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Full text of "20th century history of the city of Washington and Washington County, Pennsylvania and representative citizens"

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http://www.archive.org/details/20thcenturyhisto02mcfa 



ri 



Representative Citizens 



JOSEPH LONG THISTLE, M. D., comes of a notable 
Scotch-Irish ancestry, many of whom were pioneer set- 
tlers in the Ohio Valley at the beginning of last cen- 
tury, and all of them were thrifty and early acquired 
valuable real estate. His paternal grandfather, Samp- 
son Thistle, after marriage near Cumberland, Md., 
brought his bride, on horseback, to a clearing and cabin 
which he had previously prepared, about two miles above 
Fishing Creek on the Virginia side of the Ohio, where 
they lived to a ripe old age and brought up a family of 
eleven children. Dr. Thistle at present owns one-half 
of these ancestral lands of nearly 900 acres. 

Archibald Thistle, one of these children and father 
of the object of this sketch, entered his brother's store, 
as a partner, at the age of 18, and when 28 years old 
started in a general mercantile business at Sistersville, 
continuing uninterruptedly until his death at the age of 
78. He was the wealthiest and one of the most respect- 
ed citizens of his county. He was postmaster before, 
during and after the Civil War period, covering in all 
25 years. 

.John McCoy, the maternal grandfather of Dr. Thistle, 
married Sarah Wells, one of the 22 children of Cliarles 
Wells, whose home was in what is now Brooke County, 
W. Va. To each of 20 of these children who lived to 
maturity their father gave a good river-bottom farm, 
most of which he secured by patent from the state; 
others he bought from prior owners. To his daughters, 
Sarah (Wells) McCoy and Ruth (Wells) Birkhead, he 
gave the northern half of a valley, just midway between 
Wheeling and Parkersburg. In course of time these 
sisters decided to lay out a town site, one-half of which 
should be upon eituer side of the line dividing their 
farms. After much discussion as to a name for the 
place Sarah suggested the appropriate and unique name 
of Sistersville, and so it is to this day. The said John 
McCoy was delegate to the legislature sitting at Rich- 
mond, Va., for five terms from the founding of his 
county of Tyler in 1815 until 1822. Sarah (Wells) Mc- 



Coy was one of the founders and ever a leading sup- 
porter of the Presbyterian Church in Sistersville, organ- 
ized in 1842, (and then a part of Washington, Pa., Pres- 
bytery,) until her death in 1888, at the age of 94 years. 

In the fall of 1872 Joseph L. Thistle came from Sis- 
tersville, W. Va., where he was born in 1855, to Wash- 
ington and entered the preparatory department of Wash- 
ington-Jefferson College, and pursued the regular classical 
course, intending to be a physician, until impaired 
health compelled him to leave college soortly before the 
graduation of his Class of '78. Less than two years 
after his arrival here he united with the First Presby- 
terian Church, of which he was ordained a deacon soon, 
after becoming a resident of the town some years later. 
While in college he was a member of the Beta Theta Pi 
fraternity and of the Philo and Union Literary Society. 
After leaving college he was employed in surveying and 
engineering work, and in his father 's store, until he en- 
tered Jefferson Medical College, at Philadelphia, Sep- 
tember, 1884, after nearly two years of preparatory 
study, and received a diploma from this famous insti- 
tution in 1886, together with a gold medal, awarded in 
competition, for "the best thesis on a subject relating 
to obstetrics." 

In 1879 he married Sarah Olivia Bell, daughter of 
John E. Bell, who occupied the offices of treasurer and 
prothonotary of this county, and was collector of in- 
ternal revenue at the time of his death. To Dr. Thistle 
and wife were born six children, four of whom are liv- 
ing, — Archibald, who conducts a jewelry business at Xo. 
36 North Main street, and Helen S., Catherine K. and 
Mildred B., who reside with their father at No. 41 E. 
Beau street. For some years after marriage Mr. and 
ivlrs. Thistle lived at Sistersville. But, immediately 
after completing some post-graduate work, following 
graduation from medical college he removed his family 
to Washington, Pa., and has resided here ever since. 
This was during the hight of the oil excitement here 
and he soon had a good practice which he continued until 

37 



538 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTOX COUNTY 



in the early nineties his father's failing health and 
added cares on account of oil and gas developments in 
Tyler County, compelled him to spend about one-half 
of the time away from home for the next ten years. 
His father died in 1896, leaving a considerable estate. 
After many years of great suffering from asthma, al- 
though relief was sought in many parts of the country, 
Mrs. Thistle passed to her reward in February, 1906. 
She was most relieved at Mt. Lake Park, Md., and here 
a comfortable home was established in 1897, where the 
family have spent most of the hottest months for the 
last 12 years. 

In 1893 Washington- Jefferson College conferred upon 
Dr. Thistle the honorary degree of Master of Arts. He 
is a director in the Washington Trust Company, and in 
the Washington Electric Light and Power Company be- 
sides being a stockholder in several other banks and 
corporations of this and neighboring cities. 

HON. JONATHAN ALLISON, deceased, who was one 
of Washington 's most prominent citizens, formerly presi- 
dent of the Allison Land Company and vice-president of 
the Citizens' National Bank of Washington, for many 
years was active in the development of Washington 
County and its resources. He was born in Chartiers 
Township, Washington County, Pa., February 3, 1828, 
and was a son of Thomas and Mary (Johnson) Allison. 
His death occurred December 17, 1908. He was of 
Scotch descent, his ancestors having left Scotland for 
North Ireland at an early day because of religious per- 
secution. His grandfather, James Allison, was bom in 
Ireland and emigrated to America in colonial days, and 
was one of the very earliest pioneers of Washington 
County, settling in the woods in 1773, and was a very 
important factor in its early development. 

Jonathan Allison received an elementary education in 
the district schools of Chartiers Township and this was 
supplemented by a course in Jefferson College, which 
institution he entered at the age of seventeen years. He 
continued his studies there for two years, when, on ac- 
count of the death of a brother, it was necessary for him 
to return home and for a number of years afterward he 
devoted himself to agricultural pursuits. He purchased 
a farm of 148 acres from William Hopkins, which was 
situated about one mile from his birth place, and after 
a residence there of eight years, bought a part of his 
grandfather's old farm, from the Andrew Allison estate. 
It was on this farm that his grandfather, late in the 
eighteenth century, had discovered coal, which was the 
first found in Washington County, and he mined some 
for use in blacksmithing, hauling it a considerable dis- 
tance and selling it then for twenty-five cents a bushel. 
It was not until some years later that it was used for 
house fuel, and not until the advent of the Chartiers 



VaUey Railroad, in 1872, that it was mined on an ex- 
tensive scale. With the construction of the railroad, 
Jonathan Allison saw the opportunity of developing the 
rich underlying vein, and he soon had operations under 
way that supplied the borough of Washington with bitu- 
minous coal, sold quantities at other near points and 
also shipped to lake ports, even as far as Chicago. He 
continued his activities in the ocal business until 1891, 
employing some fifty men at the mines and shipping 
millions of bushels per annum. In that year he sold 
out to J. Y. H. Cook & Sons, of Canonsburg, Pa., and 
retired from the coal business. In 1887 he moved his 
place of residence to Washington, purchasing the old 
Acheson homestead at No. 101 South Wade avenue, 
where his widow now resides. He entered actively into 
the affairs of the borough, and in 1886 became identified 
with one of its most substantial financial institutions, the 
Citizens ' National Bank, of which he was one of the 
original stockholders, and later its vice-president. 

On April 7, 1857, Mr. Allison was united in marriage 
with Miss Margaret G. Gabby, and to them were born 
the following children: Mary, who died at the age of 
four years; Maggie, who died at Canonsburg, was the 
wife of William Dickson ; Albert ; Thomas, who is de- 
ceased; Edward and William, twins, the former of whom 
is a practicing physician, a graduate of the Pittsburg 
Medical College; John B., who is teller in the Citizens' 
National Bank of Washington; Ralph, who is a well 
known attorney at law, practicing at Butler, Pa.; and 
Jennie. Of the above family, William Allison was 
drowned in 1881, on his way home from school, by acci- 
dentally falling from a foot log while he was crossing a 
creek. 

In his political affiliation, Mr. Allison was a Whig 
until the organization of the Republican party, since 
which time he was one of its adherents. He was elected 
to the ofBce of school director the year he cast his first 
ballot and served in that capacity for many years. In 
1872 and 1873, he served his township as. justice of the 
peace, but resigned that office to accept that of State 
Representative, to which he was first elected in 1872, 
serving two terms in a manner which gained him the 
approval and good will of his constituents. During his 
tenure of ofiice he was the only representative in the 
General Assembly from Washington County. He was 
long recognized as a man of exceptional ability and 
Washington County gladly accords him a place among 
her representative men. 

WILLIAM ATEN. a prosperous farmer and life-long 
resident of Robeson Township, Washington County, Pa., 
with the heirs of his brother, John Aten, owns a farm 
of 123 acres, and comes of one of the old established 
families of the county. He was born March 1, 1842, a 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



639 



sou ut' Aurou hikI Mnry (McMiiiu) Atuu, wliu wore tko 
parent!) of six muiib; Williniii ; Andrew und Joliu, both 
deeonsed, wori' twins; Iluury, Robert, and .IiinicH, luid 
a daughter, Klizalx'th, wliu died when Iwentv months old. 
The parents of our subject, who were farmers by occu- 
patiuu, wore members of the Presbyterian (,'hureli at 
Candor, where they wore buried. 

William Aten is of Holland Dutch extraction and his 
paternal grandparents were William and Jane (Smith) 
Aten, and the maternal grandparents were Andrew and 
Elizabeth MeMinn. William Aten attended the common 
schools of the ti>wushi|) for a Mliort time and early in 
life began working on his father's farm, which was pur- 
chased by his grandfather, William Aten, in 1803, and 
after the death of his father, ho and brother John, 
purchased the land from the other heirs. John Aten, 
brother of our subject, also resided on the farm until the 
time of his death, and was united in marriage with Mar- 
garet A. Bailey, a daughter of William and Mary Ann 
(Springer) Bailey. He is survived by his widow and 
five children: Mary Frances, Aaron, Earl Bailey, George 
and John, all of whom live on the farm with William 
Aten, our subject. Mr. Aten is one of the substantial 
farmers of the township, and possesses the esteem and 
respect of bis fellow men. 

HARRY T. GHRIST, funeral director and embalmer, 
who has been engaged in business at California, Pa., 
since 1901, is a native of this borough, born January 
23, 1875, and is a son of Alfred B. and Allie V. (Phil- 
lips) Christ. 

Alfred B. Ghrist was born and reared in Fayette 
County, Pennsylvania, and was a son of James Ghrist, 
of Jefferson Township, Fayette County. James Ghrist 
and his sons were all stone masons, brick masons and 
contractors, and in 1871 they came to California and in 
1872 erected the. dormitory of the State Normal School. 
Alfred B. Ghrist was married after coming to California, 
to Miss Allie V. Phillips, a daughter of Everett Oxley 
Phillips. She was born and reared in Greene County, 
Pennsylvania, and still survives. Alfred B. Ghrist died 
in March, 1909. 

Harry F. Ghrist attended the borough schools and later 
the State Normal School at California, leaving this in- 
stitution in 189;;. in his junior year, and then learned 
the art of photography, in 1894 taking charge of the 
Rodger gallery here, which he conducted for two years. 
He then started to learn liis present business and pre- 
pared for the same by an experience of six years with 
8. W. Craft. In December, 1901, in partnership with 
Frederick S. Gleason, under the firm name of Ohrist & 
Gleason, Mr. Ghrist went into undertaking and since 
1905 has been alone, Mr. Gleason retiring in that year 
in order to accept the position of director of music in 



thu public schools of Schenectady, Now York. Mr. Ghriat 
is a qualified embalmer and he has provided every neces- 
sity and facility for funeral directing. As an honorable 
business man he stands high in the estiniutiou of his 
fellow citizens. He is the local health olTicer of the 
F^ast Pike Run and Allen townships. 

Mr. Ghrist was married to Miss Emma Aston, a daugh- 
ter of Thomas Aston. They are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He is identified fraternally with 
Pike Run Lodge, No. 491, Odd Fellows; with the F. 
(). K., at Brownsville; the Royal Arcanum, and Col. A. 
L. Hawkins Council, No. 334, J. O. A. M. 

ROBERT R. HAYS, who is president of the Farmers' 
National Bank of Hickory, Pa., was born near Bur- 
gettstown, Washington County, Pa., and is a son of 
James 8. Hays, who died at Burgcttstown in 1907, in 
the eighty-second year of his age, and was interred at 
Fairview Cemetery, by the side of bis wife, who had died 
two years previously. They were members of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Burgettstown. 

Mr. Hays was educated in the Burgettstown schools, 
McDonald Academy and Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege, graduating with the degree B. S. at the latter in 
the class of 1902. He then registered as a law student 
under the late Joseph Hay.s, at Pittsburg, and then as- 
sisted in organizing the Farmers' National Bank of 
Hickory, Pa., and settled at Hickory where he is engaged 
in banking. He is one of the town's substantial citizens. 

On July 11, 1906, Mr. Hays was married to Miss 
Jennie ('. McMurray, a daughter of Capt. H. B. McMur- 
ray, and they have one daughter, Evelyn Jean. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hays are members of the Presbyterian Church. In 
politics he follows in the footsteps of his father, being 
a stanch Democrat. He is identified with the Masonic 
fraternity and retains membership in his Greek letter 
society of college days. 

W. K. GALBRAITH, deceased, was a prominent resi- 
dent of Canonsburg for many years, where he served 
under several administrations as postmaster, for a long 
period was also a man of affairs in Washington County. 
He was born in Cross Creek village. Washington County, 
December 12, 1858, and was a son of .Tames A. and 
Mary A. (Bebout) Galbraith. and a grandson of William 
and Isabella (Welch) Galbraith, the latter of whom came 
to Washington County after their marriage in Scotland 
and settled in Smith Township. 

W. K. Galbraith was reared at Cross Creek and Bur- 
gettstown. his parents removing to the latter place when 
he was ten years old. He attended the graded schools 
and was graduated from the high school with the class 
of 1878. and then entered the recorder's office, his father 
being recorder of Washington County at that time. 



540 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



After the expiration of his father's term he continued 
in the ofSce as clerk for a year and then located at 
Cauonsburg. There he conducted a tobacco store for 
eight years, after Tvhich he was in the employ of the 
Central Grain Elevator Company of Pittsburg until 1890. 
In that year he was first appointed postmaster at Canons- 
bui'g and later was made assistant county treasurer, in 
which office he served two terms. After retiring from 
the treasurer's office he was again appointed postmaster 
and was so serving when his death occurred on Septem- 
ber 25, 1906. He was an honest and capable official 
and he was respected by his fellow citizens and esteemed 
by his friends. 

On November 13, 18S4, Mr. Galbraith was married to 
Miss Mary E. Munnell, a daughter of James Munnell, 
and they became the parents of the following children: 
James Lloyd, Katherine H., William K., Jr., Bella, Frank 
S. and A. Sheldon. Mr. Galbraith was succeeded as post- 
master by his oldest son, James Lloyd, who was born 
September 21, 1885, and was appointed postmaster Octo- 
ber 29, 1906. The late W. K. Galbraith was a member 
and liberal supporter of the United Presbyterian Church, 
to which his family also belong. He was a Eepublican. 
The family home is at No. 115 East College street, 
Canonsburg. 

DAVID W. EASEL, president of the Farmers' Na- 
tional Bank of Claysville, Pa., and for many years a 
representative business man in Washington County, was 
born in West Bethlehem Township, Washington County, 
Pa., December 23, 1859, and is a son of Frederick Rasel, 
who was an early setler in West Bethlehem Township 
and spent the remainder of his life there. 

David W. Rasel is in large measure, a self-made man. 
He enjoyed many educational advantages, but he pro- 
vided the larger number of these for himself. He start- 
ed to teach school when only sixteen years of age, leav- 
ing the home farm about that time, and he attended the 
Pleasant Valle}' schools, the State Normal School at 
California, Pa., and Thiel College, in Mercer County, 
succeeding in graduating from the latter institution in 
1882. Thus prepared he devoted himself to educational 
work for twenty terms of schools and during this period 
was principal of the West Alexander High School for 
four years. In 1898 he entered into the mercantile busi- 
ness at West Alexander and later was bookkeeper for 
the South Pittsburg Iron Works at Claysville, since 
known as the Pennsylvania Bridge Company. In 1905 
he embarked in a general hardware business at Claysville 
and in the same year became president of the Farmers' 
National Bank at this place, of which he was one of the 
organizers and has continued one of the directors. He 
is an able and astute business man and although his 



interests are numerous, he holds them well in hand and 
enjoys to the fullest extent the confidence of his fellow 
citizens. He is active in the Democratic party and has 
served in local offices and for one year was president of 
the borough school board. 

Mr. Basel was united in marriage with Miss Jennie 
G. Hayburn, of Claysville, and they have one son, David 
M. Mr. Basel is a member of the Presbyterian Church 
of Claysville and one of its elders. Mr. Basel's promo- 
tion in life makes an interesting story because it tells 
how certainly industry, perseverance, courage and integ- 
rity are rewarded. 

LESLIE G. MARPLE, a successful young business 
man of Canonsburg, who is a member of the weU known 
grocery firm of Marple & Hamilton, was born in Wheel- 
ing, W. Va., August 10, 1884, and is a son of Benjamin 
and Hannah Jane (Van Eman) Marple, natives of West 
Virginia and for the past fourteen years residents of 
Canonsburg, Pa. Benjamin Marple, who has now reached 
his seventy-sixth year, has devoted his life to gardening. 
His wife is now fifty-five years old, and they have been 
the parents of ten children, namely: Monroe A., su- 
perintendent of the Ohio County Home, who married 
Nannie Garvin; Ella, deceased, who was the wife of 
Homer Little; George, who died young; John W., en- 
gaged in the mercantile business in Canonsburg, who 
married Mary E. Moore; Alvin, deceased; Melvin E., 
connected with the Philadelphia Gas Company, who mar- 
ried Margaret McCloy; Mary, who is the wife of Mr. 
Holmes, of Fairmont, W. Va. ; James, deceased ; Leslie 
G. ; and Russell, who is a draughtsman for the Fort 
Pitt Bridge Works. 

Leslie G. Marple received his education in the public 
schools of South Canonsburg, after leaving which he 
spent nine years in the employ of the Canonsburg Pot- 
tery, in the meantime learning the trade of pressman. 
On March 15, 1909, he succeeded his brother, John W. 
Marple. in the grocery firm, which since that time has 
been known under the style of Marple & Hamilton. This 
place of business is situated at the corner of College and 
Jefferson streets, and has a large patronage among the 
residents of the community. Both of the young partners 
are progressive and enterprising, and endeavor to give 
to their customers the full worth of their money, and 
as this manner of doing business is appreciated, the firm 
has prospered accordingly. 

On August 17, 1905, Mr. Marple was united in mar- 
riage with Ida F. McCartney, daughter of Enoch and 
Mary McCartney, of Canonsburg, and one daughter, 
Florence E., has been born to the union. Mr. and Mrs. 
Marple are members of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Canonsburg. He is a Republican. 



J 




•lOllN II. MrUDOCH 



llisroin- OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



541 



JAMKS P. BUADKN, uttoroey at law, with oflice at 
No. 108 South Maiu street, Washington, Pa., i« a roprc- 
sentutivc of one of the old families of Western Penn- 
sylvania, one which has had many distinguislicd mem- 
bers. He was born at Wii-shingtoh, October 8, 1871, and 
is a son of .lolin 1>. and Anna C (Rupic) Braden. 

.lames P. Braden was educated in the Washington 
schools and Wasliington and Jefferson College and was 
graduated from that institution in the class of 1895 and 
was admitted to the bar December 31, 1900, having com- 
pleted his law course after he returned from serving as 
a soldier in the Spanish-American War. For that serv- 
ice he enlisted in the Tenth Pa. Volunteer Infantry, as a 
private and was advanced to be sergeant of his company. 
After ho was honorably discharged at San Francisco, 
August 22, 1899, he immediately returned to Washington. 
He has built up a very satisfactory practice and is num- 
bered with the ablest of the younger members of the 
Washington bar. 

Mr. Braden was married to Mrs. Anna L. Schaulis, and 
they have one little daughter, Rebecca. Their beautiful 
home is located at No. 218 West Wheeling street, Wash- 
ington. 

.lOHN H. MURDOCH, president of the Union Trust 
Company of Washington, Pa., and a prominent lawyer 
at the Washington County bar, has been an important 
factor in the business activities of this borough. He 
is a member of one of the oldest families of the county. 

John Murdoch, his earliest ancestor in this country, 
was born in Scotland, but just prior to the Revolutionary 
War was recorded as a resident of Carlisle, Pa. In 
1778 he moved to North Strabane Township, Washing- 
ton County, and from that time the name of Murdoch 
has been honorably connocteu with Washington County 
history. 

Alexander Murdoch, third son of John, was born at 
Carlisle, Pa., in 1770, and was 8 years of age when 
brought by his parents to Washington County. In 
early manhood he purchased the Canonsburg mills, to- 
gether with a large tract of adjoining land. He pos- 
sessed the commercial instinct and even at that early 
day carried on business enterprises successfully that 
older men had not yet thought of. He conducted both 
a mill and saddlery and loaded flat boats which he 
floated down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New 
Orleans, where he found a market and then he returned 
on horseback, traversing hundreds of miles of wilder- 
ness. In 1S09 he was appointed prothonotary of the 
Court of Common Pleas of Washington County, and 
then it was that he took up his residence in the borough 
of Washington, in 1822 erecting a house which in later 
years became a p.irt of the Hotel Main. He served as 
prothonotary until 1819, after which he engaged in mer- 



cantile pursuits until 1428, when, with his family, be 
moved to what was known as the Morganza Tract — 400 
acres of laud situated two miles from Canonsburg — 
which he bought in that year. There ho spent the re- 
mainder of his days, dying in 1837. His widow sur- 
vived him until 1863, dying at Canonsburg. In 1803 
Alexander Murdoch married Elizabeth Henderson, a 
daughter of Rev. Matthew Henderson, of Chartiers 
Township, and to them wore born eleven children, of 
whom the following grew to maturity: Mary M., widow 
of Hon. J. L. Gow; John R., Mrs. Sarah B. Musser, Mrs. 
E. W. Wilson, Esther Ann, Alexander, Jr., and James. 

Alexander Murdoch, the second, the father of John 
H. Murdoch, was a successful lawyer at Washington, 
and for some years was in partnership with his brother- 
in-law, Hon. J. L. Gow. In April, 1861, he was ap- 
pointed United States marshal for Western Pennsyl- 
vania, by President Lincoln, and was subsequently re- 
appointed and served two years. In March, 1869, Presi- 
dent Grant appointed him to the same oflice, one which 
he filled with entire efTiciency until he resigned it in 
December, 1872. He was a man of brilliant talent and 
was held in high esteem by his fellow citizens. He died 
.Vpril 14, 1903, in the 89th year of his age. 

John H. Murdoch has been a resident of Washington 
all his life up to the present time. He is the third child 
of Alexander and Eliza Huey Murdoch. He was grad- 
uated from Washington and Jefferson College in 1869 
and was admitted to the bar in 1874. Under the firm 
style of John H. Murdoch & Son, Mr. Murdoch is asso- 
ciated in the practice of law with his son, Edgar B., 
who was graduated from Washington and Jefferson 
College in 1896 and was admitted to the bar in 1899. 
The firm is a representative one at Washington and 
maintains offices at No. 86 North Main street. Mr. Mur- 
doch has also many other interests, owning a large 
amount of valuable realty and serving as president of 
the Thorneycroft Land Company and treasurer of the 
Murdoch-Baldwin Oil Company. He has been president 
of the Union Trust Company since its organization, and 
i.s president of the Washington County Fire Insurance 
Company, having succeeded his father in that capacity 
at the time of the latter 's death. He has been a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees of Washington Seminary 
for many years, taking an active part in its work. He 
is one of the directors of the Pittsburg Life & Trust 
Company of Pittsburg and a member of the finance 
committee of the company. He is also president of the 
Waynesburg Water Company of Waynesburg. Pa., and 
vice president of the Citizens' Water Company of Wash- 
ington. 

Mr. Murdoch was married January 8, 1874, to Martie 
Boyle, of Allegheny City, Pa., and their family con- 
sists of four children, viz.: Edgar B., May H. (married 



542 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



to Eev. W. M. Frencli), Anna V. and John H., Jr. Their 
home has been since 1874 at No. 313 North Main street. 
Mr. Murdoch is a member of the First United Pres- 
byterian Church of Washington, in which he has held 
the ofiBce of an elder for over 25 years. 

SAMUEL FAKEEE, SE., one of the good, reliable 
citizens of Independence Township, who is cultivating 
an excellent farm of 172 acres, was born May 25, 1831, 
in Mt. Pleasant Township, Washington County, Pa., and 
is a son of Andrew and Eliza (Buchanan) Farrer. 

Andrew Farrer, who was a blacksmith by trade, fol- 
lowed that occupation until 1850, in which year he com- 
menced agricultural pursuits and continued until his 
death in 1866. He was buried at Upper Buffalo Ceme- 
tery, as was also his widow, who passed away in 1893. 
They were the parents of the following children : Samuel ; 
Eobert B. and David M., both of whom are deceased ; 
Joseph A., who died when small; and Ezra L., residing 
in Missouri. 

Samuel Farrer received his education in the common 
schools of his native locality, leaving school to learn the 
trade of blacksmith, which he followed until his father 
purchased a farm. On this he worked until 1856, in 
which year he was married, and after that event he be- 
came a tenant farmer in Buffalo and Hopewell Town- 
ships. In 1870 he went back to the home farm, of which 
he had charge for three years, then bought his present 
farm, which at that time consisted of 144 acres, and to 
this he has since added twenty-eight acres. He has car- 
ried on a general line of farming and has specialized in 
sheep raising. Although past seventy-eight years of age, 
Mr. Farrer is in the best of health and in possession of 
all his faculties, and is able to carry on his duties on 
the farm every day, attributing his present excellent 
physical condition to the fact that he has always lived 
a hearty, out-of-door life and has never indulged to ex- 
cess in spiritous liquors. He is one of the prominent 
farmers of his section and a well-known member of the 
grange at Independence. 

In 1856, Mr. Farrer was married to Mary Dunkle, 
daughter of John and Eleanor (McLaughlin) Dunkle, 
farming people of Hopewell Township, and to this union 
there were born children as follows: Ellen, and J. Addi- 
son, who reside at home; Nettie B., who married C. L. 
Grimes, a general storekeeper at Coon Island, Washing- 
ton County; Andrew C, a leading merchant of West 
Middletown, who started in business in 1908 and now 
has a large trade; Abraham Lincoln, a successful mer- 
chant of Wolf town, Canton Township ; John, a carpenter 
of Buffalo village; James, who died at the age of about 
eight years; Samuel, Jr., also a carpenter, residing at 
home; Martha, who married Ernest Smith, operates a 
farm adjoining that of Mr. Farrer in Independence 



Township ; and Emma, residing at home. The mother 
of these children died August 20, 1890, and was buried 
at West Middletown Cemetery. 

Mr. Farrer is connected with the United Presbyterian 
Church at Mount Hope, in which for many years he 
sei-ved as trustee. A Eepublican in politics, he has been 
prominent in the ranks of his party, serving as county 
commissioner from 1894 to 1897, as justice of the peace 
from 1889 to 1894, as supervisor for one term, and as 
school director and judge of election for a number of 
yeare. 

M. W. SCOTT, a representative business man of Bur- 
gettstown, carrying on a large trade in furniture, waU 
paper and carpets, was born in Smith Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., November 7, 1856, and is a son of 
Eobert K. Scott. 

M. W. Scott attended school in Burgettstown, during 
boyhood and youth, after which he assisted his father 
on the home farm in Smith Township, for some years. 
In 1887 he embarked in the furniture business at Bur- 
gettstown and has added to his original stock and now 
does a large amount of dealing, his patronage coming 
from the town and also from the adjacent country. 

On January 18, 1888, Mr. Scott was married to Miss 
Sarah E. Dornan, a daughter of William Dornan, and 
they have the following children; William E. K., F. 
Donn, Pamela M., M. Burt, C. Denny, E. Lauretta, K. 
Leroy, Wylie F., Lila and Lena, twins, and Harry Mc- 
Kee. All survive with the exception of Lena, a large, 
healthy, happy, intelligent family. Mr. Scott and wife 
are members of the First Presbyterian Church at Bur- 
gettstown, of which he is one of the trustees. In poli- 
ties he is a Democrat and was formerly a member of the 
town council and of the school board. He is also serv- 
ing as one of the directors of the Union Agricultural 
Association. 

JESSE Y. SCOTT, M. D., one of Washington County's 
prominent and able physicians and surgeons, has been 
engaged in active practice in the borough of Washing- 
ton, for almost a score of years. He was born in Fallow- 
field Township, Washington Co., Pa., November 13, 
1848, and is a son of Joseph A and Eliza (Sheplar) 
Scott, who long were honored and esteemed residents of 
Washington County. 

From the common schools of Fallowfield Township, 
Dr. Scott, as an ambitious youth, took up the higher 
branches of study in the Southwestern State Normal 
School, at California, Pa., and in 1870 commenced his 
medical studies. These he pursued under the supervision 
of Dr. J. H. Leyda, of Bentleyville, and when sufficiently 
prepared, he entered the medical department of the 
University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia. With hon- 



iiisi'dia (iK w AsiiiN(;r()\ (oiNTY 



543 



orablo iiu'iitiuii lio niiii grailiiiilt'd I'nnii tliiil inM iiiil luii 
in J875, ami iinmodialcly tlioroal'ter startfti iiilo piin' 
tiee at I'entreville, WaBhiiigton County. He rcinaiiu'il 
two years at CVntreville, practiciHl oiio ypiur at Pittsbiirj; 
ami t'li'veu years at Bentleyville, and tlicii canu' to Wash 
iantini. His siu-co-ss lias been exoeptional both from the 
stan<l|ioiut ot" professional achievement ami in a tinan- 
ciaJ way. Associated with him is Dr. Donehoo, and they 
maintain a line suite of olliees at Nos. 211-213 Washing- 
ton Trust Building. He is a director of the Washington 
Trust Company, the Washington Electric Light and 
Power Company, and is tinaucially interested in other 
successful business enterprises of the borough. 

On June l(i, 1881, Dr. Scott was married to Miss Ella 
M. McLean, a daughter of Henry B. McLean, of Bealls- 
ville, who formerly served in the office of county com- 
missioner. Dr. and Mrs. Scott have a beautiful home, 
their residence being located at No. 498 East Maiden 
street. They are active members of the Central Pres- 
byterian Church. In politics, Dr. Scott is a Republican. 
His fraternal connections are with several medical or- 
ganizations and with the order of Heptasophs. 

J. HARPER WALLACE, one of Washington County's 
prominent citizens, residing on his valuable farm of 163 
acres, which is situated in Canton Township, adjoining 
the corporation limits of Washington, is president of 
the Dunbar-Wallace Company, of Washington, and pres- 
ident of the Crafton Builders' Supply Company, of 
Crafton, Pa. Mr. Wallace was born in North Fayette 
Township, Allegheny Co., Pa., January 19, 1849. 

Mr. Wallace was afforded excellent educational ad- 
vantages in his youth, receiving academic training in 
several well known institutions. In 1889 he purchased 
his present farm in Canton Township and has made it 
bis home ever since. He takes an interest in fine stock, 
particularly horses, and is credited with having one of 
the best driving teams in the county. 

In 1870, Mr. Wallace was married (first) to Miss 
Louise Donaldson, who died in 1871, leaving one son, 
Joseph D. At the time of his decease, he was a physi- 
cian of high standing and was profe-ssor of anatomy in 
Jefferson Medical College. In 1873, Mr. Wallace was 
married (second) to Miss Jennie B. Oliver, of Allegheny 
County, and to this marriage six children were born, 
namely: J. W., who is secretary and treasurer of the 
Dunbar & Wallace Lumber Company and of the Crafton 
Builders' Su]iply Company; O. C, who is connected with 
the Dunbar & Wallace Lumber Company ; John H., who 
is a graduate of Princeton University, is manager of 
the Crafton Builders ' Supply Company : Robert . who is 
interested in the management of the farm ; Frank M., 
who is fl student in Washington and Jefferson College; 
anil Alice, who resides at home. Mr. Wallace and familv 



are members of the Second I'reHbytcriuu ('huruh at Wash- 
ington. fVuternnlly he is an Elk. 

WILLI A. \l v. ( ALDWELL, who resides on his floe 
farm of ninety ai-res, in Hopewell Township, Washin^oD 
Co., Pa., was born on a farm, about two miles east 
of Buffalo village, October 27, 1855, and is a son of 
Robert S. and Caroline (Vance) Caldwell. 

The Caldwell family is a very old one in Washington 
County, Samuel Caldwell, grandfather of William V., 
being an early resident of Hopewell Towimhip. Robert 
S. Caldwell was born in Hopewell Township, December 
9, 1820, and lived on a part of the same farm until he 
retired and moved to Buffalo, where he died, December 
7, 1903, and his burial was in the Upper Buffalo Ceme- 
tery. The children born to Robert S. Caldwell and his 
wife were: Hannah J., who married Robert G. Maxwell; 
.Margaret, who is the widow of John W. Stewart, of 
Buffalo Township; William V.; Samuel, who died aged 
twenty-four years; and Carrie, who was six months old 
at the time of her death. 

William V. Caldwell attended the public schools until 
old enough to take on himself the management of the 
home farm and he has continued in argicultural pursuits 
ever since. He is executor of his father's estate. He 
remained on the home place until 1906 when he moved to 
Buffalo village. He located on his present farm adjoin- 
ing the village in April, 1909. 

Mr. Caldwell was married December 3, 1885, to Miss 
Allie M. Patterson, a daughter of Moses and Grisella 
(McComb) Patterson, of Cross Creek Township. The 
father of Mrs. Caldwell died February 7, 1906, the 
mother having passed away May 27, 1872. Mr. and 
Mrs. Caldwell have one son, Robert Vance Caldwell, who 
was born October 1, 1894. Mrs. Caldwell has one sister 
and one brother: Lettie. who is the wife of J. C. Blaney, 
of Buffalo; and James W., who resides at Coon Island, 
W'ashington County. Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell are mem- 
bers of the ITppcr Presbyterian Church of Buffalo and 
Mrs. Caldwell belongs to the church missionary society. 
Mr. Caldwell takes no active interest in politics and cares 
for no political favors. He casts his vote with the Re- 
publican party and has served on the township election 
board. He is one of the stockholders in the Buffalo 
'rdcphonc Company. 

JOHN I. CARSON, who. for many years has been 
prominently identified with the affairs of Washington, 
Pa., is a representative member of the Washingfton Coun- 
ty bar and is a leading factor in Republican politics. 
He was born in Ohio County, W. Va., October 21, 1853, 
and is a son of Joseph and Anna (Brown) Carson. 

John I. Carson was reared to school age on the home 
farm, and after completing the common school course 



544 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



near home, entered West Alexander Academy, and when 
sixteen years old, Waynesburg College. After leaving 
college he taught school in Ohio and Marshall counties, 
West Virginia, and then in Peoria County, Illinois. In 
1S75 he returned to his old home and was married in 
that year and after that settled down to farming in 
Chesterfield County, Virginia. He continued there some 
five years and then moved to Philadelphia, where he was 
employed for one year as a clerk in a commission house. 
In 1882 he became principal of the public schools of 
West Alexander and as an educator became well known. 
In July, 1891, he came to Washington Borough, where 
he entered into partnership with J. W. Murray, in the 
insurance, real estate and loan business. In the mean- 
while he prepared for admission to the bar of Washing- 
ton County under Attorney James Q. McGiffin and sub- 
sequently was admitted to practice. He maintains his 
offices at Rooms 208-209 in the Brown building, Wash- 
ington. 

Mr. Carson, however, is a man of versatile talents and 
has not confined himself to the practice of his profession. 
He is an enthusiastic Republican and many times has 
been elected to important offices on the Republican ticket. 
In 1887 he was elected a justice of the peace at West 
Alexander and served in that capacity until 1892; dur- 
ing 1892-1893, he was secretary of the Republican county 
committee; and on January 1, 1893, he was appointed 
deputy collector of internal revenue for the 23d district, 
having charge of the 7th division, which embraces Wash- 
ington, Greene and a part of Payette counties. In 1900, 
Mr. Carson was elected prothonotary of Washington 
County, at which election he led the ticket, and was 
re-elected to that office in 1903 and again led the ticket, 
with an increased majority, and served with marked 
efficiency through his second term, retiring on January 
1, 1906. 

On November 25, 1875, Mr. Carson was married to a 
native of his own county and State, Miss Josephine M. 
Whitham, a daughter of Perry Whitham. They have 
Tiad the following children: Ross MiUigan, Glenn Pere, 
Murial Joy, Salome and Denton B. The youngest son 
was accidentally killed by the railroad in 1908. Mr. 
Carson and family reside at No. 121 LeMoyne avenue. 
They are members of the First Presbyterian Church. 

WILLIAM BAILEY, who passed out of this life Jan- 
nary 27, 1880, was for many years one of the most prom- 
inent and substantial farmers of Robeson Township, and 
was a son of Joseph and Mary (Ackleson) Bailey. Mr. 
Bailey was a man of public spirit and enterprise. Dur- 
ing his early life, politically he was a Whig, but later a 
Democrat, and served in various township offices, includ- 
ing assessor and treasurer, and was for twenty-two years 
constable. He was married in 1848 to Mary Ann Spring- 



er, a daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann (McMurtrie) 
Springer, and to them were born three children: Mar- 
garet, who is the widow of John Eaton, is the mother of 
the following childi'en: Mary, Aaron, Earl, George and 
John: Joseph S., our subject; and Rachel Jane. 

Joseph S. Bailey was born on his present farm in 
Robeson Township, November 28, 1850, and since com- 
pleting his education in the common schools of the town- 
ship, has always eugaged in agricultural pursuits on the 
home farm in Robeson Township, where he and his sis- 
ter Rachel have spent their entire lives. The farm, which 
consists of 102 acres, was inherited by the three children 
of William Bailey, who still own the land between them, 
and they also inherited another farm of forty-two acres 
from the father. Joseph S. Bailey is engaged in dairy- 
ing in connection with his farming interests and ships 
his produce to Pittsburg from Midway. He keeps about 
twenty head of cattle and makes a specialty of raising 
Holstein cattle. 

Mr. Bailej' is politically" a Democrat and has served 
nine years as auditor, his present term in that office 
expiring in the spring of 1910, and he has also served 
as judge and inspector of elections. 

JAMES I. BROWNSON, member of the firm of Don- 
nans, Brownson & Miller, one of the leading law firms 
of Washington, Pa., has been in practice in this city 
throughout his professional career and has a wide ac- 
quaintance through the county. He was born at Wash- 
ington, Pa., in 1856, and is a son of Rev. James I. 
Brownson. 

Rev. James I. Brownson was a native of Franklin 
County, Pa., and in 1849 moved to Washington to accept 
the pastorate of the First Presbyterian Church, and 
he filled the pulpit of that church continuously for a 
period of 50 years, resigning Jan. 1, 1899. His death 
occurred July 4, 1899. He was an able, scholarly and 
conscientious man and lives in the memory of the people 
of this community. 

James I. Brownson, Esq., was reared in Washington 
and was educated in the public schools and in Washing- 
ton and Jefferson College, from which institution he 
was graduated in 1875. He registered as a law student 
with Alexander Wilson and was admitted to the bar in 
1878, since which time he has been in continuous prac- 
tice at Washington and with eminent success. He is a 
member of the Washington County and Pennsylvania 
State Bar Associations. He was president of the coun- 
cil of South Washington before it became a part of the 
city, and also served several terms as solicitor for Wash- 
ington County. He is a director of the Washington 
Trust Company; a member of the board of trustees of 
Washington and Jefferson College; a member of the 
Archaeological Tn.stitute of America; of the National 



HISTolfV OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



547 



tiwitfniphii'iil SiH'ioty; niiil of the Amcrii'iin Forrcstry 
As!<ociutiun. In roligioiii* iittncliiiu'iit, Mr. lirowiiHun i» 
a uieiiiber of tlio First Presbjterinu Cburc-li ami is soc- 
rotary of tlio Sunday school. 

CHARLES FRANCIS LINN, x\l. D., aiipcrintondeut 
of tbo Monungaliela Memorial HoHpital, is a native of 
Washington, I'a., vvhorc he was born August 20, 1874, 
and is a son of Alon/.o and Rebeeoa E. (Fulton) Linn. 

Prof. Alonzo Linn, the father of our subject, who 
was born in Butler County, Pa., came when a boy of 
twelve years to the vicinity of Monongahela where he 
was reared and later became an instructor in the Wash- 
ingtonJeftVrson College, in which capacity he served 
until the time of his (loath, September 24, 1901, at the 
age of seventy-four years. He is survived by his widow, 
Mrs. Rebecca E. Linn, a resident of Washington, and 
four children: George Thomas, Andrew M., Harry H., 
and Charles Francis, our subject. 

Dr. Charles F. Linn was reared in Washington, where 
he attended the Washington Preparatory School, later 
graduating from the college with the class of 1895. He 
then took a medical cour.se at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, from which he graduated in 1898 and spent the 
following year in the hospital at Pottstown. In October, 
1899, he came to Monongahela City, where he has since 
been engaged in the practice of his profession, in which 
he has been highly successful, his oiEee being located on 
Main street. He is a member of the W^ashington County, 
and the Pennsylvania Medical associations, and in poli- 
tics, is an adherent of the Republican party. 

On November 15, 1908, Dr. Linn was joined in mar- 
riage with Henrietta L. McKennan, who is a daughter 
of Dr. Thomas McKennan, of Washington, and their 
residence is located on the corner of Chess and Third 
streets. 

DAVID M. McCLOSKEY, one of the leading attorneys 
and city solicitor of Charleroi, Pa., who has been a resi- 
dent here for the past seven years, was born March 6, 
1879, in Elk County, Pennsylvania, and is a son of 
Frank P. and Jennie L. (Poland) McCloskey, both 
natives of the Wyoming Valley, near Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
The father of our subject is the manager of the Charleroi 
Real Estate and Insurance Company, and is one of the 
prominent business men of the city. 

David M. McCloskey was born in Elk County, Penn- 
sylvania, where his parents were visiting at that time, 
but was reared at Lock Haven, Pa., where he attended 
the common schools and graduated from the high school 
at the age of seventeen years. He graduated from the 
New York University with the degrees of L. L. B. and 
L. L. M., was admitted to the bar of New York City, 
and for one year engaged in the practice of his pro- 



fession in that city, but for the paat seven years hax been 
a resident of Charleroi, whore hu has been successfully 
engaged in the practice of law. He has for three years 
been city solicitor of Charleroi, is attorney for and 
director of many corporations, including the First Na- 
tional Bunk of Charleroi, the Charleroi Savings Sc Trust 
Company, Mercantile Bridge Company, Charleroi Lum- 
ber Company, Walton Lumber Company, and others. 
Mr. McCloskey has his offices on Fifth street. He is 
affiliated with the Elks, is a Knight Templar, Mason, 
and belongs to the Mystic Shrine, and is identified 
with the University and the Duquesne clubs, of Pitts- 
burg. His religious connection is with St. Mary 's Epis- 
copal Church of which he is one of the Vestrj-men. 

HON. JOHN BIRCH, deceased, was once one of Wash- 
ington County's most prominent citizens, serving in 
many offices of responsibility and ably representing his 
district in the State Legislature of Pennsylvania. He 
was born near Shippensburg, Cumberland Co., Pa., Au- 
gust 5, 1810, and was a son of William and Elizabeth 
(Mitchell) Birch. 

The paternal grandfather was John Birch and he was 
born in Ireland, but was of Scotch descent. He served 
twelve years as a soldier in the British Army. In bis 
native country he married Jane Bright and in 1801 they 
emigrated to America, settling first in Cumberland 
County, Pa., but later moving to Amwell Township, in 
Washington County. By trade he was a weaver and dur- 
ing his lifetime it was a fairly profitable one. His chil- 
dren bore the following names: William, Valentine, 
James, Jane, John, David, Thomas and Ann. 

William Birch, the eldest of the above family, became 
the father of John Birch. He was born at Belfast, Ire- 
land, February 3, 1788, accompanied his parents to Amer- 
ica thirteen years later and completed his school at- 
tendance in Cumberland County, Pa. He learned to 
weave and in his early business life was associated with 
a Mr. Campbell in the manufacture of cloth. In 1818 
he moved with his family to Amwell Township, Wash- 
ington County, settling on a farm but removing two 
years later to a farm in Canton Township, four years 
later to Buffalo Township, and in 1835 to Holmes County, 
Ohio. After the death of his wife, in 1844, he moved 
to Fulton County, 111., but returned to Ohio and resided 
at Birmingham until his decease, April 20, 1879. In 
politics he was an Old-line Whig and in religion he was 
a stanch Presbyterian. He married Elizabeth Mitchell, 
who was born in Cumberland County in 1791. a daughter 
of .lohn Mitchell, who, like John Birch, was of Irish 
birth but of Scotch ancestry. To William and Elizabeth 
Birch were born the following children: John, Mary, 
Williau\, David. George Bright, Thomas L., Drxisilla, 
Margaret J., Mitchell. Joseph and Elizabeth. 



548 



HISTOBY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



John Birch obtained his education in the common and 
subscription schools and when sixteen years old was ap- 
prenticed to John Sharp, a neighboring tanner, with 
whom he worked four years as an apprentice and one 
year as a journeyman. In 1832 he went to Claysville 
and after working for a short time for a local tanner, 
he opened a tannery of his own and conducted it for 
more than fifty years, at the end of that period retiring 
from active business. In politics he was a Jacksonian 
Democrat. Being a man of sterling integrity and pos- 
sessing intellect and education above the majority of his 
neighbors, was frequently called upon to accept oilScial 
duties. In 1848 he was elected a county commissioner 
and served three terms in that office; in 1860, was census 
enumerator in his section; served live terms as a justice 
of the peace and finally was elected to the State Legis- 
lature by a majority of more than 100 votes, and that 
in a strong Republican county. 

On May 5, 1835, Mr. Birch was married to Miss Har- 
riet Eeed, a daughter of James Reed. She was bom 
October 15, 1815, in Amwell Township, and died June 
14, 1877. To this union were born the following chil- 
dren: George W. F., born February 26, 1837, is a 
graduate of Washington and Jefferson College and is a 
Presbyterian minister; Francis A., bom April 26, 1840, 
a graduate of Washington and Jefferson College, died 
September 13, 1863 ; William T., born September 2, 1842, 
died February 4, 1864; Edward P., born February 1, 
1845, died in 1847; Henry B., bom January 9, 1849; 
John M., born July 7, 1851, was educated in Washington 
and Jefferson College; Elizabeth M., born June 1, 1854, 
married Rev. J. J. MeCarrell, of McKeesport; Thomas 
F., who is a prominent attorney at Washington; and 
Harriet J., who was born January 9, 1860, and married 
Frank T. Wray. On February 28, 1882, John Birch was 
married (second) to Miss Elizabeth Todd, of Beaver 
Falls, Pa. She was a daughter of Dr. Samuel P. and 
Susan (Kerr) Todd. Dr. Todd was a native of New 
York and his wife of New Jersey. He was a successful 
medical practitioner in New York for many years. Mr. 
Birch was a member of the Presbyterian Church and was 
a member of the board of trustees. 

Thomas F. Birch, the youngest son of the late Hon. 
John Birch, was born May 18, 1856. After complet- 
ing the classical course at Washington and Jefferson 
College, he prepared for the law and was admitted to the 
bar and has been identified with a large amount of the 
important legal business in the county courts for years. 
His offices are 208-210 Washington Trust Building. 



extraction. He was born in Hopewell Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., March 16, 1846, and is a son of Archi- 
bald and Margaret (Carlisle) Scott, the former a native 
of Hopewell Township and the latter of CarroU County, 
Ohio. 

Thomas Scott, the grandfather of Thomas, was a na- 
tive of Lancaster County, Pa., from whence he came in 
1812 with his parents to Washington County, settling in 
the woods of Hopewell Township, where his life was 
spent in agricultural pursuits. His son, Archibald, who 
died in May, 1908, also devoted his active life to farm- 
ing and stock raising, and was a prominent man in his 
day, serving as road supervisor and constable for a num- 
ber of years. Of the children born to him and his wife 
the following survive: Thomas; Rachel A., widow of 
Lemuel Liggett, of West Middletown, Pa.; Elizabeth J., 
widow of John Shaler, of Donegal Township ; Isabella, 
wife of John A. Kerns, of Pittsburg; James A., of Can- 
ton, Ohio; and Sarah M., of Wheeling, W. Va. Two 
children, Mary and Alvina, are deceased. 

Thomas Soott received his education in the district 
schools of his native township, and as a youth worked 
on his father's farm. His entire life has been spent in 
agriciiltural pursuits, and since 1888 he has carried on 
operations in Donegal Township, having located on his 
present fine farm in 1903. He has been successful in 
his efforts, and is ranked among the leading farmers of 
his township. 

Mr. Scott was married to Clara A. Barr, who was 
born in Buffalo Township, Washington Co., Pa., daughter 
of the late James Barr, formerly a well known citizen 
of Buffalo Township. To Mr. and Mrs. Scott the follow- 
ing children have been born: Joseph W., of Claysville, 
Pa.; Anna B., the wife of W. M. Rice, of Claysville; 
Fannie L., the wife of George Shaler, of Donegal Town- 
ship; William C, of Claysville; Rosa, wife of Alva Gar- 
rison, residing in Ohio County, W. Va.; Mary J., wife of 
Clinton Curtis, of Donegal Township; James A., residing 
in Ohio County, W. Va., Robert W., also of Ohio County; 
Ella, wife of Frank Howard, of Donegal Township; 
Ruth A., wife of Thomas Scott, of West Finley Town- 
ship; and Adda, deceased. 

Mr. Scott has served two terms as school director in 
Donegal Townsliip, and is known as a very public-spirited 
citizen. He is a member of Hopewell Lodge, No. 504, 
I. O. O. F., at Claysville, Pa., and he and his wife belong 
to the Christian Church. Mr. Scott was born on the 
farm on which the first Christian church in the United 
States was built, on Brush Bun, Hopewell Township. 



THOMAS SCOTT, one of the prominent agriculturists 
of Donegal Township, now operating an excellent farm 
of 102 acres, has been a resident of this township since 
1888, and comes of an old and honored family of Scotch 



HAROLD ALEXANDER HAMILTON, a progressive 
and enterprising young business man of Canonsburg is 
the junior member of the grocery firm of Marple & Ham- 
ilton, one of the newer business concerns of the city. 



iiisi'oifv OF \\asiiin(;t().\ county 



54i) 



He wiiB born at Lin<leii, North Strabiiiii' Tinvii»liip, Waah 
ington Co., Pa., ami is a son of .laiuew A. and Anna K. 
(Siininoy) Ilaniiltun. 

James A. Ilnniilloii. fntlKr cil ll:iriilil A., was born 
in 1857, in Noiliiigliiiiii 'rowiiship, Wasliington County, 
and is a son of Janios A. and Lucy (Bushyager) Uamil- 
ton, >vlio wore originally of Untlcr County. .lanu'S A. 
Hamilton the second, is a presperous farmer in North 
Strabane Township. He married Anna R. Sumney, a 
daughter of William H. and Kuth (Cianible) Sumucy, 
and they have five iliildren, iianiely: Kva A., who is 
the wife of Philip Templeton, of Oakmont ; Harold 
Alexander; Wallace ti., who is a farmer in North Stra- 
bane Township, nuirried Angelina L. DeVore; and Hallic 
W. and James Wray, both of whom reside at home. 

Harold Alexander Hamilton received a good public 
school education, leaving hi.x books in 1902, after gradu- 
ating from the \Va.sliiiigtun Business College. He worked 
on the farm and at the carpenter trade for some eigh- 
teen months and then turned his attention to merchan- 
dising, on March 15, 1909, becoming a partner with Les- 
lie G. Marple, under the firm name of Marjile & Hamil- 
ton, the two young men succeeding John W. Marple. The 
business is in a prosperous condition and the up-to-date 
manner in which it is conducted, together with the fine 
line of goods carried, has secured the liberal patronage 
of the public. Politically, Mr. Hamilton is a Repub- 
lican. Ho is a member of the Fairview Presbyterian 
Church. He belongs to a family noted for its longevity, 
his paternal grandparents living to be eighty-two and 
eighty-one years, respectively, and his maternal grand- 
parents to be ninety and eighty-two years. 

HUtill LEE, SR., a highly respected retired citizen of 
ne^ir Burgcttstown, Pa., who formerly carried on large 
agricultural operations in Cross Creek Township, where 
he still retains the ownership of two valuable farms ag- 
gregating 220 acres, was born in Cross Creek Township, 
Washington Co., Pa., in the residence now occupied by his 
brother, W'. Craig Lee, July 11, 1837. His parents were 
Maj. William and Jane (Craig) Lee. 

The first of this branch of the Lee family was Hugh 
Lee, who came from Ireland to America in 1789, and 
they first settled in the vicinity of Canon.sburg. He later 
purchased 219 acres of land of William McFarren in 
Cross Creek Township, this land being known as Holmes ' 
Victory. James Holmes made settlement in 1774, and 
received a Virginia certificate in 1780. A part of the 
tract was sold in 1808 to William McFarren, and he 
sold it to Hugh Lee as above related, and this tract is 
still owned by the Lee descendants. This pioneer lived 
here until his death about the year 1815, and his remains 
lie in the old burying ground at Cross Creek. He and 
hie wife Mary had a family of five sons and three daugh- 



ters, one. of whom, a Hon, Hugh Ivce, who wan bom 
in Ireland, was three years of ago at the time of the 
arrival of the family in this country. Ho was the only 
one of llie cliildreii to remain at home and at their 
deatluM he became the owner of the home farm. He mar- 
ried in 1H04, Hannah Urr, who was from Hollidays Cove, 
W. Va,, and they had a family of ten children. He re- 
mained on the home place until his death in 1837, and 
was survived many years by his widow who died in 1882, 
in the ninety-fifth year of her age. She was the last of 
the original members belonging to the Church of Cross 
Creek at the settlement of Kev. John Stoi'kton, D. D. 

Maj. William Lee was born on the home place in 
Cross Creek Township, in 1807, and his entire life was 
passed on this place, engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
He held a commission as major in the State militia from 
Gov. David R. Porter. He was an elder in the Cross 
Creek Presbyterian Church from 1858 until his death, 
his father and grandfather also having been elders of 
that church before him. He was married in 1836, to 
Jane Craig, eldest daughter of Hon. Walter Craig, of 
Cross Creek. They became parents of six children, three 
sons and three daughters, namely : Hugh Lee, subject of 
this record; Elizabeth Mary, widow of Hon. John N. 
McDonald; West Anna, deceased wife of R. V. Johnson, 
of Washington, Pa.; W. Craig Lee, who lives on the old 
home place; Hannah, widow of Samuel Sturgeon; and 
John S., who lives in Cross Creek Township. The death 
of Maj. William Lee occurred in 1888, and he was 
buried in the cemetery in Cross Creek, as was his widow, 
whose death occurred in 1890. Their golden wedding an- 
niversary was celebrated in 1886. 

Hugh Lee, the direct subject of this sketch, attended 
the district schools and then took a business course in 
Duff's Commercial College, at Pittsburg, where he was 
graduated. From the age of twenty-two years he has 
been interested in farm pursuits. For many years he 
gave much attention to the sheep industry and found it 
profitable. He was one of the organizers of the Wash- 
ington National Bank at Burgettstown and is a large 
stockholder. In his early politicjil life he was a WTiig, 
but when the Republican party was organized he became 
identified with it. On many occasions, Mr. Lee's fellow 
citizens honored him by electing him to responsible town- 
ship offices and he frequently served as a member of the 
board of education, as supervisor and judge of elections 
and for four years was school treasurer. 

In October, 1868, Mr. Lee was married to Miss Marian 
E. Stockton, who died in 1892. She was a daughter of 
Rev. Dr. John and Nancy (Clark) Stockton, of Cross 
Creek Township. They had two children: Nancy E. and 
Alvin C. Mr. Lee's only daughter resides at home. She 
attended school at Pittsburg and is a graduate of the 
Hollidaysburg Ladies' College, where she excelled in 



550 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



drawing and painting. The only son is one of the lead- 
ing physicians and surgeons of Mansfield, Ohio. He 
attended the district schools and Grove City College, 
where he was creditably graduated and then entered 
Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, where he gradu- 
ated with honors and was selected by his class as class 
poet. He remained as an interne in the Philadelphia 
Hospital for a year, and then took a post-graduate course 
in surgery. In 1900 he located at Mansfield and his 
advancement in his profession has been steady and sub- 
stantial. He there married Miss Hattie Niman and they 
have a little daughter of three years with the name of 
Marian. Mr. Lee and family attend the Presbyterian 
Church. 

MAJ. ANDREW GAEDNEE HAPPEE, a prominent 
resident of Washington, who has an honorable record 
for service in the Civil War, has been extensively en- 
gaged in the real estate and insurance business in that 
borough since 1871. He has been closely identified with 
the important interests of the county, has a wide circle 
of acquaintances, and stands high in the estimation of 
his fellow citizens. He was born in Union Township, 
Washington Co., Pa., August 15, 1839, and comes of a 
family which has long been established on American soO 
and in Washington County. He is a son of John Arrell 
and Violet (Gardner) Happer, and a grandson of Baptist 
and Ann (Arrell) Happer. 

John Happer, great-grandfather of the gentleman 
whose name heads this sketch, was born in 1745, and died 
August 25, 1818. He was married March 17, 1778, to 
Margaret Patton, who was born in 1753 and died May 
12, 1839. They had the following children: Andrew, 
born February 15, 1779; Agnes, born February 21, 1781, 
died August 23, 1850; Baptist, born July 15, 1783, died 
July 4, 1833; John, Jr., born January 14, 1786, died 
August 8, 1808; Jane, born May 16, 1789, died November 
24, 1791; Samuel, born June 14, 1791, died April 30, 
1812; and Jane, the second of the family to bear that 
name, was born September 11, 1793, and died November 
26, 1819. 

Baptist Happer was married September 27, 1808, to 
Ann Arrell, who was born in Pennsylvania, February 9, 
1784, and died at Mt. Hope, January 19, 1848. Their 
children were: Sarah, born September 11, 1809, became 
the wife of Eev. Thomas Gait and lived in Sangamon 
County, ni. ; John Patton, born March 16, 1811 ; Samuel, 
bom April 13, 1812, married Sarah Curry; John Arrell, 
born October 1, 1816; Andrew Patton, born October 20, 
1818, married Elizabeth Ball; James Edward, born Feb- 
ruary 2, 1821, married Mary Gardner; and Mary Jane, 
born June 12, 1823, married David Breading Arrell. 

John Arrel Happer was married May 10, 1838, to Miss 
Violet Gardner, who was bom March 24, 1818, and they 



lived in Union Township, Washington County, on the 
old homestead until their respective deaths, he dying in 
1890. The issue of their union was : Andrew Gardner, 
our subject; Anna Margaret, born October 14, 1841, 
who became the wife of Eev. John J. Beacom, a Pres- 
byterian minister of Allegheny County, Pa. ; Mary Belle, 
bom October 12, 1843, became the wife of Dr. George 
Chessman also of Allegheny County; James Breading, 
born June 25, 1846; Francis A., born January 10, 1848; 
married Emily Foster and lives in Mobile, Ala. ; Oliver 
Paulinus, born May 22, 1850; Sarah Elizabeth, born 
March 12, 1853; John WUner, born January 23, 1858; 
and EUa Blanche, born February 19, 1860. 

Maj. Andrew G. Happer received a superior education- 
al training in the district schools and Washington and 
Jefferson College, in which he matriculated in 1859. Be- 
fore the completion of his college course, his patriotism 
led him to forego his ambitions as a student, and in 
August, 1861, he enlisted in Co. K, 1st Pa. Vol. Cav. 
He was mustered into the service as a private, Septem- 
ber 6, 1861, and on March 11, 1862, was transferred to 
Co. G, 11th Pa. Vol. Inf., with the rank of first lieu- 
tenant; was promoted to captain of Co. I, of the 11th 
Pa. Vol. Inf. ; and was honorably discharged November 
7, 1865, with the rank of major. He was in many of 
the most important engagements of the war, and through- 
out his service was with the Army of the Potomac. Among 
the most important battles in which he participated 
may be mentioned the following: Thoroughfare Gap, 
Second Bull Eun, Chantilly, South Mountain, Antietam, 
Fredericksburg, the Wilderness, each one of which claimed 
its hundreds of victims. At Antietam, Maj. Happer 
was slightly wounded but nevertheless kept in the ranks, 
but was more seriously injured at the battle of the Wil- 
derness, on May 5, 1864, when he was not only taken 
captive by the enemy but received a wound from a bul- 
let which his body carries to the present day. Upon 
receiving his honorable discharge from the army he re- 
turned to Washington County and shortly afterward was 
appointed assessor of internal revenue, and, during his 
period in oflSce, from 1866 until 1871, he resided in Mo- 
nongahela City. He then returned to Washington where 
he has since lived, engaging at that time in the real es- 
tate and insurance business which he has continued and 
at present is the largest dealer in realty in Washington 
County. He is a director in the Washington Trust Com- 
pany and has other interests, having been active in de- 
veloping the oil fields in the vicinity of Washington, 
and has always done his full share and more in advanc- 
ing the welfare of the community. 

In 1878, Maj. Happer was married to Miss Matilda M. 
Watson, a daughter of James Watson, deceased, who for 
many years was a resident of Washingon. Maj. and 
Mrs. Happer occupy one of Washington's finest resi- 



u 




THOMAS .IKFFKK80N DUNCAN 



IIiyT()l{V OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



553 



(leiioos, a iiiiiguiflvent striictiiic nJ' (.'leveliiiul stone, wliii'li 
111- orectoj at No. 130 Kiist Whooliiig street. In politirs, 
Miij. Hiipiier Ims been u consistent Republioan. C'reilit 
is given liini for the siieuess llint luis attended the West- 
ern I'ennsylvimin Agriiuiltural Association, of which ho 
was secretary for ninny yetirs and in which ho was deeply 
interested. Ho is an honored member of Templetou Post, 
(jrand Army of the Kepublic, and of the Loyal Legion. 

KOBERT STKVENSON, an enterprising farmer and 
dairyman rosiiling on a farm of sixty acres in liobcson 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., was born July 16, 1837, 
on his present farm, and is a son of Robert and Sarah 
(Geary) Stevenson, and a grandson of William Steven- 
son. The parents of onr subject followed farming all 
their lives, and died on the liomc farm and were buried 
at Candor Cemetery. They were the parents of two chil- 
dren, Sarah, who makes her home with her brother, 
Robert, who is the younger. 

Robert Stevenson attended the district schools of 
Robe.son Township until fifteen years of age, when he 
went to work on the farm and has since been engaged 
in I'arniing and ilairying on the old home place. 

Mr. Stevenson was married April 8, 1869, to Martha 
Aten, a daughter of William and Sarah (Russell) Aten, 
wlio were well known farmers of Washington County, 
Pa., and the parents of the following children: Martha; 
Rachel, deceased; Jane, the deceased wife of Ephrlam 
May, 1908, was born January 16, 1881, in Washington, 
Voegle; Henry, who lives at Midway; and Elizabeth, 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Stevenson are the parents of 
the following children: Marietta, who lives at home; 
Sarah; Martha, married Charles Farrar and has one 
child, Robert; and John A., who is engaged in farming 
in Washington County, Pa. 

Mr. Stevenson is a Republican in politics, and served 
one term as assessor of the township. The family at- 
tends church at Candor. 

HUGH E. FERGUS, a well known and able attorney 
of Charleroi, Pa., who has been a resident here since 
Pa., and is a son of Samuel P. and Margaret (Weir) 
Fergus. 

The Fergus family originally came from Scotland and 
settled in Huntington County, Pa., where they attained 
considerable prominence. Samuel P. Fergus was born in 
Washington County, east of Washington, and was a son 
of Thomah Fergus. He was for many years one of the 
prominent farmers of the county, but subsequently re- 
moved to Washington, where he engaged in the oil busi- 
ness until the time of his death in June, 1900. His 
widow is still living and a resident of Washington, Pa. 

Hugh E. Fergus obtained his educational training in 



the )iul>lic schools of Washington and the Wushingtuu- 
.IcIlVrson College, from which be graduated in lOUO. 
He then entered the law departuicul of the Western 
University of Ponnsylvania, now known us tho Uni- 
versity of Pittsburg, and graduated in Jaw in 1907, 
ami in July of that year, embarked in tho practice of 
law at Washington, where he continued until May, 1908. 
Ho then camo to Charleroi, and ha« since been located at 
No. 511 Fallow-field avenue. 

Mr. Fergus is one of tho able and rising members of 
the legal profession of Charleroi, and possesses to the 
fullest e.\tent the confidence and esteem of his fellow 
men. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON DUNCAN, whose activity 
in the affairs of Washington, Pa., during the 34 years 
of his re.sidence in that city, has made him a prominent 
figure in the eye of the public, is a man of many parts. 
As an educator, lawyer and financier he has been success- 
ful, displaying those qualities of leadership and character 
which mark the highest type of citizenship. He is, at 
the present time, (A. D. 1910), senior member of the 
well-known law firm of Duncan, Chalfant & Warnc, with 
office at No. SO South Main street, and is president of 
the Real Estate Trust Company. 

Mr. Duncan was born at Bridgeport, Fayette County, 
Pa., Feb. 11, 1845, and is a son of Hon. Thomas and 
Priscilla (Stevens) Duncan, both of whom were of 
pioneer families in that county. His paternal grand- 
father, Arthur Duncan, was of Irish birth, but of Scotch 
descent, and after being engaged in the struggle for 
Irish freedom against England, left his native land for 
.-\merica late in the 18th century and took up his resi- 
dence in Fayette County, Pa., where he was employed 
at his trade as an iron worker at the forge of Dr. 
Stevens. There Hon. Thomas Duncan was born and in 
said county lived through a long and honorable career. 
He was, in early life, active as a politician and fre- 
quently was called into service as a public official, serving 
some years as commissioner of Fayette County, and 
for ten years as one of the judges of its courts. The 
declining years of his life were spent at the old home 
at Bridgeport, where he died at an advanced age. He 
married Priscilla otevens, whose death occurred in 1873 
at the age of about 66 years. Her father. Dr. Benjamin 
Stevens, emigrated from Maryland to Fayette County, 
Pa., at an early date and occupied a position of promi- 
nence in the community. In addition to caring for a 
large practice, he established and operated an iron 
forge. Thomas and Priscilla Duncan became parents 
of the following children: Sophia, deceased wife of W. 
H. Laning; Elizabeth, widow of William Worrell: Dr. 
W. S. Duncan, a physician and surgeon of wide repu- 



554 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



tation, who died in 1892 ; Arthur Duncan, who died in 
early manhood; and Thomas jellersou, whose name heads 
this sketch. 

Thomas Jefferson Duncan attended the graded schools 
of his native town, after which he studied under the 
tutelage of E. N. Hartshorn, a gentleman of scholarly 
attainments, who afterward became a professor in Mt. 
Union College, at Mt. Union, Ohio. At the age of 18 
years our subject began teaching school in Wharton 
Township, a mountainous region of Fayette County, and 
after one season thus engaged entered Mt. Union College 
to continue his intellectual training. The year of 1864 
marked a bitter contest in that institution between fac- 
ulty and students as to the authority of the former over 
the literary societies, and the result was some of the 
undergraduates were dismissed from the institution. 
Others, resenting the summary action of the faculty, 
voluntarily withdrew, and among the number was young 
Duncan, who with a friend, now the Eev. John H. Hart- 
man, entered Vermillion Institute, at Haysville, Ohio, 
a flourishing academy under the guidance of Eev. Sanders 
Diefendorf. Before the completion of his second year in 
the academy, his health failed and he was obliged to re- 
turn to his home and recuperate. In the spring of 1866 
he was sufficiently recovered to enter Washington and 
Jefferson College, at Washington, Pa., from which in- 
stitution he was graduated with the Class of 1868. Dur- 
ing his senior year he had served as teacher in the pre- 
paratory department of the college, and upon graduation 
was asked to accept a position as one of the instructors 
in the institution, but declined. His class was one of 
the largest ever sent out by his alma mater, and its 
enrollment included the names of many who attained dis- 
tinction in the various walks of life, among them: Prof. 
D. J. McAdam, Hon. H. J. Eckly, S. B. Fisher, James 
S. Moorhead, Eev. T. J. Sherrard, Eev. L. M. Gilleland, 
and Hon. W. B. Sutton. Upon leaving college he was 
chosen superintendent of schools in his native town, and 
during the two years he served in that capacity dis- 
played such ability as an instructor and executive as 
to attract attention and gain for him recognition in 
more important and remunerative fields. He was next 
elected to the otfiee of superintendent of schools at East 
Liverpool, Ohio, and while there effected a complete 
reorganization of the school system. The success of his 
work during the two years he remained there added 
largely to his reputation, but he resigned in order to 
prepare himself for the legal profession, his studies 
along that line having been begun while in college, in 
the office and under the direction of I. Y. Hamilton, 
Esq. The fall of 1872, however, found him back in the 
ranks from which he had so recently withdrawn; this 
time located at Pittsburg as principal of the schools of 
the loth and 17th Wards of that city. The progressive 



system of instruction he employed the decorum of his 
pupils in the various school rooms, and the success of his 
methods, were such as to excite comment and admiration 
and to bring many visitors from other schools. He was 
an enthusiast in all that pertained to educational mat- 
ters, became an active member of the College of Prin- 
cipals, a frequent instructor of Teachers' Institutes of 
Pittsburg and surrounding counties, a lecturer at the 
Teachers' Association, and an occasional contributor to 
the press on educational topics. Notwithstanding the 
great demand on his time by the duties of his position, 
Mr. Duncan, during his four years in Pittsburg, con- 
tinued his preparation for the profession of law and in 
the fall of 1875 was admitted to practice in the courts 
of Washington County. He subsequently was admitted 
to the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, and the various 
courts of the United States, as his business demanded. 
He embarked in practice at Washington, Pa., in 1876, 
and almost immediately gained public recognition by 
his activity on the stump during the memorable cam- 
paign in which Tilden and Hayes were rival candidates 
for the presidency . A forceful speaker, alert, resource- 
ful and of discriminating mind, he appealed to the 
reason of his audience, which he never failed to impress. 
The zeal and energy expended in the interests of his 
clients brought success and a more extensive clientage, 
and the condition soon existed where he was retained, on 
one side or the other, in much of the important liti- 
gation which came before the courts of the county. He 
has a large and well selected library of legal lore, works 
so essential for the preparation of briefs in appealed 
cases, a branch of his professional work in which he has 
been unusually successful. Although he has always been 
active in political campaigns, working hard for the suc- 
cess of his friends, he has steadfastly refused to run 
for office since the first year of his practice, when he 
was Democratic nominee for district attorney. In 1888, 
he was strongly importuned to run for Congi-ess and 
in his refusal went to the extent of telegraphing the 
Democratic Convention of the 24th Congressional Dis- 
trict. After a two days ' session in which his wishes were 
disregarded, he was nominated amid great enthusiasm of 
the delegates who believed his candidacy would bring 
party success at the polls. A committee of notification 
was appointed, consisting of James H. Hoover, of 
Fayette County; Joseph A. Skelly, of Allegheny; James 
Smith, of Greene; and John P. Charlton, of Washing- 
ton. Notwithstanding the flattering outlook for his 
election, Mr. Duncan, upon meeting with the committee, 
again voiced his refusal to accept the honor, assigning 
reasons of a personal and private character arising 
chiefly from a desire to devote his energies to the wel- 
fare of his family and business affairs. He prepared 
a letter of declination which was widely published and 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON' COUNTY 



555 



quotetl from, in which he gave uttorauce to some of the 
political principles for which he stood. Among other 
things he stated that "among his party associates he 
did not recall a single individual toward whom he en- 
tertained the slightest feeling of political animosity or 
whose advancement he would willingly impede in the 
least; that he united with unabated interest in the 
efforts of the people to maintain their liberties against 
the encroachments of power unjustly exercised whether 
manifesting itself in the form of monopolizing combi- 
nations and trusts, corporate aggregations or official 
usurpation; that he wius uncompromisiugly opposed to 
legislation in the interest of favored classes, to the 
squandering of the public domain, to oppressive and un- 
necessary taxation direct or indirect, and to the ten- 
dency during the past few years to a centralization of 
power in the administration of governmental affairs; 
and that he adhered to the principles of just government 
administered wisely and economically for the peace, 
safety and prosperity of its citizens as a whole, without 
preference or favor as to class, location, race, or other 
basis of distinction. ' ' 

Although his professional duties have claimed his at- 
tention first and foremost, Mr. Duncan has devoted 
much time to various business, benevolent and charitable 
organizations. He has served as director and vice- 
president of the Farmers and Mechanics National Bank 
of Washington; as a member of the Board of School 
Directors; trustee and chairman of the finance committee 
of the Dime Savings Bank of Washington ; chairman 
of the Board of Examiners of the Courts of the county; 
trustee of the Young Men's Christian Association; presi- 
dent of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals and Children ; curator and treasurer of the 
Citizens' Library Association; president of the Real 
Estate Trust Company, in which capacity he now serves; 
and in various other positions of trust and responsibility. 

In July, 1880, Mr. Duncan was united in marriage 
with Miss Eleanor Morris, a lady of high educational at- 
tainments and superior accomplishments. She was born 
in West Brownsville, Washington County, Pa., Dec. 11, 
1856, and is a daughter of Benjamin F. and Sarah J. 
(Miller) Morris. Paternally, she is of Quaker stock 
through both the Morris and West strains; and, not- 
withstanding their religious faith and consequent anti- 
pathy to bloodshed, numerous members of those fami- 
lies attained distinction in the Revolutionary struggle. 
The Morris family in America dates back to the early 
colonial days when David Morris emigrated from Wales, 
some time prior to 1685, at whiidi date he married ilary 
Phillipine. Their home was on the west bank of the 
Delaware River, below Philadelphia, and they reared a 
family of five children: David, Isaac, Elizabeth, Mor- 
decai and Jonathan, to whom many of the present day 



Morrises trace their lineage. The first of the family to 
locate in Washington County, Pa., was Jonathan, grand- 
son of David, first mentioned. He came shortly after 
the close of the Ittnolutionary War and took up his resi- 
dence among the Quakers in East Bethlehem Township. 
He brought his family with him, having previously mar- 
ried a sister of the celebrated early painter, Benjamin 
West, and a relative of Jonathan West, from whom was 
descended Judge William West, the famous blind orator 
of Ohio. Jonathan Morris died in 1788, and was sur- 
vived by four sons, three of whom, it is alleged, were 
in the Revolution. They were: Joseph; David, for many 
years proprietor of the widely-known Globe Inn at Wash- 
ington, Pa.; and Jonathan, who bore the rank of captain 
in the Continental Army, and is said to have organized 
and equipped a full company of soldiers at his own 
expense. He was wounded at the battle of Brandywine, 
and died at Fredericktown. Washington County, in 1838. 
Jesse, who was born in 1771, was the fourth son and the 
grandfather of Mrs. Duncan. On Apr. 12, 1789, Jesse 
Morris married Sarah Blackmore, who lacked one day 
of being 17 years old at that time, and they became 
parents of eleven children: Rebecca, Elizabeth, Mary 
Ann, Sarah, David, Almiia, Martha W., Benjamin F., 
Cynthia, Adelia M. and Jesse J. 

Benjamin F. Morris, father of Mrs. Duncan, was born 
in Washington County, May 3, 1809, and was for many 
years well known as a steamboat pilot and captain on 
the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. His career on the 
river was terminated about the time the Civil War start- 
ed, and at the time of his death, June 18, 1882, he was 
a resident of Fredericktown, in Washington County. 
A blue military cloak, which had been willed him by his 
uncle, Capt. Jonathan Morris of Revolutionary fame, and 
for which he had a peculiar affection, was at his re- 
quest made his burial shroud. Capt. B. F. Morris was 
married Aug. 15, 1842, to Miss Sarah J. Miller, who was 
born in February, 1825, and was a daughter of W. H. 
Miller. Her father was born in Barren County, Ky., 
in 1800, and died in Hart County, of that state, at the 
age of 82 years. His wife, Elizabeth, died at Louis- 
ville. Ky., in 1857. Mr. and Mrs. Miller were parents 
of five daughters: Mary E., Emily, Louisa, Julia and 
Sarah J. Capt. Benjamin F. Morris and his wife. Sarah, 
had the following offspring: Jesse J., who married 
Nancy E. Sharpneck; Mary E., who married first Leroy 
Hiller, and, after his death, W. W. Reeves; Adelia M., 
who died at the age of 2 years; Sarah Louise, wife of 
John Crumrine; L. Franklin, deceased, who married 
Jennie Cowden, and after her decease. Victoria Hendrix; 
William B.. who died in infancy ; Samuel, now deceased, 
who married Annie Reece; Eleanor, wife of Thomas 
Jefferson Duncan ; and uoreua M.. who was the wife 
01 John X. Stathers, and died Sept. 21, 1883. 



556 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Eleanor ilorris (Duncan) ^Yas two years of age when 
her pai-ents moved from West Brownsville to Jfrederiek- 
town, where she was a pupil in the public schools until 
their removal to Pittsburg in 1S69. There she attended 
school in tiie 17th Wai'd, and there formed the acquaint- 
ance of Ml-. Duncan, her future husband, who at that 
time was principal of the school. After completing her 
course in that school, she, at the age of 17 years, be- 
came a teacher in one of the schools of the 31st Ward of 
Pittsburg, and later in the loth Ward, where she con- 
tinued until her marriage in 18S0. During this time 
she held a professional certificate, received a teacher 's 
permanent certificate from the state, and was elected 
a member of the Pittsburg Academy of Teachers. She 
is a woman of great breadth of mind, a deep reader and 
well posted on current events, and an entertaining con- 
versationalist. Possessed of artistic talent, she devoted 
some time to art studies witu a view to her own pleasure, 
and has produced a number of oil paintings of merit. 
Mrs. Duncan was nonored by appointment to the Ladies' 
Auxiliary Committee of Pennsylvania for the World's 
Columbian Exposition, held at Chicago in 1S93, and 
rendered efiicient service in that capacity. 

Mr. and Mrs. Duncan reside in a beautiful home at 
No. 214 East Wheeling street, in Washington. They 
have but one child, a daughter, who married John H. 
Donnan, Esq., a son of John W. Donnan, an attorney 
of Washington, who is president of the Washington 
Trust Company and of the Citizens' jN'ational Bank of 
Washington. Mr. and Mrs. Duncan have been active 
in the work of the First M. E. Church, of which they are 
members. Mr. Duncan serves as a member of the board 
of trustees of this organization and was for many years 
custodian of its funds. 

JAMES DALLAS HOON, whose insurance and real 
estate oflBce is located in the Alexander Bank building 
at Monongahela City, Pa., has been a resident of this 
city since 1889, and is identified with various enterprises 
of this locality. He was born on a farm in Butler Coun- 
ty, Pa., August 23, 1845, and is a son of Samuel and 
Mary E. (Shanor) Hoon. 

Samuel Hoon was born in the eastern part of Penn- 
sylvania and when quite young came with his parents 
to Butler County, where he was reared on a farm and 
learned the carpenters' trade, at which he worked for 
many years. He erected many large barns through this 
section of the country and died in Butler County at the 
advanced age of ninety years. He married Mary E. 
Shanor, a native of Butler County, Pa., and a daughter 
of Daniel Shanor, who was one of the early settlers of 
that county. She died at the age of eighty-two years. 
Samuel and Mary Hoon became the parents of twelve 
children, as follows: Maria Ann, is the widow of Jesse 



Dutter; Mrs. Isabella Manda Burns is a widow; Edward 
L., who was a member of the 13th Pa. Eeg., in the 
Civil War, which was reorganized and was known as 
102d Pa. Eeg., lost a leg at the second battle of Wil- 
liamsburg; Matilda E., married John Dick; James Dal- 
las, the subject of this sketch; Mary E.; L. S., lives in 
Butler, Pa.; Harriet A., died aged thirteen years; Henry, 
whose death occurred in 1909, served in the Spanish- 
American War; Sarah, married Edward Seckler; George 
W., who died aged seven years; and Olive D., who is the 
wife of 0. Fish. 

James Dallas Hoon spent his boyhood days on his 
father's farm in Butler County, where he learned the 
carpenter's trade, and in 1865, in the last year of the 
Civil War, enlisted in Co. I, 7Sth Pa. Eeg., under Capt. 
Boggs and served until September of that same year. 
After the close of the war he was stationed a short time 
at Nashville, Tenn., then went to Ohio, where he first 
located at Warren and followed carpenter work and 
subsequently settled in Cleveland, where later he entered 
the employ of the National Milling Company, and in 
the second year was made head miller. He also oper- 
ated a mill at Minerva, Ohio, for three years and in 
1889 came to Monongahela City, where for one year he 
had charge of the mill for George & Co. Then, in part- 
nership with J. B. Hayward he rented and operated 
for 18 years the mill owned by George & Co., and when 
the railroad bought the property from the mill owners, 
he embarked in the insurance and real estate business, 
opening his present office in the Alexander Bank Build- 
ing. Mr. Hoon and Mr. Hayward also operated a coal 
mine near the Driving Park, where they owned a tract 
of 35 acres. Our subject later purchased his partner's 
interest in this business, and now has the land laid out 
in lots. Mr. Hoon is president of the Standard Eeal 
Estate Company of Donora, Washington County, is in- 
terested in oil lands in Butler County and owns stock 
in other enterprises of this locality. 

Mr. Hoon -was married Sept. 2, 1869, to Maggie C. 
Shaffer, of Warren, Ohio, a daughter of William and 
Catherine Shaffer, both deceased. Of their union were 
born two children, Jessie May, who died aged 10 years, 
and Leroy M., a student in the medical department of 
the University of Pa., at Philadelphia. Mr. Hoon and 
family hold membership with the Baptist Church in 
which he is a deacon. He is a member of the I. 0. O. F., 
Jr. O. IT. A. M., Eoyal Arcanum and the G. A. E., Stark 
Weather Post No. 60, of Monongahela City, of which 
he is quartermaster. He is a Democrat in politics and 
has served in the city council. 

EOBEET HOEACE McCLAT, a director of the First 
National Bank of Washington, Pa., and a well-known 
citizen, for many years was interested in farming, but 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



557 



has now practically retired from business and occupies 
an exceedingly comfortable home which is situated at 
No. 204 Jefferson ave., Washington. He was born in 
Canton Township, Washington Co., Pa., Jan. 12, 1850, 
and is a son of John and Jane (Welch) McClay, and 
a grandson of Samuel and Sarah (McClellan) McClay, 
the latter of whom were born in Ireland and were early 
settlers in Canton Township, Washington County. 

Robert H. MeClay was reared on the old homestead 
in Canton Township. In his boyhood his educational 
opportunities were somewhat limited, but later he ac- 
quired a good education through a course of reading 
and of absorption from those with whom he came in 
contact, who had enjoyed more advantages than had 
been afforded him. He followed agricultural pursuits 
during many years and resided on his well improved 
farm in Canton Township until he removed to Wash- 
ington. In addition to his farming interests he has been 
concerned in successful business undertakings, has made 
wise investments and is a stockholder and a director of 
the First National Bank of Washington. Mr. McClay 
has always evinced public spirit and has given active 
support to measures and enterprises which have been 
calculated to be of permanent benefit to borough and 
county. He is a man of integrity and kindness of heart 
and the majority of his acquaintances may be numbered 
with his friends. 

On Jan. 11, 1876, Mr. McClay was married to Miss 
Eachel \. Wright, a daughter of William Wright, of 
Buffalo Township, Washington County, and they have 
three children: Annie A., who married Samuel J. T. 
Hough, of Washington, Pa., and they have three chil- 
dren — Samuel Sheldon, William Robert and Sarah Mar- 
garet; John W., who married Anna Jeannette Knox, of 
Canton Township, and they have one daughter, Mary 
Jeannette; and Maggie M. The whole family holds 
membership in the United Presbyterian Church. Mr. 
McClay is a Republican, with a tendency to be inde- 
pendent in his views on public questions. 

WILLIAM J. MEHAFFEY. a representative citizen 
and prominent farmer and stocki-aiser in Donegal Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., is one of the largest land 
owners in the county, having 775 acres, 670 of these 
being in one tract, comprising the home farm. He has 
been a life-long resident of Donegal Township, born 
here May 25, 1868, and is a son of John and Elizabeth 
(Sawhill) Mehaffey. 

The father of Mr. Mehaffey was born in Donegal 
Township, Wa.shington County, where he died in 1908. 
His father, Robert Mehaffey, was born in Ireland, of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry, and came early to what is now 
Donegal Township, where he died in 1824. The late 



John Mehaffey was a man very highly respected. He 
carried on farming and stock raising all through his 
active life and then retired to Claysville. He married 
Elizabeth Sawhill, who was born in Blaine Township, in 
what was then a part of Buffalo Township, Washington 
County. The one survivor of their children is William 
J. They were worthy members of the United Presby- 
terian Church. 

William J. Mehaffey atteuded the schools of Donegal 
Township and also Duff's Commercial College at Pitts- 
burg, from which he was graduated in 1890. From 
youth he has been interested in agricultural pursuits 
and he owns enough land to satisfy his desire to raise 
bountiful crops and hundreds of head of cattle together 
with from 800 to 900 head of sheep, and at the same 
time to come into the market as an extensive grower 
of fine fruit. All his operations are carried on with 
the help of modern machinery and according to the 
very best known methods. 

In politics, Mr. Mehaffey is a Republican. He is 
serving in his fourteenth consecutive year as a school 
director in Donegal Township and is secretary of the 
board and is also secretary of the Board of Road Super- 
visors. For many years he has been a member of the 
United Presbyterian Church at Claysville and is one of 
the church trustees. He is a man who deservedly en- 
joys the esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens. 

DANIEL WILSON CRANE, a well-known citizen of 
Canonsburg, which has been his place of residence since 
1877, was born in Peters Township, Washington Co., 
Pa., June 22, 1852, and is a son of Caleb and Margaret 
(McLoney) Crane. 

The father of Mr. Crane was born in Allegheny Coun- 
ty, Pa., a son of Amos Crane. In association with two 
brothers, he worked at the ship building trade, con- 
structing many of the steamboats plying on the water- 
ways of Western Pennsylvania. Caleb Crane was mar- 
ried in middle manhood to Margaret McLoney, a daugh- 
ter of Luke McLoney, of Washington County. Her 
death occurred at Carnegie, Pa., in 1906, when aged 74 
years. Caleb Crane died almost a quarter of a century 
before, in Cecil Township, Washington County. His 
first marriage was to a daughter of Enoch Holland, of 
Allegheny County, who left one daughter at death, Mary 
Catherine, who married William Weaver. Ten children 
were born to his second union and the eldest of the 
family was Daniel Wilson Crane, of Canonsburg. The 
others were as follows: William Park, who resides at 
Carnegie; Esther Elizabeth; John, who died when 5 
years of age; Sadie Edith, Jennie Florence and Annie, 
all deceased, never married; David P., who resides on 
the old home place in Cecil Township, married a Miss 



558 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Manes; James Luke, who was aeeidentally killed by a 
railroad train at Canonsburg, left a widow; and Glenn 
Dickson, who resides at Carnegie, Pa., has a family. 

Daniel Wilson Crane attended the district schools in 
Peters and Cecil Townships. He is a well driller by 
trade and does a large amount of business all through 
the county. For more than 20 years this has been his 
main avocation. For two years he supplied Washington 
and Canonsburg from a drilled well which he discovered 
on his property at Canonsburg. This well is 200 feet 
deep and the chemist of the Board of Health of Pitts- 
burg, on analyzing it, declared its water the purest in 
the State of Pennsylvania. Naturally this water is in 
great demand. Mr. Crane owns several properties and 
is one of the borough's substantial citizens. 

In 1877, Mr. Crane was married (first) to Miss Uretta 
Hickman, who died iu June, 1899. She was survived 
by three children ; Margaret Edith, a highly educated 
and accomplished lady, formerly taught school at 
Canonsburg and is now connected with the schools of 
Wilkinsburg; Nancy Gail, who married Harry McCon- 
neU, of Canonsburg; and Howard Wilson, who is a 
student at Grove City College. In 1902, Mr. Crane was 
married (second) to Miss Jennie Norris, who was reared 
in North Strabane Township, near Canonsburg. One 
son, Norwood Norris, has been born to the second mar- 
riage. Mr. and Mrs. Crane are members of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Canonsburg, in which he is an 
elder. 

S. C. CUMMINS, postmaster at Cross Creek village 
and a prosperous business man of the place, belongs to 
an old family of Washington County. He was born in 
Cross Creek village, Sept. 17, 1854, and is a son of 
Alfred and Mary A. (Hay) Cummins. 

Mr. Cummins was educated in the village schools and 
has always resided here. He learned the business of 
painting and paperhanging and has continued in that 
line, finding his time sufficiently engaged with his busi- 
ness and his duties as postmaster, the latter of which 
he assumed in September, 1909. The business of this 
office is constantly increasing and Mr. Cummins is a 
man well qualified to handle it. 

In 1880, Mr. Cummins was married to Miss Margaret 
Wherry, who is a daughter of William Wherry. Their 
one child is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Cummins are mem- 
bers of the Cross Creek Presbyterian Church. In poli- 
ties Mr. Cummins is in accord with the present ad- 
ministration, but he lays no claims to being a poli- 
tician. He is a good citizen in all that the word im- 
plies and as such is a representative man of Cross Creek 
Township. 

GEORGE A. DOUGHERTY, M. D., deceased, was 
one of Washington's eminent physicians and surgeons. 



He was born iu County Derry, Ireland, Dec. 15, 1839, 
and died at Washington, Pa., Mar. 12, 1909, where he 
had been in continuous practice for 41 years. His 
parents were Edward and Lillie (AUender) Dougherty. 

The parents of Dr. Dougherty came with their chil- 
dren to America in 1840 and resided at Washington, 
Pa., until 1859, when they returned to Ireland. About 
the time of the close of the Civil War, Edward Dough- 
erty came again to the United States, and in 1866 his 
wife, son and daughter, Annie, joined him at Washing- 
ton. All died here, the death of the daughter occurring 
Dec. 8, 1908. 

George A. Dougherty had already made some progress 
in his medical studies and had received excellent literary 
training in the public schools and Washington College 
when he accompanied his parents back to Ireland. 
Shortly after his return to his native land came up the 
question as to where he should complete his medical 
training, and the great Glasgow University was chosen. 
In the classic shades of an institution which was estab- 
lished in 1450 and is an acknowledged repository of the 
learning of ages. Dr. Dougherty spent four full years 
and gained his coveted degrees of M. D. and C. M., 
graduating with the class of 1865. Taking advantage 
of both hospital and dispensary training. Dr. Dougherty 
remained one year longer at Glasgow, and then returned 
to Washington, as noted above. 

Dr. Dougherty was married on Jan. 14, 1880, to Miss 
Rebecca M. Clokey, and they had two children, a daugh- 
ter and son, of whom the former, Anna E., survives. 
She is the wife of W. G. Edmonds, of Washington, Pa. 
They have four children: Clarence George Dougherty, 
Margaret Rebecca, Walter Roy and Charles Raymond. 
In 1906 he erected his handsome, modern dwelling, 
which stands on the old homestead lot which was his 
place of residence during his whole life at Washington. 
At his office at No. 127 North Main street, he had a 
valuable library, in the selection of which he took much 
interest, and which contains many rare old English 
volumes, together with the apparatus generally utilized 
by the progressive men of science at the present day, to 
which class Dr. Dougherty belonged. With his family 
he was a member of the Second United Presbyterian 
Chui-ch at Washington. He belonged to the Washing- 
ton County Medical Association, and with his thorough 
training, his years of experience and his continued en- 
thusiasm for his science, he easily stood in the front 
rank among the medical men of Western Pennsylvania. 

SIMON WHITE, a leading representative of the 
business interests of Claysville. Pa., and the senior 
member of the firm of White & Son, manufacturers 
of paving material and of granite and marble monu- 
mental work, with the main plant at Claysville and a 




GE0KC4E A. DOUGHERTY, M.D. 




JOSEPH BRADFORD JOHNSON 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



561 



briincli at Wlioeliiig, \\". \'a., was Ijorii in Guernsey 
Couuty, Ohio, Sept. 24, 1844. He is u son of Alexander 
and Minerva (Reneliart) White. 

The father of Mr. White was born also in Washing- 
ton County, but the mother was a native of Waynes- 
burg, Greene County. For a number of years Alexander 
White engaged in the manufacture of head stones and 
monuments at Claysville, having learned the business 
from his father, also Alexander White. The first Alex- 
ander was the real founder of the business at Claysville 
and has been succeeded in the business by three gener- 
ations of his descendants. 

Simon White was about four years old when his 
parents brought him from Ohio to Claysville and here 
he attended school. When 18 years of age his father 
died and he took the responsibilities of the business 
on his shoulders and has continued in the same line ever 
since, making some changes and many improvements. 
The plant as it now stands was established at the pres- 
ent location many years ago and Simon White has been 
the practical head ever since. Constant employment is 
afforded 16 experienced and skilled workmen, and this 
is without doubt the most extensive business of its kind 
in this part of Pennsylvania. 

Mr. White was married (first) to Miss Elizabeth 
Bane, a daughter of Jesse Bane, of Washington County. 
This wife was survived by one son, William A. Mr. 
White was married (second) to Miss Mary A. Daugherty, 
who was born at Claysville, a daughter of the late 
Samuel Daugherty, and they have three children : 
Samuel, who is in partnership with his father, manages 
the business at Wheeling; Lorena J., who is a teacher 
residing at Homestead, Pa. ; and Harry L., who is em- 
ployed as a drug clerk, at Washington, Pa. In poli- 
tics, Mr. White is a Democrat and he has served as a 
director in the Claysville Independent School District. 
He is identified with Claysville Lodge No. 447, F. & 
A. M. 

ROBERT G. JEFFREY, one of Cross Creek Town- 
ship 's leading citizens and enterprising and successful 
farmers, was born on his present estate of 172 acres, 
situated in Cross Creek Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
Sept. 26, 1855, and is a son of Robert and Eliza (Rus- 
sell) Jeffrey. 

The father of Mr. Jeffrey was a substantial farmer 
of thLs section for many years. He was a man of quiet 
life and industrious habits and enjoyed the respect of 
his neighbors. He married Eliza Russell, who was a 
daughter of Andrew and Ann (McClelland) Russell, 
of Chartiers Township, and they had the following 
children; Anna Jane, widow of William Glass, lives in 
Mt. Pleasant Township; Mary Belle, deceased, was the 
wife of Matthew Acheson, of Smith Township; Sarah 



Klizabeth, wifo of J. M. McKitrick, of Cambridge, 
Ohio; Martha Agnes, deceased, wifo of Samuel A. Mc- 
Calmont, of Houston; Andrew Russell and Robert Gra- 
ham. 

Robert G. Jeffrey attended the public schools of 
Cross Creek Township with more or less regularity 
when farm work did not prevent, until he was 20 years 
of age, after which he cultivated the homestead farm 
for his parents and later obtained possession of it by 
purchase. For years he has engaged in raising sheep 
and general farming, and during the past two or three 
years has also engaged in dairying, shipping to Pitts- 
burg. Mr. Jeffrey has other investments and is a stock- 
liolder in the Hickory Telephone Company. 

On Jan. 1, 1879, Mr. Jeffrey married Mi.s8 Jennie 
McCalmont, a daughter of John and Mary Ann (Moore) 
McCalmont, of Mt. Pleasant Township, and they have 
five children, namely: Bessie D., who married C. M. 
Marquis, has a pleasant home in Cross Creek Township, 
and John R., Howard G., Clarence D. and Verner Lee, 
all reside at home. Mr. Jeffrey has given his children 
all the advantages in his power and his eldest son, John 
R., spent five terms at Grove City College, taking the 
engineering course. Mr. Jeffrey and wife are members 
of the Hickory United Presbyterian Church, of which 
he has been a trustee for a number of years. Like his 
father, he is a Republican and he has frequently been 
elected to township offices and has served acceptably 
as an election inspector, as a school director and as 
road supervisor. 

JOSEPH BRADFORD JOHNSON, a leading citizen 
of Canonsburg, whose fine brick residence is located at 
No. 248 West Pike street, was born in North Strabane 
Township, Washington County, Pa., Sept. 26, 1842, son 
of John and Rebecca (Van Eman) Johnson. 

John Johnson, father of Joseph B., was born in 1802, 
in North Strabane Township, where his father, Richard 
Johnson, had been a very early settler. A large part of 
John Johnson's life was spent at Canonsburg, where 
he died in 1884. He married Rebecca Van Eman, who 
survived him for about two years, dying at the age of 
76. Her parents were Joseph and Mary (Logan) Van 
Eman. To John and Rebecca Johnson three sons were 
born, namely: Richard Van Eman, who served in the 
Civil War and now resides at Washington (he married 
Anna Lee, a daughter of W'illiam Lee of Cross Creek 
Village) ; Joseph Bradford ; and John Gibson, now de- 
ceased, who is survived by his widow and three sons, 
who reside in Canonsburg. 

Joseph Bradford Johnson had just completed his 
sophomore year at Jefferson College when, in 1862. he 
enlisted for service in the Civil War, entering Co. G, 
140th Pa. Vol. Inf., and was attached to the Army of 



562 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



the Potomac. He participated in tlie battles of Chan- 
cellorsville and Gettysburg, and in October, 1863, was 
transferred to the Signal Corps, in which division he 
served until he was captured by the Confederates, Oct. 
28, 1864. The next three months and ten days of his 
life were passed most unpleasantly in the notorious Libby 
Prison, where he shared the hardships and sufferings 
of his unfortunate comrades who were confined there. 
Although paroled Jan. 22, 1865, he was unable to leave 
on account of ice in the river, and was thus compelled 
to remain until Feb. 5, 1865. He was then taken to 
Annapolis, Md., where he was given a furlough of 30 
days. On its expiration he returned to the front, but 
by that time Gen. Lee had surrendered and the war was 
virtually at an end. He was honorably discharged at 
Washington City. He had escaped death and wounds, 
but during his imprisonment he contracted scurvy, which 
gave him trouble for a long time. 

Mr. Johnson resumed his old occupations after he re- 
turned home and followed farming until 1900, purchas- 
ing his grandfather 's farm half a mile above Houston, 
this county. This farm he bought from William Quail, 
who had purchased it from Jefferson Patton, who had 
secured it from Mr. Johnson's grandfather. 

In 1867 Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Hannah 
Jane Crothers, a daughter of Samuel J. and Jane 
(Brownlee) Crothers. Three children were born to this 
marriage, namely: Ella Maud, who became the wife of 
Eev. Charles G. Williams, a Presbyterian minister, now 
in charge of the Hyde Park Church of Denver, and who 
has two children, Bradford Ealston and Jay; John 
Tracey, who still operates the home farm; and Charles 
Crothers, who is president of the Citizens ' Trust Com- 
pany, of Canonsburg, and who married Miss Grace Hen- 
derson. 

Mrs. Hannah J. Johnson died in October, 1897, and 
Mr. Johnson married Miss Anna M. Harper, April 4, 
1900. Mrs. Johnson is a daughter of Robert J. and Eliz- 
abeth R. (Henderson) Harper. Her father, who resides 
in Canonsburg and is now 80 years old, was during bis 
industrial period an engineer in the employ of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad. Mrs. Johnson 's mother was a daugh- 
ter of Matthew and Mary (Hutchison) Henderson, and 
a great-granddaughter of Rev. Matthew Henderson, a 
pioneer Seceder minister, who was among the early set- 
tlers of this section, coming here in the days of the Eev. 
John McMillen, or about the last decade of the 18th 
century. Mrs. Johnson's maternal grandmother, Mary 
(Hutchison) Henderson, was a daughter of John Hutchi- 
son, one of the early settlers of Canonsburg, the west 
end of the present town occupying the site of his farm. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Harper had ten children, four 
of whom grew to maturity; Anna, Elizabeth, Ella and 



Eva, the last mentioned being the wife of C. W. Camp- 
bell, of Canonsburg. 

The subject of this sketch is a member of Chapter 
No. 1, of the Union Veteran Legion, at Pittsburg. He 
is interested in several business enterprises and is a di- 
rector of the Citizens ' Trust Company, of Canonsburg. 
For many years he has been united with the Central 
Presbyterian Church and is now serving as one of its 
elders. His opinions on public questions make him a 
strong supporter of the Republican party. 

JOHN McCLAY, deceased, once a substantial farmer 
and respected resident of Canton Township, Washington 
Co., Pa., was born there in 1809 and was a son of 
Samuel and Sarah (MeCleUan) McClay. 

Samuel McClay was born in Ireland and from that 
country he came to America in boyhood, making the 
long voyage in a sailing vessel. He found a home and 
employment in Chester County, Pa., where he subse- 
quently married Sarah McCleUan, who was also a native 
of Ireland. Some years after their marriage they came 
to Washington County and established their home in 
Canton Township, where Samuel McClay died in 1838 
and his widow in 1842. 

John McClay grew up on the home farm in Canton 
Township. His schooling was limited, there being few 
advantages offered the children in Canton Township at 
that day. He was, however, gifted with a large amount 
of practical good sense, had the energy that enabled him 
to overcome many obstacles and in the course of years he 
became one of the township 's most prosperous citizens. 
He was for many years a director in the First National 
Bank of Washington. Mr. McClay was married (first) 
April 26, 1838, to Miss Jane Smith, who died shortly 
afterward. He was married (second) Sept. 15, 1841, 
to Miss Jane Welch, a daughter of Eobert Welch, and 
they became the parents of four children, namely: 
Sarah, widow of W. A. Morrison; and William W., 
John H. and Eobert H. In 1857 he married Sarah 
Taggart and after her demise, he was united to Mar- 
garet Brownlee, who was a daughter of James Brown- 
lee, a pioneer of Washington County. He was identified 
with the Covenanter Church until 1858, when he be- 
came connected with the United Presbyterian. Early 
in life he was a Whig, later became a Eepublican, but 
in the closing years of his life the cause of Prohibition 
claimed his allegiance. He died in January, 1895, on 
his farm in Canton Township. 

J. B. HENDEESON, proprietor of the Valley Stock 
Farm, which contains 236 acres, situated in Smith 
Township, Washington County, was born in Chartierg 
and is a son of James L. Henderson. 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



563 



Mr. llt'iidersoii 'b early aclioul days wore passed in 
Chartiers Tovvuahip and Canton Township, both in 
Washington County, and later he took a eonimercial 
course in Duff 's Business College at Pittsburg, after 
which ho settled down to farming with his father. After 
marriage, in 1892, ho located in Washington and began 
to deal in stock and finding profit in the business has 
continued until the present. In 1901 ho settled on his 
farm in Smith Township, where he niado all the im- 
provements which became necessary when ho went ex- 
tensively into the stock business. He has two sets of 
farm buildings and erected one set after taking charge 
of his property. This is known as the Valley Stock 
Farm, where Dorset sheep and Holstein cattle are bred 
from imported stock. He exhibits his fine stock at 
different points yearly and made a noted showing at 
the Chicago International Exposition in 1905. 

In November, 1892, Mr. Henderson was married to 
Miss Lulu Buchanan, a daughter of J. S. Buchanan, of 
Hickory, Washington County, and they have one son, 
James Raymond, who is attending school in Smith 
Township. Mr. Henderson and family arc members of 
the First United Presbyterian Church at Burgettstown, 
in which he is an elder. In politics he is a Republican 
and at different times he has been elected to important 
township offices, serving at present as commissioner and 
formerly was a justice of the peace. He is one of the 
county 's best known representative and reliable citi- 
zens. In his efforts to improve the grade of stock in 
Washington County, he haa benefited all those who do 
business in the same line. 

GEORGE W. RISBECK, Burgess of Charleroi, Pa., 
who deals in real estate in a general way, and has 
charge of a large insurance agency, has been a resi- 
dent of Charleroi since 1902. He was born Oct. 25, 
1869, on a farm near Brownsville, Fayette Co., Pa., 
and is a son of John M. and Nancy J. (Hess) Risbeek. 

George W. Risbeek was reared on his father 's farm, 
and after completing his education, which was obtained 
in the district schools and the Merrittstown Academy, 
he taught the district schools of that locality for nine 
years. He then worked four years in a hardware store 
in Brownsville, Pa., and since coming to Charleroi in 
1902, has been engaged in the real estate and fire in- 
surance business, having established a business of his 
own three years ago, making a specialty of fire insur- 
ance, although he also handles life, health and accident 
insurance. He represents the Pittsburg Underwriters; 
the Westchester Fire; the Williamsburg City Fire; the 
Hamburg-Bremen and the Travelers' Insurance Com- 
pany, a life, accident and health company. Mr. Ris- 
beek has been a notary public for about four years. 



and his oflict-s are located at No. 427 McKean avenue. 
In politics he is a Democrat, and has been burgess of 
C hurleroi since March 1, 1909. 

Mr. Risbeek was married in 1895 to Annie VanKirk, 
of Fayette County, Pa., and they have one child, Hallie, 
who is 13 years of age. He is fraternally, a member 
of Charleroi Lodge No. 494, Benevolent Protective Or- 
der of Elks, and has been secretary of his lodge for the 
past five years, and is also a member of tho Royal Ar- 
canum and the Maccabees. 

GEORGE T. WALKER, a member of the firm of 
Walker & Slater, is one of Washington's representative 
citizens, identified with many of her large business en- 
terprises and for years prominent and useful in public 
life. Mr. Walker was born at Washington, in 1854, and 
is a sou of Thomas Walker and a grandson of George 
Walker. 

George Walker was born in Ireland and came to 
Washington County among the hardy early pioneers. 
His son, Thomas Walker, was born in Washington 
County, in 1822, and was one of the early contractors 
and earnest politicians of Washington, and through his 
energy and public spirit, became a man known over 
a wide territory. 

George T. Walker was reared and educated at Washing- 
ton) graduating from her High School in the class of 
1870, following which he attended Washington and Jef- 
ferson College for two terms. After he completed his 
education, he learned his trade with his father and in 
1885 was admitted to partnership, under the style of 
Thomas Walker & Son, this being terminated by the 
death of his father in the following year. In 1887 the 
present firm was established, C. M. Slater becoming a 
partner, and this is now the oldest and one of the 
mo.st prominent contracting firms in Washington, in 
the general line of mill work. Mr. Walker is a director 
in the Union Trust Company; is president of the Wash- 
ington Ice Company; is treasurer of the Capitol Paint, 
Oil and Varnish Company, and is a stockholder in sev- 
eral other enterprises. Mr. Walker has been very ac- 
tive in local politics for a number of years and his use- 
fulness and efficiency have been proved during the time 
he has held public offices. He has served acceptably on 
the School Board, in the city council, of which he has 
been president, and also served one term as burgess. 
He is a Thirty-second degree Mason and belongs also 
to the Elks. For a number of years he has been united 
with the First United Presbyterian Church. 

THOMPSON MARTIN DOUGLASS, a representa- 
tive business man of McDonald, now conducting and 
managing a milk, butter and egg business at this place, 



564 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTOlSr COUNTY 



was born near Venice, Washington Co., Pa., Mar. 9, 
1848, and is a son of Robert and Nancy (Thompson) 
Douglass. 

Robert Douglass was a citizen of Washington County 
all his life. He was a stone mason by trade and as- 
sisted in the construction of many buildings, walls and 
bridges all over this section. He married Nancy Thomp- 
son and they had four children, namely : Eliza Jane, 
who is now deceased ; John Allen, deceased ; Sarah, who 
was the wife of William Scott, is also deceased; and 
Thompson Martin, the youngest and the only survivor. 
The parents were members of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 

Thompson Martin Douglass attended school until he 
was about 14 years of age, when he learned the trade 
of a stone mason and Mr. Douglass followed this trade 
for about ten years. He then went into the bakery 
business at McDonald, in which he continued until 
1900, when he retired for four years. 

In 1905 he entered into the milk, butter and egg 
business, in which he has since been engaged. 

On Oct. 18, 1871, Mr. Douglass was married to Miss 
Julia McCausland, a daughter of James and Elizabeth 
(Flake) McCausland. The McCauslands came from 
Butler to Washington County and they were parents of 
the following children: Beatrice, deceased, was the wife 
of L. B. Quinn; and John, Catherine and Julia. Seven 
children w-ere born to Mr. and Mrs. Douglass, three of 
whom died in infancy. The survivors are: Robert, a 
foreman for the Nocola Building Company of Pitts- 
burg; John A., who is engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine at McDonald; Bessie, who is the wife of M. S. 
Moorhead, a furniture dealer at McDonald, and Leon, 
who is a druggist. Mr. and Mrs. Douglass are members 
of the First United Presbyterian Church at McDonald. 
In his views on public questions, he is a Prohibitionist. 

Dr. .John A. Douglass of the above famUy, was born 
at Allegheny City, Jan. 12, 1874. He was educated in 
the public schools at McDonald and Ingleside Academy, 
going from there to Duquesne College and in 1892 en- 
tered Hahnemann Medical College, at Philadelphia, 
where he was graduated in 1896. He has built up a very 
substantial practice at McDonald. 

HARRY BROWN SIMPSON, who is secretary of the 
Monongahela Clay Manufacturing Company, extensive 
manufacturers of various kinds of brick, has been ideti- 
fied with the business interests of Monongahela City 
since 1902. He was born Feb. 20, 1877, at Pittsburg, Pa., 
and is a son of James M. and Sarah C. (Brown) Simp- 
son, the former of whom died in 1902, at Pittsburg, 
where for many years he was engaged in the real estate 
business. The mother is still living. 

Harry B. Simpson grew to manhood in Pittsburg, 



where he obtained his educational training in the com- 
mon schools, after which he entered the employ of H. 
Lloyd & Sons Company, who were the pioneer iron man- 
ufacturers of Pittsburg. He was subsequently engaged 
with the Shoenberger Steel Works of Pittsburg, which 
position he resigned in 1902, when he came to Monon- 
gahela City as secretary and manager of the Monon- 
gahela Clay Manufacturing Company, which concern 
was organized by a Pittsburg company which sold the 
plant in 1903 to the present company, of which Samuel 
M. Downer is president; P. K. Alexander, treasurer, 
and H. B. Simpson, our subject, secretary and manager. 
The plant, which is finely equipped with the latest de- 
vices and machinery for brick-making, covers a tract of 
14 acres, and is located about one mile south of Monon- 
gahela City on the M. W. branch of the P., V. & C. 
R. R. The company, whose offices are located in the 
Alexander Bank Building, employ an average of 50 men 
at the plant, where they produce 60,000 brick per day, 
manufacturing face brick, hollow brick and paving 
brick. 

Mr. Simpson was united in marriage Nov. 25, 1895, 
with Bessie J. Hughes, a daughter of W. L. Hughes, of 
Pittsburg, and of their union have been born three chil- 
dren: Harold, Kenneth and Mildred. Mr. Simpson and 
family reside in a pleasant home located on the corner 
of Meade and Coal streets. Mr. Simpson is fraternally 
affiliated with the B. P. 0. E. of Monongahela City, and 
his religious connection is with the Presbyterian Church. 
He is politically identified with the Republican party. 

LODOWICK McCARRELL, deceased, for many years 
was a prominent member of the Washington County bar. 
He was .born in Mt. Pleasant Township, Washington 
Co., Pa., Feb. 2, 1842, and was a son of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (McCounaughy) McCarrell. 

His paternal grandfather, Lodowick McCarrell, was 
a native of Ireland, who, coming to America, in 1780, 
secured a large tract of wild land lying in what is now 
Mt. Pleasant Township, Washington County, his place 
of residence being near Ten-Mile and Hickory. Here 
this pioneer ancestor of our subject rounded out a long 
and useful life, dying in 1851, after he had passed his 
84th birthday. A large part of his land had been cleared 
and made tillable by his own industry. Lodowick Mc- 
Carrell was an elder in the Seceder Church. He married 
Martha Leman, who was a daughter of that old pioneer, 
John Leman, who shared with Andrew Eagleson, the 
honor of being the first settler in Canton Township. 
They had seven children, namely : John, Thomas, James, 
Andrew and Leman, all of whom died in mature life; 
Isabella, who was the wife of Isaac Hodgens, of Buffalo 
Township ; and Elizabeth, who was the wife of John 
Cockins, of Mt. Pleasant Township. 



..'.RY 



LENOX AND 
i-Difi FOUNDATIONa 




-J^ 



'7 



c::^^ 6^ 




HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON' C'OIXTY 



567 



Thomas McCiurell, sci'oiul scm of Lodowick ami Mary 
(Leinan) McCarrell, was born in Virginia, in 1801, but 
the greater part of his life was spent in Washington 
County, Pa., where he became a man of prominence. 
He was elected a county commissioner on the Democratic 
ticket in 1853. For five years he served also as associate 
judge and for seven successive terms was a justice of 
the peace in Mt. Pleasant Township. He was thrice 
married: first, to Esther McJCary, who died in 1S31; 
second, to Elizabeth McC'onnaughy, who died in 18.59; 
and for the third time, to Margaret Martin, in 1863, who 
survived him many years, dying in 1890. The children 
of his first union were: Martha, who died at Hickory, in 
1893; Margaret, who married Joseph Cowden and died 
in Cecil Township, near Venice; John, a physician at 
WollsvlUe, Ohio, who died in January, 1891; and .laiuos, 
who was a practicing physician at Allegheny. Pa. The 
children born to the second marriage were the follow- 
ing: David M., who was a physician and died in 1894 
in Hickory; Leman, who resides on the old homestead; 
Alexander D., who is a minister in the United Presby- 
terian Church located at Trafiford City, Pa., and Lodo- 
wick. Thomas McCarrell died in 1872. Like his father 
he had been active in the affairs of the Seceder Church. 

Lodowick McCarrell, the direct subject of this sketch, 
spent his boyhood on his father's farm, attended the 
country schools, and later entered Washington and Jef- 
ferson College, where he completed the classical course. 
His father 's prominence in public affairs served as a 
stimulus to his own ambition, and early in his school 
career, he decided to take up the study of law. Accord- 
ingly on leaving college ,in 1867, he entered the law 
office of Montgomery & Wilson, and in 1869 he was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Washington County, in the follow- 
ing year opening his law ofSce in the borough of Wash- 
ington. He was soon recognized in the profession as 
a man of marked ability and his subsequent success 
was uninterrupted, his name being associated for years 
with much of the important litigation in the courts of 
the county. He was possessed of an engaging person- 
ality, which contributed much to his popularity both in 
his profession and in business and social circles. Al- 
though an active supporter of the Democratic party he 
took greater interest in the successful practice of law 
than in the strife for political honors. In the midst 
of his usefulness, he was called away on April 23, 1902, 
and was laid to rest in the Washington Cemetery. 

On .July 25, 1876, Mr. McCarrell was married to Miss 
Lida Jackson, a daughter of Robert Jackson, and to 
them one son was born, Robert Lodowick. The latter 
is a prominent figure in the financial circles of Wash- 
ington, having served for several years as assistant 
ca.shier of the First National Bank, and being at the 
present time auditor of the Washington Trust Company. 



an ollice he lias filled since -May 18, 1908. He married 
Miss Elizabeth McClane, a daughter of Wilson McClaue, 
a resident of Washington County. They have one daugh- 
ter, Jane Dinsmore. They reside in one of W'ashing- 
ton's handsome residences, at No. 345 East Wheeling 
street. 

WILLIA.M K. \VI1IT1I.\.\1, president of the West 
Alexander National Bank at West Alexander, Pa., is 
one of the representative men of Washington County, 
where his interests are numerous, and he is also a vet- 
eran of the great Civil War. He was born in Ohio 
County, W. Va., Oct. II, 1843, and is a sou of George 
D. and Rachel (Faris) Whitham. 

The Whitham family is of English extraction. Joseph 
Whitham, the grandfather, was deemed an old resident 
of Ohio County, W. Va., when William F. was a youth, 
and both his parents were born and reared there. 

From the schools of his native place, William F. 
Whitham became a student in w-hat was known as the 
West Alexander Academy, and then entered into an 
agricultural life. His father died in 1861, and on Aug. 
14, 1862, Mr. W'hitham left the farm and enlisted in 
Co. D, 12th West Va. Vol. Inf., and served until his 
honorable discharge in June, 1865. During much of 
this time he was attached to the Army of West Vir- 
ginia, which later became the Army of the James, and 
during the whole winter before the surrender of Rich- 
mond, he was with his regiment in front of that be- 
leaguered city. He is a valued member of James Noble 
Post No. 348, G. A. R., at West Alexander, of which 
he had the honor of being elected the first commander. 
Mr. Whitham returned to his farm industries and for 
a number of years gave nuich attention to raising fine 
stock and in particular to breeding sheep for wool. In 
1902 he came to West Alexander and since August, 1907, 
has been president of the National Bank at this place, 
which is regarded as one of the sound and solid finan- 
cial institutions of the county. 

On June 2, 1892, Mr. Whitham was married to Miss 
Nina Armstrong, who was born in what is now West 
Pinley Township, Washington Co., Pa., and is a daugh- 
ter of the late William Armstrong. Mr. and Mrs. Whit- 
ham are members of the Presbyterian Church at West 
Alexander, in which he is a ruling elder. In his views 
on public questions he is soemwhat independent, although 
nominally a Republican. 

