive. 140 Park Lane, 
London, W. I., England. Phone: Mayfair 
2987. Roy Letts, Business Manager. 

Stephen Bosustow, President 

Melvin Getzler, Exec. Vice-President, Treas- 
urer 

Herbert Klynn, V. P., Chg. Western TV 
Commercials 

Maxine Davis, Secretary 

Rev Chaney, Production Manager 

Services: Animated cartoon films; educa- 
tional, industrial films and theatrical short 
subjects and features. TV commercials and 
programs. Facilities: Animation studios in 
Burbank, New York, sales offices in Chicago 
and London. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Pirate, Painter (Coca 
Cola). TV Commercials: For Sunbeam 
Shavemaster (Sunbeam Corporation); To- 
nette ( Toni Company ) ; Folger's Instant Cof- 
fee ( Folger Company) ; Ex-Lax (Ex-Lax Com- 
pany) ; Pan American Coffee Bureau; Sinatra 
Show Opening (Chesterfield Cigarettes); 
Cherry Nugget Ice Cream (National Dairy); 
Psychiatrist (Stopette); What's My Line 
Opening (Remington Rand Ltd.). 



Van Praag Productions, Inc. 

1040 North Las Palmas Ave., Hollywood 3x, 
Calif. 

Phone: HOllywood 2-1141; TWX LA-1223 

Hugh S. Hole, Vice-President 

Gene Harrison, Production Manager 

(See complete listing in New York City ai-ea) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES: 

Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

5981 Venice Boulevard, Hollywood, Calif. 
Phone : WEbster 8-0183 
Frank MuUaney, in charge 
(See complete listing under Chicago area) 

RAPHAEL G. WOLFF STUDIOS, INC. 

5631 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28 
Phone: Hollywood 7-6126 

Branch: Carl Wester, 2013 Orrington Ave., 
Evanston, 111. Phone: DAvis 8-7236. 

Date of Organization: 1930 

Raphael G. Wolff, President & Treasurer 
Arthur W. Treutelaar, Vice-President, 

Production Manager 
Enid Grode, Executive Secretary 
Hoyt Curtin, Musical Director 

Services: Sales promotion, industrial, busi- 
ness, technical, training and institutional mo- 
tion pictures; televi-sion programs and commer- 
cials. Photographics International, a divi- 
sion of Raphael G. Wolff Studios, Inc. Camera- 
men in 72 foreign countries and U.S. Film 
requirements photographed on assignment 
throughout the world. Complete library of 
foreign and domestic film. Cleared for com- 
plete security for all types of classified produc- 
tion work, for national defense agencies, 
armed services. Facilities: Stages and com- 
plete production facilities; lighting equipment, 
generators, camera equipment. Mobile units 
for nationwide production; staff of editing, 
animation, anistration, music and creative 
personnel. Stereo motion picture cameras, 
16mm and 33mm, for 3-dimensional films. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Automation and Mr. Hal- 
stead (General Electric Company) ; Northwest 
Wonderland (Richfield Oil Company) ; People 
and Profit (Chrysler Corporation — Sales Com- 
munication, Inc., McCann-Erikson) ; Power 
for Progress (Los Angeles Dept. of Water & 
Power) ; Tularosa Frontier (White Sands 
Proving Grounds). 

NORMAN WRIGHT PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1515 N. Western Ave., Hollywood 27 
Phone: Hollywood 4-2133 

Date of Organization: 1948 

Norman Wright, President 

C. M. Wright, Secretary-Treasurer 

Kenneth Homer, Vice-President, Production 

Hal Geer, Editorial 

Gilbert Wright, Writer-Director 

Errol Grey, Writer-Director 

William Perez, Animation 

Services: Creative writing, planning and pro- 
duction of business, television, government 
and theatrical motion pictures in b/w and 
color. Facilities: Mobile filming and sound 
equipment. Sound stage and animation facil- 
ities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: We'll Take the High Road, 
Engineering Your Future (American Road 
Builders Association) ; What's In It For You 
(Oil and Gas Journal). (Only 1957 produc- 
tions submitted). 



A^ CD 



^y m 



PACIFIC NORTHWEST 



Oregon 
Telepix-ARVE 

806 Wilcox Building, Portland 4, Oregon 

H. S. Jacobson, in charge. 

(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 

WInik Films Corporation 

611 N. Tillamook Street, Portland 12, Ore. 

Merriman Holtz, in charge 

(See complete listing in New York City area) 

Washington 
EMPIRE FILMS CORPORATION 

227 N. Division St., Spokane 2, Washington 
Phone: MAdison 4-8141 

Date of Organization: 1952 

C. H. Talbot, President 

M. O. Talbot, Secretary, Treasurer 

T. F. Gorman, Camera Dept. Supervisor 

P. W. Carter, Recording Supervisor 

Ed Foster, Continuity-Script Dept. 

Services: Creation and production of 16mm 
motion pictures for business, industry, and 
professions. Also 35mm filmstrips. Commer- 
cials for television. Facilities: Small sound 
stage with some standing sets; productions, 
recording, and editing equipment but no lab- 
oratory; studio, location, or field assignments 
either sound or silent, b/w or color; own cam- 
eras and lighting. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Handled With Care 
(Parkmaster Systems, Inc.) ; For the Lands 
Sake (Douglas Soil Conservation Dist.) ; Cyst- 
ocele-Rectocele Repair; Caesarean Section; 
surgical films (Dr. R. T. Harsh) ; No Tears for 
Terri (El Katif Shrine for Shriners Hospital 
for Crippled Children) for March 1958 re- 
lease. 

L. R. HUBER PRODUCTIONS 

1947— 14th Ave. North, Seattle 2, Wash. 
Phone: EAst 2-4274 

Date of Organization : 1952 

Louis R. Huber, President 
Hazel I. Huber, Vice-President 

Services: Motion pictures, 16mm color and/ 
or b-w; specially-qualified and equipped for 
Alaskan, overseas and field production. Fa- 
cilities: Specialized B&H cameras (4), 
Cine-Special II (1) with wide assortment of 
lenses, special camera car; field high fidelity 
magnetic tape recording. 16mm magnetic re- 
cording Magnasync); high fidelity tape 
transfer recorder; 16mm magnetic film two 
channel editing; film planning, editing, script- 
ing, animation. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures : Letter From Alaska; Lit- 
tle Diomede; Living Wilderness (Northern 
Films) ; It's Moving Day (North American 
Van Lines, Inc.) ; On Reaching Alaska (North- 
west Orient Airlines, Inc.). 

New World Productions 

6011 38th Street, N.E., Seattle, Wash. 

G. Newton, in charge 

(See complete listing under Los Angeles area) 



RARIG MOTION PICTURE COMPANY 

5510-14 University Way, Seattle 5, Wash.' 
Phone: Kenwood 0707 

Date of Organization : 1927 

Max H. Rarig, President 

Edith A. Rarig, Vice-President 

David A. Rarig, Secretary 

James H. Lawless, Director of Production 

Ralph Umbarger, Director of Photography 

Grace Umbarger, Art Director 

John Dubuque, Sound Engineer 

Joe F. Nelson, Editor-in-Chief 

Services: Public relations, sales promotion 
and training films. TV programs and com- 
mercials. Finishing department services in- 
clude: editing, narration, writing, recording, 
art and animation, music underscoring. Fa- 
cilities: 16 and 35mm photographic equip- 
ment. Complete 16mm editing equipment; 
lighting equipment; new sound stage. Western 
Electric magnetic recording. Permanent staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: One Is Too Many (Pacific 
Coast Assoc, of Pulp & Paper Mfrs.) ; Go— No 
Go (Boeing Airplane Company) ; Mountains 
Don't Care (Mountain Rescue Council) ; The 
Bremerton Story (Reynolds Metals Company) ; 
Good Neighbor Town (United Good Neigh- 
bors) ; Concrete Progress, Newsprint Hand- 
ling Aboard Ship, Hyster Hydraulic Backhoe 
(Hyster Company) ; Vocational series Your 
Career In: Forestry, Logging & Meteorology, 
three half-hour films (Weyerhauser Timber 
Company). 



istvr ri iM-jt/9> n 



HAWAII 



CINE'PIC HAWAII 

1847 Fort Street, Honolulu, Hawaii 
Phone: 50-2677 

Date of Organization: 1947 

George Tahara, Owner-Producer 
Maurice Myers, Animation Dept. 
William W. Davenport, Writer 
Spence Brady, Writer 
Harry Onaka, Editor 

Services: Industrial, educational, theatrical 
and television motion pictures; production 
from script to screen. Facilities: Complete 
lATSE technicians; 16 and 17y2mm synchro- 
nous tape recorders. Maurer professional 
cameras and sound-on-film recorders, sound 
stage, lighting equipment, music library, an- 
imation dept.; editing and projection facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Decision for Life (Can- 
cer Society of Hawaii) ; Heart Attack (Heart 
Association of Hawaii) ; Hawaii, Its People 
& Resources (International Cooperation Adm. 
Washington, D. C.) ; Tom Moore in Haivaii 
(Pacific Panorama) ; Tahiti Calls (Fronk As- 
sociates). 



Listing Supplement In Next Issue 

i^ Literally thousands of items have been 
received from worldwide sources for the 
largest, most authoritative listing of 
producers available anywhere. Inevitable 
oversights, listing text received after ex- 
tended deadlines and any errors noted 
will be covered in Production Review 
Supplement pages in Issue 2, Volume 19. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



ALBERTA: Calgary 

I MASTER FILM STUDIOS LTD. 

I 510 5th Street West, Calgary, Alberta 
j Phone: AMherst 9-3200 

I Date of Organization: April 1955 

i E. K. Elton, General Manager 

, Spence Criliy, Managing Producer 

I C. P. MacKintosh, Secretary-Treasurer 

M. H. Hundert, Secretary 

Robert Willis, TV & Animation Dept. 
\ Werner Franz, Editing & Sound Dept. 
I John Pfiffig, Camera Dept. 
! Gus Jorg, Processing Dept. 

i^ERVlCES: Motion pictures for industry, edu- 
j;ation & TV; TV commercials; slides, anima- 
iion; 16mm printing and processing; magnetic 
'k optical recording; editing. Facilities: 30' 
c 40' sound stage; Cameras: 2 Auricon Super- 
1200s, Cine-Specials; animation stand; MR & 
DKO lighting (65,000 watts) ; B&H Model J 
[Printer; Houston Fearless processing; 2 Mag- 
liasync recorders; Magnasync 3 channel dub- 
)er; Maurer optical recorder; editing &screen- 
ng rooms; 2 station wagons. 

{ECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Oil Is a Scientific Busi- 
hess (Imperial Oil Limited) ; Gas Line East 
KTrans-Canada Pipe Lines Limited) ; Stam- 
hede Stop-Over (Canadian Pacific Railway) ; 
\Special Kind of Courage (Crippled Childrens 
iHospital Aid Society) ; End of An Era (Mas- 
iter Film Studios). 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 

S. W. Caldwell Ltd. 

311 Alaska Pine Building, 1111 W. Georgia 

St., Vancouver, B. C. 

Phone: MA. 8733 

Florence Ward, Representative 

(see complete listing under Ontario) 



HIRST FILM PRODUCTIONS 

3015 W. Broadway, Vancouver 8, B. C. 
Phone; CH 3616 

Date of Organization: 1935 

H. V. Hirst, Owner Producer 

H. W. Manson, Sales & Script 

E. Puill, Chief Cameraman 

S. Verbeke, Sound Production 

W. Taylor, Laboratory 

W. Mosher, Editor 

W. Wilson, Art Department 

Services: Motion pictures for industry, TV, 
commercials, strips, slides, industrial analysis ; 
complete laboratory services, printing, proc- 
essing, 35-16 and 16-8 reduction (optical), 
color processing. Blowup and reduction serv- 
ices for still and motion pictures. Also equip- 
ment rentals for producers and industry. 
Facilities: 35mm Mitchell and DeBrie cam- 
eras; Auricon 1200, pro, and Mitchell 16mm 
cameras Houston processing machines ; B & H 
printers. Sound stage and studio facilities. 
Optical and magnetic sound application. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Storm Shelter (Acme Im- 
provement Company) ; Prepare the Future 
(Mason Construction Co. Ltd.) ; It's Easy 



BUSINESS SCREEN INTERNATIONAL 




^ g 



CANADA 



Af n 



( Swiftknit Company) ; The Big Payoff (Home 
Oil Company) ; What Stop (The Camera 
Shop). 

MANITOBA: Winnipeg 

S. W. Caldwell Ltd. 

801 Lindsey Bldg., Notre Dame Ave., 

Winnipeg 
Phone: 92-4643 

(See complete listing under Ontario) 



PHILLIPS-GUTKIN & ASSOCIATES LTD. 

432 Main Street, Winnipeg 2, Manitoba 
Phone: WH 3-0544 

Date of Organization : March, 1947 

John Phillips, President 

Harry Gutkin, Vice-President, Managing 
Director 

Lloyd E. Moffat, Secretary-Treasurer 

Barrie Helmer, Jeff Hale, Don Bajus, Sen- 
ior Animators 

Jack Harreveld. Head, Anim. Cam. Dept. 

Ken Jubenvill, Senior Editor 

Services: Animation facilities from script 
storyboard to full cell animation. Production 
of industrial and documentary films. Facil- 
ities: 35mm Acme animation camera and 
stand; 35mm Moviolas; sound readers — edit- 
ing equipment, 35mm and 16mm Arriflex cam- 
eras, 60,000-watt portable lights, complete 
studio facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Project — North Star (The 
M. W. Kellogg Company, N. Y.) ; Centre of 
Fashion (Providence of Manitoba). TV Com- 
mercials: Kraft Cheese, Windsor Salt (J. 
Walter Thompson) ; series for Chrysler Cor- 
poration (Ross Roy of Canada) ; Kellogg's 
Bran Flakes (Leo Burnett of Canada) ; Milko 
(W. A. McCracken Ltd.) ; Bayer Nose Spray, 
Andrews Liver Salts (Walsh Advertising) ; 
Bank of Canada (McKim Advertising Lim- 
ited) ; Bufferin, Ban, Vitalis, Ipana Tooth- 
paste (Ronalds Adv.). 



ONTARIO: Ottawa 

CRAWLEY FILMS LIMITED 

19 Fairmont Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario 
Phone: PArkway 8-3513 

Branch Offices: 181 Eglinton Avenue E., 
Toronto. Phone: MAyfair 0325. 1467 
Mansfield St., Montreal. Phone AVenue 
8-2264 

Subsidiary: Graphic Films Limited, 19 
Fairmont Ave., Ottawa, Ontario. 

Date of Organization: 1939 

F. R. Crawley, C.A., President 
Graeme Fraser, Vice-President 
Stewart Reburn, Manager, Toronto Office 
Alasdair Fraser, Manager, Montreal Office 
Donald Carter, Director of Production 
Paul Naish, Office Manager 
Tom Glynn, Production Manager 
Jim Turpie, Mgr. Producers Services Div. 
George Gorman, Quentin Brown, Sally 
MacDonald, Edmund Reid, Philip Wie- 
gand, Peter Cock, Edmund Reid, Rene 
Bonniere, Betty Zimmerman, Senior Pro- 
ducers 
Rod Sparks, Chief Engineer 
Robert Johnson, Supervising Editor 
Stan Brede, Camera Department 
Ivan Herbert, Lighting Department 
Tony Betts, Recording Department 
Kenneth Gay, Animation Department 
Joan Hind-Smith, Script Department 
William McCauley, M. Bach., Dirs. of Music 
Ivor Lomas, F.R.P.S., Laboratory Manager 

& Quality Control 
Alma Givson, Purchasing Agent 
Earl Valley, Equipment Sales Manager 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms for 
Canadian and United States industry. Govern- 
ment, education and television; recording, ed- 
iting, animation, extensive laboratory services 
for producers, independent cameramen, ten 
provincial governments and other organ- 
izations from coast to coast. Facilities: 



(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



157 



CANADIAN PRODUCERS: 



CRAWLEY FILMS LTD.: Cont'd. 

30,000 sq. ft. studio building, sound stage and 
two recording studios. Cameras: Maurers, 
Newman-Sinclair, Bell & Howell, Arriflex and 
Cine-specials; blimps, dollies, ,320,000 watts 
of lighting equipment with mobile generator 
and transformer station; Maurer 16mm re- 
cording equipment and 2 recording studios 
with 8 & 4 mixing channels. 3 Rangertone 
synchronous magnetic tape recorders, 7 16mm 
Magnetic recorders and dubbers; Magne- 
corders with sync heads, 35mm dubbers, turn- 
tables, disc recorders; animation department 
with two stands i Saltzman ) ; engineering de- 
velopment facilities; still dept., casting file; 
music library; script dept. with research li- 
brary. Electronic service dept. Equipment 
Sales Division. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: French & English ver- 
sions of the following: Skij Watcli on 55° (The 
Bell Telephone Co. i ; The Order of Good 
Cheer (Canadian Restaurant Association); 
Of Soup and Love (Thomas J. Lipton Co. 
Ltd.); Xew Wonders With Wieners (Visking 
Limited); Legend of the Raven, Mural (Im- 
perial Oil Ltd. ) . Money Minters, French ver- 
sion (The International Nickel Co. of Canada 
Ltd.); A New Future Lies North (French 
version for Dept. of Trade & Commerce, and 
German version for Dept. of Citizenship & 
Immigration); Adventure at Your Doorstep, 
Waterways and Fly ways of the North, City 
of Rivers ( Manitoba Dept. of Industry & Com- 
merce); Red Carpet (Trans-Canada Air 
Lines); Jamaica Flavour (Captain Morgan 
Rum Distillers Ltd.); The Librarian (Cana- 
dian Library Assoc); Beaver Dam, Jamaica 
Sings (Crawley Films Ltd.) ; The Teens (Na- 
tional Dept. of Health & Welfare ) ; Tyrone 
Guthrie on Tivelfth Night, Michael Langham 
on Hamlet (Canadian Association for Adult 
Education) ; Social Acceptability, Emotional 
Maturity, Discipline, /.s This Love, How Much 
Affection, When Should I Marry (McGraw- 
Hill Book Co., New York) ; Ore in Sight (Ca- 
land Ore Co. Ltd. ) ; Canada's Carpet Crafts- 
men (Harding Carpets Ltd.); Put This in 
Your Pipe (Aluminum Ltd.) ; A Champion Is 
Born (House of Seagram) ; The Queen's Com- 
mission (Dept. National Defense). Film- 
strips: Museum (National Gallery of Cana- 
da); Lecture (Bank of Nova Scotia); Sys- 
tetns Analysis (R. L. Crain Ltd.); Labrador 
(British Newfoundland Corp. Ltd.); Confi- 
dence Because (Personal Products Ltd.); 
Packboard Drill (Civil Defense Div. of Dept. 
Health & Welfare). TV Commercials: For 
Kellogg's, General Mills, Pillsbury, W. A. Ran- 
kin Ltd., Pure Spring (Canada) Ltd., Victor- 
ian Order of Nurses for Canada, Trans-Canada 
Air Iine.s, Canadian Legion, Central Canada 
Exhibition Association, Progressive Conserva- 
tive Party and others. 



S. W. Caldwell Ltd. 

355 Main Street, Ottawa 
Phone: CE 5-1023 

Donald Manson, Representative 

(See complete listing under Toronto) 



The Calvin Company 

Motion Picture Centre, Toronto, Ontario 
G. S. Kedey, representative 
(See complete listing under Missouri U.S.) 



GRAPHIC FILMS LIMITED 

(A Subsidiary of Crawley Films Limited) 
19 Fairmont Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario 
Services: Laboratory and producers serv- 
ices division of Crawley Films Limited. Fa- 
cilities: 16 35 negative-positive and 16mm 
reversal processing machines; 16mm Bell & 
Howell printers; 16mm Union Step printer; 
Moy 16mm edgenumbering machine. 



ONTARIO: Toronto 



S. W. CALDWELL LTD. 

447 Jarvis Street, Toronto, Ontario 
Phone: WA 2-2103 

Date of Organization: 1949 

Branch Offices: Ontario: 355 Main St., Ot- 
tawa. Donald Manson, Repr. Quebec: 1410 
Stanley St., Montreal. Bud DeBow, Repr. 
Manitoba: 801 Lindsey Bldg., Notre Dame 
Ave., Winnipeg. British Columbia: 311 
Alaska Pine Bldg., Ill W. Georgia St., 
Vancouver. Florence Ward, Repr. 

Spence Caldwell, President 
Gordon F. Keeble, Vice-President 
Stewart H. Coxford, Comptroller 
Sydney Banks, Exec. Producer, TV Film & 
Lab. 

Services: 16 and .35mm TV film commercial 
production. Documentaries, theatrical shorts, 
35 & 16mm processing and printing, anima- 
tion (cell & camera), artwork, slides, film- 
strips, studio rental, motion picture equipment 
rental, TV program air check, filming .service 
(Kine-recording), sound recording. TV film 
sales, Canadian distributor for CBS Television 
Film Sales, Guild Films, Towers of London, 
BBC, Associated Rediffusion Ltd., Caldwell 
A-V Equipment Co. Ltd. Facilities: All 
facilities required to render above services. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Picture: Pay Attention (Ontario 
Dept. of Highways). Television Films: 
Street Scene (Tri-Nut); Italian Touch (Max 
Factor); Bathroom (Philishave) ; Silverware 
(Blue Surf); Good Seasons (General Foods). 



CHETWYND FILMS LIMITED 

21 Grenville Street, Toronto 5, Ontario 
Phone: WAlnut 4-4493 

Date of Incorporation: 1950 

Arthur Chetwynd, President & Gen. Mgr.. 
Marjory Chetwynd, Sec.-Treasurer 
Lenore Gordon, Secretary 
W. C. Donaldson, I/C TV Production 
Robert Barclay. Supervisinn Editor 
Russell Heise, / C Sound Department 
Eirikur Hagan, Film Director 
J. L. McCormick, Production Manager 
Robert Brooks, Chief Cameraman 
Services: 16mm motion picture production. 



color and b.&w. for education, sport, travel, 
industry, advertising, public relations, tele- 
vision, industrial stills; projection service; 
slidefilm and filmstrip production; research', 
writing, editing, scripting, sound, processing,' 
printing, film library. Facilities: 16mm mo- 
tion picture cameras; still cameras; research, 
writing, editing, scripting, sound, Ampex ^^'' 
tape, Stancil-HofTman 16mm sprocket tape, 
library (distribution and stock shot), studio,' 
screening room. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Calgary Stampede 1957 
(Calgary Brewing & Malting Company i : 
Pursuit of Wisdom (University of Toronto: 
Shrine East-West All Star Football Game 1957 
(Molson's Brewery Ltd.); Investment in 
Canada ( Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 
— TV). Oflicial coverage of Eastern Canada 
Big Four professional football games for 
Molson's Brewery. 12 one reel films for chil- 
dren's programs for Canadian Broadcasting 
Corporation — TV. 



FLETCHER FILM PRODUCTIONS LIMITED 

RCA Bldg., 225 Mutual Street, Toronto, Ont. 
Phone : EMpire 3-8372 

Date of Organization: 1954 

Howard D. Fletcher, President, & Gen. Mgr. 
Edward R. MacGillivray, Executive 

Producer, & Secretary 
Hugh J. Moreland, Executive Director, & 

Treasurer 
Brian C. Jupe, Supervising Director 
Michael L. Snow, Animation Director 
Svend A. Blangsted, Production Mgr. 
Paul Woolston-Smith, Camera Chief 
Ruby Renaut, Production Coordinator 
J. Kenneth Elliott, Supervising Editor 
Isabelle D. Mclnnis, Traffic Manager 

Services : Production of motion pictures, 
sound slidefilms, and slide-motion films in 16 
& 35mm, sound, b&w and color. Industrial, 
documentary, sales and technical training, 
customer and public relations, sales presenta- 
tions. TV commercials and films. Theatrical 
short subjects and trailers. Full cell and 
Vari-Cel animation. Complete programs, in- 
cluding visual aids and stage presentations for 
sales training and consumer sales. Film 
library service; editing of TV syndicated films 
and features; commercial cut-ins, timing, 
cleaning, shipping, inspecting and storage of 
TV films. Public Service Films Division spe- 
cializes in films for public service organiza- 
tions. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: It Makes Sense (Dunlop- 
Canada Limited ) ; Shipmates ( Navy League 
of Canada ) ; Tlie You in United, Special Con- 
ference ( United Appeal for Metro Toronto ) ; 
Slipper to Fill, How Natural Gas Comes to 
Your Community ( Consumer's Gas Company 
Ltd.) ; Anhydrous Ammonia for Canada (Dow 
Chemical of Canada ) ; Dr. Griffin Speaks 
(Canadian Mental Health Association) ; Sculp- 
ture in Canada (Institutional Broadcasts 
Dept., Canadian Broadcasting Co.). Slide- 
films: Warden Service (Dept. of National 
Health and Welfare of Canada) ; The You In 
United (United Appeal for Metro Toronto). 
TV Films: A Day in the Life of Mrs. Curtis 
(Canadian Broadcasting Company) ; series of 
six (Canadian Tuberculosis Society). TV 



158 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



JOMMERCIALS: For Dunlop-Canada Limited, 
Ijnited Appeal for Metropolitan Toronto, 
[Canadian Mental Health Association and 
Sthers. 



4f 

Crawley Films Limited 

181 Eglinton Ave. E., Toronto, Ontario 

Phone: MAyfair 0325 

Stewart Reburn, Manager 

(see complete listing in Ottawa area) 



KLENMAN-DAVIDSON PRODUCTIONS LTD. 

9 Bloor St. East, Toronto, Ontario 
Phone: WA 4-6482 

Date of Organization: 1956 

William Davidson, President 
Norman Klenman, Vice-President 
Stanley N. Schatz Q. C, Secretary-Treasurer 
Gordon R. Coles, Member of the Board 
P. H. Delacour, Member of the Board 
William H. Gimmi, Dir. of Photography 
James A. Willis, Head, Sound Dept. 

[Services: Complete production of theatrical 
[shorts and feature films, TV films and film 
series, industrial and public relations docu- 
'mentaries. FACILITIES : Complete 35mm pro- 
duction equipment; cameras, lights, camera 
accessories, dolly. Moviola editing equipment, 
Isound recording and re-recording facilities, 
itransports. Rents studio space when required, 
• contracts out opticals and laboratory services. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Picture: A Home of Tlieir Own ( On- 
itario Homes for Mentally Retarded Childi'en 
Inc. ) . TV Films : Major Hill of Niagara; The 
Village Blacksmith ; Jasper Park Warden; 
Rodeo Champ; The Sailmaker; Tracking the 
Sputnik; and 11 others (The TV Film Service 
Dept. of The Canadian Broadcasting Corp. 
Television Network ) . 



4f 

ROBERT LAWRENCE PRODUCTIONS 
(CANADA) LTD. 

32 Front Street West, Toronto, Ontario 
Phone: EMpire 4-1448 

Date of Organization: April, 1955 

Robert L. Lawrence, President 
John T. Ross, Vice Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 
Philip Kornblum, Treasurer 
Robert Rose, Production Director 

Services: Producers of motion pictures for 
television and industry — live-action and ani- 
mation. Robert Lawrence Productions in New 
York and Toronto; Grantray-Lawrence and 
Lawrence-Schnitzer Productions in Hollywood. 
California. Facilities : Sound stage 125' x 55' x 
25' for 16mm and 35mm color, black and white 
film production — 35mm NC Mitchell with 
blimp. Fearless dolly, Magnasync recording 
equipment. Mole-Richardson sound boom. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

(Only television commercials submitted) 

TV Commercials: for Procter & Gamble 
Cheer (Young & Rubicam); Savage Shoes 
(Breithaupt, Milsomi; Arrid ( Cockfield, 
Brown ) ; Jello ( Baker ) ; Smith Brothers 
Cough Drops (Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & 



Bayles) ; York Peanut Butter (James Lovick) ; 
York Products (McKim); Nestle Quik (E. 
W. Reynolds ) ; Reliable Toys ( Ronalds ) ; 
TRC's (CoUyen; Rose Brand (J. Walter 
Thomp.son ) ; Bradings Beer ( F. H. Hay- 
hurst); Sterling Aspirin (Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample Inc.). 



MOTION PICTURE CENTRE LIMITED 

85, Yorkville Ave., Toronto 5, Ontario 
Phone: WA 4-8329 

Date of Incorporation : 1953 

G. S. Kedey, President 
Dave Smith, Writer-Director 
Leslie George, Camera Chief 
Bob Stagg, Sound Department 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms for 
television, industry, sales promotion, staff 
training, religious, travelogues, and public re- 
lations use. Facilities: Auricon, Arriflex 
cameras, Magnasync recording equipment, re- 
cording studio, editing, writing and screening 
facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Picture: A Day for the Kingdom 
(Anglican Church). Television Films: A 
Matter of Taste; Accredited to Canada; 
House on Barrack's Hill; A New House for 
God (C.B.C. Television). 



PETERSON PRODUCTIONS 

337-9 King Street West, Toronto 1, Ontario 
Phone: EMpire 8-7065 

Date of Organization: 1947 

S. Dean Peterson, President 

Laurence L. Cromien, Director of Prod. 

Laurence Bartram, Set Design, Construction 

Douglas Kennedy, Studio Manager 

Derek Smith, Sound Dept. Head 

Doris Cromien, Make-Up 

Services: 16 and 35mm production of TV 
commercials. Documentary, industrial, sales 
training & promotion films. FACILITIES: Com- 
plete sound-proof stage, editing rooms, make- 
up room, dressing rooms, complete recording 
and re-recording facilities, screening room, 
16 & 35mm equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

TV Commercials: For Ford /Monarch Div.; 
(Cockfield, Brown & Co. Ltd.) ; Mercury-Lin- 
coln-Meteor Div. (Vickers & Benson Ltd.) ; 
Kelloggs of Canada Ltd. (Leo Burnett Co. 
Ltd. ) ; Salada Tea ( McKim Advertising Co. 
Ltd.) ; Lever Bros. Ltd. (Cockfield, Brown and 
J. Walter Thompson ) ; Lipton's Tea ; Rock 
City Tobacco ( Kenyon and Young, Rubicam, 
Gerhardt); Hood-Minor Shoes (Harold F. 
Stanfield ) ; Rollaids ( Baker Advertising Co. 
Ltd.). 



SHOWCASE FILM PRODUCTIONS 
(Div. Associated Broadcasting Co., Ltd.) 

1139 Bay Street, Toronto, Canada 
Phone: WA 4-1111 

Date of Organization : June, 1956 

Martin Maxwell, President 
Jack Chisholm, General Manager 
M. DiTursi, Production Secretary 

Services: Producers of industrial, educa- 
tional, sales training, motion pictures and 



Af a 



^ Q 



CANADA 



slidefilms; theatrical trailers; TV commer- 
cials. Specializing in industrial and engineer- 
ing films. Facilities: Motion picture produc- 
tion equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Tiie Claim Stakers (On- 
tario Dept. of Mines ) ; The Blind River Story 
(Joy Machinery) ; The Big Z (Rio Tinto Min- 
ing Co., Canada) ; Uranium Mining (Stanleigh 
Uranium Co.); The Shaft Sinker (Inger.soll- 
Rand Co., Canada i . 

ONTARIO: Windsor 

Ross Roy of Canada, Ltd. 

Windsor, Ontario 

Phone: CLearwater 6-2371 

H. J. G. Jackson, Vice-President, in charge 

(See complete listing in Detroit area) 

QUEBEC: Montreal 

REAL BENOIT FILM PRODUCTIONS 
(Formerly Benoit De Tonnancour Films) 

2161 St. Catherine Street, West, Montreal, 

Quebec 
Phone: WE 3-7339 

Date of Organization : 1949 

Real Benoit, Director 

George Fenyon, Director of Photography 

Jean Milard, Sound 

Services: Production of 16 and 35mm films 
for all purposes from script to final print. 
French translations and adaptations. Facili- 
ties: Sound stage 40' x 70'; 16 35mm positive 
and negative cutting i-ooms ; editing and pro- 
jection rooms. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Television Films: Collegiens Troubadours. 39 
films ( Pepsi-Cola ) ; series of 52 musical 
travelogues (Lever Brothers); Lojiis Cyr, 
Vieux Montreal. 3 films (Canadian Broadcast- 
ing Corporation ). 



OMEGA PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

1960 Dorchester Street West, Montreal 25 
Phone: WE 7-3525 

Date of Organization: 1951 

'^. S. Mnrrisey, President 

Pierre Harwood, Vice-President 

Leonard M. Gibbs, Secretary-Treasurer 

Richard J. Jarvis, Sales Representative 

Henry A. Michaud, Director of Production 

John R. Racine, Director, TV Commercials 

John BuiTTian, Chief Engineer 

Lise Caron, CItief Editor 

Denis Mason, Chief Cameraynan 

John Sawyer, Chief Electrician 

Services : Educational, industrial, sales promo- 
tion, theatrical, and television motion pictures. 
Facilities: 16mm and 35mm cameras, tape 
and film recording equipment, projection and 
editing facilities, sound shooting stage, ani- 
mation department. 



(LISTING CONTINUES ON FOLLOWING PAGE) 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



FILM 

HEADACHES 

CURED 



CANADIAN PRODUCERS: 




Business Films, Libraries, Adver- 
tising Companies, Film Distribu- 
tors, Etc., Vacuumate Corporation 
offers quick relief for film 
headaches— bringing to you many 
services you have urgently 
sought. 

FILM CLEANING 

INSPECTION 

AND REPAIR 

• 

SPOOLING & SHIPPING 

OF TV COMMERCIALS 

• 

FILMSTRIP CUTTING 

AND CANNING 

• 

FILM PROTECTION 

Vacuumate Corp. gives you the fine super 
Vacuumate film process for protection 
ogainst wear, oit, fingermarks, scratches 
ond climatic changes. 

• 

FILM DEPOSITORY 

films ore catalogued and stored with us 
awaiting your shipping instructions. 

• 

PACKAGING AND SHIPPING OF 
FILMS . . . FILMSTRIPS AND DISCS 



NO-EN 

FILM TREATMENT 



GIVES TROUBLE FREE EXTRA LONG 

REPEATER FILM PROJECTION FOR 

YOUR ADVERTISING CONTINUOUS 

FILMS . . . 



» only a single reel or many, Vacuumate 
will serve you well. Write for information 



V4CUUII1+K 



specialists in 

Film Haf/dling Services 

446 West 43rd St.. New York, N. Y. 



OMEGA PRODUCTIONS: Cont'd. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures : Road to the Market { Prov- 
ince of Quebec) ; St.-Benoit du Lac (St.-Benoit 
Abbey). Filmed Television Films: Pepinot 
40 episodes, Radisson 26 episodes, Tomahaivk 
26 episodes (Canadian Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion). TV Commercials: For Canada Starch 
Ltd., du Pont of Canada Ltd., Dow Brewery 
Ltd. (Vickers & Benson Ltd.); Kraft Foods 
Ltd., Standard Brands Ltd. (J. Walter Thomp- 
son Co.) : Fred A. Lallemand & Co. Ltd. 
(Walsh Advertising Co. Ltd.); W. H. 
Schwartz Ltd. (Bennett & Northropp Ltd.) ; 
Reckitt & Colman Ltd. (McKim Advertising 
Ltd.). 



S. W. Caldwell Ltd. 

Suite 319, 1410 Stanley St., Montreal 

Phone: AV. 8-0528 

Bud DeBow, Representative 

(see complete listing under Ontario) 



Crawley Films Limited 

1467 Mansfield St., Montreal, Quebec 

Phone: AVenue 8-2264 

Alasdair Fraser, Manager 

(see complete listing in Ottawa area) 



QUEBEC: Quebec City 

LES DOCUMENTARIES LAVOIE 
(Lavoie Productions) 

447 Rue Dolbeau, Quebec, P.Q., Canada 
Phone: MUrray 3-7601 

Date of Organization: 1949 

Hermenegilde Lavoie, Director 
Therese Richard, Secretary 
Richard Lavoie, Production Manager 
Services: Producers of motion pictures; in- 
dustrial and educational motion pictures and 
TV commercials. Facilities : Full production 
facilities for all phases of motion picture 
photography. Sound studio, recording, edit- 
ing and animation. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Story of Zone 2 (Le 
Soleil Ltee.); Insolation (Bouchard & Robi- 
taille Ltee.) ; Forest Operation's (John Mur- 
dock Ltee.) ; Sisters of Charity of Saint-Louis 
Meet the Challenge (Sisters of Charity of 
Saint-Louis) ; Stop (Province of Quebec 
Government) ; Rencontres dans L'lnconnu 
(Les Documentaires Lavoie). 



Experienced Film Sponsors Look 
to the Pages of This Annual Review 

• Producers whose listings appear in this sec- 
tion have voluntarily supplied the minimum 
client and film references for your reference 
use. Five business-sponsored motion picture or 
slidefilms were the minimum requested for an 
unqualified listing in the pages of this 8th 
Annual Production Review Is.sue of 1958. I* 



CANADA'S 

BIG 

STUDIO 

Caldwell's produce interesting, 
effective films for (Canada's top 
advertisers and agencies. The 
spacious, fully equipped and 
staffed Queensway Studio is 
available for rental to all 
producers. 

. . . Write and reserve your copy of mir 
illustrated brochure, soon ojj the press. 




QUEENSWAY FILM STUDIOS 

1640 The Queensway, Toronto, Ontario 
Phone Clifford 9-7641 




Are presen-flLi producing 

animated and live-action 

comn^erc^Scile for 

vVesiin^Kovise 

RENAULT 
PHILIPS 

COINTREAU 

IVTestle 
OMEGA 



complete production -facilities tor 
LIVE-ACTION and ANIMATION 



TV -films dubbed in Spanish 



estudios mofo 

LOS MESEdO, 15 • MADRID -SPAIN 



160 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



PRODUCTION IN L A T I N - A M E R I C A 



il.4f cniB^Af rn 



MEXICO 



AUDIOVICENTRO 

Av. Cuauhtemoc 226, Mexico 7, 
j D. F. 

Phone: 10-25-13 

Cable: AUDIOVICENTRO 

Date of Incorporation: 1956 

Dr. David Grajeda, Pres., Dir. 

Dr. Juan Jose Giovanni, Vice- 
Pres. 
I Marcel Gonzales Camerena, 
I Sound Engineer 
' Ernesto Martinez, Chf. C'man 

Lucy Estrop, Spanish Versions 
j Antonio Gutierrez, Animation 
I Jorge P. Valdes, Art Director 
' Octavio Motta, Foreign 
Relations 

Emmanuel Ugalde, Titles 

Services: Translations and Span- 
ish versions of foreign films. 
Titles. Optical and magnetic sound 
recording. Animation. Documen- 
tary, scientific and educational film 
production. Audio-Vex system 
(slides and records ) . TV commer- 
cials. Distribution of Spanish 
language films. Facilities : Sound 
studios; Arriflex, Bolex cameras; 
Ampex; Magnasync, RCA sound 
systems; VI-Mex titles system. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures : Translation, 
Spanish versions of 63 documen- 
tary films (U.S. Embassy) ; clini- 
cal films (National Medical School, 
Ayerst Laboratories, Colliers) ; 
documentary films fSutec) ; titles 



and animation for 206 films in 
Spanish. Slidefilms: Clinical sub- 
jects (International Congress of 
Surgeons). 



CINE COMMERCIAL, S. A. 

Louisiana No. 81, Mexico, D. F. 

Phone: 23-88-30 

Date of Incorporation: 1954 

Hans Beimler, Gen. Mgr., Tech. 

Dir. 
Arrigo Coen, Prod. Director 
Carlos Basurko, Prod. Mgr. 
Carlos Prieto, Script Supr. 
Jose Torre, Cameraman 
Ruben Gamez, Cameraman 

Services: 35 and 16mm motion 
picture production. Specializing 
in documentaries, television short 
subjects and commercial ads for 
movies and television. FACILITIES: 
35 and 16mm, camera equipment, 
stages, cutting room, projection 
room, magnetic and optical record- 
ing equipment available. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

TV Spots: For Max Factor; 
Tums; Enicar; Anacin; Coca- 
Cola; Hinds; Viceroy; DuMont; 
DuBarry; Kelvinator; Nabisco; 
Air France; Gillette; Paper Mate; 
Acco; Studebaker; Ford; Mennen; 
McCormick; Hoover; Procter & 
Gamble; Admiral; Brylcream; 
Johnston Pumps; Minn. Mining 
& Mfg.; Revlon; Johnson & John- 
son; Richard Hudnut; and others. 



CARIBBEAN AREA PRODUCTION 



V1GUIE FILM PRODUCTIONS, 
INC. 

Roosevelt Ext., Hato Rey, 

Puerto Rico 
Phone: 6-0235 & 6-1258 

Date of Organization: 1950 

Juan E. Viguie, Jr., President 
Manuel R. Navas, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Administration 
Salvador Tio, Vice-President, 
Promotion 

Services : 16mm & 35mm black & 
white and color commercial spots, 
documentary films for government 
and private organizations; TV and 
theatre newsreels; Kinescope fa- 
cilities; editing; single and double 



system photography ; laboratory 
services B & W; animated com- 
mercials. Facilities: Two sound 
studios (50' X 50' and 34' x 20') ; 
cutting rooms ; recording and pro- 
jection rooms ; laboratory process- 
ing and printing rooms ; music 
library: animation. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures : Tivo Blades for 
One, University in the Fields 
(Agricultural Ext. Service of 
U.P.R.) ; Sources of Energy 
(Puerto Rico Water Resources 
Authority) ; Eating Habits for 
Small Children (Department of 
Health) ; Puerto Rico Alert 
(Puerto Rico Sugar Growers 
Association). 



"The Magazine the Buyers Read and Advertisers Prefer" 
Business Screen Covers the Field of Visual Communication 




8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



IM^^ CJ IM^ 4^ C3 



SOUTH AMERICA 



ESTUDIOS 
CINEMATOGRAFICOS ROSELLO 

Casilla Correo 3116, Lima 

(Peru), S. A. 
Phone: 30.553 

Date of Organization : 1952 

Jose Maria Rosello, President 

and Treasurer 
R. De Nardo, Vice-President 
Luis Rosello, Production Mgr. 

Services : Complete production of 
films, black & white and color, 35- 
mm and 16mm, travel, newsreel, 
artistic productions ( drama, com- 
edy, musical ) , TV commercials, 
documentary, etc. Facilities: 16 



and 35mm cameras, lighting, 
sound truck, Magnetic sound, 
Moviola, etc. All services. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Huanda (E. 
Grana ) ; Perez Aranibar (Benefi- 
cencia de Lima); Si Don Luis 
(musical film); La Muevte Llega 
al Seffunda Show (political film) ; 
Tela Siiprela (Duncan Fox). TV 
Commercials: For Cera Poliflor, 
Persianas Flexalum, Good Year, 
Cera Cardinal, Medias Lancaster, 
Canadian Pacific Airlines, Calzado 
Rimac. Approximately 105 other 
films in 1957 in Eastman Negative 
color. 



jM^jff cniB^Af a 



ENGLAND 



BIRMINGHAM COMMERCIAL 
FILMS LTD. 

