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Full text of "1965 condensed insecticide recommendations"

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no. 899 
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^^M6S €ondensed 

Insecticide 
Recommendations 



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CI RCULATING COPY 
AGRICULTURE LIBRARY 



Insects and related pests play a major role in field 
crop production in Illinois. Although normal agro- 
nomic practices developed during the past century 
have reduced the importance of many insect pests, 
chinch bugs, grasshoppers, armyworms, aphids, 
white grubs, wireworms, cutworms, and many other 
native insects have continued to be threats to grain 
and forage production. These native pests have 
been joined by such aliens as the European corn 
borer, Japanese beetle, alfalfa weevil, spotted alfalfa 
aphid, southwestern corn borer, sweet clover weevil, 
and others. Without the use of the modern insecti- 
cides, these pests would seriously hamper economi- 
cal production by Illinois farmers and harvests 
would be much less bountiful. Weather variations 
from year to year greatly affect insect populations, 
but annually Illinois farmers reap more than 20 
millions dollars profit from the use of insecticides to 
control field crop pests. 

Financial gain from use of insecticides has not 
been the only compensation. Use of modern insecti- 
cides reduces stalk breakage and lodging from insect 
damage. This possibly has reduced the incidence of 
clogged pickers and accidents. Proper use of insec- 
ticides has also greatly reduced the need for replant- 
ing. Thus proper use of insecticides is an integral 
part of our farming business. 

However, those using insecticides should apply 
all the scientific knowledge available to insure that 
there will be no illegal residue on the marketed 
crop. Such knowledge is condensed on the label. 
Read it carefully and follow the instructions. But 
the label should be recent and not from a container 
several years old. Do not exceed maximum rates 
recommended; observe carefully the interval be- 
tween application and harvest; and apply only to 
crops for which use has been approved. Make a 



record of the product used, the trade name, the per- 
centage content of the insecticide, dilution, rate of 
application per acre, and the date or dates of appli- 
cation. 

Some of the insecticides recommended in this 
publication can be poisonous to the applicator. The 
farmer is expected to protect himself, his workers, 
and his family from undue or needless exposure. 

The chemical names used in these tables may be 
unfamiliar to you. These names are the common 
coined chemical names and as such are not capital- 
ized. Trade names are capitalized. In the table of 
limitations the common names are listed first. 
Should the trade name be more commonly used, 
it is in parentheses following the common name. 
Throughout the tables of recommendations, how- 
ever, the common name is used if there is one. In 
case of question, refer to the table of limitations. 

Recommendations sometimes change during the 
growing season. These recommendations are printed 
only once each year and are therefore subject to 
change without notification. 

These recommendations were prepared by ento- 
mologists of the University of Illinois College of 
Agriculture and the Illinois Natural History Sur- 
vey and replace mimeographs NHE 98 through 101. 

Descriptions of specific insects, their life history, 
biology, and cultural control methods are available. 
These are designated in the tables with NHE num- 
bers, and can be obtained from the county farm 
adviser or by writing to 280 Natural Resources 
Building, Urbana, Illinois. 

Insecticide recommendations for vegetable crops 
(Circular 897), for livestock and livestock barns 
(Circular 898), and for the homeowner (Circular 
900) can also be obtained from the above offices or 
from the College of Agriculture, Urbana. 



CIRCULAR 899 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
In cooperation with ILLINOIS NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY 



COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE 
Urbana, Illinois, January, 1965 



SPECIAL RECOMMENDATION CHANGES FOR 1965 



We are recommending a conservative insecticide policy 
for Illinois dairy farmers. Certain chlorinated hydro- 
carbon insecticides are secreted in the butterfat when 
dairy cattle are exposed to minute amounts of them; 
fantastically small amounts of these insecticides can be 
chemically detected; the tolerance for insecticides in milk 
is zero. Therefore we recommend that the Illinois dairy 
farmer control insects with insecticides which, even 
though ingested in moderate amounts by dairy cows, are 
not secreted in the milk; we recommend that in 1965 he 
not use the chlorinated hydrocarbons, aldrin, dieldrin, 
DDT, heptachlor, lindane, or toxaphene except for corn 
seed treatment. If these insecticides are applied as foliage 
sprays or dusts immediately adjacent to dairy pasture or 
forage crops, those using them must exercise great care to 
avoid drift. 

