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Full text of "1964-65 New York World's Fair Groundbreaking and Dedication Booklets"

THE PAVILION 
OF THE 
REPUBLIC OF 




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GROUNDBREAKING 
AT THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 



THE PAVILION OF THE REPUBLIC OF GUINEA 

WILL CONSIST OF THREE STRUCTURES SURROUNDED 
BY A CONTINUOUS MOAT. THE TWO SMALL HUTS WITH 
SIMULATED GRASS ROOFING WILL REPRESENT 
THE TRADITIONAL TYPE OF BUILDING SEEN IN GUINEA; 

HERE NATIVE CRAFTSMEN WILL MAKE ITEMS TO BE 
SOLD TO VISITORS. THE MAIN BUILDING WILL 

HAVE A STAGE WHERE THE BALLET TROUPE OF GUINEA 
WILL PERFORM. NOEL AND MILLER OF NEW YORK 

ARE THE ARCHITECTS FOR THE PAVILION. 




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Excerpts from transcription of remarks made by 
officials of the Republic of Guinea and the 
World's Fair at groundbreaking ceremonies for 
the Pavilion of the Republic of Guinea. New 
York World' i Fa/r, Thursday, July 18, 1963. 



DR. ROBERTO DE MENDOZA [Deputy Chief of 
Protocol] : Your Excellencies, Mr. Ambassador Designate, 
Governor Poletti, distinguished guests, ladies and gentle- 
men. This significant groundbreaking is one more evi- 
dence of the imaginative, vigorous and enterprising spirit 
of the young Republic of Guinea. The beautiful pavilion 
which will rise from this ground will portray the life of 
the people of Guinea and the attractions, the economy 
and the natural resources of the country. 

Before introducing the speakers I should like to have 
the honor of presenting four eminent ladies who are 
honoring us today with their presence on this important 
occasion : Madame Bangoura, wife of the Ambassador of 
Guinea to the United States; Madame Diallo Telli, wife 
of the Ambassador of Guinea to the United Nations; 



Madame Achkar Marof, wife of the Ambassador of the 
Permanent Mission of Guinea to the United Nations ; and 
Mrs. James Loeb, wife of the Ambassador Designate of 
the United States to the Republic of Guinea. 

Our first speaker was a Justice of the State Supreme 
Court and a Lieutenant-Governor before being Governor 
of the State of New York. It is my great pleasure to 
present Governor Charles Poletti, vice president of the 
International Division of the New York World's Fair 
Corporation. 

GOVERNOR CHARLES POLETTI: Thank you very 
much, Ambassador De Mendoza. Ambassador Bangoura, 
Ambassador Diallo Telli, Ambassador Loeb and distin- 
guished and charming ladies. I'm very happy to be here on 
this occasion. I think this is one of the most important 
groundbreakings that we will have at the New York 
World's Fair, not because of the size of the pavilion that 
the Republic of Guinea will have, not because of the 
amount of money that will be spent, but because it achieves 
what we have worked so hard to accomplish: to bring here 
to Flushing Meadow pavilions of a modest nature which 
reflect the new countries, the new independent nations of 
the world. And I'm very happy, as head of the Inter- 
national Division, and speaking also for the Executive 
Committee, that we're going to have the Republic of 
Guinea in such an important corner on our Avenue of 
Africa. 

Americans, particularly young Americans, are vitally 
interested in the continent of Africa. They are keenly 



11963 New York World's Foir 1964-1965 Corporation 



anxious to learn more about these new countries in Africa. 

I'm delighted that we're going to have this Pavilion of 
Guinea. It's going to be a wonderful pavilion, well de- 
signed and it's going to have demonstrations by some 
of the artisans of Guinea. Above all, it's going to portray 
for the American people and the seventy million visitors 
that will come here, the artistic qualities of the people of 
Guinea, qualities that permit their being classified as ex- 
ceptional in sculpture and in music and in dance. The 
wonderful dancers of Guinea will be on view in the 
pavilion and I think these will be an eye-opener to the 
millions of American people that will come here. 

We are happy also on this occasion to have Guinea 
participate in this Fair, because Guinea represents a new 
nation that's courageous, with lots of initiative and a desire 
to achieve progress. 

I think it's only fitting that, while we participate in this 
occasion, we should remember that at the head of this 
Republic is one of the great figures of the present-day 
world. We had the great honor to meet His Excellency, 
President Sekou Toure in Conakry, when we were there 
to extend our official invitation, and Ambassador Diallo 
Telli was gracious enough to present us to the President. 
We explained to him about the World's Fair, and as a 
demonstration of his decisive quality of mind he listened, 
and then he said to me in French, "Tres bien. On y sera." 
And here we are. 