8 Lozells Road, Birmingham 19 
Phone : Northern 8486-7 

Date of Organization; 1938 

Harold Juggins, F.LB.P., 
Governing Director 



Godfrey Davis, A. LB. P., 

Mg. Director 
Dr. W. H. J. Vernon, O.B.E., 

F.R.I.C, Dir. & Scientific Ad. 
G. Johnson, Chief Stills Cayn. 
John Varnish, Chief Prod. Asst. 
Harold E. Tonks, Chief Service 

Engineer (Cont'd, at top) 



IN CANADA- 



^4 



^ 




Canada's largest producer of sponsored films 
over 1,000 productions . . . 19 years . . . 
85 national and international awards . . . 
30,000 sq. ft. modern studio building . . . 
own lab, animation, stage . . . 
branches in Toronto and Montreal . . . 
for Canadian production, write — 



19 FAIRMONT AVENUE 
OTTAWA. CANADA 



Roger M. Jones, Secretary 
Services: Specialist producers of 
direct 16mm color sound motion 
pictures and 35mm shorts; TV 
Newsreel Dept., commercial and 
3-dimensional photography; sound 
recording (synch, or wild) ; mo- 
bile film shows; TV commercials. 
Facilities: Studios for film pro- 
duction, commercial photography; 
filmstrips, editing, titling, rear 
projection, retail still and cine 
sales division supplying audio 
visual aids. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Fan Range 
(Verity's Ltd., Birmingham) ; On 
the Beam (Joseph Lucas Ltd.); 
All Change Gear ( Self Changing 
Gears Ltd.). Television Films: 
Know Your Midlands, series of 13 
(Associated Television Ltd.). TV 
Newsreels: British Independent 
Television Authority and British 
Broadcasting Corporation. 

HALAS & BATCHELOR 
CARTOON FILMS, LTD 

lOA Soho Square, London, W.l, 

England 
Phone: GERrard 7681/2/3 

Date of Organization : 1947 

Studios; Dean House, 2, 3 & 4, 
Dean Street, W.l. Animation 
Stroud, Church Road, Cain- 
cross near Stroud, Gloucester. 

Branch: 11 West 42nd St., Room 
1146, New York 36, N.Y. 
Phone ; LOngacre 4-3346. 
Miss Irene Lee, Sales Repr. 

John Halas, Director 
Joy Batchelor, Director 
Sam Eckman, Jr. (U.S.A.), 
C.B.E. Director 

Services; Staflfof 80 for animated 
film production for advertising 
and entertainment for television 
and cinema. Industrial, public re- 
lations and educational films. Fa- 
cilities ; Studios for both celluloid 
animation and 3-dimensional pup- 
pet, model animation. Animation 
cameras ; 2 model camera setups. 
Editorial and projection equip- 
ment for 35mm/16mm. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: History of Cin- 
ema (Phillips Electrical Indus- 
tries, Holland) ; Best Seller (Shell 
Petroleum Co., Ltd.); All Lit Up 



( The Gas Council of Great Bri-: 
tain). TV Commercials: For 
Murraymints, OMO (S. H. Benson 
Ltd.) ; Surf, Walls Ice Cream 
( Lintas Advertising Agency); 
Phensic (J. Walter Thompson); 
Lyons Products ( Dorland Adver- 
tising Agency ) ; Hoover ( Erwin 
Wasey & Company, Ltd.). 

Marathon News 

73 Delamere Road, London W.) 

5, England 
Maurice Ford, in charge 
( See complete listing in New York 
area) 

UPA Pictures Ltd. 

Suite 6, Third Floor 

140 Park Lane, London, W.l., 

England 
Phone ; Mayfair 2987 
Roy Letts, Business Manager 
(See complete listing under Los 
Angeles area) 

WORLD WIDE PICTURES, LTD 

Lysbeth House, Soho Square, 

London W. 1. England 
Phone: GERrard 1736/7/8 

Date of Organization ; 1942 

James Carr, Managing Director. 
Exec. Producer 

Hindle Edgar, Company Direc- 
tor, Producer 

V. L. Price, Co. Director, Secy. 

Services: 35mm and 16mm spon- 
sored public relations, documen- 
tary, training and sales films for 
government departments and in- 
dustry, TV programs and com- 
mercials. Facilities; studios, re- 
cording theatre — Western Elec- 
tric, lighting, cameras, studio 
.staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures; Submarine Es- 
cape Training (Admiralty); 
Mousetrap Is Out (English County 
Cheese Council); The Restless 
Sphere (British Broadcasting Cor- 
poration) ; Three Men in a Truck 
(Ford Motor Company); The 
Film That Never Was (Central 
Office of Information ) . Television 
Films: Transatlantic & Common- 
wealth Televiews — monthly issues 
(Central Office of Information). 



FREIVCH 


VERSIDIVS 


Commerr 


ary or Dubbing 


Quickly 


and Correctly 


LES ANALYSES 


CINEMATOGRAPHIQUES 


6, Rue 


Francois - ler 


PARIS 


8^ FRANCE 


U. S. references: Dar 


tnell Corporafion. Mobil Oil, 


Remington-Rand, Ger 


eral Motors, Worthington. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



4f □ 



<kf C 



FRANCE 



^ 



LES ANALYSES CINEMATO- 
GRAPHIQUES 

1 6 Rue Francois ler, Paris 8e, 

France 
I Phone: BALZAC 40-58/59 

Date of Organization : 1947 

Georges Roze, General Manager- 
Jean Vincent, Sales Manager 
Andre Cantenys, Producer 

j Claude Bellanger, Art & 

I Animation Director 

Services: Department Production 
ind Realization — Documentaries, 
industrial and sales promotions 
iilms 16mm and 35mm and film- 
strips. Department Ultra-ralenti 
—Studies with high speed Kodak 
"amera. Facilities : Cameflex, 
Bell and Howell, Kodak and Cine 
Special Cameras. Titles, effects, 
i-iynchronization, dubbing, labora- 
Itory and cutting rooms. Author- 
lized dealer for Bell and Howell. 



RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

French Cotton Industry, OEEC, 
Ministry of Nal Education, Mobil 
Oil, SNCF, Worthington, Air 
France, Simca, Remington Rand, 
Renault, General Motors Frigi- 
daire, Saint-Gobain. 

Marathon Newsreel 

117 bis rue Ordener, Paris 18, 

France 
Mr. .Jean Magny, in charge 
( See complete listing in New York 
area) 

Vavin, Inc. 

(Video & Visual 

Information Films) 

72 Boulevard Raspail, Paris 

XVI, France 
Mme. Yvonne Oberlin, Manager 
( See complete listing under New 
York City) 



i»-^ a/j^Afa 



GERMANY 



^4. 

LAUX STUDIOS KG 

An der Hauptwache 10, Frank- 
furt/Main 
Phone: 27441 

Date of Incorporation: 1947 

Helmut Laux, President 
Achim Koch, Vice-President 
Ehrenfried Fischer, . Research 

and Script Director 
Werner Harzer, Art, Animation 

Director 
Werner Christmann, Prod. Mgr. 
Wolfgang Fuchs, Export Mgr. 

Services : sound slidefilms for 
every purpose. Consultation, re- 
search services. Distributors for 
DuKane automatic sound slide- 
film projectors, record or tape. 
Creators of sales promotion, mag- 
azine, picture book materials. Fa- 
cilities: completely-equipped pro- 
duction plant for sound slidefilms, 
both b/w and color. All work done 
on premises by over 50 permanent 
employees. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Slidefilms: Tactics of Sliell Ad- 
vertising (Shell) ; How to Launch 
and Develop Localized Retailer Ad- 
vertising ( Shell Petroleum Com- 
pany, London ) -.The New Opel Rec- 
ord, 1958; The Unknown Custom- 
er (Opel) ; The Balance — No Con- 
juration (Continental); Every 
Item Shopped Well Taken Care of 
in Refrigerator; Hot Water Al- 
ivays Ready ( Siemans ) ; Visits 
Well Prepared (Allianz Insurance 



Company) ; Advertising, the Key 
to Sales Success ( Bosch ) . Syndi- 
cated sound slidefilms series, The 
S Sales Resistances and How to 
Overcome Them, 8 films for sales- 
men, and Use Your Wits in Driv- 
ing, 5 films for use in driving 
schools. 

BOEHNER-FILM 

T oewenichstr. 1, Erlangen, Bav. 
Phone: 36-41 Savacall: 0629843 

Fritz Boehner, Owner 

W. E. Atzbach, Administration 

Services : Documentaries, indus- 
trial, sales promotion films, televi- 
sion. Facilities: Own studios and 
sound recording. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Draussen auf 
den Strassen (Continental Gum- 
mi werke AG, Hannover) ; Viel- 
spindlig den Ken (Burckhardts 
Weber, Reutlingen ) ; Grosse Liebe 
zu Kleinen Gaerten (Torfstreu- 
Verband, Oldenburg ) ; Das Nev- 
este Aus Schilda ( Sparkassen-U 
Girdverband, Stuttgart ) ; Dreh- 
strommotore (Allgem. Elektr. Ge- 
sellshaft, Frankfurt/M). 

Vavin, Inc. 

(Video & Visual 

Information Films) 

9 Blumenstrasse, Buderich- 
Dusseldorf, Germany 

N. Z. Moreno, Vice-President 
and Manager 
( See listing under New York City ) 



LEADING IN EUROPE 

in the field of Sound Slidefilm Production 






research 
script writing 

sales promotion material 
art-work 
photography 
colour-processing 

sound studio 
DuKane automatic- 

soundfilm projectors 



over 50 staff members specialised in sound 
slidefilms technique 

production of German, English, French, Swedish, 
Italian and Spanish versions 



LAUX STUDIOS KG. FRANKFURT/MAIN 






SFrnix^ 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



16.3 



11. 4f C2lMri9 C3 



SCANDINAVIA 



DENMARK 

7v 
MINERVA-FILM A/S 

Toldbodgade 18, Copenhagen K, 

Denmark 
Phone: Minerva No. 1 

Date of Organization: 1936 

Torben Madsen, President 
Ingolf Boisen, Vice-President 
Theodor Christensen, Director 
Hagen Hasselbalch, Director 
Jorgen Roos, Director 
Ole Berggreen, Director 

Services: production of motion 
pictures, commercial, industrial, 
scientific fields. Facilities: Equip- 
ment for 16 and 35mm production. 
Cameras : Arriflex, Bell & Howell. 
Debrie, Kodak Cine Special. Cut- 
ting - rooms. Projecting - theatre, 
Moviolas, 17V2mm tape-equipment, 
film and sound library. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Power to 
Greenland, 35mm Eastmancolor 
(Burmeister & Wain) ; Johannes 
Larsen, Atomic Energy, 35mm 
Eastmancolor ( Danish Govern- 
ment) ; Queuing Up For Life 
(Bikuben) ; Rust (S. Dyrup & 
Company) ; They Were Kafirs, 
NATO, versions, (Danish Govern- 
ment) ; Hvor Gaar Karl Hen 
(Confederation of Danish Em- 
ployers ) . 

NORWAY 

Non-Commercial Producers 

KOMMUNES FILMCENTRAL 

(Film Central of Municipalities 

of Norway) 

Nedre VoUgt. 9, Oslo, Norway 
Phone: 41-36-25 

Date of Organization: 1919 

Mrs. Kirsten Sonberg, General 
Manager 



Services: production and distri- 
bution of documentary and educa- 
tional films; distribution of com- 
mercial films to cinemas; non- 
commercial films to schools. Fa- 
cilities: 16/35mm sound record- 
ing; 16/35mm laboratory work. 
Only facilities listed, 
(no reference data on productions) 

STATENS FILMSENTRAL 

Schwensens gate 6, Oslo, Norway 
Phone: 60-20-90 

Mrs. Ingeborg Lyche (director. 
Ministry of Education), 
President of Board 

Jon Mathirsen, Managing Dir. 

Services: production and distri- 
bution of documentary and educa- 
tional films and filmstrips. 16mm 
non-commercial film distribution 
on a national scale. 16mm sound 
recording. 16/35mm laboratory 
work. Facilities: sound record- 
ing studio, laboratory. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: The Knife- 
smith, The Hatter, The Fiddlers— 
folk music (Ministry of Educa- 
tion) ; This Is Norway (Norwe- 
gian Foreign Ministry) ; Same 
Yakki-The Laplander (Per Host). 

NORSK FILM A/S 
(Norwegian Film, Ltd.) 

Kirkeveien 59, Oslo, Norway 
Phone: 69-54-90 

Date of Organization : 1932 

Rolf Stranger, Lord Mayor of 
Oslo, President of the Board 

G. W. Boo, General Manager 

Robert Heuch, Technical 
Manager 

Martin Fiksen, Studio Manager 

Services: production of weekly 
news-reel Norsk Filmavis: feature 
films and documentaries. Facili- 
ties: Film studio at Jar near 



MINKRli-FILM 


m 


Copenhagen 


K 


DENMARK 


FOUNDED 1936 




Oldest Documentary 




Film Company in 




Scandinavia 




Production: more than 140C 


films 



Oslo; film archive; studio for re- 
recording and synchronisation. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Film based on 
We Die Alone by David Howarth 
(A/S Noi-dsjofilm) ; Fools in the 
Mountains (Calmar Film A/S) ; 
Although Small (Ifas-Jonson) ; In 
Such a Night (co-production with 
Sigma-Film) ; Out of the Dark 
(co-production with Mental Film 
A/S). English translations of 
Norwegian titles. 



SVEKON FILM 

Seiersbjerget 7, Bergen, Norway 
Phone: 14688-14680 

Date of Organization: 1950 

Haakon Sandberg, Owner, Man- 
aging Director 

Sverre Sandberg, Owner, Man- 
aging Director 

Services: 16mm and 35mm docu- 
mentary-educational film produc- 
tion. Productions for U. S. tele- 
vision. Facilities: 16mm sound 
recording studio, 35mm to be in- 
stalled in 1958, laboratory, 16mm 
single system equipment, 16 and 
35mm cameras. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: London, Man- 
hattans Million (self sponsored) ; 
Klart Skip (Monopol Lakk og Mal- 
ingindustri) ; Regna (Jorgen S. 
Lien Industrier ) ; De Motes der 
Ute (Norwegian Seamen's Mis- 
sion). 



SWEDEN 

FORBERG — FILM AB. 

Kungsgatan 27, Stockholm, 

Sweden 
Phone: 111655 

Date of Organization: 1934 



FORBERG FILM: Cont'd. 

E. Forberg, Pres., Gen. Mgr. 
T. Hultgren, Executive Sec. ( 

Treasurer 
S. Hebbel, Sales Manager 
H. Peters, Director 
H. H. Bolov, Sound Services 
K. Pill, Art Department 

Services: Motion pictures in 3 
and 16mm and slidefilms for in 
dustrial, sales and personnel train 
ing. Facilities : Camera and light 
ing for 35 and 16mm motion pic 
tures; sound recording; completi 
facilities for slidefilm production 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSOR 

Motion Pictures: Building Powe 
(Bergeforsen Hyrdoelectric Co.) 
film on deciding the course of i 
tunnel (Electrical Ore Prospect 
ing Company). Slidefilms: Oi 
selling fruit (The Banana Com 
pany) ; on impregnating seed: 
(Ewos Company) ; A Study ii 
White, Baths and Bathrooms 
Boilers for Heating (Gustavs 
berg's Porcelain Factory) ; Highei 
Efficiency by Better Control (Na- 
tional Cash Register, Sweden) ; or 
the Vertico 1400 chiche camen 
(Printing Equipment Company); 
Salesman and Prospect — the Hu- 
man Contact (Sales Executives ol 
Sweden) ; Motor Lubricatiori 
(Shell — Swedish branch) ; Selling 
Breads ( Swedish Bakers' Associa- 
tion); Bus Bodies (Swedish Bus 
Owners' Association) ; on supervi- 
sion (Swedish Employers' Union) ; 
on handling customers (Swedish 
Hairdressers' Association ) ; Pork 
and Products of Pork (Swedish 
Pork-Butchers' Association) ; on 
pipe fittings and the T.A. Climate 
Compensator system (Tour Agen- 
cies Inc.) ; Saving Your Tires 
(Trelleborg Rubber Co.); Selling 
Ads, Selling Subscriptions (U- 
nited Provincial Newspapers). 
Many adaptations of U. S. and 
German sound slidefilms). 



lB-4f 




ESTUDIOS MORO S. 



A. 



Los Mesejo, 15 Madrid, Spain 
Phone: 395402 

Date of Organization : 1950 

Santiago Moro, General Mgr. 
Jose Luis Moro, Art Director 
Cristobal Marquez, Prod. Dir. 
Paul Casalini, Film Director 
Eduardo Ducay, Script Director 
Marcel Brevil, Film Director 
Juan J. Baena, Live Action 

Director 
Rogelio Cobos, Editor 

Services : Staff of 120 for the pro- 
duction of commercial films for 



television and cinema; television 
films dubbed to Spanish; indus- 
trial, public relations and educa- 
tional films. Facilities: 4 anima- 
tion units; 4 animation stands; 
magnetic sound recording; 2 
shooting studios; model and pup- 
pet animation studio; 3 editing 
rooms; projection. All facilities in 
our own building. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: La Scd No 
Tiene Estaciones (Coca-Cola) ; 
Vivir en el Aire (Firestone); 
Parejas Famosas (Philips) ; Ser- 
enata del Licor (Cointreau); 
North, South. West, Far-West ^ 
(Renault). i 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



W. J. GERMAN, Inc. 

AGEIVTS FDR THE SALE AlVD D ISTRIBUTI DIV DP 

EASTMAN 



FrnfessiDnal Films 

for 

Mntinn Pictures 

and 

Television 



FDRT LEE, Hew Jersey: 

LOngacre 5-5978 

HOLLYWDDD: EHICAGD: 

6677 Santa Monica Blvd. 6040 IV. Pulaski Hoad 

HOllywDod 4-EI3I IRvinq 8-40E4 



T H ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



Professional Motion 
Picture Production . . 




SERVICES AND FACILITIES 

• 40' X 60' Air Conditioned Sound Stage 

• RCA, Westrex and Ampex Recording Equipment 

• Mitchell Cameras 

• Mole Richardson and Bardwell Lighting and Grip 

Equipment 

• Experienced and Cooperative StafF and Crews 

• Location or Studio - 16mm - 35mm 



For information call F. William Hart, 
Vice-President and Manager 



Lincoln 6-8822 



NATIONAL riLM STUDIOS 

(formerly Capital Film Studios) 
105 nth Street, S.E. Washington, D. C. 




CINESOUND 



• Dubbing — complete facilities up 
to 10 channels . . . 

• Musical scoring — from the finest 
libraries available . . . 

• PLUS, full sound stage facilities 

1037 North La Brea Avenue, Hollywood 38. California 



if rn iW^jf a 



AUSTRALIA 



NEW SOUTH WALES 

AUSTRALIAN INSTRUCTIONAL 

FILMS PTY., LTD. 
and HALLIDAY PRODUCTIONS 

6 Underwood Street. S.vdney, 

N.S.W., Australia 
Phone: BU 6557 

Cable: AUSTFILM 

Lex Halliday, Director 

Jean Halliday, Director 

Philip J. Pike, Chief Camerman 

Noel Robinson, Scripting 

Donald Stanger, Sound 

J. Alfred, Distribidion 

Services: Production for screen 
or television. Specializing in color 
16mm standard Kodachrome, 
35mm Eastmancolor (completely 
processed in Austi-alia). Produc- 
ing films on world-wide locations 
and specifically Australia and ad- 
jacent Pacific islands. General I'e- 
search and scripting. Educational 
and scientific advising facilities. 
Facilities: Cameras, 16mm Cine 
Specials, (synchronous). Ektar 
lenses, 35mm Arriflex ( synchro- 
nous). Dollies, studios, theatrette; 
Moviola, editing facilities; full 
complement of spot and flood- 
lights. Sychronous 17.5mm port- 
able tape recording equipment. 
Optical recording on Western 
Electric System. Portable 15 KVA 
generator. Cartoon and animation. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: 35mm Eastman 
color for Lux; Lifebuoy; Rinso, 
with Pidgin English and Police 
Motu sound tracks; World Brands, 
16mm Kodachrome for Vacuum 
Oil, Bitumen; Speedo; Sunsilk; 
Quanta; N.S.W. Child Welfare De- 
partment; Sydney Today, class- 
room version. Koala. German 
sound track. Filmstrips: Train- 
ing series for Australian Mutual 
Provident Society. TV Commer- 
cials: For Surf, Sunsilk, Vauxhall 
Victor and others. Operation 
Wasteland, 35mm Eastman color 
documentary with music composed 
and orchestrated and separate 
technical and television versions in 
production. Recent additions to 
16mm Kodachrome Stock Library 
and Black & White Still Library: 
Northern Territory Industries; 
Australian Capital Cities and Pri- 
mary Industries; Aborigines; Fi- 
jian Sequences. 



CINESOUND PRODUCTIONS 
PTY., LTD. 

541 Darling St., Rozelle, 

Sydney, N.S.W. 
Phone: WB 3141 (4 lines) 

Date of Organization: lO.'il 



Norman Bede Rydge, C.B.E., 
Chairman, Directors 

Andrew J. Helgeson. Gen. Mgr. 

Reg Burbery, Prod. Mgr. 

Lloyd Shiels, Chief Cameraman' 

Sydney Whiteley, 
Editor-in-Chief 

Arthur Smith, Chief Sound En- 
gineer 

Stuart Ralston, Optical Effects 
& Animation 

Peter Whitchurch, Film Director 

Richard Allport, Film Director 

Bede Whitman, Film Director ' 

Services : Cinesound Australian 
Weekly Newsreel circulating 
throughout Australasia and New 
Zealand. T.C.N, daily TV news- 
reel. Industrial, documentary com- 1 
mercial and television films in 
35mm and 16mm. Camera repre- 
sentatives in Melbourne, Brisbane, 
Adelaide, Perth, Hobart, Towns- 
ville, Auckland, New Zealand. Fa- 
cilities: Two sound stages, full 
35 & 16mm camera and lighting 
equipment; (35mm and 16mm) 
power generating plants. 16mm & 
17V:'mm magnetic recorders and 
mixing heads. ( 8-channel re-re- 
cording). Two optical film re- 
corders. Three theatrettes. Ox- 
berry animation equipment; edit- 
ing, dubbing, script writing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Progress in 
Wool (Australian Wool Board); 
This Game of Bowls, Xafianal 
Football (Caltex Oil); Sunshine 
State (Queensland Govt.); St. 
Mary's Project ( Commonwealth 
Govt.) ; The Lysaghts Story (Ly- 
saght Steel Industry) ; Rugby 
League Football (NSW Rugby 
League); Journey to Ayres Rock 
(Trans-Australian Airlines); The 
Rheem Story (Rheem) ; The Poly- 
thene Story (Int. Chemical Indus- 
tries) ; Heavy Equipment (West- 
inghouse Le Tourneau) ; 10,000 
Miles Against the Clock (Vacuum 
Oil) ; Cartoon-Magic of Animation 
(Greater Union Theatres). 



PERIER PRODUCTIONS 
PTY., LTD. (ssf, etc.) 

PERIER FILMS PTY., LTD. 
(mp only) 

24 Jamison St.. Sydney, N.S.W. 
Phone: BU 6527 

Date of Organization : 1947 
Reg Perier, Managing Director 
Stan Murdoch, Production Mgr. 
Mildred Crowley, Bnsiness Mgr. 
Helen Hughes, Color Tran.'fpar- 

encies 
John Bowen, Film Editor 

Services: 16mm production, 
35mm B&W and color transpar- 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A (i A Z 1 N E 



ency library of Australian, New' 
Zealand and Pacific Island sub- 
jects; commercial and industrial 
photographers. Facilities: Cine 
Kodak Specials, 200 ft. magazines, 
35mm Exaktas, full range 5x4 
equipment. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Behind flic 
Portrait (Gordon Edgell & Sons 
Ltd.) ; The Ceremovij of Religions 
Profession (Little Sisters of the 
Poor): Liver Fluke (Imperial 
Chemical Industries of A & N.Z. 
Ltd.); The Automotive Electrical 
System ( Vesta Batteries Ltd. ) ; 
These Were Eventful Years (Au- 
burn Municipal Council); The 
Good Neighbor (Rockdale Munici- 
pal Council). 

VICTORIA 

CAMBRIDGE FILM & TV 
' PRODUCTIONS PTY. LTD. 

; 221 Pelham Street, Carlton, N. 

3, Victoria 
, Phones : FJ 2204, FJ 4678 

I Date of Organization : 1949 

I W. V. Morgan, Chairman of 

I Directors 

' D. J. Bilcock, Director in charge 

[ of Production 

i E. G. Morcom, General Manager 

' L. Heitman, Director of 
Photography 
D. Trewin, Sound Engineer 
S. Sesin, Head Animator 
G. Kischkowski, Office Manager 

Services: Producers of all types 
of commercial motion pictures and 
slide films; theatre and television 
commei'cials, business and indus- 
1 trial films. Black and white, East- 
man color, Kodachrome. Facili- 
ties: Individual 35mm and 16mm 
animation tables; complete 35mm 
and 16mm production equipment; 
sound stage acoustically treated ; 
blimped 35mm and 16mm cameras 
for lip sync sequences; 17V2 
(Sprocketed magnetic film recorder 
■and Byer 66 tape recorders; art 
I department ; preview theatre, 
I available for hire; 35mm and 
^ 16mm projectors; complete facili- 
I ties for still photography. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Fastening Fast 
: ( Ramset Fasteners Pty. Ltd. ) ; In 
•Keeping (C. E. Miller & Co. Pty 
Ltd.); Chisel Plowing (Chamber- 
lain Industries Ltd. i ; Grassed 
Chutes ( Soil Conservation Author- 
[ ity) ; The Difference That Counts 
(Ford Motor Company of Austra- 
lia Pty Ltd.). 



JAPAN 



INTERNATIONAL MOTION 
PICTURE COMPANY, INC. 

Katakura Bldg., Kyobashi, 

Tokyo, Japan 
Phone: 28-5778,9 
Cable Address: lANMUTSU, 

Tokyo 

Date of Organization : 1952 

Ian Mutsu, President 
Shokichi Mogami, Director 
Yasumasa Sakoda, Director 

Services: Producers of industrial 
and business films, TV commer- 
cials and newsreels. 16mm and 
35mm production. Facilities: Full 
time camera, sound and office staff. 
Own sound recording and editing 
facilities. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Kimono (Japan 
Silk Exporters Association) ; 760 
Cases of Murder ( Standard Vac- 
uum) ; International Trade Fair 
(Agriculture Section USIS); 
Tokyo Fireworks ( Hosoya Fire- 
works Company ) ; Canadian 
Wheat, Japanese edition (Cana- 
dian Embassy ) . 



AFRICA 

SUDAN PUBLICITY CO., LTD. 

Publicity House, Khartoum, 

Sudan 
Phone: Khartoum 4160, 7511 
Cable Address: Publicity 
Date of Organization: 1950 
Hamish Davidson, Managing 

Director 
Khalil Atabanl, General Mgr. 
Gabriel Tokatleian, Prod. Snp. 
Platom Lambrou, Studio Mgr. 

Services: 35mm films (B&W); 
16mm films (color); 35mm film- 
lets ( B&W and color ) . Soundtrack : 
Arabic, English, French, Greek. 
Facilities: Air-conditioned stu- 
dio, carpenter's shop, production 
offices. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Motion Pictures: Tons of Enjoy- 
ment (African Confectionery Co. 
Ltd. ) ; Sudan Black Honey ( Mid- 
dle East Agricultural Co. Ltd.) ; 
Sandgrouse at Dawn (I.C.I., Su- 
dan, Ltd.). Slidefilms: Make 
Friends u'ith Pepsi — series of 6 
I New Industries Co., Sudan, 
Ltd.); Wonderland Route (Ethio- 
pian Airlines Inc.) ; Sailor Man 
(Sudan Tobacco Co. Ltd.). 



International Review of Film 

^ Data are now being completed 
by the Editors of Business Screen 
for the most complete and read- 
able reference data on Film Pro- 
duction Services available any- 
where. Laboratory, Recording. 



Production Services Coming! 

Music, Script and other useful 
service sources will be provided 
on a world-wide basis. All Busi- 
ness Screen subscribers will re- 
ceive this material without extra 
cost as a "'plus" reader service. ^' 




TO REDUCE FILM COSTS DRASTICALLY 



If you have prints in your film library that must be 
"junked" because they are scratched, dirty or damaged 
in some way — what do you do? Do you buy new prints 
which may cost up to $150 a print? Here is a better 
solution! Your prints can be RAPIDWELD-ed — 
cleaned, scratches removed, and damages repaired — at 
a very small fraction of the cost of purchasing new 
prints. 

2. TO MAKE YOUR PRINTS LAST FOREVER . . . 

If you purchase or have new film in your library it will 
be damaged (scratched) before long, even from the most 
normal usage. Suppose an additional coating could be 
placed over the emulsion side before use, do you think 
your picture would be protected? ... Of course it would! 
RAPIDTREAT, our protective coating, will retard and 
resist scratching. If at some time in the future, your 
film does get scratched, "The Film Doctors" can easily 
remove the coating and imperfections . . . replace it with 
another coating . . . and return your print like new. 

3. TO SOLVE YOUR FILM PROBLEMS . . . 

Uapid Film Technique, spccialijts in th-> scienre of film 
rejuvenation, has been solving film problems for labora- 
tories, producers, film libraries, television studios, edu- 
cational institutions, industrial film users for 20 years. 
"The Film Doctors" can assist you with your film 
problems, lestore your prints to original screening 
quality, and prolong the life of your film. 

Write now and ask us about our Free Offer 




37-02 27th St., Long island City 1, N. Y. 



8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



ATLANTA 




What about careers in selling? Elaine Hughes, 
University of Michigan student, gives her can- 
did opinion in "Career Calling." 



Jack Markert, Atlanta "Million Dollar Round 
Table" member has this answer: "being my own 
boss is a great thing ..." 



Youth's Future iu ttie Sales Field 

Chevrolet's "Career Calling" Fills Long-Felt Need for Inspiration 
to Young People Whose Talents Are Needed in the Field of Selling 



Sponsor: Chevrolet Div. of General Motors. 
Title: Career Calling, 27 mln., produced and 

distributed by The Jam Handy Organization. 
i^ "If we're long on industrial production and 
short on customers, let's put another million 
salesmen to work!" 

So we stated optimistically a few weeks ago 
when Business Screen took a look ahead into 
1958. 

A lot of people evidently were thinking 
along the same lines and, in addition, were also 
asking the big question, "Where are you going 
to get 'em?" 

Chevrolet is performing a public service of 
high order by presenting right now a new mo- 
tion picture, Career Calling. Its purpose is to 
help find the "missing million." The new pic- 
ture sheds light on why a million opportunities 
in selling go begging as young Americans flock 
to other careers. College students, particularly, 
are asked to take a second look and to ask 
themselves whether they may be losing out on 
satisfying, rewarding life-work. 

Presents Candid, Unrehearsed Interviews 

Career Calling, a 27-minute documentary, is 
exceptional in its "live news" treatment of its 
subject, by means of candid, unrehearsed in- 
terviews. The new picture is ofl'ered for free 
use to universities, schools of business admin- 
istration, high schools and all other interested 
groups. 

The temptation in a recruiting picture is to 
show only the shiny side of the coin, the view 
from the best port hole. Career Calling is unique 
in its approach toward helping young men and 
women make a personal decision about a 
career. No attempt is made to sugar-coat or 
soft-soap. Professional interviewers let the stu- 
dents do the talking. It thereupon becomes 
obvious why sales executives are finding it hard 
to get qualified applicants from the colleges. 

Successful young salesmen then tell their own 
stories, which differ greatly from the precon- 



ceptions of the student mind. Several top cor- 
poration executives who got where they are via 
the selling route then step before the camera 
and cite the opportunities for careers in selling 
as they see them. 

Has the Selling Profession Sold Itself? 

John Daly, noted commentator, ties together 
the views expressed in the film and comes up 
with the verdict that the selling profession, 
paradoxically, seems not to have sold itself to 
the present generation of young people. Pro- 
fessional salesmen, by contrast, view their work 
as a real career with wide opportunities. 

Presenting the views of the professionals in 
Career Calling are Felix W. Coste, Vice Presi- 
dent and Director of Marketing, The Coca-Cola 
Company; Stanley C. Hope, President, Esso 
Standard Oil Company; Howard N. Hawkes, 
Vice President, United States Rubber Company; 
W. E. Fish, General Sales Manager, Chevrolet, 
and J. P. Spang, Jr., Chairman, The Gillette 
Company. 

Career Calling is available in 1 6mm standard 
prints by writing to the producer. The Jam 
Handy Organization, 2821 East Grand Boule- 
vard, Detroit 1 1 , Michigan. R' 

Commentator John Daly advises "young people 
thinking about a career to give some thought 
to selling, the opportunity is excellent." 




Banker Builder 

Manufacturers Trust Film Begins 
Broad Personnel Training Program 

Sponsor: Manufacturers Trust Company. 
Title: The Inside Story, produced by United 
States Productions, Inc. 

tV What people think of banks largely depends 
on what sort of treatment they receive from 
the bank employees they do business with. 
Realizing this. Manufacturers Trust Company, 
which has 1 1 2 branches in New York City, 
is undertaking an intensive training program 
to teach customer-contact personnel the impor- 
tance of giving the customer not merely effici- 
ent service but courteous and friendly service 
as well. 

The program was unveiled at the Bank's 
annual officers dinner this winter with the show- 
ing of The Inside Story — a different kind of 
wrong-way, right-way training and motivating 
film. The film itself is only part of an overall 
training program being undertaken for the 
Bank by United States Productions, Inc. 

Starring Henry Jones and Alan Bunce, cur- 
rently appearing in leading roles in Broad- 




In "The Inside Story" the audience sees how 
customers of the bank react to .service . . . 

way's hit play, Sunrise at Campobello. The 
Inside Story makes use of a "magic" radar-TV 
device — an ingenious gimmick — which lets the 
audience see how a customer of the Bank feels 
about the service he receives. This device 
results in a series of dramatic and effective 
film sequences and enables the picture to solve 
one of the most difficult of all training-film 
problems: How to show the "wrong way" with- 
out being obvious, dull or repetitious. 

Directed by Frank Telford and photographed 
by Larry O'Reilly, the picture will be used 
to kick off a series of training sessions to be 
held in each of the Bank's branches by branch 
officials. The officials themselves are attend- 
ing a number of conference-leader-training 
classes which will help them subsequently to 
lead training meetings among employees. 9 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



The AMA Story 

"Doctor to the Nation" Reports 

to Public in "Whitehall 4-1500" 

j Sponsor: American Medical Association 

[title: Whitehall 4-1500. 27 min., produced 
j by Centron Productions. 

Vk Need the biggest doctor in the land? Call 
'Whitehall 4-1500. This is the national head- 
quarters telephone number of the American 
Medical Association — and, suitably, the title of 
,a new 27-minute motion picture dramatizing 
the extensive services of the AMA. 
I By enlisting and augmenting the efforts of 
(individual doctors in its vast membership, by 
[facilitating numerous health programs, the 
!AMA serves as a kind of supra-doctor to the 
ination. Day after day, at the AMA Chicago 
headquarters, in response to "Whitehall 
J4-1500" calls, the switchboards busily service 
;the health needs of individuals, industries and 
health groups. 

In the new film, narrated by John Cameron 




Worried parents hover over their youngster's 
bedside as poisoning is diagnosed and the an- 
tidote found by call to AMA headquarters . . . 

iSwayze, dramatized case histories illustrate the 
lAMA's work in providing medical care, health 



land counsel on a national scale. 
I A young couple's child is mysteriously 
istricken. The family physician identifies the 
'child's sickness as the result of poisoning. The 
;doctor calls the AMA, describes the symptoms, 
iand, in minutes, is told what the probable 
I poison is and the antidote to be administered. 
j In Maple Grove, a small town, one physician 
is unable to cope with the health needs of a 
Igrowing population. The townspeople hold a 
Imeeting, petition the AMA for another doctor 
land shortly, through AMA assistance, a new 
'doctor is welcomed to town. 
i Narrator Swayze explains some of the many 
other functions of the AMA in areas of civil 
defense, alcoholism, health education, nutri- 
|tion and food standards, drugs and pharm- 
laceuticals, hospitals and accident prevention. 
j Whitehall 4-1500 was produced for the AMA 
[by Centron Productions of Lawrence, Kansas. 
lit is being distributed by Association Films, 




Radio, tv star Red Barber plays "personality" role in "Sounds Familiar." 

AT&T Snunds a Friendly Ring 

Name Stars and "Personality" Theme Give This Bell System Film Wide Appeal 



Sponsor: American Telephone & Telegraph 

Company. 
Title: Sounds Familiar, 23 min., color, pro- 
duced by Audio Productions, Inc. 
-^ Surveys of educators taken by the Bell Sys- 
tem have long indicated that teaching materials 
would be welcomed on "how the telephone 
works." And some 979^ of the teachers polled 
replied that the best way to present the material 
would be on film. 

Sounds Familiar should provide just the an- 
swer to the schools" request. In addition, as 



a general public relations film for the Bell Sys- 
tem companies, it will reach audiences in 
theatres, on television and before adult groups. 

Featured in the film are such entertainment 
stars as Tom Shirley, Red Barber, Arlene 
Francis and Edgar Bergen with Charlie 
McCarthy and Mortimer Snerd. They explain 
how the whole personality of each person is 
transmitted with fidelity by the modern tele- 
phone. 

.\ technical animation sequence explains the 
working of the telephone instrument. ^ 




Sound 
Familiar? 

At left: easy to 
recognize is tv 
voice of A rlene 
Francis. At 
right : Edgar 
Bergen is show- 
ing Charlie Mc- 
Carthy that its 
fun to phone . . . 




Inc., through distribution centers in Ridge- 
field, N. J., La Grange. III.. Dallas, Tex., and 
San Francisco. Calif. 

M A major influence in the related fields of 
films for medical and health education, the 
AMA provides an international film reference 
source for doctors; aids both sponsors and 
producers in film consultation and annually 
exhibits new films at its major Congresses. 9 



In Your Next Business Screen 

>V A big sheaf of film "Case Histories" and 
major editorial features (Wm. S. Merrell Co.; 
Ford "Round the World" picture portfolio; 
films on the international scene, etc.) will 
share the spotlight with "A New Challenge for 
the Sponsored Film" by Jay E. Gordon and 
our profile report on the 20-year history of 
major distributor, Modern Talking Picture 
Service, Inc. Watch for it in a few weeks! ^ 



NUMBER 



VOLUME 19 



PICTURING THE 


WAY 


TO SALES 




4k 






■ 


^^g 





The characicis u .. , . ,;,,.. ,'/;<■ ///r .'.( Jcnmjcr 
Blake, as she visiuilizes them from her tele- 
phone service contacts . . . 




Mrs. Merrill and her husband as Jennifer 
imagined them and their need for extension 
telephone service: from "Four Steps to Sales." 




Commercial scvmcc pioblcni: Mr. XewUind, 
whom Jennifer imagined as an "ogre" was ac- 
tiuill\ only irritated by her failures. 




Helping Service Heps to Win Sales 

A Positive, Motivational Training Program Helps Bell Telephone Office 
Representatives to Improve Customer Contacts Via "Four Steps to Sales" 



Jennifer (left) receives friendly and competent 
counsel from her supervisor. One film purpose 
was to encourage such discussions. 



Sponsor: American Telephone & Telegraph 
Company. 

TiTLi;: Four Steps to Sales, 30 min., color, 
produced by Henry Strauss & Co., Inc. 

A Most of the requests for telephone instal- 
lation — home and business — are made by 
piione. Bell Telephone Stystem business office 
representatives who handle these contacts have 
a demanding job. 

The Bell reps, girls with little sales ex- 
perience, must elicit certain facts about the 
potential customer and information about his 
calling habits. The reps must ask the right 
questions self-assuredly and with tact. They 
must quickly analyze the information, form a 
mental picture of the customer's premises and 
the telephone service that fits his needs. 

They must make their recommendations 
clearly and convincingly, strive for customer 
agreement and conclude the necessary arrange- 
ments. 

To train the representatives to do their job, 
the Bell System developed a four-step plan 
covering techniques for getting the facts, 
making the recommendations, dealing with 
customer objections and closing the sale. 
Though this plan contained the technique 
briefing required. Bell discovered technique 
was not enough. Many reps had attitudes 
which prevented them from putting the four- 
step plan to work with full effectiveness. 

Henry Strauss & Co., Inc., New York City, 
was retained to help prepare and produce a 
training program designed to replace the reps" 
negative attitudes with positive attitudes. Re- 
search disclosed the mental blocks that in- 
hibited the reps" performance. 

The reps were afraid of being turned down 
by the customer. Unsure of the value of their 
recommendations, they were reluctant to "push 
things off on people."" Many felt a strong sense 
of personal failure if the customer didn't accept 
all of their recommendations. Others lacked 
confidence in their own knowledge — were too 
tentative in making recommendations. A 
number of reps were unable to "personalize" 
the voice at the other end of the wire. 

In the motivational training package de- 
veloped by Henry Strauss, the techniques of 
BelKs four-step plan are visually infused with 
the altitudes which make the techniques work. 
The package includes a half-hour film. Four 
Steps to Sales and four specially edited se- 
quences — each covering one of the steps. 
Over 500 of these packages are in use through- 
out the Bell System in combination with dis- 
cussion and job-practice material. 

Four Steps to Sales is the story of how Bell 



rep Jennifer Blake overcame the growing 
pains of her job. Trainee reps see Jennifer 
apply herself to the same problems they may 
experience, they see her work through the 
four steps that lead to the platform of sales, 
and they see her achieve self-confidence. 

In Jennifer's triumphs and defeats, she. and 
the trainee viewers, are shown the four-step 
plan not as a rigid formula but as a guide to be 
adapted to the rep's own personality and the 
personalities of the various persons who call 
about phone installations. Use of realistic 
settings were avoided in producing the film, 
since it was believed that such sets might 
stereotype the trainee's mental picture of cus- 
tomer situations. Customers were depicted 
against symbolic backdrops. 

Color values were considered extremely im- 
portant in training representatives to sell color 
telephones that would blend into the customer's 
decorative scheme. To meet the exacting 
standard of color reproduction which this sales 
factor entailed. Four Steps . . . was shot in 
3.5mm Eastman Kodachrome. Animated se- 
quences were interspersed in several places to 
lend clarity to the teaching process. 

The film and training course material have 
already produced results. One major Bell 
Company affiliate reports that the percentage 
of contacts in which representatives followed 
all four of the recommended steps for sales has 
more than doubled since the program was in- 
augurated, "i 



Visual Report on the New 
Germany Under Free Enterprise 

Sponsor: Volkswagen of America. 
Title: Five Miles West, 15 min.. color, pro- 
duced by Marathon TV Newsreel. 
•fx The post-war economic recovery of West 
Germany and its meaning to all Europe is the 
subject of this new public information film 
which emphasizes the application of the free 
enterprise concept in the process of rehabilita- 
tion and points out the role of personal freedom 
in what has been termed the "miracle" of West 
German economy. 

Included are views of newly-rebuilt West 
German cities showing the manner in which 
their people live and contrasting them with 
scenes of the communist-dominated East Zone. 
The film features an original score composed 
and conducted by Richard Ralf and performed 
by the Volkswagen Works Symphony Orches- 
tra. It will be shown extensively in the United 
States and Europe. A 13 > -minute television 
version will be distributed in both color and 
b w to stations in the United States. 9 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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INUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 




The film "Francesca" 
was made in Italy, is 
based on actual case 
history from files of 
the Foster Parents' 
Plan who aided the 
child and her aged 
mother, shown here. 