Furthermore we urge each dairy farmer purchasing 
ensilage corn, other forage, or feed to determine whether 
an objectionable residue is present. Contaminated feed 
should not be fed to dairy cattle. In addition, dairymen 
should not apply chlorinated hydrocarbons in dairy build- 
ings or barns or on cattle. 

This step is not needed to protect public health nor 
to satisfy legal requirements, both of which are currently 
being met by Illinois dairymen. However, during the 
past two years occasional accidents, excessive drift, or 
misuse of these insecticides in other states has led to vol- 
untary dumping of milk which was followed by unwar- 
ranted and unfavorable publicity for the entire dairy 
industry. These accidents and much of this unfavorable 
publicity can be avoided by adopting a policy that will 



enable Illinois dairymen to continue to produce a whole- 
some, nutritious, and legal product. 

Dairy farmers should realize the impact these recom- 
mendations will have on their insect control practices. 
The insecticides recommended to replace the chlorinated 
hydrocarbons often may be more expensive, more dif- 
ficult to apply, and more dangerous to the applicator, and 
may provide less effective insect control. Even though 
these chlorinated hydrocarbons have label clearance for 
certain uses on dairy farms, we are currently recommend- 
ing their discontinuance by dairy farmers to prevent any 
accidental contamination of milk. 

Resistant northern corn rootworms have been present 
in Illinois for at least three years. However, we do not 
recommend that Illinois farmers change their soil insecti- 
cide practice because of them. If you have grown corn 
for 8 or 10 years in succession in a field, if you have used 
soil insecticides almost every year, if the corn lodged in 
August, and if there were lots of green beetles in the 
fresh silks, you may have resistant northern corn root- 
worm. In this case, plant some other crop in the field for 
two years. If this is not feasible and corn is to be planted, 
then use one of the recommended phosphates. For these 
fields we recommend that an application of II/2 pounds 
per acre of aldrin or heptachlor be broadcast and disked 
in before planting to control the entire complex of soil 
insects. However, only a very small percentage of Illinois 
farmers will find it necessary to make these two applica- 
tions. Most will find that only aldrin or heptachlor is 
necessary to control soil insects. This statement does not 
apply to the dairyman, as indicated above. 



DOSAGE RATES FOR SOME COMMON INSECTICIDE FORMULATIONS 



Insecticide 



Formulation 



Use following fraction of gallon or lb. of granules or powder per acre to get indicated 

pounds of active ingredient: 



(pounds of active ingredient) 
V2 H 



\V. 



20% aldrin 


granules 






2.5 lb. . 


5 1b. 


7.5 lb. 


10 1b. 


5% carbaryl 


If 






... 


20 


30 


40 


5% DDT 


>« 






10 ] 


[5 lb. 20 


30 


40 


14% diazinon 


»» 






... 


7 


10.5 


14 


10% dithiodemeton 


II 






5 


10 


. . . 




20% heptachlor 


It 






2.5 


5 


7.5 


10 


10% parathion 


II 






5 


10 






10% phorate 


II 






5 


10 






80% carbaryl 


powder 








IMlb. 


IJ^lb. 


2Hlb. 


50% diazinon 


II 








2 


3 


4 


25% Guthion 


II 






2 lb. 


4 






25% aldrin 


concentrate 






34 gal. . 


¥2 gal. 


Mgal. 


Igal. 


46% carbophenothion 


II 






... 


y% 




. . . 


25%, DDT 


II 






M 


K 


% 


1 


26% derneton 


II 




Vn gal. 


y% gal. M 


. . . 


. . . 


. . . 


18.6% dieldrin 


II 


^4 gal. . 




% 






. . . 


25% heptachlor 


II 






M 


Vi 


M 


1 


50-57% malathion 


11 






... 


K 


. . . 


. . . 


25% methoxychlor 


II 






M 


H 


% 


1 


25% naled 


II 






. . . 


y% H 


. . . 


. . . 


25% parathion 


II 




.. 3^ M . 


. . . 


. . . 




60% toxaphene 


II 








. . . 


