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Full text of "The 32nd Division in the World War, 1917-1919"



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MAJiill (ibNKUAL W. (i IIAAN. V. tK ARMY 
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U'isi'KMsiM War llisUtry CiiiumissHm: ^ / 

UBNEK.M. C-tlAHI-».S KINU. Ckaiimu 
(iOVKHNoH K I nillin- t;fNfR.M OKIANIXJ lUtl WAY 

Ml' I. JltNCI-ll M.IIAHK HON. MYHllN t KtAIS 

|-HU». A. U HALL JOHN G. (;HetiURY. ScoHaf? 



Afi(-|ii|>(iM War i/i.sr(ir>' C(>rnMii.s.si(iM: 

(M>VERNUIi A. K- SLKHtU l.»NH<\L Lolls C tXIVKLL 

CXJI.O.NKL V l> TKII-KR MAJOR Lt ROY PtARJiON 



32nil DivistDU llisU)rica\ Detail: 

MAJOR (iKNKRAI. WM. (i. HAAN, t.% 0«nriu 

UEUTKNAM COIONLL I'All IL ( I fMLNS. h.rcuiUr Ofllcrt 

MAJOR I.K KOV rKAKMlN. Illu.it.iiuaa 

CAI'TALN CARL HAN TON. Auiboc 

flR-ST UEl'TENA.VT HAROLD lANO^ M<ih miI Ati 



£)CLA601571 
NOV 16 1920 



\N IM i>ii«iti Wat llitluiy Conitniwioii, 
MaillMin, Wi* 

Wil»<.W<. U ... 



Dedication 

In my official reports and comments and 
in general orders quoted in the followinij 
pages I have in a way indicated my most 
inward thoughts as to the quality of the 
personnel of the 32nd Division and as to 
the value of their achievements in the 
great hattles of the World War. Since the 
deeds recorded in this history resulted 
from the combined efforts of every member 
of the Division, may not all those of us 
who are still living dedicate tliis brief and 
unboasiing record of events to OUR 
HERO DEAD. 




Major General, U. S. Army. 



Introduction 




jo many a student of the history of oin- ei\"il war has 
come the helief that Abraham Lineohi was horn into 
this world Div^inely destined to preserve the Union. 
To many a stndent who ponders over the history of 
tlie Red Arrow Division in the World War may come 
liie helief that the union of Michigan and AVisconsin 
in that now famous command was an inspiration. 
Certain it is that no happier combination of state soldiery was to 
be found overseas; certain it is that even when its battle casualties 
had rendered necessary heavy replacements, hailing from a do/en 
other commonwealths, jMichigan and Wisconsin ever predominated — 
ever gave the tone to the entire array. 

Almost forgotten in 1917, that combination had been strong and 
significant nearly three generations ago. Badger and Wolverine, the 
grandfathers of many a soldier of the 82nd Ui^'ision fought side by 
side in the civil Avar. Weil rcmeml)ercd now , one of the four inlantry 
regiments of the lied iVrrow Di\ ision was led for a time by the son of 
the leader of one oi' the lixc inranlry regiments of the Ii'on brigade. 
Wolverines both, they wei-e l)()tli eoiiiriuks in l)attle with the nun of 
Wisconsin. 

As was said in an address at the first reunion: 

"Over sixty years ago the soldier eomi-adeship of Michigan 
and \\'isconsin had its birth. Sixty-one years ago it was at its 
old-time liighest point, when Detroit and Milwaukee cemented 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD ]VAR 

their frieiulsliip, wlicii llic finest luilitary ()r<>ani/ations in the 
West, the Detroit and tiic INIihvaiikce IJ^ht (iiiard, uniformed 
ahiiost exactly ahke, in the dark hiue, swanow-taiied coats 
turned up with huif, the towering bearskin shakos and hroad 
white cross belts, paraded alternately in the two cities, visited 
each other at intervals, exchanged caps, souvenirs and stirring 
sentiment at every bancpiet. Each had been captained and 
drilled by veteran soldiers. West Point had done its share; each 
had been assigned as the first company of the first regiment of 
its commonwealth, and, possibly foreseeing how soon it might 
be put to the test, each had vowed its knightly fealty to the 
Union of States, and asked only that when the time should be 
ripe. Badger and Wolverine, they might go into action together. 

"Two years later the summons came. Two years later, in 
INIay, 'Gl, the first captains of those foremost companies ap- 
peared on President Lincoln's first list of some thirty brigadier 
generals of volunteers. The first regiments marched away to 
the Potomac with the very first draft under the call for 75,000, 
and the First Michigan, in front of AVashington, under Mc- 
Dowell, the First \\'isconsin near Harper's Ferry, under Pat- 
terson, had their baptism of fire in July; reorganized for the 
war in August; furnished one or two more generals aj)iecc and 
a score of field officers between them, but then were separated. 

"In the Army of the Potomac, however, there was from the 
first to the last of the great civil \\ nr jusl one brigade of infantry 
made up exclusively of western troops. In the fierce h.ittle 
summer of '02 it won the title of The Iron Brigade. Its prized 
insignia has five branches, yet its membership in August, '02, 
had but four regiments, the Second, Sixth, Seventh Wisconsin 
and the Nineteenth Indiana. But so reduced were they in nuin- 
bers by the casualties of (iainesville, Ciroveton, Second Bull 
Run and Antietam that a fresh regiment was sent to join them 
— the Twenty-fourth Michigan. 'Big as the whole brigade,' 
said the Badgers, when, under gallant old Morrow, it came 
striding into camj), and big as the whole brigade's were the 
feari'ul casnallies of the Twenty-fourlli in their first pitched 



INTRODUCTION 



battle — Gettysburg. Here on this eross are inscribed the 
names of that martial quintette, unchanged so long as that 
bloody war should last. Here again Michigan had stood in 
soldierly rivalry with Wisconsin, and when the final muster out 
was ordered here again IMichigan and Wisconsin struck hands 
and prayed that should ever in the future the honor of the 
nation be imperiled Michigan and Wisconsin should again 
stand shoidder to shoulder in the same brigade, and further 
cement, with their blood if need be, the compact of the old 
Guardsmen of '59 and '60. 

"And so it came — so it wna ordered by the powers at Wash- 
ington, as though ordained of the God of IJattles himself, IMich- 
igan and Wisconsin were destined in the most destructive, 
stui^endous war the world has ever known, out of a combina- 
tion of 48 states and heaven only knows how many possibilities, 
to be linked, not as had been their fathers, in a single brigade of 
some 5,000 men, but in a huge division, built upon modern 
lines to a strength of 27,000, almost every man of whom at the 
outset hailed from those sister states of the now Middle West." 

Born of such a union, it was to be expected that the fruit would 
be of surpassing merit. Proud as were oin* people of their Guardsmen 
thus called into the national service, confident as we were that om- 
sons would do their uttermost to uphold the honor of the Flag and the 
standards of their respective states, even we, who thought we best 
knew them, could not iiave predicted the triumphant award that 
awaited them. 

Among our citizens before the call there had long been a large 
element opposed to any expenditure for military purposes, any 
semblance of military service, any symptom of that which they termed 
militarism, but which was in fact a patriotic endeavor to prepare at 
least a certain few of our young men for the national defense should 
ever the national honor or safety be threatened. Even the press for 
many a year, and in too many an instance, threw its influence against 
the annual encampment for training purposes. It came, therefore, as 



THE THIRTY- t<EC()N I) DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

a surprise to xcvy many lioiicst souls lliat. wliik' tluy had hecii slum- 
bering in I'ancitd sccurily, .some scattered thousands of their more 
ol)servin_n, not to say more patriotie. fellow eitizens had heen dili- 
ji^eiitly sehoolin<>' themselves for scrviee in war. It <>radually dawned 
upon many elo(|uent and influential men and persuasive women, — not 
because of anylhini;. Imt in spite of exerythinj^', they had said and 
done, — ^lichi^an and Wisconsin, under eompetenl instiuetion. had 
been earnestly strivini^- to jjcrfeet their few (iuardsmen as soldiers. 
It eventually aroused in the minds of the really conscientious citi/.ens 
of this class a reali/.alion of the error of llK'ir original ways, and an 
earnest desire on part of some of their best and worthiest to atone for 
the past neglect or active opposition, by even more earnest interest 
and support. Still, they were not quite prepared to hear of the young 
men who flocked to the ranks of the 32nd Division that they should 
so early in their career be declared foremost in training and discipline; 
but wIkii, later still, they listened to the citations and reports as to 
what the Red Arrow had done in Alsace, and in the ]Marne and Aisne 
and Oise offensives, and finally in the Argonne, the scales fell from 
their eyes, and, joining with tlie kith and kin. the friends and neigh- 
bors of their soldiers overseas, there went up a chorus of pride and 
rejoicing such as these sister states had never heard before. 

And now it seems they are seeking something beyond the brief 
oflieial rejiorls and the individual missives, sti-ietly censored, of the 
sons, husbands or brothers in the ranks. It was for them, the mass 
of our people — the plain people of whom Lincoln .said "the Lord must 
deeply love them since he made so many," that the '.V1\m.\ decided 
to ])repare its history — a story one and all could read and understand. 
It was to aid in placing before the people the narrative of the service 
and sacrifices of all their sons that the War History Commission was 
established, and our people will little know the diniculties which 
beset that same Commission. 

First to be published comes this modest recital of the campaigns 
of the 32nd Division, soon to be followed by the oflieial rejiort, aeeom- 

10 



INTRODUCTION 

panied by excellent niai).s, of that able soldier who .so .skillfully trained 
and then so admirably led our chosen through the terrific canijiaign.s 
which proved the climax of the \\^)rl(l War. A.s the pages of both 
the.se military narrati\'es were studied by the members of the Wiscon- 
sin Commi.ssion (for not until five months later were their associates 
of Michigan designated and sent to take part), the utter suppression 
of individual exploit, the sinking of battalion or battery claims for 
recognition in favor of a simple recital of the deeds of the Division as 
a whole, became the subject of no little discussion. The people who 
were behind that Division and whose money paid for the preparation 
of its history were eager for something more. The personal element, 
the soldier story of comrades' daring or heroic deaths had i)een given 
no place in these pages. These were things their fathers and mothers, 
wives, sisters and sweethearts would long and exj^ect to see, and with 
one accord the chairman of the Commission was instructed to en- 
deavor to draw them out. AVith this in view he wrote to a score of 
prominent officers, begging that the lid might be lifted — that the seal 
to their soldierly silence might be broken, but it was in vain — the 
32nd woidd not talk or write of its manifold deeds. "They could fight 
like all hell," said one of their nnnd)er, "if need be, but they somehow 
couldn't be got to brag about it." iVnd so at last the work had to go 
to press without what one of their I'oreinost staff olficers termed the 
touch of lumian interest, and so it is launched upon its untrumi)ete(i 
way to perhaps ten thousand firesides in the two states. 

This at least the 32iid w ill say: It A\as a united Itousehold, a mili- 
tary family that knew neither en\y nor malice in respect to otiiei- 
cf)nHnan(ls. It had l)rotherly regard for all, but sought favor of none. 
It "minded its own business," said one of its best, and if it had internal 
differences it kept them there: No one else need know them. More- 
over, said he, it was a happy family. It was a highly favored and 
fortunate division in spite of certain <lisap[)()intni(nls in its earlv 
days. It was a loyal division, <le\()te(l to its chief and pr'oiid ol' ifs 
brigade and regimental commanders, proud of its Slalf, and well il 
might be! Had any di\ision a chic r-of-slaH" to malcli with theirs 

11 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

ever alert, driving, vigilant, yet ever kind and conrteous? Was any 
division better fed, clothed and supplied? and would the 32nd swap 
their Badger quartermaster for any other in the business ? Was there 
better organization of the medical, surgical and sanitary service in 
any other division? and would the 32nd admit anywhere the superior 
of their chief surgeon? Was there anywhere more cordial, helpful, 
pull-together spirit than between the brigade leaders, and between 
those leaders and the Division head? and by the time they launched 
out on the climax of the whole campaign, the Argonne offensive, 
would they have exchanged division or brigade commanders with 
any in the American Expeditionary Forces or elsewhere? Sorrows 
they had, as what soldiers have not? They grieved. Badger and Wol- 
verine alike, over the loss early in the campaign of the brigade and 
regimental leaders from their respective states, but in silence and 
subordination accepted their successors — total strangers as a rule, yet 
how soon they gained the confidence of their men, how soon that con- 
fidence ripened into respect and admiration, how strong eventually 
became the regard in which they were held ! 

Other sorrows they had, as what soldiers have not when called 
uijon to take leading part in such destructive warfare? Fourteen 
thousand, in round number, were the casualties, and their roll of 
honor embraces many and many a beloved name, and yet what 
division won higher honors? Fighting earlier and longer the First 
and Second regulars had lost more men, and had probably gained 
more kilometers — cajjtured more "objectives," yet at the final round- 
up, when it came to the final ceremonies of the campaign, to what 
division was assigned a prominence equal to that of the 32nd, hold- 
ing, as has been said, "the very center of the stage" beyond the Rhine, 
with the castled fortress of Ehrenbreitstein, Germany's boast and 
pride, at their back, the stars and stripes flung to the breeze from the 
lofty battlements that for generations had been garrisoned by Prussia. 
Verily, in the story of the 32nd as told by its chosen scribes, there is 
so little made of all this that it well may be that the Division admiring 

12 



INTRODUCTION 

Frenchmen named "Les Terribles" thought but casually of their own 
exploits. 

Not so with us, however, we others who so often with sleej)less 
eyes and straining hearts watched prayerfully for tidings of their 
progress, mourning over their dead and dying, yet gloiying in their 
deeds. First of all our army to cross the frontier into Germany, 
second to none in the tremendous task of breaking the German hold 
in the Argonne, and finallj% honored and acclaimed throughout the 
forces overseas as one of the five "shock" divisions, we of the home 
folk can find no words in which to tell the pride we feel in these, the 
brother Guardsmen of these sister states. 

For the Wisconsin War History Commission. 

Charles King, 

Chairman. 



13 



Contents 



Page 

Dedication ^ 

Introduction " 

Organization of the Tiiibty-Second Division 25 

High Lights in the History of the Division 20 

The History : 

Chapter I. Birth of tlio TIiirty-SccoiKl Division 27 

Chapter II. Tlie Tliirty-Spcond Division in Franoe 33 

Chapter III. First on Gorman Soil 41 

Chapter IV. Into the Big Battle 49 

Chapter V. The Baptism of Fire 57 

Chapter VI. "Les Terribles" Report to General Mangin (19 

Chapter VII. The Capture of Juvigny 77 

Chapter VIII. The Red Arrows Join the First American Army 87 

Chapter IX. Breaking the KrieinhiUle Stellnng 97 

Chapter X. Onr Last Figlit and the Armistice 113 

(jRAPii OF Casualties of the 32nd Division 125 

Chapter XI. The March to the Rhine 127 

March Table of March to the Rhine 140 

Historical Chart 141 

Chapter XII. Die Waclit am Rhein 143 

Chapter XIII. r>(^aders of Thirty-Second Division 147 

Chapter XIV. Cited in Orders 155 

Chapter XV. Reading the General's Mail 193 

Chapter XVI. The 32nd Division Veteran Association 213 

Roll of Honor 217 

Casualty Report Con-solihated 20G 

Officers and Men Awarded the Distinguished Service Cross 297 

Officers Awarded the Distinguished Service Medal 302 

Officers Awarded the Legion of Honor 302 

Officers and Men Awarded the Croix de Guerre 303 

Officers and Me:n Awarded Belgian Decorations 308 

Officers and Men Cited in Genf^sal Orders 32nd Division 30t) 

Abbreviations and Uncommon Words Used in the History 313 



21 




Colonel J. G. Pilujw, CJeneral Staff. Assistant, Cfiipf of Staff, G-3; Aisne-Manip Offensive- 

Offensive; Mciise-Argonne Offensive; Marofi to tlie Rhine; Anny of Occupation 
Lieutenant Colonel Paul B. Clemens. General Staff, Assistant Cliicf of Staff, G-2; Training Per 

pation of Sector m Alsace; Aisne-Maine Offensive; Oisc-Aisne Offensive; Metisc-Areonne 

iMarcti to tie Khine; Army of Occupation. 
Colonel Robert M. Beck. General Staff, Chief of Staff; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oise-Ai,sne 

Meusc-ArRonnc Offensive; March to the Rhine; Army of Occupation. 
Major Robert CoNNOB, Acting Assistant Chief of Staff, G-1; Meuso-Argonnc Offensive; March to 

Army of Occupation. 
LlEtTENANT CouiNEL .loHN H. HOWARD, f eral Staff, as Major, Infantiy, Division Adjutant; as 

a'I " Ai ^iL'"'^'''' '^^■*i»'»"t f't"'-' of Staff, G-1; TrainiuK Period; Occupation of .Sector 

Aisne-Mariie Offensive; Oisc-Aisne Offensive; Army of Occupation. 

23 



Oise-Aisne 

iod ; Orcu- 
Offensive ; 

Offensive ; 

the Rhino; 

Licntcnunt 
in Alsac;c; 



Organization of the Thirty-Second Division 

Division Headquarters. Commanding General, Aides and StafT. 

TTeadiiuarters Troop and Detacliment. 
(i;;rd Brigade llea(l(iuarters. 

12.5tli Infantry Piegiment. 

12Gtli Infantry Ecgiment. 

120tli Machine Gun Battalion. 
G4th Infantry Brigade Headquarters. 

127t]i Infantry Keginient. 

128th Infantry Keginient. 

121st Machine Gun Battalion. 
110th Machine Gun Battalion. 
107th Engineer Begiinent. 
107th Field Signal Battalion. 
32nd Military Police Company. 

57th Field .Artillery T.rigade. 

119th Field Artillery Begiment. 
120th Field Artillery Beginu'nt. 
121st Field Artillery Begiment. 
147th Field Artillery Regiment (Attached). 
107th Trench Mortar Battery. 
107th Mohilc Ordnance Repair Shop. 
107th Train Headquarters. 
107th Supi)Iy Train. 
107th Sanitary Train. 
107th Ammunition Train. 
107tli Engineer Train. 
107(li Motor Supjily Truck TTnit. 

158tli Field Artillery Brigade (Attached). 
322nd Field Artillery. 
323rd Field Artillery. 
32lth Field Artillery. 
30Sth Trench Mortar Baltery. 
308th .\mmunition Train. 



25 



Hi^h Lights in the History of the 
Thirty-Second Division 

Six ninntlis under fire — from ^lay to Novcnilicr, IDIS, with liiit ]ll days in a 
rest area. 

Fought on fivG fronts in tlirec major ofTensivcs — the Aisne-Marne, Oise-Aisne 
and i\Ieuse-Argonne. 

Losses — 14,000 casualties from all causes. 

Met and vanquished 23 German Divisions from which 2,153 prisoners wei'C taken. 

Gained 38 kilometers in four attacks and repulsed every enemy counter attack. 

In action east of the Meuse when the Armistice was signed. 

Jfarcheil 300 kilometers to the Rliine as fiont line clement of the Third U. S. 
Army and occupied for four months the center sector in the Cohlenz bridge-head, 
holding G3 towns and 400 square kilometers of territory. 

First American troops to set foot on German soil — in Alsace in May, lOLS; 
cajitured Fismes in the Marne offensive after an advance of 19 kilometers in seven 
days; fought in the Oise-Aisne offensive as the only American unit in General 
Mangiivs famous Tenth French Army, breaking the German line which protected 
the Chemin des Dames; twice in the line in the Jleuse-Argonne offensive, fighting 
continuously for 20 days, penetrating the Kriemhilde Stellung, crossing the j\leuse 
and starting drive to flank Metz. 

Over 800 oftieers and men decorated by American, French and Belgian govern- 
ments. Tlie colors of all four Infantry Regiments, three Artillery Regiments, and 
three Machine Guu Battalions wear the Croix de Guerre of the Republic of France 
while every flag and standard in the Division has four American battle bands. 

Composed of Wisconsin and Michigan National Guardsmen; insignia a Red 
Arrow, signifying that the Division shot through every line the enemy put before 
it; given the name of "Les Terribles" by the French; commanded in all its actions 
by Major General Wm. G. Haan and in the Army of Occupation by Major General 
Wm. Lassitcr. 

Arrived in France in Feliruary, 1918, being the sixth Division to join the A. E. 
F. Left Germany, Homeward Fxiund, in April. 1919. Arrived in the United States 
and demobilized in May. 



26 




CHAPTER I. 

Birth of the Thirty-Second Division. 

HE 32nd Division was organized under War Deiiartnient orders of 
July 18th, 1917, from National Guard troops from Wisconsin 
and Micliio:an. Details of this organization are given in 0. O. 
No. 101, War Department, 1917. 

Wisconsin furnished approximately 15,000 and Michigan 
s.OOO troops of all arms. Later 4,000 National Army troops 
I'lom Wisconsin and Michigan were transferred to the Division 
shortly before it left for France. 

When war was declared on Germany, April Uth, 1917, there 
were two National Guard infantry regiments, one from each of these states, in the 
Federal Service ; the 33rd Michigan, which had never been mustered out since its 
services on the Border, and the 3rd Wisconsin which had been called out for guard 
duty on war plants. In .Tuly the remainder of the state troops were mobilized at the 
state camps, and early in August the movement of the troops to the Division's train- 
ing camp at Camp MacArthur, Texas, commenced. 

The units thus assendjled at Camp MacArthur included all the troops from 
ilichigan and Wisconsin which had been on the Border in 1916. Six of the nine 
infantry regiments and most of the cavalry, artillery, engineers, and auxiliary troo])s 
had this Border experience. There were, however, in the new Wi.'-consin regiments, 
a large number of recruits who enlisted after the Declaration of War. 

On August 4th, 1917, Battery F, 121st Field Artillery regiment, was the first unit 
of the new division to arrive at Camp MacArthur. From that time until late in Sep- 
tember troops continued to pour in as rapidly as railroad facilities could be provided 
to transport them from the north. 

Training commenced immediately upon the arrival of the first units at Camp 
MacArthur, and proceeded under the direction of the Division Commander and the 
National Guard brigade commanders. 

Under instructions from the War Di']iartnient, the Division was reorganized in 
accordance with the "Tables of Organi-zation, 1917." on September 22, 1917. Gen- 
erally speaking, the 63rd Infantry Brigade was formed of Michigan infantry and 
the 64th Infantry Brigade was organized entirely from Wisconsin infantry. 

The 31st, 33nd and 33rd Michigan regiments, and, later on, the National Army 
recruits from Camp Custer and Camp Grant, went to form the 125th and 126th 
Kegiments of Infantry and the 120th Machine Gun Battalion. 

The 1st, 3nd and 3rd Wisconsin Infantry Regiments formed the bulk of the 
troops of the 127th and 128th Infantry Regiments and the 131st Machine Gun Bat- 
talion of the 64th Infantry Brigade. These two regiments were brought up to war 
strength by transferring enough troops to them from the 4th, 5th, and 6th Wisconsin 
Infantry regiments. These latter three regiments were in the 3nd Wisconsin Brigade, 



27 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WAR 

whicli was designated to function as the 57th Depot Brigade. From this brigade tlie 
various new units of the new Division were organized in accordance with the "Tables 
of Organization, 1917." The 57th Field Artillery Brigade included the Wisconsin 
and Michigan field artillery and cavalry and men from the 57th Depot Brigade. The 
107th Engineer Eegiment was organized from the Wisconsin and Michigan Engineer 
Battalion and men transferred from the 57th Depot Brigade. Whole companies 
were transferred from the Depot Brigade to make up the 107th Trains and Military 
Police and the 119th Machine Gun Battalion. The 107th Sanitary Train included 
the Wisconsin and Michigan Field Hospital and Ambulance Companies. The Na- 
tional Guard organizations which lost their identities to form these new units of the 
33nd Division follow: 

1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and Gth Wisconsin Infantry Eegiments. 

31st, 32nd and 33rd Michigan Infantry Eegiments. 

1st Wisconsin and 1st Michigan Field Artillery. 

1st Wisconsin and 1st Michigan Cavalry. 

1st Battalion Wisconsin Engineers and 1st Battalion Michigan Engineers. 

1st Michigan Field Signal Battalion, and 1st Wisconsin Field Signal Battalion. 

Wisconsin Ambulance Companies Nos. 1 and 2. 

Wisconsin Field Hospitals Nos. 1 and 2. 

Michigan Ambulance Company No. 2. 

Michigan Field Hospital No. 1. 

Major General James Parker, IT. S. A., assumed command of the Division on 
August 26th, 1917, in accordance with War Department orders. On September 18th, 
1917, he left for France on special duty with his Chief of Staff, Lieut. Col. E. H. 
DeArmond. They did not return until early in December, 1917, and General Parker 
was almost immediately transferred to the S5th Division at Camp Custer, Michigan. 

GENEEAL IIAAN ASSUMES COMMAND. 

Upon General Parker's departure for France, Brigadier General Wni. G. Haan, 
U. S. A., succeeded to the command of the Division, being senior brigadier general 
by virtue of his Regular Army commission. 

The reorganization of the Division was effected a few days after he became the 
Division Commander. Brigadier General Louis C. Covell, formerly the brigadier 
general commanding the Michigan National Guard troops, was assigned to the com- 
mand of the G3rd Infantry Brigade, and Brigadier General Charles E. Boardman, the 
senior Wisconsin brigadier general, who commanded the 1st Wisconsin Brigade, was 
assigned to the command of the fi4th Infantry Brigade. Brigadier General E. A. 
Eichards of the 2nd Wisconsin Brigade, who coninumded the 57th Depot Brigade 
until his troops were all disposed of, was ordered to Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, 
South Carolina. 

The 125th Infantry, Colonel John B. Boucher commanding, included all of the 
33rd Michigan Infantry with the exception of one company, and five companies of 
the 31st Michigan Infantry. 

The 12Gth Infantry, Colonel Joseph P. Wostnedge commanding, was formed 
from the entire 32nd Michigan Infantry and five companies of the 31st Michigan In- 
fantry. 

The 120th Machine Gun Battalion was formed from surplus companies of the 
Michigan Infantry P.rigade and Major David E. Cleary, formerly in command of 
the 3rd Battalion, 31st Michigan Infantry, was assigned to the command. 

28 



BIRTH OF THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION 

The 127th Infantry was organized with Colonel Wilbur N. Lee, formerly of the 
2ud Wisconsin Infantry, in command. 

Colonel John Turner, formerly in command of the 3rd Wisconsin Infantry, was 
assigned to the command of the 128th Infantry. 

Major Frank H. Fowler, formerly in command of the 1st Battalion, 3rd Wiscon- 
sin Infantry, was assigned to the command of the 121st Machine Gun Battalion. 

Major Percy C. Atkinson, formerly battalion commander of the 6th Wisconsin 
Infantry, was assigned to the command of the 119th Machine Gun Battalion. 

Major William Mitchell Lewis, of the 1st Wisconsin Signal Battalion, was as- 
signed to the command of the 107th Field Signal Battalion. 

Colonel P. S. Bond, U. S. A., was assigned to the command of the 107th En- 
gineers. 

Colonel Robert B. McCoy, formerly in command of the 4th Wisconsin Infantry, 
was assigned to the command of the 107th Ti-ains and Military Police. 

Brigadier General Wm. G. Haan, while acting as Division Commander, was also 
in command of the 57th Field Artillery Brigade. 

The 119th Field Artillery, composed largely of Michigan artillery and cavalry 
troops, was commanded by Major Chester B. McCormick, later promoted to the rank 
of Colonel. 

The 120th Field Artillery was made up almost entirely from troops of the 1st 
Wisconsin Cavalry, and the commanding officer of the latter organization, Colonel 
Carl Penner, continued in command. 

The 1st Wisconsin Field Artillery regiment became the 121st Field Artillery, the 
heavy artillery regiment of the 57th Field Artillery Brigade. The Commanding 
Officer of the Wisconsin Artillery, Colonel Philip C. Westfahl, became Commander 
of the new regiment. 

The organization of the Division Staff was completed in September, 1917. Upon 
the departure of Lieut. Col. DeArmond for France, Major Geo. M. Russell, F. A. N. 
A., who reported at Camp MacArthur on September 14th as Division Inspector, 
became acting Chief of Staff. Major John H. Howard, Inf. N". A., reported on AVar 
Department orders as Division Adjutant. Lieut. Col. Iljalmer Erickson, Q. M. C. 
N. A., the Division Quartermaster, was the first member of the staff to report, arriv- 
ing at Camp MacArthur on August 22, 1917. Lieut. Col. P. L. Boyer, M. C. N. A., 
the Division Surgeon, arrived a few days later. Lieut. Col. Gilbert E. Seaman, M. C. 
Wis. N. G., reported at the same time as Division Sanitary Inspector. The Judge 
Advocate was Major Samuel D. Pepper, J. A. Mich. N. G. Major Herbert L. Evans, 
S. C. N. A., was the Division Signal Officer, and Major J. P. Smith, F. A. N. A., the 
Division Ordnance Officer. Later Major John G. Salsman, Wis. N. G., reported as 
Assistant Division Adjutant. Major Chas. R. Williams, Q. M. C. Wis. N. G., re- 
ported for duty as Assistant Division Quartermaster. Major ]\Iathew Hansen, Q. 
M. C. Mich. N. G., who was one of the first officers to arrive at Camp MacArthur, 
and who, as Constructing Quartermaster, was largely responsible for the speed with 
which the camp was completed, also became Assistant Division Quarten'uaster upon 
the completion of his duties as Constructing Quartermaster. 

To the various stafl' departments were assigned for temporary duty a number of 
officers who assisted in the administrative work connected with the organization and 
training of the Division. In addition, there was a camp staff, which labored through- 
out the organization and training period to complete the equipment of the Division. 

In the reorganization of the Division it was the policy to preserve original com- 
pany organizations, but some consolidation was necessary to bring the companies up 

29 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WAR 

rroui (lie formerly prescribed strength of 150 men to the new tables of organization 
^(rungth of 250 men. It was also necessary to change the commands of a number of 
line officers, but this was all accomplished with a minimum of friction, and the new 
organization started its training period with excellent spirit. A number of officers 
became surplus in the Division because of the reorganization, and were assigned 
special duties in the various regiments and separate organizations and in the 
divisional schools. 

Early in Se]>teml)L'r, 1917, a large number of the Reserve Corps Officers from 
Camp Eoots reported to the Division for further instruction, and they were dis- 
tributed among the various units. A number of these Reserve Corps Officers later 
accepted National Guard commissions and were recommended by organization com- 
nuinders for permanent assignment to duty. Others took advantage of an oppor- 
tunity to be transferred to organizations from their several home states in other 
camps, and those remaining who were surplus in the Division just before it left for 
France were assigned to Camp Dodge, Iowa. 

FIGHT FOR EQUIPMENT. 

The various National Guard units which were sent south for the new Division 
arrived fairly well equipped for campaign service similar to that on the Border in 
1916, but with very little of the equipment prescribed for overseas. The necessity 
of securing, at the earliest possilile moment, the equipment necessary for duty abroad 
was immediately apparent to the Division Commander and his Staff, and their ener- 
gies from the first were bent upon so equipping the Division. 

Upon the completion of the reorganization, training, of course, took precedence, 
but there never was a let-up in the efforts to secure the equipment for service as a 
combat unit in France. In this work the Camp Quartermaster, Major Edward H. 
Andreas, co-operated with the Division Commander and the Division Quartermaster 
to an important extent, and to him a measure of the credit is due for what was 
achieved in the next three months in getting the Division ready to sail. 

TRAINING PROGRAM STARTED. 

At the time the reorganization of the Division was completed troops were training 
in accordance with War Department instructions contained in a pamphlet entitled 
"Infantry Training," prescribing a course of sixteen weeks' training for all elements 
of the Division. The first four weeks' program was completed shortly after the re- 
organization had been effected, and when the second four weeks' period was taken 
up the Division was organized on a permanent basis and the schedules throughout the 
various units were uniform. An infantry school of arms was established, and various 
officers and non-commissioned officers were assigned for training in infantry special- 
ties. Upon the completion of their course they became instructors, and returned to 
their organizations to instruct companies, platoons and squads in the use of new 
infantry weapons. Tliis school was commanded first by Colonel Marshall Cousins, of 
the 6th Wisconsin Infantry, and later by Colonel Peter Piasecki, formerly of the 5th 
Wisconsin Infantry. To this school Captain Allen L. Briggs, A. D. C. to General 
Parker, devoted all his time. Captain I5riggs was in Euroi^e when the World War 
broke out in 1914, and had had an opportunity to observe the methods used in the 
various military schools in France. Later five French officers and four British 
officers, with several French and English non-commissioned officers, arrived as in- 
structors, and during the latter ]iart of the training period gave valuable assistance 
in preparing the Division for the part it was to play in the Great War. 

30 



RIBTU OF THE TinUTY-SECONT) DIVISION 

A trench system was constructed just mitside the camp, and in this system trench 
warfare was practiced. Infantry and artillery target ranges were prepared early in 
the training period, and a thorough course of instrnction in service firing was given 
to every man in tlie Division. From tlu'se two features of the training i)rogram 
e.xcellent results were obtained. 

The War Department training program prescribed that certain hours of the 
week be devoted to athletics, and advantage was taken of this opportunity to organize 
a divisional football team, which was an important factor in creating a divisional 
esprit de corps. The team played elevens representing other military camps, and 
finished its schedule without being defeated by a soldier organization. 

TROOPS DRILLED, RAIN OR SHINE. 

The training was greatly expedited by the excellent weather which prevailed at 
Camp MacArthur. The policy of the Division was to carry out the program, rain 
or shine, and this policy was rigidly adhered to, especially in the schedule of trench 
maneuvers. However, there was very little rain, and interruptions of the program 
were rare. 

All elements of the Division trained with ecpial ene'rgy, and all ranks soon realized 
that the 32nd would "get into the war" at a much earlier date than many had at 
first realized. This was a point which the Division C'onnnander frequently emphasized 
in his daily conferences with the field officers. It was quickly evident to everyone 
that there was no time to waste, and the Division accordingly wasted none. In spite 
of handicaps due to lack of equijnnent, the Artillery Brigade developed as steadily as 
the infantry, the machine gun battalions ra.pidly gained knowledge of their weapons, 
the signal battalion, the engineers and the sanitary troops found practical work to 
do to supplement the required drills, and the trains, truck companies and trench 
mortar battery, without the "tools of their trade" with which to practice, took up 
infantry training, and organized schools to learn what they could about their 
specialties. Indeed at several division reviews the trains were commended by the 
Division Commander for the fine showing which they made, marching as infantry, 
and became rivals of the best "doughboy" battalions for smartness on parade. 

Rigid discipline was required in everything that the Division did. Even games — 
the exercises prescribed as part of the training — were played at attention. Laundry 
work was done by schedule, during hours set apart for that purpose; and facetious 
"doughboys" used to say that they took their shower baths "by the numbers." But 
if the stern military rule to which they were subjected irked the men they did not 
show it; early in the game they demonstrated a willingness to implicitly obey orders, 
and after the Division had been in training two months it l)ecame ai)parent to every- 
one that the 32nd was to be a thorou^ghly disci])lined organization. Both officers and 
men had cause, later, to be thankful for the cai-eful attention given to this important 
feature of the training diii-ing the formative period. 

SCHOOLS FOR EVERYBODY. 

The men worked hard, and the ofiicers worked even liarder. With the organiza- 
tion of the School of Arms, many junior officers and non-commissioned officers were 
ordered there for courses in specialties, leaving harassed Captains, First Sergeants 
and company clerks to handle the administration of the companies. At drill a com- 
pany commander was fortunate to have even one Lieutenant to help him liandle a 
company of 250 men, and the First Sergeant likewise was forced to "carry on" with 

31 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

his best non-com assistants away at school during drill hours. Each evening 
there was an officers' school which all commissioned grades were required to attend, 
and frequently the non-commissioned officers were called together for special instruc- 
tion "after hours." A school for Brigade, Regimental and Battalion commanders, 
with General Haan himself as director and instructor, was held daily. 

The Division was fortunate in possessing a wealth of excellent officer material 
in the ranks of the enlisted men of the National Guard, and, when opportunity finally 
offered, certain enlisted men, who had shown exceptional ability in training activities, 
were examined, and later, on recommendation of the Division Commander, they were 
commissioned as Second Lieutenants and assigned to fill vacancies in the lower com- 
missioned grades. A number of older Second Lieutenants aJso were promoted. Some 
of the best officers developed in the great campaign of the Division in 1918 were men 
promoted from the ranks during the training period at Waco, and all fully justified 
the confidence which General Haan expressed in these young officers at the time 
their commissions were announced. 

While camp life at Waco was strenuous, and the duties of all ranks most exacting, 
it wasn't entirely a case of all work and no play. The people of Waco proved 
themselves to be highly hospitable, and born and bred Southerners, who admitted 
that they had reached the age of maturity without knowing that "damned Yankee" 
wasn't all one word, went out of their way to entertain these stalwart soldiers 
from the North. Many fine friendships were formed, and when the Division left for 
overseas Waco people took the parting as they would for their own sons. In fact the 
local papers always referred to the 32nd as "Waco's Own,'' and followed closely and 
enthusiastically the gallant career of their friends from Michigan and Wisconsin. 
And in 1919 when the Division returned from abroad it is a record that many of the 
men went Ijack to Waco and "lived happily ever afterwards." 

DIVISION ORDERED OVERSEAS. 

During the latter part of November and early in December the Division was 
visited and carefully examined by War Department artillery and infantry inspectons, 
and was judged ready for overseas service. Their reports to Washington indicated 
that the 32nd was more advanced in its training at that time than any other division 
then in the U. S. Its equipment was very nearly complete, and the spirit which had 
developed no doubt also influenced the inspectors. Accordingly notice was shortly 
forthcoming from Washington that the Division would be sent to France at the 
earliest practicable date. 

In those days information regarding troop movements was carefuly guarded, 
but before Christmas it was generally known throughout the camp that the 32nd 
was on the "sailing list." Many officers and men, of course, desired furloughs to say 
good-bye to the folks at home; but the journey north was a long one, and there was 
considerable uncertainty as to just when the movement would begin, so leaves were 
impracticable, and relatives who took the hint that there might shortly be "some- 
thing doing" came to Waco for the final farewells. 

Following the receipt of orders from Washington for the transfer of the 32nd 
to the Port of Embarkation at Hoboken, N. J., the first troops left Waco on Janu- 
ary 2d. From that time on the movement was steady, until the camp was cleared by 
the first of March of all but a few casuals. Division Headquarters left Waco Janu- 
ary 14th. The infantry was moved first, arriving at Camp Merritt before Division 
Headquarters sailed. The artillery movement did not get under -way until February. 

32 



CHAPTER II. 

The Thirty-Second Division in France. 



r 



ON January 24th, 1918, the advance party of the 32nd Division 
arrived at Brest, France. Division Headquarters sailed on Janu- 
ary 31st and were at sea when the Tuseania, on an earlier convoy, 
was sunk by a German submarine. The Tuseania carried a de- 
tachment of 32ud Trains, and the Division suffered its first war 
casualties when 13 men lost their lives as a result of the attack. 
The Tuseania was one of the few American troop ships to meet 
with disaster, and her sinking caused a sensation in the United 
States. The papers, of course, carried the news that there were 
certain 32nd Division troops aboard, and relatives of all the men of the Division who 
might have been on the seas at the time had several anxious days until the identity 
of those on board was established. 

Aside from the misfortune of the Tuseania, the transport of the Division abroad 
was accomplished without accident and quite expeditiously for the facilities available 




PRAUTHOY, HAUTE MARNE, FRANCE, 
A little town about 20 kilometers south of Langres, where Division Headquarters was opened on February 24th, 1918. 



33 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOBLD WAR 

at the time. Some of the troops landed in Enghand, and nearly every port in France 
received its quota. Division Headquarters landed in Liverpool the middle of Febru- 
arj', vrent to the rest camp at Winchester for a few days, crossed the channel to Havre, 
and after anotlier brief wait went by train to Prauthoy, Haute Marne, France, (a 
little town aliout 80 kilometers south of Langres), where the first "P. C." abroad was 
opened on February 24th, 1918. The area in the vicinity of Prauthoy had been 
designated by General Pershing as the training ground for the 32nd. 

The Division was the sixth to join the American Expeditionary Force, and was, 
in accordance with General Headquarters plans made before it was known exactly 
which would be the sixth division to arrive, designated as a rejjiacement organization 
for the First Army Corps. 

.MADE A REPLACEMENT DIVISION. 

The news that the 32nd was to be a replacement organization came as a blow, 
indeed. It took the heart out of everybody. The 125th, 12fith and 12;th Infantry 
regiments were assigned as temporary labor troops immediately after their arrival, 
and went to work on important projects in the Service of Supply, so that only 
scattered detachments and casuals reached the 10th Training Area during the first 
month the Division was in Fi-ance. The Artillery Brigade went to the artillery 
training area at Camp Coetquidan, and the 107'th Engineers were assigned to en- 
gineering work in the Service of Supply. The 12Sth Infantry, however, reached the 
10th Area in March, and bore the brunt of the replacement blow, just as it was 
destined to bear the brunt of other blows later on. For about four weeks the Division 




"All the privates and taljtaius uf the 12Stli Infantry were transferred to the 1st Division as repluieiuents.' 
RAYAUMIEX, FRANCE, MARCH 21st, 1918. 



34 



TEE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN FRANCE 

functioned as a replacement organization, and during that time all the privates and 
captains of the 128th who were present for duty were transferred to the First Di- 
vision as replacements. 

It was a sad day in the towns occupied by the 128th when the time came for the 
men to be separated from their comrades, for the captains to leave the commands 
which they had so painstakingly trained. The officers and their men were not even 
to go together, the captains being assigned to one brigade of the First Division and 
the privates to another. There was, however, some consolation for those who were 
going away. The First Division had completed its training and was in the trenches, 
and the replacements had tlic assurance, at least, of seeing some speedy action. Many 
non-commissioned officers asked to be reduced to the ranks so that they could accom- 
pany their "buddies," but the "non-coms" were needed to train men who would come 
to take the place of the 128th "bucks" and their requests, of course, could not be 
granted. 

FLOWER OF 32nd GOES TO 1st. 

Tlie parting was pathetic, from the point of view of all concerned, but once under 
way the replacements started out with the 32nd Division spirit expressing itself in 
the "rarin' to go" attitude which always was evident on the eve of anything big. 
Officers who accompanied the replacements to their destination said the First 
Division officers who received them certainly were grateful. The First Division had 
received replacements before, but never such men as these. And subsequent reports 
which came in when the two divisions later found themselves side by side at the front 
indicated that the 128th replacements with the First fought as valiantly and as 
skillfully as tlieir comrades who remained with the 32nd. 

General Haan felt the blow as keenly as anyone else — perhaps more keenly — but 
when the replacement order went into effect he called a conference of officers and told 
them that replacement units were necessary ; that we had trained one set of men to 
fight and could train another; that if it was our lot to do our part in the war by 
training men to fight instead of fighting ourselves, then it was up to lis to put our 
whole heart and soul into the effort. The officers left the conference and went back 
to their skeleton units, and training soon was under way with the same energy, and, 
outwardly at least, the same enthusiasm. 

But while General Haan gave his officers no reason to believe that there was any 
way out of it, he nevertheless set to work to present certain facts and figures to the 
General Headquarters, with the result that shortly there were no further requisitions 
for replacements; and then, by undertaking some diplomatic work where it would 
do tlie most good, the Division Commander finally got the 125th and 127th relieved 
from labor duty in the Service of Supply, and the tliree regiments were sent, early in 
April, to the 10th Training Area, where they had all arrived by April 10th. 

A considerable number of troops were, however, detached from the infantry 
regiments and held on duty in the Service of Supply, so that during this period ap- 
proximately 7,000 men were transferred from the Division. The Division was short 
2,000 men upon its arrjval in France, so that at the end of the replacement period 
it was approximately 9,000 men short, practically all from the infantry. The com- 
panies of infantry in the Division consequently liad been reduced to somewhat less 
than 100 men eacli, after reassignments ecjualizing the various rifle companies. 



35 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

"PINCH HITTING" IN THE SERVICE OF SUPPLY. 

While the labor duty required of the 125th, 126th and 127th infantry regiments 
was unfortunate in that it took the edge o£E the fine state of discipline these troops 
had reached, the work they accomplished in the Service of Supply was of great im- 
portance in the American Expeditionary Force. According to a statement recently 
made by Colonel Charles J. Symonds, in command of the depots at Gievres, the 32nd 
Division arrived in France at a crucial moment, at a time when the completion of 
depots, etc., was absolutely imperative in order to supply the increasing flow of troops 
which was expected. Owing to the high state of discipline in the regiments detailed 
for labor duty, and to the fact that in their ranks many men were found with civilian 
training in just this kind of work, the 32nd Division was able, in a comparatively 
short time, to complete the construction work so urgently required, and to tide the 
Service of Supply over a critical period in its career. 

The replacement spectre removed, and tlie Division being together again, with 
the exception of those who had gone from the 128th, the artillery, and the engineers 
who were still on important construction work, the overseas training prescribed by 
General Headquarters went forward with all the zeal that hard-working officers and 
willing enlisted men could put into it. The 128th was patched up by assigning to 
the regiment a number of captains who had been on special duty throughout the 
Division, and transferring men from the 125th and 126th, so that all four regiments 
were of about the same strength, approximately 150 men per company. In this 
training period considerable attention was paid to specialties; there were a number of 
exercises in open warfare problems, and selected officers and men were sent to the 
American Expeditionary Force schools at Gondrecourt and Langres to come back 
with the latest wrinkles on how to make war. The 42nd Division sent back a number 
of officers who had had some experience in the trenches, and they gave our eager men 
many pointers on how to apply the principles they were being taught. The prac- 
tically new subject of Liaison was carefully studied, especially in the higher echelons, 
and the first practical demonstrations of its workings were conducted. From the 
first a solid foundation was laid for the divisional liaison which later came to be 
known as the most nearly perfect in any division in the American Expeditionary 
Force. 

PREPAEING FOR THE TRENCHES. 

The weather in April, when the bulk of the 32nd Division's overseas training was 
done, was wretched ; but the men were out, rain or shine, day in and day out, Sun- 
days included, drilling, working out problems, conducting demonstrations with live 
grenades, shooting on the rifle ranges, perfecting themselves in the use of the gas 
mask, and, in general, finding out all there was to find out about war; and their 
hearts were in their work. 

When the officers from the 42nd came down to help out, they were busy all day 
on the schedules which had been arranged for them, but at night they conducted 
volunteer scouting and patrolling classes, and after a hard day's work there always 
were more applicants for permission to go on these practice raids than there were 
places in the parties planned. The progress made by the Division was highly satis- 
factory, and when the fine days of early May came everybody felt that the time was 
at hand when we would got near enough to the enemy to put some of our knowledge 
to a very practical use. 



36 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN FRANCE 

FIKST IMPEESSIONS OF FRANCE. 

The Division's "first impressions" of France and the French people were acquired 
in the Tenth training area, where the ti'oops occupied about tliirty small towns and 
villages, the largest of which was Champlitte, where the headquarters of the 63rd 
Infantry Brigade was located. The Division arrived in France at what is probably 
the worst season of the year — February and March. At Prauthoy, where Division 
Headquarters was established, it snowed twice, and the first two months were cold 
and damp. The infantrymen, who, when they first landed, were scattered in detach- 
ments from a company up to a battalion, had to do manual labor on construction 
enterprises in weather that was totally miserable. After they came to the Tenth Area 
the work was different, but the weather was not. Until the first of May there were 
but few pleasant days, and in cold, raw, wet weather doughboys drilled, rain or shine, 
day in and day out, and wondered who the merry jester was who first called the 
country "sunny France." 

A part of the training consisted in the construction of trenches. In the rocky 
soil of this part of France trench digging was more of a mining than an agricultural 
operation. A weary soldier one afternoon stopped for breath while wielding a pick 
and confided to his "buddy" as follows : 

"I know what this war is about. The French are trying to make the Germans 
take this country and dig holes in it." 

The environment was not conducive to the creation of a deep love for France — - 
for the country, not the nation, that is. Few of the men could talk the language, 
and those who had learned their French from books found that the peasants of this 
district "didn't understand their own language." But in spite of exasperations, diffi- 
culties, and above all the depressing weatlier, some mighty fine friendships between 
American soldiers and French civilians sprang up. The French matrons "mothered" 
the doughboys who were billeted in their homes or barns, the French kiddies just 
naturally joined the 0. D. Army and had new daddies and big brothers by the 
score, and generous and happy their new relations were, too. The French girls — 
they weren't exactly like the girls we left behind us, but girls are girls the world 
over — readily learned to "compree" the most expressive of the doughboy slang, and 
quickly taught their big American friends certain French phrases. How well the 
young folks got along is indicated by the number of requests for leave to visit the 
Tenth Area that were submitted a year later, when the Division was engaged in occu- 
pying Germany and the men were getting the first overseas furloughs. 

The Americans, in their early association with the French, found many of the 
French ways of doing things open for criticism, but they also quickly found that the 
French war spirit was something constantly to admire. As they became better 
acquainted in this peasant country, the admiration of the Americans grew, and grad- 
ually formed one of their lasting impressions of France — lasting even through the 
period of profiteering which ensued when the American Expeditionary Force grew 
from a few to many thousands. 

THE "Y" MADE GOOD HERE. 

Y. M. C. A. huts in every town occupied by American troops quickly supple- 
mented the social centers that the men themselves arranged. The "Y" in France 
never attained the proportions of the institution in the United States, and during 
the period of active operations later in the year it did not function exactly as antici- 
pated, and sometimes described, by its admirers ; but in the Tenth Area the "Y" did 

37 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

everything that was expected of it. The huts were places where the men could write 
letters, buy limited, but generally sufficient, quantities of candy and cigarettes, read 
not-too-old magazines, and meet one another in the evening. The huts also provided 
the military with a place to hold lectures and classes, and in them on Sundays the 
chaplains conducted services, the bands gave concerts, and movies now and then en- 
tertained the men. Whatever may be said of the "Y" in the field — and plenty of 
things have been said — there is no doubt but what it made good in the Tenth Train- 
ing Area. 










1. Lieutenant Colonel Cuahles S. Caffery, General Staff, Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2; Training Period; 

Occupation of Sector in Alsace. 

2. Lieutenant Colonel Allan L. Bricgs, General Staff, Assistant Cliicf of Staff, G-3; Training Period; Occupa- 

pation of Sector in Alsace. 

3. Colonel George M. Russell. General Staff, Division Inspector. 

4. Brigadier General E. H. DeArmond, as Lieutenant Colonel, General Staff; First Chief of Staff of the Division; 

Training Period. 

5. Colonel Hjalmer Erickson, Infantry; Division Quartermaster, Training Period. 

6. Major Mathew Hansen, Q. M. C. ; Assistant Division Quartermaster. 

7. Major Edward D. Arnold, A. G. D. ; Personnel and Division Adjutant. 

39 




CHAPTER III. 
First on German Soil. 

HE German offensive of March 31st, 1918, was undoubtedly one 
of the reasons why the "powers above" listened to General Haan's 
plea for an interruption of the plan to make the 32nd a replace- 
ment division. The success of the enemy olfensive made it im- 
perative that all the available American troops in France be util- 
ized for combat duty, and after the scattered 32nd had been 
assembled in the 10th Training Area in April an inspection of 
our troops was made by the Training and Operations Section of 
the General Staff, General Headquarters. Their reports resulted 
in a decision to designate the 32nd for combat duty, and a program of training for 
four weeks was prescribed to prepare the Division for its front line debut. 

This training program had not been completed when, early in May, there were 
indications that the Division would soon get its long expected chance. During the 
month of April some replacements were received from the 41st Division and the 
rifle companies were brought up to a strength of about 160 men. Early in May 
equipment arrived to fill shortages and certain garrison equipment was turned in, 
rolling kitchens replaced, field ranges and water carts arrived, packs were reduced 
by the salvaging of extra clothing. Yes, it looked like the front, at last ! 

About the middle of May orders were received directing the Division to proceed 
to the region of Bel fort in Alsace and report to the Commanding General of the 
40th French Corps for further orders. Then for a few days there was hustle and 
bustle. Entraining points were designated for each of the rather scattered battalions, 
and orders regarding the movement were carefully issued by each echelon. The 
destination was known at Division Headquarters of course, but few others shared the 
secret, and the battalions packed up, marched to their trains and again made the 
acquaintance of "Hommes 40" without knowing where they were going, but happy 
in the knowledge that they were on their way. 



ON OUR WAY TO GERMANY. 

It was a pleasant trip, all things considered, through a beautiful country, and 
we finally arrived in picturesque Alsace. On German soil, too ! — though the Al- 
satians carefully corrected us when we made that statement, and pointed out that 
it was Alsatian soil, not German, though maps issued prior to 1914, showed the towns 
we were going to were within the former borders of the German Empire. "I'he first 
American troops to set foot on German soil." Pretty good stuff to write the folks 
as soon as the censors would allow it — if they ever would ! But it was too good a 
story for the censors to hold back for long; and a few days later, when the 32nd 
had been identified by the enemy, there was no reason for keeping the secret from the 



41 




O 



° O 






S 

0; 
O 



9) 



FIRST ON GERMAN SOIL 

people in the United States, and it was announced from Washington that the Wis- 
consin and Michigan National Guardsmen were holding the line in Haute Alsace. 

On May 18th, 1918, the first troops of the 32nd Division, consisting of four bat- 
talions, were assigned to front line duty in Haute Alsace, relieving elements of the 
9th and 10th French Divisions. It was intended that each of the infantry battalions 
should remain in the front line twelve days for instruction and other battalions were 
to be trained in the reserve areas during these periods. The plan contemplated a 
thirty-five-day course of instruction. However, the success of the German Offensive 
begun on March 21st caused a speeding up of the training, and on June 15th, eight 
battalions of the 32nd Division were placed in the front line and the other four bat- 
talions in support, the Division thus taking over a front of 27 kilometers, from 
Aspach le Bas to the Swiss border. 

In the middle of June the 57th Field Artillery Brigade joined the Division in 
Alsace, and a few days later was firing in support of the infantry. The 107th En- 
gineers joined the Division about the same time, so that on June 15, 1918, the 
Division was practically comjjlete, except for a shortage of about 2,000 enlisted men, 
mostly from the infantry. 

Upon the recommendation of the Commander-in-Chief, American Expeditionary 
Force, the French authorities undertook to complete the training of the 32nd Division 
at the earliest practicable date, with a view of placing it on the active battle line on 
the Western Front. The Division Commander and his Staff up to June 15th had not 
functioned in command of the Divisional troops in the sector. At this time, however, 
after a careful investigation by tlie 7th French Army Commander, he decided that the 
American Division Commander and his Staff should be placed in tactical control and 
in command of the troops of the 32nd Division, and also in command of the troops of 
the 9th French Division, who were occupying a part of the same sector. Accordingly 
the Division Commander and his Staff assumed tactical command of the sector from 
-Aspach le Bas to the Rhine-Rlione Canal with all the troops therein, both American 
and French, the latter forming the major portion of the 2nd line and reserve. 
The training was continued, with the assistance of many French officers and non- 
commissioned officers as instructors, until July 15th, when orders were received to 
withdraw the 32nd Division from the sector and prepare it for transportation to 
the active front. 

FIRST TO SET FOOT ON GERMAN SOIL. 

The Division went into the Alsace sector in high spirits, the troops being the first 
Americans to set foot on German soil. They proved to be keen students of trench 
warfare, and their training progressed rapidly. During their occupancy of the sector 
there were no operations of a pretentious nature, but few offensive raids being 
attempted by either side, and none of these was on a large scale. There was plenty 
of action, however, as patrols were meeting in "No Man's Land" almost nightly, and 
after the sector came under the command of the Americans successful efforts were 
made to obtain and retain complete control of "No Man's Land." 

Among companies which distinguished themselves, either in offensive or de- 
fensive operations in Alsace, were the following : 

Companies D, E and I, of the 125th Infantry. 

Companies C, D, M and K, of the 126th Infantry. 

Companies B, D, H, L and M, of the 127th Infantry. 

Companies B, C, D, G, I and L, of the 128th Infantry. 

43 



TEE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

Company A, of the 107th Engineers. 

Companies A, C and D, of the 121st Machine Gun Battalion. 

Companies A, B, C and D, of the 120th Machine Gun Battalion. 

Companies A and B, of the 119th Machine Gun Battalion. 

All these organizations had casualties as a result of the affairs in which they 
participated. 

Eight enemy prisoners were captured and eight Americans were taken hy the 
enemy. 

OUR LOSSES IN ALSACE. 

In the Alsace sector our losses were: Killed, 1 officer and 39 men; severely 
wounded, 3 officers and 79 men; slightly wounded, 9 officers and 211 men; died of 
wounds, 1 officer and 15 men. Total losses from all causes: 368. 

The losses inflicted on the enemy were fully equal to our own, according to 
reports of our raiding parties, and of prisoners captured. 

In the Alsace sector 3 German Divisions, the 30th Bavarian Reserve Division, 
the 44th Landwehr, and the 25th Landwehr, were in the trenches opposite the 32nd 
Division. 

In their skirmishes with the enemy in Alsace the infantry acquired a fine degree 
of confidence. If ever there was any question as to whether the German, with his 
four years of experience, his many years of training and his reputation for military 
knowledge, was a better soldier than the young American volunteer, our first exper- 
iences with the enemy at close hand settled the argument. Our men knew the 
German had nothing that we feared. In short order we learned most of the tricks 
it had taken him four years to perfect and had figured out a few on our own account, 
to the great delight of the French non-com instructors who were assigned to 
look after us. These French non-coms were perhaps rather dubious about our 
doughboys at first, and counseled more moderation than we had a mind to use in 
our negotiations with the foe. Haute Alsace was a "quiet sector," and neither 
the exhausted French nor the busy Germans had a desire to make it anything else. 
Accordingly the French, while they were with us, stifled a lot of budding initiative; 
but as they gradually were withdrawn, to let the Americans run things in their own 
way, the sector livened up appreciably. After our 57th Artillery Brigade came 
there was an increase in activity both in front and behind the observation posts, as 
the most advanced positions were termed, and the Germans more or less readily 
accepted the Yankee challenge. Soon shells were falling on both sides of the line, 
where no shells had fallen for months, and the front line trenches were no longer a 
place to spend a quiet evening. 

The 32nd Division found Alsace a super-quiet sector, and they left it anything 
but that. 

WE "PARLEY BOCHE." 

In Alsace the Americans were thrown into contact with a class of "French" 
people different from those they met in the Tenth Training Area. The Alsatians did 
not, as a rule, impress the soldiers in olive drab as being so wholly keen for "La 
Patrie" as the peasants of Haute Marne. In Haute Marne the people were "French- 
men." In Haute Alsace they were "Alsatians." 

With them the Americans got along quite comfortably. The average doughboy 
could talk a little French by this time, and the Alsatians could all speak German, 
which gave them a medium of understanding with the Wisconsin and Michigan 

44 



FIRST ON GERMAN SOIL 




"After our 57th Aitill.iy linuudu canu- tlii-ie was an increase in activity both in front and belnnd the 
Observation Posts as the most advanced positions were termed." 

FRONT LINE TRENCH IN ALSACE. 

46 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

troops that the peasants of the Tenth Area did not have. Many of our men could 
speak German, and accordingly one of the difficulties of being a stranger in a strange 
land was made less acute. 

The friendships formed between soldiers and civilians in Alsace were neither as 
numerous nor as lasting as those made in the Tenth Area, but in Alsace our officers 
and men had their first opportunity of meeting the French fighting men at the 
front. The admiration of the two armies was mutual. As Americans and French 
became better acquainted a spirit of true fellowship gi'ew steadily, and today many 
officers of the 32nd Division count among their best friends officers of the Ninth 
French Division with whom the 32nd was associated in Alsace. 

TWO HOLIDAYS IN ALSACE. 

Two great holidays were celebrated during the Division's tour of duty in Alsace — 
the Fourth of July, the birthday of the United States of America, and the Four- 
teenth of July, the natal day of the French Eepublic. The Fourth was the occasion 
for ceremonies in all Alsatian towns which contained Americans, and which were 
a sufficient distance from the front line to prevent Fritz from taking a hand in the 
fireworks. French soldiers and Alsatian civilians assisted the Americans in observing 
the day — there were parades, speeches and felicitations. On July 14th the Americans 
returned the compliment, helping the French to observe the holiday, which they will 
always remember as being celebrated on the eve of the turning point of the war. 







-■-t 

"■*«! 



"Soon shells were falling on both sides of the line where no shells had fallen for months and the front line 
trenches were no longer a place to spend a quiet evening." 

THE ABOVE IS NEAR IIECKEN, ALSACE. 

46 




Lieutenant Colonel Glen Garlock, Infantry. Lieutenant Colonel, 128th Infantry, Training Period; Occupation 
of Sector in Alsace ; Aisne-Marne Offensive ; Division Inspector, Oise-Aisne Offensive ; Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive; March to the Rhine; Army' of Occupation. 

Lieutenant Colonel Frank H. Fowler, Infantry, as Major commanded 121st Machine Gun Battalion, as 
Lieutenant Colonel, Division Machine Gun Officer, Training Period; Occupation of Alsace Sector; Aisne- 
Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; March to the Rhine ; Army of Occupation. 

Lieutenant Colonel S. D. Pepper, J. A. D., Division Judge Advocate, Training Period; Occupation of Sector 
in Alsace; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne Offen.'ive. 

Lieutenant Colonel Charles R. Williams, Q. M. C., Division Quartermaster, Training Period; Occupation 
of Sector in Alsace; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; March to 
the Rhine. 

Colonel Harold C. Fiske, Engineers, Division Engineer; Training Period; Occupation of Sector in Alsace; 
Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; March to the Rhine; Army 
of Occupation. 

Colonel Gilbert E. Seaman, Medical Department, as Lieutenant Colonel, Division Surgeon. 

Major William A. Woodlief, A. G.D.. Division Adjutant, Training Period; Occupation of Sector in Alsace ; Aisne- 
Marne Offensive ; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne Offensive ; March to the Rhine; Army of Occupation. 

Major Amos Ashley, F. A.. Division Ordnance Officer; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse- 
Argonne Offensive; Army of Occupation. 

Lieutenant Colonel John Scott. S. C. ; Di\-ision Signal Officer; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive; March to the Rhine; Army of Occupation. 



47 



CHAPTER IV. 
Into the Big Battle. 



ARLY in July General Pershing came to Alsace to inspect the 
Division. He visited every unit, and made a very thorough exam- 
ination of everything and everybody. During the visit of the 
Commander-in-Chief, General Haan told the head of the Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Force that the 32nd had been thoroughly re- 
hearsed in the various drills prescribed in the training pamphlets, 
and that in their exercises our men were easily kept in hand ; that 
they were getting a trifle wearv' of training, and were anxious to 
get into a real fight. 

"Fed up on it," General Pershing commented, smilingly. 

General Haan expressed the opinion that his men would give a good account of 
themselves, and hoped that he would soon get orders to go to an active front. 





"Early in July General Pershing came to Alsace to inspect the Division.' 
NEAR SENTHEIM, ALSACE. 



49 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 




•■During the visit of the Commander-in-Chief, Genera! Haan ti.ld flie head of the American l-JxprditKMmry 
Force that the 32nd had been thoroughly rehearsed in the various drills prescribed in the training pamphlets." 

A maneuver sliowing infantry advancing to 1st Objective. See picture on page 104, showing troops advancing 
on macluiie gun nests in actual battle. How similar to the above when only at drill ! 

NEAR ST. GERMAIN, ALSACE. 

General Pershing, with a bit of a twinkle in his eye, and a pleased expression on 
his face, developing into an appreciative smile, replied: 

"I like the snap in your Division, and unless I am mistaken you will be on your 
way to a more active front in the very near future. Tell your men I like their spirit." 

After General Pershing's inspection there were whispered rumors of an impend- 
ing movement of the Division. With accumulating signs that the rumor was based 
upon something more substantial than the usual trench gossip, came speculations 
as to the probalde destination of the outfit. Most guesses were that tlie journey 
would be up to the "big front." The doughboys out in the trenches received the 
papers daily and were familiar with the situation created by Marshall Foch's counter- 
offensive of July 18th. They knew that Americans had been in the thick of it, and 
that the U. S. troops had distinguished themselves. They knew that there were only 
a few divisions in the American Expeditionary Force that had been over longer than 
the 32nd, and the thoughtful officers and men figured that it was about our turn. 

Others thought that the Division would be withdrawn for a rest, refitting and 
some more training. Those who had good imaginations thought the Division might 
go to Italy — we were closer to the Italian border than any other troops on the line. 
A few "strategists" who had recently returned from the schools at Langres and 
Gondrecourt, and had seen signs of other American troops in the vicinity of Alsace, 
thought perhaps there might be a contraction of the front with the idea of an offen- 
sive in Haute Alsace. 



50 



INTO TEE BIG BATTLE 

The "strategists" were the first to be disillusioned. A few days after the mess 
sergeants' details brought back from the railhead the first rumors of a move an 
order came out directing the withdrawing of all troops from the trenches to entrain- 
ing points. On July 19th the first elements of the Division crowded the well-known 
"Hommes 40" and rattled away. It soon became apparent that the imaginative 
doughboys who had guessed we were going to Italy were all wrong, for the troop 
trains headed north. There were still three guesses left — was it to be a training area, 
Chateau-Thierry, or the British front? 

BID GOOD-BYE TO ALSACE. 

The doughboys didn't care much. They were, as General Pershing had sug- 
gested, "fed up" on Alsace and quiet sectors. If they were going to a training area 
they knew it was to prepare for something big, and if they were on their way to 
something big they felt that they were ready. Officers and men who had been away 
to the American Expeditionary Force schools and who had talked to soldiers from 
other divisions who had had a taste of the real thing, were especially keen for the 
initial try-out. 

Eeal summer weather prevailed during the troop movement. It was "sunny 
France" at last, and the men enjoyed the ti'ip northward through the beautiful 
country. It soon became apparent that the journey was not to a training area, as 
the trains passed through the section in which the American forces were preparing 
for action. We were headed straight for Paris, and those who had guessed that we 




General Pershing, Major General Haan, and Colonel Laucagne of the 9th French Division in conference. 
GENERAL PERSHING'S INSPECTION OF 32nd DIVISION, ALSACE. 



51 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 




"The 32nd Division had been thoroughly rehearsed in the various drills prescribed in the training pamphlets." 

ARTILLERYMEN OF 57th FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE 
AT GAS DEFENSE DRILL IN ALSACE. 



were bound for Chateau-Thierry indulged in "I told you so." Some of the trains 
were fortunate enough to pass through Paris in the daytime, and as the toy French 
engines jerked the toy French box-cars through the outskirts of the French capital 
the people in tlie street stopped and waved at us. They crowded the windows of the 
buildings and shouted "Vive L'Americain !" and the doughboys yelled back in good 
American fashion. 

To those wlio had passed through Paris on their way into France some months 
before the change in the attitude of the people was very noticeable. In March the 
crowds in the streets looked up as the American troop trains passed, and some of 
them waved; but there was nothing spontaneous or particularly enthusiastic about 
it. But lately the Americans at Chateau-Thierry and on the Marne had saved Paris, 
and the bulletins in the papers the day the 32nd Division passed through Paris indi- 
cated that these same Americans were about to save France. And so the French 
folks waved — all of them — and "vive-d" for "les Americains." 

The troop trains passed Paris and continued on their way. Those who had 
guessed in favor of Chateau-Thiery began to weaken. We seemed to be headed for 
the British front. Many rather hoped so. The doughboys "liked the French fine," 
and had a sincere admiration of their ability to make war, but they "sure were hard 
to talk to." Yes, going up with the British wouldn't be so bad. They were good 
fighters, too; we would learn some new tricks from them, no doubt, and then we 
would "slam into tlie Germans" and win our niche in the Hall of Fame. 



INTO THE BIG BATTLE 

NEAR THE "BIG FRONT" AT LAST. 

But it wasn't to be the British front after all. The same day that we passed 

through Paris the trains pulled up at a station in the vicinity of the forest of 

■Compiegne where the German drive had been stopped a short time before. The 

troops detrained and were billeted in a number of small towns in the neighborhood 

of Pont St. Maxcnce with Division Headquarters at Bethisy St. Martin. 

Still, our destination wasn't exactly apparent. Maybe the General and his staff 
knew where we were going to get our baptism of fire, but nobody else did, or cared 
particularly. All rather hoped it would be around Chateau-Thierry. That was 
known as an American sector, and if we got in there it would be something to write 
the folks back home when we got out. We wouldn't have to tell them that it was a 
quiet sector. 

The Division spent a few days in the small towns west of the forest of Compiegne, 
during which the entire Division was assembled there. The First Division had 
recently been in that neighborhood — we met some of the 32nd Division men who had 
been transferred to the First in our replacement days. They had been in the thick 
of it, and we listened to their tales with interest. Back from the front came news 
that the 42nd Division was smashing the German lines for daily gains. All the news 
indicated that the Allies were gaining and we were impatient to be off. 

We had not long to wait. By July 24th the whole Division was in the vicinity 
of Pont St. Maxence southwest of Soissons. We were under the orders of the 10th 
French Army, which was operating around Soissons, and were in the Army Reserve. 
On July 26th orders were received to proceed by trucks to the region of Chateau- 
Thierry and report to the 38th French Corps of the Sixth French Army. 

The Troops embussed at once and rode through a country recently swept by a 
tremendous battle. Whenever a road block developed and the truck train stopped 
the men jumped off and went souvenir hunting. There were plenty of evidences of 
the German retreat and evidences also of what had caused them to fall back — the 
French poilu. Belts of machine gun bullets, helmets and German equipment were 
scattered over the fields. But the search for souvenirs had its disadvantages. The 
Germans who had been left behind hadn't been buried very deeply, and certain 
salvaging expeditions met with rather grewsome surprises now and then. The men 
picked up a lot of souvenirs and carried them until they left the trucks — and maybe 
for an hour afterwards. Then most of them decided that a pack which was some 
pounds heavier than the man who wrote Field Service Regulations had figured on 
was enough baggage — and besides, where they were going there would be souvenirs 
in plenty. 

AT CHATEAU-THIERRY. 

Debussing at Chateau-Thierry just after nightfall, the troops marched to billets 
in the town and in small villages in the vicinity. Up ahead the war was going on, 
all right. The sky throbbed with red flashes from the big guns; their constant 
cough and rumble told us plainly that this wasn't Alsace. There was some specu- 
lation as to when we would be up there, but the immediate concern was in regard 
to billets. Some of them were quite a distance, from the debussing point and the 
hike put thoughts of future danger and glory out of our heads. Tliat night, for 
the first time since coming to France, many of the men billeted without a roof over 
their heads — some took to the fields in pup-tents, while others took their chances in 
wrecked buildings and hoped it wouldn't rain. 

53 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

The next day the 32ncl Division got its first real look at Chateau- Thierry and the 
towns in the tip of the famous Maine salient. The sight-seeing was of brief dura- 
tion, however, for late in the afternoon orders were received directing that the troops 
march at nightfall, to arrive in the immediate rear of the divisions up ahead who 
were at grips with the Germans. The rolling kitchens and field trains had marched 
from the Pont St. Maxence region and had not yet arrived, so that the meals on the 
27th were from the reserve rations and the vegetable gardens in the vicinity. 

Just before dark, July 27th, the doughboy regiments lined up on the Paris-Metz 
road and started forward. The 32nd Division was going into battle at last! How 
different from the scene a good many had visualized ! There were no bands, no flags, 
no pomp, not even a riffle of any excitement. If the men had any feeling in the 
matter they didn't express it. Their immediate concern was the difficulty of march- 
ing with their blouses on, on that hot night. But the order said what uniform should 
be worn and how it should be worn, and the 32nd was a well disciplined division ; 
the men wore their blouses, but they compromised by tucking their olive drab shirts 
into their packs. 

As the Division struggled along the hot and dusty road, frequently halted by 
blocks up ahead, the rumbling of the big guns became louder; tlieir coughing 
deeper. Tire red blotches in the sky were continuous. There was sure-enough 
fighting not far away, but nobody worried especially about that. "What in hell was 
the matter with that regiment up in front ? Couldn't they hike, or what ? Let's go !" 

Just as day was breaking, the Division reached its destination and bivouacked 
in the Forct de Fere, near le Charmcl and right in the rear of the 3rd and 28th 
U. S. divisions, which were in the line. Division Headquarters came up to Jaul- 
gonne — the 63rd and G4th Brigade P. C.'s were established at le Charmel. 

PEEPARING FOR THE BATTLE. 

The next day regimental and battalion commanders went up to reconnoiter and 
make their plans for relieving the 3rd Division. The troops remained concealed in 
the Foret de Fere, and worried a great deal more about the fact that the rolling 
kitchens were still some distance behind, than they did at the imminence of their 
participation in a major offensive and one of the decisive battles of the great war. 

The junior otficers were a little thoughtful, wondering when the relief would be 
made, and what the plan of action would be. But their minds, too, were on the "chow" 
wagons, more or less, and they hoped the mess sergeants would catch up before the 
big show started. There was no change in the situation on July 28th. The Division 
and Brigade P. C.'s remained as on the day before. The regimental and bat- 
talion commanders had reconnoitered the front, and were ready for the order 
which would send their outfits up to strike a blow for Democracy. 

After midnight of the 28th, the 38th French Corps ordered the relief of the 
3rd Division by one brigade of the 32nd, the relief to take place the night of July 
29th-30th. Orders for the relief at once were issued. The command of the sector 
was to pass to the Commanding General of the 32nd at 11 A. M., July 30th, and 
arrangements were made to move the Division P. C. to le Charmel Chateau, near 
the village of le Charmel, on the morning of July 30th. 



54 



INTO THE BIG BATTLE 

NO THOUGHT OF POSSIBLE FAILURE. 

In the Foret de Fere the men waited througli the day for the word to move out. 
They didn't know exactly what tliey were expected to do, but they knew they were 
going to do it. Nine months later, when the war was over and the men were crossing 
the ocean on their way home, General Haan made a speech at a banquet of officers 
of the Division in which he said that the possibility of failure never entered his head 
at the time his Division was preparing to go into action on the Ourcq and while the 
32nd was driving at the Germans in the long smash to the Vesle. That is exactly 
the way every officer and man in the Division felt at the time. A major offensive 
was a new one on them ; but they had trained for it, and they knew in theory what 
they should do — attack, dig in, hold and prepa.re to attack again. They thought a 
little about some concrete things tliat might actually happen, but the possibility of 
failure was not one of the visions they entertained. 

At nightfall the 64th Brigade started filtering forward to make the relief, while 
the G3rd Brigade remained bivoua.cked in the Foret de Fere. From this time on the 
battle raged, and for the next eight days hammer blows were rained upon the enemy 
whenever he was found. In the savage fighting that ensued the German line was 
forced steadily back, over difficult ground, including the strongly fortified position 
on the Ourcq river, for a distance of If) kilometers to the Vesle river, where, as a 
brilliant climax to the brilliant American attacks, the G-ith Infantry Brigade cap- 
tured by storm the important town of Fismes, and the 63rd Brigade took the im- 
portant Gemian railhead on the Vesle in the left of our sector. 




"As a brilliant climax to the brilliant American attacks, the 64th Infantry Brigade captured by storm the 

important town of FISMES." 

A STREET IN FISMES. 

55 



TUK THItlTi^hCUXlJ m VISION IN TUB WOItU) WAR 




V^-^^J^^U-^! 



; a*-'! I 




'^ 



AI)\AN( 1 
/jirA ^n emj Dhiutm 



ma. 



''\ 



^"^ 



;-~ ,. . • . • A I. \ *S 



V>, \ 



:>i; 







CHAPTER V. 

The Baptism of Fire. 

I HE memory of that relief which started as the mantle of darkness 
fell on the war-racked slopes of the Ourcq on July 29th and which 
was completed in the misty midsummer morning of July 30th, is 
indelibly impressed upon the minds of the men of the 12?th In- 
fantry who stumbled forward through the Stygian night to take 
tlicir places in the front line. They were guided into place by 
details from the tired 3rd Division and by their own reconnoiter- 
iug parties which had been over the ground in the daytime, but 
the night was so utterly black that the long relieving column had 
to grope its way blindly along, harassed by false gas alarms and all the exasperating 
delays to which a movement of this kind is always subjected. The big gun flashes as 
the troops passed through the American battery positions gave the sweating soldiers 
glimpses of a smashed and dusty road, the center of which they were forced to avoid 
in favor of the necessary ambulance and supply traffic. Although the distance 
covered was far less than the long hike a few nights before when they moved up 
from reserve to support, the effort was more trying to both nerves and muscles, but 
Colonel Langdon's regiment and Colonel McCoy's 128th, which followed in close 
support, finally made their way through the blind night, and when the damp dark- 
ness started to dissolve in the early morning hours, they had taken the places of the 
fatigued regulars from the Third and were in position on the line of the Ourcq in 
the vicinity of Roncheres. Fortunately, the necessary noise made by floundering 
through the inky night had not apprised the enemy of anything unusual, and the 
movement was completed without undue hindrance from the German artillery. 

Dawn found the front elements of the 127th facing the Bois des Grimpettes, a 
strong German position in a clump of woods, wliich had held up the 3rd Division 
after the famous conquerors of the Marne had fought their way from Chateau- 
Thierry, having been in continuous action since the German offensive started on 
July 15th. On our left were Pennsylvania National (Juardsmen of the 28th Divi- 
sion, who had been through some bloody fighting, and on our right were grizzled 
poilu veterans of the 4th French Division who had been tenaciously hanging to 
the German retreat since the enemy had started falling back from the Marne. 

IMMEDIATE ATTACK PLANNED. 

The 127th was fighting the foe liel'ore command of the sector passed to the 
Commanding General of the 32nd Division. The transfer of authority from the 
staff of the 3rd to the 32nd took place at 11 A. M., and General Ilaan, after getting 
reports that the relief had been completed and that the dispositions which he had 
ordered had been verified, immediately held a conference with the Commanding Gen- 



57 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

eral of the 3rd Division Artillery, which liad hcen left in the sector to support the 
32ud, the 57th Field Artillery Brigade having not yet come up. The 28th Division 
liad reported during the morning that the Peunsylvaniaus would be unable to advance 
in their sector until the menace of the Grimpettes woods was removed from their 
flank, and General Haan accordingly planned to take the German position at once. 
Liaison was established with the 28th, and the support of the 28th Division artillery 
was secured for the projected assault on Grimpettes. The plan contemplated the 
advance of the 28th Division as soon as the 32nd had taken the woods. 

In accordance with this plan, at 2:30 P. M., just three and one-half hours after 
the Division had taken over its first active sector, troops of the 127th Infantry went 
over the top and followed a rolling barrage into the Bois des Grimpettes. There had 
been a brief but intensive artillery preparation on the German position before the 
attack was launched, and some snappy work by runners and officers was necessary 
to get the troops in position to go over at the proper time. For some of the assault 
platoons zero hour was the moment they got their orders, but in spite of the close work 
necessary the Division's first major attack was entirely successful and was made 
exactly according to the schedule arranged. The 127th dashed across the clearing 
which the enemy woods commanded, pushed through the tangle of wire and fallen 
trees, and cleared the Germans out, until their advance was halted by machine gun 
fire from another clump of woods on their right Hank. 

On this flank, from positions in the Bois des Cierges, the enemy continued 
during the day to pour a deadly fire, and successfully hindered the 127th in its 
efforts to enlarge its gain. However, as darkness fell, the Americans made their 
way to the edge of the Cierges woods, and established themselves in position there 
with the idea of clearing the place out in the morning. During the night, the Ger- 
mans discovered the menace and delivered a counter attack, about midnight, with a 
force from the Bois de Meuniere. Determined not to be dislodged from their posi- 
tion of vantage, the 127th met the attack and a sanguinary bayonet melee raged for 
hours in the dark tangle of the woods. The attacking force finally was routed, and 
retired, leaving many dead. 

Unable to loosen the American grip on the woods by a direct attack, the enemy, 
during the rest of the night, tried to make the position untenable by making it the 
target of a heavy concentration of artillery fire. The survivors of the German attack 
were able to give the enemy artillery very exact information as to the American 
position, and toward morning our troops were slightly withdrawn so as to avoid the 
mounting losses from shell fire. We continued to comnuind the Bois des Cierges, 
however, and the front line was relieved from the galling fire it liad suffered from 
that direction on the late afternoon before. 

MICHIGAN TROOPS GO IN. 

During tlie night of July 30tli-3]st, the G3rd Brigade moved up from support 
for its baptism of fire, relieving the 28th Division, which had made a slight advance 
following the fall of Grimpettes. The Michigan soldiers duplicated the feat of their 
Wisconsin comrades on the night before, by making a successful relief in the face 
of trying circumstances, and on the morning of July 31st, were in a position for their 
share of the glory about to be won by Les Terribles. On that morning, the two 
brigades of the 32nd, in line side by side, the 63rd on the left and the 64th on the 
right, occupied the entire front of the 38th French Corps, which previously had been 
held by two Divisions. The line extended across the sector through the Bois des 

58 



THE BAPTISM OF FIRE 




aip #,9 f ^ 



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^ 






"The 63rd Brigade moved uiJ frum support for its baptism of fire." 

THE ABOVE SCENE IS NEAR COURMONT, FRANCE. 

See exploding shell just to the right of the tree on extreme left of the picture. 

Grimpettes, one-half kilometer south of the village of Cierges, to Ferrae Caranda on 
the left, where the 63rd Brigade connected up with the Rainbow troops. 

In front of the 32nd loomed Hill 213 above the village of Cierges, a hornet's 
nest of German machine guns. It was apparent to the Corps Commander that these 
two spots were the menace of his front, and, in compliance with his request that an 
attempt be made to capljure them, an attack was prepared in which both brigades 
were to participate. 

Directly in front of us was the long, open slope of the Ourcq Valley, reaching 
to the small woods leading up to the woods of Lcs Jomblettes on Hill 212, a 
spur of Hill 230. This objective constituted one of the strongest German positions 
on the line of the Ourcq, and the success of the contemplated operation meant the 
breaking of the Kaiser's last formidable line of resistance south of the Vesle. 

Les Jomblettes at this time was holding up not only the 32nd Division, but 
machine gun nests there and in the Bois Pelger, further back, flanked the open 
ground in front of the 42nd Division and absolutely prevented any advance by the 
Rainbows. 

The assault planned was on much the same order as the initial attack of the day 
before. After a brief artillery preparation, the troops advanced under the protection 
of a barrage. On the left the 63rd Brigade made its "big league" debut in a work- 
manlike manner, promptly reaching its objective. Hill 212. The Michiganders dove 
into Les Jomblettes and mop])ed it up, and then cleaned out the Bois Pelger, allow- 
ing the 42nd Division to advance. It was hot work, and some wicked fighting took 

59 



TEE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

place before the enemy was forced to retire his line to the Bois de la Planchette, 
where the Americans could see another tough job in store for them. 

While the Michigan boys were roughing it with the foe on the left, the 127th was 
struggling for further advantage on the right. The Wisconsin troops pushed their 
attack through the village of Cierges and passed beyond, only to be held up by a 
withering hail of machine gun bullets from Bellevue Farm, which had been organ- 
ized into a very strong center of resistance and which the artillery had failed to 
smother. Officers leading the attack saw the impossibility of taking the position by a 
frontal assault, and so broke off the attack until the night of July 31st, when the 
right flank of the 64th Brigade succeeded in filtering through as far as Hill 230. 

Unfortunately, however, the Fourth French Division had also been held up in 
the afternoon attack, and in consequence the Americans who reached Hill 230 
were wide open on their right flank to machine gun fire from in front of the French 
in the vicinity of Reddy Farm and on their left rear to fire from the vicinity of 
Bellevue Farm. When it became apparent that the whole front could not be 
straightened out and brought up to the advanced position, the troops in the fire- 
swept salient were withdrawn from Hill 230 and took shelter on the reverse slope 
between the village of Cierges and Bellevue Farm. 

GERMAN LINE DENTED. 

The day's attack had been launched with the hope of breaking the German line 
of the Ourcq. Owing to the courageous German resistance and a cunningly arranged 
machine gun defense, the line had not been broken, but it had been badly battered 







'The Micliigaiiders du\e ijilo Lea Juiiiblettes and mopped it up. 
BOIS JOMBLETTES, NEAR CIERGES. 



60 




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61 



TEE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

and actually pierced in some spots. It appeared tliat the German hold on the line 
had been shaken, and, with victory in sight, the Division Commander decided to 
attack along the entire front on the morning of August 1. The Bois de la Planchette 
was the objective of the 63rd Brigade, and Hill 230 the goal of the Wisconsin outfit. 
The 64th Brigade had the added mission of turning the strong position at Bellevue 
Farm which had stopped the attack of the day before. 

During the night, the Brigade and Eegimental commanders disposed their troops 
according to orders, based upon the problem before them, and by dawn were ready 
for what was regarded as the 32nd Division's most critical test. The day would prove 
whether or not the Americans could continue to deliver the punch with which they 
had entered the offensive, whether they had the power of siistaincd effort, or whether 
they had "shot their bolt" in the brief but bitter struggle of the past few days. 

The attack started with much promise of success, but reports from every section 
of the front indicated that the Germans opposed to us were not of the fleeing kind. 
They resisted desperately, and dozens of groiips died at their posts rather than 
"kamerad" before the American waves which surged forward. The German Com- 
mand was under no misapprehension as to the importance of the position, and had 
put in fresh troops to attempt to hold the Ourcq against further American attacks. 
These troops were amply provided with machine guns, strongly supported by 
artillery, and they put up a game fight. 

KEY TO OURCQ CAPTURED. 

But Les Terribles were not to be denied. Although new to the vicious kind of 
warfare in which they found themselves, they rushed the enemy defenses with irre- 
sistible determination, captured the Bois de la Planchette and Hill 230, maneuvered 
the foe out of Bellevue Farm, and finally completely overwhelmed the strong 
position which was the day's objective and the key to the entire enemy line to the 
north of the Ourcq. 

The capture of Bellevue Farm and Hill 230 was a triumph of tactics as well as 
bravery. It was accomplished by a converging movement of the two regiments of the 
64th Brigade, the 127th Infantry on the left attacking from Cierges in a northerly 
direction to the left of Bellevue Farm, and the 128th Infantry on the right going out 
of the Division sector into the French front tlirough the western edge of the Bois de 
Meuniere and attacking Hill 230 and the woods to the right of the hill, at the same 
time turning Bellevue Farm on the right. Early in the afternoon, the forward 
elements of the 128th were in Bellevue Farm, and about the same time, the leading 
platoons of the 127th passed the position on the left and continued up the road 
nearly to Reddy Farm. After dark, the 128th, still operating on the edge of the 
Division sector, got troops into the Bois de Meuniere on the right of Hill 230, where 
they were joined by liaison troops of the Fourth French Division. The two flanks 
of the Brigade thus enveloped Hill 230 and completely dominated it. 

The possession of Hill 230 and the high ground extending across the sector to the 
left had been especially valuable to the Germans, and they held tenaciously to the 
position. Wlien it fell, they could do nothing but retreat. They seem to have 
promptly sensed their danger and hastened their withdrawal while the Americans 
were making sure of victory. From information secured during the night, it was 
apparent that the enemy was pushing his retirement with great rapidity to escape 
a further blow. 

The 42nd Division, which fought grimly during the day on the left of the 63rd 
Brigade, succeeded in breaking the German resistance which had been holding up the 

62 



THE BAPTISM OF FIRE 







i iif 0(1,11 iii-ii.i Aiiiiit;i> Uligaik- na.? iiliail> nil Hi positioil." 

A CAMOUFLAGED GTJN, 57th FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE. 



Rainbow advance. By the night of August 1st, the 42nd Division line was well 
forward, and on the right of the 38nd, the Fourth French Division, under cover of 
the darkness, came up on a line with the Wisconsin men who held Hill 230. 

The situation was now such that the commander of the 6th French Army deemed 
it probable a consolidated advance could break through, and such an advance 
was accordingly ordered to begin on the morning of August 2nd. In the meantime, 
the batteries of the 57th Field Artillery Brigade, which had been coming into the 
line since the night of July 30th-31st, was finally all in position and set to fire the 
barrage which was to protect the infantry in their final push. 

There were early indications, on the morning of August 2nd, when the new 
drive started, that the Germans were abandoning their positions without the stubborn 
resistance which had made them worthy foes for the past three days. On the 32nd 
Division front, the forward movement progressed rapidly, and early in the day our 
troops had passed Reddy Farm and advanced to a line a little south of Chamery, 
which was the day's objective. "Sacrifice" machine gun crews had interrupted the 
progress to a certain extent, but none of the organized resistance of previous experi- 
ence had been encountered, so it was decided to press on beyond the objective. The 
pursuit was continued encT'getically to a line north of the village of Dravegny, which 
the 32nd Division reached by nightfall, after advancing a distance of approximately 
6 kilometers. 

The extent of the Ajnerican victory was now apparent, and the allied command 
planned to drive on to the Vesle. Accordingly, on August 3rd, the pursuit was 
resumed, and our troops continued to steadily gain ground, although meeting with 

63 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

increased resistance, especially from the left flank, where the 42nd Division, on 
account of the many patches of bothersome woods from which the sacrifice machine 
guns operated, was unable to advance as rapidly as the 32nd. 

GEEMANS STAND ON VESLE. 

By the end of the day, the Division's front line had advanced 7 kilometers, to the 
hills overlooking the valley of the Vesle, about 1 kilometer south of the Vesle on the 
left and two kilometers south of Fismes on the right flank. Here considerable resist- 
ance was encountered from the German rear guard organization, which was making 
a stand to protect the withdrawal over the river. After ascertaining that the enemy 
intended to make a stand, the advanced forces were thinned out and withdrawn, to 
prevent heavy casualties from the continuous stream of machine gun and artillery 
fire from the well organized German positions on the heights north of the Vesle. 

About midnight on August 3rd, the Corps Commander ordered the 32nd Division 
to push forward to the Vesle and provide the means of crossing. Immediately dis- 
positions were ordered with the idea of overcoming the German rear guard and 
establishing the American forces in command of the river crossings. 

When the pursuit of the Germans started on August 2nd, the Division front was 
held by elements of all four infantry regiments, the 126th on the left being in 
liaison with the 42nd Division, with the 125th, 127th and 128th, in the order named 
from left to right, the 128th being in liaison with the Fourth French Division on the 
right. When the advance was started on August 2nd, the 125th and 12Gth moved 




"The Division's front line had advanced 7 kilometers to the hills overlooking the Vesle.' 

MONT ST. MARTIN. 

Note German shell exploding — center of picture. 

64 



THE BAPTISM OF FIFE 




■'■'J' ^S%^ lii^^®%lr%^>^v-Cv'! 



y. 




"The enemy 



by means of very active trench mortar fire, was able to hold the town.' 
"Captured — 10 trench Mortars." 

A GERMAN "MINNIE." 



out side bv side, with the ISStli, taking the lead in the right Bul>-seetor, foHowed by 
the ISrtli'. On August 3rd, the 63rd Brigade also ec-heloncd in depth, the 125th 
taking the lead with the 126th in support. The 128th eoutinued in the lead on the 
right. In two days the leading regiments- advanced the Division's front line a 
distance of 13 kilometers for the greatest gains ever recorded by the 32nd. 

With another attack in prospect, the 128th was relieved at St. Gilles on the night of 
August 3rd, and on the afternoon of August 4th, Colonel Laiigdon's regiment moved 
out of St. Gilles toward Fismes, while the 63rd Brigade attacked the railroad yards 
on their front. The enemy, however, had no intention of yielding without a bitter 
battle, and by means of very heavy artillery and machine gun fire was able success- 
fully to hold the town and railroad yards during the early hours of the afternoon. 



65 




■c 



66 



TEE BAPTISM OF FIRE 



'LES TERRIBLES" TxVKE FISMES. 



In its attack on Eismes, the 127th Infantry was badly cut np, and late in the day 
Colonel Langdon organized a provisional battalion out of what was left of his regi- 
ment and sent this force forward to storm the town. His shattered companies made 
a desperate assault and finally succeeded, about nightfall, in passing through the 
town and establishing a position on the south bank of the river. On the left, the 
63rd Brigade took the railroad yards and succeeded in getting a few small patrols 
across the river during the night, but was unable to maintain them there, and they 
were withdrawn. 

On August 5th, the troops of the 127tli. who were in Fismes, gave their attention 
to mopping up the west half of the town. Attempts also were made to cross the river, 
but without success. On the night of August 5th, the Third Battalion of the ISSth 
Infantry, which was the only strong battalion left in the 64th Brigade, was ordered 
into Fismes to reinforce the 127th, and on the morning of August Oth, all four 
companies of the reinforcing battalion entered Eismes, relieving the 127th. 

There were still German snipers in the town, and the 128th continued to mop up 
the place. In the eastern part of the town German and American patrols clashed in 
fights for possession of sheltering walls and buildings, and it was not until nightfall 
that the Americans could claim anything like control of the city. 

By this time, it had become apparent that an organized attack would have to be 
made if the Allies were to secure bridge-heads across the Vesle, and the 28th Division 
was ordered up to relieve the 32nd and prepare for the effort. On the night of 
August 6th-7th, the Pennsylvanians came up from the rear, where they had been 
following in support of the 32nd since their relief from the line over a week before 
by the 63rd Brigade. The Keystone soldiers took over Fismes from the battered 
battalion of the 128th on the morning of August 7th, and relieved the 63rd Brigade 
in the left sub-sector during the night before. The relief in the town was made in 
the presence of enemy patrols, and, though the Americans continued to hold the city, 
Fismes was a No-Man's Land and fair game for both sides for several weeks there- 
after. 



67 



CHAPTER VI. 

"Le5 Terribles" Report to General Mangin. 

II E las^t tired dnughboys sifted out of the front line positions dur- 
ing the forenoon of August 7tli, and dragged tlieir weary feet 
liaek to the shattered, filthy towns which a few days before they 
liad rushed through in the heat of their first big battle. They 
found some shelter, such as it was; they found their rolling 
kitchens with plentiful hot food, and they found more or less 
rest, ]>uiictuatc(l, however, by airplane bombs and heavy shells at 
frequent intervals. In twenty-four hours they felt a lot better, 
and began to take an interest in hearing what they had accom- 
plished. Each small unit knew, of course, that it had gained its objectives, that it 
had fought well ; but had the Division as a whole demonsti'ated that it was the shock 
outfit we all believed it to be? 





"They found their rolling kilcliens with plentiful hot food.' 
NEAR MONT ST. M.'MITIN. 



69 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVL^ION IN THE WORLD WAR 

It had. Up at Diavegiiv, a town about in the center of the territory the Division 
had just wrested from the enemy, the 128th Infantry had a battalion headquarters. 
On the day after the relief a runner, coming from regimental headquarters, brought 
the news that all was well. 

"General Ilaan was just out to see Col. McCoy," he told the company runners 
gathered around l)attalion headquarters. "The Old Boy was all smiles. I guess he's 
satisfied." 

He was; and soon the story of the General's smile was going the rounds of 
every mess line. Little by little the men during the next few days heard the story 
of what their Division had done. They learned that in seven days of fighting — 
which means shooting, marcliing, rushing, digging, sweating, bleeding, enduring 
hunger, thirst, exhaustion, coolies and all manner of the manifold hardships of 
war — they had gained 19 kilometers; captured eighteen villages or fortified farms, 
captured four pieces of heavy artillery, five pieces of light artillery, ten trench 
mortars, and 28 machine guns, many of which they turned on the foe, besides hun- 
dreds of rifles and artillery and machine gun ordnance which they did hot use. They 
learned that the anunuiiition and war material which they had captured was being 
collected and hauled to the rear by the trainload. They found it was the Fourth 
Prussian Guards who had first tried to stop their rush on the Ourc(j and whom they 
had so terribly punished and completely vanquished. They learned that the 200th 
and 2 null German divisions had then Iteen thrown in against them in an attempt to 
stay their rush for the Vesle, and they knew where all that were left of those two 
divisions were now. They were north of the Vesle, and thanking their stars that 
they were fleet enough of foot to outdistance those mad soldiers from across the seas 
whom the French were calling "Ix;s Terribles." 

EARN NICKNAME OF "LES TERRIBLES." 

For it was in tliis battle that the .S2n(l Division got its name. When the fight 
first started General de Mondesir, commanding the 38th French Corps, under whose 
orders the 32nd was serving, came up to see how the Americans were conducting the 
battle. He looked over the plans at the Division P. C, and asked questions 
concerning the methods by which expected results were to be achieved; then he 
shook hands with everybody and expressed himself as "tres content," which means, 
of course, that he thought it would work. 

Not satisfied with visiting Division Headquarters, the French Corps Commander, 
in order to inforjn himself further, went to the front, found a good observation point, 
and with his own eyes saw our soldiers as they climlied the heights to the north of 
the Ourcq containing the strong position included in Bellevue Farm, Tlill 230, the 
Jomblettes Woods and the heights in the left of our sector. He saw them clearing 
the enemy out of those powerful positions with a regularity and determination which 
contented even a fiery Frenchman, and when he later learned that our troops had 
that day taken all the strong positions to the north of the Ourcq and were solidly 
entrenched there and holding them, he said, "Oui, Oui, Lps snldals fcrribic. Ires hien, 
tres bien !" 

And the name stuck. General Mangin heard of it and referred to the 32nd 
Division as "Ijes Terribles'' when he asked for the Division to join his famous 10th 
French Army of shock troops north of Soissons, and he later made it official when 
he incorporated it in his citation for their terrific punch at Juvigny. 

70 



"LES TERRIBLES" REPORT TO GENERAL MANGIN 

Owing to the sanguinary character of the figliting in the Aisne-Marne offensive, 
tlie uumbur of prisoners taken was less than might otherwise have been the case. 
The Prussian Guards shot it out with us on the Ourcq, and when they broke it was 
because there weren't enougli left of tliem to stop tlie American rush. The two 
divisions that succeeded them did not die as galhmtly, but they retired skillfully, and 
there was little "kamerading." Asi a result, but one German officer was captured, 
and only ninety-six men passed through the Division cage. 

Our burial squads interred more German dead than the 32nd Division's total of 
killed and missing. 

Our own casualties were heavy, numerically, but light in comparison with the 
results achieved and the losses known to have been inflicted on the enemy. Our 
casualties were: Killed and died of wounds, 777; severely wounded, 1153; slightly 
wounded, 2009; missing 12; captured, 2 officers and 6 men. Total losses from all 
causes, 4187. This total does not include the reduction of fighting strength sulTered 
by every regiment through the evacuation of men who were taken ill on the field of 
battle and who could not k-eep up with their hard marching outfits. Only the 
stoutest hearts and strongest constitutions reached the Vesle on the heels of the foe, 
and pitiful indeed were some of the handfuls which company commanders mustered 
as thi'ir units when they took their men out of line on August 7th. 

32nd STDOD TEST. 

This operation tested the ability of the Division in almost every phase of warfare. 
The men demonstrated that they could outfight the German in hand to hand en- 
counters; that they could take his positions by assault; that they could outmaneuver 
the enemy when maneuver tactics were desirable ; and that they would go without 
food and sleep when it became necessary to leave their supplies behind and relent- 
lessly pursue a retreating foe. During the operation, they learned to use the auxil- 
iary infantry arms, and special weapons that were not called into use in the early 
fighting were utilized to great advantage when the enemy resistance south of the 
Vesle was broken. 