FRANCIS MARION FINLEY, a highly esteemed 
member of one of the prominent old families of Union 
Township, Washington County, Pa., now lives retired at 
Finleyville, a pleasant town which was named to do 
honor to Gen. Robert Finley, an uncle of Dr. Finley, 
who was its founder and first postmaster. Dr. Francis 



568 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



M. rinley was born in Union Township, on the banks 
of the beautiful Monongahela River, Mar. 7, 1833, and 
is a son of Levi and Eachel (Neal) Finley, and a grand- 
son of John Finley. 

John Finley was probably born in Ireland and he came 
very early to Allegheny County, Pa., where he acquired 
large tracts of land and also much land in Union Town- 
ship, Washington County. He married Margaret Roland 
and they had sons and daughters, the former bearing 
the following names: Robert, James, WUliam, John and 
Levi. 

Levi Finley, father of Dr. Finley, was born, in a log 
house on his father's farm in Allegheny County, and 
he, like his father, led an agricultural life. He came 
to Washington County in early manhood and is accorded 
the credit of being the first coal miner in this valley, 
taking the coal from a mine of his own, at Limetown, 
and later he became a coal operator on a much larger 
scale. After the death of his eldest brother, Robert 
Finley, he moved to the home in Finleyville, which is 
now the property of Dr. Finley. He married Eachel 
Neal, who was reared at McKeesport, Pa., and they both 
died in FinleyvUle and were interred at Mingo. They 
had the following chDdren; Melissa, who is the widow 
of Capt. H. B. Wallace; Miranda, who married Eev. W. 
W. Laverty and both are deceased; John, who is now 
deceased ; Francis M. ; and itaohel, who is deceased, was 
the wife of John Collins. 

Francis Marion Finley was small when his parents 
moved to the Huston farm in Union Township, and 
from there to Finleyville, and here he attended school 
and later went to Washington College, from which he 
was graduated in 1854. He decided to study medicine 
and prepared for college under Dr. C. W. Townsend, of 
Union Township, entered Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, and was pursuing his studies there when 
his father died. This recalled him home and he then 
took charge of the home farm of 250 acres, and to its 
cultivation he devoted the remainder of his active years. 

In September, 1869, Dr. Finley was married to Miss 
Emeline Thompson, who died in 1907. They had one 
son, Frank H. Follow'ing in the footsteps of his honored 
father, he also studied medicine and is a graduate of the 
college of Physicians and Surgeons, at Baltimore, Md., 
but he has never entered into active practice. His home 
is with his father and he is interested in the manage- 
ment of the farm. Dr. Finley, the elder, is identified 
with the Republican party. 

JAMES P. SPEER, a leading citizen of Canonsburg 
and an honored soldier of the late Civil War, who has 
served two terms as commander of Thomas Paxton Post, 
G. A. R., and has also been post quartermaster £or six 
years, has had his home in this section of Washington 



County almost all his life. He was born in Chartiers 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., three miles from Canons- 
burg, and is a son of Robert and Nancy (Harsha) Speer. 

The father of Mr. Speer was born in Peters Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., Sept. 18, 1806, and was a 
svool carder by trade. One of his brothers, Thomas 
Latta Speer, was a minister and preached at the Cross 
Boads Presbyterian Church. Another brother, James, 
lived and died in the old homestead in Peters Township. 
One sister, Mary, married Paul Matthews, another sister, 
Jane, married Richard Black and she died in Pittsburg, 
while the third sister, Deborah, married a Mr. Wells. 
He married Nancy Harsha, who was born in Chartiers 
Township, Washington County, May 3, 1813, and died 
Feb. 17, 1903. She was a daughter of Thomas Harsha, 
who was a very early settler in Chartiers Township. At 
that early day one of the common farm industries was 
distilling and Mrs. Speer remembered that in her girl- 
hood she could stand on the porch of her home and 
count the smoke going up from 13 distilleries. She 
was one of a family of 13 children and became the 
mother of seven. Thomas Speer, born Oct. 5, 1839, died 
Nov. 19, 1861. Jennie Speer, born Aug. 3, 1841, married 
William Patterson, Aug. 22, 1860, and they reside in 
Cecil Township. James F. Speer, born Aug. 12, 1843, 
resides at Canonsburg. Robert Speer, born July 14, 
1845, enlisted in Co. G, 140th Pa. Vol. Inf., and died 
in the service, during the Civil War, Feb. 19, 1865. 
Stewart Speer, born Apr. 15, 1847, went to Missouri and 
there married a Miss Barmer and died there Apr. 14, 
1873. He is survived by two sons, Stewart and Edward, 
the former of whom lives at Carthage, Mo., and the 
latter at Kansas City. Alexander Speer, born Aug. 22, 
1849, married Eliza J. Wallace and resides at Canons- 
burg. Catherine Speer, born May 13, 1852, married 
Joseph Templeton and resides in North Strabane Town- 
ship. The father of this family died June 11, 1853. 

James F. Speer attended the old Fee School in Char- 
tiers Township, which was a typical pioneer temple of 
learning, having slab seats, puncheon floor and plenty of 
ventilation. During one winter, when he was about nine 
years old, he attended the McNary subscription school. 
He remained on the farm until the opening of the Civil 
War, when In answer to the call of the President every 
town, village and country side sent its quota to swell 
the ranks of a loyal people. The Speer family con- 
tributed two sons, Robert and James F., both of whom 
were wounded and only one of whom ever returned. 

Mr. Speer enlisted in 1861 in Co. B, 85th Pa. Vol. 
Inf., enlisting for three years. At the battle of 
Fair Oaks, a struggle covering seven days, he was first 
wounded, and at Deep Bottom, he was shot through the 
shoulder, and all through the whole period of service un- 
til he was honorably discharged on Aug. 16, 1864, he 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



569 



bore himself in tlio I'ai'C of dnilv danger, aa a brave 
and loyal soldier. He participated in many of the 
severest struggles which subsequently brought about the 
triumph of the Union arms and crushed rebellion and 
a recital of these brings to the mind of every student of 
history and true American citizen, the terrible price that 
was paid for the present peace, the fruits of which are 
enjoyed not only by the descendants of the old veterans 
who fought for it, but also by those who often seem 
forgetful how it was secured. Mr. Speer took part in 
the battles of Fort Wagner and Fort Gregg, Yorktown, 
Fair Oaks, Seven Pines (seven days of battling) Jones 
Ford, Harrison Landing, Suffolk, Black Water, South 
We.st Creek, Kingston, White Hall, Goldsboro, Folly 
Island, Morris Island, White Marsh Island, Charleston, 
Bermuda Hundred, Strawberry Plains, Chapin 's Farm, 
Deep Bottom, Petersburg and Appomattox. He was cor- 
poral, sergeant and sharp-shooter. 

Mr. Speer returned to Washington County and learned 
the bricklaying trade and followed the same until 1901. 
In 1881 he erected his present handsome residence at 
Canon.sburg where he is one of the representative citi- 
zens. He has been a life-long Eepublican. At different 
times he has been elected a member of the town council 
and during one term was president of the same. 

On Dec. 10, 1868, Mr. Speer was married to Miss 
Rebecca E. MacMillan. She is a daughter of John and 
Mary (Mitchell) MacMillan, a granddaughter of John 
and Mary MacMillan, and a great-granddaughter of the 
noted Dr. John MacMillan. Her parents were married 
January 1, 1835. The father died Aug. 23, 1890, aged 
79 years. The mother of Mrs. Speer died in November, 
1890, aged SO years. The father, John MacMillan, was 
married (first) to Elizabeth Fulton, in March, 1833. 

The grandfather of Mrs. Speer was also John Mac- 
Millan and the grandmother was Rebecca Anderson. He 
was married three times and was the father of ten chil- 
dren. Grandfather John MacMillan was born in North 
Strabane Township, Washington County, in 1787. 

Kev. John MacMillan, the grandfather of Mrs. Speer, 
was a man very prominent in the history of Washing- 
ton County. He was one of the earliest pioneer preach- 
ers to push westward and take upon himself the hard- 
ships of a preacher's life in the wilderness beyond the 
Allegheny Mountains. He was born at Fog Manor, N. 
J., Nov. 11, 1752, and graduated from Princeton College 
in the fall of 1772. He was licensed to preach in 1774 
and came to Washington County and settled in North 
Strabane Township in 1778, but owing to the hostility 
of the Indians at that time, was not accompanied by his 
family, but they subsequently joined him. He died in 
1833 at the age of 82 years. He married Catherine 
Brown. His parents' were William and Margaret (Rea) 
MacMillan, the former of whom was born in 1717 and 



ilied .Inly 2, 1792, and was buried at Chartiers Hill 
Presbyterian Church. The first wife of William Mac- 
Millan died in 17U8 and he married the mother of Samuel 
Miller, the latter of whom was associated for several 
years with Rev. John MacMillan in conducting Jefferson 
College. Mrs. Speer has one sister, Mrs. H. H. Bebout, 
residing at Canousburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Speer had six children born to them, 
namely : Mary Loretta, who was born Sept. 27, 1869, 
married William P. McConnell, of North Strabane Town- 
ship, and they have three daughters and one son — Myrtle, 
Agnes, Gaynes, Hazel and Earl; William L. Speer, who 
was born Sept. 13, 1871, resides at Allegheny City, mar- 
ried Etta Glass and they have one son, Howard; Minnie 
Orella, who was born Oct. 25, 1875, married John E. 
Hill, and they live at Azusa, Cal., and have one son, 
Speer Hill; Nancy B., who was born May 29, 1878, died 
Aug. 19, 1880 ; John Mack, who was born Mar. 30, 1881, 
resides with his father, married Annie O. O'Roak, and 
Cora P., who was born Mar. 25, 1884, married Thomas 
McKowan and they reside in Canonsburg. They have 
one son, Thomas McKowan. Mr. Speer and family be- 
long to the First Presbyterian Church at Canonsburg. 

PERRY LIGGETT, one of Hopewell Township's most 
respected citizens, who has resided on his farm of 15 
acres for the past 46 year.s, was born in Independence 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., Sept. 5, 1837, and is a 
son of Jesse and Hanna (Westlake) Liggett. The par- 
ents were farming people. They had the following chil- 
dren : William A., deceased ; Elizabeth, wife of Fletcher 
Westlake; Lemuel, deceased; Perry, Mary Jane (Cun- 
ningham), and Albert. 

Perry Liggett attended the public schools in his boy- 
hood and has devoted his whole life to agricultural pur- 
suits and still takes an interest in cultivating his farm. 
In 1862 he married Miss Rachel Vance, a daughter of 
James and Susan (Walker) Vance and they have had 
the following children : Elmer, who resides in Hopewell 
Township, married Ola Craft and they have seven chil- 
dren — Charles Vance, Deana Blanche, Quentin P., Perry 
B., Rachel G., Matthew B. and Minnie Ola; Frank, who 
carries on business in Ohio, married Lucy Liggett and 
they have a son, Charles C. ; and Eay, who resides at 
home and is engaged as a teamster. He married ilaggie 
Burkhart, and they have seven children : Hilda M., Ralph 
P., Fred V., Ashley C, Stanton R., Beatrice and Vir- 
ginia B. 

Mrs. Liggett is a member of one of the old county 
families. Her brother, Robert Vance, is deceased, but 
her sister, Elvira, survives and is the wife of James 
Dodds. Mr. and Mrs. Liggett have lived here almost 
a half century and they have seen many changes take 
place, many old families wiped out and many modern 



570 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



improvements made, such as were never even imagined 
in the early days. They have a wide circle of friends. 
Mrs. Liggett is a member of the United Presbyterian 
Church at West Middletown. 

ROBERT W. IRWIN, senior member of the prominent 
law tirm of Irwin & Wiley, with offices at Nos. 415-418 
Washington Trust Building, Washington, Pa., is a lead- 
ing member of the Washington County bar. He was 
born in West Finley Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
Apr. 25, 1858, and is a son of Ephraim and Margaret 
(Richey) Irwin. 

Both paternal and maternal grandparents of Mr. Irwin 
were born in North Ireland and they came to Washing- 
ton County early in the nineteenth century. Ephraim 
Irwin, father of Robert W., was born in Washington 
County, followed agricultural pursuits and lived a long 
and honorable life. He married Margaret Eichey and 
they became the parents of the following children: Eliz- 
abeth, who married W. J. Meloy; Esther A., who married 
Jonas Mills; William R., J. B., Robert W., Sadie M. and 
an infant son, deceased. 

Robert W. Irwin was reared until his 16th year in 
West Finley Township, working on the farm and attend- 
ing the district schools. He then accompanied his par- 
ents to Buffalo Township, Washington County, and two 
years later to Cross Creek. In 1877 the family settled 
permanently in Hopewell Township. Although Mr. Ir- 
win cheerfully performed the duties required of him on 
the home farm during youth and early manhood, the end 
he kept constantly in view was the acquisition of knowl- 
edge and the subsequent entrance into professional life. 
He commenced to teach school in the fall of 1875 and 
while liis winters were thus employed, his summers were 
usually given up to study. He attended the Claysville 
and Alexander Normal Schools and also paid some at- 
tention to the classics. It is remembered that he was 
especially interested in the debating societies and ex- 
celled the other earnest and serious-minded young men 
of his class in his lucid reasoning and his powers of 
oratory. These gave indication of the success which has 
so notably advanced him in his profession, for probably 
the Washington bar has no more eloquent pleader than 
Mr. Irwin. 

In November, 1877, Mr. Irwin entered upon the study 
of law in the office of Attorney Boyd Crumrine, and was 
admitted to the bar on June 15, 1881, since which time 
he has been continuoxisly engaged in practice at Wash- 
ington. Upon the retirement of Judge Acheson from 
the bench, at the latter 's request a partnership was 
formed with Mr. Irwin and during the several years' 
continuance of the firm of Acheson & Irwin, the com- 
bination was considered one of the strongest in the 
county. Later Mr. Irwin associated with him .lames 



A. Wiley and A. T. Morgan, both being men of recog- 
nized legal standing. Mr. Irwin has met with much 
success in his practice which has been general in char- 
acter, and his name has been identified with a large 
amount of the litigation of importance in the county 
for a number of years. 

On Dec. 24, 1884, Mr. Irwin was married to Miss 
Carrie N. Fowler, a daughter of William Fowler, of 
Westmoreland County, and a niece of William Smith, a 
prominent citizen of Smithville, Washington County. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Irwin were born the following chUdren: 
Nellie May, Earl Wilson, Ray Wilson, Frances Margaret, 
Leona, Edith and Robert, the survivors being Nellie 
May, now being Mrs. A. B. Loueks; Frances Margaret 
and Edith. Mr. Irwin and family have an attractive 
home, its location being No. 85 Highland avenue. They 
are members of the First Presbyterian Church. Fra- 
ternally, he is an Elk and a Knight Templar Mason. 
He is a leading Democrat of Washington County. 

CULBERT M. GREER, of Canonsburg, Pa., who is 
connected with the real estate department of the Pitts- 
burg Coal Company, at Pittsburg, was born on Squirrel 
Hill, Allegheny Co., Pa., Mar. 20, 1853, and is a son of 
Wesley and Mary Jane (Manes) Greer. 

The father of Mr. Greer was bom in Pittsburg, Alle- 
gheny County, and died when aged 62 years. The mother 
was born in Elizabeth Township, Allegheny Co., Pa., 
and survived her husband for a long period, passing away 
in January, 1906, when in her 80th year. They had two 
sons, Culbert M. and Wesley. The latter married Miss 
Annie Foster, of Bridgeville, Allegheny County, and 
they reside at Canonsburg. 

Culbert M, Greer left school when 18 years of age, 
having attended Jefferson Academy and Washington and 
Jefferson College. He then left the home farm and for 
the following eight years was engaged in a hardware 
and implement business, and when he disposed of that, 
he returned to the farm in Cecil Township, where he 
went into the registered stock business. He became 
a well-known and reliable breeder of Holstein and 
Guernsey cattle and also trotting and draft horses, and 
owned some of the finest stock in Washington County. 
In 1899 he began optioning coal for the Pittsburg Coal 
Company, and perhaps has purchased more valuable coal 
properties than any man ever connected with the com- 
pany. His business judgment is almost faultless and his 
tact and diplomacy are also recognized factors. Mr. 
Greer owns a large amount of property located in dif- 
ferent sections, valuable farm land in Chartiers Town- 
ship and realty in. Canonsbtirg. He has been a resident 
of Washington County since he was 10 years old, and he 
has lived in the vicinity of the borough of Canonsburg 
since 1862. His business interests are many, varied and 



IllSTOK'Y OF \VASHIN(_;T0X cointy 



571 



imiMirtaiit niul his name will si'ldcim be foiiml ideiitilied 
with any enterprise that is nut si)li<lly financed. 

Mr. (ircer married Miss Margaret S. Clark, a daughter 
of James and Mary Jane (Diekson) Clark, and she was 
born in Buffalo Township, Washington County. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Greer three children have been born, two 
daughters and one son: Lucile, who is the wife of Dr. 
Charles L. Harsha, of Canonsburg; James Clark and 
Alice. Mr. Greer is a member of the Greenside United 
Presbyterian Church, of which he has been a trustee 
for 21 years. In his political views he is a Kepublican. 

Ar)01St)N F. BURNS, a highly respected anil well- 
known resident of McDonald, Pa., where he lives, prac- 
tically retired from business activity, has been largely 
identified with oil production for a number of years 
and still owns eight valuable oil wells, together with a 
one-fourth interest in 12 other wells and a one-twelfth 
interest in 24 more. He is also an honored veteran of 
the Civil War and is secretary and treasurer of the Sur- 
vivors' Reunion Association of Capt. Easton's Light 
Battery A, 1st Pa. Reserves. Mr. Burns was born in 
Trumbull County, Ohio, Nov. 25, 1846, and is a son of 
William and Mary Jane (Sergeut) Burns. 

William Burns was engaged in the lumber business 
fur a number of years, but later turned his attention 
t(i the oil industry and continued to be associated with 
that until his death, which occurred in 1893. He mar- 
ried Mary Jane Sergent, who died in 1889, and they 
had the following children: Olive Jane, who married 
William F. McCullough; Addison F., Delay F., who died 
in 1900; Sarah Ann, who married Henry Camp; and 
Harriet R. and Charles N. The paternal grandparents 
were David and Elizabeth Burns, and the maternal were 
Jesse and Elizabeth Sergent. 

Addison F. Burns attended the district schools until 
he was 14 years of age and then began to be useful 
to his father on the home place and worked for him 
until he went into the army, becoming a member of 
Capt. Easton's Light Battery A, 1st Pa. Reserves. After 
his period of military service w-as over he returned home 
and went into the lumber business with his father until 
1872 and then gave his main attention to dealing in real 
estate until 1877, at which time he became interested 
in oil production and that was actively pursued until 
1898, when he came to McDonald, where he has lived 
somewhat retired for a few years. 

Mr. Burns was married (first) in 1867, to Miss Sarah 
E. Undereoffer, who died June 15, 1878. They had five 
children: Harry, Forest E., Ora I., Cressie and Naomi. 
Ora I. is the wife of L. W. Gibbs. Cressie died in 1881 
and Naomi died in 1907. Mr. Burns was married (sec- 
ond) to Miss Lida Pike, a daughter of William and 
Eliza Pike, who were natives of St. John 's. New Found- 



land. William Pike was a sea captain, who lost his life 
at sea in 1868. Richard Pike, a cousin of Mrs. Burns, 
commanded the ship Kite in the Greeley expedition to 
search for the North Pole. William Pike and wife had 
three children: Anna, who married Frank Lott; Eliza- 
beth, who is deceased ; and Lida, who is the wife of Mr. 
Burns. Mr. and Mrs. Burns have four children: Charles 
A., Lillian, Robert W. and Leroy F. The family at- 
tends the Presbyterian Church. In politics, Mr. Burns 
is a Republican. 

.I.-^MES C. COKEIN, a retired grocer of Mononga- 
hela (Mty, Pa., who has been a resident here all of his 
life, was born Mar. 25, 1856, and is a son of William 
and Eleanor (Hudson) Corrin. 

William Corrin, who was born on the Isle of Man, off 
the coast of England, came to America about 1848, and 
located at Monongahela City, Pa., where for many years 
he followed building and contracting. He died here 
in 1883 at the age of 70 years, and his wife, who was 
also a native of the Isle of Man, died in 1896 at the age 
of 76 years. They were the parents of ten children, the 
six oldest of whom were born on the Isle of Man, name- 
ly: Catherine, who is the wile of John Sutman; William; 
Edward, who died at the age of 65 years; Anna, who 
married H. Underwood ; John T. ; Ella, who is the wife 
of James Yohe. The four born in America are: Joseph 
H., Alfred B., James Calvin, the subject of this sketch; 
anil Emma, who is the wife of George Walker. 

James Calvin Corrin attended the public schools, and 
when a young man learned the plasterer's trade with 
A. T. Gregg. He subsequently followed contracting for 
16 years and about 1892, engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness with James Skillen, with whom he was associated in 
that business for 11 yeans. He first located on Fourth 
and Main streets, on the present site of the First National 
Bank, and after his nephew purchased Mr. Skillen 's inter- 
est in the business, the firm was known as Corrin & Cor- 
rin. They employed ten clerks in the store and had an 
e-xtensive trade until 1808, when the firm disposed of the 
business, since which time Mr. Corrin has been living 
in retirement, and his nephew, W. T. Corrin, went to 
Denver in search of health. Beside his residence prop- 
erty, located at No. 520 Chess street, Mr. Corrin owns 
considerable other real estate, and he and H. C. Sutman 
laid out North Charleroi, disposing of their land there 
in a few years. 

In January, 1897. ilr. Corrin married Mrs. Maggie E. 
(Wickerham) Penrod, a daughter of Adam Wickerham, 
and the widow of Noah Penrod, who left one son, 
Charles Edgar Penrod. Her great-grandfather laid out 
the lower portion of Monongahela City, and her father 
is the oldest living native of Monongahela City. 

Politicallv. Mr. Corrin is an adherent of the Demo- 



572 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



cratic party, is a member of the Democratic Comity 
Committee, and is serving his fourth term as a council- 
man from the Third Ward. He is fraternally a Mason, 
and past worshipful master of the Henry M. Phillips 
Lodge of Monongahela City, and is also a member of the 
B. P. O. E. 

JOHN G. HALL, county recorder of Washington Coun- 
ty, Pa., is one of the county's representative men, with 
the public affairs of which he has been identified almost 
continuously since he reached manhood. He was born 
at Washington, Pa., Apr. 27, 1872, and is a son of James 
Add and Anna (Martin) Hall and a grandson of the late 
Gen. John Hall. 

After graduating from the public schools of Washing- 
ton, John G. Hall entered Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege, leaving there in order to accept a proffered clerk- 
ship in the Washington postofifice. Later he was appointed 
deputy sheriff of Washington County and served in the 
office with efficiency and in 1903 he was first elected coun- 
ty recorder. His subsequent re-election was proof suffi- 
cient as to his capacity and popularity. He possesses 
much of the geniality that contributed greatly to the suc- 
cess of his late grandfather. Gen. John Hall, in his long 
and successful public career. Mr. Hall is a prominent 
factor in Eepublican politics, is an earnest worker for 
his party and has served as secretary and chairman of the 
Eepublican County Committee. His place of residence 
is at No. 252 Locust Avenue, Washington. 

WILLIAM E. DICKSON, M.D., physician and surgeon 
at McDonald, Pa., where he is a leading and representa- 
tive citizen, was born in Allegheny Co., Pa., Aug. 28, 
1868, and is a son of William A. and Elizabeth E. (Mc- 
Burney) Dickson. 

The father of Dr. Dickson was a farmer in Allegheny 
County where his death occurred. His widow survives 
and resides at Crafton, Pa. Their parents were: Will- 
iam and Margaret (Glenn) Dickson, and Eobert and 
Elizabeth (Welch) McBurney. They had the following 
children : Margaret Glenn, Elizabeth E., Eobert M., Anna, 
WilUam E., Agnes J., Walter E. and Bertha L. Of the 
above family, Anna is the wife of Eev. W. E. Barcus. 
Walter E. is engaged in the practice of dental surgery 
at Burgettstown. Bertha L. is deceased. 

William E. Dickson attended the public schools and 
Ingleside Academy, later Westminster College and subse- 
quently the Western Pennsylvania Medical College, now 
the University of Pittsburg, where he was graduated in 
medicine and immediately located at McDonald, where he 
has a large and substantial practice. He is a very active 
citizen, taking a deep interest in all that promises to be 
beneficial to the city. He has served as a member of the 



school board for five years and was in the city council for 
four years. In polities he is a Eepublican. 

Dr. Dickson was married Mar. 29, 1898, to Miss Jane 
E. Donaldson, a daughter of Eev. J. B. Donaldson, of 
New Wilmington. Mrs. Dickson has one sister and two 
brothers: Prances, who is the wife of Dr. A. A. Aiken; 
and Thomas I. and John, the latter of whom is a physi- 
cian. Dr. and Mrs. Dickson have three children: Pi'ances 
Elizabeth, Eobert Glenn, and William E. Dr. Dickson 
and wife are members of the First United Presbyterian 
Church at McDonald. He is a thirty-second degree 
Mason and is identified with the Blue Lodge at McDon- 
ald and the Council, Chapter and Commandery at Pitts- 
burg. He belongs also to the Knights of Pythias, the 
Heptasophs and the Eoyal Arcanum, all at McDonald. 

HON. JOHN A. McILVAINE, president judge of 
the courts of Washington County, 27th Judicial District 
of Pennsylvania, and president of the board of trustees 
of Washington and Jefferson College, at Washington 
Pa., was born in Somerset Township, Washington Coun- 
ty, Apr. 13, 1843. _ His parents were William and Ma 
tilda McHvaine, and he is a grandson of Greer McH 
vaine, who settled in Somerset Township about 1789, 
coming from the eastern part of the state. 

Judge McHvaine acquired his elementary education 
in the common schools of his native township. On Sept. 
19, 1860, he entered the junior preparatory department 
of Jefferson College, Canonsburg. Here he proved his 
natural ability and taste for work by doing double duty, 
and was rewarded by being admitted to the Freshman 
class at the beginning of the fall term of 1861. In 1865 
he was graduated with the second honor of his class, 
which consisted of 36 members, and delivered the Latin 
salutatory on Commencement day. This was the last 
class graduated at Jefferson College before its union 
with Washington College, the two institutions forming 
thereafter Washington and Jefferson College, the noted 
educational center at Washington. 

Making choice of law as his profession, Mr. Mc- 
Hvaine entered as a student the law office of Hon. Boyd 
Crumrine, at Washington, and was admitted to the bar at 
the August term of 1867. For two years following he 
was clerk in the office of the county treasurer. He then 
went to Wichita, Kan., where he served for one year as 
clerk of the District Court. Called home in July, 1872, 
by the illness of his father, he saw and embraced a 
favorable opportunity for opening an office in Washing- 
ton. During the remainder of that year and in 1873, he 
served as secretary of the Eepublican County Vigilant 
Committee. In 1874 he was elected district attorney for 
Washington County and was subsequently elected for 
a second consecutive term, serving in all for six years. 




I(»N. .lollN ,\^ .M( II.XAIM'. 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



575 



Tho imiirt'ssiou he iiuuk' as iiK-umbent of this office is 
well refleeteil in the coraraent of one of the leading 
newspapers of the county, which, although of opposite 
politics, said: "Mr. Mcllvaine has been the chosen officer 
to represent the people in all criminal prosecutions in 
this county for the past six years, and we but echo the 
sentiment of all conversant with the facts, when we say 
that he has discharged the trust with great ability and 
fairness. He is a hard worker and always had a knowl- 
edge of the fact.s, and was fully prepared to present 
them in a methodical and convincing way. Although 
a vigorous prosecutor, he was fair; and no defendant 
had just cause to complain of any undue advantage hav- 
ing been taken of him. ' ' 

While serving in the office of district attorney, Mr. 
Mcllvaine formed a law partnersip with M. L. A. Mc- 
Cracken and the firm soon obtained a gratifying share 
of professional business. This connection lasted until 
Mr. Mcllvaine 's election, on Nov. 4, 1886, to the office 
of President Judge of the 27th Judicial District, for a 
term of ten years. To this office he was re-elected in 
1896, and again for a third term, in 1906. Owing to 
the great development in the oil and gas industries of 
this county, the volume of legal business has largely 
increased since Judge Mcllvaine first took his seat on 
the bench, but it is the universal opinion among his 
brethren of the bench and bar that he has been fully 
equal to the responsibilities which have devolved upon 
him. But seldom have his rulings and decisions been 
reversed in the Supreme Court. Before his election to 
the third term a desire was expressed on many sides for 
his appointment to the Supreme Court Bench of the 
State, but he declared himself better satistied to con- 
tinue in the position he now so ably fUls. 

On Dec. 17, 1874, Judge Mcllvaine was married to 
Miss Ada C. Shaw, of Philadelphia. No children have 
come to complete his household. He is an elder in the 
Second Presbyterian Church at Washington. He has 
been closely identified with educational movements and 
for many years was a member of the board of trustees 
of the Washington Female Seminary. He is a man of 
kind and genial manner and his unvarying courtesy is 
no mere mask, but the outward expression of a kind 
and generous heart, which finds pleasure in deeds of 
charity and benevolence. 

JAMES C. RUSSELL, general farmer and dairyman, 
who has lived on his present fine farm which contains 
over 171 acres and is situated in Smith Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., for the past 35 years, was born in this 
township, Nov. 5, 1847. His parents were .John S. and 
Jane (Simpson) Russell. 

John S. Russell, father of James C, was a native of 
Ohio; but for many years he followed agricultural pur- 



suits in Smith Township, Washington County, where he 
died Sept. 15, 1879. His first marriage was to Jane 
Simpson, who died in 1853 and was buried at Raccoon 
Center. They had eight children: Eleanor, Cynthia, Mar- 
garet, Ophelia, W. S., Agnes, James C. and D. A. John 
S. Rus.sell was married (second) to Mary A. Vincent and 
they had two children: Alice Jane and John V. The sec- 
ond wife is also deceased. 

James C. Russell obtained his education in the common 
schools of Smith Township and afterward assisted his 
father on the home farm until he was 25 years of age. 
In 1874 he settled on his present farm, where he has done 
a large amount of improving, including the erection of all 
the buildings now standing. In 1888 he started into the 
dairy business, prior to that having been a large sheep 
grower. He operates his dairy with thoroughbred Jer- 
sey cows, securing 50 gallons of milk daily, all of which 
he has shipped to the same Pittsburg firm for the past 
13 years. There is one gas well on the farm. 

On November 21, 1872, Mr. Russell was married to Miss 
Eliza Jane Brimmer, a daughter of James Brimmer, and 
they have three children : John V., M. Jane and J. S. 
Mr. Russell and family are members of the Raccoon 
Presbyterian Church, of which he is treasurer. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat. He is an interested citizen of his 
township, pays a great deal of attention to the public 
schools and has served six years as a school director. 

WILLIAM B. MURDOCH, who is associated with 
his brother in a wholesale florist and nursery business 
at Canonsburg, and is engaged in carrying on an enter- 
prise which was established at Pittsburg, prior to 1840, 
by his late father, James Murdoch, this being one of the 
oldest florist and nursery houses in western Pennsylvania. 
Mr. Murdoch was bom in the city of Pittsburg, Pa., 
July 29, 1871, and is a son of James and Margaret 
(Bleakley) Murdoch. 

James Murdoch was born in Ireland and was a child 
when his parents brought him to America. He ■ was 
reared and spent his life at Pittsburg. In partnership 
with his brother, William Murdoch, he founded the busi- 
ness to which his sons, Williajn B. and James B. Mur- 
doch, succeeded. James Murdoch died at Pittsburg, 
.January 25, 1893, when aged seventy-five years. He mar- 
ried Margaret Bleakley, who was born in Lawrence 
County, Pa., who still survives and resides at Coraopolis, 
Pa. To Jame.= and Margaret Murdoch there were born 
three sons and two daughters: James B., who resides 
at Canonsburg, married Sarah Sneathen; Frank C, who 
resides at Coraopolis Heights, married Anna Patterson, 
and is now a capitalist there, having formerly been a 
florist : Margaret, who is deceased ; Esther, who is now 
deceased, was the wife of David K. Murdoch; and Will- 
iam B., subject of this sketch. 



576 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



William B. Murdoch attended the public schools at 
Pittsburg and then entered the University of Michigan, 
at Ann Arbor, where he was graduated in the class of 
1896. He immediately went into the florist and nursery 
business, in partnership with his brother and they have 
developed it into one of the largest enterprises of its 
kind in this section. The firm was originally only a 
retail one, dealing mainly in cut flowers, with green- 
houses on Squirrel Hill and two stores in Pittsburg, but 
since coming to Washington County a wholesale business 
has been done exclusively. In the spring of 1902 they 
moved the business to Van Eman, where they have four 
steel-frame, modernly-constructed greenhouses with di- 
mensions of 30 by 400 feet, together with three smaller 
structures, this firm and one other being the only florists 
in western Pennsylvania to utilize the steel frame for 
their buildings. In addition to the large business done 
in the line mentioned, the firm is interested in oil pro- 
duction in both Washington and Allegheny counties, 
while the three brothers have large real estate interests 
in Pittsburg and own also a farm of sixty acres. 

At Sewickley, Pa., Mr. Murdoch was married, Septem- 
ber 21, 1899, to Miss Florence S. Murdoch, a daughter 
of Hugh J. and Rachel (Hutton) Murdoch. The father 
of Mrs. Murdoch was the publisher of the United Pres- 
byterian for many years, being a member of the well- 
known publishing firm at Pittsburg, of Murdoch, Kerr 
& Company. He died May 20, 1903, at the age of sixty- 
nine years, his wife having passed away January 29, 
1898, aged sixty-two years. To Hugh J. and Eachel 
Murdoch the following children were born: James H., 
who is a physician engaged in practice at Allegheny, Pa. ; 
Hugh, who is a printer, resides at Pittsburg; David K., 
who is also a printer, lives at Sewickley; J. Floyd, who 
is a physician, resides at Sewickley; Frank S., who is 
an electrician, lives at Sewickley; Annie K., who is the 
wife of J. W. Arrott, Jr.; William E., who is deceased; 
Susan J., deceased, who was the wife of Dr. S. F. Shan- 
non, formerly of Pittsburg; and Florence S., who is the 
wife of William B. Murdoch. Mr. and Mrs. Murdoch 
have one son, William B., Jr. They are members of 
Greenside United Presbyterian Church. 

GEN. JOHN HALL, one of Washington County's 
most distinguished citizens, was born in Morris Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., in 1832, and died in his 
native county, October 20, 1906. He was one of seven 
children born to Thomas and Catherine (Rainey) Hall. 
His father was born in County Down, Ireland, and emi- 
grated to America early in the nineteenth century, set- 
tling first in Virginia and later removing to western 
Pennsylvania. 

John Hall received the education obtainable in the 
country schools of the time and later learned the taUor's 



trade, going into business with his brother, James Hall, 
at Dunningsville. Some years later he removed to Will- 
iamsport (now Monongahela City) and engaged in the 
grocery business. In 1851 he was elected county treas- 
urer of Washington County and removed to Washington 
in 1852. From 1855 to 1856 he was in the employ of the 
Portage Railway Company (now the Pennsylvania) as a 
wood agent, having charge of the purchase of wood then 
used as fuel for the locomotives. During the years 1857- 
8-9 he was proprietor of the Fulton House in Washing- 
ton, which stood on the corner of Main and Beau streets, 
and was at that time one of the best known hostelries 
in western Pennsylvania. In the winter of 1859 he 
turned the hotel over to his brother, Thomas M. HaU. 
In the same year he was elected transcribing clerk of 
the House of Representatives of the State of Pennsyl- 
vania and was also appointed brigadier-general of the 
State militia. On 1861 he enlisted in the United States 
Army and went to Washington, D. C. During the last 
six months of 1861 he was President Lincoln's private 
secretary. Later he was commisioned commissary of 
subsistence by President Lincoln and assigned to Gen. 
Wessell's brigade, remaining in the service until the 
close of the war, in 1865, when he resigned. 

After the war. President Grant appointed Gen. Hall 
deputy United States marshal for western Pennsylvania. 
He served for three years and succeeded the Hon. Alex- 
ander Murdoch as marshal. President Grant reappointed 
him, in his second term, and he was succ-essively ap- 
pointed to this position by both Presidents Arthur and 
Hayes, serving in all twelve years as marshal and deputy 
marshal. During the administration of President Hayes, 
on one occasion when Gen. Hall was the guest of honor 
at a reception and dinner given by President and Mrs. 
Hayes, he was accorded the honor of escorting Mrs. 
Hayes out to dinner. Gen. Hall and President Hayes were 
united closely in the bonds of friendship. 

After his retirement from public service. Gen. Hall 
engaged in farming and breeding fine Shorthorn cattle, 
on the old Wiley and Montgomery farms in Canton Town- 
ship, near Washington. He was tendered the nomination 
for governor of Pennsylvania by the late Senator Quay 
and "Bob" Mackey, who were then in control of State 
politics, but declined the honor, and Gov. Hoyt was nom- 
inated and elected. Later, Gen. Hall disposed of his 
farm and, following the death of his wife, formerly Miss 
Nancy Jones, of Somerset Township, lived a retired 
life at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. C. Wiley, 
where his death occurred. 

Gen. Hall was an earnest, consistent Christian and for 
many years was a member of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Church of Washington, having borne an active part 
in the construction of the splendid edifice on East Beau 
street occupied by the congregation. At the time of his 



HISTOh'V OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



577 



doatli 111' was president of the hoaiil of trustees. To 
tieii. Iliill ami wife were borii four children: J. Add, 
John A., Kobert T., and Belle, who became the wife of 
\V. C. Wiley. At the time of his death hLs daughter, 
Mrs. Wiley, and one son, J. Add, were living. 

During his long term in public office. Gen. Hall was 
brought into contact with hundreds of people, both in a 
liusiuess and social way, and it is probable that no man 
of his time had more friends. His genial manner, his 
strict integrity, his uniform courtesy and his ever pres- 
ent desire to aid those who required assistance, so 
stamped his personality upon all people who knew him, 
that it may be safely said that he was one of the most 
highly esteemed men of his time. 

SAMUEL H. JACKSOX, pa^tmaster at Claysville, Pa., 
a very popular government official, has served in this 
capacity since 1897, having been appointed during the first 
administration of President McKiuley. Mr. Jackson was 
born at Claysville, Pa., April 10, 1851, and is a son of 
Oliver P. and Louisa (Cooper) Jackson. 

The father of Mr. Jackson was born in Bedford Coun- 
ty, Pa., and later lived in Somerset County, coming from 
there to Claysville in the early thirties. He married 
Louisa Cooper, who died in 1873, whom he survived until 
1889. Her father, Samuel Cooper, operated one of the 
first blacksmith shops at Claysville. Postmaster Jack- 
son has one brother and two sisters residing in Clays- 
ville, namely : Chester B. ; Alice A., wife of Buchanan 
AUendar; and Nora, wife of Oliver Martin. 

Samuel H. Jackson obtained his education in the pub- 
lic schools at Claysville and his subsequent life has 
been spent in associations which have largely contributed 
to the broadening of all his faculties. From early man- 
hood he has been more or less connected with public 
affairs in his county and State and in his own city has 
served in municipal bodies and has been president of 
the school board. His first government ofiSce was that 
of store keeper and ganger and for a time he was sta- 
tioned at Monongahela City and AUenport. In 1890 he 
was the choice of the Republican party as its candidate 
for county clerk but failed of election. In 1885 he was 
elected a ,iury commissioner of Washington County and 
served with the utmost eflSciency for three years. He 
has always been an active Republican and wields a 
large amount of influence. In 1892 he was elected to 
the office of justice of the peace, and subsequently was 
elected for a succeeding term. Owing to his appointment 
as postmaster, October 1, 1897, he did not serve out his 
second term as justice. 

The Claysville postoffice is carefully conducted and 
the rights of the patrons and their convenience acknowl- 
edged and consulted. Mr. Jackson has as his assistant. 



his daughter. Mrs. .lames Smith, a lady who enjoys with 
him the esteem and good will of the public. 

Mr. .Jackson married Miss Mary A. Litle, a daughter 
of William Litle, of Washington County, and formerly 
of Buffalo Township, and they have had nine children 
born to them, namely: May, who is the wife of E. E. 
Lindley, of Homestead, Pa.; Blanche E., who is the 
wife of Edward Clem, of Indianapolis, Ind.; Gertrude, 
who is the wife of Homer Griffith, of East Finley Town- 
ship; Cecelia, who is the wife of .James Smith, of Clays- 
ville; William 0., who resides at Pittsburg; James R., 
who lives in New Orleans, La. ; and Eva and Winifred, both 
of whom reside at home; and Mrs. Melvin, of Claysville. 
Mr. Jackson and family are affiliated with the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, in w'hich he is serving as a trustee. 
The handsome new church edifice of this denomination 
was dedicated July 4, 1909, and Mr. Jackson was chair- 
man of the building committee that so satisfactorily at- 
tended to the financial affairs during its construction. 

ANDREW RUSSELL JEFFREY, a public spirited 
and substantial citizen of Cross Creek Township, where 
he owns a valuable farm of 172 acres, for many years 
carried on large argricultural operations there and then 
moved his family into Washington. He was born in 
Cross Creek Township, Washington Co., Pa., March 17, 
1853, and is a son of Robert and Eliza (Russell) Jeffrey. 

A. R. Jeffrey obtained a district school education. 
When twenty years of age he became a farmer and con- 
tinued in agricultural pursuits for a number of years, 
paying considerable attention to stock raising, making a 
specialty of hogs and sheep. He divides his time pleas- 
antly between his city and his country homes. 

On September 30, 1880, Mr. Jeffrey was married to 
Miss Clarinda Hutchinson, a daughter of Joseph and 
Mary (.Jobs) Hutchinson, residing near Taylorstown. 
They have had four children, all of whom were afforded 
every educational advantage. Anna Louethel, the eldest, 
resides at home, and is the capable bookkeeper for the 
Washington Glass Manufacturing Company. Elsie M. 
is deceased. Bertha G. and Hazel also live at home. 
The former is one of the four qualified pharmacists from 
Washington County, who pa.ssed the examination held at 
Pittsburg, in the fall of 1908. 

Mr. Jeffrey and family attend the Third Presbyterian 
Church at Washington, having formerly been members 
of the United Presbyterian Church at Hickory, in which 
Mr. Jeffrey was a trustee at different times. He has 
been a Republican ever since he cast his first vote. On 
nmny occasions he was nominated to different township 
offices, but his liberal views on public improvements 
and his known advocacy of good roads and superior 
schools, prevented him being supported by the majority 



578 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



of the tax payers. He has the satisfaction, however, of 
knowing that his standards are those recognized by the 
most worthy type of good citizens. 

JAMES FINDLEY BOYD, oil producer, with interests 
in Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, has been iden- 
tified with the oil industry since 1889. He was born near 
Sandy Lake, Mercer Co., Pa., September 30, 1865, and 
is a son of Barber and Isabel (Burrows) Boyd, and a 
grandson of Thomas and Nancy Boyd and of George and 
Mary Burrows. 

The father of Mr. Boyd was a farmer through all his 
active years and he and wife still live in Mercer County. 
In politics he is a Democrat and both he and his wife 
are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
They reared the following children : Guy P. ; Sylvester 
B.; James Findley; Nannie, who married George Eokles; 
Mary, who married M. D. Haggarty ; Walter P. ; Lina 
E., who married Prank Osborne; and Newton G. 

James Pindley Boyd went from the public schools of 
Mercer County to MeElwaine Institute, a preparatory 
school at Lebanon, Pa., and after four years of close 
study was most creditably graduated there. Later he 
attended the State Normal School at Edinboro and sub- 
sequently taught school for five terms in Mercer County. 
He then turned his attention to the oil industry, a 
business which was assuming large proportions in Penn- 
sylvania, and after spending two years in Warren 
County he came to Washington County, in which he has 
ever since made his home. Formerly he was rig-builder 
ind also forman for the South Penn. Oil Company, but 
is now individually interested. 

On September 14, 1899, Mr. Boyd was married to Miss 
Marian Oldfield, a daughter of Joseph and Marian 
(Simpson) Oldfield, who are residents of McDonald. Mr. 
and Mrs. Oldfield have the following children: Thomas, 
Robert, Emma, Marian, Elizabeth and Joseph. Mr. and 
Mrs. Boyd are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. In politics he is an Independent. He served 
three years in the borough council, but otherwise he has 
not filled political office. He is both a Mason and an 
Odd Fellow, in the former fraternity being a member of 
Garfield Lodge at McDonald and of Chartiers Com- 
mandery, and has attained to the thirty-second degree. 
Mr. Boyd is one of the well-known and representative 
citizens of Washington County and through many years 
of experience, has become an authority concerning the 
oil industi-y. 

WILLIAM WYLIE, who, for the past twenty years 
has followed his profession, that of a civil engineer, at 
Washington, maintaining an office at present at No. 131 
Jefferson avenue, was born November 10, 1859, in Can- 
ton Township, Washington Co., Pa., where he spent his 
early life, and is a son of Robert, a gi-andson of William 



and a great-grandson of Robert Wylie, all of whom 
have been identified with Washington County. 

The first of the family to locate in Washing County, 
as a pioneer, was Robert Wylie, who came directly from 
Ireland in 1761, and became a strong civilizing person- 
ality. His son, William Wylie, was born in Canton 
Township, September 25, ISOO, and engaged in farming 
and merchandising. His son, Robert Wylie, was also 
born in Canton Township, August 25, 1830, and still 
resides there, occupying a farm adjoining the old Wylie 
homestead and still interested in farming, wool buying, 
and oil production. 

William Wylie, of Washington, went from the Canton 
Township schools to Washington and Jefferson College 
and later took a commercial and mathematical course in 
the Iron City Business College at Pittsburg. For a time 
he was then associated with his father in the wool busi- 
ness but since has given his entire attention to his pro- 
fession, now residing at No. 131 Jefferson avenue. 

He is competent in every line, his work including 
mining engineering, bridge, railroad and water works 
construction, having served as chief engineer in planning 
and constructing many systems of electric railways, water 
works and coal works. He also designed and built 
thirty of the first solid concrete bridges in the county, 
and he has designed many successful structures for thQ 
companies which have employed him, that later became 
standard and were adopted and copied by other engineers 
at every chance. For the past three years Mr. Wylie has 
been in the employ of the county commissioners in bridge 
and highway work as county engineer. He is a director 
in the Real Estate Trust Company and a stockholder in 
the Pittsburg Coal Company and in several other finan- 
cial institutions. 

On June 16, 1885, Mr. Wylie was married to Miss 
Mary W. Gist, who was born August 27, 1861, and is a 
daughter of J. C. Gist, of Brooke County, W. Va. 
Through the Revolutionary heroes, Christopher Gist, and 
Isaac Heaton, she is a member of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution. They have three children: Eliza- 
beth Beall, born October 6, 1887, a graduate of the 
Washington Seminary; Clara Virginia, born November 
21, 1891, a student at the Washington Female Seminary; 
and William Clark Gist, born January 24, 1898. Mr. 
Wylie and family are members of the First United Pres- 
byterian Church at Washington. 

ROBERT A. GEARY, owner of a tract of 247 acres 
in Robeson Township, Washington Co., Pa., operates a 
dairy in connection with farming, which he has followed 
all of his life, and was born March 2, 1838, on the old 
Richard Donaldson farm in Washington County, and is 
a son of R. D. and Maria (Glass) Geary, and a grandson 
of Alexander and Elizabeth Geary, who came to this 



.ARY 



VENOX AND 

"O'JMDATIONa, 




HON. JAMES F. TAYLOR 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



579 



county in ISOG aud purchased land for six dollars an 
acre. R. D. Geary was a farmer and school teacher and 
his union with Maria Glass resulted in the birth of five 
children, all of whom are deceased but our subject. Mrs. 
Geary died about 1843 and he subsequently married 
Nancy Fulton, by whom he bad three children: Samuel; 
Mary, who married Eli Wilkison ; and Maria Jane. 

Robert A. Geary was reared on the farm and received 
but a limited amount of schooling as he was obliged to 
assist with the farm work at an early age, and started 
to plow when ten years old. Mr. Geary has always fol- 
lowed farming and purchased his farm from his father 
and his heirs, his original purchase consisting of 119 
acres, to which he added later and now has 247 acres. 
He has erected a fine modern home and rebuilt the barns 
and other buildings, and has two producing gas wells 
on the farm, but has never tried for oil. 

Mr. Geary was married January 17, 1867, to Jane 
King, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Cooper) 
King, who were farmers of Washington County, and the 
parents of the following children : Margaret ; Jane, 
wife of our subject; Anna; Martha, deceased; and 
William J. No children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Geary but they have reared three children, namely: 
Charles; Catherine, who is the wife of William Woods; 
and Bessie, who married R. R. Curamins. The family 
holds membership with the Midway United Presbyterian 
Church. 

HON. JAMES F. TAYLOR, Additional Law Judge 
of the 27th Judicial District and one of the best known 
members of the legal profession in Washington County, 
was born in South Strabane Township, Jan. 15, 1854. 
His parents were William Henry Harrison and Jane E. 
(Jones) Taylor, and he is a descendant in the fourth 
generation of Henry Taylor, who came to Washington 
County from Cecil County, Md., some time prior to the 
year 1780. This pioneer of great prominence was the 
great-grandfather of Hon. James F. Taylor. He was 
the first president judge of the Washington County 
Courts, serving first from Oct. 2, 1781, to Oct. 1, 1783; 
he served a second term Sept. 30, 1788, to Sept. 22, 1791. 
He was one of the most trusted agents of the govern- 
ment during the Whiskey Insurrection, and at that time 
was general of the militia. His commission signed by 
Gov. Thomas Miffin rs now in possession of the subject 
of this record, as is also the commission of Henry Tay- 
lor as first president judge. 

Matthew Taylor, one of the family of eleven children 
born to Henry Taylor and Jane White Taylor, his wife, 
was the oldest daughter of John White, and the grand- 
father of James F., came into possession of the old 
homestead in South Strabane Township, Washington 
County, and followed farming through life. He married 



Nancy Hutchinson aud to them were born eleven chil- 
dren, William Henry Harrison, father of Hon. James 
E., being the fifth in order of birth. He was born in 
South Strabane Township, Washington County, Pa., in 
1830, and his education was obtained in the district 
schools and at Washington and Jefferson College, which 
latter institution he attended for several years. At 
home he was taught all the duties pertaining to the 
management of the farm and there he remained until 
1866, when he moved to Washington in order to afford 
his children better educational opportunities. He there 
embarked in a general fresh and salt meat business, 
which included pork packing and stock buying. His 
successful business career was brought to a close by his 
untimely death when aged but 55 years. He was a man 
of sterling character and was respected and esteemed by 
all who knew him. He gave his children every advantage 
in his power and received from them the loving vener- 
ation of dutiful descendants. In politics he was an 
earnest supporter of Republican principles, not for any 
advantage that would accrue to him, but because he 
believed in their soundness. He was a liberal suporter 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church and its benevolent 
enterprises and was a consistent member for many years. 
In 1850, he married Miss Jane E. Jones, a daughter of 
Charles E. and Sarah (Judson) Jones, both of whom 
were born in England. They came to America in 1827, 
locating at Washington, where Mr. Jones followed car- 
pentering and contracting. Mrs. Sarah Jones died in 
1871, and Charles E. Jones in 1883. 

To William H. H. Taylor and wife six children were 
born, as follows: Edward M., James Franklin, Emma, 
Alice, William Nelson and Susan Jane. Edward M. was 
graduated in 1872 from Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege and afterwards from the Boston School of Divinity. 
He is now pastor of the Tremont Methodist Episcopal 
Church at Boston, Mass. He married Mary Bradford, a 
descendant of Gov. Bradford of the Plymouth Colony. 
Emma, the oldest daughter, married the late John A. 
Hall, who was assistant postmaster at Washington for 
many years. Alice died when aged 11 years. William 
Nelson graduated from the Poughkeepsie Busine.'s Col- 
lege and now resides in East End, Pittsburg, and is a 
vice president and manager of the National Lead and 
Oil Company and a director of the Commonwealth Trust 
Company of that city. He married a daughter of 
Stephen Crump. Susan Jane is the wife of Dr. J. M. 
Maurer, of Washington. The mother of the above 
family, although now advanced in years, enjoys good 
health and continues to reside at the old town home of 
the family which is situated on West Wheeling street. 

James Franklin Taylor received a good English edu- 
cation in the public schools of Washington, to which 
place he came with his parents when about 12 years old. 



580 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



He then became a student in the preparatory department 
of Washington and Jefferson College and remained until 
the end of the junior year at which time he left college, 
intending to return after a year 's recuperation. How- 
ever, after he realized that his old classmates had grad- 
uated and gone from the institution in the meanwhile, 
when his vacation was over he decided to take up the 
study of law at Washington and for this purpose entered 
the office of Hon. Boyd Crumrine, in 1876. On Oct. 15, 
1879, he was admitted to the bar and returned to Mr. 
Crumrine 's office as an assistant and remained asso- 
ciated with him until 1883, in which year he was elected 
district attorney. His popularity and efficiency were 
proved by his re-election to the office for another three- 
year term. He was secretary of the Republican County 
Committee, and in 1882 was elected its chairman. He 
served also as assistant burgess of Washington for one 
term. On Jan. 1, 1891, he formed a law partnership 
with Winfield McIIvaine, which connection lasted for 
a number of years, the firm being one of the strongest 
combinations of legal talent in the county. 

On June 24, 1S95, Mr. Taylor was appointed judge of 
Common Pleas, by Gov. Hastings. He was elected Ad- 
ditional Law Judge of the 27th Judicial District, in 
November, 1895, for a ten-year term, and was re-elected 
to the same position in November, 1905. His record on 
the bench has shown him to be possessed of all the req- 
uisite qualifications for the judgeship, these including 
quick intelligence, a broad and discriminating mind and 
an absolute sense of fairness and impartiality that en- 
ables him to give to each side of. a case full and equal 
consideration. His uniform courtesy has rendered him 
popular with the members of the bar and there is little 
doubt that history will record his name as one of the 
ablest jurists of Washington County. 

Judge Taylor was married in September, 1884, to 
Annie Walton, the eldest daughter of Rev. Richard L. 
MiUer, D. D., pastor of a Methodist Episcopal Church 
in Pittsburg. They are parents of four children: Alice, 
Woodward, Virginia and Gladys. In December, 1907, 
Alice was married to Clifton F. Brittain, of Crofton, 
Pa. In Feburary, 1908, Virginia was married to Carl 
D. Schultz, of Pittsburg. .Judge Taylor and family enjoy 
a comfortable home in the neat brick residence at No. 
375 East Maiden street. 

Judge Taylor is a Republican and was chosen a presi- 
dential elector at the Republican State Convention in 
1908. He has been connected in various ways and at 
different times with the general progress and business 
interests of the county. He was one of the first directors 
of the Citizens' National Bank and one of its original 
stockholders, and was one of the three members of the 
building committee appointed on the erection of the said 
bank. For a number of years he has been a trustee of 



Washington and Jeft'erson College, and he now is presi- 
dent of the General Alumni Association of said college. 
While a student there he was a prominent member of the 
Delta Tau Delta fraternity and has never lost interest 
in that society. 

JAMES J. HOTT, who is superintendent of the Char- 
leroi Brewery, which is a branch of the Independent 
Brewing Company, of Pittsburg, Pa., was burgess of 
Charleroi from 1906 until March 4, 1909, and is identi- 
fied with various leading business enterprises of this city, 
and is well-known throughout the county. He was born 
April 10, 1861, on a farm in Hardy County, W. Va., and 
is a son of John H. and EUza Jane (Saville) Hott. 
When a lad of six years his parents removed to Raw- 
lings Station, -Md., and thence to Prostburg, Md., where 
the father died in 1894, and the mother in 1904. 

James J. Hott was practically reared at Frostburg, 
where he attended the common schools. On June 1, 1888, 
he came to Pennsylvania and located at Connellsville, 
where he engaged in the piano, sewing machine and 
organ business until 1891, when he came to Charleroi, 
where he carried on the same business for two years. In 
May, 1893, Mr. Hott became proprietor of the Hotel 
Redd, which he conducted until May 1, 1896, at which 
time he purchased the Hotel Clement, of which he was 
proprietor for a period of six years. He disposed of his 
interest in the hotel in April, 1902, and embarked in the 
real estate and insurance business, and for the past three 
years has been superintendent of the Charleroi Brewery. 
Mr. Hott is also president of the Charleroi Real Estate 
Agency, is a director of the Bank of Charleroi, also 
of the Telephone Company, and is vice-president and a 
director of the Adena Mining Company, of Adena, Ohio. 

Mr. Hott served five years on the Charleroi councU, 
of which he was president two years. He is a charter 
member of the Elks at Charleroi. On March 31, 1909, he 
was united in marriage with Elizabeth Hassinger. 

ALBERT DAVIS SCOTT, one of the oldest merchants 
of Monongahela City, Pa., and a life-long resident of 
this locality, was born in April, 1844, and is a son of 
John and Hannah (Davis) Scott. 

John Scott was born in 1798, in Maryland, and in 
1800 was brought by his parents across the mountains 
in a pack saddle and located in Washington County, Pa., 
near Monongahela City. His father, James Scott, was 
a carpet weaver by trade and died at Millsboro. John 
was reared in Washington County, where he learned the 
shoemaker's trade, which he followed many years. In 
1835 he drove a six-horse team across the mountains car- 
rying merchandise, our subject having in his possession 
an old invoice, showing one load of five tons. John 
Scott spent his entire life within ten miles of Monon- 



■ I I I I llVilt 



1 1 B S 1 1 



I I § 1 5 








\VAS|1IN(;T()N llOSri'l'AI.. WASIIIN*; ton city IIOSl'ITAI.. W As| 1 1 N( ;T( t.\ 




YOUNG LADIES' SEMINARY, WASHINGTON PENNSYLVANIA DKI'OT. ^\■ASHINGTON 




Y. M. ('. A. I'.riLDING. WASllLXGTON UNION TRUST COM PA XV, \VAsniN( ;T0N 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



583 



gahela City and .lir.l in IMiii in his ninety si-i-mid vrni-. 
He was first united in nnirrint;c witli JIann:di Davis, whu 
came here from Ohio, and of their union were born ten 
ihildren, most of whom died young: Amanda, deceased; 
Cassie, married William Boyde, both deceased; Hebecca, 
<leceased; Anna, deceased; Albert Davis, the subject of 
this sketch, was the only son, who grew to maturity. 

Albert D. Scott was reared near Monongahela City, 
attended the districfschools of that locality three months 
each year until seventeen years of age, when, owing to 
the poor circumstances of the family, he started out in 
life for himself, working at all kinds of odd jobs, spend- 
ing some time in the brick yards, and ako worked on the 
river. He managed b_v much hard labor to lay aside a 
little money, and when the Civil War broke out, he 
and two neighbor boys, James and Kerr Cassner, started 
a meat wagon through this part of the country. The 
cattle were butchered at the Cassner farm, which was 
located on the present site of Donora, Pa., and the meat 
peddled along the river. In 1858 he entered the employ 
of David H. Williams, who was a farmer of Mononga- 
hela City, with whom he formed a partnership the fol- 
lowing year, and with whom he continued in business 
about ten years. They were among the unfortunates 
iluring the panic of 1873 and dropped the meat business. 
About 1878, they opened a grocery store in Mononga- 
hela City, in our subject 's present store, but during the 
following winter lost money by giving credit, and finally 
dissolved partnership, dividing their stock, etc. Mr. 
Scott remained in the old location and opened his pres- 
ent store on a cash basis and as business has increased 
has enlarged his store room and added to his stock, 
now carrying a complete line of groceries, fine china, cut 
glass, lamps, etc. 

In December, 1869, Mr. Scott was united in marriage 
with Rebecca Ammon, who was born and reared near 
Monongahela City, and they have had a family of five 
children: Anna Eetta, wife of S. C. Markell; Mary, is 
the widow of John Oehrle and has one child, John Albert 
Scott Oehrle; Albert T., married Mable Collard, and has 
two children, Amanda R. and Robert K. ; Judson K., 
who is manager of his father's store; and John, who 
died aged seven years. Mr. Scott's residence is located 
at No. 408 Cole street. He is a director of the Standard 
Real Estate Company of Donora, Pa. ; is identified with 
the Democratic party in politics, and religiously, is a 
member of the Baptist church. 

JAMES A. GALBRAITH, deceased, formerly was a 
representative citizen of Washington County, at one time 
filling the office of recorder of deeds, and at the time 
of his death was a resident of Canonsburg, where he 
was an extensive dealer in grain and farm machinery. 
He was born on the old Galbraith homestead, in Smith 



■|'ii\vii.slii[), Washington Co., Pa., and was a son of Will- 
iam and Isabella (Welch) Galbraith. 

William Galbraith was born in Scotland. He mar- 
ried Isabella Welch, a native of Ireland and they then 
came to America, soon after locating on a farm near 
Burgettstown, in Smith Township, Washington County. 
William Galbraith died in 1800. For several years he 
was a justice of the peace and was a man of much local 
prominence. For many years he was a ruling elder in the 
United Presbyterian Church at Burgettstown. His nine 
children bore these names: Matthew, James A., Robert, 
.Tohn, William R., Jane, Margaret, Elizabeth and Isa- 
bella. 

The late James A. Galbraith was reared on the home 
farm and attended the district schools to such good pur- 
pose that by the time he was eighteen years of age he 
was prepared to teach and continued in that profession 
for several years. From teaching he turned his atten- 
tion to merchandising and served as a clerk in a store 
at Cross Creek village for twenty-one years. From there 
he moved to Burgettstowm, where he opened a hardware 
store and conducted it until 1875, w'hen he was 
elected recorder of Washington County and then 
moved to Washington, where he lived until his 
term of public oiEce expired when he settled per- 
manently at Canonsburg. going into the grain 
and implement business there. He was a man of honesty 
and ability and left a name to his children of which 
they are proud. 

James A. Galbraith was married to Miss Mary A. Be- 
bout, of Cross Creek, and to them were bom the fol- 
lowing children : Aaron, who married Dora Chambers ; 
Belle, now deceased, who was the wife of Charles Hard- 
ing; W. K., formerly postmaster at Canonsburg, who is 
now deceased ; Elizabeth, who is the wife of S. A. Crosier ; 
Robert, who married Anna Coleman, is engaged in the 
drug business; and Nettie, who married Joseph Thomp- 
son. Mrs. Galbraith still survives and lives among her 
old friends, residing at No. 27 South Central avenue, 
Canonsburg. 

ROBERT ALLISON MANSON, a well known citizen 
of Canonsburg, whose w-hole life, with the exception of 
several years, has been spent in Washington County, was 
born in Mt. Pleasant Township, February 18, 1857. His 
parents were John and Emeline (Allison) Manson. 

The paternal grandparents of Mr. Manson, lived and 
died in Beaver County, Pa. They had the following 
children : James, John, Robert, David, Buchanan, Jane 
and Agnes, all of whom are deceased except James, who 
resides near Hickory and has almost reached his nine- 
tieth year. The maternal grandparents, Samuel and 
Mary Allison, moved from Beaver County to Hickory, 
Washington County, where both died. They had the 



584 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



following children: James, Joseph, Samuel, John, Mary, 
Elizabeth, Margaret, BeUe and Emeline. James Allison 
resides in "Washington State, aged about seventy-five 
years. Marj' married Alexander McCalmont; Elizabeth 
married David Cummings; Margaret married Robert 
Cowden; Belle married James Coulter; and Emeline 
married John Manson. Mrs. Cummings and Mrs. Manson 
are the only survivors. The latter, now in her seventy- 
first years, resides at West Middletown. 

The father of Mr. Manson was born in Beaver County 
and came to Washington County and settled in Mt. Pleas- 
ant Township in early manhood and there engaged in 
farming until his death, in 1869, aged forty-eight years. 
He was survived by six children, namely: Robert Alli- 
son; James Buchanan, who lives on the old homestead 
in Cross Creek Township, near the line of Hopewell, 
married Emma, daughter of Alexander McCalmont ; John 
Franklin, who is a pattern maker in the bridge works at 
Canonsburg, married Mollie Meneely, who is now de- 
ceased; Mary Emma, now deceased, was the wife of 
J. Frank Brownlee and they lived on a farm in Hopewell 
Township; Samuel, who is a carpenter by trade, resides 
at West Middletown with his mother; and Harry Elmer, 
who died in 1907, is survived by his widow, formerly 
LiUie Myers, who resides at Los Angeles, Cal. 

Robert A. Manson attended the McCarrel's district 
school in Mt. Pleasant Township, also the Limestone 
Lane school. After he was eighteen years of age he 
devoted himself to farm work for six years and then 
learned the carpenter trade, working for five years with 
Samuel McFadden, in Cross Creek Township and after- 
ward worked in different places until his marriage, when 
he moved to Washington, and two years later from there 
to Ingram, and two years after that returned to the 
farm and remained there for seven years. He then re- 
sumed carpenter work, locating at Imperial, in Alle- 
gheny County. His wife died there March 4, 1900, aged 
thirty-seven years, and on November 15, 1902, he left 
Imperial and came to Canonsburg and has continued 
working at his trade in this city ever since. 

Mr. Manson was married (first), September 30, 1885, 
to Miss Ida Jane Morrison, a daughter of James and Mar- 
tha Morrison, and they had four children : James Russell, 
who was born October 9, 1886, is connected with a pot- 
tery at Newell, W. Va., married Pearl Smith, and they 
have one child, Eugene Devid; Robert Harold, who was 
born May 27, 1890, works on a farm; and Emma Ber- 
nice, who was born September 5, 1893, and Martha Agnes, 
who was born November 30, 1895, both attend school. 
Mr. Manson was married (second) December 31, 1891, to 
Miss Mary E. McNutt, a daughter of William and Nancy 
(Weaver) McNutt. Mr. and Mrs. Manson are members 
of the First Presbyterian Church at Canonsburg. He is 
a Republican. 



JOHN LEAMON PATTERSON, who, for fifteen con- 
secutive years has been a member of the Hopewell Town- 
ship school board, and has acceptably filled other town- 
ship ofiices, resides on his valuable farm of 100 acres, 
in Hopewell Township, Washington Co., Pa., on which 
he was born. May 30, 1859. His parents were John and 
Jane (McClelland) Patterson, both of whom are now 
deceased. They had four sons: James T., Thomas M., 
WUliam H. and John L., aU of whom survive except the 
eldest. 

John Leamon Patterson obtained his education in the 
public schools and since the age of nineteen years has 
been engaged in farming, being associated with his father 
untU the latter 's death, in 1880, since when he has 
been in charge. He devotes his land to the growing of 
grain and hay and to grazing, each year raising a large 
amount of fine stock, his unusual success being the result 
of accurate knowledge and excellent judgment. 

In June, 1886, Mr. Patterson was married to Miss 
MoUie M. McElroy, a daughter of Alexander McElroy, 
and they have had the following children : Jennie L., 
who was born February 16, 1887, is a popular teacher; 
John, who is now deceased; James and Mary, both of 
whom attend high school; Homer and Hazel, twins, and 
Robert, Lillian and Hugh. Mr. Patterson and family 
belong to the United Presbyterian Church at North Buf- 
falo, in which he is an elder and for a number of years 
was a trustee. Mrs. Patterson is interested in church 
missionary work. The whole family is one held in very 
high esteem in Hopewell Township. 

Mr. Patterson has always upheld the principles of the 
Republican party. He has frequently been elected to 
of&ce by his fellow citizens and at times has been judge 
of elections and also supervisor. In June, 1909, he was 
re-elected a member of the school board, on which he 
has already served for an unusual period. He owns 
stock in the Buffalo Telephone Company. 

W. B. LINN, a member of the firm of Linn Bros., lum- 
ber dealers, at Burgettstown, Pa., and part owner of a 
valuable farm of 192 acres, situated in Smith Township, 
Washington County, was born on his father's farm in 
Franklin County, Pa., June 28, 1867. 

Mr. Linn remained on the home farm until he was 
fifteen years of age, attending school first in Franklin, 
later in Cumberland and still later in Washington coun- 
ties, and took a business course at the Iron City Com- 
mercial College at Pittsburg. He then went into the 
lumber business at Burgettstown and the firm was first 
known as Armour and Linn, but later became Linn 
Bros. After his marriage he continued to reside at Bur- 
gettstown until 1900, when he moved to McKeesport, 
where he resided until August 16, 1909, when he returned 
to Burgettstown, never, in the meanwhile, having dis- 



mSTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



585 



associated himself with the lumber firm of Linn Bros. 
While at McKeesport he was president and treasurer 
of the National Inimber Company of that place and con- 
tinued iu those offices until 1908. 

On January 19, 1896, iVlr. Linn was nuirried to Miss 
•■Mice Betts, a daughter of P. B. and Jane (Galbraith) 
Belts. Two children have been born to them, William 
B. and George P., both of whom died in infancy. Mr. 
Linn is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of 
McKeesport. In polities, he is an active Democrat and 
he has served three terms as school treasurer of Bur- 
gettstown, and for three years has been treasurer of the 
Union Agricultural Association. Mr. Linn is a member 
of the Masonic order and is a substantial and represen- 
tative citizen of Washington County. 

J.\MES M. McBURNEY, a well known citizen and 
prosperous lawyer of Washington, Pa., was born in that 
borough March 7, 1858, and is a son of Ebenezer and 
Mary (Maxwell) McBurney. The family has long been 
established in America and was a pioneer one in Wash- 
ington County. 

James McBurney, the great-grandfather of James M., 
married Mary McGoffin and they had six children: Mary, 
who married John McAuley; Martha, who married James 
Matthews; Jane, who married John Gillespie; and Alex- 
ander, Joseph and James. 

James McBurney (2), son of James, was born in 
Washington County, Pa. He was an officer iu the Penn- 
sylvania militia and resided on a farm in South Strabane 
Towship, which is now owned by the Zediker family. 
He was the father of the following children: Ebenezer, 
James, Joseph, Mrs. Eliza Hawkins, Mrs. Martha Wat- 
son, Mrs. Sarah Thompson and Mrs. Catherine Gault. 

Ebenezer McBurney was born in Mercer County, Pa., 
in 1814, and obtained his education in the subscription 
schools. He learned the carpenter trade in Washington 
and subsequently erected many of the substantial struc- 
tures of the growing borough. Some years prior to his 
death he went into the business of moving buildings, suc- 
ceeding in whatever he undertook on account of being a 
man of energy and capacity. He thus acquired much 
more than a competency but lost the greater part of his 
fortune through his generosity and his seeming inability 
to disappoint a friend when he sought his signature as 
security. Until the outbreak of the Civil War he was a 
Democrat but later became and continued a Republican. 
Although a hearty sympathizer in the cause of the Union, 
his age and physical condition were against his enlisting, 
an accident having made his acceptance impossible. His 
loyalty and his sterling character were recognized, how- 
ever, and he was appointed and served as provost mar- 
shal of his district and later was commissioned a private 
■detective for the county under district attorneys Ralph 



McConnell and J. F. Taylor, and served as such for six 
years. His death occurred September 12, 1889, at the 
age of seventy-five years. He married Mary Maxwell, a 
daughter of Thomas Maxwell, who was a hatter by trade 
and had come to Washington County from Wheeling, 
W. Va. Mrs. McBurney preceded her husband to the 
grave by six months. Two of their eleven children died 
in infancy. The others were: Helen, who married Jo- 
seph Shaw; John F., Alexander F., James M., and George 
M. ; Kate M., who married George M. Haldeman; and 
Mary and Margaret, the former of whom died aged six- 
teen years ami the latter aged twenty-one years. Eben- 
ezer McBurney was an active member of the Seceder 
Church for years but was dropped from the church roll 
because of his joining the order of Odd Fellows. 

James M. McBurney received his preliminary educa- 
tion in the public schools and in the preparatory depart- 
ment of Washington and Jefferson College, and later 
entered the collegiate department of that institution and 
was graduated in 1881. For one year after leaving col- 
lege he was principal of McKeesport Academy, in asso- 
ciation with Rev. Robert M. Russell, after which he re- 
turned to Washington and prepared for the practice of 
law in the office of Hon. H. J. Vankirk, completing his 
.studies under attorney John W. Donnan. Since his ad- 
mission to the bar of Washington County, in 1885, and 
to the supreme court of the United States, on February 
2, 1893, he has been in continuous practice and has at- 
tained a high degree of success in his profession. He 
maintains offices in the Washington Trust building, Nos. 
315-317. 

In 1889, Mr. McBurney was married to Miss Annie 
S. Reckers, a daughter of J. B. Reckers, of Washington, 
Pa., and they have two children: Ernestine D. and 
Bernard R. The family residence is a comfortable and 
attractive one situated at No. 122 North Wade avenue. 
He is a Republican of the independent type in his po- 
litical views. Always interested in educational matters, 
he has served many years as a school director. As far 
back as 1876, Mr. McBurney united with the United 
Presbyterian Church and is an elder in the same, and has 
taught an adult class in the Sabbath School almost con- 
tinuously since he graduated from college. 

MILTON C. IRWIN, a leading citizen of Buffalo 
Township, serving as a member of the board of super- 
visors, and following farming and stock raising as an 
occupation, was bom in Washington County, Pa., Feb- 
ruary 28, 1873, and is a son of William C. and Mary 
(Dye) Irwin. 

The paternal grandfather of Mr. Irwin, David Irwin, 
was an early settler in Canton Township, Washington 
County, and there both WiUiam C. Irwin and wife spent 
the greater portion of their lives and died there. They 



586 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



■were for many years members of the East Buffalo Pres- 
byterian Church, but in later years were members of the 
Second Presbyterian Church at Washington. For a long 
period William C. Irwin was one of the large sheep 
growers of this section, raising annually as many as 250 
head, his preference being for the Black Top Delaine as 
superior in wool. He was in his seventy-fourth year 
when he died, and was a well informed man and took 
a very active part in politics. 

His immediate family contained thirteen children, 
many of whom married and had children of theii- own, 
and the following survive: James D., living in Canton 
Township; John D., Leman N., William M. and Asa C, 
all living at Washington, Pa. ; Milton C, living in Buf- 
falo Township; and Clifton C, Edith and Etta, all three 
residing in Washington. 

Milton C. Irwin was reared on his father's farm in 
Canton Township and attended the district schools in 
that neighborhood until he was sixteen years of age, 
when he started out for himself, going to. the oil fields. 
Through his industry he made the business profitable and 
remained in one capacity or another, for a number of 
years, confining himself to Allegheny and Washington 
counties. About the time of his marriage he settled on 
his present place in the southern part of Buffalo Town- 
ship, and has prospered as a farmer and raiser of good 
stock. 

Mr. Irwin was married July 22, 1897, to Miss Sarah 
Chambers, a daughter of James Chambers, of Buffalo 
Township, and they have two children: Clark C. and 
Mary M. Mr. and Mrs. Irwin attend the East Buffalo 
Presbyterian Church. In politics he is identified with 
the Democratic party, and he takes an interest in town- 
ship affairs of a public nature. 

COL. L. M. MARSH, deceased, who bore an honorable 
record for service in the Union Army during the Civil 
War, was one of the foremost citizens of Washington, 
Pa., that borough having been the scene of his greatest 
business activities. He was born at Orange, Essex Co., 
N. J., June 23, 1824, and was a son of Abraham E. and 
Sarah (Munn) Marsh. 

Abraham Marsh was born in Eahway, N. J., July 8, 
1800, where he was reared and educated. He learned 
the shoemaking trade and worked at it and also engaged 
in merchandising, both in his native State and subse- 
quently in Ohio. He married Sarah Munn, a daughter 
of David Munn, of New Jersey, and she died in Huron 
County, Ohio, in 1860, aged fifty-eight years, but he sur- 
vived into extreme old age, dying two days after his 
ninetieth birthday. He was a Presbyterian of the old 
Knox faith and for many years was an elder in the 
church. He saw the formation of the Republican party 
and became a strong supporter of the same. His nine 



children bore the following names : L. M., David, Stephen, 
Harriet, George, Abraham, Charles, Henry and Mary. 

When the late Col. Marsh was thirteen years old, his 
parents moved from JNew Jersey to Coshocton County, 
Ohio, and there he completed his school attendance and 
then learned the tailoring trade. When twenty-one years 
old he went to Marietta, Ohio, where he followed his 
trade, and from there to West Virginia, where he was 
residing at the time of the outbreak of the Civil War. 
His loyalty to the Union was manifested by his immedi- 
ately enlisting, and his standing was shown by his being 
made captain of Co. E, 10th W. Va. Vol. Inf., which 
was assigned to the Army of the Potomac. He encoun- 
tered many of the direst misfortunes of war. At the battle 
of Kernstown he w:as wounded in the foot and being left 
helpless on the battle field was taken captive, j: or two 
months he was confined in the infamous Libby Prison at 
Richmond, at the end of that time securing a parole, 
and six months later was exchanged and rejoined his 
regiment. His subsequent career as a soldier was bril- 
liant and when he was honorably discnarged and mus- 
tered out it was with the rank of lieutenant-colonel. 

Col. Marsh then returned to peaceful pursuits, locating 
at Washington, Pa., and he was occupied for two years 
as bookkeeper for a large business concern. In 1870 he 
was made secretary and treasurer of the Washington 
County Eire Insurance Company and he continued to 
discharge the duties of that position during the remain- 
ing years of his active life. He had additional interests, 
being associated for some years in the real estate busi- 
ness with his son, Addison C. Marsh, under the firm name 
of L. M. Marsh & Son. He was a man of upright life 
and sterling character. 

On January 14, 1850, Col. Marsh was married to Miss 
Louisa McCoUum, a daughter of Asa McCollum, and they 
reared two chOdren: Ella, who became the wife of Will- 
iam S. Park; and Addison C, who is a representative 
citizen of Washington, of which he has been burgess since 
March, 1906. The late Col. Marsh was a Republican in 
his political aflSUation. Both he and wife were consistent 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. His death 
occurred in March, 1899. 

Hon. Addison C. Marsh was born February 26, 1858, 
and was educated in the Washington schools. He is secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Washington County Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company, with ofiice at No. 55 South 
Main street. He was elected burgess of Washington 
Borough on the Republican ticket and his ofScial career 
has been satisfactory to his fellow citizens to whose best 
interests he has devoted his careful attention for the past 
three years. He married Miss Nettie Foster, a daughter 
of E. D. Poster, a resident of Bradford, Pa., and they 
have four children: Ola E., Ellis F., Helen L. and Ruth. 
The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church. They 



HISTORY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



587 



luivi- ;i luniutiful luiino, tlio lariiilv rcsidciu'C boiiig situ 
ati'il ill Xo. 205 West Beau street. 

L. M. IRWIN, who is cashier of the Avella Bauk at 
Avolla, Pa., is one of the youngest men in Washington 
('iiiiiity to hold so responsible a position, one that he has 
aeeejitably filled since January, 1908. He belongs to an old 
and honorable county family and was born in Cross Creek 
Township, May 7, 1881, and is one of three children born 
to his parents, Dr. J. B. and Louisa Irwin, resident of 
Washington. Mr. Irwin has two brothers: Russell B. 
and Jesse B. 

L. M. Ii'win attended school in Cros.s Creek Township 
until he was eighteen years of age, graduating then 
from the high school at Cross Creek village. For a short 
time he taught school and then accepted an offer, which 
promised more remunerative work, from the James G. 
Corcoran Company, of Pittsburg, and remained with 
that concern for five years, engaged in construction work. 
In January, 1908, he came to the Avella Bank as cashier, 
having fairly won this appointment by reason of his 
energy, determination, industry and fidelity to the in- 
ter&sts of his employers in his former capacity. 

In June, 1902, Mr. Irwin was married to Miss Anna 
M. Brown, a daughter of W. J. and Margaret Brown, of 
Cross Creek Township. Mr. and Mrs. Irwin are mem- 
bers of the Lower Buffalo Presbyterian Church, in which 
he is an elder. He is identified with the Masons and 
belongs to the Burgettstown lodge. 

A. M. CARLISLE, one of Smith Township 's leading 
farmers and representative citizens, residing on his well 
improved property which contains 14.5 acres, all tillable 
land, with three oil wells, owns also a farm of eighty- 
five acres, situated in Mt. Pleasant Township. He was 
bora in the latter township, February 5, 1862, and is a 
son of Joseph Elizabeth (White) Carlisle. 

Joseph Carlisle was born on an adjoining farm in Mt. 
Pleasant Township, a short distance south of Hickory, 
and during a long and provident life which extended to 
eighty-four years, acquired two farms both in the same 
township. He was an intelligent and upright man at 
different times was selected for township offices by his 
fellow citizens. He married Elizabeth White, a daughter 
of Nicholas White, and they had three children : Annie, 
A. M., and I. M. Annie is deceased. Joseph Carlisle 
died September 16, 1898, and his widow, November 25, 
1905, and both were buried in the cemetery at Hickory. 
They were worthy members of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 

A. M. Carlisle attended school in Mt. Pleasant Town- 
ship and later at Hickory, and lived at home until his 
first marriage when he moved on the farm he now owns, 
south of Hickory, and lived there nntil January, 1906, 



when he moved to Smith Township, buying his present 
farm from his father-in-law, J. L. Rankin. He repaired 
the house and erected new farm buildings, his barn being 
the best structure of its kind in the township. He has 
sold his coal to the Pittsburg-Eaton Coal Company. He 
raises superior stock, cattle and sheep and when he ex- 
hibits at the county fairs is very sure to carry off many 
of the best prizes. He is a stockholder and a director in 
the Farmers' National Bank of Hickory; a stockholder 
and president of the Farmers' Telephone Company at 
Burgettstown; and for eleven years has been a director 
in the Union Agricultural Association of Burgettstown. 
.Mr. Carlisle was married (first) March 7, 1889, to Miss 
Emma Hastings, a daughter of Daniel Hastings, of 
Allegheny County. She died July 14, 1893, and her 
burial was iu the Hickorj- Cemetery. She is survived 
by one son, Joseph Edgar, who lives at home. Mr. Car- 
lisle was married (second) November 7, 1894, to Mary 
L. Rankin, a daughter of J. L. Rankin, and they have 
two children: John Charles, a manly youth of fourteen 
years; and Emma Elizabeth, who, although but twelve 
years of age, is a student in the high school at Burgetts- 
town. Mr. Carlisle and family are members of the First 
Presbyterian Church at Burgettstown. In poUtics he is 
independent and fraternally he is identified with the 
order of Elks. 

WILLIAM CAMERON, deceased, w^ho is well remem- 
bered by the older residents of South Strabane Township, 
Washington Co., Pa., as one of its most prominent citi- 
c-ents at an early period, was bom in the county, in Som- 
erset Township, in 1808. He was a son of John and 
Esther (Twinem) Cameron. 

John Cameron was a native of Scotland and was a 
young man when he left his own land and went to Ire- 
land, where he took up his residence in County Armagh 
and there married Esther Twinem. Shortly afterward 
they emigrated to America and settled near Gettysburg, 
Pa., and he secured his naturalization papers there. 
These papers are still preserved by a son of William, our 
subject, George M. Cameron, who has them framed in his 
home. He moved from there to the part of Washington 
(,'ounty. Pa., known now as Somerset Township. 
.John Cameron became a man of considerable importance 
in the section in which he settled and as he was intelli- 
gent and thrifty, he became a leader in public affairs and 
an owner of property. In poUtics he was a Democrat, 
and in religious matters he was a Presbyterian and one 
of the founders of the church in Somerset Township. To 
John Cameron and wife were born the following children : 
John, James G., Esther, Margaret and William. 

William Cameron, the youngest of the above family, 
was reared on the pioneer farm in Somerset Township 
and all the formal education he secured was in the prim- 



588 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



itive schools. After marriage he and wife, started to 
housekeeping on a small tract of land, tirenty-one acres 
in extent, in South Strabane Township, and to this he 
subsequently added 200 acres, this having been part of 
the farm of his father-in-law, George Mitchell. This 
was a large body of land and as it was almost entirely 
unimproved it required many years of hard work to eon- 
vert it into productive farms, but from youth he had 
been inured to labor and he had inherited a large meas- 
ure of his father 's Scotch persistency and success 
crowned his efforts. He always took an interest in the 
public affairs of his community and performed every 
public duty with faithfulness and according to conscience. 
In politics he was a Democrat. For many years he con- 
sented to serve on the school board. 

On September 28, 1837, William Cameron married 
Miss Martha Mitchell, a native of South Strabane Town- 
sip, born August 9, 1804, and died August 16, 1860. She 
was a daughter of George Mitchell and his wife, who 
had formerly been a Miss Alexander. George Mitchell 
was born in Ireland and his death occurred May 8, 1847, 
at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Cameron.' In early 
manhood he had come to America and settled in South 
Strabane Township, Washington County. In Ms political 
views he was a Democrat, and religiously he was a Pres- 
byterian. He had five ehUdren, namely: Martha, Mary, 
Eleanor, Thomas and Catherine. 

To William and Martha Cameron were born the fol- 
lowing children: John, who was born August 12, 1838, 
has always engaged in farming in South Strabane Town- 
ship; Ellen, who married John G. Paxton; Margaret; 
Mary J.; George M., who was born April 22, 1849, is a 
prominent citizen of Washington, president of the E. 
J. Young Packing Company and a director of the Wash- 
ington Trust Company; and Martha A., vfho married 
J. C. Pease. William Cameron survived his wife for 
thirteen years, his death occurring October 15, 1873. 

WILLIAM W. McCLAY, a prominent citizen of Can- 
ton Township who owns a fine farm of 191 acres, which 
he devotes to general agriculture and stock raising, 
making a specialty of sheep, was born on this farm, 
March 2, 1845, being a member of one of the old and 
honorable families of Washington County. His parents 
were John and Jane (Welsh) McClay. 

Samuel McClay, the grandfather, was born in Ireland 
and came of Scotch and Irish stock. When he emigrated 
to America he settled at first in Chester County, Pa., and 
from there came to Washington County. He located on 
the farm which his grandson, William W. McClay now 
owns, probably before the township divisions were made. 
A former owner had made some slight improvements but 
the greater part of the clearing was accomplished by 
grandfather McClay. John McClay, son of Samuel and 



father of William W., was born on this farm in Canton 
Township in March, 1809, and died in 1895. He was a 
successful business man and carried on farming and 
stock raising for many years, devoting much attention to 
the growing of sheep. In his early political life he was a 
Whig and later became a strong advocate of the aboli- 
tion of slavery. During the CivU War he' lent his sup- 
port heartily to the preservation of the Union. In early 
days he was a member of the Covenanter Church but 
later was identified for years with the North Buffalo 
United Presbyterian Church, in which he was an elder. 
He married Jane Welsh, who was born in Mt. Pleasant 
Township, Washington County, and three of their chil- 
dren survive, namely: Sarah J., who is the widow of 
Dr. William Morrison, who was a practitioner in Cross 
Creek Township, she now residing at Washington; Will- 
iam W., of Canton Township; and Robert H., who re- 
sides at Washington, Pa. John McClay was a director 
in the First National Bank at Washington. 

William W. McClay has never lived in any other home 
than the old family homestead and it is endeared to him 
by recoHeotion of his boyhood and of his parents who 
have passed away. He attended the neighborhood schools 
and also an academy at Buffalo village while he was 
growing up and later was a student in the Eastman Busi- 
ness College at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where he was grad- 
uated in 1867. From choice he has always been a farmer 
and stock raiser and has met with excellent results in rais- 
ing the Black Top sheep, usually having- from 250 to 300 
head in his flocks. 

In 1878, Mr. McClay was married (first) to Miss Myra 
C. Crothers, who was born in Buffalo Township, a daugh- 
ter of the late Samuel J. Crothers. He was married (sec- 
ond), in 1894, to Miss Jennie Maxwell, who was born in 
Harrison County, Ohio, a daughter of Eobert Maxwell, 
who formerly lived in Buffalo vDlage. 

Mr. McClay is a Republican. He has frequently been 
elected to township ofliees and has served most accept- 
ably as township auditor and also as judge of elections. 
Both he and wife are members of the North Buffalo 
United Presbyterian Church, of which he is a trustee. 

HAINES H. REED, postmaster at Eea, Pa., where he 
is also proprietor of a general store and also ticket and 
freight agent for the Wabash Railroad, belongs to one 
of the old and substantial families of this section. He 
was born in Cross Creek Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
in January, 1879, and is a son of John C. and Mary 
(Barnes) Reed, being the youngest member of their 
family of six children, the others bearing the following 
names: Lulu B., who married S. J. Welsh and they re- 
side at McKee's Rocks; Edwin C. ; Wylie B., who is 
now deceased ; and Norman W. and J. Howard. 

Haines H. Reed was educated in the common and high 




WASIILXCTUN COIN'I'Y JAIL 



(MTIZKNS NATIONAL l;A^■K 
WASHINGTON 








PUMP .STATION. CITI/KN.-. W A IKii ((i.MI'ANV, W \s| 1 1 N( ;TON 



THE NEW YOR^.'- 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 



HISTORY OF WASHIMUTON COUiNTY 



591 



school of Cross Creek and continued his studies until 
lie was nineteen years of age, when he went to Pittsburg 
auil for a time was engaged there and in the vicinity 
!i3 a clerk. He returned to the farm for a season and 
then decided to visit the far West, extending his jouf- 
uey to California. He reuiaiued there for two years, 
working as an electrician and continued work in the 
same line after coming as far east as Colorado, from 
which State he later returned to Pennsylvania. When 
he next left Washington County it was to engage in the 
gas fitting business for a time, at Andover, Ohio. In 
U'05 he came back to Cross Creek Township and became 
manager of the branch store at Rea Station for the firm 
of I. il. Reed & Son, of Cross Creek village and also was 
appointed U. S. rural mail carrier. In October, 1908, 
he purchased the store he had formerly been operating 
for the Reed firm, and in November following he was ap- 
pointed postmaster and subsequently assumed the rail- 
road duties mentioned above. He is one of the leading 
and busy men of the village. In politics he considers 
himself an independent, although he favors the prin- 
ciples of old Democracy in which his father reared him. 
Mr. Reed was married in December, 1906, to Miss 
Anna Mae Pyle, a daughter of W. S. and Mary Pyle, of 
Cross Creek Township, and they have a beautiful little 
daughter of two years. Mr. Reed and wife are members 
of Mt. Prospect Presbyterian Church. 

RICHARD GLADDEN, one of Robeson Township's 
most substantial citizens, the owner of valuable farming 
land and stock in several of the leading financial institu- 
tions of Washington County, has been a valued and es- 
teemed resident of McDonald for some years, where he 
now lives retired from business and enjoys the comforts 
of a beautiful home. He was born in Cecil Township, 
Washington Co., Pa., March 3, 1855, and is a son of 
Richard and Mary (Kelso) Gladden. 

Richard Gladden, Sr., father of Richard, was born in 
Washington County, a son of William and Mary (Woods) 
Gladden, all of whom have passed away. Richard Glad- 
den was a prosperous farmer and was a respected citizen. 
He married Mary Kelso, who was a daughter of Ben- 
jamin and Martha (Murdock) Kelso. She survived her 
husband but a short time and they both were interred in 
the Arlington Cemetery. They were worthy members 
of the United Presbyterian Church. Their children bore 
the following names: William, ilartha, deceased; Ben- 
jamin J., deceased; George, decea-^ed; Richard and 
Joseph. Martha was the wife of Thomas Reed. 

Richard Gladden went to the public schools in early 
boyhood and from there to Oakdale Academy and had 
further advantages at the West Philadelphia Academy. 
After his school days were over he engaged in fanning 



and continued in agricultrual pursuits for a number of 
years. Prior to settling permanently at McDonald, he 
spent a year in travel in California. Mr. Gladden still 
retains his farm of 200 acres which is situated in Cecil 
Township. Ho has other large investments and is a di- 
rector in the McDonald Savings and Trust Company; is a 
stockholder in the First National Bank at McDonald; is 
a stockholder in the Warner Glass Company, and is vice- 
president of the Water and Light Company at McDonald. 
On October 25, 1876, Mr. Gladden was married to 
Miss Lavina Tuten, a daughter of George and Catherine 
(Trimmer) Tuten. Mr. Tuten was a farmer and also 
was proprietor of a hotel at Hickory, Pa. Mrs. Gladden 
has two sisters: lautha, who is the widow of Albert 
Sauters; and Clara, who is the wife of Oliver Pearson. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Gladden the following children were 
born: Anna Mary, Iva C. and Prank R. Mr. Gladden 
has given his children superior educational advantages, 
his daughters being educated at Wilson College at Cham- 
bersburg, and his son at Purdue University, Indiana. 
The second daughter is the wife of Samuel H. Ridall, of 
Pittsburg, and they have one daughter, Elizabeth Ann. 
Mr. Gladden and family belong to the First United 
Presbyterian Church at McDonald. He is identified with 
the Republican party. 

WILLIAM E. LANE, county treasurer of Washington 
County, Pa., and senior member of the firm of Lane & 
Spriggs, dealers in real estate and insurance, with oflSces 
at No. 433 Washington Trust building, is a representa- 
tive of an old county family and a leading citizen of 
Washington. He was born at West Middletown, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., January 26, 1866, and is a son of Thomas 
and Rebecca (McElroy) Lane. 

Thomas Lane came to Washington County in early 
life and his interests remained centered here throughout 
his entire career. For many years he was connected 
with the U. S. mail service and he was proprietor of a 
livery stable for some time. His death occurred Janu- 
ary 25, 190S. He married Rebecca McElroy, and they 
had twelve children. 

William E. Lane was educated in the schools of West 
Middletown and then engaged in teaching school until 
he embarked in his present business at Washington. He 
is in partnership with H. H. Spriggs and they handle a 
large amount of valuable realty and represent the lead- 
ing fire, life and accident insurance companies of the 
country. Mr. Lane has been an active Republican for 
a number of years and in 1908 was elected county treas- 
urer with a large majority. He is a man well qualified 
for this important public office and has proved his efii- 
ciency. 

Mr. Lane married Miss Lillie M. McCalmont, a daugh- 



592 



mSTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



ter of Alexander McCalmont, and they have four chil- 
dren. Mr. and Mrs. Lane are members of the Second 
United Presbyterian Church. 

SAMUEL CLAEENCE IMHOFJP, who owns a fine 
farm of ninety-four acres which is situated in Canton 
To^vuship, Washington Co., Pa., is numbered with the 
successful agriculturists of this section, and is also one 
of its most enterprising business men. He was born on 
his present farm, August 16, 1863, and is a son of Sam- 
uel and Mary J. (Stewart) ImhofE. 

Samuel Imhofif was born in Canton Township and is 
a son of Martin Imhoff, who was born in Switzerland. 
During the early days of the gold excitement in Cali- 
fornia, Samuel Imhoff visited the far West and there 
was engaged for a time in mining. After he returned to 
Washington County, Pa., he followed farming in Canton 
Township, where he died in 1874. He married Mary J. 
Stewart, who was also born in Canton Township and died 
here in 1881. Of their children, Samuel Clarence ImhofE 
is the only survivor. 

Samuel Clarence ImhofE grew to manhood in Canton 
Township and in boyhood attended the district schools. 
He has been engaged in farming and stock raising ever 
since he entered into business. He also followed thresh- 
ing for a time and then bought a portable sawmill and 
for some years has done a large amount of work with 
this machine in different sections. He is a practical 
business man and stands well with his feUow citizens per- 
sonally. 

On January 28, 1886, Mr. Imhoff was married to Miss 
Emma J. Smiley, who was born in Cross Creek Township, 
Washington County, and is a daughter of the late James 
G. Smiley. They have two children : Mary S. and James 
C. Mr. Imhoff and family belong to the North Buffalo 
United Presbyterian Church, the membership of which 
includes tlie larger number of the substantial and rep- 
resentative people of this section. In his political views, 
Mr. Imhoff is independent, having connected himself 
with no definite party, but is sure to cast his vote, how- 
ever, for a responsible and reliable candidate. 

LIEUT. JOHN FULTON BELL, a highly respected 
citizen of Washington, Pa., residing in his fine residence 
at No. 80 West Prospect avenue, for many years was en- 
gaged in farming and stock raising in Amwell Township, 
Washington County. He was born in Jefferson, Morgan 
Township, Greene County, Pa., August 23, 1841, and is 
a son of Levi Harrod Bell, the Bell family having settled 
in Greene County in pioneer days. 

John Fulton Bell first attended school in his native 
place and in 1860 became a student at Georges Creek 
Academy in Fayette County. He resided in Greene 
County until 1860, when he came to Washington County 



and in 1868 bought a large farm in Amwell Township, ■ 
which he continued to operate and develop until 1907, 
when he sold his farming lands and retired to Wash- 
ington. Mr. Bell spent four years, between 1903 and 
1907 in Prosperity. For many years he was one of the 
leading stock raisers of this section. 

On August 22, 1862, Mr. Bell enlisted at Amity, Wash- 
ington County, Pa., in Co. D, 140th P. V. I., and was 
promoted June 21, 1863, from the rank of corporal to 
that of sergeant. On November 1, 1863, he became first 
sergeant; on July 20, 1864, near City Point, Va., he was 
commissioned first lieutenajit by Governor Andrew G. 
Curtin, of Pennsylvania, and served as such until the 
close of the war and for several months was in charge 
of the company. The company was mustered out May 
31, 1865, in the name of Fh-st Lieut. J. F. Bell as senior 
commanding officer. Among the twenty-five battles in 
which his company fought were those of Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, Mine Eun, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, the 
operations in front of Petersburg and those at Appo- 
mattox, which culminated in Lee's surrender and brought 
the war to happy termination. 

On May 6, 1868, Mr. Bell married Miss Lydia Boss, 
who was born in Washington Township, Greene County, 
Pa., and they have five children: Benjamin Harrod, 
Sarah Frances, Lyda Emma, Abner Ross and James 
Franklin. 

James Franklin Bell, the youngest son, is a graduate 
of Washington and Jefferson College at Washington. In 
1902 he graduated from West 'Point Military Academy 
as engineer and served two years in the engineers' corps, 
in the Philippine Islands. He was instructor in mathe- 
matics for a time, at West Point, and is now stationed at 
Washington, D. C, as a member of the engineer corps of 
the U. S. Army. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bell are members of the Baptist Church, 
in which he is one of the board of deacons. 

A. 0. HINDMAN, M. D., physician and surgeon at 
Cross Creek, Pa., has been in continuous practice at this 
place for the past ten years and commands the confi- 
dence and enjoys the esteem of the people. He was 
born in Cross Creek Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
November 9, 1875, and is a son of Thomas and Hannah 
(Stevenson) Hindman. 

The Hindman family has been settled in Washington 
County for generations, the grandparents, William and 
Betsey Hindman, having been born here. Thomas Hind- 
man was born on the farm in Brooke County, W. Va., 
which he now owns, but for many years has been a resi- 
dent of Cross Creek village. He was a blacksmith by 
trade and was a reputable citizen. He married Hannah 
Stevenson and they had three children : A. 0., Delia M. 
and Nettie P. 




LIKIT. JOHN 1 ri/rox I'.KI.I, 



YOR. 



Ill STORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



59i 



Dr. lliiiiliiKiii was i'clui':itf<l in tho district schools of 
Cross Crock Township, Hickory Acinlemy ami the Ohio 
Normal University at Ada, now known as Ohio Northern 
University. He then entered upon the study of medicine 
and completed his medical course and received his degree 
in 1899, from the Western Pennsylvania Medical Col- 
lege at Pittsburg. He immediately located at Cross 
Creek and has hero built up a substantial practice. He 
is identified with business enterprises aside from his 
profession, being a stockholder in the Burgettstowu Na- 
tional Bank, the Freehold Oil and Gas Company and in 
other concerns in this section. 

Dr. Hindman was married to Miss Ada Newcomer, a 
daughter of Thomas and Hattie (Eichie) Newcomer, 
residents of Washington, and they have one daughter, 
Helen Lucille. The family are members of the Presby- 
terian Church at Cross Creek. Dr. Hindman is an active 
and valued member of the Washington County and 
Pennsylvania State Medical Societies and of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. In addition to this he is a 
quiet scientific investigator along his ovm lines, never 
having ceased being a student. 

JAMES LINDSAY YOHE, senior member of the Yohe 
Brothers Lumber Company, which was established in 
1878 and is the oldest concern of its kind in Monon- 
gahela City, was born Dec. 20, 1849, in this city and is 
a son of Michael and Phoebe (McConnel) Yohe. 

Michael Yohe was born on a farm in Carroll Town- 
ship, in 1815, and was a son of Isaac Yohe, who came 
from the eastern part of Pennsylvania, and located on 
a farm three mUes east of Monongahela City, where he 
spent his life engaged in agricultural pursuits. Michael 
Yohe was reared in Carroll Township, where he remained 
until after his marriage, when he removed to Monon- 
gahela City, where he died, aged 68 years. He married 
Phoebe McConnel, who was born at West Middletown, 
Washington Co., Pa., in 1825, and died, aged 75 years. 
They had the following children: John M., a resident of 
Pittsburg; Isaac, of Monongahela City, Pa.; Leroy S., 
deceased; James L., subject of this sketch; William G., 
of New Kensington ; Lewis N., of Monongahela City ; 
Frank and Charles, twins, both residents of Monongahela 
City; and Sherod C, a resident of Monongahela City. 
Some 30 years ago a photograph was taken of the eight 
brothers, who recently sat for another photograph, all 
of whom, with the exception of John, the eldest, who 
was born at West Middletown, were born in Monongahela 
City. 

James L. Yohe was reared in Monongahela City, 
where he obtained a common school education, early in 
life learning the carpenter 's trade with his father. In 
1878, in partnership with his brothers, Isaac and Lewis 
N., they established the Yohe Brothers Lumber Company, 



iirul liic |il:iiit is li»alc<l on tlie Monongahela River, and 
the lirm gives cmploynicnt to au average of 60 to 100 
men. They carry on a general contracting business and 
deal in all kinds of building materials. In 1902, Clyde 
C. Yohe purchased one-half of the Isaac Yohe interest 
in the concern, and in 1909, purchased the remaining 
half interest of Isaac Yohe, who is now living in re- 
tirement. Besides his lumber interests, Mr. Yohe is a 
director in the Monongahela Trust Company, and a 
stockholder of the Perry Manufacturing Company. He 
is afliliated with tlie B. P. O. E. order, is a 32nd degree 
Mason, and is religiously a member of the Methodist 
Church. 

In 1879, Mr. Yohe married Ella M. Corrin, a daughter 
of William and Eleanor Corrin, and they have reared the 
following children : Annetta, widow of Adam C. Samp- 
son, has two children, Lois and Adam; Clyde C, married 
Nellie Beach and they have one child, Chauncey B. ; Ed- 
ward L., married Blanch Dewalt, and has two children, 
Lloyd and Bearl; Emma C, married Edward Kuhlman, 
of Indian Territory; and James K. is a student at Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College. 

HON. JOHN D. BRADEN, deceased, for many years 
was a prominent and useful citizen of Washington, Pa., 
and during the entire course of his active business life 
was engaged in the practice of law. He was born in 
Chippewa Township, Beaver Co., Pa., Nov. 21, 1826, and 
was a son of John and Katherine (Mclntyre) Braden. 

James Braden, the grandfather, was born in Ireland 
and there was married to Margaret Howe, who was of 
English parentage. After her death, James Braden, 
with his motherless children started for America and 
reached this country in 1797. One of his sons, John 
Braden, who was the father of John D., was bom at 
what was called Five-Mile town, near Enniskillen, in 
County Fermanagh, Ireland. He accompanied his father 
to America. It is probable that he followed farming 
from the time that he was capable of working, as he 
subsequently acquired farming land situated near 
Youngstown, Ohio, on which he was residing when the 
War of 1812 was declared. He wa-s called into actual 
service Aug. 26, 1812, first under Capt. Samuel Denison. 
On Sept. 16, 1812, he was transferred at Cleveland to 
Capt. Joshua T. Cotton's company, under whom he con- 
tinued until Nov. 8, 1812, and he was discharged by 
Gen. Elijah Wadsworth. He was in the First Reg., 
Third Brig., 4th Div. of Ohio militia, which was com- 
manded by Col. William Rayen. He did not marry until 
he returned from that war, and then settled in Chippewa 
Township, Beaver Co., Pa., where he and wife lived for 
more than 50 years. Of their large family of children, 
the late John D. Braden was the only one to locate per- 
manently in Washington County. The maternal grand- 



596 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



father of John D. Braden was William Mclntyre, a 
native of Scotland, who came unmarried to the United 
States and settled at Hagerstown, Md. 

John D. Braden attended Beaver Academy at Beaver, 
Pa., for some years and in 1849 entered what was then 
Washington College, which was later consolidated with 
Jefferson College, where he was graduated in 1851. He 
was prepared for the practice of law in the office of 
Hon. George S. Hart, at that time district attorney, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1853. He immediately opened 
an office in the borough of Washington, soon attracted 
attention by his legal abUity and in a few years had 
advanced to a foremost place in his profession. To 
profound learning, Mr. Braden united a high standard of 
professional honor and it has been frequently affirmed 
by those who knew him best that no client, no matter 
how powerful he might be, who came to him with a case 
which was without merit, could have his services. He 
was a loyal party man, having been cradled in Democ- 
•racy, but political office had no attractions for him, in 
fact the only local offices he would ever accept were 
membership on the School Board and on the borough 
council. In the campaign of 1892 he was appointed 
a presidential elector and was glad that he was instru- 
mental in bringing about the election of President 
Cleveland. 

On Nov. 11, 1851, Mr. Braden was married to Miss 
Anna C. Euple, the youngest daughter of Col. James 
Kuple, and they had the following children: Rebecca, 
who married D. J. McAdam ; John Mclntyre, whose 
death occurred Apr. 14, 1897, was an attorney at Wash- 
ington; Lillie, who resides with her mother in the beau- 
tiful old family home at No. 223 W. Wheeling street, 
Washington; Alfred Goodrich, an attorney and formerly 
principal of the Washington schools; George W., who 
is a photographer in business at Washington; Anna; 
Kate, who is deceased; Ernest, who died Dec. 24, 1891; 
James Paul, an attorney at Washington, with office in 
the Montgomery Bldg., No. 108 S. Main street; and 
Arthur and William, both of whom died in infancy. 
John D. Braden was a representative of the highest type 
of citizenship and he commanded the respect and en- 
joyed the affection of his fellow citizens, irrespective of 
differing opinions on many subjects. 

CLYDE H. PEKKIN, one of Independence Township 's 
enterprising and progressive young men, who, for the 
past two years has been operating his father's farm of 
156 acres, was born at Wellsburg, W. Va., Feb. 3, 1880, 
and is a son of James M. and Alice (McCreary) Perrin. 

Edward Perrin, the great-grandfather of Clyde H., is 
known to have lived in infancy on what is known as the 
Boles farm, south of Independence, Washington County, 
and probably was bom there. The family Uved in the 



county in the days of the Indiana and it is recorded that 
one John Perrin, probably a brother of Edward, traded 
what is known as the Robert Liggett farm for a shot- 
gun with which to fight Indians. Edward Perrin was 
married first to a Williamson and they had two chil- 
dren: Samuel and a daughter, who became the wife of 
Robert Dinsmore. Samuel Perrin was a lifelong resi- 
dent of Washington County and owned and operated the 
farm on which Clyde H. Perrin resides. His death oc- 
curred Peb. 22, 1889, and he was the first individual 
buried in Independence Cemetery. He married Susan 
McBride and they had three children : James M. and 
William, twins, the latter of whom lives at Tacoma-, 
Wash. ; and Elizabeth, who resides at Carnegie, Pa. 

James M. Perrin was born in Washington County and 
during his entire life since his marriage, has engaged 
in the drug business, and at present is located at Car- 
negie, Pa. For a short time he conducted a store at 
Wheeling, W. Va., and for some time one at Wellsburg. 
He married Alice McCreary, who died in February, 1887. 
She was a daughter of James and Sarah (Sitherwood) 
McCreary, of Independence, Pa. Two children were born 
to James M. Perrin and wife: Clyde H. and Elia E. 
The latter is an accomplished musician, a graduate of 
the New England Conservatory of Music and at present 
is a teacher of music in the Southern Presbyterian Col- 
lege. 

Clyde H. Perrin attended the Carnegie public schools 
and the Western University of Pennsylvania, at Pitts- 
burg, where he gave special attention to a course in civil 
engineering. For nine ' years he was engaged in civil 
engineering and surveying in West Virginia, Virginia, 
Western Pennsylvania and Maryland, but during the past 
two years he has been residing on his father's farm in 
Independence Township. Mr. Perrin is a member of 
Carnegie Lodge No. 831 of the Elks, and his political 
views are those of the Republican party. His religious 
affiliation is with the Presbyterian Church at Carnegie. 
Mr. Perrin has never married. 

FRANK R. BAKER, a representative citizen of Am- 
well Township, Washington Co., Pa., who has resided 
on his present farm throughout his whole life, was born 
July 12, 1862, and was reared near Baker's Station. 
His parents were Enoch and Margaret (Speers) Baker. 

Enoch Baker was born in Bethlehem Township, Wash- 
ington County, and his wife in AUen Township, both 
families being old settlers in the county. Enoch Baker 
was reared in his native township and lived there until 
he moved to Ten-Mile village in Amwell Township. After 
several years he moved to a farm near Baker's Station 
and here he died in 1882. His widow still survives and 
resides with her son, Frank E. She is well known in 
different sections of Washington County and is still in 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



597 



the enjoyment of mental and physical health, although 
she has jjassed her 87th birthday. She is carefully and 
tenderly cherished by her five surviving children, namely: 
David B., who resides at Washington; Apollis S., who 
lives in Vermilion County, 111.; Henry S., who also lives 
in Illinois; Frank R., of Amwell Township; and Clara 
B., who is the wife of William Hughes, of Washington. 
Mrs. Baker has two daughters, deceased, Sarah and 
Nancy. The late Enoch Baker was a highly respected 
and useful citizen and a Christian man. A Kepublicau 
in his political views, at different times he was elected 
on that ticket to township otfices and to the duties of 
these he gave careful and conscientious attention. He 
was a liberal supporter of the Presbyterian Church, al- 
though he had descended from an old Quaker ancestry. 

Prank K. Baker was reared in Amwell Township and 
through boyhood attended the public schools, after which 
he assisted his father on the farm and has continued 
in the same industry. He also became interested in rais- 
ing good stock and has made this quite a feature of 
his work. He owns 200 acres of some of the best land 
in Amwell Township. He is a leading citizen, a member 
of the School Board, of which he has been both president 
and treasurer. He has served most acceptably in other 
offices, three years as road supervisor. 

On Oct. 31, 1889, Mr. Baker was married to Miss 
Sarah Hamilton, a daughter of the late William Hamil- 
ton, of Fayette County, Pa., and they have had four 
children, namely: Charles H., who is a student at Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College, at Washington; and Nellie 
S., Mary F. and Billie B. Mr. Baker is a member of 
the Lower Ten-Mile Presbyterian Church at Amity, of 
which he is treasurer and has been trustee. Mr. Baker 
was called upon to part with his wife on March 19, 1904. 
She was also a consistent member of the Presbyterian 
Church and a lady of many Christian virtues. Her death 
caused sorrow not only to her immediate family, but to 
a large circle of friends, who could recall many evidences 
of her kindness. 

J. A. HEPLER, who is extensively engaged in the 
real estate and insurance business at Charleroi, Pa., and 
is also a notary public, with offices at No. 411 Fallow- 
field avenue, has been located here since the spring of 
1903. He was born Dec. 18, 1860, in Westmoreland 
Co., Pa., and is a son of David D. and Mary A. (Weibel) 
Hepler. David D. Hepler was a farmer by occupation. 
In 1895 he retired to Charleroi, Pa., and died there in 
1907. His widow survives. 

J. A. Hepler grew to maturity on his father's farm 
in Westmoreland County, after which he conducted a 
store and was postmaster at Coffey's Station, then known 
as Brenneman, Pa., from 1886 until 1898, when he came 
to Washington, Pa,, where he was engaged in the oil 



business until his removal to Charleroi, where he has 
since been successfully engaged in the real estate and 
insurance business. Mr. Hepler is agent for various fire 
insurance companies, including the Atlas Assurance Co., 
of London, England, which was established in 1808; the 
Germanic Fire Ins. Co., of New York City; the Union 
Ins. Co., of Philadelphia; the New York Fire Ins. Co.; 
the Keystone Underwriters of Pittsburg; the National 
Union Fire Ins. Co., of Pittsburg; the Phoenix Ins. Co., 
of Brooklyn, N. Y., and is also agent for the Standard 
Life and Accident Ins. Co., of Detroit, Mich. 

Mr. Hepler was united in marriage with Minnie P. 
Brown, who was born and reared in Erie County, Pa., 
and is a daughter of Hiram Brown, who was a soldier 
in the 111th Pa. Vol. during the Civil War. They have 
one daughter. May Hepler. Mr. Hepler is fraternally 
a member of the Ancient and Illustrious Order of Knights 
of Malta, and order of Elks. Mr. Ilcpler is also a mem- 
ber of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Char- 
leroi, being one of the trustees and treasurer of the 
new church fund. 

JOSEPH A. SCOTT, deceased, was one of the repre- 
sentative agriculturists of Fallowfield Township, and 
was a resident of Washington County, Pa., during the 
greater part of his life. There he was bom Oct. 6, 
1806, and came of a family that was established on 
American soil in colonial day.s. 

The grandfather of Joseph A. Scott was a soldier 
in the American Revolution, entering the Patriot Army 
at the age of 17 years, after every other member of his 
family had met death at the hands of the Indians. He 
remained in the army until the close of the great struggle 
and was one of the heroes who spent the terrible winter 
at Valley Forge. He later established his home in Wash- 
ington County, where he reared a family. Late in life 
the father of Joseph A. Scott moved from Washington 
County to Rush County, Ind. 

Joseph A. Scott followed farming through life and 
spent many years in Fallowfield Township, where he be- 
came a man of influence and substance. In 1835 he 
went to Peoria, 111., where he was married to Miss Eliza 
Sheplar, who had been born in Washington County, Pa. 
She accompanied him back to Washington County, the 
journey being made on horseback, and they settled per- 
manently in Fallowfield Township. He was a man of 
great energy, was a hard worker and an excellent man- 
ager, and as he took an interest in the development of 
his section, to his efforts combined with those of other 
public spirited and earnest men, may be credited the 
material progress and early improvement that put Fal- 
lowfield Township ahead of many other parts of the 
county. After a long and useful life he died Jan. 17, 
1881, when aged 75 years. His widow survived him 



598 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



until May 15, 1892, when she, too, passed away, aged 
77 years. They were the parents of nine children, two 
of whom died unnamed. The others were : Peoria, who 
died in childhood; James Addison, who died young; 
Joseph Clark, who died Oct. 31, 1881; Henry S.; Mar- 
garet M., who is now deceased, was the wife of W. H. 
Miller; and Jesse Y., who is a well-known physician and 
surgeon of Washington. 

BURNS DARSIE, who is the popular cashier of the 
Farmers' National Bank at Claysville, Pa., is a thorough- 
ly trained man in his line of work, having been identified 
with banks and the baiLking business ever since he 
finished his education. He was born Sept. 4, 1873, in 
Fayette County, Pa., and is a son of Hugh S. and Me- 
linda (Cochran) Darsie. 

Bev. James Darsie, the grandfather, was one of the 
pioneers who was associated with Alexander Campbell 
in the founding of the Christian Church, and one of his 
sons, Eev. George Darsie, for over 30 years was pastor 
of the Christian Church at Frankfort, Ky. The Darsies 
were true Scotch people, coming to America from Scot- 
land. The Cochrans mijced with .Irish blood,' but origi- 
nally were also Scotch. Both parents of Mr. Darsie were 
born in Fayette County, Pa., and Hugh S. Darsie owned 
a valuable farm in Tyrone Township which he sold to 
the pioneer coke producing firm of Cochran & Brown, 
this firm developing the veins of what is known as cok- 
ing or Connellsville coal which underlay its surface. 

Burns Darsie obtained his primary education in the 
schools near his home and then attended the State Nor- 
mal School at California. Subsequently, from 1891 to 
1895, he was a student at Bethany College, W. Va., and 
in the latter year began his bank training. He entered 
the Mechanics' National Bank at Pittsburg as a mes- 
senger and through ability and fidelity was promoted 
step by step, being corresponding clerk, collection clerk 
and discount clerk, remaining there for six years and 
during this time becoming thoroughly drilled in all the 
manifold duties and technical details of the business. 
From there he went to the Federal National Bank of 
Pittsburg and fiUed different positions, including that 
of teller, for some four years, resigning in order to be- 
come cashier of the Farmers' National Bank at Clays- 
ville. He resided at Washington, Pa., for several years 
before establishing his residence here. Mr. Darsie is a 
member of the Bankers' and Bank Clerks' Mutual 
Benefit Association of Pittsburg and belongs also to the 
American Institute of Banking. 

Mr. Darsie was married to Miss Marietta Bryce, a 
daughter of Stephen P. Bryce, the well-known manu- 
facturer of ventilating and heating apparatus, of To- 
ledo, Ohio. They have three children : Marietta B., Burns 



Darsie and Hugh 8. Mr. Darsie and wife are members 
of the Christian Church. He is a Republican. 

THE ZAHNISEE FAMILY. To American citizen- 
ship no country has contributed more acceptably than has 
Germany and among the large, thrifty, substantial fam- 
ilies of Pennsylvania, who can claim a direct German 
ancestry, is that of the Zahnisers. It is a family also 
that takes a just pride in its numbers and achievements 
and through all its 1,400 descendants there is a strong 
bond of kindred. 