(Right) Francesca 
receives the gift of 
a bed through the 
help of her friend. 
Fiore, who brought 
her to the attention 
of the Foster Par- 
ents' director . . . 




Francesca: Child of Dur Time 

Lux-Brill Scores With a Warm, Appealing Documentary Which 
Shows the Important Work Being Done by Foster Parents' Plan 



Sponsor: Foster Parents' Plan. Inc. 

Title: Francesca, 28V2 min.. b w. 
produced by Lux-Brill Produc- 
tions. 

1^ To commemorate its 20th Birth- 
day, this semi-documentary film has 
just been released by Foster Par- 
ents' Plan, the international child 
relief organization through whicli 
600.000 Americans have "adopted" 
needy children in Europe. Korea 
and Viet Nam. 

Filmed in the streets of Carchitti, 
Italy, a poor village about 30 miles 
from Rome, Francesca was acted 
by the people of the town and stars 
two Foster Children. The title role 
is played by a velvety-eyed twelve 
year old who has been unable to 
go to school because her family is 



too poor: and her friend Fiore by 
a handsome thirteen year old farm 
boy, whose whole family exists on 
$20 per month. 

Francesca tells the story of a sen- 
sitive little girl whose grinding pov- 
erty and lonely life with her sick 
mother forces her to flee from real- 
ity and contact with her townspeo- 
ple into a make-believe world. The 
film follows her gradual awakening 
to friendship and love through the 
kind intervention of her friend 
Fiore. with the help of a gentle 
American woman — Foster Parents' 
Plan's director in Italy. 

The film is available through As- 
s o c i a t i o n Films, Inc., without 
charge, to television stations, the- 
atres, school groups and all inter- 
ested organizations. R^ 



A Colorful Gem Glamorizes the Gift Wrap Art 



Sponsor: Minnesota Mining and 

Manufacturing Company. 
Title: A Touch of Magic, 16 

min.. color, produced by Arco 

Film Productions. 
■A' This little gem is one of the 
most delightful sponsored films to 
be seen in many a month. Bright 
and gay, fantastic, fey it is com- 
pletely without narration, but tells 
its story of gift wrappings and 
holiday home decoration with more 
charm and believability than any 
words could do. 

Responsible for this bold step 
away from literalism is the team 



of 3-M; its agency, MacManus, 
John & Adams, Inc.; Arco Film 
Productions, of New York; and 
Cinema et Publicite, in Paris, 
where the film was made. 

The cast of nineteen, including 
the famed English Bluebell Girls 
of the Lido nightclub in Paris, 
romp from set to set and dance 
to a specially-written score played 
by a 46-piece orchestra. 

A Touch of Magic will have the 
widest possible distribution, via 
theatres, television and 16mm 
group showings. Association 
Films is the distributor. R' 



Sales Training Slidepix Set 
Released by Henning-Cheadle 

■m- Sales training ideas of 21 sales 
managers are utilized in a new 
series of Sales Training Sound 
Slidefilms released by Henning and 
Cheadle, Inc., of Detroit and 
Chicago. 

The 21 sales managers, working 
in three committees, contributed 
their sales training methods and 
techniques to the scripts of the new 
six-film set. 

The sales slidefilms include: 
Let's Be Professional About It, 
Gel More Selling Seconds From 
Your Working Day, What Makes 
People Buy? Don't Let Objections 
Block the Sale, Close the Sale But 
Keep the Door Open, and Price Is 
Part of Every Sale. 

Each slidefilm in the series is 
approximately 10 minutes in 
length, with recordings available 
both for bell and manually-oper- 
ated projectors. Each film is 
accompanied by an 8- to 10-page 
Meetine Leader's Guide, which 
featu'-es an "Action Getter" sug- 
gestion meant to prompt the sales- 
man to put the film's principles to 
work. 

The complete series of six films 
and meeting guides is available for 
$225.00. Individual subjects are 
available for $40.00. They can 
be previewed at a cost of $10.00 
per film or $25.00 for the set to 
cover the cost of handling, ship- 
ping, postage and insurance. 

Henning and Cheadle, Inc., the 
producers and distributors of the 
slidefilm series, may be contacted 
at: 1060 W. Fort Street, Detroit 
26, Michigan, or: 1140 S. Michi- 
gan, Chicago 6, Illinois. ^ 



"Fishing Holiday" Released 
by the Langley Corporation 

M Fishing Holiday, a new 15-min- 
ute color motion picture which 
records the adventures of a sports- 
man and his wife spinfishing in 
Florida waters has been sponsored 
by Langley Corporation. San 
Diego, California, makers of spin- 
ning reels. 

Reporting that the action film 
is in demand, the sponsor advises 
that bookings should be made as 
far in advance as possible, with 
alternate screening dates specified. 

Fishing Holiday is being made 
available to sportsman clubs, civic 
groups, schools and churches on 
a free loan basis. Organizations 
interested in obtaining the film 
may contact the Langley Corpora- 
tion. 310 Euclid Avenue. San 
Dieqo 12. California. 9 



Film Aims to Recruit Lab 
"Soldiers" in War vs. Cancer 

i> To recruit young people as lab- 
oratory technicians in the fight 
against cancer, the National Com- 
mittee for Careers in Medical 
Technology has recently intro- 
duced The Human Cell and the 
Cyio-Technologist for showing be- 
fore schools, medical groups, and 
similar audiences. 

Sponsors are the Ame ican So- 
ciety of Clinical Pathologists, the 
College of American Pathologists 
and the American Society of Medi- 
cal Technologists. The film was 
produced on grants from the 
American Cancer Society and the 
National Cancer Institute. Film- 
ing was done by Churchill-Wexler 
Film Productions, Inc.. of Los 
Angeles. 

This is the second in a series 
of films on career opportunities in 
medical technology. The first. 
Caree-': Medical Technologist, pro- 
duced in 1954. won the Scholastic 
award as one of the ten best edu- 
cational films for school use, and 
is still being widely shown. 

Aim of The Human Cell and the 
Cyto-Technologist is to interest 
young people in laboratory careers 
to aid pathologists in screening 
slides to detect cancer in its very 
early stages. Many new workers 
are needed, pathologists say, if the 
public is to have wide access to 
this new medical examination. 

The new laboratory technique of 
cyto-diagnosis makes possible ear- 
ly detection of cancer, long before 
it can be detected in any other 
way. Particularly effective with 
cervical cancer, doctors believe the 
new examination, if widely em- 
ployed, could wipe out this form 
of cancer, which kills 16.000 
women a year. 

The film portrays a routine lab- 
oratory day in the life of a pretty 
young cyto-technologist. It de- 
scribes procedures involved in pre- 
paring and screening slides con- 
taining cell samplings from pa- 
tients, through to the final diag- 
nosis by the pathologist as to the 
presence of cancer. 

A unique animation sequence 
describes how cancer grows and 
throws off abnormal cells, which 
can be distinguished from normal 
cells under the microscope. 

Either color or black and white 
prints may be purchased from the 
National Committee for Careers in 
Medical Technology, 1785 Massa- 
chusetts Ave., N. W., Washington, 
D. C. Cost is $135 for color, $65 
for black and white. The film is 
also available on loan free for 
educational showings. W 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 







Fine quality . . . 
Good service 



LOYAL CUSTOMERS 

In 1951 we produced a film for a 
new customer, a large manufacturer 
of chemicals. We have completed our 
15th project for this firm. 

We consider it a privilege to serve 
a number of national* as well as 
local clients who place their trust 
in us year after year. 






TEXAS INDUSTRIAL FILM CO., INC 

2528 NORTH BOULEVARD • HOUSTON. TEXAS 





■^M&tiLi. 



Assn. of Cinema Labs Elects 
1958 Officers and Directors 
ir Officers and directors for 1958 
were elected by the .Association of 
Cinema Laboratories at the annual 
meeting, held February- 19 in the 
Warwick Hotel in New York Cit\. 

The new .ACL officers are : Reid 
H. Ray of St. Paul, re-elected pres- 
ident; Leon Shelly of Toronto, re- 
elected vice-president; George Col- 
bum. Chicago, secretary; Kerne 
Moyse. New York, treasurer. 

New board of director members 
include: Don M. .-Mexander. Colo- 
rado Springs; SpeiKer W. Cald- 
well. Toronto; Louis Feldman. 
New York; B\Ton Raudabush. 
Washington; and Sidney Solow. 
Hollywood. Directors holding over 
for another year are G. Carieton 
Hunt of HoUywood and George 
Colbum. Chicago. 

Six new members were an- 
nouiKed at the meeting, bringing 
the membership to 57. including 
members in Canada and the United 
States. 

Eight technical definitions of 
film terminology submitted by the 
group's NomeiKlature Committee, 
headed by Neal Keehn of Kansas 
City, were adopted at the meeting. 
Another meeting feature was the 
presentation of technical advance- 
ments in the industry, made b\ 
film manufacturers and equipment 
firms. 

Completion of a ser\ice bookie* 
prepared by an .ACL commirtee 
on "Laboratory Practices on Film^ 
for Tele\ision" — for free distribu- 
tion to all concerned with rv film 
production — was announced. The 
booklet is available from the .Asso- 
ciation's headquarters. 1905 Fai'- 
\Tew Avenue. N. E.. Washinston. 
DC. 

The ACL has under pr^aration 
a worid-wide directory- of film lab- 
oratories for informational pur- 
poses. A list of 389 laboratories 
has been compiled and its is ex- 
pected that the directory will be 
ready for release by June. 

The next ACL meeting will be 
in HollN-wood. April 21. in con- 
nection with the Spring Meeting of 
the Society of Motion Picture and 
TeIe\ision Engineers W 

Biological Photo Assn. Sets 
August 18-21 for Meetings 

■" Represeniati\es of the pho:o- 
graphic. medical and scientific pro- 
fessions ha\e been invited to 
attend the 28th annual meetinq of 
the Biolc^cal Photographic .Asso- 
ciation, to be held .August 18-21 
at the Sho'eham Hotel in Wash- 
ington. D. C. 

The 1 958 session is expected to 



Alanq the ProducliDn Lines 



draw the largest number of com- 
mercial, educational and institu- 
tional exhibits ever shown at a 
Biological Photographic meeting. 
.A "Scientific Salon" will feature 
an award-winning display of trans- 
parencies, prints and motion 
pictures. 

.A special program feature will 
be an all-day session at the Walter 
Reed .Army Institute of Research, 
during which the latest techniques 
being employed by W alter Reeds 
.Audio-\isual Department will be 
shown. 

The four-day program also will 
include the presentation of scien- 
tific papers on new techniques and 
de\ices. improved methods and 
unusual equipment; tours of the 
photographic laboratories in the 
nations Capital; and teaching 
workshops. ff 



"Helping the Taxpayer" Helps 
in a Job That Nobody Likes 

:^ One of the most popular public 
ser\ice films e\er made deals with 
a subject that is one of the most 
unpopular in .America: iiKome 
taxes. The film. Helping The Tax- 
payer, is being offered to stations 
by .Association Films for tele\ising 
during "tax season." January- 1 to 
.April'l5. 

Presented by the .American In- 
stitute of Cenified Public .Account- 
ants and produced by VS illard Pic- 
tures. Inc. with the cooperation of 
the Internal Revenue Service, the 
1 4 1 .-minute subject uses several 
dramatic situations (based on 
actual tax cases) to show what 
happens when the Government 
questions a tax return. In addi- 
tion. Helping The Taxpayer show s 
some of the workings of IRS in 



0(is m ^cr/o;^ , 




the handling, checking and pro- 
cessing of more than 60.000.000 
separate income tax returns each 
year. 

The film ends on a hopeful note, 
explaining that the vast majority 
of questioned tax returns are 
settled by minor adjustments or in- 
formal conferences with the Inter- 
nal Revenue .Agent. gf 
* * * 

Jam Handy to Distribute 
"Jonah" Film to Theatres 

-:r Theatrical distribution of Jonah 
and the Highway, the tjew photo- 
play released by the United States 
Steel Corporation, has been as- 
signed to the Jam Handy Organi- 
zation. Detroit. 

Offered as a public service to 
call attention to the contributions 
of the highway engineer and con- 
tractor, and to attract young men 
to careers in civil engineering. 
Jonali and the Highway is being 
shown in 35mm widescreen. The 
film was produced for U. S. Steel 
by John Sutherland Productions. 
Inc.. of Los .Angeles. ^ 

X * * 

Stehney, Stein Join United 
Studios in Executive Posts 

': Nfichael Stehney has joined 
United Film A; Recording Studios. 
Chicago, as executive producer of 
the IV film commercial department. 
In this post he will supervise, pro- 
duce and direct film commercials 
for the company. Stehney has also 
acquired a stock ow-nership inter- 
est in United Studios. 

Most recently. Stehney was exe- 
cutive producer and vice preside' 
of Kling Film Studios. Before th. 
he was associated with Sarra Fin 
Studios, winding up as genera! 
manager in charge of production 
He has been in the film industry 
for more than 20 years. 

In another appointment at 
United Studios. LawreiKe Stein has 
been named general manager in 
charge of studio operations, in- 
cluding the Motion Picture and 
Recording divisions. Stein has been 
controller and executive busii>ess 
officer at Kling Studios for the past 
three years. Before that he was 
a public accountant. 

United Studios this year is ob- 
serving the 25th armiversary of 
service to the film industrv-. 9 
* » » 

MPO Productions Vice-Prexy 
on Venezuelan Film Trek 
: L.irr> M.iui-on. -.ice-presiden- 
of MPO Productions. Inc.. Ne 
York, recently toured \enezue 
to shoot footage for a Revnc. 
Metals Co. film on the uses 
aluminum in the oil indusir 



BUSINESS S C R E E .\ .M .\ G .\ Z I N E 




Lloyd Burliiigham (r) interviews Fiinn Biireciu president Charles Schnman 

"Cross-Country" Show Debuts on 45 TV Stations 



7> Three of the top men in Ameri- 
can agriculture appeared in the 
first three Cross-Coimtry pro- 
grams, which bowed on 45 key 
; agricukural tv stations the week of 
January 27. 

Cross-Country, the first national 
agricultural tv show, is a half-hour 
weekly program, telecast during 
the noon-hour. It is produced in 
Chicago by the Cross-Country Net- 
work, Inc.. a subsidiary of Fred 
Niles Productions. Inc., Chicago- 
Hollywood film producer. 

In an exclusive appearance on 
the tv program. Secretary of Agri- 
culture Ezra Benson told of the 
reasons behind the recent an- 
: nouncement to cut dairy price 
I supports. Charles Schuman. pres- 
; ident of the American Farm 
' Bureau Federation, in another ex- 
; elusive interview predicted that 
1958 will be a slightly better year 
for American farmers than 1957. 
Lyman McKee. president of the 
American Dairy Association, was 
j another guest on one of the first 
' programs. He commented on the 
I necessity for a stronger selling pro- 
i gram on the part of his association. 
I Literally going cross-country for 
I its news and feature stories. Cross- 
1 Country has correspondents in key 
' major agricultural regions, who 
film on-the-spot news as it hap- 



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\ow selecting manufacturers 
representatives for a quality 
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pens. Farmers and ranchers are 
interviewed, cross-country, reflect- 
ing any government action which 
alTects them. 

Land-grant colleges also provide 
film reports on late research devel- 
opments and extension activities. 
Iowa State College. Purdue, the 
Universities of Minnesota and 
Georgia have filmed reports ap- 
pearing in the early programs. 

Cap Bentley. noted marketing 
analyst, delivers a weekly market- 
ing forecast. Another weekly fea- 
ture is a Washington Report, a 
discussion and depth interview 
with USDA oflRcials and leaders in 
agriculture. Lloyd Burlingham. 
veteran farmcaster, is the program 
moderator. He is assisted by Bill 
Mason, farmcaster, and Eleanore 
Warner, who represents the wom- 
an's viewpoint. 

Programs are filmed, edited and 
distributed from Fred Niles Pro- 
ductions. Inc. Film coverage from 
other sources is received daily at 
Niles' Chicago studios. Studio 
portions are filmed by Niles' cam- 
era and technical crews. The 14- 
man editing department edits the 
films, and distributes them to the 
stations carrying the program. 

The program is sponsored on a 
spot participation basis by the 
Charles Pfizer Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Spots for Pfizer are appearing in 
40 basic midwestern markets. 

According to R. W. Pat O'Brian. 
director of marketing, an advertiser 
can purchase one spot announce- 
ment in one market, or as many 
as four spot announcements in as 
many markets as desired. S' 

Bill Newton to Sarra, Inc. 

ir Sarra, Inc. announces the ap- 
pointment of Bill Newton, crea- 
tive producer-director, to its Chi- 
cago staff. S 



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INQUIRIES INVITED 

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N U .M B E R 1 



VOLUME 19 



175 



p ELiviNG Baseball's greatest 
■'•^ thriils and learning the sport 
from its top stars, an estimated 250 
million persons formed the total 
audience for 37 motion pictures 
sponsored from 1934 through 1957 
by the American and National 
Leagues of Professional Baseball 
Clubs. 

Achieved by World Series doc- 
umentaries and instructional 
16mm films, this amazing audience 
record sustains an upward trend. 
In recent years, the annual audi- 
ences for these major league films 
have approached the total annual 
ball park attendance for ail major 
league games. 

Reach 16 Million in '57 
During 1957, between 15',, and 
16 million persons saw the Ameri- 
can and National Leagues" films — 
in 16mm showings, exclusive of 
television. It is estimated that in 
1958, the Leagues' annual baseball 
film audience may range from I6y> 
to 18 million — possibly exceeding 
major league ball park attendance. 
Three new major league films. 
World Series of 1957. All-Star 
Game of 1057 and 20 Years of 
World Series Thrills— tolixVmg 780 
prints — were released January 6, 
1958, and by early February these 
films were booked solidly to 
March 1. In the "second inning" 
of this distribution, these three new 
films will be booked solidly to 
June 1 . 

Deep Into Rural America . . . 

Beneath this eye-popping score- 
board of booking and attendance 
figures is the story of an eager 
audience effectively served by a 
generous, energetic and deftly- 
aimed film distribution program. 
The program is the continuing saga 
of Lew Fonseca, a baseball star 
who became a movie pro and 
sensed the measure of the public's 
baseball devotion. 

"Towns I never heard of — day 
after day . . . You think you've 
saturated the market but you never 
do . . . I've been around here for 
24 years — every day, I get towns 
I never heard of!" Beaming like a 
home-run hitter. Lew Fonseca 
thumbs through the stack of morn- 
ing mail on the desk from which 
he directs the motion picture divi- 
sion of the American and National 
Leagues, at 64 East Jackson Blvd. 
in Chicago. 

Confirm Requests in 48 Hours 

Whether Fonseca has heard of 
the towns or not, the film request 
letters are answered within 48 
hours. That's a Fonseca rule. It's 
part of the friend-making efficiency 



— ONE OF THE FILM MEDIUM'S GREATEST STORIES — 

Majors' Baseball Films Bring 
'The Game" Id 25D Millions 



built by Fonseca since he founded 
the film program in 1934. 

"We give the films to any or- 
ganized group in the U.S. who 
make a request," says Fonseca. 
Large or small, the organizations 
get personalized attention and 
though the line is drawn at home 
showings, films sometimes are sent 
to individual shut-ins who other- 
wise might never see a big league 
game. 

Currently, 30 films, totaling 
3.500 prints, are being circulated 
to the nation and the world from 
the Leagues" Chicago film ofiice 



and through some 250 distributors. 
These include major and minor 
league ball clubs, the film's two 
cosponsoring concerns, selected 
company film libraries, school sys- 
tem film libraries and other organi- 
zations. 

Coding each film, Fonseca and 
his staff umpire the entire distribu- 
tor action. If a distributor is sit- 
ting on the reels, the films are 
called back to base to be sent else- 
where. Audience groups request- 
ing films for extended periods are 
checked for verifications of their 
.screen programs. Many other 















1^ 



TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE- 

therefore if a motion picture is to be ef- 
fective, it must present the sponsor's mes- 
sage in a manner so as to leave the audi- 
ence with the knowledge that their valuable 
time was indeed well spent. Such are the 
films produced for business, industry, 
t^overnrtient by 

FARRELL AND GAGE FILMS • INC. 

213 EAST 38th STREET NEW YORK 16. N. Y. 




groups will be asking for the films! 
and Fonseca's department wants tol 
make sure that the films go wheref 
people will see them and that the' 
films reach all the groups who re- 
quest them. 

Baseball film audiences are 
nearly everywhere. Besides the 
expanding club, school and com- 
pany audiences, the films have 
audiences in hospitals, sanitariums, 
prisons and at military bases 
around the world. The films reach 
other audiences around the globe 
as part of the State Department's 
picture of America. 

Print Goes to the Vatican 

Championship games are watch- 
ed in lonely Alaskan outposts and 
in South Africa"s Rhodesia. A 
print of a World Series film has 
been sent to the Vatican. About 
the only place where the fans have 
not been heard from, Fonseca re- 
ports, is Russia. 

The importance the Armed Ser- 
vices attaches to the morale value 
of watching America's bat-pro- 
pelled missile is illustrated in the 
use made of the new World Series 
films in the far north. On their 
release in January, all three films 
were telecast over the northern- 
most military tv station at Thule,' 
Greenland, and relayed over a 22- 
station closed-circuit net to north- 
ern defense encampments. 

Watch Series on DEW Line 

Similarly, The World Series oj 
]'.I57 was shown to 1 1 outpostF 
of the early warning radar system 
maintained from Alaska to a point 
200 miles east of Siberia by the 
5060th Aircraft Control and Warn- 
ing Group of the U.S. Air Force 
In these isolated, frozen frontiers 
men huddle around the screen ant 
have their memories rekindled. [ 

Playing to audiences assemblcQ 
by some 80,000 schools and othei 
organizations, the Leagues' film' 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



jure kindling fires of baseball inter- 
jest. The visual excitement of the 
iSeries films keeps baseball-fan 
ienthusiasm burning through winter 
land spring. Expert performances 
in the big league training films 
1 work to ignite and instruct the 
i ambitions of youngsters who can 
ibe the stars of baseball's future. 

A Good Will Builder 

Keeping high the llames of audi- 
ence enthusiasm by prompt ser- 
I vice, Fonseca sees professional 
I baseball warmed by a "tremendous 
I good will." The ardent requests 
I on Fonseca's desk — 4,030 in Jan- 
j uary — steadily endorse this con- 
; cept of promotion by good will, 
i The film requests, in efTect, are 
j pleas to bolster meeting attend- 
; ances, to enliven university athletic 
i lectures, spark church programs, 
j sharpen YMCA clinics, help 
i American Legion Posts — even to 
! gladden a bowling league! 
I Major league ball clubs use the 
I films as general public relations 
land in direct promotion. Featured 
at meetings addressed by ball club 
speakers, the films stimulate inter- 
est which the speaker ties to ticket 
sales. 

Not only are the Milwaukee 
Braves World Series champions. 



The Majors' Film Chief 
Gives His Viewpoint . . . 

•n Looking back over the past 24 
years this program has been in 
operation offers me much personal 
satisfaction. 

We, and 1 mean my wonderful 
and capable co-workers, have par- 
layed an idea I had with a $50.00 
movie camera in 1932 into a rec- 
ognized world-wide program which 
we believe to be the largest non- 
theatrical motion picture distribu- 
tion of any one subject in the entire 
world. 

Much personal satisfaction has 
been derived from the entertain- 
ment we have aft'orded all groups 
throughout the world regardless of 
race, color or creed. 

We hope that our instructional 
movies on baseball are aiding in 
some manner the development of 
future big leaguers from the little 
leaguers of today. 

This alone would mean real per- 
sonal satisfaction. 

— Lew Fonseca 

but also, Fonseca notes, they are 
whizzes at promotion. The Mil- 
waukee club has 40 film prints — 
mostly, to be sure, of the World 
Series. Films evidently will mean 



business for the newly arrived Los 
Angeles Dodgers, who had to put 
a man in charge of film requests 
immediately. 

Two Firms Sponsor Films 

Fifteen years of cosponsorship 
of the Leagues" films has been the 
promotion vote of the two com- 
panies modestly creditlined in the 
films. These companies are A. G. 
Spaulding & Brothers, Inc., sport- 
ing got)ds manufacturers, who cc- 
sponsor the World Series films and 
the instructional films, and Hil- 
lerich & Bradsby Co., manufac- 
turers of the Louisville Slugger 
baseball bat, who cosponsor the 
World Series films only. 

These two sponsors were ac- 
quired when Fonseca strove to 
safeguard the films from commer- 
cial excesses which loomed in 
earlier years when the films had 
several sponsors. The present co- 
sponsors neatly suit baseball films 
and the cooperation of these com- 
panies in the unobtrusive credit 
policy has helped to insure the 
films' universal acceptance. 

Considering the sure-fire appeal 
of baseball as played by Enos 
Slaughter, Mickey Owens, Willy 
Mays, Don Larsen and Lew Bur- 

(CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE) 



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". . . a worldwide program which we believe to be the largest 
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a Chicas;o Film Studio crew lenses a Yankee's batting skill 



gram sponsored baseball '"high- 
lights" films, featuring various 
stars. When World War II sent 
1 1 million men overseas. Fonseca 
saw a huge appreciative audience 
for World Series films. Associates 
agreed that overseas Gl's were a 
likely audience. But Fonseca's 
hunch that a massive audience 
awaited World Series films in this 
country was doubted: theatrical 
newsreels did the job, 1 6mm show- 
ings would be old stuff. 

Fonseca was alive to the 
strength of the World Series ap- 
peal, alert to the immortality of 
baseball's legends. The World 
Series films were immensely pop- 
ular in the U.S. and they re- 
mained popular. 

-In 1956 and 1957. we had 
bookings for approximately 3,000 
showings of old World Series films 



baseballs Epics: 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 177) 

ette, it is easy to think of the 
.eagues" film program as a "na- 
jral." Actually, the program is 
he result of long application to the 
roblems of production, supply 
nd demand. 

In 1932, when Lew Fonseca 
tarted clicking his camera at Chi- 
ago White Sox players training at 
'asadena, California, he had not 
et wound up his 12-year career 
s a ball player. He had two years 
3 go, serving as White Sox player- 
lanager. A major leaguer since 
921, Fonseca had been 1929 
American League batting champ, 
/ith a record of .369 as a member 
if the Cleveland Indians. 

Fonseca began scoring as a pro- 
lucer-distributor in July, 1934, 
yihen he put together a 4-reel silent 
ilm featuring the White Sox. He 
vas given 30 days to show what 
le could do with the film. Travel- 
ing to viewer groups, Fonseca 
(rejected and narrated the film. 
$y December, 1934, he had 
halked up an audience of 40,000. 

In 1935, Fonseca and the Chi- 
;ago Film Studio produced a pro- 
essional film for the American 
.eague. Under American League 
luspices, this combination con- 
inued — Fonseca planning, direct- 
ng and narrating the films and 
rhicago Film Studio doing the pro- 
iuction. Twelve years ago, the 
\merican and National Leagues 
nerged their promotional effort 
ind the film program served both 
eagues thereafter. 

Until 1943, the Leagues' pro- 




— dating from 1943 onward," says 
Fonseca. The non-Series films are 
long-lived, too. A 15-year-old 
film. Inside Baseball, remains a 
favorite. 

Restrict TV Distribution 

Television utilizes the Leagues' 
films but print circulation to tv is 
relatively restricted. New World 
Series films are not released to tv 
until the October following their 
January release. Supplying the 
expressed demand for the 16mm 
baseball films is the first objective 
of the Leagues' distribution. 
Though a "'million bugs" have been 
taken out of the operation, "we're 
still looking for suggestions," Fon- 
seca remarks. 

Fonseca likewise endeavors to 
improve the films. He tried several 
script writers but wasn't satisfied. 
They didn't know baseball. For 
the last three years, Fonseca has 
gotten the kind of scripts he wants 
from two sports writers, Ed Prell 
of the Chicago Tribune, and Edgar 
Munzel of the Chicago Sun-Times 
— who do know baseball. 

Comes Autumn and the World 
Series bleachers bend as thousands 
wait for baseball's climax to begin. 
Cameras are there to record the 
action. When victory has gone its 
way and the privileged ball fans 
have departed to begin recouirting 
new legends. Fonseca and his pro- 
duction crew are cutting and edit- 
ing the thrills which will carry these 
legends vividly to wherever there 
are audiences and 16mm projec- 
tors. 

Premieres Start the Year 

Each new World Series film is 
press-premiered in the city of the 
Series-winning ball club, then is 
premiered in other major league 
cities. The prints begin their 
journeys from the Chicago office 
where, upon return, editing equip- 
ment keeps them in condition. In 
the basic distribution set-up, long 
distance requests are mailed from 
the Chicago office. No charge is 
made for the films but the receiver 
must pay postage, using special 
delivery to return the films. 

The Chicago office and the 
League ball clubs also maintain a| 
system in which local borrowers' 
write for the films, get an ok, and 
pick up the films at the distribu- 
tion office. The Chicago office is 
geared to dispatch 150 prints a 
day. Normally, the Chicago office 
is manned by Fonseca and four 
assistants. In the busiest spring 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



months, the office adds two 
helpers. 

If it's big league ball, the 
Leagues' film program has it. This 
year, the 40-minute World Series 
of 1957 is delivering the highlights 
of all important plays from each 
of the seven games played as the 
New York Yankees yielded to the 
Milwaukee Braves. So it has been 
since '43 — a pictorial replay of 
each new World Series. 

For fans who relish baseball's 
long legends and great debates, 
there's 20 Years of World Series 
Thrills — 30 minutes of outstanding 
plays from 1938 through 1957. 
There are the annual 20-minute 
All-Star Game films — '55, '56, '57. 

Training Films for Youth 

For serious sand-lotters and 
bush leaguers who intend to move 
up, there is Building Big Leaguers 
— 20 minutes at major league 
spring training camps. For the 
true fan-hood, the unabashed hero- 
worshippers, there's The Democ- 
racy of Baseball — 20 minutes of 
past and present stars. 

For the estimated potential of 
some 2i< million baseball players 
in little leagues, high schools and 
colleges, there are the 20- and 30- 
minute instructional films — Pitch- 
ing Stars of Baseball, Catching 
Stars of Baseball, Batting Stars of 
Baseball, Infield Play at First and 
Third, Double Play Kings of Base- 
ball, Circling the Bases, Inside 
Baseball, and Umpire in Baseball. 
The Series and training films are 
in black/white, the All-Star Games 
in color. 

Promotion Isn't a Problem 

With the national and world 
audience eager for these baseball 



films, Fonseca's problem isn t one 
of promotion — it's one of sheer 
motion. The Leagues' have the 
films and, in 24 years, the word 
has gone out. Fonseca says he 
would be swamped and the print 
and handling costs would be pro- 
hibitive, were he to promote the 
films beyond the annual World 
Series premieres and the promotion 
done by other distributors. 

The Leagues' film department 
effort now is to "get it moving in 
a hurry and keep it moving." The 
man who sends in a letter asking 
for a film is interested in his own 
program, Fonseca says. The aim 
of the film program is to make sure 
that man knows that the Leagues 
share his interest. 

Today, as an unprecedented 
variety of mass-recreational at- 
tractions shout for attention. Base- 
ball is mightily pitched by the 
16mm film, thanks to Lew Fonseca 
and his team who bring America's 
major league diamonds to out-of- 
the-park millions. ^ 

Keeping Films Busy 

Dow Chemical Co. encourages 
its .sales people to use its films as 
selling tools. Here's what the com- 
pany said in a recent sales bulle- 
tin to field offices: 
T*r Our films are working for us 
only when they are out being seen 
by audiences. Therefore, our 
distribution program is aimed at 
keeping these films busy as near 
to 100 per cent of the time as is 
possible. 

When you try to arrange a film 
showing on short notice and find 
all the films busy — nobody goofed. 
It just means the distribution pro- 
gram is working. ^ 



Champion Milwaukee Braves preview "Hail to the Braves" {spon- 
sored by Miller Brewing Co.). L to r: pitcher Bob Trowbridge; Miller's 
Bob Forte, who directed film; pitcher Don Kaiser; Norman R. King, 
president of Miller; pitcher Ernie Johnson: Braves' gen. mgr. John Quinn; 
Joe Taylor, equipment mgr.: and star outfielder Hank Aaron. 




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TELEPHONE DEARBORN 2-6286 





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HOLLAND-WEGMAN PRODUCTIONS 




NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



SYLVANIA 



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BEacon 2-5722 



Charles Ross, Inc., Marks 
37th Year in Business 

Having lit the camera's way in 
eastern productions since 1921. 
Charles Ross, Inc., New York 
City, is celebrating its 37th anni- 
versary. 

Now a leading supplier of light- 
ing and grip equipment, props 
and generator trucks in the east, 
the company grew from a modest 
service founded by the late Charles 
E. Ross, who set up the original 
firm as the Motion Picture Serv- 




Founder Charles E. Ross 
brought light to films . . . 

ice Company. Mr. Ross began 
his enterprise at 321 W. 44th 
Street equipped with several sun 
arcs, a dozen assorted spots and 
some used cable. 

In his first year, Mr. Ross' 
customers included such early film 
industry homesteaders as Shadow- 
land, The Tex Rickard Company, 
Kliegl Brothers, Tiffany Produc- 
tions and Bedford Theatre in 
Brooklyn. Two New York film 
production companies which be- 
came clients in 1922 are still 
served by the Ross establishment — 
Pathescope Productions and Wil- 
liam J. Ganz Company, Inc. 

The incorporated organization, 
Charles Ross, Inc., came into 
being May 18, 1937 and the com- 
pany moved to the present address, 
333 West 52nd Street. Mr. Ross 
was active in his company until 
shortly before his death in 1952, 
at the age of 63. He had seen 
his business grow to a place of 
prominence in the film industry. 

During nearly four decades, 
Charles Ross, Inc., has supplied a 
large portion of the New York 
area's business film producers with 
production and staging equipment. 
The company also has facilitated 
eastern location production for 
major Hollywood studios. 

Keeping pace with the film in- 
dustry, the company recently added 
a new generator truck to its fleet. 
This generator truck, a 1600 Amp, 



DC unit, typifies the company's 
increasing candle power as Charles 
Ross, Inc., cuts its 37th cake and 
lights the scene for another take. 

Pelican Films Installs 

New Animation Equipment 

-.": Pelican Films. Inc., New York 
City, has recently installed a new 
Oxberry animation stand and 
35 16mm camera to provide in- 
creased facilities for the produc- 
tion of animated tv commercials 
for its clients, according to Jack 
Zander, vice-president and director 
of animation. 

More than 75 per cent of the 
firm's output is concentrated in 
producing full-animated and ani- 
mated-live tv commercials for such 
accounts as Robert Hall. Camp- 
bell Soups, Ipana. Ballantine Beer i 
and Ale. and Lucky Strike, work- 
ing through agency clients. Zander 
reports. The balance comprises 
longer films for industrial sponsors 
and government agencies. 

Pelican recently completed an 
-minute film for the Association 




Pelican Films' animation unit 

of American Playing Card Manu- 
facturers, and is currently produc- 
ing a 13VT-minute film on water 
heating systems for Better Cool- 
ing-Heating Council. 9 

CE Exclusive Sharps Outlet 

i^: Camera Equipment Company 
Inc., 315 W. 43rd St., N. Y. 36, 
N. Y., is now exclusive U. S. sales 
outlet for the Sharps colour chart 
and grey scale. 

With demand from both televi- 
sion and photographic technicians 
for an inexpensive chart which il- 
lustrates in advance how colors 
will reproduce in monochrome, the 
Sharps colour chart and grey scale 
is simple to use and will cover all 
the known requirements for day to 
day operation. It provides an easy 
to use precision reference chart for 
television, cinematography, pho- 
tography and the graphic arts. W 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Mobilux Unveils Hew Technique 



.-i^ One hundred and twelve film 
i producers and motion picture tech- 
nicians were on hand February 3rd 
I to inspect the U.S. patents granted 
jthat day to John Hoppe for a new 
film technique called Mobilux. 
This extraordinary turn-out reflects 
the enormous interest Mobilux has 
generated since rumors of the new 
process became known about a 
.year ago. 

Exclusive film and video tape 
rights to Mobilux have been ac- 
quired by Robert Davis Produc- 
tions, Inc. 

I Fantasy in Movement, Light 

The gay, cavorating Mobilux fig- 
ures, which flit about the screen 
in any direction while changing 
'form, are produced by reflections 
'from a very intense light. The 
flexible mirrors which are used are 
'made of plastic and steel and are 
'very brightly coated. Designs are 
;"'mask;ed" on the mirrors, and are 
manipulated to simulate the move- 
;ment desired. The abstract, exotic 
jfigures whose eyes wink, feet 
jdance, torsos bend, and arms and 
hands gesture, join with wholly 
creative art forms in a rhythmic 
display, and when coupled with 
bright colors and augmented by 
sound, become an effective and 
eye-appealing selling device. 

The primary difl'erence between 
Mobilux and ordinary form of 



J VISUAL AIDS 
5 



15 



MOTION 

pictures 
slio'e 

FILMS 



SEYMOUR 
ZWEIBEL 
PRODUCTIONS 
Inc. 

11 EAST 44th STREET 
NEW YORK 17, N.Y. 



animation is that with Mobilux 
there is an extraordinary fluidity 
and rhythmic dimension not found 
in animated processes. This syn- 
chronization in Mobilux to move- 
ment and music is controlled by 
hand rather than mechanical move- 
ment. 

Another important difference, it 
is said, is that with Mobilux there 
is a great reduction in the time 
element and in the cost of pro- 
ducing a film. 

Featured by Sullivan, Fisher 

In recent months, Mobilux has 
been used for fantasy productions 
on such leading tv programs as 
Ed Sullivan, and Eddie Fisher. 

Robert Davis Productions is 
currently making spot commercials 
using Mobilux combined with live 
film for such agencies as J. Walter 
Thompson, Leo Burnett, and 
Campbell-Ewald. Also, negotia- 
tions are in progress with several 
major film sponsors who are inter- 
ested in using the Mobilux tech- 
nique for public relations films. R" 

* * * 

New Guide Standardizes 
Measurements for TV Art 

i^ A framing guide to standardize 
measurements for the art work for 
tv commercials has been jointly 
developed by the American Asso- 
ciation of Advertising Agencies 
and Station Representatives Asso- 
ciation. 

Printed on cardboard, 11 by 14 
inches in size, the framing guide 
provides measurements for use in 
preparing tv flip cards, telops and 
slides. It also gives suggestions 
for safety margins, paper stock, the 
use of blacks, whites and greys. 

Electros, mats or reproduction 
proofs are available from Mar- 
bridge Printing Co., 225 Varick 
St., New York 14, New York. ^ 

# * * 

Two New Records Provide 
"Out of This World" Moods 

i^ Keeping abreast of man's in- 
vasion of space, the BG-Library of 
Mood and Bridge Music has re- 
leased two records on Interplane- 
tary Music for use in radio and tv 
broadcasts and for film sound- 
tracks. 

Eight different selections — rang- 
ing from wierd, frightening, sus- 
penseful, ghastly phenomena to 
celestial, visionary, dream atmos- 
phere — are available on these two 
records. 

Producer is the Audio-Master 
Corp., 17 East 45th St., New York. 




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VUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



181 






Imagination 
I Skill 
Integrity 
I Service 



REASONS WHY THE NAME FORDEL 
ASSURES YOU OF FILMS THAT GET RESULTS 



Fordel Films 

INCORPORATED 

7UfllVIRSITT*VE.« T 52. N T • TELEPHONE WTANOOITE 2 SOOO • TElEITPE TWKKr3i;32 • CABLE EOBDElABS. M. T 



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607 North La Brea Avenue 
Los Angeles 36, California 
WEbster 8-2191 

60 West 46th Street 
New York 36, New York 
Circle 5-0770 



ALLEND'OR 



TIONS 



FILMS FOR BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 



iSkjSk 1^1 



our newsreel organization /SPOTLITE I^EWS 



BUSINESS SCREEIV EXECUTIVE 



Connor Named Vice Pres. of 
Sylvania Photolamp Sales 

lir George C. Connor has been ap- 
pointed vice-president, photolamp 
sales, of Sylvania Lighting Prod- 
ucts, a division of Sylvania Elec- 
tric Products, Inc. He has been 
general sales manager, photolamps, 
for the past seven years. 

Connor joined Sylvania in 1934 
as a field engineer in the Equip- 




George C. Connor 

ment Tube Sales division, and 
handled special assignments on 
electronic military equipment dur- 
ing World War II. He is a for- 
mer president of the Photographic 
Manufacturers and Distributors 
Association and a former director 
of National Association of Photo- 
graphic Manufacturers. 

Hyland to Regional Sales Post 
♦ Francis J. Hyland has been 
named to the newly created posi- 
tion of southern regional sales 
manager, photolamps, of Sylvania 
Electric Products. His headquar- 
ters will remain in Dallas, where he 
has been district sales manager for 
Sylvania since 1947. Other re- 
gional offices are in New York, 
Chicago and San Francisco. 9 



Nemec Viee-Pres. 
of Reevesound Co. 

ik Boyce Nemec, for 10 
years executive secre- 
tary of the Society of 
Motion Picture & Tele- 
vision Engineers, has 
been appointed execu- 
tive vice-president of 
the Reevesound Co., 
New York. His duties 
include active manage- 
ment of the company in 
the absence of president 
Walter Hicks, currently 
in the Far East on 
company business. R' 




Douglas 



Stevens, Miller in New 
Posts for Bell & Howell 

•w Douglas E. Stevens is the new 
central regional sales manager for 
Bell & Howell Company, Chicago. 
He is responsible for district man- 
ager sales and administration in 
the central states. 

Prior to his promotion, Stevens 
had been district sales manager 
for the company. He joined Bell 
& Howell in 1944 and served 




Lee Miller 

thereafter in war coordinating, 
order control and retail sales. 

Lee Miller has succeeded Ste- 
vens as district sales manager for 



"An Informed America 
is a Strong America" 

Current ^ffairg Jfilms 

A Division of 

Key Productions, Inc. 

527 MAOISON AVE. NEW YORK 22, N. Y. 



182 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



ipart of the Chicago marketing 
area. Miller joined Bell & Howell 
lin 1955 and has handled various 
assignments in the marketing di- 
vision since transferring from the 
west coast branch early in 1957. 
* * * 

Compco Names Merle Painter 
Promotion Mgr. of Photo Div. 

'i!!r Merle E. Painter is the new 
sales promotion manager of the 
photographic division of Compco 
Corporation, Chicago. Painter's 
appointment was announced by S. 
'J. Zagel, president. 
j In his new post. Painter will 
Ihave charge of the promotion of 




t I 



Merle E. Painter 



|Compco reels and cans, film edi- 
jtors and plastic slide mounts. 
I Painter is known in the photo- 
graphic industry for outstanding 
merchandising and sales promotion 
campaigns and he brings to 
Compco a background of experi- 
jence as a merchandising counsellor 
land retailing specialist. <^' 

I * * * 

lOzalid Names James LeMay 
Midwest Visual Aids Director 

^ James E. LeMay has been ap- 
jointed mid-western regional di- 
ector of visual aids of Ozalid Di- 
yision. General Aniline and Film 
Corporation, Johnson City, New 
jlfork, according to James A. 



Travis, general sales manager. 

