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Full text of "Calendar : meeting of Budget Committee, Board of Supervisors, City and County of San Francisco"

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Or DOCUMENTS DEPT. 

MINUTES 

h>QO,Oy AUG2 7 1QQ6 

REGULAR MEETING Q . M rn 

/// BUDGET COMMITTEE 
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
O / / / CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

WEDNESDAY. MARCH 1. 1995 - 1:00 P.M. ROOM 410, WAR MEMORIAL BLDG. 

MEMBERS: SUPERVISORS HSIEH, KAUFMAN, BIERMAN 
CLERK: GREGOIRE HOBSON 

TIME MEETING CONVENED: 1:15 P.M. 

GENERAL MATTERS 



File 97-94-77 . [Franchise Application Fee] Ordinance amending Administrative 
Code by adding Article 4, Section 11.75, to require franchise applicants to pay a fee 
to defray the City's costs of evaluating the application. (Supervisor Bierman) 

SPEAKERS: None: 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDMENT OF THE WHOLE BEARING SAME 
TITLE PRESENTED IN COMMITTEE BY SUPERVISOR BIERMAN. 
ADOPTED. AMENDMENT OF THE WHOLE RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



File 101-94-49 . [Appropriation, Municipal Court] Ordinance appropriating 
$418,502, Municipal Court, of State authorized Special Revenue Funds for 
professional services to allow the Trial Courts to upgrade computer equipment for 
fiscal year 1994-95. RO #94152. (Controller) 

(Consideration continued from 1/25/95) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MARCH 8, 1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



3 1223 05718 3569 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 2 



3. File 101-94-54 . [Appropriation, War Memorial] Ordinance appropriating $73,520, 
War Memorial, from the General Fund Reserve for other non-personal services to 
allow the Real Estate Department to provide security services for Fiscal Year 
1994-95. (Controller) RO #94161 

(Consideration continued for 2/8/95) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MARCH 8, 1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

4. File 101-94-5 8. [Appropriation, Police Department] Ordinance appropriating 
$1,921,844, Police Department, from the General Fund Reserve, for salaries, fringe 
benefits, other non-personal services, materials and supplies and services of other 
departments, and rescinding $200,000 from Court overtime to increase staffing for 
fiscal year 1994-95. (RO #94173) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Ed Harrington, Controller. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

(Consideration continued from 2/8/95) 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MARCH 8, 1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

5. File 101-94-60 . [Appropriation, Dept. of Parking and Traffic] Ordinance 
appropriating $120,000, Department of Parking and Traffic, of Parking Revenue 
Funds, to a Capital Improvement Project (soil remediation at St. Mary's Square 
Garage), for fiscal year 1994-95. RO #94147 (Controller) 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. 
IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



7 45243 SFPL: ECONO JRS 
206 SFPL 11/22/00 41 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 3 



6. File 101-94-61 . [Appropriation, Dept. of Parking and Traffic] Ordinance 
appropriating $173,610, Department of Parking and Traffic, of Parking Revenue 
Funds to a Capital Improvement Project (Polk-Bush Garage architectural services 
and construction), for fiscal year 1994-95; providing for ratification of action 
previously taken. RO #94051 (Controller) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MARCH 8, 1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

7. File 101-94-62 . [Appropriation, Board of Supervisors] Ordinance appropriating 
$25,000, Board of Supervisors, from the General Reserve Fund to an Election Task 
Force Project, for fiscal year 1994-95 (Implement Proposition L.) RO #94177 
(Controller) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

8. File 101-94-63 . [Appropriation, Board of Supervisors] Ordinance appropriating 
$100,000, Board of Supervisors, from the General Fund Reserve for services of City 
Attorney's Office to provide support while developing Charter Reform for fiscal 
year 1994-95. RO #94179 (Controller) 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. 
IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. Add a 
Section 2 providing for ratification of action previously taken. 
AMENDED TITLE: "Appropriating $100,000 from the General Fund 
Reserve for services of the City Attorney's Office to provide the Board 
of Supervisors with support while developing Charter Reform for fiscal 
year 1994-95; providing for ratification of action previously taken." 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 4 



9. File 101-94-64 . [Appropriation, Police, $332,000, Semi- Automatics] Ordinance 
appropriating $332,600, Police Department, for materials and supplies and 
equipment (to purchase semi-automatic handguns, ammunition and a firearms 
training simulator). (Supervisors Kaufman, Bierman) 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. 
IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. (Add Supervisor Bierman as 
co-sponsor.) TO BOARD MEETING OF MARCH 13, 1995. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

10. File 101-94-65 . [Appropriation, Chief Administrative Officer] Ordinance 
appropriating $53,700, Chief Administrative Officer, from General Fund Reserve 
for salaries and fringe benefits for fiscal year 1994-95; placing $53,700 on reserve; 
(estimate of vested vacation and sick pay for the Chief Administrative Officer). 
(Controller) RO #94163 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. 
IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 

Reduce appropriation to $46,089. AMENDED TITLE: Appropriating 
$46,089, Chief Administrative Officer, from General Fund Reserve for 
salaries and fringe benefits for fiscal year 1994-95; placing $46,089 on 
reserve; (estimate of vested vacation and sick, pay for the Chief 
Administrative Officer)." 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

11. File 101-94-66 . [Appropriation, Department of Human Resources] Ordinance 
appropriating $182,885, Department of Human Resources, from the General Fund 
reserve for salaries, fringe benefits and equipment to create three (3) positions to 
support the Workers' Compensation Program for fiscal year 1994-95. 
(COMPANION TO THE FOLLOWING FILE) (Controller) RO #94164 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MARCH 8, 1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 5 



12. File 102-94-11 . [Public Employment, Department of Human Resources] Ordinance 
amending Ordinance No. 293-94 (Annual Salary Ordinance 1994/95) reflecting the 
addition for three positions (Classification 1444 Secretary 1, 1652 Senior 
Accountant and 1864 Sr. Systems and Procedures Analyst) in the Department of 
Human Resources, Workers' Compensation Division. (Department of Human 
Resources) (COMPANION TO THE PRECEDING FILE) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MARCH 8, 1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

13. File 101-94-68 . [Appropriation, Airports] Ordinance appropriating $26,000,000, 
Airports, from Airport Revenue Bond proceeds to Capital Improvement Projects to 
refund San Francisco Airport, Improvement Corporation Bonds as part of the 
Airport's purchase of American Airline's Superbay Hanger for fiscal year 1994-95. 
(Controller) RO #94180 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. 
IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

14. File 101-94-69 . [Appropriation, Department of Public Health] Ordinance 
appropriating $180,000, Department of Public Health, Mental Health Center, of 
Medi-Cal revenue and $220,000 from the General Fund Reserve to salaries, fringe 
benefits, professional and non-personal services, materials and supplies and services 
to continue services at the Center for Special Problems in fiscal year 1994-95; 
providing for ratification of action previously taken. (Supervisor Bierman) RO 
#94181 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATrVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Monique Zmuda, Department of Public Health, Mental Health. IN 
SUPPORT: J. Berger. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 

Reduce General Fund Reserve to $193,577; Short-Doyle Medi-Cal to 
$158,382; Permanent Salaries to $186,329; Mandatory Fringe Beneifts to 
$46,582; Other Non-Personal Services to $61,605 and Materials and 
Supplies to $1,943. AMENDED TITLE: "Appropriating $158,382 of 
Medi-Cal revenue and $193,577 from the General Fund Reserve to 
salaries, fringe benefits, professional and non-personal services, 
materials and supplies and services of other departments to allow the 
Department of Mental Health to continue services at the Center for 
Special Problems in fiscal year 1994-95; providing for ratification of 
action previously taken." 

(Supervisor Bierman requested to added as sponsor.) 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 6 



15. File 101-94-33.1 . [Appropriation, District Attorney] Ordinance appropriating 
$496,889, from the General Fund Reserve for salaries, fringe benefits and training 
to address underfunding in the District Attorney's Office for fiscal year 1994-95. 
Providing for ratification of action previously taken; subject of previous budgetary 
denial. (Supervisor Alioto) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Ed Harrington, Controller. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 

Reduce appropriation to $200,00. AMENDED TITLE: "Appropriating 
$200,000, from the General Fund Reserve for salaries, fringe benefits 
and training to address underfunding in the District Attorney's Office 
for fiscal year 1994-95. Providing for ratification of action previously 
taken; subject of previous budgetary denial." 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

16. File 216-95-1 . [Final Negative Declaration, 1003 Turk Street] Resolution adopting 
Final Negative Declaration, finding and determining that the new 911 Emergency 
Dispatch Center for the property located at 1003 Turk Street in the Margaret S. 
Hay ward Playground, Assessor's Block 759, Lot 1, will have no significant impact on 
the environment, and adopting and incorporating findings of Final Negative 
Declaration. (Real Estate Department) (COMPANION MEASURE TO FILE 
216-95-1.1.) (Also see File 223-94-2.) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Rudolf Nothenberg, Chief 
Administrative Officer; Phil Arnold Deputy Director, Recreation and Park 
Department; Steve Luke, SF Police Department; Ted Lakey, Deputy City Attorney. 
IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: Lee Gerdes, St. Paul's Community Organizing 
Project; Nicolas Dillard, Jr.; Raymond S. Brown, Pres., Bethel Housing Corp.; Rev. 
Boyd, Bethel AME Church; Carl S. Anderson, Bethel AME Church. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO THE CALL OF 
THE CHAIR. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 7 



17. File 216-95-1.1 . [Emergency Communications Center, 1003 Turk Street] 
Ordinance selecting and setting aside certain real property at 1003 Turk Street in 
the Margaret S. Hayward Playground, Assessor's Block 759, Lot 1, for the 
construction and operation of a new Combined Emergency Communications Center; 
adopting findings that such project is in conformity with the Master Plan and 
consistent with the Eight Priority Policies of City Planning Code Section 101.1.; 
and adopting and incorporating findings pursuant to the California Environment 
Quality Act. (Real Estate Department) (COMPANION MEASURE TO FILE 
216-95-1.) (Also see File 223-94-2.) 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO THE CALL OF 
THE CHAIR. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

18. File 185-95-1 . [Children's Services Plan, 1995-1996] Resolution approving the 
Children's Services Plan (CSP) for the San Francisco Children's Fund in accordance 
with Charter Section 6.415. (Supervisors Shelley, Alioto) 

SPEAKERS: ELECTED OFFICIAL: Supervisor Kevin Shelley. DEPARTMENTAL 
REPRESENTATIVES: Anthony Lincoln, Director, Mayor's Office of Children, 
Youth and Families; Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. IN SUPPORT: Noel Day, Pres., 
POLARIS Research and Development; Norma Tecson, Filpino Youth Service 
Program; Ms. Gafield; Mava Tied; Iris Wang, Deputy Dir., Charity Culture Center; 
Jan McMillian, Program Dir., Children's Council of San Francisco; Gail Priestly, St. 
Anthony's Foundation; Wyman Nicolas; Betty Candon, Director, Resources Center; 
Shirley Jones, Exec. Dir., Kaheed; Eric McDonald, Exec. Dir., Audrey L. Smith 
Development Center; Jamie Salkin, Delani Housing; Ms. O. Langston, Income Rights 
Project; Jeffrrey Gross, Income Rights Project; Rev. Martin Bazil, Ella Hill Hutch 
Community Center; Yori Wada; Paul Mason; Joshua Blum, SF League of Urban 
Gardners; Benica Adams; Larry Gee, OMI Community Association; Ruth Smith, Dir. 
Afro/American Advocaes; Scheltha Calhoun; James Richards, Black Men 
Unlimited. OPPOSED: None. 



ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDMENT OF THE WHOLE BEARING SAME 
TITLE PRESENTED IN COMMITTEE BY SUPERVISOR SHELLEY. 
ADOPTED. AMENDMENT OF THE WHOLE RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 8 



19. File 68-95-3 . [Loan Guarantee - Federal Funds] Resolution authorizing the Mayor 
of the City and County of San Francisco to apply for, accept and expend a loan of 
Section 108 Loan Guarantee Funds in a total amount not to exceed five million 
three hundred thousand dollars ($5,300,000) from the U.S. Department of Housing 
and Urban Development to be used to subsidize the redevelopment of severely 
distressed public housing located in the Western Addition on two sites known as 
Hayes Valley Public Housing North and South. Indirect costs associated with the 
acceptance of the loan funds will be paid by Community Development Block Grant 
Funds. (Supervisors Shelley, Bierman, Kaufman) 

SPEAKERS: ELECTED OFFICIAL: Supervisor Kevin Shelley. DEPARTMENTAL 
REPRESENTATIVE: Ted Dientsfrey, Director, Mayor's Office of Housing. IN 
SUPPORT: Jean Ruck; Pamela Smith; Hasinah Rahim; Fran Denoto, Pres., 
Oak/Fillimore Association; Donna Hasensa; Cecilia A. Shepard; Otis Maxwell; 
Michael Sandstrom; Shelley Salieri; Richard Brown, Ella Hill Hutch Community 
Center; Bill Witte, Development Parnter. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

(Supervisors Bierman and Kaufman requested to be added as 
co-sponsors.) 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 
RELEASE OF RESERVES 



20. File 101-90-127.8 . [Reserved Funds, Depart. Public Works] Consideration of 
request to release reserved funds, Department of Public Works, 1990 Earthquake 
Safety Bond Fund, in the amount of $622,360, for the purpose of awarding 
construction contracts for the earthquake repair of the existing Main Library 
Building. (Department of Public Works) 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. 
IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RELEASE OF $622,360 APPROVED. FILED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

21. File 148-92-7.4 . [Reserved Funds Fire Dept.] Consideration of request to release 
reserved funds, Fire Department, State Hazard Mitigation Grant, in the amount of 
$258,643.50, for the purpose of installing emergency generators at nine (9) Fire 
Stations. (Fire Department) 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. 
IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RELEASE OF $258,643.50 APPROVED. FILED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 9 



22. File 101— 92— 33.— 2 [Reserved Funds Fire Dept.] Consideration of request to release 
reserved funds, Fire Department, 1986 Fire Protection Improvement Bond Funds, in 
the amount of $258,643.50, for the purpose of installing emergency generators at 
nine (9) Fire Stations. (Fire Department) 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. 
IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RELEASE OF $258,643.50 APPROVED. FILED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

TIME MEETING ADJOURNED: 6:23 P.M. 



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CITY AND COUNTY MCfE OF &/n FRANCISCO 



OARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street, Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 



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FEB 2 8 1995 February 27, 1995 

SAN FRANCISCO 
/ PUBLIC LIBRARY 

TCh Budget Committee 

FROM: Budget Analyst \ 

SUBJECT: March 1, 19J95 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 1 - File 97-94-77 

Note: This item was rereferred from the Board of Supervisors meeting of 
January 17, 1995. 

Item: Ordinance amending Administrative Code by adding 

Article 4, Section 11.75, to require franchise applicants to 
pay a fee to defray the City's costs of evaluating the 
application. 

Description: The proposed ordinance would amend the Administrative 

Code to require that applicants for a franchise in the City, 
and applicants asking the City to approve the renewal or 
transfer of a franchise, pay a fee to defray the City's costs of 
evaluating the franchise application, renewal, or transfer. 
The amount of the fee would be based on the Controller's 
estimate of the City's cost to evaluate the franchise 
application, renewal, or transfer. The proposed ordinance 
further provides that if the City's actual costs as calculated 
by the Controller, after the application, renewal or transfer 
has been finally acted upon by the Board of Supervisors, are 
less than the fees paid, the City shall refund the difference 
to the franchise applicant. 

Where it is required by preemptive Federal or State law, the 
proposed ordinance provides that franchise application, 
renewal, or transfer fees paid to the City would be credited 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Comments: 



Recommendation: 



against the regular, recurring franchise fees required to be 
paid by the applicant to the City after the franchise 
agreement is granted. 

1. The proposed ordinance is intended to defray City 
expenses that will be incurred in the evaluation of future 
franchise applications, franchise renewals, or transfers. 
Changing Federal and State regulations and the 
development of new technologies make it likely that the City 
will receive an increasing number of franchise 
applications. According to Ms. Joan Lubamersky of the 
CAO's Office, evaluating such franchise applications will 
require time and technical and financial expertise which is 
not available with existing City staff. The proposed 
ordinance would insure that the City's costs to evaluate 
future franchise applications, franchise renewals, and 
transfers, would be covered. 

2. The City's existing, franchises for cable television, 
electricity, and other services would not be affected by this 
ordinance, unless and until franchisees apply to renew or 
transfer a franchise. According to Ms. Julia Friedlander of 
the City Attorney's Office, the anticipated transfer of 
Viacom Cablevision's franchise to InterMedia Partners 
would be covered by this ordinance, and the City would thus 
be able to require that the applicants pay a fee to defray the 
City's costs of evaluating the transfer. 

3. Ms. Friedlander has advised that the proposed ordinance 
must apply to all future franchise applications. Therefore, 
the proposed ordinance would apply to new franchise 
applications for cable television, other video services, 
telecommunications, gas, electricity, and other types of 
services. 

Approval of the proposed ordinance is a policy matter for 
the Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



File 101-94-49 



Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 
January 25, 1995. 



Department: 

Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Comments: 



Recommendation: 



Municipal Court 

Ordinance appropriating $418,502, for professional services 
to allow the Municipal Court to upgrade computer equipment 
for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

$418,502 

State-Authorized Automation Fund 

The proposed ordinance would appropriate a total of 
$418,502 to the Municipal Court, including $378,502 for the 
purchase of a portion of the software, equipment, installation 
services, and training needed to upgrade and complete a 
computer network operated by the Municipal Court for 
tracking and processing moving traffic violation cases, and 
$40,000 for an initial study to develop an overall automation 
plan for the Trial Courts (Municipal and Superior Courts) 
together when they move to the new San Francisco 
courthouse, which is expected to be completed in June of 
1997. 

1. At the Budget Committee meeting on January 25, 1995, 
Mr. Ron Ho of the Municipal Court was requested by the 
Committee to submit an Amendment of the Whole of the 
proposed ordinance from the Trial Courts, not the Municipal 
Court, and to have the Amendment of the Whole reflect that 
the entire amount of the cost of this project (i. e., $1,000,090), 
should come from the Automation Fund and not just the 
$418,502, which is the subject of this report. In that manner, 
all monies to be received from the State Trial Court funding 
could then be applied to offset the General Fund costs of the 
City's Trial Courts budget. 

2. Mr. Ho has requested that this item be continued to the 
Budget Committee meeting of March 8, 1995, in order to 
allow the Trial Courts additional time to prepare the above- 
noted Amendment of the Whole. 

Continue this item to the March 8, 1995 Budget Committee 
meeting as requested by Mr. Ho. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 3 - File 101-94-54 

Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 
February 8, 1995. 



Departments: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Item: 



Description: 



Comments: 



Real Estate Department 
Mayor's Office 

$73,520 

General Fund Reserve 

Ordinance appropriating $73,520 from the General Fund 
Reserve to pay for security services at the War Memorial at 
401 Van Ness Avenue for the period February 13, 1995 
through June 30, 1995. 

As part of the move from City Hall for seismic retrofitting, 
as of the week of February 13, 1995, staff of the Office of the 
Mayor, Board of Supervisors, Chief Administrative Officer, 
Ethics Commission, and Civil Service Commission, as well 
as the Law Library and the public hearing rooms used by 
City Commissions and the Board of Supervisors are 
relocating to office space at the War Memorial Building at 
401 Van Ness Avenue. 

Entry security at City Hall for all of these departments had 
previously been provided by 7 Sheriffs Department staff (6 
Cadets and one Deputy Sheriff) assigned to the 4 entrances 
of City Hall, using 3 walk-through metal detectors. 

1. Mr. Mike Martin of the Mayor's Office has requested that 
this item be continued to the Budget Committee meeting on 
March 8, 1995 in order to allow the Mayor's Office and the 
Real Estate Department additional time to evaluate the 
actual security requirements needed and to prepare an 
Amendment of the Whole to this proposed ordinance. The 
proposed ordinance as currently drafted is based on the 
entry security services being performed by a private 
contractor. The Mayor's Office has now recommended and 
the Real Estate Department has proposed that the entry 
security at the War Memorial be provided by in-house Civil 
Service Security Guard positions. 

2. Mr. Martin advises that currently entry security services 
at the War Memorial are being provided by Burns Security 
Services on an interim basis. According to Mr. Martin, the 
cost for these interim security services, will be reflected in 
the Amendment of the Whole of the proposed supplemental 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



appropriation ordinance which Mr. Martin advises will be 
submitted in time for the March 8, 1995 Budget Committee 
meeting. 



Recommendation: Continue this item to the Budget Committee meeting on 
March 8, 1995 as requested by Mr. Martin. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Item 4 - File 101-94-58 

Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 
February 8, 1995. 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Budget: 



Police Department 

Supplemental appropriation ordinance appropriating 
$1,921,844 from the General Fund Reserve for overtime, 
holiday pay, fringe benefits, materials and supplies, non- 
personal services and vehicle fleet maintenance (services of 
other departments), and reappropriating $200,000 from 
Overtime. 

$2,121,844 

General Fund General Reserve $1,921,844 

Reappropriation of funds from Uniformed 
Overtime - Trial Courts in Police Department's 
FY 1994-95 budget 200.000 

Total $2,121,844 

In June of 1994, the San Francisco electorate approved 
Proposition D, which requires a minimum level of 1,971 full- 
duty uniform Police Officers for the Police Department by no 
later than June of 1995. Of this supplemental appropriation 
request for $2,121,844, $506,600 would be used for costs 
related to the full staffing of the Police Department. 

In addition, $1,465,244 of this supplemental appropriation 
request would be used to fund a projected budget deficiency 
in the Police Department's overtime, holiday pay and fringe 
benefits accounts resulting from (a) the Newspaper Strike of 
November, 1994 and (b) other unanticipated events. 

The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance also 
requests $150,000 in funding for the maintenance of the 
Police Department's vehicle fleet. 

I. Police Overtime and Related Costs 

Overtime - Newspaper Strike $611,000 

The labor strike against the San Francisco 
Chronicle and the San Francisco Examiner took 
place from November 2, 1994 through November 

II, 1994. The Police Department established two 
fixed posts that required 24-hour staffing by sworn 
personnel. In addition to assigning on-duty 
personnel to strike-related duties, thereby diverting 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



these Police Officers from other law enforcement 
duties, the Police Department also had to deploy 
Police Officers on an overtime basis for the 
necessary strike-related duties. The Budget 
Analyst previously reported to the Board of 
Supervisors in December of 1994 that the estimated 
expenditures resulting from this strike were 
approximately $606,252. These expenditures were 
not anticipated in the FY 1994-95 budget. As a 
result of the strike, the Police Department is now 
requesting a supplemental appropriation of 
$611,000 to fund the projected shortfall in overtime 
related to this strike. 

Other Overtime $571,244 

In addition to the budget deficiency in overtime 
resulting from the newspaper strike, the Police 
Department is also anticipating a $571,244 
shortfall in overtime as a result of other 
unanticipated events, such as the demonstrations 
against Proposition 187 and the killing of a Police 
Officer in November of 1994. 

Holiday Pay $258,000 

The Police Department reports that it is 
underfunded for holiday pay for FY 1994-95 and is 
therefore requesting $258,000 to fund the projected 
budget deficiency. 

Fringe Benefits $25,000 

This amount is for mandatory fringe benefits 
related to the above requests for overtime and 
holiday pay. 

Total - Police Overtime and Related Costs $1,465,244 

II. Proposition D Mandate 

Materials and Supplies $31,300 

The Police Department is requesting $31,300 for 
furniture for the Police Academy. Whereas 
normally the Police Academy conducts only one 
training class at a time, because of the hiring of 
Police Officers to meet the Proposition D mandate, 
the Police Academy will be conducting up to four 
training classes simultaneously in the spring of 
1995. The Department has relocated personnel 
formally located at the Academy to other existing 
Police Department space in order to create room for 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



the additional training sessions. As such, 
additional classroom furniture is needed. The 
attachment contains a breakdown of this request. 
Although Attachment I shows that the cost of such 
furniture totals $32,918, the Department is only 
requesting $31,300. 

Non-Personal Services $475,300 

This request for $475,300 includes $70,000 for the 
Police Department to conduct a new Police Officer 
examination. According to Lieutenant Ryan of the 
Police Department, there is sufficient funding in 
the FY 1994-95 budget to conduct only one Civil 
Service examination. This exam was given in July 
of 1994. However, the Police Department expects 
to hire only between 160 and 180 Police Officers of 
the 636 candidates who passed this exam. 
Lieutenant Ryan advises that the Police 
Department had to conduct an additional Civil 
Service examination in January of 1995 in order to 
identify additional Police Officer candidates, so that 
the hiring goal of 280 new Police Officers for FY 
1994-95 could be met. The details of this $70,000 
request are as follows (although the actual cost was 
$71,768, the Department is only requesting 
$70,000): 

Site rental for written test $6,320 

Test proctors for written test 6,352 

5-day site rental for oral test ($7,768/day) 38,840 

Proctors for oral test 13,859 

Proctors for physical agility test 6.397 

Total $71,768 

In addition, this request for $475,300 also includes 
$405,300 to conduct background investigations of 
Police Officer candidates who have passed the Civil 
Service exam. Each background investigation costs 
approximately $655 per applicant and consists of a 
medical examination, a psychological test, a 
polygraph test, fingerprinting, a toxicological (drug) 
test and a credit report. These tests are performed 
by various outside contractors under existing 
contracts. Lieutenant Ryan advises that the FY 
1994-95 budget included $576,000 for background 
investigations, which would be sufficient for 
approximately 879 such investigations. However, 
the Police Department anticipates that, because of 
additional hiring to meet the Proposition D 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Comments: 



mandate, the Department will conduct 
approximately 1,540 background investigations in 
FY 1994-95, based on the 636 applicants who 
passed the first Civil Service exam and the 
anticipated 900 applicants who will pass the second 
Civil Service exam. At a cost of approximately $655 
per investigation, the total cost for FY 1994-95 is 
estimated to be approximately $1,008,700, or 
$432,700 more than the $576,000 budgeted for 
background investigations. The Department is 
requesting a supplemental appropriation of 
$405,300 to pay for these additional background 
investigations. 

Total - Proposition D Mandate $506,600 

III. Vehicle Fleet Maintenance 

Central Shops - Auto Maintenance $150,000 

The Police Department has a total of 450 vehicles, 
including 230 marked vehicles and 220 unmarked 
vehicles. The Department ordered 40 new vehicles 
in FY 1993-94. However, according to Lieutenant 
Ryan, as a result of delays in awarding the contract 
for the purchase of these vehicles, the vehicles will 
not be received until May or June of 1995. As such, 
it has become necessary to repair vehicles that were 
scheduled to be taken out of service when the new 
vehicles were placed into service. The Police 
Department estimates that these maintenance and 
repair costs have resulted in a budget deficiency of 
approximately $150,000. 

Total - Vehicle Fleet Maintenance 150.000 



Total Supplemental Appropriation Request $2,121,844 

1. In addition to the $1,921,844 from the General Fund 
Reserve, the Department is requesting to reappropriate 
$200,000 in estimated savings from Uniformed Overtime - 
Trial Courts in the Police Department's FY 1994-95 budget. 
These savings have resulted from reductions in uniform 
overtime by implementing a recommendation of the Budget 
Analyst's 1994 Zero Base Budget Analysis to (a) prevent 
requiring subpoenaed officers to unnecessarily appear in 
court on the day of case calendaring; and (b) request that the 
Courts provide a reasonable advance notice of trial dates in 
order to reduce court overtime pay. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



2. As previously noted, the passage of Proposition D has 
mandated full Uniform staffing of a minimum of 1,971 Police 
Officers by the end of FY 1994-95. As of July 1, 1994, the 
Police Department had 1,812 sworn personnel. The 
Department has hired 14 lateral transfers and intends to hire 
266 trainees during FY 1994-95, for a total of 280 new Police 
Officers. The current, revised 1994-95 Police Department 
hiring plan for uniform officers is as follows: 

Date Number of Police Officers to be Hired 

Actual: 

July 1, 1994 14 (lateral transfers) 

November 28, 1994 30 (new recruit class) 

January 30, 1995 32 (new recruit class) 

February 6, 1995 32 (new recruit class) 

Projected: 

April 17, 1995 36 (new recruit class) 

June 19, 1995 50 (new recruit class) 

June 26, 1995 86 (new recruit class) 

Total 280 

According to Lieutenant Ryan, after expected attrition of 65 
Police Officers, the Police Department will have an estimated 
2,027 Police Officers* on staff on June 30, 1995, although 172 
will be new recruits still in the Police Academy, as follows: 

Existing Uniform Staffing (7/1/94) 1,812** 

New hires in FY 1994-95 280 

Less expected attrition (65) 

Number of Police Officers, June 1995 2,027 

The costs of the 280 new Police Officers to be hired in FY 
1994-95 are included in the Police Department's FY 1994-95 
budget and will cost an estimated $3.8 million in FY 1994-95 
(partial year funding of salaries and fringe benefits). The 
cost of these new hires will be partially offset by a Federal 
grant in the amount of $614,000, $200,000 of which is 
expected to be received during FY 1994-95. 

3. The following table shows a breakdown of the 
Department's actual and projected expenditures for FY 1994- 



Although the projected total of 2,027 Police Officers is 56 more than the required minimum of 
1,971 full-duty Police Officers, Lieutenant Ryan advises that it is necessary to hire more than the 
required minimum because of the existence of light-duty Police Officers on staff. 

As of the writing of this report, there were 1,888 Police Officers on staff, including light-duty 
Officers. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



95 in overtime, holiday pay and fringe benefits, and the 
estimated budget deficiency in each of these accounts. 



Category 



FY 1994-95 
Budget 



Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures Estimated 

7/1/94 to 12/17/94 to Budget 

12/16/94 6/30/95 Deficiency 



Overtime $5,742,656 $3,515,050 $3,539,606 ($1,312,000) 

Holiday Pay 2,146,500 1,324,379 1,103,649 (281,528) 

Fringe Benefits 36.925.084 16.954.056 20.246.179 (275.151) 

Total $44,814,240 $21,793,485 $24,889,434 ($1,868,679) 

4. The following table shows the Police Department's 
estimated budget deficiency for non-personal services for FY 
1994-95: 



Category 



FY 1994-95 
Budget 



Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures Estimated 

7/1/94 to 2/1/95 to Budget 

iZSlZaa 6/30/95 Deficiency. 



Non-Personal Services $5,659,172 $1,532,766 $4,243,133* ($116,727) 

* Projected expenditures for the last five months of FY 1994-95 are greater 
than the actual expenditures for the first seven months of FY 1994-95 primarily 
due to (a) one-time costs related to the hiring of new Police Officers, and (b) the 
inclusion of approximately $2 million in unposted telephone bills from the first 
seven months of FY 1994-95. 

5. The following table shows the Police Department's 
estimated budget deficiency for materials and supplies for FY 
1994-95: 

Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures Estimated 
FY 1994-95 7/1/94 to 2/1/95 to Budget 

Category Budget 1/31/95 6/30/95 Deficiency. 

Materials & Supplies $2,222,529 $1,375,286 $982,347 ($135,104) 

Lieutenant Ryan advises that the Department does not 
intend to submit another supplemental appropriation request 
to cover the projected remaining budget deficiency of 
$103,804 ($135,104 less this request of $31,300) in materials 
and supplies but will implement cost-saving measures in 
order to live within its existing budget. 

6. The following table shows the Police Department's 
estimated budget deficiency for Central Shops - Auto 
Maintenance for FY 1994-95: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



11 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Category 



Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures Estimated 

FY 1994-95 7/1/94 to 1/1/95 to Budget 

Bjidgel 12/31/94 6/30/95 Deficiency 



Central Shops - Maintenance $1,722,549 $932,797 $940,000 ($150,248) 

Lieutenant Ryan advises that the Department does not 
intend to submit another supplemental appropriation request 
to cover the projected remaining budget deficiency of $248 
(the projected budget deficiency of $150,248 less this request 
of $150,000) in Central Shops - Auto Maintenance. 

7. The Controller's Office has estimated that the Police 
Department will have a budget deficiency in its personnel 
and related fringe benefit accounts in the amount of 
$2,173,105 for FY 1994-95. However, the proposed 
supplemental appropriation allocates only $1,465,244 for 
overtime, holiday pay and fringe benefit expenses. As such, 
the Controller's Office reports that, even with the approval of 
the proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance, the 
Police Department is still expected to have a $707,861 budget 
deficiency in these accounts by the end of FY 1994-95 
(estimated budget deficiency of $2,173,105 less this request of 
$1,465,244). 

8. The following table shows the Budget Analyst's estimated 
budget deficiency in salaries, overtime, holiday pay, premium 
pay and fringe benefits for FY 1994-95: 

Actual Projected Estimated 

Expenditures Expenditures Surplus/ 

FY 1994-95 7/1/94 to 12/17/94 to (Budget 

Category Budget 12/16/94 6/30/95 Deficiency) 



Permanent Salaries - Misc. 

Permanent Salaries - Uniform 

Overtime 

Holiday Pay 

Premium Pay 

Premium Pay - Uniform 

Total - Salaries 
Fringe Benefits 

Total 



$14,283,945 

98,575,858 

5,742,656 

2,146,500 

468,000 

5.250.978 

$126,467,937 

36.925.084 



$6,379,026 

45,706,473 

3,515,050 

1,324,379 

240,958 

2.161.641 

$59,327,527 

16.954.056 



$7,692,250 

53,817,120 

3,539,606 

1,103,649 

245,784 

2.803.656 

$69,202,065 

20.246.179 



$212,669 

(947,735) 

(1,312,000) 

(281,528) 

(18,742) 

285.681 

($2,061,655) 

(275.151) 



$163,393,021 $76,281,583 $89,448,244 ($2,336,806) 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Estimated Budget Deficiency in Personnel Accounts $2,336,806 

Less: 
Federal Grant (200,000) 

Proposed Supplemental Appropriation for Overtime, Holiday Pay and 

Fringe Benefits (1.465.244) 

Total Estimated Budget Deficiency in Personnel Accounts $671,562 

9. As reflected in Comment No. 4 above, the Budget Analyst 
has determined that the projected budget deficiency for Non- 
Personal Services, which includes such items as contractual 
services, rent, telephone and other operating expenses, is 
$116,727 for FY 1994-95. However, the Police Department 
has requested $475,300 for Non-Personal Services. 
Therefore, the Budget Analyst notes that the supplemental 
appropriation request for Non-Personal Services could be 
reduced by $358,573, from $475,300 to $116,727. 

However, at the request of the Police Department, the 
Budget Analyst is not recommending that this supplemental 
appropriation request be reduced by $358,573 for Non- 
Personal Services at this time, but rather, subject to approval 
by the Mayor, that this surplus amount of $358,573, as 
determined by the Budget Analyst, be used to partially offset 
the Department's remaining projected deficiency in the 
Permanent Salaries - Uniform account. 

Lieutenant Ryan advises the Budget Analyst that the Police 
Department intends to employ economies in order to offset 
the remaining projected budget deficiency of approximately 
$312,989 ($671,562 less $358,573), and that with the use of 
the $358,573 surplus in the Department's Non-Personal 
Services account, as identified by the Budget Analyst, the 
Police Department does not intend to request additional 
funds for the projected budget deficiency in the Department's 
Permanent Salaries and related fringe benefit accounts. 

10. Mr. Mike Martin of the Mayor's Office advises that the 
Mayor's Office concurs with Budget Analyst's 
recommendation to reduce the Department's request for non- 
personal services by $358,573 and to use such funds for the 
purpose of increasing the Department's request for 
Permanent Salaries and related accounts by $358,573, as 
reflected in Attachment II. 

11. In summary, the Budget Analyst recommends the 
following changes to the proposed supplemental 
appropriation ordinance: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



13 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Amount Budget 

Supplemental Recommended Analyst's 
Appropriation by Budget Recommended 
Category Request Analyst Change 

Permanent Salaries - Uniform $571,244 $929,817 $358,573 

Overtime 611,000 611,000 

Holiday Pay 258,000 258,000 

Mandatory Fringe Benefits 25,000 25,000 

Other Non-Personal Services 475,300 116,727 (358,573) 

Materials and Supplies 31,300 31,300 

Central Shops - Auto Maintenance 150,000 150.000 Q 

Total $2,121,844 $2,121,844 

Recommendations: 1. Reduce the supplemental appropriation request for Other 
Non-Personal Services by $358,573, the amount of surplus as 
determined by the Budget Analyst, and increase the 
supplemental appropriation request for Permanent Salaries - 
Uniform by $358,573, in accordance with the table above, and 
in accordance with the concurrence of the Mayor's Office as 
reflected in Attachment II. 

2. Approve the proposed supplemental appropriation 
ordinance, as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Attachment I 



Academy furniture POs 

Item 

2 tier lockers 3 unit 

2 tier lockers 1 unit 

Installation 

Leg extension kit 

Leg extension kit 

2 tier locker slope kit 

Locker 2 door 

Front base 

End base 

Installation 

Delivery 

Sales tax 

Stack chairs 

Folding tables 

Round Folding tables 

Lectern 

White boards 

White board 

Panels 

connectors 

Panels 

Desk 

Chairs 

Chairs 

Installation 

Sales tax 

Total 



Quantity 


price 


total 


36 


58. 18 


2 


,094.48 


4 


71.43 




285.72 


1 


505.00 




505.00 


4 


25.71 




102.84 


6 


33.38 




200.28 


22 


5.23 




115.06 


21 


154.36 


3 


,241.56 


21 


4.82 




101.22 


a 


6.34 




50.72 


1 


445.00 




445.00 


1 


430.00 




430.00 
607.06 


160 


69.00 


11 


,040,00 


72 


S3. 00 


3 


,816,00 


2 


100.00 




200.00 


12 


80.00 




960.00 


5 


212.00 


1 


,060.00 


1 


411.00 




411.00 


5 


99.00 




49 5.00 


4 


3.75 




15.00 


6 


6.00 




36.00 


6 


425.00 


2 


,550.00 


5 


252.00 


1 


,260.00 


2 


199.00 




398.00 


1 


608.00 




608.00 






1 


,890.50 






32 


,918.44 



1954bP40 



33 1 J JO g.d3IH3 



1«5 



frSSt CS5 Sit? 



B£:t7l S66T-HO-20 



SENT 'BY: 



2-24-95 ; 11 :42AM 



MAYOR'S OFFICE- 



Atta crimen t II 



Memorandum 



February 24, 1995 

To: Ed Harrington ., 

From: Mike Martin ^Mfc- 

Regarding: Amendment to Supplemental Appropriation Request #82 

Supplemental Appropriation Request #82 proposed applying $475,300 in 
General Fund reserves towards Non-Personal Services and $571,244 toward 
Uniform Salaries . To acknowledge a surplus in the non-personal services 
account and a deficit in the personal services account, my office would like to 
amend the submission as follows: 



Index: 582015 






Account 


Original 


Amended 


01/0020 
10/1269 


$571,244 
$475300 


$929,817 
$116,727 



ca 



Teresa Serata 
Harvey Rose 



lft 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



File 101-94-60 



Department: 

Item: 



Amount: 



Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Department of Parking and Traffic (DPT) 

Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance appropriating 
$120,000 of Off-Street Parking Funds for the St. Mary's 
Square Garage soil remediation project for the Department of 
Parking and Traffic. 

$120,000 

Parking Revenue Fund (previously known as the Off-Street 
Parking Fund) 

The Board of Supervisors previously approved a 
supplemental appropriation request in the amount of 
$245,000 to pay for the removal of eight underground storage 
tanks at the St. Mary's Square Garage (File 101-93-98). 
These eight tanks were removed in March of 1994. The DPT 
now reports that soil contamination resulted from the 
leakage of some of these tanks and soil remediation work 
must be performed at this site in order to remove this 
contamination. 

Ms. Carol Shamblen of the Department of Public Works 
(DPW) reports that the DPW, Bureau of Site Assessment and 
Remediation, has selected Baseline Environmental 
Consultants, a registered WBE firm, to (1) develop a soil 
remediation work plan, (2) develop a feasibility study to 
analyze potential remedial technologies, (3) conduct a soil 
and groundwater survey at the St. May's Square Garage site 
and (4) develop remediation work specifications to be used for 
competitively bidding the work out. Ms. Shamblen advises 
that Baseline Environmental Consultants has an on-going 
contract with DPW for the provision of as-needed 
environmental services. Baseline Environmental Consultants 
was originally selected by DPW to provide these as-needed 
services through DPWs Request for Proposal process. 

The proposed supplemental request of $120,000 will be 
expended as follows: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Baseline Environmental Consultants: 
Project Management : 
Principal Project Manager ($110/per hr. 

x 4 hrs.) $ 440 

Hydrogeologist ($75/per hr. x 150 hrs.) 11,250 

Geologist ($70/per hr. x 88 hrs.) 6,160 

Clerical ($45/per hr. x 6 hrs.) 270 

Subtotal $18,120 

Preparation of Work Plan for the 

Remediation work: 
Principal Project Manager ($110/per hr. 

x7hrs.) $ 770 

Hydrogeologist ($75/per hr. x $115 hrs.) 8,625 
Geologist ($50/per hr. x 10 hrs.) 500 

Geologist ($70/per hr. x 38 hrs.) 2,660 

Graphics ($50/per hr. x 10 hrs.) 500 

Word Processor ($45/per hr. x 30 hrs.) 1,350 
Clerical ($45/per hr. x 10 hrs.) 450 

Subtotal $14,855 

Subcontracts 

Clearheart Construction 21,900 

Rust Environment and Infrastructure 22469 



Subtotal 


$44,369 


Preparation of Bid Specifications: 




Principal Project Manager ($110/per hr. 


x4 hrs.) 


$ 440 


Hydrogeologist ($75/per hr. x 38 hrs.) 


2.850 


Subtotal 


$3,290 


Operating Expenses 




Miscellaneous Permits 


$1,082 


Traffic Control Plan Permit 


680 


Drilling Supplies 


2,000 


Laboratory Costs 


7,400 


Disposal Costs 


4,050 


Report Photocopying 


1.644 


Subtotal 


$16,856 



Total Contract Including Subcontracts $97,490 
Contingency (2.5 %) 2,510 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

18 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Site Assessment and Remediation 
Oversight (DPW) 

Division Manager ($76/per hr. x 40 hrs.) $3,040 
Mechanical Engineer ($48/per hr. 

x 286 hrs.) 13,720 

Administrative Assistant ($43/per hr. x 

40 hrs.) 1,720 

Clerk Typist ($38/ per hr. x 40 hrs.) 1.520 

Subtotal 20.000 

Grand Total $120,000 

Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



1Q 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



- File 101-94-61 



Department: 

Item: 



Amount: 

Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Department of Parking and Traffic (DPT) 

Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance appropriating 
$173,610 of Off-Street Parking Funds for the Polk-Bush 
Garage construction project for the Department of Parking 
and Traffic. 

$173,610 

Parking Revenue Fund (previously known as the Off-Street 
Parking Fund) 

The DPT reports that construction of the Polk-Bush Garage 
was completed in April of 1993. According to the DPT, Echo 
West/Hok Construction, a Joint Venture firm (Echo West is 
an MBE firm), the original construction contractor, was 
financially unable to complete the construction work. As 
such, Echo West/Hok Construction's bonding company, the 
Insurance Company of North America, designated Apersey 
Construction, neither an MBE or a WBE firm, to complete 
the necessary work. The DPT advises that as a result of the 
difficulty with the original contractor, resulting in an 
extended contract period and additional coordination needed 
to assist Apersey Construction to complete the project, the 
project architect, Gordon Chong and Associates, incurred 
additional costs totaling $61,652. 

Further, the DPT reports that an additional $111,958 in 
unanticipated construction services were incurred by Echo 
West/Hok Construction and Apersey Construction. 

Mr. Kevin Hagerty of the DPT has requested that this item 
be continued to the Budget Committee meeting on March 8, 
1995 in order to allow the DPT additional time to provide the 
details on the architectural and construction services costs 
and to clarify the City's liability versus the bonding 
company's liability for these costs. 

Recommendation: Continue this item as requested by Mr. Hagerty of the DPT. 



Comment: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Item 7 - File 101-94-62 

Department: Board of Supervisors 



Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Ordinance appropriating $25,000 from the General Reserve 
Fund to the Board of Supervisors for an Elections Task Force 
Project for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

$25,000 

General Fund Reserve 

In November of 1994, the San Francisco voters approved 
Proposition L, which created an Elections Task Force and 
authorized the appropriation of $25,000 to the Elections Task 
Force to complete its functions. The Elections Task Force is 
composed of nine members who are appointed, three each, by 
the Mayor, the Board of Supervisors, and the Registrar of 
Voters. 

In accordance with Proposition L, the Elections Task Force is 
to prepare one or more plans, in the form of a proposed 
charter amendment, that will provide the people of San 
Francisco with a fair and adequate method of electing 
members of the Board of Supervisors. In preparing these 
plans, the Elections Task Force shall consider all relevant 
factors, including but not limited to the costs associated with 
seeking election to the Board of supervisors, effective 
representation of the diversity of the City's neighborhoods 
and communities, the effect on the legislative process of 
establishing geographical districts within the City, the most 
appropriate number of supervisorial seats and the 
compensation provided to the members of the Board of 
supervisors. In order that the Board of Supervisors may 
present a charter amendment to voters on this issue at the 
November 1995 election, the Elections Task Force is to 
present its plans to the Board of Supervisors by no later than 
May 1, 1995. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



91 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Mr. John Taylor of the Clerk of the Board advises that the 
Elections Task Force approved the following budget: 

Consultant $3,000 

Temporary Salary 9,000 

Postage 2,600 

Photocopying 3,000 

Office Supplies 450 

Meeting Room Rental 450 
Demographic and Statistical 

Information Reserve 1.500 

Subtotal $20,000 

Contingency (25% of above) 5.000 

TOTAL $25,000 

Comments: 1. Mr. Taylor advises that of the amount of $25,000 to be 

appropriated to the Clerk of the Board, $9,000 will be work- 
ordered to the Registrar of Voters for the Temporary Salary 
of one full-time staff support position for the Elections Task 
Force for one individual for an estimated three months at 
approximately $3,000 per month. Mr. Taylor advises that 
this position has been filled since February 9, 1995. Mr. 
Greg Ridenour of the Registrar of Voters advises that the 
staff support position for the Elections Task Force will be 
responsible for answering inquiries, organizing agendas, 
taking minutes, arranging community meetings, speaking to 
the press, and conducting research. 

2. Ms. Gwen Craig, the Chairperson of the Elections Task 
Force advises that the Elections Task Force has selected a 
Consultant, David Binder and Associates, to provide 
information on request to the Elections Task Force, and to 
attend all of the Elections Task Force's weekly meetings. 
The information provided by David Binder and Associates is 
expected to include statistical analyses of voting trends and 
voting patterns, and demographics of San Francisco voters 
and precincts, as well as polling information, and general 
information about San Francisco voters. Ms. Craig, advises 
that based on the budget of the Elections Task Force, the 
Elections Task Force offered David Binder and Associates a 
flat rate of $3,000 to provide the information listed above. 
Ms. Craig advises that David Binder and Associates was 
asked to consult to the Elections Task Force because Mr. 
David Binder is considered a leading expert on San Francisco 
voting patterns, polling and demographics. Ms. Craig 
advises that David Binder and Associates began consulting to 
the Elections Task Force on February 2, 1995, and will 
continue through May 15, 1995. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

?? 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Recommendation: 



3. As noted above, the budget includes a line item for 
Demographic and Statistical Information Reserve in the 
amount of $1,500. Ms. Margie O'Driscoll, the staff person for 
the Elections Task Force, advises this Demographic and 
Statistical Information Reserve has been requested to have 
sufficient funds available to pay for an in-depth demographic 
analysis of San Francisco voters, to be conducted by David 
Binder and Associates, in the event the Elections Task Force 
decides that they need to draw district lines. 

4. As noted above, the budget includes a Contingency of 
$5,000, or 25 percent of the budget. Mr. Taylor advises that 
this Contingency has been requested to have sufficient funds 
available to pay for the salary of the staff support position to 
the Elections Task Force, in the event the project length is 
extended from May 1, 1995 to May 15, 1995, and to pay for 
the costs associated with an additional set of community 
meetings if necessary. Each set of community meetings 
includes five community meetings. 

Based on the prior policy decision of the Board of 
Supervisors, and based on the approval by the electorate of 
Proposition L, approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Item 8 - File 101-94-63 

Department: Board of Supervisors 



Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Supplemental appropriation ordinance appropriating 
$100,000 from the General Fund Reserve for services of the 
City Attorney's Office, to provide the Board of Supervisors 
with legal analysis and related support while developing 
Charter reform. 

$100,000 

General Fund General Reserve 

In January of 1995, the Board of Supervisors approved a 
motion directing the Clerk of the Board to submit to the 
Mayor a supplemental appropriation request in the amount 
of $100,000, to support the Board's work in considering 
Charter reform (File 54-94-16). The proposed supplemental 
appropriation ordinance (File 101-94-63) would provide funds 
for legal analysis and drafting by the City Attorney, and also 
for the materials and mailing costs associated with public 
hearings on a proposed new Charter. 

In 1993, the San Francisco electorate approved Proposition 
N, which supported a Charter reform process and provided 
for the establishment of a three-member Advisory Committee 
on Charter Reform, made up of representatives of the Mayor, 
Board of Supervisors and Chief Administrative Officer. This 
Advisory Committee drafted a Charter reform proposal which 
was subsequently rejected by vote of the Board of Supervisors 
in July of 1994. 

In October of 1994, the Board of Supervisors established a 
Select Committee on Charter Reform, consisting of three 
members of the Board of Supervisors, in order to draft 
another Charter reform proposal. According to the Office of 
the Chair of the Select Committee, the goal of the Select 
Committee is to have the Board of Supervisors approve a new 
Charter reform proposal for the November 1995 ballot. 
According to Mr. Matthew Batkin of the Registrar of Voters, 
this work must be completed by July 28, 1995 in order for the 
measure to be placed on the November, 1995 ballot. 

The Select Committee will undertake a detailed legal review 
of the Charter in order to determine which sections of the 
Charter are appropriate for transfer to the City's 
Administrative Code, which for revision, and which for 
deletion. The Committee will also hold public hearings and 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



2k 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

distribute draft copies of revised Charter language to the 
public for comments. According to the Office of the Chair of 
the Select Committee, this legal process will require 
extensive assistance from the City Attorney's Office. Funds 
for such assistance are not included in the FY 1994-95 
budget. 

Budget: City Attorney Staff (est. 812 hours @ $115.08/hr.*) $93,476 

Materials and Printing 5,000 

Postage 1.500 

Total $99,976 

Requested amount with rounding $100,000 

* The City Attorney's hourly billing rates include salary, 
fringe benefits, and library and clerical support staff costs. 

Comments: 1. The supplemental appropriation request would primarily 

pay salaries for City Attorney staff through a work order 
from the Clerk of the Board's Office. Existing City Attorney 
staff, whose positions are funded by the General Fund, have 
already been reassigned to the Charter reform project, at an 
estimated cost of $93,476. The primary staff assigned to this 
project are an 8181 Assistant Chief Attorney I, who will be 
working with the Select Committee full-time for a period of 
approximately six months. According to Mr. Burke 
Delventhal of the City Attorney's Office, the City Attorney's 
Office has hired a temporary replacement 8181 Assistant 
Chief Attorney I for the six-month period, along with 
temporary clerical support, to do the work formerly done by 
staff who have been reassigned to the Charter reform effort. 

2. According to the Office of the Chair of the Select 
Committee on Charter Reform, expenditures have already 
been incurred against the proposed supplemental 
appropriation ordinance. As such, the proposed ordinance 
should be amended to provide for ratification of action 
previously taken. 

Recommendations: 1. Amend the proposed supplemental appropriation 
ordinance by providing for ratification of action previously 
taken. 

2. Based on the Board of Supervisors' prior policy decision, 
approve the proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance, 
as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

25 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Item 9 - File 101-94-64 

Department: Police Department 



Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Supplemental appropriation ordinance appropriating 
$332,600 for materials and supplies and equipment. 

$332,600 

General Fund General Reserve 

In December of 1994, the Board of Supervisors approved a 
resolution urging the purchase and standard issuance of 
semi-automatic weapons to all Police Officers of the San 
Francisco Police Department (SFPD). In January of 1995, 
the Police Commission approved a resolution authorizing the 
issuance of semi-automatic weapons as the standard 
handgun to all Police Officers. 

In the past, the SFPD has issued 357 magnum revolvers as 
the standard handgun to its Police Officers. Revolvers are 
capable of firing up to six rounds of ammunition before 
reloading is required. However, a typical semi-automatic 
handgun (a) is capable of firing much more rapidly than a 
revolver, (b) can hold up to 15 rounds of ammunition, and (c) 
can be reloaded in a fraction of the time required to reload a 
revolver. 

Previously, if a San Francisco Police Officer wished to use a 
semi-automatic handgun, he or she had to acquire such a 
weapon at his or her own expense. The average cost of a 
semi-automatic weapon and related equipment (i.e., holster, 
magazines, magazine holders) ranges from $500 to $800, as 
compared to the standard 357 magnum revolver, which costs 
approximately $400. Between 800 and 850 of the SFPD's 
existing force of 1,888 sworn personnel currently possess 
semi-automatic handguns. However, because the choice of 
which weapon to use was left up to each individual officer, 
there has been no standardization regarding which model of 
semi-automatic weapon was purchased among the personnel 
who have purchased their own semi-automatic weapons. 

As a result of the San Francisco electorate's passage of 
Proposition D in June of 1994, which requires a minimum 
level of 1,971 uniform Police Officers by no later than June of 
1995, the SFPD estimates that there will be 2,027 Police 
Officers, including light-duty officers, on staff by June 30, 
1995. The Department estimates that, of the 2,027 Police 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

26 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Officers, 266 will be new recruits and 14 will be lateral 
transfers hired as of June 30, 1995. 

The SFPD plans to phase-in the purchase and issuance of 
semi-automatic handguns over a period of three years. In FY 
1994-95, semi-automatic handguns will be issued only to the 
266 new recruits. In FY 1995-96, the SFPD plans to issue 
860 semi-automatic weapons to Police Officers who have not 
previously purchased their own semi-automatic handguns. 
In FY 1996-97, the SFPD will issue semi-automatic 
handguns to the estimated 974 remaining Police Officers who 
either (a) have not yet been issued a semi-automatic handgun 
or (b) have previously purchased their own semi-automatic 
handguns. According to Lieutenant Ryan of the SFPD, it is 
necessary to purchase semi-automatic weapons for Police 
Officers who previously purchased their own semi-automatic 
weapons because of the Department's policy of 
standardization among semi-automatic handguns. The 
SFPD's estimated cost for the procurement of approximately 
2,100 (based on a planned staff of 2,027) semi-automatic 
handguns and related equipment is $1.3 million over a three- 
year period. The SFPD's schedule for the phased-in issuance 
of semi-automatic handguns to all Police Officers is as 
follows: 





No. of Weapons 


Estimated 


Year 


to be Purchased 


Cost 


FY 1994-95 


266 


$159,600 


FY 1995-96 


860 


536,640 


FY 1996-97 


974 


607.776 


Total 


2,100 


$1,304,016 



The SFPD is currently requesting a supplemental 
appropriation in the amount of $159,600 for the purchase of 
266 semi-automatic handguns and related equipment for 
SFPD's new recruits hired in FY 1994-95. Funds for the 
remaining 1,834 (2,100 less 266) semi-automatic handguns to 
be purchased in FY 1995-96 and FY 1996-97 will be 
requested through the annual budget process. 

In addition, this supplemental request includes $133,000 for 
equipment to be used to train Police Officers on how to use 
semi-automatic handguns and $40,000 for the ammunition to 
be used during training. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

27 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Budget: 



Materials and Supplies 

Semi-automatic Handguns and Related 
Equipment $159,600 

This request would provide funding for 266 
semi-automatic handguns and related 
equipment, including holsters, magazines and 
magazine holders, at an estimated cost of $600 
per unit. 

Ammunition $40,000 

This amount would purchase approximately 
333,333 rounds of ammunition at an estimated 
cost of $0.12 per round. This ammunition would 
primarily be used while training the 266 new 
recruits on how to use the semi-automatic 
handguns. 

Subtotal - Materials and Supplies $199,600 

Equipment 

Firearms Training Simulator Machine 

This request would provide funding to purchase 

the Firearms Training Simulator Machine 

("F.A.T.S. Machine"), an interactive video 

shooting simulator machine that would be used 

to train Police Officers in "shoot, don't shoot" 

situations and in firearm control techniques 

using semi-automatic handguns. This system 

would consist of a five-lane shooting simulator, a 

VCR, computers, software, student keypads, 

modified semi-automatic weapons, and a 

student observation system. This machine could 

be used to train up to 40 Police Officers 

simultaneously. Lieutenant Ryan advises that 

this $133,000 cost estimate was obtained from 

Firearms Training Systems, Inc. 133.000 

Total Supplemental Appropriation Request $332,600 



Recommendation: 



Based on the prior policy decision of the Board of 
Supervisors, approve the proposed supplemental 
appropriation ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

28 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Item 10 - File 101-94-65 

Department: Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) 



Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Comments: 



Ordinance appropriating and reserving $53,700 from the 
General Fund Reserve for (a) the estimated payment to the 
CAO of his vested, accumulated vacation and sick leave 
balances and (b) the related City costs for fringe benefits. 

$53,700 

General Fund Reserve 

This request would appropriate and reserve $53,700 to pay 
for 706 hours of vested vacation pay and sick leave pay at 
$65.86 per hour for a total of approximately $46,500 for 
Permanent Salaries, and approximately $7,200 for Fringe 
Benefits including retirement, social security, unemployment 
and health benefits related to the Permanent Salaries. 

1. The proposed appropriation of $53,700 was based on the 
CAO not using any of his accumulated vacation or sick leave 
days prior to the March 15, 1995 effective date of his 
retirement. The amount due to the CAO upon retirement 
would be reduced if the CAO does take vacation or sick leave 
days before March 15, 1995. Therefore, this appropriation 
request has been reserved and would remain on reserve until 
a final calculation of the amount due is paid to the CAO. 

2. The proposed appropriation of $53,700 was also based on 
the CAO electing to remain on the City payroll from the date 
of his retirement, March 15, 1995, until his accumulated 
vacation and sick leave days are exhausted in lieu of a lump 
sum payment on March 15, 1995. Therefore, this requested 
appropriation includes $3,309 in salary for the 50.24 hours in 
vacation time that would accumulate during the post 
retirement period. 

However, Steve Nelson of the CAO's Office presently reports 
that the CAO wishes to take his vested leave pay in a single, 
lump sum payment rather than to remain on the City's 
payroll after his effective retirement date. Therefore, the 
proposed appropriation should be reduced to $50,391 
($53,700 less $3,309). 

3. Further, the proposed appropriation of $53,700 erroneously 
includes $4,302 in Fringe Benefit amounts for retirement, 
unemployment, medical, health and dental payments. Mr. 
Akbar Shaikh of the Controller's Office advises that 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

retirement and unemployment payments for accumulated 
vacation and sick leave pay are not made in the case of a 
lump sum payout. Mr. Randall Smith of Health Services 
advises that, upon retirement, the CAO would be covered 
under his City health plan. Therefore, the proposed 
appropriation should be further reduced to $46,089 ($50,391 
less $4,302). The total of the recommended reductions is 
$7,611 ($3,309 in Permanent Salaries and $4,302 in Fringe 
Benefits). 

Recommendations: 1. In accordance with Comment Nos. 2 and 3 above, reduce 
the proposed appropriation request of $53,700 by $7,611 to 
$46,089 as follows: 



Permanent 
Salaries 


$46,500 


$43,191 


$3,309 


Fringe Benefits 


7.200 


2.898 


4.302 


Total 


$53,700 


$46,089 


$7,611 



2. Approve the proposed ordinance as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

30 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Items 11 and 12 - Files 101-94-66 and 102-94-11 



Department: 
Items: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Human Resources 

1. Item 11, File 101-94-66 - Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance appropriating $182,885 for Salaries, Fringe 
Benefits and equipment to allow the Department of Human 
Resources to Create three positions to support the Workers 
Compensation Program for fiscal Year 1994-95. 

2. Item 12, File 102-94-11 - Ordinance amending the 1994-95 
Annual Salary Ordinance to reflect the addition of three 
positions in the Department of Human Resources, Workers 
Compensation Division. 

$182,885 

FY 1994-95 General Fund Reserve 

On November 2, 1993, the voters of San Francisco approved 
Proposition L, which created a Department of Human 
Resources, and transferred the City's Workers Compensation 
Division from the Employees Retirement System to the 
Department of Human Resources. 

The Department of Human Resources (HRD) is requesting a 
Supplemental Appropriation to pay for salaries, fringe 
benefits and equipment to allow the Department of Human 
Resources to create three new positions to support the 
Workers Compensation Program for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

The proposed supplemental appropriation would appropriate 
$182,885 for the period February 24, 1995 through June 30, 
1995 as follows: 



Permanent Salaries 


$43,308 


Temporary Salaries 


46,600 


Mandatory Fringe Benefits 


17,982 


Equipment 


74,995 


Total 


$182,885 



The following are descriptions of each of the foregoing 
funding requests. 

Permanent Salaries $43,308 

This amount would: (1) fund $10,116 for the salary of one 
new 1444 Secretary I position for nine pay periods, (2) fund 
$13,932 for the salary of one new 1652 Senior Accountant 
position for nine pay periods, and (3) fund $19,260 for the 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



salary of one new Senior Systems and Procedures Analyst 
position for nine pay periods for a total cost of $43,308. 

Temporary Salaries $46,600 

This amount would fund $46,600 for the salaries of four 
temporary 8141 Claims Adjuster positions for seven pay 
periods. 

Fringe Benefits $17,982 

This amount was calculated based on 20 percent of 
Permanent Salaries and 20 percent of Temporary Salaries. 
However, Ms. Victoria Mead of the HRD advises that the 
Fringe Benefits for Temporary Salaries should be calculated 
based on eight percent of the Temporary Salaries and not 
based on 20 percent of the Temporary Salaries. Therefore, 
the Fringe Benefits for the Temporary Salaries are $3,728 
(.08 x $46,600). The Fringe Benefits for the Permanent 
Salaries are $8,662 (.20 x $43,308) As such, the total Fringe 
Benefits for Permanent and Temporary Salaries should be 
reduced to $12,390 ($3,728 + $8,662) from $17,982, 
representing a decrease of $5,592. 

Equipment $74,995 

This amount would fund a total of $74,995, including $69,120 
for equipment and $5,875 for Sales Tax, for the purchase of 
the following equipment: (1) $29,850 for computer hardware 
for the file server, network administration workstation, 
telecommunications router station, and local systems 
connectivity, as well as providing for network printing 
capability, tape backups and power supply systems, (2) 
$9,680 for computer software to run the above listed 
hardware, as well as network remote management and virus 
protection software, (3) $12,300 for PacBell 
telecommunications installation charges for a dedicated 
telecommunications line to link up the two sites of 44 Gough 
Street and 1155 Market Street, the estimated monthly line 
usage charges, and telecommunications equipment that 
would enable 44 Gough Street and 1155 Market Street to 
"talk to each other" via the telecommunications link, (4) 
$9,400 for four PC client workstations, including four 
personal computers, and access to the local area network and 
the wide area network required for transmission of data, 
teleprocessing and timely interchange of management 
information, (5) $7,890 for applications software licenses, and 
network, telecommunications and configuration costs, and (6) 
$5,875 for the 8.5 percent Sales Tax. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Attachment 1, provided by the HRD, contains a detailed list 
of equipment with the related prices supporting the $74,995 
equipment request. 

Ms. Kira Shuchom of the HRD advises that the HRD has 
received approval from the Electronic Information Processing 
Steering Committee for the purchase of this equipment. 

The proposed ordinance (File 102-94-11) would amend the FY 
1994-95 Annual Salary Ordinance to establish three new 
positions in the Department of Human Resources, Workers' 
Compensation Division as follows : 



Comments: 



Classification/Title 



No. of 
Positions 



Biweekly 
Salary 



Maximum 
Salary 
At Top Step 



1444 Secretary I 1 

1652 Senior Accountant 1 
1864 Sr. Systems & 

Procedures Analyst 1 



$1,022/$1,237 $32,286 
$1,407/$1,706 $44,527 

$l,946/$2,365 $61,727 



The total estimated annual cost of the three new positions 
including fringe benefits, is $166,248 ($138,540 salaries + 
$27,708 fringe benefits) at the top step. 

1. Attachment 2 is a letter from Mr. Wendell Pryor, Director 
of the Department of Human Resources, explaining why the 
addition of three new permanent positions, as well as four 
new temporary Claims Adjuster positions, or a total of seven 
new positions, are needed to take over the functions which 
were being accomplished by the Employees Retirement 
System (ERS), and why seven positions are not being deleted 
in the ERS to offset the seven new positions being added by 
the Department of Human Resources. 

Mr. Pryor advises that the 1444 Secretary is being requested 
to support the Health Service Administrator, who now has 
oversight over the operations of the Workers Compensation 
Division (WCD), as well as the Health Service System and 
the City's health and safety programs. No such position 
existed prior to the transfer of the WCD to HRD. 

Mr. Pryor advises that the 1864 Senior Systems Analyst is 
being requested in order to evaluate the information system 
requirements of the WCD, which are critical to the success of 
the department. An existing management information 
systems (MIS) position will remain at the Employees 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Recommendation: 



Retirement System (ERS) to respond to the information 
system needs of the ERS. 

Mr. Pryor advises that the 1652 Accountant is critically 
needed to develop and implement basic accounting services 
needed by the WCD. 

Mr. Pryor advises that the four temporary Claims Adjuster 
positions are being requested in order to clear up and close a 
backlog of cases, thereby reducing the ongoing caseload. Mr. 
Pryor states that in the HRD proposed FY 95-96 budget, 
these four Claims Adjuster positions are requested for three 
months. Therefore the Budget Analyst recommends that the 
four temporary Claims Adjuster positions be approved as 
limited duration positions. 

2. As noted above, the proposed expenditures for the 
Permanent Salaries of the 1444 Secretary I, the 1652 Senior 
Accountant, and the 1864 Sr. Systems & Procedures Analyst 
were based on nine pay periods. Ms. Victoria Mead of the 
Department of Human Resources advises that the staff will 
be hired effective May 20, 1995, and will work for 7.5 pay 
periods. As such, the amount required for Permanent 
Salaries is $35,955, or $7,353 less than the requested 
$43,308. 

3. As noted above, the proposed expenditures for the 
Temporary Salaries of four 8141 Claims Adjusters were 
based on seven pay periods. Ms. Mead advises that two of 
the 8141 Claims Adjusters will begin on May 20, 1995 and 
will work for 7.5 pay periods, and two of the 8141 Claims 
Adjusters will begin on April 8, 1995, and work for six pay 
periods. As such, the amount required for Temporary 
Salaries is $44,982, or $1,618 less than the requested 
$46,600. 

4. As noted above, the Fringe Benefits should be calculated 
based on eight percent of Temporary Salaries and 20 percent 
of Permanent Salaries. Based on the decrease of $7,353 in 
Permanent Salaries from $43,308 to $35,995, the Fringe 
Benefits for Permanent Salaries are $7,199. Based on the 
decrease of $1,618 in Temporary Salaries, from $46,600 to 
$44,982, the Fringe Benefits for Temporary Salaries are 
$3,599 for total Fringe Benefits of $10,798 ($7,199 + $3,599), 
or $7,184 less than the requested $17,982. 

1. Amend the proposed ordinance to reduce the 
supplemental appropriation request as follows: (1) reduce 
Permanent Salaries by $7,353 from $43,308 to $35,955, 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



reduce Temporary Salaries by $1,618 from $46,600 to 
$44,982, and (3) reduce Fringe Benefits by $7,184 from 
$17,982 to $10,798 for a total reduction of $16,155 from 
$182,885 to $166,730 (101-94-66). 

2. Amend the Annual Salary Ordinance to make the four 
proposed Claims Adjusters positions limited duration 
positions. 

3. Approve the proposed ordinance as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Attachment 1 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES MIS: WORKERS' COMPENSATION SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION FY 94-95 



Page 1 


of 1 








WCD 


Supplemental 










QTY 




FY 94-95 


CHAR 


OBJ 


SUB 


DESCRIPTION 


No. 


Unit Cost 


Total 






























10 






NON-PERSONAL SERVICES 






















22 






CAPITAL OUTLAY 
























220 




Equipment Purchase 


























2231 


Computer Equipment for DHR-WCD Systems Connectivity 




























Network File Server 32MB RAM^ 2 - 2GB Herd Drives 


1 


14,000 


14,000 








Network Administration Workstation with Network Cerd 


1 


2,350 


2,360 








MPR+ Router Hardware 


1 


4,000 


4,000 








Network Printer with JetDlrect Cerd 


1 


4,000 


4,000 








Ethernet Hub for Network 


1 


2,500 


2,600 








UPS (Power Supply) and Tape Backup Units 


1 


3,000 


3,000 








Network Hardware Sub-TotaF 






29,860 






















Network Software, Netware v3.1 2 


1 


4,800 


4,800 








Novell MPR+ WAN Software 


2 


1,080 


2,160 








Intel LANDask Manager 


1 


1,020 


1,020 








Intel Virus Protection 


1 


680 


680 








Cheyenne ArcServe Tape Backup Software 


1 


1,020 


1,020 








Network Software Sub-Total 






9,680 






















PacBell Telecommunications Installation (estimate) 


1 


3,000 


3,000 








High Spaed Modems DSU/CSU & Synch Adapter 


2 


2000 


4,000 








Site Cabling Charges (per Network device/user, estimate) 


10 


350 


3,600 








Telecommunications Line Charges (per month, estimate) 


6 


300 


1,800 








Telecommuntcetions Sub-Tota 






12,300 






















On-Slte PC Client Workstations with Network Cards 














for MIS Business Systems Analyst 


1 


2,350 


2,360 








for MIS Technical Support 


1 


2,360 


2,350 








for Health & Safety Administrator (Bill LeeJ 


1 


2,360 


2,350 








for Administrative Assistant (Pat Gomez) 


1 


2,350 


2,350 








PC Client Workstation Sub-Tota 


4 




8,400 






















Applications Software Licenses (Network and per user] 


6 


816 


4,890 








Network & Telecommunications Installation & Configuration (in Hours) 


24 


125 


3,000 








Miscellaneous Charges Sub-Tota 






7,890 






















Pre-Tax Sub-Tota 






89,120 








Sales Tax @ B.5% 






5,875 








TOTAL REQUESTED « 






74,995 

















Estimate as of January 20, 1 996 (Klre Chuchom) 



Version 1 .0 



E'd 



36 



PTIP-PSS-SXP Zt?:80 SS, 91 Q3J 



ty and County of San Francisco 




Atta chmen t 2 
Pap e~~ I of: 2 

Department of Human Resources 

WENDELL L. PRYOR, 
HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR 



February 22, 1995 



Mr. Harvey Rose 

Budget Analyst 

1390 Market Street, Ste. 1025 

San Francisco, C A 94102 

Dear Mr. Rose: 

You have asked for a written statement from me concerning the new positions which this 
department has requested in a supplemental appropriation request to the Board of Supervisors. 
As I understand it, your question concerns why none of these positions can be transferred from 
the Employees Retirement System. In response, the following explanation is provided. 

The 1444 Secretary is being requested as clerical and administrative support for the Health 
Service Administrator, Bill Lee, who now has oversight of the operations of the Workers 
Compensation Division (WCD), as well as the Health Service System and the City's health and 
safety programs. No such position existed prior to the transfer of the WCD to DHR. 

The 1864 Senior Systems Analyst is being requested in order to evaluate the information system 
requirements of the WCD, which are critical to the success of the program. Although the ERS 
staff apparently includes an MIS professional, this position has not been predominantly 
concerned with the information systems at the WCD, and, moreover, will remain at ERS to 
continue to respond to the information system needs of the Employees Retirement System. 

The 1652 Accountant is critically needed to develop and implement basic accounting systems at 
the WCD. ERS accountants have performed most of the basic accounting services needed by the 
WCD in the past, but these accounting activities have not been well integrated with the Bill 
Paying Unit of the WCD. Moreover, these accounting services were completely funded by the 
Retirement Trust Fund. The Workers Compensation Division, which has now been transferred 
to HRD, had been the only ERS division funded by the General Fund. Therefore, there may be 
reason to question the scope of accounting services which continue to be needed at the 
Employees Retirement System , and funded by the Retirement Trust Fund, in light of the transfer 
of the WCD to HRD; however, no General Fund savings would result from reducing ERS 
accounting services, and it is not possible to transfer employees (or funds) from the Retirement 
Trust Fund to HRD in order to provide the necessary accounting services for HRD. 



,„ 32. 



(-a oj im.A/.o\ 



Attachment 2 
Page 2 of T 



Finally, with respect to the four temporary adjusters, these are short term positions which are 
expected to reduce a backlog of cases at the WCD which could be closed, thereby reducing the 
average caseload per adjuster in order to improve the effectiveness of claims administration. 
These positions did not exist at the Workers Compensation prior to its transfer to HRD; clearly, 
if the WCD had employed additional adjusters at an earlier date, there would be a smaller 
backlog of claims which should be closed. 

Should you require additional information, please contact me. 

Sincerely yours, 




Wendell L. Pryor 

Director of Human Resources 



WLP:vm 




38 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Item 13 - File 101-94-68 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 



Source of Funds: 



Description: 



San Francisco International Airport 

Ordinance appropriating $26,000,000 from Airport Revenue 
Bond proceeds to Capital Improvement Projects to refund 
outstanding San Francisco Airport Improvement Corporation 
(SFAIC) bonds at a lower rate as part of the Airport's 
purchase of an American Airline's Superbay Hangar for fiscal 
year 1994-95. 

$26,000,000 

San Francisco International Airport Second Series Revenue 
Bond proceeds 

In 1970, the San Francisco Airport Improvement Corporation 
(SFAIC) issued $30,000,000 in SFAIC Bonds for the purpose 
of financing the costs of acquiring, constructing and 
developing a Superbay Hangar and related facilities for 
American Airlines at the San Francisco International 
Airport. The Airport now wishes to acquire the Superbay 
Hangar from American Airlines. 

The Board of Supervisors previously approved the issuance of 
up to $26,000,000 aggregate principal amount of San 
Francisco International Airport Second Series Revenue 
Bonds by the Airports Commission, for the purpose of 
purchasing the Superbay Hangar currently owned by 
American Airlines through the San Francisco Airport 
Improvement Corporation (SFAIC) (File 170-94-18). This 
issuance is scheduled to occur on March 21, 1995. 

The proposed ordinance would appropriate $26,000,000 in 
proceeds from this bond sale to be expended as follows: (1) to 
refinance $21,600,000 in outstanding, high interest rate 
SFAIC bonds at current, lower interest rates as part of the 
purchase of the Superbay Hangar, and pay for $1,055,000 in 
accrued interest when the SFAIC bonds are redeemed for a 
total of $22,655,000, (2) to pay for a debt service reserve fund 
of $2,495,000, and (3) to pay for $850,000 in issuance costs for 
professional and special services associated with the issue of 
the bonds. 

The Airports Commission has entered into a Memorandum of 
Understanding with American Airlines to purchase the 
Superbay Hangar for an $8 million dollar cash payment and 
the assumption of $21,600,000 in outstanding debt on the 
SFAIC bonds issued in 1970 for the original purchase of the 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



"}Q 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Superbay Hangar by American Airlines. When the SFAIC 
bonds are redeemed on March 21, 1995, the Airport must also 
pay an estimated $1,055,000 in accrued interest. 

The interest rate on the outstanding SFAIC bonds is 8.5 
percent. Mr. David Glasser of the Airport states that the 
latest estimated interest rate for the projected $26,000,000 
bond sale scheduled for March 21, 1995 is approximately 6.6 
percent with bond insurance. The Airport wishes to take 
advantage of these lower rates by redeeming the 8.5 percent 
SFAIC bonds and issuing new bonds at the estimated 6.6 
percent interest rate. The total cost of the debt service for the 
$26,000,000 in Airport Revenue Bonds to be paid over a 30 
year period would be approximately $60,500,000 based on an 
estimated interest rate of 6.6 percent. The average annual 
debt service would be approximately $2,000,000. 

The debt service reserve fund is set by the Airport to be equal 
to the maximum annual debt service on the bonds. The fund 
would be used to pay debt service costs in the event of 
insufficient revenues in any one year. The actual amount of 
the fund will be based on debt service terms determined at 
the time the bonds are sold on March 21, 1995. The amount 
required for the bond reserve fund is estimated at $2,495,000, 
assuming the bonds are refinanced at a 6.6 percent interest 
rate. 



Professional and special services costs associated with the 
bond issue include an estimated $350,000. Mr. Glasser states 
that the Airport will use a financial team to provide financial 
advisors, bond counsel, airport consulting and trustee 
services. Member firms of this team were selected through a 
competitive process. The firms selected, the estimated 
contract amounts and the MBE/WBE status of the 
contractors are as follows: 





Estimated 








Contract 


Percent 


MBE/WBE 


Financial Team Member 


Amount 


of Total 


Status 


Co-Financial Advisors 








Lazard Freres & Co. 


$102,050 


29.2% 


— 


Grigsby Branford & Co. 


39,950 


11.4 


MBE 


Co-Bond Counsels 








Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe 89,700 


25.6 


— 


Law Offices of Pamela Jue 


48,300 


13.8 


WBE 


Airport Consultant 








John F. Brown Company 


60,000 


17.2 


— 


Trustee 








First Interstate Bank 


10.000 


13. 





of California 








TOTAL 


$350,000 


100.0% 




BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 







BUDGET ANALYST 

40 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Comment: 



The Airport has multiyear contracts with all member firms 
and has used their services for its last 7 bond issues. 

In addition to the $350,000 noted above, Mr. Glasser further 
advises that the underwriting firm will be selected based on 
the lowest interest rate bid on the March 21, 1995 sale date. 
Bond insurance, or credit enhancement, if purchased, would 
raise the rating of the bonds, lowering the financing costs. 
Insurance will only be purchased if the savings in financing 
costs are greater than the cost of the insurance. Mr. Glasser 
estimates that the underwriting fee, including insurance, will 
total $500,000. 

In summary the proposed supplemental appropriation 
request would appropriate $26,000,000 as follows: 

Refunding Escrow Account for Bond 

Refinancing Including Interest $22,655,000 

Debt Service Reserve Fund 2,495,000 
Professional & Special Services 

Including Underwriting Fees 850.000 

Total $26,000,000 

Mr. John Martin of the Airport advises that the above-noted, 
requested appropriation amounts represent estimates and 
any proceeds remaining after the bond issue is completed 
would be returned to the Airport's Unappropriated Revenue 
Bond Funds and would be subject to future appropriation 
approval by the Board of Supervisors. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

41 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



14 



File 101-94-69 



Department: 



Item: 



Amount: 



Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Department of Public Health (DPH) 

Division of Mental Health, Substance Abuse and Forensics 

Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance appropriating 
$180,000 of Medi-Cal revenue and $220,000 from the General 
Fund Reserve for salaries, fringe benefits, professional and 
non-personal services, materials and supplies and services of 
other departments for the Department of Public Health's 
Center for Special Problems; and providing for ratification of 
action previously taken. 

$400,000 

Medi-Cal revenues ($180,000) and General Fund Reserve 
($220,000) 

During preparation of the FY 1994-95 departmental budget, 
the DPH reduced funding for the Division of Mental Health, 
Substance Abuse and Forensics' Center for Special Problems 
by $800,000. As a result of this reduction in funding, the 
Center for Special Problems was scheduled to be eliminated 
effective July 1, 1994. However, surplus funds from 
previously budgeted premium pay for Police Officers, in the 
amount of $400,000 was subsequently identified by the 
Budget Committee of the Board of Supervisors, enabling the 
Offender Programs at the Center for Special Problems to 
continue operating for the first six months of FY 1994-95 
(July 1, 1994 through December 31,1994). 

The Offender Programs at the Center for Special Problems 
provide psychiatric treatment and case management to 
assaultive and violent mentally ill offenders who are Court- 
ordered to receive treatment, to adults who sexually abuse 
children and HIV services to those foregoing populations. 
There are approximately 290 persons currently enrolled in 
the Offender Programs. 

The Board of Supervisors previously approved a resolution 
urging the DPH to request and urging the Mayor to approve 
a supplemental appropriation in the amount of $400,000 to 
continue the Offender Programs at the Center for Special 
Problems through June 30, 1995 (File 30-94-24). 

The proposed supplemental appropriation request would 
appropriate $400,000 for the Center for Special Problems 
retroactive for the period January 1, 1995 through June 30, 
1995, as follows: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Permanent Salaries 

Mandatory Fringe Benefits 

Professional Services 

Other Non-Personal Services 

Materials and Supplies 

Services of Other Dept. - Reproduction 



$216,891 

54,223 

54,000 

70,386 

3,000 

1.500 

$400,000 



The following provides details of each of the foregoing 
funding requests: 

Permanent Salaries ($216.891) 

Mr. Larry Doyle of the DPH reports that based on the current 
staffing level at the Center for Special Problems, the actual 
amount required for permanent salaries is $186,329 or 
$30,562 less than the $216,891 requested amount. The 
$186,329 would fund the following full time existing positions 
retroactive for the period January 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995: 



FTE 



0.5 


$16,939 


0.5 


20,995 


0.5 


26,799 


0.5 


52,585 


0.5 


38,775 


0.5 


14,694 


0.5 


15.542 


3.5 


$186,329 



1426 Senior Clerk Typist 
2932 Senior Psychiatric Social 

Worker 
2930 Psychiatric Social Worker 
2232 Senior Physician Specialist 
2574 Clinical Psychologist 
2593 Health Program Coordinator 
2736 Porter 

Total 

Fringe Ben efit s ($ 54 .2 23 ) 



This amount should be reduced by $7,641 from $54,223 to 
$46,582 or 25 percent of the actual amount of permanent 
salaries required of $186,329 

Professional Services ($54.000) 

This amount would pay for psychological testing materials 
and psychological testing services. 

Projected Estimated 

Expended Expenditure Total Budget 

Budget as of 1/31/95 2/1/95-6/30/95 Expenditure Deficiency 



$52,021 $52,021 



$54,000 



$106,021 $54,000 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



W\ 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Other Non-Personal Se rvices ($70.388) 

This amount would be used to pay for rent, telephone costs, 
scavenger services etc. 

Projected Estimated 

Budgeted Expended Expenditure Total Budget 

Amount as of 1/31/95 2/1/95-6/30/95 Expenditure Deficiency 

$184,590 $164,521 $81,674 $246,195 $61,605 

Based on the Budget Analyst's estimated budget deficiency of 
$61,605, the supplemental appropriation request for Other 
Non-Personal Services should be reduced by $8,781, from 
$70,386 to $61,605. 

Materials and Supplies ($3.000) 

This amount would be used to pay for various office supplies. 

Projected Estimated 

Budgeted Expended Expenditure Total Budget 

Amount as of 1/31/95 2/1/95 - 6/30/95 Expenditure Deficiency 

$15,000 $9,943 $7,000 $16,943 $1,943 

Based on the Budget Analyst's estimated budget deficiency of 
$1,943, the supplemental appropriation request for Materials 
and Supplies should be reduced by $1,057, from $3,000 to 
$1,943. 

Reproduction ($1.500) 

This amount would be used to pay for printing patient forms 
and program materials. 

Projected Estimated 

Budgeted Expended Expenditure Total Budget 

Amount as of 1/31/95 2/1/95-6/30/95 Expenditure Deficiency 

$3,500 $3,500 $1,500 $5,000 $1,500 

Comment: As noted above, the actual amount required for permanent 

salaries is $186,329. As such, the proposed ordinance should 
be amended to reduce the amount of permanent salaries by 
$30,562 from $216,891 to $186,329. The fringe benefit 
amount should also be reduced by $7,641 from $54,223 to 
$46,582 to correspond to the decrease in permanent salaries. 
Additionally, the proposed ordinance should be amended to 
reduce the other non-personal Services amount by $8,781 and 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

the materials and supplies amount by $1,057. The total 
request of $400,000 should be reduced by $48,041 to 
$351,959. 

Recommendations: 1. Amend the proposed ordinance to (1) reduce the amount of 
Permanent Salaries by $30,562 from $216,891 to $186,329 
and the amount of Fringe Benefits by $7,641 from $54,223 to 
$46,582, and (2) reduce the amount of Other Non-Personal 
Services by $8,781 from $70,386 to $61,605 and (2) the 
amount of Materials and Supplies by $1,057 from $3,000 to 
$1,943, for a total reduction of $48,041. 

2. Based on the Board of Supervisors prior policy decision to 
continue this program, including its previously approved 
resolution requesting that this supplemental appropriation 
be submitted, approve the proposed ordinance as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

AS 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Item 15 - File 101-94-33.1 

Note: This item was continued at the January 25, 1995, Budget Committee 
Meeting. 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



District Attorney 

Supplemental appropriation ordinance for salaries and fringe 
benefits; subject of previous budget denial. 

$496,889 

General Fund-General Reserve 

As previously reported to the Budget Committee on 
November 30, 1994, the District Attorney's Fiscal Year 1994- 
95 General Fund budget request for Criminal and Civil 
Prosecution and Administration salaries, was reduced by a 
total of $957,750, from $10,966,463 to $10,008,713. 

At the Budget Committee meeting of November 30, 1994, the 
District Attorney requested an additional $1,650,000 
including salaries of $1,377,000, fringe benefits of $255,000 
and training of $18,000. 

Based on the recommendations of the Budget Analyst, the 
Budget Committee recommended that the District Attorney 
be granted $1,153,111 of the $1,650,000 request, including 
salaries of $957,750, fringes of $177,361 and training funds of 
$18,000. Based on the Mayor's budget instructions, this 
amount fully restored the District Attorney's budget to his 
1994-95 budget request. The $1,153,111 request was 
subsequently approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

The Budget Analyst recommended that the remaining 
balance of the $1,650,000 request, or $496,889 be denied. The 
Budget Committee, instead, continued the balance of the 
District Attorney's request of $496,889, including $419,250 in 
salaries and $77,639 in fringe benefits. Further, the Budget 
Committee requested that the Budget Analyst verify the 
savings that the District Attorney would achieve from his 
Weekend Rebooking Program, since the District Attorney 
advised the Budget Committee that he would have to 
eliminate the Weekend Rebooking Program if the Budget 
Committee accepted the recommendations of the Budget 
Analyst. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



The Budget Analyst has determined the following 
information regarding the Weekend Rebooking Program: 

1. The Weekend Rebooking Program is one component 
of a three component Expedited Rebooking Program 
used by the District Attorney's Office to reduce the 
rebooking time period to one court day (approximately 
24 hours) from the statutorily mandated two-court-day, 
non-expedited system. The other two components of the 
Expedited Rebooking Program are (1) Narcotic Cases 
Rebooking, whereby the head of the Narcotics Unit 
performs rebookings of felony narcotics cases, and (2) 
Expedited Weekday Rebooking, whereby on each 
weekday, a Principal Attorney in the District Attorney's 
Office is detailed to assist in rebooking in order to 
achieve the rebooking within 24 hours. The purpose of 
the Expedited Rebooking Program is to reduce the 
number of County Jail incarcerations. 

2. The rebooking activity of the District Attorney's 
Office results in as many as fifty percent of defendants 
being held on felony charges being released as a result of 
the case being discharged (charges are dropped) or the 
charges being reduced to a misdemeanor, thus 
permitting the defendant to be cited out by the Sheriffs 
Office. Rebooking thus results in a reduced number of 
incarcerations and the Expedited Rebooking Program 
further reduces the number of incarcerations. 

3. According to Ms. Bridget Bane of the District 
Attorney's Office, between 1987 and 1992 there was a 
dedicated Expedited Rebooking Program Unit within the 
District Attorney's Office. However, since 1992, 
prosecution staff within the District Attorney's Office 
have been detailed for service in the Expedited 
Rebooking Program. Ms. Bane has provided the Budget 
Analyst with staffing data showing that approximately 
1.2 FTE positions are dedicated to weekend rebooking 
and approximately 1.2 FTE positions are dedicated to 
expedited weekday rebooking, for a total of 2.4 FTE 
positions, including nonprogram time (training, 
vacations, sick leave, etc.). Ms. Bane further reports that 
approximately 0.6 of a FTE position is dedicated to 
felony narcotics cases in connection with rebooking and 
that approximately 0.75 FTE positions provide support 
to the Expedited Rebooking Program. Personnel costs for 
the attorney and support positions allocated to the 
Expedited Rebooking Program are as follows: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 








Title Classification 


FTE 


Salary at 
Top Step 


Total Annual 
Salary Costs 


Principal Attorney 8180 
Legal Secretary II 1460 


3.00 
0.75 
3.75 


$98,136 
$48,363 


$294,408 

36.272 

$330,680 



The total estimated annual cost of the Expedited 
Rebooking Program, including $330,680 in salaries and 
$60,184 in fringe benefits, is $390,864. 

4. However, whether the District Attorney's Office 
accomplishes rebooking on an expedited basis within 
approximately 24 hours or within the statutory limit of 
two court days, the number of rebooking cases remains 
the same - the only variable is how quickly the 
rebooking occurs. Since the number of cases is the same, 
the only difference in the staffing required to perform 
rebooking under an expedited or non-expedited process 
is the relative efficiency of each system. The Budget 
Analyst estimates that the maximum additional cost of 
the Expedited Rebooking Program, compared to 
rebooking on a non-expedited basis, is $150,000, 
including the cost of one FTE Principal Attorney 
position. The District Attorney's Office does not concur 
with this estimate and states that the additional cost of 
the Expedited Rebooking Program is $390,864 as shown 
above. 

5. The District Attorney's Office has performed an 
analysis of the costs avoided in calendar year 1994 due 
to Weekend Rebooking Program activities. That analysis 
shows that approximately $407,600 in jail overcrowding 
fines were avoided by such rebooking. The Budget 
Analyst has reviewed that analysis and concurs with 
these approximate savings for calendar year 1994. 

6. The jail overcrowding fine rate in effect through 
November 30, 1994, was $300 per inmate, per day. 
Effective December 1, 1994, the rate for jail 
overcrowding was increased to $2,500 per inmate, per 
day, and is scheduled to increase to $5,000 per inmate 
per day in April of 1995. Sergeant Ridgeway of the 
Sheriffs Department reports that between October 31, 
1994, and February 23, 1995, the City was assessed only 
one fine of $300 for jail overcrowding, which occurred in 
the month of November, 1994. However, Sergeant 
Ridgeway advised that November and December are 
typically light months for incarcerations. Sergeant 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Ridgeway has provided the Budget Analyst with a list of 
actions taken by the City to alleviate jail overcrowding 
(see Attachment). 

Comments: 1. Because this request was the subject of previous 

budgetary denial, approval of this request would require a 
two-thirds affirmative vote by the Board of Supervisors. 

2. As previously stated, the District Attorney's Office 
original request of $1,650,000 included salaries of $1,377,000, 
$957,750 of which has already been approved by the Board of 
Supervisors. The District Attorney's Office has stated that its 
objective is to have its FY 1994-95 budget increased to the 
level of the FY 1993-94 revised budget level. The FY 1993-94 
revised funding for salaries in the District Attorney's Office 
was $11,245,597 ($11,329,642 less $84,045 for two positions 
deleted as a result of the Budget Analyst's Zero Based Budget 
recommendations). However, the requested amount of 
$1,377,000 in salaries would increase the Department's FY 
1994-95 funding for salaries to $11,385,713 ($10,008,713 
approved in the FY 1994-95 Budget plus $1,377,000 from the 
Department's requested supplemental). Thus, the 
Department would be funded $140,116 for salaries in FY 
1994-95 in excess of the amount of its revised FY 1993-94 
Budget ($11,385,713 less $11,245,597). 

