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Full text of "History of Montcalm County, Michigan its people, industries and institutions...with biographical sketches of representative citizens and genealogical records of many of the old families"

HISTORY 

OF 



Montcalm County 

MICHIGAN 

ITS PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS 
BY 

JOHN W. DASEF 



With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and 
Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



1916 

B. F. BOWEN & COMPANY, Inc. 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



3 0000 002 234 544 

LIBRARY OF MICHIGAN 



CONTENTS 



VOLUME I 

cit.\pti':r j— (;E()r.()(]u:.\T. axd I'livsrcAi. characteristics 33 

Surface Fraturcs — Altitudes — Streams — l^akes — l-'irst Correction Line — Rock 
Formations — Terminal Moraines — ^Glacial Drifts — Effect of Fakes on Tem- 
perature — I'LKtremcs of 'i'emperature — The Growintx Season — Rainfall — Coal 
Deposits— Types of Soil— Area— Improved Land. 

CHAl'TiCR II— ORCFWIZATIOX OI" MONTCALM e:()rXTY 43 

Adoption of First Constitutions by State — iMrst Settlement of State — Prin- 
cipal Facts C'oucernino l'~ormation of State — Legislative Act Creating Mont- 
calm I'ounty — The First Settlers — Montcalm Township — First Election and 
h'irst Officers — I'irst Assessment lt)r Taxation — Montcalm ("oimty Enabling 
Act — Its Xame — County lUjard of Si.pervisors — Apportionment of Taxes, 
1S50 — Real and Personal Property Valuations — F^irst Land Entry in County 
— Other I'irst Invents — Location of the County Seat— Beginning of Rivalry- - 
i'irst Court House at Stanton — Bond Issue for Present Court House— l^xcit- 
ing Contest — Description of County Buildings — Care of the Poor. 

CHAPTER HI — F.FL\TDERJ': TOWXSHIP 60 

Location — Boundaries — ( )rganization — First Election— First Officers — Soil — 
Drainage — Land Entries — Early Settlements— F'irst Schools — Sumnerville — 
Six Lakes. 

CHAPTER I V— BLOOMER TOWXSHIP ..__ 00 

Organization — First Election — Xatural Features — h'.arly Settlement Tardy — 
X'aming the Township — Assessment Roll for 1S.S2 — Original Land Purchas- 
ers — Early Settlements — The Miner F'amib' — An Early Visit to Crystal Lake 
— Pioneers — Early Events — Carson City— Its Settlement, Growth and Busi- 
ness Enterprises — Statistics — Country C'ontrihutary to Carson City — Char- 
acteristic h'eatmrs of the Town — i'rominent Citizens of Other Days — City 
Of^cials— Butterni,;. 

CHAPTER V— BCSHXFI ;, TOWXSHIP ____ 84 

( )rganizati()n — First 1'Jei.tion and Officers C'hosen — Location of Township 
and Boundaries— Xatural Features — Original Land Entries— Early Settle- 
ments — First Crops — .\ Bear Hunt— An F'-nglish Immigrant — h'irst Events in 
the Township— A Long-draw .out Suit for a Gun— Vickeryville. 






CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER VI— CATC) TOWNSl-fir _. .-- 95 

Original Location — I'ctition for Creation of — I'lvst Election — Natural I'Va- 
liires— Naming;- of the 'I'ownsliip—OriKMnal Land Entries— Settlement— First 
Orchard— Knot Maul— The Canal from Tamarack Lake— Classes of Men in 
the Lumber Camjis — Village of Lakcxievv — Early Events in the Locality — 
Business Interests — Hass Beach. 

CHAPTER VTI— CRYSTAL TOWXSHIP 107 

Petition for Creation of (he Township — Location and I'.onndaries — X'atural 
Features— Original f-and Entries— Settlement of the Tovvn>hi])— I ncidents— 
Crystal ViliaRC — Notable Characteristics — Business Interests. 

CHAPTER Vill -DAY TOWNSHIP - 118 

Location and Boundaries — Creation .>f the Township — Us Name — First ITec- 
tion — Land Entries — Early Settlements— Village of McBride — Wcstvillc — 
C'uster. 

CHAPTI'.K' IX— DOlAii.ASS 'i'OWNSHir 124 

Location — I'etition for ICrection of the Township — hirst l''.lec(ioii — ! .and 
Entries— Pioneers <if the Townshi() — ]'-.ntrican— Point Richards. 

CHA1>TER X— ELREKA TOWNSHIP 130 

One oi the Original Townships of the County — Location — Name — I'irst 
Township Meetiny — Westbrook ]"Jivine— The Saxton Entry— Other Early 
Sottlers—(iretnville— Baldwin Lake Resort— Township Highways- -( )riginal 
Land Entries. 

CHAPTER XI— EVERGREEN TOWNSllll' _ . 140 

Location and l'>oundaries — Petition for Organization of the Township — 
Original Land ICntrios — I'.arly Settlenu-nts — h'irst Taxpayer -i^arly FAents-- 
Sheridan and Its i>usiness Interests — iMshvilic. 

CHAF'JM'.R XII — FAIRI'LAIN TOWNSHIP 149 

Organization of (he Township -I .ocaMon and I'.oundario.s— Natural F'eatures 
--Original Land I'.nlries - -The HainiUon Family— losepli Decker, I'ioneer— 
Land Specnialors -Residents in 1850 -I- enwick— Shanty Plains— Anisdcn. 

C11AP'F1-:R Xlll — l-"h:RRIS TOWXSHII'^ ..._ _ 161 

Description of — Petitioners for — Xatural luatures -Original Land F.ntries — 
I'irst SeltlemiMits— Rennniscc-.ces— I'crris Village. 

CHAPTER XIV— HOME TOWNSHIP 168 

ILnmdaries- -I'ctition for— h'irst Flecrion— Natural Features- Land Entries 
— Farly Settlement— .\ Destructive Fire— F.dmorc— Imi)ortant lAcnts in the 
History of tlie \'iIIage—VVyman— Cedar Lake. 

CHAPTJ'-.R XV— .MAPLE VALLFY 'LOWXSHIP 176 

Petition for the h'.rection of— l^rst I'llection- • Description of- -Original Land 



CONTF.NTS. 

Entries — wSomc of tlie i-larly SctUers— Villa^^c of Coral — Trufant — Maj^lc 
Valley— Stalhani W. Ladu. 

CHAPTER XVI— MONTCALM TOWN'SHIP 184 

The Pioneer Township of the Comity — Its (Jrganization-— h'irst i'ownship 
Meeting- Area and P.onndaries— Xatnral heature^- Land Entries— The Lin- 
coln Eamily— Other Early Settlers— Resi<lents in 1851— Gowen Village. 

CilAI^TER XVII— PTi'JKSOX TC)\VXSMIP 194 

Sitnatif)n- (dianyes in v\rea- -Present l^onndaries — Natural h'eatures — Orig- 
inal Land Entries— Early Settlements— Early Invents— Village of Pierson— 
Maple llill—Wood Lake— Whitcfish Lake— Sand Lake. 

CIlAPTE.i^ XVITl — PLXI". TOWXSH I P__.. ..__. 201 

Itonndaries — Creation of — l-'irst Officer— Soil and Othet 'atnral Featnres 
Original I-and Entries — Lnmljcring Jnterest.s — P»eginning .li Agricultiire — 
A Snccessful Kotel — I'irst Postoflice — Langston. 

CHAPTER XIX— JHCYXOLDS TOWNSHIP ZOS 

Description — Organization — Ivrst Township Meeting — Original Land Ivntries 
—Streams and Soil— Lnmbcr 1 ndu^try- Howard City— In the Olden Day.s— 
Early Seftler^ — (irowth of the Town — Disastrous Fires — Waterworks— The 
Tcnvn Today--':rhe Besemet Home— Conger. 

CILAT'TER XX— RICHLAND TOWNSHIP 222 

Organization vi the Township — Location and Pioundaries — Natural l'"eatures 
—Original Land Entries— Charles Deaner— Vestal)urg. 

CHAPTER XXI— SIDNEY TOWXSH IP 229 

Description of — Organization of — Natural P'eatures — Destructive Tornado 
and 1' ire— Early Settlements— Original Land lintries— Colby--Sidney. 

CHAPTER XXII— WTNEllCLD TOWNSHIP 239 

Descriinion of--Organization — Otiginal Land I'.ntries — Early Settlements — 
}':arly Events— Ainble. 

CHAPT.'.R XXlfl— AGRICI'I.TCRh: IX MONTCALM COCNTY 245 

Mich: an's iCink in Agricidture -MonlcalnCs hligh Rank Among Her Sister 
Counties .Ac >age and Yicdd of Potatoes —Live Stock — Crop Reports — 
Leading Potai > Markets-County h'arm Agents— County Drains— The Era 
of (Kiod Roads— McM-.tcalm Comity .\gricultnral Society -Pairs— Other Agri- 
cultural Associat ,.ns — hair aiid Races at Howard City — Organizations of 
Stock I5rccders- ^t- y of Oscar Ecnn —Montcalm County Farmers' Insti- 
tute — Conditions 'n Pioneer Days. 

CHATTER XXIA— HKill, AYS AXD TR.XXSPORTATION 265 

Natural Conditions in l'.,.'v Days— Indian Trails— Story of the Early Roads 
and TraiPs — iMrst State llouv' Lr>;;ating Some of the F'.arly Roads — Arousing 



COiNTENTS. 

Interest in Ik'tltn- I li.^lnvuys— State lliglnvay Coniniission— (h-ccnvillc G.xkI 
I\(ia(ls Commission — Internal Improvement Scheme — The I'irst Railroad — 
Financial Difficulties— Kight of Wa}- Changed to \\'a,uon Road— Present 
Kailroad Systems— rroj)osed Trolley Lines. 

C1I.\1>TER XXV— MONTCALM COl'XTY IX TllIC CI\TL WAR : 

State Troops and Enlistments from Mcnitcahn County — Brief Mention of the 
Various Commands with Which Montcalm County Men Served — Rolls of 
Enlisted Men. 

ClIAl'TI'.R XXVI— h:rn-CATl()XAL lXTERh:STS__ 

Brief History of the First Schools in Each of the Townships of the County 
— I'ounty Orj^ani/ation — Commissioner of Schools — Stanton Schools — 
Schools at Howard City and (ireenvillc. 



CiJ AFTER XXVll— ClURCll ORG.XXIZATION'S. . 

Congregational Churches — liaptist Churches — Methodist Episcopal Churches 
— h'ree Methodist Churches— (ierman Methodists — Protestant h'.pisc^jpal 
Church— Church of C:hrist— Dunkard Churches— Danish Lutheran Churches 

— Evangelical Lutheran Churches— Seventh-day Adventi.-t Church Catholic 

Churches. 



CHAPTER XXVIII — LITTI. P. DP.XMARK DAXISII lATHI-JLW C(.)XGR1-:- 

(iATlOX .-- 

Ori^ani/.ation— Early Danish Settler^— Gowen— A Journey from Denmark to 
Michigan— Kcv. ()!e Amble— A Lar,L,^e Parish— Gowen's Business Interests— 
l-'ortieth Anniversary of Rev. Amble's P:istorate. 

CIlAPTi':R XXfX— SI'.CRET SOCIETIES AXD I'RATERX ITIES _._ , 

Eree and Accepted Masons— Order of the Ivaslcrn Star — Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows— Daughter,, of Rebckah— The Encampment and Canton— 
Knights of Pythias— Danish I'.rotherhood Society —Danish Sisterhood- 
Modern Woo<lmen of .\merica— Tribe of Ben-Hur— Royal Arcanum -Royal 
Neighbors of America— Patrons of Husbandry— (Jrand Army of the Republic 
— Woman's Relief Corps. 



CTIAPTER XXX— BANKS AXD BANKING___ _. 

Financial Changes During the County's History — The Timber I'Aa — The 
Agricultural I'.ra— Individual History of the Active P.anks oi t'.e County. 



CHAPTER XXXI— NEWSPAPERS AND PIH'.LISHERS— . 

Montcalm Reliector, the tirst Newspaper in the Count. — l^>ricf Mention of 
Other Papers Which Have Appeared and Sonir Inter^-sting Incidents in 
Connection with Them. 



CHAPTER XXXll— THE MICDICAL PROKESSIOX-^ 

Importance of Physician in the Community— -Hi- . Regard for i'rofcssiona! 
Ethics — Montcalm County Medical .""-> '-iety lAir.y Practitioners — Registra- 
tion — Xurses — Optometrists. 



BEC'O JAN 9 1945 



CONTKNTS. 



: IIAF'TKR XXXIII— I'Ol.lTICAI. AXI) STATISTUA !._- ___ _. . 428 

Republicans (icncrally Successful in Montcalm ("ounty — ^Vole for Presiden- 
tial I'^lectors — ("onstitutional Conventions — Amendments — State Senators — 
Representatives — County Treasurers — Sheriffs — County Clerks — Kcgisters of 
Deeds — County Surveyors — (Coroners — Township Super visors^Population — 
Taxes. 



CIIAl'TKR XXXIV— IXDUSTRIKS OF AlOXTCALM COLNTY 

iJricf Mention of the Manufacturinfj and Mercantile Institutions of Mont- 
„„i.,, r «- :<i, Ct.,*;..*-;,.^ 



. 443 
. _ icturin«- and Mercantile Institutions of Mont- 

calm ('ounty, with Statistics. 

CHAl'TER XXXV— COURTS AXD LAWYKRS. .. 46.S 

County Courts — i)i^-trict Courts — t'ircuit Courts — F.arly Juries— Circuit 
Judges — I'rosecutiny- Attorneys— Probate Court — C"ircuil Court Commis- 
sioners — -Attorneys Who Have Practiced in Montcalm County. 

illAPTI'K XXXVJ— STAXTOX __ 484 

Location — A Commercial Center — Incorporation — Meetinj^s of Supervisors 
— The '"(^wrs Xe.-t" — Opera 1 louse— County Seat Discussion — The Pire of 

1880--l'nblic I'tilities— Marine P.and—Mayor.s— Clerks I'rominent Karly 

Citizens. 

t HAPTiOR XXXVII— CPiCPXVIPLh: __ 505 

Its P.eHinnin.Li- Settlement — l\arly Unfavorable Conditions — Indian Traiks — 
Indians — Survey — l-'arly Settlers and Pioneers — Growth — Industries — Public 
lmi)rovements. 

CilAPTk:R XXXVFTl— CARSOX CITY PI PJ.lc; SCHOOLS 514 

First School Houses — Farly Teachers — First (jraduates — 1 mprovements in 
Huildin.ns — .Suinrintendents-- l';<iuipment — l"'rescnt Faculty. 



HISTORICAL INDEX 





VOLUME 1 




A 






I'doomer Township) - 




\rrrauc -- 




245 


Assessment Roll. 1S52. . 
r.onndaries .._ 


^.. . .. 67 

66 


A-riculun-al Socictir.. 

A,-riciiltni-c 

Altitudes -- -- 

Anihli- - - 

Aiiil)K>, Rrv. 01c._ . 


243. M7. 

.._ 351. 354. 


251 
245 
33 
457 
3S7 


Lliurches 

Doetors 

!■ lection. Mrsi 

Land Lntries 

Xamin,!.;- the Township. 


412. 415 

66. 68 

()(). 68 
___ 67 










6() 






\vv;i cf County _- 
Asscssmctit, Imt-I 




42 
45 


Organization of 

Pioneers 


66 
73 


Aitunu'vs 


465. 


475 


Postoflice k'irst 


74 




SclKxds 


_ . 301 


B 






Settlement _ . 


. 60 


iiaUhviu [.akc 

Hanks . _.... 

Haptist (.■luirches - _ 
riarU'v 


65. 115, 


136 

330 

247 


Streams 

Supervisors .. _— .— 

Taxes 

\A,te on I'.ond ]ssuc____ 


33 

._ .50. 436 

442 

54 


llass Head, 




106 


T.onds for Court llousc-- 


54 


I'.car Hunt, A 




90 


Hounties. Wolf _ 


. 48 


I'elvi.Iorc Townsliip— 






i'.nshnell Township— 




I'Miunclaric-s 




60 


I'.ear Hunt 


QO 


i-:ifction. First .. .. _ 


Ihiildincr, First . _- 


___ 92 


Lakes 


34. 


61 


Crops. First 


89 


Land ICntries _ 




61 


Doctors 


411 


l.oeation 




60 


l'"lection. Fir.-,t . _. 


47, 84 


nr^ani/.atinn of 


64. 


60 
300 


l-'ainous Suit 


93 


Seli.K.ls . . . 


First Fvents 


92 


Settlement - 




()2 


Lidians — 


92 


Soil _ __ _., 




61 


Land l-.ntries 


85 


Streams 


.^^, 


61 
435 


Location 


84 


Supervisors 


Ofticials. First - - .--_ 


84 


Texas 




442 


Organization of 


84 


\'otc on P.cMid Issue 




54 


Lostofticc. First 


92 


Leneli and Lar.. .. 




465 


K'oad, First 


92 


I!en-lhir, Tril)e of ._ 




378 


Schools . 


301 


I'eseniet Mome 


_ _. ... . ,. _ 


221 


Settlement 


87 



(2) 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 

lUishnclI Township— C'ato Township — 

Streams _ 85 Taxes 442 

Supervisors 436 Vote on I5oncl Issue 54 

Taxes 442 Cedar Lake 175, 348. 456 

Vote on i'.ond Issue 54 ("hapin, Clarence W ._ 501 

Butternut S2, 32S, 389. 456, 459. 460 Church of Christ 343 

nutternut Drain 249 Churches 145. 22«, 237, 323 

Circuit Court C'oininissioners-- 474 

Circuit Courts 467 

Circuit Judges 470 

Civil War Record 282 

Clerks, County 434 

Coal Deposits . 40 

Coll)y 236 

Commissioner of Schools 312 

Conger 221 

Congregational (!hurciies 323 

Constitutions, State 431 

Coral 179, 310, 336, 379. 388, 

397. 419, 457, 459, 460 

C'orey Lorenzo 500 

Corn 246 

Coroners 435 

Correction Line 34 

County Buildings 51 

County Clerks _ 434 

County Court.s ..„ _. 465 

County Drains __ 249 

County Farm _ 58 

County ]''arm Agent 248 

County Medical Society. 405 

County Normal __. .__ 316 

County Seat Located 50 

County Surveyors 434 

County Treasurers 433 

Court T louse Bonds 54 

Court House History 51 

Courts 465 

Oystal Township- 
Creation of 107 

First Events IH 

Incidents 112 

Lakes 34, 108 

T,and Fnt; a-s 108 

Location ...__« 107 

xXatura; h'eatures 107 

Schools 303 

Settlement 110 

Streams 33 

Supervisors 50, 436 



C 






Carson City — 






Banks . _ .. 




-392 


Business Interests __. _. 




. 76 


Cemetcrv . __ _. 




7Q 






. 348 


Doctors 




415 


l'~.nterprises, Larly . 




. 75 


hires 




79 


1 mprovcnient Association 




, 77 


industries 


452, 


, 460 


Land Lntries 




75 


Location _ ._ . . 




74 


Lodges 


360, 


368 


Xewsi)ai)ers 




403 


Officials 




81 


r-latted ... ... 




75 






77 


I'romincnt Citizens 




79 


Railways 




277 


Sch.ools 




514 


Tclepliones .... 




459 


Valuations _ ._ 




77 


Case, George F. ._., 




499 


Catholic Churches .__. 




348 


Cato Township — 






Canal, An Farly 




101 


Description 





95 


Doctors 




413 


Flection. I'irst 




Q5 


Lakes 




34 


Land Entries 




96 






10'^ 


Naming of -_. 




96 


.Vatural heaturcs _ 




95 


Orchard, First _ 




99 


Organization of 




95 


Schools 




302 


Settlement 




97 


Soil 




9(. 






33 


Supervisors 


50, 


437 



F.ai-ly Danish Settlers 


_-^_ 351 


l-'-arly Juries 


469 


llarly Medical Practitioners 


407 


ICarlv Roads 


266 


Eastern Star, Order of 


._-. 361 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 

Crystal Township — Douglass Township — 

Taxes 442 Xaniing- of 124 

Vote on Bond Issne 54 Officers, First 124 

Crystal Villase— . Pioneers 124 

Hanks 115. 390 Roads, Early 127 

Breeders' Association 255 Schools 304 

Bnsincss Interests 116 Streams -— 32 

Chnrches _ ._ . 326, 343 Supervisors 439 

Doctors 417 Taxes 442 

Hopes 115 Vote on Bond Issue 54 

Improvements 116 Drainage Commissioner 249 

Industries 455. 461 Drains. County 249 

Location ^.114 Drifts, Glacial 36 

l^od^es 371 Dunkard Churches 343 

Newspapers 402 

Settlen\ent _ 114 E 

Summer Resorts _. 117 

Telephones . 459 

Custer . 123 

D 

Danish P.r(jtherIiood . _.. 374 Julmore— 

Danish Lutheran Cluirches- -. 344,351 Asricultural Association 256 

Danish Settlers 351 I'anks 388, 390 

Danish Sisteriioo<l 376 Churches 330,339 

Dau,L;hlers of Rel)ekah 366 Commerce 173 

Day 'i'ownship— Doctors 415 

C:inirches 338 Fires 173 

Creation of 118 Industries 454,461 

Description 118 Location 172 

Flection, I'irst 118 Lodges 363,367,375 

Land Fntrics 119 Mill 172 

Name 118 Xame i_ 172 

Schools 334 Newspapers 401 

Settlement 120 Officials 173, 174 

Streams :^3 Plat 172 

Supervisors 437 Public Utilities 174 

Taxes 442 Settlers 172 

Vote on Bond Issue 54 Telephones 458 

Deaner, C:harles 224 Fducational Interests ^ 300 

Divine I'amily 131 Election Statistics 428 

Doctors 405 Elections, First 47 

Doui^lass Township — Elevations 33 

Creation of 124 Enabling Act, County 46 

Description 124 Entrican 129,334,370,421 

Doctors 419 Ei)iscopal C'hurch 342 

Election, First 124 Eureka Township — 

Fatal Fire 128 Cemetery 132 

Land Entries 125 Doctors 412 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



luircka Townsliip — 




I'.arlv Srttlcr> ._ ._ _ 


_ 134 


l-;iccti<:.n, I'irst 


___47. 131 


I'ir.sl Invents 


132 


IfiL^Invays 


-- .. 13h 


1 ^,,,j l-'tiirics 


H/ 


Location _ _. 


_^ 130 


Millin- ____ 


133 


XauR- 


130 


Orj^anization of 


.^ 130 


Uoads. F.arlv 


133 


Saxtoii ICiitrv 


134 




. __- 33 


Supervisors __ _ 


..,-50. 435 


'J-axes _. 


442 


\-ote on P.-nul issne_. 


. . ... 54 


Rvan.nelical i.ntJicraii (Inircli 


345 


l''.\ er.ureen 'i'ownship — 




rimrclies 


145 


Creation of 


140 


Description 


140 


I'.vent^, Xotal.le 


144 


l.an<l Entries .... __ 


140 


Mil! 


143 


Schools . 


305 


Setllenient __ _^ 


._._ 142 


Streams _.. 


3^ 



--airplai 
Clinrc 
C'reati 



143 
54 



345 



140 
140 
413 



Description ._. 

T)octors 

l-:iection, i'-irst __.. ^__ 47 

Daiul I'.ntrics 150 

i.and Speculators _ 150 

Xainc ___ 149 

X'atural I'Vatures . 149 

Residents in 1850. _._ 157 

Schools 305 

Settlement 152 

Snpervisors . . _50. 43-' 

Taxes .- 442 

\-ote on I'.ond issue __ _ 54 



Farm A.yent, County. 
I'"arm Statistics ...-- __. 

Farmers' Institute 

l-eiin. O.car 

I'cnvvick __.^ -. 

Ferris Township— 



245 
498 



ati( 



of 



Descri|)tion of 

Doctors 

1-irst h:\ents __ 
Land Entries - 
Xatural I'eaturt 



Schcv 
SettU 



nt -- 



Issue 



Taxes 
\ote <.n 
l-erri^ Villa-e 

I'irst Settlers .-- 

l-'ishville 

Flat i'tiver ._ ._ 

iM-atcnuties . 

iM-ee and .Accepted Ma 

iM-ee -Methodist Chnrcl 

G 



3ns 

103 



. ir.7 

44 
148 
, 250 
3()0 
3r)0 



M. 



(iardner, Dan 

Ceolo-y . _.._ 

Cerman Metho<lists _ 

Cilhert, Ciles 

Glacial Drifts _--_ 
Good Knads Movemen 

Gowen 192. 

Grand Army of the Re 

(iraml Jury, lMr>t 

(.;rand Rapids i'^' Indian 
Grand Trunk Kailroad 

(irauKC The 

Greenville— 

Hanks 

ISe.yinnin.L^s - 

Churches 

340, 

Ccuinty Seat 

Doctors -- 

I'arly C;onditions — . 
Farly Koads _ . 



. 341 

. 498 

3f) 

. 2,S0 

, 420 

381 

409 



323, 330. 
2. 344, 348, 



I-IISTORlcAL INDEX. 

( ircciiville - Howard City- — 

(•air Association 2S.^ Fires 215 

(iotxl Ivoads Association. _ 272 Incorporation 212 

inujroveincnts .512 Industries . 456,462 

Indian 'IVails 506 Lodt^cs 361. 374, 37f^ 

Indians 508 Lnnil)cr interests 213 

Industrie. _ __443, 461, 512 Newspapers _- 4(X) 

T.od.oes 369. 372. 374, 37o, 37^). 382 Olden Days 213 

Newspapers . __. 394 IMatted 211 

Pioneers .-_ 510 Present Business Interests... 220 

I'otalo Market ___247. 513 Railroads 220 

rublic. Institutions 513 Schools _ . 316 

Railroads _. ._. Z77 Settlers .— . _ 214 

Sch.xds _-. _ ___ 317 Watcrworkv. 219 

Settlers. l''irst ._ _.. 505 

Supervisors .. . _._. 440 I 

Survev, Early 510 

■l•;^scs - -_ 442 Improved Lands 245 

Teleidiones^ ^ ._^'7. _ „!-^-_"^^ 459 Independent Order of Odd I'ellows 365 

\^.te on I'.ond Issue 54 \nA\:m Trails _. _ 265 

Industries . 443. 460 

Internal Improvements -_ 272 

llaniiltoi! Family 152 J 

Ilawley. E. D. ' 502 

llitxluvays 265 

IUmuc Townshi])— 

C'reation of ... 168 

Description of . 168 

Doctors 414 

I'irst Events 171 

Land L'.ntries __ 169 

Natural Features 168 

Old Settlers 171 

Schools 171, 309 

Settlement 170 



Jail History 51 

Judf.;es, Lircuit 470 

Judges, Probate 473 

Juries, Early „ 469 



Kendallville 206 

Knights of Pythias 372 



L 



Supervisors 438 Lakes 33 

Ta.xcs 442 Lakevicw — 

Vote on Bond Issue 54 Agricultural Society 254 

Hor.-,e Breeders" Association 256 Uanks 390, 391 

Howard City— lUisiness Interests 105 

Agricultural Association 254 Cdiurches 327,340,341 

I'anks 387 Doctors 408 

liesemet Home _ 221 iMrst Invents 104 

Churches 331,345 Indians 103 

l^octors 417 Industries 453,462 

Early Growth 211 Location __ 103 

Early Stores 212 Lodges 365, 378 

I'-.lection, First 212 Newspapers 401 

l^iirs 254 Telephones 458 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 

Land Entries, First in County 49 Mills 133, 143, 145. 

T.angston 207, 397. 417 172, 180, 210; 237 

Lawyers 465,475 Miner }'"aniily 70 

LcDu, Stalham W. 181 Modern Woodmen of America 376 

Legislative Act Defniing County 44 Montcalm County Soldiers ._ 282 

Lincoln Family 187 Montcalm County Telephone Asso- 

Littlc Denmark Danish Lutheran ciation - ._ 458 

Congregation 351 Montcalm Township — 

Live Stock __246 Churches 346 

Local Option Question 431 Creation of 44 

Lodges 360 Description of 184 

Lumber 65, 203. 210, 213 Klcrtion, I-irst 45, 47 

Lakes 185 

Land Entries 185 

Officials, I-irst 45, 184 



Mc 



McBride— Original Township .. 184 



Banks . 392 

Business Interests __. 123 

Churches 339 



sideuts in 1851 192 

Schools --,- - 310 

Settlers - 187 



Doctors 41^7 Streams -__.33, 185 

Supervisors -- 50. 439 

Taxes 442 

Industries 463 Township Meeting, Fir.^t 189 



Fire -- 12 

Growth of 123 



Location 122 



Valuations, Early _- 45 



Moraines.--. .. --- 36 



X 



Lodges 368, 377. 384 ^ote on Ben 

Name 122 

Newspapers 402 

Settlement 122 

Telephones .- 458 

Xaming of County 4() 

M Natural Drainage -._ 33 

Nevins Lake . 7>I7 

Maple Hill 199, 347 >,-^^^. ^^^^„,^ 171 

Maple Valley 181, 419 x,,.spapers 394 

Maple Valley Township— Nurses __ 426 



Churches 338 

Creation of 176 

Election. First 176 



O 



Land Entries 176 C)ats __ 245 

Natural Drainage 179 o^jj Fellows 365 

Schools 309 Optometrists 427 

Settlers 178 Order of the Eastern Star 361 

Sui)ervisors __ 438 Organization of County 43 

Taxes 442 Organization of State. --.. --. 43 

Vote on Bond Tssue___^ . 54 

Masonic Order 360 

Medical Profession 405 

Methodist Episcopal Churches 3.34 Patrons of Husbandry .380 

Military Record .__ 282 Pere Marquette Railroad ll''^ 

Miller's Station 1C)0. 457 I'ersonal Property Valuations -1'^ 



1' 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



l'h}'sicians .. . _ _ 




405 


I'ierson — 






Doctors - 




41, S 


]'irst Stores 




198 






4S6 


T.ocation ._ _ _ . 




19S 


Platted 




108 


I'ierson Township- 






Churches 


-341 


343 


Creation of SO, 


194 


486 


Description of 




104 


Doctors -- - 




415 


First I'vcnts 




197 


Lakes 




34 


Land Entries 




196 


Settlement 





196 


Supervisors 


.-50 


439 


Taxes — _ 




44^ 


Vote on Bond Issue 





54 


i'ine Township- 






Agriculture - -- 




704 


Creation of 




■^01 






^01 


Doctors - - 




419 


ICarly Stores __ . 




?06 


Election, First 




201 


Land Entries 





202 


Lumber Interests 




203 


rostolTice, First 




205 


Schools 


^(V. 


110 


Soil 




?0? 


Streams _ - - 




33 






438 






44-? 


Vote on Bond Issue 




54 


I'ioneer Days 




261 


Point Richards _ _— 




1?0 


Political History 




428 


I'oor, Care of the 




58 


Population _ - . 




441 


Potatoes 


_245 


?47 


Present Railroads 


277 


Presidential Votes 





430 


Press, The 




394 






47? 


Probate Judges 




473 


I'rosecuting Attorneys 


____ 


472 


Protestant BIpiscopal Church.._- 





342 



Railroads 214. 


220, 


273 


Rainfall . __ 




40 


Real Estate \\'il nations 




40 


Registers of Deeds 


____ 


434 


Registration of Doctors 





416 


Representatives 




433 


Reynolds, Montgomery A_ 





500 


Reynolds Township — 






Descrii)tion of -- 




208 


Land Entries __ 




208 


Lumber interests 





210 


Mills .. _ _. . 




?10 


Organization of 




208 


Schools 





310 


Soil .__ -_ _. 




?10 


Streams 


__33. 


210 


Sujiervisors - -_. 





437 


Taxes 




442 


Vote on Bond Issue. .___ ___ 





54 


Richland Township— 






P.reedcrs' Association _. 




256 


Descrii)tion of 




222 


Doctors __ 




423 


Election. I'irst 




222 


Lakes .. .. 


34 


7.7?. 


Land Entries 




223 


Natural In^atures 




222 






r?7 


Schools _ . -- 




311 


Settlers ._. _ 




224 


Streams 


:^^ 


7.7.7 


Supervisors _ _ - 




4.39 


Taxes _ . 




44? 


Vote on ]3ond Issue 




54 


Rivers 





33 


Roads. Improvement of 





250 


Rock Formations 




35 


Royal Arcanum __ 





379 


Royal Neighbors of America^-. 




379 


Rye 


-245, 


247 



Sand Lake 

School Commissioner 

Schools 64, 203, 210, 213. 300 



200 
. 312 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 

Senators, State . -.. - 432 Stanton — 

Settlers, The I-ir-^t 44 C"onnt3- Seat . _--_ .51, 487 

Siianty Plains -. - ^-.- 158 Doctors .-._. 414 

Sheridan— J':arl\' Citizens _ 495 

Banks 389 I'ires 491 

Ihisiness Interests .. . 147 i'"orestry Association _._ 493 

Clnirehes 324 Incorporation 485 

l)ort<..rs 147. 417 fndnstries . ._.. 449, 463 

i'larly Business Interests.. _ 146 i.ocation _ 484 

Indn^trics 456, 463 Lodges 365, 381. 383 

I,, .cation __ 145 Marine Hand 493 

Lod-es 364.371 Mayors . .. _ ___ 494 

Mills 145 Xcwspapers __ .._. 396 

Ollicials - ...- 148 OHicials _ . __ 494 

Population 145 ()])era House 490 

J^iiihvays ITi -OwYs .Vest" 488 

Telephones _ _-- .-458 I'opulation __ .__ 485 

SherilTs 433 Potato Market - __ 247 

Sidney— Public Ttilities 493 

BcLiinning 236 Schools 313 

Business Interests li^ Supervisors-. ._ 441 

Churches-..-- IZl , Z2^ Taxes 442 

Industries. — 237,457 Telephones -.458 

Lodges --- 237,375 Vote on I'.ond Issue 54 

Mill 2i~ ' State Highway ConnnissifMr .- .-.271 

Settlement 236 State Organization . 43 

Sirlncy Township— State Road, I'irst 268 

Churclies 327 State Senators . 432 

Doctors . . ^413 Statistical 428 

lilection. First 229 Stevens, Thomas X. ... 503 

h'orest hire 233 Streams of the County Z2> 

Land F.ntrics 234 Sumnerville 64 

Location 229 Supervisors 435 

.\'atin-al I'Vatures . 229 Supervisors, C"ounty Board 48 

Organization of - 229 Surface Features of County 2i?), 41 

Schools 311 Surveyors, County 434 

Settlement 230 

Supervisors 50, 440 ^^ 

Taxes 442 

Tornado - - 230 Taxation, I'irst 45 

V(Ue on Bond Issue 54 Taxes 441 

Six Lakes 65, 362. 387, 411, 417, 457. 458 Telephones 116 

Soil Types 41 Temperature __ --- 37 

Soldiers from This County 282 Terminal Moraines 36 

South Park -- 136 Topography of the County 'iZ 

Stanton — 



Clerks 



Trails. Indian 265 

Treasurers, County 433 

Tribe of Ben-llur 378 

, 495 Trolley Lines, Proposed 281 



|->a„ky _._ 386 Treasurers, County 433 

Churches 323. 331, 348 Tribe of Ben-llur 378 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 
,u ISO, 338, 344. W 



375, 391, 413, 418. 455, 459. 463 
Xclsun M, 497 



U 



Weather i'acts 37 

WeatluTwax. ("apt. Joliii M 496 

Willian, F 49/ w,atlKrwax, Tacob 501 

\V(-st^ille 123 

Wheat 245 

Whitelisli Lake 199 

WiUett. James W 502 

I'nion Telephone L\)tnpany _ 458 \\i„tlel(l Townsliip— 

Description of 239 

Land I'.ntries - 240 

V Organization of 239 

Schools 311 

\alnations. 1850 49 Settlers 241 

\'cstaburt4— Streams 33 

Banks 391 Supervisors 439 

linsiness Interests 229 Taxes 442 

Churches 228,343 Y^^^^. o,i Bond Issue 54 

Doctors 420 ^yolf r.ountics 48 

lndu^tries 455. 464 Woman's Relief Corps 382 

Location 226 \v„(h1. Edwin K 503 

3^'9 Wood Lake 199 



Xanie 226 ^Vyman 174, 422 

Settlement 226 

Telepliones -458 Y 

Vickeryville -93, 459, 4(>4 

\'otes for (Governor ...._ 428 Yountrs. S. Terry 55 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



VOLUME II 

^ P.ower, Horace L., M. D ^(^ 

Bowman. Edward J 592 

\d;ims. C"harles II., D. V. S 500 I'.oylan. Nathan O 204 

N.lanus. Wijliam E.. D. V. S 239 v,rAcvy, Lewis E 159 

Adick. Prof. Earl J 243 ['raman. Charles IT ^p\ 

\llcliin. Vir t". 359 l'>raman. George 585 

\lU-n. Albert - '^^ Kraman. George A 493 



ck, Or; 



Albert A ^0^ RHggs. Fred J), 



95 Hricc. John X ^21 

565 n.;...c Vr.A I) 416 



, - ^^'- BrigRS. O. A «^^ 

\rbogasi. (ieorge A 2(X. y^,-ooks. Edgar S 229 

\.l,o^ast. M. C 460 y^^^^,,^^ jo,„, M 590 



75 
William A 312 



Brown. Raymond A.. 

Brown. 

Bullock. Sid v.. 



105 

• ^^^1-" V -- ^0 Butler, Benjamin F 173 

, l-rank \V.-_ 50 

Mrs. 1). H.-. 309 



l'red_ 



194 



Richard 318 



Edwin R 
(icorge 



394 fadwell. George W 1^0 



j^ __ 3F9 Campbell. John W.- 



arher. Leslie T.--. 
iarclay. James 



69 

507 
S4 



131 Cari.s> C 
632 Carolhers, R. Arthur 
atv. James -- 324 Case, Seyn^our J 4o 



Th 



284 Caswell. Francis S.. 



hronvv^'lil llrnrv' C - 594 Chaniberlin. Frt'dJ lH 

;;:::^EmoU O"..,,:::::::-- 256 chambers. Mrs. Mary L. (Barber,. 

nnc-tt, leremiah A 425 Chandler, Chester E ^0 

unctt. William R 422 Church, _ Praiik i ^■'- 



l'.is-;cll. Lewis 



•)5 C-lark, Eli S ^^^ 

196 



n.ack.' Ernest A.:: --464 Clark. John W ,--- 

Ulucndy. Herman R 548 C'lark. Wdba.n M 4/4 

r-, ..,.. \v ^74 Clement. Clifton H -— ^^ 



liUnnberg. Charles W 574 Clement. Clifton^ 



niberg, George 1 — 



73 Clement. John. 



518 



oirert. 



%;:Z:\. ""::---- - 344 CHlTe. Thomas^ J.. ^ 417 



llinger, Rev''samuel 452 Closson. Cornelius 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Cole, l-rcd J 39 

Collins. Irwin M _^ ._ 540 

Collins, John C 31.^ 

Collins. William 11 --- 114 

Conulcn, CnH)rgc J' 401 

ConKlcn, Samuel J 429 

Comstock. Jared V 570 

Cook. I'rof. Aral K 331 

C'c^rdcr. James 542 

Corey, Allen L.. M. 1) 62 

Cornell, (JeorRe K.._. . 419 

Coucliman. George D 644 

Courter. J. \Vatson_ _ 271 

Cran.lall, K. f 3(.4 

Crawford. Bert C 108 

Croekett. W. V 638 

Crooks, Thomas G 427 

Cross. c:'harles 11 5.59 

Culver. Cdu'ster R. 551 

C'ummings. J'.dward C 67 

Cmumings Krank F 509 

Cummings. Otto _- -- --6.35 

Curtis, I'rcd E 604 

Curtis. Lorenzo D KK) 

Cutler, Uov A 270 



Dailey, James A 150 

Daiiforth, Mortimer 1-... M. I).-. __ 664 

Dasef. John \\'.__ — -._ 560 

Davis. Thomas 1) 334 

Davis. William l" 358 

Dean. Diz W. --- 169 

Dean, 1-red I. -. _-_ 369 

Desi)e]ter, John C - 617 

DeYoung. Cornelius . 254 

DeYoung, James 467 

Dlekerson, Allen 1!. . _ 71 

Diekinson, Charles I'.-- --- H*^ 

Dilley, D. Darwin 650 

Dolloff. Cal'orest II.- - -- - - 646 

Dow. Thomas 1).. D. D. .S 247 

Drews. Williau! I". 614 

Drummond. CMark J,__ -.- __ - 213 

Durkee,. Ervie E 280 

Durst. Jacob W - 290 

Dver. Clarence 1 - 639 



Kdc, Albert E 296 

Edwards. George 258 

I'hle. Oscar E._- 269 

Eitelbuss, (ieorge W - 383 

b:itelbuss. Mrs. Mary .S _ .... 382 

I'ldridgc. i5ert A. 486 

Eldndge. Eli A 228 

Emerson. Robert E.- 232 

I'.vans, Robert -_ 411 

E 

^'arnsworth, Lauriston i> 189 

Ecnder, John 11 209 

Einnegan. John - 407 

Eitzpairick, John M._- 391 

I'leck. Roswell 408 

ITench, Charles W. -_ .- 96 

briedt. James W 19<^ 

hrisbie, I.!. Stephen. M. D 237 

Erost. James 633 

Fry, Randall 462 

I'uller, Thomas E 338 

I'uller. William 11 . 265 

Fults, John C 299 

G 

C;alhe]d. Benson 1 480 

Gaftield, John W' 424 

Gallagher. William J 235 

Gallon]), I'rof. Lewis B 367 

Galloup. Orland W 373 

Ciates, Clarence M 526 

Gates, Mert(m D ^ - 472 

Gibbs, (ieorge R. __245 

(iibl)s. Jay 11 40 

Gibbs. Lucius II 112 

Ciibson. Erank S 607 

C;olden. John A 4o9 

Gooby. Matthew ^^7 

Cioodwin, Andrew B 288 

Graham. Byron A ...461 

(iraham. William 534 

.Greenhoe. I'dwin D 282 

Grill. Martin A - -__ 305 

Griswold. Warren C, 220 

Gunther. 1-red. Sr.__ 242 



H lOGR A PIIIC AL 1 N DEX . 



T 



In-raliaiii. Henry L.. 
Isliani. J. Frank 



K 



llaack. Christ F.__ .. 586 

MallcU. John W ,- -- Uh 

llanchctt, Joseph-.- .. — - y^i 

Manscn. Carl I'' - 283 J 

ilansen, Fn-lchrcchl _. ()in |acks(Ui, 'Hiomas 1'- 441 

Hansen. I'Vank (i 2<'f' 'laniieson. William C._. 172 

Hansen, Hans 580 [arstfcr, l.erov K 554 

Hansen, TIans i 581 Jensen. Xiels ._.. 300 

Hansen, J. William G., D. V. S 27^ Johnson, h'rcd A., M. D 666 

Hansen, lens I'.- - — - - -645 

Hansen, Car- C,_- 267 

Hansen, ()scar T.- . ..- —. . 295 

Har<lv, C. \V.__ ..— ..--582 Keith, William W.. -^30 

Harriman, (Icov^v IC . -.- 341 Kemp, Crnest A ^')^ 

Harris, William A.. 327 Kennedy, Salem V 178 

Harit, Cieero W . -- ..--.- 54.^ Kent, Silas 654 

liaskins, James !'.._- _ 326 Keteluim, Scrt-nus I).-- -- 42 

Hatchew. F'hilii) J 606 Kimhall. Jesse P, 553 

Hauley, Charles _— 376 Kindell, Edwin J 624 

iuisler, 11. C. ..-. -375 KiiM), Howard C ...-253 

Hemi>stea(l, ("apt. Henry !^1 - 80 Kirker. William J 456 

H.iirv. Charles IC -— .- '26 Kirtland, Horace I. 167 

Hrrnian, Ceor-e 601 Kittle, K. A 405 

Herold, John A. .._.. .^08 Klees, John 505 

Hrrrick, .\<lelhen A. 368 k^.^.^, J,,seph 505 

Hrrriek. Charles R... _- 525 Klecs. I'eter A 407 

iiM-rirk. Walter (;.__. .. -510 Knapp, Almcron N 538 

Hirk>, Charles C... 556 Knai)p. James H.- - 205 

HK.;lu>e. Chancellor H 371 Knapp, f)rlan(io J 316 

Hill, .\n-ustns F 184 Kree-er, JnliiiS — 463 

Hiller. Joint X 572 Krohn, Isaac 123 

ihllis. (ieoro-e T. . 451 Krnni. C.corKC A 468 

iliUis. josei)h C. 515 

iCllis. Robert J 4« K 

Minds. Henrv H 128 

Hmklev Te<m 1 —.520 l-aDu, Charles W 203 

l,al)n. Rev. Stalham W 210 

l.arsen, Chris_ _ 634 

Lascellc, Joseph M. 238 

Fee, Fewis X.-- 521 

dl. William E -—436 Fester, Geor-e 11 --568 

„-,h, Harvey E. ... - 336 Fester, Will IF. M. D 2// 

ard," Mclvin'c, M. 1) 485 Fowis. John «-^ 

Kynian 385 Fincoln. Edward W. . 620 

Mortimer A. __-.--- ---523 Fisk, Scdomon 323 



K-ond), Albert J - -- 445 

lend), Gecn-Rc W^ 444 

Imes, Harry C.. ._ . 170 

niditon. ()h)n J 531 



lilOGRAPHlCAL INDEX. 



Sherman 399 



N 



Loper. Marvin T ^'-7 ^^^.f( Jacob AT 1-^Cj 

l.ovdy. William H -. — - 103 :^.^.^' Sherman E 1('3 

Lower. U. Earl___-^. 201 ^^,^^^^^_ j^^^j^^. j,-^^^,,^;, 598 

T.unn. WiUian: P (^ kelson, John A 307 

Luttcrloh, ilcnry 20.S Xelson Oscar E 297 

'Robert 404 



Xevins. Harlan T' 437 

XevvbrouRh. J. C 176 

Xewcomb. Solomon B 319 

Xcwhouse, Xewton \V. 



Mc 

McClellaJi. Spencer <'>10 

MeCloskey, J. I ^ 3 ^ ^^ ^.,^^ 

McConk.e, M. J ^13 ^j^^^,.^^,,, (-,,,,,,, r 502 

McCrca. Jacol), ^^45 _ ^j-,- 

McDonald, An.us 1. 4^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ --;" ,,, 

McCiowan, John._ 6 ^^^ ^^^,^^^^^ ^ 44^ 

Mcllattu.. W.lham 384 ^^^^^^ ^^..^^.^^^^ __ 3,4 

McXnlt. K. 1) 14/ .^^^^^^^^ l^crnard___ — -.- 291 

M (^ 

O-Hrien. Fred V 332 

Mabie, Charles A ---- -351 O'Drmald, Albert 311 

MaddlKS. Georse II 292 o'DonaUl, Richard 11 44 

Mader. \Villiam_-- 388 Oswald. Simon -298 

Madison, Albert..,. ....473 ^^j^ |>,.,.. Xornian L.. 377 

Ma.lsen. John '^^"^ 

Martin. Josiah ---- 5.^0 P 

Marvin. Charles 11--. .- (A\ 



Maye: 



528 Fakes, I'red A... 



Miller, (reor.«:e W 



583 I'helps. W. S.- 

Minard, George H.. 



354 I'ierce, Harrison. 



()62 



.viayes, i/i-mi-ii — , .y 

Meaeh. Charles 1 1^3 Parker. Rev. Charles - 48 

Merrilidd. Xicholas C 430 Paulson, Hrede A IJ^ 

Messenger. Judge Christopher C... 34 Peabody, (n-orge W — - ^-- 

Miel. Judge Lucas M 192 Peek, Ford S...- 

Miller, Charles M -..-■■ 140 Peek, Mrs. Mm; 



361 
Peck. Samuel D ^'O;^ 



iviiiicr, ^reomu n\ .... ■•- ■ , i 28S 

Miller. John C ^-« --^y- •'"'!" ,^--n'"" ;47 

Miller, Xoble W.. M. D 320 Peterman, Wdham H 44/ 

Miller. Oscar C 77 Petersen Peter -04 



Mills, William H - ^«>^ '''i^'PS. w. o. 

_.._ 46(> Pickell. I'red S 280 



342 



Mmer. James.- >"'^ ' ^ c^^^ 

M;n,.r M I - 348 Pierce. Warren B ^'^* 

Mmer. M. J ^^^ ^ j3(, 

Miner. I nah >'^^'- ni^uu,j^ 

Mitchell. John H 470 P.erson. George J.- - 



Moffatt. Edwin E 275 Pintler. Raymond A 481 

Moulton, Ralph W 301 IMatt. Prank — 

Mulick, Edward C. 272 Piatt, llezek.ah. 

Musson. Thomas W 578 Potrer. Thomas J 



494 

() 
3 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Preston, Hubert S 222 

Prevette, George C 154 

Prout, J. II K)9 

I'uRslcy, William H 488 

Pnrdon, James. M. D 547 

Q 

Qiii^ij;?:;, John 26v3 

R 

leader, Henry 383 

Ranncy. l-:ilis W 143 

Ranney. Frederick E 47 

Rasmusen, Willard C 647 

{■^asmussen, Xcls P 294 

Rasnnisscn, William E 152 

Reader. Fred B 589 

Heed, David C 611 

Reynolds, Claire C 660 

Reynolds, J()hn____ 293 

Rice, Harvey W 76 

Richards. Charles S 187 

Richardson, Albert A 374 

Ridley. James T 79 

Riley, (.bnrles W 26(^ 

Rol)inson. James W 597 

Rowland. Oren A 281 

Rcnvloy, ICdwin S._. __ 603 

Rule. Zacharias D. 230 

Russell. A. Noah 104 

Rutan. FuRcnc 33 

Rutan. Manning 48 

Rutherford, l':rnest A .._ _ 2h8 



Silver, Bert C. E 90 

Siple. George W 322 

Skarritt, Alfred F 124 

Skeoch, J. E 207 

Slawson, Earle B 98 

Smith, Herman W 395 

Smith, Rayburn R., M. D 218 

Smith. William B 175 

Snow, Bert R 628 

Spanglcr, Benjamin L 340 

Spencer, John P 454 

Squire, Eli 387 

Staines, William J 618 

Starr. Harry C 637 

Stearns, Alfred L 53 

Stearns. Wesley J 240 

Stebbins, Allen E 106 

Stebbins, Arthur M 118 

Stebbins. Chester H 328 

Stebi)ins, Ensign B 224 

Stccre, Joseph B 409 

Steere, William M 4.39 

Stevens, Frank A 535 

Stevenson, Morris W 60 

Stoddard, Elmer E 132 

Stokes, Edgar A 615 

Stone. Albert O 498 

Stone, T.uther R 656 

Strait. John B 216 

Strait, William E 495 

Summers, S. Clay --1 631 

Sutton, Samuel 412 

Swarthout, Charles 215 

Swarthout, Scott 162 

Sweet. Clarence A 249 



S 

St Clair, Marshall A 514 

Sanford, Otis A 226 

Sayles, C:yrenius C, M. D 512 

•Schermcrhorn, Eucius B 393 

Schroder, Martin 262 

Servis,s, John 11 141 

Sexton, William H., Jr 434 

Sheehan, Rev. John J 135 

Sherd, Marshall D 362 

Sherwood, Charles () 517 

Sherwood, Mrs. Emma C 347 

Shook. A. N 195 



T 

Tallman. W. A 655 

Taylor, .\rthur J 83 

Taylor, Frank A.._ 413 

Taylor, II. W 151 

Taylor, J. Philo, D. D. S 133 

Taylor, J. W 278 

Teed, Lemuel J 490 

Thurlby, John F 513 

Tower, R. J 134 

Towle. Dclos A 57 

Train, James K 144 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 

^T White. Charles M ^('^ 

Wiekes, Ceorge P ('■^^' 

rric, lames W .— .U:^ Williamson, I'rancis G -1^6 

Wilson. (H-(,rge M - - - 458 

V Wilson, Oscar W.. 414 

Winter. Thoma> B._. 177 

W-rplanck. James 11 -■^^'^' Wood. William A. 432 

Woods, Joseph — 
VV W or den, Adelbert 

W'orden. Thomas W ^'-'3 

Wai-ar, ih.n. Kd-ar S. --- 64 Wrij^ht. Cass T 45 

Wauar. Harry K, ---- ^^ Writiht, Will C --- - -^^ 

Waldo, Otto C 2<''l Wyckofl. V. M -. 2/4 

Wandel, John II 1'^" 

Wanink. William W ^93 y 

War.l. Lewis -- 

Warts, William O - 



Waters. David L. 



508 Yondan, J. Clan 

M)U YrnuiR. 



558 
588 



492 



Wec:ks. Ckur W.:Z::::" 88 Vonn^, John i;., M 1) - - 

Wheeler. Wilscm ^49 Vonn,,man. X lel H. ^^^^ 





zu^e.^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



EUCiENK J^LUTAX. 

Rng-ciic Ixiuiui has l)ecn one u\ the progressive leaders of eoiiiniercial 
and church hfe, in Greenville, Michigan, for manv years, and has stood 
f(jr the Ix'st influence on all (juestions i)ertaining to the public welfare, 
liis birth occurred on July 2. 1844, in Dover, Xew Jersey, and at the age 
of seven years he came to Michigan with his i)arcnts. 

The Rutans were of lluguenot descent, who located in (ireenville and 
It was in this town that Eugene was educated. .\t the age of twenty years 
he became a student of Oberlin College, in Oberlin, Ohio, and there com- 
])letcd his class-room studies. in ICS69 he began his business career by 
succeeding his father in general merchandise, hut later entered the hard- 
ware business, (,)f which he made a great success. He remained in this 
husiness for twenty-four 3^ears and then engaged in the real-estate busi- 
ness for several years, sul)sequently becoming one of the largest stock- 
holders, and later, director and vice-president of the First National Bank 
"f (ireenville. .Michigan. The ])ank finally dissolved and he then became 
one of the organizers of the (ireenville State Bank, serving as its vicc- 
l)resi(lcnt. lie is much interested in city real estate and owns several busi- 
ness blocks. 

Eugene Kutan was first married to .Marcia A. Fenton, a nati\e of 
Massachusetts, but an old resident of and a teacher in the ))ublic schools 
at Greenville, ]\lichigan, and one child blessed their union, namely, Eeo TT., 
who resides at home. The wife and mother died in February, TQ13, and 
•■m October 5, i')r4, luigene Rutan was united in marriage to his second 
wife. 1^'rancene AT. Xelson. She was born in Xew \'ork state, but has 
lieen a resident of Greenxille. Michigan, for many years, serving as a teacher 
in the i)ublic .schools. 

The famib' are members of the (.'ongregational church, of which 
luigene Rutan is steward and trustee. He is a liberal supporter of the 
church and civic needs and is also prominent in club life. l)cing a member 



3-J jMONTCAI.M COIN'TV, M IC II ICA X . 

(»t the l.iiicolii ("lub and (^f the Pioneer Sncietw lN)]itically, he is a Repub- 
lican and has serxed on the common council, as well as ha\ ini^ been a 
member of the school l)oard. fie was the owner of the l'~. Rutan (Jt Com- 
[)any !lonr-mills of IJeldino-. Aliclii^'an. which burned on l-'ebruar\- _'0, 1898. 
with a bij4' loss to Mr. Kntan. Me was one of the orioinal incor])orators 
and ori;anizers of the Moore Plow and lm))lement Company of (jreenville. 
Michi,^-an and at ])resent one of the directors and its treasurer. This is 
one of the lari^e.'^t and most important manufacturing- cr)ncerns of Mont- 
calm coimt\', Michiiran. 



juixiic (■hristoph1':r c. mI'SSI'.xgrr. 

When the peo])le of Stanton, county scat of Montcalm county, in the 
sprino- of H)i=^ elected judi^e Messen<^er to ser\e as the chief executi\'e 
of that sprightly cit}-, thc-y h(.)nored themsehes, for their discrinunating 
choice placed in the mayoral chair a man not only eminently qualified for 
the ])erformance of the exacting duties of that important |K)sition, but one 
who has l)rought to the office a natural dignit}- most beconn'ng to that liigh 
station and which has been properly maintained in the \ariotis and intimate 
relations with the iniblic which this station entails. 

Christopher ('. Messenger was l)orn at TTickory Corners, Harry C(»unty, 
this state, on Xo\ember jo, 1855, son oi ^^^-lrner and Sarah ( Crabb ) .AJes- 
scnger, l)oth nati\"es of [''-ngland. the forme'" of whom was born iri t.he citv 
of London and the latter in the city of Piverpool. 

Warner Messenger was one of thirteen children born to his parents, 
of whom mention is here made of Richard, John, who ca.me to America; 
William, .\nna, Mary, Robert and Warren. The i)arents of these children 
died when the son, Warner, was a cliild and but vague im])ressions of them 
were retained l)y him. He grew to manhood in Pondon and after coming 
to .\merica. was married in the state of Xew ^■ork to .Sarah Crabb, datigh- 
ter of Christopher C. Crabb, a tailor, and when twenty-fi\e vears of age. 
in 1 85 1, with his wife came to Michigan, and bought a farm of eightv 
acres in Parry county. To this original tract, Mr. Messenger presently 
added two adjoining "forties. " thus m.aking a farm of r)ne hundred and 
,^ixty acres, which he improved and brought to an excellent state of culti- 
\ation and there reared his family. IP's wife died in ]8()i, at the age of 
sixty-three years, but he continued to live on the home place until a cou()le 



.MON'rCAI.M COCNTY, .VI JC 1 1 K IAN. 35 

of vears before his deatli. when he went to \\\c with his daughter at TTickory 
("orners. where his death occurred on March ly, 1913, he heing then aged 
eighty-five years. Both Warner ^lessenger and his wife were members of 
the r)a])tist church an<l were regarded as among the leaders in all good 
works in the neighlK)rho()d in which they lived. To them were born two 
children. Christopher C. the sul)iect of this sketch, and Mary A., wife of 
William H. Marshall, of Hickory Corners, this state, where she has lived 
all her life. 

Rearecl on the ])arental farm in liarry county, Christopher C. Mes.sen- 
ger recei\ed his elementary education in the district .school in the neighbor- 
hood of his home, which he supplemented by a course in the Adventist 
(V)llege at i)attle Creek, this state. While attending college, Mr. Messen- 
ger began to learn the jeweler's trade, which he followed for nearly twenty 
years. In 1886 he came to Montcalm county and located at Howard C"ity, 
where he o])ened a Jewelry store and was in Inisiness there until his appoint- 
ment to the oftice of judge o\ the i)robate court for Montcalm comity in 
luiie. iS(;(;, and on June 26, 189c), he nujved to Stanton, the county seat, 
lo enter upon the duties of that offlce. I'or nine \ears and six months judge 
Messenger ])resided (.)\er the probate court of this county and at the close 
of that term of service, bought a hardware stock in the village of Butternut. 
ibis county, where he remained for two years and six months, at the end 
of which time he returned to Stanton, which since has l)een his home. 

I'or many years judge Messenger has been one of the leading and 
tnost inlluential factors in the Reptiblican party organization in Montcalm 
county, i'or six years he was secretary of (he J-icpublican central committee, 
in which cajjacity he performed \aluable ser\-ice for his party, b^or two 
years he was treasurer of Keynolds township and after that service ceased, 
he became sui)ervisor and served in that capacity for a little more than 
seven years. He then entered upon his long term of .service as judge of 
the ])r()bate court and for the past three or more years has been serving 
the pul)lic in the capacity of commissioner of the poor. In the .spring of 
\()]^ Judge Messenger was elected mayor of Stanton and is now serving 
ill that office in a manner acceptable to the entire community, even many 
"f his p(^litical o[)ponents conceding the wisdom of the ])eoi)le\s choice of 
chief executive. 

On November j6, 1884, Clu-istopher C. Messenger was united in mar- 
riage to Hieodocia 1^. 1^'isk, who was born in Johnson township, Barry 
county, on November 28. i860, daughter of Sidney S. and Elsie (Dunn) 



36 MOM'CAT.M COl'NTY. MICIIIC.AN. 

Fisk, the former of whom is still living-. Mr. and Mrs. Fi.sk were the 
parents of eight children who li\'cd to maturity, Lilly. Theodocia, Hermie, 
Lena, Nellie, Eva, William and Catherine. To Judge and Mrs. Messenger 
one child has heen l)orn, a son, Lee F. Messenger, a tras-eling- salesman, of 
Traverse City, this state, who married /\gnes Brown and has one child, a 
daughter. Catherine. Mrs. Messenger is a member of the Methodist 
Fpisco[)al church and l)oth she and the judge long have heen devoted to 
all measures ha\ing to do with the betterment of social conditions through- 
out the county and are held in the very highest regard by all. Judge Mes- 
senger is a member of the Masonic lodge at Stanton and takes a warm 
interest in the alTairs of that ancient order. He is public spirited, energetic 
and enterprising and for years has been regarded as one of Montcalm's 
most substantial and influential citizens, a man who possesses the confidence 
<md respect of all. 



HOILVCI^ L. B()Wb:R, M. D. 

])r. Horace L. Bower, the oldest physician in point of continuous 
practice in Montcalm countx^ and who has been located at Greenville since 
he recei\ed his diploma in 1864, during which time he has gained a wide 
reputation throughout this section of the state as a physician and surgeon 
of high ability, but who is now living ])ractically retired from the more 
arduous details of his profession, his onetime extensive practice being, to 
a large extent, taken over by his son, Dr. .V. J. Bower, is a native of New 
^'ork, having- been born at Lansing, in Tompkins county, that state, August 
31, 1839. 

Horace L. Bower received his early education in C^ourtland Academy 
at Homer, New York, and in a similar institution at Tthaca. same state, and 
in t86i moved to Michigan, locating at Clarkston, in Oakland county, begin- 
ning in that same year the study of medicine in the office of Dr. J. B. 
Drummond, at Greenville, this county. The next year he entered the medi- 
cal department of the University of Michigan and studied there for two 
years, 1862-63, and in 1864 entered Albany Medical College, from which 
he was graduated that same year. Upon receiving his diploma. Doctor 
Bower returned to Greenville and began the practice of his profession there 
and has since then, with the exception of a few years, been continuously 
engaged in practice at that point, during w^hich time his name and fame 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 3/ 

as a physician have extended beyond the confines of this and adjacent 
connties. 

From the time of its organization, Doctor H. L. Bower served the 
Montcahn County JMedical Society in the capacity of secretary and was 
continuously re-elected to that position until at the meeting of the society 
in 1915 he was elected president of the same. For thirty years he has been 
county physician and for many years has been health officer of Greenville, 
lie is an honored member of the Michigan State Medical Society and for 
some time served as treasurer of the Union Medical Society of Northern 
Michigan. Vor two \ears Doctor Bow'cr was grand councilor of the Royal 
Templars of Temperance, an organization with insurance benetits, and also 
ser\'ed for some time as state medical examiner for that organization. 
Doctor Bower also is a menil)er of the Masonic lodge at Greenville and 
takes a warm interest in Masonic affairs. Although still continuing active 
in his practice, the people of this section being reluctant to permit him to 
retire, his services in obstetric cases l)eing particularly in demand on account 
uf his years of notable success along those lines. Doctor Bower has pretty 
largely turned his practice over to his son. the junior member of the firm 
of ])hysicians, Dr. Albert J. liower, who has perhaps, the most extensive 
practice of any physician in Greenville, and his father is seeking, as the 
years pass, lo spend his later years in the quiet retirement of his plea.sant 
liume. 

In i8()5, the year of his permanent settlement in Greenville, Dr. Horace 
1.. i'ower was united in marriage to ICttie A. Clark, of Detroit, and to this 
union two children ha\e been l)orn. Albert J- cUid George C. Albert J. 
P)Ower, who was born in January, 1880, received his elementary education 
in the schools of Greenville and was graduated from the high school in 
that city in 1898. He then entered the Imiversity of Michigan, at Ann 
Vrbor and was graduated from the literary and medical departments of that 
institution in T903. Upon receiving his diploma, J)r. A. |. Bower was 
gi\en an interneship in the Uakeside hospital at Gleveland, Ohio, where he 
served from 1903 to 1905, during that time receiving a vast amount of 
Naluable practical experience in the practice of his profession. Thus admir- 
ably equipped, the younger lOoctor Bower returned to Greenville and in 
i';o5 became associated with his father in the practice of his profession in 
his home town and has attained a wide general practice throughout this 
section. George C. Bow^r. who was born on December 11, 1872, was grad- 
uated from the Greenville high school in 1890 and is now engaged in the 
produce business at Greenville and Belding. 



^8 MONTCAr-.M C-orXTY, MICHIGAN. 

Doctor and Mrs. Hower are members of the Hapti.st church, in the 
\arioiis l^encficences of which the}- for years ha\'e taken an active interest, 
and their sc>ns are mem])ers of the same chnrcli, while the three men are 
meml)ers of the Masonic lodge at (ireenville, in the affairs of which they 
lake a warm interest. No family hereabout is held in higher regard than is 
the T^>ower family and all enjoy the warm esteem of the entire community. 



HARRY E. WAGAR. 



Harry E. W'agar, the well-known and pojmlar cashier of the I'eoples 
State Bank of I'Mmore, this county, is a native of that village, having been 
l)orn there on June i, 1881, only .son of the late Hon. lulgar S. and Mary 
(l^feiflerj W'agar, for many years prominent and influential residents of 
that village, the former of whom died on jul\' 17, 1^14, and the latter is 
still living there, enjoying many e\idcnces of the high esteem in which she 
is held l)y the entire community. Further details of the history of this 
interesting family are set out in a memorial .sketch relating to the life 01 
the late Hon. bklgar S. W'agar, ])resented elsewhere in this \olume, to which 
tiie attention of the reader is directed in this connection. 

Harry 1'^. W'agar grew up at lulmore. receiving his elementary educa- 
tion in the excellent schools of that village, and upon completing the course 
in the high school entered h'erris Institute at P)ig Rapids, and after a course 
there entered the Michigan Agricultural College, in which institution he 
gained credits sufficient for his graduation. l)ut was ])revented from finish- 
ing with his class l)y reason of illness during the last year of his school 
work. In 1897 he entered his father's bank at I-'.dmore and learned the 
detail work of that old institution literally ''from the ground u])." Tn 1902 
he was made cashier, a position which he is still filling, with satisfaction 
both to the stockholders and to the customers, he long ha\ing been recog- 
nized as one of the ablest young bankers in this section of the .state, enjoying 
the full confidence and respect of business and financial circles generally 
hereal)Out. In addition to his l)anking connection, Mr. W'agar has farming 
interests of tw'O hundred acres in this county and a valuable farm in St. 
Joseph county, l)esides which he is financially interested in se\eral other 
enterprises in the state, and is looked upon as one of Alontcalm's most 
substantial business men. 

On November 16, T902, Harry E. Wagar was united in marriage to 



MONTCAT.M COUNTY. MICFIIGAN. 39 

(iracc Pittenger, who was l)orn al r'reckenridj^c. this state, daughter of 
lames K. and ICva (Kine ) Pittenger, and to this union one son, Guy V.., 
was horn on Septemher to, 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Wagar take a proper 
])art in the social and cultural activities c^f their home community and are 
iield in high esteem by their many friends thereabout. 

Mr. W'agar is a Rc])ubhcan and for years has been a member of the 
town council, now ser\ing his third term as ])resident of the village. He 
is a member of tlie Masonic lodge at Rdmore and of the (Irand Rapids 
( onsistor}-, Scottish Rite Masons, and of the Ancient Arabic Order of the 
.\obles of the Mystic Shrine, at (irand Rapids; a member of the lodge of 
[]]c P)ene\()lent and ]'rotecti\'e Order of l^lks at Ionia and of the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd I'Ydlows at lulmore, in the affairs of which orders he 
takes a warm interest. 



FRED J. OOLI-:. 

h^red J. Oole, well-known attorney-at-law, of Greenville, also justice of 
ihe ])eacc in and for Kureka townshi]). this coimty, and circuit court com- 
missioner, is a nati\e son of Michigan, ha\ing been born in the city of 
Jackson, this state, November 15, r875, son of A. J. and Miranda E. 
iralmer) C,"ole. who for years have been well-known residents of Green- 
ville. 

A. j. C'ole was born in Jackson county, this state, son of Horace Cole 
and uife, the former of whom had come to Michigan from Onondaga 
county, Xew York, at an early day in the settlement of Jackson neighbor- 
li'Hx] and had there established his home, becoming in liis day a fairly 
prominent resident of tliat community, and there grew to manhood, learning 
the carpenter trade which he has followed all the active years of his life. 
When the Givil War broke cmt A. J. Gole enlisted in Company K. Sixteenth 
Ivegiment. Michigan X'olunteer Infantry, and served in that regiment until 
he was \> ounded in battle in 1862. after which he was honoral)ly discharged 
t )r disability. Returning home, he presently recovered from the effect of 
his w(jund and re-enlisted, in 1863, in the Tenth Michigan Cavalry, with 
whicli he served until the close of the war, being attached to the Army of 
the West. 

Some little time after A. J. (dole's return from the army, and while 
engaged in the car[)enter business at Jackson, he met Miranda E. Palmer. 
<^f Onondaga county. New York, who was visiting kinsfolk in Jackson. 



40 MONTCALM COUNTY, AITCIHGAN. 

am', iheir niarriage shortly followed. To this union two children were 
born, both sons, Fred J., the subject of this sketch, and Leon, who died in 
infancy. When the first-born of these sons was about one year old, in 1876, 
his parents incved from Jackson to Greenville and there ha\e made their 
home since, long having been regarded as among tlie most highly-respected 
residents of that place. Mr. Cole followed his trade as a carpenter and 
builder at Greenville for about thirty-five years and has Init lately retired 
from the active pursuits of life. 

Fred J. Gole grew up at Greenville, receiving his elementary education 
in the schools of the village, supplementing the same i)y a course in the 
Detroit GoUege of Law, from which he was graduated with his degree in 
1002. Upon receiving- his diploma, Mr. Gole returned to (Treenville, was 
admitted to the bar and opened an office for the practice ot his profession 
in his iK.inie town and has been thus engaged e\'er since, having gained the 
high regard of his associates at the bar in this and adjoining counties. Mr. 
Gole is a kepul)lican and from the days of his youth has taken an active 
interest in local political affairs. 'I'wice was he appointed circuit court cotn- 
missinner and twice has he been elected to that office, now serving his fourth 
term in th.ai capacity. He was elected justice of the peace and is still serv- 
ing in tb.at cajiacity. giving to all his public service his thoughtful and intel- 
ligent attention. 

On June 6, 1906. PYed J. Gole was united in marriage to Christine 
.\\ery and botli take a warm interest in the social activities of their home 
town, being held in high esteem by all thereal)Out. Mr. Gole is a member 
of LeKoy Lodge Xo. (), Knights of Pythias, at Greenville, and takes a 
warm interest in the affairs of that order. 



JAY 11. GIBBS. 

JaA' H. (jil.)bs, Avell-kno\\n manager of tlie extensi\e interests of the 
firm of j. H. Gibbs & Son at lulmore, this county, and one of the most active 
and enterprisir^g young business men of Montcalm county, is a nati\e of this 
county, having been l)orn in Home township on December 20. 1886. only 
son and second child of the late Lucius H. and Julia R. (TLmscom) Gibbs, 
the former n( whom for many years was one of the leading men of the 
Kdmore con.imunity, a review of whose career in this county, is set out 
in a memorial sketch relating to himself, presen.ted elsewhere in this \olume. 



MONTCAT.M COL'NTY, .MJCHICAN'. 4I 

where also is presented a history of the family of his father, Josiah H. 
(iil)l)s. Avh(j is still living at hxlniore, where for many years before his 
retirement he took a i)rominent part in afl'airs and where he cstabHshed the 
large interests now manag-ed, in tlie third generation of the same family, 
h}- h!> grandson, the suljject of this sk'etch. 

j. 11. (jihl)s recei\'e(l his early education in the schools (jf Edniore 
and was graduated from the high school there in 1Q03, being the only niem- 
l)er of the class of that year, lie then took a special course in the Michi- 
gan Agricultural College, after which he entered Bliss hdectrical School at 
Washington, I). C, from which institution he was graduated with the class 
of igoH, receiving the degree of electrical engineer. Upc>n recei\ing his 
(lil)loma, Mr. (iil)l)s engaged his service as an electrical engineer with the 
Duncan Meter ^^lanufacturing Company of I.afayette, Indiana, with which 
lirm he remained a little more than six months, at the end of which time he 
transferred his services to the Columbia Aleter Company at Indianapolis, 
Indiana, from which concern he presently transferred his services to the 
illincMs Steel Coinpan}" at South Chicago, where for some time he was 
eni])loyed in the meter dei)artment. and then went to the employ of the 
Newaygo Portland Cement Company at .Vewaygo, this state, where he had 
charge of the power i)lant of th:it concern for some time, after wdiich he 
was employed l)y the Ikaver Dam Light and Power Company at Beaver 
Dam, Wisconsin, with which concern he remained until 1913, in which year 
lie returned to lujmore and has since then been general manager and super- 
intendent of the J. H. Gil)bs & Son Hour-mill and elevator and electric-light 
plant at that place, in which form of service he is doing good work. Mr. 
(iibbs is an enterprising and progressive young business man and an expert 
electrician, being a meml)er of the popular Jovian Society, an organization 
made u[) of electrical engineers over the country, which is doing great work 
in i)romoting the general interests of electrical service in the United States. 

On June 25, 1915, Jay II. Gibbs was united in marriage to Marjoric 
['"".merson, who was born in the town of Sterling, in the province of Ontario, 
Canada, daughter of R. V. and Rose (AlcGee) F.merson, prominent resi- 
dents of Alontcalm county, further details of the history of which family 
are set out in a sketch relating to Mr. and Mrs. Emerson, presented else- 
where in this \-olume, and to this union one child has Ix^en born, a son, 
Robert Lucius, born on March 15, 1914. Mr. and Airs. Gibbs take an active 
part in the various social and cultural activities of Edmore and vicinity 
and are held in the highest esteem l)v their manv friends thereabout. 



4-' MONTCAI,M COUX'I'V, MTCIIKIAX. 

Afr. (iil)bs is a Republican and lakes a good citizen's interest in the 
county's political affairs, but is not inchulcd in the office-seekino- class of 
l)oliticians. Tie is senior warden of the Masonic lodge at l''dmore. a metn- 
ber of the consistory of the Ancient .Accepted Scottish Rite Masons at 
Crancl Raj^ids. and of the temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles 
of the Afystic Shrine, at Clrand Ra])ids, and takes a warm interest in the 
affairs of these several branches of the ancient order of Freemasonry. 



SKRI':XUS 1). KFrCTIUM. 

Serenus J3. Ketchum, cashier of the F^dniore State Bank of lulmore, 
this county, and one of the most progressive and influential business men 
of that section of the county, is a native of Canada, having l)een born in 
Ontario, December j, 1873. son of Stephen J. and i^Uen (Kerwin) 
Ketchum, the former a native of Pennsylvania, of Pennsylvania-Dutch 
<lescent. and the latter, of Ireland. 

Stephen j. Ketchum was born on December 2. 1833, and the first lew 
\ears of his life were spent in Canada, his parents ha\ing moved to the 
Donn'nion when he was nine years oi age, later returning to the United 
States and settling at Dunkirk, on Silver creek, in New ^'ork state, where 
biC grew to manhood, lie then returned to Canada and was there married. 
I'Y'bruary 10. 1864. to I'dlen Kerwin, who was born at Wexford, Ireland, 
on December 2^, 1844, daughter of Xassa and Julia ( Cullen ) Kerwin, 
who came to this side of the .\tlantic when b:ilen was a little girl and settled 
in Canada, where the father died when the daughter was but nine years of 
age. T<\jllowing his marriage, Stej)hen J. Ketchum continued to make his 
home in Cana(ki. being engaged in the hotel Inisiness at r'\)rnwick for about 
eight years, at the end of which time he came with his familv to Michigan. 
l)resently locating at lulmore. in this county, where he made his home for 
about thirty-se\en years, engaged during that time as a shoemaker, a trade 
in which he was proficient. In Noxemlier, TQ05, he went to Cour d'Alene, 
Idaho, where he died on f)eceml)er 23, following. During his residence 
in Canada. Stephen J. Ketchum was an Orangeman, and upon locating in 
the states became a Democrat, but in the memorable campaign of 1896 
voted the Republican ticket and so continued a Republican the rest of his 
life. 71ie widow is still li\ing and makes her home with her children, she 
l)eing the mother of four, all of whom are .still living, as follow : Lavina. 



MOXrCAI-M COTNTY. M IC 1 1 KIAN. 43 

vvliu married S. l'^.. Yuiuig and lives in Idaho; J(jhn, of Edinorc, this counly ; 
Margaret .Ann. who married Martin S. Gray and hves at Lansing, this 
state, and Serenus 1)., the sn1)iect of tliis sketch. 

Sercnus I). Ketchum was about four years of age when he came to 
Michigan with his parents and he grew up at luhnore. He was graduated 
from the village high school, after which he took a s[)ecial course for teachers 
at I'Y'rris Institute at liig Rai)ids and was engaged as a teacher in the dis- 
trict schools of Montcalm county for about eight years, at the end of which 
time, in i8i)/, he entered the ser\ ice of the I'.dinore State IJank, with which 
old iinancial institution he has been connected e\er since. .Mr. Ketchimi 
began his Ijanking career literally "at the bottom of the ladder."' and dis- 
played such pn)ficiency in the details of bank work, that he was advanced 
to the ])osition of assistant cashier and in ic)io was made cashier, a position 
of trust and responsibility he has occupied ever since, discharging the exact- 
ing duties of the same with entire satisfaction to all concerned. Mr. Ketchum 
is a stockholder and a director of the bank and in addition to his wcM'k in 
that connection is also engaged in the general insurance lousiness, in which 
line he has been successful. Tie is also interested in the general welfare of 
his home town and is secretary of the L. IJarber ("reamerv and Produce 
Company, of Edmore. a prosperous and growing concern. 

On July lo, 1904, vSerenus D. Ketchum was united in marriage to E. 
May Dean, who was born at Edmore on July 2=,, 1885, daughter of H. H. 
and Mary j. (Eletcher) Dean, and to this union one child, Serena May, 
was born on Alarch (), igo^^). H. IE Dean was born at Kalamazoo, this 
^tate, on Xo\ emljer 7. i860, the only child of his parents. His father died 
when he was eleven years old, leaving him to aid in the support of his 
widowed mother. Tie grew up in the state of Iowa and later came to 
Michigan, .settling at Ionia, later moving to Edmore. where for a few years 
he worked for the railroad company, after which he started in business for 
himself, opening a general store, and was thus engaged for a period of 
twenty-fix e years, at the end of which time he moved to Vancouver, British 
' "olumbia. where- he and his wife now make their home. Mrs. Dean is a 
native of Canada and was l)orn on .■\])ril to, j86i. (laughter of Orin Eletcher 
and wife, 1)oth natives of the Dominion, and she grew to womanhood in 
that country. To IT. IT. Dean and wife three children have been bom, E. 
May, who married Mr. Tvetchum : Herman, deceased, and George, who is 
with his parents in Vancouxer. Before her marriage, Mrs. Ketchum had 
lieen engaged as a teacher in the public schools of Montcalm county for 
three years, having taught in district schools and in the schools. at Coral. 



44 MONTCALM: COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 

and she and Mr. Ketchiim take an earnest part in the various social and 
ciiUural activities of their home neighborhood, being held in high regard by- 
all thereabout. ]\ir. Ketchum is an Odd P'ellow and a member of the 
encami)ment of that order; a member of the Loyal Order of .Moose and 
formerly was a member of the Knights of the Maccabees. He is a con- 
tributing member of the Young Men's Christian Association at Detroit, in 
the activities of which he takes much interest, and is keyman of the asso- 
ciation at luhnore. being interested in all movements designed to elevate 
the standards of living hereabout. 



RICHARD IT. O'DOXAT-D. 

Richard H. O'Donald, the proprietor of a private bank in Howard 
City, Michigan, \vas born in Washington county, Xew York, in September, 
icS49, the sun of John and b'diza (Nelson) O" Donald, the f<3nuer of wIkjui 
was born in Ireland and the latter in Hebron, Xew Vork. John O'Donald 
came from Ireland to the United States when four years of age with an 
uncle and, on reaching maturity, worked for twenty-six years by the month. 
He was prosperous and successful and invested his savings, being worth, at 
the time of his death, al.)Out one hundred thousand dollars. He and his 
wife were members of the JNlethodist ]''4)iscopal church, in which the\' were 
faithful workers and liberal supporters. They were the parents of seven 
children, three o\ wIkjui are now living, Richard 11., the subject of this 
sketch; Albert, who is the proprietor of the Howard City elevator, and 
Mary, J., the wife of T. D. Southworth. 

Richard H. O'Donald was reared on his father's farm and was edu- 
cated in the public schools of I'oultney, X'ermont. where he was also grad- 
uated from a business college. At the age of eighteen, he left hoiue and 
went to 'rwinsl)urg, Ohio, where he worked in a general store for his cousin. 
1 le worked here four years, the lirst year clearing one hundred dollars, the 
second year twcj hundred, and each of the last two years, three hundred. 
Tn .\ugust. 1873, he left Ohio with two hundred dollars and came to Howard 
City, Michigan, and, for fifteen years, engaged in bu}'ing shingles, in which 
business he was successful, being a member of the lumber firm of Lovely 
tK. O'Donald for ten years. In 1897, '" partncrshij) with a Mr. Scott, Mr. 
O'Donald bought out a private bank, which was known under the firm 
name of O'Donald & Scott, and which was conducted under that name until 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 45 

1910, when 2ylr. O'Donald purchased Mr. Scott's interest, and has since 
conducted the bank alone under the name of the Richard TI. O'Donald Bank. 
Ik-sides his l)anking interests, Mr. O'Donaki is the owner of three thousand 
acres of fine Land in the vicinity of Howard Cit}-, inchiding some city prop- 
erty in Howard City. 

Air. O'Donald was married to Hattie Lusk, of Twinsburg, Ohio, and 
to them were born two daughters. May J., a graduate of an educational 
institution at Kalamazoo, Michigan, and now the wife of iVrie Cook, of 
Howard City, and Grace M., the wife of F.arl Phelps, an attorney of Grand 
Rapids. Mrs. Hattie O'Donald died and Air. O'Donald was married sub- 
se(iuently to Stella M. Nichols. 

In 1872 Mr. O'Donald became a member of the Alasonic fraternity at 
Twinslnirg, and also joined the chapter at that place. Politically, Air. 
O'Donald is a Democrat, but, owing to his extensive banking and real-estate 
interests, he has never had much time to devote to politics. Air. O'Donald 
is one of the most popular citi/.ens of Howard City and ATontcalm county, 
\\here he is held in the highest esteem and where he exerts a wide influence 
in all public movements. 



CASS T. WRIGHT. 



Cass T. Wright, prominent miller and foundryman, of Greenville, this 
C(ninty, who from his youth has been identified with the I>est interests of 
that thri\ing city, long having been one of the most energetic business men 
in that part of the count}-, is a native of the neighboring state of Wisconsin, 
having been born at Wrightstown, Brown county, that state, June 30, 1846, 
son of L. B. and Alaryette (Thomi)son) Wright, wdio afterward became 
])ioneer residents of Greenville, this county, and prominent factors in the 
dexelopment of the commercial and social life of that community. 

L. B. Wright was born in the town of Lafayette, in Onondaga county, 
New A'ork. son of Hoel S. Wright, w^ho in 1833 lx)"ght an extensive tract 
o! land in Brown county, AMsconsin, laid out the town of Wrightstown and 
was successfully engaged in promoting the sale of town lots and the general 
interests of the town which bore his name until t866, when he and his 
family and the families of his two sons, T.. B. and F. N. Wright, came to 
this state and settled at Greenville, this county, immediately becoming promi- 
nent factors in the development of the region thereabout. 

When the Wrights came to ATontcalm county the pine timber was still 



4') MONTCALM rOlNTY, MTCrtlGAN. 

Standing in the Greenville region and F. N. and T.. B. Wright engaged, as 
a j)artnership, in the lumher l)nsiness. L. B. \Vright died in 1868 and his 
son, C'ass T., the subject of this sketch, took a quarter interest in the con- 
cern and the business was carried on until 1889, in which year it was closed 
out, the timber having been reduced to such an extent that it was no longer 
])rofital)le to work it. F. X. Wright and Cass T. Wright then engaged in 
the agricultural inii)lenient business, which was continued as a partnership 
concern for a while, after which C"ass T. Wright took over the whole busi- 
ness and has since been o]>erating it alone. In the meantime, in 1880. the 
Weights had started in the tlour-iuilling business, in which they liecame 
ijuite successful, and later Cass T. Wright bought the old Fartlow mill, 
which lie als(.) has carried on, not acti\ely identified with it, but a priiue 
factor in the operation of the same. 

In a(l(h"tion to In's cxtensixe milling and commercial interests, Mr. 
Wright is identified with a numl)er of other prominent enterprises in and 
about (Ireenville. Tie helped organize the (ireenxillc State Bank, ')f which 
!'\ X. Wright was ])rcsident until his death, and was a director in that con- 
cern for some time, lie has been the treasurer of the (]ibson Refrigerator 
( "omi)any since its organi>^ation in 1907, l.)eing also one of the directors of 
the company, and is vice-president of the 1 lolland-St. Louis Sugar ("om- 
pany, as well as a stockholder and director of the company. In local civic 
affairs Air. Wright has Ijeen equally active and has done much toward the 
advancement and promotion of the general interests oi (ireenxille, ha\ing 
ser\ed two (;r three terms as ma\'or of the city and several terms as alder- 
man, in all his [niblic service exer haxing had an C}'e single to the public 
good, so that he long has been looked upon as one of Cireen\ille's most 
])ul)lic-spirited and progressixe citizens. .\s a Republican he ever has given 
liis thoughtful attention to the affairs of that ])arty in this county and for 
years has l)een regarded as one (_)f the leaders of the partv in this section. 

On Xovember (), i868, Cass 1\ Wright was united in marriage to 
Helen b^iller, daugliter of Benjamin Fl. Fuller, (jne of (ireen\ ille's most 
])ronn"nent citizens in his (\'a\\ and to this union six children were born, as 
follow: L. P>., who is associated with his father in the latter"s business in 
r.ireenville; I'Ahel. wife of William Patterson, who also is connected with 
the Wright enterprises; Jesse ("., who acts as his father's traNcling repre- 
sentati\'e. making his headquarters and home in (irand Rapids; h\ay, also 
connected with his father's interests: Hugh, who also has an active part in 
the develoj^ment of the W^right enterprises, and Vivien, wife of Stanley 



MONTCALM COUNTY. MTCFflCAN. 47 

Keni]>, who is connected with the business altairs of his father, K. A. 
Kemp. The mother of these children died in March, 1911. The W'rij^ht 
Tamil}' long" has been actively interested in the social and cultural life of the 
community and is held in the hij;hcst esteem throughout that entire section 
of the county. 



FKEDIiRRK !•:. R.\X.\1-:V. 

Frederick \i. Ranney, mayor of Greenville, and one of the l)est known 
business men of Montcalm county, Michigan, was born in Massachusetts, 
vn July J, i'^S3^ ^i ■■^<^-'ii of Charles and A'ancy (Gray) J^anney, wh(; were 
farmers in Xcw J.uigland during their lives, the f(jrmer dying in 1867, and 
I he latter in 1869. 

Mr. Ranney received his early education in the pul)lic schools of the 
Xew I'jigland states, after which he attended classes at an academy of his 
locality for some time, and then engaged in farming until he was nineteen 
}ears of age. .\bout the year 1872, he came to Michigan, and located at 
l^elding, Ionia county, where he worked as a carpenter, for about four 
years and then he engaged in the li^•ery business for a number of years, 
at R>elding. Some time later, Frederick 1"^ Ranney entered the manufac- 
turing business at Belding, Ionia county, and was there vice-[)resi(lent and, 
afterwards, ])rcsident of the TJelding ^^lanufacturing Gompanv, until the 
year 1892, when Mr. Ranney moved to (ireenville, Montcalm county, where 
be established the Ranney Refrigerator Gom])any, a stock company which 
he organized and of which he became the first ])resident. a concern which 
under the management of Mr. Kanney has become one of the largest 
refrigerator manufactories of the United States. In October. 1915. he 
bought the Fhelps hotel, of Greenville, the only lu'st-class American house 
«»t this city. 

In 1875. Mr. Ranney was married to Maiy P-llis. who was born in 
ionia county. Alichigan. and to this marriage were born four children: 
I'^-llis \V., who after graduating from the Michigan Agricultural College. 
of Fansing, became secretary and treasurer of the Ranney Manufacturing 
Company; Feroy, who after graduating from the L'niversitv of Michigan, 
at Ann .\rbor, became assistant secretary of the same company; Carrie, 
who graduated from Olivet College, and now is a social welfare worker of 
Grand Rapids. Michigan, and Hattie. who lives at home. Tn T900. ATrs. 



48 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

Ranncy died, and in 1901, ]\Ir. Ranney was married to Airs, l^lizaheth 
Beardslec. "ro this marriage no cliildren have been horn. 

Air. Ranney for many years has taken a good citizen's interest in the 
pohtical circles of (Jreenville and of Montcalm connty, serving- unselfishly 
as a private citizen, \vi)rking- industrioitsly in the ranks of his j)arty. until 
the election of T915, when Mr. Ranne}- was elected as mayor of Green\-ille. 
the duties of which he is now fulfilling in a most efficient manner. 

]'>atcrnally. Mr. Ranney is a leading memhcr of the Knights of Rvthias, 
and is a prominent metnl)er of the hVec and Accej)ted Masons, ha\-ing 
attained to the vShrine and the thirty-second degree. 



MAXXTXG RUTAN. 

Alanning Rutan was born on September 25, i(So<S, at New Providence, 
Union county, New Jersey, and died at Greenville, Montcalm county, Michi- 
gan, on December 9, 1,886. His parents were Abraham and Hannah (Ship- 
man) Rutan, the former a mechanic and in moderate circumstances. When 
fourteen years of age his school days ended, and he was ap])renticed for a 
period of some years to a country storekeeper, his remuneration being his 
l)oard and clothing and fifty dollars in cash. 

In T825 Mr. Rutan formed a ])artnership with a young friend and 
they opened a store in Dover, New Jer.sey. At the end of five vcars he 
retired from this partnershi]), engaging in other business, Init later, again, 
returned to Dover and re-entered the store business there, where he remained 
until, in 1851, he came to Michigan in the interests of a Wisconsin pur- 
chase which he had pre\iously made. Noting the fine character of the 
country in the vicinity of the present city of Greenville, he effected an 
exchange of his Wisconsin propert}' for seven hundred acres of land in 
MoJitcalm county, a portion of which he had surveyed and platted as a 
village site, and on October i, 1851, having lx)ught a stock of goods, he 
commenced business as a permanent resident, erecting a store and dwelling 
house for the purpose. 

.Soon finding that his land business demanded all his time. Mr. Rutan 
disposed of his interest in the store, and de\-oted his attention to the sale of 
building sites, ^^•hich, owing to the rapid increase in population, were rapidly 
sold. Later, he re})urchased the mercantile business, which he continued 
successfully for five years, when it was resigned to his only son. F.ugene 





7///r/f^ 






MON'rCAf.M COl.'NTY. MlCJllGAX. 49 

ivLitan. who. since, following in his father's footsteps, has made it the means 
..I a successful husiness career. Air. Rutan was also extensively engaged in 
I be himl)er and saw-mill Imsiness. and assisted in the organization of the 
lirst National Bank of Ionia, of whicli he w^as a director for many years. 
ih also took part in the organization of the i^rst National Bank of (ireen- 
\ ille, incorporated in 1872. of which for many years he also served as 
director. In 1876 he was elected ^)resident of this hank, and continued in 
iliat (.)rhce until his death. 

Mr. Uutan was married in jHt,i to xMiss Melinda Third, of Dover. New 
Irrsey. Their son, luigcne i\utan, was l)orn July 3, 1844, and is one 
m!" ( iieenville's most respected and prominent citizens. Mr. and Mrs. Rutan 
w ere (.)f the (original ele\'en ^^•ho organized the Congregational church society, 
<)\ (ireenville, and were always active workers in the church, it .standing 
i'\] ground donated In- Mr. Rutan for the purpose. The ground on which 
:-iands the Baptist church and the Union school building was also given 
1)\ him, and he helped to build many of the best churches and school 
houses in the county. Olivet College owes much to him, as it was the object 
of his largest gifts. Its T.atin chair was endowed by him. and bears his 
name. Oberlin College, the ("hicago Congregational Seminary, and numer- 
ous other educational and religious institutions owe him a debt of gratitude 
fur ol"t-repeated contributicnis to their support. 

The following extracts are cjuoted from the Greenville Independent, 
i>t" December 16 1886: "In all his life and multifarious relations with men, 
.\lr. Rutan was a transparent man of principle. Tie never sjwke or acted 
<mt of a self-conscious .s]:>irit; he never did anything for effect. Mr. Rutan 
was particularly remarkable for his benevolence, although a strict economist 
in all his |)ersonal affairs. Tie gave large sums of money and a great 
• iniount of ))roperty to various benevolent and religious institutions. But 
few. howexer, were permitted to know the extent of his bene\-olencc, TTe 
gave without show, and distributed his means in a quiet and .secret manner. 
i'nring his residence in Greenville his donations amounted to very much 
ninre than his remaining estate, and can be reckoned by the hundreds of 
diousands of dollars. .A man of the strictest integrity and soundest of 
temperance principles, he has moved and lived among us for thirty-six 
vears. the finest example of strict economy and great benevolence, upright- 
ness of character, and every qualification w'hieh goes to make up the pure, 
nuble, exalted Christian gentleman, the writer has ever known among lay- 
men." 

(Ah) 



50 MONTCALM COl'NTY, MICHTGAN. 

FRANK VV. BATLEY. 

Frank W. Bailey, the efficient treasurer of Montcalm county, and a 
citizen who has, for many years taken an important place in public and 
official alifairs of the community, as well as being a man who was successful 
as a farmer and stock raiser, was born, in Nelson township, Kent county, 
Michigan, on January 6, 1858, the son of James J. and Mary A. (Richard- 
son) Bailey, natives of New York state, the former born in Cayuga county, 
the latter in Allegheny county. 

James J. Bailey, came with his parents, and located in Nelson town- 
ship, Kent county, Michigan, when he was a young man, and after his 
marriage to Mary .\. Richardson, in Nelson township, who had come to 
that locality with her parents, the elder Bailey engaged in general farming, 
a line of work which he followed for the remainder of his days. 

iM-ank \\\ Bailey received his education in the commmon schools of 
Nelson township, after which he lived on the home farm until he was seven- 
teen years of age and then, his father having died some seven years earlier, 
I'Yank W. Bailey disposed of his interest in the home place and secured 
land in Maple \'alley townshi]), }*lontcalm county, a place which was the 
homestead of his grandmother. Elizabeth Richardson, who had secured the 
land on I-'ebruary (S, 1864, the deed to the land having been signed by 
General (irant. To the eighty acres which he obtained, Frank W. Bailey 
added fifty-eight acres by purchase and lived there alone as a farmer, culti- 
vating his soil in the summer and devoting a part of his time, in the winter, 
to \\ork in the lumljer cami)s of the region. .\s a farmer, Mr. Bailey w^as 
successful, his crops being of an excellent (|uality, while his acti\'it}' in raising 
Shorthorn dairy cattle and Oxford-d(3wn sheep, resulted in his securing 
awards and prizes at county fairs, in 1914, at Greenville. Mr. Bailey having 
received the first award as the owner of the cow producing the most liutter- 
fat. 

In AFa}-, 1879. I-Yank W. Bailey was married to Augusta A. Gook, who 
was born in Ontario, Canada, the daughter of William G. and Arvilla 
(Bowman) Cook, both of whom w^ere Ijorn in Ontario, Canada, and who 
came to Michigan, and located in Nelson township, where William G. (^;)ok 
^\as a successful farmer. To the marriage of Frank W. and Augusta A. 
Bailey have l)een born two children : Guy, a farmer of Maple Valley town- 
ship, Montcalm county, who married Sarah Reynolds and to whom has 
been born one child, .'\nna M.. who lives at home. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICIIJGAN. 5 1 

Few men have taken a more important place in the public life of Mont- 
calm county, than Frank W. Bailey. While yet a youth, he was a member 
of the local school board, and only a short time later he was appointed to 
fill a vacancy on the board of su]>ervisors, at the next election being elected 
to continue in that ofiice. For a few years after this time, Mr. Bailey 
retired from public life as a result of the activities of the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry, but after this wave had passed, he was again elected as a supervisor, 
!-erving some }'ears, until his entire record as a supervisor in Montcalm 
extends over twelve years of efficient and unselfish ser\ice to his consti- 
tuents. 

In 1914. I'rank W. Bailey was elected to the office of treasurer of 
Montcalm county, taking office in January, 1915, since which time he has 
been capably conducting the alfairs of this im])ortant office of trust and 
honor. 

bVank W. Bailey has long been known as a citizen interested in the 
support of clean politics and in the promoting of the candidacy and election 
of competent and efficient officers, his service along this line having given 
him a rank of esteem and honor among the people of Montcalm county. 



CTJF'TON H. CFKMl^NT. 

One of the pleasantcst and most aftable men in Montcalm county is 
(Jlifton H. dement, a retired merchant of Sheridan, a veteran of the Civil 
War, who saw nuich actixe service in that great struggle, and for many 
3ears one of the most active and influential politicians hereabout. 

Clifton H. Clement was l)orn in the town of Jefferson, Seneca county, 
Xew York, on January it. ICS44. son of John D. and Margaret L. (Hopkins) 
Clement, the former of whom was born at Bristol FTill, New York, in 1826, 
son of John Clement, who was born in the Mohawk valley and was. a soldier 
ill the patriot army during the Revolutionary War, while Margaret Hopkins 
was of the family which \vas honored by Step. Hopkins, of Rhode Island, 
one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. John D. Clement 
was reared in Xew York state, where he married, and in 1850 came with 
his family to Michigan, locating in St. Joseph county, where he bought a 
farm. The next year, however, aroused by the tales of the great gold-finds 
'11 California he left his family and started for the gold-fields, where he 
remained for four years, at the end of which time he returned to his family. 



52 MOXTCAl.M rOl'NTY, MlClllGAX. 

much richer in experience, but httle, if any, better off in material wealth,, 
having failed to "strike it rich." In 1865 John D. Clement and his wife 
left St. Joseph county and mo\'ed to Mecosta county, where Ixjth spent their 
last days. They were the parents of four children, three sons and a daugh- 
ter, namely: Allen E., now deceased, who served as a Union soldier during 
the Civil War, a member of the Jlle^'enth Regiment, Michigan \^)luntcer 
[nfantry; Charles JM., Iwrn on July ti, 1838, who also served as a soldier 
in the Seventeenth Ixegiment, Michigan \"olunteer Infantry, in the Union 
arniy ; Clarissa C., wife of Jay Xeadau, of Milll)rook, this state, cuul Clifton 
n., the subject of this sketch. 

Clifton H. Clenunit's boyhood was s])ent on the farm and at twelve 
years of age he started to make his way in the world. His first employ- 
ment was as a clerk in a general store at Ix-onidas, Michigan, and while 
working there the Ci\il War l)roke out. He enlisted in Coni])any C. Seven- 
teenth Regiment, ^lichigan Vcjlunteer Infantry, attached to the Ninth Corps 
of the Army of the Potomac, later to the Army of the Cumberland, and 
was in the Mississippi cam])aign. during which he particii>ated in the siege 
of X'icksburg and was present when that Southern stronghold fell. At the 
battle of Antietam, .Mr. Clement received a serious wound, but rcco\'ered 
and was with his regiment until the close of the war, receiving then an 
honorable discharge. Returning to St. Joseph county at the close of the 
war, ^Ir. Clement located at Colon, where he learned the shoe-maker's trade 
and some time later engaged in the boot and shoe business, and presently 
enlarged his premises into a general store and was there engaged in lousiness 
until May of 1883. at ^vhich time he came to Montcalm county and opened 
a general store at Sheridan, where he continued in business until 1906, in 
which year he retired and since that time has l)cen living comfortably at 
Sheridan, enjoying the rewards of his active life mid looking after the 
\-arious interests which he has retained in and about Sheridan. Mr. Cdement 
is c|uite well circumstanced and is the owner of three store rooms in Sheri- 
dan, besides other valuable ])roperty. 

In August, T884, Clifton H. Clement was united in marriage to Lou 
M. Bachelor and to this union two children have been Ijorn, a son and a 
daughter. Jay Dee. l)orn in May. 1886. who was graduated from the Sheri- 
dan high school and from Ferris Institute at Big Rapids and is now a suc- 
cessful merchant at Detroit, and Grace A., born in 1888, who is the wife 
of Lloyd Towner, of Sheridan. 

Mr. Clement is a Democrat and for years has taken an active i)art in 
the ])olitical affairs of Montcalm county, 1)eing at present chairman of the 



AIOXTi'AI.M COUNTY, MICIII(]AX. 53 

Democratic coniity central coimiiittee. In other days he was a well-known 
and popular iigure in the Democratic councils in this part of the state. Mr. 
( lenient was a member of the Michigan delegation to the Democratic 
national convention at Baltimore, which nominated Woodrow Wilson for 
['resident, and took a prominent i)art in the activities of that delegation. 
Despite his Icnig service in liehalf of his party, Mr. Clement has never been 
an (.)ffice seeker and the only i)ul)lic office he ever held was that of su])er- 
\ iscjr, during" his residence in ]\lecosta county. 

Mr, and Mrs. Clement take an active in.terest in lodge work, the former 
being a member of the Masonic and Odd ]'"ellows lodges at Sheridan and 
liis wife a member of the Order of the b^astern Star and of the Daughters 
of Kebekah, the woman's au.xiliaries to those popular orders, and both are 
held in the very highest esteem by their many friends in thai section of the 
county. Mr. Clement has attained to the encampment dej;rce of the Odd 
I'ellows and Mrs. Clement has passed all the chairs in the orders to which 
she is attached. .Mr. Clement also is a member of the IJenexolent and 
l'rotecti\e Order of bdks, Ijeing attached to the lodge of that society at 
Ionia, and is a meml)er of Tom Custer Post of the Grand .\rm) ^)i the 
IveiHiblic. in the affairs of which he for years has taken a prominent part. 
His long connection with the business life of ^Montcalm county ga\e him a 
iirm ])lace in the confidence and regard of commercial and linancial circles 
iiereabout. and he is looked upon as one of the honorable and substantial 
citizens of this commonwealth. 



.\Cb7>JKI) ].. STICAR.^S. 



Alfred L. Stearns, county clerk (^f Montcalm county, was born in 
b'erris townshii). this county, on June 7, 1874, son of Horatio and V.itd 
i Omans ) Stearns, natives of Xew A'ork state, both of whom had lived in 
I'^erris township since their early youth, their respective parents having 
b'een early settlers of that township. 

Horatio Stearns is the son of Law.son and bjuily (Ferris) Stearns, who 
I'migrated from Xew A'ork state tc) (icauga county, Ohio, and thence to 
I his county, settling here in what is now known as Ferris township, that 
lown.ship having been named for its first settler, ITijah Ferris, brother of 
Mrs. Stearns, who had ])receded the Stearns family here some years. Law- 
son Stearns became a well-established farmer of that section of the county 



54 MONTCAl.M COUNTY. MICPUGAN. 

and during the Civil War served the Union as a soldier in a Michigan regi- 
ment. He died at his home in Ferris township at the age of sixty-five 
years. His widow survived him many years, having been eighty-three 
years of age at the time of her death. They were the parents of seven 
children, Mary Etta, Emily J., Joseph L., John E., Joel, Horatio and Ella. 

Having been but eleven years of age when his parents settled in Mont- 
calm county, Horatio Stearns iinished his schooling in Eerris township and 
upon reaching manhood's estate became the owner of a small farm of forty 
acres, later renting and tilling an adjoining tract of forty acres in connec- 
tion with his own farm, lie also taught school during the winter for three 
terms. He married ICtta Onians, daughter of James and Anna Omans, early 
settlers in Eerris townshij), who also had come to this county from New 
York state. James Omans and his wife were well-known residents of 
h'erris township and both lived to a ripe old age. They were the parents 
of nine children, George, John, Martha, Mary, Erank, William, Irene, Etta 
and h'lorcnce. To Horatio and Etta (Omans) Stearns were born five chil- 
dren, as follow: Alfred L., the innnediate subject of this sketch; Owen J., 
of Eureka, Clinton county, this state; junily A., Avho married Oliver Hyde, 
of Essex township, ("linton county, Michigan; Addie M., who died at the 
age of sixteen years, and Essie, who is still with her parents. When sixty 
years of age. Horatio Steams moved from this county to Sumner, Gratiot 
county, this state, where he is now serving as po.stmaster, his daughter, 
Essie, acting as assistant. Mr. and Mrs. Stearns are members of the Metho- 
dist church and their children were reared in that faith. 

Alfred L. Stearns was reared on the paternal farm in Eerris town- 
ship, receiving his education in the district schools of that township, and 
remained at home until his marriage in 1893, after which for several years 
he rented a farm, prospering in his farming operations until he was able 
to buy a farm of forty acres, to which is added a tract of twenty acres 
which his wife inherited. During all this time, Mr. Stearns had been 
paying considerable attention to the political afi'airs of the county and extend- 
ing his acquaintance and was gradually getting in line for political prefer- 
ment. He had ser^-ed the people of the township very acceptably as clerk 
for a period of four years and had t)een supervisor for six years; therefore, 
when he received the nomination for the office of county clerk on the 
Republican ticket in 191 4, he was elected by a good majority in the ensuing 
election in the fall. He then rented his farm to a tenant and moved to 
Stanton, the county seat, where he is now living, having entered upon the 
duties of his office in January, 191 5. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 55 

On September 24, 1893, /Vlfrcd L. Stearns was united in marriage to 
Icnnie Jolley, who was l.)orn in Ferris township, this coimty, daughter of 
i'rancis L. and Margaret ( I'y^e) Jolley, natives of Ohio and early settlers 
II' Uiis county. I'Vancis T.. jolley died in 1905, at the age of iifty-ninc 
>,cars. I lis widow is still living, being now sixty eight years of age. They 
were the parents of live children, Blanche, Maude, Jennie, Charles and 
( iladys. Mrs. Stearns' paternal grandmother, Mrs. (Charles Jolley, is still 
lixing, at the advanced age of ninety years. She and her husl)and were 
the parents of four children, of whom Mrs. Stearns' father w^as the eldest, 
ilie others I)eing Lemuel. Douglas and Dora. Afrs. Stearns' maternal grand- 
j)arents. Curry I'yle and wife, were nati\es of Ohio and early settlers in 
this count}-, who lixed here to good old ages. They were the parents of 
tliree children. Martha, ^Margaret and a son who died in early youth. 

To .\lfred T.. and Jennie (Jolley) Stearns five children have been born, 
I'lossie. Elsie, Burdell, Frances and TToratio. Mr. and Mrs. Stearns are 
po[.)ular among their tuany friends in this county and are held in high 
regard bv all who knew them. 



NKWTON W. XKWHOUSE. 

The Si anion Clipper- ffcrald. one of the best-known and most widely 
t irciilated weekly newspapers in this part of Michigan, has been aj)pearing 
111 its hyphenated form since the s])ring of 1913, a consolidation of the 
Slaiifon Clipper and the MonteaUn Herald having been eiTected at that 
Hiiie, following the loss the latter i)aper suffered by fire; Mr. Newhouse, 
iiun sole owner of the Clipper, buying the good-w^ll of the unfortunate 
llrraJd and merging its identity w'ith that of his paper, at the same time 
i<iking into partnership with him R. A. Carothers, since which time the 
' lipper-Uerald has been edited and published by Newhouse & Carothers, 
'■' firm well equipped for the exacting duties it is performing on behalf of 
ihe |)eo])le of ^lontcalm county. 

Xewton W. Newhouse w'as born on a farm in Marlborough township, 
>-tark county, Ohio, December 14, 1858, son of William and Nancy (ATetz) 
\ewhouse, both natives of Ohio. Both William Newhouse and Nancy Metz 
'iid been previously married, to the former's first union there having been 
I'^ni six children, as follow: B. hTank, David B., Simon, Leonard W., 
Maria, who married John R. Stratton. and Velina, who married Simon C. 



5U MONTCALM (Of.VTY, MICIIIGAX. 

l^iratton, a brother of John. To Xancy Metz's first marriage four cliildren 
were born, lienjaniin, Frances, Hannah and .Mary. To the union of W'ilHani 
and N'ancy (\Metz) Xewhouse two cliildren were born, Xewton W'.. the 
subjecl. of this sketch, and Jda (j., who married William A. Corey and lives 
at St. Petersburg, F'lorida. 

