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Full text of "1964 High Point University Zenith Yearbook"

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^S igns 
and 
S ymhols 

of the 

1 964 ZENITH 



Published by the 
Student Body 

of 
High Point College 



Elaine Greene Editor-in-chief 

Carol Parrish Associate Editor 

Pam Hancox Managing Editor 

Charles Hawks Business Manager 

Dr. S. J. Underwood Advisor 



Many Things Go to Make a Campus Different 




The 1964 ZENITH tells 
of the signs and symbols 
of Hiffh Point College — 
those that give it an 
unique personality all its 
(iwn. The residence of 
the president and his 
family (left) is extremely 
close to the new dorm. 
The daffodils add to the 
uniqueness of our campus. 








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studying in the court 
of the girls' dorm (top 
left) is a treat on a warm 
spring day. College Day 
(top rijirht) sponsored by 
the High Point merchants 
could menn prizes for 
someone. This year's tug- 
of -war resulted (above 
left) in no more Beanies 
for the freshmen, and the 
editor of the ZENITH 




getting dunked. The col- 
legians, (above right) 
made up of campus stu- 
dents, offers great en- 
tertainment for campus 
functions. North Hall, 
(left) the newest girls' 
dorm, houses upperclass- 
men girls. Other dorm 
girls are jealous of the 
modern conveniences 
North Hall affords. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 




Administration 

& 
Facultv 



35 Student Ii<»dv 







Organizations 



117 Greeks 




Features 



161 



Athletics 




18 




85 




139 




Campus Life 187 



199 



Advertisers , 



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DEDICA TION 

Colleere is a time of question! np and of doubtinp; 
yet if one truly searches, it is a time of answers 
and of assurance. Severed from the restraining, de- 
pendent cords of iiome, the student naively surges 
forth into life only to be caught in the undertow 
of inevitable difficulties in adjustment, learning, 
and growing emotionally and mentally. However, if 
a person is fortunate, he will meet and come to 
know one individual — a cognitive professor, a con- 
fident guide, and a compassionate friend — who will 
open the doorway to erudition and self-realization. 

We, at High Point College, have such an indivi- 
dual, a person who goes beyond the facade of mun- 
dane interest and dedicates his time, his knowledge, 
his being to assisting students. Not only does he 
open vast vistas of information for the academic 
development of the students, but he also strives to 
strengthen individuals to understand and master 
their ow-n emotions and conflicts. 

In appreciation for his ceaseless efforts in the 
continuance of high educational standards and 
Christian ideals, we the Senior Class dedicate the 
1964 edition of the Zenith to the man who leaves 
with us his ideal — "A new commandment I give 
unto you, that ye love one another, as I have loved 
von" — Mr. John D. Martin. 




Mr. Mai-tin spends half of his teaching load counselinsr students 
who need specialized help with personal pioblenis and study 
skills. Here he is shown helpinpr a student learn to study effec- 
tively. 




Students must have the absolute trust of an individual before he 
talks frankly with an advisor. This picture reflects the confident-e 
()Ui- student body has in .VI r. Martin. 




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There is seldom a moment to relax when one as conscientiously 
as does the man we honor. Here he is shown in a rare moment 
of relaxation. 



Physical Properties of Campus Are 
Signs of Its Uniqueness 




A campus is made up of many thjngs^people, trees, 
sidewalk;^, class rnoms, bonks and buildings. These 
thinjiTS make campuses universal, but each campus has 
its own unique qualities. The uniqueness of High Point 
College endears it to each and every student who passes 
through the portals of Roberts Hall. Roberts Hall is the 



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most prominent building on campus. Its spire 
can be seen from any vantage point on the 
campus and when the weather is foggy, the 
tower seems to hover protectively over the 
college. Something new has been added to the 
campus this year. White parking signs have 
made their appearance. 




Freshmen Begin a New and Exciting Year 




A freshman's first i\ny at 
Higrh Point College is a mix- 
ture of new and exciting ex- 
periences. Many willinf^ and 
eager hands are ready to help 
new students unload cars and 
transport belongings to the 
dorms. Several upperclass- 
men boys, like these two 
Larrys, found themselves 
suffering from aching backs 
and strained muscles as the 
result of thousands of heavy 
suitcases, stuffed trunks and 




mysterious boxes. Stuffed 
animals by the b o x 1 o a d s 
f o u n d new homes in the 
rooms of \V o m a n ' s Hall. 
Mass confusion reigned as 
new students became ac- 
quainted with their new 
homes, new friends and said 
goodbyes to their families, 
Sunday night found the fresh- 
men making new friends 
among the oldtimers on cam- 
pus. 





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As is true with most colleges, High Point 
abounds with many buildings of different 
shapes and sizes. Colonial architecture pre- 
vails on the campus. The sight of these 
buildings is the first impre.?sion that a 
student gets of High Point College. The 
newcomers do not see the students, the 
profe.ssors, or the Bookstore. They first be- 
come acquainted with the tower of Rob- 
erts Hall, ascending toward the utmost 
peak of knowledge — the Lamp of Learn- 
ing. \Mth this first look, all the other 
buildings fall into view; Woman's Hall, 
McCuljnch Hall, Memorial Auditorium. 



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Pictured above is a scene of the Carrick 
Memorial Gardens. These gardens are a 
memorial to Doak Bain Carrick (1888- 
1962), a distinguished horticulturist and a 
citizen of High Point for many years. He 
was the son of the Reverend Thomas and 
Mary Bain Carrick. 

Fourteen benches have been donated by 
Mrs. Mary Stephens Carrick Hewlett and 
Mr. Carey W. Carrick, in memory of the 
Reverend Thomas and Mary Bain Carr- 
ick, parents of Doak Bain Carrick. 



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Orientation and Registration 




As a part of Orientation this 
year, all incoming freshmen were 
requii'ed to read thi'ee books: I.ook 
Homeward Angel, Conscience On 
Campus, and Lord Of The Flies. 
Durint^ Orientation Week, these 
book.s were discussed by student,^ 
and professors. Dr. Hudgins is 
.shown leading one group. 



The fre.shman year begtn.s with Orientation ... a mix- 
ture of confusion and excitement, a few tears shed, 
the joy of meeting other student.s, moving- in, unpack- 
ing, meeting professors and Dr. Patton, parting, en- 
tertainments, tests and more tests, and finally, those 
few days after classes start. There seems to be an 
electric current that nms through the atmosphere of 



the campus during the first few weeks of school. Or- 
ientation is an important part of the freshman year at 
college, and during this time, the new student becomes 
acquainted with the school ... its quii-ks, its traditions, 
its personality, and it.s people. The freshman adjusts 
to college life and becomes a vital and moving part of 
the campus. 




.An important part of Orientation is 
the taking of many different tests. 
Several students are shown laboring 
iivei one such test. 



Dr. William Matthews, advisor to 
the fre.shman class, is shown talking 
to the new students in the auditorium. 
Several members of the Orientation 
Committee are seated behind Dr. 
Matthews. 




Begin a New Year For HPC Students 



Lines, lines, itnd more lines. A 
student finds himself stunding 
in many lines before the painful 
task of register in pr is over. These 
students look like they have been 
standing in line for a lonpr time, 
even patient Dick Stinson looks 
like he is ready to give up and 
go home. 




With the return of the ui>perclassmen to the campus 
comes the task of registiation for fall semester classes. 
Registration always involves standing in line — to pet 
into the gym, to get the necessary cards, to get into the 
desired course sections, to pay the Bursar, to turn the 
completed medical form in to the nurse, to turn the 
cards in to the Registrar's office, and finally, stand- 



ing in line to get out of the gym. Registration, in 
spite of all efforts, is always mass confusion. Rushing 
to and fro in the gymnasium . . . trying to find that 
certain English professor . . . breaking for lunch , . . 
grabbing ;i (|uick bite to eat . . . and hurrying back 
to the gym to see if registration cannot be finsihed 
before midnight. This is all a part of college life. 



Director of Student Personnel, Mr. 
Taylor, and his assistants seem to be 
relieved by the rest given to them. 





Dean of the College, Dr. David Cole, 
is a very busy person during regis- 
tration. His desk is the scene of many 
conferences about schedules, hours, 
history courses, and many other pro- 
blems. 



Students Are Greeted by 




\^Mm ^. 



As the new college year begins, the students are 
greeted by old and familiar sights as well as by 
new ones. These new additions to the campus add 
to the unique pei-sonality of High Point College. 
Campus cop, Mr. Allen, is still giving out 
those dreaded parking tickets, and the fine has in- 
creased to $2 this year. The bookstore has added 
a new collection of books to whet the appetite of 
eager, young intellectuals. 





The tower of Roberts Hall still stands as guardian angel over 
the campus. An expansion in the size of the campus brought 
new housing for upperclassmen and fraternity men. Millis 
Dormitor\' was ready for occupancy at the beginning of the 
semester. A new and most unusual sight around the campus 
these days is the pet "Kitty cat" of one student. The cat sits 
patiently in the car during his master's classes. 




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12 



the Old and the New 




A familiar sight to everyone is 
the Student Center. Housing the 
campus Post Office, the Book- 
store, the offices of campus or- 
g-anizations, and lounge for stu- 
dent relaxation, this building 
could certainly be called the most 
popular building on campus. 
From 8 o'clock in the morning 
until 4 o'clock in the afternoon, 
the sounds of popular music can 
be heard wafting from the Book- 
store. 



Old and familiar sights, if seen from a new 
angle, can often seem new. This picture is a 
prime example of such an experiment. Is this 
the north side of North Hall, or is it the side 
of the library? No, this is a view of the gym- 
nasium that very few people pay attention to; 
although they see this part of the building, it 
never looks to them as it does in this picture. 








Bright, .sparkling ivhite park- 
ing signs are abundant all over 
the campus. These signs which 
are a distinctive feature of our 
campus, aid in solving the cam- 
pus parking problem. Upon reg- 
istration, each student who owns 
a car was given a parking sticker 
with a letter on it indicating a 
certain area in which the student 
i.s allowed to park his car. A 
parking ticket is the reward for 
anyone who does not obey this 
new rule. 



13 



IN MEMORIAM 




John F. Kennedy 1917 - 1963 



"John Kennedy reveled in love for the Irish 
patrimony that he had left so far behind. He 
lauRhed with love at the rofj^uery of his 
grand fat her, Honey Fitx, and his trip to Ire- 
land was ;i piljrrimajre to that love. 

He loved his brothers and his sisters with 
a tribal love. All Kennedys were l>orn grear- 
ioLis, but under seige it could be the Ken- 
nedys ag-ainst the world. 

John Kennedy loved his children with a 
light that lit up his world. He discovered 
his daughter when election brought them 
finally under the same roof, and he delighted 
in her pride and in her performance. His 
heart leapt up when he saw his son, careen- 
ing through life as if there were no tomor- 
row, and he lit up the hearts of all who saw 
them enjoy each other. 

And John Kennedv loved his wife, who 



served him so well. Their life together began 
as it ended — in a hospital — and through 
sickness and loneliness there grew the speci- 
al love that lights up the soul of the lover 
and the loved alike. 

John Kennedy is dead, and for it that we 
are lesser people in a lesser land." 

— Benjamin Bradlee 

Copied from Newsweek.December 2, 

1%3. page38. 

The editor feels that it is only fitting and 
proper for the ZENITH to pay tribute to our 
late President. We are a part of the youth 
that he was so interested in, and there is 
no better nor more poignant eulogy for 
John F, Kennedy than the one written by 
Mr. BradSee, 



14 




We 

Pay 

Tribute 

to 



Mrs. Mac is as gentle a person as one could ever knuw. Her mascot 
shai-es her delightful apartment where students come to seek a word of 
advice and to share the warm wisdom which commands such widospiead 
respect from "her boys." 



Mrs. Frances McMeekin-Kerr 



One evidence of her continuinjjr interest in a rich and 
varied life is her many hobbies. 



Each year the Zenith staff honors one member of the administration 
who has rendered ontstandiriK service to the student body. This year we 
pay tril)ute to Mi-s. Frances McMeel\in-Kerr, the housemother of J. Ed 
Mil lis Dormitory. 

One of the most difficult jobs on any college canipns is to be honse- 
mother to a group of male students. High Point College is most fortunate 
to have such a devoted person as "Mrs. Mac" to serve in this very important 
position, "Mrs. i\Iac" is always willing to help students solve their prob- 
lems and to give advice to them when she feels it is needed. Her pleasing 
personality makes her a special friend to each of the ninety men who live 
in Millis Dorm. Her advice and her concern for each student makes her 
a truly unitine person who has added much to our campus. 



Charlie Nesbitt— Student Par Excellence 




The ZENITH stfiff this year is giving special recog- 
nition to Charlie Nesbitt, Stiulent Body President for 
the 1963-64 school year. We feel that the entire student 
body joins with lis in saying, "Congratulations and 
thank yoLJ, Charlie, for a job well done." 

From the fir.st d?iy that he arrived at HPC, Charlie 
has worked to help the school and his fellow students. 
His vivaciou.'? pensonalitv and tact ha.s made him a 
friend of all. Popular with all students, he is also well- 
known and respected by the administration and the 
faculty. 

Being Student Body President has not been one of 
the easiest tasks, but Charlie has fulfilled his duties 
nobely and has always kept the students foremost in his 
mind. High Point College has become a better place be- 
cause of his four years as a student here, and the col- 
lege will always be marked by the improvements that 
he fostered. 

A warm smile and a friendly hello has endeared Char- 
lie to us all, and the ZENITH staff would like to say 
a personal "thank you" for all that you have done for 
everyone. 





16 



-//x 






ION 



President's Message to the Class of 64 



As paitinff remarks to you may I quote from an unkno^^'n 
Professor of Latin in a liberal arts college: 



"The four years a man spe'nds at colletre .should 
be like a hill in a plain. As he ascends the hill, he 
is able more and more to see back over the road that 
humanity has trod — the frreat thinps that have been 
thoufrht and said and done and believed and created. 
From this vision of the past history of the world 
and its inhabitants and from a com]n-ehensive view 
of the nature of the universe, he is able to turn 
and praze alonjr the future course of humanity; to 
jndjjfe the future from his knowledg-e of the past 
and the present ; and to plot his own steps in that 
future. Any man, whatsoever his own work, pro- 
fession or business, will l>e the better for this vision. 
Perhaps never again will he have the opportunity 
to lift his gaze from the daily routine of Hfe'.s pedest- 
rian path into the vast reaches of Nature and hu- 
man experience, but the memory of what he has 
seen from the elevation of those years will permeate 
all the remaining years of his life." 




May God always guide you and keep you and 
mav we not be lost to each other. 




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20 




Dr. Harold E. Conrad 
Dean of the College 



Administrative Personnel 




Dr. David W. Cole 

Acting Dean of the 

College 






Mrs. Dot Griffiths 

Assistant Director of 
Student Personnel 




Jesse L, Taylor 

Director of 
Student Personnel 



W. Law son Allen 
Business Manag-er 



:[ 




Mr. rjale Brown 

Alumni Executive 

Secretarv 




Mr. L. G. Wright 
Dietitian 




Dr. Clifford Hinshaw 
Director of Evening Sthool 




Miss Marcella Carter 
Head Libiaiian 



Administration and Staff 




Mr. Wesley W, Gayttor 

Bursar 




Mr. D. L, Paul 

Director of Admissions 




-Mr. W, Lawson .-VUen 
Director of Collejire Relations 




Mrs. Frances Gaynor 
Bookkeeper 




Mrs, L. G. Wright 
Dietitian 




Mrs. Marguerite Hormachea 
Director of News Bureau 




22 



Mr. N, P. Yarborough 
Registrar 




Mtsk Bobbie EverhnTt 
Campus Nuivie 





Dr, W. B. Donald, Jr. 





Dr. C* W. Surles. Jr* 
CoUeg'e Phj'sieian 



Of. Edi^in L. Airman 
Col I eire Ph ys if i ft i^ 



Dr. W. p. Hinson 
CoM^pe Physiciiin 






^h 



Dr. Eugene Tfrrtll 

College I^hysician 




Dr. Eldom Tfrrell 
College Physician 



Dr. Lee West 
College Physifian 




.M r Si . ;VI a r > Austin, 
housemother in Mt- 
Culloch Hall, is new 
oil our campus this 
year, but has proven 
to be a i2roo(i mother 
to her many c'harKes. 




Mrs. Mary Bennett is substi- 
tute "mother" for the women 
resident students. Always 
willinj; to help with any proh- 
lenis, she is beloved by all the 
girls who are under her care. 



^ W 



Mrs. Frances McMeekin Kerr is 
"mama" to the boys in the new 
Mill is Dorm. A sprig-htly, little 
lady, she is always ready to help 
whei'ever she is needed. 




Mr, Paul .\ustin 
is in charfce of 
the Student Cen- 
ter. He spends 
msny hours pag- 
ing: stLidents and 
keeping appoint- 
ments in order. 




23 









MiDfl Hekn Brawn 
S^fTftary \o Alumni 




Mrs. Louiiie Blak« 



Mrs. Dorothy Collins 
ywjtchbojird Operator 




Mrs» Ad?1m« Hamilton 
Assijstant Libiarian 





Mi^K Zelle Martin 

Secietar'^' to 
Di. D, H. Cooke 




Mrsr DoTrttlty Ktrr 
Cashier 




Mrfi. Annis Parkfl 
Minioo^raTth Office 





Mrs. Ina Patrick 
A&sistant Libiaiian 



Mrs. Lillian Mays 
Secretary to ihe Dean of 
the College 




Mrft, Shirley l^ayton 

Assistant Bonkjitore 
Manager 



Mrs. Dorathy Price 

Secretary to the Dir^cior 

of Admis^iions 




Mrs. Mtina ^^allndeTS 

Secretary to the 

Public Kelfltit>n3 Office 





Mrs. Charlotte White 

Audio-Visual Director 




Mrs. \'iftlfl Thompson 

SecEt>t^^V If" the Rusine^:; 

Manager 



Mrs. GooLaby 
Panhellenit House 



24 



Faculty 

Biology Department 





Mre. Elizabeth Conner Dr. Halsey Mi1l«r Miss Kii> Phillips 



Dr. William Lazaruk 



The Biology Department means more than 
the clatter students make as they cut up 
their frogs, gradinjj lab drawings, trying to 
master the fish, and trying to make an "A" 
in lab. 