3. Therefore, since the District Attorney's Office has advised 
the Budget Analyst that its objective is to have its FY 1994- 
95 budget increased to the level of the FY 1993-94 revised 
budget level, as a minimum, the proposed supplemental 
appropriation request should be reduced by the amount of 
$165,617 ($140,116 in salaries plus $25,501 in fringe 
benefits), or from $496,889 to $331,272. The District 
Attorney's Office concurs with this reduction. 

4. As previously noted, the Budget Analyst estimates that 
the additional costs of the Expedited Rebooking Program are 
$150,000, including the costs for one Principal Attorney, in 
contrast to the District Attorney's Office estimated additional 
costs of $390,864. 

5. At the Budget Committee meeting of February 8, 1995, the 
District Attorney reported that his Office would need 
$267,000 of the requested $496,689 to finish out the fiscal 
year. The Budget Committee expressed an interest in 
funding the District Attorney's Office in the amount of 
$200,000. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

6. Ms. Bane reports that if the District Attorney's Office is 
provided additional funding in the amount of $200,000, 
$170,600 would be allocated to salaries and $29,400 would be 
allocated to mandatory fringe benefits. 

7. The previous action of the Board of Supervisors, to 
approve supplemental funding in the amount of $1,153,111 of 
the District Attorney's total $1,650,000 request, including 
salaries of $957,750, fringe benefits of $177,361, and training 
funds of $18,000, has already fully restored the District 
Attorney's budget to his FY 1994-95 budget request which 
was submitted consistent with the Mayor's budget 
instructions. Except for the Police and Library Departments, 
which received voter mandates by the San Francisco 
electorate, no other City and County department has received 
such a full budget restoration as has been recommended by 
the Budget Analyst for the District Attorney. 

Recommendations: 1. For the reason stated in Comment No. 7 above, disapprove 
this request. 

2. If the Committee decides to approve $200,000 of this 
supplemental appropriation request in accordance with 
Comment No. 5 above, reduce the requested amount of 
$496,889 by $296,889 as follows: 

From To. Savings 

Salaries $419,250 $170,600 $248,650 

Fringe Benefits 77 r 639 29 f 400 48 r 239 

Total $496,889 $200,000 $296,889 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



JAN- 12- 95 THU 14:21 



P. 02 
Attachment 



City and County of San Francisco 



OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF 




Michael Hennessey 

SHERIFF 
415 - 554 • 7225 



Date; Thursday, January 12, 159^ 

To: Stan Jones 

Budget Analyst's Office 

San Francisco Board of Supervisors 

From: Set. Richard Ridgeway, Financial Services Manager, 
Office 0£ San Francisco Sheriff 

Rei Changes That Reduce Jail Population 

First of all, I wanted to apologize for not getting this information 
to you sooner. Our department is in the process of packing and 
being moved, while I have been trying to gather the information that 
you requested. Obviously, there has been repeated interruptions. 

The programs that are on-going, which have an impact on our reducing 
jail over crowding are as follows: 

&) Bxpansion of SWAP: Allowing more participation, 
bj Bxpansion of County Paroles More inmates eligible. 

c) Accelerated Probation Reports; Reports processed fasted, to 
increase volume. 

d) Continuation of Residential Beds: Inmates removed the jail after 
being assessed by the Sheriff's Department and County Parole for 
placement , 

e) Cite out of all non-violent misdemeanor warrants: Individual 
given a court appearance date, rather than waiting in jail, 

f) District Attorney re-bookings on Weekends and Evenings: releases 
those individuals from jail, when the District Attorney intends 
to drop the charges, 

g) Citation Release: After not meeting the department's 
qualification for cite, the individuals are reviewed by "Super 
Cite", and if they meet their standards, are cited and released. 

h) OR: Release on their Own Recognizance, after being reviewed by 
and approved by the judge on duty, the individual is released, 

i) Bail Commissioner 

j) Court Ordered Barly Release: where the inmates serve only 70% of 
their sentence. 



ROOM 333, CITY HALL 



SAN FRANCISCO. CA 94102 

51 



FAX 415-554-7050 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Items 16 and 17 - Files 216-95-1 and 216-95-1.1 



Items: 



Description: 



Item 16, File 216-95-1 - Resolution adopting final negative 
declaration, finding and determining that the new 911 
Emergency Dispatch Center on the property located at 1003 
Turk Street in the Margaret S. Hayward Playground, 
Assessor's Block 759, Lot 1, will have no significant impact on 
the environment, and adopting and incorporating findings of 
final negative declaration. 

Item 17, File 216-95-1.1 - Ordinance (1) selecting and setting 
aside certain real property at 1003 Turk Street in the 
Margaret S. Hayward Playground, Assessor's Block 759, Lot 
1, for the construction and operation of a new combined 
Emergency Communications Center, (2) adopting findings 
that such project is in conformity with the Master Plan and 
consistent with the eight Priority Policies of City Planning 
Code Section 101.1, and (3) adopting and incorporating 
findings pursuant to the California Environmental Quality 
Act. 

The Board of Supervisors, pursuant to Section 6a of Article 
XIV of the 1898 and 1929 Charters and Sections 11.101 and 
11.102 of the 1932 Charter, has the authority to select and 
set aside by ordinance real property in the Margaret S. 
Hayward Playground, formerly known as Jefferson Square, 
Assessor's Block 759, Lot 1 (the "Hayward Playground"), for 
the construction of buildings and related improvements. This 
site would serve as a central fire alarm and police 
communications center to allow for effective responses to 
City-wide emergencies. Hayward Playground is Recreation 
and Park Department land bounded by Golden Gate Avenue, 
Eddy Street, Laguna Street and Gough Street. 

The Board of Supervisors previously set aside real property 
located in Hayward Playground for the construction and 
operation of the Central Fire Alarm Station and the Interim 
Emergency Command Center (a temporary building). The 
Central Fire Alarm Station currently houses the Fire 
Department Dispatch Unit and the Department of Electricity 
and Telecommunications (DET) Support Services. The 
Interim Emergency Command Center is currently occupied 
by the Mayor's Office of Emergency Services. The proposed 
ordinance (File 216-95-1.1) would set aside additional real 
property in Hayward Playground for the construction and 
operation of a new 911 Combined Emergency Dispatch 
Center, which is a computer-aided dispatch system for police, 
fire and emergency medical services. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



The property in Hayward Playground is needed for the 
construction of the new 911 Center because, although there is 
sufficient space on the property previously set aside by the 
Board of Supervisors for the Central Fire Alarm Station and 
the Interim Emergency Command Center to construct the 
new 911 Center, the functions currently located at the 
Central Fire Alarm Station and the Interim Emergency 
Command Center must remain operational during the 
construction of the new 911 Center. After the completion of 
the new 911 Center, the functions currently located at the 
Central Fire Alarm Station and the Interim Emergency 
Command Center will be relocated to the new 911 Center. 

The additional property to be set aside for the construction of 
the new 911 Center is the present location of Recreation and 
Park facilities, including two basketball courts and one 
volleyball court. In addition, there are tennis courts and a 
soccer field immediately adjacent to the property on which 
the new 911 Center is to be built. According to Mr. Joel 
Robinson of the Recreation and Park Department, the two 
basketball courts and the volleyball court will be temporarily 
relocated to a portion of the existing soccer field, thereby 
reducing the size of the soccer field by approximately 1,300 
square feet, during the construction of the new 911 Center. 
Under the proposed ordinance (File 216-95-1.1), following the 
completion of the new 911 Center, the basketball and 
volleyball courts would be permanently constructed on the 
roofs of the Central Fire Alarm Station and the Interim 
Emergency Command Center, the top floors of which are 
scheduled to be demolished after the new 911 Center is 
completed. 

In November of 1994, the Department of City Planning 
adopted and issued a final negative declaration for the 
construction of the 911 Center at the site on Hayward 
Playground, wherein the Department of City Planning 
concluded that there is no substantial evidence that the 911 
Center construction project could have a significant effect on 
the environment. The proposed resolution (File 216-95-1) 
would provide for the adoption of this final negative 
declaration by the Board of Supervisors. 

In December of 1994, the City Planning Commission adopted 
a resolution, wherein the Planning Commission found that 
the construction of the 911 Center is in conformity with the 
City's Master Plan and is consistent with the Eight Priority 
Policies of City Planning Code Section 101.1. The proposed 
ordinance (File 216-95-1.1) would also adopt these findings of 
the Planning Commission. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

SI 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 



Comments: 1. The Office of the Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) 

estimates that the total project costs for constructing the 911 
Combined Emergency Dispatch Center will be $58,109,000, 
as follows: 

Construction Costs $13,220,000 

Furnishings, Fixtures & Equipment 1,000,000 

Computer Equipment 29,868,000 

Project Management - CAO's Office 946,000 

Controller's ISD 846,000 

Conversion Costs 280,000 

Lease Financing Costs 11.949.000 

Total $58,109,000 

Of the approximately $58.1 million total estimated cost of the 
new 911 Center, approximately $49.0 million will come from 
lease financing that will be repaid from 911 Emergency 
Response Fee Revenues, and approximately $2.1 million will 
come from 1992 Fire Protection Bond funds that can be 
applied to this project, for a total of approximately $51.1 
million from those two funding sources. The balance needed 
of approximately $7.0 million ($58.1 million less $51.1 
million) is anticipated to come from the City's General Fund. 

2. Mr. Ralph Jacobson of the CAO's Office advises that the 
estimated cost to build the temporary and permanent 
recreational facilities to replace the recreational facilities 
currently located at the proposed site of the new 911 Center 
is approximately $600,000. According to Mr. Jacobson, this 
cost is included in the $13,220,000 construction cost noted 
above. 

3. According to Mr. Robinson, in order to mitigate against 
the disruption that will be caused by the construction of the 
new 911 Center in Hay ward Playground, residents of the 
Western Addition District have requested $1 million for the 
construction of improvements, including (a) re-landscaping 
and installing new lighting for the soccer field, (b) 
rehabilitating the existing clubhouse, (c) installing new 
playground equipment, and (d) constructing accessibility 
improvements. Mr. Jacobson advises that, as noted above, 
$600,000 has been included in the budget for the new 911 
Center in order to build interim and permanent basketball 
and volleyball courts, resurface the existing tennis courts and 
resurface the soccer field. However, according to Mr. 
Jacobson, there are not sufficient funds in the current budget 
for the additional improvements requested by the Western 
Addition District. However, the CAO's Office would be 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

willing to make these extended improvements if an 
additional source of funds could be identified. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed resolution (File 216-95-1) and the 
proposed ordinance (File 216-95-1.1) are policy matters for 
the Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

ss 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995, Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 18 - File 185-95-1 

Department: Mayor's Office of Children, Youth and their Families 

(MOCYF) 

Item: Resolution approving the Fiscal Year 1995-96 Children's 

Services Plan for the San Francisco Children's Fund in 
accordance with Charter Section 6.415. 

Description: Proposition J, commonly known as the "Children's 

Amendment," was approved by the electorate in November, 
1991. The Children's Amendment amended Section 6.415 of 
the Charter to require the establishment of the San Francisco 
Children's Fund. The San Francisco Children's Fund 
augments the existing level of expenditures for services and 
programs for children. 

The Children's Amendment requires that the Mayor submit 
to the Board of Supervisors, by December of each year, a 
"Children's Services Plan" for the next fiscal year to specify 
the goals and objectives to be achieved through expenditures 
from the Children's Fund, to outline proposals for 
expenditures from the Children's Fund and to recommend 
City departments to administer the funded programs. The 
proposed resolution would approve the Fiscal Year 1995-96 
Children's Services Plan. 

The proposed FY 1995-96 Children's Services Plan budgets a 
total of $13,840,000 and identifies four areas of priority for the 
coming year. These four areas are: 

(1) School Readiness 

School Readiness programs would be designed to 
ensure that children, particularly low-income 
children, are prepared to enter school with the social, 
mental, emotional, and intellectual skills they need. 
Programs in this area would be oriented toward 
children from birth to kindergarten age. School 
Readiness would receive a total of $2,526,500. 

(2) After School Child Care and After School 
Enrichment 

After School programs would be designed to ensure 
that young children (ages six to twelve) have access to 
adequately supervised care and enriched activities 
while their parents are at work. After School 
programs would receive a total of $2,875,500, 
including $60,000 in funding for the new Beacon 
Centers initiative outlined below. 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995, Budget Committee Meeting 

(3) Youth Development I Community Service 

Youth Development/Community Service programs 
would be designed to prepare youth (ages ten to 17) for 
eventual self-sufficiency by providing them with 
opportunities to engage in activities that strengthen 
their social, cultural, cognitive, and vocational skills. 
Youth Development/Community Service programs 
would receive a total of $5,755,000, including $240,000 
in funding for the new Beacon Centers initiative 
outlined below. 

(4) Family Support Services 

Family Support Services are timely support services 
to reinforce intact families. Such services include a 
variety of child development, education, drop-in 
health service, advocacy, and referrals. Priority 
would be given to at-risk families. Family Support 
Services would receive a total of $1,693,000. 

The Children's Amendment requires that for the first four 
fiscal years in which monies are set aside, the City must 
allocate at least 25 percent of the Children's Fund to each of 
three areas of "eligible services": 1) childcare, 2) health and 
social services, and 3) job readiness, training, and 
placement. The balance of not more than 25 percent of the 
Fund may be used for a fourth area of eligible services, 
consisting of libraries, recreation, delinquency prevention, 
and education programs for children. In the proposed FY 
1995-96 Children's Services Plan, each of these four 
mandated service areas would receive exactly 25 percent of 
the $13,840,000 estimated total funding, or $3,460,000 
(including $3,212,500 in program costs and $247,500 in 
administrative, evaluation and technical support costs). 

Proposed Budget: The FY 1995-96 budget for the Children's Fund, included in 
the proposed Children's Services Plan, is organized 
according to the four areas of priority identified by MOCYF: 
School Readiness; After School Care; Youth Development; 
and Family Support Services. Within these four areas, the 
MOCYF has specified expenditures for the four mandated 
funding categories under the Children's Amendment: Child 
Care; Health and Social Services; Job Readiness Training; 
and Delinquency Prevention/Education/Libraries/ 
Recreation. 

The following budget of $13,840,000 contains $8,153,000 in 
funding for 47 continuing collaborative projects implemented 
by community-based organizations in cooperation with City 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



57 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995, Budget Committee Meeting 



departments, $1,997,000 for in-house services to be provided 
by City departments, $2,700,000 will be available for new 
collaborative projects for organizations selected in an open 
application process including $300,000 for the Beacon Centers 
initiative (Beacons are school-based community centers open 
7 days a week to provide a variety of programs such as 
afterschool tutoring, health screening and job training 
delivered by community agencies in partnership with school 
staff) and $990,000 in evaluation, technical support and 
administrative costs: 



Proposed 

FY 1995-96 

Budget School Readiness 



Contracts 
Continued from 94-95 

Child Care $1,318,500 

Health and Social Services 348,000 

Delinquen cy Prevention/Education/ 
Libr arv/Recr e ati on 168,000 

New (issued under RFP) 

Child Care 470,000 

In-House Services 

Child Care 

San Francisco Unified School District 

Child Development Center 80,000 

Health and Social Services 
Department of Public Health 
Community Health Outstation Nurses 22,000 

Delinquency Prevention/Education/ 
Libra rv/Recreation 
San Francisco Public Library 
Kidsmobile 120.000 

TOTAL, SCHOOL READINESS FUNDS $2£26 T 500 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995, Budget Committee Meeting 



After Scho ol Child Care and Enrichment 

Contracts 

Continued from 94-95 

Child Care $390,000 

Health and Social Services 391,000 

Job Readiness. Training and Placement 190,000 

Delinquency Prevention/Education/ 
Library/Recreation 532,000 

New (issued under KFP) 

Child Care 469,500 

Child Care (Beacon Centers) 60,000 

Delinquency Prevention/Education/ 

Libraries and Recreation 7,500 

In-House Services 

Child Care 

Recreation and Park Department 

Latchkey programs 245,500 

Health and Social Services 
Department of Public Health 
Mental Health Outreach 162,000 

San Francisco Unified School District 

Health Center 22,000 

Healthy Start Programs 100,000 

Delinquency Prevention/Education/Librarv/Recreation 
San Francisco Public Library 
Children 's Saturday Library hours 
Tenderloin Outreach 
Middle School Outreach Librarians 
Branch Libraries (Bayview Hunter's Point/ 
Youth Guidance Center) 306.000 

TOTAL, AFTER SCHOOL CHILD CARE 

AND ENRICHMENT FUNDS $2,875,500, 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995, Budget Committee Meeting 



Youth Development/Communi ty Service 

Contracts 

Continued from 94-95 

Health and Social Services $204,000 

Job Readiness, Training, Placement 1,795,500 

Delinquency Prevention/Education/ 
Libraries and Recreation 1,498,000 

New (issued under RFP) 

Health and Social Services 246,500 

Health and Social Services (Beacon Centers) 90,000 

Job Readiness. Training, Placement 915,500 

Delinquency Prevention/Education/ 
Libraries and Recreation 291,000 

Delinquency Prevention/Education/ 
Libraries and Recreation (Beacon Centers) 150,000 

In-House Services 

Health and Social Services 

Department of Social Services 

Teen GAIN 225,000 

Job Readiness Training. Placement 

Recreation and Park Department 

Workreation 67,500 

Private Industry Council 

Mini-Step Program 244,000 

Department of Social Services 

Foster Care Vocational Education 28,000 

TOTAL, YOUTH DEVELOPMENT/ 

COMMUNITY SERVICE FUNDS $5,755,000 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995, Budget Committee Meeting 



Family S upport Services 

Contracts 

Continued from 94-95 

Child Care $179,000 

Health and Social Services 999,000 

Delinquency Prevention/Education/ 
Lihrary/Recreation 140,000 

In-House Services 

Health and Social Services 

Department of Public Health 

Satellite Clinics 375 r 000 

TOTAL, FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES FUNDS $1,693,000 



Evaluation and Technical Supp ort 270,000 

MO(TrF Admi nistrative Costs 

(approximately 5.2 percent of total 

Children's Fund) 720,000 

TOTAL FISCAL YEAR 1995-96 CHILDREN'S 
FUND BUDGET $13340,000 



Comments: 1. The Children's Amendment requires that the City 

maintain a level of expenditure for children's services which 
is equal to or greater than the level of expenditure in fiscal 
year 1990-91 or 1991-92, whichever is greater, and sets aside a 
certain percentage of property tax revenues to fund additional 
services above and beyond the level of services funded prior to 
adoption of the Children's Amendment. The amount of these 
property tax revenues is two and one half cents per $100 of 
assessed valuation for the 1994-95 fiscal year and the six 
subsequent fiscal years. The Children's Amendment has 
been in effect for three years, and will expire after a total of 
ten years in 2002. 

2. In 1992, the Controller certified that the City's 
appropriations for children's services prior to adoption of the 
Children's Amendment totaled approximately $50 million. 
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



fti 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995, Budget Committee Meeting 



This baseline amount of approximately $50 million 
represents the required minimum expenditure by the City for 
children's services in each of the ten fiscal years. Each 
succeeding year the baseline amount will be adjusted 
annually by the percentage change in aggregate City 
appropriations since the base year. 

3. The amount of the Children's Fund in FY 1993-94 was 
$12.75 million. The Children's Fund for the 1994-95 fiscal 
year is approximately $13.84 million. According to the 
Controller's Office, an estimate for the Children's Fund for 
FY 1995-96 will not be available until after July 1, 1995. 
Therefore, for the purpose of this Children's Services Plan, 
the MOCYF has conservatively estimated that the Children's 
Fund for FY 1995-96 will be the same as for the 1994-95 fiscal 
year, or $13.84 million. 

4. The Children's Amendment requires a public planning 
process, in which public hearings are to be held by the Public 
Health, Juvenile Probation, Social Services, Recreation and 
Parks, and Public Library Commissions prior to submission 
of the Mayor's Children's Services Plan to the Board of 
Supervisors. According to the proposed plan, those hearings 
were held on October 15, 1994 and December 6, 1994. 

5. In Fiscal Year 1996-97, the Board of Supervisors may 
modify or eliminate the minimum funding requirements, 
noted above, for child care, health and social services, job 
readiness training, and delinquency prevention/education/ 
libraries/recreation. 

6. The proposed FY 1995-96 Children's Services Plan includes 
administrative costs of $720,000, or 5.2 percent of the total 
estimated $13.84 million Children's Fund, which is $200,000 
less than the current year's allocation of $920,000. However, 
this year's Plan budgets technical support costs under a 
separate category. In past years, technical support costs were 
included as part of administrative costs. If costs budgeted 
separately for evaluation and technical support of $270,000 
are included under administrative costs, the total rises to 
$990,000 or 7.2 percent of the total Children's Fund, the same 
percentage as in FY 1994-95. In total dollars, the budgeted 
administrative, technical and evaluation costs for FY 1995-96 
of $990,000 is $70,000 higher than total of the $920,000 
budgeted for administrative costs in FY 1994-95. 

The Children's Amendment contains no language specifying 
maximum administrative costs. These administrative costs 
would support MOCYF activities, as well as administrative 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995, Budget Committee Meeting 

costs at the various departments where children's services 
are implemented. The MOCYF will provide budget details for 
these administrative costs with their FY 1995-96 Budget 
requests. 

7. As noted above, the Children's Services Plan budget also 
includes $270,000 for a Plan evaluation and technical support 
services. The evaluation is for an outside assessment of the 
effectiveness of the Plan. Mr. Alan Smith of the Mayor's 
Office states that Request for Proposal (RFP) for a Plan 
evaluation by an outside consultant is currently being 
prepared. Details of the evaluation contract and the technical 
support services are expected to be available by June, in time 
for the 1995-96 budget request. The evaluation is expected to 
be completed by the fourth quarter of 1996. Technical support 
refers to consulting services in such areas as budgeting 
systems, conflict resolution and organizational efficiency. 
These services are provided to collaborating community- 
based organizations to increase the efficiency and 
effectiveness of collaborative programs. 

8. Approval of the proposed resolution would not authorize 
the appropriation of any funds, but would only approve the 
FY 1995-96 Children's Services Plan, in conformance with 
the Children's Amendment. The expenditure of all funds 
would still be subject to appropriation approval by the Board 
of Supervisors in the FY 1995-96 budget. 

Recanmaxlatiatt Approval of the proposed resolution is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



63 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 19 - File 68-95-3 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 



Mayor's Office of Housing (MOH) 

Resolution authorizing the Mayor of the City and County of 
San Francisco to apply for, accept and expend Section 108 
Loan Guarantee Funds in a total amount not to exceed 
$5,300,000 from the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban 
Development; indirect costs associated with the acceptance of 
the loan funds will be paid by Community Development 
Block Grant Funds. 

Up to $5,300,000 



Source of Funds: U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development 
(HUD) 

Description: The Section 108 Loan Guarantee Program is an extension of 

the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program 
whereby localities can borrow funds against their future 
CDBG grants or program income. Under this program, HUD 
guarantees notes held by public entities and in return, these 
public entities pledge their future CDBG funds and/or 
program income toward repayment. The MOH advises that 
the proposed Loan Guarantee Funds would be used to 
provide financing for the development of mixed income, 
private non-profit owned rental housing to replace existing 
distressed public housing, owned by the San Francisco 
Housing Authority (SFHA), which is located at Webster and 
Haight Streets in Hayes Valley. Specifically, the loan 
proceeds would be used to pay demolition and clearing costs 
and the development of new housing at two sites located at 
Webster and Haight Streets. The MOH states that the 
$5,300,000 in loan monies would be repaid over 20 years by 
(1) any positive cash flow from the housing project which may 
become available (2) CDBG Program Income monies 
generated from the sale or lease of property owned by the 
Redevelopment Agency (see Comment No. 1). Under Section 
108 regulations, CDBG funds must be used to pay off the 
loan, according to Mr. Joel Lipski of the MOH. 

According to the MOH, the SFHA public housing located and 
Webster and Haight Streets, which was constructed in 1962, 
consists of two sites separated by two blocks. One site is on 2 
acres and the other site is on 2.4 acres. There are a total of 
294 apartment units currently on the sites. The demolition 
and redevelopment of the sites was recommended by 
consultants hired by SFHA. The proposed replacement 
housing would include approximately 195 new units, 60 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



percent of which would be supported by project-based Section 
8 rental subsidies to make them affordable to current SFHA 
tenants, and 40 percent of which would have below-market 
rents under the Federal Low Income Housing Tax Credit 
Program. The MOH advises that an additional 99 units 
would be built off the Webster and Haight Street location, at 
locations yet to be determined, resulting in total replacement 
of the existing 294 units. According to the MOH, existing 
tenants would be temporarily relocated into existing public 
housing or with tenant-based Section 8 Certificates and 
would be given the right of first refusal to occupy the new 
replacement housing. Relocation costs would be paid from 
SFHA funds. 

The MOH reports that the SFHA has selected the 
development team of Related Companies of California, a 
private firm, and Mc Cormack Baron and Associates, a 
private firm, to work with the Hayes Valley North and South 
Tenants Association on a redevelopment plan. The SFHA has 
agreed to provide a long term land lease of the two sites 
located at Webster and Haight Streets to a partnership, 
which will consist of Related Companies of California, Mc 
Cormack Baron and Associates, Hayes Valley North and 
South Tenants Association and a non-profit subsidiary of 
SFHA. 

The MOH advises that the development team estimates that 
the demolition and clearing of the two sites at Webster and 
Haight Streets and the development of new housing will cost 
approximately $32,171,000. Financing identified by the 
development team thus far for this project totals $27,071,000 
or $5,100,000 less the estimated cost of this project. The 
MOH is proposing to use the $5,300,000 ($5,100,000 plus 
$200,000 for contingencies) in Section 108 Loan Guarantee 
Funds to pay for the balance of needed financing for this 
project. 

Mr. Lipski advises that the $5,300,000 Loan Guarantee 
Funds would in turn be loaned to the developers of the 
project. According to Mr. Lipski, under the terms of this loan 
agreement, if the development partnership complies with all 
the terms of its loan agreement with the City, this loan would 
be forgiven at the end of its 75 year term. The MOH would 
forgive the loan in order to allow the housing project to 
remain affordable to low income persons. If the partnership 
had to pay the loan back, it would then become prohibitive for 
the partners to maintain this property as low income 
property, according to Mr. Lipski. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

AS 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Comment: According to Mr. Lipski, if the project does not generate 

sufficient cash flow to repay the Section 108 loan from HUD 
and if the Redevelopment Agency should not have sufficient 
CDBG Program Income available to pay off the proposed 
Section 108 loan than the City would use other available 
CDBG funds. Mr. Lipski advises that if no CDBG funds are 
available, the Federal government could take over the 
housing project as collateral. According to Mr. Lipski, in no 
event would General Fund monies be required to pay off the 
loan. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed resolution is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 20 - File 101-90-127.8 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Release of reserved funds in the amount of $622,360, for 
construction contracts for the repair of the existing Main 
Library Building. 

$622,360 

1990 Earthquake Safety Bond Fund 

The Board of Supervisors previously appropriated 
$26,500,000 in 1990 Earthquake Safety Bond funds for 
various capital improvement projects (File 101-90-127). At 
the same time, the Board of Supervisors placed $16,427,980 
on reserve pending selection of contractors, the MBE/WBE 
status of the contractors and contract cost details. Of the 
$16,427,980 placed on reserve, $1,352,360 was earmarked for 
repairs on the existing Main Library building, which is to be 
used to house the Asian Art Museum collection. 

The DPW is now requesting that $622,360 of the $1,352,360 
placed on reserve be released. The DPW advises that based 
on a bid amount of $344,000, it has selected Cuevas & 
Mannion Construction, Joint Venture firm, as the low bid to 
perform the necessary construction work on the Main 
Library. Cuevas Construction is an MBE firm and will be 
allocated $175,440 or 51 percent of the total construction 
contract of $344,000. The three other bids received by DPW 
were as follows: 



M. A. Encinger & Associates (WBE) 
Gomez-Chapot Construction, a Joint 

Venture (Gomez Construction is an 

MBE firm) 
A. R. Construction Co. (MBE) 



$367,198 



$429,700 
$435,566 



Additionally, the DPW reports that CST Environmental, an 
MBE firm, has been selected to provide the necessary 
asbestos abatement work in connection with the Main 
Library. The DPW advises that CST Environmental has an 
on-going as-needed environmental services contract with 
DPW. CST Environmental was originally selected to provide 
as-needed environmental contract services based on a 
competitive bid process. 

The proposed release of reserved funds in the amount of 
$622,360 would be expended as follows: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 1, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Construction Contract $344,000 

Asbestos Abatement Contract 85,860 

Construction Contingency (15%) 51,600 

Construction Management (DPW) 57,900 

Asbestos Monitoring (DPW) 38,000 

Technical Support - Architecture (DPW) 30,000 

Technical Support - Engineering (DPW) 15.000 

Total $622,360 

Comments: 1. DPW advises that the $85,860 contract amount to be paid 

to CST Environmental is based on the following 
expenditures: 

Asbestos Abatement: 

Project Manager ($70/per hr. x 21 hrs.) $1,470 

Supervisor ($60/per hr. x 48 hrs.) 2,880 
Abatement worker ($50/per hr. x 433 hrs.) 21,650 

Safety Rigging 1,980 

Roof Repair: 

Project Manager ($64/per hr. x 16 hrs.) 1,024 

Foreman ($52/per hr. x 64 hrs.) 3,328 

Workers ($37/per hr. x 800 hrs.) 29,600 

Materials, Equipment 2,805 

Lift System to remove asbestos 7,600 

Replacement of Plumbing fixtures: 

Lead Plumber ($65/per hr. x 18 hrs.) 1,170 

Assistant Plumber ($42/per hr. x 18 hrs.) 756 

Materials, Equipment 921 

Subtotal $75,184 

Contingency (14 %) $10.676 

Total $85,860 

2. The Attachment provided by DPW contains the details of 
the in-house DPW costs of Construction Management 
($57,900), Asbestos Monitoring ($38,000), Technical Support 
($30,000) and Technical Support ($15,000) to be provided by 
DPW. 

Recommendation: Approve the proposed release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $622,360. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

68 



FEB 21 '95 14=02 AT&T FAX 9022FX 



P. 2 
Attachment 



EMLDPW$.XLS 



Cost Breakdown lor Services 

Provided by the Department of Public Works 

Existing Main Library Earthquake Damage Repairs 



Services 
Staff 


Hours 
Per Week 




No. of 

Weeks 




Total 
Hours 




Hourly 
Rate 




Total 
Cost 


Rounding to 
One Hundred 



4. 


Construction Management 




Construction Manager 


8 




26 




208 




$90 




$18,720 


BuSding Inspector 


15 




26 




390 




$75 




$29,250 


AdminyPublic Affairs/Misc. 


















$10,000 


Sub-Total 


$57,970 


$57,900 



5. 


Asbestos Monitoring 




Division Manager 


1 




10 




10 




$76 




$760 


Construction Inspector 


10 




10 




100 




$61 




$6,100 


Industrial Hygenist 


5 




10 




50 




$59 




$2,950 


HLA Senior Staff 


10 




10 




100 




$90 




$9,000 


HLA Field Technician 


32 




10 




320 




$60 




$19,200 


Sub-Total $38,010 


$38,000 



6. 


Technical Support 




Architect 


5 




25 




125 




$77 




$9,625 


Architectural Associate 


12 




25 




300 




$68 




$20,400 


Sub-Total 


$30,025 


$30,000 



7. 


Technical Support 




Structural Engjn&er 


4 




24 




96 




$79 




$7,584 


Mechanical Engineer 


3 




23 




69 




$56 




$3,864 


Electrical Engjneer 


3 




22 




66 




$53 




$3,498 


Sub-Total 


$14,946 


$15,000 



Page 1 



69 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Items 21 and 22 - Files 148-92-7.4 and 101-92-33.2 

Department: 



Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 

Description: 



San Francisco Fire Department 
Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Requesting the release of reserved funds from State Hazard 
Mitigation Grant monies in the amount of $258,643.50 (File 
148-92-7.4) and requesting the release of reserved funds from 
the Fire Department's 1986 Fire Protection Improvement 
Bond Fund interest monies, in the amount of $258,643.50 
(File 101-92-33.2) for the purpose of installing emergency 
generators at nine fire stations. 

$517,287 

State Hazard Mitigation Grant 

1986 Fire Protection Improvement Bond Fund Interest 
Income 

The Board of Supervisors previously approved a resolution 
authorizing the Department of Public Works (DPW), on 
behalf of the Fire Department, to accept and expend four 
Hazard Mitigation Grants from the California State Office of 
Emergency Services, on behalf of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA), in the amount of $4,971,000 to 
mitigate against future earthquake hazards (File 148-92-7). 
One of the four Hazard Mitigation Grants, in the amount of 
up to $500,000, to be used for the installation of emergency 
generators at 20 Fire Department facilities, was placed on 
reserve pending the selection of the construction contractors 
and the determination of the contractors' MBE/WBE status. 
State Hazard Mitigation Grants will only pay up to 50 
percent of the cost of a project, requiring the City to pay the 
remaining project costs. As such, on March 1, 1993, the 
Board of Supervisors appropriated $707,000 of interest 
earned on the 1986 Fire Protection Improvement Bond Fund 
monies to be used to install the emergency generators (File 
101-92-33). Of the appropriated amount of $707,000, 
$573,750 was placed on reserve pending the selection of the 
construction contractors and the determination of the 
construction contractors' MBE/WBE status. 

The Fire Department is currently requesting the release of 
reserved funds from the State Hazard Mitigation Grant in 
the amount of $258,643.50, and a release of reserved funds 
from the interest earned on the Fire Department's 1986 Fire 
Protection Improvement Bond Fund monies, in the amount of 
$258,643.50, for a total of $517,287 to install one emergency 
generator at each of the following nine Fire Stations: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 




March 1, 1995 






Fire Stations 


Number 


Location 


#20 


285 Olympic Street 


#22 


1290-6th Avenue 


#25 


3305 3rd Street 


#29 


299 Vermont 


#32 


194 Park Street 


#33 


8 Capitol Street 


#42 


2430 San Bruno Avenue 


#43 


720 Moscow 


#44 


1298 Girard 



The Department of Public Works issued an Invitation For 
Proposals for two separate contracts to install the nine 
emergency generators. The first contract, Contract No. 
7216E, was awarded to Cresci Electric, Inc. in the amount of 
$351,552 to install eight emergency generators, at the 
following Fire Stations: #20, #22, #25, #29, #32, #33, #42, and 
#43. Cresci Electric was the lowest of the nine bidders, as 
shown in the Attachment. Cresci Electric, Inc. is both a WBE 
and LBE firm. The second contract, Contract 5225A, was 
awarded to Chiang C. M. Construction, the lowest of nine 
bidders, to install one emergency generator at Fire Station # 
44 in the amount of $49,800. Chiang C. M. Construction is a 
MBE/LBE firm. 



Budget: 



The budget for the installation of the nine emergency 
generators is as follows: 



Cresci Electric, Inc. $351,552 

Chiang C. M. Construction 49,800 

Contingency 37,818 

Construction Management 63,800 

Building Permit Fees Payable to the 
Department of Building and Inspection 14 r 317 



Total 



$517,287 



Mr. Robert Jew of the Department of Public Works advises 
that the Construction Management cost in the amount of 
$63,800 includes $45,200 for approximately 490 in-house 
DPW Bureau of Construction Management staff hours, and 
$18,600 for approximately 300 in-house DPW Bureau of 
Engineering staff hours. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



71 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 1, 1995 

Recommendation: Approve the proposed release of reserved funds. 




*. /^f 7 



TV 

farvey M. Rose 



cc: Supervisor Hsieh 

Supervisor Kaufman 
Supervisor Bierman 
President Shelley 
Supervisor Alioto 
Supervisor Ammiano 
Supervisor Hallinan 
Supervisor Kennedy 
Supervisor Leal 
Supervisor Migden 
Supervisor Teng 
Clerk of the Board 
Chief Administrative Officer 
Controller 
Teresa Serata 
Robert Oakes 
Ted Lakey 



HOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



FEB 15 '95 02:45PM CITY8.C0UNTY S F 



P. 3 

Attachment 



TABULATION OF BIDS 



Specification No. 
Title: 



Bids Received: 
Basis: 



7216E 



Various Fire Department Facilities 
Emergency Generators 
For Hazard Mitigation 



gP* 



jj**' 



January 18. 1995 
Lump Sum Bid Items 



Bidders: 

Cresci Electric, Inc. 
(WBE/LBE) 

L C Electric, inc. 
(MBE) 

A.S. Ferrari & Son, Inc. 
(LBE) 

King C. Electric, Inc. 
(MBE/ LBE) 

Reliance Enterprises 

LC Jones Electrical 

Empire Electric Construction Co. 
(WBE/LBE) 

Abbett Electric Corporation 

Thunder Electric, Inc. 
(MBE/LBE) 



351,552.00 ( 80% of EE) 

379,627.00 

389,443.00 

395,990.00 

424,871.00 
430,000.00 
464,113.00 

486,626.00 

487,000.00 (111% of EE) 



Average Bid: 
Engineer ' s Estimate : 



423,247.00 
440,000.00 



Apparent Low Bidder: 



Cresci Electric, Inc. 
Pier 1 1/2 Embarcadero 
San Francisco, CA 94111 
Tel (415) 421-9118 



Subcontractors : 

Esquivel Grading & Paving Concrete 

Mitchell Plumbing Plumbing 



oc. Don Eng 

John Cribbs 
Bob swanstrom 



Foon chow 
Peg Divine 
Bob Jew 



Joe Cheung Nelson Wong 
Maurice Williams 



SL:sl 

January 18, 1995 



36,200 
19,100 

Todd Cockburn 
Sophia Horn 
Linda Chin 
Controller 



73 



Sf 

//MINUIiS 

1 3 A ^G 2 r 



J /*/?*" 



REGULAR MEETING 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



WEDNESDAY. MARCH 8. 1995 - 1:00 P.M. ROOM 410, WAR MEMORIAL BLDG. 

MEMBERS: SUPERVISORS HSIEH, KAUFMAN, BIERMAN 
CLERK: GREGOIRE HOBSON 

TIME MEETING CONVENED: 1:13 P.M. 

GENERAL MATTERS 

1. File 101-94-49 . [Appropriation, Municipal Court] Ordinance appropriating 
$418,502, Municipal Court, of State authorized Special Revenue Funds for 
professional services to allow the Trial Courts to upgrade computer equipment for 
fiscal year 1994-95. RO #94152. (Controller) 

(Consideration continued from 3/1/95) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO THE CALL OF THE CHAIR. 
(Supervisor Alioto requested to be added as sponsor.) 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

2. File 101-94-54 . [Appropriation, War Memorial] Ordinance appropriating $73,520, 
War Memorial, from the General Fund Reserve for other non-personal services to 
allow the Real Estate Department to provide security services for Fiscal Year 
1994-95. (Controller) RO #94161 

(Consideration continued from 3/1/95) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Ed Harrington, Controller. 
OPPOSED: None. IN SUPPORT: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MARCH 22, 1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 2 



3. File 101-94-58 . [Appropriation, Police Department] Ordinance appropriating 
$1,921,844, Police Department, from the General Fund Reserve, for salaries, fringe 
benefits, other non-personal services, materials and supplies and services of other 
departments, and rescinding $200,000 from Court overtime to increase staffing for 
fiscal year 1994-95. (RO #94173) 

(Consideration continued from 3/1/95) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Ed Harrington, Controller; 
Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst; Lt. Ryan, SF Police Department. OPPOSED: None. 
IN SUPPORT: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 

Reduce appropriation for Other Non-Personal Services by $358,573 and 
increase Permanent Salaries-Uniform by $358,573. (See Mayor's Letter 
in file authorizing revision.) (Supervisor Alioto requested to be added as 
sponsor.) 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

4. File 101-94-61 . [Appropriation, Dept. of Parking and Traffic] Ordinance 
appropriating $173,610, Department of Parking and Traffic, of Parking Revenue 
Funds to a Capital Improvement Project (Polk-Bush Garage architectural services 
and construction), for fiscal year 1994-94; providing for ratification of action 
previously taken. RO #94051 (Controller) 

(Consideration continued from 3/1/95) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MARCH 22, 1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 3 



File 101-94-66 . [Appropriation, Department of Human Resources] Ordinance 
appropriating $182,885, Department of Human Resources, from the General Fund 
reserve for salaries, fringe benefits and equipment to create three (3) positions to 
support the Workers' Compensation Program for fiscal year 1994-95. 
(COMPANION TO THE FOLLOWING FILE) (Controller) RO #94164 

(Consideration continued from 3/1/95) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Vicky Meade, Department of 
Human Resources; Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. OPPOSED: None. IN SUPPORT: 
None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 

Reduce Permanent Salaries to $35,955; reduce Temporary Salaries to 
$44,982; reduce Fringe Benefits to $10,798. AMENDED TITLE: 
"Ordinance appropriating $166,730, Department of Human Resources, 
from the General Fund reserve for salaries, fringe benefits and 
equipment to create three (3) positions to support the Workers' 
Compensation Program for fiscal year 1994-95. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



File 102-94-11 . [Public Employment, Department of Human Resources] Ordinance 
amending Ordinance No. 293-94 (Annual Salary Ordinance 1994/95) reflecting the 
addition for three positions (Classification 1444 Secretary 1, 1652 Senior 
Accountant and 1864 Sr. Systems and Procedures Analyst) in the Department of 
Human Resources, Workers' Compensation Division. (Department of Human 
Resources) (COMPANION TO THE PRECEDING FILE) 

(Consideration continued from 3/1/95) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Vicky Meade, Department of 
Human Resources; Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst. OPPOSED: None. IN SUPPORT: 
None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 4 



7. File 101-94-67 . [Appropriation, Sheriff] Ordinance appropriating $400,449, 
Sheriff, from the General Fund Reserve for salaries, fringe benefits and equipment 
to create nine (9) positions for fiscal year 1994-95 (provide security at new court 
location and increase overtime.) (Sheriff) RO #94166 (COMPANION TO THE 
FOLLOWING FILE) 

SPEAKERS: ELECTED OFFICIAL: Sheriff Michael Hennessey. DEPARTMENTAL 
REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst; Teresa Serata, Budget 
Director, Mayor's Office. OPPOSED: None. IN SUPPORT: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 

Reduce Permanent Salaries to $71,602; reduce Fringe Benefits to 0. 
Delete three (3) 8274 Police Cadets for total of only six (6) new 
positions. AMENDED TFTLE: "Ordinance appropriating $339,741, 
Sheriff, from the General Fund Reserve for salaries, fringe benefits and 
equipment to create six (6) positions for fiscal year 1994-95 (provide 
security at new court location and increase overtime.)" (Supervisor 
Alioto requested to be added as sponsor.) 

VOTE: 2-1 (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

8. File 102-94-9 . {.Public Employment, Sheriff] Ordinance amending Ordinance No. 
293-94 (Annual Salary Ordinance, 1994-95) reflecting the addition of nine (9) 
positions, Sheriff's Department (Classification 8274 Police Cadet (3), 8302 Deputy 
Sheriff (6). (Department of Human Resources) (COMPANION TO THE 
PRECEDING FILE) 

SPEAKERS: ELECTED OFFICIAL: Sheriff Michael Hennessey. DEPARTMENTAL 
REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst; Teresa Serata, Budget 
Director, Mayor's Office. OPPOSED: None. IN SUPPORT: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
Delete Classification 8274 Police Cadet (3). AMENDED TITLE: 
"Ordinance amending Ordinance No. 293-94 (Annual Salary Ordinance, 
1994-95) reflecting the addition of six (6) positions, Sheriff's 
Department (Classification 8302 Deputy Sheriff (6). (Supervisor Alioto 
requested to be added as sponsor.) 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

9. File 101-94-70 . [Appropriation, Department of Public Health] Ordinance 
appropriating $207,103, Department of Public Health, Mental Health, from the 
General Fund Reserve for medical service contracts to continue substance abuse 
programs in fiscal year 1994-95; providing for ratification of action previously 
taken. (Controller) RO #94186 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Dr. Larry Meredith, Department of Public Health. OPPOSED: None. IN 
SUPPORT: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. (Supervisors Alioto and Bierman 
requested to be added as sponsors.) 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 5 



10. File 27-95-5 . [Findings, Airport Rates and Charges] Resolution making a finding 
that the revised schedule of rates and charges for outdoor aircraft storage 
established by the Airports Commission will be sufficient to pay for maintenance 
and operation expenses of the Airport and will not require;e any; tax subsidy. 
(Airports Commission) (COMPANION TO THE FOLLOWING FILE) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Marcus Pero, SF Airport; Ted Lakey, Deputy City Attorney. OPPOSED: 
None. IN SUPPORT: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

11. File 27-95-5.1 . [Airport Rates and Charges] Resolution approving changes to the 
schedule of rates and charges for common use facilities at San Francisco 
International Airport as established by Airports Commission. (Airports 
Commission) (COMPANION TO THE PRECEDING FILE) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Marcus Pero, SF Airport; Ted Lakey, Deputy City Attorney. OPPOSED: 
None. IN SUPPORT: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

12. File 68-94-15.1 . [Addendum One, 1995 Emergency Shelter Grants] Resolution 
approving an amendment to the 1995 Emergency Shelter Grants Program, 
authorizing the Mayor, on behalf of the City and County of San Francisco, to apply, 
receive, and expend $250,750 in additional entitlement funds. Approving Addendum 
No. 1 to the expenditure schedule for recipient agencies, and determining that no 
environmental evaluation is required. (Mayor's Office of Community Development) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Jon Pon, Mayor's Office of Community Development. OPPOSED: None. 
IN SUPPORT: Robert Fulley, Central City Hospitality House; Becky Masaki, Exec. 
Director, Asian Women's Center; Wendy Kasuma, Exec. Director, La Casa del la 
Madres; Jim Lauder, Exec. Director, North Street Community Services; Tammy 
Newman, Homeless Advocacy Project; Larry Vinsky, Staff Attorney, Swords to 
Plowshares; Bea Lopez, Catholic Charities of SF; Martin Fera. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. (Supervisor Alioto requested to be 

added as sponsor.) 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 6 



13. File 170-95-3 . [Lease Revenue Bonds, Series 1995A] Ordinance providing for the 
approval and execution and delivery by officers of the City and County of San 
Francisco of an Equipment Lease Supplement No. 4 between the City and County of 
San Francisco Finance Corporation as lessor, and the City and County of San 
Francisco as lessee, with respect to equipment to be used for City purposes and the 
related certificate of approval; providing for reimbursement to the City of certain 
City expenditures prior to the issuance of Lease Revenue Bonds and approving the 
issuance of Lease Revenue Bonds by said nonprofit corporation; and providing that 
said bonds shall be subject to the certification of the Controller of the City and 
County of San Francisco prior to the sale of said bonds; and providing for the 
execution of documents in connection therewith and ratifying previous actions 
taken in connection therewith. (Chief Administrative Officer) 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. (Note: Chief Administrative 
Office staff to amend Equipment Acquisition Program to add four (4) 
transportation vans for the Department of Social Services and delete 
three (3) Marked Vans for the Sheriff. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

14. File 172-94-47 . [Competitive Bidding of Contracts Over $1 Million] Hearing to 
review contracts valued over one million dollars not competitively bid. (Supervisor 
Alioto) 

(Consideration from 1/25/95) 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO AUGUST 1995. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

TIME MEETING ADJOURNED: 3:23 P.M. 



CITY AND COUNTY 




CitiReport 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street, Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 



March 6, 1995 



TO: Budget Committee 

FROM: Budget Analyst 

SUBJECT: March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



File 101-94-49 



Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of March 
1, 1995. 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Municipal Court 

Ordinance appropriating $418,502, for professional services 
to allow the Municipal Court to upgrade computer equipment 
for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

$418,502 

State-Authorized Automation Fund 

The proposed ordinance would appropriate a total of 
$418,502 to the Municipal Court, including $378,502 for the 
purchase of a portion of the software, equipment, installation 
services, and training needed to upgrade and complete a 
computer network operated by the Municipal Court for 
tracking and processing moving traffic violation cases, and 
$40,000 for an initial study to develop an overall automation 
plan for the Trial Courts (Municipal and Superior Courts) 
together when they move to the new San Francisco 
courthouse, which is expected to be completed in June 1997. 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Comments: 



Recommendation: 



1. At the Budget Committee meeting on January 25, 1995, 
Mr. Ron Ho of the Municipal Court was requested by the 
Committee to submit an Amendment of the Whole of the 
proposed ordinance from the Trial Courts, not the Municipal 
Court, and to have the Amendment of the Whole reflect that 
the entire amount of the cost of this project, which is 
approximately $1,090,000, should come from the Automation 
Fund and not just the $418,502, which is the subject of the 
proposed ordinance. In that manner, all monies to be 
received under State Trial Court funding for this project 
could then be applied to offset the General Fund costs of the 
City's Trial Courts budget. 

2. As of March 3, Mr. Ho reported that the above-noted 
Amendment of the Whole requested by the Budget 
Committee at its January 25 meeting had not yet been 
prepared. Mr. Ho has requested that this item be continued 
to the call of the Chair in order to allow the Trial Courts 
additional time to prepare the legislation. 

Continue this item to the call of the Chair as requested by 
Mr. Ho. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 2 - File 101-94-54 

Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of March 
1,1995 



Departments: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Item: 

Description: 



Real Estate Department 
Mayor's Office 

$73,520 

General Fund Reserve 



Ordinance appropriating $73,520 from the General Fund 
Reserve to pay for security services at the War Memorial at 
401 Van Ness Avenue. 

As part of the move from City Hall due to the seismic 
retrofitting required following the Loma Prieta earthquake, 
staff of the Office of the Mayor, Board of Supervisors, Chief 
Administrative Officer, Ethics Commission, and Civil 
Service Commission, as well as the Law Library and the 
public hearing rooms used by City Commissions and the 
Board of Supervisors have relocated to office space at the War 
Memorial Building at 401 Van Ness Avenue. 

Entry security at City Hall for all of these departments had 
previously been provided by 7 staff (6 Sheriffs Cadets and one 
Deputy Sheriff) assigned to the 4 entrances of City Hall, using 
3 walk-through metal detectors. With the relocation, new 
entry security arrangements for these departments are 
necessary. 

Comments: 1. Mr. Mike Martin of the Mayor's Office has requested that 

this item be continued to the call of the Chair in order to allow 
the Mayor's Office and the Real Estate Department additional 
time to evaluate the security requirements and to prepare an 
Amendment of the Whole to this proposed ordinance. The 
proposed ordinance as currently drafted is based on the entry 
security services being performed by a private contractor. The 
Mayor's Office has now recommended that entry security at 
the War Memorial be provided with Civil Service positions. 

2. Mr. Martin advises that, currently, entry security services 
at the War Memorial are being provided by Burns Security 
Services on an interim basis. According to Mr. Martin, the 
cost for these interim security services will be reflected in the 
Amendment of the Whole to be submitted. 

Recommendation: Continue this item to the call of the Chair, as requested by the 
Mayor's Office. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

3 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 

Item 3 - File 101-94-58 

Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of March 
1, 1995. 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Budget: 



Police Department 

Supplemental appropriation ordinance appropriating 
$1,921,844 from the General Fund Reserve for overtime, 
holiday pay, fringe benefits, materials and supplies, non- 
personal services and vehicle fleet maintenance (services of 
other departments), and reappropriating $200,000 from 
Overtime. 

$2,121,844 

General Fund General Reserve $ 1 ,92 1 ,844 

Reappropriation of funds from Uniformed 
Overtime - Trial Courts in Police Department's 
FY 1994-95 budget 200.000 

Total $2,121,844 

In June of 1994, the San Francisco electorate approved 
Proposition D, which requires a minimum level of 1,971 full- 
duty uniform Police Officers for the Police Department by no 
later than June of 1995. Of this supplemental appropriation 
request for $2,121,844, $506,600 would be used for costs 
related to the full staffing of the Police Department. 

In addition, $1,465,244 of this supplemental appropriation 
request would be used to fund a projected budget deficiency 
in the Police Department's overtime, holiday pay and fringe 
benefits accounts resulting from (a) the Newspaper Strike of 
November, 1994 and (b) other unanticipated events. 

The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance also 
requests $150,000 in funding for the maintenance of the 
Police Department's vehicle fleet. 

I. Police Overtime and Related Costs 

Overtime - Newspaper Strike $611,000 

The labor strike against the San Francisco 
Chronicle and the San Francisco Examiner took 
place from November 2, 1994 through November 

II, 1994. The Police Department established two 
fixed posts that required 24-hour staffing by sworn 
personnel. In addition to assigning on-duty 
personnel to strike-related duties, thereby diverting 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



these Police Officers from other law enforcement 
duties, the Police Department also had to deploy 
Police Officers on an overtime basis for the 
necessary strike-related duties. The Budget 
Analyst previously reported to the Board of 
Supervisors in December of 1994 that the estimated 
expenditures resulting from this strike were 
approximately $606,252. These expenditures were 
not anticipated in the FY 1994-95 budget. As a 
result of the strike, the Police Department is now 
requesting a supplemental appropriation of 
$611,000 to fund the projected shortfall in overtime 
related to this strike. 

Other Overtime $571,244 

In addition to the budget deficiency in overtime 
resulting from the newspaper strike, the Police 
Department is also anticipating a $571,244 
shortfall in overtime as a result of other 
unanticipated events, such as the demonstrations 
against Proposition 187 and the killing of a Police 
Officer in November of 1994. 

Holiday Pay $258,000 

The Police Department reports that it is 
underfunded for holiday pay for FY 1994-95 and is 
therefore requesting $258,000 to fund the projected 
budget deficiency. 

Fringe Benefits $25,000 

This amount is for mandatory fringe benefits 
related to the above requests for overtime and 
holiday pay. 

Total - Police Overtime and Related Costs $1,465,244 

II. Proposition D Mandate 

Materials and Supplies $31,300 

The Police Department is requesting $31,300 for 
furniture for the Police Academy. Whereas 
normally the Police Academy conducts only one 
training class at a time, because of the hiring of 
Police Officers to meet the Proposition D mandate, 
the Police Academy will be conducting up to four 
training classes simultaneously in the spring of 
1995. The Department has relocated personnel 
formally located at the Academy to other existing 
Police Department space in order to create room for 

BOARD OF STTPFRVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

5 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



the additional training sessions. As such, 
additional classroom furniture is needed. The 
attachment contains a breakdown of this request. 
Although Attachment I shows that the cost of such 
furniture totals $32,918, the Department is only 
requesting $31,300. 

Non-Personal Services $475,300 

This request for $475,300 includes $70,000 for the 
Police Department to conduct a new Police Officer 
examination. According to Lieutenant Ryan of the 
Police Department, there is sufficient funding in 
the FY 1994-95 budget to conduct only one Civil 
Service examination. This exam was given in July 
of 1994. However, the Police Department expects 
to hire only between 160 and 180 Police Officers of 
the 636 candidates who passed this exam. 
Lieutenant Ryan advises that the Police 
Department had to conduct an additional Civil 
Service examination in January of 1995 in order to 
identify additional Police Officer candidates, so that 
the hiring goal of 280 new Police Officers for FY 
1994-95 could be met. The details of this $70,000 
request are as follows (although the actual cost was 
$71,768, the Department is only requesting 
$70,000): 

Site rental for written test $6,320 

Test proctors for written test 6,352 

5-day site rental for oral test ($7,768/day) 38,840 

Proctors for oral test 13,859 

Proctors for physical agility test 6.397 

Total $71,768 

In addition, this request for $475,300 also includes 
$405,300 to conduct background investigations of 
Police Officer candidates who have passed the Civil 
Service exam. Each background investigation costs 
approximately $655 per applicant and consists of a 
medical examination, a psychological test, a 
polygraph test, fingerprinting, a toxicological (drug) 
test and a credit report. These tests are performed 
by various outside contractors under existing 
contracts. Lieutenant Ryan advises that the FY 
1994-95 budget included $576,000 for background 
investigations, which would be sufficient for 
approximately 879 such investigations. However, 
the Police Department anticipates that, because of 
additional hiring to meet the Proposition D 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

6 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 

mandate, the Department will conduct 
approximately 1,540 background investigations in 
FY 1994-95, based on the 636 applicants who 
passed the first Civil Service exam and the 
anticipated 900 applicants who will pass the second 
Civil Service exam. At a cost of approximately $655 
per investigation, the total cost for FY 1994-95 is 
estimated to be approximately $1,008,700, or 
$432,700 more than the $576,000 budgeted for 
background investigations. The Department is 
requesting a supplemental appropriation of 
$405,300 to pay for these additional background 
investigations. 

Total - Proposition D Mandate $506,600 

III. Vehicle Fleet Maintenance 

Central Shops - Auto Maintenance $150,000 

The Police Department has a total of 450 vehicles, 
including 230 marked vehicles and 220 unmarked 
vehicles. The Department ordered 40 new vehicles 
in FY 1993-94. However, according to Lieutenant 
Ryan, as a result of delays in awarding the contract 
for the purchase of these vehicles, the vehicles will 
not be received until May or June of 1995. As such, 
it has become necessary to repair vehicles that were 
scheduled to be taken out of service when the new 
vehicles were placed into service. The Police 
Department estimates that these maintenance and 
repair costs have resulted in a budget deficiency of 
approximately $150,000. 

Total - Vehicle Fleet Maintenance 150.000 

Total Supplemental Appropriation Request $2,121,844 

Comments: 1. In addition to the $1,921,844 from the General Fund 

Reserve, the Department is requesting to reappropriate 
$200,000 in estimated savings from Uniformed Overtime - 
Trial Courts in the Police Department's FY 1994-95 budget. 
These savings have resulted from reductions in uniform 
overtime by implementing a recommendation of the Budget 
Analyst's 1994 Zero Base Budget Analysis to (a) prevent 
requiring subpoenaed officers to unnecessarily appear in 
court on the day of case calendaring; and (b) request that the 
Courts provide a reasonable advance notice of trial dates in 
order to reduce court overtime pay. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

7 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



2. As previously noted, the passage of Proposition D has 
mandated full Uniform staffing of a minimum of 1,971 Police 
Officers by the end of FY 1994-95. As of July 1, 1994, the 
Police Department had 1,812 sworn personnel. The 
Department has hired 14 lateral transfers and intends to hire 
266 trainees during FY 1994-95, for a total of 280 new Police 
Officers. The current, revised 1994-95 Police Department 
hiring plan for uniform officers is as follows: 

Date Number of Police Officers to be Hired 

Actual: 

July 1, 1994 14 (lateral transfers) 

November 28, 1994 30 (new recruit class) 

January 30, 1995 32 (new recruit class) 

February 6, 1995 32 (new recruit class) 

Projected: 

April 17, 1995 36 (new recruit class) 

June 19, 1995 50 (new recruit class) 

June 26, 1995 86 (new recruit class) 

Total 280 

According to Lieutenant Ryan, after expected attrition of 65 
Police Officers, the Police Department will have an estimated 
2,027 Police Officers* on staff on June 30, 1995, although 172 
will be new recruits still in the Police Academy, as follows: 

Existing Uniform Staffing (7/1/94) 1,812** 

New hires in FY 1994-95 280 

Less expected attrition (65) 

Number of Police Officers, June 1995 2,027 

The costs of the 280 new Police Officers to be hired in FY 
1994-95 are included in the Police Department's FY 1994-95 
budget and will cost an estimated $3.8 million in FY 1994-95 
(partial year funding of salaries and fringe benefits). The 
cost of these new hires will be partially offset by a Federal 
grant in the amount of $614,000, $300,000 of which is 
expected to be received during FY 1994-95. 

3. The following table shows a breakdown of the 
Department's actual and projected expenditures for FY 1994- 



Although the projected total of 2,027 Police Officers is 56 more than the required minimum of 
1,971 full-duty Police Officers, Lieutenant Ryan advises that it is necessary to hire more than the 
required minimum because of the existence of light-duty Police Officers on staff. 

As of the writing of this report, there were 1,888 Police Officers on staff, including light-duty 
Officers. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

8 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



95 in overtime, holiday pay and fringe benefits, and the 
estimated budget deficiency in each of these accounts. 



Category 

Overtime 
Holiday Pay 
Fringe Benefits 
Total 



Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures Estimated 

FY 1994-95 7/1/94 to 12/17/94 to Budget 

Bjidgfit 12/16/94 6/30/95 Deficiency 

$5,742,656 $3,515,050 $3,539,606 ($1,312,000) 

2,146,500 1,324,379 1,103,649 (281,528) 

36.925.084 16.954.056 20.246.179 (275.151) 

$44,814,240 $21,793,485 $24,889,434 ($1,868,679) 



4. The following table shows the Police Department's 
estimated budget deficiency for non-personal services for FY 
1994-95: 



Category 



FY 1994-95 
Budg et 



Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures Estimated 
7/1794 to 2/1/95 to Budget 

1731795 6/30/95 Deficiency 



Non-Personal Services $5,659,172 $1,532,766 $4,243,133* ($116,727) 

* Projected expenditures for the last five months of FY 1994-95 are greater 
than the actual expenditures for the first seven months of FY 1994-95 primarily 
due to (a) one-time costs related to the hiring of new Police Officers, and (b) the 
inclusion of approximately $2 million in unposted telephone bills from the first 
seven months of FY 1994-95. 

5. The following table shows the Police Department's 
estimated budget deficiency for materials and supplies for FY 
1994-95: 

Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures 
FY 1994-95 7/1/94 to 2/1795 to 

Category Budget 1731795 6/30/95 



Estimated 

Budget 
Deficiency 



Materials & Supplies $2,222,529 $1,375,286 $982,347 ($135,104) 

Lieutenant Ryan advises that the Department does not 
intend to submit another supplemental appropriation request 
to cover the projected remaining budget deficiency of 
$103,804 ($135,104 less this request of $31,300) in materials 
and supplies but will implement cost-saving measures in 
order to live within its existing budget. 

6. The following table shows the Police Department's 
estimated budget deficiency for Central Shops - Auto 
Maintenance for FY 1994-95: 



BQ7\RD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET /ANtALYST 

9 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



Category 



Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures Estimated 

FY 1994-95 7/1794 to 1/1/95 to Budget 

Budget 12/3 1 /94 6/30/95 Deficiency 



Central Shops - Maintenance $1,722,549 $932,797 $940,000 ($150,248) 

Lieutenant Ryan advises that the Department does not 
intend to submit another supplemental appropriation request 
to cover the projected remaining budget deficiency of $248 
(the projected budget deficiency of $150,248 less this request 
of $150,000) in Central Shops - Auto Maintenance. 

7. The Controller's Office has estimated that the Police 
Department will have a budget deficiency in its personnel 
and related fringe benefit accounts in the amount of 
$2,173,105 for FY 1994-95. However, the proposed 
supplemental appropriation allocates only $1,465,244 for 
overtime, holiday pay and fringe benefit expenses. As such, 
the Controller's Office reports that, even with the approval of 
the proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance, the 
Police Department is still expected to have a $707,861 budget 
deficiency in these accounts by the end of FY 1994-95 
(estimated budget deficiency of $2,173,105 less this request of 
$1,465,244). 

However, as of the writing of this report, the Controller's 
Office and the Police Department were meeting to further 
analyze the projected budget deficiency in the Police 
Department's personal services and fringe benefit accounts. 

8. The following table shows the Budget Analyst's estimated 
budget deficiency in salaries, overtime, holiday pay, premium 
pay and fringe benefits for FY 1994-95: 



Category 

Permanent Salaries - Misc. 

Permanent Salaries - Uniform 

Overtime 

Holiday Pay 

Premium Pay 

Premium Pay - Uniform 

Total - Salaries 
Fringe Benefits 

Total 



Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures 
FY 1994-95 7/1794 to 12/17/94 to 

Bjidget 12/1SZ9J 6/80/95 



$14,283,945 

98,575,858 

5,742,656 

2,146,500 

468,000 

5-250.978 

$126,467,937 

36.925.084 



$6,379,026 

45,706,473 

3,515,050 

1,324,379 

240,958 

2.161.641 

$59,327,527 

16.954.056 



$7,692,250 

53,817,120 

3,539,606 

1,103,649 

245,784 

2.803.656 

$69,202,065 

20.246.179 



Estimated 
Surplus/ 
(Budget 

Deficiency) 

$212,669 

(947,735) 

(1,312,000) 

(281,528) 

(18,742) 

285.681 

($2,061,655) 

(275.151) 



$163,393,021 $76,281,583 $89,448,244 ($2,336,806) 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

10 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



Estimated Budget Deficiency in Personnel Accounts $2,336,806 

Less: 
Federal Grant (300,000) 

Proposed Supplemental Appropriation for Overtime, Holiday Pay and 

Fringe Benefits (1.465.244) 

Total Estimated Budget Deficiency in Personnel Accounts $571,562 

9. As reflected in Comment No. 4 above, the Budget Analyst 
has determined that the projected budget deficiency for Non- 
Personal Services, which includes such items as contractual 
services, rent, telephone and other operating expenses, is 
$116,727 for FY 1994-95. However, the Police Department 
has requested $475,300 for Non-Personal Services. 
Therefore, the Budget Analyst notes that the supplemental 
appropriation request for Non-Personal Services could be 
reduced by $358,573, from $475,300 to $116,727. 

However, at the request of the Police Department, the 
Budget Analyst is not recommending that this supplemental 
appropriation request be reduced by $358,573 for Non- 
Personal Services at this time, but rather, subject to approval 
by the Mayor, that this surplus amount of $358,573, as 
determined by the Budget Analyst, be used to partially offset 
the Department's remaining projected deficiency in the 
Permanent Salaries - Uniform account. 

10. Mr. Mike Martin of the Mayor's Office advises that the 
Mayor's Office concurs with Budget Analyst's 
recommendation to reduce the Department's request for non- 
personal services by $358,573 and to use such funds for the 
purpose of increasing the Department's request for 
Permanent Salaries and related accounts by $358,573, as 
reflected in Attachment II. 

11. Lieutenant Ryan advises the Budget Analyst that the 
Police Department intends to employ economies in order to 
offset the remaining projected budget deficiency of 
approximately $212,989 ($571,562 less $358,573). However, 
Lieutenant Ryan has advised the Budget Analyst that it is 
now likely that the Police Department will have to request 
additional funds for Police Overtime for the United Nations 
(UN) 50th anniversary celebration, which is scheduled to 
take place on June 25 and 26, 1995. According to Lieutenant 
Ryan, the amount of such a supplemental appropriation 
request could range anywhere from $500,000 to $1.3 million, 
depending on whether certain foreign dignataries and heads 
of State attend the UN celebration. However, Lieutenant 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGETJ ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 

Ryan advises that the exact amount of this request cannot be 
estimated at this time. 

12. In summary, the Budget Analyst recommends the 
following changes to the proposed supplemental 
appropriation ordinance: 

Amount Budget 

Supplemental Recommended Analyst's 
Appropriation by Budget Recommended 
Category Request Analyst Change 

Permanent Salaries - Uniform $571,244 $929,817 $358,573 

Overtime 611,000 611,000 

Holiday Pay 258,000 258,000 

Mandatory Fringe Benefits 25,000 25,000 

Other Non-Personal Services 475,300 116,727 (358,573) 

Materials and Supplies 31,300 31,300 

Central Shops - Auto Maintenance 150.000 150.000 Q 

Total $2,121,844 $2,121,844 

Recommendations: 1. Reduce the supplemental appropriation request for Other 
Non-Personal Services by $358,573, the amount of surplus as 
determined by the Budget Analyst, and increase the 
supplemental appropriation request for Permanent Salaries - 
Uniform by $358,573, in accordance with the table above, and 
in accordance with the concurrence of the Mayor's Office as 
reflected in Attachment II. 

2. Approve the proposed supplemental appropriation 
ordinance, as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Attachment I 



Academy furniture POs 



Item 

2 tier lockers 3 unit 

2 tier lockers 1 unit 

Installation 

Leg extension kit 

Leg extension kit 

2 tier locker slope kit 

Locker 2 door 

Front base 

End base 

Installation 

Delivery 

Sales tax 

Stack chairs 

Folding tables 

Round Folding tables 

Lectern 

White boards 

White board 

Panels 

connectors 

Panels 

Desk 

Chairs 

Chairs 

Installation 

Sales tax 

Total 



Quantity 


price 


total 


36 


58. 18 


2 


,094.48 


4 


71 .43 




285.72 


1 


505.00 




505.00 


4 


25.71 




102.84 


6 


33 . 38 




200.28 


22 


5.23 




115.06 


21 


154.36 


3 


,241.56 


21 


4.82 




101 .22 


8 


6.34 




50.72 


1 


445.00 




445.00 


1 


430.00 




430.00 
607.06 


160 


69.00 


11 


, 040 . 00 


72 


53.00 


3 


,816. 00 


2 


100.00 




200.00 


12 


80.00 




960.00 


5 


212.00 


1 


,060.00 


1 


411.00 




4U.00 


5 


99.00 




49 5.00 


4 


3.75 




15.00 


6 


6.00 




36.00 


6 


425.00 


2 


,550.00 


5 


252.00 


1 


,260.00 


2 


199.00 




398.00 


1 


608.00 




608.00 






1. 


,890.50 






32, 


,918.44 



1954bP40 



33IJJO S.J3IH0 



13 



t/SST £SS STt- 



BE:W S66T-20-20 



2-27-3D ; 10 :57AM I 



MAYOR'S OFFICE- 



Office of the Mayor 
San Francisco 




4152520461 ;# 1/ 1 
Attach ment tt 



FRANK M. JORDAN 



Post-ir Fax Note 



7671 



Co7Dep< 



wmte($n^. 



yfio. 



February 24, 1995 

Ed Harrington, Controller 
City and County of San Francisco 
875 Stevenson Street #210 
San Francisco, Calif 94103 

Dear Mr. Harrington 

Supplemental Appropriation Request #82 proposed applying $475,300 in 
General Fund reserves towards Non-Personal Services and $571,244 toward 
Uniform Salaries . To acknowledge a surplus in the non-personal services 
account and a deficit in the personal services account, please amend the 
submission as follows: 



• of w 7 



mi l ma* 



Index: 582015 

Account 

01/0020 
10/1269 



Original 

$571,244 
$475,300 



Amended 

$929,817 
$116,727 



Thank you for your assistance. 
Sincerely, 

Teresa Serata, Director of Finance 



cc: Harvey Rose 



«» Cmr HAU, SAN FRANCISCO. CA1JK3RN1A 5* 1 
<4IJ) 554-61 <1 
RECYOJU) PAPCX 14 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



- File 101-94-61 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 

Description: 



Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of March 
1, 1995. 

Department: Department of Parking and Traffic (DPT) 

Item: Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance appropriating 

$173,610 of Off-Street Parking Funds for the Polk-Bush 
Garage construction project for the Department of Parking 
and Traffic. 

$173,610 

Parking Revenue Fund (previously known as the Off-Street 
Parking Fund) 

The DPT reports that construction of the Polk-Bush Garage 
was completed in April of 1993. According to the DPT, Echo 
West/Hok Construction, a Joint Venture firm (Echo West is 
an MBE firm), the original construction contractor, was 
financially unable to complete the construction work. As 
such, Echo West/Hok Construction's bonding company, the 
Insurance Company of North America, designated Apersey 
Construction, neither an MBE or a WBE firm, to complete 
the necessary work. The DPT advises that as a result of the 
difficulty with the original contractor, resulting in an 
extended contract period and additional coordination needed 
to assist Apersey Construction to complete the project, the 
project architect, Gordon Chong and Associates, incurred 
additional costs totaling $61,652. 

Further, the DPT reports that an additional $111,958 in 
unanticipated construction services were incurred by Echo 
West/Hok Construction and Apersey Construction. 

Mr. Kevin Hagerty of the DPT has requested that this item 
be continued to the Budget Committee meeting on March 15, 
1995 in order to allow the DPT additional time to provide the 
details on the architectural and construction services costs 
and to clarify the City's liability versus the bonding 
company's liability for these costs. 

Recommendation: Continue this item as requested by Mr. Hagerty of the DPT. 



Comment: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET^ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 

Items 5 and 6 - Files 101-94-66 and 102-94-11 

Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of March 1, 
1995. 



Department: 
Items: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Human Resources 

1. Item 11, File 101-94-66 - Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance appropriating $182,885 for Salaries, Fringe 
Benefits and equipment to allow the Department of Human 
Resources to Create three positions to support the Workers 
Compensation Program for fiscal Year 1994-95. 

2. Item 12, File 102-94-11 - Ordinance amending the 1994-95 
Annual Salary Ordinance to reflect the addition of three 
positions in the Department of Human Resources, Workers 
Compensation Division. 

$182,885 

FY 1994-95 General Fund Reserve 

On November 2, 1993, the voters of San Francisco approved 
Proposition L, which created a Department of Human 
Resources, and transferred the City's Workers Compensation 
Division from the Employees Retirement System to the 
Department of Human Resources. 

The Department of Human Resources (HRD) is requesting a 
Supplemental Appropriation to pay for salaries, fringe 
benefits and equipment to allow the Department of Human 
Resources to create three new positions to support the 
Workers Compensation Program for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

The proposed supplemental appropriation would appropriate 
$182,885 for the period February 24, 1995 through June 30, 
1995 as follows: 



Permanent Salaries 


$43,308 


Temporary Salaries 


46,600 


Mandatory Fringe Benefits 


17,982 


Equipment 


74.995 


Total 


$182,885 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

16 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



The following are descriptions of each of the foregoing 
funding requests. 

Permanent Salaries $43,308 

This amount would: (1) fund $10,116 for the salary of one 
new 1444 Secretary I position for nine pay periods, (2) fund 
$13,932 for the salary of one new 1652 Senior Accountant 
position for nine pay periods, and (3) fund $19,260 for the 
salary of one new Senior Systems and Procedures Analyst 
position for nine pay periods for a total cost of $43,308. 

Temporary Salaries $46,600 

This amount would fund $46,600 for the salaries of four 
temporary 8141 Claims Adjuster positions for seven pay 
periods. 

Frin ge Benefits $17,982 

This amount was calculated based on 20 percent of 
Permanent Salaries and 20 percent of Temporary Salaries. 
However, Ms. Victoria Mead of the HRD advises that the 
Fringe Benefits for Temporary Salaries should be calculated 
based on eight percent of the Temporary Salaries and not 
based on 20 percent of the Temporary Salaries. Therefore, 
the Fringe Benefits for the Temporary Salaries are $3,728 
(.08 x $46,600). The Fringe Benefits for the Permanent 
Salaries are $8,662 (.20 x $43,308) As such, the total Fringe 
Benefits for Permanent and Temporary Salaries should be 
reduced to $12,390 ($3,728 + $8,662) from $17,982, 
representing a decrease of $5,592. 

Equipment $74,995 

This amount would fund a total of $74,995, including $69,120 
for equipment and $5,875 for Sales Tax, for the purchase of 
the following equipment: (1) $29,850 for computer hardware 
for the file server, network administration workstation, 
telecommunications router station, and local systems 
connectivity, as well as providing for network printing 
capability, tape backups and power supply systems, (2) 
$9,680 for computer software to run the above listed 
hardware, as well as network remote management and virus 
protection software, (3) $12,300 for PacBell 
telecommunications installation charges for a dedicated 
telecommunications line to link up the two sites of 44 Gough 
Street and 1155 Market Street, the estimated monthly line 
usage charges, and telecommunications equipment that 
would enable 44 Gough Street and 1155 Market Street to 
"talk to each other" via the telecommunications link, (4) 
$9,400 for four PC client workstations, including four 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

17 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



Comments: 



personal computers, and access to the local area network and 
the wide area network required for transmission of data, 
teleprocessing and timely interchange of management 
information, (5) $7,890 for applications software licenses, and 
network, telecommunications and configuration costs, and (6) 
$5,875 for the 8.5 percent Sales Tax. 

Attachment 1, provided by the HRD, contains a detailed list 
of equipment with the related prices supporting the $74,995 
equipment request. 

Ms. Kira Shuchom of the HRD advises that the HRD has 
received approval from the Electronic Information Processing 
Steering Committee for the purchase of this equipment. 

The proposed ordinance (File 102-94-11) would amend the FY 
1994-95 Annual Salary Ordinance to establish three new 
positions in the Department of Human Resources, Workers' 
Compensation Division as follows : 



Classification/Title 



No. of 
Positions 



1444 Secretary I 
1652 Senior Accountant 
1864 Sr. Systems & 
Procedures Analyst 



Biweekly 
Salary 

$1,022/$1,237 
$1,407/$1,706 



Maximum 
Salary 
At Top Step 

$32,286 
$44,527 



$l,946/$2,365 $61,727 



The total estimated annual cost of the three new positions 
including fringe benefits, is $166,248 ($138,540 salaries + 
$27,708 fringe benefits) at the top step. 

1. Attachment 2 is a letter from Mr. Wendell Pryor, Director 
of the Department of Human Resources, explaining why the 
addition of three new permanent positions, as well as four 
new temporary Claims Adjuster positions, or a total of seven 
new positions, are needed to take over the functions which 
were being accomplished by the Employees Retirement 
System (ERS), and why seven positions are not being deleted 
in the ERS to offset the seven new positions being added by 
the Department of Human Resources. 

Mr. Pryor advises that the 1444 Secretary is being requested 
to support the Health Service Administrator, who now has 
oversight over the operations of the Workers Compensation 
Division (WCD), as well as the Health Service System and 
the City's health and safety programs. No such position 
existed prior to the transfer of the WCD to HRD. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



Mr. Pryor advises that the 1864 Senior Systems Analyst is 
being requested in order to evaluate the information system 
requirements of the WCD, which are critical to the success of 
the department. An existing management information 
systems (MIS) position will remain at the Employees 
Retirement System (ERS) to respond to the information 
system needs of the ERS. 

Mr. Pryor advises that the 1652 Accountant is critically 
needed to develop and implement basic accounting services 
needed by the WCD. 

Mr. Pryor advises that the four temporary Claims Adjuster 
positions are being requested in order to clear up and close a 
backlog of cases, thereby reducing the ongoing caseload. Mr. 
Pryor states that in the HRD proposed FY 95-96 budget, 
these four Claims Adjuster positions are requested for three 
months. Therefore the Budget Analyst recommends that the 
four temporary Claims Adjuster positions be approved as 
limited duration positions. 

2. As noted above, the proposed expenditures for the 
Permanent Salaries of the 1444 Secretary I, the 1652 Senior 
Accountant, and the 1864 Sr. Systems & Procedures Analyst 
were based on nine pay periods. Ms. Victoria Mead of the 
Department of Human Resources advises that the staff will 
be hired effective May 20, 1995, and will work for 7.5 pay 
periods. As such, the amount required for Permanent 
Salaries is $35,955, or $7,353 less than the requested 
$43,308. 

3. As noted above, the proposed expenditures for the 
Temporary Salaries of four 8141 Claims Adjusters were 
based on seven pay periods. Ms. Mead advises that two of 
the 8141 Claims Adjusters will begin on May 20, 1995 and 
will work for 7.5 pay periods, and two of the 8141 Claims 
Adjusters will begin on April 8, 1995, and work for six pay 
periods. As such, the amount required for Temporary 
Salaries is $44,982, or $1,618 less than the requested 
$46,600. 

4. As noted above, the Fringe Benefits should be calculated 
based on eight percent of Temporary Salaries and 20 percent 
of Permanent Salaries. Based on the decrease of $7,353 in 
Permanent Salaries from $43,308 to $35,995, the Fringe 
Benefits for Permanent Salaries are $7,199. Based on the 
decrease of $1,618 in Temporary Salaries, from $46,600 to 
$44,982, the Fringe Benefits for Temporary Salaries are 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

19 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 

$3,599 for total Fringe Benefits of $10,798 ($7,199 + $3,599), 
or $7,184 less than the requested $17,982. 

Recommendation: 1. Amend the proposed ordinance to reduce the 
supplemental appropriation request as follows: (1) reduce 
Permanent Salaries by $7,353 from $43,308 to $35,955, 
reduce Temporary Salaries by $1,618 from $46,600 to 
$44,982, and (3) reduce Fringe Benefits by $7,184 from 
$17,982 to $10,798 for a total reduction of $16,155 from 
$182,885 to $166,730 (File 101-94-66). 

2. Amend the Annual Salary Ordinance to make the four 
proposed Claims Adjusters positions limited duration 
positions (File 102-94-11). 

3. Approve the proposed ordinance as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

20 



Attachment 1 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES MIS: WORKERS' COMPENSATION SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION FY 94-95 



Page 1 


of 1 








WCD 


Supplemental 










QTY 




FY 94-95 


CHAR 


OBJ 


SUB 


DESCRIPTION 


No. 


Untt Cost 


Total 






























10 






NON-PERSONAL SERVICES 






















22 






CAPITAL OUTLAY 
























220 




Equipment Purchase 


























2231 


Computer Equipment for DHR-WCD Systems Connectivity 




























Network File Server 32MB RAM, 2 - 2GB Hard Drives 


1 


14,000 


14,000 








Network Administration Workstation with Network Card 


1 


2,350 


2,360 








MPR+ Router Hardware 


1 


4,000 


4,000 








Network Printer with JetDlrect Card 


1 


4,000 


4,000 








Ethernet Hub for Network 


1 


2,500 


2,500 








UPS (Power Supply) and Tape Backup Units 


1 


3,000 


3,000 








Network Hardware Sub-Totai 






29,860 






















Network Software. Netware v3.1 2 


1 


4,800 


4,800 








Novell MPR+ WAN Software 


2 


1,080 


2,160 








Intel LANDesk Manager 


1 


1,020 


1,020 








Intel Virus Protection 


1 


680 


680 








Cheyenne ArcServe tape Backup Software 


1 


1,020 


1,020 








Network Software Sub-Total 






9,680 






















PacBell Telecommunications Installation (estimate) 


1 


3,000 


3,000 








High Speed Modems DSU/CSU & Synch Adapter 


2 


2000 


4,000 








Site Cabling Charges (per Network device/user, estimate) 


10 


360 


3,600 








Telecommunications Line Charges (per month, estimate) 


e 


300 


1,800 








Telecommunications Sub-Tota 






12,300 






















On-Slte PC Client Workstations with Network Cards 














for MIS Business Systems Analyst 


i 


2,350 


2,360 








for MIS Technical Support 


1 


2,360 


2,350 








for Health & Safety Administrator (Bill Lee) 


l 


2,360 


2,350 








for Administrative Assistant (Pat Gomez) 


1 


2,350 


2,350 








PC Client Workstation Sub-Tota 


4 




9,400 






















Applications Software Licenses (Network and per user) 


6 


816 


4,890 








Network & Telecommunications Installation & Configuration (in Hours) 


24 


125 


3,000 








Miscellaneous Charges Sub-Tota 


J 




7,390 






















Pre-Tax Sub-Tota 


i_ 




89,120 








Sales Tax @ 8.5% 






5,876 








TOTAL REQUESTED 4 






74,996 
















Estimate as of Jan 
E"d 


C /^L_ „ 


• 


/ - (__— — 

jary 20, 1996 (Klra Chuchom) Version 1. 

21 




S-STfr it/:80 S6, 9* 83J 



ity and County of San Francisco 




Pape 1 of. I 
Department of Human Resources 

WENDELL L PRY OR, 
HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR 



February 22, 1995 



Mr. Harvey Rose 

Budget Analyst 

1390 Market Street, Ste. 1025 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Mr. Rose: 

You have asked for a written statement from me concerning the new positions which this 
department has requested in a supplemental appropriation request to the Board of Supervisors. 
As I understand it, your question concerns why none of these positions can be transferred from 
the Employees Retirement System. In response, the following explanation is provided. 

The 1444 Secretary is being requested as clerical and administrative support for the Health 
Service Administrator, Bill Lee, who now has oversight of the operations of the Workers 
Compensation Division (WCD), as well as the Health Service System and the City's health and 
safety programs. No such position existed prior to the transfer of the WCD to DHR. 

The 1864 Senior Systems Analyst is being requested in order to evaluate the information system 
requirements of the WCD, which are critical to the success of the program. Although the ERS 
staff apparently includes an MIS professional, this position has not been predominantly 
concerned with the information systems at the WCD, and, moreover, will remain at ERS to 
continue to respond to the information system needs of the Employees Retirement System. 

The 1652 Accountant is critically needed to develop and implement basic accounting systems at 
the WCD. ERS accountants have performed most of the basic accounting services needed by the 
WCD in the past, but these accounting activities have not been well integrated with the Bill 
Paying Unit of the WCD. Moreover, these accounting services were completely funded by the 
Retirement Trust Fund. The Workers Compensation Division, which has now been transferred 
to HRD, had been the only ERS division funded by the General Fund. Therefore, there may be 
reason to question the scope of accounting services which continue to be needed at the 
Employees Retirement System , and funded by the Retirement Trust Fund, in light of the transfer 
of the WCD to HRD; however, no General Fund savings would result from reducing ERS 
accounting services, and it is not possible to transfer employees (or funds) from the Retirement 
Trust Fund to HRD in order to provide the necessary accounting services for HRD. 



22 

OtyH.ll • 400 Van N... Avtnu. • Room I S4C ^S«n Frmd.co, CA 94102-4403 



Page TUTZ 



Finally, with respect to the four temporary adjusters, these are short term positions which are 
expected to reduce a backlog of cases at the WCD which could be closed, thereby reducing the 
average caseload per adjuster in order to improve the effectiveness of claims administration. 
These positions did not exist at the Workers Compensation prior to its transfer to HRD; clearly, 
if the WCD had employed additional adjusters at an earlier date, there would be a smaller 
backlog of claims which should be closed. 

Should you require additional information, please contact me. 

SincereW yours, 




Wendell L. Pryor 

Director of Human Resources 



WLP:vm 




23 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 Budget Committee 

Items 7 and 8 - Files 101-94-67 and 102-94-9 

Department: Sheriff's Department 



Items: 



Amount: 



Item 7, File 101-94-67 - Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance appropriating $400,449 from the General Fund 
Reserve for salaries, fringe benefits and equipment for the 
Sheriffs Department. 

Item 8, File 102-94-9 - Ordinance amending the Annual 
Salary Ordinance to reflect the addition of nine positions in 
the Sheriffs Department. 

$400,449 



Source of Funds: General Fund Reserve 

Description: The proposed supplemental appropriation would fund (1) six 

new Deputy Sheriff positions to provide a combination of 
entry security and courtroom security for the Trial Courts 
(Superior and Municipal Courts) at their 633 Folsom Street 
and 575 Polk Street locations, (2) six months funding 
retroactive from January 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995, for two 
existing Police Cadet positions that are currently providing 
entry security at the Folsom Street facility, (3) overtime to 
fund interim security staffing at the Folsom Street and Polk 
Street locations until permanent staff can be hired, (4) 
overtime to fund 10 Deputy Sheriffs and one Sheriffs 
Sergeant related to a major, pending Superior Court case, (5) 
the purchase of three vans associated with a plan to reduce 
jail overcrowding and (6) the purchase of one metal detector 
for courtroom security at Folsom Street. 

This proposed supplemental appropriation request would 
appropriate $400,449, as follows: 



Permanent Salaries 
Fringe Benefits 
Overtime 
Equipment 

Total 



$105,666 

26,644 

208,438 

59.701 

$400,449 



The following describes the budgetary details of this $400,449 
request: 

Permanent Salaries - ($105.666) 

Due to the planned seismic retrofit of City Hall, the Trial 
Courts were relocated from City Hall to a new location at 633 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

24 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 Budget Committee 



Folsom Street and an existing location at 575 Polk Street. 
According to Sergeant Ridgeway, of the Police Department, 
prior to this latest move, the Sheriffs Department had (1) six 
Police Cadets and one Deputy Sheriff assigned to entry 
security at City Hall, and (2) 22 Deputy Sheriffs assigned to 
courtroom security in 29 Superior and Municipal Court 
courtrooms, of which 27 of these courtrooms were located in 
City Hall and two Superior Court courtrooms were already 
located at 575 Polk Street. 

Entry Security 

Sergeant Ridgeway reports that funds for two Police Cadets 
are being requested (a third existing Cadet will also be used) 
and funds for two of the six new Deputy Sheriffs are being 
requested for entry security at the Folsom Street facility as 
follows: (1) three Cadets on the first floor to monitor the 
front door and three additional entrances with cameras, and 
(2) two Deputies to provide supervision to the Cadets, 
security coverage for a 3rd floor courtroom metal detector and 
relief responsibilities. According to Sergeant Ridgeway, three 
of the six Police Cadets who were assigned to entry security 
at City Hall have been reassigned to entry security at 633 
Folsom Street. The Deputy Sheriff position, which had been 
assigned to entry security at City Hall, has also been 
reassigned to 633 Folsom Street on an interim basis. 
According to Sergeant Ridgeway, this Deputy Sheriff position 
is on loan to 633 Folsom Street from County Jail #1, located 
at 850 Bryant Street and must be returned to County Jail #1. 
Sergeant Ridgeway advises that the second Deputy Sheriff 
position needed for entry security at the Folsom Street 
facility is currently being provided through overtime. The 
Sheriffs Department is therefore proposing that two of the 
requested six new Deputy Sheriff positions be assigned to 
entry security at the Folsom Street facility. 

Sergeant Ridgeway adds that the remaining three Police 
Cadets who were assigned to entry security at City Hall have 
been reassigned back to other locations; one has been 
assigned to the Parole Office located at 555 7th Street, one to 
the new County Jail at 425 7th Street, and one to the San 
Bruno Jail. 

Sergeant Ridgeway also reports that one of the requested six 
new Deputy Sheriff positions is required for entry security at 
the Polk Street facility. This Deputy Sheriff position would be 
responsible for monitoring the front door with a metal 
detector and also have some relief responsibilities in 
connection with courtroom security. The Sheriffs 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

25 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 Budget Committee 



Department reports that currently this position is being 
provided through retroactive overtime under funds allocated 
from this subject request. The Sheriffs Department is 
therefore proposing that this previously noted one new 
Deputy Sheriff position be assigned to entry security at the 
Polk Street facility in order to eliminate overtime funds for 
this responsibility. According to Sergeant Ridgeway, entry 
security, which has not previously been provided at the Polk 
Street facility, is now needed at this facility because of the 
Small Claims Court that is now located at Polk Street. 
Previously, small claims were handled at City Hall in eight 
Municipal Court courtrooms (see Courtroom Security below). 
Sergeant Ridgeway states that the two Superior Court 
courtrooms, which were previously located at the Polk Street 
facility, processed primarily civil cases involving corporate 
suits. Now, there is only one Superior Court courtroom at 
Polk Street and one Small Claims Court. 

Courtroom Security 

As previously noted, prior to relocating from City Hall, the 
Trial Courts (Superior and Municipal Courts) had a total of 
29 courtrooms. Of these 29 courtrooms, the Superior Court 
had 19 courtrooms in City Hall and two courtrooms at the 
575 Polk Street facility and the Municipal Court had 8 
courtrooms in City Hall. As noted above, the Sheriffs 
Department had 22 Deputy Sheriffs assigned to these 29 
courtrooms. 

As a result of the relocation, the total number of Superior 
Court and Municipal Court courtrooms increased by two from 
29 courtrooms to 31 courtrooms. Of the 31 courtrooms, 29 
courtrooms (8 Municipal Court courtrooms plus 21 Superior 
Court courtrooms) are located at the Folsom Street facility 
and two courtrooms (one Small Claims Court and one 
Superior Court courtroom) are located at the Polk Street 
facility. According to Sergeant Ridgeway, 25 Deputy Sheriffs, 
or three more than the current staffing level, are now 
required to serve as bailiffs for the 31 courtrooms located at 
the Folsom and Polk Street facilities, as follows: (1) Folsom 
Street facility - three Deputy Sheriffs for seven Municipal 
Court courtrooms and 19 Deputy Sheriffs for 21 Superior 
courtrooms, for a total of 22 Deputy Sheriffs at Folsom 
Street, and (2) Polk Street facility - 2 Deputy Sheriffs for one 
Small Claims Court and one Deputy Sheriff for one Superior 
Court courtroom, for a total of three Deputy Sheriffs at the 
Polk Street facility. These three requested Deputy Sheriffs 
positions are currently being provided through overtime on a 
retroactive basis under this subject request. The Sheriffs 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

26 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 Budget Committee 



Department is therefore proposing that three of the 
requested six new Deputy Sheriff positions be assigned to 
courtroom security . 