William Xewhouse was a son of David Xewhouse and wife, natives 
of an I^astern state and pioneers of Columbiana county, Ohio, who were 
the parents of the following children: William, Da\ id. Jefferson, Anthony, 
Hannah. Rachel and Rebecca. William, father of the Stanton editor, was 
a farmer and carpenter and lived most ui his life in Stark county, Ohio, 
lie died in icSgi, at Ionia, Michigan, at the adxanced age of sc\enty-nine 
years, llis wife had ])rece(ied him to the gra\e many \-ears before. 

The youth of Xewton W. Xewhouse was spent on the home farm in 
Ohio and his early schooling was ol)tained in the district school in the 
neighborhood of his home there. At the age of thirteen, in 1871, he came 
to .Michigan, locating at Muir, where for two \ears he recei\ed the benefit 
of further schooling. At the age of fifteen he began learning the [)rinting 
trade at .\Iuir and has been engaged in the printing business e\"er since. 
In i<^75 he came to .Montcalm count}-. l(.)cating at vStantcju, where he l)egan 
working in one of the i)rinting offices, lie ])resentlv became foreman of 
the U'ccL'ly Clif^pcr, a position he retained until 1894, in which year he 
bought the Clipper and became the editor and publisher of the same. On 
I'ebruary fO. 7913. the office of the Montcahii Herald at Stanton was 
destroyed by fire and Mr. Xewhouse then bo'.ight the good-will of that pai)er 
and merged the name of the same with that of his pa])er, making it the 
Clipper-1 lerahi, under which title the paper since has been published. On 
\])ril I of the year, Mr. Xewhouse formed a ]jartnershii) with R. .\. 
< "arothers, who had had long experience in the office of the Clipper, and the 
j)a])er has since l)een jmblished by the firm of Xewhouse & (/arothers. The 
Monfeahi! Herald was estal)lishe(l at Stanton in \^C)-j and the Clipper was 
established in 1879, both ])apers long ha\ing been regarded as among the 
most influential new s])apers in this section of the state. The ])aper"s ])oliti- 
cal ))olicy is in accordance with the principles of the Rejmblican partv and 
under the present management the pai)er has been made a force in the 
comnuinity. The firm of Xewhouse & ("arothers also is extensixely engaged 
in the job-|)rinting business and has a wide i)atronage in that line, both 
members of the firm l)eing very pojmlar hereabout. 

On October ri. 1883, X'ewton W. X'ewhouse was united in marriage 
to ^Finnic I. Zinkhan, who was born in Tfillsdalc countv. this state, daugh- 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MTC 1 IICAN. 57 

■<! of Junius M. and Mary ((iaj^c) Zinkhan, both natives of Michigan, who 
iDUg ha\c l)een residents of Stanton, this county, where Mr. Zinkhan is 
cn<:(aged in the jewelry l)usiness and where he enjoys the chstinction oi 
being- the oldest business man in the city. To Mr. and Airs. Newhouse two 
children have l)een liorn. Raymond and Mildred M., the former of whom 
(lied at the age of ten months and the latter of whom is living at home 
with her parents. .Mr. and Mrs. Newhouse are members of the Congre- 
gational church and take an active interest in all good works in the com- 
munity and are held in the highest esteem throughout the entire county. 

Mr. Xewhouse has for years, by virtue of his editorial position. gi\en 
close attention to political aifairs and is looked ui)on as one of the leaders 
of the Republican i)arty in this section, b'or two terms he served the people 
of Stanton as city treasurer and in many ways has manifested his interest 
in the public welfare. Tie is a prominent Mason and has attained to the 
chapter in that ancient order. He also is a member of the Odd Fellows 
lodge at Stanton and has attained to the encampment of that order; in 
both of these orders being held in high regard by his lodge brethren. .As a 
public-s])irited citizen, Air. Xewhouse is e\er acKocatiug through the columns 
of his paper such measures as will advance the general welfare of the com- 
munity in which he has long and so faithfully labored, and the many expres- 
sions of confidence heard concerning him and his work are accepted as con- 
vincing e\idences that his labors on behalf of the public are properly appre- 
ciated. 



DET.OS AIJ.AX TOWLI-:. 

.\ resident of this county since his early boyhood, there is no citizen of 
tb.e county who takes a deei)er interest in the dex'elopment of the com- 
mrinity along j)r(j])er lines than does Delos A. Towle, a ])rominent real- 
estate dealer of Stanton and proprietor of the only set of abstract books in 
Montcalm county. .Mr. Towle is an energetic and public-spirited citizen 
and e\er is found at the forefront in movements having as their object the 
adxancement of the interests of this secticm of the state. 

Delos .Mian 1\)wle was born in Erie county. New A'ork. on ATarcli 28. 
i8'')0, son of James and Lydia ( (."ooper ) Towde. the former a native of 
\ ermont and the latter of Xew I'runswick, who settled in New A^jrk state 
for a time after their marriage, afterward coming to Alichigan, where they 
remained for many years. Afrs. Towle died in 1896. at the age of fifty- 



58 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

eight years. James Towle went to Alabama in 1896, and he is still living- 
there. 

James Towle is the son of James and Elizabeth (Monaghan) Towle, 
tlie former a native of .Sctjtland and the latter of Ireland. The elder James 
Towle was a lumberman in Vermont, Maine and Canada, who located in 
Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1868, and was there for a time engaged in 
contracting, lie later mo\'ed to this county, where he died in 1876, at the 
age of seventy-four years. His widow survived him some years, she hav- 
ing been eighty years of age at the time of her death. They were the 
])arents of ten children, James, Kate. Matilda, Mary, John II., ^Villiam, 
Henry, J^lizabetli and two who died in infancy. James Towle, the eldest 
of the alx")\e children, and the father of the subject of this sketch, grew^ to 
manhood in New York state, where he married Lydia C(x)per, daughter ot 
Sanmel Cooper and Jxachel Davis, liis wife, the latter of whom was born in 
Wales. Samuel Cooper was an F.n.glish sailor, wdio left tiie sea and became 
a lumberman in New I Brunswick and later a farmer. He came to Michigan 
in the seventies and settled at Plainheld, near Grand Rapids. To him and 
his first wife there were l)orn eight children, Mary Ann, William, Sarah, 
Hannah, John, Lydia, Samuel and George. Upon the death of the mother 
of these children, in her forty-lifth year, Samuel Cooper married again and 
lo this second union there were born six children, Margaret, Benjamin, 
Joseph. Martha, l^liza and one who died in earl}- youth. Samuel Cooper 
died at the home of his son in Ionia, this state, in his ninety-third year. 
I'.efore the period oi the Civil War, the junior James Towle emigrated from 
Xew York to Wisconsin, later settling at Detroit, where for a time Mr. Towle 
was engaged in contracting. He later returned to Xew ^^)rk, going thence 
to Pennsylvania, where he resided for a time, tlien went back to Xew York, 
but in 1867 returned to Michigan and settled at Grand Rapids, from there 
to Gowen, thence to (ireenx'ille. this county, where for some years he was 
engaged in lumbering. He then went to Florida, where for two years he 
was engaged in lumbering and for the past eighteen years has been located 
at T^iedmont. Alabama, where he is prominently connected with the iron 
industry. To him and his wife were born ten children, namely: Delos A., 
the subject of this sketch; Mary I., "Matie," deceased, who was the wife 
of I^'rank B. Warren; Elizabeth, who died unmarried at Greenville, this 
county; Lydia Olivia, wife of T. E. Johnson, of Greenville; John W., James 
II., deceased; George C. C, of Tennessee; Stewart W.. of Piedmont, Ala- 
l)ama, and two who died young. 

Delos A. Towle was seven years of age when his parents came with 



MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 59 

their famil}^ to this state in 1867. They hived in Kent county until 1873, 
in which year they came to Montcahn county, locating at Gowen, and in 
1876 moved to Greenville, where Delos A. grew to manhood. After attend- 
ing the public schools at Greenville, j\lr. Towle became bookkeeper in his 
lathers' lumber office, where he remained until 1883, in which year he was 
made assistant manager of his fathers' mill at Sheridan, remaining there for 
one year, at the end of which time, on February i, 1884, he located in Stan- 
ton, going to work in the abstract office of his father-in-law, Capt. T. N. 
Stevens, then register of deeds. In 1893 Mr. 'J\)wle became a partner with 
Captain Stevens in the abstracting business and since May i, 1906, has l)een 
sole proprietor of the business and is the owner of the only set of abstract 
books in Montcalm county. In addition to his large business as an abstrac- 
ter, Mr. Towle also is extensively engaged in the real estate and loan business 
and is regarded as one of the most substantial citizens of this section of the 
state. 

On September 2J, j88i, Delos A. Towle was united in marriage to Lu 
[\. Stevens, who was born at Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, April 28, i860, 
daughter of Capt. Thomas N. and Caroline E. (vSilsbee) Stevens, the former 
of whom was born in Wyoming county, Xew York, and the latter in Grand 
Rapids, Wood county, Ohio, who had been residents of this county since 1866, 
( 'aptain Stevens having been in the a1)stract Imsiness at Greenville and Stan- 
ton all those years. He was an honored soldier of the Union army during 
the (TN'il War and died at his home in Stanton on January 19, 1908, at the 
age of seventy-two years. His widow is still lix'ing at Stanton, enjoying 
many evidences of the high regard in which she is held by all in that city, 
i'aptain and Mrs. Stexens were the parents of h\e children, Lu E., Mary 
I\, Caroline X., Bertha and one, the first born, who died in infancy. Cap- 
lain Stevens was the son of David Stevens and Nancy Nichols his wife. 

7'o Delos A. and Lu E. (Stevens) Towle have been born three chil- 
dren, as follows: Dorothy Lu, who after having been graduated from the 
Stanton high school attended Oberlin Crollege for two years ; Thomas Stev- 
ens, who after his graduation from the Stanton high school entered Oberlin 
College, from which he also was graduated, after which he entered Cornell 
L'niversit}-, from which he was graduated and is now working as an electrical 
v^gineer in Milwaukee. W^isconsin. and Delos Allan, Jr., now in Detroit, 
after being graduated from Oberlin Academy entered the University of 
Michigan and was graduated from that excellent institution. ATr. and Mrs. 
Towle and family are attendants at the Congregational church. The fam- 
ily is prominently identified with the social life of Stanton and takes an 



6o MO.\"lCAl/Af COl-NTY, MICIITGAN. 

active part in all good works here about, all being held in high esteem 
throughout the whole county. 

Mr. Towle is a Republican and for years has taken an acti\c part in the 
political affairs of the count}'. In educational matters he is regarded as a 
leader and for years has been president of the school board at Stanton, his 
admirable services in that connection undoubtedly ha\'ing done much toward 
elevating the standard of the schools of that city. Mr. Towle is a member 
of Star Lodge Xo. 250, Free and Accepted Masons, at Stanton, having l)een 
made a .Mason in 1887. ''^^^*^' ^^'^-"^ master of the lodge for four years, lie also 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias at (Jreenville and when the Knights 
of Pythias had an organization at Stanton was chancellor commander of the 
lodge there f(jr two years. In tlie civic and commemrcial acitivities of Mont- 
calm county. Mr. l\nvle long has been a prominent figure and it is not too 
nuich to say that he enjoys the coniidence and regard of the entire com- 
munitv. 



MORRIS \V. STi-AJ'LXSOX. 

l-'ormer Ma}or \V. \V. Stevenson, oi Stanton, this county, who is 
engaged in the general merchandising business in that city, is looked upon 
as (jne of the "live wires" of this section of Michigan, lie is a native 
of this state and has the general interest of this section at heart, achancing 
them in every way in his power. 

Morris \V. Stevenson was Ijorn at Ionia. Michigan, on April 21. i860, 
son of lulward and Margaret ( Kidd ) Stevenson, the former of whom was 
a native of J'Jigland and the latter of Xew N'ork state. Edward Stevenson 
was the son of Jesse Stevenson and wife and accompanied them to this 
countr\ in 1834. the family locating at Jonia. this state, where both Jesse 
Ste\enson and his wife spent their last days, 'fhey were the parents of six 
children, Jessie, John, (jccjrge. .b.dward, Kate and one who died in \\>tith. 

lulward Stexenson was trained as a shoemaker in his English home 
and for some time after settling at Ionia worked at that trade, [fe later 
w ent to (jrand Jvapids, where he started a shoe .shop, which he conducted for 
several years, at the end of which time he returned to lojiia and there 
became a ])ioneer merchant and was thus engaged until his a])pointment to 
the office of register of the United States land office at Ionia, in which 
ca|)acity he serxcd for some years. He later, in 1862, was appointed j)ost- 
master at Ionia, and serxed in that capacity for quite a term. 1 le died at 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 6t 

ihe age of sixty-eight years wliile on a visit to Stanton. His widow, who 
yur\i\'ed him many years, ched at Stanton at the age of eighty-six. She 
was a member of the C'liristian (Disciples) church and he was a meml;>cr 
(if the Methodist church. Airs. Stevenson, who was Margaret Kidd before 
her marriage, came to Michigan with her parents fnmi New York state 
man.y years ago, the family locating in the Ionia neighborhood in the 
thirties, becoming pioneer farmers. Mrs. Stevenson was one of six chil- 
dren Ijorn to her i)arents, the only one of whom now survi\'ing being Elsie, 
who is past eighty-eight years oi age, the others ha\ing been James, Thomas, 
Robert, Alary and Margaret 1^. Mr. and Mrs. Ste\enson were the parents 
ni six children, Mary, who is the wife of John W. Crinns ; Hampton E., 
lames ]., hVank T., Morris \\\ and William K. 

Aj orris W. Stevenson was reared in Ionia, receiving his education in 
the public schools of that place. :\s a boy he learned the printer's trade 
and worked in the newsi)aper office there for some time, but after his 
father's appointment as register of the land office, he became a clerk in the 
latter office, where he remained Hve years, performing excellent .service in 
that capacity. In J 892 he located in Stanton, this county, where, in com- 
pany with his brother, Tlam])ton F,., he established the business in which 
lie is still so successfully engaged. This partnership continued for a i)eriod 
of eight years, at the end of which time Air. Stevenson bought his brother's 
interest and has since I)een conducting the Imsiness alone. I lis is one of 
the best-.stocked general stores in this part of the state, quite a force of 
clerks being required in the establishment, wherein are handled dry goods, 
clothing, b(JOts and shoes, ladies' and men's furnishings and groceries. 

On Ai)ril 21, 1881, Morris W. Stevenson was united in marriage to 
Delia S. Alorris, who was born near Birmingham, Oakland county, this 
state, daughter of George \V. and J.ovina (Martin) Morris, both natives 
of Xew N'ork state and early settlers in Oakland county. He and his w-ife. 
!)oth of whom now are deceased, were the parents of two daughters, Delia 
S. and Ilattie I^. Airs. Stevenson's paternal grandfather, Benjamin Morris, 
came to this state from Alorrisville, New York, which town was named in 
his honor, and he and his wife were the parents of three children, Libbie. 
I'clle and (icorge. William IMartin, AFrs. Stevensoti's maternal grand- 
lather, and his wife also were natives of New AT^rk state who settled in 
Oakland county at an early day in the settlement of that section, spending 
the remainder of their lives there, both living to a ripe old age. They 
were the i)arents of fi\e children. E. Broox, Clark, George, Ellen and Eovina. 

To ATorris W. and Delia S. (Morris) Stevenson one son has been 



62 MONTCAT.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

born, George J\I., who is attending high school. Mr. and Afrs. Stevenson 
take a proper part in the social activities (^f Stanton and are held in high 
regard by their friends there. Air. Stevenson is a Repu1)lican and ever 
since his arrival in Stanton has given thonghtfnl attention to political affairs. 
Shortly after locating there he was elected alderman, in which capacity he 
served for one term, and later was elected mayor of Stanton, in which 
office he served for six years, his execntive jndgment in the administra- 
tion of the affairs of that office having been valnable to the community. Mr. 
Stevenson also was president of the school hoard for a period of five years 
and i]i that capacity likewise rendered admirable service. Another ])ublic 
service of which he feels justly proud, was his act, ably assisted by Delos 
A. Towle and ]^lliot O. Bellows, in constructing ten and one-half miles of 
pul)lic and "state reward" roads, for which service, by the way, he never 
rccei\ed any monetary compensation, but lie is content now to regard the 
performance of this signal deed of public service as its own reward. 

Mr. Stevenson finds time amid the arduous duties of his extensive 
business operations, to partici])ate in other enterprises in and around vStan- 
ton. among his other connections being that of director in the State Savings 
Bank of Stanton and president of the Stanton Hotel Association. He is 
an energetic and ])ul)lic-spirited citizen Avho enjoys the full confidence of 
the entire community. 



ALLEN L. (■OJ^:LV, M. D. 

Forty years of practice in and around Stanton, this county, has given 
Dr. .Mien L. Corey an ac(|uaintance hereal)out which covers not only Mont- 
calm county, but the counties adjacent thereto, and tlicre is perhaps no per- 
son in this section of the state lietter known than he. 

.\llen L. Corey was born on a farm in the vicinity of Lapeer, this .state, 
on December 7, itS44, son of Jabesh M. and luinice (l-fowland) Corey, 
natives, respectively, of Pennsylvania and ALissachusetts. Jabesh Corey 
was reared as a farmer in Penn.sylvania and upon reaching nianhood"s estate 
emigrated to Alichigan. settling in Lapeer county, where he ])ought a quarter 
of a section of land which he cleared and brought to an excellent state of 
cultivation. wShortly after settling in Lapeer county he married I'Ainice 
Howland, daughter of judge Howland. a native of Massachusetts, for many 
x'cars justice of the peace in Lapeer townishp. that county, and to this union 
were l)orn eight children, namely: i.A'eline. who died unmarried; l^gbert, 



MONTCAI.M COUNTY. MIC?Tir,AN. 63 

deceased; Clara, deceased, who was the wife of Henry W. Shaw; Alexander, 
deceased; I'^rances, who died unmarried; .Vllen L., the subject of this sketch; 
Diantha, widow of O. l\ France, an attornc}-, of ^Poledo, Ohio, and one son 
who died in youth. Both Jabcsh M. Corey and his wife spent their last days 
on the home farm, the former dying before he was sixty years of age, his 
widow surviving him al)out three months. They were Methodists and for 
years were acti\e in all good works in their \icinage. Judge liowland and 
Ins wife were the parents of eight children, of wdiom Mrs. Corey was the 
eldest, the others, now all deceased, having l)een Rosanna, Susan, John, Tra. 
I'',])hraim, 'Jliomas and TTozial. 

Allen T.. Corey was reared on the paternal farm in Lapeer county, 
receiving his elementary education in the district schools of his home neigh- 
liorhood, which he sup])lemented !)}• a course in La])ecr Academy, following 
which he entered the Cni\ersity of Michigan at .\nn Arbor and was grad- 
uated from the medical de])artment of that excellent institution in 1868. 
l^pon receiving his diploma. Doctor Corey returned to Lapeer coimt}' and 
ripened an oJfifTce for the ])racticc of his profession at Imlay City, that county, 
where he remained a year, at the end of which time he moved to N[orth 
Branch, same coutUy. where he remained until 1870. in which year he 
located in Tonia, this state, wdiere he was in practice for four years. Tn 18/=, 
Doctor Corey came to Montcalm county and located at Stanton, where he 
has ever since l)een engaged in the ])ractice of his profession and has 1)een 
very successful. Doctor Corey is a physician of wide learning, whose studies 
keep him constantly advised of the important advancements in modern medi- 
cine and surgery, and who is thus conversant with the wonderful ])rogress 
made in medical science during recent years. His medical course at Ann 
Arbor com])rised a period of four years and this he supplemented, some years 
after locating at Stanton, by a ix)st-graduate course at the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons at New York City, from which institution he was grad- 
uated in 1883. 

During his residence in Ionia, Doctor Corey was united in marriage to 
Augusta I'^iero, whose parents were natives of New York and early settlers 
in Ionia. Mrs. Corey's father died at Muir, this state, and his widow- sur- 
\ ived him many years, her death occurring at vStanton. this county, she being 
l)ast se\enty years of age at the time of her death. To Doctor and ATrs. 
( "orey three children have been born, Lutie. who married William Pcttitt, 
of vStanton. and has two children* Claude, who died at the age of four years, 
and Yelmer, who is at home. Mrs. Corey is a meml>er of the Methodist 
church and both she and the doctor for years have taken an active part in 



64 MON'ICALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 

the social and cultural life of the city. l)Oth arc held in the very highest 
esteem throughout this whole section and have many friends hereahout. 

Doctor (Torey is a Kci)ul)hcan and ever has gi\en a good citizen's atten- 
tion to political alTairs. I 'or four years he served as pensioner examiner in 
this district, ide is a member of Stanton Lodge Xo. 202, h'rce and Accepted 
Masons, and has attained to the cha])ter in that order. Tn general ])ul)lic 
aiiairs he ?ver has disi)layed a degree of interest that marks him as a public- 
si)irited and progressive citizen and is long residence in Stanton gives to his 
counsels a value which is apj)reciated in all quarters, the good doctor's influ- 
ence being felt in all mo\ements designed to better conditions along all lines 
of human endeavor throughout this section. 



IIO.X. I'DCAR S. \\'A(;AR. 

In the memorial annals of Montcalm county, no name stands out more 
distincti\ely than that of the late ffon. lulgar S. Wagar, former state 
senator from this district and for many years one of the most prominent 
lumber men and Ijankers of this count}', whose death at his home in Edmore 
on July 17, 1914, was widely mourned hereabouts, for he ever had l)een 
a man true in all the relations of life and had well earned the high regard 
in which he was held throughout this section of the state. 

Ivdgar S. Wagar was a native son of Michigan, having been born at 
Constantine, St. Joseph county, this state, on August 30, r(S50, son of Oris 
l>. and WeaUhy (Shaw) Wagar, both natives of Ontario county, Xew 
\"ork, where they grew up and where they were married. Oris 15. Wagar 
was lx)rn on f^ecember 15, 1819. son of Abram and Hannah (Washburn) 
Wagar. both natives of Xew York state, the former of whom was of (Ger- 
man descent, and who were the i)arents of ten children, (\itherine, Sarah, 
l^sther Marie, Oris B., Sarah, Caroline 1^., Zephaniah. Isaac W., (.'ornelia 
M.. and Mary Jane, of whom the last named is now the sole survivor. Mary 
lane Wagar was born on June icS. 1839. and was five years old when the 
famiK moved to C^mstantine, St. Joseph county, this state, where she grew 
to wcjinanhood and where she married, h'ebruary 6. 1859, Perry Holmes, 
who was l.)orn at Wooster, Ohio, October 16, 1838. and to this union three 
children were born. Mina Esther, who married W. .\. Couitright and lives 
in BeKedicr township, this county; Sarah, wdio died at the age of two 




iiox. i:i)(;ar s. wa(;ak. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 65 

yeiirs, and i^'rank L., a well-known l)arl)er at Edmore. Mrs. Holmes for 
\oars has been a resident of Edmore, where she is still living. 

Oris P>. Wagar and wife moved from New York state to Constantine, 
Si. J()se|)h county, shortly after their marriage and there they established 
ihcir permanent home. Air. Wagar bought a heavily-timbered tract of land 
I here and proceeded to clear the same, presently becoming recognized as 
.iiie of the most suljstantial farmers thereabout. He erected fine buildings 
on his place and l>rought his farm to a high state of cultivation. l)ecoming 
<|uite well-to-do, a man of substance, possessing wide influence for good in 
the community. He died on December 8, 1888, at the age of sixty-nine, 
and his widow survi\'ed him about seven years, her death also occurring 
on the old home farm. They were the ])arents of five children, Dr. Moyd 
(I. Wagar, of Wolverine, Michigan; .Mrs. .\nnette Brower, of Constantine; 
( iuy. who died at the age of two years; the late Edgar S. Wagar, former 
state senator from this district, the subject of this memorial sketch, and 
l.ouclla, who still lives on the old home farm in St. Joseph county, which 
was under the management of her brother, Edgar S., until the latter's 
death in 1914. 

bxlgar S. Wagar was reared on the home farm in St. Jose])h county, 
receixing his education in the local schools of that neighborhood, and at 
Mr- age of eighteen went to Cedar Rapids, where he engaged as clerk in 
;i store. He married there in the fall of 1875 and continued to make that 
jilace his home until 1S78, in which year he came to this country and located 
ii I'^dmore, where he engaged in the general hardware business. In 1887, 
>\ hen the lumljering business was at its height, he sold his store and engaged 
in the lumber and shingle trade, in which he became quite successful. Tn 
iS()7 Mr. Wagar succeeded Mr. Wisner in the l)anking business at Edmore, 
'Iterating the concern as the E. S. Wagar P>ank (private), until 1908, in 
'\hich vear it was incorporated as the Peoples vState Pank. He was elected 
the first president of this bank and continued in that position throughout 
Hie rest of his life. Mr. Wagar was identified with several other enter- 
itises in and about Edmore and was vice-i)resident of the Union Telephone 
• onipany. 

The energy and enter])rise of the late Hon. Edgar S. Wagar were not 
'■"nfmed tc^ the business life and activities of this community, for he was 
■ ipi^illy active in the political life of this section of the state. Tie was' the 
-econd president of Edmore and for five or six terms thereafter, at different 
*imes, served in a similar capacity, the interests of his home town ever being 
(.Sb) 



66 MONTCALM C()(.-NTY. MICHIGAN. 

dear t(i his heart, lie was an iinconiproiiiisin^ Re])ul)Hcaii and for two 
years served as eliairnian of the RepubHcan coniniiltee of Montcahii eounty. 
l''or two terms, 1893-96, he served as a member of the lower house of the 
Michigan (Jeneral Assembly, representative from Montcalm county, and 
during the ])eriod of that important public ser\ice was one of the distinctive 
(ig-ures of the House, having- been a member of the ways and means, the 
linance. the api)ropriations and other important committees of that body. 
l*"(,)llowin<( his service in the House, Air. W'agar was elected to the state 
Senate, as senator fn^m this district, and served with cciual distinctif^i in 
the u])])er house of the (leneral .\sseml)ly during the two scssic^is which 
com])rised his term, 1897-1900. Senator W'agar, at the time of his death, 
was a meml.)cr of the l)()ard of control of the stale hos])ital for the insane 
at TraNcrse Citv. under ai)])(»intment from Cio\ernor Warner, and took 
an active and inthKutial i)art in the affairs of that body. In i)oint of service 
Senator W'agar was the (jldest l)usiness man in l^dmore. having engag^ed 
there in July. 1878. and was a man of wide intiuence in the business life of 
the coTiimunity. in religious and fraternal circles he also took a prominent 
])art. b'or many years he was one of the leaders in the local Methodist 
!''])iscopal church, president of the l^pworth League and superintendent of 
the .*~^unday scliool. and was a thirt}'-secon(l degree Mason and a nicml>ei' 
of the Ancient Aral)ic Order of the Xobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

{ )n October 29, 1873, at ( "edar Rapids, Michigan, F-dgar S. W'ag-ar 
was united in marriage to Louisa Pfeifler, who was l)orn at Ivast Sagnnaw. 
this state. Alay J5. 1850. daughter of (iottlieb and Christina ( Katz ) 
Pfeiller. Ixjth natives of the i)rovince of W'ittenberc^. Germany, who \vere 
married at Ann Arbor, this state, where Gottlielj Pfeifler was then eng-aged 
as a eari)enter .and cabinetmaker, ("hristina Katz was a young girl when 
she nccompanied her family to this country. Iler father died and was 
buried at sea. The remainder of the family located at .\nn .\rbor. where 
("hristina married (lottliel) I'feifler. shortly thereafter moving to b^ast 
Sag^inaw. where (iottlieb Pfeifler met his death in 1854 by falling- from a 
scaffold while Imilding- a house, leaving three children. Catherine, who died 
in if)i5: Louisa, who married "Mr. Wagar, and John W'.. of b.dmore. this 
county. Idle widow^ Pfeifler married at .\nn Arbor, to wdiich i)Iace she had 
returned with her cliildren after the death of her husband. Jefferson Burch, 
and {o this union were liorn four children, as follow : Mrs. Susan Coy. 
of Home township, this county: Henry, who is in business with his half- 
bj-other. John W". Pfeifler, at Petosky ; Mrs. Geneva Hutchinson, of Alma, 



IMOXTCALM COUNTY, MICIIKLAX. 6/ 

lul Mrs. Martha Tlorton, of Home township, this county. The mother 
"f these children died in Chicago. 'I'o l^dgar S. and Louisa ( Pfeifler) 
A agar one child was born, a son, Harry \i. W'agar. cashier of the Peoples 
.-Mate Bank at i^dmore and president of the village, a biographical sketch 
I'f whom is presented elsewhere in this \ olume. Mrs. W'agar is still living 
;;,i l^dmore, where she long has quietly e.verted her gentle influence for good 
,111(1 where she is held in the very highest esteem by all. 



EDWARD C. CUMAHNGS. 

Among the able Ijusiness men and influential citizens of Carson C'ity, 
Montcalm county. .Michigan, none have taken a more useful and helpful part, 
111 local aiTairs, than has hxlward C. Cumn.iings. ])resi(lent of the State Bank of 
(arson Cit}-, and a man for forty years a financier and organizer. 

I^dward C. Cummings. who Wds l)orn in F.rie county, New^ York, on 
April 16. 1837, received only a district school education, doing chores for 
his board while attending his classes, after completing which, he began, when 
ihineen years of age, to make his own living in the world. After some 
lime as a farm hel])er in his community. J^dward C. Cummings, when about 
i\\ enty-three }ears of age, went to the (^il creek region of Pennsylvania, 
and during the days of high tide in the oil-lields of that state, he became a 
leamster, later securing boats, as carriers for oil, v.hich he towed up the 
reek, in this wa\- earning a large sum of money, with which he established 
liimself in the world, after two years in the oil-helds. On account of the 
"il gases affecting his health, b'.dward C. (\immings retired from the oil 
iields, and about the year 1866. came to Michigan, locating at Tthica, Gratiot 
■-ounty, where Mr. Cummings became a i)artner in the mercantile firm knowMi 
■ IS Shepard 8i Cummings. a Ijusiness in which hxlward C. Cummings con- 
tinued for about four years, and then, having suffered the loss of his wife, 
hy death. Air. Cummings traN'clled in the West, for the next year. 

About the year 1871, Edward C. Cummings came to Carson City, 
Montcalm county, at a time when the town was yet in its infancy, settled 
'argely by lumber men and pioneers, and established a general store, a 
'uisiness which he followed until 1875. and then, after about one year in 
i»re])aration. in 1876. he opened the first bank of Carson City, a private 
institution known as the 1.)anking house of K. C. Cummings, and with 
Vvhich he has since been officially connected. In addition to his financial 



68 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

activity, ]\ir. Cumniing-s has engaged extensively in agricultural pursuits, 
at one time having been the cultivator of two hundred and titty acres of 
land, in Montcalm county, much of which land was devoted to the culture 
of alfalfa, a product in the raising of which, he was recognized as an 
authority. 

About the year 1858, J.Cdward C. C'ummings was married to Hulda 
Ann Parsons, who was born in Eric county, Pennsylvania, where they were 
married. In 1870 Mrs. ('unimings died, survixed by her husband and three 
children : Carrie, who is now cashier of the bank at Crystal, .Montcalm 
county, and who was married to Elam Willctts, there being Ixjrn to this 
marriage two children, Harry, who died at twenty years of age, and Louisa, 
a public school teacher, of Detroit, and after the death of her husband, 
Carrie (Cummings) Willctts married William Granger; ?^Iorton P., of 
Calif(.)rnia, who is married and the father of tw-o children, and Burton, an 
emploNce of the street railway company of Erie, Pennsylvania, who is mar- 
ried and the father of three children. 

In 1871, Edward C. Cummings was married to Laura IL Barton, of 
Gratiot county, who was born near Kent, Ohio, the daughter of Samuel 
and Sarah Barton, who mo\'ed to (iratiot county, Michigan, in pioneer 
limes, and there Samuel Barton farmed on one hundred and sixty acres of 
land for the remainder of his days, dying at the age of ninety years, while 
his widow. Sarah, lived to the advanced age of one hundred and three 
years. To the marriage of Edward C. and Laura IT. Cummings have been 
born three children: Ira. who after the completion of his education at a 
commercial school, at Detroit, is now cashier of the State Bank of (Larson 
City, also l)eing interested in the other banking connections of his father, 
and who was married to Minnie Cox, and they are the parents of two chil- 
dren. Cecil and Edward: Ora, of P)illings, ^Montana, w'ho is the wife of 
l^oy J. Covert, who are the parents of two children, Paul and Gerald, and 
Lottie, w^ho is the wife of Don P. Bennett, of Detroit. 

As a l)anker, Edward C. Cummings has not only made the State Bank 
of (^arson City one of the leading banks of the county and vicinity, but he 
has enlarged on the sphere of his activity as a financier, Mr. Cummings and 
his son Ira, now having stock and influence in the affairs of the banks at 
Crystal, Montcalm county, and they are interested as half owners in the 
Bank of Hubbardston, the latter a private banking house, owned jointly 
with Ruel and Absden, bankers of Ionia county, Michigan. 

The State Bank of Carson City, a lasting tribute to the ability of 
Edward C. Cummings, was organized in 1876, as a private financial insti- 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 69 

ivition, known as the banking house of E. C". Cummings. In 1887, after 
1 prosperous decade of service, the town of Carson City gave more promise 
,i< a town, as the resuU of a railroad reaching it. and at this time, in antici- 
■Kition of future Inisincss, the l)anking house of .1^. C. Cunmiings was 
reorganized under the name of the State Rank of Carson City, with an 
authorized capital of fifty thousand dollars. Ju)r the first five years of the 
iu'wly-incorporated bank, iCdward C. (Aimmings served as president and 
(ashier. At the end of this time, Mr. Cummings declining to serve in his 
<lnal ca])acity, John \V. TFallett was elected to the office of president, while 
r.dward C. Cummings continued in the office of cashier. In 1913, Mr. 
' ummings was again elected to serve as president of the State Bank of 
(arson City, and Tra Cummings became cashier, a management which has 
(xisted. since that time. 

-Vt an early date the capital stock of the State Rank of Carson City 
was reduced to twent}^-fi\'e thouasnd dcillars. but in i()i3, the stock was again 
increased to fifty thousand dollars, and from that time, this flourishing 
and well-managed banking institution has j)rospere(l and triumphantly over- 
rame the trying times of 1893 and 1908, and has increased its business 
activities, notwithstanding keen competition. 



JOHX W. CAM PR ELL. 

To the traveling public of this section of the state the Montcalm hotel 
at Stanton, this county needs no introduction, nor do "mine host" Camp- 
i'cll and his good wife, who ha\'e made this well-known hostelry one of the 
most popular hotels in this part of Michigan. As his name indicates, John 
\\'. Campbell, proprietor of the Montcalm hotel, is of Scottish descent, his 
iMternal grandparents, John and fCliza ( Halleck) Campbell, having been born 
i!i the land o' cakes, the bonny land of the thistle and the heather. Shortly 
'iiter their marriage, John Campbell and his wife emigrated from Scotland 
' ' America and settled at Rath, Xew York, where the former spent the rest 
' ' his life. His wife survived him and died at Rockford, Illinois. They 
\' ere the parents of seven children, live sons and tAVO daughters, Henry, 
* 'Corge, Fred, Charles, Robert, Lida and Kate. 

Robert Campbell, fifth son of John and Eliza (Halleck) (Campbell, was 
■>''rn in Rath. Xew York, where he grew to manhood, receiving his educa- 
■'"n in Haviland Academy. Upon the breaking out of the Civil War, he 



70 MONTCAI/M COLNTY, MIClllGAN. 

enlisted in a New York regiment and ser\cd for several years,, being honor- 
ably discharged at the close of the service. After the war he was for a time 
engaged in the butcher business and hiter in the nuisic business. In the 
meantime he had married and in 1872 he and his family came to Michigan, 
locating at Sheridan, in this county, where for a time Air. Campbell worked 
in the timber. Later he bought a farm of sixty acres in E\ergreen lown- 
ship, this county, which he cleared and sold, after which he retired and 
moved to Stanton, where he died in 1905, at the age of sixty-one years. His 
widow is still li\ing, making her home at Stanton, where she has many 
friends who hold her in liigh regard. Mrs. Campbell, 1)efore her marriage, 
was brances Curtis. She was born in Prattsburg. Steuben county. New 
^'ork, daughter and only child of John W. and bdizabeth (Strickland) Cur- 
tis, both nati\es of that same county. John W. C'urtis was a farmer, who 
later sold music and agricultural implements. Me died at Hammondsport, 
Steuben county. New York, at the age of sixty-four and his widow is still 
living, at the age of eighty-three. To Robert and I'Vances (Curtisj (Camp- 
bell were born but two children, Jcjlm W., the subject of this sketch, and 
Carrie, who died in infanc)'. 

John W. Camj)l)ell was born at I'ath, Steuben county. New York, on 
June 28, 1870, and was eight years of age when he accompanied his parents 
to this county. He grew u^) on his father's farm in bLvergreen township, 
receiving his education in the district schools, and until the time of his 
marriage, in 1896, worked in the timber. He then went to Crystal Lake, this 
county, where he engaged in the hotel and livery business and was thus 
engaged at that point for se\en years, at the end of which time he mo\ed to 
.Stanton, where for a few \-ears he was engaged in the livery business. He 
then sold out and went to (Hiilord Lake and bought the resort hotel there, 
which he conducted for four years, at the end of which time he returned 
to Stanton and leased the Montcalm hotel, wdiich he ever since has l)een 
conducting in first-class st}le and of which he has made a decided success. 

On March t8. 1896, John \V. Campbell was united in marriage to 
vSophia Hepburn, who was born in St. Thomas, Canada, d<mghter of Ik-n- 
jamin and "Rebecca (Mitchell) Hepburn, natives, respectively, of lulinburgh. 
Scotland, and St. Thomas. Canada, wdio were the parents of nine children. 
Robert. Bcnoni. Samuel. Sophia. Albert. James, Charles. Olia and George. 
Mrs. Hepburn died at Crystal Lake, this county, in 1899. at the age of fifty- 
three years. Mr. Hepburn is still living and makes his home with his daugh- 
ter. Mrs. C^ampbell. To John W. and Sophia (Hepburn) C\ampbell one 
child has been born, a son. Don, born on February 28, 1897. ''^ho ^li^d on 



MONTCALM COCNTY, MTCKTGAX. J I 

.\])ril 13, 1898. Mrs. Canii^bcH's (iraiulfathcr .Mitchell and his wife were 
l)')tli natives of Ireland, who emigrated to Canada, where they S])ent the rest 
.if their lives on a farm. They were the parents of twelve children, of 
whom mention is made of Rebecca Ellen, Lizzie, Martha, ^Fargaret, Thomas, 
.Samuel and Ck'orge. Mrs. ( "ampl)eirs grandfather fiepburn and his wife 
were natives, respectively, of Scotland and of Canada, the former of whom 
(lied in middle life and the latter of whom lived to old age. They were the 
parents of eight children, IJenjamin, Lena. Sophia. .Martha, Jessie, Tina, 
K.sther and Jesse. 

John W. Campbell is a Republican and for years has taken an active 
interest in the ])olitics of the county. He was niacle (lei)ut\' sheriff of Ak^nt- 
calm county, under Sheriff 1^. (). Bellows, in 1903. and, with the exception 
i'\ two >ears, has held that important office e\ er since, an ample evidence 
(.f his efficiency as a ])nblic ofticer. .Mr. Cam])l)ell is a ALason and an Odd 
i'ellow. member of the lodges of those two orders at Stanton, and has 
altained to the encampment degree of the latter order. ITe also is a member 
<d the I'enexolent and IVotective Order of I'dks at Ionia, and a member of 
the lu[nital)le I'Taternal Lnion, in all of which orders he takes an acti^■e part 
and among the members of which he is deservedly popular. 

While Mr. Campbell is a thorough-going and up-to-date hotel man. he 
i> not entitled to all credit for the success he has made as proprietor of the 
VFontcalm hotel, for to Mrs. Campbell mu.st be ascribed equal credit for mak- 
ing that house one of the best hotels in south central Michigan. Ijoth are 
Avell-known among the commercial travelers who cover this district and their 
liouse receives an extensive patronage. 



.\TJ.LX P.. dicki<:rson. 

Allen B. Dickerson. who in 1910 was elected register of deeds for Mont- 
' aim county and who is now serving the public acceptably in that capacity. 
vas born in Hanover, Jack.son county, this state, on .\ugust 29. 1861. son 
"t Jacob .\L and Theresa ( lM.)rward ) Dickerson, both natives of Ohio. 

Jacob M. Dickerson was married at the age of eighteen and began 
"doing for himself" by cutting cord-wood. He presently learned the car- 
I 'enter trade and follow^ed that for some years. Tn the latter fifties he and 
!;is wife came to Michigan and for a time lived in Jackson township, where 
die subject of this sketch was Ixirn. In t86t thev returned to Ohio and 



72 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

while living there, Jacob M.. Dickerson rendered service to the Union cause 
(luring the Civil War as a member of the famous Ohio "squirrel hunters" 
brigade. In 1865 l^*^ '^"^'^ ^^i^ family returned to Michigan, locating in Bush- 
nell township, this county, where he bought a farm of eighty acres of tim^ 
l.)cr land \\hich he cleared and improved and there he reared his family, 
li\ing there until j86(). in which year he was elected to the office of probate 
judge of Montcalm county, after which he moved to Stanton, the county 
seat, where he remained for four years, the period of the tenure of his office, 
at the end of w'hich time he bought a farm in Winheld township, this county, 
onto which he retired, and there he spent the remainder of his days, his 
widow surviving him some years. P)oth Judge Dickerson, and his wife were 
valued citizens of Montcalm county and the memory of their lives here long 
will be kept fresh in the annals of this connnunity. Xot only in his service 
as pro!)ate judge, but in other ways did Judge J.)ickerson demcjnstrate his 
intelligent interest in pu])lic affairs and he was for years accounted one of 
the county's leading men. During his residence in Bushnell townshi]) he 
served very usefully as supervisor and during the time of his residence in 
Winbeld township performed a like service in behalf of the jniblic, to w'hosc 
interests he ever was devoted. 

Judge Dickerson and his wife were the parents of five children, namely: 
Lyman \\\, deceased; i'Yeeman B., of Detroit: ("lara. who is the wife of 
Jlarmon Rassman. of Lake \'iew, this county, d. Clinton, of Big Rapids, 
this state, and .Mien 15., register of deeds for Montcalm county, the sul)ject 
of this sketch. Judge and ]\lrs. Dickerson were attendants of the Metho- 
dist church and their children were reared in that faith. 

.\llen B. Dickerson was reared on the paternal farm in Bushnell town- 
shi]), ha\'ing been but fi\'e years old when his parents located there, and his 
earlv education was recei\ed in the district schools of that township and in 
the high school at Lake \'iew. Following the high school course he entered 
Rork College, but on account of ill health was com])elled to discontinue his 
studies there l)efore he had finished the course. He later took a business 
C(nirse in McLaughlin's (/ollege, at Chatham, Canada, and from that insti- 
tuti<in. was called to an office ])osition in Detroit, in which he serxed for one 
vear, at the end of which time he returned to his father's farm in Winfield 
townshi]), where he remained up to 1907. .\fter the death of his father he 
bought the several interests of the other heirs. He retained this farm which 
consisted of two hundred acres, until December. 1909, when he sold all but 
forty acres, in 1907 Mr. Dickerson moved to Lake View, this county, and 



MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 73 

remained there until 1910, in which year he was elected register of deeds 
for Montcalm county, after which he moved to Stanton, the county seat, 
entering upon the duties of the office in January. 1911, and is still the incurn- 
hent in that important office, performing his duties in behalf of the ])ul)lic 
in a \'ery cfiicient and painstaking manner. 

On April 5, 1(893, Allen B. Dickerson was united in marriage to Hattie 
(.'lark, who was born in iuu-eka township, daughter of (jcorge and Maria 
( Ikickle) Clark, prominent residents of this county, Ijoth of whom now are 
deceased, and to this union two children ha\e l)een 1)orn, Mildred T and 
("lark .V. Mrs. Dickerson is the second in order of birth of the four chil- 
dren born to her ])arents. the others l)eing Mortimer, 1 lelen and Jay, the 
latter of whom is now deceased. Mr. and .\!rs. Dickerson are identified with 
the social activities of Stanton and are {popular 1.)oth there and at Lake 
\'iew. ha\ing nianv friends who hold them in high esteem. 

.Mr. Dickerson is a Republican and for years has taken a prominent 
part in the countj-'s official affairs. During his residence in W'infield town- 
ship, he acted as supervisor of that township for seven years. He is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic lodge at Dake \'iew and of the chapter of the same order 
at Stanton, and is also a member of the \\^oodmen and of the Maccabees, 
in all of wdiich orders he takes a warm interest. In official and business cir- 
cles he is held in high regard and is looked upon as one of Alontcalm county's 
k'ading citizens. 



TTT0:M.\S ]. POTTl-.R. 



Thomas J. Potter, who after an acti\e and useful career as a business 
man, lumber dealer, organizer and financier, and as a citizen who after hav- 
ing taken no inconsiderable i)art in the de\elopment of this community and 
in the conduct of its public and official affairs, has now retired from active 
h'fe. was born in ]\lcllenry county. Illinois, on Decemljer 19. 1843, a son 
of Wilham T. and C'elestia (hlint ) Potter, of Xew York state, where they 
grew to maturity and w^ere married. 

hi 1846. William T. Potter moved to .Michigan, and started a .small 
store at Lincoln's jMill, located near the mouth of Black Creek. Later, the 
elder Potter bought a mill, which he ojjcrated near the site of the ])re.sent 
\\'right"s mill, until 1856, and then coming to Greenville, at a time when 
this town was but a village settlement, he made his home at this place for 
some time, later going to Lowell, also to Grand Haven. Michigan, w-here he 



74 MONTCALM Ccn'NTY, MICIIIGAX. 

coiuluctcd hotels for the remainder of his active hfe, dying at Lowell, 
Michigan. 

William T. I'otter was one of the best -known men of his time in CJreen- 
villc and vicinity. Mr. Potter was tlie lirst justice of the ])eace of Montcalm 
township, was a supervisor of the same to\\ nship, and a man who was always 
actively interested in the develojMiient and advancement of the comnumity. 

William T. and C'elestia Potter were the parents of seven children: 
Julia, deceased; Alma, d'homas. (ie(jrge, deceased; Carrie. hVank, and Kffie. 

Thomas ]. Potter. \N-ho has spent his entire actise life as a resident 
of Montcalm county and \icinity, received his early education in the common 
schools of this county. After com])leting his school days, he li\e(l at home 
until j<S6j, when he enlisted with Company \\ Twenty-lirsl Regiment, Michi- 
gan N'ohmteer Infantr}-, with which he ser\'ed in the Civil War. as a duty 
sergeant, in the Army of the Cuml)erland, and which was a part of the army 
of (jcneral Tlioiuas for the remainder of the war. 

After the close of the Ci\il War. Thomas j. Potter returned to Green- 
\ille. Ahjntcalm county, and shortly afterward entered the mercantile busi- 
ness as a memlier of the firm of Kider <X: Potter, a partnership which contin- 
ued until JcSji. when Mr. Potter ])urchased the interests of Ids partner and 
conducted the store as sole proprietor, for al.)out t\\'o years. In 1873. Mr. 
Potter disi)osed of his mercantile house, and lie engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness, in which he was successfully engaged until 1887. when he retired from 
the luml)er business and since has devoted a part of his time to various pur- 
suits, aiuong which was his activity in tlie organization of the Commercial 
vState .Saving i:)ank, an institutioti of which Mr. Potter became the lirst 
president. In addition to his other interests. ATr. Potter, during his active 
d.avs, cared for and sup^-rintended the culti\ation of his farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres, located in i-'air [Mains townshi]), this county. Mr. Potter 
now lias retired from active work and lives in a stibstantial lirick residence, 
which he built at 220 West Cass street, in 1873. 

In April. 1867. Thomas J. Potter was luarried to hdorence .Moore, who 
was born in Ionia county. Michigan, in 184.1. To that marriage have been 
born seven children, two of whom died in infancy, the others being lA-elyn, 
a graduate of the Greenxille high school, and now the widow of John Grover ; 
Gertrude P.; Roy Iv. who after graduating from the Greenville high school, 
became a farmer of Montcalm county; \dolet, Avho was graduated from the 
Greenville high school, now living at home, and I'dlis J., a graduate of the 
Greenville high sch(;ol, now an architect at Detroit. 



MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 75 

iM-ateriially, Mr. J 'otter is one of the leading- men of Montcalm comity, 
being a member of Greenville T.odge No. 96, bVce and Accepted Masons; 
he is a member of (]reen\ ille Chapter Xo. 79. Royal ;\rch Masons, of which 
he is past high priest; Mr. Potter is a Shriner and a thirty-second degree 
Mason. Mr. Potter also is active in the Grand .Vrmy of the Pepnblic post at 
(ireen\ille. 

.,-\s an official and citizen, infhiential in political affairs of this commun- 
ity. Mr. Potter is well known, having ser\ed as a sn])ervisor of tliis town- 
ship, as township treasurer, as an alderman of (Irecnville. and for twelve 
\ears, he was president of the hoard of public works. Politically. XFr. Pot- 
ter is a Democrat. 



R.WMOND .\. IIPOWN. 

Paymond A. J:>rown. prominent funeral director and embalmer. and a 
citizen active in the public life of (ireenville, Montcalm county, was born 
at Plymouth, Wayne county. Michigan, on September 3, 1884, a son of 
Amnion and Ada ( Dickerson ) P)rown, who are farmers of Wayne county, 
and the parents of five children, of whom Paymoiid A. is the second born. 

I\a}-nioiid A. Brown was reared on the home farm and w^as educated 
in the jiublic schools and at the high school of Plymouth, ^Michigan. After 
the completion of his education. Mr. Brown was employed for two years in 
the signal department of the T*ere ■Marquette Railway Company, after which 
he engaged in the furniture business at Plymouth for about three years. In 
Xovember, Tgo8. Raymond A. Brown came to Greenville, Montcalm county, 
where he has since continued in the furniture business, together wMth caring 
for his extensive patronage as a licensed embalmer and funeral director. 

As a business man, Mr. P>rown is a meml)er of the Miller and Harris 
l'\n"niture Company, of which George ^Filler, of Hastings, is president; .\. 
M. Hall, of P)eldiiig, vice-president, and M. J. Brown, of Greenville, secre- 
tary and treasurer, the directors being the foregoing, with the addition of 
l^aymond .\. Brown. The ^Filler and Harris i-'uniiture Company operate 
business houses at Hastings and at Belding. as well as at Greenville. 

Tn May, ic)o8. Raymond A. Brown w^as married to Carrie Stewart, 
of \\'ayne county. Michigan, and to this marriage has been l)orn one son, 
Pawrence, who is a student in the public schools of Greenville. Mr. Brown 
and his wife are active memliers of the Methodist church at Greenville. 

Raymond A. Brown has l)een active in the politics of Greenville and of 



/O MONTCALM COl'NTY, MICHIGAN. 

Alontcaliii county for several years, his standing:: as a political worker being 
indicated by his election as ]>resident of the Greenville Republican ("iub. 

Fraternally, Mr. Bnnvn takes a prominent i)lace in Greenville, being a 
menil)er of i.eRoy Lodge Xo. 9, Knights of Pythias, a chapter of which he 
is past chancellor, as well as l)eing a member of the grand lodge. Mr. 
IJrown is also a meml)er of the Knights of the Maccaliees lodge at Greenville. 

As a citizen and as a Ijusiness man, Raymond A. Brown holds an impor- 
tant and a highly-appreciated place in Oeenville, his unselfish nature and 
his pulihc-s])irited interest in the welfare of the community, having given 
him a ])rominent place among the leaders of useful mox'ements and actixities 
in this communitv. 



IlARX'hA- \V. RTC'E. 



llarx'ey W. Rice, justice of the ])eace, Stanton, Michigan, was born in 
iVanklin county, Massachusetts. May 14, J 832, son of ('alvin .M. and Aure- 
ha (Walker) Rice, the parents being natives of that state; and of nine chil- 
dren l)0rn to them 1)ut three are living, naniely : HarNcy \V. : Alou/^o, of 
ionia. Michigan; Aurelia. widow of John I'deming, Chicago; the deceased 
were .Mvin. William. George, bdlen and .Vddison, the last named dying 
young, and F.llen died alter her marriage to Fli Ihirrett. Idie father, Galvin 
M. was reared in .Massachusetts, and came to Ionia. .Michigan, in J836. 
Prior to coming A\'est he was in the clothing business, but here I^ecame a 
farmer in I^aston townshi]). ionia county, and owned eighty acres of land 
a part of which is now occupied as the site of Ionia ("ity. He improved the 
farm and there reared his family, dying there in 1885. aged over eighty-one 
years. His wife, the mother of lTar\'ey \\\. died in 1847. 'rhe\' were 
amongst the earliest ])ioneers. 1die father married a second time, and sec- 
ond wife was Mrs. Fidelia L. Gliomas, a widow, also from Massachusetts, 
and l)y her had one child. Fidelia L.. widow of David Jennings, and she 
resides at Sturgis, Michigan. 

The paternal grandfather of Harvey W. died in Massachusetts, where 
his wife also died, after having reared a large family. P)enjamin. Sarah, 
Charlotte. Calvin M.. and others. Likewise, the maternal grandparents died 
ii] Massachusetts. 1diev were farmers and reared a family, .\urelia being 
one, and others \\ho died so long ago that their names are forgotten. 

Harvey \V. Rice from the time he was four years of age to nineteen, 
lived with his parents on the farm, and attended the old-fashioned subscrip- 



MONTCALM COINTY, MICHIGAN. -jy 

lion schools. He then learned the carpenter trade, rmd followed it a num- 
l)er of years. lie went to California in i860, by way of the Isthinns, and 
followed his trade there most of the time in cf)njunction with other pursuits, 
and in the autumn of 1861 returned to Ionia, Michigan, where he resided 
until 18O7. when he came to Stanton, for permanent residence, a period of 
forty-eight years. During the Jirst nine years of his residence at Stanton 
he had a general store, and also operated lumber and milling business. Then, 
f(jr a number of years was de])Uty and under-sheriff. TTe was elected justice 
of the peace in 1893, and has held that office continuously since, excepting 
one term. In the meantime he has sold real estate and loaned money. 

On September 20. 1854, he married Miss Phoebe J. Cheney, daughter 
of l^lisha P. and j<\mny Cheney, and one child was born to them, h^stella F., 
who subsequently became the wife of Mortimer TT. Bachman of Stanton. 
They had two children, (lifton H. and Edna, the latter dying at the age 
of sixteen years. 

Afrs. Harvey W. Rice is a member of the Congregational church. She 
was born in New York state, Octoloer 14, 1833, they having lived together 
.^ixty-one years. Her father was a native of the state of New^ York, and 
her mother of Afassachusetts, Imt became early settlers in Tonia county, 
Michigan, coming there in 1844. Her mother died in Tonia county, and her 
father in Stanton, Michigan. Their children were Orson, TTenry, Jane, 
l^dward. Ann, Alercy, and Phoebe J. 

Politically. Harvey W. Pice is a Republican, and in early days was pres- 
ident of the village l)oard. 



OSCAR C. MILLER. 



Among those citizens who. active in the business and pujjlic activities of 
other days, have now retired to the more quiet walks of life, one of the best- 
known and most higlil}' respected is Oscar C. Miller, who was born in Orin 
township, Oakland county, Michigan, on June 6, 1844, ^ son of Richard C. 
and Xancy (Carpenter) Miller, the former l)orn in Connecticut, the latter in 
Massachusetts. 

l^ichard C. Miller moved with his parents to New Yoek state at an early 
age, and when ten years of age located with his parents at Detroit, Michigan, 
later, coming to Oakland county. Tn Oakland county, the elder Miller was 
married to Nancy Carpenter, who came to Oakland county with her parents 
from her native state, and Richart C. Miller was a farmer in this county 



/i< MONTCALM COT-NTY, MICHIGAN. 

im'il 1854. when he and his family moved to Alontcahn county. After some 
years as a farmer in this county, the elder Miller came to Greenville, where 
he spent his last days, li\ing in the house where his son, Oscar ("., now lives. 
Richard C .Miller died on April 5, 1898. and his wife died on May 15, 1898. 

Richard C. .Miller was a citizen who was prominent in the public and 
official affairs u\ his community, havins^' served for ten years as treasurer 
of Fairi)lain township; for forty years was superintendent of the poor of 
his township, and for two terms he was a member of the Michigan Legisla- 
ture. Richard C. and Nancy JMiller were the parents of three children: 
Oscar C". ; Chester A., a retired farmer, who is now engaged in loaning 
money in C'alifornia; and Helen, who died at the age of twenty-three years. 

Oscar C. Miller was ten years of age when his parents settled in 
Montcalm county. After the completion ni his education in the common 
schools of the countw he engaged in farming until 1874, when he went to 
li\e in Greenxille, and oi)ened a produce house, which he conducted for three 
years, lie then entered the shoe business, following that line of actixity, 
fo:- about thirty ^ears, after which he returned to the produce field, operating 
a ])roduce market with his son, for fifteen years, under the name of Aliller & 
Miller. For many years. Mr. Miller was also engaged in the shoe business, 
his firm name being O. i'. Miller & Son. During the year 1909. Oscar C. 
Miller retired from his active interest in the |)roduce business and now li\es 
a retired life, in Greenxille, where he is one of the honored men of the toxvn 
.'ind locality. During all those years he also operated a farm of three hun- 
dred and sixty acres near Greenville, and six hundred acres near Gowen, 
xvhich he partly improved and later sold. 

On Xoxember 25. i^yn. Oscar G. .Miller was married to Gatherine Rer- 
ridgc, who xvas a childhood playmate of Mr. Miller. ^Irs. Miller moxed to 
Oakland county. Michigan, xxhen she xvas ten years of age. Oscar G. and 
Gatherine Miller are the parents of four children: Gharles M., who is 
vicc-])rcsident and manager of the Gonimercial vState vSaxings I'ank of 
(Ireenville: Ernest G., who is the proprietor of a .shingle-mill, at .\l)erdeen, 
Washington; Ral])h G.. a farmer of F.ureka township, Montcalm county; 
and Julia, who is the wife of Glenn Smith, a shoe merchant, of Greenville. 

Oscar G. Miller is connected with some of the leading business enter- 
prises of Greenville, being a stockholder of the Gommercial State Savings 
P)ank and a man who is interested in real estate in Greenxille and elsewhere. 
Mr. Miller also is the oxvncr of a farm of ninety acres, in Eureka township. 

.-\s a factor in the official life in Greenx-illc and ?ilontcalm county, Mr. 



MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 79 

Miller is \\cll and fa\-oral)ly known, having ser\ed on the board of aldermen, 
:d (]rcen\ille. and on the sehool i)oard of the same town. He was eleeted in 
1915 as superintendent of the poor, for Montcahn county, in politics. Mr. 
Miller is a Republican. 

Oscar C. Miller is a deacon and for fifteen years has been a trustee of 
[he C\)ng-regational church, and he is a prominent member of Greenville 
Lodge No. 96. b'ree and Accepted Masons. 



|AMi:.S T. RIDLEY. 



James T. Ridley, well-known business man and citizen, prominent in 
the ])u!)lic and official alfairs of Green\ille, 3tlontcalni county, Michigan, was 
i)()rn in Canada on November 19, 1863, a son of Thomas and Ann ( Xoble) 
Kidley, natives of England. 

Thomas I-iidley lived in his native country until he was a young man, 
when he came to iVmerica and settled in Canada, wdiere he was married and 
where he engaged in farming for some time, he also having served for a 
l)erio(l as an e.\cisenian. Thomas Ridle\- was actue in the work and wor- 
-^hip of the Church of J^ngland in his community, and was a man well-known 
for his part in the general life of the locality in which he resided. The elder 
Uidley died in 1880; his wife died in 1870. Thomas and Ann Ridley were 
liie parents of nine children, of whom three survive, namely : W'illiam, a 
tarmer in Cjuiada ; bnizalieth. who married a farmer in Canada, and James 
T.. of this sketch. 

James T. Ridley was reared on the home farm in Canada, was educated 
111 the public schools of his locality, after which he helped his father on the 
(arm until twenty-one years of age. Lie then went to Dakota, where he 
worked on a farm for two years and then returned to (Canada, there engag- 
ing in the egg business with David Hill, .\fter two years, Air. Ridley went 
ii> .\ew ^'ork City, Avhere he spent one year in an egg commission liouse 
and then came to Charlotte, Alichigan. and Ijecame a ])artner in the firm of 
^'U!ng & Ridley. In 1894 James T. Ridley came to Greenville, Montcalm 
(I'unty. and engaged in the egg business, first in a small w^ay, but now, as a 
"'^ult of ability and resource, he has built up a large and lucrative trade in 
his line, being now the proprietor of the "Egg L^mporium," one of the best- 
l^iiMwn houses for the conduct of this line of l)usiness to be found in the com- 
innnity. Mr. Ridley not only is the owner of his business and the building 



So MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

in which he operates it, Init he is the owner of eighty acres of good farm land 
in Canada. 

In 1894. James T. Ridley was married to Anna l^llico, who was horn, 
and educated in Canada. Xo children have heen horn to Mr. and ATrs. 
Ridley. 

Mr. J>l,idley is known and prominent in fraternal circles, heing a mem- 
her of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
the l.oval Carder of Moose, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of 
the ?vlodern Woodmen of America. Mr. Ridley being past chancellor and 
])asl venerable consul of the latter organization, and is generally regarded as 
one of the most esteemed citizens of Greenville, his activity and interest in 
the town and county, having won for him a place of honor in the community. 
Politically, Mr. I-iidley has been active and has taken an important 
l)art in (ireenville afTairs, for three terms having heen a member of the 
(ireenville city council. In political affiliation, Mr. Ridley is a Republican, 
i)eing a past president of the Greenville Republican Club. 



c.\i/'r. iiKXRv M. hempstJ':ad. 

Three generations of the Hempstead family ha\e been honorably rep- 
resented in the wars of this country. Capt. Henry M. Hempstead, an old 
settler of Montcalm county and one of the best-kuow'n men hereal.)out. per- 
formed valiant service in behalf of the Union cause during the Civil War; 
his father was a doughty soldier during .Vmerica's second war of inde- 
])endence in 1812, and his grandfather was a no less valiant contender in 
behalf of independence for the colonies during the Revolutionary War. 

Henry M. Hem])stead was born in Williamstown, Oswego county, 
Xew ^'ork, on P^eljruary 2. 1832, son of Col. W^illiam and Marriam (Tlyatt) 
Hem|)stcad, both natives of Xew York state, the former of whom was 
the son of X^athan Hempstead, a soldier in the patriot army during the 
re\olutionary War. who died at Frezonia, Chautauqua county. New York, 
at the age of ninety-three years, and wdiose wife lived to the age of ninety, 
having reared a large family, among their children records being preserved 
wdiich name Isaac, Jonathan, James, \Villiam and Mrs. Esther Case. Mar- 
riam Hvatt was the daughter of Gilbert Hyatt and wife, early settlers of 
Williamstown, New York, among whose children mention is made of Mrs. 
Flsther Smith, Mrs. Hyman, Marriam. Robey and Aurelia. 




(APT. iiKxia- M. iii:mi'sti:a]>. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 8 1 

^."ol. William Hempstead, who .served as a soldier during the War of 
1812, kept a tavern in ^\'illiamsto\vn and also operated a foundry. He died 
of pneumonia, after an illness of four days, in 1834, at the age of fifty-one 
vears. His widow survived him until 1865, ^i^'" ^Ic'^th occurring then at 
the age of seventy-three years. They were the parents of eleven children, 
ten of whom lived to maturity. William Charles, Alary Ann, F.dward 
lames, ( atherine, Mary, jane, Laura, Isaac M., ITvin Arthur, Park and 
lienry M. 

Henry M. Hempstead was but two years of age when his father died. 
When he was twehe years of age his mother and her family moved to 
Osuego, where he grew to manhood. When twenty-two years of age he 
came to Michigan and located at Marshall, where he was a clerk in a store 
until 1855, in which year he went to ]\Tinnesota, locating at Stillwater, 
where he was a 1)Ookkeeper and general clerk in a lumber office in the 
pineries. The man who emjiloyed him finally owed him the sum of twehe 
hundred dollars, which he was unable to collect on account of extensi\-e 
losses on the i)art of the timl)ernian, wlio, as "conscience money," later 
-;ia\e him a note for five hundred dollars, which, owing to the panic time 
which ensued in 1837, proved worthless. Thus deprived of the rewards of 
his labors, Mr. Hempstead returned to Marshall, not well pleased with the 
"Utcome of his !\linnesota experience. He resumed his former employ- 
ment as a clerk in a store at Marshrdl and was there when the ("i\il War 
'iroke out. On .Vugust 24, t86i, he eniksted in ("om])any M, Second Regi- 
nient. Michigan Cavalry, l-"rancis W. Dickey, captain, which rendezvoused 
•11 (rrand Rapids. Going into the service as a sergeant. Henry M. Hemp- 
stead was ].)romoted to seond lieutenant in 1863 and was mu.stered out 
uith his regiment in 1865 with the rank of captain. Captain Hempstead's 
'cgiment participated in many of the most strenuous campaigns and hardcst- 
!(.)ught battles of the war and saw a great deal of active service. 

After the close of the war, Captain Hempstead returned to IMarshall 
.'.nd, in ])artnership with Tom Marshall, who was second lieutenant in the 
.-;ime coni])any during the war. engaged in the grocery business. Tn the 
fall of 1866, Captain Hempstead was elected to the important office of 
treasurer (^f Calhoim cotmty and was twice re-elected to the same office, 
!!uis serving in all three terms, after which for a time he continued his 
valuable public service as deputy treasurer. .\t the end of this service he 
i't night the store in which he had first been employed upon locating at 
Marshall and for seven or eight years was engaged in the dry-goods busi- 
(6b) 



82 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

ncss. On account of the failing state of his wife's health, he then decided 
to locate further north and went to Cheboygan, having previously con- 
tracted for a store room there. Upon reaching his destination he found that 
the building was only half completed and he was compelled to store his mer- 
chandise in a warehouse for three months. Dissatisfied with this arrange- 
ment. C'aptain Hempstead abandoned further thought of locating at Che- 
boygan and, in Deceml)er, 1882, located at Stanton, this county, where for 
several years he was engaged as manager oi the John Weatherwax store, 
after which he bought out the insurance business conducted by his 
employer's l)rot]ier and has been engaged successfully in the insurance busi- 
ness for the past twenty-live years, ha\ing made a name in that time as an 
acti\'e and energetic insurance man. 

(.)n May 5, 1864. Henry M. I lempstead was united in marriage to 
-Martha .\. Fiammond, of Marsliail. Michigan, daugliter of John Hammond 
and wife, and to this union two children were born. Arthur Tl. and Henry 
M.. Jr. Arthur H. Hempstead is a successful business man, one of the best- 
known timlKir experts in the state of Michigan. I'or o\er twent\' years he 
was in the em])l()y of a big lumber lirm at TUiy C^ity. during which time 
he spent seven years in Canada, in that com])any's interest, and is now 
manager for Merchon. Eddy & Parker Company at Saginaw. He married 
l>elle I'oul and has two children, Helen E. and Henry ^T., the third. Henry 
M. Hemj)stead, Jr.. who married Lotta May Dunn, died on April 18. igo8. 
Mrs. .Martha A. Hempstead died on .Vpril 10. 1872. at the age of thirty- 
three years, and on .V])ril 23, 1873, Captain Jleni[)stead married, secondlv, 
I'ersis .\. Hammond, his deceased wife's sister, which union was without 
issue. The second Mrs. Hempstead died on May 24. 1893, at the age of 
forty-seven. 

Cai)tain Hempstead is a Rcpul)lican and for years has taken a warm 
interest in Stanton's civic affairs and in the politics of Montcalm county 
generally. l-"or one term he served the ]Hiblic as city treasurer of St.anton 
and in other ways has given of his time to administrative affairs in the 
public service. The C^.ptain is one of the six remaining members of Stanton 
I'ost Xo. 176, (h-and Army of the Republic. Department of Michigan, and 
for man}- }'ears has devoted his time and energies to the interests of that 
post. Despite the fact that the snows of eighty-three winters have fallen 
upon the stalwart .shoulders of (^aptain Hempstead, he is still active in busi- 
ness and vigorous ph}'sically and is accounted one of Stanton's energetic 
and enterprising business men. He has a very wide acquaintance through- 
out the county and is held in the highest esteem ])y all. 



MONTCALM COi:NTY. MICHIGAN. 83 

ARTHUR J. TAYLOR. 

Arthur J. Taylor, county drain commmissioner and a citizen who has 
lieen prominent in the agricultural and bu.siness circles, as well as taking a 
leading place in the public affairs of Aiontcahn township, Montcalm county, 
was born in Greenville, this county, un August 22, j868, a son of William 
;uk1 lUsie ( iiodge) Taylor, the former born on October 30, 1834, in Staple- 
liurst. England, a son of Willi.un and Sarah ( Harden) Taylor; the latter 
horn at Sherman, New York, in \.'^Z7^ ^ daughter of hYancis and Ann Hodge. 

William Taylor rccei\ed his early education in the schools of his native 
land, after which he came to America, with his parents, in July, 1848, com- 
jtleting his education in the schools of this country. In 1868, after having 
lieen married on March tq, 1855, in Sherman, Xew A^ork, to Elsie Jane 
(lodge, William Taylor moved to ■Nfontcalm county, and bought forty acres 
of land, which he improved and cultivated, a few years later, adding forty 
acres to his farm, which he cultivated as a general fanner until 1895, when 
iic retired from agricultural activity and moved to (ireenville, where he now 
lives. 

On ;\pril 24, 1874, J-Hsie Jane, the wife of William Taylor, died, sur- 
vived by her husband and five children: Anna, born on June 9. 1857; I^ose. 
May 19, 1859; TJllian. February 14, t86i ; William \\., April 7, 1863, and 
Arthur J., August 22. 1868. In 1895. Mr. Taylor was married to Airs. 
Mary F,. Stokes, no children being l.)orn to this union. 

William Taylor is one of the best known men of the community, one 
who has l)een active as a citizen; taking his place in the official life of his 
'ownshi]) and county, during many years as a Republican and was elected as 
he candidate of his party to various offices, among which are those of road 
I'immissioner, school inspector and assessor. 

As a church worker, the elder Taylor is well known and appreciated, 
iiaving for more than sixty years served the Methodist church, his affilia- 
lion with the church, which .started when he was but twenty-three years of 
ige, Mr. Taylor believes to be one of the best acts of his life. Not only is 
AiUiam Taylor a prominent member of the Methodist church, but his wife 
lid all of his children are active in its affairs. Fraternally, William Taylor 
■- a nieml)cr of the Montcalm Grange, he having- affiliated himself with this 
■rganization in 1874, since which time he has served in nearly all of the of- 
'ces and now is the honored chaplain of this order. 

Arthur J. Taylor received a limited education in the schools of Green- 



84 MONTCALM COI'NTY, MICHIGAN. 

ville, near where he was reared on the home farm. iVftcr his school days, 
Mr. Taylor worked as a farmer on the ])lacc of his father for some time, 
also spending a few winters in the lumber camps of the vicinity. l*\)llow- 
iug his agricultural life at home, in 1905, he came to Stanton. .Montcalm 
county, and enga<^ed in the hardware and implement business, being asso- 
ciated with John Stearns in this line, until 1908, when Mr. Taylor purchased 
the interest of Mr. Stearns, after wiiich he condticted the business as sole 
propriet(;r until 1910, when he became a salesman for lightning rods, contin- 
uing in this l)usiness until 1912. 

In 1912, Arthur J. Taylor was elected to the office of drain commis- 
sioner of Montcalm county, which office he now serves, his ability and efifi- 
ciencv in this capacity resulting in the construction of the noted Butternut 
creek drain, which was constructed successfully regardless of strong opposi- 
tion. Politically, Mr. 'faylor is a Reimblican. 

In 1890. Arthur j. Taylor was married to Myrta Van W^yck, a native 
of Alichigan, and to this marriage have been born two children: I'dsie. who 
after comijleting her education at the Stanton high school, ijecame a school 
teacher, for two years, until her marriage to Raymond Slankar, of Detroit, 
and Arthur C, a graduate of the Stanton high school, formerh' a school 
teacher, now an employe of the Xorthway Motor Company, of Detroit. 

Arthur J. Taylor is a prominent member (-»f the Methodist church, at 
Stanton, and is now serving as a trustee, and for many years before coming 
to Stanton he was superintendent of the Sunday school of the Methodist 
church at Greenville. Mr. Taylor is a meml)er of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows at Stanton, and is a member of the ]\'Iontcalm Arl)or of 
Gleaners in vSidney townshi]), a cha])ter of which Mr. Taylor is a charter 
member. 



R. .ARTHUR CAROTHERS. 

On ancjther page in this volume, in connection with the sketch of New- 
ton \V. Newhouse. veteran editor of the Stanton Clippcr-JIcrald. there is 
presented a narrative of the manner in which the newsi)a])er with which 
Mr. Garothers has been so long connected, came to have its hyphenated name, 
and it will therefore not be necessary to go into further details in that regard, 
nor further to present the history of these two old papers, the Herald and the 
Clipper, in this county. Mr. Garothers, who is one of the best-known news- 
paper men in this part of the state, has been connected with the Clipper, with 



MONTCALM COl'NTY. MICHTOAX. S$ 

the exception of a few years, since he was sixteen years of age and has been 
Miie i:if the i)n1)hshers of the same since spring. J()i3. at which time he formed 
liis present partnership with Mr. Newhouse, who had Ix^cn editor of the 
Clipper for years and who at that time consohdated it with the Herald, the 
otVice of which latter paper had about that time suffered a cHsastrous loss by 
th-e. 

R. Arthur ( "arothers was born in Xorth Star township, Gratiot county, 
Michigan, January 2<S, 1876, son of James W. and Mary L. ( Litle ) Caroth- 
(.•rs, the former of whom was born in b'ranklin, l,enawee county, this state, 
and the latter in Canada. lames \Y. ("arothers. who died at his home in 
Stanton, this county, on .\pril 14. 1915, was born on Jidy 10, 1843, and 
was one of a family of six children, two sons and four daughters, all of 
whom have departed this life, the father dying when James was but four 
vears of age. I-Jefore he was twenty-one years of age, James \V. ("arothers- 
ran awa\- from home and enlisted in (\)mpan}' A. I'^dcventh Afichigan (.'av- 
;ibv. being em-olled on August 31. 1864. to serve for one year or during the 
continuance of the war. and was honoral)ly discharged on Jime 16. 1865. 
(Uu-ing the meantime liaxing endured many hardships, including incarcera- 
lion in the Libby i)ris(^n for about three months, during which time he 
nearly star\'ed to death. 

On December 30, 1871, James W. ("arothers w-as united in marriage in 
llillsdale county, Michigan, to Mary ]>. Tj'tle, who was 1)orn in Canada on 
June J2, 1846. daughter of Ralph and Maranda (Purchase) Litle. natives of 
( anada and New York r^specti\ely. and early settlers in Hillsdale county, 
diis state, who later moved to Gratiot county and still later to Stanton, this 
i ounty. where both died, the former at the age of eighty and the latter at the 
iL;e of eighty-six years. They ^\ere the ])arents of eight children, Samuel T>., 
Mrs. Hulda Cortright. William T... Mrs. Harriet Fennel. Joseph H., Mary T.., 
\\Iio married Mr. ('arothers, Mrs. Roxana Miner, and John. The latter 
lied in infancy. After residing in Saginaw and Gratiot counties a few 
ears. Mr. ("arothers and his family came to Montcalm county and located 
'■n Stanton, where he built a home, which he occupied until his death. He 
\vas a very active, hard-working man and was always busy. He stuck to his 
i>"st as long as he was able to go. M dififerent times, for nearly six years 
'ctore his death, Mr. Carothers served as nightwatchman on the street for 
'be city of Stanton and this service he kept u]) to within about a month of 
bis death in the spring of 1915. The day before his death he called his wife 
•' !ul children to his bedside and requested them not to mourn. He was pre- 



86 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

l)arcd for death and went calmly and in a spirit of complete resignation. 
Presides his widow, who survives, at the age of sixty-nine years, Mr. Caroth- 
ers left three sons, George H., R. Arthur and C'harles IL, all of Stanton. 

Barton Carothers, father of James W., was born at (Harkson, New 
York, on March 29, 181 1. He married i'olly Carothers on January i, 1840, 
at Rome. Lenawee county, Michigan. They resided on a homestead in that 
county until his death, which occurred on December 8, 1845. l*olly Caroth- 
ers was born at Lyons, Wayne county. New Vork, on December i.^, 1815. 
Mr. and Mrs. Barton Carothers were the parents of the following children; 
Robert i'., born on January 3(3, 1841. at Lenawee county; James W., July 10, 
1843, at Lenawee county, and Kllin M., October 22, 1845, <it Lenawee coun- 
ty. Polly Carothers was afterward married to James T. Bassctt. 1\:) this 
union were lx-)rn three daughters: Mary C. at Jeti'erson, Hillsdale county, 
Michigan, on October 15. 1850, and Mary Jane and Sarah Jane, twins, at 
Jefferson, on March 15, 1854. 

Ralph Litle was bom in (Canada. January 31, 181 1. He followed the 
cooper and shoemaking business for a number of years, but after his mar- 
riage to Maranda Purchase he moved to Hillsdale county, ^Michigan, and 
engaged in farming for about t\vent\- years. He then moved to Gratiot 
county, Michigan, where he jmrchased a farm, remaining on same until too 
old to work the land. Mr. Litle and wife then came to Stanton to reside 
with their daughter, Mrs. James W. Carothers. Mr. Litlc's parents, Joseph 
and Jane (Laighton) Litle, were born in Kngland and Scotland, respectively, 
'i'hey had two sons and five daughters. IMaranda (Purchase) Litle was the 
daughter of Samuel and Huldah ( Parshal) Purchase and was born at 
Phelpstown, New York, December 12, 1816. She had five brothers and 
one sister. The children born to Wr. and Mrs. Ralph IJtle are: Samuel L., 
William L., Huldah J., Joseph PL, Harriet A., Mary L., Roxana and John. 
The latter died in infancy, but the remaining sons and daughters married 
and raised families; twenty children being tx)rn in the seven families, twelve 
of whom are still living. Mr. and IMrs. Ralph Litle both died at the home 
of their daughter, Mrs. J. W. Carothers, in Stanton. He departed this 
life on January 23, 1892, at the age of eighty years, eleven months and twen- 
ty-three days. She passed away on September 22, 1901, at the advanced 
age of eighty-five years, nine months and ten days. 

R. Arthur Carothers was four years of age when his parents moved 
to Stanton and he has lived in that city ever since. He attended the public 
schools in his early youth and at the age of sixteen Ixgan to learn the print- 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 87 

r's trade in the office of the Stanton Clipper, with which paper he has been 
K'tixeh' connected for fifteen years. U])on the consoHclation of the Clipper 
and the Herald, under the name of the Clipper-Herald, on April i, 1913, he 
i)ccanic a full partner with Mr. Xewhouse in the publication of the paper 
nid has been thus engaged since that time. 

(3n June 2T, icjqo, R. Arthur Carothers was united in marriage to 
Maude B. White, who was born in (k-nesee county, this state, on October 8, 
1882, daughter of the Rev. John N. and iillla (Wilder) White, the former 
■if whom also was born in Genesee county and the latter in Carlton, New 
\ ork, l^orn June 29, 1850. but who had lived in Genesee county nearly all 
her life. Rev. John .\. White was the son of Alpheus, bom in Oakland 
county, xMichigan. and Samantha (Root) White, she a native of Xew York 
state, and pioneers of (jenesec county, this state, where the former died at 
an advanced age, his widow still living, at the age of ninety years, making 
lier home in StantCMi. l.ater, on November 25, 1894, Mrs. Samantha (Root) 
White was married to William H. Stevens, an old pioneer of Montcalm 
county and for forty years a residen.t of Stanton. He was born in the state 
"f Connecticut on October 18, 1823, and came to Michigan with his parents 
when a small boy, locating near Salem, Washtenaw^ coiuity. He afterward 
moved to Tkishnell township, this county and in 1869 located in Stanton. 
Mr. Ste\ens engaged in the saw-mill and grist-mill business here for a num- 
ber of years and also Imilt a four-story brick building on Main street. Here 
!ie carried on a hotel and opera house business for years. In many respects 
he was a very ]x;culiar man. although he had some extra good qualities, a 
liard worker and had succeeded in amassing considerable property, although 
-l)cnding a snug fortune in the courts of Montcalm county. Mr. Stevens 
!ied .April i, 1909, and was laid to rest in the Bushnell cemetery, beside the 
'cmains of his first wife, who was a sister of his late widow. She and her 
iirst husband were the ])arents of seven children, Mina E., Lemuel E., John 
\., Mary E., Nathan I., Huldah \i. and James D. The Rev. John N. White 
\as a promising young mini.ster of the Free Methodist church, in which com- 
iiunion he was a presiding elder, Imt whose promising career was cut short 
'•> death in 1892, on June 12. at Grand Rapids, Michigan, he l>cing then but 
■ hirty-eight years of age. Elis wife died on January 2, 1888, at the age of 
'lirty-eight. An infant of six weeks also died at same time. Elliott S. 
^\'ildcr was Ixorn at Fairhaven, Vermont, April 21, 1806. His wife's maiden 
ame was Sylvia Gilkey, born at Lock, Cayuga county, New York, on Aug- 
ust I. 1814. They were married 1832. The maternal grandparents of Mrs. 



88 AfONTCALM COUNTY, MICFTIGAN. 

C.^irolhers were Elliott S. Wilder and wife, natives of New York state and 
early settlers at Atlas, Michig-an. Among- their ehildren was one son, Ham- 
ilton Wilder, who died in Anderson\-ille prison during the ("ivil War, their 
other children having been Lina, FAa, Helen. Sarah. AVilbnr and lilla. The 
remaining son. Wilbur, is <'it present stationed at J''ort Ah'er. X'irginia, as 
Colonel Wilder. 

To R. Arthur and Maude 13. (White) Carothers two children have been 
born. Marjorie C". and dlen C^ ^Ir. and .Mrs. (_*arothers are interested in 
the social acti\ities of Stanton and are held in high regard by their many 
friends thereabout. Mr. Carothers is a Republican and for three years 
served the public as city clerk of Stanton, for one year as alderman, and for 
f(.)ur years served as supervisor. He is a member of the Odd b'ellows lodge 
at Stanton and is attached to the encampment of that order. 3*lrs. Carothers 
was left an orphan at the age of ten years and was raised b}' her grandmother. 
Mrs. William H. Stevens, coming- to Stanton from (ienesee county with her 
grandmother when she was ele\'en years of age. and has made Stanton her 
home e\'er since. Mrs. Carothers is a mem])er of the Daughters of Reljekah, 
the woman's auxiliary of the Odd i'^'llows, and is a regular attendant of the 
Methodist church in the citv where she li\es. 



CR.VHv^ W. WEEKS. 

Clair A\'. Weeks, a well-known business man, wlio is the proprietor and 
operator of the Weeks monument works, of Greenville, Montcalm county, 
^Michigan, was born near Belding, Michigan, on .August 23, 1878, a son of 
Leonard H. and b'lizaljeth ( Slawson ) Weeks, the former liorn at Eowell, 
Kent county. Michigan, the latter near Watkins Glenn, in Tompkins C(nmty, 
Xew \'ork, from which place she moved with her paren.ts, to Wisconsin, 
thence to Missouri, and from there to near Cooks Corners. Kent county. 
Michigan. 

b'ollowing their marriage, Leonard H. and l:^lizabeth Weeks lived on a 
farm in Ionia county, until 1891, when the.)- moved to Ijelding. Ionia county, 
where the elder Weeks, is now a stock buyer. Leonard H. and l^lizabeth 
Weeks are the parents of three children: Guy, of Saginaw. Michigan, who 
is a traveling engineer for the Pere Marquette Railway (.■omj)any ; Ora. who 
is the wife of L. M. Sagendorf. a hardware merchant of Greenville, and 
Clair W. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 8<-) 

C'lair \V. W'eeks was educated in the common schools of Ionia county 
and at the Ikdding hi^h school, after which he learned the trade of a stone- 
rntter. At this occupation, Air. Weeks continued at his trade at Gratiot, 
until 1910. when he came to (jreen\ ille, Montcalm county, and estahlished 
!iis monument Imsiness at this ])lace, erecting a building for his work, and 
where he now is successful!}' engaged in the conduct of his business. 

(lair \V. W'eeks was married to Jessie Herrick, who was born at Tru- 
ian.t, Michigan, and to this marriage was 1)orn one child, Jessie, the mother 
• lying at the time of the birth of this child. 

On l)eceml)er 2y, 1905, Mr. W'eeks was married to Mary E. Shell, whu 
\^:\^ i)orn in Al])ena county, Michigan, and to this marriage have been born 
I'dur c'n'ldren ; Lawrence, X'irene, Lucy and Helen. Mrs. W'eeks is a com- 
municant of the Catholic church. 

(lair \V. W'eeks is a meniber of LeRc^y Lodge Xo. 9, Knights of 
Tyihias, and is a member of Lodge Xo. 447, Independent Order of Odd 
I'cllows. In politics, Air. WVeks is independent of ])arty. 



jOHX LIAVLS. 

John Lewis, vice-president and genera! manager of the (iibson Refrig- 
ifalor Company, and a citizen prominent in the industrial acti\ities of (ireen- 
viUe, Montcalm county, was born in Cheltenham, England, on April 19. 
I1S54, and li\e(l in his native country until after the completion of his educa- 
tion at X'ortham|)ton, luigland, and tlien, in Octo!:)cr, 1873, after his mar- 
I lage. came to .\merica. 

On reaching .\merica, John Lewis made his home at Philadelphia, 
' 'ennsylvania, for two years and in 1875 went to Chicago, where, one year 
i.iler, Ik- engaged in the refrigerator Ijusiness. In 1884 Mr. Lewis moved 
'" IJelding, Ionia county, Michigan, and !)ecame associated with the Belding 
■lanufacturing ( 'ompany, with whom he remained mitil 1892, when he came 
!" (ireen\i!le, Montcalm county, and together with I*^. & C T. Ranney, organ- 
ized tlie l\anney Refrigerator (^)mpany. In X^'ovember, 1909. Mr. Lewis 
■lAered his connection with the Ranney Alanufacturing Company and organ- 
ized the Gi!)son Refrigerator Company, a corporation of which he is vice- 
I'resident and general manager. .\s a manufacturer of refrigerators, Mr. 
l-ewis is one of the best known men of the country and it is said that he 
'^ the oldest active refrigerator manufacturer in the United States. 



<-)() MONTCALM COrXTY, MICHIGAN. 

John Lewis, while a citizen of England, was married to Lucy M. Bron- 
son, a daughter of John Bronson, who in 1856, was the manager of the 
Edward Malley Company, one of the largest department stores of New 
Haven, Connecticut. To the marriage of John and Lucy Lewis ha\e been 
born seven children: J. I'Yank, of Baltimore; Dr. G. ii. Lewis, a graduate 
of the University of ^Michigan, now jiracticing his profession at Cleveland, 
Ohio; Fred S., of Polsbo, Wa.shington ; .Man (i., who is private secretary to 
Harry E. ("onverse, of Massachusetts; Wilburn B., who is a graduate of 
Western Reserve Unixersity; Edna, who lives at home; and Gertrude, the 
wife of Dr. W. K. Lyman, of Massachusetts. John Lewis and his family 
are members of the I'4)iscopal church. 

JNJr. Lewis is a meml>er of Greenville Lodge Xo. 96, Eree and Accepted 
^Masons, having served as master of the 1.)lue lodge, and is a member of 
('hapter Xo. 79, Royal Arch Masons. In politics, ^\r. Lewis is independent 
of party. 



BICRT C. E. SILVER. 



IJert C. E. Silver is head of the well-known Silver Family, a company of 
gifted musicians and public entertainers, known and welcomed in every towii 
in Michigan for years past, long residents of Michigan, recently purchased 
house and theater property at Greenville, which will be their liome in future, 
are proprietors of the SiKcr b'amily Park and theater at Crystal, and are 
prominently connected wMth the social and cultural activities of the town. 
Mr. Bert C. E. Silver is a nati\'e of Xew York, having been born in St. 
L.awrence county, that state, December 9, t86o, son of Dick and Eliza ( luirl) 
Silver, prominent entertainers in their time, uhose last days were spent in 
Traverse City. Mrs. Dick Silver is alive now and resides with her eldest 
son, Bert, at Greenville. 

The veteran entertainer, Dick Silver, whose memory is cherished in this 
state, si)ent seventy years of his life on the stage, the greater part of which 
time he headed the organization, which is still being perpetuated, in the third 
generation, to which he ga\e the name of The Silver Family, a company of 
entertainers which enjoys the unique distinction of lieing an exclusively state- 
limited organization, being the only known show of its kind which does not 
given performances outside the state in which it has its organization, it hav- 
ing been the policy of Mr. Silver for years to restrict his territory to the 
state of Michigan. The Silver Family thus never giving entertainments 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICTIIGAN. 9I 

more than one hundred and fifty miles rcnioxed from Greenville and Oystal. 
Dick Siher was I)orn in the town of Grotton. V^ermont, in 1827, and grew 
M|) to the life of the stage quite naturally, for his father, a native of England, 
was a concert singer of note in his day. member of an old English family, 
tlie genealogy of which has heen ])rcserved 1)ack to the year 1600. Dick 
Siher was one of a family of nine sons and five daughters and in his early 
\(-uth was sent to P^oston to learn a trade, hut instead followed the bent of 
hi. natural inclination and l>ecame a musician and for twenty years was con- 
nected with \arious musical companies tra\'eling out of Boston. He then 
organized the Silver Brothers" Minstrels and went on tour on his own account, 
achieving a reputation as a pul)lic entertainer, and in 1859. in St. Lawrence 
county. New York, met and married I^liza l^arl. who was born in Jefferson 
county. Xew York, in 1840, her father, Samuel J'Larl, of direct h'nglish 
stock, his family also tracing back to the early part of the seventeenth cen- 
lurv, having come to this country from ('anada. l^liza (b^arl) vSilver also 
was an accom])lished musician and was a competent and valuable hel])mate 
lo her gifted husband in his long life as a public entertainer and was a large 
i'actor in the success of the vSilver Family. Their eldest son, l>ert, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, experienced his iirst view of an appreciative audience 
tnun the stage when he was fi\e years of age. he having then l)cen put on 
in a singing and dancing turn at St. Lawrence county fair, New^ York, and 
his life ever since has been devoted to the entertainment of the public. Tn 
iS<')6 the Silvers located at Durand, in (fhipj>eway county, Wisconsin, and 
remained there until 1868, Dick Silver operating a concert company out of 
diat ])lace. covering Northwestern i)oints, and afterward moved to EauClair. 
Ml the same state, where Mr. Silver organized a company which he called 
die Xew York Circus, and which he conducted successfully for a period of 
lour years, at the end of which time he took out a dramatic company and 
traveled for a year, wintering at Shellsburg, Iowa. The next spring he 
-tarted out with a concert com])any and in the fall of 1873 turned in at 
' rrand Ra])ids, this state, which he made his headquarters for a time, later 
moving the same to Sand Lake, in Kent county, out of which point the 
lamily traveled for a couple of years. The season of 1876 was spent by 
die Sil\er l\amily touring Ohio and at the end of that season the family 
returned to Michigan, which by that time was coming to seem more like 
home than anywhere else, and located at Crystal, this county, wintering at 
ihat point, where they remained for eight months, during which time Dick 
Silver was made a Mason by the lodge at Crystal. In 1877 the Silver 
family toured northern Michigan, rimning out of Traverse City, which 



9-^ M0NTCALA3 C:OUNTY, MlCllKJAN. 

latter point Dick Silver thenceforward made his head(|uarters and there 
he spent his last days, having been a ])ublic entertainer for seventy years, 
the greater part of which time he headed his own company. 

To Dick and Kliza (Earl) Silver five children were born, all sons, as 
follow: l>ert ('. E., the immediate snbject of tliis biographical sketch; G. 
Lote, proprietor of the Dreamland theater at 1'raverse City; James b"., of 
(jreenville, this comity; Harry ]\, proprietor of a theater at (Jadillac. this 
state, and (ilenn C".. who was born at Ch-ystal, in this county, in 1876, now 
engaged in the livery business at Traverse City. 

Bert C". \\. Silver literally grew up to the life of the stage and 
remained with his father's company until 1889, in which year he engaged 
in the mercantile business at Chicago, at the same time occup>'ing a place 
in one of the leading orchestras in that cit_\-, and was thus engaged for four 
years, at the end of which time he returned to Tra\erse City and took his 
place in the organization of the Silver Ih-others' Company, which operated 
as a tent show tluring the summers and as bell-ringers and concert enter- 
tainers during the winters and was thus engaged for six years, touring 
principally throughout northern Michigan. In i8(j9 Bert Siher djiscon- 
tinued his connection with the Silver Brothers Com])any and organiz.ed the 
SiKer Family Swiss l^)ell- Ringers and Concert Comi)any. with headquarter.:; 
at Standish, this state, and thus continued for live years, operating a tent 
show during the summers and attached to a lycenm circuit during the win- 
ters. 

In 1904. Mr. Siher bought the (Jrove proi)erty, including drove I'ark, 
at (."rystal, this county, renaming the same the vSihxr I'^amih- J 'ark. and 
cjpened it u|) as an amusement enteri)rise, at the same time making his head- 
quarters at (ireen\ille, where he now owns valuable town property, besides 
the theater at that place, and where his family maintains its established 
home. The Siher b"amily\s route in the entertainment line is restricted, by 
choice, to the state of Michigan, it l)eing Mr. Silver's boast that his attrac- 
tion is the only one of its kind that is an exclusive state attraction. The 
b'amily uses automol)ile trucks for transportntion. running a road .show for 
the season of sixteen weeks during the summers and has planned for two 
companies to take the road in the season of 1916. 

On March 17, 1883. P)ert ('. K. Silver wms united in marriage io F.llen 
L. X'escelius. daughter of l''.. X. and Lottie \'>celius, of Tecumseh, this 
state, of b'nglish and (jerman descent, respectively, and to this union seven 
children ha\-e been born, all of whom are connected with the Silver familv. 



MONTTALM COUNTY. MTCHIGAN. 93 

entertainers, namely: l*" ranees, who married Sandy Copeland, of Crystal, 
clarinet player; G. Earl, who married Irene I'^elton, of Crystal, who also is 
connected with the Silver Family; Lanra, solo cornetist ; Pearl, trap-drum- 
mer: Rtibv, piano and I-'rench-horn, and Dick, bass horn. Kittie died at 
ihe ai;;e of three rears. All of these SiKcr children are accomplished musi- 
cians and are all graduates of the Michigan high schools. Dick having grad- 
uated with the class of .May. 1915, at ("rystai. During their limited tmic 
at home, the Silvers take an active ])art in the social life of their home town 
and all are held in the highest esteem throughout this section. 

Air. Silver is a member of Alt. Cilead Lodge No. 2<^=,, Free and 
Accepted Alasons. at Crystal, and to which his son, (j. luirl, is also attached, 
the latter being a past master of the lodge. Mrs. Silver and her daughters 
are mem])ers of the Order of the h^aslern Star and all take an earnest inter- 
est in local Masonic affairs. Mr. Silver also is a member of the Knights of 
the Maccabees and Cj. I'^-arl .Silver is a member of LeRoy Lodge No. 9. 
Knights of Pythias, at Greenville. Mr. Silver is a Democrat and gives a 
good citizen's attention to local political atlairs. but has never been included 
in the ofiice-seeking class. 



ALBLRT ALLKN. 



Albert Allen, a well-known retired farmer, owner of a fine farm of one 
Inindred acres in section 26 of l.uu-eka township, this county, now living m 
ccjuifort in a delightful home in (lreeu\'i]le, is a native son of Michigan, ha\- 
ing been born on a farm in Orion tow^nship. Oakland county, this state, 
.Vovember jy, i(S47, son of Ilarxey and Malinda (Jackson) Allen, both 
natives of Onondaga county. New A'ork, who later became well-known 
!-esidents of this county, where both spent their last days. 

liar\ev Allen was born on March 12, 1802. and grew up on a farm 
in Onondaga county. New A^ork. In T822 he married Malinda Jackson, 
who had grown up in the same neighborhood with him and they continued 
'o live there until the early 'thirties, when, with their three children, they 
■ame to .Michigan, settling on an eighty-acre farm in Orion township, where 
I hey made their home until 1851 and w^here four more children were horn 
lo them. In the year just named, LLarvey Allen sold his farm and he and 
his family mo\ed from Oakland county to Montcalm county. He bought 
eighty acres in section 24, township to, north, range 8.. west, which he 
liresently sold and Iiought the farm in section 26 of the same township, 



94 MONTCALM COfXTY, MICIITC.AN. 

which his youngest son, the immediate subject of this sketch now owns, and 
there he and his wife spent their hist days. ALrs. Allen died in 1884 'ind 
]Jarvey Allen died in 1890, at the age of eighty-eight years, long having 
])een one of the best-known and most highly respected residents of that 
section. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, of whom seven 
grew to maturity and of whom but tw^o are now living, the two last born, 
Sallie Ann, wife of Jacob Osman, of Ann Arbor, this state, and Albert, the 
subject of this sketch; the others ha\'ing been Levi j., Francis \A .. Henry 
\'\, hLsther P., ^vho died unmarried, and Joseph J. 

Albert Allen was about live years old when his parents moved from 
Oakland county to this county and he grew up on the home farm in Kureka 
township, receiving his education in the district school in the neighborhood 
of his home, remaining on the farm as he grew to manhood and eventually 
assumed charge of the same for his aged father. He bought the place, in 
[8/2. having in the meantime married, and made his home there until the 
time of his wife's death in 1909, after which he left the farm and moved to 
(ircenville. tJis wife was jane Wilbur, daughter of (k-orge Wilbur, of 
Hillsdale, and to them were born four children, as follow: Wilma. wife 
of 1). M. No.xon, of (rreenville ; Pearl, who married EtTa Forsythe and li\es 
in this county; Cora, who married V>. "M. Hall, of Manchester, and Hugh B., 
who marrie<l Julia Selsman and lives in Douglass townshi]), this county. 

On October 19, 1910, Albert Allen was married, secondly, to .Mrs. 
F,mma (C'usick) Kent, widow of William Kent and daughter of Charles 
H. and Sylvia (Hebard) ("usick. well-known residents of the neighljoring 
county of Ionia. Charles H. Cusick was horn in the cit}- of Utica. New 
York, in 1836. .As a young man he came to Michigan and settled in Lapeer 
county where in 1857. being twenty-one years of age. he bought a quarter 
of a section of land, presently married Sylvia Hebard, whose |)arents were 
pioneers of that section, and there made his home for fourteen years, and 
then he sold liis place and bmight a farm of eighty acres in Ottawa county. 
where he lived a short time and then gave up farming and mo\cd to Grand 
l\ai)ids, where he made his home for several years, later moving to Ionia 
county, where he l)ought a farm in Otisco townshi]) and there he and his 
wife spent the remainder of their lives. Charles FL Cusick died in \C)Oo 
and his widow died in 1909. They were the parents of se\en children, of 
whom five are now living, as follow: Fred \'\, who lives in vSouth Dakota; 
Emma, wife of Mr. .Mien; Oscar, who lives in St. .Anthony. Idaho; .\ddie, 
v^'ife of Frank Motter, of ^rackinac City, this state, and Claud, who lives in 



.MONTCALM COrXTY. MICHIGAN. 95 

J-Aigene. Oregon. Sarah, the firstborn of the aho\'e union, who married 
Tk-rt Bowman, is but hitel}' deceased. 

Mrs. Allen is a member of the Methodist church and she and Mr. Allen 
are interested in all movements having as their o])ject the promotion of the 
best interests of the community in which they live. Mr. Allen is a Repub- 
lican and has served the public from time to time as justice of the peace, 
constable, drainage commissioner and in other useful w^iys, long ha\ing 
hcen regarded as a public-spirited citizen. Tie and his wife have many 
friends hereabout and are held in high esteem bv all. 



OKAXC^h: S. AIAIACK. 



Orange S. Almack, who came to Michigan thirty-four years ago and 
has l)een a resident of Montcalm county since 1911, and who, since the 
latter year, has been a merchant in Sheridan, this county, doing an exten- 
>i\e business in the general merchandise line, was born in New Castle town- 
ship. Coshocton county, Ohio, on July 24, 1S53. son of Thomas TT. and 
Arabella (Coplen) Almack, who moved from Ohio to Indiana in 1863, set- 
iling in i^'ulton county, whence they later moved to Whitley county, same 
>tate, v.here they spent the remainder of their lives. 

(jeorge S. Almack \\as Imt ten years of age when his parents moved 
into Indiana and he was educated in the scln)ols of that state. On .\ugust 
'(), 1876, at \\'arsaw, Indiana, he was united in marriage to Sarah Ji. Phil- 
:!])s. who was born near Pierceton, Kosciusko county, Indiana, on February 
-i. 1859, daughter of Henry and Margaret ( Walker) Phillips, the former 
a native (jf Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio, who were married in Ohio 
and later located in Kosciusko county, Indiana, where their last days were 
spent. Henry Phillips and wife were the parents of twelve children, of 
whom five are still living, George \V., John P., Mary R.. Lena M. and .Sarah 
i^., the latter of whom was the last born. To Mr. and Mrs. Almack three 
children have been born, Alice A., who married George Bean and lives in 
Allegan county, this state, and Gertrude M., who was graduated from the 
common schools of this county and from Parson's Business College at 
Kalamazoo, married Artie Feighner and lives at Sheridan, this county. 

In 191 T, Mr. Almack came to Montcalm county and in the latter 
year opened a store at Sheridan, and ever since has been very successfully 
engaged in business there. Mr. and "Mrs. Almack are members of the 



<)6 MONTCALM COl'NTY, MICFTIGAN. 

Christian church. They also arc much iutcrcslcd in the work of the Inde- 
])cn(lcnt Order of Odd Fellows. Air. .Vhnack 1)ein<;- a member of Lacota 
l.od^i^e Xo. 33, of that order, oi which he is a past noble grand, and is also 
attached to the encampment of the same order, and .Mrs. Almack is a 
meml)cr of the Sheridan lodge of the Daughters of Rebekah, the woman's 
au.xiHary of the Odd b\'llows, and is a i)ast noble grand of that lodge and 
a member of the grand lodge of Michigan. Mr. .Almack was one of the 
charter members of the lodge to which he is attached. He is a Democrat 
and gi\es a good citizen's attention to ])oIitics, but the close application that 
he has ever given to his business affairs has i)re\ented him from taking a 
\ery active part in campaign work. He is one of Sheridan's most cnter- 
]3rising and public-spirited citizens and is ever alert to advance any move- 
ment looking to the best interests of that thriving village. He is an excel- 
lent citizen and a good neighl)or and is held in high regard throughout that 
community. 



CHARLIES W. I'RI'.XCH. 

in banking circles hereabouts lew names are better known than that 
of the gentleman whose name the reader notes al.)(.)\e. Charles W. I'Yench, 
cashier of the State Sa\ings JJank, of Stanton, this county, who has been 
connected with the banking business since he was nineteen vears old and 
who has been prominently identified with the banking interests of Stanton 
.since i8g5. 

Charles W. h>ench was born in Willoughby, Ohio, on Alay (,», 1864, 
<on of George \\\ and xMargaret (iVdton) bVench, the former of whom 
was I)orn at Rutland. A'ermont, and the latter at Willoughby. Ohio, (ieorge 
W. I'^rench was the son (jf William bVench and wife, N'ermonters, who 
<lied well along in years. William French was a harness-maker and he 
and his wife were the ])arents of the following children: I'^diza AL. (icoro-e 
W., I'jiima, Paul. John W., Mary X.. Henryette, AVillia^n I'.. Horace, 
.Sanmcl P., .Vleline, Rmeline and Sarah X., all deceased. 

Wdien twelve years of age, George W. French left home to make his 
own way in the world. He went to New A'ork City and thence to Grand 
Rapids, Alichigan, in which latter city he learned the carpenter trade and 
while thus engaged hel])ed to build 'the old Sweets hotel. Presently he 
went up Grand river to .Muir, where for a time he was engaged in the 
clothing business, later going into the lumber business and for twentv-five 




CIIAKI.KS W. FUKXCir. 



MONTCAl.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 97 

\tars operated a saw-mill at IShur, becoming one of the best-known lumber- 
incii in that region. After middle life he was attracted to the South as a 
ji'ace of residence and went to Johnson CJity, 'JY-nnessee, where for a time 
Ik' was engaged in the manufacture of plug tobacco, after which he returned 
\>> Muir, his established home, Avhere, two years later, in 1896, he died at 
the age of sixt_\'-se\cn years. During the Civil War, George W. French 
sor\ed as a soldier in the Union army for about live years, lie enlisted as 
;i i)rivate in the 'J\'nth Michigan Cavalry; presently was ])romoted to quar- 
KMinaster and was mustered out with the rank of captain Captain French 
wii'^ a valiant soldier and participated in many hard- fought engagements, 
iIk' division in which he served having been in the thick of several of the 
innst im])ortant campaigns of the war. During his long residence at Muir, 
( ajUain iM-ench took an active i)art in civic affairs and for some time served 
.ix l)rcsident of the village council. He also served as township trustee and 
in numerous other ways displayed his good citizenship and desire in every 
wiv lo i)roniote the growing enterprises of the ])lace. 

To the union of (ieorge \^^ French and Margaret Felton five children 
were born, as follow: Margaret, who is the wife of George G. Brown, 
r:i>liier of the Cadillac State T5ank; ("harles \V.. suliject of the l)iographical 
ketch; Fannie, wife of William Y. Serrin. of Cniicago: \\''illiam, deceased, 
.rid Jennie, wife of L. G. ITollbrook. of Des Moines. Iowa. Mrs. French 
<!icd in 1872. at the age of thirty-six years. Her parents, the Peltons. were 
iiatixcs of New York state and early settlers of Willoughby, Ohio, in the 
luighborhood of which the}- lived as farmers until old age. They were 
I Ik- parents of live children. Charles. John. Harriett. Jane and George. Mr. 
nid .Mrs. French originally were members of the Christian (Disciples) 
■ iinrch, l.nit later became Presbyterians and in this latter faith both died. 

The boyhood of (iiarles W. French was spent at Muir, his early edu- 

'ation ha^•ing l)een received in the public schools at that place, which he 

Ml)])lenK'nted by a course in a business college at Grand Rapids. Tn his 

■outh. l)ctween the ages of fourteen and nineteen, he worked in his father's 

•^\\ -mill, on the river and in the timber, after which he entered the bank 

i Webber. Just & Company as a bookkeeper.' Following this initial service 

i! the banking business, he worked in other banks for about two years, at 

I lie end of which time, in t886. he was made cashier of the bank of Webl:>er, 

!"--t (.S: Comi)any. He ]-)resently bought Mr. Just's interest in that bank, 

•>'-'■ that of P. 1\T. Fox, the bank firm then becoming known as S. W. 

A\ eb])er & Companv, and continued this connection until January i, 1892, 

(7b) 



f)8 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

at wliich time he oroaiiized the Oakland County Savings P>ank, of Tontiac, 
Michigan, and served as cashier of that institution until June. 1895, at 
^vhich time he came to this county and bought the hank of 11. Iv. Wagner 
at Stanton, (jperating the same under the firm name of ( '. W. French & 
Company, josiah E. Just being a partner in the enterprise. Following the 
death of Mr. Just, Mr. French for a time continued as sole proprietor. Tn 
SeiJtember. Kjor, Charles W. French organized the State Savings Bank of 
Stanton, with a capital stock of twenty thousand dollars, and has since that 
time been cashier of that concern. Associated with him in this institution 
are Fred R. Messenger, president; IJenson F. Gaffield, vice-])resident. and 
William S. French, assistant cashier. 

On April 4, 1888, Charles W. French was united in marriage to Ik'lle 
Squires, who was born in Saline, Michigan, daughter of Samuel and 
k^leanor (Shekel) Squires, l)Oth of whom now are dead, and to this union 
one child has been born, a son, William S.. a graduate of lu^rris Institute, 
who is assistant cashier in the State Saxings r.ank at Stanton, ^vlrs. French 
has a brother, John Squires, and a sister. Kate. Mrs. French is a member 
of the Episcopal church. While Mr. French is not actively identified with 
an.y of the churches, he is friendly to all and a liberal contrilmtor to worth\ 
causes, as is his wife, and both take an active intere.st in local measures 
designed to advance the common good, 'fhey are ])romincnt in the social 
life of their home city and have a wide acquaintance throughout the county, 
their friends holding them in the highest esteem. Mr. French is a Repul> 
lican and a Mason, his membership in that ancient order l.)eing in Stanton. 
Fodge No. 250, Free and Accepted Masons. Tie is widely known in com- 
mercial and banking circles throughout this jiart of the state and pos<^esse- 
the entire confidence of the business community. 