Business Department 




JS*s. 






'^mk^4!m 



Mfk Jftt C Allen 



Mr. J. L. NVIsftn Cmdr. GeorRe W. Netta 



Dr. Clyde Crobaujfh 
Department Head 



The Business DepartmeJit means more 
than mastering Gregg shorthand, ruining fin- 
gernails on the typewriter, writing papers 
of consumer goods ; and hoping for at least 
a "B" in Business Law. 




Mr* J. Wilson Rojrers 



25 



Education and Psychology Department 




Dr. Dsnnls H. Cookt 



Doing student teaching— making at- 
tractive bulletin boards — having con- 
ferences with Dr. Dan Cooke — and 
finally receiving the much sought after 
teaching certificate, are all part of the 
Education Department. 



Mf. H. E. Cobl* 



Dr. Dan B, Cooke Mr. J. D. MBrtin 









Mrs. Kathryn Rinf 



Dr. H. H. PeUrson 



Dr. W.P, Mfttlhews 
Miss Ruth Worth m^ton 




Dr. Sjimuel I'nderwood 
De^'artnienc Head 



Shakespeare — Milton — 
punctuation — term papers — 
poetry ^ Chaucer — tests ■ — 
new English Club — Drama — 
joiirnali.'^m — all these are Eng- 
lish. 



English Department 



Dr. JfAn Hallada 




Dr. Etigen« MounU 



Mrs. Shirley Rawley Mrs. Pegffy L>1m Mrs. Emily Sullivan 



26 



Fine Arts Department 




Dr. l.Hw J, Le^iifl 
Department Hcnd 




Mr. Donald Drap«au Mr. J. L. Fryhavtt Mrs. Jane Morgan 

Miss Ernestine Pielda Mr. Raifoyd Porter 



Better practice that piano a little more — gro to the 
library for information for the debate tomorrow — try- 
outs for the play next Friday — ■ rehearsals every nifrht 

— work on the sets — di'ess rehearsal — final performance 

— speech to activate for Monday — sounds of organ com- 
ing from the auditorium. 



History Department 




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5^ 





■k't^m'k 



Dr. David W. CoJe 
Dep&rtnient Hear! 




Dr Hflen Bartlett Dr. Harold Conrad Dr. S. C. Deskins 

Dr. A. P. Cratiot Mr. Jamen R. Prittchett 



The history department this year is re- 
quiring all freshman history classes to meet 
once a week in the auditorium for a lecture. 



27 



Dr. Arthur E. LeV^j 



Languages Department 





Mr. J, H, Allrod 



Miss BfTts Hirtil»r 




./• 




Mrs. EveJyn Simpson 




These professors seem to be enjoying their 
meal before their next classes. 



Mathematics Department 





.Mi^s Louise Adam» 



1 plus 1 equals 2 — staying 
up all night doin^ those trig 
problems — calculus giving 
students a headache. 



Col- CarKon J. t'ftoJt 
Department Head 



Col. Cook seems to 
be fascinated by 
something on the 
floor as the professor 
rests his hands a few 
minutes before the 




long processional of 
new students begins. 
Even the professors 
sometimes dread the 
Student - Faculty Re- 
ception. 



23 



Physical Education Department 





}, 



'p. 

^ 1-—/ . ' ' 



Dr. Jomeii T, Hamiltrin 
Department Head 



P.E. classes at 8:20 certainly are 
rough. Some people will never learn to 
hit that little birdie. 





Miss Betty Jo fiery Mr. Riibert DnvLdson Mr. C. F, Hartman 



Mr. Tom (luinn 



Dr. W. K. Lotke 
Department Head 



Religion Department 







Dr. Locke, Head of Religion 
Department, organizes an as- 
sembly. 





0'P' 




Dr. Hughes Cox Mrs. Dorothy Hays Dr. Wall Hudeins 



29 




Sociology Department 




Department Hern] 




Mr. C R. Hormachea 



A petition circulating to get lab priv- 
ileges for JIarriage and the Family classes- 
Anthropology term papers are due tomor- 
row. 



Chemistry and Physics Department 





Dr. J. M. Flowers 



Dr. E. O^ CumminES 




Don't you think that someone should inform .Mr, Hormachea that one does 
swininiinp with one's clothes on? 



not Ko 



30 




In Memory of Mr, Jerr> Mithae) 
Kel)i-iiai'\' 12, 1928 Febniai'.v 2(1. 19G4 



Hiffh Point ("ulle^e has inst a scholar. There 
is no other way to describe Mr. Jerry Michael 
— he was a scholar, an intellectual in the finest 
sense of the word, a true example of what an 
educator should be. 

Mr. Michael tauKht at Hi^h Point ("ollefre 
only a few months, but in that time he left a 
tremendous impression on everyone who came 
into contact with him. The first time you met 
him yoii said to yourself, "Here is a brilliant 
man." \ot only was he brilliant in his own 
rijrht, but he also had standards which his stu- 
dents admired. He instilled in his students the 
idea that knowledfre is much more important 
than mere grades or averages. 

In the field of economics he taujrht as few 
men could, because of his wide background and 
e.xperience. Having lived under different econo- 
mic sy.stem.s, he was free from much of the 
bias that many people have. He never stated 
that one theoi-y of economics was right and 



another «-nnijr. I'ather he pointed out the rela- 
tive merits of each system. He did not condone 
any one philosophy; instead he taught his stu- 
dents to analyze all of them and to make an 
intelligent choice for themselves. 

To the students of High Point Col lege Mr. 
Michael has endowed his profound enthusiasm. 
As a teacher he was demanding. But somehow 
you did not really mind working for him. You 
always knew that no matter how hard you work- 
ed for his classes, he always worked that much 
harder to become a more effective teacher. 

Although he was a teacher, Mr. Michael 
never stopped being a student. He was always 
searching, studying, and striving for improve- 
ment and knowledge. 

Yes, we at High Point College have lost a 
scholar. We have lost a concerned friend. We 
knew Mr. Michael for only a short time, yet 
we know that we have known a great man. 



Board of Fellows 



The High Point Collegre Board of Fellows, the direct responsibility of 
the endowment committee of the Board of Trustees, is composed of indivi- 
duals, corporations, and business concerns who are vitally interested in the 
future of Hierh Point College. The deadline for participation in this vital 
phase of the Development Program is February 1 of each year. The Board 
of Fellows sharing their abilities and influences with the college this year 
are: 



Alcoa Foundation 

Warren L. Anderson 

Mrs. Myrtle H. Barthmaier 

Mr. Jack H. Campbell 

Mr. J. Harriss Covington 

Mr. Frank Dalton 

Mrs. Frank Dalton 

Mr. Doak S. Finch 

Mr. Tom A. Finch, Jr. 

Mr. John C. Foy 

Mr. Horace S. Haworth 

Mr. Charles E. Hayworth 

Mr. David R. Hayworth 

Mr. Delos S. Hedgecock 

High Point Bank & Trust Co. 

Mr. I. Paul Ingle 

Mr. C. T. Ingram, Jr. 

Mr. Charles L. Kearns 



Mrs. Eleanor Powell Latimer 

The Lilly Company, Mr. W. R. Campbell 

Mr. Wayland B. Linthicum, Jr. 

McCrary-Acme Foundation, Inc. 

Mr. Holt McPherson 

Mrs. J. E. Millis 

Mr. James H. Millis 

Mrs. L. K. Mobley 

North Carolina National Bank 

Mrs. Ammie Mae Powell 

Mr. John M. Reeves 

Mr. Leon Schute 

Mr. Robert M. Silver 

Mr. Edgar H. Snider 

Western Electric Foundation 

Mr. Elliot S. Wood 

Ml-. Frank H. Wood 



High Point College 
Board of Trustees 



Mr. Holt McPherson, Chairman 

Mr. Horace S. Haworth, Vice-Chairmaii 

Mr. Elliott S, Wood, Treasurer 

Dr. Weiitiell M. Patton, Secretarv 



Rev. J. Clyde Aimian 

Mr, Stanford R. Brookshire 

Mrs. D. S. Colt ran e 

Mr, J. Harriss Covinjrton 

Mr. Eugene Cross 

Mr. Harry B. Finch 

Mr. Tom A. Finch, Jr. 

Bishop Paul N. Garber 

Dr. C. L. Gray 

Rev. M. E. Harbin 

Nolan B, Harmon, U.D.. Ex-Officio 

Mr. Felix Harvey, HI 

Mr, Charles E. Hayworth 



Ml-. \'ernon Hodpin 

Mr. Josh Home 

Mr. Charles L. Kearns 

Mr. A. J. Koonce 

Mr. Charles \V. McCrary 

Mr, ^>lt^ine Madison 

Dr. J. Clay Madison 

Mr. James H. Millis 

Dr. W. Stanley Potter 

Mrs. Katie Mac Aula y Rankin 

Mr. L. F. Ross. Emeritus 

Mr. William F. Womble 




Left H) riKht: First roiv — Rt-v. 
Charles E. Hayworth, Mr. Elliott 
Pherson Mr. Horace S. Harwoith 
dell Patt.in. Rev, M. E, Harbin 



J. Clyde Aumun, Mr. 

S. Wood, Mr, Holt Mc- 
Second row— Dr. Wen- 
Dr, J, Clay Madison, 



.Mr Charles W, McCrarv, Mr, J, Vernon Hodfrin, Third 
row— Dr. C. L. Gray. -Mr, S. R. Brookshire. Mr. H. A. 
Koonce, Mr, F, Logan Porter, Mr. William L. Wnnible, 



Evening School 







The Evening School offers an opportunity 
for students to receive a college education 
while pursuint: a full-time career. Approxi- 
mately forty courses are offered in many 
fields "of study. Dr. C. R. Hinshaw is director 
of the Evening School with a stuff of twenty- 
one qualified professors. 



Dr. C. R, Hinshaw 
Di recto 1- of Evctiinfr School 




Left to rijiht r Front ro«,- L D. Graham, C, R. Hormachea, Jean 
Hiilladay, -k'liy .Mkhi.'al, (". R. }Iinsh;nv. G. i\I. Nicholson, Juan 
Miranda, ,Iane Morjxan, Margaret Lyles, Gwendolyn Dopgett, 



Geoifre H, Hobart, Second row: Jack VanAnda, Reid Prillaman, 
Halsey Miller, X, P, YarborouKh, William Kuhn, Jesse Tavlor 
Wallace Hairelson, Janet MeCurry. David Holt, S, C. Deskins 



34 




'C-V.. ;"' 



HiS»^^;^ 







'■%... 



j-:-'^^ 

'■'i^-* 



•.x.-r*' 



UDEN: 






F 

R 

E 

S 

H 

M 

A 

N 




The Freshman Ijegins hi.s year with apprehension and ends it with a new 
found confidence, matnrity, and an excitement for the future. Because of 
the Sophomore Beanie Prog-ram, bonfires, fraternity rush, required courses, 
term papers, and the thousand other little things that fill a freshman's 
hours, he becomes a vital part of the High Point College student body. 



c 

L 
A 
S 
S 




Laurie- AbbQtl 
Jean All^n 



FSiilt^' Allc^n 



Jean Anrleiiion 



Feler J. Antonakos 



Wayne Ashley 

Mai'izell Aijiiin 



Ohai]<:>s D. Ayei^^ 



Marianne Behi'^ncll 
Witliam T. Bei'i-ier 



Jim Biven^i 



Thomas Blanciak 



Debliie Bolton 



Janrkif Bt'enrllc 



Janrk Biiiv^'n 




36 






rMM^ 




Me]i,'in Lawrence Byrd, Mik^ Cana- 
(lay. Ronalfi H&ndri>; Carroll, Anna 
Lee Cartel-, Thoju^H, A, Carter, 
Th<»mMs A, Carter. Pei-ry Jnn^K 
C a^ h io n , Max R . r hef k 



Hr^iTHiry Chase, 1,/irrv Cheatham. 
Rnihtri H, Clark, Jr.. Tillie Cl^rk. 
Thinmas Coleman 



Patricia Ann Cook. Francis David 
C (J u rt ney^ \l, S t e v o Cov j n irtoii . 
S a ] a h' C ra ven , Don a 1 11 C roftsJey , 
William Cude. Steve Davis 



The Freshman Year. 



Exciting New Experiences 



Julia De( roci.v e r . Roff e i' K t e ^■ i' 
De Lainife^ Donald H. De- 
Wolfe. Tom Dij^nan. DaviH 
Dorsey, Siie D]'Hn;e. Kai^en 
Edivartls, Terr>' E(lv\'ai-(ls 



Robert Stephen EUer. Leif F, 
Eriksson, Wayne Ervjn, Jill 
Everhart, Jerry Fi-^edle, EHie 
Fi'eeman, Carol Feezoi'. Jane 
C. Fleming 



Dennis Flynn, Clinton Her- 
man Foi'bis. Jr., Cainor Good- 
win^ Linda Greason. Jeff 
Graul. Sarah Creen, Friene 
Haffifht. Linda Hall 



Robert Earl Hamilttm, Faye 
HaiTnan, David Haj'i^intrton, 
Linda Herlrick, N^inrv June 
Hill, Dewey Hilllard. Ralpih 
W. Hoar, Jr.. Garry Holland 




37 








Juc^ith Ann Hollintrs%^'Di'th 








dM^M 







ilMih 



Thomas W. Hnllis 



Susan H(w>(l 



kun^lfi Hundley 
Kem|k D. Hu*s 
Judy Hussey 
Vi^rl^ne Hutchinson 



(ilcn'in Jester 



Dennis JohTi,syn 
F ]■?<,! \- J imps 



WjinnfA Jcyycv 



Tamara Kearny; 
Hwsemary Kennedy 



Hickit* I^arriek 



Alan La.shley 
VH'illiam J. Lawrence 



Aileen N, Howe 
David Hucks 



Wayne Hujrhes 




Joy In man 



Arnmi<^ Lee Jenkins 
Chvistie Jensen 



Delaine Jurney 
M a \s a ret K aeh ] er 



Rorlney O. Keains 






Jei'i'>' Lan^hei't 

Emma Lou Lj?i rules 

Gfloiire O- Laie, Jv. 



Tony Lefi*ris 
Gene Le Frade 



Sharon Letberbury 




ik^ 



Sophomore Tickets Plus 





It's about my daiKliuff! 



Yes Si I, \Vf iindeistaiid! 



38 




l^irhflrd Lew in 
liuu-h Lpwjs 
liijtt Link 



Nnlan Lowe 
Anh Macki^ 



Jan Moirib 



William Mt-lnniii 
AMhui' McKay, Ji;'. 



Sftndra New^yme 
Jamti Noi'rij^ 
Stanley North 



Ann LiUen 

Rachel Little 

Valerie Locbte 

Jean Losteft 



James Mait^ 

Larry Matlhewi 

Pat MMhous 

Jane Milnei' 



Juan Muench 

C. Dal^ McDotifiM 

Dale T, MrD4»nal«l 

Koy McDon^Irl 



Pamela N^al 

Barbara Nalkei:' 

Rnjnni* Si'encer N^lsun 

Billr Neshiir 



Ba^'bai'a Q-Connor 

Nat Oliver 

Carl AuKuAt Orton 

Barry Fhilljji Osborne 



f\f^^ 







^'.'^ ^rrp F^« 





Freshman Determination Equals 
No More Beanies 




Hev freshmen, k-t's Ret those Sophomores 1 




Why dti the ricshnicii have a rupe '/ Tu pull Georji'e Kuycrot't in the 
creek . . . 








£fe4k 







n p Qf^ 

iiiii% 




Beuy FnrKs 
Lirula Perry 
Sue Caiolyn Parker 
Eddy Pauerson 



GeovHt Patteitiori 
Hattie Pattevi^on 
Lowel Pa^'ne 
Arthur PeleiTHon 



Jim PickleMimer 
Dian(» Piiurott 
Diane Pilecki 



AiTbne Pirtle 



Catherine Pdindexler 
Nancy Poole 
jDiieph W. Poole, Jr. 
Carolyn Price 



Robert Pritchard 
David Pulli&m 

Linda PQlliam 
Darrell Rayle 



Sally C. Reed 
H<>ward Reean. Jr. 
Noel KendeJI 
Mary Kenenar 



Carlos A. Rias 
Henry E- Rivers 
Krankie Roberta 
Ceta Roeers 





Kathy Rot^eiii 
Howard Russell 
Susan Sandei^ 
Thomas Shan>e 
Richard Simms 




But Christy you already have an 8:20! 



A Study 



Jeffrey Rumple 
Jean Ruth 
Bill Stewart 
Ruth Sides 
Robert Skw'irut 



James Rorrer 
James Russ^H 
Candy Sarmuk 
Emily Sherrill 
Carol Simttson 



Carolyn Russell 
Jan Samet 
Barbara Searle 
Johnsie Simmons 
HavoH Slater 



^£^^ 










40 




In concentration 



Kenneth Wa]kei 
Robert Wells 
Norman White 
Kebecca WiUiams 
C. M. Worthy 



Kathleen Wavd 
Jo$ei>h What ley 
Horace Whitsett 
Sauniira Willians 
Preston Yates 



Ed Wflllen 

Charles Westmoreland 
Sherry White 
Ronfla Williams 
Joyte C^ayfe WiJj^ht 



Robert Weiss, Jr. 
Frank Wheelei' 
Ernie Williams 

Anita Kay Wilson 
Janet Voun^ 



^££ii 




James Slonr 
Angela Smith 
Gene Smith 
Lin\voocl Smiih 



Lowrance Smith 
Shirlej' Sn>>ler 
Donna Snwev?i 
James Spiridopoulis 



Janet Stayer 
Dina Steed 
John Steimie 
Francis Stewart 



Jun^ Carol Ste^i,'firt 

Judy Stone 

Ella Stout 

Judy Irene Stutls 



John Swan 
Robert S-^vint 
Nancy Tabor 
Bou^lad Thayer 



David Thomas 
Mary Lou Thomas 
Penny Thomx>&on 
Allen Thorburn 



Jo Ann Thorley 
Harriet Tyainfter 
Betty Vauehn 
So$an Waif oner 





Bookstore lOla 



4) 



s 
o 
p 

H 
O 

M 
O 
R 
E 




Sophumore olass office is for r.n>:)-('i4, Charles Kerr, vice president; George Roy croft, 
president; Carol Toureee. secretary; and Joe Nucklous, treasurer. 



c 

L 
A 
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S 



Upon his return, the Sophomore finds himself a year older and a year 
closer to his goals and to his college degree. The old memories are revital- 
ized through the Sophomore's associations with the t^re.shman Orientation 
programs, and new memorie.s are made with anticipations of future ones. 
The Sophomore finds himself fully integrated into college life. He begins 
to make final decisions which will affect the remainder of his life. During 
his second college year, the Sophomore cumes closer to the realization of 
adulthood. 