Sergeant Ridgeway reports that, aside from the increase in 
courtrooms, the primary reason that the remaining three new 
Deputy Sheriff positions out of the six new Deputy Sheriff 
positions are being requested for courtroom security, is 
because the existing 22 Deputy Sheriffs cannot provide 
sufficient coverage for the 31 courtrooms from a logistical 
standpoint at the Folsom and Polk Street facilities. According 
to Sergeant Ridgeway, the courtrooms at the Folsom Street 
facility are located on five separate floors as opposed to the 
two floors that these courtrooms were located on at City Hall. 
Sergeant Ridgeway states that having the courtrooms located 
on five separate floors, instead of two floors, increases the 
response time of Deputy Sheriff for emergencies and provides 
less flexibility for the Deputy Sheriffs to handle multiple 
courtroom assignments. Additionally, Sergeant Ridgeway 
advises that the Small Claims Court located in the Polk 
Street facility, which is approximately one mile from the 
Folsom Street facility, will now be the site for all small claims 
cases. According to Sergeant Ridgeway, small claims cases 
were previously divided among the eight Municipal 
courtrooms at City Hall. Sergeant Ridgeway states that small 
claims cases can be very volatile and now that all of these 
cases are being heard in one courtroom, additional security 
staffing is required. Sergeant Ridgeway notes that since the 
Small Claims Court is isolated from the majority of the other 
courtrooms, a pool of Deputy Sheriffs cannot quickly respond 
to emergencies, which makes having sufficient security 
staffing on site all the more necessary. 

The $105,666 requested amount for permanent salaries was 
based on (1) six Deputy Sheriffs being funded for the period 
February 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995, for a total of $73,296 and 
(2) three Police Cadets being funded retroactive for the period 
January 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995, for a total of $32,370. 
Sergeant Ridgeway now advises that the Deputy Sheriffs will 
be hired effective March 27, 1995. As such, the actual amount 
needed to fund the six Deputy Sheriffs is $50,022 or $23,274 
less than the requested $73,296. Sergeant Ridgeway also 
reports that retroactive funding is required for only two 
Police Cadets instead of three. Therefore, the actual amount 
needed to fund the two Police Cadets for the period January 
1, 1995 to June 30, 1995 is $21,580 or $10,790 less than the 
requested $32,370. Sergeant Ridgeway reports that these two 
Police Cadet positions, which are currently assigned to entry 
security at the Folsom facility, were only budgeted for six 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

27 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 Budget Committee 



months in order to meet the Mayor's baseline budget, since 
the specific needs of Trial Court security following the closure 
of City Hall was unknown during the budget process. 

Fringe Benefits ($26.644) 

Fringe Projected Estimated 

Benefits Expended Expenditure Total Budget 

Budgeted as of 2/10/95 2/10 /95 -6/30/95 Expenditure Surplus 

$6,969,550 $4,245,550 $2,693,450 $6,939,000 $30,550 

Based on the estimated budget surplus of $30,550, the 
supplemental appropriation request of $26,644 for Fringe 
Benefits is not needed. 

Overtime ($208.438) 

This amount would pay for the following overtime costs: 

(1) Six Deputy Sheriffs @ $20.625/per hour x 755 hours 
plus fringe benefits for a total of $95,550 for interim entry 
and courtroom security services at the Folsom and Polk 
Street facilities retroactively for the period January 16, 1995 
to March 6, 1995, pending the hiring of permanent staff. 

(2) A total of $112,888 in overtime costs for courtroom 
security for a major pending Superior Court case as follows: 
(1) 10 Deputy Sheriffs @ $20.625/per hour x 480 hours plus 
fringe benefits, for a total of $100,608 and (2) one Sheriffs 
Sergeant @ $25.175/per hour x 480 hours plus fringe benefits, 
for a total of $12,280. The Sheriffs Department is proposing 
to have four Deputy Sheriffs in the courtroom for this case at 
all times plus one Deputy Sheriff stationed outside of each of 
the four courtroom exits plus several Deputy Sheriffs roving 
in the vicinity of the courtroom. The District Attorney's Office 
anticipates that the trial will last 12 weeks. 

Sergeant Ridgeway advises that the above-noted Superior 
Court case involves seven gang members accused of raping 
two minor women. According to Sergeant Ridgeway, since 
these defendants have been in custody, they have displayed a 
propensity for violence and have been involved in violent 
altercations with other prisoners. Additionally, Sergeant 
Ridgeway advises that these defendants will not be 
handcuffed in the courtroom and will be wearing civilian 
clothes, which increases the potential for escape. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

28 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 Budget Committee 



Projected Estimated 

Overtime Expended Expenditure Total Budget 

Budgeted as of 1/13/95 1/14/95-6/30/95 Expenditure Deficiency 

$952,083 $661,286 $626,550 $1,287,836 ($335,753) 

As noted above, the Sheriffs Department has an estimated 
deficiency of $335,753 in its overtime budget or $127,315 
more than the requested amount of $208,438. Sergeant 
Ridgeway advises that the Sheriff Department will be 
submitting a future request to reappropriate the $127,315 
from surplus funds in the Sheriffs Department's materials 
and supplies account to pay for this deficiency in the overtime 
budget. 

Equipment ($59.701) 

This amount would fund three vans and one metal detector, 
as follows: 

Vans (3) $57,006 

Metal Detector (1) 2.695 

Total $59,701 

The Board of Supervisors recently approved a supplemental 
appropriation for the Sheriffs Department for the creation of 
four Police Cadets and three Deputy Sheriff positions to 
expand its Sheriffs Work Alternative Program (SWAP), in 
order to reduce jail overcrowding (Files 101-94-36 and 102- 
94-6). In addition to these positions, the Board also approved 
$14,994 towards the purchase of three vans for this program, 
in connection with the SWAP participants. The Sheriffs 
Department had originally requested the $14,994 for the 
lease of three vans. However, the Budget Analyst determined 
that it was more cost effective to purchase these vans and, as 
such, recommended that the Sheriffs Department submit 
another supplemental appropriation for the balance needed 
to purchase the vans. The Sheriffs Department had 
originally reported that the total cost of the vans would be 
$66,000 (three vans @ $22,000). The Sheriffs Department 
now reports, based on a revised quote from the van 
dealership, that the total amount required for the purchase of 
the three vans is $72,000 (three vans @ $24,000 each) or 
$57,006 more than the $14,994 currently available for this 
purpose. 

According to the Sheriffs Department, the metal detector 
requested for courtroom security on the 3rd floor at 633 
Folsom Street will be used to screen all persons who enter 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

29 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 Budget Committee 



Comments: 



Recommendation: 



the Family Courts (i. e., Divorce Courts). Sergeant Ridgeway 
advises that the metal detector which was used for this 
purpose at City Hall, is now being used for entry security at 
the Folsom Street facility. 

The proposed ordinance (File 102-94-9) would amend the 
Annual Salary Ordinance to reflect the addition of nine 
positions, as follows: 



No. of 

Positiops Classification/Title 



8274 Police Cadet 



Maximum Total 
Bimonthly Salary Annual 
Salary Amount Cost 

$822/822 $21,454 $64,362 



8302 N Deputy Sheriff 1 $1,191/$1, 191 $31,085 186.510 
Total $250,872 



Sergeant Ridgeway advises that this proposed ordinance is 
incorrect and should reflect the addition of six Deputy Sheriff 
positions only. As previously noted, funding has been 
requested only to pay for the continuation of two (not three) 
existing Police Cadets. New Police Cadet positions 
themselves are not being requested. As such, the proposed 
ordinance should be amended to delete reference to the 
addition of three new 8274 Police Cadets. 

1. As noted above, the actual amount required for Permanent 
Salaries is $50,022 for the proposed six new Deputy Sheriff 
positions plus $21,580 for the two Police Cadet positions for 
a total of $71,602 or $34,064 less than the requested amount 
of $105,666. Therefore, the proposed ordinance (Filel01-94- 
67) should be amended to reduce the amount of Permanent 
Salaries by $34,064 from $105,666 to $71,602. Additionally, 
the Fringe Benefit amount of $26,644 should be reduced to 
zero based on an estimated surplus of $30,550 in the Sheriffs 
Department's Fringe Benefit account, for a total reduction of 
$60,708. 

2. Additionally, as noted above, the proposed ordinance to 
amend the Annual Salary Ordinance (File 102-94-9) should 
be amended to delete reference to the addition of three new 
Police Cadet positions. 

1. Amend the proposed ordinance to (1) reduce Permanent 
Salaries from $105,666 to $71,602 and (2) reduce Fringe 
Benefits from $26,644 to zero, for a total reduction of $60,708. 
Therefore, the total request of $400,449 should be reduced by 
$60,708 to $339,741 (File 101-94-67). 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

30 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 Budget Committee 



2. Amend the Annual Salary Ordinance by deleting three 
8274 Police Cadet positions (File 102-94-9). 

3. Approve the ordinances as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 9 - File 101-94-70 

Department: 

Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Public Health (DPH) 

Ordinance appropriating $207,103 for the Department of 
Public Health, Division of Mental Health, from the General 
Fund Reserve to pay retroactively for the phasing out of 
medical programs contracts for substance abuse programs 
during the period from January 16, 1995 through February 
15, 1995; providing for ratification of action previously 
taken. 

$207,103 

General Fund Reserve 

A total of 15 substance abuse providers were funded in FY 
1993-94 in the amount of $3,322,167 from Federal Forfeiture 
and Asset Seizure grant funds. The $3,322,167 grant 
expired on June 30, 1994. 

During the FY 1994-95 budget process, the Mayor 
recommended and the Board of Supervisors approved 
$830,541 in the Department of Public Health's FY 1994-95 
budget to fund these 15 substance abuse providers for the 
three month period July 1, 1994 to September 30, 1994. In 
addition, the Board of Supervisors, at that time, earmarked 
$1,000,000 as part of the General Fund Reserve to fund these 
15 programs for the 3 1/2 month period from October 1, 1994 
to January 15, 1995. 

In August of 1994 the DPH requested a supplemental 
appropriation of the $1,000,000 previously earmarked from 
the General Fund Reserve to pay for the programs for the 
3 1/2 month period October 1, 1994 to January 15, 1995 (File 
101-94-20). The Mayor reduced the DPH's request by 
$151,058, to $848,942, which provided funding for only three 
months, instead of 3 1/2 months, from October 1, 1994 
through December 31, 1994, with the exception of Chemical 
Awareness and Treatment Services (CATS), which was 
granted full funding through June 30, 1995 for operation of 
the McMillan drop-in center for homeless substance 
abusers. 



BOARD OF SI IPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

32 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

On January 25, 1995, the Board of Supervisors approved a 
supplemental appropriation for the balance of $151,058 (File 
101-94-51) out of the above-noted $1,000,000 to continue 
funding the remaining 14 substance abuse providers (15 
programs less the one fully funded) for the period January 
1, 1995 to January 15, 1995. 

Mr. Jim Stillwell of the DPH now advises that alternative 
funding had been identified effective January 16, 1995 for 
three of the 14 substance abuse providers, Horizons, 
Bayview-Hunters Point Youth Program and Bay Area 
Addiction Research and Treatment (BAART). Two of these 
three programs, Horizons and the Bayview-Hunters Point 
Youth Program, are receiving monies under Proposition J 
(Children's Fund), according to Mr. Stillwell. Mr. Stillwell 
advises that the third program, BAART, received full 
funding through MediCal effective January 16, 1995. The 
remaining 11 providers (14 less 3) are the subject of this 
supplemental appropriation request. 

The proposed ordinance would appropriate $207,103 from 
the General Fund Reserve to the Department of Public 
Health for payment retroactively to 11 of the 14 nonprofit 
agencies for the provision of community-based substance 
abuse services during the period January 16, 1995 to 
February 15, 1995. The services provided by the 11 nonprofit 
agencies include substance abuse programs related to 
outpatient, residential, homeless substance abuse services, 
and methadone maintenance. 

Mr. Jim Curtis of the DPH advises that the DPH is 
pursuing additional funding for the balance of the fiscal 
year for three of these 11 agencies through another pending 
supplemental appropriation request. These three agencies 
are Asian American Recovery Services, Baker Places and 
Walden House (see Comment 1 below). 

Budget: The proposed supplemental appropriation request 

appropriates $207,103 retroactively for 11 nonprofit agencies 
providing substance abuse programs for the period January 
16, 1995 to February 15, 1995 as follows: 



Contracts 


Amount 


18th Street Services 


$5,000 


Walden House 


115,149 


Iris Center 


1,559 


Baker Places 


5,833 


Haight-Ashbury Free Clinic; Outpatient Detox 


20,769 


BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 





BUDGET ANALYST 

33 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Contracts 



Amount 



Comments: 



Recommendation: 



UCSF Program for AIDS Education & Counseling $9,902 
Bayview- Hunters Point Outpatient Methadone Maint. 17,031 
Westside Outpatient Methadone Maintenance 1,694 

Asian-American Recovery Services 8,333 

Bayview- Hunters Point Center for Problem Drinkers 6,833 
Haight-Ashbury Free Clinic; Facts on Crack 15.000 

Total $207,103 

1. As noted above, Mr. Curtis advises that the DPH has 
submitted another supplemental appropriation request 
which is pending in the Mayor's Office to fund the 
continuation of three of the 11 substance abuse providers 
listed above for the period retroactive from February 16, 1995 
through June 30, 1995. These three programs are Asian 
American Recovery Services, Baker Places and Walden 
House, all residential treatment providers. 

2. Attachment I, provided by DPH, describes each of the 15 
substance abuse treatment programs. 

2. Attachment II shows the amounts allocated for each of 
the original 15 substance abuse service providers from (a) 
the Federal grant amount for FY 1993-94 totaling $3,322,167, 
(b) the amount already funded for FY 1994-95 totaling 
$1,830,543, and (c) the amount of funding requested in this 
proposed appropriation totaling $207,103. 

3. According to DPH data, an additional $945,848 would be 
needed to continue funding of all of the substance abuse 
providers through June 30, 1995. 

Approval of the proposed ordinance is a policy matter for 
the Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

34 



A tt a chin en 
Page 1 of 



BUDGET JUSTIFICATION 

18th Street Services 



This program provides outpatient substance abuse treatment (individual 
counseling and group therapy) for gay and bisexual men. Information, 
education and prevention comprise major elements of the program with 
special emphasis on the substance abuse aspects of the HIV/AIDS 
epidemic. 18th Street Services also provides housing for AA, NA, 
Codependency anonymous and Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous meeting. 
Outreach is conducted to the gay and bisexual community, including 
indigent population, for safe sex practices and prevention measures. At 
the core of their program is active support and 12 step programs. Their 
services are available to gay and bisexual men regardless of ability to pay. 

Asian American Recovery Program 
funding 



AARS is a voluntary, long term, residential drug and alcohol treatment 
program. As a drug-free, long-term program, individuals (both male and 
female) are provided with a rigorous structure of work and clinical 
activities. The program consists of individual, group, and family counseling 
along with educational and vocational activities and development within a 
supporting multicultural environment. The program philosophy is based 
on a therapeutic community model utilizing behavioral and problem 
solving approaches. Its primary goal and objective is to provide support 
and opportunity for Asian/Pacific Islanders and others to learn to function 
successfully as responsible substance abuse free individuals. 



Bay Area Addiction, Research and Treatment (BAART) 
Geary/Townsend Clinics 



These programs have been developed from the expressed needs of the 
clients themselves. Historically, methadone programs were tailored to the 
needs of older male, chronic heroin users, and did little to provide for the 
increasingly female and younger population admitted to treatment in 
recent years. BAART programs emphasize individualized treatment, 

35 



Attachme nt I 
Page T~oF~S~ 



family treatment, women's needs including high risk obstetrical and 
pediatric care for the passively addicted neonate, vocational and academic 
training and education, and prevention of AIDS among the clients enrolled 
in our programs. Beyond the scope of methadone maintenance services, 
the BAART program has developed and implemented several innovative 
treatment components, including sedative-hypnotive detoxification, 
crack/cocaine/stimulant abuse treatment, aftercare services, primary 
medical care, family counseling, education and interventions to reduce risk 
behavior among intravenous drug users, and AIDS antibody screening. In 
addition to Methadone, comprehensive psychological services are offered 
to clients including crisis intervention, a variety of weekly groups, 
individual, family, and marriage counseling. A complete medical health 
assessment is done on every client entering the program, and referrals are 
made as needed. Goals of the program include: attracting heroin addicts 
into treatment, Prevention Strategy Code(s). 



Baker Places, Inc/Acceptance Place 

Baker Places is committed to providing a comprehensive residential 
treatment program for people whose lives are disrupted or impaired 
because of their substance abuse and attendant problems, including AIDS 
related and psychiatric jcomplications. A home-like facility is maintained 
to provide food, shelter, and rehabilitation services in a community-based, 
peer-group oriented, clean and sober living environment. The principles of 
social rehabilitation will be applied to support this purpose. Individual 
and group counseling, education and recreational services, and linkage 
with health, social, vocational, and other support services will be provided. 
Systematic supervision and evaluation of services will be used to assure 
the highest quality of professional care, and the program operations will be 
managed in a responsible, accountable manner. 

This program provides counseling services to individuals who are poly drug users and 
are unable to cease using alcohol and cocaine without therapy. The program targets 
individuals who are residents of Bayview Hunter's Point, Visitation Valley, OMI, 
Porrero Hill and all areas of South of Market Street. 

Bayview Hunter's Point/Youth Counseling 

This program provides prevention services to youth population of Bayview 
Hunter's Point, OMI, Visitation Valley, Potrero Hill and Sunnydale in order 
to curtail or even eliminate substance abuse. Specific activities include 
recruitment of 66 youths and young adults from target population to 
participate in psychological counseling and nutritional assessment. 
Counseling services are conducted in 1-hour daily sessions, 5 days a week. 
Parents and guardians also receive 2-hour counseling sessions per month. 

36 



Page 3 of 6 



Bayview Hunter's Point/Methadone Maintenance 



The Bayview Methadone Treatment program provides affordable 
treatment and prevention services for heroin and polydrug abusing people. 
The outpatient program involves stabilization with a daily methadone 
dosage. This allows clients the opportunity to reconstruct a drug free 
lifestyle. Preparation for the drug free lifestyle includes a gradual 
withdrawal from methadone to prevent side effects. Counseling and health 
care are an integral part of the services provided to clients. Counselors 
provide treatment direction and assist with referrals to employment, 
education, and other health services. The Bayview HIV risk reduction 
program is integrated into the methadone program. The goal is to reduce 
the risk of HIV transmission, the risk to sexual partners of injection drug 
users, and the risks of needle sharing practices. The on site health center 
offers primary care as well as HIV testing, case management and HIV 
specific health services target the African American and other minority 
populations for San Francisco's Bayview-Hunter's Point district 



CATS-Chemical Awareness and Treatment Services 



The contractor received Ryan White funds which will be used to back-fill 
lost Forfeiture Grant funds. However, the agency lost other State Grant 
funding which supports the McMillian Center. This request would allow 
the McMillian Center to continue current level (24-Hour operation) of 
services through June 3Q_1995. 

This program targets Homeless men and women and provides a 24-hour 
drop-in facility with services that include: medical and psycho-social 
assessments; referrals to appropriate substance abuse and other health 
and social services (both emergency and non-emergency); stabilization 
opportunities and social/recreational activities. Voluntary facilitated 
support groups are available every day. 



37 



Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinics Outpatient Detox 



The program has an established 24-year history of providing the City for 
substance abusers. This includes full medical and psychiatric outpatient 
services which provide medical symptomatic detoxification, plus dual 
diagnosis and HIV disease treatment. Their goals are to reduce or 
eliminate drug abuse by clients, to increase vocational skills and 
employment prospects, to expand the Project's treatment capabilities, to 
increase clients' awareness of HIV disease and their risk-reduction 
response, and to maintain program use by a clientele representative of the 
City's ethnically diverse drug using population. Our objectives are (1) to 
deliver at least 1,331 units of service to substance-abuser clients; (2) to 
provide employment counseling to at least 15% of employable, 
unemployed clients; (3) to provide 18 hours of staff training; (4) to carry 
out HIV risk assessment for at least 95% of new or readmitted clients; (5) 
to provide 467 hours of skills training relevant to HIV risk reduction; (^ 
to substantially eliminate illicit Prevention Strategy Code(s) drug use for at 
least 80% of clients who remain in treatment for more than one week. 



Haight Ashburv Free Medical Clinic- Glide Church Project 



This program's methodology and activities include daily support groups, 
drug intervention meetings, daily individual counseling, weekly classes in 
African history, job training, referrals for generation graduation and 
money management training. The goal is to establish culturally relevant 
and economically assessable drug treatment services that lead to self- 
esteem and sobriety for the African American. The services that are 
provided are daily groups, individual counseling, weekly classes in health, 
African history and substance education and sanctuary activities. 

Horizons Unlimited 



Horizons Unlimited through its Juventud substance abuse treatment 
program provides counseling services (individually and family). The goal 

38 



~6T^ 



of the program is to reduce substance abuse in the individual with a goal 
of abstinence. The target population is Hispanic youth and young adults. 



IRIS Center 



The program provides women/lesbians in San Francisco who have 
substance abuse problems with counseling services that will reduce their 
incidence of drug abuse and enable them to lead healthy and productive 
lives. The program's activities increase in the social, psychological, and 
behavioral functioning of the IRIS Project clients. 

The IRIS Center reaches a diversity of women from different backgrounds 
and lifestyles, particularly Women of Color and lesbian women. The 
program provides treatment to these women, especially to women of 
childbearing age at risk for pregnancy and to lesbians with chemical 
dependency problems through group counseling services. The program 
provides group counseling relating to drug and alcohol abuse and 
addiction, clean and sober lifestyles, self-esteem. The program's objective- 
is that at least 70% of the clients who complete the IRIS Project Program 
will have stayed clean and sober for at least 30 days before completing the 
program. 



UCSF SFGH Substance Abuse Services PACE Program 



This treatment program specializes in treatment and prevention services 
for heroin addiction among the HIV infected population. This outpatient 
program involves stabilization with a daily methadone dosage. This allows 

clients the opportunity to reconstruct a drug free lifestyle and to address 
their HIV related issues. Preparation for the drug free lifestyle includes a 
gradual withdrawal from methadone to prevent side effects. Counseling 
and health care are an integral part of the services provided to clients. 
Counselors provide treatment direction and assist with referrals to 
employment, education, and other health services. The HIV risk reduction 
program is integrated into the methadone program. The goal is to reduce 

39 



the risk of HIV transmission, the risk to sexual partners of injection drug 
users, and the risks of needle sharing practices. 



Walden House/Therapeutic Community 



Walden House residential program provides services 24 hours a day, 7 
days a week. The program also serves dually diagnosed clients, and clients 
with HIV disease. The program consists of orientation, therapeutic 
community involvement, and aftercare. The program serves young adults, 
adults and have an in-house school and on the job training programs. 



Westside-Methadone Treatment Program 



Westside Methadone Treatment program provides affordable treatment 
and prevention services for heroin and polydrug abusing people. The 
outpatient program involves stabilization with a daily methadone dosage. 
This allows clients the opportunity to reconstruct a drug free lifestyle. 
Preparation for the drug free lifestyle includes a gradual withdrawal from 
methadone to prevent side effects. Counseling and health care are an 
integral part of the services provided to clients. Counselors provide 
treatment direction and assist with referrals to employment, education, 
and other health services. The Westside HIV risk reduction program is 
integrated into the methadone program. The goal is to reduce the risk of 
HIV transmission, the risk to sexual partners of injection drug users, and 

the risks of needle sharing practices. The on site health center offers 
primary care as well as HIV testing, case management and HIV specific 
health services target the African American and other minority 

populations for San Francisco's Western Addition. 



40 



Attachment I 



CSAS FUNDING FOR CLOSURE OF FORFEITURE PROGRAMS JANUARY 1 5, 1 995-FEBRUARY 1 5, 1 995 





FORFFJTURE 


AMOUNT 


THIS 




GRANT 


ALREADY 


REQUEST 




12 MONTHS 


FUNDED 


FY 


1994/95 




FY 1993/94 


FY 


1994/95 


1/16/95 TO 




7/1/93 TO 






2/15/95 




6/30/94 










| PROGRAM 




18TH STREET 


60,000 




33,061 




5,000 


WALDEN HOUSE 


1,381,784 




761,374 




115,149 


IRIS CENTER 


18,692 




10,299 




1,553 


BAART 


367,196 




202,327 







HORIZONS 


60,000 




33,061 




* 


BAKER PLACES 


70,000 




38,571 




5,833 


HAFMC OP DTX 


249,230 




137,329 




20,769 


UCSFPACE 


118,828 




65,475 




9,902 


BVHP OMM 


204,370 




112,609 




17,031 


WESTSIDEOMM 


20,322 




11,199 




1,694 


AARS 


100,000 




55,101 




8,333 


BVHP CFPD 


49,000 




26,999 




6,833 


BVHP YOUTH 


82,000 




45,183 




* 


CATS 


360,745 




198,773 







HAFMC FACTS 


180,000 
3.322,167 


1 


99,182 
,830,543 




15,000 


| TOTALS 


207,103 



Prop J Funding 
Horizons--S5,000 
BVHP Youth-$6,833 



41 



CSAS JS 2/3/95 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 

Items 10 and 11 - File 27-95-5 and 27-95-5.1 

Department: Airports Commission 

Item: Resolution finding that the revised schedule of rates and 

charges for outdoor general aviation aircraft storage 
established by the Airports Commission will be sufficient to 
pay for maintenance and operation expenses of the Airport 
and will not require any tax subsidy (File 27-95-5). 

Resolution approving changes to the schedule of rates and 
charges for outdoor general aviation aircraft storage at San 
Francisco International Airport as established by the 
Airports Commission (File 27-95-5.1). 

Description: The proposed resolutions concern the establishment of 

increased aircraft storage rates for general aviation aircraft. 
General aviation aircraft refers to private aircraft in contrast 
to commercial aircraft. The Airport last increased aircraft 
storage fees for general aviation aircraft on March 1, 1993. 
The proposed fee increases are scheduled to take effect on 
April 1, 1995. The proposed hourly outdoor aircraft storage 
rates for general aviation aircraft are based on the weight of 
the aircraft. The current fee schedule, and the proposed fee 
schedule effective April 1, 1995, for the outdoor storage of 
general aviation aircraft, are as follows: 



Aircraft 
Weight 
in Pounds 



5.000 or less 

5.001 to 10,000 
10,001 to 15,000 
15,001 to 26,000 
26,001 to 50,000 
50,001 to 75,000 
75,001 to 150,000 
150,001 and over 



First 8 Hours 

Or Fraction 

Thereof 



Each Additional 

8 Hours or 
Fraction Thereof 



Current 
$12 
12 
15 
15 
17 
19 
23 
38 



Proposed 
$16 
16 
20 
20 
23 
26 
32 
53 



$2 
2 
3 
4 
5 
5 
9 

16 



24 Hour 
Fee Rate 

Current Proposed 
$16 

16 

21 

23 

27 

29 

41 

70 



20 
20 
26 
28 
33 
36 
50 
85 



Maximum 

Monthly 

Rate 

Current Proposed 
$85 $106 



124 
155 
194 
233 
271 
387 
694 



155 
194 
243 
291 
339 
483 
868 



Comments: 



1. According to Mr. Marcus Perro of the Airport, the 
proposed schedule of storage rates, plus the Airport's other 
existing rates and charges will be sufficient to cover the 
Fiscal Year 1994-95 Airport total operating costs, and 
therefore a tax subsidy from the City's General Fund will not 
be necessary for Fiscal Year 1994-95. The Airport's operating 
costs for 1994-95, as shown in the Annual Appropriation 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

42 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



Ordinance, total $215,649,466 which will be covered by 
approximately $57.1 million in landing fees and airline 
terminal rentals of scheduled airlines, and $157.9 million in 
concession and other revenue sources. 

2. According to Mr. Perro, the current fee schedule generates 
approximately $69,100 annually in revenues from the 
outdoor storage of general aviation aircraft. Mr. Perro 
advises that the proposed increase in outdoor aircraft storage 
fees for general aviation aircraft will generate an estimated 
additional $22,000 annually for a total of $91,100, or an 
approximate 32 percent increase. 

3. As previously noted, according to Mr. Perro, the Airport 
has not increased general aviation aircraft outdoor storage 
rates since March 1, 1993. Mr. Perro advises that the 
proposed 32 percent increase for general aviation aircraft 
outdoor storage rates is based on inflationary cost increases, 
and a comparison of the rates charged by other airports. Mr. 
Perro advises that although all of the Airport's costs directly 
associated with outdoor storage of general aviation aircraft 
will not be fully recovered through such storage fees, no 
General Fund subsidy is necessary because the Airport's 
revenues from landing fees and terminal rental fees are 
sufficient to fully recover all of the Airport's expenditures 
with respect to the outdoor storage costs of general aviation 
aircraft. 

4. Mr. Perro advises that even with the proposed increase 
for general aviation aircraft, the proposed fees for a 10,000 
pound general aviation aircraft at San Francisco 
International Airport would still be lower than rates charged 
by comparable airports. Mr. Perro provided the following 
outdoor general aviation aircraft storage 24 hour fee rates for 
10,000 pound aircraft at the following five airports: 



Airport 

Newark 

JFK 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Detroit 

San Francisco 

current 

proposed 

Recommendation: Approve the proposed resolutions. 



24 Hour Fee for 
a 10.0001b aircraft 

$90 
75 
43 
39 
25 

16 
20 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

A3 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 

Item 12 - File 68-94-15 J 



Department: 
Item: 



Grant Amount: 
Grant Period: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Mayor's Office of Community Development 

Resolution approving an amendment to the 1995 Shelter 
Grants Program, authorizing the Mayor, on behalf of San 
Francisco, to apply for, receive, and expend $250,750 in 
additional Emergency Shelter Grants Program (ESGP) 
entitlement funds; approving Addendum No. 1 to the 
expenditure schedule of the ESGP for recipient agencies, and 
determining that no environmental evaluation is required. 

$250,750 

Two years from the date of approval by the Federal grantor 

U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 

On November 30, 1994, the Board of Supervisors authorized 
the Mayor to apply for, accept and expend a $621,250 
entitlement under the 1995 Emergency Shelter Grants 
Program from HUD. The Mayor's Office of Community 
Development (MOCD) is responsible for administering and 
monitoring the ESGP. The purpose of the ESGP is to (1) help 
improve the quality of existing emergency shelters for the 
homeless, (2) help make available additional emergency 
shelters, (3) help meet the costs of operating emergency 
shelters and of providing certain essential social services to 
homeless individuals, so that those persons have access to 
the supportive services they need to improve their situations, 
and (4) restrict the increase of homelessness through the 
funding of preventative programs and activities. 

In October, 1994, the MOCD awarded ESPG entitlement 
grant funds to 20 non-profit homeless service providers and 
shelter operations as divided among 22 projects (two of the 
project grants were awarded to the Asian Women's Shelter 
and two were awarded to La Casa de las Madres). In 
December, 1994, HUD notified the MOCD that the allocation 
for 1995 ESGP entitlement funds would be increased from 
$621,250 to $872,000, an increase of $250,750. If approved, 
the proposed resolution would approve Addendum No. 1 to 
the ESGP, in order to revise the 1995 Emergency Shelter 
Grants Program expenditure schedule, reflecting the increase 
of $250,750, and allow the MOCD to enter into and execute 
contract agreements between the City and the agencies 
identified in Addendum No. 1. The proposed resolution 
would also authorize the Mayor to apply for, receive and 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

44 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



expend the additional $250,750 in 1995 Emergency Shelter 
Grant funds. 

Mr. Jon Pon of the MOCD advises that the 1995 Emergency 
Shelter Grants Program is not scheduled to begin until April 
1, 1995. Mr. Pon advises that the $872,000 in 1995 ESGP 
entitlement funds, reflecting the increase of $250,750 would 
be allocated to the non-profit providers as follows: 







Increase 




(Decrease) 






Subject 


Original 


Revised 


of this 


Award 


Award 


Reauest 


$14,000 


$31,452 


$17,452 


32,000 


48,750 


16,750 


20,000 


35,026 


15,026 


26,000 


26,000 





12,500 


12,500 





30,000 


41,201 


11,201 


19,000 


34,671 


15,671 


32.000 


32.000 


Q 


$185,500 


$261,600 


$76,100 



Provider 

Essential Services: * 

Asian Women's Shelter 

Catholic Charities/Richmond Hills 

Catholic Charities/Family Services 

Dolores Street Community Center 

Golden Gate Community 

La Casa de las Madres 

Swords to Plowshares 

Westside Community Mental Health Center 



* Essential Services fund staff at homeless shelters for shelter management and for 
the provision of social services to shelter residents. 

Maintenance & Operations: 

Asian Women's Shelter 

Catholic Charities Family Services 

Central City Hospitality House 

Central City Hospitality House/(Orlando House) 

Chemical Awareness and Treatment Services 

Community Housing Partnership 

Dolores Street Community Center 

Episcopal Community Services 

Friendship House Association of American Indians 23,000 

Hamilton Family Center 

La Casa de las Madres 

Larkin St. Youth Center 



$16,000 


$24,548 


$8,548 





4,974 


4,974 


12,000 


12,000 








10,000 


10,000 


26,750 


26,750 





15,000 





(15,000) 





28,000 


28,000 


40,000 


40,000 





5 23,000 


32,000 


9,000 


50,000 


50,000 





30,000 


48,799 


18,799 


26,000 


26,000 






BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

45 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



Provider 



Larkin St./Diamond Youth Center 
Salvation Army 
Swords to Plowshares 
Travelers Aid of San Francisco 
United Council of Human Services 

Homeless Prevention : 

American Red Cross Bay Area 

Bar Association/Homeless Advocacy Project 



MOCD Administration 
TOTAL 







Increase 


Original 
Award 


(Decrease) 
Subject 
Revised of this 
Award Reauest 


$16,000 

58,000 



20,000 

0. 

$332,750 


$26,000 

75,000 

3,329 

40,000 

15.000 

$462,400 


$10,000 

17,000 

3,329 

20,000 

15.000 

$129,650 



$63,000 $88,000 $25,000 

2 0,0 00 35.000 15.000 

$83,000 $123,000 $40,000 

$20.000 $ 25.000 $5.000 

$621,250 $872,000 $250,750 



Comments: 



1. Mr. Pon advises that the addition of $250,750 would 
authorize the MOCD to increase the number of funded 
projects from 22 to 26, and the number of providers from 20 
to 21. Mr. Pon advises that when the funding was originally 
allocated, the United Council of Human Services was not able 
to provide the necessary insurance to meet the MOCD 
requirements. As such, the Community Housing Partnership 
acted as the fiscal agent for the United Council of Human 
Services. Mr. Pon advises that in the interim between 
October, 1994, when the awards were allocated, and 
December of 1994, the United Council of Human Services 
was able to obtain the required insurance. As such, the 
award allocation for the Community Housing Partnership 
decreased from $15,000 to and the award allocation for the 
United Council of Human Services increased from to 
$15,000 (see Table above ). 

2. Mr. Pon advises that HUD requires a 100 percent match, 
or $872,000, from the City to be used for projects targeted at 
the homeless population. Mr. Pon states that a total of 
$1,006,219 allocated for 12 homeless-related projects in the 
1995 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

46 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



has been identified as matching funds for the ESGP (see 
Attachment). 

3. Ms. Chris Haw of MOCD advises that the MOCD is in the 
process of completing an environmental evaluation. Ms. Haw 
advises that in accordance with Federal requirements, the 
environmental evaluation will be completed prior to the 
disbursement of the ESGP funds. 

4. The MOCD has prepared a disability access checklist, 
which is in the file. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed resolution. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

47 



., _MfiR-0l-'05 WED lb:bl ID:nHYUKb Uhl- ujnn Ltv it L inu: 



The source of matching funds is the 1995 Community Development Block 
Grant Program. The following project activities and funding amounts are 
identified as matching funds- 
Episcopal Community Services $39,000 

renovtion of shelter sanitation facilities 
Glide Foundation $94,000 

renovation of kitchen serving meals to homeless 
Central City Hospitality House $48,416 

employment services for homeless youth 
Larkin Street Services $25,000 

crisis intervention for homeless youths 
Asian Women's Shelter $21,500 

shelter services for battered women 
La Casa de las Madres $52,000 

shelter services for battered women 
Catholic Charities of S.F. $30,000 

homeless prevention assistance to families 



St. Vincent de Paul $45,000 

drop-in services for homeless adults 
Traveler's Aid of S.F. $36,600 

case management for homeless persons 
Swords to Plowshare $35,000 

advocacy services for homeless vets 
Community Housing Partnership $29,703 

planning projects to employ homeless persons 
Homeless Program Pool 550,000 

projects in Continuum of Care plan 



Total $1,006,219 



48 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 13 - File 170-95-3 



Department: Chief Administrative Officer 

Item: Ordinance providing for; a) the approval and execution and 

delivery by officers of the City and County of San Francisco of 
an Equipment Lease Supplement No. 4 between the City and 
County of San Francisco Finance Corporation, a nonprofit 
corporation, as lessor, and the City and County of San 
Francisco, as lessee, with respect to equipment to be used for 
City purposes, and the related certificate of approval; b) 
providing for reimbursement to the City of certain City 
expenditures prior to the issuance of lease revenue bonds; c) 
approving the issuance of lease revenue bonds by said 
nonprofit corporation providing that said bonds shall be subject 
to the certification of the Controller of the City and County of 
San Francisco prior to the sale of said bonds; and, d) providing 
for the execution of documents in connection therewith and 
ratifying previous actions taken in connection therewith. 

Amount: Not to exceed $6,500,000 

Description: In June of 1990, San Francisco voters approved Proposition C, 

a Charter amendment which authorized the Board of 
Supervisors to approve the lease-financing of equipment 
purchases for the City through a nonprofit corporation, the San 
Francisco Finance Corporation. The equipment leased by the 
City is purchased by the San Francisco Finance Corporation 
with the proceeds of lease revenue bonds. 

Proposition C requires that the San Francisco Finance 
Corporation may not issue lease revenue bonds for equipment 
purchases unless the Controller certifies that the interest costs 
to the City will be lower through the San Francisco Finance 
Corporation than through other financing instruments. 

Pursuant to Proposition C, the total outstanding indebtedness 
of the San Francisco Finance Corporation may not exceed a 
principal amount of $20 million beginning in 1990-91, with 
increases in this limit subject to a maximum of five percent in 
each subsequent fiscal year. The maximum amount of 
outstanding indebtedness in 1994-95 is $24,309,600. The 
Board of Supervisors previously authorized the issuance by the 
San Francisco Finance Corporation of up to $34,504,707 in 
lease revenue bonds to finance the purchase of equipment, as 
follows: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

49 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Fiscal Lease Revenue 
Year Bonds 

1990-91 $7,304,707 

1991-92 Up To 10,000,000 

1992-93 Up To 10,200,000 

1993-94 Up To $7,000,000 

Total Up To $34,504,707* 

*The amount of bonds authorized may exceed the Proposition C limit 
of $24,309,600, however, the amount of bonds issued , and therefore 
the total outstanding debt, may not exceed this limit (see below). 

As shown, the San Francisco Finance Corporation was 
authorized to issue up to $34,504,707 in Lease Purchase 
Revenue bonds in Fiscal Years 1990-91, 1991-92, 1992-93, and 
in 1993-94 to procure equipment on behalf of the City. 
According to the Chief Administrative Officer's Office, the 
actual amount of lease revenue bonds issued by the San 
Francisco Finance Corporation, the amounts which have been 
repaid, and the outstanding indebtedness as of March 1, 1995 
are as follows: 

Series 1991A Bonds 

Lease Purchase Revenue Bonds Issued $7,020,000 

Repayment to date (5.880.000) 

Outstanding Indebtedness: Series 199 1A: $ 1, 140,000 

Series 1992A Bonds 

Lease Purchase Revenue Bonds Issued $5,555,000 

Repayment to date (2,300.000) 

Outstanding Indebtedness: Series 1992A: 3,255,000 

Series 1993A Bonds 

Lease Purchase Revenue Bonds Issued $10,200,000 

Repayment to date (4.780.000) 

Outstanding Indebtedness: Series 1993A: 5,420,000 

Series 1994A Bonds 

Lease Purchase Revenue Bonds Issued $6,850,000 

Repayment to date (860.000) 

Outstanding Indebtedness: Series 1994A: $5.990.000 



Total Current Outstanding Indebtedness $15,805,000 

Total Allowable Indebtedness $24,309.600 

Total Allowable Indebtedness Still Available $8,504,600 



As shown above, the current, unused balance of lease financing 
available in 1994-95 in accordance with the provisions of 

BOARD OF STTPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

50 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Proposition C is $8,504,600 (Proposition C established a limit 
of $24,309,600 in indebtedness for 1994-95, less the current 
outstanding balance of $15,805,000). The proposed ordinance 
would authorize the issuance of new lease revenue bonds in 
1994-95 in an amount not to exceed $6.5 million, which is 
within the San Francisco Finance Corporation's current 
remaining debt capacity under Proposition C of $8,504,600. 

In addition to authorizing the issuance of up to $6.5 million in 
new lease revenue bonds for FY 1995-96, the proposed 
ordinance would also authorize an Equipment Lease 
Supplement No. 4 between the City and the San Francisco 
Finance Corporation for the City's lease purchase of additional 
equipment purchased with proceeds of the new lease revenue 
bonds. The Attachment to this report shows a list of the 
equipment to be purchased under this Equipment Lease 
Supplement No. 4. 

The annual budgets of City departments for which the various 
items of equipment are being purchased must include the 
amount of the City's annual lease-purchase payments 
(including principal and interest) for equipment procured 
through the San Francisco Finance Corporation. Since these 
payments are required under the terms of the lease-purchase 
agreement with the San Francisco Finance Corporation, the 
annual payments become fixed costs of City departments for a 
period of several years, until the cost of the equipment is paid 
in full by the City. The bonds authorized by this ordinance, 
and the related payments by City departments, are planned to 
be paid over periods of three to five years. 

Finally, the proposed ordinance provides for reimbursement to 
the City of certain expenditures (see Comment 5) incurred 
prior to the issuance of the proposed additional lease revenue 
bonds, provides for the execution of documents needed to 
implement the proposed ordinance, and ratifies actions 
previously taken. 

Comments: 1. The Attachment shows a total of 189 equipment items in 40 

categories with a total cost of approximately $4,832,298 that 
are included in the 1994-95 City budget that would be funded 
by the Proposition C lease revenue bonds Series 1995A. The 
estimated budget for the proposed, (not to exceed) $6.5 million 
in lease revenue bonds for 1995 is as follows: 

Equipment Costs $4,832,298 

Required Reserve Fund 1 650,000 

Bond Issuance Costs 150,000 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

51 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Capitalized Interest 2 867.702 

Total $6,500,000 



1 Lease revenue bonds have a legally required reserve fund equal to 10% of 
the principal amount of the bonds. 

2 Pursuant to State law, the City cannot make any interest payments on 
lease revenue bonds until the equipment has been received by the City. 
However, interest on the lease revenue bonds begins accruing when the 
bonds are sold regardless of when the equipment is eventually purchased 
and received by the City. Therefore, accrued interest must be paid from 
proceeds of the bonds until such time as the equipment is actually received 
by the City and interest payments can be made from funds appropriated in 
the City budget. The CAO's Office reports that it does not anticipate that 
capitalized interest costs for these equipment purchases will be this high, 
however, given the current climate of rising interest rates, budgeting 
reserves in the amount of $867,702 appears to be appropriate. 

2. Ms. Stephanie Carlisle of the Chief Administrative Officer's 
(CAO) Office estimates that, if Series 1995A Lease Revenue 
Bonds are sold in a principal amount of $6.5 million, at an 
estimated annual interest rate of 7 percent (based on current 
market interest rates) and based on the expected repayment 
periods of between three and five years, the City's total 
principal and interest costs would be $7,565,000 million over 
the life of the bonds, including $6,500,000 in principal and 
$1,065,000 in interest costs. 

3. Ms. Carlisle estimates that the maximum annual debt 
service (amount of the City's repayment) which would be 
required in any single year before this Series 1995A bonds are 
retired would be approximately $1,900,000. 

4. The actual interest costs to the City of the proposed 
equipment lease-purchases will depend on the market interest 
rates when the bonds are sold. Interest costs will also vary for 
each item of equipment purchased based on the number of 
years in the repayment period for the item. 

5. Although the proposed lease revenue bond proceeds are the 
intended source of funds for the purchase of equipment already 
approved in the City's 1994-95 budget, some of this equipment 
was required immediately such that the City cannot wait until 
the lease revenue bonds are sold to purchase this equipment. 
In those cases, the City purchases the equipment with monies 
temporarily borrowed from other sources of funds with the 
intent that under the reimbursement provisions of the 
proposed ordinance, the temporary sources of funds would be 
reimbursed from the lease revenue bonds when the lease 

BOARD OF SUPERVISOR 

BUDGET ANALYST 

52 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



revenue bonds are sold. Subsequent to this reimbursement, the 
equipment would be owned by the San Francisco Finance 
Corporation and the San Francisco Finance Corporation would 
lease the equipment to the City. 

6. The City would take ownership of the proposed equipment 
upon repayment of all principal and interest costs to the San 
Francisco Finance Corporation in the form of lease payments, 
according to the repayment terms specified in the Equipment 
Lease Supplement No. 4, which the CAO would be authorized 
to execute under the proposed ordinance. 

7. The use of lease-financing is equivalent to borrowing funds, 
with resultant interest costs, to purchase equipment. Since 
such financing requires fixed, mandatory lease payments by 
City departments over several years, the use of lease- 
purchases "locks in" departmental expenditures for future 
years resulting in a reduction in the amount of discretionary 
monies in the City's budget in future years. However, the 
CAO's Office recommends the use of lease-financing, in 
accordance with the electorate's approval of Proposition C, for 
the City's major equipment purchases in order to spread the 
costs over several years. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

53 









Attachment 








Leas* 


Component 


ft Units 


Total Cost 


Term 


Line Truck 


1 


125,000.00 


5 


Auto 26 Tape Track 


1 


140,000.00 


3 


Oxygen and Suction Ports 


12 


48,900.00 


4 


Lighting for LDR's 


10 


50,000.00 


4 


Telemetry Monitors 


4 


32,000.00 


4 


Dermalight 


2 


17,320.00 


4 


Vital Signs Monitor 


10 


97,080.00 


4 


Cardiac Monitors 


5 


55,000.00 


4 


Warmers - Birthing Room 


10 


116,000.00 


4 


E.K.G. 


4 


49,156.00 


4 


Infant Ventilator 


2 


36,000.00 


4 


Fan Beam Collimator 


1 


20,000.00 


4 


Exercise Monitor 


1 


25,000.00 


4 


Adult Ventilator 


10 


260,000.00 


4 


Respiratory Monitor 


I 


28,800.00 


4 


Slide Coverslipper 


1 


30,000.00 


4 


Lab Testing Equipment 


1 


33,000.00 


4 


Med Image Viewing System 


1 


35,000.00 


4 


Washer Sterilizer 


1 


47,500.00 


4 


Ambulances 


9 


810,000.00 


4 


GE Portable Echo System 


1 


109,973.00 


4 


Embosser (86804Z) 


2 


21,298.00 


4 


Embosser (86805Y) 


2 


21,298.00 


4 


O.R. Table 


1 


23,376.00 


4 


Fetal Monitor 


10 


120,250.00 


4 


Blood Monitor 


3 


174,999.00 


4 


Power Equipment 


6 


89,682.00 


4 


ECG Monitors 


5 


98,150.00 


4 


Anesthesiology Machine 


2 


71,010.00 


4 


Local Area Network 


1 


500,000.00 


3 


Marked Vehicles 


21 


229,929.00 


3 


Unmarked Vehicles 


25 


167,925.00 


3 


Marked Vehicles 


13 


169,000.00 


3 


Computer Aided Dispatch * 


1 


812,652.00 


4 


1/2 Ton Pickup Truck 


1 


12,000.00 


3 


Laundry Van 


1 


32,000.00 


3 


Marked Sedans 


2 


38,000.00 


3 


Marked Vans 


3 


45,000.00 


3 


Colposcope 


1 


21,000.00 


3 


Electronic Filing System 


1 


21,000.00 


3 


TOTAL 




$4,832,298 



* A portion of the cost of this components represents the cost of software. See "Risk Factors - Limited Recourse on 
Default - Software Licenses." 

To the extent items of Equipment are acquired for amounts less than the estimated cost shown, the City will 
either purchase additional items of Equipment that will be subject to and automatically be incorporated within 
the Lease or will redeem Bonds at par. See "THE BONDS - Special Redemption." To the extent that the items 
of Equipment cost more than estimated, the City may elect to purchase fewer items of Equipment than shown 



54 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Meeting of Budget Committee 

Item 14- File 172-94-47 



Note: 



Item: 



This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 
January 25, 1995. 



Description: 



Comments: 



Hearing to review contracts valued over $1 million dollars 
that were not competitively bid. 

On November 30, 1994 the Clerk of the Board wrote to all 
City Department heads at the direction of the Board of 
Supervisors to request from each Department a report 
relating to contracts with a value over $1 million that 
were not competitively bid. The following information 
regarding each such contract was requested: 

1. Date of the contract 

2. Amount of the contract 

3. The purpose of the contract 

4. The rationale for not submitting the contract for 
competitive bid. 

As of the writing of this report, a total of 38 Departments 
had responded. Of these 38 Departments, 11 Departments 
reported a total of 36 contracts, in excess of $1 million 
each, which had not been competitively bid. The 
information provided from these 11 Departments is 
summarized in the attached tables. The Department of 
Public Health (DPH), which has the largest number of 
relevant contracts, reports that 20 contracts in excess of 
$1 million were not competitively bid as shown in 
Attachment 1, which was submitted by the DPH. Data 
from the remaining ten Departments having non- 
competitively bid contracts in excess of $1 million is 
shown in Attachment 2. 

1. The Purchasing Department prepared a list of purchase 
orders, term purchase agreements and contract orders 
and contract modifications of over $1 million issued since 
July, 1990 (See Attachment 3). Mr. Marc Rosaaen of the 
Purchasing Department advises that the Purchasing 
Department has no input into the contractor selection 
process for professional services contracts, which are 
handled directly by the departments. 

The list prepared by the Purchasing Department includes 
all professional services contracts of over $1 million (with 
the exception of those contracts that were known to the 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

55 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Meeting of Budget Committee 



Purchaser to have been competitively bid), but does not 
indicate whether or not the listed contracts were 
competitively bid since complete results are not available 
at the Purchasing Department. Mr. Rosaaen advises that 
inconsistencies between the Purchaser's list and 
information provided by the departments may, in many 
cases, be due to departmental records of a competitive bid 
process that were not available to the Purchasing 
Department. 

2. Among reporting departments, there were varying 
interpretations of the meaning of "non-competitively bid." 
The DPH listed some contracts that were originally bid, 
but have been renewed annually without subsequent 
competitive bidding. However, the Department of Social 
Services (DSS) assumed that, if a contract was originally 
bid and would, according to normal DSS practice be re-bid 
approximately every four years, the contract would not 
fall under the definition of "non-competitively bid." The 
Redevelopment Agency stated that all contracts were 
either competitively bid or "competitively negotiated." 
The Department of Electricity and Telecommunications 
noted that it has various term payment agreements with 
Pacific Bell to provide local telephone and centrex 
services, but states that these services are in the 
regulated telephone monopoly and were not subject to 
competitive bid as no other supplier could legally provide 
the services. The Recreation and Park Department listed 
in its response the City's leases with the San Francisco 
Giants and the 49ers. (These leases are not shown in 
Attachment 2, because they do not constitute contracts for 
goods or services.) 

4. The following departments and Commissions had not 
responded to the information request as of the writing of 
this report: Commission on the Aging, Asian Art Museum, 
Assessor, Chief Administrative Officer (although various 
CAO departments had responded), Chief Medical 
Examiner, Citizen's Assistance Center, City College, Civil 
Service Commission, Convention Facilities, Cultural 
Affairs, District Attorney, Film and Video Arts 
Commission, Fire Arts Museum, Health Service System, 
Human Rights Commission, Juvenile Probation, Board of 
Permit Appeals, Public Utilities Commission, Real Estate, 
Recorder, Unified School District and the Water 
Department. 

5. City Attorney Julia Ten Eyck advises that Charter 
Section 7.103 states that, "All contracts for the purchase 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

56 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 8, 1995 Meeting of Budget Committee 



of materials, supplies and equipment involving 
expenditure of fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) or more 
shall be made after inviting sealed bids by publication." 

Ms. Ten Eyck further advises that Section 21.6 of the 
Administrative Code adds a statutory requirement that 
non-professional contractual services (such as janitorial 
and security services) involving expenditures of $50,000 or 
more must be competitively bid. 

However, Ms. Ten Eyck reports, that Section 21.18 of the 
Administrative Code states that procurement of (a) 
articles or services for which there is only one known 
source of supply (Section 21.18(c)) and (b) professional or 
special services (Section 21.18(e)) "shall be made in 
accordance with written rules and regulations established 
by the Purchaser and approved by the Chief 
Administrative Officer and the Controller." 

6. Mr. Rosaaen advises that the Purchaser has 
established rules governing personal service contracts, 
which are contained in Chapter 900 of the Purchaser's 
Guide to Ordering Goods and Services. Page 9-14 of that 
document states, the requesting department is primarily 
responsible for conducting the contractor selection 
process... A formal, documented competitive process among 
several potential contractors is the preferred method for 
City to purchase professional services. If a competitive 
solicitation is not made, the reasons for the sole source 
procurement should be documented and retained in the 
contract file. 



/ft*?./ 2 -* 



Harvey M. Rose 

cc: Supervisor Hsieh Clerk of the Board 

Supervisor Kaufman Chief Administrative Officer 

Supervisor Bierman Controller 

President Shelley Teresa Serata 

Supervisor Alioto Robert Oakes 

Supervisor Ammiano Ted Lakey 

Supervisor Hallinan 

Supervisor Kennedy 

Supervisor Leal 

Supervisor Migden 

Supervisor Teng 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

57 



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Vaults should be same brand as meters; major 
competitor not compatible; avoid loss of revenue 
(vandalism) that could result from delay. 


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A ttachment' 3 

Page— i onr 



City and County of San Francisco 




December 1, 1994 



Supervisor Angela Alioto 



P^fesi^.^partmeiil 

gUDEC -2 PM ^53 



To 



Through: Rudolf Nothenherg 

^Chi^f Administrative Officer 

From : W./KSytet&tHX&g? 

Director of Purchasing 

Subject: Contracts over $1 Million and Competitive Bidding 



I am following up on correspondence, phone conversations, and 
meetings with your office. You have requested a list, covering 
the last five years, of all contracts over $1 million which were 
not competitively bid. We have searched for information 
available on-line. This on-line data covers all Purchasing 
Department purchases back to July 1992, except those for PUC, 
whose data goes back to July 1993. Prior information is archived 
and must be retrieved before we can provide all the information 
we have. We are working on retrieving this older data and hope 
to send it to you as soon as possible. 

Purchasing has run a search of its tracking system for all 
transactions over $1 million which were not bid. The results 
are attached. In City parlance, we have: 

• Purchase Orders (POs) , which are single purchases of goods or 
services ; 

• Term Purchase Agreements (TPAs) , which are purchases over time 
of goods or general services; and 

• Contract Orders (CTs) and Contract Modifications (CMs) , which 
are usually for professional services. These are contracts 
which are developed by the departments which will receive the 
services, and the departments select the vendors. The 
departments operate under guidelines published by Purchasing 
pursuant to the Admin. Code. 

The tracking system indicates if there was competitive bidding 
for Purchase Orders and TPAs, but has no such indicator for 
Contract Orders. 

The data we've been able to obtain regarding some purchases, such 
as whether they were sole source, appears under "Other 
Information . " 



At tachment . 
Page 2 of -8 



Supervisor Angela Alioto 
December 1, 1994 
Page 2 



The tracking system does not contain information on whether 
Contract Orders were competitively bid. Data on how the Contract 
Order vendors were selected rests with the departments which 
received the services, and the Clerk's prospective letter to all 
departments should generate this and any other information 
Purchasing does not have. 

What the Report Contains 

The enclosed report divides the transactions into Purchase 
Orders, TPAs, and Contract Orders, and shows: 

• Document number. The first two digits after the "PO", "CT", 
"TP" are the department number. 

• Vendor name 

• Amount of the contract, based on the encumbrance request. The 
tracking system was not designed as a financial system, rather 
as a system to monitor the progress of documents through 
Purchasing. The Controller's records would show the actual 
amount spent for each purchase. 

• Date the contract was sent to the Controller for encumbrance. 

What the Report Does Not Contain 

I want to note the type of contracts over $1 million and other 
information which would not appear on the report. 

• Construction, and architectural and engineering services. 
These contracts do not go through Purchasing. They are signed 
by the City departments which do construction, which are: the 
Airport; the Port; Public Transportation (Muni); Public Works ; 
Recreation and Park. 

• For the Contract Orders, the responsible departments know if 
they were competitively bid. 

The report should be useful to check the responses to the Clerk's 
letter to all departments, but only those departments can provide 
all the information you have requested. 

I would welcome the opportunity to meet with you to review this 
subject. I apologize for any inconvenience we may have caused 
you as we developed this response. 



63 



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/^5^x TuJ)tic Library, (Documents CDept. 

CITY AND COUNTY f^jSljl OF SAN FRAN cMBSAQ Jam JudSOTl 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street, Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 

MAR 2 1995 

SAN FRANCISCO March 16, 1995 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

TO: Supervisor Migden 

FROM: Budget Analyst 

SUBJECT: Additional Positions Requested for the Department of Human 
Resources 

Attached is my March 8, 1995 report to the Budget Committee on subject 
requested positions (Attachment A). 

Please note that Comment 1 of my report on page 18 states "Attachment 2 is 
a letter from Mr. Wendell Pryor, Director of the Department of Human Resources, 
explaining why the addition of three new permanent positions, as well as four new 
temporary Claims Adjuster positions, or a total of seven new positions, are needed 
to take over the functions which were being accomplished by the Employees 
Retirement System (ERS), and why seven positions are not being deleted in the ERS 
to offset the seven new positions being added by the Department of Human 
Resources." 

Based on the explanations provided by Mr. Pryor, and based on the 
acceptance by the Budget Committee of my recommendation to make the four 
Claims Adjustor positions limited duration positions, so that they would not be 
funded once the backlog of Workers Compensation claims cases are cleared up, I 
continue to believe that the positions requested for the Department of Human 
Resources are justified. 

However my belief is not based on a detailed comprehensive management 
audit of the Department of Human Resources. It is possible that such an audit (a) 
might reveal that certain efficiencies could be achieved and (b) could change my 
opinion. However, as you know, a management audit of the Department of Human 
Resources would take at least 3 to 4 months and based on the previous assignments 
of the Board of Supervisors to the Budget Analyst, such a management audit could 
not begin in the near future. 




Memo to Supervisor Migden 
March 16, 1995 



Since your inquiry at the Board meeting of March 13, 1995, I requested that 
Ms. Murphy provide a written explanation as to why the Employees Retirement 
System could not delete comparable positions which are now being added to the 
Department of Human Resources in conjunction with Proposition L. Attachment B 
is Ms. Murphy's response to my request. In addition to the accounting position 
referenced in Ms. Murphy's letter, Ms. Murphy advised me that, in her judgement, 
she believes that the secretarial position and the systems and procedures position 
are needed for the Department of Human Resources and that such positions would 
greatly assist in improving the overall effectiveness of the Department of Human 
Resources. 



&7f 

rvey M. Rose 

President Shelley 

Supervisor Alioto 

Supervisor Ammiano 

Supervisor Bierman 

Supervisor Hallinan 

Supervisor Hsieh 

Supervisor Kaufman 

Supervisor Kennedy 

Supervisor Leal 

Supervisor Teng 

Clerk of the Board 

Chief Administrative Officer 

Controller 

Teresa Serata 

Robert Oakes 

Ted Lakey 

Wendell Pryor 

Clare Murphy 



Attachments 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



rfyS Attachment A 

Fage 1 of 8 
Memo to Budget Committee 

Items 5 and 6 - Files 101-94-66 and 102-94-11 

Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of March 1 
1995. 



Department: 

Items: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Human Resources 

1. Item 11, File 101-94-66 - Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance appropriating $182,885 for Salaries, Fringe 
Benefits and equipment to allow the Department of Human 
Resources to Create three positions to support the Workers 
Compensation Program for fiscal Year 1994-95. 

2. Item 12, File 102-94-11 - Ordinance amending the 1994-95 
Annual Salary Ordinance to reflect the addition of three 
positions in the Department of Human Resources, Workers 
Compensation Division. 

$182,885 

FY 1994-95 General Fund Reserve 

On November 2, 1993, the voters of San Francisco approved 
Proposition L, which created a Department of Human 
Resources, and transferred the City's Workers Compensation 
Division from the Employees Retirement System to the 
Department of Human Resources. 

The Department of Human Resources (HRD) is requesting a 
Supplemental Appropriation to pay for salaries, fringe 
benefits and equipment to allow the Department of Human 
Resources to create three new positions to support the 
Workers Compensation Program for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

The proposed supplemental appropriation would appropriate 
$182,885 for the period February 24, 1995 through June 30, 
1995 as follows: 



Permanent Salaries 


$43,308 


Temporary Salaries 


46,600 


Mandatory Fringe Benefits 


17,982 


Equipment 


74.995 


Total 


$182,885 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

3 



Attachment A 
Page 2 of 8 

Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 

The following are descriptions of each of the foregoing 
funding requests. 

Permanent Salaries $43,308 

This amount would: (1) fund $10,116 for the salary of one 
new 1444 Secretary I position for nine pay periods, (2) fund 
$13,932 for the salary of one new 1652 Senior Accountant 
position for nine pay periods, and (3) fund $19,260 for the 
salary of one new Senior Systems and Procedures Analyst 
position for nine pay periods for a total cost of $43,308. 

Temporary Salaries $46,600 

This amount would fund $46,600 for the salaries of four 
temporary 8141 Claims Adjuster positions for seven pay 
periods. 

Fringe Benefits $17,982 

This amount was calculated based on 20 percent of 
Permanent Salaries and 20 percent of Temporary Salaries. 
However, Ms. Victoria Mead of the HRD advises that the 
Fringe Benefits for Temporary Salaries should be calculated 
based on eight percent of the Temporary Salaries and not 
based on 20 percent of the Temporary Salaries. Therefore, 
the Fringe Benefits for the Temporary Salaries are $3,728 
(.08 x $46,600). The Fringe Benefits for the Permanent 
Salaries are $8,662 (.20 x $43,308) As such, the total Fringe 
Benefits for Permanent and Temporary Salaries should be 
reduced to $12,390 ($3,728 + $8,662) from $17,982, 
representing a decrease of $5,592. 

Equipment $74,995 

This amount would fund a total of $74,995, including $69,120 
for equipment and $5,875 for Sales Tax, for the purchase of 
the following equipment: (1) $29,850 for computer hardware 
for the file server, network administration workstation, 
telecommunications router station, and local systems 
connectivity, as well as providing for network printing 
capability, tape backups and power supply systems, (2) 
$9,680 for computer software to run the above listed 
hardware, as well as network remote management and virus 
protection software, (3) $12,300 for PacBell 
telecommunications installation charges for a dedicated 
telecommunications line to link up the two sites of 44 Gough 
Street and 1155 Market Street, the estimated monthly line 
usage charges, and telecommunications equipment that 
would enable 44 Gough Street and 1155 Market Street to 
"talk to each other" via the telecommunications link, (4) 
$9,400 for four PC client workstations, including four 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

4 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



Attachment A 
Fage 3 of 8 



personal computers, and access to the local area network and 
the wide area network required for transmission of data, 
teleprocessing and timely interchange of management 
information, (5) $7,890 for applications software licenses, and 
network, telecommunications and configuration costs, and (6) 
$5,875 for the 8.5 percent Sales Tax. 

Attachment 1, provided by the HRD, contains a detailed list 
of equipment with the related prices supporting the $74,995 
equipment request. 

Ms. Kira Shuchom of the HRD advises that the HRD has 
received approval from the Electronic Information Processing 
Steering Committee for the purchase of this equipment. 

The proposed ordinance (File 102-94-11) would amend the FY 
1994-95 Annual Salary Ordinance to establish three new 
positions in the Department of Human Resources, Workers' 
Compensation Division as follows : 



Comments: 



Classification/Title 



No. of 
Positions 



Biweekly 
Salary 



Maximum 
Salary 
At Top Step 



1444 Secretary I 
1652 Senior Accountant 
1864 Sr. Systems & 
Procedures Analyst 



$1,022/$1,237 $32,286 
$1,407/$1,706 $44,527 

$l,946/$2,365 $61,727 



The total estimated annual cost of the three new positions 
including fringe benefits, is $166,248 ($138,540 salaries + 
$27,708 fringe benefits) at the top step. 

1. Attachment 2 is a letter from Mr. Wendell Pryor, Director 
of the Department of Human Resources, explaining why the 
addition of three new permanent positions, as well as four 
new temporary Claims Adjuster positions, or a total of seven 
new positions, are needed to take over the functions which 
were being accomplished by the Employees Retirement 
System (ERS), and why seven positions are not being deleted 
in the ERS to offset the seven new positions being added by 
the Department of Human Resources. 

Mr. Pryor advises that the 1444 Secretary is being requested 
to support the Health Service Administrator, who now has 
oversight over the operations of the Workers Compensation 
Division (WCD), as well as the Health Service System and 
the City's health and safety programs. No such position 
existed prior to the transfer of the WCD to HRD. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

5 



Attachment A 
Page 4 of 8 

Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 

Mr. Pryor advises that the 1864 Senior Systems Analyst is 
being requested in order to evaluate the information system 
requirements of the WCD, which are critical to the success of 
the department. An existing management information 
systems (MIS) position will remain at the Employees 
Retirement System (ERS) to respond to the information 
system needs of the ERS. 

Mr. Pryor advises that the 1652 Accountant is critically 
needed to develop and implement basic accounting services 
needed by the WCD. 

Mr. Pryor advises that the four temporary Claims Adjuster 
positions are being requested in order to clear up and close a 
backlog of cases, thereby reducing the ongoing caseload. Mr. 
Pryor states that in the HRD proposed FY 95-96 budget, 
these four Claims Adjuster positions are requested for three 
months. Therefore the Budget Analyst recommends that the 
four temporary Claims Adjuster positions be approved as 
limited duration positions. 

2. As noted above, the proposed expenditures for the 
Permanent Salaries of the 1444 Secretary I, the 1652 Senior 
Accountant, and the 1864 Sr. Systems & Procedures Analyst 
were based on nine pay periods. Ms. Victoria Mead of the 
Department of Human Resources advises that the staff will 
be hired effective May 20, 1995, and will work for 7.5 pay 
periods. As such, the amount required for Permanent 
Salaries is $35,955, or $7,353 less than the requested 
$43,308. 

3. As noted above, the proposed expenditures for the 
Temporary Salaries of four 8141 Claims Adjusters were 
based on seven pay periods. Ms. Mead advises that two of 
the 8141 Claims Adjusters will begin on May 20, 1995 and 
will work for 7.5 pay periods, and two of the 8141 Claims 
Adjusters will begin on April 8, 1995, and work for six pay 
periods. As such, the amount required for Temporary 
Salaries is $44,982, or $1,618 less than the requested 
$46,600. 

4. As noted above, the Fringe Benefits should be calculated 
based on eight percent of Temporary Salaries and 20 percent 
of Permanent Salaries. Based on the decrease of $7,353 in 
Permanent Salaries from $43,308 to $35,995, the Fringe 
Benefits for Permanent Salaries are $7,199. Based on the 
decrease of $1,618 in Temporary Salaries, from $46,600 to 
$44,982, the Fringe Benefits for Temporary Salaries are 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

6 



Attachment A 
Page b ot » 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 8, 1995 



Recommendation: 



$3,599 for total Fringe Benefits of $10,798 ($7,199 + $3,599), 
or $7,184 less than the requested $17,982. 

1. Amend the proposed ordinance to reduce the 
supplemental appropriation request as follows: (1) reduce 
Permanent Salaries by $7,353 from $43,308 to $35,955, 
reduce Temporary Salaries by $1,618 from $46,600 to 
$44,982, and (3) reduce Fringe Benefits by $7,184 from 
$17,982 to $10,798 for a total reduction of $16,155 from 
$182,885 to $166,730 (File 101-94-66). 

2. Amend the Annual Salary Ordinance to make the four 
proposed Claims Adjusters positions limited duration 
positions (File 102-94-11). 

3. Approve the proposed ordinance as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



(Attachment 
Attachment A 
Page 6 of 8 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES MIS: WORKERS' COMPENSATION SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION FY 94-95 



1) 



Page 1 


of 1 








WCD 


Supplemental 










QTY 




FY 94-95 


CHAR 


OBJ 


SUB 


DESCRIPTION 


No. 


Unit Cost 


Total 






























10 






NON-PERSONAL SERVICES 






















22 






CAPITAL OUTLAY 
























220 




Equipment Purchase 


























2231 


Computer Equipment for DHR-WCD Systems Connectivity 




























Network File Server 32MB RAM, 2 - 2GB Herd Drives 


1 


14,000 


14,000 








Network Administration Workstation with Network Card 


1 


2,350 


2,360 








MPR+ Router Hardware 


1 


4,000 


4,000 








Network Printer with JetDlrect Card 


1 


4,000 


4,000 








Ethernet Hub for Network 


1 


2,500 


2,500 








UPS (Power Supply) and Tape Backup Units 


1 


3,000 


3,000 








Network Hardware Sub-Total 






29,860 






















Network Software, Netware v3.12 


1 


4,600 


4,800 








Novell MPR+ WAN Software 


2 


1,080 


2,160 








Intel LANDesk Manager 


1 


1,020 


1,020 








Intel Virus Protection 


680 


680 








Cheyenne ArcServe Tbpb Backup Software 1 


1,020 


1,020 


• 






Network Software 8ub-Tote.il 




9,680 






















PacBell Telecommunications Installation (estimate) 


1 


3,000 


3,000 








High Speed Modems DSU/CSU St Synch Adapter 


2 


2000 


4,000 








Site Cabling Charges (per Network device/user, estimate) 


10 


360 


3,500 








Telecommunications Line Charges (per month, estimate) 


6 


300 


1,800 








Telecommunications Sub-Totar. 




12,300 






















On-Slte PC Client Workstations with Network Cards 














for MIS Business Systems Analyst 


1 


2,350 


2,360 








for MIS Technical Support 


1 


2,360 


2,350 








for Health & Safety AdmlnlstratorJBIII Lee) 


1 


2,360 


2,350 








for Administrative Assistant (Pat Gomez) 


1 


2,350 


2,350 








PC Client Workstation Sub-Total 


4 




9,400 






















Applications Software Licenses (Network end per user) 


6 


816 


4,890 








Network & Telecommunications Installation & Configuration (in Hours) 


24 


125 


3,000 








Miscellaneous Charges Sub-Total 






7,390 






















Pre-Tax Sub-Tota 






69,120 








Sales Tax B.5% 






5,875 








TOTAL REQUESTED * 






74,995 

















Estimate as of January 20, 1996 (Klra Chuchom) 



Version 1 .0 



E'd 



t/Ut7-t7SS-SIt> Zt7:80 96/ 9T 83J 



City and County of San Francisco 




Attachment A < Attachment^) 
Page 7 of 8 (Pape I of 2 ) 

Department of Human Resources 

WENDELL U PRYOR, 
HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR 



February 22, 1995 



Mr. Harvey Rose 

Budget Analyst 

1390 Market Street, Ste. 1025 

San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Mr. Rose: 



You have asked for a written statement from me concerning the new positions which this 
department has requested in a supplemental appropriation request to the Board of Supervisors. 
As I understand it, your question concerns why none of these positions can be transferred from 
the Employees Retirement System. In response, the following explanation is provided. 

The 1444 Secretary is being requested as clerical and administrative support for the Health 
Service Administrator, Bill Lee, who now has oversight of the operations of the Workers 
Compensation Division (WCD), as well as the Health Service System and the City's health and 
safety programs. No such position existed prior to the transfer of the WCD to DHR. 

The 1 864 Senior Systems Analyst is being requested in order to evaluate the information system 
requirements of the WCD, which are critical to the success of the program. Although the ERS 
staff apparently includes an MIS professional, this position has not been predominantly 
concerned with the information systems at the WCD, and, moreover, will remain at ERS to 
continue to respond to the information system needs of the Employees Retirement System. 

The 1652 Accountant is critically needed to develop and implement basic accounting systems at 
the WCD. ERS accountants have performed most of the basic accounting services needed by the 
WCD in the past, but these accounting activities have not been well integrated with the Bill 
Paying Unit of the WCD. Moreover, these accounting services were completely funded by the 
Retirement Trust Fund. The Workers Compensation Division, which has now been transferred 
to HRD, had been the only ERS division funded by the General Fund. Therefore, there may be 
reason to question the scope of accounting services which continue to be needed at the 
Employees Retirement System , and funded by the Retirement Trust Fund, in light of the transfer 
of the WCD to HRD; however, no General Fund savings would result from reducing ERS 
accounting services, and it is not possible to transfer employees (or funds) from the Retirement 
Trust Fund to HRD in order to provide the necessary accounting services for HRD. 



Attachment A 
Page 8 of » 



(Attachment 2) 
(Page T~B£ 2 ) 



Finally, with respect to the four temporary adjusters, these are short term positions which are 
expected to reduce a backlog of cases at the WCD which could be closed, thereby reducing the 
average caseload per adjuster in order to improve the effectiveness of claims administration. 
These positions did not exist at the Workers Compensation prior to its transfer to HRD; clearly, 
if the WCD had employed additional adjusters at an earlier date, there would be a smaller 
backlog of claims which should be closed. 

Should you require additional information, please contact me. 

Sincerely yours, 




Wendell L. Pryor 

Director of Human Resources 




WLP:vm 



10 



MfiR-14-1995 16=24 FROM C&C SF EMPLOYEE RETIR SYS TO 



92520461 P. 01 

Attachment 



City and County of San Francisco 




San Francisco City and County 
Employees' Retirement System 
Office of The General Manager 



March 14, 1995 



Mr. Harvey Rose 
Budget Analyst 
1390 Market St, Suite 1025 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Mr. Rose: 

You have requested a brief written statement regarding the proposed supplemental 
appropriation for the Department of Human Resources. First, 100% of the General fund 
positions and resources which has been budgeted for the Workers' Compensation Division were 
transferred to DHR effective January 1, 1995. 

Of the positions which are requested in the supplemental only the accounting position 
reflects resources supporting WCD which existed prior to the transfer of other requested items 
are new. The tasks of the accounting position requested by DHR were performed by several 
of the San Francisco Employees Retirement System accountants who continue to perform other 
accounting functions appropriate to the pension plan. The time which has been made available 
by the transfer of WCD accounting functions to DHR has been assigned to the increasing work 
load relating to more extensive and complex investment accounting (market value accounting, 
currency and limited partnerships accounting) and to the accounting tasks arising out of new 
collective bargaining agreements relating to Employer paid employee contributions. 



Very truly yours, 




Clare M. Murphy 
General Manager 



Pogt-it * Fax Nate 767 1 

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(415) 554-1520 



1155MarfcatStrMt 

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San Francisco 94103 

TOTAL P. 01 



BOARD of SUPERVISORS 



If 

he 07 

[/ 




March 9, 1995 



City Hall 

San Francisco 94102 

554-5184 



DOCUMENTS DEPT. 
AUG 2 7 7996 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the regularly scheduled meeting of 
the Budget Committee for Wednesday, March 15, 1995, at 1:00 p.m., 
has been rescheduled for Monday, March 20, 1995, at 10:30 a.m., 
Veteran's Building, 401 Van Ness Avenue, Room 410, San Francisco, 
CA 94102. 





John L. Taylor 
Clerk of the Board 



POSTED: 3/9/95 



£>oo,oy 



MINUTES DOCUMFNTS DEPT. 



Jrx 



RESCHEDULED MEETING 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



MONDAY. MARCH 20. 1995 - 10:30 A.M. ROOM 410, VETERANS BUILDING 

401 VAN NESS AVENUE 

MEMBERS: SUPERVISORS HSIEH, KAUFMAN, BIERMAN 

CLERK: GREGOIRE HOBSON 

TIME MEETING CONVENED: 10:40 A.M. 

GENERAL MATTERS 



File 190-95-1 . [Parking Enforcement on Sundays] Resolution urging the Mayor to 
preserve the Sunday parking reprieve in San Francisco. (Supervisors Leal, Shelley, 
Alioto) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Josalin Cain, Department of Parking and Traffic; Robert Oakes, Office of 
the Mayor. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: Norman Rolfe. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



File 172-95-11 . [Supplemental Indenture, Sutter/Post Apartments] Resolution 
approving the form of, and authorizing the execution of a Supplemental Indenture; 
and authorizing other actions related thereto. (Mayor's Office of Housing) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Joe LaTorre, Mayor's Office of Community Development. IN SUPPORT: 
None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. TO BOARD AS A "COMMITTEE 
REPORT" MONDAY, MARCH 20, 1995. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisors Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 2 



3. File 127-95-1 , [Vehicle Renter Tax Repeal] Ordinance amending Part HI, 

Municipal Code, by deleting Article 19 thereto to repeal the Vehicle Renter Tax in 
its entirety. (Supervisor Kaufman) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Ted Lakey, Deputy City Attorney; Ed Harrington, Controller. IN 
SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDMENT OF THE WHOLE BEARING NEW 
TITLE PRESENTED IN COMMITTEE BY SUPERVISOR KAUFMAN. 
ADOPTED. AMENDMENT OF THE WHOLE RECOMMENDED. NEW 
TITLE: "Amending Part III of the San Francisco Municipal Code by 
deleting Section 1905 thereof to repeal the Vehicle Renter Tax and 
making the repel operative as of July 1, 1995." 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 
TIME MEETING ADJOURNED: 11:05 A.M. 



CITY AND COUNTY 




OF SAN FRANCISCO 



City Report 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street, Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 



March 16, 1995 

TO: Budget Committee 

FROM: Budget Analyst 

SUBJECT: March 20, 1995 Rescheduled Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 1 - File 190-95-1 

Department: 

Item: 

Description: 



Department of Parking and Traffic (DPT) 

Resolution urging the Mayor to preserve the current 
unrestricted free Sunday parking in San Francisco. 

Mr. John Newlin of the DPT advises that at the present time, 
there is no pending proposal to begin charging on Sundays 
for parking at parking meters in areas of San Francisco 
outside of Fisherman's Wharf. Ms. Teresa Serata, of the 
Mayor's Office, also advises that the Mayor's Office has no 
plans for such a proposal. 

According to Mr. Newlin, the primary purpose of charging for 
parking at parking meters on Sunday at Fisherman's Wharf 
is to generate increased customer turnover at the meters for 
the benefit of surrounding businesses. He advised that the 
revenues realized by the City from charging for parking on 
Sundays at Fisherman's Wharf are a secondary benefit. 

Mr. Newlin advises that it has been the policy of the City to 
not charge for parking on Sundays in areas other than 
Fisherman's Wharf because (1) many businesses in those 
areas are closed and (2) the DPT has received no requests to 
charge for Sunday parking from local business associations in 
such other areas, even when the businesses are open. 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 20, 1995 Rescheduled Budget Committee Meeting 

Mr. Newlin states that the implementation of parking meter 
charges on Sundays in areas in the City where such charges 
are not currently imposed would require (1) the relabeling of 
meters to reflect the new parking meter charges, and (2) the 
use of additional overtime by parking enforcement personnel. 

Comment: Mr. Newlin advises that since no specific proposal exists to 

implement parking meter charges on Sundays in areas of San 
Francisco outside of Fisherman's Wharf, the DPT has not 
developed any revenue or cost estimates with respect to such 
a proposal. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed resolution is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 20, 1995 Rescheduled Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



File 172-95-11 



Department: Mayor's Office of Housing (MOH) 

Item: Resolution approving the form of, and authorizing the 

execution and delivery of an amendment to an Indenture of 
Trust; and authorizing other actions related thereto. 

Description: The MOH previously entered into an Indenture of Trust, 

effective March 1, 1988, with Security Pacific National Bank, 
as trustee for the holders of the bonds, to secure the issuance 
of the City's 1988 Multifamily Housing Revenue Bonds in the 
amount of $21,500,000. The Revenue Bonds were used to 
finance the construction of the Sutter/Post Apartments, an 
apartment development of 184 units, located at 840 Post 
Street. This development was completed in December of 
1989. Of the 184 units, 37, or approximately 20 percent, are 
designated for low-income households and the remaining 147 
or approximately 80 percent of the units are rented at market 
value. Low-income households are households at or below 50 
percent of the median income of $52,900 for a family of three, 
based on the San Francisco Metropolitan Statistical Area, as 
calculated annually by the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development (HUD). 

The MOH advises that the Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank, Ltd. issued 
a Letter of Credit to Security Pacific National Bank, dated 
April 8, 1988, to secure the payment of the principal and 
interest on the bonds. At the same time, Dai-Ichi Kangyo 
Bank, Ltd. and the developer of the project, Sutter/Post 
Associates, entered into a Reimbursement Agreement under 
which, Sutter/Post Associates agreed to reimburse Dai-Ichi 
Kangyo Bank, Ltd. for any monies paid by the Dai-Ichi 
Kangyo Bank, under the Letter of Credit. According to Mr. 
Joe LaTorre of the MOH, the City does not have any liability 
pertaining to these bonds. 

Mr. LaTorre reports that the Letter of Credit noted above is 
due to expire on April 7, 1995 and that Dai-Ichi Kangyo 
Bank, Ltd. has elected not to renew the Letter of Credit. Mr. 
LaTorre states that under the existing provisions of the 
above-noted Indenture of Trust, in the absence of a Letter of 
Credit, the bond trustee, Bank of America National Trust 
and Savings Association, the successor to Security Pacific 
National Bank, is required to request payment from the Dai- 
Ichi Kangyo Bank, under the Letter of Credit, to redeem (i. e., 
pay off) the outstanding principal and interest on the bonds. 
According to Mr. LaTorre, the Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank would, 
in turn, request reimbursement from the project developer 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 20, 1995 Rescheduled Budget Committee Meeting 

for the monies it paid to Bank of America National Trust and 
Savings Association, under the Letter of Credit, to redeem 
the bonds. Mr. LaTorre states that if the project developer 
could not reimburse the Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank for the monies 
owed, the Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank would then have the option 
to foreclose on the property and, in turn, sell the property at 
market value. 

The proposed amendment to the Indenture of Trust will 
permit the Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank to purchase the bonds, 
instead of having the bonds redeemed by Bank of America 
National Trust and Savings Association. Mr. LaTorre advises 
that the Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank desires to purchase the bonds 
instead of having them redeemed because the bonds, which 
are tax exempt, could be sold at a higher amount than could 
be realized from the sale of the property itself, at current 
market value rates. According to Mr. LaTorre, if the Dai-Ichi 
Kangyo Bank purchases the bonds, the City would benefit as 
follows: (1) maintenance of tax exempt status of the bonds 
maximizes the property's value and hence the property taxes 
paid to the City and (2) the tax exempt status of the bonds 
results in lower costs for the property owner, which enables 
the property owner to potentially maintain lower rents for 
the market value units and at the same time to provide 
adequate property maintenance. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed resolution is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 20, 1995 Rescheduled Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



- File 127-95-1 



Item: 



Description: 



Comments: 



Ordinance amending Part HI of the San Francisco Municipal 
Code by deleting Article 19 thereto to repeal the Vehicle 
Renter Tax in its entirety. 

As reflected in the San Francisco Municipal Code, the Board 
of Supervisors previously established a Vehicle Renter Tax on 
persons who rent a passenger vehicle from automobile rental 
companies located in San Francisco. The tax is $2.00 per 
vehicle per rental day with a maximum of $16.00 per rental 
agreement and became effective October of 1993. The 
proposed ordinance would delete Article 19 from the 
Municipal Code, in order to repeal the Vehicle Renter Tax. 

1. The Controller's Office previously advised that the State 
Attorney General had issued an opinion declaring a tax in 
Southern California, similar to San Francisco's Vehicle 
Renter Tax, to be a use tax, which did not conform to the 
State's statutory requirements. According to Ms. Julia 
Friedlander of the City Attorney's Office, State law prohibits 
the State Board of Equalization from collecting a 
jurisdiction's sales and use taxes if a jurisdiction adopts a 
sales or use tax that does not conform to the State's statutory 
requirements. As such, according to Ms. Friedlander, a 
jurisdiction which has adopted a use tax which does not 
conform to the State's statutory requirements has two choices 
(1) the jurisdiction can retain the nonconforming tax and 
forego the State's collection of its sales and use taxes, or (2) 
the jurisdiction can repeal the nonconforming tax so that the 
State Board of Equalization will continue to collect it sales 
and use taxes. 

2. The City's regular Sales Tax (Purchase-Use Tax) revenues 
are estimated at nearly $88 million for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 
The revenues which have been estimated to accrue to the 
City from the Vehicle Renter Tax for FY 1994-95 total 
$2,030,000. Ms. Friedlander presently reports that based on 
the State Attorney General's opinion, the State Board of 
Equalization has advised the City that it intends to suspend 
the collection of the City's Sales and Use Taxes effective July 
1, 1995 if the City continues to impose the Vehicle Renter 
Tax. According to Ms. Friedlander, the Board of Supervisors 
can comply with the State's requirements by adopting this 
proposed ordinance which would repeal the Vehicle Renter 
Tax. Ms. Friedlander advises that this ordinance would have 
to be voted on by the full Board by May 8, 1995 and the 
ordinance must be effective by June 30, 1995. According to 
Ms. Friedlander, the Vehicle Renter Tax can continue to be 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 20, 1995 Rescheduled Budget Committee Meeting 

collected by the City through June 30, 1995. As such, the 
original estimated revenue amount of $2,030,000 from the 
Vehicle Renter Tax can potentially be realized. 

4. The proposed ordinance does not specify an effective date 
for the repeal of the tax. According to the City Attorney's 
Office, an effective repeal date of no later than June 30, 1995 
should be included in the proposed legislation. Therefore, the 
proposed legislation should be amended to add an effective 
date of no later than June 30, 1995. 

5. Since the Sale Tax revenues of nearly $88 million, which 
accrue to the City annually, significantly exceed the Vehicle 
Renter Tax revenues of approximately $2 million annually, 
the Budget Analyst recommends approval of this proposed 
ordinance. 

Recommendation: Amend the proposed ordinance to add an effective repeal date 
of no later than June 30, 1995 and approve the ordinance as 
amended. 




Harvey M. Rose 



cc: Supervisor Hsieh 
Supervisor Kaufman 
Supervisor Bierman 
President Shelley 
Supervisor Alioto 
Supervisor Ammiano 
Supervisor Hallinan 
Supervisor Kennedy 
Supervisor Leal 
Supervisor Migden 
Supervisor Teng 
Clerk of the Board 
Chief Administrative Officer 
Controller 
Teresa Serata 
Robert Oakes 
Ted Lakey 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



S' 



MINUTES 



^ REGULAR MEETING 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 






WEDNESDAY. MARCH 22. 1995 - 1:00 P.M. ROOM 410, VETERANS BUILDING 

401 VAN NESS AVENUE 

MEMBERS: SUPERVISORS HSIEH, KAUFMAN, BIERMAN 

DOCUMENTS DE " 1 ". 
CLERK: GREGOIRE HOBSON 

AUG 2 7 1996 

TIME MEETING CONVENED: 1:12 P.M. 

PU3LIC LIE . 

FISCAL ITEMS 

1. File 101-94-54 . [Appropriation, War Memorial] Ordinance appropriating $73,520, 
War Memorial, from the General Fund Reserve for other non-personal services to 
allow the Real Estate Department to provide security services for Fiscal Year 
1994-95. (Controller) RO #94161 

(Consideration continued from 3/8/95) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Ed Harrington, Controller; 
Teresa Serata, Budget Director, Office of the Mayor. PARTIAL SUPPORT: 
LaWanda Preston, Local 790. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. TABLED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

2. File 101-94-61 . [Appropriation, Dept. of Parking and Traffic] Ordinance 
appropriating $173,610, Department of Parking and Traffic, of Parking Revenue 
Funds to a Capital Improvement Project (Polk-Bush Garage architectural services 
and construction), for fiscal year 1994-94; providing for ratification of action 
previously taken. RO #94051 (Controller) 

(Consideration continued from 3/8/95) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL SPEAKERS: Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst; Kevin 
Haggerty, Department of Parking and Traffic; Tony Florence, Deputy City 
Attorney. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 2 



3. File 38-95-1 . [Gift Acceptance] Resolution accepting and acknowledging a gift of 
$36,455.17 provided to the City and County by Lucille and George Jewett, Jr., for 
the maintenance of Lyon Street Park during calendar year 1994 and thanking 
Lucille and George Jewett, Jr. for their generous and beneficial gift. (Supervisor 

Kaufman) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REP RESENT ATP/ES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. On 
Page 1, lines 4, 10, 13, 15, 23 and Page 2 lines 3 and 23 replace the 
words "Lyon Street Park" and "park" with " the Permitted Lyon Street 
Garden." AMENDED TITLE: "Accepting and acknowledging a gift of 
$36,455.17, provided to the City and County of San Francisco by Lucille 
and George Jewett, Jr., for the maintenance of the Permitted Lyon 
Street Garden during calendar year 1994, and thanking Lucille and 
George Jewett, Jr. for their generous and beneficial gift." 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 
RELEASE OF RESERVE 



File 101-94-16.1 . [Release of Reserved Funds, Juvenile Probation] Consideration 
of release of reserved funds, Juvenile Probation Department, in the total amount of 
$495,423, to impelement Serious Habitual Offender Program Program and the 
Intensive Home Supervision Program for repeat offenders released to the 
community. (Juvenile Probation) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Ed Flowers, Chief Probation Officer, Juvenile Probation Department; 
Cheyenne Bell, Juvenile Probation Department; Frederick Virgilio, Juvenile 
Probation Department; Ace Tago, Juvenile Probation Department. NO POSITION 
TAKEN: Ed Dela Cruz, West Bay Filipino Health Center. IN SUPPORT: Mr. 
Cortez, Real Alternatives Project; Jose Steva, Real Alternatives Project. 
OPPOSED: Michael Hopper, Program Coordinator, Coleman Advocates; Margaret 
Brokin, Director, Coleman Advocates. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. QUESTION ON SERIOUS HABITUAL OFFENDER 
PROGRAM AND THE INTENSIVE HOME SUPERVISION PROGRAM 
DIVIDED. 

File 101-94-16.1 [Release of Reserved Funds, Juvenile Probation] 
Consideration of release of reserved funds, Juvenile Probation 
Department, in the total amount of $275,470, to impelement Serious 
Habitual Offender Program Program for repeat offenders released to 
the community. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MARCH 29, 1995, 
MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1 (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MINUTES PAGE 3 

File 101-94-16.2 [Release of Reserved Funds, Juvenile Probation] 
Consideration of release of reserved funds, Juvenile Probation 
Department, in the total amount of $219,953, to impelement the 
Intensive Home Supervision Program for repeat offenders released to 
the community. 

ACTION: AMENDED. RELEASE OF $205,124 APPROVED. Instruct 
Controller to return $14,829 to the General Fund. FILED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 
TIME MEETING ADJOURNED: 3:10 P.M. 



CITY AND COUNTY 




CitiReport 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street, Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 

March 20, 1995 

TO Budget Committee 

FROM: Budget Analyst 

SUBJECT: March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 1 - File 101-94-54 

Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of March 
8, 1995. An Amendment of the Whole will be submitted by the Real Estate 
Department at the March 22, 1995 meeting of the Budget Committee. This 
report is based on the Amendment of the Whole. 