According to family tradition, the old home of the 
Zahniser family was situated in Highland, Germany, not 
far from the River Rhine, nor far from the Swiss boun- 
dary, with which the family evidently was early con- 
nected. On September 24, 1843, either in the village of 
Ilbesheim or that of Moersheim, one Valentine Zahniser 
married Julianna Clemens. They had two sons born 
to them. Failing health led the father to start with his 
little family, for the great land across the sea, a land 
apparently flowing with milk and honey and doubtless 
one where health could also be found. The voyage proved 
long and rough and before the shores of the promised 
land came in sight, both Valentine Zahniser and his 
youngest son had succumbed and their burial was at sea. 
The widow, with her remaining son, Mathias, were safely 
landed at the port of Philadelphia, in the fall of 1753. 
After much hardship the widow and small child succeed- 
ed in reaching the German settlements in Lancaster 
County and there she was sheltered and comforted and 
subsequently spent many happy years, surviving until 
1790. From Mathias Zahniser, who landed in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1753, have descended the family of this name, 
one, which it has been found, is now represented i^ 
every State in the Union with the exception of three. 

Michael Zahniser, born in 1820, died in 1899, in 1849 
married Margaret Hogg, who died in 1888. He was a 
farmer by occupation and until 1891, lived on a farm in 
Jackson Township, Mercer Co., Pa. At that time, being a 
widower, be came to live with his children at Washing- 
ton. He was a life-long Democrat and respected citizen. 
His children were as follows: Andrew Jackson, residing 
at Washington, Pa. ; Eleanor A., widow of Charles Brom- 
ley, residing at Washington; Robert C, residing near 
Pardoe, Pa.; William S., residing at Waynesburg; M. 
Rudolph, a manufacturer, living at Washington; Valen- 
tine O., also a manufacturer, at Washington; John N., 
a manufacturer residing at Waynesburg, Pa.; Mont- 
gomery J., another manufacturer at Washington; and 
Bithynia. 

The late Michael Zahniser was a son of William Zahn- 
iser, who was born in Lancaster County, Pa., in 1789, 
and died in 1850. In early life he was given sufficient 







,^'55, 



X —< 



THE NEW YOR:?/ 

PUB'TnTjBRARY 




K'F'V ■vn 1 




CHARLES E. STEPHENS 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



601 



<Hluc';ilioiial ;iil\aiitiige» to enable liiiii to teaili si'liool ami 
lor some years lie alteniateil tcacbiiig in the winter sea- 
sons witli farm work during tUe summers, lie served as 
an American soldier in the War of 1812, with the rank 
.if lieutenant, and he was located during this time at Erie, 
I'a. A very valuable memento of this time is owned by 
his direct descendants, it being a walking stick composed 
of wood taken from Commodore Perry's famous ship 
"The Lawrence,'' and it is a unique as well as valuable 
relic. In 1814, William Zahuiser married Eleanor Stot- 
ler, who, like himself, had been born in Lancaster County, 
liut had removed with her parents to Allegheny County. 
I'ntil 1823 William Zahniser and wife lived in the old 
homestead in Lancaster County, and then moved to a 
near-by tract on which he resided until death. His 
father was Mathias Zahniser, who, in boyhood, had landed 
at Philadelphia, in 1753. 

The life history of Mathias Zahniser, on account of its 
tragic early days, as well as its story of struggle and 
success, is interesting and may be briefly given as fol- 
lows. He grew to manhood in Lancaster County, and 
in 1774 married Mary Lint, a daughter of Michael Lint, 
with whom he lived until 1790. Then Mathias moved 
with his family, which included his mother, to Allegheny 
County, where he bought a farm and also worked at his 
trade. In 1796 he sold this farm to Fi'ederick Stone. 
This land lies in Penn Township, east of Pittsburg and 
Mt. Hope Cemetery is now situated on the old Zahniser 
farm. When the Zahniser family located in Allegheny 
County, the family of Benjamin Stokely was the only 
white one definitely known to have been there previously. 
After disposing of his land, Mathias Zahniser, with his 
three eldest sons selected a new home, in what is now 
Lake Township, Mercer County, eight miles north of 
Mercer. A cabin was built and land was cleared and a 
portion of the old orchard, which, with German thrift, 
was set out, still remains in evidence. With the coming 
of winter, Mathias Zahniser returned to Allegheny Coun- 
ty but in the spring of 1797 he returned with the other 
members of the family, taking up a new tract east of 
the one first secured and which passed into the posses- 
sion of his sou Michael. Another son, Mathias, settled 
on a tract just south, while John took one just west. As 
each of these tracts contained 200 acres, the family be- 
came owners of a large body of land. 

Mathias Zahniser lived to the age of eighty-four years, 
his death occurring April 28, 1833. He had survived his 
wife, who died in 1829, aged seventy-five years. They 
were buried in the old Zahniser Cemetery, in Jackson 
Township, Mercer Co., Pa. 

JAMES COOKE GAULT, a representative farmer and 
butter producer of Cross Creek Township. Washington 
Co., Pa., where he owns 113 acres of vahrable land, was 



liorn in this township Dec. 7, l.HoO, and i.s a son of 
David and Matilda (Cooke) Gault. 

David Gault was born in Cross Creek Township, in 
1817, his people being in moderate circumstances. He 
was a small boy when his father died and it devolved 
upon him to make his own way in the world and he was 
a self-inado mau in every sense. He acquired some 300 
acres of the most valuable land in Cross Creek Township, 
a part of which forms the farm of J. C. Gault. For 
many years he was an elder in the Cross Creek Presby- 
terian Church. In the earlier years of his political 
identification he was a Republican, but later became a 
pronounced Prohibitionist. He died in February, 1903, 
at the age of 86 years. He and wife became parents 
of four children: Georgia, wife of A. H. Kerr, of Bur- 
gettstown ; Henry M., of Cross Creek Township ; James 
C; and Silas, who lives at Primrose Station. 

James Cooke Gault obtained his education in the pub- 
lic schools and Oakdale Academy at Oakdale. When 
about 19 years of age he turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits and has continued in the same ever 
since and is numbered with the prosperous farmers of 
the township. He keeps a number of cows for dairy 
purposes and makes a fiine grade of butter for the mar- 
ket. In his views on public matters he has followed 
the example of his excellent father. Although well 
qualified for the same, Mr. Gault has always declined to 
serve in political oflSces. 

On Jan. 18, 1877, Mr. Gault was married to Miss 
Margaret Allison, a daughter of John and Harriet (Mc- 
Elroy) Allison, of Hopewell Township. The parents of 
Mrs. Gault are both deceased, the father having passed 
the declining years of his life at Pittsburg. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gault have had six children, several of whom have 
comfortable homes of their own : Haidee, who is the wife 
of Alexander Campbell, has four children — Helen, Mason, 
Dorothy and Mildred Campbell; David A., who married 
Grace Miller, has one son, David; Percy, who is now 
deceased; Guy A., who is engaged in railroad work and 
lives at Carnegie, Pa.; and Donald and Archie, both of 
whom reside at home and are students in the Cross Creek 
High School. The family attends the Presbyterian 
Church at Cross Creek village and for ten years Mrs. 
Gault has been the very capable president of the Home 
Missionary Society of this church. Mr. Gault has one oil 
well on his farm. 

CHARLES E. STEPHENS, member of the firm of 
Stephens Bros., dealers in lumber and contractors, at 
Monongahela City, Pa., has resided here since 1882 and 
has thoroughly identified himself with the business and 
public interests of the place. He was born at Bentley- 
\ille, Washington Co., Pa., Jan, 27, 1860, and is a son of 
John W. and Martha J. (Bentley) Stephens. 



602 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Jolin W. Stephens was born on his father's farm in 
Payette County, Pa. After he married he settled at 
Bentleyville, where he resided until 1889, when he came 
to Monongahela City, where he is one of the respected 
and venerable citizens. For many years he was promi- 
nent in State politics and in 1878 he served as a mem- 
ber of the State Legislature. He married Martha J. 
Bentley, who died in 1895. She was a daughter of Shel- 
bazzer Bentley, who came very early to Washington 
County and was the founder of the village of Bentley- 
ville. To John W. Stephens and wife were born six 
children : Frant, WiUiam P., Charles Edgar, Henry 
Bentley and two who died in infancy. 

Charles E. Stephens resides at BentleyvUle during 
boyhood and youth, attended school there and learned 
the carpenter trade. After working at the same for 
some time at Monongahela City, where he was connected 
with Blythe & Co., for five years, he entered into part- 
nership with Thomas Neel, a lumber dealer, and they 
did business for two years under the style of Neel & 
Stephens. Then Henry and William Stephens, brothers 
of Charles E., bought the Neel interest and the firm be- 
came Stephens Bros. They were together for several 
years, when William Stephens sold out to Charles E. and 
Henry Stephens. The business was conducted on the 
opposite side of the river from the present location until 
1904, when they established their plant between the 
railroad and the river, the area covered being 312% feet. 
Employment is given 30 men and the business is in a 
very prosperous condition, many contracts being in sight 
and these will add activity to the lumber trade. Mr. 
Stephens is numbered with the city's substantial citi- 
zens and is one of the directors of the First National 
Bank. 

In January, 1898, Mr. Stephens was married to Miss 
Minerva J. Colvin, a daughter of Moses and Josephine 
Colvin, of Allegheny County, Pa., and they have three 
children: Franklin A., Josephine M. and Jean. The 
comfortable and attractive home is situated on the cor- 
ner of Eleventh and Main streets. With his family, Mr. 
Stephens is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
of which he is a trustee. In politics, he is a Republican, 
has served in the city council and for eleven years has 
been a valuable member of the school board. He belongs 
to the Elks and the Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics. 

THOMAS ALLISON, deceased, once one of the most 
active and useful citizens of Chartiers Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., during the most important time of its 
existence, its creative period, was born in that town- 
ship in 1780 and was a son of James and Jane (Brad- 
ford) Allison. 

The Allison family is of Scotch extraction but before 



the birth of James Allison, had been driven, by religious 
persecution, to the north of Ireland. When James Alli- 
son came first to America he located in Cecil County, 
Md., and it was there that he entered into the business 
negotiations with Thomas Moffatt that resulted in his 
purchase of 560 acres of land, located in Washington 
County, Pa. He took possession Oct. 26, 1773. The first 
patent for this land was issued in the name of James 
Allison, Moffatt having but a squatter's claim, and a 
part of this land is now owned by the estate of Jonathan 
Allison, late of Washington. James Allison found many 
hardships to contend with and the hostile Indians were 
so threatening that after many a night passed with rifle 
in hand, he retired from his property to a more pro- 
tected position and did not return until the following 
year. In 1774, accompanied by 20 families, among these 
being the Bradfords, the McDowells, the Parks, Scotts 
and others, whose names, with that of Allison, were 
linked with the subsequent development of the county, 
Mr. Allison returned and again settled on his land. A 
block-house was erected, in which aU lived together for 
one year, when one log cabin after another was built 
around the block-house which was kept as a place of re- 
treat in case of attack. James Allison erected a frame 
house about 1789, which stood for years afterward. He 
was one of the foremost men of his day, was associate 
judge of the courts of Washington County during 1786- 
87-88, and in 1789 was a member of the Supreme Ex- 
exutive Council, at Philadelphia, and in that position 
cast his vote for the abolition of slavery, which was 
accomplished so many years later. For years he was a 
trustee of Jefferson College and was a very strong sup- 
porter of the movement that resulted in its union with 
Washington College. He was a member of the Presby- 
terian Church under Dr. John McMillan, in North Stra- 
bane Township, which was one of the first Presbyterian 
societies organized in the county and of this he was 
a ruling elder. He married Jane Bradford, sister of 
David Bradford, who was prominently identified with 
the "Whiskey Insurrection" in Pennsylvania. They 
had eight children: William, James, John, George, 
Thomas, Mary, David and Rachel. 

Thomas Allison of the above family escaped many of 
the hardships which attended his father's early man- 
hood, but the clearing of the large estate and assisting 
in developing and civilizing the section in which was 
his home, took years of hard work and persevering en- 
durance. He was a typical Allison, honorable and up- 
right, a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, 
one of the trustees in Chartiers Township, and a sup- 
porter of law and a liberal contributor to benevolent 
enterprises. 

In 1817, Thomas Allison married Miss Mary John- 
son, a daughter of Richard Johnson, of North Stra- 



H1.ST0]{V OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



603 



bane Towiishij), and they had the following children: 
Jane, James, William, Richard, Thomas, Jonathan, 
David, Joseph, Uriah and Mary. Of the above, James 
served five years in the Civil War. Thomas Allison died 
Oct. 21, 1849, aged 69 years. His widow survived to 
the age of 86 years, passing away in 1884. 

WILLIAM L. DODD, M. D., a well-known physician 
and surgeon who has been in active practice at Amity, 
Pa., since 1890, is a member of one of Washington 
('ounty's old pioneer families which has many represen- 
tatives throughout this section. Dr. Dodd was born in 
Aniwell Township, Washington Co., Pa., Oct. 17, 1866, 
and is a sou of Daniel F. and Ruth (McFarland) Dodd. 

The late Daniel F. Dodd passed his whole life in 
Amwell Township, where he was extensively engaged in 
farming and stoock raising. His father was Freeman 
Dodd, and his grandfather was Daniel Dodd, who was 
a brother of Rev. Thaddeus Dodd, who was a noted 
preacher in his day, in Washington County, the fame 
of whom was spread all over Western Pennsylvania. 

Dr. William L. Dodd spent his boyhood on his 
father ' 'a farm and otbained his early education in the 
country schools. After his choice of profession had 
been made, he prepared for the scientiiic schools with 
local practitioners, and then entered the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, Md., and he 
secured his degree, in 1888, from the Western Penn- 
sylvania Medical College which has since been merged 
into the medical department of the University of Pitts- 
burg. Mr. Dodd immediately entered upon practice 
at Amity. Pa., associating himself with Dr. W. S. Dodd, 
then of Amity but now of Washington, and they con- 
tinued together until the removal of the latter phy- 
sician in 1890, to Washington, since which time Dr. 
William L. Dodd has remained alone, and enjoys a 
good, substantial practice. He keeps closely in touch 
with all scientific investigation and is a valued mem- 
ber of the Washington County Medical Society and 
belongs also to the American Medical Association. 

Dr. Dodd was married to Miss Emma G. Conger, a 
daughter of the late John Conger, of West Union, 
Washington Co., Pa., and they have two children : John 
L. and Ruth E. Dr. and Mrs. Dodd are members of the 
Lower Ten-Mile Presbyterian Church at Amity, in which 
he is an elder. He is a Republican. 

GEORGE S. MORRON, who is engaged in the drug 
business at Canonsburg, of which city he has been a 
resident for 15 years, was born at Lisbon, Ohio, and 
is a son of John A. and Amanda (Bon Bright) Morron. 

The Morron family is of Scotch-Irish extraction and 
the paternal grandfather, John Morron, established the 
Morrons in Columbiana County, Ohio, and there many 



of his descendants reside. The father of Dr. Morron 
was born in Columbiana County and died there in 1902, 
at the age of 80 years, his wife having passed away 
many years previously. They were the parents of six 
sons and two daughters: Alice, Frank and Charles, all 
of whom are deceased, and George S., William, Koy, 
Kdgar and Addie, all surviving. 

George S. Morron is the only member of his family 
residing in Pennsylvania. He attended the public 
schools of Lisbon, Ohio, and later the Philadelphia 
College of Pharmacy, and was graduated from that 
institution in 1892. Prior to coming to Canonsburg, 
in 1898, he was in the drug bu.siness at Salem, Ohio; 
Dayton, Ohio, and Meadville and Derry, Pa. Dr. Mor- 
ron conducts a large and modern drug store and enjoys 
the confidence of the medical profession and the people 
of his city, having kept to high standards and han- 
dling only pure drugs. 

In 189G, Dr. Morron was married to Miss Margaret 
Griffith, a daughter of A. A. Griffith, of Canonsburg, 
and they have two children : Thelma and John. Dr. 
and Mrs. Morron are members of the United Presby- 
terian Church. He is a Republican in politics and fra- 
ternally is identified with the Odd Fellows, the Eagles, 
the order of the Moose and the Elks, all at Canons- 
burg. 

JOHN W. PRY, who has been postmaster of South 
Burgettstown, Pa., since 1873, with the exception of 
seven years, for 31 years was engaged in the mercantile 
business at this place. He was born in Cross Creek 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., May 9, 1846, and is a 
son of Abraham and Rachel (McClurge) Pry. 

John W. Pry was reared on his father's farm and 
attended the district schools in Cross Creek Township, 
after which he assisted his father until he entered the 
Federal Army in December, 1864. He served until his 
honorable discharge in July, 1865, in Co. H, 21st Pa. 
Cav., and escaped serious injury, although ever at the 
post of duty. He then returned to the home farm and 
continued agricultural operations there for some years, 
after which he moved to Burgettstown and engaged in 
the mercantile business. In 1873 he was appointed 
postmaster and has filled this office for almost 30 years, 
under Republican administrations. He no longer con- 
ducts his mercantile business, but he has otiier interests, 
these including stock in the International Steel Com- 
pany, the Pittsburg Coal Company, the National Fire 
Proofing Company and the William Liard Company, of 
Pittsburg. He is a member of Capt. Samuel Campbell 
Post No. 286, G. A. E., at Burgettstown and enjoys 
attending the annual encampments. 

Mr. Pry was married (first) to Mary E. Rea, who died 
after the birth of two children, Charles L. and Rachael 



604 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



E., and her burial ■vvas in the cemetery at Cross Creek. 
He was married (second) to Elizabeth B. Welch, a 
daughter of Mathew Welch, to which marriage there 
is no issue. Mr. Pry is one of the representative citi- 
zens of Burgettstown and for years has been a leader in 
Republican polities in the county. 

HON. JAMES S. DENNISON, deceased, who was 
the founder of the Dennison family in Washington 
County, Pa., where it has been widely known for so 
many years, was born in the Shenandoah Valley, Va., 
in 1801. His father, Thomas Dennison, was born in 
Ireland and he married a lady of Scotch birth, shortly 
afterward coming to America and settling for the rest 
of their lives in Virginia. They had three children: 
Marie, who became the wife of Washington Bennett; 
and Thomas and James S. 

James S. Dennison received a rudimentary education 
in the log cabin schoolhouses near his home. That he 
became a weU informed and broad-minded man in 
after years, was due to his own efforts and his contact 
with the world. He came to Washington County in 
early manhood and engaged in agricultural pursuits 
before his marriage and after that e^ent he located for 
a short time on a property which was afterward known 
as the E. H. Dennison farm. From there he moved 
to Claysville, Washington County, where he conduct- 
ed a hotel for a time, and from there to XJniontown, 
Fayette County, where he remained engaged in business 
until his death. This took place in 1851, as the result 
of an accident, being thrown from the stage on which 
he was riding on his way home from a business trip 
to Brownsville. He was a man of prominence in his 
community and his untimely death was lamented by all. 
He was a kind husband and father and a loyal friend 
and good neighbor. He was a Democrat in politics, 
liut never was willing to assume oflScial cares. 

James S. Dennison was married at Claysville to Mrs. 
Catherine (Stevenson) King, a daughter of Hon. James 
Stevenson and the widow of William King, who is sur- 
vived by one son, W. C. King, the latter being cashier 
of the National Bank at Claysville. Hon. James Ste- 
venson was a pioneer settler of Donegal Township, 
Washington County. His death occurred at Harrisburg 
while he was serving his district in the State Legis- 
lature. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Dennison 
returned to the old Stevenson farm, one mile west of 
Claysville, where her father had large possessions, and 
there she continued to reside until her death, which 
took place Oct. 7, 1889, when she was aged 86 years. 
She was an estimable woman, possessing admirable traits 
of character and was universally beloved. For many 
years she was a consistent member of the Presbyterian 
Church. To James S. Dennison and wife were born 



the following children: James, Jane E., John, Ell- 
bridge C. and Edwin Henry. 

Edwin Henry Dennison is now living in retirement at 
Claysville, Pa., but is still owner of the home place. 
This is a part of the 400-acre tract originally patented 
by James Stevenson, Mar. 12, 1807. He took up 400 
acres for which he paid $70.24, and this tract has been 
in the Stevenson or Dennison name ever since that date. 
Edwin H. Dennison married Salina Eeed, and they had 
six children: Katherine E., Edith E., Joseph D., Harry 
C, William E. and Edwin H., Jr. 

WilUam R. Dennison, a representative of this promi- 
nent old family, was born Apr. 7, 1879, and is a grad- 
uate of Washington and Jefferson College and the Pitts- 
burg Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 1906. 
He has been identified with much important litigation in 
the county courts and many times has proven his legal 
ability. He has been active in politics and during 1907 
and 1908 was chairman of the Democratic County Com- 
mittee. In November, 1904, he was elected county 
auditor and in the spring of 1908 he was again nom- 
inated for the office. He maintains offices at No. 533 
in the Washington Trust Building. William E. Dennison 
was married June 27, 1907, to Miss Matilda Snodgrass, 
of ClaysvUle, and they have one daughter, Katherine 
''Stevenson, named after her great-grandmother, Kather- 
ine Stevenson. 

JOHN H. WEAVER, one of Amwell Township's sub- 
stantial men and most esteemed citizens, who has resided 
on his valuable farm of 187 acres, devoting it to farm- 
ing and stock and sheep raising, for half a century, was 
born in Amwell Township, Washington Co., Pa., Feb. 22, 
1835, and is a son of Jacob and Catherine (Horn) 
Weaver. 

Jacob Weaver was born in the Shenandoah Valley, 
Va., and was a son of Leonard Weaver, who was of Ger- 
man parentage. Leonard Weaver died in Virginia when 
his son Jacob was four years old and the latter was 
brought to Washington County, Pa., by his mother and 
other members of the family, and they settled on a por- 
tion of the land which John H. Weaver now owns. At 
that time the forest growth was heavy and before they 
could erect a cabin a clearing had to be made. For 
many years conditions of living were hard with the little 
pioneer colony, but all dangers were finally overcome and 
with the rapid development of this part of Amwell Town- 
ship, the Weaver family had much to do. As may be 
imagined, Jacob Weaver had but meager educational 
opportunities but he grew strong and robust physically 
and lived to the unusual age of ninety-four years. He 
was widely known for his many fine qualities. He served 
as one of the first school directors of the township and 
he was very active in the founding of the Lone Pine 



:F'V yor. 




J. R. STUDA 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



607 



Christian Clnirch nt' Hliioli lie was long a iiioinlier. In 
politics he was a Jaeksoiiian Democrat. Of his two sons, 
(ieorge W., born Jan. 2, 1837, is now deceased. 

John H. Weaver has been engaged in farming and 
stock raising ever since early youth. He has given a 
largo amount of attention to growing sheep, making this 
industry one of continued profit. On December 22, 
185G, he was married to Miss Sarah Slusher, who was 
born in Aniwell Township, December 28, 183G, a daugh- 
ter of Michael and Lovina (Paul) Slusher, her parents 
both being natives of Amwell Townsiiip. Her grand- 
father, Christopher Slusher, was born in Virginia and 
was an early settler near Lone Pine, in Aniwell Town- 
,ship, and at one period in his life owned 700 acres of 
land, a portion of which is now the site of the village 
of Lone Pine. Of the children of Michael and Lovina 
Slusher, the following survive: Mrs. John H. Weaver; 
Keturah, who is the widow of Thomas Whipkey, for- 
merly of Fayette County, and she now lives at Kansas 
City, Mo.; Ellen, who is the wife of Philip A. Cooper, 
of South Franklin Township; Hannah, who is the wife 
of Joseph Miller, of Laboratory, Pa. ; Henry C, who 
resides at Washington; Mary, who is the wife of George 
Lacock, of Miami County, Kas. ; Christiana, who is the 
wife of Addison Hazlett, of Amwell Township; and 
Martha, who lives at Columbus, Ohio. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Weaver four children have been 
born: Huston P., who married Emma Miller, and they 
have three surviving children — Arley B., Leta and Alta 
Pauline; Catherine L., who married John Bainer, of 
.\niwell Township, and they have three children — Mary, 
Jacob M. and Charles Bainer; George M.; and John 
W., who married Sarah Anderson. They have had two 
children, one of whom, David Paul, survives and lives 
in New Jersey. John H. Weaver has always shown his 
interest in the public schools and for four years served 
as a member of the Amwell Township school board. He 
is a Democrat. 

J. E. STUDA, a highly respected citizen and retired 
farmer and milk producer of South Burgettstown, who 
has the distinction of residing in the only brick veneered 
house in the place, which he has but recently completed 
and in which modern comforts have been installed, is 
one of the substantial men of this section of Washing- 
ton County. He was born in Cross Creek Township, 
Washington Co., Pa., November 14, 1851, and is a son of 
Henry L. and Melsina Studa. The parents of Mr. Studa 
were farming people in Cross Creek Township for many 
years and they were worthy members of the German 
Lutheran Church. Their family contained five sons and 
two daughters. In politics, the father was a Democrat. 

J. R. Studa received instruction in his boyhood in the 
Muddy Lane School, in Cross Creek Township, and after- 



w.-inl helped his father on tlie homo farm until he was 
twenty-eight years old and for two years more, prior to 
his marriage, worked on other farms. After marriage he 
settled on a small farm near Twin Bridges, not far from 
the Wabash Railroad, which he rented from J. Heed. One 
years later he moved to the Thomas McCorkle farm, which 
he operated for three years, going from there to the 
Mi'Conny farm, in Mt. Pleasant Township, on which he 
remained for eleven years. He then returned to Cross 
Creek Township and bought the Pryon farm of 143 acres, 
on which he lived for seven years and then sold it prior 
to moving to Burgettstown in 1902. This property was 
bought by the Washington County Coal Company and 
tliey paid a good price for it as it is very valuable. Mr. 
Studa still retains a one-fourth interest in 210 acres of 
land in Cross Creek Township and also owns his fine 
residence in South Burgettstown, the lighting plant in 
which alone cost $100, together with two more lots, and 
other lots and residences both in the town and in the 
country. He is one of the stockholders in the Bur- 
gettstown National Bank. 

On March 14, 1881, Mr. Studa was married to Miss 
Nannie B. Moore, who is a daughter of William Moore, 
and they have one daughter, Ora M., who is a talented 
musician. Mr. Studa and family are members of the 
Presbyterian Church. He is identified with the Demo- 
cratic party. Mr. Studa is something of a sportsman, 
having always taken delight in hunting and is considered 
■A fine marksman. He is also fond of driving and keeps 
two speedy roadsters. 

HENRY M. GAULT, general farmer and .stock raiser, 
residing on the old homestead farm in Cross Creek Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., on which he was born March 
16, 1848, is a son of David and Matilda (Cooke) Gault. 

The parents of Mr. Gault were well known residents of 
Cross Creek Township, where the father died in 1903. 
The mother died many years previously and David Gault 
was married (second) to Mrs. Mary Marquis, who was 
a daughter of William and Mary Patterson. To the 
first marriage four children were born : Georgetta, who 
married A. H. Kerr and lives at Burgettstown; and 
Henry M., James C. and Silas. 

Henry M. Gault was educated in the local schools and 
the State Normal School at Edinboro, leaving at the 
age of eighteen years to assist his father on the farm. 
After his own marriage, in 1874, he moved to Norfolk, 
A'a., where he engaged in gardening until 1882, when he 
went to Plattsmouth, Neb., where he carried on farming 
and stock rai.'ing until 1903, when the death of his 
father caused his return to the homestead Where he has 
been engaged ever since, having 188 acres of fine land. 

In 1874. Mr. Gault was married to Miss Rachel Dun- 
bar, a daughter of 'Winiam and Isabella Dunbar, of 



608 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Cross Creek Township, and they have had three children: 
Laura Belle, who resides with her parents; David Eoy, 
who is now deceased; and Nellie Eberta, who is a pop- 
ular teacher in the Cross Creek high school. Mr. Gault 
and family are members of the Presbyterian Church at 
Cross Creek village, and he has been an elder in the 
church for the past twenty years. Mr. Gault has never 
been very active in politics, taking much more interest 
in developing his land, but he has served for two years 
as a school director and performs all the public duties 
of a good citizen. He is a stockholder in the Hickory 
Telephone Company. He is a stanch advocate of tem- 
perance in all things and easts his vote in favor of the 
Prohibition party. 

WILSON L. ELLIOTT, a retired capitalist and for- 
mer successful farmer, has occupied his handsome brick 
residence at McDonald, Pa., since 1903, and is well 
known and very highly esteemed by his fellow citizens. 
He was born in Allegheny Co., Pa., January 18, 1856, and 
is a son of Morgan and Mary (Walker) Elliott. 

The father of Mr. Elliott was engaged in farming 
all through his active life. Both he and wife are de- 
ceased and their burial was in the Robeson Eun Ceme- 
tery. They had the following children: Joseph W., 
Elizabeth, Isabel, Huldah, Jennie, Wilson L. and James 
M. Of the above family, Elizabeth is deceased. Isabel 
is the wife of Dr. T. M. Eife. Huldah married A. E. 
Fife. Jennie married J. J. Patterson. 

Wilson L. Elliott attended the district schools more 
or less regularly until he was eighteen years old and 
after that followed farming until he came to McDonald, 
in 1903. He is a stockholder in both banks at Mc- 
Donald and is a director in the Trust Company. 

In 1891, Mr. Elliott was married to Miss EUzabeth 
Pease, a daughter of the late Joseph and Mary Pease. 
Mrs. Elliott had two brothers and one sister: Everett, 
deceased ; Wilson, and Anna, the latter of whom is the 
wife of Prank DeNormandie. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott have 
two children: Mary and Morgan, both of whom attend 
school at McDonald. The family belongs to the United 
Presbyterian Church. In his political views, Mr. Elliott 
is a Democrat. 

CYRUS MORROW, a prominent citizen of Washing- 
ton County and one of its most efficient and popular 
public officials, serving at present as register of wills, 
is a member of one of the pioneer families of this sec- 
tion. He was born in Donegal Township, Washington 
Co., Pa., and is a son of Abraham and Jane (De ITrance) 
Morrow, and a grandson of William Morrow. The lat- 
ter was a native of the north of Ireland and was the 
founder of the family in Washington County. 

Cyrus Morrow had no exceptional advantages in his 



youth, his education being mainly acquired through 
individual study and contact with the great world, with 
experience as his teacher. He turned his attention to 
farming at an early date, and after his marriage, lo- 
cated on property near Acheson, in Buffalo Township, 
where he remained until 1880, when he purchased the 
George W. Guy farm, situated on Dutch Fork of Buf- 
falo Creek, just above their point of juncture. He en- 
gaged in farming on a large scale and was one of the 
most extensive wool growers in the county. His ability 
as a business man and financier was recognized and he 
was accorded a position in the front rank among the 
affluent citizens of his township. Politically he has al- 
ways been a firm believer in the wisdom and justice of 
Republican principles, has consistently worked for the 
success of the party of his choice and has received hearty 
party recognition. He has filled numerous township 
oifices and in 1906 began his first term as register of 
wills, and is now serving his second term in that capacity, 
his term to expire January 1, 1912. As a public official 
his duties have been discharged in the same capable 
manner as his private transactions and with such un- 
varying faithfulness as to place him high in the esteem 
and confidence of his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Morrow was married August 26, 1874, to Miss 
Elizabeth Condit, who was born in AmweU Township, 
Washington County, July 1, 1853, and is a daughter of 
Cephas and Mary (Bane) Condit. To this marriage 
have been born the following children : Minnie E., 
Franklin S., Garfield B., David C, Earle, Ethel, Eliza- 
beth J., Guy and Donald A. Minnie E. Morrow married 
Clyde S. Smith and they reside at Dunsport, Pa. 

HON. JOSEPH R. McLAIN, president of the Na- 
tional Bank of Claysville, Pa., and formerly a member 
of both House and Senate in the Pennsylvania State 
Legislature, is a man of high standing in Washington 
County, his private character as well as his public serv- 
ices securing him the confidence and regard of his fellow 
citizens. He was born in Cross Creek Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., January 8, 1828, and is a son of William 
and Margaret (McLelland) McLain. 

John McLain, the grandfather, was born near Gettys- 
burg, Pa., later lived at Pittsburg and came from Alle- 
gheny County to Washington County, locating permanent- 
ly on a farm between Washington and Canonsburg. 
William McLain was born on that farm, which was lo- 
cated one and one-half miles from Washington. After 
the death of his father he had to care for the family 
and for more than thirty years engaged in teaching. He 
was a justice of the peace for a number of years and 
was one of Cross Creek's best known citizens. He died 
in 1872, having lived a long and useful life. He mar- 
ried Margaret McLelland, who was born in Huntington 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



609 



County, Pa., and of their family uf ton cliildren, Joseph 
R. was next to the youngest, and is the only one living. 

Joseph B. McLain was well educated, attending the 
schools of Buffalo Township and having private teachers 
and later he became a teacher himself and while he de- 
voteil his summers to farming and stock raising for twen- 
ty years, passed his winters in the school room, with 
hook and ferule. For a short period he engaged also in 
the mercantile business at Claysville and Taylorstown, 
hut, in 1890, when the National Bank of Claysville was 
organized, he accepted the presidency and has continued 
to shape its policy ever since. Not only has Mr. McLaiu 
been prominent in business activities but he has also 
been a power in politics in Washington County. With 
the greatest acceptability to his constituents he served 
one term of two years in the lower House of Bepresenta- 
tives in the State Legislature and approval was conclu- 
sively shown when he was elected to the State Senate 
for a term of four years. He is identified with the Be- 
publican party. 

Mr. McLain was married to Miss Susanna Balston, who 
was born at Claysville, a daughter of James and Susanna 
Ralston, well known residents of this place, and nine 
children have been born to this union, namley : Lauretta 
Mary, who is deceased, was the wife of John M. Gamble; 
William J. E., who is cashier of the National Bank of 
Claysville; Margaret, who is the wife of Dr. J. N. 
Sprowls, of Claysville; John A., who resides at Wilkins- 
burg, Pa.; Joseph Milton, who died aged thirty years; 
David, who lives in California; Susanna S., who is the 
wife of W. L. Noble, of Martin 's Ferry, Ohio ; Eebecca, 
who is the wife of Eev. H. B. King, of Harrisburg; and 
George W., who had passed his twenty-second birthday 
at the time of his death. Mr. McLain and family are 
members of the United Presbyterian Church at Clays- 
ville, with which religious body he has been connected 
since youth, and is a member of the Session. 

HENEY F. CABL, a successful agriculturist of Wash- 
ington County, Pa., and the owner of several large prop- 
erties in Independence Township, was born in Schon- 
hagen, in Province of Hanover, Germany, August 21, 
1848, a son of Henry and Hannah (Overman) Carl na- 
tives of that country. 

The parents of Mr. Carl came to the United States in 
1856, located on a farm in Washington County, Pa., 
and there began the cultivation of the soil, and spent the 
remainder of their lives in Donegal Township. They 
were the parents of children as follows: Caroline, who 
is the widow of George Kindemond, residing at Hickory; 
Lucinda, who married Henry Gunther, residing in Done- 
gal Township; Hannah, who is the wife of Charles 
Schmitz, of Pittsburg; Eliza, who is the widow of Henry 



Danenburg, of Wheeling; Minnie, who is the wife of 
Georgs Arns, of Jefferson Township; and Henry F. 

Henry P. Carl was eight years of age when he ac- 
companied his parents to this country, and until he was 
sixteen years old ho attended the school situated near his 
father 's farm. He remained on the home farm until 
his first marriage, in 187."!, when he became a tenant 
farmer, and so continued until 1896, in this year locating 
on his own farm of 106 acres in Independence Town- 
ship, which he had previously purchased, and in 1902 
bought the farm adjoining this property, a tract of 131 
a(^res. His first purchase of land was when he bought 
out the other heirs to his father 's old property in Done- 
gal Township, consisting of some fifty acres. This he 
sold and later purchased his present farm of 106 acres. 
He carries on general farming and stock raising, and 
makes a specialty of sheep breeding, while still operating 
the two farms. His land has all been acquired by his 
own efforts, assisted by those of his children, and his 
career is a striking example of what may be accomplished 
by a man through perseverance and industry. In politics 
a Democrat, Mr. Carl has been too busy looking after 
his farming interests to give much attention to public 
affairs, although he has done his duty as a citizen by 
serving as school director. The family is connected with 
the Presbyterian Church. 

In 1873, Mr. Carl was married (first) to Eachel Mc- 
Pherson, a. daughter of Daniel and Nancy McPherson, of 
Donegal Township, and to this union there were born 
the following children: Nannie, the wife of William 
Cunningham, who has four children, namely Ethel, Mary, 
Edna and Henry; Mollie, the wife of Ira Moore, of 
Independence Township; Ida, residing at home; Sadie, 
who lives with relatives at Claysville; Lucy, the wife of 
Bobert Craig, of Hopewell Township, and they have 
a son, Bobert Carl Craig; George C, of Independence 
Township, who is married and has a son, Clarence; and 
James W., Annie and Grover, living at home, Annie be- 
ing a school teacher. The mother of these children died 
in 1887, and was buried in Donegal Cemetery. In 1893, 
Mr. Carl was married to Lou Adams, daughter of Alex- 
ander and Lucinda Adams, of Independence Township, 
and two children have been born to this union : Twila 
and Earl L., both students at school. 

ABBAHAM MOEEOW, deceased, for many years was 
one of the leading agriculturists of Washington County, 
Pa. He was born in West Bethlehem Township, Washing- 
ton County, in 1816, and was a son of George and Hes- 
ter (Poole) Morrow and a grandson of William Morrow. 

George Morrow was born in the north of Ireland and 
was a son of William Morrow, a native of that part of 
Ireland, who was of Scotch-Irish parentage. William 



610 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Morrow was the first of the family to settle in Washing- 
ton County, establishing a home for himself and family 
near HUlsboro, in West Bethlehem Township. At the 
time of his death he was living with his son George, in 
Donegal Township. George Morrow remained on the 
home farm in West Bethlehem Township until some time 
subsequent to his marriage, when he moved to a farm on 
the Dutch Fork, about one mile from its confluence with 
Big Buffalo Creek, in Donegal Township, and resided 
there during the remainder of his Ufe. He married HeS' 
ter Poole and they became the parents of the following 
children: David, Abraham, Noah, Thomas, Elizabeth, 
Matilda and Mary. 

Abraham Morrow grew up on the home farm and the 
education he received was obtained in the subscription 
schools. His life was devoted to agricultural pursuits 
and he acquired an ample fortune. For some years fol- 
lowing his marriage he resided on a farm in Donegal 
Township and then moved for a few years to Licking 
County, Ohio, but subsequently returned to the old farm 
in Washington County. His death occurred February 
12, 1888. He was a man to whom his fellow citizens ac- 
corded respect and esteem. He was a consistent member 
of the Christian Church and contributed liberally to the 
erection of the Dutch Fork church edifice and parsonage. 
When he removed to Licking County he found no church 
of his faith in the section in which he located and while 
he lived there was largely instrumental in the erection 
of a suitable church edifice and the establishment of a 
congregation which has prospered. 

In 1841, the late Abraham Morrow was married to 
Miss Jane DeFrance, who was born on Eaccoon Creek, in 
Washington County, June 19, 1821. Her father was Alli- 
son DeFrance. Seven children were born to this mar- 
riage, the eldest of whom, Cyrus Morrow, is one of the 
county's leading citizens and at present is register of 
wills. Four others survive: Salem, Permelia Ann, Perry 
and Albert. EUen died when aged twelve years and a 
son passed away in infancy. 

WALTER G. CRAMER, editor and sole owner of the 
Burgettstown Herald, which newspaper he founded in 
1908, is one of the enterprising and progressive young 
business men of Washington County. He was born at 
Curwensville, Clearfield, Co., Pa., March 20, 1877, and 
is a son of Eli and Mary J. (Stansberry) Cramer. The 
father died February 1, 1899, and was buried at Cherry 
Tree, in Indiana County, Pa., in which county the mother 
still resides. 

Mr. Cramer's great-grandfather was in the Revolution- 
ary War, his grandfather in the War of 1812, and his 
father in the Mexican and Civil Wars. 

Walter G. Cramer was educated in the schools of In- 
diana County and then learned the printing trade with 



his brother, at Burgettstown. He remained in Burgetts- 
town until about 1896, when he went to Pittsburg, where 
he worked, a couple of years on the "Chronicle-Tele- 
graph. ' ' Returning to Burgettstown in 1898, he again 
took up work on his brother's paper, the "Enterprise," 
an independent weekly paper, published here. In 1906 
the brother sold the ' ' Enterprise " to a stock company. 
Mr. Cramer was editor and manager until 1908, when he 
founded the ' ' Herald, ' ' and has ably edited it and man- 
aged its business affairs ever since. It is a paying prop- 
erty and its subscription list is constantly increasing. 
Mr. Cramer has other investments and is a stockholder 
in the Washington National Bank of Burgettstown. 

On October 16, 1898, Mr. Cramer was married to Miss 
Hettie I. McCabe, a daughter of John D. and Charlotte 
McCabe, and they have two children: Herbert W. and 
John S. Mr. and Mrs. Cramer are members of the West- 
minster Presbyterian Church. He belongs to Lodge No. 
1145, Odd Fellows, at Burgettstown, and also to Silver 
Cliff Lodge, Knights of Pythias. 

GEORGE BLOOMINGSTOCK, a citizen of Blaine 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., is serving as president of 
the board of road supervisors and is also a member of 
the school board. He devotes his farm of 105 acres to gen- 
eral agriculture and stock raising. He was born in Buffa- 
lo Township, Washington County, January 18, 1855, and 
is a son of Martin and Margaret (Home) Bloomingstock. 

The father of Mr. Bloomingstock, who died several 
years since, was born in Germany, but the mother is a 
native of Pennsylvania and is one of the venerable resi- 
dents of Buffalo Township. Of their family of six chil- 
dren the following survive : George, of Blaine Town- 
ship; Robert, of Washington County; Samuel, of Canton 
Township; and John and Elton A., both residing at Wash- 
ington. In politics, Martin Bloomingstock was a Demo- 
crat. He was a faithful member of the Lutheran Church. 

George Bloomingstock was reared in Buffalo Township, 
where he attended school and then learned the carpenter 
trade. For a number of years he engaged in carpenter 
and building work and put up many fine buildings in his 
day, but since 1893 he has given the larger part of his 
attention to farming. He continued to reside in Buf- 
falo Township until 1907, when he came to Blaine Town- 
ship and has lived here ever since. He owns very pro- 
ductive land and takes much interest in its cultivation. 

In 1875, Mr. Bloomingstock was married to Miss Anna 
McQuay, a daughter of William McQuay, formerly a res- 
ident of Canton Township, and they have three children: 
Ina M., William aid Sarah W. Mr. Bloomingstock and 
family attend the United Presbyterian Church at Tay- 
lorstown. Wherever he has lived since reaching manhood, 
Mr. Bloomingstock has been an active citizen and has 
done his part in bringing about good government. He 



HISTUKV OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



613 



votes with the Democratic party but when it comes to 
matters of general benefit, he puts party feeling aside 
and lends his influence to what he believes to be right 
and this has brought him the confidence and friendship 
of liis fellow citizens in general. He has served accept- 
ably in township offices both in Buffalo and Blaine Town- 
ships. 

CHAKLES A. BINGHAM, a leading business citizen 
at Burgettstown, formerly a member of the board of 
health and borough auditor, was born at Frankfort, 
Beaver Co., Pa., February 6, 1863, and is n son of Dr. 
.\guew John and Margaret (Nicholson) Bingham. 

The father of Mr. Bingham was a well known physi- 
cian and surgeon in Beaver County and was a practi- 
tioner at Murdockville and Frankfort. His death oc- 
curred in 1866, at Candor. He married Margaret Nichol- 
son, who was a daughter of Hon. Thomas and Rebecca 
Nicholson. Hon. Thomas Nicholson was a very promi- 
nent public figure in his day, ser\ing in many high 
offices. He was a member of the Pennsylvania House of 
Representatives and at the time of death was State 
treasurer. He survived until 1872 and his death and 
burial were at Frankfort. The parents of Mr. Bingham 
were members of the Presbyterian Church. Dr. Bingham 
was identified with the Democratic party but was not an 
active politician. 

Charles A. Bingham was the only child of his parents. 
He was given many advantages and his education was 
acquired in Quishacoquillas school, in Mifflin County, in 
the Canonsburg Academy and in the Paris Academy. 
From the latter institution he went into business life, 
working for several years as a clerk in the shoe store of 
Henry Hull, at Washington, and later in the same capa- 
city was employed by W. M. Laird, at Pittsburg, be- 
coming then a salesman for the wholesale firm of Laird 
& Bay, and still later for Bingham & Co., and after- 
ward for Lyons & Butterfield. With his many years of 
practical experience, Mr. Bingham felt himself thorough- 
qualified and prepared for doing business for himself, 
and in 1902 he came to Burgettstown and has met with 
such gratifying success that he has remained ever since. 
His stock includes shoes and men's and ladies' furnish- 
ings. 

On November 21, 1894, Mr. Bingham was married to 
Miss Anna Weber, a daughter of John B. and Katherine 
Weber. He attends the First Presbyterian Church at 
Burgettstown. In politics, Mr. Bingham is a Republican 
and he has always been an active and earnest citizen. 
He is a member of Burgettstown Lodge, No. 454, F. 
and A. M., and of J. K. Moorehead Conclave, No. 82, 
of the Order of Heptasophs, at Pittsburg. 

CHARLES LLOYD HARSHA, M. D., one of Canons- 



burg's representative citizens, who has been successfully 
engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in this 
city since 1904, was born in Chartiers Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., November 12, 1876. His parents were 
Thomas and Jane (Welch) Harsha. 

Dr. Harsha 's immediate ancestors have been of Wash- 
ington County for several generations and the families 
are well represented through this section of Pennsyl- 
vania. His father followed an agricultural life for many 
years and then retired with his wife, to Washington, 
where he died in 1891, at the age of seventy-eight years. 
He was survived by his widow until 1904. Of their fam- 
ily of nine children. Dr. Harslia is the youngest, the 
others being as follows: Mary, who is the wife of J. 
G. McPherson, resides at Philadelphia; Margaret, who 
is now deceased, was the wife of J. N. Grimes; J. W., 
who is a prominent minister of the United Presbyterian 
Church, in Pittsburg, Pa., a graduate of Franklin Col- 
lege, married Dola Cable; Ella, who resides at Phila- 
delphia; Curtis, who is the wife of Robert Evans Steele, 
resides in Hutchinson, Kas. ; Thomas Clark, who is a 
farmer in Chartiers Township, married Harriet McCaf- 
fery; Robert, a graduate of Franklin College, who is 
now pastor of the United Presbyterian Church of Tay- 
lorstown, married Margaret Pollock; Nettie, who resides 
at Pittsburg; and J. V., who is a practicing physician 
at McKeesport, Pa., is a graduate of the Pittsburg Uni- 
versity. 

The boyhood of Dr. Harsha was passed on his father's 
farm, but he early discovered that his tastes and natural 
inclinations were all in the direction of a professional 
career and his studies were accordingly pursued with 
this end in view. After graduating with honors and re- 
ceiving the degrees of A. B. and A. M., from Washington 
and Jefferson College, in 1897 and after serving as in- 
structor of Latin in the Washington high school for one 
year, he entered Jefferson Medical College at Philadel- 
phia and from that grand old institution, to which hun- 
dreds of eminent medical men look back with affection, 
he was graduated in 1903. In the following year he 
entered upon practice at Canonsburg and here has found 
appreciation of his medical and surgical skill and is 
recognized as one of the ablest practitioners of the city. 
He is a member of a number of medical organizations, 
including the county. State and American Medical As- 
sociations. 

On June 17, 1909, Dr. Harsha was married to Miss 
Lucile Greer, a daughter of C. M. and Margaret (Clark) 
Greer, of Canonsburg. Mrs. Harsha was educated at 
the Pennsylvania College for Women. Dr. Harsha re- 
tains his membership in the Nu Sigma Nu and the Alpha 
Omega Alpha fraternities of his college, in which he took 
an active part during his collegiate course. In politics 
he is a Republican. With his wife he is a member of 



614 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



the United Presbyterian Church. They enjoy an attrac- 
tive home at No. 222 West Pike street. They are more 
or less interested in the pleasant social life of the city 
and have a wide circle of personal friends, many of these 
having known them from childhood. 

GEORGE W. BUXTON, a substantial business citizen 
of Independence, Washington Co., Pa., where he is car- 
rying on a prosperous general store enterprise, was born 
in 1865, in West Virginia, just across the river from 
Steubenville, Ohio, and is a son of James and Eleanore 
(Noah) Buxton. 

The Buxton family, which is well known in Pennsyl- 
vania, was founded by Jacob Buxton, the great-grand- 
father of George W., who came as a young man to the 
United States from Germany. His son, Amos Buxton, 
was a stone mason by trade, and spent all of his life 
within a few miles of Independence, becoming well and 
favorably known as a master of his trade. James Bux- 
ton, father of George W., was born in Brooke County, 
W. Va., and came to Independence Township when nine 
years of age, following farming here up to the time of 
his wife 's death in 1905, and since that time making his 
home with his son George W. James Buxton married 
Eleanore Noah, and they had two sons: George W., and 
John C, the latter also residing in Independence. 

George W. Buxton was educated in the common schools 
which he left at the age of seventeen years to engage 
in farming with his father, and so continued until 1901, 
in which year he commenced operating a coal bank, fur- 
nishing coal to the Wabash BaUroad for two years. He 
then came to Independence, buying the store of T. J. 
Adamson, and he has continued in this business to the 
present time, keeping a full line of groceries, dry goods, 
hardware and shoes, and having a large trade in his 
community. The building which he occupies was erected 
by his grandfather in 1848, and testifies to the latter 's 
skill as a workman. 

On December 27, 1898, Mr. Buxton was married to 
Mary C. Adams, daughter of Joseph P. and Florence 
Adams, of Independence, and there have been three chil- 
dren born to this union: Glen W., in March, 1901; Flor- 
ence, in July, 1905; and James, in July, 1907. 

Mr. Buxton is a trustee of the Independence Methodist 
Church, and his wife has been greatly interested in the 
work of this denomination. Although a Democrat in 
national matters, Mr. Buxton has been independent in 
local affairs, voting rather for the man than the party. 
He is the present township auditor, it being his third 
term in this office, and he has also served two terms as 
township clerk. He is a stockholder in the Farmers' 
Mutual Telephone Company of Independence, and is to 
be found in the front rank when any movement calculated 



to be of benefit to his community is being agitated by his 
fellow citizens. 

JOSEPH CARSON, deceased. The Carsons of Ohio 
County, W. Va., have always enjoyed high standing in 
that section and one of the representative and worthy 
members was the late Joseph Carson, who was born on 
the old family home place there, August 21, 1801, and 
was a son of Richard and Elizabeth (Irwin) Carson. 

The family originally moved from Scotland to County 
Tyrone, Ireland, and from there emigrated to America, 
where the famUy has been established for more than 
200 years. Richard Carson, the father of Joseph Carson, 
was a native of Pennsylvania. In the latter part of the 
eighteenth century he removed from Dauphin County, 
Pa., from the vicinity of Harrisburg, to Ohio County, 
Va., where he purchased the farm which later became 
the possession of his sou Joseph. Richard Carson was 
a soldier in the War of 1812 and his death occurred at 
Delaware, Ohio, while on his way home from that war. 
He married Elizabeth Irwin and they had the following 
named children born to them : Abner, John, Nancy, 
Joseph, David, Elizabeth and Irwin. His widow subse- 
quently became the wife of William Paris. 

Joseph Carson, the third son, was young when he was 
left fatherless. He was reared on the home farm and 
gained sufficient education in the subscription schools 
and through his own efforts, to enable him to teach school 
and for several years before settling down to an entirely 
agricultural life, he engaged in teaching in his native 
county. He was a man of marked ability and his public 
spirit was shown in his efforts to better his community 
and to develop a spirit of progress, at all times exerting 
an influence in the direction of education and religion. 
He lived a long and useful life and died on the farm on 
which he was born, July 20, 1887. 

In 1828, Joseph Carson was united in man-iage with 
Miss Anna Brown, a daughter of William Brown, of Ohio 
County, and they had the following children born to 
them; Elizabeth, who married Robert Criswell; Hannah 
J., who married Harvey J. Milligan ; Richard ; Mary A., 
who married David M. Boggs; Sarah; William; Almira 
S. and Harriet, both of whom are now deceased; Vincent 
B. and John I., the last named being a very prominent 
citizen of Washington, Pa., and a leading member of 
its able bar. Joseph Carson was an old-time Democrat 
and was a man of party influence in his day and for some 
years he served as a justice of the peace. For more than 
a quarter of a century he was an elder in the West Alex- 
ander Presbyterian Church. 

MRS. SARAH J. NOBLE, whose valuable farm of 
forty-two acres is situated in Donegal Township and is 



HlS'l'OltY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



615 



devoted to general agriculture, has resided in the village 
of Vienna, Pa., since 1907. She was born near Utiea, 
N. Y., January 14, 183(3, and is a daughter of Matthew 
and Julia (Kenneily) Lavey. 

The parents of Mrs. Noble were both born in Ireland. 
After coming to America they resided successively in 
various parts of New York State, and finally settled at 
Utica, where the father died when his daughter Sarah 
(Mrs. Noble) was but three years old. Mrs. Lavey re- 
maineil a widow for a time and then married Kobert 
Dougan and the family then came to Washington County, 
settling first at West Alexander. Later they movcti to 
Claysville and there both Mr. and Mrs. Dougan died, the 
latter in her sixty-fifth year. Robert Dougan served as a 
soldier in the Civil War. 

Mrs. Noble was sixteen years old when the family came 
to West Alexander, and on February 6, 1855, she was 
married to James Noble. He was a native of Ireland 
and was a son of James and Eosa Noble, who spent their 
lives in that country. In early manhood James Noble 
crossed the Atlantic Ocean to Canada, and from there 
came to West Alexander, where he was engaged for a 
time in the boot and shoe manufacturing business. In 
August, 1861, he enlisted for service in the Civil War, 
entering the 1st W. Va. Cav., and serving in Gen. 
Rosecrans' command. On March 14, 1862, he was killed 
by bushwhackers while on a scouting expedition. He 
was a favorite with his comrades and they all were united 
in their deep grief over his sad fate. The G. A. E. Post 
of West Alexander is named in his honor. Besides his 
widow, Mr. Noble left three fatherless children, all of 
whom have been carefully reared by their mother. The 
eldest, Eva K., is a successful teacher in the public schools 
at Frederickstown, Pa.; William E. and Mary E. both 
reside at Vienna with their mother. Mrs. Noble and her 
children are members of the Presbyterian Church at West 
Alexander, but Mr. Noble belonged to the M. E. Church. 
There are few better known or more highly respected 
ladies in the community than is Mrs. Noble, who, for al- 
most 40 years was the toll-gate keeper on the National 
Road about two miles east of West Alexander. During 
this long period she was faithful to her duties and main- 
tained the dignity and self respect which the importance 
of the position demanded. 

MISS MAEY M. SMITH. There are few family names 
in Independence Tow-nship, Washington Co., Pa., that 
are recalled with more respect than that of Smith, the 
first bearer of the name here being Nathaniel Smith, 
who was the grandfather of Miss Mary M. Smith, who 
owns and resides on the fine old homestead farm of 
eighty-seven acres. Miss Smith was born on this farm, 
in 1847, and her parents were William and Mary (Cres- 
well) Smith. 



Nathaniel Smith was born in Ireland and he came to 
this section of Washington County when there were 
comparatively few settlers here. He was a man possess- 
ing more education than his neighbors and also had the 
qualities which commanded the respect and confidence 
of the community and he was frequently called on to 
write wills and deeds, to preserve records, act as admin- 
istrator and perform other duties which usually fall to 
the leading citizen. He was a practical surveyor and 
followed this profession in addition to cultivating his 
farm. This farm originally was a part of the old 
Philip Doddridge tract, for which he obtained patent 
from the commonwealth. This farm subsequently came 
into the possession of Miss Mary M. Smith, his only 
grandchild. She has sold that property, with the ex- 
ception of the old home and two acres of land, to a coal 
company. 

William Smith, father of Miss Mary M., was a well 
known school teacher and there are many of the elder 
residents of Independence Township who can recall him 
as such. He at that early day had to furnish the school- 
house in which he taught. His death occurred in 1855 
and his burial was at Mt. Hope. He married Mary 
Creswell and they had two children: Mary M. and Will- 
iam Sidney, the latter of whom died in 1874. In 1857, 
Mrs. Smith was married (second) to John H. White, 
and they had one daughter, Esther J., who resides with 
her sister, Miss Mary M. The mother survived until 
1891, and her burial was at Wellsville, Ohio. 

John H. White was born in West Middletown, where 
his father, Thomas White was a blacksmith. The latter 
moved with his family to what now is the Stewart farm 
in Independence Township, on which he burned the 
brick out of which the house which now stands was built. 
When John H. White was first married he went to house 
keeping in a house which stood where the Wabash road 
now runs. He later moved to West Virginia, and was 
a farmer there. After the death of his first wife there, 
he was married to Mrs. Smith. 

Miss Mary M. Smith attended school at Fallen Tim- 
ber and then entered Muskingum College, Ohio, where 
she was subsequently graduated. For two years after- 
ward she taught school, in Delaware County, N. Y., and 
then returned to Wellsville, Ohio, where her mother 
joined her after the death of Mr. White. In 1896, Miss 
Smith returned to take personal charge of the old home- 
stead, which she has capably managed ever since, raising 
cattle and hogs together with grain, hay and fruit. Miss 
Smith and her sister are both members of the United 
Presbyterian Church of West Middletown and both are 
active workers in the Missionary Society. Miss Smith is 
very highly esteemed and is noted for her kindness of 
heart and charitable impulses as well as for her excel- 
lent judgment in the management of her estate. 



616 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



HON. JOHN W. WILES, burgess of McDonald, Pa., 
and a prominent citizen of this borough, was born at 
Parkersburg, W. Va., November 27, 1866, and is a son of 
Samuel J. and Mary J. (Summers) Wiles. 

The parents of Mr. Wiles were also natives of West 
Virginia and the father died there March 4, 1909, and 
his burial was at Petroleum. He was engaged in oil 
development. In politics he was a Eepublican, and he 
and wife were worthy members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. Of their four children, John W., is the 
eldest, the other being: Dora, who married W. S. Day- 
huff; Lafayette; and Lina, who married P. M. Powell. 

John W. Wiles spent but a short time in school, en- 
tering the oil fields when young and he has continued 
in the oil business ever since, at the present time having 
an interest in over 100 weUs in West Virginia, Ohio 
and Pennsylvania. He has been a very active, progres- 
sive and useful citizen of McDonald and his fellow citi- 
zens testified to their confidence and esteem by electing 
him burgess on February 16, 1909. 

In 1906, Mr. Wiles was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Copeland, who is a daughter of Jacob and Nancy Cope- 
land, who were farming people in Harrison County, Ohio. 
Mrs. WDes has four brothers : William, John, Jacob and 
George. The one son of the family bears the name of 
Robert. 

Burgess Wiles is identified with Garfield Lodge, No. 
604, P. & A. M.; No. 605, Odd Pellows, both at McDon- 
ald; and Lodge No. 831, Elks, at Carnegie. Mr. Wiles 
is manager of the McDonald baseball club, having a love 
for athletic sports and especially for the great American 



W. R. McILVAINE, vice-president of the Washington 
Trust Company, of Washington, Pa., and for the past 
twenty years identified with many of the important busi- 
ness interests of city and county, was born in 1845, in 
Somerset Township, Washington Co., Pa., and is a son 
of the late William McHvaine. 

The McDvaine family came to Washington County as 
early as 1780 and has increased and prospered here ever 
since. The father of Mr. Mcllvaine was born in Somer- 
set Township in 1805, and his whole life was passed in 
Washington County, where, for many years, he engaged 
in farming and stock raising. 

W. R. Mcllvaine obtained his education in the schools 
of his native county and resided on the farm on which 
he was bom until he was forty-five years old, following 
farming and wool growing. After taking up his resi- 
dence at Washington, he became interested in the natural 
gas industry and was one of a number who formed a 
company under the name of the Belief Gas Company, 
which was subsequently bought by the Manufacturers' 
Gas, Heat and Light Company, Mr. Mcllvaine continu- 



ing an interest in the same. He is second officer in the 
Washington Trust Company and was chairman of the 
building committee that erected the fine six-story bank 
building, a handsome structure with dimensions of 80 
by 135 feet. In addition to being a thoroughly experi- 
enced and practical business man, Mr. Mcllvaine is an 
active citizen and many of the movements which have 
contributed to the greatest welfare of the city, have had 
his approval in their inception and completion. 

In 1868, Mr. McHvaine was married to Miss Sarah 
E. Hamilton, who was born in Nottingham Township, of 
a prominent old Washington County family. They have 
three children: Nora Irene, who resides at home; Will- 
iam Alexander Hamilton, who is an attorney at Wash- 
ington; and John Addison, who is a member of the 
faculty at Mt. Airy Institute for the Deaf. Mr. Mc- 
llvaine and family- are members of the Second Presby- 
terian Church of Washington. 

DUNNING HAET, residing at No. 654 Maiden street, 
Washington, Pa., is a member of an old settled family 
of Pennsylvania. He was born in Washington County, 
Pa., November 30, 1836, and is a son of David and 
Margery Dunning Butler Hart, she being the second wife 
of David Hart. They had three children, namely: Mar- 
garet, who married Willison Kerr, is deceased as is also 
her husband; Dunning; and Eliza Harper, the latter of 
whom married Ard M. Hosack, and lives at Scenery 
Hill, Washington County. 

The Hart family in America sprung from Nathan 
Hart (1), of Scotland. He came across the waters and 
settled on Muddy Eun, Adams County, Pa., about 1730, 
which is about all that is known of his family except 
that he had two sons: Nathan Hart (2) and Micah 
Hart, the last named afterward settling near Norwich, 
Ohio. 

Nathan Hart (2) in 1769, married Margaret Monteith 
and they lived in Muddy Eun, Adams Co., Pa., and to 
them were born four children: David, in 1775; Jane, 
in 1777; Margaret, in 1782; and Mary, in 1785. Of 
these, Jane married John Kerr and lived and died near 
Gettysburg and had four children. Margaret married 
Nathaniel Paxton, in 1804, and removed to Somerset 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., in 1812. The numerous 
Paxton families throughout the norther part of Wash- 
ington County, Pa., and parts of Ohio, are descendants 
of Nathaniel and Margaret (Hart) Paxton. Mary mar- 
ried Smith McCulIough, of Pigeon Creek, Washington 
Co., Pa. Nathaniel Hart (2) died in 1787, on Muddy 
Eun, Adams County. His wife, Margaret (Monteith) 
Hart, died in 1785, leaving the four children orphans. 

David Hart assumed the entire management of the 
homestead, and eared, as a father, for his three sisters. 
On April 12, 1798, he married Sarah Paxton and re- 




I). will I'. iiAi; 
DINMNC iiAirr 



T I'AVTDTIART 

WILLIAM i; MART 

)A\'ii) I). iiAirr 



YCR_ 



HISTORY OK WASlllNUTON COUNTY 



619 



iiuiiued on Miuldy Kun until the spring of 18U7, when ho 
and wife, feeling that the advantages and future wel- 
fare of their family demanded removal farther west, 
severed the strong ties that bound them to their childhood 
home. They started on their journey to Washington 
County, coming through on horseback and arriving in 
Somerset Township about tho first of April, 1807. Here, 
in this house they had hewed out of the forest, they lived 
and died. There were born to them nine children, three 
born in Adams County and six in Washington County, 
as follows: Andrew Hart, born July 19, 1799, died 
August 10, 1861; Jane Hart, born January 28, 1801, and 
died February 21, 1864; Paxton Hart, born February 19, 
1803, died October 30, 1828; John Hart, born December 
15, 1805, died March 1, 1820; James Gibson Hart, born 
January 2, 1807; David Hart, born December 18, 1808, 
died March 30, 1872; Maria Hart; Sally Hart, born 
AprU 10, 1813, died May 17, 1830; and William Hart, 
born September 19, 1817. Sarah (Paxton) Hart died in 
1830. In 1832, David Hart married for a second wife, 
Mrs. Margaret Dunning Butler, to whom were born three 
children, namely: Margaret Hart Kerr, deeeased; Eliza 
Hart Hosack, of Scenery Hill, and Dunning Hart, of 
Washington, Pa. 

David Hart died October 1, 1862, and as to the life he 
led and to the high esteem in which he was held by those 
who knew him, it can be told no better than to add here 
the words written by one who knew him well, Eev. Bank- 
head Boyd, of Pigeon Creek. 

"David Hart died at his residence in Somerset Town- 
ship, Washington County, on the first day of October, 
1852, in the seventy-eighth year of his age. He was 
born in Adams County, Pa., November 28, 1775. The 
time of his removal to this county was 1807. He was a 
ruling elder in the Associate Presbyterian Church of 
Pigeon Creek. In noticing the death of this good man, 
it is not our design to pronounce any eulogy upon him. 
He was too well known in the community in which he 
long resided, to render this necessary. It is but justice, 
however, to say that but few men stood higher in the 
community than the deceased. He possessed a strong, 
discriminating judgment, a character fair and unblem- 
ished, strongly marked by decision, and at the same time 
distinguished for uprightness and sterling integrity, which 
secured for him the esteem and confidence of all who 
knew him. This was evident from the large amount of 
business with which ho was from time to time entrusted, 
and indeed, during the greater part of his long life, he 
was acting for others, in one way or another, and the 
vast concourse of people which accompanied his mortal 
remains to their final resting place, showed the high 
esteem in which he was held by the community at large. 
Benevolence was a paramount feature in his character. 
The good of others was an object which he kept steadily 



ill view, and any measures which he believed "calculated 
for the promotion of the public good, received his cor- 
dial support. At the time of his death he was an active 
and inllucntial member of the Bible Society of Somerset 
Township. The interests of true religion, also the ad- 
vancement of the Redeemer's Kingdom, in this world, 
were always with him matters of the first importance. 
Having early made a profession of his faith in Christ, 
he ever manifested a deep solicitude for the cause he had 
espoused, and his counsel and contributions were never 
wanting but always rendered with the greatest cheerful- 
ness, when the interests of the church required them. 
His whole life was an ornament of the profession he 
had made. His house was the house of prayer, the morn- 
ing and evening sacrifice was never neglected. His seat 
was never vacant in the House of God but for the 
weightiest reasons, and in all the relations of Ufe he 
seemed to aim at maintaining a conscience void of offense 
toward God and toward man. 

"In a word, he was a just man who feared God and 
wrought righteousness and was eminently useful in his 
day and generation, both in the church and in the world, 
being always ready for every good work. From the 
nature of the disease from which he died, he was in a 
great measure deprived of the powers of speech during 
his last illness, and consequently little could be obtained 
from him respecting his feelings or state of mind, but, 
judging from the general tenor of his life, we can have 
no doubt but that his latter end was peace. 'Mark the 
perfect man and behold the upright for the end of that 
man is peace. ' He left a wife and numerous relatives 
to mourn his loss, but trust their loss was his gain, and 
that he is now in the Upper Sanctuary, singing the song 
of Moses and the Lamb with the angels and the spirits 
of just men made perfect." 

Dunning Hart was reared on the home farm in Somer- 
set Township. He enlisted in Co. G, 140th Pa. Vol. Inf., 
and served three years of the Civil War, in the Army of 
the Potomac. He was wounded at the battle of Gettys- 
burg, receiving three gunshot wounds, one slight and two 
serious, and was in the Philadelphia Hospital for about 
eight months before again fit for duty. He was then 
transferred from Co. G, to the 3rd Vet. Ees., of which 
he was an ofScer, and was discharged at Augusta, Maine, 
in September, 1865. He is a member of W. F. Temple- 
ton Post, G. A. E. 

After his military service was over, Mr. Hart returned 
home and resumed farming and stock raising in Somerset 
Township, continuing until 1868, when he purchased the 
Lowland Stock Farm, in Amwell Township, to which he 
moved and carried on farming and stock raising there 
until 1908, when he sold out and retired to Washington. 
He was an extensive raiser of all kinds of stock and in 
later years he made a specialty of registered Shorthorn 



620 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



cattle, in which he met with much success. He has al- 
ways been an active citizen. 

Mr. Hart was married in the fall of 1865, to Miss 
Mary J. Davis, born in Allegheny County, Pa., July 24, 
1839, a daughter of George and Martha (Crawford) 
Davis. When Mrs. Hart was sixteen years of age, her 
parents moved to the Brownlee farm in Washington 
County, and she has resided in the county ever since. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hart reared a family of seven children, namely : 
George Davis, who lives on the Lowland farm; David 
Paxton, who also resides in Amwell Township; Margaret 
M., who is the wife of J. Preston Horn, lives near 
Baker 's Station ; Dunning Albert, who died when just 
past his seventeenth year; James G., who is engaged in 
business at Duquesne, Pa.; John Fergus, who is deceased; 
and William E. William E. Hart is a practicing physi- 
cian in the Roosevelt Hospital, New York City. He grad- 
uated from Washington and Jefferson College, in the 
class of 1905, and from Jonns Hopkins Medical College, 
Baltimore, Md., in the class of 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Hart 
are members of the First Presbyterian Church of Wash- 
ington. 

JULES J. CHARLIEE, treasurer of the McDonald 
Savings and Trust Company, at McDonald, Pa., has been 
identified with this financial institution since 1905, and 
has spent thirty years of his life in America, but another 
land claims his birth. He is a native of Belgium, born 
in that country in September, 1868, and is a son of 
Jules and a grandson of Alexis Charlier. 

Both grandfather and father were coal miners in Bel- 
gium and it was with the hope of finding better indus- 
trial conditions in the coal districts of Pennsylvania, 
that the father of Jules J. Charlier brought his family 
to America in 1879. He had married Josephine Mander- 
lier, in Belgium, and they became the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Emma; Octavius; Fred; Emil; Mary, 
who married Morris Evans; Alice, who married Roy L. 
Smith; and Jules J., who was the second in order of 
birth. 

Jules J. Charlier had only the rather meager educa- 
tional opportunities that are afforded children in the 
mining districts, where very often their school days are 
shortened in order that they may join the other male 
members of the family and by their work add to the 
general income, and his was no exceptional case. His 
teaching in Belgium had been in the French language 
and only four months was afforded him in the common 
schools in the United States in which to master an en- 
tirely new tongue, and then he went into the mines and 
did his daily task under ground with the others. How- 
ever, he was different in that he had ambition and when 
his hard labor was over for the day, he applied himself 
to study in the evenings and in a surprisingly short time 



had acquired knowledge that made him a valuable em- 
ploye in another direction and provided a stepping stone 
to the promotion which later awaited him. After leav- 
ing the mines he entered the employ of a merchant, T. 
B. Rollins, and later, of J. D. Sauters, a coal operator, 
and still later he embarked in a grocery business for 
himself, at McDonald. He continued in the latter en- 
terprise for some time and then sold out, and in 1905 
accepted the position of bookkeeper for the McDonald 
Savings and Trust Company, of which he is now treas- 
urer. 

The McDonald Savings and Trust Company was organ- 
ized in 1903, with a capital stock of $125,000, John P. 
Scott being its first president, and W. L. Scott, its first 
treasurer. The capitalists who formed the first board 
of directors were the following: John P. Scott, W. 
L. Elliott, Dr. G. H. Miller, C. G. Haden, J. M. Stilley, 
D. G. Bamford, James Baell, K. N. McDonald and 
Richard Lamb. It is a sound, safe concern that has 
more than met every expectation and is one of the 
most solidly financed institutions of this section. 

In November, 1890, Mr. Charlier was married to Miss 
Emma Egbert, whose parents are Nicholas and Flomey 
(Leroy) Egbert, residents of McDonald, whose other 
children are: Lena, wife of Augustus Bailey Isadore; 
Flomey, wife of Eli Conlier; and Helen, wife of Frank 
Seouvart; and Jules. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Char- 
lier : Raymond, Earl and Evaline. They are members 
of the First United Presbyterian Church at McDonald. 
He is identified with both the Masons and the Odd Fel- 
lows, a member of Garfield Lodge, No. 604, F. & A. M., 
and MacDonald Lodge, No. 605, Odd Fellows, both at 
McDonald. In politics he is a Republican. 

ROBERT L. JOHNSTON, president of the school 
board of California, Pa., and a director of the First 
National Bank, has been a resident of East Pike Run 
Township since about 1854, and was born February 5, 
1848, at Brownsville, Fayette Co., Pa., a son of James 
M. and Jane B. (Scott) Johnston, and a grandson of 
George Johnston, a native of Ireland, who came to this 
country about 1806 and located at Brownsville, Pa., 
where he died at the advanced age of ninety-three years. 
The father of our subject was a plasterer and contractor 
by trade, but spent his later years on a farm in East 
Pike Run Township. 

Robert L. Johnston was reared at California, Pa., 
where he attended the local schools and the old academy, 
and when a youth removed with his parents to the farm 
in East Pike Run Township, where he subsequently en- 
gaged in farming until 1897, when he sold the property 
and came to California, where he and his brother James 
M. carry on a plaster contracting business. Mr. John- 



HIS'roK'V OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



621 



ston lias for the past t^venty■t^Yo yoais seivcil as a mem- 
ber of the towiisliip anil borough school boards, and is 
now serving his fourth term on the California board, 
of which he has for a number of years been president. 
The other members of the board are as follows; W. J. 
Weaver, T. J. Underwood, Peter Devvar, Joseph Galla- 
gher, and Ross Denny. Mr. Johnston is a Knight Tem- 
plar Mason. He nuirried Mary Worrel, who was born 
in Washington County, Pa., and was reared in Fallow- 
field Township by James Stroud. They have three chil- 
dren: .hiMu's iS., Jane S., and Robert L. 

LEWIS N. YOHE, a member of the Yohe Brothers' 
Lumber Company, which is the oldest concern of its 
kind in Monongahela City, and was established in 1878, 
has been a life long resident of this city, where he was 
born April 1.5, 1855, and is a sou of Michael and Phoebe 
(McConnel) Yohe. 

Michael Yohe was born and reared on a farm at Val- 
ley Inn, Carrol Township, in 1815, and was a son of 
Isaac Yohe, who came from the eastern part of Penn- 
sylvania, locating on a farm three miles east of Monon- 
gahela City, where he spent his life engaged in farming. 
Michael Yohe was reared on the home farm, where he 
remained until after his marriage. He moved to Monon- 
gahela City, Pa., where he died at the age of sixty-eight 
years. He married Phoebe McConnel, who was born in 
1825, in West Middletown, Pa., and who was of Scotch- 
Irish ancestry. Their union resulted in the birth of nine 
sons, namely: John M., a resident of Pittsburg; Isaac, 
a resident of Monongahela City; Leroy S., deceased; 
James L., who is in partnership with his brother Lewis; 
William G., of New Kensington, Pa.; Lewis N., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Frank; and Charles (twins) both 
residents of Monongahela City; and Sherod, who also 
resides in Monongahela City. 

Lewis N. Yohe grew to maturity at his father's home, 
and after obtaining an education in the common schools 
of the township, spent two years on Capt. J. B. Gibson 's 
farm, and two years on Daniel Reil's farm, where he 
took the place of his cousin, J. B. Yohe, now general 
manager of the Lake Erie Railroad. He then came to 
Monongahela City, where he learned the carpenter's trade 
with his brother Isaac, with whom he and his brother 
James, established in 1878, the plaining mill and lumber 
company, which is still operated under the firm name of 
Yohe Brothers' Lumber Company. The plant, which is 
located on the Monongahela River, gives employment to 
an average of 60 to 100 men, and the concern does 
a general contracting business, dealing also in all kinds 
of building materials. Isaac Yohe disposed of his in- 
terest in the business to Clyde C. Yohe, a son of James 
L. Yohe, and is now living in retirement. James L. 
Yohe is manager of the mill, his son Clyde is secretary 



and treasurer of the company, and Lewis N. Yohe, man- 
ager of the general contract work. 

In March, 1877, Mr. Yohe was united in marriage with 
Sallie A. Wilson, a daughter of John and Susanna Wil- 
son, of Chester County, Pa., and they have had the fol- 
lowing children: Warren I., who married Margaret Ab- 
bott, and has one child, Lewis, Jr.; George W. ; Lewis 
H. ; deceased; Michael, who married Nellie McCalister 
and has two children, Donald and Harold; Sarah N., 
who is the wife of George H. Peterson; Su.san, deceased; 
Percy P., and Elsie. 

In politics Mr. Yohe is a Republican. Fraternally he 
is affiliated with the Royal Arcanum. He is an active 
member in the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which 
he has been trustee for the past twenty-eight years. 

WALTER H. BAKER, secretary and treasurer of the 
Universal Rolling Mill Company, whose plant is located 
at Bridgeville, Pa., is one of the prominent young busi- 
ness men of Washington. He was born at Zollarsville, 
in Bethlehem Township, but has practically spent his en- 
tire life in Washington, where his father, N. R. Baker, 
of the Citizens' National Bank, located when he was a 
child. 

Walter H. Baker graduated with the class of 1898 
from Washington and Jeft'erson College, and immediately 
afterward became identified with the Tyler Charcoal 
Iron Mills for two years, after which he went to Waynes- 
burg as superintendent of the Waynesburg Forge, Sheet 
and Tin Mills, in which capacity he served until 1907, 
when he accepted a position as secretary and treasurer 
of the Universal Rolling Mill Company, with which he 
has since been identified, his office being located at No. 
531 Washington Trust building, Washington. 

Mr. Baker is a member of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Church; is fraternally affiliated with Sunset Lodge. 
F. & A. M., and belongs also to the Duquesne Club of 
Pittsburg. 

In April, 1909, Mr. Baker married Amy Patterson 
Duncan, a daughter of the late James E. Duncan, who 
was a prominent glass manufacturer of Pittsburg and 
Washington. 

WILLIAM BAMFORD, a prominent farmer of Robe- 
son Township and the owner of a farm of 114 acres, on 
Vfh'iQh he has a producing oil well, was born November 
16. 1864, at Bulger, and is a son of Robert and Sarah 
(Gordon) Bamford. The father was a blacksmith during 
his early life, but subsequently followed farming. He 
died January 1, 1886, leaving his widow, who is a resi- 
dent of Midway, and the following children: D. G. 
Bamford, William, our subject; Robert, and Mary, who 
lives with the mother at Midway. 

William Bamford obtained his education in the com- 



633 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



mon schools of the towship, and since completing same 
has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in Eobeson 
Township. He is a stockholder in the Midway National 
Bank, and the McDonald Savings and Trust Company. 
In politics he is .a Democrat and has served three years 
as collector and treasurer of the school funds, and three 
years as road supervisor of the township. 

In 1882, Mr. Bamford married Anna M. Hood, a 
daughter of James and Margaret (Burns) Hood, who 
was one of ten children born to her parents,, who were 
well known farmers of this county: Jane, the deceased 
wife of James Coventry ; Mary, deceased wife of John 
Coventry; Nancy, who first married Samuel Ackleson, 
formed a second union with Thomas Eamsey; Catherine, 
the deceased wife of William Moreland; John; Alex- 
ander; Amanda, deceased; Anna Margaret, who is the 
wife of our subject; James, and George. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bamford have three children : Sarah G., Margaret H. and 
Eobert James. 

ROBERT LEMOYNE EL WOOD, ex-mayor and an 
honored and highly esteemed citizen of Monongahela 
City, Pa., who has been a resident here for the past 
forty-seven years, was born August 3, 1856, in Washing- 
ton Co., Pa., and is a son of Robert and Elizabeth 
(Howe) Elwood. 

Robert Elwood, father of our subject, was a small 
boy when his parents removed from Ohio to Washington 
County, Pa., where they settled on a tract of timber- 
land. Here he was reared and learned the blacksmith 
trade, and during the Civil War, came to Monongahela 
City, where he ran a shop on Main street, where the 
Ideal Theater is now located. He was married to Eliza- 
beth Howe, a native of Washington County, Pa., who 
died at the age of eighty-two years. Of their union 
were born the following children : Eliza, who married 
William Grable, both of whom are deceased; Anna, 
who married Wniiam Hartman, both deceased; John 
William; Margaret, who is the ^ widow of John Frye; 
Maria, who married Aaron Eeese; Clara, who is the 
wife of Amzi Eckles; Ella D., who is the wife of Harry 
McMasters; Eobert L., the subject of this sketch; and 
Jennie, who married Lewis Stuler. Mr. and Mrs. Elwood 
were married fifty years before death entered the family, 
the former's death occurring at the age of .seventy-four 
years. 

Eobert L. Elwood was quite young when the family 
removed to Monongahela City, where he was reared and 
attended the common schools, having been a member of 
the Kate Clemmons class of 1872. He early in life began 
working on the river boats, beginning as a deck hand 
on the ' ' Clipper, ' ' which was owned by William Clark. 
He later entered the employ of Joseph Walton & Com- 
pany, with whom he began as mate and was promoted 



to captain. During his period of twenty-one years of 
service with that company he was presented with a 
token of appreciation by the independent coal dealers 
for having carried the largest amount of coal ever car- 
ried in six months on the Monongahela Eiver, and he 
was at the same time presented with a miniature of hig 
old boat, "Maggie," by the other employees of the Jo- 
seph Walton Company. During his thirty-two years spent 
on the river he was fortunate in not having sunk even 
the smallest amount of coal, which is a distinction that 
falls to the lot of but few sailors. In 1904, Mr. Elwood 
retired from the river, and the following year was elected 
mayor of Monongahela City on the Republican ticket, 
serving in that capacity for two terms, and during his 
second term was appointed alderman by the governor to 
fill the vacancy caused by the death of John Holland. 
At the expiration of his first term in that capacity, he 
was elected to that oflBce and is still serving. 

In 1904, Mr. Elwood and his son Eobert embarked 
in the ice business at Monongahela City, and operate 
three wagons. He and his son have invented and ob- 
tained a patent Mar. 23, 1909, on a nut-and-bolt-loek, 
which will doubtless be used extensively in the con- 
struction of railroad structural iron work, the nut itself 
having a leveled face, which, when bolted to a surface 
of the same angle, makes slipping absolutely impossible. 

Mr. Elwood was married Jan. 8, 1878, to Mary A. 
Furlong, who is a daughter of John Furlong, of Oil 
City, Pa., and they have four children: Seward, Eliza- 
beth, Morley and Eobert L., Jr. Mr. Elwood is fra- 
ternally a member of the I. O. 0. F., B. P. O. E., Jr. 
0. U. A. M., and the Steamboat Protective Association, 
Harbor No. 25. His religious connection is with the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

WILLIAM COULSON, proprietor of the Central 
Hotel, a commodious, well equipped modern hostelry 
situated at Eoscoe, Washington Co., Pa., was born in 
England, Sept. 6, 1869, and is a son of Eneas and Mary 
(Barnes) Coulson. 

The parents of Mr. Coulson came to America in 1879. 
The father was a coal miner and found employment 
at Eleo, formerly called Wood's Eun, one mile up the 
river from Roseoe. Mr. Coulson worked as a miner until 
1901, when he went into the hotel business and it was 
in his father's hotel at Donora that William Coulson 
obtained his training and experience in this line. 

William Coulson started to work in the coal mines 
when he was 12 years old and knows all about the 
hardships and dangers of a miner's life, which he con- 
tinued to face until 1902, when he began to assist his 
father. He came to Eoscoe and took charge of the 
Central Hotel in September, 1908. This building was 
erected in 1897, but has been remodeled and the latest 



THE NEW YORIC 




losKi'ii A. iii';i;i;(».\ 



PIISTOHY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



(j'i.5 



modern comforts and conveniences installed. It is a 
large, roomy structuro, 40 apartments in all, UO of these 
being comfortable sleeping chambers. It is of brick 
and tile coustrnction and i.s three stories in height. Its 
cuisine is unsurpassed and its charges of .$1.50 per day 
are very moderate. 

Mr. Coulson married Miss Mary J. Gillie, a daughter 
of James Gillie, Sr., of Courtney, Washington County, 
and they have three children: Russell K., Isabel and 
Mary. In politics, Mr. Coulson is a Kepublican and 
was serving in his fourth year as a member of the 
Donora borough Council, when he resigned the office, on 
coming to Koscoe. He is identified with the order of 
Elks. 

AMBROSE L. EAKIN, one of Washington's repre- 
sentative citizens, a member of the city Council from 
the Eighth Ward, has long been identified with the oil 
industry and is district superintendent of the South 
Pennsylvania Oil Company, with offices on the second 
floor of the W. T. Building. He was born in 1866, in 
Venango County, Pa., but from the age of 8 years un- 
til he came to Washington County, his home was in Me- 
Kean County. 

Mr. Eakin began to work in the oil fields when he 
was a boy and more or less has been connected with 
oil interests ever since. In 1886 he came to Washington, 
being then in the employ of the Union Oil Company and 
transferred to the Forrest Oil Company when that or- 
ganization succeeded the Union, which, in turn was 
suceeded by the South Pennsylvania Oil Company. The 
territory over which Mr. Eakin has charge includes the 
business done in 234 wells. His long experience and 
thorough knowledge of details and conditions, both serve 
to make Mr. Eakin a valuable man for this responsible 
position. He takes an active interest in politics and 
for seven years has been a member of the Council. 

Mr. Eakin was married at Bradford, Pa., in 1885, to 
Miss Carrie Belle Taylor, and they have had eight chil- 
dren, seven sons and one daughter, namely : Charles, 
who is in the employ of the South Pennsylvania Oil 
Company ; Flossie, who resides at home ; Glade, who is 
a resident of Spokane, Wash. ; and Glenn, Leon, J. Shaw, 
Fred and Fay. Mr. and Mrs. Eakin attend the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church. He is a Thirty-second degree 
Mason and is a member of the Blue Lodge, Chapter, 
Council and Commandery, at Washington, and the Con- 
sistory at Pittsburg. He is also a member of the order 
of Maccabees. 

JOSEPH ALEXANDER HERRON, who is president 
of the Monongahela Trust Company, and senior member 
of Alexander & Company, bankers of Monogahela City, 
Pa., with which he has been associated since 1866, is 



identified with various banking house-s of Washington 
County. He was born October 16, 1847, in Monongahela 
City, Pa., and is a sou of David and Eliza Alexander 
Herron. 

David Herron, who was born in Kentucky, became a 
captain on the lower river and about 1844 came to Mo- 
nongahela City. He married Eliza Alexander, and after 
the birth of their only child, the subject of this sketch, 
he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he died in 1804, 
after which his widow returned with her son to Mononga- 
hela City, where she died in 1907, at the advanced age 
of eighty-four years. 

Joseph Alexander, the maternal grandfather of our 
subject, was born April 1, 1795, a son of one of the 
pioneers of the Upper Monongahela' Valley, who came 
here from Cecil County, Md., in 1763. Joseph Alexander 
first engaged in business in Monongahela in 1828 as a 
general trader, in a log house on Main street, and later 
engaged in the banking business, taking in his son, 
W'illiam J., as a partner in 1843. The business was car- 
ried on under the firm name of Joseph Alexander & 
Son, and continued under that name until 1850, when 
the present firm of Alexander & Company was organized. 
Joseph Alexander died June 20, 1871. James S. Alexan- 
der, one of the younger sons of Joseph Alexander, who 
was born August 28, 1828, became a member of the bank- 
ing firm in about 1864, and a few years previous to his 
death, in 1904, he divided his interest between his two 
.sons, William H. and Frederick K., who with Joseph A. 
Herron, constitute the present banking firm, Alexander 
& Company, of Monongahela City. William J. Alexan- 
der died June 8, 1894. 

Joseph A. Herron spent part of his boyhood days in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, where he attended the common schools, 
and after the death of his father, he and his mother re- 
turned to Monongahela City, Pa., and his education was 
completed at the Westchester Military Academy at 
Westchester, Pa. In 1866 he entered the bank of Alex- 
ander & Company as clerk, became a member of that 
firm in 1870, and after the death of his uncle, James 
Alexander, became senior member of the firm, of which 
he is the present head and active manager. The new 
building, which was erected in 1906, is a monument to 
the energy of the present firm. Mr. Herron is typical 
of the modern man of affairs, an indefatigable worker, 
with whom the affairs of Alexander & Company are ever 
foremost, but one who also finds time to do his part for 
civic betterment, and also devotes considerable time to 
his church and social duties. That he is a banker of a 
high order is shown by the fact that he is president of 
the Monongahela Trust Company; president of the Farm- 
ers' and Miners' Bank of Bentleyville ; is a director of 
the Farmers' Deposit National Bank; the Farmers' De- 
posit Savings Bank of Pittsburg; is a director of the 



626 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Reliance Life Insurance Company, and is also identified 
with various other business concerns of the county. Mr. 
Herron owns a valuable farm of 190 acres on Ginger Hill, 
and also his fine residence property which is located on 
Meade street. Politically he is identified with the Re- 
publican party, and is president and one of the board of 
managers of the Monongahela Cemetery. He has held 
membership with the Presbyterian Church for many 
years, and is also a deacon. He is fraternally afSliated 
with the Masons, the B. P. O. E., and the Jr. 0. U. A. M. 
Mr. Herron was married October 25, 1877, to Mary 
Campbell, a daughter of William and Eliza (Shaw) 
Campbell, of Butler County, Pa., and of their union were 
born : William A. ; D. Campbell, who married Julia 
Abrahams ; Joseph A. ; Donald James ; John ; Ethel ; and 
Gertrude. 

JAMES WESLEY GILLESPIE, one of Washington 
County's substantial citizens and solid, reliable men, 
resides on his . farm of 60 acres which is situated in 
Cross Creek Township and also owns a farm of 150 
acres, which lies in Jefferson Township. He was born 
in the latter township Nov. 7, 1863, and is a son of W. 
J. and Sarah E. (Gillespie) Gillespie. His parents were 
farming people and he was their eldest child, the other 
members of the family being as follows : John, Charles, 
Nannie, Minnie, Tenia, Winnifred and Ella Nora. 

James Wesley Gillespie obtained his education in the 
public schools of Jefferson Township which he attended 
during the winter sessions until he was about 20 years 
of age, after which he gave the larger part of his at- 
tention to farming and raising stock. Since 1906, as 
a side line, he has done considerable butchering and 
supplies meat to the miners in the coal works adjacent 
to his farm. In the management of his property, Mr. 
Gillespie has shown the industry, forethought and good 
management which is pretty sure to bring about suc- 
cess. 

On Feb. 19, 1885, Mr. Gillespie was married to Miss 
Mary E. McBride, a daughter of James and Elizabeth 
McBride, of Cross Creek Township, and to them have 
been born the following children : Viola B., who mar- 
ried Albert Boles, of EldersvUle; James A., who resides 
in Colorado; Ethel G., who is the wife of Prank An- 
drews, of West Newton, Pa., and they have a son, Leslie ; 
William W. and Homer R., both of whom live at home. 
Mr. Gillespie is a broad-minded man and a believer in 
higher education and he has given his children excellent 
advantages, two of them being graduates of the High 
School at Eldersville. The family attend the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He has been a lifelong Republican, 
but has always declined to serve in public ofiice, although 
well qualified in every way to do so. He is an Odd 



PeUow and has passed all the chairs in Lodge No. 805 
at Eldersville. 

W. E. McCUEDY, one of Burgettstown 's leading citi- 
zens and representative business men, conducting a 
large drug business as his main interest at present, was 
born at Eldersville, Washington Co., Pa., May 14, 1866, 
a son of Dr. J. K. and Elizabeth (Love) McCurdy. 

W. E. McCurdy was educated in the schools of Clin- 
ton and Florence and then learned the drug business, 
spending two years in Gettysburg, two more years at 
Tarport, then a suburb of Bradford, and also some 
time in ^ suburb of Philadelphia. Since his marriage, 
in 1898, he has resided at Burgettstown, where he has 
become identified with business interests and public 
affairs. For 17 years he has been local manager of the 
Bell Telephone Company, in which he is also a stock- 
holder; is a stockholder and one of the directors of the 
Burgetts town National Bank, and is proprietor of a 
drug store. He has taken an active part in advancing 
the various interests of the town and at present is 
sers'ing on the Board of Health. 

On Sept. 18, .1898, Mr. McCurdy was married to Miss 
Jennie L. McCorkle, a daughter of J. S. and Jennie L. 
McCorkle, and they have two children: Grace Elizabeth 
and John C. Mr. McCurdy is a member of the First 
Presbyterian Church at Burgettstown, in which he is 
an elder, and he is superintendent of the large and 
interested Sunday school Mr. McCurdy is a Prohi- 
bitionist and an active worker in the cause of temper- 
ance. He has been treasurer of Fairview Cemetery for 
the past ten years, being a charter member of the asso- 
ciation. 

JOHN MILTON DAY, a representative citizen of 
South Franklin Township, where he successfully carries 
on a general line of agriculture, stock raising and sheep 
growing for wool, was born in Morris Township, Wash- 
ington, Co., Pa., Aug. 26, 1847. His parents were J. 
Miller and Elizabeth (Hanna) Day. The family is so 
old and so important a one in this section that the 
records have been preserved away back through the 
grandfather, John Day, to Daniel Day and Samuel Day, 
the founder of the family in Pennsylvania. 

George Day emigrated from England to Connecticut 
in the seventeenth century and thence removed to 
Newark, N. J. His descendants are quite numerous 
in that region. His son, Samuel Day, came from New 
Jersey to Pennsylvania about 1775 and took up land in 
Morris Township, Washington County, and here became 
a farmer and man of substance. He was the father of 
four sons: Daniel, Samuel, Joseph and Benjamin, and 
one daughter, Joanna. 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



627 



Daniel Day continued to reside on the laud which 
hia father had secured, adding to its improvements and 
value thereby, and lived to advanced age, dying in 1811. 
He left six sons ami three daughters: Calvin, William, 
John, Samuel, Stephen, Cephas, Abigail, Eleanor and 
Electa. 

John Day, sou of Daniei, succeeded his father and 
grandfather on the homestead and retained possession 
of all the land during his life. On Sept. 2, 1813, by 
Bev. C. Dodd, John Day was married to Sarah Miller, 
of Amwell Township, Washiugton Co., Pa., and they 
had eleven children born to them: Eliza, Mary, Sarah, 
J. Miller, Daniel, Harvey, Annie, Abigail, Cyrus, Jessie 
and Meribah. Of these, Eliza was the wife of George 
Wolf and lived at Ninevah, Greene Co., Pa. Mary was 
the wife of John Brownlee and lived in Franklin Town- 
ship, Washington County. Sarah was the wife of Robert 
Baldwin and lived in Morris Township. Daniel was 
married (first) to Mary Bates and (second) to Etta 
Johns and resides at Canonsburg, Pa. Harvey was 
married (first) to Caroline McCollum and (second) to 
Mrs. Mary Harris, and moved to Lincoln, Neb. Annie 
was married (first) to Elias Conger, and (second) to 
Dr. Strauss, of Amity, Pa. Abigail married H. C. 
Swart, of Washington County, Pa. Cyrus died when 
aged 8 years, and Jessie and Meribah, twins, both died 
in infancy. 

J. Miller Day, the fourth member of the above family 
and the father of John Milton Day, was a lifelong resi- 
dent of Washington County and a large portion of this 
time was spent in Morris Township. He obtained ele- 
mentary training in the early subscription schools, these 
often being held in abandoned log dwellings and for- 
tunately one was situated near the Day homestead. His 
advantages were equal to those enjoyed by his asso- 
ciates and he, like many others, grew in wisdom as 
years were added to them. Much of the surrounding 
country at that time was practically unsettled, although 
much advance had been made from the time when the 
first member of the Day family penetrated into the 
wilderness. When Samuel Day first took up his tract 
of virgin land, an old fort stood in the southeastern 
part of Franklin Township and aged survivors would 
often relate to the younger generation of Days the fear- 
some adventures and terrifying experiences of early life 
on that border. Frequently the mothers would have 
to hasten with their little children clinging to them and 
take shelter within this fort when there were indications 
of visits from the Indians, who, in that section were 
savage at that time. The old fort no longer exists, but 
doubtless many a romance has been written around it. 
Among the first settlers to exert a real civilizing influ- 
ence, the Days without doubt were the foremost, the 
men of this family being industrious, energetic and 



enterprising and the women, courageous and frugal. 
Evidence was given by the rapid clearing of their lands, 
the erection of substantial buildings, the gathering of 
flocks and herds and the establishing of well ordered 
households. These characteristics of the Days continue 
into the present generation. 

The death of J. Miller Day occurred in 1903, after a 
long and useful life. Politically he was a Democrat 
and on several occasions was electea to 'he oflice of 
justice of the peace and from 1866 until 1809, he served 
the county as a director of the poor. For many years 
his presence and sui)port were given to the Uj>per Ten- 
Mile Presbyterian Church, in which he held the oflice of 
deacon for a protracted period. 

On Jan. 19, 1843, J. Miller Day was married to Miss 
Elizabeth Hanna, a daughter of John V. Hanna, of 
Morris Township, Washington County, and to this union 
seven children were born, namely : Martha Maria, who 
became the wife of John N. Weir, of Franklin Town- 
ship; Sarah Ann, who died in 1848; John Milton; Elsie 
Jane, who married William Ashbrook, of East Finley 
Township; George Hamilton, who died in 1854; Hugh 
Allison, who married Annie Andrews, and Mary Eliza- 
beth, who married Allen J. Mowl, of West Bethlehem 
Township. The mother of the above family died in 
1872 and was interred in the cemetery at Prosperity. 
J. Miller Day was married two years later to Mrs. Mary 
(Wise) McKenna. 

John Milton Day attended the schools which are now 
situated in South Franklin Township and afterward 
turned his attention to agricultural pursuits as his 
father before him. His exceptionally fine farm of 163 
acres he took possession of in 1874. He has long been 
numbered with the successful stock raisers and wool 
growers of this part of the county, worthily upholding 
the Day name as leading agriculturists and stockmen in 
Washington County. 

On Oct. 12, 1871, John M. Day vras married to Miss 
Margaret Weir, who was born in South Franklin Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., and is a daughter of the 
late Joseph Weir, who once was a prominent and sub- 
stantial farmer of this section. To Mr. and Mrs. Day 
two children were born, Elizabeth H. and Lenora P., 
the latter of whom is now deceased. The former is the 
wife of L. T. Young, who is engaged in farming in 
South Franklin Township, and they have three children, 
namely: Margaret L., Helen M. and John D. Mr. Day 
and family are members of the old Upper Ten-Mile 
Presbyterian Church, to which the Day family has given 
both moral and material support for so many years. 
Tn this body Mr. Day is serving as one of the elders of 
the church. Mr. Day was reared in the Democratic party 
and has always continued his nominal allegiance to the 
same, but he has independent proclivities and frequently. 



628 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



in local affairs has cast his vote in favor of the candidate 
who, in his judgment, seems best qualified. He has 
never been a seeker for oflSce, but has frequently been 
selected by his fellow citizens for responsible township 
positions and he has served at different times as as- 
sessor, as constable and also as township collector. 

MAJ. WILLIAM WOEKMAN, who was for many 
years one of the most prominent men in Washington 
County, Pa., was identified with both public and political 
life and held many offices of trust and honor. He was 
born in Washington, Pa., Mar. 26, 1818, and died here 
Jan. 2, 1901, and was a son of Gen. Samuel Workman 
and a grandson of Hugh Workman. 

The Workman family was established in this country 
by four brothers, who came from County Monaghan, 
Ireland, in 1777, and James and Hugh located in Wash- 
ington County, Pa., just east of the borough of Wash- 
ington. Hugh and James Workman were both soldiers 
in the Revolutionary War and were members of Col. 
William Crawford's expedition against Sandusky in 
1792. They were both members of the same company 
when the army on its outward march left the Mingo 
Bottom, but when Col. Crawford selected his light horse 
cavalry, Hugh joined it, and James remained in the 
ranks of the mounted infantry. Hugh Workman mar- 
ried Peggy Bryson and soon after the town of Wash- 
ington was laid out purchased property on South Main 
street, where he continued his residence until his death, 
Nov. 20, 1843, at the age of 84 years. 

Gen. Samuel Workman, a son of Hugh Workman, 
was born Jan. 11, 1793, in Washington, and was one of 
Washington County's most prominent citizens. He mar- 
ried Nancy McCammant, a daughter of William Mc- 
Cammant, who kept a tavern at the sign of the "Cross 
Keys" on the corner of Main and Wheeling streets. 
Gen. Workman was editor of the Washington "Re- 
porter" from 1819 until 1821, and during that time 
showed that he was a fearless and effective writer. 
Upon leaving journalistic work he entered the militia 
and rose through the various ranks to Brig.-General. 
On Aug. 11, 1821, he was appointed county treasurer 
by the commissioners, was reappointed the two succeed- 
ing years, and at the October election in 1823 was 
chosen sheriff, and being commissioned on the 25th of 
that same month, he resigned the treasurership. He 
was elected a member of the State Legislature in 1827, 
re-elected in 1828 and 1829, and on May 11, 1830, Gov. 
Wolf appointed him secretary of the land office, to 
which he was reappointed in 1833, and served in that 
capacity until May 10, 1836. He was appointed post- 
master 01 Washington on Mar. 23, 1839, and served until 
Dec. 24, 1840, and on Jan. 4, 1841, was again appointed 
treasurer of the county. His death occurred Mar. 31, 



1841, after having figured prominently and creditably 
in county and state politics, and was at all times held 
in high esteem by his fellow citizens. 

Maj. William Workman practically spent his entire 
life in Washington and vicinity, but during his early 
manhood went to Iowa with the intention of locating 
there, and not liking the outlook returned to Washing- 
ton and bought the old Workman homestead, where he 
lived until the time of his death. Although not strong 
physically, he was a man of great energy and indomit- 
able will. His education was obtained in private schools 
and at the Washington College, and he acquired a thor- 
ough training in business affairs, which well fitted him 
for the many offices of trust and honor which he held 
in later life. He early became interested in local poli- 
tics, and was the recognized leader of the Democratic 
party, a position which he held for many years after 
the average man tires of the strife and contention of 
political wrangling and gives way to younger men. He 
was many times chairman of the Democratic County 
convention and always discharged the trust thus reposed 
in him with zeal and fidelity. During his younger days 
■ he was twice his party 's candidate for county office, 
and was elected county treasurer in 1841, and in 1845 
was elected to the office of register. He was afterward 
chosen one of the jury commissioners of the county, 
and it is said, that Maj. Workman had the honor of 
being the first county treasurer after that office was 
made elective, and to have been with Hon. J. R. Mc- 
Lain, of Claysville, the first jury commissioners chosen 
in the county. He was the first county officer to occupy 
a room in the court house which was taken down in 1898. 
Few men in the county have done so much business as 
he in the settlement of estates. He was called upon to 
draw deeds, write wills, and legal papers of various 
kinds, and managed and settled many estates, and 
was thus engaged down to the day when stricken with 
his fatal illness. He was a friend to the poor and un- 
fortunate and hundreds of cases could be cited where 
he befriended individuals and families, not only with 
kind words and advice, but with substantial aid. -There 
are many such in Washington County who will long cherish 
his memory. As a citizen he was enterprising and lib- 
eral in the matter of improvements that commended 
themselves to his judgment. This is well illustrated in 
his subscriptions and donations toward the building of 
railroads and the betterment of county roads. He was 
one of the prime movers in the construction of the 
Upper Ten-Mile plank road and he did much toward 
having the B. & O. E. R. built through the county. He 
was the trustee appointed by the United States Courts 
to advertise and sell the old Hempfield road and the 
purchase of it by the B. & O. R. R. was brought about 
largely through his influence with the B. & O. directors. 



IllSTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



629 



At the time of his death auil for iimiiy ycnis pii'vious 
he was a director in the Wheeling branch of the B. & 
O. R. R., and at the annual meetings of the stockholders 
of his company was always chosen as presiding officer, 
lu his home Mr. Workman was the typical old-fashioned 
gentleman, always taking the greatest pleasure in hav- 
ing his friends come and partake of his hospitality. 

On Jan. 11, 1853, Maj. Workman was joined in mar- 
riage with Mary Jones, a daughter of Charles E. and 
Susan (Judson) Jones, the former a cabinet-maker and 
general contractor. She was born in England and when 
a babe in arms came with her parents to this country. 
She was one of ten children born to her parents, of 
whom but four are living: Mrs. Workman; Jane E., 
who resides on West Wheeling street, Washington, Pa., 
married William H. Taylor, and is the mother of Hon. 
J. P. Taylor, Common Pleas Judge of Washington 
County ; Eev. Sylvester F. Jones, D. D., of Washing- 
ton, D. C, and George O. Jones, a prominent attorney 
of Washington, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Workman had three 
children born to them; Samuel, who resides in Washing- 
ton, Pa.; aad Annie' and Ida, who with their mother 
live at the old Workman homestead at No. 645 E. 
Maiden street, Washington, this property having been 
in the possession of the Workman family for over a 
century. 

WILLIAM SIMPSON THROCKMORTON, M. D., of 
Canonsburg, was born in Franklin Township, Greene 
County, Pa., three miles west of Waynesburg, and is a 
son of Morford and Nancy (Simpson) Throckmorton. 

The genealogy of the Throckmortous can be traced 
from 1130 A. D. to 1909. From England and the north of 
Ireland came the ancestors of Dr. Throckmorton and 
America has had a number of the name, in both its 
original and its abbreviated spelling, that have brought 
distinction upon the family, their sections and them- 
selves. Mention may be made of one of the signers of 
the Declaration of Independence, as well as of the late 
Gov. Morton, of Indiana, and others equally noted. 
Both grandparents on the maternal side were converted 
to Methodism under the preaching of John Wesley him- 
self and the paternal grandfather, Job Throckmorton, 
was a convert to the same faith. He was one of its 
pioneers in the vicinity of Monmouth, N. J., where he 
]iurchased land and built an early Methodist chapel and 
on many occasions entertained Bishop Asbury, the cele- 
brated divine of that religious body. The children born 
to Job Throckmorton and his wife, Martha, were as 
follows: Joseph, who died in Greene County, Pa., aged 
96 years and six months ; James, who lived also to be 
96 years old, dying in Greene County; Job, who lived 
and died in New Jersey; Morford, father of Dr. Throck- 
morton; Barnes, who died at the age of 45 years, in 



.New .Tersey; Archibald, who died, aged 83 years, in 
Ohio; Mary Jane, who was the wife of Rev. Eliphalet 
Reed, died at Mt. Joy, Pa., aged about 80 years; and 
Eunice, who was the wife of James Barklow, died in 
New Jersey, when aged about 80 years. The old New 
Jersey home of the Throckmorton family was at Free- 
hold, a village situated within three miles of the battle- 
field of Monmouth. 

Morford Throckmorton, father of Dr. Throckmorton, 
was born in the old family home near Monmouth, N. J., 
and remained there until he reached manhood, when he 
moved to Greene County, Pa., where he was subse- 
quently married to Nancy Simpson, who was one of a 
large family born to John Simpson and wife, who were 
early settlers in Greene County. To this marriage were 
born the following children: Lucy, who died young; 
Samuel, who married Nancy Reese and was killed by 
lightning, when aged 66 years; Morford, who died near 
Chariton, in Lucas County, Iowa, married a Miss Elder; 
John, who died in Lucas County, Iowa, when aged near 
SO years, married Nancy Lazear; Margaret, who mar- 
ried Caleb Grimes, died in Greene County, at the age 
of 71 years; Alice, who is the wife of Jesse Lazear, re- 
sides in Greene County, Pa. ; Rebecca, who married Dr. 
James Guiher, of Waynesburg, died in 1908, aged 71 
years; Sarah, who died at Afton, Iowa, aged 60 years, 
was the wife of Joseph Milligan; William Simpson, of 
Canonsburg; Eliphalet Reed, who resides near Waynes- 
burg, married Samantha Hill; Caroline, who is the widow 
of George Waddell, resides at Waynesburg; and Agnes, 
who died when aged 6 years. The father of the above 
family survived to be 92 years of age. The mother died 
when aged 67 years. 

William Simpson Throckmorton was reared and re- 
ceived his primary and preparatory education in Greene 
County and later entered Jefferson Medical College, at 
Philadelphia, where he was graduated in the class of 
1865. He immediately located at Nineveh, Greene 
County, Pa., and there he remained for 42 years, during 
all that period engaged in the practice of his profession. 
In 1907, Dr. Throckmorton came to Canonsburg and 
entered into practice with his son, who had previously 
been associated with him for two and one-half years 
at Nineveh. In 1866, Dr. Throckmorton was married 
to Miss Caroline Hill, a daughter of Jesse and Maria 
(Hoskinson) Hill, and they have four children: Jessie, 
Charles B., William and Morford. The only daughter is 
the wife of Dr. T. R. Kerr, of Oakmont, Pa., and they 
have a daughter, Virginia. Charles B. Throckmorton 
has been a resident of Canonsburg for ten years and 
enjoys a large and substantial medical practice. Prom 
the schools of Greene County he entered the Ohio Wes- 
leyan University, where he subsequently graduated, 
spent one term at Jefferson Medical College, graduated 



630 



HISTOEY OF AVASHINGTON COUNTY 



in medicine at the Western Pennsylvania Medical College 
at Pittsburg and took a post graduate course on the 
eye, ear and throat, at Philadelphia. He married Miss 
Mary Donaldson and they have two children : , William 
D. and Caroline. He and his father are now associated 
in practice and have well appointed offices in the Gowern 
Building, at Canonsburg. William Throckmorton is a 
graduate of the Ohio Wesleyan University and of the 
Pittsburg Dental College and for nine years has been 
engaged in practice, located at Vernon, Pa. Morford 
Throckmorton, the youngest son, is a graduate of Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College and of the Philadelphia 
Dental College and is located in practice at Beaver, Pa. 
Dr. Throckmorton has been a lifelong member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and was a delegate to the 
recent general conference held at Baltimore, Md. In 
association with his wife, he erected the little church 
at Nineveh, which they attended and supported for 30 
years. It now has a mebership of 150 individuals. He 
was married (second) to Miss Lydia Smith, of Urbana, 
Ohio, July 6, 1909, and their pleasant home is at No. 
159 West College street, Canonsburg. 

W. G. SHILLITO, who has long been prominently 
identified with Republican politics in Washington Coun- 
ty and served most acceptably as a county commissioner 
from 1S97 until 1903, owns a valuable farm of 100 
acres, which is situated in Smith Township. He was 
born at Bavington, Smith Township, Washington Coun- 
ty, Pa., Jan. 26, 1850, and is a son of Samuel B. and 
Margaret (Galbraith) Shillito. 

Samuel B. Shillito, also a native of Wahington Coun- 
ty, was born in Hanover Townshij), Sept. 15, 1826, and 
died Dec. 16, 1858. For some years he engaged in busi- 
ness as a general merchant and also followed farming 
in Smith Township. He married Margaret Galbraith, 
daughter of William Galbraith, and they had two 
children: Jane Isabella, who is the wife of J. S. Easton; 
and W. G. The widow survived many years, her death 
occurring Sept. 15, 1906, at the age of 83 years and 
both she and husband rest in Fairview Cemetery, the 
remains of the latter having been removed from its 
first place of burial which was the United Presbyterian 
Cemetery. Samuel B. Shillito and wife were both mem- 
bers of the United Presbyterian Church, in which he was 
an elder at the time of death. 

W. 6. Shillito secured his education in the public 
schools of Smith Township, after which he engaged 
in farming and continued in agricultural pursuits until 
1897. In that year he was elected county commissioner, 
the family remaining on the farm during his term of 
office. His farm is probably one of the best improved 
and most valuable in the township, both coal and oil 
deposits having been found in paying quantities. 



Mr. Shillito was married Mar. 21, 1872, to Miss Re- 
becca H. Provines, a daughter of James and Mary Pro- 
vines, and to this marriage have been born the following 
children: Margaret Belle, who died Jan. 14, 1894; 
James P., who married Carrie Parks, a daughter of M. 
R. and Rowena Parks, and they have one daughter, 
Rowena; and Samuel Reed, who has been engaged in 
the oil business for the firm of Kelly Bros. & Cooper 
since 1903. Samuel Reed Shillito married Cassie Scott, 
a daughter of A. J. Scott. Mr. Shillito and family are 
members of the United Presbyterian Church. He is a 
stockholder and a member of the board of directors of 
the Burgettstown National Bank. Fraternally he is 
an Elk. Mr. ShUlito has been and still is one of the 
county 's representative men. 

WILLIAM E. ROSS, owner of a tract of 90 acres 
in Washington and Allegheny Counties, is one of the 
leading farmers of Robeson Township. He was born 
Aug. 30, 1855, in Peters Township, Washington County, 
Pa., a son of James and Sarah (Mouck) Ross, who were 
well known farmers of that township. They reared a 
family of six children : John, William, Mary, deceased ; 
Adeline, deceased; Lewis and George. The paternal 
grandfather of our subject was John Ross, and the 
maternal grandfather was John Mouck. 

William E. Ross was reared in Peters Township, where 
he attended the district schools several months each 
winter until about 17 years of age, and since that time 
has been engaged in agricultural pursuits, having pur- 
chased his present farm in March, 1896, from the Kraeer 
heirs. There are 30 acres of the farm in Robeson 
Township, and the remaining 60 acres are located in 
Allegheny County. Mr. Ross has remodeled the former 
dwelling into a fine modern residence, and has also 
erected a fine new bank barn. 

In October, 1885, Mr. Ross married Anna F. Woods, 
a daughter of Joseph and Sarah J. (McCully) Woods, 
and a granddaughter of Thomas McCully and Rev. Will- 
iam Woods, the latter of whom was a Presbyterian 
minister. Joseph Woods was first married to Abigail 
Hanna, which union resulted in the birth of the follow- 
ing children : Martha J., who is the wife of William 
Donaldson; Martin; Elizabeth, who married Robert 
Ferree; and Sarah Harriet, who is the wife of J. W. 
Stewart. After the death of the mother of these chil- 
dren, Mr. Woods married Sarah McCully and to them 
were born: William Franimn and Anna F., the wife 
of our subject. Mr. and Mrs. Ross have one daughter, 
Sarah L., who graduated from the Robeson Township 
High School in May, 1908. She is now taking a course 
in music. Mr. Ross is a Republican in politics, and the 
family attend the First Presbyterian Church of Mc- 
Donald. 



'^wyor;<: 




willta:\i l. gilmore 



IIISTOI.'V OF W A.SllIN(i'l'Ox\[ COUNTY 



G33 



WILLIAM LARMEK GILMOBE, the ovviier of a 
seventy-five-acro farm of well cultivated land, situated 
in Union Township, Washington County, Pa., about three 
miles east of Finleyville, is a well known and highly 
rcspeeted citizen of this section. He was born on his 
father's farm in Allegheny County, Pa., January 17, 
1S57, anil is a son of Benjamin and Mary Ann (Lyttle) 
Oilmore. 

Benjamin Gilmore was born in Allegheny County, Pa., 
and lived within four miles of his birthplace all his 
entire life of fifty-two years. He was left fatherless in 
boyhood and waa bound out to a stranger, but grew into 
a reliable, lionorablo and industrious man. He acquired 
a farm in Allegheny County, but was able to provide 
only sparingly for his family, it being an unusually 
large one. He married Mary Ann Lyttle, a daughter of 
Abram Lyttle, a well-known resident of Allegheny 
County. She lived to the age of sixty-three years. There 
were fourteen children born to this marriage, namely : 
Kachel, who died young; Fannie, deceased, who was the 
wife of W. K. Hobsou; Malissa Jane, who married 
Eobert Bickerton; Minerva, who is the widow of Samuel 
Adams; William Larmer; Sarah, who is the wife of 
Samuel Lane; Amanda, who is the wife of John Adams; 
Anna, who married Dr. C. T. Biddle; Benjamin, who 
died when aged twenty-one years; Martha A., who mar- 
ried H. H. Heath; George B.; John and Jonathan, both 
of whom died young; and Margaret, who is the wife of 
Archibald Lawson. 

William Larmer Gilmore was afforded no educational 
opportunities in his youth and he has gained his edu- 
cation entirely through his own efforts. From early 
boyhood he labored on the home farm and remained 
there until his own marriage. His main business has 
always been farming, but since purchasing his present 
property from J. P. Beatty, he has also engaged in 
dairying and during the winter seasons foUovps butcher- 
ing. The old stone dwelling on his farm is one of the 
landmarks of the township and was probably built in 
1833. While his early training on the farm was severe, 
it later proved to be of value to him when he went into 
business for himself and he is numbered with the care- 
ful and successful agriculturists of the township. 

On August 17, 1879, Mr. Gilmore was married to 
Miss Sarah J. Coulter, a daughter of William and 
Forbes (Stockdale) Coulter. She was born at Monon- 
gahela City, Pa., where her parents were well known. 
The following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Gilmore: George G., who married Katherine Findley, 
from Suterville, Pa. ; Carrie, who is a graduate of the 
Normal School at California, is a school teacher; Mary 
A.; twin babes that died at birth; Sarah, who died 
young; and Benjamin H., who is a student in the High 
School at Monongahela City. Mr. Gilmore is a Republi- 



can and he has served one term as road supervisor. He 
is iifentified with the lodge of Odd Fellows at Shire 
Oaks. The family belongs to the M. E. Church. 

ALEXANDER GASTON, who is one of Washington's 
moat respected citizens is a retired farmer and capitalist 
and lives in his comfortable residence, which is situated 
at No. 706 North Main street. Mr. Gaston was born in 
Ireland, in 1835, and was only five months old when his 
parents brought him to America. They were James and 
Jane (Luke) Gaston. 

The parents of Mr. Gaston settled near Canonsburg 
and there the father followed farming and lived a quiet 
agricultural life until his death. His children bore the 
following names: James, who lives in Missouri; Rachel, 
who is the wife of John McCoy, of Kansas; Maria J., 
who is the wife of J. P. Weaver, of Canonsburg; John 
W. and Alexander, both of whom reside at Washington; 
and Rosa, who is deceased. 

Alexander Gaston was reared an the home farm and 
went to school in the neighborhood and later became a 
farmer and stock raiser on his own responsibility. He 
devoted many years to these industries and met with 
more than the usual amount of success. In 1906 he came 
to Washington, retiring then from active labor, but he 
still retains a farm of eighty acres in Mt. Pleasant Town- 
ship. He was a leading citizen of his township and ac- 
ceptably tilled many of the township offices. 