F.XRFF B. SF.'\WS()N. 



I'^.arle B. Slawson, well-known dealer in coal and farm produce at 
Greenville, this county, is "native and to the manner born," for he first 
saw the light of day in that pleasant little city on June 17, 1875, son of 
George R. and Julia { ik-rridge) Slawson, the former a native of Cayug;; 
county. New York, and the latter of this county. 

George R. Slaw^son, for many years a prominent merchant of Green- 
ville, came to Michigan with his parents when he was a small boy and was 



MONtcATiM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 99 

1 eared on a farm in Oaklield township, Oaklield county, receiving his early 
rducation in the schools of Oakficld, after which he entered a school of 
|)harniacy and became a graduate pharmacist. Thus equipi^ed for the busi- 
;iess to which he had devoted his life he settled at Greenville, in this county 
.ind entered into a partnership with C. ('. Merritt, in the drug and jewelry 
business, and was thus engaged for five or six years, at the end of which 
lime the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Slawson engaged in the drug 
business wholly on his own account and continued in that line until his 
<kath. 

Not long after settling- in Greenville, George R. Slawson was united 
in marriage to Julia Burridge, who was born in b\-iirplain township, this 
county, member of a pioneer family in that section, whose parents, both 
natives of luigland, who had come to America in their young days, met at 
Detroit and were married there, after which they came to this county, mak- 
nig the tri]) by ox-team, and estal.)lished a ])ermanent home in Fairplain 
lownshij). Mrs. Slawson died in 1895 -^"'^^ ^'1^- Slawson survived her but 
;i few years, his death occurring in 1898. To them two sons had been 
born, Earle ?>., the immediate subject of this sketch, and David Henrv, a 
dinger in grand o]>era, who for years has made his home in Paris. 

I''arle 1'). Slawson grew up in his native town and was graduated 
from the Greenville high school. Even from his earhest youth he had 
t \ inccd the most intense inter(\st in music and upon compk'ting his course 
'11 tlie home schools, entered the Mehan (College of Music, which he attended 
lor fue years, diligently pursuing his musical studies, and then entered upon 
ni^ career as a professional nuisician. Tie followed this career until the 
:l(atb of his parents left his grandmother alone at Greenville and he 
icturned to the home of his boyhood to make her declining days comfort- 
^I'le. Upon returning to Greenville he bought the coal and produce busi- 
ness of Miller & Miller at that place and ever since has been conducting that 
business, and is looked ui)on as one of the leading business men of the town. 
bfing held in high regard by his associates generally, and accounted one of 
die city's most energetic and public-spirited citizens. 

On April 15. 1897. Earle B. Skiwson was united in marriage to Nina 
'."uise Gray, daughter of William and Emma (Rutter) Gray, of Romeo, 
Michigan, and to this union four children have been born. Seth, Donald, 
Cretchen and Barbara. Mr. and Mrs. Slawson are members of the Con- 
gregational church and take an active interest in the city's social and cul- 
tural activities, musical circles there being particularly favored by Mr. and 
^Irs. Slawson's interest along the lines of musical culture. 



JOG MONTCAr.M COUNTY, MIC lll(]AN. 

Mr. Slawson is a .Republican and gives his intelligent attention to 
political affairs, Imt is not included in the office-seeking class. He is master 
of the (ireenville lodge of Free and Acce))ted Masons, also a member of 
the local chajjter of the .Ro3al Arch Masons and of the commanclery of the 
Knights Templar at Ionia, and takes a warm interest in ^Masonic affairs, as 
well as in the atTairs of the Knights of I'ythias, of which order he is also a 
meml)er. 



JA)hiE^ZO i). CUK/riS. 

Lorenzo I). Curtis, who is extensively engaged in the coal, wood and 
ice business at Ldmore, this county, and the owner of a farm in the neigh- 
borhood of that village, is a native of the Britisl^ dominion, having been 
born at Chatham, Canada, on September ji. 185.1. son of John N. and Mary 
(Cunningham) ("urtis, the former a native of A'ermont and the latter of 
(. "anada. 

John X. Curtis was the son of John N. Curtis, ;ilso a nati\e of \'er- 
mont, who moved to Detroit and thence to (\anada and whose last days 
were sjjcnt in the home of his son in Barry county, this state. In the spring 
01 185.^, the junior John X. Curtis mo\e(1 with his family from Canad;i 
to this state, ]^)vt\^■/.o f)., the sul>iect of this sketch being then about a year 
and a half old, and settled in Barry county, where he spent the rest of his 
life, becoming a well-to-do farmer. He bought a quarter of a section of 
land there and developed his farm to a high state of cultivation. He was a 
Democrat and took an active interest in local political affairs and has served 
in several township offices. He was a Mason, a member of the lodge of 
that order at Hastings, and he and his wife were members of the Methodist 
church, he long having been a deacon in the church, and their children were 
reared in that faith. ]\Trs. Curtis died in 1895, at the age of sixty-four 
years. She was a native of Ireland and was a babe in arms when her 
parents came to this side of the Atlantic, locating in Canada, where she 
grew to womanhood, and where she married. John Xf. Curtis died in TO05, 
at the age of sixty-eight. Pie and his wife were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, namely: Lorenzo D., Martin, who lives at Big Rapids, this state; 
Horace, who lives at Woodland, in Barry county; Alfred, a resident of 
Edmore, this county; John, who lives at Vermontville, this state; Elmer, 
also of Vermontville; Henry, of Battle Creek, and Olive, deceased. 

Lorenzo D. Curtis remained on the home farm in Barrv countv until 



MOXTCAT.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. lOI 

ilis marriage in 1873, he then being twenty-two years of age, after which 
lie bonght a small farm in that same county and there made his home until 
1885, in which year he sold the farm and came to this county, settling at 
l:.(lniore, where he opened a feed store, in connection with which he also 
bought and sold grain, and was thus engaged for two or three years, at the 
end of \\hicli time he opened a meat market and was engaged in that busi- 
ness for several years. He then took up the drayage line and was thus 
engaged until he embarked in his present business, a general dealer in coal, 
wood and ice, and has ever since been thus engagd, having built up a profit- 
aljle busiTiess in that line. In the meantime Mr. Curtis had bought an eighty- 
acre farm in Home township, which he has improved in good shape, and 
twenty-one acres adjoining the village of Edmore, where he makes his 
home, ])eing very pleasantly situated there. He also owns property of value 
in l^dmore and is regarded as a substantial citizen. 

In 1873. in Barry county, this state, Lorenzo D. Curtis was united in 
marriage to Catherine l'".lizal)eth Paddock, who was Ixjrn in Steuben county, 
New Y(~)rk, May 22, i85(). daughter of Lor\- and Catherine (Jordan) I'ad- 
(!oek. tb.e former of whom was ])orn in New Jersey on March 8, 1816, and 
tlie latter, in New York state, April 9, 1816, daughter of Jesse and Anna 
iWartz) Jordan, both natives of New York state. In 1865 the Paddocks 
left NYnv York and came to jMichigan. settling in P)arry county, where they 
-pent the remainder of their lives, Mr. Paddock dying in 1870 and his widow 
.surviving until igoo. They were the ])arents oi foiu'teen children, of whom 
ien grew to maturitv. l.mt four of whom are now living, how^ever, Lorenzo, 
w lio lives at Concord, this state; Mrs. Mary Buchanan, of Holland, this 
-tale; LTezekiah. of Woodland, and Mrs. Curtis, those decea.sed after- 
maturity having been TTiza. Jessie, David, I>ydia, Levi, and Phel^e. 

To T>orenzo 1). and Catherine K. ('l/'addock') Curtis eleven children 
<-iuint\-. and the remainder in Edmore this county, as follow: bMward, 
lirivc been born, the first five of whom were born at Woodland, in Barry 
born in 1874, who died at the age of two years; Pert. 1876, owns a meat 
market at C^adillac. this state, married Leona Clark and has four children, 
Harry, Neva. Maud and Ered ; Henry, 1878. manager of the Standard Oil 
Company's wagons at Edmore. married Agnes W^ilkins and has two chil- 
'irei], Utila and J. D. ; Ered. 1880. who operates the dray line at I\(lmore. 
married Edna Eldridge and has four children, Elsie, Charlotte, Alvin and 
*'lyde; Mary, 1883, who died at the age of two years; Ollie, 1885, who 
ibed at the age of two years; Etta, 1887, who died at Edmore; Lera. 1888, 



102 MONTCAI-M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

who was educated in the schools at lulmore, the nonnal schools at N'psilanti 
and J.jig i-iapids a?id at the Ferris institute and is n(,)W in charge ot the 
pliysical training department of the K.alaniazo(j high school; LesHe, 1890, 
now living at Ionia, this state, who married Kuth Mauterstock, who died 
leaving one child, Catherine, whereupon he married, secondly, l^lsie (.'hris- 
tianscn ; Letha, 1891, who is still at home, and Glenn, i8()8, also at home. 
Mrs. Curtis is a memher of the Methodist church and takes an earnest 
interest in the general benehcences of that church. ■Mr. ("urtis is a memher 
of the Knights of the Maccabees and ?\lrs. Curtis is a social meinl)er of the 
,-,ame order as well as of the Woman's Relief Corps, in the affairs of which 
she is warmly interested. The family is substantially situated and is lield 
in high esteem throughout the community. 



SIMON ANDERSON. 



Simon Anderson, a well-known retired farmer of Montcalm county, 
wlu; now is living in comfort in the pleasant little city of Sheridan, this 
county, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, where he was born on 
August 4, 1844, son of Aanon Aanonson and wife, also natives of that coun- 
try, whose entire lives were spent there. 

When he was twenty-eight years of age. in 1872, Simon Anderson 
was united in marriage to Mary Osulson and he and his bride at once started 
out to make a home for themselves in the great country across the water. 
They landed in Canada and after a stay of three months there, crossed the 
line into I3etroit and thence to Ionia, this state, where for a time Mr. Ander- 
son was employed on the maintenance force of the Pere Marquette railroad. 
On December 31, 1873, Mr. and Mrs. Anderson came to Montcalm county 
and settled at Sheridan, where for about three years Mr. Anderson worked 
in a saw-mill, after which he bought a farm which, in time. pro\ed so 
profitable that he was enabled to retire from active labor, since which time 
he and his wife have been living in Sheridan, where they are held in high 
esteem by their many friends. They are members of the Lutheran church 
and take an active interest in church work. Mr. Anderson is a Republican, 
but is not a particularly active worker in ])o1itical affairs. He is a substan- 
tial citizen of the county and enjoys the confidence and regard of all who 
know him. 



M()NT< AI.M COINTY, MlCHKiAN. TO3 

W'lLJJAM IT. LON'ICLV. 

W illiaiu .H. Lovely, a retired lumberman and produce dealer of Howard 
I iiv. was born in Ontario, August 15, 1847, the son of John and Catherine 
, Dunham J Lovely. Both John and Catherine Lovely were natives of New 
i'.runswick and came from their native province to Ontario with their 
r(spccti\e parents. John Lovely walking all the way. They located near 
llainilton and here grew up and married, coming to Michigan some years 
l.iler in the si)ring of 1865 and locating near Lowell in Tonia county. Here 
Inhn J.ovely followed f firming until about seventy years of age, when he 
retired and he and his wife moved to Howard C'ity, where they lived until 
;hcir deaths, he ])assing away in December, 1893, and she on Deceml>cr i, 
i()()i. l)Oth were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the affairs 
of which they took a very active interest. IMr. Lovely was a Republican in 
jvib'tics and always an enthusiastic ])romoter of good government. They 
were tbe |)arents of eight children, four of whom are living, James, a 
farmer in Ionia county: William IT., the subject of this sketch; I'^hzabcth, 
I he wife of Milton Lage, a farmer of Tonia county, and J. W"., a fruit 
vr'iwcr in California. 

William H. T,o\ely was reared and educated in Ontario and remained 
ill lliat country until hfteen years of age, when he came to the United States, 
i.inding in Detroit with only ten cents in money. The day following his 
.irri\al lie secured a position at sliitigle packing, ))eing paid by the thou- 
■aiul. and followed this occupation during 1864. Tn the fall of that year, 
h/ went to Grand I^apids and from there to Big Rapids with a lumber crew, 
-pending the winter in the woods. The following summer he worked on 
■ ' farm near I>owell. and during the w^inter of 1865 and 1866 worked again 
11 the woods, but in 1867 gave up his work in the timber and came to 
i b)\\ard City, wdiere he has remained ever since. Some time after coming 
:" Howard City, Mr. Lovely formed a partnership wdth I^. H. OT)onald, 
^l^icb was known as the hrm of Lovely & O'Donald, and dealt in lumber, 
;;iain and produce, continuing until the timber was exhausted, when the 
i ini was dissolved. Mr. T^ovely was then engaged in the grain and produce 
! usiness until 1905. when he retired from active business. Mr. Lovely 
^ w ns three hundred and sixty acres of excellent farming land, part of which 
■- in Montcalm county, part in Ionia and the remainder in Mecosta county. 

Tn T873 Mr. Lovely was married in Grand Rapids to Mary A. Van 
X a very, who was born in Ontario, where she was reared and educated. 



104 MONTCALM COUNTY, ^riCHIGAN. 

To this union has been born one daughter, Minnie B., on April 9, 1875. 
vShe is a g-raduate of the Howard Chy higli sehool and the Ahna College 
at Ahna, Michigan, and is now the wife of George V. Rowe, of Traverse 
City, Michigan. 

Mr. Lovely is a charter niemljer and one of the organizers of the 
Howard City lodge, Free and iVccepted Masons, and is also a member of the. 
chapter, Royal Arch Masons. In ]:)o]itics, Mr. T.ovely is a Rcpul)lican and 
has served as supervisor and treasurer of Reynolds township, and as ])resi- 
dent of the town board of Howard (Tty. 



A. N().\H RUSSi;LL. 

A prominent hardware merchant and breeder of Hve stock of Sheridan, 
Montcalm county, Michigan, is A. Noah Russell, who was l)orn in Warren 
county. New York, /\ugust 12. 1866, the son of ^Morris and Chlistia 
(i>ramard) Russell. Morris Russell was a nati\e of France and his wife 
of Fngland, both having come to Montreal, where they grew up together. 
They were married at ],a Prairie and settled in Warren county, .New Vork, 
where Morris Russell died in r8(')S. Althou.gh Mrs. Russell survived her 
husband many years, she ne\er married again but died at the home of her 
son, A. Noah, in kk.h). The}- were the paren.ts of se\'en children, three of 
whom are now living;, Lewis, who is the owner of a mill in Lowell, Mis- 
sissi])pi ; (.". W., who conducts a mill at .Marinette, Wisconsin, and A. Noah, 
the subject of this sketch. 

A. .N'oali Russell was reared in Sheridan, Michigan, and received his 
education in the pulilic schools of that city, later attending the Ionia Busi- 
ness ('ollege. At the age of thirteen he started out for himself, working 
by the month until he was twenty-three, when he began clerking in a hard- 
ware store. In 1880 he engaged in business for himself and has continued 
so since that time. He now (nvns the Iniilding in which he has his store 
and also an exxellent farm of one hundred and sixty acres. About six- 
years ago, Mr. Russell began the breeding *)f Percheron lujrses and Holstein 
cattle, and now has some splendid animals. His herd of horses is headed by 
R()bush R, No. 1 11344, and the mares in this herd are l)ijou, No. u 1343, 
]\radam DuBarry, .No. .15835. j'^oma. No. 24042 and Jesse, No. 66182. J lis 
herd of cattle is headed bv Sherlock Lilith and Pauline Count, third. No. 



MONTCAr.M COUN:tY, MICIIIGAX. IO5 

106645. He lias exliibited his herds at \arioiis fairs and twice has been 
the winner of prizes on them. 

Air. Ixussell was married to .\nna 15. flicks, of (ireenville, \lichig-an, 
who was horn in Canada in jniie, 1873. l-^"' ^^'^^^ nnion have been born fonr 
children. Hazel, Sol Smith, Marie and T.onise. 

Politically, Mr. Rnssell is a Republican, bnt h.is never l)een an office 
seeker, b^-aternally. he is a memlier of ]'earl Lake Lo(l*(c, No. 324, h'ree 
and Accepted Masons, and Lodge 548, benevolent and Protective Order of 
T^lks, at Ionia. Mr. Russell is what may be correctly termed a self-made 
man, having started with practically nothing and accumulated l)y his own 
efforts all which he now possesses, lie is well known throughout Montcalm 
county and has a large nuinl)er of friends, l>y whom he is held in the highest 
esteem. 



Sin \-. BIJPLOCK. 



Sid \ . lUillock, a successful business man and citizen wdio has been 
])roniinent in the public affairs and oflicial life of Howard City, Montcalm 
county, Michigan, was born in Xcw York state, on September 25, 1859, the 
s(Mi of John W. and Harriett (Underhill) Ihdiock, both of whom were 
born, reared and married in New York state. 

John W. Bullock, who was a descendant of a well-known Vermont 
family, after his marriage moved to Rockford, Kent county, Michigan, 
where he lixed for a short time and then came to Howard C^ity, ?vIontcalm 
county, and, in this locality, engaged in his occupation as a wagon-maker 
for three years. Pater, in ])artnershii) with Solomon Pi.sk, the elder fkillock 
opened a new and larger sho]) at Howard Cit}', which they oi)erated for a 
riumber of years, after which John W. lUdlock retired, and lived quietly 
until his death in 1907. H.arriett, the wife of John \\'. T^>ullock, died in 
I'jo;. They were the ])arents of two children: Sid \ .. of this sketch, and 
]""nnna. of Sand Pake, Michigan, who is the widow of Heniy Blackburn. 

Sid \''. P)ullock received his early education in the common schools 
<'f Howard Pity, after which he completed the course of study at the TP)ward 
Pit\- high school and then became clerk in the local ])()stoi"tice. at the same 
time being a salesman and student of ])harmacy in the drug store of .\. R. 
Mather. After four years, Mr. Bullock became a druggist for John B. 
•juick, wM'th whom he remained about three years and then he entered the 
'h'ug l)usiness for himself in partnership with J. R. Hathaw^av in the firm 



Io6 MONTCALM COU.N'JY, MlClirdAN. 

known as I latluiway c\:. Ikillock, nnlil a disastrous lire deprived them of 
their business. ^Ir. lUillock again associated himself with John B. Quick, 
where Sid V. BuHock was engag-ed for two years. Later, after being with 
]]ein-\- Uenkle for three months, Mr. I hillock became identified with S. C. 
Scott, a Howard ( it y business man, with whom he remained about three 
years and then went to the town of Trufant. where Mr. Ihillock engaged 
in the drug Inisiness for five years, after which he returned to Howard (."ity 
and oj)ened a drug store, wdiich he conducted until 1907, when the stock 
01 W. J<-. Xagler was purchased by Mr. Ihillock and H. AI. (hbbs. This 
siock was divided. Mr. Bullock moving his share to his present location, 
where he owns his own building. 

On l^'el)ruary 19, 1882, Sid \' . Hullock was married to Carrie Tyler, 
and to this marriage have been l)orn two children: John, who is engaged in 
!)usines>^ with his father, and Sydney, the wife of Blaine Henkle. of How^ard 
< "ity. 

Sid \'. Jhillock has taken an im])ortant place in the ofificial life of 
Howard City, having ser\ed as postmaster from 1903 to 1912, and he 
has ser\-ed as town clerk, he also ha\'ing been a x'alued member of the 
Milage board for some years. In politics. Mr. IhiUock is a Republican. 

b'raternally. Mr. Buhock is a member of Howard City T>odge, Xo. 329. 
l'"ree and Accepted Masons, a member of Howard City Lodge. No. 260, 
Knights of I'ythias. and a member of the Knights of the Maccabees and the 
3.!oderu \\\)0(lmen of America. Sid \'. lUillock is one of the highly 
respected and esteemed citizens of Howard (^ity, his ])art in the laisiness 
life of this community having been an important factor in local develop- 
nir>nr. 



ALLKX E. STKBBfNS. 

Postmaster Stebbins of Sheridan, this county, has been a resident of 
that place since 1904, in which year he located there as an undertaker and 
dealer in furniture and has done very well, being recognized widely as one 
of the leading merchants of the place, wdiile his undertaking establishment 
is looked itpon as one of the leading establishments of that sort in Mont- 
calm county. 

Allen M. Stebbins was born on a farm in Easton township. Ionia coun- 
ty, this state, on December 8, 1872, son of Albert B. and Emmaline C. 
(Jei)son) Stebbins, the former of whom was born in the same county, 



.MOXTiAI.M COIN'TY, MICHIGAN. lOJ 

Xcneniber 22, 184O, and the latter, in Bennington eounty, \ ermont. Fe1> 
ruary 7, 1844. lunnialine C. Jepson received an academic education in 
her home state and fitted herself for the high calling of a teacher, after 
which she came to Michigan, when she was twenty-one years of age, to 
leach in the schools of Ionia county, and it was there she was married. 
Her husband died on May i, Kjog. and she is still living at her home in 
Ionia county, enjoying many evidences of the high regard in which she is 
held throughout that conmiunity. Albert 1'. .Stchbins and wife were the 
|,arents of four children, one of whom died in infancy, the others being as 
follow : Allen \L. the subject of this sketch; Runette M., wife of George 
I fuUiberger, who lives in Ionia county, and I'elle, widow of Frank Thomas, 
who lives in -Ionia. 

Reared on the ])aternal farm in Ionia county. Allen j^. Stebbins received 
his education in the district schools of his home neighborhood and in Saran- 
ac high school. .\s a young man he learned the undertaking business, which 
be followed for a time, after which he returned to farming and was thus 
engaged for eight years, at the end of which time he sold his farm, took a 
course in the Barnes School of r'mbalming and in 1004 located at Sheridan. 
ihis county, where he opened a modern undertaking establishment, in con- 
nection with which he opened a first-class furniture store, in both depart- 
ments of which he has l)een (juite successful, his store being looked ui)on as 
"ue of the best equipped in Sheridan, while he is regarded as one of the 
ijcst funeral directors in this |)art of the state. Tn 1913 Mr. Stebbins 
leceived the api)ointment as ])ostmaster of Sheridan and entered U])on the 
luties of that important office on December i of that year and there is pretty 
r^encral agreement that he is one of the most efhcient postmasters Sheridan 
' \"er had. 

Tn Decemlier, 1894, Allen E. Stebbins was united in marriage to Myrtle 
A, Kllison, who was born in Ionia county, this state, on April 3, 1875. Her 
•'ather was a native of New York state and came to Michigan when he was 
two Acars of age with his ])arcnts, who settled in Tonia county. Her moth- 
er was born in Dillingham, England, and came to the United States with 
lier mother when fifteen years of age. locating also in Tonia county. When 
quite a young girl. Myrtle Ellison was l>ereft of her mother t)y death and 
her father married again, she therefore having been reared by a stepmother, 
who reared her as tenderly as a mother could have done. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Stebbins seven children have been born, namely: Adelbert L.. a graduate of 
the Ferris Commercial School, married Eucellc Holland and is assistant 



I08 MOXTCAJ.M COUNTY, MICJIIGAK. 

])ostniaster at Sheridan; 11 viand \\'., who also is a graduate of the a]:)Ove 
mentioned school, is assisting his father in the furniture store, and Gerald 
r,.. Leland \\\, Maxwell j., Blanche R. and Mell)Ourne A. Mr. and Mrs. 
vStchhins are menil)ers of the ■Methodist ]{])iscopal chiuxh and their children 
have l)een reared in that faith, the familv occu])ying a high position in the 
social and cultural life of the vSheridan neighborhood. 

-Mr. Stel)l)ins is a Democrat and ever since coming to Montcalm coun- 
ty has gi\en his earnest attention to the ])olitics of the county. Tie is par- 
ticular) \- interested in local school affairs and is nov\' serving the public as 
president of the Sheridan sch()ol board. .As ])ostmaster, he is administering 
the alTairs of that office with the same care v.hich marks the management 
of his own pri\ate l)usiness and is looked upon as one of the substantial 
men of the county. His fraternal affiliations are with Pearl Lake Lodge 
\(V 324. I'>ee and Acce])te(l Masons, and with the Sheridan tent of the 
Knights of the .Maccabees, in Ijoth of which orders he is held in high esteem. 



i'.IvK'r C. CK AW I' OK IX 

I)ert C". Crawford, cashier of the P>;mk of Sheridan, was born in 
Montcalm county. Michigan, .\ugust 8, 1874, ihe son of Jacob and Louisa 
( vSIight ) (Jrawford. Jacob Crawford was a natixe of ]'enns>'lvania and his 
wife of Ohio, .\fter their marriage, they came to Michigan, settling in 
Ab)ntcalm county southwest of Greenville. In iSyf) they came to vSheridan, 
where the\' farmed and Mr. Crawford worked as a teamster, lie died in 
T8g(j and his wife foiu' \ears later in 1903. They were the ])arents of seven 
children. (i\e l)(ns and two girls, si.x of w^hom are now lixing, Alonzo. 
William, 1 larry, Oliver. Ikrt C. and T>ippie M., the wife of J. \L McMullen. 

I'ert C. Crawford was reared in the village of Sheridan and attended 
the ])ublic schools, later working for some time on a farm, b'or sixteen 
years he was assistant postmaster of Sheridan, filling this office witli entire 
satisfaction, which is proved by the long term he served. In March, iQt4, 
he was appointed assistant cashier of the l)ank of Sheridan and has been 
connected with this institution since that time. 

On May 30, iO(\v ^^^'- Grawford was united in marriage to Anna .M. 
( V)urter, the daughter of J, Watson (""onrter. whose life history is given else- 
where in this volume. Mrs. Crawford is a graduate of the high school and 
also attended school at Stanton, Michigan. 



MOXTCAI.M COrX'lY, MICIIIGAX. I OQ 

Air. Crawford owns a small farm of twenty acres two miles north of 
Sheridan, which he has purchased throngh his own elTorts. Politically, he 
is a l\.e|)ublican, and has been clerk of the village of Sheridan lor about 
twelve years, h'raternally, JMr. Crawford is a member of I'earl Lake Lodge 
No. 324, Free and Accepted .Masons, in which he has filled all of the chairs 
excej)t that of master, lie also liolds his membership in the Knights of 
the Maccabees. Mr. Crawford has lived in Montcalm county all of his 
life and has a host of friends, by whom he is well liked and highly respected. 



J. H. PROUT. 



J. 11. Prout, leading business man and prominent citizen of Howard 
City, Montcalm county, Alichigan, was born in Thornhill, Ontario, Canada, 
on September 8, 1864, a son of T. C. and Susanna (Martin) i'rout, natives 
of Plymouth, England and Ontario, Canada, respectively. 

L. C. Prout came to America, when he was hfteen years of age, and 
after landing at Toronto, ( "anada, he engaged in general work for some 
time and then he engaged in brass iitting and in the plumbing trade, for 
a short time. Later, T. C. Prout went to a place known as IJogs Hollow 
and there became a teamster, hauling llcnn- from the city of Toronto, after 
which he became a farm helper on the farm of his former employer, a place 
where the elder Prout was employed as a i)lo\\nian for some time, after- 
wards engaging in the raising oi faiin products, his success in this line 
ha\ ing won for him a Tirst prize at the 'i^>ronto exposition. 

Some time later, T. C. Prout learned the millering trade after which he 
went to Thornhill. Ontario. Canada. al)OUt the year t8()2, and after a short 
time there, during which time he married ^Susanna Alartin, Air. Prout moved 
to Xottaway, where he became head miller and where he was engaged for 
seven years. About this time, Susaima, the wife of T. C. Prout having 
died, Mr. Prout moved to W'auseon. Ohio, and followed his trade as a 
miller for some time and then he came to Greenville, jNlontcalm county, 
where he was engaged in the operating of the old Greenville mills, until 
a])()ut the year 1874. when T. C Prout together with a Mr. Simmons came 
to Howard City, and started the first mills of the community, the grinding 
])r(X'ess of these mills being done by stones. After five or six years in 
partnership with Mr. Simmons, the latter went to England, where he 
remained for about two years and then returned to Howard City and pur- 



no MONTCAT.M COL'iXTV, MICHIGAN. 

chased the interest of i\lr. JVuiit, wlio at this time went to Big Kapids, 
where he purchased the Mecosta mills, which he operated a short time and 
then \\ent to Coral, Michigan, wiiere he ojierated a small mill for alK)Ut 
three }ears, after which he went to Ihigland. lie later returned to Howard 
City, and purchased a mill, which he operated until j8(S2, when it was 
destroyed hy lire. At this time the elder I 'rout entered the mercantile 
business at Alancelona, Michigan, being in business at that place until 1886, 
he returned to J loward Cit}- and built a modern .and well-equipped mill, 
which he operated for the remainder of his days, dying in 1894. 

After the death of his iir.st wife, T. C. Prout was married about 1875 
to Anna .\ndrews, of Wau.seon, Ohio, and she now lives at Howard City. 
To the marriage of T. C". and Susanna Prout were born four children, J. H. 
and Ada, who survive, and two children who died in infancy. T. C. and 
.\nna (Andrews) Prout were the |)arents of two children, both of whom 
died in infancy. 

j. II. Proul was educated in the common schools of his community, 
and li\ed at home until he was eighteen years of age when he went to 
(ireenxille. where- he engaged in the inilling trade, ha\-ing learned the Inisi- 
ncss with his father. ,\fter some time as a miller, J. H. Prout went to 
Saginaw, Michigan, with Ira (,'. Alger, a milling engineer, and after a 
^hort time in that region returned to Howard ("ity, and there engaged in 
the milling business \n ith his father, which, after the death of the elder 
Prout, J. II. Prout secured nnd which he has since operated in a most 
efficient antl successful manner, for more than twenty- years. 

In July, 1892. J. H. I 'rout was married to Ilattie \'an Xess. a daughter 
of John and hhnma \'an .Vess. To this marriage was born one son. who 
died in infancy, ilattie. the wife of j. 11. Prout. died in July. T8g-|. 

J. H. Prout was married in r8o8 to .\da f^T^rguson, who was l)orn in 
.Australia, a daugliter of Ceorge .and Sarah b^erguson. the former of whom, 
was a gold-miner of that country. Mrs. Protit, before her marriage was a 
school teacher, she ha\ing been a preceptress of many schools in several 
localities. 

J. H. Prout is ])rominent in the official life of Ploward City, Montcalm 
county, he hax'ing been a member of the school board for the past six 
years, and he has served as president of the village for three years and as 
a member of the village council for six years. In politics, Mr. Trout is 
an ardent I^epublican. He is a member of Howard City Lodge, No. 324. 
I'Tee <and Accepted ATasons, and a meml)er of the Grand Rapids consistory 



MON'ICALM COTNTY. MICIllC.AX. Ill 

and Shrine. Mr. I'roiit is also a member of the ]\Ioderii Woodmen of 

America, a I'^orester and a member of the Kni^hls of the Maccabees, at 
JJoward City. 



l-Rl/J.) J. niAMP.I'.RLIX. 

Fred J. Chamberhn, the son of Xewton and vSerepta (Beals) Cdiam- 
berhn was born on January 25, J 868. at }*aw I'aw, Van Biiren county. 
Michigan. Newton (."hamberhn was a native of New York state and came 
with his parents to Kahuna/.oo county, Michij^^an, where they settled on a 
farm in 1836. They were among the early jjioneers and suffered the hard- 
ships incident to those times in this region. 

Newton (diamberlin remained in Kalamazoo county until he was 
twenty-one years of age. at which time he went to Paw Paw where he 
was engaged in farniin<^ for a number of )'ears. Later he engaged in the 
produce business at Decatur. .Michigan, until his death in 1893. 

Sere|)ta (Ideals) ("hrunberlin, was born in Vermont and came with her 
j)arents to Paw Paw township, \'an I'uren count)-, .Michigan, where they 
located on a farm. Airs. Chamberlin died in 1910. 

Fred j. (."haml)erlin was but a ba!)y when his parents moved to Decatur 
and here he grew to manhood and recci\ed his elementary education. In 
iS8() he graduated in pharmacy at .\nn .\rlior and the next year engagx-d 
m the drug business at l>attle Creek, where he rema.ined for the next ten 
\ears. In i<)ot he came to Carson ( ity where he bought a drug store and 
where he is still engaged in the drug business. He handles the Rexall 
iaMuedies. being a stockholder in the compau}-. 

b\)r some ten \ears he has been the manager of the Union Tele)}hone 
( omnany and the exchange is run in connecti(.)n with the store. 

Mr. ("hamberlin was married in 1003 to Lillie M. .\inesley. who was a 
nat!\e of Ohio, but came to Michigan with her parents when but a babe. 
I! or life since that time has been spent in Car.son City. 

b>.aternally. ATr. Chamberlin belongs to the ATasonic Order, the Knights 
"f Pythias and the Maccabees. 

Tfe has a pleasing personality and is an exceptionally good business 
man. His progressive .s])irit and business qualities have l)een recognized by 
the people of his home town and as a result he has served them as a member 
on the council. 



]\1(3XTCAJ.M CorN'i'y, MICHIGAN. 



LUCIUS H. GIB15S. 



In the memorial literature of ]\luiitailni county no name deserves more 
distinctive mention than tliat of the late Lucius II. (jibbs, who for year^ 
was head of the well-known millin^;- linn of J. II. (Til)bs dv Son at lulmore, 
this county, and an active participant in all nioxemen.ts designed to advance 
the <,'encral intei'est, not only oi that section. l)ut of the county at large, 
whose death on i'Vbruary 6, 1913, was regarded as a distinct loss to the 
whole community. 

d'he late Lucius H. Gibbs was horn at Burlington, Vermont, on .\ugust 
j6. 1859. son of josiah IL and Amelia L. ( lirooks^ Gibbs, the former oi 
whom was ])orn at W'cstport in that same state, July 2(k icS^y, son of David 
and l\ui)\' ( harusworth ) trib])s, the former of whom. 1)orn in .Massachusetts 
in t8oo. son of Solomon Gibbs. a hotel kee])er. died in i^hy. and the latter, 
born at l-'airfax. b'ranklin county. \'ermont. daughier of Josiah Larns- 
worth. a farmer, died in 1853. David Gibbs and wife were the ])arents of 
nine children, of whom Josiah was the fourth in order of birth. On Janu- 
ary 31. 1858, Josiah Gibbs was united in marriage to Amelia F,. Lrooks, 
who was united in marriage to Amelia E. Brooks, who was born at Lerov, 
Cienesee county. Xew York, daughter of Lucius and Gelia (Xewcomb) 
Brooks, both uati\es of the l.'jn[)ire state. Lucius Ih'ooks was born in St. 
Lawrence county, .Yew ^'ork. and some time after his marriage emigrated 
with his family to Cuyahoga county, Ohio, whence, in 1850, he migrated to 
-Aiichigan and became one of the pioneers (^f Kent county, where his death 
c-ccurred on bebruary 1, i8().i, he long having been regarded as one of the 
substantia] residents of that county. His daughter, Xmelia. who was born 
on b'ebruary 2. 1842, was about eight years of age wdien she came to 
.\i;chigan with her parents, the trip from Ohio being made in a wagon, and 
slie grew to w omanliood in Kent county. It was during a \-isit back to her 
native home in the l^ast that she iiiarried Josiah Gil)bs, in 1858. In 1862 
Josiah (jibbs and family came to Alichigan. settling in Kent county, in the 
neighljorhood of the home of Mrs. Gibl)'s i)arents. and there they lived 
imtil 1871. in wdiich year they came to Montcalm county, locating at Green- 
>ille, later moving to Cedar Springs and still later to Edmore, where Mr. 
and Mrs. Gibl)S are still living, having a 1)eautifiil home there and enjoying 
many evidences of the high regard in which they are held by the entire 
community. For years, until the time of his practical retirement from the 
active labors. Josiah Gibbs was regarded as one of the most energetic and 




IJ(MrS H. (ilHTlS. 



M(K\'J'CALM COUNTY, MlCJUGAxV. 11^ 

i:jjiicnt.ial men in his coniniunity, and the great niilHng business at Edmore, 
,,nrh is still doing business under the linn style of J. H. Gibbs & vSon, 
iKiiii;- now under the management of his grandson, Jay II. Gibbs, is one of 
.iir monuments to his enter])rise. j\Jr. Gil)bs is also the owner of the electric 
'i-hi and power plant at Edmore, which also is now being managed by his 
i.randson, and is besides the owner of valuable real estate in Edmore and 
i.inn huid in the vicinity of the village, Ijeing looked upon as one of the 
iiin-i snlxstantial citizens of Montcalm county. Josiah Gil)bs is a Republican 
,111(1 has served as delegate to various con\-entions ; has also served as vil- 
lage trustee and as village president. lie is a thirty-second degree Mason 
■iid takes a warm interest in Masonic allairs. To him and his wife three 
(hildren were ])orn, Eucius H.. Nellie E. and Mrs. Carrie E. Roller, the 
i.iiU'r of whom is now the only survivor. 

kucius El. Gibbs, eldest child and only son of Josiah and Amelia E. 
( i'r(M>ks ) Gibbs, was three years of age when his parents came to Michigan, 
niil biv early education was received in the district schools in Kent county, 
i'li-- bc'iig supplemented by a course in the schools of Greenville. When his 
lailuM" started the shingle mill at ( edar S])rings, Eucius IE Gil)l')S was but 
;. I;m\-, but be spent much time about the i]iill and gradually l.)ecame his 
[..Jut's "right-band man"" about the mill. When the elder (jibbs later 
-i.irted his shingle mill in the J^^dmore neighborhood, Eucius H. Gibbs 
iK-caine foreman of the same and so continued until the mill was closed in 
I 'Jiruary. ]S<S(). the available timl)er thereabout having then become prac- 
1 'rally exhausted, 'bhe next ye.ar the father and son., established their flour- 
i = i''! at lulmore. luider the firm style of J. IE Gibbs cK' Son, and during the 
ii'rr )ears of his life, Eucius IE (]ibbs was practically manager of the 
-•luic. his father maintaining merely a general interest in the concern. Eucius 
N. Gib])s was long one of the most active l.iusiness men in that part of the 
' 'iiiiiy and to(»k a general interest in all movements calculated to promote 
'■'■IV prosperity of Edmore and vicinity. He Avas one of the original share- 
-''idcrs in the Robinson Opera House and a director in the company, besides 
''<iiig (inancially interested in other neighborhood enterprises. He was an 
•i' ti\e Re])ublican and a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow^s lodges, 
' ^'"ig a member of the council, the chapter and the commandery of the 
I'Tmcr order. !\Tr. Gibbs \vas a fine, good-natured, jovial man; a firm 
' 'liever in the adage that "all w'ork and no ])lay makes Jack a dull boy;" 
;in ardent sportsman, much given to hunting and fishing, and found pleasure 
"1 all neighl)orhood social gatherings, being one of the most popular citizens 
(8b) 



114 M()NTCAI,M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

of that community, his death in 1913 being widely mourned throughout 
the countryside. Mr. Gil)bs had served as village president of luiniore for 
ten or eleven terms and during his administration many improvements were 
made in the place, the village at the same time being kept free from debt, 
even under a reduced tax levy, an instance of the fine executive jjowers of 
Mr. Gi!)bs. 

In 1878 Lucius M. Gil>bs was uiiite(l in marriage to Julia ITanscom, 
who was born in the state of Maine and who came to ATichigan with her 
parents when a small girl and grew to womanhood in Nelson township, 
Ivent county, in the possession of estimal)le qualities of mind and heart, 
and to this union two children, a son and a daughter, Grace and Jay H., 
were born, both of whom, with their wid()\ve(l mother, survive. Jav H. 
(ribbs. a biographical sketch of whom is \)resented elsewhere in this volume, 
is now in active charge of the extensive Gil)bs interests in and about IZdmore 
and is regarded as one of the most active young business men in Montcalm 
county. 



WriXIAM H. COTJJXS. 

A\'illiam H. Collins, leading merchant and a prominent citizen of How- 
ard City, Alontcahn county, Michigan, was born in Ionia county, this state, 
nn November 15, 1865, a son of John and Alary (Stark) Gollins, to wdiom 
were born fixe children, of whom William H.. of this sketcli. is the youngest. 

William K. ( "ollins was reared on the home farm, and educated in 
the schools of Ionia county, after which he worked as a farmer on the home 
farm, until at twenty years of age, he came to Howard Gitv, Montcalm 
county, and was em|)loyed a.s a salesman by his ])r(Mhcrs, John C. and J. A. 
Collins, merchants of Howard City. After some time. William H. Collins 
purchased the interest of John C. Collins in the store, being the proprietor 
and manager of this successfully-conducted mercantik- house, up to the 
present time. 

During the year t8()0, \\'illiam H. Collins was married to Alma Mer- 
rill, a native of Mecosta county, and to this marriage has l)een born one 
daughter. June F., who after graduating from the Howard City high school, 
was a student at the .State Normal School of Ypsilanti, ATichigan, und now 
is a kindergarten teacher at LajK^er, ATichigan. Aliss June Collins also 
is well known as a musician and as a teacher of music in the commum'tA- of 
her residence and activitv. 



MONTCAT.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. TI5 

Fraternall}-, William H. Collins is a member of Howard City Lodge, 
NO. 329, Free and Accepted ]\lasons, and he is a meniV)er of Howard City 
Fodge. Xo. 2(.x), Knights of Pythias, Mr. Collins being a charter memlx^r 
-,1 the latter organization. 

Politically, Mr. Collins is a Repuljlican, and although he has taken no 
cs])ecial part in the political or official life of the township or connty, he 
IS known as a man who supports good candidates for office and is known 
as a citizen willing to lend of his time and efforts for the advancement of 
political conditions in the community. 



IvRANClS S. CASWEIJ.. 

Francis S. Caswell, the son of Sheldon and Mary P. (Fisher) Caswell, 
was born on June 3, 1873, at Carson City. Michigan, where he grew to 
ni.inhood and was educated in the pul>lic schools of that place. 

Sheldon H. Caswell was born in Cleveland. New York, on February 
15, 1846, and his wife was bom ai Delhi on March 23, 1846. They were 
!u;irried in their native state and came to I'ortland, Michigan, in 1869, 
wliere they remained until November, 1872, when they came to Carson City. 
1 Kre INlr. Caswell engaged in the business of moving buildings for some 
.cars, after which he became established in the furniture and undertaking 
Inisiness. In December, 1895, ^'^^ ^'^^^ ^^^^' place to his son, P'rancis S., who 
iias continued the business since that time. 

1'he elder Mr. Caswell was in business for a quarter of a^ century, 
Mid at the time he came to C^'arson City, much excitement was caused by 
liic rumor of a railroad. The grade was made, but this road was not con- 
-iructed, and the town had no road at all for some fifteen years. Mr. 
< aswell was thoroughly identified with the new village and served for ten 
cars (jii the school board. After selling his business he removed to 
\'e\v York, where he lived for thirteen years taking up his residence in Los 
'\iigcles, California. 

iM'ancis S. Caswell began his Imsiness life at an early age, having con- 
incted a news-stand when fifteen years old and at the age of eighteen, had 
v'large of a branch store for bis father at Sumner, until the store was dis- 
- ontinued, at which time he was with his father in the home store until 
■H' became the owner of the business. 

In 1912. Mr. Caswell erected the finest business block in Carson C-ity, 



ii6 MONTCALM (;(n;N;Ty, miciiicax. 

ilie building heiiig of stone and white brick, and represents fifteen years 
of thought and ].t]annino-. The liuilding is one hundred and ten feet long, 
thirty-four feet frontage and forty-two feet high, with large show windows 
gixijig most excellent light. The lower .and mezzanine floors are dexoted 
lo the display of the large stock of furniture, while the upper lloor is used 
as a theater. ( )n the second door below the theater are two suites of offices, 
Mr. (aswell carries a large and exclusive stock of t'urniture, rugs, pianos, 
sewing machines and undertaking supplies. 1'he stock is larger and of a 
iiighcr grade, than one would expect to find in towns the size ol' ("arson 
City. 

Mr. (aswell was married on June _' i . T(S(jt. to Kmnia T.. Kicc. of .St. 
Johns. Michigan, tlie daughter of Orrin R. and J.ucy !'>. ( l.'rown ) Rice, 
ller father lived the greater part of his life at St. Johns, where he was 
engaged in farming. Since the death of his wife on (")ctol)er 4, igro. he 
has s|)ent the greater i)art of his time with his daughter at Carson ("it}-. 
Mr. and Mrs. Caswell are the parents of four children: Oueenie \']., kucilc 
\L. k ran CIS E. and Dorothy. 

kraternally, .Mr. Caswell is a member of the Masonic order and was 
master of the lodge for three vears, during which time the membershi)) 
was doubled. 



JOHN \V. UALIdrrT. 



Among the citizens who have been successful as business men and wdio 
have taken an important [)lace in the [)ul.)lic affairs and official life of ("arson 
City, Montcalm county, is John W. JIallett, who was born on April 5, 1845, 
in ('ayuga county, New York, the son of .Isaiah and Tsabelle (West) Td^al- 
lett. the former born in Monroe county, New York, the latter in London, 
England, where she lived until after the death of her mother and then came 
with her father to .'\merica, the father dying about one year after his arrival 
in America. 

Isaiah Hallett was educated in the public schools of his native county, 
after which he lived at home until 1840. when he started for the gold-fields 
of ("alifornia. Lsaiah Hallett making the voyage by boat around Cape Horn. 
After some time as a gold-digger in ("alifornia, the elder Hallett died, sur- 
vived by his w-ife and three children, wdio remained at the home place in 
Cayuga county. New Y^ork. 

.\fter the completion of his education in the common schools of 



MONTCALM COTNTY, MJCIIIGAX. II7 

( riyuga county, New York, and at a business coUes^e of his locality, John 
\\ . iiallett worked on a farm for some time and then, in June, 1864, he 
rnlisted in Battery A, lliird Mew York Light Artillery, with which he 
>cr\ed through the (."ivil War. lu)llowing his discharge from military serv- 
ice, John \V. Iiallett returned to farm life, following this line of work until 
;il)Out the year 1873, when he came to Carson City, Montcalm comity, and 
I'Ugaged for the greater part of the time in the lumber activities of this 
region. Later, Mr. Iiallett l)ecame a salesman in a hardware store for six 
\ears and then he became a member of the lirm of Heath & Hallett, hard- 
ware dealers, Mr. Iiallett engaging in this business for four years, after 
which time he purchased the share of his partner and for fifteen years, 
bihn W. Iiallett conducted the busin.ess as the sole owner, then taking as 
;i i)arlner in his business, his son, Roy, who is now actively engaged in the 
niiniagement of the store. During the year i8gi, .Mr. Iiallett erected a 
large brick business l>lock, in wliich they are now operating their extensive 
liiisiness. In addition to his mercantile Inisiness, Mr. Hallett is a stock- 
holfk-r of the Stale l)ank of Carson City, an institution which Mr. Hallett 
x'rved as hrst president and which he now serves as vice-president. John 
W . Iiallett is also interested in other business enterprises. 

On March 22. 1874, John W. Hallett was married to h^mma 1). La 
i hie, who was born in Ca\-uga county, New ^^ork, the daughter of Abraham 
.111(1 r.arbara A. (Scott) La Due. natives of New \'ork state, where the 
lather died, after which the mother came to ("arson City, Michigan, where 
•-he (lied. John \\ . and Emma Hallett are the i)arents of one son. Ro\-. 
V. li') was born at Carson C"ity. on April 2, 1875. 

Roy Hallett was educated in the Carso»i City schools and at a com- 
'Mcrcial college of I\ochester, New York, after which he entered the business 
"! his father, where he is now engaged. In 1902, Roy Hallett was m.arried 
'" Anna Caroline Scriven, who was born in Ontario. Canada, the daughter 
^'t John Scriven and wife. Roy and Anna ("aroline Hallett are the parents 
"I three children, John L., Burton Scrixen and Robert Gerald. Roy Hallett 
1^ a member of the Free and Accepted Masons and is one of the highly- 
'e>i.)ected business men of Carson City. 

John W. Hallett has been prominent in the public affairs of Carson 
( ity, having served as the first president of the village after its incorpora- 
''on, and since that time Mr. Hallett has been a leading and influential 
member of the village board. 

^Tr. Hallett is a prominent Mason of Carson City, and with his wife. 



llS MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

Mr. Hallett is an active memljcr of the Congregational church. The Ilal- 
letts of Carson City, ]\Iontcahn county, are among the honored famiHcs of 
the community, their part in the progress and advancement of the various 
interests of the locality having demonstrated their worth as citizens to Car- 
son (,"itv. 



ARTHUR M. STEBBIXS. 

Arthur M. Stebbins, who has been engaged in the tobacco and jewelry 
business, in Sheridan, for the past thirty-three years, was born in I.ansing- 
burg, New York, on June 29, 1853, and was the son of W. L. and Lucinda 
(' Francisco ) Stel:)bins. 

VV. L. Stebbins. a native of New York state, was the son of Jeremiah 
Steijl)ins, who was of luiglish tlescent. The name was originally spelled 
Stebbings, and when the first families came to America in an early day 
the name was spelled Stebbings. Jeremiah Stebbins came to Ohio, where 
he made his home until his death. 

].Aicinda bVancisco, the wife of W. L. Stebbins was of TTollander 
descent, l)Ut was a natise of the state of New York, where she met and 
married Mr. Stebbins. After their marriage they lived in their native state 
until 1856, and Mr. Stebbins worlced as a mechanic in New York. They 
then came to Ohio, residing on the homestead, where they took care of 
Mr. Stebbin's father and the farm until 1858, at which time the father 
died. W. L. Stebbins and his wife then came to Gratiot county. Michigan, 
where he bought three hundred and sixty acres of land and here they lived 
and died, Mr. Stebbins in t8()5 and his wife in 1902. 

W. L. Stebbins and wife were the parents of the following children, 
all of whom grew to manhood and womanhood, and six are still living: 
Edgar, deceased; Arthur 1\1., Clara, the wife of John Hughes, of Gratiot 
county; b'rederick, of Montezuma, Indiana; Orville M., deceased; Minnie, 
the wife of James W. Wheeler, of Tola, Iowa; Bessie, the wife of Phelix 
Amelia, of St. Louis, Michigan, and Myrtle, the wife of Rev. H. II. Ford, 
of Springfield, Illinois. Arthur M. Stebbins remained at home with his 
father until he was eighteen years of age, when he learned the carpenter 
and the harness-maker's trades, at which he w^orked for some time. 

On December 5, 1877, Mr. Stebbins was married to Matilda Simmons, 
the daughter of Leonard and Mary Simmons, originally of the state of 
New York. Mr. Simmons was a soldier in the Civil War and served his 



MONTC'Af.M COl'XTY, MTCIIIGAxV. II9 

■ miUry in a brave and cflicient manner. After the marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. Stebbins they resided for a time in St. Louis, Alichigan, and then at 
Martlord for two years, and in icS82 they returned to St. Louis, the town 
.\ here they were married and spent the first year of their married hfe. Since 
iliis time, Mr. vStebl)ins has 1)een engaged in the jewelry business here. 

Mr. and ]\lrs. Ste1)bins are the parents of four children, Betrand F., 
who resides at Petoskey; ?^Iaud. the wife of Frank Carr, of Lansing; Cora, 
(lie wife of Otto Olson, of Sidney township, and Harry M., who lives on 
a farm near Petoskey. 

i">aternally, Mr. Stebbins is a member of the Independent Order of 
( )d(l Fellows at Shei-idan and politically he is a Republican, having served 
a- a member of the school board and the town council. 



(ILVKLKS F. DICKINSON. 

I'harles F. Dickinson, pioneer citizen and now an honored supervisor 
oi Bloomer township, Montcalm county, was born in Bloomer township, 
"II March 2, 1857, the son of Charles R. and Hannah (Turrell) Dickinson. 
' Iiarles R. Dickinson was born at. New Haven, Addison coimty, Vermont, 
"H May 24, 1825, a member of an old New Fngland family, representatives 
■'! \Nhich came to W^rmont, from Connecticut, prior to the Revolutionary 
V\ ar. (^harles R. Dickinson came to Michigan with his parents, Julius C. 
Hickinson and wife, and settled in Jackson, where they lived for many 

wars and then moved to Pdoomcr township, where Julius Dickinson died. 

\iivv reaching Jackson comity. Michigan, Charles R. Dickinson helped in 
i'lc clearing of the wooded land and in the making of a home, where he 
'5\c(l until twenty-one years of age and then, after saving some money 

arned at odd jobs, Charles R. Dickinson went to the state of California, 
"rking there as a min.er for some time. He then returned to Michigan and 
' '>nght in 1853 a farm in Bloomer township, whicli Mr. Dickinson improved 

'1(1 cultivated and where he lived for the remainder of his active life. 

On June 27, 1855, Charles R. Dickinson was married to Hannah Tur- 
''■11. who was a native of Canada, and the daughter of Truman and Caro- 
I'Mie (Covillc) Turrell, the former of whom was born in Wyoming county, 
^ew York, in 1809, the son of Ebenezer Turrell and wife. When a young 
'ii-'m, Truman Turrell went to Canada where he secured a farm from the 
' anadian government, and there made his home for twenty-five years, after 



I20 MONTCALM COINIY, MJCIlKiAN. 

which he disposed of his land and came t(.» llloomer township, ^NTontcahn 
county, and ])urchased one hundred and sixty acres of huid in section 35, 
where a pioneer home was cstahhshed and where Air. Turrell engaged in 
general farming. Owing to faihng heakh his activities were suspended for 
about five years. Later, with the return of gO(jd hcahh, Truman TurreU 
Ijecanie a well-to-do farmer. 

Mannah. the wife of (."harles R. Dickinson, died on March 10, i860, 
and on September 1, hSOH, Mr. J)ickinson was married to Mary Turrell, 
who died shortly following her marriage. On .March 18, i86g, Charles R. 
Dickinson was married to Kate Sulhvan, who died on September 13. 1912. 
(harles R. Dick'inson died on Sejjtember 13. i89(). Charles K. and Hannah 
Dickinson were the ])arents of the following children, Charles F., of this 
sketch. kLttie V. (deceased), and TIarmon R. 

Charles k. Dickinson, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the 
pul)lic schools of his nati\e township, after \vliich he became a farmer, he 
working on the home farm until after his marriage, when he rented his 
father's farm for some time and after his fatluM-'s death he i)urchased the 
interests of the other heirs in this farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Bloomer township, Montcalm county, to which Mr. Dickinson moved and 
where he lived as a general farmer, until April, igi [, when he secured ;i 
j)ropert\- which was a former home of his father, in Carson City, and there 
Mr. Dickinson now li\cs. 

On November 28, 1882, Charles !•". Dickinson was married to Isabelle 
\\'ils(.)n, who was born near Godridge. Ontario, ( "anada. the daughter of 
(leorge and Marv ( Screalon") Wilson, both of whom were born in l^ng- 
land, he at Scarborough and she at Patrington, .and who came to America, 
soon after their marriage, and settled in Canada, which was their home 
for some years, when the}' moved to Michigan, and located near I'ort Sanilac, 
where they lived the remainder of their lives. George ^\'ilson dving in 
December, 1887; his wife in January, T904.. Mrs. Dickinson came to Car- 
son City, in 1875. and lived with her sister, Mrs. Lizzie Gage, until the 
marriage of the fonuer to Mr. Dickinson. 

Charles V. Dickinson has taken au important place in the public life 
of Bloomer townshi]), now^ being the township supervisor, an ofiice wdiich he 
has filled most satisfactorily for nine years: Mr. Dickinson also served his 
township as highway commissioner for about four years. Tn politics, ("harles 
F. Dickinson is an ardent Republican. Fie is also prominently connected 
with the business circles of Carson City, for nine years having been a 



.MONTCALM COl'NTY. M IC 1 1 ICAX. 121 

director of the Ionia. Montcalm and C'lintcMi Mutual J'^ire and Lightning 
I n>urance C.'onipan.y . 

i-'raternally, Mr. Dickinson is a well-known nietnl)er of the Free and 
Accepted Masons at Carson ("ity. and he and iiis wife are nienihers of the 
( )rder of the Juistern Star. 



joiix X. r.Rich:. 

John X. l)rice, leading merchant, i)roniinent citi/^en and man of inlluence 
in the allairs of his town and county, lK)rn in North Shade township, 
(Iratiot county, Michigan, on Janiiary 14, 1876, the son of William and 
( aroline IC. (Sturgis) I'.ricc. natives of l:lngland. William iJrice was horn 
ahout i83(.). and after his marriage in his native country, he came to 
America, and located in Xorth .Shade Lownshi]), (iratiot county, where he 
liought ahcnit the year 1858, one hundred and si\t\- acres of imcleared land, 
^\hich the elder IJrice cleared and drained of much .^wamp land, and on 
which he huilt a log cahin, making his home on there for the remainder 
ot his life, with the exception of four years, when he serxed as treasurer 
iif (iratiot county. 

William Jirice was twice m.arried. tirst. to one of the Harlow family 
in ICngland. To this marriage were horn three children, Richard, hdlen 
and .Maria; and sn1)sc(|nentl}'. Air. Ilrice was married to Caroline IL 
' Sturgis ) Uurl. a uati\e of .Michigan, and the daughter of Xorman Stur- 
gis and wife, early settlers in (iratiot county. I hey became the parents 
<>\ two cliildren. (elestia and John X. .Mrs. Hrice by former marriage was 
'lie wife of Xathaniel Ihu't. who died while serving in the (nil War. To 
this marriage was l)orn one son, Myron \\. 

W illiam Hrice was a ])ronn"nent man of his comnumit)', having ser\ ed 
as county treasurer for four \ears, as su])ervisor for fourteen years, and 
towiishi]) treasurer for nine years, lie died on h'ebruary 23, 1907. .sur- 
\ivetl by his widows who now lives on the home place. 

John X'. iJrice received his early education in the common schools of 
liis native comnuun'ty, after which he attended and graduated from the 
Ithaca high school, and then he became a student at the b'erris Institute 
at Big Kapids, Michigan, l-'ollowing his school days. Mr. Brice worked 
tor one year on the home farm and then went to (irand Kapids. where 
he wa,-£ em])loyed in a department store for .seven years, after which he 



122 -MONTCALM COfXIY, MICiriGAX. 

worked on the street railway fur one year. In the year 1906, John X. 
I5rice came to Carson ("ity, and was a salesman in the AicKenna store for 
three years, after which he operated an anto li\ery for three years and then 
was an employe of the Ih'ooks store for ahont one year. On March 10, 
J.014, John X. Brice opened his own store, having- purchased the stock and 
hnsiness oi Mrs. W. A. (lardner. and where Mr. Jkice is now successfully 
engaged in the sale of general merchandise. 

On J^"el)ruary „>4. ]()i.|, John X. Urkv. was married to Linda Babcoc.k. 
who was horn at Peck. Micliigan, the daughter of Joseph and Rhoda (vMlenj 
JSabcock, the former a farmer, school te;icher and shingle manufacturer 
at one time. Joseph I'ahcock was of I'Jiglish parentage and came to Peck, 
Micliigan, from ( "anada, lie also having engaged in car]-)enter work and at 
masonry work at Sandusky. Ohio, and at Wolverine, Michigan. Joseph 
i)a1)Cock died in 19C)0. 

John X. Brice is a member of the b^-ee and Accepted Masons, and he 
and iiis wife, are members of the Order of the l.uistern Star. ]\lrs. Brice 
is a member of the ("arson City Women's Club and is an active worker in 
the Congregational church. Mr. Brice and his wife are among the highlv 
respected peo])le of Carson Cit}- and ^iFontcalm count\-. their pleasing wavs 
and unselfish lives, devoted extensivel}- to the interests of others, liaving 
\\on for them a host of friends and admirers. 



El A S. CJ.ARK. 



I.'di S. Clark, who for many years has l)een a leading merchant and 
prominent citizen of (ireenville, .Montcalm ccnmt}'. Michigan, was born in 
Schuyler ccnmty, Xew A'ork, on b'ebruar\' 10, 1(848. a son of George and 
Erva (Jackson) Clark. nati\-es of Xew \'ork state. (Jeorge Clark, who 
Avas a country merchant of the lMni)ire state, in jS/O, mo\ ed to Montcalm 
count}-, Michigan, and settled at (ireenville, where, together with Judge 
.T.ovell. he Iniilt what is known as the T>ovell and Clark block and where 
they opened a general merch;mdjse store. '^^Fhey also became extensive 
dealers in lumber, having been the owners of one thousand live hundred 
acres of pine limber, which was standing where the l(wvn of Kendallville, 
Michigan, is now located. 

Rli wS. Clark, with his l)rother, Ethan J. Clark, opened a dry-goods 
store at Green\ille, which was conducted imder the firm name of Clark 



M(.)NTCAI,M. CorXTY, MICHIGAN'. 127, 

IJrolhers, until iSiji, when Eli S. (.'lark purchased the stuck of his brother 
and since that time has conducted the store as tiie sole proprietor under 
ihe name of K. S. ("lark. Mr. Clark, who has been a merchant of (ireen- 
ville for forty-three years, now conducts the only exclusive dry-goods and 
furnishing store in Greenvihc, now being one of the leading forces and 
influences in the business life of this community. 

On July 2(j, i8f)g. l^li S. (lark was married to ?^Iartha E. Drake, of 
Walkins, New York, and to this luarriagc have been born three children, 
two daughters, who arc deceased, and one son, Leon, who after graduating 
from the (ireenville high school, was married and now is a produce mer- 
chant of luireka townshi]). Mrs. (.'lark is an acti\e member of the Congre- 
gational church, of which Air. (lark is an attendant and toward the support 
of which he is a liberal contributor, Mr. ("lark being much interested in 
the work of this church and giving Iil)eraliy to its sui)i)ort. 

In the i>olitical life of the community, Mr. Clark takes a leading j)lace 
in the affairs of the Republican party. .\s a citizen and as a business man, 
he is highly res])ectcd and honored, his sterling character having won for 
him an enviable place in Ocenville and Alontcalm county. 



ISAAC KROHN. 



Isaac Krohn, leachng merchant and prominent citizen of Carson City, 
Montcalm county, Michigan, was Ijorn in Tosen, Germany, on September 
14, 1859, the son of Louis and Hannah Krohn, who lived their entire life 
m their native country. 

hollowing his school days in his native country, Isaac Krohn worked 
ni a notion .store of tlnesen, (iermany, and at twenty years of age, he came 
to America, and after a few days in Xew York city, dm-ing which time he 
-utTered hardshi])s as a result of lack of means, he was directed, by a friend 
ii' his uncle who lived in Detroit, T\Tichigan. During the early days of his 
hfe in Detroit, Isaac Krohn engaged in the peddling business, which he 
'iiscontinued as a result of failure, due to the inability of Mr. Krohn to 
^])eak good English. Lfe then secm-ed a position in a dry-goods store, where 
he was employed at three dollars per week. I^ater, he moved to Greenville, 
about 1883, and was a salesman in the store of Jacobson & Netzorg. for 
about five years, after which Mr. Krohn engaged in business with an 
acquaintance at ALancelona, Antrim county, a partnership which continued 



124 MONTCALM COl'NTV. .MICIIICAX. 

for one year, when Isaac Krohu (lisi)osccl of his interest and then went to 
(Ja(hllac, where he was cni])loyecl in a dry-j^oods store. After two years at 
(,'adinac. Air. Krohn went to Detroit and on stoi)])in<; at Ithaca, he became 
;ic(|uaintetl with a business niari, wlio offered hitn enii)loynient, which he 
acce])ted and \\here he remained for two \ears. (hiring" that time marrying 
a sister of his employer. I'"(.)llo\\ing his marriage, Mr. Krohn remained 
in Itliaca for af)out one year, and then came to Carson City, which at that 
time was ha\ing its tirst railroad lines constructed. IJeing favorably impressed 
with ("arson City, Mr. Krohn. in May, ]88(), established a general mer- 
chandise store in an old building, recei\'ing his first stock of goods on the 
lirst train to reach the town, and now Mr. Krohn is one of the leading 
merchants of the town, owning the largest store of Carson City and carry- 
ing the most complete stock of dry goods, clothing, shoes and womeir's and 
men's fnrnishmgs. lie has i)rospered as a merchant, anrl now is a stock- 
holder of the State lUink of Carson City, and is a man whose judgment 
and coimsel on matters of business, are sought by mairy. 

In 1883, Isaac Krohn was mru-ried to 1 )essie Xct/.org, who was born 
in Kussian roland and who came \\ith her parents to .\merica in 188^:^. 
and li\cd at Cireenville for :i time, then at Detroit .'md later mo\ed to Ithaca, 
where she was married. To the marriage of Isaac and Dessie Krohn ha\e 
been 1)orn two children. Moi-ence. who attended the maiuial trainitig school 
;it .Saginaw. Michigan, for two years, and Kaymond, who is a graduate of 
the C "arson City high school and who now is associated with his father in 
business. 

Isaac Krohn is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons and of 
the ]ndei)en(lcnt Order of Odd b'ellows. Mr. Krohn and his family are 
members among the highly res])ected and honored peoj)le (^f Carson Citv. 



AKFKIvr3 V. SKARRITT. 

Alfred b\ Skarritt. well kno\\ n for man\- years as a sticcessful and 
enterprising citizen of this county, was born on January 20, j8s8, in White- 
lake townshi]), Oakland county, .Michigan, and is the son of Richard and 
]''anny (Porter) Skarritt. Jvichard Skarritt was born on Alarch 6, 1833, 
in Ireland, and is the son of Richard and Catherine Skarritt, also natives 
of Ireland, who emigrated to .America when l\ichard was but two years 
of age. They located on a farm in Oakland county, Michigan, where they 



MoNT'vALM COCNTY. MlCiJK^AX. I25 

lanucd until death. Richard Skarritt. jr., was reared and educated in 
( )akland count}", Michii^an, and was also married there. His wife, Fanny 
I I'orter) Skarritt, was born in ICS44, in Oakland county, Michigan. Six 
cliildren hlessed the union of this cou[)le : .\lfred h., Richard jr.. Jesse, 
l-^dward. Andrew and ("harles. all horn in Oakland county. ATichigan. 
Ktcliard Skarritt. the lather of tliese children. ,^er\ed for nine months dur- 
nii; the C'i\il War. in the Twenty-fourth .Michij^an N'oltniteer Infantry, his 
icrni of ser\ ice hein^ toward the last of the conlhct. Me has alwa.ys been 
nn active Democrat, hut has never a--])ired to oflice. attendinj;- strictly to 
!li-^ farming- interests, lie is retired from actixe farminj;-. but still resides 
nii the home ])lace near his children. lie is a member of the ^lethodist 
l'j)i>co]>al church, as was .also his wife, whose death occurred in J 887. 

Alfred J*'. Skarritt was reared on the lunne place and recei\-ed his edu- 
cation in the schools of Oakland county. Michigan, in White Lake town- 
<lii]), ( )n March [4. 1882. he was married to Ada Pirasington. daug'hter of 
K'utus and Minerxa ( Dewel ) P)rasinL;ton. ;md to them was born one child, 
\l\in R.. who died when ei,uht months of aj^e. I lis birth occurred on 
S(,'])lember 28, 1885. Ada { Th-asinmton) Skanilt was born on .\u^nst 7, 
i8f)j. in ( )akland county. Michi<^an. Her father. Rufus Hrasington. is a 
iiati\e of Xew >'ork state. haxiiiL,^ been born in May. 1834. in Rerov countv, 
and is the son of Tunis and Julia ((llass) l^rasington. He came to ^lichi- 
'^du with his ])arents when only two Acars of a^-e. locating- on a farm in 
W aterford township, Oakland county. Michigan. His parents resided on 
litis ])lace until death and the farm has since l>een in his ])ossession. He 
!- now more than eighty years of age and has lived here all his life. To the 
I'uion of Rufus and Minerva (Dewey) T'rasington were l)orn two children, 
William, w^ho lives at home, and Ada. Tunis Brasington w^as a native of 
Acw York state where he was reared and educated, and became one of the 
itioneers of Oakland county. Michigan. Julia f Glass) ?)rasing-ton also was 
a natixe of Xew York, where she was married. Ada (Brasington) Skar- 
ritt was born in ]\)ntiac. Oakland county. ^^Tichigan. wdiere she w-as reared 
and educated and married. 

.\lfred Skarritt located in Edmore. Michigan, in 1887. where he engaged 
ni the meat business which he successfully conducted algne for nine years, 
at that time forming a ]:)artnership with John .Sack, the firm l)eing known 
as Skarritt & Sack. This partnershi]) continued for eleven years after 
\vliich Alfred Skarritt sold his interest to John Sack, and engaged in the 
bnving and selling of cattle, sheep and hogs. He is an excellent judge of 



I -'6 -MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

live Slock and has l)ccn very successful in all his enterprises, as is evidenced 
l)y the beautiful and s])acious home which he has erected on Main street 
west, in l*~dniore, Montcalm county, Alichii^an. This is by far the finest 
liome in the villa<;-e and one of the finest in the county. Alfred Skarritt 
is j)ractically retired, alth.ou<^h he still deals in live stock to some extent, 
and is slated for postmaster under L^-esident Wilson's achii in i strati on. tak- 
ing- ofihce on January i. kjiG. Tn his fraternal relations, he is affiliated with 
the blue lodge of the fVee and Accepted Masons, of luhnorc, Michigan. 
Politically, he is a strong Democrat and is the first Democratic postmaster 
the town has had for manv vears. 



(HAkLKS v.. IIKNRY. 

( "harles E. l.lenry. successful farmer and prominent citizen of Green- 
\ille, Montcalm county, where he is now H\ing a retired life, was born at 
Henrietta, Monroe county, Xew York, on januar}- 22, i83(S, the son of 
'fhomas and llaley (Brown) Henry, the former born in Ulster, Ireland, 
the latter in Xew York state. 

Thomas Henry and his family mo\ed to the state of Michigan, in 1846, 
and settled at (irattan. Kent county, where they established a pioneer home, 
cleared the land of timber and l.)rush, and here the elder Henry engaged 
in farming until the year 1861, when he died. 

Charles 1'.. I lenry engaged in farming until itSGi, when he enlisted in 
( ompany K, Third Michigan Volunteer Infantry, with which he served as 
a part of the Army of the Potomac, being engaged in the first battle of 
ikill Run and having a part in the construction of the fortifications for 
the protection of Washington, 1). C, until the second battle of Bull Run, 
wlien he was wounded, as a result of which he was discharged in Xovember, 
1862. 

After his discharge from military service, T^fr. Henry returned to Kent 
county, Michigan, and taught school for one winter, after which he w^as a 
student for about two years, attending the normal school at Y]isilanti one 
year, one term at Ann Arbor and graduated from Rryant and Strattoifs 
Commercial College at Detroit in 1865. He then took charge of his brother's 
farm, while the latter was serving as a soldier of the Civil War. Later, 
Charles h'. Henr}- secured a farm, which he cultivated profitably, paying for 
the land which he had secured, and on this place he lived until 1876. when 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN, 12/ 

lie iuo\ed to a farm near Smyrna. Tonia county, and lived there until 1880. 
At this time, Mr. TTcnry went to Dakota and located on a farm of four 
hundred <and cit^hty acres, which he homesteaded and where he hved until 
he had accumulated one thousand one hundred and twenty acres of land, 
on ^vhich Air. Tlem-y resided for live years, at the end of which time he 
returned to Montcahu county, and purchased one thousand and forty acres 
in Day township. On this farm he placed extensive improvements, pre- 
])ared his land for cultivation, living- at IFcBride until 1904, and then after 
(lisi)osing' of the greater i)art of his land, came to (ireenville, where he now 
lives a retired life. 

in Septeml)er, J870. Charles K. TTenry w\as married to Florence R. 
.Vorton, who was horn in Ontario county, New York, the daughter of 
Myron l\. and Sarah (Skinner) Xorton, who came to a farm of two hun- 
dred and se\'enty acres located near Smyrna, Tonia county, which was their 
home for some time, after which Mr. Norton later moved to Greenville, 
where he was engaged in several lines of Imsiness. To the marri;ige of 
( liark'S H. and Florence TIenry have keen horn the following children: 
Xorton ]\1., a druggist, who married Bessie McCarty and to whom have 
keen horn three children, Alice, Gerald and IVTyron : Florence R., who was 
tlie wdfe of Dr. Rell, of AlcP.ride, and who died akout the year 1003 ; Ethel, 
who is the wife of Rudol]:)h Xewton, of Fairj)k'iin township, Montcalm 
county, and to whom have heen born four children, Kthelhert, Charles 
ITenry, Rudolph and Florence; Fuirton, a lumber dealer of Vancouver, 
i'ritish Cohuubia, who married Jessie ^^^akh, and to whom have been l)orn 
uvo children, X^'eva and Marguerite: Alice, who is a stenographer of Fos 
Angeles. California; ATabel, Avho is the wn'fe of Joseph Gibson, of Green- 
\ille, and to wdiom have been born two children, Joseph and Charles Henry; 
1 liarles, who is a farmer living near Stanton, and who married Alice Glock- 
xin, ^\•ho are the parents of three children, Charles Jr.. Helen and Marian, 
and Gladys, who after graduating from X'orth western Lhiiversity at E\'ans- 
t'ln, Illinois, in lOjq, became a teacher at a i)rivate school at St. Paul. Minne- 
sota. 

Charles F. Henry is a prominent member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, at Greenville, and at Gratton, Kent county, he was for forty-six 
\ears prominent in Masonr}'. Mr. FTenry is res]>ectcd and esteemed in 
Montcahn county, his pleasing ways and interest in the development of the 
community and its resources having given him a place of note among the 
men of the county and vicinity. 



\ JX .\I()NTCAI.:\I COINTY. MJCIJKiAX. 

Charles I'"., ilcnry. jr., one of the well-knuwu farmers of Ah)iitcahii 
couiil}', was born on ()ctol)er 31. ]SS8, in the state of Soitth Dakota, and 
after the eonii)letion of his early ecluealion in the sehools of Alelh-ide. and 
at (Ireenville. 'became a student at Staunton Military Aeadeni)'. of Staunton, 
\ iri^inia, he Jater attending;- the Mieln'<;an \,i;rii-ultural ("olle<;e, at Lansini;-. 
as a si)eei.al student of as^rieulture and lie also ]ia\ in^-, in t(;o<), i;-raduated 
from Valparaiso I'niversity, of X'alparaiso. Indiana. 

( harJes !'".. Ilenr}-, Jr.. is now engaj^'ed in general af^rieultural |)ur- 
^vnts on ei<;hty aeres of land near Stanton. Dav townshij), he also having 
eharge of a larii^e tract of his father's land, lie is one of the i)romisin^- 
yoinii; farmers of Alontealm township, his ciTnris Ijeitig attended with e^eel- 
ient results. 



llh:\d^V J1.\KKIS()\' IIIXOS. 

Ilenry Harrison Hinds, (ji Stanton. .Michigan, a ])rominent farmer and 
e.\tensi\e landowner. a\ <as horn in l^)rest Lake townshi]), near ATontrosc. 
.Sus(juehanna county, i'ennsylvaniri, October g, i<S4o. He is a son of 
l'reser\ed and Ann h^nsworth (Walling) Hinds, the father being a native 
<»f a -Xew haigland state, and the mother, of Xew York. ['reserved Hinds 
was a car])enter by trade, anrl li\-ed in the \icinit\- of Montrose, vSus(|ue- 
lianna county, Pennsyh ania. until his death, when almost n.inety years of 
age. J lis wife sur\i\ed him, and died in Spokane. A\'ashington, at the age 
of nne hundred years, six montlis .and seventeen days. 'riie\- were meml)ers 
of the "Deep-water"' l)a])list clnirch. Tie w;is once a commissioner of 
Sus()uehanna count}, Pennsxlvania,. The paternal grandfather of Henrv 
H. Hinds was C om-ad Hinds, whose wife's name is not of record. 

Henry H.. Hinds was twehe years old when he first came to Michigan. 
He spent a vear at Hillsdale, with his aunt, Lydia l^runson, then went back 
to PennsvKa.nia. where lie grew to matdiood, and also attended the common 
schools there. .At .Montro.^e he enlisted in i86t for service in the Civil 
War. and .--erAed in (^.'ompany A. Fifty-seventh Regimetit, Pennsylvania 
\'oluntcer Infantry, until the close of that great struggle in 1865. He w\as 
hrst sergeant of the company from the start, but was afterward pre)moted, 
successively, to second lieutenant, first lieutenant and captain, and at mu.ster- 
out, was the captain of his company. He participated in all the battles of 
the Army of the Potomac in whicli his regiment was engaged, u]) to Ciettys- 
])urg. At l'"redericksl)urg, his brotlier, ^Villiam W., a duty sergeant, was 



M()X•J\•AI.^I COl'NTY, MICHK^AX. 129 

jiiiirtally \v(3nnde(l and died in his arms thirteen da}s later. Captain Hinds 
was taken prisoner at (jettys])nr_u', at tlie Shirley House, from which no man 
i-cai)ed, it htuv^ the saHent ])oint of (jeneral Sickles' line. He was conlhied 
111 the "Yankee" ofhcers" (juarters of ])ractically all the ])risons of the Sonth 
where officers were held; in all, six hundred and nine days. He was one 
1. 1' the famous one hundred and nine in the "l.ihhy f^'ison Tunnel" gang, 
whii succeeded in escai)ing. h'ifty-two reached the L'^nion lines, two were 
ilidwned, and the others were eventually recaptured, amongst whom were 
(ill. Thomas l^dward Kose, who had charge and engineered the construc- 
iinii of the tunnel, and Captain ITinds. 

After tlie war, ('a])tain Hinds left Alontrose, I'ennsyh rmia, and came 
['> Stanton. .Michigan, arriving in ()ct(jl)er. 1866, after dark, on foot, wear- 
itiL; one rubber and carrying the other in his hand. Xext dav after his 
airixal. he purchased one fori\- acres of \irgin ])ine land, the first land he 
cvvv owned, it beiiig embraced within the present corporate limits of Stanton, 
and which he yet owns. He has added to it until the farm now embraces 
iiin' thousand acres or more, and he is also the owner of other kmds in this 
•^tate and in the \\\'st. Jle cleared a field in this locality, and produced the 
In-^r crop on "pine-stum]>"' land in this part of Michigan. He also owns citv 
])r()])e'rty in Stanton. His stuni]) pulling was the first dcMie in this ])art of 
ilic state. He also built the first rod of sidewalk in the town of Stanton. 
Wryv he engaged in merchandising and the lumber l)usiness for man\- vears, 
bill at present is giving his attention to live stock farming, his specialty being 
SliMi-thorn cattle. He was one of the organizers and president of the First 
Xuional I'ank of Stanton. 

b'ven before he had gained a residence here, Captain Jlinds was elected 
ii' a local ])ublic ofTice. and has been supervisor, chairman of the board of 
-'! lervisors. state senator, and was at the head of the state live stock sanitary 
1(1 iiiui'^sion for twenty-eight years. |)ri(^r to which time he had been a mem- 
ber of the board of control of the state public school at Coldwater. Michigan, 
'hiring the construction period and inauguration of this wise charity for the 
'"■K'lit of indigent children, \N'hich is the parent institutic^n of its kind in 
'111' world. Captain Hinds was a long-time meml)er and president of the 
Clinton school board, and for more than a (juarter of a century was con- 
'Kcied with and one of the managers of the wState Agricultural Society, which 
h.i-^ charge of the Michigan state fair. 

On December 16, 1871, Capt. Henry H. Hinds married Mary Elizabeth 
Sticrwood. of l\ush\ille, Pennsvlvania, daughter of William H. and Mary 
(Qb) ' • *' 



130 .MONTCALM COl-NTY. :\rJC 1 1 ICAX. 

Jane ( Turrcl ) Sherwoocl. Mary I-".. Sherwood was horn on Deeeniher 10. 
1853, in Forest Lake township, Susquehanna county, I'ennsyh'ania. Iler 
])aternal strand fat lier was Xathan J. Sherwood. To this union were horn 
fi\t' chilch'en wlio siirvi^'ed the ])eriod of infancy, as follow : l^dua. Alma, 
E\-a, May and Sherwood, lulna was ))oni on Sei>teniher 17, 1875. and died 
on A)>ril 30, 1892, in her seventeentli \ear. Alma was horn on h"ehruar\- 
15, 1877. She was married to luhvard H. Baker, April j8, 1907, and is 
now residiui;' in hdint, .Michigan. She has two children, f^dward 1 finds, 
horn on March kj. 1908, and l*ldna r.stellc. l)orn on I'\'hruar\' 26, 1910. 
i'Aa was horn on Alarch 21, 1882. She was married to Frank D. Fhelps, 
Oct(jher 25. 1908. and is now residing in Hudson, Michigan. She has one 
daughter, TCIizaheth, horn on .Xugust 17. [910. May was horn on .Ma\' 13, 
1883. She lias heen a victim of epilepsy from infancy and is permanently 
in an institution for care and treatment. Sherwood was horn on >hu-ch 1. 
1885. lie married Mary Mayes. July 24, ic)09, and is now a civil and 
mechanical engineer, resirh'ng in Fort Wayne, Indiana, lie has three chil- 
dren, Dorothy, Ijorn on ()ctol)er t6, 19TO; Ward 1\., IA4)ruary i 1, 191-^. and 
Sherwood Kichard, June 24, 1915. Mrs. Hinds died on Octoher 13. T903, 
aged nearly hft}' years. She was a charter memlier of the I'^irst Congre- 
gational church at Stanton. 

Ca)>tain Hinds was the llrst man initiated in Stanton Star Lodge, .\o. 
250, Free and .Accepted Masons, in Stanton, Michigan, and later was master 
of the same for a numher oi years. He is also a charter njemher of Stan- 
ton Chapter Xo. 1 10, Royal Arch Masons, and lias l)een its high pi'iest. and 
for more than forty years he has heen a memher of Ionia Commandery Xo. 
IT. Knights Temi)lar. He has heen a memher of Crand Rapids Consistory. 
Scottish Rite Ma>on<. for more than thirty-fne Acars. lie is also an old 
memher of Saladin Temple. Xohles of the M}stic Shrine, at Tirand Ra])ids. 
He and his \\ife were charter memhers of Stanton ( "ha])ter .\o. 47. Order 
of the l^astern Star, he ha\ing l)een first worth\- i)atron. and she first \vorth\- 
matron of that chapter. Captain Hinds was grand \\orth\- i)atron of the 
state of Alichigan : also most worthy grand patron of the Order of the Ivist- 
ern Star of the w(M-ld, the highest rank attainahle in that order, lie and 
his wife A\ere long-time memljers of the Grange, he ha\ing served as a mem- 
her of the exccutixe committee of the state grange. They were charter 
memhers of Stanton Cirange No. 748. he l)eing its first master, and she wa- 
its first lecturer. Mrs. Hinds served as a memher of the ^vonlan's work 
committee of the state grange from the time the committee was inaugurated 



MONTCAT.M COUNTY. MICJTIGAX. I3I 

(intil her (It-ritli. Captain 1-finds is a charter nicnihcr of Stanton Post Xo. 
^-. (Irand Army of the RepnhHc. Department of Michiijan. and was the 
jK)St"s tirst commander. His wife was a charter member and tkst president 
of Stanton Women's Rehef Cor])s No. 9, and from that ])osition rf)se to 
department jiresident for the state of Michigan. 



IJiSLIh: T. BARBICK. 

LesHe T. Barber, one of the leading- bnsiness men of Kdmore, Mont- 
cahn connty, is a young man with an excellent future before him. Progres- 
.si\cly active and highly el'licient. he commands the respect of all who know 
him, He was l)orn on March ii, 1886, in St. Louis. Michigan, and is the 
son of David and Ida (Bisbee) I)ar1)er. He was reared and educated in 
Ins native town, after which he acquired a working knowledge of the steam- 
liiler's trade and followed this for a short time. He then learned the whole- 
sale produce bnsiness which he thoroughl}- mastered. l)eing a ])artner of his 
sU'pfather. J. \'. (ilassford. until his <leat.h. He then launched out for him- 
clf by entering the employ of .Swift & Co.. in the same line at Edmore, 
^iiclugan, where he located in i()o8. After severing his connection with this 
irni he left lulmon: for a sliort time, but finally returned and engaged in 
du- ])roduce business for liimself. 

On August I J. KM 3. the L. luarljer «!<: C'om|)any Creamery was organ- 
'/('d with local capital and a new plant was erected with all n.iodern improve- 
'M lUs and machinerv. .and a line lire-proof structure. Idiis plant is located 
luar the Pere .\bar((uette railroad, at F.dmore. Michigan, and has branch 
''!i\ing stations throughout the state. .\ fine grade of but-ter is made here 

■ liid much i)oultry shi])ped. Leslie T. Ilarlier is the manager of this ihriv- 
:i',U concern and does most of the buying. 1n his political life he is affiliated 
■■^\\\ the Republican partv and is now a member of the local town council. 

■ alern.all}'. he is a member of hxlmore Lodge. No. 360. of the Free and 
"^ 'oepted Masons. 

( )n Xovember 10. T()o8. Leslie T. Barber was united in marriage to 
' iilu M, Xewberry, daughter of Steveti E. and Kmma (Thomas') New- 
i'< fry, and thev are the parents of one child, namely. Thelma h>ola. whose 
'"iih occurred on October 13, j()I(). Steven E. Newl>erry was born in 
Li-nesee county. Michigan^ on November 30, 1852. and is the son of Will- 
i;!ni Xewberry and his wife, both natives of England. Steven E. New'- 



berry was rcTireil in his native county and in 1S84. lie removed to South 
Dakota and tlience to Iowa, locating- in St. I.onis, ■Michigan, on ^Tay 25. 
i<<HH. I le was a cari)enter by trade and still follows that vocation at inter- 
vals. On June 9. ^S//, Steven \\. Newberry was married to luuma Thomas, 
daugiiter of Timoth}- and Mary ( I k)lman ) 'J'homas. who were both natives 
of Kngland. and to them were born three children, whose names follow: 
Jennie, wife of I^KNin McManiis, of Waterloo. Iowa: Kmma. and I^thel, 
■wife of Milton I'okorny. also of Waterloo. Towa. I'jnma d'homas was 
lK)rn on .March Ji. \^=,H. in Lapeer county, ^lichigan. and after her mar- 
riage accompanied her husband to Piere, South Dakota, at which place lier 
daughter, l.nlu M., was born. She was about four years of age when thev 
located iu St. Louis, Micliigan. and there she was reared and educated, 
graduating from the locrJ high school with the class of i()()6. She then 
taught for one A'car in the district schools of that localitw Ider i)arents now 
h'\c in Boyne ("ily, Michigan. 



la.MlOR K. S'r()DD.\Rl). 

I.'dmer E. Stoddard is the editor and i>u]>lisher of the Sheridan Adi'cr- 
tiscr of Sheridan. Montcalm county. Michigan, and is public s])irited on all 
questions pertaining to the good of the community. He was born in 
Schuyler county, .\ew ^'<lrk. on July 27. 1863. and is the son of Henry 
and Sarah j. ( Xorris ) Stoddard, 'idiey came to the town of Sheridan, 
Michigan, in Octol)er, 1867, where ITenry Stoddard o]:)erated a store and 
-aw-mill for many years. Mnancial reverses came and he lost heavily. lie 
is now retired. 

Klmer T^. Stoddard received his education in the public schools of 
Sheridan. Michigan, and when seventeen years of age he began work in a 
saw-mill which position he held until twenty years of age. ITc then learned 
the printer's trade of l'"dwin S. Gill, on the old Sheridan News, continuing 
in that occupation for a period of (Le years. During that time he worked 
in different places and linall}' re^no^■e(l to Muir. Tonia counts-. Michigan. 
M'hcre he engaged in the ])ainting and paper-hanging business until in Octo- 
ber, i()02, at which time he returned to Sheridan, Michigan, and in March, 
1904. purchased the present business of A. E. Bacon. Oi] July 4, 7887. 
Elmer E. Stoddard was married to Alta A. Clough and to their union have 
been born three children: Ethlyn, a graduate of the Sheridan high school 



MONTC-Ar,^[ COrXTY. MICHTCAX. I33 

and the wife of lulwin R. Cha])man. who was superintendent of schools at 
ihe time of her gradnation and is now superintendent of the Pinconning 
school, in l)ay county. Michigan; Ksther is a graduate of the Sheridan high 
-.chool and is now the wife of James B. Wood, of vSheridan, Michigan; 
J.ottie died at the age of six years. T''Jiner K. Stoddard is a nieml>er of 
[\'ar] Lake Lodge. No. 324, of the I'Yce and .Accepted Masons and has 
ver\ed in most of the offices of this order. Politically, he is of the Uepu1> 
lican faith and has been very active in local proi)aganda. He is also presi- 
dent of the village council and has served as president of the county can- 
\assers. for several years. TTis publishing plant has its own electric .system 
and beside furnishing the lighting power for the printing business, it also 
lights the Masonic lodee. 



j. PIIILO T.\MX)K, J). D. S 

Dr. j. Philo Taylor, (;ne of the leaders, not only in professional circles, 
hilt in the social and i>ul)]ic life of Larson City. Montcalm County, was born 
.ti W ()]cott\ ille, Xoble county. Indiana, the son of N'enoris U. and Mary A. 
(Kowe) Taylor, nati\es of Connecticut and <.»f Pennsylvania, respective! v. 
\ enoris R. Taylor mo\ed to \Volcott\ ille when he was a young man and 
(here engaged in the general merchandise business for the remainder of his 
days. He was one of the organizers of the Methodist Assembly, at Rome 
( it\-. Indiana, and ^\■as tiie first man to erect a cottage at that place. 

j. Philo Taylor received his early education in the .schools of Wolcott- 
ville, after which he attended college at Hillsdale. Michigan, for some time 
.uid then l)ecame a student of dentistry at the University of Michigan at 
\nn Arbor, and after graduating from which. Dr. Tavlor came to Carson 
' ity in 1878. and began the i)ractice of his ])rofession. since that time liav- 
iiig been one of the mo.st successful dental surgeons in the community. 

\)r. ]. Philo Taylor h.as taken a most important place in the public 
Mid official life of i)loomer township and of Montcalm county, having served 
;i- township clerk for sexenteen years: as chairman of the Republican countv 
'■oniuiittee, and Dr. Taylor is a citizen whose counsel and judgment on 
matters of i)olitics and party affairs have given him a countrv-wide reputa- 
tion. 

In business circles. Dr. Taylor is ])rominently connected, being a 
director of the State P)ank of Carson City, as well as being the owner of 
"ue of the choice farms of the county. Dr. Taylor is a prominent member 



]34 :m().\tc.\i.m ioiniv, .mkiiican. 

of the I^'rcc and Accepted Alasons, hasitig ser\ctl as master i)f the lod^e 
at Carson City: he is also a nohle of the Alvstic Slin'ne, and has attained to 
the honored position of a thirty-second de<i,Tec Mason. 



R. J. TOWl'.R. 

Iv. J. 'I'ower was l)()rn on hebruary i. iSy), on the old Tower farm 
homestead in Oakfield townshij). Kent county. Michio-an, about, ten miles 
west atid south of Greenville. 

'i'he first fourteen years of his life were sj)€nt on the farm doing the 
ordinary farm boy's duties, when he could not escape them, and making- 
"things" in the old corn barn shop, lie well rememl>ers how in the frosty 
October mornings he would £!;o down into the back lot, Ijarefooted, to dri\-e 
the cows up to be milked— they used to let them out to pasture over night — 
and how he would stand on the ground where a cow had been lying to get 
his feet warm. 

Mis earlv school davs are still fresh in his memory. l'".\er\- inch of 
the whole one and three-fcmrth miles to the old White Swan school house 
is as clearly in mind as though it were tra\eled over yesterday, and the 
coi)[)er-tocd boots which \^'Ould not kee|) the water out, bttt seemed always 
to have water inside. 1 low the l)oys ])layed ''snap the whip," and how the 
Tower boy seemed always to be "snapper." 

The winter of 1874 and 1875 saw R. J. Tower going to the red brick 
Union school in Rockford, Afichigan. while his father was in Kast Teimes- 
see supervising the building of a foundry and machine shop. In April, 
1875, he went to his father at Sweetwater, Tennessee, remaining there until 
December of the same year, when the family came to Greenville. After 
attending the Greenville schools a year or two. he went into his father's 
sho])S and became a machinist. February 1, 1880, he l)ecame of age, and 
with his elder brother took over his father's business, continuing in ])artner- 
ship wMth his brother until October i. 1882. At this date his brother drew 
out of the business and the R. J. Tower iron w'orks Avas established and for 
about five years a history of the Tower sho]) is a history of R. J. Tower, 
as he made its w^ork his life interest. 

in 1887 it began to dawn upon his mind that a certain girl was a 
necessary possession, if his happiness was to be complete. On December 
2^, 1888, the girl, Miss Linna D. Baker, and Ray J- '^Power were united in 



MOXI'CAI.M CorNTY. MIC IIJGAX. I35 

inatrinioiiy. The paiinersliip has continued for ahnost twenty-seven years. 
Man\ years ago his wife reconiniendcd to him to make all his aims have a 
(letinite goal, and he considers this to he the hest advice he ever received. 

Since his marriage, the life history of Air. 'I'ower is onlv the history of 
one \enturc after another. Some failures, some successes. An attempt in 
iS()4 to manufacture oi)era chairs, which failed. Twehc or fifteen attempts 
to heau.ti fy spots in Greemille. spots which had been anvthing but l)eau- 
tiful. these attempts ha\e not been failures. 

All these years Mr. Tower has been o])erating the iron works, digress- 
ing in iqo/ long enough lo start the K. j. 'JVnver electric plant and flouring- 
niills. These and the iron work's and other \'etitures go to make Mr. 
Tower's life a busy one. lie says he is going to ((uit in "two or three" 
\ears, and ha\e some time to plav. but there are those who doubt it. 

One son only sur\ives of three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Tower. 
This son. Francis Iv. is becoming acquainted with the work at the iron 
works, and will eventuallv have a share in its manajrement. 



\<V\. JOITN J. Slfl'J'.riAX. 

The Kev. John j. Sheeiian. who succeeded the Kev. K. J. Whelan as 
past(jr of St. Mary's Catholic churcii at Carson City, has endeared him- 
self to the peoi)le of his congregation and by executive abilit}' built up a 
ihri\ing parish. He is a native of b'.ast Tawas. .Michigan, where he was 
born on .May 5. 1870. a son of Timothy and Ellen (O'Coniicll) Shcehan, 
both of whom were born in Ontario, ("anada. Timothy Sheehan, who was 
born in 1844, ^"m'^' to .Michigan in ]8()3 and settled in East Tawas. In 
1S80 he mo\ed lo r)ay Cit\- where he lias li\'ed ever since. 

In the St. James's parochial school at I'ay City, the Rev. John Sheehan 
received a rudimentary education and later attended the College of St. Sul- 
pice. at Montreal, Canada, heeling the need of a more thorough prepara- 
lion before assuming the duties of his calling, the subject of this sketch 
(Ictennined to study six years longer and as a result was enrolled in the 
\nierican College at Rome, one of the mo.st famous schools of its kind in 
ihe world. On April i r. 1003, he was ordained in the Church of vSt. John 
bateran. in Rome, styled in Roman usage, "the mother church of the city 
and the world,'' and surpassing St. Peter's church in dignity. Upon his 
return to this countr}'- he was assigned the position of assistant at St, 



136 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

Andrew's cathedral in (irand Rai)ids, and for a short time had chart^^e 
of St. j\lar3''s Frencli parish at Manistee, Michigan. 

As pastor of the Immaculate ("onception church at Tra\'erse City, Rev. 
Sheehan remained in charge from TU05 until January, 1914, when he left 
to assume the duties of his present parish at (arson ("ity, where he is 
])riest of St. Mary's church. The school which is C(.)nnccted with the church 
is conducted hy the Dominican Order of Sisters, who have lahored unceas- 
ingly for its welfare. 

in closing this sketch it might he stated that the Re\-. John Sheehan, 
WMth naught of intellectual higotry, has shown in his church activities 
and in all other relations of life the true and gentle spirit of a lover of man- 
kind, lie is a man of unusually high intellectual attainments, is unassum- 
ing, frank and well fortified in con\ictions concerning economic and gov- 
ernmental affairs. 



J()H.\ WIT.LTAMS SMITH IMI'.RSOX. 

The ancestors of John \A\ S. Pierson were prol)al)ly of Yorkshire extrac- 
tion. 

I. i'ierson : Henry I'ierson. the cmigrruit ancestor, was born in ling- 
land and settled in T.xnn. Massachusetts, whence he came as earl)- as 1640, to 
Southampton, I-ong Island, with a colony from Massachu>etts. of which Rev. 
.■\l)raham I'ierson. first i)resi(ient of \'ale (\)llege. heliexed to he his brother, 
was the pastor. Henry married Mary ( ooper, \\ho was also from Lynn. 
ITom !()()() to 1680 I lenr}- was clerk of .Suffolk count)-. Me died in 1680. 
His widow married Kev. Seth hdetcher and went to li\e at lilizabethtown, 
New Jerse.)', taking her son Ikinjamin TNer^on with her. (Children of Hemw 
and Mary Rierson, b)hn. Darnel and jose])h; Henry died in 1701; i'enjann'n 
died in 1731; Theodore (mentioned below), Sarali born in (660. 

II. Theodore. Son of Henry Pierson. I>orn at .Southampton, Pong 
Tslatid, 1O65. He had sons, John and Jol) (mentioned below). 

HP Job. Son of Theodore Pierson, Ijorn 1697. died 1788. He had 
sons, David and Lemuel (mentioned l)elowO- 

l\'. Lemuel. Son of Job Pierson was born in i/J^^ in Southampton. 
Lie had sons, Sanniel (mentioned below) and ^Villiam. born in 1762. 

V. .Samuel. Son of F^emuel Pierson, born at P)ridgeham])ton, Pong 
Island. 1753. Died in 1838 ; niarricd in 1 778 to p^rusha Conklin. Phildren. 



MON'TCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 1 37 

(oliaiinc, l)orii 1780, wSanmcl Dayton Ijurn in 1786, I'lsther born in 1789, Job 
(mentioned below), Mary l)oi'n in 1704- 

\'I. Job (2). Son of Sanuiel Pierson, born at Ih-idgehanipton. T.ong 
Island, on September 23. 1791. Died at Troy, Xew York, April 9, i860, 
(iradnated Williams College in i8tt. Me read law at vSaleni, Washington 
county, Xew ^'ork. and in 1813 became law ])artner of Judge Knickerbocker 
of Schaghticoke. Xew York, lie married September 24. 1815, ( "larissa 
Taintor Bulkeley. He was elecled in 1833 surrogate of Rensselaer county, 
Xew York, and from 1830 to 1834 was re])resentative in Congress. His 
wife died in 1865. ( "hildren. Sarah Jerusha. born at Schaghticoke. Xew 
York, 1815. married to Philip T. lleartt in 1839; 2, Samuel Dayton, born 
]8i9, died in 1850; 3. Job (mentioned below) ; 4, .Mary Bulkley, born 1825. 
married Major Oscar A\'inship of I'nited States army; Jiad one son. .Samuel 
C\)0]K'r: she died in 1912: 5. John Pulkley, born in 1828, died in 1885, presi- 
dent of Xational City Pank, Troy. .\cw York; n)arried Mar\- Lockwood, 
had one child daughter, .Mary, who died at the age of three years. 

VTI. Job (3). Son of Job (2) Pierson. Porn at Scliaghticoke, Feb- 
ruary 3. 1 821. In 1834 he i)rei)ared for college at Pallard .\cademy, Ik'U- 
nington, \'crmout. and in the l'"rancis school at Troy, Xew ^'ork, and was 
graduated from Williams College in i8_|2. - Tie then, after a short time in his 
father's law cTfice in Troy in 1844, entered .\uburn Theological Seminary from 
which he was graduated in 1847. Jle was ordained in the Presbyterian min- 
istry in 1851. Ife had ])astorates at ( "orning, Xew York, West Stockbridge. 
Massachusetts, ('atskill. Pittsford and \'ictor, .Xew York, Kalamazoo and 
Ionia, .Michigan. During the fall of 1856 he made a trip to Great Britain, 
retiring from active work as minister in 1879. From 1 88() to 189.1 he was 
librarian of Alma ( ollege, at Alma. .Michigan, hor u[)wards of twenty vears . 
he was engaged in work for the Xew I'Jiglish Dictionary ]:)ublished by the 
.!*hilo](\gical Society of Pondon and also for the Stanford Dictionary, edited 
by Dr. I'YMinell. f Fe was the largest cr^ntributor of words of anyone on this 
side of the Atlantic. He died at Stanton, Michigan, where he had resided 
from 1892 to i89(S, on In-bruary 3, 1896. TTe married February 7. 1849, 
Rachel W . Smith, born on December tt, 1820, at (iloucester, Massachusetts, 
and who died January K), i()o8, at Atlantic City, Xew Jersey. There were- 
IxM-n to them: i. ('larissa 4'aintor. born at Troy. New ^^)rk, September 15, 
1850; married on December 11. 1872, to IVjverly Chew of Xew Y'ork Citv. 
Died in 1889, leaving no children. 2. Samitel Dayton, bom at Pittsford, 
Xew ^^)rk, October 25, 1852. died at A'ergennes, Yt., April 28, 1914. 3. 



I^S MON'TCAl.M COfNI'Y. .\f IC 1 1 KJAN". 

John Williams v^niilh { mentioned below). 4. ['owen Whiting, horn at \'ic- 
tor, Xew York. i85<S. flied at ihidgehamijton. hong island, July 4. 1907; 
married on Octoher 12. 1 (S87. to Xannie Aleech of Xorwich, Connecticut. 
They had one child. Clarissa, horn June 8, !8<;o. residing at present with her 
mother in New ^■ork ("ily. 5. I'hili]) 1'itns lleartt, horn at Victor, New 
^■ork. March 15. \X^,(). manied on Octoher (<. i()i3. to .Mahel Dora Patterson 
and now resides at Uennington. \ ermont. 

\lll. John Williams Smith. .Son of J<.h (3 ) I'iers.Mi and Rachel Wil- 
liams, horn at Pittstord, Xew \'ork. Jul\- _'0. 185.}. nio\ed with his father's 
family to \'ictor, .Xew York, in 1856, and to Kalamazoo, .Michigan, in 1863. 
Mere he attended school until 1870. \vhen the family moved to Ionia, Michi- 
gan, Decemlxr 8. 1870. when he went to tjreenville. .Michigan, and entered the 
emploN- (d" h(.)\-ell Ih-otliers ^Kr (ireen. as ,an apprentice in their tin shop and after 
ser\ing the full time, three years, entered their emplcjy as a hardware sales- 
man, where he remained until July, i87h. After visiting the ("entcnnial 
J'".xposition at ]1iiladel|)hia. he returned to lom'a. .Michigan, in the fall and 
entered the em])Ioy oi Lo\ell & Morse, where he worked for a short time 
in hoth the tin shi]) and the store. On .Xovemher _m . 1876. assisted by his 
brother, I'hili]) T. li. Pierson, opened a hardware and sto\e store in the 
.Morrison inn'Iding on luist Alain street. With increasing trade. earl\- in 1877. 
ihe sti»ck was removed to the Paine building, 108 West Main street, where 
a lease was taken for a term of years. 11ie great tire of October u, 1880, 
completely destroyed the building ;ind stock of goods. 1die business was soon 
re-established in temporary (|uarters in the I'alace block. Meanwhile, the 
implement building at f 14 I'^ast .Main street was fitted up with a store front 
and counters and the business was remoxed to this ])oint until the Paine 
building'could be rebuilt. Tn .March, 1881, the business was reopened in the 
new Paine building. 108 West Main street. On I'ebruary 23, 1885. the imple- 
ment building at T 1 2 ICast Main street was coni|)letely destroyed hy fire. 
An adjoining lot on the west was purchased of Mr. l'>. Iv. Wood and plans 
were made for the Pierson l)uilding, size forty-four by one hundred feet. 
.Meanw'hile. Mr. Pierson. together with 1). L. Mcl'"adden. erected the 
Phoeni.x block on Camburn avenue, as a i)ermrment building for the imple- 
ment departtnent. That year the business that had been conducted as found- 
ed by John W. S. Pierson was changed to John W. S. Pierson & Company 
and Philip T. H. Pierson became a partner. On January 22, 1886, the 
dedication of the i)resent building was celebrated by a reception which 
marked the relniilding of Stanton, and the exercises were attended by a 
large number of ])eo])1e from our city and the rural districts. On March 13, 



MOX'iCALM CorXlY, MICHIGAN. 1 3Q 

1880, the new buildiiit;- was (jj)ened for business purposes. On February 
1. J.891, the business was incorporated under the name of John W. S. i*ier- 
st)n & C'onipan}-, the ollicers Ijeing John \V. S. i'ierson, president; Philip 
r. H. Pierson, vice-president, and I'^hner S. Stebbins, secretary and treas- 
lU'er, and at this time Air. i.evi W. 1 lunsicker and George VV. Markee 
l)ecaine stockholders in the corporation witli the officers. On November 
jj. 1901. the siher anniversary, marking twenty-live years of continued 
business, was celebrated. 

John W. S. ricrson was married to Clara b'deanor Dillingham, daugh- 
ter of Oapt. Lucius -\l)e!l and Jennie Lincoln Dillingham, at ("oldwater, 
Michigan, on October 9, 1904. l)orn to them one son, John Lincoln, who 
died in infancy. They ha\e two adopted sons. Liarold Dillingham IMerson, 
who resides in Detroit, and John Howard Pierson. 

J\ir. Pierson, wishing to be relieved from the direction and details of 
llie hardware business, in order to gi\e more attention to other business 
interests, on .March 27. i<;o8. to take effect -\pril i. .sold a controlling inter- 
est in the cor[)oration of John W. S. IMerson & Co.. to i'l.lmer S. Stebbins 
.md ( harlcs L. .Meacli, with no change in the corporate name, Mr. Pierson 
icfaining a substantial interest as a shareholder and becoming vice-presi- 
<knt. On March 7, igri, when the corporation changed its name to the 
Stebl)ins-(iaffield Co.. Mr. I'ierson upon this date formed the partnershij) 
under the title ()f The John \V. S. I'ierson Com])anv, dealing in investment 
securities, chieily Michigan investments, with offices in the second floor of 
ilie Pierson building, wirh the following officers: John W'. S. Pierson. 
l)resident and treasurer; Philip 'L. Li. I'ierson. vice-])resident, and Devi W. 
Munsicker. secretary. Through the first change in the name of the cor- 
poration and the later one on Januarv 8. iQi.v to Strmton Hardware Com- 
pany, Air. Pierson has retained the same interest as shareholder, and the 
iitiice of \ ice-|)resident in the business he founded in ]876, in his own name. 
.\l)art from business interests Mr. Pierson is interested in the civic, social, 
;md religious interests of our city. During his long residence as a business 
man he has not sought or accepted any salaried i)ublic office, but has accept- 
ed offices where he felt he could be of ser\ice to the community. Lfe was 
alderman in the first ward for 7882-1883. trustee of the city schools for 
sixteen years. i8()4 to tqto. and treasurer of the school board for ten years 
of this |)crio(l and during the erection of the new school house in 1905. 
Lfe was no less interested in the welfare of the church. A trustee of the 
Lirst Congregational church since 1886 and united with said church, on pro- 
fession of faith, on ATarch i, 1885. He founded the weekly offeruig svs- 



T40 MOXTCAf.M COI'NTV. .AfUllIGAN. 

U;ni of the clnirch on i8()3 and succeeded his brother, PhiHi) T. H. Pierson, as 
clerk of said church in 1909. Outside of alTjiirs in his home city, Mr. Pier- 
son is deeply interested in the welfare oi Altna College at Alma, Michigan, 
of which he has been trustee since i8()<S. 

Mrs. i'ierson is the author of a large number (jf children's books, all of 
which ha\ e lieen i)ublished by K. P. Dutton & Company, New^ York. ''Mrs. 
Pierson." said The Outlook, "has done for children what Mrs. Gatty did 
for gr( )\\ n people in M 'arables from Nature/" She is the author of 
"AuKMig the Meadow" l:'eo])le. ' "Among the Foi'est People," "Among the 
I'armyard Teople," "Among the l\)nd People." "Among the Night Peo- 
ple," "Dooryard Stories" and "Tales of a I'oultry l\arm." Besides these 
seven \olumes, Mrs. I'ierson has also written a series of children's stories 
which together constitute the Pencroft !'>ooks. In this series of four dif- 
ferent but closel}- related stories are, "The Millers and Their New I lome," 
"idn-ee Little Millers." "The Millers at ['encroft" and "The Millers and 
Their I'laymates." 

About this latter series, the merit of the stories was well summed up 
by ■/'//(' Chtircluiiau. when it said: "A new book about the 'Tj'ttle Millers' 
win surel\' be welcomed with pleasiu'e Iw- all little readers." 