Departments: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Item: 



Description: 



Real Estate Department 
War Memorial 

$208,005 

General Fund Reserve 

Ordinance appropriating $208,005 from the General Fund 
Reserve for salaries, fringe benefits, other non-personal 
services, and equipment to pay for security services and 
equipment at the War Memorial (401 Van Ness Avenue), and 
at 875 Stevenson Street. 

The proposed ordinance would approve a supplemental 
appropriation in the amount of $208,005 to pay for security 
services and equipment at the War Memorial and at 875 
Stevenson Street. 

As part of the move from City Hall due to the seismic 
retrofitting required following the Loma Prieta earthquake, 
staff of the Office of the Mayor, Board of Supervisors, Chief 
Administrative Officer, Ethics Commission, and Civil 
Service Commission, as well as the Law Library and the 
public hearing rooms used by City Commissions and the 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Board of Supervisors have relocated to office space at the War 
Memorial Building at 401 Van Ness Avenue. Offices of the 
Controller, Registrar of Voters, and other offices have 
relocated to 875 Stevenson Street; and courtrooms of the Trial 
Courts have relocated to 633 Folsom and 575 Polk Street. 
Entry security at City Hall for all of these departments had 
previously been provided by the Sheriffs Department. With 
the relocations, new entry security arrangements for these 
departments are necessary. 

At City Hall, the Sheriffs Department had covered the 4 
entrances by deploying 7 staff including 6 Police Cadets and 
one Deputy Sheriff, using 3 walk- through metal detectors. 
These Sheriffs Department staff have now been reassigned. 
One Police Cadet was reassigned to the Parole Office, one to 
the new County Jail at 425 7th Street, and one to the San 
Bruno Jail (these three assignments were previously 
approved as part of the Sheriffs Department FY 1994-95 
budget). The remaining three Police Cadets and the Deputy 
Sheriff were reassigned to 633 Folsom. As such, Sheriffs 
Department staff are not available for entry security at the 
War Memorial and 875 Stevenson. In addition, the metal 
detectors which had been in use at City Hall are old, 
frequently malfunction, and must be taken out of service, 
according to the Sheriffs Department. 

Security services at 633 Folsom and 575 Polk will be provided 
by the Sheriffs Department. Details of those security 
arrangements were submitted in separate legislation (Files 
101-94-67 and 102-94-9) which is pending for final passage by 
the Board of Supervisors. 

Under the proposed ordinance, security services at the War 
Memorial would be provided with ten temporary Civil Service 
positions including 9 Buildings and Grounds Patrol Officers 
(8207) and one Institutional Police Sergeant (8205). 
Employees for these positions are to be hired as of March 31, 
1995 and will work under the supervision of the War 
Memorial Department. In the interim period, until these 
employees are hired, security has been and will continue to 
be provided by Burns Security Services. In addition, three 
walk-through metal detectors, three hand-held metal 
detectors, and five two-way radios will be purchased for this 
location. A memo from the Police Department detailing the 
security arrangements for the War Memorial is attached. 

Security services at 875 Stevenson Street are proposed to be 
provided with two Burns security guards under contract to 
the Real Estate Department. A resolution to approve a 
Proposition J certification for contracting out these services is 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

2 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

pending before the Board of Supervisors. In addition, one 
walk-through metal detector, one hand-held metal detector, 
and one radio will be purchased for the 875 Stevenson Street 
facility. 

Budget The budget for the security services and equipment at the 

War Memorial and 875 Stevenson Street is as follows: 

Temporary Salaries 1 (See Comments) 
8207 Buildings & Grounds Patrol Officer 

9 positions, 6.5 pay periods, $1,407 per period $82,310 
8205 Institutional Police Sergeant 

1 position, 6.5 pay periods, $1,642 per period 10,673 
Premium Pay for evening and nighttime shifts 3,082 
Temporary Salaries 6,978 

Fringe Benefits 27,863 

Uniforms (9 @$100 each) 900 

Sub-total $131,806 

Private Security - Burns Security Services 2 
2,377 hours @ $10.80 per hour $25,670 

Department of Public Works (DPW) - Security 
Slafi 3 

8207 Building and Grounds Patrol (3 FTE for 
the period retroactive from 2/21795 to 3/31795) $24,729 



1 As noted above, these positions will be temporary positions. As such, an amendment to the 
Annual Salary Ordinance is not required. 

2 Burns Security Services was the low bidder on the original contract for security services at these 
locations in a competitive bidding process conducted by the Purchaser in January 1995. When 
security plans were changed, and a decision was made to use Civil Service positions for the War 
Memorial, the Real Estate Department requested, and Burns agreed, that Burns hold their bid 
available for 90 days. Burns is not an MBE/WBE. As noted above, a Proposition J certification 
has been submitted to the Board of Supervisors to allow the Real Estate Department to contract for 
these services at the 875 Stevenson Street facility. The 2,377 hours consists of 1,402 hours at the War 
Memorial retroactive from 2 /21/95 through 3/31/95 and 975 hours for the 875 Stevenson Street 
facility from 4/1/95 through 6/30/95. 

3 These three 8207 Building and Grounds Patrol positions provide security services at the War 
Memorial from 4:00 pm to Midnight. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

3 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Equipment 
Walk-through metal detectors 4 @$2,500 
Hand-held metal detectors 4 @$200 
Two-way Radios 6 @2,500 

Sub-total 


10,000 

800 

15.000 


&25 r 800 


Total 




$208,005 



Comments: 1. Ms. Beth Murray of the War Memorial reports that the 

Department's original calculations for security personnel 
assumed that; a) the security positions would be hired by the 
War Memorial Department for 8 pay periods, instead of 6.5, 
and, b) these positions would be under Permanent Salaries. 
Because these positions are being hired for 6.5 pay periods, 
and because these positions are temporary, the following 
reductions should be made: 

Premium pay of $3,082 should be reduced by $220 to 
$2,862. 

Because the 10 security positions are temporary 
positions, and because of the delays in submitting this 
item to the Board of Supervisors for approval, the 
separate line item for Temporary Salaries is no longer 
needed and therefore, this $6,978 request should be 
disapproved. 

Based on the reduction is Temporary Salaries, fringe 
benefits should be reduced by $2,556 from $27,863 to 
$25,307. 

2. The Budget Analyst's recommended reductions total $9,754 
including $220 in Premium Pay, $6,978 in Temporary 
Salaries, and $2,556 in Fringe Benefits. 

Recommendations: 1. Amend the proposed ordinance to reduce the amount of the 
appropriation by $9,754 from $208,005 to $198,251 in 
accordance with Comment Nos. 1 and 2 above. 

2. While the Budget Analyst believes that security services at 
the War Memorial and 875 Stevenson are necessary, we 
consider approval of this request, as amended, which 
includes partial contracting out of the security services, to be 
a policy matter for the Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 






SE-T BY: 



2-28-95 ; 4:35PM 



MAYOR'S OFFICE- 




ANTHONY D. R1BERA 
erne or pot-Kjt 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

HAU. Of JUSTICE 

BSD BRYANT STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94103 



February 8, 1995 



4152520461 ;# 3/ b 
Attachment 
Page I of' z 



Mike Martin 
Budget/Policy Analyst 
Office of the Mayor 
Room 205, City Hall 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

Sir, 

On February 21, 1995 the offices of the Board of Supervisors, the 
Mayor, and the Chief Administrative Officer are relocating to the 
War Memorial building and will be open for business. The pending 
move to the new location necessitates developing and implementing 
new security measures for the 3rd and 4th floors to insure the 
safety of all concerned. 

The following proposed security plan was developed as a result of 
two security surveys recently completed. The first security survey 
was completed by the Sheriff's department and the second by the 
Special Investigations Bureau of the San Francisco Police 
department. The proposed security plan is compatible with the 
existing security operation presently in place at the War Memorial 
building. 

The basic elements of the Security Plan are as follows: 

Operation: General access from the first floor to the third floor 
and fourth floor for the public and employees will 
be the two elevators and/or one of the below described 
stairways: 

The Southeast stairway allows access to the third floor 
for both employees and the public. 

The Northeast stairway allows restricted access to the 
third floor for authorized employees with keys at all 
hours, including weekends. 

The Southwest and Northwest stairways allow access only 
between the third and fourth floors for both the public 
and employees . 

Two (2) walk through metal detectors will be placed on 
the third floor with a security agent present at each 
location. One (1) metal detector shall also be 
positioned on the fourth floor with <* security agent 
present . 

The placement of the metal detectors and surveillance 
cameras at their designated locations will allow for 
maximum security, yet facilitate public access and 
movement on the floors . 



«g»g BY : 2-28-95 ; 4:36PM ; MAYOR'S OFFICE- 4152520461 ;# 4/ 6 

Attachment 
Page 2 of 2 



Staffing: A total of nine (9) security personnel are needed to 
ataff the operation. An allocation of the staff, as 
described below, provides the following coverage (s) : 

- Five (5) security agents to work from 7:30 AM to 
5:00 PM, Monday through Friday. Duties to include 
manning metal detectors, reliefs, and roving 
patrol. 

- Three (3) security agents to work from 4:00 PM to 
12:00 midnight, Monday through Friday. Duties 
consistent with those described above. 

- One (1) security agent to work 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM, 
Thursday through Monday. Duties to include roving 
patrol . 

The requested staffing permits full coverage at all the 
stationary security posts, and allows for reliefs, 
vacations, etc. An additional security agent (s) will be 
available to respond to internal alarms and assist at 
the security checkpoints during peak hours. 

Note: It is proposed that the security personnel be 
Civil Service employees. 

Equipment: The following equipment items are required to implement 
this security plan: Three (3) walk through metal 
detectors, three (3) hand held metal detectors, two (2) 
surveillance cameras, two (2) monitors, five (5) 
portable communication radios with related batteries 
and charging equipment, and uniforms for security 
agents . 



Any questions or requests for additional information pertaining to 
this proposed security plan should be directed to Inspector Jeff 
Lindberg, Special Investigations Bureau, San Francisco Police 
Department . 

Sincerely, 

ANTHONY D. RIBERA 
Chief of Police 



DElKJTYCHTEF DIARMUTD PHIL 

Commanding Officer 

Special Investigations Bureau 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



File 101-94-61 



Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of March 
8, 1995. 



Department: 

Item: 



Amount: 



Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Department of Parking and Traffic (DPT) 

Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance appropriating 
$173,610 of Off-Street Parking Funds for the Polk-Bush 
Garage construction project for the Department of Parking 
and Traffic. 

$173,610 

Parking Revenue Fund (previously known as the Off-Street 
Parking Fund) 

The proposed supplemental appropriation of $173,610 would 
be used to pay for architectural services in the amount of 
$61,652 and construction contract services in the amount of 
$111,958 in connection with the construction of the Polk- 
Bush Garage as follows: 

Architectural Servi ces - $61.652 

The DPT reports that construction of the Polk-Bush Garage 
was completed in April of 1993, at a cost of $4,466,440. 
According to the DPT, Echo West/Hok Construction, a Joint 
Venture (Echo West is an MBE firm), the original 
construction contractor, was financially unable to complete 
the construction work. As such, Echo West/Hok 
Construction's bonding company, the Insurance Company of 
North America, designated Apersey Construction, neither an 
MBE or a WBE firm, to complete the necessary work. The 
DPT advises that as a result of the difficulty with the original 
contractor, resulting in project delays, Apersey Construction 
needed additional assistance from Gordon Chong and 
Associates, the project architect. Gordon Chong and 
Associates, a registered MBE firm, incurred additional costs 
totaling $61,652. As of the writing of this report, the DPT 
could not provide the associated hours and hourly rates for 
the $61,652. 

The Attached letter from Mr. Anthony Flores of the City 
Attorney's Office, states that approximately $35,000 in 
Liquidated Damages (i. e, damages due to project delays) plus 
approximately $18,000 in damages resulting from negligence 
on the part of Echo West/Hok Construction for a total of 
approximately $53,000, may be reimbursed by the surety 



ROARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

(bonding company), the Insurance Company of North 
America, to the City. 

Mr. Flores advises that the City Attorney's Office and the 
DPT are currently negotiating with the bonding company 
regarding reimbursement to the City for the above-noted 
damages and no settlement has been reached. However, Mr. 
Flores states that, under the terms of the contract agreement 
between the DPT and Gordon Chong and Associates, the City 
is obligated to pay for the architectural services regardless of 
whether the bonding company reimburses the City for the 
damages. According to Mr. Flores, since the City is obligated 
to pay for these costs, and payment for these costs is well 
over due, the $61,652 is being requested now as opposed to 
waiting until the negotiations with the bonding company 
have been completed. Mr. Flores notes that should the 
bonding company reimburse the City for these damages such 
reimbursement funds would accrue to the DPT's Parking 
Revenue Fund (previously known as the Off-Street Parking 
Fund). 

Construction Contract Services - $111.958 

The DPT reports that an additional $341,440 in 
unanticipated construction services were incurred, as a result 
of numerous change orders and the project delays noted 
above, bringing the total amount of the construction contract 
to $4,466,440. Of the $4,466,440, a total of $4,080,860 has 
been paid to the contractors, leaving a balance of $385,580 
still owed to Apersey Construction. Of the $385,580, $80,422 
is to be paid from project contingency funds and $193,200, is 
anticipated to be paid by the bonding company for liquidated 
damages (see Attachment), for a total of $273,622. The 
balance of $111,958 ($385,580 less $273,622), is the other 
part of this subject request. 

Budget: Architectural Services - Gordon Chong and 

Associates $61,652 

Construction Contract Services - Apersey 
Construction 111,958 

Total $173,610 



Recommendation: Approval of the proposed ordinance is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



City and County of San Francisco: 




Louise H. Renne, 
City Attorney 



^ rr - , ~. Paee 1 of 2 

Office of City Attorney 



Anthony R. Flores 

Deputy City Attorney 

415-554-3936 



March 16, 1995 



Ms. Sandy Brown-Richardson 
Harvey M. Rose Corporation 
1390 Market Street, Suite 1025 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

Re: Bush - Polk Garage Supplemental Appropriation Request 

Dear Ms. Brown-Richardson: 

As we discussed, the following is further explanation of the DPT Bush-Polk Garage 
Supplemental Appropriation Request of $173,610. 

We are informed that during the course of the project, DPT faced a budget deficit and 
required funds for other uses. Apparently operating under the mistaken impression that 
the amount withheld for liquidated damages could be used to fund further construction 
change orders, DPT transferred $149,000 from the Bush-Polk Garage construction 
contingency fund to other DPT uses. This Request for additional funding is a direct result 
of DPT's depletion of the project contingency fund. 

As you know, the Request has two components, $61,652 for payment of architectural fees 
and $1 1 1,958 for construction. The project staff have reviewed and negotiated down the 
Architect's fee request, and are satisfied that the fee is appropriate for the extra work 
performed. This fee can be further subdivided into three categories. 

1. Fees due to delay. According to BCM, approximately $35,000 of the Architect's fees 
are related to extra meetings and contract administration due to the delay in project 
completion. When the Contract was put out for bid, the City determined that $1200 
per day would compensate it for the costs it would incur and the revenue it would lose 
if the Garage was not completed on schedule. This figure is called "liquidated 
damages" because it is a liquidated sum, that the parties agree in advance will settle 
the uncertainty of damages flowing from a day of delay in completion of the project. 
Setting a liquidated damages amount makes it DPT's exclusive remedy for any 
damages resulting from delay. DPT is compensated for the approximately $35,000 of 
the Architectural fees that are a direct result of the delay by the assessment of 
liquidated damages. The Surety will be responsible for the liquidated damages 
resulting from Contractor caused delay, as discussed below. 

2 Contractor negligence. BCM advises that another $18,000 of Architectural fees is 
for extra work to accommodate the new Contractor personnel, excessive shop 



(415) 554-4283 



Fox Plaza, 1390 Market Street, 5th Fir. 



San Francisco 94102-5408 



Attachment 
Page 2 of 2 



drawing and submittal review, and other extra administration expenses due to 
Contractor negligence. Because these fees are damages not related to the delay, they 
may be recovered in addition to the liquidated damages. We will seek to recover these 
fees from the Surety in our continuing negotiations. 
3. Owner requested extra work. The last portion of the Architectural fees 

(approximately $8500) arises out of extra design work requested by DPT. DPT must 
pay for this work itself and does not expect to recover any of these fees. 

It is important to note that DPT has two separate and distinct contractual obligations: to 
the completing Surety on one hand (contract balance), and to the Architect on the other 
hand (fees). The contract balance that DPT owes to the Surety can be offset by both 
delay related liquidated damages and negligence related damages, as discussed above. 
However, DPT's separate obligation to the Architect is not subject to any such offset. 
DPT's payment obligation to the Architect is not contingent upon negotiations with the 
Surety since the contracts are separate. 

As for the construction portion of the Request, the Original Contract amount of 
$4,125,000 was increased by $341,440 through approved change orders, resulting in a 
total construction value of $4,466,440. Of this amount, $4,080,860 has been paid to the 
Contractor/Surety, leaving $385,580 remaining to be paid on the Contract. 

DPT has $80,422 available in its project construction contingency fund. DPT has also set 
aside, in a separate account, the $193,200 in liquidated damages it has assessed for the 
161 days that completion was delayed. When the contingency fund and the liquidated 
damages fund amounts are deducted from the $385,580 contract balance, DPT has a 
shortfall of $1 1 1,958. The disputed liquidated damages that DPT is able to retain 
through negotiations will come out of the liquidated damages fund. The remainder will go 
to the Surety. Therefore, resolution of the liquidated damages dispute will not affect the 
DPT shortfall of$l 11,958. 

We trust the foregoing responds to your concerns regarding this Supplemental 
Appropriation Request. Please feel free to contact us if you have any further questions or 
comments. 

Sincerely, 

Louise H. Renne 
City Attorney 

Anthony R. Fibres 

Deputy City Attorney 

cc: Kevin Hagerty, DPT 
Michael Lane, BCM 



10 




Memo to Budget Committee 
March 22, 1995 



Item 3 -File 38-95-1 

Department: 

Item: 



Description: 



Comments: 



Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Resolution accepting and acknowledging a gift valued at 
$36,455.17 which was provided to the City and County of San 
Francisco by Lucille and George Jewett, Jr., for the 
maintenance of the Lyon Street Encroachment for 1994. 

In 1986, the Department of Public Works issued a revocable 
permit to the Jewetts to occupy portions of the sidewalk and 
street areas at Broadway and Lyon Streets, adjacent to the 
Presidio, with planter boxes, an irrigation system, concrete 
landings, wall and sidewalk, granite curb, driveway ramp, 
lighting, handrails and landscaping. Since 1986, the Jewetts 
have improved and been maintaining this area, which is 
adjacent to their residence. During calendar year 1994, the 
Jewetts provided maintenance services and improvements, 
which the Jewetts valued at $36,455.17, for this Lyon Street 
Encroachment. These maintenance services and 
improvements included shrub plantings, landscaping and the 
planting of flowering annuals. 

The proposed resolution would accept and acknowledge this 
in-kind gift valued at $36,455.17 by the Jewetts, on behalf of 
the City and thank the Jewetts for their generous and 
beneficial gift. In addition, according to Mr. Steve Nelson of 
the CAO's Office, the proposed resolution would provide the 
Jewetts with the necessary documentation to satisfy the 
Federal Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirements for a 
charitable tax deduction. 

1. Mr. Mel Baker of the DPW reports that since 1986 the 
Jewetts have provided a higher level of improvements and 
maintenance of the subject area than the once-monthly basic 
maintenance services previously provided by the DPW. Mr. 
Baker estimates that the DPW costs to provide the City's 
basic maintenance services for this area would be 
approximately $5,500 per year, or $30,955 less than the level 
provided by the Jewetts in 1994. Mr. Baker reports that the 
DPW does not currently provide any improvement or 
maintenance services to this area. 

2. Ms. Denise Brady, of the DPW, advises that the DPW 
issued an encroachment permit, or legal right-of-way, to the 
Jewetts in 1986. This permit (a) allowed the Jewetts to 
improve the subject area and (b) obligated the Jewetts to 
maintain the subject area and any improvements. Ms. Brady 
reports that the Jewetts have continued to provide this 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

11 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 22, 1995 

higher level of maintenance services and plan to continue 
providing such services in the future, as required by the 
revocable encroachment permit. This permit was issued after 
review and approval of a detailed landscape plan for the area. 
Ms. Brady reports that there is nothing in DPW's records to 
indicate whether or not the Jewetts intended to use these 
improvements and maintenance services for purposes of 
obtaining a charitable tax deduction. 

3. According to Mr. Ted Lakey of the City Attorney's Office, 
the IRS recently changed their charitable tax deduction 
rules, which now requires that individuals submit 
acknowledgement or receipts for charitable donations over 
$250. Mr. Lakey reports that if the City accepts this in-kind 
gift of services, the City will be under no obligation to 
continue the present level of maintenance services for the 
subject area should the Jewetts discontinue their gift of 
providing such services. 

4. Ms. Brady reports that although the City has issued 
thousands of revocable permits over the years, there are only 
approximately 20 such revocable permits similar to this type, 
in which adjacent property owners are providing additional 
improvements and maintenance landscaping services for the 
City. However, Ms. Brady indicates that the improvement 
and maintenance services provided by the Jewetts is the 
most extensive of the 20 similar revocable permits. 

5. According to Ms. Brady, the proposed resolution refers to 
the Lyon Street Park, or public park in several places in the 
resolution. However, Ms. Brady reports that the subject 
property is actually a privately maintained garden on a 
public street, which, by law, must continue to be open to the 
public. Ms. Brady therefore requests that the proposed 
resolution be amended accordingly. 

6. Ms. Brady indicates that the total amount of $36,455.17 is 
the value of the enhanced maintenance services in 1994, as 
determined by the Jewetts. According to Ms. Brady, this 
amount, which is reported to be the value of the gift, has not 
been verified by the DPW. 

Recommendations: Amend the proposed resolution to change the references to 
the Lyon Street Park or public park to the Permitted Lyon 
Street Garden on Page 1, line 4, line 10, line 13, line 15, and 
line 23 and on Page 2, line 3 and line 23. 

Approval of the proposed resolution is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 4 -File 101-94-16.1 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Juvenile Probation Department (JPD) 

Hearing requesting the release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $495,423 to implement the Serious Habitual 
Offender Program and the Intensive Home Supervision 
Program for juvenile repeat offenders released to the 
community. 

$495,423 

FY 1994-95 Juvenile Probation Department Budget 

In October of 1994, the Board of Supervisors placed $500,000 
on reserve to be used to enhance an existing Intensive Home 
Supervision Program (IHSP), and to implement a new 
Serious Habitual Offender Program (SHOP) for repeat 
juvenile offenders in JPD (File 101-94-16). This funding was 
placed on reserve pending the provision of additional 
program detail. The proposed budget for IHSP is $219,953, 
and the proposed budget for the SHOP is $275,470 for a total 
of $495,423. The funds for both IHSP and SHOP were placed 
on reserve. 

The two program budgets were based on a seven month 
period beginning December 1, 1994 through June 30, 1995. 
The Department advises that the contractors for IHSP have 
been providing services since December 1, 1994. As such, 
expenditures have been incurred against the reserved 
monies. Therefore, the proposed release of reserved funds 
would be paid retroactive to December 1, 1994. 

Intensive Home Supervision Program (IHSP): 

The Intensive Home Supervision Program is a program 
designed to provide intensive services for juvenile repeat 
offenders who have had their probation revoked for breaking 
the terms of their probation, including committing a new 
offense, and/or are at risk of receiving an out-of-home 
placement, such as Juvenile Hall, or a group home. 

The enhancement of the IHSP, proposed with the requested 
release of reserved funds, would allow the referral of more 
serious juvenile offenders, requiring intensive supervision, to 
community-based agencies. The funding would also provide 
support services to family members of the juvenile offenders, 
or assist the family members in finding the appropriate 
services to meet their own treatment needs. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

13 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



IHSP Budget: (for the period retroactive from December 1, 
1994 through June 30, 1995). 



Contract Modifications $18,000 x 6 agencies 


$108,000 


Voucher System $8,333 x 6 agencies 


50,000 


Training 


6,000 


Psychiatric Counseling 


30,000 


Overtime 


25.953 


Total 


$219,953 



Contract Modifications ($108,000): In order to expand 
the capacity of IHSP, the proposed $108,000 would increase 
funding for six currently funded contracts by $18,000 each. 
The JPD's IHSP currently funds the following six 
contractors: (1) Bayview Hunter's Point Foundation, (2) Real 
Alternatives Program, (3) Chinatown Youth Center, (4) West 
Bay Filipino Multi-Service Corporation, (5) Morrisania West 
Incorporated, and (6) Potrero Hill Neighborhood House. 
These contractors provide case management services to high 
risk youth on probation. 

Attachment 1 provided by JPD lists each of the six 
contractors, the present allocations from the City, the 
number of youth served through these allocations, the 
proposed additional $18,000 allocation per contractor, and 
the number of additional youth to receive services as a result 
of the additional allocations of $18,000. 

Ms. Cheyenne Bell of JPD reports that although the 
contractors began providing services on December 1, 1994, 
Ms. Bell advises that the agencies have not yet been paid for 
their services. 

Vouchers ($50,000): Each of the above listed contractors 
would be provided an estimated amount of $8,333 through a 
voucher system to meet the special and emergency needs of 
the youth participating in IHSP, including the purchase of 
such items as job skills courses, transportation, clothing, 
glasses, or recreational activities such as field trips. 

Training ($6,000): This funding will pay for six required 
training sessions for the personnel from the agencies listed 
above. These training sessions will include: (a) a two-day 
substance abuse program, (b) a one-day program on the 
techniques of case management (c) three, two-day programs 
on how to work with Latino Families, Asian Families, and 
African American families, and (d) a one day program on 
health issues for youth. 

BOARD OF STTPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

14 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Ms. Bell advises that these training sessions will be provided 
by six independent consultants. Each of these six 
consultants were selected by Ms. Bell based on an analysis of 
available consultants in the area experienced in the specific 
subject areas required, and on recommendations. All of the 
consultants are minorities, and five of the consultants are 
women. Ms. Bell advises that two of the above listed six 
training sessions have already occurred at a cost of $2,500. 

Psychiatric Counseling ($30,000): This funding would pay 
for 300 hours of psychiatric counseling for the juveniles in 
IHSP. These counseling services would be provided by 
consultants selected from a list of Juvenile Court-approved 
consultants, at an estimated cost of $100 per hour. 

Overtime ($25,953): This funding would pay for an 
estimated 998 overtime hours of an 8440 Probation Officer at 
$26 per hour, including fringe benefits. Probation officers 
provide assistance to the contractors, and conduct follow-up 
and oversight for the youth on probation. Since many of the 
contractors conduct activities after regular business hours, 
the probation officers are required to work overtime. 

Mr. Fred Virgilio of JPD, advises that currently, the 
probation officers are compensated for overtime by 1 1/2 
hours of compensatory time off for each overtime hour 
worked. Mr. Virgilio advises that JPD would prefer to offer 
cash payments for overtime versus compensatory time off, in 
order to maintain a consistent daily staffing level. 

Mr. Virgilio advises that these overtime hours were based on 
a seven month period at $3,708 per month. Mr. Virgilio 
advises that up to now probation officers have received 
compensatory time-off as payment for overtime hours. As 
such, the proposed request for overtime should be 
recalculated based on a three month time period beginning 
April 1, 1995 and ending June 30, 1995. The proposed 
request of $25,953 should be reduced to $11,124, reflecting a 
savings of $14,829. 

Serious Habitual Offender Program (SHOP): 

The Probation Services Division of JPD is currently 
establishing a new Serious Habitual Offender Unit to 
administer SHOP. The purpose of SHOP is to target the 
estimated 150 juveniles, who commit the majority of juvenile 
violent crimes in San Francisco, with intensive supervision 
and services. These 150 youth represent an estimated 12 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

15 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



percent of the 1,300 juveniles currently monitored by JPD. 
The probation officers assigned to SHOP will have the 
authority to enforce the special probation conditions of the 
youth in SHOP, including arrest if the probation is violated. 
The probation officers will coordinate services with the school 
system, the Health Department, community agencies, the 
Police Department and the District Attorney. The Serious 
Habitual Offender Unit is to be staffed with eight positions, 
including one existing Supervising Probation Officer, two 
existing Senior Probation Officers, four existing Probation 
Officers, and one Clerk. All of these positions will be 
transferred from their existing work units to the Serious 
Habitual Offender Unit that administers SHOP based on 
their experience levels. The loss to the these units of eight 
positions, as a result of the transfer, will be offset by the 
hiring of two Senior Probation Officers through existing 
positions which are currently vacant, and with six positions 
to be requested in the Fiscal Year 1995-96 budget. Mr. 
Virgilio advises that the juveniles in the SHOP program are 
violent repeat offenders who are likely to require a law 
enforcement aspect to their supervision and monitoring. The 
probation officers assigned to SHOP will have the authority 
to enforce the special probation conditions of the youth in 
SHOP, including arrest if the probation is violated. 

SHOP Budget: 



Regular Automobiles ($20,000 x 6) 


$120,000 


Caged Security Vehicles ($25,000 x 3) 


75,000 


Gasoline & vehicle repairs (for above listed 




automobiles and vehicles) 


5,000 


Voicemail 


12,000 


Pagers 


9,600 


Cellular phones ($500 x 6) 


3,000 


Telecommunications Charges 




(for cellular phones and pagers) 


5,000 


Computers and software equipment 


30,000 


Training 


3,000 


Printing/copying 


2,000 


Office Supplies 


4,070 


Furniture and supplies 


6,800 




$275,470 



This budget includes non-contractual services, although the 
funds were originally reserved for contractual services. 

Regular Automobiles ($120,000): The proposed funding 
would purchase six automobiles for use by the probation 
officers in the Serious Habitual Offender Unit of JPD to track 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

16 






Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



the juveniles at school, at home, or wherever they should be, 
to ensure that they are there. Mr. Virgilio advises that for 
the entire JPD, which contains 80 probation officers, there 
are only 12 automobiles, or one for every 6.6 probation 
officers. As such, Mr. Virgilio advises that for SHOP to meet 
its intended objectives, each probation officer in the Serious 
Habitual Offender Unit must have immediate access to an 
automobile. 

The Purchasing Department estimates that the cost of each 
vehicle is approximately $16,000, including sales tax, for a 
total of $96,000. Therefore, the proposed request of $120,000 
should be reduced to $96,000 for a total savings of $24,000. 

Caged Security Vehicles ($75,000): The proposed 
funding would purchase two caged security vehicles and one 
security van, each at an estimated cost of $25,000. Mr. 
Virgilio advises that the juveniles must be transported in a 
caged security vehicle in order to properly secure juveniles 
who are residing in Juvenile Hall, or juveniles who have 
violated the terms of probation, and must be located and 
transported to Juvenile Hall. There are currently two caged 
security vehicles used for transporting the entire JPD 
caseload of 1,300 juveniles on probation, of which the 150 
SHOP juveniles represent the majority of the 132 juveniles 
residing in Juvenile Hall at any one time. 

The Purchasing Department estimates that the cost of the 
caged security van is $24,500, and the cost of each of the two 
caged automobiles is $21,500 each, for a total of $67,500. 
Therefore, the proposed request of released funds in the 
amount of $75,000 should be reduced to $67,500 for a total 
savings of $7,500. 

Gasoline and Vehicle Repairs ($5,000): The proposed 
funds would be used for gasoline and vehicle repairs required 
for the proposed vehicles listed above. 

These proposed funds were based on a seven-month period, 
but will be needed for only three months. As such, the 
proposed request for Gasoline and Vehicle Repairs should be 
recalculated based on a three month time period beginning 
April 1, 1995 and ending June 30, 1995. Therefore, the 
proposed request of $5,000 should be reduced to $2,142, 
reflecting a savings of $2,858. 

Voicemail ($12,000): The proposed funds would purchase a 
voicemail system for JPD. Mr. Virgilio advises that 
probation officers spend the majority of their time away from 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

17 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



their offices, and receive many urgent calls per day. 
Currently, there are only six secretaries to answer phones for 
eight divisions. Mr. Virgilio states that the SHOP probation 
officers must be accessible at all times. The cost estimate of 
$12,000 was provided to JPD by the Department of 
Electricity and Telecommunications. 

Pagers ($9,600): The proposed funds would purchase 72 
pagers at a cost of $133 each, to provide immediate access to 
probation officers who are not in their offices. Mr. Virgilio 
advises that the inability to contact probation officers 
immediately is a constant problem within JPD. Further, Mr. 
Virgilio advises that the SHOP probation officers must be 
accessible at all times. 

Cellular Phones ($3,000): The proposed funds would be 
used to purchase six cellular phones at $500 each for the six 
probation officers in the Serious Habitual Offender Unit. Mr. 
Ace Tago of JPD advises that the JPD currently has three 
cellular phones. One cellular phone is used by the 
Department Director, and the other two cellular phones are 
used by probation officers on family visits, or other places 
where immediate back-up assistance may be required. 

Telecommunication Charges ($5,000): The proposed 
funds would be used to pay the telecommunications charges 
for the six cellular phones and the pagers. 

These proposed funds were based on a seven-month period, 
but will be needed for only three months. As such, the 
proposed request for Telecommunications Charges should be 
recalculated based on a three month time period beginning 
April 1, 1995 and ending June 30, 1995. Therefore, the 
proposed request of $5,000 should be reduced to $2,142, 
reflecting a savings of $2,858. 

Computers and Software Equipment ($30,000): The 

proposed funds would purchase six computers at a cost of 
$4,000 each, or $24,000 total, one printer for a cost of $2,000, 
and software at a cost of $4,000. Mr. Virgilio advises that 
one objective of SHOP is to implement a computer tracking 
system that would monitor the juveniles in SHOP. This 
computer tracking system would be accessible to the Court, 
the District Attorney, and the Police Department. Currently, 
there is no central method to share information, nor is there 
any means to monitor the juveniles through an electronic 
system. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

18 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Ms. Deborah Vincent-James of the Electronic Information 
Processing Steering Committee (EIPSC) advises that the 
JPD is not required to receive EIPSC approval prior to the 
purchase of these computers and software equipment because 
the JPD has not exceeded the maximum yearly purchase 
limit of 20 computers not requiring EIPSC approval. 

Training ($3,000): The proposed funds would provide 
computer training to the eight-person Serious Habitual 
Offender Unit in the use of various software programs. The 
training would be provided by the Informational Services 
Division of the Controller's Office. 

Printing/Copying ($2,000): The proposed funds would be 
used for printing and copying expenses. 

These proposed funds were based on a seven-month period, 
but will be needed for only three months. As such, the 
proposed request for Printing and Copying should be 
recalculated based on a three month time period beginning 
April 1, 1995 and ending June 30, 1995. Therefore, the 
proposed request of $2,000 should be reduced to $858, 
reflecting a savings of $1,142. 

Office Supplies ($4,070): The proposed funds would 
purchase office supplies, including paper, pens, pencils, 
binders, etc. for the eight-person Serious Habitual Offender 
Unit. 

These proposed funds were based on a seven-month period, 
but will be needed for only three months. As such, the 
proposed request for Office Supplies should be recalculated 
based on a three month time period beginning April 1, 1995 
and ending June 30, 1995. Therefore, the proposed request of 
$4,070 should be reduced to $1,743, reflecting a savings of 
$2,327. 

Furniture ($6,800): The proposed funds would purchase 
office furniture, including desks, chairs, and file cabinets for 
the eight SHOP staff. The furniture is for the two positions 
which are currently vacant, and for the six positions which 
are being requested in the Fiscal Year 1995-96 budget. 
Attachment 2, provided by JPD, includes a list of the 
furniture and the prices for such furniture. 

Comments: 1. The proposed release of reserved funds for IHSP in the 

amount of $219,953 should be reduced by $14,829 for 
Overtime to $205,124. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

19 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 22, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



2. The proposed release of reserved funds for SHOP in the 
amount of $275,470 should be reduced by $40,685 to 
$234,785, to reflect a reduction in Regular Vehicles in the 
amount of $24,000, a reduction in Caged Security Vehicles in 
the amount of $7,500, a reduction in Gasoline and Vehicle 
Repairs in the amount of $2,858, a reduction in 
Telecommunication Charges in the amount of $2,858, a 
reduction in Printing/Copying in the amount of $1,142, and a 
reduction in Office Supplies in the amount of $2,327. 

3. In total, this amount of $495,423 should be reduced by 
$55,514 ($14,829 for IHSP and $40,685 for SHOP) to 
$439,909. 

Recommendations: 1. In accordance with Comment Nos. 1, 2, and 3 above, 
reduce the requested release of reserved funds by $55,514 
from $495,423 to $439,909. 

2. However, it should be noted that the additional annual 
General Fund costs for the enhanced Intensive Home 
Supervision Program is $138,000, and the annual General 
Fund costs for the new Serious Habitual Offender Program, 
(excluding one-time start-up costs) is $349,471, for total new 
annual General Fund costs of $487,471 annually. Therefore, 
we consider approval of this request to be a policy matter for 
the Board of Supervisors. 



cc: Supervisor Hsieh 

Supervisor Kaufman 
Supervisor Bierman 
President Shelley 
Supervisor Alioto 
Supervisor Ammiano 
Supervisor Hallinan 
Supervisor Kennedy 
Supervisor Leal 
Supervisor Migden 
Supervisor Teng 
Clerk of the Board 
Chief Administrative Officer 
Controller 
Teresa Serata 
Robert Oakes 
Ted Lakey 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

20 




MPR 17 '95 16=51 FR JUUENILE PROBATION 415 753 7715 TO 92520461 P. 02/02 ZZaCmen ~ 

MEMORANDUM 



March 17, 1995 



TO: Michell Ruggels 
Budget Analyst 

FROM: Cheyenne Bell 

Director of Community Program 

RE: Table requested 



Providers 

1. (a) Bayview Hunter's Point Foundation 
Morrisania West Inc. 
West Bay Multi-Service Corporation 
Real Alternative Program 
Chinatown Youth Center 
Potrero Hill Neighborhood House 

(b) Current 94-95 funding 

$32,000 each agency for a total of $192,000 

(c) Enhancement per provider 

$18,000 each for a total of $108,000 

(d) Total funding (b+c) $50,000 each or total $300,000 

(e) Youth currently seen 

16 per agency for total of 96 per year 

(f) 30 additional youth as result of enhancement vill 
be seen. 



21 

♦• I0TAL PAGE. 02 ** 



FROM = CCS, JUUENJLE COURT T0 : 4152520 , 61 ^ ^ 1995 ^ J^g* 



CITY & COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Juvenile Probation Department 

. 300 Woodside Avenue 
San Francisco, California 94 1 27 

March 16, 1995 

To: Michelle Ruggels, Budget Analyst 

Board of Supervisors 

From: Ace A. Tago, Manager, Finance & Administration 

Subject: SHO Program - Other Costs - $1 5,870 

The above amount is broken down as follows: 

1 . Furniture: 

8 Desks @ $400.00 ea. $3,200 

8 Exec. Chairs @ $ 1 50 ea. 1 ,200 

8 Filing Cabinets @ $200.00 ea. 1 ,600 
8 Bookcases @ $100 ea. 800 $6,800 



22 



<£fr MINUTES DOCUMENTS DEP*. 

REGULAR MEETING 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

WEDNESDAY. MARCH 29. 1995 - 1:00 P.M. ROOM 410, WAR MEMORIAL BLDG. 

MEMBERS: SUPERVISORS HSIEH, KAUFMAN, BIERMAN 

CLERK: GREGOIRE HOBSON 

TIME MEETING CONVENED: 1:16 P.M. 

CONSENT CALENDAR 

1. All matters listed hereunder constitute a Consent Calendar, are considered to be 
routine by the Budget Committee, and will be acted upon by a single roll-call vote 
of the committee. There will be no separate discussion of these items unless a 
member of the committee or a member of the public so requests, in which event 
the matter shall be removed from the Consent Calendar and considered as a 
separate item. 

a) File 101-90-128.2 . [Reserved Funds, Fire Department] Consideration of 
release of reserved funds, Fire Department - 1989 Earthquake Safety Bond 
Program Fund, in the amount of $1,551,412, for the purpose of funding Fire 
Station No. 24 construction contract. (Department of Public Works) 

b) File 101-92-60.7 . [Reserved Funds, Fire Department] Consideration of 
release of reserved funds, Fire Department - 1992 Proposition C Bond Issue 
Fund, in the total amount of $952,200, for the purpose of funding the 
construction contract of Fire Stations 16 and 43. (Department of Public 
Works) 

c) File 101-94-43.1 . [Reserved Fund, Chief Administrative Officer] 
Consideration of release of reserved funds, Chief Administrative Officer, in 
the total amount of $85,416, for upgrades to City boilers at Laguna Honda 
Hospital, San Francisco General Hospital and the Hall of Justice. 
(Department of Public Works) 

d) File 97-95-9 . [Cash Revolving Fund-Sheriff] Ordinance amending Chapter 10 
of the San Francisco Administrative code by amending Section 10.164 thereof, 
increasing the Sheriff's Cash Revolving Fund from $4,800 to $6,000. 
(Sheriff's Department) 

e) File 28-95-4 . [Emergency Repair] Resolution authorizing the San Francisco 
Fire Department to take necessary measures to protect the health and safety 
of the citizens of San Francisco by performing the necessary work to repair 
the Auxiliary Water Supply System (AWSS) Main Break on Seventh Street, 
between Townsend and Brannan Streets. (Fire Department) 

ACTION: RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



REGULAR CALENDAR 
FISCAL ITEMS 



File 101-94-79 . [Appropriation, Real Estate Department] Ordinance 
appropriating $208,005, Real Estate Department, from the General Fund 
Reserve for salaries, fringe benefits, other non-personal services, materials 
and supplies and equipment to provide security services at 875 Stevenson 
Street and the War Memorial Building for fiscal year 1994-95 (includes 
revenue transfer to the War Memorial Special Fund). (Controller) RO #94161 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Teresa Serata, Budget Director, Office of the Mayor. IN SUPPORT: 
None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
Reduce appropriation to $198,251 and place $10,530 on reserve. 
AMENDED TITLE: "Ordinance appropriating $198,251, Real 
Estate Department, from the General Fund Reserve for salaries, 
fringe benefits, other non-personal services, materials and 
supplies and equipment to provide security services at 875 
Stevenson Street and the War Memorial Building for fiscal year 
1994-95 (includes revenue transfer to the War Memorial Special 
Fund); placing $10,530 on reserve." 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



File 101-94-16.1 . [Release of Reserved Funds, Juvenile Probation] 
Consideration of release of reserved funds, Juvenile Probation Department, in 
the total amount of $275,470, to implement Serious Habitual Offender 
Program for repeat offenders released to the community. (Juvenile Probation) 

(Consideration Continued from 3/22/95) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Ed Flowers, Jr., Chief 
Probation Officer, Juvenile Probation Department; Cythina Lee, Managing 
Attorney, Assistant District Attorney, Juvenile Division; Ron Albers, 
Assistant Public Defender; Deputy Chief Philpot, SF Police Department; Lt. 
Tom Brudin, SF Police Department; Judith Griffin, Juvenile Probation 
Department; Katherine Feinstein, Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice. IN 
SUPPORT: Connie Rameriz Webber; Cathy Garcia; Mary Davis; Richard 
Seres; Gloria Hampton; Elizabeth Hennet; Rita Alverez. OPPOSED: 
Margaret Broklin, Director, Coleman Advocates; Michael Hopper; Coleman 
Advocates; Mila Hook, Advocates for Recreation and Parks; Dan Macallair, 
Assoc. Director, Juvenile/Criminal Justice; Vincent Schiraloi, Assoc. 
Director, Juvenile/Criminal Justice; Helen Helper, Director, Bernal Heights 
Neighborhood Center; Doris Majon, Ingleside Community Center. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO APRIL 12, 
1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



4. File 101-94-72 . [* /ropriation, Department of Public h .th, San Francisco 
General Hospital] Ordinance appropriating $29,124,382 in Medi-Cal revenues 
for San Francisco General Hospital's participation in the SB 855 
Disproportionate Share Payment Program for fiscal year 1994-95. Providing 
$12,282,331 for 1995-96 Budget Reserve. (Includes revenue transfer to the 
General Fund and SB 855 match in other non-personal services. (Supervisor 
Alioto) RO #94167 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE; 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

5. File 101-94-73 . [Appropriation, Department of Public Health, San Francisco 
General Hospital] Ordinance appropriating $4,467,295 in Medi-Cal Revenues 
and $1,149,131 from the General Fund Service for San Francisco General 
Hospital's participation in the SB 855 Disproportionate Share Payment 
Program for fiscal year 1994-95. (Includes revenue transfer to the General 
Fund and SB 855 match in other non-personal services. (Supervisor Alioto) 
RO #94195 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE; 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

6. File 101-94-74 . [Appropriation, Airports] Ordinance appropriating 
$8,568,551, Airport, of interest earnings from various Capital Improvement 
Project Funds of the Airport to Capital Improvement Projects (expand 
electrical sources to the Airport and support Master Plan Projects) for fiscal 
year 1994-95. (Controller) RO #94165 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Peter Nardoza, SF Airport. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. TO BOARD "WITHOUT RECOMMENDATION". 

VOTE; 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE M T>T UTES PAGE 4 

7. File 101-94-75 . [Appropriation, Department of Electricity and 
Telecommunications] Ordinance appropriating $497,465, Department of 
Electricity and Telecommunications, from the General Fund Reserve, for 
transfer to the 1994 Citywide Radio Communications System Fund, for fiscal 
year 1994-95 (provide General Fund support pending bond sale); providing for 
ratification of action previously taken. (Controller) RO #94198 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Ed Harrington, Controller, Dan McFarland, Department of 
Electricity and Telecommunications. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

8. File 101-94-76 . [Appropriation, Chief Administrative Officer] Ordinance 
appropriating $32,117,349, $15,700,965 from Lease Revenue Bond proceeds 
and $16,416,384 from the Convention Facilities Fund, Chief Administrative 
Officer, for debt service and capital improvements to the Moscone Center 
and the Children's Center. (Supervisor Bierman) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Ed Harrington, Controller, Bob Gamble, Redevelopment Agency; 
Jack Moerschbaecher, Convention Facilities Department; Helen Sause, 
Redevelopment Agency. IN SUPPORT: Jean Nelson; Shelia Devolverbernan. 
OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDMENT OF THE WHOLE BEARING NEW 
TITLE PRESENTED IN COMMITTEE BY CONTROLLER. 
ADOPTED. AMENDMENT OF THE WHOLE RECOMMENDED. 

NEW TITLE: "Appropriating $32,117,349, $15,700,965 from 1994 
Lease Revenue Bond proceeds and $16,416,384 from the 
Convention Facilities Fund, Chief Administrative Officer, for debt 
services and capital improvements to the Moscone Center and the 
Children's Center for fiscal year 1994-95, placing $22,973,794 on 
reserve." 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE M^UTES PAGE 5 

GENERAL ITEMS 

9. File 47-95-7 . [Moscone Center Parking Garage Rates] Resolution approving 
new evening rates at the Moscone Center Garage. (Dept. Parking and Traffic) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Kevin Haggerty, Director of Off-Street Parking, Parking and Traffic 
Department. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

10. File 96-95-1 . fSale of Surplus Property] Ordinance authorizing the sale of 
surplus City-owned property and adopting findings pursuant to City Planning 
Code, Section 101.1. (Real Estate Dept.) 

Parcel 1. Assessor's Block 140, Lot 8, located on the west side of Davis 

Street between Broadway Street and Vallejo Street; 

Parcel 2. Assessor's Block 141, Lot 11, located on the north side of 

Broadway Street between Front Street and Battery Street; 

Parcel 3. Assessor's Block 165, Lot 21, located on the south side of 

Broadway Street between Battery Street and Sansome Street.) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO APRIL 12, 1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

11. File 203-95-1 . [Quitclaim of Easement] Ordinance urging and authorizing 
the Director of Property to Quitclaim an easement over a portion of 1096 
Eddy Street for less than fair market value to Progress Foundation for 
development of an affordable housing project and urging and authorizing the 
Director of Property to accept a relocated easement. (Supervisors Bierman, 
Alioto, Ammiano, Hsieh) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO APRIL 5, 1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

TIME MEETING ADJOURNED: 3:55 P.M. 



3 



CITY AND COUNTY 



BOA 




(Public Library, QDocuments T>ept. 
S* fflB*M: Janejudson 

OF SAN FRANCISCO ^ ^ J 



>ARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street, Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 



March 29, 1995 



// 

TO: Budget Committee 

FROM: Budget Analyst 

SUBJECT: March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item la - File 101-90-128.2 



MAR 2 3 1995 

SAN FRANCISCO 

PUBLIC LIBRARV 



Department: 

Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



San Francisco Fire Department (SFFD) 
Department of Public Works (DPW) 

This item is a hearing requesting the release of reserved 
funds in the amount of $1,551,412 from the 1989 Earthquake 
Safety Bond Program in order to fund Fire Station No. 24 
construction. 

$1,551,412 

1989 Earthquake Safety Bond Program Phase I Bonds 

In November, 1989, San Francisco voters authorized the 
sale of $59.7 million in Earthquake Safety General 
Obligation bonds for the seismic retrofitting and facilities 
improvement of various City buildings. In June, 1991, the 
Board of Supervisors approved the appropriation of 
$6,500,000 from the 1989 Earthquake Safety Bond Program, 
Phase I (ESP I) reserving $4,098,535 for the construction of 
various facilities, including the renovation, seismic 
strengthening and construction of an addition to Fire 
Station No. 24, pending the selection of construction 
contractors and determination of cost details and the 
MBE/WBE status of the contractors. This item requests the 
release of $1,551,412 in ESP I funds for Fire Station No. 24 
which is located at 100 Hoffman Avenue. 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Based on the low bid (see Comment No. 3), the Department 
of Public Works (DPW) has awarded the construction 
contract to Dennis J. Amoroso Construction/Marinship 
Construction, a joint venture. Marinship Construction 
Services is an MBE firm. Funding for the project would be 
expended as follows: 

Construction Contract - Dennis J. Amoroso 

Construction/Marinship Construction $1,469,000 

Alternative 1 (kitchen storage cabinets) 13,000 

Alternative 2 (personnel lockers) 44,000 
Alternative 3 (overhead telescopic station door) 32 r 000 

Subtotal Construction $1,558,000 

Construction Contingency 36,212* 

Total $1,594,212 

* Additional contingency funds of $197,488, resulting in 
a 15% contingency amount, will be requested in a 
separate supplemental appropriation request. 

Comments: 1. Mr. Roger Wong of the Department of Public Works 

advises that another supplemental appropriation request 
for the remaining needed amount of $42,800 (total cost of 
$1,594,212 less this request of $1,551,412) has been requested 
in separate legislation pending before the Board of 
Supervisors. 

2. The DPW has provided the following contract cost details, 
including the MBE and WBE participation, for the 
$1,558,000 construction contract. 

Fire Station No. 24 

Prime Contractor (27.9%) 
Dennis J. Amoroso Construction 

(construction oversight, carpentry, concrete) $433,951 



Subcontractors. MBE (27.7%) 




Bayview Steel 


$157,750 


KZTile 


18,900 


Golden Gate Painting 


17,246 


Kent Lim & Co. 


145,000 


Chen's Plumbing 


93.000 


Subtotal, MBE Subcontractors 





431,896 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Subcontractors. WBE (14.1%) 

United Glass $30,384 

Sierra Electric 190.000 

Subtotal, WBE Subcontractors 220,384 

Prime Contractor. MBE HQ.7%) 

Marinship Construction Services (demolition) 166,943 

Other Subcontractors (19.6%) 

Concrete Structural $16,500 



Waterproofing Unlimited 


9,273 


Wang 




40,725 


Coast 




9,676 


Harrison 




119,649 


Alcal 




16,341 


G&L 




26,000 


Cosco 




29,980 


Berlin 




20,482 


Overhead Door 


16.200 


Subtotal, 


Other Subcontractors 


304.826 



TOTAL, CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT $1,558,000 

3. The DPW has provided the attached list of the prime 
contract bidders and the amounts bid for the proposed 
construction contract. 

Recommendation: Approve the requested release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $1,551,412. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



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'Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 

Item lb - File 101-92-80.7 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



San Francisco Fire Department (SFFD) 
Department of Public Works (DPW) 

This item is a hearing requesting the release of reserved 
funds in the amount of $952,200 from the 1992 Proposition C 
Fire Protection Bond Issue Fund for the purpose of funding 
construction contracts for Fire Stations Nos. 16 and 43. 

$952,200 

1992 Fire Department Improvement Bonds 

In November, 1992 the voters of San Francisco approved the 
Proposition C Fire Protection Bond Issue totaling $40.8 
million to fund various improvements for San Francisco Fire 
Department facilities. In May, 1993, the Board of 
Supervisors approved an appropriation request of 
$15,204,533 from this bond issue, placing $10,788,125 on 
reserve for construction work at various facilities including 
Fire Stations Nos. 16 and 43. This item requests the release 
of $952,200 of the reserved funds to pay for construction 
contracts for various improvements, including foundation, 
plumbing and electrical work, to Fire Station Nos. 16 and 43. 

Based on the low bid (see Comment No. 4), the Department of 
Public Works has awarded the contracts to Cresci Electric 
Company, a WBE firm, for Fire Station No. 16, and to 
Gomez-Chapot, a joint venture, for Fire Station No. 43. 
Gomez is an MBE firm. The funds are to be expended as 
follows: 

Fire Station No. 16 (2251 Greenwich Street) 

Construction Contract - Cresci Electric 

Company (WBE) $414,889 

Construction Contingency (11.4%) 47.311 

Total $462,200 

Fire Station No. 43 (720 Moscow Street) 

Construction Contract - Gomez-Chapot $334,324 

Construction Contingency (15%) 50,822 

Asbestos Abatement/Monitoring - DPW 44,354 
ConstructionServices (Administration/ 

Management/Inspection) - DPW 60.500 

Total $490,000 

Total Request $952,200 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Comments: 



1. Mr. Peter Wong of the DPW has provided the following 
contract cost details including the MBE and WBE 
participation, for the $414,889 construction contract for Fire 
Station No. 16 and the $334,324 construction contract for 
Fire Station No. 43. 



Fire Station No. 16 

Prime Contractor. WBE (42.3%) 
Cresci Electric 

(overall construction oversight, electrical) $175,504 

Subcontractors. MBE (45.5%) 
J&W Construction $149,800 

TMC Construction 13,036 

E. Mitchell 26.100 

Subtotal, MBE/WBE subcontractors 188,936 

Other Subcontractors (12.2%) 
Diversified Metal $6,675 

Linoleum Larry 22,375 

Pacific Coast Water Proofing 8,250 

Valofi and Peck 13.149 

Subtotal, non MBE/WBE Subcontractors 50.449 

TOTAL FIRE STATION NO. 16 CONTRACT $414,889 



Fire Station No. 43 

Prime Contractor. MBE (21.1%) 

Gomez (overall construction oversight) $70,649 

Subcontractors. MBE (24.0 %) 

KZ Tile $14,700 

Joe Wang 8,000 

Made in the Shade 1,400 

Yums 23,800 

G.L. Electric 30,000 

Golden Gate Glass 2.328 

Subtotal, MBE Subcontractors 80,228 

Subcontractors. WBE (10.6%) 
Dougherty $19,214 

City Lumber 5,988 

S.L. Construction 10.120 

Subtotal, WBE Subcontractors 35,322 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Other Prime Contractor (20.3%) 

Chapot (overall construction oversight) $67,876 



Other Subcontractors (24.0%) 


5,285 




Rainbow 




BK Mills 


14,880 




Alcal 


14,928 




Western 


7,263 




Service Metal 


5,100 




Beslin 


8,913 




Meridian 


23.880 




Subtotal, Other Subcontractors 




80,249 



TOTAL, FIRE STATION NO. 43 CONTRACT 



$334,324 



2. Mr. Wong advises that because of the complexity of the 
projects, the Fire Department will budget construction 
contingency amounts of 15 percent of the construction 
contract total, instead of the normal 10 percent. 

3. However, as noted above, the requested construction 
contingency amount for Fire Station No. 16 is 11.4 percent of 
the $414,889 construction contract total. Mr. Wong states 
that the remaining construction contingency amount will be 
obtained from previously appropriated funds. 

4. The DPW has provided the attached list of the prime 
contract bidders and the amounts bid. 



Recommendation: 



Approve the requested release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $952,200. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Attachment 
Page 1 of 2 



SPECIFICATIONS: 
TITLE: 

BIDS RECEIVED: 
BIDDERS: 



TABULT^'ONOF BIDS 

5467A 

San Francisco Fire Department 
Station Number 16 Renovation 
2251 Greenwich Street 



January 18. 1995 

Pyramid Construction 
Cresci Electric 

K.P. Lam Brothers Construction 
Angotti & Reilly 
Gomez-Chapot Construction 
Chiang CM. Construction 



No Pref. 

WBE7LBE 

MBE 

LBE 

MBE/LBE/JV10% 

MBE/LBE 

Average Bid: 
Architect's Estimate: 
% Architect's Estimate: 



Base Bid 
404.040' 
414.889" 
420.900 
474.000 
489.000 
524,800 



$454,605 

$390,000 

117% 



APPARENT LOW BIDDER:" 


Pyramid Construction 










1320 Solano Avenue, Suite "A 








- 


Albany, CA 94706 


Tel. (510)528-9071 




SUBCONTRACTORS: 


Wood Marie 




Cabinets 


19.500 






Harrison Drywall 




Framing 


26.000 






Horizon Sheet Metal 




H.V.A.C 


44.500 






Lou Wong 




Floor covering 


23.500 






Pollegrend & Son 




Ceramic tile 


8.490 






Pacific Constructor; 




Floor 

Toilet partitions 


8,250 






United California 




Glazing 


2.500 






Valott & Reck 




Painting 


14.000 






Made In The Shade 




Windows 


2.600 






Roldan 




Demolition 


7.260 


cc: 


Gene Wong 
John Cribbs 




Gary Johnson 
Mark Primeau 








Todd Cockbu 


rn 


Joe Cheung 








Norm Karasic 


k 


Mauiice Williams 






Minda Tan 




Hugh Havlik 








Mary Starkwe 


ather 


Controller 






19-Jan-95 













*Cresci Electric was granted a 10% MBE preference, resulting 
in the lowest bid. 



Page 2 of 2 




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Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item lc -File 101-94-43 1 



Department: 



Item: 



Amount: 



Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Comment: 



Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Release of reserved funds in the amount of $85,416, for 
upgrades to the City's boilers at Laguna Honda Hospital, San 
Francisco General Hospital and the Hall of Justice. 

$85,416 

General Fund - 1994-95 Capital 

Improvement Projects $80,491 

Laguna Honda Hospital Operating Fund - 

FY 1994-95 Budget 4.925 

Total $85,416 

The Board of Supervisors previously approved a 
supplemental appropriation request in the amount of $85,416 
to pay for upgrades to City boilers at Laguna Honda 
Hospital, San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) and the 
Hall of Justice. At the same time, the Board placed the entire 
$85,416 on reserve pending the selection of contractors, the 
MBE/ WBE status of the contractors and contract cost 
details. 

Mr. Timothy Leung of the DPW advises that $45,416 of the 
$85,416 is to be allocated to mechanical design and the 
preparation of the contract documents, both responsibilities 
of which are to be performed in-house. The remaining 
$40,000 is to be allocated to consultant services for the 
provision of preliminary study and electrical design for the 
project. Attached is a detailed breakdown of the total 
expenditures for the requested $85,416, as prepared by Mr. 
Leung. 

Mr. Leung advises that the DPW intends to contract with 
ENTEK Corp., which not an MBE or a WBE firm, on a sole 
source basis because of the particular expertise which 
ENTEK Corp. possesses and because of the specialized 
nature of this study pertaining to boilers. Mr. Leung states 
that ENTEK Corp. has extensive work experience with this 
type of study and currently has seven other contracts for 
similar studies involving a total of 22 boilers. According to 
Mr. Leung, ENTEK Corp.'s study will involve providing 
recommendations on what measures will have to be taken to 
ensure the boilers will comply with current air pollution 
regulations. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



10 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Recommendation: Approve the proposed release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $85,416. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

11 



City and County of San Francisco 

Bureau of Engineering; 



Department of Public Works 
DIVISION OF GENERAL ENGINEERING SERVICES 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: Sandy Brov.n- Richardson 

Budget Analyst 

THRU: RayBautisu p^f^OMilVr^ 

Mechanical Section Manager 



FROM: Timothy 

Mechani 



DATE: 



FILE: 



March 23, 1995 



2.3.2 



SUBJECT: 



Release of S S 5,4 1 6 to Department of Public 
Works, Reference File No. 101-94-43. 1 



As you requested, 1 am providing a breakdown for the allocations listed in the Request to Release Funds 
letter to the Board of Supervisors, dated February 28th. 



LHH & HOJ Planning 






A. Attend Coordination Meetings 






1 Class 5254, Assoc Mech. Engr. 
2. Class 5258, Senior Mech. Engr. 


16 Hours @S62/Hr. = 
8 Hours @ S83 /Hr. 


$992 
$664 


B. Field Survey 






1. Class 5254. Assoc. Mech. Engr. 

2. Class 5258. Senior Mech. Engr. 


16 Hours @S62/Hr. = 
8 Hours (a), $83 /Hr. 


$992 
$664 


C. Design Development and Preliminary Design 






1 Class 5254, Assoc. Mech. Engr. 
2. Class 5258, Senior Mech. EngT. 


28 Hours % $62 /Hr. = 
8 Hours @ $83 /Hr. 


$1,736 
$664 


D Clerk Typing Support 






1 . Class 1426, Senior Clerk-Typist - 


8 Hours % $34 /Hr. 


$272 


Subtotal for 1 Planning 
Estimate: 




$5,984 
$6,000 *- 



(415)431-9430 
FAX 550-0831 



1550 F. VANS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94124-1400 



28 39Vd 



nv3ana 9Nia33Ni9N3 



l:' 



6frE8-t>SS-STfr I2:00 t>66l/68/I0 



City and County of San Francisco 

Bureau of Engineering 



Department of Public Works 
DIVISION OF GENERAL ENGINEERING SERVICES 



LHH & HOJ Preparation of Contract Documents 

A. Class 5254. Assoc. Mech. Engr. 

B. Class 5258, Senior Mech. Engr. 

C. Class 5346, Mech Engr. Assoc. I 
D Class 1426. Senior Clerk-Typist 



160 Hours @ $62 /Hr. = $9,920 

80 Hours @ $83 /Hi. = $6,640 

128 Hours® $48 /Hi. = $6,144 

48 Hours @ $34 /Hr. = $ 1 ,632 



Subtotal for II. Preparation of Contract Documents 

Estimate: 

Total DPW/BOE Mechanical Services Budget: 

111. (I. + II.) «= $6,000 + $24,000 

rv. LHH & HOJ Preliminary Study and Design by Consultant 

A. ENTEK Corp. 

812 Grayson Road 

Pleasant Hill, California 94523 - Lump Sum 

Hourly Rates Range from $29 /Hr. to $95 /Hr. 

V. Subtotal LHH & HOJ (III. + IV.) 

VI. SFGH Planning 

A. Attend Coordination Meetings 



1. Class 5254. Assoc. Mech. Engr. 

2. Class 5258, Senior Mech. Engr. 

B. Field Survey 

1. Class 5254, Assoc. Mech. Engr. 

2. Class 5258. Senior Mech. Engr. 

C. Design Development and Preliminary Design 

1. Class 5254, Assoc. Mech. Engr. 

2. Class 5258, Senior Mech. Engr. 

D. Clerk Typing Support 

1 Class 1426, Senior Clerk-Typist - 



$24,336 
$24.000 *• 



$30 000 




8 Hours @ $62 /Hi. 
4 Hours @ $83 /Hi. 


$496 
$332 


8 Hours @ $62 /Hr. 
4 Hours @ $83 /Hr. 


$496 
$332 


1 2 Hours % $62 /Hi. = 
4 Hours % $83 /Hr. 


$744 
$332 



4 Hours (& $34 /Hi. 



$136 



Subtotal for VI. Planning 
Estimate: 



$2,868 
$3.000 + 



(415) 431-9430 
FAX 550-0831 



1550 EVANS AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94124-1400 



E0 39Vd 



nv3yna 9Nia33Ni9N3 



6frE8-t>Sc,-c;Tb T7-.aa 



City and County of San Francisco Department of Public Works 

Bureau of Engineering DIVISION OF GENERAL ENGINEERING SERVICES 

VII. SFGH Preparation of Contract Documents 

A Class 5254. Assoc. Mech. Engr. - 88 Hours (6) $62 /Hi. = $5,456 

B Class 5258. Senior Mech. Engr. - 40 Hours @ $83 /Hi. = $3,320 

C Class 5346. Mech. Engr Assoc I - 64 Hours (cb, $48 /Hi. = $3,072 

D. Class 1426. Senior Clerk-Typist - 24 Hours @ $34 /Hr. = $ 816 



Subtotal for II. Preparation of Contract Documents $12,664 

Estimate: $12.416 % 

Total DPW/BOE Mechanical Services Budget: 

VIII. (V.+ VI.) = $3,000+ 12,416 = $IS r 4|6 

IX SFGH Preliminary Study and Design by Consultant 

A. ENTEK Corp. 

812 Grayson Road 

Pleasant Hill. California 94523 - Lump Sum = $14.000 * * 

Hourly Rates Range from $29 /Hr. to $95 /Hr. 

X. Subtotal SFGH (VIII. + K) $29.416 

XI. Grand Total (V + X.) $8 5,416 

If you need any further information you can reach me at 558-4537. 



TYL:tyl 



* the 5 'con t rL r t i S^n t r CbaniCal d " l S" -d preparation of 
" provroeY^ the^onStor^ "* ^^^ -K- services 



415)431-9430 

'AX 550-0831 1550 EVANS AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO. CA 94124-1400 



t>0 39Vd 



nV3dP9 9NIH33NI9N3 r brn bcc eTfc 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



Id 



File 97-95-9 



Department: 
Item: 

Description: 



Comment: 



Sheriffs Department 

Ordinance amending Chapter 10 of the San Francisco 
Administrative Code by amending Section 10.164 to increase 
the Sheriffs Cash Revolving Fund from $4,800 to $6,000. 

Sergeant Richard Ridgeway of the Sheriffs Department 
reports that the Sheriffs Cash Revolving Fund is used to pay 
for minor emergency repairs in the jails and for 
unanticipated activities connected with office operations at 
the Sheriffs Department's satellite offices (e. g., the purchase 
of photocopy services). Sergeant Ridgeway advises that the 
Sheriffs Department is requesting a $1,200 increase in this 
fund from $4,800 to $6,000, in connection with the new jail 
facility located at 425 7th Street and a new satellite office 
located at 1155 Market Street. According to Sergeant 
Ridgeway, $1,000 of the $1,200 would be allocated to the new 
jail facility ($500 to each of the two jails contained in this 
facility) and the remaining $200 would be allocated to the 
satellite office. 

Sergeant Ridgeway advises that the $1,200 additional needed 
funds is included in the Sheriffs Department's budget 
request for FY 1995-96. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

15 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Item le - File 28-95-4 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Fire Department 

Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Resolution authorizing the Fire Department to take 
necessary measures to protect the health and safety of the 
citizens of San Francisco by performing the necessary 
emergency work to repair the auxiliary water supply system 
(AWSS) main break on Seventh Street between Townsend 
Street and Brannan Street. 

$143,177 

1986 Fire Department Emergency Bond Funds 

In February of 1995, a 14-inch main line, of the Fire 
Department's Auxiliary Water Supply System (AWSS), 
located on 7th Street between Townsend Street and Brannan 
Street, ruptured. This condition required the Fire 
Department to barricade the street and render the water 
main inactive. As such, two high pressure hydrants and the 
primary water supply to Infirm Area #5 are out of service. 
Infirm Area #5 is the shoreline area up to Brannan Street, 
and bordered by 15th Street and 11th Street. This situation 
could result in the buildings and residents in Infirm Area #5 
being at risk because of a reduced water supply. 

In accordance with Section 6.30 of the City's Administrative 
Code, the Fire Department has declared that an emergency 
situation exists at 7th Street between Townsend Street and 
Brannan Street. The Department of Public Works (DPW) 
therefore initiated an expedited contracting procedure in 
order to retain a contractor to perform the emergency repairs, 
and selected the lowest bidder, Cal North Engineering, for 
the amount of $95,177. Cal North Engineering is a LBE 
firm. The remaining $48,000 of the proposed expenditure of 
$143,177, as shown in the Attachment provided by DPW, will 
be used for (a) DPW's engineering design, construction 
management and engineering support services, and (b) for 
the Department of Parking and Traffic to enforce traffic 
control plans during the construction, and to repaint the 
center divider lines on 7th Street following construction. 

DPW advises that the emergency repairs are scheduled to 
begin no later than April 3, 1995, and should be completed on 
or about April 24, 1995. As noted above, DPW estimates that 
the cost to repair the AWSS will total $143,177. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

16 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Comment: 



The Fire Department reports that funding to repair the 
AWSS main break on Seventh Street between Townsend 
Street and Brannan Street would be funded by the 1986 Fire 
Protection Bond Interest Funds. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed resolution. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



17 



Attachment 



Cost Breakdown 



Contract to Cal North Engineering $86,525.00 

Contingency, 10% 8.652.00 

Subtotal $95,177 

DPW Labor: 

BOE - Design and engineering support 

during construction 24,600.00 

BCM - Construction Management 

and Materials Testing 17,400.00 

DPT Labor: 

Design and review traffic control 

plans, painting, striping and 

traffic markers 6.000.00 

Subtotal 48.000 

Total $143,177 



Hours 

DPW Labor - 351 hours 
DPT Labor - 136 hours 



18 



Attachment 



Cost Breakdown 



Contract to Cal North Engineering $86,525.00 

Contingency, 10% 8.652.00 

Subtotal $95,177 

DPW Labor: 

BOE - Design and engineering support 

during construction 24,600.00 

BCM - Construction Management 

and Materials Testing 17,400.00 

DPT Labor: 

Design and review traffic control 

plans, painting, striping and 

traffic markers 6.000.00 

Subtotal 48.000 

Total $143,177 



Hours 

DPW Labor - 351 hours 
DPT Labor - 136 hours 



19 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 2 -File 101-94-79 



Departments: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Item: 



Description: 



Real Estate Department 
War Memorial 

$208,005 

General Fund Reserve 

Ordinance appropriating $208,005 from the General Fund 
Reserve for salaries, fringe benefits, other non-personal 
services, and equipment to pay for security services and 
equipment at the War Memorial (401 Van Ness Avenue), and 
at 875 Stevenson Street. 

The proposed ordinance would approve a supplemental 
appropriation in the amount of $208,005 to pay for security 
services and equipment at the War Memorial and at 875 
Stevenson Street. 

As part of the move from City Hall due to the seismic 
retrofitting required following the Loma Prieta earthquake, 
staff of the Office of the Mayor, Board of Supervisors, Chief 
Administrative Officer, Ethics Commission, and Civil 
Service Commission, as well as the Law Library and the 
public hearing rooms used by City Commissions and the 
Board of Supervisors have relocated to office space at the War 
Memorial Building at 401 Van Ness Avenue. Offices of the 
Controller, Registrar of Voters, and other offices have 
relocated to 875 Stevenson Street; and courtrooms of the Trial 
Courts have relocated to 633 Folsom and 575 Polk Street. 
Entry security at City Hall for all of these departments had 
previously been provided by the Sheriffs Department. With 
the relocations, new entry security arrangements for these 
departments are necessary. 

At City Hall, the Sheriffs Department had covered the 4 
entrances by deploying 7 staff including 6 Police Cadets and 
one Deputy Sheriff, using 3 walk-through metal detectors. 
These Sheriffs Department staff have now been reassigned. 
One Police Cadet was reassigned to the Parole Office, one to 
the new County Jail at 425 7th Street, and one to the San 
Bruno Jail (these three assignments were previously 
approved as part of the Sheriffs Department FY 1994-95 
budget). The remaining three Police Cadets and the Deputy 
Sheriff were reassigned to 633 Folsom. As such, Sheriffs 
Department staff are not available for entry security at the 
War Memorial and 875 Stevenson. In addition, the metal 
detectors which had been in use at City Hall are old, 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



20 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

frequently malfunction, and must be taken out of service, 
according to the Sheriffs Department. 

Security services at 633 Folsom and 575 Polk will be provided 
by the Sheriffs Department. Details of those security 
arrangements were submitted in separate legislation (Files 
101-94-67 and 102-94-9) which are pending for final passage by 
the Board of Supervisors. 

Under the proposed ordinance, security services at the War 
Memorial would be provided with 10 temporary Civil Service 
positions including 9 Buildings and Grounds Patrol Officers 
(8207) and one Institutional Police Sergeant (8205). 
Employees for these positions are to be hired as of April 1, 
1995 and will work under the supervision of the War 
Memorial Department. In the interim period, until these 
employees are hired, security has been and will continue to 
be provided by Burns Security Services, and by 3 Building and 
Grounds Patrol Officers under the Department of Public 
Works. In addition, three walk-through metal detectors, 
three hand-held metal detectors, and five two-way radios will 
be purchased for this location. A memo from the Police 
Department detailing the security arrangements for the War 
Memorial is attached. 

Security services at 875 Stevenson Street are proposed to be 
provided with two Burns security guards under contract to 
the Real Estate Department. A resolution to approve a 
Proposition J certification for contracting out these services is 
pending before the Board of Supervisors. According to Mr. 
Larry Jacobson of the Real Estate Department, the 
Department has not yet been advised as to when this item will 
be heard. In addition, one walk-through metal detector, one 
hand-held metal detector, and one radio will be purchased for 
the 875 Stevenson Street facility. 

Budget The budget for the security services and equipment at the 

War Memorial and 875 Stevenson Street is as follows: 

Temporary Salaries 1 (See Comments) 
8207 Buildings & Grounds Patrol Officer 

9 positions, 6.5 pay periods, $1,407 per period $82,310 
8205 Institutional Police Sergeant 

1 position, 6.5 pay periods, $1,642 per period 10,673 
Premium Pay for evening and nighttime shifts 3,082 
Temporary Salaries 6,978 

Fringe Benefits 27,863 

Uniforms (9 @$100 each) 900 

Sub-total $131,806 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

21 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Private Security - Burns Security Services 2 

War Memorial 1,402 hours @ $10.80 per hour $15,140 

875 Stevenson 975 hours @ $10.80 per hour 10.530 

Sub-total $25,670 

Department of Public Works (DPW) - Security 
Slaff3 

8207 Building and Grounds Patrol (3 FTE for 
the period retroactive from 2/21/95 to 3/31/95) $24,729 

Equipment 
Walk-through metal detectors 4 @$2,500 10,000 

Hand-held metal detectors 4 @$200 800 

Two-way Radios 6 @2,500 15.000 

Sub-total $25.800 

Total $208,005 

■*• As noted above, these positions will be temporary positions. As such, 
an amendment to the Annual Salary Ordinance is not required. 

o 

A Burns Security Services was the low bidder on the original contract 

for security services at these locations in a competitive bidding 
process conducted by the Purchaser in January 1995. When security 
plans were changed, and a decision was made to use Civil Service 
positions for the War Memorial, the Real Estate Department 
requested, and Burns agreed, that Burns hold their bid available for 90 
days. Burns is not an MBE/WBE. As noted above, a Proposition J 
certification has been submitted to the Board of Supervisors to allow 
the Real Estate Department to contract for these services at the 875 
Stevenson Street facility. The 2,377 hours consists of 1,402 hours at the 
War Memorial retroactive from 2 /21/95 through 3/31/95 and 975 
hours for the 875 Stevenson Street facility from 4/1/95 through 6730/95. 

** These three 8207 Building and Grounds Patrol positions currently 
provide security services at the War Memorial from 4:00 pm to 
Midnight. As of 3/31/95, they will transferred from the DPW to the 
War Memorial Department as part of the group of nine 8207s to 
provide security at the War Memorial from 4/1/95 to 6730/85. 

Comments: 1. Ms. Beth Murray of the War Memorial reports that the 

Department's original calculations for security personnel 
assumed that; a) the security positions would be hired by the 
War Memorial Department for 8 pay periods, instead of 6.5, 
and, b) these positions would be under Permanent Salaries. 
Because these positions are being hired for 6.5 pay periods, 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

22 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

and because these positions are temporary, the following 
reductions should be made: 

• Premium pay of $3,082 should be reduced by $220 to 

$2,862. 

• Because the 10 security positions are temporary 
positions, and because of the delays in submitting this 
item to the Board of Supervisors for approval, the 
separate line item for Temporary Salaries is no longer 
needed and therefore, this $6,978 request should be 
disapproved. . 

• Based on the reduction in Temporary Salaries, fringe 
benefits should be reduced by $2,556 from $27,863 to 
$25,307. 

2. The Budget Analyst's recommended reductions total $9,754 
including $220 in Premium Pay, $6,978 in Temporary 
Salaries, and $2,556 in Fringe Benefits. 

Recommendations: 1. Amend the proposed ordinance to reduce the amount of the 
appropriation by $9,754 from $208,005 to $198,251 in 
accordance with Comment Nos. 1 and 2 above. 

2. While the Budget Analyst believes that security services at 
the War Memorial and 875 Stevenson are necessary, we 
consider approval of this request, as amended, which 
includes partial contracting out of the security services, to be 
a policy matter for the Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

21 




~ tuo-iarr-ri n^r LUniKULLhK'b OFFICE o 

P. 6/11 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

HALL Of JUSTICE 

flSO BRYANT STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA $4103 



ANTHONY D. (UBEKA 
CHIEF Of POUCC 



February 8, 1995 



Mike Martin 
Budget/Policy Analyse 
Office of the Mayor 
Room 205, City Hall 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

Sir, 

On February 21, 1995 the offices of the Board of Supervisors, the 
Mayor, and the Chief Administrative Officer are relocating to the 
War Memorial building and will be open for business. The pending 
move to the new location necessitates developing and implementing 
new security measures for the 3rd and 4th floors to insure the 
safety of all- concerned. 

The following proposed security plan was developed as a result of 
two security surveys recently completed. The first security survey 
was completed by the Sheriff's department and the second by the 
Special Investigations Bureau of the San Francisco Police 
department . The proposed security plan is compatible with the 
existing security operation presently in place at the War Memorial 
building. 

The basic elements of the Security Plan are as follows: 

Operation: General access from the first floor to the third floor 
and fourth floor for the public and employees will 
be the two elevators and/or one of the below described 
stairways: 

The Southeast stairway allows access to the third floor 
for both employees and the public. 

The Northeast stairway allows restricted access to the 
third floor for authorized employees with keys at all 
hours, including weekends. 

The Southwest and Northwest stairways allow access only 
between the third and fourth floors for both the public 
and employees . 

Two (2) walk through metal detectors will be placed on 
the third floor with a security agent present at each 
location. One (1) metal detector shall also be 
positioned on the fourth floor with a security agent 
present . 

The placement of the metal detectors and surveillance 
cameras at their designated locations will allow for 
maximum security, yet facilitate public access and 
movement on the floors. 



9/, 



^ 16 '95 03:08PM CCSF CONTROLLER'S OFFICE 



P. 7/11 



Staffing: 



Equipment: 



A total of nine (9) security personnel are needed to 
staff the operation. An allocation of the staff, as 
described below, provides the following coverage (s) : # 

- Five (S) security agents to work from 7:30 AM to 
5:00 PM, Monday through Friday. Duties to include 
manning metal detectors, reliefs, and roving 
patrol. 

- Three (3) security agents to work from 4:00 PM to 
12:00 midnight, Monday through Friday. Duties 
consistent with those described above. 

- One (1) security agent to work 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM, 
Thursday through Monday. Duties to include roving 
patrol. 

The requested staffing permits full coverage at all the 
stationary security posts, and allows for reliefs, 
vacations, etc. An additional security agent (a) will be 
available to respond to internal alarms and assist at 
the security checkpoints during peak hours. 

Note: It is proposed that the security personnel be 
Civil Service employees. 

The following equipment items are required to implement 
this security plan: Three (3) walk through metal 
detectors, three (3) hand held metal detectors, two (2) 
■ surveillance cameras, two (2) monitors, five (5) 
portable communication radios with related batteries 
and charging equipment, and uniforms for security 
agents. 



Any questions or requests for additional information pertaining to 
this proposed security plan should be directed to Inspector Jeff 
Lindberg, Special. Investigations Bureau, San Francisco Police 
Department . 



Sincerely, 



ANTHONY D. RIBERA 
Chief of Police 



by 



DEPUTY CHIEF DIARMUID PHIL 

Commanding Officer 

Special Investigations Bureau 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 3 -File 101-94-161 

Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of March 
22, 1995. Mr. Virgilio and Mr. Tago of JPD advised that they will submit a 
report directly to the Budget Committee regarding the information that the 
Budget Committee requested. 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Juvenile Probation Department (JPD) 

Hearing requesting the release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $275,470 to implement the Serious Habitual 
Offender Program 

$275,470 

FY 1994-95 Juvenile Probation Department Budget 

In October of 1994, the Board of Supervisors placed $275,470 
on reserve to be used to implement a new Serious Habitual 
Offender Program (SHOP) for repeat juvenile offenders in 
JPD (File 101-94-16). This funding was placed on reserve 
pending the provision of additional program detail. 



Serious Habitual Offender Pro gram (SHOP): 

The Probation Services Division of JPD is currently 
establishing a new Serious Habitual Offender Unit to 
administer SHOP. The purpose of SHOP is to target the 
estimated 150 juveniles, who commit the majority of juvenile 
violent crimes in San Francisco, with intensive supervision 
and services. These 150 youth represent an estimated 12 
percent of the 1,300 juveniles currently monitored by JPD. 
The probation officers assigned to SHOP will have the 
authority to enforce the special probation conditions of the 
youth in SHOP, including arrest if the probation is violated. 
The probation officers will coordinate services with the school 
system, the Health Department, community agencies, the 
Police Department and the District Attorney. The Serious 
Habitual Offender Unit is to be staffed with eight positions, 
including one existing Supervising Probation Officer, two 
existing Senior Probation Officers, four existing Probation 
Officers, and one Clerk. All of these positions will be 
transferred from their existing work units to the Serious 
Habitual Offender Unit that administers SHOP based on 
their experience levels. The loss to these units of eight 
positions, as a result of the transfer, will be offset by the 
hiring of two Senior Probation Officers through existing 
positions which are currently vacant, and with six positions 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



2fi 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



to be requested in the Fiscal Year 1995-96 budget. Mr. 
Virgilio advises that the juveniles in the SHOP program are 
violent repeat offenders who are likely to require a law 
enforcement aspect to their supervision and monitoring. The 
probation officers assigned to SHOP will have the authority 
to enforce the special probation conditions of the youth in 
SHOP, including arrest if the probation is violated. The 
program budget was based on a seven month period 
beginning December 1, 1994 through June 30, 1995. 

SHOP Budget: 



Regular Automobiles ($20,000 x 6) 


$120,000 


Caged Security Vehicles ($25,000 x 3) 


75,000 


Gasoline & vehicle repairs (for above listed 




automobiles and vehicles) 


5,000 


Voicemail 


12,000 


Pagers 


9,600 


Cellular phones ($500 x 6) 


3,000 


Telecommunications Charges 




(for cellular phones and pagers) 


5,000 


Computers and software equipment 


30,000 


Training 


3,000 


Printing/copying 


2,000 


Office Supplies 


4,070 


Furniture and supplies 


6,800 




$275,470 



This budget includes non-contractual services, although the 
funds were originally reserved for contractual services. 

Regular Automobiles ($120,000): The proposed funding 
would purchase six automobiles for use by the probation 
officers in the Serious Habitual Offender Unit of JPD to track 
the juveniles at school, at home, or wherever they should be, 
to ensure that they are there. Mr. Virgilio advises that for 
the entire JPD, which contains 80 probation officers, there 
are only 12 automobiles, or one for every 6.6 probation 
officers. As such, Mr. Virgilio advises that for SHOP to meet 
its intended objectives, each probation officer in the Serious 
Habitual Offender Unit must have immediate access to an 
automobile. 

The Purchasing Department estimates that the cost of each 
vehicle is approximately $16,000, including sales tax, for a 
total of $96,000. Therefore, the proposed request of $120,000 
should be reduced to $96,000 for a total savings of $24,000. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

27 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Caged Security Vehicles ($75,000): The proposed 
funding would purchase two caged security vehicles and one 
security van, each at an estimated cost of $25,000. Mr. 
Virgilio advises that the juveniles must be transported in a 
caged security vehicle in order to properly secure juveniles 
who are residing in Juvenile Hall, or juveniles who have 
violated the terms of probation, and must be located and 
transported to Juvenile Hall. There are currently two caged 
security vehicles used for transporting the entire JPD 
caseload of 1,300 juveniles on probation, of which the 150 
SHOP juveniles represent the majority of the 132 juveniles 
residing in Juvenile Hall at any one time. 

The Purchasing Department estimates that the cost of the 
caged security van is $24,500, and the cost of each of the two 
caged automobiles is $21,500 each, for a total of $67,500. 
Therefore, the proposed request of released funds in the 
amount of $75,000 should be reduced to $67,500 for a total 
savings of $7,500. 

Gasoline and Vehicle Repairs ($5,000): The proposed 
funds would be used for gasoline and vehicle repairs required 
for the proposed vehicles listed above. 

These proposed funds were based on a seven-month period, 
but will be needed for only three months. As such, the 
proposed request for Gasoline and Vehicle Repairs should be 
recalculated based on a three month time period beginning 
April 1, 1995 and ending June 30, 1995. Therefore, the 
proposed request of $5,000 should be reduced to $2,142, 
reflecting a savings of $2,858. 

Voicemail ($12,000): The proposed funds would purchase a 
voicemail system for JPD. Mr. Virgilio advises that 
probation officers spend the majority of their time away from 
their offices, and receive many urgent calls per day. 
Currently, there are only six secretaries to answer phones for 
eight divisions. Mr. Virgilio states that the SHOP probation 
officers must be accessible at all times. The cost estimate of 
$12,000 was provided to JPD by the Department of 
Electricity and Telecommunications. 

Pagers ($9,600): The proposed funds would purchase 72 
pagers at a cost of $133 each, to provide immediate access to 
probation officers who are not in their offices. Mr. Virgilio 
advises that the inability to contact probation officers 
immediately is a constant problem within JPD. Further, Mr. 
Virgilio advises that the SHOP probation officers must be 
accessible at all times. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

28 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Cellular Phones ($3,000): The proposed funds would be 
used to purchase six cellular phones at $500 each for the six 
probation officers in the Serious Habitual Offender Unit. Mr. 
Ace Tago of JPD advises that the JPD currently has three 
cellular phones. One cellular phone is used by the 
Department Director, and the other two cellular phones are 
used by probation officers on family visits, or other places 
where immediate back-up assistance may be required. 

Telecommunication Charges ($5,000): The proposed 
funds would be used to pay the telecommunications charges 
for the six cellular phones and the pagers. 

These proposed funds were based on a seven-month period, 
but will be needed for only three months. As such, the 
proposed request for Telecommunications Charges should be 
recalculated based on a three month time period beginning 
April 1, 1995 and ending June 30, 1995. Therefore, the 
proposed request of $5,000 should be reduced to $2,142, 
reflecting a savings of $2,858. 

Computers and Software Equipment ($30,000): The 

proposed funds would purchase six computers at a cost of 
$4,000 each, or $24,000 total, one printer for a cost of $2,000, 
and software at a cost of $4,000. Mr. Virgilio advises that 
one objective of SHOP is to implement a computer tracking 
system that would monitor the juveniles in SHOP. This 
computer tracking system would be accessible to the Court, 
the District Attorney, and the Police Department. Currently, 
there is no central method to share information, nor is there 
any means to monitor the juveniles through an electronic 
system. 

Ms. Deborah Vincent-James of the Electronic Information 
Processing Steering Committee (EIPSC) advises that the 
JPD is not required to receive EIPSC approval prior to the 
purchase of these computers and software equipment because 
the JPD has not exceeded the maximum yearly purchase 
limit of 20 computers not requiring EIPSC approval. 

Training ($3,000): The proposed funds would provide 
computer training to the eight-person Serious Habitual 
Offender Unit in the use of various software programs. The 
training would be provided by the Informational Services 
Division of the Controller's Office. 

Printing/Copying ($2,000): The proposed funds would be 
used for printing and copying expenses. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



These proposed funds were based on a seven-month period, 
but will be needed for only three months. As such, the 
proposed request for Printing and Copying should be 
recalculated based on a three month time period beginning 
April 1, 1995 and ending June 30, 1995. Therefore, the 
proposed request of $2,000 should be reduced to $858, 
reflecting a savings of $1,142. 

Office Supplies ($4,070): The proposed funds would 
purchase office supplies, including paper, pens, pencils, 
binders, etc. for the eight-person Serious Habitual Offender 
Unit. 

These proposed funds were based on a seven-month period, 
but will be needed for only three months. As such, the 
proposed request for Office Supplies should be recalculated 
based on a three month time period beginning April 1, 1995 
and ending June 30, 1995. Therefore, the proposed request of 
$4,070 should be reduced to $1,743, reflecting a savings of 
$2,327. 

Furniture ($6,800): The proposed funds would purchase 
office furniture, including desks, chairs, and file cabinets for 
the eight SHOP staff. The furniture is for the two positions 
which are currently vacant, and for the six positions which 
are being requested in the Fiscal Year 1995-96 budget. The 
Attachment provided by JPD, includes a list of the furniture 
and the prices for such furniture. 



Comment: 



Recommendations: 



The proposed release of reserved funds for SHOP in the 
amount of $275,470 should be reduced by $40,685 to 
$234,785, to reflect a reduction in Regular Vehicles in the 
amount of $24,000, a reduction in Caged Security Vehicles in 
the amount of $7,500, a reduction in Gasoline and Vehicle 
Repairs in the amount of $2,858, a reduction in 
Telecommunication Charges in the amount of $2,858, a 
reduction in Printing/Copying in the amount of $1,142, and a 
reduction in Office Supplies in the amount of $2,327. 

1. In accordance with the Comment above, reduce the 
requested release of reserved funds by $40,685 from $275,470 
to $234,785. 

2. However, it should be noted that the ongoing annual 
General Fund costs for the Serious Habitual Offender 
Program, (excluding one-time start-up costs), are $468,866. 
Although Mr. Tago states that the overall Fiscal Year 1995- 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



30 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



96 General Fund allocation for JPD, which includes funding 
for SHOP, does not represent an increase over the Fiscal 
Year 1994-95 General Fund allocation for JPD, the Budget 
Analyst still considers the proposed release of reserved funds 
to be a policy matter for the Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

31 



FROM:CCSF JUUENILE C0UR7 



TQ: 



4152S20461 WR 16, 1995 5: 23PM 8293 P. 02 



CITY & COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Juvenile Probation Department 

. 300 Woodside Avenue 
San Francisco, California 94127 



March 16, 1995 



To: Michelle Ruggels, Budget Analyst 

Board of Supervisors 

From: Ace A. Tago, Manager, Finance & Administration 

Subject: SHO Program - Other Costs - $ 1 5,870 

The above amount is broken down as follows: 

1 . Furniture: 

8 Desks @ S400.00 ea. $3,200 

8 Exec. Chairs @ $ 1 50 ea. 1 ,200 

8 Filing Cabinets @ S200.00 ea. 1 ,600 
8 Bookcases @ $100 ca. 800 $ 6,800 



3? 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 

Item 4 - File 101-94-72 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 



San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) 
Department of Public Health (DPH) 

Supplemental appropriation ordinance appropriating 
$29,124,382 in Medi-Cal revenues for San Francisco General 
Hospital's participation in the SB 855 Disproportionate 
Share Payment Program for Fiscal Year 1994-95, and placing 
$12,282,331 of funds to be realized in Fiscal Year 1994-95 in 
a reserve for use in the City's Fiscal Year 1995-96 budget. 