JKi 




Donald Albert 
Wa>ne AndeTson 
Jiidj' Armin^ton 
Tommy Arnold 
Gtlf Balthie 



42 



* »■ John W. BerkHdsle 




William WigxfTstitt 

Tom Blake 

Elizabeth A. Dosres 

Kenity Boeev 

Vicki Bolea 



tftili 



The Return. 



A Year Older. 



A Year Wiser 



Annt Booth 

Tony Boy left 

Janit^ Bfjveniitr 

Robert Brennan 

Bob Brewer 






i^m^M 






^i^i^i^k 



Nan Brown 
Gilbert Brim 
James Brucki, Jr. 
Steve Buff 
Harold Bycrly 



43 



1^ p 





^\i^ 




Ronnie Callicutt 
Carole Cftlvtrt 
WLIliam Carter 
Annt CftAstevena 



Hujifh Cateri 
John Clulton 
MLchoel CoburB 
Karen CludfeLter 
Steve Clofif«lter 



Keith Conner 
John Conrad 



Hoyle CoppUy 
Mary Ruth Corder 



Wanda rorn^Liti^i 
ErnesHne Crai^r 




Sophomore Dick Stinson, and IMrs. Hormachea interview Dr. 
Martin, Marty, the Finch Lecturer. 




Larry C raver 
Robert Craver 
James Cross 
Betts Darin 
James Davis 



Hammond Davi^ 
Ray Davja 
Jean Denton 
Mar>' Dover 
Jeanne Dudley 



Jim DitjEKsn 
Wallace T. Duncan 
Kenneth Elmori^ 
David EvariH 
Nano- Fallon 





tltf^iik 




Marcu?i D«al 
Kcnri'tth Finjjer 
Pamela F^ktchrr 
John Flott'eritK Jt. 
P^sey Fait I em an 




f^ ^ f1( 



^M^m 




JoNell (iood^on 
Eddy Gre^j^on 
Rirhard (-uiffredo 
Jtnova Hainci 
Sandra Hargrove 



Robert Harriw 
Darrtll Htdrick 




Everybody 
Wants 




Just remember, we had to wear those beanies six weeks. 



Kitty Sut Hutchins 



46 



To Get 
into the Act 




Soirv wbout vuiir wecjuns, IVan Taylor. 



(^iilhert Jarr>h<4 




William Jon^s 
HeiTEi^ Joyner 



d\k^ 



/T il— m ill 




Taylor KennerLy 
Charles Ktrr 



Gene Keat'er 
Rkhard Kincf 




4ik4]ll 



Bill KJnjT 
Jill Knuckey 




47 




Studies 

and 
are Still 



I hope they like nie. 



Trudy Llveiigo*d 

John Loflm 

Ramonia Lomaji 

Marilyn Lund 



Joe Luther 








Patrick MfLeod 
Prank Mabrey 
t^ray Mary 
Mar>' Ann Mandrirh 
Billy Mann 



John MarcLui:; 
Aris MflstrOKJat^akifl 
Sharon Mathis 
Charlie MllUr 
Don Miller 



48 



Parties 

Assemblies 

Here 







Will he ever finish ' 



Judith Miller 
Knt>' Mims 
Heverl>' Mriody 
Mrs. Linda ^for^an 




Martha Paris 

Barbara Payne 

John Roffer Payne 

St*ve Pearson 

Nanty Perry 



49 




Reid Perryman 
Rgby Phillips 
Carol Pinn 

Dave Pope, Jr. 
Jerry Proffitt 



Kenneth Rirti 

Charles RirhanlH 

Krtd Rimmer 

Willinrn Rimmer 

Kf'Dt Ripley 

Kay Robli>. 



John RobprtM 

Linda Robfrts 

Alice RobertJion 

EUsa Rodriguez 

Wnrren Rgmain* 

Joan Root 



ELIiJi; Rouse 

Elaint' Rous 

(TPOrite Rftytroft 

Alfredo Sain?; 

CbarUfl Schritber 

Roy SroEf^ins 









Jeffrey Seaford 
I^attY Shallf roAA 
Louise Shelton 
Lennon Shipp 
Judy Shoaf 
^^tisan Slack 



50 



Korffitt Sue Smith 

Jerry Smothers 

Rojrer Stephens 

L. F. Stevens 

Richard Stinson 





^, ^^T 











Ann Tallfv 
Hmce Thorhurn 
Carnle Tnurjjee 
Ktnneth Truitt 
Karl Tv^inper 
David Ufian 




Roberto Va^C|U«z 
fraiif r \'eretn 
Cari Vunfiannon 
Omeiifia Waldrep 
Wayne Walkvr 
Hi^len WftfiLleski 



Anna Wa>- 
Dodd Webster 
Alan Weiftbecker 
Tony Wbil* 
Leonard Witt 
Vaughn Vork 



Katherint V^^a- 




51 



u 

N 
I 
O 
R 



C 
L 
A 
S 
S 




The Junior is faced with a final decision which will affect his entire life 
— the choice of a major. To m;ike a final decision, he must counsel with 
advisors and make the most intelligent choice. The Jimior spends the year 
doing research, writing papers, study ing, enjoying himself, and anticipa- 
ting the Senior year. 

The major social event of the Junior year is the Junior-Senior Prom. 
This dance lauds the Seniors and ^ives the Junior something to loolc for- 
ward to in his Senior year. 




Nathan Alberty 
Bruce Alexander 
Lairy Aniick 



Bitsy Andrew 
Ann Armentrout 
Rebecca Auman 




Be cai'eful, Ji><> and (ion't blow us upl 




Steven Beck 
Beverly Berger 



Frederick Benoit 
Rotiaki Berrier 



Lintla Black 
William Blizzard 
James Bohannon 
Beth Biearley 



Linda Sue Brewer 
James Broos 
Ken Brown 
Don Bryant 




53 




Where's that quote'.' 




Judy Berrier 
Barbara Byerly 
Gail Byerly 
Judy Callaway 



Robert Carlough 
Roger Cainiichael 
Margtai'et Ann Carter 
Linda Cassimus 



Alfred Collins 

Mrs. Faye Kennedy 
Compton 

Delano Conklin 

Susan Cooke 



Judy Cox 
Susan Culbteth 
Kenneth Deal 
Kay DeMik 



Giii'y Dennis 
James Dishman 
Janet Doby 
Jimmy Doolittle 



Jeanne Downs 
Jean Button 
Janet Early 
John Eckel 




Won't anyune c-otne help me ivait on all this; mob' 





Mrs. Watula Eller 
Betty Ei-v'iti 
Doris Fallow 
J. B. Fai-low 



Phyllis Farlow 
Yvonne Faucette 
Geiakl Fennell 
Brenda Flinchum 



Jevold Fiye 
Wayne Fuiman 
Amelia Garnion 
Sue Gibson 



Joe Gosnel! 
Roy Greenwood 
Franklin (J rice 
Rit'k Grinislev 



I'am Hancox 
William Harris 
Charles Hawks 
Stanley Hetlritk 




Janet Heydenbuitt 
William Hobsoii 
Tullie Ann Hoyle 
Roberta Hudson 



Dewey Hutchins 
Phyllis Jarvis 
Sally Jepson 
Lmnv Johnson 



Spencer Johnston 
Doufrlas Jones 
Donald Jones 
Eve Jones 




i^^iiiii 




Jo Anne Kearney 
John Kennedy 
Christine Kennedy 
Shirley Key 



Gary Kiger 
.Mac Lambert 
Joseph Lorber 
Carolyn McAllister 




Tracy McCarthy 
Jean !\[(t'ullom 



Dick McDowell 
Robert Medlin 




,)udith Mills 
Rick Mills 



Thomas Minton 
Suzanne Muck 



Steve Montag'ue 
John Thomas Moodv 



Kay Moon 
Banow MuUis 



Charles Myers 
C. J. Neal 



Gayle Nichols 
Xancy N'oblett 



One more song:, C, J. ! 




58 




Elizabeth Oklhflm 
Anne Oi'jran 



Thdmas Owens 
Thomas Page 



Helen Paisley 
Joe Parker 
Liniiida Parker 
Cairol Parrish 



Tony Parsons 
Bettycross Payne 
Russell Pearson 
Obie Peepies 



Michael Pierce 
William Pritfhard 
Leslie Purifoy 
James Ramsey 



59 




Al Kaueh 
Deanna Read 
Beth Renfi'o 
Phyllis Reynolds 



Betty Rog-ers 
Patty Anne Rogers 
Mike Rosenmarkle 
Sui* Lvnne Rothroek 



Whitfield Ruark 
Cai-leen Samuels 
Henry Sapp 
Mifhele St'hmidley 



Fred Schraplau 
Robert Seaver 
Phillip Sedberry 
Jerry Shackleford 



Sylvia Shapiro 
Orrin Shaw 
Wayne Shephard 
Eddie Sigmon 



60 




Joel Sil%'er 
.Teny Sink 
Tony Rlate 
Sue Smathers 



Bany Smith 
Bryce Smith 
FiHnces Stephenson 
Kiik Stewart 



Graduation 

A Year Closer 



This recital has to he perfect! 



Kenneth Stokes 




Mrs. Martha Stokes 




James Surratt 




61 




Bruce Rwanson 
William Swififart 
Sandia Svvitzer 
Brenda Symmes 



Sandra Tate 
Joe Ann Taylor 
Tony Taylor 
Henry Thompson 



Problems, Problems — the 







Toni Vaufrhn 
Janice Voncarinon 
Reanza Waldrep 
Arthur Warren 



Bruce Weatherly 
Marcia Wechter 
Betty White 
Gayle White 



62 




Pe^rtry Ann Wiley 
.If try Williams 
Rebecca Woody 
Barry York 



Howard York 




Juniors 



Have 



Them 




According to this, tuition is going up $100.00 next semester. 



63 



s 

E 

N 
I 
O 
R 



C 
L 
A 
S 
S 




Senior Class Officers for lllflH-tU -avv Kfii tlimn, tcfasuroi-; Harrit't Kiiifity, 
president; Bob Korneaf,'y, pi^'sidfiit; anil Bonniy Dennis, secietary. 



The Senior year culminates four years of sweat, tears, laughter, and 
heartbreak. With the coniinp nf the Senior year, the student reflects on 
his foui- collejre years and the years preceedinjr, but most importantly, 
he ju-epares himself for the years to ome. 

Before jjrraduation, the Senior must surmoimt the writing of a thesis, 
block exams, practice teaching, seminars, selection of a graduate school 
or .job, final exams, and preparations for the big' day. Seniors an.xiously 
await the Senior assemltlies, and the parties which proceed graduation, 
especially the Junior-Senior climaxing the social life of a High Point 
College stndent. 

The most important single event of the Senior year is, (jf course, grad- 
uation. During the few minutes spent receiving the diploma, the Senior 
comes to the realization that now he is expected to be a man. 



CHARLSIE MAIE ABEI. 

.San Arnonio.Trya-, 



KAl SHORK ALl.EV 

(.'hailottf. Ncn-th Cflrolirift 



W[L[,IAM THOMAS ARNETTE 





KEl'BEN DAVE BALGH.V 

Mflyoilan^ Nnitth Carolina 



GEORGE MARl.OWE BEAM. JR. 
Rockvillf. M:itvlrin(l 



MILBRKV AWE BELASD 
Wj]s<m, North Carolina 



Senior Year Experiences 
Always to be Remembered 




JANE CAROL BLAIR 

Thymasville, Nfn'th Cai^»lina 



MICKEY WAYNE BOLES 

WinstoR-Salem. Noi-th Carolina 



MERLE SUZANNE ROOTH 
IVnhiiok. Virfrinia 



BOBBY KENNETH BOvn 

.Ara]'at. North Caralina 



HAROLD WAYNE BREWER 

Hijfh Point. Nf^rih <;'aro]ina 



MARLENE SfE BRINLEY 
Tam).a. Floriils 



65 




ROSA MAE BRT\KLEV 

Lexin^tHjn. North Carolina 

WILHON HAKVKV BROWNING 
Hij^'h Point, North Carolina 

DAVID M. BRYANT 
Marlhoro. Mass^ichusetts 




STZANNK BARDIN BULLAKD 

lShad>'ft\ii^n^ Nf*rth <'srf-i!Jntt 



BARNEY BLRKS 
Winston-Ssakm, North Cai^ulimi 







Elaine Greene, To 





MARUARET McPHAlL 

Bl.HNS 
Charlotte, North t^arolititt 

ROBERT AISTIN BURNS 

Winsl(,n.S3l*m. Nurth Carulina 

KENNETH WAYNE BIRRIS 

(JoKlsljoro, Ncrih Cai-olina 



66 



CHARLES SAMIIEL BVRRs 

Cipncor.i. Ni.i-lh (.■Bv.lina 

JUDITH ROfiKRS COPPEDfJE 

Hich Puinl. Ni.i-lh Cai-iilina 

WALTER L. CARRIKER 

Chailutte, North Carolina 






*C'l^;^5>~?ife>li 



KlRTfKrMAR CHRI8TIAX 



MARY LEE COOTES 
Stiasbuie, Vii-Einia 





Ten Fi'eshman 



JAMES RONALD COVEY 
Talbot. Maiylanri 

UNDA CAROL CRAVEN 
HiEh Point, N. (.". 

ROGER JAMES CRAWFORD 

FlainfifW, New Jersey 





67 




WAYNE CLIFFORD CURRY 

Ht>NNlE JO DENNIS 
Clsirkton, North Carolina 

HOWARD l>KNN[S DRAPER 
^'ayettevillip. North Cai'Ulina 



I.ARRY STEVEN DUNN 
SeiiKrove, Not'Lh Cai^lina 

DONALD MAX DWIGCINS 

Wjrisjon-Sfllem, N. C. 

CAR03. BROCK ELLER 
Wirii^ton-Salem, N. C. 



Seniors Hold Major Offices on Campus 





THOMAS DARRELL ELLER 
Th.,masville, N. C. 

REBECCA JOYCE ELLIOTT 
Noi(h Wilkesbriio, N. C 

WILLIAM DOUGLAS FALLIN 
Wttshinicton, D. C. 




[III.KV (IJNTON PIKIJJS. JR. 

Sik'i- City. N. i;. 




CAROLYN ELIZABETH FINCHER 

Hieh Puint, N. C. 




Surely do wish that 1 could play those diumsl 




HARRIKT FINERTV 
New Castle, Deltware 



BOBBY WAYNE FOCLEMAN 
High Point, N. C. 



FRANK ASHLEY FOSTER 
Winston -Salem, N. C. 



CAROLYN ELIZABETH FRYE 

Leesbuiy. Virginia 



PHILLIP EARL flARRISON 
Gleenwood, Indiana 



CAROLE LOUISE GEIST 
Setaukot, New York 






69 




(.AIL JAS CrVKK 

Irvink'i'iii. Nr^^ Jersey 



KOBKRT RUDlll.l'K (.IHBS 



LINDA FERRAN (JIBSON 



WILLIAM JACKEE (iODWIN 







JOSEPH FRANKLIN (;o HI it IK 
HiKh 1'iiiiit. N, r 



DAVID ALKXANDKR (iRAV 

liiKh I'l.int, N, C, 



GLORIA JEAN (;RAV 



CONNIE ELAINK (JREENK 

CariiU^r, N, C. 



KENNETH GUNN 



JANICE abh;ail hall 

Mayodan, N, €. 






70 




Seniors haril at wmk in tht- libra rv. 



Ol"A.\E THOMSON HAKr.SKJ.I, 

Hii;h I'r.iiil. N. C. 



ROBERT PARKBR HAHTSFI.N 
Hith P..int. N, f. 




^M 



LLOVD STEWART HARVf:V 

Thomanville, N. C. 



BERtilE LEE HATniER 



PATRICK WILLIAM Hf;i)Rr< K 
LeKintrton, N. C. 



GENE ERWIN HELMS 
Elizabethtown. N. C. 



GEORGE LEONDES HENURl 
Hi^'h Poinr, N. C. 



CHARLES WARD H(JliS()N 
East Bend, N, C. 




JAMES (ilLBKRT HunCIN 
Hinh Pnint. N. C. 



FRED W. HOVT, JR. 

Uiish Point. N. r 



CYNDV FOULKS lU^DAK 
Haddunfi^lcl. Nt^v Jt^rsej 



LARRY THOMAS HICHES 

HiKh Point. N. C. 

FRANK MEI.VIN .PARVIS 

Hich Point, N C 

ROBERT HIATT JESSVP 
Green aboro. N. C. 





BETTLE SPENCER .[ONES 
Kinston. N. C. 



.lAMES AMOS JONES 
Winston -Salem. N. C. 



ROBERT M. JIRLCK 
Le^inffton, N. C, 

THOMAS SUTTON KESTER 
Hi(ih Point. North Carolina 



72 






BARBARA JEAN KINLAW 

Lak^ Mi>iii-fje, Flofi*]a 

STANLEY WALTEK KIWE 
Hieh Point. N. C. 

R. MARSDEN KITI.EV 
High Point. N. C. 



ROBERT DAVID KORNEGAY 

Greens boiv, N.C. 