"The secret of Mrs. Pierson's popularity." say her ])ublisliers. "lies 
in the f<act that wliat she teaches is conveyed so miobtrusti\'cly and naturally 
that the child doe^ not feel that against his will he is being sup])lied with 
facts and morals in storA' form.'' 



( liAKIJuS M. MITJJOP. 

Charles AT Miller, banker and acti\e business man in Greenxille, was 
born in ITu-eka township, on April 8, 1869, a son of Oscar ("". and Catherine 
(I'.erridge) Miller, lie attended the Greenville schools, graduating from 
the in'gh school in 1888. One year later, Mr. Miller completed a course of 
stu(h- in the Detrcjit r)U'^iness I'niversity, after which he l)ecame associated 
Avith his father in the shoe business under the ilrm name of O. ( '. Miller 
vK- Son. In this business Charles M. Miller became manager on entering 
the lirm. ])urchasing the interests of his father in. 1898. In 1904. Mr. 
Miller became xice-presidcnt and general manager of Commercial State 
Savings Pank, and extended the ownership of his store, accepting as part- 
ners. William \\'ells and Jessie Wyckoff. The firm continued in busines.s 



.MOXTfALM COINTV, M IC lUCAN . J4I 

as Wells, WyckolT cKl Miller, for one year, aL the end of which time 'Sir. 
'Miller disposed of his mercantile interests to Ik C). iJeach. 

Since this time Mr. ^Miller has been associated with the Commercial 
State Savings Ijank, an institution which, under the able direction of AJr. 
Miller and his associates, has become one of the strong and reliable banking- 
houses of the county. 

i)n August 9. 1899, Charles M. Miller an as married to Xora Macom- 
ber, a daughter of Allen E. and l^sther Macoml^er, of Lakeview, Michigan. 
Mrs. ^filler was educated at the Lakeview high school and at the Academy 
of the Sacred Heart, of bort Wayne, Indiana. 1\) the marriage of Charles 
M. and Nora Miller has l)een Ijorn one daughter, b'.sther C.*., who was born 
on October 22, 1900, and who is now a student in the Cireenville high 
school. 

Charles M. IMiller and his family are active members of the First Con- 
gregational church at (ireenville, and are well-knowui vvorkers in this con- 
gregation. 

As a |)nblic-S])irited citizen. Mr. Miller has been es])ecially active, having 
served as a member of the l)oard of education for six _\ears. and while a 
nicmljer (,)f this body, served on the building committee having charge of 
the erection of the Union high school in Greenville, lie is a member of 
Creenville Lodge. No. 96. Free and Accepted Masons: of LeRoy Lodge 
Xo. (). Knights of Pythias, and i^ a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America, at Cireenville. 



JOIJN FL Sl^RVLSS. 



John FL Serviss, the well-known county agent for Montcahu county, 
former city clerk of (jreenville, this county, and for years j)rominently 
connected with the commercial interests of that town, is a native son of 
the state of .Michigan, having been born on a farm in West fJloomfield 
township, Oakland county, on March jt. 1859. son of Charles and Xancy 
j. (Riley) Serviss. the former a native of Xew ^'ork state and the latter a 
native of Michigan, who later became prominent residents of (jreenville, 
where their last davs were spent. 

Charles Serviss was alx)ut seventeen years old when he came to Michi- 
gan with his parents, the family settling in West Bloomfield township. Oak- 
land county, and on a farm there (diaries Serviss grew to manhood. TTe 
was about nineteen years old when the gold rush to California set in. fol- 



14-' -MONTCALM CorXTY. MlClllCAX. 

lowing the discovery of gold in J84(j. and iie i<.)ined a party of other adven- 
turous spirits in a trip to California, but at the end of two years of rather 
trying exi)erienres in the gold camps of the West, he returned to his home 
in Oakland county and there married Xancy j. Riley, who was born in 
that connt)-. daughter of John I\iley. a pioneer farmer of that section, and 
a nali\e of Ireland, whose interesting histor^' is set out in a sketch relating 
to his grandson. C". W. Riley, of (ireenville, ])resente(l elsewhere in this 
^■olume. 

In i('^6i. Cliarles Serviss and his family moved from Oakland county 
to this C(ninty and for a cou{)le of \ears or thereabout. Mr. Ser\iss operated 
;i saw-mill at Langston. Me then moved to (Ireemille. where he clerked in 
the Shearer hardware store for several years, after which he engaged in the 
retail meat business and the general li\c-stock trade, in association with a 
firm, doing business under the name of .Ser\ iss I'rolhers »S: Riley, and was 
thus acti\el\' etigaged the rest of his life, becoming in that time one of the 
best-known stockmen in this section, ('harles Ser\iss died in i<S8r and 
his widow sur\i\ed him for more than twent\' }ears. her death occurrin<i 
in KK^.v TIhw were the ])arents of four children. n.'nnel\': Jennie A!., who 
married Ransom T. King, of (;reen\ille. both now deccised ; John 11., the 
subject of this sketch; Warren I')., superintendent and general manager of 
the \'allev ("it\- Teleijlione Oomijany at Saginaw, this state, and ImtcI. who 
died at the age of seventeen years. 

John II. Serviss was onls- two or three years old when his ])arents set- 
tled at Greenville and he grew up in that pleasant little city, receiving his 
education in the (ireenxille schools and beconung fanu'liar with the details 
of his father's business, thus becoming an expert judge of live stock ;\n<\ 
the retail meal trade. lie married when he was twcntv-one vears old and 
for a number of years engaged in the meat Inrsiness for himself, later form- 
ing a i)artnership in the s.ame line with (". W'. Iviley. and was thus engaged 
for three or foiu' years, at the end of which time the firtti was dissolved 
and Mr. Serviss then ser\ ed a six-years' tertn as deputy postmaster at 
{Ireenville. At the end of that official connection he became connected 
with the riollow Blast (Ir.ate Company .and was thus emplo\-ed for two 
years. He then organized the Greenville Floral Company and did business 
along that line for a year, after which he entered the P. 0. Edsall book 
5:tore and was there engaged for eight years, at the end of wdiich time he 
received his ap])ointment as county agent under the new law, his appoint- 
ment frotu Governor Ferris being dated July t. igi^. since which time he 



MONTCALM COrNTY. MICHIGAN. I4:;' 

has ])ecn dexotin^' his most thoughtful aud iutelhgent aUcntiou to the exact- 
ing chities of that ini])ortaut ol'lice, performing a most \ahiable and accept- 
;ihle ser\ ice in behalf of the common welfare. 

On January i _>. i(S8i. John 11. Serviss was united in marriage to 
Amelia 1^. Hlanck. daughter of Dr. .Andrew J>lanck. a well-known pioneer 
ph\sician of Livingston comity, this state, and to this iniion four children 
ha\e been born., as follow: Charles ,\.. who is engaged in the automobile 
business at .\l)erdeen. South Dakota: Rufus j., who died at the age of 
ele\"en \ ears : TTelen h".., who married Henrv f'- Kieft. of (irecnville, and 
( ieorge R., who is o|)erating a garage at Dake\ iew. Mr. and Mrs. Serviss 
e\er have taken their proper |)art in the general social activities of the city 
in whicli they li\e and are held in high regard by their many friends. 

-Mr. Ser\iss is a Democ-rat and from tlie days of his youth has gi\-en 
close attention to local ])olitical alfairs. In 1884 he was elected cit\' clerk 
of ( lreen\ille, rmd served very acce])tably in that office for one term. lie 
later was elected to a seat in the city council and gave etiually attentixe 
service in the jmblic behalf in that capacity. Mr. Ser\iss is a member of 
the (ir(;en\i!le lodge of the Modern Woodmen (.)f .America rmd takes a warm 
interest in the affairs of that organization. 



Idd.lS W. \< \SK\':\. 

.\mong the pronnneut citizens and leading business men of (ireenville, 
.Montcalm count}-. Michigan, few ha\'e taken a more important i)lace or 
iia\e ser\ c'd their communit)' more uscfull\- than has hdlis W. Ranney, wh(.) 
was born in IJelding, Ionia count}-. .Michigan, on l'\'l)ruar\- 23. 1878. a son 
• if bred \'\. and Mary ( bJlis ) Kannc}-. 

I'.llis W. Uanne} receixed his early educition in the jmblic sch(-)ols of 
l>elding. continuing his pre])arator\- schooling until he graduated from the 
1 '.elding high school, in 1 8(X). .\fter that time. Air. Ranney became ;i 
>lu(lent at the Alichigan AgriculitUTd College, an institution from which he 
graduated, with the degree of Master of Science, in k^k). P'oliowing the 
coni])letion of his education. Air. Rannc}- engaged in farming, for (Mie year 
and then he entered the Ranney Refrigerator Com])any, a concern which 
be serxed as general utihty man. until 1008, xxhen Mr. Ranne}'- l)ecame 
secretarx- and treasurer of the corporation, an office which he now occupies, 
in addition to his connection with the Ranney Refrigerator Company. Air. 



I.J.^ .MONTCALM COINI'V. M l(" 1 1 KJAN. 

Kaiiiic}' is a director ot the Moore Plow iX: lMi[)lcrnent ("ompan\", and he is 
interested in a dairx- farm, at l5ehh'no. Ah\hi<;an. 

In igoo, f^llis W. Ranney was married to 'I'ressie A. l->ristoI, Avho is a 
s^rachiate of the Ahiiont hi<;h school and nf the Michigan Agricultnr.'il (Joi- 
Icge. l'"or one year she was an instructor in the latter institnlion. 

'i"o the marriaj^^e of .Mr. and Mrs. Rruiney haxe heen horn four chil- 
dren: -Mary Iv. I'^rederick P>.. June h". and Ruth L., all of whom are now 
a.ttendin,^" the (Ireenwille pu1)lic schools. 

Mr. Ratiney has not heen \X'ry active in the political life of Greenville 
and .Montcalm county, hut has served as president of the Greenx'ille Repub- 
lican ("lul). and he is a man who is found in the front ranks of all move- 
ments having- for their ohject the ad\ancement of the community interests. 
Mr. Ranney is now servino- as i)resident of the Greenville school board, 
during- hts term of office having done much for the lietterment of school 
conditions in this commnnity. 

h^raternalh', .Mr. Ivainiey is one of the most ])rominent men of Green- 
\ille, or the locality, he being a nieml)er of Relding Podge Xo. 155, h'ree and 
.\ccei)ted Masons; of GreenAille Chapter No. 06. P'oyal .Arch ATasons; Tonia 
( 'ouncil .Vo. 12, Royal and Select Masons: a member of Ionia Commanderv 
Xo. II, and of the consistory and Shrine, at Grand 'Rai)ids. Alichigan. Mr. 
Ramuw- is also a member of the ]>clding T.odge, Knights of Pxthias. 



JAMl^S K. TRATX. 

James K. 'Prain. ])oslmaster of I'.dmore and former sherilt of Ah,)nt- 
ca.lm county, one of the best-known and most popular citizens of this county, 
is a native-born Hoosier, having l)een born in Stenben county, Indiana, 
.April j(), 1847, -""'^i^ "^* Stephen ( ". and C'aroline (Reynolds) Train, the 
former a nati\e of X'ermont and the latter of Alichigan, who left Indiana 
in J 847, when their son, James K.. was about one month old, and came 
to Alichigan, .settling in Pass county, where they establi.shed a substantial 
home on a farm and it was tliere that James K. Train grew to manliood. 
.Stephen ( ". 'I'rain and wife were the parents of eight children, of whom 
two are now living, Frank, of Cheboygan count)', this state, and James K., 
the snl)ject of this biogra])hical sketch, the others having l)een Afarquis D., 
who died in 1862, wdiile serving as a .soldier in the Union army during the 




AND MRS. JAMF.S K. TRAIX. 



NJOXrcAI.M COUNTY, MICJJIGAN. 145 

Civil War; Mrs. Jennie C. (Osgood, who died in Colorado, and luigene ¥., 
J.anra, Mabel and Marie. 

On September it, i<S63, he then being but sixteen years of age, James 
K. Train enhsted as a recruit in Company D, Sixth J^egiment, Michigan 
\'olunteer Infantry, for service during the Civil War, and was mustered 
out at (ireenville. Louisiana, on August 20, 1865. ITis regiment was attached 
to the Dejjartment of the Gulf and he joined it at Port Hudson, Louisiana, 
in January, 1864, being a participant in several skirmishes between that 
time and the close of the war. After being nuistercd out of the service 
at the close of the war, the regiment returned to Jackson, ATichigan, where 
it was discharged. Mr. Train then returned to Cass county, but his i)arents 
meanwhile ha\ing moved to Barry county, he presently joined them there 
and on Thanksgiving Day, 1868. was married, after which he settled on a 
farm of fortv acres in Orangevillc townshi]). thnt county, where he lived 
for three years. In 1871 he mewed to Tonia, which had been his wife's 
home, and there engaged in the drayage business, at the same time keei)ing 
a boarding house for the benetit of workmen employed on the erection of 
the new ])rison at that place, and there he made his home until September, 
1878. at which time he came to lulmore. Montcalm county, which has been 
his home [)ractically since then. He engaged in the drayage Ixisiness at 
l'"dmore and was thus engaged until the time of his election to the office 
of sheriff in i8()6. a period of nearly eighteen years. During his term of 
ser\ice as sheriff ^Ir. Train made his liome at Stanton, the county seat, but 
at the end of tliat four-year j^eriod returned to Kdmore and has since then 
made his home on his fine farm of eiglity acres at the cd^c of the village. 

.Mr. Train is an active Republican and ever since settling at Edmore 
has ])een a prominent figure in local politics. In addition to his term of 
service as county sheritT, he has served in most all of the township offices 
in Home townshi]). having been suj^ervisor for nearly five vears, and in 
other ways has done his full part toward advancing the general interests of 
tliat vicinage. On June 14, tqoi, Mr. Train received his commission as 
liostmaster of Edmore and has ever since held that office, his administration 
of the duties thereof having given general satisfaction to all concerned. 

On Xo\eniber 28, 1868, at Tonia, this state. James K. Train was united 
in marriage to Eliza Jane Martin, who was born in the province of New 
f>runswick. Canada. January 22. 1849. daughter of Robert and Milo Erances 
(Gray) Martin, the former of whom was born in Scotland in 1795 and 
the latter, in Connecticut, in 1806. Robert Martin migrated from Scotland 
dob) 



140 .MONTCAT.M COlIxYTY. MICFIIGAX. 

to New l)runs\vick when a youns^ man and there he married, all his chil- 
dren being born there. His wife had gone to that province from Connecti- 
cut with her parents during the War of r8i2, she then having been but 
six years of age, and had grown to womanhood there, in the spring of 
1849, their last-born child, hdiza jane, then being but two months of age, 
J^obert Martin and his wife and children came to Michigan and settled on 
a farm in Kalamazoo county, where they made tlieir home for years, and 
it was there that -Mrs. Train receixed her earh' education, in a log school 
house. Later her ])arcnts moved to Barry county, w^here Mr. Martin died 
in May. 1871, at the age of seventy-three years. His widow continued to 
live on the old home farm for a while and then made her home with her 
daughter. Airs. Train, at Julmore, where her last days were spent, her death 
occurring in November. 1891. at the age of eighty-five. Robert Martin 
and wife were the parents of twelve children, of whom l)ut two are now 
living. Mrs. Frances .\J. ( "ory, ninth in order of l)irth, who li\-es at Battle 
(."reek, widow n[ liJarney I''. Cor}-, and jMrs. Train, the last l)orn. the others 
ha\"ing been IsairJi. A\'illiani, (ieorge ( \\ho died while ser\-ing as a soldier 
of the linion during the L"i\il War). Robert. .Mrs. .Margaret Russell, Har- 
riet. Airs, .\lar\- r)iKt\\ick. Reuben, Nathaniel j. and Xason. .Mr. and Mrs. 
-Martin were earuol members of the ( "ongregational church .and their chil- 
dren were reared in that faith. Robert Alartin was a st;nich Republican, 
e\er taking an ;icti\-e ])art in local political affairs after nio\ing to Michigan, 
but nex'er was an aspirant for office. 

'Fo James K. and I'diza Jane (Alartin) Train si.\ children ha\e been 
born. namel\ : Mark 1).. born in 1870, now living in l<'arg(\ North Dakota, 
married Raura I). C'olburn and has fi\'e children, all sons, Russell .\lger. 
-Mark Reter. Kenneth. Paul and David; Ree. who manages the home farm 
for his father, married Alal)el Riscomb and has six children, four sons and 
two daughters. James I\.. Keith D.. Rarlton, Theresa M.. Alina IV and 
Alark D. ; Calvin K.. now living at Flint, this state, married P)lanche Alinard 
and lias fo\u' children. Xina 1'"-.. I'erkley M.. Helen and Ruth .\rlene; Mabel, 
who married flarry (). Shrodes. of Rausing. this state, and has two chil- 
dren. Glen Train and IRirry R)laine; John ("., who died at the age of twenty 
years, and Ora E.. who died at the age of nineteen. Air. and Airs. Train 
ever have taken a proper part in the social life of their community and they 
and their family are held in high esteem. ATr. Train is an active member 
of J. T. Barrett Post No. t8c). Grand Army of the Republic; a charter 
member of the Fdmore lodge of the Independent Order of Odd bellows, 



■ ^rONTCALM COUNTY, MrCIITGAN. 147 

instituted in 1875; a member of the local lodge of the I.oyal Order of 
Moose at I^dmore and of Ionia Lodge Xo. 548, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of l-'Jks, at Ionia, in the affairs of all of which organizations he takes 
a warm interest. 



R. D. McXUTT. 



K. D. AlcXntt, county surveyor and a prominent citizen of Stanton, 
Montcalm county, Michigan, was born in Greenville, this county, on April 
2'], 1890, a son of T.ee I''., and Tlattie J. (Ball) McXutt, natives of Michi- 
gan, the former born at Conwa}', Livingston county, on May 22, 1861, 
a son of Har\ey L. and Mary A. McX^itt; the latter in Luce county, on 
November 3, 1860. 

Lee E. McNutt received his early education in the schools of his native 
count V, after which he, \\hen nine years of age, came v^'ith his parents to 
(ireenville, where he completed his education at the Greenville high school. 
Later, the elder McXutt moved to vStanton. where he now lives and engages 
in the duties of a mail carrier. 

On December 25, 1885, Lee L. McXutt was married at Lowlervillc, 
Michigan, to Ilattie J. Ijall, and they are the parents of one son, "R. D., who 
was born on April 27, i8()o. ^\r. McXutt and his wife are affiliated with 
("ongregational church, at Stanton, and are well-known and appreciated 
workers of this congregation. J^'raternally, Lee L.. McNutt is a member 
of Lodge Xo. 202, Independent Order of Odd hY^Uows, at Stanton, and also 
is a member of Lodge Xo. T520. Ancient Order of Gleaners, at Stanton. 

k. D. McNutt was brought from Greenville to Stanton, Montcalm 
count v, when he was but one year of age and lived on the liome farm, 
receixing his early education in the common schools of his neighborhood, 
lie later became a student at the Stanton high school, graduating in TQ07, 
after which he entered the Michigan Agricultural College, at Lansing, 
receiving his degree as a civil engineer, in 1912. Tn iQio. Mr. McNutt 
began his career as an assistant surveyor with D. (\ Crawford, then serA'- 
ing as countv civil engineer of Ionia county, Mr. McNutt being engaged in 
this capacity utitil 1912, when he became deputy surveyor for Ionia county. 
an office which he occupied until 1914, when he was elected as county sur- 
veyor for Montcalm county. 

As an engineer and surve\-or, Mr. McNutt has made an envia1)le record. 
During the year 1912, he had complete charge of all the drainage work done 



148 MONTCALiVr CO i:\TY, MICHIGAN. 

ill ( "liiilon county, Michigan; during the summer of igi.^. he had charge 
of the preHniinary survey for the intcrurl)an lines heing contructed from 
( irand Lodge to (jraiul Rapids, Michigan, and since that time Mr. AfcMutt 
has more than fifty miles of state ward road surveys to his credit. 

R. D. McXutt is a meinher of the Michigan .\ssociation of County 
Drain Commissioners and is a memher of the .Michigan H'.ngineering Soci- 
ety, {''ratenially. Mr. McXutt is a member of Stanton l,(Klge No. 250, 
P'ree and Accei)ted Masons; of Stantr)n Chapter No. 110, RoA'al Arch 
Masons; Ionia ("ouncil No. 12, Royal and Select Ah'isons, and Ionia ("0111- 
mandery No. 11. Knights 'remi)lar. .\s a student Mr. McXntt also served 
as second lieutenant of the Michigan Agricultural (ollege military hand. 
While Mr. McNutt is not a memher of any church, he is a regular attend- 
ant of the Congregational church. In ])olifics, AFr. AlcNutt is a Repuhlican. 



RE\'. CHARLKS PARKER. 

No history of Montcalm county would he complete without fitting 
mention of the life and services of the late Rev. Charles J\'irker, a pioneer 
of the ( oral neighl)orhood and for years actixe in all affairs pertaining to 
the advancement of that community. Though Canadian l:)orn. ( harles 
Parker ever claimed to he a loyal citizen of the United States, his father, 
Charles Parker, a N'ermonter, who was a soldier of the War of 1812, never 
having renounced his allegiance to this country after making his home in 
tanada at the close of that war. 

Charles J'arker was horn at Norwood, Ontario, in 1823, the eldest of 
twelve children horn to his parents. His early childhood was spenil in 
Peterboro county, Ontario, and he early became a master hand in the use 
of tools, becoming a xery proficient cabinetmaker and j^attcrn maker. In 
1845 he married Isabella D. Bowes, who was born in Haldcman town.ship, 
Ontario, March 14, 1824, daughter of Robert and Margaret (Ford) Iiowes, 
the former of whom, a native of ICngland, was a British soldier during the 
War of 1812, and the latter a native of (Vanity Tyrone, Ireland, .\fter 
his marriage Charles I'arker worked as a pattern maker for .several years 
at Newcastle, CJntario, after which he returned to Norwood, where he set up 
a shop and was engaged as a cabinetmaker until early in 1861. at which 
time, attracted by glowing reports that then were being sent out from this 
section of Michigan regarding the fine land that could l^e secured here for 



MONTCAl.M COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 1 49 

ihe asking-, he came to Michigan and picked out an "eighty" in what is 
now the Coral neighl)orhood, Imt which then was an unbroken wilderness, 
there having been but two or three settlers in that part of the county before 
his time, lie built a twelve-l)y-sixteen log; cabin on his location and the 
next spring- returned to Canada and brougdit back to this county his wife 
and six small children, establishing- them in the humble home in the wilder- 
ness. While develoi)ing- his home tract, \\hich he bought from the railroad 
c()m])any for twelve dollars and fifty cents an acre, Mr. Parker al.so engaged 
in the lumber industry and it was not long until he was one of the best- 
known lumbermen in this section of the state, his operations being confined 
tt» the logging department of the business, his logging cam]) being the begin- 
ning of the village of Coral, a name which Mr. Parker selected for the place 
because it was easily written. Tn 1870, when the nn'lroad final!}'- was con- 
structed through that section, it was through Mr. Parker's representations 
that the survey was changed to take in Coral, in consideration of which 
concession nu the part of the conipany. Mr. Parker agreed to secure a free 
right-of-way through Maple Valley township and he succeeded in securing 
ihe same at the merely nominal cost of one hundred and fifty dollars, onlv 
two of the settlers having held out for a cash consideration. About t868 
Mr. I'arkcr donated the site for the cemetery at (>)ral. Mr. ]*arker was 
an ordained nu'nister of the Gosj^el and preached most of the funerals in 
the entire neighborhood. As a skilled cabinetmaker it also fell upon him 
t<» make most of the coffin<^ in which the ])ioneers were buried. During the 
early sixties he preached nearly every Sunday, having a circuit which com- 
prised the West neighborhood in the morning, the Parker school house in 
the afternoon and Cowden T.ake in the evening. ]\Tr. Parker also officiated 
at most of the early weddings and there was no man in that section in 
])ioneer days Avho took a more prominent or useful part in bringing about 
TH'oper social conditions during the formative period of that now prosper- 
ous and well-established community, than did he. Tn 1873 Charles Parker 
U^ft his farm and moved to the town of Coral, where for a time he engaged 
■■n the real-estate business, but this not proving satisfactorv, he returned to 
i^he farm in 1875. enlarged his land holdings there and that fall erected a 
fine ne\v home. Tn 1878. Afr. Parker's eldest son. J. B. Parker, made a 
trip to Oregon and from the fine report he brought back with him in 1879. 
Mr. Parker decided to transfer his holdings and his activities to the then 
rapidly-developing Willamette Valley. PTe sold everything he had in this 
county and in May. t88o. w^ent to Oregon. After looking over the Wil- 



150 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

lanietlc \ "alley for some time he bought twelve hundred acres on the river 
of that name, near the town of Independence, settled his three eldest sons 
on that place and he and the remainder of the family made their home in 
the town of Independence, where Mr. and Airs. J*arker spent the remainder 
of their days. Mrs. I'arker dying on .\pril t |, 1887, and Mr. Parker surviv- 
ing until January 10, i88(). 

To Charles and Isal>ella I). (Bowes) l^arker were l)orn nine children, 
iive sons and four daughters, one daughter and two sons having been born 
to them after they settled in Maple A^alley, this county. Of these nin^ 
children but four are now surviving, Jabez Bunting Parker, vice-president 
of the Farmers State I)ank of Independence, Oregon, who has made his 
home on the great Parker farm near that town since the year 1880; Cliarles 
.\.. a minister of the Gospel at Oconto, AVisconsin; Frederick W'., a prosper- 
ous farmer and stockman at Cunningham. Washington, and Clifford T., 
dredge superintendent at Natoma, California. 



J.\.MFS ALP.l'.RT D.MLFV. 

James Albert Daile\- is one oi the representati\ e agriculturists of F\air- 
plain townshi]), Montcalm county, Michigan, and is employed as a rural 
mail carrier on route i. His farm consists of one hundred acres located 
southwest of the town of Fenwick. Lie was born on June 30. 1876, in 
Washtenaw count}-. Michigan, and is the son of James 11. and fennic 
( Rorden) Dailev. James fl. Dailey was born on l''ebrnarv 20, 1845, in, 
Washtenaw county, ^^lichigan. and was the son of Allen W. and Sarah 
(Founsl)erry) Dailey. .\llen AW Dailey was born on September 1:5. 181 1, 
in Poultney townshi]). St.eul)en county. New York, and was the son of 
James and Margaret (llender.son) Dailey. James Dailey was born in 
Ireland, on June 8. r7<'')7. and immigrated to Steuben county. New York, in 
1787, where he built and o])erated the first saw-mill, west of Pake Keokuk, 
of that state. Sarah f Lounsl)erry) Dailey, wife of Allen W. Dailev, was 
born in Penn ^^an. Xew York, and was the daughter of Jonathan Pouns- 
berry, who was a member of the Dutch Quaker families of New York. 

Jennie fPorden") Dailey. wife of James H. Dailey, was born in Wa,sh- 
tenaw county. Michigan, on August 6, 1848, and was the daughter of par- 
ents who died when she was a small child. She w-as married to James H. 
Dailey in 187T, remaining in Washtenaw county, Michigan, until 1886, at 



MOXICAI.M COL'XTY, MICHIGAN. I5I 

which time he sold the farm and remcned to .Montcahii county. He then 
l.H.uight the ])resent phice on which he heed until iQii. ITis wife died on 
March 2(), 1907. They were the parents of two children: Cora, wife of 
( hauncey Rinker, and James Albert. 

James Albert Daile}' received his education in the district schools of 
Montcalm county. Michigan, and remained at home until his marriage to 
1-ula Sutton, on .\pril j6, }()0^. She is the daughter of Txwis Cullou and 
Minnie (Otto) Sutton. Lewis ("uUou Sutton was l>orn in Hagerstown, 
.\ew Jersey, removing to the western c<nmtry for his health when a young 
man. lie located immediately in Washtenaw county, ]\Iichigan, very near 
l() Ann Arbor. He was of English descent. Minnie (Otto) Sutton was 
born in Merlin, ("iermany. and immignited to America with her parents when 
she was l)ut fi\'e years of age. They also located near Ann .Vrbor, Michi- 
gan. She and her husband were the parents of two children: Lula and 
b'sther. The husl)and died in 1893 and his widow still .survives. 

To the union of James Albert Dailey and wife has been born one child, 
Helen Jane. James All.)ert Dailey is a Kcjniljlican in his political faith. He 
and his wife are members of the Congregational church of Fenwick, Michi- 
gan, also of the .Ancient Order of Gleaners. He is a member of Fenwick 
l.odge No. 466. Knights of the Maccabees, and his wife is a member of the 
sister lodge. 



H. \^^ TAYFOR. 



H. W. Taylor, e.x-county clerk and a prominent merchant of Sheridan, 
was born on July 20. 1880. in Fairplain township. ^Montcalm county and is 
the S(.^m of Hiram and h'rances (Galoup) Taylor. 

Hiram Taylor li\"ed Nvith his parents, near 'I'oronto, ("anada, until he 
was sixteen years of age, at which time he with his brothers and sisters 
came to Montcalm county. They worked for different persons in the lum- 
ber and shingle mills and on the farms, until some time later wdien Hiram 
bnught a farm in Fairplain township, and here they lived until 1883, when 
ihey moved to Bushnell township where he still lives. His wife died on 
I\>bruary 13. i()io. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor were the parents of two chil- 
dren; IT. W. and Otto, the latter of whom lives on the home farm. 

Frances Galoup was the daughter of .Austin P. and Betsy (Blennett) 
Cialoup. and was a native of Montcalm countv, wdiere she grew to woman- 
hood and received her education in the schools of her home township. 



152 MONTCAI,M COIXTV. MICHIGAN. 

Here she met and married Hiram Tayk^r and here slie reared her family 
and lived her life. 

H. W. Ta}lor was reared on the farm and remained at home, eomplet- 
ing the common-sehool course in his township and the four-\ear high school 
course at vSheridan. 'Sir. Taylor is one who believes that a good education 
is an asset to the successful farmer or ihe keen business man. 

On September 6, iqoo. Air. Taykjr was married to Nellie .\l. Grcenloe, 
the daughter of Charles C. and Alice (McDonald) (Jreenloe, whose pet)ple 
were natives of Ohio, and who in an early (hiy came to .Michigan where 
the\- were active ,'uid successful in the affairs of life. 

After their marriage Mr. and Airs. Taylor li\ed on a farm in TAer- 
green townshi[). for two years, and then returned to a farm in Bushnell 
township, where they lived but a short time w^hen they came to Sheridan, 
where Air. Tax-lor engaged in business with R. 1'".. Low^er in the spring of 
i(>i2. During the srune year he w\'is elected count\- clerk and after ser\ing 
his term of two years, having refused a second term, he returned to Sheridan 
^^■herc he has since been in business. .\t the ])resent time he is a \rduable 
member of the village council. 

Fraternally, Air. Taylor is a member of Hodge .Vo. 324, J'^ree and 
Accepted Alasons. having taken the chapter degrees. Tie is also an acti\e 
member of Oamp No. 7312. Modern Woodmen of America. 

Air. and Airs. Taylor have no family, the only child born to them hav- 
ing died in infancv. 



\VI[j;iAAl K. RASMl'SSI'A'. 

Sheriff William Iv Rasmussen. of .Montcalm county, one of the most 
popular officials in the court house at Stanton, is a nrUi\e son of this countw 
having been born on a farm in the Gowan neighborhood nn Vugirst 5- iHSr, 
voungest of the six children of August and .Marie (Sand) Rasnmssen. |)io- 
neers of that section, and among the very earliest Danish settlers in AFont- 
calm county, the former of whom is still living on tlie farm he cleared back 
in the middle fifties, and the latter of whom died in July. U)\ ], at the age 
of sixty-seven years. 

August Rasmus.sen w-as born at Soeby. Denmark, son of Rasmus and 
Bollv Jorgensen, both natives of Denmark, the former of whom spent all his 
life in his native country, a farmer, but the latter came to this country in 
1856, the year after her son, August, settled in this county rmd si)ent her 



MOXTCALM COTNTY. MKIilC.AX. I 5_^ 

last (lays al the home of the latter in Montcalm townshii), where she lived 
to he past eight}- years of age. She was the mother of seven children, of 
whom August was the eldest. August Uasmussen gnxw U]) in his native 
\illage and learned the trade of wagcjn-tnaking. lie married .\nna Peter- 
sen, hy whom he had two ••In'ldren. \\'illiam and Laura; hoth died in this 
cotnit}-. Mrs. Anna Rasmussen died in i<^79, and Mr. Rasmusseii married, 
secondly, .Marie Sand, who was horn at Laurvig. Norway, eldest daughter 
of llans Sand and wife. nati\es of that same country. 

In 1S33, iiumediately following his first marriage, Mr. Rasmussen came 
to the I'nited vStates. Thex landed at the port of New ^'ork atid ])r(;cee<led 
straightway to Michigan, settling in the timher district in Montcalm town- 
ship, this count}, where August Rasnmssen heg^an working in the lumber 
cam]>s. Presently he bought a fort\--acre tract of timber land, which he 
proceeded to clear and on that i)lace he and his wife established their perma- 
nent home, tpiickl}- becoming' inthiential in the ])ioneer life of the com- 
numit\-. .-\s he cleared his land and began general fanuing, \ugust Ras- 
mussen pros])ered and presentK' was able to buv more land until lie was the 
owner of a line farm of one hundred and ninety acres, which he still owns, 
though for the i)ast fifteen years or more he has been practicalh- retired 
from the active labors ot the farm, his sons, brrmk and William ['].. man- 
aging the same. Though nearlv ninety \ears of age. Mr. Ivasniussen is still 
plivsicallv vigorous and alert, as s])r_v as man\' :i man twent}' years \-ounger. 
lie and his wife were among the ver\ earliest of the Danish settlers in this 
part of the stale and the good word they sent back to the old home was the 
means of inducing many of their former neighbors in Denmark to come to 
Montcahn, they therefore ever having been regarded as the leaders of the 
consid(M-al)le Danish colonv in this comil}-. 

August and Marie (Sand) Rasmussen were the ])arents of six children, 
those besides the sul>iect of this sketch l)eing Frank, who lives on the old 
home place in Montcalm township; b'.mil, deceased; bjuil. of (";ito township, 
this countv ; Oscar, of (lowan, and Pdwin 1.., also of Gowan. Mr. Ras- 
mussen is ;i luember of the Seventh-Dav Adventist church, as was his wife, 
and took a warm interest in the affairs of that church. "Mr. Rasmussen is 
a l\epublican and for vears ser\-ed his home (ownsliip in the capacitv ni 
trustee, rendering valuable service to the community in that connection. He 
also was a luember of the school board for years and did much to advance 
the cause of the common schools thereabout. 

^^''i11iam P.. "Rasmusseit was reared on the home farm in "Montcahn 



154 AIOXTCAI.M COfXTY. MICHIGAN. 

towiisliip, recei\iiig- bis elcnuMUary education in tlic district school in the 
neigh] jorhood cif liis home, snppk-inenting- the same 1)y a course in I'^erris 
institute at l)is^- l\a[)ids. after which he went to (h'and l\ai)ids, where for a 
time he was em])loved in a fmaiiture factory. He then returned home and 
iov some time A\as employed in the woods and lumber c;un])s of that neigh- 
borhood, niaking his jiome with his j)arents. During his residence in (Jrand 
Rapids, Mr. Rasmn.^sen ser\ed for one \'ear as a member of the i)ohce force 
of that city and after his return home was made deputy sherilT of Mont- 
calm county, serxing in that ofhcial capacity fc^r four years, at the end of 
which time, in i (;]_', he was (.'lected sheriff oi the count}' on the I\'e|)ublican 
ticket and so faithfully did he i)erfr)rni the exacting and im[)ortant duties 
of that ofhce that he was re-elected in i()i4 and is now serving his second 
term, making his home at Stanton. 

( )n June i,^. i(M4. William 1'.. Rasmussen was united in marriage to 
I'dia R. Rainier, who was born at Stanton, this county, daughter of L. C 
and Jessie ( Ruce ) J 'aimer, the former a native of Xew York and the latter 
of this county. R. ('. Ralmer for years has been a well-known lawyer at 
Stanton and he and his wife are the parents of h\e children, of whom Mrs. 
Rasmu>sen is the fourth in order of birth, the others being Rarl. ("arl. [ Tarry 
and (irace. To Mr, and ?\lrs. Rasnui<sen one child has been born, a daugh- 
ter. .\iarv I'dizalieth. Wv. and Mrs. Rasnnissen are nieml)ers of the Meth- 
odist church at Stanton and are prominently connected with the social and 
religious life of that city, being held in high esteem by their many friends. 
Mr. Rasmussen is a .Mason and is also a member of the (Irange and of the 
(lleaners, in the affairs of all of which organizations he lakes a warm interest. 



(..R.oRc;!' r. RRh:\i-:'Rri 



(ieorge (". Rre\ette, undertaker and dealer in general house furnish- 
ings at Stanton, this county, is a natixe of iuigland, who came to America 
in i8S8, at once loca.ting in .Stanton, where he still resides and where 
he has established himself so fuMuly in the commercial life of tliat thriving 
little cit\- that he is generally recognized as one of the most sul)stantial and 
l)rogressi\e figures in the commercial life of Montcalm county, lie was 
born in l^astbourne. Sussex county, i'jigland. on ()ctol)er 9, 1861, son of 
( "harles and ( atherine i ( heale ) Rrevette. both natives of that same county, 
wlio were the parents of the following children: Katie, who is the wife of 



MONTCAr.M COIXTY, MICHKIAN. 1 35 

I'led ( hcalc, of i.cwes, Sussex, l'".ngland; George C, the iiniiiediate subject 
of tiiis sketch; J'xhvard, of Jiastliourue, England; Alfred and WiUiani 
(twins), also of ]^astl)ourne ; Juhth, wife of Edward iUitler, of London, 
I'jigiand, and four who died in youtli. 

Charles Prevette w^as the son of James Trevette and wife, of Crawley 
Downs, England, who were the parents of four sons, Charles, Moses, James 
and (ieorge. Charles i'revette was reared as a fanner and later became a 
painter, (lecorat(.)r and contractor at Eastbourne, where he died in 1895, at 
the age oi se\'ent}-thrce 3-ears. Jle was a prominent Odd Eellow and at 
one time was the oldest member of the jNlanchester Unity of Odd l^ellows. 
He and his wife were menil)ers of the Church of England and their children 
were reared in accordance w ith the tenets of that faith. Airs. I'revette died 
m KjiJ. at tlie age of se\enty-three. ller parents were natises of Lewes. 

George C. rre\ettc was reared at lCastb(nn-ne. receiving his education 
in the schools of that ])lace, and in his youth learned the car[)enter and cab- 
inet-maker's trade, which he followed there, becoming a very skilled work- 
man. On June 2, i88j. Mr. Prevette was united in marriage to b'dizaljeth 
Duke, who was born in Sussex, daughter of hxlvvin and bJi/a Duke, and in 
j(S88 they came to the L'nited States. ])roceeding directly tcj this state, locat- 
ing at Stanton, where the}- ha\e resided e\"er since. I'or li\e years after his 
arri\al at Stanton, Mr. Prevette was manager of the establishment of A. 
Harber. furniture and undertaking, and after that was associated in busi- 
ness with IL 11. H(.>u'e for lj\e years, at the end of whicli time, in 1897, ^^^ 
became sole ])roj)rietor of the lousiness and as such has conducted the same 
e\er since, having made a great success of the business. 

Mr. and Mrs. I'revette have two children. (Tertrude. who was grad- 
uated from the .Mt. Pleasant- .Vormal School and is now teaching the 
McUride school, and Howard, who is a student of the Eerris Institute. Air. 
and Mrs. Prexette are members of the Congregational church, of which he 
is a deacon, and both are held in very high esteem in church and social cir- 
rU's in Stanton. 

.Mr. Prevette is a Kepublican and was cltairman of the board of public 
\\()rk^ in 1891. lie is a Alason and has attained to the commanderv in 
that order. \'ur two years he was master of .Stanton Star Lodge Xo. 250, 
I'ree and \cce])te(l Masons, and is a nicml)er of the c]iai)ter of that order. 
His membership in the Knights Templar is with the commandery at Tonia. 
•Mr. Pre\'ette is an excellent business man and a public-s]:)irited citizen and 
enjoys the full confidence of commercial circles generally hereabout. 



l=,() MoN'iCAI.M CorX'IY. MICIIICAX. 

JACOB M. Xl'.l-F. 

jacol) M. XeH. well-known hanker at .Mcl>ri(k\^. this connty. where he 
is associated in hnsiness with his consin. Sherman \i. Neil, son of the late 
I'leilerick X'etY, is a natixe-horn son of Michigan, havin^- hecn horn in the 
\illage of Alvnr, in the neii^hhorin-^- connt\- of Ionia, Jul}- <S, .i<S-8. son of 
Lonis and Laney ( Alartin ) Xelf, wiio later lieeame prominent and intlneiitial 
residents of Montcalm connt}-, the former of whom. I<.>ns4' recoj^nized as one 
of the strojigest factors in the development of the material resources id' 
this section, died in 1915. and the latter of whom is still lixing- at her pleasant 
home at Mcl>rides. enjoying manv e\idences of the esteem in which she is 
held hy the entire community. 

[>ouis XctT was an Alsatirm. ha\ ing keen horn in Alsace, then a pro\'ince 
of k'rance. on Ma\ S, [840. son of (leorge and Marianne ( .P>arrons\ ille ) 
Xelf. the former of whom was horn in the city of Paris. When Louis St^H 
was ahoiii nine months old his parents came to the l.'nited vStates, settling in 
I'oston. where tlie}- remained for four or fi\e years. ( ieorge Xelf was a 
skilled musician and ])layed in a circus l)and, also heing a com])oser of con- 
siderahle note. ( )n leaving l>oston he and his famil)- mo\ed to Ohio, locat- 
ing at (irafton. in Lorain countv, where (ieorge .Xcff hought a small farm 
and where he and his \\\ic s])ent the i-emainder of their li\es. Though an 
excellent nuisician. (ieorge .XelT was not a good farmer and hi< family of 
ten sons and two daughters were reared anu'd rather straitened circum- 
stances. vSix of these sons t-ame to .Michigan, settling in liiis part of the 
state in the early sixties and all hecan-.e prominent and intluential in their 
res])ecti^e comnuuiities. (ieorge Xelf. still li\ing at Sheridan, tiiis countv ; 
Louis, a ])rominent resident of Mcllrides until his death in i(;i5; Frederick, 
also a prominent resident of .McLrides until his death in Decemljer, Jgi4: 
j<.hn. of Mt. Pleasant; Jacoh. also of Mr. Lleasant. and Wendell, who lives 
[U Posehush, in Isahelle county. 

It was al)out i8()() that Louis XelT settled at Muir, in the neighlx)ring 
count \" of lom'a, where he started a small hoot and shoe l)usiness. He was 
a skilled craftsman in that line and it was not long hef(irc he had worked 
up a g(H)d trade, the demand for custom-made hoots in tlio>e days makitig 
his a profitahle industry. In i8()8 he married Laney Martin, who was horn 
in ("linton county, this state, daughter of .\nthony and So])hia (Wirt) 
Martin. i)ioncers of that comity, .\nthony Martin was a native of ("ier- 
manv. who had come to the lAnited States when twelve years of age with 



.M()-\T(.AI.M COCXTY. M IC (IKJAX. I 57 

his parents, Nicholas Martin and wife, who settled in Clinton county in 1837, 
that section of Michigan at that time being a wilderness, and there Anthony 
Martin has lived e\er since, a life-long farmer, heing now^ past ninety years 
of age. lie was a soldier in the I'nion army during the Ci\il War and was 
scxerely wounded during the battle of (iettysburg. His first wife died when 
her daughter. Soph'a, was six years old. and he married, secondl}', Mary- 
Martin, a native of Clinton county, wiio was ever a devoted mother to her 
slei)daughter. 

When lie was married, Couis Xeff was tiie possessor of about sixty 
(l(.'llars w(jrth of shoemaker's tools, leather and supj>Iies and had his small 
>hop at Muir. His wife was al)out e([ually well su])plicd with the goods of 
this world, but IkaIi possessed far greater riches in their stout hearts and 
willing hands and they i)rcsently began to prosper, as they deserved to 
pros])er. They li\ed economically and Mrs. Xeff kept boarders as a means 
of "helping out" until they got a start and ever was a devoted, competent 
and \aluable helpmate to fier husband. They planned carefully, used fore- 
sight and nati\'e prudence, saxed their meager profits during their "day of 
-mall things," avoided going into debt, even declining credit or loans when 
otTered. and in due time ac([uired a cc>mpetence. l(,)ng being regarded as 
among the most substantial families in this count}-. Some years after 
.settling at .Muir, Louis Neff moved to Dallas, now knowui as h\)wler, and 
there opened a general store, in connection with which he also conducted a 
shoe shop. 

,\fter being in ))usiness there for about two years Couis Xeff' moved, 
aliout the year iiS/c;. to Mc Brides, wdiere he and his brothers. John and 
lacob. entered into a ])artnershi[) for the manufacture of shingles and were 
thus engaged, gradually enlarging into a general lumlx^r business, until in 
the early nineties, when, the timl)er thereabout having by that time become 
exhausted, they discontinued the industry. Coiris Xeff' then, in association 
with his brother, b'rederick, who also iiad long been engaged in the lumber 
Inisiness hereabout, and his .son-in-law. X. J. 1 )olph. established a shingle- 
mill in the up])er ]X'niusula. his son. (ieorge X., and X. J. Dolph operating 
the mill. Louis .Xeff contiiniing his residence at his established home at 
MciJrides. .\l)out the year igoo the shingle industry in the upper peninsula 
was abandoned and in kjo.) the l)rothers .Xeff. Louis and Frederick, in as.so- 
ciation with their res])ecti\e sons, Jacob .M. and Sherman K, started a 
pri\ate l)ank at .Mclirides. which concern ever since has been successfully 
maintained, long having l)een regarded as one of the most sul.)Stantial and 



158 MONTCALM COl'NTY, MICHIGAN. 

wcll-estahlishcd financial concerns in this part of the state. Jii addition to 
his e.\tensi\e Inmljcr and l)ankin^ connections, Louis K(il'i' also was a large 
landowner, having been the owner, at the time of his death, on Octol)er 25, 
1015. of about one thousand acres of land in this county, a half section of 
excellent land in b'erris to\\nship and the balance in J)ay townshij), I)esides 
a half section of land in the neighl)orhoO(l of Seattle, VV^ashington. 

To l.ouis and I.aney ( Alartin) XetT four children were born, three sons 
and one daughter, namely: Luella, who married N. J. Dolph, formerly 
a well-known resident of this county, now a ])rosperous real-estate broker 
at Seattle, Washington; George 1^.. wdio also is engaged in the real-estate 
business at Seattle, married Lettie Booth and has two children. Louis and 
(irace; b'red vS.. a pr()gressi\e farmer li\ ing about three-frnuths of a mile 
east oi McCrides, who married bdiza liopkins and has three daughters, 
Nina. Alary and Lena, and Jacob M., cashier of Xell's Bank at AlcBrides. 

Jacob Al. Xeif was little more than a year old when his ])ai ents settled 
at Mcl)rides and he grew nj) in that ])leasant village and has made his home 
there e\er since, lie early ac(|\ured a thorough acquaintanc(" wiih his father's 
e.\tensi\e business affairs and gradually came to take his f;tLher"s [)lace in 
the management oi the same, Louis X^etT having relinqu'shed. during his 
later vears, much of the detail c;f management to lu"s son, who earl\- dis- 
|)la\ed a large ca|)acity for business. In addition to his exacting duties in 
the XciT liank. .Mr. Sell lias other extensive interests iii his care and is 
generallv regarded as one of the most active and progres.sive business men 
in this section, enjoying the full confidence and respect of baitking and com- 
mercial circles hereal)out. 

On December 1 1. ujo/. Jacob JM. NelT was united in marriage to Maud 
Allchin, who was born on a farm east of McBrides, in this county, daughter 
of lUirdette and Alary (]\U)rse) .\llchin, the former of whom w^as l)()rn at 
l*\^nwick. this county, Alarch 8, 1856, son of lu.hvard and Ldizabeth f Curtis) 
.\llchin, who settled there about 1855. having come to this county from the 
state of X\'w NOrk. and early became recognized as among the leading pio- 
neer> of that section. b",dward .Mlchin entered a tract of go\ernmenl land 
in what is now the l'>nwick neighborhc)od, Ionia, twcbc miles away, then 
being the nearest trading point, and there he and his wife ( stablished a sub- 
stantial home and spent the rest of their lives. On that j^ioncer farm 
I'urdetle .Mlchin grew tn manhood, lie m.arried Alary Alorse, who was 
born at rortland. this state, daughter of Thomas and < "hristine (Sabin) 
Alorse. both nati\es of (ierman\-, who had settled in the F'ortland neighbor- 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 1 59 

liond in pioneer days, in 1877, shortly after his marriage, I.hirdette Allchin 
engaged in tlie hinibering business just nortli of Stanton and was thus 
engaged, making his home there, until i8(S7, in wliieh year he l.iought a farm 
between i'.chnore and Melh-ides and there he spent the rest of his life, beei)m- 
ing a prosperous farmer, his death occurring in 1903. His widow still lives 
on the iionie farm in secti(.)n _• of Da}- township. Lkirdette Allchin was a 
Mason ,-nid a memljer of the Knights of Maccal)ees, in the affairs of both of 
which orders he took a warm interest. His father, Juhvard Allchin, was 
an iionored soldier in the I'nion army during the Civil War. Mrs. Neff 
was reared on the home farm in Day township, (inishing her schoolirig in 
tlie iulmore high school, and became (|uite an accomplished musician. 

To jacol) .Vl. and Maud (Allchin) Xetf one child has been born, a 
son. Clayton lUirdette, l)orn on .September 30, Tgo8. Mr. and Mrs. Xeff 
are dexoted members of the Catholic church and take a warm interest in all 
good worlds in and about Aiclh-ides. l)eing held in high regard by all there- 
al)out. .Mr. Xe!T is a meml)er of the lndei)endent Order of Odd lA-llows. 
in the affairs of which he takes a warm interest. 



JA\"LS i-:. BRACr<Y. 



l,ewis 1^. Uraccy, for the past eleven years a prominent and active 
l)hysician of .Sheridan, was born in (rreenville on March 25. 1872, and is 
the son of lsa;ic and .Alice (Hyde) Braccy. 

Isaac Ih-acey. a native of .Vew York state, settled at (ireenville when a 
y(»ung luan of thirty. He devoted his time and attention to farming and 
the Imuber business. 

Alice (Hyde) Kracey was a n;itiAe of the state of New ^'ork and came 
to Ab)ntc:ilm countv with an older married sister. They settled near Green- 
ville, where she met an.d tnarried Mr. Bracey. To this union eight children 
were born, fom" of whom are now living: 11a. the wife of Willis Williams, 
of (;reen\ille: Clarence. t)n the I'.racey P.rothers farm in hA-ergreen town- 
ship: Clifford, whose hotue is in Cireenville. and Lewis E. 

Tewis E. Ih-acey remained at home until he was thirty yeai's of age. 
assisting on the farm of his fatlier. After having conijileted the common 
and higli school course at (ireenville he studied tAvo years at .Ann .Xrlxir 
where he (kwoted his time to medicine. He then was out of school for a 
Year, after which he entered the Detroit School of .Medicine, and after two 



iTx) MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 

\ears was grachuilA'd truni that institution in 1905. In the fall of the same 
year he located in Sheridan, where he has since that time 1jeen a successful 
physician. 

Lewis \'.. I'racey was married on l)eceni1)er jO, 1900, to h^lizaheth 
l'"d<all, the a(l(Ji)tcd daughter of janies and Alwilda ((iarrett) l^dsall. 
.\lwilda Ciarrett was a native of Oakland count}-, while James l^dsall was 
horn at I'dmira. New \'ork, and later settled in Oakland county, where he 
and Alwilda (Jarrett were married. 

I'di/t.aheth lulsall was a(lo])ted I)y Air. .and .Mrs. lulsall soon after their 
niarriai;e. She was a natixe of Trenton, (lihson county, Tennessee. The 
jiarents nioxed to Kansas A\here they died, leavin<^' three children. Two of 
the children were adopted hy one fann'ly and the I)al)y hy another. 

Dcictor and Alr<. I'racey liaxe no children of their own, hut they have 
ad()))ted one, Lee I '.d ward Ih'acey, he recei\ini4 the same kind and careful 
traininc^' as one of their own. 

Doctor ih-acex' is a memher of the county, state and .\merican Aled- 
ic.'il Societies, takini^- much interest in all the acti\ities of these organizations 
that tend toward his improvement as a physician. Tie is also the president 
of the Montcalm cmntx' |)ension hoard .and his work has heen satisfactorv 
to .all concerned. 



(;h:()k(iK WASHINGTOX ( \D\VKLT.. 

(.jeorge Washington Cadwell, a retired merchant of C'ars(.)n City, was 
Ijorn in Waterlown, New "S'ork, in 1839 and is the son of Almeron C. and 
I'liristena C". (Rich) Cadwell. He arri\cd at Carson City. Montcalm 
county, on M.ay 7. t88(S, to act as cashier of the savings h;mk and has l)cen 
connected with the interests of the town since that time. 

-Vlmeron C. Cadwell was married to Christena C. Rich in LVescott, 
Canada, she being a natixe of that country, while he was a native of \'cr- 
niont. The Cadwell family later mo\-ed to l\nmsylvania and then to Painted 
Post, New York. .\t the age of fifteen, the son Cleorge left home and rode 
to Detroit, experiencing the hardships of winter travel in those days, having 
])een snow hound, for forty-eight hours, at London, Canada. From Detroit 
he ])roceeded to Ionia, hy way of Lansing and kjigle. the entire journey 
i)eing one of great hardshi]). lie remained at Ionia for ten years, where he 
clerked for his uncle. fJon. Hampton Rich, who did a general mercantile 
Imsincss in connection with the handling of grain and lumber. ]\Ir. Rich was 



"^^p. 





MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. l6l 

tlic l)ruthcr of Mrs. C.adwell, and was one of the founders and the hrst presi- 
dent (jf the Pere Marquette railroad, lie was at one time a state senator 
and \ cry acti\e in state pohtics; he was a cousin of Governor Rich, who was 
a secund cousin of George \V. ("adweh. 

Die year after George W. came to h)nia his parents came and took 
u]) ilieir residence in the town and later the father became a partner with 
Mr. !\ich. Later, the father and son were engaged in business as partners 
for three years m the town and then removed their store to Portland where 
they remained for ten years. At this time the son retired from the mercan- 
iile business and engaged in agriculture on a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Sibawa township, Ionia county. The farm was practically unde- 
\ eloped, with but forty acres cleared and the balance wild. With the assist- 
ance of an additional man and two yoke of oxen, Mr. Cadwell soon caused 
a wonderful transformation in the place and in a short time, much of the 
farm was im|)roved and under cultivation. The second year he traded 
iiie (arm for one of one hundred and sixty acres in Lyons township, which 
he later sold to his father, after which he moved to Lyons, where he clerked 
in the drug store owned ])y liis father-in-law. Dr. David Kelley. Later, the 
iwo jjecame partners in the ownership of one of the rinest drug stores in 
Lyons. This partnersiu'p continued until icS8(S. when Mr. Gadwell was 
elected a cashier of the ('arson City Savings ]')ank and he became a resident 
<|f that ])Iace. .\fter tw<.) years he purchased a stock of drugs, school books 
and groceries and for the next two }'ears, in connection with his duties as 
cashier, did a most successful mercantile business. After resigning his 
l»osiiion ;is cashier, lie (lexoted bis energies to the development of his fast- 
is-owing business. (Jn his retirement from active Inisiness. in t8<)6, he was 
liie owner of many substantial business blocks in his home town, as well as 
ar Crystal. 

in 7864 Mr. Cadwell was married to Frances R. Kelley, a native of 
Xewfield. New York, and a daughter of David and Elizabeth ( Horton ) 
Kelley. Mr. Kelley was a native of Tom])kins county, New York, where 
lie was born in t8i6. He studied medicine in Geneva College and at Cleve- 
land. Ohio, after which he practiced at Adrian before he took up his work 
a: Lyons. He was a captain of a company in the Civil War for over two 
years and retired owing to poor health. 

Mrs. Cadw^ell was born in 1841 and was but a child when her parents 
moved to Lyons and here she grew to womanhood and was married to 
-Mr. Cadwell in 1864. She died in 1915, at Travis City, after over fifty 
Cnb) 



I*)-' .m()X'jc.\l:\[ corxTY, mi('itic;an. 

}cars of married lite. She and Mr. Cadwell were the parents of two chil- 
dren, both of whom died in infancy. Hiey adopted two after this, one of 
whom died and the other was retnrned to its mother at the age of seven 
}ear>. 

•Vir. (.'adwell l)ecame a Mason, at the age of twent\--one, and has been 
a member for over fiftv-live years and is perhaps the oldest member in the 
countv. 



SCOTT SWAkTllOCT. 

.Scott Svvarthont is a man of genial disposition, pnblic spirited and pro- 
gressively active, and bears a high reputation for honesty and accuracy in, 
as well as out of. office, tlis birth occurred on January 7, 1869, in W'in- 
lield uiwnship, this coinu\-. and he is the son of Jacob H. and j\lary A. 
( Ivittenburg) Swarthout. Jaccjb II. Swarthout was a native of TCrie county, 
I'ennsyhania. his birth occurring on J )ecember 2H, 1834. Jn 1858 his par- 
ents located in Michig.ui. Itringing him with them, anr] made a temporary 
home in Tier.^on tnw nsliip. Montcalm county, but later removed to Winfield 
t<.)wnship. in the <ame county. It was here that his marriage to Mary A. 
i"iittenl)urg was solemnized in 185c), and from where he enlisted in the Civil 
War. On August 2<>. 1864, he was mustered into Company A, 1"wentv-lirst 
Michigan \ olumeer Ivngineer C or])s, and served until the close of the con- 
vict, after which he returned to his home in Montcalm countv. In 1875 
he engaged in the car])entering business in which he continued until his death 
on November 4. 1887. lie was rm active member of the .\ndrew .\lacomber 
I'o^t of the Grand Army of the Republic, in T.akevicw, .Michigan, and an 
active Republican in i>olilics. His wife, .Mary .\. (' Rittenburg ) Swarthout, 
was born in Ontario. Canada, and was the daughter of 1 Tenrv and Susan 
Rittenburg. who located in VVintleld township. Montcalm county, for a short 
time, later moving to C'linton county, and thence to Ottawa countv, where 
their remaining days were S]XMit. Mary .A. (Rittenlmrg) Swarthout died on 
Xo\cmlK?r 28, i()ii, at the age of seventy-tw-o years. She and her husband 
were the parents of the following children: Adelaide TBale), of I.akeview, 
Michigan; Marion, deceased: b'rank, deceased; l^stella, deceased; Scott and 
Dora CAndrewsC now of Grand Rapids. Michigan. 

Scott Swarthout was but four years of age when his parents located in 
Lakeview. Michigan, which i>lace has since been lu's home. Until sixteen 
years of age he was a student in the schools of Lakeview^ Michigan, and he 



M()XT( AI.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 163 

llicii entered Inisiness as n barljcr and continued in this from 1889 until 1908. 
Sh(jrll\- after the .sliop was sold, he was appointed as postmaster of Lake- 
\\c\\\ Alichi^an. and ser\-ed for two terms under the Republican adminis- 
i ration ov. from I(,k)() until 19M- Since that time he has been elected as 
townshi]) super\isor of Cato township, and a])])ointed as deputy. sherilf. both 
offices ha\int^' been taken in KH4- -Mi'- Swarthout is also \illa,i^e treasurer, 
in which uifice he is serxiuf^- his lirst term. ITe also sei"ve(l as township 
clerk from i8()8 until 1(^04, and is still holdino- the office of secretary of the 
school l)oard, in which fjffice he has been active for more than four years. 
I'rom 1894 until i8(;8. he ser\ ed as town constal>le. J'Vaternally, he is 
.irhliated with the I'rce .and Accepted Masons, being- the secretary of Lake- 
\ iew Lodge .\o. v^o. at I.akcxiew. Alichigan, and is a memlK'r of Howard 
( "ity Lodge Xo. -'60. Knights of Cythias. Lie is also record and finance 
keei)er of the Knights of the Maccabees of the World, and a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America, in the lodge at l.akeview. Michigan. Lie is 
:i member of the l^asiern Star and (|uarterniaster oi the National League of 
\ cterans and Sons, I)oth at J.akeview. 

On October 1, i8g3. Scott .Sw<n4hout was lujited in marriage to ATyrta 
<iarland, and to their union three children ha\e been l)orn, as follow: Ade- 
laide, born on June o, 1900: l^lnor, December 1=,. 1902. and Rosalind. Fc1)ru- 
ary 2, 1909. The mother of tliese children was born in Chase, Alichigan, and 
-he is the daughter of John 1). and Gene ( (>:)llins) darland. 



SIli'.RMAX K. Nl'FF. 

Sherman IC. y.iii'(. well-known Ixmker at iMcl brides, this county, and 
long recognized as one of the most active men of affairs in this section of 
die state, his connection with the banking and lumber interests of this region 
ha\ing begun in the days of his youth when he was made a partner in the 
extensive business of liis father, is a nati\'e son of Michigan, having been 
t)orn at Muir, in the neighboring county of Ionia, this state, December 6, 
i8f)7, son of I'rederick and Hannah ( Cireenlioe) yof(, the former a native 
oi Massachusetts and the latter of Ohio. 

h'rederick Neff, who for }'ears was one of the most influential and 
powerful factors in the great lumber industry of this section of Afichigan, 
was born at Roxbury. a suburb of Boston. Massachusetts, Xovember 7, 
1842, son of George and ALarianne ffJarronsvillc) Neff, nati\'es of France. 



164 MON'CCALAf COrNTY. MICllKi.W. 

George Nell was born in the city of I'aris and after his marriage he and his 
wife lived in jVlsaee until early in \Hsi, at which time they came to the 
United States, locating- at Koxhury. where they remained until i(S40. in 
which year they moved to (irafton, Oliio, where they spent the remainder 
of their li\es on a small farm. George St'f'i was an accom2)lished musician 
and composer and for years traveled with a circus as a member of the band. 
He had little alnlity as a farmer, however, and less as a hnancier or manager 
and his family \yas reared amid straitened circumstances. He and his wife 
were the parents of twelve children, ten sons and two daughters. 

Of these ten sons, l'>ederick Xelt was about four years old when his 
|)arents mo\ed to Ohio and he grew up on the small home farm in the 
(irafton neighborhood, incidental!}' learning to make boots and shoes, a form 
of craftsmanshi]) in which he l)ecamc quite proficient. Tn r86j, he then 
being al)out nineteen years <if age, h'rederick Sd'i went to Cleveland, Ohio, 
and eniisled in TUittery I), h'irst Ohio TJght ;\rtillery, with which he served 
until the close of the (ivi! W.ar. He was the battery's bugler, and a good 
one he was. for he .had ac(iuired an excellent musical education from his 
gifted father. He was taken prisoner l)y the ( V)nfederates at ( Jreen l\i\er 
l>ridge, in Kcntnck)-, but shortly afterward was rescued by his coturades of 
the Gnion arms and ser\ed through the war with distinction, his personal 
bra.\ery and acti\itv frecjuently securing the sjjccial recogn.ition of the higher 
ohicers. who found his services \alual)le in the execution of s])ecial orders, 
such as carrying dispatches and the like. 

At the close of the -war Frederick \i'i\' returned to (irafton and shortlv 
thereafter engaged in the Itoot and shoe luisiness with several of his brothers 
at Xapolcon, Ohio, all the brothers having become excellent boot and shoe 
makers, a thrixing business in those days of custom-tuade boots. After a 
brief business exi)erience at Xapoleon, "Mr. Neff became attracted by the 
glowing" re])orts then reaching the I-'.ast regarding tlie ])ronn'sing conditions 
then l)re^•ailing in this section of ?^lichigan and he came u]") here, settling at 
Muir, in fonia ec^unty, where he started a small general store. Muir at tliat 
time was the center of trade for quite a wide territory, settlers from as far 
HAvay as F.lm Hall trading there, the princijial objects i)f barter then being 
shaved shingles, which passed, with a fixed value, about as readily as the 
currency of the land. Tt was thus that Frederick Neff received his intro"- 
duction to the great shingle and lumber industry of this section and he gradu- 
ally found himself working into that business, presently becoming recognized 
as one of the prime factors in the industry hereabout. 



M().\ r(Al..M COl'NTY. MICHIGAN, 165 

iH'forc Icaviiii;- Ohio I'Vcderick Xelf had married Hannah Greenhoe, 
wlio was ])orn at (iralloii. that state, and who (hcd at Miiir on March 28. 
i8Ck;. leaxiny- two sons, I'^rederick \']., who died on June 24, 1870, and 
Sliernian Iv. the imniethate suljjecl of this biographical review. Frederick 
XelT married, secondly, Susanna Ricliards, who also was born in Ohio, and 
wlio sur\i\es him. now li\in^- at McBridcs. this county, where she has a 
vrry pleasant home and wliere she enjoys many evidences of the high esteem 
in which she is held throughout this community. 

.\l)out the year 187:; I'Vcderick NelT left Mitir and came to this county, 
locating at Sheridrm, where he engaged in the general merchandise business, 
at the same time extending his already extensi\e lumber business. In asso- 
ciati(.)n with John AW Prestel, who had l)een a boy with him in Ohio as well 
as a comrade in the army, and with whom he ever maintained the closest 
and most brotherly relations. .Mr. Neff established a shingle-mill east of 
Sheridan and gradually worked u|) the shingle timber in that section. Dur- 
ing the late se\enties the mill was moved to the McP>rides neighborhood and 
set u]) about two and onedi.alf miles southeast of the village, Mr. Neff at that 
time establishing his ]X'rmanent home in McBrides. Soon after locating 
there the railroad was extended through McBrides. from vStanton. north to 
I'Mmore. and .\eiT .S: Trestel continued advancing their timlK-r operations 
north until a1)out i8Sj, bv which time the pine thereabout had been pretty 
w ell worked up. they having reached as far north as Harrison. Tn the mean- 
time the linn had undergone a change which meant nnich for the subject of 
this sketcli. In addition to his connection with John W. Prestel. Mr. Neff, 
whose energies ever were seeking an outlet in the extension of his business, 
was for a time engaged in shingle manufacturing in i)artnership with C. E. 
Walls, of Ionia, and in 1882 he formed a new connection, taking his son, 
Sherman V.. St'\i. who at that time was only fifteen years old, but who had 
accpiired a thorough acquaintance with the shingle industry, into partner- 
ship with him, he and ]\lr, 1 *restel dividing their holdings at McBrides and 
Sheridan, Mr. rrestel retaining the Sheridan plant and Mr. Neff retaining 
the plant at McBrides, the new firm being knowm as F. NefT & Son. 

The business of F. X(^\T 8: vSon grew by leaps and bounds, extending 
to cover various enterjjrises and sex'eral slates. Large investments in timber 
lands in Arkansas, owned by Ned tS: Prestel, w-ere exchanged in 1800 for a 
tract of about Five tliousand acres in the state of Washington, besides which 
the firm of Neff & Son possessed large timber interests in the state of Minne- 
sota. In i88() the shingle i)lant was moved from the McBrides neighbor- 



l66 MO-N'TCAI.M COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 

houd (o Gladwin and new timber material was found there sufficient to keep 
it i^'oing for al)OUt nine years, it had l)een the general custom of the lum- 
l.)ermcn in .Michigan to lake off the timber and leave the land useless, but 
Xelt & Son's |)olic\' was otherwise and it was thus that the firm presently 
hatl developed the great Xef'f ranch of more than one thousand acres in Day 
township, as well as four hundred and eighty acres in Ferris township, a 
quarter section near W'estville and a consideral)le tract of valuable mineral 
land in Minnesota. The need of better banking facilities for the hrm led to 
the organization, in October, ujo.].. of the \etl' I'ank at JNlclhades, an in.stitu- 
tion which has become a large factor in the financial life of the county and 
which is still the only bank at that place. Tn the organization of this bank 
Xeif tK: .S(.)n associated with them the elder XelT's brother. Louis Xeff. and 
on I )ecember i'- , iS')/, hrederick X'et'f &: Son. in association with John W. 
I'feitfer. I lenry lim-ch and 1^. K. Ilorton, the latter of Chicago, organized 
the Ijlmore v^tate Hank of I'Mmore, this count\'. A\hich is still being oper- 
ated under the original coiUrcjl. heirs of the fleceased mcml)ers of the f)riginal 
C()mpany continuing to represent the latter interests, the bank at McBrides 
also being continued by the families of i'^rederick and Louis X'eft, under the 
active direction of Sherman V.. Xetf and Jacob ^ii'd, the latter of whom is 
a son of Lotus Xeif. h'rederick \i;X\ died on December jc), 19 J 4, and was 
widely mourned throughout this region, for he had done a good work here- 
about and his name was held in high res])ect wherever his infiuence had 
touched during his long and busy career. 

l'"or years before his father's death Sherman \\. Xelf had been the 
l)ractical director \A the firm's extensive interests, having relieved his father 
as much as possible, during the hitter's declining years, of the routine details 
of the business and the affairs of the firm therefore were continued without 
interru|)tion or alteration of jiolicy after the death of the elder \ii'({. 'fhe 
Xeff interests hereabout mean much to the ccjuimmn'tv and Sherman V.. \<:^\ 
is very ])ro])erlv rega'ded as out' of the leaders in the financial .and industrial 
life of this section. De is a \ cry busy man. in the nature of things, but he 
ever has found time from his large jjcrsonal interests to devote a good 
citizen's attention to public alTair< and e\er has been an active ])romoter of 
such movements of a local character as have been designed to ad\ance the 
common good throughmu this section of the state, lieing held in high esteem 
by all and enjoying the full confidence and resjjcct of business circles gen- 
erally. 

in 1893 Sherman R. Xeff was united in marriage to hlorence Pingle, 



M()\T!,Ai.M COUNTY, MKFIIGAX. if)/ 

who was l)orn at Ovid, near Muir, in the adjoining- county of Tonia, daugh- 
ler of Joseph and Lois ( Bradshaw) Pingle, the former a native of Mecklen- 
l)urg-Schwerin, (iernian}-, and tlie Jatter of the state of New York. Jose]>h 
Tingle was engaged in the stave business in Ch'nton county, making his 
lionie at I'.hn Mall, when his daughter, Florence, became a teacher in the 
schools at Alci)rides. where her ac(|uaintance with Air. Neff began, and 
to the ha])])y union wliich cuhninated from this acquaintance two daughters 
ha\e been born, bxlith Blanche and Mary Helen. Mr. and Mrs. Neff occupy 
a high place in the social life of this region and are warmly interested in all 
proi)er acti\ilic's of a cultural character, being held in high regard by all. 
Mr. Xc!T is a Royal .\rch Mason and takes a warm interest in Masonic 
alTairs. 



llORACh: L. KIRTLAXD. 

Horace L. Kirtland, manager for the Union Telephone Company at 
Lakeview. Montcalm county, is a native of this state. l)orn in Springjwrt, 
Jackson c(junt}-. .VoNembcr 7. 1S63. being a son of Horace L. and Sarah E. 
(Jewell) Kirtland. IJoth parents were born and reared in the state of New 
V<,>rk and were descended from French and h'.nglish ancestors respectively, 
wln'le the family name is Scotch in its origin. 

llorac T.. Kirtland. Sr.. and his wife came to Michigan in 1859, where 
he fcjllowed his former occui)ation of farming, devoting all the active years 
of his life to this vocation. Upon coming to this state, he secured a tract 
"t go^■ernment land, in its ^•irgin state, and in the course of time converted 
It into a good farm, lie left Jackson county in [878. coming to this county 
where he i)assed the remainder of his life, with his son, Dr. John VV. His 
death occurred May 2J, iS()(). his wife having died several A'ears |>revious. 

Horace H. Kirtland. Jr.. the subject of this sketch, is one of four chil- 
'Iren, the others being John W'.. ("icorge O. and .Sarah A. He received his 
■:'dncation in the schools ot IJattle Creek, this state, where the family had 
'-arly resided, and ;ifter discontinuing his studies, at about the age of se\'en- 
(■en years, he sought his first emjjloyment in the lumber yards in Kakeview, 
and was associated with this 1)usiness for a mnnber of years. When twenty- 
one years of age he assumed the management of a lumber business in the 
lown of Totten, owned bv Dan McCoy, an ex-mayor of Grand Rapids. He 
was with .Mr. McC'oy for about a year and left his employ to go to Saginaw 
to take a sinn'lar |)osition in a large Inisiness owmed by eastern parties. He 



l68 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

remained there for three years, when tliat l>raiich of the business suffered a 
severe loss by (ire and he then went to Sault Ste. Marie and took chars^e for 
the same iirni at that point. He was there about two years, when the firm 
suffered financial reverses and he went to Tomahawk. Wisconsin, where he 
l>ecanie luanai^er for another large lumber firm. After four years at that 
])lace. he ])ractically <;ave u]) his connection with the lumber business, with 
the exception of a >liort time when he contracted for lumber, which he gTaded 
and ship])ed. 

In iSc>cj lie ])urcJia>ed an (established j^eneral mercantile business in Sid- 
naw, lloui^ditou county, this state, where he remained for about ei.<;hl years. 
J lis second year there he received the a|jpointment of jxjstmaster, which he 
held as lon^- as he remained there, or until he came to Lakeview about IQ07. 
flis iirst bu>iness \enture in J.,ake\iew was in the dru.g- business, when he 
had associated with him his nei)he\vs, the firm doin,^- business under the title 
of Kirlland Mercantile ( "om])any. This association, however, lasted but a 
year, when the business was disiKOscd of. A manager l)€ing needed for the 
Union Telej>hone ("ompany of Michigan, at the Lakeview office, Wr. Kirt- 
land assumed the duties of that position, having ]>reviouslv bought stock in 
the com]^any. That position he has continued to hold to the present time. 

Tn 1884, in l.uther. Lake county, this state, Mr. Kirtland was united in 
marriage to Martha I.eClair, born December 7. 1864, in New York. She is 
a daughter of Silas and ("atherine (lunpv) T.eC'lair, both natives of New 
^'ork aufl of ]''rench and r)ntch parentage, respectively. The luother (bed 
when Mrs. Kirtland was a small child, and w^hen she wah^ fourteen vears of 
age her father brought her to Michigan, which has since l)een her home. To 
l!(»race Kirtland and wife have lieen born fom* children; Frank L., the 
eldest, was born bVbruary 21, 1885. and was a promising young man. Fie 
became an electrical engineer and was employed in that capacity bv the citv 
of Flint, this state. During the cam])aign of 1910, while making some 
special arnmgements for electric lights for election day, he was electrocuted, 
his death occurring Se])tember 5, roio. lie was unmarried. Mabel, born 
on iMarch 12, 1887, became the wife of William Frank. They resided in 
Sidnaw. where her husband was killed l)y Inking accidentallv hit bv a baseball. 
He left one child, William F. George Kirtland was born, on A1a\- 6, t8()3, 
and Horace L., Jantiary 25, 1904. 

Mr. Kirtland gives support to the Republican ])artv, and although by 
no means an active politician, he is a member of the town council. He holds 
fraternal affiliation with the Knights of Pythias and takes much interest in 



MOXTCAI.M COUNTY. MlClllGAX. 169 

the work of iluu urder. Since hcconiino- a resident of Lakeview, Air. Kirt- 
l;ui(l has demonstrated the genuine ((tiahty of his citizenship h}' e\'idencing 
his activity iti whatever is [ikmned for the advancement of community 
interests. 



DIZ W. Dl'.AN. 



Diz W. Dean, one of the leachno' merchants and a man of [)rominence in 
])u1)lic and official hfe of AIcBride, Montcahn county. Michigan, was l;)orn in 
I'.ushnell township, Montcahn comity, May l6. 1877, the son of George L. 
and Sarah J. (lioUand) Dean. 

(aeorge L. Dean was 1)orn in C'ayuga county, New York, in 1834, the 
son oi Henry i)ean and wife, and wdien a young man moved to Hudson. 
Michigan, where lie lived some time and then moved to Bushnell township, 
Ah)ntcalm county, in 1865. wliere. together w'ith Darius Mills, he oper- 
ated a saw-mill until 1880, when the mill was destroyed 1>y fire, ^vhen 
George H. Dean hecanie a farmer on land which he had purchased at an 
earlier time, and on that farm, to which he later added more land, Afr. Dean 
continued in his agricultural life for the remainder of his days. George D. 
Dean was a prominent man of his community, having served for thirty years 
as a justice of the ])eace and for fifteen years as a director of the schools in 
r>u>hnell township. 

(jeorge L. Dean was married to Sarah J. TTolland, who was born in 
i 'enns}-lvania, the daughter of George and Alarian Holland, natives of Eng- 
land and oi 1 Pennsylvania. George Holland, after his marriage in Pennsyl- 
vania, moved to Michigan, aliout 1860, and located in I'lvergrcen tow-nship, 
w here he established a jiioneer home and wiierc he engaged in general farm- 
ing for the remainder of his days. Air. Holland was a supervisor in i^ver- 
green township for twenty-five ye<ars and w^as a man of innuence in the 
community. George L. and Sarah Dean were tlie ])arents of three sons, 
I'rcd L., Don and Diz A\\ George D. Dean died in June. 1914; his widow, 
S.arah, is now living on the old home farm in Bushnell township. 

Diz W. Dean received his early education in the jiublic schools of Bush- 
nell township, after which he attended and was graduated from the Sheridan 
high school and then became a student at A'errington College, St. T-ouis, 
Afichigan. Later. Air. Dean was a student at the Alichigan State Normal 
.School, at Alt. Pleasant, afterward becoming a teacher in the schools of 
Montcalm county for nearly four years, and then he served three and one- 



lyO ,MC)XTCAJ.M COUNTY, MICEIIGAN. 

halt \ears in the railway mail service, as a postal clerk on the Lake Shore 
railroad, operating between Chicago. Illinois, and Cleveland, Ohio. During- 
the nicMith ui October, k)04. Diz W. Dean came to AIcBride and although 
he had little means, he borrowed money and established a hardware store, 
where he is now prosperously engaged. ha\ing enlarged his stock until his 
merchandise now includes hardware, farm implements, harness and blankets, 
togetlier with extensixc dealings in coal. 

During the month of January, UJ04. Di^ W • Dean was married to Edna 
IJarton, wIkj was born in Ivlmore, Alichig.m, the daughter of Henry and 
Jlelen ( b'airchild ) Hartcui. natives of New York state and Pennsylvania, 
respectively. 1 lenry l>arton came to .Michigan about 1872 and followed the 
saw-mill busine-^s, Jjetween R<.)ckford and Cedar Springs, for about ten years 
and then located on a farm near I'.dmore. where he lixed until ]<)03, and then 
came to AlclJridc. To the marriage of l)iz \\ . and lulna Dean have been 
born three children, Doris. Allen and Alerton. 

I)iz W. Dean has been one of the most actixe citizens of Mclh-ide in 
public affairs and official life, during the wbole of his residence in AlclJride. 
haN-ing been the occu|)ant of sonu- ])ublic ofhce, aiK.l at times has ser\ed in 
two or three oftices at one time, bor five years Mr. J.)ean served as townshij) 
clerk and he has occui)ied the of^ces of village treasurer and president of 
the village of ^^Iclh-ide, and he is now village clerk and also a director of the 
local schools. 

l-'raternally. Di/ W. Dean is a tliirt}-second-(legree ]^las(-in and a noble 
of the Mystic Shrine. Mr. Dean is also a leading member (jf the Tndeijcn- 
deiit Order of Odd l''ellow's and tlie encam])ment, at l^dmorc. Diz \\\ Dean 
is also a member of the Knights of Pvthias. 



iTARKV c. iioi:Mb:s. 

Ilan"\- ( ". I lolmes. editor and publisher of the Lalccz'icci' llntcrprisc, of 
Lake\iew, .Michigan, is an acti\-c and successful business man and citizen of 
thi> count}- : solicitous for wbat tlie ])ublic wishes and a conscientious 
worker. He was born on July jS. 1879, in luUtle Creek, Michigan, and is 
the <on of Ivicliard and Ida ( Str;iil ) Holmes. Richard Holmes wa^^ a native 
of Ilenrietta. 1"e.\:is, coming t(.) .Michigan while em])loye(l as a railroad band 
and making a temporary location in Battle Creek, after wdiich he located in 
Amsdon, Michigan, where his death occurred al)Out 1883. He and his wife 



MONTCALM COIN'IV, MICHIGAN. I^I 

were the parents of four children, Harry C, W.'iltcr, who died in infancy; 
Ired AI.. h\ing in Port Huron, .Michif^an. and Stella, who died at the age 
of thirteen years. After the death of l-Jichard Ifohnes, his wife married 
\V. .v. Courtw riii^ht, who li\es in JJelvidere township. Montcalm county, 
and they were the jjarents of the following children: Vernicc ( Ai-ken), of 
(Irand iva])i(Is. Michigan; ( laude, of I'Mmore, Michigan; L. G.. also of 
(irand Rapids; Clitl'ord, o\ Belviderc township, and two others who died 
in infancy. The mother of these children was l)orn in Illinois and her death 
occurred ahoiit t8(j7. 

ilarry ( '. Holmes located in Greenville, .Michigan, when five vears of 
age. and was reared and educated in that town, after which he worked at 
various vocations, gaining the rudiments of a strong business e.\])erience, 
\\hich has enabled him to make a success of his chosen profession. At the 
age of twcnt}-t\\() \ear> he learned the ])rinter's trade under the tutelage of 
William White, ech'tor of the lidmorc Tiiiics. of lulmore, Michigan. J'>oni 
l-'.dmorc he went to .\Iorely, Michigan, where he o])crated the March' Jour- 
nal, for l.owrev «Jv Hawkins. After tw(j years he returned to the luiinorc 
Tillies as partner, this partnership continuing about two \-ears. at which 
time he mo\ed to Lake\ie\\. .Michigan, where he leased the Lakci'icii.- Iintrr- 
f^risr for one \ear. He later purchased the entire ])lant and has been so 
successful that the subscription list immbers about eight hundred. He also 
produces job ])rinting and has a lucrative business in that line. He is an 
active l\epnl)]ican and ser\e(l as \illage clerk while at lulmore. .Michigan, 
and has serxed as village treasurer of l.ake\iew. l''raternally, he is a mem- 
ber of the hanhoe Lodge .\o. .^So. I'^ree and .\ccepted .Masons, at Lake\iew, 
Michigan. 

In \()0() Ilarry G. Holmes was united in marriage to b'ae White, daugh- 
ter of William and l.illian (Garxethi White. William White was born on 
A birch 1 8, i^S^- ''i ''^- W ^i.vne, Indiana, and was left an or]>han at an earlv 
a_L;e. iii^ father having l)een killed in the notable l)attle of Bull Run. while 
<er\ing in an Indiana regiment. The bo\hood of William White was spent 
II his nati\e state, where he was obliged to ea.rn his living as best he could. 
In 1S73 he was t.aken into the family of William H. Stevens, of Stanton, 
Michigan, where he had the advantage of a good education, graduating 
from the Stanton high school with the class of 1(879. fie then engaged in 
the business of painter for a ])eriod of two years, after which he formed a 
l)artnership with 1'. S. ] )odge and together they found the Stanton Clipper. 
In j,S<S2 William AMiite sold his interest in the paper to P. S. Dodge and 



I /J :\r()XTi;ALM coi-ntv. Micinc.A.v. 

reiiiowd to I la.stiii,ii\s. Minncsotci. wlit-re he spent the suiniiier. In 1883 he 
located in I'.chnore, i\Iichit;an, and purchased the Edmore Journal, which 
was Continued lor nian\- \ears w ith success. This puhlication was a Hve col- 
innn <|uarto weekly paper, devoted to the interests ot the Republican i)arty 
and the iiivneral public. .\Jr. White was outsijoken in his opinions of public 
all'airs and tenets t)l" i^oxernment ])olic\- and was active for the party of 
which lie was a member, lie owns his business block in the town of ICdmore. 
-Michii^an, and has been ^ cry successful as a l)usiness man. On Noveml)er 
24. 1882. William White was united in marriat^c to Lillian Carveth. a nati\e 
of l>err}- county, Michiiiirui, and to them were born two children, I'ae B. and 
l.eon. The fcUher of these children is a nieml.)er of the Independent Order 
of Odd kellows, of bdmore, .Michii;an, of which order he is secretary, lie 
abo belon,^-s to the Kni.L^hts of the Maccabees, at hlduiore, and is trustee of 
the Methodist l-'.])iscopal church, oi which denonu'nation he is a de\'out mem- 



W ll.l.lA.M C J.\AlU':SOX. 

William C jamieson well-known farmer of Cato township, Montcalm 
comity, was born near the town of (jalt, in Waterloo county, Ontario, Can- 
ada, k'ebruary 17, t806. lie is a son of John S. and .Agnes ?>. (Moscrip) 
jamieson, the former born at Kingston, ( )ntario, .and the latter in New York 
st;ite. near Lake (Seorge. The Jrunieson family is of Scottish origin and 
was dri\en out oi their nati\e land at the time Scotland was overrtm l>y the 
nuading Danes. The jamiesons (led to Jreland, where they followed their 
f(.)rmer (,)ccu])ation of weaxing, for man}' years. Upon enn'grating to 
America, certain members of the fann'ly settled in Canada, near Kingston, 
where John S., father of William C., was Ijorn, and in 1832 the family mo\-ed 
to (jalt, Ontario, arriving there just hefore the outbreak of the e|>i(lemic of 
cliolera which carried (.)ff more than one thousand jjcople in that community. 

John S. jamieson was a farmer all his life and in January, .1869, he 
came to .\b)ntcalm cotmty, looking about for a suitable h^ication. lie 
journexed on into Iowa and in March or A])ril of the same vear, returned to 
Montcalm county rmd purchased forty acres in Cato townshi]). The family 
arrived in May, and later on Mr. Jamieson bought eighty additional acres, 
but ga\e it to his eldest son. The family lived in CAato township for many 
years, where three boys and four girls were reared. W'illiam C. Ixiing next 
to the youngest child. John S. Jamieson was one of the influential men of 



MOXICAI.M COINTY. M JCI I ICAN. T/^^ 

his (la\- in this section and did much to ])romote the adxancenient of ci\iJ- 
ization. lie was one of tlie ort^anizers of the Conoregational church at 
l.akeview and was also one of the organizers of the Lakeview Agricultural 
Society, in which he took an active part. He w^as a Repuhlican, l3eing much 
interested in local affairs, hut he ne\er asi)ire(l to any ofiice. 

William C". Jamieson recei\ed the hest education the common schools in 
this section at that time afforded, supplemented with some high school work 
and considerahle studv at home. In this manner he acquired considerahle 
information ahout hookkeejjing and snrxeying and at the present time he 
does all the sur\eying reipured in his \icinity. Mr. Jamieson has alwa\-s 
been considered an excellent farmer and now owns his father's original 
"fort\-" and on.e hundred and sixty acres additionrd in ("ato township. 

On Ala.rch jt, 1908. William (". Jamieson was married at (irand 
l\a])ids to Una Porter. !)orn on June Ji. 1878. in 1"rufant, Montcalm county, 
daughter of I'Yank .and Minerv.a ( ih-own ) Porter. The family history of 
die Porters will 1ie found in the sketch of (diestcr Stubbins, on another ])age. 
I'oth Mr. and Mrs. Jamieson .are interested in the work of the Congre- 
,L;alional church at Pakex'iew :md i-ontribute generoush' of their means to 
•-u])port s;une. He holds fraternal artiliatif)n with the ancient order of l'>ee- 
masonry and br)th himself and wife are members of the Eastern Star. He 
also is a ( iranger. In ]it)litics. Air. Jamies(.)n is a Republican and for the 
l.t't five \ears li.as ser\ed as justice of the ])eace for his township. He can 
be counted on for assistance in an\ cause i)lanne(l to advance anv [)hase of 
C( 'mmimitv life. 



]'.b:XJ.\AMN I'. TRJTJ.ER. 

lU'nJamin 1\ Ihitler, of Hake\iew , Montcalm coinitw Michigan, bears 
a high reputation for honest}- and integrity. He is well informed on real- 
e>i;Ue \ahies, which btisiness he rc])resents, and operates a collection agenc\- 
in connecti(»n therewith, which is a ]ucrati\-e |)art of his interests. His l)irth 
"cc-urre(l (.)n .March 18. 1884, in Inghaiu county. Michigan, his ])arents being 
k'rank I), .and Amelia ( Jlrown) Butler. 

Ikmiamin \\ 1 hitler left his native county when he was nearly live vears 
of .age. ino\ing to ( "Unton county. Michigan, with his parents, who remained 
in that location until he was nine years of age and then located in Ow^osso, 
Michigan. Tt was in that town and locality that Ikmjamin F. P)Utler received 
his education in the common schools, finishing same wdth one term in hook- 



1/4 .MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

kcc'pint; ;ui(l busine>s. in a local husiiiess collet^e. He was then employed as 
line man and bookkeeper lor the lU-ll 'rele])hone Company, at Owosso, 
Michii^an. After fonr \ear> ol" ser\ ice to this company he removed to Lake- 
view, Michii^an. and ])nrclia.sed forix- acres of land which he ciilti\ated and 
improved and on which he set out an orchaid covering- lit'teen acres. ['\,)r 
threi' yi-a.r> he (^jn'rated this farm, which he then sold, and became an 
em])lo\-ee of a local facti>r\- for a short lime. lie was then employed in the 
,i;roeery store of I'eter I'eterson. where he clerked for live years, at that 
lime beL',innin!;i an indejjendent bnsiness oi his own by ])nrchasinj( a half 
interest in his present concern. 'I'hiv was in i<H2, and the firm l)ecame 
known as Ih'ssel (X; Ihitler. operatins^' real estate, loans and insnrance. f.ewis 
b. l>is>el retired in Jnne, 11)15, on account of ai^e. and his i>kicc in the firm 
was tilled by k-dith ( ). (Stark-) Ihitler. the lirni now bein^ known as Butler 
.V llntler. 

( )n Xovember 24, u^o:;, llenjamin \\ !hitl(M- was united in marriage to 
l-.dith (). .Stark, dan.i^hter of (.coroe W. and hlida (Cobb) Stark. To the 
union of -Mr. and Mrs. Ihit'er two children ha\e l)een born: I'aul Keith, 
born on October 7, kjoS, and l-'rederick k'.ark whose birth oct'urred on 
I'ebrua.rx' _', ioii. In his fratern;il relations, licnjamin I\ Ihitler is a mem- 
l)er of l.akexicw LodL',e No. ^580, h'rce and .\ccei)ted Masons, beiui^" the 
senior warden of same. lie is al-o clerk of the T.akexiew J .odi^e of the 
.Modern Woodmen of .\merica; the ( )rder of ^'eomen also claims him as a 
member, as do the Sisters (d' the I'.aslern Star. He is an active l\.ci)ublican 
in his political views and has served as villas^e trustee one year ( I'ji^), 
and duriuL;' i<;i5 as villai^e clerk. .\s justice of the peace lie was elected to 
lill a vacancy and was re- elected in the sprint^- of J') 15. Durin.o 1914 he 
served as clerk of ("alo township, this county. 

I'.dith (). ( vSiark ) Ihiller was I)orn in St. Lawrence county. Xew^ York, 
as was her father, (;e(.»r!:^e W. Stark, who was reared, educated and married 
in that stale. lie later lived at Lowell, Michigan, for a short lime and 
thence went to Seranac, Alichigan, where he lived until death. Tie was a 
l)lumber l)v trade and was emi)loye<l with Tlunter's blardw.are Company, of 
Seranac, for more than twentv years, (ieorge W. and l^dida fC^'obl)) Stark 
were the i)arenls of three children, whose names follow: ICdith O., Eva, 
wife of I'^. 1). Ikirber. of Seranac. Michigan, and l-"rederick, a farmer, also 
of Seranac. .Michigan. (Jeorge W. Stark died in March. i()o8, at the age of 
forl\-nine years, and his wife died in i8()6. at the age of thirty- four years, 
hi is parents were I'hineas and ITannah (Dayis) Stark, natives of Eng-land 
and Gertnany, respecti\ely. Lie was active as a member of the Republican 



.MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. _ 1/5 

|;;irt\' and in his fraternal relations was affiliated with the Modern \\'oo(hneii 
of America, at Saranac. Alichit^an. Idida ( C'ohh ) vStark was the dan^s^liter 
of jose])li II. Col.)l). a nati\-e of Ionia eonnt}'. Michii^an, as was also his wife, 
lie ser\ed in the ('i\il War, after which he en<(aged in the fnrnittn'e and 
hardware l>u>iness and hecanie hoth prominent and snccessfnl. lie lillcd 
jnany local oihces in IJaldwin, Michigan, where his home and l)nsiness inter- 
ests were located. 



WfLTd AM P.. .SMITH. 



William II. Smith, en,i4ai,^ed in at;riciihtu-al labors on his farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Cat(.> township, Montcalm count}-. Michii^an, was 
horn in ColumI)iana county, Ohio. March 31, 1862. He is a son of Daniel 
and Klizaheth ( Oninn ) Smith, hoth also natives of Cohnnbiana county, the 
former Ijcini^- a son of I ewis Smith, who emi!.^Tated to this country from 
Ireland. Daniel .Smith \\as a farmer all his life and in that occupation 
William 1). was trained from his early boyhood. 

William I). Smith is the third child in a family of {i\-e children and 
a> a ho\- receixed a ^ood common-school education in the district schools 
near his farm h(.)nie. lie remained with his parents until twenty-one years 
'if aj^e. when he came to this state and located in Montcalm county, where 
he has <ince made his home. When he lirsl came to this coimty, W illiani 
r.. Smith worked in the lumber cam]ys, remaining;- there for about six years 
and durinti' that time he sa\"ed enough money to piu'chasc a farm. Me 
bought eight\' acres of his ])resent farm. i)a\ing tweUe hundred dollars in 
ca^h for it and set al)otit reuKning the sttunps and making- the ground ready 
I'lr cnhixation. The timber had all been remoxed before he |)urchased it 
■ v.](\ .\lr. Smith today has one of the line farms of his section. He has since 
a Ided an additional tract of eighty acres, built a comfortable home and has 
a \\q]\ established farm bti^iness, I fe de\-oles his attention to general farm- 
ing ;md stock raising and is i>ron(l of his e\'tensi\e orchard, which, how- 
ever, hv kee])s for prixale ])ur]ioses. 

William I'. Snn'ih was married ()n August to. TS85, to Lena C. Smith, 
who was born in Ionia county, this state, a daughter of Philip and Sarah 
Smith. 'I"hev came to this stale from Indiana and were of German extrac- 
tion. Mrs. A\ illiam P. Smith died on December 6, t8c)6, leaving her hus- 
brmd and three children, William TP, APin P. and Benjamin P. None of 
these ^ons are married and all continue to reside on the family homestead. 



1/6 MONTCALM COLNTY, MICllKiAN. 

In politics, Air. Smitli is ;i Deiiiocrat, althous^h never a seeker after 
ofiice nor actixe in ])olilical matters, lie holds Fraternal alHliation in the 
h'ree and Accepted Masons, ha\ino- united with same shortly after attaining 
his majority, and of thai ordei' his eldest son, William 11., is also a mem- 
l)er. During the years of his residence in this county. Air. Smith has seen 
many changes come about in the manner of li\ing and the large automo- 
bile which he drives is thoroughly in keeping with the most advanced ideas 
of the present time. When a young man he \\as considered an exceptionally 
g(.)od ri lie-shot and took much pleasure in hunting, still tinding keen enjoy- 
ment in the sjKjrt. 



j. C. \EWBR()U(iH. 

J. C. Xewbrough, one oi the organizers of the X'elvet Liquid Soap 
Company, and at the present time its secretary and treasurer, was born in 
i.ansing, on September .to, [(Srto. and is the son of J'Aigene P. and Saman- 
tha ( M un ) X e w l.)r oti gh . 

i'-ugene 1'. Xewbrough was b<M-n in Ashland county, Ohio, and was 
the S(jn of William IJenry and hdizabeth (J'olsley) Xewdjrough. AV'illiam 
Henry was one of three brothers who came to this country about the time 
of the Re\olutionar\- War, one of the ')rothers ser\ing as a blacksmith 
with the army. Shortly alter coming to this country, William Henry came 
on west to the new territor\- of Ashland county, Ohio, where he was one 
of the early pioneers of that sei'tion. i-'dizabelh (Polsley) Xewbrough was 
;t native of Wales, which was also the birth-place of her husband, and came 
to the United States at an early date. 

Samantha ( Alun ) Xewbrough, the mother of j. ('., was l>orn in Ash- 
land count}', ( )hio, and at present is li\ing at her home in Lansing, the 
husiiand and father having died in i(S85. luigene .Xewl)rough grew to 
manhood in Ohio where he was engaged on the farm and tauglit school. 
In 1850, and some time after his marriage, he and his wife came to Michi- 
gan, where Air. X'ewbrough was engaged in the drug and grocery business 
for a number of \ears. luigene Newbrough and wife were the parents of 
the foiiowing children, I'dizabeth R., the wife of F. K. Goodnow, of Lansing; 
J. C. ; Alary O., the wife of Frank O. Knight, of Lansing, and William H.. 
\\liose home is also in the capital city. 

J. C. Xcwd.irough received his education in the public schools of Lansing. 
After completing his education he was employed for a time in the northern 




.1. ('. XKWI'.KorriTT. 



M()NTC:Ar,M COl'NTY, MICHIGAN, I// 

woods and as a clerk in a store. He located in (jreenville in 1882, being 
cini)lo\'ed by a large lumber company, with whom he was engaged until 
1807, wlien he was the superinteiulent of construction on the government 
building at Mi. .Pleasant for one year. In August, 1898, he was appointed 
assistant postmaster and at the enci of eight years he received his commis- 
sion as postmaster, which jjosition he held for eight years, since Avhich time 
he lias been with his present company. 

J. C. Newbrough was married on November 3. 1886, to Ella Narregan, 
tlie daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Narregan, who came to Michigan 
from the state of New York. To Mr. and "Mrs. Newbrough have been born 
two children, Gertrude E.. a graduate of the high school and at present a 
student at the Michigan Agricultural College, and Violette, a student in the 
Gr(^cnville high school. 

Eraternally, Mr. Newbrough is a member of Le Roy Lodge No. 9, 
Knights of Pythias, and politically, he is a Republican and has served two 
terms as alderman for his home city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Newbrough and family are active and influential mem- 
bcTs of the Congregational church and take much interest in all the activities 
of the church. 



TflOMAS B. WLNTER. 



Thomas B. Winter, of Greenville, Montcalm county, Michigan, is the 
Dwner and manager of the Winter Inn, which is well patronized by those in 
need of hotel service. His birth occurred in April, 1852, in Canada. 

Thomas I]. Winter attended the schools of Fenton, Michigan. He then 
became interested in the livery business, continuing in this until 1908. The 
Winter Tnn was then built and he became its successful proprietor. ITe mar- 
ried TTannah Berry, the daughter of Lorando Berry. She was born in Tonia 
county, Michigrai, where she was reared. Five children have l)een born to 
this union, as follow: Jennie, a graduate of the Greenville high school and 
a former student of Olivet College and now the wife of G. W. Allwood, of 
Grand Rapids; I^loyd, also a graduate of the high school in Greenville, as 
well as from the law school, and now a practicing attorney in Greenville; 
Claude, who graduated from the Greenville high school and then became a 
student in Detroit College, and is now" a traveling salesman out of Green- 
ville; Thomas, a graduate of the local high school and a former student of 
(12b) 



178 MONTCAf.M COINTY. .AIICI I ICAX. 

the Chicago Musical Collco-e, and now a musician in Detroit. Michigan, and 
I lelcn, who is still at home. 

Thomas B. Winter is a mcnil)er o\ the Knights oi I'ythias in his frater- 
nal relations and is well liked in all circles, lie is a I\ei>ul)lican. 



S.\LEM \\ KKXXl^DY. 



Salem L'\ Kenned)", postmaster at Lakeview, this county, one of Mont- 
calm county's best-known lawyers, former county superintendent of schools, 
former county commissioner, tor \ears active in the political life of this sec- 
tion of the state and w^cll known throughout Michigan as the author of 
"Kennedy's Standard Tax Tables,'' a monumental mathematical work set- 
ting out a (|uick and accurate method of making tax rolls, also widely known 
throughou.t this section as a scholar and lecturer of distinguished attain- 
ments, is a nati\e of Ohio. ha\ing been l.)orn in Medina count}', that state, 
February 14. 1848, son of Horace Downs and Deborah I'. (Miller) Ken- 
nedy, both natives of the state of New York. 

Horace D. Kennedy was born in Eaton townshij). Madison county. New 
^'ork, July 17. 1804, son of Jacoli and Uraney (ATincr) Kennedy, the former 
of whom was born at !\lillon, M.assachusetts. April 13, 17^^, and the latter, 
also a nati\e of ?^lassachusetts. k\'bruary 13, T770. After marriage, Jacob 
Kennedy and wife settled at P)rightou, Monroe countx', Xcvv York, where 
they speut the remainder of their lives, J<ieob\s death occurring on ke1:)rnary 
2, 1826, and that of his widow on June n, 1850. They were the j)arents 
of five children, Andrew, Horace D., S;dlie. l^mmaline and TTarriet. all now 
deceased. 

Horace D. Kennedy was reared in Munrt^e county. Ne^v \'ork. and niar- 
ried at I'enfield, to Debondi P. Miller, who was bom in Ontario coimtv. New 
York, ]May V- 1808. She wa^ the daughter of Kyman and Celia T Wheeler) 
Miller, l)oth natives of Massachusetts. Toyman Miller moved from AFassa- 
chusetts to New York state, driving through with an ox-team in the winter 
time, settling in Monroe county, and from that place etnigrated to the town- 
ship of Hinkley, Medina county, Ohio, in 1833. Two years later Horace D. 
Kennedy and his wife, with their two children, followerl, settling on the 
farm for many years known as the Kennedy homestead. Horace D. Ken- 
nedy was a farmer in a general way, but was wddely known in that section 
as a composer and teacher of sacred music. He was one of the founders 




^^€:t-^')-<i^cyC'L'C''i^yiy i/ 1^^^ 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 179 

Of" tlic Sons of I'etnpcrance, at Weymouth, Ohio, in 1847, <^n<^l ^^^ '*-"*^ J"^ 
wife were nieni])ers of the Coiigrejjational church at Brunswick, same state, 
l)uth spending their last days in that place; her death occurring on h^ebruary 
j(), 1876, and his, h'ehruary 8. 1879. They were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, of whom but three are now living, Newton J., of Greenville, this 
county: Salem F., the immediate subject of this sketch, and llattie S., who 
married H. lirainard. of Brunswick. Ohio; the others having been Sanford 
I.., Uraney, Andrew M. and Arvin 1>. 

Salem 1'". Kennedy was reared on a farm in the neighborhood of Hink- 
k'\ , Medina county, Ohio, receiving his education in the schools of that place, 
and in 1866. he then being eighteen years of age, caiue to Michigan, locating 
al (irattan, in Kent county, where his associates were in lumber camps. 
Later he (Opened a writing school, as an incident to his other employment, 
and while thus engaged conducted thirty-two terms of writing school in that 
\icinity. Mr. Kennedy jx^ssesses a natural facility as a penman and his 
clVoris in teaching the useful art of caligraphy were greatly appreciated by 
ihc i)eo|)le of that section. In the meantime he opened a general store at 
(irattan Center, where he also cnvned a flour- and grist-mill, doing an excel- 
lent Inisiness in connection with hoth enterprises. In 1874 Mr. Kennedy 
married a (irattan girl and, having previously sold his store and mill, engaged 
m farming for a. couple of years, at the end of which time he began teaching 
-^chool and was thus engaged for eight years, conducting schools at White 
Swan and at C.annonsburg. in Kent county, and later for live years as ])rin- 
cipal of the l.ai<eview high school. Montcalm county. Jn 1880 Mr. Ken- 
nedy was called to this county to take the principalshij) of the schools at 
i -ake\ lew and lias e\er since made that pleasant village his home. Not long 
ai'ter taking u|) his residence in this county. Mr. Kennedy was elected county 
-nijcrintendent of schools of his comity and served the public very acceptably 
in that connection and also as county commissioner for nine years. In vari- 
' ns cami)aigns he has been on the Democratic ticket for re]>rescntative or 
-tatc senator. In the meantime and for years, Mr. ECennedy had been giving 
his most thoughtful attention to the study of law, having been a student 

■ ilong that line since he wms tw^enty-one years of age, and in 1885 was 

■ tdmitted to the ])ar. since which time he has l>een practicing his ])rofession 
in .Montcalm and adjacent counties and is wddely known as an able lawyer. 
I'or some time he served the public as city attorney of Lakeview and in 191 3 
was appointed by Governor Ferris as a memlTcr of the state board of con- 
trol and is still attached to that important Ix)d5^ 



l8o MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

For years Mr. Kennedy has L^iven his thoughtful attention to the poHtical 
aii'airs of this county and long has been regarded as one of the leaders of 
the Democratic party in the county. During the past two campaigns he has 
been ciiairman of the county delegations of that party and also has served 
in several campaigns as chairman of the county's delegations to state con- 
ventions, in November, 1914, he was appointed postmaster of Lakeview 
and is now serving- very acce])tably in that important capacity. Mr. Ken- 
nedy is a writer of no mean ability and as a mathematician has attained wide 
note. He was for several years editor of the mathematical (lei)artnient of 
the Delhi ( !*ennsylvania} Uni\ers!ty School Journal and is the author of 
a work of two hundred pages on geometry ruid mensuration sold in Tennessee, 
and also what is known as ICenncdy's "Date Ratios."' Tie also was the 
author of two vahiable treatises on differential and integral calculus, which 
were destroyed in manuscri|)t during the disastrous lire at Lakeview in 1894. 
But it is as the author of "Kennedy's Standard Tax Tables." a monumental 
work designed as a time-saving, quick and accurate method of com})uting 
tax rolls, that ATr. Kennedy is I)est known as a mathematician, this work 
having been ado])ted almost universally by the supervisors of Michigan and 
b\' many of the auditors in otlier states, being i)erhaps the most complete 
work of the kind e\-er pulilished. Mr. Kennedy also has 1:)ecn a wide traveler 
and is a man of extensive and comprehensive information on a host of sub- 
iects. F'ollowing a trip through the West Indies some years ago, he delivered 
several lectures on the habits and customs of the peo])le of those islands 
whicii attracted nmch attention, and he also has lectured extensively through- 
out the lower peninsula in connection with his researches in the field of taxa- 
tion. Mr. Kennedy also has taken an active part in the general affairs of the 
community and is a man of varied activities. He is a vice-president of the 
k\armers and Merchrmts State P>ank of Lakeview, a member of the board of 
directors of that sound linancial institution and chairman of the discount 
committee of the same. lie also is acting as receiver for the affairs of the 
AJichigan ("hair and Table Factor}-, a concern owned by a Lakeview corpora- 
tion, and in other ways has demonstrated his interest in the business life of 
the town and vicinity, long having been regarded as one of the most public- 
spirited and nseful citizens of that place. 

In T874. at Grattan. this state. Salem F. Kennedy was united in mar- 
riage to Blanche B. Wolfe, who was born at Grattan on December 25. 1850. 
daughter of Abrani and l^lizabeth (Bellamy) Wolfe, the latter of Vermont 
and the former of Ohio, who came to Michigan after a sometime residence 



MONTTCAI.M COUNTY, MTCIIIGAN, l8l 

in Ohio, iK'Coiniiig- well-known residents of Grattan, and to this union two 
children ha^"e l,)een horn, T.aurin L., assistant postmaster at Lakevievv, who 
married Ma}- JJrown and has one child, Irene May, and Louie J., a traveling 
salesman for a coffee house at Kansas City, Missouri, in which city he makes 
his home, who married Ora Lindsley and has two children. Gordon A. and 
Salem 1\ l^.lr. and .Mrs. Kennedy for years have been among the leaders 
in the social and cultural life of their community and are held in the highest 
esteem throui;liout the county. Airs. Kennedy is a woman of fine education 
and as a mathematician has been a valuable assistant to her husband in his 
extensixe lal)ors along those lines. The Kennedys have a fine home at Lake- 
\iew and ])ossess besides other valua1)le real estate in that town and in Cato 
townshi[), together with considerable land holdings in Medina county, Ohio, 
and real estate holdings in Grand Ra])ids, and are accounted quite w^ell cir- 
cumstanced. Mr. Kennedy IxH^ame a Mason in 1868. a member of Grattan 
Lodge So. U)4, and ever since, a period of nearly fifty years, has been deeply 
interested in Masonic affairs, his active membership long ago having been 
transferred to the lodge at T.akeview, in the affairs of which he takes a warm 
interest. 