M 









KEEP A RECORD OF WHAT YOU DO 






Crop and stage 
of growth 


Insecticide 


Trade name 


Active 
ingredient 


Total 

amount 

used 


Date 
of 

application 


Date 

of 

harvest 


Other information 



































































































































































LIMITATIONS IN DAYS BETWEEN APPLICATION OF THE INSECTICIDE AND HARVEST OF THE CROP 
AND OTHER RESTRICTIONS ON THE USE OF INSECTICIDES FOR FIELD CROP INSECT CONTROL 

(Blanks in the table denote that the material is not recommended for that specific use in Illinois) 







Field 


corn 






- 




Forage crops 








Seed and soil 


Grain 


Ensilage 


Stover 


Alfalfa 


Clover 


Pasture 




Seed 


aldrin 


A 
























carbaryl (Sevin) 


• . . 































DDT 


. . . 


A 


D 




D 




. . . 


. . . 










demeton (Systox)^ 


. . . 


. . . 






. . 




21,E 


21, E 




21,E 




21,E 


diazinon 


A 





10 




10 




10 


10 




2 




10 


dieldrin 


A 


60 


D 




D 
















dithiodemeton (Di-Syston)' 


100 


. . . 


. . . 




, , 






. . . 




. . . 






Guthion^ 


. . . 


. . . 






. . 




21,E 


21,E 




. . . 




21,E 


heptachlor 


A 


. . . 










. . . 


. . . 




. . . 




. ■ . 


malathion 


. . . 


5 


5 




5 




















methoxychlor 


. . . 


. . . 


. . . 




. . 




7 


7 




7 




7 


naled (Dibrom) 


. . . 


. . . 


. . . 




. . 




4 


4 




4 




4 


parathion^ 


A 


12 


12 




12 




. . . 


. . . 




. . . 




. . . 


phorate (Thimet)^ 


A 


B 


B 




B 




. . . 


. . . 




. . . 




. . . 


toxaphene 




A 


C 




C 














D 




Barley 


Oats 




- 


Rye 


Wheal 


t 




Soybeans 




Grain 


Straw 


Grain Straw 


Grain 


Straw 


Grain Straw 


Forage 


Grain 


carbaryl (Sevin) 


F 


F 


F 


F 




F 


F 


F 


F 










carbophenothion (Trithion)^ 


. . . 


. . . 


. . . 
















D 


7 


demeton (Systox)* 


45,G 


21,G 


45,G 


21,G 








45, G 


21,G 


. 






dieldrin 


7 


D 


7 


D 




7 


D 


7 


D 




D 


35,E 


dithiodemeton (Di-Syston)^ 




. . . 








. . . 


. . . 


. . . 


H 


. 


. . 


. . . 


parathion^ 


15 


15 


15 


15 




. . . 




15 


15 


. 


. . 


. . . 


phorate (Thimet)* 


. . . 


. . . 


. . . 










. . . 


H 


. 






toxaphene 


14,E 


D 


7,E 


D 




7,E 


D 


7,E 


D 




D 


A 



1. Except as granules, to be applied only by experienced operators D. 

wearing proper protective clothing. 

A. No specific restriction when used as recommended. E. 

B. Do not apply if soil application was used. Otherwise apply be- F. 

fore tassel stage. G. 

C. Do not feed treated forage to dairy animals. Do not feed 

sprayed forage or granular-treated corn silage to livestock H, 

fattening for slaughter nor granular-treated stover within 28 
days of slaughter. 



Do not feed treated forage to dairy animals or livestock fatten- 
ing for slaughter. 

Once per cutting. 

Not after boot stage. 

Apply no more than twice per season with at least 14 days be- 
tween applications. 

Do not graze treated wheat. 



FIELD CORN 



Insects 


Time of 
attack 


Insecticide 


Lb. active 
ingredient per acre 


Placement 


Timing of application 


Seed corn maggot 
Seed corn beetle 
(NHE-27) 


At germination 


dieldrin 
heptachlor 


Follow manu- 
facturer's directions 


On seed 


Protects seed only. Use with resistant 
rootworm soil treatment. 