$29,124,382 



Source of Funds: Medi-Cal revenues 

Description: Senate Bill 855 (SB 855) established a Disproportionate 

Share Payment Program that provides a mechanism for 
additional supplemental payments to the State's 
disproportionate share hospitals, such as SFGH. A 
disproportionate share hospital is defined as a hospital with 
a Medi-Cal inpatient and indigent utilization rate higher 
than the State average. Under this Disproportionate Share 
Payment Program, the City is required to make a transfer of 
funds to the State Department of Health Services (SDHS). 
The State obtains matching Federal funds to the transferred 
funds and the transferred funds plus the matching Federal 
funds are then distributed back to the disproportionate share 
hospitals as Medi-Cal revenues based on Medi-Cal patient 
days of services. The amount that the City must transfer to 
the SDHS is based on a statutory formula. 

The DPH advises that as of June of 1994, in accordance with 
Assembly Bill 1040 (AB 1040), the State allocated additional 
lump-sum payments to counties with disproportionate share 
hospitals in Fiscal Year 1994-95, so as to reduce the effect to 
counties with disproportionate share hospitals which will 
result from the State's changes in the Disproportionate Share 
Payment Program during Fiscal Year 1995-96. As a result, 
the City is eligible to receive an additional lump sum 
payment during Fiscal Year 1994-95 of $29,124,382. 

The DPH advises that to receive the additional lump-sum 
payment of $29,124,382, the City must transfer a total of 
$16,842,051 to the State based on the State's formula. 
Based on a City transfer of $16,842,051, and the State's 
return of $29,124,382, the City would realize a net gain of 
$12,282,331. The net amount of $12,282,331, to be realized 
from the State in Fiscal Year 1994-95, would be placed in a 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



33 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



reserve under the proposed legislation, and then used as 
revenues for purposes of funding the SFGH Fiscal Year 1995- 
96 budget. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

34 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 

Item 5 - File 101-94-73 

Department: San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) 



Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 

Description: 



Supplemental appropriation ordinance appropriating 
$4,467,295 in Medi-Cal revenues, and $1,149,131 from the 
General Fund Reserve for San Francisco General Hospital's 
participation in the SB 855 Disproportionate Share Payment 
Program for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 



$5,616,426 

Medi-Cal revenues 
General Fund Reserve 
Total 



$4,467,295 

1.149.131 

$5,616,426 



Senate Bill 855 (SB 855) established a Disproportionate 
Share Payment Program that provides a mechanism for 
additional supplemental payments to the State's 
disproportionate share hospitals, such as SFGH. A 
disproportionate share hospital is defined as a hospital with 
a Medi-Cal inpatient and indigent utilization rate higher 
than the State average. Under this Disproportionate Share 
Payment Program, the City is required to make a transfer of 
funds to the State Department of Health Services (SDHS). 
The State obtains matching Federal funds to the transferred 
funds and the transferred funds plus the matching Federal 
funds are then distributed back to counties with 
disproportionate share hospitals as Medi-Cal revenues based 
on Medi-Cal patient days of services. The amount that the 
City must transfer to the SDHS is based on a statutory 
formula. 

The DPH was previously scheduled to transfer a total of 
approximately $60,805,698 to the State for 1994-95 based on 
the State's formula and expected to receive approximately 
$86,179,085 back from the State. Based on a City transfer of 
$60,805,698 and a return from the State of a total of 
$86,179,085 million, the City would have realized a net gain 
of an estimated $25,373,387. The $25,373,387 was 
appropriated in SFGH's 1994-95 budget. 

However, the DPH advises that the State has now revised 
their allocation of SB 855 Medi-Cal revenues for FY 1994-95, 
which will require that the City transfer an additional 
$5,616,426 to the State for FY 1994-95, bringing the total 
amount to be transferred to the State to approximately $66.4 
million. The City will receive $4,467,295 million in Medi-Cal 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

35 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Comment: 



revenues in return for the $5,616,426 additional transfer, 
resulting in the City having to appropriate the $1,149,131 
from the General Fund Reserve. However, even with this 
required General Fund appropriation of $1,149,131, the SB 
855 Disproportionate Share Payment Program would still 
result in a net gain to the City of an estimated $24,224,256 
($25,373,387 less $1,149,131). 

Ms. Susan Andrus of the Controller's Office advises that the 
additional General Fund Appropriation has been previously 
reported as a pending supplemental appropriation request to 
the Board of Supervisors in the Controller's Six Month 
Budget Status Report dated February 6, 1995. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



36 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



File 101-94-74 



Department: 

Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Airport 

Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance appropriating 
$8,568,551 from interest earned on various capital 
improvement project funds for the Airport. 

$8,568,551 

Interest earned on the following Bond Funds and on Airport 
Capital Improvement Fund balances: 



1967 General Obligation Bonds 
1975, 1977, 1983, and 1990 Airport 

Revenue Bonds 
Refunding Bonds , Issues 1 through 4 
San Francisco International Airport 

Second Series Revenue Bonds, Issue 5 
Airport Capital Improvement Fund 
Total 



$33,265 

2,597,420 
300,254 

635,642 
5.001.970 

$8,568,551 



The proposed supplemental appropriation of $8,568,551 
would be used to partially fund the expansion of electrical 
sources to the Airport in the amount of $7,932,909 and to 
partially pay for the construction of a parking facility at the 
Airport in the amount of $635,642, as follows: 

Expansion of Electrical Sources to the Airport Project 
- $7.932.909 

The Airport reports that this project will increase the size of 
the electrical sources to the Airport to accommodate the next 
20 years of growth. The Airport advises that the United 
Airlines Maintenance Base is presently served by one 
substation which provides electricity and the Airport itself is 
served by two such substations. According to the Airport, the 
electrical distribution system was originally designed so that 
if one source to either of the above facilities failed, the 
remaining sources would be large enough to ensure continued 
operations at the other facility. However, according Mr. Leo 
Fermin of the Airport, the United Airlines Maintenance 
Base's electrical needs have outgrown its available electrical 
sources and the Airport itself will outgrow its available 
electrical sources over the next five years. Mr. Fermin states 
that the reason the Airport will outgrow its available 
electrical sources is because of the addition of new facilities 
in connection with the Airport's Master Plan and the 
Airport's planned up-grade of energy sources in its existing 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



37 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



terminals to meet current environmental regulations. As 
such, the Airport is proposing to expand the electrical sources 
to the United Airlines Maintenance Base and the Airport 
itself. According to Mr. Fermin, the reason that Airport funds 
are being appropriated for the electrical sources at the 
United Airlines Maintenance Base, instead of having United 
Airlines pay for such costs directly is because under the lease 
agreement between the Airport and United Airlines, the 
Airport is responsible for the provision of electrical utilities. 

The Airport intends to workorder the $7,932,909 to Hetch 
Hetchy. According to Mr. Ralph Leong of Hetch Hetchy, 
Hetch Hetchy will award a contract to PG & E to purchase 
the necessary equipment and to install two electrical 
transformers to provide the expanded electrical services to 
the Airport. Mr. Leong advises that PG & E has an on-going 
contract with Hetch Hetchy to provide transportation of 
electrical power over its lines to the Airport. 

The Airport advises that the total cost of the electrical 
expansion project is $9,210,038 or $1,277,129 more than the 
requested amount of $7,932,909. According to Mr. Fermin, 
the $1,277,129 will be paid for by Airport Capital 
Improvement Funds previously appropriated in the Airport's 
FY 1994-95 budget. The $1,277,129 is also to be workordered 
to Hetch Hetchy. Mr. Leong has provided Attachment 1 
which details the total project budget of $9,210,038. 

Parking Facility (Master Plan Project) - $635.642 

As a part of its Master Plan, the construction of a parking 
facility on Lot DD is currently underway at the Airport. 
When completed, this parking facility will be a free standing 
structure located near the United Airlines Maintenance 
Center and will contain approximately 3,000 parking spaces 
for Airport employees, employees of Airport tenants and for 
the general public. The Board of Supervisors previously 
approved the construction contract for this project (Files 010- 
91-40.2 and 101-92-11.2). The Airport advises that the total 
estimated cost of this project is $44,100,000, as shown in 
Attachment 2 provided by the Airport. Of the $44,100,000, 
the Airport has identified $31,000,000 in previously 
appropriated San Francisco International Airport Second 
Series Revenue Bonds, Issue 5 and previously appropriated 
Airport Capital Improvement Funds, leaving a balance of 
$13,100,000 still to be identified. The Airport is proposing to 
use the subject requested $635,642 to pay for a portion of the 
$13,100,000 needed balance. According to Mr. Fermin, the 
remaining needed balance of $12,464,358 ($13,100,000 less 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

38 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



$635,642) will be paid from future interest income from San 
Francisco International Airport Second Series Revenue 
Bonds, Issue 5 and from a future sale of Master Plan Bonds, 
Issue 8. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 






BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

39 



Mar 23.1995 11 :03PM FROM HHUIP-SF 



TO 92520461 



Attachment 1 



CO 

3* 



s 



Stf> 

T- OO 



qinojooiiJipNt 



*"8" 



U. 

1 

I 




Pr If 10" (fl TJ 



Si 



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£ 8 



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From; David GiMser To: Sandy Brown Richardson Date: 3/15/95 Time: 1S:22:06 

Attachment 2 



San Francisco International Airport 

Project to be Funded from Interest Income 

March 15, 1995 



CT- 2801 Parking Structure on Lot DP (Master Plan Project) 

Construction: $36,000,000 

Contingency: $ 2,700,000 

A.E.& I Design: $ 2,700,000 

A.E.& Inspect: $ 2.700.000 

Total Cost: $44,100,000 

This project is currently funded for $3 1,000,000. The remaining balance of S13, 100,000 will be 
funded from Issue 5 interest income for FY 1993/94 in the amount of $635,642 and subsequent 
interest income from future fiscal years. 



$3 1 ,000,000 Currently Funded 

$13.100.000 To be funded from Issue 5 interest income($63 5,642) and 
future interest income 

$44,100,000 Total Project Cost 



41 



Memo to Budget Committee 

March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



File 101-94-75 



Department: 

Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Electricity and Telecommunications (DET) 

Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance appropriating 
$497,465 from the General Fund Reserve for the Department 
of Electricity and Telecommunications; providing for 
ratification of action previously taken. 

$497,465 

General Fund Reserve 

In November of 1993, the electorate of San Francisco 
approved a $50 million Lease Financing Bond measure 
(Proposition H) to finance the lease/purchase of a City- wide 
radio communications system and related equipment and to 
pay for design costs and bond administration costs incurred 
by the DET. 

Subsequent to a Federal Court ruling that the City must 
obtain competitive bids for the City-wide Radio System 
Project, on February 7, 1995, the Board of Supervisors tabled 
legislation which requested authorization to amend a Master 
Agreement between the City and Motorola Communications 
and Electronics, Inc. (Motorola) for the City-wide Radio 
System Project, at an estimated cost of $40 million. 

The DET now advises that the bond funds, which were to 
have financed the City- wide Radio System Project for FY 
1994-95, cannot be sold until a contract for this project has 
been approved. The DET is anticipating that such a contract 
will be approved and that the bonds will be sold in FY 1996- 
97. As such, the DET is requesting that $497,465 from the 
General Fund Reserve be appropriated retroactively to serve 
as funding for the project instead of using the bond proceeds 
which previously were to have been used for this purpose. 
The DET advises that the requested $497,465 in General 
Fund monies will be reimbursed from the bond funds, after 
the bonds are sold. 

The Attachment provided by Mr. Fred Weiner of the DET 
details the proposed expenditure of $497,465. These items 
were previously approved by the Board of Supervisors in the 
FY 1994-95 budget of the DET. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



MAR-22-199S 14:13 FROM DEPT OF ELECT & TELECOM 

City and County of San Francisco 



TO 




Attachment 



Office of the General Manager 
H. DANIEL McFARLAND 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY 
AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS 



901 Rankin Strew 

San Francisco, CaSfomia 94124 

(415)550-2723 



TO: 

FROM: 
DATE: 



SANDY BROWN-RICjHARDSON, Board of Supervisors Budget Analyst 



Fred Weiner, Deputy General Manag- 
March 22, 1995 



SUBJECT: Supplemental Appropriation for Citywide Radio System Project 



the 



The following is a breakdown of how the revenue requested will be spent for the project. These 
amounts are in conformance with the original 94-5 expenditure budget 



001 Permanent Salaries 

5 existing positions (1-1823, 4-736?) 



240,000 



010 Overtime 


2,500 


060 MFB 


41,225 


100 Professional 


66,000 * 


130 Materials & Supplies 


60,000 


190 Other Non-Professional Services 


5,000 


220 Equipment Purchased 


192,175 


420 City Attorney 


30,000 


303 Real Estate 


10,000 


310 Central Snaps Maintenance 


2,000 


330 Light, Heat, and Power 


500 


316 Central Shops Fuel 


500 


350 Reproduction 


1,500 


Total 


651,400 


Net Carryforward Revenue 


153,935 


Net Total Revenue Requested 


497,465 



j *These funds were placed on reserve pending the DET's 

submission of the MBE/WBE status of the contractors 
I and contract cost details. 



A3 



TOTAL P. 01 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 

Item 8 -File 10] -94-78 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 



Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) 

San Francisco Redevelopment Agency (SFRA) 

Ordinance appropriating $32,117,349 for debt service, capital 
improvements to the Moscone Center, and the construction of 
the Children's Center to be located on the roof of Moscone 
Center South. 

$32,117,349 

1994 Lease Revenue Bond Proceeds $15,700,965 

Convention Facilities Fund 
(Bond proceeds and interest earnings 
from prior SFRA Lease Revenue Bonds) 16.416.384 

Total $32,117,349 



Description: The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance of 

$32,117,349 would provide funding for (1) Debt service 
payments for the SFRA Hotel Tax Revenue Bonds (Series 
1994), (2) Debt service payment for the SFRA Lease Revenue 
Bonds, (Series 1994) (Moscone Convention Center), (3) 
capital improvements to the Moscone Center, and (4) 
construction of the Children's Center to be located on the roof 
of Moscone Center South. 

In December of 1994, SFRA Hotel Tax Revenue Bonds (Series 
1994) and SFRA Lease Revenue Bonds (Moscone Convention 
Center)(Series 1994) were sold in order to provide for the 
financing of capital programs. Subsequently, it was 
determined that additional capital program funding was 
needed to complete the construction of SFRA's Children's 
Center and for capital improvements to the Moscone Center. 
Ms. Laura Wagner- Lock wood of the CAO advised that 
additional funds are available from current and prior SFRA 
Lease Revenue Bond proceeds. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

44 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



The details of the proposed expenditures are as follows: 

Debt Service for SFRA Hotel Tax Revenue Bonds 
(Series 1994) ($553.504) 

The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance would 
fund the remaining $553,504 of the debt service amount owed 
for Fiscal Year 1994-95 on the SFRA Hotel Tax Revenue 
Bonds (Series 1994). On an ongoing basis, the source of 
funds for the debt service is from Hotel Taxes. These bonds 
were previously authorized by the Board of Supervisors to 
finance various capital projects at the Moscone Center in the 
Yerba Buena Redevelopment Project Area. The Yerba Buena 
Redevelopment Project Area is a mixed-use development area 
of major hotels, offices, housing, retail stores, recreation, 
amusement, entertainment and cultural uses in an urban 
park setting that includes major open space and landscaped 
plazas. 

Debt Service for SF RA Lease Revenue Bonds (Moscone 
Convention Center) (Se ries 1994) ($1.376.015) 

The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance would 
fund the remaining $1,376,015 of the debt service amount 
owed for Fiscal Year 1994-95 on the SFRA Lease Revenue 
Bonds (Series 1994) (Moscone Convention Center). On an 
ongoing basis, the source of funds for the debt service is from 
Hotel Taxes. These bonds were previously authorized by the 
Board of Supervisors to finance various capital projects at the 
Moscone Center North and Moscone Center South. 

CflPJ*" 1 Improvements to Moscone Center ($22.973.795) 

The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance would 
fund various capital improvement projects at Moscone 
Center North, Moscone Center South, and the Moscone 
Center Esplanade. According to Jack Moerschbaecher of the 
CAO, a detailed budget has not yet been developed that 
identifies the use of the funds for such items as personnel 
and contractual services. Therefore, the Budget Analyst 
recommends reserving the entire $22,973,795 pending the 
submission of finalized cost details, selection of contractors, 
MBE/WBE status of contractors, and contractor cost details. 

Construction of Children's Center P roject ($7.214.036) 

The SFRA Fiscal Year 1994-95 budget, which was approved 
by the Board of Supervisors, included the amount of 
$47,201,000 for the construction of the Children's Center 
Project. This legislation would provide funding in the 
amount of $7,214,036 from prior SFRA Lease Revenue Bond 
proceeds in order to fully fund the $47,201,000 project. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

45 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



The Children's Center Project includes the following 
facilities: (1) a childcare center for 100 children, (2) an Ice 
Skating Rink and Bowling Alley, (3) a Children's Place 
(youth multimedia cultural center), (4) a Carousel, and (5) a 
Children's Garden. All of these facilities are to be located on 
the roof of Moscone Center South. The budget for the 
Children's Center is as follows: 

Children's Place $10,396,000 

Childcare Center 4,827,000 

Ice Rink 13,438,000 

Bowling Center 3,060,000 

Carousel Enclosure 1,594,000 

Carousel Purchase 1,281,000 

Children's Garden 9,783,000 
Buildings and Furnishings 

Fixtures, and Equipment 2.822.000 

Total $47,201,000 

Children's Center Project Revenues ($47.201.000) 

Bond proceeds already received $39,986,964 
Bond proceeds to be received 

(pending approval of this ordinance) 7 P 214 f 036 

Total Project Cost $47,201,000 

Ms. Cathy Pickering of the Redevelopment Agency advises 
that the Carousel will be purchased directly from a vendor. 
Ms. Pickering advises that bids have been received for the 
remaining parts of the project, as listed above. Further, Ms 
Pickering advises that the SFRA will begin reviewing the 
proposals on March 29, 1995, and will select a contractors) 
by no later than April 21, 1995. 



Recommendations: 1. Amend the proposed ordinance to reserve $22,973,795 for 
the Moscone Center capital improvements, pending the 
selection of contractors, MBE/WBE status of the contractors, 
and contractor cost details. 

2. Approve the proposed ordinance as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



46 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Item 



File 47-95-7 



Department: Department of Parking and Traffic (DPT) 

Item: Resolution to lower evening parking rates at the City-owned 

Moscone Center Garage. 

Description: The San Francisco Parking and Traffic Commission has 

oversight responsibility for City-owned parking facilities. 
This responsibility includes reviewing the parking rates 
charged at City-owned garages and lots and making 
recommendations to the Board of Supervisors for changes in 
such parking rates. 

The Moscone Center Garage is a 732-space, City-owned 
facility located on Third Street between Howard and Folsom 
Streets. Currently, most usage is between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m., 
by those attending or working at tradeshows and conventions 
at the Moscone Center or those working at offices in the 
vicinity. 

The DPT proposes establishing a reduced evening rate to 
enhance the evening use of the Garage by those visiting the 
Yerba Buena Gardens, the San Francisco Museum of Modern 
Art and the theaters, galleries and restaurants which have 
opened in the vicinity in recent years. The reduced rate, 
which will apply to those who park for four hours or more 
between the hours of 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. (later when special 
events are held) will be applied as follows: 

Current Proposed 
No. of Hours Rate Rate 



lHour 


$1.00 


$1.00 


2 Hours 


$2.50 


$2.50 


3 Hours 


$4.00 


$4.00 


4 Hours 


$5.50 


$4.00 


5 Hours 


$7.00 


$4.00 


6 Hours 


$9.00 


$4.00 


7 Hours 






or More 


$12.00 


$4.00 



Comments: 



1. Mr. Kevin Hagerty of the DPT advises that the Garage 
now closes at 10 p.m except on evenings when special events 
are scheduled in the vicinity. 

2. Mr. Hagerty reports that gross revenues for the Moscone 
Center Garage were approximately $1,092,600 for the 
FY1993-1994, or $91,050 monthly, and are anticipated to be 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

47 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 

approximately $1,170,000 for the FY1994-1995, or $97,500 
monthly. 

3. Of the total of 732 available parking spaces, Mr. Hagerty 
estimates that there are an average of 500 vacant spaces on a 
daily basis during the evening hours. 

4. Mr. Hagerty reports that, at this time, it is difficult to 
project the amount of revenues which will result from the 
proposed reduced evening rate. According to Mr. Hagerty, 
evening revenues are highly dependent on the number and 
type of events scheduled in the vicinity. However, Mr. 
Hagerty states that he is confident that by reducing the 
evening rate to $4.00 as is being proposed, increased 
revenues will be realized by the City. 

5. Mr. Hagerty advises that the proposed new rate is 
competitive with private parking facilities in the vicinity and 
that similar evening rates have been implemented with 
success at City-owned garages at the corners of Sutter and 
Stockton Streets and Ellis and O'Farrell Streets. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed resolution is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

48 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 

Item 10 - File 96-95-1 

Department: Department of Real Estate 

Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Item: Ordinance authorizing and directing the sale through public 

auction of City-owned surplus property. 

Description: The proposed ordinance would authorize and direct the sale 

through public auction, of City-owned surplus property under 
the jurisdiction of the Department of Public Works. Mr. Ken 
Chopping of the Real Estate Department reports the 
following parcels of vacant land would be sold: 



Assessors 
Block. Lot 


Area 
Location in Sq. Ft. 


Zoned 


Minimum Bid 


140-8 


Davis between 
Broadway and 10,799 
Vallejo 


C-2 


$1,150,000 


141-11 


Broadway between 
Front and 30,940 
Battery 


C-2 


$4,000,000 


165-21 


Broadway between 
Battery and 17,337 


C-2 


$2,350,000 



Sansome 

Comments: 1. Mr. Chopping advises that the minimum bids listed above 

are approximately 90 percent of the fair market values for 
these properties. Mr. Chopping reports that these minimum 
bids at the 90 percent rate are being used instead of full fair 
market values because of the stagnant real estate market for 
the subject properties. 

2. The Department of City Planning has found that the sale 
of this surplus property is in conformity with the City's 
Master Plan and the Eight Priority Policies of Planning Code 
Section 101.1. 

3. The proposed ordinance would authorize the Real Estate 
Department to conduct a public auction for the sale of the 
subject properties. The award of the sale of these properties 
to the highest bidder and the related amount to be received 
by the City would be subject to subsequent separate 
legislative approval by the Board of Supervisors. 

Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

49 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 

Item 11 - File 203-95-1 

Department: Real Estate Department 



Item: 



Description: 



Comments: 






Ordinance urging and authorizing the Director of Property to 
quitclaim an easement at 1096 Eddy Street for less than fair 
market value to the Progress Foundation to allow the 
development of an affordable housing project; and urging and 
authorizing the Director of Property to accept a relocated 
easement. 

The City owns an easement for public utilities, which is 44.75 
feet wide, located between Ellis Street and Eddy Street. 
Progress Foundation, a non-profit corporation, and its 
affiliate, Eddy Street Apartments, also a non-profit 
corporation, are proposing to develop 20 units of affordable 
housing for low and very low income persons who are 
mentally disabled adults, at property located at 1096 Eddy 
Street. The City's easement passes underneath the central 
portion of this property. Mr. and Mrs. Dayan in conjunction 
with Skyline Realty, owners of the property, which is 
currently used as a parking lot, has agreed to sell it to the 
Progress Foundation and Eddy Street Apartments for 
$475,000. Progress Foundation and the Eddy Street 
Apartments cannot proceed with the proposed low income 
housing development without the purchase and relocation of 
the easement because the current terms of the easement 
prohibit construction over the easement area. 

The proposed ordinance would urge the Director of Property 
to quitclaim the above-noted easement for public utilities to 
Progress Foundation and its affiliate, the Eddy Street 
Apartments, at less than fair market value, on the condition 
that the utilities be relocated and new easement be given at 
no cost to the City and that the property be used for 
affordable housing purposes. 

1. According to Mr. John Panieri, of the Real Estate 
Department, the Real Estate Department values the private 
property owner's interest in the property at 1096 Eddy Street 
at $200,000, "as is", for usage as a parking lot, with the 
subject easement in place. Mr. Panieri advises that the fair 
market value of the property unencumbered by the easement 
would be $475,000. Therefore, $275,000 represents the value 
of the City's interest in the easement. According to Mr. 
Panieri, if the private property owner sells the property to 
the affordable housing development at $475,000, as proposed, 
the private property owner will get the benefit of the City's 
economic interest in the property of $275,000. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



r >0 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



2. Ms. Elizabeth Dietrich of the City Attorney's Office advises 
that the quitclaim of the City's easement to the non-profit 
developers for the affordable housing project would constitute 
a legitimate public purpose. Ms. Dietrich notes that the 
proposed legislation stipulates that the conveyance be made 
subject to appropriate restrictions to ensure that affordable 
housing or some other public use be made of the property. 
Ms. Dietrich states that, while quitclaiming the City's 
easement for less than market value is a gift of a public 
resource, it is valid as long as it serves a legitimate public 
purpose. According to Ms. Dietrich, the benefit of $275,000 to 
the private property owners does not itself defeat the public 
purpose; however, it raises serious policy issues regarding the 
proper disposition of City assets. 

3. Attached is a letter from Mr. Tony DeLucchi, Director of 
Property which contains the following recommendations to 
amend the proposed legislation to provide that: " (1) Progress 
Foundation pay the current property owners the "as is" 
market value of $200,000 as opposed to the contract price of 
$475,000, (2) the City convey the easement rights to Progress 
Foundation at no cost in order that the economic benefits of a 
buildable versus a non-buildable site accrue to (the nonprofit) 
Progress Foundation and not the private (Dayan and Skyline 
Realty) property owners. Or alternately, amend the 
ordinance to authorize the City to quitclaim the easement to 
the private property owner (Dayan and Skyline) for $275,000. 
Progress Foundation could then purchase the developable 
site from Dayan and Skyline for its contract price of 
$475,000." Under the first alternative, the Progress 
Foundation would get a $275,000 benefit from the City. 
Under the second alternative, the City would receive the 
$275,000. However, according to Mr. DeLucchi, under the 
proposed ordinance, the private property owner would receive 
the $275,000 increase in property value created as a result of 
the City's quitclaim. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

51 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Recommendation: Approval of the proposed ordinance is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



/ft^ff 2 ^ 

Harvey M. Rose 



cc: Supervisor Hsieh 
Supervisor Kaufman 
Supervisor Bierman 
President Shelley 
Supervisor Alioto 
Supervisor Ammiano 
Supervisor Hallinan 
Supervisor Kennedy 
Supervisor Leal 
Supervisor Migden 
Supervisor Teng 
Clerk of the Board 
Chief Administrative Officer 
Controller 
Teresa Serata 
Robert Oakes 
Ted Lakey 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

52 



Attachment 
from:qmnifax tq: Page I of 2 

BETS* UJ-tVKlCn, iyc=p. *-*^j . u - 

City and County of San Francisco Real Estate Department 

CM ice of the 
y>~>-i, Director of Property 

AY^iir v\ March 24. 1995 



File 203-95- 1 f\ (cm II 
1096 Eddy Street 
Block 735 Lot 26 

Supervisor Tom Hsieh 
Chairman. Budget Committee 
Board of Supervisors 
City and County of San Francisco 
401 Van Ness Avenue, Room 410 
San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Supervisor Hsich: 

It is our understanding that the above-noted ordinance is scheduled to be heard by the Budget 
Committee on March 29. 1995. The ordinance urges and authorizes the Director of Property to 
quitclaim a utility easement over 1096 Eddy Street to Progress Foundation, a non-profit 
corporation, and to accept a replacement utility easement. 

Due to the nature of this matter, we would like to clarify the Real Estate Department's position on 
the proposed transaction. A map showing the subject property is enclosed (SUR 2293). 

The City's 44.75 foot wide utility easement was a reservation in a 1961 deed conveying the 
subject property, formerly a portion of Octavia Street, from City to the Redevelopment Agency 
("SFRA"). The conveyance was subject to a restriction that SFRA, or its successors, not erect 
structures nor plant trees or shrubs within the easement area. The property, as a result, is not 
capable of independent development. SFRA conveyed the subject property to Mr. and Mrs. 
Lalanne in 1961 for $21,000 (this value recognizes the negative effect of the easement, which 
prevents development of the site). The property is presently owned by Mr. and Mrs. Dayan in 
conjunction with Skyline Realty ("Owner"). The parcel is fenced, paved, and used for parking by 
the adjacent apartment building, also owned by Mr. and Mrs Dayan. The current owner has 
entered into a contract to sell the property to Progress Foundation. 

Our determination of value of the subject property in its present "as is" condition with the utility 
easement in place is approximately $200,000. If the City's easement were relocated, the parcel 
would be buildable to a density of 21 residential units, and the market value would be 
approximately $475,000. 

When first reading the proposed ordinance, it appears to be innocuous. It is not until one reviews 
the economics of the transaction does it become clear that a windfall of $275,000 is conveyed to a 
private party owner, at the expense of the City and Progress Foundation. We recommend the 
proposed ordinance be amended to provide that; (1) Progress Foundation pay the current 



SS4465Q 

FAX:S52-»2ie 25 Van Nm Avonuo. Sulto 400 Sin Fr«ndtoo. M102 



53 



FROM: OMNI FAX 



TO: 



MAR 24, 1995 2:00PM 865B P. 03 

Attachment 
Page 2 of 2 



Supervisor Tom Hsieh 
Chairman, Budget Committee 
Page 2. 



properly owners the "as is" market value of $200,000 as opposed to the contract price of 
$475,000; (2) City convey the easement rights to Progress Foundation at no cost in order that the 
economic benefits of a buildable versus a non-buildablc site accrue to (the non-profit) Progress 
Foundation and not the private (Dayan and Skyline Realty) property owner. Or, alternately, 
amend the ordinance to authorize City to quitclaim the easement to the private property owner 
(Dayan and Skyline) for $275,000. Progress Foundation could then purchase the developable site 
from Dayan and Skyline for its contract price of $475,000. 

The ordinance, as submitted, appears to create a windfall benefit of $275,000 for the private 
property owner at the expense of City and Progress Foundation. Should you have any questions 
regarding this matter, please call me at 554-9875. 

Sincerely, 



Anthony J. DeLucehi 
Director of Property 

Enclosure 



cc: Supervisor Kaufman 
Supervisor Bierman 
Joel Lipski, MOH 
arvey Rose, Budget Analyst 
etsy Dietrich, Deputy City Atty. 






JKPrkb H:\E<Wy 



54 



'if 




<£ubiic Libraru, "Documents <Dept. 
Attn: Jam Hudson 



OF SLAN FRANCISCO 



CITY AND COUNTY 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street, Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 



March 29, 1995 



'^'Budget Committee 




TO: 

FROM: Budget Analyst 

} 
SUBJECT: March 29, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



MAR 2 9 1995 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Item la - File 101-90-128.2 
Department: 



Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



San Francisco Fire Department (SFFD) 
Department of Public Works (DPW) 

This item is a hearing requesting the release of reserved 
funds in the amount of $1,551,412 from the 1989 Earthquake 
Safety Bond Program in order to fund Fire Station No. 24 
construction. 

$1,551,412 

1989 Earthquake Safety Bond Program Phase I Bonds 

In November, 1989, San Francisco voters authorized the 
sale of $59.7 million in Earthquake Safety General 
Obligation bonds for the seismic retrofitting and facilities 
improvement of various City buildings. In June, 1991, the 
Board of Supervisors approved the appropriation of 
$6,500,000 from the 1989 Earthquake Safety Bond Program, 
Phase I (ESP I) reserving $4,098,535 for the construction of 
various facilities, including the renovation, seismic 
strengthening and construction of an addition to Fire 
Station No. 24, pending the selection of construction 
contractors and determination of cost details and the 
MBE/WBE status of the contractors. This item requests the 
release of $1,551,412 in ESP I funds for Fire Station No. 24 
which is located at 100 Hoffman Avenue. 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Based on the low bid (see Comment No. 3), the Department 
of Public Works (DPW) has awarded the construction 
contract to Dennis J. Amoroso Construction/Marinship 
Construction, a joint venture. Marinship Construction 
Services is an MBE firm. Funding for the project would be 
expended as follows: 

Construction Contract - Dennis J. Amoroso 

Construction/Marinship Construction $1,469,000 

Alternative 1 (kitchen storage cabinets) 13,000 

Alternative 2 (personnel lockers) 44,000 
Alternative 3 (overhead telescopic station door) 32,000 

Subtotal Construction $1,558,000 

Construction Contingency 36.212* 

Total $1,594,212 

* Additional contingency funds of $197,488, resulting in 
a 15% contingency amount, will be requested in a 
separate supplemental appropriation request. 

Comments: 1. Mr. Roger Wong of the Department of Public Works 

advises that another supplemental appropriation request 
for the remaining needed amount of $42,800 (total cost of 
$1,594,212 less this request of $1,551,412) has been requested 
in separate legislation pending before the Board of 
Supervisors. 

2. The DPW has provided the following contract cost details, 
including the MBE and WBE participation, for the 
$1,558,000 construction contract. 

Fire Station No. 24 

Prime Contractor (19.1%) 
Dennis J. Amoroso Construction 

(construction oversight, carpentry, concrete) $297,024 



Subcontractors. MBE (27.7%) 




Bayview Steel 


$157,750 


KZTile 


18,900 


Golden Gate Painting 


17,246 


Kent Lim & Co. 


145,000 


Chen's Plumbing 


93,000 


Subtotal, MBE Subcontractors 





431,896 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

2 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 

Subcontractors. WBE (14.1%) 

United Glass $30,384 

Sierra Electric 190.000 

Subtotal, WBE Subcontractors 220,384 

Prime Contracto r. MBE (19.5%) 
Marinship Construction Services 

(general construction oversight, demolition) 303,870 

Other Subcontractors (19.6%) 

Concrete Structural $16,500 

Waterproofing Unlimited 9,273 

Wang 40,725 

Coast 9,676 

Harrison 119,649 

Alcal 16,341 

G & L 26,000 

Cosco 29,980 

Berlin 20,482 

Overhead Door 16.200 

Subtotal, Other Subcontractors 304.826 

TOTAL, CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT $1,558,000 

3. The DPW has provided the attached list of the prime 
contract bidders and the amounts bid for the proposed 
construction contract. 

Recommendation: Approve the requested release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $1,551,412. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

3 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Item lb - File 101-92-60.7 



REVISED 



Department: 

Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



San Francisco Fire Department (SFFD) 
Department of Public Works (DPW) 

This item is a hearing requesting the release of reserved funds in 
the amount of $952,200 from the 1992 Proposition C Fire 
Protection Bond Issue Fund for the purpose of funding 
construction contracts for Fire Stations Nos. 16 and 43. 

$952,200 

1992 Fire Department Improvement Bonds 

In November, 1992 the voters of San Francisco approved the 
Proposition C Fire Protection Bond Issue totaling $40.8 million to 
fund various improvements for San Francisco Fire Department 
facilities. In May, 1993, the Board of Supervisors approved an 
appropriation request of $15,204,533 from this bond issue, 
placing $10,788,125 on reserve for construction work at various 
facilities including Fire Stations Nos. 16 and 43. This item 
requests the release of $952,200 of the reserved funds to pay for 
construction contracts for various improvements, including 
disabled access, asbestos abatement, separate facilities for female 
firefighters, and plumbing and electrical work, to Fire Station 
Nos. 16 and 43. 

Based on the low bids (see Comment No. 4), the Department of 
Public Works has awarded the contracts to Cresci Electric 
Company, a WBE firm, for Fire Station No. 16, and to Gomez- 
Chapot, a joint venture, for Fire Station No. 43. Gomez is an 
MBE firm. The funds are to be expended as follows: 

Fire Station No. 16 (2251 Greenwich Street) 

Construction Contract - Cresci Electric Company (WBE)$4 14,889 
Construction Contingency (11.4%) 47 311 

Total $462,200 



Fire Station No. 43 (720 Moscow Street) 

Construction Contract - Gomez-Chapot 
Construction Contingency (15%) 
Asbestos Abatement/Monitoring - DPW 
Construction Services (Administration/ 
Management/Inspection) - DPW 
Total 
Total Request 



$334,324 

50,822 

$44,354 

60 r 500 
$490,000 
$952,200 



BOARD OF S UPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

5 



Memo to Budget Committee 
March 29, 1995 



Comments: 



Asbestos Abatement/Monitoring - DPW $44,354 
Construction Services (Administration/ 

Management/Inspection) - DPW 60.500 

Total $490,000 

Total Request $952,200 

1. Mr. Peter Wong of the DPW has provided the following 
contract cost details including the MBE and WBE 
participation, for the $414,889 construction contract for Fire 
Station No. 16 and the $334,324 construction contract for 
Fire Station No. 43. 



Fire Station No. 16 

Prime Contractor. WBE (42.3%) 
Cresci Electric 

(overall construction oversight, electrical) $175,504 

Subcontractors. MBE (45.5%) 
J&W Construction $149,800 

TMC Construction 13,036 

E. Mitchell 26.100 

Subtotal, MBE/WBE subcontractors 188,936 

Other Subcontractors (12.2%) 
Diversified Metal $6,675 

Linoleum Larry 22,375 

Pacific Coast Water Proofing 8,250 

Valofi and Peck 13.149 

Subtotal, non MBE/WBE Subcontractors 50 r 449 

TOTAL FIRE STATION NO. 16 CONTRACT $414,889 



Fire Station No. 43 

Prime Contractor. MBE (21.1%) 

Gomez (overall construction oversight) $70,649 

Subcontractors. MBE (24.0 %) 

KZ Tile $14,700 

Joe Wang 8,000 

Made in the Shade 1,400 

Yums 23,800 

G.L. Electric 30,000 

Golden Gate Glass 2.328 

Subtotal, MBE Subcontractors 80,228 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



MINUTES 

REGULAR MEETING 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

WEDNESDAY. APRIL 5. 1995 - 1:00 P.M. ROOM 410, WAR MEMORIAL 

BLDG. 

MEMBERS: SUPERVISORS HSIEH, KAUFMAN, BIERMAN 

DOCUMFNTS DE' D * r 
CLERK: GREGOIRE HOBSON 

TIME MEETING CONVENED: 1:12 P.M. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

FISCAL ITEMS 

1. File 203-95-1 . [Quitclaim of Easement] Ordinance urging and authorizing 
the Director of Property to Quitclaim an easement over a portion of 1096 
Eddy Street for less than fair market value to Progress Foundation for 
development of an affordable housing project and urging and authorizing the 
Director of Property to accept a relocated easement. (Supervisors Bierman, 
Alioto, Ammiano, Hsieh) 

(Consideration Continued from 3/29/95) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Tony Delucchi, Director of Property, Real Estate Department; Ted 
Lakey, Deputy City Attorney; Besty Dietrich, Deputy City Attorney; Joel 
Lipsy, Mayor's Office of Housing. IN SUPPORT: Tom Jones, 
Consultant/Progress Foundation; Steven Fields, Exec. Director, Progress 
Foundation. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

2. File 101-92-43.3 . [Reserved Funds, Public Utilities Commission] 
Consideration of release of reserved funds, Water Department, (1991 Water 
Revenue Bond Fund), in the total amount of $2,121,790, for Water Main 
Replacement Project. (Public Utilities Commission) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESEDNTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Joe Pelayo, Water Department. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: 
None. 

ACTION. HEARING HELD. AMENDED. APPROVED RELEASE OF 
$2,071,790. FILED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE M^ T UTES PAGE 2 



3. File 101-94-77 . [Appropriation, Department of Public Health] Ordinance 
appropriating $682,058, Department of Public Health - Mental Health, from 
the General Fund Reserve for medical service contracts to continue substance 
abuse programs in fiscal year 1994-95. Providing for ratification of action 
previously taken. (Controller) RO #94190 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Monique Zmuda, Department of Public Health, Mental Health. IN 
SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

4. File 101-94-78 . [Appropriation, Department of Public Health] Ordinance 
appropriating $125,000, Department of Public Health - Community Health 
Services, from the General Fund Reserve for professional services to 
implement the Medi-Cal Managed Care Local Initiative for fiscal year 
1994-95. (Controller) RO #94203 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Tanya Brigham, Department of Public Health. IN SUPPORT: None. 
OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
Add a section 2 to provide for ratification of action previously 
taken. AMENDED TITLE: "Ordinance appropriating $125,000, 
Department of Public Health - Community Health Services, from 
the General Fund Reserve for professional services to implement 
the Medi-Cal Managed Care Local Initiative for fiscal year 
1994-95; providing for ratification of action previously taken." 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

5. File 101-94-71 . [Appropriation, Airport] Ordinance appropriating $277,618, 
Airport, of Airport Operating Funds, to salaries and fringe benefits for the 
creation of thirty-three (33) positions and the deletion of one (1) position to 
implement the Master Plan and related Mitigation Program for fiscal year 
1994-95. (Controller) RO #94184 (COMPANION TO THE FOLLOWING FILE) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO APRIL 12, 1995. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE M^UTES PAGE 3 

6. File 102-94-12 . [Public Employment, Airport] Ordinance amending 
Ordinance No. 293-94 (Annual Salary Ordinance, 1994/95) reflecting the 
addition of thirty-three (33) positions and the deletion of one (1) position at 
the San Francisco International Airport. (Department of Human Resources) 
(COMPANION TO THE PRECEDING FILE) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO APRIL 12, 1995. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

7. File 101-94-80 . [Appropriation, District Attorney] Ordinance appropriating 
$533,277, District Attorney.of Federal Revenue and rescinding $59,253 from 
other non-personal services to fund $592,530 of computer equipment for the 
Statewide Automated Child Support System for the District Attonrey-Family 
Support Office, for fiscal year 1994-95. (Controller) RO #94191 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Edwina Young, Director, Family Support Bureau, District Attorney's 
Office. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

8. File 101-94-81 . [Appropriation, Chief Administrative Officer] Ordinance 
appropriating $23,508, Chief Administrative Officer, from the General Fund 
Reserve to provide full funding for the cost of membership in the Association 
of Bay Area Governments for fiscal year 1994-95. (Controller) RO #94201 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Steve Nelson, Chief Administrative Office. IN SUPPORT: None. 
OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE M™UTES PAGE 4 



9. File 101-94-83 . [Appropriation, Department of Public Health-SFGH] 
Ordinance appropriating $20,000,000, Department of Public Health, San 
Francisco General Hospital, to participate in the SB 1255 Disproportionate 
Share Payment Program through the California Medical Assistance 
Commission during fiscal year 1994-95; funded from Disproportionate Share 
Program Revenues. (Controller) RO #94211 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Peter Praetz, Chief Financial Officer, San Francisco General 
Hospital; Ed Harrington, Controller. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
Add a section 3 to reserve any additional revenues to be realized 
by the City under SB 1255, pending a report back to the Budget 
Committee of the Board of Supervisors regarding the proposed 
disposition of such revenues. AMENDED TITLE: "Ordinance 
appropriating $20,000,000, Department of Public Health, San 
Francisco General Hospital, to participate in the SB 1255 
Disproportionate Share Payment Program through the California 
Medical Assistance Commission during fiscal year 1994-95; funded 
from Disproportionate Share Program Revenues; placing a reserve 
on any additional revenues under SB 1255." 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 

GENERAL ITEMS 

10. File 47-95-9 . [Parking Garage Rates] Resolution approving new rates at the 
Fifth and Mission Garage. (Department of Parking and Traffic) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Kevin Haggerty, Director, Off-Street Parking, Department of 
Parking and Traffic. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE M^UTES PAGE 5 



11. File 11-95-1 . [Findings, Japan Town Peace Plaza Renovation] Resolution 
adopting a benefit finding pursuant to California Redevelopment Law 
regarding the expenditure of Tax Increment Funds outside of the Western 
Addition Redevelopment Project Area A-2. (Redevelopment Agency) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Shirely Wiesinger, Project Manager/Western Addition, 
Redevelopment Agency. IN SUPPORT: Jeff Mori, Exec. Director, Japanese 
Youth Council. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Hsieh absent.) 



TIME MEETING ADJOURNED: 2:45 P.M. 



r Bubtic Libraru, Documents <Dept. 



CITY AND COUNTY 



*0 



/ 




y 



Attn: JaneJ-CtuCson 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



lOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street, Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 



April 3, 1995 



TO: Budget Committee 

FROM: Budget Analyst face** 

SUBJECT: April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



f7c^ ; • 



Item 



- File 203-95-1 



DOCUV rrv r r 3 ZZ~ 
APR 41995 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



NOTE: This item was continued at the March 29, 1995 Budget Committee 
meeting. 

Department: Real Estate Department 

Item: Ordinance urging and authorizing the Director of Property to 

quitclaim an easement at 1096 Eddy Street for less than fair 
market value to the Progress Foundation to allow the 
development of an affordable housing project; and urging and 
authorizing the Director of Property to accept a relocated 
easement. 

Description: The City owns an easement for public utilities, which is 44.75 

feet wide, located between Ellis Street and Eddy Street. 
Progress Foundation, a non-profit corporation, and its 
affiliate, Eddy Street Apartments, also a non-profit 
corporation, are proposing to develop 20 units of affordable 
housing for low and very low income persons who are 
mentally disabled adults, at property located at 1096 Eddy 
Street. The City's easement passes underneath the central 
portion of this property. Mr. and Mrs. Dayan in conjunction 
with Skyline Realty, owners of the property, which is 
currently used as a parking lot, has agreed to sell it to the 
Progress Foundation and Eddy Street Apartments for 
$475,000. Progress Foundation and the Eddy Street 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 

Apartments cannot proceed with the proposed low income 
housing development without the purchase and relocation of 
the easement because the current terms of the easement 
prohibit construction over the easement area. 

The proposed ordinance would urge the Director of Property 
to quitclaim the above-noted easement for public utilities to 
Progress Foundation and its affiliate, the Eddy Street 
Apartments, at less than fair market value, on the condition 
that the utilities be relocated and new easement be given at 
no cost to the City and that the property be used for 
affordable housing purposes. 

Comments: 1. According to Mr. John Panieri, of the Real Estate 

Department, the Real Estate Department values the private 
property owner's interest in the property at 1096 Eddy Street 
at $200,000, "as is", for usage as a parking lot, with the 
subject easement in place. Mr. Panieri advises that the fair 
market value of the property unencumbered by the easement 
would be $475,000. Therefore, $275,000 represents the value 
of the City's interest in the easement. According to Mr. 
Panieri, if the private property owner sells the property to 
the affordable housing development at $475,000, as proposed, 
the private property owner will get the benefit of the City's 
economic interest in the property of $275,000. 

2. Ms. Elizabeth Dietrich of the City Attorney's Office advises 
that the quitclaim of the City's easement to the non-profit 
developers for the affordable housing project would constitute 
a legitimate public purpose. Ms. Dietrich notes that the 
proposed legislation stipulates that the conveyance be made 
subject to appropriate restrictions to ensure that affordable 
housing or some other public use be made of the property. 
Ms. Dietrich states that, while quitclaiming the City's 
easement for less than market value is a gift of a public 
resource, it is valid as long as it serves a legitimate public 
purpose. According to Ms. Dietrich, the benefit of $275,000 to 
the private property owners does not itself defeat the public 
purpose; however, it raises serious policy issues regarding the 
proper disposition of City assets. 

3. Attached is a letter from Mr. Tony DeLucchi, Director of 
Property which contains the following recommendations to 
amend the proposed legislation to provide that: " (1) Progress 
Foundation pay the current property owners the "as is" 
market value of $200,000 as opposed to the contract price of 
$475,000, (2) the City convey the easement rights to Progress 
Foundation at no cost in order that the economic benefits of a 
buildable versus a non-buildable site accrue to (the nonprofit) 

BOARD OF STTPERVTSORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

2 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 

Progress Foundation and not the private (Dayan and Skyline 
Realty) property owners. Or alternately, amend the 
ordinance to authorize the City to quitclaim the easement to 
the private property owner (Dayan and Skyline) for $275,000. 
Progress Foundation could then purchase the developable 
site from Dayan and Skyline for its contract price of 
$475,000." Under the first alternative, the Progress 
Foundation would get a $275,000 benefit from the City. 
Under the second alternative, the City would receive the 
$275,000. However, according to Mr. DeLucchi, under the 
proposed ordinance, the private property owner would receive 
the $275,000 increase in property value created as a result of 
the City's quitclaim. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed ordinance is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

3 



Attachment 

FROM: OMNI FAX TO= Page I o " f ~2 

BETS* UJ.tVK.icn, i>cp. ^,^-^j • j 

City and County of San Francisco Real Estate Department 

Ollice ol the 

jfi^"t, . Director of Property 

[c-/^T^\ March 2-4. I99> 



File 203-95-1 /Hem It 
1096 Eddy Street 
Block 735 Lot 26 

Supervisor Tom Hsieh 
Chairman, Budget Committee 
Board of Supervisors 
City and County of San Francisco 
40 1 Van Ness Avenue, Room 4 1 
San Francisco, California 94 102 

Dear Supervisor Hsich: 

It is our understanding that the above-noted ordinance is scheduled to be heard by the Budget 
Committee on March 29, 1995. The ordinance urges and authorizes the Director of Property to 
quitclaim a utility easement over 1096 Eddy Street to Progress Foundation, a non-profit 
corporation, and to accept a replacement utility easement. 

Due to the nature of this matter, we would like to clarify the Real Estate Department's position on 
the proposed transaction. A map showing the subject property is enclosed (SUR 2293). 

The City's 44.75 foot wide utility easement was a reservation in a 1961 deed conveying the 
subject property, formerly a portion of Octavia Street, from City to the Redevelopment Agency 
("SFRA"). The conveyance was subject to a restriction that SFRA, or its successors, not erect 
structures nor plant trees or shrubs within the easement area. The property, as a result, is not 
capable of independent development. SFRA conveyed the subject property to Mr. and Mrs. 
Lalanne in 1961 for $21,000 (this value recognizes the negative effect of the easement, which 
prevents development of the site). The property is presently owned by Mr. and Mrs. Dayan in 
conjunction with Skyline Realty ("Owner"). The parcel is fenced, paved, and used for parking by 
the adjacent apartment building, also owned by Mr. and Mrs Dayan. The current owner has 
entered into a contract to sell the property to Progress Foundation. 

Our determination of value of the subject property in its present "as is" condition with the utility 
easement in place is approximately $200,000. If the City's easement were relocated, the parcel 
would be buildable to a density of 21 residential units, and the market value would be 
approximately $475,000. 

When first reading the proposed ordinance, it appears to be innocuous. It is not until one reviews 
the economics of the transaction does it become clear that a windfall of $275,000 is conveyed to a 
private party owner, at the expense of the City and Progress Foundation. We recommend the 
proposed ordinance be amended to provide that: (1) Progress Foundation pay the current 



554-6650 

FAX:S52-B21B 25 V»n N»»i Avenue. Sulta 400 Sin Frindioo. M102 






FROti:QMNIFfiX 



TO: 



MAR 24, 1995 2- 00PM «65B P. 03 

Attachment 
Page 2 of 2 



Supervisor Tom Hsieh 
Chairman, Budget Committee 
Page 2. 



property owners the "as is" market value of $200,000 as opposed to the contract price of 
$475,000; (2) City convey the easement rights to Progress Foundation at no cost in order that the 
economic benefits of a buildable versus a non-buiidablc site accrue to (the non-profit) Progress 
Foundation and not the private (Dayan and Skyline Realty) property owner. Or, alternately, 
amend the ordinance to authorize City to quitclaim the easement to the private property owner 
(Dayan and Skyline) for $275,000. Progress Foundation could then purchase the developable site 
from Dayan and Skyline for its contract price of $475,000. 

The ordinance, as submitted, appears to create a windfall benefit of $275,000 for the private 
property owner at the expense of City and Progress Foundation. Should you have any questions 
regarding this matter, please call me at 554-9875. 

Sincerely, 



Anthony J. DeLucchi 
Director of Property 

Enclosure 



cc: Supervisor Kaufman 
Supervisor Bierman 
Joel Lipski, MOH 
arvey Rose, Budget Analyst 
etsy Dietrich, Deputy City Any. 



•b 



JKPrkb H:\Eddy 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 2 - File 101-92-43.3 

Department: Public Utilities Commission (PUC) 

Item: 



Release of reserved funds, in the amount of $2,121,790, for 
the Water Main Replacement Project. 



Amount: $2,121,790 

Source of Funds: 1991 Water Revenue Bond Fund 

Description: The Board of Supervisors previously approved a 

supplemental appropriation ordinance appropriating 
$19,565,390 in 1991 Water Revenue Bond funds for various 
capital improvement projects (File 101- 92-43). At the same 
time, the Board placed $8,240,000 on reserve, pending the 
PUC's submission of cost details, and the MBE/WBE status 
of the contractors. The PUC is now requesting that 
$2,071,740 of the $8,240,000 be released from reserve. 

According to the PUC, the Water Main Replacement Project 
is part of a long-term continuing program to replace old cast 
iron water mains in the City, many of which were installed 
over 100 years ago. The sections of water main to be replaced 
are selected by the Water Department each year by reviewing 
an existing database of pipes over 100 years old. 

The PUC reports the requested $2,071,790 will be expended 
as follows: 

Water Main Re placement Project - Grant Avenue 

($1.008.790) 

This project involves replacing approximately 3,300 feet of 8 
inch water mains installed on Grant Avenue between 
Sutter Street and Columbus Street and some sewer repair. 
The project budget of $1,008,790 will be expended as 
follows: 



Water Department Personnel: 


FTE 
0.01 




Senior Civil Engineer 


$1,125 


Assoc. Civil Engineer 


0.23 


15,750 


Civil Engineer Assoc. I 


0.47 


24,750 


Construction Inspector 


0.02 


1,125 


Utility Plumber Supv. I 


0.19 


15,000 


Utility Plumber 


1.19 


83,625 


Utility Plumber Apprentice 


0.48 


31,125 


Laborer 


0.51 


22 r 500 


Subtotal 


3.10 


$195,000 


BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 






BUDGET ANALYST 





Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Supplies 
Materials include ductile iron pipe, 
gate valves, fittings and gaskets 
for the water mains, and the service 
pipes and fittings to connect each 
water user to the water main $184,790 

Contract Services 629.000 

Total Costs - Water Main Replacement 
Project, Grant Avenue $1,008,790 

The PUC reports that Shaw Pipeline Inc. was selected, as 
the lowest responsive bidder, based on a bid amount of 
$676,465*, to provide the necessary construction services. 
Shaw Pipeline Inc. is neither an MBE or a WBE firm. The 
two other firms which submitted bids are as follows: 

Bid Am mint 
Uniacke Construction Inc. $766,420 

P & J Utility Company $884,140 

The PUC advises that Shaw Pipeline Inc.'s minority 
subcontract participation is as follows: 

Subcontract Percentage 

Amount of Contract 

Vargas-Esquivel Paving (MBE) 

Higgins Trucking (MBE) 

Double B & L Trucking (MBE) 

Total 

The contractor, Shaw Pipeline Inc., will be responsible for 
installing the replacement pipeline and for conducting sewer 
repair work. The 3.10 FTE Water Department personnel will 
be responsible for purchasing the materials, preparing 
contract specifications and drawings and performing 
construction management, inspection and service 
connections. The requested Bond Fund monies would also 
pay for that portion of the time that the 3.10 FTEs work on 
this Water Main Replacement project at Grant Avenue. 

* The $676,465 is $47,465 more than the $629,000 included 
in the project budget. The PUC advises that the $47,465 
balance, which is for sewer repair work, will be paid for by 
previously appropriated funds in the Department of Public 
Works' 1994-95 budget. The Department of Public Works will 
work order these funds to the PUC. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

7 



$90,000 


13.3% 


75,000 


11.1 


20.000 


_3J3 


$185,000 


27.4% 






Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



FTE 




0.02 


$1,500 


0.31 


21,000 


0.62 


33,000 


0.02 


1,500 


0.12 


9,500 


0.77 


53,750 


0.32 


20,500 


0.32 


14.250 


2.50 


$155,000 



Water Main Repl acement Project - Larkin Street 
($690.500) 

This project involves replacing approximately 3,850 feet of 8 
inch water mains on Larkin Street between Pine Street and 
Pacific Avenue and on Washington Street between Larkin 
Street and Gough Street. The project budget of $690,500 will 
be expended as follows: 

Water Department Personnel 
Senior Civil Engineer 
Assoc. Civil Engineer 
Civil Engineer Assoc. I 
Construction Inspector 
Utility Plumber Supv. I 
Utility Plumber 
Utility Plumber Apprentice 
Laborer 

Subtotal 

Supplies 

Materials include ductile iron pipe, 

gate valves, fittings and gaskets for 

the water mains, and the service pipes 

and fittings to connect each water user 

to the water main. 118,790 

Contract Services 416.710 

Total Costs - Water Main Replacement 

Project, Larkin Street $690,500 

The PUC reports that E. Mitchell Co. was selected, as the 
lowest responsible bidder, based on a bid amount of $416,710, 
to provide the necessary construction services. E. Mitchell. 
Inc. is neither an MBE or a WBE firm. The four other firms 
which submitted bids are as follows: 

Bid Amount 
P & J Utility Co. $430,725 

Marinship Construction Services, Inc. $441,781 

Miller/Thompson Constructors, Inc. $519,615 

Cal North Engineering $569,807 

The PUC advises that E. Mitchell Inc.'s minority subcontract 
participation is as follows: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Subcontract Percentage 
Amount of Contract 



Rosas Construction (MBE) 
Jenkins Trucking (MBE) 
Vargas-Esquivel Paving 
Total 



$100,000 

5,000 

17.000 

$122,000 



24.0% 

1.2 

4.1 
29.3% 



The contractor, E. Mitchell Co., will be responsible for 
installing the replacement pipe. The 2.50 FTE Water 
Department personnel will be responsible for purchasing all 
materials to be used, preparing contract specifications and 
drawings, performing construction management, inspection, 
and service connections. The requested Bond Fund monies 
would also pay for that portion of the time that the 2.50 FTEs 
work on this Water Main Replacement project at Larkin 
Street. 



Lombard Street 



Water Main Replacement Project 

($282.500) 



This project involves replacing approximately 800 feet of 4 
inch water mains on Lombard Street between Leavenworth 
and Hyde Streets and on Montclair Terrace. The project 
budget of $282,500 will be expended as follows: 



Water Department Personnel 
Senior Civil Engineer 
Assoc. Civil Engineer 
Civil Engineer Assoc. I 
Construction Inspector 
Utility Plumber Supv I 
Utility Plumber 
Utility Plumber Apprentice 
Laborer 

Subtotal 

Supplies 
Materials include ductile iron pipe, 
gate valves, fittings and gaskets for 
the water mains, and the service pipes 
and fittings to connect each water user 
to the water main 



FTE 




0.01 


$880 


0.18 


12,320 


0.36 


19,360 


0.01 


880 


0.02 


1,300 


0.11 


8,030 


0.05 


3,480 


0.04 


l r 950 


0.78 


$48,200 



$28,300 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Contract Services $ 206.000 

Total Costs - Water Main Replacement 

Project, Lombard Street $282,500 

The PUC reports that the Department of Public Works has 
selected Marinship Construction Services/Ghilotti Brothers 
Construction, a Joint Venture, as the lowest responsible 
bidder based on a bid amount of $206,000. Marinship 
Construction Services is an MBE firm and has 51 percent 
participation on the contract. The one other firm which 
submitted a bid was Golden Bay Construction. Golden Bay 
Construction, which is neither an MBE or a WBE firm, 
submitted a bid amount of $296,977. 

The contractor Marinship Construction Services/Ghilotti 
Brothers Construction will be responsible for installing the 
replacement pipe. The 0.78 FTE Water Department 
personnel will be responsible for purchasing all materials to 
be used, preparing contract specifications and drawings, 
performing construction management, inspection, and service 
connections. The requested Bond Fund monies would also 
pay for that portion of the time that the 0.78 FTEs work on 
the Water Main Replacement project at Lombard Street. 

Water Main Replacement Project - Brookhaven Street 

($50.000) 

This project involves replacing approximately 5,400 feet of 6 
inch and 8 inch water mains on Brookhaven between 
Huntington and Country Club and surrounding streets. The 
$50,000 request will be used to fund in-house engineering 
work including preparation of contract specifications. The 
project budget of $50,000 will be expended as follows: 

Water Department Personnel 
Senior Civil Engineer 
Assoc. Civil Engineer 
Civil Engineer Assoc. I 
Construction Inspector 
Utility Plumber 
Utility Plumber Apprentice 

Total - Water Main Replacement 

Project, Brookhaven St. 0.85 $50,000 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

10 



FTE 




0.01 


$1,250 


0.26 


17,500 


0.52 


27,500 


0.02 


1,250 


0.02 


1,250 


0-02 


1,250 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



The Bond Fund monies requested would pay for that portion 
of the time that the .85 FTEs work on this Water Main 
Replacement project at Brookhaven Street. 

Water Main Replacement Project - 10th Street ($40.000) 

This project involves replacing approximately 5,000 feet of 8 
inch water mains on 10th Street between Howard and 
Division Streets. The $40,000 request will be used to fund in- 
house engineering work including the preparation of contract 
specifications. The project budget of $40,000 will be expended 
as follows: 



Comment: 



Recommendation: 



Water Department personnel 
Senior Civil Engineer 
Assoc. Civil Engineer 
Civil Engineer Assoc I 
Construction Inspector 
Utility Plumber 
Utility Plumber Apprentice 



Total - Water Main Replacement 

Project, 10th Street 0.66 



FTE 




0.01 


$1,000 


0.21 


14,000 


0.41 


22,000 


0.01 


1,000 


0.01 


1,000 


0.01 


1.000 



$40,000 



The Bond Fund monies requested would pay for that portion 
of the time that the .66 FTEs work on the Water Main 
Replacement project at 10th Street. 

The grand total of the costs for the proposed projects is 
$2,071,790 or $50,000 less than the requested amount of 
$2,121,790. 

Release a total $2,071,790 from reserve, or $50,000 less than 
the requested amount of $2,121,790. 



BOARD O F S UPERVISO RS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

11 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 

Item 3 - File 101-94-77 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Public Health (DPH) 

Supplemental appropriation ordinance appropriating 
$682,058 from the General Fund Reserve to the Department 
of Public Health, Division of Mental Health, for medical 
service contracts to continue substance abuse treatment 
programs in FY 1994-95, providing for ratification of action 
previously taken. 

$682,058 

General Fund Reserve 

During the FY 1993-94, the DPH received $3,322,167 in 
funding from Federal Forfeiture and Asset Seizure grant 
funds for 15 substance abuse treatment programs. The 
$3,322,167 grant expired on June 30, 1994 and no permanent 
alternative funding source has been identified. 

During the FY 1994-95 budget proceedings, the Mayor 
recommended and the Board of Supervisors approved 
$830,541 to continue these programs for three months. At 
that time, the Mayor and the Board also earmarked an 
additional $1,000,000 of the General Fund Reserve to fund 
these programs through January 15, 1995. The Mayor and 
the Board subsequently approved three supplemental 
appropriation requests totaling $1,207,103 to continue these 
programs through February 15, 1995. 

Alternative funding has been identified for four of the 15 
programs. Of the 11 remaining substance abuse treatment 
programs, eight were provided on an outpatient basis, and 
three on a residential basis, with patients being housed as 
well as treated at the facilities. The eight outpatient 
programs ceased as of February 16, 1995. The DPH is now 
requesting $479,930 in funding from the General Fund 
Reserve to retroactively continue the three remaining 
residential programs from February 16, 1995 to June 30, 
1995. 

The DPH is also requesting an additional $202,128 (for a 
total of $682,058) in funding for two perinatal, residential 
substance abuse treatment programs for pregnant women for 
the period from May 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995. The present 
Federal funding for these two perinatal programs from the 
Center for Substance Abuse Prevention expires on April 30, 
1995. 



BOARD OF S UPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

12 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 



Budget: 



Contracts 



Amount 



Comments: 



Residential Substance Abuse Treatment Agencies 
(February 16 - June 30, 1995) 

Asian American Recovery Services $36,566 

Baker Places 3,350 

Walden House 440.014 

Subtotal $479,930 

Residential Substance Abuse Treatment Agencies 

Perinatal (Mav 1 - June 30, 1995) 

Jelani House 116,667 

Mia House 85.461 

Subtotal 202.128 

Total $682,058 

1. Mr. Jim Stillwell of the DPH advises that the Division of 
Mental Health is requesting additional General Reserve 
Fund monies for these five residential substance abuse 
treatment programs because of the expense and difficulty to 
City departments of reopening or replacing such residential 
programs once closed. Mr. Stillwell states that the DPH is 
continuing to pursue alternative funding sources for these 
five programs for the 1995-96 fiscal year, including State 
Drug MediCal and Federal funds. 

2. Attachment I, provided by DPH, shows for each of the five 
residential substance abuse treatment programs (1) a brief 
description of the services provided, (2) the amount of 
funding being requested and (3) the number of bed days that 
would be funded. 



Recommendation: 



3. Attachment II shows for each of the five residential 
substance abuse treatment programs the (1) annual amounts 
funded from Federal sources in the FY 1993-94, (2) funds 
already allocated from the General Fund Reserve and 
Federal funds for the FY 1994-95, (3) funds being requested 
in this proposed appropriation totaling $682,058 for the 
remainder of the FY 1994-95 and (4) the amounts needed to 
fully fund the programs in FY 1995-96. 

Approval of the proposed ordinance is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

13 



Attachment " 
Page 1 of 3 



February 10, 1995 



Request for Supplemental Appropriation 
Substance Abuse Treatment - $682,058 
Budget Justification 



This supplemental amount will continue the existing level of services for 
five residential substance abuse treatment programs through the end of 
the fiscal year. It is the department's experience that once a residential 
program closes, reopening or replacing the services is a long, difficult and 
expensive project, ultimately eroding basic treatment capacity. 

Jelani House and MIA House have received federal funding from the 
Center for Substance Abuse Prevention for women with children through 
April 1995. 

Asian American Recovery Services, Baker Places/Acceptance Place and 
Walden House received federal Asset Forfeit Seizure grant funds through 
June 30, 1994. The department recently submitted three supplemental 
appropriation requests of $848,942 (File 101-94-20), $151,058 (File 101- 
94-51) and $207,103, totaling $1,207,103. These appropriations allow the 
continuation of these services through February 15, 1995. In January 1995 
Baker Places and Walden House received Target Cities grants of $22,246 
and $65,253 respectively. 

The department has sought alternative sources of revenue to continue 
these services and continues to explore funding options for fiscal year 
1995/96. 



Asian American Recovery Program $36,566 - 4 1/2 months 
funding 

Restores 592 bed days of residential treatment to 7 individuals at a cost of 
$61.77 per bed day. 

AARS is a voluntary residential drug and alcohol treatment program. As a 
drug-free, long-term program, men and women are provided with a 



14 



Attachment I 
Page 2 of 3 



rigorous structure of work and clinical activities. The program consists of 
individual, group, and family counseling along with educational and 
vocational activities within a supportive multicultural environment. The 
program philosophy is based on a therapeutic community model using 
behavioral and problem solving approaches. Its primary goal and 
objective is to provide support and opportunity for Asian/Pacific Islanders 
and others to learn to function successfully as responsible substance abuse 
free individuals. 



Baker Places, Inc. /Acceptance Place $3,350 - 4 1/2 months 
partial funding. 

Restores 44 bed days of residential treatment to 5 individuals at a cost of 
$76.62 per bed day. In January 1995 Baker Places received a $22,246 
Target Cities grant, filling most of the funding gap for this period. 

Baker Places is committed to providing a comprehensive residential 
treatment program for people whose lives are disrupted or impaired by 
substance abuse and attendant problems, including AIDS related and 
psychiatric complications. A home-like facility is maintained to provide 
food, shelter, and rehabilitation services in a community-based, peer- 
group oriented, clean and sober living environment. The principles of 
social rehabilitation are applied to support this purpose. Individual and 
group counseling, education and recreational services, and linkage with 
health, social, vocational, and other support services is provided. 
Systematic supervision and evaluation of services are used to assure that 
the highest quality of professional care is delivered and that program 
operations are managed in a responsible, accountable manner. 



Walden House/Therapeutic Community $440,014 - 4 1/2 months 
funding 

Restores 6,750 bed days of residential treatment to 75 individuals at a cost 
of $65.19 per bed day. In January 1995 Walden House received a $65,253 
Target Cities grant, filling part of the funding gap for this period. 

The Walden House residential program provides services 24 hours a day, 7 
days a week to adults and young adults. The target population includes 
dually diagnosed clients and persons with HIV disease. The program 
consists of orientation, therapeutic community involvement, and aftercare. 



15 



Page 3 of 3 



Walden House has on site medical personnel, recreation facilities, an in 
house school, and on the job training programs. 



Jelani House $116,667 - 2 months funding 

Restores 1,814 bed days of residential treatment to total of 35 women and 
children at a cost of $64.31 per bed day. 

Jelani House provides residential substance abuse treatment to pregnant 
women and to women with their children. The program consists of 
individual, group, family and child counseling, and provides on site medical 
staff, vocational assistance, and parenting classes. The recommended 
course of treatment is twelve to eighteen months long. 



The Women's Alcoholism Center/MIA House $85,461 - 2 months 
funding 

Restores 1,037 bed days of residential treatment to a total of 14 women 
and children at a cost of $82.41 per bed day. 

Women's Alcoholism Center is a recognized pioneer in providing substance 
abuse treatment to women within a comprehensive residential recovery 
program. MIA House is a long term residential program for women with 
children and pregnant women. A well planned array of counseling, 
education and support groups form the core of the program. Additional 
services include medical, educational and vocational services along with 
child and family counseling. 



16 



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17 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 



Item 4 - File 101-94-78 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Public Health (DPH) 
Community Health Services (CHS) 

Ordinance appropriating $125,000 from the General Fund 
Reserve for professional services to implement the Medi-Cal 
Managed Care Local Initiative for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

$125,000 

General Fund Reserve 

In November of 1994, the Board of Supervisors approved an 
ordinance that formally established a Medi-Cal managed 
care local initiative in San Francisco, known as the San 
Francisco Health Authority (File 97-94-73). The Board of 
Supervisors previously approved a resolution expressing the 
City's intention to create this entity (File 30-93-15), and a 
resolution approving the State legislation describing the local 
initiative plan and authorizing the City to create this entity 
(File 12-94-20). The responsibilities of the Health Authority 
have now been established in Section 14807.36 of the State 
Welfare and Institutions Code. 

The San Francisco Health Authority is to function as a 
private health maintenance organization (HMO). The San 
Francisco Health Authority may contract with private and 
public hospitals, non-profit health providers, and private 
health providers to provide health services. 

Ms. Tangerine Brigham of the Department of Public Health 
states that the 19 member Governing Body of Directors of the 
San Francisco Health Authority developed a capital plan 
which estimates that, in order to become operational, the San 
Francisco Health Authority would incur start-up costs for 
personnel, rent, equipment, operating expenses, and 
consulting services of approximately $3.1 million over the 
approximately five-year period between September 1, 1994 
and March 31, 2000. Fourteen of the members of the San 
Francisco Health Authority's Governing Board of Directors 
were appointed by the Board of Supervisors. The remaining 
five members, or their designees, are the Mayor, the Director 
of Public Health, the Director of Mental Health, a San 
Francisco Health Commissioner, and the Chancellor of the 
University of California San Francisco. In September of 
1994, the Board of Supervisors approved a resolution 
authorizing DPH to accept and expend a State grant in the 
amount of $1,137,500 million to develop a Medi-Cal managed 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

18 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 



care local initiative (San Francisco Health Authority) 
between June 1, 1994 and December 31, 1995. The funds 
were committed to the City, on behalf of the Health 
Authority, for the purpose of funding a portion of the above- 
noted start-up costs for the Health Authority, leaving a 
balance of approximately $2 million still needed. (File 146-94- 
20). 

The San Francisco Health Authority also proposed in its 
capital plan that of the remaining $2 million needed for start- 
up costs, $1 million would come from the City's General 
Fund, $250,000 from private agencies, and $750,000 by 
withholding a portion of the Health Authority's payments 
due to providers over a two-year period. 

The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance of 
$125,000 would provide funding for development and 
planning projects related to the implementation of the San 
Francisco Health Authority. The period of funding for these 
activities is six months, from January 1, 1995 to June 30, 
1995 Ms. Brigham advises that the contractors have been 
performing these activities since January 1, 1995. As such, 
expenditures have been incurred against the proposed 
supplemental appropriation monies. Therefore, the proposed 
supplemental appropriation monies would be paid retroactive 
to January 1, 1995. 

The $125,000 funding request for these activities would be 
expended as follows: 



Provider De livery System ($40.000): 

The funding would assist the Health Authority to set 
provider participation standards, design a provider network, 
and design reimbursement and risk structures. The funding 
would also be used to develop a health delivery system 
utilization program, case management program, and quality 
management program, as well as assist in coordinating the 
delivery system with the appropriate linkages. 

These activities would be conducted by Ms. Joyce Lau, Ms. 
Susan Maerke, Ms Ellen Kaufman, Coopers & Lybrand, and 
by Health Net. Health Net is the HMO that was selected 
through a competitive solicitation process in January of 1995 
to provide administrative and technical expertise to the San 
Francisco Health Authority. Coopers & Lybrand, and the 
three other consultants, were selected on a sole source basis 
by the San Francisco Health Authority, based on their prior 
experience, including prior related services which they have 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

19 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 



provided to the San Francisco Health Authority. None of the 
above-listed consultants are MBE/WBE firms. The cost per 
hour for the above-noted consultants is as follows: 

Consultant Cost Per Hr. Max. Hrs Total 

Joyce Lau $45 45 $2,025 

Susan Maerke $100 75 7,500 

Ellen Kaufman $75 16 1,200 

Cooper & Lybrand $235 25 5,875 

Health Net (part of contract agreement) 23 400 

Total $40,000 



Data Analysis ($10.000): 

These funds would be used to pay for an analysis of Medi-Cal 
utilization rates and reimbursement data, that would be used 
to perform an actuarial analysis and develop a capitation 
budget for the Health Authority. This analysis would be 
conducted by Mr. Bill Viergeiver. Mr. Viergeiver was 
selected by the San Francisco Health Authority on a sole 
source basis based on his expertise in the area, and because 
he was already providing similar services to the San 
Francisco Health Authority. Mr. Viergeiver in not an MBE 
or WBE. Mr. Viergeiver will provide approximately 95 hours 
of service at a rate of $105 per hour for a total of $10,000. 

Legal Analysis ($30.000): 

These funds would be used to provide for ongoing legal 
analysis related to the formation of the San Francisco Health 
Authority. In addition, legal assistance will be provided in 
the development and negotiation of a strategic partnership 
agreement with Health Net. This legal analysis will be 
conducted by Mr. Eric Gold, an attorney, at a rate of $150 per 
hour for 200 hours for a total of $30,000. Mr. Gold was 
selected on a sole source basis by the San Francisco Health 
Authority based on his expertise in the area, and because he 
was already providing similar services. Mr. Gold in not an 
MBE or WBE firm. According to Ms. Brigham, the City 
Attorney provides legal analysis to the City on issues relating 
to the San Francisco Health Authority in areas with potential 
direct impact to the City. In addition, Ms. Brigham advises 
that the San Francisco Health Authority is a separate legal 
organization from the City and therefore uses its own legal 
council. Further, Ms. Brigham states that the use of the City 
Attorney to provide legal analysis to the San Francisco 
Health Authority was not advised by the City Attorney 
because of a potential conflict-of-interest that could occur in 
that when the San Francisco Health Authority becomes a 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

20 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 

HMO, the San Francisco Health Authority will be contracting 
with a network of providers, one of which will be the City and 
County of San Francisco. 

Marketing Analysis and Strategy ($45.000): 

These funds would be used to develop a marketing and public 
relations strategy in order to market the Health Authority's 
services and providers, to develop marketing materials and 
literature, and to create a member and provider satisfaction 
program. This Marketing Analysis would be conducted by 
Health Net for a total cost of $45,000. This amount was 
negotiated as part of the previously awarded contract 
between Health Net and the San Francisco Health 
Authority. 

Recommendation: As previously noted, expenditures have been incurred 
against the proposed supplemental appropriation since 
January 1, 1995. As such, the proposed supplemental 
appropriation ordinance should be amended to provide for 
approval of the proposed supplemental appropriation 
ordinance retroactively. 

Based on the prior policy decision of the Board of Supervisors 
to establish the San Francisco Health Authority, approve the 
proposed ordinance as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

21 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Items 5 and 6 - Files 101-94-71 and 102-94-12 



Department: 
Items: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Airport 

Item 5, File 101-94-71 - Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance appropriating $277,618 of Airport Operating Fund 
monies for salaries and fringe benefits for the creation of 33 
positions and the deletion of one position pertaining to the 
Airport's implementation of the Master Plan and Master 
Plan related Mitigation Program. 

Item 6, File 102- 94-12- Ordinance amending the 1994-95 
Annual Salary Ordinance reflecting the addition of 33 
positions and the deletion of one position at the Airport. 

$277,618 

Airport Operating Fund 

The Airport is requesting the proposed supplemental 
appropriation to pay for salaries and fringe benefits to allow 
the Airport to create 33 new positions to implement the 
Airport's Master Plan and related Mitigation Program. 

The proposed supplemental appropriation would appropriate 
$277,618, for the period May 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995 as 
follows: 

Permanent Salaries $233,536 

Fringe Benefits 44 r 082 

Total $277,618 

The following are descriptions of the foregoing funding 
requests: 

Permanent Salaries ($233.536) 

The Airport's Master Plan was adopted by the Board of 
Supervisors in December of 1992. The overall Master Plan 
consists of approximately 45 construction projects and 
various demolition, survey, and site testing projects. Major 
projects under the Master Plan include a new International 
Terminal, a Ground Transportation Center, an Airport 
Light Rail System and new cargo and aircraft maintenance 
buildings. The Attachment provided by the Airport, is a 
listing of 31 of the total of 45 projects. The 31 projects are 
included in the Near Term Master Plan. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

22 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



The proposed supplemental appropriation would fund the 
above-noted 33 positions (see Comment 2 below). 

Fringe Benefits ($44.082) 

This amount was calculated based on approximately 18.8 
percent of Permanent Salaries. 

The proposed ordinance (File 102-94-12) would amend the FY 
1994-95 Annual Salary Ordinance to add 33 new positions 
and delete one position as follows: 



Classification/Title 



Maximum 
No. of Biweekly Salary 
Positions Salary At Top Stop 



Add 

1203 Personnel Technician 

1242 Personnel Analyst 

1244 Sr. Personnel Analyst 

1630 Account Clerk 

1659 Chief Systems Accountant 

1721 Data Entry Operator 

1802 Research Assistant 

1818 MIS Specialist II 

1840 Jr. Management Assistant 

1842 Management Assistant 

1844 Sr. Management Assistant 

3424 Pest Control Specialist 

3632 Librarian II 

5263 Planner V 

5298 Planner III 

6138 Industrial Hygienist 

7110 Mobile Asst. Equip. Supv. 

7262 Maintenance Planner 

7308 Cable Splicer 

7344 Carpenter 

7345 Electrician 
7348 Steamfitter 
7355 Truck Driver 

7375 Apprentice Stationary Engr. 

7376 Sheetmetal Worker 
9204 Communications Supv. 
9222 Operational Coordinator _ 

Total 
Delete 
1658 Chief Accountant 



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$1,243- 

$1,502- 

$1,844 

$1,013 

$2,342- 

$1,032- 

$1,316- 

$1,565- 

$1,255- 

$1,421 

$1,626 

$1,436 

$1,698 

$2,472 

$1,756 

$2,156 

$1,871 

$1,890 

$2,412 

$2,014 

$2,135 

$2,319 

$1,484 

$1,247 

$1,918 

$1,626 

$2,094 



$1,506 
$1,844 
$2,242 
$1,226 
$2,847 
$1,249 
$1,596 
$1,899 
$1,560 
$1,723 
$1,626 
$1,740 
$2,063 
$3,005 
$2,135 
$2,621 
$2,274 
$2,297 
$2,412 
$2,014 
$2,135 
-$2,319 
$1,890 
$1,630 
$2,332 
$1,975 
$2,545 



$39,307 
$48,128 
$58,516 
$31,999 
$74,307 
$32,599 
$41,656 
$49,564 
$40,716 
$44,970 
$42,439 
$45,414 
$53,844 
$78,431 
$55,724 
$68,408 
$59,351 
$59,952 
$62,953 
$52,565 
$55,724 
$60,526 
$49,329 
$42,543 
$60,865 
$51,548 
$66,425 



1 $2,230-$2,711 $70,757 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

23 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Comments: 1. On an annual basis the cost of the 33 new positions at the 

top step, including fringe benefits, is $1,427,803. 

2. At the request of the Budget Analyst, the Airport has 
provided the Budget Analyst with a written justification for 
each of the 33 requested new positions. However, such 
information was not received in sufficient time for the Budget 
Analyst to conduct a detailed analysis. As such, the Budget 
Analyst is recommending that this item be continued to the 
Budget Committee meeting of April 12, 1995, in order to 
allow the Budget Analyst additional time to review and 
analyze the information provided by the Airport. 

Recommendation: Continue the proposed legislation to the Budget Committee 
meeting of April 12, 1995. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

24 










MAR 30 '95 10:42ftM SFIft BUDGET/FINANCE 



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Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 



Item 7 - File 101-94-80 



Department: 
Item: 



Source of Funds: 



Description: 



District Attorney (DA) 

Ordinance appropriating $533,277, of Federal Health and 
Human Services revenue, and reappropriating $59,253 from 
non-personal services to fund $592,530 of computer 
equipment for the Statewide Automated Child Support 
System (SACSS) 



U.S. Health and Human Services (HHS) 
Reappropriation of DA's Family Support 

Bureau FY 1994-95 Other Non-personal 

Services Monies 
Total 



$533,277 



59.253 
$592,530 



According to Ms. Edwina Young of the DA's Family Support 
Bureau, the Family Support Bureau is required by Federal 
and State law to participate in the Statewide Automated 
Child Support System (SACSS). As such, according to Ms. 
Young, the DA's Family Support Bureau is required to either 
purchase or lease the necessary computers, and printers, in 
order to participate in and have access to SACSS. The 
Attachment, provided by the DA's Family Support Bureau, 
documents the Federal and State requirements for (a) 
participating in SACCS, and (b) for purchasing computers in 
connection with SACCS. All of the proposed equipment 
would be part of the Statewide computer network. As 
explained in the Attachment, Ms Young further explains why 
the existing hardware currently used by the DA's Family 
Support Bureau is not compatible with the Statewide 
Automated Child Support System. 

The U.S. HHS is paying for 90 percent of the equipment and 
related costs to participate in SACSS, or $533,277. San 
Francisco must provide a 10 percent match, or $59,253 for a 
total of $592,530. 

Ms. Young advises that the State determined both the 
quantity and type of computer equipment that would be 
needed by the DA's Family Support Bureau. The following 
computer equipment would be purchased: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

26 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 

Budg et: 



Personal Computers 






(151 @ $2,658.83 each) 


$401,483.33 




Sales Tax (8.25 percent) 


33,122.37 




Destination and Installation 






($165 x 151) 


24.915 




Subtotal 




$459,520.70 


HP 4 Plus Laser Printers 






($2,511 x 22) 


$55,242 




Sales Tax (8.25 percent) 


4,557 




Destination and Installation 






($340 x 22) 


7,480 




Subtotal 




67,279.00 


HP 4si Laser Printers 






(14 @ $4,000 each) 


$56,000 




Sales Tax (8.25 percent) 


4,620 




Destination and Installation 






($365 x 14) 


5,110 




Subtotal 




65.730.00 


TOTAL 




$592,529.70 


Rounded to 




$592,530.00 



Comments: 1. Ms. Deborah Vincent James, of the Electronic Information 

Purchasing Steering Committee (EIPSC) advises that the 
DA's Family Support Bureau has obtained approval to 
purchase the proposed equipment. 

2. As noted above, the quantity and type of proposed 
computer equipment was determined by the State, based on 
staff size, caseload size, and other information derived from 
monthly reports submitted to the State by the DA's Family 
Support Bureau. As shown in the Attachment, Ms. Young 
states that "the state unqualifiedly requires the City to lease 
or purchase 151 PCs and 36 assorted printers." Ms. Young 
advises that the proposed 151 computers, as determined by 
the State, would be used for (1) the current authorized staff 
of 113 in the Bureau of Family Support, (2) 12 interview 
cubicles, (3) a training center utilizing 13 computers, and (4) 
13 computers for 13 of the 15 new staff positions to be 
requested in the Fiscal Year 1995-96 budget. Ms. Young 
advises that the State allocates a computer to each employee, 
including clerical employees, because each employee will use 
the computer each day to access and input information 
concerning each specific case. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

27 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

28 



MAR 31 '95 04:01PM DA FSB CCSF" 



ARLO SMITH 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

CITY AND COUNTY 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 




Attachment 
Page 1 ot / 



"P.l" 



ROBERT PODESTA 

CHIEF ASSISTANT 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY FAMILY SUPPORT BUREAU 
291 Tenth Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 Tet. (41 S) 553-4200 



March 30, 1995 



TO: Harvey Rose Corporation 

FROM: Edwina Young^/ Director 
Family Support Bureau 

SUBJECT: Supplemental Budget Request File 101-94-80 

Public Law 100-485 required all states to develop and 
implement a statewide automated child support system enforcement 
system by October 1, 1995. California has designed a distributed 
system operating in every county on a statewide network. 
California contracted with LOCKHEED to design, develop, and 
implement the system in every county. This includes providing 
the equipment the counties will use. LOCKHEED has chosen 
specific equipment compatible with the federally approved plan 
for this statewide system. 

The State of California developed the equipment needs based 
on caseload, caseload and population growth, and county 
procedures for handling welfare referrals to the family support 
program office. The number of PCs, high production and normal 
production printers was determined by the projected need. 

The State determined that San Francisco County needs 151 
PCs, 14 HP 4si printers, and, 22 HP 4 Plus printers. This 
equipment has a unit cost of less than $5,000 per item and is 
thus eligible for 90% federal funding if purchased prior to 
October 1, 1995. There is additional equipment that will be 
installed in San Francisco County 'that exceeds $5,000 per item 
and is not therefore eligible for Ithe purchase option. That 
equipment must be leased by the Family Support Bureau. 

California W&I Code § 10815 requires the county 
participation in the SACSS program to be incorporated in the 
Plans of Cooperation with the Department of Social Services. The 
State Plan for SACSS includes the deployment of equipment to the 
counties. 

Pursuant to a request from Harvey Rose I make the following 
statement: "Based on the above, the state unqualifiedly requires 
the city to lease or purchase 151 PCs, and 36 assorted printers. 1 



29 



Attachment 
Page 2 of 2 



S A C S S Implementation in 
City and County of San Francisco 

Issue: Why is computer equipment currently used by the Family 
Support Bureau not usable or compatible with the 
Statewide Automated Child Support system? 

Response: The Family Support Bureau currently operates in a 3270 
environment with Controllers to the City Mainframe 
computer at One Market Plaza. The Family Support 
Bureau acquired the terminals in 1987/88 and some 
discards from City Department's that were chanqing 
their environments or upgradinq their equipment. All 
the equipment has been used beyond its useful life. 

The SACSS environment is DIGITAL, with VAX processors, 
a network on which all PCs and printers will reside. 
Usinq Windows Based applications. The equipment the 
Department is usinq is not compatible with that 
environment . 



Discussion: 



The City VDT Ordinance contained in Section 1. Part II, 
Chapter 5 (Health Code) of the San Francisco Municipal 
Code, requires that all City Departments must be in 
compliance by January 26, 1995. Section 1304 
specifically speaks to the requirements of the computer 
terminal and the health of the workers. The Department 
has already had one leqal action taken and there are a 
number of workers compensation claims as a result of 
the terminals and the work environment. 

The Family Support Bureau has attempted to correct this 
condition through the budqet process for several years. 
This is a one time opportunity to qet federal funding 
to solve at least a portion of the problem. 

The SACSS environment is part of the State's Plan with 
the Federal Government. It has been designed and 
approved specifically for the SACSS project. The San 
Francisco Family Support Bureau is required to comply 
with that plan. 

The specific equipment, the number of items, and the 
network environment was desiqned by the contractor for 
the State, the State, and the Federal Funding 
Authorities. This is not a choice that we can make at 
the County level. 

The Family Support Bureau must install this equipment. 
The alternative is to lease it rather than purchase it. 
The lease alternative is payments for three years plus 
interest which is not eliqible for federal fundinq. 



30 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 



Item 8 



File 101-94-81 



Department: Office of the Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) 

Office of the Mayor 

Item: Ordinance appropriating $23,508 from the General Fund 

Reserve for the CAO's Office to complete funding for the cost 
of membership in the Association of Bay Area Governments 
for FY 1994-95. 

Amount: $23,508 

Source of Funds: General Fund Reserve 



Description: 



Comments: 



In the FY 1994-95 budget, the CAO requested $98,508 to pay 
for the City's annual dues to the Association of Bay Area 
Governments (ABAG). This request of $98,508 was reduced 
by $23,508 by the Mayor's Office to $75,000. According to 
Steve Nelson of the CAO's Office, ABAG has informed the 
CAO that (a) a member cannot unilaterally reduce its dues 
and (b) has required payment of the full amount for 
continued membership until the end of the 1994-95 fiscal 
year. 

Mr. Kent Sims, the Mayor's representative to ABAG from the 
San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, advises that the City 
and County of San Francisco has five ABAG representatives, 
including three members of the Board of Supervisors, the 
Mayor and an appointee of the Mayor. Mr. Sims reports that 
ABAG acts as a clearing house for many Federal and State 
grant applications, provides regional planning services and 
biannual demographic projections. 

1. The cost of the ABAG membership to San Francisco in FY 
1993-94 was $93,646 or $4,862 less than the requested 
$98,508 membership cost in FY 1994-95, according to Ms. 
Teresa Serata of the Mayor's Office. 

2. Ms. Serata advises that the Mayor's Office reduced the 
initial request to $75,000 from $98,508 as part of a series of 
budget reductions. According to Ms. Serata, the Mayor's 
Office noted that the FY 1994-95 dues amount of $98,508 
consists of two assessments of $49,254 each, one for the City 
and one for the County. However, according to Ms. Serata, 
the Mayor has now recommended that the City pay the full 
amount of $98,508 for the ABAG membership dues for FY 
1994-95 because the City is required to do so having accepted 
the terms of FY 1994-95 ABAG membership. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

31 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 

3. Mr. Sims advises that should the remaining $23,508 in 
membership dues not be paid to ABAG by the City and 
County of San Francisco, ABAG may bring legal action 
against the City. 

4. Since this request is the subject of previous budgetary 
denial, passage of this ordinance requires the approval of a 
2/3 vote of the members of the Board of Supervisors. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed ordinance is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 






BOARD OF SUPERVTSORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 






Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



File 101-94-83 



Department: 

Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Public Health (DPH) 
San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) 

Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance appropriating 
$20,000,000 to allow San Francisco General Hospital to 
participate in the SB 1255 Emergency Services and 
Supplemental Payment Fund previously known as the 
Disproportionate Share Payment Program for FY 1994-95. 

$20,000,000 

Medi-Cal revenue 

In 1989, Senate Bill (SB 1255) established a Disproportionate 
Share Payment Program, now known as the Emergency 
Services and Supplemental Payment Fund. This Fund 
provides a mechanism for additional supplemental payments 
to disproportionate share hospitals, such as SFGH. A 
disproportionate share hospital is defined as a hospital with 
Medi-Cal inpatient and indigent utilization higher than the 
State average. Under SB 1255, disproportionate share 
hospitals make voluntary transfer payments to the California 
Medical Assistance Commission. The State obtains matching 
Federal funds for the funds transferred by the City to the 
State. The State then transfers funds back to SFGH as Medi- 
Cal revenues based on Medi-Cal patient days of service. 
SFGH is one of 41 hospitals Statewide which is eligible to 
receive funds under the SB 1255 Program. 