LeMay has been assistant chief 
of the audio-visual center of Air 
University Library at Maxwell 




ames E. LeMay 



Air Force Base, Alabama. He also 
was consultant to the staff and 
faculty of the Air University in 
the areas of visual communication 
and photo-mechanical reproduc- 
tion processes. 

Prior to his work at Maxwell Air 
Force Base, LeMay was audio- 
visual director and instructor in 
Education at the College of St. 
Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota. 9 



Simmons Appointed Asst. Mgr. 
of Kodak Western Film Div. 

■A Norwood L. Simmons, chief 
engineer of the West Coast divi- 
sion of Eastman Kodak Company's 
motion picture film department, 
has been named assistant manager 
of the division. His appointment 
was announced by Donald E. 
Hyndman, manager of Kodak's 
motion picture film department, 
and Emery Huse, manager of the 
department's West Coast division. 
Vaughn C. Shaner will succeed 
Simmons as chief engineer of the 
West Coast division. This divi- 
sion offers technical service to pro- 
fessional motion picture studio 
customers. 9 



ART6;^V1DEART 

ANIMATION 

TITLES 

OPTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY 

COLOR or B&W — 16 or 35MM 



343 LEXINGTON AVE. 
NEW YORK 16, N.Y. 

LExington 2 7378-9 



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Da-Lite Sends 
Hamzy Southwest 

ik Norflet "Pete" Ham- 
zy has been appointed 
Southwest district man- 
ager for the Da-Lite 
Screen Company, War- 
saw, Indiana. He will 
cover these states from 
headquarters at 7469 
Mohawk Ave., Fort 
Worth, Texas; is well- 
known in photographic 
circles, particularly in 
the audio-visual field. ^ 

BUYERS READ , 
BUSINESS SCREEN | 



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a film company 



producers of 
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• DRAMATIC 

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WASHINGTON, D. C. 

1536 Connecticut Ave., N.W. COlumbia 5-2272 



iNUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 




MEIV Who Make PICTURES 



Ji^ 



•T" News of the Studios and of Executive Staff Appointments 



Complete Production Facilities Under One Roof 

ir Script Writing • Imaginative Photography. 

;■ Recording & Re-recording • Westrex Equipment. 

ir Laboratory Duplicating • COLOR or B&W. 

;' Interlock Projection • Editing Services. 

K Animation • Art Work & Photography. 

i\ Titles • Hand Lettered or Printed. 

;■ 60' by 100' Sound Stage for rent with complete 
lighting equipment. 

Let "Academy Films" produce all or any part of your next 
motion picture in Hollywood's newest superbly equipped 
motion picture studio. 



ACADEMY FILMS 



800 N. Seward Street 



Hollywood 38, Calif. 



TIESLER 
PRODUCTIONS 



An organization 
devoted exclusively to 
the production of 
Motion Pictures 
for Industry. 



1 1 2 WEST 44TH STREET 
NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 
Circle 5-1274 



Directors Name RansohofF 
President of Filmways, Inc. 

t> A rc;ilignment of management 
responsibilities for Filmways. Inc., 
and their wholly-owned subsidiary. 
World Highways Expedition, has 
been announced by Martin Ran- 
soholT. recently named prcsideni 




Martin Ransohoff 

at a meeting of the company's 
board of directors. 

In addition to Mr. RansohoH, 
who had been executive vice-presi- 
dent, Lee Goodman has been 
elected vice-president in charge of 
production and Michael Dubin. 
vice-president in charge of sales. 

During 1957, Filmways sent 
camera crews 1,500,000 man 
miles, through 23 foreign countries 
and most of the states of the Union 
shooting commercials around the 
world and in the United States. 

The company maintains two 
studios in New York, one in Holly- 
wood, and worldwide location fa- 
cilities. R^ 
* * * 

Flood in New Post at 
Close and Patenaude 

l^ David J. Flood has been ap- 
pointed director of films for Close 




David 



and Patenaude, Philadelphia sales 
promotion agency. He comes to 
the company from the Calvin Co., 



Kansas City. Mo., where he wrote, 
directed and edited motion pictures 
for sales promotion, sales training, 
education, public relations and 
employee recruitment. 

Prior to his film work. Flood 
was for 13 years with the DuPont 
Co. as advertising supervisor for 
the Finishes Division. Here he 
handled advertising and sales pro- 
motion in both consumer and in- 
dustrial fields. 9 
* * * 

Stokes Named Sales Chief 
of Jamieson Film Company 

■" Bill Stokes has been appointed 
general manager of sales of Jamie- 
son Film Company, Dallas, Texas. 
He will supervise sales for tele- 
vision and industrial films as well 
as for an expanded producer's 
service division. 

A large motion picture producer 
in the South, Jamieson Film Com- 
pany is completing a $100,000 
plant expansion. The studio has 
facilities for the complete produc- 




Bill Stokes 



lion of 35mm and 16mni color and 
black/white films. 

Stokes formerly was sales mana- 
ger for Southwest Film Laboratory. 

* * * 

Kirshner Directs Promotion 
for Pilot Productions 

•m William N. Kirshner has joined 
Pilot Productions, Evanston, III., 
as director of sales promotion. 
Kirshner's experience includes 
sales, advertising, television and 
motion pictures. 

He formerly was associated with 
Fred A. Niles Productions, Chi- 
cago; NBC-TV, Chicago; and Gel- 
ler Productions, Hollywood. His 
department will coordinate the 
sales and merchandising of audio- 
visual media. 9 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Von Maur Named President 
of Depicto Films Corporation 

■A' Jack R. von Maur has been ap- 
pointed president of Depicto Films 
Corporation, New Yorl: City, His 
appointment was announced by 
John Hans, founder of Depicto 
Fihns, who has been elected chair- 
man of the board. 

Von Maur came to Depicto 
Films in 1955 as executive-vice- 
president. 

Ray B. Helser has joined De- 
picto Films Corporation as vice- 
president. His activities will be 
directed toward the development 
of sales training and promotional 
programs. Helser formerly was 
vice-president in charge of client 
contact at Florez, Inc., of De- 
troit. 9 
* * m 

Executive Producers Named 
at Kling Film Productions 

■A Two executive appointments in 
the production department of 
Kling Film Productions, Chicago, 
have been announced by Harry W. 
Lange, executive vice-president. 

Richard Hertel, formerly Kling's 
production manager, has been 
named executive producer. Indus- 
trial, and will oversee production 
of all industrial motion pictures 
and slidefilms. Len Levy, for- 
merly production supervisor, has 
been promoted to executive pro- 
ducer, Television. Levy will super- 
vise production of all television 
commercial and syndicated 
films. 9 



The A-B-C 
of a Good Producer 



A is for Architectonic — the 
art of systematizing 
knowledge. 

D is for Background. Back- 
ground enables one to 
remember some things and 
forget others. 

P is for Counsel. "They 
^ that will not be coun- 
seled cannot be helped." 
Franklin. 



STARK FILMS 



Producers of 
Motion Pictures tliat sell 

BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 

Not a big company, 

but a Bright Concern 



Gaughan Joins Galbreath 
as Exec Vice President 

',V E. W. Gaughan has been ap- 
pointed executive vice-president of 
Galbreath Pictures, Inc., Fort 




E. W. Gaughan 

Wayne, Ind., and elected to the 
board of directors. For the past 
two years Gaughan has been an 
independent consultant in sales 
distribution and marketing. Before 
that he was vice - president and 
sales manager for Capehart-Farns- 
vvorth Co., Fort Wayne. 

His earlier experience includes 
general sales manager of electron- 
ics for Crosley-Avco, Cincinnati, 
and association with Westinghouse 

Electric Corp. 9 

* * * 

Name Halmay Sales V.P. at 
Wilbur Streech Productions 

v; Appointment of Andrew Hal- 
may as vice-president in charge 
of sales and client relations of 




Andrew Halmay 

Wilbur Streech Productions, New 
York television film producers, has 
been announced by Wilbur Streech, 
president. 

Halmay formerly was associated 
with Benton & Bowles, Inc., and 
Bryan Houston, Inc., both of New 
York, and Young & Rubicam Ltd., 
Toronto. W 

(continued on page 186) 



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I 



( 



NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 




PRODUCERS 
of the 
FINEST 
IN FILM 



Offer a refreshing team of newly organized experience for 
the production of all types of industrial challenges in our 
field — We're at your service with a wealth of "Know How" 
and complete production facilities — Ask to see the results 
of our efforts already responsible for a fine reputation. 
Wondsel, Carlisle & Dunphy welcome the opportunity of 
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We ^^an ^J < 



WONDSEL, CARLISLE & DUNPHY Jnc. 

1600 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 
Circle 7-1600 




PRODUCTIONS 

2 130 South Bellaire Street 
Denver 22, Colorado 

Phone SKyline 6-8383 



MEM Who Make PICTURES 



News of the Studios and of Executive Staff Appointments 



Wilding Picture Productions 
Announces Sales Exec Shifts 

■)i^ Three executive changes in the 
sales stall of Wilding Picture Pro- 
ductions, Inc., have been an- 




Dean Coffin 



to Detroit 




Lawrence Young ... to Cleveland 




Quinn Short ... to Pittsburgh 

nounced by Jack Rheinstrom, 
vice-president of sales. 

Dean Coffin, formerly district 
manager of Wilding's Cleveland 
and Pittsburgh sales and service 
offices, has been appointed a vice- 
president of the Company's Great 
Lakes Sales Division located in 



Detroit, where Wilding also has 
studio facilities. 

Lawrence T. Young succeeds 
Coffin as district manager in 
Cleveland and Quinn Short has 
been appointed as district mana- 
ger in Pittsburgh. R" 

Bonafield New Exec V.P. 
of Davis Productions 

^ Jay Bonafield has been appoint- 
ed Executive vice-president of 
Robert Davis Productions, Inc. 

Mr. Bonafield was formerly 
executive vice-president of RKO 
Pathe, Inc. 1" 

Ken Silver Will Manage 
Alexander Export Sales 

•hi Ken Silver has been appointed 
New York manager of Alexander 
International, export sales division 
of Alexander Film Co. Silver 
formerly was the firm's special 
representative in New York. His 
appointment was announced by 
Jay Berry, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager of Alexander's Na- 
tional Division. 

Alexander Film's headquarters 
is in Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
The export sales division's offices 
are at 500 Fifth Avenue, in New 
York. 9 

Weeks Appointed Producer 
at Pictures for Business 

tc Pictures for Business, Los 
Angeles, has appointed H. Keith 
Weeks as producer-director, ac- 
cording to Bill Deming, executive 
producer. 

Weeks will handle major mo- 
tion picture projects at Pictures for 
Business. His background in- 
cludes more than 30 years as a 
studio productions executive. His 
previous affiliations include Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer, Universal-Inter- 
national and Twentieth Century- 
Fox studios. 9 



BILL DEMING 

PICTURES FOR BUSINESS 

• GOVERNMENT 

• TELEVISION 

• INDUSTRY 

704 N. Gardner St. 

HOLLYWOOD 46, CALIF. 

Phone: V^Ebster 4-5806 



86 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Joseph Brun Joins Transfilm 
as Director of Cinematography 

^ Joseph Brun, ASC. an interna- 
tionally experienced feature cine- 
matographer, has joined Transfilm 
Incorporated, New York City, ac- 
cording to Walter Lowendahl, 
president. Before his new appoint- 
ment, Brun completed camera 
work on Everglades, a Warner 
Brothers - Schulberg Production, 
and Windjammer, a film in the new 
Cinemiracle process for Louis de 
Rochemont. 

Since World War II, Brun 
has directed the cinematography on 
feature films using many color and 
screen processes. Among his 
credits are the feature documentar- 
ies Cinerama Holiday and Martin 
Luther. Brun spent 1 1 months in 
Africa filming Savage Splendor. He 
has filmed numerous television film 
series and tv filmed commercials. 

Brun's film career began 30 
years ago with study at the Institut 
d' Optique in Paris. After gradua- 
tion, he became an operative cam- 
eraman for such directors as Rene 
Clair, Jean Renoir and Julien 
Duvivier. 

From 1933 to 1939 Brun wrote, 
directed and filmed his own docu- 
mentaries in Europe and Asia. In 
World War II, he served in the 
French Army and was wounded. 
When France fell, he escaped with 
his wife and child to America 
where he continued his film activi- 
ties for industrial film producers, 
the Army, Navy and the National 
Film Board of Canada. 9 

* * * 

Robert Eberenz Joins 
Byron, Inc. Sound Staff 

ir Robert W. Eberenz has been 
added to the sound department 
staff of Byron, Inc., Washington, 
D. C. film laboratory. 

Previously, Eberenz was sound 
transmission engineer and chief 
engineer of Fine Sound, Inc. and 
Perspecta Sound, Inc., a Loew's, 
Inc. subsidiary. He participated 
with C. R. Fine in the "Opti-Mag" 
and "Electronicue" developments. 

SOUND RECORDING 

at a reasonable cost 

High fidelity 16 or 35. Qualify 

guaranfeed. Compie'l'e studio and 

laboratory services. Color printing 

and lacquer coating. 

ESCAR 

Motion Picture Service 

7315 Carnegie Ave. 
Cleveland 3, Ohio 



Earlier, Eberenz served as field 
engineer for the Altec Service 
Company, where he supervised en- 
gineering and installation of theat- 
rical stereophonic sound systems. 
Cinemascope and three-dimension- 
al equipment. 

During the Korean War, Eber- 
enz constructed and operated a 
USIS motion picture unit in Korea, 
where films were produced for the 
rehabilitation of Communist pris- 
oners of war. R" 

Melvin Shaw Forms New 
Film Writing Service 

T^ A new business film writing ser- 
vice combining creative planning 
with training and public relations 
methods has been announced by 
Melvin Shaw. 

Shaw has had 18 years' experi- 
ence in motion picture work with 




Melvin Shaw 

National Broadcasting Co., Reela 
Films, Inc., Bob Bailey Produc- 
tions and Scripts by Oeveste 
Granducci, Inc. 

Organized as "written by Mel- 
vin Shaw," the new company will 
be headquartered in Hollywood. ^ 
* * * 

Saunders Elected Edit V.P. 
of Haig and Patterson, Inc. 

M Jackson M. Saunders has been 
elected as vice-president, editorial, 
of Haig and Patterson, Inc., in- 
dustrial film producers in Detroit, 
Michigan and Dayton, Ohio. The 
announcement was made by Earl 
E. Seielstad, president. 

Saunders' election is the result 
of Haig and Patterson's business 
volume expansion and the firm's 
increasing activities in the training 
and marketing fields, Seielstad 
said. 

Previously serving as editorial 
manager, Saunders has been with 
Haig and Patterson since 1950, 
when he joined the firm as senior 
writer. He has been closely asso- 
ciated with the production of many 
of the studio's industrial training 
and sales promotion programs in 
the midwest. W 



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CAMERAS 

MITCHELL 

l<5ftim 

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35itim Hi-Speed 

35mm NC • 35mm BNC 

BELL & HOWELL 

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ARRIFLEX 

16mm * 35mm 

WALL 

35mm single system 

ECLAIR CAMERETTE 

35mm • 16/35mm 
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all models single system 
Cine Kodak Special 
Maurer • Bolex 
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Mole Richardson 

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Bull Switclies 

Strong ARC-Trouper 

10 Amps 110V AC 5000W- 

2000W-750V/ 

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Gator Clip lites 

Barn Doors 

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Dimmers 

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Moviolas • Rewinders 
Tables • Splicers 
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GRIP EQUIPMENT 

Parallels • ladders 
2 Steps • Apple Boxes 
Scrims • Flags 
Gobo Stands 
Complete grip equipment 

SOUND EQUIPMENT 

Magnasync-magnetic film 
Reeves Magicorder 
Mole Richardson Booms and 
Perambulators 

Portable Mike Booms 

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YOU HAVE 

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WHEN YOUR FILM PROVIDES THE 

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SALES AS WELL AS CREATING AN 
UNDERSTANDING OF YOU AND 
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WRITE FOR INFORMATION: 

DEKKO-ROCKWELL FILMS 
126 DARTMOUTH STREET 
BOSTON 16. MASS. 



NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 




i. HE MOST important decision a 
sponsor has to make in connection 
with any motion picture project is the 
selection of the producing company 
that is to do the work. Year after 
year, many of the most experienced 
users of films keep coming back to: 

LESLIE ROUSH 

PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

130 HERRICKS ROAD 
MINEOLA, L. I. , N. Y, 



^ew AUDIO -VISUAL Equipment 

Recent Product Developments for Production and Projection 

chronizing kits introduced as auxi- 
liary equipment for the Kodak 
Pageant Magnetic-Optical Sound 
Projector. 

Eastman Kodak Company's new 
magnetic recording aids include 
the Kodak Synchronizing Brake 
Kit, the Kodak Synchronous Motor 
Kit, and the Kodak 2-Projector 
Synchronizing Kit. These kits may 
be attached to projectors without 
returning the projectors to the 
factory or repair shop. No modi- 
fication of the projector mechanism 
is required. 

The sound-synchronizing kits 
permit: the use of the Kodak 
Pageant Magnetic-Optical Sound 
Projector for on-set recording of 
lip-synchronized sound with a 
synchronously-driven taking cam- 
era, previewing and editing before 
sound and pictures are combined 
on one piece of film; the combin- 
ing of sound and action into one 
synchronized master print; produc- 
tion of duplicate in-sync sound 
tracks. 9 



New Processor Handles Up to 
5,400 Ft. of Film Per Hour 

■m The Filmline R-90 Processor, 
which processes 16mm reversal, 
negative and positive film at speeds 
up to 5,400 feet per hour at 68 
degrees F, has been announced by 
Filmline Corp., Milford, Conn. 

The processor's standard equip- 
ment includes stainless steel air 
squeegees, an oil-less air compres- 
sor, a developer recirculating 
pump, replenishing fittings, a filter 



New Filmosound Model 
Features Safety Interlock 

iV A rewind safety interlock and 
sealed lubrication are featured on 
a new model of the Filmosound 
16mm motion picture projector 
manufactured by Bell & Howell 
Company, Chicago. 

The new Filmosound 385 pro- 
jector has a rewind safety interlock 
built into the newly designed take- 
up reel arm, to prevent a common 
cause of film breakage. The arm 
has a spindle which automatically 
disengages the rewind gear when 
the reel of film is removed. The 
projector cannot accidentally be 
started in the rewind position when 
a new film is to be shown. 

The new unit's factory-sealed 
lubrication eliminates the need for 
oiling the projector, and assures 




the proper amount of lubricant for 
each moving part, the manufacturer 
notes. The Filmosound 385 has a 
15-watt amplifier and a voltage 
regulator which keeps voltage to 
the photocell constant. Reserve 
gain (not needed for normal oper- 
ation) is provided to compensate 
for variation in soundtracks and to 
assure ample sound volume in 
low-voltage areas. 

The single-case 385C Filmo- 
sound projector has an 8" speaker. 
Other models are available with 
12" auxiliary or 25-watt power 
speakers, in matching cases. R" 
* * * 

Sound Synchronizing Kits 
Designed by Eastman Kodak 

it Simplified production of 16mm 
magnetic lip-synchronized sound 
motion pictures is promised with 
the use of three new sound-syn- 




and spray bar, and an air agita- 
tion system with a control valve for 
the bleach tank. 

Filmline's "Temp-Guard" tem- 
perature control system with ther- 
mostats provides refrigeration and 
heating for all chemical solutions. 
A variable speed transmission and 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIN] 



film speed tachometer, and a foot- 
' age counter, olTer a wide range 
' of speeds and developing times. 
■ The unit's feed-in and take-up ele- 
' vators allow continuous operation. 
! Two dial thermometers continu- 
\ ously indicate drybox and devel- 
j oper temperatures. 

All of the processor's drive com- 
[ ponents and gears are mounted on 
i ball bearings or roller bearings 
! and the unit's heavy 1 6-gauge 
i stainless steel tanks are provided 
I with bottom drain valves. Two 
; 1200-foot daylight magazines are 
supplied with the R-90: 220 volts. 
' 60 cycles, single phase, 30 am- 
I peres. Other voltages are avail- 
able. ^ 1' 

1,000-ft. Blimp Designed for 
I Arrrflex 35 Cine-Cameras 

I i!V A new 1 ,000-ft. Arri blimp, de- 
j signed to accept any recent model 
Arriflex 35 cine-camera, has been 
announced by Kling Photo Corpo- 
ration, distributor. 

To use the Arriflex 35 camera 




Open View: magazine in place 

in the 1,000-foot blimp, the regu- 
lar DC handgrip motor is un- 
screwed and replaced by the stand- 
ard Arri synchronous motor drive. 
The entire unit is placed inside the 
blimp, where it rests on rubber 
blocks for proper sound insulation. 
The new blimp accepts 1,000- 
foot Mitchell magazines. Before 
the magazine is placed in the blimp 
and attached to the camera, a spe- 
cial adapter is joined to the maga- 
zine. No modification is needed on 
the magazine proper. The adapter 



FOR SALE 

BELL & HOWELL 

35mm to 16mm 

Reduction Printer 

• Like New 

• Fully Guaranteed 
• Price Reasonable 

CAMERA EQUIPMENT Co., Inc. 

315 West 43rd Street 
New York, N. Y. 



carries the sprocket magazine 
mouth of the regular Arriflex 35 
magazine on its lower side, while 
its upper part fits to the Mitchell 
magazine and is secured to it by 
a knurled screw and spring latch. 
These two parts are connected by 
a flexible bellows. 

Although the Mitchell magazine 
is placed on the camera in the 
same way as the Arriflex magazine, 
its weight does not rest on the 
camera, but on rubber bufl'ers ex- 
tending from the interior blimp 




Side View: shows new eyepiece 

walls. The adapter's two sprock- 
ets are driven by the camera. The 
magazine take-up spindle is driven 
by a separate torque motor located 
inside the blimp and connected to 
the magazine by a belt. 

The Arriflex 35 camera's 
"through-the-lens" focusing and 
viewing feature is maintained with 
the blimp. The regular camera 
door with finder system is replaced 
with a special door and the blimp 
has its own optical system which 
connects to the camera. The mag- 
nifying eyepiece on the rear of the 
blimp is equipped with a rubber 
eyecup and foam-plastic cushion. 




Rear View: note shutter "dial 



An auxiliary finder, such as the 
Mitchell or Ceco, can be attached 
to the door of the blimp. 

Focusing and diaphragm adjust- 
ments are controlled from the out- 
side of the blimp and transmitted 
to the taking lens through a drive- 
coupling system. A large knob 
located on the front left of the 
blimp actuates the diaphragm. 
Three knobs are provided for fo- 
cusing, one each on the front left 
and right side of the blimp and one 
on the rear of the blimp. 

Diaphragm setting and distance 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 191) 



FOR MEDICINE 
EDUCATION 
INDUSTRY 
TELEVISION 




sr— 



STURGIS-GRANT 
PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



322 East 44th Street, New York 17, N.Y. 



Miinav Hill 9-4994 




economical - professional 
motion picture production 

Film Associates 

of Michigan, Inc. 

4815 Cabot Avenue 

Detroit 10, IVIichigan 

Telephone LUzon 2-6200 



INDUSTRIAL CLIENTS 

The Dow Chemical Co. 
American Motors Corp. 
Bulldog Electric Co. 
Massey-Harris-Ferguson, Ltd. 
A. P. Parts Corporation 
Shatter Proof Glass Corp. 





Serving Industry 

for 10 years 

with 

Complete Studio 

and Location 

Facilities 



NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



I 



Send 

Your Film 

To The 

Complete 16IVIIVI 

Service 

Laboratory 

Unsurpassed for . . . 



SPEED 


^ 


p 


QUALITY 
















Personalized 
SERVICE 





MOTION PICTURE LABORATORIES, INC 

Phone BRoadway 5-2323 

1672 Union Ave., ^"\ Memphis 4, Tenn. 




ZJke rVJastei" C^mftsinanikip 




FILM AWARDS 



(also see pages 20. 26, 192, 194, 197) 

BRUSSELS INTERNATIONAL 
EXPERIMENTAL FILM COMPETITION 

Sponsored by the 

World Film Festival and La Cinematheque de 

Belgique (Belgian Film Library) 

as part of the 1958 

Universal and international Exhibition of Brussels 

Monday through Sunday, April 21 to 27, 1958 

Entries Closed February, 1958 

Purpose: To encourage free artistic creation, 
the spirit of research and pioneering effort 
by all independent film producers throughout 
the world. 

Definition: The term experimental shall be 
defined as any attempt to explore new develop- 
ments of cinematographic expression, or con- 
tents which touch on subject matter unfamil- 
iar in the cinema. 

Eligible Films: All productions, 16mm and 
35mm, sound or silent, black & white or color, 
of any length, produced since January 1, 1955, 
which fall into the classification of avant- 
guarde or experimental films, essays in film 
poetry and abstract compositions; all original 
creations falling outside the familiar pattern 
of commercial film entertainment. 

Awards: Two Grand Prizes of the Universal 
Exhibition will be awarded to the two best 
experimental films, the first of which will re- 
ceive a gold medal, the second a silver medal. 
Six other prizes which are bronze medals, will 
be awarded on grounds determined by the 
jury. All entries chosen for competition will 
receive a medal specially struck for the 1958 
Universal and International Exhibition. 

Juries: A Selection Jury will consider all en- 
tries and eliminate any productions falling 
outside the definition of experimental or below 
the required standard of originality. A Com- 
petition Jury, composed of personalities from 
the literary, art and film fields, will award the 
prizes. 

* * * 

Special Film Entry Information 
M Film producers and sponsors in the U.S. 
who desire to enter films for Brussels compe- 
tition are advised to direct inquiries to Miss 
Jean Dalrymple, c/o the Office of the Com- 
missioner General, U.S. Exhibit, Brussels In- 
ternational Exhibition, Room 100, 45 Broad- 
way, New York 6, New York. S 




"■ V, 



TRADE AND TRAVEL FILMS 
of the 

WORLD TODAY 

to stimulate understanding and goodwill 
among all peoples. 

ALFRED T. PALMER 
PRODUCTIONS 

130 BUSH STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 4 



NOBODY 
LOVES US 



Nobody but our clients, 
that is. 

They like our approach 
to their b udget 
problems. 

They like the way we use 
brain s instead of 
bankrolls. 

They like the results 
they're getting from 
our sales films. 

For sensible prices, 
brains and results, 
check with 




1004 EAST JEFFERSON AVENUE 
DETROIT 7, MICH. WO 2-3400 



SOLELY 

SOUND 

SLIDEFILMS 

We are Specialists and can solve any Sales, 
Safety or Informational problem. 

$89.50 

per frame 

This price includes: 

Story outline shooting script 

original artwork photography 

sound sound effects 

camera cast crew 

open and close music laboratory 
editing sound reproduction 

Samples of recent sound slidefilms for Car- 
nation, Catalina, Squirt, NMS, Don Baxter, 
Little Leagues, Pharmaseal, etc., are yours for 
the screening. 



The Ben JKlHaldlO Company 

6926 Melrose Avenue 

Hollywood 38, Calif. Webster 8-8541 



190 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINI 



IVew A-V Products: 

[(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 189) 

'setting are observed on large de- 
tachable scale bands located be- 
hind the soundproof, internally il- 
luminated observation windows on 
both sides of the blimp. These 
^scale bands are individually cali- 
brated for each lens and are 
Ichanged to match the taking lens. 
The blimp features an extra 
large rectangular front port with 
optical glass window. Wide angle 
lenses such as the 18mm Taylor 
Hobson Cooke or 20mm Schneider 
Cinegon can be used. In addition 
to the front port, three doors pro- 
vide access to the blimp interior. 
The blimp housing is a magnesium 
alloy die casting. It is lined with 
10 alternating layers of goat-skin, 
foam plastic and sheet lead and 
Ifinished with grey corduroy lining. 



iNew Fairchild Processor 
;Develops 16mm Film Rapidly 

I'M" An automatic self-feeding port- 
able rapid film processing device 
able to develop dry to dry 16mm 
I film at the rate of up to 10 feet per 
;minute and still attain commercial 
quality has been announced by the 
Industrial Camera Division of 
Fairchild Camera and Instrument 
iCorp. 

Known as the Mini-Rapid 16, 
the device is said to make it pos- 
isible to have an ordinary 100-foot 
I roll of black and white film ready 
for projection on a screen within 
20 minutes after shooting. 

Major elements in the new proc- 
essor, about the size of a stand- 
lard file drawer, are interchange- 



able film transport plastic inserts 
containing a high speed developer, 
a rapid fixer, a hypo eliminating 
agent and a static rinse. Provi- 
sion also has been made for the 

fsuffm 




11:15 a.m. — the camera analyzes a 
punch press operation . . . 




11:18 a.m. — film Is dropped into 
Multi-Rapid 16 processor. 

use of an accessory tank for cir- 
culating water. 

Drying is carried out by a high 
velocity air jet on the emulsion 
side of the film. The resultant film 
is of commercial quality; more per- 
manent quality may be obtained 
by running the film a second time 
with the tanks filled only with 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 193) 



In the southeast... 

on location, or 
in the studio... 

we have 

complete film facilities. 

but most of all . . . 

imagination. 

frank willard 
productions 



3223-b Cain's hill pi., n.w. atlanta 5, georgia 




PAUL HANCE 
PRODUCTIONS, inc. 



Motion Pictures for Business 




and Industry 



References: 



American Car & Foundry Co. 
American Cranberry Exchange 
American Zinc Institute 
Armco Steel Corporation 
Bell Telephone Laboratories 
Corning Glass Works 
Drop Forging Association 
General Foods Corporation 
Kasco Mills Inc. 
National Cranberry Association 
Remington Rand Univac 
Roses, Inc. 

The New Jersey Zinc Company 
United States Navy 



1776 BROADWAY . NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 
Telephone: Circle 5-9140 



M^ke yoni' own HOT PRESS TITUS 



on the 

KENSOL 11 a 

ART 

LETTERING 

PRESS 




Compare the following Kensol Hot Press advantages: 

. LETTERS COMPLETE TITLE CARD OR CEL IN ONE IMPRESSION. 

Light weight hot presses and most other methods print only one line at a time. 
• PRINTS ON POSTER BOARD, COLORAID PAPER AND ACETATE 

Hot press is the only method which will produce fine quality lettering on all three. 
. LETTERS IN BLACK, WHITE AND ALL POPULAR COLORS. 

Titles quickly and inexpensively made by inexperienced personnel. 
. NO MESSY INK TO CLEAN UP OR CHEMICALS TO CHANGE. 

Hot Press Titling is a completely opaque, dry transfer process. 



WRITE FOR 
COMPLETE INFORMATION 



OLSE 



RK 



124-132 WHITE ST., NEW YORK 13, N. Y. 

Specialists in Quality Marking Equipment anil Supplies for over 30 years 



:NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



191 





120 Page 

Photo 

Equipment 

Reference 
Book 



P? EARED TO INDUSTRIAL 
AND SCIENTIFIC USES 



Now have at your finccr- 
tips B & J"$ new 60th 
Anniversary issue at no 
cost! It's crammed with 
information, iihistrations. 
and specifics about ad- 
vanced and current phnro- 
graphic equipmenr for 
Industry. A listmq of tlit- 
world's larsest ' in-sKuk " 
selection of lenses; .nail- 
able custom-lens iahora- 
lory facilities; custom- 
built equipment for 
unique applications plus 
hundreds of Amcrua's 
standard photo tools- 
many available only thtu 
Burke & James dcaleis! 



Write 



BS258 



■ CAMERAS-from 
Sub-Miniature to 
HUGE CUSTOM 
BUILT. 

> DEVELOPING 
EQUIPMENT 

. DRYERS 

• ENL ARGERS 

SOLAR 
. STROBE 

> lENSES-From 
"Peanut' To Big 
Berthas 

. LIGHTING 

. CAMERA BACKS 

. PRINTERS 

• PROCESSING- 
Pako, Leedal, etc. 

• PROJECTORS 

■ SLIDE EQUIP. 
. STAINLESS STEEL 
. TIMERS 



FILM AWARDS 



(also see pages 20, 26. 190, 194, 197) 

TENTH ANNUAL COMPETITION 

OF THE CANADIAN FILM AWARDS 

Sponsored Join-Hy by 

The Canadian Association ■for Adulf 

Education, 

The Canadian Film Institute, 

The Canada Foundation 

Management Committee: Con.sists of repre- 
sentatives from each of the sponsoring organ- 
izations plus technical advisers, who are 
associated with the film making industry in 
Canada. 

Chairman: Charles Topshee. 

Manager: Canadian Film Institute, 142 Sparks 

Street, Ottawa 4, Ontario. 

Categories: A new category has been added 
for this year's competition. Awards will be 
given for films produced for TV and filmed 
TV commercials. Other categories are: 
Theatrical, shorts and features; Non-Theatri- 
cal, arts and experiment, children's, general 
information, public relations, sales and pro- 
motion, training and instruction, travel and 
recreation. Films released since January, 
1956 are eligible for award. 

Awards: Amateur Trophy of the Association 
of Motion Picture Producers and Laboratories 
of Canada, the Ajvard for the Canadian Film 
of the Year, an Award of Merit for each cate- 
gory. No Honorable Mention will be oflfered 
in this year's competition. 



VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL 
FILM FESTIVAL 

Sponsored by the Vancouver Festival Society 
Vancouver, British Columbia 
July 19 to August 16, 1958 

Awards and Judging: Plans are in process 
to establish standards of judging and the 
types of awards to be given. For information 
on the judging and awards, write: The Van- 
couver Festival Society, Rooms 7 & 8, 16th 
floor, Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C. 



BURKE & JAMES, INC 

~ --- Chi 



SPECIAL SERVICES 

* reasonable charges * 

EDITORIAL: The Greatest Value to 
"YOUR STORY" is Smooth Edi- 
torial Timing . . . Sympathetic 
Understanding of "YOUR STORY" 
theme . . . Sensitive Appreciation 
of "YOUR STORY" mood. 



GEORGE HALLIGAN 

Motion Pictures Hollywood 9-7962 

6060 Sunset Boulevard 

HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIF. 




PLANNING 
A PICTURE? 

ask for our 
"99 Questions 
and Answers 
on Films" 



1431 N. WELLS, CHICAGO 10, ILLINOIS 
WHitehall 4-7477 



EQUIPMENT SALE 

Our sound stage and old sound depart- 
ment have been closed to make room for 
new, modern studios with a complete 
Westrex sound system. 

Following is a list of some of the equip- 
ment that is still available for sale at 
greatlv reduced prices. 



Cameras: Cine Special: Aurican Super 
1200 Pro: 16mni Maurer: complete with 
all accessories. 

Lenses: Several niaiilied sets of Ektar and 
Cooke lenses. 



Lights: Practically new MR double 
Ijroads, and others. 



Sound Equipment: Complete studio, 
Maurer recorder. Model 10; magazines; 
racks; mixers: two Maurer optical and 
magnetic dummies; rack including A and 
B supply lor 8 dummies; two PV 100 
Reeves Ifmim magnetic recorders; one 
Reeves two position portable mixer; one 
table including two 16 inch Presto pro- 
fessional turntables with WE vertical and 
lateral pick-ups: equalizers; faders; ampli- 
fiers; and power supply: two other pick- 
ups. 

Laboratory Equipment: Fonda Positive- 
negative ICmm developing machine, can 
be converted to 35mni or 35mm- 16mm 
combination. Neumade Film Cleaner. 



Miscellaneous: Tricvclc dollies; tripods; 
camera nu)if)r: prouqiter: scenery; props; 
etc. 

Write for latest price list 
or phone FEderal 3-4000 

BYRON, INC. 

1226 Wisconsin Avenue 

Washington 7, D. C. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINEl 



^ew A-V Products: 

[(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 191) 

water. Film lengths as short as I 
foot or as long as 400 feet may 
be processed without having to 
change or add to the chemical 
:solutions. 

The unit is made of welded 




11:34 a.m. — film is ready for pro- 
jection and study . . . 




11:38 a.m. — film of punch press 
operation is being reviewed. 

istainless steel with an aluminum 
jrear housing. All chemical tanks, 
which hold 18 ounces of liquid 
each, are easily removable for rinse 
cleaning and renewing of solutions. 
All compartments are accessible 
for clearing and wiping by hand. 
In ordinary use the unit is placed 
|on a table for operation; no fas- 
|teners are needed. 

Weight of the Mini-Rapid 16 is 
170 lbs. dry. It is 27" long, 12" 
wide and 13" high. S' 



New Time-Study Projector 
Has Single-Frame Operation 

* Flicker-free projection at speeds 
of 6 to 20 frames per second is 
said to be possible with the new 
Weinberg-Watson modified ver- 
sion of the Kodak Analyst projec- 
tor, introduced by Camera Equip- 
ment Co.. Inc., New York. 

The projector gives single frame 
operation in both forward and re- 
verse. Special construction allows 
the projector to be stopped in- 
definitely on any single frame with- 
out damaging the film. Quick 
transition from continuous to 
single frame operation is provided. 
Film transport and direction of 
film travel can be controlled re- 
motely. 

Designed at the University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and 
Dentistry, the projector is appli- 
cable to such uses as analyzing 
school or professional sports films, 
industrial time and motion studies, 
or films of manufacturing proc- 
esses. 9 



Electronic Tel-Animaprint 
Automates Hot Press Work 

A new Electronic TEL-Anima- 
print hot press machine has been 
announced by S. O. S. Cinema 
Supply Corporation, New York 
City. The electronic hot press is 
described as automating the pro- 
duction of titles, crawls, flip cards 
and advertising copy. 

Ordinary printer's type is 
heated in the typeholder and im- 
pressed upon black, white or any 
color foil. This is applied to paper, 
cardboard, acetate, artwork or 
photographs. Maintenance of the 
correct level in the heating of the 
type, regardless of room tempera- 
ture, is possible with the electronic 
unit via a thermistor and an elec- 
tronic assembly. 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 195) 



iPROFESSIONAL 

MATTES • INSERTS • FADES • DISSOLVES 

WIPES • SUPERIMPOSURES 

MOTION PICTURE & TELEVISION 

OPTICAL EFFECTS ^ CINEMASCOPE 

35mm & 16mm • B & W or Color 

SPECIALIZED TITLES 

Ray MERCER & CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1928 

PHONE OR WRITE FOR SPECIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC 
OPTICAL EFFECTS CHART & INFORMATION 

4241 NORMAL AVE., HOLLYWOOD 29, CALIF. 
N O r m a n dy 3-93 3 1 



SOUTHWEST FILM LABORATORY, INC 




Go-fne6, a Aeat Odea 
in C<Uo^ P^ntlK<f 



TRIAD COLOR CONTROL*, 
a 16mm additive color print process, pro- 
vides absolute scene-to-scene color correc- 
tion. Exclusive with Southwest. Write for 
Triad Price List "A". 

*Trcide Mark Reg 



Complete Producers' Services 

SOUTHWEST FILM LABORATORY, INC. 

3024 Fori Worth Ave. Dallas 11, Texas WHitehall 6-2184 




SP^ 






1 



,. f "to^, 



S C H E R 1 N G 
PUICHA$« OUEX 






*" D^mrtmn,! I; 







'^"Any 







KEVIN DONOVAN FILMS 



208 Treat Road 
Glastonbury, Connecticut 



15 >Vest 44th Street 
New York, New York 



^^^,r^ \ 






UMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



193 




Cinekad Synchronous Motor 
Drive for 16mm Projectors 

especially designed to drive all Bell & Howell, 

Ampro and Victor 16mm projectors at 

synchronous speed. 

Projector can be instantly attached to Synchronous 
Motor Drive and quickly detached at any time in 
a nnatter of seconds. An outstanding feature is 
the flexible shaft which connects nnotor with pro- 
iector and permits smooth, quiet and steady opera- 
tion. No special technical knowledge required for 
installation and mounting. 

Write for more details and prices 
Available at leading dealers, or direct. 

CINEKAD ENGINEERING CO. 

763 Tenth Ave. New York 19, N. Y. 

PLaza 7-3511 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
MOTION PICTURE-TV EOUIPMENT 

Send tor free folder of illustrated Motion Pic- 
ture and Audio-Visual eciuipment manufactured 
by Cinekad. 



Complete 
Production 
Facilities 

16 mm 35 



I Creative Staff 

Sound Stage 

Recording 

I Art and Animation 

Wide-Screen 

Production 



Franchised Magna-Stripe Station 

MARVIN BECKER FILMS 

915 Howard St., San Francisco 3 



FILM AWARDS 



(also see pages 20, 26, 190, 192, 197) 

SIXTH ANNUAL 
COLUMBUS FILM FESTIVAL 

Sponsored by 

The Film Council of Greater Columbus 

Wednesday and Thursday 

April 16 and 17 

The Southern Hotel 

Deadline ior Entries: March, 1958 

Festival Categories 

Business & Industry: Job Training, Sales Pro- 
motion and Training, Industrial Relations, 
Public Relations and Industrial Safety. 

Travel: American and Foreign. 

Informational-Educational: Children's Films 
— Primary, Intermediate, Junior High, 
Senior High, Geography and History; 
Science; Miscellaneous; Films for Televi- 
sion; Conservation, Gardening, Home Im- 
provement and Agriculture. This year 
Health, Mental Health and Religion have 
been included in this category. 

Home Movies: Entries for Columbus and 
Franklin County only. This is a new cate- 
gory and will serve to increase local attend- 
ance at the festival. Chris Columbus Awards 
will be given to winners in the categories of 
Family, Gardening & Flowers, Home Ani- 
mal Scenes and Vacations. 

Cultural Arts and Theatre: Feature Motion 
Pictures, American and Foreign; Art Sculp- 
ture, Painting, Home Art Hobbies, Music, 
Play Production. Experimental films. 

Special Medical Category: Films produced by 
doctors, university medical schools, and 
pharmaceutical firms. 

» * * 

Entry: Film producers and sponsors are in- 
vited to enter any films they have produced 
during 1955, 1956 and 1957, provided the films 
have not been entered previously in the Colum- 
bus Film Festival. Entries should be accom- 
panied by 3x5 cards (for preview committees) 
noting: color or black and white; running 
time; brief summary of film's content. Films 
will be judged by professionals in the various 
fields. Entry fee per film is $3; $5 in case of 
a feature picture of 80 minutes or more. En- 
trant also pays roundtrip postage on films. 
Companies are invited to .send literature for 
lobby display and poster art. 

Screening Schedule: Wednesday, April 16. 
This year only one screening session will be 
held in the Assembly Room of the Columbus 
Public Library, from 6:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. 
with a refreshment break at 9. 

* * * 
Awards: This is the second year for the 
"Chris" Award, a certificate showing a photo- 
graphic reproduction of the 20 foot, 7,000 
pound bronze statue of Christopher Columbus, 
presented to Columbus, Ohio as a gift from 
the people of Genoa, Italy on Columbus Day, 
1955. This award is given to the outstanding 
films selected by professionals in various fields. 
The awards are presented at the Award 
Banquet. 



/] Bscher\ 

PHOTOSRAPHIC LABORATORY 

INC. 

COMPLETE 16MM COLOR AND 
BLACK & WHITE MOTION PIC- 
TURE LABORATORY SERVICES 
INCLUDING SOUND RECORDING 
. . . better equipped than ever 
to serve you in our new modern 
plant. 