On September 23, 1857, Mr. Gaston was married to 
Miss Mary A. Wilson, whose father was born in Ireland 
and was six years old when his parents brought him to 
America. His name was John Wilson and he married 
Margaret Wilson and they were well known residents of 
Mt. Pleasant Township. They had three children: Mrs. 
Gaston; Elizabeth, who is now deceased; and Martha J., 
who is the widow of Thomas Strouthers and lives at 
Canonsburg. Mr. and Mrs. Gaston have been members 
of the Cross Roads United Presbyterian Church for fifty- 
two years and he served twenty-six years as an elder. 
He is the only member of the Session now living who 
belonged to that body at the time he was elected and 
there are not more than two church members yet sur- 
viving of all the earnest little body of church workers 
of a half century ago, who, with Mr. and Mrs. Gaston 
united their efforts to make that organization a religious 
center. Mr. Gaston has been clerk of the Session for 
twenty-two years. As he looks around for his old co- 
laborers, it seems to him as if there has appeared an 
entirely new congregation. This may be true, but his 
efforts for the church are not forgotten, and the church 
history tells the tale to the younger congregation of how 
much it is indebted to the faith and earnest efforts of 
the older one for the spiritual opportunities now enjoyed. 



634 



HISTOEY OF AVASHINGTON COUNTY 



JAMES L. HENDERSON, treasurer and general man- 
ager of the Home Dressed Beef Company, at Washing- 
ton, Pa., is identified with other important business 
enterprises and is a thoroughly representative business 
citizen. He was born in Chartiers Township, Washing- 
ton Co., Pa., in 1844, and is a son of Joseph and a 
grandson of William Henderson. 

The Hendersons came from Eastern. Pennsylvania to 
its western borders, in pioneer days. Joseph Henderson, 
father of James L., was born in Chartiers Township, 
Washington County, June 3, 1817, and survived until 
1901. For years he was prominent in the affairs of his 
township and was one of its best known and respected 
citizens. 

Almost before he was well grounded in his studies in 
the public schools, James L. Henderson was called upon 
to assume a man's duties and responsibilities. In Au- 
gust, 1861, when he was but five months beyond his 17th 
birthday, he enrolled as- a soldier in the Federal service, 
first becoming a member of the 1st West Va. Cav., but 
later was transferred to the 5th U. S. Cav., in which 
he served until his honorable discharge in September, 
1864. He participated in many of the great raids 
through the Shenandoah Valley and served under 
Generals Sheridan, Shields and Burnside. After he re- 
turned to a peaceful life, he took a course in Duff 's busi- 
ness College and subsequently turned his attention to 
the breeding of fine stock. He was one of the first to 
introduce Holstein cattle into Washington County, in 
1878, and two years earlier had brought in Berkshire 
swine and also founded the Dorset and Cotswold sheep 
industry in this section. He continued his stock farm 
until some few years since, when, with other capitalists, 
he incorporated the Home Dressed Beef Comapny, the 
business being wholesale. He is interested also in the 
United Capitol Paint Company and is also in the coal 
business in West Virginia. 

In 1865, Mr. Henderson was married (first) to Miss 
Jennie Shaw, who was survived by five children, namely: 
Joseph B., who resides in Washington County, near Bur- 
gettstown; Prank S., who is connected with a business 
house in Pittsburg, but maintains his home at Washing- 
ton; Sarah R. ; and James L., Jr., and Ernest G., both of 
whom are in the oil business in Illinois. Mr. Henderson 
was married (second) to Mary A. Daugherty. He is a 
member of the Session of the 3rd United Presbyterian 
Church and is superintendent of the Sabbath school. Mr. 
Henderson is identified with the W. F. Templeton Post, 
G. A. R. 

ALFRED WATSON, the leading and oldest jeweler, 
also one of the progressive business men of Mononga- 
hela City, Pa., was born Sept. 20, 1861, in Yorkshire, 



England, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Woodhead) 
Watson, both of whom were members of very old fami- 
lies who resided in Colton for many generations. They 
were born and died in Yorkshire, near Leeds, England, 
He is one of four children born to his parents, namely : 
Hannah, William, Walter and Alfred, the subject of this 
sketch. 

Alfred Watson was reared and educated in Yorkshire, 
England. He graduated from the Secroft School, in 1876, 
and he later was in the employ of the North Eastern 
Railroad Company. In 1881, he came to America and 
located at Monongahela City, Pa., where for several years 
he was an employe of the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany. In 1898, he engaged in the jewelry business at 
the corner of Second and Main Streets, where he has 
since remained and greatly prospered. Mr. Watson owns 
a business block at No. 164 Main Street, and also other 
real estate in Monongahela City. 

In 1880, Mr. Watson was married in England to Paul- 
ine M. H. Harrison, and they have one daughter, Maude 
H., who is the wife of Frank P. Keller, the leading archi- 
tect of Monongahela City. In politics, he is a Repub- 
lican, and fraternally is a member of the B. of L. F. and 
E., the Royal Arcanum, and a charter member of the 
B. P. 0. E., No. 455, at Monongahela City. Mr. Watson 
resides at Waverly Cottage, No. 101 Chess Street. He is 
a vestryman and treasurer of St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church, Monongahela City. 

JOSEPH D. HORNBAKE, justice of the peace, at 
California, Pa., was born in this borough May 11, 1866, 
and has always lived in the residence he now occupies, 
the old family home. His parents were Jacob and Rhoda 
(Wilgus) Hornbake. 

Jacob Hornbake was born at Belle Vernon, Fayette 
County, Pa., but later lived at Coal Center, on Maple 
Creek, in Washington County. When 15 years of age he 
learned the cabinetmaking trade with Rev. Samuel Rock- 
well, and also learned ship carpentering and worked at 
the latter until 1904, coming to California after his hon- 
orable period of service in the Civil War. He enlisted 
with the expectation of going out in a Pennsylvania regi- 
ment but the Pennsylvania quota was already full, there- 
fore he became a member of Co. I, 2nd West Va. Inf., 
later the 5th West Va. Cav., in which his rank was that 
of sergeant. He was wounded at the second battle of 
Bull Run. He was married at Brownsville, Pa., but 
started to housekeeping at California and worked in the 
ship yard at this point. His wife was a daughter of a 
somewhat noted man, John Wilgus, who was a very com- 
petent geographer and typographer and succeeded in lay- 
ing out what was accepted as the most convenient rail- 
road route between the eastern states and California. 




AI.K.\AM)l';i; (iASTOX 



:'HE NKW YOK- 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



635 



Tlireo children were born to the above mai-riage: Joseph 
D., Mary and Nannie. The latter married Jesse Horn- 
bake, a miller, residing at Frederickstown. 

Joseph D. Hornbake was educated in the excellent 
schools of his native place and was graduated from the 
State Normal School in 1885. Por several terms after- 
ward he taught school in Allen Township and then went 
to work in the ship yard and continued until 1904. He 
has been interested in politics since attaining manhood 
and has been a zealous worker with the Republican party. 
In February, 1899, he was first elected to the otfice of 
justice of the peace in which he is serving his third term, 
giving entire satisfaction in this otfice to all concerned. 

JOHN C. FULTON, a representative business man of 
Burgettstown, Pa., doing a large grain, flour and feed 
trade under the name of John C. Fulton & Co., was born 
at Burgettstown on June 22, 1847. His parents were 
John J. and Margaret (Canon) Fulton. 

John J. Fulton was born near Hickory, his father resid- 
ing at that time on a farm on the Washington and Bur- 
gettstown road. John J. became a farmer aJso and con- 
tinued to cultivate his own land until within a few years 
of his death, moving into Burgettstown when he retired. 
He married Margaret Canon, a daughter of John Canon, 
and they reared seven children, all of whom survive. 

John C. Fulton was educated in the Burgettstown 
schools and began his business career by dealing in lum- 
ber, grain and feed. He subsequently closed out his inter- 
ests and spent two years railroading and then returned to 
Burgettstown and for several years operated a butcher 
shop. Mr. Fulton then built two large warehouses and 
re-entered the grain business and has a number of other 
important financial interests. He is vice president of the 
Burgettstown National Bank and a leading stockholder, 
and is also an oil producer. 

On Sept. 17, 1885, Mr. Fulton was married to Miss 
Emma V. Figley, a daughter of Hugh and Elizabeth Fig- 
ley, and they have two children: B. B. and Walter N. 
The elder son married Bertha Karns and they have three 
children: Thelma N., Helen M. and John D. The young- 
er son married Katherine V. Cook. Mr. Fulton and fam- 
ily are members of the First Presbyterian Church. In 
politics he is a Democrat. 

HARRY A. JONES, of the law firm of Birch & Jones, 
at Washington, Pa., and a practitioner in all the State 
and Federal Courts, is a representative citizen and a 
member of one of the old pioneer families of Washing- 
ton County. He was born June 9, 1873, near Mononga- 
hela City, Washington Co., Pa., and is a 'son of the 
late Isaac W. Jones. 

The family of which Mr. Jones is a worthy representa- 
tive was established in Washington County by his great- 



grandfather and both his grandfather, Elijah Jones, and 
his father, Isaac W. Jones, were born in this county, the 
latter in 1836. For many years ho was one of the most 
extensive dealers in wool in this section, and was a man 
of sterling character. His death occurred in 1901. 

Harry A. Jones was about six years old when his par- 
ents came to Washington borough and he was graduated 
from the public schools in 1889, ranking first in his class; 
following which he became a student in Wa.shington and 
Jefferson College, where he was equally brilliant and 
graduated as first honor man in 1895, and two years later 
received his diploma from the Pittsburg Law School. In 
1897 he was admitted to the bar of Allegheny County and 
became a member of the law firm of Mcllvaine, Murphy 
& Jones, at Pittsburg, where he remained until 1909, when 
he entered into practice at Washington, having been ad- 
mitted to the Washington County bar in 1898. On May 
1, 1909, he entered into partnership with T. F. Birch, the 
firm style becoming Birch & Jones. Mr. Jones is inter- 
ested in the Washington Ice Company and is one of the 
board of directors. 

In 1906, Mr. Jones was married to Miss Ruth Craw- 
ford, a daughter of W. F. Crawford, who is in the drug 
business at Williamsport, Pa., and they have one child, 
Katherine Crawford. Mr. and Mrs. Jones are members 
of the First Methodist Episcopal Church at Washington, 
in which Mr. Jones has been organist since 1891. He is 
a Knight Templar Mason. 

JAMES D. CAMPSEY, one of Claysville's prominent 
business and public men, who served three years as bur- 
gess of the borough and in other offices and for many 
years has been engaged here in the mercantile line, was 
born in Donegal Township, Washington Co., Pa., and 
is a son of James and Isabella (Dougherty) Campsey. 

Mr. Campsey bears the family name of James, the 
same borne by his father and grandfather, the latter of 
whom was born in County Donegal, Ireland. In very 
early days he emigrated to the United States, and for a 
time was located east of the mountains of Pennsylvania. 
In 1801 he settled in what was then a wild region but is 
now a richly cultivated portion of Washington County, 
attracted thither possibly because it bore the old home 
name of Donegal. Perchance he had something to do 
with the naming of the township. There he lived for 
many years, overcame pioneer conditions, acquired lands 
and stock and in the course of nature passed away and 
was succeeded by his son, James Campsey. The latter 's 
life was an agricultural one but he was also interested in 
public matters and gave support to both schools and reli- 
gion. He was a worthy member of the Presbyterian 
Church in Donegal Township. In early years a Whig, he' 
later identified himself with the Republican party. His 
death occurred in 1884. 



636 



HISTOBY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



James D. Campsey obtained a public school education 
in Donegal Township and engaged there in agricultural 
pursuits until he removed to Claysville. He has been one 
of the most active and useful men of the borough. He 
has served here in important offices and prior to this was 
road supervisor in Donegal Township, and has served also 
as a justice of the peace. He is a stockholder in the 
Claysville Cemetery Association and was one of the incor- 
porators, and is a director in the Claysville National 
Bank. In politics he is a Eepublican and he served one 
year through election by that party as street commis- 
sioner of the borough. 

Mr. Campsey was united in marriage with Miss Maggie 
Moore, a daughter of John and Ann E. (Anderson) 
Moore, of Donegal Township, and they have one surviving 
son, Harry O. He is a well known dealer in furniture at 
Claysville and also is an undertaker. He married Adda 
Knapp and they have four children : Mrytle, Harry 0., 
James and David G. Mrs. Maggie (Moore) Campsey 
died in November, 1897. She was a woman of many 
lovely traits of character and was much beloved. For 
many years she had been a devoted member of the Pres- 
byterian Church. 

JAMES MILTON McWILLIAMS, a Ufelong citizen 
of Canonsburg, Pa., belongs to one of the old pioneer 
families of Washington County. He was born in this 
city when it was but a village, August 3, 1854, and is a 
son of James Milton and Lydia (McCoy) McWilliams. 

Both parents of Mr. McWilliams were born in Char- 
tiers Township, Washington County and both died at 
Canonsburg, the father in 1894, in his eighty-first year, 
and the mother in July, 1907, in her eighty-sixth year. 
There were twelve children born to these worthy people, 
both of whom lived at peace with the world through long 
and blameless lives. They reared a most creditable family 
and their descendants are scattered all through Washing- 
ton County. John W., the eldest son, was a soldier in 
the signal service during the Civil War and died Januai-y 
21, 1907. He married (first) Emma Clark, daughter of 
Dr. Clark, of Washington, and (second) Louise Walker, 
who survives and resides at Cottonwood Falls, Kas. Will- 
iam McWilliams, the second son, was a soldier in the 
Civil War, a member of Co. D, 10th Pa. Kes. He never 
married and died at Canonsburg, December 25, 1908. 
George and an infant daughter both died in childhood. 
Mary, who is the widow of John Cook, resides at Canons- 
burg. George (2) follows the trade of stone contracting, 
has never married, and lives at Canonsburg. Lydia, 
who is deceased, was the wife of John Stewart. James 
Milton was next in order of birth. Addison resides at 
Canonsburg, where he is engaged in business as a brick 
and stone mason. He married Addie Cowan. Samuel 
is identified with the Comonwealth Trust Co. of Pitts- 



burg. He married Ella Eoberts, who is now deceased. 
Hattie and Nettie, the youngest members of the family, 
both reside at Canonsburg. The father owned a small 
farm near Canonsburg and also worked at Ms trade 
of wagonmaker. 

James Milton McWiUiams attended the schools near 
his home in his boyhood but in 1873 became an appren- 
tice to the stone and bricklaying trade and after acquir- 
ing a complete knowledge of the same started into busi- 
ness and has continued in the same line until the pres- 
ent, apparently being as active as years ago. His thor- 
ough knowledge and his honest methods of applying it 
long since brought him the confidence and custom of 
his fellow citizens and he has done a large amount of 
important work in this city and vicinity. He did a part 
of the building on his own commodious residence at No. 
131 West College street. 

On October 2, 1884, Mr. McWilliams was married to 
Miss Nora Ayers, a daughter of Hiram and Mary Ann 
Ayers, of Pittsburg, and they have three children: Grace, 
who is a successful teacher at Meadowlands; John, who 
is in the employ of the Eiter-Conley Manufacturing Co., 
of Pittsburg; and Frank, who is a student at Canons- 
burg. Mr. McWilliams was reared in the Democratic 
party but he is independent in his views and as he never 
asks any party favors, he votes as his judgment dictates. 
For many years he has been identified with Chartiers 
Lodge, No. 297, F. & A. M., of Canonsburg. 

OLFVER COLLINS POLLOCK, better known in 
Washington County, Pa., as 0. C. C. Pollock, has been 
engaged in the peaceful pursuits of agriculture in North 
Strabane Township since April, 1881, but prior to that 
had had a career which included some years of military 
adventure, a chroncle of which is interesting in the ex- 
treme. He is a representative of one of the old and 
honorable families of the county and enjoys a wide ac- 
quaintance, extending to every part of it. He was born 
in North Strabane Township, October 15, 1852, and is 
a son of Samuel and Esther (McNary) Pollock. 

The early ancestors of Mr. Pollock came to America 
from Scotland in 1736 and into Washington County, Pa., 
previous to the War of the Eevolution. Their names are 
preserved as Samuel and Jane Pollock. Samuel PoUock 
patented a tract of land in the present limits of North 
Strabane Township, near Clokeyville, the same being now 
owned by his great-grandson, W. T. Pollock. Samuel 
Pollock had three sons: John, Samuel and William, all 
of whom were prominent factors in the development of 
Washington County and in many ways connected with its 
early history. 

Of the above sons, William Pollock was the direct an- 
ce.stor of Oliver Collins Pollock. He married Jane Mc- 
Nary and resided all his life in North Strabane Town- 




OLR'EH C. POLLOCK 



YOK. 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON' COIXTV 



639 



ship, Washington (,'ounty. In early days he operated an 
ox-mill, which had been erected by John Cnlhouu, and 
to this mill came settlers with their j^rain from many 
miles around. 

Samuel Pollock, a sou of William and father of Oliver 

C, was a farmer and manufacturer and resided for many 
years at Canonsburg. He took a prominent part in the 
organization of the Republican party in Washington 
County and was foremost in all local enterprises. Ho was 
one of the organizers of the Oak Spring Cemetery Asso- 
ciation and was the main support of a female seminary 
in Canonsburg, known as "Olome Institute" for several 
years. This seminary occupied the site of the First 
Presbyterian Church at Canonsburg, which was first 
known as the David Templeton property. 

Oliver C. C. Pollock in early manhood added an addi 
tioual initial to his name, on account of having a brother 
with initials of A. C. residiug at the same time at Can- 
onsburg, and retained the initial after the death of the 
brother. He was taken to Canonsburg by his parents, 
in 1857, and as he grew older, attended the public schools. 
In 1868 and 1869 he was a student at Dixon and Dun- 
bar 's Academy, which is now known as Jefferson Acad- 
emy, and in 1871 and 1872, at Washington and Jefferson 
College, going from there to Westminster College, where 
lie spent two years and graduated from the latter insti- 
tution in the class of 1874. In the fall of that year he 
entered the United Presbyterian Seminary, at Allegheny, 
where he pursued his studies until the late fall of 1875. 
At this time the discovery of gold in the Black Hills 
was made known to the country and young men from all 
points in the East were attracted thither, .some with the 
hope of securing fortune and others in the spirit of ad- 
venture which, at various times, has been the secret of 
discoveries frequently attributed to scientific research. 

Among the young men, many of them students whose 
lives prior to this, like Mr. Pollock's had been mainly 
spent in academic halls, he resolved to visit the Black 
Hills. His proposal did not meet with the approbation 
of his father, and in order to get transportation to the 
supposed treasure land he enlisted under the name of 
Ira E. Douglass as a soldier in the mounted service, at 
the recruiting station at Pittsburg, on November 20, 
1875, and was transferred from Pittsburg to Jefferson 
Barracks, Mo., and from there in January, 1876, to Fort 

D. A. Russell, Wyo., and assinged to Co. M, 3rd U. S. 
Cav., and the young soldier took part in the winter cam- 
paign against the Sioux Indians, under General Crook. 
Leaving this fort on February 20, 1876, the command at- 
tacked Crazy Horse village, at the mouth of Otter Creek, 
in North Dakota on March 16, 1876, after making a 
forced march of twenty-four hours, with the thermometer 
registering forty-five degrees below zero. The command 
did not get back to Fort Fetterraan, from which place 



they were out twenty-six days, and the average tempcra- 
turo was twenty-six below zero, until March 29th. This 
was a rough experience for the prospective young gold 
miner and soldier of fortune, but it was only a beginning 
of experiences he had scarcely conceived of previously. 
In June, 1876, his command participated in the summer 
campaign against Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull's bands 
of Sioux Indians, the memorable campaign in which the 
brave Gen. Custer lost his life. In May, 1876, Gen. 
Crook's command left Fort Russell and on the 17th of 
,Tune engaged in a running light with 3,300 Sioux on 
Rosebud River and were within three miles of the death 
trap at the mouth of Dead Man's Canyon, in Montana, 
and were only saved from Custer 's fate through the 
sagacity of Frank Guiard, a half-breed scout, who was 
with the party. Buffalo Bill, Wild Bill and Texas Jack, 
all notable scouts, were also with this command. The 
fight on June 17, 1876, was practically a draw. Gen. 
Crook was obliged to return fifty miles to his supply 
station for ammunition, and the Custer disaster followed 
within a few days. On August 5, 1876, Gen. Crook left 
the supply camp with his troops to avenge Gen. Custer. 
They trailed the Indians through the Yellow Stone and 
Powder River valleys, and on the 29th reached the edge 
of the Bad Lands. For ten days the command was lost 
here, having missed the trail, but on September 9th, 
American Horse 's village was located and destroyed as 
was another Indian village eight days later, and in this 
fight Wild Bill lost his life. The command finally landed 
in the Black Hills, October 5, 1876, after much hard- 
ship on account of the supplies having ruu out, the men 
having to subsist on rosebuds and horse flesh. This 
experience in the Black Hills and Bad Lands completely 
cured Mr. Pollock of his attack of gold fever and he 
decided to serve out his time and then, as fast as possible, 
return to his native State. He still had many experi- 
ences, however, before he saw again the welcome sights 
of home. He was on duty at Fort Sheridan, near the 
Spotted Tail Agency, in the winter of 1877, when Crazy 
Horse went on a rampage, and it was Mr. Pollock who 
was detailed to carry the news to the Red Cloud Agency, 
a distance of forty-five miles, and he accomplished this 
courageous feat within four hours. He was present at 
the rounding up of Wild Hog and Yellow Hand bands 
of Cheyenne Indians, in 1877, and assisted in the removal 
of the Spotted Tail and Red Cloud bands of Sioux to the 
Ponca Reservation, and subsequently, in 1878, to the 
Pine Ridge Agency. He was stationed at Fort Sidney, 
Neb. ; Fort McKinney, Wyo. ; Camp Rawlins, Fort Lara- 
mie and Fort D. A. Russell during the remainder of his 
service and received his honorable and welcome discharge 
on November 19, 1880. He reached the old homestead 
in Canonsburg, in December, 1880, and in April, 1881, em- 
barked in farming on the old Judge McDowell farm in 



640 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



North Strabane Township, that property being then 
owned by his father, Samuel Pollock. In 1884, Mr. Pol- 
lock erected his present residence, and on December 18, 
1884, moved into it, and has continued his farm interests 
here ever since. He has taken a somewhat active interest 
in county poUtics, and on the Eepublican ticket has been 
elected to numerous township offices, serving as auditor, tax 
collector, notary public and justice of the peace, and for 
five years has been chairman of the present committee. 
In December, 1880, Mr. Pollock was married to Miss 
Anna Belle Weaver, a daughter of Thomas D. "Weaver, 
of North Strabane Township, and to them have been born 
the following children: Bessie J., Viola P., Oscar D., 
Eliza W., Inez E., Edna L., Adis C, Earl Collins and 
Samuel Blaine McDonald. The eldest daughter is the 
wife of E. L. Campbell, of Midway, Pa. AH the children 
survive with the exception of Edna L., who died aged 
four months. Mr. Pollock and famUy are members of 
the Greenside Avenue United Presbyterian Church at 
Canonsburg. 

JOHN S. CEAIG, a representative of one of Wash- 
ington County's old and respected families, who is en- 
gaged in general farming and stock raising in Hopewell 
Township, was born in Independence Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., July 4, 1851, and is a son of William and 
Margaret (McFadden) Craig, the former of whom died 
in 1890. 

John S. Craig was educated in the schools of Inde- 
pendence and Hopewell Townships and ever since early 
manhood 'has devoted himself to agricultural pursuits 
and has always resided in his native county. 

On December 1, 1886, Mr. Craig was married to Miss 
Kate Bates, of an old family of Independence Town- 
ship. She is a daughter of Conrad and Isabella (Gil- 
more) Bates, both deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Craig the 
following children have been born: Alvin McMurray, 
who lives at home; Mary Belle, who is a student in the 
Indiana Normal School; Margaret Leanna; John Stan- 
ley, and Bessie Luella. Mr. and Mrs. Craig are members 
of the United Presbyterian Church at West Middletown, 
of which he has been a trustee for twenty years, and 
Mrs. Craig belongs to the missionary society and takes 
a great deal of interest in the work. Mr. Craig is a Ee- 
publican as are his brothers and was their late father. 
He has served as school director and at present is road 
supervisor. 

MOEEIS E. WEIE, a retired farmer, residing for the 
past two years in a comfortable home at No. 99 Donnan 
avenue, Washington, Pa., for many years was actively 
engaged in farming and stock raising in South Franklin 
Township. Mr. Weir was born in 1846, in South Frank- 
lin Township, Washington Co., Pa., and is a son of 



Joseph Weir, who was born in Morris Township in 1800, 
the family being among the earliest settlers of the town- 
ship. 

Morris E. Weir was reared on a farm and obtained his 
education in the country schools. Prior to coming to 
Washington he carried on extensive agricultural opera- 
tions for many years, paying special attention to sheep 
growing, dealing only in improved stock. At times he 
had as many as 400 head of sheep at once. In 1906 he 
built his fine brick residence in Washington. . 

In October, 1872, Mr. Weir was married to Miss Sarah 
J. McClain, who was born in Washington County and is 
a daughter of James McClain. Mr. and Mrs. Weir are 
members of the Central Presbyterian Church, of which 
he is an elder. Formerly he took considerable interest 
in the public affairs of South Franklin Township and 
served on the school board for eleven years. 

JOHN A. YOUNG, vice-president of the Star Brew- 
ing Company, a business enterprise of considerable im- 
portance at Washington, has been a resident of this city 
for twenty years and is identified with many of its 
interests. He was born in 1871, in the eastern part of 
Washington County, Pa., and is a son of Jacob Young, 
for many years a substantial farmer in North Franklin 
Township, Washington County. 

John A. Young attended the schools near his father's 
farm and later the Washington schools. His first busi- 
ness experience was as bookkeeper for the firm of Joseph 
M. Spriggs & Son, and later he was connected with Will- 
iam Forgie, in the lumber business, for four years, going 
from there to the Crescent Brewing Company for one 
year. Mr. Young then went into business for himself 
and for the past six years has been vice-president of the 
Star Brewing Company, the products of which are known 
all over this section. 

In 1896, Mr. Young was married to Miss Ida Eedd, 
who was born in Amwell Township, Washington Co., Pa. 

JAMES H. VAN KIEK, one of the prominent and 
substantial citizens of Amwell Township, owns and oper- 
ates in association with his brother, Francis J. Van Kirk, 
about 300 acres of land, engaging in farming and stock 
raising under the firm name of Van Kirk Brothers. Mr. 
Van Kirk has been a life-long resident of Amwell Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., and is a son of Hiram and 
Anna F. (Hughes) Van Kirk, both of whom were also 
natives of Amwell Township, both families belonging to 
the old settled class in this section. 

Hiram Van Kirk died July 22, 1908, having passed his 
entire life in Amwell Township. He was a son of Capt. 
Joseph Van Kirk and a grandson of Jacob Van Kirk, 
the latter of whom was one of the early setlers who came 
to western Pennsylvania from New Jersey. The late 



HISTORY OP WASHINGTON" COUNTY 



641 



Hiram Van Kirk was a man of large means, having 
devoted a long life to farming and stock raising and 
having met with success in his undertakings. He was a 
liberal supporter of the Christian Church at Lone Pine, 
Pa. In his political sentiments he was a Jacksonian 
Democrat. He married Anna P. Hughes and their two 
ohildi'en survive : James H. and Francis J. 

James H. Van Kirk obtained a district school educa- 
tion and has made agricultural industries his main busi- 
ness through life. His father was a successful breeder 
of Shorthorn cattle and an extensive wool grower and 
the sous have continued to prosper in the same line. Of 
their large estate 152 acres comprise the homestead 
farm. They are recognized as good business men and 
both are held in high esteem as citizens. In politics 
they are Democrats and on the Democratic ticket, James 
H. Van Kirk was elected a member of the school board 
of the township, in February, 1909. They are heartily 
in favor of the good roads movement and would be 
pleased to see more general interest taken in something 
that is of such vital interest to the agricultural regions. 
The Van Kirk brothers are associated in business and 
their interests in many things are the same. They give 
liberal support to the Christian Church at Lone Pine. 

EGBERT D. CEAIG, one of Hopewell Township's 
leading farmers, owns 147 acres of valuable land and 
makes stock raising, and sheep growing in particular, a 
prominent feature of his work. He was born in Inde- 
pendence Township, Washington Co., Pa., September 4, 
1867, and is a son of WUliam and Margaret (Dalzell) 
Craig. The father died October 3, 1890, and the mother 
died September 5, 1908. 

Robert D. Craig attended the district schools of Hope- 
well and Independence townships, when about twenty 
years of age went to farming for his father and con- 
tinued at home and after the death of his father took 
charge of the home farm. 

Mr. Craig was married February 10, 1909, to Miss 
Lucy Carl, a daughter of Henry and Lucy (McPherson) 
Carl, formerly of Independence Township, and they have 
a son, Robert Carl Craig, born December 1, 1909. Like 
his father, Mr. Craig is a stanch Republican and he has 
served three terms as road supervisor. He is a member 
of Pomona Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. 

MEL S. MOORHEAD, who conducts a furniture store 
at McDonald, and is one of the representative business 
men of the place, was born in Washington County, Pa., 
May 9, 1874, and is a son of William B. and Margaret 
(Johnston) Moorhead. 

WiUiam B. Moorhead was a son of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth (Sprowl) Moorhead. For many years he engaged 



in farming in CecU Township and was a leading citizen 
there, serving in township offices and for two years was 
a justice of the peace. He married Margaret Johnston, 
a daughter of Thomas and Susannah (Scott) Johnston, 
natives of County Donegal, Ireland. Both William B. 
Moorhead and wife are now deceased and their burial 
was in Arlington Cemetery. They had the following 
children: Rosena, who is the wife of Dr. W. A. La 
Ross, of McDonald; Mel S.; T. B., who lives in Cali- 
fornia; and R. J., whose home is in Philadelphia. 

Mel S. Moorhead was educated in the public schools 
and Ingleside Academy, which formerly was a somewhat 
noted educational institution at McDonald. After com- 
pleting his school attendance, he went into the furniture 
business at McDonald, serving for two years as an em- 
ploye of S. H. Cook, during that time gaining knowledge 
and experience, and then went into partnership with 
J. F. Giffin. Later he bought Mr. Giffin's interest and 
has continued alone ever since. He carries a large stock 
which includes furniture, carpets, stoves and general 
housefurnishings. 

In July, 1908, Mr. Moorhead was married to Miss 
Bessie Douglass, a daughter of T. M, and Julia (MeCaus- 
land) Douglass, residents of McDonald. She has three 
brothers : Robert, J. A. and Leon, the second named 
being a physician at McDonald. Mr. and Mrs. Moor- 
head are members of the First United Presb>'terian 
Church at McDonald. In politics, he is a Republican. 
He is one of the directors in the First National Bank 
at McDonald, and is also a stockholder in the Water and 
Electric Light Company. 

Mr. and Mrs. Moorhead have one daughter, JuUa 
Douglass, whose welcome was given her on April 16, 
1909. 

WINFIELD McILVAINE, senior member of the well 
known law firm of Mcllvaine and Clark, with offices at 
No. 410 Washington Trust Building, Washington, Pa., 
is a man of prominence throughout this section of Penn- 
sylvania, not alone for his successes in the legal profes- 
sion, but as well for his activity in the field of journal- 
ism, and the results he accomplished in behalf of the 
Republican party. Mr. Mcllvaine was born in Somerset 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., January 30, 1856, and 
is a son of S. B. and Catherine (Hill) Mcllvaine. 

S. B. Mcllvaine, the father, was one of the substan- 
tial men and representative farmers of eastern Wash- 
ington County, where the family has long been e-stab- 
lished. The Hills, to which family his wife belongs, 
are an old and prominent family of the southeastern part 
of the county. S. B. and Catherine Mcllvaine became 
parents of the following children: Winfield; Arabelle, 
who is the widow of William M. Irwin; Ella Laveme, 



642 



HISTOEY OF VVASHIKGTOX COUNTY 



who is the wife of Josiah Thomas ; Lena, who is the wife 
of E. A. NichoU; and U. G., Julia, who is the wife of 
Julius W. NichoU; and Edwin L. 

Winfield Mcllvaine was educated in the local schools 
and at Canonsburg Academy, attending that institution 
for two years. During the winter of 1876-7 he taught 
in the district schools of Somerset Township, and in the 
faU of the latter year he entered as a sophomore, Wash- 
ington and JefEerson College, from which he was gradu- 
ated with honors, in June, 1880. Prior to this, in June, 
1879, he had commenced his law studies, in the office 
and under the direction of his cousin, Hon. J. A. Mcll- 
vaine, later president judge of the Forty-seventh Judi- 
cial District. The two years immediately following his 
graduation were spent on his father's farm with a view 
to recuperating his physical powers, which had been 
greatly taxed by his close application to his studies. He 
also engaged in teaching school to some extent, during 
this period. 

In the fall of 1882, he began his activity in politics, 
as secretary of the Republican County Committee, in 
which capacity he served during the campaign of that 
and the three succeeding years. In 1883, at the June 
term of court, he was admitted to the bar of Washing- 
ton County, and in the fall of the same year, he pur- 
chased of Hon. E. F. Acheson, an interest in the Wash- 
ington ' ' Observer, ' ' which was the recognized exponent 
of Republican principles in Washington County. He 
continued in this relation until October, 1890, when he 
disposed of his interest to Mr. Acheson. On January 1, 
1891, he entered into the general practice of law in asso- 
ciation with Hon. J. F. Taylor, the partnership of Tay- 
lor and Mcllvaine continuing until June 25, 1895, and 
enjoying a prestige throughout this whole section of 
Pennsylvania. After the dissolution of this firm, Mr. 
Mcllvaine became a partner of W. S. Parker, Esq., under 
the name and style of Parker & McHvaine, a combination 
of legal talent which continued until April 1, 1904, when 
the firm was enlarged to that of Parker, Mcllvaine and 
Clark, by the addition of Norman E. Clark, Esq. This 
firm continued until April 1, 1907, when Mr. Parker 
withdrew, leaving the firm as it now stands, Mcllvaine 
and Clark. Mr. McHvaine has also been identified with 
various enterprises of Washington, and at the present 
time is a director of the Washington Trust Company. 

On October 19, 1892, Mr. McHvaine was united in 
marriage with Elizabeth S. Stewart, who is a daughter 
of the late Galbraith Stewart. They reside on East 
Maiden street. They are members of the First Presby- 
terian Church of Washington. 

C. P. PAXTON, M. D., physician and surgeon at Cali- 
fornia, Pa., who is professionally associated with Dr. 
John Leslie Mercer, his step-father, enjoys a large prac- 



tice and is located in the First National Bank building. 
He was born near McConnell's Mill, not far from Can- 
onsburg, Washington Co., Pa., July 15, 1876, and is a 
son of Thomas and Eliza (Cornelius) Paxton. 

The father of Dr. Paxton died when the son was eight 
years old. Later, his mother married Dr. John LesUe 
Mercer, who, in 1908, sold out his medical practice at 
Eldersville, Washington County, where he had been lo- 
cated for nineteen years, and came to California. Dr. 
Mercer was born on a farm in Franklin Township, four 
miles west of Washington, and is a son of Z. and Nancy 
(Walker) Mercer. He is well known all over the coun- 
ty, having taught school some ten terms, six near Can- 
onsburg, one in Franklin and one in Buffalo Township 
and two at Canton, prior to entering upon medical prac- 
tice. He is a graduate of the Western University of 
Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Cumberland Pres- 
byterian Church. 

When Dr. Paxton 's mother remarried, the family went 
to live at Eldersville and there he attended school and 
afterward taught six terms of school, five of these in 
Washington County and one in Allegheny County. This 
was before he entered upon the study of medicine, which 
he pursued for several years and was then graduated 
from the medical department of the Western University 
of Pennsylvania, in the class of 1905. He came then 
to California and has built up a good practice. 

Dr. Paxton married Miss Claire Mae Philips, and they 
have one daughter, Pauline Philips Paxton. Dr. Paxton 
attends the Cumberland Presbyterian Church but is af- 
filiated with the United Presbyterian. He is identified 
with the Masonic fraternity. 

GEORGE HAZEN MURPHY, M. D., one of the lead- 
ing and successful practitioners of the medical profes- 
sion at Monongahela City, Pa., was born November 18, 
1869, on a farm in Fayette County, Pa., and is a son of 
James and Harriet (Hazen) Murphy, both of whom were 
born in Fayette County, and are still living on the farm 
in Franklin Township. The parents of our subject 
reared a family of eight children : Delmer ; Phoebe, 
married Frank Brook; George Hazen, the subject of this 
sketch; Elizabeth; Dorcas; Anna; Walter; and Watson. 

Dr. Murphy was reared on his father's farm and at- 
tended the district schools of that locality, later taking 
a course at the California, Pa., Normal School, and when 
about seventeen years of age began teaching, in which he 
continued three years. He then attended Mt. Union 
College, finally entering the medical department of the 
Western University at Pittsburg, Pa., from which he 
graduated in the spring of 1894. He first embarked in 
the practice of medicine at Kammerer, Washington Coun- 
ty for two years, then came to Monongahela City in 
1906, where he has since been located, having recently 



IIISTOliY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



643 



puichased his present office and residence on Main street. 
Ur. Murpliy has established an enviable reputation aa 
one of the successful physicians of Monongahela City, 
where he enjoys an extensive and lucrative practice. He 
is a stockholder of the First National Bank of Mononga- 
hela City, and is secretary and treasurer of the Citizens' 
Gas Company, of which he was one of the organizers. In 
politics he is identified with the Democratic party, and 
has served six years as a member of the school board. He 
is affiliated with the I. O. O. F., and the F. O. E. orders. 
Dr. Murphy was united in marriage with Mary E. 
Hoifmaun, a daughter of Andrew A. Hoffmann, deceased, 
who was one of the leading attorneys of Washington, 
Pa. Dr. Murphy has one son, George Hazen, Jr. Dr. 
and Mrs. Murphy are nu'uibers of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

ROBERT F. LINN, secretary and treasurer of the 
Burgettstown Milling and Plate Ice Company and presi- 
dent of the borough council, is identified with a number 
of the leading business enterprises of this place and is 
one of the representative citizens. He was born in Cum- 
berland County, Pa., June 27, 1873. 

Robert F. Linn was born in an adjoining county but 
Washington lays claim to him as he was educated here 
and at Concord, Ohio, completing his studies at Pitts- 
burg. He came then to Burgettstown and for nine years 
was a member of the lumber firm of Linn Brothers. 
After his marriage he settled in West Burgettstown, where 
he still resides. He is a stockholder as well as officer in 
the Milling and Plate lee Company, of Burgettstown; 
and is a stockholder in the Burgettstown National Bank. 
His business interests are numerous and he is credited 
with being a very able financier. 

On September 24, 1901, Mr. Linn was married to Miss 
Emma Scott, a daughter of Robert Scott, of Florence, 
Pa., and they have two sons : Charles S. and Robert P. 
Mr. and Mrs. Linn are members of the First Presbyterian 
Church. In polities he is a Democrat and is a very ac- 
tive, progressive citizen. He is identified with both the 
Masons and the Odd Fellows. 

GEORGE L. BARR, an honored veteran of the Civil 
War and a well known retired citizen, resides in his com- 
fortable home at No. 116 Hall avenue, Washington, Pa., 
to which city he came in 1884. He was born November 
14, 184.3, in Clarion (bounty, Pa., but was mainly reared 
in Butler County. 

George L. Barr attended the country schools and as- 
sisted on the home farm until he was eighteen years of 
age, when he enlisted for service in the Civil War and 
has a most creditable record, having bravely faced the 
enemy on many a field of carnage and endured the hor* 



rors of prison life for many months. A detailed history 
of the years of his life from 1861, when he entered the 
service, young and enthusiastic, to his honorable discharge 
at tho close of the war, in 1865, would make many pages 
of interesting reading. He was a member of Company 
K, U);ird Pa. Vol. Inf., which was at first attached to 
tho division commanded by Gen. McClelland. Prior to 
being taken prisoner by the Confederate forces at Ply- 
mouth, N. C, Mr. Barr participated in the battles of 
Fair Oaks; the seven days of fighting before Richmond, 
Va.; Kingston, N. C; White Hall, N. C; Goldsboro and 
Plymouth. At the latter place, on' April 20, 1864, Mr. 
Barr was unfortunate enough to fall into the hands of 
the enemy and was immediately dispatched to Anderson- 
ville Prison, Ga. He was confined there four months, 
escaping the sad fate which overtook thousands of his 
comrades, whose memory, at this late day, has been com- 
memorated by a memorial shaft. He was not much bet- 
ter off, however, when transferred to Charlotte, and three 
weeks later to the prison at Florence. From the latter 
place he made a daring escape, but to no purpose as he 
was soon recaptured and placed in the military jail at 
Georgetown, S. C. After one month there, he was sent 
back to Florence and was retained there until December 
8, 1864, when he was sent to Camp Parole, at Annapolis, 
Md., and in March, 1865, was regularly exchanged. Once 
more within the Union lines, he was detailed on guard 
duty, first at Roanoke Island, N. C, and later at New- 
born, and was there at the time of his discharge. 

Mr. Barr returned to Pennsylvania as speedily as pos- 
.sible and soon proceeded to Oil City, where he went into 
the oil business, later moved into the Butler and Arm- 
strong county fields, during a large part of this time 
being engaged as a driller. In 1884 he came to Washing- 
ton and helped drill the Hess gas well, which was the first 
well drilled for the Light, Heat & Power Company, of' 
Washington. He continued to work as a driller until 
1900, when he retired. Since taking up his residence in 
Washington, he has been an active and useful citizen 
and for four years has been a member of the city coun- 
cil, representing the Second Ward. 

On July 7, 1867, Mr. Barr was married to Miss Cather- 
ine Benton, and they have five children, namely: Harry 
P., John E., Sarah Alice, Berton B., and George C. 
Harry F. Barr has charge of the South Penn Oil Com- 
Iiany 's drilling crews, of Lincoln County, W. Va. .lohn 
E. Barr works in an oil well supply store at Pittsburg. 
Sarah Alice resides at home. Berton B. is a well known 
attorney at Washington. George C. Barr served in the 
Philippine Islands as captain of Co. H, 10th Pa. N. G. 
Mr. Barr is a member of the Jefferson Avenue Methodist 
Episcopal Church and is a trustee of the same, and he 
belongs to Templeton Post, G. A. R. of Washington. 



644 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



WILLIAM JAMES BROWN, a representative citizen 
of Cross Creek Township and a leader in its public af- 
fairs, at present serving as school director and road su- 
pervisor, is a member of one of the old and respected 
families of this section. He is one of the heirs of the 
old homestead farm of 126 acres, which property is ex- 
ceedingly valuable, being underlaid with Pittsburg vein 
coal. He was born in Cross Creek Township, Washing- 
ton Co., Pa., March 23, 1840, and is a son of James and 
Jane (Shoals) Brown. 

The parents of Mr. Brown were born in Ireland and 
were married in the city of Philadelphia. They came to 
Cross Creek Township, Washington Co., Pa., in 1837, 
and there passed the remainder of their days. They had 
the following children: John, who is now deceased 
William James, of Cross Creek Township; Sarah, who 
married Lewis Irwin, and had six children — James, Ida 
Anna, Robert, Jessie and Bert ; David, who is now de 
ceased, at one time was sheriff of Brooke County, W, 
Va. ; Thomas, who resides in Colorado Springs; and Jo 
seph R., who lives in Independence Township. 

William James Brown attended the district schools in 
Cross Creek Township until he was sixteen years old and 
then learned the carpenter trade, at which he worked 
for some thirty years. He was an expert and satisfactory 
workman but after this long period he became afflicted 
with rheumatism and decided to change his business for 
one that would give him more out-door work. He had 
accumulated a competency and was able to invest in a 
farm of forty acres which proved valuable to him in more 
ways than one. It gave him the needed change of em- 
ployment and as coal was discovered underlying it, the 
Wabash Railroad extended a line to tap this region and 
Mr. Brown was able to lay. off his farm in lots and sell 
for excellent prices. A number of residences have been 
built on this land, which adjoins the town of Avella. The 
old Wells mill, a landmark, stood on the farm when Mr. 
Brown purchased, but it was razed in 1898. The former 
farm is now known as Browntown. 

On January 31, 1867, Mr. Brown was married to Miss 
Margaret Phillips, a daughter of David and Margaret 
(Stevenson) Phillips, of Cross Creek Township, and they 
have had the following children born to them: Jane E., 
who was born December 5, 1867, married James Walker ; 
Maggie S., who was born July 24, 1870, married J. R. 
Crawford and they live at Wheeling, W. Va. ; David C, 
born August 14, 1873, married Mattie Eoney, a daughter 
of W. G. Roney, of Buffalo, and they live at Hubbard, 
Ohio ; John C, who was born October 27, 1876, married 
Mary Latimer, daughter of George Latimer, of West 
Virginia, and they live in Cross Creek Township; Anna 
Mary, who was born October 11, 1879, married L. M. 
Irwin, and they live in Avella; George L., who was born 
January 18, 1882, and Alice B., who was born July 24, 



1884, both reside at home. Mr. Brown and family be- 
long to the Presbyterian Church at Independent. In pol- 
itics he has always been a Democrat. He has been chosen 
by his fellow citizens to fill numerous offices of responsi- 
bility, served one term on the grand jury and several 
times on the petit jury and has served the township care- 
fully and faithfully as road supervisor, school director 
and election judge, all this local prominence going to 
prove the high regard in which he is held by his follow 
citizens. For more than forty years he has been a Free 
Mason. 

DAVID HART, a prominent citizen of Canonsburg, a 
member of the town council, is also an honored veteran 
of the Civil War. He was born in South Strabane Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., January 10, 1826, and is a 
son of Andrew and Mary (Fergus) Hart. 

Tracing the Hart family back to the great-grandfather, 
Andrew Hart, it is found that he was of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry and lived and died in Adams County, Pa., and 
was buried at Marsh Creek. David Hart, son of Andrew 
and grandfather of David Hart, came to Washington 
County as a volunteer in the service of General Wash- 
ington and was so impressed with the beauty of the land- 
scape, the excellence of the soil and the value of the 
forest trees, that he resolved to some time return and 
establish his home here. His birth had taken place in 
Adams County and he returned there, married, and in 
1807 brought his family to Somerset Township, near 
Vanceville, where he subsequently died. He was buried 
in the grounds of the Pigeon Creek Presbyterian Church. 
His first wife was Sarah Paxton and his second wife 
was a Mrs. Butler. The children born to the first union 
were: Andrew, Maria, James G., David, Jane, John and 
William. Jane married Henry Newkirk and died in 
Wayne County. Maria married John Fergus, who died 
in Washington. William moved to Ashland County, Ohio, 
and died in Jonestown, Washington County. The chil- 
dren of the second marriage were as follows: Dunning, 
who resides at Washington; Margaret, who is now de- 
ceased, married a Mr. Kerr; and Eliza, who is the wife 
of Arde Hosack, resides at Scenery Hill, Washington 
County. 

Andrew Hart, father of David Hart, was born near 
Gettysburg, Adams Co., Pa., and in 1807 accompanied his 
parents to Washington County. In 1848 he settled in the 
village of Canonsburg and died in this place in 1861. IJe 
married Mary Fergus and to them were born two sons 
and four daughters, the only survivor of the family be- 
ing the subject of this biography. His one brother, 
Samuel F. Hart, died at Hickory, Washington County, 
in 1907. He had been twice married, first to a Miss 
Ayres, of Illinois, and second to a Miss Atcheson, of 
Washington County. A son and a daughter were born 



II.ISTOKY OF \VASIIIN(iTON ('OUXTV 



645 



to the second union, the later of whom is deeeased. The 
son is J. Ernest Hart, of Hickory. None of the sisters 
of Mr. Hart ever married. Two of them died before 
reaching maturity. Tliroe are interred in the Canons- 
burg Cemetery and one, Isabella, was buried at West 
Middletown. 

David Hart obtained his education in the schools of 
South Strabane Township and at West Middletown. He 
then went to West Alexander and there spent three years 
working in the carriage and wagoumaking shops, thor- 
oughly learning the trade. In 1851 he crossed the plains 
to California, making the long journey with oxteams, 
and by the time he returned to Washington County had 
been away for three years. They were filled with many ad- 
ventures and it is with much interest that he recalls 
the home journey across the celebrated Isthmus of Pana- 
ma. He had done fairly well in the far West and had 
enough capital to enable him to buy a good farm, situ- 
ated in Chartiers Township, one mile north of Canons- 
burg, upon which he settled with the idea of spending 
his life in agricultural pursuits. The year 1854, however, 
•was one of severe and prolonged drouth and the whole 
country suffered from the withholding of moisture. This 
discouraged Mr. Hart and caused him to turn his atten- 
tion again to the West and in May, 1855, he again 
started for California, where he worked as a carpenter 
and engaged in trading and mining, meeting with many 
adventures and enduring hardships which prepared the 
way for his later life in the army during the Civil War. 
While at Jacksonville, Ore., he was one of a band of 
volunteers who went out to subdue the Indians who had 
been capturing emigrant trains. He was also one of the 
band of brave men under Capt. John Ross that went out 
from Clear Lake and Lost Eiver and distributed pro- 
visions to the sui3fering emigrants on the lava beds on the 
route to California. When the Civil War seemed immi- 
nent, he returned to Washington County, ready to enlist 
in defense of the Union. The first company accepted by 
the governor, Hon. Simon Cameron, was organized in 
June, 1861, and in August, 1862, Mr. Hart became a 
member of it, this being the famous Ringold Cavalry. 
He was sworn into the service under Capt. John Keys 
and left for the command at Beverly, W. Va. On July 
10, 1863, at Cold Springs, Md., he received three gunshot 
wounds at the same time, two in his abdomen on the 
right and one through his lungs, and, remarkable as it 
may seem, these bullets still remain in his body. He was 
left unconscious on Fairview Mountain, in the care of sev- 
eral of his comrades, while the enemy was driven across 
the river. These comrades succeeded in transporting him 
to Cumberland, where his wife met him and brought him 
home. Under her skillful and tender ministrations he 
recuperated and on the second Tuesday in October fol- 
lowing, he voted and then rejoined his regiment. 



In .March, 1864, he was given a furlough of thirty 
days and enjoyed these at home and then went back to 
Cumberland. The seven companies from Washington 
(Jounty and five companies from the eastern part of 
Pennsylvania, were included in the 22nd Pa. Cav., form- 
ing the regiment under command of Col. Jacob Higgins, 
and it was allotted to the 8th Army Corps. It was under 
different commanders but mainly under Gen. B. F. Kelly, 
who commanded the Department of West Virginia. In 
the spring of 1865, Mr. Hart was promoted to be quarter- 
master-sergeant and was with the regiment in all its 
movements in the Shenandoah Valley until the close of 
the war. By general order he was mustered out at New 
Creek and was paid off at Pittsburg in the latter part 
of June, 1865. 

Mr. Hart then went into the business of stock buying 
and selling and was in partnership with Matthew Wilson 
for seven years. Later he formed a partnership with 
his brothers-in-law, Paxton Bros., in the same line of 
busine.=s, including butchering, al.so, under the firm name 
of Hart, Harsha & Co. he built and operated the Char- 
tiers Woolen Factory at Canonsburg, which was destroyed 
by fire February 28, 1887. For some years after this 
destruction of his property, he continued to handle stock. 
Since 1872 he has occupied his present handsome residence 
which is situated on the corner of Pike street and Green- 
.side avenue, Washington. 

On October 4, 1860, Mr. Hart was married to Miss 
Annie Power, a daughter of Ezra Power, of Washington 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Hart are members of the First 
Presbyterian Church at Canonsburg. He is an active, 
useful citizen and serves acceptably as a member of the 
town council and has been burgess. In politics he is a 
Republican. He is a member of Thomas Paxton Post, 
No. 126, G. A. E., being the present commander. This 
post was named in honor of his brother-in-law, Thomas 
Paxton, who fell at the battle of the Wilderness. 

JOHN N. McDowell, justice of the peace and prom- 
inent citizen of Buffalo Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
was born in this township, January 23, 1856, and is a son 
of John and Sarah (Brownlee) McDowell, and a grand- 
son of Joseph McDowell, who may have been born in 
Scotland, but was a very early settler in Washington 
County. 

The late John McDowell was one of Buffalo Township 's 
distinguished men. He had been afforded excellent edu- 
cational advantages, attending Washington College in his 
earlier years and also teaching school for a time, but later 
he directed his attention along agricultural lines and 
became particularly interested in raising sheep. Wool 
growing in this section has long been a very important 
indu.stry and to such intelligent men as the late John 
McDowell, may be attributed a large measure of its im- 



646 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



portance, for not only through investigation and experi- 
ment has the best kind of wool been discovered to make 
the growing of sheep profitable to the American farmer, 
but through knowledge of public aifairs and legislative 
action, its scope and expediency has been proved. For 
years Mr. McDowell made this industry a subject of deep 
study and he became such an authority on the subject 
that when the tariff bill was under consideration during 
the administration of the late lamented President Mc- 
Kinley, lie was an important witness called before the 
committee. His first acquaintance and association with 
William McKinley was when the latter was a member of 
Congress, acting with him in the classification of the wool 
in preparing the schedule for the tariff bill which was 
passed and known as the McKinley bill. 

He was a leader in agricultural movements in Washing- 
ton County, served as president of the Pennsylvania State 
Agricultural Society for a number of years and at the 
time of his death was serving as commissioner of the 
Cumberland Road, an appointment made by the governor 
of Pennsylvania. In that office he served mth eiEciency 
for seven years. In polities he was a Republican and at 
various times he accepted public office in Buffalo Town- 
ship, ser\-ing long as a justice of the peace, but the 
larger portion of his life was devoted, as mentioned 
above, to the wool industry and to the various questions 
arising concerning so important a branch of agricultural 
work. On his own property he raised the Saxony-Merino 
sheep and from the soft and pliable wool obtained was 
fashioned the beautiful and admired suit of clothes worn, 
by President McKinley at the time of his second inau- 
guration. From the same web of cloth different members 
of the family had suits or cloaks made. A personal 
friendship existed between him and John McDowell, each 
admiring the other for their sterling qualities. 

John McDowell was twice married and his second wife 
still survives and resides on the homestead in Buffalo 
Township. He was the father of the following children: 
F. Vina, who lives in Buffalo Township ; Samuel B., who 
is a physician in practice at Philadelphia; Emma J., who 
lives in Buffalo Township; John N. ; William J., who 
resides at Seottdale; and Kizzie, who lives in Buffalo 
Township. Mr. McDowell was a member of the First 
United Presbyterian Church at Washington. His death 
occurred August 26, 1899. 

John N. McDowell was reared to manhood in Buffalo 
Township and attended Canonsburg Academy until his 
graduation in 1875, and subsequently graduated from the 
Iron City Business College at Pittsburg, in 1877. For 
several years after he returned from college he served 
as a clerk in a mercantile establishment at Washington 
and then became a school teacher, spending about fifteen 
winter terms as such. He also was extensively interested 
in farming and stock raising for a number of years but 



latterly has given a large portion of his time to the duties 
of public office. He is serving in his third term as justice 
of the peace and it was Justice McDowell who organized 
the Association of Justices of the Peace and Aldermen 
of Washington County, of which he is serving as secretary. 
He has also served as auditor of Buffalo Township, as 
assessor and as road supervisor. His prominence has long 
since been established and his reliability and public spirit 
have never been questioned. 

Mr. McDowell married Miss Viola Melvin, a daughter 
of Samuel Melvin, a former well known citizen who was 
proprietor of the old Pulton House which occupied the 
present site of the Washington Trust building. Eight 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. McDowell: 
Harry M., who lives in Buffalo Township ; Helena, who is 
the wife of Albert Weirich, of Canton Township; Stella, 
who is a teacher in the public schools: Margaret; John, 
who is a student in Washington and Jefferson College; 
Sarah, who is a successful teacher; Samuel B., who is a 
student at Washington and Jefferson; and Nellie, who is 
deceased. The family attends the East Buffalo Presbj 
terian Church, of which he is an elder. Formerly he was 
secretary of Lagonda Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. 

BEETON B. BAEK, a well known member of the 
Washington bar, who has been in the active practice of 
his profession in this city since the spring of 1903, was 
born December 26, 1874, in Butler County, Pa., and is a 
son of George L. and Catherine (Benton) Barr. 

Mr. Barr was ten years old when his parents came to 
Washington. For many years and until he retired from 
business activity, his father had been interested in the 
oil industry. Berton B. Barr attended the public schools 
of Washington, graduating from the Washington high 
school in 1894, after which he entered Washington and 
Jefferson College and was graduated from that institu- 
tion in 1899. With this literary foundation, Mr. Barr 
then entered upon the study of law, and in 1901, he was 
graduated from the Dickinson School of Law, at Car- 
lisle, Pa. In March, 1903, he was admitted to the Wash- 
ington County bar and subsequently to the Supreme and 
Superior Courts of the State. He has been connected 
with a number of prominent cases of litigation and has 
demonstrated his legal ability on numerous occasions. 
He takes some part in politics and evinces a public- 
spirited interest in all that promises to be of advantagb 
to Washington. He was reared in the Presbyterian 
Church. 

REV. WILLIAM DICKSON IKONS, D. D., pastor of 
the First United Presbyterian Church at McDonald, Pa., 
was bom in Beaver County, Pa., July 16, 1852, and is 
a son of Joseph and Margaret (Douds) Irons. 

The father of Rev. Irons, who died in 1890, was born 




FKRXAXI) A. TIIOMASSY 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUiNTY 



649 



in Beavor County, and was a son of Solomon and Haobel 
(Dickson) Irons. Joseph Irons engaged in farming 
tlirouglioiit his active life. He married Margaret Douds, 
wlio is a daughter of John and Mary (Hutchison) Douds. 
Her grandfather was killed by the British while serving 
as a soldier in the Kevolutionary War. To Joseph and 
Margaret Irons the following children were born: John, 
who is a di-stinguished minister in the United Presby- 
terian body, for many years was a member of the facul- 
ty of Xenia Theological Seminary; Rachel, who is the 
wife of Dr. O. R. Shannon, resides in Allegheny City, 
which is also the home of her mother; William D. ; Jo- 
seph, who is engaged in the real estate business at Roch- 
ester, Pa.; Mary, who is the wife of Edgar HefBey, who 
is auditor for the America Aluminum Works, at Alle- 
gheny City; Elizabeth, who married J. McCready, an 
oil producer; and Janie.s, who is in the mercantile busi- 
ness. 

William Dickson Ii-ons obtained his primary educa- 
tion in the schools of Beaver County and from them en- 
tered Westminster College, at New Wilmington, Pa., sub- 
sequently attending the Allegheny Theological Seminary. 
Dr. Irons came to McDonald in 1880, tinding the church 
but poorly supplied with accommodations. Through his 
energy, zeal and executive ability, the small frame build- 
ing soon gave way to the present commodious brick 
church editiee and this charge has become one of the 
important ones of the denomination. When Dr. Irons 
became the pastor of the present church he had other 
claims on his time, attention and strength, being also 
placed in charge of Engleside Academy and the 
Preneh Mission. For about fifteen years Dr. Irons was 
at the head of that academic school, which is no longer 
in existence, but during that period the students included 
numbers of men who have become prominent in pro- 
fessional life — lawyers, ministers, physicians, teachers 
and missionaries. He also has built up at McDonald one 
of the most flourishing French missions in the State. 

In June, 1874, Dr. Irons was married to Miss Edith 
Van Orsdell. Her parents were natives of Pennsylvania, 
and she has two sisters and two brothers: Laura, who 
married Dr. J. G. Templeton; W. E., who is a dentist in 
practice at Philadelphia; Mary C. ; and J. A., who is 
engaged in the practice of denti-stry in Pittsburg. To Dr. 
and Mrs. Irons the following children were born : Har- 
rold Meredith, a lawyer in Pittsburg; Mabel, who mar- 
ried John S. Moore; Laura, who married W. H. Cramer; 
William, who is a teacher in the McDonald schools; and 
Joseph, who is a student in the Western University of 
Pennsylvania at Pittsburg. 

During his long pastorate at McDonald, Dr. Irons has 
performed almost 1,000 marriages and in one year has 
conducted as many as 121 funeral services, his presence 



being especially v;Uued on such occasions on account of 
his sincere sympathy and ability to give comfort to those 
bereaved. He is beloved by his congregation and is es- 
teemed by his fellow citizens. 

BERNARD S. SMALLWOOD, who is now serving 
Ills third term as civil engineer of Charleroi, was born 
December 10, 1882, near Coal Center, East Pike Run 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., and is a son of Edward 
.V. and Salena Mary (Lutes) Smallwood, the former of 
wliom is a carpenter and contractor of Charleroi. 

Bernard S. Smallwood came with his parents to Char- 
leroi in the fall of 1890, obtained his education in the 
common schools, and the high school from which he grad- 
uated in 1899, then entered the Ohio Normal University 
at Ada, Ohio, where he took a course in civil engineering 
and graduated in 1901. After completing his education, 
Mr. Slnallwood returned to Charleroi, embarked in the 
practice of his profession, and is now not only serving 
his third term as engineer of the borough of Charleroi, 
but is also serving in that capacity for Fayette City, Pa., 
and Roscoe, Washington Co., Pa. 

Mr. Smallwood was united in marriage with Lulu E. 
Kline, who is a daughter of George Kline, and they have 
two sons, B. Culver Smallwood, and George Edward 
Smallwood. Mr. Smallwood is a member of the order of 
Elks. 

FERNAND A. THOMASSY, manager of the McDon- 
ald Opera House, of which he is part owner, and also in- 
terested in oil production in Beaver, Allegheny and Wash- 
ington counties, is one of the representative business men 
of this place. He was born in France, June 24, 1877, and 
is a son of Thomas and Julia (Wathier) Thomassy. 

The parents of Mr. Thomassy came to the United 
States when he was but three years old and settled first 
at Smithton in Westmoreland County, coming from there 
to Allegheny County and then to McDonald. The father 
was a coal miner and he and wife were consistent mem- 
bers of the Catholic Church and reared the family in 
this faith. They had the following children: Desire; 
Cecelie, who is the wife of Seal Buggett ; Anna, who is 
the wife of George Gillespie; Celeste, who is the wife of 
H. H. De Loche; Ida, who is the wife of Emil Robert; 
George; Julia, who is the wife of George Young; and 
Fernand A. 

Until he was ten years of age, Mr. Thomassy was per- 
mitted to attend school at McDonald, but after that 
he accompanied his father into the coal mines and worked 
with him for five years. He then learned the baking 
trade and worked at that for eight year.s, when he was 
appointed a member of the police force at McDonald. 
He remained a police oflficial for two years, when, in 
1902 he went into the liotcl business and conducte.l a 



650 



HISTOKY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



public house for three years hj himself and then took in 
August Valentour as a partner and continued several 
years longer. During these years both he and Mr. Valen- 
tour made judicious investments and together they own 
the opera house property and two other valuable business 
blocks. His oil interests are also of importance and he 
is numbered with the men of means in this section. 

On May 12, 1909, Mr. Thomassy was married to Miss 
Marie La Vie, a daughter of PhUip and Mary (Bess) 
La Vie. Mr. and Mrs. La Vie came to America from 
France and reside at McDonald. They are members of 
the Presbyterian Church. Mr. and Mrs. La Vie have 
the following children: Marie; Phillipine, who is the 
wife of T. D. Gladden; and George, Louis and Edward. 

Mr. Thomassy casts his vote with the Republican party. 
He is identified with several French fraternal organiza- 
tions and belongs also to the Elks, Allegheny Lodge, No. 
339; Knights of Pythias, Waverly Lodge, No. 145, and 
to the social order of the Moose. 

EOBEET HORNER ROBINSON, an extensive real 
estate and insurance dealer, who has been a life-long 
resident of Monongahela City, Pa., was born here Novem- 
ber 22, 1869, and is a son of William T. and Margaret 
(Brown) Robinson. 

William T. Robinson was born and reared in Colum- 
biana County, Ohio, and in 1852 came to Monongahela 
City with his father, Robert Robinson, who was a cattle 
dealer, and had become famUiar with this section of the 
country through that business, and he later obtained a 
contract on the construction work on the B. & 0. Rail- 
road in the Monongahela Valley and in Virginia, through 
his knowledge of this part of the country. Robert Rob- 
inson was the father of four children: William T., the 
father of our subject; Joseph; Samuel, deceased; and 
Lon. After locating at Monongahela City, William T. 
Robinson became a bookkeeper for the Culbertsons, who 
operated a general store and paper mill here, after which 
he embarked in the clothing business, in which he con- 
tinued several years, then with his brother Samuel, who 
was an expert cattleman, engaged in the meat and cat- 
tle business, shipping extensively to Pittsburg, and con- 
tinued in this business untU the time of his death. May 
30, 1891, at the age of 57 years. He married Margaret 
Brown, who survived him five years, and who at an early 
age came from Allegheny, Pa., to Monongahela City, with 
her father, William Brown, who built and operated the 
first saw and planing mill in Monongahela City. Six 
children were born to the parents of our subject: Ella, 
who is the wife of W. F. Story, of Cleveland, Ohio; 
Jennie, is the wife 'of C. A. Filson, of Wilkensburg, Pa.; 
William B., a resident of Sewickley, Pa.; Robert H., 
our subject; Albert K., a resident of Wilkensburg, Pa.; 



Mabel, who is the wife of H. C. Williams, of WUkens- 
burg. 

Robert H. Robinson was reared at Monongahela City, 
where he obtained his education in the common schools 
and later engaged in the meat business with his father, 
after which he operated a store across the river for the 
Watson Mining and Manufacturing Company for about 
six years, then opened and operated a store at Bunola 
for three years, and in 1897, at the time of the boom of 
coal lands in this section, went to Pittsburg, where he 
engaged in the real estate business for one year, during 
which time he closed several large contracts, thus gain- 
ing his start in the real estate business. He then re- 
turned to Washington County and took charge of the Star 
Coal Company for the Harbison Walker Refectory Com- 
pany, for whom he had purchased land while in Pitts- 
burg, and was sent by them to open their mine, of which 
he is still superintendent. Mr. Robinson is a director 
and was one of the organizers of the Monongahela Clay 
Manufacturing Company, and was one of the organizers 
and the first president of the Citizens' Gas Company. 
He is a Democrat in politics and has served three years 
as a member of the Monongahela City council, and in 
fraternal circles is affiliated with the B. P. O. E. of this 
city. 

In June, 1901, Mr. Robinson was married to Maude 
Heslep, who is a daughter of John Heslep, and they have 
two sons, Robert and John. 

ISAAC W. BAUM, solicitor for Washington County 
and a lawyer of high standing, with offices in the Wash- 
ington Trust building, has been a resident of Washing- 
ton for the past fifteen years. 

Mr. Baum was born in Dauphin County, Pa., in 1870, 
and received a good common school education in that 
county. In 1890, he registered for the study of law in 
the office of Judge Criswell, of Franklin, Pa., and in 
1894 was admitted to the bar of Franklin County, and 
in the following year he was admitted to the bar of 
Washington County, before which he has since practiced. 
He takes an active interest in political aifairs and is at 
present county solicitor under appointment of the county 
commissioners. He also is secretary of the McKeown 
Oil Company. 

In 1896, Mr. Baum was married to Miss Jane Best of 
Clarion County, Pa., and they reside in a comfortable 
home in Washington. Fraternally he belongs to the Elks. 

ALEXANDER G. ADAMS, one of the representative 
citizens and successful farmers of Independence Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., is carrying on agricultural 
operations on a property which was originally owned by 
his grandfather, John Adams, and which has been in the 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



651 



I'amily name fur more than 100 years. Mr. Adams was 
horn March 27, 1863, on the farm on which he now lives, 
and is a son of Alexander H. and Lucinda J. (Crouch) 
Adams. 

Alexander H. Adams, who was a farmer all his life 
in Independence Township, for many years was an elder 
in the Lower Buffalo Presbyterian Church, and took a 
great interest in its work. He and his worthy wife were 
the parents of the following children: Caroline, the 
wife of Oeorgo Keenan; Kuth, residing with her brother; 
Maria, the wife of Thoma.s McCarthy, of Independence 
Township; Orlinda, living in Washington, Pa.; Martha, 
the wife of John Adams, of Independence Township; 
Lulu, the wife of Henry F. Garl, of Independence Town- 
ship; Mary, wife of Norris McCain, of Missouri; and 
Alexander G. 

After attending the common schools of Independence 
Township, Alexander G. Adams went to work on the 
home farm, on which he has resided all of his life. He has 
always been engaged in agricultural pursuits, and his 
123-acre farm has been brought to a high .state of cul- 
tivation. He is a Republican in his political views, and 
is now serving his township as road supervisor. The 
family belongs to Lower Buffalo Presbyterian Church. 

In 1889 Mr. Adams was married to Hattie J. Keenan, 
daughter of George and Annie (Tilton) Keenan, and to 
this union there have been born six children, namely: 
William Paul, born June 27, 1891; Jane Mary, born 
March 26, 1895; Laura B., born March 8, 1899; John A., 
born May 14, 1901; Martha M., born October 21, 1904; 
and Orlando C, born October 7, 1909. 

WILLIAM H. DUNLAP, burgess of Canonsburg, 
whose handsome home is situated at No. 124 West Cel- 
lege street, is a worthy representative of an old family 
of Washington County, of Irish extraction. 

He was born in Cecil Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
May 15, 1855, and is a son of John and Priscilla (Point- 
er) Dunlap, the former of whom died in 1902, aged 
seventy-six years. The latter, at the same age, is a resi- 
dent of Canonsburg. 

William H. Dunlap grew to manhood in Cecil Town- 
ship and was educated in the public schools and Jeffer- 
son Academy. After leaving school he engaged in farm 
work and continued to live in Allegheny County for six 
years after his marriage. In 1886 he came to Canons- 
burg and embarked in the retail grocery business and 
conducted the same very successfully for six years. The 
confinement, however, told on his health and for a time 
he put aside business cares, accepting about the same 
time a position on the school board in the East Ward, 
to which he gave attention for twelve years. He then 
changed his residence to another ward and resigned from 
the board, of which he had been a valued member. On 



March 3, 1909, he entered into oUice as burgeas of Can- 
onsburg, having been elected on a platform calling for 
the enforcement of the law, and his administration 
promises to be all that the most ardent and zealous citi- 
zen can ask. Since coming to this borou'gh, Mr. Dunlap 
has been very active in the affairs of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, being a trustee, a member of the of- 
ficial board and superintendent of the Sunday school. 

On December 25, 1878, Mr. Duulap was married to Miss 
Sadie McCounell, a daughter of Charles and Annie (Mor- 
row) McConnell. They have one daughter, Mamie, who 
is the wife of John W. Schaufele, who is in the employ 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, traveling daily 
between Pittsburg and Canonsburg. 

JAMES W. GRIMES, a well known and popular em- 
ploye of the National Bank of Claysville, at Claysville, 
Pa., has been identified with the institution since Janu- 
ary, 1903. He was born in Ohio County, W. Va., Octo- 
ber 2, 1867, and is a son of John and Martha (Post) 
Grimes. 

John Grimes, father of James W., was born in Done- 
gal Township, Washington County, on the old family 
estate, and was a son of John Grimes, the latter of whom 
settled at an early date in Donegal Township, three miles 
north of Claysville. He acquired about 500 acres of land 
and 127 of this yet belongs to the Grimes family. Both 
father and grandfather were farmers. The former died 
.January 14, 1908. He was a worthy member of the 
United Presbyterian Church. 

James W. Grimes was mainly reared on the family 
farm in Donegal Township. He was educated in a pri- 
vate school in Donegal Township, the Normal School at 
Claysville and the West Middletown Academy, and after- 
ward for several years he taught school in Washington 
County. He has been an active and useful citizen of 
Claysville, serving in the borough council and also as a 
director in the Independent school district and for a sea- 
son was secretary of the board. In politics he is identi- 
fied with the Republican party. 

Mr. Grimes was married to Miss Elizabeth Hayburn, 
a daughter of James Hayburn, formerly a well known 
resident of Donegal Towmship, and they have two chil- 
dren: John L. and Margaret R. Mr. Grimes and wife 
are members of the United Presbyterian Church at Clays- 
ville, of which he is treasurer. 

T. H. W. FERGUS, assistant district attorney of 
Washington County, Pa., and a leading member of its 
bar, has been a resident of Washington Borough for 
some twenty-one years. He was bora in 1879, in South 
Strabane Township, Washington Co., Pa., and is a son of 
Samuel P. and a grandson of Thomas Fergus. 

The Fergus family originated in Ireland but has been 
in .\m(>rica for many generations and in Washington 



652 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



County since 1802, established liere by the great-graud- 
pai'ents of T. H. W. Fergus, who came from Hunting- 
don County when their son Thomas was a babe. The 
late Samuel P. Fergus, was born in Washington County 
in 1S40 and died in 1900. He engaged in farming until 
1885, when he was elected county treasurer of Washing- 
ton County and served in that office until his death. He 
was also interested in oil development in the county. 

T. H. W. Fergus attended the township schools until 
prepared for college and then entered Washington and 
Jefferson College, where he was graduated in the class 
of 1900. For about two years after leaving school he 
followed surveying, and then began to teach and for 
some years followed that profession, a part of the time 
in his alma mater, and for one year was principal of the 
Cross Creek Academy. During these years he read law 
by himself and then entered the office of Attorney J. M. 
MeBurney, where he completed his preparation for the 
bar and was admitted to practice, in 1904, in all the 
courts of the State. He is a leading Eepublican and 
for two j'ears served on the Eepublican County Committee 
being its chainnan for one year. He has filled local of- 
fices very acceptably to the public, was auditor of East 
Washington Borough and is now assistant district at- 
torney. 

Mr. Fergus is a member of the Heptasophs, the Elks 
and the Bassett Club, being one of the organizers of the 
latter. He belongs also to the Washington County Bar 
Association. For many years Mr. Fergus has been a 
member of the Second United Presbyterian Church and 
has served as an officer in the Sabbath school. He has a 
wide circle of friends; professional, political and per- 
sonal. 

K. C. VANCE, general farmer, who owns 134 acres of 
excellent land, situated partly in Smith and partly in 
Cross Creek Township, was born in Cross Creek Township, 
Washington Co., Pa., on the place on which he resides, 
June 19, 1850. His parents were Allison and Margaret 
(Campbell) Vance. 

Allison Vance was born in Smith Township, Washing- 
ton County, but later resided in Cross Creek Township, 
where he had 160 acres of land, and he engaged in farm- 
ing until he was thirty-eight years old. He married Mar- 
garet Campbell, whose death preceded his own, he sur- 
viving until 1892. They were worthy members of the 
Cross Creek Presbyterian Church and they were buried 
in the Cross Creek Cemetery. They were parents of six 
sons and one daughter. 

R. C. Vance attended the public schools during boy- 
hood and then turned his attention to farming and rais- 
ing fine stock. Since his marriage he has resided on his 
present farm, which is situated one mile northeast of 
Cross Creek and within five miles of Burgettstown. He 



has done all of the improving that gives his farm so 
fine an appearance. He breeds Shorthorn cattle and a su- 
perior grade of sheep, having about 125 of the latter 
ready for market annually. Mr. Vance also enjoys the 
income from thirteen oil and gas wells situated on his 
property. 

In March, 1875, Mr. Vance was married to Miss Mary 
E. McGough, a daughter of John McGough, of Colum- 
biana County, Ohio, and they have four children, namely : 
Homer C, who married Miss Sarah B. McNelly; Martha 
J., who married J. W. Eeed; and Margaret Mary and 
Oscar C, both of whom reside at home. Mr. Vance and 
family attend the Cross Creek Presbyterian Church. Like 
his father, Mr. Vance is identified with the Eepublican 
party but is not active in political life. He is one of the 
substantial men of this section and is a stockholder in 
the Burgettstown National Bank and the Washington 
National Bank and also the Pittsburg Building and Loan 
Company. 

JOSEPH T. ALTON, an energetic young business 
man of McDonald, Pa., who is chief clerk and a pay- 
master of the McDonald division of the Pittsburg Coal 
Company, was born at Titusville, Pa., January 2, 1882, 
and is a son of Edward and Rose (Harrigan) Alton. 
His paternal grandparents were Joseph F. and Susan 
(Sison) Alton, and those on the maternal side, Thomas 
and Mary (0 'Shea) Harrigan. Mr. Alton 's great uncle, 
George D. Alton, was the first white boy born in what 
is now the city of Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Reared in a log cabin, after reaching maturity he 
made the brick and built the first brick house in Dun- 
kirk. This house was recently torn down to make room 
tor a more modern structure, and the bricks were car- 
ried away by residents of the city for relics. 

Edward Alton, who is a machinist by trade, is now 
living at McDonald, and of his children Joseph T. is 
the eldest, the others being: Mary, the wife of J. E. 
McDonald; Cassius E. and Clarence Daniel. 

Joseph T. Alton attended the public schools of 
McDonald, leaving high school in his senior year to enter 
the employ of the Pittsburg Coal Company. It was not 
long before his services to the company were rewarded 
by promotion, and he has risen steadily until he now 
holds the position of chief clerk and paymaster of the 
McDonald division, which consists of five mines. 

On September 4, 1907, Mr. Alton was married to 
Catherine Austin, daughter of M. J. and Mary (Mc- 
Nerney) Austin, residents of McDonald. Mrs. Alton has 
a brother, William J., and a sister, Nellie. One child 
has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Alton: George G., June 
28, 1908. 

Mr. Alton is fraternally connected with Chart icrs 
Council, No. 875, Knights of Columbus, and the Maec:i- 



IIISI'OKV OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



655 



bfes at McUonaUI. He is a Kepiiblicaii in politics aiui 
lias served as auditor of McDonald. He and his wife at- 
tend the Catholic Church. 

.lOHN M. STOCKDATjE was for many years a resi- 
dent of Washington, Fa. He was born August 28, 1824, 
(111 tlie homestead in Morris Township, Greene County. 
Hi-, yiandfather, James Stockdale, came from the north 
• li Ireland to this country in 1787, expecting to return 
after seeing the new land of promise, but having ex- 
hausted his funds in traveling he determined to make 
enough money to pay his passage back home, the Fates, 
however, had decreed otherwise, before this was accom- 
plished he met Miss Weir, who afterwards became his 
wife and he gave up all thought of recrossing the fcas to 
his native land. This young couple established them- 
.selves in what was then Washington (now Greene) Coun- 
ty in 1790 and to them were born one son and three 
daughters. The mother died in 1823 aad the father died 
in 1840 at the age of eighty-six. 

Their son, William Stockdale, was born in 1792 on his 
father's farm where with the exception of a period of 
.■ervice in the War of 1812, he spent all the seventy-one 
tranquil years of his life and died there in 1863. His 
wife Hannah, a daughter of John McQuaide of Wash- 
ington Count}' died in 1873, being seventy-six years of 
age. They had seven children, James, John M., Eobcrt, 
Thomas E., Mary, Isabella and Sarah. He was a fairly 
prosperous man for his day and with the commendable 
family pride of an intelligent gentleman, he spared no 
pains in preparing his children to enter with credit upon 
the duties of life, he sent his sons and his daughters to 
pursue their studies in the neighboring schools and col- 
leges of Waynesburg, Washington and Canonsburg. 

John M. Stockdale wa.s the second child of William 
and Hannah Stockdale, his childhood was spent on the 
farm. He was prepared for college at Carmichael's 
academy and he graduated from Washington College in 
1849, immediately afterward entering the law office of 
Hon. T. M. T. McKennan and was admitted to the bar 
in 1852. The following year he became owner and editor 
of the Waynesburg "Messenger," the only Democratic 
newspaper in Greene County. In 1854 he was elected to 
the State Legislature and served two terms, then, being a 
victim of inflammatory rheumatism, he decided to go 
west, hoping to shake off this enemy to his well-being 
and it was during this search for health and recreation 
that he became connected with extensive busine.«s matters 
in Iowa. He located in Fort Dodge, a frontier town, 
which was fortified for protection against the Indians 
and in 1857 by appointment of President Buchanan ho 
became register of the government land oifice there. That 
year was a notable period in his early life, in April, he 



was nuirried to Pattie Clark, the beautiful daughter of 
Abner and Patty Evans Clark of Ten-Mile Valley, Pa. 
She was born June 22, 1833, on the farm where her 
mother and grandfather were born and which was "taken 
up ' ' as government land by her great-grandfather and has 
ever since belonged to some member of the family. She 
was one of eight children, "the family was prominent 
in the county and this home filled with these brothers 
and sisters was a center where was dispensed a large, 
lii'arty and wholesome hospitality". 

.\li-. Stockdale took his bride to his new home in the 
west where, as also in their later places of residence, her 
rare charm of manner, her ready wit which left no sting, 
lier gracious Christian character, won her a place in the 
hearts of an ever widening circle of friends. Mrs. Stock- 
dale survived her husband seven years and on May 28. 
1904, died in their home on East Wheeling street, Wash- 
ington, Pa., where their only child. Miss Elizabeth ('. 
Stockdale, now resides. 

In 1863, while j'et a resident of Fort Dodge, Mr. Stock- 
dale was nominated for the State Senate of Iowa, but 
declined the nomination. In 1864 he was an elector on 
the McClelland ticket. During his residence in Iowa he 
dealt extensively in real estate, having bought and sold 
more than 200,000 acres of land as the records show, but 
the Civil War so depressed land values throughout the 
West that for the time real estate became a hazardous 
invpstnient and in 186.5 he removed to Baltimore, Md., 
where he eugaged in ilie wholesale drug business as a 
member of the well known firm of Stockdale, Smith & 
Co. He also owned a petroleum oil refinery there until 
the Standard Oil Company by methods now well known 
crushed out all competition. 

In 1881 Mr. Stockdale and his family moved to Wash- 
ington, Pa., where for several years he published the 
' ' Review ' ' and ' ' Examiner. ' ' In 1884 he received the 
nomination for Congress on the Democratic ticket in the 
district which embraced Washington, Beaver and Law- 
rence counties. A year earlier be secured a State charter 
for the transportation and use of natural gas for light 
and heat, a company of enterprising citizens was or- 
ganized and the development of oil and gas in the im- 
mediate vicinity of Washington was the result. His 
activities along this line aided materially in the develop- 
ment of the resources and added largely to the pros- 
perity of the borough. 

His mind was well stored with knowledge, he had read 
widely and had great ability as an extemporaneous speak- 
er. He was honorable and hated injustice, he loved law 
and order and was an earnest champion of the people's 
rights. There were no neutral tints in his political colors 
he was ever an ardent Democrat, believing thoroughly in 
his party and its principles. He was a Christian and a 



656 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



member of the Presbyterian Church from early life. He 
enjoyed much success, he bore reverses with dignity and 
composure, he ' ' was equal to either fortune. ' ' 

He reth'ed from active life "as he felt the evening 
shadows coming on" and died September 17, 1897 at 
his home in Washington. 

DEMAS E. LINDLEY, cashier of the Farmers' and 
Miners' National Bank of Bentleyville, Pa., with which 
he has been identified since March 14, 1908, was born 
April 28, 1872, on a farm in South Franklin Township, 
Washington Co., Pa., a son of Benjamin Clifford and 
Miranda V. (Patterson) Lindley, both of whom are 
living in Washington County. The paternal grandfather 
of our subject was Cephas Lindley, and the maternal 
grandfather was Wilson Patterson of Franklin Township. 

Demas E. Lindley remained under the parental roof 
until nineteen years of age, attended the district schools 
of Franklin Township and took a private course with the 
Rev. Fisher, after which he took a business course at 
Washington, Pa. He first began his business career as a 
bookkeeper for Mr. Neff, a plumber of Washington, with 
whom he remained but two months, when he accepted a 
position with the First National Bank of Canonsburg, 
Pa., with which he was identified from April, 1892, until 
October, 1905, when he resigned because of ill health, 
and accepted a clerical position at the mines in West- 
moreland County, Pa. On March 14, 1908, he became 
cashier of the Farmers' and Miners' National Bank of 
Bentleyville, of which Joseph A. Herron, of Monongahela 
City, Pa., is president, and T. A. Hetherington, a farmer 
of Somerset Township, is vice-president. The directors 
of the bank are : J. A. Herron ; T. A. Hetherington ; 
Joseph Underwood, of Eoscoe, Pa.; W. F. Richardson, 
of Bentleyville, Pa. ; W. H. Murray, a farmer of Somer- 
set Township; J. E. Richardson, of Bentleyville; Julian 
Grable, of Fallowfield Township; W. H. Wilson, of 
Clover HOI; A. B. Richardson, of Somerset Township; 
and J. G. McCormaek, of Bentleyville. The bank was 
organized in the fall of 1906, after which the present 
building, a fine large three-story brick, was erected, and 
the bank was open for business March 14, 1908. 

Mr. Lindley married Blanch Ashbaugh, a daughter of 
William Ashbaugh, of Westmoreland County, Pa., and 
they have seven children : Loi-s, Zella, Freda, Clifford, 
Lloyd, John Willis, and Gladys. Mr. Lindley afiSUates 
with the Elks and the Eagles. 

CHARLES E. PHILLIPS, a member of the Wash- 
ington bar, was born in 1871, at California, Washington 
Co.. Pa., and is a son of David Phillips, a native of 
Fayette County, who has been a resident of Washington 
County for a half century. 

Charles E. Phillips was reared in his native place and 



attended first the public .schools and later the State Nor- 
mal School at California. From this institution he was 
graduated in the class of 1890. Although thoroughly 
qualified for teaching, Mr. PhilUps then turned his at- 
tention to law, entering the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he graduated 
in the class of 1895. He then was interested for several 
years in real estate dealings, but in 1904 was admitted 
to the bar and has ben engaged in law practice at Wash- 
ington ever since, maintaining his ofEce at No. 46 South 
Main street, but retaining his home at California. The 
Washington bar is distinguished for its number of bril- 
liant young men. 

Mr. PhUlips is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. In polities he is a Republican and fraternally 
he is a Mason. 

GEORGE D. SCOTT, one of Hopewell Township's 
representative citizens who carries on agricultural oper- 
ations on a valuable farm of 113 acres, was born in 
Nottingham Township, Washington County, Pa., Nov. 
29, 1869. His parents were J. Finley and Margaret 
(Davis) Scott. Mr. Scott has two sisters: Mary, who 
is the wife of L. J. Brownlee; and Anna M., who is the 
wife of Louis Liggett and lives in Ohio. 

George D. Scott was about 8 years old when his 
parents moved on a farm in Canton Township and there 
he was mainly reared. He attended the public schools 
and spent two terms at the old Buffalo Academy. He 
remained with his father on the farm until after his 
marriage in 1898, after which he rented farms until 
1901, in Canton Township, when they moved to Hope- 
well Township. In 1904, after the death of Mrs. Scott's 
father, they came into possession of this place, which 
they had rented for three years. This farm was the 
land taken up by William Smiley at the time of his 
arrival here, and has been in possession of some one 
of his descendants ever since. Mr. Scott makes a spe- 
cialty of boarding horses for their owners in Washing- 
ton, and usually has from 25 to 30 head all through the 
winter. He is recognized as an excellent business man 
and is a very successful farmer. 

Mr. Scott was married March 10, 1898, to Miss Alchie 
Hamilton, who is a daughter of the late Robert and 
Mary H. (Anderson) Hamilton, formerly one of Hope- 
well Township's most respected and best known people. 
Mr. and Mrs. Scott are valued members of the Upper 
Buffalo Presbyterian Church and take an active part 
in its various branches of work. Formerly Mr. Scott 
was one of the church trustees, while Mrs. Scott has 
long been a member of the missionary society. In his 
political views, Mr. Scott is a Republican, but he has 
always declined to serve in any public ofSce. 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



657 



CHARLES C. JOUNSON, president of the Citizens 
Trust Company of Canousbiirg, is well known in finan- 
cial circles, having been identified with the banking 
business ever since leaving college. He was born in 
Chartiers Township, Washington County, Pa., Nov. 17, 
1872, and is a son of .J. Bradford and Jennie (Crothers) 
Johnson. 

Mr. Johnson belongs to old county families. His 
paternal grandparents were John and Kcbeeea (Van 
Eman) Johnson, old residents of Washington County, 
who died in Canonsburg. They had three sons: Eichard 
v., J. Bradford and John G. The maternal grand- 
parents were Samuel and Jane (Brownlee) Crothers, 
and they had the following children: William B., de- 
ceased; Robert W., residing at Taylorstown, Pa.; Lea- 
men M., deceased; Mira, deceased, formerly the wife 
of W. W. MeClay ; Jennie ; Elizabeth, deceased ; and 
Ella, wife of E. M. Dorrance, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

J. Bradford Johnson, now an esteemed resident of 
Canonsburg, was born in Chartiers Township, Washing- 
ton County, in 1842. Until 1899 he lived on his farm 
in Chartiers Township, removing then to Canonsburg, 
where be has since been retired and is a director of the 
Citizens Trust Company. He married Jennie Crothers, 
who died in 1897, aged 57 years. They had the follow- 
ing children: Ella Maud, who married Eev. Charles G. 
Williams, who is pastor of the Hyde Park Presbyterian 
Church of Denver, Col.; John Tracy, who manages the 
home farm; and Charles C. 

Charles C. Johnson was educated in the township 
schools, Jefferson Academy and Washington and Jeffer- 
son CoDege, graduating from the latter with the class 
of 1893. During his college course he was a member of 
the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. Immediately after 
leaving college he was made assistant cashier of the 
Citizens Bank, limited, and in 1895 he became cashier 
and continued to fill that office until the Citizens Trust 
Company was organized, in 1901, when he became sec- 
retary and treasurer of this company and continued as 
such until July 1, 1909, when he became president. Mr. 
Johnson is a young man to fill so important a position 
and that he has been placed at the head, indicates the 
great confidence felt in his judgment and executive 
ability. 

The Citizens Trust Company of Canonsburg was or- 
ganized May 1, 1901, taking over ftie business of the 
Citizens Bank, limited, a private bank which had been 
in existence for ten years. The Citizens Trust Company 
building is a fine four-story pressed brick structm'e, 
which was erected in 1904, the lot and building together 
costing $90,000. The interior of the bank is of birch 
wood and mahogany finish and the rest of the building 
is finished in oak. The dimensions are 70x80 feet. The 
upper floors have been fitted up as residence flats, while 



on the lower floors, in addition to the bank proper are 
directors' and officers' rooms, vault and all modern fix- 
tures to ensure comfort, convenience and safety. The 
institution has been more than successful, paying 6 per 
cent annual interest. The management has been prac- 
tically the same since its organization. 

On June 20, 1903, Mr. Johnson was married to Miss 
Grace Moreland Henderson, a daughter of John M. and 
Anna (Gary) Henderson, and a direct descendant of 
Eev. Dr. Mathcw Henderson, who was the first pastor 
of the Upper Buffalo Church. Mrs. Johnson is a grad- 
uate of the College for Women, Cleveland. She also 
spent some years in school in Germany and Switzerland. 
They are members of the Central Presbyterian Church 
of Canonsburg, of which Mr. Johnson is treasurer. 

JOHN S. HOLMES, one of Donegal Township's well 
known and highly respected citizens, who has been en- 
gaged in farming and stock raising ever since he 
reached man's estate, was born in Donegal Township, 
Washington County, Pa., July 31, 1849, and is a son of 
George Y. and Elizabeth (Snodgrass)) Holmes. 

George Y. Holmes was born in the city of Glasgow, 
Scotland. His parents were William and Nancy E. 
Holmes, whom he accompanied to America when he was 
about 10 years old. The family came directly to Wash- 
ington County and settled a short distance from Clays- 
ville, in Donegal Township. George Y. Holmes grew 
to useful manhood here and in the course of years be- 
came a man of prominence in the community. He 
filled many public offices with credit, was long a school 
director and also a justice of the peace, and on one 
occasion was the candidate of the Republican party for 
the office of county commissioner. He was a leading 
member of the Baptist Church at Claysville and was 
also a local preacher in this body. His death occurred 
in 1903, having survived his wife for many years. Her 
maiden name was Elizabeth Snodgrass and she was born 
in Donegal Township and was a daughter of John Snod- 
grass and a granddaughter of William Snodgrass, one 
of the pioneer settlers. To George Y. and Elizabeth 
Holmes the following children were born: William, who 
lives at Washington, Pa. ; John 8., who resides in Don- 
egal Township; Nannie E., who is the wife of Charles 
W. Miller, of Claysville; George Y., his father's name- 
sake, who lives at Claysville, Pa.; Mary M., who is the 
wife of Samuel Kelley, of Buffalo Township ; Margaret, 
who lives at Claysville; Robert R., who lives at Mc- 
Donald, Pa. ; Florence, who is the wife of Wiley Reaney, 
lives at Claysville. 

John S. Holmes attended the district schools in Done- 
gal Township, in his boyhood, and afterward passed his 
youth in helping his father on the home farm. He owns 
a valuable tract of 64 acres, which he has well stocked 



658 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



and under au excellent state of cultivation. His sur- 
roundings indicate thrift and substantial comfort. 

On Jan. 1, 1873, Mr. Holmes was married to Miss 
Margaret C. Miller, who was born in Donegal Township, 
July 9, 1S49, and is a daughter of Christopher and 
Sarah J. (Knight) Miller, and a granddaughter of John 
Miller, who was one of Donegal Township 's early set- 
tlers. The mother of Mrs. Holmes was born in Vir- 
ginia. Of the children born to Christopher Holmes and 
wife, the following survive: Calvin L. and Mary J., both 
of whom live in Donegal Township; George H., who 
is a resident of McDonald; Charles W., who lives at 
Claysville; Margaret C, who is Mrs. Holmes; and 
Frances E., who is the widow of Eobert B. Eamage, re- 
sides on her farm in Donegal Township. Christopher 
Miller and wife were people of sterling worth, consistent 
members of the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Holmes have one daughter, Sarah E., 
who resides with her parents. They reared two boys, 
Andrew L. Chapman and William Eamage, both of 
whom have reflected credit on them and give them the 
filial affection of sons. Andrew L. Chapman, who is now 
a preacher in the Disciples Church, stationed at Boise, 
Idaho, served for three years in the missionary field in 
Turkey. William Bamage is engaged in farming in 
Donegal Township. Mr. and Mrs. Holmes are members 
of the Presbyterian Church at Claysville, and in Octo- 
ber, 1909, Mr. Holmes was sent as a representative of 
the Zion United Brethren Church of Donegal Township 
to the Pennsylvania State Convention, where various re- 
ligious bodies met and discussed questions affecting 
Christianity in general. As a broad-minded, clear- 
headed, intelligent man, possessing the confidence and 
esteem of all who know him, this selection of Mr. Holmes 
was a judicious one and he took part in the deliberations 
of this representative body. He casts his vote with the 
Republican party, but has never accepted any public 
office except that of school director and he is now serv- 
ing in his twelfth year as a member of the school board 
of Donegal Township. 

JAMES P. BROWNLEE, lawyer and merchant at 
Washington, Pa., and a prominent and useful citizen, 
was born in 1872, in North Strabane Township, Wash- 
ington County, Pa., and is a son of Milton .0. Brownlee 
and a grandson of Samuel T. Brownlee. 

The Brownlee family belongs to the pioneer class of 
Washington County. The grandfather, Samuel T. 
Brownlee, was born after his father settled in Washing- 
ton County. He left few descendants as he died when 
only 28 years of age. His son, Milton O., was born on 
the famUy estate in North Strabane Township, in 1849, 
where he continued to live and was extensively engaged 
in farming and the sheep industry until 1905, when he 



retired and moved to Washington, where he still resides. 

James P. Brownlee obtained his early education in 
the township schools and then entered Washington and 
Jefferson College, where he was graduated in the class 
of 1897. From there he went to Pittsburg and became 
a student in the Pittsburg Law School, but in his senior 
year suffered from an illness that made necessary the 
j)ostponement of his law studies. After he recovered 
from a rather severe siege of fever, he completed his 
law reading in the office of Attorney E. W. Irwin, and 
was admitted to the bar in March, 1901. He has ever 
since been engaged in the practice of his profession at 
Washington. In the fall of 1907 he formed a partner- 
ship with C. B. Penn, under the style of Penn & Brown- 
lee, in gents' furnishing goods, an enterprise which 
proved successful, and continued until February 1, 1910, 
when Mr. Penn retired, Mr. Brownlee continuing the 
furnishing business at No. 129 South Main street, where 
he is now located. He is also a stockholder in the Dunn 
& ConnellsviUe Coke Company. As a citizen he has 
been unusually active, lending the weight of his influ- 
ence to promote public prosperity. He has served as 
a member of the school board and from 1904 until 1906 
administered the law as a justice of the peace. 

Mr. Brownlee is a member of the First United Presby- 
terian Church and officiates as the librarian of the Sun- 
day-school. He is identified fraternally with the Elks 
and the Heptasophs. 

HON. HENEY EATON, justice of the peace at Mid- 
way, Pa., and for three consecutive years burgess of 
the borough, is a member of one of the oldest settled 
families of Washington County, doubtless of Dutch ex- 
traction on the father's side and Scotch-Irish on the 
mother 's side. One of the most prized relics is a Hol- 
land Bible, which was printed in 1570 and has been 
preserved with other family antiquities. Mr. Eaton was 
born in Smith Township, Washington County, Pa., Nov. 
6, 1848, and is a son of William and Sarah (Eussell) 
Eaton. 

Both parents of Mr. Eaton have passed away and 
their remains rest in the Raccoon Cemetery, they being 
valued members for many years of the Presbyterian 
Church at that point. William Eaton was a farmer 
throughout his active life. He was a consistent member 
of the old-time Democratic party. Five children were 
boi-n to William and Sarah Eaton, namely: Martha, who 
married Eobert Stevenson; Eaehel, now deceased, who 
was a public school teacher; Jane, deceased, who was 
the wife of E. J. Vogle; Henry; and Mary E., who 
died when aged 14 years. 

Henry Eaton attended the district schools in Smith 
and Robinson Townships and secured a teacher's certifi- 
cate, attended the Normal School at Carnegie for two 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDE.N FOUNDATIONS. 




IKLN. .lA-MES .S. STOCKINX; 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



661 



terms anil Oakdale Academy for two terms and secured 
a perniauent certificate. For many years he gave the 
larger part of his time and attention to teaching, carry- 
ing on his educational work both in Allegheny and Wash- 
ington Counties. In 1875 he came to Midway, where he 
and Mrs. Eaton successfully taught terms of .school and 
he also served for three years as principal of the Mc- 
Donald schools, Mrs. Eaton being first assistant. In 
politics he is a Democrat and on many occasions ha.s 
been shown the appreciation which his fellow citizens 
have felt for him, being elected to numerous offices of 
honor and responsibility, i'or three years ho was treas- 
urer of Robeson Township and for the same length of 
time a member of the township school board. For four 
years he had charge of the Black Diamond coal mine 
and .store belonging to his father-in-law, Thomas Tay- 
lor. After the exhausting and closing down of the Black 
Diamond mine he opened a general store of his own 
in Midway, Pa., which was a success in every particu- 
lar. After conducting his store for three years he was 
appointed postmaster during the late ex-President Cleve- 
land 's second administration. He then sold out his 
store, put in a new and expensive oflSce and gave to the 
department and patrons a service that was so satisfac- 
tory that at the close of his term he was asked to retain 
the oflSce. To this request he replied, "No, thank you, 
to the victor belong the spoils." For three years Mid- 
way found in him an able executive head and since then, 
and for the past 27 years, has been serving in the office 
of justice of the peace and has a real estate and insur- 
ance office. 

In January, 1882, Mr. Eaton was married to Miss 
Mattie E. Taylor, a daughter of Thomas Taylor and 
Sarah (Bailey) Taylor. Mrs. Eaton's brothers and sis- 
ters are: Eliza, who married Joseph Taylor; Joseph A.; 
Lilly A.; James M.; and Laura, who married Eobert 
Perry. Mr. and Mrs. Eaton have two children: Amy T. 
and Henry T. Amy has a good and lucrative position 
in the city of Pittsburg. Henry T. Eaton, after grad- 
uating from the common schools and the Pittsburg 
Academy, entered the University of Pittsburg and is 
now in his second year. Mr. Eaton is identified with 
Richard Vaux Lodge No. 454, F. & A. M., at Burgetts- 
town, Pa. 



stead at Amity, in 1828. He owned farming laud, but 
devoted his whole mature life to general contracing, in 
the line of building, and continued active in business 
until within one year of his death, when he retired to 
his farm. He married Sarah Moss, who was born in 
Washington County, in December, 1831, and still sur- 
vives, residing on her farm near Amity. They had 
three children, namely: Harvey, who oi)erates the home 
farm; Ella, who is now deceased; and Jennings Moss, 
the subject of this sketch. 

J. Moss McCollum was reared on the home place and 
was educated in a private academy at Amity, and then 
learned the carpenter trade, at which he worked until 
he was 24 years old. From boyhood he had displayed 
unusual ability in the line of his present work and 
in 1889 he gave himself up to the study of architecture 
and for 12 years remained with W. E. Ely, a well-known 
architect. He later moved his own office to Pittsburg 
and does business under the firm style of McCollum & 
Dowler. There are many fine structures at Washington 
and other points, of which he has been the architect. 
This city is somewhat noted for its fine schoolhouses 
and convent buildings, and Mr. McCollum was the de- 
signer and architect of almost all. He was the architect 
of the Washington Tru.st Company building, an example 
of taste and dignity in building that has excited uni- 
versal admiration. He also has to his credit the new 
First National Bank of Columbus, the Braddock Na- 
tional Bank of Braddock, Pa., a fine new hotel build- 
ing at Pittsburg, together with schools, churches and 
public buildings all over the country, the cost of which 
ran into hundreds of thousands of dollars. He has 
been able to combine stability and beauty, utility and 
dignity, and he has few superiors in Western Pennsyl- 
vania. 

In 1892, Mr. McCollum was married to Miss Nora 
Patterson, a daughter of Speer Patterson, of Wyland 
Station, Pa., and they have three daughters: Elinore, 
Mildred and Dorothy. The family belong to the Second 
Presbyterian Church. The beautiful family home is 
situated at No. 513 East Beau street. Mr. McCollum 
takes a good citizen's interest in civic matters and has 
served efficiently in the city council. He is a member 
of the Union Club of Pittsburg. 



J. MOSS McCOLLUM, architect, who has been a 
resident of Washington, Pa., for 24 years and is inter- 
ested in a number of the city's prospering enterprises, 
is a member of the prominent firm of McCollum & Dow- 
ler, with offices at Pittsburg. He was born at Amity, 
Washington County, Pa., in 1864, and is a son of Elias 
and Sarah (Moss) McCollum. 

Elias McCollum was born in the old McCollum home- 



HON. JAMES S. STOCKING, one of Washington 
County's most active and prominent citizens, who has 
been identified with public affairs and with business in- 
terests in this section of Pennsylvania ever since the 
Civil War, in which he rendered patriotic military service, 
was born at Wa.?hington, Pa., December 4, 1839, a son 
of Julius and Mary (Phillips) Stocking. Mr. Stocking 
(■nil hiiiist of both old Dutch niul "Mayflower" Pilgrim 



662 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTOlsr COUNTY 



ancestry. His paternal ancestors were from New York, 
and those on the maternal side came to Washington 
County from Massachusetts. 

Julius Stocking, the father of the subject of this 
sketch, was born near Auburn, N. Y., from which place 
he came in 1835 to Washington. Here, in the following 
year, he married Mary Phillips, whose father had set- 
tled in Washington County in ISOO. Three children were 
born of this union : Alfred, Mary and James Stevens. 
Julius Stocking subsequently moved to Eockport, Ind., 
where he died in 1870, aged 68 years. His widow sur- 
vived him for four years. 

James Stevens Stocking attended the local schools until 
he was about twelve years of age, after which, until he 
enlisted for seiTice in the Civil War, in 1861, he was 
variously employed and was entirely self-supporting. He 
responded to the first call of President Lincoln for troops, 
and after serving through his first enlistment of three 
months, in Co. E, 12th Pa. Vol. Inf., he re-enlisted and 
served two years and eight months in the 100th Pa. Vol. 
Inf., this being the noted "Roundhead" regiment. Again 
he re-enlisted, this time as a veteran, contracting to 
serve three years longer but the loss of his arm neces- 
sitated his discharge January 10, 186.5. Mr. Stocking 
not only gave four full years to the service of his country, 
but also his good left arm, which was left on the battle 
field at Hatcher's Eun, October 27, 1864. Prom the 
ranks Mr. Stocking had been continuously promoted for 
gallantry, and when he was mustered out it was with the 
rank of first lieutenant. 

Mr. Stocking returned to Washington and in 1871 he 
was appointed to the oflSee of United States store keeper. 
In the following year he received the unanimous nomina- 
tion at the Republican county convention, for county 
clerk, to which office he was easily elected, and in 1875 
he was re-elected to the oifice, with an increased majority. 
Later he turned his attention to journalism and from 
October 17, 1879, to October 17, 1882, he was one of the 
editors and proprietors of the "Washington Observer," 
owned by Stocking & Aeheson, during this period increas- 
ing its circulation and making it one of the strongest 
Republican organs of the State. HI health, resulting from 
the injuries received in the army, caused him to sell his 
newspaper interests. His fellow citizens manifested fur- 
ther their appreciation of his character and services by 
electing him, in the fall of 1888, to the State Legislature, 
and by re-electing him in 1890 to that position. 

In the following year he was made superintendent and 
assistant chief of the seed room in the seed division of 
the Agricultural Department, at Washington, D. C, a po- 
sition which came to him almost as a surprise, as he had 
never solicited it. The duties pertaining to this oiBce he 
satisfactorily performed as long as he retained it. 



In 1884, after his return to his native place, he em- 
barked in a real estate business, and shortly afterward 
he platted the beautiful addition to Washington known as 
Kalorama. In 1887, in association with B. F. Hassan, he 
platted and later disposed of another desirable addition. 
Woodland. He continued actively interested in realty, 
and in 1888, with James Kuntz, L. McCarrell and E. P. 
Aeheson, he platted the Weaver farm, naming this prop- 
erty West End. In the following year, the Shirles Grove 
property also came under their management and subse- 
quently they purchased from the Morgan estate a plat of 
ground which they platted under the name of the "Mor- 
gan Addition to East Washington." One of these addi- 
tions was so attractive and desirable that the time came 
when it was made into a separate borough, bringing into 
existence West Washington. Subsequently, in connection 
with John W. Donnan, James Kuntz, Jr., A. G. Happer, 
David Iseman, L. McCarrell, Thomas Allison and Dr. 
McCleary, the Gordan farm of 220 acres was purchased 
and platted, upon which some of the most prominent 
manufacturing plants in the vicinity of the borough are 
situated. This plant contained 1,500 lots, 1,100 of which 
have been disposed of to date. 

These additions offer a delightful location for home 
seekers and favorable opportunities for the establishing 
of business concerns. Mr. Stocking's name is indis- 
solubly connected with this prospering section of Wash- 
ington. He now mainly confines his energies to. attend- 
ing to the aifairs of the West End Land Company and 
the Gordan Land Company, being manager of the former 
and treasurer of the latter organization. 

Mr. Stocking was married (first) on January 4. 1866, 
to Mary Elizabeth Hallam, who died February 2, 1881. 
Three children were born of this marriage, Hugh, Harry 
and Maud. On March 17, 1S83, Mr. Stocking married 
for his second wife Miss Mary Josephine Robinson, of 
Coshocton, Ohio, whose death occurred September 2, 1907. 
She was a great-granddaughter of General Robinson, who 
acquired 3,000 acres of government land in the Mus- 
kingum Valley, Ohio. 

Mr. Stocking is quite a traveler, having been in nearly 
every state in the Union, also two provinces of Canada. 
He has been in every country in Europe with the ex- 
ception of four, and has also visited northern Africa and 
the Holy Land. In 1909 he was a member of the Clark 
excursion party, which made a trip around the world, 
visiting all prominent foreign countries. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON, a prominent citizen and 
successful agriculturist of Hopewell Township, resides 
on his very valuable farm of 230 acres, on which he was 
born, in September, 1863, and is a son of Robert and 
Mary (Anderson) Hamilton. Mr. Hamilton is the eldest 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



663 



of three eliildren, the others beiug: Benjamin and Mary, 
the latter of whom is the wife of George D. Scott, re- 
siding in Hopewell Township, Washington County, Pa. 

Robert Hamilton, the great-grandfather of Alexander, 
came from Ireland and located in Canton Township, 
Washington County. His son, Alexander Hamilton, 
grandfather of the present Alexander, came to the farm 
which the latter owns, in Hopewell Township, and lived 
here until his death. He married a member of the old 
Smiley family. The second Eobert Hamilton, father 
of our subject, lived on this farm until within a few 
years of his death, which occurred in Buffalo. 

Alexander Hamilton attended the public schools with 
more or less regularity until he was 20 years of age and 
then turned his full attention to farming and stock 
raising. He carries on his work in a scientific manner 
and along modern lines. He raises a large amount of 
registered stock, having Aberdeen Angus cattle and 
thoroughbred Duroc hogs. Before they are marketed, 
his cattle and stock present so beautiful a picture as 
they are browsing or feeding in the rich pastures where 
they have been raised, that no painting of a rural scene 
hanging in any celebrated gallery can compare with this 
bit of Nature. Mr. Hamilton has productive fields and 
abundant orchards and is' justly numbered with Hope- 
well Township's substantial and prosperous citizens. In 
1893 he was married to Miss Urania B. Taggart, a 
daughter of James and Margaret Taggart, residents of 
Canton Township, Washington County. They have six 
children: John A., Robert, Mary M., Fannie, Florence 
G. and James T. They all are in school and will be given 
the best of educational advantages. Mr. Hamilton and 
family are members of the Presbyterian Church in 
which he is a trustee. In politics he is a stanch Eepub- 
lican and at different times has held township offices. 
He is general manager and one of the board of directors 
of the Buffalo Telephone Company. 

WILLIAM H. RICHARDS, who, for the past five 
years has been in charge of the Standard Tin Plate 
Company, of Canonsburg, Pa., as general manager, is 
a man thoroughly experienced in this line of business 
and is well qualified also for executive work. He was 
born in Staffordshire, England, Mar. 16, 1858, and is a 
son of William and Sarah (Sheldon) Richards. On the 
paternal side he is of Welsh extraction and on the ma- 
ternal, of English ancestry. 

Mr. Richards came to America in April, 1873, when 
1.5 years old, and had then been a worker in the steel 
and tin plate mills for four years. He secured employ- 
ment at Leechburg, Armstrong County, Pa., and re- 
mained there for three years, going then to the mills 
at McKeesport, where he worked until 1879, when he 
came to Canonsburg. Here he engaged in the sheet 



iron business as assistant superintendent and roller. 
In 1902 he went to New Kensington, where he was put 
in charge of the erection of the Goldsmith and Lone- 
berg Tin Plate Company plant and had charge of the 
same, and was also in the employ of the American Tin 
Plate Company and remained at New Kensington for 
ten years, when he was transferred to the Demler plant 
of the American Sheet and Tin Plate Company, at Mc- 
Keesport, as general superintendent. He remained there 
until he came to Canonsburg again, in order to take 
charge of the Standard Tin Plato Company as manager. 
He is a stockholder in this enterprise, which is the 
largest concern in the line of manufacturing, at Canons- 
burg. The business is one of great importance and the 
payroll is the largest in the city. 

The Standard Tin Plate Company of Canonsburg was 
organized in 1892, with local capital, the capital stock 
being originally .$300,000. In 1908 the majority of the 
stock was transferred to the Standard Tiu Plate Com- 
pany. Since the erection of the plant in 1892 it has been 
enlarged and now covers 20 acres and is modern in every 
particular. It has on its payrolls 800 employes and 
makes a specialty of the manufacturing of black plate 
and tin plates. W. H. Richards is the general manager, 
and Louis FoUett is secretary. 

In August, 1878, Mr. Richards was married to Miss 
Annie Lewis, a daughter of Mark and Sarah Lewis, then 
of McKeesport, but a native of Wales. Mr. and Mrs. 
Richards have four children, namely: W. B., who is 
employed in the Standard Tin Plate Works as a roller, 
married Miss Lulu Pollard, of Canonsburg; Mark James, 
who is also identified with the Tin Plate Works in an 
ofiicial position, married Miss Mollie Williams; and 
Bertha May and Roy W., the latter being yet a student. 
The family home fs situated on Pike street, Canons- 
burg. In politics, Mr. Richards is a Republican and 
has always taken an intelligent interest in the political 
affairs particularly relating to his place of residence, 
served several terms on the Council in Canonsburg, and 
while living at New Kensington, served as a member of 
the town Council. He belongs to Canonsburg Lodge No. 
297, F. & A. M. ; to the Elks, at New Kensington, and 
to the Royal Arcanum at Canonsburg. In his ofiicial 
position, Mr. Richards enjoys deserved popularity with 
his great army of employes. While a strict disciplinarian, 
he is a man who can recognize merit wherever he sees 
it and possesses the tact, judgment and discretion which 
must be the qualities a successful manager of men must 
have. 

.\BEL M. EVANS was a lifelong resident of Aniwell 
Township. His father, Joseph Evans, was an early and 
H-ell know-n settlor and was one of the founders and an 
elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in this 



IKii 



HISTOEY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



section. Abel M. Evans was an extensive farmer and 
besides being a man of ample fortune, was also a leader 
in all matters eoneerning the general welfare of his 
community. He served for many years as justice of 
the peace and as an administrator of estates. He was 
also county commissioner for one term. The Evans 
family has always been attached to the Presbyterian 
faith and Abel M. Evans was one of the elders of the 
church of that denomination at Ten-MUe. He married 
Elma Baker, a member of a prominent family of the 
county, and six of their children now survive, namely: 
Nathan B., residing at Ten-Mile, this county; Elizabeth 
S., wife of A. B. Sampson, of Washington; Lucinda J., 
widow of John T. Reynolds, residing at Ten-Mile; E. 
Baker, living at Washington, D. C. ; Victorine C, wife 
of James E. Wood, of Waynesburg; and William M., 
of Ten-Mile. 

Nathan B. Evans was born near Baker's Station, in 
Amwell Township, Aug. 21, 1843, and removed with his 
parents to Ten-Mile in 1857 and was educated in the 
local schools. On Aug. 22, 1862, he enlisted for service 
in the Civil War, entering Co. D, 140th Pa. Vol. Inf., 
2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was honor- 
ably discharged from the service in June, 1865. He 
was six months a prisoner after the second day of the 
Gettysburg battle. He then returned to his parental 
home on Ten-Mile and to the farm which has been his 
home ever since. 

Mr. Evans has always taken a deep interest in edu- 
cational matters, has long served on the township school 
board and has been its president. He is president also 
of the board of trustees of Waynesburg College. He 
is an elder in the Ten-Mile Presbyterian Church and has 
also been active in Sunday-school work, for years serv- 
ing as superintendent of that school. He is a member 
of Philo Paul Post, G. A. E., of Amity. This Post has 
become almost extinct because of the death or removal 
of members, nearly all of whom went into the Civil War 
from the Amity neighborhood. 

RANSOM M. DAY, a contract driller and one of the 
representative business men of Washington, was born 
in 1S70 in Amwell Township, Washington County, Pa., 
and is a son of Stephen B. Day, a prominent citizen of 
Washington County. 

E. M. Day was reared in Amwell Township, where he 
attended the common schools, afterwards taking a 
course at Duquesne College, and later graduating with 
the class of 1891 from the State Normal School at 
California, Pa. He then taught school for four years, 
after which he spent. live years in Pittsburg as assistant 
superintendent of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Com- 
pany, since which time he has been engaged in contract 
drilling for different coal companies in Western Penn- 



sylvania, and is at present drilling in Guernsey County, 
Ohio, for the Cambridge Collieries Company. Mr. Day 
is a stockholder in various enterprises of this locality, 
and is one of the public spirited and enterprising men 
of Washington. 

In 1892, Mr. Day was joined in marriage with Minnie 
Chambers, who comes of one of the old established 
famUies of Washington County, and is a daughter of 
John Chambers of Amwell Township. Three children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Day: Earl C, Clark 
E. and Harold R. Mr. Day is a member of the First 
Christian Church. 

' A. M. ARMOR, a retired farmer of Hanover Town- 
ship, residing at Burgettstown, owns very valuable farm- 
ing lands in Washington County, consisting of two farms 
aggregating 165 acres, which are situated in Hanover 
Township. He was born in that township Oct. 30, 1833, 
and is a son of James and Nancy (McCandless) Armor. 

The grandfather of Mr. Armor was the first of the 
family to come to Washington County and he entered 
400 acres of land for himself and 400 acres for a 
brother. His son, James Armor, was born in Hanover 
Township and resided on the same farm until his death, 
that being the land secured by his father, Thomas 
Armor. It is now divided into three portions, 141, 165 
and 138 acres each, aU owned by three sons of James 
Armor and all adjoining. James Armor was a leading 
citizen of Hanover Township and served in many public 
capacities. He was a Democrat and on the Democratic 
ticket was elected township assessor and road super- 
visor, the duties of which he performed with the greatest 
care, honesty and faithfulness. He was an elder in the 
Presbyterian Church. He was twice married, (first) to 
Margaret Wilson, who, at death left four children: 
John, Thomas, Margaret Ann and an infant. Her 
burial was in the Florence Cemetery. His second mar- 
riage was to Nancy McCandless, a daughter of Alex- 
ander McCandless, and they had five children, namely: 
A. M., James E., William S., Jennie and George P. 

A. M. Armor attended the schools of Hanover Town- 
ship when he was young and then commenced to help 
his father on the farm and has owned land ever since 
he reached man's estate. His farms in Hanover Town- 
ship are well improved and he put up all the buildings 
now standing. He has almost all of the land free of 
timber, having cleared 45 acres himself. There may be 
coal deposits, but he has never experimented for them, 
but he has eight oil and gas wells that are of value. 
During the whole of his active life he carried on general 
farming. 