We again had the pleasure of meeting the President in 
Riverdale. when he was here on a visit, and I wane to 



express on behalf of myself and the New York World's 
Fair our great pleasure that the President of Guinea has 
seen fit to have a participation of his country. We express 
to him our heartfelt gratitude as well as our admiration for 
the achievements that he's already brought about for his 
country, and we look forward with him to many, many 
more accomplishments in the years to come. 

In closing, I'd like to read something that your Presi- 
dent said a couple of years ago. It was shortly after your 
independence which is October 2nd, and we're looking 
forward to celebrating October 2nd with you here at the 
International Section of the World's Fair. I'd like to 
recall to all of us what President Sekou Toure said at the 
United Nations in November 1959, about a year after 
Guinea acquired independence. The President said this: 
"Populations which include more than 80% of illiterate 
peasants with an annual individual income of less than 
$100, and therefore with the most precarious conditions 
of life, these are the harsh realities of Africa. It is no 
longer masked behind the ridiculous veil of exoticism 
which hides from unaware eyes the colossal misery of our 
vast underdeveloped countries at present sparsely popu- 
lated because of centuries of slavery. And yet in this 
poverty of which humanity should be ashamed there is 
man — with his invisible faith in the destiny of humanity. 
There is his hope, his determination to win and to grow 
— his immense spiritual brotherhood and harmony — his 
kindness still in its purest form — and at the same time 
his extraordinary energy and sharp sense of responsibility. 



Shown in their very attractive traditional costumes 

are: Madame Bangoura, wife of the Ambassador 

of the Republic of Guinea to the 

United States; Madame Diallo Telli, wife of 

the Ambassador and Permanent Representative to 

the United Nations; and Madame Achkar Mar of, 

wife of the Ambassador of the Permanent 

Mission of Guinea to the United Nations. 



Breaking ground for the Pavilion of the 

Republic of Guinea are: (left to right) Governor 

Charles Poletti, vice president of 

International Affairs and Exhibits, New York 

World's Fair; His Excellency Karim Bangoura. 

Ambassador of the Republic of Guinea to the 

United Stales; and His Excellency A. Be la. 

Ambassador of Guinea lo Morocco. 



PAVILION FOR 

THE REPUBLIC OF GUINEA 



GENERAL COftll^^ICT 

AUSERE 

ARCHITECT 

NOEL AN 

STRUCTURA" 

SEELY'^ 

ENGINEE ^ 
S.A. I 





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PAVILION FOR 

THE REPUBLIC OF GUINEA 



GENERAL CONSTRUCTION 

AUSEREHL^SON CON 



JNG CORP. 



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Governor Charles Poletti, 

vice president in 

charge of International 

Affairs and Exhibits, 

presenting World's Fair 

medallion to His Excellency 

Karim Bangoura, 

Ambassador of the 

Republic of Guinea to 

the United States. 



"There is also the incalculable amount of virtues and 
values of almost 200,000,000 Africans, the tremendous 
possibilities which this represents and the intellectual 
potential which this may hold." 

That concludes the quote from President Sekou Toure's 
speech and I'm happy on this occasion, as a representative 
of the New York World's Fair, to dedicate this Pavilion 
of the Republic of Guinea. Thank you very much. 

DR. DE MENDOZA: Thank you, Governor Poletti. 
I should like now to present two brilliant diplomats who 
are also honoring us this afternoon with their presence: 
His Excellency A. Bela, Ambassador of Guinea to 
Morocco ; The Honorable James Loeb, Ambassador Desig- 
nate of the United States to the Republic of Guinea. 

Our next speaker was a member of the Territorial 
Assembly of Guinea from 1946 to 1957; Counselor at 
the French Union Assembly from 1954 to 1958; Director 



of the Guinea Press Agency in I960; and Chief of Staff 
of the Ministry of Information and Tourism during 1961 
and 1962 before being appointed Ambassador of Guinea 
to the United States. I have the honor to present His 
Excellency Karim Bangoura, Ambassador of the Republic 
of Guinea to the United States, who is also Ambassador 
to Canada and Ambassador Designate to Mexico — 
Ambassador Bangoura. 

HIS EXCELLENCY KARIM BANGOURA [Ambas- 
sador of the Republic of Guinea to the United States] : 
Excellencies, Governor Poletti, our dear friend Lionel 
Harris, ladies and gentlemen. The Guinea family in the 
United States of America is very happy to be present here 
on this piece of land of the United States of America that 
we shall consider, for the next two years, as an integral 
part of the Republic of Guinea. Our feeling of satisfac- 
tion is very profound and comes from the heart. This is 
an occasion when we discover how many devoted, en- 
thusiastic friends the Republic of Guinea has in the United 
States. It is immensely comforting to see all of you here. 
You may be assured that we shall be the faithful inter- 
preters to the President of our beloved Republic, His 
Excellency Ahmed Sekou Toure, and to all the people of 
Guinea. 

