(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "1964-65 New York World's Fair Groundbreaking and Dedication Booklets"

PAVI LION OF 




^f 



GREECE 

SEPTEMBER 25, 1963 



/ 






«." 





GROUNDBREAKING AT THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 

1 \ xy£/ //;N1 






THE GREEK PAVILION WILL BE A ONE-STORY STRUCTURE COMBINING 
MODERN AND ANCIENT GREEK ARCHITECTURE. THE EXHIBITS WILL 
INCLUDE DISPLAYS OF GREEK CULTURE, INDUSTRY AND TOURIST AT- 
TRACTIONS, AND A TAVERN A SERVING GREEK FOODS AND BEVERAGES. 
THE PAVILION OF GREECE IS SPONSORED BY THE GREEK INDUSTRIAL- 
ISTS ASSOCIATION, THE GREEK CENTER OF PRODUCTION AND THE 
GREEK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. MESSRS. ANTHONY KITSIKIS AND ATHA- 
NESE MAKRIS OF ATHENS, GREECE, ARE THE ARCHITECTS IN ASSOCIA- 
TION WITH MR. JOHN JAMES CARLOS. AIA. OF NEW YORK CITY. 




Excerpts from transcription of remarks made by Greek and World's Fair officials at groundbreak- 
ing ceremonies for the Pavilion of Greece at the New York World's Fair, September 25, 1963. 



AMBASSADOR RICHARD C PATTERSON, JR. 
[Chief of Protocol]: Mr. Ambassador, Your Eminence, 
Mr. Carlos, Mr. Moses, Mr. Beach, ladies and gentlemen. 
His Eminence Iakovos, Archbishop of the Greek Ortho- 
dox Church of North and South America, will deliver the 
invocation. 

HIS EMINENCE IAKOVOS [Archbishop of the 
Greek Orthodox Church]: (Translation) Let us pray to 
the Lord God Almighty, who hast made the heavens with 
wisdom and has established the earth upon its firm foun- 
dations, the Creator and Lover of all men. Look upon Thy 
servants to whom it hath singled to set up a pavilion of 
exhibition of their culture, art and industry in the domin- 
ion of Thy power. Establish Thou the same upon a stable 
ground and founded according to Thy divine word in the 
gospel, so that neither wind nor flood nor any other thing 
shall be able to harm it. Graciously grant that we may 
bring it to an ending and enable all those who shall wish 
to serve the moral precepts of Thy gospel and promote 
the cultural values of their ethnic and religious tradition, 
to successfully reach their noble goal. 



For Thine is the dominion and Thine is the kingdom 
and the power and the glory of the Father and the Son 
and of the Holy Spirit, now and ever, and that onto ages 
of ages, Amen. 

AMBASSADOR PATTERSON: Of all the countries 
represented at this Fair, few — very few — are as well- 
known as Greece in the minds of civilized men. There is 
no area of western civilization that has not been influ- 
enced or shaped by this ancient and glorious nation, and 
we in America are especially aware of this. Every section 
of our national life, thought, language and politics bears 
the stamp of Greece, and we are pleased, therefore, and 
honored to have Greece represented at the New York 
World's Fair. 

I am privileged to introduce to you, ladies and gentle- 
men, the director of International Affairs and Exhibits of 
the World's Fair, Mr. Allen E. Beach. 

MR. ALLEN E. BEACH: Thank you, Mr. Ambassa- 
dor. Your Excellency, Your Eminence, Mr. President, dis- 
tinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen. The presence of 
Greece in our Fair has a deep and special meaning to us 



1963 New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporarion 




His Excellency Alexander A. Matsas, Greek Ambassador to 
the United States, speaking at the ceremonies marking the 
groundbreaking for the Pavilion of Greece. 

as Americans. Ancient Athens was the first nation to be 
governed by its people, with a true and direct democracy. 
And because of this early democracy, the citizens of 
Athens were able to create and think freely, which resulted 
in the gift to the world — of great literature, philosophy, 
art, and architecture — that students and scholars have 
studied and emulated ever since. Today, centuries later, 
here in another great democracy, a Greek Pavilion will be 
erected, representing the nation that is the home of the 
ancient Parthenon, a symbol of freedom. This charming 
Greek Pavilion will stand facing the Unisphere,® another 
architectural triumph that will stand for many years as a 



symbol of nations working together under God for peace 
and understanding. 

We are all delighted that Greece is present. Over two 
years of work by a very dedicated team has brought this 
project to the point where it is today when the first piece 
of earth will be moved. One man in particular has been 
the power behind the scenes. He's my long-time friend, 
Mr. Makris. 