LI^WIS WARD. 



One of the most prominent citizens of Lakevievv, Michigan, and one 
who has taken a cons])icuous part in the official life of his town and county, 
I'- Lewis Ward, who was born in Irwin township. Steuljen county, New York, 
August 23, 1847. J-ie is the son of Robert and Charity (Borst) Ward, both 
natives of New York, the former of English and the latter of Dutch descent, 
i he}- were farmers in Steuben county, New York, and lived there all of their 
hves. They reared a family of eleveti children, of whom Lewis was the 
eighth. 

Lewis Ward was educated in the district schools of Irwin township and. 
w hen a boy of thirteen }'ears. started out to make his own way. On Decem- 
i)er 3. 1863. wdicn sixteen years of age. he enlisted in the Civil War, in Com- 
pany A, Fiftieth Regiment. New York Ejigineers, and w-as connected with 
the Army of the Potomac. lie saw the greater part of his service around 
Petersburg and in the battle of the Wilderness, but was not in any of the 
larger engagements, being employed most of the time in building bridge.s and 
roads. He was in several minor skirmishes and often barely escaped Ix'ing 



l82 Mr)X'iCAJ.M COrNTY, MICHIGAN. 

taken prisoner, lie was discliargecl at Washington on jnne 8, t8()5, and his 
regiment (Hsbanded at J.'dtnira. New Vorl\, three weeks kiter. 

While Mr. Ward was serving in the war his lather had died and, n}X)n 
his reinrn from service, he farmed the home farm for his mother for one 
year. In tlie fall of i8()- he came west to C'ato township, Alontcahn county, 
Michigan, where he wc^rked as a luml)erman for ahont six or eight years. 
In 1875 he honght ten acres of land in section 21. of this tcnvnship, and ])ro- 
ceeded to clear it and put it under cultivation, a short time afterward ackling 
ten acres and still later another ten acres, making in all a farm of thirty 
acres. 1 le farmed this small farm for some time and then purchased eightv 
•acres in section 33. of (alo townsln'p. which he farmed until he sold out and 
moxed to !>akeview in i()0..|.. at which time he owned one hundred and sixty 
aci'es in section 33 and thirtx' acres in section 21. Since coming to i.ake- 
\iew he has bought his own home and also has another piece of proi>erty 
which he rents. 

On Decemijer 3, ii<6q, Lewis Ward was married to Mary Shutt, who 
was horn in Germany and came to America with her parents when ten years 
(»f age. 1diey lirst settled in Ganada. but later came to Michigan, where 
.\jr. and Mi-s. Ward were married. IV) this union have been horn three 
children, lames M., .'\deline and Myra. and besides these children. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ward adopted one son, Lewis S. l\'irrer. James "M. was born in May, 
1871, and was lirst married to Stella Bliss and to them were born live chil- 
dren, kVuiny, Alger, Robert. Warren and Mary, .-\fter the death of his first 
wife, he was married to Martha Scott and to them have been born three chil- 
dren, (Clifford. Ke.'its and I'ernell. i\deline, deceased, was born on b'ebruary 
13. 1873. and married John k'ries. and to them was born one child, who is 
also deceased. M_\ra, born on October 27. 1875, married James ^Maine and 
to this union was born one child, who is now deceased. Lewis vS. I'Virrer 
was born on Octo1.)er 14, 1890, the son of Solon and Jane (Jamerson) 
b'arrer, who were of Scotch descent. His mother died when he was two 
weeks old, at which time he was taken l)y Mr. and Mrs. Ward and has lived 
with tiiem since. Pie married Catherine Bates and they have one son. Jarvis. 

xVIrs. Ward is a member of tlie Methodist Episcopal church and takes 
an active part in the work of the church and Sunday school. Mr. Ward is 
a memlxir of the Independent Order of Odd lAdknvs and takes a deep interest 
in the affairs of this lodge. l''olitically, he is a Democrat, although he is 
more or less independeiit in local politics, voting for the man he thinks best 
suited for the office, regardless of his |>olitics. At ])resent he is filling the 



MOXTCALAr COITNTY, MICIIIGAX. 1 8^ 

tjfiice of constable and marshal o\ T.akcview, which position he has occupied 
lor eight years. lie has also ser\ ed as street commissioner, health officer 
and lire chief of J.akc\ie\v. 

Upon coming to Montcalm county, Mr. Ward had practically nothing, 
l)Ut In- perseverance, economy and hard work, he has accumulated his present 
possessions and may worthily be called a self-made man. He endured all 
of the hardships ex])erienccd by the early settlers and has seen Montcalm 
county grow from a wilderness into its ])resent state of prosperity. ^\r. 
Ward is one of the public-spirited and enterprising citizens of Montcalm 
count}' and is well liked and higlilv respected by all who know him. 



CHARLES L. MEACH. 



/V hardware dealer and one of the most highly respected and best-known 
men of Lakeview, AJontcalm county, Michigan, is Charles L. Meach, who 
was l)orn on l''el)ruary j6, 1877, in Ionia county, Michigan, the son of Will- 
iam and Augusta (Morse) Aleach, both natixes of New York, who came 
to Michigan when small children with their respective parents. The Meach 
family is of b.nglish and Scotch descent and a very old family in the United 
vStates. William Meach was a farmer by occupation and followed that line 
of work all of his life, or until his retirement. In 1879 he came to Mont- 
calm count}' and located near McBride. 

("harles L. Meiicli grew up in the vicinity of AicBride and here received 
his education in the district schools, later attending the Central Michigan 
N'ormal School, from which he was graduated in 1897, being a member of 
the second class to graduate fr(jm that institution. He had previously- 
received a teacher's certificate and had taught from 1894 to 1896, and, after 
attending the normal school, taught for two years in the Lakeview high 
school. In T899 he went to Sheridan, where he was sui)erintendent of the 
scIkjoI for three years, or until T902, when in November of that year, he 
was elected in the office of county clerk. In the fall of IQ02 he began teach- 
ing in the (ireenville school, but resigned this jx)sition on January i, 1903, 
when he took up his duties as clerk, holding this office for three terms or six 
}ears. In the spring of 1008 he bought an interest in the John W. S. Per- 
son Comi)any and remained widi them until 1911, at which time he disposed 
of his stock and bought out the hardware and implement business of M. W. 
(jce. in T.akeview. This firm was incorporated in the spring of 1915, chang- 



184 MONTCALM COUNTY, AITCIIIGAN. 

iiig- it from a co-])artiier,shi|> \\\{h Claude li. White to a corporation with 
six stockholders. Since taking- n]) this business, ^Nlr. M'each has been very 
successful and has recently added a line of furniture. 

("hrirk's L. Meacli was married in ^lontcalm county, August 23, 1900, 
to Jennie J. Xorthrop. who was 1)()rn in Tonia county, March 30, 1878, the 
daughter of Charles W. and Cjiarlotte ( Dygert) Xorthro]), wlio were natives 
of New York and of linglish descent. I'hey came from New York to Mont- 
calm county early in the seventies, setthnq- in Greenville. l)ut in 1876 movetl 
to Lakeview. To Air. and Mrs. Meach have been born two children. Stuart, 
born on November 20, 1908. and I'.unice Al., I'"ebruary 25, 1913. 

I'Yaternally, Mr. Meach is a member of the I'Yee and .Ycceptcd Masons, 
belonging to the 1)Iue lodge at r.ake\iew .and the chapter at Stanton; and the 
independent Order of Odd Fellows at Stanton, also belonging to the encamp- 
ment. Both Mr. and Mrs. Meach are members of the Order of the Kastern 
Star. The Meach faiuily are memljers of the Congregational church and 
take an active interest in all of the work of this denomination. Politicallv, 
]\l.r. Meach is a Rejniblican, but the only offices which he has held are those 
of county clerk and a meml>er of the town council of T.akeview. Mr. 
Meach is very popular in FakcAievv and has a large number of friends and 
ac(|uaintances, by whom he is highly esteemed. 



AlJGUSd^US F. HILL. 



-Augustus Mill \va^ born in (jcrniany, August 21, 1870, a son of Chris 
and Lmma (I'onath) Hill. Chris Mill was a farm laborer in his native 
land and about the year 187T emigrated to America, landing at the port of 
New York. Me came directly to this state, locating in Grand Rapids, where 
he continued to be employed as a laborer, but in 1880 he moved to Alontcalm 
county and Ixnight fort}- acres of land in ATaple A'alley township. The tract 
he obtained was wild land and had to be reclaimed from the virgin forest. 
The first house erected on the land was a small frame building, which served 
the family for several years, when a larger residence was l)uilt. Chris llill 
])rosj)ered, owing to his thrift and industry, and at the time of his death 
was possessed of one hundred and sixty acres. The accumulation of this 
property was brought about through much hardship, such as was the order 
of the day while he was engaged in making a home. He passed from this 
life on February 2,. 1914, his wife having i)receded him on Decem!)er 2. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. I«5 

I'joc;. Chris Hill had taken an active interest in local politics and was a 
\(jv\ devout nienihcr of tiie Lutheran chiuxh. lie was one of the organizers, 
and huilders of the Alajjle Hill cliurch in Pierson township. 

Augustus J". Hill is the eklest of a faniil}^ of three children, the others 
l)eing Kdward, who married Louisa Schaub and lives in Maple \'alley town- 
ship. He is the father of two children. Amanda and Arthur. Charles mar- 
ried Alalinda Schaul), sister of l:d ward's wife. Charles also lives in Maple 
X'alley township) and has two children, Ffarold and Kussell. 

Aaigustus 1'". II ill has never married. He received his education in the 
common schools of Trufant and remained at home until eighteen years of 
age. assisting the father in clearing the home farm and getting it under culti- 
\ation. .\fter leaxing home he was for two years with the Pere ]\hu"quette 
railroad. he1])ing in the construction of their western division. After return- 
ing home, he bought forty acre> of land in ?\rai)le N'alley township, which he 
farmed for fourteen years. Tliis farm he enlarged until he had one hun- 
dred and twenty acres in one tract. .Mr. 11 ill also owns eighty acres of land 
in Cato township. Tn lyjcn) he retired from the acti\e work on his farms 
and took up his residence in Lakeview. where he had i)reviously purchased 
a jjiece of property, and there he has since made his home. He keeps charge 
of the managensent of his land and in addition to that, devotes considerable 
lime to political matters. 

Mr. Mill gives sui)iiort to the l\e])ul)lican party and has at different 
times Ijeen a mem])er of tlie towv board, the highwax' commission and the 
heard of rex'iew, liaving s<'rve<l on the K'ltter for eight years. .\[r. Mill has 
heeu the countv [\epublican re|'resentati\'e to the state conxentions. in which 
hody he was a delegate three different times. He has been repeatedly urged 
to run for state rejiresentative, but has steadfastly refused. Mr. Hill cast 
his tlrst vote for President Cleseland and since that time had not lost a 
\-ote until the election of President Wilson. 

Augustus V. Hill holds fraternal afhliation with the Grangers and as 
a member of that lodge has hold i>i-onu"nent offices. He has been a delegate 
to the state convention and was there apj)ointed to serve on prominent com- 
mittees, such as the legislative commission, etc. Mr. Hill is not a member 
of ;my church, but is a strong advocate of religious princii>les and gives his 
supi^ort to the Congregational church. His i>rinciples are of the highest 
ruul (hiest. He is well known for his strict view^s on the temperance ques- 
tion ;uid as a friend of little children he is warmly regarded bv the rising 
generation. 



]86 .MONTCALM COL'NTY, MlClllGAX. 

In addilioii to his fanning- interests, Augustus F. Hill is a stockholder 
in the I'anncrs and Merchants Bank of Lake\'ic\v. Ilis brothers also have 
])rosi)ered, each owning fine farms and l)eing leaders in their respective com- 
nunnties. i\ach has been active in local [)olitics, liolding minor offices and 
both are devcjut menil)crs of the lAUheran church, in which they have tilled 
])rominent offices. I.Jotli also are active in fraternal organizations, being- 
members of the Ivnights of the Maccabees, the Cileaners and tiie Grangers. 



Kk.WClS (i. WILIJAAISOX. 

I'^rancis G. Williamson, a well-known grocer of Lakevicw, Alichigan. 
wa> l)orn in I'utnani county, Ohio, March 7. 1855. the son of Thomas and 
I'-Iizabeth M. (GodfrcA-j Williamson, both natives of ("umberland county, 
J'cnnsylvania. and cvf Scotch-Irish descent. Thomas Williamson was a tan- 
ner by trade and worked at this occupation for many years after coming to 
(Jhio, although he later took U)) farming, wdn'ch he followed until his death. 
To Thomas and I'Jizabeth M. W illiamson were born ten children, of whom 
J'rancis Ci. was the eightli. 

brancis G. Willianison received his elementary education in the district 
scIkkjIs of his home neighborhood and, after completing the common school 
ccjurse, went to l''remont (Sandusky county) high school, from which he 
was graduated, .\fter completing his education he went to work in a grocery 
store, wliere he rem.-iined for six months, \\-hen lie went to work in a general 
store, as he thought this store offered nu^re op])ortunity for advancement. 
He workt'd in this store for fourteen vears, after which he secured a i)osi- 
tion with the .Michigan (\.- G»hio l\;ulroad Gompany. being emi)ioyed on their 
extension work in Afichigan. While working in this state, Mr. Williamson 
had grcnvn to like it \-er\- much and. 'when his work with the railroad came 
to an end, he decided to stay, lie went to work in the timber, where he 
worked for some time or until 1881, when he located in kakeview. securing 
em])loyt7ient in a grocery store, which was located on the site of his ])resent 
store. After clerking in thi^ store for ten years, he formed a partnership 
with Daxid N. Richards and bought the ^tore. He and Afr. Richards con- 
tinued in i)artnership for three years, when Mr. AVilliamson bought out Mr. 
Richards" stock and has since conducted the business alone. He has been 
in l)usiness in the same block for about twent}'-five years and in the same 
room for twenty-tw'O years. 



MONTCALM COl'XTY, MICHIGAN. 187 

Oil AngnsL 22, i<S8(;, I'rancis G. Williamson was married to Marguerite 
.\. Cobey, who was l)oni in (.."aiiada, near Welland, Ontario, the daughter of 
jacdl) Richard and Sarah ( l/reish ) ("obey, both nati\es of Canada, })robably 
of I'rench-Canadian descent. To Air. and Airs. Williamson has been l)orn 
one child, who is now deceased. 

liesidcs his grocery business, Mr. Williamson is also interested in fann- 
ing, and for tlu past few ^ears has been ].)articularly interested in fruit cul- 
ture, which he conducis on a scientific 1)asis. TTc owns a farm of eighty 
;icres al)OUt one and one-half miles northwest of Lakeview, on which he has 
about sixteen hundred trees of ])eaches, apples, cherries, plums and pears. 
I le also raises ])otatoes, beans, corn and wheat and has l)een very successful 
in this line of work, 

Mr. and Mrs. Williamson are members of the Methodist Rpiscopal 
church and take an acti\e interest in the work of this congregation. Mr. 
A\'illiamson is a member of the Free and Acce])ted Masons, which he joined 
while a resident of Ohio, and he and his wife are both members of the Order 
of the 1-^astern Star, he haying helped to organize the local order. Although 
.\lr. Williamson has held sc^•eral minor public offices, he has neyer been actiye 
in i)olitics, preferring to devote his time and attention to his priyate interests. 



CTTART.RS S. RTCFTARDS. 

Charles S. J\ichar(ls, a fanner of Cato township, Montcalm county, 
was born in Kingston Center, Delaw^are county, Ohio, June 30, 1857. lie 
is the eldest of the three children of Cornelius and Sarah (Carney) Rich- 
ards, both also nati\'es of Delaware county. Cornelius Richards ^vas a son 
of C'ornelius, Sr., who was born of German parentage in the state of New Jer- 
.sey and when a young married man, he and his wife left their natiye state 
and went to Ohio, which \yas then on the frontier, riding all the distance 
(Ml liorseback. 

Cornelius, father of Cdiarles S., was born on June 15, 1802, and died 
on December 3, 1882. His wife \yas lx)rn on January 25, 1834 and passed 
from this life on December it, 1913. ^Idie two other children of the family 
are also deceased, so that Charles S. Richards is the sole surviving member 
of his immediate family. His brother, Commodore J., was born August 
25. 1859, and died March 14, 1907, and his brother, W^illnir C, was born 
July 26, 1866, and passed aw^'iy the same year. The parents were married 



1 88 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

in their native JJelaware connty (Ohio J. February 2, 1854, and in 1865 
tlie\ jonrneyed to this state, arriving in Cato township in October of that 
year. The elder Richards came to take possession of a tract of one hun- 
ch-ed and sixty acres of land located in sections 21 and 28, which had been 
s^iven to him by his father, who had purchased the wild land from the 
goNcrnment some thirteen years ])revious. Cornelius J'vichards made his 
Jiome for the remainder of his life on that farm. He at one time sold half 
of the original tract and piuThased forty acres of railroad land instead, 
making his lioldings one hundred and twenty acres and there he farmed 
until his active days were ended, llis wife will he remem])ered as an excel- 
lent woman and a faithful mcmljer of the Methodist lLpisco])al church. 

Charles S! h'ichards \\as a young boy when brought to this county by 
his ])arenls and reccixed his education at the Notmall school, Cato town- 
ship, making the best of such advantages as were offered at that time, b'rom 
the first he assisted the father in the work of the farm and has continued 
in that xocaiion all his life. Air. Richards conducts generrd farming as 
])ractice<l throughout this section and gives es]X'cial attention to his (ine herd 
of llolstein cattle, \^•hich he is gradually working up to a high state of per- 
fection. 

On .\])ril 19. 1885, Charles .S. Richards was married in Cato town- 
ship to ITfie Ra])[). a native of this same township, bom on September 23, 
]^(^H, a daughter of Richard and Mary J. (Cleeson) Lapp, both of whom 
were liorn in C"olbin. ( )ntario. ("anada. .Mrs. Rapp died when her daughter 
h'J'he was but seven years of age and two years later their home was 
destroyed l)y lire and the contents with it, so that all early records of her 
family were lost. To Mr. atid Mrs. Richards have been born thirteen chil- 
dren, ten of whom are lixing. They are: Rester, born January 23, 1886, 
^^ ho has been twice married. His first wife was Eva Male, who bore him 
four children: Lena. Katie. Rillie and Reo. Mrs. Rester Richards died on 
June 2. ]()I2 and f.e^ter later married Idorie (ireenlic'd. who has b(jrne him 
one child, Ainia .May. Mary j. Ivichards was horn on November 8, 1887, 
and died on Decemher i.|. i()0<). She was the wife n{ Martin Ibish. Zellia 
M.. May 2, 1880, married (."harles lUitterick and has one child, IThe E. 
Sarah. Septemher 5. i8f)o. is the wife of Oscar Russell and the mother of 
three children, lulna. l^arl and hdsie May. (x:»rnelins, January 7, r8{)4, and 
is still at home. Delia. .\]-)n\ 25. f8()5. and became the wife of John Chi vers 
and the mother of one child. Rloyd. Hazel, .April 28. 1896, and married 
Martin d. Rush. She has two children, Franklin G. and Ravniond C. 



jNioN rc:Ai.M C()i;nty. micttigan. i8<) 

l^\c'1in;i, July (j, i<X(j<S. and is the wife of Philip Wright. Peter, August 
I. 1901, and (hed Alarcli 30, IQ03. \'ictor, No\enihcr 20, 1903. Myrtle, 
.Vpril iC), !(/)(). I'xlith. January 13. i<)og, and one other child died in 
earliest infancy. 

-\s a rule, Mr. Richards \'()tes the Republican ticket, l)ut he is prac- 
tically independent in ]K)]itics, \oting for the man rather than the ticket. 
ITe has displayed a conimendaljle interest in local affairs and held some 
minor offices, discharging his duties in a fitting manner to all concerned. 



PAUKISTOX n. I'ARXSW'OliTU. 

Pauriston B. I'^uMKworth, a creditable representative of the civic and 
agricultural interests of I lie community in which he resides, was born on 
C)cto1)er JO, 1(^59, in Alasina. St. Lawrence county, New York, and is the 
son of David j. and l)idama (Bradford) h'arnsworth. David J. Farns- 
wortli was a native of Xew IPampshire and of true Yankee stock. De fol- 
lowed farming as a vocation and was very successful in this line, liis wife 
was a uati\e of New "S'ork and came to Michigan with her husband, in 
i<S(So. locating iirst in Grand Rapids for one year and thence to Montcalm 
count}-, where they established a residence on two hundred and forty acres 
of cut-over timber land, in I'ine township, section 10. A large home was 
erected in 1885, and here: lhe\ remained until death. He died on October 
18. 1899. and his widow on June 30, 1904. They were members of the 
Methodist Episco])al church, and the parents of seven children, of whom six 
lived to reach maturity. Their names follow: Alden ]., Lauriston B., 
Mrs. llattie \\ illiams, (jeorge \\ ., lulson and v^tella. Pdson died in Octo- 
ber, i8(ji. and Stella, in 1905. 

Pauriston B. b^arnswortli received his education in the schools of his 
native town, subseciuentl)' engaging in ;igricultural pursuits, which he has 
since continued. Tie remained under the parental roof until the death of 
his father and mother, at which time he came into possession of tlie home 
place. Politic:dly, he is faithful to the Democratic party and under that 
regime has served in the oflice of township supervisor, of Pine township, 
l)eing elected in T895, and serving for six years. PTe was also, in 1914, 
re-elected to this oOice which he still holds. Previous to his election as 
township su])ervisor. he acted as township treasurer for two years and pre- 
vious to his last election he w^as town.ship treasurer for two terms. Fra- 



HJO AIOXTCAJ.M COINTV, MICJJIGAX. 

ternally, he is ri mcinber of the Kiiiiihts of the .Maccaljees and of the Aiieient 
Order ui (jleaners. of \vhieh his wife is also a nieiiiber. The family are 
iiK'iiihers of the Methodist !4)isco|)al chiireh and very active in its support. 
On July 31, 181%. in (ireenville, Alontcahn enunty, Lauriston B. Farns- 
worth and Idoria I,. hd)erhar(!t were united in marriage and to their union 
two children were l)<.)rn, IJessie Iv and l^dson 11. iiessie l'~. was born on 
May 17, I <S(;o. and married 1 .eo A. \'c»tmL'inan. of Lake\iew, Michigan. 
She is a graduate of the l.ai<e\iew high school and taught for three years 
in the schools of I'ine townshij). lAlson 11. was horn on March 21, 1892, 
and li\es at h(.)ine. Idoria \ .. ( ld)erhardt ) h'arnsworth was horn on Decem- 
ber 14. i8()3. in Ionia, .Michigan, and is the daughter of Fienry IC. and 
l'di/.al)eth (Porter) l'd)erhardt. Henry i'^. l'd)erhar(it was a native of Ger- 
many, ou the l)rmks of the Ixhine. hdizabeth ( Porter) Kberhardt was a 
nati\e of llay, ()ntario. ("anada. They loc;i,ted in Ionia, .Michigan, in 1864. 
where they remained until the death of the husband. The widow married 
again and mo\e(l to Canada, where her death occurred. They were the 
])arents of se\eral children, two of whom \\\c(\ to a mature age; the names 
of the two who died at the age of ten .and eleven years were, Pdizabeth and 
I lomer. 



jOldX 11. WAXDKL. 

John il. W'andcl. (.'ato townshi]). .Montcalm coimty, was born on Sep- 
tember JO, i8()2, on a farm which is now part of his homestead, being the 
eldest of the live children of John Adam and Martha M. (Meyers) W'an- 
dcl and the only one of the fannl}- still residing in Cato township. 

-Martha (Meyers) \\ andel was a native of Bavaria, in the German 
cni|)irc, ruid was br(.)Ught to thi-- -tate by her nujther when a. child of three 
years, the father having dieil in their n;itive land. The mother located in 
Jefferson count}', Wisconsin, and there Martha grew to womanhood and 
lived until the time of her marriage. John Adam Wandel was a native of 
W urtemberg, German}-, and. when }()ung mastered the wea\er's trade, which 
he followed until thirl}- }ears of age. When thirty-eight years old he emi- 
grated to America, locating for a time in Ohio and later going to Wiscon- 
sin. IJowever, he did not settle permanently until he reached Cato town- 
ship, Montcalm county, in October, J 860. Here he ]}re-empted forty acres 
of government land in section 22, and made his home there for the balance 



AroNTCAL.M CorXTY, MiCIITGAX. K^l 

of liis lilc, owniiii^ cii^lity acres in all at the time of his death. John Adam 
W'aiulel was one of the Inst settlers in I'ato township, which had l:)een 
ori;anize<l just iiefore he came here and there were but eleven white families 
in all. Shortly afterward, on Afarch i<S. i80t, he was married in Wiscon- 
sin to .Martha .Meyers, as above stated, and this became their permanent 
home. There were li\e children born to their union, those other than John 
II., beini^- b'rances K'., wife nf Charles I>remer; James \\., deceased; Har- 
riet L.. wife of Henry Lanely and (k'ori>e .A.. 

j(.)hn 11. W'andel receiwd but the limited edncation the school facilities 
uf this section at that time atlorded and from early boyhood, assisted in 
the farm work. Me remained at home and after his father's death in 
i(S(X_|.. be purchased, in .i<^c>5, the interests of tlie other heirs and has con- 
tinued to make his home (.mi the old family homestead. Tie has pm-chased 
additional land from time to time ;md he now owns two hundred and sixty- 
se\cn acres, located in sections _m and 22. The commodiotis famil}- resi- 
(k'uce w;is erected in i*)o~ rmd since that time Mr. W'andel has erected a 
larj^e an<l modern barn. lie divides bis attention between general farmini^' 
and the raisiui^' of li\e stock. 

John II. W anck^I has been twice married, his tirst wife, with whom be 
was united in niarria;L;e on Xoxcmber _', 1SS4. was Tj'llian (j. Ward, born 
in (irand Ixauids. .Michij^an. a daui^hter of Walter and Jane ( f )aker ) Ward. 
To this um'on were born four children, one n\ whom died in infancy, three 
remaining', at the time of the mother's death on .\'o\ember 4, i8()5. These 
were l:lenr\ M., Raymond W. and John .\., but the death of Raymond 
'Kcm-rcd but twcn.ty days after that of the mother, lioth beinj:,'- caused by 
iMihoid fe\cr, of whic-h there wa^ an e|)idenu'c at tliat time. On December 
-,v i^^*'7- j"bn 11. Wandel was a!.^ain married, his bride being- Rhoda L. 
Dradlew born in (ireen\ille. .Montcaim county, ^he is a daughter of John 
and I'dixa ( (loodwell ) r>radle\-, natives of I'jtgland and Canada res])ectively. 
To .Mr, Watidel and his -econd wife iia\e been born fom* children, nameh' : 
kntli and I'.llen. both deceased; .Stanlex' P.. and Irene. 

.Mr. Wandel is a man of g'cm'al di^])osition, haxing many friends and 
L;really enjoying the sport of bunling. TTe rarelv allows a year to pass 
wit bout s])ending at lea.st a week in llie Xorthern Peninsula after deer, and 
he has in his hi.^me some excellent heads as tro])hies of his skill. He kee])s 
well i)oste(l on cm-rent events and is a good conversationalist, being especi- 
ally fond of discussing- historical subjects, in whicli study he has alwavs 
been interested. Mr. Wandel calls himself a Pciniblican. but is practicallv 



H)2 MONTCALM COUXTY, MICHIGAN. 

iii(le]K'ii(k'iit ill \otiiig- as a rule, and has never songlit public office, llis 
wife is a most excelleiU woman and iheir home (hspenscs sincere cordiality 
t(.) friend and transient "iiest, alike. 



JUDGE luc:as M. M\EL. 

Lncas M. Aiiel. who for some years has occupied the bench of the 
JMontc;dni count) prolxite court, and who for many }-ears has been promi- 
nent in the public and ofiicial ai'fairs of the community, was born in Fair- 
plain to\\nshi]), Alonicalni county, on Auyust lo, 1859, the son ot Charles 
H. and Martha xV. (^ Swift) Miel, natives of Xew York state, the former 
l)orn in Allegany count}'. 

(.'haiies 11. Aliel grew to maturity in his native county, where he was 
married, after which he came, in 1850. to Montcalm count}', Michigan, and 
])urchascd a farm in f'air])lain to\vnship, at a time when the county w'as 
yet unsettled cind when the land was uncleared and unprepared for culti- 
vation. Charles 11. Miel engaged in general farming and in the operation 
of a saw-mill, together with de;ding in lunilxT until 1861, when he enlisted 
in Comi)an}- 11. h^ighth Michigan \'oluiiteer Infantry, and served with this 
compau} in the Civil \\'ar, until he was killed at the battle of James Island, 
during the year [862. Martha, the widow of Charles H. Miel, died wdthin 
a year of the death of her husband. In the public life of early days in 
Montcalm county. Charles H. Miel was a prominent citizen, he having 
served for many years as justice of the ]X'ace. while he was chairman of 
the county l.toard of supervisors, during tiie term l)eginning in 1853. 

After the death of his parents. T-ucas M. Miel. together with the other 
four children of the family, were homeless, and t'ollow'ing the enlistment 
of his eldest Ijrother, Charles 11., Jr.. as a sf)ldier of the Civil War, Lucas 
M. Miel was cared for in the various homes of liis communitA-, until he was 
tAvelve years of age. when he went to live with a farmer east of the town 
of Greenville, making his home at that place for the next seven years. For 
the following nine }ears Lucas M. Miel worked in the woods of the state, 
for three years of his time serving as a fireman. When sixteen years of 
age he bought eighty acres of land, in r)elvidere township. Montcalm county, 
l")aying for his land with money Avhich he earned as a worker in the woods. 

AVhen Lucas IM. Miel located on his farm, Avhich wms the first real 
home of his recollection, he erected a primitive dwelling, cleared and culti- 



M()XT(.\r,M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. I93 

\aled his land, and raised live stock. Me is the owner of four eighty-acre 
farms, all of which are well cared for and in a good state of cultivation. 

When twent\'-two years of age, Lucas M. Aliel was married to Nettie 
\an Kuren, and to this marriage there was born one child, Avho died in 
infancy, shortly after which the wife and mother died. J^ucas M. Miel 
was married live years later, to Lillian (.'. Palmer, who was born in Sidney 
township. Montcalm county, the daughter of Loren 1). and Lydia Palmer, 
who came to Sidney township, from their home in New York, and engaged 
in agricultural life, for the remainder of their days. To the marriage of 
Lucas AL and Lillian C Miel were born four children: Howard IL, of 
.\lcP>ride, who married Ilattie Shannon and to whom has been born one 
son. Clifton lAicas, who was educated at the Ferris school, at Big Rapids, 
.Michigan; Parbara, who is deceased: (iladys, who, after graduating from 
tlie Stanton liigh school and receixing s])ecial normal training, is now a 
teacher, at ivock Lake, and Llelen I*",., who, after completing the course of 
^tudy at the Stanton high school, is now a teacher at Vickeryville. Lillian 
('., the wife of J-ucas M. Miel. died in igo^. and in i(;o5, Judge Aliel was 
married to Alari-e Jensen, who was born in l")enmark. the daughter of Soren 
and Alinnie ( Knudsen ) Jensen, who came to America, and located in Bel- 
\idere townshij). >\here the\- now live. ] .ucas AL and Marie Aliel are the 
parents of three children, .Mice \l., Charles Homer and Lucas S. 

ludge Lucas Al. Miel is one of the most honored men of public life, in 
Montcalm c(»untv, having served as chairman of the Republican county 
committee on several occasions, and for five years having occupied the 
Mfhcf of county su])ervisor. lie resigned this office to become treasurer of 
Montcalm county, an office to which he was elected and re-elected, and has 
-cM-ved four years, to the satisfaction of all. 

In 1908. Lucas Al. Aliel, after eight years as a farmer, was elected to 
'he office of judge o\ the probate court, in Montcalm county, an office to 
which, after serving four years. Judge Miel, in 1912, was re-elected, and is 
now serving in this capacity. The experience of Judge Lucas M. Miel in 
early childhood and his life among the lumber workers of the community, 
has ])eculiarly fitted him for the care of the orphan children, who are wards 
of his court, and for the adjustment of the affairs which arise in connection 
w ith the lumber interests of the county, making this worthy occupant of the 
bench one of the most efficient juri.sts in the history of local courts. 

Judge Lucas AT. ATiel has been active in the business interests of Mont- 
'\ilm county and adjoining counties. He has been an officer of the Ionia, 
(13b") 



194 MONTCAl^M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

AJontcalui and Clinton Conntics Mutual Fire Insurance Company for thir- 
teen _\ears. three years of this ])erio(l as director and ten years as president. 
This company has the re]mtati()n of heing- one of die strongest insurance 
corporations of the state of Micliigan, ranking fourteenth among ninet)' 
companies known for the efiiciency of their management. 

Judge Lucas AI. Miel de\'oted his time for one summer, as well as 
contributing liberally of his means, to the erection of the Congregational 
church at Six T,akes. hie became a Christian at the age of twenty-one vears 
and has since l)een a devout member of that church. I'Yaternally, he has 
been a member of the Masonic order since 1881 ; Alodern Woodmen of 
America since T()03; Ancient Order of (dcaners in 1908. and has been a 
member of all c^f them since. 



I'RF.D P..\LL. 



Frecl l*).all, a well-known farnun- in this community, was born on Decem- 
ber i(), 1853, in (renesee county, Xew ^'ork, and is tlK^ son of William and 
I'di^.abeth (Cann) Hall, both natives of l:.ngland, who came to America 
[)rior tu their marriage which was solemnized in Xew York. William Ball 
was a farmer hy occupation and engaged in this vocr.tion suljsecjuent to his 
establishing a residence in l'"Iint. (jenesee county, Michigan, in 1866. He 
was the father of thirteen children, all of wliom are lixing, with the excc])- 
lion of one. and all are residents of Michigan, with tlie exception of two, 
W illiam and ,\rch, who li\e in Washington and Redlands, ("alifornia, 
respecti\'el\'. 

I'Ved IJall received a limited education in the common schools, as it 
de\ol\ed (';n him to assist in the support of the famih". In 1873, '^^^ located 
in Montcalm count}', where he was employed in the wfjods and saw-mills of 
the locality. k\)llow ing liis marriage, he ])urchased fort)- acres of land not 
far from a tract of fort\- acn-^ which his w ife owned, later adding' seventy 
acres to the we>t of the other land. Xinet}' acres of this pro])ertv is cleared 
and under cultivation and i> devoted to general farming and stock raising. 
Tlie uncleared ])ortion of this well-regulated i^lacc contains a lake near 
which is established the summer cam]-) of the family, the entire ])lace being 
known as the "();ik Mill I 'arm."" In national politio. l-'rcd P,all is a Demo- 
crat, while in local elections he votes independentlx-. J Ic has held school 
oflTces e\-er since the school was established, and has also been assessor since 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 1 95 

iliat time. I'raternally, lie is a nit'ni1)er of the l)all Camp, AJodeni VVood- 
nieii of Ameriea, the camp Ijein.Q' named in his honor, and of which he has 
been treasurer since its inception, in i(S(j8. He is also a mcmher of the 
Independent Order of Odd h'ellows. as well as of the Danj^-hters of Rel)ekah, 
of whicli his \\ife is also a memljer. 

On April ,20. i.S/f), in Montcalm county, l^'ed Ball and hdla Wilcox 
were united in marriage, and to their union se\en children were lx)rn. as 
follow ; Myrtle ]']., who was horn on Au^ijust 25. 1877. married Walter 
Davis, of Mushiui^-. (ienesee county, Alichii^an. and they have three chil- 
dren, T,au,ra. Mabel and l^dna ; I'Mna L., was horn on Octol)er 20, 1879, and 
married Herman Washer, now deceased; they had one child, Helen; Ora L., 
.Se])teml)er ij, 188 J, and married I^lla Nellis; their home is in Kalamazoo, 
Michigan; lM-an!c F-., September 5, 1883, married Kvd Rapp; they have one 
child, Ora; Leon V., AFay 16. i8()2: T.oyd J.. March 5, 1896, and married 
I'.ina llinkley, and Arza W., Sc])tember 3. 1898. hdla (W^ilcox) Rail was 
born on AJay 5, i''^5<). in (jrcenville. Montcalm county, and is the daughter 
of ]ose|)h and f^ucx- A. ( Kingsley > Wilcox, both natives of New York, who 
l(H-ated in I.angston. ?Vlontcalm county, in 1865. 



A. X. SHOOK. 



A. X. Shook, the ])r()prietor of a general mercantile establishment at 
'oral. Michigan, w.as born on Se])tember 26. i86c), the son of Daniel L. 
and Anna ( Xevvell ) Shook. 

Daniel Sh(<ok ua> a native of the state of Xew York, where he was 
')oru on June (). ]!<j,2. the son of Daniel Shook, of Dutch descent. Daniel 
Shook, the grandfather of .\. X. .Shook, came to Pierson township from 
'anada in i86j;. Ii;i\ing remo\ ed to the Dominion from his home in Xiew 
\ nrk some years before. He was accompanied to the new home by his 
lamily, with the excci)tion of the young Daniel K., who remained in Oan- 
■ ida until the next year when he too joined the family. The senior Darnel 
Shook, was ;i man of much pronunence in the lunv country, where he con- 
nuucd the ))racticc (^\ medicine until the time of his death. 

Daniel L. Shook, after coming to his father's home in 1864, continued 
at his trade, that of a cari)enter and maker of wooden pumps. In [866 he 
(■sfablished a store at what was then known as Rdna postoffice, south <^i 
Ibiward ("ity. TIere he erected the hrst frame building in that section 



H)b MONTCALM eoi/XTY, MlCIIUJAX. 

and made this place his home until 1872 when he renio\ed to Coral, where 
he conducted a store. 

Daniel 1,. Shook was ]>roniinent in politics and ser\ed as t<.)wnship 
sviperxisor. treasurer and school oflk-er for many years. In Nosemher, i8f)8, 
he was united in uiarria<^e to .\nna .\evvell and to this union the lollowini; 
children were horn: .\. X., Ruth, the wife of (.". .\. Hall, of Hamilton, 
()ntario: ( ieoroe, I'es^ie and (jertrude, the last three hein^ deceased. 

A. N'. Shook received his education in the pithlic schools of Coral, and 
later attended the Kalamazoo hi<^h school. After completin^t^ his education 
he hecame identified with his father in the mercantile business, the partner- 
shi]) continuin^^ until 1 )ecemher, urio. when the father died. 

!n December, i8<)4, .\. X. Shook \\as united in marriage to IJeatrice 
Sanderson, a native of Canada, and a daug'hter of Robert and Caroline 
(I.eavens) Sanderson. The marriage took i)lace in Coral. To this union 
have been born two children : Ro])ert I.)., a graduate of the 0)ral high 
school and at |>resent w ith the Xational (irocery Company, of (Jrand Rapids, 
and I larry Ti., a graduate of tiie high school, who is with his father in the 
store. 

.VI r. Shook is a member of Howard City Lodge No. 32(j, hree and 
Accepted .Vlasons. He has also received the higher degrees at Clinton and 
at (irand J-Japids. Politically, Mr. Shook is a Repul)lican and re])resented 
his county in the state Legislature in 1903, 1905 and 1907. He was jjresi- 
dent of the C oral school board and was for two years secretary of the cen- 
tral committee of his |)arty. 



JOHN VV. CL.\RK. 

John W . Clark is t)ne of the ])ioneers of this county and is well known, 
throtighout this section. He was instrumental in building the county road, 
and hauled the first load of lumber used in building the first court house 
erected in this county. His birth occurred on April 24, 1843, in Tompkins 
county. New York, and is the son of Warren and Maria (Beckman) Clark, 
nati\es of Connecticut atul Ohio, respectively. 

The Clark family are of h'.nglish descent .'und emigrated to .\merica 
with the 1'ilgrim Fathers. Warren Clark was the son of Elithlet (dark, 
wdio was a drum-major in a regiment of infantry, during the War of the 
Revolution. ITis father also fought in that war, both serving directly 



MONTCALM COrNTY, MICHIGAN. IC)7 

under (jcn. ( jcorm' Washington. Warren C.'lark was always interested in 
agricnllural i)ursuits and in i<^54, lie came to Eureka township, Montcahii 
fonnty, drivini; from the town of (irotan, New York, to the city of Buffalo, 
Xew ^'«>rk, where ihey emharked on the steamer "Buffalo"' hound for 
Detroit. Michigan. l'])on their arrival in that city, they resumed their 
jdurney hy team and continued to Rochester, Michigan, where a sister of 
Warren Clark was then residing. After a short vi.sit in that town, they 
|)roeee(Ie(l to Jackson, Michigan, hy the same sort of conveyance and 
remained two months, after which they journeyed to Otisco. Tonia county, 
Michigan, where they remained uruil the following spring. At that time 
tlie\- mo\ed to this county and purchased ouc hundred and twenty acres of 
parliall}- im])ro\ed land, on which they continued to live until death. 

John W . Clark had l)Ut limited op|M)rtunities for education. In those 
da\ s, his |)la\niates were Indians, with whom they traded small trinkets in 
cNchange f<»r \ enison, which was so ])lentiful at that time. Grand Ra])ids 
was the nearest trading i)oint, and fifty cents per l)ushel was the prevailing 
price of wheat, and wliich was more often paid for in trade than in cash. 
In f'ehruary. 1861, John W\ Clark and Catherine K. Mead were united in 
marriage and two children were born of their union, namely, George L., 
who married .Sarah Shutts and now resides in Pine township, this coimty. 
They are the parents of four children, Elmer L., John L., Wilma C. and 
Winnie. Ilerl)ert IC. the second son, hA'es at hotne with his parents. Cath- 
erine 1'^ ( Afcad) Clark was born in New Jersey, and was the daughter of 
t'alvin 11. an<l Sarah ( (x)mpton) Mead, both believed to be natives of New 
jersey. They came to Michigan in 1H50 and located near the town of 
Greenville, Montcalm county, where they remained until death. C'atherine 
\'.. (Mead) Clark passed away on June 15. 1013, leaving her husband and 
children to mourn her loss. 

In 1864, John \V. ( Tu'k enlisted in defense of his country, in Company 
1'.. Tenth Michigan Volunteer Cavalry, serx'ing under Ca|)tain Dunn and 
(olonel Tobridge, until the close of the Civil War. Tie partici]>ated in the 
siege of Nashville, Tennessee, and in many other l)attles of that terrible 
conHict. After his marriage, he purchased forty acres of land from his 
lather and continued to cultivate until his second ])urchase of eighty acres. 
HI Pine township, this county, disposing of this later that he nn'ght move to 
(h-eenville, Michigan. Pfere he lived for nine years, gradually gaining con- 
sideral)le interest in the lumber business, along Flat river, but after manv 
niis fortunes he lost everything and was forced to l>egin at the f)ottom. His 



1()8 MON'ICALM rorNTY, MICHIGAN. 

new >iart in life was i^aiiicd In- excavating for Ijrick Iniiklings, which were 
just beginning to be erected in thai locah'ty. IJe lias since come to the 
In^nt and his farm is one of the 1)cst in the vicinity. In T878, he pmxhased 
eighty acres in i'ine townshi]), of this county, and from this has evolved his 
comjietenc)'. J'ohtically, IVIr. (Jlark is a strong Repubhcan. l.)ut has never 
aspired to ollice, ahhongh he has served in several minor ones. On J3cccni- 
1)er 9, 1015. All'- (dark married his ])resent wife, who was Mrs. Clara Hoff- 
man, of I'ine township. 



\M<EDE A. PAUl^SON. 



.\mong the prosperous farmers and stock raisers of VVinfield township, 
AloiiLcalm county, Michigan, is Tirede A. i'aulson, who was l.K)rii near 
Irondhjem, Xorwaw September 2(). 1857, the son of .Xndreas and Bertha 
Aiartha ( Tliompson ) kalin. natives of Norway, the former of whom died 
in that countr\-, after which his widow was married to Peter Paulson. 

;\bout the year [870. I'rede A. I'aulson, together with his mother, stej)- 
father and three l)rot]iers and three sisters, came to America, and located in 
Winfield township. Montcalm cotmty, Michigan, where Peter I'aulson owned 
forty acres of land, and in which community the elder Paulson purchased 
fnrty acres more, on which he made his home, while he bought and cared 
for eighty acres niore of land nearb\'. in the same townslii]). .Xndreas and 
I'ertha Martha haliii were the parents of the following children: Urede; 
John, of San l-'rancisco. California: Andrew, of Winfield township. Mont- 
calm county, Michigan; I'eter, iif Idaho: (.)le. who li\'cs with his brother. 
P.r(.-(le: Martha, the wife <)f Charles I'jiglebretsen. of Winfield townshi]); 
(hrislian. of San I'ran.ciscn, California, rmd Xellie. of San k'nuicisco, 

I'rede \. I'aulsou H\'ed at 1)ome until nineteen vears of age. when, hav- 
ing com])leted his educition, hv worked on neighl)oring farms for some time 
and then bought fort\ acres of land, which he cleared of the timber and 
with the i)roceeds of the srde of his timber Air. Paulson ])urchased fortv 
acres more near (A^ral, AFontcnlm countw selling t!ie timber from this land, 
the income from which he again used for the ])urchase of fort\- acres of 
land, on which he li\ed until after his marriage, when l''.redc A. Paulson 
d.ispose<l of his original farm and bought his present farm of one hundred 
and twenty acres, located in section t6, Winfield township, which he now^ 
cultivates as a general farmer and on which he makes a specialtv of r.aising 
high-onalitv Ohio Tmpro\'ed Chester \A''hitc hogs. Tn addition to the farm 



MOXTC-ALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. !()(; 

(.»f liis residence I'rede A. l';uilsoii is the (jwiier of li\e hundred and Iwenly 
acres ol' lan<l in sections 23, 24 .'ind 28. of Winheld township. Montcahn 
ccninlv, 

I )nrin.i^- the nicjntli of October, TcS^H, Brede A. J.'aiilson was married to 
Thea !>jronstadl. wlio was horn in Trondhiem. Norway, and who came to 
America when a young- girl. 'J"o the marriage of \\r. and Mrs. i'aulson 
]ia\e l)een born four chikhx'n : (."];ira, who after her graduation from the 
Howard City higli school taught school until her marriage to Arthur Shu- 
man, of Si)arta. Michigan; 'i'hora, who after her graduation from the Ypsi- 
lanti State .Xf^anal ( ollege became a school teacher, having taught one year 
in Micliigan, three years in Montana, torn- years at Goldfiekh Nevada, and 
now is teaching her third year in ("ilafornia: Afalina, the wife of T.orin 
Duggert, of Alto. Michigan, and Arthur, a graduate of tlie F Toward City 
high school, who is pre|)aring to enter the University of Michigan. Mr. 
I'anlson is a member o\ the Norwegian Lutheran church of Winheld town- 
ship, and is i)rominent in the work and worshi]) of this (k'uomination. In 
l)oHtics. k)rede A. l-*aulson is a T\e|>ublican. 



JAMKS W. 1<RIKD-1\ 

James W. Friedt is a worthy representative of the Friedt family and 
au esteemed citizen of 'Ma])le \'alley township, Ab)ntcalm county, Michi- 
gan. He is a native of Springfield township, Allen county, Indiana, his 
birth having occurred on November 16. 1871, in that locality. He is the 
son of David and Akuy K. (Brown) Friedt, natives of Ohio and Indiana. 
re<i)ectively. 

I)a\i(l Friedt was born, on April 8, 1840, in Greene township, .\shland 
<onnty. ( )hio, and is the son of John and Susan (AToudy) Friedt. John 
Iriedt being the son of b'tcob b'riedt, who was a native of Westmoreland 
county. I'ennsylvania. and of (lerman and vSwiss descent. Susan Moudy 
was a native of 1 'ennsyhania and was the daughter of John Moudv, of 
< lerman descent. John b'riedt was (irst married to lydia Zimmerman, of 
I'ennsylvania, and to them were l)orn these children: Jacob, now living in 
Allen county, fndiana, and enjfn'ing his ninety-third year; Rebecca, deceased; 
Henry, now^ li\ing in Osborne. Kansas, in his eighty-seventh vear ; F^hn, 
deceased; Cieorge. now living in Noble county. Indiana, in his eightv-fourth 
year; Sarah, widow of John Carper, noAV residing four miles south of 



200 MOX TCAi.M COTXTY, VI IC 1 1 1(;AX. 

Aulnini, Dek.-ill) county. Indiana: Mary. \\\iv of Iku'on Xotcsline, of I'orter 
connty, Indiana, now deceased; L\(lia, deceased; Samuel. \vho died when 
twenty-two years of age, and two otliers who died in infancy. Lydia 
( /inimernian ) h'riedt (hed in Ashland comity, Ohio, and John Friedt then 
married .Susan Aloudy. who was a widow and the mother of lw(.) children 
l)y herJirst union: Wesley, who died in Allen county, Indiana, and h'diza- 
beth. widow of Jacob Ilursh, now livini^ four miles east of Hunter. Indiana. 
Susan Moudy was the widow of David Xelscni. To the union of John 
b>iedt and Susan Moudy were born the children whose names follow: 
Susanna, wile of William Urown, living one mile west of Harlan, Allen 
county, Indiana; [)avid \V.: Jane, wife of DeCiroff Herrick, also living in 
Harlan, Alien county. Indiana; T.uella, who died in infancy, and Arilla, 
widow of Joseph h'nnvn, now residing in Maple Valley lownshii), oi this 
county. 

David b'riedl was reared on the home farm and remained there until 
after his marriage, removing with his family to Michigan in 1885 and 
immediately locating on the farm where he still resides. On April 22. 
1868, he was married to Mary I-diza P>rown, daughter of William and 
h'lizabeth Hrown, and they .are tlie parents of six children, whose names 
follcnv: James \Villiam. of Maple Valley, .Michigan; John Franklin, 
deceased; Cdarence l{.. a resident of Mint, Michigan; Zola, wife of Orange 
X'anZile. now living in b't. \\'a\ne, !n<liana; (jcorge ("., li\ing in Mint, 
Michigan, and hdorence \\., now Mrs. ("lifford r.rmitage, of Ma]>le N'alley 
township. Mary I'di^^a Hrown was born in Allen county. Indiana, and her 
mother was a native of Tennsyhania. l]oth Da\id k'riedt and his wife 
are members of the United Brethren church of Maple \'alley, Michigan, 
and are active in class work, David b'riedt ha\ing l)een the superintendent 
of the Snnda\' scht)ol for a great many years. Politicalh'. he is a ]'rohil.}i- 
tionist and has served his community in the capacity of school treasurer for 
one term. 

James AV. k"ri(;dt was foiu'tecn \cars of age when his parents remo\ ed 
to Michigan and he is indebted to the schools of Allen count\'. Indiana, as 
well a^ to those of .Maple \ 'alley, Michigan, for the education which he 
recei\ed. lie remained at home until he reached maturity, at which time 
he married AFillie Buchanan, the ceremony I)eing solemnized on Alarch 30. 
i8(>2. ^Millie Buchanan was lH)rn on December 8. 1871, in Maple \'alley 
townshii), this county, and is the daughter of Ro1)ert D. and lunily M. 
(Baker) Buchanan. She was reared and educated in her native township. 



^roxTCALM corx't'Y, MKiric.AX. 201 

ITcrscIf and luis1)aiul arc actiw tr.enihcrs of the L'liiled l)rethrt'n church. 
l)cin,^" leaders o\ the Sunday school and ardent sui)[)orters of the church 
interests, jauies W. I''ricdt is now serxiu^- as trustee of this denoniination. 
lie is an earnest worker for the Re])ul)lican .i)arty, taking- «2;Teat interest in 
v'.\<:]) election. 

Robert L. [Juchaiian. father of .Millie I). (Huchanan) h'riedt, was born 
on ()ctol)er u, i(S3_', in l'enns\l\ania. while his wife is a native of \ew 
^Ork state, her birth ha\iug occiu'red on March ig. hS^C). in Tompkins 
county. Iler death occurred in \()oH. She was married in the state of her 
natixity twd remo^'ed to Alichisian i]i i<^()^, where her husband enlisted in 
C"om|)an\- I*, of the Michigan \'olunteer Infantry, and served until the close 
of the Civil War. Xine children were born to the union of Robert L. and 
I'jnily M. (IJaker) Ihichanan. of whom are ncnv living: Oscar !).. of 
Stanton, .Michigan: Mattie. wife of IJyron (lag'c; l>etsey, wife of floiner 
llutT; .\lban. deceased: l^stella. deceased wife of James Hayes; Lottie: 
|ohn. li\ing in ( Owden Lake: ( 'ora, wife of (leorge Wheeler, and Millie, 
wife of James W. briedt. 



OTTO {\ WALDO. 

In the character of Otto ('. W.'ddo is found the tyi)e of business man 
whose interests are largely centered ui)on the (kwelopnient of the commun 
ity in which he li\'es. .\ nati\e of Montcalm county, there is no aspect of 
its industrial ])rosperit\- with which he is not familiar. lie wliose name 
initiates this sketch was born on April 17, i.ScS8. at .\ml)le. r^lichigan. on 
the okl Waldo homestead in Winheld township, of .Montcalm county. His 
p;irents. [.ouis and Lena 1 Laijjier ) Waldo, were natives of Germany and 
were rean-d in the vicnu'tv of the city of I'erlin. .\s a young man the father 
of the subject of tliis ^ketcli serxed in tlie (ierman army, where he 
nmked as an officer, a ])o><ition winch ciu'ries with it a great deal of 
])recedence in the J\hine country. lie fought in the ricrman war of fortv-.six 
\ears ago and after his retirement from ser\ ice, at the close of the conflicts, 
obtained a place as manager of an extensive and wealthy estate, v^liere he 
acted as foreman oxer a number of xvorkmen. .-\fter his marriag'e. which 
xxas solemnized in his native land, Louis Waldo came to this countrv with 
his wife, xvhich xvas ])robably in the year ^^/=,. l'p<»'i arriving; in the United 



202 MOXrCALM CorXTV. M IC 1 1 l(;.\X. 

Siaic's they wen.' attracted to tlie Middle West, and as a result setded in 
I't. Wayne, hidiana. I 'ere the resemrces ni Air. Waldo were exhansted 
and 111' ^vas ohli^i^ed to seek a place of employment at once, lie used the 
last ])art ot his >a\ings on a trij) to Howard City, Michi,^an, where he met 
with succe<> and later >ent l"(jr his wife to join him. In this new location 
Jie worked at several forms oi employment for a period of seven )-ears and 
durini; that time accnnuilated siiflicient capital to enahle him to ])urchase a 
f.arm coii^istint; of ( ij^htx' acres. 1 le li\ed on the farm until the time of 
Jiis deatli, and during- h.is life as a farmer added two himdred acres of land 
to the (jri<^-inal tract of eii^hty acres. 

Air. and Mr--, l.ouis Waldo l-ecame the parents of the followin,i;- chil- 
dren: William, who died when a child; .Minnie, who Ix'came the wife of 
Kichard I'ecker. a business man of .\ml)le: Charles, who resides with his 
mother on the homestead ; Lew is, who li\es on i>art <.)£ the old homestead; 
Aui.^u>t. a farmer ot W infield to\\ii>hi]) and also a landowner in Alecosta 
countx, an.d Otto C., who i> the subject of this sketcli. 

Otto ( '. Waldo was educated in the common schools of Winlield town- 
ship, and after completing- the cour>e a^^isted his father with the work on 
the farm nutd lie was iwent\- years of ai^e. Me then came to .\ml)le, 
Michigan, where iie has been idemihed A\itli tin- business world (w cr since. 
The \arious lme> of acti\il\- in which the subject of this sketch has been 
cni^ai^ed ha\e made him a wt'li-known (is^nre in the communit)' and a friend 
to all cla<<es. lie i> intereste<l princijially in the buyin<^- of ])ro(hice and 
;!.->ide from ihi< deals in loa! and lumber, lie is also ])rominenllw identihed 
with the karmers kJexator Com|)any. Mr. Walck.) has been in business for 
himself since igoS. and since that time has added to his re])utation as a 
man ^A CNecuiixe a1)ilitN'. 

The marriage of Otto C. Waldo to Dora L;u-son, the daut(litcr of 
.Mads Lar-on, an.d a native of .MitTioan. took ])lace on June 4, tqoS. ller 
l);!rent> were born in Denmark. Mi-s. Waldo has become the mother (;f the 
following', children: I.awreuce, Donald Raymond and Crwstal Mannah. 

In his i)olitical interest^ the subject of this sketch has alwavs o-iven 
]o\ al sn])port t(^ the princi])les of the l\e|mblican partw He is also deeply 
interested in educational affairs, and for three \ears acted as school director 
in his school district. In fraternal affair^. .Mr. Waldo holds membership 
in Howard C^ity J..odoc \o. 32g, Free and Accepted .Masons, and since twenty 
years of as^c has l)ecn enrolled wdth the Canadian Life Endowment Company. 



,M().\ rcAi.M (orxry. .mi(iii(;a.\. 



CIIAklJ'.S WALKI.I'N' T.aDI: 



Charles \'\ alklcy LaDii. editor of the Cryslal Mai', at (..'rystal this 
(omily, wa^ horn on January _'o, i.S/.S, son ot (Jeori^e Jacob and Catlierine 
(Minore) l.aDii. who for years ha\e heen hving- on a farm near Ctjral. this 
eonnt}^, ijr(,)nn'nent and inlhienti;il residents of that section, the former of 
wliom is the son of tlie late Rev. Stalhani W. l.aDii, minister of the Gospel 
and legislator, who for many years \\ as one of tlie m(jst infinential men in 
this section of the state, in a biographical sketch of whom, prt'sented else- 
where in this \olume. is ^et ont at some detail something of the genealogy 
of this family. 

(."ha.rles W. l.aDu was but an infant when his parents came to Mont- 
calm county in 1871. and he was ten \ears of age when liiey moved to 
Manit<.)ba. where they remained for about fourteen years on a farm, lie 
therefore was reared to the life of the farm. When he was twent\-four 
years of ;ige he mo\ed lo Muni^ing. in the npix'r jjeninsnla of Michigan. 
\\here his father \\as for some years engaged ;is super\isor (.)f the state 
hos])ital for the insane at Xewberry. I !e learned the jjrinter's trade at 
Munising. While there, in iS()*}. he married and the next year, lyoo, 
returneil to this connty. the home of his boyhood, and bought the Crysfai 
Mail, which had but recently been e.stalflished in the pleasant village of 
(rystal. .and has been owner and editor of the paper e\er since, dm'ing 
which lime he has made it a strong and influential newspaper. The build- 
ing in which Air. I.;il)u houses his excellent news|iaper anti printing ])lant 
w;is constructed especially fen- that jmrpose and leaves little, if anything. 
to be desired along that line. .Mr. T..a])u is constantly seeking to impro\'e 
his plant and his i)aper .and his mechanical e(|uipment is as good as an^' in a 
to\vn the ^i/e of Crystal in the sta.te of Michigan; his work in the ])rinting 
line cons(M|uently being u]i-to-date and of high grade, llis news])ai)cr scrx'es 
a wide territory hereabout, the nearest newspajjers being at Carson Cit\' 
and Stanton, and therefore iias a line circulation, its high tone and excellent 
([ualities as a newspa]K'r commanding in its behalf the respect and admira- 
tion of a Large circle of f.aithful readers in the territorv it s<~) admirably 
covers. 

^Ir. LaDu for \ears has taken a close jiersonal interest in the |)oHtica] 
aliairs of this county and district. Fie served as secretary of the Montcalm 
county Ixepublican committee tor two years and as chairman of the same 
fnr two years, while for four years he Avas a member of tlie Republican 



204 MOXTCAI.M COINTY. MJCMKJAX. 

coiuniittec for this c<)iii;rt's>ion;il district uiid for the past lifteen years has 
been the committeenum for his ])art}- in ("rvstal township. On Septenil)cr 
I. igo'j. he was ap{)ointe(I depntx slate oil ins])ector and served in that 
iinportfnit pnhhc capacit\ for li\e years and two months. He is now treas- 
m-cr of (rystal townshi]) and in other wavs has shown his interest in behalf 
of the ])nl)hc ser\ice. liein*: re<:;ar(led as one of the ni(.)st aetive and ])ubhc- 
s])irited citizens of Montcalm county. 

In i(S<>(,) ( harles W. [,ai)n was nnited in marria!:^e. at .Mnnising, tiiis 
state, to -Vda J.om'se I'ranch, who was horn at Otisville. AJichii2:an, daug-hter 
of M. I', and Alary Lonise ((Irahani) Branch, the latter of whom died 
when Mrs. LaDn was a small i^irl. M. \\ P)ranch moxed to Mnnisiiijo- when 
his dani;hter was a i^irl of ahont se\enteen years, and there ent^ac^'ed in the 
liimher business and wa.s later made t(nvn marshal, which official position 
he filled for several years. Mr. llranch died in Denver, Colorado, in which 
city he was en.iiia^ed as a bnildin^- contractor (hn-inq- the later years of his 
life. To .Mr. and Mrs. I.aDu one child has been born, a son, Stalham 
W'alkley, born in T90(;. 

.Mr. l.aDn is a .Mason and an Odd h'ellow and has tilled all the offices 
in the local lodt^es of those two orders and is also a member of the Knights 
of the Maccabees, and both he and his wife are members of the Order of 
the h^astern Star and of the Dan.qhters of Kebekah. Mrs. l.aOn having- filled 
the office of worthy matron of the local lodt^^e of the Order of the Eastern 
Star, and Mr. LaDn, worthy patron of the same. l)oth take their proi)er 
place in the various social ;ni(l cultural activities of the commnnit\- and arc 
held in biidi ret;ard amon_Lj- their manv friends. 



.\'.\TH.\X O. ]K)^"L.\X. 

Xathan O. Boylan, of .Ma])le \'alley townshi]). Montcalm county, 
.\lichi!j;an, is Ix^th res])ectcd as a citizen and as a farmer and thoug-h quiet 
and unassuming" in his manner, has won many friends thrcjughout the com- 
munity in which he lives, lie is the son of (."harles and Sarah ( Pctrker ) 
I'oylan, and his birth occurred on Alarch 28, 1879, in Pine town.ship, of 
this coimt\\ I.Mith jKirents were nati\es of I'ennsyK'ania and came, each 
with their parents, to I'ine townshi]), Montcalm county, Michigan, where 
their marriage was solciunized. (.Charles bJovlan died in tqt 1 but his wife 
still resides on the home ])lace, which consists of forty acres. They were 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 203 

the parents ot three chilch'en, two of whom are now Hvin^-, namely: Nathan 
(). and (ilen M.. the latter heini^- enoa^ed in the cultivation of the home 
place. 

Nathan (). l'.o\ Ian was reared on the home farm and received his edu- 
cation in the district schools of Pine townshii). On Auii^nst 23, 1897, he 
was united in marriage to Lula Clage. and to them have been born these 
children: Charles, born on January ri. T(S()(). a orraduate of the graded 
schools: Leonard, Aui^ust 23. igon: (Irace. July 28. 1902; Stanley. January 
13, U)Oj, and .Mice, .\ui4ust k;, 1912. Nathan (). Boylan is a charter 
member of the .Modern \A'oodmen of America and carries insurance in this 
order. Politically, he is a stanch IDcmocrat, and is a director of the school 
board in this townshi]). In the a.gricultural field he is engai^ed in <^eneral 
farmiui^- and in the breeding of 'A'ictor" hogs. 



jAMIvS II. KNAPP. 

James H. Kna))p, -[jrominent farmer and dairyman, and a man well 
known for his ])art in the afTairs of W'inlield township, Montcalm county, 
Michigan, was born in Steuben county. Indiana, November 30, i86t, the 
.son of ( ). J. and 'Prmina ( F.dmunds) Knapp. 

( ). J. Knapp grew to maturity in New York state, and when a young 
man moved to Noble count}-, Indiana, where he lived until 1862, and then. 
liis wife having died. Mr. Kna])p enlisted with an Indiana regiment for 
service in the ("ivil War and was with the armies of (jcnerals (iirant and 
Sherman until the end of the war. After his discharge from military 
ser\ice. Mr. Knap]) came to the state of Michigan and located at Howard 
( ity. w here he conducted a store for a number of years. O. T. and Ermina 
Knap]) were the parents of two children: Ilenrictta. who is deceased, and 
James ]].. the subiect of this sketch. 

James 11. Kna])p. :ifter t!ie death of his mother, bec^ame a ])art of the 
household of the Zigler family, of Noble county, Indiana, where he was 
educated and with whom he lived until twenty-eight years of age. when 
Mr. Knaj)]) was married, after which he came to Howard City. Montcalm 
c()unt\-, Michigan, and worked in the store of his father for about two 
\ears. T..ater. James H. Knapp ])urchased forty acres of land in Winfield 
tnuuship, a place which be im])ro\e(l and a farm to which he has added 
land at various times tmtil now he is the owner of two himdred acres of 



20f) MONTCAI.xM COL'NTY, MIOFIGAN. 

land ill secti(.»ns i) and 17, o\ W'inhelcl to\vnshi]>. On his excellent farm, 
James 11. Knap]) now is e\tensi\el\' en4^-a5.';ed in general farming, in the 
raising ot high-grade liolstein cattle and in the dairy business. 

( )n l-'el)rnary 11. uS()o, j.'imes II. Knapi) was married to JMyrtie F\kc, 
a datighter of James and .Sarah (Lint) Mke. of Xoble county. Indiana. 
To tlie marriage of James II. and .Mvrtie Knajip have been lK)rn four chil- 
dren: Mabel, who died in infan.cv; Aha .May. who is the wife of P)enja- 
min hng1ebreis(jn ; Ilazen Ilarold. wdio li\cs at home, and Ruby, who died 
in infancy. 

In politics. .\lr. Knap]) is a J\ei)nblican. although he has not as])ired to 
])ul)lic office, i)referring to ser\e as a private citizen and as a worker in the 
ranks of his i)arty. James II. Kna])]) is one of tlie highly respected citizens 
of Montcalm coimty. his i)leasing ways and unselfish nature having w^on 
for him a host, of friends. 



(d'.Ok ('.;!•: A. .\R ROC A ST. 

( ieorge A. Arboga^t is one nf the leading agriculturists and citizens of 
Abintcaltn coun.ty, Mich.igan. the Arln^gast farm, which he owns and man- 
ages, being known as one of the best in this section. It is located southeast 
of Iloward ( ity, .Michigan, and one mile west of the town of (Joral. .A 
spi'cialty is made i^i breeding jjurebred Roan Sliorthorn cattle, and "(jor- 
don" is the leader of the herd. Tleorge .\. .Arbogast has also l.)een elected 10 
ser\e in office and is now acting as treasm^er of the school board, liis 
birth occurred on ()cr()l)er io. 1868, in Canada, and his ]7arents were Mich- 
ael and .Margaret ( Ih-unner ) Arbogast. both tiati\c>s of that dominion, 
where their marriage was solemnized. They renun ed to Michigan in 1880 
and located on tiiree hundred and twenty acres of land which the\' ])m'chased. 
^riiis property was located in sections 8 and 7, in Maple X'aJley township, 
i^\ this co\mty. and here they remained until his death, in 1885. Margaret 
( Rrunner ) Arbogast reared her family of children and o])erated the farm 
until her death, in i()o8. ' )f tlii' nine children born to this union eight are 
now lixing: John, a s])ecnlator on the board of trade in Chicago. Illinois; 
l^dward, a farnier of Rine (iro\e township, Montcalm couutv; (iet^'ge A.; 
Rmma. wife of Ce<'rge fUnkle, a f.armcr li\ing in Ricrson township; ( Tara. 
wife of Andrew Voss. who is a resident of L.ake connt\-. Michigan; .Mar\-. 
wife of Martin Straight, of ("arson (j'ty, Michigan: .Michael, a farmer of 
.Ma])le V'alkw townshi]), of this county; "Margaret, deceased, and Carrie, 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 20/ 

wife ()[ (icoroe K.'idcr. of rierson township. All of these children were 
horn in Canada, with the e>:cei)ti()n of Carrie, who was horn in this connty. 
(u'or^e A. Arho,t;ast was twelve years of ai;e when his parents came 
t.) Montcalm county and is indehted to the schools of Canada, as well as to 
those of tliis localit}-. for the education which he received. On January 15, 
i(K><'>. he was married to P)lanch Ivli^ar. a native of Cato townshi]), of this 
countw and thev hecame the i)arents of one child. Rohert G.. whose hirtli 
occurred on h'ehruarv i(), 1 <)()/. iUanch ( lul^ar ) Arhot^ast was educated 
in the i^^raded schools of Cato townshiji and in the hij^h school of T.ake 
\'iew. MichiL^an. (ie(.)roe A. Xrhooast is an ahle farmer and there arc no 
finer farm hnildin^s in thi^ county than those which meet all needs of com- 
fort on this one-hundrcd-and-sixtv-acre ])lace. 



J. K. SKl^OCIT. 

j. I'.. Skeoch is a \er\- efVicient farmer, a j)rot;rcssi\e citizen and a man 
of character. (.)f Canadian hirtli and of Scotch descent, he has proven 
himself a worthy renrcscnt.'ilive of his chosen callini^;-. and in all walks of 
life he is respected hy those who know him. 1 Te is the son of John and 
(.'hristena ( Soules ) Skeoch, and was horn on June ic^. iHf)"/. John Skeoch 
was horn in Scotland, emii^ratinti;- to Canada with his parents when Init 
diree years of a,^e. His wife wa>^ a native of l"anada, and they were mar- 
ried in that dominion, removing to Alichiman in 1867. They located in 
Kent county for a short time .and then located in. Maple X'alley township. 
Montcalm county, where they remained. It was in this place that the death 
of John Skeoch occurred and where the mother died on l^A'hrnary 6. IQ16. 
rhe\- were the i)arents of four children: Minnie, wife of 1^. Durkee, of 
Maple Walley townshi]); J. IC : Rohert M., a farmer li\inii: on the home- 
stead, and Ucrtie, who married Ta\- Cooper, and is a resident of Kent 
count)'. Michioan. 

J. !'".. Skeoch wa.s hut six months of age when he hecame a resitlent of 
'his state and was reared and educated in the locality wdiere he still resides. 
He attendecl school until he A\as se\enteen years ()f ai^e. remaining with his 
l^a.reuts u.ntil he reached I'is m.aj'irity. At the age of twenty-eight years he 
formed a i)artnershii) with IC T,. Sonles, which partnership continued for 
sonie time. He is a self-made man and owes his snccess to his own al)ilit\'. 

On Sei>teml)er _'0. iS8g. J. IC Skeoch was united in marriage to P)lanch 



208 :\I()NTCALM COL'N'IY. MICIIIGAX. 

C'ryslcr. (laiii^iucr of (Icorge rind l.ydia CVwster. and they are the parents 
of the children who^c names follow; W. |., a gradnate of the Ferris Insti- 
mte, in which institntion lie took a commercial course, and J. Aml)rose, 
who is a stndent in the local high school. In his fraternal relations, J. E. 
Skeoch is a meinher of the 'Prnfant kodge Xo. 456, ['"ree and Vccepted 
Mason>. I'olitically. he is a Uepuhlican. holding ihe oflice of highwa\- com- 
missioner and school director, d'he farm which he owns and manages con- 
sists (.>f one hundred acres of well-im]»roved land, known as the "Maple 
\'alle_\- harm." and is dcNoted to general agriculture and stock raising. This 
])lace is located southeast of the town of Coral, Michigan, and is known for 
the high grade of 1 Belgian luM"ses \\hich ha\e hecome a specialty with its 
owner. 



HKXRV lAJTTKkLOII. 

Ilenr\- kuiterloh. widely known and highly respected farmer of Win- 
field t()wnship, .Montcalm county, where he cultivates one of the best 
improved and most desirable farms of the community, was l)orn in G^r- 
u^any. June 15. j8|o, li\'ing in his nati\e country as farmer and as a soldier, 
until as a yoimg man he came to America, working his wa}' to tliis country 
on a steamboat. 

(.)n reaching America, llenry i,utterloh located in New York state, 
where he was employed in a glass factory for some time, after which he 
came to Montcalm county, Alichigan, in itS/J. and worked in the vy^oods 
near lloward City a few years. Later, ]\fr. Lutterloh became a farmer, 
at the time of his marriage taking charge of forty acres of land which was 
owned l)y his wife, a jjlace which llenry Lutterloh improved and to which 
he added land until now Mr. Lutterloh is the owner of one hundred and 
sixty acres (^i \alunble and in Winfield townshi]), Montcalm ccnmty. .\s a 
])rogressi\e farmer, Henry Lutterloh has taken great interest and pride in 
the develoiJiuent of his farm into one of the most mcxleni and convenient 
])laces for agricultural life to be found in the county, having erected one 
of the best e(pii])i)ed and arranged l)arns, as well as a large and suitable 
silo for the care of his ])r()ducts. 

During the year 1878 llenry J.utterloh was married to Reka Schnick, 
who was born in Germany. To this marriage ha\e been born ten children, 
eight of whom are living: Willie, Otto, bred, Henry, .\nna, Marv, Her- 
man and Hattic. Air. Lutterloh and his family are active nieml)ers of the 



IMOXTCALM COrXTY, MIC IIIGAN'. 2O0 

(icniian I.iithenm cluircli, l\lr. Lutterloh bein^- prominent and influential 
in the affairs and in the worsln'j) of tins congTeg-ation. Henry Lutterloh 
has occupied several offices of his church and is highly honored for his part 
and for his devotion to the church of his choice., Mrs. T-utterloh died on 
June T_|, 1015. after a long and usefnllife. 

Tlie life of llcnry I ntterloh is a fair e.\ani))le of perseverance and 
devotion to purpo.^e, with the result that he is today one of the prosperous 
farmers of the count), (^oniing to America without means and by honesty 
and fair dealing to ha\e risen to a place of note among the agriculturists of 
Montcalm county, he has shown himself to he a man of unusual worth to 
the community. 

In jiolitics. Mr. Lutterloh is a Republican and although he has taken 
no (>sjx'cial part in the politicrd or official life of the community, he is known 
as a man who supi)orts good men for office, and as a man who lends of his 
time and efforts for the promotion of good citizenship and hone.st effort in 
official life. 



JOHN H. FRNDER. 



John II. h'ender, farmer and business man of Maple Valley township, 
AFontcalm county, ^lichigan, is a worthy representative of the commercial 
and agricultural interests of the county and is highly respected as a citizen. 
I k^ owns and m.anages a farm of eigiity acres and at the same time operates 
a plant for the manufacture of concrete burial vaults, also making- concrete 
blocks .and bricks. This industry is located on his place, wdiich is known 
as "Willow h'arm," and is sittiated northwest of the tow^n of Coral. He 
was born on July i^. .1878, in Henry county, Ohio, and is the son of Mich- 
ael and Laura (Hubert) Fender. Michael Fender was a native of Ger- 
many, while his wife was born in New^ York state, of German and English 
descent. They removed to Ionia county, jMichigan, in 1880. and in 1894 
they located in Ma])le \"alley township, Montcalm county. They purchased 
a farm which was situated southeast of the town of Coral, remaining there 
for a ])erio(l of four years, and then removed to ]\lecosta county, Michigan, 
where they lived until death. Of the seven children born of their union, 
only five are now living: ijiima, w;ife of Peter Desgrang'es ; Daisy, widow 
of Charles .Spence : Delia, wife of E. A. Desgranges; John H. ; Clara, wife 
of Alexander Dangler. 
(14b) 



2IO MONTCALM COl'NTY, MICIIIGAX. 

John H. I'^cnder was reared on the home place and remained under the 
I)arental roof until he reached his majority, receiving his education in the 
district schonls of Montcalm countv. On Deceniher S, 1897. he was mar- 
ried to Gertrude Fisher, a nati\e of Coral. Michii^an, and to their union 
ha\e been horn six chikh-en: Marion, Clarence. Grace, Ruth, James and 
Melvina. John IT. Fender and his wife are members of the Congregational 
church. In his fraternal relations, he is affiliated with the .Modern \\'ood- 
men of America, and in his political life he is a stanch Republican, and has 
served as high\\a\' comnu'ssioner for one vear. 



UVX. STALH:\M W. LaDU. 

In the annals of Montcalm county there are few names more distin- 
guished or more highly entitled to honor than that of the late Rev. Stalham 
\V. Fal^u. t'or many years one of the most conspicuous ligures in the Meth- 
odist church in the North country and a state legislator of commanding 
induence in Michigan. Worn by years of continuous and incessant activity 
in 1)eh<-df of the church, whose cause ever was dear to his heart, the Rev. 
v*^talham \\\ LaDu sought the health-giving ]>reath of the great forests 
hereal)out in the early se\'euties and in the lumber woods found physical 
rcstoratioti. ever after making Montcalm county his home. As was but 
natural to one of his ^■igorous intellect, he earl}- l)ecame a dominant factor 
in the social and civic development of this section and as a member ol the 
state Legislature performed a signal service in behalf of the people of 
Michigan. At the close of Mr. FaDu's second term of 1egislati\'e service, 
the Detroit Free /-^r.s'.? cditoriallv commended him as having been *'as faith- 
ful and efficient a legislator a^ e\er held a seat in the .Michigan liouse of 
Representatives.'' Ivvcr an earnest advocate of temperance, his ser\icc in 
that behalf during his iiresence in the FTouse pro\ed particularly valuable 
to the people of the state and his name, during that i)eriod. became a house- 
hold word throughout all Michigan, many of the laws now on the statute 
books regulating the li((Uor traffic in this state having been put there mainlv 
through his :^ealous efforts. As has been so fitly said nl him. the r^e\'. 
Stalham W. FaDu "was a man of profound convictions and iwssessed in a 
remarkable degree the graces that make a man strong and at the same time 
attractive. Tn character he was a clean and consistent gentleman." 

Stalham W. FaDu was born in the towm of Fishkill, in Dutchess countv. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 211 

Xcw \'ork. I''e1)ruarv 2i>, 1823, son of Jacol) and Hannah (CAn-e) LaDn, 
the former of llngnenot descent. Jacol) LaDu was born on January 3, 
1780, son of OHver and Sarah (Coniff) T.aDu, Ohver T.aDu, born on 
August 23. 1726, having been the son of Peter C and Ann Lal>u. Several 
Hues of descent from Peter C. PaDu are represented in this country, some 
of the present members of tlie family spelling the name "LaDue." (3n 
coming to America to escape religious persecution, the PaDns settled First 
in lower Canada and later located in Dutchess county, New York, where 
the subject of this sketch was born. When Stalham W. PaDu was thirteen 
years old he moved with his family to Clarkston, in Richland county, New 
Vork, and three years later to Wayne county, same state, where he remained 
about iive ^•ears. At the age of nineteen he was converted to an ardent 
religious habit of mind at a Methodist revival and was soon thereafter 
licensed to exhort, immediately entering upon a course of study in prepara- 
tion to devoting himself to the ministry of the Gospel, a course pursued 
partly by home study, under the guidance of a minister of the Methodi.st 
church, which he su]j])lemented by a two-years course at Red Creek Union 
.\cademy. .At the age of twenty-two, out of funds, he and a companion 
went to Canada, where, in Xorthumberland county, he engaged his services 
as a school teacher. During this term of service he also preached in the 
school house on .Sunda\s. and it was there he olitained the first of the great 
number of con\erts that were added to him dm-ing his later and notable 
I'areer as an e\angelist. Pic followed the same course ill other localities in 
Canada, Avith lik'c results, for scA'eral years and finally decided to enter 
deliuitely the following of the ministry. In 1845 f-hc Rev. Stalham W. 
PaDu formally entered tiie ministry and, under the direction of the Meth- 
odist conference, began conducting reviAals. invariably meeting with splen- 
did success. i)resently becoming a man of commanding influence in the 
Ak'thodist church in Canada. He was one of the founders of Albert Uni- 
versity, at Rellexille, Ontario, and served as a member of the board of 
managers of that institution until he came to Michigan and was also for 
fou.r years presiding elder of the Colburn district in Canada. 

fii 1867 the Rev. Stalham W. PaDu came to ^Michigan and for some 
time was stationed at Calumet, in the upper peninsula. Pater he was sent 
to western Wisconsin and after a wdiile was sent back to Canada, where he 
was made presiding elder of the St. Pawrence district. Plis health then 
failing under the incessant strain of his active labors, he presently retired 
from the ministry, and in 1874 returned to Michigan and made his home in 



212 MONTCAT-M COrNTY, MICHIGAN. 

Coral this county, wliicli ever afterward was his place of abode. Working 
in the hiniber woods thereabout aud actively engaging in farming, Mr. 
].al:)u shortly regained his health and at once became an active figure in 
local aiTairs, his iniluenee s])eedily extending to all parts of the state. His 
interest in political aliairs and his devotiou to the cause of good govern- 
ment caused him to take an active part in civic affairs, and he became a 
familiar figure in political conventions in county, district and state. He 
was elected to represent this district in the lower house of the state Legis- 
lature and served for two terms, 1881-84, his cons]>icuous abilities easily 
giving him a prominent ])Osition in that luxly. He was ])rominently men- 
tioned as a candidate for governor at one time and his friends could have 
obtained for him the nomination for the office of lieutenant-governor at 
another time, but he withdrew his name in the latter instance in order that 
he might be free to accept the more lucrative iX)sition of slate oil inspector, 
whicli oltice he held for two years with credit both to himself and to the 
state. During the last (juarter century of his life, Mr. T.aDu devoted his 
energies cliieily to church and good works in and about Coral and at his 
death there, on October 3, 1910, left a good memory. 

The l\ev. St.-ilham \V. LaDu married Clarissa M. Gaftield, a native of 
(Janada, many of whose kinsfolk are well-known residents of this county, 
including Wesley J. Gatfield, former sheriff' of Montcalm county, and Ben- 
jamin T.. Gaffield, former county treasurer, and to this union three children 
were born. Mrs. Hannah Minore, George Jacob l.aDu and Mrs. I'^dla Bibby. 

George Jacob LaDu, a well-known resident of this county, was born 
in .185(1. :md »was never any other than an American citizen, because his 
father was .'\merican born and e\cr remained a citizen of tlie LInited States, 
notwithstanding his long residence in Canada. Upon the rcmo\al of the 
i,aDu family to this county in 1874. George f. LaDu became a resident of 
the Coral neighborhood and has lived there most of the time since. In the 
s|)ring of 1883 be went to ^lanitoba and remained there about eleven 
vears, engaged in farming, after which he took a ])osition in the hosi)ital for 
the insane in that province and was thus engaged for four years. He then 
returned to Michigan and was a]:>])ointed supervisor of the upper peninsula 
hospital for the insane, a ]K»sition he held until he was compelled to retire 
on account of injuries recei\ed at the hands of an inmate about 1898. Mr. 
LaDu has -^ince then resided on his farm near Coral, this county, and is 
regarded as one of the most substantial citizens thereabout. He married 
Catherine Minore. who Avas born in Ottawa. Canada, daughter of William 



M(»Xl(. AT,M COUNTY. -MICTIKIAX. 213 

and I^li.rahc'th (Walkley) Minorc. the latter of whom was the daug-hter of 
luioch A\'alkley, who owned a i)ortion of the land on which the city of 
Ottawa now stands. To this union eight chihlren were born, of whom four 
(Hed in infancy and hred TT. was killed by the cars while working' as a 
l)rakenian for the T'ere Mar(|nctte railroad, at Plymouth, April 27, 19TO, 
the sur\i\ing children l)eing C'harles Walkley. editor of the Crystal Mail, 
at Crystal, this count)-, a biographical sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this volume; William T.orne and J. Harry. 



CT,ARK J. DKUMMOND. 

1 laving been a resident of this county for over half a century, Clark J, 
Drumniond has acquired a wide ac(|uaintance throughout this section, and 
after a long period of service in the postofficc at Greenville, this county, he 
is now living retired from active business affairs. 

Clark [. Drumniond was born on October 16. 1S40. at Bombay, Frank- 
lin comity. New York, a son of J. B. and Isabella (Deans) Drumniond, the 
former of whom was a native of New York state, and the latter a native 
of Scotland. 

The father of J. B. Drumniond was born in England and emigrated to 
America at an early date and settled in St. Tawrence county, New York, 
near the I'^ranklin count)- line. There J. B. Drummond grew to manhood 
and secured an excellent education for that day. He was married in St. 
r.a\\-rence comity to Isabella Deans, who was born in Scotland and who 
came to .Vmerica with her parents when she was four years of age. The 
Deans family also located in St. Lawrence county. New York. J. B. Drum- 
mond became a minister in (he Baptist church and for several 3/ears worked 
zealous])' in that calling, when, on account of failing health, he resigned 
from the ministr)- and took up the study of medicine at .Albany, New York. 
Doctor Drumniond entered upon the i:)ractice of his.j^rofession at Hartford, 
Washington county. New \'ork. and also ])racticed at several other towns 
in that vicinity. In 1863 Doctor Drummond removed. to Clarkston, Oak- 
kuid county, Michigan, and was located there for one year. He then brought 
his famil)- t(j (/reenville, this county, and was here actively engaged until 
about four years before his death, in 1876. 

J. B. Drummond was a highly respected and influential mati in his 



214 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICTTTGAX. 

day. lie took a great deal of interest in religious affairs and Innlt the 
[iaptist chnrch in (ireenville. lie was one of the prime movers in holding 
a hig revivrd in (ireenville in 1865, ^^^^ influence of which was long felt in 
this comnumity. Mrs. Isabella (Deans) Drumniond died in 1894. 

j. 15. and isabella (Deans) Drunnnond were the parents of nine chil- 
dren, all of whom grew to maturity, and five are now living: Eliza, widow 
of Ruftis Waller; Anna, wife of Rev. D. K. Hills, both being now deceased; 
Cornelia, wife of ("harles Kyle, both are now deceased; Cynthia, wife of 
i^aniel Wilcox, both are now deceased; flattie T., widow of Rastus J^eed; 
Maggie D.. widow of Newell J. Moore, lives in Albion, Michigan; Lottie, 
deeeased, was the wife of Bernard J. Growve, and lived in Detroit, Michi- 
gan; Clark ]., the subject of this sketch, and Alvin A., who lives in Spring- 
iicld, Missouri. 

("lark ]. Drunnnond acquired such educational training as was avail- 
al.)le in the schools of his native countv, and lived at home with his parents 
until he was twenty-li\e years old. He w-as married on July 2, 1874. to 
l<:mma Day, a daughter of D. W. and h:sther (Day) Day. the latter of 
w^iom was l)orn near Erie. Pennsylvania. 

.Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Day were the parents of four children, namely: 
Julia, deceased, \\as the wife of 1/^rancis Beldig; Oscar lives in Belding, 
Michigan; Loren. deceased, li\ed in Granville. Michigan; ftmma is the wife 
of Clark J. Drimimond. 

Mr. Drummond N\as engaged in the lumber btisiness as a salesman for 
about twenty years. re])resenting one of the numerous com])anies of Aiichi- 
gan when the lumber business in this state was in its prime. Tn i8c;8 Mr. 
Drummond was ai)i)ointecl ])Ostmaster of Greenville, and served efficiently 
in that ca|>acity until tc)o6. After that date he was retained in the office by 
his successor as deputy postmaster for seven years, imtil 191 3. Since the 
close of his service in the |')ostoffice Mr. Drummond has lived retired in his 
home at (jreenville, this county. 

Mr. and Mrs. ('lark J. Drummond adopted a child, Irma Harris, when 
she was three years old. and she now is the wife of Bert \''an Norman. 
They live in Detroit, and have one child. Douise. 

Clark J. Drr.mmond is a RejKiblican. and although he is a stanch party 
n)an he is ever read\' to aid in every mo>-ement that will be of benefit to the 
comnnmitv. He is a member of Greenville T.odge No. 96. Free and Accepted 
Masons, and (Thayiter No. i/), l\oyal .Arch Masons. Mr. Drummond is a 
charter member of T.eroy Dodge No. 9, Knights of Pythias. 



.\l..\r COUNTY, MlCIilCAX. 



C : H A K T . I -: S S W A RTHOUT. 



("liarles S\\artli()in, well-known retired farmer and prominent citizen 
of ("rystal, Montcalm county, Michigan, was born in Wayne township, 
Steuben county, Xew Y'.)rk. February 21, 1841, a son of Ralph and Sally 
( 1 'each ) Swarthout. 

I'ollowing his education, received in the pul^lic schools oi his native 
county, Charles Swarthout worked on the home farm until 1861. when he 
enlisted in C'ompau}- A. Sixteenth Re^^iment, New York X'ohmteer Infan- 
try, a command with which he served his enlistment period of three months, 
during this time participating in the first battle of Bull Run. About one 
month alter the expiration of his first enlistment, Charles Swarthout again 
enlisted for service in the Civil War. this time with Company 1, Eighty- 
lifth Regiment. Xew York Volunteer Infantry, and while serving in this 
command Mr. Swarthout to(.)k i>art in the Peninsular campaign, with Gen- 
eral McClellan, including the battles of Williamsburg, {""air Oaks, Mechanics- 
\ ille. and the se^■en days" light in the retreat from in front of Richmond 
and Harrison's Landing. In the battle of Malvern Hill, Charles Swart- 
hout was seA'erely wounded, as a result of which he was discharged in 
January, 1863. About one month after liis discharge from military service, 
.\lr. .Swarthout returned to .Steuben county. New York, where he remained 
one year and then came to the state of "Michigan, locating at Muir, Ionia 
c(Muity. where he engaged in his trade as a carpenter. In the )ear 1879 
Mr. .Swarthout purchased one hundred acres of timl>er land on the north 
shore of Crystal lake, in Alontcalm county, land which, after years of hard 
A\ork, he cleared and culti\ated as a general farmer until 1896, when he 
sold his farm and moved to the town of Crystal, where he has since li^^ed a 
retired life, with the exception of five years, when he was a rural mail car- 
rier from the Crystal postoffice. 

During the autumn of the year 1863 Charles Swarthout was married 
tfi Julia Churchill, who wa'^ born in Tyrone township, Stetiben county, New 
^'ork. a daughter of Josei)h and Abigail Churchill. To the marriage of 
Charles and Julia Swarthout were born three children: Clarence and 
l\dwin, who live in Ferris township, Montcalm county, and Fannie, who is 
the wife of C. TT. Braman. living on the north shore of I^ke Crvstal. 

On August 4. T885. Julia, the wife of Charles vSwarthout, died, and 
about four years later, on March 14, 1889, Mr. Sw^arthout was married, 
secondly, to May Clark, who was born at Brownstown, Monroe county, 
^lichigan, a daughter of Lorenzo and Elizabeth (Brake) Clark. 



21 6 MOXTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

T-orcnzo C. Clark was Ixjni in Oawford county, Pennsylvania. June 
i8, itS^g, a son of Watson i). and ['.dizabeth (Trace) Clark, both of whom 
were born in the state of Pennsylvania, the former of English descent, the 
latter of German ancestry, they livino- jn Alonroe county, Michigan, from 
i8|9 to iH/f), with the excei)ti()n of four years in Wayne county. New 
^'ork. Porenzo C. C.^lark, on h'ebruary 4, 1861, enlisted in Coni])any K, 
Sixth Regiment, Michigan N'olunteer Infantry, serving in the Civil War 
until August JO, 18(35, ^vhen he was honorably discharged. During the year 
1876 Mr. Cldvk moved to Gratiot county. Michigan, and settled on a farm 
in section 5. of North Star township, later in life moving to North Star, 
where he died in i<)i2. Mrs. Clark, the widow oi Lorenzo Clark, now 
lives at North Star. P^-ior to her marriage. Mrs. Clark was I^lizabeth X. 
Brake, ii daughter of l.)a\id and Marietta ( I'aker ) Brake. 

^Ir. and Mrs. Swarthout and their son. Kenneth Carleton. who was 
born on March 15. rgo;^. are active members and su])|)orters of the Con- 
gregational church, at Oy^tal, and .are amoug the res])ected and a])pre- 
ciated workers of this congregation. Charles Swarthout. since the year 
:i868, has 1)een a meml)er of the h'ree and Accepted .Masnns. and is .also a 
prominent mem1)er of the Grand Army of the I\epublic. in .Montcalm county. 

.\s a citizen, .Mr. Swartliout served as a supervisor of Crvstal town- 
ship for hve years. During the time of his active life on the farm and 
since retiring to the more (juiet walks of life he has given freely of his 
influence and su])]')ort for the promotion of the various hcli)ful movements 
of the comnmnitv. 



!OHN B. STRAIT. 



John B. Strait, welbknown and highly-respected retired farmer, living 
at Crystal, jMontcalm county, Michigan, w\as born in Defiance county, Ohio, 
June ly, 1844. a son oi lveul)en and Mary f Resler ) Strait, the former born 
in Manchester, X'ermont. .\])ril 5. 1810, a son of George Strait and wife: 
the latter born in Pogansport. Pennsylvania, from where slie moved with 
her parents to Defiance county, Ohio, at which place she was married. 

Reul)en .Strait was a man of various jnirsuits. having l)een a canal 
boatnian. managed a hotel, conducted a grocery and operated a veneer- 
mill. The elder Strait silent the greater part of his mature life at Defiance, 
Ohio, where he died in 1857. at the age of forty-seven, survived by his wife 
and two children. Ro.xey and John B.. the latter being thirteen years of age 



jAIONTCALM COUNTY, MICTIIGAN, 21/ 

.'Lt the time of the dcalh of liis father. Following the death of her hiis- 
l>aii(l. -Mrs. Strait w.'is married, secondly, in October, 1864, to Grafton Reed, 
they, after their marria.u'c mo\ int^" to I'erris tOAvnship, Montcalm county, 
Michigan, w iiere they spent their last days. 

John 15. .Strait, while yet qnite young, enlisted for service in the CHvil War, 
with C"om])any II. 'Jdiirty-eigiuh Kegiment, Ohio \'olunteer Infantry, but 
on account of i>hysical disaJ)ility was mustered out of the service a year 
afterward. J)nring the month of l^Y-bruary, t<S63, Mr. Strait again enlisted 
for service, this time with Company D, Tenth Ohio Cavalry, a command 
with which he served as a part of the army of General vSherman. on his 
march to the sea. At I'ailey's Cross l^oads, Xorth Carolina, in l-'ebrnary, 
T(S05, John 1>. Strait was captured as a prisoner of war and taken to Salis- 
bur\' ])rison. in A(~»rth (^■lrolina. later l)eing mo\'ed to Danville, and from 
there to ].ibl)y prison, lie was suffering from a gun-shot through the body 
and arm. both wounds the result of the same bullet. With the character- 
istic neglect of the notorious I.ibl)y prison, John P.. Strait received no medi- 
cal attention. beinL'; compelled 10 do with dressing of his wounds which had 
beeti a|)i)lied. by a farmer'^ wU'v a.t her home, the sole attention which Mr. 
Strait received in this ])rison haxing been two doses of medicine. The 
jirison authorities said that he would be dead before morning, but John B. 
Strait rallied from his wounds and sutTered the hardshi{)s and privations 
of the rel)e1 prison until Ai)ril 3, 1865. when he was transferred to a field 
hos])ital of the L^nion army. fn Juwv, of the same year, he rejoined his regi- 
nieiU, and served for the remainder of the war, being discharged on Juh' 6, 
1865, aJ Cleveland, Ohio. 

h'ollowing his discharge from military service, John B. Strait came to 
l-'erris township, Montcalm county. Michigan, and became a farmer on 
forty acres of land, li\ing at this i)lace until 1871. Avhen. with his family, 
Mr. Strait moved to Blackhawk county, Iowa, and farmed there for nine 
years. Tie then returned to b'erris townshi[>. Afontcalm county, Michigan, 
and with the proceeds from the sale of his Towa land, purchased a farm 
located in the northern part of Crystal township, this county, where his 
son. \A'il1iam, now lives. On his farm in Crystal townsliip, John B. .Strait 
li\ed imtil T()02, when he sold his land to his son. William, and moved to^ 
Crystal, where he now li\es a retired life. 

On ^Tarch 4, i866. John B. Strait was married to Catherine Johnson, 
who was born in Pidton county, Ohio, a daughter of John B. and Rlizabeth 
(T-'rec/^e) J(.)hnson, natiACS of \"irgim'a and of Ohio. respcctiA'clv. Nfr. and 



2F.S -MONTCALM COrXTY, MICIIIC.AN. 

Mrs. juhnsuii lived in Inilton county, Ohio, until (.)ctol>or, 1864, when they 
jnu\eci t() h'erris township, Montcalm county, where John B. Johnson 
eui^iaged in tarnn'ng and in the operati(.)n ut a blacksmith shoj; for the 
remainder of his days. To the nuirriai^e ot' John I), and Catherine Strait 
ha\e heen born eight children: (ieoriJe, who raises i)eaches and berries on 
forty .'icres ot land alonij- the southeast shore of ("r\stal lake; \'ictoria, who 
died in 1910, she havini.i- been the wife of ( "harles (iroom; IJrittomart, who 
died at the age of eight \cars; William, a farmer of Crystal townshij); 
Mary, who died in 189;,. the wife of ( )ren Myers; jMilo, a farmer living- 
two miles south of h'erris Center, in Ferris township, this county; Eliza- 
l)etli, the wife oi .Mien Page, of Crystal, and John B., who lives at Rose- 
-btish, Isabella count}', Michigan. 

b)hu 1). Strait, during the time that the Grand Army of the Repul)lic 
post existed at Cr\stal. was an acti^•e member, having taken an important 
part in the \\(.)rk .and in the efforts of this organization. Mr. Strait and his 
family are among the honored and esteemed people of this commimity, they 
haxing a host of friends and admirers. 



RAVBURN B. SMITH, M. 1). 

Dr. Kayburn B. Smith, president of the State Bank of Crystal and the 
■only practicing physician and sm-geon at Crystal, this county, is a native of 
the "Sunilower'" state, having been born in a sorl dugout near the town of 
vStockton, on the ])lains of Brooks county, Kansas, on July 18, 1881, son 
•of llenjamin l'\ and Lillian J. (Adams) Smith, who at that time were 
'T'l'oving up" a claim on the ].)rairie, during which time, for three years, they 
li\ed in a sod shanty, experiencing all the disconrforts and hardships of the 
pioneers. 

Benjamin Franklin Smith was born at Mesopotamia, Trumlmll county, 
Ohio, b'ebruary 10, 1848, son of Benjamin and Hannah (Byers) Smith, 
who were born and reared and married in \ Ork countv. I'enns\ Ivania. and 
who, after their marriage, moved to TrumlMill county, Ohio, where they 
established a home and where they spent the remainder of their lives. B. 
b\ Smith grew up on the paternal farm in Ohio and followed fanning 
imtil he was twenty-two years of age, after which, for a little more than 
six years, he was engaged in the hotel business at Garrettsville, Ohio. In 
the meantime he had married and in the summer of \S/() went to Kansas 



MONTCALM COLNTY, MICHIGAN. 2 H) 

with his bride ;ui(l entered a elaiiii to a tract of g-overnnient land in Ikooks 
eonnty, tliat state, and while "proving np"' the same lived in a sod dugout. 
Jn the fall of 1881 they returned to Ohio and for a few years Mr. Smith 
was engaged in farming in the neighborhood of his old home at Mesopo- 
tamia. In March. 1890, he came to Montcalm county and located at Crys- 
tal, where for about three years he was engaged in running a summer resort 
and boat business on Crystal lake. In 1893 he built the Lakeside House 
and there has conducted a summer hotel e\'er since. TTis hotel accommo- 
dates more than eighty guests and does a fine business (hiring the summers. 
-Mr. .Smith has taken a warm interest in general affairs herealwut since 
coming to this county and fc;r se\-eral years served on the school board. 

On June 2.^. hS/c;. i benjamin V. .Smith was united in marriage to 
Lillian J. Adams, wlu.) was born in N'elson, Ohio, daughter of Oliver J. and 
-Vancy ( Peterman ) .Xdams, the former a native of that state and the latter 
of Wisconsin, and to this union six children have 1x.'en born, of whom two 
died in infancy, the others being as follow: Jessie, who was born in Brooks 
county, Kansas, married (1. W Wright, of Alma, this state, and has three 
children, Esther Lillian. Kollo and Norman S. ; Ethel, born at Mesopo- 
tamia. Ohio, widow of -Martin S. Lewis, lives at Oystal and has one soti, 
I'hil C". ; Ida. also Ijorn at Meso])Otamia, who is the wife of Charles S. 
Dougherty and lives at Warren, Ohio, and Dr. Rayburn B., the immediate 
subject of this sketch. 

Kaybinm B. Smith was but six weeks of age when in"s parents left 
Ivansas, where he was born, and returned t(~) Ohio, The first eight years of 
his life were spent on the farm in Trumbtill county and he then came with 
his parents to this county, where he grew to manhood and where he has 
lived ever since. Upon completing the coiu'se at that time ])rescribed in the 
Cryst.'d high school he taught school for a year, at the end of which time 
he entered Sagina\v A'alley Medical College, from which excellent institu- 
tion he was graduated on May 4. 1903, and at once entered upon the j)rac- 
tice of his ])rofession in Crystal, where he ever since has been located, with 
the exception of the time he sjXint in Chicago taking a po.st-graduate course 
in the Northern Illinois College of Ophthalmogy and Otology. He has 
been health officer for Crystal township for the past eight or ten years and 
is a member of the Alontcalm County Medical Society and the Michigan 
State Medical .Society, in the affairs of both of wdiich organizations he takes 
a warm interest. Doctor Smith also has taken an active interest in general 
affairs hereabout and when the State Bank of Crvstal was organized he was 



2 JO .MOXTCALM COT' NT V, MJCHIGAN. 

ck-clcd prt-sideiU of lliai iiistitntiou. a position which he has ever since held. 
Doctor Smith is a iiuMii])er of the Alasonic order and takes a pronn'nent [)art 
in the acti\ities of the local lo'lge of Lhat order. 

^Jn September 17, 1907. Dr. !\a\l.mrn 15. Smith was united in niarriaj>e 
lo Inez Reynolds, nn ho wa^ horn at Meso])otaniia.. TrumlniU county. Ohio, 
daui^liter of J(j1) and Altha (Lewis) Reynolds, both natives of that county, 
and to this union two children have been born, Reynolds C. and Marian J. 

Job Reynolds was liorn on Se])teniber 6, 1837, son of Job and Betsey 
(Arnold) ReNUolds, w h(.) v.'ere married in (A)nnecticut and inimi^^rated to 
Ohio, settling in rrnmlml] county at an early day in the settlement of that 
section and there established a home in the woods, exentually developing a 
line farm of about three liundrefl acres, and there the junior Job Reynolds 
was l)()rn and grew to manhood. [le married .\ltha Lewis, daughter of 
Sila'- and .'-^ilana ( llathawa)) Lewis, natives of Massachusetts and pioneers 
of d'rumbnll county, (,)Iiio. Job Reynolds. Jr., lived on the farm on wdiich 
he was liorn until in Sei>tcmber. rNS-. at which tin.ie he moved to the village 
of .Meso])')tamia. where he c\er since li\'cd and for many \-ears has been 
engaged in the 1i\e-stock l)usiness. lie is a veteran of the ("ivil War, having 
ser\-ed for one year and six months from the time of his enlistment, on 
.September i, 1861. in the Second Ohio (^'avalry. engaged in the campaign 
in Missouri, Arkansas and the South, and was discharged on a physician's 
ccrtibcate of disabilitv. 



WARRM'.X G. GRLSWOLD. 

Warren G. (iriswold, a veteran of the Civil War and a prospei"ous 
retired larmer, now living in comfort at his pleasant home in the village 
(jf Grystal, this county, is a native-l)()rn son of Michigan, having heen born 
at .Vo\i, in Oakland count}, this state, i^'ebruary 22, 1849, son of Warren 
i). and Rhoebe Ann 'Holt) Griswold, the former a native of X'ermont and 
[lie huter of .\ew ^'ork state, who. in the early fifties, moved from Oak- 
land countv to Ionia county, where Warren P>. Ciriswold traded a yoke of 
cattk" for twenty acres of l.-md and i)roceeded to make a new home in the 
forest wilderness, and there he spent the rest of his life, his death occur- 
ring in 1874. liis wife died in i8f.)\, their son, Warren G.. the stibject of 
this sketch, then being twelve vears of age. 

In October, T8r)4. he then being lifteen years of age, Warren ( i. Gris- 
wold enlisted in ('omi)any ( ". 'i'liird Regiment. Michigan \'olunteer Infantrv, 



.MONTCALM CCUNTY, MICIUGAX. 221 

and saw ser\-icc in 'i cnnessee and 'J'cKas. heinp; mustered out at San Antonio, 
Texas, on J''e])ruarv lo. rS66. U])on the eonipletion of his niihtarv experi- 
ence >dr. (iriswold returned home a.nd resumed his place on his t'atlier's farm. 
1"lie next s])ring- he married and tor a numher of years was eni^a5..>;ed as a 
titnbcrman and gener;d t'amier. In 1870 he Ijci^'-an farmiiig for himself, 
havini^ honi^lu a small place two miles sou.tli and one mile west of the vil- 
lai^e of Crystal, in this county. Me did well and gradually added to his 
holdiui^s tliere until at tlie time of his retirement fron.i the farm in February, 
I'M 5. he was the owner of <nie hundred and twent}- acres, more than one 
iitm(h-e(! of which h.ad been cleared and was under cultivation. Uc sold the 
place to his son, JAnian. and bon.uht a home in the villag-e of Crystal, where 
he and liis wite are now lixini;- in comfortable retirement. Mr. (rriswold 
i-> an earnest l\e[)ubhcan and for years has t^ixen thouj^htful attention to 
ci\ie affairs. lie has ser\ed the [public in the capacity of drain commis- 
su)iiei- and was also hiy"hwa\- conimis>ioner for Crystrd township for some 
years. lie is a member of the Independent Order of ( )d(l Tudlows and of 
tile (irand Anny of the Republic and takes rui active interest in the affairs 
of those orq-anizations. 

On .March 21, uSO^. A\'arren (i. (iriswold was united in marriaj^e to 
i-.hira Kockwell. wlio was ]M)rn in ("rawford county. i*enns\lvania, ;\uo-ust 
21, ]X~,o. daughter of (."harles and Almeda (Millard) Rockwell, the former 
a nati\e of i'eimsylvania and the latter of New York state, who came to 
thi^ county in Oct(>ber. 1^=,/, and bougdit a farm southwest of Crvstal, 
where Mr. and Mrs. (iriswold for years made their home and where their 
son is now living;. When the l\ockwells settled here there was onlv a trail 
leading- through the dee]; timber and Mrs. Criswold has seen the develop- 
ment of Crystal township from the very beginning- of the establishment of 
a social order therealiout, she being ackncwvledged to l)e the only i)erson now 
h\ing for nndcs about ^\■llo has been a resident of that section as long- 
as she. March 2.1. km 7, will be the hftieth anniversarv of the marriag-e 
(kite of Mr. and Mrs. Griswold. To them ten children have been 
l>orn ;md they have thii-t^-two grandchildren and one great-grandchild, 
Donna, daughter of Truman Rolt'e. Of the ten children born to ~\\r. and 
Mrs. Criswold live are ^till h'ving". bve having- died when cpiite voung-. three, 
J*"rwin. Clinton and l\a\niond, having died within a week of each other of 
a combination of scarlet fever and di])htheria, the youngest less than a year 
okl ruid the eldest not (jnite five years of age: Franklin Charles, their first- 
born child, died at the age of two years and six months, and \Veslev, the 



22 2 MONTCALM COrNTY. MICHIGAN. 

third in order of birth, a few days l)efore liis (ifth l)irthda_\-. in Fehruarx', 
i8<So. The living children, in the order of their 1>irth. are as follow: ICstella, 
widow of W atson Kolfe. is lixing at Crystal and has ei^^ht children. Harley 
\... I^rne>t W'., Leo. Trnnian. f.eslie. Ha/.el. J.ncille and Dale; Piertha. wife 
of Daniel Kidder. li\es near the town of Alnir. in Ioin"a connty. and has 
eight children, ("littord. Xettic. 'iracc, Claire, Donald, l\a\mond. Marion 
and h'rank ; Ina, wife of ! 'erry I'lfnmt, living two and one-half miles sonth- 
west of Crystal, has hve children, Alta, hord, Floyd. Dorothy and Joyce 
l^laine; Lyman, wdio hought the old home farm, where he now makes his 
home, married Ina Rickard and has fi\e children. Beatrice. Lyle, Warren. 
Cecil and IJenlah. living, and two dead, and Rli. living near Afnir. in Ionia 
connty. who married lulith Dudho])e and has '^ix children, IClsie, Rlton. 
hdheri. luila. i'dmer and lumice. 



MUBKirr S. I'RESTON. 

llni)ert S. I'reston. a well-known building contractor and photographer, 
ol (rystal. this connty. who for more than lifteen years has served the 
people of ('r}slal townshii) in the important public ca])at-ity of justice of the 
peace, is a nati\-e-born son of Michigan, having been born at Battle Creek, 
this stale. .\])ril 2,^, i!^57, son of James AL and Lucy E. (Canfield) Pres- 
ton, the former of whom died in that city in j()0-i. at the age of se\ent\'- 
eight, and the latter now is lixing at St. Johns, this state, in her eighty- 
third year. 