This event will be inscribed in history as a contribution 
to strengthening universal harmony, to forging the bonds 
of friendship, to furthering cooperation, to generating this 
indispensable understanding for establishing peace, hap- 
piness and justice in the world — the sort of world to 



which we all aspire and toward which you work, without 
perhaps, being aware of it. 

Therefore, this ceremony today is an indication of the 
simplicity, of the friendship and of the cooperation so 
precious to our people — and we know, also so precious to 
you and to your country, the United States of America. 

Through its presence here, the Republic of Guinea has 
no other aim than to confirm its strong desire always to 
remain in the stream of universal progress. In agreeing 
to our participation in the New York World's Fair, His 
Excellency Ahmed Sekou Toure wished in fact to achieve 
a symbol, but above all an act of faith. 

Our wish, through our pavilion, is to set forth evidence 
of the national unity of Guinea in creative work, under 
the constant impulse of the initiative and imagination of 
our people. It will be our modest contribution to this 
great human endeavor to offer to the many visitors the 
results of the various activities of our country — agricul- 
tural, industrial, handicraft and art — produced in an 
atmosphere of total independence, thanks to our refound 
liberty. 

Let me express, in the name of the Republic of Guinea 
and of its President, heartf elt thanks to everyone who has 
contributed to the realization of our project. Our thanks 
are addressed most particularly to you, Governor Poletti ; 
to our friend Lionel Harris; to the architects, Noel and 
Miller; and to all those who have given us assurance by 
their valuable cooperation, so that we can already see 
the good results. I am sure the Pavilion of Guinea will 



be, in view of this collaboration, attractive, lively and 
interesting; it will also contribute to strengthening the 
bonds of friendship and of cooperation between the Re- 
public of Guinea and the United States. 

Finally, it is my pleasure to greet The Honorable James 
Loeb, the Ambassador Designate of the United States to 
Guinea, and Madame Loeb, whose presence here today 
expresses their great interest for our country where they 
will be called to serve in a few weeks. But today, ladies 
and gentlemen, we are only at the first step, and there 
is much work to be done. I am happy to share with you 
the pleasure of breaking ground today and, awaiting the 
Guinea Pavilion, to leave this soil in the hands of the 
architects, contractors and workmen. 

In dosing this groundbreaking ceremony, I would also 
like to mention an important contribution made by a 
citizen of the Republic of Guinea, a citizen possessed of 
great energy, a dynamic spirit and a profound sense of 
patriotism and loyalty — the late Albert Constantin, who 
was a schoolmate of Ambassador Bangoura. May I ask 
you, Mr. Ambassador, to express to the widow of Mr. 
Constantin, and to her son, the fact that the New York 
World's Fair appreciates very much what Mr. Constantin 
has done in connection with the participation of the Re- 
public of Guinea at the Fair. As you have aptly put it, 
Mr. Ambassador, this Fair will serve not only to increase 
the understanding between the peoples of Guinea and 
of the United States, but also between all the peoples of 
Africa and of the United States. 



PAVILION FOR THE REPUBLIC OF GUINEA 





HIS EXCELLENCY KARIM BANGOURA, Ambassador of the Republic of Guinea to the United States 
HIS EXCELLENCY DIALLO TELLI, Ambassador of the Republic of Guinea to the United Nations 
MR. ABEL CAMARA, Commercial Attache', Embassy of the Republic of Guinea 
NOEL & MILLER, Architects, New York 
AUSEREHL & SON, Contractors, New York 



NEW YORK 
WORLD'S FAIR 
1964-1965 
CORPORATION 
Flushing 52, N. Y. 
Tel. 21 2- WF 4-1964 

ROBERT MOSES, President 

THOMAS J. DEEGAN, JR., Chairman of the Executive Committee 

WILLIAM E. POTTER, Executive Vice President 

CHARLES POLETTI, Vice President, International Affairs and Exhibits 

STUART CONSTABLE, Vice President, Operations 

WILLIAM BERNS, Vice President, Communications and Public Relations 

ERWIN WITT, Comptroller 

MARTIN STONE, Director of Industrial Section 

GUY F. TOZZOLI, (Port of New York Authority) Transportation Section 

ERNESTINE R. HAIG, Secretary of the Corporation and Assistant to the President 

WILLIAM WHIPPLE, JR., Chief Engineer