The operation was fought almost entirely under the 38th French Corps, the 3rd 
U. S. Corps, commanded by Major General Bullard, taking over the sector on the 
morning of August 5th after the 32nd Division had occupied the south bank of the 
Vesle. , ; I Hl.j 

For a few days after the relief the division rested in the small towns between 
the Oureq and the Vesle to which the troops had been withdrawn. Up ahead the 
77th and 28th Divisions were trying to cross the Vesle and finding it impossible. 
It appeared that a period of stabilization on the Vesle front would follow, and 
orders were received for the 32nd to resume training. A rcdisj)osition of forces was 
required which took the men from the towns where they were billeted and sent them 
to bivouac in the shelter of woods not far from the front, always within range of the 
German artillery, and constantly exposed at night to the air])lane bombers. How- 
ever, the men remained well concealed; their jxisitions were apparently not dis- 
covered by the enemy, and the casualties during the time that the Division served 
as a reserve for General BuUard's Corps were slight. 

The training program provided for instruction in the use of infantry specialties, 
and maneuver problems, including a division terrain exercise. A few replacements 
were received to fill the gaping ranks, but (he new men were only partially trained, 
and, of course, had never been under fire. Tliey brought the strengtii of the rifle 

71 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN Till: WORLD WAR 

companies up to about 110 men and two officers cacli. In less than twenty days 
after they joined the Division these new men were thrown into one of tlie fiercest 
bits of action of the whole war. But so thorough was their limited instruction 
and so quickly did they assimilate the aggressive s])irit of the Division, that they 
conducted themselves like veterans when the test came, and contributed greatly to 
the prestige which the Division gained in its famous Juvigny campaign. 

ORDERED TO HEroitT TO MANGIN. 

The training had proceeded less than two weeks w'hen orders were received to 
move the Division again to the vicinity of Soissons and report to the Comnumding 
(■eneral of the Tenth French Army, the great Mangin. 

Tile order came rather suddenly, and provided that the movement be made by 
trucks for the foot troops and by marching for the artillery and mounted element.'!. 
The 57th Field Artillery had remained in action when the 3tind was withdrawn, and 
was supporting the 28tli and 7ith Divisions. 

On August 23rd the artillery brigade was withdrawn from the Vesle and the 
infantry embussed for the new sector. The Division moved to the vicinity of Perre- 
fonds, and after a few days in the Army reserve was sent acro.«s the .Xisne to a posi- 
tion in the rear of the 127th French Infantry Division, with instructions to prepare 
to relieve that division at an early date. Tlve 32nd had no sooner reported itself in 
the new reserve position than the order for the relief came. 

The sector north of Soissons seemed, as we marched toward the front on the 
night of August 2Gth-27th, every bit as active as did the Chateau-Thierry sector 
when we marched in there just a month before. Up ahead were the same rumbling 
guns, coughing their barrages at the foe. In the summer sky was the same feverish 
red glare, throbbing throughout the night, as our batteries and theirs poured back 
and forth tbcir deadly hates. 

"JUST BEFORE THE BATTLE." 

But this time we knew what we w^ere going into. While the men were training 
back of the Vesle they had hoped that their ne.xt move would be out of the war zone, 
for a week or two anyway, away from the shells and the airplanes and the cooties. 
The hope survived in the breasts of some even during the "bus (rip to the new sector, 
but when they debussed they knew this was no rest area. Well, fair enough, the 
doughboy ruled; anything was better than those' damned woods in which they had 
been camping since their last fight. 'Iliis coming action looked like it might be a 
whole lot like the last. The country appeared to be much the same. It wasn't rain- 
ing anyway, but there sure was a sight of dust. "C'est la guerre!" If it wasn't one 
thing it was another. 

We wondered whether Heinie would stick as he did on the Ourcq or run as he did 
afterwards. Some of the doughboys would just as soon he didn't stick; those 
Prussian Guards were sure hard to lick. Others IioihhI he would. 

"Might as well wipe him up all in one place," they figured. "Besides when 
we're chasing Ileinie we're running away from our chow." The memory of those 
eatless days during the Aisne-Marne pursuit survived longer than the horror of the 
bloody fights which ensued when the chase was temporarily halted. 

As they marched into their second battle the men voiced some ideas that they had 
not expressed as they went into their first fight. They were veterans now, and they 
had the assurance of veterans. They knew their companies were down to 50 per 

72 




■S g w 
260 

g E ^ 






73 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WAR 

cent, of tlie autliorized strength, but they also knew that what there were of them 
were as good as full companies before Chateau-'J'hierry. And again the possibility 
of failure wns never thought of. The French had pushed the Germans out of the 
trenches through which the road we were using drove toward the front. Well, if they 
could make the enemy move, so could we. The doughboys hoped the front line 
wasn't too far ahead of the support position. These approach marches were a 
nuisance. Wlio wouldn't rather fight than hike? 

The relief order provided that the ;i2nd should occupy the position then held by 
the 127th French Division on the night of August 2Tth-28th. It was decided to 
])ut the 63rd Brigade in the line and the 64th in support, and orders were issued 
accordingly. As soon as darkness furnished a cover the troops started moving up 
and again the battle was on. 

It was a dilTercnt fight from the Aisne-Marne operation. It was a fight all the 
time — every minute. There was no respite while we were catching up to the enemy. 
We were caught up to him from the instant we got into the front line zone until we 
pulled out of it — five days of hell on earth. The 63rd Brigade went over the top 
at the very minute General Haan took command of the sector and the filth Brigade 
was stabbing machine gun nests five days later when the Moroccans came up to 
lake the job off our hands. 




74 




1. Mahhhau Pktain. 

2. CJknkrau Mangin, Commandinc 10th French Army. 

3. Marshal F(k:h, Commander of all Allied Forces. 

4. Major Armand (I<iez, Ficnch Aniiy, Liaison Olhcer with the 32nd Division diirinp; all operations. 

5. LiEUTRNANT Coi.ONEL Htanii-aus Lobf.z, French Army, Chief of French Corps of Instructors with the 32nd 

Division during Training Period in France; Occupation of Sector in Alsace, Aisne-Marnc Offensive and 
Oise-Aisne Offensive. 



75 



77/ A' TIIIRTV-SECOM) DIVISION L\ Till': WOULD 







76 



CHAPTER VII. 
The Capture of Juvigny. 



il 



T|HE CSrd Brigade veterans made the relief ot tlie 127th French 
Division with neatness and disjjatcli, and without any of the con- 
' fusion which characterized the relief on the Ourcq a month befoi-e. 
The Americans were giiided into their positions by the retiring 
French, and slipped into the trenches in perfect order. By 2 
A. M. the relief had been accomplished, and reports to that eifect 
were made to the two French divisions on either side of us. As 
soon as he learned that the Americans were in position, the Com- 
manding General of the French division on the right notified the 
Commanding General of the 32nd that he had planned an attack to take place at 
7 A. M. for the purpose of correcting a dangerous salient in his front line. As the 
immediate objective was about opposite the point of liaison between the two divisions, 
the Americans were asked to participate in the attack. 

In spite of the fact that the hour set for the operation — 7 A. M. — was the 
precise hour at which command of the sector passed to General Haan, the 32nd 
Commander sent word to the French that we would assist in the attack. General 
Covell, then commanding the 63rd Brigade, was informed of the French request and 
of General Haan's assent to it, and the Brigade Commander in turn instructed 
Colonel Westnedge, in command of the front line, to get in touch with the French 
and assist in the operation. This was promptly done, and, regardless of the fact that 
no preliminary reconnaissance of the front by the relieving troops had been practical, 
a plan of action was agreed upon, objectives fixed, and at the appointed hour the 
Michigan troops went over the top for the first clash of what was to be a continuous 
struggle for five bloody days. 

The Americans readily gained their objective — the railroad track west of the vil- 
lage of Juvigny, the village which was destined to be one of the high spots in the 
career of Les Tcirriblcs. The 63rd Brigade turned in over one hundred prisoners 
as a result of their push, and the captured Germans all testified as to their complete 
surprise at the presence of Americans in the sector. Their surprise was a testimonial 
to the careful manner in which the approach to the sector had been accomplished 
and the relief made. 

During the day, the 63rd Brigade found that it is often a lot easier to gain 
ground than it is to hold it. The advance in tlie morning had been made with com- 
paratively light casualties, but the position captured was on high open ground on the 
slope of a hill facing the enemy. There was little cover to he had except in shell 
holes, and our men were subjected to artillery and machine gun fire from enemy 
positions that had our front lines under excellent observation. Under this galling 
fire, the casualties were heavy; but there was nothing to do but stand it, as the 
position could not be abandoned without endangering the French. 



77 




78 



THE CAPTURE OF JUVIGNY 

Shortly after noon, the Germans decided to attempt a counter attack for the 
purpose of dislodging the Americans. Preceded by an artillery and machine gun 
barrage, they struck at the point of contact between the French and Americans. The 
•5l)th French Division on our right was forced to fall back several hundred meters, 
Mild the right of our line was bent back to maintain liaison. Our machine gunners, 
however, held their gi'ound and poured an effective fire into the attacking Germans, 
and our artillery also got into action quickly. After their first recoil, the French also 
delivered a telling fire, and the counter attack was broken up without having accom- 
plished its object. After that, the Germans resumed their harassing artillery and 
machine gun fire on the troops in the vicinity of the railroad tracks, but they 
thinned out, took what shelter they could find, and weathered the storm as best they 
could. 

WHOLE ARMY ATTACKS. 

General Mangin ordered a general attack by the entire 10th French Army to 
take place at 5 :35 A. M. on the morning of August 29th, with the pretentious 
object of a complete break through the German line. For this operation, the 
Division was disposed in the same manner as when it entered the sector, namely with 
the 63rd Brigade in the front line and the (!4th Brigade in support. The two regi- 
ments of the 63rd were side by side, with the 126th on the right and the 12.5th on 
the left, each in liaison with a French division. Two companies of tanks and a troop 
of Moroccan cavalry were attached to the Division to be used as necessary. The 
57th Field Artillery Brigade came into the sector and the artillery command was 
taken over on the night of August 28th-29th by Brigadier General G. Leroy Irwin, 
who had under him several units of French artillery in addition to his own 32nd 
Division guns. 

A tremendous artillery preparation had been ordered during the night, and was 
carried out; but the enemy organization of machine gun defense was so effective that 
the artillery failed to put the numerous nests out of commission, and the barrage 
which rolled ahead of the attacking infantry did not keep the German gunners from 
operating so as to cover the entire front. The numerous caves in this region lent 
themselves admirably to the Gernum plan of defense, the machine gunners remaining 
safely far underground during the artillery preparation and until the barrage passed, 
when they suddenly appeared and poured their fire into the advancing doughboys. 
It also appears that the enemy had been expecting a general offensive, and was well 
prepared for it with artillery. 

At any rate, there was a very heavy machine gun fire across our entire front 
from both flanks, and a counter barrage of great intensity was laid down just as our 
troops jumped off. In consequence, little progress was made. On the left, the 12-ith 
made a slight advance and captured a few prisoners. On the right isolated groups 
which could find cover crossed the jump-off line and penetrated the woods to a con- 
siderable depth, but it was never possible to get enough troops forward to bring the 
whole line up to the position reached by the most advanced patrols. The net result 
of the day's fighting was that no ultimate advance was made, and the positions main- 
tained after the attack wore practically the same as on the night before, except for a 
few minor advantages which the Americans had gained. 

This was true on the front of the entire Army. Everywhere General Mangin's 
storm troops had been sto])])ed, none of the divisions on eilher our right or left 
having anything to show for their powerful thrust. Our casualties from artillery 
and machine gun fire were heavy, as were those of the French. The Germans, too, 

79 




so 



THE CAPTURE OF JUVIGNY 




"Two (oiiiiiaiiii'- (il tanks ut'ie attached to tin- iM\isiuti. ' 
NEAR JUVIGNY, FRANCE. 

it developed later, suffered mightily during the day, anil their defenses were far mure 
badly shaken than was apparent at the time. 

During the forenoon the Division Comnuindcr made a personal reconnaissance 
of the positions held by his troops, and found tliat the men were suffering severely. 
Accordingly, instructions were issued to thin out the front line and hold the for- 
ward positions, which were under intense fire, merely as an observation line. The 
position of our troops was not of the best, and early in the afternoon, the Commander 
of the ()3rd Brigade asked for authority to move his Ijrigade forward and attack the 
woods to the southwest of Juvigny with a view of caj)turing that town and getting a 
more favorable position. Arrangements were made for the attack, which was to be 
delivered at 5 :.'50 P. M., but at 4 :.30 a telephone message from the Corps Com- 
mander directed that no attack be made, and gave tbe information that another 
general attack was to be made the next day. 

In preparation for this attack, the G3rd Brigade, which had suffered heavily in 
the fierce fighting of the two days it was in line, was relieved on the night of August 
y!)th-3()tb by the (Mtli Brigade, the relieving brigaile being dis])oped with the two 
regiments side by side, the 127111 on the right and the 128th on the left, each with 
two battalions in the front line and one in support. 

ASSAULT ON JUVIGNY ORDERED. 

The contemplated general attack, however, was not ordered, and information 
received from the Corps Commander indicated that no infantry attack was intended 
for the 30th. This situation left the 32ud Division front line still exposed on the 



81 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WAR 

hill to the west of Juvigny, with the troops sufTeriiig heavily. While corrective meas- 
ures were being considered, word was received from the SOth Division on our right 
that its right flank had advanced in close liaison with the division on the right of the 
59th, whicli liiid found a weak spot in the German line and had broken through. By 
closely following the progress of this operation, it became evident that the movement 
was destined to meet with considerable success, and preparations were immediately 
made to participate in the shove. Shortly after noon, the Corps Commander in- 
formed the 3'ind that the Germans on our right were giving ground, and instructed 
us to advance our right flank in liaison with the 59th Division. This gave us our 
looked-for opportunity to attack Juvigny, and the plans which had been considered 
were immediately j)ut into effect. 

While progress was being made by troops on our right, .such was not the case on 
our left, where the 66th French Division was held up by heavy fire from machine 
gun nests located on the plateau directly in front of it. Accordingly, it seemed 
probable to tiie Division Commander that the blow at Juvigny would have to be a 
turning movement, with the right of the Division swinging on Juvigny while the 
left kept liaison with the 6Gth French. This was exactly what happened. When the 
attack was launched, the left flank, together with the division on our left, was held 
up by heavy fire coming from the northeast. The right flank, however, moved for- 
ward, and wlule it encountered determined opposition in going through the woods, 
it succeeded in making its way through the ravine to a position to the south of 
Juvigny with the extreme right partially enveloping the town to the east. One 
battalion of the 128th Infantry in the left sub-sector moved forward west of Juvigny 




"Troops entered the town and mopped up, encountering some wicked fighting.' 
JUVIGNY, FRANCE. 



83 



THE CAPTURE OF JUVIGNY 

and finally reached a piisition north of the (own, and in thi,s way the two forces 
practieally surrounded the village. 

The enemy was taken by surprise by the direction of the attack, but recovered 
and delivered a counter attack on our left flank from a point to the north of Juvigny. 
This attack was repulsed by the 128th, which had been reinforced on its left by a 
battalion of the 125th. This battalion had been moved in to keep liaison with the 
GGth French Division, which had been unable to move forward. The left of the 
188th, which tried vainly to push forward, suffered intensely from fire coming from 
in front of the French, and had lost so many men that reinforcements were 
necessary. 

With Juvigny virtually surrounded, troops from the supporting battalion of the 
127th entered the town from the southwest and mopped up, encountering some 
wicked fighting. Over one hundred and fifty prisoners, three of them being officers, 
were captured in the town and a large number w-ere killed. The day's operation 
netted 180 prisoners. 

WHOLE GARRISON^ WIPED OUT. 

The attack cost the Division severely in casualties, especially in the 128th. The 
troops on the right, which gained the ground and captured -luvignj', sufi'ered com- 
paratively light casualties, owing to the fact that the enemy's attention was given 
principally to the troops on the left. The swinging movement of the right flank 
took the enemy by surprise and blanketed his machine guns, located to the north and 
northwest of the village. Juvigny was in our hands for some hours before any 
enemy shells fell in the town, probably due to the fact that the German command 
did not know that the village had been lost. It is thought that none of the garrison 
escaped through the surrounding cordon, the troops holding the village being all 
either captured or killed. 

Instructions had been given to the Commanding General of the G4th Brigade to 
place his troops on the road running north and south just cast of Juvigny, and 
after gaining that ridge to organize the position for defense against possible counter 
attacks, and at the same time prepare for a further advance. The troops of the 
reserve brigade were hurriedly disposed so as to insure the safety of our flanks in 
case of a heavy attack by the enemy. Telephonic communications with the new front 
were quickly established, so that the artillery might be instantly informed of indica- 
tions of enemy activity. 

As a result of the action which culminated in the brilliant capture of Juvigny, 
the front line of the 32nd Division on the morning of August 31st was considerably 
in advance of that of the divisions on our right and left. The division on the left 
had made no advance whatever, and was about a kilometer to the rear, while the 
division on the right, which had fought sturdily all day, was about half a kilometer 
to the rear. 

General Mangin ordered his second gcnci'id attack to take place at four o'clock 
in the afternoon on .Vugust lilst. He ordered an artillery jjrcparation of four hours 
to precede the infantry attack and smash up the enemy defenses which had been so 
badly battered for three straight days of almost continuous artillery fire. The entire 
57th Field Artillery and the artillery of the First Aforoecan Division, which was sup- 
porting the 32nd, was assigned to General ITaan for this attack. A plan to make 
a novel use of this abundance of artillery was discussed by the Division Commander 
and the Artillery Commander, with the result that it was decided to place a triple 

83 



THE TimiT) -SECOND DIVISION fN THE WOULD WAT! 





"Telephonic communications with the new front were quickly established." 
NEAR JUVIGNY, FRANCE. 

rolling barrage in front of the advancing infantry. It luid been learned from 
previous experience in tliis sector that the German macliine gunners were able to 
remain safely concealed during the artillery preparation, and that they did not come 
out of their caves until after the barrage had jiassed over them, wiien tiiey had plenty 
of time to attack the advancing infantry unless the doughboys were following the 
barrage very closely. To overcome this, a double barrage had been tried by some of 
tlie French divisions, the second barrage often catching the machine gunners. But 
not all of them apparently had left their shelters in time to be caught by the second 
ijarrage, so the Americans planned to improve the scheme and use a third barrage. 
'J'hcre were also other factors, namely the peculiar alignment of the Division front, 
which commended the triple barrage for the occasion. Owing to the inability of the 
Division on our left to advance on the ;?Oth, the right half of the Division was con- 
siderably in advance of the left. It was planned to place a st^inding barrage in front 
of the advance lialf of the Division while a rolling barrage was to start in front of 
the left and bring it up on a line abreast of the liglil. Then tlic entire barrage was 
to move forward across the whole front. 

TTIE TKIl'LE BAKHAGE. 

The triple barrage was to cover a depth of about ly^ kilometers, in order to flank 
machine gun nests wliicli might be too far to the west to be covered by the single 
barrage and which might succeed in preventing our troops from moving forward. 
The 128th Infantry, in the left of the sector, was required to move forward, the 
troops adjusting themselves at the same time to the barrage. A time schedule was 



84 



THE CAPTURE OF JUVIGNY 

carefully arranged, and the delicate operation was carried out with great skill and 
exactly as intended. Wlien the rolling barrage arrived on a line with the most 
advanced portion of the front, the troops in the right half of the sector moved 
forward and successfully carried the German trenches. 

Progress across the whole front continued until the Division reached the Terny- 
Somy-Bethancourt road. On the extreme right of the sector, however, in ravines 
and sheltered places, machine gun nests succeeded in holding up the advance of 
the French division on our right and some of the elements of the right of the 32nd. 
The general advance stopped at the Terny-Sorny road, and infiltration was resorted 
to for the purpose of stalking machine gun nests and reducing strong points that 
were harassing the right flank. It was not possible, however, in the short remaining 
period of daylight to clear out all of these obstacles. The ground was therefore 
organized to guard against counter-attacks, and a reorganization of the attacking 
troops was undertaken to prepare for a continuation of the advance on tlie following 
day. 

Our casualties for the day, while considerable in nunilier, were small when com- 
pared with the magnitude of the operation, the result accomplished and the stubborn 
resistance of the enemy. The total number of prisoners captured from 4 o'clock 
in the afternoon until 10 o'clock at night was 550. From them were obtained many 
amusing stories concerning the effect of the triple barrage. Some of them thought 
the Yanks had a machine gun which sprayed seventy-five shells. Their oificers 
characterized the American artillery fire as "crazy," and fi-ankly admitted that they 
did not know what was happening during the terrifying afternoon. The morale of 
the Germans was evidently badly shattered by the tremendous pounding to which 
they had been subjected, and the prisoners all expressed complete satisfaction with 
the fact that they were behind, instead of in front of, the American artillery. 

On the morning of September 1st, further attempts were made to improve the 
positions of oirr advanc-ed elements, and a number of troublesome machine gun nests 
were cleaned up. An effort was made to assist the 59th French Division to come up 
to the road on our right, and the Division was engaged in this ojieration when tiie 
order came for our relief by the First Moroccan Division. This sterling division, 
which included some of the crack French Colonial troops, the Foreign Legion and 
other famous units, had followed closely in support of the 32nd, and upon accom- 
plishing the relief on the night of September lst-2nd, took up the task where the 
.\mericans had left olT, and on Septemixn' 2nd continued tlie advance to Terny-Sorny. 



85 



CHAPTER Vni. 

The Red Arrows Join the First American Army. 

FTER our relief in the front line the Division remained for a 
couple of days in support of the advancing French Army. The 
63rd Brigade at one time nearly got back into the fight. There 
seemed to be a chance to split the German lino by putting another 
brigade in to assist the Moroccans, who were striking some mighty 
W] [ ^ ^' jkMij^ blows in the salient which the 32nd Division had formed, and the 
MS-*3f"*" ■ "" Jl Corps Commander ordered a brigade of the 32nd alerted for the 
purpose. But the opportunity for its use did not develop, and on 
the night of September Sth orders were suddenly received to the 
effect that the 32nd was to be transferred to the First American Army. The next 
day the Division started moving back across the Aisne to its former billeting area 
near Pierrefonds. 

There is no record that after the battle of Juvigny General Haan came out to 
Col. McCoy's P. C. and smiled, but there is a record that after the brilliant 





IN THE GREAT CAVE AT TAUTIERS WHERE GENERAL MANGIN VISITEU THE 32.vd DIVISION. 

87 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOELD WAR 

maneuver which drove the Germans from tlic Juvigny plateau, General Mangin 
came to the 32nd Division P. C. in the great cave at Tartiers and smiled. And 
when he smiles he looks as happy as he looks fierce when he does not smile. He 
told General Ilaan how pleased he was with "Les Terribles," and the way he later 
gave out decorations to the Division demonstrated that he meant what he said. 
General Jlangin wanted to decorate the Division then and there, but learned that it 
must "go through channels," and through channels it went, arriving over si.\ months 
later, when the war was over and General JIangin and "Les Terribles" were again 
neighbors keeping "Die Wacht Am Khein." He decorated the colors of all four 
infantry regiments and all three machine gun battalions with the army order of the 
Croix do Guerre, and cited some 500 officers and men for gallantry in action while 
under his command. Later he issued an order decorating the colors of the artillery 
regiments which participated in the fight. 

Upon its withdrawal from the Oise-Aisne offensive the Division required con- 
siderable replacements. For five days the battle raged with terrific intensity, both 
sides fighting with grim determination and striking blow for blow. In spite of the 
sanguinary nature of the operation and the constant exposure of our troops to every 
weapon with which the enemy was su])plied — and he had them all — our casualties 
were not unusually heavy. 

Our losses were: Killed and died of wounds, 485; severely wounded, 599; 
slightly wounded, 1251; missing, 14; captured, 5 men. Total losses from all causes, 
2504. 

Five German divisions were used \ip in an attempt to hold the position which the 
32nd stormed— the 7(h, the 7th Kescrve, the 223rd, the 238th, and the 23?th. From 
these divisions 937 prisoners were captured, 9 of them being officers. 

The material captured included 2 pieces of heavy artillery, 2 of light artillery, 
IG trench mortars, 112 machine guns, 700 rifles and gi-eat quantities of ammunition 
and material. 

A few of the required replacemeiit.s arrived while the Division was in the vicinity 
of Pierrefonds, waiting for orders. It was generally known that we were to join the 
new American army then in the process of formation. Kumor had it that (here was 
to be an all .Vmerican debut sliortly in the Toul sector, and thither we expected to be 
sent, for a rest and refitting, we hoped, before another drive. 

MOVE TO REST AREA. 

Tlie move wasn't to the Toul sector, but to a rest area in the vicinity of Joinville, 
north of Chaumont. Division Headquarters opened there on September 10th, the 
troops moving from Pierrefonds by train. There everyone prepared for a well- 
earned rest. 

Well earned it was! The 32nd had in less than six weeks engaged in two major 
offensives, and had won victories which contributed decisively to the upper hand 
the Allies were now maintaining all along the front. In the Aisne-Marne Offensive, 
the 32nd, by forcing the Germans back from the Ourcq to the Vesle, had finished 
what Marshal Foch had planned for this phase of the action when his offensive of 
July 18th was launched on the Marne. The Germans were too solidly established 
north of the Vesle to be ousted by a frontal attack, except at great loss, so a flanking 
movement north of Soissons was inaugurated and it was in this movement that the 
32nd participated at Juvigny. 

There, in an operation against an enemy disposed in great depth, supported by 
adequate artillery, and entrenched in highly organized positions, in a country which 

88 



THE UED ARROWS JOIN THE FIRST AMERICAN ARMY 

lent itself naturally to defense, the Division had again broken through the German's 
key position, penetrated his line to a depth of G kilometers and started an enemy 
withdrawal, thus paving the way for a forw'ard movement by the whole 10th French 
Army, which outflanked the positions on the Vesle and allowed the Americans and 
French there to push forward to the Aisne. 

Yes, the doughboys and their officers figured, they had a rest coming, and for a 
few days they enjoyed it, in a peaceful, lovely section of agricultural France in 
which American troops had never before been billeted. Then came replacements, 
and, of course, a training program. About 5,000 new men arrived, including some 
officers. Many of the replacements had had but little training, and intensive in- 
struction was necessary, as the First American Army had struck its initial blow 
with great success at St. Mihiel, and the word had been received that the Division 
might at any time be called upon again to go into action. Special attention was paid 
to gas defense drill, target practice and exercises in attack formations for small 
units. 

ORDERED TO THE ARGOXNE. 

We were just getting acclimated to the Joinville area, and learning to like it 
immensely, for a change, when the Division was ordered forward as a reserve unit. 
We were still short three officers and about fifty men per rifle company, but the new 
men had caught the spirit of "Les Terribles," as all of our replacements readily 
did, and reports from regimental commanders, while indicating that the new-comers 
were not sufficiently trained, spoke highly of their morale and their eagerness to 
profit by the knowledge of the veterans. 




"The Infantry followed in trucks on September 22nd.' 
NEAR SOUILLY, FRANCE. 



89 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 




"The artillery went forward to the vicinity of Verdun." 

The 57th Field Artillerj^ brigade, which had again remained in line north of 
Soissons when the infantry was withdrawn, supported the Jloroccans until the whole 
Division was transferred to the American Army. The artillerymen won the unquali- 
fied praise of the French big gun chiefs with whom they were associated, and before 
they pulled out were assured of the Moroccan commander's appreciation of their 
services. They arrived in the Joinvillc area some time after the infantry, and the 
order sending the 33nd up as a First Army reserve provided that the artillery move- 
ment should begin at once, the marching to be entirely at night. The artillery and 
all animal drawn transportation of the Division started at once. The infantry fol- 
lowed in trucks on September 22nd. 

We did not see the artillery until about three weeks later, when we were in the 
thick of tiie Argonne battle. The artillery went forward to the vicinity of Verdun, 
and immediately was assigned a mission in sujjjjort of the 79th Division, which was 
to jump off in the Argonne-Meuse Offensive, launched on September 2Gth. 

The infantry followed the tn^ail of the artillery to the vicinity of Verdun, where 
the Division was assigned to the Fifth Army Corps as reserve. Wlien the battle 
started on September 2Gth, orders were received to march forward and prepare to 
occupy as a garrison the original front of the Fifth Corps, which had that morning 
gone over the top and attacked the enemy in the Argonne. 

We had listened to the great barrage which opened the Meuse-Argonne offensive 
on the night of Sejitcmbcr 2.'>th-2Gth, and our doughboys, who had heard some 
sizeable barrages up Chateau-Thierry and Soissons way, sensed at once that this 
was something new in the way of a battle. There was something American about 
it. We knew we were going to be in it pretty quick, and all ranks were glad they 
were going to fight as part of an American Army. Not that they didn't like to fight 



90 



THE RED ARROWS JOIN THE FIRST AMERICAN ARMY 

with the French — the poilu was a bully front line pal — but the doughboy likes a 
change, and besides we were Americans, and this was an American punch. 
"Let's go !" 

MISERABLE WEATHER SETS IN. 

About the time we were ordered up in immediate support of the three divisions 
of the Corps which had jumped off that morning, the miserable weather, which was 
one of the most disagreeable features of the long drawn out Argonne battle, set in. 
The Division marched during the night of September 25th-26th and the afternoon 
of September 26th, some of the latter part of the way under a little shell fire, to a 
position in the Foret de Hesse, about 4 kilometers south of what for four years had 
been No Man's Land. 

Foreseeing that the Division might at any moment get instructions to relieve one 
of the divisions in the front line, the brigade commanders were directed to recon- 
noiter the front for the best means of crossing No Man's Land, and our engineers 
and some of our infantry were put to work on the roads. Liaison was immediately 
established by moans of mounted agents with each of tiie divisions in front of us, 
and the staff kept a close watch on developments, so that we might be informed of 
the situation on any front the 32nd might be required to take over. 

In the wet, cold Foret de Hesse the troops waited for whatever might be in store 
for them. Back from the front came reports that success had crowned the attack, 
that every division in the corps had made big gains and that losses had been small. 
Then the reports indicated that the going was becoming harder. Then the gains 
practically ceased. Late in the afternoon on September 28th a report came back that 











"What for four years had been No Man's Land." 
NEAR AVOCOURT, FRANCE. 



91 




el O 

►J O 

» o 



o < 

'A & 

g s 

a H 



92 



THE RED ARROWS JOIN THE FIRST AMERICAN ARMY 

the 37th Division, directly ahead of us, had been counter-attacked and had lost some 
ground. The Corps alerted the 32nd Division and actually had one brigade started 
for the front, when it was discovered that the report was erroneous. So the 63rd 
Brigade, which drew the assignment, had its thrill of again going into action post- 
poned for twenty-four hours. 

INTO BATTLE ONCE MORE. 

Just as darkness was setting in on the cold and rainy night of September 29th, 
the order was received to go forward and relieve the 37th Division. This order had 
been anticipated, and full reconnaissance had been made as to the best routes for 
marching. There was only one road across No Man's Land, and that was by way 
of Avocourt. This was only nominally a road. It was impracticable, for any but 
the lightest vehicles. Moreover, when General ITaan, with a part of his Division 
Staff, rode forward that night with the order in his pocket for the relief of the 37th 
Division, he found that this road, so-called, was blocked for more than 5 kilometers 
by a double line of vehicles, all standing perfectly still. We were so near the front 
line that no lights of any kind were allowed. It was, furthermore, a very dark 
night — no moon — with heavy clouds and a continuous fall of rain whicli bad been 
going on for several days. On the sides of the so-called road, tlirougli Xo Man's 
Land, there was much barbed wire, and it was difficult to get through even in the day 
time, but the order required that we go through that night. 

Fortunate indeed it was that General Ilaan and his Brigade Commanders had 
carefully reconnoitered this ground; otherwise it would have been impossible to get 
through at all at night. General Haan, in person, had reconnoitered the trail further 
on through the woods to the Headquarters of the 37th Division the day before, and 
was familiar with this trail. He himself, therefore, led his own staff to their new 
headquarters, using now and then an electi'ic flash lantern to make sure that his 
staff officers, all of whom were mounted, would not lose their horses in the deep shell 
holes that were on all sides. He reached the Headquarters of the Commanding 
General of the 37th Division about midnight, and reported to that officer the dis- 
position of the 33nd Division, which was making its way forward as best it could, 
one brigade marching on each side of the so-called road, across No Man's Land, in 
single file. The troops marched all night, arriving in the Bois de Montfaucon at 
early dawn, with the heads of the columns. 

This approach march, made by the 32nd Division, is considered by General Haan 
one of the greatest pieces of work that the Division did in all of its battles in France. 
Each man was carrying on his back a load weighing approximately 78 pounds, 
and during this dark and rainy night, floundering all the distance through tlie 
mud, falling frequently over broken barbed wire and broken down brush and trees, 
many of the men marched more than 18 kilometers, which means about 11 miles. But 
these men were hardeTied to their work, and the Division Commander felt sure that 
although the task be was giving them was about the limit of human endurance, yet 
they would respond to his command, and they did. Not only this, but after arriving 
in these shot-to-pieces woods, and after resting from two to three hours and snatch- 
ing a bite of breakfast, the 63rd Brigade was moved forward under cover of mist 
and fog to relieve most of the elements of the 37tli Division during the day-time of 
September 30th. 



93 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 




kk" 'A 4'- . '■■■ 






"On the sides of the so-called road through No Man'a Land there was much barbed wire.' 
NEAR AVOCOURT, FRANCE. 



94 



THE RED ARROWS JOIN THE FIRST AMERICAN ARMY 




"it was at this same lieadquarters, while tlie report was being prepared by the Division Commander and his 
Staff, that a direct hit was registered on this Uttle building." 

DIVISION P. C. IN BOIS DE MONTFAUCON, FRANCE. 

General Haan established his Headquarters in a half sunken building erected by 
the Germans for headquarters, and found that this place was more or less com- 
fortable, although facing in the wrong direction. It was shell proof from the south, 
Init we were now receiving the shells from the north. 

It was in this same "shack" that General Haan, three weeks later, when our 
troops were withdrawn after their terrific work, again sat down to write the account 
of the employment of his troops in the great battle. It was at this same head- 
quarters, while the report was being prepared by the Division Commander and his 
Staff, that a direct hit was registered on this little building by the long range German 
guns. During this period the troops billeted in shell holes and any places that could 
be found through these woods, and were bombed nightly from airplanes. 



95 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 







0|)erations 

o( 

32nd Division 

Sept. 30-Oci. 20 

1918 



96 



CHAPTER IX. 

Breaking the Kriemhilde Stellung. 




^^:-r"<i>^^ 



r WAS in front of a village called Cierges that Les Terribles had 
faced, in the Valley of the Ouicq, their first considerable problem 
of the war; and again, on that inist\- last day of September, they 
found themselves lining up in battle array before another town of 
that same name and size and general appearance. The 63rd 
Brigade had barely gotten into the sector by dawn, and no part 
I if the relief, except the establishment of a few headquarters, had 
Ijuen effected before broad daylight. But a heavy fog hung low 
' over the rolling hills between the Meuse and the Argonne, and, 

liid from enemy aviators and artillery observers by this welcome veil, the Michi- 
gauders proceeded, during the rest of the day, to t^ike over positions from the weary 
and disheveled Ohioans. By nightfall, all elements of the 37th Division had been 
relieved or located, and as soon as darkness fell, the troops in the front line were 
changed, and the 32nd Division was again toe-to-toe with the Germans. 

The morning of October 1st, found the (j;ird Brigade holding the entire front line, 
that had been occupied by the 37th Division, a front of about -i kilometers, extending 
east and west and about one-half kilometer from the village of Cierges. It was im- 
mediately apparent that this Cierges, like the bloody obstacle of two months before, 
was a thorn in the side of the front line. Our troops were in the open, exposed to the 
observation of the enemy, and the Germans were very active in taking advantage of 
their knowledge of the position of our troops. Artillery fire rained down upon 
them, and from Cierges, and other points of vantage where nests were located, came 
a constant swarm of machine gun bullets. 

The front line commanders quickly sensed the necessity for action. The in- 
fornuition from the retiring 37th Division was to the effect that the Germans were 
not holding their front very heavily, so it was decided to exploit the ground imme- 
diately before us by means of combat patrols, cleaning out, if possible, the bother- 
some German garrisons, and permitting our front line to advance to a better position. 



FIEST ATTACK SUCCESSFUL. 

This plan was promptly and successfully carried out. Our front elements were 
pushed through the village of Cierges and to a point about one-half kilometer north 
of the town, the advance being accomplished witliout a great deal of fighting. There 
were a few rather rough tussles between .\merican and German patrols, but the net 
result of the day's work was that the front was permanently shoved forward for a 
gain of about one kilometer. The position obtained was a better one than that taken 
over from the 37th, but was such that any further forward movement in the limits 



97 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

of our sector was easily observed. Directly in front of our new line was a section of 
terrain completely dominated by the strong position of the enemy south of Romagne 
and on the heights to the west of that place. Although the (liTinans knew exactly 
where the American advanced positions had been established, and were therefore 
able to considerably harass them with artillery, there was shelter from machine gun 
bullets and a good field of fire for defense. 

t)n October 2nd, the Corps Commander began preparations for a new attack, and 
the 32nd Division, being in place, was not called upon for any action. However, as 
a part of the plan for the next blow, two new Divisions were sent in to relieve outfits 
which had jumped off in the attack on September 26th. This necessitated a slight 
change in frontage, and on October 3rd, an order was received for the 32nd to relieve 
the 91st Division, on our left, and we, in turn, to be relieved of a part of our front 
on the right by the 3rd Division, which had come in the night before to take the 
place of the 79th. 

The G4th Brigade was ordered up to make the relief of the 91st Division, and the 
G3rd Brigade gave up part of its sector to the 3rd Division. This arrangement left 
our two brigades in line side by side, with the G4th on the left and the G3rd on the 
right. The relief was accomplished during the night of October 3rd-4th, and in the 
morning our troops found themselves in a position with all the disadvantages of the 
front they held on the morning they took over the line in front of Cierges. 

CAl'TURE OF GESNES. 

'J'his time the town of Gesnes, which had changed hands several times in previous 
fighting, was the sore spot. Combat patrols were at once sent out to test the German 
strength, and found that the enemy had taken advantage of the lull of the past few 
days to get better organized for defense. The patrols found the enemy too strongly 
disposed to be ousted by infantry action alone, and so artillery support was secured 
and the line promptly advanced to a position running from northeast to southwest, 
just south of the village of Gesnes. The town was taken by a mopping-up party, 
but was not garrisoned, as the Germans laid down a heavy artillery fire on the place, 
right on the heels of its departing defenders, and made the town too hot to handle. 
So it remained a part of No Man's Land and a fair field for patrol combats. Gesnes 
had been a sort of rest resort back of the German front line in the Argonne, with 
pleasant army cottages, a Casino with a band-stand and beer-garden and various 
kindred places of amusement, calculated to make Heinie continue to love his Father- 
land. It was reported that one reason the American patrols liked to reeonnoiter 
'round the town and why the Germans also liked to come around that way on their 
trips out in front, was that the beer-garden stock had not been entirely destroyed 
by the avalanche of artillery, which, first one side and then the other, had loosened 
on the place. 

When the 61th Brigade comjileted its relief of tlie 91st Division, the famous 1st 
Division was found on our left, the American Expeditionary Force veterans having 
come in as the right division of another Corps at the same time the 91st was with- 
drawn. Both divisions at once sought to estiiblish the proper liaison, but the point 
of contact was the hot spot of the entire line and continued to be during the next few 
days, with the result that the troops charged with maintaining the connection had 
some terrific fighting and suffered serious losses. 

The operation of October 4th, which had wrested Gesnes from the enemy, had 
put the 64th Brigade practically in front of the Bois de la Morine, which bristled 

98 



BREAKING THE KRIEMHILDE STELLUNO 




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PANORAMA FROM HILL 255, I KILOMETER N. W. OF GESNES. 





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HILL 288 FROM SLOPE OF HILL 255, 1 KILOMETER N. W. OF GESNES. 

99 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

with well placed machine gun nests. These nests were adequately protected from 
the searching fire of our artillery, and all cfTorts to reduce their effectiveness failed. 
After the first artillery preparation, the G4th Brigade tried to take the woods in an 
attack covered only by the fire of infantry weapons. While some progress was 
made, the German positions proved to be too thoroughly organized for an operation 
of this nature to be entirely successful, and, accordingly, a further and more destruc- 
tive artillery preparation was ordered to be followed by an infantry assault, assisted 
by a barrage. 

TANKS AID DOUGHBOYS. 

Tliis attack was made on the morning of October oth, the troops driving in a 
northeasterly direction towards the southeastern edge of the Morine woods. For 
this operation, the 64th Brigade was echeloned in depth, the 127th Infantry having 
three battalions in line, closely supported by the 15Sth Infantry, which followed the 
attack with one battalion behind the other. On the right of the Division sector the 
63rd Brigade also attacked, with the 126th in the front line and the 125th support- 
ing. Gas and flame troops and tanks were assigned to the attacking units, and were 
used to assist the doughboys. 

The operation was successful. The Bois de la Morine was overwhelmed and its 
pestiferous machine gun nests cleaned up. The direction of the attack was then 
changed to the north, with the idea of reducing tlie Bois de Chene Sec. Consider- 
able determined resistance was met with in these woods, and hand-to-hand fighting 
developed when our men followed the barrage into the thick undergrowth and found 
that the enemy had not yet had enough. The Bois de Chcne Sec was finally 
mopped up and remained securely in our hands, but further advance became im- 
possible because of the strong position on Hill 255 and Hill 269. 

During the attack on Octo])or 5th, the 127th Infantry was relieved in the front 
line by the 128th, and on the night of October 5th-6th, the 126th Infantry was 
relieved by the 125th in the sub-sector of the 63rd Brigade. Both of the retiring 
regiments had sufTercd heavily in their struggle to advance, and the supporting 
troops were pushed in to give the Division the punch to carry on the attack in case 
a further forward movement seemed advisable. 

However, no general attack was ordered, and during the next two days the 64th 
Brigade strove valiantly to rcdiice, by local attacks, the strong points which had 
halted the advance. Efforts were especially directed at obstinate German detach-' 
ments directly in front of the point of liaison bctn-een the 32nd and the 1st Divi- 
sions, and finally, through the efforts of brave combat groups on both sides of the 
corps dividing line, the worst of the obstacles were removed. 

In the meantime, the 125th Infantry gave its attention to small patches of woods 
on its immediate front, which were unusually heavily garrisoned with cunningly 
arranged machine gun nests, so well protected as to be invulnerable (o artillery fire. 
After considerable effort, these nests were finally cleaned up. 

The sector of the 32nd Division was at this time nearly six kilometers wide, 
and the Corps Commander decided on another change, placing between the 1st and 
the 32nd Divisions, one brigade of the 91st Division which had been held in the Corps 
reserve since its relief in the line. The Brigade took over from the 32nd Division 
about 2 kilometers of front and wc in turn took over from the 3rd Division, on our 
right, about one kilometer. This change in the sector necessitated a rather com- 
plicated relief, and it was decided to again place one brigade in the line, with a front 
of about 5 kilometers, with the other in support. The 63rd Brigade was given the 

100 



BREAKING THE KRIEMIIILDE STELLUNO 




PANORAMA FROM HILL 269, LOOKING TOWARD HILL 255 AND TRONSEL FAR\L 




PANORAMA FROM HILL 2G9, LOOKING TOWARD HILL 255 AND TRONSEL FARM, ABOUT 

I kii.omet?;r n. w. of gesnes. 



101 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

front line, and the 64th withdrawn to a support position. This movement was 
executed on the night of October 7th-8th. On the morning of October 8th, the new 
front was on a line about two kilometers north of the village of Gesnes. 

BLOODY APPROACH COMPLETED. 

Les Terribles had now completed tlieir bloody approach to the Kriemhilde 
Stellung, and were directly in front of what was known as the strongest position on 
the whole Hindenburg line in the Argonne-Meusc sector. The struggle to reach the 
ramparts of the bristling natural fortress which our men now faced had been over a 
dangerous terrain, and every outpost to the Kriemhilde line had been desperately 
defended by an enemy fully aware of the deadly peril ho would be in should the 
Americans continue their success. Forced, finally, into the position he had cleverly 
chosen for his final stand, the German Commander issued orders to his troops to hold 
the line at all costs, and reinforced his points of vantage with all the men available. 

On our side, preparations were at once made to attack before the foe had longer 
in which to set himself for the expected shock. The Division Commander's idea was 
to capture the strong points by maneuver, and a special maneuver map was prepared 
under his direction, showing graphically the movements to be executed by the various 
units when the attack was launched. This map was distributed down to company 
commanders. The general plan was to penetrate the wire and works at some point 
south of Romagnc and then to roll up the remainder of the position by a movement 
to the left, taking the heights from the rear. 

October 8th was devoted to disposing of the troops for the attack. On the morn- 
ing of October 9, the assault was delivered. Our troops closely followed the barrage 
right up to the wire, and on the right, the ]2(ith Infantry, supported by tanks, 
succeeded in breaking through and reached the southern outskirts of Romange. On 
the left, one battalion of the 125th Infantry fought its way to the top of Hill 258. 
Along the rest of the front, the attack was stopped by organized positions about 1 
kilometer south of Romagne. 

Tlie next day, October 10th, the fighting was continued, and after reix>atcd 
efforts, the 125th Infantry captured one of the outlying defenses of La Cote Dame 
Marie and held it in spite of the efforts of the enemy to loosen our grip. La Cote 
Dame Marie was the name given to a frowning hill which now lay immediately in 
the path of the 32nd and seemed to effectually bar further progress. It was flanked 
by similar crests, and the approaches were regarded as extremely diflrieult. Indeed, 
the Germans thought they were invincible. It was one of these smaller crests which 
the 125th took on October 10th and to which they clung with so much tenacity. 

KRIEMHILDE STELLUNG REACHET*. 

The same day, the right of the line was advanced by the 120111 Infantry, which 
reached the Tranchee de la Mamelle. an important bulwark in the Kriemhilde 
Stellung. In this deep and well fortified trench, the 120th met the enemy in a hand- 
to-hand conflict and succeeded in occupying a part of the system. In the center of 
the line, the enemy held firm and succeeded in turning back every effort the Ameri- 
cans made to storm the approaches to the trench. 

On the following day, the different front line groups devoted themselves to con- 
solidating the advanced positions they had won and organizing for a further attack. 
Various local operations were undertaken to imprnvc the position of certain exposed 
troops, and some fierce fighting resulted from the clashing of our combat patrols 

102 



BREAKING THE KEIEMIIILDE STELLUNG 




•■Ov.-r 5fi0 pii-"i"i 



must of them surrendering in the Tranchee (le la Mamelle." 



and tliose of the ent'iuy, now alert and vigilant and with his back to the wall. There 
were some especially sanguinary struggles in the vicinity of La Cote Uame Marie, 
where our men were trying to gain control of the approaches; but the net result of 
the day's work was that no substantial gain was recorded. 

In the fighting of October lOth-llth over 500 prisoners were taken; most of 
them surrendered to the 126th Infantry in the Tranchee de la Mamelle. The smash 
had brought the 32nd Division up to the wire of the Kriemhilde Stellung with both 
flanks almost astride of the German line. 

When it became apparent that the Kriemhilde line was almost within our grasp, 
a further push was decided upon, with the hope of driving through at points where 
the 32nd Division had already partly penetrated. In preparation for this movement, 
the brigade of the !)lst Division, which had been in action between the 1st and 32nd, 
was relieved on the night of October llth-12th by the 127th Infantry, and the 12(5th 
Infantry, which had suffered heavily in the bloody battling in the Tranchee do la 
Mamelle, was relieved by the 128th Infantry. This put three regiments of the 32nd 
Division in line. At the same time, the 42nd Division relieved the 1st on our left, 
the 1st having sustained heavy casualties in battering its way up to the Krieuihilde 
line. 

The re-arrangement of the forces was not completed in time to plan any organ- 
ized offensive action for October 12th, and the day was largely devoted to the 
straightening out of troops. Developments in the general situation then caused the 
Corps to again change the sector limits, and the 42nd Division was ordered to take 
over the part of the 32nd Division front held by the 127th Infantry. The 127th 
was moved over to the right, to take over a part of the line held by the 125th, which 
was too low in effectives to hold the front assigned to it. This necessitated again 



103 




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104 



BREAKING THE KRIEMHILDE STELLUNG 

placing the 126th iu line to take over the rest of the 125th sector, so that on the 
morning of October 13th, our front line from right to left was as follows: two 
battalions of the 128th Infantry', one battalion of the 126th Infantry, one battalion 
of the 127th Infantry with the 125th Infantry in support. The Commanding Gen- 
eral of the 64th Brigade was placed in command of Hie front line, both of his regi- 
ments being in contact with the enemy. 

GEKMAN LINE CRUMPLED. 

On October 13th, the Corps Commander directed a renewal of the attack, and in 
accordance with his instructions orders were issued for an assault to be delivered at 
5 :30 A. M. on October 14. A\niile the realignment of infantry forces had been 
taking place on October 12th and 13th, our artillery had been delivering a heavy 
fire on the enemy defenses, and when the attack started, on the morning of October 
14th, a barrage was laid downi on the enemy trench system along the entire front and 
held there for five minutes, while our troops moved forward as close to the wire as 
possible. WHien the barrage lifted, the Americans flung themselves at the German 
positions and sought to tear through the tangle of wire and trench wreckage before 
the German infantry could get into action. 

The battalion of the 126th, in the center of our front, had the best luck, spring- 
ing forward from its position on Hill 258, surging through the wire and closely fol- 
lowing the barrage as it advanced to the first objective of the attack. On the right, 
the 128th Infantry, by some vigorous and heady work, succeeded in getting through 
the trenches south of Eomagne, and by skillful maneuvering virtually surrounded 




"Tlieir officera said they quit as soon as they discovered they were surrounded.' 
BOIS DE MONTFAUCON, FRANCE. 



105 




£ 6 

S O 
■5 K 



106 



BREAKING THE KRIEMUILDE STELLUNG 

the town and established a line on tlie nortliern outskirts. The 12Sth liad been 
forced to avoid the town iu its rusli aliead, and, accordingl}-, niopping-up parties were 
sent into the village from the 125th Infantry, which had been following in support, 
ready to take advantage of just such a situation. The 125th had its hands full, but 
the Germans at length gave up the fight and some 200 prisoners were taken. Cap- 
tured officers said they quit as soon as they discovered they were surrounded. In the 
meantime, the 128th was stretching its left flank north of Komagne, and the 12Cth 
was reaching out with its right, liaison finally being established and the position con- 
solidated. 

While the 12Gth and 128th were thus breaking through the Kriemhilde Stellung, 
the 12?th on the left was flinging itself in vain against the impregnable defenses of 
the hills which flank La Cote Dame Marie. Colonel Langdon's men found that the 
artillery preparation had not cut up the wire to any appreciable extent, and the first 
wave which dashed over the top as the barrage lifted found itself caught iu the 
impassable tangle. Into this wire strong enemy groups poured a withering machine 
gun fire, and eft'ectually halted all efforts of the 127th to advance. 

But, while La Cote Dame Marie was successfully resisting every effort at a 
frontal conquest, her doom was being sealed by the valiant battalion of the 126th, 
which had been the first to break through the line iu the morning. This battalion 
drove straight forward, concealed and protected from view of the Cote, and passed 
the hill on the right. Its objective was north of La Cote Dame Marie, and this 
objective the battalion reached, there establishii:g the position which it had extended 
to the right to meet the 128th. 

COTE DAME MARIE FALLS. 

The support battalion of the 12Gth, which followed in the wake of the troops 
who had forged ahead from Hill 258, sent a mopping-up party from Company M 
under command of Captain Strom to make a turning movement to the left and 
attack the defenders on Dame Marie from the flank. This mopping-up party, by 
an effective use of rifle grenades, put to rout the group which had been holding 
the German left flank on the hill, and allowed the whole 12Gth line in the center of 
the Division sector to move forward to the objective north of Dame Marie. 

In the meantime, the 127th had despaired of taking the position frontally or of 
obtaining a footing from which a further attack might be launched. Accordingly, 
n maneuver around the German right flank was decided upon and immediately un- 
dertaken. It was as successful as Captain Strom's attack on the other German 
flank. Mopped up on one side and outflanked on the other, there was nothing left 
for the defenders of the German stronghold to do but give it up. This they did, and 
when darkness came, and the 127th decided upon an audacious march across the top 
of Dame Marie, expecting to meet and battle to the death with whatever of the 
enemy remained, they found the wicked machine gun nests deserted by all but 
the dead. 

By morning of October 15th, the 127th had moved its line over Dame Marie, 
establishing liaison on the right with the 126tli and on the left with the flanking 
detachment which had gone forward the day before. This detachment had already 
gotten in touch with the 42nd Division, which had come up to the new line reached 
by the 32nd. This com])letcd the estalilishment of the new front and the complete 
penetration of the Kriemhilde Stellung. The line extended from a point about one- 
half kilometer north of ]{omagne to 300 meters no ftli of La Cote Dame Marie. 

107 



The TlIlRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 




"This completed 



» • • 



the pcnctratiun of tlif Kricmliilde SttUung." 



THE ABOVE IS A PORTION OF THE KRIEMUILDE STELLUNG, 
THE STRONG GERMAN POSITION. 



108 



BREAKING THE KRIEMHILDE STELLUNG 

There was a bulge in the center of the line caused by the aetivit}' of the 12Cth in 
exploiting the front after its objective Had been readied, the center being about 
a kilometer in advance of the two flanks. The exploitation was made necessary, and 
its success possible, by reason of the fact that this part of the sector was covered 
by woods, whereas both the right and left flanks were exposed to fire across an open 
country in front of them. 

Although the great attack had been crowned with success and the objectives 
gained, there were still advantageous positions on our front which it was advisable 
to take, and fighting was resumed on the morning of October 15th and continued 
during that day and the 16th and 17th. Special artillery fire was employed on 
obstinate points, machine gun concentrations were utilized to assist small infantry 
attacks, and the doughboys relied upon their own w'eapons in cases where artillery 
and machine guns were not available. Our line was pushed steadily forward until 
it extended across the sector about two kilometers north of the village of Romagne. 
In all this fighting, through a tangled wilderness of shattered woods, over small bare 
hills, across fire-swept guUeys where machine gun bullets ripped and where deadly 
gas hung low, up difficult slopes, .always struggling for the mastering of a terrain 
that presented a new problem the moment the one immediately in hand had been 
solved, there had been constant action, varying from the clash of large units using 
everything from heavy artillery to hand grenades, to those ferocious hand-to-hand 
conflicts between our combat patrols and the enemy outposts left in sacrifice positions 
in machine gun nests as the foe retired. 




"Fighting through a tangled wildernesa of sliatt«red woods.' 
ENGINEERS REPAIRING ROADS IN ARGONNE. 



109 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 
NEW LINE CONSOLIDATED. 

But tlie line sought was finally won and consolidated. The position, north of 
Romagne, which the Americans occupied on October 17th, was an excellent one 
from which to launch a systematic offensive, and an order for another general 
operation was consequently awaited. Tending the expected attack order, attention 
was devoted to the exploitation and penetration of the Bois de Bautheville, a consider- 
able stretch of woods in front of our sector. This exploitation was carried on vigor- 
ously during the next few days. On October 17th, the work was started by directing 
a heavy machine gun fire at sensitive points in the woods. The section north of the 
road running southwest from Bantheville, crossing our sector, was sprayed by fire 
from all the machine guns that could be brought to bear upon this part of the woods. 
Our observers from points on Hill 286 and the slopes of Hill 288 were able accurately 
to direct artillery fire on any evidence of enemy activity, while for twelve, straight 
iiours the woods were harassed by the combined fire of six machine gun companies, 
augmented by captured German Maxims, minenwerfers and 77 mm. field pieces. 

At the end of the period of preparation strong exploitation patrols were sent 
forward into the woods with instructions to report back at a definite hour. These 
patrols returned to our lines at noon on October ISth with the word that they had 
advanced to the northwestern edge of the woods, about a kilometer and a half to the 
front, and had discovered only small groups of the enemy. 

Accordingly, it was decided to push forward and occupy the woods in force, and 
on the night of October 18th-19th this operation took place. Infantry posts and 
machine gun positions were established on the northern edge of the woods. In the 
left sub-sector, the movement was promptly completed, very few Germans being 
encountered. In the right sub-sector, on account of the long echelonment necessary, 
the task of mopping up the woods proceeded at a slower rate. When morning came 
on the 19th, patrols were still pushing forward on the right, when they drew fire 
from enemy positions on Hill 274 'and Hill 275. The front line established, bulged 
considerably in the center and put the Division in a salient, this however, being well 
protected by the Bantheville woods, in which the men found adequate concealment. 

Late in the afternoon of October 19th, came the long expected relief order, the 
89th Division being designated to take over the sector. That night the relief was ac- 
complished without incident, the S9th electing to hold a line through the center of the 
woods instead of taking over the further outposts on the northern edge of the woods. 



110 




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1. LiKUTENAXT CoLONEL W. E. MARBLE, Ordnance Department, Division Ordnance Officer: March to the Rhine: 

Army of Occupation. 

2. I.lEfTBNANT t'oLONEL J. A. HowELL, J. A. D., Division Judge Advocate, Army of Occupation. 

3. Lieutenant Colonel Guy M. Wilson, Infantry, as Major, commanded the 2nd Battalion, 125th Infantry, 

Training Period; Occupation of Sector in Alsace; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse- 
Arconne Offensive: Commanded the 126th Infantry, March to the Rhine; as Lieutenant Colonel, Division 
Inspector. ■ ,. «. 

4. Lieutenant Colonel William Mitchell Lewis, Signal Corps, as Major commanded the 107th Field Signal 

Battalion, Training Period; Occupation of Sector in Alsace; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; 
Meuse-Argonne Offensive, as Lieutenant Colonel, Division Signal Officer: Army of Occupation. 

5. Colonel L. H. Callan, as Lieutenant Colonel commanded the l67th Engineers, Training Period ; Occupation 

of Sector in Alsace; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; March 
to the Rliine: Army of Occupation; as Colonel, Division Engiiiser, Army of Occupation. 

6. Lieutenant Colonel James R. Scott, Medical Department: as Major, Division Sanitary Officer; as Lieutenant 

Colonel, Division Surgeon. 

7. Major Fred A. Rodcers, J. A. D., Division Judge Advocate; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; March to the Rhine; 

Army of Occupation. 

8. Major A. W. Kluecel, M. T. O., Divi.sion Motor Transport Officer: Training Period; Occupation of Sector 

in Alsace; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oi.se- Aisne Offensive: Meuse-Argonne Offensive: March to the Rhine; 
Army of Occupation. 

9. Major J. E. BaRzvnski, Q. M. C, Division Quartermaster; March to the Rhine; Army of Occupation. 



Ill 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 




112 




CHAPTER X. 
Our Last Fight and the Armistice. 

JUEING the night of October 19th-20th, our troops not actually on 
the line succeeded in getting back to the corps reserve position, 
which was where the German front line troops had been located 
when the offensive of September 26th opened. Our outposts, how- 
ever, were not relieved until about daylight, and it was noon be- 
fore the last of the 32nd Division left the forward area and 
staggered away from the scene of their three-weeks' nightmare. 
During this period it had rained almost continuously; the nights 
were always raw and cold, the men were nearly always in the open, 
and there was scarcely an hour of the day or night in which they were not under fire. 
They had gone over the top in attack after attack, sometimes gaining their objectives 
in the first rush, sometimes being forced to re-form their shattered ranks and try 
again, but always in the end sending back the message, "Objective gained." They 
had dug themselves in after taking position after position in the formidable Kriem- 
hilde Stelhmg, and they had easily repulsed the few counter-attacks that the harassed 
Germans had had the heart to launch. They had followed each formal attack by 
exploiting the new front gained, and had spent the days between their big pushes in 
reducing machine gun nests and improving their position so as to be ready for the 
next shove. 

They had finished three weeks of constant fighting. They had broken tlirougli 
a whole series of lines like the position on the Ourcq where three months before they 
iiad received their baptism of fire. They had been through three smashes like the 
battle of Juvigny. There had been no pursuit like the chase in the Second Battle 
of the Marne, but there had been dozens of those small but vicious fights with ma- 
chine guns for every one that took place in the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

The Division had encountered everything that troops in modern battle might be 
called upon to face. 'J'he struggle was over the most ditlicult terrain that any soldiers 
in the great war were ever asked to conquer. There were commanding hills on which 
the enemy could make his stand, deep open ravines which he could sweep with 
machine guns and fill with gas, patches of weeds tangled with wire which were 
(lillicult to penetrate even when not garrisoned by the deadly Maxims of the Kaiser's 
machine gunners. There were open spaces on which the enemy had perfect observa- 
tion, and whicli could be crossed only at the cost of a heavy toll of lives. East of the 
Meuse the enemy had batteries, which kept our rear areas under observation, and 
frequently shot up troops forming for attacks who thought themselves concealed 
and who were out of view from the front. 



113 




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114 



OVU LAST FIGHT AND THE ARMISTICE 




''There were commanding hills on which the enemy could make his stand." 

OPPOSED BY KAISER'S SHOCK TROOPS. 



The enemy realized the importance of holding the line at this point. His posi- 
tions were organized with ever}' means that four years of experience in trench warfare 
had suggested. The troops which opposed the 32nd were shock units of the first 
order, and their instructions, as captured prisoners invariably stated, were to hold 
the line at all costs. The enemy was well supplied with machine guns and artillery. 
He was fully familiar with every detail of the country in which the fighting took 
place. He was hampered by no problems of supply, for he was being forced back 
upon an abundance of every required material, and had an ample system of strategic 
wagon roads and narrow-gauge railways. All the advantages of combat were with 
him ; yet he was completely beaten in every clash with the 32nd Division ; the famous 
Hindenburg line of the Meuse was wholly broken, and not only was the Kriemhilde 
Stellung over-run, but the Freya Stellung, the German third line position, was pene- 
trated in its outpost zone by the capture of the Banthevillc woods during the last few 
days in which the Division was in line. This was a daring operation, performed 
largely by our patrols, after the enemy had been shot out of the woods by a terrific 
machine gun barrage. Combat groups then exploited the woods, seized vantage 
points, and effectually prevented the enemy from re-occupying the territory. 

It is significant that our losses in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive were not greatly 
in excess of the casualties in the Aisne-Marne. Although in the line nearly three 
times as long, and engaged in heavy fighting all the time, contesting every inch of the 
ground won, the Division had 1179 killed, and dead of wounds; lOOO severely 
wounded; 3321 slightly wounded. Total losses from all causes, 6046. 

115 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

In the approach and penetration of the Kriemhilde line the 32nd Division 
met and vanquished 11 German divisions, including the 5th Prussian Guards, the 
3rd Prussian Guards, and the 2Sth Division, known as the "Kaiser's Own." The 
others were: the 37th Division, tlie 52ud Division, the 115th Division, the 39tii 
Division, the 123rd Division, the 236th Division, the 41st Division, and the 13th 
Division. 

During our long tour of duty in the front line, tiie TOtli, 3rd, and 5th U. S. 
Divisions occupied the sgctor on our right, and the 91st, 1st and -12nd U. S. Divisions 
the sector on our left. 

The haul of prisoners made in the Argonne was the heaviest in any sector, 28 
officers and 10G7 men being captured. The material captured included 2 pieces of 
heavy artillery, G pieces of light artillery, 51 trench mortars, 50 machine guns, and 
800 rifles. 

GAINED 81/2 KILOMETERS. 

The total depth of advance in this offensive was 8y2 kilometers. In the whole 
period of twenty days of continuous fighting the weather was miserable. It rained 
almost constantly, and the fields over whicli the fighting took place were knee-deep 
in mud. In spite of all the heart-breaking difficulties it was called upon to encounter, 
the high spirit of the Division, which had been forged in the flames of two previous 
major offensives, constantly manifested itself, and it was the grim detcnnination of 
the veteran framework of the 32nd that carried the newly trained replacements to 
the magnificent victory which the Division achieved. 




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"All the advantAges of combat were witli liim, yet lie was completely beaten in e\ery clusli with the 32nd 

Division." 

GERMAN PRISONERS. 

116 



OVR LAST FIGHT AND TUB AliMlSTlCE 




"The material captured included • * ' 50 machine guns." 
GERMAN HEAVY (MOUXTED) MACHIXE (UN AND AUTOMATIC RIFI.E OR MCIIT 

M \i IIIXl': GUN. 



""^ 







In a haniincrk ol clin ki-ii wire siistir-iulc.l o\tt a shell-hole, this 32nd Division UotiL'iiln i\- ninkcs himself com- 
fortable on an Aieonne battlefield. (Oct. 18, 1918.) 

"The men came out of this battle more completely exhausted than had yet been their experience." 

IN THE ARGONNE, FRANCE. 



117 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

The men came out of this battle more completely exhausted tlian had yet been 
their experience. The battle had lasted longer, and the conditions of weather and 
the terrific fighting told very much on the physical strength and endurance of the 
men. Their equipment was badly depleted, their clothing was largely worn out, but 
their spirit was still with them — a spirit that it seemed nothing could break. 

These men needed only rest and refitting to make them ready for another great 
battle. It was not practical to remove them far from the front. They had to go 
immediately into reserve of the 3rd Corps, where there was shelter in the Mont- 
faucon Woods, immediately surrounding General Haan's Headquarters. The remark 
that they were "sheltered" needs some explanation. There was no shelter in the 
proper sense of the word. There were dug-outs which a survey indicated would 
accommodate 2400 men, but the Division still had some 18,000. Moreover, these 
dug-outs, many of them, were filled with water, and those which were not were un- 
healthy, and every single one of them contained that pesky beast which had come 
to be known as the "cootie"; all of our men, including the oHicers, had become well 
acquainted with this little pest, and were now in the very center of the area in which 
the insect thrived most plentifully. For twenty days, the Division had been fighting 
in the rain and mud; but just as the men were assembled by regiments in various 
places in these woods, there was a gleam of sunshine in the afternoon. General 
Haan visited the various regiments, called together as many as he could get, and 
spoke to them something about as follows: 

"You men are to be congratulated upon the splendid success you have 
again achieved, in that you have taken every objective against which you were 
sent, and indeed, you have gone beyond. You are the first division that suc- 
ceeded in getting through the great Kriemhilde Stellung. You have just 
been through perhaps the greatest battle that has ever been fought in the 
world, and you were in the very center of that, and every one of you is glad of 
it. You are now located in a so-called 'rest area,' which, without doubt, is 
from every viewpoint the rottenest and worst in all of France, and you ought 
to be glad of that, because see what stories you can tell to your friends when 
you get home, without the least exaggeration." 

"ALL THE COMFORTS OF HOME." 

In tliis general line, General Haan encouraged his men everywhere to return to 
their smiles and good humor. He told them that he would send for the biiiuls next 
day; that they should have concerts and all the comforts that could be had in 
such a home. The sun kept on shining, and the men kept on smiling, and it was a 
revelation to see how these men pulled themselves together; how they got rid of those 
little animals, "the cooties"; how the supply departments strained every nerve to 
get them new clothing, new blankets; how the engineers constructed those famous 
"palace baths," where the "cooties" and the old clothing were gotten rid of all at the 
same time, and where new clothing and blankets were issued. For five days the 
weather was fine, neither too cold nor yet too warm, and at the end of a sliort period 
of three days, training was again started, training by scliodule — everything was done 
by schedule. General Haan insisted on schedule for everything, and what a differ- 
ence it was in the training ! How the men understood what was going on ! How easy 
it was to correct the few errors that were still noticeable here and there, and how 
mobile this force had become ! The orders were carried out as by haliit, and when the 
Division a few days later was called again to move out, the Commander had but to 

118 



\ 




119 



THE r/IIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOUl.!) \VM! 




"It was a revelation to see how these men pulled themselves together; how they got rid of those little animals 

'the cooties'." 

IN THE ARGONNE, FRANCE. 

say a fuw words, tlie Staff fornnilatpd the order, and hardly liad the order gotten off 
the mimeograph when the Division was in motion. 

Shortly after coming out of the line five hundred men were permitted to go on 
leave, and it was planned to send an equal number when the first fortunatcs returned. 
Hut when they got back the Division was again preparing to go info battle, and it 
was months before any more, leaves were granted. Except in a few individual cases — 
a very few — these were the only 32nd Division officers or men to be granted leaves 
from the time the Division arrived in France until a vear after our landing. 



TEANSFERRED TO 'rillKD CORPS. 

The Division remained in reserve of the 5th Corps until Xovemlwr 1st, when it 
was transferred to the 3rd Corps, on the eve of the renewal of the Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive. When the 89th, 90th and 5th Divisions jumped off in the big attack of 
November 1st and started their successful drive up the left bank of the ]\[euse, the 
32nd followed in their wake, in close support and ready to go to the relief of any 
one of them. Our troops marched forward again through the country they had 
fought over, and finally bivouacked in the Bantheville woods, while the Corps front 
line was being pushed to the river bank and the left flank of the First Army was 
edging toward Sedan. 

The 57th Field Artillery, which had supported the 79th in the opening of the 
Meuse-Argonne Offensive on Septemlwr 26th remained in the sector when the 3rd 
Division relieved the 79th, until the 3rd Division's artillery could get into position, 

120 



OUR LAST FIGHT AND THE ARMISTICE 

several artillery brigades in the meantime supporting the 33nd. On October 7th the 
57th Brigade again reverted to the 32nd and supported their comrades of "Les 
Terribles'' until the 89th took over the front. In spite of its long tour of duty and 
its heavy losses in horses, the 57th Brigade was held in line to support the 89th, and 
(ired in the barrage which opened the November 1st attack. But when the First 
Army surged forward in victory, the 57th was without the motive power to follow, 
and was withdrawn for refitting. To supply the 32nd with artillery, the 158th 
Brigade, which had been assigned to the Division when the 32nd first came up to the 
Argonne, but which had never fired for us, reported and accompanied us as we 
marched up in support of the divisions on the Meuse. 

On A^ovember 4th the 5th Division, which was fighting on the right flank of the 
3rd Corps front, forced a crossing of the river at Dun-sur-Meuse, and, in a brilliant 
attack, formed a bridge-head there. Up to that time the Corps axis of march had 
been northward. Now it turned to the northeast on the right flank, in an endeavor 
to connect with the French and American divisions, which had been driving up the 
right bank of the river, but considerably in the rear of the Third Corps front. The 
5th Division, however, was too widely disti'ibuted on its front to make the contact 
required on its right flank, and the divisions east of the Meuse were slow in coming 
up. So on the night of November 5tli the Corps ordered the 32nd to send a regiment 
to report to the Commanding General of the 5th Division for use in support of the 
right flank. The 128th was designated for this duty and crossed the Meuse on the 
night of November 5tli. On November Cth the 128th took up a position on the 
right flank of the 5th, but the contact, which was being sought for in the front line, 
was not made, and on the 7th tlie 128th was put into line on the right of the 5th 
Division. The regiment attacked on the 7th and 8th, capturing the town of Braude- 
ville and finally connecting with the 17th Frencli Colonial Division. 

On November 9th orders were received for the remainder of the Division to cross 
the Meuse and go into line in the sector the 128th was holding, between the 5th U. 
S. Division and the 17th French Colonials. The 32nd crossed on the pontoon 
bridge during the night of the 9th, tlie 128th Infantry reverting to the command of 
General Haan and going into line on the right of tlie new Division sector, with the 
127th on the left. 

The information of the enemy contained in the Corps order which sent the 32nd 
Division again into the fight, was to the effect that the Germans were retreating, and 
the Division accordingly went into battle in pursuit formation. The G4th Brigade 
furnished the advance guard, while the 63rd Brigade, with most of the artillery and 
the divisional troops, made up the main body. 

MEUSE CROSSED IN DARKNESS. 

The crossing of the Meuse was made under cover of the darkness and was not 
interrupted by the enemy. It was an all night operation and was not completed 
until dawn, when the leading battalion of the 127th reached the front line, occupied 
by the 128th, and relieved a battalion of that regiment which then moved into the 
right sub-sector where the ]28tii had l)een concentrated. The two regiments, side by 
side, verified their liaison, and prepared to attack at G A. M. November 10th. 

In accordance with the instructions contained in the Corps order for the attack, 
the advance guard moved forward in two columns, one in each sub-sector. There was 
not a continuous front line, the space intervening between the routes of march of the 
two columns being covered by patrols. There was no artillery support available 

121 




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122 



OUR LAST FIGHT AND THE ARMISTICE 

except the one battalion which had been assigned to the advance guard, the remain- 
ing artillery being engaged in a struggle to move forward from the river and get 
into position. 

A heavy fog hid the advance. The leading elements of the First Battalion of the 
18Sth, which was at the head of the column, made rapid progress. The troops had 
been in the sector long enough to have some knowledge of the terrain, and wasted no 
time in getting off. They encountered enemy troops almost at once, but fought their 
way through the Bois Pommcpre and part way up a hill called the Cote de Mont. 
A combat liaison group on the right, which was there for the purpose of maintaining 
contact with the French Colonials, advanced even farther. 

At about this time the fog lifted and the 128th discovered that instead of 
pursuing a fleeing foe they had fought their way right into the middle of a strong 
German position wliich the enemy apparently had no intention of abandoning. The 
fog had prevented the Germans from effectively defending their works, and the only 
clashes of the early morning had occurred when our advancing doughboys happened 
on groups of the enemy. 

LIKE BALAKLAVA. 

As the mist cleared the advance guard found itself in a position similar to that 
of the famous "Gallant Six Hundred" in the charge of Balaklava. "Cannon to right 
of them, cannon to left of them" — and behind and in front of them, too, — "volleyed 
and thundered"; only in this case the cannon were mainly machine guns located in 
nests, which the 128th had passed by in the thick morning. The German artillery, 
hearing the sudden rattle of machine guns, opened up with a barrage where the front 
line ought to have been, and the Americans seeing the shells bursting in their rear 
thought their own artillery was falling short. It was a situation which would have 
been fatal to less seasoned troops. It was immediately apparent that liaison had 
been lost on both the left and right, and that neither the 127th on the left nor the 
French Colonials on the right had been able to advance as rapidly as the 128th. 

Our men were almost completely surrounded, imable to go ahead against an 
opposition that was showing increasing strength, subjected to a galling flanking fire 
by machine guns where they were, and confronted with the alternative of filtering 
back through a barrage that they feared was thickened by both their own and the 
enemy artillery. But in a pinch they proved themselves veterans, and in good order 
made their way back to a position on a line with the units on the right and left. 

In the meantime the 127th in the left sub-sector had moved forward cautiously, 
encountering considerable machine gun resistance, which increased as the troops 
advanced. As they approached the Kiver Thinte minenwerfers made further gains 
impossible and they organized to hold the line, having gained 3 kilometers during 
the day. 

ENEMY NOT RETREATING. 

By nightfall it was ajipai-ont that the information that the enemy was retreating 
was erroneous, and arrangements were immediately made to adopt different tactics. 
The artillery, which had been coming into position all day, was informed of the con- 
ditions which tVie 128th had encountered and the positions which wore holding up 
the 127th. Fire was ordered on points of apparent enemy strength and plans were 
made for a formal attack to dislodge the enemy. Reports coming back from divisions 
on our right and left indicated that they had likewise been able to make but little 
progress and that they also had found that the enemy was not retreating. The 

123 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

Division Commander made a personal reconnaissance of the front line to verify 
reports of the situation, and, after conferring with the commanders of the front line 
troops, a plan of action for the next day was decided ujion. The Corps issued in- 
struction to continue the operation on November 11th, and preparations for an attack 
to occur at 7 A. M. November 11th were perfected early in the evening of November 
10th. Orders were issued to the artillery to keep up a heavy fire during the night 
which was to increase in volume early in the morning and gather into a barrage to 
precede the scheduled advance of the infantry. 

Out in front the troops were tired and cold and wet and miserable. For five 
days the 128th had been fighting and marching from one point in the sector to an- 
other as the regiment's punch appeared to be needed. During the' day the gallant 
cnniniand's casualties had been heavy and the morale had not been improved by the 
unfortunate foray in the fog. The 127th had spent a night in a long hike over 
horrible roads to get into position, and a day in a struggle against a wicked machine 
gun resistance. Most of the night of the lOth-llth was spent in getting units into 
position to go over the top in another drive. But when day-break came they were 
ready, all set to deliver one of the blows for which Ix?s Terril)K'S were becoming more 
and more famous. 

Finally the last relief was verified, the last reports that all was in readiness had 
been sent back to regimental and brigade headquarters. Overhead the preparatory 
fire of our artillery was shrieking toward the (ierman lines, and the enemy, conscious, 
no doubt, of the impending attack, was raining shells on where he thought our 
assault troops might be forming, and on the back areas where the support troops 
were concentrated, ready to follow up the shove. At :30 officers in command of the 
take-off line were issuing their last instructions; fifteen minutes later they were 
looking at their wrist watches, not with the tense excitement which characterized 
the approach of zero hour on the Veslc, not with the savage elation with which they 
waited for their turn in the tremendous smashes at the foe at Juvigny, not with 
the grim determination with which they entered each succeeding struggle in the 
Argonnc, but with the calm deliberation of veterans who had a day's work ahead of 
them, a day's work the like of which they had done before and which they knew 
just how to do, a disagreeable, dangerous day's work; but, well — it was all in a day's 
work — c'est la Guerre ! 

"FINIS LA GUERRE!" 

Five minutes to seven ! The men started to stir around, getting a toe-hold for the 
take-ofT, shaking their equipment into place, gripping their guns. Seven o'clock 
and some of them were off, over the top. Others had been stopped just in the nick 
of time, and after the advancing skirmish lines of those who had gotten away went 
panting runners from headquarters with the magic words: 

"FINIS LA GUEltRF!" 



124 



OUR LAST FKUIT AM) Till' Ah'.MISTlCE 





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12G 



CHAPTER XL 

The March to the Rhine. 




N November 17th, as one of the leading elements of the Tiiinl 
Army, the Division crossed what had been its front line on 
November 11th and started on its long march to the Rhine. On 
our right marched the First Division, veteran of many battles. 
On our left was the Second Division of regular doughboys and 
Marines. Behind us followed the 42nd Division, the famous 
Rainbows, who to the Ourcq and in the Argonne had fought side 
by side with the 32nd. These four divisions, generally considered 
' the flower of the American Army in France, were in the Third 

Army Corps, which had been through all the major offensives where American troops 
were employed, and was regarded as the elite corps of the Army. In this brilliant 
company it is no wonder that our men stepped off toward Germany with their heads 
high and the pride of good soldiers in their hearts. 

The Division took to the roads at the hour set, marching in two columns. There 
were no ceremonies, though the bands played the 32nd Division March and other 
triumphant pieces as the various regiments got under way. Except for the bands, 
the march was conducted at all times as in the presence of the enemy. The attitude 
of higher authority was that war conditions still prevailed, and the field orders 
issued by the Third Corps always prescribed advance guards, indicated out-post zones 
and lines of resistance to be established at the end of each day, and ordered that 
adequate measures be taken for the security of the command, both on the front and 
on the flanks. Cavalry was provided for advance scouting and maintaining liaison 
with the divisions on eitlier flank of the 32nd, which were going forward about the 
same distance each day, and on parallel roads. 

The roads used by the Division were charted as first class, but showed hard usage 
and little recent repair, so that the going was not easy. For some units the day's 
march was rather long, but the average distance marched by the foot troops was 
20 kilometers. The first villages encountered were practically uninhabited; the 
country through which we nuirched was desolate and shot up by the artillery fire of 
the last days of the war. 

After the first two hours of progress, signs of life in the villages became evident, 
regimental colors and standards were displayed, and the bands played as the troops 
marched through the towns at attention. Otherwise the movement was much like an 
ordinary practice march. Excellent discipline was maintained on this as well as on 
every succeeding day of the hike, and the movement was executed in each instance 
exactly as ordered. 



127 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

FEENCH CIVILIANS WELCOME DELIVERERS. 

In some of the towns a few Ereucli civilians were encountered. These in- 
liabitants, most of whom had remained in tiieir homes during the German occupation, 
decorated their houses with flags which had survived four years of Teuton intoler- 
ance. Nowhere was there a boisterous welcome or anything in the nature of a 
carnival spirit. The people seemed to have been subdued and blunted by their four 
years of bondage, but their relief and joy in their deliverance was very impressive; 
it was expressed in their faces, their voices and their words of welcome. In Mar- 
ville a modest ceremony was prepared for the arrival of the Division Commander. 
WTien his car entered the main street in the early afternoon and drew up in front 
of the building selected for his Head(]uarters, all the people of the town, dressed in 
their best and headed by the Mayor, met him with flags and flowers in their hands. 
The crowd, which had been waiting for two hours for General llaan's appearance, 
was mostly composed of women and little children, nearly all in black, with a few 
old men and some released French prisoners among them. The Mayor made an 
address of welcome, and a young girl, Mme. JIarie Louise Desaux, read a testimonial 
in the name of her dear compatriots, which she afterwards presented to the General 
with a bouquet of flowers bound about with the French tri-color. 

The plan for the march to the Rhine contemplated that the fmuard movement 
of the Americans should be by "bounds" — a "bound" to consist of two or three days' 
marching, followed by a rest of two or three days. Longwy, a considerable manu- 
facturing town in the iron and steel district of Lorraine, was the objective of the first 
"bound" of the 32nd, and was reached on November 18th. The town was the largest 
in which the Division P. C. had ever been located. There w-ere adequate billeting 
facilities there, and ofiicers and a considerable number of men experienced tiie luxury 
of sleeping in comfortable beds for the first time in many months. The town had 
been relinquished but two weeks before by the Headquarters of General von Galli- 
witz, commander of the Third Gorman Army Group, whose many divisions during 
the past two mouths of hard fighting had opposed the advance of the First American 
Army on both banks of the Mouse. The entire town was en fete through the day 
of the arrival of the Red Arrows. In the afternoon the Mayor read an address of 
welcome to General Haan and his command in the central square of the city, where 
the chief participants in the ceremony were surrounded by a remarkable crowd, 
consisting of the entire civil population of the city and over 2,000 released Italian 
and Russian prisoners and French poilus. 

The day after the signing of the Armistice some captured .Americans had returned 
through our lines, a few of them being men who had been taken when the advance 
guard of the 128th Infantry got into trouble on November 10th. During the fol- 
lowing days prisoners of every allied country continued to pour into our lines as they 
were turned loose by the Germans. Feeding and handling these prisoners and the 
homeless civilians became a serious j)roblcm to our supply service, harassed by the 
necessity of getting up supplies without adequate facilities. A large number of Ger- 
man soldiers also gave themselves up, but were treated as prisoners of war and sent 
back to the prison camps. Many of them were Alsatians and natives of Lorraine, 
who claimed they had deserted or had been discharged from the German Army and 
were hurrying back to their liberated homes. 

After one day's rest at Tjongwy the march w-as resumed, and on November 20th 
the Americans crossed the border into Luxemburg. 

128 



THE MARCH TO THE RHINE 




"The day after the Armistice some captured Americans had returned through our lines.' 



GENERAL HAAN LEAVES DIVISION. 

At LoDgwy General Haan learned that he had been selected to command the 
Seventh Army Corps, which had been formed to go into Germany as the reserve 
Corps of the Army of Occupation. That same day Major General Wm. Lassiter, 
formerly chief of First Army iVrtillery and a veteran artilleryman who had seen 
action on all of the American fronts of France, arrived under orders to take com- 
mand of the 32nd. General Haan accompanied the Division across the Luxemburg 
border, and then relinquished command to General Lassiter. On account of the 
imperative necessity of General Ilaan's reporting at once at the headquarters of his 
new corps at Dun-sur-Meuse, there were few farewells. The Staff congratulated 
the leader of Les Terribles on his promotion and wished him luck; but the General, 
while no doubt appreciating the honor that had been accorded him in recognition 
of the great qualities of leadeisliip which he had displayed, seemed to have some 
doubt about the exact status of the luck that separated him from his beloved Di- 
vision. With him, apparently, the 32nd Division ranked about as high as an Army 
Corps. 

"C'est la guerre," said the General. ''Never mind, I won't be far away from 
you. Tell the men I'll keep an eye on them and see them often, no doubt, when we 
get up there and reach the goal of our desire." 

He kept an eye on "his" men. Frequently, in the months that followed, sorrow- 
ing parents in the United States wrote to General Ilaan for news of their loved 
ones. The General wrote to the proper units for the information and answered the 
letters himself. And when officers from the 32nd Division met ofHeers from Seventh 



129 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

Corps Headquarters and asked ''IIow's the General?" the answer always was, "He 
seems sort of homesick." When the General came up across the Rliine to visit the 
32nd, as he did on occasion, he always admitted liis homesickness. That was a 
common malady in those days, though the General's ailment was dillerent from 
that suffered by the rest of us — he wanted to get back to his Division ; we wanted to 
get back to the U. S. A. 

The change of command did not inturrui)t (lie progress of the business at hand. 
General Lassitcr took hold immediately, and proved him.=elf to be an admiralile 
commander, handling the problems which subsequently arose in the administration 
of affairs in the Array of Occupation with rare tact and skill. 

On November 21st General Pershing made a triumphant entry into tlie City 
of Luxemburg, with a part of the First Division as an escort, while the 32nd Di- 
vision marched througli the suburbs of the town in two colunms to reach its billeting 
areas in the vicinity of the capital. Though the Ked Arrows took no part in the 
formal entry into Luxemburg, which was witnessed by the Grand Duchess and the 
American Commander-in-Chief, it came about that each of our columns had a sort 
of private ceremony all its own in passing througli the outskirts of the city. Colors 
and standards were uncased, and the men marched to the cadence of the regimental 
bands. The 127th Infantry received a considerable ovation from the Luxemburgers, 
who lined the streets as Colonel Langdon's command passed througli. The Division 
P. C. that day was located in a chateau owned by the Grand Duchess, who had 
directed her retainers to invite the American Commander to occupy her property. 

GERMAN BORDER REACHED. 

On November 23rd the Division reached the German border on the Saar river. 
We had overtaken the retiring Germany Army. Across the river, enemy troops could 
be seen, apparently having cleared the bridges but a few hours in advance of our 
front line elements. It was announced by the Corps that the movement would halt 
on the German frontier until December 1st, as required by the terms of the armistice. 
The time intervening was to be devoted to cleaning up, the issuing of such equip- 
ment as could be secured, and the inevitable and hated training scliedule. 

The rest was very welcome for several reasons. Having started the march after 
participation in one of the toughest campaigns in military history, men and animals 
were far from being in prime condition. The period between the signing of the 
armistice and the beginning of the march had not been sufficient to transfer to the 
Division the supplies necessary to fully equip the troops for an operation of the 
character they were undertaking. Arrangements were made for bringing up the 
supplies during the halt on the German frontier, and it was thought that when the 
march was resumed and German territory actually invaded tiie material required 
would be on hand. 

During the week's halt every effort was made to fill requisitions which had been 
submitted. As the result of the untiring endeavors of all Staff Departments, par- 
ticularly the G-1 Section, a noticeal)le improvement was made. Every day, time was 
devoted to cleaning up and to disciplinary drills. Some equipment was drawn and 
distributed. 

ON GERMAN SOIL AGAIN. 

On December 1st the march was resumed, tlie Division using three bridges cross- 
ing the Saar into German territory. For some of our men the experience of setting 
foot on German soil was a new thrill, but for the veterans of the Division it was 

130 




J 31 



THE THIRTY- SECOM) Dt VISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

"old stuff." The doughboys who had been among those present in Alsace remarked 
that they were back where they started from — in Germany. That had been over 
si.x months ago. Well, it liad been a long, hard trip. "So this is Germany.'' lyct's go I 

Our second crossing of the pre-war Germany frontier was as unostentatious as 
was the first, down in Alsace, and far less impressive. There was the usual American 
lack of ceremonies of any sort. 

The columns moved out in the same formation that had previously ])ievailed, 
taking the precautions usual in the presence of the enemy. With the advance guards 
marched a detachment of G-2 observers and intelligence officers, charged with col- 
lecting early information concerning the attitude of the civilian population. Their 
first reports were to the elfect that the eitixons exhibited only the expected measure 
of curiosity, and that their general attitude seemed to be one of restraint. Later 
reports indicated that the civilians were more or less in doubt as to the treatment 
that would be accorded them by the Americans, and the restraint which had been 
noticed was due to fear of our soldiers. When they discovered that no harm was to 
be done to their persons or property, they became more affable. When the military 
representatives met the civil authorities for the purpose of arranging for billets for 
the troops, the matter was handled without the slightest friction. There was, of 
course, an absence of the cordial greeting which was accorded the Americans wherever 
they went in Luxemburg, but otherwise there was small difference in the atti- 
tude of the inhabitants. They seemed to do everything possible to make the soldiers 
comfortable, and the civil authorities promptly responded to both the letter and the 
spirit of any requests made of them. 

GERMANS LOOKED WELL FEU. 

The soldiers' first impression of Germany was one of surprise at the well-fed ap- 
pearance of the civil population, and the excellent condition of the livestock. Upon 
investigation it developed that barns were well stocked with forage, and the country 
immediately east of the Saar seemed very well provisioned. 

On the first day's march on German soil, tlie Division advanced approximately 
15 kilometers on an air line, the troops marching on an average of 20 kilometers. 
As a considerable part of this march was over a hilly country, men and horses arrived 
in the new billeting area quite tired, but apparently in fair condition, and un- 
doubtedly able to continue the march prescribed for the following day. The motor 
transportation also found the going difficult, owing to the narrow, winding roads. 
However, by 3 :00 o'clock all organizations were in the billeting areas assigned. 

December 2nd we advanced the front line another 10 kilometers; but when the 
front line advanced 10 kilometers, that means on an air line, the troops themselves 
being forced to march twice that distance, and over an extremely rugged country, 
on roads which were ruinous to even the tough sole leather of L^ncle Sam's shoes. 

The march was continued on December 3rd. On the -Ith we rested and on the 
uth started out again on a three-day hike. 

HARDEST DAY OF LONG HIKE. 

On December 5th the advance was resumed. The movement still was oyer a very 
hilly country — the roads were winding, narrow and slippery from the prevailing wet 
weather. The march was by far the hardest the Division ever had attempted, and 
the fact that all units reached the objectives which had been assigned, proved that 
the 32nd Division could claim distinction as a hiking as well as a fighting organiza- 

132 



THE II ABC 11 TO TEE RHINE 




"The roads were winding, narrow and slippery." 
NEAR DAUN, GERMANY 

lion. 'Die 125th and 128th Infantry Regiments had the longest distance to travel. 
In addition to the unusually long march required, the 128th Infantry was com- 
pelled to use some very bad roads. The men of these two regiments were on the 
road from daylight until dark, and it was long after the sun had set before the 138th 
reached its billeting area. The 12r)th Infantry covered a distance of 40 kilometers. 
The 128th covered an equal distance, but over a more difficult terrain. The men 
were on the road for fourteen hours, marching almost continuously. The 12fith 
Infantry also had a hard day's march, covering 32 kilometers. The 127th had a 
comparatively easy day, but, even so, marched 20 kilometers. Heavy marching also 
fell to the lot of the artillery units. The light regiments covered 35 kilometers and 
the heavies made 30. 

Corps and Division Headquarters were fully cognizant of the extreme dilTiculties 
encountered during the day by horses and men, and considerable concern was felt 
regarding their ability to continue the march on the following day. In order to Iw 
sure of the exact condition of the troops, inspections were ordered and reports for- 
warded to Division Headquarterc. These reports indicated that although the shoes 
of many of the men were in very bad condition, causing them to finish the march 
with bleeding feet, their morale was still excellent, and they had no desire but to 
continue to march forward as the leading element of the Army. 



133 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

The TTcadquarters of the Division moved from Speieher to Daun. Daun was 
a fairly large city, and it was thought that on this account the attitude of the 
population might be somewhat different from that of the small towns through which 
the Division had previously passed. Such, however, was not the case. Daun also 
seemed to be fully as well provisioned as the small farming towns to the west. 

REACH VALLEY OF RHINE. 

The march was continued on December 6th. On December 7th the 32nd Division 
was the leading Division of the Corps, being one day's march in advance of the 
2nd Division, and shoulder to shoulder with the 1st Division on our right. The 
day's march was through the usual hilly country, and a number of extremely difficult 
grades were encountered. Good roads were scarce, and the entire Division was 
forced to move over two main highways. One of these was used by the 63rd Brigade 
in the left sub-sector and by the 2nd Division after our troops had cleared. The 64th 
Brigade in the right sub-sector encountered one of the steepest hills that military 
traffic had passed over in the Third Army's march to the Rhine. The 128th In- 
fantry led the way up this difficult grade, the doughboys lending a hand to pulling 
their transportation up after them. The work required all the energy and endur- 
ance that men and animals were capable of exerting, but there was never a moment 
when the morale broke down or when the spirit of the toiling troops was not as high 
as their efficiency in handling the trying situations they encountered. 

While the front line was advanced to a depth of only 12 kilometers, the troops 
were forced to march on an average of twice that distance in order to reach the 



•^« 



-■C5^ ^' 



r-» 







"Tl»e horses were not in aa bad sliapo as miplit liave lu-en expected in view of the heavy hauling that was 

required of them." 

NEARING THE RHINE. 

134 



THE MARCH TO THE RHINE 

uew objective. The 126tli Infantry had tlie hardest hiking, its battalions marching 
from 23 to 30 kilometers. The 125th Infantry marched 18 kilometers, the 128th 
Infantry, 15 kilometers. One battalion of the 127th Infantry marched 27 kilometers 
and the other two battalions 18 kilometers. All troops arrived in fairly good con- 
dition, and the horses were not in as bad shape as might have been expected in view 
of the heavy hauling that was required of them. There had been an issue of what 
shoes were available to the most needy cases, and this improved the situation some- 
what. There were some men, however, who were forced to make the day's march in 
footgear that was entirely unserviceable. 

On December 8th, the Corps field orders announced that the march to the Khine 
would be completed in three more days. The sector limits were changed slightly, 
making the Moselle river the boundary line between the 32nd and 1st Divisions. 
This put the 1st Division into Coblenz, which is west of the Rhine and south of the 
Moselle. 

On December 9th the Division made its first day's march in the Valley of the 
Rhine, and at the end of the day the foremost elements were 10 kilometers closer 
to the final objective. On good roads and through a more level country the troops 
marched on an average of less than 15 kilometers. The hike was an easy one, com- 
pared with the difficult marches of previous days, and was completed before noon. 
Division Headquarters moved from Mullenbach to Mayen. 

ADVANCE GUARDS ON RHINE. 

The attitude of the civilian population of tlio Rhine country appeared no different 
from that of the inhabitants on the Western German border. Their long habit of 
obedience to authority caused them to readily assent to whatever orders the Allied 
military saw fit to issue. There seemed to be less fear of our troops than had 
previously been the case, and accordingly less restraint was noticed, in spite of the 
fact that it appeared that some German newspaper writers were urging the people 
to be more distant in their relations with the invading troops. It was evident that 
reports of the good conduct of our troops had preceded the advance, and this fact 
had a great deal to do with the ready acceptance of our soldiers by civilians with 
whom the men were billeted. Division Headquarters moved from Mayen to 
Ochtendung. 

On December 11th, just one month after the signing of the armistice, the 32nd 
Division reached the Rhine. The final phase of the march was completed at 11:00 
o'clock, when the 128th Infantry established its outposts at the junction of the Rhine 
and Moselle opposite Coblenz. The city itself was not entered by our troops, as 
it was outside the Corps sector. The three other Infantry regiments had previously 
arrived on the Rhine, the 127th completing its dispositions at 9 :30 o'clock. The 
63rd Brigade had arrived at the river on the lOtli, and on the 11th moved but one 
battalion in order to eslabli.sh outposts on the west bank. 

TROOrS IN HIGH SPIRITS. 

The troops arrived in the Rhine in high spirits and good physical condition. The 
animals showed the strain of the hard marcli to which they had been subjected. The 
equipment of the Division had not suffered seriously, but there were many shortages 
which existed when the march started, and many requisitions still remained to be 
filled. During the progress of the march efforts were made to secure needed supplies, 
and as the end of the operation a])proached plans were made for energetically con- 

135 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 





designated the E.isers bridge for the use of tlie 32..d Division in crossing the Rhine on 
December 13th." 
ENGERS BRIDGE. 

136 



THE MARCH TO THE RHINE 

tinning the work of getting the Division fully equipped. On December 11th Division 
Headquarters moved to a beautiful chateau at Basseuheim.. 

December 12th was a day of rest. The Corps designated the Engers bridge for 
the use of the 32nd Division in crossing the Ehine on December 13tb. The order 
which prescribed the movement gave us two days to move all elements of the Division 
across. Accordingly it was planned to cross all infantry and light artillery units 
on December 13th, and to bring the heavy artillery and auxiliary troops over on 
tbe following day. The bridge was to be at the disjiosal of the 2nd Division after 
3 r. M., December 14th. 

THE RED ARROWS CROSS THE RHINE. 

The 32nd Division crossed the Rhine on Friday the 13th. Although this day 
and date combination is usually not considered auspicious for the beginning of any 
important undertaking, the fact that the Americans were directed to make their 
historic passage of Germany's famed river on what is popularly called a "hoodoo" 
day, caused little concern to the doughboys fortunate enough to have the privilege 
of being in the front line of the Army of Occupation. Always quick to attach 
significance to any omen, they made no exception in this case, but contented them- 
selves by frequently repeating the assertion that it meant bad luck for the Germans. 
It must have been as the doughboys said, for the 32nd Division certainly encountered 
no misfortunes during the day. The crossing was conducted exactly according to 
schedule, and the movement went of? like clockwork. 

The 32nd Division and the 1st Division were the leading elements of the 3rd 
Army in the passage of the Rhine. These two divisions crossed at the same hour, 
and pushed forward side by side into the Coblenz Bridgehead. Elements of the 
2nd Division crossed on the extreme left of their sector, cavalry and advanced 
patrols occupying the 2nd Division front. The remainder of the 2nd Division was 
held in support under orders to complete its crossing on December 14th. 

The forward limit of the American sector in the Coblenz Bridgehead was 
announced in Field Order No. 83, 3rd Army Corps. The order directed that the 
front line be plainly marked by signs, and that jiassage beyond this line be forbidden 
except by proper authority. 

The crossing of the river was accomplished without ceremony. The leading 
elements of the 64th Brigade were lined up at the approach to the Engers bridge, 
and at 7 :00 A. M. the advance guards moved out in combat formation. To the 
127th Infantry went the honor of being the first to cross. The remainder of the 
64th Brigade followed. The Brigade Commander had estimated that his command 
would reqiiire a maximum of 3 hours and 15 minutes to make the crossing, and 
he was allowed this time in the march table. However, it developed that the time 
allowed for unforseen delays was excessive, as there were none, and the 64th Brigade 
completed its movement at 9 :45. The 63rd Brigade was under orders to begin 
crossing the bridge at 10:15, and the Brigade march table did not bring the head of 
the column to the bridge before that hour. Accordingly there was a gap of half an 
hour during which there was no traffic over the bridge. The 63rd Brigade was given 
until 12:30 to complete its movement, but the tail of the column was clear of the 
bridge at 12:15. The light artillery was scheduled to begin its movement at 12:30, 
so advantage was taken of the gap between the end of the infantry and the head 
of the artillery column to cross a convoy of trucks carrying regimental, brigade and 
division headquarters equipment. This convoy cleared in time to permit the light 

137 



THE Till IITY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 




"Outposts were establislied on the American Army's front." 

artillery to start at the appointed hour. The field order regulating the movement 
fixed 3 r. M. as tlie limit of the artillery passage. The Inst of the artillery column 
was clear of the bridge at 2:30. The movement of the iiifantr)' and light artillery 



138 



THE MARCH TO TEE RHINE 

was so well conducted that the six regiments crossed the bridge in one hour and a 
quarter less time than had been allowed. 