• Developing 

• Ink edge numbered work prints 

• Editing assistance of all types 

• Conforming and A-B roll preparation 

• Optical printing 

• Narration, music and special 
effects Sound Recording 

• Exposure corrected answer prints 

• Release prints 



We 


hav 


e earned 


the 


confidence 




f our 


custon 


..„■ 


through 


fittin 


g ou 


serv 


ce to thei 


r 


ndivid 


ual needs ■ 


and 


in 


turn! 


ng out fin 


er motion 


P 


ctures 


May 


we ■ 


help 


yo 


1) on 


your 


next 


production 


? 


Vltite 


today 


lor 1 


cur 


ale 


St pr 


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1. 










i 



/MfsCHER\ 



PHOTOGRAPHIC 
LABORATORY, INC 



6555 NORTH AVENUE, OAK PARK. ILLINOIS 
EUCLID 6-6603 



F & B RENTALS 



F 



ASTEST GROWING RENTAL 
EQUIPMENT HOUSE 



AND 



B 



ECAUSE ALL EQUIPMENT IS 
MAINTAINED AND METICULOUSLY 
CHECKED AND DOUBLE-CHECKED 



F 



OR MITCHELLS - 16 NC-BNC 
ARRIFLEX, B&H, AURICON, 
McALISTER CRAB DOLLIES, LIGHTS 



AND 



B 



OOMS, SOUND EQPT., PROJECTION 
EQUIPMENT, MOVIOLAS, SPLICERS, 
SYNCHRONIZERS, GRIP EQUIPMENT 



F 



OR ALL TYPES OF MOVIE EQUIPMENT 
RENTALS — GUARANTEED IN 
PERFECT WORKING ORDER 



AND 



B 



E SURE TO CALL 



F&B 



FLORMAN & BABB, INC 

68 WEST 45th ST., NEW YORK 36, N. Y. 
MUrray Hill 2-2928 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



IVew A-V Products: 

l(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 193) 

\ Manipulation of dials to correct 
Itemperatures is unnecessary with 
the controlled unit which was de- 
iveloped by the Fenwall Company. 
[The Electronic TEL-Animaprint 





Electronic Tel-Animaprint 

lis supplied with a 9" self center- 
ling typeholder, calibrated preci- 
ision linefinder and anodized ani- 
imation peg bar line -board. Pres- 
lent owners of the standard model 
lean convert with an Electronic 

'Heating Control Kit. 9 

' * * * 

New 150- Watt Projector 
Added to 4 McClure Units 

i-w- A new 150-watt projector will 
he standard equipment on four 
iPicturephone sound slidefilm units 
manufactured by O. J. McClure 



McClure I 50- Watt Projector 

Talking Pictures, Chicago. Pic- 
turephone models D, L, M and J 
are equipped with the new projec- 
tor, providing increased screen 
brilliance. 

Used in the projection of 35nim 
single-frame filmstrips with re- 
corded sound, the 150-watt pro- 
jector features push-in threading, 
convection cooling and convenient 
framing. Of streamlined design 
and finished in aluminum, the pro- 
jector's parts are easily accessible 
for the replacement and cleaning 
of lamps, condensers and lenses. 

* * * 
Filmstrip Cans of Plastic 
i^ New filmstrip cans of colorful, 
durable and flexible plastic have 
been announced by FilmKare 
Products Company, 446 West 43rd 
Street, New York. 

Designed to fit all regulation 
filmstrip storage and shipping con- 
tainers, FilmKare cans are made 
in red, yellow, green and blue 
colors, are light in weight, sturdy 
and Simooth to prevent scratching. 
A specially constructed lid will not 
"pop olT." 

Prices range from two dollars 
for three dozen cans to $21 per 
thousand for large orders. R" 




BRAY STUDIOS 



INCORPORATED 



Since 1911 



Pioneer Producers of 
Motion Pictures 



TRAINING 
TECHNICAL 
EDUCATION 
ANIMATION 
SLIDEFILMS 




729 SEVENTH AVE., NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 



r I L / Vl O . . . ^o-fft izi.ean.cU to- n^&teaie. 

for sales promotion • public relations • sales 
training • advertising • industrial development 

Motion Pictures • Slide Films • Television Shows and Spots 
Trailers • 16-35mm • Color • B/W • Sound • Animation 
Live Action. 

COMPLETE LABORATORY SERVICES 
AND FACILITIES FOR PRODUCERS 

Printing • Processing • Recording • Special 
Effects • Photo and Sound Editing and Cut- 
ting • Sound Stage. Company occupies 14,000 
square feet and custom tailors services to meet 
your needs. 



beeland-wood films, inc. 

752 Spring Street, N.W. 
Atlanta, Ga. 



iNUMBER 



195 



19S7 Highest Business Year 
for Eastman Kodak Company 

w" Sales and earnings of Eastman 
Kodak Company in 1957 were the 
highest in the company's history, 
according to a report by Thomas 
J. Hargrave, chairman, and Albert 
K. Chapman, president. 

"Over-all, 1957 was the com- 
pany's best year." Hargrave and 
Chapman reported. "The long- 
term trend of the company's sales 
continued upward at a rate above 
the growth of the U.S. economy." 

In the 1957 report, the Kodak 
officials noted increases in the 
company's total volume of produc- 
tion, the number of new products 
introduced, dividends on common 
shares, employee wages and the 
number of share owners. 

Consolidated sales of the com- 
pany's United States establish- 
ments in 1957 amounted to 
$798,283,443. about 5 per cent 
more than the 1956 total of 
$761,689,559. Net earnings after 
taxes were $98,108,305, an in- 
crease of 4 per cent over the 
$94,162,004 in 1956, the best 
previous year for sales and 
earnings. 

Photographic equipment made 
by Kodak's Apparatus and Optical 
Division in Rochester, New York, 
increased in total sales over 1956. 
Total sales of photographic films, 
papers and chemicals also ad- 
vanced over 1956 but professional 
motion picture film sales were 
moderately below 1956, it was 
reported. m 

* * * 

Arriflex Leasing Plan Told 
by Kling Photo Corporation 

a Prospective users of Arriflex 
16mm and 35mm Mirrcfr-Reflex 
Motion Picture cameras arc being 
offered a new "pay-as-you-pro- 
duce" leasing plan, according to 
Kling Photo Corporation, New 
York distributors. 

The Arriflex equipment is avail- 
able on the leasing plan through 
all Arriflex-franchised dealers who 
arrange the user's lease with Na- 
tional Equipment Rental, Ltd., 
Floral Park, New York. 

Leases may be arranged for up 
to three years to suit individual 
needs. The cost of the lease 
amounts to about 9% of the pur- 
chase price per year. At the ex- 
piration of the original lease, the 
user has the option to purchase the 
equipment for 10% of the original 
cost, to arrange a lease for com- 
pletely new equipment with the 
original equipment as a trade-in 
or to sign a new lease at a reduced 
cost. m- 



THE BUSmESS IVEWSREEL 

Trends and Names in the News Events of the Month 



Movielab's Business Volume 
Up Half Million in 1957 

i< Increases in virtually every cate- 
gory of film processing resulted in 
a half-million dollar rise in annual 
volume during 1957 for Movielab 
Film Laboratories and Movielab 
Color Corporation. New York 
City, according to Saul Jeffee. 
president. 

Industrial motion pictures, tele- 
vision commercials and television 
programs were cited as sparking 
the uptrend in Movielab's business. 
The organization anticipates a con- 
tinued expansion in the film proc- 
essing business during 1958. 

Movielab Color was credited 
for a large share of the company's 
growth. The Movielab Color proc- 
essing facilities were designed by 
Movielab's own engineers in co- 
operation with Eastman Kodak 
Company and other leading sup- 
pliers. 

In 1957, Movielab spent $2,- 
000,000 on expansion of process- 
ing facilities at its Manhattan 
building and now has a capacity 
of over 1,100,000 feet of film per 
day. To handle the growing vol- 
ume of business, which includes 
secret government work and a 
steadily increasing trade from Lat- 
in America and all parts of the 
United States. Movielab's staff has 
been enlarged 40";, in the past 
year. 

Besides processing facilities, 
Movielab maintains a private pro- 
jection theatre and 65 editing and 
film storage rooms in the Movie- 
lab Building at 619 West 54th 
Street in New York. ^' 

Brown Named A-V Equipment 
Sales Manager for Graflex 

7^ Appointment of James S. Brown 
as manager, audio-visual equip- 
ment sales for Graflex, Inc., 
Rochester, N. Y.. has been an- 
nounced by H. O. Schumacher, 
vice president. 

This new position resulted from 
the assumption by Graflex, Inc., a 
subsidiary of General Precision 
Equipment Corp.. of manufactur- 
ing and distribution functions for 
the audio-visual equipment line of 
the Society for Visual Education. 
Inc.. Chicago. 

Before coming to Graflex, 
Brown served as administrative 
assistant to the president of SVE. 
He entered the industry in 1951 
with Ampro Corp., manufacturer 



of tape recorders and motion pic- 
ture projectors, whose product 
sales later became a responsibility 
of SVE, a member company of 
General Precision Equipment 
Corp. Ampro and SVE equipment 
sales have since become the re- 
sponsibility of Graflex. f^ 

Byron installs New Westrex 
Hi-Fi Recording System 

■5^ Byron, Inc., Washington, D.C.. 
has completed installation of a new 
Westrex high-fidelity recording sys- 
tem, said to be the first of its kind 
in the 16mm film industry in the 
United States. 

Designed and engineered jointly 
by Byron and Westrex. construc- 
tion and installation of the system 
took almost a year. 

The system includes two mixer 
studios, two narrator studios, 
theater recording studio with both 
16mm and 35mm projection facili- 
ties. All rooms "float" indepen- 
dently of each other. 

Recording facilities include two 
35mm and two 16mm optical dub- 
bers, two 35mm and four 16mm 
magnetic dubbers, three 16mm and 
one 35mm magnetic recorders, 
16mm film recorder, 14-inch tape 
with Rangertone sync. 

The 8-input re-recording con- 
sole has sliding faders, graphic 
equalizers, effects filters, and high 
and low position filters. Entire 
system is interlocked for forward 
or reverse. 

Other features include looping 
facilities, high-fidelity monitoring 
systems, double-speed transfer 
system, and track processing by 
latest spray method. Individual 
editing rooms are provided with a 
Westrex editor, with or without 
editorial personnel. A complete 
music and effects library is avail- 
able. ^^ 
* * * 

Williams and Mann Join 
Roger Wade Productions 

tV Roger Wade Productions, Inc., 
motion picture producers, an- 
nounces two new appointments: 
Thomas B. Williams, in charge of 
sound slidefilm production and 
Howard A. Mann as chief film 
editor. 

Williams comes to the company 
from Transfilm, Inc., where he 
served as production manager of 
its sound slidefilm department and 
as account executive. Prior to that, 
he was writer-producer-director of 



the visual education section of 
General Electric Co. in Schenec- 
tady. 

Man will serve as chief editor of 
all the Wade organization's motion 
pictures and television commer- 
cials. He was formerly with 
Hartley Productions, Robert Yar- 
nall Richie Productions and Trans- 
film. i^» 

* * * 

Fred England Joins JHO 

ii A. E. Gedelman, treasurer of 
The Jam Handy Organization, an- 
nounces that Fred C. England has 
joined the financial department of 
Jam Handy, producers of motion 
pictures, slidefilms and live shows. 
England previously was associated 
for 10 years with Encyclopedia 
Britannica Films. ^ 

* * * 

Henning and Cheadle Names 
R. D. Schwartz Account Exec 

•A Robert David Schwartz has been 
appointed account executive in the 
Chicago office of Henning and 
Cheadle. Inc., according to F. E. 
Harrold, vice-president. 

Schwartz formerly was advertis- 
ing and sales promotion manager 
of Deepfreeze Home Appliances 
and an account executive with 
Arthur Grossman Advertising. 
Henning and Cheadle, with head- 
quarters in Detroit, produces mer- 
chandising, promotion and training 
programs. ir^' , 

* * * 

Hutchings Named Vice-Pres. 
of Kling Film Productions 

w" William C. Hutchings has joined 
Kling Film Productions, Chicago 
— as vice-president, according to 
Robert Eirinberg, president. 

Hutchings will concentrate on 
major industrial film sales — partic- 
larly sales training and sales pro- 
motion programs. 

Formerly executive vice-presi- 
dent of United Film and Recording 
Studios in Chicago, Hutchings is 
experienced in the broadcasting, 
music and film fields. At one time 
he was general sales manager of 
the Radio and Music Division of 
the Brunswick - Balke - Collender 
Company. ^ 

Alexander Film Co. Appoints I 
Parker Theatre Div. Manager | 

'■ Clifford Parker has been ap- 
pointed vice-president and general 
manager of the theater division 
of Alexander Film Co.. Colorado 
Springs, Colorado. He will direct 
the activities of Alexander's na- 
tional sales force. Parker formerly 
was general sales manager for 
the companv. producer of short- 
length advertising films. R- 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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FILMEFFECTS 

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1 5 West 46th Street, New York 
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(also see pages 20, 26, 190, 192, 194) 

10TH INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION 
OF CINEMATOGRAPHIC ART 

The Lido, Venice, Italy 

June 10 to Novennber 4, 1958 

Closing Date for Entries: May 31, 1958 

•^ This exhibition is made up of seven sepa- 
rate cinematographic events, as follows: 

1st International E.xhibition of Film on Art 
— June 10 to 12 (on the opening of the 24th 
Biennale of Figurative Art) 

10th International Exhibition of Film for 
Children— July 17-27 

9th International Exhibition of the Docu- 
mentary and short Film — July 17-27 

4th International Exhibition of the Film 
Book and the Film Journal and Magazine — 
August 15 to September 15 

2nd International Exhibition of the News- 
reel — August 22nd 

19th International Exhibition of the full 
length feature film — August 24 to September 7 

3rd International E.xhibition of the Scien- 
tific-Didactic Film — October .30 to November 4 
at the University of Padua. 
Awards : A prize is awarded for the best film 
in each event. Certificates are presented to 
the entrants of all films selected for the 
exhibition. 

Entry Information: Producers and sponsors 
in the U.S. who wish to enter films in overseas 
film festivals, (particularly Edinburgh and 
Venice) are advised to send full details (but 
not film prints ) on entries to Harold Wigren, 
Coordinator for the Advisory Committee, 
Council on International Non-Theatrical 
Events, 1201 Sixteenth Street, N.W., Washing- 
ton 6, D.C. 

A New Overseas Filnn Arrangement 
■u Progress is being made for improved han- 
dling of sponsored, educational (classroom) 
and documentary films from U. S. sources, 
suitable for overseas exhibition. A new Ad- 
visory Committee, representing principal 16- 
mm educational, business and professional 
audio-visual groups is working on the problem. 
Plans call for careful advance review of 
prospective entries by correspondence. Prints 
will then be screened by appropriate groups 
and a $15 handling fee charged only if the film 
is accepted for overseas shipment. ^ 



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A 1,000 WATT SLIDE 
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A 3,000 WATT SLIDE 
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slides ond changes them in less than Vj second by 
push button remote control 

FOR INFORMATION WRITE TO 



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gauge U. S. steel, In the famous 
brown finish. Finest you can bi)y 
. . . Available in 400' to 2,300' 
sizes, other sizes made 6f hard 
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application. 

sold thru authorized dealers only 

GOLDBERG~BROSr^ 

DENVER, COLORADO ^"^^ 



NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF VISUAL EDUCATION DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 



• MASSACHUSETTS • 

Cinema, Inc., 234 Clarendon St., 
Boston 16. 



• NEW JERSEY • 

Slidecraft Co., 142 Morris Ave.. 
Mountain Lakes, N. }. 

Association Films, Inc., Broad at 

Elm. Ridgefield, N. J. 

• NEW YORK • 

Association Films, Inc., 347 Mad- 
ison, New York 17. 

Buchan Pictures, 122 W. Chip- 
pewa St., Buffalo. 

Crawford, Immig and Landis, 
Inc., 200 Fourth Avenue, New 
York 3, New York. 

The Jam Handy Organization, 

1775 Broadway, New York 19. 

Ken Killian Company, Inc., 723 

Prospect A\e.. Westbury, N. Y. 

S. O. S. Cinema Supply Corp., 

602 W. 52nd St., New York 19. 

Training Films, Inc., 150 West 
54th St., New York 19. 

Visual Sciences, 599BS Suffern. 



• PENNSYLVANIA • 

J. P. Lilley & Son, 928 N. 3rd St., 
Harrisburg. 

Lippincott Pictures, Inc., 4729 
Ludlow St., Philadelphia 39. 

The Jam Handy Organization, 

Pittsburgh. Phone: ZEnith 0143. 



• WEST VIRGINIA • 

B. S. Simpson, 818 Virginia St., 
W., Charleston 2, Dickens fi- 
6731. 



SOUTHERN STATES 



• FLORIDA • 

Norman Laboratories & Studio, 
Arlington Suburb, P.O. Box 
8598, Jacksonville 11. 

• GEORGIA • 

Colonial Films, 71 Walton St., 
N. W., Alpine 5378, Atlanta. 



• LOUISIANA • 

Stanley Projection Company, 1117 
Bolton Ave., Alexandria. 

Delta Visual Service, Inc., 815 

Poydras St., New Orleans 12. 
Phone: RA 9061. 



• MARYLAND • 

Stark-Films, Howard and Centre 
(Since 1920) Sts.. Baltimore 1. 
LE. 9-3391. 

• MISSISSIPPI • 

Herschel Smith Company, 119 

Roach St., Jackson 110. 

• TENNESSEE • 

Southern Visual Films, 687 Shrine 
Bldg., Memphis. 

• VIRGINIA • 

Tidewater Audio-Visual Center, 

Cameraland Bldg., #29 South- 
ern Shopping Center, Norfolk 
5. Phone JU-31181. 



MIDWESTERN STATES 



• ILLINOIS • 

American Film Registry, 1018 So. 
Wabash ,\ve., Chicago 5. 

Association Films, Inc., 561 Hill- 
grove, LaGrange, Illinois. 

Atlas Film Corporation, 1111 
South Boulevard, Oak Park. 

The Jam Handy Organization, 

230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 



Midwest Visual Equipment Co., 

3518 Devon Ave., Chicago 45. 

• MICHIGAN • 

Engelman Visual Education Serv- 
ice, 4754-56 Woodward Ave., 
Detroit 1. 

The Jam Handy Organization, 

2821 E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 
11. 

Capital Film Service, 224 Abbott 

Road, East Lansing, Michigan. 



LIST SERVICES HERE 

Qualified audio-visual dealers are 

listed in this Directory at $1.00 per 
line per issue. 



• OHIO • 

Academy Film Service, Inc., 

2110 Payne Ave., Cleveland 

14. 
Fryan Film Service, 1810 E. 12th 

St., Cleveland 14. 
Sunray Films, Inc., 2108 Payne 

Ave., Cleveland 14. 
The Jam Handy Organization, 

Davton. Phone: ENterprise 

6289. 
Twyman Films, Inc., 400 West 

First Street, Dayton. 
M. H. Martin Company, 1118 

Lincoln Way E., Massillon. 



WESTERN STATES 



• CALIFORNIA • 

LOS ANGELES AREA 
Clausonthue Audio Visual, Sales 

and Service, 1 10 Shoppers Lane, 

Covina. 
Coast Visual Education Co., 5620 

Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 

28. 
Hollywood Camera Exch., 1600 

Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood. 
The Jam Handy Organization 

1402 N. Ridgewood Place, Hoi 

iv^vood 28. 
Ralke Company, Inc., 829 S 

Flower St., Los Angeles 17 

Phone: TR. 8664. 
S. O. S. Cinema Supply Corp. 

6331 Hollywood Blvd., Holly 

wood 28. 
Spindler & Sauppe, 2201 Beverly 

Blvd., Los Angeles 57. 

SAN FRANCISCO AREA 

Association Films, Inc., 799 

Stevenson St., San Francisco. 
Photo & Sound Company, 116 

Natoma St., San Francisco 5. 
Westcoast Films, 350 Battery St., 

San Francisco 11. 

• COLORADO • 

Audio-Visual Center, 28 E. Ninth 

Ave., Denver 3. 

• OREGON • 

Moore's Motion Picture Service, 

1201 S. W. Morrison, Portland 
5, Oregon. 

• TEXAS • 

Association Films, Inc., 1108 Jack- 
son Street, Dallas 2. 

• UTAH • 

Deseret Book Company, Box 958, 
Salt Lake City 10. 



USE THIS DIRECTORY TO LOCATE THE BEST IN EQUIPMENT. FILMS AND PROJECTION 



EXECUTIVE JVDTES: 

Lane Named to New Post in 
Kodak International Division 

ti^ Appointment of William P. Lane 
as assistant general manager of 
Eastman Kodak Company's inter- 
national division has been an- 
nounced by Richard B. DeMallie, 
the division's general manager. 

Lane has been manager of ex- 
port sales and manager of Kodak's 
affiliates in Latin America and the 
Far East. In his new post, he will 
continue general supervision of 
these areas and will be in charge 
of the international division when 
ever DeMallie is in the field. 

Frank R. Zierer, assistant man- 
ager of Kodak Mexicana, Ltd., 
has been named assistant manager 
for Kodak's affiiliates in Latin 
America and Hugh J. Knapp has 
been promoted from assistant man- 
ager to manager of the export 
sales department. 

Lane joined Eastman Kodak in 
1924. He served in various mana- 
gerial capacities in the Orient be- 
fore and after World War II and 
was appointed manager for the 
Far East in 1947. He was named 
manager for Latin America last 
spring. 

With Kodak since 1929, Zierer 
has held positions in sales, dis- 
tribution and other phases of the 
business and was appointed assist- 
ant manager of Kodak Mexicana, 
Ltd., in 1940. Knapp started 
with the company in 1934, join- 
ing the international division in 
1946. After assignments in the 
Orient for the past 10 years, he 
returned to Rochester recently to 
become assistant manager of ex- 
port sales. 9 

* * * 

Roy Low Now in Charge 
of Gordon Camera Division 

ii Roy Low has been designated 
as sales engineer in charge of the 
motion picture camera division of 
Gordon Enterprises, North Holly- 
wood, California, by George W. 
Sutphin, director of customer ser- 
vices. Formerly in charge of the 
engineering library at Gordon 
Enterprises, Low has also worked 
as a camera technician for the 
firm. 9 

* * * 

Named Vice Presidents 

•fx Election of three new resident 
vice-presidents has been announc- 
ed by W. H. Hendren, president 
of United Film Service, Inc., pro- 
ducers and distributors of theatri- 
cal screen advertising. They are: 
Lawrence M. Goodwin, Detroit; J. 
Frank Carpenter, Chicago; and 
Jack V. Shippee, San Francisco. 9 



198 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



BUSINESS SCREEN BOOKSHELF SERVICE 

Your Convenient Mail Order Source for Useful Audio-Visual Books and Guides 



BOOKS ON PRODUCTION TECHNIQUE: 

101 — American Cinematographer Hand Book and Reference 

Guide, by Jackson J. Rose. A convenient source of the basic 
facts concerning photographic materials, methods and 
equipment. Ninth edition, 331 pages $5.00 

102 — Film and Its Techniques, by Raymond Spottiswoode. An 

encyclopedic treatment of the documentary film — from 
idea to script and through all the steps of production. Uni- 
versity of California Press, 505 pages $7.50 

103 — 16mm Sound Motion Pictures, by W. H. Offenhauser, Jr. 

A complete manual for the professional or amateur 16mm 
producer. Interscience Publishers, Inc., 565 pages.. ..$11.50 

104 — Painting with Light, by John Alton. A discussion of the 

technical and artistic aspects of lighting — what lights are 
used and where they are placed; how to make sure natural 
light is correct. The Macmillan Co., 191 pages $6.75 

105 — Handbook of Basic Motion-Picture Techniques, by Emil E. 

Brodbeck. Basic know how for both amateurs and profes- 
sionals. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 307 pages.. $6.50 

106 — The Recording and Reproduction of Sound, by Oliver 

Read. A complete, authoritative discussion of audio in all 
its phases. Howard W. Sams &: Co., Inc., 800 pages $7.95 

107 — Stereo Realist Manual, by Willard D. Morgan, Henry M. 

Lester and 14 leading 3-D experts. A complete manual of 
modern 35mm stereo photography illustrated with 3-D 
photos in color and black and white. A special viewer is 
included in the book. Morgan and Lester, 400 pages.. ..$6.00 

108 — The Technique of Film Editing, compiled by Karel Reisz 

for the British Film Academy. A practical analysis of the 
problems of film editing by 10 experienced film makers — 
a guide for film editors and TV directors. Farrar, Straus 
and Cudahy, 282 pages $7.50 

109 — Preparation and Use of Audio-Visual Aids, by Haas and 

Packer. Practical, step-by-step instructions on how to pre- 
pare and use visual aids effectively. Prentice-Hall, Inc. 
381 pages $6.65 

TELEVISION PLANNING AND PRODUCTION: 

201 - The Handbook of TV and Fihn Technique, by Charles W. 

Curran. A non-technical production guide for executives 
covering film production costs, methods and processes. 
Includes a section on the production of films for TV 
programs and commercials. Pellegrini and Cudahy, 120 
pages $3.00 

202 — Movies for TV, by John H. Battison. A comprehensive 

technical guide to the use of films in television program- 
ming. Covers the basic principles of the medium, equip- 
ment, program planning. Macmillan Co., 376 pages. ...$5.00 

203 — Color Television Standards, edited by Donald G. Fink. A 

digest of the National Television System Committee's rec- 
ords on color television. McGraw Hill Book Company, Inc. 
520 pages $8.50 

204 — The Television Commercial, by Harry Wayne McMahan. 

A new and enlarged edition of this practical manual on 
television advertising. Shows how to create better com- 
mercials, both from advertising and film production view- 
points. Hastings House, 223 pages $6.50 

206 — Staging TV Programs and Commercials, by Robert J. 
Wade. A handbook aimed to help in solving the physical 
production problems of "live" television programming. 
Hastings House, 210 pages $6.50 

208 — How to Direct for Television, by William I. Kaufman. 
Nine top TV directors tell, in their own way, how to pre- 
pare for a director's job and make a success of it. Hastings 
House, 96 pages $2.50 



209 — An Ad Man Ad-Libs on TV, by Bob Foreman. Here is 

every facet of TV, as seen through the eyes of a man in 
this business since its beginning. This amusing book con- 
tains a wealth of information for the neophyte as well as 
the experienced. Hastings House, 173 pages $4.50 

210 — How To Get Rich In TV-Without Really Trying, by 

Shepherd Mead. A hilarious treatment of "case histories" 
in the TV business, liberally sprinkled with clever car- 
toons. A good gift item for those in TV or people who 
wish they were. Simon and Schuster, 180 pages $2.95 

GENERAL REFERENCE BOOKS: 

301 —The Dollars and Sense of Business Films, by the Films 

Steering Committee of the A.N. A. An analysis of the actual 
cost and circulation records of 157 important business firms. 
Association of National Advertisers, 128 pages $2.00 

302 — How To Use a Tape Recorder, by Dick Hodgson and H. 

Jay Bullen. Aimed to help business and home recorder 
owners learn how to get full value from their machines. 
Opens a new world of potentials for tape recorders. 
Hastings House, 209 pages $4.95 

303 — Selling Color to People, by Faber Birren. Devoted wholly 

to the commercial uses of color in reaching, influencing 
and selling the American public. Contains a 5,000 word 
chapter on the medium of color television. University 
Books, 219 pages $7.50 

AUDIO-VISUAL METHODS & MATERIALS: 

401 — Audio-Visual Methods in Teaching — Revised Edition, by 
Edgar Dale. A review of the Audio-Visual field, both its 
theory and practice. Colorfully illustrated. The Dryden 
Press, 520 pages $6.25 

403 — Audio-Visual Aids to Instruction, by McKown &: Roberts. 

How to program audio-visual devices for education. Mc- 
Graw-Hill Book Co., 493 pages $4.75 

404 — The Audio-Visual Reader, edited by James S. Kinder and 

F. Dean McClusky. Philosophy, theory, research and audio- 
visual instruction in teaching materials in the school sys- 
tem. Wm. C. Brown Co., 378 pages $5.75 

405 — Audio-Visual Techniques, by Chandler & Cypher. A guide 

to enriching the curriculum with a wide variety of audio 
and visual materials. Noble and Noble, 252 pages $3.50 

PERIODICALS AND GUIDES: 

501 — Business Screen Magazine. The national journal of audio- 

visual communications in business and industry. A full 
year's service, eight issues $3.00; two years $5.00 

502 — The Audio-Visual Projectionist's Handbook. A two-color 

portfolio of ideas and pointers for presenting a better 
audio-visual program. Business Screen $1.00 

503 — The National Directory of Safety Fihns. A catalog of more 

than 950 subjects including additions. National Safety 
Council - $1-00 



NUMBER 1 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



DETACH AND MAIt WITH YOUR CHECK TO: 

BUSINESS SCREEN BOOKSHELF 

7064 SHERIDAN ROAD • CHICAGO 26, ILLINOIS 

Pleose ship the following (indicate by number): 



_Totol an 



City ^ - Zone Stote 

BOOKS WILL BE SHIPPED POSTPAID IF CHECK ACCOMPANIES ORDER 



AN INDEX TO ADVERTISERS IN THE 8TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION REVIEW 



— A — 

Academy Films 1*^ 1 

Acme Film Laboratories 175 

Alexander Film Company 37 

AUend'or Productions 182 

Allied Motion Picture Center, Inc. ... 91 

Animatic Productions. Ltd 197 

Animation Equipment Corp., The ... 22 

Ansel Film Studios, Inc 93 

Ansco Division, General Anil'.ne 

& Film Corporation 131 

Association Films, Inc 31 

Atlas Film Corporation 32 

Audio-Master Corporation 68 

Audio Productions, Inc 21 

— B — 

Barbre, Thos. J., Productions ISG 

Bay State Film Productions. Inc 29 

Becker, Marvin, Films 194 

Beeland-Wood Films 195 

Berndt-Bach, Inc 49 

Beseler, Charles, Company 99 

Better Selling Bureau 11 

Bray Studios, Inc 195 

Burke & James, Inc 192 

Byron Laboratory 5 

— C — 

Caldwell, S. W., Ltd 160 

Calvin Company, The 26 

Camera Equipment Co., Inc. . .27, 187, 189 

Camera Mart Inc., The 185 

Canyon Films of Arizona 188 

Capital Film Laboratories, Inc. . . .55, 56 

Caravel Films, Inc 1 

Gate & McGlone 30 

Centron Corporation, Inc 181 

Chicago Film Studios 55 

Cinekad Engineering Go 194 

Cinema Research 68 

Cinesound 166 

Golburn, George W., Laboratory Inc. 179 

Golmes-Werrenrath Productions, Inc.. 96 

Color Reproduction Company 28 

Gompco Corporation 177 

Comprehensive Service Corporation . 40 

Condor Films, Inc 174 

Consolidated Film Industries 9 

Corelli-Jacobs Film Music Inc 86 

Crawley Films Limited 162 

Creative Arts Studio, Inc 36 

Current Affairs Films 182 

— D — 

Davidson Corporation 78 

Davis, Robert. Productions, Inc 90 

Dekko-Rockwell Films 187 

Dephoure Studios, Inc 180 

Depicto Films Corporation 192 

Distributor's Group, Inc., The 55 

Donovan, Kevin, Films 193 

Douglas Productions 64 

DuKane Corporation 44 

Dunn, Gal, Studios 86 

DuPont Photo Products 141 

Dynamic Films, Inc 16, 17 

— E — 

Eastman Kodak, Company 135 

Electro-Chemical Products Corp 76 

Empire Photosound Inc 197 

Escar Motion Picture Service 187 

Estudios Moro S.A. ( Spain ) 160 

— F — 

Fairbanks, .Jerry, Productions 

of California, Inc 77 

Farrell & Gage Films, Inc 176 

Feil, Edward, Productions 56 

Fiberbilt Sample Case Co., Inc 72 



Film Associates Inc 52 

Film Associates of Michigan, Inc. . . . 189 

Filmeffects of Hollywood 197 

Filmfa.\ Productions, Inc 52 

Film Graphics Inc 185 

Filmline Goi-poration 58 

Filmsounds, Inc 48 

Filmways Incorporation 73 

Fi.scher Photographic Laboratory, 

Inc 194 

Fisher, Oscar, Company, Inc 94 

Florez Incorporated 85 

Florman & Babb, Inc 171, 194 

Fordel Films Inc 182 

Fotovox, Inc 82 

.Jack A. Frost 38 

— G — 

Genarco Inc 197 

General Film Laboratories Corp 61 

German, W. J., Inc 165 

Glover, Ozzie, Productions 195 

Goldberg Bros 197 

Granducci, Oeveste, Scripts By, Inc.. . 53 

— H — 

Haig & Patterson, Inc 89 

Halligan, George 192 

Hance, Paul, Productions, Inc 191 

Handy, Jam, Organization, 

Inc., The Back Cover 

Henning & Cheadle, Inc 64 

Henry, Bruce 75 

Hillsberg, F., Inc 38 

Holland-Wegman Productions 179 

Holmes, Frank, Laboratories, Inc. ... 58 

Hollywood Film Company 62 

— I — 

Industrial Film Producers, Inc 71 



Jamieson Film Company 183 

Jones, Dallas, Productions, Inc 79 



Kalart — Victor Animatograph Div. . . 46 

Key Productions, Inc 182 

Klaeger Film Productions, Inc 88 

Kling Film Productions 7 

Kling Photo Corporation 87 

Knickerbocker Productions, Inc 51 

Knight Studio 76 

Knight Title Service 44 

— L — 

Lab TV 66 

Lakeside Laboratory 36 

Laux Studios 163 

Lawrence, Robert, Productions, Inc. . 80 
Les Analyses Cinematographiques 

(France) 162 

Lewis & Martin Films, Inc 192 

Lux-Brill Productions, Inc 178 

— M — 

Marathon TV Newsreel 100 

McClure, O. J., Talking Pictures 81 

Mercer, Ray, & Company 193 

Metropolitan Sound Service Inc 66 

MGM-TV 59 

Minerva-Films A/S ( Denmark ) .... 164 

Mitchell Camera Corporation 15 

Modern Talking Picture Service, 

Inc Inside Front Cover 

Motion Picture Laboratories, Inc. . . . 190 
Movielab Color Corporation 

Inside Back Cover 

Moviola Manufacturing Co 30 

MPO Productions, Inc 43 

Murphy, Owen, Productions, Inc. . . 



— N — 

National Film Studios 166 

Neumade Products Corporation 136 

Niles, Fred A., Productions, Inc 23 

Norwood Motion Picture Studios, Inc 183 

— O — 

Olsenmark Corporation 



191 



— P — 

Palmer, Alfred T., Productions . . 

Palmer, W. A., Films, Inc 

Parthenon Pictures — 

Hollyv/ood 24, 36, 

Pathescope Productions 

Peerless Film Processing Corp. . . . 

Pelican Films, Inc 

Pictures for Business 

Precision Film Laboratories, Inc. . 

— R — 

Rapid Colorprint Company, Inc. . . . 

Rapid Film Technique, Inc 

Ray, Reid H., Film Industries, Inc. 
RCA Victor Custom Record Sales , 
Regan Film Productions, Inc. ... 

Rinaldo, Ben, Company, The 

Rocket Pictures, Inc 

Rockett, Frederick K., Company . . 

Ross, Charles, Inc 

Ross-Gaffney, Inc 

Roush, Leslie, Productions, Inc. . . 

— S — 

Saltzman, J. G., Inc 

Schuessler, William 

Shaw, Melvin 

S.O.S. Cinema Supply Corp 

Sound Masters, Inc 

Southwest Film Laboratory, Inc. . 

Stark-Films 

Stewart-Trans-Lux Corp 

Strauss, Henry, & Company, Inc. . 
Sturgis-Grant Productions, Inc. . 
Sutherland, John, Productions . . . 
Sylvania Electric Products Inc. . . 

— T — 

Technical Service, Inc 

Technicolor Corporation 

Television Graphics Inc 

Telic, Inc 

Texas Industrial Film Company . . 

Tiesler Productions 

Training Films, Inc 

Transfilm Incorporated 

Tri Art Color Corporation 

— U — 

United States Productions 

United World Films, Inc 



84. 



— V — 

Vacuumate Corporation 

Valentino, Thomas J., Inc 

Van Praag Productions 

Videart Inc 

Video Films 

Vidicam Pictures Corporation 

Viewlex, Inc 

Visualscope, Inc 



— W — 

Wade, Roger, Productions 

Washington Video Productions . 
Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

Willard, Frank, Productions 

Wolff, Raphael G., Studios, Inc. . 
Wondsel, Carlisle & Dunphy, Inc. 



190 

80 

92 

63 

45 

161 

186 



76 

167 

60 

54 

95 

190 

11 

69 

19 

177 

188 



50 
82 
98 

181 
39 

193 

185 
72 
35 

189 
3 

180 



18 
147 
185 

12 
173 
184 
190 

47 

25 



67 
65 



160 
70 
83 
183 
190 
57 
10 
24 



74 
92 
13 

191 
41 

186 



— Z 



8 Zweibel, Seymour, Productions, Inc. . 181 






\ 



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MOVIELAB BUILDING, 619 W. 54th ST., NEW YORK 19, N. Y., JUDSON 6-0360 



Geared to a 
Fast Moving Age 

Teamwork geared for efficiency . . . men who know the tools of 
their professions . . . with nothing borrowed or sub-let to chance, 
means integration and means the security of undivided responsibil 
Witli every facility needed to deliver important ideas in this fast- 
moving age. The Jam Handy Organization is a complete group of 
highly-specialized and thoroughly experienced personnel, supported 
by company owned facilities set up to do the job right and right on tin 
This complete control of production, whether for group meetings, 
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Nothing fnnnrfl out! 

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Hollywood 3-2321 



DETROIT 11 
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BUSINESS SCREEN 

MAGAZINE • NUMBER TWO • VOLUME NINETEEN • 1958 





FALL CREEK 



They^re off to watch your public relations film 



MODERN I 

Talking Picture Service, Inc. ■ 



3 East 5ith Street, New York 22 



V^ y 



SALES OFFICES 

New York PL 8-2900 

Chicago DE 7-3262 

Detroit TE 2-4211 

Los Angeles MA 9-2121 

PittsburKh GR 1-9118 

Ian Francisco YU 2-1712 



Public relations films are part of farm living in sum- 
mer months. A Hollywood feature and a public relations 
film make up the program for free film nights — ROAD- 
SHOWS — in a thousand rural towns. In these theatre- 
less towns not reached by TV, roadshow films are often 
the only movies folks see. 

Henderson, Michigan, has had a roadshow each sum- 
mer since 1934. Folks in Steuben, Wisconsin, have en- 
joyed theirs for 17 summers. And Montrose, Iowa, 
begins its 15th season in May. 1,027 Midwestern towns 
in all borrowed films for roadshows from Modern in 
1957. Total attendance was 4,553,663. 

Roadshow locations may be the town square in Fall 
Creek, Wisconsin, or the baseball diamond in Hubbard, 
Nebraska. Each roadshow is well publicized by local 
town merchants. They sponsor these free film shows to 
draw traffic to their stores on show nights. 

And the folks come. They come from miles. With their 
families . . . welcoming a chance to shop and have fun. 
The Chamber of Commerce of Green Ridge, Missouri, 



has shown free movies each week of the summer foro|T 
20 years. Crowds have averaged over three times 
town's population of 350. Average attendance at 
roadshows is about 275 persons. 

Film sponsors who wish to reach the farm mart 
know this is a good way to do it. They also know il 
can keep their prints busy during summer months w! 
other audiences vacation. Last summer Eli Lillyi 
Company showed the beefmaker (the story of thr 
new hormone-rich feed Stilbosol) over 700 times t 
roadshows to a total audience of 222,219 people, 
Salsbury's Laboratories presented PROGRESS IN POUL'f 
to 827 farm audiences with total certified attendancff 
218,211 persons. 283,825 farm viewers watched BIGS^r 
by Anheuser-Busch, Inc. 

You can't keep 'em down on the farm when thei* j 
roadshow that night. So why don't you put your sh' I 
on the road this summer and increase your recognita i 
among farm families. Modern will be happy to give jJ 

the facts. 




ll-IVIt>INC.i 

20 \A/est End Ave. ceoth St.) • New York 23, N. Y. . Circle 7-6110 



I 



producers of distinguished motion pictures for 

industry and television for over 35 years 



PROBLEM: How to make 16mm Kodachrome Intermediates with the same emulsion position as the original. 
SOLUTION: A specially designed, "one-to-one" optical printer. 

This is Job Sanderson, CFI Equipment Supervisor and a staff member for 22 years, with the newly com- 
pleted 16mm Kodachrome "one-to-one" optical printer. During the printing operation, a separate film control 
strip makes scene-to-scene hue and intensity corrections resulting in a 16mm Kodachrome Printing Master 
that is balanced for color and density. Most important, the optical printing provides an Intermediate with the 
same emulsion position as the original. Advantages: 1 ) the Intermediate and original can be spliced into the same 
roll for subsequent printing; 2) prints from the Intermediate can be spliced into existing prints to make replace- 
ments; 3) the Intermediate can replace the original Kodachrome without making^a new sound track negative. 



CONSOLIDATED FILM INDUSTRIES 959 Seward St., Hollywood 38, Calif.. HOMywood 9-14.4-1 /521 W.Tth, New York 19, N.Y. Circle 6-0210 



BLIC RELATIONS • EDUCATIONAL* TRAINING • MEDICAL* FARM . . .and 



Technical pictures don't have to he too technical. 
Technicians are also people. Their worlds are complex 
ones, but the technical motion pictures they seem to 
prefer are the ones which are clear, interesting and well 
executed, as well as being accurate and informative. Put 
yourself in an audience with upper-case technicians and 
you couldn't tell a physicist or a biochemist from your 
neighbor next-door. Technical groups want motion 
pictures on technical subjects to be, in the first, second 
and third place, good motion pictures. 








Among our clients: 

American Telephone & 
Telegraph Co. 

Babcock & Wilcox Co. 

Carborundum Company 

Cast Iron Pipe Research 
Association 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
& Company 

Ethyl Corporation 

Ford Motor Company 

General Motors Corp. 

McGraw-Hill Book Co. 

Merck & Co., Inc. 

— and many. 



JNational Board of Fire 
Underwriters 

National Cancer Institute 

Pennsylvania Railroad 

Sharp & Dohme 

E. R. Squibb & Sons 

The Texas Company 

Union Carbide & Carbon 
Corporation 

U. S. Navy 

Virginia-Carolina 
Chemical Corp. 

Western Electric Co. 
many others 



^FewFAcrs 



KSVO 






FILM CENTER BUILDING 



630 NINTH AVENUE 
TELEPHONE PLaza 7-0760 



NEW YORK 36, N, 



Frank K. Speidell, President • Herman Roessle, Vice President P. J. Mooney, Secretary & Treasurer 

Producer-Directors: L. S. Bennetts H. E. Mandell Earl Peirce 

Alexander Gansell Harold R. Lipman Erwin Scharf 

Sales Manager: Sheldon Nemeyer 



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A LEASE PLAN 

FOR USERS OF 

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regtdar, or rear projection type 
16 mm sound projectors in your 
sales and training programs on a 
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EASTERN OFFICE: 141 E. 44th STREET. NEW YORK 17. NEW YORK 
WEST COAST OFFICE: 4357 MELROSE AVE.. HOLLYWOOD 29. CALIF. 



the national safety film awards 



National Committee on Films 
as Outstanding 1957 Motion 

SpoN.soRFi) McrnoN I'ictures 
and sound slidet'ilms swept all 
but five of the 28 citations an- 
nounced by the National Com- 
mittee on Films for Safety cover- 
ing subjects produced or released 
in" 1957. 