Southern and June-August 
northern corn 
rootworm (NHE-26) 


aldrin^ 
heptachlor^ 


1 in row 
1}4 broadcast 
same as aldrin 


In soil 
In soil 


To control soil insect complex. If broad- 
cast, work into soil immediately. 



Resistant corn June-August 



rootworm' 



diazinon granules 1 

dithiodemeton granules 1 

parathion granules 1 

phorate granules 1 



Soil surface Apply as 7-inch band on soil immediately 
ahead of press wheel. 



VVireworm 
(NHE-43) 



White grub 
(NHE-23) 



May-July 



May-October heptachlor^ 



aldrin^ 1 in row In soil 

1 14 broadcast or 
3 on peat soils or if 
many large worms are present 

Same as aldrin In soil 



If broadcast, work into soil immediately. 
1}4 lb. kills only small ones. 



Grape colaspis 
(NHE-25) 



May -July 



As for rootworm; broadcast preferred. 



Sod webworm 
(NHE-42) 



May-June 



carbaryl 
DDT' 



1 



At base of 
plant 



At time of initial attack. 



Cutworm May-June Broadcast preplant soil treatment of aldrin' or heptachlor' preferred as preventive. 

(NHE-38) carbaryl 2 -^t base When damage is first seen; use 50-100 

dieldrin' \4 °^ plant gal. of finished spray per acre. 

toxaphene' 3 



Grasshopper 
(NHE-74) 



June- 
September 



carbaryl 

diazinon 

dieldrin' 

malathion 

toxaphene' 



M. 
1 

1^ 



On entire As needed. For ensilage corn use diazi- 

plant non, malathion, or carbar>'l. 



Flea beetle 
(NHE-36) 


May- June 


carbaryl 
toxaphene' 


1^ 


Over row 


When damage becomes apparent on small 
corn. 


Armyworm 
(NHE-21) 


May- June 


carbaryl 
toxaphene' 


1^ 


Over row 


At first migration or when damage first 
becomes apparent. 


Fall armyworm 
(NHE-34) 


June; August- 
September 


carbaryl granules 
toxaphene' granules 


W2 


In whorls 


Granules preferred for whorl. When silk- 
ing (see earworm). 


Chinch bug 

(NHE-35) 


June-August 


carbaryl 
dieldrin' 


1 

y2 


At base 
of plant 


At beginning of migration. Also apply 
strip in adjacent grain. 


Thrips (NHE-39) 


June 


carbaryl 


1 


As foliage 
spray 


When severe wilting and discoloration 
are noticed. 


Corn leaf aphid 
(NHE-29) 


July- 
September 


malathion 
parathion' 
phorate granules 


1 
1 


As foliage 
spray 

In whorl 


Pretassel when aphids are thick on occa- 
sional plants. 

Pretassel 


Corn borer, 
first generation 


June-July 


carbaryl granules 
DDT granules' 
diazinon granules 


W2 

1 


On upper 3^ 
of plant and 
into whorl 


When tassel ratio is 30 to 50, and 75% 
or more plants show recent borer feeding 
in whorl. 


Corn borer, 
second generation 


Mid-August 


carbaryl 

DDT' 

diazinon 


As for first 
generation 


From ear 
upward 


At first hatch when there are 1 or more 
egg masses per plant. 


Corn earworm 
(NHE-33) 


July-August 


carbaryl spray 


IK 


In ear zone, 
seed corn only 


2 to 4 applications at 3- to 5-day intervals, 
starting at 10% silk. 25 gal. of finished 
spray per acre. 



* Not for use on dairy farms. If for foliage application adjacent to dairy pasture or hay crop, avoid drift. 

' Dairy farmers should use these materials in 1965 for soil insect control although they are not as effective as aldrin or heptachlor. 

' To be applied only by experienced operators or those wearing protective clothing. 



SOYBEANS 



Insect 


Time of 
attack 


Insecticide 


Lb. active 
ingredient per acre 


Placement 


Timing of application 


Bean leaf beetle 
(NHE-67) 


May-June, 
August 


carbaryl 
toxaphene^ 


1 


On foliage 


When leaf feeding becomes severe, but 
before plants killed and pods eaten. 