Division Headquarters moved from Bassenheim to Sayn. 

IN FKONT LINE AGAIN. 

While the last elements were being brought across the river on December 14th, 
tlie troops which made the passage on December 13th, were being moved toward 
the front line of the Division Sector in the Coblenz Bridgehead. A corps field 
order issued on the day before had fixed the limits on tlie left and right, and gave to 
the 32nd Division a front line of approximately 30 kilometers. Our area was 20 
kilometers in depth, and the Division occupied nearly 400 square kilometers of 
territory. The troops either were billeted in, or occupied as outposts, 03 towns. 

Outijosts were established on the American Army's front, and a preliminary 
disposition of troops on the line of resistance was made. In the left sub-sector the 
125th Infantry took over the line of observation and established liaison with the 2nd 
Division. In the right sub-sector the 127th Infantry covered the line of observation 
on the Division's right flank, and the 128th Infantry established outposts in the 
center of the sector. The 323rd Field Artillery was disposed in support of the left 
sub-sector, and one battalion of the 322nd Field Artillery was in a position in sup- 
port of the right sub-sector. 

On December 15th the Division was disposed with elements of four regiments 
in the front line. The artillery regiments moved forward to positions in support 




"Autliority to move tlie Division P. C. from .Sayn to lleeensdorf also was secured, and orders were giVLMi to malie 

this move on the following day." 

DIVISION P. C. RENGSDORF, GERMANY. 



139 



THE TUlUTr-^ECOXV DlVlSlUS L\ THE WOULD WAR 

of tlie infantry units. The work of reconnoitering for strong points and suitable 
observation posts was continued. 

Every effort was made by a careful examination of the ground to take advantage 
of favorable terrain in the preparation of preliminary plans for the organization of 
the sector. After the movement of troops on December 15th, only slight readjust- 
ments remained to be made, and these were to he concluded on December IGth, under 
the direction of Brigade Commanders. 

Based upon the reports of the various reconnoitering parties plans for the defense 
of the sector were prepared and submitted by the various commanders on December 
ItJth. While the reconnaissances were going on, there were several minor changes 
in tlie disposition of troops, owing to the necessity of billeting units in the vicinity 
of the part of the line of resistance they were to occupy. 

The Division Surgeon published an interesting memorandum which recorded the 
fact that the evacuations of the 32nd Division during the march to the Ehine were 
much lower than the Corps average. 

On December 17th there were further slight changes in troop dispositions, and 
the Divisional plan of defense for the sector was completed and forwarded to Corps 
Headquarters on December 18th. Authority to move the Division P. C. from 
Sayn to Kcngsdorf also was secured, and orders were given to make this move on 
the following day, thus completing the 32nd Division's march to the Khine and 
occupation of an important front line position in the Coblenz Bridgehead. 

MAKCH TO THE KHINE— 32nd DIVISION. 
Table of Daily Distances Traveled. (Kilometers.) 







Infantry. 


Artillery. 


Date. 




















Minimum. 


Ma.vimum. 


Minimum. 


Ma.ximum. 


November 17, 


1918 


13 


29 


9 


34 


18, 


" 


16 


30 


14 


23 


19, 


C( 


, , 


. . 






20, 


cc 


14 


20 


9 


19 


21, 


ti 


18 


35 


18 


2G 


22, 


ti 


9 


19 


7 


13 


23, 


ii 


10 


23 


10 


17 


" 24,30, 


(C 


. . 


. . 






December 1, 


li 


15 


30 


18 


28 


2, 


ii 


5 


25 


G 


17 


3, 


ii 


7 


25 


8 


20 


4, 


ii 


2 


15 


, , 




5, 


ii 


21 


40 


30 


35 


6, 


ii 


11 


25 


25 


30 


7, 


ii 


14 


29 


8 1/2 


20 


8, 


ii 


4 


IG 


, , 




9, 


ii 


4 


IG 


IG 


20 


10, 


ii 


8 


18 


11 


20 


11, 


ii 


2 


18 


14 


14 


12, 


ii 


4 


G 


, . 


. . 


13, 


ii 


17 


35 


9 


23 



One kilometer equals six tenths of one mile. 



140 



THE MAECH TO THE RHINE 




141 



CHAPTER XII. 
Die Wacht am Rhein. 




IFE in tlie Coblenz bridge-head was, as tlie doughboys put it, "not 
at all hard to take." They had better billets than they had 
"enjoyed" in France. Most of them had beds. The food, while 
"army straight," was excellent. There was, of course, too much 
of the hateful "training" to suit anybody, but as the lliird Army 
got "oriented," things took on a more pleasant aspect. There were 
athletics for all who desired outdoor recreation. For many 
who did not desire so to utilize what they thought was their leisure 
' ' time, there were soldier shows, and the Y. M. C. A. furnished 

professional talent to while away the long evening hours. 

Fraternization with the enemy was from the first sternly prohibited by all man- 
ner of orders, and these orders were strictly interpreted and rigidly enforced. The 
French "defendu" and the German "verboten" were easy words compared with the 
"Lay off !" which the American Military Police hissed when a Yankee doughboy 
smiled, perchance, at a German "miidchen" of more or less surpassing loveliness, 
or slipped a bit of chocolate to a roly-poly German youngster, or passed a neighborly 
"Guten .\bcnd"' to the motherly German matron with whom he was billeted. No 
orders were needed to prevent fraternization with the full-grown German male of 
the species, but with the "wimmin and kids" it was different. The Yanks just 
couldn't get up any hate for them, and couldn't help showing their good nature. 

But orders were orders, and the doughboys managed to get along pleasantly with 
the citizens of the Ehineland without becoming unduly chummy with anybody. 
However, the anti-fraternization order made for a lot of homesickness and more or 
less discontent. We all wanted to go home; wanted that trip across the ocean more 
than we wanted anything else; but the general sentiment was snmnied up by a 
stalwart sergeant of the 127th Infantry who wore a D. S. C, and who made a 
speech one night to some of his homesick comrades, which ran about as follows: 

"I sure want to go home, but let me tell yon fellows that right now I am just 
where I wanted to be when, back in 1917, just after war was declared, I enlisted in 
the National Guard. And I got here in a lot better shape than I expected, and a 
lot sooner than I expected. And the circumstances of my being here are just what 
my fondest hopes pictured. Of course, it may have been Berlin instead of Coblenz 
I was thinking of at that time, but that's a detail. Sure I want to go home, but 
I'm so blamed well satisfied about getting here at all that I'm willing to be patient 
with TTncle Sam and wait until he says the job is finished. Then I know he'll send 
us home." 



143 



THE Til IliTY- SECOND D IV IS f OX IN THE WORLD WAR 




"There were soldier shows.' 



SAILING DATE ANNOUNCED. 



Early in the New Year there were rumors that certain Divisions in the Army 
of Occupation which had been over longest would soon be put upon the sailing list. 
That meant us. There were only four combat divisions in France ahead of us, and 
three of them were in the Army of Occupation — the 1st, 2nd and 42nd — and the 
first two were regulars and no doubt would have to stay until the end. About the 
middle of February the announcement was made that the 32nd would sail in May. 
Happy days ! We could hardly wait for the long weeks to pass. At first it was 
planned to send the homeward bound Army of Occupation divisions down the Rhine 
to a Dutch port to embark from thei'e, but finally it was decided that the scheme was 
impracticable. 

On April 18th the 32nd Division started moving back from the Rhine, across 
France to Brest, on the first lap of the Homeward journey. At the same time the 
announcement was made that General Lassiter had asked to remain in France, and 
that General Haan was to take the Division home. General Ijassiter was assigned to 
command of the Third Army artillery, and General Haan joined the Division at 
Brest, after making an automobile tour to the sections of the western front over 
which his division had fought. 

At Brest the 57th Field Artillery Brigade also was assembled, the 32nd Division 
thus bringing home two artillery brigades, the 57th and 158th. On May 1st the 
first troops of the Division were on the Atlantic, and by May 15th all but the casuals 
had left France. 



144 



DIE WACIIT AM NIIEIN 

Arriving in the United States, largely in regimental detachments, a great recep- 
tion was accorded Les Terriblcs. Delegations from Wisconsin and j\Iicliigan met 
the incoming steamers in the harbor. The various detachments debarked at New 
York and Boston, and went to Camps Devens, Mills, Merrit, Upton and Dix, 
where they wore separated into detachments and sent to the camps nearest their 
homes. The largest parties, of course, were sent to Camp Custer, Mich., and Camp 
Grant, at Kockford 111. The arriving Michigan troops informally paraded in De- 
troit, Grand Eapids, Port Huron, Kalamazoo and others of their "home towns" 
before being mustered out of the service. 

In Wisconsin a Red Arrow Day was set aside, and on June 5th the returning 
Wisconsin warriors were given an enthusiastic formal welcome and parades in Mil- 
waukee, the state metropolis; — Milwaukee, with its Teutonic accent — which had 
sent to war some of the bravest and best soldiers that ever carried the Stars and 
Stripes or any other flag to victory. 

The 32nd Division was broken up — gone — but arrangements had been made for 
perpetuating its memory, for renewing its associations in the years to come. During 
the Armistice Days on the Rhine a "Thirty-second Division Veteran Association" 
was formed, officers elected, members recorded, and plans perfected for continuing 
during the years to come the spirit wliich led Les Terribles to success on the battle- 
fields of France in the great vear of 1918. 




145 




Brigadicb General W. D. Connor, as Colonel, General Staff, Chief of Staff; Training Period; Occupation of 

Sector in Alsace; as Bripndier General commanded the 63rd Brigade, Aisne-Marne Offensive. 
Brigadier General Louis C. Covell. Commanded 63rd Infantry Brigade, Training Period; Occupation of 

Sector in Aisace; Oise-Aisne Offensive. 
Brigadikb General Frank R. McCoy, Commanded 63rd Brigade in Oisne-Aisjie Offensive; Meuse-Argonne 

Offensive: March to the Rhine. 
Major General Robert Alexander, as Brigadier General commanded 63rd Brigade, Aisne-Mame Offensive. 
Brigadier General William R. Smedberg, Commanded the 63rd Infantry Brigade; March to the Rhine; Army 

of Occupation, 



146 



CHAPTER XIII. 

Leaders of Thirty-Second Division. 




HE names of the officers assigned to command of the different 
units of the newly organized 32nd Division and the roster of the 
first Division Staff may be found in Chapter I. From the time 
the reorganization of the Division was completed at Camp Mac- 
Arthur in September, 1917, until its assembly in the Tenth 
Training Area in France there were, for one reason and another, 
several changes. 

Upon arrival in the American Expeditionary Force the Di- 
vision Staff was reorganized to conform to the requirements of 
overseas service. During the training period in France changes were necessitated by 
the drafting of Division Staff Officers for duty with higher units. Lieutenant 
Colonel E. H. De Armond was continued as Chief of Staff in the Overseas organiza- 
tion, with Major John H. Howard as G-1, Major C. S. Caffrey as G-2, Major Allen 
L. Briggs as G-3, Lieutenant Colonel Hjalmer Erickson as Division Quartermaster, 
Lieutenant Colonel Paul G. Hutton as Division Surgeon, Major Samuel D. Pepper 
as Division Judge Advocate, Major Geo. M. Russell as Division Inspector, Major 
Herbert L. Evans as Division Signal Officer, Captain Wni. A. Woodlief as Division 
Adjutant, Major John P. Smith as Division Ordnance Officer. 

During the training period. Lieutenant Colonel De Armond was called to General 
Headquarters, and was succeeded as Chief of Staff by Colonel W. D. Connor, G. S. 
Major Caffrey was detailed on duty at Army General Staff College shortly after 
the Division entered the Alsace sector, and was succeeded by Major Paul B. Clemens, 
one of the original National Guard officers of the Division, who had been sent 
abroad before the Division left Camp MacArthur, to attend the American Expe- 
ditionary Force General Staff College at Langres, and who had graduated in May. 
Lieutenant Colonel Erickson was given a line command shortly after his arrival in 
France, and was succeeded as Division Quartermaster by Major Chas. li. Williams. 
Lieutenant Colonel Hutton also left the Division early in the training period in 
France and was succeeded as Division Surgeon by Lieutenant Colonel Gilbert E. 
Seaman. Major Russell was transferred to Fifth Corps head'quarters as G-2, and 
for a time several different officers served as Division Inspector. 

In the Alsiice sector. Lieutenant Colonel Robert McC. Beck, Jr., relieved 
Lieutenant Colonel Briggs, who had been assigned to the Staff College at Langres. 
When Colonel Connor was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General and assigned 
to the G3rd Brigade, Lieutenant Colonel Beck became Acting Chief of Staff and 
Major Smith became Acting G-3. 



147 



THE TtilHTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

GENEliAL IIAA.N I'LAL'ED IN COMMAND. 

General llaan was placed permanently in command of the Division in December, 
1917, and the same War Department orders assigned Brigadier General E. F. Mc- 
Glachlin, Jr., to the command of the 57th Field Artillery Brigade. General Mc- 
Glachlin brouglit the brigade to France, but was transferred to more responsible 
duties almost immediately, and was succeeded a little later by Brigadier General G. 
Leroy Irwin, who commanded the brigade in all of its many actions. 

General Haan was promoted to the rank of Major General on February 7th, 1918, 
just before he sailed for France. 

Colonel Boucher, of the 125lh Infantry, was found physically disqualified when 
he took his overseas examination at Camp MacArthur, and was relieved just before 
his regiment left for the Port of Embarkation. lie was succeeded by Colonel Am- 
brose I'ack, formerly of the 31st Michigan Infantry. Colonel Pack took his over- 
seas physical examination at Camp Jlerritt, and was likewise disqualified, and the 
regiment was taken to France by Lieutenant Colonel Edward G. Heckel. After the 
125th reached its training area in France, Colonel Peter F. Piasecki, formerly of 
the Fifth Wisconsin Infantry, was assigned to the regiment, but never assumed 
command, as a transfer was effected with Colonel Robt. B. McCoy of the 107th 
Trains, by which Colonel McCoy went to the 125th and Colonel Piasecki became 
commander of the Trains. 

Colonel P. S. Bond took the 107th Engineers to France, but almost immediately 
upon his arrival was assigned to the American Expeditionary Force I-^ngineer School, 
and Lieutenant Colonel L. H. Callan remained in conimaml until Colonel II. C. Fisk 
joined the regiment. 

Several changes were made in the organization of the machine gun units. The 
119th Machine Gun Battalion was cut down to two companies, and was made the 
motorized machine gun battalion of the Division. Major Stanley Piasecki, who suc- 
ceeded Major Percy C. Atkinson to the command of the battalion when the latter 
failed in his overseas physical examination, was transferred to the 121st Machine 
Gun Battalion when the 119th was motorized in -April, 191S, and Major Frank H. 
Fowlur of the 121st became commander of the 119th. Later Major Fowler was 
made Division Machine Gun Oflicer and promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 
He was succeeded by Major Wm. A. McCullough in command of the 119th. Just 
before going into Alsace Major Piasecki was transferred to the infantry and Captain 
Daniel L. Kcmington assumed command of the 121st, later being promoted to Major 
and attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel after the armistice. 

In the other organizations the commanding officers remained the same, the 
leaders who had trained the men in Waco taking them into the trenches in Alsace. 

CHANGES ON FIRING LINE. 

Once on the firing line, other changes occurred. At his own request. Brigadier 
General Charles R. Boardman was relieved of the command of the 6! lb Infantry 
Brigade, and was succeeded by Brigadier General Lejeune of the Marine Corps. 
General Lejeune commanded the Brigade until July 26th, just before the Chateau 
Thierry action, when he was promoted to the rank of Major General and placed in 
command of the 2nd Division. Brigadier General Edwin B. Winans succeeded to 
the command of the Brigade and held it until his "Les Terribles" were mustered 
out in 1919. 

148 



LEADERS OF THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION 

Colonel John Turner, who had commanded the 128th from its organization until 
the latter part of June, 1918, was at that time transferred to a school assignment, 
and was succeeded by Colonel Eobt. B. McCoy of the 125th. Colonel McCoy com- 
manded the 128th in all of its battles and during the latter part of its service in the 
Army of Occupation. He brought it back to the United States in 1919. Colonel 
McCoy was succeeded in command of the 125th by Colonel Wm. M. Morrow, U. S. A. 

On July 22nd, 1918, just after the 63rd Brigade had been withdrawn from Al- 
sace, Brigadier General Covell was ordered to a Field and General Officers' School 
and Brigadier General W. D. Connor was assigned to the command of the Brigade. 

On July 12th Colonel Kussel C. Langdon, U. S. A., succeeded Colonel Wilbur 
M. Lee in command of the lS7th, and retained the command until the demobilization 
of the regiment. 

The command of the 63rd Brigade changed again in the midst of the drive to 
the Vesle, Brigadier General IJobt. Alexander succeeding General Connor on August 
6th, when the brigade was engaged in firmly establishing itself on the Vesle and 
attempting to make a crossing of the river. General Connor was transferred to im- 
portant duty elsewhere. There was only one change in the Division Staff during 
the Aisne-Marne offensive. Lieutenant Colonel Jerome G. Pillow reporting for duty 
as G-3 on August 31st, 1918. After the completion of the operation the Division 
Signal Officer, Herbert L. Evans, who had been promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, was 
given a Corps assignment and was succeeded by Major John Scott, promoted shortly 
afterwards to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. At about the same time Lieutenant 
Colonel Glenn R. Garlock of the 128th Infantry, who had won recognition in the 
fight for Cierges, was transferred to the Division Staff and made Division Inspector. 
Major Amos T. Ashley became Division Ordnance Officer, and Major Smith, who 
had been actinjj G-3, was transferred to 5th Corps Headquarters. 

The command of the 63rd Brigade changed again during the Oise-Aisne Offen- 
sive. On August 26th, the day before his brigade went into battle. Brigadier General 
Alexander was promoted to the rank of Major General and assigned to command 
of the 77th Division, where he was destined to win great fame. He was succeeded 
by Brigadier General Covell, who had been the first commanding general of the 
Brigade, and who at the time was on temporary duty with the Division. On August 
29th, just as the Brigade was emerging from the front line to the support position, 
Brigadier General Frank E. McCoy reported with orders assigning him to command 
of the 63rd, and succeeded General Covell, who left the Division shortly after to com- 
mand a depot brigade. 

Colonel Morrow, of the 125th, was wounded at Juvigny on August 29th, and was 
succeeded by Lieutenant Colonel Heckel. Colonel Morrow returned to the Division 
on September 9th and was relieved on September 17th, going to the Third Division. 
Lieutenant Colonel Heckel again assumed command, was later promoted to the rank 
of Colonel, and commanded the regiment until its demobilization. 

There were no changes in the Division Staff until just before the Argonne battle, 
when Lieutenant Colonel John H. Howard, G-1, was detailed to attend the General 
Staff College at Langres and was succeeded by Major Robert Connor, formerly of 
the Wisconsin National Guard, who had just returned from the Staff College. 

CHANGES IN ARGONNE. 

After the Argonne operation there were two changes in the Division Staff. 
Lieutenant Colonel Seaman was promoted to Cor]js Surgeon for the Fifth Corps, 
and was succeeded by Major James Seott, who later was promoted to Lieutenant 

149 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

Colonel. Lieutenant Colonel Pepper was also transferred to the Fifth Corps and 
made Corps Judge Advocate, being succeeded as Division Judge Advocate by Major 
Fred S. Eogers. 

While the Division was in reserve of the Fifth Corps after the breaking of the 
Krienihilde Stellung, Colonel K. B. McCoy of the 128th was evacuated, sick, and 
when tlie regiment went into action in the Duo-sur-JIeuse bridge-head early in 
November it was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel John B. Schneller. Lieutenant 
Colonel Schneller was relieved on November 9th, and the regiment fought during 
the last two days of the war under Lieutenant Colonel Henry Meyer, later promoted 
to Colonel. Lieutenant Colonel Meyer took the regiment to its position in the 
Coblenz bridge-head, where he was succeeded by Colonel Geo. T. Smith. 

COLONEL WESTNEDGE DIES. 

Colonel Joseph Westnedge of the 126th was evacuated, sick, just before the 
bigning of the Armistice, and died in France. lie was the only original regimental 
commander of the 32nd Division to retain his command from first to last. The 
regiment started the march to the liliine under Lieutenant Colonel Caziarc, U. S. A. 
The latter was relieved at Longwy, and Major Guy Wilson brought the regiment to 
the Coblenz bridge-head. There Colonel Wm. A. Mollison reported with orders to 
take command, and he brougiit the regiment to the United States. 

Lieutenant Colonel Chas. II. Williams, Division Quartermaster, was evacuated, 
sick, while the Division was on the Saar river, just before the march into Germany, 
and was succeeded by Major J. E. Barzynski, U. S. A. Lieutenant Colonel Howard 
returned from the Staff College in January and again resumed his duties as G-1. 
Major liogers. Judge Advocate, was relieved in January. He was succeeded by 
Major Benjamin Chilton, and later by Major J. A. Howell, who wds promoted to 
Lieutenant Colonel and remained with the Division until its demobilization. Just 
before the crossing of the Saar river General McCoy was transferred from tlie ()3rd 
Brigade for important duty in the Service of Supply in connection with the home- 
ward troop movement, and was succeeded in command in the Brigade by Brigadier 
General William R. Smedberg who continued in command until demobilization. 

In February, 1!)19, Colonel McCoy returned to the Division. At that time Gen- 
eral Winans of the (J-ith Brigade was away on special duty and Colonel Langdon of 
the 127th was commanding the Brigade. Accordingly Colonel McCoy was assigned to 
command of the 127th. Just before the homeward movement of the Division started 
Colonel McCoy was again transferred to the 128th, Colonel Smith taking charge of 
the troop movement. 

Major Cieary, of the 120th Machine Gun Battalion, was sent to the States as an 
instructor while the Argonne battle was in progress. He was succeeded by Captain 
Sharp. On the march to the Rhine Major Kossow reported and took command. 

Major McCullough, of the 119th Machine Gun Battalion, was wounded at 
Juvigny and evacuated. He joined the command again in time to take tlie batt^ilion 
into the Argonne, where he was again wounded on the first day of the battle. Cap- 
tain E. S. Koynolds then took command, retaining it during the balance of the Ar- 
gonne battle. On the march to the Rhine Major Blossom reported and took com- 
mand. 

Lieutenant Colonel Remington remained in command of the 121st Machine Gun 
Battalion, e.xcept when on other temporary duty, when the battalion was commanded 
by Captain John A. McCullom. 

150 



LEADERS OF THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION 

MANY PROMOTIONS MADE. 

Most of the changes which from time to timg took place in the commanding 
officers and staff officers of the Division were due to the transfer of officers to other 
duties which they were especially fitted to perform. Usually these changes were 
regarded hy the authority issuing the orders as in the nature of promotions, but it 
is doubted if an officer ever left the 32nd Division for other work without a feeling 
of deep regret and a personal wish to remain. 

This spirit, together with additional light on some of the changes that were made 
during the career of the 32nd Division, is perhaps well defined in a signed interview 
which General Haan gave at Seventh Corps Headquarters in Germany to E. A. 
Bachelor of the Detroit News, a newspaper correspondent who had been with the 
Division during its training period in the United States and later was accredited to 
the 32nd in France. The interview follows : 

PRAISE FOR NATIONAL GUARD OFFICERS. 

"The 32nd Division, as it went into battle, was composed of approximately three- 
fourths National Guard and one-fourth drafted men. The spirit of the Division 
was due entirely to the spirit that was built up in the Division when it was composed 
wholly of National Guard troops and before it left Camp MacArthur, Texas. In 
building up a Division spirit the Division Commander had most loyal support and 
assistance, particularly from the two Brigade Commanders in Infantry, Brigadier 
General C. R. Boardman from Wisconsin and Brigadier General L. C. Covell from 
^[ichigan. To these two officers must also be given credit for energetic work in 
training their units in accordance with the theory announced by the Division Com- 
mander and the schedules based upon War Department instructions. 

"To these officers, as well as to other National Guard officers of high grade, must 
also be given credit for their conscientious assistance in eliminating officers unfit for 
war service. Nearly all such officers were eliminated upon the recommendations of 
National Guard officers, and, where that became necessary, went before Boards com- 
posed entirely of National Guard officers. 

"The high spirit of the Division made itself felt even in those early days, because 
it seemed to me even then that the Division fully realized that we were not training 
merely in theory, but that we were training to actually go into battle, in consequence 
of which it became the more important that all officers unfit to lead men for any 
cause whatsoever had to be gotten rid of. Most of these officers recognized their 
own deficiencies and willingly quit. To their credit, it should be said that they 
quit with heavy hearts. Here again came in the spirit of loyalty in these men which 
was so manifest from the beginning and which grew day by day as the training 
progressed. 

"Everyone knows what a heartsick feeling went through the Division upon ar- 
rival in France, when it was announced that it was to be a Replacement Division. 
The very heart seemed to drop out of it. Nevertheless the two Brigade Commanders 
stood firmly by the Division Commander, and told the men that some one had to 
do this work, and that, in order to do it well, the better trained organizations were, 
the better it would be for the Army as a whole. With this spirit the Division began 
to get ready replacements and send them forward. 



151 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

SriRIT OF AFFECTION. 

"During tlie short period that the Division had been a rcphicement Divij^ion, 
nearly half of its infantry had been taken away, and consequently when it began 
training for a temporary combat Division again, many replacements had to be 
moulded into the organizations, including olKcers and nun; but the old spirit of 
the Division predominated, and it was but a short time — a surprisingly short time — 
when these new troops, many of them but little trained, not only became efficient in 
their work, but came to like the Division, and, through a process which seemed 
almost contagious, never wanted to serve with any other Division. This is the spirit 
that has constantly existed in the 32nd Division. I have seen no such manifestation 
of personal liking for each other in any other organization, among men and among 
officers, as has always manifested itself in the 32nd Division. For these reasons 
naturally I have become greatly attached to the Division. I frequently feel more 
or less homesick to get back to it, and I certainly shall feel, if the Division goes home 
and I stay in France, as if I were an orphan far from home and friends. 

"I have spoken of the spirit of the Division that was manifest before it entered 
into any of its great battles. Its conduct in these battles already has been published, 
but it cannot be too highly praised. Everywhere, always, the results were greater 
than I had expected, and in many cases equal to what I had hoped for. These 
successes of course added greatly to perhaps not the affection, but the pride, among 
the members of the Division, and particularly so with the Division Commander and 
the Division Staff and the higher commanders. It was this pride, together with the 
spirit of comradeship and liking for each other, that carried the front line troops 
many times into and over most difficult obstacles. It was this spirit that overcame 
the strong position of the Ourcq ; it was this spirit that stormed Fismes and 
.Tuvigny; it was this spirit that carried the key position of the Kriemhilde Stellung, 
La Cote Dame Marie. 

"My own personal liking for the Division on account of its fine response to my 
attempts for its training naturally grew as time passed, and grew even faster, I 
think, on account of the rewards that were handed to me by the higher authorities 
on account of the work of the 32nd Division. I feel very certain that I owe to this 
Division my promotion to Major General (temporary grade) and Brigadier General 
in the Regular ,\rmy, and Corps Commander. I have therefore personal reasons 
which alone would lie sufficient to make me feel grateful to (he men of this Division ; 
but which are small in comparison to the feeling of admiration and pride that has 
manifested itself through the entire time, from its organization until the close of 
its last battle, and on its march to the Rhine." 



152 




^^^ 



Majos General John A. I.ejuene, Marine Corps, as Brigadier General Commanded the 6-lth liifantry Brigade; 

Occupation of Sector in Alsace. „„ . ^. 

Brigadier Genebai, Edwin K. Winans, Commanded tlie 6ltb Infantry BriKiidc; AisJic-Marne Offensive; Uiso- 

Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; March to the Hliine; Army of Occupation. 
Br.cadier Genehai, Charles K. Boardman, Commanded 64th Infantry BiiKade; Training Period; Occupation ol 

Sector ill Alsace. 



153 




CHAPTER XIV. 

Cited in Orders. 

F THE many words of commendation which the 32nd Division 
received during its career the expression of admiration which all 
ranks cherish most is a brief letter from ex-Presidcnt Theodore 
Roosevelt to Major General Haan, written under date of Septem- 
ber 13th, and received while the Division was battling its way 
through the Kriemhilde Stellung. 

"I most heartily congratulate you, my dear Sir, on the great 
work of your Division," wrote Colonel Roosevelt. 
' "By George, your men have hit hard ! Will you thank the 

Division for me?" 

The letter from the former president was in answer to a note from General 
Haan, written in August, in which the 32nd Division commander reported that "Les 
Terribles" had conquered from the Germans the territory in which Lieutenant 
Quentin Roosevelt's grave was located. Near the little French village of Chamery 
this reminder of the brave son of a brave father was found by our doughboys. They 
passed it in their race from the Ourcq to the Vesle, and when they returned from the 
front line early in August the spot was in the reserve area to which they were 
assigned. 

Reverently they replaced the plain marker erected by the Germans with a made- 
by-Americans cross. Flowers they brought from the woods near by, and a little 
fence was built around the grave. This General Plaan reported to Colonel Roosevelt, 
and the ex-President replied, voicing his gratitude and his admiration for the 32nd 
Division. 

When the first brief history of the 32nd Division was published during the 
Armistice days on the Rhine, the account contained only a few bald facts concerning 
the accomplishments of the Division, but a place of honor was given to Roosevelt's 
letter. Before and since, such noted persons as Clemenceau, the Tiger of France, 
great generals, governors and civic leaders, have said kind things about Les Ter- 
ribles, but in their hearts they will always cherish above all else the simple, sincere 
appreciation of one great leader for the soldier.'! of another. 

PREMIER CLEMENCEAU'S COMMENDATION. 

Next to the commendation of Col. Roosevelt, the most highly regarded words of 
praise were perhaps those uttered by M. Clemenceau, prime minister of France. 
When the Division was at Brest late in March, 1919, M. Clemenceau sent to Ad- 
miral Moreau, commandant of the port, a letter to be read to I^es Terribles on the 
occasion of presenting to General Haan and certain members of his immediate staff, 
the French medal of the Legion of Honor. The letter expressed the gratitude of 



155 




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^^^.rcSS^'j;^r""Br,^"l^?i..'w^>^V^5orr Aili;;tant 63,d Infant^- Bn.aCe; A.sne-Marne 

uJ^^^'h^S^^^^T^^so^. Cavalry, -Maio. AcU,^t ^U- Infant^ Bn^ade; ^.-Man,e 

Offensive: Oise-Ais..e Offensive; M«.se-Argn„neOffes,ve March to '^ ^^.„„ ^f sector in A saee. 

MAJOR Edgar H. Campbeix AG D. Adjutant, 63rd BiRa^^^^^ Occupation of Sector in Alsace. 
Major Charles A. Green, Infantry, Adjutant, 64th Brigade, iraming 

157 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

the French Republic for the work of the 32nd Division and wished good luck to the 
officers and men. 

On behalf of the French nation Admiral Jloreau decorated General Ilaan with 
the rank of Commander in the legion of Honor, Brigadier General G. LeRoy Irwin 

of the 57th Fiokl Artillery Brigade and Colonel Hobt. McC. Beck with the order of 
Ollirier, and Lieutenant Colonel Paul B. Clemens with the rank of Chevalier in the 
Legion of Honor. The rank of Officier was also awarded Brigadier General Edwin 
B. Winans of the r)4th Brigade, Colonel Russell G. Langdon of the 127th Infantry, 
and Colonel IT. B. Fiskc of the 107th Engineers. Colonel Jerome G. Pillow of the 
G-3 Section, General Staff, Colonel Gilbert H. Seaman, formerly Division Surgeon, 
Lieutenant Colonel John 11. Howard, G-1 of the Division, and Lieutenant Colonel 
John Scott, Division Signal Officer, were awarded the medal of Chevalier in the 
Legion of Honor. These officers were not present at Brest, and were decorated 
elsewhere later. 

Premier Clemenceau's letter follows: 

"Ijct me bid farewell to your division before it leaves France, and permit me to 
address to your unit a message of gratitude. 

"When decorating your flags with the French War Cross, General Jfangin 
enumerated some of your deeds and noted that the ()4lh Brigade had been given by 
its French brothers in arms the glorious name of the "BRIGADE LES TER- 
RIBLES." 

"To that testimonial T wish to add a few remarks: From May to November 
the 32nd Division spent on the firing line one hundred and twenty days, thirty-five of 
which were during engagements in the hardest battles. Your losses from enemy 
fire were 14,268. 

"In the spring you were holding the front line in Alsace. During the summer 
you fought from the Marne to the Vesle. In the autumn you were in the llont- 
faucon Woods. On the eve of the armistice you were still delivering an attack. You 
have met successively twenty German divisions; you have never given up to them 
an inch of ground. 

"T salute your glorious flag, I pay to your dead the homage of our thankfulness, 
and I say to those who leave: bon voyage, good luck in life; and do not forget your 
French friends." 

PERSHING COMPLIMENTS 32nd. 

When the 32nd Division had been placed on the sailing list and was preparing 
to leave France, General Pershing wrote a personal letter to Major General Lassiter, 
then in command of the Division, in whieli ho spoke in the most complimentary 
terms of the great work of the Wisconsin and Mieliigan National Guardsmen. He 
briefly recited their accomplishments on the field of battle, and paid them a glowing 
tribute for their soldierly conduct in the Army of Occupation. General Pershing's 
letter follows: 

"My dear General Lassiter: 

"Please extend to the officers and men of the 32nd Division my sincere 
compliments upon their appearance and upon the splendid condition of the 
artillery and trans])ortation at the review and inspection on March 15th. In 
fact, the condition of your command was what would be expected of a division 
with such a splendid fighting record. 

158 



• CITED IN ORDERS 

"After traiuing for several months following its arrival in February, 
1918, it entered the line in Alsace and held this sector until the time of the 
Aisne-Marne offensive, when it moved to that active front. On July 30th it 
entered the line on the Ourcq, and in the course of its action captured Cierges, 
Bellevue Farm and the Bois de la Planchette. The attack was resumed on 
August 1st; the Division captured Fismes and pushed ahead until it crossed 
the Vesle. On August 28th it again entered the line, and launched attacks 
which resulted in the capture of Juvigny at the cost of severe casualties. 
During the j\Ieuse-Argonne Offensive the 32nd Division entered the line on 
September 30th, and by its persistence in that sector it penetrated the Kriem- 
hilde Stellung, taking Romagne and following the enemy to the northeastern 
edge of the Bois de Bantheville. On November 8th, the Division took up 
the pursuit of the enemy east of the Meuse until the time when hostilities 
were suspended. 

"Since the signing of the Armistice the 32nd Division has had the honor 
to act as a part of the Army of Occupation. For the way in which all ranks 
have performed their duties in this cajjacity, I have only the warmes.t praise 
and approval. The pride of your officers and men, justified by such a record, 
will insure the same high morale which has been present in the Division 
during its stay in France. I want each man to know my appreciation of the 
work he has done and of the admiration in which he is held by the rest of his 
comrades in the American Expeditionary Forces. 

Sincerely yours, 

(Signed) John J. Peeshing." 

General Pershing's letter was written after he had reviewed the 32nd Division in 
the Coblenz bridgehead in March. Previously, in December, he had made a flying 
trip through the 32nd area, where the troops were lined up on the roads in the vicin- 
ity of the villages which they occupied. Several times during the afternoon he left 
his car and passed along the line of paraded troops, looking them over very carefully. 
The General had last seen Les Terribles when they were in the thick of the Argonne 
fight and he came up one day to see how things were going. On that September day 
he had seen the Division for the first time since July, when he said he liked the snap 
of General Haan's men. When he visited the Division P. C. in the Argonne he 
expressed himself as satisfied with the way things were going. 

HIGH REGARD FOR THE 32nd. 

"I have regarded the 32nd Division highly since the day you took Hill 230 on the 
Ourcq when you first went into action," said the Commander-in-Chief. "I was 
anxious for you to make good, so we could prove to the French that all our divisions 
were made up of first class troops. You all know how well you fulfilled my expecta- 
tions, and what an excellent impression you made upon the French. 

"Then General Mangin wanted you to form the hammer-head of the blow he 
aimed to strike north of Soissons, and I sent you up there, and you again made good. 

"Here in this battle you have had a hard task, and you are doing it well. I want 
you to continue to strike and strike hard, as you have been doincr, and I know vou 
will." ^ 

After the Aisne-Marne Offensive General Pershing commended the work of the 
First and Third American Army Corps in General Headquarters General Orders 

159 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

143, 1918, mentioning each division, including tlie 32nd. General Order 143 fol- 
lows: 

"It fills me with pride to record in General Orders a tribute to the service 
and achievements of the First and Tiiird Corps, comprising the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 
4th, 26th, 28th, 32nd and 12nd Divisions of tlie American Expeditionary 
Forces. 

"You camo to the battlefield at tho crucial hour of the Allied cause. For 
almost four years the most formidable army the world had as yet seen had 
pressed its invasion of France, and stood threatening its capital. At no time 
had that army been more powerful or menacing than when, on July 15th, it 
struck again to destroy in one great battle the brave men opposed to it, and 
to enforce its brutal will upon the world and civilization. 

"Three days later, in eonjunction with our Allies, you counter-attacked. 
The Allied Armies gained a brilliant victory that marks the turning point 
of the war. You did more than give our brave Allies the support to which 
as a nation our faith was pledged. You proved that our altruism, our pacific 
s])irit, our sense of justice have not blunted our virility or our courage. You 
have shown that American initiative and energy are as fit for the test of war 
as for the pursuits of peace. You have justly won the unstinted praise of our 
Allies and the eternal gratitude of our countrymen. 

"We have paid for our success in the lives of many of our brave comrades. 
We shall cherish their memory always, and claim for our history and litera- 
ture their bravery, achievement and sacrifice. 

"This order will be read to all organizations at the first assembly forma- 
tion after its receipt. jqhj^ j_ Pershing, 

General, Commander-in-Chief." 

At the review of March 15th which was held for General Pershing in a big 
natural amphitheater about 20 kilometers east of the Khine, near Dierdorf, Germany, 
General Pershing presented the Distinguished Service Medal to Major General 
Lassiter, Brigadier General Winans and Colonel R. McC. Beck. He presented 
Distinguished Service Crosses to over a score of oflicers and men of the Division 
to whom .the honor had been awarded. After the presentation ceremonies and the 
parade which followed, General Pershing gathered the whole Division about him in 
a huge semi-circle and addressed the troops as follows: 

"I cannot let the 32nd Division go home without taking this opportunity — 
without expressing to you in person my sincere thanks and appreciation for the 
splendid and ofiicient service you have rendered since you arrived in France. It may 
be that another opportunity may not come to me to say what I feel in my heart, 
and I am going to occupy a few minutes in your Division and say it now. 

"When America entered the war we found our Allies in a very low state of 
morale. The leading men of those nations doubted very much whether they would 
be able to withstand another onslaught of the Armies of the Central Powers, but 
our entry gave them a new hope, filled them with fresh determination, and when in 
the Soissons-Chateau Thiery Ofl'ensive, which the 32nd Division aided in turning 
from a defensive into an offensive, they found that American stamina, American 
aggressiveness, American methods and training and American soldierly qualities 
were something to be considered worth while, — they were given new life and en- 
couraged to assume a renewed spirit of aggressiveness. On the other hnnd: the 
enemy learned that ho had a new force to contend with. 

160 




Colonel K. G. Heckel. Infantry, as Lieutenant Colonel of 125th Infantry (as Lieutenant Colonel Coinmaiided 
125th Infantry enroute to France) Training Period; Occupation of Sector in Alsace; Aisne-Mame Offen- 
sive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; as Colonel Coninianded 125tli Infantry; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; March to 
thp Rhine; Army of Occupation. 

Colonel Joseph B. Westvkdge. Infantry. Cmimanded K6th Infantry; Training Period; Occupation of Sector 
in Alsace ; Aisne-Mame Offensive ; Oise-Aisiie Offensive ; Meuse-Argoinie Offensive ; Died in France, 
November 29ih, 1918. 

Colonel K. B. McCoy, Infantry. Commanded Trains and Military Police; Training Area; Commanded 125th 
infantry. Training Area ; Occui>ation of' Sector in Alsace ; Commanded 128tli Infant ly, Occupation of 
S<'ctor in Alsace; Aisne-Marne Offiensivo : Oise-Aisnc Offensive; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; Commanded 
127th Infantry, Anny of Occupation; Commanded 128th Infantry, Anny of Occupation. 

Colonel Peter F. Pia.secki, Infantiy. Cnmmanded Trains and Militar>' Police; Trainina Area; Occupation 
of Sector in Alsace; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; March to 
the Rhine; Army of Occupation. 

CoLONKL Russell C. Lancdon, Infantry, Commanded 127t.h Infantry; Occupation of Sector in Alsace: Aisne- 
Mame Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; March to the Rhijie; Army of Occu- 
pation. 

161 




\C,2 



VITKI) L\ ORDERS 

"Beginning with C'antigny as a small example (if what the Ameriean troops were 
able to do, on down through the Chateau Thierry and the Aisne-Marno Offensive, 
then at St. Miliiel where tlie First American Army first functioned, then in the last 
campaign carried through hy the American Army alone, and the splendid final 
victory, American arms never met with a defeat. From the lime they started there 
has been nothing but a continuous succession of victories to uur credit. 

"As to your services here in the enemy's country as a part of the Army of Occu- 
pation, I have none but words of praise. You have caught the idea of your 
superiors, and your conduct has been irreproachable. As I travel among the divi- 
sions of this army 1 find everywhere a record of humane conduct and fair treatment 
of a people whom you are entitled by the effects of your labors to regard as a 
conqueror regards the conquered. I congratulate your officers and you for the work 
you have done. 

''When you return to your homes after having served here much will lie expected 
of you, not only m your own locality as to policies there, but also in the nation at 
large as to higher policies; therefore, prepare to speak for your country's interest 
when you are asked for advice. A splendid indication of the worth of the principles 
you have shown here will be displayed when you go back into your ohl or your new 
positions if you show, in whatever job of whatever places you may be called upon 
to fill, the same industry and the same spirit you have shown here. It has been a 
very great honor for me to command an army composed of divisions like this, and 
now that the time has come for the divisions to break up and the men go to their 
homes, I can only hope that they will go back possessing the same spirit of idealism 
with which they fought. For this sjilendid work, I thank you. I thank you for 
the devotion you have shown; I thank you today in the name of your comrades of the 
American Expeditionary Force. I thank you. I may say, in the name of the Ameri- 
can people, who will soon be able themselves to say to you what they think of you 
and of the work that you have done. I thank you sincerely." 

(JENEUAL MAXGIX DECOKATES COLOKS. 

The review was a highly impressive ceremony, and was approached only hy the 
military pageant held Ju.st before the Division left the l!liiiii' on the occasion of the 
decoration of the colors of the 125th, 13Gth, 137th and l^Stli Infantry Kegiments, 
and the lisnh, 12()th and 121st Machine Gun Battalions, with the Croix de Guerre. 
The same day over 200 ofTicers and men of the Division were iiresented with the 
Croix de Guerre for gallantry in action, Gent'ral Mangin himself i)inning the 
medals on those cited in French Army orders. The honor of having all of its in- 
fantry and machine gun colors decorated with the French war cross by a French 
Army Commander was one of the greatest ever accorded an .Xnu'riean military unit, 
and the signiliiviiiee of the occasion was not lost on the men of the ;52nd. 

Jn addition to tlie French decorations bestowed that day, Major General Dick- 
man, of the Third Army, ]iinned Ijattle ribbons on the colors of the various regiments 
and separate battalions, each ribbon recording a battle in which the unit so decorated 
had participated. General Haan, then commanding the Seventh Corps, pinnecl 
Distinguished S('rvice Crosses <in a iiuiiiher nf men to whom the distinction had 
been awarded, and Major Geiu'ral Ifines, of the Third Corps, piniu'd Belgian decora- 
tions on several oilieers and men whom the I'.elgiaii governnu'ii! saw fit to so honor. 

.\fter General Maiigin had revereidly kissed the colors on which he had pinned 
the French war cross, he stepped out in front of the assembled Irooiis. and in a clear, 

1G3 




Colonel Chester B. McCormick, F. A.; Commarulod 119tli Fiv\d Artillery. Trainiiic Period; Occupation of 
•Sector in Alsact-; AJMie-Marne Offeiitiive; Oi.se-Aisiie Offensive: Mense-Argonne Offensive. 

Colonel Carl Penner, F. A.; Commanded the 120tli Field Artillerj', Training Period; Occupation of Sector 
in Alsace; Aisne-Marne Offensive: Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meuse-Argnnne Offensive. 

Lieutenant Colonel Robert Arthur, F. A.; Commanded l^lst Field Artillery; Occupation of Sector in Al- 
sace; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meiise-ArKonne Offensive, 

Major General E. F. McGi^chlin, as Brigadier General Conunanded the 57tli Field Artiller>' Brigade; Train- 
ing Period. 

Brigadier General G. Leroy Irwin. Commanded llie 57th Field Artiller>' Bripade, Training Period; Occupa- 
tion of Sector in AUace; Aisne-Marne Offensive; Oiye-Aisne Offensive; Aleusc-Argonnc Offensive. 

Colonel Phillip Westfahl, F. A.; Commanded 121st Field Arlilleiy, Training Period; Occupation of Sector 
in Alsace. 

Major James Gilson. F. A.; Adjutant 57th Field Artillcr>' Brigade; Occupation of Sector in Alsace; Aisne- 
Marne Offensive; Oise-Aisne Offensive; Meiise-Argonne Offensive. 



164 



CITED IN ORDERS 

ringing voice, easily heard by tlie thousands of officers and men present, he spoke in 
French, as follows: 

"My dear American Comrades : 

"I am very happy to lie among yon once more, and proud that this 
meeting of ours is taking place on the other side of the Rhine. The occasion 
of this reunion is to bestow upon you a few decorations, meager tokens of 
the gratitude which the French Republic, the People of France, and the 
soldiers feel towards you, for the brilliant conduct and the splendid courage 
you displayed in taking the town of Juvigny, the memory of which will 
remain forever intact with us, and which will place in history the glorious 
deeds of the 32nd Division and of its able and valiant Chief, General Haan. 

"You are going back to your noble country, proud to have accomplished 
your task for its sake and for the sake of humanity. 

"Take back with you the assurance of continued friondf^hip and the 
eternal gratitude of France." 

THE BRIGADE CITATIONS. 

The citations on which the infantry regiments and machine gun battalions of 
the Division were decorated follow: 

"63rd Infantry Brigade. 

"The G3rd United States Infantry Brigade, composed of the 125th and 
12Gth Infantry Regiments and the 120th Machine Gun Battalion, has ac- 
quired the most splendid titles of glory in the battle of August 28th, 1918, 
in the vicinity of Juvigny. Scarcely having entered the lines, it dashed for- 
ward into the assault; the enemy, surprised, became demoralized by the 
rapidity and vigor of the attack. It proved its superiority in a fierce hand- 
to-hand struggle where the 125th and 126th Regiments emerged victoriously 
despite counter-attacks by the enemy. It drove back the beaten enemy as 
far as the approach of Tcrny-Sorney, while efficaciously supporting the neigh- 
boring French troops during the attacks from August 31st to September 
1st, 1918." 

"64th Infantry Brigade. 

"Magnificent brigade, to which the French soldiers fighting by its side 
have rendered the most beautiful homage in calling it the 'Brigade les Ter- 
ribles.' Composed of the 127th and 128th Infantry Regiments and the 121st 
Machine Gun Battalion, it took, in a brilliant and irresistible attack, the 
village of Juvigny, the 30th August, 1918, and pursued its advance the 31st 
August and the 1st September, dominating constantly the enemy, in spite of 
heavy losses, sustaining without faltering the most violent enemy counter- 
attacks, fighting for three days without stopping, without rest, and almost 
without food." 

CHEERING MESSAGES FROM THE STATES. 

On several occasions while the Division was at grips with the enemy and after 
the American troops had pressed the war to a victorious conclusion, cheering mes- 
sages came from the States. 

1G5 



THE thihty-secdm) ihvi^iox i.\ the would wm: 

Oh .SO]itenil)cr 8lli. after tlie ;52n(l Division had withdrawn from its second major 
olFensivu — tliu Oiso-Aisne — the following cahle^'rani addressed to General llaan was 
received from Governor Albert E. Sleeper of .Michigan: 

"The newspapers recount heroic and daring exploits of Michigan men in 
our country's liattles. I'lease convey to officers and men of your Division 
Miihigiiu's thanks for their gii'at work. Their deeds over there spur us over 
here. We salute tlieni."' 

This brief cablegram was publisiied in General Orders No. 88 of the 32nd Di- 
vision and at tlu> direction of General Ilaan was read to all officers and men as soon 
as they reached their rest area in the vicinity of Joinville. 

On October Kith, while Les Terribles were battling for the Ivriendiilde Stellung, 
the following cablegram was received by General Haan from Governor E. L. I'liilipji 
of Wisconsin : 

"The splendid work of your Division cheers our hearts. On behalf of the 
people of this state, I congratulate you, your officers and men, and ask you 
to express to our Wisconsin boys our deepest love and alfection." 

This cablegram was ])ublisbed in Cieneral Orders 94 of the Division, and was 
read to all officers and men. 

WISCONSIN LKa; I SL.\TURK PAYS TIM BUTE. 

While the Division was on (he Kliiiu', a c-o])y of .loint K'esolution .\o. ;!(!, "Com- 
mending the Wisconsin National Guard for its consjjicuous part in the World War," 
was received by Major General Ijassiter. The resolution was passed by the Wiscon- 
sin Legislature, then in session. General Tjassiter ]niblished the resolution to the 
Division in General Orders No. 'i',. April (!tli. liHI*. The resolution follows: 

"■WiiKHE.vs, in the world war just brought to a victorious end, the Wiscon- 
sin National Guard, iueorjiorated in the Thirt^'-second and Forty-second 
Army Divisions, were among the firs.t American troops to land in France and 
confront the German enemy, and 

"WiliciiE.vs. in Alsace, and in the advance fiom the Ourci| to the Vesle, at 
Soissons, at St. Mihiel. in the Argonne Forest, and the advance to Sedan and 
the Meuse. in fact in every major operation and victory of the .\mcric;in 
Army in France, these two Divisions had glorious and vital ])art, and 

"WiiEUEA.s, the valor, the steadfast courage and fine soldiership of these 
Guardsmen has caused their Divisions to be rated and commended as among 
the five shock divisions of the .Vnierii-an .Vrmy oftenest, longest and most 
scveiely tried of any, and 

''WiiicitE.vs, Other thou.'<ands of Wisconsin soldiers on the battlefields of 
I' r;iii(c' iuul Russia and in camps and cantonments in l''uro))e and this country 
have loyally done and are doing their full duty as soldiers of the Republic; 

-Rcxulvcd by the SENA'I'E, the ASSEMBLY concurring. That the 
]ieople of the State of Wisconsin, through their Ijegislature, extend their most 
sincere a])])reeiatiou of the gallant soldiershi]) of these Badger soldiers, who 
have blazoned high and l)riglit in the constellation of states the star of Wis- 
consin as a loyal lighting member of this Republic, and be it further 

1G6 



CITED IX OnDEES 

'^Resolrcd, Tluit a copy of these resolutions, signed by tlie presiding 
officers of both houses, and countersigned by their Cliief Clerks, be forwarded 
to J[ajor General William G. Haan, U. S. A., under whose leadership the 
Tiiirty-secoiul ])ivision (Wisconsin-Michigan National (iuard) gained in its 
first great battle and advance the ])nui(l war title 'Les Terribles/ and that a 
further copy Ijc foi'warded to Major (ieiu'ial William Lassiter, U. S. A., now 
(■(Uiimanding the Thirty-second Division, with the I'equest that this message 
of appreciation i)e transmitted to officers and soldiers of Wisconsin residence, 
now assigned with the Army of Occujiation in Germany." 

That Waco had never forgotten the 33nd Division, but had eagerly followed the 
victorious career of the unit her citizens so fondly called "Waco's Own," was indi- 
cated by frequent newspaper clippings received by the men. On November 30th, 
when the Division was triumphantly marching toward the Khine, the following 
cablegram from Jim Penland, President of the Waco Chamber of Commerce, was 
received by General Haan, who was then commanding the Seventh Corps. General 
TIaan forwarded the message to General Lassiter, who published it in General Orders 
m . 1 !> 1 S. Tlie cablegram follows : 

"In behalf of the people of Waco I congratulate you and your command. 
W'e hope you will be returned to Camp MacArthur for a demonstration of 
Waco's a])preciation." 

GENERAL ILVAX'S WORDS OF PRAISE. 

After each of the major offensives in which the Division particijjated. General 
Haan took occasion to comment, in General Orders, on the work accomplished. 
These General Orders recited the achievements of the troops, praised their fortitude 
and courage, and expressed the Division Commander's satisfaction with the results. 
That these General Orders were not mere matters of form, but were words of 
sincere appreciation, was indicated by the fact that General Haan often took occasion, 
while commending his men, to point out deficiencies the correction of which would 
make the 'S2nd even more efficient in battle. 

The Division's first major operation in the Aisnc-JLirne OITensivc was followed 
by General Orders 7fi, 1918, issued on August Tth, the day the troojis were being 
withdrawn from the line. This order follows: 

''Li the first serious -encounter of tliis Division with the enemy in 
offensive operations in open warfare, the work and conduct of the Division 
lias been eminently satisfactory. In a campaign of eight days, during 
which there has been constant fighting or pursuit, the endurance of the 
men has liecn put to a severe strain. At no time during this period was 
there an indication of a lowering of the high spirit with which the Division 
started. The Division occupied the ctitire front of the Corps sector, and 
during the eight days threw the enemy back more than 18 kilometers, 
capturing in the neighborhood of 100 prisoners, 2 cannon and many machine 
guns, together with immense quantities of ammunition and other war sup- 
])lies. The Division had a considerable number of casualties, but we have 
actually buried more of the enemy dead tlian our own total number in killed. 
Tliis shows that the men have a])preciated and understood the training in 
offensive spirit and war of movement that it was the ])olicy to convey to them 
during the brief jieriod of 1i-aiiiing in Frniu-e. 

1C7 




CdLii.NtL William Mollison, liifaiitrv; Comiimcided 126lli lufaiitiy; March to thu Khinis Aniiy of OccupBlion. 
Colonel Wilblb M. Ltt, Infantry, Connimiuli-d 127tli Infantry, Training Period; Occupation of Sector in 

Alsace. , ,-v ■ 

Colonel Georoe T. Smith, Infantr>': Coinnianded 128ih Infanliy; Army of Occupation. 

LlEUTENA.NT CoLoNEL JOHN B. ScHNELi.EB, Infantry: Division Inspector, Training Period; OccupaUou of bee- 
tor in Alsace; Commanded 128tli Infantry in Mcuse-Arconne Offensive. 

Colonel P(ii. S. Bond. Encineers; Division Engineer, Training Period. 

CouiNEL Henry .\. Meyer. Cavalry; Commanded 128tli Infantry; Meuse-Argonne Offensive; March to the 
Khiiic; Army of Occupation. „ , „ ., . ■ -r 

Colonel .liiHN B. Bihther, Infanliv; Commanded 12.'ith Infnntn,'; Trainms Period; Camp MacArtJiur, lexas. 

Colonel Ambrose C. Pack. Infantry; Commanded 125th Infantry, Port of Emlmrkation. 

Colonel John Tirner. Infanto ; Commanded I28th Infaniry ; Training Period; Occupation of Sector in Alsace, 

1G8 



CITED IN ORDERS 

"The two strong positions captured in the first three days of the campaign 
were the center of resistance of the enemy's main line on the Ourcq, where a 
determined stand was made in order to permit him to withdraw as much of his 
war supplies between that river and tlie Vesle as possible. When tliese points 
were captured the entire line rapidly retired. The conduct of the men in 
capturing these two places was magnificent. The positions fell only after 
hard fighting which required courage, endurance and skill. 

"We have yet many deficiencies, but the work already accomplished is one 
to be justly proud of, and the Division Commander, who has supervised the 
organization and training of the Division, is well satisfied with the work 
accomplished, and he feels confident that after a brief period of rest for 
equipment and a little training as to more scientific methods of attack, to 
minimize as much as possible our losses, this Division will be much better 
qualified to again take its place in the front line than it was July SOth. 

"The Commander-in-Chief has expressed his desire that after an engage- 
ment prompt report be made of all casualties, and prompt report be also made 
of any heroic deeds performed by individuals which should be recognized by 
the awarding of Congressional medals. The Division Commander, therefore, 
desires that immediate steps bo taken by all commanding oilicers to render 
reports in the form already prescribed (see See. 11, G. 0. 67, current series, 
these headquarters). Great care must be taken in the preparation of these 
reports, in order that there may be as little delay as possible in getting action." 

FREXCH COEPS COMMANDER CONGRATULATES 32nd. 

After the first blow had been struck in the Oise-Aisne Offensive, General Haan, 
in Par. 2 of General Orders 84, 1918, published the following: 

"The Division Commander desires that the congratulations of the French 
Corps Commander on the fine work that the Division has done be communi- 
cated to all officers and men of this command. 

"The Corps Commander is very much pleased with the results accom- 
plished, and has sent his personal congratulations to the Division, through the 
Division Commander, by an officer of the Corps Staff. The Commanding Gen- 
eral desires tliat this order be communicated to all troops at as early a date 
as possible." 

On September 5th, when the 32nd Division had been withdrawn from the Oise- 
Aisne Offensive after capturing Juvigny and driving through the enemy lines to a 
depth of 6 kilometers. General Haan expressed his satisfaction to his troops in Gen- 
eral Orders 87, as follows: 

"In tlic task accomplished by the 32nd l')ivision with the Tenth French 
Army the Division has again demonstrated its fighting qualities, and has 
shown, moi-e than in its previous operations, the results of scientific training. 
resulting in more perfect team work. I have never doubted the courage of 
the men of the Division, but I have wondered occasionally whether our train- 
ing has been snfficiently complete to establish proper team-work between all 
its elements. Tlie team-work in the recent operation worked immensely better 
than in the Second Battle of the Mame. Tliere was much less straggling, 
and the Division Surgeon has reported officially from the hospitals and dress- 
ing stations that among ihe sick and wounded there were no quitters. 

109 



THE TllinTl'-SECUM) J>J\ISIi>.\ JS THE WOJUJ) II. I/.' 

"The figliting sjiirit of tlio Division is as fine if not belter than ever. The 
French Corjjs C'oiiniuinder and tile Freiieli Army Coniinander have e.\]tre?sed 
their admiration of the work aceomplished and of the spirit in wiiicli it was 
done. To this 1 desire to add niv eongratuhitions to everv man in tlie Di- 
vision. You had before you tlie very best of German troops, sent liere fresh 
to hold tlie lines at all costs. These lines you succeeded in jiiercinjr. and at 
everv point where you were ordered to go ahead you not only succeeded in go- 
ing aliead, but during your lirief period of action you liave succeeded in 
capturing from the enemy's best troops !).S4 prisoners, 12 of whom are odic-crs. 
You have made a record of which all the memliers of this Division will ever be 
proud and which will clu'cr our folks at home."' 

An example of the "common sense" advice that General llaan so fre(|uently 
imparted to his men and oflicers on the occasions when he lield informal conferences 
or inspections, both in and out of battle areas, is contained in Genera! Orders 94, 
issued on October 1.5th, 1918, the day after the 32nd Division had broken through 
the Kricnihildc Stclhing, advancing the front line some distance ahead of the 
rarlheniKist gain made by divisions on the right and left. The Division on this occa- 
sion was very eager to press forward through the breach, and men and officers 
regarded it as unfortunate that the flanks could not move up. 

LOVK THY XKlGlll'.Ol! .\S THYSELF. 

In General Orders 91, (ieni'ral llaan liad the rollinviiig to say about the comment 
that the situation developed : 

"Bad habits are easily foinu'(l. and one of the worst that has come to the 
attention of the Division Commander is criticism of units that arc fighting 
alongside of us. We frequently hear the remark that 'if the ])eople on our 
right — or left — were able to go a.hea<l, we could continue without any trouble.' 
Everyone must remember that cverybodv else is fighting as hard as he can, 
and if he could go ahead he would not wait for us to juill him along. There- 
fore, just ]iiit yourself in the other fellow's ])lace. and make up your minds 
that he has just as hard a job as you have, and that be is trying just as hard 
to get ahead as you are, and perhaps by going ahead you can help him. 
Consequently, rather than to think of him, just try to get ahead yourself."' 

The same General Orders (pioled a message from Ca]it. John ifcCullum. of 
• Co. A, 121st Alachine Gun Tiattalion, as "illustrating the kind of sjiirit that wins." 
General Pershing saw the message on September l.lth when he came up to (cimiili- 
ment the Division on breaking through the Kriemhilde Stcllung. The Commander- 
in-Chief suggested its publication to the Division. Captain McCullum"s field mes- 
sage, which was addressed to the C. O. 121st ^fachinc Gun Battalion, and which 
was forwarded by the latter to the C. (!. (i-lth Infantry Brigade, and then to Division 
Headquarters, follows: 

"I am sending you a sketch showing my iiositions toniifht. Have four 
guns in reserve. Cor])oral Jerry J. Jerabek went through the wire at 7 
o'clock this morning, after he bad fired 7,000 rounds into the woods west 
of IJomagne. and went to the lop of Hill 22o and staved there until the in- 
fantrv came through at 11 o'clock. Tie was ONLY ."lOO meters ahead of the 
infaiitrv. He ca|iturcd 22 ]iiisoners and never lost a man. Wc arc ahead so 

170 



CITED IN ORDERS 

far. but will he a little more contented wlu'n the aiunuuiition and gndi get 
here. We tired 30,000 rounds today on Hill 246 and into the woods south of 
Hill 240 and Roniagne. We sure can 'give them hell' in the morning, as we 
have good positions." 

When Brigadier Genei-al Winans, of the 64th Brigade, reeeivc(l the niess:ige, he 
at mice sent the following reply to Captain Mct'ulhim: 

"The spirit of your message to your commanding officer appeals to nie. 
Give Cor))oral Jerabek my personal congratidations, and tell him that his 
conduct will not be forgotten by me." 

Another paragrajih of the same General Orders is interesting as showing General 
llaau's attitude toward the "peace talk" which was heard now and then. 

"The jjeace proposals of the enemy are another form of propaganda to 
affect the morale of the Allied Troops. Speculation thereon by officers and 
men is wholly out of place, and must be suppressed in this Division. The 
making of peace is not our Job — which is defeating the enemy Armies. 

"The wireless news of the enemy's propositions should serve us in but one 
way, and that is to cause us to redouble our efforts to completely defeat him 
and so make him submit to the terms which the Allies will impose.'' 

THE SPIBIT THAT NEVER FALTER!']!). 

The last troops of the Division to be relieved in the first phase of the Argonne- 
Meuse Offensive came out of the line on October 20th, and the next day, when they 
were in bivouac in the Bois de Montfaucon, the following General Orders, No. 96, 
1918, were issued and read to the officers and men : 

"In its third effort in battle, the Thirty-second Division broke through 
the famous Kriemhilde Line, tlie last organized line of the enemy's defense 
on this front. 

"During the nineteen days of almost continuous battk', not a day passed 
without some progress being made, and during this period a fajtal advance of 
eight kilometers was accomplished. This in itself does not seem a great dis- 
tance, but when it is considered that this progress was made through a well- 
organized positicm of great natural strength, at a key-])oint of that position, it 
is a task accomplished of which the Division can and shmild feel proud. 

"The actual penetration of the famous Ivriendiilde line was perhaps less 
dilficult than the long approach to the wire of that ])osition upon ground 
where the !)ivision had to first work down a slope and then uj) another slope 
for from 3 to 4 kilometers, where it was constantly under observation and 
under artillery and machine gun (Ire. The excellent maneuvering of sub- 
ordinate commandeis, suj-ported by the artillery, machine guns, stokes 
mortars, one-pounders, and all other auxiliary weajions all working together, 
permitted the accomplishment of our mission and the attaining of our objec- 
tives with a minimum of loss. Tlie Corps Commander and the Commander- 
in-Chief have ex])rcssed to me jiersonally their satisfaction at what the Divi- 
sion has accomplished, and I desire to add my hearty congratulations to all 
officers and men, one and all of whom have shown under the most difficult 
circumstances a spirit that never faltercil under ihe most trying conditions." 

171 




1. CoLONKi, Morse, Commanded 323rd Field Artiller>- ; March to the Rhine. 

2. BaicAiiiKR Gr.xFBAi. A. S. Fi.cmi.nc. CcniniiiiKled ISStli Field Artillery Brigade; Meusc-Argonne Offensive; 

March to the Uliiiie; Army of Orcni>ation. 
3 LicL'TtiNANT Colonel S. R. Uopkins, F. A.; Adjutant IS8tb Field Artillery' Brigade; Amiy of Occupation. 

172 



CITED IN ORDERS 

CHEEtRFUL TROOPS COMMENDED. 

On the following day, October 22ii(l, after General Haan had been over the 
"billeting area" occupied by his troops, he issued the following General Order, 
No. 97, 1918: 

"In my general inspection of tlie infantry troops of the Division yester- 
day, I was more than pleased with the cheerful and wideawake spirit found 
everywhere; also by the well-formed habit of proper rendering of salutes. 

"The appearance of the uniform must be made the best possible under 
the difficult situation. Well-trained troops can make themselves look military 
even in old and badly used up uniforms, and nothing less is satisfactory in 
the 32nd Division. 

"We are to receive at once a considerable number of replacements, and 
every effort must be made to immediately inspire these new troops with the 
fine fighting spirit of the Division. All officers, non-commissioned officers 
and privates must unite in bringing the instruction, training and discipline 
of these troops up to the highest possible standard, and our Division will be a 
better fighting unit than ever before. 

"The enemy must be defeated, and wherever our Division is placed in the 
line it must accomplish its missions. This can only be done by the highest 
discipline, training and a proper development of the fighting spirit." 

GENERAL SUMMERALL THANKS "LES TERRIBLES." 

The same day, October 22nd, General Haan received from the Headquarters of 
the Fifth Army Corps a letter from Brigadier General W. B. Burt, Chief of Staff of 
the Corps, conveying the thanks of Major General Charles P. Summerall, the Corps 
Commander, for the work of the 32nd Division in breaking through the Kriemhilde 
Stellung and taking its objective. The letter of commendation follows : 

"The recent long service of the 32nd Division in the front line of the 
Fifth Army Corps has been characterized by such a fine example of soldierly 
effort that the Corps Commander commends you and your soldiers for it. 

"Under extremely difficult circumstances, and over a rough, hilly and 
wooded terrain, the Division broke through the enemy's strong lines, the 
Kriemhilde Stellung, and reached and took its objectives. 

"This effort and the result accomplished speak for themselves, but that 
you and your men may know that the Corps Commander appreciates their 
exertion, and acknowledges their success, he thanks each one." 

This letter was published to the Division in a General Order. 
It was for the strategy shown in this o])eration that General Haan was subse- 
quently decorated with the Distinguished Service Medal. 

"FIRST IN WAR AND FIRST IN PEACE." 

Like the "Father of his Country," the 32ud Division was "first in war and first 
in peace." The conduct of "Les Terribles" in battle was no less excellent than the 
discipline and good order which they maintained on the dreary grind of the march to 
the Rhine. On December 10th when tiio first elements of the Division had reached 
the famous river which was the Third Army's goal, General Orders Xo. Ill, 1918, 
were issued by command of Major General Lassiter: 

173 



THE rilJRTY-SECOyi) DIVISIOX IX THE WORLD WAR 

"The Division has completed its marcli to the Rhine. Leaving tlie bat- 
tlefields on the Meuse on Xoveniher 17tli it marched to and across the 
(Jrand Duchy of Luxendnirg, and crossing into German territory on Decem- 
ber 1st, it reached the Khine on December IDlli. Throughout this long march 
and its many difficulties the Division has kept closed up, prepared for action, 
and it now stands on the Khine concentrated and ready for whatever may 
come. This feat will stand among the many memorable achievements of the 
Division. Hereafter, officers and men will recall it with pride. 

"It is with sincere pleasure that the Division Commander records this 
accomplishment, and testifies to the fine spirit, characterizing all ranks, which 
has made it possible." 

'•ELITE" DIVISIOX COM I'LLMENTED. 

After General Pershing had inspected the 32nd Division on the Rhine in March 
he expressed his pleasure, in conversations with the Corps and Army Commander, at 
the condition in which he found the troo])s. The Commander-in-Chief insjiecfed the 
Eirst and Second Divisions, the other divisions in the Third (bridge-head) Corps, 
at the same time, and his remarks, after his visit to his elite divisions, resulted in 
the letters published in General (jrdei's "J".', Headipiarters '.Vim] Division, March 24th, 
1!)18, as follows: 

Nil. 22. 

1. Tl.c l'(illii\viii<i Iftlcr is pnl)lislird for tlie iiifiirniLitioii of :ill c-onoeiiictl : 

AR.MV OF OCCUPATION, 
THIKD U. S. ARMV. 

Coblenz, Germany, 
March 19th, 1919. 
FROM; Chief of Staff, Third Army, American E. F 

TO: Commaiitiing General, Third Arniv Corps, American E. F. 

SUBJECT: Commendation. 

1. The Army Commander desires me to congratnlate the Commanding General of the Third Corps 
on the very satisfactoiy condition of the Third Corps troops and the Divisions of the Corps during 
the recent inspection of the Commander-in-Chief. 

2. The condition of your troops voices far more strongly than can be accomplished by any other 
means, the intelligent and successful labor which has been expended by all concerned in training and 
instruction since the occupation of the bridgehead. 

By Command of Major General Dickiuan : 

MALIN GRAIG. 

Brigadier General, U. .S. A. 

Chief of Staff. 

1st Ind. 
II<I. Third Army Corps, .American E. F., March 21, 1019 — To Commanding General, 32nd Division, 
.American E. F. 

1. For his information. 

2. Tie Corps Commander desires to express his keen appreciation of the high coniiiliment paid 
the 'I'hitd Corps troops and the Divisions of the Corps by the Army Commander. 

By Conmiand of Major General Hines: 

CAMPBELL KING, 

Chief of .Staff. 

By Command of M.ajor General LA.SSITER , 

R. M. BECK. Jr.. 

Colonel, C;eneial .Staff, 

Chief of Staff. 

EREXCH CO:\r:\IEXDATTOXS XFMEROITS. 

Commendaiory letters from French commanders under whom the 32nd served 
dui-ing its earlier career in France are numerous. During their service in Alsace the 
conduct of the nlficers and men frequently inspired woi-ds of admiration from Gen- 
eral raulinici'. of the 40th French .\rniy Cor])s. which held the Haute .\lsace sector. 
W'lii'ii Hie Division left the sector for sterner duly I'lscwhcrc General Paulinier e\- 

174 



cm'.! I IX onpHh's 




"After GciMTal Pcishiiig bad iiisiwctcd tlie 32nd Division on tlic Rliine in Manh Ir uxpn-^-ed Ids pleasure." 

RENGSDORF, GERMANY. 

pressed liis njipiTciatiDii in tlie I'ollowiiii;- (ieiRTdl Oi-ilci- Xd. ."), lli';!il(|uarters 40tli 
French Army Corps, July -.'.^th. 1918: 

"At the time when the 'o-iud V. >S. Division knaves the zuiir of llaute Al- 
sace, tlie Coiiimandiiig General of the 40th Army Corps wishes to express to 
the Commanding (General of the Division and to his troops, the great satisfac- 
tion he has e.\])erienced in liaving them under his command. 

"By the courage, the e.vcellent spirit, the perfect hearing, the zeal to gain 
knowledgi', of which they have given proof in all circumstances, these troops 
have shown all that can he expected of them under a commaml such as that of 
General Daan. 

"The :Vhu\ U. S. Division leaves for coming liattlcs, and i.nr hest wishes 
go with them. The General, the officers and the men, know that they are 
taking with them the affection and the esteem of the French troops of the 
zone with whom they have collaborated in a spirit of such cordial comrade- 
ship, and the gratitude of the people of Alsace, whom, together with their 
brothers in arms, they will contribute to return definitely to their country." 

THE FIRST "CITATION." 

During its tour of duty in Alsace the 32nd was closely associated with the 9th 
French Division, commanded by General Gamelin. On October 29th General 
Gamelin sent to General Haan. a liricf oi' accouni ol' llic opci-ations of the Ofli French 
Division after leaving the sector of Alsiu-c. In Iransnntting the rei)ort General 
Gamelin wrote: 



175 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

"Six months ago the 32nd U. S. Division and the 9th French Division 
were called upon to work together in the calm sector of Haute Alsace. That 
was at the time when the enemj' was hurling divisions en masse upon the 
Anglo-French forces, in the hope of obtaining a decision before the great 
American Army could enter into action. 

"Together we followed with anxiety the fortunes of the fight which others 
engaged in on the roads to Amiens and Paris; together we desired to be 
thrown into the great battle, side by side. But our desires could not be 
realized, and at the decisive hour, the 32nd U. S. and the 9th French entered 
the line separately. 

''However, last August echoes of the splendid part played by your troops 
in the victorious ofTcnsive reached us. Personally, I had the great pleasure 
of meeting you and expressing my congratulations. The officers and soldiers 
of the 9th French Division were happy and proud to learn that their Amer- 
ican comrades had, with them, taken part in the success upon the great battle- 
field whose name will always remain immortal^'Tlie ilarne.' 

"Since that time the Divisions have followed their separate destinies. I 
have thought that you would be glad, in order to continue the chain of our 
cordial relations, to learn the history of our movements since we separated. 
This is the object of the modest account which I send you herewith, which 
will allow you to see that the 9th French Division endeavored whole-heartedly, 
and with all its energy, to accomplish its part of the common task. 

"We entertain the hope that you will, in exchange, let us know the ex- 
ploits of the 32nd IT. S. in the great struggle which already the dawn of vic- 
tory is beginning to light up. 

"With my personal regards to you, my dear General, will you be good 
enough to accept for your officers, and for your soldiers, the ever faithful 
good wishes of the officers and soldiers of the 9th French Division." 

PKOUD TO COMMAND AMERICANS. 

During and after the Aisne-Marne Offensive commendatory orders were fre- 
<|uently issued by the French Army and Corps commanders under whom served 
several American divisions in the great battle. As in General Pershing's order, the 
troops of the First and Third Corps were grouped for words of praise. Among the 
most cherislied of these orders is a General Order of the 3Sth French Corps of the 
Sixth French Army, under which the 32nd gained its name of "Les Terriblcs." The 
order was signed by General L. de Mondesir, commanding the 3Sth Corps, and com- 
mended the 32nd and 28th (Pennsylvania National Guard) troops as follows: 

"The time having come for him to turn over the zone of battle to Gen- 
eral Bullard, commanding the Third Corps, American Expeditionary Force, 
General de Mondesir, commanding the 38th French Corps, addresses all his 
thanks to the splendid troops of the 28th and 32nd Divisions, American Ex- 
peditionary Force, who have proved during the pursuit, which is still being 
continued, not only their courage, but also their staying fjualities. 

"The casualties, tlie toils and the hardships due to the difficulties of bring- 
ing up rations during the marching and fighting of this period, were unable 
to break their high morale, their dash and their warlike spirit. 

"General de ^Inndesir is proud to have had the opportunity to command 
them. He hopes that the day will come when he will have them next to him 
as comrades in our common fight." 

176 



CITED IN ORDERS 

AMERICANS MADE VICTORY POSSIBLE. 

The day tlie armistice went into effect, when the 32nd Division and the 15th 
French Colonial Division went in line side by side east of the Meuse, General Haan 
and General Guerin, who oominanded the Colonials, exchanged felicitations. General 
Guerin's letter to General Haan follows: 

"General Guerin, commander of the 15th French Division of Colonials, 
sends to the General Commanding the 32nd IT. S. Division, his personal 
thanks, as well as those of his entire Division, for the kind letter of congratu- 
lations of November 11th, 1918, received by him. 

"We are happy to celebrate victory in conjunction with the splendid 
soldiers of the United States. 

"The indomitable energy and tenacity of the French troops, sustained 
without weakening for over four years, against a formidable enemy, prepared 
the way for victory. 

"The entry into line of the American Army, coming out of the waves 
of the ocean like a miracle, and arriving with all the verve of its vigorous 
youth, with strength and dash which were irresistible, made victory rapid and 
decisive. 

"This has cemented the union of the two great peoples, already bound by 
close ties, forever." 

FRENCH OFFICER'S STORY OF FIGHT. 

An interesting account of the Division's advance from the Ourcq to the Vesle, 
written by a French officer, was incorporated in the official report of the Aisne- 
Marne Offensive submitted by General Haan to the Commander-in-Chief. The 
author, Lieutenant de Tessan, was on duty as an instructor attached to the American 
forces, and his account of the battle was made in the form of a report to the Chief 
of the Information Section of French G. Q. G. His report went through the 
Headquarters of the Sixth French Army where it was marked "Seen and approved" 
by the Army Chief of Staff. Lieutenant de Tessan, who wrote under date of August 
9th, entitled his account "The March of an American Division on Fismes." As in 
General Haan's official reports, Lieut, de Tessan had the advantage of writing while 
the facts, which he obtained from personal observation, were fresh in his mind. He 
wrote, from notes made on the ground, as follows: 

"Forced to beat a general retreat, after our counter-offensive of 18th July, 
the Germans have tried to make a stand at the Ourcq, and, on the heights 
which overlook the river, have held some furious fights. However, under the 
repeated blows of our Allies, they were obliged to give way, and then, be- 
ginning on 3()th July, the enemy commenced a falling back movement in the 
direction of the Vesle. Definitely thrown back from the heights of Seringes, 
and from Hill 230, northeast of Sergy, they were subjected to an energetic 
push on the part of American elements, fresh and in high spirits and ready 
to descend the slopes of Ronchercs, while the Frencl-i, on their right, were 
advancing through the Meuniere Woods. 

"It is the action of the American Division, which marched from Ron- 
cheres to Fismes, progressing almost parallel with the road marked out 
by Coulonges, Cohan, the Longueville Farm, St. Gilles, that wc are follow- 
ing from 30th July — date of its debut in the sector — until 5th August, 
when it entered Fismes. 

177 



TJII-: riiiin y-sh:c().\i> nnisiox /-v riii-: would ir.i/; 




niE RKU Aituow piinuiNc; the c;kuman links iuom the oukcq to the vesle.' 

178 



CITED IX (Jh'DERS 

''It is interesiiig to note that in this Division were included regiments 
composed in majority of men originating from Wisconsin. This means that 
among them were large numbers of German-Americans, who, by giving their 
blood for the United States, gloriously affirmed their loyalty. 

"On the ;iOth, they began their operations in the fighting sector, by attack- 
ing the (Jrim]x?ttes Woods, after a short ai'tillery preparation, and they at- 
tained the southeastern point of the woods. But the Germans were de- 
termined not to let go without a stubborn resistance. They soon counter- 
attacked and pushed hack the Americans" advanced elements. The iighting 
became extremely close, and some hand-to-hand fighting followed. 

"It was not imtil the morrow, 31st, that the entire woods fell to the hands 
of the Americans. The machine-gun nests which intei'dicted their march 
on Cierges had been smashed or reduced; tiie way was clear. Now installed 
in the Jondjlettes woods, the enemy, by bis well-feil fires, was trying to retard 
the advance of the Americans. 

"Cierges is situated in a hollow. Therefore the Germans, after evacu- 
ating the village under a strong pressure, were showering it with gas shells. 
However, the Americans did not stop in Cierges. They passed this unfavor- 
aide position, and by a single rush they climbed up the inclines north of the 
village. Then, after a short pause, they jjartly cleared the Jomblettes Woods. 

"In the meantime, the French were advancing on the right, and debouched 
from the Jleuniere Woods, which they had thoroughly cleaned up. 

KEEN AT IXFAXTIJV MANEUVER. 

"On the 1st of .\ugust, the Americans had a new series of obstacles to 
overcome, the most important of which were the Reddy Farm and Hill 330. 
In the course of the first engagements, they had already shown a keen sense 
of the infantry maneuver, seeking the tactical means most sure to attain 
their objective, and giving proof of precious qualities of initiative and 
imagination. Add to this the fact that they used with skill the machine 
guns, the automatic rifles, the light mortars of accompaiiiiiient. 'J'his is why 
they mastered the German defenses once again. 

"Hill 230 was taken in a superb manner, and 70 prisoners were added to 
the tally. 

"Frnm then nn, the enemy lied and (ipjuised b\- feeble I'i'ar-guards the 
advance of the Americans. The latter swept them on their wav, and took 
Chamery, T.^' Jloiicel. \'illome, Cohan, without great ditliculty. .\t Cohan, 
the Gernuuis hung on for several hours, but were forced to give up toward 
tile end of the day, the Americans having reached the heights north of 
Dravegny. Conseijuently a progress of (> to 7 kilometers had been efTecled 
during that day of the 2nd of August. For 12 hours tlie infantry had been 
engaged in uninterrupted figliting, in s])ite of the dilTiculty of bi'inging up 
rations and sujiplies, there- being l)ul a single narrow road which coidd be 
used by the convoys, and heavy rains having rendered the roads very bad. 

"In spite of the fatigue and prixations of the leading units, the ])ursuit 
of the Germans was taken up again al (lay-break, on 3rd .August. Easilv 
enough, tlie line which |)asses through Les F.ouleaux was reached. lUit then 
the enemy turned around and faced the .Americans with numerous machine- 
gun sections and a powerful artillerv, whieb ■^hnwei-ed Ihe \illages cif the 
valley, the cross roads, the i'a\ines. 

170 



TUE TllIKTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WAR 

"It became necessary to proceed with a methodical rolling back of the 
enemy, and maneuver around his strong points, whicli permitted the Ameri- 
cans to reach the slopes north of ilont Saint Martin and of St. Gilles. The 
Division had therefore added to its gains 7 kilometers in depth. 

LAST SUPHEME EFFORT. 

"A last and supreme effort was to bring it to Fismes and the Vesle River. 

"On 4th August, the infantry combats opened with unheard of bitterness. 
The outskirts of Fismes were strongly held by the Germans, whose advanced 
groups were very hard to take. The Americans persevered in their endeavors 
to reduce them with their light mortars and a few 37 mm. guns, and they 
succeeded, not without trouble, toward the end of the day ; and, thanks to 
this slow and tenacious pressure, they were, at one kilometer of Fismes, 
masters of Villesavoye and of the Chazelle Farm. 

"During the whole night the rain impeded their movements and rendered 
harder their task for the next day. 

"On the right, by similar jumps, the French had conquered the series of 
woods and undulations of the Meuniere woods east of St. Gilles, and were 
then on the plateau of the Bonnemaison Farm. On the left, another Ameri- 
can unit had succeeded in reaching the Vesle, to the east of Saint Thibaut. 

"On 5th August, the artillery prepared the attack on Fismes by a well 
regulated bombardment, and the final assault was launched. The Americans 
penetrated in the city and began the very hard task of reducing the last 
remaining 'isles' of resistance. Evening saw the task nearly accomplished. 
\Vc held the entire southern part of the city as far as the Reims road, and 
l)atrols were searching the northern part of the city. A few patrols even 
succeeded in crossing the Vesle, but they only made a simple reconnaissance, 
the Germans then occupying very strongly the right bank of the river. There 
then remained nothing but the complete cleaning up of Fismes and fortifying 
of ourselves therein, against an offensive return of the enemy. 

"Such was the march of an American Division, which having started from 
Roncheres on 30th July, and having victoriously covered 18 kilometers, 
crowned its success by the taking of Fismes." 

FRENCH NEWSPAPER PRAISE FOR "LES TERRIBLES." 

Newspaper articles, both French and American, frequently i-eferrcd to the ex- 
ploits of the 32nd Division. The articles written by the American journalists were, 
of course, read by everybody at home, and came back, in magazines and newspapers 
and clippings from home, to the troops abroad. Some of the French articles, how- 
ever, were not translated for publication in the United States. 

In General llaan's personal files is a translation of an article published in "Le 
Petit Parisien" on August IGth, 1918, just after the 3'2nd Division had made its 
spectacular drive from the Ourcq to the Vesle. The article is entitled "La Brigade 
Terrible" and was published on the front page of the great French daily. The 
writer was a famous French war correspondent who had recently been the guest of 
the Division. His "story" follows: 

" 'The fighting, the wild, the terrible in combat' and 'savage' — thus has 
been called the G4th Brigade to which we had been conducted, while it was in 
support, after it had taken such a brilliant part in the recent operations 

180 



CITED IN ORDERS 

against the villages which had been destroyed to such an extent that they 
were practically crumbling to pieces. The Brigade was eneampd in a wood, 
the shattered trees of which showed only too plainly what havoc the shells 
had wrought. 

"This 'savage' Brigade, composed of volunteers from Jlichigan and Wis- 
consin, is, as a matter of fact, made up of men of intellect to a very great 
extent, many of them being university students. To an air in which are 
mingled fragments of student songs, melodies dating from the days of the 
war against Spain, and a few notes of the 'Marseillaise', they have composed 
an attractive marching song, in which the Emperor of Germany is advised to 
look out for them, 

" 'The Kaiser has no chance 

" 'We'll shoot him in the pants'," etc. 

"They have evidently amused themselves in composing pieces of this kind 
with the idea of giving the impression that they are old campaigners! As a 
matter of fact, the 64th Brigade, after a stay of six months in France, made a 
magnificeut showing when under fire for the first time, and neither the 
French, who fought beside them, nor the enemy, whom they hurled aside, will 
dispute their right to the title of 'terrible.' This Brigade was engaged for 
a period of nine consecutive days. In order to proceed to the attack more 
quickly, these 'doughboys' as the Infantrymen are called, only took their 
ammunition along with them. During these nine days, they were only able to 
have small quantities of food three times. When relieved, their strength was 
exhausted but they had conquered a large area. 

"Here they are today, still near the battle line, and they have completely 
regained their usual calm and serenity. After what they saw and what they 
did, the German aeroplanes, which only the previous evening had bombarded 
the wood — but luckily without success — do not bother them much. The 
charming cordiality of their welcome reminds us that there are young men 
of learning and of literary ability among these 'savages.' 

" 'These aeroplanes are annoying, however," one of them confessed to us. 
'They deprive us of every form of amusement when we do not want to go to 
sleep. No noise, no light of any kind — that is the order. This idea, there- 
fore occurred to us. In our company we have instituted this game : whoever 
can sing in the deepest voice — in one hardly audible, but in such a way that 
the tune and the words are recognizable — is the winner.' 

"They have reminiscences in abundance. One of their officers recounted 
to us certain characteristics significant of the energy and decision of these 
fighters of yesterday. 

"There were two men who, because of their enthusiasm, suddenly found 
themselves among the Germans. Without the least hesitancy, they sprang 
upon the machine gunners, killed them, and turning the machine gun around, 
one of them fired it while the other fed the strips. Thus they held the enemy 
at bay and cleared the way for their comrades. Liaison was established 
between companies with unbelievable boldness. Three patrols, whidi had 
lost their w-ay, put an entire German platoon to flight. A doctor, who was 
proceeding under fire at the head of a group of stretcher-bearers, found a 
soldier entirely covered with blood, whose face no longer seemed like that of 
a human being. 

181 



77//v' Tlllirrr-SECOND DIVISION IN Till': WonLI) ir.lA' 






.ME5N1L ^C>..N W.-V^kS-ux 

iTBRN-Y-1 




rUK UKD ARROW PIEHC'IXG Hli; l.NKMV LINKS Al JLMU.W. 



182 



CITED L\ ()I!l>i:i!:< 

'' 'We must ciirrv him bnek,' s;ii(l the mcilii'al olliccr. 

"'Not on your life,' re|ilieil the sohlier, who hi)ii lieiinl the (luelor's re- 
mark; 'I'm no softy — jnst show me the way." 

'"These Yanks liold out on a position which they iinve reaehed until the 
very last, whether they are attacked in force or not, hut their sacrifices jier- 
niit their companions to arrive and nuiintain the position. 

amp:ricans "UREK ALLES.'' 

'"i'herc is a special point which I shoidd like to hring out. In one of the 
re<,fiments of this Brigade, there arc a nundier of young men of German 
origin. Their attitude is one of the most characteristic manifestations of 
the thorough ahsorption hy America of those who conio to live under her laws. 
Atavism with them has ceased to exist, so to speak; they are first and last 
American citizens, and they think and act as su( h. 

"l?eeently a reconnaissance had to he luadi' hy a man of determination, 
and at all costs. A volunteer came foi'ward and asked that he might he 
allowed to carry out this honorahle and perilous mission. 

"'So ninch tlie worse' said he laughing, "if a Boche iircs on a Boelie.' 
The nohle spirit of liberty with which tliey are saturated has removed rrom 
these soldiers all trace of similarity with the liarharians. 

"In addition, the first American soldier killed on French soil was of 
German origin and name. 

A CHILD AS :\IASCOT. 

"Xearly every American regiment has a mascot, which is generally an 
animal of some kind. A regiment of Marines is greatly attached to an ant- 
eater which it brought from Mexico. Others have goats, curious looking dogs, 
or donkeys. The (54th Regiment outdoes these ; its mascot is a young French 
boj', about twelve years old, whom it has adopted. The story of this young- 
ster, the son of a French soldier killed in action, is an especially tragic one, 
for he had become lost and had suffered greatly until the Americans found 
him. Today he is the idol of all the soldiers. He has been given a khaki 
shirt, military breeches and wrajiped leggings. The regiment act as hi.- 
family, and they have decided to educate him. He has begun to learn 
English quickly in order to know his adopted fathers even better. He is 
devoted to them, endeavors to help them in every possiltlo way, and boasts 
that he is already half American. He w^as angry only once; that was when 
he was compelled to remain behind, during an al(acl<, when \u- insisted that 
he had the right to remain with the troops. 

"'The next time." he told us, thinking that his big friends had not over- 
heard him. Til find a way of slipping in with them.'" 

r.h'KMlTKST CKM OF .VMKIMC.W .\I;.\1V. 

Another French newspaper artit:le by which (ieneral llaan sets great stm-e was 
published in "Le Matin,"' one of the largest and most inlluential of the daily paj)ers 
of Paris, on Se])tendier 8th, just after the l!".!nd Division had been withdrawn from 
the Oise-Aisne Offensive. .\s the :i2m\ Division was the oidy .\merican unit opei-- 
ating with the French army on this front at the time, the writer means the .'i^'ud 

183 



HIE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WAR 

whenever he refers to the exploits of Americans in this battle. The statement of 
Genera! Mnngin, which he quotes, was made to a party of Freneh and American 
correspondents, and was published in the United States, but the 'Mm\ Division 
was, of course, not mentioned specifically at the time, because of the censorsliii) 
regulations, although reference was made to Michigan and Wisconsin ^'ational 
Guaidsmen being ])resent on the front. In fact the War Department announced that 
it was General llaan's troops who took Juvigny and advanced to Teniy-Sorny. 
Ijc Matin's article follows: 

"The results were very fine: all the Tardenois, a part of the Soissons, is 
recaptured, and the German forces shaken in such a way as to be hojielessly 
demoralized. But the retreat of the Boche and their pursuit did not take 
place everywhere at the same pace. 

"North of Soissons, and between the Aisne and the Foret de Saint-Gobain, 
the Germans hung on tenaciously to all the strong points which constitute 
the advance posts of the Chemin des Dames, an indispensable buttress of 
their probable line of resistance. Therefore, one of the brightest gems in 
the history of the American Army is_the conquest of the plateau of Juvigny 
and Terny-Somy, which allowed our troops to penetrate into the Foret de 
Coucy. 

"One can scarcely imagine the difficulties of the fighting in this countn' 
to the north of the Aisne, with deep valleys in between chalky crests, and 
honeycombed with holes making admirable machine-gun shelters. The 
artillery action against them was less efficacious than one would suppose. Xo 
matter how the terrain was churned by shell fire, it was always possible to 
move these light machine guns, which are capable of pouring down a deadly 
rain of bullets at 2,.500 metres, along the communicating trenches. When in 
action these machine guns literally rain bullets, and when soldiers are 
called upon to cross this curtain of fire, those who have crossed the most dense 
artillery barrages hesitate and think twice before crossing such a deadly zone. 
Add to this, the fact that the gas which the Germans now send over is carried 
by shells which burst without making any noise. One does not die from the 
effects of this gas, but one is so suffocated or burned that it is humanly im- 
possible to hold the line, and unfortunately the mask is not an absolute pro- 
tection ; the least opening in the mask allows the gas to penetrate to the 
skin, and, as it frequently happens, one is taken unawares by the silent burst- 
ing of the shell and intoxicated before one has had a chance to take pre- 
cautions. 

"The above will perhaps allow the readers to understand the immense 
efforts necessary to conquer these crests one after the other, after having 
destroyed the machine-gun nests by the use of the bayonet. The tanks, it 
is true, lend to the infantry a precious support, but it ofon happens that 
they cannot be used on such abrupt slopes. 

AMEEICAN DIVISION NEVER DAUNTED. 

"Nevertheless, the keenness and fighting spirit of the American Division 
never was daunted. On the contrary, the difficulties seemed to stimulate them 
and the only reproach that can be adjudged them is that of an excess of 
young ardor. It is certain that their losses might have been much less had 
they been more patient and more prudent. Experience in war will teach them 
little by little to attain the same results without sacrificing so much heroism. 

184 



CITED IN ORDERS 

''The ft'ats of bravery tliat might be cited are iniiunierable, but the 
'dougliboys' do uot like to have one be astonished at what they do with such 
good humor and in sucli a natural way. Keally, they go into combat as though 
it were a game, and if the game were not so terrible I might say that the 
relief of a regiment which leaves a line of fire to go into rest, with all these 
young men, tall and straight, wearing the flat cap of the soldiers of Cyrus, 
the brown shirt rolled back over their brawny arms, tired most certainly, but 
smiling and calm, is one of the most beautiful sporting spectacles that one 
could wish to see. 

"Listen, however, to what General Maiigin, who has seen them fight, 
thinks of them. This is the statement, word for word, which he gave to the 
War Correspondent who interviewed him: 

GENERAL MANGIN'S GLOWING TRIBUTE. 

" 'The American troops can be proud of what they accomplished 
on the plateau of Juvigny. They showed the same qualities of cour- 
age and tactical skill as those who fought at Chateau Thierry in the 
month of July. The American artillery acquitted itself well in the 
preparation before the attack, while the infantry displayed admirable 
courage and dash. Moreover, the General Staff made its strategic 
dispositions with consummate skill; it laid its plans before me prior 
to the attack and I accepted them without any change or additions. 
The enemy attached great importance to this battle of the plateau. 
He concentrated there his best troops and reinforced them with 
Guard Divisions, the 1st, the -Ith, the Chasseurs and elements of 
dismounted cavalry. He considered the plateau of Juvigny as the 
keystone of his line of defense on the west. The Americans carried 
it like a whirlwind. America has a right to be proud of its children, 
and I also am proud to have them in my Army.'" 

COMMENDATIONS FOR AKTILLERY BRIGADE. 

Whenever the 32nd Division was commended, all of the elements of the 32nd 
Division, including the 5Tth Field Artillery I'rigade, were included in the commen- 
dation, as every unit of the Division was present in each of the nuijor actions in which 
the Division participated. In addition to sharing in the words of praise uttered on 
behalf of their Division, the four regiments in the 57th Field Artillery Brigade — the 
11 nth, 120th, 121st and llTth — also were especially commended on several occasions 
by the commanders of other Divisions to whom the artillery brigade of Les Terribles 
was from time to time attached. 

In the Aisne-Marne Offensive the 57th Brigade served the 28th and 77th Divisions 
after the 32nd had been withdrawn from the line, and sustained a number of casual- 
ties in the incessant artillery duel which tke German and Allied guns carried on 
during the period of stabilization on the Ourcq. For the assistance given, the com- 
manders of the 2>Sth and 77th Divisions expressed tiicir gratitude, which was indorsed 
by General Rullard. the American Corps Commander. 

After the 32nd bad taken Juvigny and had been relieved by the Second Jloroccan 
Division, which included as one of its units the famous Foreign I^egion, the 57th 
Brigade remained in line and supported the Moroccans in their attack, blasting a 
way for the charge of the Foreign Legion in the salient which the Red Arrows had 

185 



THE Tiiiirry-SECOMi n/vismx /.v ri/i-: would wai; 




•THE lucD Aiiitow PiKiu'i.Nt: nu: kiiik.miiii.ue-steliaxg/ 



18G 



cLTi'.n IS onDh'ns 

foniuil. 'J'Ih' riitii-i' lirii,'ailr wns cnn^Tiitiibiti'd 1)V the ('oiiunaiuliiig- (ii-iicral (if the 
Moroccan division, hy (Icneral I'cnct, tlio French Corps Connnander and liv (ieneral 
Mangin. The Jloroccan coiiiniainler was especially deiiglited witii tiie work of the 
men of the 147th Field Artillery, and recommended a nuniher of them for the Croix 
dc Guerre. The 1'. C."s of tlie 1-f Tth and the Jloroecan Division were located in the 
same cave, and the Staffs got to know each other intimately during the few days that 
they were close neighhors. 

The Commanding (ieneral of the 7!)th T^. S. Division, whose troops wei'e sup- 
ported by the oTth F'ield xVrtillery Brigade when the Division jumped olf on the 
opening day of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, praised the brigade for its wonderful 
work in literally dragging its guns across Xo Man's Land to follow in close support 
of the victorious infantry. This was an effort which piit to the test the best that 
was in the artilleryman, and be it said to the credit of tlie 57th Brigade that it was 
among the first to get its guns across and again into action. 

\\'hen the Brigade became a unit of the artillery of tiie F'irst Army, after ])artici- 
jiating in the opening of the attack on Xoveniber 1st, the Army Commander made 
it known that he appreciated the spirit with which th*^ .■)7th "carried on" until the 
last ounce of its material was used up. Its guns were worn out, it had not sufficient 
horse-flesh left to move, but the personnel, tired and weary as the men were, remained, 
in the expressive parlance of both doughboy and red-leg, "rarin' to go." 

But to go was impossible, and the Brigade was left behind the while the First 
Army swept on, across the Meuse and to Sedan. And when the 32nd Division was 
desijrnated to go forward to the Khine. the .")7th Field Artillerv was forced to bear, 
with the best grace possible under the circumstances, the knowledge that another had 
taken its place in the ranks of "Les Terribles." Tlie 07111 was finally moved back 
to the Service of Supply, and assigned to the 9tli Army Corps. There, when at last 
relieved to rejoin the homeward-bound .32nd, the following letter of commendation 
was sent to Brigadier General (J. Leroy Irwin by Major (ieneral Clias. P. Summerall, 
then commanding the Ninth Corps: 

COMl'LIMKXTS OF !)tii COIU'S COMMANDER. 