A total of 15 sound films and 
slidefilms were judged in the 15th 
annual competition, the purpose 
of which is to stimulate produc- 
tion and use of films on accident 
prevention and to encourage their 
higher quality. 

Sponsored ttlms won six of the 
eight highest awards — bronze 
plaques — in the four principal 
categories: occupational; traffic 
and transportation; general; and 
theatrical. Seventeen of the 20 
awards of merit in these same 
categories also went to sponsored 
productions. 

Dual Awards to Two Studios 

Two producers had a pair of 
contest winne's in the competition. 
Cal Dunn Studios produced a 
film and a six-film series for Na- 
tional Safety Council which won a 
bronze plaque and a merit award, 
respectively, in the occupational 
category; and Texas Industrial 
Film Co. produced two occupa- 
tional safety motion pictures for 
AT&T which received awards of 
merit. 

In the occupational films cate- 
gory, plaques were awarded to: 

Danger — Roofers at Work. 1 8 
min., color and b w, sponsored by 
Florida Industrial Bldg. Assn., 
and produced by the University 
Broadcasting Services, Florida 
State University. — The film illus- 
trates employee working hazards 
on roofing jobs. 

Falls Are No Fun, 10 min., 
b/w, sponsored by National Safety 
Council and produced by Cal 
Dunn Studios. — This is an instruc- 
tion:il cartoon film showing types 
of falls and how to prevent them. 

Occupational Merit Awards 

Awards of merit for occupa- 
tional films were made to: 

Chain Saw Safety Pay.': Off, 



for Safety Cites 28 Winners I 
Pictures and Sound Slidefilms ' 

24 1 J min.. color and b w, spon- 
sored by Homelite, Division or 
Textron, Inc., and produced b) 
Victor Kayfetz Productions. Inc 
— Stressing maintenance and safe, 
operation of chain saws. 

Lock and Tag, 23 ' .. min., coloi 
and b w, sponsored by Safety j 
Fire Protection Div., E. I. di 
Pont de Nemours, and Savannal 
River Plant, AEC; produced by E 
I. du Pont de Nemours and Thf 
Calvin Co. — Covering the impor-i 
tance of locking and tagginj 
equipment to prevent accidents. 

Pulp Makers' Film Cited 

One Is Too Many, 28 min. 
color, sponsored by Pacific Coas 
Assn. of Pulp Manufacturers! 
produced by Rarig Motion Pic 
ture Co. — Showing the emphasi; 
on safety, from top managemen 
to worker. 

Safe Poles, 23'j min., color 
and Safe Work on Poles. 22y, 
min.. color, sponsored by Film i 
Employee Information Div.. Pub 
lie Relations Dept.. Americai 
Telephone & Telegraph Co.; pro 
duced by Texas Industrial Filn 
Co. — Companion films, the firs 
emphasizes the need for checkinj 
condition of the pole before thi 
lineman starts his climb; thr 
second instructs new employees ii, 
safe methods of pole climbing, j 

Safety on the Job at Sea, 111 
min., b w, sponsored by Militar 
Sea Transportation Service, Nav; 
Dept.; produced by F. K. Rocket 
Co. — Covering various hazard 
and safety precautions aboan, 
ship. I 

Merit Awards to Slidefilms 

Sound slidefilm award of men 
winners in the occupational cate 
gory were: 

Judgment. 13 min., color, spon 
sored and produced by Phillip 
Petroleum Co. — Pointing ou 
common accident preventioi 
measures around the service sta 
tion. 

Seven Doorways to Death. I 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 64 



Issue Two. Volume Nineteen of Business Screen Magazine, published March 30, 195f 
Issued 8 limes annually at six-week intervals at 7064 Sheridan Road, Chicago 2f 
Illinois by Business Screen Magazines. Inc. Phone BRiargate 4-8234. O. H. Coelln, Ir 
Editor and PublUher. In New York: Robert Seymour. Jr., 489 Fifth Avenue, Telephon 
Riverside 9-0215 or MUrray Hill 2-2492. In Los Angeles: Edmund Kerr, 104 So. Caror 
delet. Telephone DUnkirk 7-2281. Subscription $3.00 a year; $5.00 two years (domesllc) 
$4.00 and $7.00 foreign. Entered as second class matter May 2, 1946, at the post offio 
at Chicago, Illinois, under Act ol March 3, 1879. Entire contents copyrighted 1958 b- 
Business Screen Magazines, Inc. Trademark registered U.S. Patent Office. Addres 
advertising and subscription inquiries to the Chicago Office of publication. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINI 



CASE HISTORY OF A 



SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS FILM 



* 




^ "THE STORY OF A MAIN STREET MERCHANT" 
Starring'^ JAN CLAYTON and ARTHUR FRANZ 

Written and Produced for J. C. PENNEY COMPANY 



i 



JULY, 1952 THROUGH DECEMBER, 1957 
20,311 NON-THEATRICAL SHOWINGS 

AUDIENCE: 1,332,310 
699 TELEVISION SHOWINGS - 

ESTIMATED AUDIENCE: 15,973,640 

"WEEKLY VARIETY" DATED MAR. 19, 1958 SELECTED IT AS ONE OF THE FIFTY 
OUTSTANDING FREE TELEVISION FILMS SHOWN BY TV STATIONS IN 1957. 
HONOR MEDAL- FREEDOMS FOUNDATION-1952 
MERIT AWARD -BOSTON FILM FESTIVAL- 1953 

John Sutherland Productions, Incorporated 



LOS ANGELES 




NEW YORK 


01 North Occidental Boulevard 




136 East 55th Street 


Los Angeles 26, California 


Dunkirk 8-5121 


New York 22. New York 



PLaza 5 1875 



BUSI^ESSLAiVD' 



A TWICE TOLD TALE 

When Wernhei- Von Braun was explaininK 
to newsmen how the U.S. satellite, "Explorer," 
was successfully launched and why it would 
stay in orbit for some time, he must surely 
have had the feeling he was going through 
something for the second time. 

Twenty-four months earlier he was explain- 
ing substantially the same thing at the Walt 
Disney Studio to Walt and a storv crew who 
were beginning work on a film dealing with 
outer space. In a few months Dr. Von Braun's 
story, now augmented with animation, color 
and music, was on film and was being told to 
millions of Americans via the Disnevland tele- 
vision program MAN IN SPACE. 

Today, in the light of the Sputniks and the 
Explorer, and particularly in the light of sci- 
ence's next objective — manned space travel — 
MAN IN SPACE becomes an important film 
to all branches of our society. 




MAN IN SPACE is of major interest to 
American business — and many industrial 
companies are: 

1. Acquiring prints to use in their employee, 
community and public relations programs. 

2. Recognizing what science educators have 
already attested — namely, that MAN IN 
SPACE can make a giant contribution in 
the classroom where the problem of moti- 
vating junior and senior high school stu- 
dents to seriously pursue courses in mathe- 
matics and other basic sciences is the prime 
hurdle the science teacher must overcome. 
Realizing that this gives them the chance 
to put a potent teaching tool in the hands 
of classroom teachers, many companies are 
donating prints to the .schools in their area. 
Credit titles added to film identify donor. 




The film runs 35 minutes — is in 16mm with 
color by Technicolor — sound on film. 

If your company shares the concern of so 
many others regarding our critical need for 
more scientifically trained personnel and 
should you desire more information, we'll be 
delighted to answer youi- inquiry. 

Educational Film Divi.sion 
WALT DISNEY PRODUCTIONS 
Burbank, California 
P.S. The second in Walt Disnei/'s series of 
"Science-Factual" films— OUR FRIEND THE 
ATOM — is also now available in 16mm color. 




BUSINESS SCREEN 

THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS JOURNAL OF AUDIO & VISUAL 
COMMUNICATION FOR INDUSTRY - EDUCATION AND TELEVISION 

preview of contents 

The 1958 Safety Film Award Winners Announced 4 

A New Challenge for the Sponsored Film by Jay E. Gordon 17 

Screen Actors Negotiate New Contract for TV Commercials 22 

Procedures for Copyright of Films by Evelyn Dunne 31 

Evolution of Man-Made Rubber: Esso's ""Rubber From Oil" . . . . 30 

McCall's Magazine Film Program: a 10- Year Pattern 33 

Merrell: Servant to the Medical Profession 34 

Ford Tours the World; Those Ford "Round the World" Films 35 

The Modern Story: Growth of a National Film Distributor 36 

The Union Pacific Shows Its "Company Manners" 37 

A "Floor Show" That Sparkles for A.T.&T 38 

How a Priest Spends His Day: a Documentary Picture 38 

Meet the Reclamation Engineers Told '"By His Deeds" 39 

Feature: The Sales Manager's Audio-Visual Guide 40 

People Who Make Pictures: News of Staff Appointments 46 

"T.R." and His Times: the Roosevelt Centennial Film 47 

What's New in Sponsored Pictures: Reviews in Brief 48 

The Search That Never Ends: Report on Gulf Oil Research 50 

Gordon's Bids for Vodka Sales Leadership 50 

Calling All Card Players: The Playing Card Picture 54 

New Audio-Visual Equipment and Accessories 56 

Index of 1957 Sponsored Films Reviewed in Business Screen. . . .63 
Plus: The National Directory of Visual Dealers 

Office of Publication: 7064 Sheridan Road, Chicago 26 

IN NEW YORK CITY 

Robert Seymour, Jr., Eastern Manager: 489 Fifth Ave. 

Riverside 9-0215 • MUrray Hill 2-2492 

IN HOLLYWOOD 
Edmund Kerr, Western Manager, 104 So. Carondelet 

Telephone: DUnkirk 7-2281 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE* 



Serving tlw needs 
of the 16111111 
film industry . 

byron 

announces 
another fii'H 




designed and 
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include new 

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in less time 



For full information and price list, 
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features include: 

• Mixer Studios. Narrator Studios and Tlieatre Recording Studio, 
with 16mm and 35nnn projection facilities. 

• Dubbers and Recorders, both optical and magnetic, including 
16mm and 35mm and ^-inch tape with Rangertone sync. 

• Interlock System for forward or reverse. 

• 8-input Re-recording Console with sliding faders, graphic 
equalizers, effects filters, and many other unique features. 

• Looping Facilities. 

• High-fidelity Monitoring Systems. 

• Special Double-speed Transfer System. 

• Track Processing by latest spray method. 

• Individual Editing Rooms with Westrex Editor, with or 
without editorial personnel. 

• Complete Music and Effects Library. 



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Laboratory 



1226 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Washington 7, D.C., FEderal 3-4000 



PRACTICALLY EVERY 16MM FILM PRODUCER IN THE UNITED STATES IS A CLIENT OF BYRON 



r JI B E R 



VOLUME 19 




USINESS SCREEN MAGAZIiV, 



KODAK MAKES AUDIO-VISUAL NEWS 

ANNOUNCING A NEW KODAK 

PAGEANT SOUND PROJECTOR 

AT A NEW LOW PRICE 



The new Kodak Pageant Sound Projector, 
Model AV-085, rolls prices back to 1955-56 
levels. It lists for just $439!* At the same time, 
it has all the essentials for good 16mm sound 
projection. The AV-085 is a true Pageant. 

As with all Pageant Projectors, you never 
oil the AV-085: it's permanently lubricated 
for you at the factory. As with all Pageants, 
it is easy to operate, sets up in a jiflfy with 
folding reel arms, attached belts, and simpli- 
fied film path. And it has Kodak's exclusive 
Super-40 Shutter for added screen brilliance. 

New features, too —There's a powerful, 
sensitive new amplifier, designed around 
printed circuits, to make it more compact, 
rugged, easy to service. It delivers its full 
rated 8 watts. For better listening, the speaker 



is housed in a baffled enclosure which as- 
sures good response over its entire frequency 
range. The speaker itself is an 1 1-inch oval— 
shaped that way to make it compact— and 
designed to give you the same effective cone 
area as a conventional 8-inch round type. 

The Model AV-085 has a new type of pull- 
down claw that's virtually wearproof, made 
of hard tungsten carbide. You'll have no 
problems with municipal electrical codes 
either— a new 3-wire cord provides for 
grounding, adapts to ungrounded outlets, too. 

Ask your Kodak Audio- Visual dealer to 
demonstrate the new AV-085 Pageant. Or 
write for Bulletin V3-22 for full details. No 
obligation, of course. 

* List price, subject to change without notice. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, Dept. 8-V, Rochester 4, N. Y. 





New low-cost Pageant Model AV-085 comes with 
economical 750-watt lamp, exclusive Kodak Super- 
40 Shutter for brilliant pictures on the screen. 



Resonant, natural sound comes from new 11 -inch 
ova/ speaker in bafffed enclosure. Oval shape 
lends rigidity, makes case more compact. 



VOLUME 19 



IG 



FFERENCE... 





[The technical know-how and production 
skills mastered by Color Reproduction 
Company in over 19 years of Specializing 
Exclusively in 16mm Color Printing has 
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936 Sania Monita Blvd., Hollywood 46, California 

s/epfione: OLdfield 4-8010 



SIGHT & SOU^D 



Vancouver Film Festival Wins 
Int'l Producer Group OK 

i~ The Vancouver International 
Film Festival has received the 
official approval of the Interna- 
tional Federation of Film Produc- 
ers Associations in Paris. The 
Federation is the organization 
which rules on the validity of film 
festivals throughout the world. 

To be held July 19 to August 
16, the Vancouver Film Festival 
is part of the Vancouver Interna- 
tional Festival program which 
also features musical and dramatic 
stage presentations. 

The event is sponsored by the 
Vancouver Festival Society. Van- 
couver. British Columbia. Recog- 
nition by the International Federa- 
tion signaled the release of final 
invitations to film producers who 
have been waiting for official word 
before submitting entries. More 
than 160 entries are expected by 
Vancouver Festival officials. 
Twenty countries had submitted 
120 entries as of March 1. 

For information on the compe- 
tition, write: The Vancouver Fes- 
tival Society. Rooms 7 & 8. 16th 
Floor. Hotel Vancouver. Vancou- 
ver. B.C. If 

Falkenberg-Jacobs "Seminar" 
Planned for Italian Region 

■ Documentary film producers 
Paul Falkenberg and Lewis Jacobs 
will conduct a three-week seminar 
tour of the Abruzzi and Marche 
region of Italy from July 25 to 
August 15. 

The trip is designed as a vo- 
cational seminar in film-making 
with twice daily briefing sessions 
by Falkenberg and Jacobs. The 
two will also point up opportuni- 
ties for good filming. 

The tour is open to anyone with 
knowledge of cinematographic 
fundamentals. 

* * * 

Under-Water Photography 
is New Firm's Specialty 

it A new Chicago organization, 
called Adventure Inc.. has been 
set up by Jim Thorne. a specialist 
in under-water photography. 

In addition to its specialty, the 
firm will offer counsel to motion 
picture firms, outdoor or scientific 
publications and a location guide 
service. A testing service for cer- 
tain types of new equipment also 
will be offered. 

The firm's motion picture and 
still film library, available to cli-i 
ents, includes a variety of under- 
water scenes and sequences. 



10 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 






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"Schweitzer" Film, Westrex 
Sound System Get "Oscars" 

The only documentary film to 
win a Motion Picture Academy 
"Oscar" for 1957 was Albert 
Schweitzer, a Hill and Anderson 
production by Louis de Roche- 
mont Associates. Jerome Hill, pro- 
ducer. 

Westrex Corporation and Todd- 
.AO Corporation received "Oscar" 
statuettes for developing the meth- 
od of producing and exhibiting 
wide-film multi-channel sound pic- 
tures known as the Todd-AO Sys- 
tem. These awards were made in 
the scientific and technical class, 
which covers achievements which 
have a definite influence on the 
motion picture industry. 

The Westrex contribution to the 
Todd-AO process is the six-chan- 
nel stereophonic sound recording 
and re-recording system. Equip- 
ment used in the process was de- 
signed and built by Westrex Cor- 
poration's Hollywood Division. 

The new sound system was first 
used in the Todd-AO production 



of Oklahoma. Since then it has 
been used for Around the World 
ill 80 Days and South Pacific. 

Twelve scientific and technical 
awards have been presented to 
Westrex Corporation, its predeces- 
sor organization. Electrical Re- 
search Products, Inc., and its par- 
ent company. Western Electric 
Company, Inc., by the Academy 
of Motion Picture Arts and Sci- 
ences. l«j|^ 

Sponsor 3-Day Conference 
on Use of Business Films 

i> A three-day conference on the 
Use of Films in Business and In- 
dustry has been scheduled for May 
27, 28 and 29 under sponsorship 
of the University of California and 
the San Francisco Film Producers 
Association. Sessions will be held 
at the University Extension Center 
in San Francisco. 

Co-sponsors of the conference 
on the part of the University of 
California, in addition to the Ex- 
tension Center, are the School of 
Business Administration and the 
Department of Journalism. 

Sponsors of the conference hope 
it will be the first in a series of 



annual gatherings of this sort. 

Sessions will be aimed at giving 
a comp.ehensive view of the scope 
of some of the problems involved 
in business" use of motion pictures, 
and stimulating interest in gaining 
further information. 

O. H. Coelln, publisher of 
Business Screen Magazine, will 
lead one of the conference ses- 
sions. He will discuss "Business 
Film Distribution Methods." Clyde 
B. Smith, motion picture producer, 
University Extension, is program 
co-ordinator. IJJ' 

Brennan to New Coast Post 

X John J. Brennan has been ap- 
pointed director of business af- 
fairs of California National Pro- 
ductions, a division of NBC. He 
was formerly business manager of 
NBC owned and operated stations 
and NBC spot sales. jf 

MPO Executive Tours Mexico 

M Marvin Rothenberg, vice-presi- 
dent of MPO Productions, Inc., 
has recently made a three week 
tour of Mexican film studios and 
location sites. ^ 



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12 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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U. S. steel Films Reach 
12,810,873 During Past Year 

■«• Twenty-nine motion picturesi 
sponsored by United States Steel*' 
Corporation reached a total audi-: 
ence of 12,810,873 during 1957. 
The U. S. Steel films were shown 
to 27,722 business, educational 
and social groups last yeai'. 

Added to coverage in all 4S 
states, Alaska and Hawaii, the cor- 
poration's pictures were screened 
for 35,424 viewers in foreign 
countries. 

Leading U. S. Steel's 1957 non- 
theatrical film tallies was a favorite 
of 1 7 years service. Steel — Man's 
Servaiil — which was shown to 
5,575 groups during the year. 

Kiioning's Not Enoiiiih. a safety 
film, was in second place with 
3,330 showings. Kno\\iiii;'s Not 
Enoiifih has been made available 
to other business organizations for 
use in promoting the national 
safety program. The film won the 
Occupational Film Award for 1 956 
presented by the National Com- 
mittee on Films for Safety. 

Not included in the 1957 totals 
were statistics on U. S. Steel's new 
theatrical release; Jonah and the 
Highway, now being shown in 
theatres throughout the nation. The 
film was released November I. 
1957. As of February 26, 1958. 
a total of 731 theatres reported 
showing the film on 2,110 days, 
to a total audience of 1,656,569. 
Jonah and the Highway recently 
was awarded a George Washington 
Honor Medal by the Freedoms 
Foundation. \Q 

* * * 

SM Names Donate for TV 

7^ Jose di Donato has been ap- 
pointed manager of TV client 
service for Sound Masters, Inc. 
He is the latest addition to the 
company's expanding television 
commercial film department. 

Mr. di Donato is a well known 
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MGM-TV Names William Gibbs 
to Head Industrial Division 

T^ William R. Gibbs has been ap- 
pointed director of MGM-TV's 
commercial and industrial division, 
it has been announced by Charles 
C. Barry, vice president in charge 
of television for Loew's Inc. 

For the past two years Gibbs 
has been television commercial 
production supervisor for Young 
& Rubicam, San Francisco, with 
headquarters at Warner Brothers 
studios. Previously he was tele- 
vision director for Fuller & Smith 
& Ross, and producer-director for 
the Jam Handy Organization in 
Detroit. 

Gibbs succeeds Virgil E. Ells- 
worth, who has resigned. 515" 
* * * 

Wilding Names Morton to 
Sales Administrative Post 

-M- Appointment of Joseph Mor- 
ton as administrative assistant, 
sales, for Wilding Picture Pro- 
ductions, Inc., Chicago, has been 
announced by Jack A. Rheinstrom, 
vice-president in charge of sales. 

In addition to his new duties, 
Morton will continue to super- 
vise Midwest TV Production and 




Joseph Morton 

Sales in coordination with Ted 
Westcott, who has joined Wilding 
as midwest manager of TV Sales, 
with headquarters in Wilding's 
main Chicago office. 



"In his new position as admiii' 
istrative assistant, sales, Morton*! 
primary responsibility will be liai' 
son between Wilding's sales anc 
production departments," Rheiii' 
Strom said. Prior to joinin{ 
Wilding, Morton was with Klinj 
Film Productions and Young an< 
Rubicam, Inc. 

:f * * 

Ross Wetzel Studios Opens 
New Building in Chicago 

it Ross Wetzel Studios Inc. is tht 
new corporate identity for Car- 
toonists, Inc., recently moved to ; 
new location at 615 North Wabasf 
Avenue, Chicago. 

Ross Wetzel, president of the 
company since its organization ir 
1948, said the new name more ac 
curately reflects the company's 
present activities, since it is nov 
producing all types of art and pho- 
tography in all areas of visual com 
munication. 

In its new location, the compaii 
occupies four floors totaling 12,0ii 
square feet of space. William Lari;: 
don is general production manage 
Roger Sloan is sales manager an 
Russell Stamm is creative direct(> 

The company recently added t 
its studio equipment an Oxben 
optical printer, said to be the fu 
of its kind in Chicago. Bob Shiple\ ; 
who operates the new printer, ha: 
been with Wetzel since 1950. Pre- 
viously he was with Hal Roacl 
Studios, Jam Handy and A. Georg( 
Miller. 19 

* * * 

Wuest Named Exec Producer i 
Wilbur Streech Productions 

tr Appointment of Harry Wues 
as executive producer at Wilbu 
Streech Productions, Inc., Nev 
York City, has been announce 
by Wilbur J. Streech, president 
Before joining Wilbur Streech pro 
ductions in 1954, Wuest free 
lanced as director and cameramai 
on a number of industrial, edu 
cational and theatrical films. 




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BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINJ 



He Okayed 
the script '^^ 

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(istarted as an idea, a rough 
tiatment, a shooting script. Now 
il up to you to fulfill the promise of 
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\ • sole the world's greatest assortment 
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The Finest in Products & Sen/ices 
Are AcJvertised in Business Screen 



( cont'd from previous page ) 

ed. and one of America's most 
respected educators has put his 
finger on a prime Icey to the solu- 
tion. 

Give Schools a "New Reach" 

What can American business do 
i:bout it? 

I can think of no more concrete 
contribution that a business or in- 
dustry could make to help a teach- 
er do a better job than furnish him 
one of the world's most potent 
teaching aids, an instructional 
sound motion picture. To use Dr. 
Killian's phrase, let business give 
the teacher "a new reach." 

This is what I suggest. Let there 
be created an agency which could 
be called the "American Business 
Council for the Development of 
Educational Films." (The initials 
■"ABCDEF" suggest that education 
must go farther than the "ABC's". ) 

This Council, composed of rep- 
resentatives from industry and ed- 
ucation, could set forth a list of 
most-urgently-needed science and 
engineering education films, A film 
on, say. Dynamics of Rocket En- 
gine Control Systems, then could 



be adopted for sponsorship by one 
of the leading companies in this 
field, where there is not only pri- 
mary interest, but the very least 
information on the subject. The 
Council would serve in an advis- 
ory capacity to aid the selected 
film producer in developing an 
educationally-sound script, fitted 
to the curriculum where the need 
is greatest. 

No Commercials in Films 

A standard credit-title format, 
furnishing evidence of the spon- 
sor's contribution, would identify 
the sponsor at the head and end of 
the film. No commercial or "sell" 
information would be permitted in 
the film itself. 

Compliance with an educational 
film production code would be re- 
quired, the basis of which could 
be the excellent "Criteria for 
Business - Sponsored Educational 
Films," published by the Associa- 
tion of National Advertisers. 

The sponsoring corporation 
would foot the entire film produc- 
tion bill. Beyond that, one com- 
pany may wish to donate several 
prints to schools of its choice, while 
another misht wish to eo further 



and donate several hundred pri 
to schools recommended by tl 
Council, 

Or the prints could be bou 
at a printing cost, which would 
only a fraction of the cost of 
similar educational film produce _, 
on speculation. Smaller companies 
wishing to participate in this' 
science-engineering film could 
make money grants to schools to 
finance purchase of prints. 

Here are some of the more im- 
portant standards that should bi 
incorporated into these films: 

They must be effective teaching 
aids. 

Science demonstrations must il- 
lustrate superior teaching tech- 
niques. 

Integrate With Curriculum 

There should be sufficient cor- 
relation between the teaching tech-j 
niques displayed in the film and the' 
average classroom situation to in- 
spire the teachers who use the film 
to improve their own methods. 

The film lessons should, when- 
ever possible, illustrate applica- 
tions of modern (even futuristic) 
technology now in use in American 
industry. 

The scientific and engineering 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 20) 



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Cordon Yoder shooting flood damage in the Dallas area 



'For widest exposure and processing latitudes... 



my choice is Du Pont film 



f f 



says Gordon Yoder, staff cameraman in Dallas, 
Texas, for Hearst Metrotone News, Inc. 

Mr. Yoder, winner of the 1957 title, "Newsreel 
Cameraman of the Year," in the N. P. P. A. — Ency- 
clopaedia Britannica contest, tells us that all his 
35 mm work is done with Du Pont Superior® 2 
and "Superior" 4 Motion Picture Film. 

Like all newsreel cameramen. Mr. Yoder must 
be able to count on the latitude of his film since 
news coverage cant be reshot. "Regardless of 
indoor or outdoor lighting, temperature, action, 
weather. I have to come up with usable shots," he 
says. "In addition, I can't even process my own 



fflE 



Better Things for Better Living . . . through Chemistry 



NUMB E R 2 



VOLUME 19 



19 58 



film— it's rushed to New York and developed there. 
So I can"t compensate for varied exposure by con- 
trolling the processing. 

"Despite this handicap," Mr. Yoder continues, 
"I can still shoot confidently with Du Pont film. 
There has been only one exposure complaint from 
my office in ten years and, even then, the story 
was usable!" ... 

For newsreels. commercials, features — for every TV use 
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Science Challenqe: 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18) 

principles outlined in the films 
should be demonstrated, when this 
can be done, by the actual men 
who developed them or made his- 
toric applications of them. 

The films should show how one 
science depends on another. For 
example, a physics film should 
show how this science may depend 
on chemistry, mathematics or as- 
tronomy before the particular 
theory under study can be put to 
practical use. 

Always, the importance (and, 
in some cases, the rewards) of the 
fields being portrayed should be re- 
flected in the films. 

500 Films Are Needed 

What films are needed? Dr. Kil- 
lian referred to 90 necessary films 
in physics alone. 1 should guess 
that 500 are in great need in the 
scientific and engineering fields. 

There are enough that each ofj 
America's 100 largest corporations! 
earning their profits from the fruits 
of science and engineering might 
afTord five each over a two-year 
period. Insurance, banking, andj 
other corporations may want to 
contribute, which could either 
broaden the base or accelerate the 
program. 

Research would indicate the ex- 
act nature of films needed in the 
various curricula. In addition, how- 
ever, a number of "attitude condi- 
tioning" films are needed. Some 
titles might be: 

How a Scientist Works: The 
Experimental Method: Researchl 
. . . What is It?: What it Takes to\ 
Become a Scientist: The Educationl 
of an Engineer: Opportunities for 
the Technical Worker: Tomorrow's 
Challenges: Great Experiments in 
Science. 

Biographical sketches or inter-' 
views with present-day scientists ori 
engineers of note are other pos-i 
sible film subjects. 

A number of films should he' 
made for tv and theatrical release. 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 59) 



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BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIN 




^MIBER 2 • VOLUME 19 • 195! 



21 



Win Increases Up to 143 Percent- 
Higher Talent Costs for Television Commercials 
as Screen Actors Guild Negotiates New Contract 



VISUAL SEI.L.II 

THAT BRINGS 



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* The negotiating committee of 
the Screen Actors Guild has 
reached agreement with the prin- 
cipal national advertising agencies 
and independent film producers on 
the terms of a new contract cov- 
ering actors, singers and announ- 
cers in tv commercials, John L. 
Dales, national executive secretary 
of the Guild, has announced. 

The agreement is subject only 
to ratification by the Guild mem- 
bership. Rate increases ranging 
as high as 143 per cent are pro- 
vided. The agreement is retro- 
active to March 2 last and runs to 
June 1, 1960. 

Besides Dales, the Guild negoti- 
ating committee included Leon 
Ames, president; George Chand- 
ler, treasurer; Verne Smith, a 
member of the board of directors; 
Chester L. Migden. assistant ex- 
ecutive secretary; and William 
Berger. legal counsel, all from 
Hollywood; Norman Mackaye, 
president of the Guild's New York 
branch; Tom Shirley, first vice- 
president; and Joseph S. Bell, re- 
cording secretary; Dwight Weist; 
Harold M. HofTman, New York 
executive secretary; Raymond A. 
Jones, Chicago executive secretary. 

Agencies Represented at Talks 

National advertising agencies 
were represented at the negotia- 
tions in New York City by John 
Devine of J. Walter Thompson 
and David Miller of Young & 
Rubicam. 

It is understood that some mem- 
bers of the New York Film Pro- 
ducers Association have not yet 
approved the new contract, but 
the Guild already is signing com- 
mercial producers throughout the 
U.S. to the agreement. 

Key Points in New Contract 

Here are some highlights of the 
new contract: 

! . On camera minimum raised 
from $70 to $80 per eight-hour 
day; off camera raised from $45 
to $55 per session; with new re- 
quirement that player be paid 
promptly for each commercial 
made. Under previous "unit pay- 
ment" system, player was paid by 
producer for only one commercial 
per day or session and additional 
commercials were paid for only if 
and when delivered to advertising 
agency. 

2. All use payments on spot com- 
mercials, previously reaching maxi- 
mum when spot was televised in 



over 20 cities, graduated sharp 
upward. 

Class A usage now limited 
21 to 60 cities, with on came 
minimum for each 13-week u 
increased from $140 to $170; ne 
Class AA, 61 to 125 cities wi 
on camera minimum of $220; ne 
Class AAA, over 125 cities, i 
camera minimum $260. 

Increases in Off-Camera Rates 

Even larger percentage i 
creases in off camera minimum 
such as Class B (six to 20 citie; 
raised from $52.50 to $72.5 
Class A (not over 60 cities) fro 
$70 to $ 1 05 ; New Class AA, $ 1 5 
new Class AAA, $170. 

3. New York, previous 
"weighted" as seven cities in d 
termining classification for 
payments, to be weighted a 
cities, with Los Angeles and Ch 
cago set as seven cities each, ai 
two of these three to constitu 
Class A usage, and all three 
constitute Class AA usage. 

4. Program commercial 
rates also were substantially i 
creased and the so-called "cut-off 
which set a maximum payme 
for a Class A program commerci; 
was eliminated. 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 24 



FOR PRODUCERS 
OF VISUAL SELLING 
IN MOTION PICTURES 
SLIDE FILMS 
TV COMMERCIALS 



illsberg \nt 

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animation 
slide films 
titles 
telops 
flip cards 

lettering 

layout 

maps 

bacl^grounds 

retouching 

color correction of 
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a wide 
assortment 
of type for 

liot press titles 

type catalogue 
on request 



421 WEST 64TH STREET, NEW YORK 19, N ' 
PLAZA 7-1525 



22 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIK 



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Six powerful reasons why new RCA 
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Built-in Lubrication — Sintered 

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Wear-Resistant Cose — Surf green 
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Famed RCA Sound Quality— 

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Film Protection — Newly designed 
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ar all critical points. 



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RCA "Life-Tested" 16mm 
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UMBER 2 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



23 



F&B PRO-CINE TRIPOD 



MODEL 
202 




THESE EXCLUSIVE FEATURES 
ORIGINALLY DESIGNED BY F&B: 

A. Camera tighfening knob 

— Angle gears. 

B. Telescoping, offset pan handle. 

C. Second pan handle position. 

D. Large pan and tilt tension locks. 

E. Large diameter precision 

center shaft. 

F. Precision machined friction 

plate. 

G. Leg brackets firmly bolted 

with leg rest ledge. 

H. Aluminum leg tops. 

i. Single leg locking knobs — 
prevents bending and 
warping. 

J. Superb, seasoned, oil-treated 
hardwood legs. 



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Send now <or your FREE F&B EQUIPMENT CATALOG and FSB RENTAL PRICE LIST 
. . . Givej all fhe informaHon, descriptions and prices you need if renting or purchas- 
ing motion picture equipment. 



m^ 



FLORMAN & BABB 



68 West 45fh Street, New York 36, N. Y. 



Phone: Murray Hill 2-2928 
Cable Address -FLORBABB, N.Y. 



Coming Attractions: Audio-Visuals at the Brussels Fair; 
hlow Sound Slidefilms Work for Business and Industry; and 
The "Inside Stories" of Films at Bethlehem Steel and Bell 



In Hullywuud 

Top-flight production group 
will produce your stage se- 
quences on sub-contract, to 
your script, with full Holly- 
wood resources, at controlled 
costs plus fixed fee. For 
specimen work, screen 1957 
Golden Reel winners Outside 
That Envelope and The Next 
Ten Cprints from Modern 
Talking Pictures i. 

PARTHENON PHlTlIHEb 

2625 Temple St. Hollywood 26 

DUnkirk 5-3911 



NEED A 
TECHNICAL FILM MAN? 

Have you iiccn faced with the 
choice of trying to make an en- 
gineer into a motion picture 
man or a motion picture man 
into a engineer for your tech- 
nical films? 

I offer you the cotnhination of 
an engineer — Bachelor of Elec- 
trical Engineering from Cor- 
nell University — and a motion 
picture man — experienced as a 
writer, producer and director 
of both technical anil non-tech- 
nical films. 

William L. Simon 

1771 Lanier PI., N.W. Washington 9, D.C. 



Higher Talent Cnsts: 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22) 

Under the new agreement, after 
$740 is paid on camera or $565 
is paid off camera within a 13- 
week period, the player continues 
to be paid at the rate of IT^-j per 
cent of the individual use rate for 
use of the commercial within the 
13-week period. 

5. Program openings and clos- 
ings: On camera raised from $400 
to $500 for 13 uses in 13 weeks, 
and from $570 to $650 for 13 
uses in 26 weeks; off camera, 
raised from $280 to $400 and 
from $415 to $500. 

6. Dealer commercials: One 
year use, on camera raised from 
$575 to $700 and off camera from 
$295 to $425; six month use, on 
camera, from $295 to $375; off 
camera, from $155 to $250. 9^ 

TSI Announces Lease Plan 
for 16mm Sound Projectors 

•k Motion picture projectors for 
16mm sound films now can be 
leased by the month under a new 
plan announced by Technical Serv- 
ice, Inc., Livonia, Michigan, pro- 
jector manufacturer. 

Leasing is available on three 
portable models, offering com- 
bined large screen and built-in 
screen projection, and repetitive 





E. H. Lerchen, Pre 
Technical Service, Ir 



projection on a built-in screen. 
Renters can convert from leasing 
to purchase, with allowance for 
fees paid. Service charges for in- 
stallation, maintenance and pro- 
jector training are on a "pay for 
what you get'" basis. 

The rental-leasing plan is de- 
signed to encourage wider use of 
16mm sound pictures for training, 
education and demonstration, by 
eliminating projector cost as a ma- 
jor consideration, according to E. 
H. Lerchen. TSI president. In 
the new le:isint! p'an. the rental is 



only a fraction of the purcha- 
price, he pointed out. 

Lerchen cited as an example il 
company's Model M6 Movieni, 
tic projector, a built-in scrci 
unit designed for salesmen's us 
The Moviematic rents for $84. ( 
for one month, with the rent 
dropping to $45.00 at the sixi 
month. Rental periods shorti 
than a month can be arranged. 

Technical Service. Inc. mam 
facturers projectors for point-i> 
sale and desk-top demonstration 
conventions, class-room and auti 
torium instruction and training. \ 

* * * 

Packinghouse Workers Use A- 
to Report Wage Conference 

M Come to the Conference, a 2i 
minute documentary utilizing coK 
slides and a taped commentai 
has been circulated by the Uniti. 
Packinghouse Workers of Amerii 
to district union organizations. Tl 
film reports on a national waj 
conference held in Chicago la 
September. 

The audio-visual report featur 
delegates as they consider maji 
wage questions and depicts UPW 
officers and Senator Wayne Mor 
and Rev. Martin Luther King. .1 
who spoke at the convention, i 

* * * 

Timken Tells Its Story in 
New 32-Minute Color Film 

^' Even in this era of precisii 
mass production, quality roll 
bearings are remarkable for t 
extraordinary accuracy required 
their manufacture. 

No Trouble At All, (32 mil 
color) produced for The Timki 
Roller Bearing Co.. Canton. Ohi 
by Wilding Picture Productiot 
inc., outlines the processes i 
volved in the production and tc 
ing of the roller bearings the cor 
pany makes. 

Conveying a true and interesti 
picture of a segment of Americ 
industry, the film gets to its su 
j;ct without any tiresome drama 
tricks. 

The film is available throui 
Modern Talking Pictures Servii 



PROFESSIONAL 

TITLE Typographer 

and 

Hot-press Craftsmei 

SINCE 1938 

Virile for FREE type ch. 



KNIGHT TITLE SERVIC 

1 15 W. 23rd Si. New York, N. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIN 



YOUR CALENDAR OF IMPORTANT MEETINGS 



SMPTE Convention Set for 
iApril 21-26 in Los Angeles 

jsY Closed-circuit television equip- 
ment, transmission systems and 
ibtandardization goals will be sub- 
jects covered in one session of the 
iH3rd Semi-Annual Convention of 
the Society of Motion Picture and 
Television Engineers, to be held 
in Los Angeles, at the Ambassador 
iHotel, April 21-26. 
i Other SMPTE sessions will be 
devoted to such current topics as 
•Distribution of TV Programs on 
Film." "Plastics for the TV and 
Motion Picture Industries" and 
Video Tape Recorders." 

An advance schedule of papers 
.0 be read at the SMPTE Conven- 
fion has been prepared by Program 
iChairman Herbert E. Farmer, di- 
rector of services. Department of 
Cinema, University of Southern 
California, and Topic Chairman 
iBoyce Nemec, the executive vice- 
president of the Reevesound Co., 
iNew York. 

I Robert G. Day. General Elec- 
|tric Co., Syracuse, New York, will 
kpeak on the increasing interest in 
I.echnical standards in closed-cir- 
j;uit tv and the role the SMPTE 
j;an play in this standardization — 
in relation to work being done by 
ihe Electronics Industries Associ- 
Ution. 

1 The cost of wideband transmis- 
sion over long distances has been 
in obstacle to many applications 
if closed-circuit tv. Donald M. 
,is.rauss. General Electric Co., has 
prepared a survey of several meth- 
pds of generating, transmitting and 
processing narrowband tv signals, 
with emphasis on a system using 
pnventional pickup and display 
pquipment operating at standard 
[scanning rates. 

I A new electronic method of 
pompressing Cinema-Scope and 
VitaVision picture images making 
jt possible for them to be shown 
\m standard home tv screens, with- 
out noticeable cropping or distor- 
tion, will be discussed by F. N. 
Gillette, General Precision Labo- 
;atory. Inc., Pleasantville, New 
't'ork. Gillette will describe the 
pontrol console and installation 
jeatures. 

I Frank G. Back, Zoomar, Inc., 

Wew York, will report on the dif- 

erent characteristics of several 

i lypes of zoom lenses, in respect to 

'heir advantages and disadvan- 

|ages. His talk will be illustrated 

|)y pictures and diagrams. 

: I The sensitivities of various cam- 

i pra tubes, in terms of the illumina- 

iion levels required for both stand- 



ard and non-standard tv scanning 
rates, will be discussed by R. G. 
Neuhauser, Radio Corporation of 
America, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

* * * 

Schedule DAVI Convention for 
April 21-25 in Minneapolis 

yV More than 1,500 persons inter- 
ested in the audio-visual field are 
expected to attend the 1958 Na- 
tional Convention of the Depart- 
ment of Audio-Visual Instruction 
of the National Education Asso- 
ciation, to be held April 21-25, in 
the Hotel Leamington in Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota. 

Attending the DAVI Conven- 
tion will be directors of audio- 
visual programs for cities, coun- 
ties and universities; teachers, 
supervisors, principals, superin- 
tendents, and other school buying 
executives; governmental and mili- 
tary a-v specialists; executives of 
professional and trade associa- 
tions; librarians and adult educa- 
tion leaders; religious educators, 
and producers and distributors of 
a-v materials and equipment. 

A three-day exhibit of audio- 
visual materials, products and 
services will be featured at the 
DAVI Convention. Held in the 
new Hall of States on the Hotel 
Leamington's lobby floor, the ex- 
hibit will be open from 1 1 :00 a.m. 
to 6:00 p.m. on April 22. 23, and 
24. 

Services to exhibitors include 
an exhibit guide, distributed to 
convention registrants, which calls 
attention to the exhibit's impor- 
tance and lists the exhibitors and 
the products shown. Exhibitors 
also will be listed in a convention 
program and they will be given 
the names and addresses of all who 
register at the convention. 

Details of how business organi- 
zations can participate in the con- 
vention may be obtained from: 
The Department of Audio-Visual 
Instruction, National Education 
Association, 1201 16th Street, 
N. W., Washington 6, D. C. !■ 

* * * 

Institute for A-V Selling 
Scheduled for July 20-24 

ik The Tenth Anniversary National 
Institute for Audio- Visual Selling 
will meet on the Indiana Univer- 
sity campus in Bloomington, July 
20-24, just prior to the National 
Audio-Visual Convention in Chi- 
cago. 

Special features of the four 
standard Institute courses this year 
will include the use of role-playing; 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 26) 




NUMBER 2 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



25 




Coming soon 

to serve you with 

T^VICE the processing 

facilities 

• New Neg.-Pos. Color 

• New 35 mm Black-and- White 
"Daily" Service 

TV^ICE the printing facilities 
TWICE the editorial facilities 
T>VICE the sound services 

• Both RCA and Westrex 



CAPITAL 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

1905 Fairview Ave. N.E., 
Washington 2, D. C. 
LAwrence 6-4634 



MEETIIVG EVEIVTS: 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25) 

a new approach to sales demon- 
strations of equipment; and further 
development of the use of expert 
consultants in specialized areas of 
the Salesmanship. Sales and Busi- 
ness Management and Applied 
Selling courses. A fourth course. 
Preparation and Use of Audio- 
Visual Materials, features practical, 
low cost methods of local prepara- 
tion and will be summarized with 
a review of applications to major 
markets. 