BETTY LEONA KRLMMINGER 
Concord. North Carolina 

JUDY GRAYLAMBETH 
Lexington. North Carolina 



SYLVIA Sl'SAN LECKIE 
Statesvilk, Noi-th Carolina 



ROBERTA WOODRUFF LEDFORD 

Winsiton-Salem. N. Cr 



VELMA JOY LEMMONS 
High Point. N C. 

DARRELL BRENT LEONARD 

Thomaaville, N- €. 




73 




c 





I'ATHKTA AN\ r.KWIH 



WAl/fEK WAYNK LEWIS 



SANDRA mCn.l.E \MM1 
Hiuh IVint, N. C. 



CAKOLYN McMASTERS 
LINEBERKY 

Cireensfcioro. N, C- 

DOKIS SELENE LILES 

rtcjanrtke, Nocth Ca]'o]ina 

BRENDA JOYCE LINER 
Hiiih Point, N. C. 




DONALD A. LITTLE 

Iron Stnli^tn. N. C, 



MARY ANN LUCK 

Thomasiville, N. C. 



ATHBLENE PAYNE MARLOWE 
Thomasvilk, N. C. 



MARJORIE PATTEN MARROW 

Winsion-Saltm. N. C 

JANET LOUISE MILLER 

ClemmonR, N. C. 

MARLENE B. MOORE 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 



T. GREGORY MORTON 
Jialcigh. N. C, 




JANICE ELAINE MYERS 

Trinity, N. C, 



CARRIE ESTELLE MYRICK 
LincoJnton, N. C. 



CHARLES EDWARD NESBITT 

Aaheville, N, C, 



ftOBERT WAYNE PENDER 

Mebane, N. C. 

JAMES DONALD PHILLIPS 
Roxboro, N. C. 

JUDITH GAIL PHILLIPS 

Sflei- Cit/, N. C. 



75 




PATRICIA FOINDEXTER REED 

v\'in^torL. Salem, N. C. 



WILLIAM T, RICHARDS. JR. 

HiK-h p.jjnt, N. C. 

NINA RUTH RICHARDSON 
Thoma>i\'i||e, N. C, 



76 




HAYWOOD ALLEN RIERSON 

Urttrnaboi-o. N, C. 



CAROLYN ROUTH 
Greensboro, N. C. 




RITA MURIEL SANDERS 
Hmh Point, N. C. 



RITA JOYCE SAUNDERS 

Charlotte, N. C. 



HOBART SIMPSON 
Ararat. N. C. 



GLENN THOMAS SMITH 

High Point. N. C. 

HAROLD C. SMITH 

Thomasville, N. C. 

HARRY C. SMITH 
Chevy Chase, Maryland 




77 




K. JANT SMrTH 

Hirhnmnil Vii'trinis 



MARfJARET ROSS SMITH 
Andersiin, S<n]lh CaiYNlina 



'SYLVIA AN'NETTE SMITH 



nONME EMAI.I\*E STILWELL 

ThunifL'.ville, N. C. 



l,r\DA STRICKLANB 

l.f■^iTlt•tl>n. N. C. 



JAMES ROBERT 

SI'l.LIVAN. JR. 
HiKh Pfint. N. C. 



JAMES EDWARD SIRRATT 

Thomas villc. N, C. 

EDCiAR A. TAYLOR 

A. r;eRALD tertzacian 

Wan^massfth Nc\\' Jersey 



ALBERT S. TROMBETTA 
McKc-es Rotk. Pi^nn, 

BETTY TREECE 
Conooitl. N. C. 

JOSE ROBERTO VELADO 
Hifth Point, N. C. 



78 



JESSE JAMES WALDON, JH, 
Hith Point. N, C, 

(iENE WALSH 

LOUELLA RKHARDS WARD 

Hifrh Point, N. C, 



G. RICHARDS WARE. 
Greensboi'o, N. C. 



JOY WATKENS 

HiKh Point. N. C. 



DIANA WAT LEY 

BcthivaKC. New Yfn'k 



CHARLES WELCH 

Charlotte, N. C. 

DIANE S. WESTMORELAND 
Winslon-Sal^m, N. C. 

CARRIE WHITEHURST 

t;ieenvil]f, N. C- 



DAVID WHITLOCK 

Breva]M], Florida 



pe(;(;y whitt 

Koxboro, N. C. 



DAVID WILLABD 
Pilot Mountain. N. C. 




79 




JAME^ WILMOT 



CARROLL DOKNA WOOD 

RimfMfm.'iii, N. C. 



Chevy Cha^ip, M&vyland 



JAMES C. VARBOROUGH. JR. 

fiORDON VAKBOROUCH 
Lexin^tnn, N. C. 

JOHN! SUTTON YORK 

Ram^eur, N. C. 



Pomp 
and 



Circumstance 




(iiiiduation l-ijiih>?— ;i time of sorrow and a time of happiness. 



80 



Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities 



Eleven seniors were elected to Who's Who among American Colleges 
and Universities— a national honor organization. To be selected for this 
honor, a senior must possess several outstanding ([ualities. Among these 
qualifications are excellence in scholarship, citizenship, leadership, ser- 
vice to the school, participation in extracurricular activities as well as 
academics, and promise of future success. The seniors selected from High 
Point College possess these qualities and have been recognized for their 
outstanding contributions to the welfare of the school and to the promo- 
tion of the school image to the general public. 




Linda Craven 

Linda, an excellent stu- 
dent, was Chief Mai'shal in 
her junior year. She is an 
English major and will con- 
tinue her edutaticin in g-rad- 
uate school. 





Carolyn Frve 

"Scooter" is the President 
of the Women's Dormitory 
Council this year and also 
serves on the .ludieiary Coun- 
cil and is a member of the 
Student Legislature. 



Gail Geyer 

Gail has represented HPC 
as Miss High Point College 
and as Miss High Point City 
in the past years. Gail also 
was chairman of one of the 
Standing committees of the 
SGA. 




n\n Fallin 

Bill served this year as 
Chief Justice of the Judici- 
ary Council and as oo-captain 
of the Panther basketball 
team. He is an active mem- 
her in many other campus 
organizations. 




\ 



Linda Ferran (ohson 

Linda has been an active 
member of many campus or- 
ganizations and has sensed 
as the President of Phi Mu 
Sorority for the past two 
years. 



SI 



Who's Who 




iUih Kornefray 

Bob has served as Presi- 
dent uf both his Junior ami 
Senior classes and was also 
a Junioi' Marshal. He has 
been active in many campus 
activities. 





Charlie N^shitt 

Presittent of the Student 
Kocly this year, Charlie has 
taken an active part in many 
and varied campus organiza- 
tions. He is also a member 
of the Student Lejrislature. 



( arios I'rado 

Carlos, an International 
Relations student, has taken 
an active part in many cam- 
pus organizations. He is es- 
pecially interested in music 
and is a member of the band. 





Don Little 

Don, editor of the campus 
newspaper, sej'ved this year 
as Speaker of the Letjisla- 
ture. Don is a past presi- 
dent of the Younfc Republi- 
can Club. 




Betty Treece 

Betty has been active in 
SGA, sei'ving as the Secre- 
tary her junior year and as 
Vice-President this year. She 
has participated in many 
other campus activities. 



Carrie U'hitehurst 

Carrie has been active in 
the Methodist Student Fel- 
lowship a n d in the Fel- 
lowship Teams, She hi.s par- 
ticipated in many other cam- 
pus organizations. 



32 



Top Ten Seniors 





Bonnie Dennis is secretary of the 
Senior class, feature editor of the 
Hi-Po, and a member of SNEA and 
Methodist Student Fellowship Teams, 



Carolyn Fry is a member of Zeta Tau 
Alpha sorority and served as presi- 
dent last year. She was a member of 
the Tower Players, the Dormitory 
Council, SAM, S,\'EA, SGA committee, 
and the Panhellenit Council. 




Bill Fallin is a member of Lambda 
Chi Alpha fraternity and plays var- 
sity basketball. He was Chief Justice 
of Judiciary Council this past year and 
V.P, of his sophomore class. 




Linda Ferran was awarded the Mary 
Lewis Mills Scholarship this year. 
She is a member of Phi Mu soroi'ity 
and has served on the dormitory coun- 
cil, the Judiciary Council, and the Jun- 
ior Marshals. She was also a finalist 
in the Miss HPC Contest for two 
years. 



Gail Geyer is a member of Kappa 
Delta sorority and the Physical Edu- 
cation Majors Club. Sho has served 
on the Student LeKislature and the 
Freshman Orientation Committee. She 
was Miss Hitrh Point in VM'Z and Miss 
HPC in H)(>1. 




S3 



Top Ten Seniors 





Connie Elaine Greene is E<litoi-in- 
Chief of the Zenith and last year ser- 
ved as business manaK^r. She is a 
member of Zeta Tau Alpha sorority. 



Charles E, Newbitt is jtresident uf the 
student budy this year. He was class 
representative to the Ipislature in his 
junioi' year, president of his sopho- 
more class, and a member of tiio SGA 
Senate, He sanp; with the college 
choir in his sophomore year and is a 
member of Kappa Chi, He is also a 
member of Theta Chi frat. 




Robert David Kornegay is a member 
of Delta -Signia Phi fraternity and pre- 
sident of the senior class. He was 
named a Junior Marshal last year and 
was inducted into the Order of the 
Lighted Lamp, 




Donald A, Little is editor of the Hi- 
Po this year. He is also Speaker of 
the Lefi'islature and a former president 
of the Yountr Republicans Club, 



Betty Treece is a member of Phi Mu 
sorority and is Pledge Director this 
year. She is presently serving- as Vice 
President of the Student Government 
Association, She also served as secre- 
tary of the SGA last year and headed 
the Freshman Orientation this year. 





84 





TIONSl 




Alpha Delta Theta 




President 






Don Hevenei' 



Judy Buiri^i- 
Secretary 



Ann Talley 
Chaplain 



"Sisters in the service of God", this is AlpJia Delta 
Theta. The girls of the sisterhood are like all other 
collegre students. They are searching- for Ultimate 
Truth. They face the changes of growth and the strug- 
gles that encircle them as they reach upward toward 



God and outward toward their fellow man. Life lived 
within this sisterhood is one enriched by experiences 
with others and by a striving together of young women 
from varied backgrounds and with varied interests, but 
all with one common goal — -to learn to Live — to live a 
life in the service of God. 






Ltitsy Aticli'cw 



Reljf (."<'« A II m iti n 



Mhii'I^HI Austin 



"^■^^ .^B 



MUIm>-v HelEiiul 





Ann IluifKS 








SiiKnnne l^onlh 



I,irt4];i Hre^^'i'i 



^Jituti;!! Cairle 



Anna Lee Caite 



^usan C'cokf 



^s^ A 



Wjinnla Ct-nneliua 











Judy Com 



Hetts Davjji 



■Foanne Dttw^ns 



Jean Duttun 



Ninuy Fallon 




36 





^ 







Klli<? I'lf^iL'nKtn Ameliii <!ai'iiti:Mii 



Carol Ceiiil 



8ui' (iillS*;]!! 



Kiithy Mi'v^'k".-!- Rc^bei t;i Huft>.nn 





m 



a 






Ros^mmy Kennedy Joyce Ktrkmiin 



S.vJvia Ltckitf Ceraldyne Lockman Ht^t^y Nttfst Naticy NoUett 







Marihd Pa] is Judy FhilLii>^ 



Carol Pino Kaihy Poind«;M.t!r Nanty Puole 



MmiK I'oweis 










;lsr^ 





Leslie Pui-ifiiy Sal[y Keed 



Mitiy ken^irai- rh>Jlis ke>nH.HjH]K Klisa iitnUiii:nt^A Ifiich A nit sides 




k^ .^ 








J 



Culeen SiKman Jane Smith 



Satnlrii Tate lietly Jo Vau^'hn Pani Wallace Came Whitehui-st 





Carol Wood Kalherine Vow 



87 



Student Christian Association 



The work of the Student Christian Association has been to enliven the 
school year with provocative thout^ht, discussion, and activity. Besides 
provoking, the SCA has tried to add meaning to special events and seasons 
of the year. During Orientation Week, the SCA provided for the incoming 
freshmen a vesper welcome service, a ministerial tea, and a picnic at the 
City Lake. The fall assembly "No Mali Is an Island" proved its point when 
the laughter occured in the right places. Dr. Martin E. Marty, the Finch 
Lecturer, challenged the mask of "The Living". The Thanksgiving Can-Can 
Party and the Christmas Caroling Service gave pleasure with a purpose — 
cans and cards for cheer. The Summer Service Seminar was a pseudo- 
employment agency for students who needed .summer jobs. And the Absur- 
dity Days . . . with the aid of the Tower Players, SCA culminated its year 
within the framework of a zoo, a sandbox, and the song of a bold soprano. 





Mrs. Dorthoi^' Hays, Dr. William 
R. Locke, Advisois. Elizabeth Old- 
ham, President. 



Ann. Talley, Secretary 
Elizabeth Oldham, President 
Jeanne Downs, Second Vice-President 
Chuck Richards, Treasurer 
Henry Thompson, Vice President. 




Seated, Left to right: Dr. William 
Locke, Elizabeth Oldham, Mrs. Dor- 
thory Hays, Jeanne Do%vns, Ann Tal- 
ley. 



Standing, Left to right: Pat Lewis, 
Susan Cooke, Betsy Neece, Chuck Ric- 
hards, Judy Burrier, Betty Rogers, 
Frank Grice. 



88 



Methodist Student Fellowship 




OFFICERS 
Left to right: Judy Burrier, S.C.A. re- 
presentative; Carol Pino, Publicity 
Ch.; Frank Grice, President; Jean Dut- 
ton. Secretary; Pam Fletcher, Program 
Ch.; Art Warren, Treasurer; Betsy 
Neece, Vice President. 



The Methodist Student Fellowship is the "Methodist Church at work on 
the college campus," The purpose of this organization is to reach the 
Methodist students in a way that the local church is unable to do during 
the college years. The programs are varied to give insight and useful in- 
formation to it.'; members. All students are welcome to join to the MSF and 
to enjoy the benefits of fellowship, service and worship which it offers 
its members. 




69 



Fellowship Teams 



Co-Chairmen 



Betty Rogers 



Henry Thompson 



Sandra Tate Secretary 

Kenneth GilHam Treasurer 

Elisa Rodriguez Publicity 

Carrie Whitehurst Packets Chairman 

Betsy Neese SCA Representative 

Wanda Cornelius Curriculum 

Advisors Dr. William Locke 

Mrs. Dorothy Hayes 




Team No 1 

Beth Brearley 
Nancy Fallon 
Bob Hamilto'n 
Collen Sigman 
John Swan 



Team No. 2 

Wanda Cornelius 
Betsy Neese * 
Ellie Freeman 
Jim Piclesimer 
Carol Tourgee 
Judy Burrier 



Team No, 3 

Jean Dutton * 
Kenneth Gilliam 
Chuck Richards 
Johnsie Simmons 
Nancy Tabor 
Ann Talley 



Team No. 4 

Janet Early * 
Ernestine Craig 
Jeanne Downs 
Kenneth Gunn 
Roger Stephens 



Team No. 5 

Frank Grice * 
Betts Davis 
Clyde Henderson 
Kathy Poindexter 
Leslie Purifoy 
Nan Brown 



Team No. 6 

Eve Jones * 
Winfred Bristow 
Pam Fletcher 
David Pulliam 
Bettycross Payne 



Team No. 7 

Janet Miller * 
Marlene Brinley 
Phyllis Foy 
Jenova Haines 
Joe Parker 
Arther Peterson 



Team No. 8 

Elisa Rodriguez 
Susan Cooke 
Dennis Draper 
John Kennedy 
Linda Pulliam 
Phyllis Reynolds 



Team No. 9 

Carrie Whitehurst ' 
Wayne Ervi'n 
Emma Lou Landes 
Linda Morgan 
Carol Pino 
Sally Charles Reed 



Alternates 



David Bryant 
Tillie Clark 
Kathy Hoecker 
Kent Ripley 
Bob Hartsell 
Barrow Mullis 



Pam Neal 
George Oxdenford 
Sandra Tate 
Art Warren 
Tony White 



90 



Fellowship Teams 




Fellowship singing 



Waiting for food — what food ? 




From the mountains 



... to the sea 




Games are played during fellowship period. 



'Serious" discussion 



Women's Dormitory Council 





Carolvn Five; President 



Mrs. M;M-y Bennett and Miss Kay Phillips, Resident Counselors 




Suzanne Booth Carolvn Frve Eve Jones and Doris Liles cheek Other members of the Dorm Council are: 1. to r. Pat Lewis, Gail 

to see who has how many dements. f'^'J''?'"- '^"" T'''^^^'- "^'^"^ Teajrue, Jo Ann Taylor, Myra Morris, 

and Wynne MatCieEor. 



92 



Men's Dormitory Council 

The Men's Dormitt^ry Council is the Kciverninfr bndv of the resident 
students in Mcrnllnn};:h Hall and J. Ed Millis dormitory. They assist in 
li'eshmen orientation and handle anv minor infractions of the dormitory 
rules. With the truidance of :\Ii-s. Austin and :Mrs, :McMeekin-Kerr, resident 
housemothers, the officers have made dormitory life a rich and rewarding 
experience for resident men students. 




Bob Jessup, President 
Frank Grice. Vice-President 



J. Ed MilHs Dnrmitoi'y 



MeCullough Hall 





93 



Day Students of High Point College 




DAY STUDENT (tFFICERS 



Ellis Rouse, Treasurer; Charles Welch, President; Tom Smith, Vice President; 
and Jackie Beamer, Secretary. 



Day students come mostly from the city of High 
Point, but there are also large representation from 
Green.sboro, Win.ston-Salem, and the communities 
sui'rounding Hijrh Point. To spend an hour in the 
book store will beai' ont this fact, and on fall and 
-cspring days the steps in front of the .student center 
are filled with High Point College -student.s — 
mostly commuters-basking' in the sunshine. On 



cold winter days the ping-pong tables are filled, 
iind the rooms of Roberts Hall are usually a haven 
fo)- the day student.s catching up on studies. How- 
ever, mostly the day students finds his car as 
his "home away from home." The Ford, Chevy, 
and small sports car give the commuter a place to 
keep his l)ooks and store other materials which are 
needed for college work and life at H. P.O. 




