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Full text of "1964-65 New York World's Fair Groundbreaking and Dedication Booklets"

GROUNDBREAKING AT THE 
EW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964 





Governor Nelson D. Rockefeller drives the first pile in the 200- 
foot high observation tower of the New York State pavilion. 
Left to right: President of the Fair Robert Moses t Mrs. Paul 
Peabody, Lt. Gov. Malcolm Wilson, fudge John Lomenzo, and 
Governor Rockefeller. 




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1962 New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation 



REMARKS BY NEW YORK STATE AND WORLD'S 
FAIR OFFICIALS AT THE STATE'S EXHIBIT 
GROUNDBREAKING CEREMONIES, NEW YORK 
WORLD'S FAIR, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1962. 



ROBERT MOSES [President of the New York World's 
Fair]: Ladies and gentlemen, in presenting the head of 
the State Commission, I want to tell you briefly what he's 
doing. Not only is he building the state pavilion here 
which is the largest and the most important of all the state 
pavilions in the Fair — this is the host state and these 
officials are putting the most money and enthusiasm into 
it — the Lieutenant Governor is also in charge of build- 
ing the state theater over in the Lincoln Center for the 
Performing Arts, where the Fair is in partnership with 
the Lincoln Square people. That is a tremendous enter- 
prise also. They are both on schedule. They are both going 
along smoothly. They'll both be finished on time, and 
they'll both be great attractions at the World's Fair. Lieu- 
tenant Governor Malcolm Wilson. 

LT. GOV. WILSON: President Moses, Governor 



Rockefeller, Mrs. Peabody and other members of the 
World's Fair Commission, and distinguished guests, ladies 
and gentlemen — I don't propose to detain you at all. I 
just want to express the thanks of the chairman of the 
Commission to those whose cooperation has made possible 
this day. First of all, of course, to our Governor, whose 
enthusiasm for this Fair has been boundless, recognizing 
what it means not alone to our state but to this nation 
and the free world, he has been extremely active in ad- 
vocating the necessary programs which have been ap- 
proved by the Legislature. 

I am delighted to see Speaker Carlino here. I want to 
pay our debt of appreciation to the Speaker, to Senator 
Mahoney, and to members of the Legislature in both 
houses for giving us the appropriations necessary for this 
work. 

I want to make it crystal clear that the chairman simply 
basks in reflected glory because it is the work of the mem- 
bers of the World's Fair Commission, appointed by the 
Governor and by Speaker Carlino and Senator Mahoney, 
who are responsible for the plans and for this construe* 
tion, and I want to acknowledge my debt of appreciation 
to them. 



3 



Finally, I want to say that we appreciate very much 
the magnificent cooperation which we have received from 
Mr. Moses and all associated with him in the World's 
Fair Corporation. We are very grateful to Philip Johnson, 
our architect, to Thompson Starrett and Company and 
those who are working with them, and especially the 
skilled workmen who are here, whose skill translates the 
admirable conception of Mr. Johnson into what will be 
a beautiful exhibit. Thank you all for coming out here 
today. 

MR. MOSES: I don't want to repeat what I said before 
in introducing the Governor, but I just want to add one 
thing. There is not only a problem here at the Fair in 
persuading the states, the foreign governments, our in- 
dustries, the United States Government and the city ad- 
ministration to provide exhibits here; but also we have 
a more complex public works program than exists in any 
other metropolitan community here or abroad. Our prob- 
lems include not only the utilities under ground to serve 
the Fair — and the Park which will follow when the 
Fair is finished — but also the arterial construction you 
can see going on around here which in the main the State 



is providing, partly with federal and partly with state 
money. 

All you have to do is look around to see how compli- 
cated it is. I suppose, in a way, I ought to make an apology 
to people around here who were inconvenienced and dis- 
commoded and held up and all that kind of thing, but 
I'm not going to do that because, as we have said in our 
signs around here, you can't make an omelet without 
breaking some eggs. This is a tough job, the toughest 
job of its kind anywhere. The Governor has taken a tre- 
mendous interest in it and so has Burch McMorran. We 
have had the cooperation of the Borough President, Mr. 
Clancy, and we are all working together — federal, state, 
and city governments. But it is the state officials who are 
in charge of this construction work. Governor Rockefeller. 

GOV. ROCKEFELLER: Thank you very much, Com- 
missioner. Thank you Lieutenant Governor Malcolm Wil- 
son, Speaker Joe Carlino, Miss Peabody, members of the 
Commission, all those who are working on the job here, 
and friends. 

Bob mentioned the scale and complexity of this under- 
taking and I must say, I don't think there's ever been as 
much activity in this number of acres, as is taking place 




I * 



Architect's rendering of the New 
York State pavilion being built at 
Flushing Meadow for the New 
York World's Fair, showing the 
theatre (circular building on 
lower left) , the flag-bedecked 
''Tent of Tomorrow'* and the 
three observation towers. 





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right here, in and around Flushing Meadow Park. More 
than $93 million is being expended on the highway con- 
struction alone, and untold millions on the buildings and 
the preparation of the site itself. I'd particularly like to 
thank the members of the Legislature, represented by Joe 
Carlino here today, for having made available the funds 
for all of the projects in which the state is participating. 

I'd like to thank Malcolm Wilson and the Commission 
for providing leadership in working out plans for the 
state's participation. Malcolm has done a superb job, not 
only here in relation to this building, working with Phil 
Johnson and the engineers to erect one of the most excit- 
ing buildings that I think is going to come up on the 
Fairgrounds, but also in his support and development of 
the plan for the Lincoln Center New York State Theater. 
He has worked out arrangements with the city, persuad- 
ing the civic officials to cooperate and match funds in a 
comparable amount to insure the completion of Lincoln 
Center in time to function as the Fair's cultural hub during 
the two years of 1964 and 1965. 