Course content changes and 
plans for facilities, demonstrations, 
equipment, personnel and recrea- 
tion have been completed by the 
Institute's board of governors. 
Frank E. Creasy of W. A. Yoder 
Co., Richmond, Va., is chairman 
of the Institute board of governors, 
with Al Hunecke, DuKane Corp., 
St. Charles, 111., as vice-chairman. 
Dr. K. C. Rugg, associate director 
of the Audio-Visual Center at In- 
diana University, is assisting in 
plans and administration. 5^' 

2,500 Expected at NAVA 
Convention on July 26-29 

.' Up-to-the-minute communica- 
tions ideas and resources will be 
massed for the benefit of educa- 
tion, business and industry, the 
church field, science and medi- 
cine at the annual National Audio- 
Visual Convention and Exhibit, 
to be held in Chicago, July 26- 
29. 

An estimated 2,500 audio-vis- 
ual practitioners and a-v materi- 
als and equipment manufacturers 
will convene in meetings and at 
exhibits in Chicago's Morrison 
Hotel. 

It is expected that more new 
audio-visual products and develop- 
ments will be displayed at this 
year's NAVA convention than 
for any NAVA exhibition held in 
the past five years. Nearly $1.5 
million in equipment, products and 
materials will occupy the mezza- 
nine and first floors of the Morri- 
son Hotel, convention headquar- 
ters. Over 100 a-v producers and 
manufacturers, including a num- 
ber of new entrants in the field, 
will be featured in some 160 ex- 
hibits. 

Concurrent sessions are being 
planned by six audio-visual or- 
ganizations and the National 
Audio-Visual Association, chief 
sponsor of the convention. Speak- 
ers in many phases of a-v activity, 
workshops, seminars, discussion 
groups and film previews are be- 
ing scheduled for the event. ^ 



"The Hunters" Top Winner 
in N.Y. College Competition 

M City College of New York- 
Robert J. Flaherty Award foi 
1957 "for outstanding creative 
achievement in the documentar\ 
film" has been given to Thi 
Hiiniers. it is announced by Yae 
Woll. director of the City Collegi 
Institute of Film Techniques 
sponsor of the annual competition 

The Hunters is a study of the 
primitive culture of the Bushmer 
of South Africa. I'roduced fo 
the Peabody Museum of Harvan. 
University, the film was shot ir 
color in the Kalahari Desert. Tht 
award will go to writer-photogra 
pher John Marshall and Rober 
Gardner, who collaborated in di 
recting the film. 

A special award was given ti 
The Earth is Born, produced fo 
Transfilm-Geesink by Walter Low 
endahl. This color film portray: 
the formation of the earth, as i 
might have appeared to an on 
looker, from its beginning in gas 
eous matter to its solidification. 

The award will go to Mr. Lou 
endahl, president of Transfilni 
and Zachary Schwartz, who dir 
ected the film. 

Honorable mentions went tc 
C/7v of Gohl. produced by Ton 
Daly, and Overture, written an( 
directed by Jean Louis Polidori 
for the United Nations Film Sei 
vice, and filmed by U.N. camer.i 
men. City of Gold is a nostalgn 
film visit to Dawson, Alaska, i^ 



£ VISUAl AIDS 



MOTION 

pictures 
slid'e 

FILMS 



SEYMOUR 
ZWEIBEL 
PRODUCTIONS 
Inc. 

11 EAST 44fh STREET 
NEW YORK 17, N.Y. 



26 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIN 



!VIPTE Video-Film Course 
jsing Offered by UCLA 

< A course in "Film and Video 
1 Television" is being sponsored 
I the University of California, 
!3S Angeles, by the Society of 
potion Picture and Television En- 
rtieers in cooperation with the 
^CLA Engineering Extension, 
jitiated on February 26, sessions 
je slated to run for 1 7 weeks. 
I The new course was developed 
}i aid television personnel who are 
jsponsible for the handling and 
iaintenance of film and for pro- 
(dural techniques in the use of 
ms in tv stations. Aspects of 
in use and care will be discussed 
experts from the motion pic- 
re and television industries. 

Westfall Coordinates Course 

Sponsorship of the course is 
ling eflfected by a subcommittee 
iipointed by the SMPTE's Edu- 
(tion Committee. The subcom- 

ittee is headed by Edward E. 
.pnham, chief engineer of station 
jrTV, Los Angeles. Coordinat- 
:ig the course is Ralph Westfall, 
ijotion picture engineer. West 
past Division, Motion Picture 
jlm Distribution, Eastman Kodak 
•jmpany. 

;The Society's Education Com- 
littee, under the chairmanship 
^ John G. Frayne, engineering 
. Manager, Westrex Corporation, 
joUywood, consists of subcom- 
littees on the west and east coasts 
jir the training of sound techni- 
<|ins and laboratory technicians 
.id the development of university 

d technical school curricula. 

TV Photography First Subject 

The course's opening lecture, 
ntroduction and Practical As- 
Ixts of Photography for Televi- 
»n," was given by Benham. Other 
i';tures include: "Principles of 
jilm Manufacture," "Dimensional 

I 'oblems in Film Usage," "Film 
ioduct Identification and Nomen- 
jature," "Principles of Film Man- 
liacture," and "Important Ele- 
lents in Film Care," all given by 
jestfall. 

i William E. Gephart, vice-presi- 
i|nt, General Film Laboratories, 
'ill lecture on "Laboratory Chemi- 
^1 and Physical Control Methods" 
id "Photographic Requirements 
r Films in Television"; Robert 
'j Hufford, physicist. West Coast 
|j;vision, MPFD, Eastman Kodak, 
'U discuss "Film Projection 
jquipment — Intermittent and 

' i3ntinuous TV Projectors." 
{Ralph E. Lovell, head of Kin- 
icope Recording, National Broad- 

ICONTINUEDON PAGE 28) 



New ideas in teaching and training tools 

. . . crafted by Bell & Howell, the recognized leader in audio-visual equipment. 
Here are only samples of the broad line that includes: New Electric Eye 
Cameras . . . Time and Motion Cameras . . . Slide and Movie Projectors . . . high 
fidelity Tape Recorders ... all with Bell & Howell's famed engineering quality. 
All are sold and serviced by the nation's most experienced A-V dealers. 




Spool Load Electric Eye Camera Automatic Slide Projector— Changes Brilliant Multipurpose Projectoi 

— automatic exposure control. Lets slides automatically or by remote con- —shows both slides and filmstrips. 50( 

everyone shoot e.xpertly. 240EE. trol. Easiest to use. Robomatic. watt and 750 watt models. 724A. 




4-Speaker Tape Recorder-high fidel Deluxe Portable Tape Recorder-su- Heavy Duty Sound Projector -meets 

ity for music appreciation. Unique sound perior 2-speaker model, versatile and all projection situations, conference 
system, simple operation. 300L. compact, newest control features. 775. rooms to auditoriums. 16rrun. 614CB. 

Ask your Bell & Howell A-V dealer for a demonstration of these 
and other products in the broad, quality line he carries. For full 
descriptions and prices, call him today, or vv^rite Bell & Howell, 
7108 McCormick Road, Chicago, Illinois. 



^ Bell & Howell 

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sound, proven dependability. Magnetic 
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UMBER 2 



VOLUME 1! 



27 




ICA Victor Ciislom Recording covers more ground - faster — 
nan any other service of its kind. Our engineers' superior skill, 
einforced by years of experience and the most up-to-date tcch- 
liques and equipment, makes RCA Victor the constant leader 
a the field. 

tCA Victor also supplies the most extensive library of musical 
elections for slide films — at no extra cost. First quality record- 
ig, careful handling, and fast delivery go hand-in-hand with 
very order. 

lave RCA Victor Custom Record Sales provide yon with its 



famous "one-stop" service — recording, editing, pressing, and 
shipping — for greater quality, economy, and results! 

RCA Victor custom record sales ^5t> 

New York 10, l.'i.'i East 2I,lh St MUrray Hill 9-7200 

Chicago 11. 4i5 N. I.aUe Shore Drive WHitchall i-SSlS 

Hollywood 3S, lOtr, N. Sycamore Ave OLdfield 1,-1660 

Nashville S, 1525 McGavock St ALpine 5-6691 

In CiiiKidtt. call Record Department, RCA Victor Company, Ltd., 1001 
Lenoir St., Montreal, Quebec. For information concerning other foreign 
countries, write or phuiie RCA International Division, SO Rockefeller Plaza, 
New York SO, N. Y.-JU C-3S00. 



SMPTE Video-Film Course 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27l 

casting Company, will lecture on 
"Video Recording — Film and 
Tape" and "Elements of Televi- 
sion Engineering." Theodore B. 
Grenier, chief engineer. Western 
Division. American Broadcasting 
Company, will lecture on "Tele- 
vision Film Pickup Systems.' 
Charles Van Enger. Jr., film edi- 
tor. Review Productions, and 
Frank G. Ralston, director of the 
Network Film Dept., ABC, will 
discourse on "TV Film Editing." 

Representatives from various 
film distributing companies wili 
lecture on "TV Film Distribu- 
tion." A final session will feature 
a general review of all lectures h) 
the respective instructors. Nor- 
wood L. Simmons, member of the 
West Coast Subcommittee on Edu-; 
cation of Laboratory Technicians 
will moderate this session and lec- 
ture on "Methods of Color Pho- 
tography." 

The sessions will be held at th{ 
Eastman Kodak Company, Sant; 
Monica Blvd., Hollywood. Th( 
fee for the course is $30.00. f 

Dynamic Films Opens New 
Executive and Sales Offices 

Dynamic Films, Inc. has openec 
new executive and sales offices a 
405 Park Avenue, New York 
Production facilities at 112 Wes 
89th Street have been expanded. f 

Gold Medal Studios Elected 
to N.Y. Film Producers Assn. 

>■ The Film Producers Associa 
tion of New York has electee 
Gold Medal Studios, Martin Poll 
president, to membership, 

Recently Gold Medal acquirei 
a new Mitchell rear-screen pro 
jection device, one of only thre* 
in the East, that permits extensi\ 
scenic effects. It is available t. 
all film producers on a rental basi' 
The company has augmented it 
main film stages with two ne\ 
stages on its Biograph Studios loi 
another at the DuMont Tele 
center in midtown Manhattar 
and a "western" stage at th 
Cimarron Ranch just outside N. \ 
* * ♦ 

U.S. Exports of Still Projector 
Show Gain During 1957 

■m" Exports of still picture projei. 
tors increased by more than 1 2,00i 
units in 1957, according to th 
Business and Defense Services Ad 
ministration of the U. S. Depart 
ment of Commerce. 

Shipments of this type equij 
ment totaled 54,210 units value 
at $2,108,978 in 1957, as con, 
pared with 42,003 units valued ^ 
$1,697,229 in 1956. i 



28 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIN 



RIGHT Off the REEL 

Labor Takes An Active Role in Use of the Film Medium 



(HE Labor Unions are setting 
jl a fast pace for management 
lith a sizeable number of im- 
portant new public relations films. 
i)ne which won't win any com- 
Dany plaudits in Detroit, at least. 
Is the United Auto Worker's Pros- 
\)erity jor AH. UAW president 
Valter Reuther explains in detail 
vhat the union's bargaining de- 
nands are in coming negotiations 
Kith auto, aircraft and agricultural 
implement companies. 

The International Brotherhood 
)t' Electrical Workers will release 
^s new film Operation Brolher- 
Lyj — the IBEW Story next 
Inonth. Picture tells the history 
;)f the union. Last February, the 
Jnited Steelworkers of America 
bremiered its 68-minute film Bur- 
den of Truth and there's a new 
Packinghouse Workers' picture. 
j The labor organizations are get- 
ling these pictures ,v/)ovi7i, not only 
[o their own members but among 
influence leaders throughout the 
i:ountry as well as to school chil- 
liren. It is a sad commentary that 
Management has lapsed into com- 
i)arative silence, filmwise, at this 
decisive hour of economic stress. 

ireedoms Foundation Award 
o "The Battle for Liberty" 

Sharing honors with American 

Engineer which was awarded the 

ncased George Washington 

JTonor Medal by the Freedoms 

|-oundation in February was 

' 'mother important film contribu- 

: |ion from The Jam Handy Organi- 
ption. Also accorded highest hon- 
ors was the sound slidefilm series 

' The Battle for Liberty, which de- 

■ tails the principles and patterns of 

' tommunism. 

' I This hard-hitting presentation of 
jjasic facts about totalitarian Com- 

' 'nunism is now being made avail- 
ible to schools and groups. 9 

\ This hard-hitting series of sound 
'filidefilms on Communism won 
* freedoms Award honors. 



*V«^^ 



PICTURES THAT MADE NEWS THIS /ViONTH 



"Disaster and You" Depicts 
Red Cross '55 Flood Work 

'■ Disaster and You, a 3()-minute 
film depicting the work of the 
American Red Cross disaster units 
in alleviating distress caused by the 
New England floods of 1955, was 
premiered by national, state, and 
local Red Cross officials recently 
in Torrington, Conn. Much of the 
footage in the film was made in 
Torrington. 

Also at the premiere were Gov. 
Abe Ribicolf of Connecticut, U.S. 
Senators Prescott Bush and Wil- 
liam A. Purtell, and representatives 
of the federal government. 

Produced by Wilding Picture 
Productions, the film was made 
through a grant from Radio Cor- 
poration of America through its 
chairman Brig. Gen. David Sar- 
noff. 

Purpose of the picture, accord- 
ing to a high Red Cross official, is 
to "help people better to under- 
stand the nature and scope of Red 
Cross disaster operations." 

On the day following the pre- 
miere, the film was shown every 
hour to residents of Torrington, 
many of whom were personally in- 
volved in both the disaster and the 
work of the Red Cross. Clips of 
the film also were shown on Dave 
Garroway's Today tv show. 

Distribution of the film through 
Red Cross units is being planned. 



Warren R. Smith, Inc., Now 
in New Pittsburgh Studios 

- The new film studios of War- 
ren R. Smith. Inc., Pittsburgh, 
were dedicated recently in cere- 
monies presided over by Mayor 
David L. Lawrence. Now cen- 
tralized in an entire building at 
210 Semple Street in Oakland, 
the new location affords 12,500 
square feet of studio, laboratory 
and production space. 

Attending the "studio warming" 
were representatives of tv and 
radio stations, newspapers, public 
relations and advertising agencies, 
educational institutions, business 
and industrial organizations, and 
civic groups. 

Besides producing films for in- 
dustry, education and television, 
the Smith laboratories also have 
been a major processor of film 
for tv stations, industrial firms, ad- 
vertising agencies, and educational 
institutions. 1' 




Honored Guests at recent Washington I). ( . i>rr/iiit'rc of "Rubber From 
OH" (see page 30) were (I. to r.) U. S. Commissioner of Patents Rob- 
ert C. Wat.son; Secretary of Commerce Sinclair Weeks: A. D. Green, 
butyl pioneer; W. J. Sparks, co-iiivenlor of butyl: W . C. Ashury, Esso 
Research Vice President and host: and U. S. Senator Alexander Wiley. 




A Driver's Eve \ii\\ hI ihc i'.S. is what audiences at the Bniwch 
Exhibition will see in "An American Highway Experience," produced 
by General Motors for showing there. Using an Arriflex 35mm camera 
with a Mitchell finder, hood-mounted on a special platform, Jo Hudyma 
(above), G. M. Photographic cameraman, and director-cameraman Don 
Nor burn shot scenes from New England to Florida. 




Pittsburgh's Mayor David L. Lawrence (right) helped to dedicate the 
new Warren R. Smith, Inc. Studios in that city last month. His host, 
president Warren Smith, demonstrates company's Tele-Cam equipment. 



;\' UMBER 2 



VOLUME 19 



1958 




Fian'-lii;ht dramatizes a night view of the fxiiiuiuin section of an E.s.so l->utyl plant. 

EvDlution of Man-Made Rubber 

Esso's Film "Rubber From Oil" an Imaginative Treatment of Technical Subject 



THE Interpretation of Science and 
technology to the general, non-technical 
public is one of the greatest challenges and 
opportunities to sponsors and producers of 
business lilms. The challenges, although great 
in every industry, are especially exacting in 
the petroleum and chemical industries. Film 
producers and sponsors have long wept bitter 
tears about the sameness of tanks, towers and 
reactors. 

So when the Esso Research and Engineering 
Company decided with Nat Campus, president 
of Campus Film Productions, that the com- 
pany's next public relations film should be on 
butyl synthetic rubber, there was unanimous 
agreement that towers and reactors should be 
deemphasized in favor of a more imaginative 
approach. 

Recognize Story's Dramatic Qualities 

To begin with, there was agreement that 
the butyl story — more than most industrial 
stories — had certain inherent dramatic ad- 
vantages. For example, in contrast to most 
new developments where it is often difficult — 
if not impossible — to single out the scientists 
who contributed most, butyl had been invented 
by two company chemists, Drs. W. J. Sparks 
and R. M. Thomas. 

After a crash program of development, butyl 
had helped the allies win World War II by 
supplying inner tubes and other military equip- 
ment; and because of its many special proper- 
ties, butyl is being used in new products 
almost every day. 

So this man-made rubber offered the oppor- 
tunity to interpret industrial research, chemistry 
and chemical engineering to the general 
public — and especially to the young people 



who, with the proper motivation, might be- 
come tomorrow's chemists. 

In addition, butyl was, in line with the 
company's overall public relations objectives, 
a good example of how large-scale industrial 
research contributes to the nation's defenses 
and results in improved products for living. 

Accent on Realism and Authenticity 

From the beginning, both Campus and the 
company insisted on realism and authenticity. 
It was agreed that the film would cover the 
problems and failures as well as the successes. 
Too many films, they agreed, make science 
and engineering seem routine and dull. Al- 
though an occasional lab assistant might be 
permitted to wear a white coat for aesthetic 
reasons, most of the scientists would be in 
shirt sleeves and the more practical lab aprons. 

Where pilot plants had been torn down, a 
careful search was made for contemporary 
duplicates. The goal was an interesting and 
exciting film that would be understandable to 
laymen and credible for the scientists. Al- 
though singleness of purpose is no doubt a 
virtue in film production, it is the opinion of 
both the company and the producer that the 
two-edged standard, in this case, resulted in 
a better film for all audiences. 

As the central scientific and technical organ- 
ization for the Standard Oil Company (New 
Jersey), Esso Research is primarily interested 
in producing films which can be used as widely 
as possible by affiliates operating in more than 
60 nations. As a matter of fact, once a film 
such as Rubber From Oil is produced, Esso 
Research prefers to turn all distribution, even 
U.S., over to affiliates. 

Two previous Campus productions, Flowini; 



Solids and Leadership Through Research hav 
proved that this formula works. For exampk 
Leadership Through Research was retired i' 
1954 only after it had reached over four millio' 
people in the U.S., Latin America and Europ 
at an average cost of about two mills pe 
person. 

Because of the large potential for foreig 
language distribution, the company has founi 
it best to avoid live sound so there will b 
no lip-sync problem in translation. By th 
same token, use of English placards or title 
in the body of the film must also be avoidcc 
Naturally this imposes a few limitations; how 
ever, in the case of Rubber From Oil, th 
narrative style (CBS's Bob Hite serves a 
narrator) proved to be most effective. 

Most "Actors" From the Company Ranks 

Because butyl was invented more than 2( 
years ago, a decision was made to find actor 
to play the roles of the co-inventors. Althougl 
the inventors are not widely known outsidi 
industry circles, it was still felt that the actor 
should be selected, in part, for their resem 
blance to the inventors. The other personne 
appearing in the film were recruited from com 
pany ranks and responded with natural be 
lievability to Director Don Haldane's coaching 

After the usual rounds of rewriting, thi 
script by Alvin Boretz emerged with a ston 
line which traces butyl from its invention (thi 
first batch was actually turned out in a honn 
washing machine) on a Saturday in July, 1937 
through its successful vulcanization and im 
provement, war-time process development an( 
product research. Three animation sequence 
explain the chemistry of the development. 

Because it was difficult to compress thi 
story of 20 years of research into less thai 
thirty minutes, a decision was made to maki 
a somewhat longer film. After editing, th( 
film runs 31 minutes; however, a 27' -j minute, 
b/w version is under consideration for tv. 5! 

Man-made rubber as it leaves extrusion presse. 




30 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE| 



I 



PROCEDURES FDR EDPYRIGHT 
of Motion Pictures and Filmstrips 



by Evelyn Dunne, U. S. Copyright Office 



N 1894, The First Claim to copyright in a 
motion picture was registered. The film was 
le famous Edison Kinetoscopic Record of a 
neeze popularly known in film circles as Fred 
ht's Sneeze, with a running time of two and a 
alf minutes. Since then the Copyright Office 
as registered claims in over 90,000 films; in 
lie first six months of 1957, 2105 claims in 
ew films were registered, as well as 507 re- 
jewals of previously registered claims. 

This summary describes briefly the require- 
lents for copyright registration of motion pic- 
ires and filmstrips, and gives the basic infor- 
lation on application forms, return agree- 
lents for films deposited, and the film cata- 
)gs published by the Copyright Office. 



COPYRIGHT CLASSIFICATION 
OF SUBMITTED FILMS 



In the early days there was no statutory 
iassification system. The different types of 
taterial submitted for copyright were distin- 
■ jaished only by a descriptive word or phrase 
^ (iter the title of a work: "book," "musical 
|)mposition," "photograph," etc. 
I In the absence of specific mention of "mo- 
' 'on pictures" in the law, the term photograph 
':emed most nearly applicable for purposes of 
atry, but the physical nature of the items de- 
• "Dsited ranged from paper prints and repre- 
fentative stills to complete motion pictures on 
jSmm positive photographic paper rolls. 
I A classification section was eventually pro- 
jded in the Act of March 4, 1909, and on Au- 
jast 24, 1912, two additional classes were es- 
blished for motion picture registrations: 
lass L for photoplays, and Class M for mo- 
on pictures other than photoplays. Presently, 
lass M includes training and promotional 
Ims, documentaries, and filmed television pro- 
rams having no plot. Filmstrips and slide 
Ims, as well as still photographic prints, are 
:gistered in Class J, photographs. 



REGISTRATION OF COPYRIGHT 
CLAIMS IN FILMS 



pplication Forms 

Presumably much of the material in which 
iie readers of Business Screen are interested 
jelongs appropriately in Class M, although any 
ramatic film, regardless of its use, would be 
imsidered Class L material. The same form. 



Form L-M, is filed for both classes, but it is 
essential that in each application filed it be in- 
dicated whether the work for which registra- 
tion is sought is a photoplay. Class L, or a mo- 
tion picture other than a photoplay. Class M. 

The latest forms. Form L-M, and Form J 
which is suitable for filmstrips, may be ob- 
tained without charge from the Register of 
Copyrights, Library of Congress, Washington 
25, D. C. All applicable items in forms sub- 
mitted must be filled in to secure registration 
of a claim; incomplete applications are not ac- 
ceptable. 

Besides a statement as to whether or not 
the work deposited is a photoplay, the infor- 
mation required includes the complete name 
and address of the claimant or claimants; the 
title of the work, that is, the title of the film or 
filmstrip; and the name and citizenship of the 
author of the film. Where a work is made for 
hire, the employer is considered the author, 
and citizenship of an organization formed 
under United States federal law or the law of 
one of the states should be stated as "U.S.A." 

If the work seeking registration has been 
published; i.e., if copies have been placed on 
sale, sold or publicly distributed, the date and 
place (country) of publication must be stated 
on the application. If the film is based on or 
correlated with a previously published work, 
this should be indicated and a brief statement 
made, describing the new work of authorship 
in which copyright is claimed. 

The Notice of Copyright Prescribed by Law 

i> Copyright in a published work is secured 
according to the statute, Title 17 of the United 
States Code, Section 10, by the very act of 
publication, provided all the copies bear the 
prescribed notice of copyright at the time of 
first publication. The Copyright Office regis- 
ters a claim after copyright has thus been se- 
cured by publication. The registration is, how- 
ever, a condition precedent to any suit for 
infringement of copyright. 

Publication generally means the sale, plac- 
ing on sale or public distribution of copies. In 
the case of a motion picture, it may also in- 
clude distribution to film exchanges, film dis- 
tributors, exhibitors or broadcasters under a 
lease or similar arrangement. 

The notice of copyright should consist of 
the word "Copyright," the abbreviation 
"Copr.," or the symbol "®," accompanied by 



UMBER 2 



VOLUME 19 



19 58 



the name of the copyright owner and the year 
date of publication; for instance, "'' Indiana 
University, 1958." The notice should be 
easily legible, and should appear on the film 
itself, preferably on or near the title frame. 

Use of the symbol ""'-'" together with the name 
of the copyright owner and the year date may 
result in copyright being secured in some coun- 
tries outside the United States which are mem- 
bers of the Universal Copyright Convention. 
For information regarding the protection in 
other countries of works by United States citi- 
zens, an informative circular may be obtained 
from the Copyright Office (Circular 37). 

Once a work is published with notice, there 
is a legal obligation to register a claim. Under 
the copyright statute, claims may also be regis- 
tered in unpublished works, i.e., those not re- 
produced in copies for sale or public distribu- 
tion. 

Deposit Requirements 

M In the case of an unpublished film, the fol- 
lowing should be deposited in the Copyright 
Office: 

1. the title of the motion picture (shown in 
the application); 

2. a description, which may consist of a syn- 
opsis, press book, continuity or other 
identifying matter; 

3. a print taken from each scene or act if 
the film is a photoplay, or not less than 
2 prints from different sections of the 
work, if it is a motion picture other than 
a photoplay; 

4. an application Form L-M, duly com- 
pleted; and 

5. a fee of $4.00. 

The requirements for registration of a claim 
in a published work are the same with regard 
to items 2, 4 and 5 above; a description, ap- 
plication and fee must be deposited. However, 
instead of the separate prints, (item 3 above), 
two complete copies of the best edition of the 
motion picture then published should be sent 
to the Register of Copyrights promptly after 
publication. 

If a registered, unpublished work is later 
reproduced in copies and published, it is neces- 
sary to make a second registration, in accord- 
ance with the requirements outlined above for 
a published work, including the placing of the 
statutory notice containing the correct year 
date on all copies of the film before publication, 
and the deposit of two complete copies of the 
work, together with a new Form L-M, descrip- 
tion and $4.00 fee. 

To register a claim in a filmstrip. Form J 
is filed. If the filmstrip has been published, two 
complete copies of the work must be deposited; 
if it has not been published, one. A $4.00 fee 
is also required. 

Registrations are more rapidly completed if 
ail the requisite elements — copies, application, 
fee and description — are sent to the Copyright 

(CONTINUED ON PAGE THIRTY-TWO) 



31 



PrDCGdurGS for Film Copyright: 



(continued from page thirty-one) 

Office at the same time. Upon completion of 
the registration of a woriv. the certificate (page 
3 of the application form), bearing the seal 
of the Copyright Ofiice. is returned to the appli- 
cant. Such a certificate will be admitted by any 
court as prima facie evidence of the facts 
stated therein. 



HUiHTS SIM THE I) BY 

( ()pykk;ht owners 



■sV Copyright in unpublished works is secured 
by compliance with the statutory requirements 
for deposit; copyright is secured in published 
works by the publication of the work with the 
prescribed copyright notice. 

The original term of copyright in a published 
work lasts for 28 years from the date of publi- 
cation; in the case of a work originally reg- 
istered in unpublished form, the copyright term 
lasts for 28 years from the date of registration 
in the Copyright Oftlce. In either case, the 
copyright may be renewed for a second 28- 
year term, but only if an acceptable renewal 
application and $2.00 fee are filed within the 
last (28th) year of the original copyright term. 

Form R is used for renewals, and. like the 
other forms, is available without charge. Page 
4 of this form contains detailed information 
about renewal requirements. 

It is not possible to obtain a "blanket" copy- 
right; copyright is secured only in the particular 
work in which the claim is registered. Copy- 
right, if secured in a given film, does not apply 
to future or past films in a series, nor to the 
series as a whole. The general idea, outline or 
title of a motion picture or other work cannot 
be copyrighted, nor can the characters or situa- 
tions portrayed. 

The Copyright Office is not empowered to 
register claims in unpublished scenarios or syn- 
opsis except where they approximate complete 
shooting scripts. Films accompanied by sound 
recordings are accepted as deposits, although 
claims are not registered in sound tracks alone 
or in phonograph recordings. 



PH<)< ESSI.\(i BY COPYRIGHT 
OKKKE -LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



Agreements for Return of Copies 

iT The deposit copies ( i.e., reels) of a published 
motion picture are subject to retention by the 
Copyright Office. However, a special, prepared 
contract may be signed with the Librarian of 
Congress for the return of copies immediately 
following registration. 

If no contract with a particular remitter 
exists, upon the receipt of deposit copies, a 
letter is written to him, explaining that an 



agreement for the return of copies is available, 
and enclosing copies of the form of agreement. 
The copies of the film are held by the Copy- 
right Office, pending a reply. 

An agreement, once approved, applies to all 
motion pictures the claimant may deposit. The 
agreement must be between the Librarian of 
Congress and the copyright claimant, and the 
claimant must sign the agreement. Deposited 
films are returned to the claimant. Railway 
Express collect, at the address given in the 
application. 

According to law, any motion picture de- 
posited may be selected by the Librarian for 
the collections of the Library of Congress. 
Therefore, claimants agree to keep available, 
for a period of two years, one copy of each 
motion picture so deposited. Unless the Librar- 
ian requests a copy within the specified period, 
he is deemed to have relinquished the right to 
demand a copy. 

If no such agreement is concluded, the copies 
of motion pictures deposited for copyright are 
transferred to the Library of Congress for dis- 
posal. 

Examination & Cataloging of Films 
by Copyright Office 

w The copies of motion pictures deposited for 
copyright registration are examined by means 
of a special projector for validity of the copy- 
right notice — inclusion of all required elements, 
legibility and position — for completeness of 
copies and for data for cataloging. The films 
are not examined for originality or monetary 
value. 

A data sheet is made by the examiner and 
forwarded with the application to the Catalog- 
ing Division of the Copyright Office, where 
semi-annual and cumulative catalogs are pre- 
pared for publication, as well as the cards 
which constitute the Copyright Card Catalog 
maintained in the Copyright Office. 

Film Catalogs Issued Semi-Annually 

Semi-annual catalogs of motion pictures and 
filmstrips registered are published by the Copy- 
right Office. They constitute Parts 12-13 of 
the "Catalog of Copyright Entries." In 1957, 
3204 motion pictures and 513 filmstrips were 
registered and catalogued. 

These catalogs may be obtained for $ 1 .00 a 
year, payable in advance, from the Register of 
Copyrights. The latest volume is "Motion Pic- 
tures and Filmstrips January-June 1957." Or- 
ders may also be placed for subscriptions for 
one or more years. 

Arrangement of the catalog is by title. Each 
work is described in a main entry which in- 
cludes information pertinent to the copyright 
claim, and references lead to associated titles. 
Renewals are in a separate section. There is 
also a name index in each volume, containing 



the names of claimants, producing and releasii 
companies, sponsors and authors given in tl 
main entries. 

How Film Entries are Cataloged L 

The main entry for each work current! 
registered contains the following items, if an 
plicable and available: I 

1. title (any variants, and the descriptiu 
word "filmstrip" if applicable); 

2. production statement; 

3. physical description, including runnii 
time or number of reels, silent or sound filr 
color or black and white, width of film; 

4. series statement (if applicable); 

5. author and title of any published work o 
which the film may be based (if informatio 
appears on application or copy); 

6. names given in the application which c 
not appear elsewhere in the entry; 

7. name of the employer in the case of 
work made for hire, and of the employees whe 
given in the application; 

8. information in application relating to rej 
istration of an earlier version of work; 

9. in the case of new versions, brief stat( 
ment of the new matter in which copyright 
claimed; 

10. copyright symbol "?"; 

11. name of the copyright claimant; 

12. in the case of published works, date ( 
publication given in the application; in the ca; 
of unpublished works, date of receipt in tli 
Copyright Office of the last of the items n 
quired to complete registration; 

13. registration number. 
Here are some typical entries : 

THE BEST TRUCK TIRE EVER MADE 

(Filmstrip) Chevrolet Motor Divisioi 
Made by Jam Handy Organization, 
fr., b&w, 35mm. 
'^Chevrolet Motor Division, General M( 
tors Corp.; 23Mar57; JU8826. 

MAKE YOUR HOME SAFE. Young Amei 
ica Films. 11 min., sd. b&w, 16 mm. Wit 
teacher's guide. 

©Young America Films, Inc. : 10May57 
MP8161. 

The Copyright Office has also published thre 
cumulative catalogs of motion picture entries 

Motion Pictures 1894-1912, identified froi 
the records of the United States Copyrigl 
Office by Howard Lamarr Walls. 1953. 92 
Buckram, $2.00. 

Motion Pictures 1912-1939, a cumulati 
catalog listing works registered in the Cop) 
right Office between August 24, 1912 an 
December 31, 1939. Copyright Office Cumuh- 
live Series. 1953. 1.256 p. Buckram, $18.0( 

Motion Pictures 1940-1949, a cumulativ 
catalog listing works registered in the Cop) 
right Office between January 1, 1940 ai 
December 31, 1949. Copyright Office Cumul 
tive Series. 1953. 598 p. Buckram, $10.00. 

Orders are taken for these three volume! 
which together list 80,000 motion pictures. K 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIN 



Pa., into four 
ul shoe stores 
/Ir. Metzger's 
lensed into 12 
rs which are 
lure and re- 
McCall's will 
eeing the film, 
as staged with 

at J. & J. 
shoe store in 
;il Films, Inc. 
elv free hand 

format and 
ne interesting 
ery shot was 
listomer's eye 
ting a story 

that used in 
roduction. 

Retailers 

an? was pre- 

Shoe Fair 

Some 5,000 

'cs saw the 

ngs daily for 

Fair. Many 

and chains 

Red Cross, 

. Penney and 

rints on the 

|heir salesmen, 

me 30 more 

t use through- 

h more being 

Vit cost ) each 




now found 
n has brought 
requests from 
to use it in 

.t budget. Are 
been one of 
fashion pro- 
magazine has 
lly entrenched 
y (it regularly 
"s shoe adver- 
service maga- 
hus renewing 
s earned with 
ishion arbiter 
In. R' 



'^^ yf!9*>- 



FEATURE-LENGTH MOTION PICTURE WITH ORIGINAL S)K] 
AND MUSIC HIGHLIGHTS THE 1958 DEERE DAYS PROG\K| 



(CONTINU 

Office at thi 
the registrat 
3 of the a 
of the Copy 
cant. Such 
court as p 
stated thereil 



ti- Copyrigh 
by compha 
for deposit; 
works by th 
prescribed c 

The origi 
work hists fi 
cation; in tl| 
istered in im 
lasts for 2<s 
in the Cop 
copyright n 
year term, 
appMcation 
last (28th) 

Form R i 
other forms, 
4 of this fc 
about renew 

It is not p 
right; copyrii 
work in whi * 
right, if secu| 
to future or 
series as a 
title of a m 
be copyright 
tions portra 

The Cop 
register clai 
opsis except 
shooting scr 
recordings ;i 
claims are n 
or in phonojj 





Providing something new and different to entertain | 
the host of farm families that gather each year for the 
Deere Days programs is a difficult task. For more 
than twenty years we have successfully filled that 
assignment and the 1958 picture is no exception. Six 
weeks in production in Arizona and on stage (see 
illustrations) , this fast-moving musical comedy titled 
"Ace Ranchero," will highlight the Deere Days with 
sheer fun and entertainment. Except for the cast of 
110 television, screen and musical comedy stars, all 
personnel involved were regular Wilding employees. 



o 



Fletcher D. Richards advertising agency teamed with Wilding 
to produce a series of twenty-six half-hour television shows for 
AMF — American Machine Foundry — leading manufacturer of 
bowling alley pin-setting equipment. Starring championship keg- 
lers the series is now entertaining millions of people coast-to-coast. 




New Bufferin television commercials made 
through Young and Rubicam feature nation- 
ally known "Breakfast Clubber" Don McNeil. 

A series of product television commercials for 
Leo Burnett and their client Chas. Pfizer & 
Company were produced on Terramycin. 



H- 



Pa., into four 
ul shoe stores 
/Ir. Metzger's 
Icnsed into 12 
rs which are 
ture and re- 
McCail's will 
eeing the film, 
as staged with 

at J. & J. 
shoe store in 
il Films, Inc. 
elv free hand 

format and 
ne interesting 
ery shot was 
[istomer's eye 
ting a story 

that used in 
jroduction. 

Retailers 

an? was pre- 
|nal Shoe Fair 

Some 5,000 
ives saw the 
ngs daily for 

Fair. Many 

and chains 

Red Cross, 

. Penney and 

rints on the 

eir salesmen. 
Tie 30 more 
t use through- 
h more being 
nt cost) each 

now found 
n has brought 
requests from 
to use it in 

it budget. Are 
been one of 
fashion pro- 
magazine has 
ily entrenched 
y (it regularly 
's shoe adver- 
service maga- 
hus renewing 
s earned with 
ishion arbiter 



m 

IK y^S%- 



NUMBER 2 • VOLUME 19 • 195! 




EXCLUSIVE 



The "Academy of Lighting Arts" is a sales training pro- 
gi'am developed for the Large Lamp Department of General 
Electric to train people to sell "Light for Living." An intense 
field study was conducted to appraise the methods by which 
the merchandise of lighting is sold and to probe for opportuni- 
ties to improve selling methods. Out of the study was gen- 
erated a broad program consisting of ten carefully planned 
clinics designed to bring lighting knowledge and selling tech- 
niques to people who influence the sale of lamps and fixtures 
and generally better lighting in communities. Visual ele- 
ments in the program include two important motion pictures. 



"Academy of Lighting Arts" 

A PROGRAM DESIGNED TO HELP SALES PEOPLE BECOME LIGHTING SPECIALISTS 



One film illustrates the sales potential for residential light- 
ing and some of the ways to get better lighting into homes in a 
community. The other film illustrates selling methods that 
work on a showroom floor. Colorful slidefilms mechanize 
the teaching of functional and decorative lighting techniques 
and lighting for special tasks. The program also includes 
carefully planned meetings, open foi*ums, live demonstra- 
tions, outside reading, lighting projects and quizzes. The 
result of the program will be the graduation of a large 
number of "Certified Lighting Consultants," people quali- 
fied to help home owners make intelligent lighting selections. 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A G .A Z I N E 



I 




JOHN DALY NARRATES 
"THE ROAD AHEAD" 

In this scene fronn one of the movies, Daly 
illustrates the importance of all allies in the 
electrical industry cooperating to promote 
the "Light for Living" program. 



SELLING IN A LIGHTING 
FIXTURE SALES ROOM 

This scene from the color movie on floor 
salesmanship shov/s hov/ the v/aiting cus- 
tomer is recognized by the salesman even 
though he is temporarily involved. 



A SCENE FROM ONE OF 
THE COLOR SLIDEFILMS 

Here sales people are taught the value of 
checking fixture installations after a light- 
ing job is completed. The satisfied customer 
should be the objective for all lighting 
sales people. 



Pa., into four 
ul shoe stores 
/[t. Metzger's 
iensed into 1 2 
rs which are 
ture and re- 
McCairs will 
eeing the film, 
as staged with 

at J. & J. 
shoe store in 
al Films, Inc. 
elv free hand 

format and 
)ne interesting 
■ery shot was 
istomer's eye 
ting a story 
e that used in 
roduction. 

■ Retailers 

an? was pre- 
nal Shoe Fair 

Some 5.000 
ives saw the 
ings daily for 

Fair. Many 
. and chains 
; Red Cross. 
'. Penney and 
irints on the 
heir salesmen, 
me 30 more 
t use through- 
h more being 
nt cost) each 

now found 
n has brought 
requests from 
to use it in 

;t budget. Are 
been one of 
fashion pro- 
magazine has 
lly entrenched 
y (it regularly 
's shoe adver- 
service maga- 
hus renewing 
s earned with 
ishion arbiter 




DUMBER 2 



VOLUME 19 • 1958 




^^^ 



PXCLUSlVEl pR"N«Nc 



I 



HI 

( < 



^ra/faara uii lop-tevei bates {.onrerence 
Includes Workshop Meetings and Entertainment 






To spur sales in all divisions Standard Oil con- 
ducted a three-day sales conference of workshop 
meetings aimed at its higher echelon of sales 
management. The meetings consisted of execu- 
tive speeches, motion pictures, flip chart discus- 
sions, glass slides and other visual presentations. 
Highlight of the three days was a musical play 
of original songs sung by top-flight performers 
in colorful costumes on elaborate stage sets 
which deftly combined a significant sales mes- 
sage with live entertainment. Standard Oil of- 
ficials were so impressed with the impact created 
by the play they commissioned Wilding to put it 
on film and subsequently showed it throughout 
the company's sales territory to the praise of 
dealer audiences. 




The top illustration is a candid shot take; 
during an actual performance of the play o; 
a theatre stage. The lower illustration show 
the two-camera technique that was used in film 
ing the same scene on a Wilding sound stag« 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINl'. 




maVision Eastman Cotor Motion Picture and Live S/iow 
are Combined to introduce New 1958 fords 



]ig ideas require big thinking. For example, the 
{lility to produce and travel a show introducing 
1e 1958 Fords to dealers and salesmen across the 
] ition, was a project of tremendous magnitude. It 
ivolved an hour and fifty minutes of motion pic- 
1 j-es and forty-five minutes of live presentations. 

ere are some of the vital statistics: thirteen mo- 
nn picture sets, some 100 feet long (see illustra- 

Dns), sixty- two pieces of special motion picture 
quipment, five sound stages and seven weeks of 



filming by five different crews shooting simultane- 
ously in Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit and New 
York. To troupe the show required seven separate 
units — each complete with its own scenery and 
props — composed of ten performers, twenty-five 
stage hands and a stage manager. The performers 
highlighted the show with skits, songs and new car 
presentations. About 1,300 people were involved in 
the over-all production and the travelling crews 
played twenty separate shows to enthusiastic 
audiences in nineteen major cities across the U.S. 



IT TAKES FACILITIES, EXPERIENCE AND SKILL TO BLEND AN UNDERTAKING 
OF THIS MAGNITUDE INTO A WELL-COORDINATED AND PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 



Pa., into four 
ul shoe stores 
Ax. Metzger's 
iensed into 12 
rs which are 
ture and re- 
McCall's will 
eeing the film, 
as staged with 

at J. & J. 
shoe store in 
al Films, Inc. 
ely free hand 

format and 
)ne interesting 
'ery shot was 
istomer's eye 
ting a story 
e that used in 
roduction. 

; Retailers 

an? was pre- 
nal Shoe Fair 
Some 5.000 
:ives saw the 
ings daily for 
Fair. Many 
; and chains 
; Red Cross, 
.". Penney and 
prints on the 
heir salesmen, 
me 30 more 
t use through- 
h more being 
nt cost ) each 

now found 
n has brought 
requests from 
to use it in 

;t budget. Are 
been one of 
fashion pro- 
magazine has 
lly entrenched 
y (it regularly 
's shoe adver- 
service maga- 
thus renewing 
s earned with 
ashion arbiter 




NUMBER 2 • VOLUME 19 • 195 



EXCLUSIVE! PR^oN.>*cv.e^ 



! 



Under ideal conditions — inside, out of 
weather— a motion picture camera recordslu 
step-by-step progress of ARMCO people eijL 
ing a steel service building. It's for a K(a 
chrome picture titled "Space, Time and Std" 




A backyard replete with fence aj, 
foliage erected on stage provides 
realistic set for the picture "Over 1 
Backyard Grill" one of a series mo 
for the National Live Stock and M« 
Board on preparing and cooking me< 



On another Wilding stage a camera crew focuses on an impres- 
sive stylized decorator's studio. Ifs a scene from "Color Magic" 
produced for Interchemical Corporation. 