"Upon the relief of the r)7th Field Artillery Brigade from the Hth Army 
Corps, in comiiliance with orders from higher authority, the Corps C(nu- 
mander desires to convey to the officers and soldiers of this Brigade his appre- 
ciation and commendation of the services rendered by the command, not only 
during its presence with the Cor])S, but tliroughout its ]iarticiiiation in the 
campaigns of the American P'xpeditionary Forces. The i-eview of this 
Brigade for the Corps Commajuler, which was held on April 7th, presented 
an excellent a])pearance and gave abundant testimony of the high morale and 
soldierly sjiirit that now animates the command. 

"Tlie Brigade is compo.^ed of the 119th, 12l)tli, 121st ami IKth Field 
Artillery li'igiments. Tlu' records show thai the Brigade ai-ri\cd in Fi-ance 
during .March, liMS, juid trained at Camp Coet<|uiden. Firing batteries fi-om 
this Brigade were furnished to the Ai'tillery Training Camps at Saunnir and 
at Montigny-sur-Aube during the succeeding year. The ll!)th and 147tli 
liegiments .served in the Toul Sector from June oth to .June 22nd, 1!)18, in 
support of the 2()th Division. The entire Brigade .served in fhe Haute .Msace 
sector from June 12th to July 22nd, supporting the 32ik1 Division. It par- 
ticipated in the Aisne-Marne Olfensive from .\ugust 1st to August 25tli, sup- 

187 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

porting tlio 32nrl, the 2StIi and the TTth Divisions, anrl mlvanccd against 
resistance 20 kilometers. Without rest, it made a forced march to the Oise- 
Aisne Offensivo, and supported the 32nd American Division and the First 
Jloroccan Division from August 2Sth to September Gth. It participated in 
the capture of Juvigny and Terny Sorny, advancing 8 kilometers. After five 
days rest at Wassy, the Brigade marched to the Jleuse-Argonne Otfensive, 
where it supported the 79th, the 3rd, the 32nd and the 89th Divisions, serving 
continuously, without relief, from September 2(ith to November 8th. During 
this period, it advanced 26 kilometers and sulTered severely from the cam- 
paign. It was then withdrawn to a rest area, where it served with the 40th 
Division at IJevigny, and later with the S8th Division in the Gondrecourt 
area. 

"Not only has the Bi'igade performed its full share of duty in the 32nd 
Division, to which it originally belonged, but it has contributed by its efforts 
and its sacrifices to the success of other divisions of the American Army. The 
work of the training batteries at the centers of artillery instruction has been 
no less valuable in contributing to the success of our arms than that of the 
batteries engaged in combat, and they are entitled to a full share of the credit 
which is due the command. 

"Every officer and soldier may well cherish with pride the privilege of 
having participated in the momentous events of the campaigns with this 
Brigade, and its history will be a lasting inheritance to the Army and to the 
American people. The good wishes and the abiding interest of the Corps 
Commander will remain with the members of the Brigade in their future 
careers." 

INVOLVED IN NO CONTROVERSIES. 

It is worthy of note that all the commendatory statements which have been 
enumerated in this Chapter, as well as many others, which, being of no particular 
historical significance, have not been reproduced, failed to "turn the head" of the 
Division. In the controversy on "Who Won the War,"' which raged after the 
Armistice, and in which champions of a nunil)er of Divisions presented their claims 
in the columns of the American press published in Europe, the 32nd Division took 
no part. A few of the commendations, especially those of Clcmenccau, Mangin and 
Pershing, were given to the correspondents by the headquarters issuing the orders, 
and were published in France and America. However, all newsjjaper articles dealing 
with the exploits of the 32nd Division were published under the names of the cor- 
respondents writing them, and were not — nor did they appear to be — inspired by 
anybody connected with the Division. 

This policy of remaining aloof from the various controversies in which many 
Divisions participated was adhered to by the individual officers and men of the 32nd 
as well as those in authority on the Staff. The result of this policy, plus the amicable 
relations which always existed between the 32nd and its neighbors at the front, 
resulted in The Red .Vrrows leaving France with the high regard of their comrades 
in the American Expeditionary Force. As an Embarkation official remarked, at 
Brest : 

"Nobody has anything on the 32nd." 

This was literally true. In the Army of Occupation the 32nd was "neighbors" 
to the 1st, 2nd and 42nd Divisions, by common consent the "elite" of the Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Force. With all of these proud and spirited organizations the 

188 



CITED IN ORDERS 

most friendly relations were maintained. This was due in part, no doubt, to the 
fact that in the 1st Division were many officers and men who formerly had belonged 
to the I'^Sth Infantry, in the 42nd Division was a battalion of the Wisconsin Na- 
tional Guard and an Ambulance Company from Michigan, and in the Second Divi- 
sion were many firm friends of the 32nd. To quote from an after-dinner speech 
made by Colonel Snyder of the famous Fifth Marines, who were on our left in the 
Coblenz bridge-head: 

"One of the greatest sonrces of personal satisfaction to me is the friend- 
ship which has sprung up between these two units of brave fighting men — the 
32nd Division and the 5th Marines. Each is a proud outfit with a proud 
record, and each has for the other a sincere respect and admiration, born of 
a thorougli knowledge and understanding of the accomplishments which have 
made us equal sharers in the glory that is ours." 

The 32nd Division had the more or less unique distinction of having never 
claimed to be the best division in the American Army, nor, for that matter, to be 
better than any other of the combat divisions, although that latter claim was made 
for it by no less an authority than Colonel Frederick Palmer, known as the "war 
correspondent of the American Expeditionary Force," in his series of articles on the 
Mcuse-Argonne Offensive. No word of detraction for any other division was ever 
written by anyone in the 32nd Division, and few, if any, were ever uttered. Perhaps 
this is why, with its wonderful record of achievement, which might well inspire envy 
in those less fortunate, the Embarkation official at Brest was able to put form to one 
of the most significant compliments ever paid the Bed Arrows when he said: 

"iSTobody has anything on the 32nd." 

Home-coming encomiums, of course, were multitudinous, with home-town news- 
papers and welcome-home orators reviewing the accomplishments of the Division 
and speaking high words of praise for its men. 

THE SKIPPER'S PRAISE. 

At a banquet of 32nd Division officers on board the George Washington, home- 
ward bound early in May, addresses were made by Secretary of War Newton D. 
Baker, Mr. Raymond B. Fosdick, Congressman Madden, Bishop Brent, and Captain 
McCauley of the "President's Ship." In his speech, Captain McCauley paid a 
compliment to the 32nd Division which those present will no doubt remember as 
one of the finest ever spoken. His appreciation of Les Terribles was based upon his 
personal observations, and his estimate of the Division's excellence was made after 
comparisons witli other troops which the steamship commander had had many op- 
portunities to make. Early in the troop movement to Europe in 1918, the George 
Washington took a regiment of the 32nd Division to France, and on that voyage 
Captain McCauley and his crew first became acquainted with the Michigan and 
Wisconsin Guardsmen. 

"I am very glad to have the opportunity of saying what I am going to say in 
the presence of your Secretary of War and in the presence of your Division Com- 
mander," said Captain McCauley in closing his talk. "In no voyage which the 
George Washington has nuide, carrying troops to Europe or carrying them home, 
have we had on board a contingent which has been the equal of the present one in 
discipline, adaptability and efficiency, from the point of view of ship organization, 

189 



Till:: riiiin y-sEcuM) nivisiox i.\ riij: would war 




potrds ii\ Gern\6.TV 
™\« vrkick were 
pierced t^ ttas D.ed 

32NDD[VI3WN. 

Dvcwu Ly LL HJLa.tvce. G-2.C 



■■Till'; HKl) AliHOW ON ■[■]{]■: UAiri.lM'lKl.D.s OF FHANC-K. 

i;mi 



CirKD IX ORDERS 

cleanliness and iipkeej). It has been niv experience that when n;en — soldiers or 
sailors — are organized, controlled or constituted as the oIKcers and men of this con- 
tingent have shown theinsehcs to he, those officers ;nid men aie also the best when 
the real business of war is to be done. The record of the .'V.'nd l)i\ision lias demon- 
strated this to be true. 

"1 have heard from my olficers, from my jietty ollicers and men. ami I have 
myself been impressed by the fact that this contingent of officers and men has more 
qnickly assumed the habits and daily routine of life on board ship, has learned 
more readily and observed more carefully the sliip's regulations and customs, than 
any other troops we have ever had on board. It has been more eager to co-operate 
with our officers, to accept and carry out suggestions. Tn short, I cannot imagine 
a body of officers and troops wlio conlil have done their ])art better than have the 
men now on board. As I said to the Executive Otticer, Commander Perkins, tliis 
morning, after an inspection in which your Secretary of War, your Division Com- 
mander and your Commanding Officer of Troops did us the honor to accompany us: 

" 'Perkins, to my mind, from what we have seen this morning, this ship has 
become an ideal tniop transport." and that is what all the naval officers and men on 
this ship have been working for. And now the 32nd Division has come on board and 
enabled us to accomplish our aim. A\'e could not have realized our andjition without 
your efficient co-operation, or without the training, experience and discipline which 
you must have had as a part of the :i'hid Division under irnjoi- (Jeiicral Haau." 

"LIVEST WIRE WITH TWO STARS." 

Mr. Fosdick, in his speech, told of a tour which he made of the Army of Occu- 
pation as a representiitive of the Training Cam]) Activities Committee. 

"I distinctly remember my meeting with (iciicral llaan on that occasion at the 
headquarters of the Seventh Corps which he was then comnumding," said Mr. 
Fosdick. "I asked him about the welfare work in his Corps. He not only told me 
what was being accomjilished but told me the nuiidier of workers and spoke their 
names in connection with their several activities. At that time [ made an entry in 
my note-hook which I shall read to you: 

" 'The Livest Wire with two stars that I have seen on this trip.' 

"And in view of my first impression 1 was glad to hear Colonel Beck, your Chief 
of Staff, say in a conversation on the boat the otlier day: 

"'General llaan from the staii liad. as a matter of course, (he loyalty of his 
ollicers and men. Then he gained their i-onlidenci', thcii- icspcct, tbeii- admiration, 
and now he has their alfection.' 

"That indeed is a matter of congralulation : to have the loyalty, confidence, 
respect, admiration and alfection of a victorious Division with as ]iroud a record as 
vours !" 



litl 




CHAPTER XV. 

Reading the GeneraFs Mail. 

UPPLEMENTING his formal reports of the exploits of his 
Division, the semi-oflBcial reports (as General Haan calls certain 
letters which he wrote to his friends, in and out of the military 
service, during the stirring days of the summer of 1918,) contain 
a large amount of interesting material. General Haan made 
copies of these letters to his friends which he sent to Mrs. Haan 
in New York to preserve for future reference, and at the request 
of the Division historian the letters were made available for such 
use as might be made of them to amplify the more formal re- 
ports sent through military channels. 

In his formal reports of the engagements in which his Division participated, 
General Haan discussed only the strategy of the immediate front with which his 
mind was occupied. In his letters to his friends, particularly those to Major Gen- 
eral Enoch H. Crowder, the famous soldier who was known as the man who "put 
over the draft," General Haan took a larger view of the situation, and discussed the 
strategy of the whole front, as affecting the probable employment of his Division. 
Some of his estimates of the situation show an astonishing insight into the German 
plan of battle and express a constantly growing confidence in the ultimate success 
of the allied arms. 

General Haan's first letter to (ieneral Crowder after the former's arrival in 
France was written on April 7th, 1!)18. The letter was not written in a prophetic 
vein, but gave a very clear estimate of wliat General Haan then considered to be tlie 
objective of the German Offensive. The letter was given considerable circulation 
among General Crowder's personal friends and associates in official Wasliington; in 
fact it is reported that the President saw it and was interested and pleased with the 
views it expressed. 

In view of subsequent developments General Haan's grasp of the situation in 
April, 1918, is regarded by military men as truly remarkable. In a number of his 
later letters he refers to his first estimate, and up to the day of the Armistice when 
Germany was "licked" — not starved — he saw no reason to change the idea formed 
when he first came to France and which he put in writing in the following letter: 

"My dear Crowder: 

"This sure is some war, but it differs in no essential features from what 
my estimate had been when I left the United States. Of course, I had 
formed in my mind a pretty careful picture of what I thought we were going 
to meet when we got here. 



193 



THE TIIIETY-SEOOND DIVISION IN THE WOELD WAR 

"I do not know how you size up the situation at long range, but from my 
jioint of view tilings look far better than I exix'cted to see them after the 
fourth day of the German drive. The spirit of the French and British soldiers 
and of our own I don't believe has ever been as good as it is now, and it will 
take a great deal more effort to break that spirit. 

"The reports that have come from America al)0ut the seizure of Dutch 
ships, the procurement of ships from Japan and the number of now sliijis 
turned over is the best tonic that has struck the Allied armies. 

"The Germans have an undoubted superiority in numbers at the present 
time, but this will not last long if our troops come over as fast as they should 
under the present arrangement?, and once we catch up in numbers we soon 
will pass them, and then it will only be a question of time before we will get 
such a superiority that we will be ajjle to take the offensive and keep it up 
until the war is over. 

"We do not believe here that Germany can be starved, but we do believe 
it has to be licked, and furthermore it can be done provided decision does not 
come in favor of Germany in its present effort, and that I do not believe 
will happen. 

"She has not sufficient superiority in numbers, and her losses must be 
terrific. What we hope is she will fritter away her ])rescnt superiority in 
numbers. 

"Evidently her progress is not in accordance with her plans, which wc have 
every reason to believe were as follows, in three phases: 

"1. — To break through the Allied line and practically separate the British 
and French armies. 

"2. — To place as tliin a line as jiossible in front of the French army and 
then crush the British army. 

"3. — To then turn on the French army, offer them peace again, and if 
they did not accept it, to crush the French army and peihaps occupy Paris. 

"The first phase of the battle appears to be over; at least she expected 
before this time to accomplish the first phase, and if she is unable to accom- 
plish this first she will not be able to accomplish either of the others, and 
it looks to me now, as it did when the battle started, that it would be the 
decisive battle of the war and that Germany could only be successful if she 
won a complete victory in the first phase. 

"It may be she considers the first phase still on, but I hope and believe 
she never will be able to accomplish this first phase, in which case it must be 
decided the battle was in favor of the Allies, because, as a result of such 
failure to accomplish the first phase, I believe the Allies will win the war and 
it will be won by the weight America can put into it in addition to what 
England can still put in. 

"I think the length of the war will depend on the length of time it will 
take America to get from 1,500,000 to 2,000,000 men in France, or, in other 
words, to get 1,000,000 on the fighting line. 



194 



READING THE GENERAL'S MAIL 

"I estimate that to put 1,000,000 on the fighting line we will have to 
have 1,800,000 here, and that will mean replacements of at least 50,000 a 
month thereafter to maintain that force. 

"Very sincerely, (Signed) W. G. Haan." 

Writing to General Crowder under date of July 29th, when his Division was 
going into battle for the first time, General Haan calmly discussed the success so 
far attained by the allied counter-attack. 

"The French counter-attack in the west which began on July 18th was 
a fine stroke of strategy," he wrote. "Their present attack (referring to the 
assault planned on the German position on the Ourcq) does not seem to me 
to be so strategically well planned. It is merely driving in the salient without 
accomplishing anything much either in the way of capturing munitions or 
prisoners. It strikes me that if a greater effort had been made to the south of 
Keims that part of the salient might have been pushed in and more dis- 
astrous results accomplished for the Germans. 

"The progress in the attacks from the south have been surprisingly suc- 
cessful so far. It looks now as if the Germans were attempting at stabiliza- 
tion in the vicinity of the Ourcq. The French appear to think the enemy 
can be driven further back. *****" 

"Reports of prisoners received from widely different parts of the line 
seem to confirm the view that many of the German divisions are getting quite 
short in men, and that the Germans are using more and more machine guns 
to save personnel. They handle their machine guns well, particularly on the 
defensive. This the American troops have not learned much about, but they 
are learning every day. * * * " 

"On the whole, I think the Germans are beginning to realize that the first 
phase of their great offensive of March 21st cannot be realized, and conse- 
quently the second and third phase, as given in my first estimate of the 
situation, cannot even be attempted. They are beginning to realize that the 
American forces will cut a large figure in this war from now on, and this 
figure will be increasing in size as time goes on. This they know, and they 
also know that our air service will be rapidly expanding in the future. All 
this will not give them any particularly great pleasure." 

On August fith, when his Division was firmly established on the Vesle and in 
Fismes, General Haan wrote: 

EXPRESSES PRIDE IN HIS DIVISIOIST. 

"The 32nd Division has been put to the test and has made good." (He 
then gives a detailed account of the salient features of the fighting and adds) : 

"The conduct of the soldiers of the 32nd Division was all that could be 
asked of any soldiers. They never faltered in their attack on any position, 
no matter what difficulties they encountered. Wlaen they were ordered to go 
in, they went in. 

"I had received word from General Pullard, who, at the time, was not 
yet in command of the Corps, that General Pershing was exceedingly anxious 
for our Division to take Hill 230, which we were at that moment attacking. 
The Commander-in-Chief wanted to demonstrate to the French that our 

195 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD ]YAR 

National Guard Divisions were fighting Divisions, as well as our Regulars. 
I think we have succeeded in convincing everj'one that the 32nd Division is 
a real fighting division and has the fighting spirit. 

"At some places on the field of battle the dead lay very thick. Our losses 
have been very heavy but not heavier than should be expected from the work 
that has been done. The Division is going into camp, and it is my opinion 
that it will rapidly recuperate. If we get our replacements quickly, we will 
be ready to make another, and even better, fight, inside of two weeks. 

"I think it can now ho stated that the last attempt of the German Army, 
begun on the morning of July 15th, has not only been a failure, but that the 
Germans have been signally defeated in open warfare, which is the kind of 
fighting they have been looking for. The American troops, fortunately, have 
not had much trench warfare to contend with, and therefore the only warfare 
they know is open warfare. This has been the kind of warfare for which we 
have been training under instructions issued by the Commander-in-Chief, 
and it looks to me as if his policy were the correct one. Undoubtedly the 
greatest effort in this drive was made by the French, but the American 
Divisions, with their greater strength, have been able to take over a sector 
about double the front of the French divisions. Our men are fresher, they 
are enthusiastic, whereas the French are, naturally, much exhausted. The 
young Americans will recuperate quickly and will be ready for another 
battle before the Germans can recuperate the divisions which have opposed us. 

"The 32nd has had in front of it. nearly the entire distance, one of the 
best of the German Guard divisions, but at no place have they shown any 
superiority over our men in actual open combat. 

APPROVES ALLIED FNITY OF COMMAND. 

"I am more than ever convinced that my fir.et estimate of the situation of 
the German intention on the 21st of March was correct. They never have 
succeeded in accomplishing the first phase of the offensive, which was the 
separation of the French and British forces, and then beating them in detail. 
The American troops have been wisely thrown to the support of both flanks 
and the entire Allied Army placed under one head. This latter, in my 
opinion, is the only thing that could have made the present Allied offensive 
successful." 

On August 19th, when his Division was recuperating, as he had predicted, but 
with its ranks still depleted by the absence of replacements. General TIaan again 
wrote to General Crowder. General Haan told about being busy completing his 
formal report and said : 

"It is about as much of a job to write the report as it was to fight the 
battle. * * * The weather has lately been perfectly beautiful and my men 
are now all right again. We are still greatly reduced in numbers, and many 
of the men are mourning the loss of comrades. However, I can have no 
feeling of sadness because we lost so many men; they died bravely and in a 
noble cause. Those young men who gave up their lives have at least left hon- 
orable names for their families, and since it will be only a comparatively 
short time before the rest of us have to give up our lives too, in one way or 

196 



READING THE GENERAL'S MAIL 

another, I am not sure but what these youngsters who fought for the whole 
human race should not be considered more fortunate than those who still have 
to trudge along. Their troubles are over, and perhaps their past misdeeds 
have been forgiven by the sacrifice they made. 

"I don't think the German is feeling very good. I think he is beginning 
to realize that he made one hell of a big mistake in getting the United States 
into this war. Old Hindcnburg seems to have given up the job and Luden- 
dorff, I think, is getting a little tired himself. Just what the Turk is think- 
ing of I don't know but I feel certain that the Bulgarians and the Austrians 
are beginning to wish they were out of it. I look to see Bulgaria try to get 
into the band-wagon before long. 

THE GENERAL PLAYS HIS LUCK. 

"We are living here in a little hunting lodge, and they have built me a 
dug-out nearby, but so far I have not gone into it, on account of the bombs. I 
have always thought I was lucky, so I stay in bed and let the damn bombs drop, 
which they do every night. I don't believe they can hit this little house 
anyway. 

"By the way the German has been in complete control of the air in this 
sector ever since my Division has been here. However, I hear that some 
machines may be expected here some time, but they are not in evidence yet. 
We have one American squadron here, but they have observation machines 
and the Allies have no fighting planes to protect them in their observation 
flights. Our aviators are brave lads; they go over in spite of the lack of 
protection, but many of them are shot down. Their time will come soon, I 
hope. I believe we have good aviators here, if they can only get good 
machines. 

"The Germans have been pretty busy with their night bombing in our area 
and I suppose they think they have inflicted a lot of punishment on our 
Division. But so far — and I just knocked wood — they have not killed a 
single one of my men in their night bombing. 

"In the day time when observation planes are over us we hang our 
laundry in woods we are not using, and when the raiders come over at night 
they drop their eggs in these woods, while the men are sleeping — or trying 
to — under their shelter tents in other woods. So far the trick has fooled 
him. I don't think the German is so very cunning. I think the Americans 
are going to fool liim in more ways than one. 

"One thing I feel more certain of now than ever before, and that is that 
we are going to lick him. I told you at the beginning that we were going to 
lick him, but I did not feel anywhere near as certain about it as I do now. 
We are going to have lots of work to do yet, and lots of hard fighting, but I 
think it will generally be on the winning side, because I think that the Ger- 
man has lost his punch and pretty soon will lose his nerve. I should not 
be surprised to find that the German is not a very good loser and once we get 
him going — I think we have him going right now — then wo may get him 
demoralized. We have not succeeded in doing that yet. He has made some 
good retreats, but in some places we have got a good deal of his ammunition, 
in which, if I am not mistaken, lie is not at present overloaded." 

197 



THE TTIIBTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

PRAISE FOR STRATEGY OP MARSHALL FOCH. 

General Haan wrote that he thoroughly approved of tlie discontinuation of the 
pressure of the Vesle front. 

"Marshal Foeh, instead, decided to hit the enemy in the Amiens front, 
where he took a slice out of them in quick order," MTote General Haan. 
"This was fine strategy, and ranch more was accomplished there, perhaps, 
than if he had given us sufficient force to continue the offensive here. 

"Everyone I have talked to lately has expressed growing confidence in 
Marshal Foch's ability and strategy, and I think that Ludendorff is be- 
ginning to think that maybe the French Commander has not only some 
Icnowledge of strategy, but also that he has some punch left in his Armies. 

"It appears that the American troops are being concentrated elsewhere. 
Possibly Foch has a mission for them. I, hope they will hit the Boche un- 
expectedly somewhere. If General Pershing once gets through his lines with 
a lot of fresh American divisions, I am thinking he will give them a stagger- 
ing blow. I hope I will get my Division into it, because it has recovered its 
old fighting spirit again, although yet too depleted in numbers. We have 
been out of the line now 11 days and have received practically no replacements, 
either in officers or men. I do not quite understand what this means. It 
may mean that we are to remain in this sector and help hold this front while 
other divisions are being filled up and prepared for offensive operations. My 
Division is not a good Division to sit on a quiet front — I think it prefers 
active operations. It is full of ginger, and the enemy has found that out. 
However, other divisions must have their chance, and I am sure most of them 
will give a good account of themselves. I want to see what our National 
Army divisions will do when they get a chance in open work. I hear that 
they have a lot of ginger, too. Well, if they have any more than the 32nd 
they will be going some ! 

REGRETS HEAVY LOSS OF OFFICERS. 

"I have looked into our recent losses and have found that tiie reports 
show a larger percentage of casualties among the officers than among the 
men. This speaks well for our officers, but too many good ones were lost. 
However, many of them will soon be back, and they will be better for carrying 
a few scars with them. 

"The training of our Division is now going on in a very satisfactory 
manner, but it is unfortunate that we must carry on this training so short- 
handed in officers and men. If we only could get the men this would be a 
fine time to give them the necessary training for the next operation, but there 
is no use kicking — we cannot make officers and men out of nothing. So we 
will have to wait until we get some, and in the meantime, if we cannot 
smile, we will not weep either. 

"Tlie effort that has been made by America is marvelous. No one can 
say that a Republic cannot make war when it has good cause for doing so. 
T believe that there is today no man in the world who has such wide power 
as the President of the United States, and the best of it is that he has this 
power because the spirit of the American people is such that he must take it." 

General Haan wrote a great deal, in this as well as in other letters, of about the 
same jjeriod, of the success of the Division liaison during the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

lOS 



READING THE GENERAL'S MAIL 

"Our liaison worked so much better than I ever hoped for that I am 
satisfied that in our next fight our liaison will be as good as the best in any 
veteran French or British division. The success of our liaison I attribute 
mainly to Major Lobez, chief of the French Mission attached to our Division. 
I detailed him as a personal staff officer with specific instructions to suggest 
to me continuously any improvements that we might make in getting infor- 
mation, and he has not been backward in coming forward with suggestions." 

During the brief ti'aining period after the battle, General Haan delivered a 
series of lectures on the lessons of the operation, to officers and men, wherever it 
was jiossible to get them together tor an informal talk. In his letters he discusses 
these lectures and writes : 

ENEMY HEAVILY PUNISHED. 

"I have found but little to criticize in the manner in which our infantry 
worked; they did splendidly. They attacked positions which, when examined 
afterward, seemed almost impossible to carry. The most satisfactory feature 
in connection with our attacks on several very strong machine gam nests was 
that we lost fewer men in killed in each case than the enemy dead found on 
the spot, which I think rather remarkable. It shows that our soldiers had 
profited much by their experiences in training in the Belfort sector. Our 
losses were heavy, but General Bullard told me that he had compared our 
losses with the casualties of the French on our right, who were in his Corps, 
and in comparison to what we did our losses were no heavier than theirs. 
General Bullard expressed himself as being satisfied with the manner in 
which our men behaved in this attack." 

General Haan wrote of the Oise-Aisne Ofl'ensive in practically the same language 
as he wrote his official report. In regard to the commendation of the Division by 
General Penet, commanding the French Corps, General Haan wrote: 

"The Corps commander sent an officer to my Headquarters, who stated 
to me that the Corps Commander had sent him especially to congratulate the 
32nd Division on the excellent work that was done by it in the capture of the 
most difficult position which liad been holding up the line for some time." 

In a letter to a friend in his old home town of Hammond, 111., General Haan, 
on October 5th, when the Division was struggling against the enemy between the 
Argonne and the Meuse, said : 

"I have lost a good many men in killed and wounded, but that cannot 
be helped; I knew that would happen if we got into the war, that is, into 
the real fighting, and we are right in the midst of the real fighting now." * * * 

General Haan then gave some facts concerning the length of the Division's 
service in actual combat and added: 

BOASTING NOT FASHIONABLE. 

"I don't want this published, because it might be construed as boasting, 
and no one here boasts; it is out of fashion. Everybody is doing the best he 
can and we are accomplishing something." 

199 




s 



200 



READING THE GENERAL'S MAIL 

General Haan told of visiting the observation post on the lofty crest of Mont- 
faucon and of the citadel which the Crown Prince of Germany had built there. 

"The French lost 15,000 men trying to take the position," said General 
Ilaan. "The Americans lost some, too, but took it. Of course, the French 
had more troops opposing them when they made the attack, or perhaps they 
had a lesser force than we used. The French are fine fighters, they gain 
ground all the time and know the game. I like tliem more than ever, and 
after the war the American people will know much more about the French 
and they will like them, too." 

In a letter written to Senator Harry S. New, on October 5th, General Haan 
made tlie following statement regarding the Y. M. C. A. : 

"THERE'S NO SUCH THING AS A BEST CAMP." 

"The Y. M. C. A. does a fine work when we are in what is called 'Rest 
Camp,' though there is really no such thing as a 'Rest Camp.' To be in a 
'Rest Area' merely means that we are training instead of fighting. The men 
and officers work hard every day. However, in these so-called Rest Camps 
the Y. M. C. A. serves tlic men very well. I suppose in the quiet sectors they 
do pretty good work, but in camjiaigns like the ones the 32nd Division has 
been in tlie Y. M. C. A. organization is hopelessly inadequate. Nor do I 
think that it should be expected to do so much." 

\Yhen Major Generals write personal letters to each other they use language 
about like the rest of us; to judge from the following quotation from a letter written 
by General Haan on October 15th, to his friend. Major General E. F. McGlachlin, 
Jr., then Chief of tlie First Army Artillery: 

"My Division is in fine spirits though tired as hell. This has been by far 
the fiercest fight we have ever lieen in. Yesterday morning we went through 
a trench system (the Kriemhilde Stellung), j)roteeted.in front by three bands 
of wire. It seemed almost prohibitive, and we would not have gotten through 
had it not been for perfect artillery fire, so well in hand that where the in- 
fantry got through the barrage went on, and where it didn't get through the 
fire was dropped back on the trenches. We got through with two battalions, 
but were held up with the other two; but the artillery, from good observation 
points which had been found, was recalled to the points where the infantry 
didn't get through and supported the infantry there until they did get 
through. 

"KICKING 'EM IN THE TAILS." 

"Some day I want you to come out and look at the positions my Division 
took yesterday morning. It is a veritable Gibraltar. And remember that the 
Division had been fighting in the open in front of this trench system for 
13 days, during which time it was continuously under enemy observation 
and subjected to perfectly controlled artillery fire. Nevertheless we kept on 
approaching the position until we were in front of the wire, and then we 
went over and got it. And we are going to keep it, and we are going to kick 
them in the tails until they get further away; but we can't kick very hard 
any more. Some of my battalions are down to 6 officers and 250 men, but 
there is ginger in them yet." 

201 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE ]YORLD WAR 

Writing under date of October 19th, General llaan had more to say about tlie 
wonderful work of his Division in penetrating the Krienihilde Stellung. 

"It has been a terrific strain on the men wlio have been in continuous 
battle for 20 days," he wrote. "I am more than pleased at the work the 
Division has done and the ground it has gained, hut T am more pleased at the 
way in which it was done. * * * j examined the German ])osition — the 
Kriemhilde Stellung — in the vicinity of Cote Dame Marie today, and I don't 
believe any troops in the world could take it if it were held by our men." 
On October 20th, just after the Division had been withdrawn from the front line. 
General Haan wrote as follows to General Crowder: 

HTS MEX .\T.L S:\rTTJXG. 

"T have just returned from an inppection of my Division, which is 
huddled in a wood, covering about 4 square miles. I visited all of the In- 
fantry regiments, which are the ones that suffered most of the casualties. This 
morning we had three or four hours of intermittent sunshine, and I am glad 
to find that my men are all smiling. Every one of them is lousy, but even 
this does not have any immediate bad effects on them. I know that my 
Division is going to recuperate in a very short time, and it will soon be ready 
for another scrap even if we have to stay in the damnable hole. 

"I had pictured war as hell, but never quite so much like hell as this. I 
don't want any more war — but T want to stay in this one until it is finished, 
and moreover I want to stay with my Division. It's a peach. I believe there 
is no better Division here; in fact T don't believe there is as good a one. I 
have fine Brigadier Generals and fine Colonels and fine men with a spirit 
that can't be beaten." 

The last letter of the file to General Crowder was written December 12th, just 
before the Third Army crossed the Rhine. 

"In Germany, amon^ the people as you see them on the streets," wrote 
General Haan, "they look perfectly healthy, and there is no indication of 
underfeeding. I think, again, that my estimate of the situation, made 'way 
last .\pril, that the German people could not be starved out, but that the 
German Army had to l)c licked, is entirely correct. The German Army was 
licked — if the armi.stice had held off 10 days longer, it would have been de- 
stroyed. Of course we would have lost a good many men, and it is jirobably 
better as it is." 

In a decidedly lighter vein, hut none the less interesting, are General TTaan's 
letters to Mrs. Haan, written at various times during the 32nd Division's career in 
France. These letters were secured from Mrs. Haan by a reporter for the Detroit 
Free Press, shortly after T^ea Terribles returned from France, and were published 
while the country was welcoming home the famous Wisconsin and Michigan warriors. 

General Haan wrote his wife under the nickname of "Bunker," by which he 
has been known to his intimates since his West Point days. When the letters were 
published General Haan was in Battle Creek, ^fieh., commanding Camp Custer. 
Mrs. Haan had written him from New York that she had "given a reporter some 
letters." When he read them in the paper, a year after he had written them, far 
from the turmoil in which the words were penned, he smiled, and his only com- 
ment was : 

202 



READING THE GENEUAL'S MAIL 

"I am quite astonished at some of the statements T made." 

In the same camp were a number of men of the ;J2nd Division, being demobilized. 
They read the letteis witli more interest tiian anyone else. They smiled, too, and a 
veteran othcer remarked : 

"Guess the Old Man is just like the rest oi: us. I've censored iiuiuy a letlei' that 
reads like those to 'Margaret.' The Geneial writes just like a doughboy." 

And the Editor of the Free Press in his comment introduciiig the letters to his 
readers said: 

"The outstanding feature running throu^gh the letters is that General 
Haan is revealed as 'human' — vitally interested in exactly the things that in- 
terested the men who fought under him." 

It is a military principle that an organization tends to pattern itself after its 
commanding officer. No Division could be commanded for the length of time Gen- 
eral Haan commanded the 32nd without assimilating many of the personal char- 
acteristics of its chief. "Bunker to Margaret" letters which General Haan has per- 
mitted the Division historians to republish demonstrate this fact more clearly, per- 
haps, than anything else. 

If any one feature of the morale of Les Terribles was more evident than another, 
the cheerfulness with which the ol^icers and men accepted wliatever came their way 
was perhaps the most impressive characteristic of the Division. Many of General 
llaan's letters to liis wife were written at times his men will remember as not being 
conducive to light-heartedness, but there was hardly a time when he couldn't find 
something to joke about. If it wasn't his rubber tub, which was the envy of his 
staff ofBeers, it was the Kaiser's bed, in which he refused to sleep. 

"We were billeted in the ex-emperor's house," he wrote, "but I couldn't bring 
myself to sleep in the old lobster's bed." 

In the early training days in France before the Division went into the trenches 
in Alsace, the General was just as restless to go forward as any of his men — 
perhaps a bit more so. His letters exemplify the Division spirit of "Let's go." 
Many of his letters were written while the Division was under action or just coming 
out of a victorious fight. In these the spirit of pride in the glorious achievements 
of his men is always uppermost. 

The natural beauty of France interested him, too, just as it interested all the 
fighters from America, and the spirit of the French women working in the fields 
tugged at his heartstrings, just as it tugged at the heartstrings of every American 
mother's son over there. 

The General's first letter tells of his voyage across the Atlantic. It reads: 

March 5, 1918. 

"Dear Margaret: Here we are, safe and sound after an interesting trip. 
Had one fake 'sub' attack in mid-ocean ; some one had dropped a barrel over- 
board, our lookouts signalled 'Submarine,' and we had some nice target 
practice. 

"The last two nights the strain was a little wearing, but when we sailed 
into this beautiful French port, with briglit sunshine on the hills and city, 
it was grand. The Cadillac is now being unloaded and we will use it to go 
to our headquarters. 

"I do not detect the hopeless feeling among the French of which I have 
heard so much. We will give the German pirates a run for their money 
before we finish. j^^^^ „f ]„^p^ BuxNker." 

203 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WAR 

A week later General Haan wrote: 

"Dear Margaret: It seems a lung time since we landed, yet it is only a 
week. The sun has been shining beautifully every day, and all over France 
the farms are being plowed and planted. Tlie season is earlier than in the 
United States. 

"Apparently there is ample food; no meatless days in France, and you 
can buy anything you need cheaper than in the United States. I was sur- 
prised. Butter is very scarce. The bread is black, but good. Sugar is not 
plentiful, but more so than in New York. 

"I have seen many old friends, and soon will see some more. We are 
billeted in 30 ditl'eient quaint old villages, but quite comfortable. I have 
a chateau, or rather a large room in a big stone house, and eight officers arc 
with me. 

"1 have a line bed, good mattresses, sheets and blankets and towels all 

furnished, bed made and sheets and towels laundered for half a franc (10 

■ cents) a day. Too much ! No bath in the chateau. Too bad ! But then I 

have my rubber tub, which is 0. K., for I get a bucket of hot water now and 

then. 

"Things arc most interesting here, and I am glad I am in the thick of it. 
In a few days I expect to have a look at the enemy. They are rather active, 
but our men are full of confidence and pep, and we are getting more in all the 
time. I think our navy is going to get the better of the 'subs,' too. 

"I don't know what to think yet of the end of the war. I can't see any way 
but to keep on scrapping for a long time." 



The General's third letter was written on St. Patrick's day, and sets forth how 
he worked to get his Division together after the units had been separated by powers 
higher up : 

"Dear Margaret: This has been a most beautiful day, and I have had 
a ride up front; not very near the front yet, but I shall get nearer next week. 

"My Division is still all scattered and helping in the supply line, but I 
will get it together soon, I think. I have been after them hard with the big 
stick. 

"I am feeling fine as silk. We don't get much news, although I take 
a French morning paper, Le Matin, and an English evening paper, the Daily 
Mail. Our American papers have better news. 

"I am gradually getting ae(iuainted with the general organization of 
things here and it is intensely interesting. The Secretary passed through 
here today. He is being taken on a personally conducted tour and seems 
to enjoy it. 

"1 am very comfortable, and like my work even better than at Waco." 



A letter written by General Haan March 29th, reflects the spirit of unrest that 
spread over the Allied world during the German offensive in the north of France: 

"Dear Margaret: Things are 'sizzling' here, and at the moment there is 
grave doubt as to whether our lines will finally hold, but the French are 
quite optimistic. 



204 



READING THE GENERAL'S MAIL 

"A terrible battle is in progress. We hope to stem the onslaught, which 
was expected just where it came. If we are able to bring them to bay now, 
and 1 think we will, then we will get them in the end. 

"Things are looking a little better toda}', and our British friends certainly 
are doing themselves proud. 

"I hope soon to get a more active part in the doings." 



April 2. 

"Dear Margaret: The Germans seem to be stopped, and I feel certain we 
are going to get them in the end. Our troops are coming over much faster 
now and they will come faster soon. 

"Our people must all realize that the enemy cannot be talked to death 
or starved out. He must be licked, and that will require some heavy fighting. 

"I feel sure now that we will by fall get control or at least great super- 
iority in the air, and that will give our armies a big advantage. By that time 
we also should have more soldiers than the CJermans, and we will be able 
again to take the oil'ensive, wbieh we will do with a vengeance. 

"I am quite comfortable in my chateau, where I come for a sponge bath 
now and then. That rubber tub is the envy of my staff. 

"Ever since the Germans sliot into the Paris church on Good Friday they 
have been in bad luck. The spirit of the Allied armies is fine — never better, 
and that is much." 



In a letter of April 8th the General writes: 

"Dear Margaret: All the general officers in France, except those in my 
Division, have been ordered to take another examination. We were ordered 
too, but when I told them we had been examined so often in the United States 
that whenever we met a medical officer we began to unbutton our clothes, 
they let us off. I hope I don't have any more physical examinations until 
the war is over; not that I am afraid of them, because I never felt better, 
but they are a nuisance. 

"The troops of the Division are anxious to get to the front. A few of 
them are up there now. 

"You tell any good people who are wondering what they could do to help, 
that they should use all their influence to do what General March asks. He 
is now Chief of Staff; he has been over here and he knows just what is 
needed. 

"We have a nice 'mess,' although we have just lost our cook. We are 
promised a French chef, and then we will start all over again. 

"I went to the movies Saturday night, saw Fatt)' Arbuckle and felt 
quite at home." 



A trip to the front lines, and his views on the perilous situation with the British 
in the north, are set forth in the General's next letter: 

April 13. 
"Dear Margaret: War is even 'Heller' than we used to think it was. The 
British are now under a frightful strain. As I am writing, the battle is at 
its height, r hope and believe the British again will stop them liefore it is 
too late. 

205 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN Till-: WOULD HI/.' 

"I have just returned from the front trenches, where I have been study- 
ing the modern metliods of trench warfare. I went into the middle of No 
ilan's Land, into a listening post within 50 yards of the German trenches. 

"Our soldiers are going to be fine. Where we are weak is in our older or 
rather our field officers, that is colonels and majors and most captains. They 
are too old to get into the full spirit of the strenuous training required. 

"The French have become quite used to the war. They live in the villages 
10 miles from the front and go on planting (the women), and carry on just 
as if nothing were happening. Shells drop in their fields, but that doesn't 
worry them. They do not go until they are ordered away by the military 
authorities, and then they go reluctantly. I'ractically all the work of plant- 
ing the fields is done by the women. A few old men are seen now and then, 
but they don't seem to be able to do much work, except on the roads, which are 
kept in fine shape. 

"This is Saturday night and I feel a little lonesome. Tomorrow I am 
running up to General Pershing's headquarters in a new car — made in De- 
troit. It's a peach, and the roads around here are in fine shape." 



Thd General's next letter, dated May 1st, tells of the artistic beauties of France. 

"Dear Margaret: France in the springtime, among the hills, is beautiful. 
I wish you could be here to enjoy it, as you surely would, and rummage 
around some of those quaint old country villages — marvelous specimens of 
unsanitary conditions, but artistic by their very nature — pictures to make the 
artists dance and drink the wine coming from the hillside vineyards." 



That Thirty-second Division spirit of "Let's Go" is set forth in a letter of May 
11th, as follows: 

"Dear Margaret: Good for you for wanting to be a man and a soldier. 
You are doing good work, and will continue to do so as long as you feel that 
way. We have a tremendous job on our hands, but if we all pull together 
we'll put it over. 

"Got me a new uniform today — a peach. Am going up front tomorrow. 

"My sports are ready for a tour in the trenches. They are 'fed up' on 
training, as the Scotch say, and are all eager to get a try at the foe. Me, 
too, Pete !" 



A letter written May 11th takes the Division up one step nearer the front. The 
General writes: 

"Dear Margaret : We are moving today, but it is not like Texas. We get 
the order, and zip, in two hours we report ready. Good training! 

"I had a nice trip to the front Sunday ; lunched with a French General. 
He is quite comfortable, and so will we be when we get into the line (in a 
quiet sector). 

"We arc not to lie in the thick nf the l)iii(lo for some lime yet." 

20G 



READING THE GENERAL'S MAIL 

"May 18. 

"Dear Margaret: We have just completed a 100-mile movement without 
a hitch and exactly on schedule time — not like the Texas movement. We are 
now in another locality, but not on an active front yet. Plenty of shooting 
and bombing and fights in the air. My men are learning by contact, and 
my officers are, many of them, improving fast. 

"The enemy seems to be threatening another drive. Well, he will get 
another crack in the nose, and before long some more cracks, and then some 
more. It looks to me now as if we might spend next winter here, but one can 
never tell. I am not expecting a speedy decision, and he is trying his best to 
turn Russian soldiers against us through his tools, Trotzky and Lenine, but 
I don't think he will succeed. 

"We are quite comfortable here. I am writing this in my 'office' under 
an electric light." 

A little touch of homesickness is evident in a letter dated May 24th : 

"Dear Margaret: Things are not much different than I expected. Lots 
of details we are learning every day, and the French Officers are simply fine 
in giving us the benefit of their experience. We have much to learn yet, but 
not nearly as much as when we started. 

"Being 'in contact' adds much zest to our work and keeps up the interest. 
And the days are nice and long now — plenty of daylight so that we don't 
miss the lightless nights so much. 

"But, ye gods, how I would enjoy the lights on Broadway. 

"One of my men was killed yesterday by machine-gim fire and two were 
wounded today by artillery fire — also some civilians. 

"It has turned cool today, but the weather is generally fine, with plenty 
of sunshine and flowers, mostly yellow and blue." 



General Haan's pride in the first two men in the Division to win the French 
Croix de Guerre, and his concern over his first wounded, are set forth in letters of 
May 29th and June 2ud : 

"Dear Margaret: This war is some hell, but we are going to come out 
on top in the end ; I feel sure of that. 

"Have had a few men killed and some wounded ; not many. Two of my 
men have won the Croix de Guerre. One was killed and the other shot 
through the lungs. The latter was Sergeant Sanford, 126th Infantry, who 
met a German patrol of five and attacked them single-handed. They fired at 
him and fied. He pursued them after he was shot and emptied his pistol 
into them. He brought in grenades and a wire cutter thny dropped in their 
flight. He is very seriously ill in a hospital, but I think ho will recover." 



June 2. 

"Dear Margaret: I visited the hospitals today. The sergeant is still 
alive and has a good chance of recovery. 

"We made a raid last night and caught two German prisoners; others 
were killed, number not known. All we wanted was to find out who was 
in front of us, and we have identified them. 

207 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

"The Germans surely hit a soft spot in the Allied line in their last drive. 
I hope we will be able to hold at Soissons and Reims, which should force the 
enemy to withdraw. I hope further that they may push in at these points and 
make a disaster for the Germans. 

"We are too short of men. The Germans have some 50 divisions more 
than the Allies, and they are a single command, and they are better trained. 
But our troops are coming over faster every day now, and already they are 
giving a great deal of help." 



More impressions of the French Army are set forth in a letter dated June 24th. 
It reads : 

"Dear Margaret: I guess you haven't had your mails crowded by my 
letters lately; things have been rather rushed with us the past month and 
I have not been troubled as to how to kill time. 

"I have the great honor of commanding a French division in addition to 
my own. This is the first time an American Officer has commanded a French 
division. The French are doing everything they possibly can to help us 
along. I never believed such perfect relations could be established by troops 
of different nations serving together. 

"The weather has been rather raw here, and tonight I am only fairly 
warm with a heavy overcoat on as I am writing. 

"I noticed by the evening paper we have 300,000 men over here now. 
That's fine. I am glad they have decided to publish the numbers, because it 
will cheer up the French and British and will nuike the Germans weep. We 
flattened out four of their sports yesterday that we know of and will get 
more soon. 

"Inclosed is a program for concert given by an American and French 
band playing as one band." 



The General's next letter, dated July 24th, was written after he and the Thirty- 
second had moved from Alsace to the vicinity of Chateau niierry. It follows: 

"Dear Margaret: We are a long way from our old station. T expect you 
may have located us before you get this; anyhow, if you have not T can't 
help you. We are all 0. K. and doing our best and will continue to do that 
to the end. 

"The losses in our Division have not as yet been heavy, but no one can 
tell what will happen in the near future. All is uncertainty, hut we are 
preparing as best we can for eventualities. 

"Be that as it mav we shall smite the enemv as hard as we can." 



The next letter, written August 3rd, tells of the Division's first battle in its drive 
from the Ourcq to the Vesle. It reads : 

"Dear Margaret: I have been with my Division for four days and nights 

in a terrific battle. My men have done excellent work and I am well satisfied. 

"The men are about exhausted. We have beaten the German in 'open 

warfare,' where he thought himself invincible, and Berlin is not rejoicing 

overmuch. We have many casualties, but we have actually counted more 

308 



READING THE GENERAL'S MAIL 

than twice as many dead Germans on the ground as our dead numbered. I 
think tomorrow my Division will be replaced by a fresh one, but if not my 
men can fight more yet. Some of them have had nothing to eat for two days, 
but tonight they will be fed. 

"We have driven the enemy across a river and he has blown up the 
bridges in his flight — so we have to stop over night. That gives us a chance 
to get food to the very front troops. 

"I am starting out to inspect the front at 4 tomorrow morning. I would 
forever have regretted it had I missed this battle." 



Slore about this same battle is contained in the General's next letter. 

"August 7. 

"Dear Margaret: Just a word now that our first real battle, lasting eight 
days, is over. 

"We had many wounded, but only aliout 500 killed in the eight days of 
terrific fighting in the middle of the big push. 

"One of my regiments took Fismes by storm and killed many Germans. 

"On the battlefield of our first fight, lasting part of two days, more than 
500 enemy corpses have been buried by our men. War is getting to be hell 
for the Germans, but it's nothing to what it's going to be. 

"My men are having three days' rest now and they are reported very 
cheerful and in high spirits. Tomorrow I am going to visit all of them." 



Capture by his troops of the town near which Quentin Boosevelt is buried is one 
of the outstanding features in a letter dated August 17th, which says: 

"Dear Margaret: Tomorrow we will put on our first gold service stripe 
(si.K months on big war service). 

"My Division has had a good rest and is al)out ready for another scrap, 
but we are very short in officers and men and I hope I will get replacements 
soon. 

"T have been busier since the battle ended than I was during it — in 
getting matters in hand again. Battles are very discouraging even when you 
are winning. 

"What do you think of our stunts? I told you we would get the Germans 
in the end. Wtll, the end is not yet, but I think the foe wishes it were. 
We are just beginning. I hope we don't dash in too boldly; we might get 
pinched a little — but anyway, we will lick the Kaiser before we come back. 

"We don't want i>eace. We want to lick him to a frazzle. 

"We captured the town near which Quentin Roosevelt is buried and found 
his grave alongside Ihe remains of his aeropla,nc. I wrote to Teddy about it. 

"Well, about f^ur staff officers are waiting for me, so good-night." 



The General found less time to write letters in the days of the Juvigny battle 
that followed the writing of this last one, b^it October 5th, he wrote : 

209 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

"Dear Margaret: Yesterday I put in 24 hours' work and the time was 
too short. My Division was in a terrific battle all day and most of the night 
and again all today, but it has stopped now. They are good fighters, every 
one of them. 

"I am quite well and glad we are on the offensive. Now for a little sleep." 



A letter written twelve days later shows General llaan exceedingly proud of his 
Michigan and Wisconsin fighters. It reads: 

"October 17th. 

"Dear Margaret: The fighting here has been terrible and my fine Division 
has again pointed its nose straight through the enemy's Kriemhilde line, 
his last organized line on this front. My Division is the only one that got 
through on this front and now they are going (I hope) to push a fresh 
Division through the hole we made, which we are still enlarging. 

"It's been frightful and the losses very heavy, but the men are in mag- 
nificent spirit and still going to it. 

"We are to be taken out for a rest tomorrow night. 

"I am proud of my Division." 



On the morning of November 11th, when the .\rmistice went into effect, General 
Haan sent a brief cablegram to his wife. 

"TTiippy days!" was all he said. 



In the evening of Armistice Day, the General wrote : 

"November 11. 

"Dear Margaret: This is a day of celebration. Even in the wilds of the 
finish of the great war on our last battlefield we have bcH^n able today to have 
a banquet — perhaps the happiest of our lives. 

"This morning we resumed the attack at G -M which we had stopped last 
night after dark. At 7 we received orders to stop the battle. That was some 
job, too. We got it stopped entirely at 10:4.5, just I.') minutes before the 
armistice went into effect. One of my chaplains was killed at 10 :40. Hard 
luck ! 

"Day before yesterday we went back into the fight again, and yesterday 
we pounded them all day, driving them back everywhere. But they fought 
like the very devil still — had a new division in front of us and parts of two 
other divisions, but we punched them. 

"I am glad the war is over. We are now waiting for the enemy to get a 
little start and then we will follow him and before long wo will establish 
'Die Wacht am Ehein.' Isn't that grand ? 

"Anyhow, we licked the foe to a frazzle and the Hohenzollerns and the 
Hapsburgs are out of business for keeps." 

210 



READING THE GENERAL'S MAIL 




"Here at Long^y 5,000 French people were on tlie main square to greet me." 

Three days later, General Haan wrote: 

"Dear Margaret: Now that the fighting is over and we can liavc lights 
at night, the world seems different — a whole lot of improvement. 

"My Division has been selected to move forward in the advance guard to 
establish a 'Wacht am Rhein' and that tickles me most to death. We start 
after the Germans day after tomorrow. My Division is one of six (elite.) 
selected for a station on the Rhine, probably at Coblenz. We march through 
Luxemburg and Treves. You remember our visit there? Isn't that grand? 

"Nothing doing but cleaning up and getting new clothes." 



How it feels to sleep in a real bed is described in a letter from Chateau Longwy 
dated November 18th, as follows: 

"Dear Margaret : Fine business this living in 'Kaiser House' and 'Baron 
Chateau.' Things are improving. 

"Had grand reception at Marville yesterday, and today here at Longwy 
5,000 French people were on the main square to greet me when I arrived 
with the Division. We are now on the border of Luxemburg. 

"I had a fine bed to sleep in last night — my first night in a real bed in 
more than three months, and a bath too. Too much ! Afraid I'll get sick. 

"The baroness called on me today and apologized for the fillliy condition 
of the cliateau, hut explained that today was the first time slie had been 
permitted to get inside for four years. 

"Ye gods, but these people are happy to get rid of llio invaders, who are 
beasts. Nothing less! Lots of Love, Bunkeh." 



211 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 

In a letter dated Xoveinber 22nd, the General tells about losing his "good old 
Thirty-second" and being promoted to command the Seventh Corps, and later, on 
November 28th, he writes: 

"I occupied one of the Kaiser's houses the other night, but I fouliln't 
bring myself to sleep in the old lobster's bed." 



Most of his subsequent letters have to do with the Seventh Corps, although now 
and then there is a touch of sadness at being away from "his boys" in the Thirty- 
second. 

That he was overjoyed at l)eing transferred back to the Eed Arrows is well known 
by all General Haan's friends. 




212 



CHAPTER XVI. 

Constitution of Thirty-Second Division Veteran Association. 

1. Tlie name of this Association shall he: THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION 
VETERAN ASSOCIATION. 

2. The object of this Association shall be: To foster ajid perpetuate the 
spirit of comradeship which has been the greatest single factor in the success 
of the Division and to perpetuate in act and deed, by strong Americanism, the mem- 
ory of our dead comrades, who by their supreme sacrifice have permitted us to return 
in honor. 

3. The Active Members of the Association shall be: All persons of the military 
forces of the United States who honorably served with the 32nd Division at any 
time from the date of embarkation until the 8th of April, 1919, or any other per- 
sons who similarly served with the Division in any other official capacity during the 
time specified. 

The Associate Members of this Association shall be: All persons who honorably 
served as members of the 32nd Division from July loth, 1917, and who through no 
effort of their own were prevented from serving with the 33nd Division of the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces. The Executive Committee, hereinafter formed, is em- 
powered to admit as Association Member, upon the personal application, any person 
entitled to such membership. 

Honorary Members may be elected by a majority vote of the members of the 
-Association present at a regular convention of the Association, upon the recommen- 
dation of the Executive Committee, for valuable services rendered to the Spirit of 
the Arrow. In addition the next of kin of all former members of the Thirty-second 
Division who were killed in action, or who died from other causes and whose status 
at the time of death was such as to warrant them memberships, may be admitted 
as Honorary Members under like conditions. 

4. Tlie initial fee for Active and Associate Membership shall be ten (10) 
francs if paid in France and Two Dollars ($3.00)' if paid in the United States and 
will carry with it a life membership. 

5. The annual convention shall rotate between the States of Wisconsin and 
Michigan, provided, however, either State may at any time waive its right to the 
convention in favor of one of the Middle West States. The first regular convention 
will be held in the year 1920 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and the second annual meet- 
ing in the year 1921 at Detroit, Michigan, at a time and place to be designated by 
the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee is also authorized to arrange 
for auxiliary Divisional Meetings in such place suitable for the members who find 
the regular Convention not available. 

6. The term of office shall be for one year until their successors arc elected 
and qualified. 

213 



CONSTITUTION OF THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION VETERAN ASS'N 

The officers of the Association will be, a President, Senior Vice-President, Junior 
Vice-President, Senior Secretary, Junior Secretary, Treasurer, Chaplain, Historian 
and Assistant Historian. There shall also be an Executive Committee consisting of 
one member from each of the following organizations: 

125th, 12Gth, 12rth and 128th Infantry Kcgiments; 

119th, 120th, 121st, 147th, 322ud, 32;5rd, 32 1th Artillery Regiments; 

107th Engineers, 107th Animunitiou Train, 107th Sanitary Train and 107th 

Supply Train ; 
119th, 120th, 121st llachine Gun Battalions, to be consickircd as a regiment 

and entitled to one representative. Each Machine Gun Battalion to be 

entitled to have its representative chosen from its members each tliird 

term. 

All other units not otherwise mentioned to be entitled to one representative at 
large. The President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, Historian and the 
retiring President shall be ex-of/icio members of the Executive Committee with full 
power to vote at all its meetings. There will also be selected an Honorary President 
and Honorary Vice-Presidents, whose duties ai'e to preside at all Memorial Meetings 
of the Association. 

The Executive Committee shall have power to fill vacancies occurring between 
Conventions. 

7. The Executive Committee shall have full control of all the affairs of this 
Association, between the times of its Conventions, and may act through duly dele- 
gated Sub-Committees selected by them. They shall make annual jjrinted reports to 
the President at each Convention of their individual official activity and the collec- 
tive Association activities since the last regular Convention. 

8. Associate and Honorary Members shall be eligible to all the benefits of this 
Association but shall not hold olKce therein or have any voice or vote on the changes 
or additions to the Constitution, or of the Association By-Laws. 

9. The membersliip fees of the Association shall be placed in a trust fund under 
the terms of a trust to be prepared and executed by the Finance Committee for and 
on behalf of the Association and a trust company designated by the Executive Com- 
mittee, to the end that the income therefrom and limited amounts of the principal 
sum only are available for current Association expenses. 

The Finance Committee shall consist of three members of the Association ap- 
pointed by the Executive Committee for one, two and three years and their successors 
to be ajipointed for terms of three years each. 

10. The Executive Committee shall designate a depository for the funds of 
the Association and they shall be paid out only upon warrants signed by the Presi- 
dent and Secretary and countersigned by the Treasurer. 

11. The Association adopts as its official name "The 32nd Division Veteran 
Association" with the sub-title "Les Terribles." The official button and seal shall 
be a bronze circlet, with the official emblem, the Barred Eed Arrow, imposed on two 
gold service chevrons and the Association directs that the Executive Committee pro- 
tect all the above by copyright. 

12. The Association directs that the Executive Committee be organized into a 
non-profit-making voluntary corporation under the Laws of the State of Wisconsin. 

13. This Constitution may be amended by two-thirds vote of all the members 
present at a regular Convention of the .\ssociation. 



214 



THE TIllRTy-SECONI) DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



A iut0 



OPf^ONTHS afier tke tragic days of 1918 wkeu tte men 
III wliose names appear on tlie Tkirhj -Second Division's 
Roll ol Honor gave tkeir lives for tlieir country on 
tne battlefields of France, sorrowing parents, relatives and 
friends are still longing for details of tke last days of tkeir 
loved ones. 

Many men wko read tkis list of keroic names will recall 
incidents of tke service of tkeir dead comrades. Some, per- 
kaps, were w^itk tkem in tke fatal kour of tkeir passing. To 
tkese men is given tke opportiuiity, and it skould Le consid- 
ered in tke ligkt of a duty, to communicate wkatever facts 
are in tkeir possession to tke next of kin wkose names and 
addresses appear opposite tkose of tke dead in tke appended 
roll. Tkere are many motkers and fatkers wko do not yet 
know from autkentic sources of tke manner in wkick tkeir sons 
paid tke supreme sacrifice. Tkey are deeply grateful for eack 
word from former comrades of tkeir boys, and tke Division 
Historians urgently recpiest tkat tkose wko kave information 
concerning any of tke Division's fatalities, write at once to 
tke next of kin, giving tke fullest accounts possikle. 

Tke casualty lists of tke A. E. F. were prepared under 
tke stress of combat, and in spite of efforts to fully correct tke 
vmavoidable errors, tkere are still many mistakes and muck 
missing information. Tkese lists can be made complete and 
correct only by details supplied by men wko kave first-kand 
knowledge of tke facts, and tkese men are requested to cor- 
respond witk tke Secretary of tke Tkirty - Second Division 
Veteran Association to tke end tkat our Roll of Honor may 
finally be made into a full and accurate record. 



216 




ROLL OF HONOR 



KIA— Killed in Action. 
DW— Uied of Wounds. 



MIA — Mis.sing in Action. 
DD — Died of Disease. 



OFFICERS 



ACC— Accidentally Killed. 
Uii' — Drowned. 



Name 



Abelc, William H. 

Amberlang, Lisle P. 

Anderson, Orville L. 

Arnold, Orville L. 

Atkins, Arthur K. 

Barlow, Francis A. 

Bcal, William John 

Beaton, Lloyd Orendorff 

Beaudrj-, Frederick W, 

Blomberg, Henr>' S. 

Bostick, Ray E. 

Brigliam, Stephen O. 

Buck, Charles C. 
Burton, Edward A. 
Canary, James H. 
Champagne, John C. 
Chapman, John Arthu 
Chatterton, Iden E. 
Clarke, Bruce W. 
Colvin, Delancy J. 
Cook, James 
Cook, Kichard E. 
Cottrell, Erk M. 
Cranefield, Marion C. 
Crowell, Fleming M. 
Daniels, Charles R. 
Davis, Bryre E. 
Davitt, William F. 
Devenny, James V. 
Dickop, Ray C. 



Rank 



1st Lt. 
1st Lt. 
Captain 
Captain 
2nd Lt. 
Captain 
1st Lt. 
2nd Lt. 
Captain 
1st Lt. 
2nd Lt. 

1st Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

1st Lt. 

1st Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

2n(I Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

2iid Lt. 

2iid Lt. 

1st Lt. 

1st Lt. 

2nd Lt. 

Ist Lt. 



Organizatiox 



Sup. Co. 324 F. A. 

Med. Dept. 125 Inf. 

Co. E. 128 Inf. 

Reg. Adjt. 128 Inf. 

Co. C. 126 Inf. 

Co. H. 125 Inf. 

Co. L. 126 Inf. 
Hq. Co. 119 F. A. 
Co. H, 126 Inf. 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 
119 Mg. Bn. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 120 .Ml 
126 Inf. 

Co. G. 127 Inf. 
1st Bn. 127 Inf. 
Co. H. 123 Inf. 
Co. H. i:6 Inf. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 
Co. D 127 Inf. 
125 Inf. 
125 Inf. 

Co. E. 126 ijif. 
Co. L. 127 Inf. 



Bn. 



Cause 



ICIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 



Date 



10/27/18 

8/8/18 

8/1/18 

10/7/18 

8/31/18 

10/7/18 

8/29/18 

8/30/18 

8/1/18 

10/4/18 

8/1/18 

8/1/18 

10/18/18 

S/2/18 

7/31/18 

7/31/18 

9/12/18 

10/6/18 

8/6/18 

10/14/18 

7/30/18 

8/4/18 

10/9/18 

7/31/18 

10/15/18 

11/23/18 

10/7/18 

U/Il/18 

10/9/18 

8/4/18 



Address— Next of Kin 



1620 Walnut St., Toledo, Ohio. 

Mrs. William H. Abele. 
Cascade, Wis. 

Mrs. Magdalene Amberlang. 
Verdon, Manitoba, Canada. 

.Mrs. Or\'ille L. Andeison. 
211 Chester St., Sparta, Wis. 

Mrs. Orville Arnold. 
31 State St., Boston, c/o Frank B. 

Blair & Co. Mr. Astley Atkins. 

202 Western Ave., Clieboygan, Mich. 

Mrs. Eva Audrey Barlow. 
101 Beirdler St., Muskegon, Mich. 

Mrs. William Beal. 
Baldwin, Kas. 

Mrs. John Beaton. 
419 McDougall Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

.Mrs. Elizabeth Beaudry. 
2612 22nd St., Superior, Wis. 

Mrs. C. Blomberg. 
Mantau, Mich. 

Mrs. Charles H. Bostick. 
Madison, Wis., R. F. D. 2. 

Mrs. J. J. Brigliam. 
94 Prospect St., Dover, N. J. 

Mrs. A. G. Buck. 
Hillsboro, Wis. 

Mrs. Jessie L. Burton. 
Canary, Kas. 

S. C. Canary. 
Elm St., Lake Charles, La. 

Mrs. Rcna Chanipa;?ne. 
44 Puritan Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Cailos Wint«nmeyer. 
1112 Wellington Ct., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Mrs. Nora Chatterton. 
Auiru.sta, Wis. 

Mrs. Frank L. Clarke. 
428 West Mason St., Jack,son, Mich. 

Harriet Colvin. 
103 Wayne St., Pontiac, Mich. 

Mrs. James Cook. 
204 E. 36th St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mrs. Eva R. Cook. 
232 E. 4th St., Greenville, Ohio. 

James A. Cottrell. 
304 N. Orchard St., Madison, Wis. 

Frederic Cranefield. 
2:97 Baxter St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mrs. Daisy M. Crowell. 
352 Gooding St., Lorkport, N. Y. 

Mrs. H. E. Daniels. 
456 Goshin St., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Mrs. Amelia Davis. 
842 Chicopee St., Willimansett, Mass. 

Mrs. Lawrence Davitt. 
146 W. Chelton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mrs. C. F. Devenny. 
West Bend, Wis. 

Mrs. Lena Schiller. 



217 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Name 


Rank' 


Obganizatioh 


Cause 


Date 


Address— Next or Kin 


Dole, Saiiford B. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Le'.viston, Idaho. 
Fred A. Dole. 


Duff, Joscpli M. 


2nd Lt. 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


564 Waslnngton Ave., Carnegie, Ga. 
Uev. Joseph M. Duff. 


Falk, Oscar 


Captain 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


DW 


8/1/18 


.Meiiomiiiee, Mich. 
Mrs. Oscar Falk. 


Fenelon, Harry \V. 


1st Lt. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/18/18 


115 E. Fiederick St., Rhinelandcr, Wis. 
Mrs. Mary Fenelon. 


Feustel, William B. 


2nd Lt. 


Bat. 13. 147 F. A. 


DW 


8/7/18 


1070 E. Lincoln St., Portland, Ore. 
Mrs. Emma Feustel. 


Ebert, Rapliatl P. 


1st Lt. 


Hq. Tr. 32 Div. 


DD 


2/19/18 


Superior, Wis. 

Mrs. R. P. Ebert. 


Pick, Everett S. 


1st Lt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Winnifield, La. 
Mrs. Helen Fick. 


Fieldinc, Donald M. 


2nd Lt. 
Captain 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 
125 Inf. Att. 


DW 
KIA 


10/9/18 
8/29/18 








Frierson, Meade, Jr. 


513 Broadway, Nashviile, "feiin. ' 












Meade Frierson, Sr. 


Gaartz, Alfred E. 


Captain 


Co. D. 120 Mg. Bn 


KIA 


8/29/18 


\'an Buren St., Milwaukee, WLs. 
.Mrs. A. E. Gaartz. 


Gerald, George M. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


2307 N. Church St., Beloit, Wis. 
Mrs. George N. Gerald. 


Girard, John F. 


Captain 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


439 W. Washington St., Tonia, Mich. 
Mrs. Catherine Girard. 


Godfrey, Frank C. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


8 Warren St., Norwalk, Conn. 
Mrs. B. A. Comstock. 


Gra.ssold, Randolph 0. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


DW 


7/21/18 


Chilton, Wis. 

Jo.seph Gra-ssold. 


Hammond, Charles A. 


1st Lt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


785 15th St., Detroit, Mich. 
John J. Hammund. 


Hanger, Fred L. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Wa'ipun, Wis. 

.Mrs. Chas. Hanger. 


Harding, Stacy L. 


2nd Lt. 


Bat. B. 120 F. A. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Antioch, Calif. 

Mrs. J. S. Harding. 


Harris, Clifford O. 


2nd Lt. 


128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


95 E. 72nd St., Portland, Ore. 
Mrs. W. R, Harris. 


Harris, George W. 


2nd Lt. 


Bat. A. 120 F. A. 


DW 


10/13/18 


307 W. Cedar St., Franklin, Ky. 
CieorKC C. Harris. 


Harrison, Little 


Captain • 


Co. E. 119 F. A. 


DW 


7/15/18 


215% Dennis St., Houston, Texas. 
Dr. R. H. Harrison. 


Hastings, Walcott B. 


1st Lt. 
Captain 


127 Inf. 
C(i. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/18/18 
9/30/18 








Hawkes, Milbum If. 


201 N. Ferry St., Ludington, Mich. 












Mrs. Milburn H. Hawkes. 


Hefferan, 


1st Lt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


.■Vshland Block Bklg., Chicago, 111. 


Thumas E. M. 










Mr. W. S. Hefferan. 


Hill, Henry Robt. 


Major 


128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


516 Main St., Quincy, III. 
Mrs. Cecelia R. Hill. 


Hoffman, 


2nd Lt. 


125 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


1121 Ford Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 


Edward Aubrey 










J. G. Hoffman. 


Hyland, Harold \V. 


2nd Lt. 
1st Lt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 126 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


9/7/18 
6/:3/18 






Johnson, Carl A. 


356 Cherry' St'.".'Grarid Rapids, Mich. 












Mr. A. P. Johnson. 


Johnson, Henry G. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. C. 121 Mg. B:i. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Pepin, Wis. 

Frank Johnson. 












Jones, Edwin 


1st Lt. 


Mg. Co. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/3/18 


Oconomowoc, Wis. 


Llewellyn 










Mrs. Oscar T. Jones. 


Joyce, Harold H. 


1st Lt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


218 Power Block, Helena, Mont. 
George J. Joyce. 


Kanter, Benjamin W. 


2nd Lt. 
2nd Lt. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


8/:i/18 
8/31/18 






Kearn, Lester W. 


£51' wV I'eotli ' St. ', ' New York' City. 












Mrs. Kearn. 


Kfiser, Hariy Ma.se 


1st Lt. 


Att. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


4641 Lake Park Ave., Chicago, III. 
Mrs. Florence Ma.sc Keiser. 


Keller, Arthur L 


2nd Lt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


250 St. Gooilridge .\vc.. Rlverdale 

on Hudson, N. J. 
Mr. Arthur T. Keller. 


Kelly, Roy W. 


2nd Lt. 


Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


912 Beascr Ave., Ashland, Wis. 
Mrs. Otillia L. Kelly. 


King, Harold J. 


1st Lt. 


F. & S. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Manistee. Mich. 

Dr. James A. King. 


Lamb, Merritt Udell. 


Captain 


Hq. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Rockford, Mich. 
T. K. Lamb. 


Learned, Charles A. 


Captain 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


446 Highland Ave., Detroit. Mich. 
Mrs. Charles A. Learned. 


Le Baron, Paul K. 


2nd Lt. 


Sup. Co. 120 F. A. 


DD 


10/14/18 


Bcrwvn, 111. 

Mrs. Paul K. Lc Baron. 


I-ietcmeyer, Irenacus J. 


1st Lt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/6/18 


New Iberia. La. 

Fred M. Lictemeyer. 


Lindberg, Wendell A. 


2nd Lt. 
2nd Lt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 
128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/18/18 
10/18/18 








Locke, Edward H. 


Madison .Maine. 












Mrs. Edward H. Locke. 


McElderry, Augustus B. 


2nd Lt. 


Bat. C. 120 F. A. 


DD 




859 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
Mrs. J. Jarok (Sister). 











218 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Obcanization 


Cause 


Date 


Address— Next of Kin 


McLacIiIan, Ira D. 


Captain 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/31/18 


313 Spruce St., SaultSte. Marie, Mich. 
Mrs. Helen McLachlan. 


McGcc, Archie D. 


1st Lt. 


127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


4243 Hudson Blvd., No. Bugen, N. J. 
Mrs. Stelle M. McGee. 


Macheska, William J. 


1st Lt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


177 Woodruff Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mrs. W. J. Macheska. 


Mackay, William R. 


1st Lt. 


127 Tnf. 


DW 


10/18/18 


2446 10th Ave. N., Seattle, Wash. 
Mrs. John C. Mackav. 


Maddox, Joe G. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


129 Ga. Ave., Baisville, Ga. 
Mrs. E. F, Maddox. 


Malloy, Frederick Fagg 


1st Lt. 


Hq. Tr. 32 Div. 


DD 


10/18/18 


Ashville, N. C. 

Mrs. Ella Page Mallov. 


Mattern, Henry 


2nd Lt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


198 Ea-ten Ave., New Bmn-swick, N. J. 
Mis. Marv Mattern. 


Mauger, Harry B. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


5801 Rising Sun Av., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mrs. Ida B. Mauger. 


Meld, Wm. F. 


Major 


1 Inf. 


DD 


10/22/17 


1229 National Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Dr. Hugo F. Mehl. 


Morgan, William D. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/9/18 


Tangiphahoa. La. 
Mr. Morgan. 


Mulcahy, Richard W. 


1st Lt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Jefferson St., Portage, Wis. 
Mr. Dan. Mulcahy. 


Miller, William 


1st Lt. 

2nd Lt. 


Amb. Co. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 120 Mg. Bn. 


DD 
KIA 


5/28/18 
7/31/18 








Miller, Raymond E. 


778 Lothrop Ave., Detroit, Mich. 












Mrs. C. J. Miller. 


Murry, Sent W. 


2nd Lt. 


Co, I. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/13/18 


825 28th St., Newport News, Va. 
Mrs. Lucy W. Murray. 


Nelson, Elmer Burdett 


1st Lt. 


Co. A. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


7/30/18 


R. F. D. 4, Pontiac, Mich. 
Albert A. Nelson 


Nelson, John Bastian 


2nd Lt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


822 Main St., Eau Claire, Wis. 
Mrs. John B. Nelson. 


Noble, Clarence G. 


1st Lt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/4/18 


1026 S. Web.ster Ave., Green Bay, Wis. 
Mrs. Wilhelmina B. Noble. 


Oas, Otto 


1st Lt. 


127 Inf. 


DW 


1/3/19 


Manitowoc, Wis. 
Mr. Otto Oas. 


Dates, Morley S. 


2nd Lt. 


Bat. F. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


8/22/18 


Detroit, Mich. 
W. R. Gates. 


Osthaus, Robert Axford 


2nd Lt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/15/18 


330 Wheeler Ave., Scran ton. Pa. 
Mrs. .41ice Osthaus. 


Perry, Ralph H. 


Captain 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


DW 


11/22/18 


Algoma, Wis. 

Mrs. Melvin W. Perry. 


Peters, Harry B. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18' 


Osceola Mills, Pa. 

Mrs. Ida May Peters. 


Post, Dana C. 


1st Lt. 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/6/18 


Benton Harbor, Mich. 
Dr E. J. Post. 


Redner, Joseph H. 


1st Lt. 


Hq. Co. 119 F. A. 


DD 


10/18/18 


2547 28th St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Mrs. Fred P. Redner. 


Regan, John M. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


1009 Warm Springs Av., Boise, Idaho 

W. V. Regan. 
701 N. J. St., Tacoma, Wash. 


Rhodes, Edward Byron 


2nd Lt. 


Co, E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 












Mrs, Edward B. Rhodes. 


Rice, Bernard L. 


1st Lt. 


Hq. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Sparia, Wis. 

Thomas P. Rice. 


Rit, Maurice 


Lt. 

1st Lt. 


Terr. 127 Inf. 
Reg. Int. Officer 


DW 

DW 


10/18/18 
8/4/18 








Roberts, John Basil 


509 Edgewood Ave., Madison, Wis. 












Mrs. Mar>' Roberts. 


Ross, Albert H. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. K. 125 Int. 


KIA 


10/9 /IS 


1627 12th Ave., S. Birmingham, Ala. 
Chas. W. Ross. 


Rowles, William J. 


Captain 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Davenport, Iowa. 

Mrs. W. T. Rowles. 


Rust, William H. 


1st Lt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


DW 


8/29/18 


Merrill. Mich. 
Edward Rust. 


Schwartz, Charles, Jr. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


1003 Currie St., Marinette, Wis. 










Mr. Chas. Schwartz, 


Seif, Louis E. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Neillsville, Wis. 

Mr. Fred Seif, Sr. 


Settle, Paul T. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. A. 120 Mg. Bn. 


DW 


11/14/18 


Unadilla. Oa. 

Eilwanl G. Settle. 


Sheldon, Herbert J. 


2nd Lt. 


F. & S. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


124 W. Bilbnrn St., Lansing, Mich. 
Mrs. H. J. S'^elrton. 


Shelly, P. M. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


2516 Colfax Av., S. Minnenpolis. Minn 
Mrs. B. M. Shelly. 


Sliiells, Alexander E. 


1st Lt. 


Co. E. 107 Eng. 


DD 


2/17/19 


240 6th Ave., Wniiwatosa, Wis. 
Mrs. Emma Shiells. 


Slade, John P. 


1st Lt. 


Bat. D. 121 F. A. 


DD 


9/17/18 


1603 N. 5th St., Clay Center, Kana. 
Mrs. John P. Slade. 


Slesingcr, Albert 


2nd Lt. 
2nd Lt. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 
Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


8/18/18 
10/13/18 








Smith, Harvey F. 


208 Pingrec Ave., Detroit, Mich. 












Miss R. G. Smith. 


Smith, Homer R. 


2nd Lt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


3 West Srd SI.. Fiillon, N. Y. 
Mr. F. G, Smith. 


Smith, Richard Fredrick 


Captain 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


410 Fra-icis Court, Jackson, Mich. 
Catlerine B. Smith. 



21!) 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Name 



Sperbeck, George E. 
Steen, John Houston 
Street, J. A. 

Stubbs, David 

Sturtevant, Frank A. 

Sugg, A. I. 

Taylor, Douglas Arthur' 

Taylor, Herbert Jones 

Terhune, Elmer S. 

Thomas, Ottis B. 

Thompson, Carl 

Thompson, Edward W 

Thorsen, Edwin B. 

Togstad, Morris 

Toole, Charles M. 

Trier, Adolph M. 

Vemey, Everett L. 

Vogel, Theodore K. 

Wall, Lee N. 

Wallber, Hilbert C. 

Ward, George A. 

West, Myron Chester 

Westnedge, Joseph B. 

Wheeler, Tolman D. 

Wilber, 

Charles Raymond. 



Rank 



Major 
1st Lt. 
Major 

1st Lt. 
2nd Lt. 
2nd Lt. 
2nd Lt. 
1st Lt. 
1st Lt. 
2nd Lt. 
2nd Lt. 
Major 
2nd Lt. 
2nd Lt. 
1st Lt. 
Major 
2nd Lt. 
2nd Lt. 
2nd Lt. 
1st Lt. 
1st Lt. 
Captain 
Colonel 
1st Lt. 
2nd Lt. 



Obcanization 



Cadse 



Uaie 



Abdress— Next op Kin 



147 F. A. 

M. D. 125 Inf. 

1st Bn. 128 Inf. 

Co. A. 127 Inf. 

Co. H. 128 Inf. 

121 F. A. 

Co. B. 127 Inf. 

Co. M. 125 Inf. 

Bat. B. 121 F. A. 

Co. A. 126 Inf. 

Co. E. 126 Inf. 

F. 4 S. 119 F. A. 

Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 

Hq. Co. 127 Inf. 

Co. B. 107 F. S. 

CO. Hq. 127 Inf., 
2nd Bn. 

127 Inf. 

128 Inf. 

Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Bat. A. 120 F. A. 
Co. C. 107 F. S. Bn. 
Hq. Co. 127 Inf. 
126 Inf. 

Co. G. 127 Inf. 
Co. B. 126 Inf. 



DW 
KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DD 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DD 

DW 

DD 

DW 

KIA 



10/11/18 

8/6/18 

10/18/18 



8/6/18 
10/9/18 

8/30/18 

9/2/18 

10/8/18 

8/3/18 

8/31/18 

10/18/18 

8/2/18 

11/10/18 

10/1/18 

7/30/18 

10/19/18 

11/10/18 

7/31/18 

8/19/18 

3/26/18 

8/5/18 

11/29/18 

9/6/18 

10/3/18 



Parker, S. Dakota. 

Mrs. George Sperbeck. 
Vaughan, Miss. 

Mrs. John H. Steen. 
Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

Mrs. John A. Street. 

Care Col. Alonzo Gray. 
119 S. West 42nd St., Des Moines, la. 

Mr. V. R. Stubbs. 
412 Wesley Ave., Oak Park, 111. 

Mrs, Ruth K. Sturt«vant, 



214 Clark St., Rhinclander, Wis. 

Mr. Artliur Taylor. 
739 Jefferson Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 

Mrs. F. G. Taylor. 
670 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, N. J. 

Frank A. Terliune. 
70 Radford St., Yonkers, N. Y. 
I Mrs. F. R. Thomas. 
I Curtiss, Wis. 
' Miss Anna Thompson. 
: 933 Phoenix St., South Haven, Mich. 

Mis. Edward W. Thompson. 
615 12th Ave. West, Ashland, Wis. 

Mrs. Bertha Thorsen. 
337 W. Mifflin St., Madison, Wis. 

Mrs. O. C. Tog.stad. 
68 Weld Hill St., Forest Hills, Boston. 

Mr. John Toole. 
325 Doty St., Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Mrs. Rose Trier. 
406 West B. St., Marshfield, Wis. 

Mrs. A. F. Verney. 
169 Hillside St., Asheville, N. C. 

Mrs. Mary Vogel. 
2001 College Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

N. Wall. 
298 29th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Carl Wallber. 



613 St. Lawrence Ave., Beloit, 

Mrs. Slyron C. West. 
R. F. D. 5, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Mrs. Eva May Westnedge. 
Now York City, N. Y. 

H. R. Wheeler. 
Walpole, Mass. 

Mrs. Charles H. Wilber. 



ENLISTED MEN 



Abbott, Henry G. 
Abe, Edward A. 
Abegg, Alfred 
Abendroth, Franklin L. 
Abernathy, Joseph 
Abrams, Glen R. 
Ackley, Harry 
Adair, John 
Adamick, John 
Adams, George F. 
Adams, Joseph 
Adamson, Bob 
Agaires, Theodore 
Ahlf, Ben 
Akin, Webster E. 
Ubrecht, Herbert H. 



Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 



Co. L. 125 Inf. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 

Co. B. 163 Inf. 

Co. B. 127 Inf. 

Co. C. 126 Inf. 

Co. I. 125 Inf. 

Co. I. 128 Inf. 

Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 

Co. M. 125 Inf. 

Co. B. 127 Inf. 

Co. A. 128 Inf. 

Co. B. 127 Inf. 

Co. II. 126 Inf. 

Co. G. 125 Inf. 

Co. L. 128 Inf. 

Co. B. 128 Inf. 



KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
DW 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 



10/21/18 

8/4/18 

10/11/18 

10/19/18 

10/.5/I8 

10/11/18 

9/1/18 

9/1/18 

10/20/18 

10/11/18 

8/1/18 

10/11/18 

10/9/18 

10/13/18 

11/7/18 

8/31/18 



Vardaman, Miss. 

L L. Abbott (Father). 
187 Villard Ave., Mdwaukce, Wis. 

August J. Abe (Father). 



Markesan, Wis. 

Mr. Fred .\bendroth (Father). 
Rii-liaids, Buffalo Co., So. Dakota. 

Mr. Wm. H. Abernathy. 
1010 Essex St., Essexvillc, Mich. 

Maud Daisy Berkley (Mother). 
166 E. 38tli St., Portland, Ore. 

Ralph Ackley. 
Sandusky, Mich. 

James Adair. 



1500 Ohio St., O.shkosh, Wis. 

Mrs. Nellie Adams. 
1438 Mohawk St., Chicago, 111. 

.Mrs. Anna Adams (Mother). 
Liberty, Teim. 

A. C. Adamson (Father). 
Violet. La. 

Lucy Agaires. 
R. F. D. 4, Centralia, III. 

Claus Ahlf (Father). 
Lovergene, Tenn. 

Mr. .lohn W. Akin (Father). 
I4I0 Washington, Berlin, Wis. 

Mrs. Emma Albrecht. 



220 



BOLL OF HONOR 



Name 



Aldereta, Leopold 
Alderman, Claude W. 
Alderman, Fredrick 
Alderman, Hartzel 
Alexander, Harold J. 
Alexander, John R. 
Alexander, James 
Alfano, Frank 
Alft. Joe 
Allen, Fraiik H. 
Allen, George W. 
Allen, Leon E. 
Allen, Miles D. 
Allen, Ralph H. 
Allen, Raymond 
Allinson, Claude C. 
Altman, John 
Ammarell, Louis E. 
Amstutz, Fred 
Anderson, Adolph 
Anderson, Albert H. 
Anderson, Anthony C. 
Anderson, Arvid 
Anderson, Charles O. 
Anderson, Einar 
Anderson, Fred R. 
Anderson, George D. 
Anderson, Gustaf H. 
Anderson, Harold C, 
Anderson, John M. 
Anderson, Lewis 
Anderson, Walter H. 
Andres, Carl 
Andrews, Jeff 
Andrykowski, Victor 
Antczak, Louis F. 
Antico, Jack 
Aravanis, Angelo 
Arbutz, Ledwig. 
Arlt, George 
Arlt, Louis H. 
Armes, Tommie R. 
Armijo, Marcus B, 



Rank 



Organization 



Cause 



Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Mech. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

1st Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 



Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 
Co. B. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 
107 T. M. B. 
Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Co. A. 120 Mg. Bn. 
Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Co. D. 126 Inf. 
Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 127 Inf. 
Co. A. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 
Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. K. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 
Co. K, 126 Inf. 
Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 
Hdqs. Co. 128 Inf. 
Hdq. 110 Inf. 
Co. B. 127 Inf. 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. G. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 125 Inf. 
Co. L. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 
Co. H. 126 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 125 Inf. 



KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

ACC 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

DD 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 



Date 



lO/U/18 

7/31/18 

10/14/18 

11/7/18 

11/10/18 

8/27/18 

9/14/18 

10/20/18 

7/8/18 

7/31/18 

7/31/18 

8/4/18 

10/12/18 

8/1/18 

9/2/18 

I0/9/I8 

10/10/18 

10/3/18 

8/5/18 

10/13/18 

9/1/18 

9/1/18 

9/5/18 

10/9/18 

10/29/18 

9/2/18 

8/29/18 

8/3/18 

10/13/18 

8/1/18 

10/6/18 

10/5/18 

4/13/18 

10/12/18 

7/31/18 

8/29/18 

11/7/18 

8/3/18 

8/4/18 

10/9/18 

7/31/18 

10/9/18 

8/5/18 



Address — Next op Kin 



Cantillo, Texas. 

Bernardo Aldereta (Brother). 
Bron.son, Mich. 

William Alderman (Father). 
Wills, Va. 

Homer Alderman (Father). 
Excelsior, Wis. 

Mrs. Florence Alderman. 
4th & Clara Sis., New Orleans, La. 

Mary Alexander. 



R. F. D. 1, Lebanon, Va. 

John B. Alexander. 
112 12th St., Ft. Smith, Ark. 

Joe Alfano (Father). 
Shawano, Wis. 

Mrs. John Alft (Mother). 
North -Street. Mich. 

Mrs. Nettie Allen (Mother). 
R.F.D. 4, Washington Court House, O. 

Mrs. J. N. Beatty. 
Hartland, Mich. 

John Allen. 
Fair Oaks, Beloit, Wis. 

Mrs. J. L. Allen (Mother). 
Elmdale, Mich. 

Mrs. Flora Allen (Mother). 
Millington, Mich. 

Charles Allen (Father). 
R. F. D. 2, Box 51, Rnckville, Mo. 

William Allinson (Father). 
R. F. D. 1, White Lake, S. Dakota. 

Elizabeth Altman. 
2028 Pitkin Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Emil Christian Ammarell. 
Monticello, Wis. 

Mrs. Samuel Amstutz (Mother). 
Oconto, Wis. 

Mrs. O. Oldson (Mother). 



R. F. D. 3. Altok, Mich. 

Mr. Julius Wester (Friend), 



708 Appinwald St., Elkart, Ind. 

Mrs. Catherine Elmer (Mother). 
649 Broadway Av., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 

Mr. G. Anderson (Father). 
1003 Keenan St., Rhinelander, Wis. 

Mrs. Oliver Anderson (Mother). 
Fish Creek, Wis. 

A. C. Anderson. 
512 East 44th St., Chicano, 111. 

Charles Anderson (Brother), 
418 8th St., Crnndon, Wis. 

Mrs. Otto Peterson. 



227 S. W. I3th St., Washineton, D. C. 

Martha J. Anderson (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Box 25, Vermillion, S. D. 

Ole Anderson. 



R. 2, Millntte, S. Dakota. 
Mr. Williard Sweeten. 



738 Wesson Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

John Antczak. 
149 Columbia St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

John Antico (Father). 



Lepa, Russian Poland. 

Andrew Arbutz (Father). 
Bird Island, Minn. 

Mrs. Christ Arlt. 



R. F. D. 4, Box 7, Keyville, Va. 
Robert J. Armes (Father). 



221 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Namc 



Rank 



Arms. James W. 
Armstrong, Clyde L. 
Armstrong, David \V. 
Armstrong, Homer A. 
Armstrong, John E. 
Amctt, George 
Arnelt, William 
Arnold, Charles 
Arnold, Glenn H. 
Arnold, William M. 
Ar\-iB, Raymond O. 
Asch, Frank 
Asmundsen, Celborn C 
Astarita, Alphonsus 
Atkinson, Wilmer 
Augustine, Arthur 
Auscins, Thomas 
Austin, Edwin 
Austin, Leslie B. 
Ayatte, Napalicn 
Babin, Bennett J. 
Baca, Frederick 

Back, Joseph E. 
Bacon, John 
Badke, Arthur 
Baggett, Monroe J. 
Baggio, Michael 
Bailey, Vurt 
Bailey, Elder 
Baily, John M. 
Baird, George 
Baird, John J. 
Baker, Joseph J. 

Baker. Lee E. 
Baker, Peter 
Baker, William 
Baldridge, Am!>roje H 
Baldwin, William 
Ball, Elihu F. 
Ballard. William T. 
Ballman, Charles 
Bamm, Harry W. 



OaGANIZATION 



Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt Icl. 

Pvt 

Corp. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Corp. 

Corp. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Sgt 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt 

Corp. 

Pvt 

Pvt Icl. 
Pvt Icl. 
Pvt 
Pvt 

Not on 



Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 125 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Bat E. 120 F. A. 
Co. A. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Hq. Co. 119 F. A. 

Hi]. Co. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 125 Inf. 

Co. F. 128 Inf. 
San. Dct. 121 Mg. Bn. 

Co. C. 121 Mg. Bn. 

Co. M. 126 Inf. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 

Co. E. 128 Inf. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 

Co. M. 125 Inf. 

Co. G. 125 Inf. 

Co. G. 125 Inf. 

Co. K. 125 Inf. 



Caose 



Co. M. 125 
Co. L. 125 
Co. B. 128 
Co. F. 127 
Co. I. 128 
Co. E. 125 
Co. I. 126 
Co. M. 125 
Co. B. 125 
Co. K. 126 
Co. C. 126 



Inf. 
Inf. 
Int. 
Inf. 
Inf. 
Inf. 
Inf. 

Inf. 

Inf. 

Inf. 

Inf. 



Co. L. 128 Inf. 

Co. K. 126 Inf. 

Co. L. 125 Inf. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 

Div. records. 



Sgt 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


Pvt 


107 T. M. B. 


Pvt 


Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn 


Sgt 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 



KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DD 

ACC 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DD 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DD 

KIA 

KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
K I A 
DW 
ACC 
KIA 
KIA 



Date 



11/7/18 
10/4/18 
10/9/18 
8/5/18 
8/5/18 

8/15/18 

11/10/18 

10/3/18 

9/3/18 

8/30/18 

8/5/18 

10/4/18 

10/4/18 

10/10/18 

9/2/18 

10/21/18 

7/31/18 

7/31/18 

7/31/18 

8/29/18 

lO/lD/18 

10/9/18 

10/3/18 

10/10/18 

10/18/18 

10/12/18 

7/31/18 

10/9/18 

7/31/18 

10/10/18 

2/12/18 

10/5/18 

11/7/18 

8/29/18 

7/31/18 

10/7/18 

10/5/18 

10/9/18 

8/1/18 

10/11/18 

in/ll/lS 



AnuBB— Nkzt or Kin 



Licking, Mo. 

Mrs. Mar>' M. Aims. 
Belleville, W'. \a. 

Mrs. Anna Armstrong (Mother). 
Centralia, Kansas. 

Mr. W. E. Armstrong (Father). 
Odell, Neb. 

John M. Armstrong (Brother). 



612 E. 3rd St., Marslificld, Wis. 

John Arnett (Father). 
K. F. D. 1, Palvel Station, Tenn. 

Pole Arnold (Father). 
Perry, Mich. 

Elmer N. Aniold. 
27 K St, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. T. E. .\rnold (Aunt). 
Ill E. Bismark Av., Fergus Falls, Minn. 

Louis J. Arvig (Father). 



Rhinelander, Wis. 

Charles Asmundsen, 
197 22nd St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kalph Astarita (Brother). 
Empire, Mich. 

Helen Atkinson (Wife). 
742 27th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Viola AuKUstiiie (Wife). 
Cha-m, Holland. 

Cornelius Ausenis. 
Shawano, Wis. 

George Austin (Fatlier). 



Donaldson ville. La. 

Louise Babin (Mother). 
1112 National Ave., Elas Vegas, 

New Mexico. 

Mrs. Lucis Garcia Baca. 
Appleton, Minn. 

Mary Mattson (Mother). 
80 W. division St., Fond du Lac, Wis, 

Geraldine Bacon (Aunt). 
Picketts, Wis. 

Rudolph Badke. 
Garford, Texas. 

Mr. S. Baggett (Father). 
217 Ave. B, New York City, N. Y. 

Antonio Baggio. 



Big Rapids, Mich. 
Alex Bailey. 



Montezuma, Ind. 

Mrs. Emma Baiid (Mother). 
Ginseng, Ky. 

Mrs. Lama Baird fMothcr). 
R F. D. 2, Station B, Locus Co., 

Toledo, Oliin. 

Walter J. Baker (Father). 
Copperdale, Ohio. 

Isnbell Dickinson Baker. 
832 Crosby St., Gd. Rapids, Muh. 

Ilenrv Baker. 
Lake \icw St., Menominee, Mich. 

Mrs. Levina Baker (Mother). 
Stonington, 111. „ . , , 

Mrs. Abbie Baldridge (Mother). 



Kalka'ika, Mich. 

Cornelius D. Hall. 
White Lake, Wis. 

Mrs. Dora Ballard (Molhcr). 
! R. F. D. 1. McClive. Ohio. 
Helena Dnmor (Sister). 
Dundee. Mich. 
I F. Bamm (Father). 



222 




^p^^ 




1. KiHST LiKUTENANT Chari.ks M. Toole, Company B, I07lh Fielii Sij^iml liuttalioii. Died October 1st, 1918, of 

wounds received in action during tlie Meuse-Argr)iine Offensive. 

2. Captain Little Harrison, Batttsry E, 119th Field Artillery. Died July 15th, 1918, of wounds received in Alsace. 

3. First Lieutenant Elmer Burdett Nelson, Company A, I20th Machine Gun Battalion. Killed in action July 

soil,', 1918. during the Aisnc-Marne Offensive. 

4. Second Lieutenant Edward Byron Rhodes, Company K, 125th Lifantry. Killed in action October 10th, 1918, 

during the Meusc-Argonne Offensive. 

5. Major Edward W. Thomtson, 119th Field Artillery. Died October I8th, 1918, of wounds received in action 

fluring the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

6. Second Lieutenant Raymond E. Miller. Company B, I20th Machine Gun Battalion, Killed in action July 

31st, 1918, during the Aisne-Marnc Offensive. 

7. Second Lieutenant Mokley S. Gates, Battery F, 119th Field Artillery. Killed in action August 22nd, 1918, 

during the Aisne-Mame Offensive. 

8. Second Lieutenant Henry G. Johnson, Company C, 121st Machine Gun Battalion. Killed in action October 

4th, 1918, during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

9. Second Liedtenant Edward Aubrey Hoefman, 125th Infantry. Died of wounds October 10th, I9I8. 



223 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Name 


Rank 


OUUNIZATtON 


Cause 


Dill 


Adduss— Next op Kin 


Banholzer, Albert A. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Sewanee, Tenn. 
John Banholzer. 


Banks, Charles E. 


Corp. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


207 Emanud St., Mobile, Ala. 
James A. Banks. 


Bannister, Robert 


Pvt. 


Co. L. I2i Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Cspac, Mich. 

Mrs. Minnie Harvey (Mother). 












Bannworth, Clarence J 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


R. F. D. 2, Box 64, Bdleview, Ohio. 
Mrs. Barbara Batmworth (Mother). 


Baranouski, Gustave 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


222 Perent St., Royal Oak, Mich. 
Peter Baranouski (Brother). 


Barclay, Ernest 


Corp. 


Hq. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


108 Haidey St., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 
A. E. Barclay. 


Barg, Joseph 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Co. L. 128 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


9/2/18 
11/7/18 






Barkley, Millard O. 


Carrolton, Ark. 












Geoanna Barkley (Mother). 


Barlow, Wilfred W. 


Corp. 
Corp. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


2/14/18 
10/14/18 








Barnaby, Horace 


1844 iiorton Ave.' S. E.',' Gd. Rapids. 












Horace F. Barnaby. 


Barnard, Minor 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Lohriville, Wis. 

Mrs. J. Murray (SisU?r). 


Barnes, Harvey A. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


224 Brady St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mrs. A. L. Barnes (.Mother). 


Barnett, George W. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Colmer, Ky. 

Mr. Henry Bamett (Father). 


Bamett, James H. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


Allison, Kansa.s. 

Mr. J. M. Bamett. 


Barr, Oscar 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Hanson, Ky. 

Mistnrn Jone Barr. 


Barrett, Henry 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


104 Sweet St., Gr. Rapids, Mich. 
Mrs. Georee B. Hall. 


Bartels, Herman J. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


R. F. D. 11, Holland, Mich. 
John Bartels. 


Bartelt, Ernest 


Pvt. 


Co. II. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Tripoli, Iowa. 

August Bartelt (Father). 


Bartlett, Ellsworth H. 


Bugler 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


264 N. Johnson St., Pontiac, Mich. 
Mrs. Marguert Bartlett (Wife). 


Bartlettc, Orville 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


AppeLson, Ark. 

A, G. Bartlett (Father). 


Bartolino, Maris 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Grocevien Prov., Trapani, Italy. 
Mr. Vito Bartolino (Father). 


Bartusink, Andiew E. 


Corp. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/IO/lS 


Elyria, Neb. 

Peter Bartusink (Father). 


Basel, Otto A. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


1257 19tli St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
William Basel (Father). 


Basford, Roy M. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Ree. No. Dakota. 

Williiim O. Ba.'iford (Father). 


Baslioro, Henry F. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


818 4th St., Marine City, Mich. 
Morris Bashore. 


Basom, Ransford B. 


,Pvt. Icl. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Sparta. Mich. 

Eilward A. Basom. 


Bass, John F. 


Sgt. 


Co. C. 126 I[if. 


KIA 


I0/9/I8 


2142 Portage St., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Mrs. Lucy Bass. 


Basta, Gtiiseppe 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


11/11/18 


Aullizzio, Italy. 

Mrs. Clarina Bosta (Mother). 


Bastian, Anton 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


W^avne, Neb. 

C. C. Bastian (Father). 


Bates, Clarence F. 


Pvt. 


Bat. C. 120 F. A. 