Mr. Armor was married (first) Oct. 26, 1865, to Ann 
Maria Moreland, a daughter of John Moreland, who 
died Mar. 17, 1880. Her burial was in the Hopewell 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



665 



(cmi'li'iy, lie was niarried (seeoud) to Mrs. Kebocca 
A. Mc'Chiskey, who dicil May 22, 1908. >io children 
wero boru to either marriage, but his second wife had 
one daughter, Mary W., by her first marriage, who re- 
sides with Mr. Armor. Both wives were most estimable 
women. Mr. Armor is a member and an elder in the 
First Presbyterian Church of Burgettstowu and before 
leaving his farm was an elder in the Hebron Church. 
In politics he is a Democrat and served three terms as 
assessor of Hanover Township and many terms as a 
school director. He is a stockholder in the Burgettstown 
National Bank. The Armor family is one of the old 
and substantial ones of the county and its men have 
been noted for their usefulness to their communities 
and for their general good citizenship. 

DAVID R. McNARY, one of the most highly esteemed 
and respected citizens of Robeson Township, who, for 23 
years has been a valued resident of McDonald, where 
he now lives retired, was born on his father 's farm in 
Cecil Township, Washington County, Pa., where East 
Canonsburg is now located, Mar. 27, 1831. His parents 
were Joseph and Elizabeth (Van Volkenburg) McNary. 

The parents of Mr. McNary are both deceased. The 
father was twice married, nine children being born to 
the first union and six to his marriage with Elizabeth 
Van Volkenburg. Of the latter family, David B. Mc- 
Nary was the second in order of birth, the others being: 
Elizabeth, who is now deceased, was the wife of James 
Templeton ; William M. ; Levinia, who married John 
Wesby ; George ; Sarah, who married Milberry Douglass ; 
and Nancy, who married Alexander McCloy. 

David R. McNary remained on the home farm until 
he was 21 years of age. He first attended the Oram 
school in Chartiers Township, when his teacher was John 
Curry, who afterwards established Curry Institute at 
Pittsburg. After leaving home, Mr. McNary attended 
this institute conducted by his old preceptor and then 
took a three-year scientific course at Jefferson College. 
Later he attended two terms at the State Normal School 
at Millersville, coming under the direct instruction of 
Prof. J. P. Wickersham, who not only organized that 
school, but who became the first state superintendent by 
executive appointment. Subsequently, Mr. McNary grad- 
uated from Duff's Commercial College at Pittsburg, and 
for several years was engaged successfully as a school 
teacher and during 1858-59 was postmaster at Munn- 
town. 

During the Civil War, Mr. McNary was employed in 
the building of government boats at the works at Soho, 
Pittsburg, and assisted in the construction of the 
Maneyunk and the Umque, used on the southern Missis- 
sippi River. He also served for eight years as freight 
agent on the Panhandle Railroad, at Sturgeon, a station 



llii'ii called Willow Urove. I'ur sonu^ years he has been 
devoting the larger i>art of his time to looking after 
valuable realty that he owns at McDonald. 

On Oct. 4, 1859, Mr. McNary was married by the 
Rev. James Sloan, then pastor of the Pigeon Creek 
Presbyterian Church, to Miss Mary A. Munn, who was 
born at Munntown, Pa., Mar. 8, 1839. This town was 
named for hev grandfather, Samuel Munn, who was a 
large land owner, posseasing several entire sections. 
The burden of paying taxes, however, was so great, that 
he traded one section of land for one ewe lamb, and it 
is thought probable that this was the first Merino sheep 
introduced here, the beginning of an industry that has 
made Washington County one of the greatest sheep 
growing counties in the United States. Her parents 
were John and Louisa (McDonald) Munn. She has one 
brother, Samuel A., and one sister, Matilda. To Mr. 
and Mrs. McNary the following children were born: 
Ida Mary, who is the wife of Thomas Grant, of Sheri- 
den. Pa. ; Elizabeth Ora, who is the wife of Stewart C. 
Gailey, of Columbus, Ohio; John and S. A., both resid- 
ing at Sheridan ; and Clara, who resides at home. Mr. 
and Mrs. McNary have but recently celebrated the oOtb 
anniversary of their wedding and the pleasure of the 
occasion was dimmed by no absent faces, all the children 
of the family being living, together with 13 grandchil- 
dren and one great-grandchild. More than usual in- 
terest was shown in this celebration on account of the 
prominence of the participants. Kindred came from 
far and near, while friends and neighbors manifested 
a desire to participate in the festivities and to take the 
opportunity of showing their regard. 

Mr. McNary has been a useful citizen and has served 
on the borough council. He is a member of Garfield 
Lodge, F. & A. M., at McDonald and of Cyrus Chapter 
at Carnegie. He is a member of the Session of the First 
Presbyterian Church. 

J. W. MANON, D. D. S., one of the prominent dental 
surgeons of Charleroi, Pa., who has been successfully 
engaged in the practice of his profession in this city 
since September, 1897, was born Nov. 3, 1869, at Van 
Buren, Pa., and is a son of William A. and Hannah 
(Chadwick) Manon, the former of whom was a black- 
smith by trade, and died in 1904. The mother is still 
living, and is a resident of Pittsburg. 

J. W. Manon was reared at Van Buren, where he at- 
tended the common schools and learned the blacksmith 
trade, after which he ran a shop at Lagonda for one and 
one-half years. He then attended the State Normal 
School at California, Pa., after which he taught school 
in South Franklin and Independence Townships, Wash- 
injrton County, for three years. He then took a course 
in dental surgery at the Pennsylvania Dental College at 



666 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Philadelphia, from which he graduated in the spring of 
1897, and in September of that same year came to Char- 
leroi, where he has offices over Piper's drug store. He 
has won the esteem and confidence of the public, and the 
professional success which he has gained has been well 
merited. Dr. Manon is the owner of the Manon Build- 
ing, containing four flats, and office rooms, on Fallow- 
field avenue, and is also the owner of several other val- 
uable properties in Charleroi. He served from 1906 
until June, 1909, as a member of the school board, of 
which he was secretary during the years 1906-07, and 
was president of that body during the last year of his 
membership. He is fraternally a member of the Masonic 
order, and his religious connection is with the Washing- 
ton Avenue Presbyterian Church. 

Dr. Manon married Orpha P. Grim, who was born 
and reared in Greene County, Pa., and came to Washing- 
ton County, with her father, Harvey Grim, who settled 
near Old Concord. Three children have been born to 
Dr. and Mrs. Manon: J. Paul, who was born Oct. 25, 
1899; Irene Elizabeth, who was born July 10, 1903, and 
Virginia Mae, who was born May 11, 1909. 

WILLIAM A. McKAY, who is engaged in the whole- 
sale manufacturing of ice cream, at Washington, Pa., 
with plant at Nos. 7-9 Sumner street, is a leading citi- 
zen and representative business man of the place. He 
was born at Washington, Pa., May 21, 1869, and is a 
sou of G. W. and Susan Elizabeth (Pease) McKay. 

Mr. McKay is a representative of some of the oldest 
and most honorable of the Washington County families. 
His maternal great-grandfather, Andrew Pease, was 
probably one of the first settlers in the county, and 
his son, Andrew Pease, was a , , man of great 
prominence in pioneer days. His daughter, the 
mother of William A. McKay, was born in 1843 
and still survives, residing with her only surviving child. 
On the paternal side the grandfather was William Mc- 
Kay, who was one of the earliest cabinetmakers to settle 
near Washington. His son, the late George W. McKay, 
was born near Claysville, Washington County, and during 
his active years worked at the shoemaking trade. His 
death occurred in 1909. Mrs. McKay was one of a 
family of nine children and is one of the six survivors, 
the others being: Zachariah, who lives in Indiana; Maria 
C, who married George W. Teegarden, lives in Illinois; 
Rebecca EDen, who lives in Washington County; An- 
drew J., who lives on the old Pease homestead; and J. 
C. C, who is a resident of Washington County. 

William A. McKay was reared and attended school 
at Washington and during his early manhood engaged 
in clerking, later embarked in a restaurant and con- 
fectionary business, and in the spring of 1897 started 



his present enterprise. He does a large wholesale busi- 
ness and has also an excellent retail trade. 

Mr. McKay was married in 1892, to Miss Emma J. 
Miller, who is a daughter of Simon P. Miller, of Greens- 
burg, Pa., and they had two daughters: Mildred A. and 
LiUy Irene. The beloved wife and mother died Novem- 
ber 12, 1908. Mr. McKay and daughters are members 
of the Second Presbyterian Church. He belongs to the 
Eagles and the Maccabees. 

REV. THOMAS PATTERSON, deceased, for many 
years was one of the ablest preachers in the Pittsburg 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which 
he was admitted in 1866, and remained a faithful mem- 
ber of that body until the time of his death, which oc- 
curred while he was, as he himself would have wished it, 
in the performance of his ministerial duties. The mes- 
sage came to him while attending a conference session, 
at Bellevue, Pa., and he passed quietly away on Friday 
evening, October 8, 1909. 

Thomas Patterson was born June 3, 1835, near Ten 
Mile, Pa., and was a son of John and Jane (Simpson) 
Patterson. John Patterson was born in Ireland and 
when'he emigrated to America, came to Pennsylvania and 
settled on a farm near Mai'ianna, Washington Co., Pa., 
which remained in the family until after the death of 
one of his sons, Samuel Patterson, who lived and died 
there, and it is now the property of the Pittsburg-Buffa- 
lo Coal Company. 

The following children were born to John and Jane 
Patterson: Catherine, who was born January 25, 1812, 
married James Wherry; Rebecca, who was born Decem- 
ber 6, 1813, married John Bumgardner and they lived at 
Amity, Pa.; Elizabeth, who was born September 8, 1815, 
married Levi Hopkins; Jane, who was born April 1, 
1817, married Palmer Baker; Sarah, who was born July 
16, 1819, married Levi Dawson; Andrew, who was born 
Mar. 20, 1821; John, who was born Feb. 1, 1823, never 
married; Samuel, who was born Dec. 15, 1824; Ann, 
who was born in January, 1827; Mary, who was born 
Dec. 5, 1828, is the widow of Joseph Siebert and resides 
at Washington, being the only surviving member of the 
family; Thomas, who was the youngest, was, as stated 
above, born in 1835. Through intermarriage the Pat- 
terson family is connected with many other leading fami- 
lies, both in Washington and in Greene Counties. 

Thomas Patterson was educated in the public schools 
and in Waynesburg College, his studies from early youth 
being directed along theological lines. While still at 
college the great Civil War was declared and with the 
loyal enthusiasm of youth he determined to do his part 
in the suppression of rebellion. He enlisted in the 
famous Ringgold Cavalry regiment, which was after- 




i;i:\ THOMAS Patterson 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



669 



wards organized as the 22ud Pa. Cav. aud at tliis time 
he was chosen as chapkiin of the regiment. He con- 
tinued in the army until the end of hostilities and was 
mustered out of the service in October, 1865, his regi- 
ment then being known as the 3rd Pa. Prov. Cav. He 
participated in many of the severest engagements of the 
war, among which was the battle of Winchester, or Cedar 
Creek. Years afterward, Rev. Mr. Patterson would glow 
with enthusiasm in speaking of the gallant Gen. Sheri- 
dan, his commander, who turned defeat into victory on 
that day. llis own victories, in an entirely different 
way, were no less wonderful and there are many now 
living who can testify to the triumphs secured for them 
by him, as commander of spiritual forces. 

After he returned from the army, Mr. Patterson com- 
pleted his theological studies and was admitted to the 
Pittsburg Conference. For 35 years he preached con- 
stantly at regular appointments, until failing health 
prevented his accepting such work. In all his years of 
ministry he served every appointment to which he was 
assigned for the full time limit. He served five years 
at Waynesburg and also was pastor of the churches at 
Johnstown, Leeehburg and Canonsburg. On the last 
Sabbath of his life he conducted the service of Holy 
Communion at Canonsburg, in the church building which 
was erected during his pastorate there. He was not 
only a deep thinker and earnest student and a courageous 
supporter of what he deemed his ministerial mission, 
but as a man he was kind hearted, tactful and naturally 
sympathetic. He thus commanded both the intellects 
and the hearts of his people. 

Thomas Patterson was united in marriage with Miss 
Emma Virginia Black, a daughter of James A. and 
Sarah (Steel) Black, of Greene County, Pa. The father 
of Mrs. Patterson is living, aged 87 years, a son of 
James H. Black. The Black family has been prominent- 
ly identified with public affairs in Greene County. When 
the great-grandfather, Benjamin Black, was a member 
of the State Legislature, he was the youngest serving 
in that body. It was Charles A. Black, a young attorney 
of Greene County, who compiled the first school laws 
of Pennsylvania. The venerable mother of Mrs. Pat- 
terson also survives. She was born near Philadelphia. 
Her father was James Steel, a miller by trade, of Quaker 
extraction. He lived for a short time in Fayette County, 
Pa. His death was occasioned by an attack of cholera. 
One daughter. Miss Mary Patterson, survives and resides 
with her mother at Canonsburg. 

ADAM COON SAMPSON, deceased, was one of the 
leading business men of Monongahela City, and was one 
of the organizers of the Peoples Bank, now the Monon- 
gahela City Trust Company. He was born at Long Eun, 
Allegheny County, Pa., a son of Thomas and Anna 



(Coon) Sampson, and died May 10, 1872, at the age of 
49 years. During his early life he engaged in the in- 
surance business, having a general agency through the 
western portion of Pennsylvania, and in 1871, with 
James Sampson, J. B. Pinley and others, estab- 
lished at Monongahela City the Peoples' Bank, of which 
he served until his death as president, with James 
Sampson, as vice president, and J. B. Finley, cashier. 
In fraternal circles he held membership with the I. O. 
O. F. and the Masons, and his religious connection was 
with the Presbyterian Church. Politically, he was a 
Republican. 

Mr. Sampson was first united in marriage with Mar- 
garet Williams, after whose death he married Fanny 
Moore, who also died, and on Nov. 11, 1862, he married 
Letitia 8. Manown. They became the parents of the 
following children: Anna Kuhn, deceased, married Dr. 
William Boyde, deceased; Sarah Manown; Letitia, mar- 
ried Edward Brubaker, and died, leaving one son, Henry, 
who was reared by her mother, Mrs. Sampson, and he 
is a graduate of Bliss College of Washington, D. C, and 
is engaged as an electrical engineer at Donora, Pa.; 
Adam Coon, deceased, married Annetta Yohe, by whom 
he had two children, Lois and Adam Coon; and Harriet 
L., who is the wife of Attorney W. K. Vance, has two 
children, Willison K. and Adam Sampson. 

Letitia S. (Manown) Sampson, widow of our subject, 
was born May 16, 1832, on her father's farm just across 
the Monongahela River, and is a daughter of James and 
Cassandra (Devore) Manown. James Manown was born 
in County Down, Ireland, and in 1798 came to America 
with his parents, Richard and Abigail (Smith) Manown, 
who settled near Round Hill, then Westmoreland County, 
and now known as Allegheny County, and was one of 
five children born to his parents: Peggy, who is the wife 
of Robin Bailie ; John ; William ; James, father of Mrs. 
Sampson ; aud Richard. James Manown married Cas- 
sandra (Devore) Elliott, a daughter of David Devore, 
who was the first to obtain a license to run a ferry be- 
tween Monongahela City and the bridge on the other 
side of the river. He married the widow of George 
Elliott, who was drowned while trying to save their sou 
Burnsides. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott also had a daughter, 
namely. Patience, the deceased wife of Benjamin Davis, 
who is also deceased. Her union with James Manown 
resulted in the birth of the following children: Frank- 
lin, deceased; Eliza, deceased, married A. Vankirk, also 
deceased; Nancy Ann, deceased, was the wife of John 
Thirkield, deceased; Cassandra, deceased wife of Alfred 
Thirkield, also deceased; Dr. James H. Manown, of 
West Virginia; Harriet P., widow of James Moore; 
Sarah, deceased ; Letitia, widow of Adam Coon Samp- 
son, our subject; and three who died in childhood. 

Mrs. Sampson was reared on her father's farm and 



67U 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



obtained her educational training at the township schools 
and a private school at Monongahela City, after which 
she graduated from the Washington Seminary with the 
class of 1852. She was united in marriage with Mr. 
Sampson in 1S62 and since his death has continued to 
reside in the family residence which was erected by him 
in 1S63, and which is located on the corner of Main and 
Eifth streets. Mrs. Sampson is held in high esteem by 
a large circle of friends, among whom she has spent the 
greater part of her life. She is a member of the Presby- 
terian Church and was for a number of years president 
of the Missionary Society. 

ROBERT S. FLANEGIN, general merchant and post- 
master at Woodrow, Washington County, Pa., and also 
agent for the Wabash Railroad at this point, was born 
in Mt. Pleasant Township, Washington County, Sept. 
30, 1S73, and is a son of Robert and Esther Flanegin 
and is the youngest of their family of children, as fol- 
lows: Emma J., who married W. S. Noah, resides in 
Mt. Pleasant Township; Agnes E., who is now deceased, 
was the wife of WOliam Philips; and E. Harriet, who 
is the wife of J. H. Gorman, of Canonsburg. 

Robert S. Planegin attended the public schools of 
Mt. Pleasant Township and continued and completed 
his education at the academies at Hickory and Buffalo. 
When 18 years of age he became a farmer and continued 
an agricultural life for several years, after which he 
went to Woodrow and there entered the employ of C. 
M. Marquis as a clerk for a time and then went back 
to the farm, but when J. S. Buchanan bought the store 
from Mr. Marquis, he installed Mr. Flanegin as manager. 
Mr. Buchanan subsequently went out of business and Mr. 
Planegin secured the location and opened up a store 
of his own. WTiere others had practically failed he suc- 
ceeded and is now starting on his fourth year with the 
brightest of prospects. He has a reputation for busi- 
ness honesty as well as capacity and a liberal patronage 
is accorded him from the adjacent country. In 1905 
he was appointed postmaster and the business of the 
office has grown to be so important that on Oct. 1, 1909, 
a money order system was installed. He is also the 
accommodating ticket agent for the Wabash Railroad 
and in every way is a popular citizen of this community. 

Mr. Planegin was married in October, 1896, to Miss 
Georgia A. Holmes, a daughter of John and Mary 
Holmes, of Hopewell Township. They are members of 
the United Presbyterian Church of Hickory. In politics 
he is a Democrat. He is a stockholder in the Hickory 
and Woodrow Telephone Company. 

S. GILLMORE DICKSON, who conducts a fire insur- 
ance business at Canonsburg, being one of the leading 
men in this line in the borough, was born in Washing- 
ton County. Pa., in the old tollgate house two miles east 



of this place, near Morganza Station, Feb. 29, 1864. His 
parents were William and Margaret J. (Ferguson) 
Dickson. 

William Dickson was born in Ireland and in early 
manhood, about 1856, came to America, made his way 
to Pittsburg and later joined an uncle who was living 
at Canonsburg. He soon found work in the mill of 
James Berry and later was employed on the farm of 
Israel Haines in North Strabane Township, and also 
operated the farm of William Martin, now deceased, 
who was for many years president of the First National 
Bank. On Oct. 4, 1859, he married Margaret J. Fer- 
guson, who was bom on East College street, Canons- 
burg, a daughter of Thomas Ferguson, a stone mason, 
who died in 1864. Both William Dickson and wife sur- 
vive and they reside at Canonsburg. Eight children were 
born to them, four sons and four daughters, namely: 
Thomas F., residing at Bower Hill; Lizzie M., wife of 
G. A. Crumm, a rural mail carrier, at Canonsburg; S. 
GiUmore; William Martin, residing at Canonsburg; Cora 
A., Margaret P. and Ada B., residing at home; and 
Alvin H., employed at the Fort Pitt Bridge Works. 

S. GiUmore Dickson attended the local schools, then 
engaged in farming, after which he was employed for 
four years at the Pennsylvania Reform School at Mor- 
ganza, and in 1895 he came to Canonsburg and em- 
barked in the fire insurance business. He represents a 
number of the leading companies and through his care- 
ful and close attention to all risks and his promptness 
in settling all losses, he has built up an excellent busi- 
ness. 

In 1898, Mr. Dickson was married to Miss Emma Hess, 
of Chartiers Township, and they have two children: 
Agnes J. and Mary E. Mr. Dickson and wife are mem- 
bers of the Central Presbyterian Church of Canonsburg. 
In politics he is a Democrat. Mrs. Dickson prior to 
her marriage, made her home with her great-uncle, Adam 
Edgar, of an old Washington County family. He died 
at Canonsburg in June, 1902, at the age of 82 years. 

AARON K. LYLE, superintendent of the Highland 
Glass Company Factory No. 1, and identified with other 
business enterprises at Washington, Pa., has been a resi- 
dent of this city for ten years. He was born in Smith 
Township, Washington County, Pa., in 1870. 

Capt. William K. Lyle, father of Aaron K., was born 
in Washington County, in 1833, and for a number of 
years engaged in farming and stock raising in Smith 
Township. He served with gallantry in the Civil War 
and was captain of his company. He was active in pub- 
lic affairs in Washington County and for six years was 
superintendent of the Children's Home. In 1905 he re- 
tired to Crafton, Allegheny County, where he now re- 
sides. Ho married .Tane A, Cooke, who is now deceased, 



IIISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



671 



;iiid five of their children still survive, namely : Josephine, 
who is the wife of C. A. Dally, of Allegheny County; 
Harriet, who resides with her father; Wilfred C, a civil 
engineer employed by the government, at present being 
on the Tennessee Elver; Janet, who resides with her 
lather at Grafton; and Aaron K. 

Aaron K. Lyle was reared in Washington County and 
was educated in the public schools and Oakdalo Academy, 
at Oakdale, Allegheny County. His first business en- 
gagement was with the Washington Carbon Company, 
where ho remained five years and then accepted a po- 
sition with the Highland Glass Company, starting in 
as a packer and shipper and rising step by step, until, 
in 1906 he was made night superintendent. He is recog- 
nized as a capable, reliable man in a position that re- 
quires technical knowledge as well as executive ability. 
During the Spanish-American War, Mr. Lyle served as a 
member of Co. C, 14th Pa. Vol. Inf. 

In 1901, Mr. Lyle was married to Miss Mary Belle 
Galbraith, who was born in Smith Township and is a 
daughter of the late William Reed Galbraith, who was 
a leading merchant at Burgettstown for ten years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lyle have one son, Aaron K., Jr. They are 
members of the Second Presbyterian Church, in which 
Mr. Lyle is a deacon. Fraternally he is an Odd Fellow, 
and is identified with both lodge and Encampment. 

LEMAN CAESON, one of the large wool growers of 
Blaine Township, Washington County, who also devotes 
his land to general farming and stock raising, has over 
100 acres and this is the old homestead on which he 
was born, it then being in Butfalo Township, Mar. 20, 
1849. His parents were Thomas and Mary (Wright) 
Carson. 

Both parents of Mr. Carson were born in Washington 
County and both are now deceased, the father's death 
occurring on Jan. 15, 18G5, and the mother's on Jan. 
5, 1886. They are survived by four children : Rachel, 
who is the widow of Henry C. Noble, resides at Clays- 
ville, Pa. ; Isaac, who lives in Missouri ; Samuel W., 
Buifalo Township, and Leman, of Blaine Township. 

Leman Carson was reared on the old place and se- 
cured his education in the schools of the neighborhood. 
He is numbered with the successful agi'iculturists of the 
township and does a large amount of business in wool, 
raising the Merino sheep for this special purpose. He 
also has several producing oil wells. Mr. Carson is a 
director in the Farmers' National Bank of Claysville., In 
politics, he is a Democrat. For a number of years he 
has been a member of the Presbyterian Church at Clays- 
ville, in which he is an elder. 

Aug. 3, 1887, Mr. Carson was married to Margaret 
Gillespie, of Blaine Township, and they have one son, 
Willi.ini, who resides at home. 



J. WILBUR MUNNEL, who is officiating as assistant 
Ciishier of the First National Bank of Canonsburg, is a 
representative of one of the old and prominent families 
of Washington County, with the leading affairs of which 
it has been more or less identified ever since, being 
active in advancing business interests and thus con- 
tributing to the general prosperity. Mr. Munnell was 
born near Canonsburg, Washington County, Pa., Apr. 
28, 1867, and is a son of James and Sarah (Grandstaff) 
Munnell. 

James Munnell, the father, was born in South Stra- 
bane Township, Washington County, in 1837, and is a 
resident of Crafton, in Allegheny County. His father, 
Samuel Munnell, was also born in South Strabane Town- 
ship and his mother in Butler County and was a mem- 
ber of the well-known McQuistan family. James Mun- 
nell married Sarah Grandstaff, who was born at Mounds- 
ville, W. Va. She lived into her 70th year, passing away 
on July 28, 1908. The following children were born to 
James and Sai-ah Munnell: Mary, who is the widow of 
W. K. Galbreath, a former postmaster at Canonsburg; 
Catherine D., who died in 1882, when aged 17 years; J. 
Wilbur; J. Franklin, who is engaged in theatrical work; 
Jean B., who is the wife of George White, of Swissvale, 
Pa. ; Maud H., who resides at Canonsburg ; Thomas, who 
died in infancy; and Zelda, who resides at home. 

J. Wilbur Munnell was a mere thild when his parents 
came from the farm to Canonsburg and here he attended 
the public schools and Jefferson Academy. He was 
about 18 years of age when he started to work with his 
father at the carpenter trade, but shortly afterward 
secured a position in the Canonsburg Bank, Limited, 
which institution was reorganized in the following year, 
1891, and he has been identified with it ever sinfe. From 
being bookkeeper, Mr. Munnell advanced through his 
capacity and proved fidelity to be teller, and later to 
the position of assistant ca.shier. In all his business 
dealings he has shown superior qualifications, and his 
I)leasing, courteous manner has been generally appre- 
ciated by the patrons of the First National. Many of 
his acquaintances have known him from childhood and 
his friends have watched his advancement with pleasure. 

In 1891, Mr. Munnell was married to Miss Catherine 
.1. McNutt, a daughter of William and Nancy (Weaver) 
McNutt, of Washington County, and they have a family 
of four children: Helen W., Catherine G., James W. and 
Paul D. Mr. and Mrs. Munnell are members of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Canonsburg, of which he 
is treasurer. Like his father he is identified with the 
Democratic party and for some years served a.s borough 
auditor. He is one of Canonsburg 's representative men. 

CHARLES M. MAEQUIS, a leading citizen, general 
farmer and stock raiser of Cross Creek Township, Wash- 



6;:2 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



ington County, Pa., is one of the substantial men of 
this section, owning over 200 acres of valuable land. 
He was born in this township Nov. 3, 1872, and his 
parents are Sinieon and Caroline (Stevenson) Marquis. 

Simeon Marquis was born in Cross Creek Township 
and is a son of William Marquis, who was probably born 
and spent his life in the same township. Simeon en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits and always lived on the 
homestead near Cross Creek village. He was married 
(first) to Sarah Mason and they had four children. His 
second marriage was to Caroline Stevenson. 

Charles M. Marquis, with his brother, James M., who 
now lives in Mt. Pleasant Township, attended the dis- ., 
trict schools, after which he was a student in the Cross 
Creek Academy and later attended Duff's Business Col- 
lege at Pittsburg, where he was graduated. At the 
age of 20 years he settled down to farming and con- 
tinued for six years, when he went into the mercantile 
business and conducted a store at Woodxow for six 
years, after which he resumed his agricultural pursuits. 
His land is well cultivated and he gives much care and 
time to raising fine stock and has made sheep something 
of a specialty. 

In August, 1S9S, Mr. Marquis was married to Miss 
Bessie Jeffrey, a daughter of K. G. -Jeffrey, of Cross 
Creek Township, and they have had the following chil- 
dren: Belle, Margaret, Eobert, Eaymond, Mary and 
Kuth. Two of their little ones have passed away. Belle 
and Eobert. Mr. Marquis and wife are members of 
Mt. Prospect Presbyterian Church, of which he formerly 
was a trustee. In politics he is a Democrat as was his 
father before him. 

JAMES E. DUNCAN, Jr., secretary of the Duncan 
& Miller Glass Company, is one of Washington's leading 
business men, being also president of the Donely Brick 
Company and vice president of the Capitol Paint, Oil 
and Varnish Company. He was born at Pittsburg, Pa., 
and is a son of James E. and Anna (Patterson) Dun- 
can. 

The late James E. Duncan was prominently identified 
with the iron and glass manufacturing interests of 
Western Pennsylvania. He was a native of Pittsburg 
and was a son of George Duncan, who was the founder 
of the business now conducted under the name of the 
Duncan & Miller Glass Company. James E. Duncan 
moved his glass manufacturing plant from Pittsburg 
to Washington and did business under the title of George 
Duncan 's Sons and in 1900 the present style was adopt- 
ed when the business was incorporated. James E. Dun- 
can continued his active interest in the business until 
his death in January, 1900. He married Miss Anna 
Patterson, who was born at Pittsburg and was a daugh- 
ter of Andrew Patterson, who was directly concerned 



in many important Pittsburg enterprises and owned 
much real estate. Four children were born to this mar- 
riage, the three survivors being: James E., Jr.; Andrew 
P.; and Amelia P., who is the wife of W. H. Baker, 
who is a son of N. R. Baker, cashier of the Citizens' 
National Bank at Washington. 

James E. Duncan, Jr., attended the public schools of 
Pittsburg and was also instructed by private tutors, later 
entering Washington and Jefferson College. In 1896 he 
entered the glass factory of George Duncan's Sons and 
when the business was incorporated, following the death 
of his father, he became secretary, a responsible po- 
sition „e has filled ever since. 

Mr. Duncan is a Thirty-second degree Mason and is 
present master of Sunset Lodge No. 623, F. & A. M., 
Washington. He is also a member of the Elks and of the 
Bassett Club. Mr. Duncan attends the Mrst Methodist 
Church in this city. 

JAMES W. McDowell, of J. W. McDowcU & Son, 
a prominent law firm of Washington, Pa., has been a 
resident of this city since February, 1873. He was born 
in Mt. Pleasant Township, Washington County, Pa., in 
1842, and is a son of John and a grandson of James Mc- 
Dowell. 

The grandfather, James McDowell, came to Washing- 
ton County from Lancaster County, Pa., in 1787, being 
one of the pioneer settlers here. John McDowell, son 
of James, was born on the pioneer farm in 1811 and his 
son, James W., had the same birthplace. John Mc- 
Dowell was engaged in farming and was also extensive- 
ly interested in the sheep industry. He was a man of 
local prominence and sterling character. He died in 
1886. 

James W. McDowell was reared and educated in his 
native county, graduating first from Jefferson College 
at Canonsburg and in 1866 receiving his diploma from 
Washington and Jefferson College, the year of the col- 
lege consolidation. He then entered upon the study of 
law with William Montgomery and in 1869 was admitted 
to the bar of Washington County; afterward he was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Allegheny County. After two years 
of successful practice in Pittsburg, he came to Washing- 
ton and has since continued here, practicing alone untU 
his son became associated with him, on Sept. 3, 1900. 
The combination is considered a strong one and the firm 
appears in much of the important litigation and court 
business in this section of the county. 

Mr. McDowell was married Sept. 23, 1869, to Miss 
Nancy J. Bea, a daughter of Joseph Eea, of Mt. Pleas- 
ant Township, and they have two sons; John W., who 
is the junior partner of the law firm of J. W. McDowell 
& Son, and Joseph Eea. The latter, who is a graduate 
of Duff's Commercial College at Pittsburg, is agent for 




JAMES w. McDowell 



'EWYORJs: 



C .- ■ FOUNDATIONS, { 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



675 



the Adams Kxprcss Company al Wasliiugtoii. He mar- 
ried Miss Eleanor Little and they are members of the 
First Presbyterian Chureh. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. 

John W. McDowell was born in 1875, at Washington, 
Pa., and in 1896 was graduated from Washington and 
Jefferson College. He studied law in his father 's office 
and was admitted to the bar Sept. 3, 1900. Both mem- 
bens of the firm practice in all the courts of the State. 
In 1908 he was married to Miss Sarah Margaret Junk, 
a daughter of the late James Junk. They are members 
of the First Presbyterian Church. John W. McDowell 
was one of the organizers and is a member of the ex- 
clusive Bassett Club and he is a Freemason. At different 
times he has served as secretary and treasurer of the 
Democratic County Committee. 

James W. McDowell is an elder in the First Presby- 
terian Church. In politics he is a Democrat and has 
served in the borough Council and as a member of the 
school board. He is prominent in Masonry and at pres- 
ent is serving as District Deputy Grand Master of the 
Southwestern District of the jurisdiction of the Grand 
Lodge of F. and A. Masons of Pennsylvania. Aside from 
his profession, Mr. McDowell has large business in- 
terests. 

ROBERT M. DICKSON, senior member of the firm 
of Dickson & Wallace, leading business men at Midway, 
dealing in hardware and builders' supplies and main- 
taining a lumber yard, was born in Washington County, 
Pa., Feb. 23, 1863, and is a son of William A. and Eliz- 
abeth (McBurney) Dickson. 

The father of Mr. Dickson died in 1895, having spent 
all his active life as a farmer. His widow survives and 
resides at Crafton. Their family consisted of the fol- 
lowing children: Margaret G., Elizabeth W., Robert M., 
Anna, W. R., Agnes J., Walter E. and Bertha L., now- 
deceased. Of the above, Anna is the wife of Rev. W. 
E. E. Barcus, a minister in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church; W. R. is a practicing physician at McDonald, 
Pa., and Walter E., a dentist at Burgettstown, Pa. 

Robert M. Dickson attended Ingleside Academy at 
McDonald, at that time a flourishing school, and then 
took a commercial course in the Iron City Business Col- 
lege at Pittsburg, Pa., after which he assisted his father 
and remained on the home farm until 1895, when he 
came to Midway and embarked in bis present business. 
He has been a very useful and active citizen, serving on 
the township school board before the borough was or- 
ganized and frequently on the Council since. He is 
identified with the Republican party. 

In 1895, Mr. Dickson was married to Miss Ina M. 
Andrews, of Burgettstown, Pa., and they have two chil- 
dren: William A. and Elizabeth R., both of whom re- 



side at home. Mr. Dickson's paternal grandparents 
wore William and Margaret (Glen) Dickson, and the ma- 
ternal, Robert and Eliza (Welch) McBurney, all these 
names being representative ones in Washington County. 

CIlAIiLES SOMERVILLE CRALL, member of the 
firm of I. Shelby Crall Company, of Monongahela City, 
Pa., who are extensive growers and shippers of ilowers 
and vegetables, was born Nov. 1, 1861, in Nevada Coun- 
ty, Cal., and is a son of I. Shelby and Sarah (Somer- 
ville) Crall. 

I. Shelby Crall was born in Fayette County, Pa., 
where he grew to manhood and learned the iron moulderg 
trade. He then ran a foundry in Allegheny County 
until 1851, when the plant was destroyed by fire, and 
the following year, in company with others from Monon- 
gahela City, he went to California, where he met with 
much success in the mines. In 1866 he returned to 
Monongahela City with the intention of retiring from 
business activities, but the following year established 
the plant of the I. Shelby Crall & Company. He had 
always been fond of flowers and plants and had a pri- 
vate greenhouse at his residence, but the flowers and 
plants attracted the attention of his friends and neigh- 
bors, who wanted to buy them, and in a short time he 
had established such an extensive business, that he was 
obliged to obtain larger quarters, and purchased a tract 
of 70 acres, upon which the present plant was estab- 
lished. This land was at one time an old Indian camp- 
ing ground, as is shown by the large Indian mound, and 
many cooking utensils and other Indian relies have been 
discovered buried on it. Subsequently 30 acres of the 
land were disposed of in building lots, and Mr. Crall 
continued in the business until the time of his death in 
1901, at the age of 74 years. He married Sarah Somer- 
ville, who was born in Jefferson County, Pa., and died 
in 1907, at the age of 68 years. Three children were 
born of their union: Charles Somerville; Maude A., who 
is the wife of H. M. Griffith, and James Shelby, all of 
whom are natives of California. 

Charles S. Crall was quite young when his parents 
removed from California to Monongahela City, Pa., 
where he was reared and attended the public schools. 
He left school at an early age to assist his father in 
the greenhouses, and after the death of his father in 
1901, formed a partnersip with his brother James, and 
Harry M. Griffiths, a brother-in-law, and continued in 
the business under the old firm name of I. Shelby Crall 
Company. James Crall has charge of the office, Mr. Grif- 
fiths is in charge of the retail store located at No. 251- 
253 Main street, while our subject is overseer of the entire 
plant, which is located on Fourth street, and consists 
of 22 greenhouses containing 75,000 square feet of glass 
and has 1,000 square feet of hot beds. In 1906 Mr. 



676 



HISTOKY OF WASIilNGTON COUNTY 



Crall established a poiiltry farm ou a tract of 3U acres 
in Carroll Township, where he has 1,000 laying hens, 
and finds a ready market for his produce at Mononga- 
hela City. Mr. Crall is a member of the American 
Carnation Society, the Pittsburg and Allegheny Gar- 
deners' and Florists' Club, is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, of which he is past chancellor, is past State 
Councilor of the Jr. 0. U. A. M., and is a trustee of the 
National Orphans ' Home at Tiffin, Ohio, which is under 
the management of the Jr. 0. U. A. M. In politics, Mr. 
Crall is identified with the Democratic party, and has 
served as a member of the Monongahela City council for 
the past seven j^ears. He holds membership with the 
Presbyterian church. 

D. S. and. J. B. TAYLOE, sons of D. S. and Sarah 
(Oliver) Taylor, are old residents of Smith Township, 
where each owns an interest in 365 acres of valuable 
land. The father, D. S. Taylor, was born two miles 
northeast of Washington, Pa., and was reared on his 
father's farm, and was a son of Joseph Taylor and a 
grandson of Hon. Henry Taylor, who was the first judge 
in Washington County. D. S. Taylor resided in West- 
moreland County, Pa., for one year after his marriage 
but in the spring of ]834 moved back to South Strabane 
Township, Washington County, and lived there until 
1849, when he moved to Adams County, Ohio, for one 
year, and from there to Smith Township, Washington 
County, and settled on the farm now owned jointly by 
his sons, and died there in March, 1888. His burial was 
in Fairview Cemetery, at Burgettstown. His estate in- 
cluded 256 acres of land at that time. He was a Demo- 
crat in politics and at different times had served as 
school director and road supervisor. He married Sarah 
Oliver, a daughter of Samuel Oliver. She died in March, 
1898. They had the following chUdren : Mary Ann, Jo- 
seph, Samuel O., Henry G., William P., Jane Olive, 
D. S., Jr., J. B. and Matthew, three of these — Joseph, 
Samuel O. and Matthew — being deceased. 

D. S. Taylor, son of D. S. and Sarah (Oliver) Taylor, 
was born two mUes northeast of Washington, Pa., Oct. 
7, 1847, and his school days were spent in Smith Town- 
ship, having come to the present farm with his parents 
on Apr. 1, 1850, when they came back to Washington 
County from Adams County, Ohio. Mr. Taylor engaged 
in farming but became interested also in other enter- 
prises. He is secretary and treasurer of the Burgetts- 
town Publishing Company of Burgettstown, of which he 
is a large stockholder. He is also a stockholder of the 
Washington National Bank of Burgettstown, of which he 
was formerly vice president; has been either president or 
vice president of the Union Agricultural Association of 
Burgettstown since 1876, with the exception of four 
years, and for 15 years served as a justice of the peace 



iu Smith Township. In politics he is a Democrat. He 
attends the First United Presbyterian Church. He has 
always shown an interest in educational affairs and is 
serving as a member of the Smith Township School 
Board. 

J. B. Taylor, son of D. S. and Sarah (Oliver) Taylor, 
was born in Smith Township, Mar. 30, 1857. He owns 
a one-half interest in 365 acres in Smith Township and 
is a substantial as well as a representative citizen. He 
spent his school days in Smith Township in which the 
family was reared and with his brother and one sister 
resides on the old homestead. The place is well im- 
proved and all the buildings now standing were erected 
by J. B. Taylor, as he learned and worked at the carpen- 
ter trade for 12 years. Owing to ill health he was 
obliged to give up his trade and since then nas been 
interested in contracting for steam heat and hot water 
systems at Burgettstown and in the vicinity. Like his 
older brother he is a Democrat but mixes little in poli- 
ties, his main desire being to see good men elected to 
office. He attends the First Presbyterian Church at 
Burgettstown. 

JOHN H. McCEACKEN, who is one of Washington 's 
enterprising and wide awake young business men, is a 
member of the wholesale produce firm of McLeod & Mc- 
Cracken, the operations of which cover a wide radius of 
territory. Mr. McCracken was born at Wheeling, West 
Va., in 1878. 

Ml-. McCracken has been a resident of Washington for 
22 years, coming here during his school period. After 
leaving his books he worked for four years in a grocery 
house and to the knowdedge there gained by close atten- 
tion to the details of the grocery business may, in large 
part, be attributed his success when he embarked in the 
business for himself. Since 1899 he has been in the 
wholesale produce business and for two years conducted 
a retail grocery. In 1908 thei present firm was organ- 
ized and it deals extensively in butter, cheese and eggs. 
The business has continued to increase in volume and 
the prospects of the firm are bright, dealing as they do 
in the necessary commodities of daily life, and having a 
practical knowledge of this line. In 1S9S, Mr. Mc- 
Cracken was married to Miss Minnie Holder, of Wash- 
ington, Pa., and they have one daughter, Elizabeth. 

JOHN CUNNINGHAM, justice of the peace, member 
of the school board and owner of a magnificent farm of 
532 acres, may justly be denominated a leading and 
representative citizen of Donegal Township, Washington 
Co., Pa., where he was born Oct. 25, 1863. His parents 
were John and Margaret (Heyburn) Cunningham. 

The father of Mr. Cunningham, the late John Cun- 
ningham, w-hose death occurred late in the 90 's. was 



Ilisr()i;v OF \VASIIIX(iT()N COUNTY 



677 



h(,rii in ('(.iiiity Dhhii, IivIm.i.I, .Inly ^4, 1S29, and whs a 
sou (if I'elei- anil Uonitlica (Wilkinson) Cunningham. 
I'etor Cuuningham engaged in fanning to some extent, 
raised cattle and also worked at the weaving trade. All 
lit' his eight children with the exception of John, the 
fir.-itborn, remained in Ireland. The latter learned the 
weaving trade from his father but never found the neces- 
sity of following it. In 1849 he came to America almost 
iMn|itylianded, but in a very short time his industry and 
iiiliiT yiiml qualities gave him recognition and in a few 
numlhs lie linil entered into the employ of James Camp- 
soy, a large farmer in Washington County, Pa., and re- 
mained tliere for 14 years. Jn 1863 he married and for 
some years afterward rented land from Mr. Campsey, but 
liy 1872 he w-as able to buy a tract of land, in Donegal 
'roH-nship, and lived there until 1881. He then moved 
III! a part of the Heyburn tract, situated three miles 
niirthwest of Claysville, also in Donegal Township, and 
there resided until his demise. He was a man of ster- 
ling character, honest, upright and courageous. He gave 
support to the Presbyterian Church and in private life 
was unusually charitable and generous. On Sept. 17, 
1863, he was married (first) to Margaret J. Heyburn, 
who was born in 1840, and died Dec. 25, 1879. Of 
their children the following survive: John, George, of 
Vienna, Pa. ; Joseph E., of Donegal Township; and 
Amanda, now Mrs. Miller, of Donegal Township. 

John Cunningham, the eldest of the above family, was 
reared and attended school in Donegal Township and 
from early youth has been interested extensively in farm- 
ing and stock raising. He devotes special attention to 
sheep raising and makes this industry profitable. Fol- 
lowing in the steps of his father, he is a stanch party 
Republican and gives loyal support to its policies. In 
local matters he is very closeiy concerned at all times, 
ser\ing on school and highway boards as the best way 
to better the conditions of both, and the esteem in 
which he is held is shown in the fact that he is serving 
his second term as justice of the peace. 

On Mar. 21, 1900, Mr. Cunningham was married to 
Miss Bertha B. Noble, who was born in Buffalo Town- 
ship, Washington County, and they are members of the 
Prebyferian Church at Claysville, of which he is a 
trustee. 

WILLIAM BOYLE HOUSTON, a leading citizen of 
Canonsburg, Pa., and president of the First National 
Bank of Houston, the latter city standing on what was 
once his grandfather's farm, was born at Canonsburg, 
Washington Co., Pa., and is a son of David Clark and 
Louisa B. (Sweitzer) Houston. 

The Houston family in America traces its lineage back 
to the Highlands of Scotland, even to the days of the 
gallant William Wallace. In Renfrewshire, Scotland, 



Ihe old linroiiial halls Still stand and the bead of the 
family still commands his vassals. Early in the 17th 
century members of the clan migrated to North Ireland 
and the name is a familiar one in Counties Donegal, Lon- 
donderry, Tyrone and Antrim. It was from North Ire- 
land that three brothers of the name of Houston crossed 
the Atlantic Ocean, between 1725 and 1730, and settled 
in wliat is now' Lancaster County, Pa. They increased 
ill miiiihers and prospered and eventually scattered into 
otliiT [larls of the I'nion and no record of the family 
wiiuM lie ioin|iIete without mention being made of that 
old Texan hero, Ucn. Sam Houston. "The History of 
Lancaster County"' has rightly regarded this family as 
one of its most interesting and distinguished and many 
important facts and much data concerning it may be 
olitained by consulting this publication. 

John Houston lived on a farm in Lancaster County, 
facing the Delaware Water Gap station, on the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad, and he had six sons and two daugh- 
ters born there. Five of these sons: Daniel, John, Will- 
iam, James and Thomas, were soldiers in the Revolu- 
tionary War. After its close, Daniel Houston took up 
his residence in Franklin County, Pa., removing later to 
Washington County, settling in what is now Cross Creek 
Township. He was accompanied by his son, Daniel 
Houston, who was born in Franklin County but whose 
subsequent life was spent in Washington County, where 
lie became a more than usually useful citizen. He early 
tntered into the busiuis; of buying and shipping such 
commodities as wool, flour and pork, loading boats at 
the mouth of Cro.'S Creek and delivering at New Orleans. 
In the face of dangers long since eliminated from all 
river traffic in the United States and in spite of hard- 
ships of all kinds, Mr. Houston made many successful 
trips to the South and from many of these walked the 
whole distance home. In his business dealings ho ,\as 
considered honorable and upright, and of his personal 
characteristics, his contemporaries speak with the utmost 
kindness and admiration. He alw'ays adhered to the old 
Seceder Church in his religious views and he gave a site 
for the erection of a church edifice. It is still standing 
and now belongs to his grandson, William Boyle Houston. 

In addition to the personal business enterprises men- 
tioned, Daniel Houston was concerned in others of a 
more public nature, through which many of his fellow 
citizens were more or less benefitted and accommodated. 
He was one of the organizers of the old Franklin Bank 
of Washington, now the First National, was the largest 
stockholder and its president. He was also a trustee of 
Jefferson College at Canonsburg and gave encourage- 
ment to educational effort wherever he was able. He 
was one of the most liberal contributors to the project 
of building the Chartiors Railroad, giving, it is said, the 
sum of $6,000. Although the first railroad enterprise 



678 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



remained ineffective for many years, the arousing of the 
people and the contributing were not lost factors when 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company subsequently com- 
pleted the contract. 

Daniel Houston married Betsey Clark, a daughter of 
David and Hannah (Baird) Clark, a family of Scotch 
extraction, and to this marriage three children vrere 
born, one son and two daughters, both daughters dying 
in childhood. 

David Clark Houston, the father of William Boyle 
Houston and the only son of Daniel and Betsey (Clark) 
Houston, was born on the old farm of his father in Inde- 
pendence Township, Washington Co., Pa., and died at 
Canonsbm-g, May 27, 1888, in his seventy-third year. 
He obtained an excellent education, completing his 
studies at Jefferson College. Early in manhood he 
turned his attention to mercantile pursuits which he con- 
tinued until other demands on his attention in relation 
to his large inheritance of property induced him to 
retire. Together with his father he served continually 
as a director of the First National Bank of Washington 
from its organization, was a trustee of Washington and 
Jefferson College, a trustee of Jefferson Acadamy, presi- 
dent of the Oak Spring Cemetery Company and a mem- 
ber of a number of charitable boards. He was active 
in securing the Chartiers Valley Eailroad as was his 
father, whose example he followed in many public-spir- 
ited movements. Por many years he was a valued and 
honored member of the Chartiers United Presbyterian 
Church. 

At Washington, Pa., in 1840, David Houston was mar- 
ried to Louisa B. Sweitzer, who was born at Browns- 
ville, Pa., and died at Canonsburg, in 1887. Her father 
was Dr. Lewis Sweitzer, a native of Pennsylvania who 
secured his medical education in France. Dr. Sweitzer 
and wife were the parents of a large family and among 
them were many distinguished members and a family of 
daughters as noted for their personal beauty as the sons 
were for their mental gifts. To David Hou.ston and wife 
there were born three sons and three daughters, namely: 
Elizabeth, who resides at Canonsburg; Mary, who is now 
deeaesed, was the wife of Rev. William F. Brown, whose 
father was president of Jefferson College and his grand- 
father of Washington College; Harriet, who died when 
aged twenty-two years; Louis, who died when aged twen- 
ty-four years; William Boyle; and Daniel, who died 
when aged three years. There are two survivors of this 
family: William Boyle and Miss Elizabeth. 

WUIiam Boyle Houston was reared in a cultured home 
where the means were ample for every demand of life 
and his wishes were more or less consulted as to the 
direction his educational efforts should take. He at- 
tended .Jefferson Academy, with which his family had 
been .so closely identified for so long a time, and then. 



in preparation for an active business life, took a course 
at Duff's Commercial College at Pittsburg. Like father 
and grandfather his talents have been brought to light 
as a financier. They were the organizers of financial 
institutions which have become solid ones of this sec- 
tion and Mr. Houston, in 1902, organized the First 
National Bank of Houston, which is recognized as one 
of the leading and conservative banks of Washington 
County. To the interests of this bank Mr. Houston de- 
votes much of his time and he is also interested in look- 
ing after both his own and his sister's important invest- 
ments and large amount of property. Both he and Miss 
Elizabeth Houston are members of the United Presby- 
terian Church. He was brought to Canonsburg by his 
parents in 1875, and he resides here during all but the win- 
ter months, spending these in Florida. 

CHARLES MATNARD EEA, whose well cultivated 
farm of 120 acres lies in Cross Creek Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., not far distant from the village of Kea, 
which perpetuates the name of his family, an old and 
prominent one in this section, was born on this farm No- 
vember 6, 1865. His parents were Charles and Cather- 
ine (Cook) Rea. 

WUIiam Rea, the great-grandfather of Charles M. 
Rea, was born in Northampton Co., Pa., September 13, 
1762, and came from there to Washington County, in 
1789, shortly afterward settling on what is now the farm 
of his great-grandson, in Cross Creek Township. William 
Rea taught school one vrinter one and one-half miles 
west of Hickory, in Mt. Pleasant Township and then 
bought the above farm which has remained in the family 
into the fourth generation. He was a .iustice of the 
peace for Cross Creek, Hopewell and Mt. Pleasant town- 
ships for a number of years and was one of the foremost 
men of this section. In 1794 he was one of a committee 
of three representative men appointed and sent by the 
whiskey insurrectionists to meet the U. S. Army corps 
detailed to suppress the insurrectionists and had much 
to do with the final adjustment of difficulties. He died 
September 28. 1835, aged 74 years. His wife was Jane 
Mason and among their children was William Mason 
Rea, grandfather of Charles M. He was born on this 
farm March 16, 1790, and always lived on the place. 

Charles Rea, father of Charles H., was born on the 
present farm, April 25, 1834, and died October 12, 1900. 
He was a son of William Mason and Elizabeth (Camp- 
bell) Rea. His whole life was spent on his farm in 
Cross Creek Township. On November 27, 1856, he was 
married to Catherine Cook, a daughter of A. C. and 
Mary (Campbell) Cook, of Wayne County, Ohio, where 
Mrs. Rea lived until her marriage, since when she has 
lived on the old Rea homestead. Charles Maynard was 
the fifth child and eldest son born to the above mar- 



L 




J ION. CIIAHLES A. IMONTLEY 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



681 



riage, the others beiug: Mary E., wife of Johu K. 
Smiley, of Smith Township; Ida F., wife of William 
C. Marshall, of Oakdale, Pa.; Winnifred E., widow of 
William H. Buchanan, of Indopeudcuce Township; Effie 
L., wife of Harry C. Seott, residing in Pittsburg; Jennie 
E., wife of D. W. Cummings, of Cadiz, Ohio; Tamar C, 
deceased, was the wife of Harry S. Lee, of Cross Creek 
Township; Ella Elberta, wife of Walter E. Cozins; and 
Iva v., wife of Lester Donaldson, of Columbus, Ohio. 

Charles M. Rea attended school with more or less 
regularity until he was eighteen years of age, and since 
then nas given the larger part of his time and atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits. He is a practical and suc- 
cessful farmer and he also raises a large amount of as 
fine stock as is produced on any farm in Cross Creek 
Township. In his political views he follows the teach- 
ings of his late father, who was a stanch Republican, 
and at different times he has served acceptably in town- 
ship offices and is numbered with its most reliable men. 
He was elected vice-president of the Washington County 
School Directors' Association, in which capacity he is 
still serving. Mr. Rea is unmarried and lives with his 
mother on the homestead. They are members of the 
Cross Creek Presbyterian Church, in which he is an elder 
and has been a trustee for a number of years. 

HON. CHARLES- A. BENTLEY, member of the 
Pennsylvania Legislature, and a conductor on the Ells- 
worth branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad, was born 
July 11, 1860, and is a son of Samuel B. and Minerva 
(Rabe) Bentley. 

Samuel Black Bentley was born and reared in Mimou- 
gahela City, Pa., and was a grandson of Samuel Black, 
who was one of the early settlers of Washington County 
and owner of over 1,500 acres of land. Samuel B. Bent- 
ley spent almost his entire life in this locality and died 
at the age of 68 years. He was a trader by occupation, 
buying and selling wool extensively. He was first united 
in marriage with a Miss Graham, after whose death, he 
married Minerva Rabe, and they had the following chil- 
dren: Millie, a resident of Monongahela City; Frank, 
deceased; Charles A., the subject of this sketch; Harry 
K., ex-mayor of Monongahela City; and Mary, who mar- 
ried B. L. Ross, who is clerk of Monongahela City. Mr. 
Bentley served three years in the Civil War as quarter- 
master of the 140th Pa. Vol. Inf. and was a member of 
the G. A. E. 

Charles A. Bentley obtained his educational training 
in the common schools of Monongahela City and early 
in life learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked 
several years. In 1881 he began working on the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad, first as brakeman, and since 1890 has 
been conductor, now serving in that capacity on the 
Ellsworth branch. He is also interested in the coal and 



lumber business in lhi.s city, and with the exception of a 
few years spent in Pittsburg, has always been a resident 
of Monongahela City. 

Mr. Bentley is a Republican in politics, has served 
two terms in the city Council, and was elected to the 
State Legislature in 1907, being re-elected in 1909. He 
is fraternally a member of the O. R. C. of Pittsburg; 
the B. P. O. E. of Homestead, and the Masonic order of 
Charleroi. 

In 1888, Mr. Bentley married Margaret Recs, a daugh- 
ter of David Rees, of Pittsburg. 

LOUIS RIETSCH, a member of the well known firm 
of Rietsch Brothers, general stone and brick contractors 
of Washington, Pa., has been a resident here for the 
past twenty-one years. He was born in France, March 
25, 1867, and there became a bricklayer and stone mason 
by trade. At the age of twenty-one years he came to 
America and located for two years at Hartford, Conn., 
after which he came to Washington, where he worked 
at his trade until the present firm of Rietsch Brothers 
was established. They carry on a general contracting 
business in stone and brick work and road building, and 
are practically engaged in doing all kinds of general 
contracting, ranking high among the leading contractors 
of Washington. Mr. Rietsch is a .stockholder in the 
Real Estate and Trust Company of Washington; he has 
served as a member of the city council of South Wash- 
ington, and also as a member of the council of Washing- 
ton Borough, participating actively in local politics. Mr. 
Rietsch is a member of the Catholic Church. 

JOHN N. WALKER, one of Jefferson Township's 
most prominent citizens, serving in the office of justice 
of the peace and being also treasurer of the school board 
and treasurer of the road fund, has followed farming 
all his mature life. He was born in Cross Creek Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., January 3, 1849, and is a son 
of John N. and Anna (Vance) Walker. 

The parents of Mr. Walker were both natives of Wash- 
ington County, the father of Jefferson Township, a son 
of Alexander and Elizabeth (Norris) Walker, who came 
from New Jersey. The mother was born in Smith Town- 
ship and was a daughter of William and Rachel (Pat- 
terson) Vance. She died in 1870 and was survived by 
hor husband until 1882. They were worthy members of 
the Presbyterian Church. They had the following chil- 
dren: Rachel V., who married Robert S. Donaldson; 
Alexander E., who resides at Burgettstown ; William 
Vance, who is deceased; James A., who lives at Murray, 
Neb. ; Elizabeth, who married John Lawton, died Octo- 
ber 2.3, 1909, lived in Kansas; Hannah G., who married 
.1. P. Reed, lives in Kansas; Mary 51,, who married J. 
Kdgar Rankin, deceased; Virginia A.; John N. ; Joseph 



HISTOEY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



P. and Frauklin P., both of whom are deceased; and 
Cynthia C, who married Samuel Wilson, deceased. 

John N. Walker was reared on a farm and enjoyed few 
educational advantages in his youth, his present fund 
of knowledge having been mainly acquired through ju- 
dicious reading and association with intelligent people. 
While he has made farming his business in life, he has 
not confined his attention to agricultural pursuits. From 
early manhood he has been active in politics and for a 
number of years has been a Democratic leader in this 
section. For the past three years he has been a member 
of the Democratic County Committee, a very strong 
party organization, and he has been a delegate to both 
State and National conventions. He enjoys very fully 
the confidence of his fellow citizens and fills offices of 
honor, trust and responsibility. 

In February, 1895, Mr. Walker was married to Miss 
Ella Boles, who is a daughter of John L. and Margaret 
Boles, the former of whom died in 1894. Mrs. Boles 
still lives on the homestead in Jefferson Township. To 
John L. Boles and wife the following children were 
born: Mary, who married Eobert Bloomingstook; Ella, 
who became Mrs. Walker; Thomas E., who resides in the 
city of Chicago ; John J., who lives at Eldersville, Pa. ; 
and H. P., who lives with his mother. Mr. Walker is 
identified with the Masonic lodge at Burgettstown. 

ARTHUB DAY, who has been proprietor of the Hotel 
Arthur at Charleroi, Pa., for the past three years, was 
born at Haverhill, Mass., in 1865, and is a son of John 
W. Day. He was reared and educated at Haverhill, 
Mass., where he subsequently ran a restaurant until about 
1900, when he came to Charleroi, Pa., and that same 
year erected part of his present hotel building, which is 
a modern two-story brick building, containing twenty 
rooms, and here ran a restaurant for three years. In 
1906 he completed the building, as it now stands, and 
has since conducted an up-to-date hotel. 

Mr. Day was united in marriage with Beatrice Frost, 
of Portland, Me. He is fraternally affiliated with the 
Elks and the Eagles. 

JOHN P. LINN, justice of the peace, in the borough 
of Burgettstown, has been engaged in business here for 
a number of years, dealing in lumber and builders' sup- 
plies. He was born in Franklin County, Pa., September 
11, 1863, and is a son of William A. P. and Elizabeth 
(Proudfit) Linn. 

The father of Mr. Linn was born in Franklin County, 
Pa., June 27, 1838. He married Elizabeth Proudfit, a 
daughter of John L. Proudfit. Six children were born 
to them: John P., William B., James P., Robert F., 
living, and Edmund L. and Arthur G., both dead. He 
engaged in farming in Franklin County until 1882, when 



he came to Smith Township, Washington County, where 
he resided until 1900, when he retired and moved to 
Burgettstown, where he died March 7, 1907. His burial 
was in Fairview Cemetery, of which his son, John P., is 
a director. His widow survives and resides at Burgetts- 
town. William A. P. Linn was successively an elder in 
three churches — the church in Middle' Spring, Cumberland 
County, Pa. ; the Florence Presbyterian Church, and 
later the Burgettstown Church, in all of these, by precept 
and example, testifying to his Christian faith and zeal. 

John P. Linn attended the public schools of Franklin 
County and the State Normal School at Shippensburg, 
Cumberland Co., Pa., later taking a business course in 
the Eastman Business College, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., 
returning then to Washington County and entering into 
the lumber business at Burgettstown, with a partner, 
under the firm name of Armour & Linn. . When Mr. 
Armour retired, Mr. Linn and brother, William B., con- 
tinued the business, adding builders' supplies to their 
stock. They are representative business men of the 
place. 

On September 30, 1879, Mr. Linn was married to Miss 
Sarah A. Cole, a daughter of Thomas Cole, and they 
have eight children: Thomas C, Elizabeth, William, 
Gertrude, Alice, Mary, John, Jr., and Elsie. Mr. Linn 
is a stockholder and director in the Burgettstown Na- 
tional Bank. He was reared to respect the principles 
of the Democratic party and has always been more or 
less active in politics, and at one time was his party's 
candidate for the State Legislature. With his family 
he belongs to the First Presbyterian Church. He is a 
member of the school board and he belongs to the Masons 
and the Odd Fellows. 

WILLIAM H. McENRUE, reporter of the Common 
Pleas Court of Washington County, Pa., was born Sep- 
tember 29, 1875, in Washington, and is a son of WUliara 
H. McEnrue, who was for several years one of the prom- 
inent lawyers of Washington. His father was born in 
Cambria County, Pa., in 1844, and was for several years 
engaged in the practice of his profession at Wheeling, 
W. Va., after which he came to Washington, was ad- 
mitted to the Washington County bar and embarked in 
the practice of law. He continued until the time of his 
death, August 15, 1877. 

William H. McEnrue, the subject of this sketch, was 
educated in the public schools and the business college of 
Washington. He became assistant court stenographer 
in 1895, in w-hich capacity he served until 1902, since 
which time he has been oflicial stenographer of the Com- 
mon Pleas Court of Washington County. In 1900 he 
was elected secretary of the Washington Borough coun- 
cil and served three years in that capacity. 

Tn 1905. Mr. McEnrue was joined in marriage with 



IIISTOIJV OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



683 



Kliz;iliftli Biiui'i-, of St. Mary's, Pa., who is a daughter 
of M. Q. Bauer, a building coutraetor at St. Mary's. 
They have one child, Sarah Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. 
MeEnrue .are members of thi; Catholic Church, at Wasli- 
ington. 

WILLIAM A. BONAR, one of Donegal Township's 
leading citizens and successful farmers, residing on a 
part of the old Bonar estate, near Vienna, in Donegal 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., was born in this town- 
ship, April 7, 1S.'55. His parents were Satniicl and Eliza- 
betli A. (Anilrews) Bonar. 

There are few older or more iej)res«ntative families in 
Washington County than that of Bonar. There were four 
brothers of the name who came to what is now Donegal 
Township as early as 1770. They found the Indians so 
ho.stile that they left Washington County, several going 
to Maryland, and they did not return and secure their 
patents for government land until 177.5. One of these 
pioneers was Barnet Bonar, who was born in Scotland in 
1695, and his son, William Bonar, accompanied him and 
with three brothers secured 1,200 acres of land, a part 
of which has ever .since remained in the possession of 
the family. 

Bai-net Bonar, the grandfather of William A. Bonar, 
was born on the farm on which the latter lives, January 
14, 1778, and resided here his entire life. He was one 
of the early elders of the Presbyterian Church in this 
section. He married Jane Donahey, a native of Ireland. 

Samuel Bonar, father of William A., was born in Done- 
gal Township, July 9, 1822, and died February 12, 1905. 
He married Elizabeth A. Andrews, who was born in 
Richland County, Ohio, and died in Washington County, 
Pa.. December 29, 1904. 

They had eleven children, namely: Mary, who is the 
wife of S. A. Magill, of Lebanon, Mo.; Barnet L., who 
was born July 31, 1852, graduated from Washington 
and .Jefferson College in 1877, and the Pennsylvania 
Medical University, at Philadelphia, and located for 
practice at Streator, 111., where he died December 21, 
1906; William A.; Jane, who resides in Donegal Town- 
ship; Samuel, who lives at Lebanon, Mo.; Elizabeth P., 
who was born October 27, 1860, died January 16, 1866; 
Sara L., who was born January 21, 1863, graduated 
from Waynesburg College in 1884, married Elmer E. 
Woodburn, of Claysville, Pa., and died November 29, 
1895; James L., who lives in Texas; Anna McConnel 
Bonar, who was born September 5, 1869, died in June, 
1898; Margaret D., who is the wife of .James Patterson, 
resides at Vienna, Pa. ; and Isabel, who was born August 
13, 1875, died February 1, 1881. The late Samuel Bonar 
was a man of sterling character, one who performed every 
public and private duty well and conscientiously. He 
spent his whole life in the quiet jiursuits of agriculture, 



alw-ays, however, finding time to show an interest in 
public matters that affected his own community. He 
served as a member of the Donegal Township school 
board and he identified himself in the late 50 's with the 
Republican party. He was a valued member of the 
I'rosbyterian Church at West Alexander, Pa. 

William A. Bonar attended the Donegal Township 
schools and later Waynesburg College, at Waynesburg, 
Pa. He has followed farming and stock raising almost 
to the exclusion of other business interests, and the value 
of this clo.se attention is shown in his well tilled fields 
and his herds of sleek North Devon cattle, usually fifty 
head or more. His farm contains 150 acres and it is 
not only one of the oldest in the township but is also 
one of the most valuable. Like his ancestors, Mr. Bonar 
is a Republican in politics and a Presbyterian in re- 
ligion. He i.s one of the trustees of the West Alexander 
Church. He has served his political party as a member 
of the County Central Committee and his township as 
road supervisor. He is known in every direction and is 
held in esteem by his fellow citizens. 

WILLIAM BUCHANAN CHAMBERS, of Canons- 
burg, is in the best sense a representative citizen of 
Washington County, having been one of its most popular 
public officials. He has served at different times as 
sheriff, treasurer, and in other offices. He is a native 
son, having been born in Canonsburg, this county, Au- 
gust 14, 1850, son of John and Catherine (Ramsey) 
Chambers. 

His parents were both born in South Strabane Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., in 1813. They came to Can- 
onsburg in 1840. In his minority John Chambers worked 
for some time at the trade of blacksmith. He after- 
wards embarked in the mercantile business in Buffalo 
village, and was also a large wool buyer. After coming to 
Canonsburg he opened a store here for the sale of gen- 
eral merchandise and was thus occupied subsequently 
until his death, which took place October 26, 1885. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Politically 
a Democrat, he served in various borough offices. 

John Chambers was twice married, first to Catherine 
Ramsey, a daughter of Josiah Ramsey, of South Stra- 
bane Township. Of this union there were six children : 
Martha C. Josiah R., John S„ Nancy H., William B., and 
Dora, who is deceased. Their record in brief is as fol- 
lows: Martha C. became the wife of Rev. Dr. W. G. 
Keady, a Presbyterian minister of Greensboro, Ala,, who 
graduated from Jefferson College in 1856, During the 
Civil War he served in the Confederate army. He is 
now deceased. They had two sons — George, who is editor 
of the Alabama "Beacon," and William A., who is 
engaged in the drug business at Commerce, Ga. Josiah 
R., who is now deceased, was a soldier in the 10th Pa. 



684 



HISTOEY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Eeserves dui'ing the Civil War. He married Mary Ellen 
McAfee, who is also deceased. They had two sons and 
five daughters, namely: John, who served in the Philip- 
pines with a California regiment and died on his return 
voyage; William A., who was with the Eed Cross De- 
partment in the Philippines and is now connected with 
an express company at Los Angeles, Calif.; Margaret, 
who married A. H. Sauers and resides in Pittsburg; 
Catherine, who is the wife of John W. Wairick, of Wash- 
ington, Pa. ; Dora, who is the wife of H. F. Hetzell, of 
Bellevue, Allegheny County; Elizabeth, who resides at 
Washington, Pa.; and Martha, who lives with her sister, 
Mrs. Hetzell. 

John S. Chambers, third child of John and Catherine 
(Ramsey) Chambers, was a member of Co. D, 10th Pa. 
Eesen'es in the Civil War, and on the expiration of a 
term of three years served in the signal corps. After 
the close of the war he spent three years in the regular 
army, was killed in a railroad accident in Marion, Ind., 
March, 1895. iSfancy H. is the widow of M. S. McCloy 
and resides in Canonsburg with her only son, W. L. 
McCloy, general superintendent of the Philadelphia Gas 
Co. Dora, now deceased, was the wife of A. E. Gal- 
braith. William B. is the special subject of this sketch. 

The mother of the above mentioned children died in 
Canonsburg in 1854, and Mr. Chambers married for his 
second wife Mrs. B. P. McConneU (nee Watson), a 
widow lady who had one child by her first husband — 
Township. By Mr. Chambers' second marriage there is 
Annie, w-ho married Joseph Kammerer, of Nottingham 
one child, Ida M., who is unmarried and resides in Can- 
onsburg with the subject of this sketch. 

William Buchanan Chambers began his education in 
the common schools and afterwards attended Washing- 
ton and Jefferson College until the close of the fresh- 
man year. While a student there he belonged to the 
Philo and Union Literary Society, and to the Phi Kappa 
Sigma fraternity. His vacations he spent in his father's 
store, gaining an insight into commercial routine. At 
the age of nineteen he left college to enter the mer- 
cantile business at McDonald, Pa., becoming associated 
with the firm of J. D. Sauters & Co., where he continued 
for six years. He then spent over two years in the 
employ of the Valley Milk Co., of Pittsburg. 

He had early begun to take an interest in public af- 
fairs, and as one of the young and active Democrats of 
the county, had rendered effective political service to 
his party. On January 1, 1880, he came to Washington, 
to fill the position of deputy sheriff under Sheriff Per- 
ritte, serving in that capacity three years. In 1882 he 
was elected to the office of sheriff, on the Democratic 
ticket, and served three years — from January 1, 1883, 
to January 1, 1886 — rendering efficient and satisfactory 
service. At the e.xpiration of his term he was appointed 



chief U. S. deputy marshal, under George W. Miller, 
marshal for the Western District of Pennsylvania, serv- 
ing four years, during the first administration of Presi- 
dent Cleveland, and also for four months, under Mr. 
Miller's successor, J. E. Hanna, the latter being an ap- 
pointee of President Harrison. Mr. Chambers served 
for almost five years in that capacity, his removal being 
due to the change of party control in the government. 
He next returned to Canonsburg, where he remained un- 
occupied for a whUe. 

In 1892 he was nomiaated on the Democratic ticket for 
the office of county treasm'er, and was triumphantly 
elected, overcoming a normal Eepublican majority of 
2,000. He thus served until 1896. He was the first 
Democratic county treasurer that had been elected in 
twenty-five years. Later he was further honored by being 
appointed by Governor Patterson to a position on the 
board of managers of the Pennsylvania Eeform School, 
at Morganza, Washington County, and held that position 
until 1897. In 1896 he was the choice of his party as a 
candidate for Congress in Washington County, Pa. At 
times also he has been a member of the town council 
and by appointment served as road and bridge reviewer. 
He has gained popularity as an official and is highly es- 
teemed as a man and citizen. This was early shown, on 
his retirement from the office of sheriff, when, at a ban- 
quet held by the Washington County bar, the following 
sentiment, proposed by Alexander Wilson, Esq., was 
unanimously accepted by the assembly: 

"William B. Chambers, Esq.: — A faithful officer, fear- 
less in the discharge of his duties, pleasant in his inter- 
course with his fellow citizens, kind and obliging to the 
members of the bar and officers of the court. He retires 
from the office of high sheriff of Washington County 
with an honorable record for purity and integrity, and 
with the best wishes of all who have had official and per- 
sonal intercourse with him. ' ' 

In 1895 Mr. Chambers was married to Mrs. Anna (Cole- 
man) Galbraith, who died two years later. She was 
a daughter of Hartman Coleman, a well known resident 
of S. Pittsburg. In 1902 Mr. Chambers was chair- 
man and general manager of the centennial celebration 
of the incorporation of the borough of Canonsburg, Pa. 
Mr. Chambers resides with his sisters at Canonsburg. 
He attends the Presbyterian Church. Since 1904 he has 
been connected with the Philadelphia Company in the 
Canonsburg office. 

JOHN M. PHILLIPS, a highly respected citizen of 
Cross Creek Township, Washington Co., Pa., who has 
been engaged in mining for coal for fifty-five years, is a 
native of Wales, born February 5, 1845. His parents were 
David and Catherine (Davis) Phillips. They had three 
children : Elizabeth, Thomas and John M. Thomas 






'O^ LENO; 'Aii 




CURTIS R. POTTER 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



(-.8? 



came to the United States and lived for a time at Mid- 
way, iu Washington County, Pa., but returned to Wales 
in 1877. Elizabeth was married to David J. Morgan, 
and was living in Luzerne County at her death. 

John M. Phillips was educated iu the select schools of 
the Church of England, in Wales, and was twenty-four 
years old when he started for America, taking passage 
on a sailing ship bound for Quebec. He met with many 
adventures before he reached Pittsburg, Pa., June 1, 
1869, and the recital of these lose none of their interest 
in the telling. Mr. Phillips became a coal miner and con- 
tinued to work in dift'erent parts of Allegheny County un- 
til 1897, with the exception of three years spent at 
Massillon, Ohio, when he came to Cross Creek Township 
and bought land which is richly underlaid with coal. 
Mr. Phillips operates his own mine and from it supplies 
the majority of coal consumers within a radius of some 
eight miles. He has had a large amount of experience 
in coal mining and has seen many changes take place in 
the methods of bringing the precious commodity to the 
surface, and many needed laws made for the better pro- 
tection of miners while engaged in their hazardous work. 

On November 3, 1866, in Eglwysillian, Wales, Mr. 
Phillips was married to Miss Margaret Howells, a native 
of Wales, and the following children were born to them : 
William Lincoln, born in 1872, lives in Eoselle, N. J.; 
Thomas N., born in 1876, lives in Everett, Wash. ; Edwin 
J., born in 1880, lives in Brooklyn, N. Y. ; and Minnie, 
who married William France, of West Middletown, Pa. 
Edwin J. served three years as a member of Co. A, 6th 
U. S. Cav., and served in the Philippines and in the 
Boxers' uprising in China. Mr. Phillips and family 
are members of the Christian Church at Pittsburg. In 
polities he designates himself as a Lincoln Democrat. 
He is a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

CORNELIUS CUERAN, a prominent brick contractor 
of Washington, who in point of service is the oldest con- 
tractor in Washington County, ha.s been a resident of 
this city for about fifty-four years. He was born in 
1850, in Mahoning County, Ohio, but when quite young 
came with his parents to Washington, where he was 
reared and educated, and early in life began working, 
a part of the time, on a farm. In 1869 he started to 
learn bricklaying with Samuel Hargrave, and since 1875 
has been engaged in brick contracting, during which 
time he has worked on many important buildings in 
Washington County, some of his largest contracts being: 
the First National Bank, the Eeed building, Second 
Presbyterian church and chapel. First Presbyterian 
church, the Catholic and Baptist churches, the Washing- 
ton County court house and jail, and jails at other 
points. He was joint contractor in the erection of the 



Wasliington Trust building, the Montgomery building, 
the Siegel Hotel and of many of the ward school build- 
ings of Washington, 

In 1873, Mr. Curran married Addie Spriggs, who was 
born near Wlieeiing, W. Va., and reared at West Alexan- 
der, Pa., where her parents located when she was a girl. 
They have had the following children: Edward S., who 
resides in Chicago, 111., is employed by the American 
Tobacco Company; Margaret, who died when about four- 
teen years old; Charles C, who is engaged in business 
with his father; Ada; Mary F., who is a teacher in the 
Washington public schools; Agnes L., who is bookkeeper 
for her father; and John J., who is a student in the 
Pittsburg College, of Pittsburg. Mr. Curran and family 
are members of the Catholic Church, and he belongs to 
the Knights of Columbus and to the C. M. B. A. 

CUETIS EANDOLPH POTTEE, an honored veteran 
of the Civil War, who has lived retired from business 
cares, in a pleasant and comfortable home at McDonald, 
since 1904, is a highly esteemed citizen of this borough. 
He was born in Brady Township, Clearfield County, Pa., 
Apr. 25, 1845, and is a sou of Joseph and Margaret 
(Postlethwait) Potter. 

The father of Mr. Potter engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits in Clearfield and Indiana Counties, Pa., and in 
those sections the family was a highly respected one. 
To Joseph and Margaret Potter the following children 
were born: Agnes Ann, who married (first) Daniel Cris- 
man, and (second) Henry Elkins; Rachel Ellen, who 
married Joseph Byerly; Curtis Eandolph; Woodward E.; 
Cordelia, who married George Herron ; James B. ; Emma, 
who is now deceased, was the wife of C. C. Stear; and 
Lilly, who married Frank Crean. 

Curtis E. Potter had the usual school advantages of 
the country boy of his youth, and he helped his father 
on the home farm until he left it in order to become a 
soldier when his country needed defenders. He enlisted 
in 1864, in Co. A, 100th Pa. Vol. Inf., this being the 
noted Roundhead regiment, and was honorably discharged 
July 28, 1865. He returned to the home farm for one 
year and then learned the milling trade and was first 
interested in a mill at Venice, in Washington County, 
and then purchased what was known as the McConneU 
mill, and engaged in milling for 20 years, having some- 
thing of a reputation through the country as a fine mil- 
ler. Later he proved that he was equally well equipped 
as a merchant and as a public official. He conducted a 
general store for four years at Venice and during this 
time served as postmaster, having been appointed by 
the late ex-President Cleveland to that ofiice during his 
first term. He then transferred his store to Midway 
and conducted it there for two years, after which he 



688 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



came to McDonald and here engaged in a general store 
business untU lie retired in 1904. He has always been 
a conscientious Democrat. 

In 1869, Mr. Potter was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Thompson, who is a daughter of William and Eliza Jane 
Thompson . Mrs. Potter was reared on her father's farm 
in Washington County. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Potter ate the following; Mary Elmira, who is the wife of 
John S. Campbell; Cecelia, who is the wife of Bert 
Brestle; Lyla Myrtle, who resides at home; and Emma, 
who married Everett Ferguson. Mr. Potter and family 
belong to the First Presbyterian Church at McDonald. 
He has been an elder of the Presbyterian Church for 
the past 28 years. He is a member of the Grand Army 
of the Kepublic post at Carnegie, Pa. 

JOHN SYLVESTER McCLURG, who is now Uving 
retired in the pleasant town of Eldersville, for a number 
of years was successfully engaged in farming and stock 
raising. He was born in Hanover Township, Beaver Co., 
Pa., March 4, 1855, and is a son of William and Nancy 
Ann (Mercer) McClurg. 

The McClurg family is of Scotch descent. William 
McClurg was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., and 
was a son of Joseph and Ruth (McKenzie) McClurg. 
William McClurg was a tiller of the soil as was his father 
and also were his sons. He was as stanch a Democrat in 
his political opinions as he was firm in his adherence 
to the United Presbyterian faith. He married Nancy 
Ann Mercer, who was born in Beaver County, Pa., a 
daughter of Reese Mercer, of Irish birth. To William 
and Nancy McClurg the following children were born: 
Margaret Jane, who died young; Sarah Ann, who is de- 
ceased, was the wife of Robert Johnston; Elizabeth Ada- 
line, who is deceased ; John Sylvester ; Alvin R., who is 
a merchant at Candor, Pa. ; and Joseph and David, 
twins, the former of whom lives near Hookstown, Beaver 
County; and the latter of whom lives near Harsheyville, 
in the same county. The parents of this family are still 
kindly remembered in the section in which their lives 
were spent. Their remains rest in the Mill Creek Valley 
Cemetery, in Beaver County. 

John Sylvester McClurg attended the public schools 
in Hanover Township until he was fourteen years of 
age and then became his father's useful helper on the 
farm and continued in farm pursuits for many years 
afterward and then retired to Eldersville, where he re- 
sides in the enjoyment of ample means. Like his father 
he always supported the Democratic ticket and many 
times was elected to office by that party while he lived 
in the country. He served many years as school di- 
rector in Jefferson Township and for six years was the 
very efficient road supervisor and at present is filling the 
office of .iudge of elections. 



On September 12, 1877, Mr. McClurg was married to 
Miss Mary A. Cunningham, a daughter of Francis and 
Sarah Ann (Burd) Cunningham, prominent farmers of 
Jefferson Township at one time. They are both deceased 
and their burial was in the Bethel Cemetery in Jefferson 
Township. Francis Cunningham was a son of John and 
Susan (Metcalf ) Cunningham. At the time of his death 
he owned 750 acres of land in Washington County. With 
his wife he belonged and gave liberal support to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. To Francis Cunningham 
and wife the following of their children grew to ma- 
turity: Mary, who became Mrs. McClurg; and John, 
David, William, Stephen, Jennie, Emma and James. 

To Mr. and Mrs. McClurg three children have been 
born: Frank, Anna B. and Alverta. Frank McClurg 
is a farmer and dairyman residing in Jefferson Town- 
ship. He maiTied Margaret McCorkle and they have 
one daughter, Gladys. Anna B. McClurg is a highly edu- 
cated lady and is a teacher in the high school at Mid- 
way, Washington County. Alverta McClurg married John 
Johnston, a farmer and dairyman in Jefferson Town- 
ship. They have three children: Arthur, Helen and 
Mary. Mr. McClurg and family are members of the 
Bethel Methodist Protestant Church. 

A. H. KERR, one of the well known financiers of 
Washington County, has served in the cajjacity of cashier 
of the Burgettstown National Bank since 1903. He was 
one of its founders, charter members and stockholders 
in 1879, and was president from 1887 until 1903. He is 
a member of an old and prominent family of this sec- 
tion. He was born at Cross Creek, Washington Co., Pa., 
May 29, 1850, and is a son of I. H. and Jane (Lee) 
Kerr. 

I. H. Kerr was born in Washington County and died 
at Cross Creek, February 2, 1866. He was a son of A. 
H. Kerr, the latter of whom was of Scotch-Irish ex- 
traction and for many years was a leading politician of 
the State, serving several terms in the Legislature. For 
a long period I. H. Ker was a merchant at Cross Creek 
and was known as an honest man and leading and use- 
ful citizen. He married Jane Lee, who still survives, 
aged eighty-two years. Her father was Hugh Lee, one 
of the old settlers of this section. To I. H. Kerr and 
wife were born three children: Anna, who is now de- 
ceased, was the wife of Dr. T. C. M. Stockton; A. H.; 
and M. B., who is a merchant at Winfield, Kas. 

A. H. Kerr attended school at Cross Creek and Duff's 
Commercial College at Pittsburg, lea%dng school in 1866 
in order to take charge of his father's estate, after the 
latter 's death, and continued the operation of the store 
at Cross Creek for thirty-three years and moved to Bur- 
gettstown, in 1895. He has been identified with the 
banking interests of this place since 1879. 



HISTOKY OF WASlUiNliTON COUNTY 



689 



On May 27, 1S7-1, Mr. Korr wus married to Miss 
Ueorgiettii Ciault, a daughter of IJavid aud Matilda 
(Lyle) Gault, and they have two children: Jean Blanche 
aud Grace M., the former of whom lives in New York. 
Mr. Kerr is a member of the First Presbyterian Church 
(if Burgettstovvn. In politics he is a Republican. 

I.OUIS FOLLPrr, whose position with the Standard 
Till Plate Company, of Canonsburg, is that of secretary 
and commercial manager, is a man of large experience 
in this business, having devoted his whole mature life to 
the tin plate industry. He was born in Australia, Au- 
gust 4, ISUo, and came to America in 1891. 

When sixteen years of age, Mr. Follet began work in 
the tin plate factories in South Wales and after com- 
pleting his apprenticeship he showed the ability that 
caused him to be put in charge of the affairs of E. More- 
wood & Company, who, with British capital, erected one 
of the first tin plate plants in this country, located at 
Gas City, Ind., after the passage of the McKinley Tariff 
Bill. He remained there eight years and was assistant 
treasurer of the company. It was then taken over by the 
American Tin Plate Company and Mr. FoUet remained 
in charge for a few months and was then transferred by 
the company and put in charge of the operating de- 
partment with headquarters in New York City. After 
four year.s there in that capacity, in 1904, Mr. FoUet 
came to Canonsburg and became secretary of the Stan- 
dard Tin Plate Company and took charge of its com- 
mercial business. Mr. FoUet is a man of fine address 
aud great business qualifications. His place of residence 
is Grafton, Pa. 

WILLIAM NEWTON HAWKINS, a member of the 
well known firm, Davis & Hawkins, extensive operators 
in the gas and oil fields of Pennsylvania, West Virginia 
and Ohio, w-as for many years one of the leading farm- 
ers and stock raisers of Washington County, Pa. He 
was born in 1855, in East Bethlehem Township, and is 
a son of James C. Hawkins, who was born in 1809, in 
what is now known as Beallsville Borough, and died in 
Washington County, where he spent his entire life en- 
gaged in farming and stock raising. Richard Hawkins, 
grandfather of our subject, was one of the early set- 
tlers of Beallsville Borough, his father, Robert Hawkins, 
being buried in the old Hawkins burying ground about 
one mile from Beallsville. 

William N. Hawkins received his educational training 
in the common schools of his native township, the Jeffer- 
son Academy of Canonsburg, and the Iron City Business 
College, after which he taught for a period of three years. 
He then engaged in farming and stock raising and for 
about twenty years made a specialty of raising Black 
Percheron horses, in which he was highly successful, and 



in 1900, he eamo to Washington, where he has since been 
engaged in the real estate business, making a specialty 
of buying and selling coal lands. He formed a partner- 
sliip with William E. Davis, and they are extensive 
ii[ierators in the territory above named. 

-Mr. Hawkins is a member of the First Baptist Church, 
of which he has been a member of the oflicial board. 
Fraternally he is a Mason. 

In 1881, Mr. Hawkins was married to Addie Farquahr, 
who died in 1893, and they had the following children: 
Leona; Louis F., who taught for three years in the East 
Washington high school, is now principal of the Hickory 
high school ; Mary E.stella, a teacher in the schools of 
Monongahela City; James C, a student at the Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College; and Hannah Anna, a stu- 
dent in Washington Seminary. In 1894, Mr. Hawkins 
married Ida M. Miller, a daughter of Hev. James Miller, 
of Cumberland, and to them have been born four chil- 
dren : Ruth Elizabeth, Glenn D., Margaret, and Helen. 

HUGH WILSON, general farmer of Hanover Town- 
ship, where his fine farm of 130 acres is situated, was 
born at Paris, Washington Co., Pa., where his father 
was then in business, August 15, 1839, and is a son of 
William and Jane (Smith) Wilson. 

Allegheny County contributed many excellent citizens 
to Washington County and one of these was William 
Wilson, father of Hugh, who came from Allegheny and 
settled at Paris, in Washington County, where he car- 
ried on a wagonmaking shop all his life. He was an 
industrious and thoroughly respected man, one who set 
a good example to his children, to whom he gave every 
advantage he could provide in the way of education. 
He was a member of the United Presbyterian Church at 
Paris. He mai-ried Jane Smith, who was born in Jeffer- 
son Township, Washington County, and they had the 
following children: Alexander, Hugh, John and Will- 
iam; Rowenna, deceased, who was the wife of Russell 
Parks; Rachel, who married William Dunbar; and James. 

Hugh Wilson attended the schools at Paris until he 
was eighteen years of age. He desired to be a farmer 
rather than to learn his father '.s trade, and found 
work by the month with farmers in the neighborhood 
of Paris and continued to work in that way for about 
nine years. For some fourteen years following he rented 
farm land, but in the spring of 1880, invested in his 
farm in Hauover Township, purchasing from the Han- 
lin heirs. It is an excellent property and Mr. Wilson 
has made many improvements. 

On March 26, 1868. Mr. Wilson married Miss Ophelia 
Rur^pU. a daughter of John and Jane (Simpson) Rus- 
sell, aud the following children were born; Elenora; 
Synthia, deceased; Margaret, who married James Dun- 
bar; Simpson; James; and Agnes and Dnvi.l, both dp- 



690 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTOK COUNTY 



ceased. Mr. Wilson was married (second) to Mary Ann 
Vincent and they liave had three children: Jane, now 
deceased, who was the wife of Dr. Smith, of Bulger; 
a son that died in infancy; and John E., who was born 
February 4, 1SS2. This fine young man has inherited 
his father 's love of agricultural pursuits and intends to 
devote his entii-e life to farming and stock raising. He 
resides at home and married Miss Minnie Stevenson, a 
member of an excellent family of Hanover Township. 
Mr. Wilson had a great respect for his father's opinions 
and early identified himself with the Democratic party, 
and his son is the third generation of the family to also 
believe in its superiority and work for its supremacy. The 
Wilson family is connected with the Florence Presby- 
terian Church. 

HAEVEY T. BILLICK, M. D., a well known and suc- 
cessful medical practitioner of Monongahela City, Pa., 
was born on a farm in Allegheny County, Pa., July 2, 
18-51, and is a son of Alexander D. and Mary (Hall) 
Billiek. 

Alexander Billiek was born in Elizabeth, Allegheny 
Co., Pa., where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until the time of- his death, which occurred when in his 
seventy-eighth year. He married Mary Hall, a native 
of New Jersey, and they reared a famOy of twelve chil- 
dren : Sarah C, deceased ; Louisa, deceased ; George M. ; 
John H. ; Alexander C; Harvey T., the subject of this 
sketch; Mary J.; James B.; David W. ; Lewis ; Laura 
M. ; and Dora C. 

The boyhood days of Dr. H. T. Billiek were spent on 
the home farm in Allegheny County, and his educational 
training was received in the public schools and the acad- 
emy at Elizabeth, Pa. After teaching school for a 
period of eight years in Allegheny County, he entered 
the P. and S. Medical College at Baltimore, from which 
he graduated an March, 1885, and in August of the same 
year went to Courtney, this county, and was there until 
November, 1896, then to his present location in Monon- 
gahela City, and opened an oflSoe at his present location, 
where he has since been successfully engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession. He is a director of the First Na- 
tional Bank, and is fraternally a member of the Knights 
of Pythias. In politics he is identified with the Demo- 
cratic party, has served two terms on the school board, 
ono term on the select council, and was also elected 
mayor of Monongahela City. 

Dr. Billiek was married December 24, 1885, to Yeurith 
M. Wycoff, a daughter of John W. Wycoff, of Elizabeth 
Township, Allegheny Co., Pa., and they have two chil- 
dren: Lydia M. ; and Eugene W. 

JAMES A. JOEDAN, residing on his valuable farm 
of ninety acres which is situated in Canton Township, is 



successfully engaged in farming and stock raising and 
is held in high esteem as a neighbor and as a citizen. 
He was born in Washington County, Pa., December 20, 
1864, and is a son of Edward and Martha (McClure) 
Jordan. 

The Jordan as well as the McClure families have been 
in Washington County for at least three generations. 
Edward Jordan, W'ho died in 1876, was a son of Peter 
Jordan. James McClure, the maternal grandfather was 
an early settler and was of Lrish parentage. The mother 
of James A. Jordan was b.orn also in Washington Coun- 
ty and now resides in Chartiers Township, being in her 
sixty-fifth year. She is a member of the United Presby- 
terian Church and is active in all good works in the 
neighborhood in which she lives. Four children of Ed- 
ward and Martha Jordan still survive: Hannah B., who 
is the wife of Slate Gomp, resides at Washington; Annie 
M., who is the wife of James Amos, resides also at Wash- 
ington ; James A., of Canton Township ; and William 
C, who is a resident of Pittsburg. Ellen and Nancy 
are deceased. 

James A. Jordan has been engaged in farming ever 
since he was a boy and has made his own way in the 
world to a large extent. He came to his present farm 
early in the 90 's and has made it one of the best in the 
township. Although he never enjoyed many educational 
advantages he is a great friend of the public schools and 
has served as school director a number of times, and in 
other township offices, and in every position he has shown 
wisdom and a desire to further the best public interest. 
In addition to general farming and stock raising, Mr. 
Jordan gives special attention to the growing of fruit 
and also raises very choice vegetables, finding a ready 
market at Washington. 

Mr. Jordan was married (first) to Miss Catherine 
Kelley, a daughter of James Kelley, late of Canton 
Township, and they had the following children born to 
them: Maud M., Clara B., Guy E., of Washington; and 
Edward M., Otha O., Annie M., James P., Emmett, 
Helen M. and Emerson, Emmett being deceased. Mr. 
Jordan was married (second) to Eva G. Mackey, a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania, and they have one son, Carl. Mr. 
Jordan is a member of the North Buffalo United Pres- 
byterian Church. He is a Eepublican. 

CLARK M. HACKNEY, a retired farmer and highly 
respected citizen of Washington, who owns 340 acres of 
fine fanning land in Amwell Township, has been a resi- 
dent of this city for the past three years. He was born 
January 23, 1860; in Amwell Township, and is the only 
living child of Clark and Sophia (Nelan) Hackney. 
Clark Hackney was a native of Fayette County, Pa., who 
came to Washington County at an early period and set- 




ASUrUY p.. ('AL1>W1 



HISTOKY OF WASniNOTON COUNTY 



UU3 



tied in Amwell Township where he engaged in farming 
and stock raising until the time of his death in 1905. 
The mother of our subject died in 1804. 

Clark M. Hackuey grew to manhood in Amwell Town- 
ship, attending the common schools of the township, 
also the Union school, and the Washington and Jefferson 
College, where he was a student for two terms, lln then 
engaged in farming and stock raising in Amwell Town- 
ship, where he was \ery successful and acquired con- 
siderable wealth. He still oversees his valuable farming 
land, although a resident of Washington the past three 
years. 

In 1880, Mr. Hackney waa married to Minerva Shape, 
who was born in Greene County, Pa., and they have 
reared three cliildren : Lillie M.; Charles, who is en- 
gaged in the real estate and insurance business in Wash- 
ington, married Hazel Gaus, and has two children, Don- 
ald Charles and James Bernard; and Lida M., who mar- 
ried John E. UUom. They have one child, Lillie May. 
Mr. Hackney is a member of the Methodist Protestant 
Church of Amity. 

ASBURY B. CALDWELL— It is with a feeling akin 
to reverence that the people of Washington County re- 
call the life and deeds of the late Asbury B. Caldwell. 
Standing foremost in the business world, a leader among 
men, he added materially to the prosperity of the com- 
munity and aided in the development of resources lying 
dormant and undiscovered within the confines of the 
county. As founder and owner of the great store now 
conducted by the A. B. Caldwell Company, as president 
and principal stockholder of the Peoples' Light and 
Heat Company, as owner of the Leader Refining Com- 
pany and in the multitudinous interests he possessed in 
other enterprises, he achieved a success through his in- 
dividual efforts, foresight, sagacity and good manage- 
ment, unparalleled in the history of Washington. Great 
man of affairs that he was, his life was a model of sim- 
plicity and domesticity, his greatest enjoyment came 
from association with his family at his beautiful home 
in the borough, where his leisure hours were spent in 
relaxation from business cares in the study of Nature and 
the culture of flowers, his conservatory being the finest 
in Western Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Caldwell was born in 1829 and was a son of James 
and Esther (McCraeken) Caldwell, and a grandson of 
Samuel Caldwell, who was the first of the family to 
become established in Washington County. The Cald- 
wells are of Scotch-Irish descent and they were among 
the earliest pioneers of Western Pennsylvania. Samuel 
Caldwell erected a cabin in the sparsely settled region 
now known as Buffalo Township, Washington County, 
and there lived in the woods, enduring and rearing his 



family with privations known only to those very early 
settlers. 

James Caldwell, father of the late Asbury 3. Cald 
well, was born in Buffalo Township, Washington County, 
Pa., in 1787, and there followed farming all his days. In 
connection with the tilling of his lands, he conducted a 
public house known as the Caldwell Inn, which was lo- 
cated on the "old West Pike." This place of refresh- 
ment was well known to the early travelers along that 
highway. In 1883, his son, Asbury B., erected a hotel 
on the same site and built on the same plan. In early 
numhood, James Caldwell was joined in marriage with 
Jisther McCraeken, who was of a neighboring pioneer 
family, and they became parents of the following chil- 
dren: Samuel, who died in Missouri; John, who died 
in Illinois; and Joseph, William, Asbury B. and Esther. 
James Caldwell died in 1839, at the age of 42 years, 
leaving his widow with the responsibility of rearing 
their six children. She proved equal to the task and 
to her motherly influence and teachings may be at- 
tributed the characters that were moulded. Her death 
occurred in 1875, when she was aged 75 years. 

Asbury B. Caldwell was reared on the home farm and 
received but a modicum of schooling, developing, how- 
ever, through his own efforts into a clear minded, in- 
tellectual man. He was but 11 years 'of age when his 
father died and it became necessary for him, as well as 
his brothers, to contribute to their own support at a 
very early age. When 16 years old he went to Clays- 
ville, Washington County, where he engaged as a clerk 
for a time, then formed a partnership with a Mr. Still- 
wagon. Under the firm name of Caldwell & Stillwagon, 
they operated a general store for three years, when Mr. 
Caldwell sold his interest to his partner, and in January, 
1852, moved to Washington. He there became manager 
of William Smith's dry goods store and continued with 
that employer for 12 years. In 1865 he resumed busi- 
ness on his own responsibility, opening up a store in the 
room now occupied by the A. M. Brown firm. A close 
application to business and a judicious management of 
the same brought wonderful success and it was soon 
apparent that more commodious quarters must be se- 
cured and this led to his erection, in 1873, of one of the 
finest business blocks in the borough of Washington, on 
Main street, opposite the Court House. Upon its com- 
pletion he filled his store rooms with a complete stock 
of dry goods, carpets, clothing and gentlemen's fur- 
nishings. It soon outstripped all competitors in point 
of size and quality and its immense patronage soon 
pushed the amount of sales to the six figure mark, an- 
nually. At the time of his death. Mar. 27, 1892, Mr. 
Caldwell was the only citizen in Washington paying a 
license of more than $100 per year, for general busi- 



694 



HISTOEY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



ness, which is indicative of the magnitude which his es- 
tablishment reached. 

Aside from his store, Mr. Caldwell turned his attention 
to various business enterprises. He was the pioneer in 
the development of the oil fields adjacent to Washington, 
and had ten producing wells in Buffalo Township. In 
1891 he organized the Leader Eefining Company, of 
which he was owner, and erected a refinery on the Balti- 
more and Ohio Eailroad, seven miles west of Washington, 
which had a capacity of 400 barrels a day. He was one 
of the organizers and the principal stockholder of the 
People's Light and Heat Company, and served as presi- 
dent of the company from its inception until his death. 
He was also a director in the Washington County Fire 
Insurance Company. 

Although Mr. Caldwell through his own inherent quali- 
ties became one of the wealthiest men of Washington 
County, his gain did not remain a purely personal one, 
for no man did more to make Washington the flourish- 
ing and prosperous borough of the present than Asbnry 

B. Caldwell. The residence, now occupied by his widow, 
at No. 140 East Wheeling street, was built by George 
Black ,and he purchased from Mrs. Martha Montgomery, 
and is unsurpassed in this city in its appointments and 
beauty. The broad, well-kept lawn and the magnificent 
conservatory were features in which he took keen de- 
light and to add to their attractions was his constant am- 
bition. He was a Democrat in politics, and although 
well informed on all matters pertaining to State and 
Nation, and believing it the duty of every man to go to 
the polls and cast his vote according to his principles, 
he never actively participated in political affairs. Honest 
and conscientious in all his transactions, vast as they 
were, his friends were numbered almost by his acquaint- 
ances, and in sincere mourning his fellow citizens fol- 
lowed him to his last resting place in the beautiful Wash- 
ington Cemetery. As a neighbor and friend he had 
ever been cordial and sympathetic, and a kind heart 
prompted many charities, which were performed in a 
quiet and unostentatious manner, unknown to the public. 
He held the affection and confidence of the people to a 
remarkable degree, and had he aspired to a public career, 
would have had the loyal support of his constituents. 

In 1858, Mr. Caldwell married Miss Mary Lonkert, a 
lady of the highest type of womanhood, who also is of 
a prominent and respected pioneer family of the county. 
The following children were born to this union: Minnie 

C, who is the wife of Dr. George Warne, of Chicago, 
III. ; George C, who died leaving a widow, Mrs. Addie 
Caldwell, who resides at No. 78 South Wade avenue, 
Washington; ilrs. Essie Humphrey, who resides at Mt. 
Vernon, N. Y. ; Charles S., who resides at No. 54 West 
Maiden street, Washington, married Eleanor Baird; and 
Mrs. Katherine C. McVcv, vvlio resides at No. 140 East 



Wheeling street. The surviving children of Mr. Calu- 
well now compose the firm of the A. B. CaldweU Com- 
pany, which under the management of Mr. Charles S. 
Caldwell has maintained the prestige it enjoyed under his 
father's control. 

JOHN EALPH MAXWELL, M. D., a physician and 
surgeon at Washington, a member of the staff of the 
City Hospital and a leading member of his profession 
here, is a representative of one of the oldest and most 
substantial families in Washington County. He was born 
in Mt. Pleasant Township, Washintgon County, in 1878, 
and is a son of the late Robert Graham Maxwell. The 
Maxwell family is of Scotch-Irish extraction, and James 
Maxwell, the great-grandfather of Dr. Maxwell, came to 
Washington County as a pioneer. His son, John Max- 
well, was born in Hopewell Township in 1810. He w-as 
a cabinetmaker by trade but later turned his attention 
to farming. The late Eobert Graham Maxwell, son of 
John Maxwell, was bom in Hopewell Township, in 1840, 
and engaged in farming and stock raising near Buffalo 
village. He died in 1881. 

John E. Maxwell attended the public schools through 
boyhood and then entered Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege, where he was graduated in the class of 1898, im- 
mediately afterward entering the medical department of 
the University of Pennsylvania. On his completion of 
the course he was graduated from that institution in 
1901. Por a year subsequent thereto he was resident 
physician in Mercy Hospital at Pittsburg and from there, 
in 1902, he came to Washington. He devotes himself to 
general practice and keeps in close touch with the prog- 
ress made in his profession through his affiliation with 
leading medical organizations, including the Washington 
County and the Pennsylvania State Medical societies and 
the American Medical Association. He is an active citi- 
zen, taking much interest in good government and for 
some time has been a member of the school board. 

Dr. Maxwell was married in June, 1906, to Miss Eliza- 
beth B. Patterson, a daughter of Josiah Patterson, who 
is one of Washington's esteemed retired citizens. Dr. 
and Mrs. Maxwell have two daughters, Florence Jane and 
Susan Mary. Dr. and Mrs. Maxwell are members of the 
Third Presbyterian Church at Washington. 

EOBEET W. CEISWELL, justice of the peace, in 
Hanover Township, Washington Co., Pa., aud the owner 
of two valuable farms, one containing ninety-seven acres 
and the otlier 132 acres, was born in this township, De- 
cember 7, 1838. His parents were William and Sarah 
(Wallace) Criswell. 

The CrisweU ancestors came . to Washington County 
from the western shore of Maryland. The father, Will- 
iam Criswell, was born near Canonsburg, in Washington 



HISTORY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



695 



County, ;iiul the iiiotlier belonged to tlie old Wallace 
family of Hanover Township. To William and Sarah 
Criswcll the following children were born : Marie, who 
is now deceased, was the wife of Jackson McC'lcland; 
Harriet, who is deceased, was the wife of Mahland H. 
Stokes; Robert W. ; and Sarah A., who married R. S. 
Work. William Criswell was a hatter by trade but the 
latter part of his life was spent in a farm in Hanover 
Township, where he died, and his burial was at Florence. 

Robert W. Criswell was mainly educated in select 
schools at Florence and after he put aside his books he 
assisted his father on the farm until he entered the 
Federal army as a soldier for the suppression of the 
rebellion. He enlisted on September 13, 1861, in Co. 
A, 85th Pa. A^ol. Inf., and served until November 22, 
1864, serving all that time without a single furlough. 
He participated in the battles of Williamsburg and Fair 
Oaks and at the latter was wounded in the right side by 
a musket ball. He was placed in a hospital at White 
House, Va., from which he managed to escape in ten 
days and made his way back to his regiment. He also 
participated in the siege of Charleston on Morris Island 
in 1863. From that time on he saw very hard service 
and took part in some of the fiercest fighting that dis- 
tinguished his regiment as one of the most courageous 
bodies of men in the whole army. His immediate com- 
mander was Gen. Quincy A. Gilmore. He escaped with- 
out further injury and at the end of his term of enlist- 
ment was honorably discharged and returned to the home 
farm. 

On May 4, 1865, Mr. Criswell was married to Miss 
Harriet L. Tucker, a daughter of David and Sarah 
(Watt) Tucker, both natives of Pennsylvania. Mrs. 
Cri.swell was the third born in a family of eight children, 
the others being: Angelina, who is deceased; Mary E. ; 
John W., who was killed during the Civil War, in the 
battle of the Wilderness; R. C, David S., Lemuel J., 
and Sarah J., who married Dr. Graham. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Criswell two children were born : 
John T. and Sallie B. John T. was born February 18, 
1866, and died November 6, 1902. Sallie B. was born 
August 2, 1869, and died January 7, 1908. She married 
Charles S. Ewing and they had two children: Robert 
Harley and Charles Wayne. Mr. and Mrs. Criswell are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Hanover 
Township. Like his late father, Mr. Criswell is a Repub- 
lican. In 1900 he served acceptably as township census 
enumerator. He is a valued member of W. S. Bradley 
Post, No. 286, G. A. R., at Burgettstown. 

ROBERT M. EAGLESON, M. D., physician and 
surgeon at California, Pa., has built up a substantial 
practice here and has become identified with the leading 
interests of this college town. He was born in Mercer 



County, Pa., January 25, 1870, and is a son of John and 
Margaret (Clark) Eagleson. 

Dr. Eagleson was reared in Mercer County and ob- 
tained his primary education in the local schools and 
afterward attended the Edenburg State Normal School, 
and Grove City College. He spent the following three 
years in teaching school, remaining in Mercer County 
during two years of this time and spending the third 
year in Lawrence County. During this period he had 
completed his preliminary medical studies and then entered 
the medical department of the Western University of 
Pennsylvania, at Pittsburg, and from that institution he 
was graduated in the class of 1897. He immediately 
entered into practice at Cross Creek, Washington County, 
remaining there until August, 1899, when he established 
himself at California, where his professional ability has 
been recognized and appreciated. 

Dr. Eagleson was married to Miss Ella Lytle, who is 
a daughter of Joseph Lytle. He is identified with the 
fraternal order of Elks and he belongs also to various 
medical organizations. 

LIEUT. A. S. EAGLESON, a leading citizen of Can- 
ton Township, Washington Co., Pa., and a surviving 
veteran of the great Civil War, to which he devoted three 
years of his early manhood, was born in Hopewell Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., in March, 1836, and is a son 
of Rev. John and Mary (Stewart) Eagleson. 

Rev. John Eagleson, D. D., who was a very prominent 
clergyman of the Presbyterian body in Pennsylvania, for 
many years, was born in Harrison County, Ohio, on the 
same day that witnessed the birth of Abraham Lincoln, 
and in many respects their characters were similar. In 
1829 he graduated from Jefferson College at Canonsburg, 
later from the Western Theological Seminary and before 
coming to Washington County, in 1833, he had been 
licensed to preach. He was a man of religious zeal and 
of scholarly attainments and for forty years was pastor 
of the Upper Buffalo Presbyterian Church. His death 
occurred January 23, 1873. He was married (first) to 
Mary Stewart, and three children were born to that 
union, namely: A. S. ; David S., who became a physician 
and is now deceased; and William S., who is a Presby- 
terian minister, residing at Columbus, Ohio. The second 
marriage of Dr. Eagleson was to Mary Gordon, and five 
children were born to them : Alexander G., who is a 
Presbyterian minister residing in Guernsey County, Ohio; 
Henry G., who is a farmer residing at Midway, Washing- 
ton County, Pa., Jane G., now deceased, who was the 
wife of Samuel D. Blancy, of Taylorstown ; and Hannah 
and George, both of whom reside near West Liberty, 
Ohio County, W. Va., 

A. S. Eagleson attended the Hopewell Township schools 
and Buffalo Acadcmv. and afterward taught school f(ir 



696 



HISTOEY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



several years. The outbreak of the Civil War determined 
his career for the three succeeding years, for he enlisted 
in 1S61, in Company K, Sth Pa. Reserve Vol. Corps, which 
was identified with the Army of the Potomac. He par- 
ticipated in many of the most important battles of that 
period, including: Mechanicsville, the seven days fight- 
ing in the Peninsula, the Second Battle of Bull Run, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, Battle of the Wilderness, and 
Spottsylvania Court House, and he participated in the 
skirmishing and long and weary marching that fell to 
the soldier's lot. He gained promotion for bravery and 
at one time received a painful wound. He is identified 
with W. F. Templeton Post, No. 120, G. A. R., at 
Washington, of which he is past commander. Lieut. 
Eagleson, with tender emotion, recalls many of his brave 
comrades who shared hardships with him and remembers 
with especial affection the gallant tent-mate who carved 
for him the keystone watch charm he wears with pride, 
while the Sth Regiment was camping on the battlefield 
of Antietam. 

After he had received his honorable discharge from 
military service, Lieut. Eagleson returned to Hopewell 
Township, where he engaged in farming and stock rais- 
ing, and to a moderate degree he has also been a breeder 
of Shorthorn cattle. Besides this, he has made a busi- 
ness of surveying, and is a director in the Citizens' 
iSfational Bank. In his younger years he took a lively 
interest in politics and frequently was elected to county 
ofiSces. He served three years as county treasurer and 
one term as county surveyor. 

Lieut. Eagleson was married in 1864, to Miss Jennie 
M. Pyles, of Washington County, who died in January, 
1875. She was a daughter of James and Ann Eliza 
(Smith) Pyles, the former a farmer of Hopewell Town- 
ship. They had four children born to them, namely : 
John, who resides at home; James P., who is a prominent 
attorney at Washington; and Margaret Smith and An- 
drew Stewart, both of whom reside at home. Lieut. 
Eagleson is a member of the East Buffalo Presbyterian 
Church, in which he has been an elder for over forty 
years. Formerly he was active in the Masonic fraternity. 
He is a lineal descendant of the Byers people who were 
pioneer settlers of East Finley, from 1780 to 1790, 
whose descendants have become prominent from Penn- 
sylvania to California. 

CARL E. GIBSON, a prominent young attorney and a 
member of the well known law firm, McHvaine, Vance 
& Gibson, of Monongahela City, Pa., was born July 9, 
1873, in Fallowfield Township, Washington Co., Pa., and 
is a son of Capt. James B. Gibson. 

Carl E. Gibson spent his boyhood days on a farm in 
Carroll Township, attended the distirct schools of the 
township, afterwards graduating from the Monongahela 



high school in 1891, having walked to and from school 
each day. He subsequently taught for six years in Alle- 
gheny and Washington Counties, then engaged in the 
lumber business for three years with his brother, J. D. 
Gibson. In 1899 he entered the Pittsburg Law School, 
and after his graduation entered the oflice of B. E. 
Taumbaugh, of Washington, Pa., for one year, and after 
being admitted to the Washington County bar in 1902, 
formed a partnership with Oliver S. Scott, with whom 
he was associated but a short time, their partnership 
being dissolved in the spring of 1903, after which the 
present firm, Mcllvaine, Vance & Gibson was established. 
Mr. Gibson is a Democrat, and was a candidate for dis- 
trict attorney in 1908, and has served as city solicitor 
for Monongahela City since 1904. He is a director in 
the Monongahela City Trust Company, and the First 
National Bank of this city. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Masons, the B. P. O. E., the Jr. O. U. A. M. 
He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Gibson was married (first) September 25, 1895, 
to Mary Lament, who died in November, 1899, leaving 
thi'ee children: Mary, Lois, and Ruth. He was married 
(second) on June 20, 1907, to Jean E. Wyeoff, and they 
reside in a comfortable home at No. 309 Third street. 

D. F. CALDWELL, a prominent dealer in real estate 
and fire insurance, with office in the Washington Trust 
Building, has been a resident of Washington during the 
past fourteen years. He was born in Mt. Pleasant 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., in 1851, and is a son of 
William Caldwell. 

William Caldwell was born in County Down, Ireland, 
and was young at the time of his father 's removal to the 
United States, the latter James Caldwell, purchasing a 
farm in Mt. Pleasant Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
in 1812. He died on that place the following year. Will- 
iam Caldwell spent the remainder of his life on that farm, 
except two years which were passed on a farm he pur- 
chased, located about six miles east of the old home- 
stead. He was a prominent citizen and a strong Aboli- 
tionist, being an important factor in the Underground 
Railway. He was captain of a military company in the 
early days and when the Civil War came on became cap- 
tain of a company of Home Guards. His death occurred 
in 1866, shortly after the close of the war. 

D. F. Caldwell was reared on the old homestead and 
educated in the district schools and at Ohio Central 
College in Morrow County, Ohio, which he atended one 
year. He then returned to the farm and engaged in 
farming and sheep raising successfully until about the 
.year 1895, when he moved to the borough of Washington. 
Here he embarked in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness and has been very active ever since, buying and 
selling real estate extensively and handling rentals. He 




THO-MAS M. REESE 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



699 



handles many of tho old and reliable fire insurance lines, 
and has a well established business in tbis branch. Mr. 
Caldwell has investments in various parts of the county 
and takes rank among the city's most substantial busi- 
ness men. 

In 1885, he was married to Miss Sarah Elizabeth Mc- 
Donald, who was born in Beaver County, Pa., and was 
reared in Hancock County, W. Va. They are members 
of the Second United Presbyterian Church, of which Mr. 
Caldwell has been an elder for a number of years. 

WILLIAM MALCOLM DINSMORE, deceased, for- 
merly one of the best known and leading citizens of Can- 
ton Township, Washington Co., Pa., whose useful life 
was brought to a close in February, 1906, was born on 
the farm where he lived ever afterward, January 25, 
1848. His father was William Dinsmore, his grand- 
father W..S John Dinsmore, and his great-grandfather 
was James Dinsmore, who was of Scotch-Irish parentage. 

William Malcolm Dinsmore grew to man's estate on 
the present farm, which is now occupied by the fifth 
generation. The old ancestral home, of brick construc- 
tion, was built in 1810, and is one of the oldest residences 
in Washington County. The brick for the house was 
burned on the place in 1809. The frame work of the 
barn now standing was erected in 1818. Here William 
M. Dinsmore spent a happy life. He was a successful 
farmer and raised a large amount of good stock and was 
one of the leading sheep growers for many years, fre- 
quently owning 600 head at one time. He was a well 
informed man, having attended the country schools and 
also the high school at Buffalo and later kept posted on 
all current events of the country and directed his busi- 
ness and cast his vote intelligently. He was a Repub- 
lican in his political views and took an interest in public 
matters but was well content with his life as a farmer 
and desired no political favors. He was a liberal sup- 
porter of the Presbyterian Church of Buffalo village and 
served both as church trea-surer and church trustee. 

On November 10, 1875, Mr. Dinsmore was married to 
Miss Margaret J. Dinsmore, who was born in Hopewell 
'iownship, Washington County, and is a daughter of 
William W. and Mary J. (Maxwell) Dinsmore. The 
father was born in Mt. Pleasant Township and the 
mother in Hopewell Township, both being now deceased. 
To Mr. and Mrs. William M. Dinsmore the following 
children were born : John Alvin, S. Adaline, E. Helen 
and Mary Daisy, the latter of whom is deceased. Of the 
above family, J. Alvin is the practical manager of this 
large estate, comprising 287 acres of very valuable land 
situated in Canton Township. He is well qualified, having 
attended the Pennsylvania State Agricultrual College, 
where he took a course in dairying. He is a wide-awake, 
progressive young man, imbued with modern ideas and 



with tho good judgirieiit which assists him in succcsfully 
carrying thcni out. 

ROBERT F. STEVENSON, proprietor of the Steven- 
son Laundry, having the best equipped and most modem 
laundry plant in Washington, Pa., was born in Ligonier, 
Montgoniery County, Pa., October 28, 1863, and was 
eight years old when his parents moved to Corsica, Jef- 
ferson County. In 1877 he accompanied them to Wash- 
ington, Pa. His father, now deceased, was the Rev. 
Ross Stevenson, D. D., who preached through the western 
part of Pennsylvania for over fifty years. 

Robert F. Stevenson was educated in the public schools 
of Ligonier, Corsica Academy, Paris Academy and Jeffer- 
son Academy at Canonsburg. His first self supporting 
work was done as an employe of the grocery house of 
J. A. Stewart & Company, of Chicago, 111., where he re- 
mained for a year and a half, afterward going to the 
Wholesale Fertilizer Company, of the same city, and re- 
maining three years. In 1882 he returned to Washington, 
and in 1889 he started the Stevenson Laundry, on a 
modest scale, having five girls and two men as his full 
working force. The business prospered from the first 
and in 1901 Mr. Stevenson built on his present site. In 
1905 he rebuilt, erecting his three-story brick building, 
on Washington street, the dimensions of which are 30 
by 100 feet. Mrs. Stevenson has made a careful study 
of his business and has spared no expense in equipping 
his plant, every device and up-to-date machine being in 
use that will further the work and ensure satisfaction to 
the patrons. He gives constant employment to eighteen 
girls and eight men and has four laundry wagons. 