The DPH estimates that, if the City transfers $20,000,0000 to 
the California Medical Assistance Commission, the City 
would receive back $34,000,000, resulting in a net gain of 
$14,000,000 to the City. The DPH reports that approval of 
the proposed legislation is being requested, prior to the DPH 
knowing the exact amount of the net gain to be realized by 
the City, in order to permit the DPH to access these funds as 
soon as the State announces their availability. The DPH 
advises that, customarily, there is only approximately a two 
to three week turn-around period between the time the State 
announces the availability of revenue and the time in which 
the DPH must transfer the payment to the California 
Medical Assistance Commission in order to take advantage of 
the increased revenues. As of the writing of this report, the 
exact amount of the resulting net gain to the City is not 
known. However, according to Mr. Peter Praetz of the DPH, 
the City will in fact realize some amount of net gain by 
appropriating the requested $20,000,000 for transfer to the 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

33 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Comments: 



Recommendation: 



State. Mr. Praetz adds that this requested transfer of funds 
would represent the eighth time under the SB 1255 program 
that the DPH has participated in this program. 

Similar legislation, which has been recommended by the 
Budget Committee of the Board of Supervisors, and which is 
now pending before the full Board, pertains to SB 855. That 
legislation, results in a net gain to the City of $24,224,256 for 
FY 1994-95 and an additional $12,282,331 net gain, to be 
reserved for the FY 1995-96 budget. The prior legislation 
pertaining to SB 855, and the proposed legislation pertaining 
to SB 1255, both concern payments to disproportionate share 
hospitals. The differences between these two programs are (1) 
under SB 855, the DPH transfers funds to the State 
Department of Health Services, whereas under SB 1255, the 
DPH transfers funds to the California Medical Assistance 
Commission and (2) under SB 855, monies are allocated on 
the basis of a statutory formula, whereas under SB 1255, 
monies are allocated on the basis of negotiations between 
DPH and the State Medical Assistance Commission. 

1. Mr. John Madden of the Controller's Office advises that, as 
of the writing of this report, the Controller cannot provide an 
estimate of the amount of the net gain to be realized by the 
City as a result of the proposed transfer of $20,000,000 to the 
State. However, the Controller will not release any of the 
$20,000,000 appropriation until formal notification is 
received from the State indicating the specific level of 
revenues that will be available to the City. 

2. As previously noted, it is anticipated that this proposed 
legislation should result in an undetermined amount of 
additional revenue to the City. According to Mr. Madden, 
there has not yet been a determination made as to whether 
any additional revenues to be received by the City under SB 
1255 would be utilized by the City in FY 1994-95 or would be 
used as revenues for purposes of funding the SFGH FY 1995- 
96 budget. 

3. Therefore, the Budget Analyst recommends that this 
proposed legislation be amended to reserve any additional 
resulting revenues to be realized by the City under SB 1255, 
pending a report back to the Budget Committee of the Board 
of Supervisors regarding the proposed disposition of such 
revenues. 

Amend the proposed ordinance in accordance with Comment 
No. 3 above and approve the legislation as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

34 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 

Item 10 -File 47-95-9 

Department: Department of Parking and Traffic (DPT) 

Item: Resolution approving monthly rate adjustments, and the 

implementation of a Discounted Validation Stamp Program 
at the Fifth and Mission Parking Garage Facility. 

Description: The Parking and Traffic Commission has oversight 

responsibility for City-owned parking facilities. This 
responsibility includes reviewing, annually, the parking rates 
charged at City-owned garages and lots and making 
recommendations to the Board of Supervisors for changes in 
such parking rates. The Parking and Traffic Commission, as 
a result of their annual rate analysis, has recommended a 
decrease in the monthly reserved area parking permit rate, 
and the implementation of a Discounted Validation Stamp 
Program at the Fifth and Mission Parking Garage Facility. 

The Fifth and Mission Parking Garage has 2,622 parking 
spaces. In March of 1994, the Board of Supervisors approved 
a resolution to increase parking rates, that also included 
authorizing, for the first time, the following two new monthly 
parking categories: (a) reserved parking spaces at $250 per 
month, and (b) parking permits for parking vehicles in a 
newly established reserved area for $200 per month. The 
DPT allocated 150 parking spaces in the newly established 
reserved area to be used for either the reserved space parking 
or for the reserved area parking, depending on the usage 
level need within each category. The cost for regular monthly 
unreserved parking was approved at $150 per month (File 
47-94-5). 

Mr. Kevin Hagerty of DPT advises that an increase in 
revenues was projected by DPT at $221,280 annually based 
on the sale of 100 monthly permits at $200 per month in the 
newly established reserved area. (Mr. Hagerty advises that 
because some of these parking permits were sold for less than 
$200 per month for tax-exempt vehicles, the projected 
revenues of $221,280 were not based on a simple 
multiplication of 100 monthly permits x $200 per month x 12 
mos.) However, this annual increase in revenues was not 
realized. Mr. Hagerty advises that based on a recent survey 
of the regular unreserved monthly parking permit holders 
who pay $150 per month to park, DPT believes that an 
estimated 44 of these permit holders would be willing to pay 
an additional $25 per month, or $175, to park in the more 
conveniently located reserved area. In addition, Mr. Hagerty 
estimates that the increased marketing efforts by the Garage 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

35 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 

would result in an additional 33 new regular area parkers to 
the Garage. As such, Mr. Hagerty advises that DPT is 
proposing to lower the reserved area parking permit cost by 
$25 from $200 per month to $175 per month. Mr. Hagerty 
estimates that the proposed reduction in the monthly permit 
cost in the reserved area of the Garage, and the increased 
marketing efforts to attract unreserved area monthly 
parkers, would generate an additional $5,170 per month, or 
$62,040 annually. As noted above, the revenue projection 
calculations include the revenues for tax exempt vehicles 
which pay less than the non tax-exempt vehicles. 

Mr. Hagerty advises that DPT is also proposing to implement 
a Discounted Validation Stamp Program. The purpose of the 
program is to assist area retailers and businesses in 
generating new business and maintaining current business. 
A recent survey of local businesses has determined that there 
is interest in the Discounted Validation Stamp Program. The 
proposed program would operate as follows: The Fifth and 
Mission Parking Garage Facility would market and sell books 
of discounted validation stamps to area businesses at 
discounted prices. Discounted validation stamps would be 
available in one, two and three hour increments and would be 
discounted at the following rates: 

Current Rate Discounted Validation Hourly 

Rate Discount 

lHour $1.00 $0.75 $0.25 

2 Hour $2.00 $1.50 $0.50 

3 Hour $3.00 $2.25 $0.75 

Mr. Hagerty estimates that the Discounted Validation Stamp 
Program would generate additional parking revenues of 
$16,560 annually. 

Comments: 1. The Attachment provided by Mr. Hagerty explains the 

Discounted Validation Stamp Program, and explains the 
basis for the estimated annual revenues from (a) the 
proposed reduced monthly parking rates in the reserved area 
of the Fifth and Mission Parking Garage and (b) the 
Discounted Validation Stamp Program. 

2. In summary, DPT is estimating that the City would 
realize increased annual parking revenues at the Fifth and 
Mission Parking Garage Facility of (a) $62,040 by reducing 
the monthly parking permit cost from $200 to $175 in the 
reserved area of the Garage, and (b) $16,560 annually from 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

36 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 5, 1995 

the establishment of a Discounted Validation Stamp 
Program. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed resolution is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

37 



f 



•MflR-27- , 95 MON 17:19 ID:DEPT PARKING b TRflFF FAX N0:415 554 9834 



FIFTH AND MISSIOf> 
Discounted Validation 



1994 Transient Vehicle 



1 Hr. 

2 Hr. 

3 Hr. 



Rate 
$1.00 
$2.00 
$3.00 



8653 P05 



Attachment 
Page 1 of 3 



GARAGE 
Program 



Volume: 1,200,000 



ASSUMPTIONS: 

1.20%ofparkers 
2. The new program 
or less. 



312,000 x 20% 
348,000 x 20% 
216,000 x 20% 



312,000 x 8% 
348,000 x 8% 
216,000 x 8% 



undefr three hours will utilitize program ; 

wjl generate 8% increase in new parkers using the garage for three hours 



1 12,400 x. 25 
( 19,600 x. 50 
43 ,200 x. 75 



;:4,960x$ .75 

::7,840x$1.50 

7 280 x $2.25 



.Percent 


Vehicles 


Revenues 


26% 


312,000 


$312,000 


29% 


348,000 


$696,000 


18% 


216,000 


S648 000 


Total Revenues 





51,656,000 



Revenue Reduction 
$15,600 
$34,800 
$32.400 

Revenue Gain 
$18,720 
$41,760 
$38,880 



Estimated Yearly Net Gain 



($ 82,800) 



$ 99,360 



$ U,560 



38 



ru-irc-^--ys riUN IV: IV ID:DhPT FORKING & TROFF FAX N0:415 554 9834 



8653 P83 

Attachment 
Page 2 of 3 



The Corporation estima :es that it could generate an additional $ 62, 000 in annual gross 
revenues by adopting tr e new $175 rate. Please see the attached Garage Monthly Revenue 
analysis. 



Discounted Validation 1 'rogram 



The Downtown Parkinj ; 
stamp program. The 
generating new and 
businesses and 
sell books of discounte ! 
would be available in 
following rates: 



Corporation is also interested in implementing a discounted validation 
purpose of the new program is assist area retailers and businesses in 
ma ntaining current business. The Garage Corporation has surveyed local 
determined that there is interest in this program. The Garage would market and 
validation stamps to area businesses. Discounted validation stamps 
one, two and three hour increments and would be discounted at the 



ConenlRate 



lHr. 
2Hr. 
3Hr. 



$1.00 
$2.00 
S3. 00 



The Corporation is projecting 
$20,000 a year in new 
analysis. 



Piscounted Validation Rate 


Hourlv Discount 


$ .75 


$.0.25 


$1.50 


$0.50 


$2.25 


$0.75 



that over time the new validation could generate $15,000 to 
parage revenue. Please see the attached discounted validation rate 



A representative from l he Downtown Parking Corporation is scheduled to attend the 
Commission Meeting a rid will be available to answer your questions. 

Staff recommends that you approve the rate modifications. 



39 



MAR-31--95 FR1 11=04 ID:DEPT PflRKING & TRflFF FAX N0:415 554 9834 



«695 P02 

Attachment 
Page 3 ot' 3 



FIFTH AND MISSION GARAGE 
Monthly Revenue Analysis 



Current Situation 





Number 


Rate 


Total Revenue 


Regular . 




329 


$150 


$49,350 






102 


$120 * 


$12,240 


Reserved Area 




12 


$200 


$2,400 






29 


$160 * 


$4,640 


Reserved Space 




10 


$250 


$2,500 




Total M 


onthly 


Revenues 


$71,130 



| Projected Situation . | ** 






Number 


Rate 


Total Revenue 


Regular 318'; 


$150 


$47,700 


102 


$120 " 


$12,240 


Reserved Area .56 


$175 


$9,800 


29 


$140 * 


$4,060 


Reserved Space 1 


$250 


$2,500 


Total Monthly Revenues 


$76,300 


Projected Difference In Monthly Income 




$5,170 


Projected Additional Annual Income 




$62,040 



* Tax Exempt Vehicles 

** Assumes 44 of Regular 318 monthly parker3 will become Reserved Area 
parkers and that the garage will recruit an additional 33 Regular 
monthly parkers. 



40 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 11 - File 11-95-1 

Department: Redevelopment Agency 

Item: Resolution adopting a benefit finding pursuant to California 

Redevelopment Law regarding the expenditure of tax 
increment funds outside of the Western Addition 
Redevelopment Project Area, A-2. 

Description: Ms. Shirley Wysinger Project Manager of the Redevelopment 

Agency advises that the Redevelopment Agency's FY 1994-95 
budget includes $600,000 in Tax Increment funds from the 
Western Addition Project Area, A-2. These funds are 
designated to pay for the renovation of the Peace Plaza, 
located in the Japanese Cultural and Trade Center. The 
Peace Plaza, which is owned by the City for public use, was 
purchased by the Recreation and Park Department in 1989 
as permanent open space. The property is essentially vacant 
with the exception of a 100-foot high Peace Pagoda, which 
was a gift to the City from Osaka Japan, San Francisco's 
Sister City. 

The Peace Plaza is within Western Addition Project Area, A- 
1, which is adjacent to Western Addition Project Area, A-2. 
However, as noted above, the property is owned by the City 
for public use. Ms. Wysinger advises that State law prohibits 
Redevelopment Agencies from spending funds for the 
renovation of publicly-owned facilities unless the Board of 
Supervisors determines that (1) the publicly-owned facility is 
a "benefit" to a redevelopment project area or its immediate 
neighborhood, (2) no other reasonable means of financing are 
available and (3) the payment of funds for the renovation will 
assist in the elimination of blight within the redevelopment 
project area. 

The Redevelopment Agency advises that the Peace Plaza is 
located on the southside of Post Street immediately adjacent 
to the Western Addition Project Area, A-2 and is the main 
entrance to the Nihonmachi Mall, which is located within the 
Western Addition Project Area, A-2. According to the 
Redevelopment Agency, the Peace Plaza, in its current 
deteriorated condition, represents a blight on the 
surrounding area. The Redevelopment Agency states that the 
renovation of the Peace Plaza will be an economic benefit 
because tourists who visit the Peace Plaza, for such events as 
the Annual Cherry Blossom Festival, will be more likely to 
shop at the stores located in the Nihonmachi Mall if the 
surrounding area is made more attractive. Preliminary plans 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

41 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

for the renovation of the Peace Plaza include a landscaped 
Japanese garden and an outdoor performance area. 

Comments: 1. The Department of Public Works estimates that the total 

cost to renovate the Peace Plaza is $1,300,000 (see 
Attachment) or approximately $700,000 more than the 
$600,000 which is the subject of this report. According to the 
Redevelopment Agency, $190,000 of the $700,000 balance 
needed will be paid for by previously appropriated Open 
Space Funds. The Redevelopment Agency advises that the 
remaining approximately $510,000 will be provided through 
private fund raising activities sponsored by the Friends of the 
Plaza, a group of community and business representatives 
who have organized for the purpose of renovating and 
maintaining the Peace Plaza. 

2. Mr. Tim Lillyquist of the Recreation and Park Department 
advises that the City's current annual maintenance costs of 
approximately $30,000 would not increase once the Peace 
Plaza is renovated. According to Mr. Lillyquist, the Friends of 
the Plaza would be responsible for the payment of any 
additional costs incurred for on-going maintenance after the 
Peace Plaza renovation is completed. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed resolution is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 

Harvey M. Rose 




cc: Supervisor Hsieh 

Supervisor Kaufman 
Supervisor Bierman 
President Shelley 
Supervisor Alioto 
Supervisor Ammiano 
Supervisor Hallinan 
Supervisor Kennedy 
Supervisor Leal 
Supervisor Migden 
Supervisor Teng 
Clerk of the Board 
Chief Administrative Officer 
Controller 
Teresa Serata 
Robert Oakes 
Ted Lakey 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

42 



Attachment 



City and County of San Francisco 




Beparlm6rtlM Public Works 

Bureau of Engineering 



To: Sandy Brown-Richardson 

Budget Analyst's Office 

From: OGSberman Horn, Manager 

/^Landscape Architecture Section 

Date: March 31, 1995 

Subject: Japan Town Peace Plaza 

Per your request, the following is the estimated budget for the subject project: 



Planning (DPW and Consultant) $ 20,000 
Design and Engineering (DPW and Consultant) 80,000 

Construction and Construction Contingency (Contract) 1 , 1 00,000 
Construction Management (DPW) 100.000 



Total Estimated Project Budget 



1,300,000 



A3 



£> 



s.p 



<2ub(ic Libraru, (Documents (Dept. 
Attn: Jane Hudson 



Memo to Budget Committee 
_April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting REVISED 

Contract Services $ 206.000 

Total Costs - Water Main Replacement 

Project, Lombard Street $282,500 

's/SS The PUC reports that the Department of Public Works 

(DPW) has selected Marinship Construction Services/Ghilotti 

^j. Brothers Construction, a Joint Venture, as the lowest 

responsible bidder based on a bid amount of $1,147,739. The 
$206,000 noted above for contract services, will pay for water 
main replacement work, which is a portion of the work to be 
performed under this contract. The other work to be 
performed under this contract includes sewer work and 
landscaping. Marinship Construction Services is an MBE 
firm and has 51 percent participation on the contract. The 
one other firm which submitted a bid was Golden Bay 
Construction. Golden Bay Construction, which is neither an 
MBE or a WBE firm, submitted a bid amount of $1,296,977. 

f+\ im^VTS DCrT. The contractor Marinship Construction Services/Ghilotti 

DO LaJ! - Brothers Construction will be responsible for installing the 

APR 6 1995 replacement pipe. The 0.78 FTE Water Department 

-~i<^cO personnel will be responsible for purchasing all materials to 

SAN FRA ^ AR y be used, preparing contract specifications and drawings, 

PUBLl performing construction management, inspection, and service 

connections. The requested Bond Fund monies would also 
pay for that portion of the time that the 0.78 FTEs work on 
the Water Main Replacement project at Lombard Street. 

Water Main Replacement Project - Brookhaven Street 
($50.000) 

This project involves replacing approximately 5,400 feet of 6 
inch and 8 inch water mains on Brookhaven between 
Huntington and Country Club and surrounding streets. The 
$50,000 request will be used to fund in-house engineering 
work including preparation of contract specifications. The 
project budget of $50,000 will be expended as follows: 

Water Department Personnel 
Senior Civil Engineer 
Assoc. Civil Engineer 
Civil Engineer Assoc. I 
Construction Inspector 
Utility Plumber 
Utility Plumber Apprentice 

Total - Water Main Replacement 

Project, Brookhaven St. 0.85 $50,000 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

10 



FTE 




0.01 


$1,250 


0.26 


17,500 


0.52 


27,500 


0.02 


1,250 


0.02 


1,250 


0.02 


1.250 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 5, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



The Bond Fund monies requested would pay for that portion 
of the time that the .85 FTEs work on this Water Main 
Replacement project at Brookhaven Street. 

Water Main Replacement Project - 10th Street ($40.000) 

This project involves replacing approximately 5,000 feet of 8 
inch water mains on 10th Street between Howard and 
Division Streets. The $40,000 request will be used to fund in- 
house engineering work including the preparation of contract 
specifications. The project budget of $40,000 will be expended 
as follows: 



Comment: 



Recommendation: 



Water Department personnel 
Senior Civil Engineer 
Assoc. Civil Engineer 
Civil Engineer Assoc I 
Construction Inspector 
Utility Plumber 
Utility Plumber Apprentice 



Total - Water Main Replacement 

Project, 10th Street 0.66 



0.01 


$1,000 


0.21 


14,000 


0.41 


22,000 


0.01 


1,000 


0.01 


1,000 


0.01 


1.000 



$40,000 



The Bond Fund monies requested would pay for that portion 
of the time that the .66 FTEs work on the Water Main 
Replacement project at 10th Street. 

The grand total of the costs for the proposed projects is 
$2,071,790 or $50,000 less than the requested amount of 
$2,121,790. 

Release a total $2,071,790 from reserve, or $50,000 less than 
the requested amount of $2,121,790. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

11 



MINUTES 
REGULAR ME ETING DOCUMENTS DE^. 

BUDGET COMMTTTEE 
// BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

SAN FRANCE 

PU3LIC LIBR/ 



WEDNESDAY. APRIL 12. 1995 - 1:00 P.M. ROOM 410, WAR MEMORIAL BLDG. 

MEMBERS: SUPERVISORS HSIEH, KAUFMAN, BIERMAN 
CLERK: GREGOIRE HOBSON 

TIME MEETING CONVENED: 1:05 P.M. 

GENERAL ITEMS 



File 193-95-1 . [Candlestick Park Renovation Plans, Superbowl 1999] Hearing to 
consider the Mayor's plan to renovate Candlestick Park for the 1999 Superbowl. 
(Supervisors Hsieh, Bierman, Shelley, Hallinan, Migden, Leal, Alioto) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Jim Lazarus, Port of San 
Francisco; Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst; John Madden Assistant Controller; Don 
Alameda, Project Manager, Bureau of Architecture, Department of Public Works; 
Phil Arnold, Assistant General Manager, Recreation and Park Department. IN 
SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: Linda Jofuko, Local 21; Margaret Brokin, Coleman 
Advocates; Frank Lee. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO THE CALL OF 
THE CHAIR. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE N. JTES PAGE 2 



2. File 97-94-82 . [Overtime Expenditures, Bi-Annual Report] Ordinance 

amending Chapter 18 of the San Francisco Administrative Code by amending 
Section 18.13 thereof, requiring all City departments to bi-annually report 
overtime expenditures in excess of five percent (5%) of budgeted 
straight-time wages to the Board of Supervisors and analyze whether hiring 
additional employees would be more cost effective than the overtime hours. 
(Supervisors Hsieh, Alioto, Bierman) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; John Madden, Assistant Controller; Theresa Lee, Mayor's Office. IN 
SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
On Page 1, replace section (b) to read: "The appointing officer of 
very department shall submit a bi-annual report on May 1 and 
October 1 to the Board of Supervisors justifying departmental 
overtime expenditures which exceed 5% of total budgeted 
straight-time wages or which reach $1.0 million annually or more 
in overtime wages (i.e. overtime wages for uniform members of 
the Police and Fire Departments, Transit Operations, Transit 
Operator Supervisors, Nurses and emergency workers are not 
exempt). The report shall also analyze whether hiring additional 
part-time or full-time employees would be more cost effective 
than the overtime expenditure." On line 16, insert after "(e)" 
Except as provided in subsection (b),". 

VOTE: 3-0. 



File 96-95-1 . [Sale of Surplus Property] Ordinance authorizing the sale of 
surplus City-owned property and adopting findings pursuant to City Planning 
Code, Section 101.1. (Real Estate Dept.) 

Parcel 1. Assessor's Block 140, Lot 8, located on the west side of Davis 

Street between Broadway Street and Vallejo Street; 

Parcel 2. Assessor's Block 141, Lot 11, located on the north side of 

Broadway Street between Front Street and Battery Street; 

Parcel 3. Assessor's Block 165, Lot 21, located on the south side of 

Broadway Street between Battery Street and Sansome Street.) 

(Consideration Continued from 3/29/95) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO THE CALL OF THE CHAIR. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE h. UTES PAGE 3 



RELEASE OF RESERVE FUNDS 



File 101-94-16.1 . [Release of Reserved Funds, Juvenile Probation] 
Consideration of release of reserved funds, Juvenile Probation Department, in 
the total amount of $275,470, to implement Serious Habitual Offender 
Program for repeat offenders released to the community. (Juvenile Probation) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Edgar Flowers, Jr., Chief Probation Officer, Juvenile Probation 
Department; Cynthia Lee, Supervising Attorney, District Attorney's Office, 
Juvenile Division; Theresa Lee, Mayor's Office; Katherine Feinstein, 
Director, Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice; John Madden, Assistant 
Controller. PARTIAL SUPPORT: Margaret Brokin, Coleman Advocates, Dan 
MacAllair. IN SUPPORT: Sharon Slone, President, 25th Street Neighborhood 
Association; Anne Feibush; Ross Worden; Deputy Chief Philpot, S.F. Police 
Department; Paul Norris; Elizabeth Tenant; Vivian Xavier; Rita Alver; Rose 
Churchwar. OPPOSED: None. 

(Consideration Continued from 3/29/95) 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. File 101-94-16.3 . RELEASE OF 
$150,880 APPROVED. FILED. 

File 101-94-16.1 . HOLD $60,000 ON RESERVE FOR PROPOSED 
FUNDING OF A ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY. Instruct 
Controller to return $64,590 to the General Fund. 
CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO THE CALL OF THE CHAIR. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



5. File 101-94-5.1 . [Reserved Funds, Fire Department] Consideration of 
request to release reserved funds, Fire Department, 1992 Fire Protection 
Bond Interest earnings, in the amount of $69,850, for replacement of 
underground fuel tank at Station 13. (Fire Department) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Assistant Chief James Lynch, SF Fire Department. IN SUPPORT: 
None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RELEASE OF $69,850 APPROVED. FILED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE N. JTES PAGE 4 



File 79-92-3.11 . [Reserved Funds, Mayor's Office-Community Development] 
Consideration of request to release reserved funds, Mayor's Office of 
Community Development, 1993 CDBG program funds, in the amount of 
$100,000, for the purpose of financial and compliance audit services to be 
performed by the accounting firm of Calvin Louie. (Mayor's Office of 
Community Development) 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RELEASE OF $100,000 APPROVED. FILED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



GENERAL ITEMS (Cont'd) 

7. File 101-94-71 . [Appropriation, Airport] Ordinance appropriating $277,618, 
Airport, of Airport Operating Funds, to salaries and fringe benefits for the 
creation of thirty-three (33) positions and the deletion of one (1) position to 
implement the Master Plan and related Mitigation Program for fiscal year 
1994-95. (Controller) RO #94184 (COMPANION TO THE FOLLOWING FILE) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Peter Nardoza, SF Airport. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

(Consideration Continued from 4/5/95) 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
Delete five (5) positions: 1203 Personnel Technician, 1242 
Personnel Analyst, 1840 Junior Management Assistant, 1630 
Account Clerk and 7308 Cable Splicer. Reduce appropriation to 
$118,499. AMENDED TITLE: "Appropriating $118,499, Airport, 
of Airport Operating Funds, to salaries and fringe benefits for the 
creation of twenty-eight (28) positions and the deletion of one (1) 
position to implement the Master Plan and related Mitigation 
Program for fiscal year 1994-95." 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE N. UTES PAGE 5 



8. File 102-94-12 . [Public Employment, Airport] Ordinance amending 

Ordinance No. 293-94 (Annual Salary Ordinance, 1994/95) reflecting the 
addition of thirty-three (33) positions and the deletion of one (1) position at 
the San Francisco International Airport. (Department of Human Resources) 
(COMPANION TO THE PRECEDING FILE) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Peter Nardoza, SF Airport. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

(Consideration Continued from 4/5/95) 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 

Delete the following five (5) positions: 1203 Personnel Technician, 
1242 Personnel Analyst, 1840 Junior Management Assistant, 1630 
Account Clerk and 7308 Cable Splicer. AMENDED TITLE: 
"Amending Ordinance No. 293-94 (Annual Salary Ordinance, 
1994/95) reflecting the addition of twenty-eight (28) positions and 
the deletion of one (1) position at the San Francisco International 
Airport." 

VOTE: 3-0. 



File 172-94-32.1 . [Shared Medical Systems Contract Amendment] Resolution 
authorizing the Director of Public Health to execute an amendment to the 
Information Systems Agreement between the City and County of San 
Francisco and Shared Medical Systems Corporation dated August 31, 1994. 
(Department of Public Health) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; John Madden, Assistant Controller; Dr. Larry Meredith, Department 
of Public Health; Ted Lakey, Deputy City Attorney. IN SUPPORT: Mr. 
Dickson, Shared Medical Systems Corporation. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
On Page 2, line 13 after the word "shall" replace 'Tie 
approximately $4,568,867 and in no event shall such services 
exceed $5,025,753" to read "not exceed $4,568,867 and that any 
amount in exceed of $4,568,867 shall be subject to approval by the 
Board of Supervisors. Beginning on line 20, delete the following: 
"SMS's liability to the City is limited to $12 million." 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE V UTES PAGE 6 



10. File 97-95-14 . [Home Ownership Assistance Load Fund] Ordinance amending 
Section 10.117-76 of the San Francisco Administrative Code to allow monies 
from the Home Ownership Assistance Loan Fund to be loaned to nonprofit 
corporations for (i) the purchase of housing units for resale to low and 
moderate income households and (ii) curing defaults on senior loans on housing 
units which have received secondary City financing; and to designate the 
Mayor's Office of Housing, or its successor, as the administrator of that fund. 
(Supervisors Ammiano, Bierman) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. (Add Supervisor Bierman as 
co-sponsor. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



11. File 79-95-3 . [Federal Funding - 1995 Community Development Program] 
Resolution approving an amendment to the 1995 Community Development 
Program. Authorizing the Mayor, on behalf of the City and County of San 
Francisco, to receive and expend $2,818,000 in additional entitlement funds 
and transfer $182,000 from contingencies under the City's 1995 Community 
Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program from the U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban Development. Approving Addendum 1 to the expenditure 
schedule for recipient departments and agencies and for indirect costs, and 
determining no environmental evaluation is required; authorizing the receipt 
and deposit in contingencies of 1995 CDBG entitlement funds in excess of 
$26,984,000. (Mayor's Office of Community Development) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Larry Del Carlo, Director, Mayor's Office of Community 
Development. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE K UTES PAGE 7 



FISCAL ITEMS 



12. File 101-94-89 . [Appropriation, Recreation and Park] Ordinance 

appropriating $325,000, Recreation and Park Department from the Special 
Revenue Fund (rent credit from the San Francisco 49'ers) to make capital 
improvements to Candlestick Park. (Supervisor Kaufman) RO #94215 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Jim Lazarus, Port of 
San Francisco; Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst; John Madden Assistant 
Controller; Don Alameda, Project Manager, Bureau of Architecture; Phil 
Arnold, Assistant General Manager, Recreation and Park Department. IN 
SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: Linda Jofuko, Local 21; Margaret Brokin, 
Coleman Advocates; Frank Lee. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
Place $325,000 on reserve. AMENDED TITLE: "Appropriating 
$325,000, Recreation and Park Department from the Special 
Revenue Fund (rent credit from the San Francisco 49'ers) to make 
capital improvements to Candlestick Park; placing $325,000 on 



VOTE: 3-0. 

13. File 101-94-84 . [Appropriation, Board of Supervisors] Ordinance 

appropriating $149,520, Board of Supervisors from the General Fund Reserve 
to professional services to allow the Budget Analyst to conduct "Zero Base" 
Budget analysis of various City departments for fiscal year 1994-95; providing 
for ratification of action previously taken. (Supervisor Hsieh) RO # 94128 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE N. UTES PAGE 8 



14. File 101-94-82 . [Appropriation, Public Defender] Ordinance appropriating 
$452,624, Public Defender, from the General Fund Reserve to salaries and 
fringe benefits for the reduction of salary savings and creation of three (3) 
positions for fiscal year 1994-95. (Controller) RO #94204 (COMPANION TO 
FILE 102-94-13; RELATES TO FILES 101-94-85 AND 102-94-12) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
Reduce appropriation to $424,154. AMENDED TITLE: 
"Appropriating $424,154, Public Defender, from the General Fund 
Reserve to salaries and fringe benefits for the reduction of salary 
savings and creation of three (3) positions for fiscal year 1994-95." 

VOTE: 3-0. 



15. File 102-94-13 . [Public Employment, Public Defender] Ordinance amending 
Ordinance No. 293-94 (Annual Salary Ordinance, 1994/95) reflecting the 
addition of three (3) positions (classification 8174 Civil Attorney) in the 
Public Defender's Office. (Department of Human Resources) (COMPANION 
TO FILE 101-94-82; RELATES TO FILES 101-94-85 AND 102-94-12) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE h .UTES PAGE 9 



16. File 101-94-85 . [Appropriation, Trial Courts] Ordinance appropriating and 
rescinding $405,565, Trail Courts, from salaries and fringe benefits to create 
three (3) positions and pay fees of attorney and expert witnesses for fiscal 
year 1994-95. (Controller) RO #94199 (COMPANION TO FILE 102-94-14; 
RELATES TO FILES 101-94-82 AND 102-94-13) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Alan Carlson, Court Administrator, Superior Court. IN SUPPORT: 
None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. QUESTION DIVIDED ON CREATING THREE (3) 
POSITIONS AND PAYING FEES OF ATTORNEY AND EXPERT 
WITNESSES. 

File 101-94-85 . Ordinance appropriating and rescinding $138,564, 
from salaries and fringe benefits to allow Trail Courts to create 
three (3) positions for the fiscal year 1994-95. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO APRIL 26, 1995, 
MEETING. 

File 101-94-85.1 . Ordinance appropriating and rescinding 
$267,000, from salaries and fringe benefits to allow Trail Courts 
to pay fees of attorneys and expert witnesses for fiscal year 
1994-95. 

ACTION: RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



17. File 102-94-14 . [Public Employment, Superior Court] Ordinance amending 
Ordinance No. 293-94 (Annual Salary Ordinance 1994/95), Superior Court, 
reflecting the addition of three (3) positions (classification 0676 Research 
Assistant (1), 0697 Judicial Clerk (2). (Department of Human Resources) 
(COMPANION TO FILE 101-94-85; RELATES TO FILES 101-94-82 AND 
102-94-13) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Alan Carlson, Court Administrator, Superior Court. IN SUPPORT: 
None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO APRIL 26, 
1995, MEETING. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE K .UTES PAGE 10 



18. File 101-94-86 . [Appropriation, Fire Department] Ordinance appropriating 

$652,000, Fire Department, of 1992 Fire Protection Bond proceeds for Capital 
Improvement Project (design of new 911 Dispatch Center and Fire Station 41) 
for fiscal year 1994-95; subject of previous budgetary denial. (Controller) 
RO #94202 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Assistant Chief James Lynch, SF Fire Department; Gary Hoy, Bureau 
of Architecture, Department of Public Works. IN SUPPORT: None. 
OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. SEVER $52,000 AND CONTINUE 
$600,000 TO THE CALL OF THE CHAIR. 

File 101-94-86. Ordinance appropriating $600,000, Fire 
Department, of 1992 Fire Protection Bond proceeds for Capital 
Improvement Project (design of new 911 Dispatch Center and Fire 
Station 41) for fiscal year 1994-95; subject of previous budgetary 
denial.. 

ACTION: CONTINUED TO THE CALL OF THE CHAIR. 

File 101-94-86.1. Ordinance appropriating $52,000, Fire 
Department, of 1992 Fire Protection Bond proceeds for Capital 
Improvement Project (design of new 911 Dispatch Center and Fire 
Station 41) for fiscal year 1994-95. 

ACTION: RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



19. File 101-94-87 . [Appropriation, Department of Public Works] Ordinance 

appropriating and certifying $26,364, Department of Public Works, for Capital 
Improvement Project (sewer repair) to cover ten (10) percent overage as per 
Charter Section 7.203, providing for ratification of action previously taken, 
for fiscal year 1994-95. (Controller) RO #94200 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATT/E: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
Increase appropriation to $26,634. (Mayor's Office to provide 
letter authorizing increase.) AMENDED TITLE: "Appropriating 
and certifying $26,634, Department of Public Works, for Capital 
Improvement Project (sewer repair) to cover ten (10) percent 
overage as per Charter Section 7.203, providing for ratification of 
action previously taken, for fiscal year 1994-95. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE ft UTES PAGE 11 



20. File 101-94-88 . [Appropriation, Juvenile Probation Department] Ordinance 
appropriating $1,415,990, Juvenile Probation Department, of Federal 
Subvention Revenue for facilities maintenance at the Youth Guidance Center 
and Log Cabin Ranch for fiscal year 1994-95. (Controller) RO #94196 

SPEAKER: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Ace Tago, Business Manager, Juvenile Probation. IN SUPPORT: 
None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
Place $440,000 on reserve. AMENDED TITLE: "Appropriating 
$1,415,990, Juvenile Probation Department, of Federal Subvention 
Revenue for facilities maintenance at the Youth Guidance Center 
and Log Cabin Ranch for fiscal year 1994-95; placing $440,000 on 
reserve." 

VOTE: 3-0. 



TIME MEETING ADJOURNED: 5:00 P.M. 



CITY AND COUNTY 




AWH: Jane Juris on 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street, Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 



ur 



April 7, 1995 

nN documents scr 

TO: Budget Committee APR 1 2 1995 

FROM: Budget Analyst SAN F ^CiSCO 

& J PUBLIC LIBRARY 

SUBJECT:_April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 
Item 1 - File 193-95-1 

1. This item is a hearing to consider the Mayor's plan to renovate Candlestick Park 
for the 1999 Superbowl. 

2. In September of 1994 the Mayor's Office, the Recreation and Park Department 
(RPD), the San Francisco Convention and Visitor's Bureau and the 49ers 
(collectively known as the Superbowl Task Force) submitted a bid to the National 
Football League (NFL) to host the 1999 Superbowl. In November of 1994, the NFL 
selected San Francisco as the site for the 1999 Superbowl. 

3. The Board of Supervisors approved Resolution No. 756-94 on August 29, 1994, 
which endorsed the efforts of the Superbowl Task Force and encouraged the Task 
Force to submit a bid to the NFL on behalf of the City and County of San Francisco 
to host Superbowl XXXIII. Attachment No. 1 provides a copy of this resolution. The 
resolution was proposed for immediate adoption by the full Board of Supervisors. 
The matter was not discussed in Committee, and the Budget Analyst was not 
directed to review the bid submitted to the NFL. 

4. The Board of Supervisors resolution endorsing the bid refers to a nine year, $30 
million renovation project at Candlestick Park which had already been undertaken 
by the RPD. The resolution does not address future capital improvements to 
Candlestick Park. 

However, the cover letter from Edward DeBartolo, owner and Chairman of the 
Board of the San Francisco 49ers, to the Commissioner of the NFL, states that, "The 
City of San Francisco has committed itself to a stadium improvement program of 
$26,000,000 which will begin immediately upon receiving approval from the 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

membership." (See Attachment No. 2.) Within the text of the bid, this commitment 
is reiterated. The section of the bid entitled "Stadium Facility" states: 

The (Recreation and Park) Department, with the firm commitment of 
Mayor Frank Jordan, continues to upgrade the stadium and has 
developed a $26 million, four-year capital improvement program, 
leading to Super Bowl XXXIII. The program includes fixed salable seat 
expansion to 71,000 seats, renovation of all luxury suites, expansion of 
the football press box, locker room renovation, new press interview 
facilities, ADA compliance projects and general maintenance and 
replacements, including a new field drainage and irrigation system. 

Presently, the Stadium has 69,497 seats available for football games (65,000 seats 
are available for baseball games), according to Mr. Phil Arnold of the Recreation 
and Park Department. 

The bid goes on to discuss locker room renovation and press box expansion in 
greater detail. See Attachment No. 3 for an excerpt from the bid which discusses 
capital improvements. The bid includes no financial commitments other than the 
capital improvements. 

5. Although the bid to the NFL states a commitment to $26 million in capital 
improvements, the bid itself did not include a full fist of the proposed improvements. 
However, the $26 million was derived from a list prepared by the RPD and the 
Department of Public Works (DPW), with input from the Mayor's Office. The 
specific capital improvements are described and cost estimates for each 
improvement are shown in Attachment No. 4. 

Mr. Lazarus states that the City is not legally required to carry out these 
improvements, but the NFL has the right to withdraw its offer if such capital 
improvements are not completed by the start of the 1998 football season. 

6. Mr. Lazarus advises that several of the Superbowl capital improvements, 
estimated to cost a total of $17.7 million, were previously called for in a 1985 Master 
Plan for Candlestick Park that was approved by the Recreation and Park 
Commission, are scheduled replacements, or are required by law. These include: 

• Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility improvements, at $5 
million; 

• Plumbing repairs, at $400,000; 

• Suite improvements, at $2.64 million; 

• Field irrigation system and turf replacement, at $1.5 million; 

• Parking lot renovation, at $800,000; 

• Electrical emergency systems modifications, at $600,000; 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Parking lot restroom construction, at $2.16 million; 

Upper level waterproofing, at $1 million; 

Signage, at $800,000; 

Security improvements, $500,000; 

Improvements to the plaza of gates A and F, at $1.3 million; and 

Painting, at $1 million. 

7. Mr. Phil Arnold of the RPD states that the RPD has identified approximately $6 
million in revenues that would be available for Candlestick Park capital 
improvements over the next four years ($1.5 million per year) from rental fees paid 
by the 49ers and the Giants, Hotel Tax revenues designated for use at Candlestick 
Park, and the Stadium Operator's Admission Tax. 

8. Mr. Lazarus states that the Mayor has directed staff to identify private sector 
funding opportunities to raise the needed funds to complete the capital 
improvement projects for the Superbowl. Mr. Lazarus has presented the following 
sources and revenue estimates: 

Possible Revenue Source Possible Revenues 

Sale of stadium name, @ $1 million 
to $2 million/year over 5 years $5 - $10 million 

Advertising revenue from Superbowl 

product sponsorships, sold over next 4 years, 

@ $1 million/year $4 million 

$14 million bond issue supported by Candlestick 

Park revenues and Hotel Tax funds, OR 

$6 million in Candlestick Park funds $6 to $14 million* 

Total identified potential revenue: $15 to $28 million 

*Hotel Tax funds, which equal to approximately $1.5 million per year in excess of 
amounts currently being expended to support existing debt service, could either be 
expended directly for capital improvements at Candlestick Park (see Comment 7), or 
could be diverted from existing capital projects at Candlestick to support a new 
bond issue. Therefore, a bond issue would result in a net increase of $8 million over 
four years ($14 million bond issue less $6 million Hotel Tax increment funds). 

Mr. Lazarus has stated that up to an additional $2 million might also be realized 
from new Stadium Club seating in an expanded press box. However, no decisions 
have been made regarding the construction of a new or expanded press box. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Therefore, Mr. Lazarus has not included this $2 million in the revenue sources 
listed above. 

9. Based on methodology developed for the Superbowl in Atlanta, Georgia, Mr. 
Lazarus estimates that hosting the Superbowl will generate approximately $4.2 
million in additional tax revenues to the City, using Hotel, Parking, Sales, Utility 
and Business taxes, as follows: 

• Additional Hotel Tax revenues of $1.3 million, assuming 13,000 additional 
hotel rooms over five nights will be occupied as a result of Super Bowl 
XXXIII; 

• Additional Parking Tax revenues of $165,000, assuming 5,000 additional 
rental cars for five days; 

• Additional Sales Tax revenues of $450,000; 

• Additional unspecified Business and Utility taxes, and other unspecified 
revenues, at $2,285,000. 

The Budget Analyst notes that these estimates may be overstated, in that: 

• The above estimates assume that retail goods in San Francisco which are 
subject to sales taxes cost 25 percent more than the same goods would cost in 
Atlanta, Georgia. However, while certain items cost more in San Francisco 
than in many areas of the country, such as housing, other items, including 
retail goods, may be only slightly more expensive or the same cost; and 

• The estimate includes unenumerated revenues of $2,285,000 from direct and 
indirect sources. 

As Attachment 5 to this report, we provide a Memorandum from Mr. Lazarus 
detailing these revenue estimates. 

Cftmmpnf. 

It should be noted that all of the City funding appropriations, including Capital 
Improvements at Candlestick Park, are subject to appropriation approval by the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



84/07/1995 09:41 



4152218034 



SF R£C PARK 



PAGE 02 
Attachment 1 



Office of the Mayor 

SAN FRANCISCO 



File No. 197-94-3 




Prank m. Jordan 



Resolution No. 756-94 



ENDORSING THE EFFORTS OF THE SUPER BOWL TASK FORCE AND ENCOURAGING 

THE TASK FORCE TO SUBMIT A BID ON BEHALF OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN 

FRANCISCO TO HOST SUPERBOWL XXXIII. 



WHEREAS, The City and County of San Francisco and Stanford University hosted the very 
successful Super Bowl by the Bay in 1985; and 

WHEREAS, The Recreation and Park Department has undertaken a nine year, $30 million 
renovation project at Candlestick Park with the intent of expanding the seating capacity of the stadium 
to qualify for a Super Bowl; and 

WHEREAS, The National Football League is considering proposals from cities wishing to host 
Super Bowl XXXIII; and 

WHEREAS, The San Francisco Convention and Visitors Bureau, the San Francisco Forty Niners, 
the Mayor's Office, and the Recreation and Park Department comprise a Super Bowl Task Force and have 
prepared a bid to host SnperBowl XXXIII at Candlestick Park in January, 1999; and 

WHEREAS, San Francisco, the world's favorite destination, is an ideal locale for this premier 
sporting event; no, therefore, 

BE IT RESOL l^D. That the Board of Supervisors hereby endorses the efforts of the Super Bowl 
Task Force and encourages the Task Force to submit a bid on behalf of the City and County of San 
Francisco to host Super Bowl XXXII 1. 

Adopted - Board of Supervisors. San Francisco, August 29, 1994 

Ayes - Supervisors Alioto, Bierman, Conroy, Hallinan, Hsieh. Kennedy, Leal, Maher, Migdcn, 
and Shelley. 



Absent - Supervisor Kaufman 



/ hereby certify that the foregoing resolution was adopted by the 
Board of Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. 



Sept. 2. 1994 




200 CITY HAH.5AN (KANCIiCO. C'H'OknU VJiOJ 
HlJ)3i4-<,HI fAX HI5J J5A-6I60 



APR 03 '95 12:55PM PORT OF SF EXECUTIVE 



P. 2/9 



SAN FRANCISCO 4 9 E R S Actachment 




SUPER BOWL CHAMPIONS 
XVI. XIX. XXIII. XXIV 



September 6, 1994 



Paul Tagliabue 
Commissioner 
National Football League 
410 Park Avenue 
New York, NY 10022 



Carmen A. Policy 
President 



Administrative Office 
Marie P. DeBartolo Sports Centre 
4949 Centennial Boulevard 
Santa Clare, California 95054-1229 

ephone 409/ 5624949 
fax 408/ 7274937 



Dear Commissioner Tagliabue, 

The City of San Francisco and the San Francisco 49ERS enthusiastically invite 
the National Football League to grant us the opportunity to serve as the host 
community for Super Bowl XXXMI. We have formed a Super Bowl Task Force 
Committee which has assembled a bid package that reflects a significant and 
far-reaching commitment to this event and the NFL. John Marks, President 
of the Convention and Visitors Bureau for San Francisco, will serve as Co- 
chairman of the Committee along with Carmen A. Policy. The San Francisco 
49ERS will stay involved in a Co-chairmanship position if we are selected as 
the host city until the end of 1 999. This will be a continuing guarantee of our 
involvement and a direct connection to the League office so that any details 
that must be handled during the months and years prior to the game will be 
given the proper attention. 

The City of San Francisco has committed itself to a stadium improvement 
program of $26,000,000 which will begin immediately upon receiving appro- 
val from the membership. Those teams that play in San Francisco will recog- 
nize appreciable benefits both before and long after Super Bowl XXXIII is 
played. The Super Bowl Task Force Committee and the City have committed 
to many other items which I assure you will make our bid highly competitive. 

This beautiful City by the Bay is very rich in National Football League history 
and it has contributed a great deal to professional football. It is recognized as 
the most beautiful and sought-after place to visit on this planet. It is only 
fitting that the world's #1 City should be the host for the world's #1 sporting 
event. 



^^ 



Very truly yours, 



Edward J. DeBartolo, Jr. 

Owner and Chairman of the Board 



sr Kt_u rAKK 




PAGE 04 

Attachment 3 
Page 1 of 2 



24 



STADIUM FACILITY 



Question 12 

Lacker room details - space 
Should bt large enough for 55 
pUym, leparate training 
ana, separate locker rooms 
for head caach and another 
for up to twelve assistants. 



Candlestick Park will meet or exceed all of the locker room 
requirements needed by the NFL. As part of the City's $26 
million upgrade, each of the two locker rooms will clearly reilcci 
NFL quality. Each team will have more than ample locker room 
space to accommodate 55 players, plus associated coaches, 
training and equipment areas. 



Question 13 

Special spacious interview 
areas close proximity to lacker 
rooms (20, 000 square feet total 
or 10,000 for each of two 
areas.} If not available in 
stadium, should detail 
alternative and cost. 



A temporary 20,000 sq. ft. facility will be provided contiguous to 
the team locker rooms at no cost to the NFL. Access will be 
controlled and secured. See stadium map in "ATTACHMENTS" 
Section 3.1. 



Question Id 

Maximum media work space 
plus areas that can be 
converted to auxiliary sections 
without dramatic loss of 
seating for sole (7S0 working 
tpacei, with octets to power 
supply). Maximum number of 
booths for radio, TV, 
networks, coaches, team 
officials, foreign broadcasts, 
etc. (2S minimum). Indicate 
status of wiring each position 
for telephone and power. 
Detail number of seats in 
existing preti box (27S 
minimum) and booths. Plans 
for accommodating additional 
space and total lots of seats 
Architectural renderings 
should be included for all 
temporary plans. Locations 
for holding media from TV 
crew/ who attend any 
pottgame press conferences 
(7, $00 square feet). Potential 
location and cost to construct 
poslgame mrdia work area of 
up to 20.000 square feel 



Major renovation and expansion to Candlestick Park's press hox is 
an integral part of the City's committed $26 million improvement 
program. For Super Bowl XXXTJI, there will be 200 permanent 
seats in the football press box. In addition, there will be 700 
auxiliary press seats in the upper deck (300 with tops) for a anal 
of 900. There will be 12 media booths in the football press box, 
seating an average of 14 persons. Additionally, nine (9) media 
booths will be utilized in the existing baseball press box, 
averaging 12 seats per booth. Also, seven (7) auxiliary media 
booths, seating an average of 10 persons will be temporarily 
constructed in the stadium's upper deck for a total of 28. All 
media booths and press seats will have adequate power and 
telephone service. Architectural renderings are in the final Mages; 
however, it is anticipated that the total gross scat loss from the 
salable manifest as a result of temporary press seats and media 
booths will be 1,300. As committed in Stadium Facility question 
3, the net salable seats to the NFL will be 71,000. A holding 
area will be created in or adjacent to the post-game interview, 
facility, and will have controlled access from the locker room 
area. A total of 20,000 sq. ft. of space is planned at no cost to 
the NFL. 



84/87/1995 89:41 



4152218834 



SF REC PARK 




PAGE 83 

Attachment 3 
Page 2 of 2 



19 



STADIUM FACILITY 



Question 3 

Minimal fixed talablt sue of 
stadium must be at tttui 
70,000. If temporary noting 
it proposed, detail exact 
mature, eott to UataU and 
funding of this cost Salable 
is defined as capacity less 
needed for extra media, that 
are obstructed, from a trade 
out for suite holders, etc. 
Architectural renderings 
should be Included on all 
temporary needs. 



The City and County of San Francisco's Recreation and Park 
Department has completed a nine-year, $33 million renovation and 
expansion program. Candlestick Park now has 70,200 fixed 
salable seats and 93 luxury suites. Concession and rcstroom 
facilities have been enlarged and modernized, and entry gates and 
concourses have been expanded. Additionally, new scoreboards, 
a replay screen and concourse closed circuit television have also 
been installed. 

The Department, with the firm commitment of Mayor Frank 
Jordan, continues to upgrade the stadium and has developed a $26 
million, four-year capital improvement program, leading to Super 
Bowl XXXin. The program includes fixed salable seat expansion 
to 71.000 seats, renovation of all luxury suites, expansion of the 
football press box, locker room renovation, new press interview 
facilities, ADA compliance projects and general maintenance and 
replacements, including a new field drainage and irrigation 
system. 



Additionally, the Super Bowl Task Force is working with ADP 
Sports Inc. to investigate the possibility of constructing additional 
temporary seating for Super Bowl XXXIII. It is undetermined as 
of this writing exactly what potential exists. 

See "GREETINGS" Section for letter of commitment from the 
Mayor of the City and County of San Francisco and Board of 
Supervisors' Resolution. 



Question 4 

Details on chauback or special 
section seating. Note total 
setts between goal lines. 
Include any obligation or right 
to retain seats for existing 
Octet holders. 



All stadium seats are chairback. The number of seats between the 
goal lines exceed 28,000. Existing ticket holders do not have the 
right to their seats for special events such as the Super Bowl. 



Attachment 4 



Candlestick Park Stadium 

Capital Improvements 

Superbowl XXXIII 



I Locker Room Improvements 

II Press Box Improvements 



III Press Box Elevator 

rV Interview Facilities 

V Grounds Crew Room 

VI Broadcast Compound 
Improvements 

VII ADA Accessibility 

VIII Additional Seats 

IX Plumbing Repairs 

X Suites Improvements 

XI Player's Training Room 

XII Field Irrigation System 

XIII Parking Lot Renovation 



Remodel existing football locker room 

Add third floor above existing press box 
Expansion behind existing press box - hospitality 
Expansion to 10 yard line markers 
Existing press box renovation 
Two exit stairs 

New elevator to football press box 

Develop at existing grounds crew location 

Develop at centerfield storage room 

Expand existing office building 
Enlarge existing compound 

Scope defined by City 

Expand seating to 71,000 seats 

Water main replacement 

Remodel 93 existing suites 

New facility near E Plaza 

Field irrigation system replacement 
Turf replacement 

Drainage, resealing, restriping, signange 



XIV Electrical Emergency Systems Scope defined by City 



XV Parking Lot Restrooms 

XVI Upper Level Waterproofing 

XVII Additional Signage 
XVin Security Improvements 

XIX A Gate Plaza Improvements 

XX F Gate Plaza Improvements 

XXI Painting 
Projects Grand Total 



Six new buildings at A F & E plazas 
Waterproofing repair program 



$281,000 
6,000,000 



800,000 
422,000 
612,000 
126,000 

5,000,000 
200,000 
400,000 

2,640,000 
612,000 

1,500,000 

800,000 

600,000 

2,160,000 

1,000,000 

800,000 

500,000 

800,000 

500,000 

1 000.000 

$26,753,000 



APR 06 '95 03:48PM PORT OF SF EXECUTIVE 



PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO 




Ferry Bidding 
San Francisco. CA 94111 
Tbleononc 115 274 0400 
Telex 275940 PSFufl 

MEMORANDUM Fa " " S2W0S28 



Cabta SFPOFTTCOMM 
Writer 



April 6, 1995 



TO: Harvey Rose 

FROM: Jim Las 

SUBJECT: Super Bowl XXXIII Revenues 




The economic benefits of hosting a Super Bowl are large, especially during an off-peak 
period, such as late January. 

According to John Marks, President of the Convention and Visitors Bureau, the City's 
hotel occupancy in late January has averaged 57%. During the four or five days prior to 
Super Bowl Sunday (January 31, 1999), hotel occupancy will be close to 100%. 

Estimates of economic impact from Super Bowl's has increased from Tampa Bay's 1984 
estimate of $87 million, to San Diego's 1988 estimate of $143 million to Adanta's $166 
million finding for the 1994 game. Enclosed is a report prepared by the University of 
Georgia, which found that the game had a direct impact on Georgia's economy of $76 
million and an additional indirect impact of $90 million. 

Using the Atlanta visitor estimates (San Francisco's visitor count should be higher) and 
increasing daily expenditures for inflation (15%) and higher base costs in the Bay Area, 
(25%), total direct regional spending in 1999 should be at least $106,000,000 ($352 x 4 
days x 75,000 visitors). Using Adanta's multiplier for indirect benefits, total economic 
impact can be estimated at $232,000,000. 

Assuming 75% of the visitors stay in San Francisco and virtually all of the NFL events, 
corporate hospitality activities and media expenditures occur in the City, it is safe to 
assume that at least $174,000,000 of economic benefit will accrue to the City. 

Regarding direct tax revenues to San Francisco, I estimate additional hotel tax revenue at 
$1,300,000 (13,000 rooms x 5 nights x $20 tax), parking tax at $165,000 (5,000 cars x 5 
day x $5 tax + game day parking tax) and sales tax at $450,000 ($45,000,000 x City 
share of 1%). The City will also receive additional business and utility taxes and hotel 
occupancy will exceed seasonal norms for up to two weeks before and one week after the 
game. Total direct and indirect tax revenue to the region can conservatively be estimated 
at $4.2 million. 

Enclosure 

Rosc.igq 



10 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Item 2 - File 97-94-82 
Item: 



Ordinance amending Administrative Code Section 18.13 to 
require all City departments to provide the Board with a 
biannual analysis justifying overtime expenditures in excess 
of 5% of budgeted straight-time wages for all employees of 
the department, and provide an analysis of whether the 
hiring of additional part-time or full-time employees would be 
more cost-effective than the use of current staffing levels and 
overtime hours. 



Description: 1. The proposed amendment to the Administrative Code 

would insert subsection (b) to Section 18.13 of the 
Administrative Code to require City departments to report, 
on a bi-annual basis, overtime expenditures in excess of 5% 
budgeted straight-time wages of all employees of the 
department to the Board of Supervisors, and analyze 
whether hiring additional employees would be more cost- 
effective than the use of overtime hours. 



Comments: 



2. Administrative Code Section 18.13 currently limits 
permissible overtime hours that a City employee may work to 
16 percent of the number of hours the employee is regularly 
scheduled to work on a straight-time basis in that fiscal year. 
An appointing officer may require an employee to work in 
excess of this amount, but must provide written 
authorization for this extra overtime work, and provide the 
Board of Supervisors with a biannual report justifying this 
excess overtime expenditure. 

3. However, Section 18.13, which also applies an overtime 
"cap" of 16 percent of straight time hours, does not apply to 
members of the uniformed ranks of the Police and Fire 
Departments, Transit Operators and Transit Operator 
Supervisors of the Municipal Railway, or nurses and other 
emergency workers employed by the Department of Public 
Health. This proposed ordinance would not change the cap on 
overtime hours or the exemptions. 

1. In October, 1994 the Budget Analyst submitted a report to 
the Board of Supervisors on overtime expenditures from 
January, 1993 through June, 1994. The findings contained 
in the Budget Analyst report included: 

a) The City of San Francisco pays approximately $62.6 
million in overtime and holiday overtime wages per 
year to employees in more than 40 City departments. 

b) Many City employees still work overtime hours in 
excess of 16% of non-overtime hours, hut most of these 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



I I 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

employees, such as Police, Fire, Muni and Nurses, are 
exempt from Administrative Code Section 18.13 
limiting permissible overtime. 

c) The Muni, Police Department and Fire Department 
spends the vast majority of City overtime dollars. 

d) The small number of employees that earn very 
large amounts of overtime wages pose significant costs 
to the City in the form of increased retirement 
benefits. 

2. The Budget Analyst report recommended the Board of 
Supervisors amend Administrative Code Section 18.13 such 
that all departments with significant overtime expenditures 
must provide the Board with a biannual analysis justifying 
the overtime expenditure and analyzing whether the hiring 
of additional part-time or full-time employees would be more 
cost effective than current staffing levels and overtime hours. 
This Section of the Administrative Code would continue to 
exempt the uniformed members of the Police and Fire 
Departments, Transit Operators and Transit Operator 
Supervisors of the San Francisco Municipal Railway, Nurses 
and other emergency workers employed by the Department of 
Public Health from the 16% overtime cap, as described in 
Point 3, above. As presently written, the exemption would 
also apply to the bi-annual reporting requirement that would 
be inserted in the Administrative Code by this proposed 
ordinance. 

The Budget Analyst believes that the reporting requirement 
to the Board of Supervisors should apply to all City 
Departments that spend significant overtime dollars. 
Moreover, the 5% threshold for this proposed reporting 
requirement allows some departments (i.e. San Francisco 
General Hospital and the Department of Public Works) to 
avoid the reporting requirement even though they have 
significant overtime expenditures. The recommendation 
below will, if approved by the Board of Supervisors, correct 
the proposed ordinance to conform to the prior 
recommendations of the Budget Analyst. 

Recommendation: Amend the ordinance to make the bi-annual reports to the 
Board of Supervisors on overtime spending applicable to all 
City Departments (i.e. uniform members of the Police and 
Fire Departments, Transit Operators and Transit Operator 
Supervisors, Nurses and emergency workers should not be 
exempted) who spend in excess of 5% of total budgeted 
straight-time wages of all employees of the department or 
who spend $1.0 million annually or more in overtime wages. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

12 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Item 3 - File 96-95-1 



NOTE: This item was continued at the March 29, 1995 Budget Committee 
meeting. 



Department: 



Item: 



Description: 



Assessors 
Block, Lot 

140-8 



141-11 



165-21 



Department of Real Estate 
Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Ordinance authorizing and directing the sale through public 
auction of City-owned surplus property. 

The proposed ordinance would authorize and direct the sale 
through public auction, of City-owned surplus property under 
the jurisdiction of the Department of Public Works. Mr. Ken 
Chopping of the Real Estate Department reports the 
following parcels of vacant land would be sold: 



Location 

Davis between 
Broadway and 
Vallejo 



Area 

in Sq. Ft . 



10,799 



Broadway between 
Front and 30,940 

Battery 

Broadway between 
Battery and 17,337 

Sansome 



Zoned 



C-2 



C-2 



C-2 



Minimum Bid 



$1,150,000 



$4,000,000 



$2,350,000 



Comments: 



1. Mr. Chopping advises that the minimum bids listed above 
are approximately 90 percent of the fair market values for 
these properties. Mr. Chopping reports that these minimum 
bids at the 90 percent rate are being used instead of full fair 
market values because of the stagnant real estate market for 
the subject properties. 

2. The Department of City Planning has found that the sale 
of this surplus property is in conformity with the City's 
Master Plan and the Eight Priority Policies of Planning Code 
Section 101.1. 

3. The proposed ordinance would authorize the Real Estate 
Department to conduct a public auction for the sale of the 
subject properties. The award of the sale of these properties 
to the highest bidder and the related amount to be received 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



13 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

by the City would be subject to subsequent separate 
legislative approval by the Board of Supervisors. 

4. The Office of Supervisor Teng has advised the Budget 
Analyst that a request will be made to continue this to the 
call of the Chair. 

Recommendation: Because of concerns raised by the Chinatown and North 
Beach communities, we consider approval of the proposed 
ordinance to be a policy decision for the Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



1 A 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 4 -File 101-94-16.1 

Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of March 
29, 1995. The Department was requested to meet with various interested 
parties in order to consider their concerns regarding the structure of the 
proposed Serious Habitual Offender Program. 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Juvenile Probation Department (JPD) 

Hearing requesting the release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $275,470 to implement the Serious Habitual 
Offender Program 

$275,470 

FY 1994-95 Juvenile Probation Department Budget 

In October of 1994, the Board of Supervisors placed $275,470 
on reserve to be used to implement a new Serious Habitual 
Offender Program (SHOP) for repeat juvenile offenders in 
JPD (File 101-94-16). This funding was placed on reserve 
pending the provision of additional program detail. 

Serious Habitual Offender Prog ram (SHOP): 

The Probation Services Division of JPD is currently 
establishing a new Serious Habitual Offender Unit to 
administer SHOP. The purpose of SHOP is to target the 
estimated 150 juveniles, who commit the majority of juvenile 
violent crimes in San Francisco, with intensive supervision 
and services. These 150 youth represent an estimated 12 
percent of the 1,300 juveniles currently monitored by JPD. 
The probation officers assigned to SHOP will have the 
authority to enforce the special probation conditions of the 
youth in SHOP, including arrest if the probation is violated. 
The probation officers will coordinate services with the school 
system, the Health Department, community agencies, the 
Police Department and the District Attorney. The Serious 
Habitual Offender Unit is to be staffed with eight positions, 
including one existing Supervising Probation Officer, two 
existing Senior Probation Officers, four existing Probation 
Officers, and one Clerk. All of these positions will be 
transferred from their existing work units to the Serious 
Habitual Offender Unit that administers SHOP based on 
their experience levels. The loss to these units of eight 
positions, as a result of the transfer, will be offset by the 
hiring of two Senior Probation Officers through existing 
positions which are currently vacant, and witb six positions 
to be requested in the Fiscal Year 1995-96 budget. Mr. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

L5 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Virgilio advises that the juveniles in the SHOP program are 
violent repeat offenders who are likely to require a law 
enforcement aspect to their supervision and monitoring. The 
probation officers assigned to SHOP will have the authority 
to enforce the special probation conditions of the youth in 
SHOP, including arrest if the probation is violated. The 
program budget was based on a seven month period 
beginning December 1, 1994 through June 30, 1995. 



SHOP Budget: 

Regular Automobiles (6) 
Caged Security Vehicles (3) 
Gasoline & vehicle repairs (for above 

listed automobiles and vehicles) 
Voicemail 
Pagers 

Cellular phones ($500 x 6) 
Telecommunications Charges 

(for cellular phones and pagers) 
Computers and software equipment 
Training 
Printing/copying 
Office Supplies 
Furniture and supplies 



The revised budget, as submitted by JPD, reflects (a) $40,685 
of reductions previously recommended by the Budget 
Analyst, (b) the withdrawal of all funds for caged security 
vehicles as requested by the Budget Committee and (c) the 
addition of $60,000 for the District Attorney. The budget 
explanations, including the amounts originally budgeted, are 
described below. 

Regular Automobiles ($120,000): The proposed funding 
would purchase six automobiles for use by the probation 
officers in the Serious Habitual Offender Unit of JPD to track 
the juveniles at school, at home, or wherever they should be, 
to ensure that they are there. Mr. Virgilio advises that for 
the entire JPD, which contains 80 probation officers, there 
are only 12 automobiles, or one for every 6.6 probation 
officers. As such, Mr. Virgilio advises that for SHOP to meet 
its intended objectives, each probation officer in the Serious 
Habitual Offender Unit must have immediate access to an 
automobile. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

16 



Original 


Revised 


Budget 


Budget 


$120,000 


$96,000 


75,000 


— 


5,000 


2,142 


12,000 


200 


9,600 


1,575 


3,000 


1,505 


5,000 


2,188 


30,000 


30,087 


3,000 


3,000 


2,000 


858 


4,070 


1,743 


6,800 


6,800 


— 


60.000 


$275,470 


$206,098 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



The Purchasing Department estimates that the cost of each 
vehicle is approximately $16,000, including sales tax, for a 
total of $96,000. Therefore, the proposed request of $120,000 
should be reduced to $96,000 for a total savings of $24,000 as 
shown in the revised budget. 

Gasoline and Vehicle Repairs ($5,000): The proposed 
funds would be used for gasoline and vehicle repairs required 
for the proposed vehicles listed above. This request was 
revised to $2,142. 

Voicemail ($12,000): The proposed funds would have 
purchased a complete voicemail system for the JPD. Mr. 
Virgilio advises that probation officers spend the majority of 
their time away from their offices, and receive many urgent 
calls per day. Currently, there are only six secretaries to 
answer phones for eight divisions. Mr. Virgilio states that 
the SHOP probation officers must be accessible at all times. 
The cost estimate of $12,000 was provided to JPD by the 
Department of Electricity and Telecommunications. This 
request was revised to $200 for minimal voicemail lease costs 
for the balance of the year. 

Pagers ($9,600): The proposed funds would have purchased 
72 pagers at a cost of $133 each, to provide immediate access 
to probation officers who are not in their offices. Mr. Virgilio 
advises that the inability to contact probation officers 
immediately is a constant problem within JPD. Further, Mr. 
Virgilio advises that the SHOP probation officers must be 
accessible at all times. This request has been reduced to 
$1,575 which would result in leasing 7 pagers. 

Cellular Phones ($3,000): The proposed funds would have 
purchased six cellular phones at $500 each for the six 
probation officers in the Serious Habitual Offender Unit. Mr. 
Ace Tago of JPD advises that the JPD currently has three 
cellular phones. One cellular phone is used by the 
Department Director, and the other two cellular phones are 
used by probation officers on family visits, or other places 
where immediate back-up assistance may be required. This 
request has been reduced to $1,505. 

Telecommunication Charges ($5,000): The proposed 
funds would be used to pay the telecommunications charges 
for the cellular phones and the pagers. 

These proposed funds were based on a seven-month period, 
but will be needed for only three months. As such, the 
proposed request for Telecommunications Charges should be 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

17 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



recalculated based on a three month time period beginning 
April 1, 1995 and ending June 30, 1995. Therefore, the 
proposed request of $5,000 should be reduced to $2,142, 
reflecting a savings of $2,858. The revised budget has further 
reduced this request to $2,188. 

Computers and Software Equipment ($30,000): The 

proposed funds would purchase six computers at a cost of 
$4,000 each, or $24,000 total, one printer for a cost of $2,000, 
and software at a cost of $4,000. Mr. Virgilio advises that 
one objective of SHOP is to implement a computer tracking 
system that would monitor the juveniles in SHOP. This 
computer tracking system would be accessible to the Court, 
the District Attorney, and the Police Department. Currently, 
there is no central method to share information, nor is there 
any means to monitor the juveniles through an electronic 
system. This request has been increased to $30,087. 

Ms. Deborah Vincent-James of the Electronic Information 
Processing Steering Committee (EIPSC) advises that the JPD 
is not required to receive EIPSC approval prior to the 
purchase of these computers and software equipment because 
the JPD has not exceeded the maximum yearly purchase 
limit of 20 computers not requiring EIPSC approval. 

Training ($3,000): The proposed funds would provide 
computer training to the eight-person Serious Habitual 
Offender Unit in the use of various software programs. The 
training would be provided by the Informational Services 
Division of the Controller's Office. 

Printing/Copying ($2,000): The proposed funds would be 
used for printing and copying expenses. This request was 
revised to $858. 

Office Supplies ($4,070): The proposed funds would 
purchase office supplies, including paper, pens, pencils, 
binders, etc. for the eight-person Serious Habitual Offender 
Unit. This request was revised to $1,743. 

Furniture ($6,800): The proposed funds would purchase 
office furniture, including desks, chairs, and file cabinets for 
the eight SHOP staff. The furniture is for the two positions 
which are currently vacant, and for the six positions which 
are being requested in the Fiscal Year 1995-96 budget. The 
Attachment provided by JPD, includes a list of the furniture 
and the prices for such furniture. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Comments: 1. The Attachment, provided by the District Attorney's Office, 

explains the basis and need for the requested $60,000 for the 
District Attorney. 

2. It should be noted that the ongoing annual General Fund 
costs for the Serious Habitual Offender Program, (excluding 
one-time start-up costs), are $468,866. Mr. Tago states that 
the overall Fiscal Year 1995-96 General Fund allocation for 
JPD, which includes funding for SHOP, will not represent an 
increase over the Fiscal Year 1994-95 General Fund 
allocation for JPD. 

Recommendations: 1. Approval of the proposed release of reserved funds is a 
policy matter for the Board of Supervisors. 

2. If the Budget Committee releases funds for the Serious 
Habitual Offender Program, the maximum amount of funds 
to be released should be $206,098 ($275,470 less $206,098) in 
accordance with the revised budget as detailed above. The 
balance of $69,372 should be returned to the General Fund. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

19 



flP R _ 07 _.g 5 FRI 12:51 ID:SF DISTRICT ATTY YGC TEL NO: 415-753-7700 FRX7709 »699 P02 



Attachment 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY Fa § e L ot 2 



ARLO SMITH /tftSffik ROBERT M.PODESTA 

DISTRICT ATTOHNSV ££«80} oX*?Sv 




SAN FRANCISCO 

880 BRVANT STREET. SAN FRANaSCO 94103 TEL. I4ISI SM-I7M 

April 7, 1995 

VIA FAX 

Michelle Ruggles 
Budget Analyst Office 
Board of Supervisors 
1390 Market St. #1025 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Ms. Ruggles: 

This letter is being provided pursuant to your request for 
further information with regard the amount of $60,000. for an 
Assistant District Attorney position which is contained in the 
Juvenile Probation Department's request for release of funds for 
the Serious Offender Program. 

The proposal is that the Juvenile Probation Department fund 
a portion of the salary (with benefits) of an Assistant District 
Attorney. The sum represents 60% of a Senior Trial Attorney, 
Step 4. Our office will fund the remaining 40% of that position, 
with the funds to come from the Vehicle Fund. 

The duties of the Assistant District Attorney who will be 
designated as the Serious Offender Program attorney will be to 
work with the SFPD and Probation Department in investigation, 
preparation, and litigation of any new case involving a program 
participant. The ADA will review each booking with the Probation 
Officer, review all available information about the minor, to 
include law enforcement contacts, probation contacts, social 
history and school history. The ADA will also review the evidence 
presented by the SFPD as to the filing of any new charges, and 
make a determination as to the charges to be filed, consistent 
with the current filing policies of our office. The ADA will 
appear at the detention hearing and at all subsequent court 
appearances, including arraignment, pre-trial, motions, trial, 
disposition, and restitution hearing. The ADA will be the only 
district attorney assigned to the case and as such, will provide 
consistency and continuity in contact with the victims and 
witnesses, from the beginning of tho case through conclusion of 
the case. The ADA will meet with the Probation Officer, and any 



20 



APR-07-'95 FRI 12:55 ID:SF DISTRICT flTTY YGC TEL NO: 415-753-7700 FAX7709 8700 P02 



Attachment 
Page 2 of 2 



Ms. Michelle Ruggloa 
April 7, 1995 
Page Two 

other appropriate and interested parties prior to disposition/ 
and be prepared to present any evidence necessary to the court. 

The ADA who is assigned to the Serious Offender Program will 
be responsible for the vertical prosecution, as described above, 
of any new cases charged on program participants. Additionally, 
time permitting, the ADA will also file and prosecute 
supplemental petitions (probation violations), should the minor 
violate the terms and conditions of probation. 

Currently, the staffing at the Juvenile Division of our 
office does not allow for vertical prosecution, except in 
homicide or 707B cases. Our staffing currently is for five 
attorneys; we have three attorneys currently handling over 500 
open cases . The cases are handled by whichever attorney is in 
court at the time the case comes on the calendar. This does not 
allow the attorneys time to review the minor's history and other 
relevant factors in depth. We have one attorney currently 
assigned to two double homicide cases which have been pending for 
over one year; that attorney is also charged with handling WI 
707B cases. The managing attorney handles case conferences with 
the SFPD and Juvenile Probation Department, determination of 
whether cases should be charges, charges to be filed, and other 
administrative duties, which include participation on the School 
Attendance Review Board, and community meetings. 

The position will be a full-time position. Please contact me 
if you require any further information. 



•\truly yours, 




Cynthia M. Lee 
Managing Attorney 



CML:nn 



'1 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Item 5 - File 101-94-5.1 



Department: 

Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Comments: 



Fire Department 

Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Hearing requesting the release of reserved funds from 1992 
Fire Protection Bond interest earnings in the amount of 
$69,850 for the replacement of an underground fuel tank at 
Fire Station No. 13. 

$69,850 

1992 Proposition C Fire Improvement Bond interest earnings 

In July of 1994, the Board of Supervisors appropriated 
$98,436 in interest earnings from 1992 Proposition C Fire 
Facilities Improvement Bond Fund monies including $20,586 
for DPW Design and Construction Management costs and 
$69,850 for construction contract and contingency costs for 
the replacement of the underground fuel tank at Fire Station 
No. 13 located at Sansome and Washington Streets. Of the 
$98,436 total, $69,850 was placed on reserve pending the 
selection of the contractor and the MBE/WBE status of the 
contractor. 

Mr. Thinh Nguyen of the DPW advises that the Fire 
Department has selected the lowest bidder, EMJ Contractors, 
which submitted a bid of $156,350, of which $54,345 would be 
used for the replacement of the underground fuel tank (see 
Comment 2). EMJ Contractors is neither an MBE or a WBE 
firm. 

The DPW is requesting the release of the entire amount of 
$69,850 previously reserved to pay for the $54,345 portion of 
the contract amount, including $15,505 or 28.5 percent, for 
contingency funds. 

1. Assistant Chief James Lynch of the Fire Department 
states that the full amount of $69,850 is being requested 
because the Department has encountered unanticipated costs 
during recent underground work involving such problems as 
toxic material, cracked foundations and defective sewers. 
Therefore, he requests that a contingency fund of 28.5 
percent, or $15,505, be permitted. 

2. Mr. Nguyen advises that the replacement of the 
underground fuel tank at Fire Station 13 is part of a joint 
contract which includes the replacement of an adjacent fuel 
tank which ruptured during the 1989 Loma Prieta 

ROARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



22 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

earthquake. According to Mr. Nguyen, the $156,350 total 
amount of the joint contract would be paid for by (1) $102,005 
in FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) funds 
previously appropriated by the Board of Supervisors for the 
replacement of the ruptured fuel tank and (2) $54,345 in 
reserved funds subject to this request for the replacement of 
the other fuel tank. 

2. The Attachment, provided by Mr. Nguyen, shows the 
contractors which submitted bids for the joint contract, the 
amounts of the bids and the MBE/WBE status of the 
contractors. 

Recommendation: Approve the proposed release of reserved funds in the 
requested amount of $69,850. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

23 



34/ 0<*/ I'M i.^.ZZ) H 1 J-DD0-400J 



Specification No. 7088S 



tNUlINttKlNb BUKtAU 



TABULATION OF BIDS 



Jitle: 8an Frenoiaco Fire Department 
station 13 
Underground Fuel Tanks Replace* 



lida Received! February 22, 1995 
aaia: Unit Bid Items 



Attachment 



iddera : 

EMJ Contractors 



Subsurface Environmental 
WBE 

Accutite 

V.C.I, of California 




of E.E. 



/or age Bid: 

agineer ' a Ea timate : 



218,094 110% Of E.E. 
198,000 



pparent Low Bidder: EMJ Contractors 

550 Church Street 

San Francisco CA 94114 



Telephone: (415) 664-3060 



Lbcont factor a: 

Henchion Environmental 
Northwest Demolition 
Fitzearld Electric 
San Luis Construction 



Envi Isolation 
Drilling and Offhaul 
Electric and Insulation 
Excavation 



59,000 
17,500 
15, 200 
12,920 



Bob Jew 
John Cribbs 
Todd Cockburn 
Controller 



Linda Chin 
Peg Divine 
Nelson Wonq 
Sophia Horn 



Dob Swanstrom 
Foon Chow 
Don Eng 
Maurirp Williams 



H:hah 

bruary 22, 1995 



2U 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 11, 1995 

Item 6 -File79-92-3.il 



Department: 
Item: 



Description: 



Comments: 



Recommendation: 



Mayor's Office of Community Development (MOCD) 

Hearing requesting the release of reserved funds from the 
Mayor's Office of Community Development, 1993 Community 
Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, for financial and 
compliance audit services to be performed by the accounting 
firm of Calvin Louie. 

In November of 1992 the Board of Supervisors approved a 
resolution authorizing the Mayor's Office to apply for, accept 
and expend up to $21,708,373 in funds from the 1993 
Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) entitlement 
from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban 
Development (HUD). Of the $21,708,373 total amount, the 
Board placed $815,791 on reserve including $100,000 for 
MOCD Program Administration, Subgrantee Audits. The 
MOCD now requests the release of these funds to be used for 
financial and compliance audits of selected CDBG 
subgrantees by the accounting firm of Calvin Louie, an MBE 
firm. 

1. The Attachment provided by MOCD is a list of the CDBG 
fund subgrantees that would be audited under the proposed 
resolution and the amount of CDBG funds each subgrantee 
received in calendar years 1993 and 1994. 

2. Mr. Bernhard Gunther advises that the firm of Calvin 
Louie was previously selected through a request for proposal 
process on the basis of the amount bid and previous 
experience with HUD audits. The firm is to provide an 
estimated 3,337 hours of work at an average hourly wage of 
$30.20. 

Approve the proposed release of reserved funds in the 
requested amount of $100,000. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



25 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Items 7 and 8 - Files 101-94-71 and 102-94-19. 

Note: These items were continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 
April 5, 1995. 



Department: 
Items: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Airport 

Item 7, File 101-94-71 - Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance appropriating $277,618 of Airport Operating Fund 
monies for salaries and fringe benefits for the creation of 33 
positions and the deletion of one position pertaining to the 
Airport's implementation of the Master Plan and Master 
Plan related Mitigation Program. 

Item 8, File 102- 94-12- Ordinance amending the 1994-95 
Annual Salary Ordinance reflecting the addition of 33 
positions and the deletion of one position at the Airport. 

$277,618 

Airport Operating Fund 

The Airport is requesting the proposed supplemental 
appropriation to pay for salaries and fringe benefits to allow 
the Airport to create 33 new positions to implement the 
Airport's Master Plan and related Mitigation Program. 

The proposed supplemental appropriation would appropriate 
$277,618, for the period May 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995 as 
follows: 



Permanent Salaries 
Fringe Benefits 
Total 



$233,536 

44.082 

$277,618 



The following are descriptions of the foregoing funding 
requests: 

Permanent Salaries ($233.536) 

The Airport's Master Plan was adopted by the Board of 
Supervisors in December of 1992. The overall Master Plan 
consists of approximately 45 construction projects and 
various demolition, survey, and site testing projects. Major 
projects under the Master Plan include a new International 
Terminal, a Ground Transportation Center, an Airport 
Light Rail System and new cargo and aircraft maintenance 
buildings. The Attachment, provided by the Airport, is a 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



26 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



listing of 31 of the total of 45 projects. The 31 projects are 
included in the Near Term Master Plan. 

Fringe Benefits ($44.082) 

This amount was calculated based on approximately 18.8 
percent of Permanent Salaries. 

The proposed ordinance (File 102-94-12) would amend the FY 
1994-95 Annual Salary Ordinance to add 33 new positions 
and delete one position as follows: 

Maximum 



No. of 


Biweekly 


Salary 


Classification/Title Positions Salary At 


Top Stop 


Add 

1203 Personnel Technician 


1 


$1,243-$1,506 


$39,307 


1242 Personnel Analyst 


1 


$1,502-$1,844 


$48,128 


1244 Sr. Personnel Analyst 


1 


$l,844-$2,242 


$58,516 


1630 Account Clerk 


1 


$1,013-$1,226 


$31,999 


1659 Chief Systems Accountant 


1 


$2,342-$2,847 


$74,307 


1721 Data Entry Operator 


2 


$1,032-$1,249 


$32,599 


1802 Research Assistant 


1 


$1,316-$1,596 


$41,656 


1818 MIS Specialist II 


1 


$1,565-$1,899 


$49,564 


1840 Jr. Management Assistant 


1 


$1,255-$1,560 


$40,716 


1842 Management Assistant 


1 


$1,421-$1,723 


$44,970 


1844 Sr. Management Assistant 


1 


$1,626-$1,626 


$42,439 


3424 Pest Control Specialist 


1 


$1,436-$1,740 


$45,414 


3632 Librarian II 


1 


$l,698-$2,063 


$53,844 


5263 Planner V 


1 


$2,472-$3,005 


$78,431 


5298 Planner III 


1 


$1,756-$2,135 


$55,724 


6138 Industrial Hygienist 


1 


$2,156-$2,621 


$68,408 


7110 Mobile Asst. Equip. Supv. 


1 


$l,871-$2,274 


$59,351 


7262 Maintenance Planner 


1 


$l,890-$2,297 


$59,952 


7308 Cable Splicer 


1 


$2,412-$2,412 


$62,953 


7344 Carpenter 


2 


$2,014-$2,014 


$52,565 


7345 Electrician 


2 


$2,135-$2,135 


$55,724 


7348 Steamfitter 


1 


$2,319-$2,319 


$60,526 


7355 Truck Driver 


1 


$1,484-$1,890 


$49,329 


7375 Apprentice Stationary Engr 


■. 2 


$1,247-$1,630 


$42,543 


7376 Sheetmetal Worker 


3 


$l,918-$2,332 


$60,865 


9204 Communications Supv. 


1 


$1,626-$1,975 


$51,548 


9222 Operational Coordinator 


1 


$2,094-$2,545 


$66,425 


Total 


33 






Delete 








1658 Chief Accountant 


1 


$2,230-$2,711 


$70,757 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



27 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Comments: 1. On an annual basis the cost of the 33 new positions at the 

top step, including fringe benefits, is $1,427,803. 

2. The Airport has provided the Budget Analyst with 
statements of justification for each of the requested new 
positions. 

3. The Department of Human Resources has reviewed the 
Position Classification Questionnaire and supporting 
documentation for each of the requested new positions. The 
Department of Human Resources has recommended the same 
classification as requested by the Airport for each of the 33 
new positions, with the exception of Classification No. 7308, 
Cable Splicer. The Department of Human Resources has 
made the determination in that case that further 
classification review and interview are required. Therefore, 
the request for the Cable Splicer position should be denied. 

4. As a part of the FY 1995-96 Zero-Base Budget Review, 
presently being conducted at the direction of the Board of 
Supervisors, the Budget Analyst has been developing 
measures for evaluating increases in management and 
administrative positions since FY 1984-85. The Budget 
Analyst has developed ratios, expressed as percentages, of 
management and administrative positions to total positions, 
for all departments for FY 1984-85 and FY 1994-95. Where 
there have been increases in such percentages, we have 
identified position reductions to eliminate such increases. 

5. Shown below are comparative data from FY 1984-85 and 
FY 1994-95 by job category and position count for the 
Airport. The information shown is based on position data 
maintained by the Civil Service Commission, as modified by 
the Budget Analyst to include a professional administrative 
support category, and to allocate unclassified and exempt 
positions to categories that reflect the nature of the position. 

Officials & Administrative Elected & Office & Boards & 

DepartmentAdministrators Supp ort Exempt Subtotal ClericalCommissioners Other Totals. 

1984-85 

27-Airport 17 20 37 88 5 777 907 

Percentage of Total 1.9% 2.2% 0.0% 4.1% 9.7% 0.69 85.7% 100.0% 

1994-95 

27-Airport 39 33 72 146 985 1,203 

Percentage of Total 3. 2% 2.7% 0.0% 6.0% 12.1% 0.0% 81.9% 100.0% 

6. As noted above, between FY 1984-85 through FY 1994-95, 
the Airport's percentage of administrative positions has 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

28 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



increased by approximately 46 percent, from 4.1 percent to 
6.0 percent. Applying 4.1 percent to the FY 1994-95 total 
departmental position count of 1,203 would result in a total 
of approximately 49 administrative positions. The Airport, 
however, has a total of 72 administrative positions in FY 
1994-95, which is 23 positions more than the 49 positions 
computed under our methodology. 

7. Further, between FY 1984-85 through FY 1994-95, the 
Airport's percentage of office and clerical positions has 
increased by approximately 25 percent, from 9.7 percent to 
12.1 percent. Applying the 9.7 percent to the FY 1994-95 
total departmental position count of 1,203 would result in a 
total of approximately 117 clerical positions. The Airport, 
however, has a total of 146 clerical positions in FY 1994-95, 
which is 29 positions more than the 117 positions computed 
under our methodology. 

8. The following 7 positions, which are a part of the Airport's 
subject request for 33 new positions, are included in the two 
major categories of "Professional Administrative Support" or 
"Office & Clerical:" 

Maximum 
No. of Biweekly Salary 
Classification/Title Positions Salary At Top Stop 

Office & Clerical 

1630 Account Clerk 1 $1,013-$1,226 $31,999 

1721 Data Entry Operator 2 $1,032-$1,249 32,599 

9204 Communications Supv. _1 $1,626-$1,975 51.548 

Subtotals 4 $116,146 

Professional Administrative Support 

1840 Jr. Management Assistant 1 $1,255-$1,560 40,716 

1842 Management Assistant 1 $1,421-$1,723 44,970 

1844 Sr. Management Assistant _1 $1,626-$1,626 42.439 

Subtotals 3 $128,125 

Grand Total 7 $244,271 



9. Based on the additional workload from the Airport's 
Master Plan, the following two positions are the only 
positions which the Airport believes could be deleted from 
this request at this time: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

29 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Maximum 
No. of Biweekly Salary 
Classification/Title Positions Salary At Top Stop 

1203 Personnel Technician 1 $1,243-$1,506 $39,307 

1630 Account Clerk JL $1,013-$1,226 31.999 

Total 2 $71,306 

10. We acknowledge that the Airport will need additional 
staff in order to complete its Master Plan. Based on our 
analysis, the Department has 23 more administrative 
positions and 29 more clerical positions than we believe are 
justified. However, the Airport represents that all of its 
administrative support and clerical positions are currently 
filled and that therefore, no such positions could be 
eliminated at this time or for the foreseeable future. 

11. According to Ms. Helen Lucas of the Airport, the 
Department would not be able to fill the new positions for 
more than two pay periods, on the average, rather than the 
four pay periods currently funded. Therefore, the requested 
amount of $277,618 for permanent salaries and fringe 
benefits should be reduced by one-half. 

12. In the judgment of the Budget Analyst, the following 
administrative-type positions listed below are not critical to 
the accomplishment of the Airport's Master Plan and could 
be deleted. For example, the justification for the 
Classification No. 1242, Personnel Analyst, position includes 
the statement that "This position is to absorb an employee 
who was bumped out of her position by a DHR layoff who had 
higher City-wide seniority on this classification." 

Maximum 
No. of Biweekly Salary 
Classification/Title Positions Salary At Top Stop 

1242 Personnel Analyst 1 $1,502-$1,844 $48,128 

1244 Sr. Personnel Analyst 1 $l,844-$2,242 $58,516 

1802 Research Assistant 1 $1,316-$1,596 $41,656 

1840 Jr. Management Assistant 1 $1,255-$1,560 $40,716 

1844 Sr. Management Assistant 1 $1,626-$1,626 S42.439 

Total 5 $231,455 

Recommendations: 1. In accordance with Comment No. 11, amend the proposed 
ordinance (File 101-94-71) to reduce the FY 1994-95 funding 
period from May 1, 1995, to approximately June 1. 1995, hy 
(1) reducing the requested permanent salaries amount from 
$233,536 to $116,768 and (2) reducing the requested fringe 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

10 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



benefit amount from $44,082 to $22,041 to correspond to the 
reduced salaries. 

2. Amend the proposed Annual Salary Ordinance (File 102- 
94-12) to delete the two positions shown in Comment No. 9 
above, to delete the five positions listed in Comment No. 12 
above, and to delete the Cable Splicer position listed in 
Comment No. 3 above. 

3. Amend the proposed ordinance (File 101-94-71) to reflect 
the deletion of the eight positions identified in 
Recommendation No. 2 by (1) reducing permanent salaries by 
$24,458, or from $116,768 to $92,310 and (2) reducing fringe 
benefits by $4,598, or from $22,041 to $17,443. 

4. Approve the proposed ordinances as amended which will 
result in the approval of 25 new permanent positions at the 
Airport. 

5. In summary, File 101-94-71 should be reduced by a total of 
$167,865, or from $277,618 to $109,753, by (1) reducing 
permanent salaries by $141,226, or from $233,536 to $92,310, 
and (2) reducing fringe benefits by $26,639, or from $44,082 
to $17,443. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

31 



MAR 30 '95 10:42fiM SFIA BUDGET/FINANCE 



P. 1/1 

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32 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 9 - File 1 72-94-3? 1 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Public Health (DPH) 

Resolution authorizing the Director of Public Health to 
execute an amendment to the Information Systems 
Agreement between the City and County of San Francisco 
and Shared Medical Systems Corporation dated August 31, 
1994. 

$4,568,867 

Medi-Cal revenues including SB 1255 funds 

The Board of Supervisors previously approved legislation 
authorizing a contract, in the maximum amount of 
$21,319,026, between the DPH and Shared Medical Systems 
Corporation (SMS) for SMS to provide medical information 
system services to the DPH for the implementation of an 
expanded Management Information System (MIS) for DPH. 
(File 172-94-32). The MIS specifications included in this 
contract will link the District Health Centers, San Francisco 
General Hospital (SFGH), Laguna Honda Hospital (LHH), 
clinical laboratories, radiology, mental health and other DPH 
sites. Functions performed by the MIS would include patient 
registration, appointment scheduling, billing, service orders 
and lab results, patient data, eligibility information and 
clinical records. The contract, which is for the period 1994- 
1995 through 1999-2000 will provide the following services; 

1. Remote Computing Option (RCO) Processing and Storage: 
the Remote Computing Option system will provide DPH with 
the use of SMS's proprietary software for patient billing and 
registration, patient accounts, clinical records, laboratory 
orders and results, and other data and exchange capabilities. 

2. Network installation and use: SMS will install a network 
to connect DPH sites with each other and with SMS's MIS 
Systems Center in Malvern, PA. In addition to installation, 
the SMS contract includes annual charges for use of the 
network. 