DD 




R. F. D. 1, Eau Claire, Wis. 
Mrs. I. A. Bates (Mother). 


Batista, Sbodio 


Pvt. 


Bat. F. 147 F. A. 


DD 


9/30/18 


Angera per Jaho Mangiore, Caprona. 
Miss Rose Shodio. Italy. 


Battiste, Isidor 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


501 Broadway, San Francisco, Calif. 
Joe Battiste (Brother). 


Bausam, Gran R. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


North Jackson St., Magnolia, Ark. 
Bcsse Bausam (Wife). 


Bauer, George 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Racine, Wis. 

John Bauer (Father). 


Baughey, Ward B. 


Corp. 


Co. B. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


149 S. Winter St., Adrian, Mich. 
William H. Baughey. 


Bauley, Lafayette P. 


Pvt. Id. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Newport, Mich. 
Louis Bauley. 


Bayhem, Ovedo O. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/8/18 


Moiitpclier, Iowa. 
A\'mantlia Bavliem. 


Bayons, Peter 


Sgt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


522 Sponsor Court. Sheboygan, Wis. 
Mrs. C. Bayons (Mother). 


Bazznrre, Roy 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


Lawmoor, Va. 

Thomas M. Bazzarre. 


Beam, William C. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Limestone, Ark. 

Mrs. Laura Ogden. 


Beard Tommy L. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Talley Station, Tenn. 
Mrs. Ida Beard. 


Beardsley, Floyd C. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/31/18 


1905 E. Main St., Jackson, Mich. 

W. J. Beardsley (Father). 
Bristow, Va. 


Beavers, Maurice 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/22/18 












Magie Beavers (Mother). 



224 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Bebout, Charles A. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


ACC 


7/30/18 


Beck, William E. 


Pvt. kl. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Becker, Clarence 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Becker, Gustave G. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


Bedford, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


DW 


about 
8/1/18 


Beebe. Harold V, 


Sgt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Eeechley, Artyur 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Beer, William F. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Besaw, Leonard 


Corp. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Beldon, Harry 0. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


Bell, Harry T. 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


about 
10/11/18 


Bell, Newton 


Corp. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Bell, Pascal P. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Bellis, Clell 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Beloungea, William A. 


Sgt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/8/18 


Benedict, Frank, Jr. 


Corp. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Bennett, Clyde J. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


about 
9/6/18 


Bennett, Earl C. 


Corp. 


Bat. D. 147 F. A. 


KIA 


8/13/18 


Bennett, Jasper 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


Bennetts, Harry 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/7/18 


Benoit, Steven 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Benson, Edward W. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/6/18 


Beranek, Joseph B. 


Pvt. 


Md. Dept. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/6/18 


Bereal, Anthony C. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/3I/I8 


Berg, Alex. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


DD 


3/13/18 


Bergann, Frich A. 


Sgt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Berge, Williard 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


0/6/18 


Bergmann, Fred W. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 120 Mg. Bn 


DW 


10/6/18 


Bergquist, Rudolph W 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Berkompas, Olius 


Bugler 


Co. 1. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


I0/I4/1S 


Berry, Floyd E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Bertram, William 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/27/18 


Hertz, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Beat, Everett 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


Bcuthin, Clarence 


Pvt. 


Med. Det. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


S/6/I8 


Bevier, James J. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Bezio, Joseph 1 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 1 


KIA 


10/14/18 ' 


Biavaschi, Martin 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


I0/4/I8 


Bicker, George C. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Bierschbach, William 

Tony 
Bigelow, Gordon 


Corp. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


I0/0/I8 


Pvt. Icl. 


F. H. Co. 126 Inf. 

107 San. Tr. 


KIA 


10/19/18 



Address— Next of Kin 



West Finley, Pa. 

John L. Finley (Uncle). 
Lansing, Iowa, 

Joseph B. Beck (Father). 
R. F. D. 2, Williamstown, Mo. 

George Becker. 
242 William St. S. W.. Gd. Rapids. 

Mrs. Fred Becker. Mich. 

423 N 8th St., Manitowoc, Wis. 

Bedford Arthur (Father). 
314 Railroad St., Woodstock III. 

Mrs. E. Reynolds (Mother). 



90 3rd St., N., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Dodson-Fisher-Brockman Co., 
N. D. Beer (Uncle). 
Shawano, Wis. 

Alex Besaw (Father). 
Rush City, Minn. 

Mrs. Mattie Belden (Mother). 

Copperville, Va. 

Thomas B. Bell. 
Muses Mills, Ky. 

Mrs. Rebecca Bell. 
R. F. D. 1, Bedford, Ky. 

Mrs. P. P. Bell. 
Baker, Mont. 

Fred Bellis (Father). 
Could City, Mich. 

Mrs. Frank Sly (Sister). 
St. Clair, Mich. 

Mrs, Frank Benedict (Mother). 

R. F. D. 3, Reedsburg, Wis. 

D. J. Bennett (Father). 
Lester, Iowa. 

W. L. Bennett (Father). 
R. F. D. 4, Waynesburg, Ky. 

J. D. Bennett (Father). 
8 Duke St., St. Anstell. Cornwall, Eng, 

W. Bennetts. 
2207 Thomas St., Marinette, Wis. 

Felix Menor (Friend). 
6215 Aplin St., Chicago, 111. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Benson. 
1303 Caladonia St., La Crosse, Wis. 

Mrs. Barbra Beranek. 



746 Center St., Lansing, Mich. 

Wm. Bergann (Father). 
Cambridge, Wis. 

Mrs. Wm. Berge (Mother). 
310 N. 8th St.. Watertown, Wis. 

Mrs. Fred Bergmann. 
1010 7th St., Rockford, 111. 

Mrs. Hilma Bergquist (Mother). 
Rudyard, Mich. 

F. A. Berkompas (Father). 
106 Dryo Alley, Jackson, Mich. 

Mrs. Muntley Greg (Mother). 



136 E 115th St., Chicago, 111. 

Lena Bertz (Mother). 
Hennessey. Okla. 

Mrs. Hannah Best (Mother). 
419 S. 13th St.. Saginaw Mich. 

Mrs. Lena Beuthin (Mother). 
4430 Blaisdale Av., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mrs. Hanna Bevier, 
1007 Main St., Marinette, Wis. 

Edward Bezio (Father). 
Sodria, North Italy. 

Barney Biavaschi (Brother). 
Washington, Mo. 

Mrs. Mary Bicker (Mother). 
R. F. P. 1, Mt. PIea.sant, Mich. 

Sam Bierschbach (Uncle). 
R. F. D. 2. Box 131, Anaheim, Calif. 

Mrs. Orilla Bigelow. 



325 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD ]YAR 



Namb 


Rank 


Okganization 


Cahsb 


Dais 


ADDiess— Next or Kin 


Bileta, Peter 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/8/18 


Krevlin Volyhsk, Russia. 


Bills, Claude W. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Mrs. Feodonm Bdets (Wife). 
Mills. Neb. 

Mrs. Emilia Irulson (Motlier). 


Bishell, Alfred 


Corp. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


ACC 


6/14/18 


Darlington, Wis. 


Bissonnette, Charles J. 


Corp. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


11/9/18 


Polcte Bisiiell (Father). 
Rhinelander, Wis. 


Bissonnctle, Harold F 


Corp. 


Bat. C. 120 F. A. 


DD 




George Bisaojuiette (Brother). 
Charles City. Iowa. 
Wm. Bissonnette. 


BJerken, Helmer L. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Germantown, Minn, 


Bjorbeck, Lars 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/S/I8 


Lars B. Bjerken (Father). 
Clear Brook, Minn. 
Mrs. Ole Bjorbeck. 


Bjordal, John II. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/8/18 


Hendrun, Miim. 

Mrs. J. N. Bjordal. 


Black, Charles M. 


Corp. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/31/18 


R. F. D. I, Everett, Wash. 
Mrs. Ida Black (Mother). 


Black, Morris 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


518 S. Rolnnsim .St., Baltimore, Md 
Mrs. Fannie IVltz (.Sister). 


Black, Thomas J. 


Pvt. 


Bat. I. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


9/29/18 


195 Midland Av., Ilishland Park, Micli. 
Mrs. S. J. Houghton (.Sister). 


Blackmar, Maurice R. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/1/18 


Santa Fc, Calif. 

Mrs. Mary 1. Wlieeler (.Mother). 


L-fackwood, Berlin E. 


Sgt. 


Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


10/8/18 


Toniah, Wis. 

Mrs. B. E. Blaikwoo<l (Wife). 


Bladyka, James 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/30/18 


864 Cheiie .St., Detroit, Mich. 
Casmer Bladyka. 


Blair, Charley 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 
about 


2011 E. 4lh St., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Winnie Blair (Sister). 


Blake, John P. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 
about 


Bo.scobcl, Wis. 

Mrs. Delia Blake. 


Blakeslee, Frank J. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Conifer, Colo. 

■Mrs. H. S. Blakeslee. 


Blanford, Robert 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/11/18 


West Louisville, Ky. 

Mrs. Victorine Blanford (Mother). 


niankortz, Walter T. 


Sgt. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Dearborn, Midi. 

Mrs. C'arrie Blunkertz. 












Blaschka, Frank A. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/15/18 


8 Lake St., Rhinelander, Wis. 
Mrs. Rose Bla-schka (Mother). 


Blase, Edward H. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


R. K. D. 4. Mexico. .\lo. 
Mrs. August H. Blase. 


Blcvins, Willie 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/11/18 


Incline, Ky. 

George W. Blevins (Father). 


Blixt, Gustave F. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


1921 Warren Ave. 

Mrs. Anna Nyberg (Mother). 


Block, Frank A. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. F. 127 Irif 


KIA 


8/1/18 


1381 30tli St.. Milwaukee, Wis. 
Otto Block (Father). 


Blockside, John E. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


37 Atlantic Ave., ,Swanipscot, Mass. 
Harry Blockside (Father). 


Bloedom, Arno 


Corp. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Brillion, Wis. 

Fred Ulciedorn (Father). 


Blumenthal, Alabel 


Pvt. 


Med. Det. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


6130 Evans Ave., Chicago, III. 
Mrs. Lena L. Blumenthal. 


Bodell, Lloyd 


Corp. 
Pvt. Id. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. B. 107 M. P. 


DW 

KIA 


8/8/18 
8/31/18 








Bodin, August 


Washburn, Wis. 












Mr.s. Elizabeth Bodin (Mother). 


Bodstuebner, Frank A 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


59 West St., Rockville, Conn. 
Oscar Bodstuebner (Father). 


Boemer, Edward 


Mech. 


Hq. Co. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


Antigo, Wis. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Bcjerner. 


Book, Homer H. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


R. F. D. 1, Holly .Springs, Ga. 
William A. Keeter. 


Bohnnon, Jesse 


Pvt. 


Co. 1. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/21/18 


Central City, Kv. 

Mrs. Perl B. Bohanon (Wife). 


Bolcom, Frederick 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
10/4/18 








Bolin, EuRene H. 


Connelton. Ind. 












Willis J. Bolin (Father). 


Bohacz, Joe W. 


Corp. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Walker St., Broii.-ion, Mich. 
.Stanley Bonacz. 


Bonue, Frank W. 


Pvt. Id 


Co. n. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Miivville, W^is. 

Ferdinand Bonaii (Father). 


Bond, James 


Pvt. 
Corp. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
10/16/18 








Boneburg, George 


Hiidsonville, Mich. 












J. Boneburg. 


Bonnevie, Christian 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 121 Mg. Bn 


KIA 


10/10/18 


193 Mcnnlian St.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Mrs Gertrude Bonnevie (Mother). 


Boone, Charles E. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


428 .S. Washington Av., Et.owah, Tenn. 
Mrs. Jnnics T. Boone (Mother). 


Boraback, Charles H. 


Pvt. Id. 


Bat. A. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


8/12/18 


Bancroft, Mich. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Boraback (Mother). 


Boroschi, Gelindo 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Palnnzane ParTia. Italy. 
Alexandro Bara.sclie. 



22G 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 



Borle, Omer 
Borondo, Philiip R- 
Borst, James R. 
Bosnett, Alfred 
Boswell, Giles D. 
Bouder, Samuel 
Boursaw, Isaac V. 
Bovin, Peter 
Bovyn, Camiel 
Boyer, Carl M. 
Bowman, Alex J. 
Boyd, Harley 
Boyer, Frank 
Bojett. Earl W. 
Boykin, Robert B. 
Brabazon, Vernon 
Brackin, Gib. 
Bradburry, Henry E. 
Bradbury, Lester E. 
Braden, John G. 
Bradley, Clarence 
Bradley, Frank S. 
Bradley, Gaylord A. 
Bradley, John H. 
Bradley, Thomas J. 
Bradshaw, Benjamin 
Brady. Emory 
Brady, Loren J. 
Bragvatne, Ole A. J. 
Branchini, Alfred 
Branch, Clifford J. 
Brandt, Herman A. 
Branigan, Frank E. 
Bray, Earl L. 
Brazean, Joseph 
Brebout, Charles A. 
Brehl, John A. 
Breit, Joseph M. 
Brcmaiyer, William 
BrcninK.sthull, George 
Brittenham, Floyd E. 
Brisendine, Ottie D. 
Brewer, George 



Organization 



Sgt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 


Id. 


Corp. 




Pvt. 


Icl. 


Pvt. 




Corp. 




Corp. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Mus. 


3cl. 


Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Corp 




Pvt. 




Mus. 


3cl. 


Cook 




Pvt. 




Cook 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 


Id. 


Pvt. 


Id. 


Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 


Id. 


Pvt. 


Id. 


Pvt. 




Pvt. 


Id. 


Pvt. 




Pvt. 




Pvt. 





Co. D. 126 Inf. 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Co. I. 126 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 126 Inf. 
Co. K. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 126 In'f. 
Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 126 Inf. 
Co. I. 127 Inf. 
Co. A. 147 F. A. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Hil. Co. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. I. 126 Inf. 
Co. B. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 126 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Co. L. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf 
Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Hdq. Co. 128 Inf. 
Bat. E. 147 F. A. 
Co. B. 120 Mg. Bn 
Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 125 Inf. 
Med. Dct. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 
Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Co. I. 128 Inf. 
Co. L. 126 Inf. 
Co. L. 126 Inf. 
Co. C. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 
308 Btry., Tr. Art. 
Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 126 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. G. 128 Inf. 



Cadse 



KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 



Date 



10/5/18 

10/12/18 

10/9/18 

7/31/18 

8/28/18 

10/9/18 

6/23/18 

7/31/18 

10/9/18 

10/21/18 

10/15/18 

10/17/18 

10/14/18 

11/10/18 

10/6/18 

8/1/18 

10/10/18 

8/30/18 

8/4/18 

10/9/18 

8/7/18 

8/29/18 

11/11/18 

8/14/18 

6/16/18 

10/5/18 

7/31/18 

8/6/18 

10/5/18 

7/31/18 

9/4/18 

10/6/18 

10/9/18 

10/7/18 

10/12/18 

7/30/18 

10/23/18 

7/31/18 

10/10/18 

11/8/18 

10/15/18 

10/6/18 

10/18/18 



Address— Next of Kin 

R. F. D. 4, Mount Pleasant, Mich. 

Throphile Borle (Father). 
King, Calif., 

Lucy Borondo (Mother). 
147 Mechanic St., Big Rapids, Mich. 

J. H. Borst. 

Chatham, Va. 

Mrs. Dave Boswell (Mother). 
R. F. D. 2, Powell, Ohio. 
Dave B. Bouder (Father). 

511 Bellvue St., Menominee, Mich. 

Mrs. A. Bovin (Mother). 
Box 15, Marshall, Miim. 

Mrs. Phil Bur.se. 
Box 12, Franklin. III. 

Mrs. Hettie E. Boyer. 
R. F. D. 1, Haywood, Calif. 

Kate Bowman (Mother). 
R. F. D. 2, McMinnville, Tenn. 

Miss Eliza Boyd (Sister). 
Fifield, Wis. 

James Boyer (Father). 
Sallis, Miss. 

Joe Boyett. 
Mist, Ark. 

G. A. Boykin. 
159 Harrison St., O.shkosh, Wis. 

Mrs. Brabazon (Mother). 
Bevear, Ky. 

Mrs. Sallie L. Brackm. 



Rirkrcall, Orecon. 

James Braden (Father). 



Red Bluff, Calif. 

James H. Bradley. 
Mansion, Wis. 

E. W. Bradley. 
Barnes, N. V. 

James Bradley. Jr. (Brother). 
308 Commonwealth Av.. Bo.ston, Mass. 

Miss Mary E. Bradley (Sister). 
Erekine, Minn. 

Mrs. B. J. Bradshaw. 
Unionville, Mich. 

William H. Brady. 
R. F. D. 5, Marlin, Ont., Canada. 

Mrs. James Brady (Mother). 
R. F. D. 2, Box 46, Urbcrg, S. Dak. 

Markus B. Johnson. 
Box 654, Iron River, Mich. 

Willma Branchini (Si-ster). 
R. F. D. 2. Tekonisha, Mich. 

Mrs. William Slighley. 
Box 138, White Cloud, Mich. 

Edward Brandt. 
16 Spencer Court, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mrs. Adam Branigan. 
Velma, Nebra.ska. 

Mr. S. E. Bray (Father). 
206 Julian St., Provirlence, R. I. 

Charles Brazean (Father). 
West Finlev. Pa. 

John L. Finlev (Unde). 
439 S. 5t,h St., Columbus. Ohio. 

Mrs. Theresa Brehl (Mother). 



Fort Recovery, Ohio. 

Michael Bremaiyer. 
Milan. Mich. 

Will Greene (TInde). 
Brady Island, Neb. 

I,. S. Brittenham (Father). 
R. F. D. 1, Hunt, W. Va. 

Mary C. Brisendine. 
Wilhurst, Ky. 

Taylor Brewer (Father). 



327 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN TUE WORLD WAR 



Name 


Rank 


Obganization 


Cause 


Date 


Address— Next or Kin 


Brewer, James W. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
11/10/18 








Brewer, Jasper C. 


R. F. D. 3, Bums^■ille, Miss. 












.Vlitis Pearl Brewer. 


Briggs, Oscar T. 


Corp. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/26/18 


R. F. D. 2, Allegan, Mich. 
Mrs. Josephine Briggs. 


Brigham, Albert E. 


Pvt. 


Hdq. Co. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


222 N. Ba.«!ictt St., Madison, Wis. 
Mrii. A. E. Brigham. 


Bright, Lewis A. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Red Cloud, Neb. 

A. H. Bright (FatherX 


Brill, Clifford W. 


Pvt, 


Co. V. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


3439 Jav St.. Avondale. Cincinnati, 0. 
Mr. Daniel Brill (Father). 


Brodie, John M. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/22/18 


Gavlord, Mich. 

John M. Brodie (Father). 


Bronsted, Henry E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Tomahawk, Wis. 
J. N. Bronsted. 


Brontsena, Peter 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


DS 


9/16/18 


75 Orchard St., Muskegon, Mich. 
Jeiuiie Brontsena. 


Brooks, Beverly F. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/26/18 


Logan, Va. 

Mr. Tom Brooks (Father). 


Brooks, diaries 


Corp. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/30/18 


Cheboygan, Mich. 
James Brooks. 


Brooks, Gale S. 


Corp. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/31/18 


167 Nelson St.. Battle Creek, Mich. 
Mrs. Ella Marie Brooks. 


Brooks, Lloyd W. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


Philip, S. Dak. 

Uolicrt E. Brooks (Father). 


Broughcr, Edgar C. 


Pvt. 


Bat. D. 147 F. A. 


DW 


10/29/18 


P. 0. Box 11 CokcviUe, Pa. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Brougher. 












Brewer, LaFay 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 InL 


KIA 


10/8/18 


Ash ton, Idaho. 

Mrs. Sarah Brower (Mother). 


Brown, Albert 


Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Hdq. Co. 127 Inf. 
Bat. D. 322 F. A. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 
DD 
KIA 


8/30/18 
11/4/18 
4/13/18 
10/18/18 








Brown, Charles E. 








Brown, Clarence E. 








Brown, David A. 


R. ' F.' D.' V," Union,' Miss! 












R. A. Brown (Father). 


Brown, James A. E. 


Pvt. 


Bat. A. 120 F. A. 


ACC 




132 Smith St., No. Attleboro. Mass. 
Mrs. Samuel Brown (Mother). 


Brown, Lloyd E. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. Id. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 107 F. S. Bn. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/13/18 
10/10/18 


R. F. D. 6, Fairmont, West Va. 


Brown, Orley C. 


825' Newhaii St'.,' Milwaukee.' 'wis.' 












Mrs. Mary L. Brown (Mother). 


Brown, Orville 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


R. F. D. 7. Decatur. III. 
Thomas Brown (Father). 


Brown, Solomon H. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


R. F. D. 2, Orlando, W. Va. 
Homer Brown (Father). 


Brown, Walter B. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


BraiiiaT-d, Minn. 

Mr. Andrew Brown (Father). 


Brown, Wilbert C. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Ripling, Mich. 

Mrs. Anna Houghlin (Mother). 


Browne, Joseph 


Corp. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


DW 


9/1/18 


1705 S. 10th St., Slieboyiian, Wis. 
Chas. Browne (Father). 


Browning, Frank R. 


Corp. 
Pvt. Id. 


147 F. A. 

Co. A. 128 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


10/18/18 
10/20/18 




Browning, Lewis A. 


.Siloam Springs, Ark. 












Jacob Browning. 


Brayles, William C. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


11/18/18 

10/21/18 







Bruno, Peter 


Udena, Italy. 












Mr. .\ntonio Bruno. 


Bruce, Daniel H. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 12S Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Lake Providence, La. 
James Wilburn. 


Bruce Lloyd G. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Big Sandy, Mont. 

Mrs. F. C. Bruce (Wife). 


Bruhn Arent A. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


Enumclaw, Washington. 
Otto Bruhn (Father). 


Brunner, Mike 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/8/18 


Manitowoc, Wis. 

Frank Bnumer (Father). 


Brj-an, Guy M. 


Corp. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


908 Princeton Ave., Spokane, Wash. 
Mrs. Josephine Br>'an. 


Bryan, Leroy 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


Royaltan. Pa. 

Anna Bryan (Mother). 


Br>ant, Oyff A. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/S/I8 


142 Cnpe St., Oshkosh, Wis. 
Mrs. Mabel Bryant (Wife). 


Brioswski, Jacob 


Medi. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


931 Kirby St., Detroit. Mich. 
Frank Br?;07.wski (Father). 


Brrojwski, Waller 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


122 Darford St., Hamtramck, Mich. 










Jove Breoiwski (Brother). 


Buck, John H. 


Mcch. 


Sup. Co. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


9/I/I8 


Holt, Mich. 

John Buck (Father). 


Budfl, Bert 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


R. F. D. 1, Gustavtis, Ohio. 
Mrs. Senna Budd (Mother). 



228 




Second Lieutenant Douglas Arthur Taylor, Company B, I27th Infantry. Killed in action August 30tli, 1918, 
during the Oise-Aisne Offensive. 

First Lieutenant Raphael P. Edert, Headquarters Troop, 32nd Division. Died at Coblenz, Germany, Febru- 
ary 19th, 1919. 

Second Lieutenant Edwin B. Thorson, Machine Gun Company, 127th Infantry. Died of wounds August 
2nd, 1918. 

First Lieutenant John P. Slade, Battery D, 12Ist Field Artillery. Died in France, September I7th, 1918. 

Captain William J. Rowles, Company M, 128th Infantry. Killed in action August 30th, 1918, during Oise- 
Aisne Offensive. 

First Lieutenant Hilbert C. Wallber, Battery C, 120th Field Artillery. Killed in action August 19th, 1918, 
during Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

Second Lieutenant Charles C. Buck, 119th Machine Gun Battalion. Killed in action October ISth, 1918, 
during the Meuse-Argonne Offcn.sivc. 

First Lieutenant Frederick Fago Malloy, Headquarters Troop, 32nd Division. Died in Franc© October 
18th. I9!S. duriiic Mi^nse-AiKniuie Offensive. 

First Lieutenant William H. Abele, Supply Company, 324th Field Artillery. Killed in action October 27th, 
1918, during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 



229 



THE Til IRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WAll 



NiMI 



Bucttner, Victor 
Buiiigamer, William A 
Burlwy, Paul 
Burch, Jesse C. 
Bureh, John D. 
Burch, Verland 
Burdick, Earl 
Burk, James 
Burke, Abio L. 
Burke, John 
Burke, John 
Burkett, Alexander 
Burkett, Dallis 
Buikland, Fred A. 
Burns, Frank C. 
Burns, Robert E. 
Burton, Everett 
Burwill, William C. 
Bush, Maurice J. 
Buskirk, Coal 
Butler, Frank T. 
Butler, John 
Butler, Lester F. 
Butlerfield George R. 
Bychinski, Nick J. 
Byers, John S. 
Cabui, Louis 
Cairns, William B. 
Caldic, Thomas D. 
Call. Ernest J. 
Caloni, Victor 
Cameron, Fred L. 
Camors, Arnold W. 
Campbell, Cecil E. 
Campbell, Ernest 
Campbell, Fred E. 
Campbell, John H. 
Campbell, Robert H. 
Campbell, William 
Canavan, Roy 
Cantanszei, Pomelo 
Canuteson, Otto 
Cappelleti, Amedco 



Rank 



Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Mech. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Corp. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Corp. 

Corp. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 



Organization 






Co. 1. 125 Inf. 

Co. M. 128 Inf. 

Co. M. 127 Inf. 

Co. K. 125 Inf. 

.Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 

Co. H. 126 Inf. 

Co. D. 126 Inf. 

Co. C. 126 Inf. 

Co. M. 128 Inf. 

Co. L. 128 Inf. 

Co. K. 128 Inf. 

Co. B. 127 Inf. 

Co. K. 125 Inf. 

Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 

Co. E. 128 Inf. 

Co. H. 127 Inf. 

Co. K. 127 Inf. 

Co. I. 128 Inf. 

Co. B. 126 Ijif. 

Co. K. 128 Inf. 

Co. C. 120 Mg. Bu 

Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn 

Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Hdci. Co. 126 Inf. 

Co. G. 128 Inf. 

Co. 0. 126 Inf. 

Co. D. 128 Inf. 

Co. G. 127 Inf. 

Co. A. 121 Mg. Bn. 

Co. H. 127 Inf. 

Co. G. 126 Inf. 
Bat. A. 120 F. A. 

Co. K. 125 Inf. 
Bat. A. 119 F. A. 

Co. D. 126 Inf. 

Co. H. 125 Inf. 

Co. I. 128 Inf. 

Co. I. 126 Inf. 

Co. E. 125 Inf. 

Co. C. 126 Inf. 

Co. 1. 126 Inf. 

Co. M. 126 Inf. 

Co. C. 126 Inf. 



Cause 



KIA 

KIA 

DW 

Kl.V 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

MA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

DW 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA . 

KIA 

ACC 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

DW 

DW 



Datb 



I 



10/9/18 

8/30/18 

8/4/18 

7/31/18 

8/31/18 

10/9/18 

7/31/18 

8/1/18 

10/13/18 

11/6/18 

11/9/18 

10/11/18 

10/10/18 

8/29/18 

8/30/18 

10/9/18 

10/24/18 

11/9/18 

10/5/18 

11/10/18 

8/1/18 

8/28/18 

8/-1/I8 

10/2/18 

8/4/18 

IU/22/18 

8/4/18 

7/30/18 

10/7/18 

9/3/18 

10/28/18 

8/14/18 

10/10/18 

7/4/18 

S/2/18 

10/7/18 

10/16/18 

10/5/18 

7/31/18 

8/1 /I8 

8/30/18 

10/19/18 

8/30/18 



Add««8»— NexT OK Kin 



Waterloo, Monroe Co., III. 

Mr. Joseph Buettner. 
611 N. Santa Fe Ave., Tulsa, Okl.a. 

U. Bumgarncr. 
Lena, Wis. 

Mrs. Paul Burbey (Motl.er). 
U F. D. 2. ColcniHii, Mich. 

Mrs. Julia Burch (Mother). 



Perry, Ark. 

H. W. Burch. 
159 W. River St., Ot.-*go, Mich. 

Mrs, \'elma Burdick. 
Crescent, Ohio. 

Mrs. Addie Burk (Mother). 
Montana, W. \*a, 

Isabf'llc Burke. 
Route 7. Box 59, Sparta, Wis. 

Daniel Burke (Father). 
648 June .St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mrs. Mary Burke. 
Glcini Lyon, Pa. 

Frank Burkett (Father). 
R. F, D. 4, Inka, 111. 

Mrs. Marsh Burkett (Mother). 
R, F, D. 3, Cumberland, Wis. 

Gust Burkland. 
Candon, Ore. 

James D. Burns. 
Main St., Cold Spring, N. Y. 

Mrs. M. V. Rogee. 
R, F. D. I, Waggoner, III. 

Walter W. Burton (Father). 
Shenandoah, Va, 

Chri.stina Burwill. 
Ill Maple Ave,, .\drian, Mich. 

Jo.scph Bush. 
R. 4. Stant,on, Mich. 

Mr. William Buskirk. 
237 Bishop St., Walcrl)ur>', Conn, 

Mrs. J. C, Butler. 
1414 8th .St., Superior, Wis. 

Mrs. John J. Butler. 
Shapiers, Wis. 

Mrs. Mary Btittcr. 
17 W. 9th St., Holland, Mich, 

Mrs. Stella Clark. 
Wausaw, Wis. 

Tofili Bychinski (Mother). 
Bumpass, Louisa Co., Va. 

Mrs. A. C. Richardson (Sister). 



2010 Madison St., Madison, Wis. 

William B. Cairns (Father). 
Stiles, Wis. 

Mrs. Thomas D. Caldic (Mother), 
728 Lake .\ve,, Manclie.-^tcr, N. H. 

Silas W. Call (Father). 
1251 Peim Ave., Pitt, Pa. 

John Caloni. 
Bessemer, Ala. 

C. B, Cameron. 
1527 Melpomene St. New Orleans. La, 

Mrs. .lo.'fcpliino Camors. 
2097 Hamilton Blvd.. L.insing. Mich. 

Mrs, O, G. Campbell (Mother). 
Monroe, Va, 

Mrs. R:ichael A. Campbell. 
222 S. 2nd St., Onawny. Mich. 

Mrs. Mary Canti>l>cll, 
510 Hamlin St.. Jackson, Mich. 

Henrv H. Campbell. 
R. P. D 1. Wichita. Kans. 

Mrs. Sue Campbell. 



Vicksburg, Mich. 

Mrs. Anna Canavan. 



.Sterling, Mich. 

C Caimteson. 
Norma Roam, Italy. 

Mrs. Orsolo Camandra (Mother), 



230 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Caradine, John G. 


Corp. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/12/18 


Carboncau, Arthur L. 


Pvt. Id. 


Hdq. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Card, Glenn H. 


Pvt. kl. 


Bat. C. 120 F. A. 


DW 


10/29/18 


Carignan, Charles F. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Carlisle, Norman 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Carlson, Carl 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


Camehan, George T. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Carps, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Carr, Bamell 


Pvt, 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Carretto, Joe 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 362 Inf. 


DW 


10/2/18 


Carrico, Edd. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 12S Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Carroll, Frank L. 


Sgt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/8/18 


Carter, Allen B. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Carter, George. 


Pvt. 


Hq. Co. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Carvounis, James J. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Case, Fred T. 
Casford, Earl 


Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 

Co. D. 120 Mg. Bii 


KIA 
KIA 


10/4/18 

about 

8/30/18 


Casper, Orvel N. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Med. Dept. 120 F. A 
Co. F. 128 Inf. 


DR 
KIA 




Cassens, Herman 


about 
8/4/18 


Cason, William L. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Catilini, Bambino 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Catlin, Samuel L. 


Corp. 


Co. B. 121 .Mg. Bi, 


KIA 


10/3/18 


Catlow, Clarenee E. 


Pvt. 


Hci. Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Caton, Guy L. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


DW 


n/12/18 


Caulkins, Clifford M 


Pvt. 


Hq. Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 

about 

10/17/18 


Cayo, Edward J. 


Sgt. 


Co. G. I2S Inf. 


KIA 


Calmer, Alexandria. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Cescato, Vittorio 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/13/18 


Chamberlain, Hariy A 


Pvt. 


Hq. Co. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/7/18 


Champagne, Wilfred J 


Pvt. 


Co. 11. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Champion, Horace n. 


Sgt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Chaney, Walter T. 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Chapman, George W, 


Corp. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Chaplain, T.oui.s H. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


Chapman, Leslie K. 


Mech. 


Co. n. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Chapman, Wilbur R. 


Sgt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Chatfield, Wallaee 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


I0/6/I8 


Che'rry, Joseph T. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


lO/U/lS 


Cliipchase, Rny 


Corp. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


9/30/18 


Choate, Ilnzael .S. 


Sat. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Cherney, Jac-k 


Pvt. 


Co. .\, 125 Inf. 


DW 


8/29/18 


Christanson, Toward 


Corp. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


DW 


9/3/18 


Christcnson, Chri.st W 


Pvt. 


Co. a. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 



Addbess— Next of Kin 



Monroe, Wis. 

H. N. B. Caradine (Father). 
East Lake, Mich. 

James Carboneau (Father). 
639 Woodlawn, Owosso, Mich. 

Mrs. Mayme Card. 
Avondale, Mont. 

Joseph Carignan. 
Elkton, Ohio. 

William Carlisle (Father). 
Barrett, Minn. 

Emil Carlson. 
Snells P. O., Spottsylvania, Va. 

Mrs. Eva Brown. 
Cariugie, Pa. 

Lawrence Carps (Brother). 
Albany, Ky. 

T. R. Carr. 



Davis City, Iowa. 

Mrs. Emily Carrico (Mother). 
Lynch, Neb. 

R. F. Carroll (Father). 
615 Kate Ave., Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Mrs. M. J. Carter. 
St. Joseph, Mich. 

John Lysaght (Friend). 
Souvilleas, Pliiotidos, Greece. 

John D. Carvounis (Father). 
Tomahawk, Wis. 

P. A. Case. 
237 Division St., Oshkosh, Wis. 

Miss Millie Casford. 
605 28th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Joseph H. Casper (Father). 



Atlanta, .\rk. 

Albeit C. Cason (Father). 
Crockett, Calif. 

Anselo Catilini (Brother). 
Kiiigsburg, Calif. 

James H. Catiin (Brother). 
Barrington, III. 

Mrs. John E. Catlow (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Gcshen, Ind. 

Mrs. Mary Caton (Mother). 
New Auburn, Wis. 

Calvin Caulkins (Grandfather). 
416 Steward A\e., Wausau, Wis. 

Elsie Helen Cayo. 
4104 E 7th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Stanley Calmer. 
Lalauche, Alaska. 

Angelo Cescato (Brother). 
Mauston, Wis. 

Roy Chamberlain. 
53 Waterfille St., Waterbury, Conn. 

Alfred J. Champagne (Falher). 
7 Vauxhall St., St. Heliers, Jersey, 

Mrs. Lillian Dale (Sister). Eng. 
R. F. D. 4, Horse Cave, Ky. 

Mrs. W. E. Chaney. 
Edgar, Wis. 

Louis Chapman (Father). 
2107 Art. St., New Orleans, La. 

Mr.s. Frank Chaplain (Mother). 
18 Orchard St., Auburn, N. Y. 

Mrs. A. H. Chat)man. 
Me.sa, Arizona. 

Mrs. A. R. Chapman. 



Saratoga, Texas. 

Mrs, Olmar Crow (.lister). 
455 17th St., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Clara Chipcha.se. 
Cement Citv. Mexico. 

Mrs. W.' H. Choate (Mother). 
PodolskiiV. Huberni. Russia. 

Mike Cherney (Brother). 
Soo Junction, Mich. 

Ed. Christanson (Father). 
R. F. D. 1. Box 82 Vj, Gillett, Wis. 

Martin Cliristenson (Father). 



231 



THE TlllHTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Niui 


Rank 

Pvt. 


Obganizatioh 


CAU8I 


DAn 


Christensen, Jacob 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Christianson, Charles 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31 /I8 


Christie, Maynard L. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Ciniglio, Andrew 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Cirwyski, Pete 


Pvt. 1 


Hq. Co. 126 Inf. 


UW 


10/6/18 


Clancy, Dan B. 
Clark, Budd W. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
about 
9/1/18 


Clark, Otis F. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Olark, Roy F. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DD 


10/27/18 


Clarke, James H. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


Clarkson, William 


Pvt. IcI. 


Bat. E. 308 Tren. .\1 


DD 


1/13/19 


Clegg, John T. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KI.A 


10/10/18 


Cleightman, Paul 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/6/18 


Clemens, Ralph B. 


Sgt. 


Bat. A. 322 F. A, 


KIA 


11/11/18 


Cline, David E. 


Corp. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Clinefclter, Clyde C. 


Sgt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


ainefelter, Robert 0. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


asiek, Joseph F. 


Pvt. IcI. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


DD 


8/14/18 ■ 


Coates, Archie F. 


Corp. 


Co. A. 121 Mg Bm. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Cochren, Floyd B. 


Pvt. 


Bat. B. 147 F. A. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Cody, Claude T. 


Corp. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/30/18 


Cody, Henry E. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Coffee, Robert L. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


n/10/18 


Coffin, Hiram W. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Cofran, Edward 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Cohen, Louis 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 121 Mg. Bi, 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Cohen, Phillip 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Colbert, Donald C. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Cole, Elmer 


Corp. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Cole, Glenn 
Cole, James M. 


Reg. Sgt 
Mjr 
Pvt. 


Hq. 128 Inf. 
Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/7/18 
10/6/18 


Coleman, Aron 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


lO/ll/IS 


Colenso, Herbert H. 


Sgt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Collins, Claude 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/7/18 


Collins, Edward 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Collins, Edward A. 


Sgt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Collins, Herbert B. 


Sgt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


Collins, Lawrence R. 


Corp. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Collins, William N. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Combs, Sherman 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. F. 107 Engrs. 


DW 


11/24/18 


Compana, Thomas 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


Comiska, Charles F. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Compton, John R. 


Corp. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 



AsDBZss— Next or Kin 



R. F. D. 2, Hurley, So. Dakota. 

Miss Anna Christensen. 
Hamilton, Texas. 

Mr. John Christianson (Fatlier). 
2 Park Ave., Helena, Mont. 

Mrs. Agnes Christie. 
21 Frederick St., Grays Inn Road, 
London, England. 

Andrew Ciniglio (Father). 
46 Indiana .\ve., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 

Izydor Cirwyski (Uncle). 
2210 Harvard Ave.. Butte, Mont. 

John Clancy (Father). 
R. F. D. 2, Blanrhard, Mich. 

\V. E. Clark. 
Wonewoc, Wis. 

Mrs. Ztttn F. Clark. 
Moorefield, Nebr. 

C. G. Clark (Father). 

R. F. D. 1, Proctor, \V. Va. 

David C. Clarke (Father). 
South Euclid, Ohio. 

Alice Clarkson (Mother). 
Dubois, Idaho. 

Mrs. Walter Clegg. 
Albion, 111. 

Mrs. Minnie Cleightman. 
1625 Wyoming >St., Dayton Ohio. 

D. IJ. Clemens (Father). 

2337 Cherry .St., Pt. Huron, Mich. 

Leonard Cline (Father). 
Ill Elm St., (3oldwBter, Mich. 

Mrs. Addie Clinefelter (Mother). 

404 iiatten Ave., Rice Lake, Wis. 

Mrs. CSeneva Coates (Mother). 
15 Central Ave., Batavia, N. Y. 

Mrs. Floyd B. Cochren. 

Mrs. Florence E. Cody (Mother). 
Billings, Mont. 

Mrs. Agnes Valenzula (Mother). 
Chester, W. Va. 

Frank Coffee. 
Steuben Ave., Herkimer, N. Y. 

Mrs. Charles Bluett (Sister). 
Silver Springs, Maryland. 

Miss Alice I^eitch. 
63 2nd Ave., New York. 

Mrs. Anna Cohen (Mother). 
19 Henry St., New York City, N. Y. 

Sam Ldowskj (Friend). 
Neoga, III. 

Mrs. Laura Cross (Godmother). 
Adrian, Mich. 

Miss Alice Cole (Sister). 
317 Roosevelt St., Beloit, Wis. 

Mrs. Ben Cole. 
Marks, Miss. 

J. M. Stafford. 
Adamstown, Pa. 

John Coleman (Father). 
Lock Box 403, Houghton, Mich. 

Capt. Edwin Colenso (Father). 
R. F. D. 2. Fenwick, Mich. 

Ren Collins. 
760 nth Ave., New York CSty, N. \. 

Kale Collins. 
1207 Division St., Pt. Huron, Mich. 

Mrs. Augusta M. Collins (Wife). 
222 Crapo St., Alpena, Mich. 

Bruce Collins (Father). 
364 Vicksburg Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mr. Roy W. Collins (Father). 
Moonshine Hill, Humble, Texas. 

Mrs. Myrtle Dunn (Sister). 

Mrs. Lanna Ombs (Wife). 

R F. D. 2, Aipena. Mich. 

Mrs. Anna (Comiska. 
2398 Clyde Park Ave.. Gd. Rapids. 

Johii N. Compton, Sr. Mich. 



232 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank | 


Oroanization 


Cause 


Date 


Conley, Earl J. ' 


Pvt. Icl. 


Bat. A. 120 F. A. ' 


KIA 


8/6/18 


Conley, Jolin P. | 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Conley, Leonard 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


Conlin, Edward 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Conroy, George C. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/3/18 


Conti, Ernest F. 
Cook, George 


Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


10/9/18 
auout 
10/18/18 


Cook, Lewis C. 


Sgt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Colley, Jess B. 


Pvt. Ic!. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Cooper, Abraham 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Cooper, Clare 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Cooper, Jacob 


Corp. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


Cooper, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Cooper, Willie B. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Cooperider, Luke 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Comal, Earl E. 


Wag. 


Hdq. Co. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


Cornice, Joseph 


Pvt. Id. 


308 Bat. Tr. Art. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


Coryell, Stanley 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Cossette, Edward L. 


Corp. 


Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 


DW 


7/3/18 


Costa, Joe 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


Counter, Kenneth E. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


DW 


5/27/18 


Corwell, Charles L. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Coutu, Joseph R. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Covert, Richard 


Mess Sgt. 


Co. K. 126 I. if. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Cowen, Earl 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Cowley, Joseph R. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Cox, Aubrey 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/5/18 


Cox, Homer M. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Cox, John W. 


Pvt. 


Co. G, 6 Inf. 


DW 


10/15/18 


Craidge, Robert E. 
Craig, Robert 


Corp. 
Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 

about 

8/5/18 


Grain, Albert 


Pvt. 


Bat. C. 120 F. A. 


DD 




Crane, Lester 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/1/18 


Crawford, Henry B. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Crawford, Henry J. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


Crawford, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Creasey, Walter H. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Creech, Phelix 


' Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Cripps, William H. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. R. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Crist, Jessie 


Corp. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Crocos, Angel 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


6/13/18 


Croff, Clarence 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


Croninger, Dewey C. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


DW 


9/1/18 



Address — Next op Kin 



Apolionia, Wig. 

Peter Conley. 
Levi. West Va. 

Mr. James Lewis Conley. 
4211 S. 20th St., Omaha, Neb. 

Mr. Viret E. Conley. 



Clinton, Wis. 

Mrs. Alice Ritsnian (Sister). 
Grottollela, Province Avelhno, Italy. 

Mary Machia Conti (Motliei). 
Frankfort, Ky. 

Mrs. Nettie Cook (Mother). 
North Kansas City, Mo. 

Mr. Lewis L. Cook. 
Brighton. Mich. 
I Mrs. Francis Colley. 



R. F. D. 5, Birch Run, Mich. 

Manford Cooper (Father). 
Ferrysburg, Mich. 

Mrs. H. Cooper (Mother). 
1816 3rd St., Superior, Wis. 

Joe Cooper. 
Cooper, Ky. 

Minnie Cooper. 
R. F. D. 1, Siloam Springs, Ark. 

E. Cooperider. 
2010 St. Charles St., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 

Mrs. E. M. Cornal (Mother). 
506 Rhodes Ave., Akron, Ohio. 

Mary Cornice (Mother). 
Browiitown, Wis. 

John Con.'-ell (Brother). 
Box 11, Pence, Wis. 

Prosper Cossette. 
314 21st .St., Windber, Penti. 

Mrs. Armello Conom (Sister). 



R. I, Danville, Ark. 

Frank Corwell (Father). 
298 Park Place, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Champ Coutu (Father). 
540 Grand Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

R. L, Covert. 
Burford, N. Dak. 

Mr. Robert M. Cowen (Father). 
107 Van Dorn St., Jackson, Mich. 

Mrs. Emma Cowley (Mother). 
Greenwood, Wis. 

Sidney Cox (Father). 



611 Polk St., Bay City, Mich. 

Mrs. Mary Craidge. 
(Uentralia, Wash. 

Mrs. Robert Craig (Mother). 
Elm wood. Wis. 

Mrs. Delia Grain (Mother). 



Fairmont Cily, Pa. 

Mrs. Ella (Ilrawford. 
Alpena, Mich. 

Mrs. John Crawford. 
Corydon, Kv. 

Mr. A. J. Crawford (Father). 
Custer, Washington. 

William Creasey. 

Mrs. Henry J. Creech (Mother). 
R. F. D. 3. Liberty. Tenn. 

Mrs. Nola Caroline Cripps (Wife). 
410 Michigan Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

.John Allen (Friend). 
I 200 W. Johnston St.. Fond dii Lac. 
I John Paper (Cousin). Wis. 

O.sceola. Ark. 

Sallie Groff. 
Washburn, N. Dakota. 

Mamie Evans (Sister). 



233 



THE TllIKTr-SECOND IJIVJSIOX L\ THE WOULD WAR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


I DA-re 


Adiiucss— Next op Kin 


Crosby, Harry 


Pvt. 


Hdqs. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/8/18 


26 Sunnyside St., Burngitlc, Conn. 
Mrs. Ella Crosby (.Mother). 


Cross, Archie B. 


Pvt. 
Corp. 


C:o. C. 128 Int. 
Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/14/18 
8/2/18 






Crotlicra, Gordon M. 


P. Oi'ijoxmritocki.'.id, Mici.'.'' 












Mrs. Hazfl Crothers (Wife). 


Crjstal, William L. 


Wag. 


Co. C. 120 F. A. 


U\V 


6/27/18 


Uighy, Idaho. 

Mrs. Mary E. Cr>'.slal. 


Cudwortli, Alonzo II. 


Corp. 


Bat. C. 120 F. A. 


KIA 


8/29/18 
about 


367 Prospect Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Wm. H. Cudivorth. 


Cummings, Edwin L. 


Pvt. 


Co. A, 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


402 Vine St., Baraboo, Wis. 
\ .Mrs. N. Cummings. 


Cunningham, Charles 


Sgt. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


DD 


7/3/18 


1317 I.aKayitte Av., Gd. Rap ds. Mich. 
Augusta Bangboune (Mother). 


Cunningham, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 121 Mg. Bn. 


DW 


10/Il/lS 


Sturgecin Bay, Wis. 

Hubert Cunningham (Father). 


Cupast, August 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Box 39, Burnside, Conn. 
Mrs. Pezin. 


Curb, James M. 


Corp. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


i 10/9/18 


.Myra, Texas. 

J. W. Curb (Father). 


Curran, John J. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mary Curran (Aunt). 


Curwen, Harry T. 


Corp. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


R. F. D. 2, St. Croix Falls, Wis. 
Thomas Curwen (Father). 


Cushing, Benjamin. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


, 8/28/18 
about 


R. F. D. 2, Marion, Mass. 
Mrs. Amy H. Gushing. 


Cusick, Jay N. 


Corp. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Tiltonville, Ohio. 

Mrs. Sarah E. Cusick (Mother). 


Custer, Earl J. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 121 Mg. B:i 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Bolivar, Oiii... 

Mrs. M. Custer (Mother). 


Cutright, Amon 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Ozar, W. Va. 

Mr. Job. A. Cutright. 


Cutsinger, William 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/14/18 


Taylorsville, Ky. 

Mr. Martin Cutsinger. 


Cuza, Nick 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Palaggo .^driano, Provingia Parlemo, 
Via Colegio, Italy. 
Vinrcnjo Cuza. 


Czyzicwski, Marion 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


2 Wallicki Place, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Pollic Lysczewska (Sister). 


Dadison, Andnis P. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 

Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
8/1/18 






Dahl, Arthur 


R . f! b.' 1 ,' 'Gali?iv'iil'e, Wis! 








1 




Mrs. Andrew Dahl. 


Dahl, Oscar 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Iiif. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


608 Arnold Av. N.. Thief River Falls, 
Mr.'*. Clara Dahl (Mother). Minn. 


Dahlberg, Abncr F. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


R. F. D. 41, Rhinelnnder, Wis. 
Mrs. l.vdia Wenistram (Mother). 


Dahlem, Glenn G. 


Corp. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


127 N. Muirav St., Madi.son, Wis. 
A. W. Dahlem. 


Dalen, Arnold 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 I.if. 


DW 


9/1/18 


R. F. D. 1, Box 40, Starbuck, Minn. 
Mrs. Bertha Dalen (Mother). 


Daley, Michael J. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 119 F. .K. 


DW 


9/2/18 


.\ndover, Mass. 










Mrs. Patrick Daley (Mother). 


Dally, Theodore J. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Reno, Minn. 










Mrs. Augustus Dally (Mother). 


Daly, Bernard J. 


Mech. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. B. 125 Inf. 
Co. I. 127 Inf. 


inv 

KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 

8/6/18 

10/16/18 






Damhuk, Jake 






Daniels, Charles 


Buyck, Minn. 

Mrs. Johanna Daniels (Mother). 












Daniliuk, \asily 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Sawara, S. C. J. D. Kriel St;i , Russia. 
Mrs. Christiana Daniliuk (Wife). 


Danner, Claude F. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


nw 


10/4/18 


Gardner, 111. 

Mrs. Jacob F. Danner (Mother). 


Dant, Taylor S. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


R. F. D. 1. St. Joseph, Kv. 

Mr. William T. Danl (Father). 


Dargo, Leo 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Beaver, Wis. 

Tlicodnre Dargo (Father). 


Daugherty, James D. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


R. F. D. 3, Enclewood, Tenn. 

William T. Daugherty (Brother). 


Dausman, Lcroy L. 


Sgt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Saranac, Midi. 

Samuel Daurman (Father). 


Davenport, Lyle 


Mech. 
Mus. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 
Hq. 322 F. A. 


KIA 
DW 


8/6/18 
10/23/18 






Davenport, Millard E. 


R. F. i). i, Porrvshurp, Ohio. 












Mrs. Rose E. Wellslead (Mother). 


Davis, George F. 


Pvt. ! 

Pvt. 
Pvt 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. A. 127 Inf. 


DW 

KIA 
KIA 


8/3/18 
7/31/18 

10/7/18 






Davis, Henry 






Davis, Less F. 


Colesburg, I'.»\va. 






1 






Thos. Davis (Father). 


Davis, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


99 Cook St.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Mrs. Annie Levj (Sister). 


Davis, Russell R. 


Sgt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Genesee, Mich. 

Mrs. Sarah A. Davis. 



234 




1. First Lieutknant Rkhakij W. Mulcahy, Company F, 128th Infiuilry. KilU-tl in action November 10th, 1918, 

during Meiise-Art;<>nriL' Offensive. 

2. Skcond Lieutenant Fkank A. Sturtevant, Couipany II, I28th Infantry. Killt-d in action October 9tli, 1918, 

during Meuse-Arfionne Offensive. 

3. Second 1.ieut?;nant John M. Kegan, Company V, I28fh Infantry. Killed in action Angii.st 4th, 1918, dnrinfi 

Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

4. First Lieutenant Harold II. Joyce, Company I, 128lh Infanliy. Killed in action August 30th, 1918, during 

Oi.se-Aisne Offensive. 

5. Captain Orviule L. Arnold, Adjutant, 128th Infantry. Killed iTi action October 7tli, 1918, near Epinonville, 

France, during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

6. First Lieutenant Edwin Llewellyn Jones, Machine Gun Company, 128th Infantry. Died August 3rd, 1918, 

of wounds received during Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

7. Second Lieutenant Theodore K. Vocel, Jr., 128th Infantry. Killed in action November 10th, 1918, during the 

Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

8. Second Lieutenant Henry Mattern, Company D, 128th Infanfiy. Killed in action October 16fli, 1918, during 

the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

9. Second Lieutenant Hakhy H. Peters. Company B, 128th Infantr>'. Killed in action October 15th, 1918, during 

the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 



235 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Nah( 



Rank 



Davis, Thomian 

Davis, Fallmer 

Davis, Warner 

Davis, William J. 

Davis, W^illard 

Daws, Hairison 

Dawson, Albert M. 

Dawson, llollus E, 

Day, Claude O. 

Day, Harrj' U. 

Duy, Robert J. 

Dearmond, Thomas 

DebutU, Ray G. 

Decaire, David 

Decorali, Foster 

Decorah, Robert 

De Dominicis, Aristidi' 

Deeds, Kennie H. 

Doering, Hci-man 

Dicringer, Guy 

Deeriiighoff, 

Ferdinand i^ 
Deeti, Edwin 11. 

Degiacomo, Nickolia 

DeGucrre, Ernest A. 

Dchl, Herbert A. 

Dekkinga, Mart 

Delancy, Forrest L. 

Delapp, Galbert F. 

Delgoff, Rodney 

Delihant, Leslie E. 

Dahlberg, Abner F. 

Demorest, Joe A. 

Demund, Jacob H. 

Dencker, Henry W. 

Dennis, Joe H. 

Denno, Henry D. 

Denouden, Dirk 

Densinore, Fred L. 

Denton, Gilford 

Dcrdowski, Omcr 

Dcreuisscaux, Ralph 

DeRonde, Edward J. 

Desantis, Anibale 



Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. :ci. 

Pvt. lei. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Clr. Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 



Organization 



Co. G. 58 Inf. 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 
Co. I. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inl. 
Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. A. 121 Mg. Un 
Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 



Caubi 



Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 
Bat. E. 322 F. A. 
Co. M. 126 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 
Co. A. 127 Inf. 
Co. I. 126 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 
308 Batry. Tr. Art. 
Co. I. 126 Inf. 
Btry B. 147 F. A. 
Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 
122 F. A. 
Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 
Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Co. B. 127 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 
Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 126 Inf. 



DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

Error 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DD 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

ACC 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 



Date 



8/5/18 

11/8/18 

10/9/18 

8/31/18 

10/5/18 

8/1/18 

10/7/18 

10/12/18 

9/1/18 

10/10/18 



ASDBESS— Nkxt or Kin 



I.,eoIa, Ark. 

Mrs. L. A. Davis (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Box 17, Slate, W. Va. 

Mrs. Bill Davis (Motlier). 
Sanma, W. \'a. 

Mrs. M, C. Davis. 
Aberdeen, So. Dakota. 

John H. Davis (Father). 
R. R. 4^ Prospect, Tenn. 

Robert Daws (Father). 
Owosso, Mich. 

Barron, Wis. 

Miss Verne Dawson (Sister). 
R. F. D. 2, Turner, Mich. 

Mrs. Melinda Day. 
St. Urain, New Mexico. 

Lydia Day (Mother). 
I Aurora, Neb. 

Walter Day (Father). 



9/3/18 

8/6/18 

8/2/18 

8/2/18 

12/24/18 

8/3/18 

7/2/18 

10/4/18 

10/15/18 

10/9/18 

8/31/18 

8/4/18 

10/23,18 

10/9/18 

8/9/18 

9/2/18 

7/31/18 

10/3/18 

8/4/18 

8/1/18 

10/11/18 

10/11/18 

11/8/18 

10/13/18 

10/4/18 

10/17/18 

10/13/18 

8/1/18 

10/5/18 

8/31/18 

10/18/18 



Boyne City, Mich. 
11. Dcbutts. 



Fiiendship, Mich. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Decorah (Mother). 
Mauston. Wis. 

John Wallace (Brother). 



College Park; Mar^'land. 

Mrs. Lydia Deeds (Mother). 



Saline, Mo. 

D. M. Deeringer (Father). 
Mozee City, Washington 

Mrs. V'erena Deeringhoff. 
Aurora, Oregon. 

H. H. Doctz (Father). 
Nenteodarisio Chieti, Italy. 

Rose Degiacomo. 
Toronto, Canada. 

M. T. DcGuerre 
902 W. Mound St., Columbus. Ohio. 

Mrs. Christina Dehl (Mother). 
R. F. D. 2. Husey, Mich. 

Klile Dekkinga. 
227 Linden Ave., Moundsville, W. Va. 

Mrs. Abbie Dolv (Mother). 
412 Gardner St., Rhinelander, Wis. 

Chailes Nitschke (Friend). 



8 Wood St., Quinccy, Mich. 

D. A. Demorest. 
Gnines, Mich. 

Ca'iclance Demund (MotherV 
1827 Hawkins St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Mrs. Elizabeth Dencker. 
Macnolia, .Ark. 

Pliil Dennis (Father). 
R. F. D. 5, Brandon, Vt. 

Mrs. Mary Denno. 
Pulten Gelderland, Holland. 

Antoni Denouden (Father). 
Oswnyo, Pa. 

Mrs. G. E. Densmore (Mother). 
R. F. D. 4, Box 47. Bristol, Tenn. 

Mrs. MarcaretL. Dentin (Mother). 
1411 Marsac St., Bay City, Mich. 

Mary Dcrdowski (Mother). 
Box 162, Hamilton, Mont. 

Matilda Bennett. 
36 Taft Ave.. Detroit, Mich, 

Leora DeUonde (Mother). 
Woodstock Pott.ifTice, Portland, Ore. 

Mr. Louis De.'iantis (Brother). 



236 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 



Devries* ArUiur 
Dewitf, Albert W. 
DeWitt, Morris B. 
Deyo, Harold D. 
Diamond, Jack 
Deangelo, James J. 
Dick, Coy 

Dickerson, George T. 
Dickey, Irwin- E. 
Dickinson, Tiinotliy 
Dietrich, Alfred H. 
Dimassa, Alexandre 
Diuwiddie, Frank 
Dirrigl, Frank 
Dicken, Clarence O. 
Distler, George 
Dixon, Maurice 
Dodds, James M. 
Doerr, John 
Dolan, Joe 
DoUinger, Abraham 
Dombrowski, Joseph I 
Doney, Everett 
Donnelly, Michael J. 
Doran, George E. 
Dorcheus, John A. 
Dorenburg, Frank A. 
Dorey, Hugh 
Dorfman, Alexander 
Doughert, Edward 
Douglas, Arthur W. 
Dow, Francis E. 
Dowliog, Lawrence 
Dowdy, Monroe 
Dowty, Chancey P. 
Dozier, Clifford 
Drabenstott, Alvia R. 
Drake, Payne 
Draper, Frank M. 
Urennon, Merritt, 
Dreps, Anthony 
Dressell, Egerctt C. 



Rank 



Sgt. 
Pvt. 
Sgt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Corp. 
Corp. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Hit- 
Sgt. 
Pvt. 
Corp. 
Pvt. Id. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Corp. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 
Corp. 
Serg. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Corp. 



Organization 



Co. M. 126 Inf. 

Co. H. 127 Inf. 

Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn 

Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 

Co. D. 127 Inf. 

Co. K. 128 Inf. 

Co. G. 125 Inf. 

Co. B. 127 Inf. 

Co. C. 128 Inf. 

Co. M. 128 Inf. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 

Co. E. 125 Inf. 

Co. H. 127 Inf. 

Co. C. 128 Inf. 

Q. M. C. Att. Hq. 

32Div 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 

Bat. C. 119 F. A. 

Co. D. 126 Inf. 

Co. I. 125 Inf. 

Co. C. 121 Mg. Bn. 

Co. D. 128 Inf. 

Co. E. 125 Inf. 

Co. M. 127 Inf. 

Co. H. 127 Inf. 

Co. D. 127 Inf. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 

Co. H. 127 Inf. 

Co. H. 127 Inf. 

Co. A. 121 Ma. 

Co. F. 125 Inf. 

Co. B. 128 Inf. 

Co. H. 126 liif. 

Co. D. 322 F. A 

Co. G. 127 Inf. 

Co. C. 128 Inf. 

Co. I. 126 Inf. 

Co. I. 126 Inf. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 

Co. I.. 125 Inf. 

Co. K. 128 Inf. 

Co. C. 127 Inf. 

Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 



Cause 



Bn. 



KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DVV 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

DD 

KIA 

KIA 

IvIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 



Date 



8/2/18 

7/31/18 

I0/6/I8 

10/2/18 

10/10/18 

8/3/18 

10/6/18 

10/19/18 

8/3/18 

11/4/18 

7/30/18 

7/31/18 

10/6/18 

8/31/18 

2/20/18 

8/29/18 

8/8/18 

10/4/18 

7/31/18 

9/2/18 

10/5/18 

10/9/18 

8/4/18 

10/16/18 

6/17/18 

10/7/lS 

10/13/18 

10/4/18 

10/7/18 

7/31/18 

7/9/18 

8/3/18 

10/15/18 

10/10/18 

8/1/18 

10/9/18 

8/1/18 

9/4/18 

7/31/18 

10/6/18 

8/3/18 

10/10/18 



Address— Next of Kin 



1069 W. Bridge St., Gd. RapLds, Mich. 

Dr. W. Devries (Father). 
Box 122, Moore, Mont. 

John D. Dewitt (Father). 
185 Glessner St., Mansfield, Ohio. 

H. B. DeWitt (Father). 
113 East Ward St., Urbana, Ohio. 

Mr. George Deyo (Father). 
Fannington, Minn. 

Fred A. Thomas (Friend). 
414 S. Exter St., Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. A. Deangelo. 
1222 S. West St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Oliver M. Dick (Father). 
R. F. D. 1, Indian Valley, Va. 

Port Dickerson (Father). 
Hudson, Wis. 

Mrs. George Dickey. 
Lisbon, New Hampshire. 

Mrs. Hattie L. Dickm-son (Mother). 
1717 Wright St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. Mary Dietrich (Mother). 



Park Falls, Wis. 
Mr. Dirrigl. 



R. F. D. 1, Jefferson City, Mo. 

Albert Distler. 
103 Laliana St., Lansing, Mich. 

Mrs. Emma Dixon (Mother). 
Panquitch, Utah. 

John Dodds (Brother). 
Barnes, Kansas. 

Daniel Doerr (Father). 
734 Prospect Place, BrookKn, N. Y. 

Mrs. Mary Callahan (Mother). 
419 E. 5th St., New York, N. Y. 

Joseph Dellinger (Father). 
519 Isabell St. 

Alex. Dombrowski (Brother). 
Oconto, Wis. 

Ira Doney (Godmother). 
36 Arlington St., N. Cambridge, Mass. 

Mary Donnelly (Sister). 
764 14th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Daniel Doran (Father). 
Ashton, Idaho. 

Mrs. Mary Dorcheus (.Mother). 
318 June St., Carnegie, Pa. 

Catherine Dorenburg (Mother). 
2401/2 Hibbard Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. H. L. Dorey (Mother). 
16 E. 7th St., New York City, N. V. 

Miss Sarah Zuckeman (Cousin). 



152 Terrace, Redlands, Calif. 

W. C. Douglas (Father). 
377 Putman Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Mathilda Dow (Mother). 
R. F. D. 5, Dayton, Ohio. 

Mrs. Irene Louis Dowling (Mother). 
Ingram, Texas. 

Mrs. Lee Ella Dowdy (Mother). 
Morlan, Kansas. 

Ella L. Dowty. 
Wall send, Ky. 

Evin r>t)zier (Father). 
R. F. D. 3, Custer, Mich. 

Mrs. Flora Drabenstott. 
Shawano, Wis. 

Mrs. Mora Drake (Mother). 
2716 8th Blvd., Pt. Huron, Mich. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Draper (Mother). 



1401 N. 8th St., Sheboygan, Wis. 

John A. Dreps (Father). 
R. F. D. 4, So. Haven, Mich. 

Mr. Fred A. Dressell. 



237 



THE rillETr-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Naub 


Rank 




OaCAMZATION 


Causb 


Dm 


Uresser, Frank A. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. 


B. 107 F. S. Bn. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Drill, Edward L. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


C. 107 F. S. Bn. 


KIA 


10/2/18 


Driver, Dib. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Urury, John H. 
Dry, Wafford 


Pvt. Icl. 
Corp. 


Amb. Co. 126, 

107 Son. Tr. 
Co. C. 107 F. S. Bn. 


KIA 


10/1/18 
8/29/18 


Duanr, Mark S. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


D. 121 F. A. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Diickett, Gitrdon A. 


Corp. 


Co. 


H. 126 Inf. 




8/30/18 


Dudek, John 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. 


M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Dudley, Joe D. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


K. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/18/18 


DudU'y. Nt'wton 
Dudzin^ki, Franciszak 


Pvt 


Co 


A r*8 Inf 


KI.\ 




Pvt. 


Co, 


I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Duerwearder,AIheric J 


Corp. 


Co. 


H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/8/18 


Dufaii, John 


Pvt. 


Co. 


F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Duffy, Edward 


Pvt. 


Co. 


L. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/30/18 


Duffy, Michat'l 


Pvt. 


Co. 


M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Dugiin, JoM?ph P. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


5/25/18 


Duhn, Arnie F. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


Dujoudin, Arthur 


Pvt. 


Co. 


B. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Dukot. Stanley G. 


Corp. 


Co. 


I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Dulepski, Stanley E. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Duncan, Clinton E. 


Corp. 


Co. 


I,. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Duneklw, LcsU^r W. 


Corp. 


Co. 


B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Dunham, Scott H. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


II. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Dunigaii, Luke B. 


Corp. 


Co. 


D. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Dunken, Guy H. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


Dunn, Benjamin. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Dupras, Eugene 


Pvt. 


Co. 


C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Dupius, Ezra 


Pvt. Id 


308 Btry. Tr. Art. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


Dupris, Joseph 


Pvt. Id. 


Bat 


. C. 147 F. A. 


DD 


9/2/18 


Durhin. Lonnie 


Pvt. 


Co. 


K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Durka, Henrj' 


Pvt. 


Mg 


Co. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/30/18 


Durkee, Frank 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


B. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/18/18 


Dumherger, Peter 0. 


Sgt. 


Mg 


Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Duseld, Joseph 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


Dwycr, Loo M. 


Pvt. 


Bat 


. E. 322 F. A. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


Dyer, John M. 


Corp. 


Co 


M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Dykes, Jesse M. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Easly, Ijither B. 


Corp. 


Co. 


K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


FA(itliind Ole A 


Pvt. 
Cr.rp. 


Co. 
Co. 


E. 128 Inf. 
M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 

KIA 




Eastman, Riclmrri O. 


8/30/18 


Eaton, Frank J. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


L. 128 Inf. . 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Ehy, Daniel A. 


Corp. 


Co 


F. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/21/18 



AiiDii£ss— Next or Kin 

Rirlilund, Washington. 

Flank Dre^Nser (Father). 
Prwiceton, Wis. 

Mr. Andrew Drill (Father). 
I.ilHTty, Tenn. 

Burrd Driver (Father). 

Uichtteld, N. Carolina. 

.lames C. Dry (Father). 
Mi-llaii, Wis. 

Mrs. Mary Duane. 
160 I-'irt-nian Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

William B. Duckett. 

Madiso'ii,' S. D. 

Mrs. Blanche Hfgdahl. 
Phasant Hill, Mo. 

Mrs. hula Bugshaw (Sister). 
8813 23rd Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Slary Dudzinski (Si.-Hter). 
Clieboyj:an, Mich. 

Charles \'aii Hoorn Taniier>'. 
5407 Carthage Ave., NorwofMl, Ohio. 

Mrs. Josephine Dufan (.Mother). 
233 N. Fanheld Ave., Chicago, III. 

Patrick J. Duffy. 
Phillipsburg, Mont. 

John W. Duffy (Father). 

R. F.b! 32] BVa'ck Creek,' Wis. " 

August Duhn (Stepfather). 
Swevere Le Province, W. 

Vlawndereli, Bt'Igiiim. 

Loui.-yj Dujoudin. 
1111 Minneapolis St., Marinette, Wis. 

Mr. Chester Duket, Jr. (Father). 
Etna St., Naugaluck, Conn. 

Mrs. Maiy Rosgeii (Si.-^ter). 
903 Beard St., Port Huron, Mich. 

Mrs. J. W. Duncan (Mother). 
928 Mt. Clair Ave., St. Clair Hts., 
Mich. 

Mrs. Wm. Cole Duncklee (Mother) 
3003 E. Cirand Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

James F. Dunham (Father). 

Peetjs, (ioi. 

Walter Dunken (Fatlier). 
Toledo, Ohio. 

Mrs. J. Burns. 
2012 E. River St., Two Rivers, Wis. 

Ray Dupras (Father). 
Box 189, Ashland, New Hampshire. 

Mrs. Amy Dupius (Mother). 

Garfield, ky. 

Hiram Durbin (Father). 
643 Frankfort St.. D.-trnit, Mich. 

John Pikora (Half Brotlier). 
R. F. D. 1, Ousted, Mich. 

E. B. Durkee. 
R. F. D. 1, Okanogan, Washington. 

Mrs. Carrie Parks. 
1111 S 9th St., Manilowoc. Wis. 

August Duseld (Father). 
R. F. D. 8, Dayton, Ohio. 

Mrs. Glenn Mrlin (Sister). 
Rei'ii City, Mich. 

Mrs. Jas. Dyer. 
314 2nd St., Richmond, Ky. 

Je.sse Dykes (Father). 

Dalho, Minn. 

Peter A. Eastlund (Father). 
Lawrence. Mich. 

Mrs. Vclevia Eastman. 
R. 4, Box 48, Augusta, Wis. 

Mrs. Annie Eaton. 



238 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Address— Next op Kin 


Edflson, Samuel M. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


10/1/18 


63 Pike St., New York, N. Y. 
Harris Edelson. 


Edmonson. William F. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Strasburg, Va. 

Maggie Edmonson. 


Edwards, George W. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Bengal, Ky. 

James Edwards (Father). 


Egelhoff, Otto J. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Raymond, 111. 

William F. Egdhoff (Father). 


Eggert Thomas \V. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


3021 N. 30th St., Omaha, Neb. 
Paul Eggert (Father). 


Egle, William. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Palisade, Neb. 

Christian E. Egle (Brother). 


Egleston, Lewis 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


526 Norman St., Lansing, Mich. 
Henry Egleston (Father). 


Ehlen, Fred 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/6/18 


Aurora, Oregon. 

Henry C. Ehlen (Father). 


Eich, Peter J. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


UW 


10/9/lS 


Prairie Du Rocher, Illinois. 
Peter Eich (Father). 


Eick, George 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 




9/1/18 


Oconto Falls, Wis. 

August Eick (Father). 


Elder, \Vi!li:,m \V. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Fannington, W. Va. 
Mrs. Agnes Beck. 


Eldridge, Rix B. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


Green Forest, Ark. 
John E. Eldridge. 


Elefson, Edwin 


Sgt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Shawano, Wis. 

Ell Elefson (Father). 


EIia.<!, Loman C. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/21/18 


1914 Sarah St., Fresno, Calif. 
_ Mary Elias (Mother). 


Elijah, Richard 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Kinder, La. 

Joseph Elijah. 


Ellenberger, Franklin 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/7/18 
11/8/18 






Elliott, John C. 


730 ' 6th St.', ' S. ' WV, ' Roanoke,' Va.' ' 












Hilda Elliott. 


Ellis, Roes R. 


Corp. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/31/18 


.^Uouez, Mich. 

Mrs. Thomas Ellis. 


Elmer, George 


Pvt. 


Sup. Co. K8 Inf. 


DW 


10/4/18 


2829 Fletcher St., Chicago, III. 
Anna Elmer. 


Embrey, Sidney E. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Booneville, Mo. 

Andrew A. Embrey (Father). 


Emerick, Clarence 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn 
Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DO 
KIA 


9/14/18 
10/5/18 








Emfinger, James M. 


Bude, Mi-^s. 












Edgar R. Emfinger. 


Engle, Charles W. 


Pvt., Id. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


R. F. D. 5, Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Mrs. C. F. Engle. 


Englehardt, Carl 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


DW 


9/3/18 


125 Park Ave., .Sheboygan, Wis. 
William Englehardt (Father). 


English, Cyrus J. 


Corp. 
Pvt. 1(1. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
DW 


7/31/18 
8/4/18 






Enochs, Paul S. 


Puvallup, Wash. 












John A. Enochs (Father). 


Epley, George P. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/22/18 


Marlowe Ave., College Hill, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Mrs. George P. Epley (Wife). 


Erbe, Garret 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


1121 Clinton St., St. Louis, Mo. 
Ruth Erbe (Wife). 


Erickson, Carl 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Bladen. Neb. 

Charles C. Erickson (Father). 


Erickson, George 


Corp. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 




9/1/18 


912 Holmes k\e., Menominee, Mich. 
G. Erickson (Father). 


Erickson, Jens M. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


Flom, Minn. 

Mrs. J. Erickson. 


Erick.son, John V. 


Corp. 


Co. E. 119 F. A. 


DW 


10/14/18 


P. O., Lacota, Mich. 

John V. Erickson (Father). 


Erickson, Olaf 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/7/18 


3119 No. 20th St., Tacoma, Wash. 
Irene Vosoba (Sister). 


Ericson, John A. 


Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Med. Det. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


8/1/18 
10/8/18 








Escuek, John 


Dora. Ark. 












Miss El-ie English. 


Essman, Alfred B. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


R. F. D. 25. Waterford, Wis. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Essman. 


Estabrook, Sylvester C 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


New London. Wi.s. 

Mrs. Pearl .Seigle (Sister). 


Etue, Walter F. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


513 Ketchum St.. Bay City. Mich. 
Mrs. Mary Etne (Mother). 


Ethicr, Alfred 


Corp. 


Bat. A. 120 F. A. 


DW 


8/6/18 


998 Island Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
A. D. Ethicr. 


Ecistice, Raymond R. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. E. 10 Am. Tr. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Rewey, Wis. 

Mrs. M. P. Eilstice. 


Euper, Clarence A. 


Pvt. 


Bat. C. 120 F. A. 






R. F. D. 2, Woodland, Mich. 

Mrs. Christina Euper (Mother). 


EuRwiller Hennan E. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


R. R. 4, Tinnecanoe City, Ohio. 
John Z. Euswillcr. 


Eva. Harry 


Sgt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 













239 



THE TinnTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



VtHUE 


Rank 


ORGAN'IZATION I 


Cacs* ! 
KIA 


DATS { 


ADDBE88— Next of Kin 


Evans* LeRoy 


Pvt. Icl. ; 


Co. 


E. 128 Inf. 


8/31/18 


Forbes, Tenn. 














Mr. Tham Evans. 


Evsna, Otia 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. 


F. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/2/18 


Gresham, Wis. 

Mrs. Marie Johnson (Mother). 


Evans, Walter 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


L. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/29/18 


942 6th St., Bcloit, Wis. 
Vera H. Evans (.Sister). 


Evens, Elgin 


Pvt. 


Co. 


E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Voss, N. Dak. 

Even Evens (Father). 


Ewald, Edward A. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Brownton. Minn. 

John Ewald (Father). 


Ewing, Edwin H. 


Corp. 


Co. 


I. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/5/18 , 


104 Harris St., Ludington, Mich. 
F. C. Ewing. 


Exline, Oscar 


Pvt. 


Co. 


K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


Strange Creek, W. Va. 
Martha C. Exline. 


Fahey, Matthew L. 


Sgt. 


Co. 


B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


674 10th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Miss Kathernie Fahey (Sister). 


Fur, Randolph W. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


R. F. D. 2, Manassas, Va. 

Mrs. Julia T. Fair (Mother). 


Farmer, Joseph H. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 1 


Dawnsville, La. 

Mrs. Sally Farmer. 


Famham, Dewitt E. 


Sgt. 


Co. 


L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


.Sparta, Wis. 

Matilda I. Farnham (Mother). 


Farrand, Arthur D. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. 
Co. 


F. 126 Inf. 
I. 126 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


8/S/18 

1 

I0/9/I8 






Farrell, Michael 


SO Fail' St.',' '.isii'e'ly.' 'Pa! 














Mrs. Ed. Carry. 


Ferris, William H. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


1408 Schiller Ave.. Little R.ick, A k. 
VVayne Ferris (Brother). 


Fauncc, Charles 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. 


M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Plainwcll, Mich. 

Mrs. Irwin Hamilton. 


Fay, Ernest J. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Rhinelandcr, Wis. 












Mrs. Ernest Fay. 


Fehrs, Peter 


Pvt. 


Co. 


A. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/4/18 


Belgrade, Neb. 

John Fehrs (Father). 














Fclber, Frank 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. 


G. 126 Inf. 




8/30/18 


376 E. 1st St., Mansfield. Ohio. 
Frank Felber. 


Folhefer, Henry 


Pvt. 


Co. 


G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Jacksoiiport. Wis. 

Frank Fdhefer (Father). 


Feltz, John A. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


16 Filmore St., Dayton, Ohio. 
Joe Feltz (Father). 


Fcrgison, Francis B. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. 


K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Ousted. Mich, 

Richard Morgan. 


Ferg\ison, Eugene 


Corp. 


Co. 


H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Raco. Mich. 

Mrs. Ada Ferguson (Mother). 


Ferguson, Lerey 


Corp. 


Co. 


K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


Holden, W. Va. 

Mi.ss Marie Ferguson. 


Fessenden, Bert A. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Edgehill, Montana. 

Albert B. Fessenden (Father). 


Fctrow, Charles G. 


Corp. 


Co. 


K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/5/18 


R. F. D. 3. Dover, Pa. 
Mrs. Savilla Fctrow. 


Fetscher, Valentine A. 


Pvt. lol. 


Co. 


L. 128 Inf. 


DW 


9/4/18 


1101 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Valentine M. Fetscher. 


Fett, Paul 


Sgt. 


Co. 


L. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


519 5th St.. Grand Haven, Mich. 
Ernest Fett. 


Fick, Everett S. 


Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 


Error 

Co. C. 12.5 Inf. 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 


DW 
ACC 
KIA 






10/3/18 

10/20/18 
8/31/18 




Fiiiley, John 


........... \.......... • • . • • . • . . . • • . 




Fischer, Edward 






Fields, William 


St. Louis, Mich. 














Mrs. Helen Fields. 


Fien, Julius 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. 


K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


51 Morgan St.. Hartford. C!onn. 
Mrs. A. P. Fien (Mother). 


Fikstad, Melvin P. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 




Thornton. Idaho. 




Mrs. Frederica Fikstad (Mother). 


Finnerty, Joseph J. 


Corp, 


Co. 


G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


315 North Lake St., Madison. Wis. 
Mrs. E. Finnertv (Mother). 


Finney. John 


Pvt. 


Co 


G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


1813 Winter St., Superior, Wis. 
Tony Burgraff (Friend). 


Finstad. Carl K. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co 


B. 120 M. P. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Washburn. Wis. 

Knudc J. Finstad (Father). 


Fintrilakis, Enanglos 


Pvt. 


Co 


A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


518 W. 2nd St.. Salt Lake City. Utah 
John Fintrilakis (Brother). 


Fisher, Earl C. 


Pvt. 


Co 


M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


R. F. D. 1. Parkcrsliurg. W. Va. 
James O. Fisher (Father). 


Fisher, John 


Corp. 


Co 


A. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/15/18 


R. F. D. 4. Marshfield. Wis. 
Mrs. Henry Schmidt (Mother). 


Fisher, Peter W. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co 


L. 128 Inf. 


DW 


9/3/18 


206 Water St.. Grand Haven, Mich. 
Mrs. Dcna Fisher. 


Fitzgerald, Chester 


Corp. 


Co 


I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


98 6lh Ave.. North Tonawanda. N. \ 
Mrs, Potor Fitzgerald (Mother). 


Fitzgerald, Rossotler S 


Pvt. Id. 


Co 


C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


R. F. D. 2, Howard City, Mich. 
Ambrose Fitzgerald. 


Fitzpatrick, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co 


C. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


2132 So. 7tli St., Sheboygan, Wis. 
1 Tom Fitzpatrick (Father). 



240 




1. Second Lieutenant Roy W. Keu.y. Machine Gun Company, 127th Infantry. Killed in action August 3Ist, 

1918, during the Oise-Aisne Offensive. 

2. First Lieutenant Stephen O. Bhigham, Company G, 127th Infantry. Died August 1st, 1918, of wounds 

received during tlie Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

3. Second Lieutenant Lestf.r W, Kearn, Company K, 127th Infantry. Killed in action August 31st, 1918, during 

the Oise-Aisne Offensive. 

4. Second Lieutenant John Bastian Nelson, Company A, 127th Infantry. Killed in actitm October 18th, 1918, 

during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

5. Major Oforge K. Si'ERbeck, 147th F. A. Died of wounds October 11th, 1918. 

6. Second Lieutenant Everett L. Varney, 127th Infantrj'. Died October 19th, 1918, of wounds received in action 

October 14th, 1918, during the Meuse-Aixronne Offensive. 

7. Second Lieutenant Charles Schwartz, Jr., Company D, 127th Infantry. Killed in action October 18th, 1918, 

during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

8. Second Lieutenant Homer R. Smith, Company F, 127th Infantry. Killed in action August 29th, 1918, during 

the Oise-Aisne Offensive. 

9. Second Lieutenant E. Seif, Company M, 127th Infantrv, Killed in action August 4th. 1918, during the 

Aisne-Mamo Offensive. 



241 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD MM/; 



Name 



Rank 



Klancry, Leo E. 
Fleigner, Louis 
Fligg, Ray \V. 
Flee, Lewis 
Klorinc, Paul F. 
Flynn, John J. 
French, John B. 
Folry, Thomas L. 
Folkencr, Harry 
Folker, Dan 
Foody, Joseph P. 
F<)rl>e.«, James A. 

Ford, Walter T. 
Forsberg, Lawrence 
Forshee, Henry E. 
Fortman, Frits 
Fortenberry, Forest 
Foss, Jerry S. 
Fountain, William F. 

Kowers, Herbert F. 
Fowler, Arthur V. 
Fowler, John W. 
Fowler, Raleigh 
France, B. W. 
France, George C. 
Francis, Oliver J. 
Francovirk, Peter 
Franek, Lewis 
Frank, Earl 
Frank, George A. 
Franks. Amos B. 
Franz, William C. 
Frede, Arthur 
Frederickson, Glenn S 
Fredrichs, Ferdinand 
Freeman, Charles C. 
Freahour, Daniel \. 
Freyler, \'irtor H. 
Frink, Edw-ard 
Friske, Robert E. 
Frith, Jesse T. 
Friti, Alfred J. 



Sgt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 



Oecanization 



Cause 



Co. 

Co. 

Co. 

Co. 

Co. 
I Co. 
I Hq. 

Co. 

Co. 

Co. 

Co. 

Co. 



M. 128 Inf. 
A. 127 Inf. 
L. 127 Inf. 
H. 128 Inf. 
D. 127 Inf. 
M. 128 Inf. 
Co. 127 Inf. 
H. 128 Inf. 
H. 125 Inf. 

C. 127 Inf. 

D. 127 Inf. 

E. 127 Inf. 



Corp. 


Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


Pvt. let. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


Corp. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


SRt, 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Mg. 119 F. A. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 119 F. A 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Hq. Co. 127 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Mg. Co. 127 Inf 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


Pvt. 


; Co. A. 128 Inf. 



KIA 
DW 
KIA 
DW 
DW 
KIA 
DD 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 



Date 



Abdiu:**— Next of Kin 



8/30/18 

8/5/18 

10/16/18 

10/8/18 

6/19/18 

10/15/18 

10/8/18 

11/11/18 

10/15/18 

10/15/18 

10/15/18 

9/2/18 



KIA 


8/29/18 


KIA 


8/31/18 


KIA 


8/21/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


11/7/18 


KIA 


10/12/18 


KIA 


8/1/18 


UW 


9/2/18 


DW 


8/29/18 


KIA 


8/29/18 


KIA 


9/1/18 


KIA 


10/9/18 


DW 


9/10/18 


DW 


8/31/18 


KIA 


8/30/18 


KIA 


8/1/lS 


KIA 


10/10/18 


KIA 


8/1/18 


DW 


10/11/18 


KIA 


8/2/18 




9/5/18 


KIA 


11/11/18 


KIA 


' 7/31/18 


KIA 


10/11/18 




8/30/18 


KIA 


10/10/18 


KIA 


8/1/18 


KIA 


lO/S/18 


KIA 


10/27/18 


KIA 


i 10/18/18 



216 Racine St., Jaiicsville, Wis. 
John Flaiiery. 



R. F. D. 2, Jacksonville, III. 

Mrs. (Jeorge Fligg (Mother). 
Eland, Wis. 

Mrs. Andrew Flee. 
R. F. D. 4, F(. Atkinson, Wis. 

G. Florine (Father). 



R. F. D. 5. Clinton, Mo. 

Miss Vircie Foley. 
York, New Salem, Pa. 

Mrs. J. C. Folkener. 
Fors>tlie, Mont. 

Jake Lccmhuis (Friend). 
323 E. 2n(I St., Xenia, Ohio. 

Nora Ftiwly (Mother). 
Reno, WashinRton. 

James G. Halvorson 

(Father-in-Law) 
Central Point. Orv. 

Miss Clara ShotMiiaker. 
1275 Logan St., Marinette, Wi.s. 

V. Forsberg (Father). 



Route 1, Columbus. Miss. 

Conrad Fortenberry (Fatl:er). 
Milbank, So. Dak. 

Charles Foss. 
R. F. D. 6, Ferry Road. 

Manchester, N. H. 

Agne5 C. Fountain (Mother). 
Hooper, Utah. 

Joseph Fowcrs. 
Addre.'^ unknown. 

Lillian Fowler (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Box 14, Fh-miuK, Mo. 

Mary C. French. 
767 Brooks St.. Bcloit. Wis. 

C. W. Fowler (Father). 
440 Putman .\ve., Detroit. Mich. 

Hattie France (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Byron Center. Mich. 

Mrs. Fedir Fra-ire (Mother). 
321 N. Normal St., Mt. Pleasant. Mioh. 

Mrs. Alfred Franris (Mother). 
Crivitz, Wis. 

Mrs. John Kaishim (Sister). 
Stanton. Neb. 

Mrs. Mai-v' Franek. 
R. F. D. 1. Nlontezmnii, Ohio. 

Albert Frank. 
Shawano, Wis. 

Cha-Ies W. Frank (Brother). 
R. F. D. 2. Perry. Mirh. 

Mrs. .Amos B. Franks (Wife). 
11 Mt. Wood, Wheelinp. W. Va. 

John Franz. 
R. F. D. 3. Mt. Clenu-ns, Mich. 

Sirs. Anna Frede (Mother). 
Waraw, Ind. 

Ray Frederirkson (Brother). 
Sheboygan Falls, Wis. 

Amo Fredrichs (Father). 
R. F. D. 2. Box fifi. Owosao, Mich. 

Wni. B. Freeman (Father). 
Kibbie, Mich. 

Mrs. Maude Fresliour. 
316 Pine St., Helena. Mont. 

Huso FrevliT (Father). 
R F. D. 5. Mt. Clemens. Mich. 

Kdward Frink (Father). 
1001 Beaser St., Ashland. Wis. 

Mrs. Minnie Friske (Mother). 
Svdnorsvi'le. Va. 

■ Mrs. E. T. Frith. 
2416 Grifhth Ave.. Louisville. Ky. 

Mrs. Charles E. Fritz. 



242 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cau.se 


Date 


Address— Next op Kin 


Fre.«t, Ernest F. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Morland, Kans. 
M. P. Frest. 


Fruend, Hennan A. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Hoffman, III. 

Fred W. Fruend (Father). 


Fr>*e, George E. 


Sgt. 
Pvt. IcI. 


Co. D. 322 F. A. 
Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn 


KIA 
KIA 


11/4/18 
8/4/18 






Fuchs, Jolin 


Toniah, Wis. 












Frank Fuchs (Father). 


Fuerbftck, Fn'd 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


616 6th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. Mary Fuerback (Mother). 


Fuller, Ralph 


Pvt. lei. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 




9/7/18 


199 Ashland Ave., Oshko.sh, Wis. 
Mrs. E. T. Fuller (Mother). 


Fuller, Walter R. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


1407 Matim Ave., St. Joseph, Mich. 
Mrs. Rachel Fuller. 


Fulton, Chailes J. 


Sgt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


516 Vine St., St. Clair, Mich. 
Mrs. Louise Fulton (Mother). 


Fummnyki, Anthony 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Bessemer, Mich. 

Stanley Furmanski (Father). 


Gaj, W. 


Pvt, 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


1308 Dubois St., Detroit, Mich. 
Wojciech Mackowski (Friend). 


Galaska, Edward J. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 121 Mg Bn 


KIA 


8/4/18 


829 Garden St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Albert Galaska. 


Galvin, John L. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Batry A. 121 F. A. 


KIA 


8/11/18 


Cottage Grove, Wis. 
John Galvin (Father). 


Callus, John A. 


Sgt. 


Hq. Co. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


Independence, Wis. 
Frank Gallus. 


Gamblin, Henr>' N. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/29/18 


Mt. Vernon, Oregon. 

Mrs. Florence Bird (Mother). 


Gample, Ethel 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


R. F. D. 1, Edgemae, Tenn. 
Lena Gample (Brother). 


Gander, William U. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


1415 Race St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Mrs. Emma Gander (Mother). 


Gappa, Joseph 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


8/3/18 
10/23/18 






Gareia, James 


Cresce'nt,"Caiif. 












Eliza Donavan (Aunt). 


Gardiner, Haral 


Sgt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/14/18 


Delta, Ohio. 

Mrs. Alice Gardiner. 


Gariepy, .\lbert 


Pvt. 


Med. Det. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Leroy, N. Dak. 

Joe Gariepy (Father). 


Garrett, Stanley B. 


Pvt. 


Hq. Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Nelsons Bridge, Pa. 

Charles E. Coy (Friend). 


Garski, Nick L. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Bat. F. 121 F. A. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


1936 Mead St., Racine, Wis. 
Joe Garski (Father). 


Gates, John 0. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


309 Elm St., Eau Claire, Wis. 
Mrs. .\nna Knees (Mother). 


Gattis, Paul 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


R. F. D. 2, Alabama City, Ala. 
Fannie G. Gattis. 


Gebert, Joseph 


Sgt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Box 67, Princeton, Wis. 
Mrs. Rose Gebert. 


Gecowets, A. C. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 





1039 HaiTison St., Defiance, Ohio. 
Mrs. Fred Stahl (Sister). 


Gehring, Thomas 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/8/18 


354 College Ave., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 
George Gehring. 


Georgakis, James G. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


133414 E. 1st St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
John Menegakis (Father). 


George, Guy S. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Shawano, Wis. 

D. H. George (Father). 


George, William 


Pvt. 

Sgt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 


nn 

KIA 


9/23/18 
8/4/18 






Gerald, Charles, Jr. 


845 St. Lawrence Ave., Beloil. Wis. 












Mrs. G. M. Gerald (Mother). 


Gerbasi, Pasquale 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Belle Vernon, Pa. 

Savens Oliverio (Friend). 


Gerheim, Harry M. 


Pvt. Id. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


P. O. 318, Salina, Pa. 

Phillip Henry Gerheim (Father), 


Gerlach, William H. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Henrv Gerlach (Father). 


Germann, William 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


Belleville, 111. 

Fred J. Klemme (Unde). 


Gilligan, Earl 


Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 


Co. F. 107 F. S. Bn 

Co. A. 120 F. A. 


DVV 

KIA 


8/8/18 
9/3/18 






Germershausen, Leo J- 


813 Oakland Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 












Mrs, B. Germershausen. 


Gerowx, David 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/6/18 


Box 531, Lake Linden, Mich. 
Uemi Gerowx (Father). 


Getchel, Dan 


Corp. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


24 Zimmerman St., Waupun, Wis, 
Charles Getchel. 


Giacoma, Peter 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/28/18 


1215 Bishop Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Jiie Oddone (Brother-in-Law). 


Gibbons, Eha 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KlA 


8/8/18 


R. F. D. 2, Edmore, Midi. 
Edwin Gibbons. 


Gielarowski, Joseph 


Pvt. Id. 


Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


34 Everett St. E., Hampton, Mass. 
Bartlomien Gielarowski (Father). 


Gictzen, William 


Corp. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


R. F. D. 2, Warren, Mich. 
Nicholas Gietien. 



243 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Namb 


Rank 


Okcanization I 


Caosb 


Datb 


AoDiEss— Next or Kin 


Gilbert, Cornelius 


Pvt. 


1 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DW 




Concord, Calif. 

Thomas Gilbert (Father). 


Giles, Arthur E. 


Pvt. 111. 


Co. E. 107 Am. Tr. 


KIA 


9/29/18 


532 W. Main St., Waukesha, Wis. 
William Bruhn. 


Gillespie, Clyde 


Corp. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


DD 


6/26/18 


59 Arthur Ave., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 
Nina E. Gillespie. 


Gillette, William F. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


Mills St., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Otha Gillette (Brother). 


Green, Lloyd H. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn 


KIA 


10/2/18 


Northville, Mich. 
Frank Green. 


Gilmette, Joseph 


Bug. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/7/18 


Onaway, Mich. 

Alfred Gilmcttc (Brother). 


Gislasson, Charles 


Sgt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


Detroit Harbor, Wis. 
Lawrence Gislasson. 


Glenn, Jay T. 


Sgt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Gregor>', Mich. 

E. L. Glenn (Father). 


Glynn, George H. 


Pvt. 


Med. Det. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


R. F. D. 1, Lansing, Iowa. 
Josephine Glynn. 


Goddard, Lewis 


Sgt. 
Pvt. 


Co. A. 119 Mg. Bn 
Co. G. 128 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


12/16/18 
10/8/18 








Godowski, Ziglin 


Chappel'f Hiil',' Texas'. 












Mai-y Godowski. 


Godwin, Eli 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 




DcQuein, Ark. 

Joe F. Godwin (Father). 


Golden, Horace F. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Gothenburg, Neb. 

Charles Golden (Father). 


Goltz, Herman D. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


2105 E. 37th St., Los Angeles. Calif. 
Mrs. Henrietta Goltz (Mother). 












Goree, Jow 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Shawano, Wis. 

Mrs. Ida Goree (Mother). 


Gorke, William G. 


Sgt. Id. 


Co. G. 107 F. S. Bn 


KIA 


8/29/18 


1946 E. Main St.. Madison, Wis. 
Mrs. Minnie Gorke (Mother). 


Gortj, Bert D. 


Pvt. Icl. 


308 Batr>-. Tr. Arty 


KIA 


10/23/18 


4427 Ganna Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Mrs. W. Lillian Gorti (Wife). 


Gossett, Charles W. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 
Co. I. 127 Inf. 
Hq. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 

KIA 
KIA 


11/10/18 
10/17/18 
9/1/18 






f»n<isTvilIpr Tlnl^prt (^ 




^JuOO tT4i(^A| A^Vt^^lv ^^ ■ 




Gould. Lyie E. 


1119 Harkcr St., Port Huron, Mich. 












Mrs. Laura Gould (Mother). 


Gowan, James 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/2/18 


Shawano, Wis. 

William Erdman (Friend). 


Gowers, R. H. 


Sgt. 
Pvt. Icl. 


Co. M. 362 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


10/5/18 
9/1/18 






Grabowski, Leonard 


1095 ib'tlV 'st.',''MiVwauk«'. Wis. 












Mrs. Francis Grabowski (Mother). 


Grabowski, Paul 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


510 Braddock, Braddock, Pa. 
William Amowitz. 


Graf, Ernest 


Sgt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


1223 Wright St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Mrs. Margaret Graf (Mother). 


Graham, James H. 


Sgt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/6/18 


1210 Williamson St., Madison, Wis. 
H. B. Graham. 


Graham, William 


Corp. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


202 Franklin St., Whitewater, Wis. 
Mrs. R. Graham. 


Graninier, Joe 


Corp. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


Big Fork. Mont. 

Mrs. Enmia L. Grammer (Wife). 












Grams, August B. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 125 Iiif. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


R. F. D. 2, Fricsland, Minn. 
John F. Grams. 


Granc, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


332 W. Elm St., Kent, Ohio. 
Edmund Granc (Brother). 


Grave, Clarence C. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/29/18 


Harpers Ferry, W. Va. 
Morris F. Grave. 


Graves, Arthur T. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Quitman, Mo. 

Mrs. Georgiana Graves. 


Gmvps Johnson 


Pvt. 
Pvt. Icl. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


10/6/18 
8/1/18 




vj t a « Co , V uif 1 101-/11 




Gray, James S. 


R. F.' B.i, Battle' Creek', Mich.' ' 












Mr.. S. R. Gray. 


Gray, Roscoe 


Corp. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Lima, Dhio. 

Elii «beth Gray (Mother). 


Gray, Scliyler 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/31/18 


Cadiz, Ky. 

Jar les Gray. ,...,_ 


Greeley, Tim W. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 




8/29/18 


86 S. . effcraon Av., Battle Creek, Mich. 
M s. Dell Greeley (Mother). 


Green, Carl 


Corp. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


NortI Vendon, Ind. 

E Y. Green (Father). 


Gieen, Donald E. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


927 I lorchester Av., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 
Vr.s. E. Green (Mother). 


Green, James L. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Ami sville, Va. 

James Green (Father). 


Green, Roy A. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/12/18 


R. F. D. 2. Portland, Mich. 
Albert Cireen. 


Greggs, Archie L. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


2006 Edna Ave.. Scranton. Pa. 
Thomas GrocBs (Father). 


Grego, Dominick 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 107 Engrs. 


KIA 


8/9/18 


716 Urown «f , '^nMlt Pte Marie, Mich. 



244 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Address— Next op Kin 


Greer, Glenn 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


II/IO/IS 


Laurel Bloomery, Tenn. 
Sam Greer. 


Greskowiak, Bert S. 


Corp. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


DW 


8/10/18 


1407 Mill St., Alpena. Mich. 
George Greskowski (Fatiier). 


GrifSn, Fred H. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


316 So. Oakley, Kansas City, Mo. 
A. M. Griffin (Brother). 


Griffin, Joe B. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Earlington, Ky. 
Ella Griffin. 


Griraes, George 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


415 Franconia Ave. San Francisco, 
John Grimes (Father). Calif. 


Grimes, Harry L. 


Pvt. 


Med. Det. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


R. F. D. 2, Anocartes, Wash. 
Mrs. Leona Grimes. 


Grimes, James F. 


Corp. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Melvin, Mich. 
Hobert Grimes. 


Griswold, Frank M. 


Sgt. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


40 Reynolds St., MuskeEon, Mich. 
Mrs. R. A. Griswold. 


Grooms, Robert 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


R. F. D. 11, Rushville, Mo. 
James E. Grooms (Father). 


Gross, Alfred 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


R. F. D. 3, Shawano, Wis. 
Henry Gross (Father). 


Gross, Merle F. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Richmond, Ind. 
Mrs. Nora Gross. 


Groves, Burtaw 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


8/7/18 
10/19/18 








Griibb, William T., J 


1462' b'tii' St., San' Francisco,' 'c'a'lif.' 












Mrs. Nellie Grubb (Mother). 


Guest, Donald A. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/20/18 


1263 Franklin St., Otsego, Mich. 
Mrs. Nellie Guest. 


Guide, Fred 


Pvt. 