James M. I'reston ^^■as born in the state of New York in 1824, son of 
b,])hraim I'reston and wife, who came to Afichigan when he was three years 
old and settled at I'.attle t'reek. which at that time was a small settlement 
containing but four stores and a mere cluster of unpretentious houses. There 
James .\L I'reston gre\v to manhood and married Lucy \i. Canfield. who 
was born in A'crmont and whose mother died when she was a baby, after 
which her father came to this state and she grew to womanhood on a farm 
between Ouincy ;md ('■oldwater, in T'ranch county. .Some years after their 
marriage. James M. Preston and wife moved to Kalamazoo county, this 
state, where they settled on a farm in Clitnax township and there they lived 
for many years, long jiast the days of their middle age retiring from the 
farm and returning to Battle Creek, wdiere Mr. Preston died in 1902. TTis 
widow married \Vells .Sheldon and is now living at St. Johns, this state. 



MONTCALM COIXTY. MTCFIKiAN. 22^^ 

lliil)ert S. I'reston v/as but three years uf aii;e when his parents moved 
from 15attle ("reck to Kalamazoo county, and in the latter place of residence 
he i^rew to manhood, there learning the carpenter trade and at the same 
time becoming- a skilled pli(;lograi)her. About itS/j he went to Barry ccnmt}-. 
this state, where, near the town of Woodland, he began wt)rking as a car- 
])cnter. While there he married bdla \\. I'^.sterbrook, who died nut long 
afterward, \\ ithout isstie. l.ater. Air. l*reston moved to the t(jwn of Sebawa. 
in Ionia ccjunty. this state, where, I'ebruary 5, 1879, he married, secondly, 
Clotilda DeCamp, who was b(.)rn in Xol)le county, Indiana, .\iigust 5, 1857, 
daughter of Simeon and .\nna (S(|uires) DeC'amp, both of whom were 
born near the town of ICrie. in Washington county, Pennsylvania, the for- 
mer on .\pril 22\ 1824, anil the latter. August 7, 1824, who, in their early 
childliood. were taken to Ohio, their respective families moving to that 
state at tb.at time, and in i8j6 the\- were married, both the DeCamp and 
the S(juircs families at that time li\ing in the neighborhood of ("olumbus, 
the state ca])ital. About J 854 they moved to Xoble comity, Indiana, and 
thence, in the fall of i8(y.). to this state, settling in the neighborhood of 
.Sebewa. in ionia county, a\ here .Mr. DcC'amp bought a farm and where 
both he and his wife sjient the remainder of their lives, his death occurring 
on July 2<). .i(;o3, at the age of se\ enty-nine, and hers, November 13. i:<)ii, 
at the age of eight}-seven. 

l-'ollowing his second marriage, .Mr. I'reston remained at Sel>ewa about 
three \ears. at the end. of which time he returned to his old home in Kala- 
nia/.oo coinuv. where lie made his home for eight years, fi\e years of winch 
time he spent carjicntering and one }e.ur as a photographer. It was during 
that i)erio(l that he s])ent nine mc^nths in North Dakota, but not hnding 
things there to his liking returned to Kalamazoo county and devoted some 
time to linishing his study of the art of photography. In the s])ring of 
1888 .Mr. I'reston came to this county and located at Crystal, where he 
e\-er since has made his home. Me had a car l)uilt for use as a mo\a1)lc 
photograph gallery and for four years was engaged in oi>erating the same 
in and al)Out Crystal, lie then sold the car, expecting to build a more com- 
modious one, but just at that time wa> a.^^ked to build a house for a friend 
and he thus, incidentally, Avas led to resume his former vocation of car- 
l)cnter. Demands for his services in this connection continued to be made 
and for fifteen years he was continuously engaged in building, dm-ing which 
time he constrticted most of the better class of houses erected in Crystal in 
tliat ])eriod. In the meantime, in the s|)ring of T()oo, Mr. Preston w'as 



224 .MONTCAL.M COrXTY. MIClliGAX. 

cIccUmI justice of llic jjcace of Crystal township and so a(.lniira1)ly has he 
iilied the ofhcc that he has heen continnonsly rc-clccted at each recurrin,^- 
election since and i> still serving-; in that important caj)acity, his excellent 
jndgnient and the thuu^htfii] attention he ,^ives to the cases which arise 
within his jnrisdiction rendering- him well (|iia.liried for the ];lace of local 
ma,^-istrate In l'el,>rnary, 191 t, Squire Preston bnilt a photooruph 5>-aIlery 
next door to his home .and since then has heen (le\()ting his attention almost 
exchisi\ely to the art of photography, althongh he still does some carpenter- 
ing-. 

To Iln.hert S. and Clotilda ( DeC'amp ) Preston two sons have been 
horn; Arthur j.. horn at v'^ehewa in 1880. and Roy C, at Crystal in t88(), 
Ixjth of whom are ministers of the Gospel. The Rev. Arthnr J. l*reston, 
who is a minister of the Meth(jdist church, inarried Nellie Hinkslon and 
i.s now living at Ik'ar Pake, in Manistee county, this state. The Rev. Roy 
C. I're^ton, who is a minister of the Pajitist church, now stationed at Mien, 
in IlilPdale county, this state, is also a teaclier in the ])ul)lic schools and 
received his training in the n(trmal school at Vjj'^ilanti and the college at 
Tlillsda.le. Me married Maggie hdlenthorp and has two cln'ldreh, Catherine 
l'Ael\n and Irene Hessie. 

Sijuire Preston is a Republican and for years has given close attention 
\o local political affairs. He i.s ;i Mason and was senior deacon of the local 
lodge for aliout twelve }-ears, also ha\ing served as junior warden and as 
senior warden. 'Mrs. Preston is a member of the ATethodist church and. 
together with her husband, ever has been active in good Avorks. 



ENSIGN B. STKBPINS. 

Jvnsign P. Stebbins, business man, hnancier, man of altairs and promi- 
nent citizen, of Carson City, Montcalm county. Michigan, was born at 
Muskegon, Aiichigan. on October 24, 1865, the son of Chester H. and 
.h.mch'ne 1 Pike) Stebbins, both of whom were born in Ionia county, 
MifTiigan. 

Chester PL Stel)l)ins. following his marriage in Ionia county, hvcd at 
Muskegon for some time and then moved to the town of Ionia, a place 
which was his home until some time later, when he went to Lake View, 
i\rontcalm county, where he has .since been engaged in the milling business 
arid in general agricultural pursuits. As a resident of Lake View, Chester 




KXSKJX i;. STKIMUNS. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 223 

II. ^tebbi^s has taken an imi)ortant part in public and official affairs, hav- 
ing;- served as village president, as township supervisor and as the occupant 
of other offices of trust and honor. 

jjisigu B. Stebbins was educated in the schools of Lake View, Alont- 
c.'ilni county, and after the completion of his educational efforts, he estab- 
lished a small factory for tlie manufacture of novelties, a place which, under 
die able management of J\lr. Steblnns. soon ])ecame a factory for the mak- 
ing of furniture. After some years as a manufacturer, at I^ake View, 
ICnsign J-). Stel)l)ins, in 1905, moved to Sturgis, Michigan, where he erected 
a modem factory building for the conduct of his business as a furniture 
manufacturer. Mr. Stel)l)ins engaging successfully in this business at that 
))lace for six years, when he sold out and went to Grand Rapids, where he 
lived for some time, l^nsign B. Stebbins came to Carson City, and organ- 
ized the Farmers and Merchants State Bank, a financial institution of which 
Mr. Stel)l)ins has been cashier since its organization, in 1915. 

\n 1885, at f.ake View, Ensign H. Stebbins was married to Mattie 
fuller, who was born in TTillsdalc county. Michigan,' the daughter of Lewis 
and I'hoebe (Alley) Fuller, who settled in Lake \'iew al)0Ut 1880. where 
Lewis Iniller o])erated a plauing-mill and followed his occupation as a coii- 
Iractor and builder, until shortly before his deatli, when he went to Birming- 
ham, .Alabama, where he died in 1907. I'hoebe, the wife of Lewis Iniller, 
<lied at Lake A'iew, about the year 1900. To the marriage of Ensign B. 
and Mattie Stebbins haxe l)een born three daughters, Aileen, ITazel and Mil- 
dred, all of whom live at home; TTazel was educated at Olivet College. 

1^'nsign B. Stebbins is a prominent member of the h^ree and Accepted 
.\ bisons, at Carson City, and is a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. Mr. Stebliins is (Mie of the esteemed and honored citizens of 
* arson City and of Alontcalm county, his judgment and counsel on matters 
of business and hnance l)cing eagerly sought, and being a man of progres- 
sive ways, unsellish life and devotion to the interests of the community, he 
has won for him.self a host of friends and admirers among his fellow 
eiti/cns and associates. 

The l\armers and Merchants State Bank, of Carson City, which is 
an evidence of the ability and efforts of Ensign B. Stebbins, was organized 
"n January 2, 1915, as a state bank, with an authorized capital stock of 
twenty-five thousand dollars. After the organization of the Farmers and 
Merchants State Bank, the business of the institution was conducted in 
temporary quarters, until September 18. 191 5, when they moved into their 
fTSb) 



226 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

present especially constructed and modernly furnished building, located on 
one of the choice sites of ("arson City. 

The building is of brick, is furnished with quartered oak furniture, well 
lighted and ventilated, heated by steam, and is so arranged that the con- 
venience of the building makes it a pleasure for the conduct of business. 
The h'armers and jVIerchants State I'ank, of ('arson City, is supplied with 
safety de])osit facilities, with ])ri\'ate l)OOths for the use of depositors, is 
equipped with ladies' rest rocnn, lounges and desks for correspondence and 
the care of business, and in this modern bank building is a large room 
equipped wi;.h tal)les, chairs and all furnishings and supplies necessary for 
the conduct of Imsiness, of the holding of meetings or social gatherings. 

The affairs of the [*\armers and Merchants State P)ank. of Carson Citv, 
arc cared for by the following officers: William E. Adams, president; 
George Walt, vice-president; Ensign ?>. .Stebbins, cashier, and Paul A\ 
Bretz, assistant cashier. The stock of this bruiking house is owned l)v about 
twenty local stockholders, men well known as farmers and merclirmts of 
Carson City and Montcalm county. 



CrnS A. SANEORD. 



Otis A. Sanford. well-known manufacturer and owner of the garage at 
Crystal, this countv, and generally recognized as the chief "booster" of that 
pleasant village, though too modest personally to admit that local distinc- 
tion, is a iiati\-e-l)orn s«»n <:>f Michigan. ha\ing been born in York townshi]>, 
AA'as!)tenaw county, this stale, November 20. 1873. son of A. W. and Emma 
(TuttkA Sanford. lie grew up on the paternal farm in Washtenaw county, 
su])i)lemcnting his district-school schooling by a course in the high school at 
iMilan, after which, .at the age of eighteen, he began work for himself in 
the cai)acitv of lireman for a cider factory. .After a few months of such 
ser\ice he went to [kittle Creek, wliere for a \(>ar he was engaged as a 
fireman in the city waterworks of Battle Creek, after which he went to Jack- 
son, where for three years he wa- in the em])loy of (he Collins Manufactur- 
ing Company as an all-around mechanic, having charge of the electrical 
equi]iment of the plant, running a machine and doing such other things as 
his hand found to do. in the meantime developing a real genius for the 
intricacies of mechanics. 

Mr. Sanford then was attracted by the possibilities presented in the 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 22" 

fniit belt of California and went to that state, where for two years he was 
enj^aiiX'd as a foreman on a fifty-acre fruit farm near the town of Newcastle, 
in Placer county, hut not fmcling thint^s there wholly to his liking returned 
to Jackson, re-cnlcring the em])loy of the Collins ATanufacturing Company 
and \vas thus engaged for two }'ears, at the end of which time he bought a 
carriage and repair sliop on 2\lain street in that city, which he operated quite 
successful!}- for a year. He then sold his shop to advantage and for a year 
thereafter was connected with the w^ork of creating beautiful Cooley park, 
now the Michigan state Odd h>llow home, after which he came to this 
county, in 1899. locating in Crystal, where he started a factory for manu- 
facturing lath and ])otato crates. Tie presently added an e(]uipment of plan- 
ing-mill machinery to his plant, to which he later added a set of buhrs for 
grinding feed. In 1902 he estal)lished the electric-light plant at Cr}^stal and 
the next year put in a full set of rollers for a flour-mill, at the same time 
ilro|)ping the manufacture of lath, and ])otato crates. He o|x^rated the flour- 
iniJl until Ton. in which year he established a general garag'e and automo- 
liile-rcpair shop, which he ever sitice has been very successfully operating. 
In Mji^ Mr. San ford added to the equipment of his electric-light ])lant a 
powerful storage battery, by the use of which he is enabled to give Crystal 
a full twenty- t'our-hoiu- light service with only twelve hours of power. Tn 
the meantime he built a handsome residence in Crystal and is now quite 
comfortablv situated there. He was one of the chief organizers of the 
Crystal Telephone Company and was manager of the telephone system there 
until July i. J9J5, and in. other ways has contributed much to the general 
ad\ancement of the ])cM interests of that thriving village. Mr. San ford is 
a member o\ the ln(le])en(lent Order of Odd h^ellows and of the Gleaners, 
ni the affairs of both of which organizations he takes a wann interest. 

Fn i8(;7 Otis A. Sanford was united in marriage to Georgiana Mesler, 
who was born in Jackson county. Michig.an. daughter of Charles and Amelia 
( Dranier) Mesler, and who was (|uite a small girl when her parents moved 
into the city of Jackson, where they now reside. To Mr. and A4rs. Sanford 
two children have been born. F.eon T. and Milo D. 

As an in>tance of the manner in which Mr. Sanford is regarded bv his 
neighbors in C'rystal. the following extract from a recent article in a local 
ncwspaiier is presented: ''Air. Sanf(^r(l is a 'booster' for the tipbtiilding of 
Crystal and vicinit\- and it \\ as mainly through his efTorts that manv of the 
ini])ro\cments of the village were brought to a '^uccessftij culmination. Mr. 
Sanford is too modest to take any credit for the work, and when asked who 



228 MONTCAJ.M C(U;\TY, MlClllGAX. 

it wa.s thai ]nit throniLih the many iniproveiiieiits lie .says, 'the boosters of 
C'ryst.al.' lUit Mr. San ford has iiiaiiy friends in Crystal who are wiHing to 
gi\e him the crech't deserved. The Crystal liiJhting plant is not surpassed 
in Michigan, and ])rol)al)ly nowhere else. Jt is run hy steam till ten o'elock 
at nii^ht and from then until the steani power stru'ts in the morning the 
current is furnished l)y stora^^e hatteries, which also are used all day Sun- 
days. At his garage all rei)airs can be made, vulcanizing done and mag- 
netos recharged and a full stock of accessories and tires is cruTied." 



VAA A. ELDRTDGh: 



i'di A. h^dridge, v.-ell-known business man, engaged in the (Jccu])ation 
or a house-mo\er, of (Jarson City, Montc:dm county, Michigan, was born in 
Salem t(3wnshij), Washtenaw county, Michigan, May 26. 1H5Q, t!ie s{,)n of 
lames rmd Jlarriett (Higgins) Eldridge, nati\'es of Kent, l^ugland. 

James J'^dridge and his wife came to America in 1858, and after a 
short time at Detroit, they came I0 a point near the present town of N;orth- 
\ille, where they li\ed for three years and then mo\ed to Mecosta county, 
later, in 1863, moving to Crystal township. Montcahn county, where James 
I'ddridge purchaser! one hundred and sixty acres of uncleared and unim- 
proved land. This land the elder Eldridge pre|)ared for cultivation and 
lived the life of ]>ioneers, and as a farmer for the remainder of his life, with 
the exception of three years as a soldier in the Civil War. James J'ddridge 
was a drainage comnn'ssioner of his townshi]) for two terms and he was an 
active meml>er and local preacher of the P)a|)tist church in Montcalm county. 
James Eldridge died t)n May 26, 1910: his wife died in. December, igoQ. 
James and Harriett r>ldridge were the parents of five children: W. E., 
Addie, Bert, l^li A., and Nettie May, who is deceased. 

VA\ A. hddridge spent his youthful days on the home place, was educated 
in the public schools of his native township, and then he engaged in general 
work, for al)Out two years, after which he |)urchased a sttim])-pulling outfit 
and followed this line of work for about ten years, during this time Mr. 
Eldridge having taken out the stumps for the Grand Trunk railway branch 
in Montcalm county. After clearing forty acres of land which he purchased 
in Montcalm county, ^\r. Eldridge disposed of his stump-pulling outfit and 
then, in 1896, Iwught a house-mo\ing outfit and engaged in the house-mov- 
ing Imsiness throughout his locality for two years and then moved to Car- 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 22g 

^on (.'ity. wliere he now lives and cares lor an extensive business in his Hne 
of activity. .Mr. IChh-idi^e is t]ie owner of a choice home property in (.'arson 
C'ity. and is also the owner of three other houses and lots in his home town. 

During- the year i8S^., Kli A. h.ldridj^e was married to Ida May Binkley, 
a daiii:hter of jacoh and TTarriett Binklev. To the marriage of Kli A. and 
Ida May I'ddridge were born three children, luldie, Leon and ITarry. all of 
whom are deceased. Ida ?*Iay, the wife of Kli A. Kldridge, died, and in 
i(}03, Mr. bddridge was married, secondly, to Mary I'ercy McVeigh, who 
was Ijorn at Fuist I Mains. Ionia county. Michigan, the daughter of B. W. 
and ^Tary If. (N'ance) McVeigh, the former l)orn in Orange countv. the 
latter at Dundee. Yates county. New York. 

Kli .\. b-ldridge and his wife are active workers of the Congregational 
church, at Carson City, and are i)eople who are highly resperted and esteemed 
tor their iiart in life and activities- of Cars(-»n City and Montcalm countv. 



h:i)G.AR S. BROOKS. 



i'.dgar S. Brooks. ]>romincut merchant and leading citizen of Car.son 
City, Montcalm county, Michigan, was horn at (joodrich village. Atlas 
lowushi]), (Jenesce county, Michigan, on January 28, 1861. the son of Lewis 
.'^. and Cordelia ( Rothchild) Brooks, natives of New York state. 

Lewis S. Brook's, who was the son of John Brocjks and wife, was edu- 
cated in Xew ^'ork state, li\-ed tliere until a young man, when he was mar- 
ried :iu<\ then, in 1830. moved to Genesee county. Michigan, where he fol- 
lowed In's occupation as a shoemaker and where he conducted a shoe shop, at 
(ioo(]rirh. until the ninetieth \ ear of his life. 

After the completion of hi'? education, in the schools of Goodrich, 
I'.dgar .S. lirooks worked as a farm helper and as an emplovee of local 
store;- until ]H\)(). when he came to (^aison City, and purchased a restaurant, 
a place w!ii(-h he conducted for al)Out one and one-half vears, and then, sell- 
ing his restaurant business, Mr. Brooks bought the general store where he 
now is successfully and prosperously engaged in the sale of general mer- 
chandise. Tn addition to his general mercantile business, Edgar vS. Brooks 
is a partner of tlie Carson City Auto Company, a company engaged in the 
^ale of high-grade automobiles and supplies. 

During the year 1882. Edgar S. Brooks was married to Rmma Barron, 
who was born in Genesee cotmty, the daughter of Bethuel and Alice CKirk- 



230 AIOXTCAI.M C()i;x\TY, MICIIIGAX. 

]>atrick ) narroii, natives of New ^'ork state, who settled on a farm in 
Genesee ccmnty, alx)nt the year i860, hving on the farm for the remainder 
of their days. To the marriage of Edgar S. and Emma Brooks have been 
born three children: Roy E., who married Eena Steffey, of Grand Rapids, 
now a salesman for a Carson C.'ity 1)usiness house, after having disposed of 
a photographic business which he conducted for about live years; Ray C., 
a partner with his father, who married Hazel Brice, of North Shade town- 
ship, Gratiot county, and Tda P., who was graduated from the Carson City 
high school and now is pursuing a commercial course. Edgar S. Brooks is 
an interested supporter of the Methodist church of Carson City, a church 
of which Mrs. Brodks is a well-known member. 

Edgar S. Brooks is a member of the Eree and Accepted Masons, of 
the Knights of the jMaccal)ees, of the Eraternal vStar and of the Mystic 
Workers. Mr. Ih-ooks has taken an actixe part in tlie political affairs of 
Carson City, having served as village i)resident for two years, for two years 
served as >'illage treasurer and for two years was a leading and influential 
member of the (Larson City village council. 



ZACII.VRIAS D. KUEE. 

Zacharias D. Rule, one of the leading merchants of Crystal, this county, 
is a native of Ohio, having Ijeen 1)orn in the town of Woodbur}^ that state, 
on November 19, 1869, son of Adam H. and Louise (Jacobs) Rule, the 
former a native of I'ennsylvania and the latter of New York state. 

.\dam H. Rule was a miller in Ohio. By his marriage with Louise 
Jacobs eight children were born, of whom six were sons who grew to man- 
hood. 'Idle mother of these children died in Ohio and Mr. Rule later mar- 
ried, secondly. Cordelia Eagley, to which union two children were born. 
Tn 1880 he came to Michigan with his family and settled in the dee]) woods 
in North .Shade township in Gratiot county, where he bought a small tract 
of land, cleared the same and made a farm of it and there he lived until 
well past middle age. when his wife (bed after which he retired from the 
farm and s]K'nt his latter days in the town of Middleton. where he died in 
1909. 

Z. D. Rule was Imt a lad when he came to Michigan with his father 
and he grew up on the farm in Gratiot county. He attended Eerris Institute 



MOXTCAl.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 23 1 

two terms after the coinplctioii of his eourse in the common schools and for 
se\'eral years taui^ht school and for four years was connected with the work 
of the state institntion at Traverse City, after which, for a short time, he was 
engat^ed as a carpenter. In Inly. 1898, Mr. Rnle enli.sted in Company H, 
riiirt}-fifth Regiment, Michigan X'olunteer Infantry, for service dnring the 
.'^])anish-.\merican War, which regiment was encam])ed at Camp Aleade, in 
Pennsylvania, nnfil winter, afterward lieing encamped at Angusta. Georgia, 
wliere it spent the winter ;ind was mnstered ont in the s[)ring of 1899. In 
jnly of the latter year Z. D. Rnle enlisted in ("om])any C, Thirtieth Regi- 
ment, United States \'olnnteers, for service in the Philippines and went ont 
a^ a sergeant, remaining in that service nntil Febrnary, 1901, dnring which 
time he also served for some time as a member of the metropolitan ])olice 
I'lirce in the islands, a force of men picked from the soldiers for special 
detail in Manila. Ui)on his retnrn home at the close of his military service, 
Mr. Rnle engaged in bnilding contracting and was tlins engaged for eight 
\ears, at the end of which time, in iojo, he entered into partnership with a 
merchant at Bntternnt, this connty. in the general merchandise way. which 
partnership, however, continned but ten days, for dnring that time he recog- 
nized an opportunity to do l.)etter in the neighboring village of Crystal and, 
veiling his interest in the rUitternut store to his partner, went to Crystal, 
honght a general store and has ever since been engaged in business 
tliere, during \\hich time he has built up an extensive trade and is regarded 
as one of the leading merchants of the town. lie also is financially inter- 
ested in the cheese factory there and is otherwise interested in the general 
af^'airs of the comnnniitv. Mr. Rnle also has given pro[X"r attention to the 
civic affairs of that locality and for some time served as clerk of Cry.stal 
township. 

[11 1903 Zacharias 1). Kule was united in marriage to Gertrude Hard- 
man, who was born in Richland county. Ohio, daughter of Francis M. and 
Dora .\. (Goodwin") llardni<m. v.ho settled in North Shade township. Gra- 
tiot county, this state, in r886. Air. ITardman was a cari:>enter in Ohio, but 
ui)on cotm'ng to this state bought a timber tract, cleared the same and there 
made a home, in which he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring 
in i()i2. His widow is now living at Middleton. Their daughter. Ger- 
trude, grew to womanhood on the home farm in North Shade township, 
attended high school at Carson City and the normal school at Mt. Pleasant 
and had been teaching school for about ten years at the time of her mar- 
liage to Mr. Rule. Mrs. Gertrude (Ilardman) Rule died on Decem!>er 21, 



2y2 MOXTCAr.M COINTY, MJCIIIGAN. 

1915. She was a IMiLlifnl and deNoiit member of the (."hrislian chureli and 
was greatly monrned by all who knew her. 

Mr. \i\\]e is a member of the indei)eudent Order of Odd b'ellows and 
of the encampment of that order and takes a warm interest in both these 
brandies of Oddfellowshi]). 



kOBI^RT F. EAIKRSON. 

One wlio has stood as a chstingnished type of the state's productive 
workers is Robert V. l^merson. who has deeply impressed his intlnence upon 
the industrial life of the county in. which he Hves. He has been actively 
and prominently identihed with business interests in Carson I'ity for over 
twenty consecutive years and liolds precedence in the community as one 
whose hfe lias been marked by useful accomplishments. Robert F. ICmer- 
son is a native of FTastings county, Ontario, Canada, where he was born on 
the 24th of September, 1857. He is the son of Robert and Margaret (Rob- 
inson) iMuerson, both of whom wa^re natives of Ireland. His father, who 
was born in County bermanagh, was educated in his native hmd and ui)on 
arriving in this country settled in Canada, where he met his future wife, 
who had come to America in her childhood. 

Robert F. Emerson was trained to the sturdy discipline of the farm 
and lived in Canada until i<SS2. when he came to Carson City and took uj) 
his residence on a farm one and one-half miles southwest of the place just 
mentioned. He began farming in this section of the state on forty acres of 
land, and continued to reside on the farm until the following s|)ring. when 
he left for the Dakotas. Tn the West he took up three claims of land, each 
claim consisting of one hundred and sixt}' acres. He remained in the West 
seven years. After selling out his farm interests in that locality, he returned 
to ("arson City and has l)een occu])ied wdth a dray business here ever since. 
Mr. luncrson has achieved success in business through his own endeavors. 
He is a man of firm character wdio has lived up to the highest ideals of life 
in every held of activity in which he has been engaged and as a result is) 
held in the highest regard ]>y the citizens of the community in which he 
labors. 

The marriage of Robert I'^.merson to Rose Ann McGee was solemni;i:ed 
in Canada, Mrs. Emerson, who is the daughter of Thomas McGee, was 
reared in Canada, on a farm near Sterling, Ontario. By her marriage to 



M()NTCAI..\f COl'NTY. M IC H J( lA.V. 233 

.Mr. ICniersoii she has 1)cconie the inolher of the following children: Margie, 
who married Jay (iihbs, of luhnore. and who has one son, Rol)ert; jay 1\., 
who resides in lX'tn.)it and who married (jeorgia Fritz; and Francis >]ay, 
who is at home with her ]>arents. It might l)e added that Jay lunerson is 
at the present time ])nrchasing agent for the King Motor C/at (Company, of 
i>troit. and for a n.nmber of years was with the Oakland ('ompany, serv- 
ing in the same capacity, before taking u]> antomol)ile work as a i)erma- 
nent occujjation. J a} Kmerson was in the offices of the Grand Trnnk Rail- 
road Comj)any. At the age of sixteen he was gradnated from the Carson 
C ity high school and ui)on comi)leling the conrsc attended the J^>rris Insti- 
tute for eighteen months. Margie is also a graduate of the Carson City 
high school and of Ferris Institute and before her marriage taught in the 
public schools, three terms of which were s])ent in (\'irson City. hVances 
May is at the present time attending school in Carson City. Mr. Fmerson 
is a meml)er of the Inde|>endent Order of Odd I'Ydlows and was treasurer 
several years, lie and his wife are memlK?rs of the Rebekahs and are mem- 
bers of the Methodi-t b^pisco])al church. 



wiLF Fv>r.\x WRKirrr. 



lunty. 
their 
man, 



l-'ew men of Carson (rty. or of Bloomer township, Montcalm cc 
Alichig.an, have taken a more important or useful i)art in the affairs of 

comniunitx . than has A\'ill Lyman A\'right, teacher, educator, business 

jniblic ,sj)irite(l citizen and pul)lic office-holder, who was l)orn on November 
j(), 1868. ne;ir Carson City, the .son of 13. Frank and Rhoda (Bush) Wright, 
iiotli (jf whom were born and married in Machias, ( Cattaraugus county, New 
^■ork. 

I), brank Wright and wife came to Gratiot county. Michigan, in 18^)7. 
and located about two miles south of Carson City, in the western part of 
the count}-, \vlicre they remained about one year, then located on si.\t\' 
acres of wild land just west of Carson City, where he cut timber and built 
a log house, in which the elder \\ right and his f;imilv lived until January. 
1881. when l>. brank Wright was killed in the woods near Greenville. After 
the death of her husltand, Khoda, the widow of B. Frank \\'right, in 1883, 
])urchased a property in Carson City, wdiere she lived untij f8()6, and then 
went to ~\r(M-ricc, and lived with her son. Will, of this sketch, until later 
when they went to Bancroft, w-here J^hoda W^right died, on b'ebruary 19. 



234 -MOXTCAL.M COrXTV. MICIIK^AX. 

U)02. V>. iM-ank and Klioda Wright were the parents of seven children: 
\y.orn and 1 lorton, who arc dccca'-cd : Lib1)ie, Wa.lter F., ATai^g-ic, Will L. 
and l'>ed A., wlio snr\jvf. 

Will l.yni.'in \\'ri<^lil rcoei\ed his early C(hication in tlic public sclu^ols 
of Carson City, and ihen, when tuurteen \ears of ag'e. luuing moved with 
liis mother to Carson (Jitw Will. to,i;"ether with his brother, continued as 
students in the Carbon City liij^^h school, they oradnatini;" from this school 
with the class of iS8(^, after havin^- made their ex[>enses ])y the selling of 
ne\\s])apers and by doing janitor work, l.atc in the year 1S87, ^^ill T.yman 
Wright became a school teacher, teaching the school at \'ickeryville, for 
four months, after which he returned to his high school classes, and gradu- 
ated a^ the jjresident of his class. i'"ollowing the completion of his high 
school education. Mr. Wright was a teacher in the brick school Avest of Car- 
s(»n City for three years, and in January. i8c;i. he entered the \'psilanti 
Xormal ( ollege. graduating in the }ear t8<)3, having comj)leted bus work 
in Utile more than half the time consumed bv the other students of his class. 
Will Lyman Wright returned to Carson City and In-crune prJncii)al of the 
town school for two ye.ars. during this time having jiurchasefl one htuidred 
and '-ixtv acres of timberland in Wexford county, a place which he, together 
vith b.is brother. Morton, clearerl by the use of a portable saw-Tuill, which 
they bou!^ht and oiK'rated. until the panic of t803 caused them considerable 
lo^s. as a result of which they discontinned tlieir business in lumber. 

I. ale in the \ear i8()6. Will Lyman Wright was elected as superin- 
tendent of the schools of Morrice. Michigan, an office which Mr. Wright 
(ilJed in a most efficient manner f(^r four years, after which he moved to 
the town of L.ancroft and there ])urchased a printing plant in )()oo. and 
was editor of the Bnucroft Coiiuucrrial for ele\'en years. While a resi- 
dent of [Bancroft. Will Lyiuau Wright ser\e(l as towushi]) clerk for nine 
\-ears and as president of the school board for four }-ears, also during his 
activities at liancroft having been the organizer of the local Cemetery 
-Xssociation. ha\ing for its object the imiirovement of the town cemeterv. 
\\''ill Lvman Wri:L;ht ser\ed as huancial director of the Cemetery Association 
of Bancroft, and as ])resident and business manager of the Bancroft band 
for four years. 

In October. T()t i. X\'ill Lyman Wright disjjosed of his business at Ban- 
croft, ■Michigan, .and returned to Carson City, Montcalm county, where he 
purchased a one-third interest in the hardware store (-if his brother, Fred A. 
'Wright, die two brothers conducting the store until Julv 27. TQ15, wdien 



JNIO.N rC.\T.>[ COIXTV. .M IC 1 1 IGAX . 2^5 

they sold the sture lo the lirni of I'xjwer & Geller. In 'March, 1013. Will 
L\nian Wright was ai)]>ointe(l to fill the unexpired term as clerk of P)looiiier 
townshi]), Alontcalm county, an office which Mr. Wriglit has since served, he 
ha\ ing heen elected to this oflicc on two occasions. 

During the year i8()5. Will T-ynian Wright was married to Neva M. 
llclden, who was born at Corunna, Michigan, where she lived until about 
fourteen years of age and then itioved with her parents to Owosso, where 
her father was agent for the Standard Oil Company lor thirty years. Fol- 
lowing her education in the Owosso high school, from which school she 
graduated in 1889. and after the completion of her course of study at the 
Owosso Normal (^)llege, Neva M. Tkdden came, as a teacher, to Carson 
City, where she became accjuainted with and was married to Mr. ^Vright. 
To the marriage of Will Lyman and Neva Wright have been born four chil- 
dren. Keitha D.. Ireta J^ileen. Arlon Bush and Nona Rhea. 

Will r.yman \A'right is a ineml)er of the Knight of the ^Taccabees and 
Knights of i.'ythias and is a man who is |)romincnt in various ass(X-iations 
and organizations having for their object the impro\ement of conditions 
and the advancement of the interests of Carson City and Montcalm county. 
The life of Mr. Wright has been a \aluable asset to his communitv and he 
is one of the honored and esteemed men of the countv. 



WIIJMAM J. GAKLAGTTKR. 

William J. Gallagher, well-know-n liveryman at Carson City, this 
county, who also is the owner of a line farm in the neighl)ornig county of 
Gratiot, is a native son of ^Michigan, having been born on a farm in North 
Shade townshi]>, Gratiot county, tliis state, on December 17, 1869, son of 
John and Elizabeth (TTartnian) Gallagher, the former a native of Ireland 
and the latter of Germany. 

John Gallagher, who was born in T8^Vb "^vas but a lad when his parents 
emigrated from Ireland to this cou.ntry. They settled in Ohio and in that 
state he grew to manhood and then came to Michigan, settling at Monroe, 
where he married Elizabeth Hartman. Avho was born in Hamburg, Germany, 
and wdio came to America with her parents when a young girl, the family 
settling first in New York state, later going to Ohio and thence to 
Michigan, settling in. Monroe, where she Avas married. After their mar- 
riage John (lallagher and wife went l)ack to Ohio, where they lived for a 



2^6 MONTCALM COl-NTV, MICHIGAN. 

time, after which they returned to Michigan and located in North Sliade 
townshi]). in (iratiot township, lieinsj; anioni^- the earl}- settlers in that sec- 
tion of the count}-. Shortl}- after locating- there John (iallagher enlisted in 
a Michigan regiment I'or service during the C'ivil War and served tintil the 
close of the A\ar. after which he returned to liis farm in Gratiot county 
and there spent the remainder of 1iis life, his death occurring- in 1875, at 
the age •>[ forty-one. llis widow, who continued to make her home on 
the farm. ^ur\i\ed him many vears, her death occurring in i()io. at the age 
of se\enty-hve }ears. They were the ])arents of six children, all of wdiom 
are still li\ing save one. as follow: hrank. a farmer, living near New- 
Uaxen, this state; hdla. who married Thomas L'rie and li\es on a farm in 
Deerlleld township, Isaliella count}', this state; Rosetta, deceased, who was 
the wife (>f .\lden I'almer; William j.. the immediate subject of this sketch; 
John, of C lintcni county, this state, and jai>het. who lives on the old home 
farm in Xorth Shade township, in the adjoining coimty of Gratiot. 

William J. (iallagher grew t(» manhood on the home farm and remained 
there until i(Sg8, in which \ear he hcMight an eight}--acre farni .and started 
farming on his own account, lie later bought an adjoining' tract of lift}' 
acres and remained there, engagedi (|uite |)rorital)ly in general farming until 
March 16. igi2. at which time he retired from the farm and moved to ("ar- 
son Git}-, this count}-, where he bought a handsome home and where he 
ever since has made his home. In December, 1912. he bought a livery barn 
there and has since that time been engaged in conducting the same, at the 
same time keej^ing an e\-e on the ])ro])er operation of his fariu. lie has a 
good business in the li\erv line, manages the 'bus line and carries a full line 
of autouK (biles for hire, as well as an excellent equii)ment in the horse liverv 
line, and is regarded as one of the most energetic and capable business men 
of that nourishing little city. 

In iS^)5 William J. Gallagher was united in marriage to Dertha Worden, 
who was i)orn in North Shade townshi]), Gratiot count\'. this state, daughter 
of lliram ;uid l'!lizabeth WonJen. natives of Ganada, who canie to Michigan 
more than fort}- \'ears ag(t. making their home in North Shade townshii>. 
in the neighboring count}' of Gratiot, where lliram W^orden died in 1903. 
llis widow now^ tuakcs her home in Garson City. To Mr. and Mrs. (ialla- 
gher four children ha\'e been l)orn, Rich.ard. William. Otis and Bernard. 
Mr. (jallagher is a member of the Masonic lodge and of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, in the affairs of both of \\hich orders he takes a 
warm and actixe interest. 



AI()XTCA1,M COl-NTY. MICHKIAN. 2}^^ 

W STI^IMirX FRISBIK, M. D. 

Dr. 15. Stephen l'"risbie. who for ten years (kiriii«- the time of his resi- 
(leiiee in this eonntx was one of the l)est-known residents of the Oystal 
neii^hborhood. A\as a nati\e of Oliio, havini,^ Ix^en born near the city of Cleve- 
land in Cayuga county, that state, on Se|)teniber 12, \'^}^2. He grew ii)) 
th.ere and in his yondi wa'^ a schoohnate of Janies A. Garfteh.l, the martyred 
Troident of the I'nited States. He became a physician and successfully 
practiced his ])rofes^i<)n in Ohio until 1876. in which year he came to Mich- 
igan and settled in Montcalm county, buying a farm just south of the vil- 
lage of Cr\stal. the ])lace now ov.iied and occupied by his son, William 
l^-isbie. There Doctor I'risbie engaged in farming, at the same time prac- 
ticing his i>rofessi()n as long as his health would permit, and there he died 
in Se])teml)er, j8(Sr). an^l was \\idely mourned, for (hiring his residence in 
that section he had greatly endeared himself to all. He had aided very 
nialerially in ttie work of building the (Congregational church at Cryst<U 
and was acti\e in manv otiier ways in promoting the best interests of that 
Community. 

Doctor b'risbit' was twice married. To his union with \\'>althy b'ord 
ti\e children were liorn, as follow: Arthur G.. who for years was the head 
of the I'Tisbie h'.ealtv Com]>any, at Cleveland, Ohio, and is now in the real- 
estate business at b'resno. California; Mrs. Millie A. Van l^.ttan, a graduate 
nur.^e, with a diploma from the Huron Street hos]>ital at Cleveland, for 
more than twent\"-ll\'e _\ears active in her ])rofession, now living with a son 
in b'resno, California: Jennie, who came to Montcalm county with her father, 
married Martin l:'inkle\' and died in tqot ; IClla A., who for years was a 
stenographer, married Philip Henn and li^■ed at Cleveland for eleven 
years, now a resident of Crystal, this county, and is attending- Moody Insti- 
tute at Chicago, and Dr. H. Gates T'^risbie, a i)racticing physician at Canton, 
Ohio. The mother of these children died in Ohio about 1871 and Doctor 
Krisbie married, secondly, i^liza Smith, who was born at i\aris, in Stark 
county. Ohio, and to this latter union seven children were born, namely: 
\^'illiam P. . who is now farming the old home place near Cry.stal. this 
countv; I'Aa D., who for fourteen years was a school teacher, the wife of 
Prof, bjnerson I.eddick. formerlv superintendent of .schools at Montague, 
this state; Clyda ]>. and Fred .S., twins, the former of Avhom is the wife of 
j. M. T.ascelle, ])ostniaster of Crystal, and the latter is a meml^er of the 
Treliing Manufactiu-ing Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, general building con- 



2^8 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

tracl<jrs and manufacturers of all kinds of mill-work for building' purix;scs; 
A label, wlio died in infancy: De^sie, who lives with her brother, William, 
and Minnie K., a well-known teacher, a graduate of Mt. Pleasant Normal 
(.'ollege. who taught in the uyiper peninsula of Michigan and in the Island 
of I'orto J\ico, now teaching in Arizona, (jnite a traveler, who finds much 
delight in seeing the world. \fter Doctor Frisbie's death his widow con- 
tinued to make her home at the old home place near Crystal, where she died 
on September 7, tc^oi. 



JOSKPIT M. PASCEPLE. 

Joseph M. J.ascelle, ]K)stmaster at Crystal, this county, is a native of 
Ohio, iiaving been born near the town of Lyons, in Fulton county, that 
state, on August cS. ]H(]y. son of (jiles 11 and Maria (Lcdgyard) Lascelle, 
both nati\es of New York state, and both of wdiom died in Ohio. 

Joseph M. Lascelle was reared on a farm in Ohio and remained there 
until he a\:is t\\ enty-li\e vears of age. at which time he came to this county 
on a \isit to his brother, AFilton ,\. Fascelle and his two sisters, Airs. Mary 
Merrick and Mrs. LiL)1)ie Yaner, who then resided in the pleasant village of 
C'rystal. Mr. J.ascelle had come here seeking the benefit of a change of 
climate, his health having- become impaired, and he was so delighted with 
the beneficial cliaiige at once ap[)arent in his condition that he decided to 
remain. After a time spent in resting and tra\eling a bit he worked as a 
farm iiand and in the lumber cam])s. seeking the 0[)en, and presently was 
fu!l\- restored to his former vigor of body. lA)lU)wing his marriage in i8(;7 
Mr. Lascelle bought a small farm one-half mile east nf ("rystal and there 
made his home for about two years. On January 1, 1900. lie was ajjpcjinted 
[)ostmaster id' ( rystal and e\er ><ince lias held that position. In .\])ril, tc)oo, 
he also became towiishi]^ clerk and held that position for twelve years, or 
imtil the ruling of the postoflice dei)artment forbade iK)stmastei-s from hold- 
ing other ))ublic oftices. lie also served for some years as school director 
and for die past sixteen vears has been townshi]) librarian. LVom the time 
he became jiostmaster he has been acting as collector for the Tonia-AIont- 
calm-CIinton Counties Alutu.al b'ire Insurance Association and for the past 
three \ears also has been solicitor for that association. 

On August 31, i8o7- Jose])h M. Lascelle was united in marriagx- to 
Chda P). lY-isbie, who was born in Crystal, daughter of the late Dr. R. 



.M().\rcAT..M corxTY. \HcriiGAX. 239 

Stei)lien and I'.iiza (Smith) Frisbic. further mention of whom is made in a 
hiographical sketch relating to Doctor h>isl)ie, presented elsewhere in this 
\(»lnme, and to this union three children have been born, Loy B., Doris I. 
and Isadora Helen. Mrs. .1 .ascelle grew up at Oystal and supplemented her 
Common-school course Ijy a course at the normal school at Mt. Pheasant, 
after which she entered the ranks of i\fontcalm county's teaching force and 
had taught one term of school when she married .Mr. Lascelle. She is a 
valuable assistant to her husband in his duties as postmaster. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lascelle are members of the Congregational church and 
are active in all good works in and about Crystal, taking a warm interest 
in all m()^•ements designed to ])romote the general welfare thereabout. Mr. 
Lascelle is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the 
Knights of the Maccabees and in the affairs of both those organizations 
takes an earnest interest. 



WILLIAM I'.. ADAMS. D. V. S. 

Dr. A\iiliam F. Adams, successful veterinary surgeon. ])rominent busi- 
ness man and lin.ancier, and a citizen who takes a leading place in the affairs 
of Carson City. Montcalm countv. Michigan, was born in Ontario, Canada, 
on May 13, 1863. the son of James and Flizabeth (Chaptman) Adams, 
natives of l^llon, Scotland, and of Ontario, Canada. res])ectiveh'. 

James Ad.ams came to America when he was fourteen years of age, 
with his parents, and engaged in farming in Ontario, Canada, until alxjut 
Kjoo, when he came to the United States and located in the state of ATich- 
igan, where he now lives. 

William ]*",. Adams received his earlv education in the common schools 
of his native community, after which he attended high school, graduating 
and then becoming a student of the Ontario Veterinary College, of Toronto, 
Canada, an institution from which VVilliam F. .\dams, together with his 
I)r()ther, Charles TT. Adruns, was graduated in Afarch. 1893. 

b'ollowing the receii)t of his degree as Doctor of \^eterinary vSurgerv. 
Dr. William F. Adams caiue to the state of ATichigan and located at Carson- 
City, in Montcalm c(Mmty, where he is now engaged in the practice of his 
l)rofession, in partnership with his l)rothcr Dr. Charles TT. Adams. The 
Doctor^ Adani> have a lucrative practice and are among the leaders of their 
profession in the county and vicinity, both being a])preciated and active 
members of the Michigan A^eterinarv ATedical Association. 



240 MONTCALM. COLX'IY. MICIJTGAX. 

In addiliDii to his ])rol'(.'ssioiiMl duties. Dr. William M. .\daiiis has 1)een 
acti\c in the business life of Carson City, beini^- the ])resident, director and 
one of the oriiani/ers of the |)ros])erous l'"arniers and Merchants State 
Bank of (/arson City. \}y. William 1''. Adams has been one of the influen- 
tial members of the ("arson City village council and is now one of the school 
directors f(.ir the town of his residence and activity. 

( )n June 7. i8(>^^, i)r. William !•'. .\dams was miited in marriage to 
Harriett Cjc^o-, a native of I'oronto. Canada, and the daughter of Thomas 
and Anna (Webster) Clegg-. the former born in Yorkshire, iuigland, the 
latter in Ontario. (Canada, '^lo the marriag-e of William E. and Harriett 
Adams ha\c been born three children: James I*., Zelnia Maude and Grette 
Mae. aged twenty, seventeen and fourteen. res|>ectively. Dr. William E. 
Adams and his family are actixe members of the Eirst (7ongreg'ational church, 
of Carson Cit}'. 

Dr. William K. Adams is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
I'ellows, and he has lieen active in the work of the T^vcbekahs and the Knights 
of the Maccabees. Dr. William F.. Adams is one (d' the valued citizens of 
Carson Citv and of Montcalm countv, his efforts for the good of the com- 
munity and his j)ublic-spirited devotion to the ])rogress of the various inter- 
ests of the locality having- won for him a host of friends and admiring: fel- 
low citizens. 



WESEEY J. STEARNS. 

lH)rmer County Treasurer Wesley J. Stearns has been a resident of 
Montcalm county since lie was five years old, that ha^•ing been the number 
of his years at the time his parents came to this county and settled at 
Sheridan. .After having l)een interested in various forms of enterprise, 
Mr. .Siearns settled down on his present fine farm in J'Aergreen township, 
this county, on rural route No. 5, out of vStanton, and is now^ very well 
circumstanced. 

\\'esley J. Stearns was born in loAva, May 20. 1868, son of J. L. and 
Addie (Sawyer) Stearns, both natives of New Ham])shire, and the former 
■of whom is still living. J. E. Stearns was born in New 1 Tam])shire on 
]\larcli 19, 1831. In 1849 he joined the g-reat dirong- of gold-seekers who 
flocked to (/alifornia. but did not realize any great fortune to reward him 
for the strenuous exiKjrience and in 1851 he returned to New Hampshire, 
Avhere he married iMary Sawyer and straightway started for Iowa with his 



MONTCAI.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 24I 

bride. After a lew years' residence in the liawkeye state, Mr. Steams 
moved to ]\Jis.soiiri and in 1873 ^'''-ine to this county, locating at Sheridan, 
where he followed his trade as a carjx^nter until long past middle age and 
was quite successful. 1 1 is wife died in 1880. But two of their children 
now are living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, l^^llen, wife of 
M. F. McXaughton, of Sheridan, this county. 

Having Ix'en but tWe years of age when his parents came to this county, 
A\'esley J. Stearns has spent practically all his life here and is one of the 
best-known men in the county. He received his education in the vSheridan 
schools and after lea\"ing school worked for tAvo summers in the employ 
of a washing-machine company, after which he vv^ent to the state of Wash- 
ington. He presently returned to .Sheridan, however, and there bought a 
meat market, which he operated for fourteen years, at the end of which 
time he bought the farm in livergreen townshi]) on wdiicli he now lives and 
has lived there ever since. i\lr. Stearns for years has been interested in the 
ci\ic affairs of Montcalm county and has been active in politics. His first 
public office was that of treasurer of Evergreen township, in which office 
he served for two terms. He then was elected township supervisor and for 
five years gave proper attention to the duties of that office and two years 
later w^as elected treasurer of Montcalm county, on the Republican ticket, 
serving four years in that important office, his term of office expiring on 
January I, 191 5. 

On April 10, 1890, Wesley J. Stearns was united in marriage to Anna 
Gallagher, who was born in Canada, but who had been a resident of Sheridan 
since she was twelve years of age, that having been her age when her par- 
ents located there, and to this union three children have been born: Vera, 
a graduate of the Sheridan high school and of the Stanton Normal School, 
wito is now a teacher in the schools of this county; Morris, a graduate of 
the high school at Stanton, who is now cashier in the office of the auditor- 
general of the state of Michigan, at Lansing, and Ronald, a graduate of the 
Stanton high school, who is ins])ector of automobile tires in the Morgan 
Wright estal)]ishme.nt at Detroit. 

As suggested abo\e, by the statement that he was elected to the office 
of county treasurer on the I^ej)ublican ticket, Mr. Stearns is an ardent 
Republican and is now serving that party as chairman of the county central 
committee, previous to which service he had been for four years the secre- 
tary of the committee, and is thus known as one of the most active party 
(J6h) 



242 MOXTCAI.M COl.NTY, MICHICAX. 

workers in this i)art of the state. \\r. Stearns is an active, energ-etic and 
enterprising- citizen and is concerned in \arions enterprises hereahont. amon<;- 
which may he mentioned the Mntnal Insurance Company, of Afontcahn, 
Ionia and (dinton counties, of which he is the ])resi(lent. ITe is a member 
of I 'earl 'I>ake T.odoc No. 324, 1^'ree rmd .Accepted Masons, and is ))ast 
master of that lodge, as well as a member of Stanton Cha])tcr No. 1 10, 
l\oyal .\rch Masons, of which he is now king. Air. Stearns has a wide 
ac(|uaintance throughout this and neighl)oring counties and is iield in high 
regrunl by all who know him. 



[<[<F.D GIJNTHER, Sr. 



iM-ed Gmither, Sr., a native of VVurtembcrg, Gertnany, and the son of 
Matthias and .Anna Marie (J.hik) Gunther, was born on Alarch 7, t8-i8. 
lie grew^ to manhood in his native country, where he learned blacksmilhiug 
and wagon-making, at wdiicli he worked until he came to America in iXfx;. 
.After arriving in the United States he worked lor some months at Oakland, 
in r.i\ingston county, Xeu York. Tie later went to Ionia, Michigan, where 
he worked for John Childs for five years in the carriage sliop. On Octo- 
l.)er 14, 1875, he came to Carson City and purchased a ])1acksmith shop, 
where he made carriages and wagons, in connection with his general woi"k 
as a l)lacksmith. .\t this time the lumbering inchr^try was at its height, 
the nn'lls were busy and the woods aWvQ with tlie lumbermen. During the 
da}- A'Tr. Gunther was busy with the heavier work and at night he made iron 
corks for the 1"K)ttom of the men's shoes, lie continuerl at this work until 
1908, when his sight and general health became sucli tliat he was no longer 
a1)le to continue at the work. He still retains the old shop, wlu'ch lie uses 
as a warehouse, in connection with his Inisiness as an implement dealer, in 
which he and his son are ])artners. Fie was for six years a member of the 
village council and has been active in tlie development of the town. 

On July 6, J^/;'>,, T^-ed Gunther, Sr., was married to Sophia Davis, a 
native of Prussia, Germany, wdiere she grew to w-omanhood atid after 
which she emigrated to Ionia, wdiere she lived until her marriage. Air. and 
Mrs. Gunther are the parents of the following children: William F., Fred. 
Jr., Lottie. .Alfred, Clara. I^Vank and Mabel. William F. married Nora 
Cooper, they li\'e in Carson City and he travels for the Johnson Harvester 
Company. Fottie was first married to Clem Neldred. who died, after which 



MONTCALM COl'NTY. MICHICAX. 243 

>he married I'", i". liolcski, of Alma. Fred. Jr., married y\lta Perrin, a 
dani^litcr of 'i'ohias and ("atheriiio ( Reese) Perrin. They live at Carson 
Chy where he is engaged in business with his father. Alfred is en<2^a,ii^ed 
in the furniture and undertakinjn;- l)usiness at Carson City. Clara is at home. 
I'"rank. horn on October 12. tSqo. lives in the home town where he assists 
die fadier in his business. L]e married Grace All^ough, on June 24, 1914. 
Mabel is at home. 

^Fr. (iunther has seen the town grow from a small trading point with 
few buildings and Imt little Imsiness. Today there are but few residents of 
this thri\ing town who were here when Mr. Gunther first came. In ATr. 
(lUnther one finds the honest, hard-working and progressive citizen, who has 
made a .success of life in a new country. His character is alx)ve reproach, 
his hal:»its the best and he is held in high regard by all who know him. 



\'R(W. KARP J. AETTCK. 

One of the best-known yoimg educators in Montcalm county is Prof. 
Earl j. Aelick, sujjerintendent of the schools at Sheridan, this county, lie 
was born at Ionia, Michigan, on February 10, 1885, son of Andrew and 
Isadore (Galloway) Aelick, former Avell-known residents of Douglass town- 
ship, this county, who now are li\ing in Orange township, Ionia county. 

Andrew \elick was born in Canada, Decem))cr 15, 1850. When ten 
years ot age he \\as thrown largely on his own resources by reason of the 
accidental death of his father, who left a widow and a large familv of 
children none too well provided for in the matter of world's goods. Begin- 
ning at this tender age to work for himself. Andrew Aelick worked for 
one man on a farm for seven years, the greater part of his earnings l>eing 
given o\er to his wifknved mother. Tn 1873 he came to the United States, 
and for some years followed the rugged life of a timber man, in time 
becoming head s.awyer. In i88t he married and continued his labors as a 
head sawyer until 1888. in which year he Iwught a farm in Douglass town- 
ship, this county, on which he lived until in ATay, 1912, at which time he 
moved to Orange townshij), Ionia county, this state, wdicre he is now living, 
enjoying fully the ample rewards of his life of industry. During his resi- 
dence in Douglass township, y\ndrew .\elick was looked upon as one of the 
most progressive and substantial citizens of tliat section of the county and 
for some time served as townshi]:) treasurer. He is now clerk of the town- 



244 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

ship in which he hves in Ionia county. He and his wife are members of the 
Metho(h"st church and he is a member of the Masonic lodg-e at Stanton and 
also of the Gleaners and Maccabees. Mrs. Aelick was born in Berlin town- 
ship, Ionia county, this state, on November lo, 1863, daughter of James 
and Cordelia (Heater) Cialloway, the former a native of Pennsylvania, and 
the latter of Ohio. To the union of Andrew and Isadore (Galloway) 
Aelick there was but one child born. Earl J., the subject of this biographi- 
cal sketch. 

r^arl J. .\elick was reared on the farm and received his elementary 
education in the district scliools of Douglass township, this county, being 
the tirst ])upil to C()m))lete the eighth grade in the county. Following his 
graduation from the grade school he entered the high school at McBride, 
from which he was graduated with the class of 1904, after which he 
entered the ranks of Montcalm county's progressive teachers and has ever 
since that time been thus engaged, in the meantime, IVofessor Aelick spent 
some time at Ferris Institute and at the Michigan State Normal at Mt. 
Pleasant, enlarging his equipment for his high calling, and has been very 
successful in his school work, earning a high reputation both as a teacher 
and as a superintendent of schools. For two years after enteruig the service 
of the board of education, he taught in district schools. For three years 
he then was in grammar work in the Lake View school, after which he was 
called to take the princii)alship of the schools at Trufant; later was made 
princii>al of the Pierson schools, where he served for three vears, and then 
was called to take charge of the schools at Sheridan and has been superin- 
tendent there for the past three years. During this time the non-resident 
attendance at the Sheridan school has doubled, and during his administra- 
tion two of the largest classes in the history of the school have been grad- 
uated. 

On November 24. I<)04. Prof. Farl J. Aelick was united in marriage 
to Mary F. Gook, who was born on a farm in Grattan townshi]>. Kent 
county, this state, daughter of Rufus R. and Elizabeth (Brown) Cook, the 
former of whom was born on that same farm and the latter in Ionia count v. 
Rufus R. Cook died on 'Xugust io. TO05. To Professor and Mrs. Aelick 
tw-o children have been br)rn. Marguerite L., born on August 27. tooq, and 
Rufus Cook. September t2, 1913. Professor and Mrs. .Aelick are members 
of the Congregational church and take an active part in the social and cul- 
tural life of Sheridan, where they are held in high regard. 

Professor Aelick is a Republican and takes a good citizen's interest in 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICJTIGAN. 245 

political affairs, though not what may be called an active worker in politics, 
although his voice and influence ever are exerted in behalf of the cause of 
good government. He is a meml)er of Pearl I>akc Lodge No. 324, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and of Progress Podge No. 342, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, at McRride, and takes a warm interest in the affairs of 
these two popular orders. 



GEORGE RTPEY GIBBS. 

George Riley Gibbs, well-known business man and highly-respected 
citizen of Carson Gity, Montcalm county, Michigan, was born in Knox 
county, Ohio, on August 26. 1842, the son of Robert and Miriam (Ames) 
(iii)l>s, natives of Cannonsburg, Washington county, I'ennsylvania, and of 
the state of J Delaware, respectively. 

Robert Giljl)s was descended from Robert Gibbs, who was the first 
governor of South Carolina under the Firitish crown, and who was one of 
three hrothers who came to America in the early days of American his- 
tory, 'j'hc Gibl)S family of England was one of prominence, a representa- 
tive of this house having served his country as secretary of state, and 
another having been a cardinal of the Catholic church, while another was a 
noted sea ca])tain. For many generations the Gibbs family was recognized 
by a crest and a coat-of-arms, in England, and this family has taken a place 
of note in the affairs of their country since the eleventh century. 

Robert Gibbs, father of the subject of this sketch, was the son of 
Robert Gibbs. who mo\ ed from South (Carolina, where he was the owner 
of a large tract of land, having been a pros|>erous planter of that state. 
Robert Gi1.)bs, Jr., when a young man. moved with his family to Nobles- 
town, Pennsylvania, where he lixed for some time and then went to Seneca 
County, ()hio. li\ing there until b'ebruary. 1855. when he moved to the 
wilderness of Tsabella county, l\1ichigan. where he secured land and lived 
for some time and then mo\ ed to Ionia county, where he secured forty 
acres of land located in Scbcwa township, and there lived for the remainder 
of his days. 

Robert (jibbs ^vas married to l\firiam Ames, who was the daughter of 
John and Sarah (Cheney) .\mes. both the Ames and Cheney families hav- 
ing been prominent in the aff.iirs of New York state. Miriam .Ames came 
to Ohio with her parents, where her father secured a large tract of land, 
on which he lived for the remainder of his life. 



240 MONTCALM COi:XTY, MICJIIGAN. 

George Riley Gihbs received his early education in the public schools 
of Pennsylvania and in the public schools of Seneca county, Ohio, after 
which he lived in Isabella county, Alichig-an, and later came to Tonia county, 
where he worked as a farmer for some time in the summer months and 
attended school in the winter. After the completion of his school days, 
George Miley Gibbs learned the blacksmith trade, an occupation which he 
I'ollowed until September 15, i86i, when he enlisted in Company D, Ninth 
Jvegiment, Michigan \'olunteer Tnfantr}', a command with which Mr. Gibbs 
served until ()ctol)er. i<%4, during his service being engaged chiefly in the 
duties of blacksmithing and in the care of wagon trains which su]Ji)lie(l the 
troops of the i'"ourtcenth .\rmy Corps. As a soldier, Mr. (7ib)>s had many 
close calls from (.leath: was a sufferer with ty|)hoi(l fever on two occasions 
and at one time, after injuries received in a wagon train wreck, he was 
c()m])elled to suffer many hours of hardship and privation before he was 
able \o secure mechcal attention at a hospital which was located forty miles 
away, and to which he was transi)orted on a two-wheeled ambulance. George 
Riley Gil>l>s fought in some of the most severe engagements of the Civil 
War and has one of the most honorable records of seiwice. 

After his discliarge from the army, in October, 1864. George Riley 
Gil)l)s returned to Rortland, Michigan, where he resumed his work as a black- 
smith and where he followed the lousiness of a wagon-maker for a short 
time and then engaged in the duties of his business at Maj)le Center, near 
the town of Lyons, a i)lace where Mr. Gil)l)s remained until 1867, when he 
returned to I'ortland, and for the next five years worked as a blacksmith 
with an old em])loyer. 

During the month of May, 1873. George Uiley Gibbs moved to Carson 
City, Montcalm county, and engaged in his business as a blacksmith and 
wagon-maker, until the year 1887, when he retired from active business, as 
a result of failing health. In April, 1889, Mr. Gibbs was apix)inted to the 
office of iH:)stmaster of Carson City, an office which he occupied most satis- 
factorily for eight years. Later. George Riley Gil)bs entered the insurance 
and loan business field and now he is one of the successful and able 
men engaged in this line of work in Montcalm county. Tn addition to his 
other insurance duties, Mr. Gibbs, for about seventeen years, has served 
as solicitor for the Ionia, Montcalm and Clinton Count\- Mutual Inre Insur- 
ance Company. 

On July 5. t866, George Riley Gibbs was married to Afary A. TTow- 
land, of Grand Ledge, who was born in Ohio, the daughter of Aretus and 



MOX'IXAI.M COfNTY. MICrilGAxX. 247 

Mliza (Aleen) Howlcind. early settlers in Grand Ledge, Michigan. To the 
jnarriage of George Riley and Mary A. Gibbs were born four children: 
Mamie, who is deceased; I'^-ank FT., a traveling salesman of Clinton, Iowa. 
who married Xettie McPherson and to whtnn have been bom six children; 
Ala1>el, who is the housekeei)er for her father, and George R., Jr., who is a 
licensed pnhhc accountant of Detroit, who married Grace TTill, of Williams- 
town, Michigan. l'"rank II. (h'bbs and his wife have three grandchildren, 
(ieorge Riley (iibbs has been prominent in the pnl)lic life of Carson 
(."it\' and of Montcalm county, having ser\ed as assessor and having been a 
member of the street and water commission. Mr. Gibbs is a pioneer Mason 
of Montcalm county. ha\ing identified himself with this organization in the 
N'car 1865. He joined the lodge at Portland, where he took nine degrees. 
Mr. Gibl)s was master of Carson City Podge No. 306, for ten years. George 
Riley Gibbs is one of the honored men of Masonry in Carson City, his ]X)r- 
trait now adorning the walls of the lodge hall. 



TIIO.\I.VS D.WID.SON DOW, 1). D. S. 

Dr. Thomas D. Dow, well-known and successful denti.st of Stanton, 
this county, who has been engaged in the practice of his profession in that 
city since \()00, is a native of the Pritish Dominion across the border to the 
north. ha\ ing been l)orn in Teeswater, Ont.'irio, .\ugust 14, 1876, son of 
Thomas and Margaret .\. (Davidson) Dow, the former of whom was a son 
of Thomas and Margaret (AFcDonald) Dow and the latter was a daughter 
of Thomas and h^liza (Campbell) Davidson, the former a son of George 
and Mary (Stuart) Davidson and tlie latter a daughter of James and Eliza 
( Reid) Campbell, the former a son of Alexander Cam])bell and the latter a 
daughter of Samuel Rcid, .^on of William Reid, all of Scottish birth or 
descent. 

Doctor Dow's iKiternal grandfather, Thomas Dow. came to this side of 
the water from Ranffshire. Scotland, with his parents, Thomas and Jane 
( J)ow) Dow, in 1832, he then IxMng but six years of age, the family .settling 
in C'anada, and it was there the grandfather grew to manhood, married Mar- 
garet McDonald and reared his family. Hie third Tliomas Dow was mar- 
ried at Detroit, the Reverend Worthington, rector of St. John's church, offi- 
ciating, July 26, T874, to Margaret A. Davidson, who was born in Bally- 
mena ])arish. County Antrim, Ireland, May i, 1856, and who was about six- 



248 :v[OXTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

teen years of age Avhen she came with her parents to this side of the water 
in 1872, tlie family settHng about six miles east of Sarnia, Ontario, and was 
temporarily residing- in Detroit when she married Mr. Dow. After his mar- 
riage 'Diomas Dow moved to Teeswater, Ontario, where he made his home 
until 1880, in which \ear he moved to C"aro. in Tuscola county, this state, 
where he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring on June 4, 
nj 10. He was born in Fergus, Ontario, on October 31, 1853, and was a 
skilled mechanic, a vocation he followed all his life. He was a Republican 
and he and liis wife were de\-out meml)ers of the Baptist church, with which 
church the latter, who is still li\ing at Caro. is still connected, long having 
been an earnest ex])onent of all good works in that place. Three sons were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Dow, of whom the subject of this sketch is the eldest, 
the others V)eing James, born on July .13, 1878, who died in 1888, and \A'ill- 
iam, May 22, 1881. 

Thomas Dow, fom^th of the name in his line, was three 3'ears old when 
his ])arents came to ■Michigan and his youth was spent in the village of 
Caro, with the excc[)tion of two years, 1888-90. s])ent in Sebewaing, in 
Huron county. LJi)on completing the course in the Caro high school in 1893 
he began teaching school and was thus engaged for four years at 
}'-ast J3a\ton. l-'air Grove and W'atrousville, all in Tuscola county. In the 
fall of :i8<}7 he entered the University of .Michigan and was graduated from 
the dental department of that institution in 1900. During his college days 
Doctor Dow paid considerable attenti<')n to athletics and still holds the half- 
mile indoor track record for walking. Upon receiving his diploma.. Doctor 
Dow came I0 this county, opened an office for the practice of his profession 
at Stanton and has been thus engaged there ever since, having built up an 
extensive and profitable practice. 

On August 24. 1003, Dr. Thomas D. Dow was united in marriage to 
Marguerite ('. Shntt. daughter of Mrs. .S. P. Youngs, of Stanton, and to 
this union two children, daughters. ba\e been born. Margaret FJizal)eth. born 
on January 16. 1005. and ( onstance Rachel. May 8. i()0(). Mrs. Df)w was 
Imrn in Ohio, and after the death of her father. San ford .\. Shutt, came with 
her mother to this county, the latter being engaged as a teacher in the vStan- 
ton schools, the daughter continuing her schooling, anrl was graduated from 
the Stanton high school in t8()9. Doctor and Mrs. Dow take an active inter- 
est in the social life of .Stanton anrl are held in high esteem bv their manv 
friends there and throughout the county. 

Doctor Dow is a Republican and is now- an alderman of Stanton. He 



MONTCALM COI^NTY. MICHIGAN-. 249 

also is secretary of the school hoard and in other ways exhibits his interest 
in the general affairs of the cit\-. Tie is a Koyal Arch ATason and is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd l-\'lIows, in the affairs of lx5th of which 
organizations he takes a warm interest. The year after locating at Stanton, 
Doctor Dow was i>laced in charge of the "Marine" band there and has been 
director of that j)opnlar nuisical organization ever since. ITe is the owner 
of the office bnilding in vvhich he is located in Main street and is regarded 
as one of Stanton's snbstantial citizens. 



Cr.ARKXClL A. SWJiET. 

Clarence A. Sweet, the son of Tlartwell Prentice and Aha M. (Burt) 
.Sweet, was horn on jannar}- J. (S/c), at Carson Cit}-. 

Hartwell P. .Sweet was born on September 30. i<S52, at Marshall and 
was one of a family of ten children of V/illiam Allen, jr., and Maria ( Far- 
rar) Sweet. William Allen. Jr.. was the son of William Allen, Sr., wdiO' 
was the son of Paul, the s(.)n of Ca])t. Silas Sweet, who was a captain on a 
merchant shi]) and later nio\-ed to Wrmont. so that his sons would be away 
from the influence of the \vater and not become sailors. The son, Paul, was 
lK)rn on A[)ril t. f/zS- and married Rebecca Chadwick. who was boni on 
July 21, 177^, and was the daughter of John and Mary (Allen) Chadwick. 
Mary (Allen) Chadwick was the daughter of William Allen, \K)rn on Octo- 
1)er T, T727, and Jane Spooner Allen, born some years before. William Allen 
was of an old \'\^rmont family and related to pjhan Allen, of Revolutionary 
fame. William Allen Sweet. Sr.. the son of Paul and Rebecca (Chadwick) 
.^weet. was l}orn at Bedford. Vermont, in 1805. and went to Colburn. Canada. • 
where he married Marie Farrar. a native of Vermont, who had gone to 
Canada with her parents. Prentice and Klizabeth ('Osgood) Farrar. Pren- 
tice l\'irrar was the sou of .Stephen l-'arrar. who was l)orn on September 8, 
1738. and was the son of Deacon Samuel Farrar. .Ste])hen was ca graduate 
of Tlnrvard and the first minister in New Ipswich, New Hampshire. Tie w^as 
ma.rried to Funice Brown, of AValtham. He died in T8og. Deacon Samuel 
Farrar was born on Septemlier 28. 1708, anrl was the son of George and 
l.ydia (Barrett) l\arrar, the former of whom died in 1783. George, who 
was l>om on August t6, 1679, and married Mary Howe, was the son of 
Jacob l\'n-nn-. who was born in Fngland in 16.42. and emigrated to T.ancas- 



J^O MONTCALM COTNTY, MlCllJGAN. 

ter in 165S. lie married iiaiinali Ilayward, and some years later was killed 
in Kini;- l^bilip"s War. 

William .\. Sweet, alter many years' residence in Canada, became 
invohed in the re'hellion of uS^H and i'ound it convenient to leave that terri- 
tory and move to Marshall. Calhonn county, this state, where he worked at 
his trade, that of a cal)inet-niaker. and remained there until 1866, when he 
bought a farm near there, where he s]>cnt the remainder of his life, he havinjj^ 
died in 1881. His wife died in Carson City in T893. They were the par- 
ents of the following children: Harriet I'dizabeth, Louise, William Allen, 
r.. I'Vank. Kate. Ilartwell I'rentice, Jane, Lilly. Tom and Charles. ILirriet 
was Ijorn at Colburn, C'anada, in 1835, and l)ecame the wife of Orlando G. 
Post. Louise was born on (.)ctol)er 19, 1838. and is the widow- of Major 
James A. Stroni^-. Slie now resides in Chica.i^o. William Allen was born at 
Marshall. April J7, ]8-|.j, and served in the Civil War in Company T, Third 
.\iicliigan Cavalry, from September 2, 1861, to March 15, 1866. After the 
war he was surxeyor oi Calhoun county for six years, after which he came 
U) Carson City, where he practiced law and was county surveyor for three 
terms. 15. i'rank was l)orn at .Marshall on vSeptember 21, 1843. ^i^ ^^'^^^ 
lirst liuetenant in the J""ourteenth .Michi<^'-an Light Battery in the Civil War. 
I ie now resides in Carson Cit\ , where he wa!> engaged in the drug business 
from 1873 until \no\. Kate was born near Marshall and is the wdfc of 
Charles \\ . Ilinkle. Jane, the widow^ of S. W'. Davis, lives at Bay View and 
at Letosky. 

Ilartwell I'rentice .Sweet grew to manhood near Marshall and spent 
much of his younger life in travel, b'rom 1871 to 1873 he was in Califor- 
nia, where he followed his trade, that of a i>ainter. Tie now resides in Car- 
son City. On November 1, 1877, he was married to Alta M. Burt, who was 
born on .March k^, j86i, in Gratiot county, a short distance ea.st of Carson 
(_ity. vShe was the daughter of William and Mary (Bemis) Burt. Her 
father was of a family of early jjioneers of (iratiot countv. Tn earh- life he 
became a marine engineer and was thus engaged at the beginning of the 
Civil War He enlisted in the Twenty-first Regiment, .Michigan Volunteer 
Infantry, and served as a brave soldier until his death on the field of action. 
He is buried in Tennessee. Mrs. Alta Sweet was a native of Ohio. 

Alta M. Cfhirt ) Sweet was deprived of a mother's care at an early age 
and lived for some time with an aunt in Ohio, until her marriage to Hart- 
well P. vSweet. They were the parents of two children. Clarence and Louise, 
the latter of whom is the wife of Ralph C. Miller, and lives on a farm near 



iMONTCAl^M COUNTY, MICHICAN. 25 1 

(ircenvillc. Jii 1915, .iftcr subtnitting- to two o|>orations for appendicitis, 
AJrs. Alta Sweet died on July 15, after loving hands and the l)est medical 
skill had acconiphshed all that was ])Ossihle. Unrino- her life she was always 
an active worker in the Methodist ICpiscopal chnrch and took great interest 
in the varions societies of the chnrch. She was a kind neighbor and was 
ever ready to assist in sickness and adversity. Mr. H. P. Sweet is also a 
nienibcr and an active worker in the church. TTe has been a member of the 
Indejjendent Order of Odd h'ellows and the encamjnnent at Maple Ridge 
for many years. 

Clarence A. Sweet li\ed at home nntil he was eighteen years of age, 
when he went to live with his uncle. Dr. C. A. Sweet, at East Jordan. Tlis 
intention was to be a doctor, but after one year's work he became aware 
that it would be inipossi1)le for him to operate and gave up the study. He 
returned home and engaged in ])ainting and pa[)er-Iianging, which he has 
followed e\ er since. Mr. Sweet is a very active and influential Republican, 
and takes much interest in the campaigns of the party. He has served as a 
member of the town board and at present is completing his fourth year as 
treasurer of I)l(»omer township. 

In igoi Clarence A. Sweet was married to Pearl Dewey, who was lx)rn 
at Pewamo, and is the daughter of b>ed D. and luigenia (X'ance) Dewey. 
They are the ])arents of two children, Paul and Mary. 

Fred I). Dewey is a native of j'ewamo. where he conducted a drug store 
nntil i8go, when lie moved to Atlanta. Georgia, where he continued the 
Inisiness. lie is the son of Thomas H. and Rachel (Harding) i^ewey. 
Thomas II. was born in Comiecticut on December 31. 1814, and moved to 
I.\ons in 1837, having walked all the w'ay. He moved to Pewamo about 
T862 and clerked in a store for many years, later l:)ecoming a member of the 
firm of Coon, Dewey & Rickey. He died on March tt, 1903. He was the 
son of ("hristo|)her, Jr., and Hulda ( Babcock") Dewey. Christoj>her, Jr.. 
was die son of Christo[)her, .Sr.. and IVggy (?)rown) Dewey, the former 
the son of David and fk-borah (Tracy) Dewey, the former the son of Jabez 
and Deborah (^'ork) Dewey, the former the son of Lsrael Dewey, jr.. the 
son of Israel, Sr., and Abigail (Drake) Dewey. Israel, Sr., was the son of 
Thomas and T'r.-mces Dewey. Thomas Dewey is known as the fotmder of the 
family in this countrx'. haxing come from Kent, England, with Governor 
W'inthrop and Re\-. lohn W'arham and settled at Salem in February, 1637. 

-Margaret I'rown. the wife of Christopher Dewey, was the daughter of 
Ruben P)rown, son of Humphrey Prown. son of Thomas Rrow-n, son of 



252 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

Nicholas P>n)\vii. who was the son of Edward Browai, of Worcestershire, 
England. 

The family liislor\' of Dehorah Tracy, the wife of David Dewey, lias 
\)wn traced tliron.^ii many generations. Her father, Jonathan Tracy, was 
the third son of Thomas Tracy, the settler of Norwich, Connecticut, w-ho 
was the son of Gov. William Tracy, the governor of Berksley Hundred, 
from i6jo to i(>22, in Virginia. Governor Tracy came to America at the 
solicitation of ("apt John Smith. After the death of Governor Tracy, his 
widow and young son, Thomas, returned to England. Some years later 
Idiomas returned to .\merica, settling first in Watertown, Massachusetts, 
then <it Salem and later founded Norwich. 

(iox^ernor Trac)' w ris of nohle hirth. the family history being traced 
thirongh nineteen generations to Eord Dudley and his wife. Grace de Traci, 
the latter of whom was a granddaughter of Raron de Traci, who came to 
I'Jigland ^\•ith William the C'on(|ueror .and fought in the ])attle of idastings 
in To()6. Lord Dudley traced his history through four generations, to Ethel- 
red, king of I'Jigland from 979 to 1015. He was the seventh in the litie of 
I'.nglish kings, beginning with ICgbert, who ruled from 800 to CS38. 

King ICgbert's ancestry is recorded to Cedric, the tirst king of West 
.^axony. in 534, while that of Cedric is traced to Woden, who was master of 
a great part of northern luirope in the third century. Some claim to have 
traced this famous ruler through Darius to Japtha, the son of Noah. 

luigeuia X'ance. the mother of Mrs. Clarence A. Sweet, was born on a 
farm near Eewamo and was tiie daughter of Madison R. and Mary (Beck- 
with) Nance, ^iladison R. X'ance was born in Yates county. New York, on 
.\pril 16. 182..'. He was one of five brothers who moved to Tonia county 
and settled in I'^ast Plains. He was a man of robust constitution and was 
al)le to withstand the many hardships of i)ioneer life. By his efforts he was 
enabled to spend his later days in comfort and enjoy the respect and confi- 
dence of his neighI)ors and friends. He died on May 13. 1908. His wife, 
Marv ( I'eckwith ) Yance, was Ixtrn in 1825, in Monroe county. New York, 
and moved with her ])arents to East Plains, where she was married. Mr. and 
^i'lrs. X'ance were active and faithful members of the Methodist EjHscopal 
church until their death. 

Mr. Sweet is a (piiet, but sociable man, with many friends. He enjovs 
liis l)e.-nitiful home and family rather than the social life of the world. He 
is highlx' respected by all A^ho know him. 



montcai.m: corNTY, miciikjan. 253 

IIOWAUD C. KIPP. 

iJoward C. Kipp, leading- business man and prominent citizen of Green- 
\ille, AJontcalni comity, Michigan, was born at Carson City, this county, on 
August 25, 1884, a son of Isaac and Drusilla (England) Kipp, natives of 
ionia, iMichigan, and of Canada, respectively. 

Isaac Ivipp, after the com])letion of his education in the common schools 
(if Ionia, learned the trade of a shoemaker, an occupation which he followed 
after coming to Carson C"it\- when he was seventeen years of age, for some 
years. Later, the elder Ki]-)p estabhshed himself in business as a shoe dealer, 
a business which he followed most successfully at Carson City until 1896, 
when Isaac Kipp moved to Greenville and opened a store, carryiug a general 
bne of merchandise and furnishings. As a merchant of Greenville, the elder 
Kip]> ])rc»<pered until he not only was the owner of his successful business, 
l)Ut was the owner of considerable pro|:)crty in this town. 

Isaac Kipp was promijient in the efforts of the Democratic party in 
Montcalm county, and while a resident of Carson City was treasurer of the 
town for some time, hratcrnally, Mr. Ki])p was a member of Eureka Lodge 
No. 9, Independent Order of Odd Eellow s. Isaac Kipp was a leading mem- 
ber and worker of the Methodist church and for some time served as a 
uiember of the official board of this church at Greenville. Isaac and Dru- 
silla Kipp were the parents of three children: Sadie B., who was educated 
in and graduated from the Greenville high school, she now living at home; 
Howard C, and Keith, of Greenville. 

Howard C. Kip|) received his early education in the public schools of 
(-.'arson City, afterward becoming a student at the Greenville high school, 
from A\hich institution he was graduated in 1903. Later, Mr. Kipp became 
a student of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, after two years of 
^tudy at that school going to Chicago. Illinois, where he si>ent two years as 
an empknec of the AVestern I^lectric Company. He then returned to Green- 
ville, and on account of the disalnlity of his father, took charge of the busi- 
ness interests of the elder Kipp, after whose death Howard C. Kipp con- 
tiimed in that work imtil a rearrangement of the business iiUo a co-partner- 
ship, when Mr. Kij^p was retained as manager. Howard C. Kipp now spe- 
cializes in the grocery business, conducting one of the best kept and most effi- 
ciently managed busiitess houses of Greenville. 

louring the year j()ii Howard C. Kipp was married to Adelaide E. 
Siple. who was born near Greenville, educated in the Greenville public schools 



254 M()XTCAI„M COl NTY, MICIIIGAX. 

and orjidnatcd from the Circcinillc liii^ii school. Mrs. Kipp is an active mem- 
ber and dc\()Ut worker in tlic ("ongre.yational clutrch ot Grccn\-ille. 

Howard C Kipn is a member of l^eRoy T.odti^e No. 9, Knights of 
l'}diias. and is a citizen who i^ acti\e in tlie sni)])ort of the policies and 
cfforls of the Ivepnljlican ])art\- in Montcalm count}'. 



COKXh'.TdUS Dk YOUNG. 

(■(.(rnelins i.)e^'oung^ well-known hardware merchant at Crystal, this 
county, and former representative in the state Legislature from this county, 
is a nati\e' s(.)n of Michigan, having been born at Cxrand Rapids, this state. 
January j.v j(S6o, son of William and Afary ( A'linderhout) DeYonng, both 
natives of Holland and both born in the year 1830, the former of whom, 
\vhen a young man of nineteen, came to the United States and settled at 
Grand Jvajjids. where he engaged in the grocery business. Mary ATinderhout 
was al)OUt twenty years old when she came to this country and she, too. 
located at (b-and Rapids, where she and William DeN'oung were shortly 
afterward married. They made their home in that city until 1877, in which 
\ear the\- came to this county, l<K\'Uiug at what then was known as the }3urke 
I'ond ^aw-mill. on I'ish creek, at a i>;)int now included in the southeastern 
section (.>f the towu of Crystal, and tliere William i)e Young bought the saw- 
mill and established hfs home, he and his famil}' thus being among the very 
earliest settlers of that section and were aniong the leaders in the develop- 
meni of the now thriving little city of Oystal. 

\\'illiam DeA'oung was one of the most active promoters of the growth 
of Crvstal and was for years regarded as a leader in the business life of that 
comnnniitv. fie was a Rei)ublican and took an active part in the political 
afi"airs of the county, his thorough ac(|uaintance with conditions in liis ])art 
of the county giving much w^eight to his counsels in the deliberations of the 
l)arty managers. He died in .Xjiril, T(SSX, and his widow snrvived him for 
six'teen years, her death occurring- in 1904. They were the parents of nine 
children, namelv : James, who lives three miles east of Stanton, in this 
countv; Daniel, who lives fcjur miles east and one mile nortli of Stanton; 
Cornelius, the immediate snbject of this biographical sketch; John, who died 
in the fall of 1915; Kngel, who died in 191 2; William, who lives three miles 
southeast of Crystal; Edward, who is in the hardware business at McBain; 
Mrs. Marv Markmn, who lives in Grand Rapids, and Mrs. Jennie Sykcs. 



MON'ICAI.M t'orXlY, MJCIUCAX. 255 

('ornclins DcN'outit;- orcw ui) ;it Crystal aiul early aajuired an excellent 
hu^incss rrainiiijL;. in iS(S6 he 1)egan l)nsiiu\ss tor hiniself. starting;- a store 
at l''isli\j]le, this county, and was eni^a^ed in hnsiness there until i8()o. in 
which vear he returned to ("rystrd and engai^ed in the hotel hnsiness, and was 
duis engaged for three years, at the end of which time, in 1<S()3, he entered 
ihe hardware lield. oi)eniu<; a well-stocked harchvare store at Crystal, which 
he e\er since has couducted and in which liusiness he has met with much 
-^uccess, loni; ha\in_L; heen rated as one of the leading' merchants of that town. 

Mr. 1")e^'oung• has not ])ennitted his extensi\e mercantile interests to 
detract from his interest in the puhlic service and he has given close and 
intelligent attention to the ci\ic affairs of the comit)'. fn 1894 ^^^ ^^'^^ elected 
clerk of CrAStal townshi]) and serxed in that capacity for six years. Tie 
later was elected treasmx'r of the townshi]), in which official capacity he 
-cr\ed for one tertn, and in J(;n8 was elected as the representative from 
\h)ntcalm count\' to the lower house of the .Michigan (ieneral .\ssenihlv. 
Iii^ service in the Legislature during the session of i(;o(; heing credital)le not 
oiih' to himself hut to his constituenc\'. he hax'ing accptitted himself in the 
lh)use, in the i)erforni;ince of <all the exacting duties of his rei)resentative 
ojiicc, with scrupulous regard to his obligation to his constituency and with 
an eye single to the ptihlic good. 

On Decemljcr 25. 1880, C<,)rnelius DeN'oung was tinited in marriage to 
l"\a (\-ise, who was horn in Crystal township, her father a member of a pio- 
neer family of that section, his mother, lunmaline Smith Case, ha\ing ])(^(^n 
the first white woman \o settle in that tow^nshi]), and to this union two chil- 
dren were born. I'>nest. born in 1887. now living at Cry.'ital, and IJllian, 
horn in i8()4. who married Tlarr\ Rogers, and now lives at Alma. 1"he 
mother of these children died in October, 1007, and in July, T908, Cornelius 
DeVonng married, secondly. I'ertha Owens, daughter of the Rev. David J. 
Owens ruid wife, i)ioneers of Crystal township, the former of whom, for 
lofty years a well-kno\\-n minister of the Gospel, is still living in Crvstal. 
and to this second union one child has been born, a son, .\ustin, !)om on 
August 5, i()0(;. Mr. and Mrs. ]')eYoung are memlKM's of and earnest work- 
ers in the Baptist church at Crystal, Mr. DcYoung 1)cing the teacher of the 
young people's class in the Sunday school and are interested in all good 
works in their community, being held in high esteem among their many 
friends thereabout. Mr. DeVoung has heen a member of the Knights of the 
Alaccabees since T8g5, in the affairs of which order he has ever taken a 



256 MONTCALM COUNTY. MIC1[IGAN. 

wuriu interest, having been a nienil)er of the great camp, serving as great 
second master of the guards for one term and is well known among the 
members of that popular order throughout the state. 



FAAAOTT (). r,I^LL()\\\S. 

lilliott (). Bellows, successful farmer and stock raiser, and citizen 
prominent in the affairs of Sidney township, Montcalm county, ATichigan, 
was born in AlcKean county. 1 'cnnsylvania, on April 8, 11^53, a son of 
W'ilham and jane (Afanning) Ik'Hows, natives of X'ermont and of AlcKean, 
I'ennsyhania, resi)ectivcly. 

\fter their marriage. William I'cllow.s and his wife lived at AlcKean, 
Pennsslvania, mitil iS.vS. when they moved to vSmithport. Pennsylvania, 
which was their home until ]86i, and then they moved to Tioga county, 
Xew N'ork, where they lived until 1864. About this time William Bellows 
and h.is family went to Carroll county, Illinois, wdiere, a year later, the elder 
Bellows purchased a farm of eighty acres, which he cultivated for three 
years and then, selling his land, William Bellows rented a larger farm for 
two years, afterward buying one liundred and twenty acres of land, on 
which he lived as a farmer until 1872. William Bellows and his family, 
with the exception of Elliott (). Bellows, the subject of this sketch, at that 
time moved to the state of Kansas, where the elder Bellows \vas prosper- 
ouslv engaged in general agricultural jmrsuits for the remainder of his days, 
dying on January 30. iS8^. \YUVuim and Jane Bellows were the parents of 
eleven children: Ellen, ^^'ilIiam D., Thomas, ()ri>lia. Orcivilla, Cora, T,ily 
and Lxdia, who are decea.sed : and Ada, l^lliott O. and ATarshall N. 

l^lliott O. Bellows lived w-ith his parents until July. 1871, and then 
after three months as a thresher in Carroll county. Blinois. he came to 
Aiichigan and located in Alontcalm county, where he worked as a lumber- 
man in the winter of 1871, and in the spring of the year 1872 took up 
duties as a salesman in a store .at T-angston. continuing in this work for 
three and one-half years. In the year 1875 Mr. Rellow-s again became a 
lumberman for one winter, and in 1876 he bought eighty acres of land in 
Montcalm count)-, which he cleared and where he farmed, alternately with 
his fhities as a lumberman, until January. 1870, when Elliott O. Bellows 
sold his land and moved to T<;ansas and purchased a farm, on which he 
lived for two vears. About the year 1881 Mr. Bellows returned to Mont- 




ELLIOTT 0. BELLOWS. 



MONTCALM COT'NTY, MICilKJAN. 257 

c.'ilni county, IMicliigan, and bought forty acres of land in Montcalm town- 
ship, a place which ho cultivated for alx)ut one year and in 1882, in partner- 
ship with Fred D. Buggs, he entered the mercantile business, two years later 
(h'sposing of his interest and going to Canada, where he had charge of a 
crew of men engaged in construction work for the Canadian Pacilic Rail- 
way Company. 

After four months in Canada, Mr. Bellows returned to Montcalm 
county, Michigan, and purchased eighty acres of land in Ferris township, 
where he made his home for three years, until the spring of the year 1887, 
and then Flliott O. Bellows again became a merchant, starting a general 
store at Six Lakes, iMontcalm county. During the month of Feljruary, 
1890, the store of Mr. Bellows was destroyed by fire, and after rebuilding 
he sold his place of business to his brother and returned to his farm in Ferris 
township, which was his home until January i, 1901. Elliott O. Bellows 
having I)een elected sheriff of Montcalm county, he moved to the town of 
Stanton, and there made his home during tw^o terms of office. AVhile living 
at Stanton. ATr. !>ellows, in ^c)()^,, sold his farm in Ferris township, and 
])urchased a farm of one hundred acres in Day township, a place to which 
he added land until he was the owner of tw-o hundred and twenty acres. 
In 191 J Air. Bellows sold the farm in Day township and a few months 
later l.)OUght one hundred acres of farm land in .Sidney township, to which 
he moved in January. [914, and where he now lives as a general farmer 
and as a raiser of purel)re(l Guernsey cattle. In addition to his valuaMe 
f;u-m, Mr. Bellows is the owner of fifteen acres of land in the town of 
.Stanlon, Montcalm county. 

D\iring the year 1875 l'"Jliott O. Bellows was married to Mary John- 
son, who. in the year 1883, died, leaving two children, Lily M. and Fred 
K., both of whom are deceased. Tn the year 1884 Mr. Bellows was mar- 
ried, secondly, to Mary A. I'eal. and to this marriage were lx)rn two chil- 
dren: Severens I^.. who, after completing a high school education, became 
a civil service em])loyee at Lansing, Michigan; and Inez, who, after com- 
puting her education, became a school teacher for a short time and then 
was married to Arthur Strouse, a hardware and grocery merchant of Stan- 
ton, Alontcalm county. On April 20. 1904, Mary, the wife of Elliott O. 
nellows. died, and some time later Mr. Bellows was married, thirdly, to 
Airs, l^vangeline (Baird) Shauman. a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth 
(Miller) l^)aird. lK)th of whom were natives of Pennsylvania, in which state 
thev lived until mo\ing to Ohio, and later to Elkhart county, Indiana, in 
(17b) 



258 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

1865. ilenry Baird, who was a wagon-maker, and his family Hved in Klk- 
liart county, Indiana, until i87(,), when they moved to Michigan, locating 
first in Mecosta count}-, and then at Stanton, in Montcalm county, where 
they spent their last days. 

Prior to her marriage to Elliott O. Bellows, Mrs. Bellows was the 
widow of J. P. Sha.uman, to whom she was married at Elkhart. Indiana, 
on A])ril 28, 1879, after which they lived in Elkhart, Indiana, for some 
time and then moved to Day township. Montcalm county, Michigan, where 
Mr. .Shauman was emi)loyed in a mill, he afterward going to Stanton, where 
he died on July 7. 1902. J. P. and F.vangeline Shauman were the [)arents 
of two children : Olion, \\ ho. after coni]>leting a high school education, 
became a druggist, now being located \it Chelsea, Michigan, and John H., 
of Greenville, Montcalm county. 

As a public man and official. I'llliott O. Bellows has taken a prominent 
])lace in Montcalm county, serving as sherifif for two terms. 1)eginning on 
January t, T90J. In 1906 Mr. BBellows was appointed to the office as post- 
master of Stanton, being reai)pointed in the year 1910, and occupying the 
ofiice until A])ril. T914. b^lliott (). Bellows was a sui)ervisor of bY^rris town- 
sliip for six years and during a long term of activity in the ]\'epublican partv 
he has been the occupant of various local offices, all of which he has served 
in his usual efficient and able manner. 

Elliott O. l>ellows is a i)rominent member of Stanton Eodge No. 250. 
Free and Accc])ted Masons, is a well-known member of the Knights of the 
jMaccal>ees. and together with his wife, is a member of tlie Order of the 
Eastern .*^tar. In church affiliation, ]\Trs. Elliott O. Bellows is a member of 
the Cc^ngregational church. - 



GEORGE EDWARDS. 

George bMwards. a coal dealer of Sheridan. Michigan, was born in 
Bushnell township, Montcalm county, July 16. 1857. the son of George and 
.\nne (Haysmer) Rdwards. George Edwards and Anne Haysmcr were looth 
born in England, where they were reared and married, and. three years after 
their marriage came to America, their only child dying on the voyage across 
the ocean. Upon arriving in this country, they came direct to Bushnell 
township, Montcalm county, and, at the outbreak of the (Ivil ^^'ar, (jcorge 
Edwards enlisted in the army, dying while in service. Four children were 
born to them after their arrival in this ccnmtry : George, the subject of this 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 259 

sketch; Uerbcrt, who Hves in Bushncll township; Frank, who resides in 
Ionia county, and JvHzabeth, deceased, who was the wife of Henry Arntz, 
of lu'cr.ii^recn township. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Anne Edwards 
was married to Ceph Weignian, of Bushncll township, but no children were 
born to this union. She is now deceased, Imt he is still living" in Bushncll 
township. 

George b.dwards lived at home until he was twenty-one years of age, 
when he started out for himself, renting a farm for two or three years, in 
which o(Xupation he was very successful. At the end of that time he was 
able to purchase forty acres of land in Bushnell township, on which he 
moved and to which he subseeiuenlly added until he now owns one hmidred 
acres in I'ushnell township and twenty-seven acres near Sheridan. In Febru- 
ary, 19 II, Mr. lidwards came to Sheridan and engaged in the coal business, 
which he has followed since that time and in which he has l>een very pros- 
])crous. He rents the farm. 

(k'orgc Edwards was married on July 8, 1877, to Anna Minier, the 
(laughter of Joseph and l-'.lizabeth (Pennington) Minier, both of whom were 
born in I'ennsyhania and came to Ohio with their rcsi>ective ])arents. They 
\\ ere reared and married in Ohio, and one son was bom to them while still 
residents of that state. Five years after their marriage they came to Michi- 
gan and settled in Montcalm county. They were the parents of nine chil- 
dren, seven of whom arc now living: James, who resides at vSix T^kes, 
Michigan; Florence, the wife of David Youngs, of Evart, Michigan; Anna, 
the wife of Mr. lul wards ; George, who lives at Millersburg, Michigan; 
Simon, who is a resident of Palo, Michigan; Howard, who resides at Lans- 
ing; and Clara, the wife of Walter Root, of Fenwick. Michigan. 

1'o Mr. and Mrs. George Edwards have Ijeen born six children, two of 
whom, Ma1>le and i'loyd, died in infancy. The four living children are: 
I'Jmer. a farmer, who resides in P)Ushnell township; iuirl, who is a resident 
of Sheridan and a railroad man on the Grand Trunk; Jesse, who lives in 
Bushncll township and farms the home place, and Ella, the wife of Hans 
( )1son, of Powell, Michigan. 

-Mrs. l.ulwards is a member of the Baptist church and an earnest worker 
in this congregation. Fraternally. ^Ir. Edwards is a member of Even Lodge 
.\o. 57, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a past noble 
grand and which he rei)resente(l at the state encampment in IQ15. His son, 
l-'Jmer. is also a member of this order and represented the local lodge at the 
grand encampment. lV)litically, Mr. Edwards is a Republican and has 



2(K) MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

always taken an active part in local ])()litic.s, JIc has served as school direc- 
tor in his home district and is now serving his first term on the city council 
of Sheridan. 



CHAKI.RS W. RTLKY. 



L'harles VV. Kiley, well-known owner and operator of the "Reo" gar- 
age in Lafayette street, Greenville, but formerly and for years engaged in 
the meat-market business and stock buying at Greenville, long having been 
recognized as one of the l)est-kno\\n business men in that city, having grown 
up there in business in connection witli his father's long established business, 
is a native son of Michigan, having been born at Farraington, in Oakland 
county, this state. October 2,7, 1861, son of H. W. and Valeria (VVieand) 
Kiley, the former a native of New York state and the latter of the state of 
Michigan, who for years were well-known and respected residents of Green- 
\ille, where botli sfK-nt their last days. 

n. VV. Riley, who was the son of Henry Riley, came from New '\'ork 
to .Michigan when he was a small l)oy with his parents, who settled in the 
l'\-irmington neighborhood in Oakland county, where the lad grew to man- 
hood. He was nineteen years old when the "gold fever" swept over the 
countr}', following the o[Xining of the gold fields in California in 1849. and 
he joined the throng of modern Argonauts who sought their fortunes amid 
the hazard of the times in the West. He remained in the gold fields for six 
years and made some money, but was not sufficiently attracted to the place 
to remain longer and returned to h\'Lrmington, where he married X'aleria 
Wieand, a native of that section of the state, whose parents had come from 
Cayuga count}', New York, her father having walked from that state to 
Michigan to enter a claim in Oakland county, where he established his home 
and where he spent the rest of his life. 

Tn 1870 the Rileys came to Montcalm county and settled in Greenville, 
where H. W. Riley opened a meat market and later formed a partnersliip 
with the Serviss brothers, under the firm name of Serviss Brothers & Rilev, 
doing a general business in the retail meat trade and the buying and selling 
of live stock, which partnership continued for two years, at the end of wdiich 
time Mr. Riley engaged in business for himself and was thus engaged until he 
retired from active business pursuits in 1905. His death occurred on May 
II, 1910, and his widow survived him a little more than three years, her 
death occurring in October, IQ13. They were the parents of five children, 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 261 

namely: Alice, who married A\ery Marks, now assistant postmaster at 
(ireenville; Charles \\'., the immediate suhject of this biographical sketch; 
Mxrlle. wife of William Dreitzler, of .Seattle, Washington; Ruth, who died 
ill icS()0, and Heni(lon, who lives in Seattle. 

Charles \V. Riley was about nine years of age when his parents moved 
to (ireeiu ille and he continued his studies in the schools of that city. Upon 
com])leting his schooling he became actively identified with his father in the 
live-stock business and was thus engaged until his marriage, at the age of 
Iwenty-eight. after which time he entered into a partnership with John Ser- 
\iss in the meat and live-stock business and was thus engaged for two years, 
at the end of which time he entered into the same line of business for him- 
self and lias since tliat time conducted his stock business alone. Tn i()o6 he 
became interested in the automobile business, financing the "Reo" garage in 
bafayette street, and since T.913 has been devoting the greater part of his 
time and attentit)n to the extensive ruid grown'ng interests of that concern. 
ha\ing become one of the best-known garage men in this part of the state. 

On .May 27. tS()0. Charles W. Riley was united in marriage to Alma 
Stevens, daughter of Ro\al and Jennie Stevens, well-known residents of 
(b-een\ille. Air. and Mrs. Riley take an active interest in local affairs and 
have a wide circle of friends, who hold them in the warmest esteem. The^■ 
are members of the ('ongregational church and are deeply interested in the 
various good works of that religious body. Mr. Riley is a Democrat and is 
a meml)cr of l)Otli the Masonic lodge and the lodge of the Knights of Pvthias 
at Greenville, in the affairs of both of which orders he takes a warm interest. 



R. EARL LOWER, 



I\. Earl J.ower, a leading merchant and in/hiential citizen of Sheridan, 
Montcalm county, Michigan, was born in Oakwood, Paulding county, Ohio, 
November 7, 1882, the son of John A. and Jemima A. (Brand) Lower, of 
Cerman and luiglish descent, respectively. 

John .\. Lo\\er. who was a son of Jacob Lower and w\ic, moved with 
his parents to Indiana from Peinisylvania and located near Waterloo, where 
Jacob Lower lived and died, after which John A. Lower and his family 
moved to the state of Michigan, in 1893, where Mr. Lower purchased a 
farm in Evergreen township, tins county, a place which he now makes his 
home. John A. and Jemima A. Lower are the parents of one son, R. Earl. 



2(y2 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

R. Earl Lower received his early education in the schools of his native 
count)', after which he came to Michis^an with his parents and worked on 
his father's farm in Evergreen township until sixteen years of age. when he 
became a school teacher, the duties of which profession he followed for 
about five years. When about t.went\- years of age, Mr. Lower accepted a 
jKjsition in a store at 'J\)rch Lake, Michigan, remaining in this work for eight 
years and then he entered business for himself, purchasing a store at Sheri- 
dan, which he conducted successfully for about four years. Later. Mr. 
Lower (lis)X)sed of his original store and. with H. W. Taylor, started another 
store at Sheridan, where he is now engaged, being one of the prominent 
merchants of this community. Mi:, Lower is now the sole owner of the 
store, having ])urchased the interest of Mr. Taylor on October 28, 1915. 

On November 26. 1902, R. Earl Lower was married to Rosetta Ben- 
nett, a daughter of Noah K. Bennett and wdfe, well-known i)eople of Bush- 
nell township, Montcalm countv. To the marriage of R. Earl and Rosetta 
Lower have been lx)rn two children, Burton E. and R. Lucile. Mr. Lower 
and his family are active meml,)ers of the Methodist Episcopal church at 
vSheridan. 

Mr. Lower is a member of J\'arl Lake Lodge No. 324, b""ree and Accepted 
Masons, and he is a member of Even Lodge No. 8c), Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, including the encampment at Stanton. Tn jXDlitics, R. Earl 
Lower is an ardent Republican, having been elected as the candidate of this 
party to the offices of township clerk, treasurer and to a place on the village 
l)oard of Sheridan. 



MARTIN SCHRODER. 



Martin Schroder is very active in community affairs and represents the 
agricultural interests of vSidney township, Montcalm county, Michigan. He 
was born on November 24, tS6o, in Utcland, Denmark, and is the son of 
Hendrick and .\nne (jansen) Schroder. Hcndrick Schroder lived atul died 
in his native land, and bis widow emigrated to America, where she resided 
with her two sons until the time of her death. She and her husl)and were 
the parents of five children, three of whom are now living: iM'itz lives in 
Sidney township, Montcalm county, Michigan ; Martin also lives in this 
township; Margaret, deceased, married Nels Petersen; vStina, deceased, and 
Matilda, who is the wife of J. J. Jensen. 

Martin Schroder emigrated to America when he was twenty-one vears 



MOXTCAr.M COUNTY, MICIIIGAX. 263 

of age, locating teiii[)orariIy in Jackson, Michigan, where he was employed 
in the .Michigan Central railroad sliops for six months. He then came to 
Montcalm county. Michigan, being employed by a farmer near Greenville 
for two months, after which he engaged in the lumber woods and continued 
in this Inisincss for six years. He then purchased a farm of forty acres' in 
Sidney township, remaining there until in the fall of 1914, at which time 
he retired to the town of Sidney. His farm now consists of seventy-nine 
acres, thirty-nine acres having been added to the original property. 

On (")cto1>er 30, i8cS4. Martin Schroder was united in marriage to y\nnic 
N. Marie Kasmussen, daughter of Rassmus Andersen, and they are both 
meml)ers of the Danish Lutheran church. Martin Schroder is also a member 
of the Dam'sh Brotherhood. Politically, he is a Democrat and has served 
as township treasurer for two years. He is now serving his second term of 
office as justice of the ]>eace. In school matters he has acted in the capacity 
of district school director, of district No. 8, in Sidney township, Montcalm 
county, Michigan. 



JOHN QUIGG. 



John Ouigg, a well-known cigar-maker of Trufant, this county, whose 
wife has been postmistress of that village since July, 1915, is a native of the 
neighboring county of Ionia, having been lx)rn in the city of Ionia, county 
scat of that county, on June 25, 1873, son of Harry and Mary (Bradley) 

Harry Quigg, who was born in the north of Ireland, came to the United 
States with his parents when a boy and grew up at Hudson, New York, 
where he learned the stone-mason's trade, which he later followed at Ionia, 
this state, where his last days were spent, his death occurring in 1879. His 
widow is still living at Ionia. Harry Ouigg and wife were the parents of 
seven children, as follow : Anna, who married M. J. Callahan, a railroad 
man, who died in Cliicago ; Alexander, who died in the West; Mary, a clerk 
in a store at Ionia; John, the immediate subject of this biographical sketch; 
J-fenry, a l)oiler inspector in the sho])s of the Lake Shore Railroad Company 
at Hillsdale, this state: Margaret, who died at the age of twenty-four years. 
and Nellie, deceased, who was the Avife of Han^ev E. Kidder, now postmas- 
ter at Ionia. 

John Quigg was reared at Ionia and remained at home until he was 
fourteen years of age, at which time he started to learn the cigar-maker's 



264 MOXTCALM COl'NTY, MICHICAN. 

trade, and has l)een thus engaged ever since. After working;" for three years 
in that ])laee he started out as a "journeyman"' cigar-maker and was employed 
at his trade at a numher of (hlYerent places until his marriage, in 1900, 
shortly after which event he settled at Trufaiil, this county, and has ever 
since i^een engaged in the manufacture of cigars at that place, hecoming one 
of the best-known and most popular citizens of that pleasant village. 

On b'ehruar}- 14, igoo, John yuigg was iniited in marriage to Mabel AI. 
E\eretts, daughter of Albert and Ellen (Valentine) J^veretts, the former a 
native of J'ennsylvania and tlie latter of Ohio, and to this union one child 
has been born, a son, John Lawrence. Air. and Mrs. Quigg take a proi)er 
part in the \arious social activities of their home town and are held in high 
regard thereabout. Mr. Quigg is a Y)emocrat and ever since locating at 
Trufant has taken an interested part in local civic affairs. In July, IQT5, 
Airs. Quigg received her appointmejit as ]X)stmistrcss at Trufant and is mak- 
ing a very acceptable and competent oflici^l. 



IM^TER EEl^ERSEN. 



Peter Eetersen, the son of Mans and Johanna (Lamb) Petersen, was 
l)orn in Montcalm county on Octol^r 27, 1885. Hans Petersen was born in 
Sjalland, Denmark, in i8|(). where his early life was spent on the farm. At 
the age of fourteen he took charge of a farm for a widow and conducted it 
in a most satisfactory manner. Tie was married in his native coimtry and 
there one child was Ixirn. Flis wife died a few years after their marriage 
and the husband and father came to the United States, landing at New York, 
lie later settled at Greenville, with the family of Nels Hansen, whom he 
knew in Denmark. For a time he lived in Fairplain township and then 
became a resident of Sidney, where he worked in the mills, during which 
time he Ixjught forty acres of land, which he sold later and purchased 
another forty, one mile from Sidney, where he lived until 1905, when he 
traded eighty acres of his then one-hundred-and-forty-acre fami for the 
store of which Peter Petersen is now the proi)rietor. The father and son con- 
ducted the store at Sidney, and an implement store at Greenville, tnitil the 
death of the father, in the spring of 19 12. Of the three children of the 
family, Peter and Chris are in the store at Sidney, while Alma is a resident 
of Lansing. 

Peter Petersen was married on June 25, 1907, to Julia Nielsen, the 



MONTTCALM COL-NTY. Al IC 1 1 ICAX. 265 

(lanjjliter oi Ulic and Mary Xiclscn. To liiis union three children have lx;en 
horn: Myrtle. \ iolet and Mari^arie. all ot whom are at home with the 
])a rents. 

I'Yaternally. Mr. Petersen is a niemher of the Pearl T.ake Lodge. h>ee 
and Accepted Masons, the (Jleaners and the Dam'sh Hrotherhood, in all of 
which he takes an active and prominent part. 

Mr. Petersen and his family are memlK'rs of the Danish Lutheran 
church, in which they take great interest. I'oliticallv. Mr. Petersen is a 
niemher of the l\epui)lican party and has served for a numher of vears as a 
niemher of the school hoard and as its treasurer. 



WILLIAM H. Fl'LLh:K. 