He is the head of European Displays, Ltd., in Athens, 
a well-known firm on the Continent which has worked on 
exhibits in all major cities in Europe. Mr. Makris has 
also worked for the United States Government. We con- 
tacted him and he went to bat for us; we certainly can 
say that he has batted a thousand. He is now managing 
director of the Greek Pavilion and is its prime architect. 
Among others who contributed greatly to this project are 
His Excellency, Mr. Triantafyllis, Minister of Commerce, 
and Mr. Vlahos, Press Undersecretary. 

We welcome Greece to this great Fair, and we salute 
the hard-working team that has made it possible. Con- 
gratulations. Thank you. 

AMBASSADOR PATTERSON: Thank you, Allen 
Beach. In the tradition of the ancient and modern Greeks, 
our next speaker has been known to speak his mind and 
to fight for what he believes is right. For this, and for 
the amazing contributions he has given to this country- 
over the years, he has won the respect and admiration not 
only of New Yorkers but of all Americans. I have the 



high honor to present to you the president of the Fair, 
the Honorable Robert Moses. 

MR. ROBERT MOSES: Ambassador Patterson, Your 
Eminence, Your Excellency, and friends. I learned when 
I was in college, being in perhaps the last generation 
that was compelled to study the classics, that Greece was 
the great point of light in history. When I say compelled, 
I actually studied Latin and Greek, as the Italians say, 
con amove, the greater part of two years. 

I can't say too much about Greek as a factor in educa- 
tion. It has been a source of real disappointment and 
sorrow to me that it has been dropped in so many places. 

When I first went to Oxford, I found that the great 
subject, studied by the ablest of the students and those who 
later became the heads of government, was Greek and 
Roman civilization, what they called "Greats," Interne 
human fares. They figured that, if anyone understood the 
Iliad and especially if he knew Greece and Greek litera- 
ture, he was on his way to being an educated man. I still 
fetl that way about it. 

I have only one other thing to say about this exhibit. 
We are delighted that Greece is here for the reasons given 
by my friend Allen Beach. I heard a rumor that there was 
a possibility that Greece might send over the Hermes of 
Praxiteles. That is one of the great works of art of all time, 
I believe one of the few authentic surviving works of 
Praxiteles. I hope this can be done. I think it would rank 
next to the Pieta as an object of interest in the Fair. If I 



and my associates can do anything to make it possible to 
bring this great work here, we would be simply delighted. 
I hope that they will give this particular objective serious 
consideration. Thank you. 

AMBASSADOR PATTERSON: Thank you, Mr. 
Moses. Before presenting the next speaker, I should like 
to introduce the very popular and distinguished Dr. Basile 
Vitsaxis, Consul General of Greece in New York, who 
has done so much to cement the bonds of friendship be- 
tween our two countries. 

HON. DR. BASILE VITSAXIS [Consul General of 
Greece in New York] : I thank you very much. Ambassa- 
dor Patterson, for your very kind words. I'm very happy 
to be here today and to witness this beautiful ceremony. 

AMBASSADOR PATTERSON: Thank you. Next, a 
good friend of ours, Theodore Pyrlas, Commercial Coun- 
selor of the Greek Embassy. 

MR. THEODORE PYRLAS [Commercial Counselor, 
Embassy of Greece] : Thank you very much, Mr. Ambas- 
sador. I'm very happy to be here todav. 

AMBASSADOR PATTERSON: Our next speaker 
has, for many years, enjoyed a national and international 
reputation as an architect. There is hardly any type of 
building he has not planned and constructed. I am priv- 
ileged to introduce Mr. John James Carlos, Commissioner 
General of the Greek Pavilion and designer of the pa- 
vilion in association with Anthony Kitsikis and Athanase 
Makris. 




His Eminence, Archbishop iakovos, Primate of the Greek 
Orthodox Church of North and South America, delivers in- 
vocation at the groundbreaking ceremonies for the Pavilion 
of Greece at the New York World's Fair. 



MR. JOHN JAMES CARLOS [Commissioner General 
of the Pavilion of Greece]: Your Eminence, Your Excel- 
lency, Commissioner Moses, ladies and gentlemen. Let me 
submit that this is a very proud and happy moment. This 
groundbreaking ceremony celebrates a sharing of the 
Greek nation and of its people. It is a sharing of 25 cen- 
turies, of a cultural heritage which still lives in the minds 
and hearts of civilized men the world over. Greece — the 
glory that was — and the wonder that it is — is the home- 
land and treasure house of the shining ideals of western 
culture. Greece has been rediscovered again today, as it 
has been rediscovered in the past, in the imbricate histori- 
cal periods of the European renaissance, the Greek revival 
of the last century, and the present day renaissance of 
contemporary Greece. 

This pavilion shall stand as a symbolic sharing of the 
20th century rebirth of the cultural, social and economic 
forces of this most ancient land. Thank you. 