Co. I,. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


1452 S. Komensky Ave., Chicago, III. 
Mrs. Anna Gordon Guide. 


Gullo, Sam 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 


DW 
DW 
KIA 


5/8/18 

2/I5/:8 

10/11/18 








Gustafson, Jolm 








Gu.stafson, Alfred I. 


Cook, Minn. 












Theila Gustafson. 


Gutli, Carl E. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


324 Moll St., Locklaiid, Ohio. 
Emil H. Guth (Father). 


Guyton, Joseph W. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


5/24/18 


Ebart, Mich. 

Mrs. Winona Guvton. 


Guzal, Anthony J. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


R.F.D. 4, Box 126, Pinconning, Midi. 
Mrs. Mary Guzal (Mother). 


Guzman, Jesus 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/22/18 


Corpus Christi, Texas. 
Mrs. J. Cortez (Sister). 


Haa.s, Alvin A. 


Pvt. 

Pvt. 


Bat. D. 322 F. A. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
DW 


10/15/18 
10/10/18 








Iladtrath, Byron 


Ortonville, Minn. 












Charles Hadtrath. 


Hagan, Jolm J. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Hdn. Co. 121 Mg. Bn. 
Bat. B. 120 F. A. 


KIA 

DW 


10/27/18 
8/7/18 








Hagerstrcm, Clia-les E 


549 ioth Ave. S., Wisconsin Rapids, 












Wm. Hagerstrcm. Wis. 


Haines, Richard B. 


Sgt. Icl. 


Med. Det. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/6/18 


Aptos, Calif. 

Mr. W. W. Haines (Father). 


Hall, Charles A. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


R. F. D., Weston, W. Va. 
Sarah D. Hall (.Si.ster). 


Hall, Floyd 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/2/18 


Fenton, Mich. 

Mrs. Frank Hall (Mother). 


Hall, Oliver 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. L. 123 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Turner, Mich. 

Mrs. Mary Nightingale (Mother). 


Hatch, Harold F. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/6/18 


Cobbs Creek, Va. 

Mrs. Evelyn Hatch (Mother). 


Hallope'ter, Charles C. 


Corp. 


Cn. L, 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


Bruce, Wis. 

Curtin Hallopeter (Father). 


Hamilton, Burr 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


.\lpena. Ark. 
Rosa Hamilton. 


Hamilton, I\-nn R. 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


859 4th St., Od. Rapiils, Mich. 
Mrs. Huch Thayer. 


Halvorsen, John 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/7/18 


Meridian. Wash. 

Erick Halvor.sen (Father). 


Hamilton, Nevel H. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Enavesta, Va. 

Matt. Hamilton (Father). 


Hammond, Mervin F 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Oreion Citv, Ore. 

T. J. Hammtinii (Father). 


Hampton, Robert 


Corp. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/4/18 


926 N. lOth St., Manitowoc, Wis. 
Harry Hampton (Father). 


Hanlon, Patrick L. 


Corp. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


813 Hurr Oak St., Albion, Mich. 
Mr. P. H. Hanlon (Father). 


Hanrahan, Martin 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


23 James St., Providence, R. I. 
James I.. Hanrahan. 


Hamilton, Jay 0. 


Pvt. 


Hdq. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


9/30/18 


Decatur, Mich. 

Emmett Hamilton (Father). 


Hansen, Frank R. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. Irl. 


Hq. Co. 119 F. A. 
Co. C. 125 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


8/16/18 
8/29/18 




Hansen, Ray H. 


851 ' iiaii-oim 'Ave.',' lictroit, Mich.' ' 












Mrs. Clare Hansen (Sister-in-Law). 



245 



THE Tiiiirrv-SECOND Pirisiny ix the woni.n war 



Namb 


Rank 


OlGANIZATION 


Hansford, Morie 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


Haralohns, Vasilian 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


HarRis, Marion D. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


Harden, Janicn 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


Harder, Paul 


Corp. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


HardiuR, Ward M. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


Hardliiks, James 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


Hardinf;, IJuj-d 


Corp. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


Hardy, Arthur H. 


Sgt. 


Hdq. 125 Inf. 


Harem, Andrew 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


Harmon, Frederiek A 


Pvt. Id. 


Co, M. 125 Inf. 


Harkins, James 


Corp. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


llarridge, Elmer 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 107 Engineer 


Harms, Ufkie 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


Harper, Fred B. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


Harper, Henry P. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


Sarpham, Bert E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. C. 121 Mj;. Hi. 


Harris, George 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


Harris, Clarence G. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


Harris, Walter S. 


Pvt. 


Bat. A. 120 F. A. 


Harris, William H. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


Uassell, Walter E. 


Sgt. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 


Harrison, Frank 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


Harrison, John 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


Harrison, Oscar B. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


Hart, Joe H. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 5 F. A. 


Hartman, Leiand O. 


Corp. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


Haney, Roy E. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


Haslick, Charles 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


HaURht, Thomas M. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


Hayden, Frank J. 


Pvt. 


Bat. C. 147 F. A. 


Haugen, Oscar O. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


Hawes, Wiles T. 


Pvt. 


Hdq. Co. 128 Inf. 


Hawks, Eincr>' M. 


Sgt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


Hawkins, Marvin 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


Hawkins, Roscoe 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


Hawks, John 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


Hazelton, Patrick 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


Hayes, Harrison G. 


Corp. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


Haynes, Lynn L. 


Pvt. Id. 


Hq. Co. 126 Inf. 


Hayton, Jo»-ph K. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


Hay word, Wayne 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


Heier, Phillip P. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 



Cause 


Date 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


10/12/18 


DW 


10/15/18 


KIA 


10/15/18 


DW 


8/1/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


8/29/18 


KIA 


10/10/18 


DW 


10/5/18 


KIA 
KIA 


10/15/18 
about 
10/18/18 


KIA 


8/^9/18 


DD 


2/15/18 


KIA 


9/3/18 


KIA 


9/3/18 


KIA 


11/11/18 


KIA 


8/31/18 


DD 


11/2/18 


DW 


8/1/18 


DD 




KIA 


10/4/18 


KIA 


10/13/18 


KIA 


8/1/18 


KIA 


10/7/18 


KIA 


10/22/18 


DW 


10/7/18 


KIA 


10/2/18 


KIA 
KIA 


10/12/18 
al>out 
9/4/18 


DW 


10/15/18 


KIA 


9/29/18 


KIA 


10/17/18 


DW 


10/23/18 


KIA 


10/9/18 


KIA 


8/2/18 


DW 


11/11/18 


KIA 


8/2/18 


KIA 


10/20/18 


KIA 


6/30/18 


KIA 


10/10/18 


KIA 


10/9/18 


KIA 


10/21/18 


KIA 


10/15/18 



AsDiiKss— Next or Kin 



Isle of Cyprus. 

\'asilios Haralobas (Father). 



Shelley, Idaho. 

William Harden. 
Ft. Atkinson, Wis. 

Guide Harder (Father). 



.Stewartville, Minn. 

Mrs. Nellie Hardlicks. 
312 4th St., Bay City, Mich. 

Mrs. Jennie Harthng. 
Flint, Mich. 

Mrs. Wesley Conke (Sister). 
Tron<ilijem, Norway. 

Mrs. Anna Harem. 



1609 Sterling Place, Brooklyn, .V. Y. 

Patrick Harkins (Brother). 
Prairie Hill, Mo. 

Wilhcrt F. Harridge. 
R. F. D. 3. Humbolt. Mich. 

Harry H. Harms (Fatlier). 



Scott, Ark. 

Mrs. Nancy Harper. 
Council, Idaho. 

Mrs. A. Harpham (Mother). 



R. F. D. 2, Oakley, Mich. 

Mrs. Ellen Harris (Mother). 
413 16lh St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. G. R. Cassidy (Mother). 



Stockholm. Wis. 

L. A. llallell. 
164 Northampton St., Easton, Pa. 

Mrs. Samuel Harrison. 
Bleasdale Lane, Nr. Garstang. Eng. 

Margaret Harrison (Mother). 
Greeneville, Tcnn. 

William B. Harri-son (Father). 



R. F. D. 2. Stanwood, Mich. 

A. M. Hartman. 
Walnut Ridge, Ark. 

Louise Har\ev (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Brown City, Mich. 

Clarence Haslick (Brother). 
Sincerilv, W. Va. 

William Haught. 
4 Lowell St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Mrs. Catherine Hayden. 
Hanskn, Minn. 

01c J. Haugen (Father). 
141 Austin St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Mmnie L. Hawes (Mother). 
317 Pasadena Ave., Fliiit, Mich. 

Charles Hanks (Brother). 
Dav\', West \'a. 

Flovd Hawkins (Father). 
R. F. 1). 2, Murrayville, III. 

Levi Hawkins (Father). 
R. F. I). 3, S. Norwich, W'ash. 

Mrs. Jos. Gardnier (Mother). 
Eau Claire, Wis. 

Mrs. M. Hazelton. 



1301 i,erry St., Jackson, Mich. 

I,ouis Havnes. 
R. F. D. 1, Bristol, Va. 

William Hayton (Father). 



Glenullin. N. D. 
Mr. Philip Heier. 



246 




First Lieutenant Iden E. CHArreRXON, tntelligence Officer, Second Battalion, 126tli Infantiy. Killed in action 

October 6th, 1918, during the Meuse-Argonne Offensixe. 
First Lieutenant Thomas E. M. Heffeiun, Company M, 126th Iiifantr>'. Killed in action August 1st, 1918, 

dvirinK the Aisne-Marne Offnnsi\'e. 
First Lieutenant William John Real, Company L, 126f.h Infantry. Killed in action August 29th, 1918, 

during the Oise-Aisne Offensive. 
Captain John F. Girard, Company D, 126th Infantry. Killed in action OctoI)er 5th, 1918, during the Meuse- 
Argonne Offensive. 
Captain Richard Frederick Smith, Company F, 126th Infantry. Killed in action August 5th, 1918, during the 

Aisne-Marne Offensive. 
Captain Frederick W. Beaudry, Company H, 126th Infantry. Killed in action August 1st, 1918. during the 

Aisne-Marne Offensive. 
SccoND Lieutenant Arthur Kindred Atkins, Company C, 126th Infantry. Died of wounds August 3Ist, 1918. 
Second Lieutenant Robert AxEimn Osthaus, Company E, 126th Infantry. Died of wounds October I5th, 1918, 

during the Mevise-Argonne Offensive. 
Second Lieutenant Richard E. Cook, Company H, 126th Infantry. Killed in action August 4th, 1918, during 

the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 



247 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Naui 



Rank 



Organization 



Causb 



Healey, Charles G. 
Ileasley, Henry C. 
Ileffron, Peter J. 
Hegelan, Christ 
Uillery, John 
Heinecke, Frank H. 
Heia, Roman J. 
Helroke, William 
Hendrikson Heniy B. 
Henning, William 
Henniger, George 
Herber, August W. 
Herbert, Leon S. 
Herbst, Fred B. 
Herigstad, Nela 
Herman, Irving E. 
Herrold, Carl E. 
Hesterkind, Tirnnion 
Hewitt, George E. 
Heyenga, Lubbert L. 
Hibbard. Albert L. 

Hickey, John J. 

Hieatt, Aaron C. 

High, Willie D. 

Highfil, James G. 

Higley, Earl L. 

Hildebrand, William F 

Hiler, Edward 

Hilferink, Hubert 

Hill. James 

Hill, Phillip 

Hillman, Anton F. 

Hilton, Robert I. 

Hnff, Charles A. 

Hintz. Fred E. 

Hintz, John A. 

His-!iorse-is-fast, Isaac 

Hitrhcork, Floyd M. 

Hit, James C. 

Hodder, Jesse C. 

Hodges, Fred 

Hodson, Floyd F. 

Hoofer, Michael 



r 

Pvt. Icl. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. Id 


Batt. A. 121 F. A. 


DW 


Pvt. 


Hdq. Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pv,. 


Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 


DW 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 1 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvi. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. 128 Inf. 


DW 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KlA 


Corp. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


Sgt. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DW 


Sgt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


Corp 


Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 6 Inf. 


DW 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


DW 


Pvt. 


Sup. Co. 120 F. A 


DD 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


DD 


Pvt. 


Hdq. Co. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


Corp. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Corp. 


1 Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Mcch. 


' Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


DW 


Corp. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 



Datx Addbess — Nbxt op Kin 

10/9/18 I Churchview, Va. 

Mrs. Vttshii Hcaley (Motlier). 
10/11/18 Ree Heights, S. Dak. 

Henry Hcasli-y (Father). 
8/21/18 415 Grand Ave., Milwnukee, Wis. 

James J. Ht-ffron (Brother). 
10/10/18 Grandin, Mo. 

Mrs. Marv Hallcr (Cousin). 
2/18/18 650 S. Broadway, Akron, Ohio. 

Michael Ilillery (Brother). 
10/4/18 New Athcnis, III. 

Henry Heinecke (Fatlier). 
10/15/18 1432 Clay St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mrs. Harriett Heis (Mother). 
7/31/18 

8/5/18 ■ R. F. b! irVerridaie, "Minn. 

John B. Hendrikson (Father). 
7/31/18 R. F. D. 3, Mt. Clemens, .Mich. 

William Hemiing. 
11/11/18 

8/28/18 I 425 McG'ivan.Ave.'.Akron, Ohio. 

Mrs. Elizabeth School. 
8/28/18 Perry, La. 

Renny S. Herbert (Father). 
10/9/18 Park Ave., Bcxley, Ohio. 

Celia Loui?c Herbst (Wife). 
8/29/18 Silverton, OrcRon. 

I Ncls N. llerig.stad (Father). 
8/30/18 421 River St., Janesville, Wis. 

Mrs. D. Herman. 
8/29/18 R. F. D. 6, Seward, Neb. 

Raymond Herrold (Brother). 
8/4/18 Cedar Rapids, Neb. 

Mrs. Henry Uicken (Friend). 
8/5/18 ; 122 Merrill St., Detr.>it, Mich. 

Mrs. Laura Hewitt. 
10/12/18 Ridott, 111. 

Lvibhert L. HeycnEa (GrandfntI.er). 
10/16/18 I 955 4th St., Belmt, Wis. 

Mrs. O. L. Hibbard (Mother). 
8/4/18 ' 22 N. Baswtt St., Madison, Wis. 

Mrs. Sophia Hickev. 
11/8/18 Smithfield, Ky. 

Aaron Hieatt. 
10/9/18 R. F. D. 1, Cn,'stal Hill, Va. 

Mary R. High (Mother). 
10/21/18 ! 

10/15/18 ...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

9/2/18 ' Guide Rocic, Neb. „ . , 

A'ava H. Hildebrand (Father). 
7/31/18 609 Jackson St., Gd. Haven, Midi. 

Mrs. G. P. Hiler. 

R. F. D. II. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

about Mrs. M. Hilferink. 

10/10/18 Van Bnren, Ark. 

(Juinn Hill. 
10/19/IS 6th & Arizona St., Huron, S. Dak. 

Mrs. Augusta Hill (Grandmotlier). 
3/13/18 I 

10/17/18 ; ...'.'.'.'.'.'. .'.'.\'-'-" '.'■■'■ 

10/15/18 Ft. Raiisom, N. D. 

Mr. Sam C. Hoff. 
10/7 '18 901 S. Peach St., Mnrshficld, Wis. 

August Hintz (Father). 
8/31/18 

8/1/18 I White Horse. S. Dak. 

Robert His-hors«-i5-fnst. 
10/20/18 Gillespie. III. , ,^ ., - 

Edward Hitchcock (Father). 
10/7/18 136 Grave Ave.. Detroit, Mich. 

H. W. Hix (Brother). 
9/3/18 Tawas Citv, Mich. 

Sarah Navess (Mother). 
10/16/18 I Blvthesvillc, Ark. 

Mrs. Fannie F. Hodges. 
8/28/18 Bdlaire, Mich. 

I Vclma Russcl (Mother). 
7/31/18 , 2102 Thomas St.. Marinette, Wis. 

Matt Hocfer (Father). 



248 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 



I 



Rank 



Hoeppiier, Herbert O. 
Hoffman, Russell L. 
Hoffman, Frank 
UoUingsworth, Bane C 
Hoffman, Theobald 
Hofftier, Herman 
Hohn, Joseph A. 
Hokanson, Carl A. 
Holconib, Frank J. 
Holland, Harold 
Holienberger, Floyd H. 
Holewinski, Leo 
Hood, James W. 
Hollis, Charles 
Hollonsbad, Hoyt 
Holmes, Floyd D. 
Holtke, Herbert 
Holton, Guy H. 
Holtz, Frank F. 
Holub, Floyd C. 
Holzschuh, George 
Honaker, Jason 
Hood, Harold H. 
Hurst, Karl 
Hooker, Sam 
Hooten, Floyd 
Hope, Charles E. 
Hopkins, Albert 
Hopkins, Arden 
Hopkins, Harry 
Hopkins, Thomas R. 
Hopeland, Obert 
Hopp, Roy 
Horn, Nelson J. 
Horn, William 
Hornaday, Paul W. 
Hosier, Clifford C. 
Hottenstein, Lonnie 
Hottinger, Benedict J. 
Houshin, Ward W. 
HourcaiUou, Jean B. 
House, Forest G. 
Houser, William M. 



Ohganuation 



Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Corp. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 
Wag. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt, 
Corp. 
Corp. 
Pvt. 
Corp. 
Pvt. 

Sgt. F. H 
Pvt. IcI. 
Pvt. Id. 
Corp. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Mech. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 

Bnd. Corp 
Pvt. lol. 



Co. M. 127 Inf. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 
Co. C. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 126 Inf. 
Co. C. 127 Inf. 
Bat. E. 322 F. A. 
Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Bat. D. 147 F. A. 
But. D. 147 F. A, 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Sup. Co. 120 F. A. 
Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 
Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Co. 128, 107 S. Tr. 
Co. P. 125 Inf. 
Hdq. Co. 125 Inf. 
Co. E. 126 Inf. 
Co. B. 107 Sup. Tr. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 125 Inf. 
Bat. E. 322 F. A. 
308 Bat. Tr. .\rt. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 125 Inf. 
Hq. 120 Mg. Bn. 
Co. H. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 
Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Hdq. Co. I2S Inf. 
126 Inf. 



Cadsb 



KIA 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DR 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DD 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KlA 

DD 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 



Date 



9/2/18 

10/16/18 

9/1/18 

10/6/18 

8/31/18 

10/10/18 

7/31/18 

8/31/18 

8/4/18 

10/6/18 

6/8/18 

10/16/18 

10/10/18 

11/10/18 

7/31/18 

7/31/18 

7/31/18 

9/21/18 

8/4/18 

10/19/18 

7/31/18 

8/28/18 

8/1/18 

10/18/18 

10/18/18 

8/4/18 

10/10/18 

10/23/13 

11/8/18 

10/12/18 

8/1/18 

8/3/18 

7/31/18 

8/30/18 

in/21/18 

6/9/18 

10/9/18 

10/3/18 

8/28/18 

10/2/18 

7/31/18 

8/6/18 

8/28/18 



ADD8ES8— Next of Kin 



Desmond, Neb. 

Theodore Hoeppner (Father). 
Clinton, Dewitt Co., 111. 

Jacob Hoffman (Father). 
1024 St. Clair St., Sheboygan, Wis. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Jacket't (Mother). 
Mineral, Ark. 

Helen H. Hollingsworth. 
1423 So. 8th St., Sheboygan, Wis. 

Mrs. Isabel Hoffman (Wife). 



Westmoreland, Kan. 

John Hohn (Father). 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 

Mrs. Victoria Munkvold (Sister). 
Centerville, S. Dak. 

James H. Holcomb (Father). 
1523 E. Jefferson St., Seattle, Wash. 

John Holland (Father). 
Plymouth, Wis. 

Mrs. F. Holienberger. 
Roberts, Wis. 

Peter Holewinski (Father). 



Gravel Ridge* Ark. 
Henry Hmes. 

707 Prospect St., Flint, Mich. 

Mrs. Bessie Brady. 
1133 W. 4th St., Marion, Ind. 

Wellington Holmes. 



26 Lathrop Ave., Beloit, Wis. 

George Holtz (Brother). 
998 14th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. Anna Holub. 



705 Fort St., Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

120 W. Washington St., Ann Arbor, 
Mrs. Harold Hood (Wife). Mich. 



Prescott, Ark. 

J. Y. Hooker (Father). 
Burlington, Iowa. 

Miimie Hooten. 



7504 Claa.sn Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Mrs. William Hopkins (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Giles, W. Va. 

Tobatha Hopkins (Father). 
Russell St., Saginaw, Mich. 

Mrs. Ela Freder. 
Milan, Mo. 

Mrs. Mary E. Hopkins. 
Eleva, Wis. 

E. O. Hopeland. 
335 13th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Matt P. Hopp (Father). 
551 Chatham St., Janesville, Wis. 

E. D. Horn. 
Green Spring, W. Va. 

Andy J. Horn. 



East Jordan, Mich. 

Mrs. Kate Hosier. 
Moore, Mont. 

P. S. Hottenstein (Father). 
243 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

George Mcgonegal. 
Hosterman, W. Va. 

Tliomas Houshin (Father). 
1055 Valencia, San Francisco, Calif. 

John HourcaiUou (Brother). 
Lee Center, N. Y. 

Mrs. Hetfie Hou.se. 
200 S. Main St., Keyser, W. Va. 

Forest Houser. 



249 



THE Til JETY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Nahi 


Rank 


OUGANIZATION 


C«i;sE 


D*n 


Aduess— Next or Km 


Hovercamp, Jolin 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


R. F. D. 1, Ensign, Mich. 

Charles Hovercamp (Brother). 












Howard, Glenn L. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Neillsvillc. Wis. 

John Howard (Father). 


Howard, Ray A. 


Corp. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


506 W. Washington St., Harvard. Ill 
George A. Howard (Father). 


Howe, Frank 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


1203 Hamilton Si., Saginaw, Mich. 
Ellen Howe (Mother). 


Howell, ElUridge 


Pvt. 


Co, F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Grubbs, Ark. 

May Howell (Sister). 


Hnlzhieter, Herbert A 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 


ACC 
KIA 


8/8/18 
8/31/18 








Hrdlieka, James L. 


Stewartville, Minn. 












Mrs. Nellie Hrdlieka (Mother). 


Hubbard, Joseph J. 


Sgt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/1/18 


Forest Ave., Neenah, Wis. 

Mrs. Mary A. Hubbard (Mother). 


Hubert, Don 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 
about 


Bedford. Mich. 

M Hubert (Father). 


Hudson, EUa O. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


Midwav, West Va. 
Mr. Albert Hudson. 


Huff, Lawrence 


Corp. 
Pvt. 


Batt. A. 323 F. A 
Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


1/1/19 
7/31/18 








Huff, William Mck. 


R. F. ' b! 'i! Sand ' Lake' " Mich.' 












Mrs. Susan Huff. 


lluggins, Robert C. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


R. R. 7, Owcnsboro, Ky. 
Milus Huggins (Father). 


Hughes, Forrest 


Pvt. 
Pvt. Icl. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 

KI.\ 


8/3/18 
9/1/18 








Hughes, James D. 




280H Pearson St., Milwaukee, Wis. 












Jeanette Hughes (Sister). 


Hughes, Richard C. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


Kl V 


7/31/18 














Richard j. Hughes (Father). 


Hulet, Moses A. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/9/18 
11/10/18 








Humphreys, Burey 


Tri'nitv, Texas. " 












Betty Humphreys. 


Ilinriphrey, Avery 




Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 

about 

10/2a/18 




Collins 


Corp. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 




Humphrey, David H. 


Eugene, Oregon (Ctow Stage). 












Mrs. Pline E. Humphrey. 


Hunsingcr, VVillinm A. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


1423 West oath St., Seattle, Wash. 
Mrs. Majy HunsingiT (Mother). 


Hunt, Richard R. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


68 Foster St., Pontiac, Mich. 
Charles Hunt (Father). 


Hunt, Willard 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


209 N. Horton St., Jackson, Mich. 
Mrs. John Lacy (Friend). 


Hunter, Alger R. 


Corp. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


13 W 


8/22/18 


Mt. Clemens, Mich. 

.Mr. Albert Hunter (Father). 


Hurst, Robert H. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


UW 


10/7/18 


Mftckoy, K\-. 

Lucy Hurst (Mother). 


Hurt, William J. 


Pvt. Icl 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


R. K. 9, Paris, Tenn. 
John W. Hurt (Father). 


Iluschke, Bernard II. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 103 Engrs. 
Hq. Co. 121 F. A. 


UW 


8/5/18 
8/1/18 




Ilutcheson, Clarence K 


Pvt. 


KIA 


Bentonville, Ark. 












W. T. Hutcheson (Father). 


Hutchison, Henry 


Pvt. 
Corp. 


Co. B. 120 Mg. Bn 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


9/3/18 
10/18/18 




I'' 


Ibbotson, George W. 


R.F.b. 2, Box 17, Kalamazoo, Mich 












George W. Ibbelson. 


Igo, William 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


Turner, Ariz. 

Mrs. M. A. Igo. 


Ingram, Hamilton 


Pvt. 

Corp. 

Corp. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 
Co. G. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 
KIA 


10/21/18 

8/4/18 

10/10/18 








Ingrnm, Judson E. 








Irish, Wallace J. 


R. f'.'d.' 5,' 'Gayiord'.'Mich. 












Mr. George Irish. 


Irons, Oliver 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Moberly, Mo. 

Mr. William A. Irons. 


Irwin, Abram L. 


Mcch, 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


655 Hanes Ave., Alliance, Ohio. 
Harry Irwin. 


Irwin, Herbert W. 


Pvt. Ic!. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


R. F. D. 1, Smvrnn. Mich. 
Dudley M. Irwin (Father). 


Isaacson, Victor S. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


57 S. Jefferson Av.. Kalamazoo, .Mich. 
Mrs. Marv I.«aacson. 


Iverson, Ole 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/14/18 


Carson, N. Dak. 
Mr. Peler Iverson. 


Jack, Joe D. 


Bug. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Ticonderoga, N. Y. 

Mr. Tonv D. Jack (Brolher). 


Jnckola, Axel R. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Hancock, Mih. 

Mrs. Axel Jackoln. 


Jacks, Robert 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Platt.«mouth, Neb. 

A. J. Jacks (Father). 


Jackson, Brewster 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


R. 2. EllenW(K»l, Ga. 
Mrs. Otiie Pope. 



250 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Note 


Rank 


Obganization 


Cause 


Date 


Address— Next op Kin 


Jackson, Charles B. 


Sgt. 

Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 
Arab. Co. 126 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 


DW 
DW 
KIA 


12/23/18 

7/31/18 

8/1/18 








Jackson, John 








Jacobson, Artliur 


Calumet, Mich. 












Mrs. Kaiss Jacobson. 


Jacobson, William A. 


Pvt. 


MD. I2S Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Viroqua, Wis. 

Mr. Jacob Jacobsijn. 


Jaeckel, Harold 


Corp. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


500 N. Cherry St., Marshfield, Wis. 
Mrs. Louise Jaeckel (Mother). 


Jagcr, John 


Corp. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


DD 


10/29/18 


568 W. Western Av., Muskegon, Mich. 
Samuel W, Jacer. 


Janczyak, Stanislaw 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


990 E. 57th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Jan Czekal (Friend). 


Jaiike, Otto W. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


New Auburn, Minn, 

Mrs. Marvel! G. Janke (Wife). 


Jankowski, Leo 


Pvt. 


Bat. A. H7 F. A. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


White Pigeon, Mich. 

Mrs. Mary Jankowski (Mother). 


Jankowski, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Kalisz, Pomat Kolo Gmin Koscilec. 
Wiis Gosdow, Russia. Poland. 
Mrs. Leona Jankowski (Wife). 


Jaussen, Fred R. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/6/18 


Nokornis, 111. 

Ubbe Janssen (Father). 


Jarkala, Axel R. 


Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 
Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
9/1/18 








Jatropulo.s, Gust. S. 


1201 Gratiot Ave.',' Detroit, Mich. 




1 








W. A. Buerger. 


Jaworski, Jacob 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


129 Andrus St., Hamtramck, Mich. 
Joseph Jaworiski (Father). 


Joworski, Stephen 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


127 31st St., Detroit, Mich. 
Frank Jaworski. 


Jelbrer, Marcol 


Pvt. 
Corp. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 
Co. A. 121 Mg. Bn 


KI.\ 
DW 


8/1/18 
9/1/18 








Jenkins, Melvin 


Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 












Mrs. Joseph Jenkins. 


Jonnart, Leon 


Bugler 


Co. E. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


7/12/18 


608 Heckel Ave., Spring City, Pa. 
Mrs. Anna Jonnart (.Sister). 


Jenson, Emil A. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/12/18 


R. F. D. I, Erskine, Miim. 
Bethel Jensen. 


Jeppson, Hilmer 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Chappell, Neb. 
H. Jeppson. 


Jerred, Harry D. 


Corp. 

1st Sgt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


9/6/18 
about 
10/15/18 








Jerzakowski, Walter 


940 2nd Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 












Jacob Jerzakowski (Father). 


Jett, Je.sse J. 


Pvt. Ich 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


R. F. D. 2, Fredericksburg, Va. 
Mrs. Irene E. Jett (Mother). 


Jewell, Carleton 


Sgt. 
Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
DW 


7/31/18 
10/20/18 








Jewell, Harvey 


37 'So.'Mth 'st.'.' Louisville, Ky." 












Ed. Jewell (Father). 


Jobe, Dera 


Pvt. 


Co. M. i:6 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Slauehterville, Ky. 
Mrs. Clarence Jobe. 


Johns, Herman 





Hq. Co. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


R. F. D. 1, La Crosse, Wis. 
Chas. Johns. 


Johns, Lewis C. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Bath, Mich. 

Mrs. Mary Johns (Mother). 


John.^on, Albert 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


P. O. Box 31, Olondo, Wis. 
Fred Johnson (Brother). 


Johnson, Algot 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/30/18 


Box 484, White Hall, Mich. 
Mrs. Clara Johnson. 


Johnson, Andic J. 


Corp. 
Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
10/9/18 








Johnson, ,\ndrew M. 


Scoffs Lamhull, Sweden. 












John M. Macnusoii (Father). 


Johnson, Anton 


Pvt. 


Co. J. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Box 31, Oconto, Wis. 

Fred Johnson (Brother). 


Johnson, Cecil 


Pvt. 


Hq.. Co. 125 I[if. 1 


DW 


10/13/18 


Bavfield, Wis. 

Effie Johnson (Wife). 


Johnson, Clyde 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


DW 


S/29/18 


Joy, Mich. 

John A. Johnson (Father). 


Johnson, Edmund O. 


Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt, 

Pvt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 
DW 


9/16/18 

9/2/18 

10/9/18 








Johnson, Ernest 








Johnson, Forrest 


R. 'f.' 'd.' 'a'.' 'Box 'iV',' ivionti'ce'li.'i! '.Vrk. 












Mrs. Minnie Pevcy. 


Johnson, Fred L. 


Sgt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Farmington, Me. 

Mrs. Florice G. Johnson. 


Johnson. Gilbert 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


Viola, III. 

Lee William Johnson (Brother). 


Johnson, Graves 


Pvti 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


R. F. D. 7, McMinnville, Tenn. 
Will .lohn.son (Father). 


Jolmson, Harold 


Sgt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Menominee. Mich. 

Mrs. Hilda Johnson (Mother). 


Johnson, Harry 


Corp. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


5917 Oakes Ave., Superior, Wis. 
Mr. C. L. Johnson (Father). 



251 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Johnson, William M. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Johnson, William H. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


Johnson, Herbert C. 


Bug. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Johnson, Jens A. 


Corp. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Johnson, John E. 


Pvt. 


120 Mg. Bn. 


DD 


10/11/18 


Johnson, John S. 


Pvt. 


Co. S. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 
about 
10/10/18 


Johnson, John W, 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


Johnson, Malvin B. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


Johnson, Oscar E. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


6/31/18 


Johnson, Peter 


Sgt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/3/18 


Johnson, Ralph C. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Johnson, Richard 


Sgt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Johnson, Rollie 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Johnson, Victor E. 


Pvt. 


Bat. B. 120 F. A. 


DD 




Johnston, Percy L. 


Pvt. 


Bat. D. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


9/29/18 


Jones, Ben 


Corp. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Jones, Charlie 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


.Fones, Clarence E. 


Pvt. 


Bat. F. 322 F. A. 


DW 


10/27/18 


Jones, Harmon R. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Jones, Harry R. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Hq. Co. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/2/18 


Jonker, Alvin 


Sgt. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Jorgenson, Kmile 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Josephson, Edwin B. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Joyner, Other 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Judkina, Aubrey 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


DD 


1/15/19 


Judson, Ralph A. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Jump, Eden W. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Jving, Otto F. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Kagibitang. Alex 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Kah, Alonzo L. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


Kahn, Leo 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. G 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/12/18 


Knhra, Reino 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/29/18 


Kaiii, Frank M. 


Wag. Sup 


Co. 127 Inf. 


DD 


10/23/18 


Kalbrs, John 


Pvt. Ic!. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/-I/18 


KalkbreruuT, Fred W. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Kiipanke, Fred 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Kaparos, Nicolas P. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Kapczuk, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Kaphan, Jerome 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


Karch, Karl 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Karolczak, John 


Pvt. 


Hdq. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/6/18 


Karston, Gilbert D. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Karvola, William 


Corp. 


Co. A. 107 Eng. 


KIA 


10/21/18 



Address— Next op Kin 



Standish, Mich. 

Mrs. Wm. M. Johnson (Mother). 
Sartori, LouLsiana. 

Jeau Carpenter (Uncle). 
92 Clifford St., Detroit, Mich, 

Julia Johnson (Mother). 
R. F. D. 30. Beloit, Wis. 

Jens S. Johnson (Father). 



Buhl, Idaho. 

Mrs. Anna Brown (Sister). 
Clear Brook. Minn. 

Olivia Johnson (Mother), 



191 5th St.. Oshkosh, Wis. 

James Johnson (Brother). 
111! CinnniinRS Ave., Superior, Wis. 

J. Nelson (Father). 
Putnam & Birch Sts., Eau Claire, Wis. 

Carl Johnson (Brother). 
.SlampiMR Ground, Ky. 

Lenora Johnson. 
Weverhauter, Wis. 

(Motlier). 
Lake. Miss. 

Alice Johnston (Mother). 
Camp Dougla!^, Wis. 

Oliver Jones. 
R. R. 2, Snyder. Okla. 

Mary Plumlee. 



925 Burlingame Ave., Gd. Rapids, 

J. C. Zimmer (Father). Mich. 

321 Conant Terrace, Gd. Rapids, 

F. E. Jones (Father). Mich. 

513 Columbus St., Gd. Haven, Mich. 

Mrs. Annie Jonker. 
Thompson, N. Oak. 

Jergcn jnutson (Father). 
1417 Griffith St.. T.os Angeles, Calif. 

Jolianas A. M. Josephson (Father). 
Holum, Louisiana. 

Ebenzen Joyner. 



Lewistown, Mont. 

Samuel Curtis (Friend). 
473 E. 143 St.. Bronx, N. Y. 

Cross Village. Mich. 
Mrs. Margcret Kagebitang (Mother). 
11. F. D. 1. Anna. Ohio. 

Mrs. Emma Kah (Mother). 
.514 N. Troy St.. Chicago. III. 

Mrs. Jennie Kahn (Mother). 
Iron Rivor, Mich. 

Elv Kahra (Brother). 
Mndd.ck, N. Dak. 

Mrs. Jasper Kain (Mother). 
Uound, Wis. 

Adam Kalbes. 
301 W. Ross Ave., St. Bernard, 

Hamilton, Ohio. 

Walter Kalkbrcnner. 
SliBwano, Wis. 

Fred Kananke. Sr. (Father). 
10 N. I4th St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Louis Kaparos. 



563 24th St., Oakland. Calif. 

George Kaphan (Father). 
R. F. D. 1. St.. Joseph, N. Dak. 

Mr. Karl Knrch. 
302 Scro St., Heidlersburg, Pa. 

Stanley Karolczak (Brother). 
Zeeland, Mich. 

Miss Martha Karston (Sister). 
232 1st St., Calumet, Mich. 

Matt Kar\'ola. 



252 




1. First Lieutenant Bruce W. Clarke, Company G, 127th Infantry. Killed in action August 6tli, 191S, during 

the Ai.sne-Marne Offensive. 

2. First Lieutenant Henry S. Blomberg, Company D, 127th Infantiy. Killed in action October 4th, I9I8, while 

directing the organization of important ground which had just been won by his company during the 
Mouse -Argonnc Offensive. 

3. First Lieutenant Ray C. Dickop, Company L, 127th Infantry. Killed in action August 4th, 1918, during the 

Aisne-Manie Offensive. 

4. First Lieutenant John Basil Roberts, Regimental Intelligence Officer, 127th Infantry. Died August 4th, 

1918, of wounds received during the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

5. Major Adoipii Trier, Commanding Second Battalion, 127th Infantiy. Killed in action July 30th, 1918, during 

the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

6. Captain Myron Chester West, Headqviarters Company, 127th Infantry. Died August 5th, 1918, of wounds 

received during tlic Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

7. First Lieutenant Archie D. McGee, I27tli Infantry. Killed in action October 18th, 1918, during the Meuse- 

Argonne Offensive. 

8. First Lieutenant Irenaeus J. Lietemever, 127tb Infantry. Died of wounds August 6th, 1918, during the 

Aisne-Manie Offensive. 
9.* FiBST Lieutenant Otto Oas. 127th Infantry. Died January 3rd, 1919, of wounds received in action August 4th, 
1918, during the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

253 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WAIi 



Naub 



Rank 



Koite, Harry 

Katapodes, John 

Katz, Morris 

Kaufman, Alex 

KtfBan, Ray 

Keil, Edward H. 

Kwni-r, William H. 

Ki't'zel, William A. 

Kt'ozer, Charles 

Kegley, Charles 

Keinarth, Conrad 

Keith, Lee 

Kelian, George L. 

Kellar, Samuel W. 

Kille, Fred 

Keller, Ralph C. 

Kelley, George W. 

Kelley, Raymond S. 

Kellis, Burnice B. 

Kelly, Dan C. 

Kelly, Harry E. 

Kelly, Nelson C. 

Kempter, John B. 

Kennedy, Lyman J. 

Kent, Rosier H. 

Kerlin, Arthur A. 

Kerns, Perry 

Kerp, Christian N. 

Keske, Clarence H. 
Ke&*r, James C. 
Kessler, Godfred 
Keveney, Alfred 
Kicklighter, Charlie 
Kidd, John 
Kidder, Albert M. 
Kicfor, Carl 
Kicrschke, Edward G. 
KilRorc. Clyde B. 
Kimball, Herbert P. 
Kimbel, Roy 
Kimmcl, Donald K. 
Kinard, Ray V. 
King, Eldridge G. 



Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Cook 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Corp. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Sgt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 



OUGANIZATION 



Cause 



Co. I. 126 Inf. 
Co. E. 126 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. D 107 EtiR. 
Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Co. A. 127 Inf. 
Co. H. 126 Inf. 
Co. A. 127 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 
H.|. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 126 Inf. 
Co. L. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 
Bat. E. 147 F. A. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 56 Coast Art. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 
Bat. F. 120 F. A. 
Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 125 Inf. 
Bat. B. 120 F. A. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 
Co. A. 127 Inf. 
Co. 107 F. S. Bn. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 
Co. B. 126 Inf. 
Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. L. 126 Inf. 
Co. 'E. 125 Inf. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 
Co. H. 126 Inf. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 



Datb 



KIA 


1 8/29/18 


KIA 


8/1/18 


DW 


10/2/18 


KIA 


9/6/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


8/4/18 


IJW 


10/9/18 


KIA 


10/15/18 


KIA 


8/28/18 


DW 


10/8/18 


DW 


10/6/18 


KIA 


11/7/18 


KIA 


8/5/18 


KIA 


8/24/18 


KIA 


10/17/18 


KIA 


10/19/18 


ACC 


10/15/18 


DW 


11/15/18 


KIA 


8/29/18 


KIA 


8/29/18 


DD 




UW 


10/18/18 


KIA 


11/10/18 


KIA 


11/8/18 


KIA 


10/4/lS 


DW 


8/5/18 


KIA 


10/9/18 


KIA 


8/3/18 


KIA 


10/19/18 


KIA 


11/10/18 


KIA 


9/1/18 


KIA 


10/15/18 


KIA 


10/2/18 


KIA 


10/16/18 


DW 


10/5/18 


KIA 


8/7/18 


KIA 


8/1/18 


DW 


9/1/18 


DW 


9/1/18 


KIA 


10/9/18 


KIA 


8/27/18 


KIA 


10/5/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 



Address— Next dp Kin 



RugtowTi, Pa. 

Mrs. Luke Ka** (Mother). 
1003 Broadway Av.,Aim Arbor, Mich. 

CJeorce Katapodes. 
189.5 Milwaukee Ave., Chicago, III. 

Max Katz. 
776 Bow St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. Mary Kaufman (Mother). 



809 14th St. So. Bellingham, Wash. 

C. O. Keel (Father). 
Seymour, Tenn. 

Hannar Kei'ner. 
Limestone, Tenn. 

Lizzie Williams. 
Erirkson. Neb. 

Mrs. Clara A. Kcezer. 
789 6th St., Detroit, Mich. 

Charles Arbouch (Brother-in-Law). 
3!60 Vine St.. Ciminnati, Ohio. 

Mrs. Martin Keinarth. 
1543 Galleeer St., Louisville, Ky. 

John Keith (BroUier). 



Hurley, S. Dak. 

Ida M. Kellar (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Napoleon, N. Dak. 

Jacob Kelle. 
.Monterey, Indiana. 

Martin Keller (Father). 



R. R. 2, Opdyke, 111. 

Dorothy Furn Kelley (WiftO- 
Wickenburg, Ariz. 

Mrs. Hattie J. Kellis. 
Miizon, III.. 

Wayne Carter (Friend V 
101 Broad St., Elkhom, Wis. 

C. E. Kelly TFather). 
545 Parker Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Joe Frernd. 
1616 Prairie St., Milwaukee. Wis. 

Mr. John Kempter (Father). 
2116 Division Ave., dd. Rapids, Mich. 

Airs. Ada Kennedy (Mother). 
40 E. Montgomery St., Baltimore. Md. 

Lida Kent (Wife). 
801 Armour Ave., Cudiihy, Wis. 

ftust Kerlin. 
Wn-^hinEton St.. Peterslui-g, Va. 

Mary Keanis (Wife). 
Zortman, Mont. 

.lohn Kerp (Brother). 
R. F. D. 2. Beaver Dam. Wis. 

Charles Keske (Father). 
2417 Ohio Ave.. Parkersburg, \V. Va. 

Mrs. Rose Bolser. 
754 10th St., Milwavikee, Wis. 

Fred Kessler (Father). 
921 Riverview Place, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mrs. Anna Keveney. 
Jestip, Georgia. 

Mark Kicklighter (Father). 



Raisin Tw., Adrian, Mich. 

Mrs. Rena Sanford (Mother). 
Tunnel City, Wis. 

J. J. Keifer (Father). 
1143 McDougnl Ave.. Detroit, Mirli. 

Mrs. Anna Kierschke. 
CoMuril BlufTs. Iowa. 

Mrs. J. J. KilRore. 
1954 France Av«»., C,(\ Rapids, Mich. 

Mrs. Alice Kimball. 
Round Lake, Mirm. 

Fred Niennher (Friend). 
360 Linewood Ave.. Detroit, ^fich. 

Mrs. Pauline Kimmel (Mother). 
Eldorado, Ark. 

0. O. Kinard. 
Westfield. Penn. 

Mrs. Etta Car. 



254 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Naub 


Rank 


Organization 


Cacsb 


Date 


Addbess— Next op Kin 


King, George A. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/6/18 


R. F. D. 3, White Pigeon, Mich. 
Charles W. King. 


King, George H. 


Corp. 


Hq. Co, 119 F. A. 


KIA 


8/12/18 


65 Ledyard \\e., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. George H. King (Wife). 


King, William C. 


Corp. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


2119 Corry St., Madison, Wis. 
John King (Father). 


Kingsburg, Leo F. 


Sgt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


1410 Koswett Ave., Latising, Mich. 
Mr. Edward M. Kingsbury (Father). 


Kirkeman, Sofus P. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Veiers Pr. Oksboi, Copenhagen, 

Denmark. 
Axsel Anderson (Half Brother). 


Kirkpatrick, Roy 


Corp. 


Co. O. 126 Inf. 


KI.\ 


10/10/lS 


434 S. Cherrie St., Alatha, Kan. 
James Kirkpatrick (Father). 


Kister, Harold T. 


Corp. 


Bat. F. 121 F. A. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


1737 Erie St., Racme, Wis. 
Mrs. Anna Kister (Mother). 


Klavanian, Guiegh 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


228 Ferdinand Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
Absar Chanian (Brother-in-Law). 


KU'bha, August J. 


Corp. 


Co. F. 125 liif. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


904 Mill St., Alpena, Mich. 
Mrs. Julia Klebba (Mother). 


Klemmer, Louis A. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


2605 Walnut St., Milwaukee. Wis. 
Mrs. Louis A. Klemmer (Wife). 


Kline, Anthony 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/17/18 


164 Jacob St., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Mary Kleine (Mother). 


Klingman, Alfred 


Pvt. 
Corp. 


Co. E. 362 Inf. 
Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DW 
DW 


10/12/18 
10/10/18 








Klinkner, Gilbert 


423 Washington Av., Muskegon, Mich. 












Mr. Jake Klinkner. 


Klomstad, Fred 0. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Audubon, Minn. 
Ole Klomstad. 


Klucka, Anthony 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
10/4/lS 








Klusendorf, Rudolph 


R. F.' D.' 'l , ' Welcome', ' Minn. 












Henry Klusendorf (Father). 


Klykunas, Stipanes 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


133 Dorchester Ave., Worcester, 

Mary Swedarski. Mass. 


Knag, Edward J. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Litchfield, III. 

Mrs. Lewis Knag (Mother). 


Knapp, Roy 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Sidney, Mont. 

M. W. Knapp (Father). 


Knarr, Donald C. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/3/18 


93 13th St., Portland, Oregon. 
Mrs. E. F. Knarr (Mother). 


Kneer, Mathias 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


309 Elm St., Eau Claire, Wis. 
Mrs. Anna Kneer (Mother). 


Knobloch, Louis 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


Prairie du Rocher, Illinois. 
Mrs. OIlie Knoblock. 


Knoke, Harvey A. 


Corp. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


844 Mt. Vernon St.. Oshkosh, Wis. 
C. C. Wiedeman (Friend). 


Koblite, Emil 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


laA 


8/31/18 


1626 Market St., La Crosse, Wis. 
Mrs. G. Peterson. 


Koca, Frank E. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/29/18 


Tobias, Neb. 


Kochanik, John 


Corp. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Miss Emily Koca. 
1002 7th Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Walter Kochanik (Brother). 


Kocian, Wi'liam 


Corp. 

Pvt. 111. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Mg. Co, 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/4/18 
10/11/18 








Koeklaun, Richard H. 


2188 Fulton Road, Cleveland, Ohio. 












Mrs. Louise Koeklaun. 


Kohlmeier, George 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


7/9/18 


Gen. Del., Linn, Kansas. 












Mr. Henry Kohlmeier (Father). 


Koiviipalo, Henry 


Corp. 


Co. D. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


15 N. Tamarack St., Calumet, Mich. 
Mrs. Emma Koivupalo. 


Kokoska, Michael 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


DW 


6/27/18 


2122 W. 18th St., Chicairn, III. 
Joseph Kokoska (Father). 


Kolche, Sylce 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Unlinski Gub, Russia (Szodrasz). 
Oprzinia Kolche. 


Kolean, Geo, L. 


Corp. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


River St., Chippewa Falls, Wis. 
Herman Koiean (Father). 


Kolkana, Herman J. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


725 E. 28th St.. Portland, Ore. 
Nicholas Kolkana. 


Kolling, William 


Corp. 


Co. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


Hardv, Neb. 

William Kolling. 


Koiodzlejski, Albert F 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


78 Center Ave., Detroit, Mich. 












Mr. Frank Kolodziejski (Father) 


Kominek, Frank 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/7/18 


Cushingj Minn. 

Martin Kominek (Brother). 


Kopchinski, Frank J. 


Corp. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


109 Hair St., Detroit. Mich. 












Miss Anna Kopchinski (Sister). 


Koperwicz, Anthony 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


6/19/18 


913 Willis Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
Francis Kreia.ski. 


Kopp, Clarence E. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


SIO York St., Hanover, Pa. 
John Kopp (Father). 


Kops, Otto Herman 


Corp. 


Co. F. 107 .Sup. Tr 


DW 


10/3/18 


Unity, Wis. 


Kordus, Paul F. 


Pvt. Ici. 
Pvt. Icl. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


8/24/18 
10/5/lS 


Herman Kops. 






Korea, John L. 


506 .si. Center .St.. Beaver Dam, Wis. 












Barney Jores. 



255 



THE THIRTY- SECOND Df VISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



^^MB. 


I Rank 


Omunization 


Cause 


1 Dah 


1 AsDiEss— Next or Kin 


Korinski, Adulph 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. C. 53 Inf. 
Co. L. 125 Ir.f. 


DW 
KIA 


10/12/18 
7/31/18 








Komas, John C. 


1 1 Flower St . , Detroit,' Mich. 












Katlicrin Kornas (Sister). 


Kosal. Eli 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. H. 125 Iiif. 

1 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Ruth, Mich. 

.Mr. \alcntine Kosal (Father). 


Koss, George J. 


Sgt. 


Co. C. 107 F. S. Bn. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


343 18th St.. Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mr. John Koss (Father). 












Kosi>ewi»ki, Atnoni 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Wallace, Mich. 

Pete Kos.««wski (Brother). 


Ko3ter, Thomas 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 

1 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Butterfield, Mich. 
1 Mr. William Koster. 


Kovasivick, Wasil 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 

KIA 


7/31/18 
10/5/18 








Kovnat, Hyman 


1137' N.' '6'akicy ' Bi'vd.'.' 'Clhica'go,' III. 












Aleic Kovnat (Brother). 


Kovich, Boscco 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


Bear Creek, Mont. 

Sam Somarreh (Friend). 


Krause, John 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Gillett, Wis. 

Mrs. Charles Krause (Mother). 


Kovola, Oscar 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


P. O. Box 661, Hancock, Mich. 
Fred Kovola. 


Krawczyk, John 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 120 Mk. Hn. 


DW 


10/12/18 


90O American Ave.. Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mrs. Martlia Krawczyk. 


Krazewski, John 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


Suicide 


10/2/18 
about 
10/11/18 






Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 




Kreitel, Glen 


R. 'f! 'd.' l',' Box' 25^ 'Nap'o'leoii',' N. D. 












Mrs. C\em Kreitel. 


Krell, George 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Iiif 


DW 


10/13/18 


246 Benzinner St.. Buffalo, N. Y. 
Mrs. Emma Schwartz (Aunt). 


Kremer, John F. 


Sgt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf 


KIA 


8/29/18 


411 N. Blacksunie St., Jackson, Mich. 
C. B. I.aRue. 


Kiemetski, William 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


717 N. 17th St., Springfidd, III. 
William Kremetski (Father). 












Kresen, Frank A. 


Corp. 


Bat. F. 120 F. A. 


ACC 




Williston, N. D. 

Mrs. Frank Kresen (Wife). 


Kresowki, Adolph 


Pvt. 

Sgt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


9/23/18 
10/15/18 








Kristoferson, Alfred 


3710 liigii' Liin'e,' 'Seattle',' Waiiii. 












Mrs. A. Kristoferson. 


Kritt. Harry A. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


ACC 


2/13/18 


400 S. Saratoga St., Baltimore, Md. 
Mrs. Vera Kritt (Mother). 


Kriz, Joseph F. 


Corp. 


Bat. E. 147 F. A. 


DD 


10/3/18 
about 


R. F. D. 2, Codar Rapids, Iowa. 
Joseph A. Krii (Father). 










Kroepfel, Arthur J. 


Sgt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/13/18 


1810 Cold Spring .\v.. Milwaukee Wis. 
Arthur Kroepfd (Father). 


Kronquist, Charles T. 


Corp. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


R. F. D. Box 37, Marinette, Wis. 
Mrs. A. Kronquist (Motlier). 


Kromer, Bernard G. 


Sgt. 
1st Sgt. 


Mg. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


8/2/18 
10/3/18 








Krueger, William J. 


628' 2n'd St' ,' 'Ocon't'o,' 'Wi's'. 












Mr. Albert Krueger (Father). 


Knill, Reubin 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


R. F. D. 4, Three Rivers, Mich. 
John H. Knill. 


Kryscysyns, Stanley 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


DW 


5/29/lS 


Podulski, Russia. 

Frank Kr>'.scysyns (Father). 


Kubeck, James 


Pvt. 


308 Btry. Tr. Art. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


4274 E. 128tli St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Mrs. Marie Kulieck (Mother). 


Kucora, Jerry E. 


Corp. 
Pvt. Id. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


8/1/18 
9/1/18 






Kudlinski, Joseph. 


1026 1st Ave.. Milwaukee, Wis. 












Anton Kudlinski (Father). 


Kuhn, Russel C. 


Corp. 


308 Btry. Tr. Art. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


258 Souclcr Ave. 

Mr^. Florence W. Kuhn (Wife). 


Kujawa, Walter 


Pvt. 


Med. Dept. 120 F. A. 


DD 





1008 Chicago Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Michael Kujawa (Father). 


Kujawski, Thomas 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/24/18 


8437 Brandon Ave., So. Chicago, III. 
John Kujawski (Brother). 


Kulbacki, Witold 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 107 Am. Tr. 


KIA 


10/8/18 


984 Grove St., Milwaukee. Wis. 
Theodora Kulbacki (Mother). 


Kumbera, Albert 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. F. 107 Am. Tr. 
Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


n/10/18 
10/12/18 






Kunes, Archie G. 


Crescent, Idaho. 












David Kunca (Grandfather). 


Kunkel, Frank 
Kunz, William 


Pvt. Id 

Pvt. 

Corp. 


Bat. A. 120 F. A. 
Co. E. 121 F. A. 
Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DW 
DR 
DW 


11/21/18 
9/14/18 
8/13/18 


1027 291 h St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Frank Kunkel, Sr. 




Kunzie, Harry K. 


Her-sey, Mich. 

Mrs. W. G. Kuniie (Mother). 


Kurklietis, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


509 Pearl St., Toledo. Ohio._ 
Laurimias Kurkietis (Friend). 


Kvlet, Oscar B. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. j 


DW 


10/9/18 


Lonneherge, Sw-cden. 


Kvikawakie, Barney J. 


Pvt. 


Hdqs. Co. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/15/18 


Louisa Kvist (Mother). 




1 





256 



BOLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Oroanization 


Cause 


Date 


Kwyecinski, WIdyslaw 


Pvt. 


Co. Iv. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/5/18 


Labar, Harry V. 


Pvt. 


Hilq. Co. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Labelle, Eugene 


Corp. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Labudavitch, Savo 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


Labutsky, Charles A. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. FH. 128 Inf. 


DD 


2/26/IS 


Ladd, Alfred E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Med. Det. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/6/18 


Lade, Arthur 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Laffey, John H. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/7/18 


LaFrania, Kenelm 


Corp. 


Co. E. 127 Ii^f. 


KIA 


7/31/IS 


Lagemarsino, Stefano L 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


I0/1S/I8 


Lair, John C. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/8/18 


Laird, Floyd M. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


LaJeunnesse, Henry J. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. M. 128 Ir.f. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


LaJiness, Harry W. 


Corp. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Lajores, Louis 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/4/18 


LaLonde, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 12S Inf. 


DW 


8/29/18 


Lamb, Ernest A, 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


Lamberton, Harold 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Lammerding, Joseph H 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Lamphere, Glenn 


Corp. 


Co. A. 119 Mg. Bii. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Lams, Albert 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Lander, Richard 


Sgt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/2/18 


Landstrom, Axel E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


DD 


9/28/18 


Lane, Edward 


Sgt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


DW 


9/l/:8 


Lane, William D. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


Lang, Frank J. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Lang, Michael J. 


Sgt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/lS 


Lange, Albert 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Lange, Harry L. 


Corp. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/4/18 


Lange, Otto R. 


Corp. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DD 


10/13/18 


Langehaug, Ole 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Langendorf, Charles W 


Pvt. Id. 


Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/1/18 


Langford, Richard J. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Laniesski, Victor 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/'8 


LaPage, Dewey N. 


Sgt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


LaPoint, Delbert 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Large.", Walter W. 


Vvi. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Larkin, Harold 


Corp. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


about 
9/1/18 


Larkowski, Ted 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


I^arm, Joseph R. 


Unknown 




DW 


10/2/18 
10/6/18 


Larrick, Everett 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


Larson, Axel 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Larson, Enoch L. 


Pvt. 

1 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


DD 

i 


1/1«/I9 



Address— Next of Kin 



Clio, Mich. 

Mrs. Harry V. Labar. 
494 Alma St., Montreal, Canada. 

Jule Labelle (Father). 
Nicgich, Monteiief^ro. 

Plara Lubiidovich (Sister). 
230 Terrace Av., SE., Gd.Rapid.s, Mich. 

Glen Whitney (Brother-in-Law). 
Cranberry Isles, Maine. 

Louis E. Ladd (Father). 
Sherbnrn, Minn. 

Mr. Herman Lade (Brother). 
Williamson ville, 111. 

Josephine Walsh Laffey (Wife). 
Bloomer, Wis. 

Joseph LaFrania (Father). 
38 Alert Alley, San Francisco, Calif. 

Mrs. Mary Creno (Sister). 
1319 6th St. W.. Canton, Ohio. 

Mr. Alois Lair (Father). 
Comstnck, Wis. 

William Laird (Father). 
520 N. Taylor Ave., Oak Park, III. 

Mrs. Delia La.Jaunnesse. 
209 Elmira Ave., Monroe, Mich. 

Mrs. Agnes LaJiness (Mother). 
804 Monroe St., Toledo, Ohio. 

Peter Lajores (Brother). 
Gold City, Mich. 

Mrs. Philman LaLonde. 
R. F. D. 5, Fulton, Ky. 

James Edd Lamb (Brother). 
Toledo, Ohio. 

Mrs. Edith Denman. 
Buffalo, Minn. 

Anthony Lammerding (Father). 
Stanley, Wis. 

Mrs. Charles Lamphere (Mother). 
Allouez, Wis. 

Victor Lams (Uncle). 
21 Trinwith PL, Cornwall, England. 

Mrs. Richard Lander (Mother). 
Commonwealth, Wis. 

A. F. Lanstrom (Father). 
436 Ford Ave., Highland Park, Mich. 

Lulu Oliphant (Fiancee). 
R. F. D. 1, Murraysville. W. Va. 

Mrs. Camie Lane (Mother). 
641 W. German St., Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. Anna Lang (Mother). 
1603 Sherman Ave., Madison, Wis. 

M. J. Lang (Father). 



Horicon, Wis. 

Mrs. Anna Lange (Mother). 
Columbus, Wis. 

Julius S. Lange (Father). 
Bottineau, N. Dak. 

Halver Langehaug. 
96 N. Dale St., St. Paul, Minn. 

Mrs. Margaret Langendorf (Mother). 
Osseo, Minn. 

Richard F. Langford (Father). 
Chicago, in. 

Frank Cuno (Half Brother). 
1511 12th St., Superior. Wi>i. 

Mr. Napoleon LaPage (Father). 
Box 47, Linden, Mich. 

Mrs. Lizzie LaPoint. 
345 Moviell St.. Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Anna Largos. 
Kill>oum, Wis. 

Miss .Jessie Larkin. 
Dannfbrog, Neb. 

John Larkowski. 



499 Pettit St.. St. Paul. Minn. 
Mrs. Betty OKson (Friend). 



257 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Nahk 


Rank 


OUCANIZATION 


Cause 


Datb 


Addbess— Next of Kin 


Larson, Rudulph A. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1 /I8 
about 


Box 112, National .Mine, Mich. 
Mrs. Mary Larson (Mother). 


LaReu, Thomas B. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/.8 


Ironton, Wis. 

Luke LaHuo (Futlier). 


I.athrope, Lowell D. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Joplin, Mo. 

Mrs. Catherine F. Lathrope 

(Mother). 


Law, Edward 


Pvt. 
Corp 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 
Co. M. i:S Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


10/12/18 
7/31/18 




Leach, Gaylord P. 


Manistique, Mich. 












Rev. Frederick R. Leach. 


Leary, Leo P. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 I.if. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Gratiot, Wis. 

Elmer J. Leary (Brother). 


Le Buda, Emil 


Pvt. 


Co. G. i:8 Inf. 


DW 


8/8/18 


Sauk llapids, Mich. 
Gotlicb Le Buda. 


Lecher, John P. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


R. F. 1). 1, Box 39, Venturia, \. I). 
Mrs. Kate Lecher. 


Lodford, James E. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Rome, Tenn. 

Mr. Mathew Mofield. 


Lee, Harold 


Sgt. 


Co. E. 1:7 Inf. 


UW 


9/2/18 


Wheeler, Wis. 

George Lee (Father). 


Lee, Nels 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


R. F. D. 2, Ogilvie, Minn. 
Mrs. Dagmar O. Lee (Wife). 


Lee, William W. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Fleming, Minn. 

Sware L. Lee (FatI.er). 




Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


11/10/18 
8/3/18 








Lehmann, Wilford 


Montague, Micli. 












Mrs. Fred Lehmann (Mother). 


Leistikow, Herman 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/13 


1024 2Sth St., Milwaukei", Wis. 
Herman Leistikow (Father). 


Lesland, Edgar H. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


308 Linwood Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Fred S. Leland. 


Lemanski, Roman 


Corp. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


6/17/18 


1053 Middleman Av, Milwaukee, Wis. 
John H. Lemanski (Father). 


Lemaster, Homer W. 


Pvt. 
Corp. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


11/7/18 
1 1/7/18 








Lemke, Gustav 0. 


R. 4,' 'Weston,"Mic'h'. 












William Lemke. 


Lemke, John W. 


Mech. 
Corp. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


3/26/18 
7/31/18 








Lemke, William C. 


543 Cyrus St., Inna, Mich. 












Mr. Charles Lemke (Father). 
221 E. Jefferson St., Wausau, Wi.«. 


Lendowsky, Lea J. 


Sgt. 


Co. G. 12s Inf. 


DW 


9/1/18 












Mr. .\. Lendowsky. 


Lcnig, Harvey 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/12/18 


Lyons, Neb. 

Mrs. Menia Lenig. 


Leonard, Hany J. 


Sgt. 
Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
about 
10/20/18 






Leonard Leo L. 


We'sifiVld," Wis'. " "c/o ' jamcs Russell. 












Mrs. Mary Leonard. 


Lesch, Charles 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


6/19/18 


174 Freeman St., BrookljTi, N. Y. 
Mrs. Mar\' Lesch (Mother). 


Lerch, Henry 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


R. F. D. 2, Valmeyer, III. 
Adam Lerch (Father). 


LeschikaJ, Emil 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


New Ulm, Tex. 
Emil Le.<;chikaz. 


Lese, Jacob P. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Princeton, Wis. 

Mr. William Lese. 


Leslie, Martin 0. 


Corp. 


Co. B. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


Box 322, Kenmare, N. Dak. 
Anna Leslie (Mother). 


Lesniak, Michael 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


116 Charest St., Hamtramck, Minn. 
Steve Antoscsyk. 


LesselyounR, William 


Sgt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


200 Vine St., Marshficld, Wis. 
Mr. John Les.«elvoung. 


Lcszczeinski, John 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 12s Inf. 


DW 


8/35/18 


625 Main St., Detroit. Mich. 
Joseph Bristevicz (Friend). 


Leszkicvitch, Joseph 


Pvt. 

Corp. 


Hdi. 127 Inf. 
Bat. A. 119 F. A. 


DW 
KIA 


8/30/18 
8/10/18 





Leveaux, Cosmer M. 




Ludington, Mich. 












John Leveaux (Father). 


Lcverenz, Clarence R. 


Sgt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


274 10th St.. Milwaukee, Wi.s. 
Mi.-Js Louise Leverenz. 


Levesque, Joseph R. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Salem, Mass. 

Mrs. Claudia Berceir. 


Levesque, Leo 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 12.5 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 
KIA 


8/4/18 

7/31/18 

10/11/18 






Levi, Sandy 






Lewis, Frank A, 


Chavies, Alabama. 












Jofeph W. Lewis. 


Lewis, Harry 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/8/18 


1111 Sherman Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Richard Lewis (Father). 


l/owis. Jack 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/6/18 


Franklin, Mo. 

J. T. Lewis (Father). 


Leyanna. Francis 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


R. F. D. 1, Muskegon, Mich. 
Mose Leyanna. 



258 




1. Second Lieutenant George M. Gebald, Company D, 127th Infantry. Killed in action July Slst, I9I8, during 

the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

2. Second Lieutenant Randolph 0. Grassold, Company C, I27th Infantry. Died July 21, 1918, of wounds received 

in ALsace. 

3. Seco.nd Lieutenant Fred L. Hanger, Company A, I27th Infantry. Killed in action October 14th, 1918, during 

the Meu^e-Argonne Offensive. 

4. Second Lieutenant Fleming M. Crowell, Company G, 127th Infantry. Killed in action October 15th, 1918, 

during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

5. Second Lieutenant Chahi.es U. Daniels, Company D, 127 Infantry. Died of wounds November 23rd, 1918, 

durinc tlie MpUFe-.\rE(»nne Offpn?ive. 

6. Second Lieutenant Marion C. Cranefield, Company C, 127th Infantrj-. Killed in action July 31st, 1918, dur- 

ing the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

7. Second I.ieutenant .Setii W. Murray, Company I, I27th Infantry. Died of wounds October 13th, 1918, during 

tne Meuse-ArEonne Offensive. 

8. Second Lieutenant Delancy J. Colvin. First Battalion, 127th Infantry. Killed in action October I4th, 1918, 

during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

9. Second Lieutenant Morris Togstad, Headquarters Company, 127th Infantry. Killed in action November 10th, 

1918, dunng the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 



259 



THE TIllETr- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD ll'.lT? 



Naue 



Rank 



< >I;CAN1ZAT10N 



Lichtfuss, Charles 11. 
Liedke, Albert 
Lien, Louis 
Likens, Arthur 
Lillcfloren, Ole 
Lindon, Curtis 
Lindsay, Henry B. 
Linar, Oscar R. 
Liniger, William 
Linn, Ralph E. 
Linna, George H. 
Linstrum, Clemens 
Lippert, William W. 
Lipschitz, Isaac 
Littleton, William C. 
Livingston, Clyde D. 
Lockhart, John I. 
Locke, Guy 
Locke, Harrison 
Lodusirc, Frank 
Loeacono, Frank 
Loftus, Glen E. 
Loibl, Anthony T. 
Loicca, Joseph P. 
Loomis, Clyde A. 
Lopez, Reducindo A. 
Losciskie, Joseph 
Lukeman, Joseph 
Lott, Peter M. 
Lovcjoy, Philip 
Lowall, Mikady N. 
Lowder, Herbert 
Lowe, George 
Loxon, Carl W. 
Lucas, Everett 
Luce, Fred E. 
Luciand, Bonbert 
Luduscr, Clinton B. 
Ludvigson, Earl 
Lueckc, Robert 
Lueskow, Arthur 
Lumsden, Clarence 
Lund, Eddy G. 



Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

! Pvt. 

Sgt. 
Pvt. 
Sgt. 

Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 



Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Wag. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 



Hq. Co. 127 Inf. 

Co. D. 121 Mg. Bn. 

Co. F. 128 Inf. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 

Co. G. 126 Inf. 

Co. A. 125 Inf. 

Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 

Co. D. 127 Inf. 
I Co. I. 128 Inf. 

Co. H. 127 Inf. 

Co. G. 125 Inf. 

Co. C. 12S Inf. 

Co. K. 128 Inf. 

Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 

Co. II. 128 Inf. 

Bat. D. 321 F.A.Hvy. 

Co. II. 126 Inf. 

Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn. 
) Bat. F. 322 F. A. 
I Co. G. 128 Inf. 

Co. L. 125 Inf. 

Eat. C. 120 F. A. 

Hq. Co. 126 Inf. 

Co. E. 127 Inf. 

Co. H. 126 Inf. 

Co. C. 128 luf. 

Co. M. 128 Inf. 

Bat. F. 119 F. A. 

Co. C. 128 Inf. 

Co. H. 125 Inf. 

Co. C. 119 Mg. Bn. 

Co. G. 128 Inf. 

Co. F. 125 Inf. 

Co. L. 128 Inf. 

Co. G. 120 Mg. Dn. 

Co. A. 126 Inf. 

Co. L. 

Co. B. 128 Inf. 

Sup. Co. 120 F. A. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 

Co. L. 125. Inf. 

Co. G. 126 Inf. 

Co. C. 128 Inf. 



Cause 



KIA 

ACC 

KIA 

DW 

ACC 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

ACC 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

DW 

KIA 

UD 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DD 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 



Datb 



9/9/18 

7/31/18 

11/10/18 

10/5/18 

10/10/18 

10/9/18 

10/11/18 

10/12/18 

10/9/18 

10/13/18 

10/14/18 

10/13/18 

8/2/18 

10/1/18 

8/3/18 

11/25/18 

10/12/18 

10/11/18 

11/3/18 

10/11/18 

10/21/18 

8/31/18 

10/5/18 

10/9/18 

10/10/18 

10/5/18 

10/3/18 
about 
9/1/18 

4/30/18 

10/6/18 

11/9/18 

10/9/18 

8/28/18 

8/28/18 

8/1/18 

10/10/18 

10/14/18 

8/1/18 
7/31/18 
i 10/2/18 
8/1/18 



Addbess— Next or Kin 



507 Washington St., Fond du Lac, 

Mrs. Caroline Liedke. Wis. 

R. F. D. 1, Rothway, Minn. 
Alf Lien (Brotlier). 
Com Land, 111. 

John Likens (Brother). 
Brucelyn, Minn. 

George Lillefluren (Brother). 
Taulbee, Ky. 

Sofia Lindon (Wife). 
1345 Fainiew St., Flint, Mich. 

R. A. Lindsay. 
R. F. D. 1, Benton, Tenn. 

Jame.s S. Linar (Father). 
153 W. Western Av., Muskegon, Mich. 

Mrs. E. Liniger. 
Three Forks, Mont. 

Leslie R. Linn (Fatlicr). 
Painesdale, Mich. 

George Linna (Father). 
182 Alvarado Rrl., Berkeley, Calif. 

Mrs. P. G. Belts (Cousin). 
Nicholsville, Ky. 

W. M. Lippert 
Lockhaven, Pa. 

Max Liply. 



R. F. D. 2, Louisville, Ohio. 

_ Mrs. I,ue Livingston (Mother). 
Linneus, Mo, 

John W. Lockhart. 
221 E. Silver St., Wapakoneta, Ohio. 
CIvde Locke (Father). 



Scofield, Wis. 

Albert Lodusire (Father). 
Triggiano Di Bari, Italy. 

Guiseppi Loeacono (Father). 
1314 Blamlina St., Utica, N. Y. 

Edward Loftus (Father). 
126 Franklin St., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 

Mrs. Thriosia Albcrt.s (Mother). 
R. F. D. 4, K.ankakec, III. 

Dominie P. Loicca (Brother). 
6 Palmer St., Gd. Rapiils. Mich. 

James N. Loomis (Father). 
Casa Grande. Ariz. 

Mrs. Carmen A. Lopez. 
Parsons, Pa. 

Martha Lapinski. 
567 Patterson St., Flint, Mich. 

Hennan D. Lukeman (Brother). 
Fairmont, Neb. 

Mrs. L. F. Lott. 

Cohtopa, Ala. 

Ham- Lowder (Father). 
R. F. D. 2, Snover, Mich. 

(3eorge Lowe, Sr. (Father). 
Grant, Mich. 

Peter L. Loxon. 

R. F. b. 3, Bronson, Mich. 
Wellington Ijice, 

Ii\iciand, Bonbert. 
R. F. D. 1, Lyndonville, Vermont. 

Mrs. Corn Luduser. 
Elk Mound, Wis. 

Mrs. G. Ludvigson. 

805 Martha Ave.. Slennminee, Mich. 
Bertha Lueskow (Mother). 

Frederidc, Wis. 
Mrs. Lund. 



2G0 



ROLL OF HONOR 



N.\ME 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Addeess— Next of Kin 


Lund, Otto T. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Blooming Prairie, Minn. 

Mr. C. L. Lund (Father). 


Lungwitz, Theobald 


Pvt. 


Co. 


G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Wittenberg, Mo. 

Herman Lungwitz (Father). 


Lutz, Anthony E. 


Sgt. 


Co. 


A. 125 Inf. 


ACC 


9/19/18 


923 Livernois A\e., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Lutz (Mother). 


Lutz, William i. 


Pvt. Id. 


Bat 


A. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


8/10/18 


Saline, Mich, 

Mr. John Lutz (Father). 


Lux, Jesse J. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Encinitas, Calif. 

Peter Lux (Father). 


Lyczkowski, .Anthony 


Pvt. 


Co. 


L. 128 Inf. 


DD 


10/14/18 


6 Winter St., Detroit, Mich. 
Albert Lyczkowski (Brother). 


Lymburner, Robert H. 


Pvt. 


Mg. 


Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


602 Huron Av,, Harbor Beach, Mich. 
Mr. Alfred Lymburner. 


Lynch, John 


Pvt. 


Co. 


A. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


Sfvy, W. Va. 

Mrs. Minnie Lynch. 


Lynge, Nels P. L. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


R. F. D. 1. Arlington, S. Dak. 
Martin P. Nelson (Friend). 


Lyngen, George H. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Milan, Minn. 

Mr. Andrew Lyngen (Father). 


Lyons, Ivan B. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


M. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


Wayne, Neb. 

Mrs. Lizzie Lyons (Mother). 


Lyons, Joseph P. 


Pvt. 

Pvt, Id. 
Corp. 


Co. 
Co. 
Co. 


H. 127 Inf. 
G. 127 Inf. 
A. 128 Inf. 


lilA 
KIA 
DW 


7/31/18 
7/30/18 








Maas, Peter J. 








MacGregor, Robert 


Co, i.' '3rd" Oregon 'inf.' 














George Mavleer (Friend). 


Machen, Rajmond 0. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/5/18 


89 Wisconsin St., Oshko,-<h. Wis, 
Mrs. Alice Machen (Mother). 


Maciejewski, Joseph E 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


7/2/18 


624 Broadway, Berlin, Wis. 
Mrs. Josephine Maciejewski. 


Mackinder, Joseph 


Pvt. Id. 
Pvt. 


Co. 
Co. 


I. 128 Inf. 
M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
DD 


9/1/18 
6/14/18 








MacMillen, Ralph F. 


119' Ful'le'r' 'Av! 'SE,^ Gd,' Rapids', "Mi'ch, 














M^s. Mary G. MacMillen (Mother). 


Madera, Arthur 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 
107 M. P. 


DW 
DW 


10/7/18 
8/31/18 









Madson, Peter A. 


Iron River, Wis. 














Mrs. Anna L. Madson (Mother). 


Mairsky, Peter 


Pvt. 


Co. 


C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Box 39. Butler, Pa. 
deck Maersky. 


Mainard, Lawrence 


Pvt. 


Co. 


M. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/16/18 


523 4th St., Great Falls, Mont. 
Nancy Mainard (Mother). 


Mainville, Lewis J. 


Col p. 


Co. 


F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


324 .^very Ave,. Alpena, Mich. 
Mrs. Lena M. Dove (Sister). 


Maiorana, Marius 


Pvt. 


Co. 


C. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/1/18 


260 Antontom St., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Josephine Ajosta. 


Walinowski, Nikodym 


Pvt. 


Co. 


K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


691 55th St., West Allis, Wis, 
Albert Malmowski (Brother). 


Malinski, John 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


992 Greenbush St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Frank Grajak. 


Manecke, Envin R. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


D. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


506 State St., Merrill, Wis. 
Auirust Manecke. 


Mangan. Edmund 


Corp. 


Co. 


H. 125 Inf. 


DW 


8/29/18 


Onaway, Mich. 

Mrs. James Daly (Sister). 


Margold, Louis A. 


Corp. 


Co. 


F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


1002 Cedar St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mrs. Anna Margold (Mother). 


Manocke, Dommicke 


Pvt. Id. 
Pvt. 


Co. 

Co. 


A. 126 Inf. 
A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


8/5/18 








Manriquez, William 


Wh'i't'ti'ei^ ,' 'Calif.' 














Trinidad Rurrul (Brotlier-in-Law). 


Man.'^field, Henry R. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Greensville, Texas, 
H. A, Mansfield. 


Manska, Harry W. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


D. 128 Inf. 


laA 




EIrov, Wis. 

Albert Manska (Father). 


Manson, Har\'ey D. 


Corp. 


Co. 


G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


1013 Center Ave., Madison, Wis. 
Margaret Priest (Mother). 


Manzclla, Michael 


Pvt. icl. 


Co. 


G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Palermo, Italy. 

Guiseppe Manzella. 


Mape.s, Ray D. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 




Wolbach. Neb. 
B. A. Mapes. 


Marro, Deloir A. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


A. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/1/18 


8 Sunset Ave., Little Falls, N. Y. 
Mrs. Celia Marco (Mother). 


Markel, George 


Pvt. 


Co. 


H. 125 Inf. 


DW 


9/1/18 


R. F, D, 2, Gacetown. Mich. 

Mrs, Elizabeth Markel (Mother). 


Markely, Frank 


Pvt. 


Co. 


G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Columbia Furnace, Va. 
Moses Markdv (Father). 


Markowski, John 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


C. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


201 S. 58th St., Superior, Wis. 
Mrs, J. 0. Olcnski (Sister). 


Markowski, L<'e 


Pvt. 


Co. 


L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


1274 Chene St., Detroit, Mich. 
Verna Ropalski. 


Marks, Arthur A. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


B. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


R. F, D, 2, Palmyra, Mich. 
Will F. Marks. 


Marks, Rex V. 


Corp. 


Co. 


M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Fennville. Mich. 

Mrs. Rose Marks (Mother). 



261 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Name 


Rank 




Organization 


Marler, E. D. 


Pvt. 




Co. 


M. 


6 Inf. 


Marlin, Jesse 


Corp. 




Co. 


B. 


127 Inf. 


Marquardt, Albert R. 


Sgt. 




Co. 


G. 


127 Inf. 


Marsh, Beteen 


Corp 




Co. 


F. 


128 Inf. 


Marshall, Peter 


Pvt. 




Co. 


L. 


127 Inf. 


Marthaler, Otis C. 


Pvt. 




Co. 


M 


127 Inf. 


Martiii, Carl 


Pvt. 




Co. 


F. 


128 Inf. 


Martin, Claude B. 


Pvt. 




Co 


D. 


125 Inf. 


Martin, John W, 


Pvt. 


U.1. 


Co. 


F. 


125 Inf. 


Martin, Jo.^cph 


Pvt. 




Co. 


B. 


128 Inf. 


Martin, Luce C. 


Pvt. 




Co. 


L. 


125 Inf. 


Marvin, Melvin. 


Pvt. 




Bat 


D 


147 F. A. 


Mason, Chester M. 


Pvt. 




Hq 


Co 


. 128 Inf. 


Mason, Many 


Pvt. 


Icl. 


Co. 


H. 


127 Inf. 


Matchkiewicz, Stanley 


Pvt. 




Co. 


B. 


127 Inf. 


Matenazyk, John 


Pvt. 




Co. 


D. 


128 Inf. 


Matl'.er, Harry 


Pvt. 




Co. 


D. 


126 Inf. 


Mathews, Burton Jay 


Pvt. 


Icl. 


Co. 


E. 


125 Inf. 


Matl-.iot, Cyrus 


Pvt. 




Co. 


D. 


110 Inf. 


Mayer, John 


Pvt. 




Co. 


A. 


128 Inf. 


Maynard, Mertaon 


Pvt. 


Icl. 


Co. 


A. 


128 Inf. 


Maionski, Hendiick 


Pvt. 




Co. 


n. 


126 Inf. 


McArthur, Charles R. 


Corp 




Co. 


I. 


127 Inf. 


McCabe, Edward 


Pvt. 




Co. 


I. 


128 Inf. 


McCadam, Joseph J. 


Pvt. 




Co. 


L. 


361 Inf. 


McCanii, Fied 


Pvt. 


Icl. 


Co. 


II. 


127 Inf. 


McCann, George 


Corp 




Co. 


H. 


127 Inf. 


McCartcr, Jesse 


Pvt. 




Co. 


G. 


125 Inf. 


McCarthy, Joreph D. 


Pvt. 




Bat 


C 


119 F. A. 


McCarthy, Thornton 


Pvt. 


Icl. 


Bat 


B 


119 F. A. 


McCloskey. Douglas K 


Pvt. 




Mg 


Co 


. 125 Inf. 


Mathison, Melvin 


Pvt. 


Id. 


Co. 


A. 


128 Inf. 


McCann, Frank A. 


Pvt. 




Co. 


A. 


120 Mg. Bn. 


McClurg, John H. 


Pvt. 


Icl. 


Bat 


B 


147 F. A. 


McCormack, George R. 


Corp 




Co. 


L. 


125 Inf. 


McCormick, Charles W. 


Corp 




Co. 


B. 


128 Inf. 


McCormick, Everett 


Sgt. 




Co. 


M. 


125 Inf. 


McCoy, Marion 


Pvt. 


Id. 


Co. 


A, 


120 Mg. Bn. 


MrCracken, Charles 


Corp 




Co. 


M. 


128 Inf. 


McDermott, Albert 


Corp 




Co. 


K. 


128 Inf. 


McDermott, 

Thomas W. 
McDonald, Archie R. 


Pvt. 
Corp 




Mr 
Co. 


Co. 128 Inf. 
C. 126 Inf. 


MrDonald, James 


Pvt. 




Co. 


D. 


128 Inf. 



Cause 


Date 


DW 


10/15/18 


D\V 


10/S/lS 


KIA 


8/5/18 


KIA 


11/10/18 


KIA 


10/16/18 


DW 


8/12/18 


KIA 


11/10/18 


KIA 


8/31/18 


KIA 


8/4/18 


KIA 


11/10/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


8/4/18 


DW 


10/18/18 


KIA 


7/30/18 


KIA 


10/11/18 


KIA 


8/5/18 


DW 


10/16/18 


KIA 


10/9/18 


KIA 




KIA 


11/10/18 


KIA 


8/1/18 


KIA 


8/4/18 


KIA 


9/1/18 


DW 


10/11/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


8/5/18 


KIA 


10/14/18 


KIA 


10/23/18 


KIA 


8/12/18 


KIA 


8/1/18 


DD 


3/31/18 


DW 


10/29/18 


KIA 


9/30/18 


KIA 


10/9/18 


KIA 




DW 


10/9/18 


ACC 


7/16/18 


DW 


9/24/18 


KIA 


11/7/18 


ACC 


5/27/18 


DW 


9/15/18 


DW 


11/11/18 



Addhess— Next op Ki.v 



Genl. Del., Billings, Mont. 

L. C. Hall (Friend). 
R. F. D 4, Baraboo, Wis. 

Mrs. Louis Marqt^ardt. 
Red Granit/*, Wis. 

Mrs. C. H. Cody. 
R. F. D. 2, Dedham, Iowa. 

Mrs. Sarah Sagler (Aunt). 
143 Vennont St., Beaver Dam, Wis. 

.Mrs. E. Martha'er (Mother). 
Elliston, Ohio. 

John Martin. 



Coal Creek, Tenn. 

Miss Bonnie Martin (Sister). 
1755 Lincoln Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. llattie Martin (Mother). 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 

Mrs. Ida Mar\-in. 
Whilmore, Ark. 

James L. Mason (Fatlier). 
Blanchard\ille. Wis. 

Mrs. Ella Mason (Mother). 
343 E. Grant St.. Nanticoke, Pa. 

Joe Matchkiewicz (Brother). 
3225 Fisk St., Chicago, III. 

George Sabloski (Cousin). 
R. F. D. 2. Box 15, Shakoppp, Minn. 

Joim Mather (Father). 
R. F. D. 3, Caro, Mich. 

John Mathews. 



Cackle, N. Dak. 

John M. Mayer (Father). 
Lodi, Wis. 

John Maviiard (Father). 
422 30lh St., Detroit, Mich. 

Mary Mozonski. 
Hancock, Minn. 

A. F. McArthur (Father). 
Lenna. Okla. 

William McCabem. 



ShuUsburg, Wis. 

James McCann (Father). 
ShuUsburg, Wi.5. 

James McCa-in (Father). 
R. A. Carlisle, Ind. 

Mrs. John McCarter (Mother). 
2 Howard Place. Dorchester. Mass. 

Margaret E. McCarthy (Mother). 
Webberville, Mich. 

Charles McCarthy (Father). 
Carson C^ty, Mich. 

Flora E. McCloskey. 



Jacksonville, Ohio. 

Mrs. Ella McCann (Mother). 
Inkom, Idaho. 

Mrs. E. J. Mears (Mother). 
5726 Magnolia Ave., Chicago, III. 

Lilly McCormark (Mother). 
Soldiers Orove. Wis. 

Mrs. Frank McCormick (Mother). 
Cooks, Mich. 

Mrs. A. J. McCormick (Sister). 
Box 374, Ravenna, Neb. 

Mrs. Eail Harris (Mother). 



1009 Sibley St., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 

T. McDermott. 
R. F. D. 2, .\lbanv. Wis. 

John McDermott (Father). 
Box .W, ConlrnI Lake, Mich. 

Mrs. Anna McDonald. 
Box 572, Livingston, III. 

Mrs. Helen Hunter. 



262 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


ORG.\N'IZATION 


C.TOSE 


Date 


Address — Next op Kin 


McDonnell, Peter 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 128 Inf. 


DW 


11/12/18 


Baraboo, Wis. 

Peter McDonald. 


McDowell, John H. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


DO 


12/8/18 


R. F. D. 3, Mendon, Mo. 
Orrin McDowell (Father). 


McElfresh, Leon 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


D\r 


9/1/18 


Redmond, 0;egon. 

Josephus McElfresh (Father). 


McEvoy, John J. 


Pvt. Scl. 


Co. B. 120 Mg. Bn. 


DD 


7/7/18 


Station C, Detroit, Mich. 
Joseph McEvoy (Brother). 


McFarliiig, George T. 


Pvt. Id. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. Id. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. K. 126 Inf. 
Hq. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
DW 

KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
11/10/18 
10/l-t/:8 
S/6/18 








MoGaughey, Mathias 








McGenley, Eddie Roy 






McGIue, William G. 


L;\nse, Mich. 












William McGlue. 


McGoIerick, Judge 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Star Route, Ponit of Rock«. Md. 
Minerva McGoleiick (Mother). 


McGraw, Michael B. 


Pvt. Id. 


308 Btry. Tr. Arty. 


KIA 


IO/23/iS 


817 Frank St., McKces Rocks, Pa. 
Miss Mary McGraw (Sister). 


McGraw, Thomas 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/7/18 


1016 Calumet Ave., Chicago, III. 
Mrs. Charlotte McGraw. 


McGraw, Wilson L. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


Prairie, Miss. 
Lula Corter. 


McGregor, Wayman J 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


11/11/18 


Abrams, Wis. 

Mrs. Delia McGregor (Mother). 


McGuinness, James W. 


Corp. 
Pvt. 

Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 
KIA 


8/2/18 
7/31/lS 








McQuire, Michael 








McGushin, 


1112' W.'es'ci St.',' New York City,' 'n'.Y. 


Christopher M 










James McGushin (Brother). 


McHugh, Kenneth L. 


Corp. 


Bat. A. 120 F. A. 


KiA 


10/4/18 


71 31st St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
M. L. McHugh. 


Mclntyre, Harry 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


616 W. Carpenter St., Springfield, III. 
Mrs. D. L. Hixon (Sister). 


McKeehan, David A. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


King. Ky. 

Franklin McKeehan. 


McKeehan, 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


King, Ky. 


Henderson S 










Franklin McKeehan. 


McKay, William W. 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 


DD 


9/30/18 


Ismay. Mont. 

Mrs. William McKay (Mother). 


McKearn, Joseph A, 


Corp. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


822 4th St., Bcloit, Wis. 

Michael McKearn (Father). 


McKeen, James 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


2864 8th Ave., New York City, N. Y. 
Mrs. Su^ie McKecn (Mother). 


McKinney, Hugh L. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


Douglas, Ariz. 

Earl McKinney (Brother). 


McLaughlin, James F 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


5 Re bey St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Mrs. Nellie McLaughlin. 


McLenahan, James 


Pvt. 


Co. F 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Qiiiton, Okla. 

Mrs. Beulah McLenahan (Mother). 


McLean, Donald 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Brighton, Coloiado. 

Donald McLean (Father). 


McLenden, Felix 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


DW 


11/14/18 


R. 1, Atlanta, Ark. 

R. H. McLenden (Father). 


McManus, Eugene N. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Hq. Co. 147 F. A. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


8/2/18 
11/10/18 








McMillan, Fred 


Ric'lifieidridaho.' 












Miss Bertha McMillan. 


McMullen, Howard 


Pvt. 


Cj. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


Grandfit, Colo. 

Mrs. Elsie Mclntire. 


McXamara, Leon 


Sgt. 


Co. F. 128 liif. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Cadillac, Mich. 

Mrs. T. McNamara (Mother). 


McN'ecse, Walter L. 


Co p. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


R. F. D. 3, Jonesboro, Tenn. 
John McNeese. 


MrPherson, Ivan 


Corp. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Onaway, Mich. 

John McPherson (Father). 


McQuien, Walter H. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 120 Mr. Bn 


DW 


8/28/18 


Law. Texas. 

Mrs. M. A. McQuicri. 


McRae, Orlo 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


La Veta, Colo. 
J. W. McRae. 


Meacham, Lawrence 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/12/18 


Port Allegheny, Pa. 
George Meacham. 


Mead, James F. 


Pvt. Id. 


C.n. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Sandusky, Wis. 

William Mead (Father). 


Meadows, Lee C. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


51 E. 72nd St., Portland, Oregon. 
C. W. Meadows (Father). 


Meier, Walter E. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Knox, Pa. 

Mrs. J. J. Meier. 


Meinhart, John L. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


R. 1. Jewett, III. 

Maichcn Meinhart. 


Meiser, Julius 


Pvt. 


C). H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10 15/:8 


240 Vine St., Reading, Ohio. 
Mayme Meiser (Sister). 



263 



THE Tlllirry-SECOND PIVTSION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Name 



Rank 



Mdcher, Edward 
Molnichuk, Samuel 
Melosh, Eugene 
Melvin, Frank 
Mercer, Bruce A. 
Merrill, Percy E. 
Merry, Clarence F. 
Messner, Fred 
Metzenbauger, Claire 
Metzler, Hany 
Meuli, Michael 
Meyer, Frank 
Michel, Henry A. 
Michell, Carl A. 
Micliel, John A. 
Michelson, Heimer 
Mienkwicz, Frank P. 
Mierzwinski, Peter W. 
Mike, Dewey 
Mikclajczyk. Joseph 
Mikkelson, Johannes S 
Miles, Glenn 
Millar, James 
Miller, David D. 
Miller, Ernest G. 
Miller, Francis 
Miller, Frank R, 
Miller, Fred 
Miller, Hiram 
Miller, John E. 
Miller, Leo A. 
Miller, Leo M. 
Miller, Orcn Grover 
Miller, Pram G. 
Miller, Ray L. 
Miller, Thomas 
Miller, Ulysses 
Miller, Walter B. 
Miller, Walter R. 
Miller, William 
Mills, Alfred C. 
Minehnn, Hugh P. 
Minnard, Wibur 



Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Cook 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Mech. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Horseshr 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Wag. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Bug. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Corp. 

Corp. 



Organization 



Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Bat. C. 120 F. A. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 
Co. F. 107 Sup. Tr. 
Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. G. 125 Inf. 
I07 Sup. Tr. 
Co. A. 121 Mg. Bn. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 
Hq. 127 Inf. 
Co. A. 125 Inf. 
Co. L. 126 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 107 M. P. 
Co. A. 18 Inf. 
Hq. Co. 126 Inf. 
Co. A, 128 InL 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 
Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 127 Inf. 
Sup. Co. 120 F. A. 
Co. H. 126 Inf. 
Co. A. 127 Inf. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 
126 Inf. 

Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 126 Inf. 
Co. D. 107 Sup. Tr. 
Hq. 125 Inf. 
Hq. 125 Inf. 
Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Co. B. 125 Inf. 
Co. II. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 
Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 



C.»D8B 



Date 



KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
DD 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 

KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 

KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DD 

KIA 
KIA 
DD 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DD 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 

nw 

KIA 
KIA 



8/28/18 
8/1/18 

10/31/18 

10/4/18 

12/24/18 

8/28/18 

10/8/18 

2/5/18 

10/10/18 

9/2/18 

7/31/18 

8/6/18 

10/9/18 

11/8/18 

8/2/18 

9/1/18 

10/2/18 

8/30/18 

8/4/18 

8/2/18 

10/4/18 

8/30/18 

10/15/18 

8/2/18 

9/24/18 

9/1/18 

10/7/18 

8/4/18 

8/29/18 

6/29/18 

8/6/18 

8/6/18 

8/3/18 

10/5/18 

10/20/18 

8/29/18 

7/15/18 

7/31/18 

8/31/18 

1I/I1/I8 

10/5/18 



Addbess— Next op Kin 



43 Williams Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Emma Melchcr. 



R. 1, Ellsworth, Mich. 

Bert Melosh. 
8338 N. PhUlyss St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mrs. Kity Melvin. 
421 W. 9th Ave., Puyallupp, Wash. 

Mrs. C. N. Mercer (Mollier). 



548 Giddings St., Gd. liapids, Mich. 

Harry L. Merry. 
Trimountain. Mich. 

Oscar Stcinheld (Brother-in-Law). 



R. F. D. 3, Oak Hill, Ohio. 

Charles Metzler (Father). 
212 Rurla St., Chippewa Falls, Wis. 

Joseph Meuli (Father). 
1032 N. Hickory St., Janesville, Wis. 

Henry F. Meyer (Father). 
Lapeer, Mich. 

Aiuia Michel (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Emmett, Ark. 

A. F. Jahanke (Father). 
1304 Huntington Ave., Sandusky, O. 

Wm. Michel. 



1306 Michiguu A\c., Hay City, Mich. 

Mrs. Jmia Mienkwicz. 
2429 Walton Ave., Chicago, III. 

Mieczislaw Mierzwinski. 
NeilLsville, Wis. 

John Mike (Father). 
834 Burnham St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Frank Mikelajczyk (Father). 



Smithfield, Utah. 

Gertrude Miles (Wife). 
Lake Geneva, Wis. 

William Millar. 
R. F. D. 4, Clare, Mirh. 

Mrs. Mary Miller (Mother). 
Ea.st 9th St., Marshfield, Wis. 

Gustave Fred Miller (Father). 
103 Henrietta St.. Jackson, Mich. 

Frank Miller (Father). 
R. F. D. 1, Gladstone, 111. 

Mrs. Mary Miller (Mother). 
Butte, Mont. 

Samuel Shiner (Friend). 
Dresden, Ind. 

William Miller (Father). 
1202 S. Spring St., Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Mrs. Gust. Miller (Mother). 
Middleville, Micli. 

Otto B. Miller. 



425 Michigan Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Nellie Miller. 
425 Michigan Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Nellie Miller. 



Viva, Ky. 

George Miller (Father). 



417 Sackett Ave.. Monroe, Mich. 

Forest H. Miller. 
R. F. D. 21, Plainwell, Mich. 

Mrs. Cora Miller (Sister). 
613 Division St., Enu Claire, Wis. 

Fred C. Miller (Father). 
415 6th Ave., Great Falls, Mont. 

Robert J. Mills (Brother). 
Garrison, N. Dak. 

Annie Minehnn (Mother). 
R. F. D. 2, OUsego, Mich. 

Mrs. Susi« M. Minnard. 



264 




1. Second Lieutenant Edward A. Burton, Company D, I28th Infantry. Killed in action August 2nd, 1918, dur- 

ing the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

2. Captain Ralph H. Perry, Company B, 128th Infantry. Died November 22, 1918, of wounds received Novem- 

ber 10th, 1918, during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

3. Second Lieutenant Frank C. Godfrey, Company D, 128th Infantry. Killed in action August 30tli, 1918, during 

the Oise-Aisne Offensive. 

4. First Lieutenant Bernard L. Rice, Headquarters Company, 128th Infantry. Killed in action August 3rd, 

1918, during the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

5. Major Henry Root Hill, Cnmmanding Second Battalion, I28th Infantr>*. Killed in action October I6th, I9I8, 

while leading his battalion against the enemy position northwest of Romagne, France, during the Meuse- 
Argonne Offensive. 

6. First Lieutenant Clarence G. Noble, Company G, 128th Infantry. Died August 4th, 1918, of wounds received 

in action during the Aistie-Marnc Offensive. 

7. Second Lieutenant Sanpord R. Dole, Company K, 128th Infantry. Killed in action October 18th, 1918, dur- 

ing the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

8. Second Likutenant Clifford O. Harrks, Company G, 128th Infantry. Killed in action September 1, 1918, 

during the Oise-Ai.sne Offensive. 

9. Second Lieutenant Edward II. Locke, Company A, 128th Infantry. Killed in action October 18th, 1918, 

during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 



2G5 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



S\s.t. 



Minus, Alex 
Mitclu'll, John A. 
MitUcslat, Earl C. 
Mjelde. Olaf 
Moellcr, Edward 
Mocnkhouise, Earnest 
Monday, George T. 
Monocka, Tony 
Monroe, ElinL-r 
Monroe. Georce S. 
Montcomeo'i Ira S. 
Montley, James E. 
Mooney, Ralph K. 
Moonier, Jesse A. 
Moore, Ampliss M. 
Moore, Edwin D. 
Moore, I'rancis C. 
Moore, George W. 
Moore, James M. 
More, Jasper M. 
Moore, John 
Moore, Nathan R. 
Moore, Ralph 
Moore, Sherman E. 
Moore, Vinton J. 
Moos, Martin A. 
Moran, Joseph 
Morgan, Arthur O. 
Morgan, Ernest P. 
Morgan, Floyd H. 
Morgan, Frank 
Morris, Budd 
Morris, John C. 
Morris, Lyle 
Morris, Robert 
Morrison, George D. 
Morrison, Jo5eph P. 
Moser, Edward L. 
Mortenson, Sophus 
Moszcinski. John 
Moussa, Walter 
Moycr, Delbert 
Moyers, Ernie 



Ran-k 


OaCtNIZATION 


Cause 


Datc 


Addicss— Next of Kin 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


165 Thedore St., Detroit, Mich. 
Anna Minus. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


D\V 


8/29/18 


Otc, Ky. 

Mrs. 0. F. Watcher.- 


Sgt. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bii. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


New Boston, Mich. 

Mrs. William Mittlestat. 


Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 1:5 Inf. 


DW 

KIA 


8/31/18 
10/9/18 






BIoom(iei(i,"Neb! 










Mrs. Martha Moellcr (Mother). 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 127 I:.f. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


R. 1, La Grande, Ore. 

D. W. Moenkhousc (Father). 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


Ivanhoe, Vm. 