Meetinfr place of many day students^CoUepe Book Store 

94 



International Students Club 



The Internationa] Students Clnb is an orpanizatinn for fnreijrn students 
and for American students \vii<i are interested in learning abont other 
lands, and who wish to participate ih the activities of the club. 

The purpose of the clnl) is to estalihsh closer unity amonp foreign stu- 
dents and American students and to create better coUejre community re- 
lations through the services of the clul». 

The foreign students are: Roberto Vasquez, president, from Bolivia; 
Carlos Rios, vice-president, and treasurer, from Bolivia ; Alfredo Sainz, 
historian, from Bolivia; Elisa Rodriguez, secretary, from Cuba; Carlos 
Prado, from Cuba; Yang- Sieng Lu and Grace Chin Lu Cheng, from Sara- 
wak: Jay Kim, from Korea; Jose Roberto Velado, from El Salvador; Aris 
Mastrogianakis, from Greece, and Kirt Christian from India. Our counsel- 
lor is Mrs, Dorothy Griffiths. 

Some of the American students that participate in our activities are 
Betsv Sullivan, Nancy Fallin, Martha Ward, Joe Goforthh and George Beam. 




<s- «. r >i Trafp TjU Mrs Dot Griffiths, 
que-i, Kirtkumar Chnstian. Jay Kmi, 



95 



Order of the Lighted Lamp 

The Order of the Lighted Lamp is High Point College's oldest honor 
society, having been organized in 1935 under the guidance of Dr. Clifford 
Hinshaw. The present sponsor is Dr. Dan Cooke. A student selected for 
membership must have an average of 1.75 for five semesters, the last five 
semesters. To be eligible, a student must possess excellent, exemplary char- 
acter, have proved himself as a leader, and have delivered outstanding 
service to the college. In making nominations, the society is guided by the 
following organizations: student government, athletics, publications, social 
groups, a'nd religious organizations. Nominations are made by the current 
members and are approved by a faculty majority. 



1963 1964 

Carrie Whitehurst Donald Little 

Linda Craven Carolyn McAllister 

Linda Ferran Gibson Elizabeth Oldham 

Sandra Light Myers Clara Jane Neal 

Robert Kornegay Betty Rogers 

Eve Jones 
Carolyn Frye 



96 



Scholastic Honor Society 

The Scholastic Honor Society was inaugurated in 1957 to stimulate the 
love of learning and to recognize and encourage scholarship. One of the 
greatest honors that a student can receive at High Point College is to be 
selected as a Member of the Scholastic Honor Society. To become a member, 
a junior must have completed 75 semesters of regular college work with a 
quality point ratio of 2.75. The minimum ratio for a senior is 2.25. Mem- 
bership in this society consist of students, honorary and associate members. 



FACULTY STUDENTS 

Harold E. Conrad The student members 

Helen R. Barlett for 1963-1964 have 

William R. Locke not been selected. 

Benjamin Hill 

Alice Paige White 

J. Hobart Allred 

Dennis Cooke 

Stuart Deskins 

Clifford Hinshaw 

Walter Hudgins 

Lew Lewis 

Nathaniel Yarborough 

Vera Idol 

L. Hughes Cox 

William Lazaruk 

Christopher Wilson 



97 



Junior Marshals 

E;u'h ye;ii- the Junioi- Marslials are selected by the faculty fnim the 
members of the Junior Class with the best over-ail averages. The Marshals 
are selected on the basis of their st'holastic attainments, leadership, and 
participation in colle>,'e activities. While serving as a Junior Marshal, the 
duties to be ]ierformed iiR-lude checking assembly attendance, ushering for 
concei'ts. Tower Player productions, and graduation. 




cj!;r'';i ";!;;/,. 'ix r;„'>: kiis'-nir'?,; 



93 



Student Government Association 




The Student Government Association is the govern- 
ing body of the students of High Point College. This 
year, under the leadership of President Charles Xesbitt, 
the SGA sponsored a m<ist successful orientation pro- 
gram. Homecoming Weekend and May Weekend high- 
lifirhted the SCiA affairs, along with the dances, a newly 
initiated College Bowl, and the Student Congress. The 
three branches of the SGA, the Student Legislature, the 
Judiciai'y Council, and the Executive Council, have 
made this year's Stndent Government Association an 
organization of which we all can be proud. 




President, Chai'lcs Nesbitt 



Vice President, Betty Treece 





Secretary, Caiolyn MaoAUister 



Treasurer, Larry Amick 




99 



Judiciary Council 




Lfli to rifilit : [Richard Allifrood, Bud Hairis, Donna Hevener, Joe Loi'ber, Diana Tea- 
Kue, Bill Kaliin, Cliief Justice; Joe Ann Taylor. Jiick Piatt, Chailes Welch, Wayne 
Burris. 




The Jtidiciary Cniincil has been set up aw the highest 
branch of student authority on our campus. The council 
is responsiljle for trying all cases involving infractions 
of the Student Government Association's laws. This 
year Bill Fallin has served as chief justice of this 
council. 



Bill Fallin 
(Tiief Justice 



too 



Student Legislature 




Hiprh Point Collejfe can he ]M-<iud uf its Student Government Associa- 
tion. A vital part <it' this student fjrovernint: botty is tiie Student Lesris- 
lature. Made u]) of outstanctinff leaders on the campus, the Student Legis- 
latnre considers and discusses issues of great importance to the campus 
and the students. Don Little acts as Speaker. 




101 



English Club is New on Campus 




The Enf,'lish Uepartment established the English Chib this year. The 
chib was designed to provide English majors and othei' interested persons 
an opportunity for fellowship and intellectual growth through the medium 
of speakers, poetry reading and informal discussion. The "esteemed men- 
tor" of the club is Dr. Jean Halladay. and Jerry Proffitt has served as an 
excellent "most exalted ruler". 




102 



Student National Education Association 




The Stiuient National Education Association is open to all students who 
are interested in the teuchiiiK jjrofession. Kay DeMik is this year's presi- 
dent. The club usually meets in the private dining- room of the cafeteria 
foi' discussions, speeches, and sharinjr sessions. 




103 



High Point College Choir 





The Hi^h Point Collegre Choir is a source of enter- 
tainment and pleasure for the students. The choir sings 
in assemblies and jioes on infamous choir tours. Nothing 
is more inspirational than to hear the choir sing our 
ALMA MATER. Under the direction of Mr. Jay Fry- 
hover, it provides students with an opportunity to share 
then- sinpinj: talents with others. Tom Page, left, is Pre- 
sident of the group and also sings with the Collegians. 



Concert Band 



The High Point College Concert Band is composed of 
students who enjoy and appreciate music. Each year 
the band takes an extended totir and travels to many 
schools to perform. They also perform for colletre func- 
tions throughout the year. The band is directed by Mr, 
Robert Clark, 




Mr. Robert Clark, Director 





Charles Smith, Al Collins 




Beth Renfro, Robert Batten, George Roycroft 



Rifk Benoit, Jim Cross 



105 



Physical Education Major's Club 




Left .o right: President Ger.ld Tert.afiian; Tre„„...., . 

■ tma„; Secretary. Sylvia Smith; and Vice President. Rick 



Advisoi-, Chufk Hartr 
Grimsley, 



reasurer, Susan Culbreth; 



The Physical Education Major's Club of Hig-h 
Point College is one of the most rapidly expand- 
ing- clubs on campus. The club was organized 
to further the welfare and learning of the mem- 
bers ; to fester activities in the field of physical 
education; to facilitate interest throiig-h pro 
grams, methods, techniques, and activities- to 
pi-omote a sound campus and community under 
standin^r of physical education; and to raise the 
professional standai'ds for the future of the on 
cupation. 

This is one of the most active clubs on campus 
and has sponsored many programs in which the 

n!!!rrl*-"f "^ '"'^'■'' ^'-^ '^'"" ^"^'^t^^l to partici- 
pate. Chief among these, perhaps, has been the 

annual ( o-Kecreati(in Xight. The latest addition 

to the program of the Physical Education Ma- 

.lors Club IS the Annual Awards Banquet. At 

this time menibers of all athletic teams are 

recognized for their performances. 

We hope that through membership in our 
organization the students wil] gain the know 




Fr<>nt ro«, left to right; Dale Neai, Don Long, Jerry Tertzaeian 
R.ck Gn msey, Nancy Fallin, Joe Forte, Harold ^Wse Ki t 
rl/hr^'^V ^''' ^^^-'Sf't Mr Hartman-ad visor, S.oond ro,v "ieft o 
right: Micky Russel, Joyce Kirtmaii, Judith Arniington, Ernestine 



SulVlSlttSu; Jo'^hS'".' prif Balthis, Jua.ita Speight, 
right: Bob S^averfon.il'^S Ita^t ^'^'/^'^^ ro.Jeff to 
Kirt Jones, Bob Brennen Bob B^e^ver'' ^^"'^"^'^' Bob Harris, 



106 



Student Art League 





The Student Art League provides an oppor- 
tunitv fni- students with artistic talent to show 
their best. Of course, Mr. Porter's dog. Bo, is a 
reguhtr occupant of the Fine Arts Building. 



^*^^^ 




107 



"A Streetcar Named Desire 



99 






wi 1 1 !■ Mittmit^rw^! 



toe 




Fred Sehraplau, President; Doris Liles, Secre- 
tary; Jerry Proffitt, Treasurer; Don Drapeau. 
Director. 



Tower Players 



The Tower Players is composed of members from the 
student body who enjoy many phases of dramatic pro- 
duction. Many hours are spent rehearsing, building 
sets, desigrninpr costumes, and selling tickets. 

Because of all the hard work and long hours, the 
meml)ers receive a tremendous amount of satisfaction 
when the final curtain closes and they know their pro- 
duction was a success. 

The Tower Players have been successful this year in 
their production of Tennessee Williams' play, "A Street 
Car Named Desire," in the fall. This spring three one- 
act plays, "The Zoo Story", and "The Sandbox" by Ed- 
ward Albee, and "The Bald Soprano" by Eugen lonesco, 
were presented. 



Production From the Absurd Theater 




Ralph Hoar and .Shirley Key 



Jerry Proffitt. Shirley Key, Charlsie Abel and Ralph Hoar 



109 




€ht 



The Hi-IN). niir campuH newspaper, is, "The voice of the 
students." This year's ediUji', Don Little, has been keeping 
the presses hot with the latest news from the hij^her echelons 
in his column, "Little's Bit." Roj^er Pike has been the number 
two man and has contributed much to the editorial page 
from "Across the Desk." Greek News, Campus Comments, 
Sports, Letters to the Editor, and last, but not least, Gort 
have been regular features in this year's paper. 



Editor-in-Chief Don Little 

Manag'ing Editor Roger Pike 

Business Manager Ken Gunn 

News Editor Phyllis Foy 

Feature Editor Bonnie Dennis 

Sports Editor Richard Stinson 

(Ireeic Editor C. J. Neal 

Circulation Manager Ernestine Craig 

Faculty .Advisor Dr, Sam Underwood 



Don Little, Editor-in-Chief 




Rogrer Pike, Managing Editor 




110 



Ken Gunn, Business Manager 



m-tn 




C. J. Neal, Greek Editor 





Dick Stitison, Sports Editor 




Phyllis Foy, News Editor 



Al Ranch, Associate Editor 



Campus Literary Magazine APOGEE 




Last year, Hijrh Point C<jllef^e .students produced an excellent literary 
magazine. An able staff will ajrain. this year, publish another APOGEE 
which will enrich the life and intellectual jjfrowth of the campu.s. The 
magazine feat n res creative work done by the students. Our hats go off to 
this venture, and we hope that this will become a tradition with High 
Poitit College. 




The Etiiturial staff Koes over material submitted by the students. 



Dr. Eugene Mounts, Faculty Advisor and Vera Mclnnis, 
Editor. 



tl2 




1964 ZENITH Staff 



The 1964 ZENITH Staff has 
made an all-out effort to make 
this yearbook a remembrance 
that will be treasured by all for 
years to come. We hope that vou 
will enjoy your book, and that 
you will show it to all yonr 
friends because vou are proud of 
it and of High Point College. 




Elaine Greene 
Editor-in-Chief 



Carol Parrish 
Associate Editor 




The Group 






Dr. Sam Underwood 
Faculty Advisor 



Charles Hawks 
Business Manager 



Pam Hancox 

Manafiinj; Editor 



113 




"^^■^^:a^ 



^ V 





Th 



ii,, in piilite terms, is .-ulled the -lineup". We simply eall it the Editoiial Board. 




Laey Ballard, staff photographer, tries his 
hand at "shooting" the Editor. 








Michelle Schmidley, Art Editor 



114 



Tom Minton, Advertising Manager 





Angie Smith, Layout, and Sandra Newsome, 
Typist discuss a problem. 



Our Copy staff looks extremely energetic! 




The ZENITH Office seems always to be the center 
of activity. What with closet parties unci just plain 
work, it is the hideaway of the Editor-in-Chief and 
her "friends". Puttinpr out a yearbook i.s a lot of 
hard work, tried patience, black circles under the 
eyes, thousands of cigarettes, and jiust plain exhaus- 
tion. Yet, they tell us thiit it is worth all these 
things when the finished product comes back. We 
hope so ! 



David Evans, Jean Anderson, and Verlene Hutchinson go over 
some of the finished layouts. 




Carroll Wood, Charlie Hawks, and Milbrey Beland don't seem to be worrying 
about the money problems. 



Erlene Haight and Rodger Franklin, Class 
Editors have given up trying to find who goes 

where. 




Putting" out the yearbook is not all hard work, just most of it. 
Sometimes the staff will break down and pull a few gags. We even 
have a mascot whose name is Jona.s Archibald McLamb, III. Dr. 
Underwood will flometimert get after the Editor with a niler, but 
he has never managed to hit her, yet. This is just an exception, 
though. Producing a yearbook is an experience that we will never 
forget, and if you don't see us when the yearbooks are distributed, 
it will be because we are recuperating in the hospital. 





Caroll Parrish and her staff are busy workinje: out how to feature our campus 
beauties. 



116 





\ 



■^ 



^^ 






PanheUenic Council 



Rush . . . pledg-es , , , parties . . , Greek Week . . , 
Sisterhood, All these things and many more help to 
make sorority life what it is. 

The PanheUenic Council is the co-ordinating group 
of the four sororities on the High Point College campus. 
The Council encourages high social and scholastic stan- 
dards and helps to unite the sororities in the true Greek 
spirit. 



Joe Ann Taylor, President 




Sealed, left to risht: Myra Morris, Joe .\nn Taylor, Joan Gale, 
ing, left to right: Jean McCoUum, Gail Geyer, Betty Ti'eece, 
Roberts. 



Cliarlsie Abel. Stand- 
Janet Miller, Linda 



118 



Interfraternity Council 

The lilt erf raternity Council is the governing body of the six Greek letter 
social traternities. 1 he (\iuncil serves as a media l'i>r the discussion of fra- 
ternity affairs. The Council was established to promote interfraternity re- 
lations and to deal with interfraternity- matters. The fraternities realize 
that a stronj? propei'ly constituted interfraternity organization is necessary 
in order to have a well oriented fraternal life. 

Each year the Council awards a trophy to the outstanding fraternity 
man of the year who has contributed the most to the betterment of the 
Greek system. The IFC also presents annually the IFC Scholarship Award 
to the fraternity who has had the highest academic average of all the 
fraternities. 

This year under the sLii dance of Commander George Netts, our faculty 
sponsor, the IFC expanded its functions and programs. The first inter- 
fraternity retreat was held this fall in order to advance friendship and 
cooperation among the brotherliodds. In con.j unction with the Panhullenic 
Council, the first Greek Week was held. This week was full of events 
which ranged from helping with the Heai't Fund to a mass shaving cream 
fight. Co-recreation night and the Greek Sing were highlights. The entire 
week was concluded by the Greek dance. For incoming students next year, 
the Interfraternity Council and Piinhellenic Council have expanded their 
rush publication to aid new students in all phases of Greek life. 

This year the six fraternities received the Summa Cum Laude Scholar- 
ship Award from the National Interfraternities Conference. This award is 
presented each year to the fraternities on a particular campus who were 
above the all men's average. This year only 35 Greek systems from colleges 
across the United States received this distinction. 




Ditk :\IcDowe)l 
I.F.C. President 




Front row, left to riRht: Steve Montague David Parsons Dick 
McDowell, president: Robert Carlough, Wayne Walkei. Second 
row, left to right: Commander Netts, Lloyd Harvey, 



beth. Bill Fallin, Dave Willard. Roy Greenwood, 
Missing- from picture; Bob Sullivan, Dave Baughn. 



Tom Kester. 



Mac Lam- 



1 f9 




lat V. Prea. 
Mary Lee Cootes 




Treasurer 
Kay Rnbha 




Patty Rtttrc-rs 




Jane Flcnriini^ 




Jo Ann Taylor 







» 



Mflrizell Austin 





/ 



Prej4tdent 
Bytty White 





2nd V. Pre^. 




Social Chairman 
Judy Callaway 



SecrHarv 
Kay D^'MJk 



^^P 



Rush Chairman 
Gfiyle Nichols 




Marlf^n*' Mnoi-f 




Sanfitfi Ne\^:j;ome 




Mi' 




Julia Bf^iley 



Wantla Joyce 





Sarah Shelton 



Susanna Mock 





Diana Steail 



Joy Tnman 





C, J. Neal 



Maruaiet Carter 



.^iSf 



Beth Renfrti 



Alpha Gamma Delia 
Gamma Eta 






Julia Di^'tloyer 



# 



K;iiL-ti I'lodfeUcr 






Rebec ta Williams 






Taniai-a Keams 



Dehia Bolton 





Nancy Pearsfiri 



Judy ^liljer 





Linda Roberta 



Kaien Moody 





Wynn MacGregor 



Nancy Perry 



Bev er I y Moody 



M^^ 

^p^' 



Ellen Siess 




Carol Ki^ev 



120 



"When you come to the end of a perfect year" — 
Alpha Gam left school with sisters all. "Like we did 
last summer" we were back at the beach haviiifir a ball 
as usual. It may have been crowded, but it was fun. 