REEL NEWS is a copyrighted publication printed in the U.S.A. 



REEL NEWS 

published by 

WILDING PICTURE PRODUCTIONS^ 

CHICAGO 

General Offices and Studios 
1345 Argyle Street • LOngbeoch 1-8410 



NEW YORK CLEVELAND 

405 Pork Avenue 1010 Euclid Avenu 

PLaza 9-0854 TOwer 1-6440 

PinSBURGH HOLLYWOOD 

3 Gateway Center 5981 Venice Blvd. 

GRonI 1-6240 WEbster 8-0183 



CINCINNATI DETROIT 

617 Vine Street 4925 CadI 

GArfleld 1-0477 TUxedo 2 

ST. LOUIS ST. PAUL 

3920 Lindall Blvd. 1821 Univ 

JEfferson 5-7422 Midway ( 



Published three times a year, REEL NEWS provides o brief resumeM 
activities in producing industrial motion pictures, television commerh 
films, industrial shows and other visual programs. If you ore intelP 
more detailed account of our operotions please contact any of 
listed here. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Fashion Show 

French Handbag Industry 
Sponsors New Color Film 

Sponsor: The French Handbag 
& Leather Goods Industry 

Title : Behind the Label, I3I/2 
min., color, produced by Joseph 
Schaeffer. 

is This film, narrated by actor 
Claude Dauphin, was made in 
Paris and New York. It begins 
at Left Bank School, sponsored 
by the Paris Chamber of Com- 
merce, where a boy and girl meet 
while attending classes in the art 
f creating handbags and belts. 
The school, attended by some 200 
ipprentices, combines French ar- 
istry with modern methods of or- 
;anization and mass production. 
The film shows how the students 
re trained to specialize in "maro- 
quinerie" (handbags and bill- 
olds); "gainerie" (boxes and 
:ases); and "sellerie" (briefcases 
md luggage). 

The second part of the film 
ihows scenes of Christian Dior's 
boutique, a fashion show at the 
Lido in Paris, and scenes in New 
York. It seeks to illustrate that 
'Made in France" is synonymous 
with artistry and skill in handbags 
and leather goods. 

Color and b/w prints of Be- 
hind the Label are available 
through the distributor, Sterling- 
Movies U. S. A., Inc. S 

* * * 
Fibers, Fashions Promoted 
in Du Pont Sound Slidepix 

I ik Informative humor is employed 
in a new 18-minute sound and 
icolor slidefilm on Automatic Wash 
;'n" Wear Fashions, being made 
ji .available to merchandising and 
'sales training staffs by the Textile 
Fibers Department of E. I. du 
'Pont de Nemours & Company, 
Inc. 

The light pictorial is intended 
o impress merchandisers, buyers 
and sales people with the advan- 
jtages of Automatic Wash 'n' Wear 
Fashions. Fiber content and con- 
struction details which make pos- 
sible automatic washing and dry- 
ng of suits, dresses and sportswear 
ue demonstrated. 

The slidefilm finishes with a 
ashion show — parading advertise- 
nents of Automatic Wash "n' Wear 
,^ashions currently available in 
|.tores. The promotional film was 
Produced by Close and Patenaude, 
ales promotion agency of Phila- 
Iclphia and Welmington, Del. 



Right: McCalis new 

film "Are You This 

Man" is discussed 

by Babette Doniger, 

head of Educational 

Films and Lawrence 

Horan, Sr., head of 

J. J. Slater, Inc., 

at whose store the 

film was staged. 




McCall's Lonks tn the Screen 

Promotional Motion Pictures Serve As a Vital Part of 
10-Year Drive for Top Spot Among Women's Magazines 



ALERT, Fast-Moving McCalFs 
has been the outstanding suc- 
cess story in the women's magazine 
field for the past ten years. With 
its potent theme "Togetherness," 
an editorial policy that has almost 
revolutionized the sweet, simple 
and girlish format of women's 
magazines of yesteryear, and the 
industry's top sales promotion, 
McCall's has come a long. long 
way. It is now closing with and 
challenging the perennial leader. 
The Ladies Home Journal. 

New TV Film Each Month 

Films are an important medium 
in many of McCall's promotion 
activities. Enough so that for 
several years a day has nbt gone 
by without one or more McCall's 
films being in one stage of pro- 
duction or another. A regular 
monthly filmed "news release" 
goes out to television stations tell- 
ing about one of the features of 
the current issue. This can be on 
food (Why Fad Diets Fail), fashion 
(McCall's Goes to Paris), home 
furnishing (At Home With the 
Abraham Lincolns), or an out- 
standing article (The Day Christ 
Died — an interview with author 
Jim Bishop). 

Four for "Living" Congress 

Most of McCall's films have 
been produced by Editorial Films, 
Inc.. whose president, Babette J. 
Doniger, was formerly in televi- 
sion programming for a large net- 
work. 

When McCall's sponsored the 
annual Congress of Better Living, 
in Washington, last fall, Editorial 
Films produced four films which 
described the kind of housing the 
modern woman is seeking. These 
are being shown as an informa- 
tional service to advertisers. Other 



films have been purely short and 
specific sales presentations or gen- 
eral service films. 

Help for Footwear Sales 

One good example of these 
service films McCall's has de- 
vised in its hot battle for the top 
rank is a new picture, in color, 
made for the women's shoe indus- 
try. DilTerent from the standard 
self-promotion tool, the film is 
very probably the first magazine- 
sponsored picture made purely as 
a service for its advertisers, with 
nary a plug for McCall's through- 
out its 12 minutes running time. 

Are You This Man? was 
planned and supervised by Mc- 
Call's Fashion Promotion Mana- 
ger, Jacqueline Neben. Going to 
the heart of a problem facing the 
industry. Miss Neben and Miss 
Doniger first consulted the three 
major associations of the industry: 
National Association of Shoe Re- 
tailers, National Association of 
Shoe Manufacturers, and the Shoe 
Association. It seemed that al- 
though shoe salesmen are the high- 
est paid of retail sales people 
($8,000 average, and $35,000 not 
uncommon), they could definitely 
stand some brushing up on ele- 
mentary sales techniques. Too 
many shoe salesmen were not 
realizing their potential, and be- 
ginners in the trade were not re- 
ceiving proper training. 

Making the Salesman a "Pro" 

Made to help solve this train- 
ing problem. Are You This Man?'s 
premise is that shoe salesmanship 
can be more than a job, but a fine 
profession and a lucrative one. It 
employs the good sense and skill 
of consultant Owen Metzger, 
called the "Dean of Shoe Sales- 
men," who has parlayed a small 



shop in Allentown, Pa., into four 
of the most successful shoe stores 
in the country. Mr. Metzger's 
techniques were condensed into 12 
salient sales pointers which are 
featured in the picture and re- 
stated in a folder McCall's will 
supply to salesmen seeing the film. 
The production was staged with 
a professional cast at J. & J. 
Slater's fashionable shoe store in 
New York. Editorial Films, Inc. 
was given a completelv free hand 
in determining the format and 
writing the script. One interesting 
technique is that every shot was 
made from the customer's eye 
viewpoint — necessitating a story 
board plan much like that used in 
animated cartoon production. 

Win Plaudits of Retailers 

Are You This Man? was pre- 
miered at the National Shoe Fair 
in Chicago last fall. Some 5.000 
leading shoe executives saw the 
film in its six showings daily for 
the four days of the Fair. Many 
large shoe retailers and chains 
(such as Dr. Locke Red Cross, 
National Shoes, J. C. Penney and 
Kinney) ordered prints on the 
spot for showing to their salesmen, 
and since then some 30 more 
prints are in constant use through- 
out the industry with more being 
purchased ($89 print cost) each 
month. 

Miss Neben has now found 
that news of the film has brought 
a large number of requests from 
schools who want to use it in 
training courses. 

Made on a modest budget. Are 
You This Man? has been one of 
the most successful fashion pro- 
motion ideas the magazine has 
found. Always solidly entrenched 
with the shoe industry (it regularly 
carries more women's shoe adver- 
tising than any other service maga- 
zine), McCall's is thus renewing 
the confidence it has earned with 
the industry as a fashion arbiter 
for 9,630,000 women. 9 



NUMBER 2 



VOLUME 19 



1958 




EXCLUSIVE 



,,. KIMSEV .-■. 
I PREONSNCV. 




ihis 



In "Doctor Defendant 

lawsuit jor jailing to gel his patient' 

of a hazardous cancer treatment. 



physician faces a 
approval 



Thoughtless criticism of another doctor's work 
without knowing all the fads can cause legal 
problems, the film points out. 



Servant to ttie Medical Professian 

Through Its "Medicine and the Law" Films, the Wnn. S. Merrell Company 
Builds Goodwill in the Profession; Reaching an Impressive Total Audience 



FOR Over a Hundred years, the Wm. S. 
Merrell Company, of Cincinnati, now an 
ethical pharmaceutical division of Vick Chemi- 
cal Company, has had an enviable record of 
service to the medical profession. It is not a 
large company in its field, has a sales staff of 
270 men whose job is to call on physicians and 
"detail" them on new drugs. This method is 
standard operating procedure in the ethical 
drug field for successful product presentation. 

Merrell's detail men, in recent years, have 
sometimes found too many busy doctors' doors 
closed to them — doors found open only to 
representatives of the few largest pharmaceuti- 
cal concerns or those having extensive product 
campaigns. How to open these doors had 
become a serious problem for Merrell. 

Dr. John B. Chewning, director of profes- 
sional relations of the Merrell Company, was 
approached 18 months ago by Dynamic Films, 
Inc. with the idea of doing a "different" kind 
of film program from the usual special subject 
medical and surgical films that interest only 
parts of the professional audience. Merrell 
wanted to reach the total audience of 225,000 
physicians in a program of sustained interest 
with identification of the Merrell name. This 

Dr. John B. Chewning, Merrell's director of 
professional services, worked with Medical 
Dynamics, Inc. on the film series. 




identification associated with the program 
would have to engender a positive sense of 
good will with no implication of objectionable 
commercialism. 

Medical Dynamics, medical division of Dy- 
namic Films, surveyed the problem and sug- 
gested several interesting and potentially effec- 
tive programs. All followed the precepts of 
good merchandising, thinking in terms of the 
problems of the customer, in this case the 
physician. All had the added value of series 
presentation to deliver the needed continuous 
message. 

Merrell selected Medicine and the Law. a 
series of 30-minute films, as the one which 
would offer greatest audience drawing power 
and convey the high ethical character of the 
Merrell name. 

Medical and Law Groups Lend a Hand 

Through So! S. Feuerman, executive vice 
president of Medical Dynamics, exclusive co- 
operation agreements were arranged with the 
American Medical Association and the Ameri- 
can Bar Association to provide subjects and 
advisors. Merrell. the sponsor, wisely agreed 
to reserve for itself only title identification. 

This association with the key professional 
groups not only provided the company with 
the kind of identification that was of positive 
value to it but also assured it of a distribution 
that could not have been obtained without the 
approval of these groups. In giving up stronger 
title identification with the film. Merrell not 
only enhanced its distribution potential; it main- 
tained its ethical position carried out in all of 
the company's advertising and public relations. 

First lilm in the series. The Medical Witness. 
was premiered at the American Medical Asso- 
ciation's annual Clinical Session in November. 
1956. Top officials of both AMA and ABA 
were present, and marked the series as the first 
joint effort of these two national organizations. 

The series' second film. The Doctor Defen- 
dant, dealing with the important subject of 



medical malpractice and professional liability, 
was premiered in New York in June, 1957 at 
the annual AMA convention. There it was 
enthusiastically received. 

From its own distribution records, Merrell 
has compiled some interesting data as to the 
effectiveness of these films, a marked departure 
from the usual product-type ethical pharma- 
ceutical film. Figures that follow represent only 
Merrell's own distribution. They do not include 
broad distribution through AMA and ABA. 

"Medical Witness" Viewed by 168,000 

In less than a year, more than 168,000 in- 
terested viewers have seen The Medical Wit- 
ness, a film stressing the importance of proper 
preparation by both physicians and attorneys 
before presenting any medical testimony in 
court. Both physicians and attorneys have been 
high in their praise of the film and its purpose, 
the company says. 

In 12 months, Merrell has had 645 showings 
of The Medical Witne.is. In the first three 
months following its release. The Doctor De- 
fendant had 127 showings. 

"An interesting fact is that some medical 



4 




At "Medical Witness" premiere: David F. 
Maxwell, past pres., American Bar Assn.; Dr. 
David Allman, pres. American Medical Assn.; 
S. J. Stetler, dir. AMA law dept.; and Sol S. 
Feuerman, exec, v.p.. Medical Dynamics, Inc. 



schools and societies are repeating showings, 
with some having had three bookings on the 
same film," the company says. "Advance book- 
ings average about 50 per month on each film, 
with the second film getting equal demand; and, 
in many cases, the two being booked together." 

The Medical Witness has been shown at 1 45 
medical conventions. At some of these, a phy- 
sician or attorney (sometimes both) has mod- 
erated a discussion on problems of medical 
testimony. 

While the average audience at each showing 
was about 88 persons, Merrell reports that on 
several occasions as many as 600 physicians 
have packed an auditorium to see the film. 

The company estimates that 70 per cent of 
the audiences were potential prescribers of its 
drugs, 20 per cent were in associated medical 
fields (nurses and pharmacists) and 10 per 
cent were attorneys. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Important to note here is that, although the 
umber of actual viewers may seem small in 
imparison to a national tv audience figure, it 
•presents a very high percentage of the audi- 
ice desired. 

Those who saw the films were persons Mer- 
•II wanted to have see them; they saw the films 
hen Merrell wanted them to see them; and 
hen they saw them, they were in a receptive 
aine of mind. 

■'In several cases, doctors, to get preferential 
^e of the film, have contacted Merrell sales- 
len and arranged appointments that resulted 
1 definite sales," the company notes. 

Besides being a tremendous morale impetus 
ir salesmen, popularity of the films has enabled 
lem to make contacts with physicians in areas 
here previous contact had been difficult. 

Salesmen Arrange to Show Films 

W herever possible. Merrell uses its salesmen 
1 arrange for film showings. The salesmen have 
een unanimously in favor of the films. Some 
f the reasons they gave in reply to a company 
uestionnaire were; 

Doctors mentioned the film series to the 
ilesman. 

Salesmen have been able to see busy doctors 
here the door was closed before. 

Doctors were more cooperative and attentive 
mentioned by 10'', ). 

Acceptance and prestige of Merrell were im- 
nned (mentioned by 94^;). This latter rep- 
-sents a significant gain in the highly competi- 
\e pharmaceutical industry. 

Success of the films has caused many profes- 
onal groups, both medical and legal, to want 
lints for permanent use, the company reports. 
hese have been made available at cost; and 
lore than 24 recognized professional organi- 
itions or schools own one or both of the sub- 
lets produced so far. 

One Year's Result: 75 /c Exposure 

As mentioned above, all audience figures 
jported represent only Merrell's distribution, 
/hen the AMA audience is added. Merrell 
;els it can claim to have reached more than 75 
ler cent of the "physician audience" within a 
ear of the program's start. This does not take 
ito account the thousands of nurses and 
harmacists who have seen the films, or the 
lany attorneys who have become aware of 

CONTINUED ON PAGE SIXTY) 

elow; in Merrell film, local medical groups 
•am to meet legal problems by getting attor- 
's advice on their professional liability. 






Filming 'round the world. World Highways Expedition crew camps on Mt. Ararat in Turkey. 



FORD "Round-the-World" 
televison commercials, now 
showing the 1958 Ford zipping up 
the Champs Elysee or barreling 
over Iranian mountains, are but 
one part of a million-dollar project 
that was eight months in produc- 
tion and will soon result in the 
release of several full-scale motion 
pictures documenting the trip. 

The project originated as a 
gleam in the eye of Martin Ranso- 
hoff, president of Filmways, Inc., 
early last year. Ford, and its agen- 
cy. J. Walter Thompson Company, 
agreed enthusiastically with Ranso- 
hoff's round-the-world plan, and 
with great secrecy a new dummy 
company — World Highways Expe- 
dition — was set up in the Devon 
Hotel in New York, in March, to 
gather personnel and purchase 
equipment for the trip, without 
leaking news to Ford's competitors. 

Staying completely disassociated 
from the busy traffic in Filmways" 
main offices, the new company 
spent three and a half months ar- 
ranging for the procurement of 
$75,000 worth of camera equip- 
ment, 100,000 feet of 35mm East- 
man color film, and a staff of 18 
for the production unit which 
would actually make the trip. 

Meanwhile, Ransohoff, with 
Ford and Thompson people, work- 
ed out diplomatic and travel ar- 
rangements with the U.S. State De- 
partment and with 23 ambassadors 
of the countries through which the 
expedition would pass. 

Kevin McClory, who had been 
overseas on-location director for 
Around the World in 80 Days, was 
engaged as producer-director for 
(continued on page 62) 



Fnrd Tours the World 




The Maharajah of Jaipur's elephant makes an unsteady 
camera perch. 



U M B E R 



VOLUME 19 





"Guided by principli'." Modern's 
presideni is Frank Arlini;liatis . . . 

Tilt Magic of Sound that 
brought "life" to the motion 
picture medium also brought the 
early beginning of what is now the 
business and television film me- 
dium's leading specializing distrib- 
utor. 

The genesis of Modern Talking 
Picture Service. Inc.. come of age 
this next July I. 1958 on its 21st 
birthday, actually begins with the 
advent of 35mm sound films in 
1927. Today, this wholly inde- 
pendent concern distributes the 
films of over 300 leading com- 
panies and trade associations, plus 
scores of advertising agencies and 
television film producers, through 
its nationwide network of 28 re- 
gional film libraries throughout the 
United States. 

Films for 16mni, Theatres, TV 

Films from "Modern" go to 
more than 1.50.000 "self-equipped" 
16mm audiences, to a large part 
of the nation's 19,000 permanent 
and drive-in theatres, to 529 tele- 
vision stations and to thousands of 
16mm "road-show" towns in rural 
areas of the nation with no formal 
theatres. 

The story of how it all began is 
as fascinating as the story of 
"modern" business films which it 



This Is the MDDERIV Story . . . 

Born With the Advent of Sound Films, the History of Modern Talking Picture Service 
Parallels the Development and Growth of the Business Film Medium in Past 20 Years 



* 



parallels. The year: 1927. Tlw 
event: the public's enthusiastic re- 
action to the first "talkie" as Al 
Jolson's The Jazz Sint^er hit the 
screens of especially-equipped 
theatres throughout the U.S.A. 

In that eventful year, the West- 
ern Electric Company (which had 
made and shown the first educa- 
tional sound film, an animated 
cartoon on the vacuum tube as 
early as 1922), formed a new 
subsidiary to market and service 
its non-telephone products. The 
new company. Electrical Research 
Products, Inc., licensed the use of 
sound equipment and furnished 
acoustical engineering assistance to 
both producers and distributors. 
By 1931, ERPI had installed talk- 
ing picture equipment in 8,000 
theatres throughout the world. 

ERPI's Non-Theatrical Advent 

In March, 1929, ERPI created 
a non-theatrical department to in- 
troduce talking pictures into such 
fields as education, religion and 
industry. The Western Electric 
had developed "portable" 35mm 
sound equipment (weighing a mere 
2.500 pounds) and now made this 
equipment available to institutions. 

Attracted to this new field 
activity was a youthful graduate 
engineer by profession but a film 
pioneer by fortune and inclination. 
Frank Arlinghaus. In him. both 
the medium and his company 
found the components for achieve- 
ment: the practicality of his 
engineering background plus the 
vision and missionary zeal to ad- 
vance this completely new me- 
dium. That he also possessed a 
good measure of fortitude was not 
the least of his assets as the com- 
plicated and weighty new appara- 
tus moved out across the land. 
Fortunately, the early 35mm phase 



This early 35nini "porlahle" sound film ecpiipnienl was 
accompanied by trained operators at slio\rini;s in tlw 30' s. 




gave way to the first 16mm sound- 
on-disc equipment of 1931 — and 
by 1934. the first sound-on-film 
projectors were taking their places 
along the distribution line. 

Set Up "Road Show Licensees" 

1932. however, was the year of 
a major development in "non- 
theatrical" motion picture distribu- 
tion. In that year. ERPI estab- 
lished its first "road show licensees" 
and began the practice of supply- 
ing the portable equipment and 
trained projectionists to sponsors 
and producers of early sound films. 

This "road show" program fol- 
lowed two main paths: the first 
was that of "projection service" 
for sales meetings, conventions, 
etc. The other was the showing 
of new company-sponsored sound 
films to consumer audiences. These 
were "club shows" which included 
both operator and equipment. To 
book sponsored films for these 
"club" dates. ERPI licensees be- 
came film distributors. 

License First Four Companies 

In this "red-letter" year of 
1932. ERPI licensed the first four 
independent companies as road- 
show distributors. The first of 
these was MacCallum Pictures of 
Philadelphia, of which more later. 
By 1935, there were 10 licensees 
and they held their first "conven- 
tion" in New York City. At this 
historic gathering, the licensees 
adopted the trade name "Modern 
Talking Picture Service" to be 
"operated nationally through licen- 
sees by ERPI" and the now- 
famous slogan "any place, any 
time" made its appearance on the 
familiar Modern "tombstone" 
trademark. 

In 1935, Frank Arlinghaus was 
placed in charge of ERPI's grow- 
ing road-show activity (there were 
now 20 licensees) as "distribution 
manager." These were bustling, 
bright, growing years. Records 
that would be commonplace today 
were made and broken with each 
passing month. The medium was 
growing up, coming along fast . . . 

These Were the Eventful 30's 

"34 simultaneous showings in 
34 dill'erent cities were tied in with 
a national radio broadcast as the 
Plymouth Motor Car Company 



announced its 1936 model with a 
sound motion picture presenta- 
tion . . ." 

* * * 

". . . an audience of 20.000 
persons saw a Modern-projected 
program at the A&P Birthday 
Party in Madison Square Garden." 

* * * 

". . . a single audience of 
13.000 in Philadelphia's Conven- 
tion Hall witnessed the Ford 
Motor Company's picture Rhap- 
sody in Steel." 

". . . a campaign for Metro- 
politan Life Insurance Company 
resulted in a health education pic- 
ture being shown to 15.000,033 
people." 

". . . 4,200 people in one day 
saw the B. F. Goodrich film pro- 
gram in Orangeburg. South Caro- 
lina. Total population of Orange- 
burg: 8.000." 

And so it went through showing 
records for H. J. Heinz Company, 
Brown and Williamson Tobacco 
Corporation, Plymouth and Dodge 
regional sales meetings and theatri- 
cal distribution (initiated in 1936, 
also) for still-active sponsors such 
as the National Association of 
Manufacturers, Weyerhaeuser, 
Westinghouse, the Institute of Life 
Insurance, American Iron & Steel 
Institute . . . 

Principle of Audited Circulation 

On June 20, 1935, Modern was 
already advertising a principle for 
which it has become a principal 
advocate and a foremost exponent 
in the industry. In Advertising 
& Selling, it proclaimed: 

"Now you can get Audited 
Circulation' in Industrial Talk- 
ies." 

But that's a short mile ahead in 
this narrative from history. 

In 1937. the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission asked the 
Western Electric Company to di- 
vest itself of some of its ERPI 
activities. Arlinghaus proposed 
that employees of the distribution 
department take over its owner- 
ship. The bid was accepted and 
an independent corporation was 
formed under the Modern Talking 
Picture Service banner. Modern 
was incorporated on July 1. 1937. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINK 



M The story of Modern, which begms on these pages, is one we 
have lived with these past two decades. Business Screen was 
founded the year following Modern's corporate birth . . . this 
series salutes a conletnporary wliose high standards and prac- 
tices have advanced the entire business film medium. — OHC 



Of the original seven employees, 
six are still associated with 
Modern. 

First Officers Are Named 

Frank Arlinghaus. associated 
with ERPl through the early 
j pioneering days of sound, became 
Modern's first president and re- 
Jmains so in this 21st year of its 
independent entity. William "Bill" 
IMacCallum, the first "licensee" as 




1 ice President Bill MacCallum 
u (/.s Modern's first licensee . . . 

, MacCallum Pictures, had joined 
lERPI itself in January. 1937 and 
jbecame one of the first directors 
'of the "new" Modern. (He be- 
icame a vice president in October, 
i 1948. ) Another director was Dan 
! Collins, who held a position in 
ERPI's parent company. Western 
Electric and Howard Eberle, who 
I returned to Western Electric in 
1 1942, was Modern's first Secre- 
|tary-Treasurer. He continues to 
I serve Modern as Secretary and in 
;June, 1951, became a director. 
I Ed Manke, who came over from 
jERPI in February, 1938, is the 
sixth of the original seven em- 
ployees who are still associated 
I with Modern. 

Started With 35 Licensees 

Modern began its solo flight into 
I lie future with 35 licensees on 
I board. Among them was Bernie 
) Payne, then and now Modern 
licensee in Cleveland where B. W. 
Payne Films is the only one of 
the company's present non-theatri- 
(Cal exchanges associated with 
I Modern since the beginning of its 
I corporate life. 

Almost simultaneously with 
Modern's independent status, came 
la new era in the distribution of 



sponsored motion pictures. 16mni 
sound-on-lilm was making rapid 
headway throughout the country 
among industries, churches, 
schools, county agents and other 
organized groups who were acquir- 
ing their own sound projectors. 

Modern's First 16mm Picture 

Projection service or "club 
show" arrangements were still the 
most effective way to reach specilic 
target audiences, however, in these 
late 3()'s. For Westinghouse, 
Modern circulated the company's 
Golden Jubilee picture New Fron- 
tiers as its first 16mm film (show- 
ings began in May, 1936); for the 
American Iron & Steel Institute, 
Steel — A Symphony on Industry. 
was offered in a February, 1937 
magazine advertisement and was 
another Modern "first" — the first 
film to be offered to self-equipped 
I6nim audiences. 

The first account sold by Mod- 
ern as an independent company 
was Hiram Walker. The film: 
Keeping Nature on Its Course, 
distributed in 1937 and for several 
years thereafter. 

Another "First" in 1941 . . . 

The next major step in 16mm 
distribution to self-equipped audi- 
ences took place in 1941. Modern 
mailed to adult audiences a pro- 
motion listing six titles and book- 
ing requests for that promotion are 
said to be coming back as recently 
as four years ago. 

The opening of a Chicago sales 
office late in 1940 carried forward 
Modern's progress toward nation- 
wide service and supervision for 
both its accounts and the growing 
thousands of 16mm audiences. 
Richard M. Hough, now one of 
Modern's vice presidents, had or- 
ganized the Allied Film Exhibitors 
in California. 

Modern bought into Allied, 
gave it a blanket franchise for the 
West Coast and Dick Hough 
joined the parent company to set 
up the Chicago sales office which 
he still heads. 

In 1942, with an inventory of 
28 non-theatrical titles. Modern 
switched its major emphasis from 
projection service "club shows" to 
its present form of distribution to 
"self-equipped" audiences . . . 

(CONTINUED IN NEXT ISSUE) 




In production along the Union Pacific trackside: Gate & McGlone's 
script chief Walter Wise (center) checks a human relations point in film. 

The EssencE of Public Relatinns 

The Union Pacific Railroad Shov/s Its "Company Manners" 
and Offers an Example for All Enlightened Management 



Sponsor: Union Pacific Railroad 

Title: Company Manners, 20 

min., color, produced by Cate 

& McGlone; script by Walter 

Wise. 

M The terms "public relations" 
and "human communications" 
have achieved recognition and pro- 
fessional stature in business but 
there are surprisingly few motion 
pictures which interpret their real 
meanings to the public, to com- 
pany employees and to manage- 
ment. 

The Union Pacific's latest film. 
Company Manners, is a first-rate 
exposition on the functions of its 
Press. Radio and Television de- 
partment but it is an even better 
summation of the broad scope of 
an industry's acceptance of the 
responsibilities of all its people for 
human communications, for en- 
lightened relations with the public. 

People Make the Company . . . 

The measure of Company Man- 
ners lies in this passage from the 
script: "A famous corporation 
once proclaimed that a corporation 
has no soul. That statement is 
only partially correct. It has no 
soul of its own. It relies on 50 
thousand railroaders to give it 
form and substance and to give it 
meaning ..." 

Pictorially. the film presents a 
very comprehensive pattern of the 
UP's press and photographic 
people in nearly every aspect of 



Right: good public relations is "every- 
body's business along the Union Pacific . . . 



their jobs. Inter-related are scenes 
of other UP workers, doing equally 
important public relations work: 
the conductor of a domeliner; a 
clerk in reservations, a freight 
salesman, office workers and sec- 
tion hands ... all of them fulfill- 
ing the company's adage that 
"good communications with the 
public is everybody's business." 

There are several "key" epi- 
sodes where UP railroaders have 
rendered courteous service, be- 
yond the call of duty, making 
friends for every worker along the 
right of way. 

A Picture Worth Seeing 

Company Manners is "must" 
viewing for any management team 
in modern business. Its coverage 
of the practical aspects of press 
relations is comprehensive enough 
to serve as a "short course" on the 
work of a p.r. department. News- 
paper, radio and tv activities and 
the road's photographic and film 
production functions are thorough- 
ly defined in picture and sound. 
Through it all there is the keynote 
of "responsibility" which sets 
Company Manners and the UP 
apart as examples of enlightened 
business citizenship. 9 



NUMBER 2 



VOLUME 19 



1958 





PflEVIEWS 
of IVew Films 

Pictures from Business and 
Church Serve Wide Audience 



Above: two telephone 

engineers visit a 

proiliicer to discuss 

a film on floor care. 

Right: the film goes 

into detiiil on all 

elements involved in 

cleaning floors and 

protecting them from 

iinnecessarv abi4ses . 




A Flnnr Show" That Sparkles 

Bell Trains Maintenance Crews to be "Polished" Performers 



Sponsors: American Telephone & 
Telegraph Company. 

Title: Floor Show, 42 min., color, 
produced by Sound Masters, 
Inc. 

ir Have you ever admired the 
sparkling floors in telephone build- 
ings and thought: "Beautiful . . . 
How do they do it?" 

This new Bell System training 
film shows how they do it. It is 
a comprehensive wrap-up on the 
"hows" and "whys" of cleaning, 
waxing and polishing floors of 
linoleum, vinyl and asphalt tile. 

Floor Show is in two parts — 
either of which can be shown as 
a unit itself. One half (26 min.) 
deals with cleaning floors, the 
other half (16 min.) with protect- 
ing them from wear and tear. 

For an idea of how useful the 
film can be, consider these statis- 
tics: A staff of more than 12,000 



house-service people spend a sig- 
nificant portion of their time main- 
taining the Bell System's linoleum 
and tile covered floors which 
spread over 110,000,000 square 
feet, or about four square miles. 
(Downtown Manhattan, from 1 4th 
Street, south to the tip, is about 
four square miles, or 2,500 acres.) 

These people apply a million 
and a quarter pounds of soap onto 
this broad expanse of floor area 
each year to clean it. They spread 
220,000 gallons of wax and resin 
finishes over it each year to pro- 
tect it. 

Floor Show will help train new 
house-service people in proper 
techniques of doing this vast job 
— and very probably improve the 
technique of old-timers, as well. 
As a public service, AT&T will 
also make the film available to 
schools, business organizations and 
institutions through Bell System 
Telephone Companies 9' 



PrnniDtinq Chain Saw Safety 



Sponsor: Homelite Division of 
Textron, Inc. 

Titles: CItain Saw Safety Pays 
Off, and Chain Saws Pay Off on 
the Farm, 25 and 27 min., color. 





jH^^^BB^K] % 


mMriA 



produced by Victor Kayfetz 
Productions, Inc. 

M These films are designed to show 
proper, safe and productive prac- 
tices of today's woodsmen and 
farmers in logging and home wood 
lot operations. Produced for 
Homelite, manufacturers of gaso- 
line powered chain saws, the films 
contrast the old-fashioned hand 
methods of wood-cutting with the 
power chain saw methods of today. 



They show the advantages of the 
chain saw under actual forest and 
farm conditions in felling, limbing 
and bucking trees of all sizes. 

Made with the cooperation of 
the American Pulpwood Associa- 
tion and with the technical assis- 
tance of its safety engineers. Chain 
Saw Safety Pays Off stresses the 
safe practices observed by profes- 
sional woodsmen at work: proper 
maintenance and care of the chain 
saw, safe clothing worn on the job. 
the correct way to handle the chain 
saw in cutting, the proper stance to 
take, and the special way heavy 



logs can be lifted and stacked safe- 
ly by one man. 

Cliain Saws Pay Off on the Farm 
shows how the farmer fells his trees 
and hauls them to a pulpwood mill 
for a cash sale. The farmer can 
improve his property by felling dis- 
eased trees, by clearing unwanted 
growth and obstructions and by 
cutting logs for firewood. 

Cfiain Saws Pay Of] on the Farm 
is available on free loan from the 
Farm Film Foundation, 1731 Eye 
Street. N.W., Washington 6, D.C. 
B/w prints for television distribu- 
tion are available. y 



Hdw a Priest Spends His Day 

Chicago Archdiocese Aims a Documentary at Religious Life 



Sponsor: Radio and Television 
Office. Catholic Archdiocese of 
Chicago. 

Title: Twenty Four Hours, 26 'i 
min.. b&w. produced by Fen- 
ton McHugh Productions, Inc. 

•fx This is a documentary film with 
a purpose: to encourage vocations 
to the priesthood. 

In simple, straightforward style, 
it tells the story of Twenty Four 
Hours in the life of a parish priest. 




Above: religious duties occupy a 
big part of "Father Gordon's" day. 

From the time he is aroused from 
bed before dawn to administer the 
last rites to a dying man in a hos- 
pital operating room until he ends 
his activities by proctoring a teen- 
agers' dance, the camera follows 
"Father Gordon," assistant pastor 
of "St. Mary's" parish, through 
his daily doings. 

The film manages to weave 
clerical and non-clerical duties into 
an interesting continuity; so that 
the result is an accurate and ab- 
sorbing account of what a priest 
does with his day. For example, 
while an admittedly important part 
of his work is concerned with read- 



ing Mass, visiting the sick, baptis- 
ing infants and conducting religious 
information classes. "Father Gor- 
don" also is coach of the grade- 
school baseball team and a speaker 
at civic luncheon meetings. 

Much of the real-life impact of 
the film stems from the fact that 
it was made in actual parish sur- 
roundings. Several parishes in the 
Chicago area were used as loca- 
tions. Another factor leading to 
this end is that only one profes- 
sional (the actor who is "Father 
Gordon") was used. All the 
others who appear in Twenty Four 
Hours are "just folks"; members of 
the various parishes in which the 
documentary was filmed. 

Authentic background music for 
scenes showing Catholic cere- 
monials is from recordings made in 
France featuring a choir of Soles- 
mes monks in Gregorian chants, 
supplied by courtesy of London 
Records. 

The film was written by Fenton 
P. McHugh and Rev. John S. 
Banahan, and directed by Ernest 
A. Lukas. Cameraman was Lutz 
H a p k e ; production manager. 
James R. O'Riley; recording was 
by August M. May. ^' 

Below: all of the fihn's scenes 
were made in parish surroimditigs. 




BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Martin's Matador Story— 
"The Missile Man" 
Fighter for Freedom 

sponsor: Glenn L. Martin Com- 
i pany. 

Title: The Missile Man, 28 min., 
color, produced by the sponsor. 

:i When the Air Force success- 
I'ully launched their Matador Mis- 
die, the Glenn L. Martin com- 
pany had just cause to feel proud 
i)f their part in its production. 
!\fter a time, much information 
i:oncerning the assembling, launch- 
ing and tracking of the missile 
j)ecame declassified and released 
lo the public. The company then 
liecided to produce a film about 




LMunciung a Martin "Mauuior" 

ht missile so all could see as much 
|!S possible what goes into the pro- 
Iluction and use of such a weapon. 
The Missile Man has about as 
luch unclassified information 
I bout the Matador as has ever 

I lieen presented before. It was 
limed on location at launching 

* |ites and, among other things, 
hows the Air Force team re- 
ponsible for the use of this 
""eapon and how they carry out 
|heir mission. 

\ Prints are available for school 
nd adult groups through Modern 
alking Picture Service, Inc., ex- 
lianges on a free-loan basis. ^' 




Scene in "By Their Deeds" shows a giant compression tester at work . . . 

Meet the Reclamation Engineer 

New Government Film on His Work Is Aimed at Wide Audience 



It's a Neat Trick ... in these 
days of ominous international 
headlines, of more tv screens lit 
up than ever before, of more radio 
announcers announcing ... to get 
and hold attention. 

It's a neater trick to grab and 
hold, all in the same package, the 
eyes and ears of a starry-eyed, 
fresh-from-college engineer and his 
older, more cynical counterpart 
who wants '"nothing but the facts." 

That was the job the United 
States Bureau of Reclamation, De- 
partment of the Interior, handed 
to Thos. J. Barbre Productions in 
connection with the making of its 
documentary film. By Their Deeds. 
A 30-minute, sound-color produc- 
tion, the title borrows from a 
Biblical text and implies that "by 
their deeds America's reclamation 
engineers shall be known." 

Film Serves Three Purposes 

The Bureau wanted the film for 
three purposes: 

1. To interest young engineers 
in careers with the Bureau. 

2. To provide a documentary, 
semi-technical outline of the work 
of the Bureau. 

3. To appeal to a general audi- 
ence as is found in schools, clubs 
and among tv viewers. 

The "deeds" covered in the pic- 
ture vary from barring down rock 
high up the sheer face of Glen 
Canyon, to running down obscure 
water law in dusty archives, to 
building a dam with concrete, to 
helping others develop projects in 
remote ocean zones oceans away. 

By Their Deeds is the first 
Bureau film in history to be con- 
tracted entirely "on the outside." 



The engineering headquarters 
office in Denver negotiated with 
Barbre to deliver a completely 
scripted, photographed and assem- 
bled package. 

Later, by mutual agreement, one 
or two Bureau-shot sequences were 
incorporated to save budget; but 
the project was still considered a 
one-package deal. 

Cover Wide Operational Range 

Deeds was thus a pioneer film. 
Many persons had to be consulted 
— -in the planning, in the scripting, 
in the shooting, and in the final 
recording. All of the various de- 
partments involved had to be made 
to feel that their activities were 
well represented. 

To appeal to the three types of 
audiences to which it will be 
shown, the finished film mixes 
dashes of lightness to heavy tech- 
nical sequences, and vice versa, for 
maximum interest and eft'ective- 
ness. 

Example: The Bureau's five- 
million-pound compression tester 
is shown crushing a 30-inch thick 
column of concrete. The very next 
scene shows the four-story high 
monster snuffing out the flame of 
a tiny candle with no damage to 
the candle. 

Light Touch and Heavy Facts 

Example: In a recreation scene, 
a pretty girl is shown riding an 
aquaplane on an artificial lake, 
quite a departure from the "aU- 
man" practices common to most 
government films. 

Example : After a rather "deep" 
sequence of laboratory procedure 
and compaction testing of earth. 



the last scene of the sequence, a 
close-up of a mortar and pestle, 
dissolves to an on-site close-up of 
a sheepsfoot roller, a tons-size 
mortar and pestle. 

The film takes viewers through 
the steps necessary to conceive, 
design and build a project, from 
determining the need and obtain- 
ing congressional approval through 
maintenance of the finished com- 
plex. Two huge dams were 
"built" during the picture, one of 
concrete and one of earth. 

First Film on Glen Canyon 

One particular sequence, which 
had both the Bureau and Barbre 
concerned at first, turned out to 
be a nice "plus" to the film. When 
prime bids were opened for the 
Glen Canyon Dam, the film had 
not been contracted for. So only 
Bureau photographers shot the 
event ... in black and white film. 

A vital part of the whole story, 
the scene had to be used. It was 
finally decided to work the black 
and white scene into the color film 
as a "newsreel" of the event. Suit- 
able newsreel background music 
was used, and the sequence fit in 
perfectly. 

By Their Deeds was recently 
shown before delegates to the 
Federal Extension Service Visual 
Aids Workshop in Washington ^ 



Teaching Youngsters 
Respect for Trains 

Sponsor: The Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad. 

Title: Otto N abetter and the Rail- 
road Gang, 15 min., color, pro- 
duced by Ted Eshbaugh Studios, 
Inc. 

"¥■ This color cartoon, designed to 
promote juvenile adherence to 
safety rules, tells the story of Otto 
Nobetter, a little boy who is 
tempted to throw stones at passing 
trains. Through an imaginative 
dream sequence, Otto is harassed 
by the "Railroad Gang" (the en- 
gine, the box cars and the safety 
signals! whom he has heretofore 
abused. The climax of the film is 
highlighted by the big diesel train 
chasing him to his home where the 
disaster of a crash is averted by his 
last-second acceptance of the Safety 
Rules. 

The film includes a tuneful theme 
song which might become a hit 
among school children. 

Baltimore & Ohio will distribute 
the film to school and television 
audiences. W 



UMBER 2 



VOLUME 19 



1958 



-39 



: THE SALES MANAGER'S : 

j AUDIO-VISUAL GUIDE \ 



Selected Motion Pictures and Slidefilms for Sales Training 



i-r Following our editorial premise that there 
is nothing wrong with our national economy 
that a million inspired salesmen can"t help fix. 
the Editors of Business Screen present this 
useful selection of readily-available motion 
pictures and sound slidefilms from free-loan, 
rental and purchase sources. In addition, 
better and more extensive use of your com- 



pany's own films and some of the extensive 
product pictures available on a free-loan ba- 
sis from suppliers can help to prepare sales- 
men for greater results in the field. Well-pre- 
pared sales meetings, including proper room 
setup, arrangements for projection, good ven- 
tilation, etc. are basic to successful presenta- 
tion of these films. 9 



FREE LOAN FILMS 

See the general source list on 
pages 45-46 for addresses of 
film sponsors and distribu- 
tors of these free loan films. 



All I Can Do, 23 min.. b w. 
Coopers, Inc. Demonstrates 
five basic steps of good salesman- 
ship which, if practiced, will help 
salesmen increase their sales and 
build up good customer relations. 
Source: Modern. 

The Big Little Things, 30 min., 
b w. Coopers, Inc. A retail 
sales training film demonstrating 
the importance of small acts 
which can and do influence a 
customer for or against buying. 
Source: Modern. 

Calling All Salesmen, 14 min., 
color. Life Magazine. Animated 
cartoon shows salesmen that 
national advertising of the prod- 
ucts they sell to be retailed lo- 
cally is also local advertising; 
this advertising helps retailers 
sell the products the salesmen 
supply. Source: Life. 

The Care and Handling of Buy- 
ers, 4,5 min., b/w. Republic 
Steel Corp. Tips on fundamentals 
of successful selling, gathered 
from nationwide surveys. Pre- 
sented in story form. Source: 
Modern. 

Chuck Woods-Go Giver, 26 min., 
b/w. Wood Conversion Co. 
Gives retail lumbermen examples 
of effective selling techniques 
and proper customer relations. 
Source: Wood. 

The Conference Method As a 
Selling Tool, 32 min.. color, 
Texaco. Designed to teach Texaco 
salesmen how to conduct a con- 
ference with dealers which