Samuel C. Mon<lay (Father). 


Corp. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


n/14/I8 


R. F. D. 1, Coldwalcr, Mich. 
Mrs. Julia Monocka. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Lebanon Junction, Ky. 
D, E. Monroe. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Bly. F. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


8/22/18 


456 Monroe Blvd., So. Haven, Mich. 
George C. Monroe (Father). 


Corp. 
Pvt. 


Ca. G. 1:6 Inf. 
Co. B. 126 I. if. 


KIA 
KIA 


8/28/18 
10/5/18 






321 So. Poppleton St., ijaltimore, Md. 










Mrs.Martha M. MonUey (Mother). 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/3/18 


R. F. D. 1, Princeton. Ind. 
Mrs. A. Mooney (Mother). 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. M. 1:8 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Perr>'villc, Mo. 

Edward Moonier. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/8/18 


R. F. D. 1, Box 29, Tolee, Ky. 
Eli Stanton Moore (Father). 


Pvt. Icl. 


Bat. C. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


10/21/18 


1122 Robin St., New Orleans, La. 
.Mrs. Elsie Ferguson (Mother). 


Pvt. Icl. 


San. Det. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


1019 E. 75th St., Cliicago, 111. 
Mrs. C. A. Moore. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


3219 15th St. S., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Louis Moore (Father). 


Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 
Co. M. 125 Int. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


lI/n/18 

10/9/18 

10/17/18 










McMillan, Wa.shington. 










Merle Greenwood (Cousin). 


Pvt. 


Co K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/i:/18 


R. F. D. 3. Casev, Ark. 
W. E. Moore (Brother). 


Sst. 


San. Det. 102 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


10/8/18 


Milton, Ind. 










Jesse Moore (Father). 


Mech. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


R. F. D. 3, Ravenna, Mich. 
Mrs. .\nna Crowe (Mother). 


Corp. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Ladysmith. Wis. 

Vinton Moore (Father). 


Sgt. 


Mg. Co. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


173 Summit A\-c., Oconoinowoc, Wis 
Martin A. Moos. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3'18 


2143 Hiunbolt Blvd., Chicago, III. 
Mr-. Marca-et Moran. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


R. F. D. 1, Topinabee, Mich. 
IIenr>' Morgan. 


Pvt. 


Sup. Co. 120 F. A. 


DD 




1927 N Da'ien St , Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mrs. Alice Coll. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


DW 





R. F D. 2. B IX 85, New Martinsville 
A. E. Morgan. W. Va 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


126 W. Broad St., Nanticoke, Pa. 
Mrs. William R. Morgan. 


Corp. 


Co. n. 128 Inf. 


DD 


1D/H/I8 


Mansion, Wis. 
Marion Morris. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/4/18 


Clarkston, Wash. 

Alec Morris (Father). 


Sgt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Berlin, Wis. 

Mrs. Bert Morris. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


Calhoun, Ky. 

Mrs Kattie Morris (Wife). 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


DW 


7/31/18 


Germfask, Mich. 

David F. Morrison. 


Corp. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


R. F. D. 1, Box 101, Ironwood, Mich. 
Mr.n. Julia Morrison. 


Corp. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


lO'ie/lS 


Aliens Grove, Wis. 
Louis Moser. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


3107 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Marie Mortenson. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


388 Palmer Ave , Detroit, Mirh. 
Ignac Moszcin-^ki (Father). 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


1602 2Sth St., SW., Superior. Wis. 
Mrs. K. Thorstensen (Mother). 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Bat. B. 324 F. A. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
10/13/18 






R. F. i). i, Cunningham, Ky. 










Dbvo Moyers. 



266 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Address— Next of Kin 


Mrvalevitch, Nickola 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


San Diego, Calif. 

Mrs. Nitkola Mrvalevitch. 


Mueller, Arthur J. 


Corp. 


Bat. D. 121 F. A. 


DW 


10/5/18 


1312 25th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Paul Mueller (Father). 


Mueller, Herman 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Box 302, Sheboygan, Wis. 
August Mueller (Father). 


Mulcare, John 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


DW 


9/2/18 


2139 W. 7th St., Clevdand, Ohio. 
Miss Lilly Mulcare. 


Muller, Louis 


Corp. 


Hq. Co. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


2119 N. Clark St., Chicago, 111. 
Miss Charlotte Muller. 


Mulligan, Francis 


Pvt. 
Corp. 


Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


8/8/18 
10/5/18 






Mulligan, Fred 


752 Logan .St., .lancsvil'le, Wis. 












Joseph Mulligan. 


Munch, Cyril 


Corp. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


DW 


9/4/18 


201 Main St., Toledo, Ohio. 
Joseph Munch. 


Munksgard, Chester H 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/13/18 


6 Cedar St., Warren, Pa. 

Mrs. Katie Pederson (Sister). 


Murawski, Charles 


Pvt. Icl. 


308 Btry. Tr. Arty. 


KIA 


I0/23/IS 


6920 Rathbun Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Mrs. Sophie Murawski (Mother). 


Muri, Lincoln D. 


Corp. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Forsythe, Mont. 

D. J. Muri (Father). 


Mureowski, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 107 F. S. Bn. 


KIA 


10/3/18 


162 44th St., Piltsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. Anna Mureowski (Mother). 


Murphy, Cornelius 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


274 Avenue B. New York, N. Y. 
Margaret Patterson (Mother). 


Murray, Clayton 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Mackinaw City, Mich. 
Alonzo Murray. 


Murray, Frank 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/1: 


Kerman, Calif. 
Mrs. R. DuBois. 


Murray, Fred \V. 


Sgt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/6/lS 


Menominee, Mich. 

Miss Jo.sephme Murray (Sister). 


Murray, Henry 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Haworth, Okla. 

James Albert Murray (Father). 


Murray, John E. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


laA 


10/12/18 


65 Pine St., Green Island, N. Y. 
Allies Murray (Brother). 


Murray, Mike 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


DD 


9/14/18 


Central Junction, Chippewa Falls, Wis 
Mrs. M. Murray (Motlier). 


Murry, Henry W. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 




10/11/18 


Haworth, Okla. 

James Albert Murry (Father). 


Musgerd, Carl N. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


10/8/18 
9/1/18 








Musier, Henry 


802'ciaiVnce"St.rClevelanVl,'bhi'o.' 












Mrs. Emma Musier (Mother). 


Muth, Karl 


Pvt. Id. 
Pvt. Id. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 
Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 

KIA 


7/31/18 
8/29/13 








Muzzall, Cleat^r E. 


712' Walnut ' SV. ,' Fu'l to'] 1 ,' Kv. 












Mr. J. 0. Muzzall (Fatlier). 


Myers, Carl J. 


Pvt. 
Corp. 


Bat. D. 120 F. A. 
Co. K. 125 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


7/31/18 








Myers, George W. 


525 N. Gratiot Ave., Alma, Mich. 












Charles Myers (Father). 


Myers, Howard S. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Hendricks, W. Va. 

Mary C. Mvers (Mother). 


Nadler, Emil 


Corp. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 




701 N. Walnut St., Rcedsburg, Wis. 
Fred Nadler (Father). 


Nadolski, Walter N. 


Corp. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


1214 S. Monroe St., Bay City, Mich. 

Julian Nadolski. 
Espanola. New Me.xico. 


Naionjo, Joe R. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 












Nanuel Naronjo (Father). 


Narbon, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


1210 Princeton Ave., Princeton, N. J. 
Louis Narbon (Father). 


Narofhonek, Stanley 


Corp. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


24 Stovel Place, Detroit, Mich. 
Minnie Narodzonek (Mother). 


Nascadi, Angelo 


Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 
Pvt. Id. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 322 F. A. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/18/18 
10/10/18 
11/10/18 








Naylor, James R. 








Naylor, James R. 


R. f! ii 4',' Conway,' Ark.' 


^ 










Mrs. Londl T. Navlor (Motlier). 


Nehrba=.s, Henry 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


R. F. D. 1, Athens, Wis. 
John Nchrbass (Father). 


Nehring, William G. 


Pvt. 


Bat. F. 120 F. A. 


DD 




82 4lh Ave., Wauwatosa, Wis. 
K. J. Nehring (Father). 


Nfilson, Arnold 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Overton, Neb. 

Miie Neilson (Sister). 


Nell, John 


Pvt. 


Co. B, 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Edinburg, 111. 

George Ndl (Father). 


Nelson, Albert L. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/6/lS 


Chetok, Wis. 
Ram Dyrland. 


Nelson, Burg 


Corp. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


SharoM, Wis. 
Art DcOraff. 


Nelson, Edward M. 


Pvt 


Hq. Co. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


7/30/18 


2010 W. Ohio St., Chicago, 111. 

Martha Kregan Nelson (Mother). 


Nelson, Fritichof 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


7/1/18 


514 Chapin St., Iron Mountain, Mich. 
August Nelson (Father). 



267 



rilB THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD 11'. 1 A' 



Name 



Nelson* George 

Nelson, George 

Nelson, Harold C. 

Nelson, Medes A. 

Nelson, Raymond 

Nelson, Walter C. 

Netchcr, William A. 

Netzel, Edward F. 

Newman, Robert E. 

Nichols, Benjamin 

Nicliols, Claud A. 

Neverdalil, 

Lawrence W . 
Nichols, Frederic li. 

Nichols, Howard 

Nichols, Ramond L. 

Nicholson, Ray U. 

Niskerson, Uoward B. 

Niebuhr, George 

Niehaus, Fred 

Nielson, Niels 

Ninneman, Jolm 

Noel, George 

French Soldier 
Norris, Alexander 

Norris, William 

Notting, Joseph 

Novek, Frank E. 

Novitske, Walter A. 

Nowack, Fred C. 

Nowack, John M. 

Nowatny, John 

Nusbaum, Willis 

Nystrom, Caleb 

Oakey, Howard G. 

Oakley, Harley R. 

Oakley, George M. 

O'Brien, Frank 

O'Brien, Maurice C. J 

O'Connel, Jeffery A. 

O'Connell, John V. 

O'Connor, Eddie 

O'Connor, Frank J. 

O'Connor, Frank J. 

O'Day, Charles H. 



Rank 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Wag. 

Pvt. 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt 

Sgt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Sgt 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 



Oeganization 



Co. C. 
Co. C. 
Co. A. 
Co. G. 
Co. C. 
Co. F. 
Co. G. 
Co. I. 
Co. A. 
Co. C. 
Co. L. 
Co. H. 
Co. C. 
Co. H. 
Co. G. 
Co. K. 
Co. C. 
Co. A. 
Co. E. 



128 Inf. 
128 Inf. 
121 Mg. Bn 

125 Inf. 

126 Inf. 
128 Inf. 

127 Inf. 

127 Inf. 
I2o Inf. 
125 Inf. 

125 Inf. 

128 Inf. 

107 Sup. Tr. 

126 Inf. 

127 Inf. 
126 Inf. 

128 Inf. 
128 Inf. 
126 Inf. 



Cause 



Co. B. 125 Inf. 
Sup. Co. 128 Inf. 
No. 21, 237 F. A. 
Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. A. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 127 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 
Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. A. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 
107 Eng. Train 
Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 
Bat. A. 119 F. A. 
Hq. Co. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 127 Inf. 



KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

ACC 

DW 

KIA 

DD 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 

KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 



Date 



Address— Next op Kin 



10/12/18 

10/12/18 

9/1/18 

10/7/18 

10/5/18 

9/11/18 

10/4/18 

10/18/18 

10/22/18 

10/9/18 

10/20/18 

2/1/18 

8/30/18 

8/3/18 

6/30/18 

10/12/18 

10/5/18 

8/29/18 

8/29/18 

9/2/18 

10/13/18 

10/4/18 

7/3I/I8 

8/1/18 

11/10/IS 

8/4/18 

7/9/18 

11/10/18 

8/1/18 

8/31/18 

11/10/18 

9/1/18 

8/1/18 

8/8/18 

7/31/18 

8/10/18 

10/11/18 

8/1/18 

10/11/18 



Angela, Mont 

Mrs. Helen Nelson. 
Angela, Mont. 

Mrs. Helen Nelson. 
828 Lake St., Rice Lake, Wis. 

Mrs. W. O. Ncl.ion. 
Ausable Forks, N. Y. 

Clara Nelson (Mother). 
Maiiton, Mich. 

Oscar C. Ransom. 
Marshall, Miim. 

William Nelson. 
Trenton, Utah. 

Mrs. C. S. Netcher (Mother). 
Crivitz, W'is. 

Alex Netzel (Father). 
Valley Station, Ky. 

Mrs. Emma Newman (Mother). 
Englewood, Tenn. 

Mary Nichols. 
R. F. D. 1, Tupdo, Miss. 

Jackson R. Nichols (Father). 
221 16th Ave., Menomonie, Wis. 

Tom Neverdahl. 
221 Congress St., Detroit, Mich. 

Edward Nichols. 
R. F. D. 1. Weidman, Mich. 

Allen Nichols (Father). 
1615 Schiller Court, Madison, Wis. 

Mrs. W. N. Nichols (.Mother). 



Farnaai, .Neb. 

Mrs. Cora A. Messersmith. 
Limeridge, Wis. 

William Niebuhr (Brother). 
222 Este Ave., Wenton PI.. 

Cinciiniati, Ohio. 

Adolph Coerling (Brotlier-in-Law). 
1822 Duane St., Astoria, Oregon. 

Jens Nielson (Father). 
611 Garfield Ave., Wausnu, Wis. 

Herman Ninneman (Father). 



1191 Ilarri-on Ave., Cincinnali, Oi>io. 

Anna Norris (Mother). 
j Shelbum, Ind. 

Mrs. Anna Norris (Wife). 
1185 27th St, Milwaukee, Wi.s. 

Miss Rose Notting (Sister). 
3414 S. Irving Ave., Chicago, III. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Novck (Mother). 
Ripon, Wis. 

Mrs. M. Novitske. 
R. F. D. I, Big Lake. Minn. 

Ferdinand Nowack (Father). 
884 Warren Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. Rose Nowack (Wife). 
R. F. D. 2. Wautoma. W'is. 

Albert Nowatnv (Father). 
R. F. D. 4, Sluffion, Ohio. 

Daniel Nusbaum (Father). 



1214 W. Wa-sliington Ave.. Maili.-.on. 

Mrs. C. E. Oakev (Mother). Wis. 
R. F. D. 1, Humboldt, III. 

Mrs. Ella Oakley (Mother). 
Idabd, Okla. 

B. A. Oakley. 
R. F. D. 2. Avocn, Wis. 
! Mrs. Mary O'Brien (Mother). 
805 Michigan Av., S. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. Patrick J. O'Brien (Mother). 



998 2nd Ave., New York. N Y. 

Mrs. Margaret COuioell (Mother). 
Dunlap, Iowa. 

Mrs. Marv 0'0>nnor (Mother). 
421 Sheldon Ave., Gd. Rapiils, Mich. 

James O'Coimor (Father). 
Berlin, Wis. 

John O'Connor. 
Adrian, Minn. 

Mrs. R. M. O'Day (Mother). 



268 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Ohoanization 


Cause 


Date 


Odee, John 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 


127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Odell, Lynn. 


Corp. 


Co. D. 


128 Inf. 


DD 


3/24/18 


Odermatt, August 


Corp. 


Co. H. 


127 Inf. 


DW 


10/13/18 


O'Donnell, Lawrence 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 


126 Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


Oehler, Fred G. 


Corp. 


Hq. 127 


Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Oertel, Emil L. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 


127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Ogdin, Guy 


Sgt. 


Co. M, 


128 Inf. 


laA 


8/30/18 


Ogletree, Cecil E. 


Bug. 


Co. C. 


120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Oldenburg, Ernest F. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


6/18/18 


Olin, Charles C. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 


128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Oliver, Wilson 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 


128 Inf. 


DW 


9/1/18 


01k, John E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Amb. Co. 128 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Ollnich, Harry 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Olsen, Carl A. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 


127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Olson, Albert 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 


128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Olson, Ame B. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 


127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Olson, Chester W. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. M. 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Olsson, Herbert T. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


O'Malley, Edward P. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 


128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


O'Malley, Martin L. 


Sgt. 


Co. I. 


127 Inf. 


DW 


9/4/18 


O'Malley, Thomas 


Pvt. Icl. 


Md. 322 F. A. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Opsahl, Colmer T. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 


127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Orr. John L. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 


128 Inf. 


DW 


8/1/18 


Orr, Louis D. 


Pvt. 


Co. L 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Orr, Russell 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 


126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Orr, Wifred A. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 


126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Orrick, Jasper > 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 


126 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


Ortiz, Conception 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. L 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Orwocke, John 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 


107 Am. Tr. 


DR 


7/17/18 


Osbom, Gilbert 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/2/18 


Oser, Joseph F. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 


127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Ostrom, Einer 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/22/18 


Ostrander, Guy W. 


Sgt. 


Co. D. 


126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Ostrander, Levi 


Corp. 


Co. E. 


125 Inf. 




8/29/18 


Osypienski, Wladyslaw 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/6/18 


Ottinger, Andrew D. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 


127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Overholser, Calvin R. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 


324 F. A. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Owen, Charles 


Corp. 


Co. H. 


128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


Owens, James 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 


128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Owens, John H. 


Corp. 


Co. I. 


128 Inf. 


KIA 


6/13/18 


Owens, Oliver J. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. D. 


126 Int. 




8/29/18 


Ozman, James C. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 


126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Pada, Walter 


Corp. 


Co. L. 


125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 



Addhess— Next op Kin 

1120 8th Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Rose Odee (Mother). 

Monroe, Wis. 

Mrs. Chas. Shutt (Sister). 
307 Buchmann St., Phoenixville, Pa. 

Mrs. John O'Donnell (Mother). 
Uhrichsviile. Ohio. 

Paul F. Oehler. 
R. F. D. 1, Box 51, Rozellville, Wis. 

Paul Oertel (Father). 
402 2nd St., Edgerton, Wis. 

Mrs. Geo. L. Ogdin. 
458 Distel Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Dora Merrow. 

202 George St., Marion, Oliio. 

Ethel Olin (Wife). ■ 
New France, Mo. 

J. J. Oliver. 

34 '8th 'Ave.'," 'Spoka'i'ie,' 'Wa's'h. 

Cecelia .Spurkland. 
Sheyenne, N. D. 

Andrew Olson. 
Castlewood, S. Dak. 

Mrs. Thome Olson (Mother). 

R.F.i). 2, iix. "7'2','Marine-o'n'-'st."Croix, 
Otto Olsson (Father). Minn. 

R. F. D. 2, Spiing Grove, Minn. 

Knut Opsahl (Father). 
427 Wriuhtwood -Ave., Chicago 111 

Mr. James W. On- (Father). 
413 3rd Ave., Great Falls, Mont. 

Eugene Snider (Friend). 
922 N. Webster St., Saginaw, Mich. 

Mrs. Catherine Orr (Mother). 
515 Pottowattomee St., Tecumseh, 

Robert Orr. Mich. 

Eagle Pass, "Texas. 

Virginia Ortiz. 
Empire Block, Platfeville, Wis. 

Wisconsin Zinc Co. 
R. F. D. 6, Rnbert.son, III. 

Samuel Osborn (Father). 
1443 Walnut St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Mrs. Francis Oser (Wife) 
22 Sweden Gine, W. Slottsgatan. 

Guatav I. Ostrnn. 
R. F. D. 1, Brcckcn Bridge. 

Albert Ostrander (Father). 
90 Will Willett, Attica, Mich. 

Pearly May Ostrander (Sister). 
98 Nagel St., Ilamtr.imck, Mich. 

Mrs. Sophia Pylzka (Sister). 
Sheridan, Oregon. 

W. D. Ottinger (Father). 

Patl'ifork' 'iiy! 

Daniel Owens (Father). 

R. F. "d! i ,' 'Pa'lest i'lie,' 'w.' ' Va. " 

Joshtia Owens (Father). 
Brookville, Penn. 

Mr. Joseph Ozman (Father). 
Menominee, Mich. 

Mrs. Mathilda Pada (Mother). 



269 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Nauc 



Pudeii, Walter 
Padgett, Uried E. 
Page, Hugh 
Page, H. T. 
Pagnani, Nicola 
Pahoon, Herbert A. 
Paine, Burley L. 
Palmer, Harry M. 
Palmer, Jack, 
Palmer, James S. 
Palmer, Leonard 
Palmer, Ralph B. 
Palmiero, Asparo 
Pape, Herman 
Pardee, Herman O. 
Pargawski, Tony 
Parkinson, Homer R. 
Parkinson, Leo N. 
Parks, Charley 
Parks, Clayton A. 
Parks, Edward J. 
Parnis, Carlo 
Parrish, Henry F. 
Parthe, Carl F. 
Partridge, Merrett E. 
Paseka, Andrew J. 
Patterson, Arthur C. 
Patterson, George 
Patterson, Oscar M. 
Patrick, Clarence A. 
Paulson, Otto A. 
Payne, Everettc L. 
Payne, Ira 
Pnyson, Carl F. 
Pearson, Rortiard N. 
Pearson, William B. 
Peatroski, Stanley 
Paccia, Nicola 
Pederson, Harry J. 
Pederson, Nels S. 
Pederson, Oscar 
Peebles, Charles E. 
Pegues, Nick T. 



Bank 



Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Sgt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Corp. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

1st Sgt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 



Obganization 



Causb 



Co. F. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 168 Inf. 
Co. L. 125 laf. 
Co. M. 125 Ii.f. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 
Co. A. 127 Inf. 
Co. B. 127 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 127 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. L. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 
Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Co. A. 127 Inf. 
Co. B. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Co. I. 127 Inf. 
Hq. Co. 128 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Co. L, 125 Inf. 
Bat. C. 120 F. A. 
Co. D. 126 Inf. 
Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. C. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 125 Inf. 
125 Inf. 

Co. E. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. K. 128 Inf. 



Daw 



AsDB£s»— Next or Kin 



KIA 


11/10/18 


KIA 


10/5/18 


KIA 


8/30/18 


DW 


10/17/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


8/28/18 


KIA 


10/6/18 


lUA 


8/4/18 


KIA 


8/31/18 




10/20/18 


KIA 


8/2/18 


KIA 


10/7/18 


DD 


3/1/18 


KIA 


8/4/18 


KIA 


8/31/18 


KIA 


10/18/18 


DW 


10/4/18 


DW 


9/1/18 


KIA 


10/7/18 


KIA 


8/5/18 


DW 


9/1/18 


DD 


2/12/18 


KIA 


10/16/18 


KIA 


10/17/18 


KIA 


10/12/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


DW 


8/30/18 


KIA 


8/6/18 


KIA 


10/9/18 


DW 


10/29/18 


KIA 


10/10/18 


DW 


10/6/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


' 7/31/18 


KIA 


10/22/18 


KIA 


8/2/18 


KIA 


8/3/18 


KIA 


10/15/18 


KIA 


1 8/4/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


7/31/18 


KIA 


I 11/10/18 



333 E. Warren, Princeton, 111. 

John R. Paden (Father). 
Stitlilon, Ky. 

Mrs. Rose Padgett (Stepmother). 
765 Ellery St., Detroit. Mich. 

Mrs. Ida Page (Mother). 



Campoli, Sppinno, Casenta, Italy. 
Mrs. O. Paguani (Wife). 



52 23rd St., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Winnie Paine. 
Madison, Neb. 

Roy Palmer (Father). 
Townsend, Mont. 

Mrs. R. MclEitvre (Sister). 
200 Edison Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Clavin A. Palmer (Father). 
104 Ram-sey St., Dawson Springs, Ky. 

John Palmer. 
Mistletoe, Mo. 

Gilbert F. Palmer (Father). 
12 Stanton St., New York, N. Y. 

Mrs. Garigi Salvatore (Sister). 



821 W. 33rd St., Chicago, 111. 

Frank Parjrawski. 
Blanchardville, Wis. 

Dwight E. Baker (Friend). 
Blanchardville, Wis. 

Mrs. Dwight E. Baker (Sister). 
Hovt, Okla. 

J. H. Parks. 
Route 4, Sauk Center, Minn. 

Joseph Parks (Father). 
W. Uailersville St., Marshfield, Wis. 

Stewart Parks (Father). 
Loggeuno, Per Bosco, Com. Italy. 

Mrs. Benda Tera.*^. 
Right .\ngle. Ky. 

M. B. Parrish (Father). 
Hall Ave., Marinette, Wis. 

Mr. Carl Parthe, Jr. (Father). 
478 Washington St., E Walpole, Mass. 

Mrs. Emily Partridge. 
Wood, So. Dak. 

Frank Paseka. 



299 Linwood Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Marj' Kimon (Sister). 
R. F. D. 6, Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 

Henry A. Patterson. 



Malvern, Iowa. 

C. A. Paulson. 
Hand, Ark. 

Elle Russell. 
R. F. D. 6, Richmond, Va. 

Mrs. Alice Payne. 
Monroe, Mich. 

Mrs. Minnie Timbertman. 



Gordon. Ala. 

A. M. Pearson (Brother). 
148 Jacob St., Hnmtrnmck, Mich. 

Mrs. Helen Tilipiak (Sister). 
Canlaliipo, Nelsonia. Italy. 

^Ia^y Domenica Parcia (Wife). 
Skudesncs, Blikshavn, Norway. 

Peder Pederson. 
Wilmar, Minn. 

Anna .\brahamson. 
Wells, Mich. 

P. O. Pederson. 



Earle. Ark. 

Mrs. Maude Pegues. 



270 





U^^^^^S"" 


HflFA^^HI 








•- 9 .:1 

1. Second Lieutenant Charles Raymond Wilbur, Company B, 126th Infantry. Killed in action October 3rd, 

1918, during the Meuse-Argonnc Offensive. 

2. Second Lieutenant James Vincent Devenny, Company E, 126th Infantry. Killed in action October 9th, 1918, 

during the Mevise-Argonne Offensive. 

3. Second Lieutenant Carl Thompson, 126th Infantry. Killed in action August 31st, 1918, during the Oise- 

Aisne Offensive. 

4. Second Lieutenant John C. Champagne, Company I, 125th Infantry. Killed in action July 31st, 1918, duniig 

the Aisne-Mame Offensive. 

5. Captain Milburn H. Hawkes, Company D, 125th Infantry. Killed in action September 30th, 1918, during 

the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

6. Second Lieutenant Lee N. Wall, Company M, 125th Infantry. Killed in action July 31st, 1918, during the 

Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

7. Second Lieutenant Erk M. Cottrell, Company F, 126th Infantry. Killed in action October 9th, 1918, during 

the Meu-se-Argonne Offensive. 

8. Second Lieutenant Otis H. Thomas, Company A, 126th Infantry. Died of wounds August 3rd, 1918, during 

Ihe Aisne-Manic Offensive. 

9. Second Lieutenant Harvey F. Smith, Company K, 125th Infantry, Killed in action October 13th, 1918, dur- 

ing the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

271 



77/ A' Til inrV- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOIHJ) II. 1 A' 



Name 


Rank | 


Obcanization 


Causi 


Datc 


Adduss— Next of Kin 


Pelagalle, Marco 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
7/31/18 






Pelisscro, Guiseppo 


354' Mi'dVlie 'st!,' 'konoshaV Wis'.' 












August Pelissero. 


Pclligrino, John 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


San \'ito La Capo, Italy. 

Francisco Pelligrino (Father). 
799 Riopelle St., Detroit, Mich. 












Pclowski, Joseph 


Pvt. lei. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 














Miss Pauline Pelowski (Sister). 


Penneyer, II. W. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Hamilton, Mont. 

L. A. Penneyer (Father). 


Perdue, William T. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 I;if. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


439 Hicks St., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Mrs. Mary Riley (Sister). 


Perkins, Elmer J. 


Pvt. Icl. 

Sgt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 
Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 

KIA 


7/31/18 
11/11/18 




Pcrlick, Otto 


283 Town«!nd 'Ave'.', Detroit , Midi. 












Mrs. Ida Grill (Sister). 


Pcrou, Charles A. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
10/13/18 






Perry, Clarence J. 


Port Clinton, Ohio. 












Mrs. Kate Shaefer (Mother). 


Perryman, Fred E. 


Pvt. 


Bat. B. 120 F. A. 


DW 


10/17/18 


431 N. Main St., Tulsa, Okla. 

Mrs. Laura Perr\'man. 
2654 K. 67th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 


Pester, Louis 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 


. KIA 


10/15/18 












Jake Pester. 


Peters, Clarence E. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


925 Spring St , Beaver Dam, Wis. 
Mrs. Frank Peters (Mother). 


Peters, Oliver D. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Dewitt, Ark. 

Mrs. Mary Harrison (Mother). 


Peterson, .Arnold J. 


Sgt. 


Co. 127 Inf. 


DW 


6/30/18 


1025 8th St., Bdoil. Wis. 
A. 0. Peterson (Father). 


Peterson, Artlmr 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. II. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Nora, M.icklabv OInnd, Sweden. 
Per NiUon (Father). 


Peterson, Arvie 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


DW 


8/29/18 


Kenesaw, Neh. 

J. C. Peterson (Father). 


Peterson, Charles W. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Pine River, Wis. 
Jens Peterson. 


Peterson, Ernest A. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/13/18 


7243 Greenwood Ave.. Chicago, III. 
Gust. Peterson. 


Peterson, Matt 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


8/1/18 
10/12/18 






Peterson, Viggo 


Viborg, S. Dak. 












Mrs. Trcona Peterson (Mother). 


Petitt, George H. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


P. 0. Box. 205, Ashland, III. 
Charles L. Petitt (Father). 


Petri, William S. 


Corp. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


R. F. D. 1, Rozellvillc. Wis. 
August Petri (Father). 


Petro, Anthony 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 

KIA 


7/31/18 
10/21/18 






Petrowsky, Andrew 


26 Camjjbeli'ist'.'.'Carnegie, Pa. 












Welder Pelrowsky (Brother). 


Petty, John 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/2/18 


Lone Cerlnr. W. Va. 
Will Pickering. 


Petty, Pat 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Lonoke, Ark. 

Thomas F. Petty. 


Pfeil, Henry 


Corp. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


29 Madison St., Oshkosh, Wis. 
J. H. Pfeil (Father). 


Pflug, Alfred 


Pvt. 
Pvt. Icl. 


Bat. B. 322 F. A. 
Co. I. 127 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


12/18/18 
8/4/18 






Philbrook, George W. 


South Range. Wis. 












Mrs. R. P. Philbrook (Mother). 


Philbrook, James H. 


Sgt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


South Ranee, Wis. 

Mrs. Marv Philbrook (.Mother). 


Phillips, Dewey 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


427 Hanchptt St., Saginaw, Mich. 
John Phillips (Father). 


Phillips, John 


Pvt, 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


2218 Willis Ave., Omaha, Neb. 
J-im-s C. Phillips (Father). 


Phillip, Vent 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/7/18 


Cooporsville, Mich. 
Fred L. Phillip. 


Piaskowski, Frank 


Corp. 


Co. D. 120 Mg. Bn. 


DW 


10/6/18 


701 Main St., Green Bay. Wis. 
Joseph Piaskowski (Father). 


Pickncy, Louis E. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


Winchester, Tenn. 

Mr. Louis P. Pickney. 


Pierce, Frank 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 
125 Amb. Co. 
Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 

KIA 


10/14/18 
10/13/18 
8/6/18 


R. F. D. 4, Box 80. Pleasanton, Kan. 


Pierce, Max 0. 




Pierson, Nile 


Krisliustad, Sweden. 












Miss Alma Pierson (Sister). 


Pietras, Waller 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


5 Duke St.. Pontiac, Mich. 
Joseph Rybach. 


Pietrykowski, Louis 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


1780 Tecumseh St., Toledo, Ohio. 
Grace Gozwiak (Sister). 


Piezy, Lawrence 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 




10/4/18 
1/16/18 






Pcllington, James 













272 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Pinch, Henry 


Corp. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Pinn, Arthur V. • 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/S/I8 


Piper, Elmer L. 


Sgt. 


Co. K. 12.5 Ihf. 


KIA 


I0/I0/I8 


Pira, Frank 


Pi't. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


lO/U/18 


Pittcnger, Bcarl V. 


Sgt. 


Hq. 119 F. A. 


inv 


8/4/18 


Pitterle, Frank L. 


Corp. 


Co. U. 120 M-. I!m. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Pitts, Albert 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Pexley, Loren E. 


Pvt. . 


Med. I)ut. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/6/18 


Pizzini, Louis 


Pxt. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


I)W 


8/29/18 


Plana, Frank 


Pvt. • 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Plassmeyer, Albert J. 


Pvt. 


Bat E. 322 F. A. 


DW 


8/1/18 


Plude, Louis C, 


Corp. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Plummer, Guy L. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 119 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Poe, Melvin 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 153 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


Poet, Julin W. 


Coi-p. 


Co. D. 125 liif. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Pohlmann, Francis 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Pohlpcter, Bernard J. 


Sgt. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Polak, Max 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Polomis, Peter A. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Polovina, Fred 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Polowski, Joseph 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


DW 




Polubitz, Wyllcm 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Amm. Tr. 


DD 


6/24/18 


Ponti, Charles 


1st. Sgt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Poplian, Cecil J. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Porte, Alex 


Pvt. Icl. 


Eat. A. 120 F. A. 


DW 


■ 9/3/18 


Porter, Horace 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


k:a 


11/7/18 


Porter, Ray 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Posharitzky, Stephen 


Pvt. 


Co. R. 125 Inf. 


Suicide 


7/16/18 


Potter, Harrs- 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Powell, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Powers, John 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/4/18 


Prahl, Louis 


Corp. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 




Prate, Roderick G. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Pravica, Nickola 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


DW 


8/29/18 


Preiss, Clarence G. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Preissner, Joseph F. 


Sgt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Prestegaard, Lars E. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Preston, Hobart P. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


DD 


10/27/18 


Price, Dave 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/6/18 


Price, Eula 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Price, John 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/7/18 


Price, Thurlow M. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


Preiskom, Erwin 


Corp. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/31/18 



Address— Next op Kin 



Georgetown, Wis. 

Mary Pinch (Mother). 
Harwood, Texas. 

Mrs. Clar Pinn (Mother). 
Goastia, Mich. 

E. H. Piper (Father). 
Dogliani, Italy. 

John Pira (Father). 
R. F. D. 4, Muncie, Ind. 

Jarvia Pittenger (Father). 
206 3rd St., Wafertown, Wis. 

Mrs. Theresa Pitterle. 
Seligman, Arizona. 

Hai-vey B. Pitts (Brother). 
809 Lawnsdale Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Guy L. Pexley (Father). 
Belt, Montana. 

John Pizzini (Father). 



1412 State St., .Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. Mary Plude. 
Joliet, Mont. 

Mrs. N. A. Plummer (Mother). 
OIney, Ky. 

Bandoio Williams. 
75 Chamberlain St., Detroit, Mich. 

John Poet (Father). 
Brussels, 111. 

Barney Pohlmann (Father). 
1330 6th St., Fort Madison, Iowa. 

Miss S. Pohlpeter (Sister). 
1077 12th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Vincent Polak (Father). 
Wausaukee, Wis. 

Catherine Polomis (Mother). 



1612 17th St., Superior, Wis. 

Mrs. Margaret Mary Ponti (Wife). 
Batlletown, Ky. 

Mr.«. Flora B. Padgett. 
299 14th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

C. E. Porte. 
Bluffton, Yell Co., Ark. 

Mrs. Anna Porter. 
420 Milton St., Paris, 111. 

Mrs. Martha Porter (Mother). 
Gordd, Krasnoiarsk, Gubernia, Komit, 
Pomochia, Ceshenow, Russia. 

Ivan Posharitzky (Father). 
Brown City, Mich. 

Mrs. Flora Potter (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Como, Miss. 

James M. Powell (Father). 
98 Milton Ave.. Dorchester, Mass. 

Miss Sadie Powers (Sister). 
R. F. D. 2, Box 71, Berlin, Wis. 

Edward Prahl (Father). 
Munising, Mich. 

Joseph Prate (Father). 
607 Castelar St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

G. Dabobich. 
334 15th St.. Milwaukee, Wis. 

John A. Preiss (Father). 
1818 State St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Theresa Hutl. 
Voose Vangern, Bergen, Norway. 

Mrs. Enger Prestegaard (Mother). 



Williamson, W. Va. 

David W. Price. 
Ashland, N. C. 

Filmore Price. 
769 1st Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mary Price (Mother). 
P. O. Box 4."). Oak Dale, Tenn. 

Thelma Calyon (Sister). 
II Adams St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Henry Pciskom (Brother). 



273 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD W.M! 



Name 



Rank 



Obsanization I Cacse 



Prime, Dean 
PrinU, Frank E. 
Prizzi, Michael 
Procter, Merlin 
Prokopowich, John 
Pruchnofski, Frank 
Prybylski, Joseph B. 
Przybylowski, Leonard 
Pukita, Trofin 
Pullen, Janies T. 
Purely, Williard D. 
Purvis, James M. 
Quails, James L. 
Quereau, Edwin C. 
Quigg, Charles 
Raak, Arthur 
Raasch, George 
Rabenstein, Carl H. 
Radcliff, Lilburn 
Radecki, Leon 
Radov'ich, John 
Radovitch, John B. 
Ragan, Arthur E. 
Raithcl, Otto G. 
Ralph, Earl 
Ramm, Devalois Fred 
Randall, Carl F. 
Rankin, Clarence L. 
Rankin, Raymond 
Rannow, Theodore 
Rapp, Joseph J. 
Rasp, Charles J. 
Rath, Francis T. 
Rathburn, Leora A. 
Rathbun, William 
Raustis, John 
Rawdon, Lawrence S. 
Raymer, George L. 
Reardon, William S. 
Rebec, Albert M. 
Rech, Baldwin 
Redmen, Samuel C. 
Reed, Cecil 



Pvt. 

Mech. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Stab. Sgt 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt, Icl. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 



Med. Dct. 125 Inf. 
Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 127 Inf. 
Co. L. 127 Inf. 
Co. I. 128 Inf. 
Co. I. 12i Inf. 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. L. 128 Inf. 
Co. A. 127 Inf. 
Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 
Co. A. 103 Engrs. 
Bat. C. 120 F. A, 
Co. M. 126 Inf. 
Mg. Co. 128 Inf. 
Co. A. 128 Inf. 
Co. A. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 126 Inf. 
Co. C. 127 Inf. 
Co. D. 121 Mg. Bn. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 
Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Co. B. 18 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 128 Inf. 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 
Co. L. 126 Inf. 
Co. L. 59 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. C. 127 Inf. 
Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. I, 128 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 
Hq. Co. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 126 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 



DW 
KIA 
DD 
DD 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 

ACC 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

DD 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

ACC 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 



Daiz 



10/12/18 
8/31/18 
6/23/18 
4/2S/18 
9/2/18 
9/1/18 
8/28/18 
9/2/18 
I 10/4/18 
9/23/18 
7/4/18 
10/10/18 
10/11/18 
8/7/18 



AsDKESs— Next op Kin 



10/9/18 

8/31/18 

10/10/18 

11/10/18 

10/5/18 

10/5/18 

6/13/18 

I0/7/I8 

10/18/18 

9/2/18 

9/1 /I8 

8/12/18 

8/1/18 

10/9/18 

8/4/18 

10/10/18 

7/2/18 

10/10/18 

10/10/18 

8/31/18 

7/31/18 

8/4/18 

10/4/18 

1I/8/I8 

10/8/18 

8/1/18 

10/5/18 

8/3/18 



423 Norma! Ave., Stevens Point, Wis. 

Mrs. Matt Printz. 
8 Emmett St., Rochester, N. Y. 

Sam Prizzi (Father). 



Box 630, Calagorment, Canada. 

Nick Prokopowich (Brother). 
832 2nd .St., Mcna.sha, Wis. 

Jfie Pruchnofski. 
R. F. D. 1, Pinconninc, Mich. 

.Mirhael Prs'bylski (Father). 
915 .Maple St., Milwaukee, Wij. 

Victor Przyhvlowski. 
23 E. York St., Baltimore, Md. 

Alexandri Pukita (Brother). 



Box 632, Marshfidd, Wis. 

Mrs. Edgar Purdy (Mother). 
Gunn, Mis.s. 

Sam Purvis (Father). 
Story. Ark. 

Mrs. Dora Quails (Mother). 



824 E. Grand .\ve., Eaii Claire, Wis. 

Mrs. J. C. Quisg (Mother). 
Herkimer, N. Y. 

Mrs. Verman Raak (Mother). 
R. F. D. 1, Oconomowoc, Wis. 

Dr. N. C. Stuesser (Friend). 
Neillsville, Wis. 

Carl Rabenstein (Father). 
Smithfield, Kv. 

Dack Radcliff (Father). 
319 .Stewart Ave., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 

Mrs. Klinentvna Gulemlcawski. 
2015 Ventura .\ve., Fresno, Calif. 

Mrs. Dora Obradovich (Aunt). 
Fond du Lac, Wis. 

John Henry (Friend). 



Jefferson Citv, Mo. 

Julius Raithcl (Father). 
Guide Rock, Neb. 

E. Ralph. 
ViKil. 111. 

John C. Ramm (Father). 
R. F. D. 5, Ionia, Mich. 

Soloman J. Randall (Father). 
R. F. D. 2, Schoolcraft, Mich. 

Henry Ilankin. 
CoopersNTlle, Mich. 

John Rankin. 



Star Route, Shippensville, Pa. 

Henrv Rapp (Father). 
509 McDriugall Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

John Rasp. 
R. F. D. 2, Defiance, Ohio. 

W. P. Rath (Father). 
R. F. D. 1. Box 49. Belle Fourche, 

James Rathburn (Father). S. D. 
Sparta, Wis. 

Jes=e Rathbun. 
276 Main St., Amsterdam. N. Y. 

Anna Raustis (Mother). 
Malta, Montana. 

Sieve Rawdon (Father). 
Gen. Del., Edwards, Mo. 

Presley RajTner (Father). 
1969 Chathron Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 

Julia Reardon. 
East Jordan, Mich. 

Mr. Anthonv Rebec (Father). 
845 14th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. Catherine Rech. 
Front Royal, Va. 

Taylor Redmen. 
406 Lain St., Dnrnnd, Mich. 

Elmira E. Reed (Mother). 



274 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Address — Next op Kin 


Reed, Seth 


Corp. 


Co. A, 125 Inf. 


OW 


9/5/18 


R. F. D. 1, Wolverine, Mich. 
Thomas H. Reed (Father). 


Reedy, Austin F. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Lihby, Montana. 

Mrs. Joh Reedy (Mother). 


Rees, John 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 12.? Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


2028 Peoria Road, Springfield, 111. 
Mrs. Rachel Rees (Motiier). 


Reese, Amose C. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 




1739 Sebert St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Jesse L. Reese. 


Reese, Lester C. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


.McMinnville, Ore. 

Mrs. W. W. Reese (Mother). 


Reeser, Harley R. 


Sgt. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 


DW 


10/4/18 


Logansport, Ind. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Reeser. 


Regert, Sam J. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Phillips, Wis. 

Mrs. Fred Strobel. 


Reliling, George C. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


Arlington, Minn. 

Mrs. Louisia Rehling (Mother). 


Reid, Neil W. 


Corp. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


R. F. D. 1, Warren, Mich. 
J. M. Reid (Father). 


Reiff, Myron 


Sgt. 


Bat. A. 120 F. A. 


DW 


9/3/18 


3406 Walnut St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mrs. P. A. Reiff. 


Reiff, Ralph R. 


Corp. 
Pvt. 


Hq. 322 F. A. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/30/18 
8/1/18 








Reily, William T. 


1127"b St.' SE.', 'wkshingtoii,' D." C.' 












Mrs. Ardenia Reily. 


Relly, George B., Jr. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


1236 Cress St., Baltimore, Md. 
Mary Relly (Mother). 


Reinkens, Alfonso 


Pvt, Icl. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/lS 


Montt'sano, Wash. 

John J. Reinkens (Father). 


Remley, Earl M. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


R. F. D., Russellville. Mo. 
George Remley (Father). 


Rempler, Perrj- 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/21/18 


R. F. D. 2, Foster, Ohio. 

Mrs. Ella Rempler (Mother). 


Replogla, John 


Pvt. 

Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/29/18 






Reuter, Frederick J. 


R. f! D.' 3,' Mac'ton,' Maryiand'.' 












Mrs. Jacob Reuter. 


Reynolds, Ralph 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


1209 Dewev Ave., Beloit, Wis. 
C. A. Reynolds. 


Rezak, Martin 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


103 Lincoln St., Butler, Pa. 
Joseph Rezak (Brother). 


Rice, Bertie K. 


Corp. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


Metcalf, 111. 

Mrs. Emma Newell (Sister). 


Richard, Ramie 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Creole, La. 

Mrs. Alice Richard (Wife). 


Richards, Samuel 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Boyero, Colo. 

Ida Richards (Mother). 


Richardson, James M. 


Pvt. 


Hq. Co. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


Boone, Iowa. 
Mrs. Tons Bell Richardson (Mother). 


Riches, Albert S. 


Sgt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


1014 Harrison St., Superior, Wis. 
S. A. Riches (Father). 


Richmond, Benjamin 


Corp. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Gamer Apts., Pontiac, Mich. 

Robert Garner (Brother-in-Law). 


Richmond, Earl G. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Joseph Richmond. 


Richmond, Leslie M. 


Sgt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Stockbridge, Mich. 

Mrs. A. L. Richmond (Mother). 


Riddle, Henry 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/19/18 


Unirin Co., Sturgeon, Kv. 
J. T. Riddle (Father). 


Rieck, Victor I. 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


P. O. Box 30, Utica, Mich. 
Herman J. Rieck. 


Riemer, Albert W. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 




615 Clarke St., Oconto, Wis. 
Mrs. Fred Riemer (Mother). 


Rierson, Ernest H. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


King, N. Carolina. 
Mrs. Mary Rierson. 


Rietz, Charles 


Pvt. Icl. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


41 Vanderljilt Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Fred Budnik. 


Riffle, Lloyd H. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


2116 Belle Plain Ave., Chicago. 111. 
Mrs. R. W. Burdick (Sister). 


Riggleman, Charles W 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/22/18 


Rockingham, Va. 
Jennie Riggleman. 


Rigic, Ferdinand 


Mus. 
Pvt. 


Hq. 322 F. A. 
Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/14/18 
8/1/18 






Riggs, Joseph E. 


Panguitch, Utah. 












Andre J. Riggs. 


Rimstidt, Harry I. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


642 Pleasant St., Beloit, Wis. 
Mrs. Lovina Andrews (Mother). 


Rinaldi, Scarjnei 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 128 Inf. 


DW 


9/4/18 


Penisa. Italy. 

Agnes Marcluci. 


Rineberger, James W. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/:8/18 


1652 High St., Louisville. Ky. 
Mrs. Lena Warren (.Sister). 


Rippberger, Oscar A. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


25 Whistler St., Frecport, III. 

Mrs. Aloce Rippberger (Wife). 
1104 2nd Ave.. Ilalispell, Mont. 


Rising, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


KI.V 


10/9/18 












Mrs. M. Rising (Mother). 


Ritzert, Charles T. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 














275 



THE TJinrrv-SECONi) nivisiox in tiif. woh'i.n war 



\ \:n 


Hank 
Pvt. 


1 IKGA.MZATION 


Cause 


Date 


Addbess— Next or Kin 


Roam, Mike 


I .. n. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/15/18 


1269 Water St., Meadvillc, Pa. 












Ralph Ditucia (Uncle). 


Rcaw, Camiel 


Corp. 


Co. n. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


1072 Bewick Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. II. Hcase (Sister-in-l.aw). 


Roljb, Vernon M. 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


DW 


8/31/18 


Douclas, Neb. 

Mrs. F. M. Robb (MuUier). 


Roberts, Bcrtd 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Hyden, Leslie Co., Kentucky. 
Mrs. Lucy Roberts. 


Roberts, Earl E. 


Corp. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


46 Pine St., Muskegon, Mich. 
Mrs. D. L. Roberts. 


Roberts, Wyatt 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


Sweetland, W. Va. 
Mrs. Bara Roberts. 


Robertson Edward A, 


Pvt. 
Pvt. Id. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 

KIA 


11/10/18 
8/4/18 








Robinson, Charles 


Gresham, Wis. 












Ella Quinney (Aunt). 


Robinson, John H. 


Corp. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/3/18 


30 E. Milwaukee St., Detroit, Mich. 
William Robinson (Father). 


Rubiiison, Trowis VV. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


Harvard, N. Carolina. 
Charley Robinson. 


Roemer, Jolin L. 


P^t. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 




8/28/18 


Raspeburg, Md. 
John Roemer. 


Rogalska, George F. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Hq. Co. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Apt. 21,428 Cass St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Lydia Lemons Rogalska (.Mother). 


Rogers, Austin 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Churchill, Tcnn. 
Harry Rogers. 
Judsonia, Arkansas. 


Rogers, Edward E. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 












Joseph A. Rogers (Father). 


Rogers, Samuel 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


Iron River, Wis. 
Calvin D. Rogers. 


Roman, Adam 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


26 Garfield St., Natrona, Pa. 
Mr. Kostanty Rzewnicki. 


Romanzuk, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Vilenski, Russia. 

Pauline Romanzuk. 


Romes, Stepliens 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Western Ave., Cheboygan, Mich. 
Steven Romes, Sr. (Father). 


Roinoly, Earl 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 
Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 

KIA 


10/5/18 
9/1/18 








Romotowski, Chester 


lOoi Kaniioljjh St., Saginaw, Mich. 












Zopi Wolkawic 


Roose, Camiel 


Corp. 
Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 
10/13/18 








Rooney, Thomas 


1228 La Crosse St., La Crosse, Wis. 












Thom.'xs Rooney. 


Root, George E. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


110 Edwards St., St. Paul, Minn. 
Delkia Root (Mother). 


Rorabacher, Clare 


Corp. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Hamburg, Mich. 

Charles Rorabacher. 


Rosati, Antonio 


Pvt. 


308 Btry. Tr. Arty. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


Union Savings & Tmst Co., 1127-1129 
Vine St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Vittorio Rosati (Brother). 


Rose, Carl 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Thornwood, W. Va. 

Mrs. Agnes Rose (Mother). 


Rose, Manuel R. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


UW 


10/11/18 


Milpitns, Cahf. 

Louisa Rose (Mother). 


Rose, Orson A. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 12.5 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


R. F. D. 1, Fowlerville, Mich. 
Eliza Ann Rose (Mother). 


Rose, Ralph C. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


140 Main St., Meadville, Mo. 
Lillian Rose (Wife). 


Rosenburger, Leslie 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Jefferson ton, Va. 
Mrs. Mary A. Rosenburger (Mother). 


Rosenkranz. William J 


Sgt. 
Pvt. 


Co. A. 322 F. A. 
Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


12/24/18 








Roscnzweig, Henry F. 


Morley, Mich. 












John Rosenzweig (Father). 


Rosky, John 


Pvt. 


Co. II. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


P. 0. Box 38. DeWard, Mich. 
Thomas McGuire (Friend). 


Ross, Edwin 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 


DW 
KIA 


9/5/18 
8/1/18 








Ross, La^vrence H. 


458' Disfel ' Ave.',' 'Detroit,' Mich. 












Mrs. Dora Merrow. 


Ross, Murdo C. 


Corp. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 




9/2/18 


Be.iuly. Inverne.'^shire, Scotland. 
Mrs. Mary Ross (Mother). 


Ross, William 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/8/18 


Littleton, 111. 

Mrs. Maggie Ross. 


Rossbach, Fred J. 


Sgt. 
Corp. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 
Hq. Co. I. 


DD 
KIA 


3/18/18 
10/3/18 








Rothermel, Richard J. 


Plainfield, Wis. 






207 Amm. Tr. 






Frank A. Rothermel. 


Rothfus, Adrian 


Sgt. 


Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


1036 Fulton St. SE., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 
Mrs. Alberta Rothfus (Mother). 


Rosscau, Raymond J. 


Corp. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/3I/I8 


R. F. D. 1, Rhinelander, Wis. 
Mrs. C. Rousseau (Mother). 


Rowe, Jesse 


Corp. 
Corp. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. n. 120 Inf. 


KIA 
DD 


7/31/18 
7/3/18 








Roy, Charles M. 


Jerome, Mich. 












Calvin, Roy (Father). 



276 




1. First Lieutenant (Father) Wili-iam F. Davitt, Chaplain 125th Infmitry. Killed in action November 11th, 

1918, during tlip Meuse-Argoniie Offensive. 

2. Captain Meade Frierson, Jr., 125th Infantry. Killed in action August 29th, 1918, while making a reconnaissance 

before the enemy during the Oise-Aisne Offensive. 

3. First Lieutenant John Houston Kteen, Medical Department, 125th Infantry. Killed in action August 6th, 

1918, during the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

4. Captain Charles A. Learned, Company A, 125th Infantry. Killed in action August 5th, 1918, during the 

Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

5. Captain Oscar Falk, Company F, 125th Infantry. Died August 1, 1918, of wounds received during the Aisne- 

Marne Offensive. 

6. Captain Mkrritt Udell Lamb, Regimental IntcHigence OfTicer, 125th Infantry. Killed in action August 29th, 

1918, while making a reconnais.sance before the enemy during the Oise-Aisne Offensive. 

7. Second Lieutenant Joseph M. Duff, 125th Infantry. Killed in action October 11th, 1918, during the Meuse- 

Argonne Offensive. 

8. Captain Francis A. Barlow, Company H, 125th Infantry. Killed in action October 7th, 1918. during the 

Meuse-Argomie Offensive. 

9. First Lieutenant Charles A. Hammond, Company L, 125th Infantr>*. Killed in action July 31st, 1918, whil« 

leading his company against the enemy during the Aisne-Manie Offensive. 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Royer, Horry O. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Rozwadewski, Walter 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Rube, Fred K. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/VI8 


Ryby. Wilbur M. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/8/18 


Ruchti, Alfred 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/2/18 


Rutdisale, William 


Corp. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


DW 


8/5/18 


Rugg, Harry Geo. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Rundquist, Oscar 


Sgt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Runnyoii, Joseph W. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Rush, William 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 




11/3/18 


Russell, Charles T. 


Pvt. 


Bat. E. 76 F. A. 


DW 


10/5/18 


Russell, Louis A. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Russell, Orrin M. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Russell, Robert E. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Russell, Sim L. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/28/18 


Rust, Daniel T., Jr. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Rust, David L. 


Pvt. Id. 


Bat. A. 322 F. A. 


DD 


12/12/18 


Ruth, William T. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 149 Mg. Bn 


KIA 




Ryan, Arthur 


Pvt. Id. 


Bat. C. 120 F. A. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Ryan, Bert 


Corp. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Sabeen, Merton D. 


Corp. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Sadkowski, Chester 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Sader, Fred 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


Sage, James E. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Saintom, Nicola 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Sakkinen, John P. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Sakolka, John 


Pvt. 


Co. A. i:6 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Salazar, Jesc C. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Sales, Walter H. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Salo, Andrew 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Salsgiver, Vernct 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


.Saltin, William 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Salvator, Benita 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 30 Inf. 


DW 


10/4/18 


Salzor, Edward 


Pvt. Id 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Samples, Leonard 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Sandheimicr, William 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Sanders, Edward L. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Sanders, Ralph S. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


1/8' IS 


Sanders, Theodore 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Sandridge, Marion L. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Sands, Walter H. 


Corp. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/16/18 


Sanstrom, Albert 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


Sandy, Harry J. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 



AiiDRESs— Next or Kin 



R. F. D. 1, Orville, Wayne Co., Ohio. 

J. F. Royer (Father). 
668 Palmer Ave., Detroit. Mich. 

Mis. Mary Rozwadewski. 
Kelso, Wa.sh. 

Mrs. Peter IloUeman (Sister). 
Selleraburg, Ind. 

Mrs. W. M. Ryby (Wife). 
Green County Hou.m;. Alonroe, Mich. 

Adolph Ruchti (Brother). 
900 Van Dyke Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

W. J. Ruedisale (Father). 
R. F. D. 1. Remington, Vt. 

Carrie Thoinps<in (Sister). 
I0I7 4th Ave., Big Rapids, Mich. 

Mrs. Olaf Rundquist (Mother). 
Shelby, N. Carolina. 

J. C. Runnyon. 



R. F. D, 3, Cedar Springs, Mich. 

Byron R. Russell (Father). 
Colfax. Wis. 

James B. Russell. 
Barryville, Va. 

Mrs. Mary Russell. 
Canmer, Ky. 

Mrs. A. W. Russell (Mother). 



516 Euclid Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
Patrick Ryan. 



New Richmond, Wis. 

Mrs. A. R. Sabeen. 
38 Jackson St., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Matalyra Zuzuchowski. 



Burke, Idaho. 

Mrs. Eugene Sage. 



Box 9, Painesdale. Mich. 

Peter Sakkinen (Father). 
Wulklanska, Russia. 

Tusoph Sakolka. 
290 N. Mever St., Tucson, Ariz. 

Mrs. Felipa Gonzales. 



Van Buskirk, Wis. 
John Salo. 



1214 Langley St.. Escanaba, Mich. 
Mrs. Emma Fait. 



Neqpit, Wis. 

Cgrl Salzor (Father). 
Route 1, Hatton. Ky. 

George Samples. 



Brooke, Ky. 

Berth Sanders (Father). 
Erlanger, Ky. 

Mrs. Sanders. 
Baltimore, Md. 

George Sanders (Father). 
Moormans River, Va. 

L. L. Sandridge. 



1418 6th Ave. Rockfrird, 111. 

Frnnl Sanstrom (Father). 
Java, S. Dakota. 

Jim Campbell. 



278 



BOLL OF IIOXOR 



Name 



Rank 



Sanson, Joseph 
Santerclli, Angelo 
Sarazen, Aleck 
Sather, Ben 
Satterlee, Glenn N. 
Sattenvhite, Lilbom 
Sauvola, Ernest 
Sauvala, Charles 
Savedro, Jose L. 
Sawcheck, Gregory 
Saxe, Chas. E. 
Schener, John 

Saxay, Harry 
Schaedler, August S. 
Schafke, Albert 
Schanger, Lj-man T. 
Scheffler, Joseph 
Schenck, Oscar K. 
Scheik, Arthur J. 
Schielz, Henry 
Schireson, Gustav D. 
Schaikowski, Alois 
Schlosser, Joseph, Jr. 
Schmees, Leo 
Schmidt, Harry 
Schmidt, Hazen 
Schmidt, Walter F. 
Schmitt, Harry 
Schmitt, Peter D. 
Schmitt, Thomas 
Schmitz, Joseph 
Schmider, John 
Schnieder, John 
Schniers, Leo 
Schnupp, Carl 
Schoenrock, Frank T, 
Schoof, aark W. 
Schoon, Charles 
Schram, Elmore E. 
Schubert, Louis H. 
Schrech, Andy 
Schroedcr, AuKUSt 
Scliweikert, Edward L 



Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Id. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 

Pvt. 



Organization 

Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 
Bat. C. 120 F. A. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 128 Inf. 
Co. L. 126 Inf. 
Co. G. 125 Inf. 
Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. E. 126 Inf. 
MD. 107 Engrs. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 

Co. E. 127 Inf. 

Co. C. 121 Mg. B:i. i 

Co. H. 125 Inf. 

Co. E. 125 Inf. 

Co. M. 127 Inf. 

Co. H. 128 Inf. 

Co. H. 127 Inf. 

Co. A. 127 Inf. 

Co. A. 128 Inf. 

Co. K. 127 Inf. 

Co. F. 127 Inf. 

Co. G. 126 Inf. 

Co. D. i:8 Inf- 

Co. A. 125 Inf. 

Co. B. 128 I;if. 

308 Btry. Tr. Arty. 

Bat. F. 120 F. A. i 

Co. B. 128 I:if. 

Co. B. 125 Inf. 

Co. F. 125 Inf. 

Co. F. 125 Inf. 

Co. G. 126 Inf. 

I 
Co. B. 127 Inf. 

Co. M. 125 Inf. 

I 
Co. D. 126 Inf. i 

Co. L. 125 Inf. 

Bat. D. 121 Mg. Bn. j 

Co. C. 128 Inf. j 

Co. E. 125 Inf. 

j Co. M. 126 Inf. 

i Co. C. 128 Inf. i 



Cause 



lilA 

KIA 

DD 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

DD 

KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KI.\ 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
ACC 
DW 
DW 

KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
DW 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 
KIA 



Date 



11/10/18 
8/4/18 

9/2/:8 
8 '1/18 
11/10/18 
7/31/18 
7/31/18 
10/15/18 
8/:8/18 
2 '19/18 

9/2/18 

8/31/18 

10/20/18 

7/31/18 

8/4/18 

10/5/18 

13/7/18 

13/8/18 

8/4/18 

7/31/18 

10/14/18 

8/30/18 

8/5/18 

8/31/18 

13/23/18 

10/9/18 

10/16/18 

10/9/18 

10/9/18 

10/14/18 

10/6/18 

7/31/18 

8/1/18 

7/31/18 

8/11/18 

10/12/18 

8/29/18 

10/4/18 

I0/I5/I8 



Address — Next op Kin 



Bowling Green, Ky. 

Joseph J. Sanson. 
Tooele City, Utah. 

Pasquale Santerelli (Brother). 
Bruce, Wis. 

Mary Sarazen (Mother). 
1240 S. Dewey St., Eau Claire, Wis. 

Mrs. J. Sather (Mother). 
Hubbardsville, N. Y. 

C. A. Satterlee. 
R. F. D. 1, HewK-tt, Va. 

Frank D. Satterwhite (Father). 
Chassell, Mich. 

Oscar Sauvola. 



Camp St., Lansing, Midi. 
Jack Moesig (Friend). 



701 Louis St., Louisburg, 

Continton, Ky 
Charles Schener. 
Willow Creek, Calif. 

Kidd Saxav (Father). 
St. Thomas, Mo. 

Mrs. Sophia Schaedler (Wife). 
Posen, Mich. 

Mrs. Mary Schafke. 



1048 N. Paulina St., Chicago, 111. 

Frank Scheffler (Brother). 
Gushing, Neb. 

George H. Schenck (Father). 
1943 Gravois Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. Lena Scheik (Mother). 
Fenwood, Wis. 

Mrs. Susan Schielz. 
349 N. Main St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Jack Schiresnn (Brother). 
496 21st Ave., Mihvauke, Wis. 

John Schaikowski (Father). 
4008 Li.?bon Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. J. G. Schlosser (Mother). 
122 Seneca Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Herman Schmees. 
Mildmay. Ontario, Canada. 

Mrs. Jacob Schmidt. 



212 W. Arndt St., Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Mrs. Hannan Schmidt. 
4087 E. 56th St.. Clevdand, Ohio. 

Peter Schmitt (Father). 
1215 Main St., Merrill, Wis. 

Peter Schmitt (Father). 
173 Russell St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mrs. Anna Finnegan. 
2658 Michi-ran Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. May Schmitz (Mother). 



1908 Montrose St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mrs. Antoine Schnieder (Mother). 
122 Seneca Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Herman Schniers (Mother). 
28 E. Washington Av., Norwalk, O. 
Richard Schnupp (Father). 



R. F. D. A, Washington, Mich. 

William Schoof (Father). 
739 Wall St., Port Huron, Mich. 

Mrs. Annie Schoon (Mother). 
127 2nd St., Baraboo, Wis. 

Mrs. H. Schram. 
Centertown, Missouri. 
Fred E. Schubert. 
Ty.'JOn, Missouri. 
Otto Schrech. 
Central City, Neb. 

Miss Saiiim Matson (Cousin). 
2028 Webster Ave., New York, N. 
Mrs. Lucy Schweikert, 



279 



77/ A' TIIIHTY-SECONI) Dl VISION IN TIIK WOin.D HI/.' 



Name 


Rank 


OaGANIZATION 


Cause 


Date 


Schwenkner, Herman 


Corp. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/21/18 


Schukalsky, Anthony 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Scliukncclit, Elmer N. 


Wag. 


Sup. Co. 127 Inf. 


ACC 


9/22/18 


Scliulgcn, Ernest 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


DW 


7/1/18 


Schultz, Carl A. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Schulti, Charles 


Sgt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Schultz, Edward 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/5/18 


Schultz, Herbert J. 


Corp. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


I)\V 


10/9/18 


Schultz, John E. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Schultz, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


6/22/18 


Schulz, Harry W. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Schur, Peter J. 


Wag. 


Snp. Co. 127 Inf. 


DD 


10/9/18 


Schwartzburf;, 

Gerald W 
Schyr, Peter J. 


Corp. 
Wag. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 
Sup. Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
DD 


8/2/18 
10/9/18 


Severson, Harry 


Pvt. 


Hq. Troop, 32 Div. 


DD 


2/23/19 


Schwietzer, Fred 


Sgt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Schwindt, Harry 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


Schwitzenbert, Fred 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Sharpc, James H. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Scribner, Charles E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


DW 


9/1/18 


Scully, William L. 


Corp. 


308 Btiy. Tr. Arty. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


Sczepanick, Marion 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Seay, Newell P. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


Sccrcst, Luther Edgar 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Sccley, Charles A. 


Pvt. 


Hq. Co. ?61 Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


Sehrt, Allen J. 


Pvt. 


Mctl. Det. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Seidl, Louis A. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Seifert, Herbert J. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 




Seipold, Earl 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Sells, Otto 


Corp. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Selschotter, Julius 


Pvt. 


Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Senstad, George K. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 


ICIA 


7/31/18 


Sevcille, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


In '1 :• 


Shershenuk, Frank 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 




>. .- :- 


Scwcll, Whit C. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Shaefer. Henry 


Corp. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Shanks. Elmer F. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Shershcniak, Frank 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Sharp, Don E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Med. Det. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Shick. Charles D. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Sharpley, Sheldon 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/2/18 


Shaver. Homer T. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Shaw, Robert C. 


Pvt. 


Bat. B. 120 F. A. 


DD 





AnDHEss— Next op Kin 



Shawano, Wis. 

Fred Schwenktier (Father). 
R. F. D. I. Box 65, Beaver, Wis. 

W. D. WiUis (Stepfather). 
610 Van Buren St.. Pt. Washington, 

William Schuknccht. Wis. 



Saco, Montana. 

Fred Schultz (Father). 



1615 W. Mulberry St., Baltimore, Md. 

Frank Joseph Schultz. 
926 Hartatt St., Escanaba, Mich. 

11. A. Scliultz. 
R. F. D. I, North Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Mary Schultz. 
633 Adrian Ave., Jackson, Mich. 

Mrs. A. Schulz (Mother). 
1532 Macadam St., Portland, Ore. 

Peter F. Schur (Father). 
North Milwaukee, Wis. 

W. C. SchwarUburg (Father). 



13336 Buffalo Ave., Chicago, 111. 

John Schwietzer (Father). 
Dickerson, N. Dak. 

Anton .Schuiiidt. 
Neillsville, Wis. 

Helen Schwitzenbert (Sister), 
R. R. 1, Frankfort, Ky. 
Mrs. America Spurr Sharpe (Mother). 



198 Midland Ave., Columbus, Ohio. 
Miss Mary Scully (Sister). 



Route 27, Maysville, Georgia. 

John A. Seay (Father). 
Southmavde, Texas. 

Mrs. Viola Secrest. 



942 College Ave., Beloit, Wis. 

Sophia Sehrt. 
Ill N. Central Ave., Marshficld, Wis. 

Jo.'ieph Seidl (Father). 
Baltimore, Mich. 

Aucust Seifert. 
613 5th St., Oconto, Wis. 

Gertrude Scipold (Mother). 
1715 Michigan St.. Oshkosh, Wis. 

William Sells (Father). 
601 Clayton St., Flhit. Mich. 

Leone Sel.scliotter (Mother). 
Lakrville, Minnesota. 

Mrs. C. Senstad (Mother). 
Mercersburg, Pa. 

John Seveille. 



Waldo, Ark. 

Mrs. Mollv Sewell (Mother). 
1722 Walnut St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Mrs. B. Shaefer. 
Miami, Florida. 

Mrs. S. A. Bemi (Mother). 
117 Alice St., Hamtrnmck. Mich. 

Pete Murzichuk (Friend). 
510 Johnson St., Saginaw, Mich. 

Mrs. S. Sharp (Mother). 
Billett, Illinois. 

Lee Shick. 
McDonald St., Oconto, Wis. 

Mrs. Alex Sharpley (Mother). 



758 Washington St., Portland, Me. 
Mre. Fanny Shaw (Mother). 



280 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


tiRCA.NIZATION 


Cause 


Date 


Address— Next of Kin 


Shea, William 


Pvt. 


308 Btry Tr. Arty. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


8804 Jeffries Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Michael Joseph Shea (Father). 


Sheelmn, John R. 


Pvt. 


Bat. C. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


588 Dorchester Ave., S. Huston. Mass. 
Mr.'i. Katherine H. Shephan (.Mother). 


Shell, Gillis 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 




10/10/18 


Woodbnie, Ky. 

Sallie Bailey (Mother). 


Sherman Harry L. 


Corp. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


DW 


8/1/18 


105 W. Chicago St., Quiiicy, Mich. 
Mrs. Lillia Sherman. 


Sherman, William H. 


Sgt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 




8/27/18 


Bad Axe, Mich. 

Nelson Sherman (Father). 


Sievers, Edwin 


Pvt. 
Sgt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 
Bat. A. 12! F. A. 


DW 


10/18/18 
10/1/18 








Sinnatt, Ray 


866 Astor St.' Milwaukee, Wis. 












Thomas Smnatt (Father). 


Shiiiklc, Leonard 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 

DW 


10/10/18 
10/10/18 
10/15/18 








Shinn, Harley F. 






Shirey, Meria 


Guin, Alabama. 












J. F. Shirey. 


Shirley, Arthur L. 


Corp. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Lawrence, Neb. 

W. B. Shirley (Father). 


Shovan, Earl J. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Skanee, Mich. 

Mrs. J. Shovan (Mother). 


Shrigley, Lloyd 


Corp. 
Pvt. 


Co. M. 123 Inf. 
Hq. Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
10/16/18 








Shubert, William A. 


R. f!'d. 3, ij'ox 84, Eigm, 111.' 












Albert Shubert (Father). 


Shull, Charles R. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 




Cascade, Montana. 

Mrs. D. D. Jamison (Mother). 


Shuttlesworth, James H 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Worthington, W. Va. 

Mrs. Hattie Shuttlesworth. 


Sierpleuski, Felix 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


55 Holborn St., Detroit, Mich. 
Walter Sierplenski. 


Sigorski, Julius 


Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
10/14/18 








Sikors, Frank 


75l' 5th Av'e.i 'Milwaukee,' 'wis. 












John Sikors (Brother). 


Sijka, Paul 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


458 Martin St., Detroit, Mich. 
John Sijka (Brotlier). 


Siberberg, Joseph 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. n. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


457 Mitchell St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Benjamin Rosenberg. 


Simons, Ritchie 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/1/18 


R. F. D. 1, Berea, Ritchie Co., W. Va. 
Mrs. Victoria Simons (Mother). 


Simonsen, Adolph 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


369 E. Main St., Cory, Pa. 
Elsie Anderson (Aunt). - 


Simonson, Gaylor T. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Agee, Neb. 

Lawrence Simonson. 


Simonson, Richferd L. 


Sgt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Hudson, Wis. 

Andrew Simonson. 


Sims, Wilbur 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


R. F. D. 1, Branch, Mich. 
James Sims. 


Sinaveski, Kazimer 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


941 Russell St., Detroit, Mich. 
Louis Sinaveski. 


Sinclair, Harold 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


Baker, Montana. 

Dean Sinclair (Father). 


Sines, Benton 


Corp. 


Co. M. l:6 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Johnston, Ohio. 
Mrs. Ben Sines. 


Sinniger, George C. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Hdqs. 128 Inf. 


DW 


11/10/18 


18th & Bennett Sts., La Crosse, Wis. 
Anton Sinniger. 


Siuba, Benny 


Pvt. 


Co. n. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


155 36th St., North Milwaukee, Wis. 
Lloyd W. Place (Father). 


Sizemore, Noah 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Roark. Ky. 

Bud Sizemore (Brother). 


Sizer, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


King, Montana. 
Mary Seuser. 


Skaggs, Emery 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/25/18 


Barnrock, John.son Co., Kentucky. 
John C. Skaggs (Father). 


Skaggs, Otto R. 


Pvt, 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Litchfield, Ky. 
Rebecca Well, 


Skaleski, Charles J. 


Corp. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


R. F. D. 1, Oneida, Wis. 
Mrs. Ed. Sijich (.Sister). 


Skibski, Frank A. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


3217 Warsaw St., Toledo, Ohio. 
John Skibski (Father). 


Skinner, Harold C. 


Pvt. 


Co. A, 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/3/18 


McMinnville, Ore. 

C. J. Skinner (Father). 


Sky, John A. 


Corp. 
Pvt. Icl. 


Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 
Batt. A. 120 F. A. 


KIA 
DW 


8/1/18 
8/6/18 








Slanoy, Maurice 


179 Belair Place, Milwaukee, Wis. 












Mrs. W. J. Holleran. 


Slattery, John J. 


Sgt. 


308 Bt. T. M. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


833 W. Broad St., Columbus. Ohio. 
Mrs. Anna Slattery (Mother). 


.•^lining, Ole 


Pvt. Icl. 
Corp. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/19/18 
9/1/18 








Sloniiia, Andrew 














281 



THE TJllRTy-SECO.XD D1V1;SI0N IN THE WORLD WAR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cadse 


Datb 


AoDHsss— Next op Kin 


Sllialur, Piml \V. 


Pvt. 1(1. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Co. K, 128 Inf. 


KIA 
I)W 
KIA 


8/30/18 
8/30/18 
10/16/18 








Smitli, Albert 








Smith, Albert H. 


EdgehiilVMo." 

Eyhel Shy. 












Smith, Benjamin F. 


Pvt. 
Pvt 


Co. L. 125 Iiif, 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/9/18 
10/29/;8 




Smith, Charles E. 


700' Otii 'St!,' Milwaukee,' 'wisV 












Hennan Smith (Father). 


Smith, Clyde R. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


R. F. U. 3, Winfidd, Ala. 
J. N. Smith (Father). 


Smith, Clyde 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. K, 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 118 I;if. 


KIA 

Kl.\ 


10/16/18 
10/13/18 








Smith, David, R. 


Tulhihoma, Term. 












James A. Smith. 


Smith, Eidridge I). 


Pvt. 


Co. U. 125 Inf. , 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Wytheville, Pa. 

William 1). Smith (Father). 


Smith, Emery N. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 120 Mg. B.I 


DW 


10/11/18 


44 North St., Nazareth, Pa. 
Gideon Smith (Father). 


Smith, Everett 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


La Grange, Ky. 

Miss Eva Smith (Sister). 


Smith, Fiack 


Pvt. 

Sgt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 
Co, K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/21/18 
8/2/18 








Smith, Garret 


420 Fremont Ave., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 












Mrs. J. Siden (Sister). 


Smith, George A. 


Corp. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Ontonagon, Mich. 

Andrew Smith (Father). 


Smith, Gilbert W. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


R. F. D. 3. Niotji. Teiiri. 
Mrs. Lucy Smith (Wife). 


Smith, Harrison B. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/8/18 


707 Fisher St., Peoria, 111. 
Louise Smith (Sister). 


Smith. Harold 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 121 Mg. B.i 


KIA 


10/17/18 


2004 Vintin St., Omaha, Neb. 
S. H. Smith (Father). 


Smith, Howard 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


R. F. D. 4. Milford, Mich. 

George W. Ormsbt^e (Grandfather). 


Smith, Ira H. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


1359 Lewis St., Santa Clara, Calif. 
Mrs. Ida Smith (.Mother). 


Smith, John K. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Bierne, Ark. 

Mrs. A. J. Smith (Mother). 


Smith, John S. 


Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 


Cupp. Co. 125 Int. 
Co. B. 107 Eng. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 


DD 
DD 
KIA 


5/24/18 
1/26/18 
10/9/18 








Smith, Loo J. 








Smith, Lester J. 


R. F. D. 1, Covington, Va. 












John Osborne Smith (Father). 


Smith, Millard 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


511 Va St.. Farmville, \a. 
L. A. Smith. 


Smith, Phillip C. 


Pvt. Id. 
Corp. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. I. 126 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


3/25/18 
10/9/18 






Smith, Richards E. 


Otia. Mich. 












Albert Butter. 


Smith, Robert K. 


Bus. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


414 Pingiee Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Thomas Smith (Mother). 


Smith, Robert 


Pvt. Icl. 


Bat. F. 120 F. A, 


DD 




J. J. Mitchdl Est., Lake Geneva. 
Arthur Smith (Father). Wis. 


Smith Riissi'l I 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Bat. E. 32 F. A. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/23/18 
10/14/18 




«w-lJlll«lB| AVU^OCI 4/. 




Smith, Tink 


R. f! D.' V ,' baiias,' Ga. 












Jim S. Smith (Brother). 


Smith Wilion T 


Pvt. 

Pvt. 


Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/7/18 
11/10/18 




k^llULJllf If It^V'li Ua 




Smith, William 


Barbourville, Ky. 












James Smith (Father). 


Smith, William P. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. D. 126 I:if. 


KIA 


7/3/18 


Winton, Iowa. 

Mrs. J. P. Campbell (Friend). 


Smotzer, Andrew 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KI.\ 


10/4/18 


Philipsburg, Pa. 

Mrs. Julia Smotzer (Mother). 


Snced, John A. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 12S I:.f. 


KIA 


11/8/18 


Eagle Springs, N. C. 

Mrs. F. S. Sneed (Mother). 


Snell, Harry E. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


in/20/18 


Harrisburg, N. C. 
C. A. Sndl (Father). 


Snyder, Charles E. 


Corp. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2S/18 


1709 S. 10th St., Waco, Texas. 
Miss Margaret Kisaler (Friend). 


Snyder, George F. 




Bat. D. 323 F. A. 




9/18 


628 Center Ave., Butler, Pa. 
Mrs. Geo. F. Snyder (Wife). 


Snyder, John Mathias 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. E. irS Inf. 
Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/6/18 
9/1/lS 






Sole, Arthur A. 


1125 Johnston St., Saginaw, Mich. 












Mrs. Anna Kasehoot (Mother). 


Soles, Walter H. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Richfidd Road, Manshfidd, Wis. 
William H. Soles. 


Solomon, Max 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


413 Hastings St.. Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Joseph (Cousin). 


Soltis, Michael A. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


29 N. 6th St., W. Terre Haute, Ind. 












Mr. Louis Soltis (Father). 



282 




1. First Lieutenant John A. Chapman, Company C, 120th Machine Giin Battalion. Died Septfniber 12th. 1918, 

of wounds received in action August 29tli, while directing the disposition of his kuus against the enemy 
during the Oisc-Aisne Offensive. 

2. First Lieutenant Harry M. Keiser, 125th Infantiy. Killed in action July 31st, 1918, during the Aisne-Marne 

Offensive. 

3. First Lieutenant Lisle P. Amberland, Medical Department, I25th Infantry. Killed in action August 6th, 

I9I8, during the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

4. Second Lieutenant Everett S. Fick, Company K, 125th Infantry. Killed in action August Ist, 1918, during 

the Aisne-Manie Offensive. 

5. Major Ira I). MacLachlan, 2nd Battalion, 125th Infantry. Died of wounds October 3Ist, 1918, during the 

Meu?e-Argonne Off^enrivc. 

6. First Lieutenant William II. Ru.st, Company K, 12Sth Infantr>'. Killed in action October 10th, 1918. 

during the Meu-o-Argonne Offensive. 

7. Second Lieutenant Herbert J. Sheldon, Headquarters 125th Infantry. Killed in action October lOth, 1918, 

during the Meuse-Argonne Offen.«ive. 

8. Second Lieutenant Albert S. Robs, Company K, 125th Infantry. Killed in action October 9th, during Meuse- 

Argonne Operations. 

9. Second Lieutenant Phillip M. Shelly, Company F, 125th Infantry. Killed in action October 10th, 1918, 

during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

283 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WURLD WAR 



Name 


Rank 


OaCA.NIZATIO.V 


Cahsb 


Date 


AuuaEss— Nbxi op Kin 


Sonn, Edward H. 


Corp. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 ' 


Oakfield, Wis. 

Mrs. Henrietta Sonn. 


Soronson, John 


Pvt. 
Pvt 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/10/18 
8/4/18 








Sortum, Andrew 


Albec,"s."Dakote.' 












Esten A, Sortum (Father). 


Soulis, Angeles J. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 

KIA 


7/31/18 
10/9/18 






Sours, Emry 


Axin, Mich. 












Levi D. Sours. 


Sowards, Arthur 


Corp. 


Co. E. 127 li.f. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


1015 Grand Ave., E. Eau Claire, Wis. 
Mr,s. Arthur Sowards (Wif<>). 


Spargimino, Meze 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


149 West St., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Joe Spargimino (Brother). 
Gimlet, Ky. 


Sparks, Rccsc D. 


Pvt. Icl. 


107 T. M. Datt, 


KIA 


6/30/18 












George Sparks. 


Spencer. Frank 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


1419 Willow St., Pt. Huron, Mich. 
William G. Spencer (F.ither). 


Spencer, Robert 


Corp. 
Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 
Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


8/3/18 
n/10/18 








Sperle, Michael 


Napoleon'.' 'n.' 'Da'k.' 












Michnel Sperle (Fatlier). 


Spicknell, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Ro>^eIand. Neb. 

Mrs. Lillic Spicknell (Motlier). 


Sprightly, Richard L. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/lS 


Beloit, Wis. 

R. J. Sprightly (Father). 
Windsorville, Me. 


Sproul, Harold J. 


Pvt. 


Bat. B. 120 F. A. 


DD 














James W. Sproul (Father). 


St. Anthony, Frank 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Faribault. Minn. 

Mrs. Katie Ives (Friend). 


St. Peter, Fred 


Mech. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


633 Almyra St.. Menominee, Mich. 
Mrs. Mary St. Peter (.Motlier). 
23 W. 43rd St., Chicago, III. 


Slack, Fred 


Corp. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 












Mrs. R. Holker. 


Staff, Bibe 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Gulnare. Ky. 

John B. Staff (Father). 


Stafford, Edward A. 


Corp. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


325 S. Terrace St., Muskegon. Mich. 
Mrs. Marguret D. S'aff >rd. 


Stamitz FTerman E 


Pvt. Icl. 
Pvt. 


Co. F. 125 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
DW 


7/31/18 
10/9/18 




k..>niiiiuu, Ai^iiiitaii a;j. 




Stamp, CTifford 


Rank'i'n',' ill'. 












Ira Stamp (Father). 


Stanton, Guy M. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. F. 107 Am. Tr. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/9/18 
10/6/18 






Slap.ski, Stanislaw 


811 1st' '.Vve.'.' 'Milwaukee', Wis.' 












Frank Stapski (Brotlier). 


Starbuck, Harry 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Gowen, Mich. 

Frank Starbuck (Father). 


Stauber, John 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Mennminee, Mich. 

Michael Stauber (Father). 


Staupparhcr, LoRny 


Corp. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/15/18 


Blnnchnrdville. Wis. 
Mrs. Marion Stauppacher (Mother). 


Slearns, Ford 


Pvt. Id. 


Hdq. Co. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


410 La Grave Ave., Gd. Rapids, 
Mrs. Nettie Steams. Mich. 


Stonrns, Walter 


Pvt. Icl. 


Hdq. Co. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


1641 E. Stark St., Portland, Ore. 
J. 0. Steams (Father). 


Stodwell. Rohinrl 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/12/18 


Carbon Hill, Ohio. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Stedwell. 


Stceves, Raymond 


Corp. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


143 Mary Ave.. Fond du Lac, Wis. 
Mr. J. D. Steeves. 


Stpffe, Paul E. 


Corp. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Newavgo, Mich. 
J. W. Sleffc. 


St/*Knl, Jcs-sie D. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/15/18 


Seneca, Wis. 

M. W. Stegal (Father). 


Steinberg, Henry F. 


Corp. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


422 Cooper .\ve., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. T. Steinberg (Mother). 


Steinbom, Emil W. 


Sgt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


1418 22nd St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Lurie Steinborn (Mother). 


Stekclberg, William C 


Corp. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


407 Washburn Place, Madison, Wis. 
Mrs. Anna Rowley (Sister). 


Stenseth, Jalmcr L. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 


DR 
DW 


5/21/18 
10/7/18 






Stopke, Eugene J. 


6th St. Indiana Ave., Glassport, Pa. 
Anna Stepke (Mother). 


Sterling, Robert L. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


R. F. D. 7, Marysville, Tenn. 
Samuel A. Sterling (Father). 


Slettler, Floyd L. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


DuPont, Ohio. 

Mrs. Ruth Stettler. 


Stevans, Raymond R. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Churubusco. N. Y. 

James B. Stevens (Father). 


Sfcver, Helmet 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 121 F. A. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Milan, Wis. 

Hemian Stever. 


Steves, Raymond E. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/20/18 
9/30/18 






Steward, Rus.'icll H. 


R. F. d! 4, Nelsonville, Ohio. 






1 






Norman Steward. 



284 



BOLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


Orcvnization 


Cause 


Date 


Stewart, Iver V. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. A. I2S Inf.- 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Stewart, Ir\*ing J. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. I. 128 luf. 


DD 


2/6/18 


Stcwert, William H. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/lS 


Stimay, Matt 


Corp. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Stinson, Ernest B. 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Stipsky, Vincent M. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/1/18 


Stoewer, Charles 


Corp. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Stokes, Arthur T. 


Corp. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Stolling, William C. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Stomner, Martin A. 


Corp. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Stone, Ed. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


Stone, Fred 


Pvt. 


Hd.i. Co. 314 Inf. 


DD 


10/3/18 


Stone, Verne E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Stone, Walter 


Corp. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


Stonecipher, Norman 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Storey, Elmer 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Storey, William C. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Stover, Roy H. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Stovall, Shelby 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Stowasser, Harold 


Sgt. 


Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Straightwell, Wesley G. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Strand, Cornel B. 


Sgt. 


Co. A. 107 F. S. Bn 


DW 


10/12/18 


Stover, Mack D. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


U/IO/IS 


Strand, Otis W. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


DW 


.s/.';o/i8 


Stratham, James A. 


Corp. 


But. n. S22 F. A. 


DD 


12/7/18 


Strntton, Arthur E. 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


S/3/18 


Stratton, Walter R. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Struber, Herman 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Strong, Judson 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn 


KIA 


I0/1/I8 


Stronghoener. 

William H. 
Stracham, James G. 


Pvt. 
Corp. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 
Bat. D. 322 F. A 


KIA 
DD 


10/5/18 
12/7/18 


Stnmk, Freeman 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/7/18 


Stuart, Arthur J. 


Corp. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31 /IS 


Sturia, Piotro 


Pvt. 


Unknown 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Sucicie, Herbert C. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


Sukut, August 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


1I/I0/I8 


Sullivan, Charles 


Sgt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 


DW 


7/20/18 


Sullivan, Daniel 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


DW 


7/31 /IS 


Summers, William 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


I0/7/I8 


Sund, Bemt H. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 12S Inf. 


DW 


10/9/18 


Sutfin, Dnvid L. 


Pvt. 


San. Dot. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Sutherland, Fred 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


Sutter, Ernest 


Bus. 


Cn. D 127 Inf. 


DW 


6/I5/1S 



Address— Next of Kin 



R. F. D. 1, Gothenburg, Neb. 
A. F. Stewart (Father). 



R. F. D. 3, Greenville, Pa. 

Clara A. Stcwert (Mother). 
Box 636, Paincsdale, Mich. 

Mat Stimay (Father). 
Monroe, Ky. 

Sam T. Stinson. 
Stuttgart, Ark. 

Julias Stipskv (Father). 
3419 O'Donnd St.. Canton, Md. 

Mrs. Augusta Stoewer (Motliei ). 
10 Marine Tr., Co. Dublin, King.ston. 

Mrs. H. Stokes (Mother). 



506 59lh St., Seattle, Wash. 
Andrew Stomner. 



R. F. D. 7, Memphis Me. 

E. W. Stone (Father). 
Bay \'iew. Wash. 

H. E. Stone. 
715 E. Chester St., Jeffersonville, Ind. 

Mary E. Stonecipher (Mother). 



2112 S. nth St., Springfield, 111. 

Mrs. Marv Storey. 
R. F. D. 1, Luray, Pa. 

William Stover (Father). 
Graham, Ky. 

Oda Stovall. 
Necedah, Wis, 

J. S. Sto«asser (Father). 
R. F. D. 61, Brookville, Pa. 

George Strainhtwell (Father). 
430 16th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

B. Strand. 
Grimms, W. Va. 

Alfred Stover (Father). 



301 Forth St., Nelsonville, Ohio. 

Ephraim Stratton. 
Giand View, Mont. 

Lucus Stratton (Brother). 
Romeo, Mich. 

Charles Struber (Father). 
Francis Hospital, Waterloo, Iowa. 

Thomas Strong. 
Gerald, Mo. 

Theodore Stronghoener (Brother). 



Parkers Lake, Ky. 

Mrs. Freeman Strunk (Wife). 



318 Wayboset St., Providence, R. I 

Mrs. Gray (Friend). 
R. 1, Box 27, I,hr, N. Dak. 

August Sukut (Father). 



Star Route, Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Jnmes Summers (Father). 



316 E. South St., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Box' ViV,' Ke'ansburg,' n!' J. 

Jacob Fries. 



285 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WAR 



Name 


Rank 


Obcanization 


Cause 


Date 


SvcUik, Henry P. 


Corp. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Sweet, Harold 


Pvt. 


! Hdq. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


Sniedarke, Wilbur A. 


Pvt. 


1 Co. H. 128 Inf. 


DW 


8/1/18 


Swierczynaski, John 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Swift, Claude 


Corp. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


UW 


12/6/18 


Swift, Lloyd N. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Swift, Lonnie 


Pvt. 


Co. IS. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Swincy, Nath 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Swischer, Ba^jil 


Pvt. 


Bat. A. 147 F. A. 


DD 


7/2VI8 


Szczepanski, Leo 


Pvt 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Tackowiak, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Tahlier, Joseph 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Talbert, Harry U. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Talbot, Guy 


Pvt. 


Bat. A. 322 F. A. 


DD 


12/19/18 


Tallroth, Leo 


Pvt. Icl. 


Bat. B. 120 F. A. 


KIA 


8/7/18 


Tande, Ludvig 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Tanner, Harold E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Bat. A. 120 F. A. 


KIA 


8/6/18 


Tanson, Edwin A. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/30/18 


Tasson, Nick 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Tate, Isaac 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 362 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


Taylor, Edward A. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/3/18 


Taylor, Harry M. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/12/18 


Taylor, Kalph C. 


Corp. 


Bat. A. i:9 F. A. 


ACC 


7/4/18 


Taylor, Walter 1. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Teichler, John 


Sgt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Terry John P. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


Teunis, John W. 


Sgt. 


Bat. C. 119 F. A. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Thcrkildsen, Niels 


Pvt. 


.Mg. Co. 361 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


Thomas, Clarence E. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Thomas, David F. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/10/18 


Thomas, Eniil 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8 '27/18 


Tln)inas, Harold L. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. B. 1C8 Inf. 


DW 


8/S1/18 


Thomas, John T. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


Thomas, Walter E. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Tlii.inas, Walter E. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Thompson, Alfred M. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Thompson, George 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Thompson, Henry B. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Thompson, Pcrie 


Sst. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/20/18 


Thorne, Charles E. 


Pvt. Id. 


Bat. C. 147 F. A. 


KIA 


9/29/18 


TImnton, Eniest M. ' 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/12/18 


Thurlow, Gordon G. 

1 


Corp. 


Mg. Co. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/4/18 



Addbess— Next op Kin 



Cadott. Wis. 

W. B. SveUik. 
Ea.st Jordan, Mich. 

Mrs. Nellie Sweet (Mother), 



1367 Duboise St. 

Joseph Swierczynaski. 



R. F. D. 2, Hardin, Ky. 

W. D. Swift (Father). 
Tilford, Kv. 

M. M. Swift (Father). 
Livingston, Ky. 

Mrs. Eva Swiney (Mother). 



Wansaukee, Wis. 

Emile Tahlier (Father). 
Revillo, S. Dak. 

Albert Krause, Jr. 



539 Clement Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Hclmer Tallroth. 
Tande, Mont. 

Ole Tande (Father). 
6702 Greenfield Ave., West Allis,Wi3. 

Albert F. Tanner. 
Silverton, Oregon. 

Mrs. A. Tanson (Motlier). 
787 S. Pine St., Ishpeminu, Mich. 

Mrs. Nazarino Mose (Sister). 



Minburn, Iowa. 

Mrs. Annanda Taylor (Mother). 
Kidds Fork, Va. 

Frank L. Taylor (Father). 
R. F. D. 3, Mt. Plea.-ant, Midi. 

J. C. Taylor (Father). 



Menominee, Mich. 

Edward Teichler (Brother). 
Aqnilla, Texiis. 

Mrs. Lee Gregory (Mother). 
Spring Lake, Mich. 

Mrs. Herman Teunis (Mother). 



R. F. D. 4, London, Ohio. 

Isabell J. Thomas. 
Box 42, Rowlev, Iowa. 

David F. Thomas. 
770 24th St., Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. Minnie Thomas (Mother). 



Goliad, Texas. 

John Thomas (Father). 
Palmvra. Wis. 

Will Tliomas. 
314 S. Eudid Ave., Oak Park, III. 

Stedman Thomas (Father). 



Dalton, Wis. 

John Thompson. 
3510 Canal St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

John Thompson (Father). 
1020 Reed St., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Mrs. Eli7.a Thompson. 
Pierre, So. Dak. 

Al. Thome. 
Thornton, Idaho. 

Mrs. Minnie Thanton. 
10 Fountain PI., New Uochdic, N. Y. 

Mrs. H. M. Thurlow (.Mother). 



28G 




1. FlBST LiEun:.SANT Ei.MEB S. Terhune. Battery B, 12Ist Field Artilk-ry. Killed in action Outober 8th, 1918, 

during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

2. Second Lieutenant William D. Murgan, Company E, 128th Infantry. Killed in action November 9tli, I9I8, 

during the Meuse-Argonnc Offensive. 

3. First Lieutenant Habold J. King, 128th Infantry. Killed in action October 10th, 1918, during the Meuse- 

Argonne Offensive. 

4. Second Lieute.\a.\t Andbew S. Dineen, 128th Infantry. Died of wounds received November 10th, 1918, during 

ti.e Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

5. MAJOt John A. Street, Commanding Fiist Battalion, 128th Infantry. Killed in action October 18th, 1918, 

during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 

6. Second Lieutenant Ray E. Bostick, Company C, 126th Infantry, Killed in action August 1st, 1918, during 

the Aisne-Marne Offensive. 

7. Second Lieutenant Carl A. Johnson, Company M, 126th Infantry. Killed while repulsing un enemy raid in 

the trenches in Alsace June 23rd, 1918. 

8. Captain Orville L. Anderson, Company E, 128th Infantry. Killed in action August 1st, 1918, while leading 

his company agsin.st Hill 230 during the Aisnc-Marne Offensive. 

9. Second Lieutenant Abthur I. Keller, Company I, 126th Infantry. Killed in action August 1st, 1918, during 

the Mame Offensive. 

287 



THE TlUirrY-SECOND DIVISION IN TJJK WOULD W'All 



Naue 


Rank 

Pvt. 


OltCANIZATION 


Causi 


Date 


Addhess— Next op Kin 


Tice, Claroiice J. 


Hq. Co. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/8/18 


2320 Cherry St., Milwaukee, Wis. 












Maggie Lovejoy (Aunt). 


Tidball, Jock T. 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Fayerre, Ark. 

Mrs. Charles Tidball. 


Ticgs, Emil 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/30/18 


Shawano, Wis. 

Miss Anna Tiegs (Sister). 


Tieman William O 


Pvt. 
Pvt. Id. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 
Co. C. 126 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


12/14/18 
8/1/18 




& lt.ll(UII| •» IIIlUtBl '^J • 




Tieman, Raymond 


640 Korre^it Ave., llaniiiloii, Ohio. 












Phillip Tieman, Sr. (Father). 


Timm, Adolph 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


Ontario, Wis. 

Mrs. J. O. Timm (Mother). 


Tira, Fiorengo 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Bx. 1292, Renton, Wa.sh.. or Domenica 
Tira. S. Giorgis, Canavisc, Italy. 
Louis Delaurenti. 


Titcis, Lloyd 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/2/18 


Munith, Mich. 

Mrs. Bertha Titus (Mother). 


Tobin, Wilaon 11. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Washington, Va. 

Kemnel G. Tobin (Father). 


Toby, Williard 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Taylnr\-iMe, Calif. 

Mrs. Jennie Toby (Mother). 


Tollefson, Lclaiid A. 


Corp. 


107 Tr. Motor Bty. 


DW 


8/17/18 


624 Badger Ave., Antigo, Wis. 
Mrs. Marh Tollefson (Mother). 


Toloknianik, lonan 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/29/18 


Russia. 

Mrs. Anna Toloknianik. 


Tdlijtnn Tfif'i'iVt 


Sgt. 
Sgt. 


Co. G. i:8 Inf. 
Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


8/3/18 
9/1/18 




X V'ISlliUp ulXK,\t^J 


*, 


Tomanski, Bamey 


814' ibth Ave.',' Miluaukee, \Vi^.' 












Andrew Tomanski (Father). 


Tomczak, Chester 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/6/18 


7M Bccher St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Ben Tomczak (Father). 


Tomilson, Fred M. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


10 E. 6th St., Portland, Oregon. 
Mrs. Mary Tomilson (Mother). 


Toskan, Gus S. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


116 E. Main St., Mcdford, Oregon. 
Peter Toskan (Brother). 


Town, Eskay D. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


R. F. D. 1, Casnovia, Mich. 
Mrs. Minnie Town (Mother). 


Tracoy, Louis B. 


Pvt. Id. 


Ilq. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Sand Lake, Mich. 

Mrs. Louis Salsgiver. 


Trautmann, Otto 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/29/18 


117 70th St. N., St. Paul, Minn. 
Mrs. Sophia Trautmann (Mother). 


Traylor, Andrew J. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 126 Inl. 


KIA 


8/28/18 


Stepstone. Ky. 
Sam Traylor. 












Trepozynski, Frank A. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


1320 Junction Ave., Owasso, Mich. 
Minnie Trepozvnski (Mother). 


Tricrweiler, Nick 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


312 W. 4th St., Mar.shfield, Wis. 
.•\ugu5t Tricrweiler (Father). 


Tritcs, Edmund S. 


Corp. 


Co. C. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


306 McKinster, Detroit, Mich. 
J. S. Trites. 


Trocstcr, Carl F. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Sidney, Ohio. 

Mrs. Louis Troester (Mother). 


-Trombley, Jerome 


Pvt. 
Pvt. Id. 


Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 


ACC 
KIA 


7/18/18 
10/9/18 






Trout, Homer B. 


Shawnuit, Ark. 












Viola Trout (Wife). 


Trowbridge, William K 


Sgt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


4 E. 1st St., Monroe, Mich. 

Clement Trowbridge (Brother). 


Trurkov Aiitoine J 


Pvt. 
Corp. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
DD 


7/31/18 
10/12/18 




A 1 ULIkL_1 , d>>l,v/lllb " - 




Tucker, Arthur J. 