"Happy day.s are here again"— September found all 
sisters excited to be "home". Upperclassmen rush be^'an 
swing- and brought us Bev, Louise, and Ann. "Hello, we 
welcome you to AGD" as we welcomed seventeen pledges 
after first semester rush. 

Basketball sesson starred five Ah)ha Gam cheerlead- 
ers; Gayle, Kiiye, "Clod", Wynne, and C. J. Maggie, Call- 
away, and Mock made the fi-uternity tircuit as sweet- 
hearts, Robbs blinded us with her diamond. 

"Stardust" filled every eye as we entered the room at 
the Mistletoe Ball, What a wcmderful night, thanks to 
the pledges. "We'll have a blue Christmas without you." 



Back after \'acati(in, exams were on our minds. Soon 
second semester was here bringing Sonny to Gayle. 
Kirk's "fiancee" was Queen during Homecoming and 
had Joe Aim, Beth, and Jane as attendants. Kay, Betty, 
and C. J. Ijecame "ushers." 

"Memories" — Ellen, did you ever get over the "un- 
happy gleep ))ii'd"? Teague made the scone in Africa. 
Who's Wanted for imitating a funnel, Roberts*.* Maybe 
rooming with Sylvia will help you. Bones. He always 
calls first, huh, Patty Ann? You really have that "Pan- 
hell" spirit, CootesI You sav it crackled like tissue paper, 
Betsy ? 

"In our Alpha Gamma Delta" — Initiation drew near, 
and anticitiation filled our hearts. A Ijeautiful R<ise Ball 
Ijrought anothei' year to a close for the Alpha Gams, 
"See you in September." 




'Looks Greek to me!" 





Cootes and company. 




"Happy, Debbie?" 



121 



The crew. 





"The pledge flass strikes asiain- 



■Point of iirflpr. Madame President.' 



That woiiflei-ful year ... 1964 .. . and Phi Mn's 
wasted no time . . . Treere ni'iciitinjr tlie Fi'eshmeri . . . 
Mcllvaine's "cheelis of tun". . . Ferrari's '•unmention- 
able". Slumber party . . . Fiphts with the hall proctor 
. . . work, work, and more work . . Have another hot 
clop, Kathy. Myra and .Judy ride the Roat . . . Marge 
and her letter.^ from Zanzibar . . . Sal'^ famous panta- 
loons . . . SonR practices that wouldn't quit , , , RUSH, 
and the bijjrgest pledge cla.-^s on campus . . . Cassimus 
gets her man . . . Marcia battles the Winston-Salem 
police force . . , Cokes for everybody. Anpie . . . Sue 



Lynne embarks for life in her trailer . . . Gainor doesn't 
care, as lung- as he's a Theta (.'hi . . . The pledges go 
Southern-fried . . . 4,032 pennies for Founder's Day , . . 
Carolyn moans over the checkbook . . . Harriett gets 
another bill from the florist . . . Our 7-man speedball 
team . . . The alums come through with more goodies . . . 
Lizzie finally makes it to the dorm . . . It's going to cost 
how much for Greek Week'? . , . The beach can't come 
soon enough , . . The climax to a vear of friendship , . , 
dedicated to LOVE. HONOR. TRUTH ... The spirit of 
Phi Mu. 



"The mornitiE' after the iiitrht before,' 



"We aim to please," 





122 



Phi Mu 





Membership rhairm^in 
Elizabeth Oklhnm 





Prenident 
Betty Trceoe 



MnTtr<? Hums 



Gamma Zeta 




Chaplain 
Joy Watkins 




Secretary 
Suzanne Bullaid 




Treasurer 



// 




Myif-a Morris 






Katy MimK 






Mary Coiflev 




Jean Allen 



ArifTplfL Smiih 



.^■■^^ 



Brenrla Symes 




Mai'i'iet Finiriy 





Ju^ly StHhoe 




Jean Ruth 



Emma Landt^r^ 




Ruth Harvey 




May tula Kai>;ei" 












Carolyn Price 



SiJ!5an LaSalla 



jLicty AvmiiiLnon Cainor Goodwill Mfiry Keneiran 



Laura Lentz 





Deann:i Keed Shan in L*TLtheWj> 





TiUie Cli^ik 





Jackit^ Iver 







Su&an M'ii^runei" Joyc*' Mcllvain? 



Ernestine Crnin: 



Maivift W*?ciher Janet Hydt^nbure Pamela Neal 



123 




Chaplain 
Sterling Banks 



Kappa Delta 
Gamma Gamma 




Diulit? WtrslnnjvtlsMHl 




Vice Prt- widen t 



fl^ ^ 




Secrelary 
JgJy Wnrlick 




Membership Chairman 
Cari'ie Mji'ick 




A^Histant TreRsurf>r 
PcifjfV Wiley 



President 
Gaii Geyei" 




Von K.'iLU'ette 




Kftlhv Kn^^ei'S 




Pal^;>' Mi^Ciirmick 




Joannt' Thurley 





Mai'ifinne B^hi*?n(lt 



Lintlfi Grea-s(»n 





Jackie Brendle 



Bevei'h' Heiirer 





UniekMM \V;ililni 




Delaine Jurney 




Juily Htfllini^svrurlh 




Baihai-£i Cacy 




Liz Jensen 




■Christie Jen;<*?n 




Kaien E^iwarda 




JLutv Mill 





Sherry Sn<3W 




Aile{?n Hi^^ve 




Jane Loi>?a.n 



SEiiu]vn Hariirrove 



Joan dale 



124 





Our trest — Convention New Orleans, La. 



A bunch of very happy KDs.'ll 



Hep, Hep . . , 19 (if the sharpest plecifres evei' . . ukes 
. . . much KD spirit . , , our president Gail reipns as 
May Queen . . . Pe^Ry arrows another iiuh to reach Dale 
. . . Sti'nky will always he our very own queen . . . Cat y, 
yon sure looked good leading us in our homecoming 
cheers . . . Kenny which guy is it now, Pika nr the one 
from Carolina??'.' P.ev, will we «ver get those grades?! 
ILambeth and Norma leave us in January, Maid of Hon- 
or, Diane, beauty queen again . . . Jackie and Delaine 
take a sudden interest in basketball . , . Sterling, please 
don't throw your Pika lavalier around today . . . Sandy 
sticks with her TjamV>da f'hi while Joan moves on to Miss 
HPC contest, and a Theta Chi . . . Oniegia and Liz sing 
out about "Dumb Pledges" . . . Leenie, "ui'e you still a 
Bucknell fan?" 3Iary Alien invites everyone to a "Merry 
Christmas" tea . . . Pledges get hfJd of bleach-orange 
hair. Sherry veils out another cheer for H. P. C. KDs 



pi'oud of their cheerleaders . . . "Beaver Greason" builds 
anothei' dam, which holds her. '\'vinine, finalist in Miss 
H.P.C— Sam, honeylnm I Julie gets hooked up with a 
Pika. Christie on May Coui't and on a certain Jim's 
mind. Homecoming Coui't we find five KDs — Marianne 
sure looked cute . . , Cari'ie plans foi' her big wedding 
while Karen is leaving for King again. Joium and Kathy, 
l)lease clean u[) that dii'ty room 1 1 Judy H. i>iles more 
potato chips on us. Patsy still commutes and Jane Logan 
and Judy Mills come back to join their KD sisters . . , 
A year full of beatniks, displays which fall , , . dresses 
fo]- Gangster Pall and much Kappa Delta love. We've 
given up Lollipops Ijut the White Rose will stay forever. 
In all .seriousness our beloved Kappa Delta means more 
to us than words could evei' e.vpress. A select few ai'e 
picked to join (lur group and know f>ar love . . . honor- 
able, beautiful and highest — Kapjia Delta, we love you. 



Does KD really claim these two? 



I'M a KD happy .Jackie! I 





I2S 




"My, your hand is bricht today! 




"For I'm a Zeta Tau Alpha . , ," 




Zeta Tail Alpha \vas tuiintiecl 
at Lonjrwood Colletre, Fai-mville 
Virginia, Octoijer 15, 1B98. Del- 
ta Gamma became the 100th Link 
of the n<nv 117 Chapters. Fivi- 
ternity colors are the cherished 
tiD'quoise blue and steel gray. 
The white violet is the fraternity 
flower. 

As the year unfolded, it pave 
forth an abundance of varied ac- 
tivities. Biennial workshop at 
Athens. Georpia caused Janet 
M., Marlene, and Ann O. to be 
countins- the mile.s. 0. D. Reach 
was quite a blast. Huh. Charlsie? 

September brought Zetas back 
from many state.s. Scooter seoot.s 
from dorm to donn getting- new- 
comers pacified. Nan starts par- 
ty plans. 

Providence President comes. 
Rush brinprs lots of fun and hard 
work — and new pledges added to 
the ranks of !)lue and gray . . , 
Eriene, Rosemary, Valei'ie. Jean 
L,, Ann M, fiue, Linds, Diane, 
Carolyn R., Candy, Janet Y., 
Rhonda, and Julie. 

Betty and Barbara are teach- 
ing . . . Elaine has stars in her 
eyes . . . Ann A. is still smiling 
. . . Co-Rec Night brings fun and 
trophy . . , Christmas Caroling 
— Oh, my cold, aching feet I Sur- 
prise Christmas party for 
pledges. Pledge party for sisters, 
spaghetti, hamburgers. Sharon 
returns for 2nd .semester. 

Ooops — exams here again. 
Stock in midnight oil goe^ up. 
Block courses ! I Valentine Party, 
Pledge ti'icks , , . say youi- room 
just made room check. Scooter? 
Initiation brings new sisters. 

Seniors start frantically ap- 
plying for jobs. 

Through light blue clouds of 
Zeta love, the golden summer 
tie.s another package of wonder- 
ful Zeta memories. 




^*6». '^'^ 



"But I don't want to stand up!" 




"Let's go!' 




'Not another call-meeting!" 



"The birds are coming!' 



126 



^ 



Vitt President 

Carolyn Fiye 




Ann Aimerjtroiit 



f^ 



Social Chairman 
Nan Bi^owi; 



Zeia Tau Alpha 
Delta Gamma 






Treasurer 
Marl<?ne Brinley 




Corresponding Secretary 
Jan Mf Co([um 




Membership Chairman 
Ann Ork'in 



President 
Janet Mi|]iL>i 




^ Qb % 



Sharon Mader 



Ros^iTiary Kenndy 




ElaEne Green 




Jan Stayer 




Caridy Siirmnk 



Cnrr»|yri Rnss^oHl 





Bctt^' Jnncs 



Diane Pih'rki 





Valeni t^ocket 



^ 



Chavlene Abel 





Baihara Randcll 



ru \. 



Sue Pavkei- 






Jean Lester 



Rhonda Williams 



Ei'l^ne Haiifht 



Ann Mackie 



127 




Secretary 
Ray Alley 




Wayno Buvrls 




Ru^h Cbairman 
Charlie K*rr 





Bob Kornepay Lany Amick 




Bill Kint; 



Don Link 



P 




Delta Sigma Phi 
Delta Zeta 





Gene Kesler 






Vice president 

Mat' LaniT-'ih 




Mike Rosenmarkte 




Robin Russell 





i^ 





MH.lM'lt Wrlls 





Treasurer 
Art Warren 




Pt^dffe Master 
Bob Jessup 




y^ 



Hu^h Chairman 
Ray Davis 




Ki^h;n<l Allp:r»u<l 




James Foster 



Gary TiKkett 



Huph Coatea 



Ed Turner 



David Evans 



Micky Russell 



1 2d 



1963-64 ... a great year for all Delta Sig-'s. Fall 
semester begins with new loiinge, color T.V., parties, 
and great expectations . . . Again Delta Sig's hold 
important S.G.A. offices on campus . . . Two new 
trophies . . . Third consecutive intramural cham- 
pionship and Henshaw Award for highest scholastic 
average on campus ... Made out better this year 
on the mountain trip ... the sun shined, but Lor- 
bor, Rosey, and dates still get lost?!! . . . Fall rush 
... 26 pledges . . . success . . . biggest a'nd best 
pledge class on campus . . . Jessup's, Eurris's ser- 
nades . . . Makes a big hit with the girls and a big- 
ger splash with the Brothers . . . Great football sea- 
son . . . almost . . , Rosey and Alley head All-Star 
team . . . Hawaiian party in lounge . . . sphinx shines 
as pledges build traditional Christmas Tree . . . 
Merry Christmas , . . Exams follow quickley as 
Brothers cram at the Rat and the Expresso . . . 
Brothers have party and all pledges with an average 
are invited . . . Some blast . . . Congrats to New 
Brothers . . . Pledges start coat hanger brigade and 
lounge gains a ne^v bar . . . Lewis gives Gail a dia- 
mond , , . Candy is hooked . . . Four more top 
pledges . . . Alligoood leads cheers ? ? . . . Delta Sig's 
again undefeated in basketball . . . Rosey-Davis All- 
Stars . . . Champs. Jessup carries Delta Sig Squenil 
gun to H.P.C. ball game.s . . . Flay Boys great . . . 
Beards begin to sprout , . . Harrington ring your bell 
. . . Treasurer Warren drives new car, Fraternity 
fimnds??? . . . Lambeth elected president of H.C.A. 
. . . King's hat and Well's head — what a com- 
bination . , . Lightning Alley struggles through 
track practice . , . Jones makes great speeches^ 
Ain't dat right . . . Time for Sailor's Ball . . . moon- 
light dance, and raids on sand dunes . . . Great week- 
end . . . Beards gone and so is the year. Expecta- 
tion has gone to reality and then into memories . . . 
Brothers leave for the summer, but the Spirit of 
Delta Sigma Phi remains. 




Are these champs? ' 




These are champs! ! 



Brothers \i-ek'oiiie best pledg-e class on campus. 





"Traveling- St-ianaders" 




Lamixhi Chi Alpha . . . founded nationally . . . 
Boston University ... 1909 .. , locally ... 1954 ,. . 
"The Cross and Crescent" . . . official publication 
of Lambda Chi Alpha . . . Flower , . . the white rose 
. . . honored coloi's . . . purple, green, and jrold. 

Year's end ajrain and Lambda Chi's look back . . . 
an eventful and sucves.sful year it was, too , . . fif- 
teen new pledges start off the year in a j^-reat way 
. . . second semester . . . lots of planninfr, much hard 
work ... nets ... nine pledj>:es which didn't hurt us 
either . . . finally hit the fifty mark . . . December 
7 brinps another edition of Campus Capers . . . 
Opus IV this time . . . best talent ever . . . talent and 
audience both enjoy themselves . . . Worthwhile 
projects stniin the muscles and put more $$$ in 
the "Kitty" . . . Anyone for a Saturday car wash??? 
. . . Let's get out and sell those First Aid Kits, fellows 
. , , Christmas was time to give as well as receive 
. . . Lambda Chis gave a Christmas party to the 
children of Mills Home . . . The smiles and appre- 
ciation made it all worthwhile ... As usual, parties 
brightened the school year . . . starting: off, of course, 
with a swinging rush party at I. T. Mann . . . The 
Drifter.s were even better than last year , . . And, 
of course, don't forget those other combo parties 
either . . , Then there was the Founders' Day Ban- 
quet and White Rose Ball ... A night to remember 
. . . Judy Calloway, the new Crescent Girl . . . Bob 
Fogleman deservedly receives the Outstanding 
Pledge Award . . . The new lounge offers a com- 
fortable gathering place . . . The color T.V. destroyed 
many a test . . .The bar helped to boost our morale 
after failing those tests . . . Spring brings serenades 
. . . White rose bouquets . . , The annual sandy trek 
to the beach ... A spring weekend blast to end the 
year right ... So another ti-emendous year ends , . , 
See y'all in September when we migrate back to 
H.P.C. 




Joe GosneJi 




Dave Willard 




G&ra-y TerUaeiari 




Gerry FennelJ 



Miss Judy Calla^vay Frattinity Sponsor 
Pledgre Class 





John Oaboinc 



^^Q 




Robert Burns 



Vice Pi-«sideiiit 




Stc rotary 
Charles \V*"lrh 



Bill Fallin 




Reeffit* Jtf.v 



Br tire Swflnflon 



Jeff Sea ford 



Han? Id Mortse 



Hick MrDr.^vf^n 




[.iitriV r1'ihTlM»ri 



W% 




S|ifnoe]' Jtjhns<n] 




V\':iviif l^l■e^'^et■ 




Lamba Chi Alpha 








Pr^■^id*►nl 
Rainey Unrks 




TTf'iirpe Hfnrtrix 




HaiT.^' 5^mith 






Tom Smiih 





Social Chairman 

Ri^k rTTim>lt'S- 




C^iy Kijffi" 




Fiaxiei- Veveen 





Trffli^urer 




Trene WaJsh 




Ku?;h <'hairman 



John York 




Doiii; JoTies 




Drtvis 



Ritualist 
Grt'^r Morton 




J^K- Lijthe 




<^ary Msitv 




Jim Surratt 




I'ntrt-r CaimJL-ha'e^l 




Rni<!dv Varlioro^iKh 



HihMiy F^»^:hmn[^ 



ChiK'k ?;rhT]ftK=v 



Jt'ri y lUijjh*' 



V^'ayne Eati'n 



I);iriTiy Lrnl lin 



131 




M ilii M 

^ liQ' H ^ 



I 




Ai'e there any PiKA's down in H- 



Everyone enjoys PiKA parties 



Here ai'e those Pika "Fnrpet-Me-Nots" for 1964 : Now, 
Van Hook, don't pet excited, the thing to do is don't 
^et excited Bob Harris, What else do they call yon be- 
sides "Funnel"? Pete, are yon really Koing to graduate? 
Bnlla, why don't yon take my jiicture? Buckey, why do 
they ciill you "cue sti<k"? By the nii\\ Newton Wiisn't 
Martha Ann supposed to be the Sweater Girl? Mouse, 
who is champion of D-(>? Bifd Bath, what kind of soap 
do you use? Hey Bone-Fare, Let's go to Beeson's. Ashley, 
why can't you talk after a weekend at home? 