In 1S91 Mr. Stevenson was married to MLss Linda E. 
Leech, who was formerly principal of the Second Ward 
school of Washington . They have one son, Pressly. Mr. 
and Mrs. Stevenson are members of the Third Presby- 
terian Church, in which he is an elder. Politically he is 
a Republican, and fraternally, is identified with the 
Masons, Odd Fellow.s and Heptosophs. 

THOMAS M. REESE, justice of the peace at Canons- 
burg and a thoroughly representative citizen, who is also 
engaged in the fire insurance and real estate business, 
was born at Briton Ferry, Wales, May 24, 1872, and is a 
son of John and Mary (Williams) Reese. 

Both parents of Mr. Reese were born in Wales and 
they came to America with their children, in 1882, lo- 
cating at Pittsburg, where the father secured work in 
the steel mills. Two of his brothers, Evan and Charles, 
were already employed in industrial plants in that lo- 
cality. .John Reese and family moved to Canonsburg, 
Pa., in 1883 and he has resided here ever since, with 
the exception of six months spent at nreciiville, in Mer- 



700 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



cer County, Pa., in 1886, and was employed in the 
Canonsburg Steel and Iron Works until he retired. To 
John and Mary Eeese were born three sons and four 
daughters, Thomas M. being the second in order of 
birth. The others are: Elizabeth Ann, who is the widow 
of George Forester, of Canonsburg; Jessie Mary, who 
resides at home; Keziah, who is the wife of Bernard L. 
Conierford, resides at Canonsburg; John Reese, Jr., who 
lives at home; David Charles, who is with the McClin- 
tock- Marshall Construction Company, at Carnegie; and 
Edith, who resides with her parents. 

Thomas M. Eeese began work in the Canonsburg iron 
and steel plant when he was 13 years old, having attend- 
ed school prior to this both at Pittsburg and Canons- 
burg. He worked continuously for the same company 
until 1902, with the exception of one and one-half years 
when he was serving as a soldier in the Philippine 
Islands. He was a member of Co. H, 10th Pa. Vol. Inf., 
and spent one year in the Island of Luzon, and was 
mustered out of the service on Aug. 22, 1899. For about 
one year, Mr. Reese then served as a clerk in the office 
of the Fort Pitt Bridge plant, in 1904 embarking in his 
present business. 

Mr. Reese has been an active citizen, a strong sup- 
porter of law and order and bis efficiency has been 
recognized on many occasions. In 1898 he was elected 
borough auditor for a term of three years, but resigned 
at the end of two years on account of being elected a 
member of the Council, in 1900, for three years, and 
served as the president of that body for one year. In 
1903 he was elected burgess of Canonsburg and served 
most acceptably to all concerned, until 1906, when he 
was elected to the office of justice of the peace, for a 
term of five years. On May 3, 1890, to gratify a mili- 
tary ambition, he made application for a cadetship at 
West Point, but just about that time he was accidentally 
and severely burned and although his examination se- 
cured him the place of alternate, the scar left by the 
burn prevented his appointment. In many ways it 
.seemed an unjust discrimination and was a great disap- 
pointment as he had prepared himself for the rigid ex- 
amination by diligent study. However, other avenues 
of usefulness opened up and his fellow citizens prefer 
to have his advice and help at home rather than the 
credit to them he might have earned as a soldier. 

On Sept. 26, 1906, Mr. Eeese was married to Miss 
Jennie M. Halpin, a daughter of Robert and Mary 
(Higgins) Halpin, of Moundsville, W. Va. They have 
two children: Thomas Halpin, born July 23, 1907; and 
John Paul, bom in June, 1909. Mr. Eeese was reared 
in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

With all classes Mr. Eeese is a popular citizen. He 
has always been sympathetic with the working class and 
during the years when he was closely identified with the 



steel and iron industry as an employe himself, he aiso- 
ciated himself with the great Amalgamated Association 
of Iron, Steel and Tin Workers, where his qualities soon 
made him a leader. As such he represented the local 
body in the National conventions of the association, in 
1893-94-9.5-98 and 1900, 1902 and 1904. On many oc- 
casions his calm judgment assisted in solving perplexing 
questions and in bringing peace where there might have 
resulted war. 

JAMES M. DINSMOEE, a prosperous and highly re- 
spected farmer, who owns 172 acres of valuable land, 
lying along the Washington and Wellsburg road, in 
Hopewell Township, Washington Co., Pa., was born 
September 1, 1853, in this township and has spent his 
life here. His parents were WiUiam WUberforce and 
Mary (Maxwell) Dinsmore. 

The Dinsmore family came among the pioneers to 
Washington County. The great-grandfather, James Dins- 
more, came to America in 1798 and probably settled then 
in this section. Both parents of Mr. Dinsmore have 
passed away and their remains rest in the Upper Buffalo 
Cemetery. They had the following children: Margaret 
J., who is the widow of Malcolm Dinsmore, of Canton 
Township ; Hattie A., who is the wife of Luther Law- 
ton, of Hickory village; James M., of Hopewell Town 
ship ; Benjamin F., who resides in Canton Township ; 
Mary L., now deceased, who was the first wife of J. 0. 
Ely; Robert A., who is a dentist in practice at Cleveland, 
Ohio; and Emma E., who is the second wife of J. O. 
Ely. 

James M. Dinsmore has been engaged in agricultural 
pursuits almost since boyhood. His education was ob- 
tained in the district schools. He owns a fine tract of 
land, one that has been made very productive through his 
careful tillage. His surroundings all indicate thrift and 
comfort. 

Mr. Dinsmore was married November 18, 1880, to Miss 
Flora Donaldson, a daughter of Robert S. and Rachel 
(Walker) Donaldson, of Mt. Pleasant Township, and 
they have an exceedingly intelligent family, all members 
of which have been given superior educational advan 
tages. The eldest daughter, Grace W., is a highly culti- 
vated young lady and talented in music which she 
teaches. She attended BlairsviUe College for two years. 
Mary J., the second daughter, is a graduate of the Wash- 
ington High School. Robert Edwin is a graduate of 
Van Orden's Business College at Washington, and Will- 
iam Lloyd, who attended the University of Pennsyl- 
vania for one year. All yet reside under the home roof. 
The family belongs to the Upper Buffalo Presbyterian 
Church, of which Mr. Dinsmore has been an elder for 
a number of years. Mrs. Dinsmore is much interested 
in the church missionary work. Mr. Dinsmore takes only 



IllSTOUV OF WASmXUTOX COUNTY 



701 



the interest of a voter in polities, lie is a Republican 
and frequently has been importuned to accept ofliees, 
but has always decliued such honors. 

i 
H.VKRY WINFIELD BLACK CANNON, attorney- 

at-law, has been engaged In the practice of his pro- 
fession since 1906. 

Mr. Cannon was born in the old Black homestead in 
the Twenty-second Ward of Pittsburg, in 1S81, and was 
there reared. After completing the prescribed course 
in the public schools, he entered Washington and Jeffer- 
son Academy, and later Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege. He completed a law course in the University of 
Michigan at Ann Arbor, Mich., graduating with the 
Class of 1906. After spending some time in the West, 
he located in 1908 at Washington, Pa., where he has 
since practiced very successfully. During his short resi- 
dence here he has gained a high position at the bar. 

In June, 1908, Mr. Cannon was married to Miss 
Eleanor Aiken, of Washington, Pa. Fraternally, he is a 
member of Braddoek Lodge, B. P. 0. E. 

BENJAMIN M. TALBOT, editor and manager of 
The Enterprise, a weekly newspaper, and The Bur- 
gettstown Publishing Company, at Burgettstown, Pa., 
is an enterprising young business man, one whose suc- 
cess in journalistic work indicates that he has found 
the right channel for his activities. He was born at 
Denver, Colo., Jan. 15, 1891, and is a son of Robert 
H. Talbot and wife, the former of whom died Sept. 
28, 1902, and the latter of whom is a resident of Bur- 
gettstown, Pa. 

Mr. Talbot attended school at Denver. At the age of 
14 years, after coming to Washington County, Pa., he en- 
tered the Record office at McDonald, where he learned 
the printing trade, coming later to The Enterprise 
at Burgettstown, where, after some months, he was ad- 
vanced to the position of editor and manager. The 
Enterprise is an independent weekly journal, among 
the oldest established in the county, and as it has no 
political bias is acceptable as a purveyor of news to 
every citizen and finds its way into the majority of the 
homes of the town and adjacent country. Mr. Talbot 
is a member of the First United Presbyterian Church 
at Burgettstown. 

HARRY L. WILLIAMS, a busy practitioner of the 
Washington County bar and a member of the reliable 
and able law firm of Mcllvaine & Williams, was born 
in 1871, in Fallowfield Township, Washington County, 
Pa., and is a son of David N. and Julia (Greenlee) 
Williams. 

Francis H. Williams, the grandfather of Harry L., 
built the old stone house in Washington County in 



which the hitter was born, and it is one of the old land- 
nuirks and is still occupied by a member of the family. 
Francis 11. Williams was one of the earliest settlers in 
Fallowfield Township and there his son, David N. was 
born, in June, 1840. David N. Williams is a large 
farmer and an extensive breeder and dealer in sheep, 
and resides within sight of the old place, although on 
his own farm. He married Julia Greenlee, a daughter 
of John Greenlee, of ClarksviUe, Greene County, and 
they had four children, namely : Harry L. ; John A. and 
William J., twins, the latter of whom is deceased; and 
Charles E. John A. Williams served in the 10th Pa. 
Vol. Inf., in the Spanish-American War. He now is 
engaged in farming in Nottingham Township, and 
Charles E. is a farmer in Fallowfield Township. 

Harry L. Williams attended the Washington County 
schools and the California State Normal School, subse- 
quently teaching school for some years and during this 
period did a large amount of j rivate law reading. Later 
he graduated from Duff 's Business College and then 
entered the law department of the University of Michi- 
gan, at Ann Arbor, and was graduated in 1893. He 
did not enter into practice, however, for several years. 
In 1900 he was admitted to the Washington County bar 
and later to all the state courts and ever since has 
commanded a very satisfactory practice. He has been 
a very active and interested citizen and in 1905 he 
served as chairman of the Citizens' Organization, and 
also served acceptably for three years as burgess of East 
Washington. 

On April 6, 1904, Mr. Williams was married to Miss 
Anna Blanche Weir, a daughter of Robert E. Weir, of 
Morris Township, Washington County, and they have 
one child, Julia Inez. Mr. and Mrs. Williams are mem- 
bers of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Wash- 
ington. He is identified prominently with the Elks 
and is jiast exalted ruler of the local organization. 

JAMES M. COLLINS, manager of the Pittsburg Gro- 
cery Company at Canonsburg, was born at Uniontown, 
Fayette County, Pa., Dec. 27, 1880, and is a son of 
James and Mary E. (Bryson) Collins. 

The parents of Mr. Collins reside at Uniontown, where 
the father is superintendent of the jail and court house. 
They reared the following children: Ada, residing at 
home; Belle, wife of George S. Daugherty, of Pittsburg; 
.John, residing at Pittsburg; Charles, a resident of 
Uniontown; James M., of Canonsburg; M. R., residing 
at Pittsburg; and Clara, Edna, Loma and Dorothy, all 
residing at home. 

James M. Collins received his education in the public 
schools and at Madison Academy, at Uniontown. He 
began his business life as an employe of the grocery 
firm of George S. Daugherty & Co.. of Pittsburg, where 



702 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



he remained for sLs years, coraing to Canonsburg on 
June 1, 1904, and since then has been manager of the 
Pittsburg Grocery Company. His experience of eleven 
years in this line has made him thoroughly acquainted 
Tvith the demands of the trade as well as a competent 
judge of commodities and of the best and most eco 
nomical way of handling the same. He is numbered 
with the successful and popular business men of Canons 
burg. 

In Pittsburg, Mr. Collins was married to Miss Cath 
erine Dornberg, a daughter of Herman Dornberg, and 
they have three children: Harold, Euth and Kenneth, 
Mr. Collins and family are members of the Baptist 
Church. In politics he is a Eepublioan. He belongs 
to Chartiers Lodge No. 297, P. & A. M.; Lodge No, 
89.3, Odd Pellows; Lodge No. 204, Knights of Pythias 
and to the Sons of Veterans, his father having been a 
soldier in the Civil War. 

J. OLIVEE PEIGG, a retired farmer of Canton 
Township, "Washington County, now residing at 192 
Jefferson avenue, Washington, Pa., was born Oct. 12, 
1854, in Canton Township and is a son of James and 
Caroline (Mounts) Prigg. 

James Prigg was born in Washington County in 1820, 
a son of Samuel Prigg, who was one of the earliest set- 
tlers of Washington County. James spent his active life 
in general fai'ming and stock raising, the last ten or 
twelve years of his life being passed in Washington, 
where he died Dec. 13, 1895. He was a Democrat in 
polities. He married Caroline Mounts, who was born 
in this county and comes of one of the oldest families 
in this locality. They were the parents of the follow- 
ing children: J. Oliver, the subject of this sketch; Laura, 
who married Stephen Halpin of Washington, Pa.; and 
Amanda, who died at the age of 14 years. 

J. Oliver Prigg was reared and educated in his native 
township, and was there engaged in farming and stock 
raising until two years ago. He then came to Washing- 
ton, where he has since lived in retirement, although 
stUl managing his farming interests in Canton Town- 
ship, where he owns two tracts of land — the homestead 
farm of 118% acres and an additional farm of 75% 
acres on the Taylorstown Eoad. 

On Jan. 13, 18S1, Mr. Prigg was united in marriage 
with Delia Weir, a daughter of William C. and Sarah 
(Mounts) Weir, and a granddaughter of Adam Weir, 
who was one of the pioneers of Washington County. 
Mr. and Mrs. Weir were the parents of the following 
children : William J. ; Mamie C, who married J. C. Hale 
of Oklahoma; and Delia, the wife of the subject of this 
sketch. Two children were bom to Mr. and Mrs. Prigg, 
namely: Minnie Maud, who married C. Vance Linn, and 
resides with her parents; and Harry Cleveland, who 



resides on the homestead farm in Canton Township. 
He married Cora Elizabeth Mounts, and they have a 
son, Le Eoy Mounts Prigg, born Sept. 6, 190S. Mr. and 
Mrs. Prigg are members of the Third Presbyterian 
Church, of which Mr. Prigg is also a member of the 
Brotherhood. 

JAMES STEPHENSON, whose death occurred on 
May 7, 1904, was one of Hanover Township 's esteemed 
and respected citizens for many yeai'S. He was born 
in Jefferson Township, Washington County, Pa., Jan. 
9, 1825, and was a son of Thomas and Isabel (Martin) 
Stephenson. 

The late James Stephenson obtained the usual edu- 
cation of the country boy when he was young and very 
early became acquainted with all the necessary details 
of farm life. He was a quiet, industrious, capable and 
good man, doing his duty to his family, his neighbor- 
hood and his country. Through his good management 
he acquired an excellent farm of 66 acres on which he 
placed many improvements and this property, unin- 
cumbered, belongs to his widow and children. He was 
identified with the Eepublican party. With his wife he 
belonged to the Methodist Protestant Church at Elders- 
ville. He was one of a family of eight children : John, 
James, David, Margaret, Isabel, Cyrus, Nancy and 
Thomas. 

On Jan. 23, 1868, James Stephenson was married to 
Mary C. Crossland, a daughter of George and Mary 
(Iker) Crossland. They never lived in Washington 
County, their home being at Connellsville, in Payette 
County, where Mrs. Stephenson was born, her mother 
dying at her birth. Her father survived but six months. 
She was reared by her paternal grandparents, who were 
Eichard and Eebecca Crosslands. Mrs. Stephenson re- 
sides on the farm in Hanover Township and is a lady 
who has a wide circle of friends. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephenson the following children were born: James, 
who married in the far west and has two children — 
Mary and James; Charles T. and William M., twins, 
the latter of whom is deceased; George, who operates 
the home farm; Ada Belle, who married Theodore Mc- 
Ewen, has one son, Raymond McEwen; Nannie Viola, 
who married James Anderson, has had two children ; 
John Oscar ; Harry Bemis ; Minnie Wilda, who married 
John E. Wilson; and Mary Margaret, who is a teacher 
in Smith Township. 

JOSEPH BENJAMIN PAINTEE, a prominent farm- 
er and stock raiser of Independence Township, operating 
his valuable farm of 160 acres, was born in Westmore- 
land County, Pa., in 1854, and is a son of John and 
Susannah (Williams) Painter. 

The father of Mr. Painter was a substantial farmer 



nrSTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



703 



auj the I'aiiiilj- was a largo one. The lamily record is 
as follows: Maria, who is deceased; Adaline, who was 
the wife of Jacob Mitchell, deceased, of Westmoreland 
County; Catherine, who was the w-ife of James Culbert- 
son, deceased, of Westmoreland County; Christopher, 
who died in Westmoreland County; Jacob, who is de- 
ceased; Tobias, deceased, who spent the greater part of 
his life in Kansas; Harrison, who is deceased; Susan, 
now deceased, who was the wife of Rev. J. M. Hantz; 
Israel, who is now a resident of Missouri; Joseph Ben- 
jamin; and Lucinda, who died in infancy. 

Joseph B. Painter attended the common schools of 
Westmoreland County, West Newton, Mt. Pleasant High 
School, Academy and the Columbia Classical College in 
Lancaster County, and later graduated from the Iron 
City Business College at Pittsburg. He then devoted 
some time to the study of Blackstouc, with a view of 
entering the law, but later abandoned that ambition and 
accejited a favorable opening in the oil business. He 
continued to be identified with that great industry for 
12 years and after retiring from the same, located on 
his present fine farm not far from Avella, where he 
has successfully pursued agriculture ever since. 

In 1877, Mr. Painter was married to Miss Phebe 
Manchester, a daughter of the late Asa Manchester and 
a member of one of the old and leading families of 
Washington County. Mr. and Mrs. Painter have four 
children: Asa Manchester, who is married and resides 
in Independence; J. M., who resides at home and assists 
his father; Stanley H., who is a student in the State 
College of Pennsylvania; and Clarence B., who is a 
student in the Hickory High School. Mr. Painter and 
family belong to the Presbyterian Church of Lower 
Buffalo. 

In politics, Mr. Painter is nominally a Democrat, but 
he reserves the right to vote independently when his 
judgment impels him to do so. Formerly he took a 
lively interest in public affairs and frequently consented 
to hold office, for nine years being a school director in 
Clarion County, and for three years a member of the 
borough council at Edinburg, in that county. In the 
fall of 1909 he was chosen a meber of the United States 
Jury, sitting at Pittsburg. For many years he has 
been prominently identified with Masonry, is a member 
of Washington Lodge No. 164, F. & A. M., and has 
served the Lodge and Chapter by filling the chairs; 
is a member of Syria Shrine of Pittsburg, and was a 
charter member of Edinburg Lodge No. 550 and of 
Clarion Chapter in Clarion County. He belongs also 
to the Elks. He is an active grange worker; is a mem- 
ber of Avella Grange No. 1371, and is district deputy 
of Washington County and a past master of his sub- 
ordinate and Pomona Granges. He is a fluent writer 



and a ready debator. Few men have led a more active 
life than the subject of this sketch. 

EDWARD C. STEWART, superintendent of the Hazel 
Atlas Glass Company of Washington, Pa., has been a 
resident of this city for the past 13 years. He was 
born in Pittsburg, Pa., in 1809, and is a son of James 
C. Stewart, who was for years engaged in railroad con- 
tracting, but spent his later years on a ranch in South- 
western Texas. Mr. Stewart is of Scotch-Ii-ish descent 
and comes of one of Pennsylvania's oldest and best 
families, it having been established in Lancaster County 
during the colonial era and from thence removing to 
Allegheny and Washington Counties at an early period. 

When quite young Mr. Stewart's parents moved to 
Southwestern Texas, where he attended the common 
schools until about 1886, when he came north and lo- 
cated near the "S" Bridge, where he completed his 
education. Upon entering the business world, he was 
first employed in an insurance office in Pittsburg, after 
which he was with the Pittsburg Stone Company until 
1896, when the Atlas Glass Company of Washington 
was established, since which time he has been super- 
intendent of the factory. He is also interested as a 
stockholder in the company, and gives his entire time 
to the business, having no lodge or club affiliations. Mr. 
Stewart attends the Presbyterian Church. 

MORGAN B. PBIGG, a representative citizen and 
farmer of Canton Township, resides on his valuable farm, 
the old Prigg homestead, which contains 150 acres, on 
which he carries on farming and stock raising, and was 
born here. Mar. 24, 1873, a son of Enoch D. and Ma- 
tilda M. (Daniels) Prigg. His father was born in 
Washington County aud hi.s mother in what is now West 
Washington. 

Knoch D. Prigg was born in Washington County, Pa., 
Nov. 11. 1817, and died Aug. 26, 1901. His parents 
were Samuel and Hetty (Dye) Prigg, with whom he 
continued to reside until they no longer needed his 
assistance. In the course of years aud business trans- 
actions he acquired the homestead and lived on it until 
death, later acquiring also other valuable land until his 
possessions aggi'egated 385 acres, some of this land in 
the South owned in connection with a stock company. 
He was married in June, 1858, to Matilda M. Daniels, 
a daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth M. Daniels, who 
was born May 24, 1839, and came of Scotch ancestry. 
To this marriage the following children were born: An- 
drew M., who resides at Washington; Sarah J., who is 
the wife of Charles Taylor, of Canton Township; Isabel, 
who is the wife of E. C. Longdon, of Washington; 
.\nnie C, who is the wife of James Lacoek, of Canton 



704 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Township; and Morgan K., also residing in Canton 
Township. The venerable mother of the above family 
resides on the homestead in Canton Township. 

Morgan E. Prigg has devoted himself closely to ag- 
ricultural pursuits ever since his schooldays ended. He 
has given a large amount of attention to the subject 
of sheep raising and therefore follows it intelligently, 
his choice of stock being the National Delaine. They 
are satisfjang wool growers and possess other desirable 
points. 

On Sept. 29, 1897, Mr. Prigg was married to Miss 
Lillian B. Eamsey, who is a daughter of the late William 
C. Eamsey, who was a very prominent citizen of Wash- 
ington County and former sheriff. He was born in 
Amwell Township Mar. 5, 1843. He married Elizabeth 
Sowers, who was born in West Bethlehem Township, 
Washington County, and they had five children, namely: 
Ulysses B., residing at Washington, Pa.; Levi H., re- 
siding in South Franklin Township; Kate P., living at 
Washington; Wilmetta M., now deceased; and Luuan 
D., who is the wife of Mr. Prigg. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Prigg four children have been born : E. Wray, Florence 
.J.. William L. and Mauveleen M. Mr. Prigg and wife 
are members of the Fourth Presbyterian Church at 
Washington. Like his late respected father, he is a 
Democrat in his political opinions. 

WILLIAM OLAEK BLACK, the founder and managing 
editor of the ' ' Union Labor Journal, ' ' the first Labor 
paper in Washington County, Pa., with oflB.ees in. the 
Brown Building, Washington, Pa., was bom in this city 
May 23, 1873, a son of George W. Black, Jr. His pa- 
ternal grandfather, George W. _ Black, Sr., was in the 
tobacco and cigar business, and was the originator of the 
now familiar "stogie." 

George W. Black, Jr., was educated in this county and 
subsequently entered the tobacco business, in which he 
continued until his death. He married Myra Belle Crall, 
of Monongahela, and their children were Samuel, Martha 
Elizabeth, Mary Etta, William Clark, George, Lucy 
Hazlett and Myra. 

The subject of this sketch received his education in 
the public schools of Washington County. On January 
27, 1887, he entered the office of the old "Washington 
County Democrat," to learn the printer's trade. After 
getting some insight into the business, he went to Chi- 
cago, HI., where he found employment for a time on 
the ' ' Inter Ocean. ' ' From the office of that paper 
he went to that of the old Chicago "Mail," and from 
there to the ' ' Morning News. ' ' He next worked on the 
"Times," at the time that pa'per was edited by Carter 
H. Harrison. In September, 1897, he went to the State 
of California, where after some residence received an 
appointment to a position in the State Printing Office 



at Sacramento, and worked there and in the State for, 
some six years. Lived also in Oregon, where he worked 
for some time on the "Eogue Elver Courier," at Grant's 
Pass, Josephine County. He also had considerable 
newspaper experience in the State of Washington, and 
the copper mining regions of Shasta County, Cal., Kes- 
wick, De La Mar, Sallee and Copper City; as well as in 
the Mother Lode gold mining district of California, 
Calaveras and Amador Counties. In April, 1894, he re- 
turned to Washington, Pa., and in March, 1907, founded 
the ' ' Union Labor Journal, ' ' of Washington and Greene 
Counties. This paper is the official newspaper of the 
Washington Central Trade Assembly, of Washington, 
Pa., and also of the Monongahela Valley Central Trades 
Council, located at Charleroi. 

Mr. Black is a member of Typographical Union No. 
456, and for the last seven years has been the Washing- 
ton (Pa.) correspondent for the "Typographical Jour- 
nal. ' ' He was elected delegate from this local to Bos- 
ton (Mass.) in 1908. He was secretary of the Washing- 
ton Central Trades Assembly for three years, serving one 
term as treasurer and was district organizer of the 
American Federation of Labor for Washington, Pa., and 
the vicinity two and a half terms. In politics he is 
independent, and his religious affiliations are with the 
Episcopal Church. Mr. Black is unmarried and resides 
with his mother, Mrs. George W. Black, at No. 276 Lo- 
cust avenue. 

WILLIAM S. VANCE, a representative business man 
of Washington, conducting a drug business at No. 66 
North Main street, can claim descent from two of the 
old and honorable pioneer families of Washington 
County. He was born in South Strabane Township, 
Washington County, Pa., Oct. 24, 1872, and is the 
younger of two sons born to his parents, who were 
William and Nancy (Dinsmore) Vance. 

William Vance was also a native of Washington 
County and died on April 30, 1872. His widow still 
survives and since October, 1874, has occupied her beau- 
tiful Washington home, which is situated at No. 246 
East Beau street. She was born in Washington County 
and is a daughter of Eobert W. Dinsmore, also a native 
of this county, who was engaged in farming and stock 
raising all his life. 

William S. Vance was reared in Washington County. 
He began his education in the public schools, graduating 
with the high school class of 1889 and afterwards at- 
tending Washington and Jefferson College. When about 
17 years old he began the study of pharmacy and was 
employed as a clerk in different drug stores of Wash- 
ington until 1900, when he engaged in the retaU drug 
business for himself at his present stand. He is a grad- 
uate of the Pittsburg College of Pharmacy (now a de- 




WILLIAM CLARK BLACK 



YORK 



l! 



Ck, LENOy. Af-!D 
-_ .1 cQUMDATIOHa 



IIISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



707 



purUin'iit ul' llio Uuivorsitj- oi Pillslmrg) in tlio class 
of ISUtJ. 

Ou Feb. 12, 190G, Mr. Vance was married to Miss 
Lou Catlierine Woodard, uf VVa-shiugtou, Pa., and they 
have one son, William Woodard. Mr. and Mrs. Vance 
arc members of the First Presbyterian Church. He is 
iilciitilii'il fraternally with the Klks. 

JOiliN L. COCKINS, vice president of the First JSa- 
tional Bank of Canonsburg and a prominent citizen, was 
born near Hickory, in Mt. Pleasant Township, Wash- 
ington County, Pa., May 31, 1S47. His parents were 
John and Klizabeth (McCarrell) Cocking. 

The paternal grandfati er of John L. Cockins came 
to Washington County from ijastern Penn.sylvania, at a 
very early date, established a home on the border, as- 
sisted in bringing civilization to what was then a wild 
section, and after a long and useful life, passed away 
and his memory is preserved with that of the other 
pioneers. 

John Cockins, father of John L., was born in Eastern 
Pennsylvania, in 1799, and was a child when the family 
came to Washington County. He became a man of sub- 
stance and spent his entire life in agricultural pursuits. 
His death occurred in July, 1865, when he was aged 66 
years. He married Elizabeth McCarrell, a daughter of 
Lodowick McCarrell, early settlers also in Washington 
County. She died in 1889 in her 84th year and was laid 
by the side of her husband, in a cemetery at Venice, 
Pa. They were parents of ten children, eight of whom 
readied maturity. Vincent, the eldest, became a minister 
in the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church and 
never married. At the time of his death, he was pastor 
of the Fourth Associate Eeformed Presbyterian Church 
of Pittsburg. Lavina married Alexander Russell and 
lived and died at Burgettstown. Margaret and Belle H. 
died unmarried. William married Miss Anna Welch 
and for 40 years they have resided at Lawrence, Kas., 
spending a part of their time in California. He is a 
successful business man and is interested in real estate. 
Martha Jane, who died in Mt. Pleasant Township, was 
the wife of William Berry. James M. is a Presbyterian 
minister, residing at Los Angeles, Cal. He married 
(first) Jennie Bosserman, and (second) Anna Miller. 

John L. Cockins is the youngest born of the above 
family. He was educated in the common schools and 
took a commercial course in the Iron City Business Col- 
lege at Pittsburg, and after his return home engaged in 
farming, operating the old home farm in Mt. t'leasant 
Township until 1875, in which year he moved to Canons- 
burg. He still owns the old homestead, together w-ith 
another farm in Mt. Pleasant Township, a third farm 
in West Finley Township and still another, situated 
at Dinsmore Station, in Smith Township. His interests 



in realty at Canonsburg arc also extensive and he is 
(•onnected with the Canonsburg Land Company, the 
.•\lc.\andcr J^and Company and the Cockins and Johnston 
plat of lots in Canonsburg. He is interested in other 
concerns, being a director as well as vice president of 
tlie First National Bank and a stockholder in the 
Canonsburg Steel and Iron Works. 

In 1873, Mr. Cockins was married to Miss Anna Mor- 
gan, a daughter of Robert and Mary (Martin) Morgan, 
old settlers in Mt. Pleasant Township, who died about 
1891. Mr. and Mrs. Cockins have two children: Howard 
L. and Alice May. Howard L. Cockins was born in 
.Fanuary, 1874, was reared and educated at Canonsburg, 
and for the past 12 years has been engaged in the furni- 
ture business. He married Miss Edith Perritt, a daugh- 
ter of George Perritt, who formerly was sheriff of Wash- 
ington County. Mrs. Cockins was reared at Canonsburg. 
.\lice May Cockins is the wife of Dr. William Inglish, 
a practicing physician at Columbus, O., and they have 
two sons — John C. and William D. Mr. Cockins and 
family enjoy a beautiful modern home, which is located 
on West Pike street, which was completed in 1892. In 
1903 the family visited California, but no climatic nor 
business advantages served to separate Mr. Cockins, 
except temporarily, from Pennsylvania. He has always 
been identified with the Republican party, but has led 
too active a business life to have been able to devote 
much attention to public office. He has, however, served 
as a justice of the peace for a quarter of a century. 
His interest in educational matters has been genuine and 
constant and for nine years he served on the school 
board. He is a leading member of the Chartiers United 
Presbyterian Church, an elder in the same and has done 
much to promote the efficiency of the Sunday-school 
and for some 33 years served as assistant superintendent 
and as treasurer. 

.lAMES F. WESTLAKE, who has been postmaster at 
Independence, Washington County, Pa., since 1903, came 
to this village in 1856. Mr. Westlake was born April 
13, 1846, in West Middletown, Washington County, Pa., 
and is a son of James and Mary (Miller) Westlake. 

Benjamin Westlake, the grandfather of James F., 
was born in Ohio and came to Washington County in 
1826. He was a man widely known in his day as a brave 
and venturesome frontiersman, and made several trips 
by flat-boat to New Orleans, the trip back being made 
on foot, quite an undertaking in those days. On one 
of these return trips, while passing through an Indian 
village, he received a tomahawk wound, which left a livid 
scar on his face. 

.Fames W^estlake learned the trade of shoemaker when 
16 years old at Barnesville, Ohio, and worked with hLs 
uriclc until after his marriage, when ho engaged in busi- 



708 



HISTOEY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



ness on his own account at West Middletown, Pa., and 
there continued to reside for 14 years. When he came 
to Independence, in 1S56, and here carried on Ms trade 
until within four years of his death, which occurred in 
1909. Mr.' Westlake was married to Mary Miller, of 
Donegal Township, and to them the following children 
were born: Jennie, the widow of J. B. Fouch, of Douora; 
James Fletcher; John S., residing in Canton, Ohio; 
Cassius M., minister of the Congregational Church at 
Sheldon, Iowa; William H. S., residing in Salt Lake 
City, Utah; and Bertha, who died in infancy. 

James Fletcher Westlake attended the district school 
of the place of his nativity, and later entered Mt. Union 
CoUege at Mt. Union, Ohio, which he left in 1864, when 
IS years of age, to enlist in the 162nd O. Vol. Inf. at 
Canton, Ohio. He saw foui' months of active service at 
Camp Chase and in Central Kentucky, and after the 
close of hostOities he became a private in the regular 
army and for three years saw service in Southeast Da- 
kota during the trouble with the Sioux Indians. In 
1S6S he came back to Independence, where he went to 
work with his father, as a shoemaker, and he has made 
this city his home to the present time, with the exception 
of two years spent in Fayette County. 

In June, 1873, Mr. Westlake was married to Mary F. 
Fouche, who is a daughter of Samuel and Catherine 
(King) Fouche, of Centerville, Somerset County, Pa., 
and to this union there have been born children, as 
follows: Jeanette, who married Eobert E. Scott, resid- 
ing near Irwin, Pa. ; James Edward, a school teacher 
of Washington, Pa., and Frank Eoss, a clerk in the 
Avella bank. 

Mr. Westlake is a Eepublican in polities, and in ad- 
dition to having been postmaster since 1903, has served 
as township clerk, tax collector and in other capacities. 
For a number of years he has been a trustee of the 
Methodist Church of Independence. 

NOEMAN EMMETT CLAEK, who has practiced law 
in Washington, Pa., since 1885, was born in .what is 
now South Franklin Township, Washington County, Nov. 
8, 1861, and is a son of John Gaylord and Sarah Clokey 
Clark. 

Mr. C'lai'k attended the public schools of the county 
and Washington and Jefferson College, from which he 
was graduated with the Class of 1882. He then regis- 
tered as a law student and was admitted to the bar of 
the county Dec. 16, 1885. He entered upon the practice 
of his profession immediately and in 1886 was made 
deputy clerk of courts of Washington County. Upon 
the death of the clerk he was appointed to fill out the 
unexpired term. He then practiced by himself until 
the year 1889, when he entered the firm of A. W. and 
M. C. Acheson. Upon the retirement of Judge Acheson, 



the firm became Acheson, Irwin and Clark, and later 
Acheson, Clark and Berryman. In 1899, Mr. Berryman 
withdrew from the fii-m and moved to Pittsburg, the 
fii-ni having prior to that time become Clark and Berry- 
man, upon the withdrawal of Mr. Acheson. Mr. Clark 
practiced alone until 1904, when the firm of Parker, 
Mcllvaine and Clark was formed. Since 1907, Mr. Mc- 
Ilvaine and Mr. Clark have been associated alone, the 
firm being Mcllvaine & Clark. They practice in all the 
State and Federal Courts and have offices in the Wash- 
ington Trust Building. Mr. Clark has been solicitor for 
the borough of East Washington since 1894, and enjoys 
the distinction of being the only solicitor that borough 
has had since it was created. He has been local counsel 
for the Baltimore and Ohio Eailroad continuously since 
1893. He is a member of the Washington County Bar 
Association, and the Pennsylvania State Bar Associa- 
tion, and served two terms each as vice-president and 
jjresident of the former body. 

In 1892, Mr. Clark was married to Miss Sarah Hanna 
Flack, a native of Washington County, N. Y., and they 
have three children: John Gaylord, Norman Emmett 
and Mary Foster Clark. 

W. F. SCOTT, general merchant and representative 
citizen at Burgettstown, a member of the Board of . 
Health and identified with many important interests of 
the borough, was born in Smith Township, Washington 
County, Pa., Nov. 7, 1856. His father, E. K. Scott, is 
a general farmer in Smith Township. 

W. F. Scott obtained his education in the local schools 
and at Burgettstown, after which he remained at home 
assisting his father on the farm until he was 23 years 
old. He then came to Burgettstown to enter into busi- 
ness and formed a partnership which resulted in the 
establishing of the firm of McMurray & Scott, which 
continued for ten years. At the close of the decade, 
Mr. Scott sold his interest to his partner and then start- 
ed into a general store business for himself, at his 
present location. He carries a large stock, including 
dry goods and groceries and also handles flour and feed. 
In politics he is a Democrat and has been interested in 
public matters ever since he came to the borough as a 
permanent resident. He has served usefully on the 
borough council and is recognized as one of the re- 
sponsible and representative men of the place. 

On Jan. 19, 1887, Mr. Scott was married to Miss 
Hannah May Lee, a daughter of W. S. Lee, and they 
have two children. Hazel and Merle, both of whom, after 
graduating from the Burgettstown schools, entered a 
seminary near Philadelphia, to pursue a higher course. 
Mr. Scott and family are members of the United Pres- 
byterian Church, with which he has been connected 
since boyhood. 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



ro!) 



A. p. DUIS'CAN, treasurer of the Duncan & Miller 
Glas3 Company, at Washington, and a director in the 
Keal Estate Trust Company, is a representative busi- 
ness man of this eity and has been identified with glass 
manufacturing all his business life. He was born in 
1875, at Pittsburg, Pa., and is a sou of the late James 
E. Duncan, the founder of the present large glass busi- 
ness, with plant situated at Jefferson avenue and Fac- 
tory street. 

A. P. Duncan was educated at Pittsburg and at Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College, Washington, where he was 
graduated in the class of 1896. He immediately entered 
into the business of glass manufacturing, as an employer 
of the iii'm of George Duncan's Sons, and after the 
business was incorporated, in 1900, as the Duncan & 
Miller Glass Company, he became treasurer. The busi- 
ness is one of large importance, employment being 
afforded about 190 people, the output of the factory 
being high grade table glass ware, with a number of 
specialties from private molds. 

JOHN S. McCAETY, one of the old representative 
business men of McDonald, Pa., senior member of the 
firm of McCarty & Sons, dealers in lumber, was born in 
Mt. Pleasant Township, Washington County, Pa., Sept. 
27, 1846, and is a son of John and Jane (Eoseberry) 
MeCarty. 

The parents of Mr. McCarty were farming people in 
Mt. Pleasant Township and in their day were well known 
and highly respected. They were members of the Candor 
Presbyterian Church and were interred in the cemetery 
there. Their parents were Timothy and Jane (MeCon- 
nell) McCarty, and Benjamin and Mary (Donaldson) 
Eoseberry. John S. McCarty, the fifth member of his 
parents' family, is one of the three survivors, Benjamin 
E. and Elizabeth being the others. Martha J., wife of 
Eussell Thompson, Timothy, James H. and Thomas D., 
all are deceased. 

John S. McCarty had common .school advantages in 
his youth and then assisted his father on the home farm 
until he was 30 years of age. About 1879 he embarked 
in the lumber business at Midway and after seven years 
sold out to his brother on account of a desire to visit 
California. He remained in the far West for six years 
and after he returned to Washington County bought a 
one-half interest in a lumber and hardware business, 
which he continued interested in until 1894. In the fol- 
lowing year he came to McDonald and here went into 
business with J. W. Eobb, in April, 190.5, purchasing 
his partner's share and identifying his sons with him. 
The firm does a large business all through this section. 
For four years he served as postmaster at Midway under 
President Cleveland's first administration in Robeson 
Township. 



Ill Uclobur, 1S74, Mr. McCarty was nmrried to Miss 
Anna M. Lindsey, a daughter of William and Anna 
(Vanemen) Lindsey, who were much respected resi- 
dents of Washington County, Mr. Lindsey being a sub- 
stantial farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Lindsey had the follow- 
ing eliildren: Sarah, who is the widow of Eichard Boyce; 
John, who is deceased; Elizabeth, who married Hamil- 
ton Kennedy; Alexander V.; Rebecca, who is deceased, 
was the first wife of Dr. A. C. Stevenson ; Margaret ; 
Keua, who is deceased, was the second wife of Dr. A. C. 
Stevenson; Eobert; Rachel, who married Joseph W. 
Robb; and Anna M., wife of Mr. McCarty. Mr. and 
Mi-s. McCarty have had four children : John W. K. and 
Robert V., are associated with their father in business; 
and Bertie Jane and Clifford, both died young. The 
family attends the Presbyterian Church. Mr. McCarty 
is a member of Garfield Lodge No. 464, F. & A. M., at 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

WILLLVM M. THOMPSON, the well-known gardener 
and successful fruit grower of N. Franklin Township, 
Washington County, who has resided on his present place 
which contains more than 73 acres of enriched land 
since 1903, was born in Ohio County, W. Va., Mar. 2, 
1863. His parents were Armor and Nancy (Linton) 
Thompson. 

The paternal grandfather was a native of Ireland and 
when he came to America he settled in Greene County, 
Pa., and there Armor Thompson was born,, who subse- 
quently moved to Ohio County, W. Va., where he married 
Nancy Linton, whose grandfather, David Linton, was 
born in Scotland, but lived many years in West Virginia. 
Armor Thompson died when his son, William M., was 
15 years old and was survived by his widow until the 
son had about reached his 24th year. 

In all e.'sentials, William M. Thompson is a self-made 
man. He obtained his education in the common schools 
<if Elm Grove, W. Va., and as far as his strength per- 
mitted, assisted his father on the home farm. He was 
only 16 when he took entire charge and continued to 
manage the property for his mother until her death, in 
1891. He then left his native state and came to Wash- 
ington County, Pa., locating in North Franklin Town- 
ship and here followed gardening and fruit growing 
and with such success that he became well known in the 
industries mentioned. In 1903 he secured his present 
land which is favorably situated within a short distance 
of Washington and just off the National Road. It is 
an interesting place to visit and in blossoming and har- 
vest time is a very delightful one. He has set out 2,500 
fruit trees, devoting ten acres to the same, and has al- 
most every variety that will do well in this climate. 
These include 300 apple, 600 peach, 300 pear, 100 plum, 
with quince and cherry trees, all being of choicest se- 



(10 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



lection aud attended to with experienced knowledge, for 
Mr. Thompson has long made a close study of this sub- 
ject. He also raises luscious berries of aU kinds, also 
currants, in fact everything in the line of desirable fruit 
that he can market, either retail or wholesale, at Wash- 
ington. He devotes about 40 acres to general gardening 
and his fresh vegetables are the first that are offered 
from the local markets. He expects, henceforth, to de- 
vote his individual efforts exclusively to fruit growing, 
his present plans being to double his acreage in fruit in 
the coming year. 

Mr. Thompson vras married (first) to Miss Annie 
Einkes, who was a native of West Virginia. He was 
married (second) to Miss Lulu Henderson, a daughter 
of James Henderson, of Dallas, W. Va., and they have 
had three children: Irvm E., Margaret Irene and WUl- 
iam C, the last named being deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thompson are members of the Third Presbyterian 
Church at Washington. In politics he is a Republican, 
and fraternally he is identified with the Knights of 
Pythias, belonging to the lodge at Claysville. 

J. E. FOEEEST, one of Washington's best known 
and esteemed citizens, who has reflected no little credit 
upon this city through his literary work, may almost be 
claimed as a native as he was but one year old when 
his parents moved here from Pittsburg, where he was 
born in 1847. His father, George Forrest, became a 
substantial business man at Washington, conducting a 
tailoring business for many years. 

J. E. Forrest was educated in the Washington schools 
and at Washington College, leaving its halls when but 
17 years of age, to answer his country's call for volun- 
teers. He enlisted m Co. H, 87th Pa. Vol. Inf., in which 
he served untU the close of the war, almost a year later. 
During this period he was never absent from duty a 
single day from sickness, although he was once slightly 
wounded. Upon his return from the army, he took up 
the study of law in the of&ce of Euth & Hamilton, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1867 and for many years 
engaged in the practice of his profession at Washington. 
In the meanwhile, he had developed talent as a writer 
and recently has devoted the larger part of his time 
to literary pursuits. He has contributed to current pub- 
lications and has also published a number of books, both 
of poetry and prose, and has other works ready for the 
publisher. Many readers have enjoyed his poems: "The 
Monongahely Boy, " " The Unreturning Brave, " " Gath- 
ering Home" and "The Sinner's Prayer," and four of 
his works of fiction have had a wide sale: "The Student 
Cavaliers, " "A Tangled Web, " "A Brother 's Sacri- 
fice" and " Setribution. " For some 20 years Mr. For- 
rest was a justice of the peace at Washington and doubt- 
less many of the incidents in his wTitings have a founda- 



tion in the facts of his experience. He is interested 
to a large degree in realty at Washington and is num- 
bered with the substantial citizens of this place. 

Mr. Forrest was married to Miss Belle Boyle, of 
Greensburg, Ind., and they have three children: Daniel 
B., residing at Kenton, Ohio, where he is engaged in the 
tobacco business; Earl Eobert, a graduate of Washing- 
ton-Jefferson College, who is taking a post graduate 
course in Forestry at the University of Michigan; and 
Alma, who is a student at Washington Seminary. Mr. 
Forrest is a member of the First Methodist Episcopal 
Church. He belongs to Templeton Post No. 120, G. 
A. E. 

JOHN T. STARE, who has been proprietor of the 
Hotel Starr at West Brownsville, Pa., since May 1, 1909, 
has been a lifelong resident of West Brownsville, where 
he was born June 18, 1863, a son of Alfred S. and 
Mary E. (McDonald) Starr, who are also residents of 
West Brownsville, the former of whom spent his active 
career engaged in ship carpentering. 

.John T. Starr grew to manhood at West Brownsville, 
Pa., and for many year's worked in the coal mines of this 
vicinity. He also spent about about three years as a 
fireman on the Pennsylvania EaUroad and for about 
seven years ran a boarding house at Brownsville, where 
since May 1, 1909, he has been the owner and manager 
of the Hotel Starr. 

Mr. Starr married Annie Yoders and they have one 
daughter, Mary J. Starr. Mr. Starr is afSliated with 
the I. O. O. F. and the Knights of Pythias, and is a 
man who stands high in the esteem of his fellow men. 

JOHN C. MURPHY, sheriff of Washington County, 
Pa., is one of the county's best known men, for many 
years prior to accepting public oifice, being an educator 
and highly considered in that capacity. He was born 
in Washington County, Pa., June 9, 1857, one of a fam- 
ily of six children born to Franklin B. and Lacy (Wal- 
ler) Murphy. Franklin B. Murphy was a farmer and 
a well-known citizen. He died in 1905; On the maternal 
side, Sheriff Murphy is connected with the old pioneer 
family of Peas. 

John C. Murphy was reared and educated in Washing- 
ton County and throughout life has been loyal to her 
best interests. For 26 years he taught school here, di- 
viding his time between four districts, and from under 
his instruction have gone out many young men and 
women who have reflected credit upon his thoroughness. . 
He is a man of excellent judgment and wise discrimi- 
nation as well as of personal courage and his four 
years of service as deputy sheriff gave the experience 
he needed when he was first elected to the sheriff 's 




■lOMN r. .MTPvPHY 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A3T0R, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



ii;j 



iillii-o in 19l)7, tlip tlutios of which he ussumod in .lauuary, 
1908. 

On Sept. 10, 18S7, Mr. Murphy was married to Miss 
Mary A. Williams, a daughter of Casper Williams, and 
they had a family of five children, four of whom are 
living, namely: J. Russell, Harry W., Edna J. and Kruest 
M. Politically he is a Kepublican and fraternally he is 
an Islk and an Oild Fellow. 

WILLIAM JAMES IIOWARTH, deceased, who, for 
half a century was identified with the business interests 
of Washington, Pa., established and operated the 
Howarth Granite and Marble Works, which is the lead- 
ing concern of its kind in Washington County, Pa. Mr. 
Howarth was born in 1831, in Philadelphia, and died 
in March, 1907, in Washington, where he first established 
himself in business with his brother Joseph, their marble 
works being located upon the present site of the Union 
Trust Company. He subsequently established the Ho- 
warth Marble and Granite Works, which he successfully 
operated until the time of his death, since which time 
the business has been managed by his widow. He was 
a man of unimpeachable integrity. 

In 1880, Mr. Howarth was united in marriage with 
Annie M. Parker, who was born near Van Buren, but 
spent her early girlhood days in Amity, Washington 
County, and has been a resident of Washington, Pa., since 
about 17 years of age. She was educated in the schools of 
this city, after which she taught here about ten years. She 
is a daughter of Capt. Silas and Eliza (Andrew) Parker, 
the former, a native of Washington County, who re- 
cruited Co. D, 140th Pa. Vol. Inf. for the Civil War, 
and although 50 years of age, went into service as cap- 
tain of the company. After nine months of service in 
the army he contracted an illness, from which he sub- 
sequently died after his return home. Mr. and Mrs. 
Parker were the parents of four children, of whom but 
two are living: Mrs. Howarth and W. S. Parker, the 
latter of whom is practicing law at Washington, Pa. 

Mr. Howarth was connected with the Methodist Prot- 
estant Church, of which he was for 18 years secretary 
of the Sabbath school. Mrs. Howarth is a member of 
the same church, and is a prominent worker in the 
church societies and the auxiliary of the Y. M. C. A. 

DeWITT C. PARKINSON, postmaster and a lifelong 
resident of Monongahela City, was bom July 7, 1864, 
in a log house on Gregg street, this city, and is a son 
of John and Mary Catherine (Weaver) Parkinson. 

John Parkinson was bom and reared in Lancashire, 
England, and when about 20 years old came to America 
and located at Monongahela City, Pa., where for some 
time he ran a soap factory, and later became foreman 
in the Union Paper Mills. He died here at the age of 



•17 year^. He married Mary Catherine Weaver, who 
was born in Monongahela City in the log house which 
until recently stood upon our subject's present place. 
She was a daughter of John Weaver, who was one of the 
pioneer settlers of this locality, and her death occurred 
May 15, 1904, at the age of 74 years. Seven children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Parkinson: Richard, de- 
ceased; Eliza, widow of William Rose; Clara, deceased; 
Mary Anna; John, deceased; Dewitt C, subject of this 
sketch ; and Daniel. 

DeWitt C. Parkinson wxs reared in Monongahela City, 
and attended the public schools, later entering the Union 
Paper Mills, where he worked for about eight years, 
after which he worked in the coal mines of Washington 
County fo'r five years. He was then for ten years pri- 
vate night watchman in the business section of Monon- 
gahela City, and in 1904 was appointed postmaster, as- 
suming the responsibilities of that oflSce on June 5, 
1904, in the old location. 

Mr. Parkinson was married to Theresa Behanna, a 
daughter of David and Mary Behanna, of Monongahela 
City. They have five children : Mary C. is the wife of 
Porter Baldwin; Clara; Dewitt C, Jr.; Edward and 
James R. While working as night watchman, Mr. 
Parkinson tore down the old log house on his place, and 
erected his present commodious residence. He is a Re- 
publican in politics and has served as constable and 
assessor for ten years. 

EWING S. MeWREATH, a leading citizen of Mc- 
Donald, who has been identified with many of the bor- 
ough 's most important interests, being secretary and 
treasurer of the McDonald Water Company, the Mc- 
Donald Electric Light Company and the McDonald Sav- 
ings and Trust Company, was bom June 3, 1858, in 
Donegal Township, Washington County, Pa., and is a 
sou of Joseph and Elizabeth (DeFrance) McWreath. 
.roseph McWreath, who is a millwright by trade, is now 
residing in Cross Creek Township, his wife having died 
in 1903 and was biu-ied in the Independent Cemetery. 
E«ing S. McWreath was the eldest of their children, 
the others being: Sylvia, deceased, who was the wife 
of Owen M. Lotten, also deceased; and Grant. 

Ewing S. McWreath first attended the common schools 
of Donegal Township, later entered Hopedale College, 
at Hopedale, Ohio, and subsequently attended the North- 
western State Normal School, from which he was grad- 
uated. He then commenced teaching in the common 
schools, and after nine years thus spent became a teacher 
in the academies, so continuing for six years, the last 
three years being in the Ingleside . Academy at Mc- 
Donald. At the expiration of this period, he became 
identified with the water company, with which he has 
since been connected. Mr. McWreath is a member of 



714 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Garfield Lodge of Masons at McDonald, and of the 
Chapter and Commandery at Pittsburg. He is a Demo- 
crat. With his family attends the First United Presby- 
terian Church at McDonald. 

On Oct. 23, 1SS4, Mr. MeWreath was married to Alice 
Kea, daughter of John C. and Mary (Lyle; Eea. Mr. 
and Mrs. Eea had nine children : Lyle, WiUiam, Jefferson, 
Leander, Joseph, Sarah, Mary, Alice and Eliza. Three 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. MeWreath: J. 
Bea; Mary, a graduate of the Indiana Normal School; 
and Guy A., a student at the McDonald High School. 
J. Eea MeWreath is a gun-pointer on the United States 
battleship Minnesota, which under Capt. John Huboard 
won the championship for markmanship in 1907. 

WILLIAM G. POTTEE, conducting a real estate, fire 
insurance and loan business, with oflices at No. 401 and 
402 Brown Building, Washington, Pa., has also other 
important business interests and is a leading citizen 
here. He was bo^-n in West Finley Township, Wash- 
ington County, Pa., in 1869, a son of William and Mar- 
garet (Hutchison) Potter, and is a grandson of John 
Potter, a native of Now Jersey, who came to Washing- 
ton County about 1810. 

The venerable father of Mr. Potter, William Potter, 
has lived a retired life in Washington, Pa., for some 
years. He was born in 1830 and was brought to Wash- 
ington County in his infancy. His mother having died, 
he was reared in the family of Thomas Supler, who lived 
in Donegal Township. His industrial activities were 
those of a farmer and carpenter. A man of advanced 
thought on moral questions, he was one of the early abo- 
litionists of the county, at a time when abolition was 
a very unpopular doctrine. He married Margaret Hutchi- 
son, who was born and reared in East PJDley To^inship. 
Washington County. She was a daughter of Thomas 
Hutchison, a native of Washington County, whose father 
had come from Scotland and was one of the very early 
settlers in Washington County and the progenitor of a 
family which has taken a prominent part in its affairs. 

William G. Potter attended the public schools of the 
county and completed his education in the State Normal 
School at Edinburg, Erie County, after which he taught 
school for about ten years. He then went into the con- 
tracting and buUding business at Washington, in which 
he continued interested for five years, and this led grad- 
ually to the development of his real estate business. 
He now deals to a large extent in realty and has aided 
largely in attracting capital to this section for invest- 
ment. He is interested also in the Washington Drug 
Company, of which he is secretary and treasurer, and 
fills the same offices with Zinn's Iron Mining Company, 
of Vesuvius, Va. 

In 1897, Mr. Potter was married to Miss Sabina E. 



Ashbrook, of Morris Township, Washington County, who 
was born in September, 1833, a daughter of Absalom 
Ashbrook. Mr. and Mrs. Potter are members of the 
Second United Presbyterian Church of Washington, in 
which he is chairman of the church finance committee. 

Mr. Potter was reared in the principles of good citi- 
zenship and on all occasions he is a hearty worker for 
the public welfare. He is a Prohibitionist in his political 
views and is very active in advancing the interests of 
the Prohibition party, at times even consenting to become 
a candidate on its local ticket. 

JACOB M. HAESHMAN, whose exceUent farm of 
115 acres is situated in Buffalo Township, Washington 
County, Pa., was born on this place Sept. 21, 1847, and 
has always lived here. His parents were Jacob and 
Susan (Bumbarger) Harshman. 

The Harshman family is of German descent. The 
father was a farmer during all his active life and was 
considered a good citizen of Buffalo Township, his 
neighbors electing him to the oflice of road supervisor, 
a position to which considerable prominence is attached. 
He died in 1897, his wife having died in the 60 's. Of 
their family of children the following are living: Mary 
.7., who lives in Ohio, is the wife of Jacob Metzner; 
Eachel, who lives at Wolfstown, Pa., is the widow of 
B. Jenkins, formerly of Washington County; Melissa, 
who lives in South Strabane Township, is the wife of 
Andrew Plymire; Isaac, who lived in West Bethlehem 
Township at the time of his death; Jacob M., of Buffalo 
Township; and Adaline, who died when small. 

Jacob M. Harshman has followed farming and stock 
raising ever since his boyhood passed and his well tilled 
fields, together with his herds of cattle and healthy stock 
in his meadows and pastures testify to the pleasure 
he has taken in an agricultural life, for system and 
thrift is shown on every side. His fine residence was 
erected in 1897 and his other farm buildings are of 
pleasing appearance and of substantial construction. 

Mr. Harshman was married to Miss Mary E. Buck- 
ingham, who was born at Washington, Washington 
County, Pa. Her father, the late Frederick Buckingham, 
was a native of England. Mr. and Mrs. Harshman have 
had six children: Flora, who is the wife of David Wil- 
son, of Washington ; Laura, who is the wife of Charles 
Weirick, of Washington; Mary E., who is the wife of 
Arthur Gromo, of Washington; George D. and John F., 
both of whom live in Buffalo Township ; and Eachel, 
who is yet at home with her parents. Mr. Harshman 
and family are members of the East Buffalo Presby- 
terian Church. In politics, Mr. Harshman is a Eepub- 
lican. He takes no very active part in public matters 
but when important movements are on foot, his felloT 
citizens are pretty sure to seek his advice. 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



715 



W. S. OLIVER, who iras for many years one of the 
leading dry goods merchants of Washington, Pa., was 
born in 1864 in the State of California, a son of G. B. 
aud Sarah (Hewitt) Oliver, and a grandson of John 
Milton Oliver, who was one of the prominent citizens 
and large land owners of Washington, Pa. 

G. B. Oliver was born in 1829, in Washington County, 
Pa., where ho was reared and in boyhood became a clerk 
for William Smith. In 1850 he went to California, 
where he engaged in the mining business until 1864, 
then returned to Washington, where he w'as manager of 
the store for Mr. Smith until 1877, at which time he 
established himself in the dry goods business at No. 
47 North Main street. Here he continued with much 
success until 1890, when he disposed of the business and 
lived in retirement until the time of his death, which 
occurred suddenly, in June, 1903, while visiting his 
daughter in Elwood, Ind. He was united in marriage 
with Sarah Hewitt, a native of Schenectady, N. Y., and 
to them were born four children: George H., deceased; 
Annie, the wife of V. G. Kittle, of California; William 
S., the subject of this sketch; and Walter R., who lives 
in California. 

William S. Oliver was practically reared in the dry 
goods business, entering his father's store when quite 
young, and about 1890, purchased the store from his 
father and became one of the leading dry goods mer- 
chants of Washington, continuing in that business with 
uninterrupted success until Sept. 1, 1909, when he dis- 
posed of the store. Mr. OUver is also concerned as a 
stockholder in various enterprises of this city and is 
extensively interested in Washington real estate. 

In 1891, Mr. Oliver maiTied Annie Crosier, of Phila- 
delphia. He is a member of the fraternal order of Elks. 

A. J. PROUDFIT, one of Smith Township's sub- 
stantial farmers and well-known citizens, owns 160 acres 
of laud richly underveined with coal, having one bank 
opencil aud other work in prospect. He was born near 
Burgettstown, Washington County, Pa., Mar. 20, 1831, 
and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Lyle) Proudfit. 

.John Proudfit was born in York County, Pa., and came 
to Washington County in early manhood. He married 
Elizabeth Lyle, whose father, John Lyle, resided at that 
time near Hickory, and to this marriage ten children 
were born, six sons and four daughters. For some time 
following his marriage, John Proudfit resided in Han- 
over Township, but later sold his property there and re- 
turned for a while to York County, but subsequently 
came back to Washington County and .settled in Smith 
Township, where he and wife died, both aged about 72 
years, and their burial was in Cross Creek Cemetery. 
In their religious belief they were Presbyterians. 

A. J. Proudfit obtained his education in the district 



schools and was reared to farm pursuits. After his 
marriage lie settled on his present farm and, as occasion 
required, put up all the buildings now standing. His 
land is very valuable and it is estimated that at least 
110 acres is underlaid with coal. He pays considerable 
attention to growing sheep and keeps six cows for dairy 
purposes, churning butter about three times a week, for 
which he has a steady demand. He devotes a part of his 
land to fruit orchards and his apples, peaches and plums 
all do well. Like his father, he is identified with the 
Democratic party, but he has never desired to be a poli- 
tician, desiring only to be a useful citizen. 

In January, 1864, Mr. Proudfit was married to Miss 
Elizabeth Porter, a daughter of Andrew Porter, and they 
have one daughter, Ida, who resides with her parents. 
Mr. Proudfit and family are members of the First Pres- 
byterian Church of Burgettstown. 

HERBERT G. VanKEUREN, a substantial business 
citizen of McDonald, Pa., who has chosen this place as 
his field of operation in the insurance Une, was born July 
4, 1860, in Warren County, Pennsylvania, a son of Henry 
and Helen (Gilson) VanKeuren, his paternal grandparents 
being Henry and Margaret VanKeuren, and those on the 
maternal side James and Nancy (Connors) Gilson. 

Henry VanKeuren, who was a lumberman by occupa- 
tion, fought in the Civil War as a private in the 145th 
Pa. Vol. Inf., and died shortly after the close of the war 
from the effects of his army experience, Being buried in 
Crawford County. The mother, who stUl survives, makes 
her home at Long Beach, Cal. The children born to 
Henry and Helen VanKeuren were as follows: Mary, 
deceased, who w as the wife of James Thompson ; Thomas 
B.; Herbert G.; Charles H.; and Hattie. who is the wife 
of George Morhenstecher. 

The educational advantages of Herbert G. VanKeuren 
were limited to attendance in the common schools of 
Warren County, which he left at the age of 17 years to 
enter the oil fields, where he remained until February, 
1909, when he came to McDonald and engaged in the 
insurance business, a line which he had engaged himself 
in as a side issue during the last seven years of his em- 
ployment in the oil fields. He is well and favorably 
known in insurance circles, being special agent for the 
Grand Fraternity of Philadelphia, at McDonald, as well 
as being connected with the Maccabees, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Improved Order of Hcptasophs. He has 
been successful in his business ventures, with the result 
that he is the owner of considerable valuable real estate 
in McDonald. Politically a Democrat, he has taken a 
great interest in local ailairs, but has not accepted 
ofSce. His religious connection is with the First United 
Presbyterian Clmrch. 

On Dec. 23, 1878, Mr. VanKeuren was married to 



rl6 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Mary Harrington, daughter of Thomas and Julia Har- 
rington, farming people of Warren County. They had 
eight children, namely: John; Thomas; Jerry, deceased; 
Mary, Mrs. VanKeuren; Julia, the ivife of John Mans- 
field; Nellie, who was the wife of John Cooney, deceased; 
Margaret, who married Justin Boyer; and Catherine, 
who is the wife of Cornelius Kennedy. Mr. and Mrs. 
VanKeuren have had sis children : Josephine, deceased ; 
Henry, who married Lena Campbell, now deceased, has 
one child, Herbert; and Claud, Blanche, Nellie and 
Everett. 

J. HOWARD CLARKE, whose well improved farm 
of 164 acres is situated in South Franklin Township, 
Washington County, Pa., is a representative citizen of 
this section, where he was born on Nov. 15, 1857. His 
parents are John G. and Sarah (Herron) Clarke. 

The Clarke family is an old and prominent one in this 
section, having been established in South Franklin Town- 
ship by the grandfather, Joseph Clarke, who secured 
land from the Government at an early day. John G. 
Clarke, father of J. Howard Clarke, is one of the vener- 
able citizens of South Franklin Township, of which he 
has been a lifelong resident. For many years he was 
prominent in public life and is one of the three native 
born citizens of Washington County who have been elect- 
ed members of the State Legislature, in which body he 
served with distinction. He married Sarah Herron, who 
was born in North Strabane Township, Washington 
County, and of their children the following survive: 
Catherine L., who resides at Washington, Pa. ; J. Howard, 
who resides in South Franklin Township; Norman E. 
and Mary E., both of whom reside at Washington; J. 
Julius, who is a practicing physician at Pittsburg; Ean- 
kin J., who resides in SoutK Franklin Township ; Albert 
E., who is a prominent dentist at Pittsburg; and Lulu 
A., who lives in South Franklin Township. In his po- 
litical affiliation, Hon. John G. Clarke is a Republican. 
Since he removed from the farm to Washington, a few 
years since, he has been an attendant of the Second 
United Presbyterian Church. He still retains the owner- 
ship of his great stock fai-m of 401 acres, situated in 
South Franklin Township, where he was engaged for 
many years in farming and stock raising. He raises 
horses, cattle and sheep, paying especial attention to 
the latter, keeping from 500 to 600 of the Saxon breed, 
and is credited- with growing the finest wool produced in 
Washington County. Although he has reached his 80th 
year, he remains interested in his business enterprises 
and is still concerned in the public affairs of the coun- 
try, in which he once was an important factor. 

J. Howard Clarke was educated in the schools of South 
Franklin Township, Washington and Jefferson College 
and the iron City Commercial College at Pittsburg, and 



was graduated from the latter institution. For a num- 
ber of years his interests have been mainly agricultural, 
farming and stock raising, to which he has added the 
specialty of fruit growing. He has devoted large sec- 
tions of his land to the cultivation of cherries, peaches, 
plums, pears and berries and those who have visited his 
abundant orchards can never doubt that Washington 
County can produce fruit equal to any other section pro- 
vided scientific knowledge is made use of in the planting 
and care of trees and vines. 

On Nov. 21, 1897, Mr. Clarke was married to Miss 
Sarah Brinton, who was born in Allegheny County, Pa., 
a daughter of the late Stephen Marshal and Mary (Mc- 
Grew) Brinton, who were parents of five children: 
Samuel M., who lives on the old homestead at PitcaLrn; 
Elizabeth (McCleary), who is deceased; M. Homer, a 
prominent citizen of Ellsworth, Iowa; W. M., who is 
now deceased, was a physician of Sharpsburg ; and Sarah. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarke have had four children born to 
them: Elizabeth B., S. Rebecca, Mai-shal B. and Mary 
B. Mr. Clarke and family are members of the Second 
United Presbyterian Church of Washington.. He is a 
man of enterprise and public spirit, a Republican in 
politics, and for six years has served as a member of 
the school board of South Franklin Township. 

CHAELES H. LAMBIE, president and treasurer of 
the Findlay Clay Pot Company, with factories at Find- 
lay, Ohio, and Washington, Pa., the main plant being 
located at Findlay, has been prominently identified with 
this concern since 1901, coming to Washington in 1902, 
when he established a plant in this city. 

Mr. Lambie is a native of Pittsburg, where he was 
reared and educated and subsequently engaged for a 
period o-f ten years as buyer for the Joseph Home Com- 
pany. He then engaged in glass manufacturing at Find- 
lay, Ohio, and was president of the Dalzell, Gilmour & 
Leighton Glass Company until 1899. In 1901 he became 
identified with the Findlay Clay Pot Company, manu- 
facturers of a general line of glass house supplies. Mr. 
Lambie is a stockholder and member of the board of 
directors of the Washington Trust Company and is also 
a stockholder in several other business enterprises of this 
locality. 

In 1882 Mr. Lambie was joined in marriage with Isa- 
bella McClurg, a daughter of James MeClurg. of Pitts- 
burg, and they have reared five children: James, who is 
vice-president and general superintendent of the Findlay 
Clay Pot Company, and Alice, Jessie, Hannah, and Isabel. 

Mr. Lambie is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
He belongs to the 1st Presbyterian Church. 

HIEAM C. HOENEE, residing on the National Road, 
in Canton Township, near Washington, Pa., is one of 



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THE NEW YORK 

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ROBEET H. MILLER, D. 0. 



rilSTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



719 



the leading men and large land owners of this section. 
His farm of 72 acres, situated in Canton Township, pro 
di'ces oil and offers also fine grazing opportunities, and 
lie takes advantage of these and grows cattle and stock, 
and he owns also a stock farm of 200 acres in Greene 
County and Washington County, crossing the line from 
Morgan Township in the former county. Mr. Ilorner 
was born in Morgan Township, Greene County, Pa., Apr. 
16, 1873, am! is a son of Oliver C. and Amy A. (Cox) 
Horner. 

On both sides Mr. Horner comes from goinl, sonnil 
stock, his grandfathers being men of sterling qualities 
and among those who hewed out homes from a practical 
wilderness. Grandfather Cox bore the name of Chris- 
topher and he was one of the earliest settlers in Morgan 
Township, while Hiram Horner, the paternal grand- 
father, accompanied his father, WUliam Horner, from 
Maryland to Fayette County in pioneer days. Family 
records tell of the early troubles with the Indians and 
of the hardships which they faced vrith stout hearts. 

Oliver C. Horner, father of Hiram C, died in Greene 
County, Pennsylvania, in 1890, having been a prominent 
citizen of Morgan Township, serving in township ofiices 
and being a consistent member during the later years of 
life of the Disciples ' Church. 

Hiram C. Horner was reared to manhood in Morgan 
Township and was educated in the schools of Greene 
County. His interests have always been in the lino of 
agriculture and he carries on farming and stock raising 
with the success that follows industry and experience. 
He settled on his present place in Canton Township in 
1906. In politics he is a Republican, as was his late 
father. 

Mr. Horner married Miss Jeannette McMurray. who 
was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, a 
daughter of James and Tillie J. (Dickey) McMurray and 
a granddaughter of James and Catherine (Whitely) 
McMurray. Grandfather James McMurray was born in 
Ireland, Mar. 13, 1796, and was brought to America by 
his parents in his boyhood, and he was reared to man- 
hood on their pioneer farm in Pennsylvania. He was 
married in Washington County, in 1830, to Catherine 
Whitely, and ten children were born to them. After 
marriage he bought a farm of 218 acres, situated in 
Pigeon Creek Valley, near the village of Vanceville, and 
on that farm he .spent the remainder of Us life. He 
was a very active worker in the United Presbyterian 
Church of Pigeon Creek, but he cared little for politics. 
He died Apr. 15, 1875, having survived his wife from 
Dec. 26, 1867. 

James McMurray (2), father of Jlrs. Horner, was 
born near Vanceville, Washington County, Mar. 6, 1844, 
and was reared to manhood on the farm on which he was 
born. On June 2, 1875, he was married to Tillie J. 



Dickey, and they had two children, one of whom died in 
infancy. Mfs. .McMurray died in December, 1878. He 
was married (second) Oct. 9, 1884, to Lucy Craig, of 
near West Middletown, Washington County. After this 
marriage he moved to Kansas City, Mo., where he was 
engaged in the shoe business. He was a member of the 
United Presbyterian Church and was a strong Prohibi- 
tionist in his views on public questions. 

Mr. and Mrs. Horner have four children : John 0., 
.\niy Elizabeth, Hazel C. and Hiram R. The family 
belongs to the Baptist Church. 

ROBERT HORACE MILLER, D. O.. whose office is 
located at 403-4 Brown Building, has been established in 
Washington since February, 1900, and has built up a 
large and lucrative practice. Dr. Miller was born at 
College Springs, Iowa, in 1869. He obtained his literary 
training at Amity College, College Springs, and sub- 
sequently taught school for three years. He then became 
interested in osteopathy and was led to the study of the 
system, later becoming a student in the American School 
of Osteopathy at Kirksville, Mo., where he came under 
the direct teaching of the venerable Dr. Still, the founder 
of this modern system of healing. The prescribed course 
at this institution retains much that a student would 
be required to learn at a medical college of the old 
school, particularly in the department of anatomy, 
physiology and pathology, but for the ordinary thera- 
peutics substitutes the curative methods peculiar to the 
osteopathic system. After Dr. Miller was graduated 
from the Kirksville institution in 1900 he came im- 
mediately to Washington, where he entered into practice, 
being the pioneer practitioner of osteopathy in Wash- 
ington County. He is a member of the American Osteo- 
pathic Association, the Pennsylvania Osteopathic Asso- 
ciation and is president of the Western Pennsylvania 
Osteopathic Society. 

Dr. Miller was married in 1901 to Miss Clara C. Brown, 
of Wooster, Ohio. He is a member of the First United 
Presbyterian Church. 

WILLIAM CRAIG, one of Independence Township's 
substantial and respected citizens, who resides on his 
valuable farm of 200 acres, was born in Independence 
Township, Washington County, Pa., in 1847, and is a 
son of Williani Craig, Sr., who was one of the early set- 
tlers in this section. Other members of the family still 
surviving are his brothers, Robert and John S. Craig, 
both of whom reside in Hopewell Township. 

William Craig had only the educational opportunities 
offered by the pioneer schools near his home, but of these 
he took advantage. He has followed farming and stock 
raising all his mature life and is a representative man in 
this line in Independence Township. As time has gone 



7.20 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



by he has made many substantial improvements and his 
surroundings indicate a large degree of solid comfort. 
He has other investments and is a stockholder in the 
Pittsburg Light and Heat Company. He has given sup- 
port to the Grange movement and belongs to the organ- 
ization at Avella and is also a member of the Washing- 
ton County Agricultural Association; takes a good citi- 
zen's interest in public matters in his township and has 
served two terms as school director. He votes with the 
Republican party. 

Mr. Craig was married Oct. 14, 1S84, to JMiss Ada M. 
Nuzum, a daughter of Joel and Jane (Gillespie) Nuzum, 
of Ohio County, West Virginia, and they have five 
children : Pearl, who attended the Normal School at 
West Liberty, W. Va. ; Helen, who was educated at the 
Normal School of Indiana, and Irene, Pauline and 
AVilliam, all yet students. Mr. Craig and family belong 
to the United Presbyterian Church, in which he is an 
elder. The two older daughters are members of the 
church missionary society and are active in the work 
of this organization. 

THOMAS STUAET GEIEE, one of the representative 
and substantial citizens of Canonsburg, to which place 
he came in ]907 from the old homestead in North Stra- 
bane To'miship, Washington County, was born in the 
old Grier home there, Oct. 5, 1870. His parents were 
James and Hannah (Van Eman) Grier. 

The first of the Griers to come to America was Thomas 
Grier, who moved from Scotland to North Ireland, and 
from Belfast started for the long journey which landed 
him in the United States. He was followed a few years 
later by a brother, but in the immensity of the new 
country they lost each other. Thomas Grier settled first 
in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and moved from there 
to Cumberland, Pa., where he married and reared a fam- 
ily of twelve children. 

.James Grier, son of Thomas the pioneer, was born in 
Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died in 1833. He 
purchased 160 acres of land in North Strabane Township, 
and founded there the Grier homestead, which was in- 
herited by his son, James Grier. For that land he paid 
$10 per acre. He was married (first) to a Miss Espey, 
and after her death married Mary Stuart, of North Stra- 
bane Township.' To this marriage the following children 
■were born: Samuel Stuart, who married a Miss Donald- 
son, and they both died in Columbiana County, Ohio ; 
Thomas, who died in young manhood, was a Presbyterian 
minister; Guion, who died in North Strabane Township; 
David, who was a physician, married and lived and died 
in Illinois; Jane, who died when aged sixteen years; 
James, and several who died in infancy. 

James Grier, father of Thomas Stuart, died Jan. 6, 
1895, in the same house and on the same farm on which 



he was born, in North Strabane Township, and was 
buried on his seventy-fifth birthday. He was a farmer 
during all his active life. He was married in 1858 to 
Hannah Van Eman, who was born in Cecil Township, 
Washington County, and died in January, 1906, in her 
eighty-second year. The parents of Mrs. Grier were 
William and Mary (Brackan) Van Eman and they had 
the following children: Thomas Brackan, who became a 
Presbyterian minister, married (first) Mary Fulton, and 
(second) Rachel Stuart, served a congregation at Maple 
Creek and died in South Canonsburg; Rebecca, who is the 
widow of John Donaldson, formerly of Georgetown, 
Ohio, lives in North Strabane Township ; Jane, who mar- 
ried Simon B. Mercer, who was a professor in the Salts- 
burg Academy; Ann, a twin of Jane, who is now de- 
ceased, married Rev. Wilson Donaldson, a Presbyterian 
minister, who moved to a western State; Hannah, who 
became the mother of Thomas S. Grier, and James, who 
died young. The parents and the grandparents on both 
sides of the family were interred in the cemetery belong- 
ing to the Chartiers Hill Presbyterian Church, of which 
they all were worthy members. 

Seven children were born to James and Hannah Grier, 
namely: Mary "Van Eman, who died unmarried, in 1886; 
Jane, who is the wife of John Neill, resides at Canons- 
burg; Sarah Ann, who resides at Canonsburg; William 
J., who is also a resident of Canonsburg, married Mary 
Belle Rebout, and they have one daughter, Dorothy B.; 
Rebecca L. ; Frances, and Thomas S., of Canonsburg. 

Thomas S. Grier was reared and educated in North . 
Strabane Township and continued agricultural pursuits 
on the old homestead until after his mother 's death. 
When rich coal deposits were discovered on this land, 
contracts for its excavation and sale were made with the 
Pittsburg and Buffalo Coal Company and the work was 
carried on for some years before the surface land was 
sold. It is some of the most valuable land in Washing- 
ton County. 

On Oct. 22, 1908, Mr. Grier was married to Miss 
Blanche Linn Boyle, a daughter of E. B. Boyle, of North 
Strabane Township. Mr. and Mrs. Grier are members 
of the Presbyterian Church. 

THOMAS M. BEBOUT, a representative of a substan- 
tial old family of Washington County, Pennsylvania, 
residing in a beautiful home situated at No. 90 East 
Beau street, owns a valuable farm of 167 acres lying 
in Amwell Township, to which he gives much attention. 
Mr. Bebout was born in North Franklin Township, Wash- 
ington County, Pa., ,luly 20, 1J62, and is a son of William 
N. and Susan (Bebout) Bebout. 

William N. Bebout was born in Amwell Township, 
Washington County, Pa., Feb. 19, 1820. His father, 
Beden Bebout. moved on the farm which our subject now 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



721 



owns in March, 1795, and died there in 1S67. The fain 
ily is of Holland Dutch descent. 

Beden Bebout, father of William N. Bebout, was born 
in Sussex County, New Jersey, Apr. 5, 1773, and came to 
Washington, Pa., in 17SS, accompanied by his brothers, 
Alexander and William, tailors, all young men of thrift 
and industry. Beuen Bebout was a tailor for years. He 
was married Sept. 25, 1794, to Margaret Nemons, 
daughter of William Nemons, and they had thirteen 
chilaren. In 1795 Beden Bebout bought the farm in 
Amwell Township which is now owned by Ids grandson, 
Thomas M. Bebout, and on that place he passed the re- 
mainder of his life, dying Feb. 20, 1S67, at the age of 
ninety-five years. After he commenced farming he only 
worked at his trade in the winter time, going to different 
houses in the neighborhood as was the custom of the 
time, the cobbler also making his rounds, and later came 
the traveling dentist. All the early industries were car- 
ried on on Mr. Bebout 's place, his wife being as in- 
dustrious as himself. The cloth and linen she wove he 
would carry to Bauimore, where the product of her loom 
found a ready sale. William N. Bebout frequently was 
heard to say that until he was twenty-one years of age he 
never wore any garments that had not been woven and 
fashioned by his mother. 

William N. Bebout attended the subscription schools 
in the neighborhood of his father's farm and assisted 
at home as his services were required, and after his mar- 
riage, in 1845, lived for fifteen years longer on the old 
farm. He then purchased a farm in Franklin Township, 
on which he lived for ten years and then sold it and 
bought a farm in Marion County, West Virginia. After 
residing there for eight years he disposed of that prop- 
erty and returned to Washington County and he and wife 
resided in Buffalo Township until 1888, when he pur- 
chased a comfortable home on East Beau street, Wash- 
ington, and in that both Mr. and Mrs. Bebout lived until 
the close of life. His death occurred in 1897, but she sur- 
vived until 1909. They were members of the Second 
Presbyterian Church. In politics he was a Democrat and 
at various times he served acceptably in township offices. 

On Sept. 25, 1845, William N. Bebout married Susan 
Bebout, whose grandfather was a second cousin of Mr. 
Bebout 's grandfather. She was a daughter of Peter and 
Isabel (Cooper) Bebout, who settled in North Strabane 
Township, Washington County, in 1823. He was a soldier 
in the War of 1812. The following children were born 
to William N. and Susan Bebout: Alexander; Isabel; 
Margaret, who married H. L. Barnes; Elizabeth, who 
married Franklin Arnett ; Frank J. ; Nettie, who married 
George Eitchey; Flora, who married W. S. Noble; 
Thomas M., and Ida and Beden, the former of whom 
married Theodore Bell. 

Thomas M. Bebout was six years old when his parents 



moved to Marion County, West Virginia, and during their 
residence there he attended school and then accompanied 
them back to Washington County. He remained on the 
home farm in Buffalo Township until 1884, when he went 
into the liardware and agricultural implement business 
at Morgantown, West Virginia, and continued for two 
years, and then returned to the old farm in Amwell 
Township, on which his grandfatner had settled in 1795. 
He now owns that farm and resided there untU 1905, 
when he took up his residence in Washington. He con- 
tinues to look after his farming and sheep raising, but 
no longer takes part in the actual labor. 

In 1882 Mr. Bebout was married to Miss Martha E. 
Ziegler, and they have two children: Mary Belle and 
William N. Mr. Bebout and family are members of the 
Second Presbyterian Church at Washington. He is a 
member of the fraternal order of Eagles and the Royal 
Order of Moose, and belongs also to the Knights of 
Pythias, the lower lodge and the Uniform Rank. 

D. MAJOR BELL, M. D., a trusted physician and sur- 
geon engaged in the practice of his profession at Clays- 
\ille, Pa., was born at Midway, Washington County, 
Pa., Dec. 7, 1875, and is a son of James and Jane 
(Major) Bell. 

The parents of Dr. Bell both reside in the old home at 
Midway. They were born in North Ireland. The ma- 
ternal grandfather, David Major, at one time lived in 
Smith Township, Washington County, Pa., but later 
moved to Carlton, Kas., where he still resides. 

Dr. Bell attended school at Midway, at Oakdale Acad- 
emy, and completed his purely literary training at 
Duquesne College at Pittsburg, after which he entered 
Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, where he was 
graduated in 1903. He located first at Camden, N. J., 
and from there came to Claysville and here has built up a 
very substantial practice. He is a member of the county 
and state medical societies and also of the American 
Medical Association. 

Dr. jjell married Miss Jennie Russell, a daughter of 
J. C. Russell, of Bulger, Pa., and they have two children: 
.Tames R. and Gladys. He has long been prominent in 
Masonry, having attained the Thirty-second degree. He 
is a member of Trimble Lodge, No. 117, F. and A. M., at 
Camden, N. J.; of Chapter No. 19, Van Hook CouncU, 
of Camden, and of Cyrene Commandery, No. 7, Knights 
Templars, at Camden, and belongs also to Excelsior Con- 
sistory there. During the Spanish-American war he 
was a member of Co. C, 14th Pa. Vol. Inf. Dr. Bell not 
only stands high in his profession, but ranks with the 
most valued citizens of Claysville. 

JOSEPH W. BYEKLY, who is now living retired at 
McDonald. Pa., was for many years identified with the 



722 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



milling business in Washington County as one of the 
proprietors of the Eoller Mills. Mr. Byerly was born in 
Fayette County, Pennsylvania, Aug. 8, 1830, and is a 
son of David and Harriet (Clark) Byerly. 

David Byerly, vrho was a farmer all of his life, died at 
Plumville, Indiana County, where both he and his wife 
were buried. They had the following children : Samuel 
and Levi, who are deceased; Joseph W. ; Mary Jane, 
who is deceased; Sarah, deceased, who was the wife 
of Daniel Eareigh ; Hannah, who is the widow of John 
Walker, and Florinda, who is the widow of Isaac Howard. 

Joseph W. Byerly attended the common schools of 
Fayette County, after leaving which he engaged in farm- 
ing on the home place until he was 21 years old and then 
went to learn the milling business, in which he continued 
throughout the remainder of his active life, a period 
covering 55 years. He was in partnership with C. R. 
Potter as owner of the Eoller Mills for 40 years, and 
after disposing of his interests in this line retired from 
active Ufa and has since Uved quietly at McDonald, 
where he owns considerable real estate. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, as was his father before him, and he 
and his wife are consistent members of the Presbyterian 
Church at McDonald. 

On Oct. 1, 1862, Mr. Byerly was married to Rachel 
Ellen Potter, daughter of Joseph E. and Margaret Pot- 
ter, and three children have been born to this union : 
Clarence E., an oil producer of California; Mary Agnes, 
wife of J. W. Wallace, and Joseph W., in the mercantile 
business at Pittsburg, Pa. 

J. H. KUETZ, a representative business citizen of 
Washington, Pa., a member of the Kurtz & Eamsey 
Monument Company, is a representative of one of the 
oldest families of Juniata County, members of which 
colonized Kurtz "Valley prior to the Eevolutionary War. 
Mr. Kurtz was born in Juniata County, Pennsylvania, 
July 17, 1863. 

When seventeen years old Mr. Kurtz went to Lan- 
caster, Pa., and began to serve an apprenticeship as 
marble and granite cutter and completed his trade at 
Newport, in Perry County. Since then he has been 
employed in some of the largest shops in the country, 
learning important details and different methods so 
that he can claim an all round education in his special 
line of work. In 1903, when he came to Washington, 
h'e entered the shops of the Howarth Marble and Monu- 
mental Works, and after the death of Mr. Howarth he 
managed the plant until in April, 1809. Then, in asso- 
ciation with U. B. Ramsey, he formed the present com- 
pany. They are so equipped that they can do all kinds 
of marble and granite work and they have every reason 
to expect a prosperous business career. 



In 1889 Mr. Kurtz was married to Miss Louisa Kern, 
of Shamokin, Northumberland County, Pa., and they 
have had four children born to them : Earl, Hazel, Carl 
and Marian, a band of bright and intelligent public 
school students. Mr. Kurtz and family are members 
of the Jefferson Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church and 
he is the much beloved superintendent of the Sunday- 
school. He is a member of the beneficiary order of Pro- 
tected Home Circle. 

HON. JOHN N. McDonald, deceased, who served 
in the State Legislature from Washington County, Pa., 
in 1853 and 1858, and held many other positions of 
honor, trust and responsibility, was long a representative 
citizen of his county and a respected resident of Mc- , 
Donald. He was born in Robeson Township, Washing- 
ton County, Pa., Feb. 10, 1820. His education was ob- 
tained in the subscription schools. On Oct. 29, 1862, he 
married Elizabeth M. Lee, a daughter of Maj. William 
Lee, of Cross Creek Township, and they had the fol- 
lowing children born to them: Edward, Jane Craig, Mar- 
garet, William Lee and J. Nesbit. 

In his early years of manhood, Mr. McDonald was a 
Whig, but later identified himself with the Republican 
party and became a man of wide influence in its ranks. 
In addition to serving in the Legislature, he was a dele- 
gate to the Union State Convention, in 1856, and a rep- 
resentative delegate in 1876 and again in 1880 and once 
again in 1884. For many years he was a member of the 
board of directors of Washington and .Jefferson College. 
He was deeply interested in schools and religious bodies 
and formerly was a trustee in the First Presbyterian 
Church at Candor, but in 1886 he became an elder in 
the First Presbyterian Church at McDonald. His death 
occurred May 23, 1889, and his burial was in Raccoon 
Cemetery. 

Edward McDonald, the eldest son, was born on the 
old homestead at McDonald Jan. 11, 1864, and in 1884 
was graduated at Washington and Jefferson College. 
He then took charge of the home farm in partnership 
with his father, and carried on farming and stock rais- 
ing until April, 1892, when he was elected president 
of the First National Bank at McDonald. 

This bank was organized June 15, 1892, with a capital 
stock of $50,000. Its president was Edward McDonald; 
vice president, W. B. Moorhead; cashier, G. S. Campbell; 
and assistant cashier. Miss Ida V. Steen. The directors 
were: W. B. Moorhead, Samuel Shane, J. R. Gladden, 
J. D. Sauters, D. Campbell, P. Hoey, Samuel Sturgeon, 
.1. Hunter and Edward McDonald. The present officers 
are the same as at first with the exception that J. D. 
Sauters is vice president in place of W. B. Moorhead, 
deceased. The present board of directors are: Edward 





^, x^^'o^ft^-^-^^^ 



IllSTOKV ()V WASHIXtiTOX COUNTY 



725 



MclJonalil. .1. i). Siuiters, (1. S. (■aiiipljell, ('. l'Vi-{,nis»n, 
N. G. Cook, Mel Moorhoail, J. X. McDuiinl.l. Samuol 
81i!uip and D. Campbell. 

WILLIAM W. THOMPSON, an umisiialiy prosperous 
agriculturist of Indepeinlcnee Township, where he owns 
a fine farm of 174 acres, was born in Cross Creek Town- 
ship, Washington County, Pa., Mar. 6, 18.58, and is a 
son of James and Mary A. (Provines) Thompson. 

The farm owned by Mr. Thompson is a very old settled 
one, being taken up under the old Doddridge patent, 
which bears the date of 1785. This patent included what 
is now property belonging to the Thompsons, the Mur- 
docks, the Carls, the McConnells and the Manchesters, 
and is recorded at Richmond, Va., as at that time both 
Pennsylvania and Virginia claimed this territory. On the 
Thompson farm at .one time was a blockhouse which 
was erected for a refuge from the Indians. In one 
corner of the farm is an abandoned cemetery which is 
the site of what was once known as Old Chapel, an edifice 
erected by the early Methodists, probably in 1790, and it 
was used as a place of worship until 1866, when it was 
no longer suitable for that purpose and is now used as a 
sheep-house. In the old cemetery, now overgrown with 
briers and underbrush, one may find tombstones in 
memory of those who passed away in 1790, 1793, 1804, 
1812 and later. 

The above farm was the property of the father of its 
present owner and came to the latter by will. Mr. Thomp- 
son has two brothers and one sister, namely: John L., 
who is a farmer and resides at West Middletown; J. P., 
who resides in Washington, Pa., and Dorcas A., who re- 
sides in West Middletown. 

William W. Thompson attended the common schools 
and then turned his attention to farming and stock 
raising and since the death of his father has resided on 
his present place. This land was covered with valuable 
timber and from this alone Mr. Thompson realized .$3,000. 
He is an excellent manager and shrewd business man, 
has progressive ideas, keeps thoroughly posted and is 
numbered with the substantial and representative men of 
Independence Township. 

In 1892 Mr. Thompson was married to Miss Alice M. 
Vance, a daughter of Eobert B. and Mary B. (McCleary) 
Vance, of Independence Township. The widowed mother 
of Mrs. Thompson lives at Independence. They have 
three children: Bertha and Alice, who are students in 
the Independence high school ,and Howard. - 

WILLIAM C. LEET, M. D., who has been a promi- 
nent member of the medical profession of Washington, 
Pa., since 1865, was born in 1838 about three miles north 
of Washington, and is a son of William V. and Elizabeth 
(Fullerton) Leet, and a grandson of Isaac Leet, who 



was iiiHii Mar. 13, 1753, in New Jersey, and was one 
of the earliest settlers of Washington County. 

William V. Leet, who was a farmer and one of the 
early surveyors of Washington County, was born Mar. 
18, 1787, in Washington County, and his wife, who in 
maiden life was Elizabeth EuUerton, was born July 26, 
1800, also in Washington County. They were the parents 
of six children: Nancy M. and Elizabeth, both of whom 
are deceased; Isaac C, who is a civil engineer and a 
resident of Kansas; Daniel W., who is an attorney of 
Milwaukee, Wi.s. ; William ('., anil Sarah Jane, a resident 
of Washington, Pa. 

Dr. Leet was educated in the academy at Buffalo, Pa., 
and the Washington High School, after which he began 
reading medicine in Washington, and in 1865 entered 
upon the practice of his profession at Washington, being 
associated with his preceptor during the first three 
years. Since 1868 he has been alone and has made many 
personal and professional friends, and has always en- 
joyed an extensive and lucrative practice, but for the 
past four years has been gradually withdrawing from 
practice. 

Dr. Leet has been a member of the Presbyterian church 
for many years and is fraternally affiliated with the 
Masonic order. He was joined in marriage Jan. 20, 
1891, with Annie L. Howe, who died Apr. 30, 1904. 
Apart from his medical attainments Dr. Leet is ingenious, 
having patented several useful inventions, and made a 
number of very fine violins. He has almost completed a 
small book of beautiful poems, not yet published. 

J. J. OSBUEN, general farmer in Smith Township, 
where he is operating his valuable farm and meeting 
with much success, is a native of Washington County, 
Pennsylvania, and was born in Bobinson Township, Dec. 
15, 1834. His parents were .Tames and Martha (Mc- 
Kennet) Osburn. 

The father of Mr. Osburn was born in Ireland and he 
was brought to America by his parents, who settled in 
Westmoreland County, where he was reared. He mar- 
ried Martha McKennet and they moved to Bobinson 
Township, Washington County, where he died when his 
eldest son, J. .T., was eight years old. He was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church. There were 
two other sons: G. W. and B. C, the latter of whom is 
deceased. The parents were buried in Miller's Bun 
Cemetery. 

J. J. Osburn obtained his education in the schools 
of Bobinson Township and when quite young began to 
perform farm duties and has devoted the larger part 
01 his life to agricultural pursuits. Following his mar- 
riage he resided for some years on a farm of 138 acres 
in Bobinson Township, in which he has a one-third in- 



726 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTOiSr COUNTY 



terest, and then purchased a farm of 110 acres near 
Dinsmore, and while still owning that, bought the one on 
which he now resides, subsequently disposing of the 
other, and is now cultivating 100 acres in Smith Town- 
ship. 

On July 5, 1S66, Mr. Osburn was married to Miss 
Elizabeth McAdam, who died Feb. 17, 1909, and was 
laid to rest in Pairview Cemetery. She was a woman of 
exemplary life and beautiful character. Eight children 
mourn the loss of a devoted mother, namely: Cora E., 
who married J. V. Sutherland; Eva E., who married 
John B. Blockhard; Nora B., who resides with her 
father; Ida, who died young; Ida (2), who lives at 
home; Oscar L., who married Chess Aekleson; Alvin C, 
who married Alma Blanchard; N-oland C, who lives in 
California, and Kalph E., who lives at home. Mr. Osburn 
and family are members of the Eirst Presbyterian 
Church at Burgettstown. In his political views, Mr. 
Osburn is a Eepublieari and in both Eobinson and Smith 
Townships has been an active party worker and has been 
recognized as a useful citizen. During three terms he 
was president of the Election Board in Eobinson Town- 
ship and has served on the school board, and during his 
term as road commissioner the public highways in his 
district were carefully looked after. 

C. E. PENN, who is engaged in the merchant tailoring 
business at Washington, Pa., and is also manager of the 
Sanitary Cleaning and Dyeing Works at No. 133 South 
Main Street, has been identified with the business inter- 
ests of Washington since 1901 and formerly was a mem- 
ber of the highly successful firm of Penn & Brownlee, of 
this city. He was born near Ninevah, in Greene County, 
Pa., in 1875, and is a son of Hamilton Penn, who is a 
well known resident of Dunn's Station, Washington 
County. 

C. E. Penn was reared in Washington County and 
from the country schools entered Washington and Jeffer- 
son College as a student and after leaving there went to 
Pittsburg, where for five years he was in the tailoring 
and ready-made clothing business. In 1901 Mr. Penn 
came to Washington and for three years conducted a 
merchant tailoring establishment by himself, but in 
1904 he admitted E. E. Bottenfield as a partner, under 
the firm style of Penn & Bottenfield. Later he pur- 
chased Mr. Bottenfield 's interest, about the same time 
adding to his stock and making his leading line men's 
furnishings. In 1907 James P. Brownlee became a part- 
ner and the firm style became Penn & Brownlee. On 
Feb. 1, 1910, Mr. Penn severed his connection with this 
firm and embarked in the merchant tailoring business for 
himself. Mr. Penn is a progressive and energetic busi- 
ness man and has other interests. He was one of the 



organizers of the Sanitary Cleaning and Dyeing Works 
at Washington, in which he is financially concerned. 

In 1903 Mr. Penn was married to Miss Josephine Cun- 
ningham, of Pittsburg, and they have two children : 
Elwood and George. Mr. Penn is a member of the 
Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Fraternally he is an 
Odd Fellow and an Eagle, and socially is connected 
with the Bassett Club. 

JOHN ANTON, a member of the well-known firm of 
George Anton & Brother, of Monongahela City, Pa., 
manufacturers of miners ' lamps, which is the largest and 
most widely known concern of its kind in the United 
States, was born June 10, 184-5, at Alsace Lorraine, Ger- 
many, a son of John and Barbara (Hoggelstine) Anton, 
both of whom were natives of Alsace Lorraine, Germany. 
The father of our subject was for many years a miner, 
but spent his later years engaged in the manufacture 
of pickhandles at Monongahela City, Pa., where he and 
his wife both died. 

John Anton, our subject, was the eldest of a family of 
nine children, namely, John; Mary, who married M. 
Bronson; George, senior member of the George Anton 
& Brother Manufacturing Company; Fred, deceased; 
Christopher L.; Joseph B., who resides in New York; 
Peter, now deceased, was engaged in the practice of 
medicine at Chicago, 111. ; Elizabeth, the deceased wife of 
Samuel Wilton, and Jessie, who married Capt. Armstrong. 
John Anton was but a child when he came to America 
with his parents, who after a voyage of three months 
landed in New York City, where they remained a short 
time, then came to Pittsburg on the canal by the way 
of Harrisburg. The father worked for some time at 
Coal HUl, Pittsburg, and subsequently brought his fam- 
ily to Monongahela City, where John Anton, Jr., was 
reared and spent eighteen years working in the mines. 
In about 1873 this John Anton and his brother, George, 
engaged in the manufacture of miners' lamps, opening a 
small shop on the corner of Second and Jlain Streets, 
where they employed a few men to assist them. They 
later moved to larger quarters on Park Avenue, where 
the business still continued to increase, and they finally 
moved to their present location on Seventh street, where 
they employ about thirty men and manufacture an aver- 
age of 250 dozen lamps per day. Their plant is the 
largest of its kind in the United States, and they ship 
their goods to all parts of the world where miners ' 
lamps are used. Mr. Anton is overseer of the plant, his 
brother George having been retired from business activi- 
ties for the past few years, altuough still retaining his 
interest in the business. Mr. Anton is the owner of a 
business block at Monongahela City, and besides his 
residence property on Third Street, also owns considera- 
ble other real estate. 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



727 



On Nov. 30, 187L', Mr. Anton was uuitccl in marriage 
with Margaret Wisebacker, a native of Buffalo, N. Y., 
and of their union were born four chiUlren: George, who 
is one of the superintendents of the plant, married Let- 
tie Polly in October, 1907; Mary; John, who is engaged 
as one of the superintendents of the plant, and Anna. 
Mr. Anton is a Democrat in politics, and his religious 
connection is with the Catholic Church. 

L. E. STERRETT, secretary of the Franklin-Washing- 
ton Gas Company of Washington, was born in McKean 
County, and is a son of David and Emma C. (Brooks) 
Sterrett. 

David Sterrett was born in Center County, Pennsyl- 
vania, and died in 1907 in Washington, Pa., where for 
twenty years he was engaged in the practice of law, 
and was recognized as one of the leading and most able 
lawyers of the county. For many years he was identified 
with the oil and gas industry of this locality and always 
took an active interest in politics, being at one time 
a member of the State Legislature from McKean County. 
He was united in marriage with Emma C. Brooks, who 
was born in Pittsburg, Pa., and is now a resident of Wash- 
ington. They had a family of five sons and two daughters, 
as follows: Charles C, who is a Presbyterian minister 
now in Persia; Arthur, who died while a student in the 
medical department of the U. of P.; Walter B., who is 
an instructor in the University School for Boys, at Chi- 
cago, 111.; Malcomb B., who resides at Evanston, 111., 
and is engaged in the practice of law in Chicago; L. E., 
who resides at Washington, Pa.; Martha, who died in 
infancy, and Marion, who is a graduate of the North- 
western University, 111., after which she spent a year in 
Europe. 

L. E. Sterrett was reared and educated at Washing- 
ton, Pa. He was engaged as a clerk in a store for sev- 
eral years and since 1907 has been interested with the 
Franklin Washington Gas Company, of which he is secre- 
tary. Mr. Sterrett is a member of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Washington. 

ALEXIS C. LE COMTE, a leading citizen of Wash- 
ington County, largely interested in oil production and 
fonnerly president of the Savings and Trust Company 
at McDonald, Pa., was born at New Orleans, La., Dec. 
3, 1856, and is a son of Anatole and Mary (Favre) Le 
Comte. 

The i)arents of Mr. Le Comte were born in France, 
came to America in youth, about 1828, and wore mar- 
ried in New Orleans. They had the following children 
born to them: Joseph, who is now deceased; Alexis C, 
of McDonald, Pa. ; Jennie, now deceased, who was the 
wife of .Tohu Wasson; Elizabeth, who married Grant 
Hoffman ; Emma, who married Prof. Aubin Paux. for 



meriy an instructor in French and now a dry goods mer- 
chant at Meadviile, Pa.; and Edward J. and Arthur A. 

Alexis C. Le Comte attended the public schools while 
his parents lived in New Orloiins, later attended the 
schools at Meadviile and Loretto College at Loretto, Pa. 
From the age of 15 years he worked on a farm for 
three years, after which he went to the McKean County 
oil fields and there embarkeil in an industry in which he 
has maintained an interest ever since, and at the present 
time is operating 42 wells in Ohio and Pennsylvania. 
He has been identified with business atl'airs at McDonald 
and for 1(5 months served as president of the Savings 
and Trust Company at that point. 

On Dec. 28, 1886, Mr. Le Comte was married to Miss 
Julia Ducray, who is a daughter of .\ugustus and Vic- 
toria (Monin) Ducray, natives of France. Mrs. Le 
Comte is one of the following family of children: Jessie, 
who is now deceased; Sarah, who married Joseph Mail- 
laird; Mary, who married Edward C. Koche; Julia; 
Augustus L. ; and Lilly, who married Benjamin Baird. 
Mr. and Mrs. Le Comte have one son, Ralph M., who was 
born Feb. 19, 1888. He is now a student of medicine 
at the Georgetown University, Washington, D. C. Mr. 
Le Comte and family belong to the Catholic Church. 
In politics he is a Republican. 

WILLARD G. COOK, deceased, who was for many 
years one of the representative farmers and stock raisers 
of Canton Township, Washington Co., Pa., was born 
in Canton Township, in 1839, and died Oct. 28, 1898. He 
jn-actically spent his entire life on the farm in Canton 
Township, having located in Washington just two years 
previous to his death. He was a son of William Henry 
Cook, who, when 18 years of age came from Rhode 
Lsland and settled in Canton Township, Washington 
County. Willard G. Cook was one of the progressive, 
public spirited men of the township, and always took 
an active interest in all affairs which tended toward the 
advancement of the community in which he lived. He 
lield membership with the Second Presbyterian Church. 

In 1872, Mr. Cook was united in marriage with Nannie 
W. Irwin, who was born and reared in West Bethlehem 
Township, Washington County, and is a daughter of 
Robert and Nancy (Weir) Irwin, the former a native of 
Highland County, Ohio, who came to Washington Coun- 
ty when young and engaged in farming and stock rais- 
ing until the time of his death. His wife was born in 
Washington County and came of one of the pioneer 
families of the county. Mr. and Mrs. Willard G. Cook 
were the parents of two daughters: Margaret E., mar- 
ried Charles E. Smith, who is a teacher in the Wash- 
ington public schools, and they have one child, Charles 
Raymond Smith; and Maud E., the widow of John P. 
riark, of Waynesburg, has one son, .John Willard Clark. 



rs8 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



and resides with her mother in Washintgon. Mrs. Cook 
and daughters are members of the Second Presbyterian 
Church. 

JOHN SCOTT BAitE, formerly county commissioner 
of Washington County, Pa., has been a prominent resi- 
dent of Canonsburg since 18S8, but prior to that for 
many years, carried on extensive agricultural operations 
in Somerset Township, where he owned 300 acres of land. 
He was born in Somerset Township, Washington County, 
Pa., Jan. 26, 1S27, a son of William and Mary (Boyd) 
Barr. 

The parents of Mr. Barr were both born in County 
Antrim, Ireland. The grandfather, John Barr, brought 
his family to America in 1S19 and settled in the upper 
end of Somerset Township. He was accompanied by his 
brothers, Robert and Joseph, the latter of whom lived 
and died near Finleyville, Pa. Bobert Barr settled on 
Marengo Creek and operated what was long known as 
Barr 's mill. John Barr had married Martha Dickey in 
Ireland and they had a family of four sons and two 
daughters : William, John Robert, Archie, Margaret and 
Mary. Through marriage they became connected with 
other old families. John Barr married Elizabeth Smith 
and was a farmer in Somerset Township. Robert mar- 
ried Margaret Jackson and was a farmer and blacksmith 
in Somerset Township. Archie was accidentally killed 
when 12 years old. Margaret was the wife of Robert 
Patterson and died in Indiana County, Pa. Mary mar- 
ried Andrew Jackson, who was reared on an adjoining 
farm and she lived and died there. 

William Barr was born in 1797 and died Sept. 28, 
1838, from dysentery, when aged 41 years. He pur- 
chased a farm near what was then known as the Seceder 
Church, near Pigeon Creek, and lived there until his 
death. He married Mary Boyd and they had eight chil- 
dren born to them, the eldest being John S. Barr, who 
was 13 years old when his father died. The others were: 
Hugh and Eliza, twins, Margaret, William Wilson, Bank- 
head B., Mary, Jennie, who was the youngest. She mar- 
ried WOliam Berry, who resided in North Strabane Town- 
ship, near Clokeyville. Mary married William Garrett, of 
Washington County, from which they moved to their 
present home at College Springs, Page County, Iowa. 
Margaret .married James S. Dickey and died in Pitts- 
burg, her family now residing at Pittsburg. Eliza mar- 
ried Duncan Williamson, a farmer near Xenia, Ohio, 
She is now a widow and resides at College Springs, Iowa. 
Of the sons, Hugh died on his farm in Somerset Town- 
ship. He married Belle Black. William Wilson, who 
died several years since in the city of Philadelphia, was 
a minister of the United Presbyterian Church and for 
many years was secretary of the Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions. He married Catherine Barr. Bankhead B. Barr 



enlisted for service in the Civil War, entering Co. G, 
140th Pa. Vol. Inf. He received wounds at the battle 
of Gettysburg and again at the battle of the Wilderness 
and died from these injuries, at Alexandria, Va. His 
body lies interred in the family burying ground at Pigeon 
Creek and his sufferings in devotion to his country, make 
it doubly hallowed ground. 

John Scott Barr obtained his education in the public 
schools of Somerset Township, but on account of the 
early death of his father, had many responsibilities placed 
early on his shoulders. Under his management the land 
was cultivated and he took upon himself the education 
of his brothers and the proper rearing of the family of 
fatherless children. He not only preserved the original 
tract of land, but added to it until he owned 300 acres, 
only a part of which he now retains, having disposed 
of one farm and of his coal lands to a large degree 
when, in 1888, he retired to Canonsburg. He still di- 
rects his agricultural affairs as formerly, but takes no 
part in them. 

Mr. Barr was married (first) in 1852 to Miss Mary 
Gibson, who died in 1855. Her father was James Gib- 
son, the family being a well-known one in North Strabane 
Township. One daughter survives, Mary, who is the wife 
of Rev. James M. Duncan, of Shannon City, Iowa, who 
is pastor of the United Presbyterian body at that place, 
and they have one daughter. Mr. Barr was married 
(second), Jan. 26, 1865, to Miss Mary Pattison, of In- 
diana County, Pa., a daughter of Robert and Mary 
(Stewart) Pattison. Three children were born to this 
union, but one only survives, Martha Jane, who is the 
wife of Rev. W. P. Wier, of Ashtabula, Ohio. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wier haVe had four children, three of whom are 
living: John S. B., William Thomas and Leroy MoiEtt. 
In early life, Mr. Barr was identified with the Whig 
party, but is now and for years has been a stanch Re- 
publican. He went out with the militia when Pennsyl- 
vania was threatened with invasion. In 1872 he was 
elected a county commissioner and served three years 
and two months in that oflBce. He has served for some 
18 years as a member of the school board and was ap- 
pointed by the Governor of Pennsylvania as a manager 
of the Reform school for four years. In 1862 he was 
elected an elder in the Pigeon Creek United Presbyterian 
Church and wheii coming to Canonsburg about 20 years 
ago was elected an elder' in the Chartiers United Presby- 
terian Church. 

SAMUEL McWILLIAMS, one of the leading citizens 
of Canonsburg, was born Nov. 30, 1858, in Chartiers 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., on a farm one mUe 
distant from this city, and is a son of James Milton and 
Lydia (McCoy) McWilliams. 

.Tames Milton McWilliams was born in Washington 



w 





HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



731 



Coiuitv ill 1S13 aud lived to the af^e of 81 years, lie 
was ii wagonjiiaker by trade and also owned a small 
farm. He married Lydia McCoy, who was born near 
McConnell's Mills, who died in July, 1908, when aged 
eighty-six years. They were the parents of twelve chil- 
.dren, namely: John W., who was an attorney at law, died 
in Kansas; William J., who resided at Canonsburg, died 
in December, 1908; Mary A., who is the widow of John 
Cook, resides at Canonsburg; George S., who is a resi- 
dent of Canonsburg; Lydia, who is now deceased, was 
the wife of John M. Stewart; James M., Addison W., 
Samuel, Hattie E. and Nettie, all of whom are residents 
of Canonsburg; and George, and an infant daughter, 
both died in this city. The parents of the above family 
were members of the Chartiers United Presbyterian 
Church. 

Samuel McWilliams attended the public schools of 
District No. 8, Chartiers Township, in boyhood and then 
continued his studies for several years in Jefferson Acad- 
emy at Canonsburg. For about eight years following he 
taught school and became well known in this connection 
in different sections of the county and during this period 
for two years had charge of the " E " Division of the 
Morganza Pennsylvania Reform School. Upon retiring 
from educational work he entered into the mercantile 
business at Canonsburg and continued there for ten 
years. In 1895 he became associated with the Citizens' 
Bank, Limited, of Canonsburg, in the capacity of assist- 
ant cashier and when it was merged into the Citizens' 
Trust of Canonsburg in 1901, became its assistant secre- 
tary and treasurer, and maintained this connection until 
Sept. 1, 1909, when he accepted the position of book- 
keeper in the trust department of the Commonwealth 
Trust Company of Pittsburg. 

On Sept. 11, 1884 Mr. McWilliams was married to 
Miss Ella S. Roberts, who was born in Canonsburg. She 
was a daughter of John T. and Sarah (Kelso) Roberts. 
Mr. and Mrs. McWilliams had four children, namely: 
Edith M., who was educated in the local schools, grad- 
uated from the Canonsburg High School and Jefferson 
Academy, is a successful teacher in Cecil Township; 
Charles Ray, who is a bright student in the High School; 
and William Walter and John M., both of whom are in 
school. Mrs. McWilliams died Sept. 15, 1901. She was 
a most estimable lady, one whose many amiable qualities 
served to endear her to all who came within her influ- 
ence. 

In politics, Mr. McWilliams is a Democrat. He has 
served several terms as a member of the School Board 
but has given more attention to his business than to pub- 
lic affairs, as concerns the holding of office. He is a 
member of the Chartiers United Presbyterian Church. 
His only fraternal connection is with the Royal Arca- 
num. 



U. B. RAMSEY, member of the Kurtz & Ramsey Mon- 
ument Company, with business quarters at No. 220 
South Main Street, Washington, Pa., was born at Cross 
Roads, Washington County, Dec. 10, 1865, a son of the 
late W. C. Ramsey, formerly sheriff of Washington 
County and a very prominent citizen. 

U. B. Ramsey was reared on the home farm and at- 
tended the country schools. He was largely interested in 
farming and stockraising in Buft'alo Township until 
March, 1909, when he removed to Washington and one 
mouth later entered into partnership with J. H. Kurtz 
in the monument business, the latter being a practical 
worker in marble and granite. This new enterprise has 
capital, energy and practical know'ledge back of it and 
has a promising future. 

In December, 1886, Mr. Ramsey was married to Miss 
Mary A. Mounts, who died December 1, 1908. She was 
a lady of beautiful Christian character, and amiable per- 
sonality. Her father was Adam Mounts, an old and 
honored resident of ^Washington County. The four sur- 
viving children are: William Calvin and Adam Mounts, 
twins, the latter of whom is associated with his father 
in business; and Elizabeth Grace and Howard Paul. Dur- 
ing their residence in Buffalo Township, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ramsey were members of the East Buffalo Prebyterian 
Church and since coming to Washington, Mr. Ramsey has 
identified himself with the Third Presbyterian Church. 

WILLARD 6. CUNDALL, a leading citizen and suc- 
cessful farmer of Blaine Township, Washington County, 
Pa., who is serving most acceptably as president of the 
township board of school directors, was bom in Char- 
tiers Township, in the same county, Aug. 16, 1860. His 
parents were Edward G. and Martha (Cook) Cundall. 

Edward G. Cundall was born in Washington County, 
Pa., in 1834 and resides at Washington, Pa. His father 
was Edward Cundall, who was a native of Rhode Island. 
Edward G. Cundall is a well known citizen of the county 
and formerly was superintendent of the County Home, 
in Chartiers Township, where he served for fourteen 
years in that responsible ofiSce. He married Martha 
Cook, who was also born in Washington County and they 
had a large family, four of whom survive the mother, 
who died in 1892, namely: Margaret R., who is the wife 
of DeForest Wilson, of Taylorstown ; Emma J., who is 
the wife of William McMannis, of Taylorstown; and 
Willard G. and William H., the latter being a resident rff 
Washington. 

Willard G. Cundall was reared and educated in his 
native county and throughout his whole life has been 
more or less connected with agricultural pursuits. For 
some years he has also been in the employ of the Wash- 
ington Oil Company. The South Pennsylvania Pipe 
Line station is located at the place which was named 



732 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Cundall Station in honor of this family, the site being 
on the old Cundall farm. 

Mr. Cundall maxried Miss Ada E. Clarke, who was 
born in Chartiers Township and is a daughter of Thomas 
P. Clarke who is now a resident of Washington. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cundall have four sons: Thomas W., Harry P., 
Edward M. and Willard G. With his family, Mr. Cun- 
dall belongs to the United Presbyterian Church at Tay- 
lorstown. He is a member of the order of Knights of 
Pythias at that place and has frequently been elected to 
oiEcial position in the lodge. In politics, like his father, 
Mr. Cundall is a Eepublican. 

JAMES E. WALLACE, farmer and successful fruit 
grower, residing at No. 500 Locust Avenue, has been a 
citizen of Washington since 1890, coming from West- 
moreland County, Pa., where his family is one of age and 
prominence. Mr. Wallace was born in Westmoreland 
County, in 1861, and is a son of the late William Wal- 
lace, who died at Washington, in 1896. 

The grandfather, James Wallace, was born in West- 
moreland County, in 1805, and followed an agricultural 
life. His father was Peter Wallace, who was also born 
in Westmoreland County, where he was prominent in 
public affairs, serving some twelve years as a member of 
the State Legislature from there. His father, Richard 
Wallace, was the first of the family to settle in West- 
moreland County and he built one of the first mills and 
a fort, known as Wallace Fort, which was one of the 
earliest defenses erected to protect settlers from the 
Indians, west of the Allegheny Mountains. He was 
known as a great Indian fighter and on several occasions 
he fell into the hands of the savages, but managed to 
escape. Finally he joined an exploring expedition into 
the Ohio wilderness and never returned. 

James E. Wallace was reared and educated in his na- 
tive county and there engaged in farming until 1890, 
when he came to Washington County and purchased land 
near where he resides. He makes a specialty of peaches 
and strawberries and grows other fine fruit, finding a 
ready market for aU his land will produce. 

In 1896, Mr. Wallace was married to Miss Julia Fran- 
ces Eansom, who was born at Mt. Vernon, Ohio, a daugh- 
ter of Willard Wallace and Julia Nichols (McGiffin) 
Ransom, both of whom were natives of Mt. Vernon. 
The mother of Mrs. Wallace died when she was seven 
weeks old. The father survived for many years and died 
at his home in Mt. Vernon, March 30, 1902. Mrs. Wal- 
lace was an only child. Mr. Ransom was a farmer. Mr. 
and Mrs. Wallace are members of the Second Presby- 
terian Church of Washington, in which he is a deacon. 

JOHN LOGAN McCLELLAND, a representative busi- 
ngs citizen at Canonsburg, dealing in real estate and 



insurance, aud one of the organizers of the Canonsburg 
Electric Light Company, was born at Florence, Hanover 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., August 21, 1841. His 
parents were Jackson and Mary (Criswell) McClelland. 
The McClelland family was established in Washington 
County by the great-grandfather, Hanson McClelland-, 
who came from Ireland. He reared a family of sturdy 
sons, one of these being William McCleUand, who became 
the grandfather of John Logan McClelland. The Mc- 
Clellands aud McCooks were neighbors in Chartiers Town- 
ship and William McClelland aud Daniel McCook, father 
of the "fighting McCooks," of the CivU War, together 
owned the salt well in Chartiers Township. William 
McClelland married Hannah Long and they had four 
children: Jackson, Joseph, James and Catherine, the 
latter of whom married Rev. M. A. Parkinson. 