Clover root 
curculio adult 
(NHE-71) 


May- June 


carbaryl 
toxaphene^ 


1 


On marginal 
rows 


When clover is plowed up, beetles mi- 
grate to adjacent beans. 


Grasshopper 
(NHE-74) 


June- 
September 


carbaryl 
dieldrin^ 
toxaphene* 


Ms 
IK 


On foliage 


When migration from adjacent crops be- 
gins. 


Flea beetle 


May- June 


carbaryl 
toxaphene^ 


1 

IK 


On foliage 


Seedlings usually attacked. Treat when 
needed. 


Green clover 
worm (NHE-75) 


August 


carbaryl 
toxaphene^ 


1 

tK 


On foliage 


When damage appears and small worms 
are numerous. 


Webworm 
(NHE-42) 


June-August 


carbaryl 
toxaphene^ 


1 

IK 


On foliage 


When damage appears and small worms 
are numerous. 


Mites 


June-August 


carbophenothion^ 


% 


On foliage 


As needed on field margins and entire 
field. 



' Not for use on dairy farms. If for foliage application to fields adjacent to dairy pasture or hay crop, avoid drift. 
' To be applied only by experienced operators or those wearing protective clothing. 



STORED GRAIN (Com, Wheat, and Oats) 



Insect 



Time of 
attack 



Insecticide^ 
and dilution 



Dosage 



Placement 



Suggestions 



Angoumois grain 
moth (earcorn) 
(NHE-62) 



April-October 
(Southern K of 
Illinois) 



malathion 57% 
E.G., 3 oz. per 
gal. water 



Apply to runoff 



Spray surface 
and sides in 
April and 
August 



Plant tight husk varieties. Shelled corn 
is not affected by Angoumois moth. 



Meal moths and April-October 
surface infestations 
only (NHE-63) 



malathion 1.0% 
dust 

malathion 57% 
E.G., 3 oz. per 
gal. water 



30 lb. per 1000 sq. 

ft. 

2 gal. per 1000 sq. 

ft. 



Spray or dust Glean and spray bin before storage. Do 
on surface not harvest grain until moisture is safe 

for storage. 



General 

Internal and ex- 
ternal feeders 
(NHE-64, 65) 
Rice and granary 
weevils 

Flat grain beetle 
Saw-toothed 
grain beetle 
Rusty grain beetle 
Foreign grain beetle 
Gadelle beetle 
Flour beetle 



April-October malathion 1.0% 40-60 lb. per 



dust 

malathion 57% 
E.G., 1 pt. per 
3-5 gal. water 



1000 bu. 

3-5 gal. per 1000 

bu. 



Spray or dust 
uniformly as 
grain is 
binned 



Glean and spray bin before storage. Do 
not harvest grain until moisture is safe 
for storage. 



liquid fumigant 



3-5 gal. per 1000 
bu. 



On surface; Glean and spray bin before storage. Do 
repeat if nee- not harvest grain until moisture is safe 
essary for storage. Use surface treatment of 

malathion as recommended for meal 

moths. 



* Use only "premium grade" malathion on grain. Malathion vaporizes and is lost rapidly when grain is heat-dried. 
Note : E.C. = emulsion concentrate. 



SMALL GRAINS 



Insect 


Time of 
attack 


Insecticide 


Lb. active 
ingredient per acre 


Placement 


Timing of application 


Grasshopper 
(NHE-74) 


June-August 


carbaryl 
dieldrin* 
toxaphene^ 






On entire 
plant 


Control early while grasshoppers are 
small and before they scatter over a wide 
area. 


Chinch bug 
(NHE-35) 


June-July 


carbaryl 
dieldrin' 




H 


At ground 
and base of 
stalk 


Treat strip in grain to protect corn from 
migrating bugs. 


Armyworm 
(NHE-21) 


May- June 


carbarj'l 
toxaphene^ 




IH 


On foliage 


When worms are still small and before 
damage is done. 


Greenbug 


May-June 


demeton^ 
parathion^ 






On foliage 


When needed. 


Hessian fly 


Sept. -October; 

April-May 


dithiodemeton 
phorate 




^ 
M 


In drill row 


5 lb. of 10% granules at seeding with a 
grass-seeder attachment. For susceptible 
varieties seeded early in fall. 