3. Installation of software and implementation of DPH's MIS 
system at SMS's Information Systems Center in Malvern, 
PA. 

4. Training and education, software upgrades, interfaces with 
additional locations, and other software customization 
services. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

33 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

The proposed resolution would amend the contract between 
the DPH and SMS for SMS to provide project management 
and implementation assistance, which the DPH had 
previously determined was necessary at the time the DPH 
submitted its original $21,319,026 request for the SMS 
contract. The basic contract with SMS is for SMS to provide 
medical information system services for the implementation 
of an expanded MIS for DPH. This $21,319,026 contract was 
approved by the Board of Supervisors. 

The DPH had originally proposed to contract with Coopers & 
Lybrand LLP, in the amount of $6,668,025, including 
expenses, for the provision of project management and 
implementation assistance in connection with the expanded 
MIS. However, a resolution (File 172-94-45) requesting 
authorization for DPH to enter into that contract with 
Coopers & Lybrand was tabled by the Budget Committee due 
primarily to the Committee's concerns pertaining to the costs 
of that contract which amounted to $6,668,025 including 
$1,114,923 for travel, lodging and subsistence expenses plus 
$255,000 for administrative support expenses. 

Under the proposed subject contract amendment with SMS, 
SMS would receive an estimated additional amount of 
$4,568,867 on top of their basic contract amount of 
$21,319,026. The contract amendment further provides that 
in no event shall the additional amount exceed $5,025,753. Of 
the $4,568,867, $1,142,160 or approximately 25 percent, 
represents minority subcontract participation. SMS has 
selected Systems Support Technology, an MBE firm, as a 
subcontractor. In accordance with the terms of the contract 
amendment, SMS staff would provide approximately 26,360 
hours of service at a rate of $130 per hour, including 
expenses, for a total of $3,426,707 and Systems Support 
Technology would provide 9,518 hours of service at a rate of 
$120 per hour for a total of $1,142,160. 

Comments: 1. The attached letter from Mr. David Counter of the DPH's 

Computer Services unit, explains (1) the need for this 
additional proposed management project and implementation 
assistance by SMS, (2) what specific services will be provided 
by SMS and how SMS is able to provide these services at 
$2,099,158 ($6,668,025 minus $4,568,867) or approximately 
31.5 percent less than the amount of the previously proposed 
Coopers & Lybrand contract, (3) the steps taken by the DPH 
to address the concerns of the Budget Committee regarding 
these additional contract services, (4) why DPH did not 
utilize an RFP process instead of contracting on a sole source 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

34 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

basis with SMS, and (5) how a conflict can be avoided by 
contracting with SMS which would not only provide the basic 
medical information system services but also would now 
provide project management of itself. 

2. Mr. Counter states in the attached letter that the DPH 
plans to issue a Request for Proposal to solicit a contractor to 
serve as the project auditor to insure that SMS project 
deliverables conform to project specifications and meet the 
strategic business needs of the DPH. Mr. Counter estimates 
such contract will cost approximately $250,000. 

3. As noted above, under the terms of the proposed contract 
amendment, SMS would be paid a total of $4,568,867 and in 
no event shall the amount exceed $5,025,753. As such, SMS 
could potentially be paid up to $5,025,753. Therefore, the 
Budget Analyst recommends that the amount of the contract 
amendment be capped at $4,568,867, and that any 
expenditure beyond $4,568,867 be subject to separate 
legislative approval of the Board of Supervisors. 

Recommendations: 1. Amend Lines 13 and 14 of the proposed resolution to 
reflect that the cost of the proposed contract amendment will 
not exceed $4,568,867 and that any amount in excess of 
$4,568,867 be subject to approval by the Board of 
Supervisors. 

2. Approval of the proposed resolution, as amended, is a 
policy matter for the Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



■ fiPR-07-1995 03:38 



FROM DPH MHS/FMIS 



TO 




Attachment 

9 252B4S1 P. 02 

Page 1 of 2 



City and County of San Francisco 



Department of Public Health 



MEMORANDUM 



April 5, 1995 

TO: 
FROM: 

SUBJECT: 



Sandy Brown-Richardson, Board of Supervisor's Budget Analyst 

David Counter, Director, Department of Public Health VGs^ 
Management Information Systems 

Resolution authorizing the Director of Public Health to execute an 
amendment to the Information Systems Agreement between the City and 
County of San Francisco and Shared Medical Systems Corporation dated 
August 31, 1994. 



The following information is provided pursuant to the subject request for Resolution 
approval. 

1) Need for Contract. 

The proposed professional services are required to implement the information 
systems infrastructure to help support a Managed Care environment. The Department of 
Public Health has already contracted for Shared Medical Systems (SMS) clinical and 
administrative systems which will integrate patient care services across multiple facilities. 
The implementation of these systems will produce a Community Health Network which will 
enable multiple facilities and health care providers to exchange and share patient 
demographic, clinical and financial information, control costs, monitor quality and meet 
contractual requirements for acquired applications. 

Implementation assistance is essential to bring these critical computer applications to 
full production status in order to meet the mandated State Medi-Cal deadline for Managed 
Care of June, 1996 



2) Services to be provided by Shared Medical Systems. 
A) Specific Services. 

The proposed professional services contract will provide the Department of Public 
Health with the one time implementation assistance required to bring the acquired systems 
to full productive use including project planning and administration, systems and procedures 
analysis, completion of detailed specifications, network hardware and system software 
installation, application building, system testing, user training, live conversion and post-live 
support. 



Community Health Services 



101 Grove Street 



San Franclaco, CA 94102 



36 



92520461 P. 83 

Attachment 
Page 2 of 2 



. flPR-07-1995 03=38 FROM DPH MHS/FMIS TO 



TO: Sandy Brown-Ridiardton, Board of Superior Budget Analyst 
April Si 1995 

! Page 2 



These project tasks will be accomplished by staff provided by Shared Medical 
Systems and a local MBE firm, Systems Support Technology (SST), which will receive 
25% of the contract fees. Information systems staff from the Department of Public Health 
will work as part of this team in order to be trained and became proficient in the new 
technology so as to assume full support of these systems once they are brought to full 
production status. It should be noted that no new Department of Public Health staff will be 
required for thi6 function. 

B) Reduced Project Fees. 

Shared Medical Systems has been able to reduce the overall project fees by the 
amount of $2,099,149 through the utilization of staff assigned to their local office in 
Pleasanton, California, and by agreeing to a flat hourly rate of $130.00 inclusive of any 
expenses. This rate is achieved due primarily to the fact that the implementation will be 
accomplished within the context of the larger systems acquisition contract which spans 
several years. 

In addition, SMS has committed to the original project timelines in order to meet the 
State Medi-Cal Managed Care mandate of June, 1996. Due to the high visibility of the City 
and County of San Francisco account, the critical nature of these systems and the size of 
their existing contract, SMS has agreed to provide all technical resources needed to achieve 
project completion goals. 

C) Sole Source Contract. 

Shared Medical Systems is in a unique position to assist with the one time 
implementation of their applications due to the detailed, proprietary knowledge of how 
these systems are actually designed. Beyond Coopers and Lybrand, L.L.P., who have a 
practice specialty in the implementation of Shared Medical Systems software, no other firm 
has the particular expertise necessary to bring the acquired systems to error-free full 
production status in order to meet the June, 1996 timelines for Medi-Cal Managed Care. 

D) Project Audit and Quality Assurance. 

The Department of Public Health, however, recognizes the need for an objective 
third party quality assurance and project audit function which was to have been provided by 
Coopers and Lybrand, L.L.P. As such, the Department will publish a Request for Proposal 
(RFP) in the coming months to solicit this third party project auditor and select an 
appropriately competent industry consultant to insure that project deliverables conform to 
specifications and meet die strategic business needs of the Department of Public Health. 



cc: Larry Meredith, Ph.D. Deputy Director for Operations 

Richard Cordova, Executive Administrator, S.F.G.H.M.C. 



DO405B.DOC 



TOTAL P. 03 



37 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Item 10 -File 97-95-14 



Item: 



Description: 



Ordinance amending the Administrative Code Section 
10.117-76 to allow monies from the Home Ownership 
Assistance Loan Fund to be loaned to nonprofit corporations 
for (1) the purchase of housing units for resale to low and 
moderate income households, and (2) curing defaults on 
senior loans on housing units which have received secondary 
City financing; and to designate the Mayor's Office of 
Housing, or its successor, as the administrator of this Fund. 

The proposed ordinance would amend parts (a), (b), (c), (d), 
and (g), of Section 10.117-76 of the Administrative Code, 
entitled Home Ownership Assistance Loan Fund. The Home 
Ownership Assistance Loan Fund is a Fund established to 
expand home ownership opportunities to low and moderate 
income persons by providing loans to first-time home buyers. 
The Home Ownership Assistance Loan Fund receives its 
funding from the repayment of promissory notes from 
persons who have purchased housing units developed on 
surplus City sites for low and moderate income housing, and 
from the repayment of prior Home Ownership Assistance 
Loan Fund loans. The estimated balance of the Home 
Ownership Assistance Loan Fund is $1.3 million. 

The proposed ordinance would amend part (a), entitled 
Establishment of Fund, to expand the definition of those 
persons eligible to participate in the Home Ownership 
Assistance Loan Fund from (a) persons or families of low or 
moderate income to (b) persons, families or households of low 
or moderate income. 

The proposed ordinance would amend part (b), entitled Use of 
Money in Fund, to expand the definition of how the Home 
Ownership Assistance Loan Fund monies may be used. 
Currently, the Fund provides loans to low and moderate 
income individuals and families. The proposed ordinance 
would authorize the Fund to be used to provide loans to low 
and moderate income individuals, families and households . 
In addition, the proposed ordinance would be amended to 
authorize the Home Ownership Assistance Loan Fund 
monies to be used to provide loans to nonprofit corporations 
for the purchase of housing units to be resold to low and 
moderate income individuals, families and households: or for 
curing a default on a senior loan made with respect to a unit 
that has secondary financing from the City. 

The proposed ordinance would amend part (c), entitled 
Administration of Fund, to change the definition of who may 



BQAK1) OF SUPKHVISOHS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



administer a loan program under the Home Ownership 
Assistance Loan Fund from (a) the Mayor's Office of Housing 
to (b) the Mayor's Office of Housing or its successor . In 
addition, the proposed ordinance would be amended to 
authorize that the administrative expenses that are 
appropriated through the annual budget process or through 
supplemental appropriation for the Mayor's Office may now 
be appropriated for the Mayor's Office of Housing or its 
successor. 

The proposed ordinance would amend part (d), entitled 
Authorization to Expend, to change the definition of who may 
approve expenditures from the Fund. Currently, the 
Executive Director of the Mayor's Office of Housing approves 
expenditures from the Fund. The proposed ordinance would 
amend this to state the Director of the Mayor's Office of 
Housing or its successor shall approve expenditures from the 
Fund. 



Comments: 



Recommendation: 



The proposed ordinance would amend part (g), entitled 
Reporting on Program Status, to change the definition of who 
will report annually to the Board of Supervisors. Currently, 
the Mayor's Office of Housing reports annually to the Board 
of Supervisors. The proposed amendment would authorize 
the Mayors Office of Housing or its successor to report 
annually to the Board of Supervisors. 

1. Mr. Joe LaTorre of the Mayor's Office of Housing advises 
that the proposed ordinance would have no additional fiscal 
impact on the City. 

2. The Attachment provided by the Mayor's Office of 
Housing further explains the requested amendments and 
how the provisions of these amendments would be applied. 

Approval of the proposed ordinance is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



04/06/1995 08:07 415-554-8940 MAYOR OFF HOUSING Attachment 

page 1 of 2 

FAX TR A NS MISSION MFMORAN PUM 

MAYOR'S OFFICE OF HOUSING 

NUMBER OF PAGES (INCLUDING COVER SHEET): 2 

IF YOU DO NOT RECEIVE ALL PAGES, PLEASE CALL (415) 554-8788 

April 6, 1995 

TO: Michelle Ruggles, Budget Analyst 

FROM: Joe LaTorre J^~~> 

SUBJECT: Amendments to Home Ownership Assistance Loan Fund 



Per your request, here is the background for each of the changes in the administrative code 
provisions for the Home Ownership Assistance Loan Fund: 

1 . Sec. 10.1 1 7-76 (a): "Households" is inserted in addition to persons and families in 
order to clarify that eligible borrowers include households consisting of unrelated 
individuals. 

2. Sec. 10.1 1 7-76 (b): Two additional uses of funds are proposed. One is to permit 
loans to nonprofit corporations to purchase homes for resale to low and moderate 
income households. When the unit is resold to an eligible household, this loan will 
be repaid to the City, in most cases in less than a year. This provision will enable 
the City to: (a) Most immediately, finance the acquisition of 29 units of low and 
moderate income live-work housing by Artspace Development Corporation. The 
units are nearing completion of construction. Artspace will resell these units to first 
time homebuyers immediately after completion, (b) Assign rights of first refusal 
held by the City to nonprofit corporations in cases where eligible buyers cannot be 
identified within the City's right of first refusal period. In a few cases in recent 
years, the City has been unable to exercise such rights of first refusal and restrictions 
on affordable units have consequently been lost. We expect to use funds for this 
purpose infrequently, but would like to be able to do so if necessary, (c) Provide 
financing to a nonprofit to acquire a deteriorated property, carry out rehabilitation 
and resell the home to a first-time homebuyer. San Francisco Housing 
Development Corporation is currently studying the feasibility of such a program. 

The second use of funds is to cure defaults on senior loans in cases in which the 
City has provided secondary financing. If such a default results in a foreclosure by 
the senior lender, the City's second loan is wiped out. Again, we expect to use 
funds for this purpose only rarely, but request the ability to do so if this is the only 
way to avoid a foreclosure and loss of the City's second loans. 



10 UNITED NATIONS PLAZA, SUITE 600 • SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94102 ■ (41 5) 554-8777 • I AX (41 5) bb4-8940 



04/06/1995 08:07 415-554-8940 MAYOR OFF HOUSING Attachment 

page 2 of 2 



Michelle Ruggles 
April 6, 1995 
Page 2 



Sec. 1 0. 1 1 7-76 (c): The phrase "or its successor" is inserted so that, in the event 
that the Mayor reorganizes the functions of his office, the Administrative Code will 
not need to be amended. Since 1 983, the administration of housing programs has 
been carried out by Mayor's Office entities known as the Mayor's Office of Housing 
and Economic Development, the Mayor's Office of Housing and Community 
Development, the Mayor's Office of Economic Planning and Development, and the 
Mayor's Office of Housing (twice). 



Finally, you requested the amount of funds currently available in the program. As of the 
end of March, our records show that there is a balance of $193,912 in the fund. In 
addition, Bank of America, trustee on our 1982 Single Family Mortgage Revenue Bond 
program, is in the process of transferring approximately $1,136,909 in repayments of 
Home Mortgage Assistance Contracts from borrowers under that program. Thus MOH will 
have available approximately $1,330,821 for additional loans (plus repayments received in 
the future). This will provide funds for the $1.1 million required for the Artspace loan, plus 
additional downpayment assistance loans on an ongoing basis. 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Item 11 -File 79-95-3 

Department: Mayor's Office of Community Development (MOCD) 

Item: Resolution approving an amendment to the 1995 Community 

Development Program and authorizing the Mayor, on behalf 
of the City to receive, and expend $2,818,000 in additional 
entitlement funds and transfer $182,000 from contingencies 
under the City's 1995 Community Development Block Grant 
(CDBG) Program from the U.S Department of Housing and 
Urban Development (HUD), approving Addendum 1 to the 
expenditure schedule for recipient departments and agencies 
and for indirect costs, and determining that no 
environmental evaluation is required, and authorizing the 
receipt and deposit in contingencies of the 1995 CDBG 
entitlement funds in excess of $26,984,000. 

Description: On November 30, 1994, the Board of Supervisors approved 

the 1995 Community Development Program in the amount of 
$29,955,061 including carryover funds and program income. 

On April 3, 1995, when HUD announced the annual grant 
awards, San Francisco was notified that it would actually 
receive an additional $2,818,000 in CDBG program funds. 
The increased allocation was the result of Congress 
approving a higher amount for the entire CDBG Program 
and San Francisco's receiving a proportionate increase. The 
proposed resolution would authorize the City, through 
MOCD, to receive and expend these additional funds of 
$2,818,000. 

In addition, the proposed resolution would allocate $182,000 
of contingency funds. According to Mr. Bernhard Gunther of 
the MOCD, there is currently a balance of $270,688 in the 
CDBG contingency account. If the requested contingency 
funds in the amount of $182,000 are approved, the 
contingency fund balance would be $88,688. The $182,000 in 
additional contingency funds, plus the $2,818,000 of 
additional CDBG entitlement funds, would provide 
$3,000,000 in additional funding for the requested projects 
that comprise Addendum 1, as shown below. 

The proposed additional $3,000,000 in requested funding is 
as follows: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Housing Site Acquisition Pool ($1.000.000) 
The proposed funding would be used to increase the existing 
Site Acquisition Program Pool by $1,000,000 from $3 million 
to $4 million. This funding is used to acquire housing sites 
for low-income persons. Specifically, these funds would be 
used by the Mission Housing Development Corporation for 
the acquisition and rehabilitation of a 58-unit Single 
Resident Occupancy (SRO) buildings in the Mission District 
designed to provide shelter to homeless and formerly 
homeless persons. According to Mr. Gunther, the total cost of 
the project is $6.6 million, and the balance of funds needed, 
or $5.6 million would be provided by the Mission Housing 
Development Corporation. 

Small Business/ Self Employment and Enterprise 
Development(SEED) Loan Fund ($1.500.000) 

This Loan Fund provides loans to (a) small businesses 
intending to create or retain jobs available to low income 
persons, and (b) start-up loans to low/moderate income 
persons intending to start microenterprises. A 
microenterprise is usually a one person business operated out 
of a home. The loans for the small businesses average 
between $75,000 and $100,000. These loans can be used for 
working capital, inventory, and the purchase of equipment. 
Loans for this program are packaged and monitored by four 
neighborhood economic development organizations. The 
start-up loans for the low/moderate income persons are for 
under $10,000. Recipients of these loans must be sponsored 
by one of the current SEED Program assistance providers. 

The balance of the Small Business/ SEED Loan Fund, as of 
April 1, 1995, is approximately $750,000. There were no 
allocations made for the Small Business/ SEED Loan Fund in 
the 1995 Community Development Program. The MOCD 
advises that none of the Loan Fund's existing funds have 
been identified for a specific project. The Loan Fund 
allocations would be determined pending the receipt of 
proposals for the use of these loan funds. 

Disability Access Upgrade Program ($200.000) 
The Disability Access Upgrade Program provides funds for 
non-profit organizations and City departments to remove 
architectural and program barriers for persons with 
disabilities as outlined in the Americans with Disabilities Act 
(ADA). The additional allocation would fund a portion of 
capital improvement projects, including a wheelchair ramp, a 
wheelchair lift, and door modifications at the War Memorial 
building. Such improvements have a total estimated cost of 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Comment: 



Recommendation: 



$455,300. The funding sources for the balance of these costs 
of $255,300 are the FY 1993-94, FY 1994-95 and FY 1995-96 
War Memorial and Performing Arts Center Opera House 
capital improvement budgets. 

Public Space Improvement Pool ($200.000) 
The Public Space Improvement Program Pool provides funds 
for non-profit organizations to improve public spaces used 
primarily by low and moderate income persons and families. 
The additional allocation would be used specially for 
improvements to playground spaces at child care centers 
serving children from low and moderate income families. The 
Attachment provided by MOCD contains the proposed budget 
allocations. 

Planning and Capacity Building Program Pool ($100.000) 
The Planning and Capacity Building Program Pool would be 
increased by $100,000 from $250,000 to $350,000, to be used 
to provide both technical assistance and to build the capacity 
of non-profit corporations serving low and moderate income 
persons. This program enables these corporations to hire 
consultants skilled in such areas as strategic planning, 
organizational development, and Board of Directors 
development. The Attachment provided by MOCD contains 
the proposed budget allocations. 

Mr. Gunther advises that, as stated in the proposed 
resolution, no environmental evaluation is required at this 
time for the additional programs. Any necessary 
environmental evaluations would be conducted prior to the 
time a proposed project is funded. 

Approval of the proposed resolution is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPKRVISOKS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



^-.^flPR-06-'05 THU 08:50 ID:NFlYORS CFF COMM'DEU TEL NO: 



Attachments to 4/12/95 Memo to Budget 



Committee 



Attachment for Public Space Improvement Projects - 

The construction of five playgroun Is at $40,000 each are proposed at: 
Mission YMCA 
Muir Children's Center 
Busybee 

Whitney Young Child Devejopment Center 
Connecticut Garden 



Attachment for Planning and Capacity Butting 
Additional planning projects pro; 

Completion of the "UnfinisHed 
Continuum of Care planning 
Enterprise Community plan iing 



Attachment 



include: 

Agenda" project through HRC ($70,000) 
(approximately $20,000) 
(approximately $10,000) 



45 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Item 12 - File 101-94-89 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 

Description: 



Recreation and Park 

Supplemental appropriation ordinance appropriating 
$325,000 from the Recreation and Park Special Revenue 
Fund (rent credit from the 49ers) to make capital 
improvements to Candlestick Park. 

$325,000 

Recreation and Park Special Revenue Fund 
Advance Payment of 1995 Parking Lot Rent 
from 49ers 

The proposed supplemental appropriation would authorize 
expenditure of $325,000 to support design work on 
Candlestick Park capital improvements related to the 1999 
Superbowl during FY 1994-95. A description of all of the 
capital improvements, and the City's bid to the National 
Football League (NFL) for the 1999 Superbowl, is provided in 
Item 1, File 193-95-1, of this report to the Budget Committee. 

Mr. Don Alameida, the DPW architect who is project 
manager for the Candlestick Park capital improvements, 
reports that the proposed supplemental appropriation is 
needed to enable the design consultant, Anderson DeBartolo 
Pan Inc., to complete design work for the press box in time 
for construction of the site work to be completed during the 
period from approximately January to March of 1996, when 
neither the 49ers nor the Giants are using Candlestick 
Park. Actual construction of the press box would then be 
completed in early 1997, thus permitting testing of the new 
facility during the 1998 football season. 

Mr. Alameida reports that the DPW issued a Request for 
Qualifications (RFQ) in July of 1994 for the Superbowl 
capital improvements design work. (Pursuant to the 
Administrative Code, professional services contracts may 
be awarded to the most qualified bidder and fees may be 
negotiated with the selected consultant.) Mr. Alameida 
states that the DPW awarded the design contract to the firm 
of Anderson DeBartolo Pan Inc. of San Francisco in 
December of 1994. Four other firms responded to the RFQ, 
including the firms of Heery International Inc., Crosby 
Helnich, Ellerbe Becket, and Greg Roja and Associates. 

Mr. Alameida reports that the DPW is in the process of 
negotiating a contract with Anderson DeBartolo Pan Inc. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



According to Mr. Alameida, the RFQ stated that the 
complete design work for the Superbowl capital 
improvements should be completed for professional fees not 
to exceed $2.6 million. According to Mr. Alameida, because 
the overall scope of work will in part be a function of the 
ability of the City to raise private money to fund the projects 
(See Item 1, File 193-95-1), the contract will not contain a 
detailed scope of work. Mr. Alameida advises that the 
consultant will provide proposals for each successive phase 
of the projects, which will be attached to the contract as 
contract modifications. (This contract will be subject to 
separate approval by the Board of Supervisors if it is in 
excess of $1 million. Mr. Alameida anticipates that the 
contract will be in excess of $1 million.) 

Mr. Alameida advises that the $325,000 requested, which is 
part of the maximum contract amount of $2.6 million, and 
the subject of this proposed supplemental appropriation 
would be used to obtain the following work projects from 
Anderson DeBartolo Pan Inc.: 

Work Product Estimated Cost 

Phase I Plumbing Repair Design Development $27,000 

Phase II Disabled Access Design Development 122,000 

Phase III Press Box Study 35,000 

Phase IV Initial Press Box Site Work Design 141.000 

Total $325,000 

The DPW advises that specific information regarding the 
project scope and hourly rates is available for Phase I, II, 
and III of this project. However, as of the writing of this 
report, the DPW had not provided this specific information 
to the Budget Analyst (see Comment 7). 

The purpose of the plumbing repair study is to define 
schematic options for the plumbing repairs that need to be 
done. The purpose of the disabled access study is to 
document the status of disabled access to the stadium, for 
use in negotiations with the United States Department of 
Justice regarding the specific capital improvements that 
will have to be made to comply with the Americans with 
Disabilities Act (ADA). The purpose of the Press Box Study 
is to explore the options for providing more press box space, 
which include remodeling the existing press box, 
dismantling the press box and building a new press box in 
the same location on the west side of the stadium, or 
building a second press box on the east side of the stadium. 
Mr. Alameida advises that the DPW has based the cost 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

47 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

estimates for these studies on proposals received from 
Anderson DeBartolo Pan Inc. The balance of the funds, or 
$141,000, would be used to start site work design plans for 
whichever press box option is selected. 

Comments: 1. The firm of Anderson DeBartolo Pan Inc. is partially 

owned by Mr. Jack DeBartolo, who is a second cousin of 
49ers owner Mr. Eddie DeBartolo Jr. However, Mr. 
Alameida states that the DPW does not consider this a 
conflict of interest because Mr. Jack DeBartolo and Mr. 
Eddie DeBartolo Jr. do not have any business relationships. 
Mr. Alameida advises that the firm of Anderson DeBartolo 
Pan Inc. has participated in capital improvement projects 
for ten Superbowls nationwide. 

2. The reason the RPD requires these additional funds 
beyond the amount included in the RPD's regular FY 1994- 
95 budget is because of a FY 1994-95 unanticipated cost to 
correct a construction error in the installation of new upper 
deck seats at Candlestick Park. In February of 1994, the 
Recreation and Park Department (RPD) used $375,000 in 
Recreation and Park Special Revenue Funds to finance the 
installation of 800 new upper deck seats in Candlestick 
Park. Although installation was completed by March, 1994, 
the seats have not been used because of unanticipated sight 
line (visibility) problems. The two rows of seats were 
installed at the same level, so that the rear row does not 
have adequate visibility of the playing field. 

In order to correct the visibility problems, the RPD planned 
to allocate approximately $375,000 of its $750,000 FY 1994-95 
Candlestick Park capital improvements budget to make 
needed modifications. However, the initial cost estimate 
was incorrect, because more concrete removal is needed 
than was originally anticipated. The actual cost of the 
platform modifications, as determined by a competitive 
bidding process, will be $695,180 ($660,180 for construction 
costs, $25,000 in DPW project administration costs and 
$10,000 in design costs), or $320,180 more than the $375,000 
amount which was anticipated in the FY 1994-95 budget. 

Expenditure of a total of $695,180 out of the $750,000 
Candlestick Park capital improvement budget would leave 
only approximately $54,820 for other FY 1994-95 Candlestick 
Park capital improvement projects. 

3. Completion of the seating renovation project to correct the 
visibility problems was identified by the RPD as the highest 
priority Candlestick Park capital improvement for FY 1994- 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



95. This project was also a high priority for the 49ers. 
Therefore, a contractor has been selected through a 
competitive bid, and Mr. Phil Arnold of the RPD states that 
the seating renovation project is scheduled for completion 
by mid-May, 1995, in time for the new opening day of the 
baseball season, although the project may extend a few 
weeks into the baseball season. 

4. Mr. Arnold states that the seating renovation project was 
given top priority by the RPD because completion of the seats 
will yield revenues to the City. Mr. Arnold advises that the 
RPD expects the 800 new seats to generate an additional 
$320,000 in ticket revenue to the 49ers during the 1995 
season (800 seats x 10 games x $40). This would result in 
additional revenues to the City of approximately $31,040 per 
year (the 49ers, under the lease agreement pay the City 10 
percent of the gross receipts from the sale of admissions to 
each game, net of the $1.50 per seat for the Stadium 
Admissions Tax). The 49ers must pay a minimum of 
$125,000 per year to the City. 

5. Mr. Alameida reports that the architect who designed the 
original plans for the 800 new seats that were installed in 
1994, Thornton Architects, is currently being sued by the 
City. As noted above in the description, the two rows of seats 
were installed on the same level, so that one row has 
inadequate visibility of the playing field. 

6. Under the terms of the 49ers lease with the City, the 49ers 
pay the City a parking lot rental fee equal to 42 percent of the 
gross receipts net of the parking tax (i.e., 75 percent of gross 
receipts) from the operation of the parking lot during the 
football season. Total projected gross revenues for the 1995 
season range from $1,040,400 ($15 x 8,670 parking spaces x 8 
regular season games) to $1,300,500 ($15 x 8,670 parking 
spaces x 10 regular and preseason games). Therefore 
parking lot revenues to the City would range from an 
estimated $327,726 ($1,040,400 x .42 x .75) to $409,658 
($1,300,500 x .42 x .75). (These estimates do not include any 
post season games.) 

In order to avoid delaying the start of the Superbowl capital 
improvements, the 49ers have offered to advance $325,000 in 
1995 parking lot rental fees at this time that would 
otherwise be due the City during the 1995 football season 
(i.e., FY 1995-96). If this proposed supplemental 
appropriation is approved, the 49ers will pay the $325,000 
immediately, and then deduct the first $325,000 in parking 
rent due the City during the 1995 calendar year. If the 49ers 

BOARD OF SI JPERVTSORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

49 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

advance $325,000 of parking lot revenues from the 1995 
season, the City would receive a balance of an estimated 
$111,968 to $221,210 during FY 1995-96 from parking 
revenues. 

According to Mr. Arnold, the Controller's Office stated that 
$325,000 will be deducted from the proposed FY 1995-96 
Candlestick Park capital improvement project budget 
request of $1.5 million if the 49ers advance $325,000 from 
1995 parking lot revenues this fiscal year. 

7. Mr. Alameida states that Anderson DeBartolo Pan Inc. 
will charge the City an average hourly labor rate of $75 per 
hour. As noted above, the DPW advises that specific 
information regarding the project scope and hourly rates is 
available for Phase I, II, and III of this project. However, 
as of the writing of this report, the DPW had not provided 
this specific information to the Budget Analyst. 

Given the history of questionable project oversight that is 
evidenced by the new seat installation in 1994 (See Comment 
No. 5), in the professional judgment of the Budget Analyst 
the DPW should require the consultant to provide a detailed 
scope of work for all phases of the project prior to 
commencing each element of the capital improvement 
plan, including estimated hours to be spent by specific 
categories of staff. Therefore, if the Board of Supervisors 
approves this supplemental appropriation request, $325,000 
should be reserved pending provision by the DPW of a 
detailed scope of work with projected hours by type of staff 

8. The capital improvements budget for Candlestick Park is 
submitted to the Board of Supervisors as two line items in 
the proposed budget ($750,000 for capital improvements and 
$750,000 for maintenance and repairs). The Recreation and 
Park Department should provide detailed information 
regarding capital improvements at Candlestick Park 
during the FY 1995-96 budget approval process. 

Recommendations: (1) Approval of the proposed supplemental appropriation is 
a policy matter for the Board of Supervisors. 

(2) If the Board approves this proposed supplemental 
appropriation, reserve $325,000, pending provision by the 
DPW of a detailed scope of work with projected hours by type 
of staff for each of the four Project phases. (The DPW 
advises that such specific information is available for the 
first three phases; however, as of the writing of this report, 

BOARJ) OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



this information had not been provided to the Budget 
Analyst.) 

(3) Send a letter to the Department of Recreation and Park 
requesting that the Department provide a detailed capital 
improvements budget for Candlestick Park as part of their 
annual on-going budget requests, including the FY 1995-96 
budget approval process, since the capital improvements 
budget for Candlestick Park is submitted as a two line 
items. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

51 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Item 13 -File 101 -94-A4 

Department: Board of Supervisors 



Item: 



Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance to conduct a Zero-Base 
Budget analysis 



Amount: $154,980 

Source of Funds: General Fund 

Description: At the initiation of the Chair of the Budget Committee, the 

Board of Supervisors had previously approved a motion (see 
Attachment) requesting subject funds for a Zero-Base Budget 
analysis. Subject to approval by the Board of Supervisors, this 
would be the second year that the Board has directed the 
Budget Analyst to conduct a Zero-Base Budget analysis. 

As previously reported, the results of the analysis completed 
for Fiscal Year 1994-95 resulted in estimated savings of $15.9 
million from the recommendations which were accepted by the 
Mayor and the Board of Supervisors. 

Zero Base Approach 

The Zero Base approach is guided by the following principles: 

□ Existing programs and expenditures are not assumed to 
automatically be continued from year to year; 

□ No assumption is made that the way services are 
delivered should continue; alternatives are considered 
for increased efficiency; 

□ The link between expenditures and program outcomes is 
examined; 

□ Expenditures are evaluated on the basis of their 
contribution to each department's mission and specific 
program goals and outcomes. This directly relates to the 
"mission driven" budget. 

As part of the Zero Base analysis, expenditures are broken 
down into "programs", which are defined as distinct functions 
directed toward achieving an objective. Programs may be 
services provided directly to the public, to another department, 
or an administrative function. Programs should not be defined 
so broadly that they obscure important considerations nor so 
narrow that they reflect work procedures rather than distinct 
service areas. By providing expenditure information in a 
program format, it is easier for the Mayor and Board of 
Supervisors to evaluate the effectiveness of programs and to 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



determine appropriate funding levels in the context of the 
department's mission and goals and objectives. 

Cost, revenue, staffing, and performance data are analyzed by 
program. In our experience last year, this information had to 
be developed as many departments did not maintain cost and 
performance data on a programmatic basis. This approach to 
analyzing department budgets was used by the Budget 
Committee and the Mayor's Office, providing meaningful 
information to evaluate resource allocation levels. 

The Link between Zero Base and Mission Driven 
Budgeting 

The newly adopted "mission driven" budgeting approach will 
require each department to annually provide the Mayor and 
Board of Supervisors with its mission statement and specific 
program goals and objectives, along with cost, revenue, and 
performance data for each program area. A Zero Base analysis 
of program areas will provide information and 
recommendations on the appropriate level of funding for 
program areas based on actual performance and an analysis of 
alternative approaches. 

Work Plan 

The specific tasks to be performed for a Zero Base review for 
1995-96 would consist of the following three components: 

1. Review entire budget of the Recreation and Park 
Department and the Purchaser which were not included 
in last year's review. These two departments will be 
implementing "mission-driven" budgeting this year. 

The Purchaser's review would include questions 
regarding decentralization of this service and the 
advantages and disadvantages of consolidating this 
department with other "general services" agencies in the 
City. The Recreation and Park Department review 
would be a full zero base analysis. No existing program 
area would be assumed to be ongoing. We would review 
all areas of expenditure and assess the potential for cost 
reductions and greater efficiencies. 

Estimated Hours: 335 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

53 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



2. Establish measures to conduct comparisons of 
administrative costs between City departments. This 
portion of the project would include: 

A. Development of measures such as: 

number of managers relative to total 
department staff; 

department finance/accounting costs 
relative to total department budget; 
department personnel costs relative to total 
department budget. 

B. Collection and analysis of measure data from 
General Fund departments 

C. Comparison of measures between departments 

D. Analysis of significant differences between 
departments. 

E. Development of recommendations of areas where 
administrative costs could be lowered. 

Estimated Hours: 530 

3. Zero Base Budget review of following General Fund 
departments program areas. 

Department/Topic(s) Hours 

City-wide Real Estate: Analysis of City-owned 
land, purpose, value, and justification for current 
use (vs. selling). Include analysis of rental costs 
for City offices as part of this. 100 

City-wide Fleet: Analysis of size, distribution, 
and cost of fleet, justification for current 
allocation, potential for central pool 121 

Court Consolidation: To analyze cost savings 
that have been realized to date through 
consolidation of Municipal and Superior courts 
and to identify potential future savings. 80 

District Attorney: 

Misdemeanor Unit Staffing 30 

Preliminary Hearings Staffing 30 

Rebooking Unit Staffing 30 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Department/Topic(s) Hours 

Information Technology Organization: To 

review the potential benefits of consolidating 
departments that are providing information 
technology-related services including Information 
Services Division (ISD), Telecommunications, and 
Electronic Information Processing Steering 
Committee (EIPSC). 80 

Paramedic/Fire Department Consolidation: 

To analyze the potential costs savings and service 
impacts of consolidating these functions as has 
been done in other jurisdictions. 100 

Police Department: Analysis of potential for 
creating an entry level classification to assume 
clerical and administrative functions now 
performed by full Police Officers. 120 

Public Defender: Misdemeanor Unit Staffing 24 

Department of Public Works: Overhead rate 
analysis 100 

Estimated Hours: 815 

Project Administration 100 

Total Project Hours: 1,780 

Costs 

The proposed analysis would require an estimated 1,780 hours 
of professional staff time. Based on an average hourly rate of 
$84, total costs for the Budget Analyst's services would be 
$149,520. 

Comment: Because time is of the essence with respect to the forthcoming 

Fiscal Year 1995-96 budget, work has begun on this project 
based on direction from the Chair of the Budget Committee 
and based on the attached motion as previously approved by 
the Board of Supervisors. The estimated date for presentation 
of the Zero-Based Budget Report to the Budget Committee is 
May 10, 1995. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

55 



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Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Items 14 and 15 - Files 101-94-82 and 102-94-13 



Department: 
Items: 



Amount: 



Public Defender 

Item 14, File 101-94-82 - Supplemental appropriation 
ordinance appropriating $452,624 from the General Fund 
Reserve for the reduction of salary savings and the creation 
of three positions. 

Item 15, File 102-94-13 - Ordinance amending the 1994-95 
Annual Salary Ordinance to reflect the addition of three 
positions in the Public Defender's Office. 

$452,624 



Source of Funds: General Fund Reserve 

Description: The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance (File 

101-94-82) would appropriate (a) $58,265 for three new 8174 
Civil Attorney positions to staff the Public Defender's 
Dependency Division; (b) a lump-sum payment of $34,359 in 
vested sick leave, vacation pay and holiday pay for the 
retirement of one Head Attorney in the Public Defender's 
Office; and (c) a projected budget deficiency in permanent 
salaries and fringe benefits of $360,000, for a total of 
$452,624, as follows: 

Permanent salaries and fringe benefits for 

three new Civil Attorney positions $58,265 

Lump-sum payment for retirement 34,359 

Projected budget deficiency in permanent 

salaries and fringe benefits 360.000 

Total Supplemental Appropriation Request $452,624 

New Civil Attorney Positions 

The Public Defender's Office is required to refer a case to the 
Superior Court if that case represents a conflict of interest. 1 
When a case is referred to the Superior Court, the Court 
must hire and pay for the fees of private attorneys and expert 
witnesses. In FY 1993-94, a total of 1,800 conflict of interest 
cases were referred to the Superior Court by the Public 
Defender. 



1 Examples of cases that represent conflicts of interest are cases pertaining to the defense of 
indigents which involve (a) multiple indigents, (b) witnesses previously represented by the Public 
Defender's Office, or (c) indigents who have certain relationships with indigents currently or 
previously represented by the Public Defender. 

ROAR I) OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



In the FY 1993-94 and FY 1994-95 budgets, three Civil 
Attorney positions were eliminated from the Public 
Defender's Dependency Division by the Mayor's Office, 
leaving the Public Defender with one Civil Attorney position 
to handle juvenile dependency cases. According to Mr. Peter 
Keane of the Public Defender's Office, because of the 
elimination of these three positions, the Public Defender's 
Office has been forced to refer 75 percent of its dependency 
cases to the Superior Court since July 1, 1994. However, 
these cases were referred to the Superior Court not because 
of the existence of a conflict of interest but because of 
"insufficient resources", according to Mr. Keane. Thus, the 
Superior Court incurred costs for hiring private attorneys 
and expert witnesses for conflict of interest cases as well as 
for cases referred to the Court because of "insufficient 
resources", namely, the lack of the three positions which had 
been previously eliminated by the Mayor's Office. 

The average cost of hiring a private attorney and expert 
witnesses is approximately $852 per case, versus $449 if the 
case is handled by the Public Defender. According to Ms. 
Kate Harrison of the Superior Court, 359 cases were referred 
to the Superior Court between July 1, 1994 and March 31, 
1995 because of "insufficient resources" in the Public 
Defender's Office. As such, the Superior Court incurred 
$305,868 in additional costs because of these 359 cases ($852 
per case x 359 cases). (See Comment No. 1). 

The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance (File 
101-94-82) would appropriate $58,265 for the salaries and 
fringe benefits for three new Civil Attorney positions for 8.8 
payperiods, or from approximately February 27, 1995 
through June 30, 1995, at the first salary step (See Comment 
No. 2). These three positions would be assigned to the Public 
Defender's Dependency Division and would handle the 
dependency cases which would have otherwise been referred 
to the Superior Court because of insufficient funds. A 
breakdown of this request is as follows: 

Annual Cost 
No. of Annual Salary for 3 Positions Amount of 
Position Title Positions @ Top Step @ Top Step this Request 

8174 Civil Attorney 3 $57,394 $172,182 $47,758 

Fringe Benefits (22%) _ 37.881 10.507 

Total 3 $210,063 $58,265 

Based on the 359 cases that were referred to the Superior 
Court over the nine-month period from July 1, 1994 through 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

March 31, 1995 due to "insufficient resources," the addition of 
the three new Civil Attorney positions should allow the 
Public Defender's Office to handle an additional 479 cases per 
year rather than referring these cases to the Superior Court. 
Based on the Superior Court's cost of $852 to hire a private 
attorney and expert witnesses, the Superior Court would 
avoid $408,108 in additional costs ($852 per case x 479 
cases). The annual cost to the Public Defender's Office of 
handling these 479 cases would be $215,071 (the in-house 
cost of $449 per case x 479 cases). Thus, the estimated net 
annual savings to the City would be $403 per case ($852 less 
$449) or $193,037 per year ($408,108 less $215,071). 

The proposed ordinance (File 102-94-13) would amend the FY 
1994-95 Annual Salary Ordinance to reflect the addition of 
the three new Civil Attorney positions in the Public 
Defender's Office. 

Lump-sum Retirement Payment 

The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance (File 
101-94-82) would also appropriate $34,359 for a lump-sum 
payment for vested sick leave, vacation pay and holiday pay 
for the retirement of one Head Attorney in the Public 
Defender's Office. A breakdown of this amount is as follows: 

30 sick days @ $404.40 per day $12,132 

32.6 vacation days @ $404.40 per day 13,183 

5 holidays @ $606.60 per day 3.033 

Subtotal $28,348 

Fringe benefits (21.2%) 6.011 

Total $34,359 

Projected Budget Deficiency 

The Mayor's Office and the Controller have projected a 
budget deficiency of approximately $360,000 in the Public 
Defender's permanent salaries and fringe benefits accounts 
for FY 1994-95. The proposed supplemental appropriation 
would also appropriate $360,000 for this projected budget 
deficiency. (See Comment No. 4) 

Comments: 1. As previously noted, the actual cost to the Superior Court 

of handling the 359 cases referred to it by the Public 
Defender since July 1, 1994 because of "insufficient 
resources" in the Public Defender's Office was $305,868. 
According to Ms. Harrison, the Superior Court intends to 
employ efficiencies to offset some of this cost as well as any 
future costs incurred for cases referred to the Court by the 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

59 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Public Defender for the remainder of FY 1994-95. In 
addition, the Superior Court has submitted a supplemental 
appropriation ordinance (See Items 16 and 17, Files 101-94- 
85 and 102-94-14 of this report to the Budget Committee). 
That supplemental appropriation ordinance includes a 
request to reappropriate $267,000 in the Superior Court's FY 
1994-95 budget in order to offset a portion of the Superior 
Court's $305,868 cost to hire private attorneys and expert 
witnesses for cases referred to it by the Public Defender 
because of insufficient resources. 

2. Mr. Keane advises that the Public Defender's Office 
expects to hire the three proposed Civil Attorney positions on 
or about May 1, 1995, and not on February 27, 1995 as had 
been anticipated. Thus, the amount needed for salaries is 
$24,422 ($1,809 per pay period at Step 1 x 4.5 pay periods x 3 
positions) and for fringe benefits is $5,373 (22% of $24,422), 
or a total of $29,795, for the period from May 1, 1995 through 
June 30, 1995. As such, the supplemental appropriation 
request for permanent salaries and fringe benefits for three 
new positions should be reduced by $28,470, or from $58,265 
to $29,795. 

3. If the Board of Supervisors approves the proposed 
supplemental appropriation ordinance to authorize and fund 
three additional attorneys for the Public Defender, the Trial 
Courts' Fees and Other Compensation account should be 
reduced by $408,108 in FY 1995-96 to reflect a reduction in 
fees for outside private attorneys and expert witnesses, based 
on a reduction of 479 cases referred from the Public Defender 
at $852 per case. Attachment I is a written memo obtained 
by the Public Defender from the Trial Courts representing 
that the FY 1995-96 budget of the Trial Courts will in fact be 
reduced by $408,108 if the subject request of the Public 
Defender for the three new positions is approved by the 
Board of Supervisors. According to Ms. Harrison, this 
$408,108 reduction will be made in the Trial Courts' Fees and 
Other Compensation account (See Attachment II). 

4. Based on information provided by the Controller's Office, 
the Budget Analyst projects a budget deficiency of $368,099 
in the Public Defender's permanent salaries and fringe 
benefits accounts, as reflected in the table below: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

60 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Category 


FY 1994-95 
Budget 


7/1/94 to 
2/10/95 


2/11795 to 
6/30/95 


Permanent Salaries 
Fringe Benefits 


$6,651,339 
1.100.937 


$4,271,988 
649.962 


$2,743,825 
454.600 


Total 


$7,752,276 


$4,921,950 


$3,198,425 



Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures Estimated 

Budget 
Deficiency 

($364,474) 
(3.625) 



($368,099) 



The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance includes 
$360,000 for the projected budget deficiency in permanent 
salaries and fringe benefits. Mr. Keane advises that the 
Public Defender's Office will employ economies in order to 
offset the remaining projected budget deficiency of $8,099 
($368,099 less $360,000). 

5. In summary, the Budget Analyst recommends the 
following reductions to the proposed supplemental 
appropriation ordinance: 



Amount Budget 

Supplemental Recommended Analyst's 
Appropriation by Budget Recommended 
Request Analyst Reductions 



Category 

Permanent Salaries: 

New Positions $47,758 24,422 

Retirement Payment 34,359 34,359 

Projected Budget Deficiency 302.473 302.473 

Subtotal $384,590 $361,254 



($23,336) 




($23,336) 



Fringe Benefits: 

New Positions 
Projected Budget Deficiency 
Subtotal 

TOTALS 



$10,507 

57.527 

$68,034 



$5,373 

57.527 

$62,900 



$452,624 $424,154 



($5,134) 



($5,134) 



($28,470) 



6. The proposed supplemental appropriation ordinance (File 
101-94-82) and the proposed ordinance (File 102-94-13), 
which would authorize and fund three new positions in the 
Public Defender's Office, require two-thirds approval by the 
Board of Supervisors because of prior budgetary denial. 

Recommendations: 1. Reduce the supplemental appropriation request by 
$28,470, or from $452,624 to $424,154, as reflected in the 
table in Comment No. 5 above. 

2. Approve the proposed supplemental appropriation 
ordinance, as amended (File 101-94-82). 



HOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



3. Approve the proposed ordinance to amend the FY 1994-95 
Annual Salary Ordinance to reflect the addition of three new 
positions in the Public Defender's Office (File 102-94-13). 

4. The recommendation of the Budget Analyst to approve 
three new positions for the Public Defender's Office is 
predicated on the Trial Courts' representation contained in 
Attachment I obtained by the Public Defender, in which the 
Trial Courts concur that their budget will be reduced by 
$408,108 in FY 1995-96 in order to reflect a reduction in fees 
for outside private attorneys and expert witnesses. 
According to Ms. Harrison, this $408,108 reduction will be 
made in the Trial Courts' Fees and Other Compensation 
account (See Attachment II). 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

62 



Attachment I 



^upeviax (Enuri ai (Ealtfnrma 

J^art JJfranciacn 



CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND UBWrtft « Mrtnu 

OERK OF THE COURT MEMORANDUM 
633 KXSOM ST. ROOM 500 

[4151 554-4110 April 7, 1995 



TO: Peter G. Keane 

Chief Assistant Public Defender 

FROM: Kate Harrison ip$s 

Manager, Budget and Administration 

RE: Supplemental Request of Public Defender's Office 



As you requested, I am confirming in writing that were your office to receive the three 
dependency attorneys you are currently requesting by supplemental, it would save the Court 
approximately $408,000 in conflict attorney funds. If your supplemental request is approved, the 
Court will reduce its 1995-96 budget for dependency attorneys from the revised budget of 
$2,185,000 (original 1994-95 budget of $1,918,000 plus pending supplemental request of 
$267,000) to $1,777,000. 

Please call me if you have any questions concerning this matter. 



Alan Carlson, CEO 

Karen Sikkenga, Budget Analyst's Office 

Karen Kegg, Budget Analyst's Office 



2/2d ,-, Wd8E:F0 S6. 90 «<*) 



r.-APR 07 '95 09 :46AM 



Attachment II 



KATE HARRISON 

MANAGER OF BUDGET 

AND ADMINISTRATION 

CITY HALL. ROOM 313 

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94102 









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Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Items 16 and 17 - Files 101-94-85 & 102-94-14 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 



Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Trial Courts 

Supplemental Appropriation ordinance appropriating and 
rescinding $405,564 from salaries and fringe benefits to create 
three new positions and pay fees of outside private attorneys 
and expert witnesses for Fiscal Year 1994-95. (101-94-85) 

Ordinance amending the 1994-95 Annual Salary Ordinance to 
reflect the addition of three new positions (1 FTE 676 Research 
Assistant, 2 FTE 697 Judicial Clerks) (102-94-14) 

$405,564 

Reappropriation of surplus funds in the Trial Courts 1994-95 
Budget 

The Trial Courts are requesting that $405,564 in surplus 
monies be rescinded from Permanent Salaries and Fringe 
Benefits in the Trial Court's existing FY 1994-95 budget, and 
reappropriated to support the following: (1) $267,000 for the 
fees of outside private attorneys and expert witnesses to defend 
indigents; and (2) $138,564 for 12 months to support three new 
positions: a Research Assistant and two Judicial Clerks, for 12 
months. 

The budget of the Public Defender was reduced by three of four 
dependency attorneys in FY 1994-95. Deputy Attorneys handle 
cases having to do with the custody of children. The Presiding 
Judge of the Superior Court reports that the Public Defender 
had referred 359 cases to the Superior Court as of March 1, 
1995, because the Public Defender did not have the resources 
to defend those cases. When a case is referred to the Superior 
Court, the Court must hire and pay for the private attorneys 
and expert witnesses. The $267,000 for the fees of outside 
private attorneys and expert witnesses would support the costs 
for hiring and paying such attorneys and witnesses. 

Additionally, the Superior Court is requesting funding for two 
new Judicial Clerks and one new Research Assistant to 
perform additional work created by the new "Three Strikes 
You're Out" sanction, which specifies that persons convicted of 
three or more felonies must serve jail time. The Presiding 
Judge advises that the number of felony proceedings is 
expected to grow 22 percent in FY 1994-95, because defendants 
are less willing to plead guilty knowing that a guilty plea 
automatically results in jail time (see Comment 7). The new 
positions would research motions, maintain and retrieve 

HOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



65 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



records, and provide information to prosecutors within and 
outside the jurisdiction of the County. The costs of the salaries 
and fringe benefits for these positions for the period May 1, 
1995 through June 30, 1995 are as follows: 



Personnel 

676 Research Assistant 

(1 FTE) $46,067 

697 Judicial Clerk 

(2 FTEs) 68.069 

Total Permanent Salaries $114,136 

Fringe Benefits, at 21 percent 23.969 

Total Salary and Fringe Benefits $138,105 

Comment: 1. The total amount of salaries and fringe benefits for the three 

requested positions noted here is $459 less than the amount of 
$138,564 requested by the Superior Court because of slight 
errors on the part of the Superior Court in calculating the total 
annual salary, based on a bi-weekly salary for the Research 
Assistant of $1,765 and, for the Judicial Clerks, $1,304. 
Therefore, the proposed Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance should be reduced by $459 to reflect this lower need. 
In addition, the Superior Court would only be able to fill these 
positions for May and June (two months) of Fiscal Year 1994- 
95. Therefore, this request should be reduced by an additional 
$115,085, to reflect the costs for two months instead of 12 
months of salary and benefits, or $23,017, rather than full year 
costs of $138, 105. 

2. As noted above, funds for this supplemental appropriation 
would come from a reappropriation of existing surplus monies 
in the Trial Court's 1994-95 budget. However, it should be 
noted that the addition of the three new positions would result 
in on-going additional annual costs for the Superior Court of 
$138,105 based on FY 1994-95 salary levels. 

3. The average cost per case assigned to private attorneys in 
FY 1993-94 was $940. The average cost for FY 1994-95 is $852. 
According to Ms. Kate Harrison of the Superior Court, this is 
because the Superior Court has discouraged continuances and 
reorganized the scheduling of motions so that all motions 
associated with a single party are consolidated, thereby 
reducing waiting time for private attorneys. Also, the Superior 
Court hired a mediator to intervene in dependency cases 
instead of hiring attorneys in every case. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



4. In the Budget Analyst's Zero-Based Budget report of May 9, 
1994, we provided as a policy option that the Public Defender 
pursue an in-depth study and analysis of the advantages and 
disadvantages, costs and benefits, of establishing within the 
City an alternative public defender office, whether within the 
City and County government or through a nonprofit 
organization, to process the preponderance of cases that the 
Public Defender cannot represent because of conflict of interest 
or lack of funds. (The Public Defender is required to refer a 
case to the Superior Court if such a case represents a conflict, 
such as a case involving multiple defendants, cases involving 
witnesses previously represented by the Public Defender's 
Office, and cases involving defendants who have certain 
relationships with defendants currently or previously 
represented by the Public Defender.) We made this 
recommendation because it is more costly to hire private 
attorneys and expert witnesses than for the Public Defender to 
represent indigents on an in-house civil service basis. In FY 
1993-94, cases defended by private attorneys cost an average of 
$940 each, while in-house cases cost $449 each on average. As 
of the writing of this report, the Public Defender has not begun 
to study the benefits of forming such a separate organization. 
(In October, 1992 the Budget Analyst conducted an analysis of 
Conflict-of-interest Cases for the Representation of Indigent 
Cases. However, no specific proposal for an alternative 
organization had been developed by the City. 

5. Since it is more costly to hire private attorneys to defend 
indigent cases through the Superior Court than for the Public 
Defender to defend such cases in-house, the Public Defender 
should not reassign the workload associated with them to the 
Superior Court. The Public Defender has submitted a 
supplemental appropriation request to support three 
additional attorneys in the Dependency Division, which is also 
calendared for the April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting. 
However, according to Ms. Kate Harrison of the Superior 
Court, the cases that have already been referred to the 
Superior Court must remain with the current attorneys 
assigned to such cases because reassigning the case would be 
prejudicial to the interest of the client, and paid for by the 
Superior Court. The proposed Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance includes projected full-year costs for these cases for 
FY 1994-95. 

If the Board of Supervisors approves the proposed 
Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance to authorize and fund 
three additional attorneys for the Public Defender (Files 101- 
94-82 and 102-94-13), the Trial Courts Fees and Other 

BOARD OF SUPKHVISOHS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Compensation account should be reduced by $408,108 in FY 
1995-96 to reflect a reduction of fees for outside private 
attorneys and expert witnesses, based on a reduction of 479 
cases referred from the Public Defender, at $852 per case. (359 
cases were referred to the Superior Court in the nine months 
from July 1, 1994 to March 31, 1995.) Attachment I is a 
written memo obtained by the Public Defender from the Trial 
Courts representing that the FY 1995-96 budget of the Trial 
Courts will in fact be reduced by $408,108 if the Public 
Defender's request for three new positions is approved by the 
Board of Supervisors. According to Ms. Harrison, this 
$408,108 reduction will be made in the Trial Courts' Fees and 
Other Compensation account (See Attachment II). 

6. The Budget Analyst estimates that a total of 399 cases will 
be referred to the Superior Court over ten months in FY 1994- 
95, assuming that the Public Defender's supplemental 
appropriation request is approved and the Public Defender 
therefore ceases to refer cases to the Superior Court as of May 
1, 1995. The Superior Court advises that the average cost per 
case for conflict cases defended by private attorneys is $852. 
Thus, the $267,000 requested for fees for attorneys and expert 
witnesses would support attorney costs for 313 cases. (The 
remaining cases are supported by increased efficiencies in the 
Superior Court, noted in Comment 3.) 

7. In regard to the three new positions requested by the 
Superior Court, the State of California Legislative Analyst's 
Office conducted a survey of 42 California counties to 
determine the impact of "Three Strikes." The Legislative 
Analyst's Office reported on January 6, 1995, that, prior to 
"Three Strikes," 94 percent of all felony cases Statewide were 
disposed of through plea bargaining. After "Three Strikes," 
only 14 percent of all second-strike cases, and six percent of all 
third-strike cases have been disposed of through plea 
bargaining. The Legislative Analyst's Office also reported that 
the number of jury trials has increased Statewide due to 
"Three Strikes." These findings of the State Legislative 
Analyst's Office support the Superior Court's claim that the 
number of cases going to trial, and thus the workload, has 
increased as a result of "Three Strikes." 

8. As part of the presently ongoing Zero Base budget analysis 
for Fiscal Year 1995-96, the Budget Analyst is currently 
analyzing cost savings that have been realized and additional 
savings that could be achieved by the Municipal and Superior 
Courts through consolidation efforts. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 6ft 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

9. Refer to Items 14 and 15, Files 101-94-82 and 102-94-13, for 
a more in-depth discussion of the Public Defender's request for 
three new attorneys. 

Recommendations: 1. Reduce the proposed Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance 
by $115,544, from $405,564 to $290,020, to reflect a reduction 
of $459 to correct an arithmatic error and to support the cost 
for two months rather than full-year salary and fringe benefit 
costs for the proposed three new positions (101-94-85) 
requested by the Superior Court. 

2. Approve the requested amount of $267,000 needed for 
outside private attorneys and for expert witnesses. 

3. If the Board of Supervisors approves the proposed 
Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance to authorize and fund 
three additional attorneys for the Public Defender, the Trial 
Court's Fees and Other Compensation account should be 
reduced by $408,108 in FY 1995-96 to reflect a reduction of fees 
for outside private attorneys and expert witnesses. Attachment 
I is a written memo obtained by the Public Defender from the 
Trial Courts representing that the FY 1995-96 budget of the 
Trial Courts will in fact be reduced by $408,108 if the Public 
Defender's request for three new positions is approved by the 
Board of Supervisors. According to Ms. Harrison, this 
$408,108 reduction will be made in the Trial Courts Fees and 
Other Compensation account (See Attachment II). 

4. Approval of the proposed Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance, as amended, and of the proposed amendment to the 
1994-95 Annual Salary Ordinance, which would add three new 
permanent positions to perform additional work associated 
with "Three Strikes," are policy matters for the Board of 
Supervisors (Files 101-94-85 and 102-94-14). 



HOARD OF SUPKKVISOKS 
BUDOKT ANALYST 



Attachment I 



Superior (dnnri ai (Ealtfarma 

^a« ,3[ranciaco 



MEMORANDUM 



CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND 

CtERK OF THE COURT 

633 FOISOM ST. ROOM 500 

(415J 554.4110 April 7, 1995 



TO: Peter G. Keane 

Chief Assistant Public Defender 

FROM: Kate. Harrison $$£-' 

Manager, Budget and Administration 

RE: Supplemental Request of Public Defender's Office 



As you requested, I am confirming in writing that were your office to receive the three 
dependency attorneys you are currently requesting by supplemental, it would save the Court 
approximately $408,000 in conflict attorney funds. If your supplemental request is approved, the 
Court will reduce its 1995-96 budget for dependency attorneys from the revised budget of 
$2,185,000 (original 1994-95 budget of $1,918,000 plus pending supplemental request of 
$267,000) to $1,777,000. 

Please call me if you have any questions concerning this matter. 



Alan Carlson, CEO 

Karen Sikkenga, Budget Analyst's Office 

Karen Kegg, Budget Analyst's Office 



2'2'd 70 WdBE:H3 96. 90 dd« 



.-r.-fPR 07 '95 09 :46AM ._ , 

•••;.^'--. | Attachment II 



KATE HARRISON 

MANAGER OF BUDGET 

AND ADMINISTRATION 

CITY HALL. ROOM 313 

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94102 

/£& 4f? , < y/ / 

goJfoi- /9vi^Vj^ ^~c^ 7/7/ ?<s~ 



71 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Item 18 - File 101-94-86 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Comments: 



Fire Department 

Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Ordinance appropriating $652,000 of the 1992 Fire Protection 
Bond Proceeds for a capital improvement project, design 
work for a new 911 Dispatch Center and Fire Station 41, 
subject of previous budgetary denial. 

$652,000 

1992 Proposition C Fire Improvement Bonds 

In November of 1992, the voters of the City and County of 
San Francisco approved the Proposition C Fire Improvement 
Bond Issue. A total of $40,800,000 in General Obligation 
bonds were approved to finance (1) improvement costs related 
to various Fire Department facilities, (2) design costs for the 
new 911 Dispatch Center, and (3) construction costs for the 
Fire Department's new Headquarters/Pump Station 1 
project. 

In October of 1994, $10,105,000 in Proposition C Fire 
Improvement Bonds were sold by the City. These bonds were 
sold to provide financing for (a) improvements to 32 Fire 
Department facilities and (b) architectural and engineering 
services for the new 911 Dispatch Center. In October and 
December of 1994, the Board of Supervisors appropriated a 
total of $9,453,000 in Proposition C Bond Fund monies. A 
request for an additional $600,000, which was related to the 
new 911 Dispatch Center, was not approved because the Fire 
Commission had not taken final approval actions pertaining 
to this $600,000 request. 

On December 27, 1994, the Fire Commission took its final 
actions to approve the $600,000 for architectural and 
engineering services for the new 911 Dispatch Center. The 
Fire Department is (a) now again requesting an 
appropriation of this $600,000 for the 911 Dispatch Center, 
and (b) is requesting an additional $52,000 for design 
services for Fire Station No. 41, located at Leavenworth and 
Clay Streets, for a total of $652,000 representing the 
remaining unappropriated amount from the total of 
$10,105,000 in Proposition C Fire Improvement Bond 
proceeds. 

1. According to Mr. Gary Hoy of the DPW, the $652,000 in 
architectural and engineering services for the new 911 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Dispatch Center and Fire Station No. 41 would be performed 
in-house by DPW employees. 

2. Attachment I, provided by the DPW, explains the details of 
the entire $652,000 request. Attachment II, provided by Mr. 
Hoy, explains the details of the $600,000 in services by DPW 
employees for the new 911 Dispatch Center. 

3. Since this request is the subject of previous budgetary 
denial, passage of this ordinance requires the approval of a 
2/3 vote of the members of the Board of Supervisors. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



7? 



APR 06 '95 08=21 AT&T FAX 9022FX 

City and County of San Francisco 




Date: 
Subject: 



Page i of 2 

Department of Public Works 
Bureau of Architecture 

April 5, 1995 

Use of Funds 

Supplemental Appropriation 

of $652,000 



The Budget Analyst 

1390 Market Street - Room 1025 

San Francisco CA 94102 

Attention: Mr. Jerome Sayre 

Dear Mr. Sayre: 

Per your request, as of this date and in reference to the 
Supplemental Appropriation of $652,000 requested by the Fire 
Department, following is a description of the use of funds for the 
projects : 

1 . New Dispatch Center 

Project Management $300,000 

Environmental Review 50,000 

Design/Documentation 250, 000 

Total $600,000 

2. SFFD Station No. 41 

Architectural Services $52,000 

If you have any questions or need further information in regard to 
this matter, please call Mr. Peter Wong of my staff at 557-4657. 



Very truly yours, 




City Architect 



PW/da 
cc: 

Ref: 



30VN 

Peter Wong, DPW 

Gary Hoy, DPW 

Asst. Chief James Lynch, SFFD 

PW201.C 



115)557-4700 



30 Van N0S3 Avonue, Suite 4100 



Sfln Francisco 94102-6028 



APR 07 '95 14:55 AT&T FAX 9022FX 

Breakdown of Expenditures lor $600,000 Appropriation 



P.l 

Attachment 
Page 2 of 2 



Expenditures for 600,000 appreciation 



Project Management 

BOA/Senkx Architect 
BOA/Adminlstratjve Asst 



Rate Hours Subtotal Total 

80 /hour 3120 249600 

45 /hour 1120 50400 300000 



Environmental Surveys 

BCM/SeniorTech. 
BCMflech. 
BCM/Administrarive Asst 



75 /hour 
65 /hour 
45 /hour 



300 
300 
180 



22500 
19500 
8100 50100 



Architectural/Engineering De$lgn 

BOA Project Architect 

Architectural Associate 
Architectural Asst 

BOE/Crvil Project Engineer 

Associate Engineer 
Engineering Asst 

BOE/tandscape Sr. Landscape Architect 
Landscape Architect 
Jr. Landscape Architect 



75 /hour 
60 /hour 
50 /hour 
75 /hour 
60 /hour 
50 /hour 
70 /hour 
60 /hour 
50 /hour 



600 


45000 


600 


36000 


350 


17500 


450 


33750 


450 


27000 


300 


15000 


450 


31500 


450 


27000 


350 


17500 250250 



600350 



75 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Item 19 - File 101-94-87 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 

Description: 



Comments: 



Department of Public Works 

Ordinance appropriating $26,364 for a capital improvement 
project to cover an overage above 10 percent of the contracted 
amount as per provisions of Charter Section 7.203, providing 
for ratification of action previously taken. 

$26,364 (See Comment 2) 

Capital Improvement Project, Sewer Repair and Replacement 
Fund 

The Board of Supervisors previously approved a contract for 
the repair, of two steel Return Activated Sludge (RAS) 
pipelines at the Southeast Sewage Treatment Plant. The 
previous appropriation included the contract amount of 
$295,750 and a 10 percent contingency of $29,575 for a total 
of $325,325. Charter Section 7.203 requires authorization of 
the Board of Supervisors by supplemental appropriation 
ordinance when the amount of the original contract is 
exceeded by more than ten percent. 

According to Mr. Robert Carlson of the DPW, existing 
appropriated monies have been used to pay the contractor 
and the DPW is now requesting retroactive approval by the 
Board to exceed the original contract amount by more than 
10 percent. 

The work to be performed under this contract consists of the 
repair of two steel RAS pipelines at the Southeast Sewage 
Treatment Plant. According to Mr. Ramses Attia of the 
DPW, this work required additional cost for (1) use of a 
unique lining material for the pipes, (2) the replacement of 
six discharge reducers found defective, (3) additional coating 
required for adjacent pipes and (4) contract delays due to wet 
weather. These contract additions totaled $81,459. Mr. Attia 
further reports that the use of the unique lining material 
eliminated the need for concrete work associated with a 
planned concrete pipeline, thereby resulting in a cost 
reduction of $25,250. 

The budget details of this contract overage above ten percent 
of the original contract amount for the repair of the two steel 
RAS pipelines at the Southeast Sewage Treatment Plant are 
as follows. 



HOAHI) OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Contract Amount $295,750 

Contract Modifications 
Pipeline lining rework, 
flange installation $13,637 

Replacement of pump discharge 

reducers 21,000 

Additional coating spot repair on 

adjacent RAS pipelines 31,631 

Demobilization, remobilization for 
wet weather shutdown, equipment 
maintenance and plywood covering 
during shutdown 15.191 

Subtotal Contract Additions $81,459 

Contract Deletions (for unneeded concrete work) 
(25.250) 

Net Contract Modifications ($56,209 
divided by $295,750 reflects a 19.0 % 
increase in the original contract amount) 56.209 

Revised Contract Amount $351,959 

Previously Appropriated Funds for 

Contractual Services (including 

contingency) $325.325 

Excess of Revised Contract Amount Over Previously 
Appropriated Funds (subject of this request) $26,634 

2. Mr. Mauricio Trigueros of the DPW reports that the correct 
amount of the proposed appropriation request should be 
$26,634, not $26,364 as contained in the proposed ordinance. 

Recommendation: 1. Amend the proposed ordinance to correct the amount being 
appropriated to $26,634 instead of $26,364. 

2 Approve the proposed ordinance as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

77 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 

Item 20 - File 101-94-88 



Department: 

Item: 



Amount: 



Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Juvenile Probation Department (JPD) 

Supplemental appropriation ordinance appropriating 
$1,415,990 of Federal Subvention Revenue for facilities 
maintenance at the Youth Guidance Center and Log Cabin 
Ranch for Fiscal year 1994-95. 

$1,415,990 

Federal Entitlement Program, Title IV-E and IV-A Revenue 
Funds, that pass through the State Department of Social 
Services to the Juvenile Probation Department. 

The Juvenile Probation Department would use the proposed 
funds to provide for (1) Miscellaneous Facilities Maintenance 
costs both at JPD's Youth Guidance Center and at the Log 
Cabin Ranch (LCR), and (2) for Capital Improvements 
Projects to improve health, safety and security at the Youth 
Guidance Center (YGC). The proposed funds would be 
expended as follows: 

Miscellaneous Facilities Main tenance YGC ($249.969): 

The following table shows the JPD's estimated budget 
deficiency for the Youth Guidance Center for FY 1994-95: 



Category 



FY 1994-95 
Budg et 



Misc. Facilities 
Maint. $173,700 



Actual 

Expenditures 
7/1/94 to 
3/31/95 



$215,000 



Projected 
Expenditures Estimated 
4/1/95 to Budget 
6/30/95 Deficiency 



$208,669 ($249,969) 



Mr. Ace Tago of JPD advises that JPD expended all of the FY 
1994-95 budgeted Miscellaneous Facilities Maintenance 
funds for YGC, in the amount of $173,700, by December 31, 
1994 because of emergency repair costs, such as the 
replacement of broken heating pipes, and other repairs to the 
Central Heating System. As such, between the period of 
January 1, 1995 and March 31, 1995, Mr. Michael 
McGuinness of JPD advises that an estimated amount of 
$41,300 was borrowed from the JPD Materials and Supplies 
account. The proposed supplemental appropriation would 
reimburse the JPD Materials and Supplies account, in the 
amount of $41,300, and would provide funding in the amount 
of $72,322 for Miscellaneous Facilities Maintenance costs for 
a three month period, beginning April 1, 1995, through June 

HOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



30, 1995. These funds would be used for daily maintenance 
costs, including the replacement of broken windows and other 
unforeseen maintenance requirements. The remainder of the 
funds, in the amount of $136,347, would be used to fund 
specific projects for JPD's Youth Guidance Center. These 
projects are listed in Attachment 1. According to Mr. Tago, 
Miscellaneous Facility Maintenance work is done by JPD, or 
is work-ordered to the Department of Public Works. 

Miscellaneous Facilities Maintenance LCR ($86.021): 

The following tables show the JPD's estimated budget 
deficiency for the Log Cabin Ranch for FY 1994-95: 

Actual Projected 

Expenditures Expenditures Estimated 

FY 1994-95 7/1/94 to 4/1795 to Budget 

Category Budget 3/31/95 6/30/95 Deficiency 

Misc. Facilities 

Maint. $22,300 $22,500 $85,821 ($86,021) 

Mr. Tago advises that JPD expended all of the FY 1994-95 
budgeted Miscellaneous Facilities Maintenance funds for 
LCR, in the amount of $22,300 by March 31, 1995 because of 
unanticipated emergency repair costs, such as repairing the 
Water Purification System. In addition, Mr. McGuinness 
advises that an estimated amount of $200 was borrowed from 
the JPD Materials and Supplies account. The proposed 
supplemental appropriation would reimburse the JPD 
Materials and Supplies account, in the amount of $200, and 
would provide funding for Miscellaneous Facilities 
Maintenance costs, in the amount of $7,494, for a three 
month period beginning April 1, 1995. These funds would be 
used for daily maintenance costs, including the replacement 
of broken windows and other unforeseen maintenance 
requirements. The remainder of the funds, in the amount of 
$78,327, would be used to fund specific projects for JPD's Log 
Cabin Ranch. These projects are listed in Attachment 2. 

Capital I mprovement Projects ($1.080.000): 

The proposed funds, in the amount of $1,080,000 would 
provide funding for (1) a bridge replacement at the Log Cabin 
Ranch, (2) a renovation of the police bookings area at 
Juvenile Hall, (3) Juvenile Hall security partitioning, and (4) 
the installation of a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning 
system at Juvenile Hall. A description of these projects is as 
follows: 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

79 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Bridge Replacement at Log Cabin Ranch ($190.000): 
The proposed funds would be used to replace the Access 
Roadway Bridge. This Bridge is used daily to operate and 
maintain the domestic water pump station which provides 
the main water supply for the Log Cabin Ranch and the 
Hidden Valley Ranch. Due to the rains, and the resulting 
erosion, as well as a decayed condition and fractures in the 
supporting beams of the bridge, the bridge is currently not 
usable. Mr. Tago advises that the replacement of the bridge 
and the repairs to the surrounding area, will be done by the 
Department of Public Works (DPW). Attachment 3, provided 
by JPD, provides cost details for the proposed bridge 
replacement. 

Renovation of Police Bookings Area of Juvenile Hall 
($20.000): 

These funds would be used to renovate an existing area in 
Juvenile Hall that is used by the police to book the juvenile 
offenders. The funds would be used to provide asbestos 
abatement, ventilation, installation of electrical outlets for 
the booking equipment, install a search area, strip the floors, 
paint the room, and install a sally port entrance into the 
Police Booking Area, as well as the Admissions Unit of 
Juvenile Hall. A sally port entrance is an entrance that has 
two consecutive locked gates, so when a vehicle enters 
through the outer gate, the outer gate is locked prior to 
opening the inner gate, so that when the inner gate is 
opened, no one can escape. Mr. Tago advises that at this time 
no contractor has been selected to provide the proposed 
renovations. As such the proposed funds, in the amount of 
$20,000 should be reserved, pending the selection of the 
contractor, the MBE/WBE status of the contractor, and 
contract cost details. 

Juvenile Hall Security Partitioning ($420.000): 
The proposed funds would be used to install electronically 
controlled doors in all cottage bedrooms, to install electronic 
control panels at counselors workstations, and to renovate 
the counselors work stations in order to provide better work 
space and lockers for the staff. In addition, security 
partitions would be installed between the living area and the 
bedroom area in all seven units of Juvenile Hall. Mr. Tago 
advises that at this time a contractor has not been selected to 
provide the proposed renovations. As such the proposed 
funds, in the amount of $420,000, should be reserved pending 
the selection of the contractor, the MBE/WBE status of the 
contractor, and contract cost details. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 



Juvenile Hall Heating. Ventilation and Air Conditioning 
($450.000): 

The proposed funds, in the amount of $450,000, would 
partially fund a construction contract for the replacement of a 
floor heating system and the installation of a ventilation 
system in Juvenile Hall. These renovations are required 
under the Youth Law Center Court Settlement Agreement. 
The proposed funds would provide the balance needed for this 
project which has a total cost of $1,080,417. Following an 
Invitation for Bids for the proposed system, the Department 
of Public Works received bids from four contractors on 
November 30, 1994. The lowest of the four bidders, Western 
Plumbing & Heating, Inc., was originally selected, at a cost of 
$842,000. However, Western Plumbing & Heating did not 
meet the MBE/WBE subcontracting goals. As such, the 
second lowest bidder, Aire Sheet Metal, Inc., was selected at 
a cost of $889,000. Aire Sheet Metal, Inc. is an MBE. In 
addition, Aire Sheet Metal, Inc. met the MBE/WBE 
subcontracting goals determined by the Human Rights 
Commission. Aire Sheet Metal, Inc. is subcontracting with 
the three following subcontractors: (1) Cresci Electric for an 
amount of $84,365, (2) E. Mitchell for an amount of $128,000, 
and (3) L3 Metal Technologies for an amount of $155,000. 
Cresci Electric and L3 Metal Technologies are MBE firms, 
and E. Mitchell is a WBE firm. 



Comment: 



As noted above, the proposed funding for the (a) Renovation 
of the Police Bookings Area of Juvenile Hall in the amount of 
$20,000, and (b) Juvenile Hall Security Partitioning in the 
amount of $420,000, for a total amount of $440,000, should be 
reserved pending the selection of the contractors, the 
MBE/WBE status of the contractors, and the contract cost 
details. 



Recommendation: 



1. Amend the proposed supplemental appropriation by 
reserving $440,000, in accordance with the Comment above. 



2. Approve the proposed supplemental appropriation 
ordinance as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 12, 1995 




cc: Supervisor Hsieh 

Supervisor Kaufman 
Supervisor Bierman 
President Shelley 
Supervisor Alioto 
Supervisor Ammiano 
Supervisor Hallinan 
Supervisor Kennedy 
Supervisor Leal 
Supervisor Migden 
Supervisor Teng 
Clerk of the Board 
Chief Administrative Officer 
Controller 
Teresa Serata 
Robert Oakes 
Ted Lakey 



HOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



R I 



APR 05 '95 11:52 FR JUUENILE PROBATION 415 753 7715 TO 92520461 P. 02/03 

Attachment 1 



Juvenile Probation Department 
Facilities Maintenance & Building Repairs 
FY94-95 



Youth Guidance Center 

Day to Day Facilities Maintenance Expenditures Projection 



Projected Expenditures for FY94-95 



1 . B-5 Cottage Security Windows $34,557 

2. Replacement of Hot Water Heat Exchangers in W Cottages 22,500 

3. Repair Main Refrigeration Unit in Juvenile Hall Kitchen 5,300 

4. Additional Asbestos Removal in Cottage Air Handlers-Health 1 5,000 

5. Reinsulation of Steampipes in W Cottages Utility Tunnel-Health 20,000 

6. Backflow Devices(phase two)-Health and Safety 15,990 

7. Renovate Emergency Command Center 20,000 

8. Handrails in W Cottages-ADA Compliance Project 3,000 

Total $136,347 



Supplemental Appropriation Calculation 

Current Funding Level ($173,700) 
Less: 

Projected Day to Day Facilities Maintenance Expenditures 287,322 

Facilities Repairs 136,347 



Total Request $249,969 



Exhibit #1 



RPR 05 '95 11:52 FR JUUENILE PROBATION 415 753 7715 TO 92520461 P. 03/03 



Attachment 2 



Juvenile Probation Department 
Facilities Maintenance & Building Repairs 
FY94-95 

Log Cabin Ranch 

Day to Day Facilities Maintenance Expenditures Projection 



Projected Expenditures for FY94-95 

1. Dormitory Building Renovations #1-ADA Compliance Project $12,000 

2. Electrical for Kitchen Window Fan Replacements-Health 5,127 

3. Electrical for Water Ozonation Filters-Health 5,200 

4. Dormitory Building Renovations #2-ADA Compliance Project 22,000 

5. Dormitory Building Tree Trimming and Removal-Fire 7,500 

6. Repair Cement Steps and Access Areas-ADA Compliance Projects 2,000 

7. Repair Ceilings in Kitchen, Utility, and Restroom Areas-Health 10,000 

8. Fire and Sprinkler System Certificaiton-Fire 4,000 

9. Installation of Ozonation Filters-Health 10,500 

Total $78,327 



Supplemental Appropriation Calculation 

Current Funding Level ($22,300) 
Less: 

Projected Day to Day Facilities Maintenance Expenditures 29,994 

Facilities Repairs 78,327 



Total Request $86,021 



Exhibit ttl 



.03 ** 



FRQM:CCSF JUUENILE COURT 



TQ: 



RPR 6, 1995 4: 12PM 8316 P. 02 



Attachment 3 



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85 



-St 

DOCUMENTS DEFT 

Memo to Budget Committee APR 11 1995 

April 12, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



1 



REVISED 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Comments: 1. The Attachment, provided by the District Attorney's Office, 

L^- explains the basis and need for the requested $60,000 for the 

District Attorney. 

2. It should be noted that the ongoing annual General Fund 
costs for the Serious Habitual Offender Program, (excluding 
one-time start-up costs), are $468,866. Mr. Tago states that 
the overall Fiscal Year 1995-96 General Fund allocation for 
JPD, which includes funding for SHOP, will not represent an 
increase over the Fiscal Year 1994-95 General Fund 
allocation for JPD. 

Recommendations: 1. Approval of the proposed release of reserved funds is a 
policy matter for the Board of Supervisors. 

2. If the Budget Committee releases funds for the Serious 
Habitual Offender Program, the maximum amount of funds 
to be released should be $206,098 in accordance with the 
revised budget as detailed above. The balance of $69,372 
($275,470 less $206,098) should be returned to the General 
Fund. 



HOARD OF SUPERVISOR S 
DUPGET ANALYST 



OPR-07-'95 FRI 12:51 ID:SF DISTRICT ATTY YGC TEL NO:415-753-77B0 FRX7709 «699 P02 




Attachment 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY Fa S e i °±" 2 



ARLO SMITH /#&£& ROBERT M.PODESTA 

r.l«Tnir-T ATTOHNKV fcilifN CHIEF ASSISTANT 

DISTRICT ATTORNKr fcLiHfflJsl DISTRICT ATTORNEY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

880 BRYANT STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 94103 TEL. I4I5I &S3-17SJ 

April 7, 1995 

VIA FAX 

Michelle Ruggles 
Budget Analyst Office 
Board of Supervisors 
1390 Market St. #1025 
San Francisco, CA 94102 

Dear Ms. Ruggles: 

This letter is being provided pursuant to your request for 
further information with regard the amount of $60,000. for an 
Assistant District Attorney position which is contained in the 
Juvenile Probation Department's request for release of funds for 
the Serious Offender Program. 

The proposal is that the Juvenile Probation Department fund 
a portion of the salary (with benefits) of an Assistant District 
Attorney. The sura represents 60% of a Senior Trial Attorney, 
Step 4. Our office will fund the remaining 40% of that position, 
with the funds to come from the Vehicle Fund. 

The duties of the Assistant District Attorney who will be 
designated as the Serious Offender Program attorney will be to 
work with the SPPD and Probation Department in investigation, 
preparation, and litigation of any new case involving a program 
participant. The ADA will review each booking with the Probation 
Officer/ review all available information about the minor, to 
include law enforcement contacts, probation contacts, social 
history and school history. The ADA will also review the evidence 
presented by the SFPD as to the filing of any new charges, and 
make a determination as to the charges to be filed, consistent 
with the current filing policies of our office. The ada will 
appear at the detention hearing and at all subsequent court 
appearances, including arraignment, pre-trial, motions, trial, 
disposition, and restitution hearing. The ADA will be the only 
district attorney assigned to the case and as such, will provide 
consistency and continuity in contact with the victims and 
witnesses, from the beginning of the case through conclusion of 
the case. The ADA will meet with the Probation Officer, and any 



20 



MINUTES 

REGULAR MEETING 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

//9/?sr 



ifo 



WEDNESDAY. APRIL 19. 1995 - 1:00 P.M. ROOM 410, WAR MEMORIAL 

BLDG. 

MEMBERS: SUPERVISORS HSIEH, KAUFMAN, BIERMAN 

CLERK: GREGOIRE HOBSON 



TIME MEETING CONVENED: 1:08 P.M. 



CONSENT CALENDAR 

All matters listed hereunder constitute a Consent Calendar, are considered to 
be routine by the Budget Committee, and will be acted upon by a single roll 
call vote of the Committee. There will be no separate discussion of these 
items unless a member of the Committee or a member of the public so 
requests, in which event the matter shall be removed from the Consent 
Calendar and considered as a separate item 



a) File 101-92-33.3 . [Reserved Funds, Fire Department] Consideration of 
release of reserved funds, Fire Department, 1986 Fire Protection Bond 
interest, in the amount of $23,758.78 for the purpose of installing an 
emergency generator at Fire Station No. 24. (Fire Department) 

b) File 101-94-6.2 . [Reserved Funds, Fire Department] Consideration of 
release of reserved funds, Fire Department, 1986 Fire Protection Bond 
interest, in the amount of $1,732,221 to award Contract No. 7225E, 
which will allow for the following Auxiliary Water Supply System 
(AWSS) extension: Ocean Avenue/Mission Street, Phelan Avenue/Norton 
Street. (Fire Department) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE M~ TT JTES PAGE 2 

c) File 38-95-2 . [Acceptance of Gifts] Resolution accepting gifts valued 
at $278,000 for use by the Recreation and Park Department. 

City Parking Company $ 6,000.00 

David B. Gold Foundation $ 10,000.00 

Anonymous Donor $ 12,000.00 

Anonymous Donor $100,000.00 

Catherine Takamine Trust $150,000.00 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: HEARINGS HELD. ITEM a REMOVED FROM CONSENT 
CALENDAR. REMAINING ITEMS RECOMMENDED. 

ITEM a - File 101-92-33.3 . AMENDED. REDUCE RELEASE OF 
AMOUNT TO $21,400.00. APPROVED RELEASE OF $21,400.00. 
FILED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



REGULAR CALENDAR 
FISCAL ITEMS 



File 101-94-90 . [Appropriation, Rent Board] Ordinance appropriating 
$91,644, Rent Board, Special Fund Revenue to salaries, materials and 
supplies, equipment and services of other departments to implement 
Proposition I for fiscal year 1994-95. (Controller) RO #94207 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Joe Grubb, Executive Director, Rent Board; Ted Lakey, Deputy City 
Attorney; Ed Harrington, Controller. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
Reduce appropration to $82,718. AMENDED TITLE: 
"Appropriating $44,718 of Rent Board Special Fund Revenue to 
salaries, Materials and Supplies and operating equipment and 
services of other departments to allow the Rent Board to 
implement Proposition I and $38,000 for the purchase of new 
equipment for fiscal year 1994-95." 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE M^JTES PAGE 3 

3. File 101-94-91 . [Appropriation, Retirement System] Ordinance appropriating 
$13,980, Retirement System, from Employees Retirement Trust Fund for 
services of other departments to provide funding for a Worker's Compensation 
Adjuster for fiscal year 1994-95. (Controller) RO #94208 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO APIRL 26, 1995. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



4. File 101-94-92 . [Appropriation, Mayor's Office] Ordinance appropriating 
$35,000, Mayor's Office, from the General Fund Reserve to non-personal 
services to provide funding for the Mobilization Against AIDS through the 
Community United Against Violence for fiscal year 1994-95. (Controller) RO 
#94209 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Jerry Windley, 
representing Supervisor Alioto; Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst; Robert Oakes, 
Office of the Mayor. IN SUPPORT: Michael Shriver, Executive Director, 
Mobilization Against AIDS. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



5. File 101-94-94 . [Appropriation, Human Resources] Ordinance appropriating 
$636,638, Department of Human Resources, from the General Fund Reserve, 
for the costs of collective bargaining under Proposition F. (Supervisor 
Kaufman) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Wendell Pryor, General Manager, Human Resources Department. IN 
SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE M^UTES PAGE 4 

GENERAL ITEMS 

6. File 97-95-11 . [Parking Rates for Special Events] Ordinance amending 
Chapter 17 of the San Francisco Administrative Code, Section 17.17 to permit 
the Parking Authority Commission to adjust rates charged at public off-street 
parking facilities temporarily on account of a special event. (Supervisor 
Migden) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Michael Colbruno, 
representing Supervisor Migden; Harvey Rose, Budget Analyst; Kevin 
Haggerty, Director, Off-Street Parking, Parking and Traffic Department. IN 
SUPPORT: Marcus Phillips. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 

7. File 97-95-19 . [General Grant Levels] Ordinance amending the San 
Francisco Administrative Code by amending Section 20.57 (General 
Assistance Ordinance) relating to the computation of AID Grants. 
(Department of Social Services) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Harvey Rose, Budget 
Analyst; Brian Cahill, General Manager, Department of Social Services. IN 
SUPPORT: Marcus Phillips. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 2-1. (Supervisor Bierman dissenting.) 

TIME MEETING ADJOURNED: 2:26 P.M. 



CITY AND COUNTY 




OF SAN FRANCISC 0*-"***/ J\CpOTt 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street, Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 



April 17, 1995 



TO: Budget Committee 

FROM: Budget Analyst 

SUBJECT: April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item la - File 101-92-33.3 



Department: 

Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 

Description: 



San Francisco Fire Department 
Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Hearing requesting the release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $23,758.78 from 1986 Fire Protection Bond Fund 
interest to install an emergency generator at Fire Station 
No. 24. 

$23,758.78 (See Comment No. 2) 

1986 Fire Protection System Improvement Bonds accrued 
interest 

In November of 1986, San Francisco voters approved the 
issuance of $46.2 million in Fire Protection System 
Improvement Bonds to finance improvements to the City's 
Auxiliary Water Supply System (AWSS). The AWSS is a 
system of reservoirs and cisterns, pipelines and pump 
stations which provide a source of water for fire protection 
in the event that the main water supply system fails. 

In February of 1993, the Board of Supervisors appropriated 
$1,191,769 in accrued interest from the 1986 Fire Protection 
Bond Fund, placing $623,350 on reserve for emergency 
generators and a geotechnical study contract pending the 
selection of contractors, the MBE/WBK status of the 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 19, 1995 



Comments: 



contractors and the contract cost details. The Board 
previously approved the release of $308,243.50 of the original 
$623,350, leaving $315,106.50 on reserve. The Fire 
Department is now requesting the release of $21,400 of the 
remaining $315,106.50 on reserve for an emergency 
generator for Fire Station No. 24 at 100 Hoffman Avenue. 

The funds for the emergency generator for Fire Station No. 
24 are to be expended as follows: 



Purchase and Installation of 
Emergency Generator 



$42,800* 



*The balance of $21,400 is to be provided from a pending 
release of reserved State Hazard Mitigation Grant funds. 

1. Mr. Roger Wong of the DPW advises that the total $42,800 
cost of the purchase and installation of the emergency 
generator is part of a larger project for the renovation and 
seismic strengthening of Fire Station No. 24. That 
renovation project was previously approved by the Board of 
Supervisors (File 101-90-128.2) and a contract for the project 
was awarded to Amoroso Construction/Marinship 
Construction, a joint venture, which submitted the low bid 
of $1,558,000. Marinship Construction, an MBE firm, 
received 19.5 percent or $303,870 of the total $1,558,000 
contract amount. 



Recommendation: 



2. Assistant Deputy Chief Frank Scales of the Fire 
Department advises that the correct amount of this release 
of reserved funds is $21,400, or half of the $42,800 total 
project cost to purchase and install the emergency 
generator, and not $23,758.78 as stated in the proposed 
request for release. 

Release reserved funds in the amount of $21,400 instead of 
$23,758.78, in accordance with Comment No. 2 above. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 19, 1995 

Item lh -File 101-94-R.2 



Department: 

Item: 



Amount: 

Source of Funds: 

Description: 



San Francisco Fire Department 
Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Hearing requesting the release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $1,732,221 from 1986 Fire Protection Bond Fund 
interest to allow for an Auxiliary Water Supply System 
(AWSS) extension from Ocean Avenue at Phelan Avenue to 
Mission Street at Norton Street. 

$1,732,221 

1986 Fire Protection System Improvement Bonds accrued 

interest 

In November of 1986, San Francisco voters approved the 
issuance of $46.2 million in Fire Protection System 
Improvement Bonds to finance improvements to the City's 
Auxiliary Water Supply System (AWSS). The AWSS is a 
system of reservoirs and cisterns, pipelines and pump 
stations which provide a source of water for fire protection in 
the event that the main water supply system fails. 

In July of 1994, the Board of Supervisors approved the 
appropriation of $2,490,000 in accrued interest from the 1986 
Fire Protection Bond Fund for the one-mile extension of an 
AWSS pipeline on Ocean Avenue at Phelan Avenue to 
Mission Street at Norton Street placing $2,090,000 on 
reserve pending the selection of the contractor, the 
MBE/WBE status of the contractor and the contract cost 
details. The Fire Department now requests the release of 
$1,732,221 of the $2,090,000 in reserved funds for the 
proposed AWSS pipeline extension 

The Department of Public Works (DPW) has awarded a 
contract to the low bidder, A. Ruiz Construction Company 
and Associates, Inc., which submitted a bid of $1,558,383. A. 
Ruiz Construction is an MBE firm. The funds are to be 
expended as follows: 

Construction Contract - A. Ruiz (MBE) $1,558,383 
Contingency (10%) 155,838 

Radio-Controlled Water RegulationValves 18.000 * 
Total $1,732,221 

*To be provided by tbe Department of Electricity and 
Telecommunications (see Comment No. 2). 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 19, 1995 



Comments: 



1. Mr. Thinh Nguyen of the DPW has provided the following 
contract cost details including the MBE/WBE participation in 
the $1,558,383 total construction contract. 