William 11. k'nller has heen connected with the sherilLs ollice for more 
than lifteen years. ha\ing ^erxed as deput\- sheriff for fourteen years and as 
ci)nstal)le for fifteen years, alst.) as marshal of the village of Sheridan. Mont- 
calm county. Michigan. lie was horn on .\pril 4, 1843, in Springwater, 
Xcw \'()rk, and is the son of jose])h and Angeline ( .Sparks ) Fuller, hoth 
nati\es of .\ew York. Joseph iMiller was engaged in the timher husiness 
and in ag'riculture. his son, W illiam. having charge oi the farm until he 
removed to Michigan. William l^iller was reared and educated in Spring- 
water, New York, and came with his father's husiness partner, Jonathan 
i-'orhes. to Sheridan. .Michigan, when twenty years of age. They arri\a'd 
on .Ma\' 20, i(Sr)4, and \\ illiam TI. I'uller hegan work in the timher. his occu- 
l)ation heing to haul shingles and lumher from Sheridan to Ionia, Michigan. 
The place to which they came was virgin timher. with nothing but an old log 
house in which to live. He filled the position of teamster for three \'ears 
and then purchased a farm of forty acres, in lUishn.el! township. Montcalm 
county. Alichig.an. continuing to cultixate this place for five years. The 
farm was then sold and he removed to I'A'ergreen towmship. locating on forty 
acres one mile north of Sidney and later he moved to Sheridan and engaged 
in the hotel husiness, running the Potter PTouse. w hich Inirned. and he is now^ 
in the retail meat business. 

In January, 1867. \Villiam IT. Puller was wedded to Alwilda Jackson, 
daughter of TTenry Jackson, and of this union these children were lx)rn : 
Lillie, wife of Charles White, of Bushnell township, Afontcalm countv; 
llenry, wdio lives in Muskegon. Michigan; Claude; Ralph, who lives in 



266 MONTCALM COl^NTY, MICHIGAN. 

Sheridan, Alichigaii; Aiiiui, and two others who (Hed in infancy. Ahvilda 
(Jackson) l''u11er was Ijorn in Canandaigna, New York, and came to Michi- 
gan with lier parents in 186^^, locating in hjnia connty, three miles north of 
tlie town of that name and in Jvaston township. She and her husband are 
members of the Methodist l^))iscoj)al church, in which denomination William 
if. I'uller is a trustee, rolitically, he is a Republican, and served as path- 
master and street commissioner, also as an officer on the school board. In 
his fraternal relations, he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
I'ellows, Kvergreen Lfulgc No. (S7. Ife is also a member of the Knights of 
the .Macc.al)ecs. 



I'RANK G. HANSKX. 



l-'rank G. 1 lansen, the ])r()[)rietor of a general store at Sidney for the 
past thirteen years, was born at Gowen, Alontcalm county, on July 21, 1873, 
and is the son of Peter and Aima liansen, both of whom were natives of 
Sjalland, Denmark. 

Peter Hansen and wife, soon after their marriage, came to the United 
States in i<S6(S, landing at the port of New York, they came at once to "Big 
11 ills," two nnles east of (iowen. Here Mr. Hansen was engaged in the 
mills and the timber business for Ijfteen years, after which he bought a 
farm of forty acres in Sidney township. By hard w^ork and strict attention 
to business, Mr. ILanscn has been able to purchase another forty acres of 
land, and todav he has a well im])roved and highly developed farm of eighty 
acres, where he and, his wife live and enjoy many of the comforts of life. 
'I'o them ha\c been born seven children, five of whom are still living: Frank, 
the subject of this sketch; William, living at Greenville; Tina, the wife of 
George Nelson; Alfred, whose home is in Detroit; Clara, the wife of Will- 
iam Peterson, of Cinmd l\a])ids, and Tina and Theodore, who died in infancy. 

I'Tank G. Hansen's educational adxantages were limited to the district 
schools, where he remained un.til he was thirteen Acars of age. At this early 
age he began to work f(.)r the farmers of the neighborhood. At the age of 
fifteen he began work for P. J. Despelder. with whom he remained for five 
years, after which he was at home for a year before he went to Stanton 
with the l''.. D. Jiawley & Company for seven years. He then came to vSid- 
ne\-, where lie \vas with C. \Y. DeHart for t\\o years, after which he estal)- 
lished his present mercantile business, in which he has been most successful. 

On April 28. j8()8. 1/Yank G. H.ansen was married to Anna Peterson, 



MONTCALM COl.'NTY, MICHIGAN. 267 

the daughter of Air. and Airs. Peter Peterson. vShe was a native of Denmark 
and came witli her parents to America when but eleven years of age. They 
came direct to Alontcahn county, where they settled in Sidney township, 
wliere the parents still reside. 

Frank (i. Hansen and wife are the ]>arents of three children: ATildred 
Geneva, who is a graduate of the common schools; Chester Raymond, a stu- 
dent in the public schools, and Leslie Ronald, now four years of age. 

Air. Hansen is a member of the Danish Brotherhood and the Inde- 
])endent Order of (XU\ Fellows. Air. Hansen and his family are mem1>ers 
of the Danish Futheran church. J'olitically, he is a Republican and at the 
present time the treasurer of his township. 



PARS P. PF'\NSEN. 



Lars P. Hansen, a retired farmer of Sidney Center, Sidney township, 
Montcalm county, was born in Sjalland, Denmark, on November 28, 1845. 
He was the son of Hans and Bodel (Larson) Jenson. Lars P. Hansen 
grew to manhood and received his education in his native country, where he 
retnained until 1868, working by the year for the farmers of the neighbor- 
hood. At the age of twenty-two he came to America, landing at New York, 
and traveled to ATuskegon, where he worked for six months in a saw-mill. 
He was then on a farm in Ionia county for a year, after which he assisted 
in the grading of the Pere Marcpiette railroad, then the Lansing, Ionia & 
(ireenville railroad. He was for five years employed by a firm at Dixon to 
work in a saw-mill, after \\hich he worked for two years at Bass lake l)efore 
he located in Sidney township, where he bought a farm of fifty-three acres, 
two miles west of the town of Sidney. Here he made his home for a good 
man\- years, but later sold this place and purchased his present farm of 
eighty acres in Sidney township, joining Sidney on the north. He owes his 
success in life to hard work and strict attention to business. 

On .Se])teml)er 13. 1873, Lars P. Flansen was married to Kathrina 
Sorensen, the daughter of Soren Afadsen. Airs. Hansen was a native of 
Denmark and came to the Fhiited States when twenty-one years of age, she 
and her brother, AF'uls. l.)eing the only members of the family who came at 
the time. vShe came to Gowan, where she worked until Se])tembcr, when 
she became the wife of Air. Flansen. 

ATr. and Airs. Hansen arc the parents of the following children: Sinea, 



268 MO x\ T C A I , M CO I ' \ 'I Y , M IC 1 1 IC. A N . 

Williai)!, (.'arcy. Ivti^ina. Anna, Tlicodorc. Amelia and Alljcrt. Sinea is the 
\\\\t oi Hans 1,. Jensen; William li\es in Detroit; Carey makes her home in 
(Jrand l\a])ids, where she married Albert Wortman; Kej^'ina is the wife of 
\ ictor folmsen, of (irand Rapids; Anna also resides in (jrand Ra]>ids, and 
is the wife of b'red Gaber ; 'i^lieodore is at home; Amelia, the wife of Albert 
.Myers, resides in (irand Rapids, and Albert, who married Mossie l-'ish. lives 
in l'Aer<4reen township. 

The ])arents of Lars \\ llansen eame to Ameriea in 187T and settled in 
.Sidney townshi[), where they bony|-ht a farm and made (Iieir home the rest of 
their lives, iJoth are dead. 

Rolitieallv, Air. llansen is a Republican and has ser\ed has ]>art)- and 
the pe(,>ple of hi> community in variou>; oCfices, ha\'inj.^' been highway commis- 
sioner for two years, townshij) treasurer for two years, and for ele\en years 
townshi]) clerk. lie has also been assessor and school officer for his district. 

Mr. llansen and his family are members of the Danish Lutheran church 
and take much interest in the work. Air. Hansen has served the organization 
in a faithful manner a> one of its officers. 



I'.RXi'Sr A. RUTllERI'ORD. 

k.rnest A. Ltitherforck \\ho conducts an elevator in Sherichui, Mich- 
igan, was born in ( 'anada, January 24. 1870, and is the son of Wilham J. 
and .MatiUla (Sternes) Rutherford, both of whom were natives of Canada, 
where they farmed all of their lives. They were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, four boys and foin- girls, John, ALirtha, William, Klizabeth, Charles, 
i:. A.. Clara and Nellie. 

JCrnest A. Rutherford received his education in the common schools of 
Canacki and started out for himself at a very early age, working by the 
month at \ arious pla.ces until he came to the United States on June 10, 1891. 
lie had ])racticall\- nothing wdien he arrived in this country, Ijut he immedi- 
ately went to W'Ork for an uncle (Hi his farm and later leased the farm of 
four hundred and eighty acres. Me remained on this farm for seven years 
and here he prospered and saved enough to get a start. For some time he 
carried mail (.m one of the rural rotites. and !^i.\ years ago went into the ele- 
vator business, but this was burned on January 24, 191 5. He built a new 
up-to-date elevator in the spring of 1916, and also runs the Sheridan hotel. 
Sheridan, Alichigan. 



AI()NTCAI.^r COl'XTY. MICIIIGAX. 26() 

Ernest A. Kiithcrfunl married Dora (jrj<4gs, who was l)()rn and reared 
in Montcalm connty. and to them have l)een born two children. William, who 
is twelve years old, and Doroth}', who is ten. Both children are now attend- 
inL*" school. 

Mrs. kntherford and the two children are meml:>ers of the Congrega- 
tional church, hratcrnally, Mr. Knthcrford is a member of I'earl Lake 
Lodge No. 321. hree and .\cce|)ted -Masons, of which he is the treasurer. 
Jn ])olitics, Mr. Kntherford is an independent voter, and is a member of the 
Sheridan council. 



OSCAR E. l^HLE. 



Oscar E. J^hle, a retired farmer, whose home is in Sheridan, was born 
3n April 26, 1842. in Zora. County of Oxford. Canada, and was the son of 
Jacob and Mary I Hull) Ehle, the former of whom was a native of Penn- 
sylvania and the latter a native of New York. 

Jacob h'hle was the son of Adam Ehle, who moved from Pennsylvania 
to Canada in an early day. .'\dam Ehle, the father of Adam, Jr., was a 
native of (iermany and came to America and settled in Pennsylvania, as one 
of the early pioneers. 

.Marv I lull, the daughter of TTendrick and Hetsy Hull, who were natives 
of New \ ork, mo\ed with her i)arenis to Canada and there met and mar- 
ried Jacol) h-hle. 'j'hey made their home in Canada until their deaths, the 
father dying when Oscar E. w^as but m'ne years old and the mother |)assing 
awav one vear later. They were the parents of the following children: 
Mariah, Sophia. Charles. Edwin. Eena. Oscar, John. Dewey and Arthur. 
Of these the following are deceased: Mariah, who was the wife of T''.. H. 
(irav, deceased; .Sophia. Charles and Edwin, who died in Canada. Of the 
living. John is a resident of Iowa. Dewey lives in Duluth, Arthur is a resi- 
dent of Independence, and Oscar is the subject of this sketch. 

Oscar E. h'hle, after the death of his parents, iruide his home with an 
uncle until he was eighteen years of age. when he worked by the month for 
(nhers at teaming and at the lumber business. On Februaiy 24, 1864, Oscar 
E. EJile was married to Mary Ann 1'ottle. the daughter of Joseph and Ann 
(Tutten) Tottle. She was a native of England and emigrated with her par- 
ents to Oxford county. Canada, when but five years of age. There she 
made her home with the parents until her marriage to Mr. Ehle. 

In iSSc; Mr. and Mrs. Kh\e came to Sheridan, Montcalm county, and 



2/0 MOXTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

bought fort\- acres of land, which was increased later to one hundred and 
sixty acres (jf well iniproNcd land. After the ])urchase of the first forty acres 
of the farm, nnicli hilxjr was necessary on the part of the young couple to 
clear and get ready for cultivation their newly acquired home. Yet by dili- 
gence and strict attention to Inisiness the wilderness soon began to blossom 
mU) well culti^■ate(l fields. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elile are the ]>areiits of the following children: Arthur 
J()se])h, of Detroit; John Alfred, killed at the age of nineteen; Francis 
Dewey, a [baptist minister at Detroit; Milo lives on the old farm; Kll>ert 
I'Tnest. of h^vergreen township; Charles Julwin, a Baptist minister of Bush- 
nell township; James Har\ey, of Sidney township; Carlton E., of y\nn 
Arbor, and ( jordon Stewart, who livens on a farm and is a mail carrier out 
of Sheridan. 

.Mr. and .Mrs. J-^hle are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
are active in its various departments. Mr. Ehle is a Democrat, but has never 
I)een an office seeker, and favors the election of the best men to office. 



ROY A. CUTLER. 



A well-known a.n(l pros]3erous merchant of Sheridan, Michigan, is Roy 
A. Cutler, who was liorn on October 5, 1885, in Sturgis, St. Joseph county, 
-Michigan, the son of J. (J. .and ]\fary (AUman) Cutler, the latter of whom 
died in 1890. J. G. Cutler i.s a native of St. Joseph county, and an active 
member of tbe J. G. Cutler Com])aiiy. He started in business at Dclton, 
l)arry county, .Michigan, in i8()3, and remained there until 1906, when he 
came to Sheridan, fie has remained in this city since that time and has 
become a \ery successful business man. F:le is a member of the Methodi.st 
J*]pisc()pal church and, in j)olitics, is a Democrat. To J. G. and Mary (AH- 
mruii Cutler were born three children: Carl J., one of the firm of J. G. 
Cutler Company, of Sheridan; Roy A., the subject of this sketch, and Belle, 
the wife of Homer Crandall. 

Roy A. (Jutler was educated in the public schools of Delton and, after 
finishing his education, was employed in his father's store for five vears, 
after which he worked for the J. S. Goodyear Company for two years at 
Hastings. Michigan. WMien he was twenty-one years of age he came to 
Sheridan, at which time the present (inn of J. G. Cutler Company was 
organized, and liere he has remained since that time. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICJJIGAN. 2^1 

(Jn jutie ly. J908, R03- A. Cutler was married to Ethel Howard, who 
is a grachiate ot the normal school at i'Lverett, Michigan, and who, before 
her marriat^e. was a teacher in the i)ul)lic schools of this state. 

Mr. and Mrs. C'utler are memlvers of the Congregational church, in 
which both arc acti\e workers. Mr. Cutler l)eing superintendent of the vSun- 
day school. i'Vaternally, Mr. Cutler is a member of Pearl Lake Lodge 
Xo. 3J4, h'ree and .\cce|)ted Masons, and is the efficient master of the lodge. 
In ])olitics. he is independent. Mr. Cutler is a (|uiet, unassuming man, 
attends strictly to his own affairs and is well liked bv all who know him. 



J. WATSON COURT RR. 

J. Watson Courter, a well-known contractor and mechanic oi Sheri- 
dan, Montcalm count)', Michigan, was born in Essex county. New Jersey, 
July 18, 185^. the son of Hem-y and Alice A. (Bowden) Courter, both of 
whom were lx)rn, reared and married in Essex: county. To Henry and 
• Mice A. Courter were born live sons, four of whom are living: J. Watson, 
the subject oi this sketch; b'rank, of Essex county, New Jersey; Theodore. 
ot Portland, Oregc^n, and .Xnthony of Sidney, .Michigan. The mother of 
these chil(h-en died in i86t and the father later remarried. 

J. Watson Courter was thirteen years of age when he came to vSidney, 
Montcalm county. Michigan, where he received his education in the public 
schools. Mr. Courter was twenty-two years of age when he started out for 
himself, working first on a farm and later as a millwright and at various 
other occupations. He was always naturally skillful in working with 
niachinery, and he still follows this occupation, also being a contractor, 
justice of the peace and notary public. Mr. ("ourter owns one hundred and 
twenty acres of land in the southeastern part of vSidney township, Mont- 
calm county. 

In 1877 J. Watson Courter was married to AHce Crane, a native of 
•Newark. New Jersey, where she was reared and educated. To this union 
!ia\e been born four children, three of whom are now living: Anna, the 
wife of Picrt C. Crawford, of Sheridan. Michigan: Erank H., a rural mail 
carrier on route No. 2. otit of Sheridan, and Eva E., the wife of A. H. 
Prayton. a farmer in Sidney township. 

Politically, Air. Courter is affiliated with the Republican ])arty and has 
always been active in local politics. The only official position which he has 



2/2 MOXTCAI.M COrNTY. MICHIGAN. 

filled is that of siiporv'isor of Sidney township, in which he served for three 
years. I^Yaternally. .Mr. (onrter is a member of Pearl Lake I.od^£5;e No. 
324, h>ce and .Xcccpted Masons, of wliich he has been secretary for the 
l)ast twenty years, and l^ven Lodge No. 87, Indeix,Mident Order of Odd 
I'Vllows. of which he is a ])ast grand and meml>er of the grand lodge. Air. 
Oourter and his daughter are members of the Order of the Eastern Star, 
of A\hich his daughter is a past worthy matron and a member of the grand 
]o(Ige. Mrs. /\hee Courter (bed in h\'brnary. 1908. During her b'fetime 
she was also a member of the Eastern Star. 



EDWARD G. MULICK. 



lulward (j. Alnlick, leachng florist and prominent citizen of Greenville. 
Ab)ntcalni county, Michigan, was b(,)rn near Mt. Sterling", Wisconsin, on 
Deccml>er 8. 1870, l>eing the second born of a family of six children. 

lidward (]. Mulick was reared on the home farm in Wisconsin, where 
he lived until ten years of age. and in 1880 moved to Grand Rapids. Mich- 
igan, in which city he received his education in the ]>ublic schools. .After 
leaving school. Mr. Mulick learned the trade of a cabinet-maker, an occupa- 
tion which he followed for some time and then finding that indoor work 
was detrimental to his health, b^dward (]. Mulick went to the City of Chi- 
cago, Illinois. In that city Mr. Mulick was engaged in the work of build- 
ing motor boats for some time and theu for three years he was a builder 
in the Lnited States navy yard, at Mare Lsland. California. 

During the month of July, 1903. lulward G. Mulick came to Greenville, 
Montcalm count v. and engaged in his present business as a florist, which 
Mr. Mulick has built up until now- it is one of the largest and most thriving 
floral com])anies of this region. When the business was started the plant 
had l)ut ten thousand feet of glass, there now iK'ing seventy-five thousand 
feet of glass in the houses, and the product is shipped to various parts of 
the United States. In 1903, when Mr. Mulick came to Greenville and 
assisted in the organization of the Greenville b^loral Company, he was elected 
as secretary and treasurer, with R. E. Si)rague as president, and John Service 
as vice-president. During the year 1914, Mr. Mtilick took over all the stock 
of the Greenville Eloral Company and now conducts this flourishing busi- 
ness, which is among the concerns of which Greenville, and the county, 
may w^ell be proud. 



MON'ICALM COl'NTY, MICIIKIAX. 2/3 

I'xlward G. Mnlick was married to Florence Eastman, who was edu- 
cated in the ])ubHc schools of Greenville, and at the State Normal College 
at Mt. IMeasant, after which she became a school teacher at Greenville for 
three years and at Capac, Michigan, for one year. To the marriage of 
fuhvard G. and Florence Mnlick have been lx)rn three children: Mabel, 
Edward and Charles, aged nine, seveti and two years, respectively. 

Edward G. Mnlick has served as a member of the city council at Green- 
ville, and is a man who is active in the promotion of business and enterprise 
in the community. Fraternally, Mr. Mulick is a meml>er of Greenville 
Lodge No. 96, l'>ee and Accepted Masons, is a member of LeRoy Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, and is a member of Eureka Lodge No. 91, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 



J. WJLLLVM G. HANSEN. D. V. S. 

Dr. J. William G. Hansen, a leading professional man, engaged in the 
practice of veterinary medicine, surgery and dentistry, at Greenville, Mont- 
calm county, Michigan, was born in Fairplain township, this county, on 
September 16, 1878, a son of Nels G. and Karen (Jensen) Hansen, natives 
of Denmark, in which country they spent their early life, coming to America 
in 1 871, and locating in Michigan, where the elder Hansen now lives a 
retired life at Greenville. 

J. William G. Hansen received his early education in the schools of 
h'airplain township, Montcalm county, after which he became a farmer on 
his father's farm for ai>out seven years. Later, Mr. LTansen went to Grand 
Rai^ids. Michigan, and entered the Grand Rapids Veterinary College, an 
institution from which J. \A''illiam G. Hansen graduated as a Doctor of 
\'etcrinary Surgery, in 1006. After the com]>letion of his professional edu- 
cation. Dr. Hansen returned to Montcalm county, and located at Trufant, 
where he engaged in the ])racticc of his ]>rofession for one and one-half 
yeru's. Dr. J- William G. Hansen came to Greenville in IQ07. where he 
is now successfully engaged in the duties of his- profession, having risen to 
a ])lace of prominence among the leading practitioners of veterinary sdence 
in the community. 

On May 27. 1914. Dr. J. William G. Hansen w^as married to Ann 
Kromaim. who was born and educated at Greenville. Dr. Hansen and his 
wife now occupy a beautiful home which the Doctor has erected in Green- 
(i8b) 



2/4 .\i()XrrAL.\r corx'iY. MiciruiAX. 

ville, and tlic}- are anion^- the liic^lil}- res])cctecl and esteemed people of the 
coniinimity. Doetor and Airs. Hansen are members of the Danisli J^nth- 
eran church and take an active ])art in the work and worship of this congTe- 
gation. 

Dr. J. William G. Hansen is one of tlie leading members of the Ancient 
Order of Cdeaners, in Montcalm coimty. for two years having- served as 
secretar}' and treasui"er of this organization, it being during^ his iticumbencv 
in this office that he realized the field of 0])portnnity for his profession and 
therefore took up the stndy in which he has made such a notable success. 

In the i)olitical life of the community Dr. Hansen has taken no es])ecial 
part, preferring to serve as a ])rivate citizen in the ranks and as one readv 
to d(j his part in the ad\'ancement qf general conditions in the town and 
county. 



V. M. WYCKOFF. 



F. M. Wyckoff. for twenty-one years a wholesale produce merchant, 
twelve years of which time he has been at Sheridan, was born in Tom])kins 
county, state of New York, on June 13. 1876. the son of Tra and Christena 
(Metzger) Wyckoff. 

Tra Wyckoff w^as born in the state of New York, of Holland Dutch 
descent and A\-as the son of Jesse AYyckoff. was born in New Jersey, wbere 
he lived and died. Ilie wife and mother. Christena Wyckoff. was the 
daug-hter of John and F.lizabeth Metzg^er, of New York and Pennsylvania, 
respectively. 

Tra Wyckoff and Christena Mctzg-er were married in the state of New 
York, where Mr. Wyckoff was engaged in farming. I'hey were the par- 
ents of four children: T.oa ?>., in Greenville; F. M.; George T... who resides 
in Milwaukee. Wisconsin, and Jesse F., a resident of Greenville. Before 
his marriage to Christena Metzg-er. Mr. AYyckofif was married to Jidia .Ann 
Newman and to this union ten children were bom: John, T.evi, A. J., and 
Henry, all of whom are deceased: W. O., at one time president of the T^em- 
ing-ton Typewriter Comj)any; Julia, the wife of Thompson ATetzg-cr, of 
New A^ork state: Alvin. of PTarbor Springs. New York; C. H., at .Aurora, 
New A^ork, was the originator of the AAVckofif strain of Single Comb White 
Feg-horn chickens: Susan, the wife of F. ATetzger, and Sylvester Wyckoff, 
Iwth of New A'ork. 

Tra Wyckoff died in 1(884. when the son. F. AT., was but eight years 



MONTCALM COLXTY, MICHIGAN. 275 

ot age The next year the widow and the children came to Greenville, 
where slie has since made her home. V. M. Wyckoff entered school at his 
!iew home and completed the ninth-year course, after Avhich he l^cgan to 
work. At the age of eighteen he began operations on the potato market, 
lie showed keen and intelligent knowledge of the business, almost from the 
first. I'y close application to business and noting each detail of the trade 
he soon became proficient in the buying and selling and the handling of his 
products. 

On Se]Ueml>er lo. iSg6. I'. M. Wyckoff was united in marriage to 
(."aroline .\. Wittkop]), the daughter of William and Minnie W'ittkopi), all 
of whom are nati\es of (iermany, and came to Montc"Um county when 
("aroline was l;)Ut two years old. To this union the following children have 
lieen born : .\insworth, a young man of eighteen years and with his father 
in business; Howard 1'^.., twcKe years of age: William dale, ten years old; 
.Marion C, six years old, and Frank ^J., Jr., two years of age. 

b'ratcrnally. Air. Wyckoff is a member of Cam]) No. 7312, Modern 
Woodmen of .\merica. Tie and his family are members of the (jcrman 
Lutheran church. 



f:i)WlX v.. AIOFI" \TT. 

iMlwin 1'^. Molfatt, manager of the lline J. umber Company, and a man 
pnjminent in the citizenship of Sheridan, Montcalm county, Michigan, wa.s 
born in Stanton, Michigan, on June 7, 1X67, a son of J. L. and Julia ((iould) 
-Moffatt. 

J. I.. Moffatt was born at Lock|)ort. New \'ork, where he grew to 
maturity and where he learned the trade of a shoemaker, an occupation 
which Mr. .Moffatt followed in .New ^'ork state until 1862, when he enlisted 
for service in the Civil War, and was a soldier in various campaigns utitil 
the vear 1865, ^^'^i^'n ^ic was discharged at the end of the war. After the 
close of the Civil War, J. I.. Moffatt came to his family, who were with 
relati\es at Stanton, Alontcalm county, Michigan, and here the elder Mof- 
fatt followed his trade of a sluKMuaker for many years, after which he 
l>ecame a carjxfnter and builder, a business which he followed at Stanton. 
Montcalm county, and thereabout, until 1883. when, with his family, Mr. 
Aloffatt moved to Evergreen townshi]) and purchased forty acres of land 
which he cultivated mitil 1888, and then moved to Greenville, where he 
lived until his death, on May 2/, igii. J. L. Moffatt was buried on 



2/0 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

Memorial Day and his funeral was conducted by the Greenville Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, a detail from which acted as an escort to the grave. 
J. T.. Moffatt is survived by his wife, who lives at Greenville, and by five 
children: I'Yed, a newspaper man of Oreckenridj^e, Michigan; h>ank, a 
merchant tailor, of IX^troit, Michioan; Kdwin K., the subject of this sketch; 
W. G.. of Greenville. Montcalm county, and Roy Layton, who lives with 
his mother at Greenville. 1"wo children. Bertie and Lola, are deceased. 

iulvvin JO. Moifatt recei\ed his education in the Montcalm county 
comnujn schools and at the high school of Stanton, after which he lived at 
home and worked wn'th his father until twenty-two vears of age. when Mr. 
Moffatt learned the trade of a c,-'.binct-maker, with James Wheeler, of Stan- 
ton, IVlontcalm county. Later, LcKvin Iv ]\b)ffatt secured a farm in Lver- 
green township, which he cultivated until i88q, and then he moved to Grand 
Kapids, Michigan, and followed his trade for a short time, tlien mo\Mng to 
Rclding, Ionia county, where he was engaged at the duties of his tnide until 
1894; during his residence at Belding also having l)een engaged in the meat 
business for one year. During the year 1894 Mr. Moffat purchased a farm 
located south of the city of Greenville, Montcalm county, and lived there 
as a general farmer until 190 1, when he went to vSheridan and there fol- 
lowed his business as a contractor and builder, a line of actixity which he 
followed until the month of May, 1915. when he became manager of the 
Mine ]>unil)i.T.. Company, at Sheridan. 

On Octo1>er 1:5, 1888, lulwin i^. .Moffatt was married to Anna Griggs, 
who was born in (Ontario, ( !anada, a daughter of George and Mary Griggs, 
who came to Michigan from their home in Canada. To the marriage of 
I^dwin P.. and ./\nna Moffatt have been born four children : Flarrv W., 
who lives at home: (loldie. who. alter graduating from high school, 1)ecamc 
a student of music at Chicago, Illinois, and h>ed and Frank, wdio are attend- 
ing school in Montcalm county, the former in high school, the latter in the 
grade schools. 

Edwin I^. Moffatt is prominently affiliated in the fraternal circles of 
Montcalm county, being a member of Even Lodge Xo. 87, Independent 
Order of Odd bellows, at .Sheridan; a member of the Evergreen Encamp- 
ment No. 89. Independent Order of Odd I'^-llows. and a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of .-Vmerica camp, at Sheridan. Mr. "Moffatt repre- 
sented his lodge as a member of the Independent Order of Odd PVllows at 
the state encampment in 1913 and he is one of the best-known fraternal 
men of the communitv. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 2^^ 

In [)()litic.s, Mr. Moffatl is a I^tjmblican, one who is active in the affair.s 
of his party. Jul win \L. Moffatt has served as a nieni)>er of the board of 
trustees of Sheridan. ATontcahn county, and is known as a citizen of influence 
in the public affairs of this town. Mr. AFoffatt and family are menil)ers of 
the Congreg-ational church at Sherid.an. and take an active part in the work 
and worsliip of this denomination. 



WILT. H. LESTEI^^, M. D. 

Dr. Will II. Lester, one of the foremost physicians and a man of 
l)rominence in the public life of Greenville, Montcalm county, Michigjm, 
was born in Greenville, this county, in the house where he now lives, on 
July 13, 1874, a son of Dr. Lyman B. and Amelia C. (Pulver) Lester. 

Dr. L\'nian B. Lester was born in Oswego county, New York, on 
December 28. 1827, was reared on the home farm and received his early 
education in the public schools of Oswego county. New York. After the 
completion of his preparatory education, Lyman B. Lester became a student 
ai the Geneva Medical College, Syracuse University, at Geneva, New York, 
an institution from which he graduated, with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine, in 1864. In the year 1867, Dr. Lyman B. Lester, his father having 
died, came to this county, journeying from Ionia by stage, at that time the 
railway ending at Ionia. During 1868 Dr. Lyman B. Lester opened his 
office and began the practice of his profession at Greenville, he continuing 
in practice for the remainder of his days, dying on Septemljer 15, 191 5, and 
so generally lo\'ed and esteemed was Dr. Lyman B. Lester that the business 
houses of Greenville were closed during the hours of the funeral of this 
man who had done so miich for the advancement of the community and 
who had given the greater part of his life to service in Montcalm county 
and the vicinity. 

Dr. Lyman B. Lester was married on November 25, 1868, to Amelia 
I'ulver, and to this marriage were l>orn two children: L. B. Lester, now a 
furniture dealer and undertaker, at Freeport, Michigan, and Will IL, the 
sul>ject of this sketch. 

Will H. Lester recei\ed his elementary education in the common schools 
of Greenville, attending and graduating from the high school in 1894. Later 
he w.'is a medical student at Milwaukee for two years and then he went to 
Kansas Gity and comi)letcd his medical education in 18^)9. as a graduate of 



278 MONTCALM COfXTY. MICHIGAN. 

the medical department of the Universit}^ of Kansas. Imniecb'ately fol- 
lowing his graduation. Dr. Will 11. Lester returned to Greenville, Mont- 
ai\n\ county, and o[>ened an office with his father under the firm name of 
Drs. Lester (!t Lester, an association which continued until the death of die 
elder Dr. Lester, after which Dr. Will TT. Lester assumed the ]>ractice of 
his father and now is successfully engaged in caring for his own ])ractice 
in addition to that of his father. 

On June 23, igof). Dr. Will TL Lester was married to h'd'fie M. ("arroll, 
who graduated from the Greenville high school and then completed the life 
certificate course and graduated from the State Normal College, at Y])si- 
lanti, Michigan in 1901, after which she taught in the Detroit public schools 
until her marriage. To the marrhige of Will H. and Effie C. Lester have 
been horn two children: Eileen E., horn in 1911, and Wilma A., born in 

1915- 

Dr. Lester has been active in the public and official life of Greenville, 
having served two terms as a memlx^r of the city council and now is chair- 
man of the board of health. Tn politics, Dr. Lester is a Republican. 

I">aternally. Dr. Will IT Lester is a meml)er of Greenville Lodge No. 
<;(), h'ree and .Accepted IMasons ; is a member of Cha])ter No. 79. Royal .\rch 
Vla.sons, and of the Ionia council; he is a member of the Greenville Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, and of LeRoy Lodge No. 9, Benevolent and Protectixe 
Order of Elks, at Tonia. Dr. Lester as a progressive physician is also a 
member of the Montcalm Medical Society, of the Michigan State Medical 
Association and of the .American Medical .Association. Tie is a medical 
examiner for a number of old line instu'ance companies. 



J. W. TAYLOR. 



.\s a resident of Montcalm county, Alichigan, for a period covering 
almost fifty years, during which he has l)een closely identified with the farm 
interests of the community in which he lives, J. W. Taylor can rightfully 
he looked upon as an authority on all branches of rural economy touching 
the section of the state in which he resides. J. W. Taylor is a native of 
Canada, having V)een born twenty-eight miles from Ottawa, Ontario, on 
.\ugust 19, 1861. Idis parents were Robert and Elizalwth CJ'aylor) Tay- 
lor, the former of whom was born in the very same house which was the 
birthplace of the subject of this sketch. The ])aternal grandfather of J. W. 



AJONTCAL.M COl.'NTY. MJCIIIGAX. 2/9 

Taylor was janies 'I'aylor, who was born near Belfast, Ireland. As a young- 
man ho left the JMnerald Isle to take np his residenee in Canada. He settled 
jiear Ottawa, a location which at that time rei)resented little more than a 
tract (jf wilderness. In tli;it section of Canada. James Taylor was conse- 
(juently looked upon as a pioneer. He gra])ple(l with the problems of the 
soil and was successful in his chosen line of endeavor, so that before his 
death h.e had ac<pured no small dej^ree of i)ro.sperity. 

Kobert 'i'aylor was reared amid the customs of a community experienc- 
ini^ its hrst stage of agricultural development, and as a child became accus- 
tomed to liard work, lie li\ed on his father's farm until he reached the 
age of seventeen, when he turned his attention to learning a trade, and went 
t(j act as an api)rentice in a shoemaker's shop. After .spending several years 
at this (occupation he returned to his home, \^■here he divided his time between 
fartn work and the shocmaking trade for over a year. After his marriage 
he went to Xew ^■ork state, where he followed the occupation of farming. 
In J 86/ he was attracted i)y the possibilities offered in the agricultural 
res(;urces of Michigan, and came to this state, where he settled in Maple 
\';dley township, of .Montcalm c(uuity. The farm, which w'as located in 
section ^-^o, consisted of forty acres of unimproved land. Mr. Taylor was 
occu])ied with the interests of this farm for a period of two years, and at 
the end oi that time moxed to section 21. of the same tow^nship, where he 
i)ought twenty acres of land, in addition to farming he also continued to 
follow his trade as a shoemaker, which ])roved unusually profitable, since he 
was the only man skillful in that line of work in this township for several 
years. 

The twenty-acre farm just mentioned remained the home of Robert 
Taylor until his death. During his residence here, however, he continued 
to add to his agricultural joossessions until he had accumulated over two 
himdred acres of land. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Taylor: j. \V.. who is the subject of this sketch; G. T., who resides 
in Maple \'a11ey townshiji. .Montcalm county: William E., who passed away 
at the age of nine months, and Mary b-.. who is a well-known school teacher 
and who makes her home with her brother, the subject of this sketcli. 

j. W. Taylor received the advantages of a common-school education, 
and as a young man began his life as a farmer on his father's farm. After 
his marriage, which occurred 011 Se])teml)er 2. 1890. to Annie Althouse, the 
daughter of (leorge and l.i/.zie fSoules) .Althouse, he made his home on 
sixty-five acres of land he had bought near Coral, Michigan, where he has 
li\ed e\er since, with the exception of two years which were s^x^Mit on a 



28o MONTCALM COUNTY. xMICHlGAN. 

nnited farin. It might be stated that the orig-jnal farm has l.)een extended to 
one liun<lred and twenty acres, part of which is located in section 28. of 
Maple N'alley township. The residence occnpied by the subject of this sketch 
is situated in section 21, of the same township, and is in rural route district 
of Coral, Michigan. Although Mr. Taylor devotes most of his attention to 
the lines of general farming, he also lakes great pride in the raising of a 
high grade of stock, including jersey cattle. (K'fonl sheep and Poland ("hina 
hogs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have become the parents of the following chil- 
dren: (t. )i., who resides with his parents and who completed the course in 
the common schools of his native township and later attended the high school 
at Coral, finishing at the h'erris Institute ; luigene is a -graduate of the How- 
ard City high school, of Ferris Institute and also attended the normal school 
at Alt. Pleasant and at the i)resent time is engaged in teaching school at 
Coral; T>)ris, the youngest child, is still attending school. 

fn his political interests, the subject of this sketch is ))rominentlv alfil- 
iated with the cause of the Kepul)lican ))arty atid his loyalty has been recog- 
nized by the niemlK'.rs of the part>-. who have entrusted him with public 
office, lie has been a memlKM- of the township board of review and has also 
served as townshi]) treasurer, for two terms .Mr. Taylor held the office of 
highway commissioner, during which time he executed the dtities of the i)osi- 
tion in a manner deser\ ing the highest ])r.'use. Tn fraternal affairs he is a 
mcml)er of the Coral Grange, .and serves that organization as master. 



FRVW. E. DCRKR!'. 



P.rvie P. Durkee. a farmer and a former breeder of Oxford Down 
sheep, lives on his farm of forty acres in section 10, Ma])le Valley towmsliip. 
He also owns eighty acre of good land nearby. .Mr. Durkee was born in 
Pavilion township. Kalamazoo county, on August 21, 1856. and is the son 
of Jason and Sabrina (TJeane) Durkee. 

fason Durkee was born in the state of New York atid moved to Charles- 
town townshi]), Kalamazoo county, with his father, Thomas Durkee, when 
but a small boy. Thomas Durkee was a direct descendant of the Durkee 
brothers, who came to \'ermont from .Scotland in a very early day. 

When Thomas Din-kee came to Michigan he entered one hundred and 
forty acres of government land, which he develojied and im|)roved and here 



MONTCAl.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 281 

lie spent the remainder of his days. Here it was that Jason grew to man- 
hood and later made a home for himself and family. 

I^rvie Durkee lived in Kalamazoo county until he was nineteen years of 
a.^e, when he left the home of his father and came to Montcalm county and 
settled in ]\Ia])le Valley township [fere the father, Jason Durkee, and the 
s(.)ns hou,i(ht a little farm, which was cleared and devel(j]>ed. h>vie, l>esides 
working- on the farm, did much teaming and lumbering for different firms 
for a number of \ears. and when the timber became scarce at home he 
hauled luml>er for K. F. AA'ard for a number of years. .After his marriage, 
on October 22. 1883. to Minnie Skeoch, the daughter of John and Christena 
( Soules ) Skeoch. lM-\-ie I'.. Durkee resigned his position with Mr. Ward and 
he and his wife lived at the old .Skef)ch home for the ne.xt six or seven years. 
kee])ing the family together after the death of the father. They later took 
up their residence on the old homestead of his father, where thev cared for 
him in his okl age. Here they ha\-e resided ever since. 

Mr. Durkee is a Republican in politics, and held the ])osition of school 
director for his district for twenty \ears. TTc is also an active and inHuential 
member of the Modern Woodmen of .\merica at Coral. 



ORKN A. KOWT. AND. 

( )ren .\. Rowland was born on .\pril 25, 1839. in Ilauiilton, New \'ork.. 
and is the S(jn of Samuel and Lucy (T>rondige) Rowland, the former of 
whom was a native of Rhode Island and the latter of New York state. They 
were married in New ^'ork and engaged in farming in that state, in )*\ilton 
county, remaining there until their death. They were the parents of eight 
children. Oren .\. being the only remaining child. Six years after the death 
of Samuel Rowland his wife remarried, l)Ut remained a resident of her native 
state. 

Oren A. Rowland received very little education. l)eing forced to sup- 
port himself \\hile verv young. ITe engaged in the lumber woods for several 
>ears, later interesting himself in agricultural pursuits. On July 4. 1862, 
he was married to Phoebe Covell, and to them were l)orn fourteen children. 
ek'\en of whom are now li\ing: Seymour, Joseph. Charlotte, Willirun, 
<rusta. George. Aleda. Oren. Tra, (^harles and Bertha The three who died 
were: Samuel, who passed away, aged thirtv-seven \'ears ; William A., who 
died aged two vears, and James S., who died aged seven weeks. Phoebe 



282 .\1(1XTCA1,M C<)( \'IY. MICHICAX. 

(.'ovell was born on August 17. 1S45, iu the state of Vertuont and removed 
to Xew \'ork state when a child of nine years. After her marriage she 
came to ^Michigan with her husband and they located on their present farm 
in iSCx). then- hrst biouse having been Iniilt of logs. The place was virgin 
timber when they first occu])ied it. but it was gradually cleared and they 
later erected their present house The familv are members of the I'Vee 
.Methodist church of Coral, Michigan. Oren A. Rowland being a trustee of 
this denomination. Although a former member ni the Democratic ])art\-. 
he is no\v an active Prohibitionist. 



b;i)\\JX 1). (iRFd'lX ilOb:. 

lulwin D. (jreen.hoe. for the past two years an insurance agent and 
real-estate dealer of Sheridan, and for twelve years a barber, was born in 
.X'orth Plains township, Ionia county, on .April 17, i86y, mid is the son of 
(leorge M. and Marv M. ( (jreenhoe ) (jreenhoe. 

(jeorge Al. (ireenhoe, the son of .Andrew 1). (jreenhoe, is a native of 
.Sutnmit County, ( )hio, and his ])arents located, as early settlers, in honia 
count), after their children were large enough to care for themselves. 
.\ndre\v (Jreenhoe and wil'e, after moving to Ionia county. ])urchased one 
hundred an<l sixty acres of land, which was cleared and iinpro\ed by them, 
after \vhich they sold the i)lace and latc^r moved to Ihishnell townshi]), Mont- 
calm countv, making their home with the s(.)n, (ieorge M. 

(leorge M. (h-eenhoe, after his parents left the home in Ohio and came 
to Aiichigan. remained in his native state and worked for others on the 
farm, after which he came to the home oi his father in Aiichigan and here 
enlisted, in June, 1862, in (.'ompany F, Twentv-lirst Regiment, Aiichigan 
Volunteer Jnfantry. lie ser\ed during the war and received his honoraljle 
discharge in Jtme, 1865. and returned to the home of his i)arents. In 
November. 1866. Mr. (ireenhoe was married to Alary Al. Greenhoe, the 
(laughter of Henry and Hannah Greenhoe, both of whom were natives of 
Ohio, and came to ATichigan as permanent residents in i8r)r). To them have 
been lx:>rn four children, all of whotii are living: hdwin I)., the suldect of 
this sketch; Delbert S., a farmer in [evergreen township; Ornian l\.. and 
Zerah Al., car|)enters (.>f Sheridan. 

Rdw'in I). Greenhoe remained a.t h(.>me tmtil eighteen vears of age. 
attending school in the district and assisting in the general work of the 



AlO.VTCAr.M COUNTY, MICIIKIAN. 283 

farm. After leaviiii^- the home place he learned the trade of a shint^le- 
weaver and worked for Serf Brothers, east of McBride, for several years, 
after which he worked at \arions places, hut always at his trade, until he 
was twenty-four \ears old, when he returned to the old home. He assisted 
with the work of the farm and was enji^aged in the lumher business and did 
some trading. 

On Xoxemher 24. i8()5, lulwin IX Greenhoe was united in marriage to 
Jennie I. l.udwick. the daughter of John If. and Sarah ( (.jreenhoe ) Lud- 
wick. hV)r one year thereafter he worked u])on the farm of his father and 
then for two years he was with his father-in-law in the lumher business in 
Mecosta count v. In tgoT he engaged in the barber business at Sheridan, 
and continued his sho]) until i()T3, when he sold out and engaged in the 
insurance and real-estate business, which Imsiness he conducts at the present 
time. 

To Mr. and Mrs. (Treenhoe ha\e been born two children; Otto T.., 
who is in second \'ear high '^chool at .Sheridan, and Helen T... who died on 
April 24. 1906. 

Mr. Greenhoe is an active member of the Reimblican party, having 
held the ol'lice of town [)resident. member of the council, assessor, and is 
now serving his second term as \illage treasurer. Mr. Greenhoe is a mem- 
ber of IVarl Lake 1-odge No. 324. Free and .\ccepted Masons, and the 
Sheridan ('amp No. 7312. Modern Woodmen of America. Tie is at present 
secretary of the board of education of (he Sheridan public .schools. 



CART. V. H.WSEN. 



Gonspicuous among the residents of Montcalm county, Michigan, is 
Garl b\ Hansen, who, by his indomitable effort, has w'on for himself an 
enviable place in the res])ect of iiis fellow citizens. Handicaj)ped with a 
limited education and forced at an early age to l)ecome the arbiter of his 
own destin\'. he has ac((uired an honorable competency while still young 
enough to enjo\ the fruit of his labors. His birth occurred on January 24, 
1867, in .Denmark, and at nine years of age he began to support himself, 
acting as cattle herder during the summer months and attending school in 
the winter. W hen lie was nearly twenty years of age he was given a ticket 
by his l)rother-in-law, said ticket l)eing the means of bringing him to Green- 
ville. Michigan, on May 13. 1887. Tie then removed to Gowen. Michigan. 



284 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICJllGAN. 

where he was employed in the woods for some time, following which he was 
engaged as a clcris in the store of a Mr. Thompson, remaining in that ik>s\- 
tion for several \'cars. After a short time spent in Cadillac, Michigan, he 
returned to Gowen. and in iSijj made a tri]) to his native land of Denmark, 
where he remained only a short while. When he returned to Michigan he 
accepted a ])osition as manager of 'J^hompson's store, remaining there for a 
period of eighteen years. 

In April. 1X96. Carl F. J lansen was united in marriage to Anna Soren- 
sen, a native of Maple Valley townshij), and they were the parents of one 
child, Hilda, who was I)orn in .Vpril, 1900. Anna ( vSorensen) Hansen passed 
away in 1906. leaving the hushand and young daughter to mourn their loss. 

In 1911 Carl I'". Hansen purclict^ed the hank which he still owns and 
manages, and is the possessor of country property and city real estate, all 
of which he has gained through honest endeavor. He is a niemher of the 
Danish Dutheran church, also of the Danish I'rotherhood. Tn his fraternal 
relations, he is afhliated v.ith lodge Xo. 500. Independent Order of Odd 
l^'ellows, and in his political views he is a stanch Democrat, serving his com- 
munity as ]K)stmaster during President Cleveland's last administration. He 
has c'dso acted as justice of the peace and in many ways heen of service to 
the citizens of this localitv. 



PHOMAS P.ATY. 



Thomas Haty. the son of John and Jane (Scott) Baty, was horn in 
l\'Tih county, Ontario, ('anada, on June 23, 1862, and now lives on his 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Winfield and Mai)le Valley towit- 
sliips, his residence heing in VVinlield township. 

John Piaty was horn in luigland near the houndary of Scotland. There 
he spent his early boyhood and later emigrated to Canada with his jxirents. 
jane (Scott) I'aty was horn in Scotland and came with her parents to 
CaiKida when hut a child. The elder Scotts and P)atys lived and died in 
Canada. 

Thomas i>aty grew to manhood on a farm in ("anada .and on Deccmher 
21. 1884. was married to Matilda I'.. Rhel. the daughter of William and 
Wilhelmiria (Crappee) T^l^cl. The former horn in Montreal and the latter 
\\as of (ierman descent, she having heen horn in Flanover, where she grew 
to womanhood and emigrated to Montreal at the age of nineteen. There she 
met and married ^\■illiam i^hel. Mrs. F.hel is still living at Stratford. 



MONTCALM COl'NTY. MICJIIGAN 285 

Qmada, Mr. Ebel having died some years ago. To this union were ])orn 
nine children, eight of whom are still living: William. I.onis (deceased), 
Wilhelniina, Matilda. Sophia, l^rnest, TTernian, I.ouisa and Charles. 

John and Jane liaty were the ])arents of eleven children, ten of whom 
are still living: Richard, Jane (deceased), Rol>ert, John, Marion, wife of 
(.)liver Jones; ICliaheth, wife of David Ross; James; Margaret, wife of 
loseph Woodhall ; William; Isabella, wife of 'Jdiomas McGorman. and 
Thomas. 

Tliomas l)at\ and wife for two years after their marriage lived on the 
lujme farm of his father, after which they rented for one year and then 
moved to IToward City, where they remained for sixteen years, Mr. Baty 
being engaged in carpenter work. In 1903 they rented a farm in Maple 
Vallev, and in 1()T2 they ])urchased their present farm where they reside. 

Mr. and Mrs. Baty are the parents of eight children, as follow: Wil- 
mena. living in Detroit ; William <and Tina Bell, both of whom died in 
infancv; Marian, who died at the age of twelve; C^leal and Charles, at 
home; Margaret, who died at the age of lifteen months, and Darwin, who is 
in the eighth grade of the district school. 

Mr. Baty is a Re])ul)lican in politics, and w^hile interested in selecting 
the best men to oftice he has taken no prominent or active part in the politi- 
cal affairs of his community. 



JOHN L. PENNY. 

John J.. I'enny is one of the prosperous and influential citizens of this 
section and stands high in the resi)ect of his fellow men, not alone for his 
lujnesty and integrity Init for his i)rogressive ideas as well. He is the son 
of William and Mary I'enny, and his birth occurred on October 23, 1848, 
in Union county, I'ennsx Ivania. William Penny was a native of Ireland 
and w-as the son of Thomas Penn.y. also a natixc of that countrx-. He emi- 
grated to American with his parent'^, who located in Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania, later removing to Union county, of that state. Mary (Voder) 
Pennv was a native of Pennsylvania, and a resident of Union countv, where 
her marriage occurred. Her birth occurred on /\]>ril 22, 1822, and her 
death in b'ebruary. T()04, her husband having died in 1858. They were thf' 
parents of scxen children, four of whom are now* living: Harry is a resi- 
dent of PennsvKania ; Mary J. is the wife of Seth Howard; John L., and 



286 MOXTCAI.M COCNIY. MICJIICAX. 

("lara, wlm is the wife of \\ illiatv. (l\iiul\. li\ini( in L'liion county. [Penn- 
sylvania. 

John I.. I'einn- remained a resident of his nati\e county until he reached 
the ai^e of t\\ent}-oue years, ha\'insi attended the coninion schools oi that 
locality until he was eii^hteen years of a.^e. In the fall of 1871 he remoxed 
to Ala])le \ alley. Alichjoan, travelini^- hy the wa\- of ("hica,i;-o. Illinois. (.)n 
.Mav 5. of the same )ear. he was united in marriage to Addie I'".. I'Valick. 
and of this union two children have heen l)orn : Arthur W . and Mertie .M. 
Arthur W. is a graduate of the local hi.^ii school and of the State University 
of Alichiiian. and is now a prominent attorne\' of Cadillac, Michii^an. His 
hirlh occurred (mi Ma\- 5. 1875, wliile thrtt of his sister v.as on April 20. 
1877. She is a .graduate of the coiHuion schools of Montcalm comity, and 
is the wife of .\lliert l'".de. The mother of these children is a natixe of 
( )hio. remo\ini^- to this comil\- when she was (i\e years of aj^e. 

John I.. Penny and his wife are memhers of the Methodist lipiscopal 
churcli, of AicKinlc}-, .Michij^an. He has always heen \ery acti\c in church 
W(.)rk, as well as in fraternal relations and is a memher of the Knights of 
tlie .Maccahees, in whicli order he carries insm-ance. In political views, he 
is a l\epul)lican, heini; much interested in local ])()litics. The farm which 
he owns consists of one lumdred and eleven acres of well im])roved land and 
is K)caled two and one-half miles from Trufant. Michij-'an. 



J'KK I) S. IM(T<FI.L. 

h'red S. I'ickell, a farmer livino- on his farm of ei<;"hty acres, southwest 
of .Stanton, \\as horn in Jackson comity on Decemher 23, 1868, and is the 
son of I^dson rmd Cornelia ( iielcher ) Pickell. ICdson Tickell was horn in 
I'emisyKania in 1842 and lived there till he was ten ye<ars of ai^e, when he 
came with his jiarents, Isaac and .Mary ( W'illiams ) Pickell. to Jackson county, 
.Michii^an. where he ,i,n-e\v to manhood. .Mary Williams was horn in Luiy- 
land and came with her iiareuts to the L'nited .States when hut a small <::^irl. 
Isaac Pickell was of German descent, his forefathers havini>- come to the 
United States at an early date. Isaac Pickell and wife hoth died in Jackson 
county some years a!4'0. To them were horn eleven children, all of whom 
are dead exceptino- T'rank. who lives in Jaek.son county. 

ImIsou was the fifth child of his father's family and he remained at 
home until 1861. when he was ei<>hteen years of age, at which time he 



.M().\T( AJ.M COCNTY. MICHIGAN. 2^/ 

enlisted in Lotnpanx I), b'irst l\e<^iinent, Michigan N'ohmteer Infantry. He 
served with distinction (hirinf^ the war and was mustered out at Jefferson- 
\ ille. IncHana, in the tall of 1865. lie returned to Jackson county, where 
he was married soon after to Cornelia Belcher, and to this union were lx>rn 
three children: Charles, a harher at McBride; Seth, a farmer near McBride, 
and Fred S. 

The wife and niotiier, Cornelia Bickell. died in iH/2 and on July 5, 1H73, 
ICdson 1 'ickell was united in marriage to Kose B. Mesler, who was horn in 
i.ake count}-, Ohio, and married in Ionia county. Michigan. She was the 
daughter of William and Rachel B. (Beam) Mesler, hoth of whom were 
natixes of Xew jersey. William Mesler was the son of John and I'ermelia 
(Snow) Mesler. John Mesler was a native of (iermany and came to 
America as a small hoy, while I'ertnelia Snow was a native of h>ance and 
came to the United States as a small girl and settled in N'ew Jersey with her 
p.'irents, where she and Mr. Mesler lived and died. 

William Mesler and Ivachel Beam were married in Xew Jerse\-, where 
they lived for some years, after which they were residents of L.'Us-e county. 
Ohio, for live years, when they moved to Oakland county, Michigan, where 
the\- resided for four \ears hefore taking up their residence in Sidney town- 
-hip. Montcalm county. Here Mr. Mesler homesteaded eighty acres of land 
and here they made their home until their deaths. They were the parents of 
thirteen children, two of whom are still living: Rose, who was horn on 
l)eceml)er 10. J<S55. and l^dward W.. of Sidney, horn on June 24, i<S62. 

Shortly after their marriage. Kdson Pickell and wife settled in Mont- 
calm county, where Mr. Pickell followed teaming for a time, after which 
they purchased the home farm in 1875. Here he made his home until his 
death, on .August 10, 1909, in Sidney township, where his son, Fred S., now 
resides. Mr. Fickell was a i)rominent Repuhlican and for five years he was 
a justice of the jK^ace of .Sidney township and was a school oflficer for 
twenty-five years. He was a memher of the Grand .Army of the Republic 
Post \o. 37, Stanton. Michigan. 

I'Ved .S. J 'ickell was married on February i. 1909. to Fulna Fleck, the 
daughter of John and Hettie (Morgan) Fleck. John Fleck was a native of 
l'airi)lain township and was the son of John and Mary (Butterworth) 
Meek, who were natives of the state of New York and came to Montcalm 
county with their parents. They were inarried in the county and here 
niade their hotne tnitil their deaths. 

Jf)hn and TTettie Fleck w^ere the parents of four children, all of whom 



2S8 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

are living: lulna l-eni, the wife of Fred S. Pickell; Cecil May, at home; 
George, a resident of McJJride, and William, at home. 

To I'"red S. Pickell and wife have been ])orn two children: Murl Servill, 
born on August 9, igog, and Thelma Leona, who was born on Noveml)er i, 
19 ro. 

iVlr. Pickell operated a threshing outfit for about twenty-five years, in 
which line his father had also l)een engaged. He now carries on general 
farming. In politics. Fred S. IMckell is a Republican, but lias not cared to 
hold office. 



.\Nl)Kl'.W P.KAc:F (iOODWIN. 

Andrew Brace Cioodwin was born in Ronald township, Ionia county, on 
January 11, 1865, and was the son of Andrew M. and CorneUa (Talcott) 
(joodwin. Andrew M. Goodwin was born in 1834 in the state of New 
York and moved with his parents, Chauncey and Sallie (Hubbard) Good- 
win, to Ionia county in 1840. 'J'he Goodwin family have been residents of 
the United States for many generations, Ozias Goodwin having come to 
Boston from London in 1632 and later settled at Hartford, Connecticut. 
.Andrew M. Goodwin was the son of Chauncey, who was the son of Jesse, 
jr., the son of Jesse, Sr., who was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, on Sep- 
temlxT 3, 1737, and later served in the company of Lieut. Thomas Bidwell, 
in the l^ighteenth Regiment of the Connecticut Militia, which was stationed 
at New York from August 19, 1776, to Septeml)er 8, of the same year. He 
was also a corjjoral in the company of \maser Mills, in the regiment of 
Col. Roger F.nos, which was organized for dut>- on the Hudson river. Jesse, 
Sr.. was the son of Abraham, the son of X^athaniel. the son of William, who 
was the son of Ozias. who with his brother. William, came to the United 
States from I'Migland. The family connection has been traced to 15 19, 
when they lived in I'r.'iintree, bLsse.x county, bjigland. 

Among the ))rominent descendants of the Goodwin family is Judge 
Daniel Goodwin, of Detroit, who was chairman of the Constitutional con- 
vention of 1850. A.nother of the family is James Junius Goodwin, at one 
time a partner of J. PierjK^nt Morgan, who pre])ared an exhaustive history 
of the Goodwin family. 

After taking up his residence in Michigan, Chauncey Goodwin devoted 
the rest of his life to farming in Tonia counnty, where .\ndrew M. grew to 




AXDUKW 15. (;()()I)\VIX. 



MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. jSi) 

iiianhcjod and received liis education in the common schools of the state and 
where lie spent his life as a farmer, having died in 1865. 

(.'ornclia (Talcott) (ioodwin, the wife of. Andrew \[.. was born in 
.Madison, .\ew \'ork, in 1835, and was the daughter of Ebenezcr and Ruby 
.S. (Risleyj 'I'alcott. The Talcotts came to Alichigan, settling in Ionia 
CDiint}'. where the mother died in 1869. 

Andrew l>race Goodwin is one of a family of three children: Charles 
I., of Orange township; Ida M., widow of Robert 15. Catt, who lives on the 
old home farm, and Andrew Brace, who was hut a baby when his father 
died and I>ut three years old at the death of his mother. The brotiier, 
diaries, is a man of much force an<l influence in the community, having 
];een register of deeds in Ionia county lor two terms and a member of the 
board of su]>ervisors for six years, lie is a graduate of the Michigan 
Agricultural College and is active in all ])ublic affairs. 

.\fler the death of the ])arents. of young Andrew he li\ed with relatives 
until he was abinit fourteen \ears of age when he went t(j work on a farm 
and attended school, later graduating from the -Michigan .\gricultural Col- 
lege in the class of j8<XS, after which he li^■ed on a farm for three years and 
then read law with Chaddock ^- Sculley, at Ionia, and was admitted to the 
bar in i8(;4. .\fter his admission he came to C'arson City where he has 
been engaged in the profession and where he has been eminently successful. 

.Mr. (loodwiii is allied with the Democratic party and is very active in 
Its campaigns. lie takes a great interest in all ])ublic afTairs and is an 
inlluence for all that is gocjd and progressive. lie has held many minor 
local offices and at the ])re.sent time is the efficient postma,ster of his home 
town, hor some \ears he was the secretary and later the treasurer of the 
central committee. 

On September 4, 1889, Xndrew B. (ioodwin was married to Nellie Rose 
Klotz, a native of Ionia count) , and the daughter of .Augustus F. and Sarah 
( .\'icliol.son ) Klotz. Her father came from Germany with his parents and 
located in Ionia county, where he has lived the life of a farmer. Sarah 
( Nicholson) Klotz was reared in fonia county and there the daughter, Nellie 
Kose, lived until her marriage, after which she lived in ('arson City until her 
death in 1900. 

Mr. and Mrs. (ioodwin were the parents of three children: Harold 
Klotz. Raymond Irving and Andrew Fred. Raymond and .Andrew are at 
home. [ larold assists his father in the postoffice. Mr. Goodwin belongs 
to the .Masonic order and is secretary of his lodge in Carson (Tty. Tlie 
family are active and prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
(19b) 



290 MONTCALM COl'N'l'Y. MICHIGAN. 

.•111(1 before the death of Mrs. (joodwiii she took much interest in all church 
work. Harold married (iertrude 1'^ .Msaj) and is now keepin.g^ house in 
("arson (."itv. 



jACOP. \\\ DURST. 



Ainon^- the citizens of Canadian birth whose services have contributed 
U) the material i)roiiress of Montcalm couiitx', Michii^an, is Jacob W. Durst, 
who lias followed the (,)Ccu])ation of a farmer here for a number of years 
and whose loyalty to the county in which he resides is of the most insistent 
ordiM-. He was born on October 11, 18^)6. on a farm in I'erth county, 
Ontario. Canada, and is the son of D;miel and Caroline ( Brunner ) Durst, 
both of whom were nati\es of ( "anada. Daniel Durst was the son of Adam 
Durst, who was born in (jcrmany, and who came to (Amada. after his mar- 
riai^e, where his family was reared. The ]>arents of Caroline l)runner were 
also natixes of (iermany, who settled first in ( \'mada and later in Montcalm 
county. Michi.Lian. where thev ])assed away. 

Daniel Durst lived in (Aanad.'i for a number of years after his marriai^e. 
where ei<.:^ht of his children were born. The familx' came to the Cnited 
.States in li^Sh. locatin,^ in Ma])le Valley township, of Montcalm county, 
where .Mr. Durst bought eii^hty acres of land. .Mrs. Durst died in i88g. and 
her husband continues to reside on the home ])lace. Daniel Dur.st and his 
wife became the parents Of the following- children: )acob W.. the subject 
of this sketch; Adam, who died after reaching- tiie age of manhood; Mary, 
who became the wife of !>. .M. lUirt, of Ma])le Valley; Daniel, who resides 
in I'ierson township; hdlen, the wife of Charles I'oss. of Owassc, .Michigan; 
John, who lives near Coral, in Mai)le Valley township; PTank, who is living- 
in Ma])le Valley townshi]); i^dgar. who is a resident oi the place just men- 
tioned, and rearl. who is the wife of (ieorg-e .Snow, of .Maple X'allcy. .Mont- 
calm county. 

Jacob W. Durst, after gaining- the educational advantages offered in 
his natixe county, assisted his father in the work on the home farm, where 
he olitained the most valuable experience in his chosen held of endeavor. 
The subject of this sketch remained at liome until his marriage, which took 
l)lace in ]i<()\. when he moved to the farm he now occu]iies. 1"he farm is 
located in section 18, Maple \'alle\- townshij). Montcalm countv. and con- 
sists of one hundred and twenty acres, eighty acres of which "Mr. Durst pur- 
chased beb^re his marriage. On this farm he follows the lines of general 



M()N:T(AI,M COl'NTY. MICHIGAN. 29 1 

farming, de\oting a great part of his lime to the raising of high-grade st(x:k. 
Air. Durst is a man of high |)rinci]:)les, who lias attained .success through his 
devotion to (hity and his ability to meet the problems of the soil. He enjoys 
a wide acquaintance among the citizens of the community in which he resides 
and is looked upon as a man to whom worthy recognition is due. 

The marriage of lacol) Durst to Nettie Backart, the daughter of Julias 
and Luck Ikickart. took place in February, IcSqi. Mr. Backart was a native 
(d" Germany. The following children have l)een }K)rn to this union: Ralph 
J., who married Morence Curtis, and who has one child. Iris Vivian; Car- 
rie, Ducy, Cieorge and Donald, all of whom are living with their parents. 

In political affairs, the subject of this sketch gives support to the prin- 
ci|)les of the Republican party. Tie is also an enthusiast on erlucational 
affairs, and is acting as director of the school district in which he resides, 
an office he has held for the i)ast three years. 



B,b:R.V.\KD KOK'IO.X. 

Bernard Norton, a well-known general merchant, liveryman and dealer 
in produce, coal and wood at Trufant. this county, is a native son of Mich- 
igan. lia\'ing l)ecn Ixorn in the neighlioring county of Kent on August 25. 
icS/^, son of h'dward and jane (O'Brien) Norton. \xAh natives of Ireland 
and ]jioneer residents of the section in which they lived in Kent county. 

l^dward Norton and his wife came to the Ignited States not long after 
their marriage and settled in Kent county, this state. They were without 
material means, but both possessed stout hearts and willing hands and they 
set about making a new home in the woods and were so diligent in their 
affairs that at t!ie time of his death b^dward Norton was the owner of a fine 
farm of one hundred acres and his family had been reared in sub.stantial 
comfort. lie and his ^^■ife were earnest members of the Catholic church 
and their children were reared in that faith. There were eight of these 
children, of whom se\en are now living, those besides the subject of this 
l)iographic.'il sketch being James P.. a farmer, produce dealer and elevator 
man. of Afosley. Kent county, this state: Charles F... head of the linn of 
< "barles \\. Norton t^- Company, dealers in women's furnishings, carpets and 
drai)eries at Grand Rapids, this state: George A., who owns and operates 
the old home farm in Kent county; ("atherine. wife of Daniel Weaver, of 
Crrand Rai)ids: Celia. wife of Neil Felnode. of l\Tuskegon. this state, and 



292 MONTCALM COIJNTY. MICHICAN. 

Jennie V., wil'e of koy Howard, of (irand Rapids, all of whom are doing- 
well their respective parts in life. 

Pjernard Norton was reared on the home farm in Kent county, receiv- 
ing his education in the district schools of his home neighhorhood, and early 
l)egan his career in Inisiness. At the age of twenty-twt; he married Kath- 
erine O'Donnell, who was hcjrn in Xew \'ork state and who had come to 
this section of the state in her girlhood with her parents, and not long after 
that event hegan his career as a husiness man in Trufant. Mr. Norton is 
engaged in the produce, coal and wood husiness and is hesides the owner of 
the livery stable at Trufant and the owner of the warehouse at the same 
l)lace. lycing (|uile successful in his several ventures and regarded as one of 
the most substantial citizens of tl^at place. 

To f'ernard and Katherine (O'Donnell) Norton live children ha\e been 
born, Lenore, Manns and Margaret (twins). Helen and Bernard, Jr. Of 
these children, Margaret is now a student in the Michigan State Normal 
.'^cliool. Mr. and Mrs. Norton are members of the Catholic church and 
their children ha\e been reared in that faith. The family is active in the 
general social life of the comnmnity and is held in high esteem by all there- 
about. Mr. Norton is a Democrat and gi\es a good citizen's attention to the 
political affairs of the county, but is not included in the office-seeking class 
of ]K)liticians. 



(;b:oRCii': n. maddhks. 

(jeorge \\. Maddhes is deserving of the res[)ect in which he is held l)\' 
liis fellow citizens, for. when only nine years of age, he was called upon to 
shoulder many responsibilities which arc meant for older ])ersons. Mis 
birth occurred on .\ugust lo. 1872, in I'ierson tr)wnship. Montcalm count}', 
Michigan, and he is the son of l^'red and Amelia ( IMerson ) Maddhes. l)Oth 
natives of (iermau\-, who emigrated to Oanada. where they were married. 
They purchased an eighty-acre farm in Picrson township, of this county, 
and removed there after a short sojourn in Dowell, iCent count)-, Michigan, 
making the trip by ox-team. The farm was virgin soil and heavily covered 
witii timber, but a log cabin was soon built in the wilderness, and the culti- 
vation of the land was begim, improvements were made and the jiroperty 
was increased until the place consisted of two lumdred and forty acres. While 
at work in the woods Fred Maddhes was killed by a falling tree. Four chil- 



MOXrtALM fOlN'TV. MICHIGAN. 2()3 

(Ircn were 1)orii to this union, two of whom met. tragic deaths, and George 
II. Maddhes is the only surviving child. 

(ieorge 11. Maddhes was reared on the home farm, receiving his educa- 
tion in the district sch(.)()ls of this comity, hut discontinuing his studies at an 
early age. (jn July 5. iS()2. he was married to .\nielia Johnson, daughter 
ol' Xels Johnson, oi Coral. Michigan, and to them h.'is heen h(:»rn one child, 
namely, hVed i>.., whose l^irth occurred on Fehruary i, i^<-)^], and who is a 
i;raduate of the common schools of this locality, .\melia Johnson was horn 
in i<S75. George 11. Maddhes is a Repuhlican in his i)olitical affiliations. 



JOHf\ RT^VNOl.DS. 

John l\e\nolds. ex-])ostmaster at Trufant, coroner of Montcalm county 
ind for many years a well-known merchant of the pleasant village of 'i'ru- 
lant. where he is engaged in the general jjroduce i)usiness very successfully. 
is a native ot l^ngland. ha\ing heen horn in ^'orkshire on December jj, 
1S50. son of John and .Sarah ( (jreen ) Reynolds, and was reared in that 
countrx. learmug the trade (jf machinist. .Mr. Reynolds remained in his 
native coinitr) until. he was eighteen years of age. at which time, in com|.)any 
with an elder sister, he came to the L'nited .States, the two of them i)ro- 
cecding directix to .Michigan and settling in Greenville, this county. John 
Reynolds remained in the village about a year after locating there and then 
was em])loye(l on farms in that neighl)orho<,)d for a couple of years, having 
been thus emi)lo\ed by Henry and .Moses P)arage. lie then took emi)loy- 
ment in the lumber woods ;md dis])layed such ca])acity for this form of 
acti\ilv that he soon was promoted to the position of foreman and served 
as foreman for ^uch well-known lumbermen as William Steele. James M. 
W'lnte. Horace Reck and \V. 11. Walker, during which time he gained a 
wide ac(piaintance throughout this section, becoming one of the best-known 
timbertuen in this region. 

During his service as a lumberm.an. Mr. Reynolds had Ixeen located for 
awhile at Trufant. in the interest of Reck & Rrovvn. and l>ecame so well 
l)leased with the C(^nditions existing in the village that he decided to make 
his home there, and presentlv did establish his home iti Tnrfant. about 1895. 
and engaged in the i>ro(Iuce business, which he has conducted with much 
success e\er since, being looked u])on as one of the oldest and most sub- 
stantial business men of that village. Mr. Reynolds is a Republican, and 



2g4 MONTCAr.M COl'NTY, MICHKJAN. 

ever since locatiiii;" in this count)- Ikis taken a warm interest in political 
alTairs. In i8()5 he was elected coroner of Alontcahii comity, and so effi- 
ciently (lid he perform the duties of that office that he has been continuously- 
retained in the office ever since, |)rol)ably a record for continu(.)us jMihlic 
service in this part of the state. In TQ05 Mr. Reynolds was commissioned 
l>ostmaster of Trufant, and continued in that office until 1915. the duties of 
which he administered to tlie entire satisfaction of that part of the public 
hereabout which is served from the Turf ant postoffice. 

On January 1. iSSf), John Reynolds was united in marriai^c at Trufant 
to C.ov'A Kilbm-n. daut;hter of Dr. J. T. and hjuily Kilburn. natives of Ohio 
and ])rominent early settlers at 'Prufant. and to this union three children 
were born. Moyd. Ruth and MauVl, all of whom have been graduated from 
the Trufant hij^h school. I'loyd Reynolds, who also is a graduate i^f h\'rris 
Institute, is now promineutlx' connected with the I'uick Manufaclm-ing ( "om- 
])anv, at Flint, this state. Mrs. Reyuolds died on Vugust 31. i()i.j. 

Mr. Reynolds is a member of the P)aptist church and takes an active 
interest in all local g(;o(l works, being a very highly esteemed citizen of Tru- 
fant, held in high regard throughout the whole county. ITe is a charter 
memlK^r of Trufant Rodge N^x 456. Free and Accei)ted ^Ulsons, and was 
a prime factor in the organization of that lodge. Tie also is a member of the 
Order of the Knights of the Maccabees, and in the affairs of both of these 
orders takes a w^arm interest. 



Xh:LS F. R.\SMlJSSh:\. 

Nels R. Rasmus.'^cn. produce buyer and farmer of Ma[)le Valley tow 11- 
shij), Montcalm county, Michigan, was born on .\ugust T2, 1S77, in Den- 
mark, and emigrated to .\merica with his parents w-hen he was four years 
and eight months of age. lie received his education in the public schools ni 
Trufant. Michigan, in which town his ])arents had located upon their arrival. 
.\t eighteen years of age lie was em])loycd in the ])otato business, in which 
he continued for about se\en years, later becoming the manager for several 
large iirms for whom he (^])erated for six years. In (()()2. Xds R. Ras- 
mussen returned to his nati\e land and there met .\nna J. Motisen who 
])romisefl to become his wife. Some months after his return to his home 
in Michigan. 011 \pril 5. u)c>3. she came to this country, their wedding- 
occurring on .\]>ril 1,^ of the same year. To this union have been born four 
children : .\dof, Megrada, Oleva and Chris. 



M().\TCAI,M COINTY. MICHIGAN. 2()5 

Xels P. Ivasniussen and liis wife are incinbers of the Danish Lutheran 
church, of Trufant, Michigan. In his fraternal rehitions lie is af^Hated with 
the Danish Brotherh(.)0{l, the Independent Oder of Odd hYdlows and of the 
Xcw Kra, in which order he is past grand. T'ohticahy. he is a stanch Repub- 
lican and ac(i\e in the furtherance of i)art}- ])rinciples. He is the owner and 
manager of tno of the finest truck farms in this section and has a line home, 
the entire place being a model of order and well-directed effort. 



OSCAR T. F1.\NSKN. 

Oscar T. llansen. well-known elevator and mill man and cigar-maker 
at Turfant. (iiis comity, is a native of .Montcalm county, having !)een born 
on a farm near the village of Coral on June j^. 1885. son of Jens and ^Tary 
llansen. v.^ell-known residents of that neighborhood, who are now living 
retired in tlie |)leasant village of Trufant. 

Jens llansen grew to manhood in his nati\e land. Denmark, coming 
lo tile United .States when Ik- \vas about twent}-one years of age. For 
some little time after coming here he worked on a railroad near Detroit and 
then came to this county, taking employment in a lumber mill at Coral and 
was thus engaged for several years, fn the meantime he bought a farm in 
that neighborhood, on which he made his home, continuing, however, to 
work at the mill until he had his place cleared, after which he began farm- 
ing and was so engaged until about i8c)o. when he moved to Trufant, wdiich 
has been his home e\er since. Upon locating at Trufant he bought the feed 
mill there and ojierated the same irnti! kk)/. in which year liis son. Oscar. 
bought him out and has since continued to operate the mill, Jens TTansen 
h\ing a retired life in the village. Vo\- a number of years the Hansen f.am- 
il\ . in addition to owning and operating the mill, also owned and operated a 
general ^tore at Trufant, but this latter est.abb'shment was sold in 1QT2. To 
Jens Hansen and wife four children have been born, namely: IT. Chris, a 
farmer li\ing neru" Lansing, this state; Anna, who is the wife of N. C. X^iel- 
sen. of Graxling. this state; Oscar, the immediate subject of this l)iogra])hi- 
cal sketch, rmd Martin, who is in the mercantile 1)usiness at luiton Rapids. 
tin's state. 

Oscar T. Hansen was about fwc year^ of age when his j>arents moved 
Irom the farm into Trufant and he grew uji in the \illage. I>ecoming thor- 
oughly familiar with his father's nn'Uing business, which he has continued 



2()6 MONTCALM COIXTY. MICHIGAN. 

to operate with niiu-li success since taking it over in 19(17. In addition to 
his niilhni^ business, Mr. 1 iansen also is eng-aged in the maimfaclnre of 
cigars, several brands of cigars which he mannfactnres having attained wide 
popularity throughout this section of the state. Mr. I Iansen is a l\e])ubli- 
can and e\er since attaining jiis majority has taken a warm interest in local 
ci\ic affairs. He has served as township clerk and is now secretary of the 
local hoard of education, a form of public service to which he gives his 
most thoughtful and intelligent attention, his interest in the public service 
and his activity in business circles causing him to be regarded as one of the 
most energetic and public-spirited young men in that part of the county. 
On June jj, 1907, Oscar T. Hansen was united in m.arriage to Sena 
Petersen, daughter of Mrs. i.'». ^Petersen, of Trufant, and to this union one 
child has been born, a son, lack Mervin. Mrs. Hansen was graduated from 
the Trufant and the (ireenxille schools, supi)lementing this jieriod of school- 
ing- l.)\- a conr^^e in a business college at T>ig l\a])ids, after which she was 
engaged for several \ears as a teacher in the high school at ( Greenville. Mr. 
and .Mrs. Hansen tak'c an interested part in the social life of their comniupuly 
and are held in high regarrl by all tliereabout. Mr. Hansen is a member of 
the local lodge of the Danish l>rot.herhood Society, and is also a member of 
Trufant Lodge \'o. -I56. brce and .Xccej^ted Afasons. 



\LBi-:irr k. ldk. 

.Albert \i. lule. a well-known farmer and stock raiser of Ma])le X'alley 
townshi]), Montcalm count v. Michigan, was born in (jrand l\a[)ids. laimarv 
(k 1)^70, the son of h'dwin and F'ermelia (Hillj lule. Ivlwin l'"de was l)()rn 
in .\ldershot, ICngland, and lived there until nine years of age, when, his 
father having died, he ran away from home and wrjrked his'wav across the 
ocean to Ouel>ec. .\fter landing in Canada, lie had a hard time to get any- 
thing to do, owing to his extreme youth, but fuiaily secured w'cjrk with a 
lumber companv. at which he worked for one year. Fie then went to a 
village called Hamilton, where he worked in a mill, remaining there until he 
was married. He married l-\Tmelia Hill, the daughter of Andrew Hill, vyho 
conducted a mill and tavern in Hamiltf)n. In r868 he nun-ed to (irand 
Rapids, where he vyas employed in a lath mill until 1883, when he pur- 
chased a farm in Montcalm county, \yhere he lived until his death, on 
January 8, Tgi2. His wife had died many years previously, on October rj. 



MdXTCAl.M CorXTY. M IC II ICAX. 29/ 

iS,S_:^. They were the ])areins ot (ivc cliildrcii : f.eiih, who married l^niil 
Wortli and h\es in Kcwanet'. Ilhnois; Alherl M. the siihjcct of tliis sketch; 
l~.llen, who married !'"red Rohinson and w lio (\\va\ in 1S91 : Kva, the wife of 
Wilham Kihs, of (irand Rapids, and Har\ey. who h'ves in (."hicai^o. 

Alhert hi lule received his echication in tlie piihhc .schools of Maple 
\'a)ley townshij) and (irand Jva])i(ls, and was fonrteen years of at^e when 
his parents moved to the homestead farm in Ahjntcalm county. He Vncd at 
home nntil he was married, after which he purchased a farm of forty acres 
across the road from his father and hved there until 1912, when he l)oui[dit 
the old home farm, which contains one hnndred and twenty acres and ^\■]lere 
lie now Ii\-cs. 

Alhert \\. lule was married on March 17, i8<)7, U) Myrtle I'enny, the 
dani^hter of John Pom}, ivf Ma])le X'ailey. To this union has heen horn one 
daui^hter. filadvs .Mildred, who is now a senior in the Howard City hii,di 
school. 

l-"raternally. Mr. h'de is a tnemher of iloward ("ity J.odge Xo. j,2i). 
hree and .\cce])ted Masons, and the K'niqhts of the Maccahees at ('oral. 
Politically, Mr. Ivle is afhliated witli the Repul)lican partN' and takes an 
acti\e interest in measiu'cs which stand for the welfare of his townshi]) and 
county. i la\ini^' li\ed in this county practically all of his life. Mr. Ivle is 
well known and has ;i host of friends and ac(|uaintances throut;^hout .\h)n(- 
calm count \-. h\ whom he is hio-hlv resi)ecte(l. 



OSCAR K. .XI'.LSO.V. 

( )scar !•',. .\elson, successful farmer and stock raiser, of Sidney town- 
ship. Montcalm county, Michii^an. was born in ^'ates county, Xew^ ^'ork. on 
October i8. i88j, a son of diaries and (lanna ((Trimheck) Xelson. natives 
of Sweden. 

Charles Xelson came to America as a yount^- man, and ens^a^ed in rail- 
way construction work. he. a year laler. heinj^ married to ! lanna Grimheck, 
whom he had known in his nati\'e comitr\' and wiio came to .\merica and 
located in Xew York state, where thev were married. Tvater, Charles Nel- 
son and his family moved to Michigan, in iHH^, and locate<l in Sidney town- 
ship. Montcalm county, where the elder Xelson purchased a farm on which 
he made his home for the remainder of his days. To the marriage of 
Charles and ilanna .Xelson wei'e horn two children. John and Oscar, both 



298 MONTCALM COINTV. MK'HIGAN. 

of whom arc farmers of Sidney to\\nshi|), Montcalm county. Mr. and Mr.s. 
Charles Nelson were niemhers of the l.ntheran church. 

Oscar 1*'.. Xelson received his education in the schools of Montcalm 
conntv, after which he hecanie a farmer, workini; on the home farm for 
some veais and later secnrini^' the home place, which he imjjrovefl and to 
which he has added land until now he is the owner of one Inmdred and sixty 
acres of well-improx ed and hiehh -cultivated soil. On his farm in Sidnev- 
township ( )scar !•'. .\elson is successfuil\- en^a.t^x'd in genera! farmin,^' and 
in the r.aisinii- of lari^e (|u;intities of ijood i^rade li\e-stock, Durham and Mol- 
stein cattle. Mr. .Xelson has si)ent the whole of his active life on his jjreseni 
farm. wMth the c.\ce|Uion oi one year, when he was an employee of a shingle- 
mill at r.aui^'^ton, .Michii!,an. 'I/he f.arm is located on Lcni^' lake and here 
Mr. Nelson has a fme home. 

On linie _'<). k^m. C)scar \\. Nelson was married to h'dna ("urtis, a 
daughter of [ames a)id Susan (/urtis. ( )scar and h'dna Nelson are the ]>ar- 
cnts of one child. Norma .Marine, who w^as horn on Octoher ii, 1()T4. Mr. 
and Mrs. Nelson are memhers of the (^ono-rci^ational church in Sidney 
townslu'i). thev heiuij: well-known memhers of this church. 

t )scar IC. Nelson is an actixe memher of the .\ncient Order of (jleaners. 
at Stanton. Montcalm county, and is a citizen who aftiliates himself with all 
movements and projects havinii:;- for their ohject the ad\ancetnent of the 
interests of .Sidney townshi]) and Montcalm county. In politics. Mr. Nel- 
son is a Repuhlican. and his father A\'as also active in that part\-. 



ST.MON OSW.MJ). 

.Simon Oswald is a native of (lermanw ha\ino- heen horn in that country 
on Octoher 15. 184.;. ile is the son of ]ose])h and .Mary Oswald, who lived 
atid died ui (iermany. rhe\- were the parents of two children. ( "arl and 
SiuKHi. Simon Oswald wa^ reared in a (ktukui \illa,ue and attended school 
umil he reached the atic of fourteen ye.ars. at which time lie learned the 
haker's trade, which lie followed until his enumeration to the Ignited States, 
in \Hh(). lie arrived in .New Ynr\< with a capital of two dollars, remainino^ 
there hui a short time and then renios ino- to the town of Troy. New N'ork. 
where he was eniplr^yed on the h'.rie canal for one month. Tie liually en,^a<,n>d 
in ag:ricult\n-e, heiu"- employed by the nuMith until 1871. Me then removed 



MONTCALM COL'NTY. MICHIGAN. 2g() 

to Albany, where he engaged in the l^ikery business, but again took up 
agriculture as a vocation and has since remained in that business. 

Simon Oswald was married to Catherine vSheets, who came to America 
when a young w(jman. and they have been the parents of eleven children, of 
whom eight are living at the present time: Joseph, ( harlcv, Xellie, wife of 
I'red X'.anAllen; (ieorge. .Xettie. Gus, i^^mma and Albert. Of whom los- 
eph. George. I'jnma. (his and .\lbert are at home. The mother of these 
children was born in (jern]any and rcmo\-ed to Montcalm county, AJicliigan. 
with her husband in i(S85. Icjcating near Greenville. Simon Oswald is a 
[\ci>ublican in his political \iews. His present farm consists of two hun- 
dred and twenty acres and is locited near the town of Sidnev, .Michigan. 



JOHN (". la^f/rs. 

John C..'. I'ults. successful farmer and pioneer citizen of Sidney town- 
ship, Montcalm county, Michigan, was l)orn in Herkimer county, New \'ork. 
on July II, 1830, the son of William and Mariah (McKoon) Inilts, natives 
of .\ew York state, the former of German and the latter of Scotch descent. 

W'illi.am b'ults died shortly after his marriage, following which his 
wid(nv, -Mariah, and her only child, John (.".. came to Michigan, in 1835, 
and located at Komer*. .Vlacomh count)-, later moving to .St. Glair county. 
\vhere Mariah iMilts was married to IJenjamin Thorntoii, a union to which 
were born two daughters. Hulda and b'sther. both of whom and the mother 
are deceased. 

John G. bults li\ed with his mother until seven years of age. when he 
became a part of the household of William Garris. a farmer of Macomb 
comit\', with whom John G. li\ed initil about ten years of age. it being 
<luring that time that 1k^ receixed his education in the common schools of 
Macomb county. About the year 1840 John G. b'ults went to li\e with the 
Sutherland famih", (»f Macoml) county, making his home with these people 
for about li\c \ears. after which he started to make his own wa\- in the 
\\orld. working at differenl i>laces in various lines of activity, chiefly fartn- 
ing, until a few \ enrs later, when he bought forty acres of land in Macomb 
county, a i)lace where he engaged in general farming a short time and then 
moved to St. Glair count \'. where he lived for several years. During the 
year i87() John G. b'ults came to ^^lontcalm county and l>ought one hundred 
and fortx-six acres of land in Sidney township, on the south side of T,ake 



300 MOXTCALM CorXTY. M IC 1 1 ICA X. 

DickcT^oii. a place \'. hicli i)ri«,)r to the coiuiii^- of Mr. I'ults was without sct- 
tlenient. the place hcin^ occupied S(jlely h\ a mill. On his tarni in vSidnc}- 
townslii]) .\lr. I'"ults lias ])lacc(l extensive iniproxcnu-nts and now li\es there 
as a successful fanner. 

( )n \o\enil)er f^. 1^50, John C. h'ults was married to ("atlierine \oun,i(s, 
who was horn in Wayne countw Xew York state, on June 30, r835, the 
daui.ihter of Ilarry \'oungs and wife. To the marriaiL^e of John (". and ('atli- 
erine I'ults were horn nine children. se\en of whom are now li\in<i;-: Cor- 
nelia, the wife of josiah Decker, of Douglass township, .\Jontcalni county; 
Mariah. who is the wife of Jolm Trumhull. of Pinconning, Michigan: Ahiar, 
tile wife of John Coleman, who 1i\es at Stanton; Ira, who is deceased; 

.\nnie, the widow of lohn .\datH>, of Stanton; Andrew, wiio lives on the 

( 
home place; Lincoln, who died in uitancy; johnscju, who lives ;it Mcl'ride, 

and I'.va (.race, who is the wife of Seth Pickeli. of Da\- townshii>. Cath- 
erine, the wife of John ( ". I'ulis. dit'd on March 2(\ 1^15. she heing eighty 
\ears of age at that lime. John ('. I'ults, ;is was his wife, is a de\-ont mem- 
her of the Scveuth-Da\ ,\d\(Mitist cluu'ch. heing acti\e in the work and wor- 
ship of this denomin-ition. 

|ohn {.'. l-'nits ha> heen a life-long kci)nhlican. ha\ing cast his first 
x'ote for lohn C. h'reniont, and since that time has l)een an active and inter- 
ested worker in the affairs of the Ivcpulilican partv. .\lr. h'ults is one of the 
pioneer citi/ens of Sidney townshi]) and .Montcalm county, he having live<I 
a long and useful life to his communitv. 



.\fh:L^ li':xsh:.\. 



.\moug the well and favorahh kiKwvn farmers and slfx'k raisers of 
Sidney townshii), Montcalm count}-. .Michigan, is Xiels Jensen, wdio was 
horn (;n the south .side of the Island of Sjclland, Denmark, on March 20. 
184S. the son of Jens and Carrie ( 1 -arsen ) Nielsen, who spent their entire 
li\es in Denmark, the latter dying in 1S54. Jens and Carrie Nielsen were 
the parents of six children: .\nnie; Christiana, the wife of Jens Tlanscn. 
who lives in Denmark; Carrie, the wife of Nels I fansen. of (ireenville. 
.Montcalm comity; .Mary, the widow of Chris llansen. living in Kairplain 
townshi]); Niels, of this sketch, and I'eter. who is a farmer of Sidney town- 
shi]). 

Niels lensen was educated in the ])uhlic schools of his native land and 



MONTCALM COINTY, MICHIGAN. ^O I 

li\e(l in Denmark until \H/2, when, being twenty-funr years of a<^e. he eanie 
lo America with his sister. Alary, and her hnsbaiul, and located at (jowen, 
.Montcalm count\, Michigan, where .Mr. Jensen lived for two \ears. working 
in the mills of the locality. Later. Niels Jensen went to the state ot Wis- 
consin, worked one sutnmer as a sailor and then returned to Montcalm 
rounty, where he was engaged in general work at a number of [places until 
1S78, when he ])ureliased sixty acres of land in section 17, Sidney township, 
where he now lives and is successfully engaged in general farnn'ng and in 
the raising of live stock. 

On October jo, i?^8o. .\iels Jensen was married to .Mary Hansen, a 
daughter of kasnius Hansen and wife, after which they s])ent one \ear on 
a farm near (ireenville, and then came to the farm of Mr. Jensen in Sidney 
towiishiij. To the marriage of Niels and Mary Jensen have been born two 
daughters; T'arric Christina, the wife of John .Mnssen, a farmer of Sidney 
township, and Annie \mcli;i. who lives at home. .Mr. Jensen and his family 
are acti\e inenibers of the Danish Lutheran chui-eh. 

In politics. Niels Jensen i^ an ardent l\e])ublican. and although he has 
taken no esjrecial i)art in the public or ofhcial life of the community he is 
known as a citi/.t-n who has the interests of the townshij) and county in 
consideration and as one who is ready at all times to do his part in the pro- 
motion of the general welfare of the localitv. 



K.Md'l-l W. MOULTON. 

,\mong the well-known citizens of Howard City. Montcalm county, 
.Michigan, is l\al];h W. Moulton. ]>roduce dealer, who was born on b'ebruary 
2^^ 1866. in .\da township. Kent county, Michigan, the son of Marcus C. 
and Harriett (Smith) .Moulton. 

Marcus C. Moulton was l)()rn in Monroe county. New York, and lived 
there until he was a young man. when he mo\ed to Huron county, Michigan, 
and bought a farm which he culti\ated for alwnt ten years, after which he 
<lisposed of his land and moved to Kent county and farmed sixty acres of 
land in Ada townshi]). ntitil 1872. when the family came to How'ard City, 
.Montcalm countv. In Maple Valley township, Montcalm county, Marcns C. 
Moulton purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land, which he improved 
and on which he lived for the remainder of his days. Marcus C. and TTar- 
riett iMoulton were the parents of nine children. Charles II.. Priscilla. Nora. 
I-cwis fdeceaserl ). Ralph ^^^, :\gnes, Mable. Mattie and Hattie (deceased). 



302 MONTCALM COINTY. MICHIGAN. 

Ralph W. AJonlton rfcei\ccl his echication in the puhHc schools of Coral, 
Montcalm covmty, attending classes until he was eighteen years of age, when 
he took up work in the woods of the county during the winter and worked 
on the farms of tiie communit)' in the summer. When twenty-two years of 
age. (\al])h \V. Aioulton hecame a farmer on the home place, living there for 
tive years, after which he Ijought fifty acres of land in W'iniield township, 
-Montcalm county, and cultivated this place as a general farmer for eight 
years. \fter this time, Mr. Moulton moved to Howard City, where he Nvas 
empl(.)\ ed ior fourteen years and then he secured his present place of business 
and now is successfully engaged in the buying and selling of [)roduce. 

On .September 5. i<S(>), Ralph W. .Moulton was married to Myrtle Cole, 
a daughter of .\lbert and Harriet (Wagner) ("ole. To the marriage of 
Ralph W. and .Myrtle .Moulto^i have been born five children: IJattie, who 
is the wife of I'. .S. Woodhall, of Howard City; Lula, ]~red, Richard and 
Margaret, who li\e at home, and Xora, who is deceased. 

Rali)h W. Moulton is a well-known member of Howard Citv f.odge 
.\o. ^2(), bree and Accepted .\Jasons, and is a man who is ])roniinent in the 
aiTairs of the Republican ])arty in his communitx'. ATr. Moulton is one of 
the a])])reciated citizens of Howard City and Montcahu county, his unselfish 
interest and active efforts for the betterment of general conditions in the 
township and county having given him a place among the foremost men of 
the community. 



FRANK P. CHUl>LCn. 

Frank P. C-hurch, farmer and supervisor of Wintield township, Mont- 
calm county. Michigan, is one of the active, pr'jgressi\'e men who liax'e taken 
a keen interest in the development of their community, devoting time and 
ability to all (piestions of vital im])ort. His ])resent home is the jjlace of his 
birth, which event occurred on December 15, 1^73. b'rank P. ("hurch is the 
son of Lucius L. and . Amelia L. (SiM.'nce) Church, who were natives of 
Kent count\'. .Micliigan. and Xew \'ork state, respectively. Lucius H. Church 
was born on .\pri] 22, iS.j^, and was the son of Rix R. and Adelia .\. 
( Prown ) Church. Lucius L. Chm-ch was berea\ed of his father at the age 
of se\en years and was soon conijielled to assume the grave burdens of life. 
Cutil the beginning of the Cixil War he was occupied at \arious kinds of 
work, but at that time enlisted in the services of his country, being mustered 
into Compam il. Twentv-first Regiment. Michigan X'olunteer Infantry, in 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 3O3 

the l'"irst l^^riiiadc ot" the Third Division 011 August g, 1862. Me was after- 
ward trans feri-ed to the l-onrteenth Army C."or{)s, in tlie Third Brigade of the 
l*"irst Division, where he ser\ed as a ]:)ri\ate for some time, Imt was later pro- 
moted to the rank of cor])oral. Among the battles in which he engaged the 
names of those following are tiic most notable: i'errysville. La Vergne. 
Stewart's ("reek. Stone's l\i\er, Tnllah».)ma. I'^dk lvi\er, Chickamanga, Chatta- 
nooga, Brown's h'erry, Alissonri Uidge, Savannah, Axerasborough and Ben- 
ion\-ille On Jiuie 22. 1865. he received his discharge at Detroit, Michigan. 

.\fler the close of the ('i\il War. Lucins L. Church located in Montcalm 
county, Michigan, the date of his arrival being Ai)ril 20, 1868. On b\'bru- 
ar\' 13, 1866. he was united in marriage to ;\melia C S]>ence, daughter of 
William and llannah ( Newton ) Spence, and to them have been born these 
children: Anna IC, Ijorn on August 22. 1868; Lucy L., August 7. 1870; 
Frank P.. Decemlier 15. 1873; Mandana, July 18, t88o. all of whom are liv- 
ing. Amelia L. S])ence was born on August 10, 1840, in Li\-ingston comity, 
Xew York. J.ucius L. Church was exceedingly po[)ular as a man and as a 
citizen and was elected to till ma.ny ]>ositions of lionor and trust, namely: 
Justice of tlie i)eace, which office he held for twelve years; highw^a)' com- 
missioner for one year; treasiu'er for a period of two years; stipervisor for 
I'leven }'ears. and also ser\ed as a member of the ^tate Legislature for two 
terms, under the Republican regime. In his fraternal relations he was a 
member of the Dree and .Accepted Order of .Masons and of the Lastern Star, 
lie was also a meml)er of the Crand .\r\uy of the Kei)ublican and a stanch 
Repul.)lican. 

P^rank 1'. Church was reared on the home place and received his educa- 
tion in the local public schools, remaining at home until the age of twent\- 
three vears. On XoNcmber 3, 1896, he was united in marriage to Rul>y 
Cole, daughter of .Albert and Llattie (Wagner) Cole, and they are the ])ar- 
cnts of three children: Katherine .\.. l)()rn on ]\lay 3. 1898, a graduate of 
the local high school and now a student in the state normal; Harold F., July 
7, I go I, is a student in the local high school, and (jrace L., May 31, 1903, 
who is also a student in the high school of Howard City. Michigan. Ruby 
Cole was born on May 7, 1873, in Xew \'ork state, and removed to Mont- 
calm countv, Michigan, with her parents when she was a child of four years. 

I'^-ank l\ Church has been ;icti\e in local ])olitics, rendering valuable 
^er\ice to the l\e])ublican i)arty of wdiich he is a meml>er. ITe served as 
justice of th(? peace for two terms and as stipervisor since T912. He was 
also a candidate for the office of register of deeds of Montcalm county, Mich- 



304 MONTCALM COIXTY. MICHIGAN. 

ij^aii, in 1914, but was defeated, l^'raternally, he i.s a nienil>er of Howard 
City Lodge No. j,J(), h'ree and Accepted Masons, and l)oth he and his wife 
are nien]l)ers of the Order of the h'astern Star, of Howard City, Michigan. 
I'Vank I'. Church is an active menil)er of the Howard City Grange and has 
been identified with the local school b(jard for a great many years. The farm 
on which he lues consists of one hundred and twenty acres of land, located 
two and one-half niiks east of Howard City, and is one of the well managed, 
l)roducti\e farms of this locality. 



\VI]dJA.M XO AH. 

r 

William .\oah has the distinction of having been a schoohuate of James 
A. (jarfield, the martyred ['resident. William Xoah alst^ fought for the 
l)reservation oi the Union during the Civil War, losing his rigiit arm in the 
battle of iicntonville, Xorth Carolina, on .March 19, 1865. He was a private 
in Company JJ. 'I'wenty-first Regiment, .Michigan Volunteer Infantry, and 
now draws a i)ension of fifty-fiA^e dollars i)er month. He is the son of 
jcjshua V. and Ruth ( b\jN;-J)aniel ) .Xoah. and his birth occurred on August 
J 4. 1H3J. in Xeison tow-nship. IVjrtage county. Ohio. Joshua V. Xoah was 
also born on the same place as his son and was the son of John Xoah and 
wife, both natives of ( iermany. who first kjcated in New ^'ork state, thence 
removing to Portage county, Ohio, wiiere they died, 'fhey w^ere the par- 
ents of eight children Joshua \". .Xoah was married in Lake county, Ohio, 
and remo\'ed to Michigan in 1855. where he remained until his death. He 
was the father of eleven children, li\e of whom are living: William, 
Joshua, Orange, John and i-juily, who is the wife (jf a Mr. Waters. Ruth 
( I'\)x-Haniel ) .Xoah was the mother of live children by her first marriage. 

William Xoah received his education in the district schools of his native 
county, upon the completion of whicii he followed the trade of carpenter. 
In 1853 he was married to llannah (iolile and of this unioti nine children 
were born. She died in iS8i and he was then married to Rohy ( Burl- 
ingrune) Leonard. I'^onr children I)orn of his first union are now living: 
(ieorge V... a farmer living in Ohio: .\sher R., a farmer living in Sidney 
townshi]), Montcalm county. Michigan: Ruth, wife of Alonzo Crane, of 
Detroit. Michigan, and Rosa, of Stanton. Michigan. 

William Xoah is a member of the Congregational church and a liberal 
sn|)|)orter of srune. He is also acting deacon of this denomination in the 




WITJ.TAM XOAIT. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. .3O5 

town of Sidney. Alicliijran. I'olilic.illy, he is affiliated with the Re]>iiblican 
party, though he was a Democrat before the Civil War. Tie is a menil)er 
of .Stanton Post No. 37. Grand Army of the Republic. He has heklall of 
the township offices and always l)een very active in all public ((ucstions. He 
was one of the first settlers of this county, locatinj^ here in 1856, and has 
done nnich for the |)rot]^re?s of his community. His fami consists of fifteen 
acres and is well manag"ed. In the organization of the township in 1858 he 
was elected the first township clerk. At that time there were but twenty- 
iwo voters in the township. 



MARTIN ALT.KN GRILL. 

Martin Allen Grill is the owner and efficient manager of "Pleasant 
\'iew Farm."" located one and one-half miles west and one-half mile south 
of the town of Stanton, Michigan. He was born on November lo, 1867, 
in Summit count}. Ohio, and is the son of Martin and Rachel (Ludwickj 
Grill. .Martin Grill, vSr., was a native of Pennsylvania and his wife was a 
nati\e of Ohio, in which state she was married. They removed to Mich- 
igan in 1868, locating in Clinton county, where they remained for one year, 
later removing to a farm which they had purchased in Gratiot county. Later 
they effected a residence in Tonia county, where his death occurred in 191 1. 
The widow is still li\ing. They were the parents of these children: Mary, 
wife of Albert Jones; Amanda, wife of /\nsell (joodell ; Henry, now living 
in Clinton county, Alichigan; Kmma, wife of Fred Trilliger, of Tonia coimty. 
Michig.an; Martin ;\. ; Charles, of Tonia county, Michigan, aJid Clara, wife 
of John Wright, of Clinton county, Michigan. 

Martin Allen (irill was reared on the home farm and received his edu- 
cation in the district schools of the township, in Gratiot county, Michigan. 
He remained under the parental roof until he reached the age of twenty- 
seven years. l)eing paid for his services after he had reached his majoritv. 

On -March 7, 1894, Martin Allen Grill was married to Bertha A. Slan- 
ker, and of this union two children have Ix^en born : Hazel L., born on 
December 3, 1897, and Mabel M., March 7, 1901. Both are students in the 
.school at Stanton, Michigan. 

Bertha A. Slanker was born on January 3, 1876, in Gratiot county, 
Aiichigan. and was educated in the schools of that county, removing to Mont- 
calm county, Michigan, in the fall of 1894, where her husband engaged in 
(20b) 



306 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

savv-niill work. He jnircliased the ])resent farm in 1904. He has two hun- 
dred and forty acres, one hundred and sixty of which are under cultivation. 
The family are members of the Church of God, in which church Martin 
Allen Grill serves as trustee. He is also a teacher in the Sundav school, as 
are also his wife and daughter. 

Bertha A. (Slanker) (^,rill is the daughter of S. S. and Bell (Percell) 
Slanker. natixes of Summit county, Ohio, and Genesee county, Michigan, 
res|RCtively. They are now residing in Stanton, ATichigan, and are members 
of the C'ongregational church of that town. S. S. Turcell is a teacher and 
deacon of that denomination. The names of their children follow : Bertha 
A., Theresa J., wife of Ed Goodwin, of Jonia, Michigan; Gertrude H., w^ife 
of Jay Kinsman; J. T.ee, of Stanton, Michigan, and Raymond, who is living 
in Detroit, Michigan. 

Tn ]>oHtics, Martin .Mien Grill is an independent voter, sui^ix^rting the 
best men on the ticket regardless of party. 



DAVH:) I.. WATERS. 

J)avid E. Waters has been identihcd with the agricultural interests of 
this township for many )'ears, and in all res|)ects has held the high regard of 
his fellow citizens. He was }x)rn on January 8. 1850, in Grand Rapids, Kent 
county, Michigan, and is the son of Eevi and Adeline f Abel) Waters, natives 
of New York and Connecticut, resix^ctively. Adeline fAl)el) W'aters 
removed to (Jrand Ra|>ids, .Michigan, when a young girl and was reared and 
educated in that nlace. Eevi Waters also removed to (jrand Rapids when 
young/ engaj^ihg in the tanner's trade, which he followed until his marriage. 
.After his wetiding he removed to Kent county, Michigan, where he ()i)erate(l 
a saw-mill for his brother. John Waters, for nine years. He then purchased 
fortv acres of land in .Montcalm county, on which he remained until his 
death on April 24, igi^. His widow still survives. They were the parents 
of three children. David E., Eouise and Erances A. Eouise died in infancy 
and kVances is the wife of J. E. Cook and lives with her mother. 

David E. Waters was educated in the schools of Kent county. Michigan. 
Ix'ing an attendant until his sixteenth year. Eater lie was a student in the 
schools of this county for two \ears. He was a resident of T>o\vell, Mich- 
igan, and for a i)eri()d of two }ears worked in the lumber woods and saw- 
mills of Montcalm countv. 



MONTCAT.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 3O7 

On February, 1871, David L. Waters was married to Mary A. Wilder 
and to this union two daug-hters were born, Addie A. and Jennie L. Addie 
A, is the wife of Henry Linderman, while Jennie I., is the wife of J. L. 
Schinicrhorn. After the death of his first wife, David L. Waters married 
Airs. Emily A. Goodell. the wedding l)eing- solemni;:ed on March 12, 1884. 
I'jnily \. Goodell was born in Sunmiit county, Ohio, on July 6, 1840. and 
came to this county vvliere her education was received. She has been married 
three times, having two children liy her Hrst union, Sylvia, widow of W. H. 
Kilpatrick, and Gcorj^e M., deceased. By her union with James A. Goodell 
two children were born. Ida A., wife of II. C. I.owery, of Stanton, Michigan, 
and James A., a farmer in Sidney township. David Waters and his wife 
are members of the Gongrcgational church and active in its support. He 
is a member of the Knights of the Maccabees and in political matters is a 
member of the Republican |)arty. Mis well-improved, well-regulated farm 
is located three miles west and one mile south of Stanton, Michigan, and 
consists of fortv acres called "Lakeside l^'arm."' 



JOHN A. NRLSON. 

Among the younger generation of agric^ilturists who are active in local 
affairs as well as in their chosen profession, none are more worthy the resj>ect 
of their fellow citizens than is John A. Nelson, of Sidney township, Mont- 
cahn county, Michigan. He was lx)rn on January 31, 1880. in Penn Yan, 
N'ates county, New York, and is the son of Charles and Hanna (Grimbeck) 
Nelson, both natives of Sweden. They were the i>arents of two children. 
C)scar b'.. and John A. Oscar E. is a farmer and lives in Sidney township. 
John A. Nelson was but three years of age at the time of his immig-ration 
tt) Michigan, in company with his parents who located in this locality. He 
received his education in the common schools of this township and in the 
(h-ecn\ille Business College, after which he became an employee of the Buick 
Automobile Company in their ]>lant at IHint, Michigan, remaining- with them 
tor two years. He had previously purchased a farm and in 1910 took 
])ossession of same. 

On March 17, iQCv J(~>hn A. Nelson was united in marriage to Mabel C. 
Sampson and they are the parents of one child. Dale E., who was lx)rn on 
February 14. 1915. ^Tabel C. (Sampson) Nelson was born in 1883. in 
McBride. Montcalm county, Michigan. She received her education in the 



308 MONTCAr.M COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 

public schools of Greenville. Michigan, graduating- from the high school of 
that place and from the state normal in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan. She fol- 
lowed the vocation of teacher both in her native state and in the state of 
^\^ashington, for two periods of three years each. 

John A. Nelson and his wife are members of the Congregational church, 
rolitically. John A. Nelson is affiliated with the Republican party. He is 
also a member of the Ancient Order of Gleaners, at Stanton. In an agricul- 
tural way he is devoting his time to the raising of high-grade i)otatoes in 
which he specializes. His farm is well improved and has a fine Inmgalow^ 
which was built in the sununer of 191 3. A large barn was built in \<.)i2. 
This place is called "'Pleasant \'iew Farm" and well deserves the name. 



K)HN A. HEROT.D. 



.\mong the i>rominent business men and leading citizens of TToward 
City, .Montcalm county, ATichigan. is John A. Herold, who was born near 
Bucyrus. Crawford countv, Ohio, on September 25, 1857, the son of Rrnest 
and Susanna (Bertsch) TTerold, the former born at ji^udclstadt, near Frank- 
fort-on-the-Main, Germany, the latter in the state of Pennsylvania. 

l^lrncst TTerold came to .\inerica when a young trian and located in Craw- 
ford county. Ohio, where he followed his trade as a shoemaker for some time 
and then was married to Susanna Rertsch, who immigrated to Ohio with 
her parents, they being of German descent. Shortly following his marriage. 
Tamest ITerold and his family cajne to Michigan and located at T Tolland. 
Ottawa county, where the elder Tierold followed his trade and manufactured 
and sold boots and shoes for the remainder of his days. Frnest and Susanna 
T-Terold were the parents of the following children: Helen and ATary, of 
Wol.)urn, Massachusetts; John .\.. of FToward City; Alonzo, of Grand ]\ai)ids, 
Michigan ; Mary, who is the widow of George Ballard, of \^''oburn, .\Tassa- 
chusetts ; (liristina, the wife of John Benjamin, she now being deceased as is 
her twin sister, who died in infancy, and T<Cate, the wife of George TTunt, of 
TTolland, Michigan. 