' Not for use on dairy farms. If for foliage application to fields adjacent to dairy pasture or hay crop, avoid drift. 
' To be applied only by experienced operators or those wearing protective clothing. 



CLOVER AND ALFALFA 



Insect 



Time of 
attack 



Lb. active 
Insecticide ingredient per acre Placement 



Timing of application 



On foliage When 50% of tips are being skeletonized 

second growth may need protection. 



Alfalfa weevil 



April-June 



diazinon 


1 


Guthion^ 


H 


malathion 


1 


methoxychlor 


IH 



Clover leaf 
weevil (NHE-12) 


March-April 


malathion 


1 


On foliage 


When larvae are numerous and damage 
is noticeable, usually early to mid-April. 


Spittlebug 
(NHE-13) 


Late April, 
early May 


methoxychlor 


1 


On foliage 


When bugs begin to hatch and tiny spit- 
tle masses are found in crowns of plants. 


Aphid 

(NHE-14 and 19) 


April-May 


demeton^ 

diazinon 

malathion 


1 


On foliage 


When aphids are becoming abundant. 


Leafhopper 
(NHE-22) 


Early July 


carbaryl 
methoxychlor 


1 
1 


On foliage 


When second-growth alfalfa is 1 to 6 in- 
ches high, or as needed. 


Garden webworm 
(NHE-42) 


July-August 


carbaryl 
toxaphene^ 


1 


On foliage 


When first damage appears. Use toxa- 
phene only on new fall seedlings, not for 
hay or grazing. 


Cutworm 
(NHE-77) 


April-June 


carbaryl 


IK 


On foliage 


Cut, remove hay, and spray immediately. 


Armyworm 
(NHE-21) 


May- June, 
September 


carbaryl 
malathion 


1 


On foliage 


Only when grasses are abundant. 


Seed crop insects 
(NHE-68 and 73) 


July-August 


toxaphene' 


13^ 


On foliage 


No later than 10% bloom. 



Grasshopper 
(NHE-74) 


June- 
September 


carbar>'l 
diazinon 


% 
Yi 






malathion 


1 






naled 


Vx 



On foliage When grasshoppers are small and before 

damage is severe. 



Sweet clover April-May toxaphene' 

weevil (NHE-15) 



\y2 On foliage When 50% of foliage has been eaten. New 

seedlings only. Observe small-grain re- 
strictions. 



' Not for use on dairy farms. If for foliage application to fields adjacent to dairy pasture or hay crop, avoid drift. 
' To be applied only by experienced operators or those wearing protective clothing. 



FOR YOUR PROTECTION: Always handle insecticides with respect. The persons 
most likely to suffer ill effects from insecticides are the applicator and his family. Ac- 
cidents and careless, needless overexposure can be avoided. Here are a few rules that 
if followed will prevent most insecticide accidents: 

1. Wear rubber gloves when handling insecticide concentrates. 

2. Do not smoke while handling or using insecticides. 

3. Keep your face turned to one side when opening insecticide containers. 

4. Leave unused insecticides in their original containers with the labels on them. 

5. Store insecticides out of reach of children, irresponsible persons, or animals; store prefer- 
ably in a locked cabinet. 

6. Wash out and bury or burn empty insecticide containers. 

7. Do not put the water-supply hose directly into the spray tank. 

8. Do not blow out clogged nozzles or spray lines with your mouth. 

9. Wash with soap and water exposed parts of body and clothes contaminated with insecti- 
cide. 

10. Do not leave puddles of spray on impervious surfaces. 

11. Do not apply to fish-bearing or other water supplies. 

12. Do not apply insecticides, except in an emergency, to areas with abundant wildlife. 

13. Do not apply insecticides near dug wells or cisterns. 

14. Do not spray when weather conditions favor drift. 

15. Observe all precautions listed on the label. 



i 



Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics: University of Illinois, College of Agriculture, and the United States Department of 
Agriculture cooperating. lOUIS B. HOWARD, Director. Act approved by Congress May 8 and June 30, 1914. 



f 



22M—1-6S— 85031 

SM— 3-65— 85994 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 

Q.630.7IL6C COOS 

CIRCULAR URBANA. ILL. 
899 REV. 1965 




019541090