Jackson McClelland was born in Chartiers Township 
aud the mother in Hanover Township, Washington Coun- 
ty. In 1843 they moved to Canonsburg, where both 
died, the mother in 1891, in her seventy-first year. They 
had the following childi-en: John Logan; Romulus L., 
who died in 1852, aged ten years; and Mary Long, who 
was married to Arthur McMui'trie, of Huntington; and 
Nettie Criswell, both of whom live with their brother. 
John Logan McClelland attended Jefl^erson College be- 
fore he accompanied the family when removal was 
made South in 1858. In 1862 the family came back to 
Canonsburg. In 1861 Mr. McClelland entered the Con- 
federate army as a private in Co. G, 50th Tenn. Vol. Inf., 
in which he served a short time, this regiment being the 
garrison regiment of Fort Donaldson. Soon after en- 
listing he was made second lieutenant. In 1869 he re- 
turned to Washington County and was a member of the 
civU engineering corps that built the Chartiers Valley 
Railroad and after the completion of that contract he 
entered the office of the chief engineer of the Panhandle 
Railroad, and remained with that road until 1881. In 
1883 he was made deputy sheriff of Washington County 
and served three years under Sheriff W. B. Chambers. 
In 1886 he opened a real estate office and at the same 
time organized a building and loan association which 
proved very successful, aud demonstrated his ability 
and integrity as a business man. In 1894 he organized, 
with others, the Canonsburg Electric Light Company, of 
which he was president from 1894 until 1907, which 
was sold to the Washington Electric Light Company in 
1909, it taking charge on April 1, 1909. 

In politics, Mr. McClelland is a stanch Democrat, and 
is a very popular citizen. He has never married. 

WILLIAM C. RAMSEY, deceased, once a citizen of 
large influence in Washington County, was also one of 
sterling character. He was born in Amwell Township, 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



733 



Washington Co., Pa., March 5, 1843, ami was a sou of 
Keuben and Margaret (Horn) Ramsey. 

Kcuben Kamsey was born near the corner of College 
and Maiden streets, Washington, and was a son of 
George and Lydia (Lloyd) Kamsey. He settled in Am- 
well Township after he married and there worked at the 
cooper trade and also as a farmer and there he died in 
1882, survived by his widow until 1S90. Keuben Ram- 
sey married Margaret Horn, a daughter of Michael and 
Elizabeth (Closscr) Horn, and they had the following 
children born to them: William Calvin, Robert Hamil- 
ton, George Washington, Nicholas Murray and Jolin Nel- 
son. 

William C. Ramsey was reared on the home farm and 
was afforded excellent educational advantages, better 
than were enjoyed by his associates. He was prepared 
to teach school but on August 8, 1862, he entered 
the Federal Army, enlisting in Co. D, 140th Pa. Vol. 
Inf., and served faithfully until he was honorably dis- 
charged June 25, 1865, at Albany, N. Y. He was ever 
at the post of duty and at the battle of Gettysburg he 
was seriously wounded, his injury making it necessary 
for him to spend many months in a hospital. After he 
had sufiBciently recovered, he was transferred to the 11th 
Veteran Corps, of which he was made quartermaster- 
sergeant, having served in the 140th Regiment with the 
rank of color corporal. His whole military record is one 
that reflects honor and credit upon him and is a source 
of pride to his family. 

After he returned to Washington County, Mr. Ramsey 
spent several winters teaching school after his summers 
on the farm, and in the meanwhile he took an active and 
intelligent interest in public matters in the county. He 
had been reared a Democrat and on the Democratic ticket, 
in 1870, he was elected to the important office of sheriff 
of Washington County and during his three' years of 
service was acknowledged to be an able, courageous and 
conscientious officer. When he retired to private life he 
bought a farm situated about five miles distant from 
Washington and resided there until the close of his life, 
his death occurring December 2, 1902. His widow sur- 
vives and occupies a comfortable home at No. 155 Dun- 
can avenue, Washington. 

Mr. Ramsey was married in 1863 to Miss Elizabeth 
Jane Sower, a daughter of Levi and Cynthias Sower, of 
West Bethlehem Township. They reared five children, 
namely: Ulysses Bernard, who is a member of the 
Kurtz & Ramsey Monument Company, at Washington; 
Levi Harlan, who is engaged in farming in the county ; 
Kate Florence, who resides with her mother at Washing- 
ton; Wilmetta Maud E.?tella, who is now deceased; and 
Lillie Blanche, who is the wife of Morgan Prigg, residing 
on a farm in Canton Township. Mr. Ramsey was one of 
the active and liberal members of the East Buffalo 



I'ri sbyterian Chinch, in which he was an elder. Although 
he began life with little means, through industry, pru- 
dence and good judgment, he acquired an ample estate. 
He was one of the directors of the Farmers' ami .Me- 
chanics' Bank of Washington. 

ERNEST C. LAWTON, whose comfortable residence 
is suituatcd on the edge of the village of West Middle- 
town, Washington Co., Pa., is successfully carrying on 
general farming and stock raising on 128 acres of excel- 
lent land which lies in Hopewell Township. He was 
born in Independence Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
xMarch 9, 1870, and is a son of Joseph K. and Mary L. 
(Quest) Lawton. ,His mother, who lives in West Middle- 
town, is a daughter of the late Dr. Quest, of Wellsburg, 
at one time a practitioner of West Middletown. He has 
a twin sister, Eva, who married M. G. Lawrence, and 
one other sister, Annie, who married Malcolm Atmore. 
Mr. Lawton was a carpenter by trade and lived here 
most of his life, dying in 1906. 

Ernest C. Lawton secured a good common school edu- 
cation and worked at first, after leaving school, as a 
tinner. He has been very active in politics and is a 
recognized Republican leader. He served as deputy 
sheriff under his father-in-law. Sheriff Pentecost, has 
also been warden of the jail and has been a member of 
the township school board. 

On November 27, 1900, Mr. Lawton was married to 
Miss Martha Pentecost and they have a charming little 
daughter, Phoebe, who w as born in her grandfather 's 
house during his official term as .sheriff of Washington 
County. 

JOHN W. WARRICK, one of Washington's representa- 
tive business men, conducting a large grocery enterprise 
at No. 102 South ilain street, Washington, is also 
identified with other business concerns of this section. 
He was born at Washington, in 1862, and is a son of 
George M. and Mary (Wilson) Warrick and a grandson 
of Jonathan and Mary (Slack) Warrick, old residents 
of Washington County. 

After leaving school, John W. Warrick entered his 
father's grocery store and in 1881 became a partner 
in the business which was conducted as G. M. Warrick 
& Sons until the father retired, when the firm style 
was changed to G. M. Warrick's Sons. la 1908, 
William J. Warrick, the other member of the firm, 
retired, and since then John W. Warrick has been sole 
proprietor. During the entire course of his business 
life he has been identified with grocery interests and 
is one of the most experienced men in this line in 
Washington County. This house has always enjoyed 
a liberal patronage as it has been conducted along th< 
lines to ensure a continuance of the confidence nf th" 



?34 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTOiST COUNTY 



public. Mr. Warrick has other interests, being con- 
nected with the Floral Company of South Strabane 
Township and is a director in the First National Bank 
of Washington. 

Mr. Warrick was married in 1896, to Miss Catherine 
Chambers, a daughter of Josiah E. Chambers, of Canons- 
burg, and they have two sons: George Eamsey and 
John Wilson. With his family, Mr. Warrick ia a mem- 
ber of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Wash- 
ington. He has never been unduly active in public 
matters but his fellow citizens know where he stands 
when the good citizens of the community are appealed 
to, to further movements which promise to be beneficial 
to every one, or to aid in the maintenance of law and 
order. 

W. W. HOTT, burgess of Washington, Pa., has been a 
resident of this city for the past 2Q years and has taken 
a deep interest in public affairs. He was born at Pitts- 
burg, in 1867, and prior to locating at Washington lived 
in various parts of the country. 

Mr. Hoyt was reared and educated in Pittsburg, and 
there learned the trade of a horseshoer in his father 's 
shop. He afterward worked at his trade at various 
places throughout the country and in 1889 came to Wash- 
ington, Pa., with the intention of remaining but one week. 
He has been here continuously since that time and has 
met with much success at his trade. In 1894, he entered 
into business for himself, making horseshoeing a spe- 
cialty, and he now has three men in his employ. He is 
a Democrat in politics and has always taken an active 
interest in political affairs. He served in the city Coun- 
cil from the Fourth Ward a number of years, and in 
February, 1909, was elected burgess of Washington over 
the Republican nominee, Jacob Zelt, Jr. He is the first 
Democrat honored with election to that office in a num- 
ber of years, the city being normally Eepublican, and he 
received a majority of 394 votes. 

On Mar. 5, 1890, Mr. Hoyt was married to Miss Edith 
S. Jones, of Homestead, Pa., and they have six children 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt are consistent members of 
the First Baptist Church. He is prominently . affiliated 
with a number of fraternal organizations: National 
Lodge No. 81, I. O. 0. F. ; Shakespeare Encampment No. 
20, I. O. O. F.; Eebecca Lodge; Hancock Lodge No. 231, 
K. P.; Washington Commandery No. 62, U. B. K. P., 
of which he was captain six years; Modern Woodmen of 
America; Home Guards of America; the Eagles, and 
Local No. 166, Master Horseshoers National Protective 
Association. 

A. J. EUSSELL, a leading citizen of Washington 
County, Pa., who has been prominently identified with 
public affairs and business interests of Bulger, Midway, 



and Smith Township, is vice president of the Midway 
National Bank and is agent for the Pennsylvania Cen- 
tral and St. Louis Eailroad at this point. Mr. Eussell 
was born two miles north of Hickory, in Mt. Pleasant 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., October 6, 1841, and is 
a son of Andrew and Jane C. (Miller) Eussell. 

Andrew Eussell was born in Chartiers Township, 
Washington County, about three miles north of Canons- 
burg, and there he was a large farmer for many years, 
moving then to Mt. Pleasant Township, where he livea 
until a year and a half of his death, when he retired to 
Houston, where he purchased a residence. He was one of 
the old and reliable citizens of this section and during ? 
large part of his life was a member of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. He married Jane C. Miller, a daughter 
of Andrew Miller and ten children were born to them. 

A. J. Eussell was educated in the common schools of 
Mt. Pleasant Township and Hickory Academy, complet- 
ing the course of study at the latter place. In 1862 he 
entered the Federal Army as a soldier in the Civil War, 
enlisting in Co. G, 123rd Pa. Vol. Inf., and with that 
organization completed the nine months of his first 
enlistment. After a visit home, Mr. Eussell re-enlisted 
for further service, entering the 21st Pa. Vol. Cav., and 
with that brave body of troopers he continued a soldier 
until the close of the war. After his safe return to 
peaceful pursuits, in 1867, Mr. Eussell embarked in the 
mercantile business, at Bulger, which enterprise he con- 
tinued for 34 years, when he disposed of it to Charles C. 
Eodgers. In 1866-67, he accepted a railroad agency with 
the Pennsylvania system and this business interest he 
has retained ever since. He has been an active politician 
and many time has been elected to important offices 
on the Eepublican ticket. For 35 years he served as 
postmaster at Bulger, and for three terms as a justice 
of the peace in Smith Township and so satisfactory 
were his decisions that he was re-elected for a like period 
but declined to serve. When the Midway National Bank 
was organized, July 4, 1867, Mr. Eussell became vice 
president and he has continued in that office ever since 
and is one of the largest stockholders. Mr. Eussell 's 
business ability, his public spirit and his general high 
standing in his community, have brought him the respect 
and approbation of his fellow citizens irrespective of 
political affiliation. 

Mt. Eussell was married (first) June 2, 1867, to Miss 
Margaret MeBurney, who died in 1886, leaving one son, 
Andrew L., \\ho is a resident of Midway, Pa. Mr. 
Russell was married (second) to Miss Alice M. Smith, 
a daughter of Eobert Smith, of Cherry Valley. They are 
members of the United Presbyterian Churcli at Midway, 
in wnich Mr. Eusseil has been an elder for 15 years. 

G. M. BAEEE, a retired farmer of Washington, Pa., 
and owner of a fine farm nf 168 acres in South Strabane 




W. W. IIOVT 



I Tij-DEN FOUNDAriSWS, 



J 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



737 



Township, was boru on September 26, 1849, at Scenery 
Hill, Washington Co., Pa., and is a son of William and 
Martha (Munce) Barre. 

William Barre, who was born in 1822, at Scenery Hill, 
Pa., was a wagon maker by trade, at which he worked 
for many years during his early life. He subsequently 
bought a farm in South Strabane Township, where he 
was engaged in farming and stock raising until about 
one year before his death, when he removed to Washing- 
ton, where he died in 1899. He married Martha Munr-c, 
who came of one of the pioneer families of Washington 
County, and they became the parents of fifteen children, 
of whom the following are living: Joseph C, of East 
Maiden street, Washington; Thomas, resides in Mis- 
souri; Angeline, married James Matthews of Washing- 
ton, Pa.; Kate (Mrs. Haines) resides in California; 
Maggie, is the wife of Andrew Horn of Washington 
County; Emma, is the wife of James Wilson, who 
conducts an undertaking establishment in Washington, 
Pa.; Sadie, married Samuel McCowan ; and G. M., the 
subject of this sketch. 

G. M. Barre was reared and educated in South Stra- 
bane Township, where throughout his active career, he 
was engaged in general farming and stock raising, 
making a specialty of sheep raising. In 1904, Mr. Barre 
retired from business life and came to Washington, 
where he resides in a fine home at No. 281 Locust avenue, 
but still continues overseeing his farming interests in 
South Strabane Township. In 1894 Mr. Barre was 
joined in the bonds of wedlock with Annie Ellwood, who 
was born in Washington County and is a daughter of 
Thomas Ellwood. Mr. and Mrs. Barre are members of 
the Second Presbyterian Church. 

THOMAS A. MeCREIGHT, who owns 70 acres of very 
valuable land which lies in Hanover Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., was born in Jefferson County, Pa., April 
3, 1864, and is a son of Smith and Elizabeth (Murphy) 
McCreight. 

The parents of Mr. McCreight were both born in 
Pennsylvania and were married at Brookville, in Jef- 
ferson County. The father died March 10, 1907. He 
had many business interests, being engaged in farming 
and lumbering and also owned a grist-mill. They had 
the following children : Thomas A. ; Clara, who married 
Orville M. Grissinger, lives in Colorado; Anna, who 
married Andrew Wheeler, lives in Jefferson County ; and 
Susan B., who married E. P. Gardner of Hanover Town- 
ship, and with this daughter the mother makes her home. 

Thomas A. McCreight attended school pretty regu- 
larly until he was I.t years old, after which he went to 
farming with his father and has made farming his main 
work in life, although he has also worked at the car- 
penter trade. This he never really learned, but having 



a natural talent, has done some very creditable work in 
that line, in the way of improving his property. 

On May 10, 1888, Mr. McCreight was married to Miss 
l-aura Bell, a daughter of William and Anna (McCready) 
Hell, who were farming people of Washington County. 
The children of the Bell family were: Mary, who is now- 
deceased, was the wife of Seward Walker; Harry; 
James A. ; Ada, w-ho married Mayo Patterson ; Laura, 
who married Mr. McCreight; Dessa, who married Alex- 
ander Wilson ; and W. C. and A. J. Mr. and Mrs. 
McCreight have the following children: Clarence A., 
Lester S., Craig 0., George D., Alice Bell and Stella 
May. The family belong to the United Presbyterian 
Church of Hanover Township. In politics, like his late 
father, Mr. McCreight is a Republican. He has served 
very acceptably in the office of road master and is a 
respected and representative man in his township. 

GEORGE M. WARRICK, one of Washington's most 
esteemed retired citizens, was born in Amwell Township, 
Washington Co., Pa., February 28, 1831, and is a son 
of Jonathan T. and Mary (Slack) Warrick. 

Jonathan T. Warrick was brought to Washington 
County when about ten years of age, but later was 
taken to Beaver County and lived there until he was 
seventeen, when he returned to Washington County and 
engaged in school-teaching here until he was twenty-six 
years old. For some time afterward he worked at 
carpentering and cabinetmaking and then turned his 
attention to farming in Amwell Township, moving from 
there in 1835 to East Finley Township, where he re- 
mained until his death, in 1846, at the age of sixty-two 
years. He married Mary Slack, who was a native of 
Washington County, and to them were born the fol- 
lowing children : Sarah, who married Jackson Harsh- 
man; James; Matilda; Mary, who married George Ely, 
is survived by one son. Dr. Ely, residing at Washington; 
Charlotte, who married Elijah Coulson ; William W. ; 
George M. ; Elizabeth, who marrieil W. K. Long, of 
Washington ; and Hannah C. 

George M. -Warrick obtained his education in the 
country schools and continued to work on his father's 
farm until he was sixteen years of age, at which time 
he came to Washington, where he spent two years work- 
ing at the carpenter trade. He was of a mechanical 
turn of mind and soon mastered details sufficiently to 
enter into contracting and when twenty years old he went 
to Chicago and engaged in work there until homesick- 
ness caused liis return to Washington. He continued 
contracting until 1858, when he embarked in the mer- 
cantile business, at this time entering into partnership 
with his brother, W. W. Warrick, under the firm name 
of G. M. and W. W. Warrick. In 1866 this firm, in 
partnership with .Tohn M. Wilson, bought the Washing- 



738 



HISTOEY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



ton Flouring ilills and for some years both the milling 
and grocery business was carried on, when William W. 
Warrick retired from both enterprises and the other 
members of the firm continued together until 1887, when 
they sold the miU to Zelt Brothers, Mr. Wilson retiring 
from the firm. Mr. Warrick then associated his two 
sons, John W. and William J. Warrick with him, under 
the firm style of G. M. Warrick & Sons. This became 
one of the leading grocery concerns at Washington and 
when George M. Warrick retired from active business 
life the sons continued, making a slight change in the 
fimi stj'le, preserving the founder's name, in G. M. 
Warrick's Sons. In 1908, one son, W. J., retired from 
the firm to engage in another business, and the enter- 
prise came entirely into the proprietorship of John W. 
Warrick, who still carries it on. 

In 18.55, George M. Warrick married Miss Mary 
Wilson, a daughter of William Wilson, of Taylorstown, 
Wasliington Co., Pa., and five children were born to 
them, namely: Matilda Belle, who married Eev. Mc- 
Carrell, a Presbyterian minister; William J., who is in 
the florist business at Washington ; John W., who is a 
grocery merchant; and Eachel and Jennie, both of whom 
reside at home. 

Mr. Warrick united with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church when eighteen years of age, and has been a 
consistent member of this religious body ever since. He 
started out in life entirely dependent upon his own 
efi'orts and through industry, enterprise and integrity, 
built up a large business and attained to a high and 
honorable position among his fellow citizens. His beau- 
tiful home is situated at No. 263 East Beau street. His 
leisure time is occupied in performing the duties of vice 
president of the Washington County Fire Insurance 
Company. 

HAEEY B. HAYDEN, a wholesale liquor dealer of 
Monongahela City, Pa., and president of the Finleyville 
Southern Electric Railroad, has been a resident of 
Monongahela City since October, 1903. He was born 
June 4, 1873, at Pittsburg, Pa., and is a son of Michael 
Hayden, who was a resident of Pittsburg, where during 
the greater part of his life he followed his trade as a 
bottle-blower. He was a member of the Green Glass 
Bottle Blowers' Union of the United States and Canada, 
and during the latter part of his life was general mana- 
ger of the Ohio Valley Glass Works. His death occurred 
in Pittsburg, and he was the father of a large family 
of children, of whom the following are living: Thomas 
M. ; Joseph E.; James E.; Harry B.; Anna L., who is 
the wife of Harry Walsh; Eegina, who is the wife of 
Bay Albert, and William F., of KnoxviUe. 

Harry B. Hayden was reared and obtained his educa- 
tional training at Pittsburg, where when a young man, 



he ran a confectionery store, which he disposed of during 
the Flint Glass Strike. He then went to Indiana, where 
he and his brother Thomas M., rented a farm, which 
they operated successfully for several years, and where 
our subject celebrated his 21st birthday. In October, 
1903, Mr. Hayden came to Monongahela City, Pa., and 
on May 1, 1907, opened his present business on Second 
street. Fraternally he belongs to the B. P. 0. E., the 
F. O. E., the Loyal Order of Moose, Ancient Order of 
Hibernians, and the Turners, aU of Monongahela City. 
His religious connection is with the Eoman Catholic 
Church. 

In August, 1901, Mr. Hayden was united in marriage 
with Catherine E. GriU of Pittsburg, and they have 
three children: Catherine, Naomi, and Grace. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hayden reside at No. 714 Coal street. 

JOHN McCLAIN, a well known broom manufacturer 
of Washington, Pa., who was for many years identified 
with the farming interests of Franklin Township, was 
born August 21, 1842, on his father's farm in Franklin 
Township, a son of Simeon and Jane (Carter) McClain. 

Simeon McClain, who was born in Franklin Township, 
Washington County, about 1816, was the youngest son of 
.John McClain, who was one of the earliest settlers of 
the county. Simeon McClain followed farming and stock 
raising during the greater part of his life, and was one 
of the substantial and enterprising citizens of the com- 
munity in which he lived. He was united in mari-iage 
with Jane Carter, a native of Amwell Township, and a 
daughter of Isaac and Nancy Carter, and their union 
resulted in the following issue: John McClain, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Elizabeth Ann, the ueceased wife 
of H. K. Bell; William N., who resides on Franklin 
street, Washington; Sarah Ellen, his twin sister, who 
died October 16, 1807, was the wife of S. S. Bell; W. 
Boss, of Virgiuia; and Mary Mai'garet, who is the wife 
of Homer C. Andrew, of Van Buren, Pa. 

John McClain was reared in Franklin Township, where 
for many years he engaged in farming. About 1869 
he came to Washington, and for a period of twenty 
years operated the Washington Woolen Mills, to which 
on January 1, 1871, he added a broom factory, which 
he carried on in connection with the mills. He subse- 
quently disposed of the woolen mills, and on account 
of his health, spent a part of his time on the farm each 
year, but he continued the manufacturing of brooms, 
which he still is engaged in. Mr. McClain is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, and fraternally is a Knight 
Templar Mason. 

On December 25, 1875, Mr. McClain was united in 
marriage with Anna M. Gordon, a daughter of James 
Gordon of Washington County, and they have two sons: 
James B., who is chief engineer of the Sea Board Air- 



HISTORY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



739 



lino R. K., is located at Columbia, S. C. ; and Otis, who 
is a mechanical draughtsman, is located at Franklinton, 
N. C, where he is overseeing the building of the concrete 
abutments on the Sea Board Airline Railroad. 

HUGH IIANNA, M. D., a prominent citizen of 
Donegal Township, who has been engaged in agricultural 
pursuits near Claj'svUle since he retired from the active 
practice of medicine, was born in Cecil Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa. His parents were Hugh and Dorothoa 
(Whitely) Hanna. 

The father of Dr. Hanna was born in North Ireland 
and the mother in Washington County. The paternal 
grandparents of Dr. Hanna came to the northern part 
of Washington County when their son was small and 
he was reared there and subsequently married Dorothea 
Wliitely, but died early. Dr. Hanna being only four years 
old when his father 's death occurred. 

After the death of her husband, the mother of Dr. 
Hanna, with other members of the family, removed to 
Nottingham Township, Washington County, and there he 
was reared and was mainly educated in the J. C. Mes- 
senger Academy, in Somerset Township. For about ten 
years he taught school, in both Washington and Alle- 
gheny Counties, and during a part of this time he de- 
voted all his spare moments to reading medical works 
in preparation for practice. Dr. C. W. Townsend, then 
of Peters Township, was his preceptor and director, and 
under him the young man was thoroughly prepared and 
subsequently was graduated from Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege, Philadelphia, in 1870. He immediately settled at 
Noblestown, Allegheny County, but shortly afterward, 
was called to Canonsburg, an old preceptor. Dr. Weaver, 
being prostrated with an illness that subsequently re- 
sulted in his death, this being the cause of Dr. Hanna 's 
locating in that borough. He continued in practice there 
for nine years and then removed to Chartiers Town- 
ship, where he was practically retired from practice 
and engaged in farming and raising fine stocli for a 
number of years, and during this time became interested 
also in the sheep industry. From there he then moved to 
Donegal Township, in 1903 settling on his present valua- 
ble farm of 100 acres. In Chartiers Township he served 
for six consecutive years as school director but has 
accepted no public oiBce since locating in Donegal Town- 
ship. In his political views he is a Democrat. His 
ability both as a medical man and as a careful agri- 
culturist is acknowledged and aside from business con- 
siderations he is held in very high regard for his 
personal qualities. 

On November 1, 1876, Dr. Hanna was married to Miss 
Elizabeth Wallace, who was born in Knox County, Ohio, 
and is a daughter of Thomas and Nancy (Arnold) 
Wallace, her parents being old Washington County peo- 



ple of Scotch extraction. Dr. and Mrs. Hanna have 
had three children: Howard T. E., who resides in Done- 
gal Township; Leota M., who is deceased; and Birdie 
B., the latter of whom graduated from Jefferson 
Academy at Canonsburg, in 1904, and is an accom- 
plished young lady. Mrs. Hanna is a member of the 
United Presbyterian Church at Claysrille, Pa. 

THOMAS MONTGOMERY HALL, a worthy repre- 
sentative of one of the oldest pioneer families of Wash- 
ington County, was born in Somerset Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., February 13, in 1828, and now lives 
retired in his pleasant home at No. 227 Jefferson ave- 
nue, Washington. He is a son of Thomas and also a 
grandson of Thomas Hall. 

The first Thomas Hall came from County Tyrone, Ire- 
land, and settled in Somerset Township, Washington 
Co., Pa., in 1788, at that time purchasing the land which 
is now owned by his great-grandson, Samuel B. Weir. 
Thomas Hall married Sarah Keyes, also of County 
Tyrone, and to them were born the following children: 
Jane, wife of Henry Vance; Mary, wife of Adam Weir; 
James, who married Mary Pierce; and Thomas, whose 
marriage to Catherine Rainey, connected the Halls with 
another early pioneer family of consequence. 

Thomas Hall (2) was born in Somerset Township, 
Washington County, in August, 1792, grew to manhood 
there and married a daughter of James and Elizabeth 
(Broomfield) Rainey. To Thomas and Catherine Hall 
were born the following children : James, who survived 
to the age of eighty-six years; Sarah, who is deceased; 
Austin W. and John, both of whom are deceased; Eliza- 
beth, who married Mark Richey; Thomas M.; Catherine, 
who married Robert Lutton ; Adam Weir, who married 
Mary Munnell; and Mary Jane, who married Frederick 
Whiteley. Of the above family, Thomas JI. Hall is the 
only survivor. 

In early youth, Mr. Hall came to Washington and 
learned the saddlery and harness-making trade. For a 
number of years he was in the hotel business, conducting 
the old Fulton House, becoming one of the best known 
men of the place. He was married in 1857 to Margaret 
Kiser, who was born at Shippensburg, Cumberland Co., 
Pa., and they reared five children, namely : Kate, who 
is the wife of John B. Gibson, of St. Louis, Mo.; Jane 
S., who resides at home; Mary Elizabeth, who is the 
wife of Henry W. Williams, of Pittsburg; Harry M., 
who is a resident of Washington ; and Helen M., who 
resides at home. i\Iany members of the Hall family have 
been prominently identified with the United Presbyterian 
Church and have also been liberal to other religious 
denominations. Thomas Hall (2) donated the ground 
on which the old United Presbyterian Church was built 
on Pigeon Creek. Thomas M. Hall is a Methodist, hav- 



740 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



ing been ideutified with that church for about sixty 
years. 

SAMUEL H. bOOK, now living retired after a long 
and useful life, during his most active years devoting 
himself to agricultural pursuits, located at McDonald 
among the earliest settlers in the village. He was born 
in Cecil Township, Washington County, Pa., Apr. 17, 
1832, and is a son of John and Ursula (Herriott) Cook, 
the latter of whom came from a distinguished family. 
She was a daughter of George Herriott, of the - well- 
known family of Scotland, who claim descent from David 
1st of Scotland, (1124-53) who by marriage became the 
earl of Huntingdon. King David was a great monarch 
and for his wise administration and purity of his life 
was deemed a saint by his people. He was succeeded 
by his grandson, Malcolm IV, (11.54-65). Herriott is 
spelled both Herriott and Herriot. Kerriott was assigned 
a leading part in Sir Walter Scott 's novel, ' ' Sir Nigel. ' ' 
Mr. Cook has a very interesting article on his family 
descent copied from an ancient book (GuUlim's Display 
of Heraldry). 

John Cook followed farming in Cecil Township through- 
out his life. He was married (first) to a Miss Coulter 
and six children were born to that union, namely: Jane, 
Robert, Moses, Marjorie, Mary and John. John Cook 
was married (second) to Ursula Herriott, and they had 
the fckllowing children : George H., Elizabeth, Archibald, 
Samuel H. and Hester. His third marriage was with 
Nancy Grier and a son was born to that union, Nathan 
G. In politics, John Cook was a Democrat. He was a 
consistent member of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Samuel H. Cook attended seuool until he was 12 years 
old and then became self supporting, working on the 
home farm for his father until his majority and con- 
tinuing farm labor until he was 37 years of age. He 
then came to McDonalu and has resided here ever since 
and is one of the representative citizens. He has taken 
a great deal of interest in the remarkable growthof the 
place and owns property. 

Mr. Cook was married (first) in 1857 to Miss Re- 
becca Donaldson, and they had one daughter, Rebecca, 
who died when aged 3 months. In June, 1862, Mr. Cook 
was married (second) to Miss Mary Ann GilfiUan, who 
died leaving three children, namely: Nancy Grier, who 
is the wife of Prof. J. M. Shaffer, of Westminster Col- 
lege, has one daughter, Mary Johns Shaffer ; Dora, who 
died when aged 19 years; and M&ry Etta, who married 
Josepli McClay and has two sons, Samuel Cook and 
David McClay. The mother of these daughters died in 
December, 1885. Mr. Cook was married (third) to Miss 
Amanda C. Smith, a daughter of Robert J. and Sarah 
A. (Crawford) Smith. Mrs, Cook's parents are de- 
ceased, but .she has the following brother and sisters: 



Mary, who married James Dunseath, is now dead and 
left two sons and one daughter, one of the sons dying 
after his motner; Margaret, who married Daniel Thomas; 
Lena, who mai-ried William J. Potter; Sadie E., who 
married E. J. McKnight, and Robert S. A family re- 
union of the cjidred of Mrs. Cook was held in Allegheny 
County, near Bakerstown, recently and there were 450 
guests present who were relatives. 

WILLIAM J. GOWERN, one of Canonsburg's repre- 
sentative citizens, and probably the largest individual 
real estate owner in the city, is engaged in a real estate 
business on an extensive scale and also handles fire in- 
surance risks. He was born in the city of New York, 
December 5, 1853, and is a son of Robert F. and Alice 
(Robinson) Gowern. 

The parents of Mr. Gowern were both in New York 
and the mother still survives, having reached her eighty- 
third year. The father died at Canonsburg, Pa., July 
12, 1898, at the age of sixty-eight years and eight 
months. By trade, the lat« Robert P. Gowern was a 
blacksmith and carriage-maker. In 1875 he entered into 
the manufacture of carriages at Canonsburg, under the 
firm name of Gowern & Sons, his partners being William 
J. and Robert Frederick. The latter died May 24, 1895. 
The sons purchased the -father 's interest in the business 
and also his large real estate interests in 1887, after 
which the firm name was Gowern Bros., which continued 
until the death of Robert Frederick, as noted above, and 
was continued by the surviving partner nntil November 
14, 1898, without change. At that time the plant, with 
a number of other buildings, was destroyed by fire. It 
was located on the southwest corner of West Pike and 
Jefferson avenue, a section swept by the flames. 

William J. Gowern was three years old when his 
parents moved from New York to Harrodsburg, Ky., 
and there he attended school until the age of thirteen, 
when he accompanied the family to Paterson, N. J., 
where he received several months of schooling. He then 
went to work in a cotton mill as bobbin boy and was so 
capable and industrious that by the" time he was fifteen 
years of age, he occupied the position of , assistant to 
the superintendent of the carding room. From Paterson 
he went to Pittsburg, Pa., and there entered the employ 
of .John S. Sehaffer, with whom he served an apprentice- 
ship of two years in the carriage painting trade. A 
change in the proprietorship of the works caused him to 
leave there, after which he came to Washington, Pa., 
and for two years was in the employ of S. B. & C. Hays. 
From the age of nineteen to twenty-one, he worked for 
this firm as a jonrneyman painter. At this time he ac- 
companied his father and brother to Canonsburg and 
here they went into the carriage-making business and 
were very prosperous until their plant was lost by fire. In 




SA.MIKI. II. COOK 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



743 



iulditiun to their iiuiuufacturiug, the firm dealt largely in 
real estate and as each member possessed foresight an<l 
business judgment, their investments usually proved prof 
itabic ones. In November, 1903, the firm of Morgan & 
(jowern was organized, the senior member being John 
('. Morgan, and this partnership was continued until 
lyou, when Mr. Morgan was elected county treasurer of 
Washington County, and since that date, Mr. Gowern 
has conducted the business alone. A large number of 
the properties he handles are his own and his mother 's, but 
he deals also in first class realty for others, on a large 
scale. The Gowern business blocks are among the finest 
structures at Canonsburg. 

On July 10, 1901, Mr. Goweru was married to Miss 
Margaret I. Conboy, a daughter of John (Jonboy, of 
Pittsburg, and they have three children: Elizabeth, 
Eileen and Margaret. With his family, Mr. Gowern be- 
longs to the Catholic Church. In politics he is an active 
Republican. He is serving as a notary public. As a 
citizen, his efforts at all times are directed to the better- 
ment of the community. 

JOHN SLATER, manufacturer and wholesale and 
retail dealer in cigars, with business house at No. 21 
North Main street, Washington, is a prominent and 
useful citizen, and is identified with a number of suc- 
cessful and important enterprises of this section. He 
was born at Washington, Washington Co., Pa., in 1858, 
and is a son of Theodore and Apolonia (Weis) Slater. 

Theodore Slater was born in Germany and came to 
America in 1845, and settled at Washington in 1851. 
He embarked then in the shoe business which he con- 
ducted until 1866 and then became interested in the 
cigar business and extended his interests until he com- 
manded a large wholesale as well as retail trade. He 
amassed an ample fortune through his business ability, 
and was a citizen whose worth was recognized by those 
with whom he was associated. He died in 1879. He 
married Miss Apolonia Weis, also a native of Germany. 
Mrs. Slater survives. They had four children, namely: 
John, who died in infancy; Mary, who is Mother Su- 
perior in Mt. DeChantle Convent, near Wheeling, W. 
Va. ; John, who is in the cigar business at Washington, 
and is our subject ; and Annie, who is deceased. 

John Slater was reared at Washington and was edu- 
cated in the public schools and St. Vincent College, at 
Latrobe, Pa., and immediately after his return home en- 
tered into business with his father, whom he succeeded, 
at the latter 's death. He is a director in the Citizens' 
National Bank of Washington, and is financially inter- 
ested in other concerns. The cigar business is one of 
importance, the manufacturing plant being situated at 
Lancaster City. A number of favorite brands are on 



the market and Mr. Slater has four traveling men visit- 
ing the trade. 

In 1886, Mr. Slater was married to Miss Regina T. 
Stillwagen, of Claysville, Pa., and six sons and two 
<laughters have been born to them, namely : John Jo- 
seph, who is connected with the manufacturing depart- 
ment of his father's business, at Lancaster; Charles 
Erancis, who is on the road for the house; Edward Theo- 
dore, M. Paul, Mary R., Elizabeth A., and Bernard, aje 
students in school at Washington, Pa. ; and Francis 
Xavier is still at home. Mr. Slater and family are mem- 
bers of the Roman Catholic Church. He is identified 
with the Knights of Columbus and the Elks. 

FRANK .1. SCOaVART, one of the enterprising busi- 
ness men of Independence Township, Washington Co., 
Pa., who is conducting a successful general store at Avel- 
la, is a native of Belgium, where he was born in 1876, 
the only child of Vital and Nellie Scouvart. 

Mr. Scouvart received his education in the public 
schools of his native country, and was eleven years of 
age when the family came to the United States, settling 
in McDonald, Washington County, where young Scouvart 
found employment in the mines. When about sixteen 
years of age he became clerk at the company store lo- 
cated at Sturgeon, below McDonald, and continued in 
that capacity for about twelve years, when he formed a 
partnership with a Mr. Matthews, and the firm of Mat- 
thews & Scouvart operated general stores at Cecil and 
Avella for two years. At the end of this time Mr. Scou- 
vart purchased Mr. Matthews ' interest in the business, 
closed the store at Cecil, and has since been giving his 
entire attention to the establishment at Avella, where he 
carries a complete stock of hardware, mining tools, guns, 
paints, oils, furniture and shoes. He is a shrewd and 
capable business man, and his custom of always giving 
the best goods at a fair price has won for him a large 
and lucrative trade in his community. 

In 1900 Mr. Scouvart was married to Helen Egbert, 
who is a daughter of Nickolas and Phelomene Egbert, 
of McDonald, and to this union there have been born two 
children : Nellie and Prank J., Jr. Mr. Scouvart is a 
Republican in politics, and has served as township clerk 
and inspector of elections. His fraternal connection is 
with Moose Lodge and the Order of Elks, at Carnegie. 

SAMUEL A. POLAN, who is numbered with the rep- 
resentative business men of Washington, conducts a first 
class grocery at No. 481 West Chestnut street, and has 
been a resident of this city for thirteen years. He was 
Viorn in East Finley Township, Washington Co., Pa., in 
1862. 

William Polan, father of Samuel A., was born in 



744 



HISTOEY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



West Virginia and came to WasMngton County in 1854, 
where lie engaged in farming and stock raising for many 
years. Since the death of his wife he has resided with a 
daughter, in Buffalo Township. Although seventy-three 
years old, Mr. Polan is still active physically and also 
retains his mental faculties. He married Deborah Mar- 
tin, who was born and reared in East Finley Township. 
They had seven children and four of these survive, name- 
ly: John, James P., and Samuel A., all of whom reside 
at Washington; and Ida, who is the wife of William 
Mounts, of Buffalo Township. 

Samuel A. Polan grew to manhood in East Einley 
Township and attended the public schools. He followed 
farming and stock raising until 1896, when he came to 
Washington and embarked in the grocery business and 
has been at his present location for seven years. He 
carries only first class goods, catering to the best trade, 
his stock including staple and fancy groceries and salted 
and smoked meats. He has never taken a very active 
part in politics and has accepted no office except that of 
school director and has served as such both in the country 
and in Washington. 

In March, 1888, Mr. Polan was married to Miss Jennie 
McNeal, who was reared also in East Finley Township, 
and they have had seven children born to them, all re- 
maining at home except the eldest daughter, Elizabeth, 
who married Norman Kunsebuan and resides on Fay- 
ette street, Washington. The eldest son, Charles, is as- 
sociated with his father. The others are: Samuel Law- 
rence, Dora, Marie, Wanetta and Duane. Mr. Polan and 
family are members of the Central Presbyterian Church. 
He is identified with the P. O. S. of A., the Maccabees 
and the Knights and Ladies of Honor. 

WILLIAM F. EEED, a member of the school board 
of Hanover Township, has been identified with the oil 
industry during the larger portion of his business life 
and now fills the office of lease foreman for the Hanover 
Oil Company. It is one that requires a large amount of 
practical knowledge and unerring judgment. Mr. Reed 
was born in Beaver County, Pa., October 31, 1863, and is 
a son of Samuel W. and Mary (Martin) Eeed. 

The parents of Mr. Eeed were both born in Penn- 
sylvania and the father was a farmer throughout life. 
They were the parents of the following children: Mary 
Alice, who married Veasy Alexander; William F. ; Eliza- 
beth Adella, Marion S., George E., Jennie, Laura and 
Clarence. The father now lives retired at Frankfort 
in Beaver County. The mother died in 1S79, and was 
interred in the Hanover Cemetery. 

William F. Eeed attended the common schools in the 
neighborhood of his home, never enjoying any superior 
advantages. He was about nineteen years of age when 
he went on the farm with his father with whom he re- 



mained for two years and then went to farming on shares 
in Washington County for two years. He then entered 
the oil fields and that decided his future business career 
for he has continued to be identified with this great in- 
dustry until the present, and through his industry has 
made it a remunerative business for himself. 

In 1885, Mr. Eeed was married to Miss Lucy M. Au- 
miller, a daughter of Elijah and Hannah Aumiller. They 
were Oliio people but they died in Pennsylvania, leaving 
two children: Lucy M. and Wade, the latter of whom 
resides at Newark, Ohio. Four children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Eeed: Clara, born in 1887; Elmer, 
born in 1890; Bertha, born in 1893; and Wade, born 
in 1903. Mr. Eeed and family belong to the Pennsyl- 
vania Church in Florence, to which place he came in 
1901, and has a handsome home here. Like his father 
he is a Democrat but the only public office he has ever 
consented to accept is the one he now holds. He is a 
member of Cardville Lodge, No. 407, Odd Fellows, at 
Florence, Pa. 

EMANUEL SHEAEEE, a retired farmer and highly 
respected citizen of Washington, Pa., was born January 
1, 1843, in Franklin Township, Fayette Co., Pa., where he 
was reared and engaged in farming and stock raising 
until 1900. He then disposed of the coal beds under his 
farm land, and came to Washington County, where he 
purchased the old Allen farm of 188 acres at Eighty-four, 
North Strabane Township. Here he was for four years 
engaged in agricultural pursuits, then sold his land, re- 
serving the coal beds, and came to Washington, where 
he has since lived in retirement in his fine residence at 
No. 510 East Beau street, in the enjoyment of a well 
earned rest after years of unceasing activity. In August, 
1909, Mr. Shearer sold the balance of his property in 
Fayette County for $15,000, receiving $7,500 for the 
coal under five acres which he had formerly retained. 

In 1865, Mr. Shearer married Elizabeth Cook, who 
was born and reared in Fayette County, Pa., and of their 
union were born the following children: Emma E., lives 
at home; F. 0. Shearer, a general merchant residing at 
Eighty-four; Harry Jacob, deceased; Jessie May, at 
home; and John Cook Shearer, who is engaged in busi- 
ness with his brother at Eighty-four. Mr. and Mrs. 
Shearer are members of the First Christian Church of 
Washington. 

JOHN W. PAEEAE, general farmer in Smith Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., who owns a one-half interest 
in 178 acres of land, which is located three miles east 
of Burgettstown, was born in this township, March 2, 
1847, and is a son of John and Phoebe (White) Farrar. 

John Farrar, father of John W., was born in Mt. 
Pleasant Township, Washington County. He was one 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



745 



of the representative men of this section in liis day, a 
prominent Republican and for some years served iu the 
office of associate judge. During the early part of his 
business life he conducted a store and was a well known 
merchant. After disposing of his mercantile interests, 
he purchased a farm of 196 acres, in Smith Township, 
which is owned jointly by his two sons, John W. and 
Clark Farrar. lie resided on this farm during the re- 
mainder of his life, his death occurring iu 1875, his 
burial being in the Candor Cemetery. He was a leading 
member and an elder iu the Raccoon Presbyterian Church. 
He married Phoebe White, who died in 1870. She was 
a daughter of John White, a well known old resident. 
To this marriage six children were born: Mary, Samuel 
Clark, Preston W., John W., William W., and George. 

John W. Farrar attended the schools of Smith Town- 
ship until he was old enough to give his father appreci- 
able help on the farm and he continued to assist until 
his father died in 1875. Then, together with his brother 
Clark, he took charge of the operation of the farm and 
together they managed it for a number of years, when, 
on account of failing health, he rented out his portion 
and went to Kansas. After an absence of five years, Mr. 
Farrar returned and settled again on his property, re- 
suming general farming. The Pittsburg and Eastern 
Coal Company have a lease on the farm, which has four- 
teen oil wells in operation. 

Mr. Farrar is one of the recognized good citizens of 
his township, always taking an interest in its progress 
and continually adding to its material development. In 
politics he is a Republican. For three years he has been 
auditor of Smith Township and in June, 1909, he was 
elected a member of the school board, to serve until 
1912. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

W. S. NOBLE, one of Washington 's representative 
and substantial citizens, whose home is situated at No. 
385 Jefferson street, has been identified with the oil and 
gas industry for some fourteen years and has been a 
lessor and operator in most of the fields in the coun- 
try. He was born in Buffalo Township, Washington Co., 
Pa., in July, 1854, and is a son of Robert and Rachael 
(McKean) Noble. 

The parents of Mr. Noble are both deceased, the 
mother dying in 1855 and the father surviving until 
February 22, 1893. He was born in Washington County 
in 1819 and was a son of William Noble, who was a very 
early settler in the county. Robert Noble engaged in 
farming and stock raising and continued active until 
1884, when he retired to Claysville. He was married 
(first) to Rachael McKean and four children were born 
to them: William R., of Washington; Margaret, wife 
of John H. Vankirk, of Franklin Township; J. W., who 
died in 1893 ; and Wishart Stevenson. 



W. S. Noble was reared and educated in Science Hill 
school, in Washington County, and prior to October 4, 
1895, resided in BulTalo Township. There he engaged in 
farming and raised stock and also, for some few years 
bought and shipped fat stock. About 1895 he became 
interested in the oil and gas business and since then has 
been very active, being engaged as producer, contractor 
and lessee, working in the West Virginia, Ohio, Penn- 
sylvania and Illinois iields. 

Mr. Noble, through marriage with Miss Flora B. Be- 
bout, became connected with an old family of Washing- 
ton County. They have four duldren: Jennie B., who 
married James L. Henderson, a son of James L. Hen- 
derson, Sr., a prominent citizen of Washington County, 
and they have one son, Paul, who is now seven years 
old; D. Burnell, who is a resident of Erie, Pa., married 
Ada Richards and they have one son, Albert, who is 
five years old; Susan B., who married William Kennedy, 
of Washington, and they have two children — Italph, who 
is aged two years, and Flora B., who is six months old; 
and Edna B., who lives at home. Mr. Noble and family 
are members of the Third Presbyterian Church. He is 
identified with the Royal Arcanum. Although not active 
in politics, Mr. Noble belongs to that class of citizens 
never found derelict in the faithful performance of 
necessary public duties. 

ADOLPH KAPP, owner of a bakery ai Donora, Pa., 
where he has been a resident since 1901, was born Au- 
gust 18, 1874, iu Baden, Germany, and is a son of 
Kilian and Sophia (Binz) Kapp. 

Kilian Kapp was born and reared in Germany, where 
he died in 1907, aged seventy-three years. His occupa- 
tion was farming. His wife, Sophia Binz, also a native 
of Germany, died in 1901, age(3 fifty-five years. 

Adolph Kapp, who is the only member of his family 
who came to this country, was reared on his father's 
farm and attended the schools of Baden. He was seven- 
teen years of age when he came to America, and first 
located in Pittsburg, where he worked for some time in 
various bakeries. He then spent a short time in New 
York and in Portland, Me., after which he returned to 
Pittsburg. In 1897 he went to Monongahela City, Pa., 
as a baker, and on August 1, 1901, came to Donora, 
where he erected his present business block and estab- 
lished himself in the bakery business. 

Mr. Kapp was united in marriage May 6, 1899, to 
Martha Planert, also a native of Germany, and they 
have two children: Martha, and Margaret. Mr. Kapp 
is a member of the F. O. E., I. O. 0. F., and the F. and 
A. M. 

J. B. IRWIN, M. D., one of Washington's older physi- 
cians and surgeons, for the past eighteen years has been 



746 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



engaged in active practice here and enjoys the confidence 
of a large number of the leading families. He was born 
in West Mnley Township, Washington Co., Pa., in 1852, 
and is a son of Ephraim and Margaret (Riehey) Irwin. 

The father of Dr. Irwin was also a native of Wash- 
ington County, born in 1812, and the whole of his acliv<i 
life was devoted to agricultural pursuits. His death oc- 
curred in 1894. He married Margaret Eichey and they 
reared a family of seven children, as follows: Elizabeth, 
who is now- deceased, was the wife of William Meloy ; 
Esther Ann, who married Jonas Mills; William, who is 
a resident of West Middletown, Washington County; 
Joseph Buchanan; a son who died when eight days old; 
R. W., who is a prominent attorney at Washington; and 
Sarah Margaret, who married 'William Richmond, of 
West Middletown. 

Dr. J. B. Irwin attended the common schools in West 
Einley Township, and from them entered higher institu- 
tions of learning, including the Claysville Normal School, 
Canonsburg Academy and Westminster College, during a 
part of this period teaching school at intervals. His 
medical preparation extended over some years. He 
spent one year in the medical department of the Univer- 
sity of New York, one term in the University of Mary- 
land, and in 1884 was graduated from the Kentucky 
School of Medicine. In the succeeding summer he lo- 
cated at West Alexander, in Washington County, and 
engaged in practice there until 1891, when he came to 
Washington. Here he has not only built up a large 
and substantial practice, but has become a representative 
citizen, taking deep interest in the progress of education 
and accepting service on the school board. He is valued 
as a member of the county and State medical societies 
and is one of the obstetric staff of the City Hospital of 
Washington. ... 

On June 24, 1880, Dr. Irwin was married to Miss 
Lovisa Johnson, who died September 21, 1885. She was 
a daughter of R. T. and Elizabeth Johnson, residents of 
Cross Creek Township. Three sons were born to this 
union, namely: L. M., who is cashier of the Lincoln Na- 
tional Bank; E. E., who is a minister of the United 
Presbyterian faith, now located at York, N. Y. ; and 
Jesse B., who is a student of law in the office of his 
uncle, R. W. Irwin, at Washington. Dr. Irwin was mar- 
ried (second) to Mrs. Maggie McKee, who died March 
17, 1904, leaving no issue. Dr. Irwin is a member of the 
Third United Presbyterian Church. 

WILLIAM W. HUNTER, a valued resident of Buf- 
falo Village, Pa., and the owner of two of the finest 
farms in Washington County, one being the old homestead 
of the Hunters, containing 91% acres, and the other 
1121/i acres, for a number of years has distinguished 
himself in different sections of the country, as the 



founder of philanthropic movements and as an influential 
temperance leader. Mr. Hunter was born in Hopewell 
Township, Washington County, Pa., Mar. 4, 1837, and 
is a son of William and Maria J. (Chambers) Hunter. 

The Hunter xamily came originally from Ireland, 
where the grandparents, John and Jane Hunter, were 
born, reared and married. In 1800 they came to America 
and after reaching Washington County, Pa., settled on 
a farm near Buffalo village. Shortly 'afterward their 
son, William Hunter, waa born and he spent his entire 
life in Washington County. In 1830 he married Maria 
J. Chamoers anu they had four children : Joseph C, 
Jane, William W. and Joshua J. 

William W. Hunter attended the public schools more 
or less regularly until he was 20 years of age, after 
which he taught school for four years. He assisted on 
the farm until he met with a serious accident in operat- 
ing a threshing machine, by which he lost his right arm, 
in 1859. He then made preparations to enter upon the 
study of law at \vashington. When the Rebellion came 
upon the land and his comrades were entering the army 
on every side, ^e also desired to be of service and, while 
debarred from enlisting as a soldier, he succeeded in 
being accepted in the transportation department, and 
endured as a teamster, as much hardship and exposure 
as he would have been subjected to if he had been march- 
ing in the ranks. He persisted in the work, however, and 
remained in the army until March 12, 1863, when he 
returned to the farm. He served with the Ringgold 
Battalion and received no compensation. Mr. Hunter's 
two brothers, Joseph C. and Joshua J., served in Co. C, 
Ringgold Cavalry, and both died in the service. 

On Dec. 15, 1864, Mr. Hunter was married to Miss 
Elizabeth T. Smiley, a daughter of Caldwell and Nancy 
(Tweed) Smiley. She is a granddaughter of William 
Smiley, who was killed at the raising of a barn on the 
Dr. Anderson farm, now owned by Alexander Hamilton. 
The family was Scotch-Irish and William Smiley, Sr., 
great-grandfather of Mrs. Hunter, was one of the pioneer 
settlers of Hopewell Township. In the year 1800 the 
Upper Buffalo Presbyterian Church, of which he was 
an elder, found itself badly in debt and unable to pay 
its pastor. The members were thrifty and industrious 
and had raised crops for which there was no local mar- 
ket. Mr. Smiley, then aged 60 years, volunteered to go 
South to New Orleans with products in an effort to raise 
the much needed money. He was gone for more than 
nine months and his family and the congregation had 
almost given up hope for his safe return, when he ar- 
rived with gold enougu in his belt to clear the church 
indebtedness. He had walked the entire distance back, 
avoiding the Indians as best he could and at times pene- 
trating an unbroken forest. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter have 
been married for more than 45 vears and in that time 



IIISI'oi;^ OK WASIIIXd'I'oN COUNTY 



749 



of li:i|>|iv assiii.-i;itioii and ciiiiiiiaiiioiisliiip, IIk'v Uhm; lurn 
tnio lielpmeets. They are the parents of four sons: 
.loseph \V., who is a practicing physician located at Cbar- 
leroi. I'a. ; John S., who is successfully engaged in farm- 
iiif; uu the old home place, is active in the affairs of 
i-hurch and in matters pertaining to the welfare of the 
toHUihip; Clarence M., who is a salesman for the Na- 
tional Biscuit Company and maintains his residence at 
Monougahela City; and Howard T., who, for 15 years 
served as teller in the Washington Trust Company. 

Since earl}" manhood, Mr. lluuter has displayed literary 
ahility and has been a newspaper correspondent, being 
identified with a number of journals at the present time. 
In prize essay contests on the subject of horses he won 
more prizes than any man in the United States, in one 
instance winning over 75 contestants, representing 2i 
.States. He won another prize offered by the Clydesdale 
Association, the competition being open to the world. 
He is also gifted as an orator and probably there is no 
man in Washington County, who is called on so fre- 
quently to make addresses at agricultural, religious and 
educational meetings. His deep interest in religious and 
philanthropic work caused him, in 1894, to turn his farm 
responsibilities over to others and to enter into Sabbath- 
school missionary work. He continued to devote him- 
self to this great undertaking until 1898, making his 
headquarters at Fairmount, W. Va. During this period 
he traveled 15,000 miles and visited over 5,000 families. 
In 1897 he was licensed as local evangelist by the Pres- 
bytery at Parkersburg. He then went into regidar evan- 
gelistic work, making his headquarters at Smithfield, 
Wetzel County, W. Va., where he remained one year, dur- 
ing which time he organized the First and the Second 
Presbyterian Churches in that county. His wife was 
there stricken with typhoid fever and because of her 
subsequent broken health, he left that field of work and 
returned to Pennsylvania and in 1901 he purchased the 
comfortable and commodious residence at Buffalo village. 

In 1870 Mr. Hunter was chosen elder of the Upper 
Buffalo Presb.yterian Cnurch, the youngest ever chosen 
as such in that body. In 1891 he was commissioned to 
the General Assembly oi the Presbyterian Church of the 
United States at Detroit, and with his masterly talk 
swayed the assembly to adopt a measure of economy in 
handling the financial affairs of the church. 

Mr. Hunter has been interested in and identified with 
many branches of puilanthropie work, but perhaps he is 
most widely known as an apostle of temperance. It is 
said of him that he has practically through his own 
efforts, been the means of keeping saloons out of six 
or eight of Washington County 's prospering towns. He 
is superintendent of tne Washington County Sabbath- 
school Temperance Association and is the acknowledged 
leader of the temperance forces in the county. In 1902 



lie was appointed one of the trustees of the Plumber 
Temperance Fund, which now amounts to .$17,000, and 
he sees to the investment and disbursement of this vast 
sum. Public confidence is reposed in Mr. Hunter and 
he is very frequently appointed as executor and adminis- 
trator of estates and has numerous minors under his 
careful guardianship. His life has been one of great 
usefulness and his efforts for the uplifting of others have 
been crowned w.... much success. 

.lOSKl'll B. SMITH, a leading citizen of Hopewell 
Township, who is filling the offices of register and 
assessor of the same, lives on his well improved, valuable 
farm of 125 acres, which he purchased in 1906. He was 
horn in Monroe County, Ohio, April 22, 1855, and is a 
son of Cary and Margaret (Blair) Smith. 

The parents of Mr. Smith are deceased. They had 
the following children: Amos, Susan, John, James, all 
deceased ; Isaac, who resides in West Virginia ; Joseph B. ; 
Mary, who is deceased; Huldah, who married Edward 
Stetson, of Ohio; 'Nanej, who married Samuel Reed, of 
Brooks County, West Va. ; and Norman, who still resides 
in Ohio. 

Joseph B. Smith attended school until he was 13 years 
of age, and then went to work on the farm and has de- 
voted himself to agricultural pursuits ever since and has 
been unusually successful in his undertakings. He owns 
lanil tliat is well adapted to general farming and grazing, 
and his herds of cattle and flocks of sheep compare 
favorably with any in the township. Following his mar- 
riage, Mr. Smith moved to West Alexandria, Pa., where 
he lived four years, then moved to Claysville and lived 
there for 18 years, coming then to his present farm. 

Mr. Smith was married November 25, 1880, to Miss 
Nora Steenrod, a daughter of David and Hannah 
(Davis) Steenrod, of Belmont County, Ohio, and they 
have had the f ollow ing children : Essie L., born December 
10, 1881, is the wife of Chester Sutherland, who is 
county recorder of Washington County; Vernon S., born 
January 24, 1884, resides at Pittsburg; Clara W., born 
October 10, 1887, married William Hunter, of South 
Franklin Township; Roy, born November 10, 1889, is a 
student in civil engineering at the Carnegie Technical 
School at Pittsburg; Olive L., born March 10, 1893, is 
attending the Washington Seminary; and Mark Mc- 
Kinley, born January 20, 1897, is in school. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sutherland have a daughter, Ruth, born April 10, 
1907. It is a remarkable fact that four of the children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Smith and their only grandchild, were 
born on the tenth day of the month. Mr. Smith has 
given his children fine educational advantages and they 
are developing into superior men and women. In his 
political affiliation he is a stanch Republican. With his 
wife he belongs to the United Presbyterian (Jhurch. 



750 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



JOHN E. KUNTZ, a retired druggist and one of the 
leading citizens of Washington, Pa., was born September 
S, 1S53, in this borough, and is a son of Michael G. and 
EUza (Euth) Kuntz, who were among the early settlers 
of Washington. For many years during his early busi- 
ness life, Michael G. Kuntz was proprietor of a men's 
furnishing establishment. He was the father of five 
children: George B., resides with our subject; Mary J., 
is the widow of Eobert Dniry and is a resident of 
Pittsburg; James, retired, resides in Washington; 
Elizabeth, is the widow of John M. Morrow, and resides 
in Pittsburg; and John K., the subject of this sketch. 

John E. Kuntz was reared in Washington, where he 
attended the common schools, and at the age of fourteen 
years entered the drug store of John B. Vowell, de- 
ceased, in whose employ he remained between three and 
four years, subsequently working about the same period 
with George W. Eoberts. In 1S78 he engaged in the 
drug business for himself, continuing in that line for 
about twenty-eight years, when on account of ill health, 
he sold the business and has since been living in retire- 
ment, his residence being located at No. 25 South Col- 
lege street. Mr. Kuntz is a director of the Washington 
Light & Power Company, and is also a director of the 
Eeal Estate Trust Company of Washington. Mr. Kuntz 
is a man of enterprise and public spirit and takes an 
active interest in all local politics. He is fraternally 
affiliated with the B. P. 0. E. order. 

In 1894, Mr. Kuntz was united in marriage with Jessie 
Eomaine Newson, of Minneapolis, Minn. 

JOHN C. MOEGAN, vice president of the Citizens 
Trust Company, of Canonsburg, Pa., and ex-treasurer 
of Washington County, is identified with other business 
interests of this place, of which he has been a resident 
for some thirty-one years. He was born in Allegheny 
County, Pa., October 28, 1846, and is a son of James 
and Elizabeth (Hindman) Morgan. 

The Morgan family was established in Allegheny 
County in 1700, when the great-grandfather, who was 
probably of Welsh extraction, came to this section from 
West Virginia. He was accompanied by his son, Hugh 
Morgan, who grew to manhood, married, reared his 
family and died on the farm which has been in the 
family ever since and is now owned by John C. Morgan. 
On the same farm the late James Morgan, father of 
John C, was born and died, passing away in his nine- 
tieth year, in 1898. He married Elizabeth Hindman, 
who was born in Union Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
and died in 1869, aged sixty-three years. They had 
seven children born to them, all of whom survive, 
namely: Hugh, who resides at Oakdale, Ohio, married 
Harriet Hickman; Sarah Jane, who is the widow of 
William ^M. Hcrriott, lives in Mt. Pleasant Township, 



Washington County ; Samuel W., residing at Marshall- 
town, Iowa, married Charlotte Benedict of that State; 
Billingsley, residing on the old homestead in Allegheny 
County, married Mary Farran, whom he survives; 
William P., residing at Canonsburg, married Martha 
Johnston ; Margaret A., who is the widow of James Fife, 
residing in Upper St. Clair Township, Allegheny County; 
and John C, who is the youngest of the family. 

John C. Morgan 's life until he was twenty-one years 
of age, was mainly passed on his father 's , farm. He 
attended the country schools and the academy at Mans- 
field, now Carnegie, for five months. When he departed 
from home surroundings, Mr. Morgan went to Marshall- 
town, Iowa, where he spent seven years, during a part 
of this time being engaged in business for himself, and 
during the other part was in the railroad service. In 
1878 he came to Canonsburg, where he embarked in the 
dry goods business, in which he continued until 1903, 
at which time he sold out. In 1891 he erected the hand- 
some four-story business and ofSce building to which his 
name is given and which is a credit to the city. In this 
block is situated the Canonsburg Opera House, a tasteful 
and well arranged amusement hall. In addition to his 
real estate interests and his financial connections, he is 
treasurer of the Canonsburg Pottery Company. In large 
measure, Mr. Morgan is a self made man and is one of 
unquestioned integrity and recognized ability. 

In 1886, Mr. Morgan was married to Miss Clara Wil- 
son, of Washington, and they have five children, namely: 
iiJdith, who is the wife of Edward Crawford, residing at 
Fremont, Tex.; Edna, who is the wife of Arthur Shaw, 
residing at East Liverpool, Ohio; and Clara, James and 
Florilla, residing at home. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan are 
members of the Central Presbyterian Church. He has 
been an active Eepublican since he reached manhood. 
He was elected treasurer of Washington County in 1905 
and assumed the duties of the office January 1, 1906, 
and performed them to the entire satisfaction of his 
fellow citizens. 

JAMES WATSON, once a leading citizen of Wash- 
ington County, for many years was a prominent member 
of the bar, and through his ability and high standard of 
legal procedure, did much to add to its prestige. Mr. 
Watson was born at Canonsburg, Washington Co., Pa., 
in 1809, and was one of a family of six children bom to 
John and Mary (Miller) Watson. 

From his brilliant school days, James Watson was 
destined for the bar and immediately after his gradua- 
tion from Canonsburg College, he entered upon the study 
of lavr with Hon. Thomas McKennan, at Washington. 
Shortly afterward, when Mr. McKennan was elected to 
Congress, Mr. Watson was admitted to a partnership, 
and although a young and practically inexperienced 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



751 



lawyer, carefully, discreetly and success I'ully attended 
to the firm's large business during the senior partner's 
absence, which covered four full terms and a part of a 
fifth. Early in his legal career Mr. Watson engaged in 
a general practice, but in the course of time the burden 
of work became onerous and for a long period previous 
to his death, which occurred April 15, 1875, he had re- 
fused all criminal cases. He possessed all the qualities 
which go to make up a reliable lawyer — was a close 
reasoner and judicial advisor, and ever cherished the 
highest ethics of his profession. His political convic- 
tions made him a Republican. In religious faith he was 
a Presbyterian. 

On January 15, 1835, Mr. Watson was united in 
marriage with Miss Maria Woodbridge Morgan, who 
was a daughter of George and Elizabeth Aldrich 
(Thompson) Morgan. George Morgan, the father of 
Mrs. Watson, was born in the old college city of Prince- 
ton, N. J., in 1780, and was a son of Col. George and 
Mary (Baynton) Morgan. Col. George Morgan probably 
won his military title through service in the Eevolutionary 
War. He came with his family to Washington County 
and acquired land in North Strabane Township, on 
which he died in 1810, Ms widow surviving until 1825. 
Their burial, according to the manner of the time, was 
upon their own land, but at a later date their remains 
were transferred to the beautiful cemetery at Washing- 
ton, and in close proximity now rest the remains of 
their granddaughter, Maria Woodbridge Morgan Watson, 
who passed away on March 5, 1909. George Morgan 
remained in New Jersey until he had completed his 
course at Princeton College. For many years he resided 
on the farm in North Strabane Township, Washington 
County, his death occurring at the age of seventy years. 
He married Elizabeth A. Thompson, who was born in 
Delaware and died in Washington County. Of their 
family of nine children, the late Mrs. Watson was the 
fifth in order of birth. 

To James Watson and wife were born the following 
children: Elizabeth Thompson Watson, who resides at 
Washington; Mary Baynton, w^ho is the widow of the 
late Eev. Ale.xander Reed, resides at Washington and 
has four children: Eleanor, who married Joseph McCord 
and resides in Princeton, N. J.; Mary Morgan, who 
married John Ewing Woods, and resides in Cincinnati : 
James Watson Reed, who lives in Pittsburg; and Robert 
E. Reed, who is a resident of Washington; George 
Watson, who is deceased; Jane Gilman Watson, who 
resides at Washington; David Thompson Watson, who 
is one of the leading attorneys of Pennsylvania, lives 
in Pittsburg and married Miss Margaret Walker of that 
city; Matilda, who is the wife of A. G. Happer, of 
Washington; James Watson, who is deceased; and Will- 



iam M. Watson, who resides at Seattle, Wash., married 
Sarah McKnight, of Pittsburg, and they have two chil- 
dren : Ormsby Morgan Watson and Maria Morgan 
Watson. For years this family and its connections have 
been identified with the best citizenship of Washington 
County. 

JEREMIAH M. LINVILLE, one of Donegal Town- 
ship's representative and substantial citizens, a promi- 
nent farmer and breeder of fine stock, resides on one 
farm of 108 acres and owns also another farm, contain- 
ing 228 acres, both situated in Donegal Township. Mr. 
Linville was born in Donegal Township, Washington 
County, Pa., March 12, 1S52, and is a son of George 
W. and Mary (Eodgers) Linville. 

George W. Linville was born August 10, 1816, in 
Donegal Township, and was a son of Jeremiah and 
Elizabeth (Riley) Linville. In 183G, Mr. Linville was 
married to Mary Rodgers, a daughter of Francis Eodgers. 
She died in 1865, having been the mother of the fol- 
lowing children : Alfred, who is now deceased ; George ; 
Elizabeth ; Mary Jane, who is now deceased ; Wilson ; 
Francis; Jeremiah M. ; John, and Calvin Terry. In 
1867, Mr. Linville was married (second) to Lydia Lucas, 
and they had two sons, Riley and Newton. Mr. Linville 
followed farming and stock raising during the entire 
active portion of his life. With his family he was a 
member of the Dutch Fork Disciples Church. 

Jeremiah M. Linville was reared in Donegal Township, 
but he obtained his education mainly in the schools of 
Independence Township. He is a man of ample fortune 
and has many important business interests, nevertheless 
be can be classed with those who have justly gained the 
title of self made men. WTien he left home he went to 
Licking and Athens Counties, Ohio, and there spent 
thirteen years in the lumber regions, interested in the 
sawmill business, after which he returned to Donegal 
Township and has resided here ever since, devoting a 
large part of his time to his stock interests. He has 
shown great good judgment in conducting these and his 
course has been fully justified by the results. On his 
farms are found registered Poland China hogs. Short- 
horn and Jersey cattle and other stock of the very best 
grade. He is progressive in his ideas and as a successful 
stockman he is known all over the county. He makes 
something of a specialty of sheep growing, keeping 
some 600 in his flocks, these also being of the kind that 
lie has found will give the largest return in fine wool. 

Mr. Linville was married in February, 1898, in Done- 
gal Township, to Miss Millie Morrow, who is a daughter 
of Abraham Morrow, a former resident of this township. 
They are leading members of the Dutch Fork Disciples 
Church. In politics, Mr. Linville is a stanch supporter 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTOX COUNTY 



of the principles and policies of the Eepublican party. 
He does his duty as a citizen but he is no seeker for 
political favors. 

WILLIAM P. CUEEY, who has served continuously 
for 18 years as secretary of the Hanover Township 
School Board, is an esteemed and representative citizen 
and resides on his valuable farm of 60 acres, on which 
he was born, in September, 1850, and is a son of Robert 
and Sarah (Stewart) Curry. The family is an old one 
in Washington County and the father was a volunteer 
in the War of 1812. 

William P. Curry is the youngest in a family of three 
children, having one brother, Oliver S., who is a farmer 
in Hanover Township; and Caroline A., a sister, who 
married Aaron Johnston. All attended the district 
schools and Williain P. then took a college course at 
Pittsburg, Pa., after which he taught school for two 
terms in Alleghen}' County. Before settling down to 
business, Mr. Curry then spent sis months in travel 
through the West, visiting many interesting places. 
After he returned he purchased his present place from 
the Robert Curry heirs and went into the stock business. 
He did a large amount of improving on this place, re- 
building where necessary and repairing wherever needed. 
With the exception of three years, Mr. Curry has spent 
his entire life in Hanover Township. 

In 18/6, Mr. Curry was married to Miss Agnes J. 
McKee, a daughter of Andrew and Mary (Hill) McKee. 
Her father died when she was small, his children being: 
George; James, now deceased; Elizabeth, wife of James 
McGiU; and Agnes J., the wife of Mr. Curry. Her 
mother was later married to Robert Fulton and had 
three children : Emma, Estella and Castner. Mr. and Mrs. 
Curry have four children: May W., who is a teacher in 
the public schools of Pittsburg; Lou A., who is a stenogra- 
pher for the Carnegie Steel Company ; Gladys, who is » 
stenographer for J. B. Haynes & Son, merchants, at Pitts- 
burg; and Elva B., who is a stenographer for the Credit 
Men 's Association at Pittsburg, aU intellectual and accom- 
plished young ladies. Mr. Curry and family are mem- 
bers of the First Presbyterian Church at Burgettstown. 

CHARLES F. HALLAM, a member of the Hallam 
Construction Company, and one of the substantial busi- 
ness men of Washington, Pa., was born in 1861, in this 
city, and is a son of Louis and Eosanna (Teegarden) 
Hallam, and a grandson of Joseph Hallam, one of the 
pioneer hotel men of Washington. 

Louis Hallam, father of our subject, was born in 
Washington in 1814, where during his early life he fol- 
lowed his trade of blacksmith, but later engaged in 
teaming. He was the owner of several teams of horses 
and carted goods across the mountains. His death 



occurred in Washington in 1876. He married Rosanna 
Teegarden, and of their union were born the following 
children: Joseph, who is engaged in the contracting 
business; George T., also engaged in the contracting 
business; John W., who with Charles F. Hallam, our 
subject, operates the Hallam Construction Company of 
AVashington; Robert H., who is engaged in the furniture 
business; Anna; Sophia, who is the widow of George 
Parshall; and three who are deceased. 

Charles F. HaUam obtained his educational training 
in the schools of Washington, Pa., and was practically 
reared in the construction business. In partnership with 
his brother John, he established the Hallam Construction 
Company, which is the largest concern of its kind in the 
county. They at times employ as high as 400 laborers 
and own seventy-five head of work horses and often find 
it necessary to hire from twenty to twenty-five extra 
teams. In politics, Mr. HaUam is identified with the 
Republican party and takes an active interest in all 
affairs concerning that party. 

In August, 1887, Mr. Hallam was united in marriage 
with Ida M. Briggs, who was born and reared in Wash- 
ington, and to them has been born one daughter, Rosanna. 

OLIVER S. CURRY, one of Hanover Township 's lead- 
ing citizens, who owns 67 acres of valuable land, which 
he devotes to farming and stock raising, was born in 
Hanover Township, Washington Co., Pa., where he has 
spent his whole life, September 28, 1843, and is a son 
of Robert and Sarah (Stewart) Curry. 

The grandparents of Mr. Curry were Robert and 
Isabella (McKenzie) Curry, who came to America from 
(Scotland. Robert Curry (2) father of Oliver S., was 
born in Washington County at a date not recalled, but 
he was old enough to be a volunteer in the War of 1812, 
and he received 160 acres of land in Kansas as a reward 
for his services in the war. He owned a farm of 148- 
acres in Hanover Township, Washington Co., Pa. He 
married Sarah Stewart and they had three children : 
Caroline A., who marrieu Aaron Johnston ; Oliver S. 
and William P. 

Oliver S. Curry had sufficient educational training to 
enable him to become a teacher, having attended school 
regularly in Hanover Township, after which he took a 
course at the Iron City College, in Pittsburg, but he 
did not make use of his knowledge in that way. As he 
was the eldest son and his father needed him at home, 
he returned to the farm and has engaged in agricultural 
pursuits ever since. 

In October, 1879, Mr. Curry was married to Miss 
Letitia Hanlin, a daughter of Charles and Margaret 
(Lyons) Hanlin, who were farming people in Jefferson 
Township. They are now deceased and their remains 
rest in the cemetery at Eldersville, Washington County. 




D. A\'ALLACE PATTERSON 



inSTORY OF \VASHIN(i'rOX COUiVTV 



755 



Mr. Iliiiiliii \Mis a i;,.inil.lic-;iii in |Hilili,s, :iii.l liotli lie 
;iikI wiio boloiiyud to the Metlioilist I'rotostaut Church. 
Mrs. Curry is one of the following family of ehildron: 
Elizabeth, who is deceased; Letitia, who is the wife of 
Mr. Curry; Fillmore; James K., who is deceased; 
Florence, who is the widow of Samuel Johnston; and 
Anna L., who is deceased. 

Mr. and Jlr.s. Curry have three accomplished daugh- 
ters: Ethel, who is a popular teacher in the public schools 
at Duquesne, Allegheny County; Margaret, who is 
stenographer for the Reiueke Wagner Company, of 
i'ittsburg; and Bertha, who is a teacher in Finley Town- 
ship, Allegheny County. Mr. Curry and family are 
members of the Presbyterian Church. In polities he is 
a Democrat and he has served the township as a member 
of the election board. 

D. WALLACE PATTERSON, wlio, for 40 years has 
been continuously engaged in educational work in Wash- 
ington County, is one of the best known and most es- 
teemed of its citizens. He was born in lS-i6, at Patter- 
son's Mill, in Cross Creek Township, Washington Coun- 
ty, Pa., and still occupies the fine old mill property. 

The parents of Mr. Patterson were Lysander and Eliz- 
abeth (Wallace) Patterson, the former of whom was a 
native and lifelong resident of Washington County, ex- 
cept for one year spent in the West. The mother was 
of an old and respected family of Allegheny County. 
They were the parents of the following children : D. 
Wallace, Mandaline, John, Margaret, Jennie, Maurice, 
Mayo, Mary, Harry and Elizabeth. Of this family, John 
is a practicing physician at Imperial, Pa. Margaret 
married James Clemens and they live at Bavington, Pa. 
Jennie married Robert Clemens and they live at the 
same place. Maurice is temporarily in Texas. Dr. Mayo 
is now deceased. Mary resides at Imperial and Harry 
resides at Youngstown, Ohio. Elizabeth married Clarence 
Colter and they live at Mineral, W. Va. 

D. Wallace Patterson attended the schools at Patter- 
son 's Mill until 20 years of age and then began to teach 
and later took a course in the State Normal School at 
California, Pa. Mr. Patterson has devoted a long life to 
useful effort and he has found a large measure of enjoy- 
ment in it, the gaining and imparting of knowledge hav- 
ing largely filled the cup of his ambition. He is enter- 
ing upon his seventh continuous year at Patterson 's 
Mill and has a large body of students in charge. He 
has been one of the township 's most active citizens in 
aiding movements for the general welfare, having always 
been an earnest and thoughtful student of public af- 
fairs. On many occasions he has been selected for re- 
sponsible offices by his fellow citizens and he has served 
as judge of elections, inspector and clerk and also as 
road supervisor and ai.ditnr. 



In 1S7N, .Mr. Patter.>^on was married to Miss Jennie 
I'alterson, a daughter of Robert and Isabella Patterson, 
of Westmoreland County, Pa., and they have had four 
children, namely: Alva, who resides at home; Lester, who 
lives at Youngstown, Ohio; Lena, who is a successful 
teacluM-; and Eflfie, who died at the age of 17 years. 

V. (). ZAIIMSKl;. iif the prominent foundry and 
macliino firm of Zahniser Bros. & Sten, with plant and 
automobile garage on Washington street, near Chestnut, 
Washington, Pa., was born in Mercer County, Pa., in 
1860, and is a son of Michael Zahniser, who was born 
there in 1820 and was the progenitor of a large family, 
and a descendant of a very old settled one in Pennsyl- 
vania. 

V. O. Zahniser remained in his native place until he 
was twenty-four years of age, attending school in his 
earlier years and later assisting on the home farm. He 
then went to the West and spent a year in Nebraska, 
during that time teaching school and farming, and from 
there went to Kansas, where he took up a homestead of 
160 acres, located in Cheyenne Cbunty, and resided there 
for one and one-half years. He returned to Nebraska 
for another year, but in September, 1888, he went back 
to the East and took up his residence at Washington. 
For about one year he worked at rig building in the oil 
fields, then was in railroad work for ten months and 
after this experience entered the employ of the Me- 
Dermot Tool Company, at Martin's Ferry, Ohio. His 
work there covered a period of eighteen months, when 
he came back to Washington, where he had many friends 
and relatives, and shortly afterward became a member 
of the firm of Zahniser Bros. & Sten. He has additional 
interests, some of these being in the oil fields, and he 
is also concerned in the Forgoing Machine Shops, at 
Waynesburg. He has been a man of progressiveness 
and energy wherever he has lived and is numbered with 
tlie stable and reliable business men of Washington. 

In 1895, Mr. Zahniser was married to Miss Mary 
Beucler, of Shelton, Neb. They are members of the 
Tliird Presbyterian Church at Washington. 

JOHN CLARK RANKIN, D. D. 8., a leading prac- 
titioner of dentistry at Canonsburg, Pa., is a member 
of an old established family of North Strabane Town- 
ship, Washington County, the old homestead on which 
Dr. Rankin was born, October 1, 1858, being situated 
four miles from Canonsburg. Both his father and grand- 
father lived on that farm. He is a son of John H. and 
Almira (Lee) Rankin, and a grandson of John Rankin. 

To John Rankin four sons and one daughter were 
born, namely: John H., Samuel, Joshua, Margaret 
and Joseph H., the latter being the only member of the 
familv still surviving. He resides at No. 714 .\llison 



ro6 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



avenue, Washington, Pa. John H. Eankin, father of 
Dr. Eankin, died in AprU, 1896, when in his sixty-seventh 
year. He married Almira Lee, who was born in Alle- 
gheny County and died October 15, 1903, when in her 
seventy-third year. The Lees were of English extraction 
and one branch of the family settled in Virginia and there 
became distinguished. The Eankins were of Scotch-Lrish 
stock. To John H. Eankin and wife were born four sons 
and two daughters, as follows: William, who died in child- 
hood: Mary Elizabeth, who resides at Canonsburg; Al- 
mira Belle, who is now deceased, was the wife of Capt. 
A. M. Porter; James Lee, who is a di'uggist, married 
Elizabeth McCloy, of Washington County; Joseph H., 
who died at the age of nineteen years; and John Clark, 
of Canonsburg. 

Dr. John Clark Eankin gi-ew to manhood in North 
Strabane Township and attended the public schools and 
also the Canonsburg Academy and after deciding upon 
his choice of profession, became a student in the Penu- 
sylvania Dental College, at Philadelphia, where he was 
creditably graduated in the class of 1886. He remained 
in Philadelphia for six years longer, engaging in the 
practice of his profession, then went to Pittsburg and 
built up a large practice there and continued his office 
in that city for fourteen years. In 1882 his father had 
purchased the present comfortable residence at Canons- 
burg and during his period of practice at Pittsburg as 
well as since. Dr. Eankin maintained this as his home. 
He has a very satisfactory practice in this city and his 
work commands large remuneration, being along the 
most modern lines. He has thoroughly equipped olEces 
and keeps abreast with the times in professional methods. 

In March, 1904, Dr. Eankin was married to Miss Mary 
Margaret McKinley, a daughter of Eev. E. G. McKinley, 
a presbyterian minister, who is now engaged in mission- 
ary work in Florida. They have one ehUd, Anna Lee. 
Dr. and Mrs. Eankin are members of the First Presby- 
terian Church at Canonsburg. 

W. G. EDMONDS, who has been a resident of Wash- 
ington, Pa., since 1901, is engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business and is also the local representa- 
tive of the firm of Simon White & Son, the owners of the 
largest monument business in Washington County, their 
plant being located at Claysville. Mr. Edmonds was born 
at Bellaire, Ohio, in 1881, and when fourteen years of 
age, moved to Muncie, Ind., where he completed his 
education. 

Mr. Edmonds' entrance into business was as a de- 
signer of moulds for glassware, and his artistic talent 
made him very successful in that line. Prior to engaging 
in his present business, which he established in February, 
1909, he was connected for two years with the firm of 
A. B. Caldwell, dealers in clothing and furnishing goods. 



and there gained a fair knowledge of successful merchan- 
dising. Mr. Edmonds is a musician of more than usual 
ability and he has composed a number of pieces of 
music which have been cordially received by the musical 
world. He is an active, enterprising young man and, 
aside ii-om his different business undertakings, is in- 
terested to some degree in local politics. 

In 1904, Mr. Edmonds was married to Miss Anna E. 
Dougherty, a daughter of the late Dr. George A. Dough- 
erty. Mr. and Mrs. Edmonds have four children: Clar- 
ence, Margaret, Eoy and Eaymond. Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
monds are members of the Second United Presbyterian 
Church. 

WILLIAM W. WEIKICH, a leading citizen of Canton 
Township, a prominent farmer and stock raiser, belongs 
to one of the old settled families of this section. He was 
born in Canton Township, Washington Co., Pa., Novem- 
ber 21, 1845, and is a son of Samuel K. and Charlotte 
A. (Shaffer) Weirich. 

Samuel K. Weirich was born in Canton Township and 
was a son of Hon. Jacob Weirich, who was also born in 
Washington County and was the son of Jacob Weirich, 
the founder of the family here, who came from Lancaster 
County, Pa. Hon. Jacob Weirich, the grandfather, was a 
very prominent man in his day in Washington County, 
serving as a member of the State Legislature. His son, 
Samuel K., followed closely in his footsteps. He was a 
justice of the peace for many years and also served as 
county commissioner. He was a shrewd and successful 
business man and engaged extensively in agricultural 
pursuits. 

William W. Weirich was reared iu Canton Township 
and obtained his education in the local schools. His 
business has been farming and raising stock and his 
undertakings have been uniformly successful. 

In politics he is a Eepublican but has independent ten- 
dencies, being a man well qualified to judge public mat- 
ters according to their merits. He has frequently served 
iu public capacities, being a member of the township 
school board during three terms and treasurer of the 
same, has also been road commissioner and township 
auditor. He is a maji of public spirit and enjoys the 
esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens. 

On April 30, 1867, Mr. Weirich was married to Miss 
Mary E. Christie, of West Middletown, Pa., a daughter 
of John F. Christie, late of Washington. To this mar- 
riage seven childi'en were born, six of whom survive: 
Lucy M., who is the wife of Philo Paul, of Duquesne, 
Pa.; Samuel K., who is an oil well contractor at Wash- 
ington, who has been in the Philippine Islands, in Japan, 
and many European countries; Mamie E., who is the 
wife of .John W. Miller, of Turtle Creek, Pa.; Lovenia, 
who is the wife of S. A. Davis, of Canton Township; 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



757 



John C, who resides at Portland, Oregon ; William H., 
who died during the Spanish-American War when he 
was serving in Co.G, 2nd W. Va. Inf. ; and J. Alvin, who 
lives at Washington. Mr. Weirich and family belong to 
the First Christian Church at Washington. On January 
10, 1906, Mr. Weirich was deprived of his companion, 
after a happy domestic life of thirty-nine years. The 
bereavement was a heavy one as she was a woman of 
most lovely character. 

E. W. KNOX, a successful lawyer of Washington, 
Pa., comes of an old and prominent family of Wash- 
ington County. He was born on a farm in Bufl'alo 
Township in 1S69, and is a son of William Knox, who 
was born on the same farm in 1827. John Knox, grand- 
father of K. W. Knox, was born in County Antrim, Ire- 
land, and upon coming to the United States located in 
Washington County, Pa., in 1811. In 1813, he settled 
upon the farm in Buffalo Township, upon which hLs son 
William has always lived. The latter has been engaged 
in general farming and sheep raising on a large scale, 
and is one of the most substantial and venerated citizens 
of that section. 

R. W. Knox received a preliminary education in the 
district schools of Buffalo Township, supplemented by a 
classical course in Washington and Jefferson College, 
from w-hich institution he was graduated with the class 
of 1893. He then completed a two-year course in law 
in the University of Buffalo, graduating in 1895, and 
in the following year was admitted to the bar of Wash- 
ington County, and at once opened an ofSce at Washing- 
ton, where he has since continued with uninterrupted 
success. He practices in all the State courts and is a 
member of the Washington County Bar Association. 
Mr. Knox is an enthusiastic Democrat and has always 
been a hard worker for party supremacy. He served 
three years as chairman of the Democratic County Com- 
mittee, and in 1908 was a delegate to the Democratic 
National Convention at Denver. 

In 1904, Mr. Knox was married to Miss Sarah A. 
Chaney, a daughter of G. W. Chaney, of Washington, 
Pa. They are members of the Second United Presby- 
terian Church. Soci.ally, he is a member of the Bassett 
Club. 

A. J. FERGUSON, one of Smith Township's repre- 
sentative citizens and successful farmers and dairymen, 
residing on his farm of 213 acres, was born in Jackson 
County, W. Va., August 15, 1862. His parents were 
James M. and Mary Jane (Boso) Ferguson. 

James M. Ferguson was born in Westmoreland Coun- 
ty, Pa. From the time of his marriage until his death, 
which occurred May 14, 1895, he resided in .Jackson Coun- 



ty, W. \'a., and his widow surviving, resides at New 
Cumberland, Hancock County, in the same State. Both 
were active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
as far back as their son can remember, and the father 
was a class leader. 

A. J. Ferguson was reared and educated in Jackson 
County. When he started out for himself, he went to 
Illinois, and there followed farm work for ten years, re- 
luming then to West Virginia, where, for the next seven 
years, he engaged in teaming at New Cumberland. He 
then moved to Beaver County, Pa., where he acquired 
land and carried on farming for eleven years, in April, 
1906, coming to his present place, which he leases from 
tlie Pittsburg & Erie Coal Company. About fifty acres 
of this land is in pasture and has never been under the 
plough, and forty acres is covered with valuable timber. 
He makes dairying a leading feature, keeping nineteen 
cows and daily shipping fifty gallons of milk to Pitts- 
burg. He is a man of excellent business qualifications 
anil has developed a large dairy business from its begin- 
ning. 

On March 13, 1889, Mr. Ferguson was married to Miss 
Hattie M. Smith, a daughter of Benjamin and Rebecca 
Smith, and they have four children: Homer R., Cecil, 
Marie and May, the two eldest being students in the 
Burgettstown high school and the others attendants in 
Smith Township. Mr. Ferguson and wife are members 
of the W^estminster Presbyterian Church. As was his 
father, he is a Democrat in his political views, but he 
takes more interest in properly directing his own business 
than in attending to public matters. 

ARCHIBALD THISTLE, a representative business 
man of Washington, Pa., jeweler and optician, is es- 
tablished at No. 36 North Main street. He was born at 
Washington, in 1881, and is a son of Dr. J. L. Thistle, 
one of W'ashington County's leading physicians and sur- 
geons. 

Mr. Thistle attended the Washington schools and then 
entered Washington and Jefferson College, and left col- 
lege to enter business in his junior year, in the following 
year embarking in his present line, and has met with 
satisfying success. He carries a large stock of jewelry, 
watches and diamonds, and a full line of optical goods, 
and is prepared to do the work of an optician. 

In 1905, Mr. Thistle was married to Miss Dessie Leon- 
ard, and they have one son, Joseph L. Thistle, Jr., a 
namesake of his indulgent grandfather. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thistle are members of the Presbyterian Church. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Elks. He is an enter- 
prising and well balanced young business man and enjoys 
the confidence of his fellow citizens. He takes no very 
active interest in politics. 



758 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON' COUNTY 



WILLIAM M. NEEDHAM, who owns 23 acres of well 
cultivated land situated in Hanover Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., was born at West Alexander, Pa., 
February 25, 1868, and is a son of Hugh and Mary 
(Hughes) Needham. 

Both the father and mother of Mr. Needham were 
born in County Mayo, Ireland, and they were married 
there before they crossed the great ocean to America, in, 
1847. When the war- of 1S61 was declared, Hugh Need- 
ham enlisted for service, becoming a member of the 
140th Pa. Vol. Inf., in which he remained untU the 
close of the war. He survived a severe gunshot wound 
in the wrist and returned home, but later was accidentally 
killed by a railroad train, at Colliers, West Va. His 
venerable widow, now in her 80th j-ear, still survives 
and has her appointed place in the household of her son. 
The children born to Hugh and Mary Needham were the 
following: Ellen, who married James Holleran; Peter, 
who lives in Texas; Mary; Margaret, who married 
Martin Larkins; William M. and Charles. 

William M. Needham attended school pretty regularly 
through the winter seasons until he was 17 years old, 
and then started to helping his father clear up the farm. 
He can remember when it was all a wilderness and none 
of the present improvements had been put here, and a 
large amount of hard work had to be done before the 
timber was cleared off. A great change has been 
brought about by industry and perseverance. 

Before the father of Mr. Needham became a soldier, 
he was a Democrat in his political opinions, but he 
afterward became a Republican and his sons adopted his 
views. The family belongs to the Catholic Church. 

SAMUEL SHANE, owner and proprietor of the lead- 
ing hardw-are store at McDonald, Pa., is one of the fore- 
most citizens of this section of v\'ashington County and 
is actively interested in a number of its business enter- 
prises and a leader in public affairs. He was bom in 
Allegheny County, Pa., Sept. 8, 1854, and is a son of 
Andrew and Elizabetn Ann (Miller) Shane. 

Andrew Shane was born in Allegheny County and was 
a son of Samuel and Mary (Patterson) Shane. He fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits all his life, in the vicinity 
of Robinson Run, and died on his farm there in July, 
1904. He married Elizabeth Ann Miller, whose father 
was Richard Miller. She stiU survives and, as was her 
late husband, is a valued member of the United Presby- 
terian Church at Robinson Run and his remains rest in 
the cemetery there. They had the following children: 
R. M. ; Samuel; T. R., who lives in Cecil Township; J. 
P., who resides at McDonald ; and Anna Mary. 

Samuel Shane attended the public schools near his 
home in boyhood, then an academy at Oakdale, after 
which for five years ne taught school in Allegheny Coun- 



ty and following that spent one and one-half years in 
attendance at the Indiana State Normal School. Pour 
more years of teaching followed in Allegheny County 
and for one year he was associated with Dr. Irons, a 
noted educator, in conducting a select school known as 
Ingleside Academy. Mr. Shane then turned his attention 
to merchandising, having Joseph Gladen as a partner 
at first, but has been alone since embarking in his pres- 
ent business on Oct. 6, 1884. Mr. Shane has served con- 
tinuously as school director ever since McDonald has 
been a borough and it is a fact that the public schools 
here are most creditable in character. He is a director 
in the First National Bank and also in the Heat and 
Light Company as well as the Water Company. He was 
reared a Republican, but his own views are in favor of 
the principles oi the Prohibition party. 

On June 19, 1900, Mr. Shane was married to Miss 
Minnie B. Wallace, a daughter of james and Mary Ann 
(Sproul) Wallace, the former of whom is surviving, but 
the latter has passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Wallace had 
the following children : Minnie B. ; J. P., who is an at- 
torney residing in Pittsburg; Nettie, who married J. P. 
Shane, a brother of Samuel; and R. S., who is an at- 
torney in Pittsburg. To Mr. and Mrs. Shane three chil- 
dren have been born, namely: Edna Maurine, who is 
a student at Westminster College, at New Wilmington, 
Pa.; and Gertrude Elizabeth and Samuel Wallace. Mr. 
Shane and family are members of the United Presby- 
terian Church at Robinson Run.. 

CLIFFORD T. IRWIN, a representative business man 
of Washington who deals in general hardware, paints 
and oils, at No. 483 West Chestnut Street, has been a 
resident of this city for the past six years. He was 
born in Canton Township, Washington Co., Pa., in 1877, 
and is a son of the late William C. Irwin. 

William C. Irwin was born in Canton Township, 
Washington County, May 6, 1830, and was a grandson 
of David Irwin, who undoubtedly was one of the earliest 
settlers of Washington County. James Irwin, father of 
William C. and son of David, was born and reared in 
Canton Township. To his second marriage, with Nancy 
Clark, the following children were born : Margaret, Ann, 
Jane, Mary, William C, Martha, David, Nancy and 
Adeline. The mother died in 1860, the father having 
passed away in 1854. The grandparents of Clifford T. 
Irwin were among the founders of the United Presby- 
terian Church at North Buffalo. 

On October 19, 1854, William C. Irwin was married to 
Mary R. Dye, and they had the following children: 
James D., who lives on the old homestead; John L. and 
Leman N., both of whom reside at Washington; William 
M., who is proprietor of the Clover Leaf Dairy, lives at 
Washington; Asa C, who also resides in Washington; 




SAMUEL SHANE 



HIST01?Y OP WASTTTNGTON COUNTY 



761 



Cliiirles Milton, wlio is a farmer in Buffalo Township; 
Clifford T. ; Kditli E. and Marietta, all of whom reside 
at Washington, I'a. The mother of the above family 
died in 1SS6 but the father survived until IM'l. He was 
one of the substantial farmers of Canton Township and 
owneil valuable property there. Both he and wife were 
worthy members of the Seeond Presbyterian Church of 
Washington. 

(^lifford T. Irwin was reared in Canton Township and 
remained on the home farm until the death of his father. 
He was educated in the public schools and Washington 
Business College, graduating in 1895. After coming to 
Washington, Mr. Irwin, associated with his brother, 
William M. Irwin, erected the commodious brick business 
block on West Chestnut street, the dimensions of which 
are 41 by 70 feet, two stories in height, with two large 
business apartments on the first floor, one of these being 
occupied by Mr. Irwin, since 1905, as a hardware store. 
He carries a very complete stock and does a business 
which has had a steady growth since it was started. 

lu 1902, Mr. Irwin was married to Miss Lina Lindley, 
of Washington County, who died November 20, 1909. 
She w-as a member of the Second Presbyterian Church. 
Their two children survive; Dorothy and Edith. Mr. 
Irwin is also a member of the Second Presbyterian 
Cliurch and one of the most interested members of 
.Uidge McTlvain's Bible class. 

JAMES N. and DAVID H. BEMIS, physicians and 
surgeons, who are associated in practice at West Middle- 
town, Pa., are among the best known and most reputable 
citizens of Washington County. They trace a clear 
ancestral line back to Joseph Bemis, who was born in 
England, in 1619, who came to Watertown, Mass., in 
1640, with his wife Sarah, and died in 1684. 

Of the descendants of Joseph Bemis the records show 
that more than 100 served in the American Revolution. 
One of his descendants was Elias Howe, whose mother 
was a Bemis and who also married a Bemis, was the 
inventor of the sewing machine. The line of descent 
from Joseph Bemis the settler, to Drs. Bemis of West 
Middletown, is as follows: Joseph, Philip, David, John, 
David and Erastus, seven generations before the present 
one. David Bemis, the great-great-grandfather, and 
John Bemis, the great-grandfather, were both soldiers in 
the Revolutionary War. The former married Mary, a 
daughter of David Dunster, who was the grandson of 
Henry Dunster, who came from Lancashire, England, 
and was the first president of Harvard College. John 
Bemis, son of David and Mary (Dunster) Bemis, was 
married to Jemima, daughter of Rev. David Whipple, 
the first Baptist minister of the State of Vermont. 

James N. Bemis, M. D., was born June 20, 1845, in 
Hopewell Township, Washington Co., Pa., where his 



brother and associate. Dr. David H. Bemis, was born, 
.lune 17, 1852. They, with a sister, Mary, were the only 
children of their parents, who were Dr. Erastus and 
Huth (.McCullough) Bemis. 

Dr. Erastus Bemis was born near Brattleboro, Vt., 
October 3, 1817, and his early life was passed in his 
native State, where he received an elementary training, 
lie engaged in teaching during his early days and during 
his vacations pursued a course of study. About 1840, or 
perhaps a little earlier, he came to Pigeon Creek, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., and entered the office of Dr. Emery, 
remaining there some time. He attended Dartmouth 
College one year, after which he entered the University 
of New York, from which he was graduated in 1842, 
when he returned to Washington County and for a time 
assisted his former preceptor. Dr. Emery. After his 
marriage, in 1844, he settled in Buffalo Village, in Hope- 
well Township, and practiced there until 1847, when he 
moved to West Middletown, where the remainder of his 
life was passed. He became one of the most successful 
and well known physicians of the county, and in edu- 
cational matters was the peer of any citizen in his 
vicinity. Originally he was a Whig in politics and was 
a leader in the Abolition party, taking an active part 
in the Underground Railway, of which West Middletown 
was then a station. His death occurred in the prime of 
life, July 14, 1866. He was married February 14, 1844, 
to Ruth McCullough, who was born in Somerset Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., April 30, 1819, a daughter of 
Isaac and Mary (McMillen) McCullough, the former a 
native of Somerset Township and the latter of Peters 
Township. The grandfather of Mrs. Bemis was Patrick 
McCullough, w-ho was a native of County Antrim, Ire- 
land, and was 18 years old when he came to America. 
At that time he located in Somerset Township, Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., where he became possessed of some 600 
acres. Of this he received a patent for 439V4 acres, this 
document bearing date of March 4, 1786, being now in 
the possession of the subjects of this sketch. The 
warrant for the land was October 29, 1784. Patrii:k 
McCullough served on the first jury in Washington 
County, and he was one of the signers of the moral 
pact entered into by the people of that part of the 
county for the suppression of lawlessness. His wife was 
Hannah Smith. The wife of Dr. Erastus Bemis died 
March 8, 1901. 

James N. Bemis attended the local schools until pre- 
pared for Washington and Jefferson College, where he 
completed his literary training. He then attended the 
medical department of the University of Michigan at 
Ann Arbor for one year, and subsequently took a final 
course at Bellevue Medical College and Hospital, New 
York, where he was graduated in 1870. Coming im- 
nu>diately to West Middletown, he has since been located 



762 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTOISr COUNTY 



there and since 187S has been associated in medical 
practice with his brother. Dr. James N. Bemis was mar- 
ried September 7, 1876, to Miss Dora Chapman, who 
died in 1877. He was married (second) to Miss Jennie 
Brownlee, a daughter of John Brownlee, and they have 
had the following chDdren: Newton, who is deceased; 
Euth; Janet; Sarah L.; and Erastus Lindsey. 

David H. Bemis also entered Washington and Jefferson 
College after his preparatory training, but on account of 
failing health was obliged to leave his studies when in 
his junior year. Subsequently he read medicine and en- 
tered Bellevue College, New York, where he was grad- 
uated in 1878. He immediately settled at West Middle- 
town, where he has been associated with his brother. 
Both physicians are held in high regard by tlieir fellow 
citizens, their professional skill being undoubted and 
their personal qualifications being such as to make them 
desirable and valuable citizens. They are both active in 
public affairs to a reasonable extent and have served 
acceptably in numerous borough oiBces. They vote with 
the Republican party. In September, 1908, Dr. David 
H. Bemis was married to Miss Jennie E. Brownlee, a 
daughter of Ebenezer and Eliza Brownlee, residents of 
Donegal Township, Washington County. For several 
years. Dr. David H. Bemis has filled the ofiSce of pension 
examiner. 

WI1.LIAM T. POLLOCK, a veteran of the Civil War, 
and owner of a farm of 160 acres, lying in North Stra- 
bane and South Strabane Townships, was for many years 
one of the leading agriculturists of Washington County. 
He now lives in retirement at No. 50 North avenue, 
Washington, Pa., where he recently erected a fine modern 
brick residence. He was born in North Strabane Town- 
ship September 28, 1840, a son of James Pollock, and 
comes of a family long established in this county, his 
father and grandfather having been born in Washington 
County on the same farm which is now owned by our 
subject, and which was first the property of his great- 
grandfather, John PoUock. 

William T. Pollock was reared in North Strabane 
Township and received his education in the district 
schools and at Jefferson College, Canonsburg, where he 
was a student when the Civil War began. In 1862 he 
enlisted in Company G, 140th Pennsylvania Eegiment, 
and sen-ed until the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, 
participating in all the important engagements and 
skirmishes up to that time, including the battles of 
Chancehorsville, Gettysburg, Bristow Station, Mine Bun, 
the four days' battle in the Wilderness, Tod's Tavern, 
Poe River, Spottsylvania, Tolopotama, Cold Harbor, the 
Siege of Petersburg, (including all the engagements in 
the vicinity of that city) Fort Stedman, Reams Station, 
Deep Bottom, Five Forks, and Appomattox. He enlisted 



as a private and was orderly sergeant at the time of the 
surrender, and while he had buttons shot off his coat, and 
his canteen shot, he suffered not even the slightest skin 
wound, nor was he ever sent to the hospital. He was 
mustered out of service at Alexandria and paid at 
Pittsburg. After the war Mr. Pollock engaged in farm- 
ing in Washington County on the old farm entered from 
the government by his great-grandfather, raising a large 
number of sheep for many years. He then engaged in 
dairying for about 20 years, and in 1909 came to Wash- 
ington, where he erected a fine modern brick residence. 
Here he lives in retirement in the enjoyment of a well 
earned rest after years of unceasing activity. 

In December, 1867, Mr. Pollock was united in marriage 
with Sarah J. Barr, who was born in Somerset Town- 
ship, Washington County, Pa., and they have three chil- 
dren living, namely: Elizabeth A., residing at home; 
Margaret M., who is the wife of Eev. Robert Harsha of 
Taylorstown; and James H., who lives on the farm. Mr. 
Pollock and family are members of the Pigeon Creek 
United Presbyterian Church, in which he is serving on 
the board of elders. He is also a member of Templeton 
Post, Ct. a. E. 

JEROME W. POTTS, who is the manager of the old 
Potts homestead farm situated in Hanover Township, of 
which he is one of the heirs, was born in Hanover Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., January 17, 1848, and is a 
son of William and Margaret (Ward) Potts. 

Both parents of Mr. Potts are now deceased, having 
leased their whole lives in Pennsylvania. The father 
was a farmer and they both were devoted members of 
the historic old Presbyterian Church at Florence, where 
Rev. Elisha McCurdy, of noted memory, was the first 
minister, and as he also practiced medicine in a quiet 
way he frequently made professional as well as pastoral 
calls at the home of William Potts and his mother, Lydia 
Potts. To William and Margaret Potts were born the 
following children : Eeuemah, who married Dr. W. F". 
Pollock, of South Pittsburg; William Jackson, who died 
July 21, 1895; Jerome W. ; Thomas Albert and James 
A., twins. The former died when two and one-half 
years old, but the latter is a practicing physician in 
Pittsburg, Pa., where he was married to Miss Fannie 
W. McGahan, a teacher of that city, October 25, 1888. 

Jerome W. Potts attended school as regularly as his 
health would permit until he was about seventeen years 
of age and then became a clerk in a general store at 
Florence and later at Burgettstown, with the idea of sub- 
sequently becoming a merchant, but continued poor 
health made it advisable for him to turn to work that 
would be in the open air and thus he became a farmer. 
He has always maintained his residence in Florence, but 
manages the work of the tenant farmer and raises quite 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



763 



a large amount of stock for which he finds a ready sale. 
In politics he is a Democrat as was his father, and he 
has served acceptably in the ofliee of township auditor 
for a number of years. 

On October 2, 1879, Mr. Potts was married to Miss 
Elizabeth H. Stevenson, only daughter of Rev. Ross and 
Elizabeth (Hurst) Steven.son. Rev. Ross Stevenson was 
born in Strabane, Ireland, and came to this country when 
eighteen years of age, and for fifty years was a minister 
of the Presbyterian faith. He married Elizabeth Hurst, 
who was born at Mf. Pleasant, Westmoreland Co., Pa., 
and their only child was Elizabeth H., the young mother 
dying when her babe was but nine days old in Johnstown, 
Pa., where Mr. Stevenson was pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Potts liave no children of their own, 
but they are rearing and educating Agnes Florence Potts, 
giving her every advantage although they have not 
adopted her. They are members and liberal supporters 
of the Presbyterian Church at Florence. 

FRANK H. MEYER, who has been proprietor of Hotel 
Donora at Donora, Pa., since April, 1906, was born July 
8, 1875 at Essen, Germany, and is a son of Henry and 
Dora (Minor) Meyer, both of whom were born and 
reared in that place. 

Henry Meyer, who was for many years engaged as a 
shoe merchant in Essen, in 1880 brought his family to 
the United States, locating for one year at Noblestown, 
Allegheny County, Pa. He then removed to Carnegie, 
where he resided 13 years, and then went to New Ken- 
sington, Pa., where he lived until 1906. He then came 
to Donora and in partnership with his son Frank H. pur- 
chased from F. E. Garwood, the Hotel Donora, which he 
operated for two years. Selling his interest to his son, 
he then returned to New Kensington, Pa., where he still 
resides, spending his time in looking after his real estate 
interests. He married Dora Minor, who died in the fall 
of 1906, and of their union were born the following chil- 
dren : Herman ; Frank Henry, the subjete of this sketch ; 
Adolph; Mary, who is the wife of Dr. E. W. Klingen- 
smith ; and Charles, who was the only child born in the 
United States. 

Frank H. Meyer was quite young when his parents 
came to this county and was reared to maturity at Car- 
negie, where he attended the common schools of the 
First Ward. When a young man he learned the barber's 
trade, afterwards conducting a shop at New Kensington, 
Pa., for twelve years. In 1906 he came to Donora and 
with his father purchased the Hotel Donora, and since 
1908, when he purchased his father's interest, he has 
been sole owner of the business. 

Mr. Meyer was married June 12, 1907, to Margaret 
Keating, a daughter of James Keating, who is one of 



the old residents of New Kensington, Pa. In fraternal 
circles he holds membership with the B. P. 0. E. at 
Monessen, and the Improved Order of Heptasophs at 
New Kensington, and he is religiously a member of the 
Roman Catholic Church. He is politically an adherent of 
the Republican party. 

M. L. COOKE, a prosperous general farmer of Smith 
Township, residing on his well improved property which 
contains 169 acres, was born on this same farm, in 
Washington County, Pa., April 6, 1850. His parents 
were O. P. and Eliza (Lyle) Cooke. 

Mr. Cooke was educated in the common schools of 
Smith Township and at Duff's Comereial College at Pitts- 
burg, after which he took charge of the farm when he 
was nineteen years old, and has since made this his 
home. Mr. Cooke has either erected or put in repair all 
the buildings now standing on the farm and has made 
many improvements which have added both to the ap- 
pearance and value of the property. He grows excellent 
crops, making use of modern machinery and raises suf- 
ficient stock for his own use. He is a stockholder in the 
Washington National Bank at Burgettstown and formerly 
was one of the directors. In politics he is a Republican 
but takes no very active interest and the only public 
office he ever accepted was that of school director. 

On December 30, 1880, Mr. Cooke was married to Miss 
Eliazbeth M. Welch, a daughter of M. R. Welch, and they 
have had four children: Clair, who is the teacher at 
the Cook school in Smith Township; and Homer C, 
Julius R. and Lola, Julius R. being deceased. Mr. Cooke 
and family attend the Cross Creek Presbyterian Cliurch. 

ALEXANDER SPEER, one of the representative 
men of Canonsburg, has been a resident of this locality 
for thirty-seven years and has been identified with the 
business and public interests of the borough ever since 
locating here. He wa.s born August 22, 1850, in Chartiers 
Township, Washington Co., Pa., and is a son of Robert 
and Nancy (Harsha) Speer. 

The first of the Speer family to locate in Washington 
County were three brothers, and one of these, Robert 
Speer, was the grandfather of Alexander Speer. He 
married a Miss Mathews, and settled on the little branch 
of Chartiers Creek, purchasing a farm which has been 
in the possession of the family for more than 100 years. 
The children born to the grandparents of Alexander 
Speer were: James, who lived on the home farm; Latta, 
who w'as a United Presbyterian minister and preached 
at the Cross Roads Church; Jane, who married a Mr. 
Black, of Allegheny City; and Robert. Robert Speer, 
father of Alexander, was a native of Washington County, 
and conducted a carding mill below Canonsburg up to 
the time of his death, which occurred in 1852, when he 



764 



HISTORY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



was forty-eight years of age. His wife, who was a native 
of Chartiers Township, died in March, 1903j having 
reached the age of ninety-one years. They were the 
parents of the following children : Thomas, who died 
young; Jennie, who married William Patterson, of Ven- 
ice; James F., a veteran of the Civil War, residing in 
South Canonsburg, who married Eebecea McMillan, great- 
granddaughter of Dr. John McMillan, and daughter of 
John McMillan; Eobert L., who was a soldier in the 
Civil War, was wounded in the service and died of 
chronic diarrhea contracted while in the army; Stewart, 
who died in Cass County, Mo., where he had been en- 
gaged in farming ; Alexander ; and Catherine, who mar- 
ried Joseph Templeton, of North Strabane Township. 

Alexander Speer has been a resident of Canonsburg 
for many years, and his education was secured in Char- 
tiers Township. Until the age of eighteen years he 
worked on a farm, then learned the bricklaying trade, 
which he followed for a long period, and he helped to 
build the majority of the houses on Jefferson street, 
Canonsburg. He now resides in his own home here, 
which, at the time it was erected by him was located in 
Chartiers Township, but has since been included in the 
borough. A Republican in political matters, Mr. Speer 
has been an active worker in the ranks of his party in 
this section, and has served as a member of the council 
and as treasurer of the borough. He belongs to the 
United Presbyterian Church, 

In March, 1882, Mr. Speer was united in marriage with 
Eliza J. Wallace, daughter of James and Jane (Irwin) 
Wallace, former residents of Six-Mile Perry, Allegheny 
County, on the Monongahela Kiver, now deceased. Mr. 
and Mrs. Speer have had no children. She has two 
brothers living: Samuel, a farmer of Baldwin Town- 
ship; and John I., a retired citizen of near KnoxviUe. 

HON. JOHN G. CLAEKE, ex-member of the State 
Legislature of Pennsylvania, and a director of the Pirst 
National Bank of Washington, for many years has been 
one of the most active and best known men of Washing- 
ton County, Pa. His principal business until recent years 
was farming and wool growing, in South Franklin Town- 
ship, but he is now living practically retired from busi- 
ness activity, his residence being at No. 90 South Wade 
avenue, Washington. He was born not far from Wash- 
ington, January 24, 1829, and is the third son of Joseph 
Clarke and a gi'andson of Joseph Clarke, Sr., who pat- 
ented the farm on which the nephew of John G. Clarke, 
Joseph J. Clarke now lives, in South Franklin Township. 

.John G. Clarke enjoyed excellent educational advan- 
tages, first in the public schools and later in Washington 
and Jefferson College. At the beginning of his indi- 
vidual career, agricultural activities lay nearest his hand 
and he became interested in farming and stock raising. 



but, at the same time, gave considerable attention to the 
affairs which pertained to the welfare of South Franklin 
Township. After the formation of the new township of 
Franklin, in which he assisted, he helped in its redis- 
tricting and at the first election was chosen as a member 
of the school board. Being somewhat of an enthusiast 
on matters pertaining to public education, he continued 
his services on the board and for a long term of years 
was its secretary. As his years increased his public re- 
sponsibilities increased also. Soon after its incorpora- 
tion, he was elected to the board of managers of the 
Upper Ten-Mile Plank Eoad Company and served as its 
president for thirty-five years. 

In the meanwhile, Mr. Clarke became an extensive 
wool grower and was one of the leading advocates for a 
tariff on wool, writing articles on the subject for publi- 
cation in the newspapers and carrying the fight to Con- 
gress, three times being sent to represent the Washington 
County Wool Growers ' Association, of which he was presi- 
dent for several years, to Washington, D. C. In 1886, 
he had the honor of making the only farmer's address 
in defense of tariff on wool before the committee on 
ways and means. This address was published in the 
periodicals all over the United States and excited much 
comment, being pronounced a clear and convincing ex- 
position of the wool growers ' case. In addition he was 
chosen to make the speech on behalf of the wool grow- 
ers' of Washington County, when this body visited the 
late President McKinley, at his residence. That he had 
a keen insight into the conditions that existed and the 
results that would be brought about by the proposed 
tariff, was amply demonstrated by what followed the 
enactment of the Dingley Bill. 

Politically, Mr. Clarke was reared a Whig and held 
strong anti-slavery views and upon the organization of 
the Eepublican party he joined its ranks. In 1886 he 
was the party nominee for the State Legislature, and in 
his election which followed, led the ticket with the larg- 
est majority. He took the duties of his office seriously, 
was always to be found in his seat and in committee 
meetings, and voted intelligently on all questions of im- 
portance to his country and State. He was particularly 
active in furthering those bills of vital import to the 
rural communities, served efficiently as a member of the 
agricultural committee, and gave his influence in favor 
of the bill for the increase of State appropriations to 
the public schools. He antagonized the repeal of the 
oleomargerine law. Mr. Clarke served with faithfulness 
and won a place high in the esteem of his constituents. 

On May 26, 1853, Mr. Clarke was married to Miss 
Sarah H. Clokey, a daughter of Samuel Clokey, of Clo- 
keyville, Washington County, and to them were born 
seven sons and three daughters. He is a member of the 
United Presbyterian Church at Washington, of which 




HON. JOHN (i. Cl.ARKK 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



767 



he has been an elder since 1864. Prior to that time he 
was a member of the East Buffalo congregation, of 
which ho was made ruling elder when twenty-six years 
of age. He has always been very active in church work 
and has contributed liberally of his means to its sup- 
port and to the furthering of charitable undertakings. 

CLARK C. POST, who, in association with his son, 
John L. Post, owns a valuable farm of 266 acres, situated 
in Blaine Township, Washington Co., Pa., was born in 
Morris Township, December 16, 1840, and is a son of 
William A. and Margaret (Lindley) Post, both natives 
of Washington County. 

William A. Post was a son of Jeremiah Post, who came 
to western Pennsylvania from New Jersey and settled in 
Washington County when forests covered a large part 
of the land, making his home in what is now South 
Franklin Township. Jeremiah Post married a daughter 
of Dr. Charles Cracroft, that pioneer physician of Wash- 
ington County, who once was a prisoner with the Indians, 
but escaped. Nine children were born to William A. 
Post and wife and two of the sons — Jeremiah and Joseph 
M., were soldiers in the Civil War, Joseph M. being 
killed at the battle of Shiloh. 

Clark C. Post is the only survivor of a once large and 
happy family that made the old farmhouse in Morris 
Township a place of domestic happiness, that went to 
the district schools in company and that sadly said fare- 
well to the two brothers when they went to the war 
from which one never returned. In 1866, Mr. Post was 
married and in the fall of 1870, he moved to Pottawato- 
mie (;ounty, Kas, taking up land on which he resided 
for thirteen years. From there he moved to near War- 
rensburg, Mo., sixty-five miles southeast of Kansas City, 
and remained there for ten years, after which he returned 
to Washington County and settled in West Finley Town- 
ship, on the old McNay farm. From there, in the spring 
of 1907, he removed to Claysville, staying there until the 
spring of 1909, w'hen he came to his present farm in 
Blaine Township. This has proved fine land for farming 
and stock raising and there is also probability of profit- 
able oil production here. In politics, Mr. Post is a Demo- 
crat and while living in Johnson County, Mo., he served 
a number of years as school director of Warrensburg 
Township. He is no longer actively concerned in political 
matters. 

On December 26, 1866, Mr. Post was married to Miss 
Nannie R. McNay, of West Finley Township, Washing- 
ton County, a daughter of Smith and Jane (Bell) Mc- 
Nay, her father being once a prominent citizen there. 
Two sons and two daughters have been born to them : 
Belle, Etta M., Frank S., and John L. Belle Post was 
born in Washington County, January 19, 1868, married 
S. F. Hunter, of .Johnson County, Mo., and they have 



six children: Oma Belle, Edna Lucile, Clark Calvin, 
Nannie, Jolin Dale and Glen. Etta M. Post was born in 
Washington County, November 9, 1869, married Charles 
C. Post, of Allen County, Ohio, and they have two chil- 
dren: Helen R. and Clark L. Frank S. Post was bom 
in Pottawatomie County, Kas., October 11, 1871, and is 
a practicing physician of Pittsburg, Pa., residing on 
Penn avenue. He married Clara Kirk, and they have 
two children : Frank S., Jr., and Lawrence Kirk. John 
L. Post was born August 21, 1874, in Pottawatomie 
County, Kas., married Bertha E. Sprowls, of West Fin- 
ley Township, and they have two children : Mary E. 
and Alice R. John L. Post is a graduate of the Missouri 
State Normal School and formerly was a teacher. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark C. Post are members of the United 
Presbyterian Church at Taylorstown. 

ROBERT J. COOK, justice of the peace at McDon- 
ald, Pa., and a leading citizen, was born near London, 
England, June 16, 1844, and is a son of Robert and 
Emma (Benton) Cook, who never came to America. The 
father was a farmer. He was an excellent man and 
both he and wife were members of the Episcopal Church. 
They had two children: Robert J. and William, the 
latter of whom is deceased. 

Robert J. Cook was educated in England and remained 
there until he was twenty-five years of age and then 
came alone to America. His first year in the United 
States was spent on Long Island, N. Y., and from there 
he came to McDonald, where he remained until 1879, 
when he returned to his native land. Mr. Cook resided 
in England eight years before he came back to McDonald 
and his fellow citizens venture to hope that the claims 
of the old country can never again outweight those of his 
adopted one, as he is a very popular citizen of McDon- 
ald. He understands several trades, brickmaking and 
picture-framing being included, but for some years he 
has found his time taken up with official duties. He was 
first appointed a justice of the peace in 1896. For thir- 
teen years he was elected clerk of the borough council 
anil has also been burgess. 