Hey Ernnie, what's that extension course you're tak- 
ing in French? McKay, how alxnit paying this Florist off 
so he'll get off onr back. Pat, how are the voice lessons 
going? Stan, did you teach Casy how to drive Old 99? 
Kester are you getting discount rates from Bun- Pat- 
terson? Q.T., when did your brother start working at the 
Express? Who said the Pikas weren't athletes? "Hey 
Pledge, go get Parson's hammer." 





Whifh hand has the ^l & M candv. 



Miss Yvonne Fauctte, Fraternity Sponsor 



132 



Pi Kappa A Ipha 
Delta Omega 




Pl-tsident 




Vift Pr«flident 





Stcretary 





Treasurer 
Tf^Mj' Parsr>n 



Bill Harris 



PledjTf Master 



Rush Chairman 
Charles VfinHook 




Bucky Caldwell 



Nrn'iTiflin SimfiHinn 





Slari Kinney 





Pttc Hciilei- 




Wi 




•^J ""? -«.- 



Kelly Phillii.s 




^i% 



Pat Hedrick 




John RoberUi 



Stan Htdrick 



Moh Harri:^ 



Tom Blake 



J. K- Kfwtu 



Chavlei; Mendenhatl 



133 



L-ii i-^i/v,. ■>-:^.->A.-,^>tf'<wii^:-M^'i3^^. 




Hey Rip. look at the commode moon! 



'The Beauty and the Beast" 



Theta Chi Fraternity was founded in 1856 at Norwich 
University. Norwich Vermont; and '\?., therefore, in it's 
second century of existence. 

Since then, Theta Chi has taken its place among the 
educational institutions of America as a promoter of 
knowledge, an advancer of culture, an<l a l>uilder of char- 
acter. 

Every year more than twenty-five hundred young 
men ])ledire themselves to the high ideals exemplified bv 
Theta Chi. 

On December 11, 1954 Epsilmi p]ta Phi of High Point 
College was installed as Epsilon Aljjha chapter of Theta 
Chi. Since then, Epsilon Alpha has become a leader 
on the High Point campus, supported by over a century 



of brotherhood. 

How can we forget : Hey Green ie, whose got it now 
. . , Boomer turns over a new leaf, oops ... 1 . . But 
Len, why Chavis Y.M.C.A.? . . . Jesse, how's ya fern? 
, . . Warren finally reaches puberty . . . Who's got Lew- 
in's P.P\'s? . , . Chase one more time and you'll wish you 
were a Kangaroo . . . Who slipped that ham on my 
tray? , , . H<>t Pastrami at O. D. . . . "Sure Mebane's got- 
ta traffic light" I . . . Cat-Sass becomes Pork & Beans . . . 
^Mother Renoit's tuna . . . Did Whip juggle the books? 
. . . Two more for the stick . . , The 18 best pledges 
. . . Who's Hen-pecked, Henny???! . , . 

And now, after a year of Academic Excellence, we 
retreat to 0. D. to meditate. 




Where's Everhart & Sipmon — Selling Sandwiches' 




Fraternity Sponsor . . . Rita Saunders 



134 




Don Bryant 




Serrctary 
BEii-ry Ynrk 



Theta Chi 
Epsilon A Ipha 






Vice Pr«B]d«]nt 
Roy Gi-e^nwood 




Treasurer 
Tony Taj-lov 



SaciaL Chairman 
Hick Benoit 




Dick Olson 



wm 






D&ve L'rian 



Je]i>' VViMiams: 



Charles Nft;bitt 



St*'\'f ^^(!ntai,'^^p 




Tom Ainctte 





Wa>iu- Kurman 



Lai'i'y Shallcro^s 




\V[ii-f^n KMniainc 




Jim l^ruckL 



Kent KiiiJey 




Mickey Boies 



Mickey McDaniel 



J<i*l Silvei 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 
N. C. Eta 



President 

Bill Rimmei- 






Vice President 
Tom Mintun 




Secretary 
Fr&nf'i^^ Courtney 



Comptroller 

John Cai-t' 



Pledge TrAJner 

Don Hormachea 



Today, over 70,000 men wear the "Golden Heart" of 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. The Brotherhood of Sigma Phi Ep- 
silon is a proud heritage that came forth from Richmond 
College on November 1, 1001. 

High Point "Sig P^ps" have enjoyed a good year on 
campus ennshasizing character . . . scholarship . . . lead- 
ership . . . and service . . . Fall Rush . . . Drag Party at 
Schrafft's . , . seven new pledges ... the Marlljoi'o Pack 
Contest . . . First Place . . . new T.V. ... the pledges vs. 
Rill Rimmer . . . the Christmas Party at Holiday Inn 
. . . one of the liest fi'aternity parties of the year. Mr. 
Hormtichea's the "Thinker" juke l>ox ... the great Or- 
phan's Christmas Party at I he Mill's Home . . . begging 
gifts for the orphans . . . their eyes when they got them 



. . . the football game with them . . . the tears when we 
left . . . the gang at Skip's house at Christmas . . . three 
new pledges , . . Dave, Gene, and Louie . . . Second place 
for our Homecoming Display . . Mr. "H" is Mr. Ugly . . . 
Hel)) Week . . . Three new l>rothers . . . Skip, Tom, and 
Don . . . The Sig K]> Ball at Charlotte ... the week-end 
that no one will forget . . . Tom pins Georgie . . . late to 
bed — early to rise . . . the trip back with Bill and Mandy 
. . . The Sweetheart Ball . . . Mandy chosen Sweetheart 
. . . Charlie's Day . . the fabulous week at the beach . . . 
All total up to the great feeling of accomplishment <at 
the end of the vear ... AS THE SIG EPS GO ROLL- 
iXG ALOX(.;: 





"The Knights and their Ladies" 



'Their Royal Majesties'' 

136 



"The Three Stooges" 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 




President 
Phillip E. Garrison 






!a«f rotary 
Vice President 



Historian 
Serf eant-at' Arms 
"Wayne Walker 





Pledjte Trainer 
Lai-J'V Dunn 



Treasurer 

Boh Sullivan 



In January of 1899, five men of Wesleyan University 
landed together and founded what was to become the 
arpest international fraternity — both in chapters and 
.inderjTraduate meml>ers. Theta Kappa Epsilon came to 
High Point College in 1954 aw Delta Kappa chapter. 

TKE brothers and pledges have played an active role 
in campus activities. Phil Garrison, co-captain of the 
basketball team, high scorer, Vice-President of the 
Men's Dorm Council . . . George Beam, band president, 
lighting director for Tower Players . . . Bob Snllivan, 



College Bowl Team . . . Don Crossley, chorns. lighting 
a.ssistanf . . . Steve Deal, track . . . Tracy McCarthy, 
Junior Marshal, tennis team. College Bowl team . , . 
Larry Dunn, All-Star ?>rd baseman. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon, with its keystone of character, 
stands for men. Our first loyalty is to our alma mater. 
We l)elieve that cnllege is primarily the place for attain- 
ing an education and that we should strive for academic 
achievement. 



Pledges 

Don Crossley 
Tracy McCarthy 
Terry Edwards 
Pete Antonokos 
Dave Thomas 
Bob Weiss 
Steve Deal 



137 




138 







f) 






* 




, Jtea. 









^■^ 






f 



> 



"%_ 



"^- 




Miss High Point 



Fourth Runner-up 

MISS JOY WATKINS 



Third Runner-up 

MISS YVONNE FAWCETT 




140 



College Finalists 



Second Runner-up 

MISS JA\ MORRIS 





First Runner-up 

h MISS SHIRLEY KEY 




Miss Congeniality 

MISS BRENDA FLINCHUM 






Miss Congeniality is chosen by the contest- 
ants on the night of the ptigeunt. The girls vote 
for the one they feel has been the most "easy to 
get along with" during the pageant rehearsals. 
Brenda met this qualification with an always 
ready smile and a vvorri of encouragement. She 
was a real "Miss Congeniality" in every sense 
of the word. 




U2 








143 



Miss High Point College 




Miss Sharon Math is was chosen Miss High 
Point College of 1964. For the talent portion 
of the contest, Miss Math is played an organ 
medley. She is the daughter of W. E. Mathis 
of Trinity, N. C. In the picture below. Miss 
Mathis is being crowned by Miss Carolyn 
McAllister, Miss High Point College of 1963. 




«:r^^57~- -■-^~ 





t 





T 



I 




i 






/ 



\ 



X 




h 




May 



Miss Hetty Treete 



Senior Attendants 



Miss Ehiine (iieene 




\i6 



Court 



Miss Joe Ann Tavlor 




Junior Attendants 




Miss Suzanne Mctck 




Miss Judv Miller 



Sophomore Attendants 



Miss Jill Knucke^ 



May 




148 



Court 



Miss Christie Jenson 




Freshman Attendants 




Miss Jean Allen 



149 






May Queen 



; jtJfT 



;^ >«*•"• 












w 



■4'i '■ V- 



¥m, 








Miss Gail Geyer 



Maid of Honor 




."Miss Diane \\'es(m*)reland 



151 



Miss Zenith 




Miss Gai! Geyer 



r 



Miss Dian« Westmoreland 




Finalists 



Mrs. Lou el la Richards Ward 





Miss Judy Laml>elh 



Miss Zenith 1964 




'XA"t™**t7f f^c'.: 



Mrs. Linda FeiTun (iibson 



155 



Homecoming 





\ 



=s* 



Miss Jant> FlfminE 
sponsoied by Barry Smith 




Miss Beth Renfro 
sponsored hy Bill Fidlin 









V. 



^ 



.Miss .laikii' IJrindlt' 
sponsored hy Al Trunibetta 




'IL 




Miss nplainf Journey 
sponsored by Phil Garrison 



Miss Anne (astevens 
sponsored by Bob Bivens 



156 



Court 




Sponsored by Dale Nee] 





■7 




Miss Judy Warlick 
spotisoi'ed by Sam Byers 



Miss Betty Treece 
sponsored by Larry Cheatham 





Miss Joe Ann Taylor 
sponsored by Jerry Lambeth 



Miss Mary Ann Berhrant 

sponsored by Jcje Forte 



157 



Crowning of Homecoming Queen 




Pittuieii ahove aiv K;iy Ii.OIrk, Homecoming Queen: Bill Henderson. Pi-eskJent <jf the 
Alunmi Associatinn : and .Imly Raykcs, Homec(iminir Queen of 10(i3, 



15S 





..-^ 



Homecoming Queen 



Miss Kay DeMik 
sponsored by Kirk Stewart 



L 




Homecoming 






HomecominjT is a time for returning to 
High Point College as an alumnus; for re- 
newing friendships made d ii ring college 
days; and for observing progress made on 
campus. 

Each homecoming is highlighted by one 
special event. This year's special event was 
the dedication of the new J. Ed Mi His Dorm- 
itory. As a part of the dedication ceremony, 
Mrs. Helen Brooks Millis unveiled a portrait 
of her husijand the late Mr. Millis. 




muH^a 





Cheer 



Jim Roi'rer and Richard Allijrood 





162 



leaders 




Head Cheerleader— Carolyn McAllister. Gail Nichols, Linda Cabot, Karen 
Clodfelter, Juy Wat kins, Julio DeGooyer, Sherry Snow. 





163 



Basketball 




Coach Tom (hiinn 

. . . Compiling a 23-3 record is not an easy task, neither for the team 
nor for the coach. It is a lot of hard work and sacrifice for the players and 
the coach. Regardless of the material or schedule, there are times when the 
going g'ets touj:h — and that is the time a coach and his team show what 
they are really made of. The rewards for victory are .sweet , , . 



164 



Basketball 




Coach Qui (in prepares to review hist nie-ht's ffame aiifi flis- 
cuss mistakes. 



The 196;3-C-1 Panther basketball team enjoyed the best 
season in HiKh Point ColleKe history, posting an almost 
nnbelieveable 23-3 record which carried them to the NA 
I A national tournament in Kansas City. Missouri, 
Coach Tom Quinn, in his second year with the team, 
credits team spirit and hustle for the Panthers degree 
of success. Coach Quinn, who has been to Kansas City 
before with Xewberry College, calls this year's team 
"the best I have ever coached. It is (he strongest, fastest, 
deepest, most versatile team since I began coaching. 
They can do more things better." 

The '2?,-?> lecord was good enough to seed High Point 
College number two in the XATA tournament behind 
Pan American College of Texas and All- American Lus- 
cious Jackson. The Panthei-s lost only to Elon in an over- 
time and twice to Lenoir Rhyne by one and two points, 
Howevei-, the Panthers downed the Bears in the semi- 
finals of District 26, 36-27, for the right to go to Kansas 
City. Only days before, the Panthei's had dropped a 31- 
30 heartbreaker to the F'ears for the CaroHna Confer- 
ence championship. 

One of the ttrightest points during the season was the 
night of Feljruarv 4 when the Panthers broke the school 
recoi-d in beating Guilford, L?8-85. The Panthers set 
the record for the most points scored by a team, most 
field goals, and for the most points .scored in a half. 
Also impressive was High Point's victory over the 
Italian Olympic team on December 30. 

Panther f<illowers were able to follow the team's pro- 
gress during the season bv watching the Tom Quinn 
show over WOHP-TV. 




S'^^^S^ 



Coach Quinn chats with hi.'; cd-captains, Phil (iarrison and Bill Fallin. 



165 



^M 


nHH^HI 




^^^^K ^ .^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^v 


^^ 


^^B^ **^ ' "^ i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^l 



Phil Garrison, F— (i':r', 20:^ — Glen wood. rnd. 





Dale Xeel, C— irvt", 229— Roc-kvillf, .M<1. 





BariT Stuith, G — (.i':i" 177 — Wnshintrtoii, i). 



Al Trombetta. G— 5'10'", 160 — -McKees Rock, Pa. 



166 





Kiik Steu-;ii-t, F.-trs". 200— Whfaton, .Mil. 



Sam Eyt^vs. F— ()'3". 194— Concord, X. C. 




Boh Riveiis. C— i;t.-. 174, Hifrh Point, X. C. 





Joe Forte, G — 5'7". 155 — Levittown, N.Y. 



Kiehanl (iuiffredo, G— 6'2". Port Chester. X.Y, 





Elon's coach Bill Millei- is appart'iitly not satisfied with the 
results of this one. 



Dale Nt-el tries jumper against Lenoir Rhyne. 





Garrison drives for score against Pembroke. 



Big Dale Xeel dV iJ") and AI Trombetta (5' 10") ham it 



up. 



tea 








Theie is no doubt about who has this rebound. 



'And if that doesn't work, we'll ti-y soniethintr else." 





Forte controls the ball as Guilford's Parker presses. 



'-■Vll ritrht you K'uy.-;, play it your own way!' 



169 




Stewart takes control in Elon ^ame. 



Smith scores as Lenior Rhyne's Deehan defends. 




Stewart, Byeis, and Neel reach for the moon. 



Cheatham shoots against Western Carolina, 



170 




Panthers wai'm up for the Lenior Rhyne Bears. 




Batk row: Coach Quinti, Bob Bivcns, Kirk Stewart, Phil ham, Al Trombetta, Barry Smith. Jerry Lambert, and Assist- 

Garrison, Bill Fallin, Dae Keel, Sam Eyers, and Manager anl niariager Nat Oliver. 

Ralph Clements. Front row: Rich Guiffredo, Larry Cheat- 



171 



TOURNAMENT: 

The Panthers finished first in the Carnlinas Con- 
ference with a 14-2 record and were seeded number 
one for the first time since 1951, However, Lenoir 
Rhyne's Bears repeated last year's feat of beatinp: 
the Panthers to win the championship. 

On Febrnary 27 the Panthers advanced to the 
second round by Ijeatin^ the ^Mountaineers from Ap- 
palachian 88-57. Dale Neel led the Panthers cause 
with 21 points. 

Guildord's upsurpinfr Quakers almost pulled the 
major upset of the tournament in the semi-finals 
but Hifrh Point emerged the vict<ir in a 45-43 slow- 
down conte,-?!. Neel wa.s aj^'ain high man for HPC 
with 12 points. 

In the finals for the fourth straigrht years the 
Panthers were defeated by Lenoir Rhyne 31-30 in 
another slowdown conte,'5t. Joe Forte was the only 
Panther in douljle figures with 10 points. 

The Panthers got revenge in the District 2G 
semi-finals by defeating Lenoir Rhyne 36-27 in 
Alumni Gymnasium. A 82-61 victoiy over Erskine 
in the finals proi>elled the Panthers to Kansas City 
and t'i the national playoffs. 




f;Hni!?oii shoots over Apps' Richardson 
» liW m iwiijiiiniiiuii 



1, 




KANS.AS CITY HERE WE COME! 