Prime Contractor - MBE (81.3%) 



A. Ruiz Construction Co. 




$1,266,583 


Subcontractors (18.7%) 






(all MBE firms) 






Esquivel Grading 


$30,000 




P&K Trucking 


40,600 




Loi Electric 


110,000 




Jenkins Construction 


80,000 




Vickers Saw 


31.200 




Subtotal, MBE Subcontractors 




291.800 


Total, Construction Contract 




$1,558,383 



2. According to Mr. Nguyen, the Department of Electricity 
and Telecommunications (DET) will install radio-controlled 
devices allowing the remote operation of two motorized 
valves to increase the flow of water from the AWSS pipelines 
on one side of the City to those on the other side during an 
emergency. Mr. Nguyen reports that the $18,000 cost for the 
radio control valves includes materials and labor associated 
with their installation and activation. 

3. The DPW has pi-ovided the attached list of the bidders and 
the amounts bid. 

Recommendation: Approve the proposed release of reserved funds in the 
requested amount of $1,732,221. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



CMUllNHtirciMU DURtLHU 



r«ut UJ 



SPECIFICATION NO. 

•ITLE: 

IIDS RECEIVED: 

UDDERS: 



PPARENT LOW BIDDER: 



TABULATION OF BIDS 
7225E 

Ocean Ave./Mission St Phelan Ave. to Norton St. AWSS 
February 22. 1995 



A. Ruiz Construction Co. M8E/L8E 

McNamara & Smallman Construction LBE 

D'Arcy 4 Harty and San Luis Construction MBE/LBE/JV 10% 



A. Ruiz Construction Co. 

1615 Cortiand Ave. 

San Francisco, CA 94110 



Average Bid: 

Engineer's Estimate 

% of Engineer's Estimate: 



Tel. (415)647-4010 



BaseJJjd 
1.558,363 
1.608.730 
1,743,420 

1.636.844 

1.488.360 

110% 



UBCONTRACTORS 



ORS: 


Esqurvel Grading 


Paving 




P&K Trucking 


Trucking 




Loi Electric 


Electrical 




Jenkins Construction 


Excav-Equip 




Vickers Saw 


Saw cut 


Sob Jew 






John Cribbs 






Linda Chin 






Todd Cockburn 




Nelson Wong 






Peg Divine 






Sophia Horn 






Controller 






Maurice Williams 




Don Eng 






Bob Swanstro 


m 




Foon Chow 







30.000 
40,600 
110,000 
80,000 
31.200 



-Feb-95 



..: 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item lc - File 38-95-2 

Department: Recreation and Parks Department 

Item: Resolution accepting five cash gifts totaling $278,000, for use 

by the Recreation and Park Department. 

Description: The proposed resolution would accept, on behalf of the City, 

five gifts for use by the Recreation and Park Department, 
with a total value of $278,000. The five gifts are as follows: 

1. $6,000 cash gift from City Parking Company, for 
discretionary use by Golden Gate Park. According to Ms. 
Elaine Molinari of the Recreation and Park Department, this 
gift will be used to fund a brochure about Golden Gate Park. 

2. $10,000 cash gift from the David B. Gold Foundation, 
including $7,000 for Reforestation and $3,000 for a Memorial 
Bench, both in Golden Gate Park. The $7,000 in 
Reforestation funds will be added to other budgeted funds 
used for reforestation, and the $3,000 will be used to 
purchase and install a memoi'ial bench and maintain the 
bench for a period of five years. 

3. $12,000 cash gift from an anonymous donor for the 
Recreation Division. These funds have been specified by the 
donor to enhance teen programs in the Tenderloin, Mission, 
Western Addition, and Bayview-Hunter's Point, and to 
include more girls in programs. According to Ms. Mary 
Burns of the Recreation and Park Department, the funds will 
be used for materials, special events and outings for youth 
from the neighborhoods listed above. 

4. $100,000 cash gift from an anonymous donor for the 
Reforestation Program for Golden Gate Park and Lincoln 
Park. These funds will be used to partially fund the purchase 
of a piece of equipment known as a tub grinder, which will be 
used to grind up very large waste materials, such as fallen 
trees, in the Parks. The Department plans to acquire this 
equipment at a total estimated cost of $265,598. 

5. $150,000 cash gift as a partial distribution from the 
Catherine Takamine Trust for the Strybing Arboretum and 
Botanical Gardens' Takamine Garden. Ms. Catherine 
Takamine left funds in her will for a Japanese-style garden 
in Strybing Arboretum. These funds were used, together 
with funds given many years ago by the Ikebana Society 
International, in the creation of the Takamine Garden, which 
was established in the 1970s. The proposed $150,000 gift will 



BOARD OF SUI'KKVISUKS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

be placed in a special gift account and invested by the City 
Treasurer, with the income to be used for the maintenance 
and improvement of the Takamine Garden. 

Comment: According to Recreation and Park Department staff, these 

gifts, except for the memorial bench and the Takamine 
Garden, (which maintenance funds have been provided for in 
the subject gifts), will have minimal impact on the City's 
maintenance costs. 

Recommendation: Approve the proposed resolution. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

7 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 2 -File 101-94-90 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Rent Arbitration Board 

Ordinance appropriating $91,644 from the Rent Arbitration 
Board Fund to salaries, materials and supplies, equipment 
and services of other departments to allow the Rent Board to 
implement Proposition I for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

$91,644 

Rent Arbitration Board Fund 

The proposed ordinance would appropriate $91,644 from the 
Rent Arbitration Board Fund to pay for temporary salaries 
and related expenses for the purpose of implementing 
Proposition I, which was approved by the voters in November 
1994. 

Funds for these items are available from unappropriated 
revenue in the Rent Arbitration Board Fund, which receives 
revenues through a $10 fee paid annually by landlords for 
each unit which is covered under the Rent Control 
Ordinance. Use of these funds is restricted to implementation 
of the Rent Control Ordinance. As of April 14, 1995, the 
Fund had a balance of approximately $390,000. Approval of 
this appropriation would reduce that balance to $298,356 
($390,000 less $91,644). 

Proposition I, which was approved by the voters in November 
of 1994, repealed the exemption from rent control for owner- 
occupied buildings containing four or fewer units, thereby 
making all rental units in the City subject to rent control, 
except (1) those units built after June 1979, and, (2) units 
exempted through a Rent Board petition based on the unit's 
requiring substantial rehabilitation or the unit being 
permanently removed from the housing market. 
Approximately 18,000 buildings containing approximately 
45,000 rental units are newly included in the Rent Control 
Ordinance as a result of the passage of Proposition I. 

According to Mr. Joe Grubb, Executive Director of the Rent 
Board, Proposition I has created a substantially increased 
work-load for the Rent Board. Specifically, the Rent Board is 
required by ordinance to notify all affected landlords that 
they are now covered by the rent control ordinance, respond 
to inquiries from landlords and tenants, and conduct 
hearings on tenant and landlord petitions. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Under Proposition I, the starting rent for the affected 
apartments is the rent that was effective as of May 1, 1994. 
However, regulations adopted by the Rent Board for 
implementing Proposition I allow landlords to petition for an 
increase in rents where the unit is substantially below 
market rate. The Rent Board must schedule hearings on 
such petitions within 45 days of the request, and must issue a 
decision within 30 days of the hearing. The Rent Board is 
currently prohibited from acting on petitions under this rule 
due to a lawsuit filed by a tenant organization. However, Mr. 
Grubb reports that a settlement of the lawsuit is anticipated 
shortly which will allow the Rent Board to proceed with 
petition hearings. Legislation now pending for final passage 
before the Board of Supervisors (File 109-95-3) would 
prohibit the Rent Board from issuing rules and regulations 
that treat units brought under rent control by Proposition I 
differently from units previously under rent control in 
determining whether rent increases are justified. According 
to Mr. Grubb, approval of that legislation would not 
significantly reduce the number of inquiries and hearings 
that the Rent Board will need to conduct in order to 
implement Proposition I. 

The funds appropriated for salaries ($20,778) under the 
proposed ordinance would allow the Rent Board to hire two 
temporary positions, including one additional Hearing Officer 
and one additional Citizen Complaint Officer, for a period of 
three months (See Comment) and purchase related supplies 
($2,750) and equipment ($2,000) in order to allow the Rent 
Board to conduct hearings on rent increase petitions and 
other issues in a timely manner. The Rent Board currently 
has a staff of 4 Hearing Officers (annual salary at top step is 
$57,394) and 6 Citizen Complaint Officers (annual salary at 
top step is $43,605). 

In addition, the proposed funds, in the amount of $38,000, 
would pay for the purchase of an automated telephone 
attendant system to answer questions about the rent law. 
The automated telephone attendant system is currently 
being leased by the Rent Board. Callers can choose and 
listen to recorded messages on 36 different topics 24 hours a 
day. The system receives 5,000 calls per month, and the Rent 
Board reports that more than half of callers do not need 
additional information after hearing messages from the 
system. The Rent Board now leases two lines for this system 
at a cost of $6,000 per year. Mr. Grubb reports that currently 
callers get a busy signal for long periods of time. If the Rent 
Board were to add 10-15 lines to the leased system, which is 
anticipated to allow immediate access to the system, and add 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee . 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Budget: 



Comments: 



recorded messages in Chinese and Spanish to provide greater 
access, the leased system would cost approximately $42,000 
annually. According to Mr. Grubb, the purchase of the 
system, including message options in Chinese and Spanish, 
and the additional 10-15 lines to the system, would cost 
$38,000. Therefore, it is more cost effective to purchase the 
system for $38,000, than to continue leasing the system for 
$42,000 annually. 

Finally, the proposed funds would pay for the cost of 
generating a list of all buildings with the additional units 
now subject to rent control as a result of the passage of 
Proposition I. The building owners would be identified and 
billed for the $10 per unit fee as authorized by the Rent 
Control Ordinance, and the fees would be processed. These 
functions will be carried out by workordering funds from the 
Rent Board to the Tax Collector's Office ($21,916) and to the 
Controller's Office ($6,200). 

The proposed budget, for the period May 1, 1995 to June 30, 
1995, is as follows: 

Temporary Salaries (See Comment 1) 

2975 Citizen Complaint Officer (3 months @$2991/mo.)$8,973 
8162 Hearing Officer (3 months @$3935/mo.) 11.805 

Sub-total salaries 20,778 

Materials and Supplies (furniture and office supplies) 2,750 

Equipment Purchase (See Comment 2) 2,000 

Automated telephone attendant system 
(workorder to Dept. of Electricity and Telecommunications) 38,000 

Billing/Fee Collection 
(workorder to Tax Collector; mailing costs included) 21,916 

Information Systems Data programming 
(workorder to Controller; cost of listing all Prop. I units) 6 T 200 

Total $91,644 

1. Mr. Grubb reports that this supplemental appropriation 
requested sufficient funding in Temporary Salaries at the 
time it was submitted to hire an additional Hearing Officer 
and Citizen Complaint Officer through the end of the 1994-95 
Fiscal Year. Due to delays because of the lawsuit mentioned 
above, and delays in bringing this item before the Board of 
Supervisors, only two months instead of three months will 
remain in the Fiscal Year at the time these positions are 
hired (approximately May 1, 1995). Therefore, the Budget 
Analyst recommends that the amount for Temporary Salaries 
be reduced by $6,926, from $20,778 to $13,852, which is the 
amount necessary to fund these positions for two months. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



10 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

2. Mr. Grubb reports that the $2,000 which had been 
included in this budget for the purchase of office equipment is 
no longer necessary because the Rent Board will be able to 
utilize existing office equipment for one of the two requested 
temporary positions. Therefore, this line item can be 
eliminated. The remaining budget items are one-time 
expenses, unrelated to salary costs, which should not be 
reduced. 

3. The Attachment, provided by Mr. Grubb, details the basis 
of the proposed expenditures for materials and supplies 
($2,750), purchase of the automated telephone attendant 
system ($38,000) and workorder funds to the Tax Collector 
($21,916), and Controller ($6,200). 

Recommendations: 1. Reduce Temporary Salaries by $6,926 from $20,778 to 
$13,852. 

2. Eliminate the amount of $2,000 under Equipment. 

3. Reduce the overall request of $91,644 by $8,926 ($6,926 
plus $2,000) to $82,718. 

2. Approve the proposed ordinance, as amended. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

11 



City and County of San Francisco 




Residential Rent Stabilization and 
Arbitration Board 



RENT BOARD MEMORANDUM 




SUBJECT: 



April 13, 1995 

Peg Stevenson, Budget Analyst, Harvey Rose 
ph P. Grubb, Executive Director 
o. 101-94-90, Supplemental Request 



The material and supplies cost for the aforementioned supplemental 
request breaks down as follows: 

$1 ,800 1 Computer and wiring charges 

$ 400 Software for 1 computer (Word, spreadsheet, etc.) 

$ 200 1 Desk and chair 

$ 250 1 Phone and wiring charges : 

$ 100 2 Desk supplies (hardware — calculator, pens, paper, etc.) 

$2,750 Total 



Please note that the department is only making purchases for one of the 
two requested positions. This is because the department currently has a 
vacant position that will allow us to utilize that position's equipment for 
the most part. 



TE1_ (415) 554-9SS0 



FAX (415) 252^*899 



25 Van N»a« Avanuo, #320 



San Francisco. CA 94102-6033 



12 



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Page 2 of 4 



AT&T 



•January 17, 1995 

Carl Ruiz 

Telecommunications Manager 

DET/Telecoia 

901 Rankin Street 

San Francisco CA. 94124 

Dear Carl: 

In response to Nancy Lillegard's request for a Jntuity Voice 
Mail System at 25 Van Ness for "Human Rights",, I am providing 
this budgetary quote based on the following customer 
specified parameters. Please review and advice me if any 
changes are necessary . 

The Intuity shall be "Migrated* from a D£F AUDIX which 
presently consists of 6 ports and 15 hours of disk storage. 
The number of ports and disk storage shall remain the same 
with the Intuity providing support for : 

- 300 initial users / growth to 350 

- auto attendant 

- remote access for one 

- 1 local printer 

- call accounting software 

- multilingual software 

cost including shipping $ 34,075.26 + $ 2,510.11 tax + travel 
cost $ 1200.00 « $ 37,785.37. 

Monthly maintenance is $ 456.14. This quote is good for 60 
days. 

If there are any other questions please call ae direct on 
(415) 834-2251. 

Sincerely, 

Robert Sexton 
Account Executive 

/ cc: nlillegard 

"Jfoes not ae&uni 6c iu&toxeJ rWfe 

NOTE: This memo from AT&T to DET incorrectly refers to 
"Human Rights" 



3*3 Sansom* Si'wt 

10th Floor 

Sail F«inrJsr,o. CA 94 104 



TOTAL P. 81 



13 



"APR 13 '95 13:50 SF RENT BOflRD 1 -^ 1 -^ '«>• ^f ICE TEL f<J: 4l5-554-?l2l " L - Lav -' uuc " 1 -, 

Paee 3 of 4 



HEMQRAHPUM 



TO: Joseph Grubb 

Director Rent Board 

FROM: Anita Jin 

Tax Collector's Office 

RE: Additional Costs for Supplemental Statements Under 
Propostion I 



TEMPORARY SALARIES? 

1720 Data Entry Operator (3 weeks) $ 3,942 

1630 Account Clerk (8 weeks) 4,352 

1424 Clerk Typists 7,912 

(1 for 8 weeks, 2 for A weeks) $16,206 

RON-PERSONAL COSTS; 

City Mail Service $ 5,411 

Materials and Supplies _ 2 . 9 9 

5.7AQ 

Total $21,916 



14 



<flPR"l3" r 95 13M9 SF RO^" BOARD -CONTROLLERS ISD 





City and County ©J San f/«Ad«co 



Ofllc* of th. Conl/ollw 



WIWWATJON SERVICES 



MEMORANDUM 



tlSSU^rV*! SL, 9lh Roor 
San FrancUco, CA W103-1S2S 
(41S) SSA-0600 



To: 



Joe Grubb 
Anita Jin 



From: Shirley Schiffler^ 

Date: January 20, 1995 

Subject: Estimates for Rent Control Changes 

This memo documents ISD's estimated costs to make two changes to the Rent Control 
Board (RCB) automated system: 

* Write a program to identity additional landlords subject to rent control fees as a 
result of Proposition I. Produce a notification letter explaining the impact of Prop 
I on tenants and landlords. The letter will be printed by the computer and will- 
include the landlord names and mailing addresses. Note that we do not track 
tenant names or addresses and therefore cannot produce tenant notices. 

Assumes Joe Grubb will provide the format of the notice and that it will be simple 
and straightforward. Assumes Anita Jin will use window envelopes for the 
mailing. Assumes Anita Jin will work with the Mailroom to arrange a date for the 
mailing. 



Estimated Cost $1,200 



Estimated ISD Hours: 24 



Flag the accounts newly subject to rmi control fees. Produce bills (i.e., 
"supplemental* bills), delinquent notices, hearing notices, and lien notices for 
these accounts. Transfer unpaid accounts to the Recorder for liening. At tax bill 
time, release the Recorder liens and transfer to the Tax Collector as "Special 
Assessments'. Modify an on-line transaction to display a code indicating if an 
account received a supplemental bill. Train Anita Jin's staff. 

Assumes the new accounts will be tracked only until the beginning of the new 
rent control year (October 1995) and afterward will be treated exactly like other 
"normal* accounts. 



Estimated Cost $5,000 



Estimated ISD Hours: 100 



Joe, this documents the verbal estimate I gave you earlier. If you decide to proceed, 
we will n&ed to clarify how to identify the newly eligibla accounts and also to determine 
how penalties and Interest should be handled. Please call me at 554-0812 to let rhe 
know your ptans. Anita, I hope this answers your questions. 



H^IBVRENTEST t DOC 



TOTAL R.&2 



15 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 19, 1995 

Item 3 -File 101 -94-91 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Comment: 



Employees Retirement System (ERS) 
Department of Human Resources (DHR) 

Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance appropriating 
$13,980 from the Employees Retirement Trust Fund for 
Services of Other Departments to provide funding for a 
Workers Compensation Adjuster for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

$13,980 

Employees Retirement Trust Fund 

On November 2, 1993, the voters of San Francisco approved 
Proposition L, which created the Department of Human 
Resources, and transferred the City's Workers Compensation 
Division from the Employees Retirement System to the 
Department of Human Resources. 

The Employees Retirement System is requesting 
authorization to workorder $13,980 from the Employees 
Retirement Trust Fund to the Department of Human 
Resources, Workers Compensation Division to fund the 
salary and fringe benefits of an existing, full-time, 8141 
Workers Compensation Adjuster position for approximately 
six pay periods beginning April 10, 1995 and ending June 30, 
1995. The purpose of the 8141 Workers Compensation 
Adjuster position would be to (1) process the Employees 
Retirement System's ordinary disability and industrial 
disability retirement cases, (2) process all claims regarding 
applications for death allowances where there is no similar 
claim made before the Workers Compensation Appeals 
Board, (3) monitor and report permanent disability awards to 
the Employees Retirement System, and (4) meet regularly 
with the Employees Retirement System to review and discuss 
the status of retirement applications, and other issues related 
to the processing of retirement applications. 

The Budget Analyst has requested additional information 
from the DHR regarding the justification for this proposed 
request. Therefore, the Budget Analyst is requesting that 
this item be continued to the Budget Committee meeting on 
April 26, 1995, in order to obtain the additional information 
necessary for the Budget Analyst to conduct a detailed 
analysis of the subject request. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



16 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 19, 1995 

Recommendation: Continue the proposed ordinance to the Budget Committee 
meeting on April 26, 1995. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

17 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 19, 1995 

Item 4 -File 101-94-92 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Mayor's Office 

Ordinance appropriating $35,000 from the General Fund 
Reserve to Non-Personal Services to provide funding to 
Mobilization Against AIDS, a non-profit agency, through the 
Community United Against Violence, a non-profit agency, for 
Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

$35,000 

General Fund Reserve 

The proposed supplemental appropriation would provide 
funding in the amount of $35,000 to Mobilization Against 
AIDS (MAA), a non-profit agency. These funds would be 
provided by the Mayor's Office to MAA through an existing 
nonprofit agency contractor of the Mayor's Office, 
Community United Against Violence (CUAV). CUAV would 
serve as a fiscal agent and MAA would perform as a 
subconti-actor. According to Mr. Robert Oakes of the Mayor's 
Office, MAA received $75,000 for the first time in 1994 from 
the Department of Public Health's Fiscal Year 1993-94 
budget to be used for Cities Advocating Emergency AIDS 
Relief (CAEAR) Coalition membership dues, MAA advocacy 
and travel expenses, and to assist MAA in paying for the cost 
of the International AIDS Candlelight Memorial and 
Mobilization event. Mr. Oakes advises that this funding was 
originally intended to be provided on a one-time basis. 
However, Mr. Oakes states that the shift in Congress from a 
Democratic majority to a Republican majority has increased 
the need for lobbying and advocacy efforts to promote AIDS 
awareness, and to at least maintain current funding levels 
for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention activities. The 
proposed supplemental appropriation would provide General 
Fund monies for increased lobbying and advocacy efforts. 
According to Mr. Oakes, MAA is the leading lobbying and 
advocacy agency in San Francisco that lobbies and advocates 
on behalf of San Francisco for HIV/AIDS funding. As such, 
the proposed funds would be allocated to MAA on a sole 
source basis. 

According to Mr. Michael Shriver, the Executive Director of 
MAA, MAA is the oldest HIV/AIDS advocacy agency in 
California. MAA lobbies for improved HIV/AIDS policies and 
funding; coordinates the International AIDS Candlelight 
Memorial and Mobilization event; and coordinates 
fundraising for the Cities Advocating Emergency Relief 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



18 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 19, 1995 



(CAEAR) membership dues. The proposed funding would be 
expended by MAA as follows: 

Membership Dues for Cities Advocating Emergency 
AIDS Relief (CAEAR) Coalition ($15.000): 
The purpose of the CAEAR Coalition is to lobby Congress for 
Title I Ryan White funding on behalf of the CAEAR 
Coalition's members. Title I Ryan White funding is used for 
the care and treatment of individuals that are HIV+ or are 
suffering from AIDS. The members of the CAEAR Coalition 
include Cities, such as San Francisco, that receive Title I 
Ryan White Funding. These Cities pay annual dues to the 
CAEAR Coalition. The dues are used for lobbying and other 
related expenses. According to Mr. Oakes, the CAEAR 
Coalition has been responsible for increasing Federal Ryan 
White Title I funding to San Francisco from $14 million in 
1990 to $40 million in 1995. MAA is responsible for 
coordinating the fundraising for these membership dues in 
San Francisco. According to Mr. Shriver, San Francisco's 
CAEAR Coalition dues for 1995 are $75,000. Of this amount, 
MAA has allocated $25,000 from their own Fiscal Year 1995 
budget. MAA's fiscal year is based on a calendar year. The 
proposed supplemental appropriation would provide $15,000 
on behalf of the City, and it is anticipated that the balance of 
$35,000 would be acquired through MAA's private 
fundraising efforts. 

Advocacy and Travel Budget ($10.000): 
The proposed funds, in the amount of $10,000, would be used 
for Travel Expenses, Phone and Fax Expenses, Production 
Costs, and Miscellaneous Costs as follows: 

Travel Expenses ($5.000): 

The proposed funding would be expended by MAA to pay for 
five individuals, which may include MAA staff, for trips to 
Washington DC and Atlanta at a cost of $1,000 per trip, in 
order to enhance MAA's lobbying efforts for HD7/AIDS 
funding. Mr. Shriver advises that MAA has selected the 
Mayor and one of his staff persons to go to Washington DC. 
The remaining three individuals for the three remaining 
trips have not yet been selected. 

Telephone and Fax Expenses (S2.000): 

The proposed funding in the amount of $2,000 would be used 
to offset MAA's telephone and fax expenses, totaling an 
estimated, $12,500 annually. According to Mr. Shriver, these 
telephone and fax expenditures are incurred by MAA for 
coordinating and strengthening AIDS advocacy efforts and 
communication links nation-wide. 

BOARD OF STIPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

19 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 19, 1995 



Production Costs ($2.000): 

The proposed funding in the amount of $2,000 would be used 
for the development of lobbying packets, informational 
materials, and media briefing books to be distributed to 
Congress, their staff, and the media. 

Miscellaneous ($1.000): 

The proposed funding, in the amount of $1,000 would be used 
to offset MAA's incidental lobbying and advocacy costs, 
including taxi reimbursements, hotel accommodations when 
needed, and food costs where applicable. 

International AIDS Candlelight Memorial and 
Mobilization ($10.000): 

According to Mr. Shriver, the International AIDS Candlelight 
Memorial and Mobilization event, which is coordinated by 
MAA, is the largest annual HIV/AIDS grass roots event in 
the world. The purpose of the event is to (1) organize 
individuals and communities that are affected by AIDS, and 
(2) to maintain international attention to the global threat of 
HIV/AIDS. 

The proposed funding, in the amount of $10,000 would be 
used for (1) a consultant to organize the international 
component of the International AIDS Candlelight Memorial 
and Mobilization event ($6,000), and (2) to off-set the 
production costs of the International AIDS Candlelight 
Memorial and Mobilization event,($4,000). 

Mr. Shriver advises that this is the first year that MAA has 
coordinated both the national and international components 
of the International AIDS Candlelight Memorial and 
Mobilization event without the assistance of other 
organizations. As such, MAA selected as a consultant, Ms. 
Donna Rae Palmer, for a flat rate of $6,000, to organize the 
international component of the Event. Mr. Shriver advises 
that Ms. Palmer was selected on a sole source basis, based on 
her prior experience and expertise in organizing the 
international component of the International AIDS 
Candlelight Memorial and Mobilization event. Ms. Palmer is 
not a MBE/WBE firm. 

The proposed funding, in the amount of $4,000, would be 
used for production costs, including a sound system to 
broadcast the event locally, and for the production of posters, 
brochures and advertisements for the event. Mr. Shriver 
advises that the City would be recognized both nationally 
and internationally through these published materials, as 

BOAKDOFSII'KKX 1SOKS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

20 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 19, 1995 

the sponsor of the International AIDS Candlelight Memorial 
and Mobilization event. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed ordinance is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

21 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 5 -File 101-94-94 



Department: 

Item: 



Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Human Resources Department 

Ordinance appropriating $636,638 from the General Fund 
Reserve for the costs of collective bargaining under 
Proposition "F" for the Department of Human Resources for 
Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

$636,638 

General Fund Reserve 

The proposed ordinance would appropriate $636,638 from the 
General Fund Reserve to the Human Resources Department 
to pay for the costs of collective bargaining and arbitration 
processes with 39 unions which are now subject to collective 
bargaining as a result of the passage of Proposition F, which 
was approved by the voters in the November 1994 election. 

Prior to the voters' approval of Proposition F, the wages of 
most City workers were set through a salary survey which 
standardized City wages relative to those of workers in 
comparable positions in other jurisdictions. Under 
Proposition F, the wages and other benefits and working 
conditions for City workers will now be set through collective 
bargaining-. Proposition F also provides that if the City and a 
union are unable to reach agreement on a new contract, the 
disputed issues will be submitted to a three member 
arbitration board for settlement. 

The Department of Human Resources is currently 
negotiating Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) for 1995- 
96 with 33 unions which were moved out of the salary 
standardization formula and into collective bargaining, and 
also is negotiating MOUs with six unions which were already 
subject to collective bargaining. According to the Human 
Resources Department, the cost of arbitrating these MOUs 
will be dependent on the City's success in negotiating, which 
will dictate the costs for arbitrators and court reporters. 
According to the City Attorney, issues which are submitted to 
arbitration generally require that the City employ additional 
legal assistance and also expert witnesses to testify before 
the arbitration panel, each of which increase the costs of 
concluding an MOU. The City Attorney currently estimates 
that between 9 and 13 of the 33 negotiations will be 
submitted to an arbitration panel. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
1UTDGKT ANALYST 



22 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Budget: 



According to Ms. Vickey Mead of the Department of Human 
Resources, the estimated total cost of collective bargaining 
with the 39 unions in order to bring the City into compliance 
with Proposition F is $989,638. Of that $989,638, the Airport 
has agreed to pay $207,000 for its share of the costs of 
negotiation with unions that include workers at the Airport, 
and the Public Utilities Commission has agreed to pay 
$50,000 from its existing budget for its share of the costs of 
negotiation with unions that include PUC workers. In 
addition, $96,000 which had been budgeted to the 
Department of Human Resources for conducting the 
previously used Salary Standardization surveys, can be 
applied to this expense, bringing the subject amount 
requested from the General Fund Reserve to $636,638 
($989,638 less $207,000 less $50,000 less $96,000). 

The Department of Human Resources requested a 
supplemental appropriation of $711,790 to negotiate or 
arbitrate the 39 contracts under collective bargaining. The 
budget, as approved by the Mayor, provides $636,638 for this 
purpose, as follows: 



Citv Attorney 


Hours 


Rates 


Total 


Deputy City Attorney 


690 hours 


$128.03/hour 


$88,341 


Deputy City Attorney 


625 hours 


$91.69/hour 


57,306 


Deputy City Attorney 


510 hours, 


$123.52/hour 


62,995 


Deputy City Attorney 


560 hours 


$110.45/hour 


61.852 



The City Attorney has agreed to a flat rate of $200,000 for these 
negotiations, however, they estimate the costs will be $270,494. 



$200,000=* 



Temporary Citv Salaries 

1822 Admin. Analysts 480 hours $19.85/hour 

1426 Notetakers 1,280 hours $13.00/hour 

Sub-total 

Outside Legal Services 

Liebert, Cassidy & Frierson 

Police contract 200 hours $187.50/hour 

Other contracts 466 hours $187.50/hour 

Seyfarth, Shaw, Fairweather 

Fire contract 200 hours $187.50/hour 

Senior Paralegal 550 hours $35.00/hour 

Paralegals 720 hours $25.00/hour 

Sub-total 



9,528 
16.640 



$37,500 
87,500 

37,500 
19,250 
18.000 



26,168 



199,750 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Expert Witnesses 

David M. Griffiths Consulting-Comparability & Job Class Analysis 



Analysts 279 hours $125/hour 

Analyst 10 hours $100/hour 

Technical support 354 hours $85/hour 

Expenses 10% of costs above 

Gussie Stewart-Comparability & Job Class Analysis 



745 hours 
John Draper— Statistician 179 hours 
Other Expert Witnesses 

9 arbitrations, 3 per session 
Sub-total 

Citv-Appointed Arbitration Panelist 



$65-$175/hour 
150/hour 

$750/day 



Panelist 


96 hours 


$187.50/hour 


Management Information Svstems (MIS) 


S.K. White Consulting 


528 hours 


$75.00/hour 


Arbitrators 

Police MOU 
Fire MOU 

9 Airport & other unions 
6 Unions, complex neg 
22 Unions, simpler neg 
Sub-total 


15 days 
15 days 
54 days 
72 days 
132 days 


$1000/day 

$1000/day 

$750/day 

$750/day 

$750/day 


Court Reporters 


129 days 


$500/day 


Equipment 

Computer Rental 

Telephone, 5 months at $300/month 
Copying 




Overhead 

Office space 5 months @ $1000/month 
Supplies 
Parking 
Sub-total 





Total 

Less Airport Contribution 

Less PUC Contribution 

Less Salary Standardization Fund 

General Fund Reserve Requested Amount 



34,875 
1,000 

30,090 
6,597 

72,958 
26,850 

20,250 



15,000 
15,000 
40,500 
54,000 
99.000 



13,563 
1,500 
2,437 



5,000 
2,000 
1.000 



192,620 



18,000 



39,600 



223,500 
64,500 



17,500 



LOGO. 

$989,638 
<207,000> 
<50,000> 
<96.000> 
$636,638 



KOAKDOrSUPKHVISOHS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

7k 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Comments: 1. Mr. Jonathan Holtzman of the City Attorney's Office 

reports that the City Attorney has reassigned the caseload of 
existing personnel in order to be able to conduct the 
negotiations for these MOUs. The Budget Analyst questions 
whether this expense, in the full requested amount of 
$200,000, is necessary, given that the City Attorney's Office 
already has previously assigned existing personnel to handle 
the City's needs with respect to collective bargaining and 
other labor issues in the past. As of the writing of this report, 
the City Attorney's Office was not able to provide sufficient 
information on this issue. 

2. Mr. Holtzman reports that the City Attorney will engage 
the two firms listed here (Liebert, Cassidy & Frierson and 
Seyfarth, Shaw, Fairweather) in negotiations which are 
complex, require special expertise in issues such as labor and 
public safety, and in which the number of employees and, 
therefore, the overall cost of the MOU to the City is very 
large. These negotiations include the Police Department 
MOU, Fire Department MOU, Local 21, the Municipal 
Executives Association, and the Municipal Attorneys 
Association. The City Attorney has used these firms 
previously, on contract, because of their particular expertise 
in labor relations, according to Mr. Holtzman. The two firms, 
Liebert, Cassidy & Frierson and Seyfarth, Shaw, 
Fairweather, are not City-certified MBE/WBEs. • 

3. According to the Department of Human Resources, and 
the City Attorney's Office, expert witnesses are required to 
research and testify before the arbitration panel on issues 
such as comparing job classes and comparing wages and 
benefits in other jurisdictions. In addition, in almost every 
negotiation, the City will require expert testimony on the 
historical and possible future trends in City revenues, 
including revenues from City sources, State, Federal, and 
other sources which dictate the City's ability to pay its 
workforce. The consultants to be employed by the City for 
this purpose have been chosen by the Human Resources 
Department and by the City Attorney's Office because of 
their particular expertise in research and analysis of public 
sector job classifications, comparability, wage rates, and 
other issues. These consultants and individuals are not City- 
certified MBE/WBEs. 

4. According to the Department of Human Resources, and 
the City Attorney, the Management Information Services 
portion of this contract is required in order for City 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

25 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

negotiators to have access to data such as the numbers of 
employees in various classes, the numbers of employees at 
different salary steps, and other information which will assist 
in determining the cost of various contract proposals. 
According to Mr. Holtzman, the City did not have this 
capability previously, and, as a result, was unable to 
accurately estimate the cost of labor contract proposals. S.K. 
White consulting has been selected to carry out the computer 
programming and other tasks as a sole source provider. S.K. 
White consulting is a City-certified MBE/WBE. The Budget 
Analyst believes that at least some of this work may be 
duplicated under the contracts proposed in this appropriation 
for Expert Testimony/Statisticians, and, therefore, questions 
whether some of this $39,600 requested cost could be 
reduced. As of the writing of this report, the Human 
Resources Department was not able to provide sufficient 
information to the Budget Analyst on this issue. 

5. According to the Department of Human Resources, the 
Department does not have sufficient meeting space in its own 
location to hold the meetings and negotiations that are 
required in order complete these collective bargaining 
processes. The Department is proposing to rent temporary 
space at the Fashion Center at 8th and Townsend Street for 
this purpose, at a cost of $5000 for five months, as shown in 
the budget above. According to Ms. Mead, the Real Estate 
Department has approved this lease, although details of the 
lease have not yet been submitted to the Budget Analyst. 

6. The Budget Analyst believes that additional details need 
to be provided to the Budget Analyst and additional analysis 
time must expended by the Budget Analyst prior to making a 
recommendation on this request. 

Recommendation: The Budget Analyst recommends that this item be continued 
to the meeting of April 26, 1995. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



26 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 6 - File 97-95-11 

Department: Department of Parking and Traffic (DPT) 

Parking Authority Commission 

Item: Ordinance amending Chapter 17, Section 17.17 of the 

Administrative Code to permit the Parking Authority 
Commission to increase or decrease parking rates charged at 
public off-street parking facilities during special events. 

Description: The proposed ordinance would amend Section 17.17 of the 

Administrative Code to provide that the Parking Authority 
Commission may, at its sole discretion, increase or decrease 
parking rates for any public off-street parking facility to 
accommodate a special event provided that: (1) the parking 
rate adjustment is not in breach of any contractual 
obligations, (2) the parking rate is only in effect on the day(s) 
and at the time(s) of the special event, (3) the Parking 
Authority did not receive sufficient prior notice to the event 
to permit the Parking Authority to submit a request for such 
a parking rate adjustment to the Board of Supervisors for 
approval, (4) the Parking Authority has determined that the 
sponsor or organizer of the special event acted reasonably in 
making the request and did not delay in making the request 
in order to avoid having such request submitted to the Board 
of Supervisors, (5) If the requested adjusted parking rates are 
higher (Mr. Kevin Hagerty, Director of Off-Street Parking 
advises that some for-profit companies might be willing to 
pay higher rates in order to obtain the necessary parking 
spaces) than the parking rates approved by the Board of 
Supervisors then: (a) the Parking Authority does not expect 
that such higher parking rates will result in a significant 
reduction in the use of the parking facility and (b) the 
adjusted parking rates must be competitive with respect to 
parking rates charged at other nearby parking facilities in 
the area on the day(s) and at the time(s) of the special event, 
(6) If the adjusted parking rates are lower than the parking 
rates approved by the Board of Supervisors then: (a) the 
primary sponsor or organizer of the special event must be a 
nonprofit charitable organization, (b) on the day(s) and at the 
time(s) of the special event, the parking facility would 
ordinarily be either closed or, if open, would be significantly 
less than full, (c) in the opinion of the Parking Authority, 
lower parking rates are necessary in order to encourage the 
public to attend the special event, (d) the lower parking rates 
are still sufficient to cover the cost of operating the parking 
facility during the special event and (e) the lower parking 
rates apply only to those users of the parking facility that 
present evidence (in a form to be agreed upon by the sponsor 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

27 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Comments: 



Recommendation: 



of the event and the Parking Authority) that they are 
attending the special event. 

1. As noted above, the proposed legislation provides that (1) 
only nonprofit agencies would be eligible for reduced parking 
rates which are adjusted to a lower rate than the parking 
rates previously approved by the Board of Supervisors and (2) 
such reduced rates for nonprofit agencies would only apply at 
parking facilities that would normally be closed at the time of 
the special event or, if open, would have sufficient vacant 
parking spaces. As such, according to Mr. Hagerty, the 
proposed legislation should result in an undetermined 
amount of additional revenues to the City. 

2. Mr. Hagerty, advises that the Parking Authority 
Commission receives approximately 12 requests annually 
from various companies, agencies and organizations (e. g. 
nonprofit agencies, film companies) to adjust rates at City- 
owned parking facilities for special events. According to Mr. 
Hagerty, the proposed legislation is needed because, 
historically, the majority of such requests are not received in 
sufficient time for the Parking Authority Commission to 
submit the requests to the Board of Supervisors for approval. 
Mr. Hagerty advises that currently if requests for adjusted 
parking rates are not received in sufficient time to be 
approved by the Board of Supervisors, such requests are not 
granted. 

Approval of the proposed ordinance is a policy matter for the 
Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

28 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 7 • File 97-95-19 



Item: Ordinance amending the San Francisco Administrative Code 

by amending Section 20.57 (General Assistance Ordinance) 
relating to the computation of aid grants. 

Description: The proposed ordinance would amend the Administrative Code 

in order to suspend a scheduled cost of living adjustment 
(COLA) for General Assistance clients for Fiscal Year 1995-96. 
The maximum General Assistance grant amount is currently 
$345 per month for a single individual (the grant is higher for 
families, depending on the number of eligible individuals in the 
household). If the proposed ordinance is adopted, the 
maximum General Assistance grant would not increase in 
1995-96, but would remain at the current level of $345 per 
month. 

Under existing provisions of the City's Administrative Code, 
the General Assistance grant is scheduled to increase on July 
1, 1995, based on the percent change in the Minimum Basic 
Standard of Adequate Care which is adopted annually by the 
State Legislature (see Comment 1 below). 

The maximum monthly General Assistance (GA) grant 
amounts, under existing provisions of the Administrative Code, 
are as follows: 



No. of Eligible Persons in Same Family 

Single Individual 

2 Persons 

3 Persons 

4 Persons 

5 Persons 

6 Persons 

7 Persons 

8 Persons 

9 Persons 

10 Persons 



Current Monthly 
Grant Amount 



$ 



345 

567 

703 

834 

952 

1,070 

1,175 

1,281 

1,388 

1,508 



The General Assistance grant level was last increased on July 
1, 1992, when the maximum monthly grant amount for a single 
individual was increased by $4.00, or approximately 1.2 
percent, from $341 to $345. In 1993 and 1994, the Board of 
Supervisors approved legislation, similar to this proposed 
legislation, to suspend the GA COLA for Fiscal Years 1993-94 
and 1994-95. 



29 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Comments: 1. The City's Administrative Code ties the GA grant to the 

change in the State's Minimum Basic Standard of Adequate 
Care (MBSAC), which is calculated as 70 percent of the change 
in the California Necessities Index (CNI). Without action to 
suspend the COLA, General Assistance grant levels will 
increase automatically on July 1, 1995 in an amount equal to 
the percentage increase in the MBSAC for 1995-96, which is 
1.66 percent. 

2. The increase of 1.66 percent in the MBSAC for 1995-96, 
which would be used to determine the cost of living adjustment 
in the GA grant (unless the COLA is suspended pursuant to 
this proposed ordinance) would increase the maximum GA 
grant for a single individual in 1995-96 by approximately 
$6.00, from the current monthly grant level of $345, to $351. 
Considering all GA recipients, the Department of Social 
Services estimates that such a COLA would result in increased 
GA expenditures in 1995-96 of approximately $825,000, which 
are funded 100 percent by the City's General Fund. 

3. Ms. Sally Kipper, Assistant General Manager of the 
Department of Social Services (DSS), advises that, prior to 
1990, the State increased grant amounts in the Aid to Families 
with Dependent Children (AFDC) progi~am based on changes 
in the MBSAC. However, Ms. Kipper states that AFDC and 
Social Security Income (SSI) COLAs have been suspended by 
the State Legislature since July 1, 1990, and will be suspended 
again in 1995-96. In addition, Ms. Kipper reports that the 
State Legislature has also reduced the AFDC grant amount by 
approximately 12.5 percent since July 1, 1990, and that the 
Governor has pi^oposed a further decrease of 10 percent in the 
AFDC grant level for 1995-96. Given these factors, it is 
unlikely that the State will increase AFDC payments in 1995- 
96 based on the change in the MBSAC. 

4. Ms. Kipper reports that because GA programs differ from 
county to county, and each county is able to develop a program 
to suit its own needs, many counties do not have GA program 
COLA provisions that are automatically tied to the MBSAC, as 
San Francisco does. Ms. Kipper advises that some counties tie 
their GA grants to the dollar value of the State's AFDC grants, 
which has resulted in GA grant reductions. Ms. Kipper reports 
that Los Angeles County suspended its GA COLA for a five 
year period of time, that San Diego County has suspended its 
GA COLA beginning in 1988-89, and that Alameda County has 
suspended its GA COLA beginning in 1989-90, and has 
recently passed a reduction in its GA gi-ant to $260. Ms. 
Kipper states that, to her knowledge, no California counties 



30 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 19, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

have increased the GA grant level over the past two to three 
years, and the average monthly grant level for a single 
individual among the Bay Area counties is currently $299 as 
compared to the present and proposed San Francisco grant 
level of $345. 

5. In summary, approval of the proposed ordinance would 
result in suspending the scheduled cost of living adjustment for 
GA recipients for Fiscal Year 1995-96, which would be 
approximately 1.66 percent, in order to realize General Fund 
savings which are estimated by DSS at 8825,000 for Fiscal 
Year 1995-96. Approval of this proposed ordinance would be 
consistent with the Board's approval of similar legislation for 
the current Fiscal Year of 1994-95. 

Recommendation: Approval of the proposed ordinance to suspend the Fiscal Year 
1995-96 cost of living adjustment for General Assistance 
recipients is a policy matter for the Board of Supervisors. 




Harvey M. Rose 



Supervisor Hsieh 
Supervisor Kaufman 
Supervisor Bierman 
President Shelley 
Supervisor Alioto 
Supervisor Ammiano 
Supervisor Hallinan 
Supervisor Kennedy 
Supervisor Leal 
Supervisor Migden 
Supervisor Teng 
Clerk of the Board 
Chief Administrative Officer 
Controller 
Teresa Serata 
Robert Oakes 
Ted Lakey 



3] 



^ DOCUMENTS DEPT 

MINUTES 

REGULAR MEETING AUG 2 7 iQQc 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 
BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



WEDNESDAY. APRIL 26. 1995 - 1:00 P.M. ROOM 410, WAR MEMORIAL 

BLDG. 

MEMBERS: SUPERVISORS HSIEH, KAUFMAN, BIERMAN 

CLERK: GREGOIRE HOBSON 



TIME MEETING CONVENED: 1:08 P.M. 



CONSENT CALENDAR 

All matters listed hereunder constitute a Consent Calendar, are considered to 
be routine by the Budget Committee, and will be acted upon by a single roll 
call vote of the Committee. There will be no separate discussion of these 
items unless a member of the Committee or a member of the public so 
requests, in which event the matter shall be removed from the Consent 
Calendar and considered as a separate item 



a) File 28-95-5 . [Emergency Repair, Parker Avenue Sewer] Resolution 
authorizing the Director of the Department of Public Works to take 
necessary measures to protect the health, welfare and property of the 
citizens of San Francisco by performing the necessary work to replace 
structurally inadequate sewer in Parker Avenue between Geary 
Boulevard and Anza Street. (Department of Public Works) 

b) File 28-95-6 . [Emergency Repair, Guerrero Street Sewer] Resolution 
authorizing the Director of the Department of Public Works to take 
necessary measures to protect the health, welfare and property of the 
citizens of San Francisco by performing the necessary work to replace 
structurally inadequate sewer in Guerrero Street between 27th Street 
and 28th Street. (Department of Public Works) 

c) File 28-95-7 . [Emergency Repair, Pine Street Sewer] Resolution 
authorizing the Director of the Department of Public Works to take 
necessary measures to protect the health, welfare and property of the 
citizens of San Francisco by performing the necessary work to replace 
structurally inadequate sewer in Pine Street between Larkin Street and 
Hyde Street. (Department of Public Works) 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MT TES PAGE 2 

d) File 23-95-4 . [Statue of Limitations - Warrants] Resolution waiving 
statue of limitations with respect to payment of certain warrants of the 
City and County of San Francisco, the sum of $661.41 a legal obligation 
of the City and County of San Francisco. (Controller) 

Carolyn Horn $598.36 

Falefasa Tagaloa $ 63.05 

e) File 148-92-7.5 . [Reserved Funds, Fire Department] Consideration of 
release of reserved funds, Fire Department, State Hazard Mitigation 
Grant, in the amount of $47,080.00, for the purpose of installing 
emergency generator at Fire Station No. 24. (Fire Department) 

ACTION: rTEM E REMOVED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR. REMAINING 
ITEMS RECOMMENDED. 

File 148-92-7.5 . [Reserved Funds, Fire Department] 
Consideration of release of reserved funds, Fire Department, 
State Hazard Mitigation Grant, in the amount of $47,080.00, for 
the purpose of installing emergency generator at Fire Station No. 
24. (Fire Department) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVE: Debra 
Newman, representing Budget Analyst. IN SUPPORT: None. 
OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: AMENDED. REDUCE RELEASE OF AMOUNT TO 
$45,158.78. APPROVED RELEASE OF $45,158.78. 
FILED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 

HEARINGS 

2. File 78-95-3 . [Dependent Care Reimbursement Plan] Hearing to consider the 
status of the City's Dependent Care Reimbursement Plan and ways to 
improve the participation of City employees in the Plan. (Supervisor Hsieh) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Debra Newman, 
representing Budget Analyst; Teresa Serate, Budget Director, Office of the 
Mayor; Randy Smith, Executive Director, Health Service System; Ed 
Harrington, Controller; Victoria Mead, Department of Human Resources. IN 
SUPPORT: Veronica Sanchez, Port of San Francisco; Linda Jofuko, Local 21; 
Arlene Isen, Health Educator; Ms. Ward, Health Educator; LaWanda Preston, 
Local 790; Chris Kerillela; Diane Oshima, City Planning Department. 
OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO JUNE 7, 
1995. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MT TES PAGE 3 

3. File 13-95-13 . [Federal Recession Bill] Hearing to consider the impact of 
the Federal Rescission Bill on San Francisco's budget. (Supervisor Hsieh) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Margaret Kisliuk, State 
Legislative Advocate; Ed Harrington, Controller. IN SUPPORT: Marcus 
Phillips, North of Market Planning Coalition; Michael Colbruno, representing 
Supervisor Migden. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO THE CALL 
OF THE CHAIR. 

VOTE: 3-0. 

FISCAL ITEMS 

4. File 101-94-85 . Ordinance appropriating and rescinding $138,564, from 
salaries and fringe benefits to allow Trail Courts to create three (3) positions 
for the fiscal year 1994-95. (Budget Committee) (COMPANION TO THE 
FOLLOWING FILE) 

(Consideration Continued from 4/12/95) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MAY 3, 1995. 

VOTE: 3-0. 

5. File 102-94-14 . [Public Employment, Superior Court] Ordinance amending 
Ordinance No. 293-94 (Annual Salary Ordinance 1994/95), Superior Court, 
reflecting the addition of three (3) positions (classification 0676 Research 
Assistant (1), 0697 Judicial Clerk (2). (Department of Human Resources) 
(COMPANION TO THE PRECEDING FILE) 

(Consideration Continued from 4/12/95) 

SPEAKERS: None. 

ACTION: CONSIDERATION CONTINUED TO MAY 3, 1995. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



BUDGET COMMITTEE MT TES PAGE 4 

6. File 101-94-91. [Appropriation, Retirement System] Ordinance appropriating 
$13,980, Retirement System, from Employees Retirement Trust Fund for 
services of other departments to provide funding for a Worker's Compensation 
Adjuster for fiscal year 1994-95. (Controller) RO #94208 

(Consideration Continued from 4/19/95) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Debra Newman, 
representing Budget Analyst; Clare Murphy, General Manager, Retirement 
System. IN SUPPORT: None. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 



GENERAL MATTERS 

7. File 65-95-2 . [Lease, Beach Chalet] Ordinance approving a twenty (20) year 
lease with the Beach Chalet, (L.P.) for the operation of a microbrewery and 
restaurant on the second floor of the Beach Chalet building. (Supervisors 
Hsieh, Bierman, Leal) 

SPEAKERS: DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Debra Newman, 
representing Budget Analyst; Phil Arnold, Assistant General Manager, 
Recreation and Park Department. IN SUPPORT: Laura Trappelli, co-owner. 
OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. RECOMMENDED. 

VOTE: 3-0. 

8. File 97-95-18 . [James Guelff Fund] Ordinance amending the Administrative 
Code by adding Section 117-115 to establish a Peace Officers' Safety Fund 
for purchase of semi-automatic firearms and related equipment, and 
accepting gifts to that fund and limiting expenditures from that fund. 
(Supervisors Shelley, Alioto, Kaufman) 

SPEAKERS: ELECTED OFFICIAL: Supervisor Kevin Shelley, President of 
the Board. DEPARTMENTAL REPRESENTATIVES: Debra Newman, 
representing the Budget Analyst; Sgt. John Mazolli, SF Police Department. 
IN SUPPORT: Laura Irving; Marcus Phillips. OPPOSED: None. 

ACTION: HEARING HELD. AMENDED. RECOMMENDED AS AMENDED. 
On Page 2, line 7, add a sentence to read: "All Expenditures from 
this fund in excess of $40,000, are subject to appropriation 
approval by the Board of Supervisors." (Supervisor Kaufman 
requested to be added as co-sponsor.) 

VOTE: 3-0. 
TIME MEETING ADJOURNED: 3:35 P.M. 



CitiReport 



CITY AND COUNTY 




OF SAN FRANCISCO 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

1390 Market Street. Suite 1025, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415)554-7642 



April 24, 1995 



TO: Budget Committee 

FROM: Budget Analyst 

SUBJECT: April 26, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Items la. lb and lc - Files 28-95-5. 28-95-6 and 28-95-7 



Department: 
Items: 



Amount: 

Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Resolutions authorizing the Director of the Department of 
Public Works to take necessary measures to protect the 
health, welfare and property of the citizens of San Francisco 
by performing the necessary work to replace structurally 
inadequate sewers located at (1) Parker Avenue between 
Geary Boulevard and Anza Street (File 28-95-5), (2) 
Guerrero Street between 27th and 28th Streets (File 28-95-6), 
and (3) Pine Street between Larkin and Hyde Streets (File 
28-95-7). 

$98,000 File 28-95-5 
123,780 File 28-95-6 
104.950 File 28-95-7 
$326,730 Total 

Sewer Service Charge, Repair and Replacement Fund 

Item la, File 28-95-5 - According to the DPW, on January 20, 
1995, the DPW's Bureau of Street and Sewer Repair (BSSR) 
requested an emergency contract to repair a structural 
inadequacy of the existing sewer at Parker Avenue between 
Geary Boulevard and Anza Street. The DPW reports that 
two property owners on Parker Avenue complained of 
basement flooding due to the backup of sewage resulting in 



Memo to Budget Committee 

September 23, 1994 Budget Committee Meeting 

the authorization of a Class "A" emergency by the 
Department. A Class "A" emergency is one which 
threatens the immediate health, welfare and property of 
citizens and must be repaired without delay. 

Mr. P. T. Law of the DPW reports that, in accordance with 
Section 6.30 of the Administrative Code, a contractor was 
selected without instituting a bidding procedure as allowed 
by the Class "A" emergency authorization. The DPW 
selected McNamara and Smallman, an LBE firm, which 
submitted a contract cost of $98,000. The DPW reports that 
sewer work is currently underway and is expected to be 
completed by April 30, 1995. 

Item lb, File 28-95-6 - The DPW reports that on November 
22, 1994, the BSSR requested an emergency contract to 
replace a partially collapsed and cracked section of the 
existing sewer at Guerrero Street between 27th and 28th 
Streets. 

In accordance with Section 6.30 of the Administrative Code, 
the DPW initiated an expedited contracting procedure and 
requested award to the lowest bidder, McNamara and 
Small, which submitted a bid of $118,270. However, the 
DPW reports that McNamara and Small failed to meet 
subcontracting goals set by the Human Rights Commission 
(HRC) and the contract was therefore awarded to the second 
lowest bidder, Uniacke Construction. Uniacke 
Construction, an LBE firm, submitted a bid of $123,780 or 
$5,510 more than McNamara and Small. According to the 
DPW, construction is expected to be completed by May 30, 
1995. 

Item lc, File 28-95-7 - The DPW reports that on November 3, 
1994, the BSSR requested an emergency repair contract 
after inspecting a brick sewer at Pine Street, between Hyde 
and Larkin Streets, and finding it structurally inadequate 
due to missing bricks and mortar. 

In accordance with Section 6.30 of the Administrative Code, 
the DPW initiated an expedited contracting procedure, 
awarding the contract to the lowest bidder, P & M Pipelines 
Construction. P & M Pipelines, an LBE firm, submitted a 
bid of $104,950. According to the DPW, the project is 
expected to be completed by May 30, 1995. 

Comment: Mr. Law reports that funds previously appropriated to the 

DPW's Sewer Repair and Replacement fund in the 

Board Of Supervisors 
Budget Analyst 

2 



Memo to Budget Committee 

September 23, 1994 Budget Committee Meeting 



Department's 1994-95 budget would be used for these 
repairs. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed resolutions. 



|K>A1M) OF Si IPKRVLSOKS 

BUDGET Analyst 

3 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 

Item Id - File 23-95-4 

Department: Controller's Office 

Item: Resolution waiving the statute of limitations with respect to 

the payment of certain warrants of the City and County of 
San Francisco, totaling $661.41, payable to Carolyn Horn and 
Falefasa Tagaloa, a legal obligation of the City and County of 
San Francisco. 

Description: According to Section 10.182 of the San Francisco 

Administrative Code, a warrant issued by the City becomes 
void one year from the date issued. The payee of the warrant 
may present the warrant to the Controller for payment, up to 
three years from the date it was rendered invalid or four 
years from the original date. After that point, the Controller 
may no longer pay such a warrant because the statute of 
limitations has expired, unless approval is obtained from the 
Board of Supervisors. 

The proposed resolution would waive the statute of 
limitations and would authorize the Controller's Office to 
replace two warrants, one issued to Ms. Carolyn Horn, a 
current employee of the Commission on the Status of Women, 
and one issued to Ms. Falefasa Tagaloa, a current employee 
of the San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) in the 
following amounts: 

Payee Warrant No. Date Issued Amount 

Carolyn Horn 516-3481798 09/13/88 $598.36 

Falefasa Tagaloa 516-4834132 12/05/89 63.05 

Total $661.41 



Comments: 



According to Mr. Honorato Layug of the Controller's Office, 
(1) the warrant in the amount of $598.36 was issued to Ms. 
Horn by the Commission on the Status of Women and (2) the 
warrant in the amount of $63.05 was issued to Ms. Tagaloa 
by the SFGH. Mr. Layug further reports that both the above- 
listed warrants were misplaced, never cashed by the payees 
and were cancelled by the Controller's Office. Mr. Layug 
advises that there are sufficient funds in the FY 1994-95 
General City Responsibilities Budget to replace the two 
subject warrants. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed resolution. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET, ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 

Item le - File 148-92-7.5 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



San Francisco Fire Department 
Department of Public Works (DPW) 

Hearing requesting the release of reserved funds in the 
amount of $47,080 from State Hazard Mitigation Grant 
monies for two emergency generators, one for Fire Station 
No. 24. and one for the Arson Task Force Building. 

$47,080 (See Comment No. 3) 

State Hazard Mitigation Grant 

The Board of Supervisors previously authorized the DPW to 
accept and expend a total of $4,971,000 in State Hazard 
Mitigation Grants from the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA) to mitigate against future earthquake- 
hazards. One of the State Hazard Mitigation Grants, in the 
amount of up to $500,000 for emergency generators for 20 
Fire Department facilities, was placed on reserve pending the 
selection of contractors, the MBE/WBE status of the 
contractors and the contract cost details. 

The Board of Supervisors previously approved the release of 
$258,643.50 of the original $500,000 leaving $241,356.50 on 
reserve. The Fire Department is now requesting the release 
of $45,158.78 (see Comment No. 3) of the remaining 
$241,356.50 on reserve for two emergency generators, one for 
Fire Station No. 24 at 100 Hoffman Avenue and a second for 
the Arson Task Force Building at 676 Howard Street. 

Funds for the emergency generator at the Arson Task Force 
Building would reimburse the City for previously expended 
funds in the amount of $23,758.78 or 50 percent of the total 
project cost of-$47,517.56 (see Comment No. 1). Funds for 
the emergency generator in the amount of $21,400 for Fire 
Station No. 24 would be expended as part of a construction 
contract previously approved by the Board of Supervisors (see 
Comment No 2). 

Purchase and Installation of Emergency Generators 

(1) Arson Task Force Building $23,758.78 

(2) Fire Station No. 24 21.400.00 

Total $45,158.78 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

" 5 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 



Comments: 



Recommendation: 



1. Mr. Bob Jew of the DPW advises that the total $47,517.56 
cost of the purchase and installation of the emergency 
generator for the Arson Task Force Building was part of a 
larger project for the seismic retrofitting of that building 
completed in November of 1992. Mr. Jew reports that half of 
the $47,517.56, or $23,758.78, is eligible for reimbursement 
from State Hazard Mitigation Grant funds. 

2. Mr. Roger Wong of the DPW advises that the total $42,800 
cost of the purchase and installation of the emergency 
generator for Fire Station No. 24 is part of a larger project for 
the renovation and seismic strengthening of this Fire Station. 
That renovation project was previously approved by the 
Board of Supervisors (File 101-90-128.2). The proposed 
release would pay for 50 percent of the total cost of $42,800 or 
$21,400. 

3. Mr. Jew reports that the correct amount of this release of 
reserved funds is $45,158.78, or half of the $90,317.56 total 
cost to purchase and install the two emergency generators, 
one for Fire Station No. 24 and second for the Arson Task 
Force Building, and not $47,080 as stated in the proposed 
request for release. 

Release reserved funds in the amount of $45,158.78 instead 
of $47,080 in accordance with Comment No. 3 above. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

6 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 26, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



Item 



File 78-95-3 



Item: 



Description: 



Comments: 



This item is a hearing to consider the status of the City's 
Dependent Care Reimbursement Plan and ways to improve 
the participation of City employees in the Plan. 

The City's Dependent Care Reimbursement Plan, established 
pursuant to Federal Code Section 125, has been administered 
by the City's Health Service System since 1991. Under the 
Dependent Care Reimbursement Plan, a City employee may 
elect to have a specified amount of money deducted from 
his/her gross earnings, before taxes are taken out, to be used 
for payment of dependent care costs, thereby lowering the 
City employees taxable income. The monies that are deducted 
for this purpose are placed in an account and are used to 
reimburse the employee for dependent care expenses. 

The Federal government has set the maximum annual 
allowable contribution towards a dependent care 
reimbursement plan at $5,000 for a married couple filing 
jointly or for a single parent/individual. The maximum limit 
for a married person filing separately is $2,500. Qualified 
dependent care expenses include costs for child care for 
children under 13 years of age and custodial care (e. g. 
housekeeping services, preparation of food, assistance in 
maintaining personal hygiene) for a spouse or a dependent 
who is incapable of self-care (e. g., an invalid parent). 
Dependent care does not include health care services. 

1. Mr. Bill Irwin of the Health Service System advises that 
only City employees who are Health Service System members 
are entitled to enrollment in the City's Dependent Care 
Reimbursement Plan. According to Mr. Irwin, of the 
approximately 24,500 City employees who are Health Service 
System members, only 272 employees or approximately one 
percent are currently enrolled in the City's Dependent Care 
Reimbursement Plan. 

2. Mr. Irwin reports that employee enrollment in the City's 
Dependent Care Reimbursement Plan represents a savings to 
the City because the monies which are deducted from the 
employee's gross income are not subject to the City's payment 
of costs for Social Security and Medicare. Mr. Irwin reports 
that the average amount deducted from gross earnings for 
the 272 employees currently enrolled in the Plan is $161 
biweekly or approximately $4,202 annually for each 
employee. Based on 272 employees, the total amount 
deducted annually for this purpose is approximately 
$1,142,944. According to Mr. Irwin, based on the $1,142,994, 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 26, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



the current savings to the City for not having to pay Social 
Security and Medicare costs at 7.65 percent is approximately 
$87,435. 

3. Mr. Randy Smith, Executive Director of the Health Service 
System of the Human Resources Department advises that 
the cost to administer the Dependent Care Reimbursement 
Plan is $60 per participant annually and is paid for by the 
participants. Mr. Smith notes that Section 16.903 of the 
Administrative Code provides that the City not be 
responsible for any direct cost to administer this Plan. The 
Human Resources Department contracts with Colonial Life & 
Accident Insurance Company to implement the Plan. 

4. According to Mr. Smith, employee participation in the Plan 
could potentially be increased by making perspective 
employees more aware of the Plan through the enclosure of 
an informational flyer or brochure with City employee's 
payroll checks and/or distributing informational posters on 
the Plan to City departments. Mr. Smith advises that 
currently information on the Plan is included in the Open 
Enrollment Benefit booklet, which is made available to 
members of the Health Service System, as well as in an 
informational brochure, which is available. Mr. Smith states 
that based on the experience of other jurisdictions which 
provide a Dependent Care Reimbursement Plan, the 
maximum estimated employee participation which can be 
expected with regard to this Plan is 735 employees or three 
percent of the 24,500 employees that are eligible for the Plan. 
If employee participation is increased by 463 from 272 to 735, 
it could result in estimated additional annual savings to the 
City of $148,833 or 7.65 percent of $1,945,526 (463 employees 
x a deduction of $4,202 annually for each employee). 

5. Mr. Smith reports that the Human Resources Department 
could take responsibility for printing and distributing 
informational posters to City departments on the Dependent 
Care Reimbursement Plan, which would be less expensive 
than the option of enclosing a flyer or brochure with City 
employees payroll checks. Mr. Smith advises that he believes 
the costs to print and distribute the posters to City 
departments would be minimal and could be absorbed in the 
Human Resources Department's existing budget. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

8 






Memo to Budget Committee 

April 26, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 

Item 3 - File 13-95-13 



Item: Hearing to consider the impact of the Federal Rescission 

Bill on San Francisco's budget. 

Description: In March, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a 

"Rescission Bill" which, if approved by Congress and signed 
by the President, would rescind appropriations of Federal 
funds in a wide variety of programs for 1995 and 1996. The 
total amount of funds rescinded in the House Bill is $17.4 
billion. The Senate version of the Bill, passed in early April, 
rescinds $13.5 billion. Both Houses of Congress are 
currently in recess. When they return to session in May, a 
Conference Committee will meet to reconcile the two 
versions of the Rescission Bill. 

There are hundreds of programs affected by this legislation, 
some of them entitlements, some formula-based, and some 
competitive grant programs. San Francisco's Federal 
Lobbyist, Ms. Marilyn Berry-Thompson, has estimated that 
the House version of the Bill could impact San Francisco 
programs directly by at least $45 million, and individuals 
and families in the City by another $45 million, over the 
next two fiscal years. However, it is not possible at this time 
to quantify all of the potential impacts on San Francisco 
because of the variety of programs affected. Some of the 
major cuts which are known to affect San Francisco 
directly are as follows: 

• Community Development Block Grant funds. San 
Francisco could lose approximately $2 million. 

• Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 
Public Housing Modernization Funds. San Francisco could 
lose approximately $9.4 million. 

• HUD Special Grants for Housing. San Francisco could 
lose up to $5.5 million in housing funds for homeless 
individuals and substance abusers 

• Housing Opportunities for People With AIDS (HOPWA). 
San Francisco could lose up to $12.4 million. 

• Summer Youth Employment and Job Training 
Partnership Act Funds. San Francisco could lose 
approximately $8.1 million over Fiscal Years 1995-96 and 
1996-97. These funds support jobs for approximately 3,600 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

9 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 26, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



youth, and job training and placement services for another 
350 homeless, and other disadvantaged adults and youth. 

• Transportation grants. Two projects in San Francisco 
have been targeted for cuts; a $9.1 million cut for the 
transportation projects in the Bay Area which could affect 
the BART extension to San Francisco International 
Airport, and a $1.25 million for the Pacific Medical Garage 
Project. 

• Ryan White Care Act funds and other AIDS funds. The 
House Rescission Bill cuts $13 million from the Ryan White 
Care Act funds nationwide, and $23 million from AIDS 
prevention and education funds nationwide; San Francisco 
could lose an indeterminate amount of funds which are 
targeted both to City programs and to non-profit AIDS 
service providers in San Francisco. 

• National Endowment for the Humanities and National 
Endowment for the Arts. Both versions of the Rescission 
Bill cut $5 million from each of these programs, for a total of 
$10 million. San Francisco has received substantial grant 
funding from these programs in the past. 

In addition to the above specific program cuts known to 
affect San Francisco directly, the Rescission Bill cuts 
funding in a variety of welfare, entitlement and grant 
programs which benefit individuals and families in San 
Francisco. These programs include: 

• The Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program. The 
House Rescission Bill cuts $25 million nationwide from this 
program, which funds food supplements for low-income 
women and children. 

• Low-Income Heating Energy Assistance. The House 
Rescission Bill cuts $59.75 million in California alone from 
this program, which provides assistance in paying heating 
bills for low-income families. 

• HUD Incremental Rental Assistance. The House 
Rescission Bill cuts $2.7 billion, the Senate Bill $2.4 billion, 
from this program, which includes a variety of rental 
assistance programs, including the Section 8 funds used to 
subsidize rental housing costs of low-income families. 

• Head Start. The Senate Rescission Bill cuts $42 million 
nationwide from this program, which provides child 
development services to low income families. 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS ..'■ 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 

April 26, 1995 Budget Committee Meeting 



• Title I Education Funds. The House Rescission Bill cuts 
$148 million nationwide from this program, which provides 
funding to schools in high-poverty areas. 

Comment: Ms. Berry-Thompson provided a report, dated March 27, 

1995, which details the cuts in Federal funding made by 
both the House and Senate Rescission Bills. An earlier 
report, dated February 28, 1995, from Ms. Berry-Thompson 
analyzed the specific impacts on San Francisco from an 
early draft of the House Rescission Bill. Copies of both of 
these reports were distributed to the Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SU PERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

11 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 

Items 4 and 5 - Files 101-94-85 & 102-94-14 

Note: This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its April 12, 1995 
Committee meeting. 



Department: 
Item: 



Amount: 



Trial Courts 

Supplemental Appropriation ordinance appropriating and 
rescinding $405,564 from salaries and fringe benefits to create 
three new positions and pay fees of outside private attorneys 
and expert witnesses for Fiscal Year 1994-95. (101-94-85) 

Ordinance amending the 1994-95 Annual Salary Ordinance to 
reflect the addition of three new positions (1 FTE 676 Research 
Assistant, 2 FTE 697 Judicial Clerks) (102-94-14) 

S138.564 



Source of Funds: 



Description: 



Reappropriation of surplus funds in the Trial Courts 1994-95 
Budget 

The Trial Courts are requesting that $138,564 in surplus 
monies be rescinded from Permanent Salaries and Fringe 
Benefits in the Trial Court's existing FY 1994-95 budget, and 
reappropriated for 12 months funding to support three new 
positions: one Research Assistant and two Judicial Clerks. 

The Superior Court is requesting funding for two new Judicial 
Clerks and one new Research Assistant to perform additional 
work created by the new "Three Strikes You're Out" sanction, 
which specifies that persons convicted of three or more felonies 
must serve jail time. The Presiding Judge advises that the 
number of felony proceedings is expected to grow 22 percent in 
FY 1994-95, because defendants are less willing to plead guilty 
knowing that a guilty plea automatically results in jail time 
(see Comment 3). The new positions would research motions, 
maintain and retrieve records, and provide information to 
prosecutors within and outside the jurisdiction of the County. 
The costs of the salaries and fringe benefits for these positions 
for the period May 1, 1995 through June 30, 1995 are as 
follows: 



HOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 

Personnel 

676 Research Assistant 

(1 FTE) $46,067 

697 Judicial Clerk 

(2 FTEs) 68.069 

Total Permanent Salaries $114,136 

Fringe Benefits, at 21 percent 23.969 

Total Salary and Fringe Benefits $138,105 

Comment: 1. The total amount of salaries and fringe benefits for the three 

requested positions noted here is $459 less than the amount of 
$138,564 requested by the Superior Court because of slight 
errors on the part of the Superior Court in calculating the total 
annual salary, based on a bi-weekly salary for the Research 
Assistant of $1,765 and, for the Judicial Clerks, $1,304. 
Therefore, the proposed Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance should be reduced by $459 to reflect this lower need. 
In addition, the Superior Court would only be able to fill these 
positions for May and June (two months) of Fiscal Year 1994- 
95. Therefore, this request should be reduced by an additional 
$115,085, to reflect the costs for two months instead of 12 
months of salary and benefits, or $23,017, rather than full year 
costs of $138,105. 

2. As noted above, funds for this supplemental appropriation 
would come from a reappropriation of existing surplus monies 
in the Trial Court's 1994-95 budget. However, it should be 
noted that the addition of the three new positions would result 
in on-going additional annual costs for the Superior Court of 
$138,105 based on FY 1994-95 salary levels. 

3. In regard to the three new positions requested by the 
Superior Court, the State of California Legislative Analyst's 
Office conducted a survey of 42 California counties to 
determine the impact of "Three Strikes." The Legislative 
Analysts Office reported on January 6, 1995, that, prior to 
"Three Strikes," 94 percent of all felony cases Statewide were 
disposed of through plea bargaining. After "Three Strikes," 
only 14 percent of all second-strike cases, and six percent of all 
third-strike cases have been disposed of through plea 
bargaining. The Legislative Analyst's Office also reported that 
the number of jury trials has increased Statewide due to 
"Three Strikes." These findings of the State Legislative 
Analyst's Office support the Superior Court's claim that the 
number of cases going to trial, and thus the workload, has 
increased as a result of "Three Strikes." 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

13 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 



4. As part of the presently ongoing Zero Base budget analysis 
for Fiscal Year 1995-96, the Budget Analyst is currently 
analyzing cost savings that have been realized and additional 
savings that could be achieved by the Municipal and Superior 
Courts through consolidation efforts. 

Reoommendatinns: 1. Reduce the proposed Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance 
by $115,544, from $405,564 to $290,020, to reflect a reduction 
of $459 to correct an arithmetic error and to support the cost 
for two months rather than full-year salary and fringe benefit 
costs for the proposed three new positions (101-94-85) 
requested by the Superior Court. 

2. Approval of the proposed Supplemental Appropriation 
Ordinance, as amended, and of the proposed amendment to the 
1994-95 Annual Salary Ordinance, which would add three new 
permanent positions to perform additional work associated 
with "Three Strikes," are policy matters for the Board of 
Supervisors (Files 101-94-85 and 102-94-14). 



ju>AR» OF SUPER VISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

14 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 

Item 6 - File 101-94-91 

Note: 



This item was continued by the Budget Committee at its meeting of April 
12, 1995. 



Department: 
Item: 

Amount: 
Source of Funds: 
Description: 



Employees Retirement System (ERS) 
Department of Human Resources (DHR) 

Supplemental Appropriation Ordinance appropriating 
$13,980 from the Employees Retirement Trust Fund for 
Services of Other Departments to provide funding for a 
Workers Compensation Adjuster for Fiscal Year 1994-95. 

$13,980 

Employees Retirement Trust Fund 

On November 2, 1993, the voters of San Francisco approved 
Proposition L, which created the Department of Human 
Resources, and transferred the City's Workers Compensation 
Division from the Employees Retirement System to the 
Department of Human Resources. 

The Employees Retirement System is requesting 
authorization to workorder $13,980 from the Employees 
Retirement Trust Fund to the Department of Human 
Resources, Workers Compensation Division to fund the 
salary and fringe benefits of one existing, full-time, 8141 
Workers Compensation Adjuster position for six pay periods, 
from April 10, 1995 through June 30, 1995. The 
responsibilities of this position include (1) processing the 
Employees Retirement System's ordinary disability and 
industrial disability retirement cases, (2) processing all 
claims regarding applications for death allowances where 
there is no similar claim made before the Workers 
Compensation Appeals Board, (3) monitoring and reporting 
permanent disability awards to the Employees Retirement 
System, and (4) meeting regularly with the Employees 
Retirement System to review and discuss the status of 
retirement applications, and other issues related to the 
processing of retirement applications. 

Ms. Victoria Mead of the Department of Human Resources 
advises that this position was funded in the 1994-95 Workers 
Compensation Division budget of ERS. The Workers 
Compensation Division of the ERS was transferred to DHR 
from ERS on December 31, 1994 in accordance with 
Proposition L. However, according to Mr. Dan Maguire of the 
City Attorney's Office, the Retirement Board is still 

ROA RI) OF SUPERVISORS 

BUDGET ANALYST 

15 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 



Comments: 



responsible for processing and overseeing the applications for 
disability retirement in accordance with the City Charter. 
Mr. Maguire advises that the Retirement Board may adopt 
any rules or regulations that it deems appropriate and 
necessary to fulfill its Charter obligations. As such, 
according to Ms. Mead, ERS has elected to fund this position 
from the Retirement Trust Fund through a workorder to 
DHR The primary purpose of the proposed supplemental 
appropriation would be to have the funding source for this 
position paid for by the Employees Retirement System Trust 
Fund, and not by General Fund monies of DHR. 

Since the proposed 8141 Workers Compensation Adjuster 
position is already funded in DHR's 1994-95 Fiscal Year 
budget, the requested $13,980, to be workordered from the 
Employees Retirement Trust Fund to DHR, would be used to 
offset DHR's Fiscal Year 1994-95 General Fund monies. 
According to Mr. Matthew Hymel of the Controller's Office, 
the $13,980 in previously appropriated General Fund monies 
would be returned to the General Fund Reserve at the end of 
Fiscal Year 1994-95 (June 30) if such monies are surplus, and 
are not required to offset a shortfall in the DHR budget. 

1. The Board of Supervisors recently approved funding for 
four temporary 8141 Workers Compensation Adjuster 
positions (Files 101-94-66 and 102-94-11). Those positions 
were funded in order to clear up and close a backlog of 
permanent and temporary disability cases, thereby reducing 
the ongoing caseload. According to Ms. Mead, those four 
temporary positions were not hired to process disability 
retirement applications, as is the case of the subject Workers 
Compensation Adjuster position. 

2. Ms. Clare Murphy of the Employees Retirement System 
advises that the workorder funds to continue this Workers 
Compensation Adjuster position are included in ERS's 
requested Fiscal Year 1995-96 budget, and that such funds 
would continue to be workordered to DHR for this position in 
Fiscal Year 1995-96. 



Recommendation: Approve the proposed ordinance. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

16 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 



Item 7 -File 65-95-2 

Department: 

Item: 



Location: 

Purpose of Lease: 

Lessor: 
Lessee: 



Recreation and Park Department (RPD) 

Resolution approving a 20-year lease between the City and 
County of San Francisco and The Beach Chalet, L.P, 
which provides for the establishment and operation of a 
microbrewery and restaurant ("brewpub") on the second 
floor of the historic Beach Chalet building, located at 1000 
Great Highway in Golden Gate Park. 

Second floor of the Beach Chalet building, located at 1000 
Great Highway in Golden Gate Park 

Operation of a microbrewery and restaurant ("brewpub") 

City and County of San Francisco 

The Beach Chalet, L.P. 



No. of Square Feet: 6,032 square feet 



Monthly and Annual 
Rental Revenue: 



The Beach Chalet is currently being renovated by the 
Recreation and Park Department (RPD). Part of this 
renovation project involves the establishment of a Visitors 
Center and Museum for Golden Gate Park on the first 
floor and a Garden Area in the rear of the building. The 
estimated cost for the design and construction of the 
Visitors Center/Museum and the Garden Area is 
approximately $250,000, which is being funded from 
private donations raised by Friends of Recreation and 
Park (See Comment No. 1). The Visitors Center/Museum 
and Garden Area are scheduled to be completed at the 
same time as the proposed second floor operation (the 
brewpub), in approximately June of 1996. However, the 
proposed lease provides that the rent payable to RPD by the 
lessee would be lower if either one or both of the Visitors 
Center/Museum and the Garden Area were not ready to 
serve the public prior to the opening of the brewpub. 

The proposed levels of rent to be paid by the lessee to RPD 
are as follows (See Comment No. 3): 



HOARD OF SUI'KKVlSOltS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

17 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 

•If the Visitors Center/Museum and Garden Area open at the same 
time the brewpub opens: 

The higher amount of either: 

(a) S6.000 per month or $72,000 per year 
(SO. 99 per square foot per month) 

OR 

(b) 6% of food/non-alcoholic beverage sales, plus 
10% of beer sales, plus 

6% of retail merchandise sales 

•If the Visitors Center/Museum opens but the Garden Area does not 
open at the same time the brewpub opens: 

The higher amount of either: 

(a) S5,160 per month or $61,920 per year 
(SO. 86 per square foot per month) 

OR 

(b) 6% of food/non-alcoholic beverage sales, plus 
7.5% of beer sales, plus 

6% of retail merchandise sales 

•If the Garden Area/Museum opens but the Visitors Center does not 
open at the same time the brewpub opens: 

The higher amount of either: 

(a) S4.110 per month or $49,320 per year 
(SO. 68 per square foot per month) 

OR 

(b) 4% of food/non-alcoholic beverage sales, plus 
7% of beer sales, plus 

4% of retail merchandise sales 

•If neither the Garden Area/Museum nor the Visitors Center open 
at the same time the brewpub opens: 

The higher amount of either: 

(a) $2,730 per month or $32,760 per year 
($0.45 per square foot per month) 

OR 

(b) 4% of food/non-alcoholic beverage sales, plus 
4.5% of beer sales, plus 

4% of retail merchandise sales 

Utilities and Janitor 
Provided by Lessor: No 

Term of Lease: Subject to approval by the Board of Supervisors, the 

effective date of the proposed lease is 30 days after the 
execution of the lease by the Mayor. The term of the 

• BOARD OF SUPERVISORS c ' ' 

BUDGET ANALYST 

18 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 



proposed lease is 20 years, to commence on the first day of 
business operations by the proposed lessee (projected to be 
in June of 1996), and to expire 20 years later in June of 
2016. 



Right of Renewal: 



Description: 



The proposed lease contains two options for the lessee to 
extend the lease by five years. The terms of the proposed 
lease would be subject to renegotiation at the time each 
option is exercised by the lessee. 

The Beach Chalet, a two-story building located along the 
Great Highway in the western end of Golden Gate Park, 
has been vacant for approximately 14 years. According to 
RPD, the Department's several attempts to lease out the 
premises have failed primarily because of the inability of 
prospective lessees to finance the restoration and opening 
of the entire facilitv. 



Comments: 



In August of 1993, RPD was notified that it had been 
selected to receive a $724,000 grant from the Federal 
Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act 
(ISTEA) for the renovation of the Beach Chalet facility. In 
February of 1994, RPD advertised a Request for Proposals 
(RFP) in the San Francisco Examiner , the San Francisco 
Chronicle . The Independent and Commercial Property (a 
local real estate publication) for the operation of a 
restaurant, food and beverage operation or any park- 
related commercial concern on the second floor of the 
Beach Chalet. Two bids were received, one of which (from 
Teamwork Associates, Inc.) was deemed non-responsive 
by RPD because it did not include the information 
specifically requested in the RFP, such as cost projections, 
financial information and project design. RPD awarded 
the contract to the responsive bidder, The Beach Chalet, 
L.P., a California limited partnership, which proposed 
the establishment of a microbrewery and restaurant (a 
"brewpub") on the second floor of the Beach Chalet. 

1. RPD would be responsible for (a) completion of the 
Visitors Center/Museum and Garden Area; (b) renovation 
of the Beach Chalet building structure, the public 
restrooms and the parking lot; (c) installation of a 
Heating, Ventilation and Cooling (HVAC) system, 
burglar and fire protection systems, and an elevator and 
ramps to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act 
(ADA) requirements; and (d) utility upgrades. The 
estimated cost of these improvements is approximately 
$1,550,000 ($250,000 for the Visitors Center/Museum and 
Garden Area plus $1.3 million for the remaining 
renovations). As previously noted, the $250,000 cost of the 

BOARD OF SI TPFRVTSORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

19 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 



Visitors Center/Museum and Garden Area will be funded 
by privately donated funds raised by Friends of Recreation 
and Park. Of the remaining $1.3 million, $724,000 will be 
funded by a Federal Intermodal Surface Transportation 
Efficiency Act (ISTEA) grant and the remainder 
(approximately $576,000) from previously appropriated 
1992 Golden Gate Park Bond proceeds. 

2. The proposed lessee, The Beach Chalet, L.P., would be 
responsible for capital improvements to the second floor of 
the building, plus the cost of installing brewing and 
restaurant equipment. The estimated cost of capital 
improvements is $400,000 and the estimated cost of 
brewing equipment and opening capital is $600,000, for a 
total of $1 million. Thus far, the lessee has acquired 
letters of intent from investors totaling $550,000. Other 
investors, including John Hickenlooper and Wynkoop 
Brewing Company, will provide consulting services to The 
Beach Chalet, L.P. The Attachment to this report is a 
letter from RPD representing who the investors are and 
the amounts to be invested. 

3. As noted above, the rent proposals range from a 
minimum of $32,760 to $72,000 per year depending on 
whether the Visitors Center/Museum and the Garden 
Area are open when the brewpub opens. According to 
RPD, this is because the brewpub's business would be 
affected if the Visitors Center/Museum is not open to draw 
people to the building. Rent would be adjusted in 
accordance with the schedule above (see "Monthly and 
Annual Rental Revenues") when either or both the 
Visitors Center/Museum and the Garden Area are 
opened at a later date. According to the Department, such 
rent increases would not require separate legislative 
approval by the Board of Supervisors since these increases 
are already provided for in the pioposed lease. 

4. Although a minimum monthly rent has been 
established, RPD anticipates that it will receive more than 
this minimum rent by instead receiving a percentage of 
gross receipts each month. As such, RPD estimates that 
the proposed lease would generate revenues to the City of 
approximately $2 million over the first ten years (an 
average of $200,000 per year). 

5. The proposed lessee, Beach Chalet, L.P., would have 
sole responsibility for the day-to-day operations of the 
brewpub, including the setting of prices, the choice of 
menu items and the hours of operation. However, the 
lessee would be required to file changes with the 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS -' ' • '■' 

BUDGET ANALYST 

20 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 



Department as notification prior to action. Such day-to- 
day operations and subsequent changes to the operations 
would not be subject to approval by the Board of 
Supervisors. 

6. According to RPD, because of the problems associated 
with two parties performing construction on the same 
building, a liquidated damage clause is written into the 
proposed lease. This provision states that the City shall 
pay $200 for each day that the lessee is prevented from 
finishing its work if the problem resulted from the City's 
extreme negligence, based on a timeline schedule to be 
provided by the lessee. The lessee's timeline would be 
subject to approval by the Recreation and Park 
Commission simultaneously with the construction 
contract for the Beach Chalet renovation project. 
According :o Mr. Tom Hart of RPB, the Departmenl 
Public Works (DPW), which will be managing RPD's 
portion of the Beach Chalet renovation project, will 
communicate with the proposed lessee's architect and 
construction contractor in order to coordinate RPD's 
construction schedule with the lessee's construction 
schedule. 

7. In 1981. the Beach Chalet was designated as a national 
landmark by the National Park Service. In addition, the 
Beach Chalet is decorated with descriptive frescoes and 
mosaics. The proposed lease provides that the lessee shall 
comply with specific safeguards in order to prevent 
damage to the artwork. Additionally, the proposed lease 
requires that any alterations made by the lessee which 
may affect the landmark status of the Beach Chalet be 
subject to approval by the Recreation and Park 
Commission, the Landmarks Board and the Arts 
Commission. 

8. The proposed lessee would be permitted to serve food 
and beverages in the Garden Area in the rear of the Beach 
Chalet building, provided that the general public is not 
denied access to any part of the Garden Area. 

9. The Visitors Center/Museum on the first floor of the 
Beach Chalet building will provide the following services: 
(a) historical data and displays; (b) maps of bicycle and 
pedestrian trails; (c) educational information on 
conservation, urban forestry, leisure and recreation 
alternatives, and volunteer opportunities; and (d) a public 
rest stop for visitors. According to RPD, the staffing at the 
Visitors Center/Museum and the Garden Arm and the 
funding sources for such stalling will be provided by 

ROAR1) OF Slfl'KKVlSOKS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 

Friends of Recreation and Park. RPD advises that the 
opening of the Beach Chalet would encourage recreational 
use of Golden Gate Park, Ocean Beach, Land's End, the 
San Francisco Zoo and the Golden Gate National 
Recreational Area. In addition, this section of roadway is 
part of the "49 Mile Scenic Drive" followed by tourists 
throughout San Francisco. 

10. The proposed lessee, The Beach Chalet, L.P., has 
committed to donating $0.05 for every glass of beer that it 
sells to a Beach Chalet Community Fund, which would be 
donated to Friends of Recreation and Park to provide 
funding for community projects such as removing graffiti 
at Ocean Beach and creating nature trails in the western 
end of Golden Gate Park. The Beach Chalet Community 
Fund is not included as part of the proposed lease but was 
included in the proposal submitted by the lessee to RPD. 

Recommendation: While the Budget Analyst concurs that the process 

utilized by RPD has resulted in a proper contract award, 
we consider approval of the proposed lease to be a policy 
matter for the Board of Supervisors. 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 



OPR 20 '95 12:43 FROM ANNEX 

ACtachiTie nt 

From: OREO* LARA TRORRtLU..T»:t.F. REC. AND PARK Date: 4O.0M Ttm«i OfctMM* : — 



The Beach Chufet Brewing Company 

2163 44th Avemu 

San Francisco, CA 94116 

(415) 753-5260 fax (4 15) 753-5607 



To: Tom Hart 

From: Greg Truppelli and I,ara Truppelli 

Date: April 19. 1995 

Re: l"hc Beach Chalet Lease 



Tom. 

The following is a confidential list of the names and amounts committed to by future 
investors: 



I^ira Truppelli 


S25,000 


Greg Truppelli 


S25,000 


Timon Malloy 


$250,000 


Edwin & Susan Malloy 


SI 25,000 


Rob & Wendy Graham 


S25,000 


George & Jackie Truppelli 


S25.OO0 


Carin Berol/.heimer 


S25,000 


Ann Sehefiler & Bill ScheJTerSSfl.OOO 



Total: $550,000 



*The Recreation and Park Department has author i use 
of this list as an ;it t achmont to our report. 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 

Item 8 -File 97-95-18 



Department: 
Item: 



Description: 



Comments: 



San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) 

Ordinance amending the Administrative Code by adding 
Section 10.117-115 to establish the James Guelff Memorial 
Peace Officers' Safety Fund for the purchase of semi- 
automatic firearms and related equipment, accepting gifts to 
that fund and limiting expenditures from that fund. 

The proposed ordinance would add Section 10.117-115 to the 
Administrative Code to establish a special fund to be known 
as the James Guelff Memorial Peace Officers' Safety Fund for 
the SFPD. The subject fund would accept donations and 
restrict their usage to (a) the purchase of semi-automatic 
firearms and related equipment, (b) support of the police 
firing range facility and (c) related training costs. 

The Board of Supervisors previously approved a 
supplemental appropriation request of $332,600 for the 
purchase of such firearms, related equipment and a training 
device (File 101-94-64) to equip and train 266 newly-recruited 
police officers. 

1. According to Lieutenant Larry Ryan of the SFPD, the 
monies in the proposed fund would augment monies to be 
requested in the FY 1995-96 and FY 1996-97 budgets for the 
purchase of semi-automatic firearms, related equipment and 
training for the balance of the uniform force of the SFPD. 

2. Lieutenant Ryan advises that the projected costs over a 
three-year period for equipping and training the 2,027 
member police force with semi-automatic firearms would be 
approximately $1.3 million, including the $332,600 already 
appropriated. Lieutenant Ryan further advises that the 
SFPD has no estimate of possible revenues from the proposed 
fund. 

3. The proposed special fund would not be subject to 
appropriation approval by the Board of Supervisors. Based 
on inquiries of the Budget Analyst, Sergeant John Bisordi of 
the SFPD advises that while the SFPD has no objection to 
appropriations from the proposed special fund being subject 
to approval by the Board of Supervisors, the Police 
Department believes that a ceiling of $40,000 would be 
reasonable. Therefore, the Committee may wish to amend 
the proposed legislation to require all expenditures in excess 
of $40,000, or some other designated amount, to he subject to 
appropriation approval by the Board of Supervisors. 



HOARD OK SCPKKVISQHS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

24 



Memo to Budget Committee 
April 26, 1995 



Recommendations: 1. Approve the proposed ordinance. 



2. Amendment of the proposed ordinance, in accordance with 
Comment No. 3 above, is a policy matter for the Board of 

Supervisors. 



/77' 

Harvey M. Rose 



Supervisor Hsieh 
Supervisor Kaufman 
Supervisor Bierman 
President Shelley 
Supervisor Alioto 
Supervisor Ammiano 
Supervisor Hallinan 
Supervisor Kennedy 
Supervisor Leal 
Supervisor Migden 
Supervisor Teng 
Clerk of the Board 
Chief Administrative Officer 
Controller 
Teresa Serata 
Robert Oakes 
Ted Lakey 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 
BUDGET ANALYST 

25