In October, 1872, Mr. Cook was married to Miss Ma- 
tilda Carson, a daughter of Robert and Jane (Bell) 
Carson. They were natives of County Antrim, Ireland, 
W'here Mrs. Cook was born. She is one of the following 
children born to her parents: Robert, John, William and 
Samuel; and Eliza, who married Henry Smith; MatUda, 
who became Mrs. Cook; Charlotte, who married A. B. 
Cochran; and Margaret, who married James Querns. The 
mother of this family is now in her eighty-ninth year, 
but the father is deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cook have had children, as follows: 
Robert, who married Agnes Dick; William; Em 
ma, who married H. H. Forsythe; John, who married 



T(i8 



HISTORY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Isabel Hassell, of Belleville, 111.; Herbert; Mary, who 
married John E. Brown; Matilda, who married Leo 
Buheit, died in September, 1909 ; and George and Samuel. 
Mr. Cook 's family are members of the United Presby- 
terian Church. He is identified with the order of the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle, at Carnegie. 

C. O. BBADEN, who is engaged in the transfer and 
general storage business at "Washington, Pa., was born 
July 18, 1857, in Morris Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
and is a son of John Braden, who was born in Greene 
County, this State. His father came to this county in 
1855 and was for many years engaged in farming, also 
dealing largely in stock and wool. In politics he was 
a stanch Democrat. His death occurred in 1896 in 
Washington County. 

C. 0. Braden was reared to maturity in Washington 
County, where he attended the common schools. At an 
early age he embarked in the mercantile business in 
Fayette County, Pennsylvania, after which he was for 
ten years a traveling salesman for a wholesale grocery 
house of Wheeling, West Virginia, and for the past 
eight or nine years has been successfully engaged in 
transferring and the general storage business. He also 
deals in flour in job lots. 

In 1877 Mr. Braden was married to Emma lams, who 
was born and reared in Washington County, and is a 
daughter of Thomas lams, who lived near Amity for a 
number of years, and later moved to Arlington, 111., 
where he died. The lams family has been long estab- 
lished in this county. Mr. and Mrs. Braden have three 
children living, namely: Anna, wife of C. W. Minton, a 
resident of Washington, who is engaged in business at 
Pittsburg; Lucy Miller Braden, a stenographer, employed 
in the office of Murdock & Son ; and Harry W., who is 
connected with the Dominion Natural Gas Company of 
Hamilton, Canada, and who married ^elUe Covey, a 
native of Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Braden is a member of the Second Presbyterian 
Church of Washington and one of the board of deacons. 
He is also a member of the improved order of Heptasophs. 

ALEXANDER C. MeCLUEE, a member of the firm 
of B. F. MeClure & Bro., proprietors of a hardware 
business at Burgettstown and one of the leading citizens, 
was born at Washington, Washington Co., Pa., June 3, 
1849, , and is a son of Dr. Eobert and Eleanor (Ruth) 
McClure. 

Alexander C. McClure spent his school days at Wash- 
ington and Middletown and then came to Burgettstown 
and has been interested here in the hardware line ever 
since. In 1874, when his brother, B. F. McClure, bought 
the present location, he purchased an interest and the 
firm style has been B. F. McClure & Bro., ever since. 



On January 17, 1877, Mr. McClure was married to 
Miss Nannie Rankin, a daughter of John L. and Eliza- 
beth Rankin, and they have four children : Frankie, who 
married Rev. Harry Nesbit; Anna, who married Dr. 
WilUam P. Patterson; Belle, who married C. S. Graham; 
and Elizabeth, who is at home. Mr. and Mrs. McClure 
are members of the United Presbyterian Church. In 
politics he is a Republican but takes no very active part- 
in public affairs. 

JAMES M. WALLACE, junior member of the promi- 
nent business firm at Midway, Pa., of Dickson & Wallace, 
dealers in hardware, lumber and builders' supplies, was 
born m Robeson Township, Washington Co., Pa., May 
28, 1865, and is a son of Joseph and Sarah (McBurney) 
Wallace. 

Joseph Wallace was born in Washington County and 
was a son of Robert and Mary (Walker) Wallace. This 
is the same Eobert Wallace who, when a child between 
three and four years of age, with his mother, an older 
brother, and an infant in arms, were taken from their 
home, near Florence, Pa., by Indians, in the raid of 
1782. Eobert was the only one of the prisoners ever 
recovered, his father securing him in IISG. He carried, 
however, through life, a scar on one cheek, made with a 
tomahawk in the hand of an Indian squaw. It seems 
passing strange that there are those now living who 
have listened to tales from the lips of participants, of 
the days when men, women and chUdi'en suffered from 
Indian attacks and fled from savages over these smiling 
farms and the sites of busy towns. Joseph Wallace 
followed agricultural pursuits, assisting his father in 
early manhood and later acquiring substance and re- 
sponsibilities of his own. He married Sarah McBurney 
and they both are deceased. She was a daughter of 
James and Catherine (Aeheson) McBurney. The children 
born to Joseph and Sarah Wallace were as follows: 
James M. ; Eobert W. ; Minnie J., who married W. H. 
Eutherford; Eleanor, who is deceased; John B.; and 
Margaret, who is the wife of Eev. J. D. Gibson, pastor of 
the Midway United Presbyterian Church. 

James M. Wallace attended the public schools of 
Eobeson Township, and later Ingleside Academy at Mc- 
Donald, and subsequently took a commercial course at 
Duff 's Business College, in Pittsburg. He then went 
back to the farm and remained there until 1895, when 
he came to Midway, formed his partnership with Mr. 
Dickson and has been actively engaged in business here 
ever since. He is an independent voter, not being 
identified with either of the dominating parties, and h« 
is known to be a reliable dependable citizen. 

In October, 1896, Mr. Wallace was married to Miss 
Minnie L. Cummins, a daughter of Eobert and Elizabeth 
(McCalniont) Cummins. She is one of the following 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



769 



fniiiily of .■liiUlrcn: Minnie L.. William Ji., Joan :\r., R. 
Max, Mamie, Cliarles and Boyd, tlifi latter of whom is 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Wallace have cue son, .Joseph 
W. The}' are niombcrs of the Ecformed Presbyterian 
Chnrch at Miller's Rnn. 

WILIIKLM F. ALTEN, a prominent real estate anil 
insurance dealer of i\[onongahela City, Pa., was born 
October Ki, 1S74, at Braddock, Pa., and is a son of 
George and Esther (Kremer) Alten. 

George Alteu was born and reared in Bremen, Ger- 
many, where Ms father, Heinrieh Alten, was the pro- 
prietor of a large exporting and importing establishment, 
and of which city he and his wife Metta Alten, were 
lifelong residents. George Alten was born March 18, 
1836, and when about IS years of age came to America 
and after spending some years in Baltimore, Md., Ten- 
nessee, and Ohio, finally located in Pittsburg, Pa., where 
he engaged in the wholesale grocery business. He became 
a member of the firm of Watt, Lang & Company, one 
of the old established grocery houses of Pittsburg, and 
became one of the best known traveling salesmen on the 
Monongahela Eiver and through Western Pennsylvania. 
He subsequently became identified with Allen, Kirk- 
patrick & Company, and Arbuckle & Company. He was 
first united in marriage with Eachael Norfolk of Monon- 
gahela City, their marriage being the first celebrated in 
the Methodist Church of that city. Shortly after his 
marriage he located at Braddock, Pa., where one year 
later his wife and infant son passed out of this life. 
He formed a second marital union with Esther Kremer 
of Uniontown, Pa., who died September 1, 1909, at the 
age of 59 years. Of their union were bom the following 
children: Wilhelm, the subject of this sketch; and his 
twin, Margaret E., who is the wife of Thomas C. 
Farquhar; Alice Virginia, wife of Dr. Marcellus R. 
Meredith; Georgina, wife of William Alvin Allen; and 
Rachel A. George Alten died September 12, 1905. 

Wilhelm F. Alten was eight years of age when his 
parents came to Monongahela City, where he attended 
the public schools and graduated from the High School 
with the class of 1891, after which he took a commercial 
course at Duff's Business College. After completing his 
education he was employed as a bookkeeper at Connells- 
ville. Pa., and in 1893 became associated with the James 
C. Lindsay Hardware Company of Pittsburg. After 
spending three years in the store, he was for ten years 
a traveling salesman for the same house, and in March, 
1906, opened his present office in Monongahela City, 
where he has established a fine real estate and general 
insurance business. 

Mr. Alten is fraternally aflSliated with the Masonic 
order, being a Past Master of Henry M. Phillips Lodge, 
No. 337, F. and A. M.. a member nf Monongahela Chapter, 



No. 249. R. .\. .M,; is Kminent Commander of McKean 
Commandery. No. 80, Knights Templar, at Charleroi, 
and a member of Syria Temple A. A. O. N. M. S., at 
Pittsburg. 

Mr. Alten was united in marriage in 1901 to Helena 
S. Hammond, second daughter of the late Dr. .John D. 
and Maria A. Hammond, and they reside at No. 712 
Chess street. 

.JOHN J. MAEKEY, president and general manager 
of the National Wrought Iron Anaealing Box Company, 
which was established about 15 years ago, was born 
September 13, 1864, in Wolverhampton, England, and 
when four years of age came to .America with his parents, 
w'ho settled in Indianapolis, Ind. Here he was reared 
and early in life was bound out by his parents with 
Sinker-Daws & Company, of Indianapolis, as a ma- 
chinist blacksmith. He remained with that concern for 
four years, when he entered the employ of the Big Four 
Railroad at Urbana, Illinois, where for three years he 
was engaged in making locomotive frames. He then 
entered the Chicago & Eastern Railroad shops at Dan- 
ville, Illinois, and while in their employ received a tele- 
gram from the Sinker-Davis Company asking him to take 
charge of their works at Indianapolis, in which capacity 
he served for three years, when he engaged in business 
for himself, establishing the Indianapolis Forge Works. 
In 1893 he established the National Wrought Iron 
Annealing Box Manufacturing Company at Anderson, 
for the manufacture of annealing boxes for tin plate 
and sheet mills and also galvanized baths. The plant 
in Washington was built in 1908. He is the patentee of 
the annealing box, being the first man in this country to 
produce welded wrought iron boxes, both tin plate and 
sheet annealing boxes. They are now in use in every 
plant of consequence in the country. 

On September 10, 1890, Mr. Markey married Hannah 
Eedfern, who was born and reared in Indianapolis, and to 
them have been born the following children: John (de- 
ceased), Edward and Paul. Mr. Markey is a member of 
the Eoman Catholic Church, and is fraternally atfiliated 
with the B. P. 0. E. 

JAMES JOHNSTON VAN EMAN, deceased, who was 
one of Canonsburg 's prominent citizens for years, a 
leading business man and active in public affairs, was 
born in North Strabane Township, Washington Co., Pa., 
in 1848, and died at his home on West College street, 
Canonsburg, April 18, 1909. His parents were Samuel 
Logan and Martha (McConnell) Van Eman. 

The Van Eman family came originally from Holland, 
the first representatives who reached Pennsylvania being 
George Van Eman, who was born in Holland, a son of 
Nicholas Van Eman. September 12. 1753. He settled 



7;o 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



as a pioneer iu Nortli Strabaue Township, Washington 
Co., Pa., not far distant from the present town of 
ClokevTille. He married Bebeeca Scott and they had the 
following children: Nicholas, George Scott, Jane, An- 
drew, Rebecca, Elizabeth, Joseph, Garrett, William, 
Sarah, Abraham and Hannah. In 1810 the father of this 
family moved to Stark County, Ohio. 

Joseph Van Emaii, son of George and Rebecca Van 
Eman, was born in North Strabane Township, December 
12, 1790, and in the course of time acquired several 
farms in Cecil Township, one of these being situated 
where the Van Eman Station on the Chartiers Railroad 
is now located. He died on the latter farm and was 
survived by his widow, formerly Isabella Logan, and a 
family of children, one of whom, Samuel L., was the 
father of the late James Johnson Van Eman. Joseph 
Van Eman served as a director of the Poor for Wash- 
ington County and frequently was appointed adminis- 
trator and executor of estates, enjoying the fullest confi- 
dence of his fellow citizens. 

Samuel Logan Van Eman was born in Cecil Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., July 20, 1816. On September 
28, 1847, he married Martha McConnell, who was bom. 
in Cecil Township, in 1826, a daughter of James and 
Sarah (Phillips) McConnell. To Samuel and Martha 
MeConnell were born children as follows: James John- 
ston ; Belle M., who was born in 1850, married John 
N. Brown, a son of Rev. A. B. Brown, D. D., at one time 
president of Jefferson College; Sadie E., who married 
Samuel A. McCalmont of Houston; and Joseph Scott, the 
latter of whom died in infancy. Samuel Logan Van 
Eman died in 1891 and was survived five years by his 
widow. They were members of Center Presbyterian 
Church of Peters Township, in which he served for 
thirty-five years as a ruling elder. He was a man of 
sterling character and, like his father, was frequently 
entrusted with business pertaining to the settlement of 
estates. 

James Johnston Van Eman was born on the old farm 
near Van Eman Station and his education was obtained 
in the common schools and at an academy at Elder's 
Ridge, in Indiana County, and he completed his literary 
studies by taking a course at Washington and Jefferson 
College at Washington. After leaving school he con- 
tinued on his father's farm and as an individual enter- 
prise, went into the business of buying and selling stock 
and continued until after his marriage, in 1871. Then 
he went into the mercantile business, opening a store at 
ThompsonviUe, in Peters Township, which he conducted 
for six years, when, on account of failing health, he re- 
turned to the farm. Five years later he again entered 
mercantile life, opening a store at Pittsburg, for the 
sale of agricultural implements, and continued the same 
for two years, and then came to Canonsburg and em- 



barked here in the hardware business conducting it suc- 
cessfully up to the close of his life. The business is 
continued by his son, S. L. Van Eman, who had been 
the junior partner in the firm of J. J. Van Eman & Son. 
During his business period at Pittsburg he was a member 
of the firm of Brown, Gillespie & Van Eman, and when 
he removed to Canonsburg, the business style at first was 
Brown & Van Eman, in 1897 the change being made to 
J. J. Van Eman & Son. 

James J. Van Eman married Miss Margaret S. Espy, 
who was born in Upper St. Clair Township, Allegheny 
Co., Pa., and is a daughter of John and Margaret 
(Smith) Espy. The Espy family is of Scotch extraction. 
To this marriage were born four sons and three daugh- 
ters. John Espy, and Ernest, both died in 1895. The 
survivors of the family are: M. Etta, who is the wife 
of J. G. Hopper, a furniture dealer at Canonsburg; 
Samuel Logan, who succeeded his father as proprietor 
of the hardware business; Martha Maud, who resides 
with her mother at Canonsburg; Nellie E., who is the 
wife of Robert L. Grant, a merchant on E. Pike street, 
in partnership with J. F. Morgan, under name of Morgan 
& Grant, Canonsburg; and James Jay, who is a student 
in the Canonsburg High School. Mr. Van Eman was a 
member of the Central Presbyterian Church in which he 
was a ruling elder and superintendent of Sunday school 
since the organization of the church, a period covering 
twenty years, and is one of the original twenty-nine 
organizers of the church. 

In his political views, Mr. Van Eman was a Republican. 
On many occasions he was invited to accept positions 
of trust and responsibility by his appreciative feUow 
citizens, and served as mayor of the city and also as 
president of the School Board. He was to some degree 
a capitalist, owning a large amount of valuable realty at 
Canonsburg, together with a fine farm of 140 acres 
situated in North Strabane Township, within two miles 
of this place. 

JOHN W. HALLAM, whose place is among the fore- 
most business men of Washington, Pa., being president 
of the Hallam Construction Company, president of the 
Gardner Steam and Gas Engine Company and vice presi- 
dent of the Union Trust Company, is a native of Wash- 
ington, born Feb. 24, 1859, a son of Lewis and Rosanna 
(Tegarden) Hallam. 

John W. Hallam 's educational opportunities were 
meager and when only ten years of age he began to earn 
his own support by acting as a clerk in a clothing store, 
where he continued until he was 14 years of age. He 
then embarked in business for himself, starting a gro- 
cery store at vVasuington, and notwithstanding his 
youth he successfully conducted it for a period of three 
years and then sold out to advantage. He then spent 




(»ll.\ \V. HALl.A.M 



L 



J 



11ISI'()1;V OK WASHINGTON COUNTY 



773 



;i year in travel, in tlie Soutlj aud West, gaining many 
now ideas during this time wMcli later proved of benefit 
to him. When 20 years old he began contracting at 
Washington, securing a number of contracts for public 
improvements which the borough had in contemplation, 
and the successful and satisfactory manner in which he 
ronipleted these laid a souml foundation upon which his 
present extensive business has been built. His specialty 
has been contracting in stone foundations, in paving aud 
sewer construction. From its beginning up to the pres- 
ent time when it ha.s assumed enormous proportions, the 
business has always been under the direct management 
of Mr. Hallam, although, at times, he has been associated 
with other practical men. When the Hallam Construc- 
tion Company was organized, he was made president and 
general manager. This is one of the best known con- 
cerns in its line in Washington County and in adjacent 
counties it also presents a tine showing. Mr. Hallam has 
been financially interested in other business undertakings 
and is closely identified with their management. He is 
a man of notable public spirit and has done much .to 
aid in the prosperity of the borough and has served 
as one of the board of directors of the Chamber of 
Commerce, and for a number of years served most use- 
fully as a member of the borough Council. 

On Feb. 25, 1887, Mr. Hallam was married to Miss 
Kate H. Brady, a daughter of Benjamin and Rebecca 
Brady, of Washington, and they have two children: 
HaroM Herbert and Helen Estelle. In politics he is a 
Republican and he was elected to his first public office 
just after reaching his majority. In 1896 he was elected 
to the office of treasurer of Washington County, and 
served three years, during which time the new court 
house was under course of construction. He has fre- 
quently served as delegate to State conventions, and is a 
member of the Republican State Committee. He belongs 
to the Heptasophs and the Junior Order of United Amer- 
ican Mechanics. Personally, Mr. Hallam is a man of 
sterling character and is notably temperate in all things. 
He takes a justifiable pride in the fact tuat he has never 
tasted liquor or indulged in tobacco in his life. 

SAMUEL H. PYLES, manager of the D. G. Bamford 
Milling Company, at Midway, Pa., of which he is also 
a stockholder, was born at Midway, Washington Co., Pa., 
January 29, 1871, and is a son of Joshua and Nancy 
(Pyles) Pyles. 

The parents of Mr. Pyles are both deceased. During 
his active years the father was a farmer but lived re- 
tired for some years before his death. He was a man of 
con.siderable prominence in Robeson Township where he 
served for fifteen years in the office of justice of the 
peace and was also tax collector. He married Nancy 
Pyles and of their children Samuel H. is the youngest. 



tlu) others being three daughters, namely: Helen, who 
is now deceased, was the wife of David Gray; Mary, 
who is the wife of Oliver Dyhar; and Laura, who is 
deceased. 

Samuel H. Pyles secured academic training in the well 
known Ingleside Acadamy at McDonald and later took 
a commercial course in Duff's Business College at Pitts- 
burg and became so proficient that he was engaged as an 
instructor at the college, where he remained for eighteen 
months. He then returned to Midway and vvfas book- 
keeper for the Midway Gas Company for four months 
and in 1894 came to the Bamford Milling Company in 
the same capacity. In 1905, when Mr. Bamford became 
president of the Midway Bank, Mr. Pyle.s, on account 
of his fidelity and business efficiency was appointed man- 
aged of the mill busines.s and has been most satisfactory 
in this position ever since. The business shows a healthy 
growth and the improvements brought about by Mr. 
Pyles have added to the efficiency of the mill without 
increasing the outlay. 

On October 25, 1893, Mr. Pyles was married to Miss 
Esther Thompson, a daughter of Russell and Martha 
(McCarty) Thompson. To Mr. and Mrs. Pyles six chil- 
dren have been born, all bearing pleasant names and liv- 
ing up to them as bright, intelligent, engaging young 
people: Myra, Wilma, Roland, Lyle, Helen and Miller. 
Mr. Pyles and family belong to the United Presbyterian 
Churc-li. In politics he is an independent thinker. Fra 
tornaily he is identified with Garfield Lodge, No. 604, 
P. and A. M., at McDonald, Pa. 

JOSEPH S. DANLEY, who for the past six years 
has been living in retirement in Washington, Pennsyl- 
vania, owns a fine farm of 134 acres in Buffalo Township, 
and was for many years one of the leading farmers of 
Washington County. He was born in 1849 in East Finley 
Township, and is a son of William Danley, whose father 
emigrated to this country at an early period and was 
one of the pioneers of Washington County. 

Joseph S. Danley was reared in his native township 
and obtained his education there and in Greene County, 
after wliich he located in Buffalo Township and em- 
barked in farming and stock raising. Six years ago he 
built a fine residence at No. 496 Allison avenue, Wash- 
ington, where he has since continued to reside, while he 
continues to look after his farming interests. 

Mr. Danley was maiTied in 1885 to Marietta Bur- 
roughs and their children are: Harry B., Thomas, Ma- 
tilda, Joseph, and Mary. Mr. Danley and family attend 
the Third Presbyterian Church of Washington. 

J. A. RUSSELL, who is engaged in business at South 
Burgettstown, Pa., conducting a meat market and a gen- 
eral store, is one of the representative citizens and is 



774 



HISTORY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



serving as auditor of the borough. He was born in 
Muskingum County, Ohio, February 11, 1856, and is a 
son of Alexander and Margaret Ann (Atchinson) Russell. 

J. A. Eussell moved from Ohio to Mt. Pleasant Town- 
ship in 1864, and remained on the farm until 1876, when 
he came to Burgettstown and assisted his father in the 
mercantile business untU 1884, when he embarked in busi- 
ness for himself. From that date until 1904 he con- 
ducted a butchering business and dealt in first class 
meats and met with so much success that he was en- 
couraged to broaden the scope of his business and added 
groceries, flour and feed to the commodities he haudles. 
Mr. Russell has conducted his business along those lines 
which have attracted custom to him and he has proved 
tliat custom once honestly gained is seldom lost. He has 
seen Burgettstown develop along every line during his 
more than thirty years of residence here, and as an active 
and loyal citizen he has given support to the various 
movements which have contributed to the general wel- 
fare. In his political views he is a Republican and has 
served on the borough Council and school board for a 
number of terms, and on that ticket he was elected audi- 
tor of the borough. 

In 1884, Mr. Russell was married to Miss Agnes J. 
Scott, a daughter of R. K. Scott, and they have four 
children : Frank M., who mai-ried Mary Smith, a daugh- 
ter of James Smith, has one son, Wilfred B.; Lillian 
Etta, who married F. M. Welch; and Jennie Myrtle and 
Robert Alexander, both of whom are at home. Mr. Rus- 
sell and family are members of the United Presbyterian 
Church, of which he has been treasurer for several years. 

JOHN A. FLACK, one of BufCalo Township's promi- 
nent and enterprising citizens, president of the town- 
ship school board and a leader in public matters, was 
born in Buifalo Township, Washington Coimty, Pa., 
Jan. 19, 1S69, and is a son of Salem and Margaret 
(Farrar) Flack. 

Salem Flack was born in Ohio, in 1824, and died in 
Buffalo Township, Washington County, in 1903. He 
was a son of Samuel Flack, whom he accompanied from 
Ohio to Buffalo Township in infancy, the family bring- 
ing its belongings into what was then a wild region. 
The grandparents of John A. Flack died in Buffalo 
Township. Salem Flack married Margaret Farrar, who 
was born in Washington County, Pa., Sept. 15, 1833, and 
resides at Washington, where she still enjoys the society 
of her friends and continues in good health. Three of 
their children survive, namely: Samuel L. and John A., 
both of Buffalo Township; and Jennie A., who is the 
wife of R. W. Parkinson, a prominent attorney at Wash- 
ington. One daughter, Sarah V., is deceased. 

John A. Flack has resided in Buffalo Township all 



his life, obtaining his education in the public schools 
and since attaining manhood having the management 
of a large property. He owns 145 acres of fine land 
and raises abundant crops, cattle and sheep, making a 
specialty of wool growing, keeping a fiock of 150 head 
of a fine variety of sheep and making this industry very 
profitable. Mr. Flack is an active citizen, taking a 
deep interest particularly in the public schools. He 
has consented to serve on the school board for a num- 
ber of years and the value of his advice and services 
have been acknowdedged by his election to the presidency 
of this body. In politics he is a Republican and he has 
seiTed also as inspector of elections in Buffalo Town- 
ship. 

Mr. Flack was married to Miss Elizabeth Ashbrook, 
who was born in Buffalo Township, a daughter of Simon 
Ashbrook, of Washington, and they have had five chil- 
dren: Nellie Margaret, Milton Luther and John Salem, 
who survive. Charles Ivan and a babe are deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Flack are members of the East Buffalo 
Presbyterian Church, in the faith of which they were 
reared by pious parents. 

JAMES S. FORSYTHE, secretary and treasm-er of 
the Washington Brick Company, and owner of a farm 
of 250 acres in Amwell Township, is one of the repre- 
sentative citizens of Washington County. He was born 
in Brownsville, Fayette County, Pa., in 1845 and ob- 
tained his education in the schools of Brownsville and 
Pittsburg. Dui'ing the early part of his life he was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits, but later embarked in 
the mercantile business at Redstone, Pa., where he was 
located until the spring of 1882. He then came to 
Washington County and b'ought his present farm in Am- 
well Township, where he resided for eight years, when he 
came to Washington and engaged for a time in the 
brokerage business. He was one of the organizers of 
the Washington Brick Company, of which he has been 
secretary and treasurer since its establishment, about 
nine years ago. He is a member of the board of direc- 
tors and secretary and treasurer of the S. B. Reese Lum- 
ber Company, operating in Kentucky, and whose main 
office is located in Washington. Mr. Forsythe still re- 
tains his farm of 250 acres in Amwell Township. 

In 1876 Mr. Forsythe was united in marriage with 
Mary E. Morton, a daughter of Rev. George Morton, 
now deceased, who was a Presbyterian minister of Phila- 
delphia and of Scotch descent. Mr. and Mrs. Forsythe 
have four children, namely: Lilian S., a graduate of the 
Washington Seminary, and w'ife of Frank C. Lewis, of 
Washington; Jesse H., a graduate of the Washington 
and Jefferson College; Raymond D., a civil engineer 
working on the state roads, who graduated with the class 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



775 



of 1907 at Washington ami Jefferson College; and 
Kobert N., a student. Mr. Forsythe is a member of tlie 
Prcsl)yterian Cbureh. 

DAVJD Ci. GKAY, the practical miller at the D. G. 
Baniford roller milLs and a stockholder in the D. G. 
Bamford Milling Company at Midway, Pa., was born 
iu Greene County, Pa., Nov. 29, 1864, aud is a son of 
Thomas T. and Margaret (Vanata) Gray. 

The parents of Mr. Gray reside at Coshocton, Ohio, 
whei-e the father is in the ice business. Of their chil- 
dren, David G. is the second born, the others being: 
George M., Willis, Archibald, Thomas and John. 

David G. Gray attended school regularly until 14 years 
of age and then went to learn the milling business and 
has been connected with it ever since and is a thorough- 
ly experienced man. He has been identified with the 
present company since 1884, working for six months as 
an oiler, then for seven years as assistant miller and 
ever since as chief miller. This plant is one of size and 
importance and its products find a ready sale over a wide 
territory . The equipments are modern in character and 
Mr. Gray is master of the technical part of the business 
and has experienced helpers, the result being the pro- 
duction of the finest grades of mill products. 

In 1887, Mr. Gray was man-ied (first) to Miss Helen 
Pyles, who died July 4, 1906, and her burial was in the 
('andor Cemetery. He was married (second) to Miss 
Isabel Herd, a daughter of Kobert and Margaret Herd, 
retired residents of Midway. They have the following 
children: Margaret, Jean, Anna, John and Neil. Mr. 
and Mrs. Gray are members of the United Presbyterian 
Church. In his political views, Mr. Gray is a Pro- 
hibitionist. 

JOHN B. DONALDSON, M. D., one of Washington 
County 's leading physicians and surgeons, who has been 
actively engaged in practice at Canonsburg, Pa., for more 
than thirty years, was born in Marshall County, West 
Virginia, Aug. 1, 1848, and is a son of Dr. David and 
Ellen (Boyce) Donaldson. 

The Donaldson family was founded in the United 
States at a very early day, when all this broad expanse 
of mighty country was looked upon by older civilizations 
as only colonies. From Ireland came David Donaldson, 
the great-grandfather, who is known to have settled in 
Maryland about 1751. From there he came to Washing- 
ton County, remaining for a time at Gastonville, and then 
moved into Allegheny County, where he probably died. 
His son, William Donaldson, married Elizabeth Morrison 
and they both died in Allegheny County. In that county 
the late Dr. David Donaldson, father of Dr. John B., was 
born in 1820 and died in that county in 1883, at the age 
of sixty-three years. He married Ellen Boyce. who was 



;ilso born in Allegheny County and died in 187L', aged 
forty-five years. Her people came to America from 
North Ireland and died in Allegheny County, her parents 
being John and Elizabeth (McCabe) Boyce. Dr. David 
Donaldson was twice married. His children were: Annie, 
who is a teacher in the schools of Alabama; Ulysses, who 
resides at Bridgeville, Pa., a railroad man and also a 
dealer in real estate; William Robert and Henry, both of 
whom reside at Canonsburg; Mary, who married John 
Ralston, resides near Galveston, Tex.; Charles Cotter, 
who is engaged in newspaper work, and John B., of 
Canonsburg. 

John B. Donaldson was educated in the common schools, 
at Bethel Academy and the Western Reserve University, 
of Cleveland, Ohio, and was graduated from the medical 
department of that institution in 1872. He located for 
one year at Mt. Lebanon and then moved to Bridgeville, 
where he practiced medicine for five years. In 1878 he 
canio to Canonsburg and ever since has been identified 
not only with the professional life of the place but has 
become one of the interested and useful citizens. He 
has taken a prominent part in the medical affairs of 
Washington County, for several years serving as secretary 
of the county organization, and belongs also to the State 
and to the American Medical Associations. In his politi- 
cal views he is a Republican. His earnestness and activ- 
ity as a citizen have been frequently recognized and he 
has many times been elected to important civic offices, 
serving as burgess and as a member of the council, and 
also on the School Board. During 1889-1890 he was a 
member of the Pennsylvania General Assembly, where he 
proved his quality as a public-spirited citizen. He has 
led a busy life and has had many responsibilities, but his 
clear record shows that he has been equal to any de- 
mand made upon him. 

Dr. Donaldson was married to Miss Elizabeth S. Foster, 
of Bridgeville, who is a daughter of Walter and Maria 
(Sill) Foster, and they have had six children, as follows: 
Walter Foster, who is a graduate of the Northwestern 
University at Chicago, is a medical practitioner, resid- 
ing at Pittsburg; Nellie Boyce, who married Paul C. 
Little, lives at Carnegie, Pa., and they have two daugh- 
ters, Elizabeth and Helen; Maria, who died in 1906, 
was the wife of J. R. Dunn, an attorney at Pittsburg; 
.John Paul, who is cashier of the Central Trust Com- 
pany of Pittsburg, married Elsie Kelso, of Bellevue, 
and they have one son, John Paul, Jr. ; Samuel Foster, 
a resident of Pittsburg, where he is connected with the 
city health department ; and David Halsey, who is a mem- 
ber of the Class of 1910, in the Canonsburg High School. 
Dr. Donaldson owns a handsome residence at Canons- 
burg. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church and 
he belongs also to Chart iers Lodge No. 297, F. & A. M., 
at (Canonsburg. 



776 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



E. W. MASON, purchasing agent for the Joseph Seep 
Purchasing Agency, of Washington, was born Oct. 7, 
1865, at Centerville, Washington County, Pa. When he 
was five years old his parents moved to Pittsburg, where 
they resided untU 1S76. They then came to Washington, 
where Mr. Mason was for a time cash boy for William 
Smith & Sons, bankers of this city. He then attended 
the old Union Schools of Washington for two years 
and subsequently became a messenger boy for the West- 
ern Union Telegraph Company for about two years. He 
then became weighmaster in the coal office of V. Harding, 
which position he retained one year, at the end of which 
time he accepted a position as telegrapher with the B. 
& O. Railroad, with whom he remained three years. In 
January, 1886, Mr. Mason became identified with the 
Southwest Pennsylvania Pipe Line Company, with which 
he remained in various departments until October, 1902, 
when he was made purchasing agent for the Joseph Seep 
Purchasing Agency. 

On June 5, 1889, Mr. Mason was united in marriage 
with Nellie Wright, of Washington, Iowa, and they have 
three children — E. Wright Mason, district plant chief 
of the Bell Telephone Company, with headquarters at 
Monongahela City; Mabel J., a student in the Washing- 
ton High School; and Robert W., also a student in the 
Washington High School. 

Mr. Mason is a Republican in poUtics and was for 
three years a member of the school board, during which 
time he served one year as secretary of the board. He 
was for two years treasurer of The Washington Borough. 
He is a member of the First Methodist Episcopal Church 
and is fraternally affiliated with the Masonic order, be- 
longing to the Blue Lodge, Chapter, CouncU and Com- 
mandery and is past officer in all those bodies except 
the Council. He is also a member of the Royal Arcanum 
and Improved Order of Heptasophs. 

R. A. RUSSELL, whose business is that of contract- 
ing carpenter, at South Burgettstown, to which place 
he came in 1893 with his family and who in 1907 erect- 
ed his fine residence, is one of the leading business men 
in his line in this section. He was born in Muskingum 
County, Ohio, Oct. 22, 1853. 

Mr. Russell was brought to Washington County in 
boyhood and attended the Concord and Rankin schools 
in Mt. Pleasant Township, also a select school at Hickory 
and later Muskingum College. He then assisted his 
father on the farm and also learned the carpenter trade 
and later went into contracting. 

Mr. Russell was married in February, 1888, to Miss 
Agnes .Jennie Welch, a daughter of M. R. Welch, and 
they have three children : John E., who is a student at 
Athens University, Athens, Ohio ; Mary Belle, who is 
a student in the State Normal School at Slippery Rock; 



and Wilda MT., who attends the Burgettstown school. 
Mr. Russell and wife are members of the First United 
Presbyterian Church. In politics he is a Republican. He 
is an active and useful citizen, taking an interest in all 
that pertains to the general welfare of the town. He 
is serving in his sixth year as a member of the borough 
Council. 

REV. THEODORE B. NOSS, Ph. D., deceased, al- 
though best known to the people at large as an educator, 
was also a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
an extensive traveler, an author of note, a philanthropist, 
a man with varied business interests kept well in hand, 
and was the largest property owner in the borough of 
California, Pa., which for years had been his chosen place 
of residence. The death of Dr. Noss, which occurred 
Feb. 28, 1909, was a distinct loss to the whole country 
and an almost irreparable one to his community, with 
the leading affairs and the higher life of which he was 
so closely identified. 

Theodore Bland Noss was born on his father 's farm 
near Waterloo, Juniata County, Pa., May 10, 1852, and 
his parents were George and Isabella Noss, and his 
grandfather, from whom he undoubtedly inherited his 
physical appearance and much of his perseverance and 
tenacity of purpose, was Rev. John Coulter, a noted 
preacher of the Presbyterian faith, who filled one charge 
for 30 years. When the parents of Mr. Noss moved 
from near Waterloo to a little settlement named later 
in honor of his father, Nossville, he was quite young, 
but was 18 years old when they removed to the Shenan- 
doah Valley, in Virginia. They had ten children, and two 
daughters and one son died in infancy. One son died 
of consumption, when aged 20 years, and a daughter, 
Mrs. Belle Goshorn, died in 1906. The survivors are: 
Mrs. Jennie Hoy, and Mrs. Rachel Lineburg, both of 
Montandon; Mrs. Annie Widney, of Lindon, Kas. ; and 
Mrs. Clara H. Park, also of Montandon. 

Theodore B. Noss was reared by a father who had 
very practical ideas and fixed beliefs that amounted to 
stern convictions. The boy worked faithfully on the 
farm and in the tannery, neither occupations affording 
him any mental stimulus, in fact being distasteful in the 
extreme. He was permitted to attend the little academy 
at Waterloo, when work was not pressing at home, but 
when he expressed a desire to enter some larger educa- 
tional institution, he was offered no assistance by his 
father. This attitude, however, was largely due to the 
fact that an older son had died at school, when away from 
home, a victim of consumption, and the stern, but loving, 
father could not bring himself to send a second son to 
what he believed a similar fate. Thus Theodore pursued 
his studies and acquired his education under a handicap, 
but he was too large minded to blame his father and 



"'-^^ I' 












^Ajl^. ^S^^-^-^^ 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



779 



trusti'il lu time and bis uwu pt'isevoraiice to accomplish 
bis uiids. The first money be earned was by teaching a 
country school across the State line, in Maryland, and 
this money he used to take a course in the Normal School 
at Shippensburg, Pa., and when it did not cover the total 
expense, it was bia father who gave way and supplied the 
balance and enabled him to remain until he was gradu- 
ated, be baying apparently recoguized his son's ability. 

Immediately after graduation, Mr. IS'uss was apopintcd 
principal of the Shippensburg high school, which was then 
rated as one of the most advanced in the State, and after 
satisfactorily filling that position, he was called to Dickin- 
son Seminary, at Williamsport. There he taught more 
advanced studies and also continued his own in prepara- 
tion for his entrance into Syracuse University, from 
which be was graduated with the class of 1879. A por- 
tion of his time was devoted to his first trip to Europe. 
After graduating at the above university, from which he 
received his degree of A. M., in 1882, and of Ph. D., in 
1884, he was invited by Prof. George P. Beard, then 
principal of the Southwestern State Normal School, at 
California, to accept a position as one of its instructors, 
which he accepted and very shortly afterward was made 
vice-principal and remained in authority here until 1882. 
Dr. Noss then accepted a call to what was then the Pitts- 
burg Female College, but conditions were not congenial, 
and he returned to bis former position in the Normal 
School. In the spring of 1883, Prof. George P. Beard 
resigned and Dr. Noss was immediately elected as his 
successor and he continued principal of the California, 
Pa., Normal School from that time until his death, de- 
voting his time, his energy, often his means, to further 
his ideals in connection with this gi"eat s»hool. 

The life of Dr. Noss was one of continued usefulness 
but bis death had many sad features. Apparently in the 
best of health, in company with is wife and several per- 
sonal friends. Dr. Noss started to attend an educational 
meeting at Chicago, in which he was mucli interested. 
A slight chill developed son after the party started and 
his illness grew as the journey continued, a condition that 
greatly alarmed Mrs. Noss, whose tender care bad pre- 
served his life in a similar attack, some two years previ- 
ously. By the time the great city was reached he was 
seriously ill but was hastened to the Auditorium Hotel 
and the best medical skill summoned to bis aid. Weakened 
tissues from his previous illness perhaps, could not be 
strengthened in time to save bis life and ere few of bis 
hundreds of friends and loving pupils knew that be was 
.sick the announcement of bis death was flashed to them. 
All through the funeral ceremonies, California was a 
city of sadness, grief was pictured on every countenance, 
men turned from their ordinary pursuits and little chil- 
dren were told that a good man had passed from earth. 
It is but fitting to mention that people of distinction in 



different walks of life came to do honor to his memory 
and many of these accompanied the mourning family to 
his last resting place in the Monongahela Cemetery. 

On May 17, 1883, Dr. Noss was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary Graham, and she survives with their two 
children: Mary, who was born March 20, 1886; and 
Theodore, who was born April 4, 1896. Mrs. Noss and 
daughter are at present members of the Normal School 
faculty. In 1889, Dr. and Mrs. Noss, with their little 
daughter spent six mouths in Europe and visited many 
interesting points. In 1893 they again went to Europe, 
with congenial friends, and together they pursued special 
studies at the University of Berlin and at Jena Univer- 
sity. The third trip they took abroad together wa.s dur- 
ing the school year of 1906-7, when they spent eight 
mouths as students in the Sorbonne University of ParLs, 
concluding with a visit to the University of Heidelberg. 
Apparently at that time, Dr. Noss was just as eager for 
knowledge as was the farm boy of long before, propping 
up his school book before him on the plough or tan vat. 

Dr. Noss was a local preacher in the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church and was a lay delegate to the General Con- 
ference in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1896. He was an active 
member of the National Educational Association, a mem- 
ber of the National Educational, Council also president of 
the Normal department of the same, in 1899. He was 
the author of a number of serious works, all more or less 
educational, which will perpetuate his fame as a literary 
man. In private life he was cultured, diplomatic, friend- 
ly, sympathetic and courteous. His interests at Califor- 
nia included a directorship in the People 's Bank. 

JAMES HODGENS, deceased, who spent practically 
the whole of his long and useful life in the vicinity of 
Taylorstown, Pa., was born at that place, Sept. 29, 
1829, and was a son of Isaac and Isabel (McCarrell) 
Hodgens. 

The Hodgens family was one of the earliest to settle 
in Buffalo Township, Washington County, and genera- 
tion after generation it prospered and sent forth sons 
and daughters who became respected members of so- 
ciety. The family originated in Ireland, the grand- 
father, Thomas Hodgens, coming to America from 
County Armagh, in 1807, then being a man of family, 
and in the spring of 1808, he bought a farm in Buffalo 
Township,- near what is now Taylorstown, then but a 
scattered hamlet. He died in 1821. He was one of the 
founders of the Christian Church in this neighborhood. 

Isaac Hodgens, son of Thomas, and father of the late 
James Hodgens, was born in County Armagh, in 1794, 
and accompanied his parents to America. He completed 
bis education under a preceptor whose classes he had 
attended in Ireland, this being Alexander Campbell, who 
established what is now Bethany College, W. Va. Isaac 



780 



HI8T0EY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Hodgens liad the startling experience of being carried 
off by a war ship that attacked the vessel in which the 
family was journeying to America, but subsequently 
was restored unharmed to his famUy. He was a man of 
unusual strength of mind, served some years as county 
commissioner, and for a time one of the associate judges 
of Washington County. A great admirer and follower 
of Andrew Jackson, he subscribed to that leader's po- 
litical principles. His fellow citizens recognized his 
superiority and elected him to oflBces of the highest 
responsibility. He was active in the militia of early 
times, and reached the exalted rank of major gen- 
eral. In 1822 he married Isabella MeCarrell, 
also of Irish extraction. They resided on the old home- 
stead in Buffalo Township until 1835 and then moved 
into Taylorstown, but later purchased a farm that ad- 
joined the village and there the remainder of their lives 
were spent. Isaac Hodgens died in 1860 and was sur- 
vived 12 years by his widow. They had eleven chil- 
dren, the larger number of whom grew to maturity. 

The, late James Hodgens was given educational oppor- 
tunities far beyond those afforded many of his asso- 
ciates, attending good schools and completing his studies 
at Jefferson College. He had shown a taste for mathe- 
matics and this aided in perfecting him in civil 
engineering and surveying. Later he gave a large por- 
tion of his time for some years to his profession and 
enjoyed it, but he also carried on large agricultural 
operations. His engineering work took him to other 
points and he was connected with railroad construction 
in Iowa, but later gave up contracts that would take 
him so far from home. He owned 260 acres of some of 
the best land in Buffalo Township and his farm was 
well stocked, his herds of cattle being Holsteins and 
Shorthorns; his stock of the highest grade throughout. 

On Dec. 24, 1863, Mr. Hodgens was married to Miss 
Mary E. Farrar, who was born in Buffalo Township, 
Washington County, Pa., and is a daughter of Aaron 
and Jane (Griffith) Parrar. Mrs. Hodgens comes of 
Revolutionary stock. The great-gi-andfather of Mrs. 
Hodgens, James Parrar, had two brothers, John and 
Peter Parrar, who served in Washington's army and 
were killed at the battle of Long Island. Her grand- 
parents, Andi-ew and Margaret (Moore) Pai'rar, crossed 
the Allegheny Mountains and came to Washington Coun- 
ty, after the close of the Eevolutionary War, settling 
in Mt. Pleasant Township, where they died about 1832. 
Their eighth son, Aaron, father of Mrs. Hodgens, was 
born in 1812, in Washington County, married Jane 
Griffith and they had five children, Mary E. being the 
fourth in order of birth. j.n 1845 the Farrars moved 
from Mt. Pleasant to Buffalo Township and purchased 
a farm near Taylorstown. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hodgens nine children were born 



and the following survive : Thomas M., formerly a min 
ing man and banker at Butte, Mont., now has head 
quarters at Indian Chase, Greenwich, Conn.; Maud E 
who is the wife of Eev. D. P. Smith, formerly pastor 
of the United Presbyterian Church at Pawnee City 
Neb., and now pastor of the U. P. Church at Springfield, 
Mo. ; Isaac W., who is a physician at Chicago, 111. ; James 
0., who was formerly a banker at Butte, Mont., is now 
interested in irrigation in Madison County, Mont.; Al- 
bert M., who is a graduate of Washington and Jefferson 
College, is a civil engineer by profession, and is a justice 
of the peace of Blaine Township; and Ralph M., who 
is interested in mines and irrigation projects at Butte, 
Mont. He was a soldier in the Philippine Islands and 
while in the service was once wounded in the arm by 
the savage islanders. 

In his political views the late James Hodgens was 
a rigid Democrat and he exerted a wide influence. He 
served at times in township offices as his duties in other 
lines would permit, and for a considerable length of 
time was justice of the peace. He was a leading mem- 
ber of the United Presbyterian Church at Taylorstown. 

J. J. DAVIN, manufacturer of and dealer in all kinds 
of drilling and fishing tools, with quarters near the 
Chartier depot, at Wasliingtou, Pa., leads the trade in 
this line, in the oil country. He was born in 1848 in 
Ireland and came to America a boy of 15 years. 

Mr. Davin secured work in a tobacco factory at 
Brooklyn, N. Y., but after he had accumulated a little 
capital, he started out to seek a better business field, 
and in his travels reached Chicago, Ills. He remained 
there until 1868, but the rapid development of the Penn- 
sylvania oil fields and the business opportunities offered 
on every side, led him to go to Oil Creek and he has 
been identified with the oil industry in some way ever 
since. He began the manufacture of tools and appurte- 
nances required in the oil fields while still at Oil Creek, 
later moved his business to Bradford, and finally, in 
1885, to Washington. He carries the largest stock of 
general drilling and fishing tools of modern design and 
improved patterns, also cordage, win lines, rubber bells 
and fillings, to be found in the oil country. In addition 
to this successful enterprise, Mr. Davin is interested 
iu other prosperous concerns. In 1880 Mr. Davin was 
married in Canada to Miss Ellen A. Magner. They are 
members of the Roman Catholic Church. He is a charter 
member of the order of Elks at Washington. 

Mr. Da^dn has shown his enterprising spirit by estab- 
lishing a branch of his business at Sisterville, W. Va., 
where he has put a nephew, Mr. Magner, in charge. 
Thiough his enterprising spirit, his energy, industry and 
good judgment, Mr. Davin is numbered today with the 
representative business men of Washington. 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



781 



l'H{ANK KAMP, manager of the old Hopper lionie- 
steail farm iu Peters Township, Washington Connty, 
Pa., has 135 acres of land under cultivation and is num- 
bered with the leading citizens and successful agricul- 
turists of this section. He is a son of Michael Kamp, 
of Allegheny County. Mr. Kamp mai-ried Miss Mary 
Jane Hanna and they have one son and three dauglitors: 
Albert, Anna, .lulia and Jennie. 

James Hopper, grandfather of Mrs. Kamp and tlie 
founder of the Hopper family in Washington County, 
was born in County Den-y, Ireland, in 178S, and was a 
son of Robert Hopper. He learned the linen weaver's 
trade in early manhood. He married Jane Little, also 
of County Derry, and in 1849 he brought his family 
to America and tliey lived for one year at Pittsburg, 
Pa. Mr. Hopper then bought a small farm on Bru-sh 
Eun, in Peters Township, Washington County, and there 
engaged iu farming. In 1878 he purchased the present 
homestead and subsequently added to it until he owned 
135 acres at the time of his death, which occurred Feb. 
3, 1885, at the advanced age of 97 years. His wife died 
Feb. 12, 1879, aged 81 years. Mr. Hopper's mother 
was conceded to have been the oldest woman on record 
in Ireland, living to the remarkable age of 105 years. 
James and Jane Hopper were the parents of nine chil- 
dren, namely: Mary A., Arthur, James, Robert, Thomas 
and John, twins, Nancy, Eliza and Samuel. All of the 
children were born in Ireland and Eliza died there. 
Three of the children survive: Thomas, John and Sam- 
uel, these aged brothers being tenderly ministered to 
by Mr. and Mrs. Kamp, all residing on the old home- 
stead. The eldest daughter, Mary A. Hopper, married 
Richard Uauua, of Pittsburg, who died Dec. 16, 1871, 
and she died on the homestead in September, 1895, leav- 
ing five children : Samuel H., James, Joseph, Thomas J. 
anil Mary Jane, who is Mrs. Kamp. The family belongs 
to Center Presbyterian Church. 

ROBERT H. BLACK, of the firm of Robert II. Black 
& Son, iu marble and granite monumental work at 
Canonsburg, established this business in 1876 and it is 
the only concern of its kind in this place. Mr. Black was 
born at South Canonsburg, Washington County, Pa., 
only a few rods from his present residence, and is a 
son of William and Eleanor (Manifold) Black. 

James Black, the grandfather, was born in Adams 
County, Pa., and came very early to Washington County, 
where both he and wife died. They were interred at the 
Hill Church Cemetery, one mile south of Canonsburg. 
The grandparents had four sons and four daughters. 

William Black, father of Robert H., was born in 
Washington County. In 1847 he purchased what was 
known as the College farm, on which South Canonsburg 



is now located and both he and wife died there, his 
(huith occurring in 1866, when aged 64 years. He "mar- 
ried Eleanor Manifold, who was born in 1804, in York 
County, Pa., and died in 1885, in Washington County, 
when aged 81 years. She belonged to a family of noted 
longevity, seven members of which averaged 82 years 
at date of death. To William and Eleanor Black ten 
iliiidren were born, Robert H. being the youngest of 
the family. The others were as follows: William, who 
lives in Suulh Canonsburg, married Mary Bebout; Ben- 
jamin, who was killed during the Civil War at Gettys- 
burg, was a member of Co. G, 140th Pa. Vol. Inf.; 
.lames, who never married, was a member of Co. D, 
Kith Pa. Res. Corps and served through the Civil W'ar, 
died at Rome, Ga., in 1907; George, who died on his 
farm near Washington, married Jane McNary; Richard, 
who is a resident of Canonsburg and now retired, mar- 
ried Flora White; Margaret, who became the wife of 
William Grimes, who died in Butler County, Pa., for 
more than 40 years a minister of the United Presby- 
terian Church in Belmont County, Ohio, and Mrs. Grimes 
resides at Millersburg, Ohio, with their son. Rev. Will- 
iam Grimes, who is pastor of a church at that place; 
Mary, and two who died young. Mary Black married 
Rev. J. S. Barr, retired and living at New Wilmington, 
Lawrence County, Pa. At the time of marriage both 
were missionaries in India, where they spent 43 years 
and Mrs .Barr died at Sealkote, India. A son, J. D. 
Barr, is a member of tlie faculty of the New Wilmington 
College. 

Robert H. Black attended school at Canonsburg until 
18 years of age and then went to work on a farm and 
continued there until he went into the marble and 
granite business. The plant is now situated at No. 16 
Central avenue, having been moved from beneath the 
Citizens Trust Company building. He is one of Canons- 
liurg's old and reliable business men. 

In 1878, Mr. Black was married to Miss Margaret 
Wliite, a daughter of W. S. and Jane (Stewart) WTiite. 
Mrs. Black was born near Hickory, in Mt. Pleasant 
Township, in Washington County, and died at Canons- 
burg in 1900. She was the beloved mother of the fol- 
lowing children: Helen D., residing at home; Harry, 
■A draughtsman, who resides at Toledo, Ohio, unmarried; 
.lidin W., who is associated with his father in the monu- 
ment business; Virginia, who died in 1904; and Mary 
K.. Agnes, Jeanetta and Eleanor, all at home, the 
younger ones still attending school. Mr. Black and chil- 
dren attend the First Presbyterian Church at Canons- 
Inirg. The family residence is an attractive one located 
at No. 305 South Chestnut street. In politics Mr. Black 
is a Republican and he has served acceptably as school 
director and also as Councilman. 



i-ss 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



J. W. PINAE, an extensive dealer in builders ' sup- 
plies, coal and ice, is one of the leading young business 
men of Washington, where he has resided since 1905. He 
was born in 1S75 in Chicago, lU., but was reared and 
obtained his early schooling in Guthrie County, Iowa, 
later graduating with the Class of '97 from Iowa College 
at Grinnell, Iowa, when he received the degree of A. B. 
He subsequently took a post graduate course at the 
University of Chicago, and at ShurtleflE College, Upper 
Alton, lU., where he received a degree of A. M., after 
which he taught for four years in Illinois and Wisconsin. 
Mr. Pinar was engaged for a period of three years in 
the furniture business at CLueinnati, Ohio, after which 
he filled a position as traveling salesman for a brick 
concern of Pittsburg until 1905, when he purchased his 
present business in which he has since continued with 
well merited success. 

In 1902 Mr. Pinar was united in marriage with Miss 
Emily Brooke, of Cincinnati, Ohio. He is a member and 
an elder of the Central Presbyterian Church of Wash- 
ington, and fraternall}- has recently been elected for 
initiation in the I. 0. 0. F. lodge. 

JONATHAN EANKIN, a retired farmer and one of 
the most respected residents of South Burgettstowh. 
whose valuable farm of 245 acres is situated in Smith 
Township, Washington County, was born in Fayette 
County, Pennsylvania, Aug. 10, 1837, and is a son of 
James and Eachel Eankin. Their family consisted of 
three sons and two daughters. The survivors are Jona- 
than and one of his two sisters. 

Jonathan Eankin was reared in Fayette County, ob- 
tained his education there and for many years there- 
after engaged in farming and in school teaching in his 
native county. In 1901 he purchased his valuable land 
in Smith Township and at that time took up his resi- 
dence, in South Burgettstown, where he has been num- 
bered with the useful citizens ever since. He is a man 
of capital and is one of the stockholders in the First 
National Bank of Burgettstown. In polities Mr. Eankin 
has always been identified with the Democratic party, but 
he has never sought political office. 

Mr. Eankin married Mrs. Eachel E. Murphy and they 
have five children, as follows: Laura Jane, who married 
A. B. Pearsol; Margaret, who married George Pearsol; 
Winnie I., who married J. K. Chalfant; Bessie, who mar- 
ried C. A. Eittenhouse, and Harry, who married Jessie 
Currey. Mr. and Mrs. Eankin are members of the First 
Presbyterian Church at Burgettstown. 

AMBLEE M. ELLIOTT, residing on his well cul- 
tivated farm, which contains more than 149 acres and is 
situated in Blaine Township, was born in Morris Town- 



ship, Washington County, Pa., Jan. 10, 1863, and is a 
son of Valentine and Nancy (Dougal) Elliott. 

Valentine EDiott was born in Morris Township and 
was a son of Jacob Elliott, one of the very early settlers 
in that region. Valentine Elliott was a farmer and stock 
raiser and was one of the useful and leading men of his 
township. He was a prominent Democrat and frequently 
had township offices tendered him and served as road 
superintendent and school director. His death occurred 
in February, 1906, when he was in his seventy-fourth 
year. His widow survives and lives comfortably at 
Claysville. Of their children the following survive: 
Eelda P., widow of Bobert Adams, resides at ClaysviUe; 
Ambler M., of Blaine Township, and Perry S., of Denver, 
Colo. The father of these children was a valued mem- 
ber of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church of East 
tinley Township. 

Ambler M. Elliott attended the public schools and was 
trained to an agricultural life on his father's farm. 
After his marriage in 1885 he engaged in farming in 
East Finley Township and then returned to Morris Town- 
ship, later moved to a farm in Jackson Township, Greene 
County, and remained there for nine years, when he 
moved to Eich Hill Township, in the same county, where 
he resided until April, 1908, when he returned to Wash- 
ington County and settled on his present farm, where he 
has carried on farming and stock raising ever since. 
He is an intelligent, progressive man, and makes use of 
modern methods and knowledge in his agricultural opera- 
tions. 

On Dec. 19, 1885, Mr. Elliott was married to Miss 
Mary M. Johnson, a daughter of the late Nicholas John- 
son, of Eich Hill Township, and they have two daughters : 
Ella S., who is the wife of William Huston, of Morris 
Township, Greene County, and Anna L., who is the wife 
of Harry Applegate, of Blaine Township, Washington 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Applegate have a little daughter, 
Mary Jeanette. 

In his political views Mr. Elliott is entirely inde- 
pendent. He keeps posted on current events, does his 
own thinking and casts his vote as his judgment dictates. 
He is more or less a self-made man and, like all such who 
have successfully made their own way in the world, pos- 
sesses a large amount of that useful commodity, com- 
mon sense. 

JOHN WHITE MAETIN, of the dry goods firm of J. 
W. Martin & Sons, leading merchants at Canonsburg, was 
born in South Strabane Township, Washington County, 
Pa., Jan. 11, 1828. and is a son of James and Mary 
(White) Martin. 

.James Martin was born in York County, Pennsylvania, 
and was a son of Peter and Mary (Adams) Martin. 




JOHN A. DIXON 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



rso 



The greater part of his life was spent in Routli Strabane 
Towiisliip, Washington County, wliere lie dieil when aged 
eighty-eight years. He married Mary White, who was 
born in North Strabano Township and died in South 
Strabane Township at the age of eighty years. Iler 
parents were Samuel and Mary (Henderson) White and 
her maternal grandfather was Rev. Matthew Henderson, 
a pioneer preacher and the first pastor of what is now 
the North Buffalo United Presbyterian Church, serving 
from 1781 to 1795. To .Tamos and Mary Martin the 
following children were born : Peter, who married Mary 
.T. Clokey, died in South Strabane Township; Samuel, 
who married Sarah Herron, died at what is now Smith 's 
Mill, in North Strabane Township; James, who married 
Elizabeth Clokey; John W. ; Matthew Adams, who died 
unmarried ; Mary J., who died in early womanhood ; 
Ebenezer Henderson, who was a soldier in the Civil War 
and a member of the 140th Pa. Vol. Inf., was drowned 
while attempting to cross the James Biver, in Virginia, 
on horseback; William H., who died on the home farm 
near Washington, married Annie, daughter of James 
Thon; Elizabeth, who is the widow of George Davis, 
lives in South Strabane Township; Thomas J., who was 
accidentally killed by a fall from a haymow, and Ann 
Eliza, who died in childhood. 

John White Martin, who has been identified with the 
dry goods business at Canonsburg for a period of fifty- 
one years, enjoys the distinction of being the oldest 
active merchant in the place. He was reared on the home 
farm, but early decided upon the study of medicine. 
In 1S49 he was graduated from Washington and Jeffer- 
son College and shortly afterward began the reading 
of medical works under Dr. John Wishart and then at- 
tended medical lectures in the medical department of the 
University of Pennsylvania and was graduated there- 
from in the class of 18.53. He returned to Washington 
County and engaged in practice at Canonsburg until 
1858, when he entered into the dry goods business, with 
which he has been so prominently connected ever since. 
For a number of years he remained alone and had 
already built up a large business before his younger 
sons were prepared to be taken into partnership. The 
present firm is made up of John White Martin, John C. 
Martin and Ralph Martin, the firm style being J. W. 
Martin & Sons. 

In 1855 Dr. Martin was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Allison, who died in 1881 and was interred in beautiful 
Oak Springs Cemetery. Five children were born to this 
marriage, namely: James Allison, who died at the age 
of nineteen years; Charles Edwin, who has been con- 
nected with the Standard Oil Company since youth, has 
his home at TitusviOe, Pa., but spends a part of his 
time at Buft'alo, Pittsburg and other points as the duties 



(if tlio position lie fills rci)uire; .lohii (_'., who is associated 
with his father, was educated in Canonsburg Academy; 
Ralph, who is a member of the firm of J. W. Martin & 
Sons, married a daughter of William Donaldson and 
they have one daughter, Mabelle, who is the wife of 
George Cameron, and Mr. and Mrs. Cameron have a 
daughter; and Mary, who is the wife of William Dick- 
son. Mr. and Mrs. Dickson lost one child, but they have 
three — Aneita, Margaret and William. 

Pr. Martin has always been an active citizen in the 
sense of supporting any proposition for the improving 
of the borough along well considered lines or advancing 
the permanent welfare of the people, but he has de- 
clined all public offices with the exception of membership 
on the School Board. He is one of the leading mem- 
bers of the Grecnside Avenue United Presbyterian Church 
and is a member of the Session. For a number of years 
he served as superintendent of the Sabbath-school. He is 
a Republican in his political views. 

JOHN N. DIXON, an honorary member of the board 
of trustees of the Southwestern State Normal School at 
California, Pa., was an active member of that board for 
more than thirty-five years, during all of which time he 
was president of same with the exception of two years. 
He was born March 16, 1824, on a farm just across the 
Monongahela River in Fayette County, Pa., and is a 
son of Nathan and Elizabeth (Forsythe) Dixon. Nathan 
Dixon followed farming all his life and was also born 
and reared on the Dixon farm in Fayette County, which 
was land settled on by his father, John Dixon, a native 
of Chester County, Pa. Nathan Dixon died when our 
subject was a small child, leaving his widow with three 
children to rear, namely : John N. ; Jane, who married 
James Elliott, died at the age of seventy years ; and 
Ruth, deceased, who was an invalid during the greater 
part of her life. 

.John N. Dixon was reared on the home farm in Fay- 
ette County, and lived continuously for seventy-six years 
on part of the land originally purchased by his paternal 
grandfather, John Dixon. His maternal grandfather, 
EH Forsythe, also owned' a tract of 400 acres near the 
Dixon farm. Mr. Dixon has always followed farming 
and also dealt extensively in coal for some time, and has 
been highly successful in all his business venture.s. In 
1900 he sold his farm, consisting of 212 acres, and came 
to California, Pa., where he has since been living in 
retirement. Mr. Dixon is vice-president of the People's 
Bank of California, and is a member of the Presbyte- 
rian Church of California. 

Dixon Hall, the fine new dormitory of the South- 
western State Normal School at California, which was 
erected at a cost of $9.5,000, and completed during the 



786 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



summer of 190S, was dedicated and named in honor of 
Mr. Dixon, who possesses to the fullest extent, the con- 
fidence and esteem of his fellow townsmen. 

J. G. MAEQUIS, a retired farmer and auctioneer, 
residing in his handsome residence at Burgettstown, for- 
merly was engaged in farming in Cross Creek Township, 
Washington County, Pa. He . was born in that town- 
ship May 9, 1S43, and is a son of William and Lettice 
(Griffith) Marquis. The father died in 1855 and the 
mother in 1882. , They were members of the Cross Creek 
Presbyterian Church and were buried in the cemetery 
attached to the same. 

J. G. Marquis attended school through boyhood in 
Cross Creek Township and devoted himself to agri- 
cultural pursuits both before and after marriage. He 
was also a well known and popular auctioneer and cried 
sales in many parts of the county. In the spring of 
1906 he retired to Burgettstown, where he is a valued 
citizen. 

On Mar. 1, 1866, Mr. Marquis was married to Miss 
Clara A. McFarland, a daughter of Andrew and Mary 
McFarland, and eleven children were born to them, all 
of whom survive with the exception of the oldest, which 
died unnamed, and Amber Q., whose death occurred in 
December, 1905. The others are: Mary L., Anna B., 
Orin K., Clara, Margaret A., Jannette G., Ella A., Elsie 
and William A. Mr. Marquis and family attend the 
Westminster Presbyterian CTiurch at Burgettstown. In 
politics he is a Democrat and has served three years in 
the office of judge of elections. He is a stockholder in 
the Guardian Trust Company, of Pittsburg. 

WILLIAM PICKETT, general contractor and a rep- 
resentative business citizen of Washington, Pa., was born 
in this city, April 22, 1863, and is a son of .John and 
Kora (O'Leary) Pickett. 

The parents of Mr. Pickett, who were born in County 
Clare, Ireland, came to America in March, 1852, landing 
at Castle Garden, New York. The father secured work 
on what was then known as the Hempfield Railroad, now 
a part of the Baltimore & Ohio system, and then came 
to Washington County. He was found to be a faithful, 
reliable man and was given the position of watchman at 
the Baltimore & Ohio roundhouse, at Washington, which 
he held for 14 years. Later he served four terms as 
street commissioner at Washington. He married Nora 
O'Leary and they had eleven children, the survivors 
being: Thomas F., who is superintendent of Hazel Glass 
Factory No. 1; William; Peter and John H., both of 
whom are agents for the United States Express Com- 
pany ; Michael, who is with the Hazel Glass Works ; 
Mary, who is employed at the United States Express 
office at Washington ; .Julia, a teacher in the public 



schools; Catherine and Margaret, both of whom are at 
home; Anna, who is bookkeeper for the Real Estate 
Trust Bank; and Nellie, who is a teacher in the public 
schools. 

William Pickett, with his brothers and sisters, was 
reared and educated at Washington. One of a large fam- 
ily, it was necessary for him to early assist his father, 
and later, through his own industry, he accumulated the 
capital with which he started into business in genera] 
contracting work. Beginning in a small way, by honest 
work, fail' prices and punctuality he won some important 
contracts, which paved the way for others, until now 
he stands very near the head in his line of business at 
Washington, his work mainly being street grading, buDd- 
iug and street railway contracts. He erected his own 
handsome home at No. 57 North Lincoln street. 

In June, 1898, Mr. Pickett was married to Miss Mary 
Scanlon, of Steubenville, Ohio, and they are members of 
the Catholic Church. Mr. Pickett is a charter member 
of the Knights of Columbus Lodge at Washington. 

JOHN SAWHILL, one of Blaine Township's leading 
citizens, who owns three farms, aggregating 370 .acres, 
was born in this same section of Washington County, 
Pa., Aug. 10, 1835, and is a son of William and Jane 
(Lorimer) Sawhill, and a grandson of. William Saw- 
hill, the latter of whom was a pioneer settler in the 
county and ever since, his descendants have been owners 
of land, farmers and stock raisers in this vicinity. 

William Sawhill, father of John Sawhill, died in 
Washington County in 1867. He was a well-known man 
and respected one and for many years enjoyed member- 
ship with the United Presbyterian Church in Buffalo 
Township. In his early years he was a Whig, but later 
became a Republican. He married Jane Lorimer and 
but two of their children survive: John and Sarah J., 
the latter of whom is the widow of J. R. Donaldson, for- 
merly of East Finley Township. Mrs. Donaldson now 
resides at Claysville. 

.John Sawhill grew to manhood on the home farm and 
from youth has been accustomed to farm work of every 
kind. For many years he has made a specialty of the 
sheep industry and is one of the largest sheep raisers 
in Blaine Township, keeping from 200 to 300 head at 
a time. Although Mr. Sawhill had but few educational 
advantages in his youth he profited by those he had and 
is one of the well informed and intelligent men of this 
section. All of his land is valuable and he has the 
knowledge that enables him to cultivate every portion 
of it profitably. Mr. Sawhill is interested also in the 
National Bank at Claysville and ever since it was organ- 
ized has been one of its directors. 

On Jan. 4, 1864, Mr. Sawhill was married to Miss Jane 
B. Ziegler, who was born in Lancaster County, Pa., and 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



787 



is a (.laugliler of Abraliaiii Ziegloi', who iiiovcil from 
Lancaster Couuty to Donegal Towiisliip in Washington 
County. To Mr. and Mrs. Sawhill ten children have 
been boru and of these the following survive: Nettie, 
who is the wife of William Woodburn, of Washington; 
William L., who lives in Donegal Township ; Elmer C, 
who lives in Pittsburg; Oscar II., who resides in Blaine 
Township ; John M. ; Ina M. ; Sadie M., who is the wife 
of Ulysses G. Duvall, of West Pittsburg; Maud E. ; 
Clai-a A., who is a successful teacher in Blaine Town- 
ship; and Elizabe.h, who is deceased, .lohn M., Ina M., 
Maud E. and Clara A. reside on the old luinie place in 
Blaine Township. 

Mr. Sawhill is a Republican in his jiolitical opinions. 
He has frequently been elected to public otfice in Blaine 
Township and has served most acceptably as school di- 
rector and road supervisor, performing every duty to the 
best of his ability. He is a member of the United 
Presbyterian Church at Taylorstown and for a long 
time served as a trustee of the same. 

HENRY C. COOPER, a retired merchant of Elders- 
ville, Pa., who was engaged in business here for 35 con- 
secutive years, was born at Bellevue, Allegheny County, 
Pa., May 5, 1845, and is a son of Erasmus and Eliza- 
beth (Patterson) Cooper. 

James Patterson, the maternal grandfather, came 
from Ireland with his wife about 1793, and his oath of 
allegiance, now in possession of Henry C. Cooper, was 
made in 1794, and in 1814, he was made a citizen of 
this country, the naturalization papers being also now 
in the po.^session of Mr. Cooper. James Patterson and 
wife were parents of four sons and three daughters. 
He died when aged 92 years and his wife when aged 84 
years. 

. Erasmus Cooper resided for a number of years on a 
farm near Bellevue, Pa., but after the death of his first 
wife, in 1846, moved to Massillon, Ohio, where he kept 
a book store. Four sons were born to his first marriage : 
John, William, Robert P. and Henry C. At Massillon, 
Erasmus Cooper was married to Mary Elizabeth Logan, 
and they had one child, Mary Elizabeth (Mrs. Bethel), 
who lives in California. When Erasmus Cooper later 
moved to Iowa with his second family, his two elder 
sons, John and William, accompanied him. At that time 
transportation facilities were poorly developed and Mr. 
Cooper and his family had to go down the river from 
Steubenville by boat to St. Louis and thence to Keokuk, 
Iowa, and from there drove across the country to a 
farm on which he settled and on which he lived until 
the time of his death, Nov. 4, 1856, and his burial was 
at Des Moines. His farm is now within the limits of 
that city. In politics he was a Whig. 

Henry C. Cooper attended school at Eldersvillo and 



.Sliarpsburg, and after gaining a little practical experi- 
ence in the mercantile business, in 1867 embarked in the 
same with his brother, John, and they successfully car- 
ried it on until 1890, when the latter retired. The for- 
mer continued the business alone for 12 year-s, but in 
1902 sold out and also retired. He is a man of ample 
fortune, being one of the stockholders in the Washing- 
ton National Bank of Burgettstown, Pa., the owner of 
considerable town property and also the owner of his 
grandfather Patterson's farm of 191 acres, which has 
never been out of the family since 1797. 

Mr. Cooper was married Dec. 18, 1889, to Miss Carrie 
Virginia McCarrell, a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(McComb) McCarrell. Her grandfathers, Thomas Mc- 
Carrell, Sr., and Capt. John McComb, were Revolutionary 
soldiers. Mr. Cooper was reared in the Protestant Metho- 
dist Church, of which he is an officer. Mrs. Cooper is a 
member of the United Presbyterian Church, in which 
her late father was an elder for a large part of his life. 

WILLI.A.M W. LESLIE, general contractor, is one of 
Washington 's enterprising business men and has lived 
in this city all but four years of his life. He was born 
at Monmouth, Ills., in 1875, and is a son of Peter and 
Agnes (Brownlee)) Leslie. 

The Leslie family is probably of Irish extraction. 
The father of Mr. Leslie, who died in 1908, was born 
near Xenia, Ohio. He married Agnes Brownlee, who 
was born in Washington County and was a member of 
one of the oldest county families. 

W^illiam W. Leslie attended the Washington schools, 
having accompanied his parents here in 1879, and then 
learned the brick-laying trade and for ten years has been 
engaged in general contracting. In addition to building 
many other residences, in 1903 he erected his own fine 
home at No. 405 Addison avenue. In the same year he 
was married to Miss Sue Grimes, a daughter of Thomas 
Grimes, of Washington. They are members of the First 
United Presbyterian Church, Mr. Leslie being on its of- 
ficial board. 

JOHN W. STEWART, deceased, was formerly one of 
Buffalo Township 's best known and respected citizens. 
Born in Buffalo Tow-nship, Washington County, Pa., 
Nov. 3, 1847, he died Oct. 26, 1905, and was buried in 
the cemetery at Washington. HLs parents were John 
'W. and Jane (McCall) Stewart. 

The Stewart family is numbered with the old ones of 
Washington County and the name occurs again and again 
in the early records. It originated in Scotland, but the 
date of the coming of the first immigrant has not been 
preserved. Both parents of Mr. Stewart were born in 
Washington County . 

John W. Stewart in his bovlioo.l attended the district 



788 



HISTORY OF WASHINGTOISr COUNTY 



schools near his home, but from early youth assisted 
in the opperation of the home farm and became thor- 
oughly acquainted with all the work 'that is required 
in order to make agriculture a successful business. He 
continued to farm and to raise fine cattle and stock dur- 
ing the entire period of his active life and when he was 
called away he left an ample estate to his surviving 
widow and his children. He was a consistent member 
of the North Buffalo United Presbyterian Church, of 
which he was also a trustee and was a man who not 
only professed to be a Christian, but led the life of one. 
He was a Eepubliean in his political views, but sought 
no public offices. 

On Oct. 11, 1877, John W. Stewart was married to 
Margaretta M. Caldwell, who was born in Hopewell 
Township, where she was also reared. She was edu- 
cated in the public schools and at Washington Seminary, 
at Washington, Pa. Mrs. Stewart's parents were Robert 
S. and Caroline (Vance) Caldwell. Her father was a 
native of Hopewell Township and her mother of Cross 
Creek Township, both of Washington County, and her 
grandfathers had also been old residents of those sec-; 
tions. Robert S. Caldwell was a farmer and also raised 
many sheep, this industry for many years being one of 
the most profitable. He was a leading member of the 
Presbyterian Church at Buffalo Village. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart had four children, namely: 
Robert V., who is engaged in the practice of medicine at 
Monongahela City, Pa.; Irene McCall, who is the wife 
of Charles F. Young, of Nestor, Cal.; J. Lloyd, who 
Uves in Buffalo Township ; and Edna Margaretta, who 
also is at home and attending school. Mrs. Stewart is 
very active in the North Buffalo Presbyterian Church 
and is president of the Missionary Society. She con- 
tinues to reside on the old Stewart farm, the old home- 
stead, where she has spent many peaceful, happy years. 
In 1904, a fine new brick home, modern in its construc- 
tion and improvements, was erected by Mr. Stewart, but 
he lived to enjoy it but a few months. 

GLENN GEORGE HALLAM, a lifelong resident and 
for many years one of the prominent business men of 
Washington, Pa., who has retired from business activi- 
ties, was born in 1855 in this city and is a son of John 
B. and Emma (Forrest) Hallam. 

Joseph Hallam, the grandfather of our subject, was 
one of the pioneer settlers of Washington, where at an 
early period, which was during the days when the old 
prairie schooner was the mode of travel, he conducted 
a hotel for many years. 

John B. Hallam, who followed wagon manufacturing 
throughout his active career, was born in Washington 
County, Pa., and died at the age of 74 years. He mar- 
ried Emma Torrest, and to them were born a family of 



five sons and two daughters; Glenn G., the subject of 
this sketch; Clara, who died in infancy; Hugh B., de- 
ceased; Prank Forrest, who is a resident of McKeesport, 
a civil engineer by profession and is employed on the 
state roads; Alice M., the wife of Charles H. Spriggs, 
a wholesale grocer; John E., one of the leading photog- 
raphers of Washington; and Forrest R., a resident of 
Belleville, Ills. 

Glenn G. Hallam was reared and obtained his edu- 
cational training in Washington, and early in life began 
learning the carriage-making trade with J. M. House, 
who failed in the business in 1871. He then learned 
the carpenter 's trade, and afterwards embarked in the 
manufacture of brick for many years, later dealing in 
grain and builder 's supplies for six years. Since that 
time he has been devoting his entire attention to his real 
estate business, which he has always carried on in con- 
nection with his other business enterprises. 

Sept. 15, 1881, Mr. Hallam was joined in marriage 
with Eva McCoUum, who was born in Washington, a 
daughter of Dennis McCollum, and of their union were 
born the following offsprings: Ethel M., Emma B., Sarah, 
deceased; Glenneva, deceased; and Paul MeColIum Hal- 
lam. Mr. Hallam is religiously a member of the First 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and fraternally is affiliated 
with the Royal Arcanum. 

CHARLES C. COATES, president of the Hickory- 
Woodrow Telephone Company of Mt. Pleasant Township, 
and station agent at Hickory, Pa., for the Wabash Rail- 
road, has been identified with railroad work for a num- 
ber of years and his oflSee experience has been of a 
character to well qualify him for the position he fills. 
He was born at Plumer, Venango County, Pa., Aug. 14, 
1872, and is a son of Frederick C. and Mary C. (Denny) 
Coates. 

The father of Mr. Coates died Nov. 30, 1888, but the 
mother survives and resides at Custer City, Pa. Fred- 
erick C. Coates served 18 years on a German man-of- 
war. He was a carpenter and contractor after locating 
at Plumer, Pa. In polities he was a Democrat, and in 
religious faith he was a German Lutheran. 

Charles C. Coates attended school at Custer City and 
then entered Western Brooke College, at Olean, N. Y., 
and after completing a commercial course there, became 
manager of the Sewickley Valley Journal, a weekly so- 
ciety newspaper, at Sewickley, Pa., and was manager 
of the printing office there for some years. He also was 
a resident of Haysville, Pa., for some time and during 
that period was prominent in public affairs, serving one 
term as burgess and one term as president of the Coun- 
cil, and also was a school director. He also was elected 
president of the Pennsylvania State Brass Band Asso- 
ciation and during his year of service in this position, 




(■ii.\i;!.i';s w. v,\i;.\Ai.i.. .m.d. 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



791 



lie increased the iiiembcrsliip of the orgauizatiou froii) 
980 to 2,210, a larger increase than was ever made be 
fore or since. He is an expert telegrapher and is a mem 
ber of the order of Railroad Telegraph Operators. Mr, 
Coates was called to Hickory when the Wabash Com 
pany inaugurated its service here, in July, 1904. He 
has had many duties, including service as chief clerk 
for the superintendent and also for the roadmaster of 
the Wabash Railroad at Pittsbui-g. In politics ho is an 
independent Republican. He was a member of the 
Council in the city of Pittsburg, also served on the 
Central Board of Education, being elected on an inde- 
pendent Democratic ticket. At present he is serving a.s 
a member of the school board of Mt. Pleasant Town- 
ship. 

On Dec. 8, 1900, Mr. Coates was married to Kath- 
erine Neelan, a daughter of Thomas Neelan, and they 
have one daughter, May D., who is attending school at 
Hickory. Mr. Coates is a Thirty-second degree Mason 
and he belongs also to the fraternal order of Hepta- 
sophs, the Royal Arcanum and other societies. 

JOHN M. BURROUGHS, a representative citizen of 
Buffalo Township, who is jiow serving as a member of 
the township school board, devotes his estate of more 
than 125 acres to farming and stock raising, like his 
neighbors, giving a large amount of attention to sheep. 
He was born in Greene County, Pa., Dec. 10, 1862, and 
is a son of Talmage T. and Jane (Scott) Burroughs. 

The father of Mr. Burroughs was born in Morris 
Township, Greene County, Pa., a son of Samuel Bur- 
roughs. The latter spent the larger portion of his life 
in his native county, but prior to his death, moved to 
Iowa. Talmage T. Burroughs married Jane Scott, who 
was born in Center Township, Greene County, and of 
their children the present survivors are: H. S., a phy- 
sician practicing in the city of Pittsburg; Belle, wife 
of Frank Hedley, of Rich Hill Township, Greene County; 
Lottie, wife of Leroy Marsh, of Rich Hill Township; 
Ella, wife of Dr. T. N. Milligan, of Waynesburg, Pa.; 
John M.; James, who lives in Center Township, Greene 
County; and Bertha and William, both of whom live in 
Waynesburg. 

John M. Burroughs has been a farmer all his mature 
life. He resided in his native county until 1907, when 
he came to his present valuable farm in Buffalo Town- 
ship. It did not take him long to prove to his fellow 
citizens that a man of energy, experience and good judg- 
ment had settled among them and in the spring of 1909 
they elected him a member of the school board for a 
term of three years. 

On Oct. 15, 1887, Mr. Burroughs was married to Miss 
Emma F. Throckmorton, who was born in Center Town- 
ship. Greene r'oiintv. and is a daughter of James Throck- 



morton. Two children have been born to them, Edna 
Belle and Etta Mary. Mr. and Mrs. Burroughs are mem- 
bers of the East Buffalo Presbyterian Church. In hie 
political views he is a Democrat. 

CHARLES WESLEY YARNALL, M. D., physician 
and surgeon, and specialist in diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose and thoat, has been actively engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession in Washington County, Pa., for 
two decades and has been located at California since 
1899. IIo was born at Claysville, Pa., October 10, 1860, 
and is a son of Rev. J. V. and Elizabeth (Boggs) Yar- 
nall. 

The Yarnali name is an old one in the city of Phila- 
delphia, and from there came the grandjiarents of Dr. 
Yarnali. The father of Dr. Yarnali was born in Ohio. 
He became a preacher in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church and according to the discipline of that church 
was transferred from one charge to another every three 
years. In that way his children attended school at dif- 
ferent places, wTierever the temporary home might be, 
all, however, during Dr. Yarnall's boyhood, being in 
Washington County, Pa. The latter became a student in 
the State Normal School at California, leaving in his 
senior year to enter Allegheny College at Meadville. For 
six years he was connected with the railway mail service 
between Pittsburg and New York. By that time he was 
prepared to gratify his cherished ambition of entering 
Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, where he was 
graduated April 3, 1889. He subsequqently took a post- 
graduate course in 1899, in New York City. He settled 
tirst at Roscoe, Washington County, where he practiced 
for five years, moving then to Bellsville for five years 
more, after which he came to California. In large meas- 
ure. Dr. Yarnali is a self-made man, providing for his 
ow-n education by teaching school and otherwise, and is 
justly proud of the fact. He is deeply interested in his 
profession and keeps fully abreast with the times in all 
that concerns it. He was one of the first to install an 
X-Ray machine in his office, with other costly electrical 
apparatus, in this section, and makes a specialty of their 
use. He enjoys the confidence of a large clientele and 
the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens in general. 

Dr. Yarnali was married before coming to California, 
to Miss Allie Hopkins, who was born in West Pike Run, 
Washington County, and is a daughter of T. C. Hopkins. 
Dr. and Mrs. Yarnali have three children namely : Jo- 
seph Olan, a graduate of the State Normal School at 
California, who is now a student in the Dickinson Law 
School, at Carlisle, Pa.; Eva May, a graduate also of 
the State Normal School at California, who is a teacher 
in East Pike Run Township; and .\udrey U.. who is a 
student in the senior i-Ia^s in the Califoniia .Xorxal 
School. 



792 



HISTORY OP WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Dr. Yarnall is professioually identified with various 
medical and scientific organizations and fraternally he 
belongs to the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Eagles and the order of the Moose. 

DONAiD G. WILKINSON, who fills a very import- 
ant position, being engineer of the Pittsburg Coal Com- 
pany, at Westland, Pa., was born in Scotland, Nov. 19, 
1859, and is a son of George and Christina (Morrison) 
Wilkinson. 

The mother of Mr. Wilkinson died in Scotland, but 
the father came to America and later resided at West- 
land and worked as a boss track-layer. Both of his two 
sons reside here, Donald G. and Andrew M., the latter 
of whom married Margaret Christie. 

Donald 6. Wilkinson came to America in February, 
1887, hence his school days had all been spent in his 
native country. He landed in the United States at 
Philadelphia, and from there went to Clearfield and 
later to Westmoreland County. In April, 1890, he went 
from there to Stoekdale, where he worked for one year, 
then to Morewood for eight months, to Uniontown for 
nine years, to Bufiington for one year and from there 
came to Westland and accepted his present position. 
He has thus had a large amount of experience as an 
engineer and is regarded as a safe and trusty employe, 
under all conditions. Mr. Wilkinson is one of the stock- 
holders in the Farmers' National Bank at Hickory. In 
politics he is a Republican and he has served four years 
as a justice of the peace. 

Mr. Wilkinson M-as married in Scotland to Miss Jenet 
Stewart, whose parents were John and Mary Stewart. 
They attend the Presbyterian Church at Westland. Mr. 
Wilkinson is much interested in the Young Men's 
Christian Association at Washington and has been a 
member of that organization for three years, and he is 
identified also with the Elks, the Odd Fellows and the 
Miners' Union. 

M. W. LARKIN, who has been a resident of Wash- 
ington for a period of 20 years, is interested in a num- 
ber of business enterprises of this city and is one of 
the experienced and successful oil and gas operators of 
this section. He was born at Syracuse, N. Y., in 1864 
and was only 1.3 years of age when he entered the oil 
fields of Butler County, Pa. Although a mere boy, he 
found plenty of work in the busy oil fields and soon 
began to gain a knowledge of the industry and to get 
practical experience. From Butler County he went to 
Venango County, and later to the McKean County oil 
fields, from there to Allegheny County, N. Y., and then 
to Pittsburg, where he became heavily interested in 
both oil and gas wells. He returned for a time to the 
Butler field and then visited the oil regions near Lima, 



Ohio, after which he came to Washington, where he 
established a permanent home. At present he is operat- 
ing in Lawrence and Crawford Counties, Illinois, has 
interests in lUinois and also in West Virginia and Ohio. 
The whole of his industrial career has been devoted to 
the oil and gas industry and this long experience has 
made him well qualified to pursue the business success- 
fully. 

In June, 1892, Mr. Larkin was married to Miss Adelia 
Connor, of East Brady, Clarion County, Pa., and they 
have four ehildi'en, Mary, Edward, Martin and Kath- 
erine. Mr. Larkin and family are members of the Catho- 
lic Church. He is identified with the fraternal order 
of Maccabees. 

FRANK W. DONALDSON, deceased, was once one 
of Buffalo Township 's most respected citizens and suc- 
cessful business men. He was prominent in the affairs 
of the community in which he lived and when he passed 
from earthly life, on Oct. 9, 1900, he left behind the 
record of many kind deeds done and an honorable name 
along with a substantial estate. He was born in Mount 
Pleasant Township, Washington County, Pa., May 8, 
1858, and was a son of Robert and Rachel (Walker) 
Donaldson, a grandson of Robert and a great-grandson 
of Isaac Donaldson, who was one of the first settlers in 
Mount Pleasant Township. 

Frank W. Donaldson was reared in his native town- 
ship and attended the district schools. His family was 
an agricultural one and he naturally became a farmer 
also and developed into an excellent one. He gave a 
large amount of attention to stock raising and made a 
specialty of growing sheep, and with his usual good 
judgment, made this industry a profitable one. After 
his marriage he lived for a short time in Buffalo vil- 
lage and then acquired and settled on what was known 
as the old Governor Ritner farm, on which the remainder 
of his life was passed. It comprises 150 acres of well 
improved land. In his political sentiments, Mr. Donald- 
son was a stanch Democrat, but he cared little for pub- 
lie office, consenting, however, to serve at times as a 
school director, when, on account of his good judgment 
and capacity, he was usually made secretary of the board. 
For many years he was a worthy and valued member of 
the North Buffalo Presbyterian Church. 

On November 8, 18S3, Mr. Donaldson was married 
to Miss Annie F. Taggart, who was born in Canton 
Township, Washington County, Pa., and is a member of 
one of the oldest and most representative families of 
the county. Her parents were James and Margaret M. 
(McBride) Taggart, and her grandfather, James Tag- 
gart, settled in Washington County while the Indians 
were still numerous liere. Tlie father of Mrs. Donaldson 
was a leading citizen of Canton Township, held public 



IIIS'I'OIJY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



793 



office tliere and successfully conducted large farmiug eu- 
terprises. He was a prominent member of the Upper 
Buffalo Presbyterian Church and was a member of the 
building committee when its new edifice was erected, 
being treasurer of the same. To James Taggart aud 
wife the following children were boru: .James McBride, 
who lives in ilopowell Township; Aunie F. ; Archibald 
A., who lives in Canton Township; Urania B., who is 
the wife of Alexander Hamilton, of Hopewell Township; 
and Charles L., who lives in Canton Township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donaldson had five children born to 
them, as follows: Earl McBride, wlio is engaged in the 
practice of dentistry at Glassport, Pa.; Mabel V., who 
resides with her mother; James T. and Archibald Mc- 
Bride, both of whom reside at home, in Buffalo Town- 
ship ; and Robert, who is now deceased. Mrs. Donald- 
son is a member of the North Buffalo United Presby- 
terian Church and she has a pleasant social circle in the 
township, many members of which liave known her dur- 
ing her entire married life. 

W. J. SHIDLER, M. D., who is engaged in the prac- 
tice of medicine at Westland, Pa., was born near Scenery 
Hill, Washington County, Pa. HLs parents were Jacob 
and Sarah (Ward) Shidler. 

W. J. Shidler enlisted for service in the Spanish- 
American War, entering Co. H, 10th Pa. Vol. Inf. Dur- 
ing his service he was once wounded. After he returned 
home he entered the medical department of the West- 
ern Pennsylvania University, at Pittsburg, where he 
graduated with the Class of 1903. After spending one 
year as an interne in the South Side Hospital, at Pitts- 
burg, he came to Westland Feb. 22, 1904. He is a mem- 
ber of the Washington County and the Pennsylvania 
State Medical Societies and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. 

On Sept. 30, 1908, Dr. Shidler was married to Miss 
Margaret Adella Couch, who is a granddaughter of the 
late Joseph Couch, of Mt. Pleasant Township, Washing- 
ton County. Dr. Shidler is a Republican and during 
1908 was a member of the Republican County Committee. 

JAMES P. EAGLESON, a well-known member of the 
Washington bar and a practitioner in all the courts of 
the State of Pennsylvania, is a member of one of the 
old Washington County families. He was born in 1869, 
in Canton Township, and is a son of A. S. Eagleson. 

James P. Eagleson went from the country schools to 
Washington and Jefferson College and was graduated 
there in the Class of 1892. He at once registered as a 
student in the office of J. W. & A. Donnan and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in January, 1896. He has been in con- 
tinuous practice at Washington ever since and has taken 
part in a number of important cases, both in Washing- 



ton County and in other parts of tho state. He has 
never consented to be a candidate for any public office, 
but has worked loyally and effectively for his friends. 
He is financially intqrested in some local enterprise and 
is u stockholder and director in the Manufacturers' Light 
and Ileal Company. He is a member of fraternal or- 
ganizations and is particularly prominent in the Masons 
and Elks, being a Knight Templar in the former body 
and holding the office of Past Exalted Ruler in the lat- 
ter. He was the representative to the grand lodge held 
at Los Angeles, Cal., in 1909. Mr. Eagleson is a mem- 
ber of the East Buffalo Presbyterian Church. 

THE McKENNAN FAMILY— The Rev. William Mc- 
Kennan, of Scotch ancestry, emigrated from the North 
of Ireland about the year 1730 and settled in the State 
of Delaware. 

He was for many years pastor of the White Clay Creek 
Congregation and also of the First Presbyterian Church 
of Wilmington, Del. 

He married a MLss Wilson, of Winchester, Va., and 
died in 1809 at the age of 94 years. 

His son, William McKennan, was born in Delaware 
in the year 1758 and prior to the Revolution was a mer- 
chant of Wilmington. In 1776 he entered the Continen- 
tal Army as a lieutenant, afterwards being made cap- 
tain. He served throughout the war and retired at its 
close with the rank of colonel. He was also a member 
of the "Society of the Cincinnati," an organization 
founded by the officers of the Revolution at the close of 
the war. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, 
a niece of Gov. Thomas McKean. 

In the year 1797 Col. McKennan removed to Wellsburg, 
Va.. afterwards residing for a time at West Middletown, 
Pa. 

Upon the election of Gov. McKean he received the 
appointment of prothonotary of Washington County 
and removed to the county seat in 1801, where he died 
in 1810 from the effects of wounds received at the battle 
of Brandywine. He was also one of the early promoters 
and a trustee of Washington Academy and Washington 
College. 

His children were William, John Thompson, Thomas 
McKean Thompson, David, James Wilson and one 
daughter, Anne. 

John L. McKennan. the father of William B. Mc- 
Kennan, was boru in Delaware and was educated at 
Washington Academy and Washington College. After 
graduating, he removed to Brownsville, Pa., where he 
engaged in business. He was also for many years 
cashier of the old Monongahela Bank of Brownsville. 
He married Harriet Bowman, a daughter of .Tacob Bow- 
man, who came from Hagerstown, Md., at an early day 
and served as postmaster during the latter part of 



794 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



PresiJent Washington's admiuistration. He was also 
prominent in tlae business interests of Brownsville. 

The children of John L. McKennau were Isabella L., 
Elizabeth L., Mary S., Jacob B., Anne B., and William 
Bowman. 

William B. McKennan was born in Brownsville, Pa., 
March 10, 1829. He was educated in the public schools 
of that town and later at Kenyon and Washington Col- 
leges. After leaving school he engaged in farming pur- 
suits, locating in A.shland County, Ohio, but returning 
to Washington County in 1853, and has since resided 
in North Franklin Township. 

Mr. McKennan was married in 1854 to Miss Anna 
QuaU, a daughter of David Quail, of Washington County ; 
she died in 1857. 

Mr. McKennan 's second marriage was to Adeline D. 
Ramsey, a daughter of Benjamia Eamsey, who grad- 
uated at Washington College in 1833 and afterwards 
practiced law at Portsmouth, Ohio. His father came 
from Franklin County and located near Washington 
in 1803. 

Mrs. McKennan 's mother was a daughter of Philip 
Doddi'idge, of Wellsburg, Va., whose father, John Dodd- 
ridge, of English descent, came from Maryland and was 
the first settler in Independence Township in 1773. Soon 
after he erected a defence from the Indians, which was 
known as "Doddridge Fort." 

To Mr. and Mrs. McKennan five children have been 
born: John T., residing at home in North Franklin Town- 
ship; Martha R., married to Joseph P. Moore, of Pitts- 
burg; Thomas R., of Greensburg, Pa.; B. E. and May 
S., at home in North Franklin. 

Mr. and Mrs. McKennan are members of Trinity Epis- 
copal Church, of which lie is a vestryman. 

In political sentiment he is a stanch Republican, and 
has served in some of the minor offices of the county. 

S. M. aLLEN, postmaster a*- Primrose, Washington 
County, Pa., and the leading merchant of the village, 
was born in Hancock County, Ohio, Nov. 21, 1855, and 
is a son of D. G. and Sarah (McCandless) Allen, both 
of whom are deceased. 

S. M. Allen first attended the district schools in Jeffer- 
son County, Ohio, and then entered college at Hopedale, 
in Harrison County, and also spent some time at an edu- 
cational institution in Carroll County. He secured a 
teacher's certificate and for two years engaged in teach- 
ing in Jefferson County, and for eleven years after his 
marriage, resided on a farm in Carroll County, coming 
to Primrose in 1889, where he has resided ever since. 
For 15 years he was railroad agent for the P., C. & St. 
L. E. R. and for eleven years has been a merchant and 
postmaster. He was elected a justice of the peace short- 
ly after coming here and is one of the best known men 



in this part of the county, having been active in so 
many lines. He also has some oil interests in Mercer 
County, Pa., but is mainly concerned with affairs in 
Washington County. 

Mr. Allen was married in Washington County Apr. 3, 
1878, to Miss Sarah Ann Crawford, a daughter of Mat- 
thew Crawford, and they have four children: Cora, who 
is the wife of F. L. Bone, of Newark, Ohio; Grace, who 
is the wife of J. C. Strain, of Washington County; T. 
6., who is in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad; 
and Marie, who still goes to school. Mr. Allen and 
family attend the First Presbyterian Church at Mc- 
Donald. He has been a Republican since he cast his 
first vote. 

THOMAS R. HART, oil producer and one of the rep- 
resentative business men of Washington, Pa., was born 
in 1S65 at Brady's Run, Armstrong County, Pa., a son 
of William J. and Elizabeth (Robertson) Hart. His 
parents were both natives of Scotland, the father com- 
ing to America with his parents when three years old, 
being for many years a contract driller in the oil fields. 
He died in 1887. The following children were born to 
the parents of our subject; James, deceased; Jennie, 
who married W. C. Hayes, of Dayton, Ohio; John, of 
Pittsburg; William, a resident of Washington; Jeanette, 
the widow of Harry Templeton, residing in Washington; 
Guy, a resident of Washington; Thomas R., the subject 
of this sketch ; Lilly, who lives in Washington ; and 
Bessie, who married M. Day, of Washington. 

Thomas R. Hart w-as reared in Armstrong County and 
early in life began working in the oil fields as a driller. 
He later became an operator and since coming to Wash- 
ington in 1886, has been prominently identified with 
the development of oil in this county. He and his 
brother Guy now have 20 producing wells in operation 
in this county. Mr. Hart owns two fine residences in 
this city, both on West Chestnut, his residence number 
being 684 West Chestnut street. 

In 1896 Mr. Hart was joined in marriage with Emma 
McDaniel, who is a daughter of A. J. McDaniel, a re- 
tired farmer of Washington. They have two children, 
Donald Robertson and Loyal Thomas. 

ISAAC NEWTON MILLER, a representative and 
substantial citizen of Buffalo Township, who has resided 
on his present magnificent farm of 252 acres since 
March, 1889, here carries on large farming operations 
and raises cattle and sheep. He was born in West Beth- 
lehem Township, Washington Co., Pa., June 29, 1863, 
and is a son of John H. and Saral\ A. (Hatfield) Miller. 

The parents of Mr. Miller were both natives of Wash- 
ington County. The father met an accidental death in 
May, 1900, on a west-bound passenger train on the 




TIIO:\IAS PARRY 



ISI'OHY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



797 



l!:ili)iiHiiv ^ Ohi,, liaihd.-i.l Ml llif ■|':i,vl,iislci\Mi Statidii, 
At lli.-il lime l;c was .-i resilient of VVasliiiigtoii County, 
Oliiii, nii.i Ills pns.iu-e in Pennsylvania was as a visitor. 
He nuiriiiHl a daugliter of R. Hatfield, who, at oue time 
resided near Amity, in Washington County. Six of 
their children survive, namely: Louisa, widow of Thomas 
Lyneli, who lives in Ohio; Flora, who is the wife of 
Willnrd Starling, of Guernsey County, Ohio; Isaac New- 
tcm ; .John M., who resides at Knoxville, Tenn.; Sadie 
E., who is the wife of Joseph Keed, of Washington 
Ciuinly, Oliio; and Delia, who is the wife of James 
l.yii.li, ,.t' Washington County, Ohio. 

Isaac .Newton Miller was quite young wlien his par- 
ent.s ruovetl from West Bethlehem Township to Morris 
Township, and he lived there, attending school when- 
ever lie cciuld be spared from home, untilhe was 20 years 
old. He then went to live with John H. Van Kirk, a 
well-known citizen of South Franklin Township, with 
whom he remained for eleven years. During the first 
two winters there he attended what was known as the 
Diekerson school. Mr. Miller made the most of his op- 
portunities, being thrown on his own resources when 
quite young. Through force of character he grew to 
industrious, self-respecting manhood and won warm 
friends. Within a few years after reaching maturity 
he married Miss Elizabeth Miles, a daughter of the late 
Elijah Miles, of Buffalo Township, and six children 
have been born to them, Grace V., John H., Harry N., 
Ruth E., Henry C. and Ralph L. Mr. Miller is num- 
bered with the substantial men of his township. He 
is a practical farmer and stock raiser and yearly has 
a large income from his well managed enterpriser. He 
is a Republican in politics and has served acceptably as 
road supervisor and at all times is ready to do his part 
in township matters, as becomes a good citizen. With 
his family he belongs to he Presbyterian Church at Clays- 
ville, in which he is an elder. 

THOMAS PARRY, iiroprietor of the Parry Hotel, at 
Elrama, Pa., was born in England, May 10, 1854, and is 
a son of Thomas and Caroline (Feridon) Parry. 

The parents of Mr. Parry were English born and 
reared. The father was a miner and met his death in his 
native land. The mother subsequently married Alfred 
Townsend. She died at Charleroi, Pa., in 1907, aged 79 
years. The family came to America in 1867, and Mr. 
Townsend died three months later. He left one child, 
Mary E., who fi.rst married Daniel Swaney and later 
became the wife of L. Dale. The parents of Mr. Parry 
had five children: Thomas, Herbert, William Henry, 
C. Samuel and Mary E., the two survivors being Thomas 
and C. Samuel. 

Until he was nine years old, Thomas Parry was permit- 
ted to attend school but after that he had to work hard 



ill I he mines, lie was tliirteen years of ago when the 
family came to America and to Pennsylvania. The death 
of his .step-father made it all the more necessary that 
he shouKI keep at work, and for six years he labored in 
the Butler and Allegheny county mines, locating then 
at the Pleasant View mine in the latter county. There 
ho and his mother bought a house and one acre of land 
and he kept this as his home while he worked in different 
mines in the surrounding neighborhood for five years. 
.\fter he married he continued with his mother for a 
short time and then built a double house at Shire Oaks, 
with tlie intention of occupying a part of it, but changed 
liis mind before he moved there. He then bought 12% 
ai're.s of land which had a log house, situated at Lobes 
Kun, in Tnion Township, and lived there for eighteen 
years, in the meanwhile erecting a comfortable frame 
residence. He still owns that property. Later he built 
a liotel on the land at Shire Oaks where his double house 
stood and he conducted a licensed public house there for 
ten and one-half years, when he sold out all his property 
in that vicinity to the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 
Mr. Parry then built his fine brick hotel at Elrama, in 
1906, which is of modern construction, contains nineteen 
room.s, with conveniences. His reasonable rates of $1.00 
per day, 50 cents for lodging and 35 cents per meal, 
have met with the approval of the traveling public and 
lie has the satisfaction of knowing that a guest once 
entertained at his hotel will be sure to endeavor to re- 
turru Ha is a business man of most excellent judgment 
.■mil ha-i acquired considerable property in Union Town- 
siii]!, i.wniiig three dwellings besides his hotel at Elrama 
and the old Samuel Ineman farm containing 131 acres. 

On July 4, 1879, Mr. Parry was married to Eliza Jane 
Edwards and the following children have been born to 
them: Caroline, who is deceased; Fannie, who was ac- 
cidentally drowned at the age of sixteen years; Samuel 
and Thomas, who are associated in business with their 
father; Mildred, who married David Artley, has two 
children — Grace and Eliza Artley; Eliza Jane, Mary, 
George, John and Caroline, all of whom are at home; 
and Joseph and William, both of whom are deceased. 

Mr. Parry is a Republican but he has never accepted 
any public ofiSce except that of school director, in which 
he served three years. He is identified w-ith Monongahela 
Lodge, No. 337, F. and A. M., and Chapter No. 249; the 
Elrama Lodge of Odd Fellows, No. 697, and the Parker "s 
Ferry Encampment, No. 175, at Monongahela. 

FREDERICK G. NASER, one of Washington 's repre- 
sentative citizens, capably filling the important office of 
street commissioner, was bom at Washington, Pa., Jan- 
uary 17, 1847, and is a son of Frederick and Catherine 
(Naser) Naser. 

The parents of Mr. Naser were horn in Wurtemberg, 



798 



HISTOEY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



Germany. Frederick Naser came to Washington County 
Pa., about 1840 and for some forty years was a leading 
gardener here. He married Catherine Naser and to them 
were born eleven ehUdren, ten of whom still survive, 
eight being residents of Washington County, one of Day- 
ton, Ohio, and one of the State of Washington. All are 
doing well, having been reared to habits of industry and 
frugality by excellent, hard-working parents. 

Frederick G. Naser attended school in boyhood and 
helped his father in his gardening work until he started 
out for himself. He went into the teaming business and 
followed it more or less continuou-sly for a quarter of a 
century, when he was elected to the office of street com- 
missioner. After thus serving several years he moved 
out of the borough and then worked on the street ear 
lines out of Washington, and he was the man who turned 
the fii-st fui'row in the ground where the Washington & 
Canonsburg Eailroad was subsequently built. He also 
started the work on the Cherry Valley Eailroad. In the 
spring of 1909 he was again elected street commissioner 
of Greater Washington, and is now efficiently performing 
the duties of that office. Mr. Naser owns property in 
Washington and built his own handsome residence at No. 
503 North Main street. 

In 1872, Mr. Naser was married to Miss Elizabeth I. 
Hall, who was born in Ohio. They have five children — 
James F., Robert E., Pearl, Elizabeth, and Charles Ed- 
ward, all residing at home. The family attend the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Naser is an Odd Fel- 
low, belonging to both the subordinate lodge and the 
Encampment. 

JACOB WEHIICH, a leading citizen of Buffalo Town- 
ship, Washington Co., Pa., where he owns 150 acres of 
valuable l^nd, is serving in his second year as a mem- 
ber of the School Board and is also treasurer of the 
School Tax Fund of Buffalo Township. It was in this 
township that he was born, May 24, 1860, son of Israel 
and Sarah (Thompson) Weirich, both of whom were 
born in Washington County. 

Israel Weii-ich was born in Canton Township and was 
a son of Jacob Weirich, who was three years old when 
his parents brought him to Washington County, settling 
in that section which is now known as Franklin Town- 
ship. This family originated in Germay and Jacob has 
been a favorite name in every generation. Israel Wei- 
rich died in April, 1908, when in his seventy-second year. 
He married Sarah Thompson, and of their children the 
following survive: Jacob; James E., who lives in St. 
Paul, Minn. ; William R., who lives in Canton Township ; 
Charles B., who is a resident of Philadelphia ; Howard 
R., who lives in Minnesota; Henry W., who makes his 
home ?t Goldfield, Nevada; and Albert A, who lives in 
Cantot Township. The father of the above family was 



prominent in the public affairs of Canton Township dur- 
ing the larger part of his Ufe. He served in numerous 
local offices, such as road commissioner and school direc- 
tor, and was highly considered for his honesty as well as 
efficiency. In his earlier years he was a ruling elder in 
the United Presbyterian Church in Buffalo Township and 
later served in the same capacity in the Third Presbyte- 
rian Church at Washington. 

Jacob Weirich was two years old when his parents 
moved from Buffalo to Canton Township and there he 
grew to ihanhood. The township schools were rather 
superior ones and in them Mr. Weirich obtained a fair 
common school education. His entire business life has 
been taken up by agricultural activities and his main 
interests have been the careful tilling of his fields and 
the raising of fine stock. He has found it profitable to 
make a specialty of growing sheep and ordinarily has 
from 150 to 200 head. 

Mr. Weirich married Miss Anna Logan, a daughter of 
Samuel Logan, of Buffalo Township, and they have four 
children: Ralph M., Harry E., Sarah H. and Esther H. 
The family attends the East Buffalo Presbyterian Church 
in which they ,are much valued, and Mr. Weirich is one 
of the church trustees. In politics, like his father, he is 
a strong Eepublican. His fellow citizens have demon- 
strated their confidence and esteem by electing him to 
offices of responsibility. 

HAEEY A. EATHEETON, superintendent of the 
Findlay Clay Pot Company, at Washington, and one of 
the stockholders and directors, is one of the city's most 
progressive and enterprising young business men. He 
was born in Putnam County, Ohio, in November, ISSl. 

Mr. Batherton was mainly reared at Findlay, Ohio, 
where he obtained his education. He has been identi- 
fied with the clay pot industry during the whole period 
of his business life, beginning as office boy in the Find- 
lay Clay Pot Company, at Findlay. In December, 1901, 
he came to Washington and took charge of the office of 
the company here and was later made superintendent of 
the Washington plant. 

Mr. Eatherton was married in December, 1903, to Miss 
Eunice V. Houser, who was born and reared in Ohio, 
and is a daughter of Eev. F. M. Houser, a minister of 
the Methodist Clmrch. Mr. and Mrs. Eatherton have one 
sou, Clarence Z. They are members of the Jefferson 
Avenue Methodist Ejjiscopal Church and he is active in 
Sunday-school work. He is also interested greatly in 
the Y. M. C. A., and is a member of its board of direc- 
tors at Washington. 

FIELDING FEASHEB, one of the leading architects 
and building contractors of Washington, who has been a 
resident of this cit.y since 1898, was born Jan. 4, 18.54, 



IIISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



799 



in Fayette Comity, Pensylvatiiu, and wIkmi alioiit IS years 
of age went to Pittsburg, wliere lie served an ai)prentice- 
ship in carpentering. After the death of his mother in 
1876, he returned to the liome farm in Fayette County, 
and worked at his trade until 1879, then went to Pitts- 
burg and engaged in contracting and building and for 
the past 25 years has been engaged as an architect in 
connection with his general contract business. He came 
to Washington in 1898, where he has since continued his 
residence, and has erectetl many structures all through 
this section of the State, including the building for the 
Struthers Coal & Coke Company; a large building for 
the Pittsburg & Buffalo Coal Company of Canonsburg; 
the Thaddeus Stephens School building of Pittsburg; the 
Snowdeu building in Brownsville and was superintendent 
of construction of the Union Trust Co. building on 4th 
Ave. in Pittsburg, Pa., and numerous tine residences in 
this section of Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Frasher was married Mar. 19, 1884, to Miss Oe- 
tavia Jones, of Pittsburg, and they have two children: 
Jean W. Frasher, who graduated with honors from the 
Washington Seminary, is now engaged in teaching; and 
Earl Frasher, who was educated in Washington, and is 
at present with Rutan Ru.ssell, an architect of Pittsburg. 

ROBERT M. EDWARDS, of the hardware firm of R. 
M. Edwards & Son, leading merchants in that line at 
Canonsburg, was born at St. Clairsville, Belmont County, 
Ohio, Feb. 1, 1850, and is a son of William and Mary 
(Nolin) Edwards, the former of whom died in 1864. 

Robert M. Edwards was left fatherless when but eight 
years old and was reared on a farm near St. Clairsville, 
where he attended school. On Mar. 1, 1874, he went to 
Wheeling and there entered the employ of McGee Bros., 
tinners and roofers, and remained with that firm for five 
years. In the spring of 1880, he embarked in business 
for himself at Union Port, Ohio, where he contiuned for 
six years and then went to Wellsburg, and from there, in 
August, 1886, came to Canonsburg. Here he accepted 
the position of foreman for J. J. Vau Eman and later 
J. J. Van Eman & Son. In January, 1904, he went into 
business under the firm name of R. M. Edwards, and 
three years later, when he took his son into partnership, 
the style became as at present, R. M. Edwards & Son. 
This firm commands a very large trade, its territory 
being the surrounding towns, Washington Borough, and 
parts of Ohio and West Virginia. A full line of stoves 
and stove hardware is carried and hot air systems placed 
and roofing done. 

In 1881, Mr. Edwards was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Rittenhouse, of Union Fort, Jefferson County, Ohio. Her 
parents were Thomas and Catherine Rittenhouse. They 
have one son, Clarence, who is his father's partner and 
resides at homo. Mr. Edwards is a member of the 



Melliodisl Mpiscopai Cluirch and belongs to its official 
board. In politics lie is a Republican but has never 
aiceptcd any other office than school director. His beau- 
tiful lioine is situated at No :'M\ West College street, 
('anon.'^biirg. 

JOHN M. DUNiS", one of Washington's most public 
spirited citizens, for six years county commissioner of 
Washington County, and for a long period identified with 
real estate, oil and gas interests in this section, was born 
in (Jrecne County, Pa., in 1857, and was brought to Wash- 
iiiHtiin Ciiunty by his parents, when one year old. 

.John M. Dunn was reared to the age of seventeen 
years in the little hamlet now known as Dunn's Station, 
leaving the schools there to enter Waynesburg College. 
After completing his collegiate course he embarked in a 
inercantile business at Des Moines, Iowa. Three years 
later, when his father's health broke down, he was re- 
called to Washington County to assist his parent in clos- 
ing up several estates of which the latter had charge, 
and to take over the management of the farm. Here be 
remained for several years, in the meanwhile dealing ex- 
tensively in wool and stock. In 1895 he was elected 
chairman of the Republican County A'igilant Committee, 
and in the following year was elected a county commis- 
sioner of Washington County. Mr. Dunn proved a very 
valuable member of the board of commissioners and it 
was during his incumbency that the magniiicent court 
house and jail were completed, there being no finer in 
the State. Since his term of office expired, Mr. Dunn 
has given his attention to the oil ad gas industry and to 
dealing in realty. He was a member of the company 
that drilled the famous Fonner Gusher, a well that pro- 
duced 1600 barrels a day; also the Lohr well which pro- 
duced more than 2000 barrels per day, as well as many 
other large producers located in Washington and Greene 
Counties, Pa., and in West Virginia. 

In December, 1882, Mr. Dunn was married to Miss 
Anna Ross, of Jefferson, Greene County, and they have 
four children: Allan Ross, a civil engineer, who is with 
the Pennsylvania system and is located on the Logans- 
port, Iiid.. Division, graduTited from Washington and Jef- 
ferson College in the class of 1906; Laura I., v.'ho is a 
graduate of the Washington Seminary; John H., who is 
a student in the .lunior year at Washington and Jeffer- 
son; and Anna, who is a student in the Washington 
Seminary. Mr. Dunn and family are members of the 
Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is a Republican, 
but irrespective of this fact, he served for almost nine 
years as a member of the school board at Dunn's Station, 
a Democratic stronghold, and resigned to accept the 
oflice of ccMinty commissioner, carrying his township each 
lime lie w:is a candidate for the latter office. He has 
been foremost in all enterprises organized to better the 



800 



HISTOKY OF WASHINGTON COUNTY 



eoudition of the people of his community, and in no way 
was his genuine good will more definitely shown thnn in 
his donation of land to the city for park purposes. This 
led to other donations for the same object until now 
Washington has one of the finest natural parks in this 
section of the State. In generous spirit and with broad 
and enlightened views, Mr. Dunn has also contributed to 
churches, schools and charities. 

.70SEPH H. UNDERWOOD, Jr., cashier of the First 

National Bank of Eoscoe, Washington County, Pa., was 

■ born at Milesville, Allegheny Co., Pa., January 29, 1878, 

and is the youngest child of Joseph and Ellen (Roscoe) 

Underwood. 

When but six weeks old, the parents of Mr. Underwood 
moved to California, Pa., where they resided for five 
rears prior to coming to Eoscoe. His education was se- 
cured in the local schools. His brother, Thomas J. Un- 
derwood, was the first agent appointed at the railroad 
station at Charleroi, and Joseph H. assisted there to 
some extent and also around his father 's mines and 
finally was permitted to go on the boats belonging to 
his father's company, and make the voyage to New 
Orleans, and he remained two years on the river, after 
which he took a business course at Curry University, 
Pittsburg, Pa., after a short time again at the mines he 
entered the First National Bank at Monessen, which 
was then the Monessen National Bank. He served as 
assistant cashier there and came from there in 1901 to 
accept his present position with the First National Bank 
of Eoscoe, succeeding the late Oliver Miller. 

Mr. Underwood married Miss Mary Spahr, who is a 
daughter of Henry C. and Hannah E. Spahr. The 
Spahrs are old residents of Eoscoe, which was formerly 
known as Lucyville, having been so named in honor of 
Mrs. Lucy Spahr, Mrs. Underwood's grandmother, while 
its present name was given it in honor of Mr. Under- 
wood 's own mother. Three children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Underwood : Edwin Eoscoe, Harriet Irene, 
and Mary Josephine. Mr. Underwood is a Knight Tem- 
plar Mason and also a Shriner. 

.■v. CLAEK WAENE, a representative citizen of Wash- 
ington, identified with a number of prospering enter- 
prises, has been connected with financial institutions 
throughout his entire business career and occupies a 
prominent position as treasurer of the Washington Trust- 
Company, at Washington, Pa. He was born in Notting- 
ham Township, Washington Co., Pa., in 1865, and is a 
son of Hiram and Elizabeth (NichoUs) Warne, and a 
grandson of Maj. James and Mary (Parkison) Warne. 

Maj. James Warne, an ofScer of the Pennsylvania 
militia, and later distinguished in the War of 1812, was 
born in Forward Township, Allegheny Co., Pa., December 



6, 1779, and died December 6, 1855. He attended the 
.schools of Forward Township and later an academy at 
fJnicntown. Subsequently he came to Washington County 
and accepted a position as clerk in a store at what was 
then Parkison 's Ferry, but is now Monongahela. Later 
lie became interested in boating, boat-building and trad- 
ing and his activities reached as far as New Orleans. 

Maj. Warne was thirty-two years old, in 1811, when 
lie was commissioned, by Gov. Samuel Snyder, a 
captain of light infantry in the 2nd Battalion, 53rd 
Pa. Militia. In the following year the governor accepted 
this regiment for service in the war with Great Britain 
then impending, and Captain Warne served in that 
official position until September 25, 1812, when he was 
commissioned major of the 1st Battery in the 3rd Eegi- 
ment, commanded by Col. Snyder, and with that rank 
continued to serve until his honorable discharge, Decem- 
ber 31, .1812. He rendered faithful and efiicient services 
and won merited honors. 

After his return home, Maj. Warne, in association 
with his brother-in-law, William Parkison, built a glass 
factory, which was the first enterprise of its kind at 
Monongahela City, or Williamsport, as the place was then 
called. The two business men were interested together 
in other concerns and conducted a general merchandise 
business until 1825. After that Maj. Warne engaged 
in the peaceful pursuits of agriculture and resided on his 
farm, to which he gave the suggestive name of ' ' Eden, ' ' 
until his death. The court records of his day show how 
frequently he was called upon to