172 



1963-64 SCHEDULE: 

■Nov. 30 Pfeiffer 

Dec. 4 East Carolina 

Dec. 7 Campbell 

Dec. 9 Newberry 

Dec. 14 Elon 

Dec. 30 Italian Olympicc Team 

Jan. 4 Newberry 

Jan. 8 Campbell 

Jan. 11 Catawba 

Jan. 14 Western Carolina 

Ja'n. 18 Appalachian 

Jan. 25 Elon 

Jan. 30 Atlantic Christian 

Feb. 1 Lenoir Rhvne 

Feb. 4 Guilford 

Feb. 6 Ea.st Carolina 

Feb. 8 Catawba 

Feb. 10 Pembroke 

Feb. 12 Western Carolina 

Feb. 15 Appalachian 

Feb. 17 Atlantic Christian 

Feb. 19 Pfeiffer 

Feb. 22 Lenoir Rhyne 

Tournament : ( Lexington) 

High Point 88 Aiiiialachian 

Hiprh Point 45 Gnilford 

Lenoir Rhyne 31 Hijih Point 

Dist. 26 Tournament: 

High Point 36 Lenoir Rhvne 

High Point 82 Er.'^kine 



69 
43 
30 



61 





.Smith scores in season's finale 



Final Carolinas Conference Standing: 

1. High Point 14— 2 

2. Western Carolina 13— 3 

3. Elon 10— 5 

4. Catawl)a 9— 6 

5. Lenoir Rhyne 9 — 8 

6. Appalachian 8 — 9 

7. Pfeiffer 5—13 

8. Guilford 3—9 

9. N'ewberrv 3— 9 

10. Atlantic <''hristian 3—13 

SCORING AVERAGES: REGULAR SEASON 

NAME G REB PTS AV 

1. Phil Garri.'^on 21 197 342 16.3 

2. Dale Neel 21 251 281 13.4 

3. Barrv Smith 20 52 264 13.2 

4. Bill Fallin 21 241 275 13.1 

5. Joe Forte 10 21 103 10.3 

6. Kirk Stewart 21 146 195 9.3 

7. Sam Bver.s 20 134 134 6.7 

8. A. Trombetta 19 56 86 4.5 

9. Richard Guiffredo 9 3 17 1.9 
10. Larry Moi-gan 4 1 5 1.3 

'' Statistics on Bob Eivens, Jerry Lambeth, 
and Larrv Cheatham not available. 




Garrison hits on favorite shot. 



173 



Kirk fires against Appalachian. 



Baseball 




Front row: Ro|rer La rick, George La re, Roy Greenwood, 
Joe Forte, Harold Moose, Joel Silvers, Robert Harris, Tom 
Di^nan. Back row: Keith Conner, Tom Blancak, Dave 



Kemp, Bill Lee, Larry Dunn, Dave Willard, Kirk Stewart, 
Dave Whitlick, Charley Craver, and manager Jerry Tertze- 
g-ian. 




Co-captains: Pitcher Kirk Stewart and firstbaseman Dave Kemp. 



174 



Veteran coach Chuck Hartman has a strong nucleoli s to work with this 
year in returning leltermen Kirk Stewart, Roy Greenwood, Joel Silvers, 
Harold Moose, Boh Haniss, Dave Whitl^ck, Dave Willard, Dave Kemp, and 
Larry Dunn. Among the newcomers are Keith Conners, Roger Larick, 
George Lare, Tom Dignan, Bill Lee, Charley Craver, and Tom Blanciak. 
The team will play a 25 game schedule. 




'Hit away son, we need a hit." 



175 




The coach discusses pie-eiuiie strategy. 




Playci's nAax befure frame. 




Uavi' Kemp, tiie team's top slusfrei'. lashes out a hit. 




Frtshmati prospeds: Riijiei Lafick, Geoiffe Laie, Tom Difijian, Bill Lof. Charley 
Crave I . and Turn Klaiitiak. 




Fans soak up sim behind Panther duffout. 




Coach Haitman holds pepper ssmc. 



Track 



Cctach Bob [>aviflsc)n returns for his second year of coaching the HPC 
track team. Despite the loss of outstanding cindermen Jack Wag-oner and 
Bot)by P.reniitin, the coach is very optimistic id^out this year's team. Letter- 
men Milie Sabino, Dave Baufrhn, Tony Boyles, Steve Pearson. Ken Truitt, 
Don Jones, Ken Rich, Giiff Bait his, and Bob Seaver form a good founda- 
tion for this vear's team. 




l-'riint Mmy. (Iiiff HaltliLs, Jim 1'ii.kleseimei-, Dave Bautrhn, J. R. 
Xowtoii. Wayne Ashley, Gcoi'Ke Mastroyiuniiakis, Alan Lashley, 
ami Mike Sabiiio. IJatk rvvi . Don Jones, Ken Truitt, Steve Pear- 



sun, Ray Alley, Bub Mediiti, Tony Boyles, Larry Dunlop, and 

Coath Bobby Davidson. 



173 




f) 



-n 




Coaeh Bob Davidson 





Bob Seaver— Javelin 



Steve Pai'son anrl Mike Sabino 



179 







^^^^^;;-"^ 







R;iv Alk'V -Discus 



Dave Yovinfr troes up and dVer. 




.^'irfi'i.'^^e^rS f ^ 



Davi.' Fliuif,'-lin--Veter;in hurdler 



Boh Mc-dlin— Shot Put 



ISO 



Cross Country 



After ;i two year absence, cross cinintry retiirnefl tn the Hijrh Point 
Cnllejre cami)iis for the 196?^-64 season. Mike Sabino and Jack Warner were 
instrumental in leading the team to a 4-^^ seasiDi. Coach Bolj Davidson's 
Panther's picked up wins over Atlantic T'hi-istian, X. ('. State freshmen, 
and Pembroke. In the state cross country meet at RaleiKh Jack Wapner 
fini.shed llith, Grif Halthis 35th, and Tony Bnyles 49th out of 69 ii.])]->U- 
cants. Mike Sabinf) finished second and Jack Wagrner finished ninth in the 
10.000 Meter Road Race held in Lexint-'ton, Va. 



THE SCHEDl'LE 



Oct. 


18 


Oct. 


20 


Oct. 


22 


Oct. 


29 


Nov. 


4 


Nov, 


7 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


12 


Dec. 


8 



Atlantic Christian 

Wake Fore.st 

Pembroke 

N.C. State Frosh 

State Meet 

Atlantic Christian 

Pembroke 

Davidson 

10,UO0 Meter Race 



Hi^h Point \\\ ) 
Wiiistnn-Salem (L) 
Pembroke (L) 
Raleigh (W) 
Raleigh 
Wilson (W) 
Hifjh Point (W) 
Davidson (L) 
Lexington, Ta. 




left O. rijrht: Turn- Bovles, Griff Balthis. .Jack Waj^ner. Mike Cabinu, Davo 
Whitliitk, and Dave Yourif;. .U)S(^nt from picture: Marshal Hernandez, Bob Harris, and 

Jim Wilnioiit. 



lei 



Golf 



"^1 




fa^^ 



^:^*^fe^'si|. -^.t 




3 






Stan Kinney 



Stan Kinney antl Craven Ytmng — putting practice. 




i 




-1- 



<•■«, 




','(|j|^""4?'<^&v#', 



'WU 



Dick Olson 



Craven Yuunj 



182 



Golf 



Blair Park pro Johnny Ji>hnsoii will afrain 
serve as golf coach for the Panthers. Stan Kin- 
ney and Dick Olson are the mainstays of the 
team this year and will )>e looking: for help from 
Roger Watson, Dan Hammond, < 'raven Yonng 
and Bill Fanning. 




Johnny Johnson, Coach 




.^rtffi^ijji?' 



Lett to liijrhf: Dick Olson. Dan Hammond. Stun Kinney, Bhiii- Pavk, assistant coaeh 
Walt Snood, iuid Ciaven Vounfr. 



183 



Tennis 



-.f^tMt 





Coach Tom (Juinn 



Mike Roseniiiiukle 








I-arry Aiuuk 



Wayiit Fuiiiniii 



184 



Bowling 



For the second consecutive year Hi^h Point ColleKe represented Dis- 
tnct 26 in the NAIA National Bowling Tournament at Kansas Citv, Mo. 
The team paced 14th in the nation among small colleges after thhe threee 
day tot;ds were computed, Dave Fancher was High Point's top bowler as 
he converted 2208 pins for a 184 average. 

INDIVIDUAL AVERAGES 

pins average 

Dave Fancher 2208 184 

Joe Gosnell 2170 181 

Jim Brucki 2084 174 

Garland Kinnev 1522 169 

Charhe Miller 1500 167 

Kenny Deal 894 149 

TOP ir> COLLEGES 

1. Southwestern Louisiana State Lafayette, La. 

2. Pacific University Forest Grove, Ore, 

3. Pomona Colleg-e Claremont, Cal. 

4. William Jewell Collet^e Liberty, Mo. 

5. Indiana State College Terre Haute. Ind. 

6. Plattesville State College Platte.sville, Wis. 

7. David Lipscomb College Nashville, Tenn. 

8. St. Joseph's College Rensselaer. Ind. 

9. Kearnev State College Kearney, Neb. 

10. Detroit' Tech Detroit. Mich. 

11. Arkansas Tech Russeville. Ark. 

12. Christian Brothers College Memphis, Tenn. 

13. Black Hills Teachers College Black Hills, S. D. 

14. HIGH POINT (^OLLEGE HIGH POINT, N. C. 

15. Emporia State College Emporia, Kan. 




Front ro«: Garland Kinney, Charlie Miller, and Joe Gosnell. Back row: Kenny Deal, 
Jim Brucki, Dave Fancher, and -Mr. Xetts, 



185 



Intramurals 



The intramural department at Hiprh Point College is a division of the 
Health, Physical Education, and Athletic Department. This department 
promotes, furaishes equipment for, and supervises competition in various 
sports areas. All students and faculty members are encouraged to take 
part in the intramural projfram which has become an important part of 
the extra-curriculai" activity of the college. 

Intramural teams are composed of fraternities and independent teams, 
which enable each student enrolled at High Point College to participate in 
the inti'amui-al spoi-ts program, Bobby Davidson is Intramural Director. 




-it^*^ 



Delta Sips and l.aiiibda Cliis battle in football game. 



Even the girls play! 




Half-time strategy. 



First and ten. 



Life at High Point College 

There are many activities that take i)lace <in a cnllejre campiis-acadeniic, 
athletic, .social. This section of the yearbook is devotee? to portraying the 
many and vaiied asiK'cts of Hi^h Point Colle^re campns. It is intended to 
jjnitray, thronyh i)ictnro porti'aits, the typical school year at HP(.'. You 
have already seen the faculty, administration, classes, organizations, 
sports, Greeks, and campus (|ueens. Now, in an attempt to give yonr year- 
book a personality all its own, you shall see the more exciting aspects of 
the campus. Let us call this our "Iwhind-the scene" look at onr campus. 




Academics Stressed at H. P. C 



Studying- plays an important role in the life 
of a HPC student. He may spend huiP's pouring 
over a textbook, burn the midnight <iil for 
exams: bnt in the final analysis all this woi-k is 
worth the effort. 




189 



Every student hus an opportunity to partici- 
pate ill some type of recreation. It ma.\' just l>e 
getting: dunked in t lie creek. 





190 




Hi^^h Point College offei'^s its student many 
uppnrtunities to hear eminent speakers and lec- 
turers. This year we were fortunate to huve Dr. 
.Maitin Miuty, Finch lecturer, and Mr. Harry 
Hartron, pantomime.st. Needless to s;iy, every 
student always enjoys City-Colleye Day. 





191 



RVTGEp 



t-if^" 




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192 




>9i 





Winter cnme.s to the campus of ]iis;;h 
Point College and bi-injrs with it snow, 
snowball fights, Christmas d n i- ni jiar- 
ties, caroling, door decorations, and m<.>st 
important nt' all — Christmas Hnlidays, 




A 




195 



Students go to claiiCL's, ^L't Beanie tickets, ai'e awarded campus honors, 
seek job opportunities — why, even the professoi's take time out tn eat. 




196 






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A person's college life is filled with many exciting events. He listens to 
speakers, jnins in many activities, has a fnll social life, but the greatest 
event of all is — graduation. Each college student holds his breath until 
that final walk np the aisle, and maybe a teal' will fall in sadness fur 
all the ha]>!)y hours he is leavinji- behind. 



ENGLISH MOTOR 
CO., INC. 

Sales Service 

FORD, FORD TRUCK, FALCON, 

FAIRLANE & T-BIRD 

HEADQUARTERS 

201 E. Washington St. 

Phone 882-6848 
High Point, N. C. 



RATHSKELLER 

Where Good Friends Meet in a 

Pleasant Atmosphere 

High Point, North Carolina 

At 5 Points 



Compliments of 



NEILL PONTIAC, INC. 

902 N. Main Street 
High Point, North Carolina 



Compliments 

COCA-COLA PLANT 

South Main Street 
High Point, N, C. 



STEEL'S DINER 

Operated By Frond and Bunny Cochran 
At 5 Points 



FIVE POINT BARBER 
SHOP 

Manager Mr. Chapman 



HARRIS DRYCLEANING 
AND SHIRT SERVICE 

Next to Winn Dixie 

College Village Shopping Center 
Five Shirts Only One Dollar 

For Every $3,00 of Drycleaning 

the Customer will Receive One 

Silver Dollar 



200 




MILLER-JONES SHOES 

'We Corry all Styles in Men's and 

Ladies' Shoes for on and off 

campus/' 



TIP-TOP BAKERY 

Bread, Cakes, and Rolls 

Located between High Point 
and Greensboro 



MODEL BARBER SHOP 

325 N. Wrenn 
High Point, N, C. 



HUDSON'S PHILLIPS 66 STATION 

College Village 



HIGHLAND MOTORS, 
INC 

Cadillac 

Oldsmobile 

F-85 

805 N. Main St, 
High Point, N, C. 



MOBIL PAINT STORE 

"High Point's Color Center" 

Featuring a Complete Line 
of Mobil Finishes 

1645 English Road 





COLLEGE 


VILLAGE 




BARBER SHOP 




8-6 Men, 


thru Sat, 


C 


H. Word 


H. E. Durham 




C, B. Cecil 


L. 0, Poole 


H. 


D. Cecil 


C. J. Johnson 



201 




TO V\AORK FOR 

CONE... 



YOU'VE 
GOT TO BE 

SHARP! 



A company is only as good as the people who work for it. Cone Mills 
through its people has achieved an enviable position as a major producer 
of high quality textiles. To maintain this position Cone needs sharp 
young people with initiative and intelligence. Cone offers opportunities 
in four areas . . . production, administration, sales and research. 
Interested in joining this progressive organization? Write Industrial 
Relations Department, Cone Mills Corporation, Greensboro, N. C. 



CONE MILLS CORPORATION 

"Where fabrics of tomorrow are woven today." 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES 

Greensboro, N. C. 



FINISHING PLANTS 
Carlisle & Greenville, S. C. 
Greensboro & Haw River, N. C, 



MANUFACTURING PLAKTS— Awodale, Cliffside. Greensboro, Forest City, 

Salisbury, Pineville. Reidsville, Gibsonville, Haw River and Hillsboro in 
North Carolina. Greetiville in Sojth Carolina, 



202 




Compliments of 

MYRTLE DESK COMPANY 



FLI-BACK CORPORATION 



GRIFFITH OFFICE EQUIPMENT 



792 North Main 



Good Show Carol! 





now it^ Pepsi 

for those who think young 




0^ 

PEPSI-COLA 








203 



HARLLEE'S 

OF HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Compliments of 

SPORTSMAN'S SHOP, INC. 

College Villoge Shopping Center 



J. W. SECHREST & SON, 
INC. 

Serving This Community Since 1897 

Phone 882-2555 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

Two Oxygen Equipped Ambulances 

Day and Night 



HERITAGE* 

a living tradition in furinture 

HERtTAGE F(.RMTl-RF. CO ^ filGH PQiyT. SORTU CAROUSA 



LYLES CHEVROLET CO. 



"Your CHEVY Service Center" 



1800 North Mom Street 



RELIABLE CLEANERS 

1253 Montlieu At 5 Points 

One Hour Cleaning Any Time 

Sofurdoy Until Noon 

Phone 888-7229 



PITTSBURGH PLANT GLASS CO. 

101 South Homilton Street 

High Point, N, C. 

PAINT AND GLASS PRODUCTS 




HALL PRINTING COMPANY 

S. HAMILTON STREET HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 

Serving HIGH POINT and HIGH POINT COLLEGE with 

QUALITY PRINTING since 1924. 



204 




A good company to be insured in, 
and a good company to work for! 



Between High Point and Greensboro 



Tiobias 



Compliments of 

PIEDMONT SAVINGS & LOAN 

Main St., H[gh Point, N, C. 



W. F. MAULDIN, INC. 

Buick Special, Le Sabre, 

InvictQ, Electro, Riviera 

819 N. Main St. High Point, N C. 




MITCHELL ESSO SERVICE 

MOO E. Lexington Ave 
"We're Hoppy To Serve You" 



Compliments of 



HORACE G. ILDERTON, INC. 

701-709 S. Moirv St. 
High Point, N. C^ 



Compliments of 

THE LILLY COMPANY 

High Point 




205 



A FRIEND 



Compliments of 



HUNTER & CO. 



VICK 


PAINT 


& 




WALLPAPER 


CO. 




Phone 882-8425 


Phone 882-0029 


1 13-1 15 E. Commerce, Higf 


1 Point, N. 


C. 


Paint - Wallpaper - Art 


Supplies 





Compliments of 

CAROLINA CONTAINER 
CO. 




206 




ROSE'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

At The New South Gate Shopping Center 
1628 South Main 



r 



Compliments of 



ADAMS -MILLIS 




STUTTS MEN'S STORE 

1 26 South Moin Str-eet 
Style Clothes for the College Mon 



JL' JEWELERS 



Just Moved to 124 South Main 



207 



Compliments of 

GILBERT'S 

Beoutiful Shoe Line Since 1936 











e|m 


ElectroMechanics 


1 

High Point, North Corolino 



Urn 


m Wmmt Em'^.m^ lm\m ^mw^ism- 




Estoblished 1905 




Huin Point, XoHTii (.ak^oijxa 




Member Federol Deposit Insurance Corporotion 



to Coait 







mRrA 



ZAI SOUTH MAIN STREET 

1530 North Main Street 
1310 North Centennial 



DICK CULLER'S INC. 

!42 Church Street 

Complete Campus Wear 

Sports - Dress and Formal Wear 



i%ORTH 






CAROLIIMA 


l\ATIOI\AL 


^,^rt^. 


HIGH POINT, N. C. 


BAIVK 


-^S^fB^' 



^^ 



iabri 



cs.ina 



1937 W. Green Dr. 



High Point, N. C. 



BEESON HARDWARE CO. 

High Point's Sporting Goods 
Heodquorters 




The book takes its toll! 



208 



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PRINTING COMPANV • CNarl^tl 



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