506 Clierr\' St., Anaconda, Mont. 












C. Tudter (Father). 


Tucker, Edward C. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


R. F. D. 2, Lynchburg, Tcnn. 
William C. Tucker (Father). 


Tunis, Guy A. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


Route 1, Winamac, Indiana. 
Elmus Tunis (Father). 


Turley, Clarence L. 


Corp. 

Pvt. 

Corp. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Co. H. 126 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 

DW 


8/31/18 

10/14/18 

9/1/18 






Turloy, Joe R. 






Turner, George 


1389 Hastings St., Detroit, Midi. 












Miss Hazel Turner (Sister). 


Tweedale, Elinor J. 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Samuel Tweedale. 


Twoitc, Alfred L. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


R. F. D. 2, Barron, Minn. 
Martha Tweite (Mother). 


Twomey, Michael P. 


Corp. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


711 3rd St., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Mrs. A. Twomey. 


Tyler, Albert H. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Prairie du Chien, Wis. 

Seroy L. Tyler (Brother). 


Tyler, Alvin 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/6 '18 
about 


Pocahonta.s, Ark. 

William Tvlcr (Father). 


Udych, John 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


677 MrKinslrv' Si., Detroit, Mich. 
Rosa Maach (Half-Sistcr). 


rdell, Midmcl J. 


Corp. 
Pvt. Id. 


1 Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
8/1/18 






tni-icl., Dan F. 


312 Brown St.. Ionia, Mich. 












Mrs. Cora Hamer. 



288 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Name 


Rank 


OaGANIZATION 


Cause 


Date 


Address— Next op Kin 


Undenvood, David H 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. B. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Tecumseh, Midi. 

Cyrus J. Underwood (Father). 


Underwood, Walter A. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 
about 


R. F. D. 1, Grass Lake, Mich. 
Mrs. Hattie Underwood. 


Upton, Grover C. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


R. F. D. 1, Prairie Point, Mi.5s. 
Tom Upton (Father). 


Upton, Philley H. 


Corp. 


Co. I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


R. F. D. 1, Bradley, S. Dak. 
Homer Upton. 


Urbaniak, Steve 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 
Co. B. 119 Mg. Bn 
Mg. Co. 126 Inf. 


DW 
DW 
KIA 


8/11/18 
10/5/18 
10/16/18 






Urbanschack, Richard 






Vance, Nurl S. 


Hurricane, W. Va. 












Mrs. Mahulda Burton (Mother). 


^*aIulegarde, Joseph H 


Corp. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


6043 S. Honore, Chicago, 111. 
Mrs. Eva Vandegarde. 


Vandegezelle, Isaac 


Bug. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Hokzaroost Biu-g, Zeeland, 

Netherlands. 
Mrs. Susana ^'andegez^■lle. 


Vender Heide, Cornelius 


Pvt. Ic-I. 


Hq. Co. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


152 Page St., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 
P. S. Vonder Heide (Father). 


VanDeHoiiiing, Leonard 


Pvt. Ul. 


Co. M. I2S Inf. 


DW 


9/30/18 


R. F. D. 1, Alma, Mich. 
Mrs. Val Cryder. 


Vanderhoof , Har\'ey W 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/4/18 


Enid, Mont. 

Allie Vanderho£f (Brother). 


\'an Dyke, Wynard 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


1531 Roosevelt Av.. Gd. Rapids, Mich. 
Melvin Van Dyke (Father). 


Van Einieren, Everhart 


Pvt. kl. 


Bat. C. 120 F. A. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


640 Hawthorne Ave., S. Milwaukee, 
Martin Van Eimeren. Wis. 


Van Ells, Andrew V. 


Wag. 


Sup. Co. 127 Inf. 


DW 


8/10/18 


514 Main St.. Pt. Washington, Wis. 
Andrew Van Ells (Father). 


Van Handel, Rudolph 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/19/18 


734 N. 3rd St., Sheboygan, Wis. 
Mrs. Peter Van Handel (Mother). 


Van Horsen, William 


Sgt. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


DW 


Unknown 
al>out 


430 Slayton St., Gd. Haven, Mich. 
William Van Horsen. 


Van Huizen, Albert 


Bug. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Owen, Wis. 

Jeny VanHilizen (Father). 


Van Voorhees, Simon 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. K. 125 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


8/31/18 
7/31/18 








Van Wert, Peter 


2501 Center Ave., Bay City, Mich. 












Mrs. Margaret Luxton. 


Varga, Paul 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. II. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


23 Thaldens St., Detroit, Mich. 
Rev. Andrew Daniel. 


Vermecky, John F. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


297 Harold Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 
George Vermecky. 


Vamo, Antonio 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


DD 


9 '18/18 


2148 2iid Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Mrs. Libarto Varno (Mother). 


Vath, Raymond 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


514 Wilker Court, New York, N. V. 
Miss Veromea Vath. 


\'egnapoulos. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/17/18 


264 Main St . Springfield, Mass. 


Constantine 










Nicholas Veciiapoulos (Brother). 


Velliquette, Cosmas C 


Coip. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


Limestone, Ohio. 

Mrs. Caroline Velliquette (Mother). 


V'pmpr .Tnmp<i 


Pvt. 
Pvt. Id. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 
Co. F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/21/18 
10/18/19 




TClilClj l/UIAJ^O 




V'etraino, John 


85 HaleySI-.', betroit',' Mich. 












Dommico Vetraino (Brother). 


Vibbert, Edward T. 


Pvt. Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. A. 121 Mg. B'l 


KIA 

KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
7/31/18 
8/6/18 








Viilalevos, Chris. 








\'illeneauve, AK^xander 


2709 Pardridge Ave., Marinette, Wis. 












— , Villeneauve (Father). 


Vingere, Roy 


Sgt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Sparta, Wis. 

Thomas C. Rice. 


Voss, Arthur F. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. n 127 Inf. 
Co. O. 128 Inf. 


KIA 

DW 


6/17/18 
10/7/18 








Voss, Jolin B. 


Albany, Minn. 












Mrs. Anna Voss. 


Vum, JoK'ph 


Saddler 


Bat. F. 147 F. A. 


KIA 


8/31/18 
about 


Parker, S. Dak. 

Frank Vnrn (Father). 


Wache, August C. 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 I].f. 


KIA 


10/16/18 
about 


820 Malone St., West Hoboken, N. J. 
Mrs. Charles Wache. 


Wade, Percy C. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/16/18 


Elli.ston, Mo. 

William E. Wade. 


Wade, William C. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


1203 Lincoln Ave., Pt. Huron, Mich. 
Louis G. Blunt (Friend). 


Wagner, Frank 


Pvt. Id. 


Bat. B. 322 F. A. 


DD 


12/24/18 


R. F. D. 2, Lcwishurg, Ohio. 
John Wainer (Father). 


Wagner, Lester W. 


Corp. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/I/I8 


Markesan, Wis. 

William Wagner (Father). 


Wagoner, Westley C. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. I. 128 Inf. 
Co. G. 128 Inf. 


ACC 
KIA 


5/4/18 
9/1/18 


" 




"".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'■.'■■.'.... 


Waite, Francis 


Owatonna. Minn. 












Ben Chladek. 


Waitekunas, John 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 


DW 


8/30/18 


127 Cardoni Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Sylvia Bizanskas. 



289 



THE THIRTY-SECOND DIVISION IN Till: WOULD WAIl 



Name 


Rank 


Obganization 


Causb 1 


Date 


Wakeman, Albert 


Corp. 


Co. C. 107 F. S. Bn. 


KL\ 


8/31/18 


Walker, Charles L. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/18/18 


Walker, John 


Pvt. 


Hq. Co. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


Walker, John Thomas 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Walker, Lemual A. 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Wallace, William 1). 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Wallen, John 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


Wallis, Henry D. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


Walling, Carl W. 


Corp. 


Uq. Co. U7 Inf. 


UW 


8/30/18 


Walsh, Edward 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11 /IS 


Walters, George J. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


Walton, William B. 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 126 Inf. 


DW 


10/15/18 


Wangen, Carl 


Sgt. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Ward, Benjamin C. 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/lS 


Ward, Clarence V. 


Corp. 


Co. U. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Warner, Charles A. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


Suicide 


4/27/18 


Warner, John E. 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 119 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


8/29/13 


Wari^n, Millard F, 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Washburn, Charles 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


9/2/18 


Washburn, Earl 
Wasserberger, Charles 


Pvt. 

Corp. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 
Co. A. 128 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


10/5/18 

about 

9/1/18 


Watkins, Harry T. 


Corp. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Watkins, Leonard L. 


Pvt. 


Co. K. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


Watson, Elmer T. 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/11/18 


Watson, Henry 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Watson, Leonard 


Sgt. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Watson, Robert 


Pvt. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Way, Travis S. 


Pvt. 


Co. L, 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Waybrant, Albert 


Corp. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Weaver, Carl O. 


Corp. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/5/18 


Weaver, Charles S. 


Pvt. 


Mg. Co. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/12/18 


Webb, Roy Adair 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


Weber, Herman F. 


Corp. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


Weeks. George T. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


Wert man, George 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/1/18 


Weese, Wilbur W. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/6/18 


Weide, Christigen 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 128 Inf. 


DW 


10/14/18 


Weigcll, Carl 


Sgt. 


Bat. A. 120 F. A. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


Wcigel, Moritz 


Pvt. 


Co. F. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


Weisgerber, Clifton C: 


Sgt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Weiss, Adolph C. 


Pvt. 


Med. Det. 125 I.if. 


KIA 


S/6/18 


Weiss, William 


Pvt. 


Bat. F. 121 F. A 


DW 


S '21/18 



Address— Next or Kin 



Big Rapids, Mich. 

Mrs. C. E. Wakuman (.Mother). 
R. F. D. 2, Hillsboro. Ore. 

Mrs. A. W. Walker (Mother). 
R. F. D. 2, Applegatc, Mich. 

John Walker (Father). 
28 Franklin Crt., Baltic Creek, Mich. 

Mrs. Helen G. Walker (Wife). 
R. F. D. 2, Northvillo, Mich. 

Mrs. Bctlie Walker. 
R. F. D. 7, Frankfiird, Ind. 

Hueh .\. Wallace (Father), 
.•^bo, Finland. 

Erika Wallen (Father). 
Greenwood, Wis. 

Leroy Wallis (Brother). 
235 Halscv St., Portland, Oregon. 

Mrs. Carl W. Walling (Wife). 
609 Aider St., Anuconda, Mont. 

Patrick Walsh (Brother). 
2372 Rohs St., Clifton Heights, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Miss Lillian Walters. 
Stevensvillo, Va. 

Mrs. Maiy A. Walton. 
1215 State St., Eau Claire, Wis. 

Iver Wangen (Father). 
Vannlstvne. Texas. 

M. C. Hunnicutt. 
Portland, Mich. 

Mrs. R. J. Ward. 



R. F. D. I, Olympia, Wash. 

Jolm A. Warner (Father). 
Trade, Tenn. 

William Warren (Fatl'.er). 
304 Byrun Road, H<iwell, Mich. 

George Wnshhurn. 
Whittemore, Mich. 

Enoch Wnshburn (Unilc). 
Neillsville, Wis. 

Charles Wasserberger, Sr. (Father). 
.\llen, Mich. 

William Watkins. 
R. 1, Fulton. Ark. 

Lee Watkins (Father). 



R. F. D. 2, Sherwood, Mich. 

Mrs. Elemine Watson (Mother). 



74 Main St., Inkcrman, Luzerne C .. 

Mrs. Margaret Watson. Pa 

Hunting Park, Calif. 

George Way. 



713 Grove Ave.. Petoskey, Mich. 

Mrs. George A, Weaver (Mother). 
1129 New Hampshire Ave. W., 

Wnshiiigton, D. C. 

Mrs. N. N. Neck (Mother). 
Box 341, Shamrock, Oklahoma. 

Mrs. Delia Shouse (.Mother). 
Mykawa, Tex. 

Mrs. Mary Weber (Mother). 
Womble, Ark. 

John William Weeks (Father). 
921 Canefield Av. S. W., Gd. Rapids. 
Mich. 

Mrs. Delia Wertman (Mother). 
Beverly, W. Va. 

Park Wee.se (Father). 
Remus, Mich. 

Louis Weide. 
138 18th St.. Milwaukee, Wis. 

August Weigell. 
Shawano, Wis. 

CJustave Weigel (Father). 
716 Wealthy Ave., Gd. Rapids, Mich. 

Mrs. Maymirc L. Barton. 
518 Hernmnsau St., Saginaw, Mich. 

J. A. Weiss (Father). 
2109 Clarence Ave., Racine, Wis. 

Fred Weiss. 



290 




Second Lieutenant Paul T. Settle. Company A. 120th Machine Gnu Battalion. Died November Hth, 19IS, 

of wounds received October 8th during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive 
First Lieutenant Hakry W. Fexelon, Comimiiy L, 127tli Infantrj-. Died August 18th, 1918, of wounds 

received in action during the Aisne-Marne Offensive. „ . . ,o»i j 

Second Lieutenant Harry B. Mauoer, Company A, 127th Infantry. Killed in action October IStli, during 

Meuse-Argonne Operations. ^ ^. , , , c^ ^ i a,, ,n,Q 

First Lieutenant Tolman D. Wheeler, Company 0, 127th Infantry, Died of wound.s beptember 6tli, 1918, 

during the Oise-Aisne Offensive. 
Captain James Cook, 120th Macldne Gun Battalion. Killed in action July 30th, 1918, while making a recon- 

nais,sance before the enemy during the Aisne-Marne Offensive. . 

First Lieutenant David STUuns. Company .\, 127th Infantrj-. Killed in action August 6th, 1918, during the 

Aisne-Marne Offensive. . . 

Second Lieutenant Lloyd O. Beaton, Headquarters Company, 119th Field Artillery, Killed in action August 

30th, 1918, during the Oise-Aisne Offensive. 
Second Lieutenant William S. Feu.stel. liattery B, 147th Field Artillery. Died August 7tli, 1918, of wounds 

received during tlie Aisne-Marne Offensive. ^ , ,, . ,nio 

Second Lieutenant Stacy L. Harding, Battery B, 120th Field Artillery. Killed in action October llUi, 1918, 

during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. 



391 



77//1 TIIIHTY-SECOM) division in Till-: WOULD \v.\n 



Naui 


Rank 


OUGAMIZATION 


Cause 


Daw 


Addbcss— Next or Kin 


Wclmeriiik, William E 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


856 Watson St. S. W., Gd. Rapids, 
John Welmerink (Father). Mich. 














Wellner, Louis 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. 


A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/4/18 


.Marshfidd, Wis. 

Mr. GeorRC Wellner (Fatiier). 


Wells, Benjamin E. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/22/18 


732 Malivax. Petersburg, W. Va. 
Mrs. E. W. Wells. 


Welsh, Frederick 


Pvt. 


Co. 


I. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Homing Falls. W. Va. 
Oscar L. Welsh. 


Welsh, James 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


H. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


16th & Williams St., Omaha, Nob. 
Miss Hazd Welsh. 


Welsh, Loreiii A. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


G. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


Breckenridfie, Mo. 

Bessie Welsh (Sister). 


Welton, Gale 


Pvt. 


Co. 


C. 121 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


S/31/18 


Sextonville, Wis. 

Mrs. Carrie Wdton (Mother). 


Wenzel, Byron W. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/27/18 


104 S. Grave St., Sturgis, Mich. 
Mrs. Ida Wenzel. 


Werner, Edward 


Pvt. 

Sgt. 


Co. 
Co. 


M. 125 Inf. 
M. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


7/31/18 
10/9/18 








Wescott, Ira L. 


Grandville, Mich. 














L. D. Wescott (Father). 


West, Ernest S. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


L. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/21/18 


142 E. Thornton St., Akron, Ohio. 
Charles West. 


West, Lynn M. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


L. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/4/18 


Walworth. Wis. 

Mrs. Edna F. West (Mother). 


Wezcsenski, Edward 


Corp. 


Co. 


D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/31/18 


R. F. D. 2, Randolph, Wis. 

.Mrs. Joseph Wezesen.ski (.Mother). 


Whalen, Loy 


Pvt. 


Co. 


F. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/2/18 


719 .«. Main St., Mattoon. III. 
Mrs. Sarah WhalcTi (Mother). 


Wharren, Williamson G 


Pvt. 


Co. 


D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


Hiphwood, Mont. 

Tom Wharren (Brother). 


Wheaton, Benjamin P 


Pvt. 


Co. 


D. 120 Mg. Bn. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


38 Malbone Ave., Newport, R. I. 
Mrs. E. Wheaton. 


Wheeler, George H. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


H. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/13/18 


Camden, W. Va. 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Whce!er. 


Wheeler, Thomas M. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. 


A. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


riollis, Long Island, N. Y. 
Mrs. Joe B. Wheeler. 


Whichser, Emil 


Corp. 
Pvt. 


Co. 
Co. 


H. 127 Inf. 
H. 128 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 


Unknown 

11/10/18 








Whipple, David O. 


R. i). 4. Portiand, Ind. 














Mrs. Susie Whipple (Mother). 


Whisler, Homer 


Pvt. 


Co. 


1. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


R. F. D. 11, Ottaway, Ohio. 
Mrs. Mary Whisler. 


White, Leonard J. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/1/18 


Debush, Va. 

W. A. White (Father). 


Whitchurst, Walter 


Pvt. 


Co. 


G. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/11/18 


Butler. Ind. 

.Man- M. Whitchurst (Mother). 


Witcmore, Wilbur 


Pvt. 


Med. Det. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/6/18 


R. F. D. 3. Bancor, Mich. 














Fred C. Witcmore (p'ather). 


Wicklund, Jolin 


Corp. 


Co. 


E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


127 Water St., Eau Claire, Wis. 
Charles Wicklund (Father). 


Widdifield, Clarence P 


Corp. 


Co. 


K. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


607 Church St., Lvnchburg, Va. 
I)c .\lphonso Widdifield (Father). 


Widener, William G. 


Corp. 
Pvt. 


Co. 
Co. 


F. 1st An>. Tr 
E. 125 Inf. 


DW 
DW 


10/6/18 
10/10/18 








Wiebuseh, William 


Somerville. Texas. 














J. F. Wiebuseh (Father). 


Wictem, Uork J. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


F. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/9/18 


Node, Wvo. 

Mrs. Carrie Wietem (Wife). 


Wilcox, Allen C. 


Pvt. 


Co. 


E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/3/18 


918 12th St.. Areata. Calif. 
H. C. Wilcox (Father). 


Wilczynski, 


Pvt. 


Co. 


I. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


76 Adison Ave., Detroit, Mich. 


Adam Albert 












Jo ephine Mary Wilczynski (Wife). 


Wilkc, Arthur 


Sgt. 


Co. 


D. 120 M-. Bn 


KIA 


10/9/18 


530 Greenfield Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mrs. P. Wilke. 


Wilkcr, Albert A. 


Corp. 


Co. 


B. 125 I:;f. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


R. F. D. 2, Box 40, c/o Mrs. Fra'ik 
Shiblev, Elyria, Ohii>. 
Freda Wilker (Sister). 


Wilkerson, Vahner 


Pvt. 


Co. 


A. 123 Inf. 


DW 


9/1/18 


R. F. D. 6, Lafayette, Ala. 
William Wilkerson (FatI er). 


WiUtins, George A. 


Pvt. Id. 
Corp 


Med. Dept. 120 F. A. 
Co. L. 125 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


7/31/18 






Wilkinson, Harry D. 


Rockford, Mich. 














Mrs. Hattie Wilkinson (Mother). 


Wilks. Clyde L. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. 
Co. 
Co. 


I. 125 Inf. 
G. 127 Inf. 
G. 127 Inf. 


DW 

DW 
DW 


6/6/18 
8/31/18 
8/30/18 






Willar, Clarence 






Williams, Daniel C. 


305' ¥.'. 'SStli ■ sV.,' New York,' 'n'. ' Y.' 














Ndlic Rally Williams (Wife). 


Williams, Ernest 


Pvt. 


Co. 


C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


7/15/18 


R. F. D. 2. Canton, Pa. 

Burnett Williams (Brother). 


Williams, Franklin C. 


Sgt. 


Bat 


C. 120 F. A. 


UD 


4/3/18 


376 Kane PI., Milwaukee. Wis. 
Frank J. Williams (Father). 


Williams, Harry 


Corp. 


Co. 


B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/3/18 


Bi.'ihcr, Mont. 

J. S. Williams (Father). 


Williams, Hugh R. 


Pvt 


Hq 


Co. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/12/18 


R. F. D. 1, Rochester. Wash. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Williams (Mother). 



292 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Namb 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


Address — Next op Kin 


Williams, Julius 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co, M. 125 Inf. 
H;l. 64 Inf. Brig. 


KIA 
DD 


7/31/18 
3/11/18 








Williams, Robert Wells 


Camp Douglas, Wis. 












Lt. Col. Chas. R. Williams (Father. 


Willis, Frank 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


8/29/18 


508 Main St., St. Joseph, Mich. 
Louis Willie (Brother;. 


Wilson, Fay M. 


Corp . 


Co. C. 107 V. S. B:i 


KIA 


10/14/18 


Waupaca, Wis. 

W. L. Wilson (Father). 


Wilson, Fred C. 


Ptv. Icl. 


Hosp. 126- 

107 San. Tr. 


KIA 


10/31/18 


110 34th St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mrs. (Charles C. Wilson. 


Wilson, Harry V. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


505 3rd St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Charles B. Wilson (Father). 


Wilson, John 


Pvt. 


Co. M. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/20/18 


Crab Orcliard, Ky. 
James Wilson. 


Wilson, Lewis 


Corp. 


Co. D. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


Mauston, Wis. 

Mrs. Gene Lulu Senogles (Mother) 


Wilson, William L. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/10/18 


Route 5, Coshocton, Ohio. 
Jesse Wilson (Father). 


Winch, Ray 


Corp. 


Co. A 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


901 East 9th St., MarsliHehl, Wis. 
Carlton Winch (Father). 


W'indl, Lawrence 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. D. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


9/1/18 


608 B. St., Jefferson, Wis. 
Joe Windl (Father). 


Winkler, Artlmr E. 


Pvt. 

Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. G. 128 Inf. 
Co. L. 126 Inf. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
SIW 
DW 


8/3/18 

3/27/18 

10/13/18 








Winner, Charles A. 








Winslow, John M. 


1435' ist St! N.' W.',' War Trade Road, 












Washington, D. C. 












Miss Ethel Clara Winslow. 


Winsper, Carl V. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. B. 128 Inf. 
Hq. Co. 125 Inf. 


KIA 

KIA 


10/14/18 
10/13/18 








Winger, Courtlin" 


McNeil,' 'Ark. 












Mrs. Fannie Winger (Wife). 


Wireman, Lindsey 


Pvt. 


Co. I. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


10/21/18 


Oil Springs, Ky. 

Mr. Abe Wireman (Father). 


Wirketis, Peter 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/2/18 


2130 W. 22nd St., Chicago, III. 
Zapipa Gentilaite (Friend). 


Witte, William 


Pvt. 


Co. B. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/10/18 


504 L St., Louisville, Ky. 

Mrs. Catherine Witte (Mother). 


Wludarski, Sladyslaw 


Pvt. 


Co. H. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


8/30/18 


943 Milwaukee Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. Stanley Gorecki (Cousin). 


Woleford, Frank 


Sgt. 


Co. M. 126 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 


DD 
KIA 


Unknown 
7/31/18 








Wojciechowski, 


1523' S.' 'Monroe" St.', 'Bay' City, Mich. 


Alex Aloyz 










Mrs. Stelle Wojciechowski (Mother). 


Wolfe, Lawrence 


Corp. 


Co. A. 125 Inf. 


DW 


10/5/18 


42 Norvall St., Detroit, Mich. 
Rope Wolfe (Mother). 


Wolfe, Edward J. 


Pvt. Icl. 


Co. B. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


8/5/18 


1020 Bellevue, Seattle, Wash. 
Mrs. E. J. Wolff (Mother). 


Wolff, Verne O. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 


Co. D. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 126 Inf. 


DW 
DD 


8/30/18 
9/20/18 








WoUnski, Sol. 


185' Ave.' 'C,' 'New ' York' City,' 'n. ' Y. 












Mrs. Bessie Goldberg. 


Wolman, Ben 


Pvt. 


Co. D. 121 Mg. Bn 


KIA 


8/31/18 


Wautoma, Wis. 
Louis Wolman. 


Womac, Claude 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


10/23/18 


.A.tliens, Tenn. 
M. Womac. 


Wood. Archie B. 


Pvt. 


Co. L. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


11/7/18 


536 Main St., Clarksville, Tenn. 
David B. Wood (Father). 


Wood, Clark 


Sgt. 


Co. A. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


n)/9/18 


321 W. Cushman, Three Rivers, Mich. 
John W. Wood. 


Wood, Fred E. 


Pvt. 
Pvt. Icl. 


MD. 322 F. A. 
Co. M. 125 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 


10/16/18 
7/31/18 








W'ood, Jamf^a A. 


Reed St., Warren, Mass. 












James Wood (Father). 


Woods, Leo V. 


Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 


Co. C. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 125 Inf. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 


DW 
KIA 

KIA 


8/6/18 

7/31/18 

10/1/18 
about 








Woolford, Charles E. 








Woodvillc, Henry H. 


Indiantown, Orance Co., Va. 










Mrs. Julia A. Woodville (Mother). 


Woodworth, Earl F. 


Pvt. Id. 


Co. E. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


10/15/18 


526 E. Main St., Owos.so, Mich. 
Mrs, Cora Woodworth (Mother). 












Woolridge, William 


Pvt. 
Pvt. 
Corp. 


Co. M. 125 Inf. 
Co. II. 128 Inf. 
Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 
KIA 

KIA 


8/4/18 

10/15/18 

8/27/18 








Worcester, Thomas F. 








Worta, Pelcr P. 


704' Theodore 'Ave.',' iiciroit, Mi'c'li.' 












Mrs. Anna Wortz (Mother). 


Wozenski, Julius 


Pvt. 


Co. A. 128 Inf. 


KIA 


8/1/18 


296 Evliiie St., Hamtramck, Mich, 
Frank Wozenski (Father), 


Wrasse, Earl G. 


Corp. 


Co. E. 127 Inf. 


KIA 


7/31/18 


308 14th St., Milwaukee, Wis, 

Mrs, Frank W, Wrasse (Mother), 


Wray, Willie A. 


Pvt. 


Co. G. 126 Inf. 


KIA 


10/21/18 


Wirtz, Franklin Co,, Va. 


Wright, Charles H. 


Pvt. 


Co. C. 125 Inf. 


KIA 


6/30/18 


Mr. David Wrav (Father), 
1224 Dorr St., Toledo, Ohio. 
Lina Ifla Balcy (Si.ster). 



293 



TIIK TllIRTr-SECOXD DIVISION IX THE WOULD WAR 



Name 


Rank 


Organization 


Cause 


Date 


AsDHEsa— Next or Kin 


Wright, Elmer F. 
Wriglit, George W. 
Wright, Preston M. 
Wright, Roy S. 


Corp. 

Pvt. 

Pvt Icl. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Moch. 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt, Icl. 

Pvt. let. 

Pvt. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt 

Pvt 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Sgt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt Id. 

Pvt. 

Pvt. 

Pvt 


Co. K. 128 Inf. 
Co. D. 125 Inf. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 
Co. C. 128 Inf. 
Bat. C. 120 F. A. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 
Co. L. 126 Inf. 
Co. M. 127 Inf. 
Co. I. 125 Inf. 
Co. M. 125 Inf. 
M. D. 127 Inf. 
Co. F. 128 Inf. 
Co. I.. 128 Inf. 
Co. A. 126 Inf. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 
.Mg. Co. 361 Inf. 
Co. C. 125 Inf. 
Co. F. 126 Inf. 
Co. F. 127 Inf. 
Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Co. E. 127 Inf. 
Co. .M. 127 Inf. 
Co. H. 127 Inf. 
Co. H. 126 Inf. 
Co. K. 126 Inf. 
Co. D. 128 Inf. 
Co. K. 125 Inf. 
Co. B. 128 Inf. 
• 


KIA 
KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

I)D 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

DW 

KIA 

DW 

DW 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

DW 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 

KIA 


10/6/18 

10/11/18 

9/2/18 

8/4/18 

9/I2/I8 

8/3/18 

10/5/18 

8/3/18 

8/1/18 

7/31/18 

9/1/18 

8/3/18 

9/1/18 

7/31/18 

9/1/18 

10/9/18 

8/29/18 

7/29/18 

9/15/18 

8/1/18 

7/19/18 

8/4/18 

7/31/18 

9/20/18 

8/29/18 

8/31/18 

8/1/18 

8/31/18 

1 


Whitewater, Wis. 

Mr. Frank Wriglit 
R. F. D. 1, Fcrrum, Va. 

John W. Wright (Father). 
Iloi^tess, House, Vancouver, Wash. 

Mrs. Robert K. Wright (Mother). 




Wright, Walker 
Wynt, Max 


Ripley, W. Va. 

Jessie M. Wright (Sister). 




Yancy, Phillip R. 


368 Pine St.. S. Muskegon, Mich. 
Phillip Yaney. 






Young, Bain E. 






Young, Edward J. 






















Zajicek, Ilnbert O. 














Znne, Ralph L. 






Zaneni, John 






Zenewich, John 
Zenus, Anthony 
Zeuske, Emil C. 
Zilmar, Glen 


408 Perry St., Bowery PI., Phil., Pa 
Nikols Zenewich (Brother). 

16 10th St., Dayton. Ohio. 
Joseph f>mith (Friend). 

Shawano, Wis. 

Mrs. Amiiia Merkes (Sister). 




Zimmerlie, Georce W. 






Zininiennan, Henr>' 






Zimmerman, Victor 






Zitterman, John J. 






Zive, Samuel 






Zuhin, Julius 






Zuckowski, Antoino 






Zullo, .\ntonio 











294 




Majob William F. Mehl, 127th Infantry, died at Waco Texas, October 22, 1917. 

Captain Alfred E. Gaartz, Co. D, 120th Machine Gun Battalion, killed in action August 29, 1918, during the 

Oisc-Ai.snc OfFen.';i\e. 
First Lieutenant Herbert .Iones Taylor, Co. M, 125th Infantry, died of wounds September 2, 1918, during 

the Oise-Aisiie Offensive. 
First Lieutenant Alexander E. Shiells, Co. E, 107th Engineers, died of disease, Februaiy 17, 1919. 
Second Lieutenant George E. Harris, 120th Field Artillery, died of wounds, October 13, 1918. 
Second Lieutenant Paul K. LeBaron, Supply Co. 120th Field Artillery, died October 14, 1918. 



295 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



Consolidated Casualty Report 



Killed in Action and 
Dind of Wounds. 



ALSACE 

AISNE-MARNE 



OISE-AISNE ... 
.VIEUSE- 

AKGONNE. 
EAST OF THE 
MEUSE. 



(..(H'lCKHS 

2 
66 
15 
37 

7 



127 



Men 

54 

715 

470 

1,141 
153 



2,533 



Wounded— All 
Degrees. 



Officers 

19 
161 
132 
132 

17 



461 



Men 
238 
3,184 
1,855 
4,525 
505 



10,352 



Missing. 



Officers 



Men 
2 
12 
14 
82 
24 



134 



Non-Battle 

Casujiltit'.s. 



.\lKN 



(Note — Includes Die<l 
of Uiiiease, Prisoners of 
War, Accidentally In- 
jured, Drowned, etc.). 



12 



317 



GRAND TOTAL-13,936 



296 




DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS. 

125TJI INFANTRY. 



Lt. Col. Guv M. Wilson, D. S. C. 
Capt. Geo. S. Crabbe, D. S. C. 
Capt. C. M. Williams, D. S. C. 
Chaplain Thos. E. Swan, D. S. C. 
Capt. Chas. Follis, D. S. C. 
Capt. Meade Frierson, D. S. C. 
1st Lt. Harry S. Wheat, D. S. C. 
1st Lt. Herman Moyse, D. S. C. 
1st Lt. Chas. A. Hammond, D. S. 0. 
1st Lt. Harrv M. Keiser, D. S. C. 
1st Lt. Merritt Wilson, D. S. C. 
1st Lt. Herman Crites, D. S. C. 
1st Lt. Robert E. Motley, D. S. C. 
1st Lt. Francis A. Barlow, D. S. C. . 
1st Lt. Levi Stevens, D. S. C. 
2nd Lt. William S. Brittain, D. S. C. 
2nd Lt. Samuel Snowden, D. S. C. 
2nd Lt. Edgar A. Jennings, I). S. C. 
1st Sgt. Russell V. Somes, D. S. C. 
Sgt. Ivan Smith, D. S. C. 
Sgt. Carl F. Pavson, D. S. C. 
Sgt. John Teichler, D. S. C. 
Sgt. Paul H. Rediker, D. S. C. 
Corp. Arthur G. Stuart, D. S. C. 
Corp. Robt. E. Craidge, D. S. C. 
Corp. Theodore T. Carierv, D. S. C. 
Corp. Gustave Miealka, D. S. C. 
Corp. Alden Bush, D. S. C. 
Corp. Matt Stevens, D. S. C. 
Corp. Clarence Smith, D. S. C. 
Pvt. lc-1. Everett C. Dressell, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Icl. Wilfred V. Seeler, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Icl. Arthur Heritier D. S. C. 
Sgt. Joseph A. Madden, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Jacob Masson, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Marcus Armijo, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Pontiae Williams, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Fred Connette, I). S. C. 
Pvt. Andy Skrypeck, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Harold J. Bevereaux, T). S. C. 
Pvt. Bernard Schulthei.s, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Nelson Burleigh, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Joseph Isaacs, 1). S. C. 
Pvt. Harrv Rolev, I). S. C. 
Pvt. George McFarling, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Harry Ollrich, D. S. C. 



Pvt. Edward T. Wibbert, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Franciszak, D. S. C. 
Corp. Elmer W. Brenuan, D. S. C. 
1st Sgt. Michael Castura, D. S. C. 
Corp. Ravmond Heurv, D. S. C. 
Corp. Geo. H. Pohl, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Roy C. Mark, D. S. C. 
Pvt. John Mecom, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Wm. Holzgiebe, D. S. C. 
Mechanic Eino I. Jarvi, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Lionel Goodman, D. 8. C. 
Pvt. Victor Andryowski, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Chas. T. Ritzert, D. S. C. 
Pvt. John Heikkinen, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Michael F. Conuellv, D. S. C. 
Corp. Fred C. Stein, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Harrv Thrall, D. S. C. 
Pvt. lei. William Reese, D. S. G. 
Pvt. Hazen Wilson, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Icl. Mike Kaminski, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Icl. Dewey Phillips, D. S. C. 
Corp. Thos. M. Purdon, D. 8. C. 
Pvt. Walter B. Brown, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Frank B. Holmes, D, S. C. 
Corp. Fred Clay, T>. S. C. 
Sgt. Wm. A. Monroe, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Icl. Leonard St. James, D. S. C. 
1st Sgt. James McDonald, D. S. C. 
Corp. Harlow B. Emerson, D. S. C. 
Sgt. Earl Adelspberger, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Icl. Frank Lewis, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Conception Ortiz, D. S. C. 
Bugler Olius Berkompas, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Geo. Bullian, D. S. C. 
Corp. Wm. B. Bell, D. S. C. 
Corp. Wm. A. Belongea, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Richard C. Anderson, D. S. C. 
Corp. Isaac Chandler, D. S. C. 
Bugler Geo. Decaire, D. S. C. 
Sgt. Walter L. Chcllis, D. S. C. 
Pvt. David H. Underwood, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Franciszak Dudzinski, D. S. C. 
Sgt. Enierv Hawks, D. 8. C. 
1st Sgt. A. H. Griswold, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Lyman N. Morrison, D. 8. C. 



297 



THE Timrri-SEcoyD Divisioy l\ the wored ^\Ali 



126TII INFANTliY. 



Colonol Joseph B. Westnedge, 1). S. C. Pvt. 

Lt. Col. Janu-s O. Cathcart, D. S. C. Pvt. 

1st Lt. Leo. J. Cnim, D. S. C. Pvt. 

1st Lt. Philip Tiiulall, I). S. 0. Pvt. 

1st Lt. Harolil ,1. King, D. S. C. Sgt. 

1st Lt. Chas. L. II. Bates, D. S. C. Corp 

1st Lt. Edgar L. Burton, D. S. C. Sgt. 

2iid Lt. James M. Wilson, D. S. C. Sgt. 

Sgt. Rancv R. Kain, D. S. C. Corp 

Sgt. Orrie" Thompson, D. S. C. Pvt. 

Sgt. Dougald Ferguson, D. S. C. Sgt. 

Sgt. Wm. Lizinski, D. S. C. Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. John G. Zcldam, D. S. C. Sgt. 

Pvt. Steven V. Chipman, D. S. 0. Sgt. 

Sgt. Kolicrt J. Kline, 1). S. C. Pvt. 

Sgt. Ale.\auder Salik, D. S. C. Sgt. 

Sgt. Carl Banks, 1). S. C. Corp 

Corp. Frank B. Ravmond, D. S. C. Pvt. 

Pvt. Albert R. Neitzel, D. S. C. Sgt. 



Albert S. Krzvwa, D. S. C. 
Chas. L. Beck, D. S. C. 
Wm. A. Edsall, I). S. C. 
Frederick W. McClemmens, D. S. C. 
John G. Fowle, D. S. C. 

Ernest A. Sheer, D. S. C. 
Maxwell E. Smith, D. S. C. 
Arthur Aamot, D. S. C. 
. Ilenrv E. Dve, D. S. C. 
Wm. E. Hurst, D. 8. C. 
Geo. A. Hopkins, D. S. C. 
Lonso L. Fuller, D. S. C. 
Wm. Liniger, I). S. C. 
Osear A. Rundrpiist, D. S. C. 
lei. Howard A. Waite, D. S. C. 
Harold A. Dawson, D. S. C. 
. Laurel Shore, D. S. C. 
Harrv Swift, D. S. C. 
Ira L. Westcott, D. S. C. 



isrni INFANTRY. 



Col. Russell C. Langdon, D. S. C. Corp, 

Major Wm. G. Watkins, D. S. C. Pvt. 

Capt. John D. Si)encer, D. S. C. Sgt. 
1st Lt. Herman W. Steiiikraus, D. S. C. Pvt. 

1st Lt. Rav C. Diokop, V). S. C. Pvt. 

1st I^t. Henrv S. Blomborg, D. S. C. Pvt. 

Pvt. Olaf Olsen, I). S. C. Sgt. 

Sgt. Frank Glomski, D. S. C. Sgt. 

Pvt. Icl. Jos. A. Chavie, J). S. C. Sgt. 

Pvt. Icl. Wilfred Llovd, D. S. C. Pvt. 

Sgt. Rav Rolain, D. S. C. Sgt. 

Corp. Jesse Marlin, D. S. C. Pvt. 

Pvt. Helmuth Dewitz, D. S. C. Pvt. 
Pvt. Chas. Holmes, D. S. C. 



. Clarence I-ake, D. S. C. 
Jos. Mueller, D. S. C. 
Walter Siebert, D. S. C. 
Emil Buckcndahl, D. S. C. 
Mike Curti, D. S. C. 
Arthur L. Stuckrad, D. S. C. 
Max P. Thalke, D. S. C. 
James McSorlev, D. S. C. 
Louis Witte, \X S. C. 
Henrv W. Wetzel, D. S. C. 
Willard D. Purdv, D. S. C. 
Edwin Austin, D. S. C. 
James C. Hix, D. S. C. 



128T1I INFANTRY. 



Major Frank L. Gottschalk, D. S. C. 
Major Daniel J. Martin, D. S. C. 
Major Henrv R. Hill, D. S. C. 
Capt. Clifford E. Bischoff, I). S. C. 
1st Lt. Clarence G. Noble, D. S. C. 
1st Lt. Walter O. L. Peterson, D. S. C. 
1st Lt. Alexander L. Nicol, D. S. G. 
2nd Lt. Richard W. Austerman, D. S. C. 
2nd lit. Oscar T. Slagsvol, D. S. C. 
Sgt. Arthur Schultz, D. S. C. 
Sgt. Max P. Thalke, D. S. C. 
Corp. Clarence L. Turley, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Clem Anthony, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Lonso L. Fuller, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Geo. W. Langham, D. R. C. 



Pvt. Samuel Shaskau, D. S. C. 
Major Chas. L. Sheridan, D. S. C. 
Corp. Claude R. Roberts D. 8. C. 
Pvt. Icl. Herman Plauman, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Ravmond Genicke, D. S. C. 
Corp. Earl M. Curnow, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Maurice L. Mathev, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Lvnn Blossom, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Wm. A. Jacobson, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Clarence J. McNultv, D. S. C. 
Pvt. Alabel Blumonthal,"D. S. C. 
Pvt. Mack Dudlev. D. S. C. 
2nd Lt. John M. Regan, D. S. C. 
Sgt. Elmer Evenson, D. S. C. 
Corp. Chester C. Kromer, D. S. C. 



121st machine GFN BATTALION. 
1st Sgt. Paul J. Gaston, D. S. C. Sgt. Herman Korth, D. S. C, 

?98 




299 



THE TllIRTY-SECONU V1\I;SI0N IN THE WOULD WAR 

1II7T1I ENGINEERS. 
2ii(l Lt. Geo. Winfield Kiililiiiiiii, WB.V. 2iul l,t. .lames Stanley Solton, D. S. C. 

lOTni F. S. r.ATTALlON. 

Sgt. John Lamb, D. S. C. Corp. Donald D. Palmer, D. S. C. 

Sgt. Id. Geo. Uurr, D. S. C. Pvt. Edw. Pelki-y, 1). S. C. 

120TU FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT. 

2nd Lieut. Stacev L. Harding, D. S. C. Pvt. lei. Joseph Biwan, 1). S. C. 

Sgt. Frank M. Ilolt, D. S. 0. Pvt. Icl. Harold J. Protning, D. S. C. 

Wagoner Nick Adler, I). S. C. Pvt. Lee O. Preseott, D. S. C. 

Corp. Frank I. Fo.x, 1). S. C. Pvt. Stei)hen H. Faatz, 1). S. C. 
Corp. Floyd Preseott, D. S. C. 

121st field ARTILLERY REGnfFAT. 
Sgt. Albert R. Brown, D. S. C. 

147th FJK1>1) AliTILLKRY REGIMENT. 

Sgt. Hobart M. Bird, D. S. C. Pvt. Icl. Chas. E. Thorne, D. S. C. 

Corp. Albert J. Reed, D. S. C. 

lOlTii AMMUNMTION TRAIN. 

Wagoner James A. Norton, P. S. C. Pvt. Icl. John F. Shcdlewski, D. S. C. 

Pvt. Icl. Walter J. Kaleigh, 1). S. C. 

158Tn FIKI.D ARTILLERY BRIGADE. 

2nd Lt. John Morrison, D. S. C. Corp. Elvin L. Pierson, D. S. C. 

Corp, Jolin M. Crocker, D. S. C. Pvt. Urban V. Craft, D. S. C. 



.-300 




s § 

s i 

o 

a Gb 

« 5 

sa O 

s q 

to ti 

-o a 

i p 



a 

o 
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301 



THE TIIlirry-SECONI) DIVISION IN THE WOUI.T) WAR 



322nd, 323UD ilKLD AKTILLEUY liliUlMKXT. 

Pvt. Ul. Joe J. Donahue, D. S. C. Corp.Elvin L.Pierson.D.S.C, Battery "A." 

Sgt. John M. (VofUiT, r». S. C, Ilq. Co. Pvt. Urban V. Craft, D. S. C, Hq. Co. 

308th TKENCH JIOTOR BATTEEY. 

Capt. Don. R. McCil, D. S. C. Sgt. Horace L. HoUowav, D. S. C. 

2nd Lt. Roy B. Foreman, D. S. C. Sgt. Elver J. Dowles, D. S. C. 

2nd Lt. Harold Burns, D. S. C. Corp. Carl F. Turkopp, D. S. C. 
Sgt. Chas. S. Hoover, D. S. C. 

UNATTACHED. 

1st Lt. Maurice J. V. Ritt, D. S. C. Corp. Jean Babtiste Carrere, D. S. C. 

2nd Lt. Verne E. Rogers, D. S. C. 

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL. 

Major General W. M. Haan, Div. Hq., D. S. M. 

Major General Wni. Lassiter, Div. Hq., D. S. M. 

Brigadier General Edwin B. Winans, 64th Inf., D. S. M. 

Brigadier General G. LeRov Irwin, 57th F. A. Brig., I). S. M. 

Colonel Robt. McC. Beck, j"r., Div. Hq., D. S. M. 

Colonel Rus.sell C. Langdon, 127th Inf., D. S. M. 

Colonel Robt. B. McCoy, 128th Inf., D. S. M. 

Colonel G. E. Seaman, Div. Surgeon, D. S. M. 

Colonel Joseph B. We.stnedge, 126th Inf., I). S. M. 

Lt. Col. Philip Zink, 127th Inf., 1). S. M. 

MEDAILLE MILITAIRE. 

125th infantry. 
1st Sgt. Wm. B. Scheffler. 

LEGION OF HONOR— FRANCE. 

Major General William G. Haan Division Commander. 

Major General William Lassiter Division Commander. 

Major General J. A. Le Jeune 64th Infantry Brigade. 

Major General Robert Alexander 6:ird Infantry Brigade. 

Brigadier (jeiieial William D. Connor 6:ird Infantry Brigade. 

Brigadier Adrian S. Fleming IfiSth Field Artillery. 

Brigadier General G. LeRoy Irvi-in 57th Field Artillery. 

Brigadier General Frank R. McCoy 63rd Infantry Brigade. 

Brigadier General Edwin B. Winans 64th Infantry Brigade. 

Colonel Robert McC. Beck, Jr Chief of Staff. 

Colonel Harold C. Fiske 107th Engineers. 

Colonel Russell C. Langdon 127th Infantry. 

Colonel William M. Morrow 125th Infantry. 

Colonel Jerome G. Pillow Ass 't Chief of Staff, G 3. 

Colonel George M. Russell Acting Chief of Staff. 

Colonel Gilbert E. Seaman Division Surgeon. 

Lt. Col. Paul B. Clemens Ass't Chief of Staff, G-2. 

Lt. Col. John IT. Howard Ass't Chief of Staff, G-1. 

Lt. Col. John Scott Division Signal Officer. 

Lt. Col. Guy M. Wilson 125th Infantry. 

Lt. Col. Allen L. Briggs Ass't Chief of Staff, G-3. 

Captain Clifford E. Bischoff 128th Infantry. 

Captain James Wilson 125th Infantry. 

302 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE DECORATIONS 



CROIX DE GUERRE. 

DIVISION IIEADQUARTEKS, HEADQUARTERS TROOP, 
AND DETACHMENT. 



Mnjor General W. M. Haan, C. G. 
Major General \Vm. Lassiter, C. G. 
Goloucl Robt. McC. Beck, Jr., C. G. 
Colonel H. B. Fisk, C. G. 
Colonel Jerome G. Pillow, C. G. 
Lt. Col. John H. Howard, C. G. 
Lt. Col. John Scott, C. G. 
Colonel G. E. Seaman, C. G. 
Lt. Col. G. W. Garloek, C. G. 
Lt. Col. Paul B. Clemens, C. G. 
Lt. Col. Chas. E. Williams, C. G. 
Lt. Col. James Scott, C. G. 
Major Fred C. Best, C. G. 
Major Wni. H. Holmes, C. G. 
Major Chas. S. Harrison, C. G. 
Major Patrick Dunigan, C. G. 
Major Robt. Connor, C. G. 
Major Edgar H. Campbell, C. G. 



Capt. Frank Ward, C. G. 

Capt. Wm. J. Niederprucm, C. G. 

Capt. John C. Crandall, C. G. 

Capt. Herbert Shonk, C. G. 

Capt. LeRov Pearson, C. G. 

Chaplain W'm. P. O 'Connor, C. G. 

Capt. Daniel L. Thomiison, C. G. 

Capt. Chas. F. Bowen, C. G. 

Lt. Ernest H. Barrow, C. G. 

Lt. Camilla Morvant, C. G. 

Lt. Harold J. Lance, C. G. 

Lt. F. F. Mallov, C. G. 

Sgt. J. Irl Crosiiaw, C. G. 

Sgt. William L. Barrard, Jr., C. G. 

Sgt. Fred R. Starr, C. G. 

Corp. Perry R, Shisler, C. G. 

Pvt. Icl. Frank Stafford, C. 0, 

Pvt. Vernon L. Downer, C, G. 



63iiD INFANTRY BRIGADE, HEADQUARTERS. 
Lt. John P. Gregg, C. G. Lt. CoL John J. Burley, C. G. 



125th INFANTRY. 



Lt. Col. Guy M. Wilson, C. G. 
Major Milton L. Hinkley, C. G. 
Major Alfred E. Lemon, C. G. 
Capt. C. M. Williams, C. G. 
Capt. Joseph M. Donneley, C. G. 
Capt. Oscar Falk, C. G. 
Capt. C. M. Williams, C. G. 
Chaplain Wm. F. Davitt, C. G. 
l3t Lt. Levi Stevens; C. G. 
1st Lt. Harry S. Wheat, C. G. 
1st Lt. Herman Moyse, C. G. 
1st Lt. Chas. A. Hammond, C. 6. 
1st Lt. Harry M. Keiser, C. G. 
Lt. Chas. A. Keskey, C. G. 
Lt. Joseph Jenkinson, C. G. 
1st Lt. Francis A. Barlow, C. G. 
1st Lt. Rav C. Diekop, C. G. 
1st Lt. Wm. F. Weine, C. G. 
Lt. John L. HynaTi, C. G. 
Lt. Wm. Ward, C. G. 
2nd Lt. William S. Brittain, C. G. 
2nd Lt. John J. Bruenn, C. G. 
Corp. Marion Ross, C. G. 
Sgt. William Quilliam, C. G. 
Sgt. Clyde O. Hclgeson, C. G. 
Sgt. Alfred N. Piatt, C. G. 
Sgt. Darwin D. Martin, C. G. 
Sgt. Anthony Kwiathkowski, C. G. 
Sgt. Harry Beiiker, C. G. 
Corp. Everett C. Dressell, C. G. 
Corj). Herman Yokio, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Arthur Allen, C. G. 



Sgt. Harold Burley, C. G. 

Pvt. James A. Burlingame, C. G. 

Pvt. Fred A. Lepire, C. G. 

Pvt. Clarence Hunter, C. G. 

Pvt. Paul A. Moore, C. G. 

Pvt. Wm. Phillips, C. G. 

Pvt. Emile Jensen, C. G. 

Pvt. Harry Hill, C. G. 

Pvt. John Canavan, C. G. 

Pvt. Antone Markiando, C. G. 

Pvt. Wm. E. Ferris, C. G. 

Pvt. Etinne Badeaux, C. G. 

Pvt. Icl. Henry M. Bradow, C. G. 

Cook Daniel Pratt, C. G. 

Mechanic Ivan Wardell, C. G. 

Pvt. Burton G. McSivean, C. G. 

Pvt. Icl. Fred Rosencranco, C. G. 

Bugler Lester C. Reese, C. G. 

Pvt. George Pearson, C. G. 
Sgt. Jos. A. Lefebre, C. G. 

Sgt. Manuel Vieau, C. G. 

Sgt. Chas. B. Orr, C. G. 

Corp. Ali)honse Bergen, C. G. 

Corp. Virgil V. Sabourin, C. G. 

Corp. Arthur Adams, C. G. 

Corp. Albert Neault, C. G. 

Pvt. Icl. Wm. E. Hurst, C. G. 

Pvt. Icl. Joseph Hilbig. C. G. 

Pvt. Benhard A. Schultheis, C. G, 

Sgt. Harold Springer, C. G. 

Sgt. Russel Fisk, C. G. 

Sgt. Carl F. Pavson, C. G. 



303 



THE THIRTY- SECOJSID DIVISION IN TUE WOULD WAR 



125x11 INFANTRY— Continued. 



Sgt. Ivan Smith, C. G. 
Corp. Isaac Chandler, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Arthur Heritier, C. G. 
Pvt. Fred Connette, C. G. 
Pvt. Geo. Decaire, C. G. 
Pvt. Carl O'Neil, C. G. 
Pvt. E(l\v. T. Vibbert, C. G. 
Corp. Elmer W. Brennan, C. G. 
Corp. Allien Bu.sh, C. G. 
Corp. Paul H. Rcdiker, C. G. 
Corp. Clarence Smith, C. G. 
Pvt. Nelson Burleigh, C. G. 
Pvt. Devereaux, C. G. 
Pvt. Ilarrv Folcv, C. G. 
Pvt. Wilfred Seeler, C. G. 
Pvt. Pontiae. Williams, C. G. 
Sgt. Walter L. Chellis, C. G. 
Sgt. Edgar H. Jennings, C. G. 



Corp. Morris D. Mist, C. G. 
Corp. Matt Stevens, C. G. 
Pvt. Joseph Madden, C. G. 
Pvt. Harrv Thrall, C. G. 
Sgt. Horace H. Sole, C. G. 
Sgt. Fowler, C. G. 
Sgt. Edw. J. Mac Hugh, C. G. 
Sgt. Samuel Snowden, C. G. 
Sgt. Orville Weir, C. G. 
Corp. Harlow B. Emerson, C. G. 
Corp. T. Cariepv, C. G. 
Pvt. Kichard (.'." Anderson, C. G. 
Pvt. Harry W. Dennison, C. G. 
Pvt. Josejih Isaacs, C. G. 
Pvt. Stuart P. Tice, C. G. 
Corp. Barnel C. Carr, C. G. 
Mechanic Philip K. Janey, C. G. 
Corp. Clyde O. Martinson, C. G. 



126th infantry. 



Colonel Joseph B. Westncdge, C. G. 
Major Wm. Ranliin, C. G. 
Major Wm. Hcnrv Burke, C. G. 
Lt.'Leland E. Wheeler, C. G. 
Lt. Walter I.. Shirley, C. G. 
Lt. Jacob Cohen, C. G. 
2nd Lt. James Blanev, C. G. 
2nd Lt. Donald Perry, C. G. 
Corp. Clarence L. Hinkle, C. G. 
Sgt. Wm. E. Hamilton, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Okcv Price, C. G. 
Pvt. John C. Casev, C. G. 
Pvt. Albert L. Luce, C. G. 
Sgt. Richard Lauder, C. G. 
Corp. Henry 6. Griflin, C. G. 
Corp. Glenn Graves, C. G. 
Pvt. Id. James Tavlor, C. G. 
Pvt. Id. Wendell Wilson, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Chas. F. Comska, C. G. 
Pvt. Frank W. Fresse, C. G. 
Sgt. Mathew Post, C. G. 
Sgt. James H. Babcock, C. G. 
Sgt. Arthur B. Pehrson, C. G. 



Sgt. Ben F. Fogelsong, C. G. 
Sgt. Alexander Salik, C. G. 
Corp. Geo. Pohl. C. G. 
Corj). Gustave Michalka, C. G. 
Sgt. Dougald Ferguson, C. G. 
Sgt. Arthur E. Hawks, C. G. 
Sgt. Rancv R. Kain, C. G. 
Sgt. Wm. Luzinski, C. G. 
Sgt. Orrie Thomson, C. G. 
Sgt. Rov Webster, C. G. 
Pvt. Geo. S. Downing, C. G. 

Pvt. Shipman, C. G. 

Sgt. Vonk, C. G. 

Corp. Jerrold B. Thompson, C. G. 

Pvt. Isidore Vissilo, C. G. 

Pvt. John J. Zeldam, C. G. 

Sgt. Bugler Theo. Kutchinski, C. G. 

Sgt. Lvman T. Covell, C. G. 

Sgt. Geo. Rinaldi, C. G. 

Corp. Lewis Hudson, C. G. 

Mechanic Guthfort Cournmer, C. G. 

Sgt. Wallace J. Waltman, C. G. 

Sgt. William R. Smith, C. G. 



2nd Lt. Louis H. Carlson, C. G. 
Pvt. Logan A. Sond, C. G. 



120th machine gun batt.vtjon. 

Pvt. Nick Luccro, C. G. 



127th INFAXTin'. 



Colonel Russell C. Langdon, C. G. 
Lt. Col. P. J. Zink, C. G. 
Major John F. Stevens, C. G. 
Capt. Wilbur K. Black, C. G. 
Capt. Martin Aekerson, C. G. 
Capt. Arnold A. Gritzmacker, C. G. 
Capt. (luy V. Anderson, C. G. 
Capt. Stephen Boon, Jr., C. G. 



Lt. Garlon E. Harrington, C. G. 

Lt. Frank Krukar, C. G. 

Lt. Harmon Chas. Padon, C. G. 

Lt. Rogers T. Cooksev, C. G. 

Lt. Willfred Page, C. G. 

Lt. James W. Stiggleman, C. G. 

1st Lt. Stanlev A. Jewasinski, C. G. 

1st Lt. Wm. F. Woine, C. G. 



304 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE DECORATIONS 



127th INFANTRY— Continued. 



2nd Lt. J. Kenneth Rutherford, C. G. 

2ud Lt. Moriss Togstad, (!. G. 

2nd Lt. Koy W. Kelley, C. G. 

2nd Lt. Laverne E. Deal, C. G. 

Sergt. Olaf Olseu, C. G. 

Pvt. Paul Florine, C. G. 

Corp. Frank Plain, C. G. 

Sgt. Peter La Fromway, C. G. 

Sgt. Wm. K. Larson, C. G. 

Corp. August C. Meyer, C. G. 

Corp. Ralph Rand, C. G. 

Sgt. Frank Glomski, C. G. 

Pvt. Richard E. Charles, C. G. 

Pvt. Wm. J. Kirkpatrick, C. G. 

Pvt. Oliver O. Grant, C. G. 

Pvt. Icl. Jos. A. Chayie, C. G. 

Corp. Carl Rasmessen. 

Sgt. Floyd Hughe.s, C. G. 

Sgt. Isadore Rheuaume, C. G. 

Sgt. Wm. N. Waugh, C. G. 

Sgt. Floyd F. Brown, C. G. 

Cook Erwin Kunath, C. G. 

Cook Leo Kick, C. G. 

Pvt. Wm. H. Price, C. G. 

Sgt. Wm. J. Huempfner, C. G. 

Sgt. Bernard Allen, C. G. 

Sgt. Frank Bufka, C. G. 

Sgt. Chas. R. Schmidt, C. G. 

Sgt. Lawrence Gauthier, C. 6. 

Sgt. Rudolph Rallies, C. G. 

Pvt. Icl. Arthur Wolfe, C. G. 

Pvt. Icl. James Faulds, C. G. 

Pvt. Icl. Alfred Swens, C. G. 

Pvt. Chas. Huling, C. G. 

Pvt. Guv Whitman, C. G. 

Pvt. Bert Harper, C. G. 

Pvt. Donald K. Brown, C. G. 

Pvt. Venanzio Guilio, C. G. 

Pvt. John F. Hart, C. G. 

Pvt. John Anderson, C. G. 

Pvt. Lester Rondeau, C. G. 

Corp. Arthur Deel, C. G. 



Corp. Bert Williston, C. G. 
Corp. Wm. Taylor, C. G. 
Corp. Eitel Meyer, C. G. 
Corji. Geo. H. Rowe, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Louis Lafave, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Joseph Adamski, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Melvin Mercord, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Hjalmer Hanson, C. G. 
Mechanic Carl A. Larsen, C. G. 
Pvt. Edw. J. Riley, C. G. 
Cook Robert H. Morris, C. G. 
Corp. Alvin Bocher, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Wm. Tolkren, C. G. 
Sgt. Vincent P. Kielpinski, C. G. 
Sgt. Paul G. Bonaek, C. G. 
Sgt. Joseph Witeek, C. G. 
Sgt. Tom Xvgogasrepolos, C. G. 
Sgt. William Watt, C. G. 
Sgt. Jacob Borski, C. G. 
Sgt. Stanley Tarznyski, C. G. 
Corp. Marshall Rumary, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Joseph Milicki, C. G. 
Corp. Thos. Stafford, C. 6. 
Corp. Alexander Legault, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Wm. J. Ashmun, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Louis Schlegel, C. G. 
Sgt. Wm. H. Bruce, C. G. 
Sgt. Benjamin G. Bilter, C. G. 
1st Sgt. Richard Arndt, C. G. 
Sgt. Ellsworth Hay, C. G. 
Sgt. Howard C. Coates, C. G. 
Sgt. Alfred Erhardt, C. G. 
Sgt. George Abell, C. G. 
Sgt. Marek, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Wilfred Lloyd, C. G. 
1st Lt. John D. Spencer, C. G. 
Sgt. Rolain, C. G. 
Pvt. Alexander J. Lurye, C. G. 
Corp. Alfred J. Wevaildt, C. G. 
Pvt. lei. Wm. Schneider, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Cyrus McKenzie, C. G. 
Corp. John Tremain, C. G. 



128th INFANTEY. 



Colonel Henry A. Meyer, C. G. 
Major Lewis A. Moore, C. G. 
Major Orra L. Norris, C. G. 
Major Emil G. Prcllivitz, C. G. 
Major Frank L. Gottschalk, C. G. 
('apt. ('arl Hanton, C. G. 
Capt. John D. Ewing, C. G. 
Capt. John M. Scantleton, C. G. 
Capt. Leo. Schwanekamp, C. G. 
Capt. Rantz E. Snoberger, C. G. 
Capt. Clifford E. BisehofF, C. G. 
Capt. Wm. R. Doctor, C. G. 
Capt. Earl Ij. Hemenwav, C. G. 
Lt. Frank E. Machus, C.G. 
Lt. Archibald A. Walker, C. G. 
1st Lt. John R. Devall, C. G. 
Lt. Francis L. GuUickson, C. G. 
2nd Lt. Oscar T. Slagsvol, C. G. 



Sgt. Arthur Schultz, C. G. 

Sgt. Ma.x P. Thalke, C. G. 

Corp. Clarence L. Turlev, C. G. 

Pvt. Clem Anthony, C. G. 

Sgt. Walter Peterson, C. G. 

Corp. Claude R. Roberts, C. G. 

Pvt. Id. Herman Plauman, C. G. 

Sgt. Raymond H. Kraft, C. G. 

Sgt. Jess Ford, C. G. 

Corp. Mike Rouchena, C. G. 

Sgt. Wm. G. Hunter, C. G. 

Corp. Floyd C. Hanson, C. G. 

Sgt. Severin Setter, C. G. 

Sgt. Ralph W. Bock, C. G. 

Sgt. Forest Touton, C. G. 

Pvt. Id. Phil Case, C.G. 

Pvt. Icl. John Anton Staudingor, 0. G. 

Pvt. lei. John Bonneville, C. G. 



305 



fJiM flllRTY- SECOND DlVtSIOiX JN THE WORLt) WAR 



l28tii iNFANTliY— Continued. 



^vt. ](1. Hilton E. Pressi'l; C. G. 

('orp. Mack Diulley, C. G. 

t'orp. Joseph Polandj C (3. 

Corp. drover Jones, C G. 

Corp. Martin L. Kukliuski, CO. 

Pvt. Joseph Mattrass, C. G. 

Sgt. John Peters, C. G. 

Sgt. Frank Murphy, C. G. 

Sgt. Geo. V. Banann, U. G. 

Sgt. Ernest P. Coleman, C. G. 

Sgt. Kov Meadows, C. G. 

Sgt. James K. Briggs, C. G. 

Sgt. Max A. Draheim, C. G. 

Pvt. Michael Kenipin.ski, (?. G. 

I'vt. Thos. L. Lawton, C. G. 

('orp. Carl Koutnik, C. G. 

Corp. John Nelson, C. 0. 

Cook Benjamin J. Bradshaw, CO. 

Pvt. Joseph W. Powell, C. G. 

Pvt. Wm. J. Hilt, C. G. 

Pvt. Frank J. Bell, C. G. 

Pvt. Paul Pichler, C. G. 

Pvt. Chas. E. Coulin, C. G. 

Bandmaster Webster G. Needles, C. 0. 

Pvt. Arnold E. Erling, Jr., C. G. 

Pvt. Albert Peralta, C. G. 

Pvt. Rov Marlev, C. Q. 

Pvt. Floyd W. Sieber, C. G. 

Pvt. Ravmond Genicke, C. G. 

Sgt. Roilin B. Curtiss, C. G. 

Sgt. Robert S. Finkle, C. G. 

Sgt. Arthur R. Klein, C. G. 

Sgt. Louis E. Wilpolt, C. G. 

Sgt. Arthur Streieh, C. G. 

Sgt. Christ Christianson, C. G. 

Corp. John Maciejwski, C. G. 

Corp. Chester Kromer, C. G. 

Corp. Russell Smith, C. G. 



Corp. Walter Thomas, C. G. 
Corp. Frank A. Southworthj C. G; 
Corp. Harvey C. Bohn, C. O. 
Corji. John Horvath, C. G. 
Corj). Erwin A. Olson, C. G. 
Cor]). John Junk, C. G. 
Corp. .\lphonsus Cavanaugh, C. G. 
Corp. Cecil E. Lolmaugh, C. G. 
Corp. Lloyd Mosier, C. 0. 
Cori). Mike Jankowski, C. Q. 
Corp. Edwin A. Cable, C. 0. 
Corji. Mvrl O. Piatt, C. G. 
Pvt. Id. Archie Black, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Mike Gentino, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Dominick Geomo, C. G. 
Pvt. Lvnn Blossom, C. G. 
Sgt. Edward Becker, V. G. 
Sgt. Geo. B. Schultz, (;. G. 
Sgt. Elmer Evcnson, C. G. 
Sgt. Harrv Peterson, C. G. 
Sgt. Han-is A. Hallenbeck, CO. 
Sgt. Earl A. Goldsmith, C. O. 
Sgt. Clarke A. Trimble, C. G. 
Sgt. Chas. Gislason, C. G. 
Sgt. Clyde B. McAnlev, C. G. 
Sgt. Emil P. Kabat, C. G. 
Sgt. Irving Roberts, C. O. 
Sgt. Adolph Knutson, C. G. 
Corp. Carl L. Curnow, C. G. 
Pvt. Clarence G. Ston, C. G. 
Pvt. Geo. W. Langhan, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Geo. L. Croce, C. G. 
Pvt. Pete Anderson, C. G. 
Corp. Peter L. Dimouich, C. G. 
Pvt. Clvde E. Howell, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Wm. O. Morgan, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Donald Swartout, C. G. 
Corp. James P. Ewing, C. G. 



121st MAL'lilNE GUK BATTALION. 



Lt. Col. Dan. L. Remington, C. G. 
Capt. John C. Graham, C. G. 
Capt. John G. Brunkhorst, C. G. 
('apt. John McCullum, Jr., C. G. 
Lt. Austin A. Peterson, C. G. 
Lt. Daniel M. Erickson, C. G. 
Lt. Allen S. Harrison, C. G. 
1st Sgt. Paul J. Gaston, C. G. 
Sgt. Herman Korth, C. G. 
Sgt. Jos. D. Phelan, C. G. 



Sgt. Elmer C. Aune, C. G. 
Sgt. Jos. Halter, C. G. 
Corp. Wm. A. Stone, C. G. 
Corp. Nathan Wilson, C. C. 
Pvt. Icl. Jacob Tautges, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Albin C. Ness, C. G. 
Pvt. Richard Blumke, C. G. 
Pvt. Francis J. Dunn, C. G. 
Pvt. Sillas F. Wallen, C. G. 
Pvt. Donald 0. Hume, C. G. 



119th machine gun BATTALION. 



Major Wm. \. McCulock, C. G. 
Capt. Edw. S. Reynolds, C. G. 



Bugler Orvillo Schcffner, C. G. 
Pvt. Robert J. Coey, C. G. 



306 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE DECORATIONS 



32nd military POLICE COMPANY. 



L'lid Lt. Fred J. Mattingly, C. G. 
Sgt. Chas. E. Walker, (J. G. 
Mess Sgt. Norman Sever, V. G. 
Pvt. Edw. Freidel, C. G. 



Pvt. Paul M. Wcdviek, C. G. 
Pvt. Harrv R. Eavburn, C. G. 
Pvt. Eay b. May, G. G. 
Pvt. Harry M. Bently, C. G. 



Kirxii EXGIXEERS. 



Name. 
Colonel L. H. Callan, C. G. 
Lt. Col. C. S. Smith, G. G. 
Major Edgar C. Barnes, C. 6. 
Major R. A. Loveland, C. G. 
Major James W. Shaw, C. G. 
Capt. Sinclair H. Lorain, C. G. 
Capt. Arthur Knowles, C. G. 
Capt. Harold B. Schmidt, G. G. 
Capt. C. U. Smith, C. G. 
Capt. T. Dodson Stamps, C. G. 
Lt. Heurv H. Hart, C. G. 
Lt. Andrew T. Sweet, C. G. 
Lt. Robert H. Sauds, C. G. 
2nd Lt. Chas. Hemberger, C. G. 
2nd Lt. James Stanley Cotton, C. G. 
2nd Lt. Wm. N. Pcarce, C. G. 
Master Engr. Chas. F. Akin, C. G. 
Master Engr. A. Bartlett King, C. G. 
Sgt. Wm. A. Hartman, C. G. 



Name. 
Sgt. Frederick C. Brown, C. G. 
Sgt. LeRoy S. Barber, C. G. 
Sgt. Lester H. Edwards, C. G. 
Sgt. Roland B. Hackiu, C. G. 
Sgt. Robert M. Hoagg, C. G. 
Sgt. Cliff Hendrickson, C. G. 
Sgt. Albert J. Jackson, C. G. 
Sgt. Howard R. Winterbottom C. G. 
Sgt. Jean A. Thibeau, C. G. 
Sgt. Lawrence W. Evins, C. G. 
Sgt. Elmer J. Jestila, C. G. 
Sgt. Harold S. Brown, C. G. 
Corp. Raymond W. Hackett, C. G. 
Corp. Wm. A. Ward, C. G. 
Corp. Wm. J. La Plante, C. G. 
Corp. Wallace L. Anderson, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Jerry L. Allen, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Wm. P. Murphy, C. G. 
Pvt. Id. Hans P. Christensen, C. G. 



lOr-ni FIELD SIGNAL BATTALION. 



Lt. Col. Wm. Mitchell Lewis, C. G. 

Lt. Elmer G. Meyer, C. G. 

Sgt. John Lamb, C. G. 

Sgt. John W. Dollar, C. G. 

Sgt. Warham A. Kuehlthau, C. G. 

Sgt. Icl. Ivan L. Allen, C. G. 

Sgt. Louis G. Komarek, C. G. 



Sgt. Frank A. Mateja, C. G. 
Corp. Wafford Dry, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Harry D. Hunter, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Frank E. Root, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Ernest E. Ross, C. G. 
Pvt. Peter J. Proten, C. G. 
Pvt. Elmer G. Weller, C. G. 



l-iTTH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT. 

(41st U. S. Div.) 

Attached to 33nd Division, American E.xpeditionary Force. 



Colonel Boyd Wales, C. G. 

Capt. Richard A. Dorcr, C. G. 

Capt. Thos. W. Watson, C. G. 

Capt. Geo. F. Weber, C. G. 

1st. Lt. Arthur Bergstrom, C. G. 

1st Lt. Wallace Burton, C. G. 

1st Lt. James Gay, C. G. 

1st Lt. Alvin M. Knutson, C. G. 

2nd Lt. I-awrence I. Champe, C. G. 

Sgt. Solomon Hov, C. 6. 

Sgt. Earl C. Kicselhorst, C. G. 

Sgt. Avres H. Larrabce, C. G. 

Sgt. David Lew, C. G. 

Sgt. Warren L. Cooper, C. G. 

Sgt. Leo L. Dcnbo, C. G. 

Sgt. Edward Hardy, C. G. 

Sgt. James H. Heffron, C. G. 

Sgt. Thos. E. Pitts, C. G. 



Sgt. Francis W. Rollins, C. G. 
Sgt. Floyd R. Young, C. G. 
Musician Carl W. Bahr, C. G. 
Musician Wilbur B. Koplitz, C. G. 
Corp. Wm. MacMalion, C. G. 
Corp. Clifford E. Pole, C. G. 
Corp. Frank B. IJitchey, C. G. 
Corp. Arthur J. Anderson, C. G. 
Corp. Arlo W. Bredberg, C. G. 
Corp. Frederick G. Bunch, C. G. 
Corp. Chas. M. Dalbv, C. G. 
Corp. Rov E. Dunn, C. G. 
Corp. Nclles K. Egner, C. G. 
Corj). Earl Henderson, C. G. 
Corp. Pliilip T. Lee, C. G. 
Coqj. Ernest C. Lord, C. G. 
Corp. Geo. Meats, C.G. 
Corp. Edgar C. Morford, C. G. 



307 



THE TniTiTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WOULD WM! 



lirxH FIELD Airi'lLLKliY KKGlMExNT— Continued. 



Corp. P^aiik C. MacClaffin, C. U. Pvt. 

Corp. Lars Sand, G. G. Pvt. 

Corp. Koy C. Stone, C. G. Pvt. 

Corp. O.scar Voyen, C. G. Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. Arthur Anderson, C. G. Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. Harlev Gamber, C. G. Pvt. 

Pvt. Icl. Homer Heath, C. G. Pvt. 

Pvt. Id. Walter W. Jennerjahn, C. G. Pvt. 

Pvt. lei. Harry A. Millener, C. G. Pvt. 



Icl. Walter MacCruin, C. G. 
Ul. llumert ('. MaeGeo, C. G. 
lei. Carl L. I'itt.s, V.. G. 
Icl. Ernest L. Reek, C. G. 
lei. Chas. E. Stoddard, C. G. 
Icl. Donald A. Young, C. G. 
Geo. Kongle, C. O. 
Carlyle Ogders, C. G. 
Ernest A. iStauffacher, C. G. 



Driver James .\. Norton, 0. G. 
Pvt. lei. Walter .). Raleigh, C. G 



iu:xii AM.ULXiTlOX 'ilLVlX. 

Pvt. Id. John F. Shedlewski, C. G. 



57th field artillery BRIGADE. 
Major James Gilsoii, C. G. 

322nd FIELD Aim LI,KI;Y K'KC I M K,\T 
Pvt. tTiban V. Craft, Hq. Co., C. G. 



120th FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT. 

Priv. Theodore Janssen, C. G. 



Capt. Miles D. Cottingham, C. G 
1st Lieut. Thomas J. Uhl, C. G. 



IOTth SANITARY TRAIN. 



Capt. Geo. B. Beach, C. G. 
Sgt. Carl H. Smith, C. G. 
Pvt. Icl. Wm. Cline, C.G. 
Pvt. Id. l)i,k Hamstra, C.G. 



Pvt. Id. Wm. M. Koehler, C. G. 

Pvt. Id. Ivazimier Mareinkowski, C. G. 

Pvt. Id. John Hall, C.G. 



BELGIAN DECORATIONS. 

2nd Lt. Edgar A. Jennings, Co. M, lenth Inf. Belgian War Cross. 

Sgt. Horace H. Cole, Co. B, 12.-,th Inf. Chevalier of the Order of Leopold II. 

Bugler Geo. Deeaire, Co. G. Belgian Militarv Dec. 

Corp. Morris D. Mist, Co. A, 12.5th Inf. Roigian Militarv Dec. 

Corp. Wm. B. Bell, Co. I, 125th Inf. Belgian War Cross." 

Capt. James MacNiekam Wilson, 126th Inf. Decoration of Chevalier of the National Order. 

Sgt. Geo. Kinaldi, Co. G, 126th Inf. Chevalier of the Order of Leopold II. 

Sgt. Lyman T. Covcll, Co. L, 126th Inf. Chevalier of the Order of Leopold XL 



308 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE DECORATIONS 



DIVISION CITATIONS. 



HEADQUARTERS, 32nd DIVISION. 



Sgt. William A. Jauk. 

Sgt. EiiuTsou B. Wood. 

Pvt. Icl. Fred Ten Hoore. 

Bat. Sgt. Major Francis E. Prokop. 

Pvt. lei. Dave N. Piersou. 

Army Field Clerk Frank Milaui. 

Army Field Clerk Robert L. Jacobs;in. 

Pvt. John Abraham Blomster. 

Corp. Fred A. Yeager. 

Bat. Sgt. Major John J. Chisholm. 

Bat. Sgt. Major Peter P. Walsh. 

Pvt. Dewit Bonebrake. 

Pvt. John E. Collins. 

Pvt. Niels C. Anderson. 

Pvt. Icl. Class Edwin P. (.libson. 

Beg. Sgt. Major Peter Johnson. 

Pvt. Icl. Stuart A. Wendell. 

Keg. Sgt. Major Joseph M. Noll. 

Pvt. Icl. John P. Mallow. 

Bat. Sgt. Major Joseph H. Hacbig. 

Bat. Sgt. Major Irl F. Bratten. 

Army Field Clerk George W. Carnev. 

1st Lt. E. K. Barr. 

Bat. Sgt. Major Barnard T. Campb.dl. 

Sgt. Hy Mulianey. 

Sgt. Martin Hendricks. 

Sgt. Joseph Dirmeier. 

Pvt. Icl. John N. Schaack. 

Pvt. Icl. Henry W. Thompson. 

Sgt. Hilding Olson. 

Sgt. Julian Ramsey. 

Pvt. Icl. James Harland Hyde. 

Wag. Wm. K. McLaggan. 

Pvt. Icl. Clyde W. Albright. 

Pvt. Ole Matson. 

Horseshoer Roy J. Fuller. 

Corp. Joseph G. Rogers. 

Pvt. Icl. Elmer J. Nygaard. 

Pvt. Fav A. Raefsnyder. 

Pvt. Melville Rhodes. 

Wag. Gordon T. Gee. 

Wag. .■\nders Kolberg. 

Wag. Mavnard B. Reed. 

Wag. Harry T. Gnat. 

Wag. James H. Ellis. 



Wag. Nisholas Kenp. 
Wag. Robert I. Kniitson. 
Wag. Fred D. Miles. 
Wag. Ora Sands, 
Wag. Charles B. Hill. 
Pvt. Icl. Lewis 1). Adams. 
Pvt. Stanley Zukowski. 
Pvt. Martin T. Thoreson. 
Pvt. Icl James D. Blythin. 
Pvt. William C. Northamer. 
Sgt. Warren B. Niles. 
Lt. Colonel Frank H. Fowler. 
Capt. LeRoy Pearson. 
Capt. Daniel D. Thompson. 
1st Lt. Frederick F. Malloy. 
Colonel Harold C. Fisk. 
Colonel Jerome G. Pillow. 
Lt. Col. John H. Howard. 
Lt. Colonel Paul B. Clemens. 
Major Fred C. Best. 
Capt. Carl Hanton. 
Capt. Charles F. Bo wen. 
Lt. Col. Charles R. Williams. 
Lt. Col. James R. Scott. 
Lt. Col. John Scott. 
Lt. Col. Wm. Mitchell Lewis. 
Lt. Col. James A. Howell. 
Major Joseph E. Barzyinski. 
Major Robert Connor. 
Major William Woodlief. 
Major Thomas E. Blood. 
Major Charles R. Harrison. 
Major Luther G. Beckwith. 
Major Lewis A. Moore. 
Major Amos H. Ashley. 
Major Alexander W. Fhiegel. 
Major Edward T>. Arnold. 
Capt. Walter M. Gaudynski. 
Capt. .John A. Crandall. 
Capt. Fred B. Rhyner. 
Capt. W'illiam .J. Niederprnem. 
Cai)t. William .1. Brennan. 
Capt. Harvey F. Wiles, 
l.st. Lt. Harold J. Lance. 
Capt. Robert L. Wiley. 



107th engineers. 



Regimental Sergeant Major Walter Belau. 
Master Engineer, Sr. Grade, Samuel E. 

Johnson. 
Master Engineer, Sr. Grade, Roy O. Papen- 

thicn. 



Bat. Sgt. Major Norman L. Johnso 
1st Sgt. Arthur F. Miller. 
Sgt. Id. Melvin W. Dock. 
Sgt. Michael P. Marino. 
Colonel Luke H. Callan. 



309 



The THtRfY- second division in the world war 



lOr-ni SAiXITAHY TKAIX. 



Major Wiliiam Johnston. 
Capt. Luther N. Schnetz. 
Capt. Harry W. tiargeaut. 
C'apt. William J. Ilanlcy. 
Wagoner Frank F. Howe. 
Major John A. Sullivan. 
Capt. Haymoud L. Keuney. 
Capt. William J. Eynearson. 



Corp. Carl C. Ulave. 
Corp. Thomas McAneuy. 
Wag. Earlc W. McGovern. 
Pvt. Icl. Krwin E. Carl. 
Pvt. Icl. Earle A. W. Frank. 
Pvt. Benjamin B. Cieslinski. 
Pvt. John Drury. 
l^vt. Lloyd Ueesey. 



119x11 MACHINE GUN BATTALION. 



Sgt. Evald N. Nelson. 
Pvt. Icl. Harry A. Newburv. 
Pvt. Icl. William Jonett. 
Pvt. Icl. William E. Menard. 
Mech. George H. Streeter. 



Pvt. Icl. Harry Wahl. 
Pvt. Icl. Isrcal Secular. 
Pvt. John Borysiewicz. 
Corp. Vernis K. Shuttelworth. 



VETERINARY MOBILE SECTION. 

Pvt. Icl. Alvin Madison. Pvt. Frank C. Bassett. 



128th INFANTRY. 



Capt. Leyiris J. Donovan. 
1st Lt. Edmund T. Szaskos. 
Ist Tjt. T^ee A. Brown. 
1st Lt. Talma A. Scott. 
1st Lt. James T. Harris. 
Mess Sgt. Severin Setter. 
Sgt. John L. Harris. 



Sgt. Sigwald Steen. 

Sgt. Fred Galoff. 

Sgt. Herbert L. Hadden. 

Sgt. Albert Siebers. 

Sgt. Otto Olsen. 

Sgt. Clyde O. Helgcson. 

Corp. Joseph Bruce. 



1271-11 INFANTRY. 



Colonel Russel C. Langdon. 

Capt. Stephen Boon. 

1st. Lt. Stanlev A. Jowasinski. 

1st Lt. Tolman D. Wheeler. 

2nd Lt. Rov M. Kelley. 

2nd Lt. R. E. Barelav. 

Sgt. Williard D. Purdy. 



Corp. Ruben J. Cain. 
1st Lt. John G. Purtillo. 
Sgt. Edward Krawczyk. 
Pvt. Albert R. Guernsey. 
Corp. Carl Tullberg. 
Pvt. Guy Whiteman. 
Pvt. Albert R. Guernsey. 



HEADQUARTERS G3ri) INFANTRY BRIGADE. 



1st Lt. R. G. Carter. 

1st Lt. A. C. Baltzer. 

Wag. Perce J. Cox. 

Pvt. Icl. Leon Sehenrelberg. 



Pvt. Icl. Cressio N. Johnson. 

Regt. Sgt. Major Rodney D. Schopps. 

Wag. Charles M. Wolfe. 



310 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE DECORATIONS 



120TII MACHINE GtJN BATTALION. 



Capt. Claude C. Manly. 

1st Lt. Wm. O. Chamberlain. 

1st Lt. Fred A. Dietz. 

1st Lt. Odin T. Kovelstad. 

1st Lt. Walter H. Sheup. 

1st Sgt. Loren Coon. 

!Sgt. Samuel Koutas. 

Sgt. Harry H. Peck. 

Sgt. Harold B. Schindrick. 



Sgt. Ernest C. Lylo. 
Sgt. Patrick J. Kelly. 
Sgt. Peter J. Drazage. 
Corp. Mark O. Lover. 
Corp. James C. Monroe. 
Corp. Oscar Lamliert. 
Corp. Forest D. Sherman. 
Wag. Earle T. Wood. 
Pvt. Icl. John Pontoski. 



l^dTii INFANTRY. 



Colonel Joseph B. Westnedge. 

Major James T. Potter. 

Capt. Charles R. M.yers. 

Capt. Otto K. Budder. 

Capt. Fred W. Jamoska. 

Capt. Roscoe L. Graves. 

Capt. William Haze. 

Capt. Joseph A. McDonald. 

Capt. Burton P. Harrison. 

1st Lt. C. H. Modie. 

1st Lt. John E. DeVall. 

1st. Lt. George H. Bunnell. 

1st Lt. Patrick Sweeney. 

2nd Lt. Donald E. Perr'y. 

Regt. Sgt. Major MiUoii K. Abell. 

Bn. Sgt. Major John M. Lofstrora. 

1st Sgt. David Carpe. 

1st Sgt. Wm. Owen. 

2nd Lt. Joseph A. Sobie. 

Sgt. Icl. Benjamin S. Beck. 

Supply Sgt. Arthur E. Hawks. 

Mess Sgt. Herman P. Cuser. 

Sgt. John G. Fowle. 

Sgt. George Einaldi. 



Sgt. Cornelius J. Vonk. 
Sgt. Frank M.Townsend. 
Sgt. Lvman T. Covell. 
Sgt. Roy Webster. 
Sgt. Theodore Kutschinski. 
Sgt. Russell A. Fuller. 
Sgt. Part A. Dove. 
Sgt. Paul E. Slauthter. 
Sgt. Hei'al Gardiner. 
Sgt. Harry A. Smith. 
Sgt. Bausome Garter. 
Sgt. John DeBoer. 
Corjj. Banrcll C. Carr. 
Corp. Lewis Hudson. 
Corp. Jerrold B. Thomson. 
Mech. Cuthbert Couryner. 
Mech. Phillip R. Vaney. 
Mech. Erik Vettergren. 
Pvt. Wilson M. Stirdivant. 
Pvt. George S. Downing. 
Pvt. Isidoro Vissillo. 
Pvt. Charles A. Carlon. 
Pvt. Walter Rhenow. 



125th infantry. 



Colonel Edward G. Heckel. 
Major Augustus H. Gansser. 
Capt. Charles A. Learned. 
1st Lt. Charles Giles. 
1st Lt. Dudlev P. Rannev. 
1st Lt. Wm. H. Rust. 
2nd Lt. William Ward. 
Bn. Sgt. Major Lyle C. Pratt. 
1st Sgt. Wm. B. Scheffler. 
Sgt. Emery Hawks. 
Sgt. Guy L. Young. 
Sgt. Herbert B. Collins. 
Sgt. William Wines. 
Sgt. Aaron L. Gensiver. 
Sgt. Napoleon J. Beaune. 
Sgt. Darwin D. Martin. 
Sgt. Lawrence LaPorte. 
Corp. Morris D. Mist. 
Corp. Ernest O'Brien. 
Corp. Michael Coyne. 
Corp. Wm. H. Emmick. 
Corp. Leonard A. Unson. 
Corp. Archie J. Finley. 



Corp. Clyde C. Martinson. 
Corp. Joseph Frommert. 
Mech. Christian G. Stillmeyer. 
Pvt. Icl. James A. Brennan. 
Pvt. lol. Chester Smith. 
Pvt. Icl. Robert J. Ahearn. 
Pvt. Icl. Fred W. Kalkbrenner. 
Pvt. Icl. Anton Marehiaudo. 
Pvt. Icl. James S. Palmer. 
Pvt. Angus Teeple. 
Pvt. Alfred B. Anderson. 
Pvt. Charles Reifschneider. 
Pvt. John Redmond. 
Pvt. Hugh Laughlin. 
Pvt. Donald A. Smith. 
Pvt. Walter Bastedo. 
Pvt. Marcus Amiijo. 
Pvt. Samuel Williams. 
Pvt. Elmer A. Brashaw. 
Pvt. Alva Cook. 
Pvt. John Adams. 
Pvt. Wm. Fleming. 



311 



THE THIRTY- SECOND DIVISION IN THE WORLD WAR 



107111 SUri'LY TEAIN. 



C'ori). Lynn S. Savage, 
('orp. Henry M. Rider. 
Sgt. Vernon Kelly. 
Corp. Simon P. Hilebranclt. 
Sgt. Hilton A. Doege. 
Sgt. Thomas Weir. 
I'vt. Jo-sepli Bizunowicz. 
Sgt. Dayton C. Baldwin. 
Corp. Guy Wiseman. 
Corp. David M. Rickerd. 
Corp. Harry P. Vanderburg. 
Corp. Sigmund Kudlieki. 
Pvt. led. Dale D. V. Whitnev. 



Corp. Simon P. Hillebrandt. 
Corp. Joseph (jildcrs. 
Pvt. John Baniszewski. 
Corp. Kdward l'\ Paul. 
Pvt. Walter E. Taylor. 
(Jorp. Frank I'olomarcs. 
Corp. Riidiard Tlioniton. 
Corp. Albert J. Krause. 
Pvt. Merle G. Vantassel. 
Corp. Roy E. Pottle. ' 
Pvt. Herman H. Seeley. 
Sgt. Galen D. Mover. 
Sgt. George A. Borgenhelmer. 



n9Tii FIELD .\RTILLERY. 

1st I.t. Milton Shaw, M. C, San. Det. 119th F. A. 

1st Lt. William E. Wilson, M. C, San. Det. 119th P. A. 

2nd Lt. Llovd C. Beaton, n9th F. A. (Dec'd). 

Sgt. Glenn J. Brook, 297.152, Batt. C, 119th F. A. 

Sgt. Jesse A. Lamson, 2969,30. Hq. Co., 119th F. A. 

Sgt. Bearl V. Pittinger, 297481, Hq. Co., 119th F. A. 

Sgt. Lee H. Crippen, 2973.50, Batt. C, 11 9th F. A. 

Sgt. Harold D. Graham, 197199, Batt. F, 119th F. A. 

Sgt. Archie C. Norris, 296927, llq. Co., 119th F. A. 

Sgt. Robert Elliott, 297494, Batt. I), 119th F. A. 

Sgt. Benjamin E. Hartsig, 29747.''), Batt. D, 119th F. A. 

Corp. Raymond H. Moore, 297706, Batt. E, 119th F. A. 

Corp. Pare M. Thomas, 2969.=i6, Hq. Co., 119th F. A. 

Corp. Joseph M. Lambert, 297401, Batt. C, 119th F. A. 

Cook Carl M. Marietta, 297452, Batt. C, 119th F. A. 

Cook Claude V. Jack, 297445, Batt. C, 119th F. A. 

Pvt. Thomas R. McBride, 297566, Batt. D, 119th F. A. 

Pvt. lei. Charles Sieger, 297657, Batt. E, 119th F. A. 

Pvt. Walter W. Holt, 1634070, Batt. D, 119th F. A. 

Pvt. Jesse Sawver, 297580, Batt. D, 119th F. A. 

Pvt. Id. William J. Christie, 46.11, San. Dot., 119th F. A. 

Pvt. Guy S. Gongwer, 4117, San. Det., 119th F. A. 

Pvt. James R. Jollie, 626.532, Batt. D, 119th F. A. 

Pvt. Robert D. Chisholm, 828050, Batt. C, 119th F. A. 

Pvt. Wilbur E. Schaefer, 14.34933, Batt. C, 119th F. A. 

Pvt. John E. Feighner, 4118, San. Dot., 119th F. A. 

Pvt. Id. George R; Koopman, 297784, Hq. Co., 119th F. A. 

Meeh. Orville J. Collins, 1435704, Batt. D, 119th F. A. 



312 



ABBREVIATIONS AND MILITARY TERMS. 

A. E. F Amcricau Expeditionary Forces. 

Axis of Liaison The line on which telephone, telegrapli lines or other means of 

communication are to be extended. 

A. C. I Advance Center of Information. A point in advance of a Post of 

Command, designated in orders, where messages and information 
may be sent. 

Barrage A wall or curtain of fire, fired by artillery or machine guns. 

Brig Brigade. 

Bn. Battalion. 

Bound A word used in French Orders — ' ' to advance by bounds ' ' mean- 
ing advancing in regulated distances according to a schedule. 

Btry Battery. An artillery unit corresponding to a company of in- 
fantry. 

Bridge Head The holding of a sufficient amount of territory on the enem}' side 

of a river to enable friendly troops to construct bridges and 
cross, or cross troops on bridges already built. 

Bus Move A move of troops by motor. A Bus is a covered motor truck 

with seats along each side and accommodating from 18 to 30 
men each. The French call a truck a "camion." The British 
call it a "lorry." 

"Bucks " Private soldiers. 

Bois The French word for Wood or Woods. 

Casualty A man or animal, killed, wounded or missing in action. 

Co Company. 

C. O Commanding Officer. 

Col Colonel. 

C. G Commanding General. 

Cote The French word for Hill. 

C. of S Chief of Staff. 

D-Day The day an attack or movement is to takQ place. Generally men- 
tioned in secret orders which can be prepared long in advance 
of the day of an action. When the proper time for the attack 
arrives, notice is sent out that D-Day for the attack prescribed 
in such and such an order -nill be 4 July 1918 — for example. 
(The same definition for H-Hour- except that the hour is named 
instead of the Day). For example, H-Hour and D-Day will be 
5:30 A. M. 4 July"l9]8. 

Dump .' A designated place for the storage or assembling of rations, 

forage, aninuinition or other supplies. 

Div Division. 

Dug In or Dig In The construction of individual shelters — "fox" or "funk" 

holes. 

D. S Detached Service. 

Evacuate To send back. Evacuating the wounded means sending them to 

hospitals or dres.sing stations in rear of the firing line. Sick 
men are counted as "evacuations" but not as ■" casualties. " 

Eng Engineer. 

Field Tn Field Train. 

F. A Field Artillery. 

F. Field Order — Orders issued in the Fiidd. 

Fox H(de An individual shelter, generally a hole in the ground in the side 

of a hill, ditch or embankment away from the enemy. 

Funk Hole Same as a fox hole. 

Fcrme The French word for Farm. 

G. S General Staff. 

313 



Tilt: TIIIUTY-SEGONl) DIV/SIOX IN THE WORLD WAR 

U-l The first section of the General Staff; the section having the 

administration, supply and coordination of all the services of an 
organization. 

G-2 The second section of the General Staff; the section which col- 
lects all information of the enemy, and produces and distributes 
maps. 

G-3 The third section of the General Staff; the section responsible 

for the training of an organization and of its operation during 
combat. 

G. H. Q The General Headquarters of the American Expeditionary 

Forces. 

"IIommes40 Chevaux 8 ". .On nearly all French box cars, this phrase is painted. It means 

that the capacity of the car is 40 men or 8 horses. 

IIHour See definition to D-Day. 

\r> Hours The system of designating time in the French Army and adopted 

by us. By its use, it is unnecessary to state A. M. or P. M. 
thereby eliminating possible mistakes; — 1.5 hours may be easily 
understood as 3 P. M. or 23:30 Hours as 11:30 P. M. 

Hq Headquarters. 

H Plus 3 hours Three hours after an attack commences. 

Inf Infantry. 

Infirmary Where medical treatment is rendered to minor cases of illness or 

injury. A First Aid station, etc. 

I. D French designation for the Infantry troops of a division. An 

Infantry division is abl>reviated I). I. Thus the 32nd D. I. U. S. 
is the Thirty-Second American Infantry Division. 

Jump Off Line A lino from which the Infantry launches an attack. 

J. A Judge Advocate. Tlie Staff Ofiicer having charge of legal 

matters. 

"Kricniliilde Stellung" ...The name of a strong German ])osition; the main line of resist- 
ance corresponding to the Hindenburg Line. By ' ' position ' ' is 
meant a line of prei)ared trenches, in front of which were masses 
of strong wire entanglements to obstruct the advance of our 
troops. 

Kamerad The German term for ' ' I surrender." 

Km Kilometer. In France and Germany distances are measured by 

kilometers instead of miles. A kilometer is five-eighths of a mile. 

Liaison Communication. "Liaison was good" means the transmission 

of messages and information was rapid and satisfactory. 
"Getting in liaison with the Division on our right" means that 
the Division Commander or his agent had visited the Division 
on our right and tliat the plans of both organizations had been 
discussed — or in other words, each was made familiar with the 
plans of the other. 

Lieut Col Lieutenant Colonel. 

Machine Gun Nest Several machine guns in different locations but in close prox- 
imity to each other. 

MM Millimeter (.039 of an inch). The term used in describing the 

caliber of artillery pieces. — French 7,5s, German 77s, French 
155s, etc. 

M. S. T. U Motor Supply Truck Unit. A truck repair shop. 

M. O. E. S Mobile Ordnance Repair Shop. A repair shop for rei)airing 

artillery, small arms and other ordnance. 

M. P Military Police. 

M. C Medical Corps. 

M. D Medical Department. 

M. G Machine Gun. 

M. T. O Motor Transportation Officer. 

"Minnie" The nickname for the German ininnenwerfcr — a trencli mortar. 

N. G National Guard. 

N. A. National Army. 

^ Rn -7.6 



ABBREVIATIONS AND MILITARY TERMS 

Non-Coms Non-Commissioued Officers. 

N. C. O Non-Commissioned Officer. 

No Man's Land The land between the trenches of opposing forces. 

O. P Observation Post. A post from which tlie movements or actions 

of the enemy are observed. 

Objective Successive lines which troops are to take or advance to accord- 
ing to schedule. 

"Over the Top" The phrase used by troops in describing their start to an attack. 

(Over the top of the trench.) 

O. I) Olive Drab. 

O. O Operation Officer. Ordnance officer. 

P. C Post of Command. Sometimes the same place as the Head- 
quarters of an organization. Generally in combat the head- 
quarters, the supply and administrative branch, is left behind in 
some convenient place where it can function without annoyance 
from the enemy, while the Commanding Officer, with part of his 
staff, go forward to be nearer the front line that he may better 
direct the operations. This forward location or Headquarters 
is called the Post of Command, or P. C. 

Poilu A private in the French Army; the French doughboy. 

Panels A piece of white cloth, or paper, used to signal from the ground 

to an airplane. Carried by the infantry. When a friendly air- 
plane flies over and calls for the signal, the panels are shown. 
The observer in the plane marks their location on his map, flies 
back and drops the map at headquarters, thus locating the front 
line. 

P. W. E Prisoner of War Enclosure. 

Q. M. C Quartermaster Corps. 

Runner A messenger. 

R. H Railhead. A railway station where the replacements and sup- 
plies of a camp or Division are received from warehouses in the 
rear. 

Replacements Men, animals or material sent forward to replace those killed, 

wounded, or broken and worn out. 
Ration The food for one man or one animal for one day. For example, 

1000 rations means food for 1000 men for one day. 

R. T. O Railway Transportation Officer. 

R. L. O Regimental Liaison Officer. 

S. O. S Service of. Supply, fonnerly known as the Line of Communica- 
tions. The service responsible for the supply of all troops of an 
army. 

Sanitary Train The Medical Organization of a Division, Corps or Army. It con- 
sists, in a Division, principally of four Ambulance Companies 
and four field hospitals. 

Sector A section or area alloted to and occupied by an Army, Army 

Corps, Division, Brigade, Regiment or other organization. 

"In Square so-and-so- "... A kilometer square referred to on a map. French maps are 

generally laid off in kilometer squares to facilitate the reading 
of co-ordinate. In sending messages, it was sometimes easier to 
refer to some woods or a cross road "in Square 64" than to 
name the co-ordinates. 

S. C Signal Corps. 

Triage The French term for a casualty Clearing Station, where the 

casualties were classified as "transportable," "non-transport- 
able," and "slightly wounded, not to be evacuated." 

Take off line A line or position from which an attack is to be launched. 

Tn Train. 

T. S. F Radio or wireless telegrajihy. 

T. P. 8 Earth telegraphy. 



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