AMBASSADOR PATTERSON: Thank you, Mr. Car- 
los. Our final speaker, in every way, has been true to the 
political and intellectual heritage of Greece. He has had 
a brilliant career in the diplomatic service, and numerous 
times he has been honored by his country and many for- 
eign countries. He was Ambassador to Turkey, he was 
Ambassador to Iran and Pakistan, before he became Greek 
Ambassador to the United States in 1961. 

He is also a scholar and a writer of great renown, has 
had volumes of poetry published and three tragedies pro- 



duced for rhe Greek stage and radio. It is a very great 
honor for me to introduce the Greek Ambassador to the 
United States, His Excellency Alexander A. Matsas. 

HIS EXCELLENCY ALEXANDER A. MATSAS 
[Ambassador of Greece]: Your Eminence, President 
Moses, Ambassador Patterson, Mr. Beach, Mr. Moses, 
Mr. Consul General, and distinguished guests. I regard 
it as a great privilege to be called upon to attend this 
most important groundbreaking ceremony at the site of 
the Greek Pavilion at the New York World's Fair. This 
pavilion, as you know, is the result of private enterprise, 
and it will illustrate one of the most deeply rooted and 
ancient beliefs of die Greek nation, which is, as we all 
know, profoundly shared and constantly applied in this 
great country of the United States of America. I mean 
the belief in private enterprise and private initiative. 

The pavilion is being built by a group of private enter- 
prising corporations who founded, for that purpose, a 
special corporation for building this pavilion. It will house 
a comprehensive series of Government exhibits, which 
will aim at showing, as fully as possible, the varied eco- 
nomic and cultural efforts which are now being accom- 
plished in Greece. Thus, the pavilion will not only show 
an image of the endeavor of the Greek nation on eco- 
nomic industrial, commercial and cultural levels, but it 
will also stress the philosophy which lies at the root of 
our system and which is the belief in private enterprise 
and in private initiative. 



The Greek nation, of which the modern achievements 
will be shown by this pavilion, has a very ancient tradi- 
tion in trade and commerce. As a matter of fact, I don't 
think that there has ever been another nation which has 
ever deified commerce. 

Commerce is a free flow of ideas, of ethnic, aesthetic 
and artistic concepts, of techniques and of knowledge. In 
fact, it is the exchange of the spiritual and material wealth 
of nations. 

That is why, I think, a universal manifestation of the 
magnitude of this New York World's Fair is connected 
to a very great extent with this deeper meaning of com- 
merce. On this site which proudly bears this great metrop- 
olis of the new world, the nations of the world are invited 
to meet in a friendly competition and exchange of in- 
dustry, technology, knowledge and culture. They will 
learn from each other, and in doing so they will get to 
know themselves a little better. 

This great challenge is the best teacher that we can find 
for testing our capacities, for measuring our limitations, 
and for promoting our aptitudes. I would also like to say- 
that the ancient Greek city had as a center the market 
place, which was then and is today called Agora, which 
became the center of the public life of the first democracy 
ever known to mankind. I hope that this New York 
World's Fair will be another great forum for the better 
understanding between nations and for the promotion of 
their peaceful and constructive cooperation, Thank you. 



PAVILION OF GREECE AT THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 



HIS EXCELLENCY ALEXANDER A. MATSAS, Ambassador of Greece 

HIS EMINENCE, ARCHBISHOP IAKOVOS, Primate of the Greek Orthodox 

Church of North and South America 
THE HONORABLE DR. BASILE VITSAXIS, Consul General of Greece 
MR. THEODORE PYRLAS, Commercial Counselor 

MR. JOHN JAMES CARLOS, Commissioner General of the Pavilion of Greece 
MR. ATHANASE MAKRIS, Managing Director of the Pavilion of Greece 



Architects: ANTHONY KITSIKIS, Athens, Greece 
ATHANASE MAKRIS, Athens, Greece 
JOHN JAMES CARLOS, AIA, New York City 
Consulting Engineers: MARTIN LOVETT, P.E., Structural, New York City 

MESSRS. WALD & ZIGAS, Mechanical & Electrical, 
New York City 
Contractor: ORESTES DALLAS, New York City 





NEW YORK 
WORLD'S FAIR 
1964-1965 

C O R P O R AT I O N 
Flushing, N. Y. 11380 

Tel. 212-WF 4-1964 

ROBERT MOSES, President 

THOMAS J. DEEGAN, JR., Chairman of the Executive Committee 

WILLIAM E. POTTER, Executive Vice President 

CHARLES POLETTI, Vice President, International Affairs and Exhibits 

STUART CONSTABLE, Vice President, Operations 

WILLIAM BERNS, Vice President, Communications and Public Relations 

ERWIN WITT, Comptroller 

MARTIN STONE, Director of Industrial Section 

GUY F. TOZZOLI, fPort of New York Authority) Transportation Section 

ERNESTINE R. HAIG, Secretary of the Corporation and Assistant to the President 

WILLIAM WHIPPLE, JR., Chief Engineer