In addition, Malcolm has shown his genius for leader- 
ship in handling the new Capital City Planning Commis- 
sion, of which he is chairman. Some day we hope all of 



you New York Cityi tes will come up to Albany and see 
one of the great permanent exhibits — our new State 
capitoL 

It's exciting indeed to see the way progress is being 
made here on the New York State exhibit's site, and I 
am happy to say that the State building is ahead of sched- 
ule. I just hope some of the other buildings come along 
and catch up with us. 

After years of planning and months of preparation, it 
is particularly exciting to see the actual construction begin- 
ning on our New York State pavilion. As Bob Moses 
knows, my administration has been among the most en- 
thusiastic and active supporters of the World's Fair proj- 
ect. Lieutenant Governor Malcolm Wilson has given 
unsparingly of his time and energy, as chairman of the 
State's Temporary Commission on the World's Fair, as 
have the personnel of our many state agencies. 

The pavilion to be built on this site will stand as testi- 
mony to other efforts, hand-in-hand with Fair officials and 
industry. The structure's nobility and grace will testify 
to the art of its famous architect, Philip Johnson, and to 
the skill and hard work of the men who will erect it. 

Another tangible evidence of the State administration's 



enthusiasm for the 1964-1965 World's Fair is not here 
but at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. To further 
the World's Fair while advancing the cultural life of New 
York, the State has provided funds for the New York 
State theater building at Lincoln Center. This beautiful, 
$15 million theater, which will be the focal point of the 
performing arts program for the World's Fair, is the 
State's permanent contribution to the Center and the City, 
and I would again like to thank Joe Carlino and all the 
members of the Legislature who are making possible this 
tremendous cultural undertaking. 

At this pavilion and elsewhere on the Fairgrounds, the 
World's Fair will also yield lasting benefits as a mag- 
nificent showcase for the Empire State's industries, for its 
resources, for its scientific and social advancement. Within 
our pavilion, exhibits by state agencies will show how 
New York's government encourages the finest develop- 
ment of all of these elements for a rewarding life for 
New York State's people, 

These Fairgrounds w r ill draw an estimated 70 million 
people from all parts of the country and of the world. The 
value of this opportunity to introduce New York to new 
friends is incalculable. To aid the millions of tourists who 



will be visiting the Fair, the State Department of Public 
Works, under Burch McMorran in 1961, initiated one of 
the largest arterial improvement programs in history. 
More than $112 million in State and Federal funds will 
be spent in the Flushing Meadow area, for expansion and 
improvement of the arterial system. 

Through the State Department of Commerce, under 
the leadership of Commissioner McHugh, we are en- 
deavoring to insure that millions of Fair visitors will also 
see the rest of the state. Vigorous tourist promotion pro- 
grams are being launched in Europe and Latin America, 
to attract Fair visitors to the State's recreational areas, to 
its shopping centers, to its historic sights and to its cul- 
tural institutions. In dollars and cents alone, the Fair's 
drawing power will yield many many times its total cost. 

However, the 1964-65 World's Fair has a value far 
beyond its commercial potential. The hundreds of thou- 
sands attracted to the Fair from overseas will see for them- 
selves how the people of our state and our nation live, 
think, and feel. The Fair will accomplish, as no other 
undertaking could, the purpose which is expressed in its 
theme, PEACE THROUGH UNDERSTANDING. 

Thank you very much ladies and gentlemen. 



NEW YORK STATE COMMISSION ON THE WORLD'S FAIR 




UNISPHERE 

prMinttf by (IS) Unit** %mn Stnl 

Q IW *« **«% WarU'i I** l*64-lf« 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR MALCOLM WILSON, Chorrman 
MRS. PAUL E. PEABODY, Vice Chairman 
CHARLES J. BROWNE 
HON. WILLIAM T. CONKLIN 
MRS. MAY PRESTON DAVIE 



IRA H. GENET 
MORTIMOR S. GORDON 
JOSEPH A. KAISER 



WALTER J. MAHONEY 
JOSEPH F. CARLINO 
JOSEPH ZARETZK1 
GEORGE L. INGALLS 



EX-OFFICIO 



OTTO KIN2EL 

JOHN WALTER KOESSLER 

HERMAN I. MERINOFF 

JULIUS L. MINTZ 

DR. CLILAN B. POWELL 

WILLIAM A. SHEA 

JOSEPH T. P. SULLIVAN 



ANTHONY J. TRAVIA 

AUSTIN W. ERWIN 

FRED W. PRELLER 



Fair President Robert Moses (right) presents Governor Rocke- 
feller with the official Fair medallion at the New York State 
pavilion's groundbreaking ceremonies. 




NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION 

Flushing 52, N. Y. Tel. 212-WF 4-1964 

ROBERT MOSES, President 

THOMAS J. DEEGAN, JR., Chairman of the Executive Committee 

WILLIAM E. POTTER, Executive Vice President 

CHARLES POLETTI, Vice President, international Affairs and Exhibits 

STUART CONSTABLE, Vice President, Operations 

WILLIAM A. BERNS, Vice President, Communications and 
Public Relations 

ERWIN Win, Comptroller 

MARTIN STONE, Director of Industrial Section 

GUY F. TOZZOLI, (Port of New York Authority) Transportation Section 

ERNESTINE R. HAIG, Secretary of the Corporation and 
Assistant to the President 

WILLIAM WHIPPLE, JR., Chief Engineer