John A. T-Ierold secured a limited education in the schools of Ottawa 
county, after which he lived at home until thirteen years of age and then 
went to Grand Rapids, where he became an employee of a shoe factorv, 
remaining wdth that company for ten years. About 1883 Mr. ITerold opened 
a shoe store at Grand Rapids, a business which he conducted for tw^o vears 



MOXTCAI.M COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 3O9 

and then sold lo his brother, after which he went to St. Paul, Minnesota, 
where lie followed his trade as a shoemaker, for about two and one-half 
years. Subserjneritly, Mr. llerold came to Howard City, Montcalm county, 
2\lichigan, and started a store, dealing in shoes, later adding- stocks of furni- 
ture and general merchandise, lines which he has handled most successfully 
during twenty-eight years oi' his career as a merchant of Howard City. 

On July 14, i8cS9, John A. llerold was married to Sadie Bennett, who 
was a daughter of iNlrs. Xancy Bennett, of Hopewell Cape, New- Brunswick, 
(-"anada. Mr. llerold and his wife are leading members of the Congrega- 
tional church. (;f Howard City, he now being the treasurer of this church. 
Mr. llerold was a member of the building committee and was one of the lead- 
ing factors in the movement for the erection of the new church building for 
this denomination, at Howard ("ity. in 1893. 

In politics. John A. llerold is a Re])ul)lican. having been prominent in 
the efforts of this ])arty for many years. Air. llerold has occupied various 
oOices in Howard City and is a man who has done no little in the progress 
and advancement of the interests of this community. 



MRS. D. II. BAIRD. 



Mrs. D. 11. Baird, one of the well-known w^omen and the widow of D. 
11. Haird, who was one of the highly resix^cted citizens of Winfield township, 
tliis county, was born in New York state, on September 3, 1853, a daughter 
of James and B. (Clark) Snyder, natives of New York state, where they 
grew to maturity, were married and where they lived until the death of 
James Snyder, on October 9, 1864. 

I'ollowing the death of her husband, Mrs. James Snyder came to Mich- 
igan, where she made her home until her death at Morley, Mecosta cotinty, 
in 1898. Mr. and Mrs. James Snyder were the parents of the following 
children: S]>encer, of Manton. Michigan; Mrs. D. H. Baird, and Frank, a 
railro.ad man of Missouri. One child is deceased. 

Mrs. D. H. Baird received her education in the schools of New York 
state, after which she lived on the farm of her parents, until Septeml)er 24, 
1874, when she was married, in New York state, to D. H. Baird. Shortly 
follow^ing their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Baird came to Michigan, and located 
on a farm in Eureka township. Montcalm county, near Greenville, a place 
which was the home of Mr. and Mrs. Baird for two years, after which they, 



310 MONTCAI.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

in 1876, moved to a farm of eii^hty acres which Mr. Baird purchased in 
Winfield township, where Mrs. Tkiird now makes her home, on a well- 
inij)roved and highly cuki\ated farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. 1:1 . Baird were the parents of the following children; 
Merwin, h>nest and Irving, who live in Ohio; Mahcl, the wife of N. F. 
Ooff, an implement dealer of Morley. Michigan; Harvey, a dealer in Morley, 
Michigan; Edna, the wife of Alhert Kohler. a farmer of Winfield townshi]>. 
and All)ert and Harrison, who cnlti\'ate the home farm. 



J. E. McCLOSKEY. 

J. E. McC'loskcy has been identified with the educational interests of 
Montcalm county, Michigan, for man\' years and has fulfilled the trust with 
efficiency and fervor. His i)resent ]K>sition as sui)erintendent of the Howard 
City schools is Init the culmination of past experience and the prelude to 
future successes. He was horn on May 18, 1861, in C^rystal townshi]), Mont- 
calm county, iMichigan, and is the son of Barney and Charlotte (Skipi)ey) 
McCloskey. natives of northern Ireland and Oakland county, Michigan, 
respectively. J>arney McCloskey emigrated to the United States when he 
was twentv-one years of age, kjcating in the slate of V^crmont l)ut later 
removing to (Oakland county, Michigan, where his marriage took ])lace. 
vSoon after their union the}- mm'cd to Crystal townshi]) of this coimtv and 
remained here until death. P.-aruey McCloskey followed farmitig and hecame 
prominent in local ])olitics and held many to\vnshi]> offices. He was also 
active in church affairs and the father of sc\('n children. 

J. IC .McCloskey sjkmU his ho^hood days in Crystal townshi]), where he 
attended the district schools, subsequently graduating from the Ionia high 
school, of Tonia, Michigan. Tie then became a student in the .Michigan State 
Norm.'d School, of Alt. ricasant. .Michigan, from which institiition In- gradu- 
ated and almost innnediately took uj) edncatinnal (hities at Stanton, Michigan. 
He taught school in the \ari(»ns districts of Montcalm county, and wa>^ elected 
su|:)erintendent of schools in Sheridrui, Michigan, continuing in that cai)acity 
for two >ears. Tde w^vs then elected secretary of the county board of examin- 
ers. ser\ing for one term, following which he was elected first county school 
commissioner of Montcalm county, Michigan, serving in this cai)acit\- for 
four years. For eleven years, following his retirement from office, he served 
in the capacity of superintendent of schools of Stanton, Michigan, and was 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 3IT 

then, in 11)04, elected to his present office. He has always been a Rei>ul> 
lican in his iK)litical affiliations and very active in local polities. 

On Augnst 12, iHSy, J. E. McCloskey was united in marriage to Jessie 
I. Collins, of Carson City, Michigan, and a teacher in the schools of the 
count)-, and to them ha\e l)ccn born these children: Grace, deceased; Roger, 
a graduate of the Howard City high school and a teacher in the school at 
Aml)le, Montcalm county. Alichigan; Ruth, also a graduate of the Howard 
City high school and now a student in the Michigan State Normal College, 
of Ypsilanti. Michigan: Esther, also a graduate of the same high school and 
a student of the same college: Helen, a student of the local high school, and 
Margaret, who is a student in the grades. In religious matters the family 
are affiliated with the ("ongregational church. 



ALBERT O'DONALD. 

Albert O'Donald, a grain and produce dealer of Howard City and the 
proprietor of the Howard City elevator, was l)orn in Washington county, 
New ^'ork, June 2. ICS53, the son of John and Eliza J. (Nelson) O'Donald, 
the former of whom was born in Ireland and the latter in Washington county, 
Xew N'ork. John O'Donald came to the United .States at the age of eight 
years, when he was thrown on his own responsibilities and worked at vari- 
ous occupations. He hnally took up farming and was very prosperous, own- 
ing several large tracts of land at the time of his death. To John and Eliza 
J. O'Donald were l)orn seven children, three of whom are living: Richard 
11.. whose life history is given elsewhere in this volume; Mary J., the wife of 
r. D. Southwonh. of Washington count3^ New York, and Albert, the subject 
of this sketch. 

.Albert O'Donald was reared on a farm in Washington coinity. New 
^'o!-k, where he attended the ])ul)lic schools and received a good common- 
school education. He retnaincd at home until he was seventeen years of age, 
when he came to Howard City and made his home with his brother, Richard 
If., for some time. I''or sixteen years he was employed by his brother and 
was very successful with him, Imt. preferring to go into business for himself, 
he engaged in the grain and produce business and has ]>rosi>ered from the 
heginning. He now does a large business in this line and has one of the lead- 
ing grain and produce concerns in Montcalm coimty. 

Mr. O'Donald was married on Jiuie 12, 1878, to Elizabeth Rol)erts, who 



3T2 xVrONTCAI.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

was horn in Vermont, where they were married. To thorn has heen horn (Hie 
davig-hter, EHzaheth M., l)orn on March 8. 1893. She was g-ra(hiated from 
the Howard City hi^h school, later attending- the Alma University, and is now 
the wife of If. V. Wilcox, of Detroit, Alichij^an. who is the sportini>- editor 
of the Dctrnit Times. 

I'Vaternall}', Mr. O'Donald is a memher of TToward City f,od,oe. i'^ree 
and Accepted Masons; Greenville Chapter. Royal Arch Masons; is a thirty- 
second degree Mason and also a memher of the Shrine at Grand Rajjids. 
Besides his Masonic relations, Mr. O'Donald is a memher of the Knights 
of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Politically, he 
is a Republican, bnt has never held a pnhlic of^ce. 



WILEIAM A. BROWN. 



William A. Brown, pros])erous farmer and owner of eighty acres of 
land, known as "Maple Drive Farm," located near Howard City, in Winfield 
township, Montcalm county, Michigan, was lx)rn in Barry townshij), Barry 
county, Michigan, on March 8, t866, a son of J. A. and Agnes (Louden) 
IVown, natives of A^'ermont and of Rochester, New York respectively. 

When a young man, J. A. Brown came to Michigan and located in 
Barry county, where, after some years, he was married to Agmes Poudcn, 
she having come to Barry county, with her parents, at an early age. h^ol- 
lovving his marriage, J. A. Brown moved to Newaygo county, where he lived 
for the remainder of his days and where his widow now lives. J. A. and 
Agnes Brown were the parents of nine children, five of whom are now- 
living: Mary, the wife of Cornelius Tack, of Pierson, Michigan; William 
A.; Edward 1.., a farmer of Newaygo county, this state; Florence, the Avife 
of B. F. Wells, a farmer of Newaygo county, and Guy, a farmer of the 
same county. 

William A. Brown was reared on the home farm and was educated in 
the schools of Barry county, Michigan, after which he worked with his 
father until twenty-one years of age, when he took up work in the woods 
of Newaygo county, to which locality his parents had moved, and where 
William A. Brown was employed for some time, following his duties as a 
luml^erman in the winter and as a farmer in the summer. During the 
month of Octol)er, 1905, Mr. Brown came to Montcalm county and located 
near Howard City, in Winfield township, where he secured a farm which is 



MOXTCAJ.M COrNTY. .\1 If 1 1 KiAX . 313 

now known as '*.Mai>le r)ri\c I'arni,"' a desiral>le and well-improved ])lace of 
eii^hty acres. W illiain A. Brown does not live on his farm now, but for 
some )-ears has made his home at Howard City, where he is snccessfully 
engag-ed in the management of his liver}' and sale business. 

Dnrini^ the )ear 1889. William A. Brown was married to Ella Ter- 
wiUi.i^er, who was ]>orn in Newayi:^o county, Michigan, on March 14, 1870. 
and received her education in the common schools and at the Fremont liigli 
scliool, after which she was a school teacher for three years. To the mar- 
riage of William A. and Ella Brown have been born two children: Clay- 
ion TI., wdio niarried Lola Trudell. and ]\:lary I'carl. who, after the com- 
[jletion of her education, was married to Arthur R. Woods, living- near 
(irand Rajnds, jMichigan. 

William .\. Brown is a prominent meml)er of the Howard City Grange 
and is a man wlio takes an active and influential part in the agricultural 
affairs of Reynolds township and Monlcalm county. Jn politics, Mr. Brown 
is a Repul)lican, being an interested worker in and a supporter of the prin- 
ci])les of this party. 



JOHN C. COLEINS. 



John C. Collins, a real estate, loan and insurance dealer of Howard 
I ity, was born in Ionia county, Michigan, June to, 1856. the son of John 
and Mary (Stack) Collins, the former of whom was Ix3rn in Massachusetts 
and the latter in New York state. John Collins mo\-e(l with his ])arents from 
Massachusetts to Washtenaw county. Michigan, when quite small and there 
was reared to manhood. After living for a number of years in Washtenaw 
county, he removed to Ionia count}' and purchased some school land, which 
lie cleared and on which he put out a crop of wheat. He then returned to 
Washtenaw county for his wife and. after loading all of their belongings on 
an ox-cart, they started for their new home in Tonia county. Ui>on their 
arrival, the}- immediately set to work and erected a shanty and went to house- 
keeping. John Collins lived on this farm until late in life, when he and his 
wife moved to f-Toward City, wdiere they died, he in 1905 and she in 1905. 
Both were members of the Methodist h'piscopal church and active supporters 
of this denomination. In politics, he was a Republican and always took an 
active part in all i)olitical affairs, having served as supervisor of Orleans 
township and as justice of the peace, and always having taken a deep interest 
in educational affairs. John and Mary (Stack) Collins w'cre the parents of 



314 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

live children, Alary, the wife of Charles Bras, of Lansing, Michigan; John 
(."., the subject of this sketch; James A., of Otsego, Michigan; Agnes, the 
wife of Ira II. Clark, of T.an.sing, Michigan, and William H., a resident of 
Howard City. 

John (". Collins was reared on a farm in Ionia county and recei\ed his 
education in the public schools, which he attended in the winter, working on 
the farm in the sinnmer. In 1874 he came to Howard City and began 
clerking in a dry goods and clothing store at a small salary, remaining there 
until the fall of icS/f), when he went to Morley, Michigan, and worked for 
eight months in a dry goods and shoe store. l^Vom Morley he went to Big 
kajjids. where he sta\e(l six months and then returned to Howard C-ity and 
was married. After his marriage, he engaged in the mercantile business in 
partnershi)) with a Mr. Bras under the iirm nrune of T)ras & Collins, which 
arrangement continued until i8(S-|, when they were burned out. In the 
same year, .Mr. Collins erected a building on Main street and conducted a 
mercantile store alone for a few years, when he took his brother, j. .\.. into 
the partnership and later sold his interest to his brother, \V. H. He then 
purchased a farm in I^'erson township and operated it for a number of years, 
when he sold it. Since about l8(/) he has been engaged in the real estate, 
loan and insurance business. 

On .\ugust 3, ]878. John C. (^)lHns was married to Christena j. Robbie. 
wh(.) was born in Canada, bebruary 21, i8f)0. the daughter of William and 
Helen { Ste\ens ) Robbie. .Mr. and Mrs. Robbie were both natives of .Scot- 
Irmd. she born in 183 r and he in 1829. and were married one year after emi- 
grating from that countrx' to ( "anada. Mrs. Collins came with her parents 
from Canad.a to Michigan when she ^vas eight years of age and received 
her education in the ])ublic schools of Howard City. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Collins have been liorn three d.'uighters : Marjorie, a graduate of the How- 
ard ("ity high school and the widow of (j. A. Colbns; Iva, a graduate of 
the high school and the wife of Charles b. Huff, and Hazel, also a graduate 
of the high ncIiooI and the wife of J. W. Pemberton. Mr. and Mrs. Collins 
abn have two grandchildren. 

IVaternally, .Mr. Collins is a member of Howard City Lodge No. 329, 
I'ree and .\cce])ted .Masons, of which he is a past master, and also a mem- 
ber of (jreenville Chapter, Ro\-al .\rcli Masons. Tie and ■Mrs. Collins are 
memliers of Ivanhoe Chapter Xo. 128, Order of the [eastern Star, in which 
she has ser\ed in an official ca])acity and he as worthy |)atron. Tn p<jlitics, 
Mr. (\)llins is a Republican and has serxed as a member of and i)resident 



MONTCALM COINTY, MICHIGAN. 315 

of the villaj^e council of Howard City, and a member of the Iward of edu- 
cation, serving as ])resident of same for a time. He has 1:>een secretary of 
the board of county superintendents of the poor for ten years, and a mem- 
ber of the lM)ard for sixteen \'ears. 



I. CLAUDR YOUDAN. 



.\ ])rominent attorney and well-known citizen of Howard ('ity is J. 
("laude ^'oudan, who was born in Essex township, Clinton county, "Mich- 
i,i^a,n, (.)ctol)er fj. 1877, tlie son of James I^. and Adelaide (Beach) Youdan, 
Ixjlh natives of Clinton county. James 10. Voudan was educated in the 
public schools of Clinton county and later served with an engineerini^' corjjs, 
becoming very proficient in that occupation. He was married in Clinton 
county and came with his family to Montcalm county in i87(), locating in 
the village of Crystal, where he engaged in the mercantile and hardware 
business. Tie followed this line of work until he was elected to the office 
of county surveyor, in which he had formerly .ser\ed as a deputy, and con- 
tinued in that otilice until his death. James \\. ^'oudan was a very promin- 
ent Mason during his life and was one of the ix^st informed memi)crs of that 
fraternity in .Montcalm county, having ser\ed as master of his local lodge 
for thirteen years. To James Iv and .\delaide ( l>each) Youdan were born 
two children, li. Duff and J. Claude, the subject of this sketch. 1-:. Duff 
\\;is an apprentice under his father, learning the surveyor's trade, and. u]K)n 
the death of his father, was ai)])ointe(l to fill the office of county sur\'e\'or. 
ser\ing two ;md one-half terms. He is unmarried and lives at Crvstal, 
where he is engaged in ci\il engineering, also sur\eying at Greenville and at 
other towns in the county. 

J. Claude ^'oudan, who v.-as reared in the village o\ Crystal, was edu- 
cated in the i)ublic schools of that place and was graduated from the Maple 
ixapids high school with the class of i8()7, having taught school before and 
after his graduation. In i8()8 he entered \\alparaiso University at \'alpa- 
raiso. huh'aua. \\here he pursued the scientific and law courses and was 
graduated in ic).)o with the degrees of Ikchelor of Science and Bachelor of 
I.a\\s. .\fter his graduation from college. Mr. Youdan was admitted to the 
Circuit Comt of the United States and, after serving for a time in this 
com-t, returned home, where he remained for two years, after which he 
went to Missouri and practiced for one year. He then came back to Crvstal 



3l6 .MUXTCALM COL-XTY. MJCIITGAN. 

and was deputy surveyor of. Montcalm county for two years, at the same 
time practicing' law at Crystal. l)Ut. in i()o6, moved to Howard City, where 
he has ])racticed e\er since. He was elected prosecutor of Montcalm 
county in 1913 and served in this capacity during the years 1913 and 1914. 

In j()02 j. (Claude \'oudan was married to Blanche ]3aun, of Edgar 
count\. Illinois. She is a graduate of the normal course of Valparaiso Uni- 
versity and. before her marriage, was a teacher in the public schools. To 
this union has been jjorn one son, James Weaver, who was born on August 
8, 1912. 

J.ike his fath.er, VI r. ^'oudan is very prominent in Masonic circles in 
this county, being a meml)er of Howard City Lodge Xo. 329. l^Yee and 
A'-ce[)ted Alasons, of \\ hicli he is a ]>ast master, and is also a past master of 
Alt. (jilead Lodge Xo. 2(S5, at Crystal. When Mr. Youdan was initiated 
into the blue lodge his master mason's degree was conferred upon him by 
his father, lie is also a member of Stant(.)n Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; 
a member of the thirty-second degree at (Jrand Rapids, and a member of 
the Xobles of the Mystic .Shrine. In politics, Mr. Youdan is a lve[)ublican 
and lias always taken an acti\e interest in all )>olitical affairs, having held 
\arious public offices. Air. Youdan is a progressive, pul)lic-sj)irited citizen 
and takes a keen interest in all public measures which are for the advance- 
ment of his citv. county or state. 



ORLAXDO J. KX.XLI'. 



Orlando J. Kna])p. retired merchant, ex-official, and a man prominent 
in public and fraternal life of Lloward City, MontcaJm county, Michigan, 
was born in I'ierrepont township, St. J.awrence county, New York, on Janu- 
ar}' 3, i<S38, a son of Lsaac P. and Margaret (Chase) Knai>p, natives of 
New York state, in which commonwealth the elder Knapp syxiiit his entire 
life as a farmer. Lsaac V. and Margaret Knapp were the parents of eight 
children, the subject of this sketch l)eing the only one now living. 

Orlando L Knapp received his education in the district schools of New 
York state, where he attended classes until he was eighteen years 'of age, 
and then, one year later, he moved to the state of Indiana and located in 
Steuben county, a place which was the home of Mr. Knapp until 1862, 
when he enlisted in Company B, Twelfth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, with which command Orlando J. Knapp served, as a part of the 



MON'TCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN, 317 

.innies of (iencrals (rrant and Sherman, until the end of the war. (hn-injj; 
his ])eriod of service takings;" ];)art in many enga<^cments, among" which was a 
part in the siege of N'icksbnrg. 

Following his release from military service, at the close of the war. 
( )rlando J. Knai>]) returned to New ^'ork state, where he remained until 
1871, and then came to Michigan, locating at Howard City, Alontcaim 
count)', where he engaged in the manufacture of wooden eave troughs, for 
some time and then later, after having reco\'ered from tlie effects of failing 
health. Mr. Knapp engaged in tlie grocer\' and jirovision business, shf)rt1y 
afterward erecting the business block which now f)ears his name in Ibnvard 
t'ity. After some years as a successful business man. Air. Kna])p retired 
from active business ])ursuits and ncjw lives a (juiet life at his home in 
Ibnvard City, in which he has an honored and esteemed place. In addition 
lo his business life at iJoAvard C'it)', Mr. Knapj). during his acti\"e days. 
ac(|uired a farm of one hinidred and ten acres, in Montcalm county, a place 
which is among the most desirable farms of the community. 

Orlando J. Knap]) was married to Armina C. luhnunds. of Steuber. 
county. Indiana, and to this marriage were born two children, one daughter, 
who is deceased, and James M. Knap]), who. after the death of his mother, 
in 1862, wris cared for by a faniily of Steuben county. Indiana, during the 
iij7ie ^vhen his father was ser\'ing- as a soldier of the Civil War. Later. 
James TI. Kna])]) went to i\lichigan. atul joined his father at Howard Citv, 
afterward securing a farm in Win^ield township. Montcalm county, where 
he now is successfully engaged in general agricultural pursuits. 

Orlando J. Kna]>p has been consi)icuously affiliated with the oflicial life 
of Howard City, and Reynolds townshi]:), at various times, from January 
20, 1890. to the year 1903, having been ])ostmaster of TTow^ard City, and at 
an earlier time served Reynolds towaiship as treasurer and also as highway 
comnn'ssioner. Mr. Knapp is an ardent Republican and has served as chair- 
man of the Republican county central committee. 

I^'raternally, Orlando J. Knapp is a member of Howard Citv T.odge No. 
329, h^ree and Accepted Masons, and is a charter member and ])ast com- 
mander of the Grand .Army of the [Republic Post Xo. 252, at Howard Citv. 

Mr. Kna]))> is one of the honored men and highly esteemed citizens of 
How.ard City and ?^Iontca1m county, his unselfish devotion to the com- 
munity and his efforts for tlie advancement of the locality and its various 
interests having won for him an enviable place in the roll of valued citizens 
of Afontcalm county. 



3l8 MONTCALM COINTY. MICHIGAN. 

RICHARD BANXEN. 

Richard liauiicii was Ijoni on .\i>ril 2, 1840, in County Wentworth, 
Ontario. Canada, and is tlic son of l^dward and Catherine (Traner) r^annen. 
luUvard liannen was a native of ("ounty Meath. Ireland, removing to Can- 
achi some years hiter where he remained until death, following- the vocation 
■of farmer as his life's work. Catherine {'I'raner) liannen was a native of 
Dundas, (jntario, Canada, and A\as the daughter of James Traner who 
immigrated from Ireland. They were the parents of eight children, nearly 
all of whom were educated in the home under the |)rivate instruction of the 
\'illage school teacher, who was engaged to visit the home of evenings. 

Richard l)amien was never fond of his hooks and, as the school was 
three miles distant, he received the advantage of home instruction and thereby 
gained a good laiowledge of the ])rinci|)al things which every child should 
l)e taught, llis initial training in work was received in the woods of C.'an- 
ada, and he was employed by one man for more than twenty x'cars in this 
capacity, saving the sum of three thousand three hundred and thirty dol- 
lars diu'ing the time of service. He was engaged at ten dollars per month 
which w^as later increased to twehe dollars, and from this to twenty-six. 
after he had become a foreman. In iHyb. he was ai>pointed t(^ serve as 
I)ailift' of the foiu^th di\'isi(;n of the county court of Wentworth, Ontario, 
Canada, the office being similar to our office of sheriff, and he held this ofhce 
for a ])eriod of f(jm"teen years. .Shortly after his arrival in IMne township. 
Montcalm count)-, in 1885, he jnu'chased eighty acres of cut-o\er timber land 
fnjni which the stumps and undergrowth had to be removed before cultiva- 
tion could take place. Seventy acres of this ])ro])orty has been cleared and 
])Ut under a high state of cultivation, and other land has been i)urchased for 
his sons. This land is devote<l to general farming and stock raising and 
is well imi)rove.d and managed. Politically, Richard KaTuien is a stanch 
])emoci-at and, although he has never aspired to office since couu'ng to the 
United States, he held many offices while a resident of Canada, lie is a 
man of high principle and has adopted the Coklen Rule as the best and 
truest policy, and above all things else, adnu'res .an honest man or woman. 

On April 26. 1864, in AVentworth coinny, Ontario, Canada, Richard 
Bamien was united in marriage to Margaret Armstrong, daughter of John 
and Isabella Armstrong, and they became the ])arents of -elcxen children, 
wdiose names follow : l^dward, married Mora Blasdal and they have nine 
children, Cintha, Albert, Marguerite, Ida, Elmer, Myrtle. Thelma, Elva and 



MONTCALM COLNTY, MICIJiGAN. 319 

(Jenevive; John, married Ivosc Packard and they are the parents of six chil- 
dren, Isabella. Gordon, Darwin. Ennice, William, and l>ewis; Effie, married 
All)ert Wales and they have live children, Mary, Ernest, Ida, Ruby and 
Maggie; William married l'"lsie Hale and they have one child, Trnie; Maggie 
married Walter Whitlow and they have two children, Anna and Reno; 
lunma married Albert Roush and they have two children. Edma and Zora ; 
Robert married Letha Patton and they are the parents of three children, 
(ieorge. Zelda and Eila. After his wife's death Robert I^annen married 
Cliarlottc A\'ray; Herbert married Myrtle Sissman and they have one child, 
[{stella; Roy married hdossy Mct^onnell and they ha\e two children, Elden 
and Milford; Walter married Clara Nelson and they have three children, 
Helen. Otto and Eioyd ; rsabcllc married George Roush who is now deceased. 
'I'liis family ha\e always been strict adherents of the Presbyterian 
faith and active in the su])p()rt of this denomination. The mother of these 
children is a iiative of County Wentworth, Ontario, Canada, and is of Scotch 
descent, her i)arents h;iving been natives of southern Scotland. Their home 
was on the line between Scotland and ICngland. 



SOEOMON B. NEWCOMB. 

The name of Solomon B. Newcomb has long been an honored one in 
Montcalm county. Michigan, lx)th in politics and civil relations, and his 
active life toward the betterment of the commimity will not soon l)e for- 
gotten. His birth occurred on Eebruary 21, 1855, "'' ^i^ townshij), Schuy- 
ler county. New York, and he is the son of W.aldo and Sarah (Boss) New- 
comb. Waldo Newcomb was born in 1821 in Massachusetts, while his wife 
was a native of Rhode island. They were married in New York state and 
located on a farm in Sclnnder county, where they lived until her death, 
h'ollowing this the husband removed to (lieniung county, New York, later 
removing to (horning. New York, where he remained until his death. He 
was the father of ten children, five by lu's first union and five by his second 
marriage. Seven children are now living, three by his first marriage: Solo- 
mon B.. .Susan, wife of Daniel lUitts, of New York state, and Helen, widow 
of Josiah Alexander. 

Solomon P*. Newcomb was reared on the home farm until twelve years 
of age. at which time he began to support himself by working for his fjoard 
during the winter months and going to school and working as a farm hand 



,^ 2() M ( ) i\ T C: .\ I . M Co U X l' Y , M I ( " F n G A N . 

in the sninnier. On April 3, 1873. he arrived in I'ierson, Michigan, where 
he was eini)I()ye(l as a telegraj)!! ()[)erator for the Grand I'iapids & Indiana 
railroad. On X(jvcnil)er 29, 1H73. he was promoted to hll the position as 
agent and o])erator, which position he held for twenty-seven years. He 
entered the political life of the connty and was elected to serve as register 
of deeds for two terms, lie was appointed as postmaster at IMerson, and 
his third a])])ointment was dated Septemlier 3. 1905. and on Angnst 22. 
10^14, he took the civil service examination and w^as i)ernianently aj)|K)inted 
to (ill tlie j)osition which he had so al:)ly held on previous occasions. 

Solomon B. Xewcoml) has, hy his well-directed efforts, acfpiired some 
proi)erty, being the owner of fivt* hundred acres of land in Newaygo county, 
Michigan, and two hundred acres in Pierson township, Montcalm county, 
Michigan, beside owning town realty. 1'he iwstotlice building is owned l)y 
him. Beside his aj)pointment as postmaster he was elected on the common 
council and assumed the office in f^^'bruary, 1877. l'"ollowing this he was 
elected as village recorder and held the office for a period of seven years. 
Jle was then elected as justice of the peace, holding the oftice sixteen years, 
following which he served as township clerk for one year and su])ervisor 
for two }ears, subse(|uently being elected as register of deeds. 

On August 22, 1876, Sok)mon B. Xewcomb was wadded to ATinerva 
IJradish, and to them were 1)orn six children, five of whom are now living, 
namely: Charles B., a graduate of the .schools of Pierson and Howard 
Oity and of the Michigan State University at Ann Arl)or, graduating from 
the latter institution as a dentist; George W.. a grachiale of the Pierson 
and Howard Gity high schools and now em])loyed as a conductor on an 
interurban railway in British Columbia; .Alice, a graduate of the Pierson 
and Howard City high schools and the wife of Otto Swanton ; Ethel and 
Mary, both of whom are graduates of the local high school, the Stanton 
normal and the music and drawing department of the Ferris Institute, of 
Big Rapids, Michigan. 



NOBLE W. MILLER. M. D. 

Dr. Noble \V. Miller, one of the leading professional men engaged in 
the practice of medicine and surgery, at Howard City, Montcalm county, 
Michigan, was born in Chicago, Illinois, on Octol>er 3, 1882, the son of 
William E. and Sophia (Kueker) Miller. 

William Iv Miller was born near Evansville, Indiana, the son of Jacob 



MONTCAI.M COUNTY. MlCEllGAN. 32I 

Miller and wile, natives of Geriiiaiiy, who, following their marriage came 
[() America, where Jacoh Miller engaged in the duties of a minister of the 
Lutheran Evangelical church at various places, until his death, which 
' occurred while he \\ as a minister located at Dayton, Ohio. When twenty- 
!i\e Acars of age, William !^^ Miller went to Chicago, wdiere he was mar- 
ried and where he took up the study of medicine and surgery, graduating 
from the (diicago College of Physicians and Surgeons, in 1887, after which 
lie eng;iged in the duties of his profession, a line of activity in wdiich he is 
vvi engaged. Dr. William \i. and Sophia Miller are the parents of four 
children, who grew to maturity, tv.^o of whom are now living: Maude, the 
wife of G. V. Dohman. of Chicago; Noble W., of this sketch; Jessie 
(d.eceased), who was the wife of B}ron W^ilson, of Chicago, and .Arthur, 
who died when two years of age. 

Xoble W. .Miller recei\ed his early education in the public schools of 
his cornmunity, after which he attended high school for about two and one- 
half years and tlicn he became a student at vSt. John's Military Academy, at 
nelafield, Wisconsin, a school which Doctor Miller attended for three years. 
\fter the comijletion of his prejjaratory education Doctor Miller went to 
( hicago, Illinois, and entered the Chicago College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, from which he graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, in 
[()(;(). Then Dr. .Miller went to (irand Rapids, Michigan, where he served 
:i> house ])hvsician at the Butterworth Ilosi)ital, during the years TQ06-07. 
Later, Dr. Aliller went to Cuba, Illinois, where he practiced his ])rofession 
until 1912, and then came to llouard 'City, Montcalm county, at which place 
he now is successfully engaged in the duties of his profession. 

Dr. Miller has taken an active part in the official life of Reynolds town- 
hip and Howard Ciiw now serving as health officer, a position which he 
has (KX'upied in a most al.ile rmd efficient manner for more than two years. 
Li i)olitics. Dr. Miller is a Re])ul)lican. 

On November 2^, i()oS. Dr. Miller was married to l\lal>cl Butler, wdio 
\\as born in London, Ontario. Canada, of English and Scotch descent. To 
die marriage of Dr. and Mabel Miller have been born three children, Robert 
I'.. Ruth and E.ulalie. 

iM-aternallv, Dr. Miller is a member of I Toward (^ity Lodge No. 329, 
hree and Accepted Masons; he is a member of Howard City Lodge No. 260, 
Knights of Pvthias. and as a i)rogrcssive physician he is affiliated wdth the 
\merican Afedical Association, the Michigan State Medical Society and the 
Montcalm County Medical Society- 

f2Tb) 



■^'Z2 MONTCALM COUNTY,, MICHIGAN. 

GEORGE: W. STPLE. 

George \V. vSiple, a farmer of Pierson township, Montcalm comity, 
Michigan, was horn in Union Citv, Randolph county, Indiana, on Octoher 
31, 1869. and is the son of Emanuel and Mary (Marquis) vSiple. 

Emanuel Sii)lc was born at Osborn, Ohio, situated l)etwcen Dayton and 
Springfield, he being the son of Jacol) and Anna (Brosey) Si])le, who were 
born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and later moved to Clark county, 
Ohio. Jacob Si]>le, the grandfather of George AV., was the hrst of his 
famil}- to come west from Pennsylvania, having made the trip by canal and 
b>' walking and driving a mule the long distance to (Hark coimty, where he 
located on a sixty-acre farm. Eater he moved to Randolph county, Indiana, 
where lie became possessed of many acres of land and where he spent the 
remaining da\s of his life. 

Emanuel Siple, in early life, purchased nine acres of land, which he 
later sold for t\\'o thousand seven hundred dollars and then purchased 
eightv acres close by, after which he and his family went to Missouri in 
1882. There he ]nirchase(l three hundred and twenty acres, which he sold 
in 1897. Mr. Si))le still resides in Missouri, his home being in Joplin. 

George ^\^ Siple remained at home till he was twenty-six years of 
age, when he married Dell Mitchell, the daughter of Ephraim G. and Sarah 
(Zumbrun) Mitchell, l-'.phraim G. Mitchell was born at Morri.stown, Bel- 
mont county. Ohio, and was the son -of William C. and Mary J. Mitchell. 
Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell had moved to Belmont county from Virginia, wdiere 
the .Mitchells had settled after coming from Ireland. Sarah Zuml)run. the 
daughter of John and Elizabeth Zumbrun. was born in Montgomery county. 
Ohio, where her parents were among the earliest settlers of that section. 
Great-grandfather Marcjuis was a Dunkard minister and one of the early 
settlers of Ranflol]>h county. 

George W. Siple and wdfe, soon after their marriage, went to Missouri, 
where they remained for some time, after which they returned to Indiana, 
and later came to Montcalm county, where they now reside on their farm 
of one hundred acres, which they have develo])ed and improved. George 
W. vSiple and wife are the parents of four children: Claudia, Ronald. .Anna 
and Mildred, all of whom are in school. 

Mr. Siple is a Republican in ]wlitics. and at the present time is serving 
his commimity as treasurer of the school district. 

Mary ( Marcpiis ) Si])le, the mother of George W., was born in Darke 



MONTCALM COUxNTY, MICHIGAN. 323 

coxmty, Ohio, and mo\ed with her lather. George Marquis, to Missouri in 
i(S5g. where they made their home in Cedar county. There Mr. Marquis 
was tlie only man who cast his vote for Abraham TJncohi in the county. 
It was there that ^lary Mar(|uis distinguished herself and came near being 
shot as a S])\. .She escaped and returned to Ohio, where she met and mar- 
ried Ktuanuel Siple. Idie event that l)rought her prominence in Missouri 
was when she notihed Lane's forces of the presence of Ouantrall's gang and 
sa\ed the former froiu destruction l)y swimming the ri\er with a voung 
liorse. The conditions being such that lier life was in danger, she returned 
to her former home in Ohio. 



SOLOMOX LISK. 



Solomon Tisk. well-known retired merchant and leading citizen of 
Howard City, Montcalm county, was born in Coeymans, Albany county, 
New York, on September 15, 1828, a son of Israel and Elizabeth (Skinner) 
i.isk, natives of New York state, the former born in Coxsackie, now New 
Baltimore, Crccne county, on February to. 1792, a son of James and Mar- 
garet Lisk ; the latter in Coeymans, Albany county, on May 5, 179T, a daugh- 
ter of Solomon and Catherine Skinner. Alx)ut the year 1830 James Lisk, 
with his family, moved to T.yons, Wayne county, Ncw^ Y^ork, where they 
lived about one year and, in 1831, moved to Seneca county. New York, 
which was the home of James L.isk for the remainder of his days. 

Solomon Lisk lived at hcwie until he was eighteen years of age and 
then, with his sister and her husband, he went to Warren county, Illinois, 
where he remained a short time, after which he went to Burlington, Iowa, 
there engaging in different lines of work, among wdiich was the driving of 
a stage-coach and an omnibus for about two months. I^ter, Solomon Lisk 
started back home, stopping at Chicago, for some time, then at Michigan 
City, Indiana, and afterwards at Battle Creek, Michigan, where he spent 
the winter. In the following spring he went to his home in Seneca county, 
New York, where he took his father's place and aided in the care of the 
family. After two years, during which time Mr. Lisk was married, he 
came to the state of Michigan, about 1851, and after a short time in Battle 
Creek, came to Hillsdale county, where he purchased a farm in Wheatland 
township, and where he lived as a general farmer until t86i. Having 
recovered from an attack of rheumatism, Mr. Lisk moved to Branch county, 



324 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

Michigan, and pnrcliased one hundred and twenty acres of hind near Ouincy, 
which he sold after a short time, and then went to Chicago, where for ahout 
one and one-half vears he was employed in a commission house. From 
Chicago, Mr. f.isk went to Decatur, Michigan, for a short time and then 
went to Lawrence. Van j.^juren county, and took charge of a place for four 
years. Later he farmed for a short time and then went to Cass county, 
Michigan, and conducted a store at Cassopolis, until he came to Howard 
City, Montcalm count}-, and entered the grocery business. He retired from 
the grocery business and was an em]>loyee of a sash and blind factory, after- 
wards buying a wagon works, which he operated until he Ijccame a dealer in 
implements, in ])artnership with his son. SoUnnon Lisk continued as a mer- 
chant of Howard City until he retired from active business life. 

On December 27, 1849. Solomon Lisk was married to Cordelia ?>. 
Hum])hrcy. a daughter of George and Elizabeth Humphrey. To the mar- 
riage of Solomon ruid Cordelia Lisk have been born five children: Warren, 
a merchant of Howard City; bdora, who is the wife of Charles Larray ; 
Jennie, the widow of (ieorge Hewitt; Agnes, who is the wife of Franz 
King, of Howard City, and I'cssie. who is deceased. 

As a ))ublic man, Mr. Lisk is well known, having served Howard City, 
and Kevnolds l(n\nship. as i)resident of the village board, and as townshij) 
su]>ervisor for aljnut se\-en }^ears. and as township treasurer and justice of 
the peace. In j^.olitics. Mr. Lisk is a Republican. Tn fraternal circles, he is 
))rominently afliliatcd. l)eing a meml)er of LToward City Lodge No. 326, 
b'rec and .\ccei)tcd Masons, and for three or four years was master of his 
lodge. Mr. Lisk is also a member of the Order of the Fastcrn Star, at 
Howard Chw 



jAMFS BATY. 



An admirable record as one of the progressive workers and rejiresenta- 
tivc farmers of Montcalm county, Michigan, has been made by James Baty. 
the subject of this sketch. He ranks high as a loyal citizen of the com- 
munity in which he resides, and his success in his chosen field of endeavor 
has been due to his own individual effort. 

James Baty is a native of Ontario, Canada, having been born near 
Blantford on /\ugust 28. 1855. He is the son of John and Jane (Scott) 
Baty, the former of whom came to this country from Cumberland, l^ng- 
land, with his parents when a small child. The family settled in Canada, 



^fONTCALM (.'OrXTY, MlCIlHiAX. 325 

where Joliii r>aty g^rew to manhood and where he met his wife, who was a 
native of the Dominion. The conple spent their married hfe in Canada, 
where they reared an interesting- family, inchiding the foHowing children: 
jane, the wife of Donald Tate. li\ed in Canada nntil her death; Richard is 
unmarried and resides in Canada; Rohert also lives in Canada; John has 
Necome widely known in IMerson townshij), Montcalm county; Marian mar- 
ried Olive Jcunes, of Canada; James is the sni)ject of this sketch; Elizabeth 
became the wife of David Ross, of ( "anada ; William also resides in Canada; 
.May, the wife of |osei)li Woodall. resides in Howard Cit_\- ; Isabella, the 
widow of Thonia< .Mc(iannon, is living in i.]ig ivapids ; Thouias. the young- 
c-t >on. lives in \\'in!ield townshi]). Montcalm comit\'. 

James liaty attended the public scho(jls near his home in Canada and 
after reaching the age of manluxul assisted his father with the work on the 
farm. He was thirty years of age when his marriage took i)lace, and at 
dial lime began his independent career, lie rented a small tract of land in 
( anada, where he continued the occupation as a farmer for three years. 
At the end of that time he came to Howard Cit}-, .Montcalm county, where 
lie was emploxed in a faclor\- for two wuiters and where he worked as a 
carpenter during the summer months. Later he obtained employment on the 
farm of Bert Collins, where he worked for eight years. During that time 
he accumulated enough to purchase a farm of liis own. which is the one on 
which he resides at the jiresent time. The farm jnst mentioned consists of 
one hnndred and forty acres of l;md and is located in section 17, M'aple 
\ alle\- township, on rural ronte Xo. 2. of Coral. Michigan. ''IJrookdale 
barm" is the name gi\en to the place, which is a model of attractiveness. 
The excellent condition in which the farm is now found is due to the untir- 
nig efforts of Mr. l>aty to make e\ery piece of work he has undertaken show 
the result of tirst-class workmanship. The snccess now enjoyed l)y Mr. 
f>aty is on.ly the logical result of a life of well-directed endeavor and honest 
|)rinci[)les of li\ing. 

On lulv ro, 18X5, James I'aty was united in marriage to Bess .Anna 
l\oss, the daughter of William and Afaggie (McClay) Ross, l)Oth of whom 
were born in Scotland, but who s])ent the greater ])art of their lives in 
Canada. Mrs. TJaty has become the mother of three children, as follow- 
-Maggie McClay, who died shortly after her marriage to William Armilage; 
James Alexander, who married C;irrie Croft, and who resides on the home 
l)lacc. and William ]\oss. who married Clara Weaver, and who lives on his 
father's farm. 



326 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

I'hongh Mr. l"^)aty has never cared to take an active ])art in political 
affairs, he lias strong convictions regarding governmental policies and gives 
his allegiance to the Repul)lican party. His religions faith is sincere and 
zealous, and he is a prominent and infhtential member ol the Presln'terian 
church. 



JAAIKS B. IT.ASKTXS. 



James B. Haskins, postmaster of Howard City, Montcalm county, 
Michigan, and editor and publisher of the II award City Record since Janu- 
ary 1, 1903, was 1)orn in Knsley township, Newaygo c(Mmty, Michigan, on 
July 18, 1880, a son of James H. and Adella (Moore) Haskins, natives of 
Crawford county, Pennsylvania, and Oakland county, Michigan, respect- 
ively. 

James H. Haskins, who was the son of James B. and jemima (I^aniels) 
Haskins, w^as born on Septeml)er 26. 1842, and when a Ijoy came to Illinois, 
where he lived until the death of his father and then, with his mother, 
returned to the state of Pennsylvania, where he received his education and 
lived until 1861. James H. Haskins enlisted for service in the Civil War, 
with the One Hundred and Fiftieth Regiment, Pennsylvania X'olunteer 
Infantry. After the close of the Civil War, Mr. Haskins returned to Craw- 
ford county, I V>nnsylvania. for about one year and then came to Montcalm 
county, Michigan, and settled at Moores, al)Out five miles w-est of Howard 
City. In his new home, Mr. Haskins first worked in the woods, and then 
was engaged in the hauling of sup]>lies to various lumber camps, a line of 
work which he followed for al.)out two years and then he came to Knsley 
townshi]), -Vewaygo county, in 1866. and bought one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, located in section 1, where he is now successfully engaged in 
general agricultural pursuits. 

On April 7, i8('k), James II. Haskins was married to .Adella Moore, a 
daughter of Jacol) J. and He])saheth ((lillett) Moore, the former of whom 
w;is born in New Jersey and who, as a young man, came to .Michig"an and 
o|>erated one of the first saw-mills of the commimity, together with the 
engaging in his trade as a caljinet-maker. To the marriage of James PI. 
and Adella Haskins have l)een born three children, (diaries Idieodore and 
Altie M., who are deceased, and James P^. 

James B. Haskins received his early education in the common schools 
of Knsley township, after which he attended the Howard City high school. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 327 

an institution from which he grachiatcd with the class of 1898. Following 
his school (lays, he became an cm])loye of B. J. Lowrey, who was the mana- 
i;er and editor of the Ilozi'ard City Record, on which Mr. Haskins was 
engaged in the pnl)lishing bnsiness for about two years, after which he went 
ii) l)ig Rapids, Michigan, for a short time, thence to Grand Rapids, Michi- 
gan, where he was engaged in editorial work for about two years. T.ate in 
igoj Mr. Haskins returned to Howard City, Montcalm county, and pur- 
chased a half interest in die plant of the Howard City Record, this partner- 
ship continuing until April i, K)o6, when he purchased the whole interest in 
I he business and became tiic editor and publisher of the paper, which he now- 
edits and publishes in a most able and efficient manner. 

On Septeml)er jo, 1902, James B. Haskins was married to Iklla AI. 
.Scott, w ho was born at Big Rapids, Michigan, a daughter of Ste]>hen C. and 
ilella (M.unn) Scott, natives of Indiana. James B. and Bella Al. Haskins 
.ire the parents of three children, T\'a Natalie, Elizabeth Scott and James 
Stephen, aged tw-elve, nine and six years, respectively. 

Air. Haskins is prominent in the ol^cial life of Montcalm county, now 
being the postmaster of Howard City, an office which he has occujned 
>ince 1912, and lie has served his town as president for owq year and as 
treasurer for two years. In ])olitics, he is an ardent Republican. Frater- 
nally, Mr. Haskins is a member of Howard City Lodge No. 329, Free and 
Accepted Masons, and he is a meml.)er of Dewitt (dinton Consistory and of 
the Saladin I'emplc, Nobles of the Mystic vShrine. at Grand Rapids, Michi- 



WILLIAM A. HARRIS. 

William A. Harris, of I'ierson township, Montcalm county, Michigan, 
was born on January 8, 1849, in England. He emigrated to America with 
his parents the same year and has lived in the state of Michigan ever since. 
His father, Orlandon Flarris, was born in 1823, in \Vhitehorse Tavern, Eng- 
land, married in that country and then removed to the United States, locat- 
ing in /Mien township, Hillsdale county, Michigan, where he purchased one 
hundred acres of land. He still lives on the home place, where, at the u\yQ 
age of ninety-two years, he is enjoying the fruits of an active life. Ann M. 
( .\Iorely) Harris, mother of William A. Harris, was born on November 24, 
1825, in England, and died on (3ctober 2, 1909. She and her husband w^cre 
the ])arents of these children: William A., Elizal)eth, widow of John lies. 



328 MONTCAI.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

who was a nati^'e of liiii^iaiid ; Jane, widow of lulgar Parrish : T\obert. now 
livino- in (.."oldw atcr, Michi<^'an; T.ewis. also of Coldwatcr, Michii^an. who 
is cn,<;a,^'ed as a traveling salesman, and ilarriet, wife of Fred Frary. 

William .\. I larris received his education in the townshij) schools u\ 
Hillsdale county, Michigan, remaining at home until twenty-one years of 
age. lie then married Catherine ('ain, on Xovemher 28, 1878, and began 
indei)endently to accumulate a comforlahle competency, (."atherine Fain 
was Ixirn on Uccemhcr 8. 1858. in Jones\ille. Michigan, and is the daughter 
of J. I"). (";iin, who^-e family are of li'reuch descent. .*^oon after their mar- 
riage, \\'illi;un A. ilarri- -md his wife remoxed to Nh)ntcalm count\-. Michi- 
gan, where ihc}.- have since remained and where the\- ha\c reared and edu- 
cated their four children, whose names follow: F-eorge 1)., a resident of 
Mint, Michigan, an electrician h\- trade; Ijuma. a graduate of the Pierson 
high school, frou) whicli her brother, Feorge. also graduated, and the wife 
of John K. lUn-ch. of (h-and ka])ids. Michigan: Milfred P.. and Mildred (.:. 
(twins) were l;orn on .\hiy 2ij, i8<)i, and .are both graduates of the high 
school at Picrson. Michigan. Mildred F. is also a graduate of the Ab)ntcalm 
county nornial and taught school prior to her marriage to b'rank Pierce. 

William .\. Harris is a Republican in his political \iews and is ])rogres- 
sive in his agricultural ])ursuits. Tie is engaged in general farm.ing and 
stock raising and has a well-regulated place, which was much im])roved in 
ig04 by the erection of a large. well-e(iui|)ped barn. Mis \\ife is an active 
member of the Disciples church, which denomination the\- heartilv suj)iK)rt. 



FIHCSTFR H. .STFPIMXS. 

One of the inlluential retired citizens of T-akeview. Montcalm county, 
^richigan, is Chester 1 1. Stebl)ins. who has lived in Fake\iew for a great 
many years. 

Chester 11. Stebbins was born in Clinton county, Michigan.. Decen-!l)er 
17. i8.|i. a son of Chaunc}' and Sophia (Pice) .Stcbl)ins. Channcy Stebbins 
was born in Conwav, .Massachusetts, and was the son of Chester .'^teljliins. 
The Stel.ibins familv is of hjiglish origin and the founder of the family in 
America was Rollin Stebbins, who canie over in the early days with the 
I'ilgrim leathers. ( haimcv Stebbins tir^t came to Michigan in 18^4, locating 
in Clinton county, and when Chester IF was but a small boy the familv 
mewed to Ionia connt\- where the father had secured by trade a tract of 



MOXTCALM COrXTY, MICHIGAN". 329 

fanning- land, wliicli is now the site ol tlie reformatory. On that fann 
Chester J I. passed Ins l)oyhood. attcndinj^ the schools near his home and 
receivin<^- i)rohai)K- a Httle better than the common scliool eckication possil)le 
in this section in those early dax s. While still a small l;oy he l)egan assist- 
ing the father in the work of the farm and while still in his teens the father 
died, after which Chester IT. made his home with a brother until the time 
of his marriage. .Vfter marriage, he and his brother, (ieorge, formed a 
])ar(nershi]/ for the ])nrchase of one luindred and si.xty acres of land, which 
tluy farmed together for a time and then dixided. and on his portion ("hester 
li\ed for a great many }-ears. 

('lusicr [\. Stel)bins came to Montcalm county in 1866, locating- in 
Lake\'ie\\, and has since made his home there. (lis lirst business \enture 
was a tanner}-, which he opened and oper.ated for some four }-cars, and 
by tliat time realizing that ihe distance to a railroad w^as a serious handica]) 
to his business and also ihe need of a planing-mill being ap])arent. he closed 
u]> hi> lanuer\- and became engaged in the mill business, ojjerating that for 
>ome six or se\en \ ears. I lis next venture was the purchase oi farming 
lands in ( ato township, where he took U]) agriculture as an occtii)ation, but 
conti'iiutd t(.) reside in J .alceview. lie pro'spered in that venttu"e and at one 
time owned and operated two hundred and tw-enty acres of land. In addi- 
tion to his farming- interests, he owns his lionie in T.akeview, wdiich was one 
of the ^irst in the town of modern construction. In igocS Chester Stebbins 
](racticall\ retired from the actixe duties of life, having- given many years 
to active and useful pursuits. 

Chester 11. Stebl.iins was lirst married in 1861, his bride being Emmeline 
Tike, a native of Canada. Tier death occurred seven years later and she 
left one child, I'.nsign 15. . now a banker in C\-irson C'ity, Montcalm county. 
.\iichigan. who m;u-rie(l Mattie I'uller, and they have three children, .Mien, 
Hazel an(l .Mildred. About .1870 Mr. Stel)bins was again married, his bride 
being liertha O. l^.)rter, a native of Ohio and two children of that union 
lived to maturity. riiese are Laura, who married Addison Kirtland and 
has four children. I.^•]e, Ckiir. William and Dean.; and Roy, who married 
i'dma GafiJeld and is the father of two children. Dorothy and Walter. Airs. 
Ik-rtha Stebbins died in i()i4 and in ,\ugust of TO15, Mr. Stebliins married 
Mrs. Miner\-a (I'rown) I'orter, widow- of a brother of the second A[rs. 
Stel)bins, and the motlier of six children: .\ddie. Una, ("Ilenn, Alvin. 
I'ertha and Clayton. 

Throughout the years of lu's residence in Lakeview, Mr. Stebbins has 



330 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

been actively interested in the growth, and development of various com- 
munity interests. He has served as president of the village and was a mem- 
I>er of the council for a great many years. Independent in politics, he has 
served as township supervisor, townshij) treasurer, justice of the peace and 
school trustee, discharging the various duties thus devolving upon him in a 
manner pleasing to all concerned. 

linsign Stebl)ins, eldest son of (liester IT., was the founder of the 
furniture factory in J.akeview, which has meant so much to the commercial 
and manufacturing interests of the place, and Roy Stebbins, youngest son 
of Chester H.. is now at the head of this factory. 



WILLIAM W. KEITH. 



William W. Keith, a retired farmer of Pierson, was born in Otsego 
county. New York, on Alay 30, 1834, l)eing the son of Pierce and Mary 
(Weeden) Reynolds. When William was but two years of age his father 
died, and at the age of four his mother passed away and the young 1x)y 
was gi\en to Thomas Keith, a prominent Democratic politician of the state 
of Xew York. At the time Polk was elected iVesident, Thomas Keith w'as 
elected by his county to re]jresent it in the Legislature. That was when 
W illiam was a lad of ten years. 

William W. Keith grew to manhood in the state of New York and 
lixed there until he was twenly-eight years of age. at which time his foster 
father, Thoiuas Keith, died, and he came to Michigan. On his arrival at 
Rockford, Kent county, his only eartlily possession was five dollars in 
money. He went to work at once in a saw-mill, where he was engaged until 
j(S65, wlien he returned t'.) Xew York. After renting land in New York 
state until Jf^//, the fanu'l}- returned to I'ierson, where Mr. Keith was again 
engaged in a saw-mill, being employed by b'red 1\ 1'aylor for a tnne. He 
later served for twelve years as town marshal and constable and managed 
to sa\e enough from his meager t-arnings to purchase an eighty-acre farm 
in I'ierson township, which he held for a number of years, when he traded 
one-half of u for town ]jroperty. Mr. Keith spent some years in the L'pper 
i'eiiin'V.la, where he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land, 
which he after a time sold, and ])urchased six acres of land in the village of 
Pierson. 

In T857 W^illiam W. Keith was married in Xew ^'ork state to Klmira 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 



331 



Peck, who was a first cousin ot Governor Peck, of Wisconsin, the author 
of ".Peck's P)ad Roy." Mrs. Keith was the daughter of (liester Peck, a 
])rotlier of David Peck, the father of George Peck, the author. 

To Mr. and Afrs. Keith were ])orn the following children: Chester, 
who died while tlie family were still residents of the state of New York, 
and Myrtle Kate, who died in 1883, at the age of seventeen years. The 
wife and mother died six years later, in 1889. 

Jn 1892 William W. Keith was married to Mrs. Rdith Porter, who 
came to Pierson to purchase propertw She was a nati\e of Ohio and after 
her marriage to Mr. Keith she resided in I'ierson until her death, on .\ovem- 
l.)cr 13, 1914. 

]\lr. Keith is a Democrat of much prominence and takes much interest 
in the activities of his party. He has been a member of the town council 
for a number of years. 



[\R01'. .\R.\L E. COOK. 

Prof. .Aral E. Cook, teacher, educator, sui)erintendent of the puljjic 
schools of Carson City, and a prominent citizen of .Montcalm county, .Mich- 
igan, was born in Car.son City, on July 7, 1881, the son of Walter S. and 
Anna (Straight) Cook, natives of Morrow county, Ohio, and Hillsdale 
count}', .Michigan, respectively. 

Walter S. Cook w.is educated in the schools of his nati\e count}' and 
li\ed there until he was sixteen years of age, when he moved to Kichland 
county, where he lived for some time and then went to Hudson, in Hills- 
dale countv, Michigan, where he was married to .Vnna Straight, after which 
they came to Carson City, about 1877, making their home in this locality for 
several }-ears an.d then going to Petoskey. where Mr. Cook now li\-es. Mrs. 
^\nna Cook died in i8()|, and two years later Mr. Cook was married to 
Addie .\. AlcClure. Walter S. and .\nna Cook were the parents of two 
children. Aral IC. and lAa l.H^lora, who is the wife of I'Ted Colson and 
lives at Pausing, Michigan. 

When twelve years of age, Aral !■-. Cook moved with his parents to 
IVtoskey, Alichigan, where he completed his eleinentary education, and where 
he hved for five }ears, and then, his mother having died, ATr. Cook returned 
to Carson Cit}', where he attended high school, and then became a student 
at the Alt. Pleasant Normal College, an institution from which .Aral P. Cook 
graduated in J()05. Later Professor Cook was a student of special work in 



332 MONTCAT.M COUNTY. MICllKiAN. 

science and education at the University ol C'hicago. after completing which 
he was a teacher for three years in the Ah)ntcahn county rural schools and 
then for two years was ].)rinci]vil of the \'estal)uri^" schools. 

I'rofessor ("ook then hecanie the principal of the Trufant school for 
two years, after which he was a teacher in the hi^h school cjf I.akeview 
for four vears, ;ind then was made su])erintendcnt of the l.-ake\iew scliools, 
remainini^ in th's oi'licc for three }-eais. In 1913 Professor Cook came to 
Carson City and hecame superintendcMit of the cit} schools, a position which 
he now holds and an oflice which he is servin.^- with notable e.'licienc}- and 
al)ilit}'. During- the administration of Prof. .\ral 1[. Cook, great progress 
has jjcen made in the x'arious ]!hases of school work in Carson City, among 
the most notable being the erection of a new lifteen-thousand -dollar, modern 
addition to the scho(.)l building, as a result of which Carson C"ity now has 
one of the best ef(ui])])ed and most conxenient school buildings of the county 
and vicinity. 

During the year i()o6, ]"'rof. ;\ral P.. Cook was married to t.'arrie \\. 
(.^adham, who was l)orn at Leland. Michigan, the datighter of John and Anna 
(Service) Cadham. Prior to her marriage Mrs. ('ook was a well-known 
school teacher, having attended the Mt. P'leasant Normal Ctjllege and for 
six years was a successful teacher in the schools of Leelanau county. To 
the marriage of Aral K. and (Jarrie Cook have been born two children, 
Walter John and Rhea Rosamond, aged four and one, respectively. 

Prof. Aral E. Cook and his wife are prominent memb.ers of the Congre- 
gational church at Carson Ci;v. Professor Coc^k is a Mason and lie and 
his wife are member^ of the Order of the l^astern .Star. 



b'RPD L;. O'PRIPN. 

In the domain of newsiiaper enterprise in Montcalm count\-, .Michigan, 
I-'red U. O'P.rien has attained a ])osition of inlluencc and special recognition, 
and as editor of the Coral Xci^'S for the i)ast eighteen vears has made his 
pa[)er one of the leading exponents of social and industrial life in the coiintv. 
His loyalty and public spirit are of the highest t}|)e and he has made a splendid 
record of achie\'emcnt in his chosen lield of endeavor. 

]''red U. O'lh'ien is a native of Michigan, ha\ing been born in the city 
of Ionia, Ionia county, on May Kj, tcSfx;. and has been a resident of (^iral 
almost continuously since 1873. He is the son of bVederick \V. and Augusta 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 333 

( Ilanham) O'Brien, who are of Irish descent, and natives of Ontario, Can- 
ada. As a boy and young man the subject of this sketch spent his time in 
the pubHc schools of Coral, and worked in the stave and lumber mills of 
northwestern Montcalm county. At the age of nineteen years he entered 
the office of the IJoward City Record to learn the printer's trade. After 
serving his apprenticeship he worked as a journeyman printer in Grand 
i\ai)ids, Michigan, and in smaller towns in Michigan until 1897, when he 
established the Coral News, working with success and public commendation. 

The marriage of Fred U. O'Brien with Ora E. Reighley, a native of 
Xewton, Kansas, took place on July 23, 1892. Mrs. O'Brien is the daughter 
of William S. and Sarah (A\'illiams) Reighley, who were pioneer settlers in 
Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien are the parents of the following children: 
Kena A., who is a graduate of the Coral high school, attended the h^erris 
Institute for two terms and is an accomplished musician and teacher oi 
music ; Frederick, who follows the occupation of a printer, is employed in 
his father's office; George H., who is a graduate of the high school at Coral, 
is employed as a bookkee])er in the bank at Coral, and Edmund, the youngest, 
is still attending school. 

The subject of this sketch, in his ])olitical interests, follows the prin- 
ciples of the Republican part}', lie is intensely interested in the question 
(vf the prohibition of the li(|uor traffic, and through the columns of his ])aper 
gives \aluril)le support to temperp.nce work in Montcalm county, where he 
has acted as a mem])er of the .\nti-Saloon Feague since its organization in 
iO<H. .Aside from this Mr. O'Brien contributed largely to the Local Option 
Vcllo-cu Jacket, a ])ai)er which played one of the most i)rominent parts in the 
movement which placed Montcalm cotuity on the dry list. He is now 
stumping Michigan in the interests of the state-wide prohibition movement. 
By his native command of the b'.nglish language and the spontaniety of 
expression, which ha\e placed the Irish people among the leading orators 
and writers of the past, ]\lr. O'Brien has been able to reach effectively a 
large number of people who have readily supported him in his convictions 
along the lines of temperance. 'J'he career of Mr. O'Brien has not been 
devoid of hardships. He has been obliged to meet adverse circumstances 
;nid to rise above unjust criticisms, and his success today in his chosen field 
of endeavor is due largely to the enduring and persevering qualities of his 
nature wdiich have ena1)led him to conquer adversity. 

Not only in the field of newspaper work has Fred U. O'Brien gained 
distinction, but as |)ostmaster of Coral, an office he has held for fourteen 



334 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

years, he has received a high degree of puhhc trust and confidence. Air, 
O'Brien has also received recognition from the poHtical party of which he 
is a member, having been chosen to serve as delegate to both connty and 
state conventions at varions times. 



THOMAS D. DAVTS. 



No history of Alontcahn county would be complete without fitting men- 
tion of the life and serxices of the late 'lliomas D. Davis, one of the pioneers 
of Bloomer to\\nship. this connty, an honored \eteran of the Civil War and 
for years one of the leaders in the life of the community in which the best 
part of his life was lived. He ]>ecanie a resident of Bloomer township in 
1859, making his home in what was then a forest wilderness, and lived to 
see that section develop from its primeval state to a state of high cultivation, 
with a proper and w'ell-established social order, and in the good work of 
bringing- about these latter conditions j)layed no inconspicuous part. His 
widow, who still survives him, \vas a faithful and helpful pioneer wife and 
mother and retains the most vivid recollections of the hard years through 
which the pioneers passed during the ]>eriod in which the forests were being 
cleared that the land might be rendered hal)itable. 

lliomas D. Davis was born in the state of Pennsylvania in 1826, son 
of xAaron and Elmira (Baker) Davis. While he was yet a small boy his 
parents moved to Attica, New York, and there he grew to manhood. He 
married in 1849 and for ten years thereafter was engag'ed in farming in tlie 
Attica neighborhood. In 1859 he and his little family came to Atontcalm 
county to make a new home in the forest, the promising possil)ilities of this 
region at that time beginning to im]>ress the peo])le of the Kast. Air. Davis 
bought two adjoining forty-acre tracts in the northeast quarter of section 
10 in ]jloomer township and. cutting a small clearing in the woods about 
eighty rods back from the trail wdiich led through that section, erected a 
small house of logs and there made his first home. At that time there were 
no established roads through the forest, the pioneers having followed a mere 
"blazed" trail through the woods nearly all the way from Pewamo. Will- 
iam Davis, a brother of Thomas D. had settled here a year or two before 
and had already had his home set up on the tract now occupied by William 
Davis, son of Thomas D., hence the newcomers were not wholly "strangers 
in a strange land." Notwithstanding this advantage of kinship with an even 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 335 

earlier pioneer, however, the outlook was not encouraging and it was with 
no small n'.isgiving that Mr. Davis entered upon his new responsibilities. 
The ex])ense of the trip^ out here had exhausted practically all his ready 
cash .and when he arrixed here with his wife and five small children he had 
l)ut five dollars in nioney and n(.) house in which to shelter his family. For 
the moment he was so disheartened by the bleak prospect then presented that 
he gladly would haxe returned to New York if he had had the money for 
the return trip, init his wife, with the fine courage of the true pioneer, Ujoked 
for\\ard to the home they should ha\e when the land should 1>e cleared and 
the country settled and they proceeded hopefully to build their home and 
were fairly well established when the Civil War broke out. In 1864 Hiomas 
1). Davis enlisted for service in behalf of the Union in Company C, Third 
Regiment, Michigan \'olunteer Infantry, and was in the service until some 
time after the war closed, receiving his discharge in September, 1865, hav- 
ing been confined to a hospital for two or three months previously. Upon 
returning from the army he bought a fc^rty-acre tract from his brother, on 
which there was a house near the road, the place where William Davis now 
lives, and there he made his home until shortly before his death, when he 
moved into Carson City, where he died in 1900. Thomas D. Davis w^as a 
man of earnest Christian character, for many years a deacon in the Baptist 
church and active in all good works; a good citizen who had done faithfully 
his part in the work of bringing alxDut proper conditions in the neighborhood 
of his home. 

In 1849 Thomas D. Davis was united in marriage, near Attica, New 
York, to Caroline Crawford, who w^as born at Brighton, near the city of 
Rochester, New York, in 1831, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Fuller) 
Crawford, and who is now living in this county at the advanced age of 
eighty-five, still in vigorous physical condition, as active and alert as most 
women twenty years her jimior. Daniel Crawford was a descendant of 
Scottish Presbyterians who sought refuge in the north of Ireland during the 
days of the ])ersecution of those of their faith on the other side of the Irish 
Sea, one of the earlier descendants of whom, John Crawford, l)orn in County 
Tyrone. Ireland, died in that county in 1773. His son, John, born in Pound- 
ridge, Ireland, in 1776, came to America and married Parthenia Lyon, who 
was born in Bedford, Massachusetts. He died in Saratoga. New York, 
in 1831. John Crawford, the founder of that branch of the Crawford 
family in this country, was a man of strong and vigorous character and was 
noted for his invariable kindness of heart. His son, Daniel Crawford, was 



33^ MONTCALM COUNTY. MTCUIGAN. 

born at Saratoga, New Yurk, on January 19, 1802, married Alary I'^iller and 
lived near Rochester, where, (hiring the early years of his married life, he 
was engaged as a brick-maker and Later became a substantial farmer. His 
wife. Alary Iniller. was l)orn at I'.a.st iJloomington, New "S'ork, in 181 r, and 
both she and her Iiusband died at West Bethan}-, in that state. Their daugh- 
ter, Caroline, lived near .\ttica until her marriage to Mr. Davis. 

'i'o Thomas I), and Caroline f Craw ford) Davis eleven children were 
born, two of whom died in infancy. Jane, at the age of eight; Alary, at the 
age of eleven; [''rank and Alunroe. at the ages of thirty-one and twenty-nine, 
res])ectivcly, of typhoid fever in 1879, and (jcorgc, in 1895. heaving a widow, 
Myrtle (Sperry) Davis, and four children. 0( the survixing children, 
Fjnily, widow of Thomas V. Fuller, whose family history is given on another 
])age in this volume, is li\ing on the I'uller farm one mile west and a half 
mile north of the old Davis farm in Hloomer townshij), and her aged mother 
is making her home with her; Charles lives near Ihitternut; Kmmett lives 
in Slicridan ; William lives on the old homestead. 



IT.VKX'hVV !•:. IIOWOUTH. 

Marvey 1;;. llowcjith, a |)r()niinent farmer, residing on his farm of 
three hundred and liftecn acres. located in sections 2=,, 26 and 36, Bushnell 
township, Montcalm county, was born in .Mlegany county, New York, and 
was the scni of (ieorge and Mariah (Shave) Howorth. 

(ieorge and Mariah l^oworth were natives of hjigland and came to the 
iMiited States, with those of their children who were born in tlie old country, 
and settled in the state of New York. They were the ])arents of fifteen 
children, twelve of whom grew to manhood rmd womanhood, and two are 
now living: Mary, the widow of Corydan Rice, li\'es in F'alo, Ionia count}', 
and Harvey E., wlu) was but three years old when his father died. 

After the death of George Howorth the family remained in New A'ork 
state for seven years, when the mother with her children mox-ed to North 
Plains, Ionia county, where they resided for two years, after which they 
w'ere residents of Berlin for tw^o years, before they came to lihishnell lown- 
shi]), where the mother hr)ught forty acres of land, and where she Ii\ed the 
rest of her life. 

Harvey T''.. Howorth began to work for himself at the age of eighteen 
and soon thereafter bought the home place of his mother and since that 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 337 

lime he had added many acres to his original purchase. Plis success has 
been due to his frugal habits and his active and industrious life. 

On October Ji, 1879, Harvey E. Howorth was married to Adele Corey, 
the daughter of Air. and Mrs. Charles Corey, and to this union the following 
children have been born: Hugh, who resides in Hansing; James, a large 
landowner in Montana and the proprietor oi a large elevator, and Mable, 
llie wife of Claire Wright, who assists in the work on the farm of Mr. 
II o worth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Corey wx're the parents of four children, two 
of whom died in infancy; (Jiarles A., who is also deceased, and Adele. 
.Mr. and Mrs. (diaries (^"orey were born in New York state. 

h'^raternally Mr. Howorth is a member of the Free and Acce])ted 
M;isons. He is a member of the Reimldican ])artv. but is not an active 
politician and has never been an ofhce seeker. 



MATTHIAX" GOOUY. 

Matthew Cooby is a natixe of Little])ort, England, having l)een born in 
t^'ambridgeshire. .May r, 1832. He is the son of John and Rebecca ( Rowell) 
( loob\-, and grew up in the country of his nativity. .Vfter reaching the age 
'>[ twenty-two he was married to Elizabeth I'adgett. also a native of Little- 
l)ort. and the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Padgett. In t86o the couple 
ranie to .America where they took up their residence in luiclid, Oliio, now a 
^nburl) oi (,'incinnati. 

.Shortly after the arrival of Matthew Gooby in this country, a call was 
-ent out for \o)unteers to serve the cause of the Cnion in the Ci\'il War, 
and Mr. Gooln'. though not yet a citizen of the United States, desired to 
give his services and his life if necessary to preserve those principles which 
lie believed were right. He took out naturalization papers wliile in the army 
'UKi enlisted in Company .\, One ITiuidred and Third Regiment, Ohio \'olun- 
teer Infantry. During the war the sul)ject of this sketch had many varied 
cx])eriences, including service with Sherman until the fall of Atlanta, and 
during the t\vo years and ten months of fighting he missed only one day of 
acti\e service. 

At the close of the ^var Matthew Gool)y returned to l^uclid. where he 
remained until the fall of 1866 when he decided to buy a farm in Mich- 
(22b) 



^^8 MONTCALM COUXTY, MICHIGAN. 

igan. The land was located on the north edge of North Plains township, 
in Ionia county, along the line ol Bloomer township, in Montcalm connty. 
The farm, which originally consisted of forty acres, ^vas co\-ered almost 
entirely with a wild growth of underhrnsh and timher. Ilie task of clear- 
ing the land occn])ie(l the immediate attention of Mr. Gooby, who worked 
unceasingly to transfoim the place into a cultivated region. The wife of 
the subject of this sketch proved a valuable assistant to her husband dm-ing 
the hrst great strnggic of their life on a farm in the wilderness. Through 
her hel]) he was able in a short time to clear large tracts of the forest, which 
he im]>roved and to which he added forty acres ten years later. Krom time 
to time he contiruied to bu}- small tracts of land until the original farm 
spread over a large area, h'or three years he lived near Palo wdiere his wife 
]>asscd awa}' in 1883. Since 1Q05. Mr. Gooby ha*^ made his home with his 
children and though he has j)assed eighty years he is as able as the average 
farmer to labor on the farrji. During his boyhood days the oi)i)ortunities 
for receiving an education were extremely limited. Despite the fact that 
he was deprived of school advantages, Air. (iooby possesses a mind of 
unusual (juality and in business affairs has gained much more success than 
many who lla^•e had every adAantage of the modern schools. 

Of the children born to Mr. and ^^frs. Gooby, three claimed England 
as the country of their nativity. They <are now deceased. Those born in 
Ohio are Keziah. who became the wife of Edward Mull, of J'^'airwell, Mich- 
igan; John, who lives in North Plains township, Tonia county, and Emma, 
the wife of Orson Bogert who resides in Bloomer township, Montcalm 
county. The following meml>ers of the family were born in Michigan, 
Rel.)ccca, the wife of William Graham, Avho resides in Bloomer township; 
Matthew, who makes his home in Tonia county, and Harriet, who married 
Delia Cummings, also of Tonia county. 



THOMAS E. EUTT.ER 



The late Thomas V. TTiller, who for years was regarded as one of the 
most substantial farmers as well as one of the leading citizens of I)loomer 
township, this county, and who died at his home there in 1913, was a native 
of New York, having been born in Steuben county, that state, in 1834, son 
of William and TIannah (Sanford) I'uller. the former a native of Dutchess 
countv, that same state. 



MONTCALM CcnJNTY, MICHIGAN. 339 

Thomas V. Fuller grew up in Steuben county and there married Amanda 
Schuyler, who was born in Wayne county. New York. In i860 he and 
his w'ife and two small children came to Michigan and settled in this county, 
locating- in Bloomer township, where Mr. h^illcr bought a tract of timi)cr 
land just south of th.e railroad, one and one-half miles west of Carson City, 
and proceeded to clear away the forest and create a home in the then wilder- 
ness. Jn J864 Mr. l'"uller's ^^ifc died, lea\'ing two children, h'rances R., 
now the wife of William Davis, of Bloomer townshi]). this county, and 
Scott, who went to South Dakota years ago. In 1867 Mr. Fuller married, 
secondly, ICmily Davis, who was born near Batavia, New York, and who 
came to this county early in T85C) with her parents. Thomas D. and C^aroline 
(Crawford) Davis, who settled on a farm near where Mr. iMiller first settled 
in l)loomer townshi]). hater .Mr. I'uller Ijought the farm one mile east and 
one mile north of Buttermit, in this county, where he spent the remainder 
of his life and where his widow now^ lives. 

Air. Fuller was much interested in school work and his efforts in behalf 
of the schools during the formative period of tliat now well-established 
farming community did very much toward the creation of pro])er educa- 
tional standards therealx)ul. He was also active in the work of the F>ee- 
Will Baptist church and was regarded ever as a leader in such movements 
as were designed to better conditions in his neighborhood and at the time 
of his death in 1913 there was a general feeling of loss throughout that 
community, for he was a man who had done well his part in all the rela- 
tions of life. 

To Thomas V. and Kmily (Davis) F^uller were born three children, Ada 
'\.. Kay T. and Eva V.. all of whom became teachers. Both sisters were 
graduated from the Carson City high school and from the Normal College 
at Ypsilanti and the former is now a teachei" in the public schools of Grand 
Ivapids, this state. Ray T. Fuller ^^■as graduated from the high school at 
Carson City and from the Medical (College at Saginaw and is now^ suj^erin- 
tendent of the Sarah (joodrich Hosi>ital at New Orleans, having for six 
years previous to the time of entering upon his ]>resent valuable service been 
dean of Flint Medical College in that same city. Doctor Fuller married 
Ida Stuckev, who was born in Ohio and reared in Gratiot county, this state, 
and to this union three children have been lj(3rn : Paul, now aged fifteen; 
1 Esther E. and Raymond. 

Thomas F. b\iller"s brother, 1 benjamin F. b\iller, was one of the promin- 
ent pioneers of this county, he having come here as a teacher in 1854, and 



34^-) MOXrCAI.M COl NTV, MICHIGAN. 

later served as a justice of the ])Cace, sui)ervisc)r and town clerk. When 
the C'ivil War Ijroke out. JJenjainin K. k'nller enlisted for service in the 
Union armv and was slain in hattle. 



HRNJAMIX L. SI 'ANGLER. 

l.jenjaniin L. .S|)an<:;ler, a well-known farmer of the (."arson ("ity neii^h- 
horhooil. livino- in lUoonier township, this county, was horn on the farm on 
which he is now ]i^•ing■ and where lie has spent his entire life, in i8()6, son 
of Reuhen and llannah M. ( Lono) S])an!^ler, the former a native of the 
state of T'ennsxlvania and the latter of Ohio, ])ioneers of that section, the 
former of whcim died in .1901 and the latter of w lujin is still livin<;- in the 
old home there, at the advanced ai;e of eii^dity-four years. 

Reuhen S])an,olcr moved to Ohio with his i:)arents when he was a hoy 
and i^rew to nianlKJod in Ashtalnda count}, in tlie latter state, and there he 
married Hannah M. !.on<^-. In 1855 lie had made a i)rospectini>- trip through 
this sectir)ri of Michigan and houglit a fort\-acre tract along the east line of 
Montcalm count)-, in the southeast p\art of Rloomer township, and later 
houglit sixty more in (Ir.atiot countw but did not make his home in this 
county until 1865, in which year he and his wife took up their residence on 
the \\()odland tract and there the\' made their ])ermancnt home. At that 
time that section of the comity was \ery >i)arsely settled, the roads there- 
about being but \\in<ling- trriils through the deep forest. The now flourish- 
ing- \illage of ("arson ("ity had not tlien been laid out and the now loiig'- 
established county-line road had not then been cut throug^h the woods. k"or 
the first two or three winters after coming- to this county, Reuben S]iangler 
found occu])ation in the lumijer camps. Init ])resently he got his farm cleared 
and under culti\-ation and thereafter de\-oted liis whole time to its ])roper 
cultixation. lie died in kjoi rmd bis widow is still li\-ing there. 

To I'Jeuben Sj)angler and wife were born eight children, four of whom 
g;rew to maturit\-. Those who grew to n-iaturity are Salina. Klma (deceased), 
I'enjamin and I'^stella. Salina married A. TT. Pruden and lives ne.ar Clrecn- 
ville. and has three children, .\ddie, bdma and Ida. I'",stella married J. II. 
Drew and lives on the old homestead and has six children. I'en, Madge, 
Meda. Maude, l\uby and Bernicc. 

Renjamin R. Spangler has s])ent his whole h'fe on the farm on which 
he -was l.K)rn and since his father's death has hacl full charge of the opera- 



MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 34I 

Moii of the home ])lrice. continuing- to make his home with his aged mother, 
wIk) is now one of the oldest settlers in' that part of the county, and to 
•\hose comfort in lier old age he is thoroughly devoted. Tn his youth he 
,it (ended the district schools of his home neighhorhood and from the days 
'if his l)o)hood ])roved a valuahle aid to his father in the work of develop- 
ing the farm. Though still in the \ery prime of his life. Mr. Spangler may 
he looked upon as one of the ]:)ioneers of that section, which he has seen 
'lc\elop from its i)rimitive forest state to its ])resent condition as a well- 
cstahlished and ])ros])erous farming region, and is in consecpience one of the 
liestd<no\vn men in that ];art of the county. 



(Ji'.ORf;]-: 1'. makriman:. 

(ieorge F. Ilarriman. a well-known farmer and stock raiser of Bushnell 
tHwushij). .M(.)ntcalm count}', Michigan, was born in Long h^aton, England, 
Scjjlcmher 2T, 1862. the son of Cieorge and Emma (Horton) Harriman, 
i nth naii\es of i'jigiand. Accompanied l.)y his eldest brother. Jack, George 
Marriman, Sr.. catne to America, locating in Afontcalm county, \vhere he 
IMirchased forty acres of land. .Vbont six montb.s later, Mrs. Harriman and 
ilie remainder of the family came to this country and joined AJr. Harriman 
III the newly-founded home. 'I'his tract was subsecjuently increased to 
• ighty acres and here the p.arents of Mr. Ilarriman lived the remainder of 
'heir lives. To them were born ten children, four of whom grew to maturity, 
iiut oul}' three of whom are now living: (je<.)rge F. is the subject of this 
-ketcli; ITioch, who is a graduate of the University of Michigan at Ann 
'\rl)or. is now a resident of wS[)ringfiel(l, Illinois, and Sam lives in Alden, 
\ntrim county, Michigan. 

(icorge F\ ilarriman lived at home mitil he was twenty-one vears of 
■ige, when he was married and moved to twenty acres of land which he 
'lad jireviously purchased, living on this farm for two years. From this 
place he went tf) h'airjjlain township and lived two years, when he moved 
'" .Montana and engaged in the cattle business for three years. He then 
returned to !''air]ilain township and ])urchased one hundred acres, on which 
u' lived for ele\'en years, when he l)Ought the Wescott ])lace, later selling it 
nd mo\ing to his present farm, which is known as "Cherr\' Farm." This 
-rm consists of fifty acres and besides it Afr. FTarriman farms one hundred 
iiid twenty acres belonging to F. TT. TLarriman and ten acres which are 



34- MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

leased, making one hnndred and eighty acres, all in Bnshnell township. Mr. 
Harriman is an extensive breeder of pnre-blooded Holstein cattle and has 
an excellent herd, which is headed l)y "JVmtiac Jewel'" and "Butter Boy." 

On November 25, iSHt,, Mr. TIarriman was married to Eva Slocum, 
the daughter of TTenry and Martha (Galloup) Slocum, the former of whom 
was born in New York state and came to Michigan when a young man, and 
the latter Ix^rn in England and came to America w-ith her ])arents when a 
small girl, settling at North Plains, Ionia county, Michigan. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Harriman have been born nine children, three of whom, Joe, Vona and 
\lvi\, died in infancy. The living children are, Dora, the wife of Claude 
llarker, who lives on tlie same farm with Mr. Harriman; Emma, the wife 
of J. Sitts, of Antrim county; Charlotte, who is a music teacher and lives at 
home; Inez, .Anna and vSam Enoch, all of whom reside at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harriman and family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and are enthusiastic workers of that congregation, Mr. 
Harriman being superintendent of the Sunday school. Fraternally, Mr. 
Harriman is a member of the Eenwick Lodge No. 517, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, of which he is a past noble grand ; also a member of the 
Gleaners at Eenwick, of which he has l)een secretary for fifteen years. 
Politically, i\Ir. Harriman is a Republican, but has never been an office seeker 
nor cared to take an acti\e part in politics. 



HARRISON PIERCE. 



Harrison Pierce, one of the oldest and best-known farmers of Eureka 
township, this county, who for many years has taken an active part in the 
affairs of that community, is a native son of Michigan, having been born on 
a farm in Napoleon township, Jackson county, this state, August 8, 1840, 
son of Harry and xN'ancy (Mason) Pierce, both natives of Onondaga county, 
New York, where they grew up and where they were married. 

Harry Pierce was a farmer and was reared to that vocation from child- 
hood. A few years after their marriage he and his wife and their little 
family came to this state and located in Napoleon township, Jackson county, 
where thev made their home until 1845, in which year they came to this 
county, settling in Eureka township, near the village of Greenville. Flarry 
Pierce entered a quarter of a section of land there, his tract being divided 
bv the river, and there the family made their home for about ten years. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 343 

Mrs. Pierce died in 1853 and shortly thereafter Mr. IMerce sold his place 
and nio\ed his family to Greenville. Later he moved to the neighborhood 
of Grand Tfaven and from there presently went to Canada, but after awhile 
returned to (jreenville, where and in the vicinity of which he spent the 
remainder of his life. Harry TMerce and wife were the parents of six chil- 
dren, namely: Chloe Anne, now deceased, who married C. B. Miner; Edwin 
k., deceased; James, deceased; Minerva, now deceased, who married James 
( '. Schultz; Lavina, deceased, who married George N. (]ole, and Harrison, 
now the sole survivor of the family, the immediate subject of this biograph- 
ical sketch. 

Harrison Pierce was about hve years of age when his parents came 
from Jackson county and settled in this county and he was about thirteen 
\ears old when his mother dieck vShortly after that he began working in the 
lumber woods and was thus engaged for several years. luml>ering in the 
winters and working on farms during the summers. In 1861 he bought a 
forty-acre tract of the state-asylum land in section 25, of F.ureka township, 
this county, and two years later, on September 27, 1863, was united in mar- 
riage to Harriet Monroe, daughter of Samuel Monroe and wife, pioneers 
of that section. After their marriage Harrison Pierce and his wife settled 
on the forty-acre tract above mentioned and made their home there until 
the death of Samuel Monroe, after which they moved to the old Monroe 
home, in order to make a proper home for Mrs. Monroe, and there they 
lia\e lived ever since, living in the .same house in which they were married 
more than a half century ago. Harrison Pierce is a substantial citizen of 
liis community, the owner of one hundred and twenty acres in section 24 and 
eighty acres in section 25, of Eureka township, and his pleasant home on 
rural route No. 4, out of Greenville, has been for many years noted as one 
of the most hospitable homes in that part of the county. 

To Harrison and Harriet (Monroe) Pierce four children have been 
born, as follow: Aria ;\., wife of George Poppeywell, of Greenville; 
^iartha, wife of George Perry, of Greenville; Efifie. deceased, and lulson R., 
who still makes his home on the old home place. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce are 
members of the Methodist church and their children have been reared in that 
laith. 'J'he famil\- e\er has taken a proper part in the general social activities 
of tlie community and all are held in high esteem thereabout. 

At the time of its greatest activity back in the seventies, Harrison Pierce 
was an ardent member of the Greenback party, but after that party declined 
and ceased to be, he became quite inde])endent in his political views and has 



344 .^roNTCALM county. Michigan. 

so coiitinned. lie was prominent in the local councils of the old (ireenback 
])arty and had scr\-ed as a delei^ate to state conventions of the same. He has 
taken an interested part in local c'nic affairs and has ser\'ed as hif,di\vay over- 
seer of luireka townshi]). ITe also has been an officer of his school district 
for more than forty years and has done mnch to advance the cause of edu- 
cation there during- tlia.t time. Afr. Vierce is a member of Tent Xo. 458, 
Kniiijiits of the Maccabees, and for years has taken a warm interest in the 
affairs of that (organization. 



or^soN BocMcirr. 



Orson Bogert. who is one of the successful farmers of lUoomer town- 
ship, Montcalm count}-, was born in iS')!, on the southern edge of the 
townshij) in which he ncnv resides, and is the son of Richard and lunma 
(Decker) Bogert. Jvichard Bogert, the father of the subject of this sketch, 
was born in the state of New Y(;rk, and at an early age was left an orphan. 
He was reared in an orphan asylum and in 1858, after he had begun an 
inde])endent career, .settled in Michigan. One of his ])urposes in coming 
to this state was that he might marry Kuhc .\nn Decker, whom he had 
known in former years. When he arrived here he found that she had just 
been married to a rival, so he turned his attention to her sister, I'jrima 
Decker, "who consented to become his wife. Both Emma and Ruhe Ann 
Decker were the daughters of John S. Decker, who settled in Bloomer 
townShi]), jMontcalm county, during the fifties, 'idiey were pioneers in the 
agricultural life of this community where they spent the greater part of 
their li\'es. 

ivichard r>ogert gave his ser\icc to the Union during the Oivil War, 
and enlisted as a volunteer in a Michigan regiment for a term of three years. 
.At the close of the war Afr; B)Ogert lost his wife, wdio was survived by her 
husl)and and one son, who is the sul)jcct of this sketch, another son, William, 
having died, in 1867 Mr. Piogart married l-^uhe Decker, who has been spoken 
of before as the sister of his first wife. The cou|)le lived in Bloomer town- 
shi]) where Mr. Bogert followed the occupation of farming until his death. 

Reared to the sturdy discipline of farm life, the subject of this .sketch 
was well 4.-.in'fied to cope with the agricultural ])rol)lems that confronted 
him when he l)egan an inaependcnt career. After his marriage Mr. Tiogert 
bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in the southern part of 




^^'^ AM, M,.s. (HfSCX I!.„;,,,rj 




^r()KTC.\LM COl'NTY, MICHIGAN. 345 

IMooincr township, where he continues to reside. He has managed the 
farm along modern methods of improvement and as a resuU owns one of 
the best cidtivated places in the community. 

In 1893 the marriage of (Jrson Bogert to ICmma Goohy. the daughter 
of Matthew Gooljy, took place. Mrs. Bogert, who was born in iuiclid, 
Ohio, came to Michigan with her parents when she was a child. She is a 
woman of unusual Imsiness al)ility and for a number of years had full 
management of the extensi\'e business carried on by her father, of whom a 
full account a])pears on anotlicr ])age of this volume. To Mr. and Mrs. 
[Vigcrt two children ha^e been l)orn : Xc}-, who is now twenty years old, 
and Hattie. Ncy helj^s his father on the farm. 



JAMKS W. URIE. 



James W. Urie, one of the best-known farmers of Bloomer township, 
this county, former lish and game warden and a skilled gunsmith, who for 
years has been acti\ely identified with the affairs of this county, is a native 
of Montcahn county, having been b<.)rn on a pioneer woodland tract in 
nioomer township, one mile south of the present town of Butternut, on 
I''e1)ruary j8. 1859. son of Thomas S. and Matilda (Norris) Urie, who 
were amotig the earliest settlers of that section. 

Thomas S. Urie was born in Ashland county, Ohio, and grew to man- 
liood there, lie married Matilda Xorris, who was a native of that same 
county, and came to this county about the year 1854, settling in Bloomer 
louiishi]). whci-c they Ijouglit a tract of timber land, and there the subject 
of this sketch was l)orn. Soon thereafter Idiomas S. Urie and his little 
tamily remoxed to Hillsdale county, remaining for four v^ars, at the end 
of which time they came back to Montcalm county and made a permanent 
br)me in F'loomer townshi]). Ijuying a timber tract two and one-half miles 
south of the ])resent site of Carson City, where Mr. and Mrs. Urie s])ent the 
remainder of their lives. .\t that time there were no roads through the 
toresls in that section, the pioneers following the old Indian trails, and 
I bomas S. Urie did much toward ]")re])aring the land for its present high 
st;ite of develoi)ment. The town of Tyons then was the nearest trading 
point for the settlers in that i)art of the country and the elder Urie used to 
walk to that |)oint for supi)lies, carrying meal and other prcnisions back on 
his back. Thomas S. I'rie, in addition to being a robust and stalwart 



346 AIONTCAI^M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

farmer, was a skilled blacksiriith and {gunsmith, and his son, janies \V., early 
learned this form of eraftsmanship, being of much assistance to his father 
both at the forge and at the l)ench at such times as the demand for their 
labors in this direction became too ])ressing. The Indians were good cus- 
tomers of these pioneer gunsmiths and it was nothing unusual in those early 
days for fifty or seventy-live redskins to Ixi waiting at the door of the little 
shop of the Urics in the woods to have their firearms lixed, the smith and 
his son often working until midnight to get the tasks conij>leted. As a 
farrier the elder Urie's services also were in great demand. Ide made his 
own horseshoes and nails and received six dollars a span for shoeing horses. 

Tt was thus that the youth of James W. Uric was spent, his early years 
being devoted to the strenuous toil necessary to the clearing of the forest 
about the pioneer home and in helping his father in the smithy. He has 
worked as a gunsmith ever since he was old enough to stand at the bench 
and can make any part of a gun. today doing all kinds of u])-to-datc work 
in that line. After the death of his father he bought the old home place and 
continues to make his home there, having thus lived there ever since he was 
five years old. Mr. Urie has ever taken an active part in local public affairs 
and for tvvehe years gave very acce|)tablc service as school director of his 
district. Tie also was for some years the (ish and game warden for this 
district, during which term of service he ever gave studious and faithful 
attention to the interests of the state, always making sure of his cases before 
Ix'ginning proceedings, thus a\'oiding careless prosecutions. 

On January ig. 1884. James W. Urie was united in marriage to Emma 
Wright, who was Ixjrn in the neighboring county of (iratiot. daughter of 
John S. and Anginette (Ciarner) Wright, the former of whom was born in 
Suffolk county, luigland. on January 4, 1837, and died at the home of his 
son, John, at Maple Rapids, this state, on January 5, 191 5. at the age of 
sevent}'-eight years. In 1S53 John S. Wright came to .\inerica with his 
parents, the family settling at Wellington, in T.orraine county, Ohio, where 
they lived for a couple of years, at the end of which time they came to 
Michigan, locating at North Shade, in (iratiot county, in March, 1855, and 
there the elder Wrights spent the remainder of their lives. On Julv 3. 
i85(). John S. Wright was united in marriage to Anginette Garner, wdio was 
born in Summerhill. Courtland county. New York, Februarv 2},, 1837, and 
in the spring of i860 settled on a forty-acre farm in section ro, b'ulton 
township. Gratiot county, where they spent the remainder of their lives, and 
there their daughter Emma was born and there she made her home until 
her marriage to Mr. Urie. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 347 

To James W. and Emma ( Wright) Urie five children have heen born, 
namely: John S., who was born on December 31, 1884, in Gratiot county 
and started farming for himself in 1904, the next year buying a farm one- 
half mile south of the home farm in Bloomer township and there has been 
farming ever since, at the same time being actively engaged as an auctioneer, 
having- l^ecn most of the time associated with C. E. Chandler, one of the 
best-known auctioneers in Michigan, and for the past five years has also 
been engaged in managing a threshing outfit; in 1914 was married to Win- 
nie Davis, daughter of William Davis, a prominent resident of this county, a 
history of which family is set out in the biographical sketch of Mr. Davis, 
presented elsewhere in this volume; Frances, who married Neff Brown, liv- 
ing in the southeast part of Bloomer township, this county, and has two chil- 
dren, I'aul and Tralorene, living, and one, Gladys, who died at the age of 
six weeks ; Minnie, who married Albert Bennett, living in the northwest 
part of the neighboring county of Clinton, and has three children, James 
Warren, Ruth and Hazel; Myrtle, who is at home with her parents, and 
Carrie Belle, also at home. 



MRS. EMMA C. SHERWOOD. 

Emma C. Sherwood is one of the competent women who ably manage 
their affairs after they have been deprived, through death, of those who 
have sheltered and protected them. She was born on May 2, 1865, in Bush- 
nell township, Montcalm county, Michigan, just one mile east of her present 
home. She is the daughter of George W. and Sarah E. (Winegar) Collins. 
George W. Collins was born in the southern part of Michigan and was the 
son of George W. Collins. Sr. Shortly after the birth of George W. Col- 
lins, Jr., the family removed to Washtenaw county, Michigan, where they 
remained until death. 

George \\\ Collins, Jr., was reared on the home place and remained at 
home until he was thirty years of age, at which time he purchased a farm 
in Montcalm county, Michigan. He had married while a resident of Wash- 
tenaw county and his wife had borne him two children. Her death had 
occurred previous to his removal to Montcalm county, Michigan, and the 
children had been left to the care of her parents. Each winter he returned 
to visit them until his second marriage, which was solemnized six years after 



348 MONTCAI.M COL'NTY. MICHIGAN. 

the death of his iir>t wife. Two years later the children (Hed. By his 
second marriaj.ic Air. C'ollins had one child, F.mnia C. 

On March 26. i8(Sj, I'jrima C. Collins was united in marriage to Charles 
\\ Sherwood, son of Solomon and Christina Sherwood, and to them one 
child was horn, i'^rank C., who died in infancx'. Solomon and Christina 
Sherwood were natives of Jackson county, Michigan, and removed to Mont- 
calm county, Michigan, when their son. Charles k\, was six months old. 
After the death of their own child, (liarles V. and Emma C. Sherwood 
adopted a ho\- named Ted R. and he is now with his foster mother. Charles 
!'". Sherwood was a memher oi the P.usiinell Grange, as is also his widow, 
lie was one of the charter meniliers of the organization. 

On Xo\eml)er 16, 19 [5, Afrs. .Sherwood removed to Palo. Tenia county, 
where she ])urcha^ed a handsome hrick residence, having- sold her farms. 
She was ]:iossessed of two farms consisting of hfty acres and one himdred 
acres resi)ccti\X'ly, hoth of which she sold. 

Charles I'\ Sherwood was taken sick in March, 1015. and died on June 
18, 1015. and was huried in the Palo cemetery. He at one time was a mem- 
her of the Maccal)ees. He was \vell liked atid during his lifetime had the 
conlidence and esteem of ah who knew him. ITe was at the time of his 
death, treasurer of the I'ushncll Grange. In politics he was a J^epuhhcan. 



AT. TAY ATTNER. 



AI. Ja\' Aiiner, |)r()S]>erous farmer and w^ell-knowai citizen of Bloomer 
township. Alontcalm county, Michigan, was horn one rnile east of Bloomer 
Center, this county, on August 0, 1880. a son of George TL and .Martha 
Annette (Abates) Aiiner. the former l)orn in Lyons, Alichigan, on Novemher 
JO, 1S53. a son of Alartin J. and Lucinda ( I fawley) Afiner; the latter l)orn 
at Chili. Alonroe county. Xcw York, a daughter of William and Margaret 
{' A "andenhm-gh ) ^'ates. 

Alartin J. Aiiner. the grandfather, was a son of Anderson and Delilah 
Aiiner. the former oi wdiom w.'is one of the first settlers in the southeast 
part of Alontcalm county. Michigrm, a United .States government deed, 
dated Septemher T, i8sf. granting to .\ndcrson Miner one hundred and 
sixtv acres in the northeast ((tiarter of section 28, in I~51oomer townshi]), the 
grant heing made hy virtue of a land warrant given him as an artificer in 
Captain Partridge's com])any of United States Artificers, in the War of t8t2. 



MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 349 

Aiulersoii Miner came from the state of New Vork to Montcalm county. 
.Michigan, among- the hrst of those to reach l)lot)mer township, they lincHng 
it necessar)' to cut" roads through the timher and 1)rnsh in order to reach their 
hu)d in this communit}'. As an earl_\- citizen Anderson Miner took an 
imi)ortant part in the advancement of the interests of the early settlers, the 
first township meeting, at which the townshi]) \va> organized, being held in 
the home of Mr. Miner. 

Martin J. Miner spent the greater i)art of life on the home farm in 
l)loomer township, although for some years he was engaged in business at 
("arson City, Ab)ntcalm ctnmt}-, as a furniture dealer, later as the operator 
u\ an eltvntor business, wliiie at one time he was a builder, having superin- 
tended the erection of the buiUling in which the State r)ank of ("arson C'ity 
is now located. 

Martin 1. Miner was married to Lucinda 1 law ley. who was born in 
1837, in (iene\a county. Xew York, a daughter of Alpheus C. and Lucena 
( ljners(»n ) llawley. a sketch of whose lives is presented elsewhere in this 
\olume under the name of (ieorge TI. Lester. Mrs. Miner having been a 
--ister of Mrs. (). L. lUu'dge, foruierl\- the wife of (ieorge II. Lester. ^Irs. 
Miner came to Montcalm county. Michigan, with her j)arents. where she grew 
to maturity and was married to Martin J- Miner, to tliem being born tvv(.) 
cliildren : (ieorge IJ.. and T.ucena. deceased, who was the wife of T. C. 
I'^rushour. 

(ieorge II. Miner grew to maturity on the home farm in IMoomer town- 
shi]). .Montcalm count}, after completing his education in the public schools 
of the localit\- becoming a farmer, a \ocation which he follow'ed on one hun- 
dred and fifty-se\en acres of land near the ])resent Bloomer (x'uter church 
for tiie whole of his life, with the exception of a few years when he was 
engaged in agricultural i;ursuits on eighty acres of land nearby, which farm 
lie left and moved to his later place in 1881, li\-ing there until his death on 
.\ugust 26, 1908. 

.Martha .\nnette. the wife of (ieorge IF. ATincr, s])ent her early ^'ears 
at the home of her i)a,rents, William and .Margaret ( Vandenburgh ) ^''ates, 
natives of Schaghticoke. Rensselaer Cf^unty. Xew York. Later her parents 
moved to AM on roe count}-. .\'ew- \"ork. living there until the death of Mrs. 
\'ates. which occurred when I^lartha .\miettc was a child, h^ollowing the 
death of his wife. William ^'ates was married, a second time, the family 
moving, in the early seventies, to Montcahn county. Michigan, where, after 
living in several localities, they finally settled in f^loomer townshii), where 
\\'illiam Yates spent his last da}-s. 



350 MONTCALM COUNTY. MICIIJGAN. 

1^0 the luarriai^c of George IT. and Alartha Annette Afiner. which 
occurred on March i(S. 1871, were l)orn two children: . ^1. jay, and one 
daughter who died in infancw .Mrs. .Miner now lives on a farm near Bloomer 
Center, Montcalm county, Michigan. 

M. jay Miner was ahout one year of age when he came with his ])arents 
to llloomer Center, where he was reared on the home farm, receiving his 
earl}- education in the common schools of the locality, after which he 
hecame a student at the (Larson (^.it\- high school. Following his school days 
-Mr. Miner s]jent .'^ome time at Chicago. Illinois, at Saginaw, Michigan, and 
other places, la.ter returning to T'loomer township, this county, where he was 
married and then hecame a farmer on the old Miner farm. Mr. Afiner first 
lived near the Bloomer ('enter church and then, in Novcniher. rgio, moved 
to his present home near the southwest corner of Bloomer Outer, where he 
lives and cares for the cultivation of tw-o hundred and forty acres of exxel- 
lently improved and highly cultivated farm land. 

On April 18, 1906, M. Jay Miner was married to Ola Th<ayer, who 
was born at Carson City, Montcalm county, Afichigan, and to this marriage 
have Ix^en l)orn five children : Martha Louise, Veneva Leone, Velma Eliza- 
beth, George William, and Irma Lucille, who died \\hen seven weeks old. 

Mrs. Miner is a daughter of William Henry and Martha Jane (Luther) 
Thayer, the former born on December 27, 1840, in Erie county. New York, 
a son of John G. cmd Mary (Davis) Thayer; the latter born in Erie county, 
Penn.'iylvania, a daughter of J. 1'.. and Julia Ann (Washburne) Luther. 

William II. 1'hayer spent his boyhood days on the home farm and 
when twenty-three \-ears of age went to the oil regions of Pennsylvania, 
where he was engaged in dressing tools for oil-drilling apparatus, for eleven 
years. In 1874, Mr. Thayer mo\-ed to Carson Cit\-. Moiitcalm county, Mich- 
igan, where he lived and engaged in the drug Inisiness until March, T907, 
when he went to Greenville, this county, and for four and one-half years 
was an em])lovee of the Sprague (S: Company drug store. Wr. Thayer then 
went to Mt. F'lcasant and followed the same line of w^jrk until .April ii, 
19 1 4, when he moved to Bloomer Center, where he now resides. 

As a citizen and political worker W'illiani IT. Thayer has taken an 
important place in Montcalm county, while a resident of Carson City having 
served as township clerk for several years, was tow nship treasurer two vears, 
village treasurer one term, and was a school official for many years. 

On March 15, 1870, William TL Thayer was married to Martha Jane 
Luther, who after the death of her mother, Julia .Ann T.uther, and the second 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MlCIIIGAN. 35 1 

marririge of her father, J. !>. Luther, lived with the ])arcnts of lier step- 
mother until she wa-^ fourteen }ears of age, at that time going to \'enango 
county, I'ennsylvania, wliere she hved until her marriage. To the marriage 
of William H. and Marth;i Jane Thayer have Ijeen horn six children: Grace 
i:., William luu-l. Ola A!., (ieorge B.. l>^oene L. and lucrell D. 

(Jla Thayer, who is the wife of AT. Jay Miner, was educated in the 
puhlic schools of Carson City, graduating from the local high school in 
lyoo. after which she hecamc the deputy to Mr. Beemis, postmaster of Car- 
son City, Montcalm county, remaining in that position for one year. 

M. Jay Miner is one of the fa\oral)ly known men of Bloomer township, 
Montcalm county, being forem(.)st in those things having for their object the 
ad\ancement of the conmiunity's interest and being a citizen who lends 
freely of his time and effort for the promotion of various projects dealing 
with scientific agriculture and the betterment of general local conditions. 
I'Vaternally, Mr. Miner is a prominent member of the I'Tec and Accepted 
Masons, of Montcalm county. 



CHARLRS A. MABIE. 



Charles A. Alabie, w-ell-known farmer and highly-respected citizen of 
Hushnell township. Montcalm county, Michigan, w-as born in Fairplain town- 
shii>, Montcalm county, July 22, 1868, a son of Joel W. and Rachael S. 
(Koutz) Mabie. the former born in New York state, a son of Jeremiah and 
Lois MA'ans) Mabie, who were of Holland-Dutch descent, the latter born 
in Mifflin townshi]), Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Jacob 
K(jutz and wife, who were of German descent. 

When a boy, Joel W. Mabie came to the state of Michigan with his 
father and located in Ionia county, where Joel W. Mabie was married to 
Rachael S. Koutz, who came to Ionia county. Michigan, with her parents, 
after which Mr. Mabie and his wife moved to Fairplain township, Mont- 
calm county, living there for some time and then moved to Bushnell township, 
a ])lace which was the home (T the elder Mabie for about forty years, during 
that time he being employed as a miller and working as a farmer on his 
farm of forty acres. Joel W. and Rachael S. Mabie were the parents of 
nine children, I.ebias J., Marian A., Morence A.. Luella J.. Sarah E., Charles 
A, .Svlvia C. Angie R. and William. 



352 MONTCALM COl'NTY, MICHIGAN. 

diaries A. Mabie lived on the home farm and eontril)iitcd to the sii])- 
puri uf the home durin,^^ the years of his early manhood and then, having 
married, Air. Alahie took charge of the farm, which he improved and on 
which he is now successfnlly engaged in general farming. 

On Jnne 26. IQ12, C'harles .V. Afahie was married to Xcllie IJorden, a 
da.nghter of \Vili)in't iJ. and ;\ramantha Al. (McCrady) Borden, who moved 
to Ionia county from Oakland county, Michigan, Mrs. IJorden originally 
ha\ing come from (.'anada, where she was l)orn, of Scotcli parentage. I^o the 
marriage of Charles A. and Nellie Mal)ie ha\'e heen born two children, 
Kachael Araniantha. liorn on. May 20, 19 13, and RonaW N'orman, .\pril 22, 

(diaries A. Mabie is a member of Sheridan Lodge Xo. 7312. Modern 
\\ oodmcn of .\nierica. and is a inemlK^r of Sh.eridan Lodge Ko. 50, Knights 
of the Maccabees. In pc^lilics, AJr. .Mabie is an ardent Repnldican. and 
although he has taken no es])ecial part in the ])olitical life of the community, 
not as])iring to public oftice. he is known as a man of intelligence in partv 
matters and is a citi/en who is \a1ued and ai)])reciated for his part in the 
])romotion of the gener.al welfare of the townshi]) and county. 



JOSRPIJ llAXCIIinT. 

Prominently listed among the well-known veterans of the C'ivil War 
;,ii:l >uhslanlial farmers of .Montcalm ciraniy i;; found Joseph IJanchett, of 
Bushnell township, whose place on rural route Xo. 1, out of Sheridan, is 
one of the most ])roducti\-e farms (hereabout. Josephv I lanchett was born 
in the town of Tompey. Onondaga county, Xew ^'ork, on May 16, 1834, 
son of I.saac 1.'. and Lucina ((iriines) 1 lanchett. both natives of that same 
place, who came to Michigan in (869 and located for a time in Palo, Ionia 
county, after which they came to Alontcalm county, where they spent the 
remainder of their lives. They were the parents of ten children, four sons 
and six daughters. Idiese four sons all enlisted for service in the Union 
arniv during the Civil War and fought bravely for the preservation of the 
nation's unity. Of these ten children, tive are still living: Joseph, the 
subject of this sketch: \'.. J. Hanchett, a ])ros])erous retired farmer living 
at Long Ikach, California: .\. C. Hanchett, of Clare county, this state: 
Nancy, widow of i'xlward Drake; Lottie, wife of Theodore Baxter, of 




MR. AND M1!S. JOSKl'lI IIAXCIIETT. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICiflGAN. 353 

Palo, this state; Grimes, who was a soldier in the Civil War and was killed 
ill service, and Becky, deceased, who married James VVestcott. 

Joseph Hanchett was reared on the home farm in New York state 
and after reaching manhood came to Michigan and began farming. When 
the Civil War broke out he enlisted in Company D, Ninth Regiment, Mich- 
igan \\)liinteer Infantry, the date of his enlistment being August 5, i86i. 
lie served in this regiment until the close of the war, participating in many 
of the hardest-fought battles of the war during a period of four years and 
ihirty-five days, during which time he never was off duty, and never 
received a wound. He received his honorable discharge on September 15, 
1865. The Ninth Michigan was in the army commanded by Gen. George H. 
Thomas and from the time that famous general took command of the corps, 
Joseph Hanchett was attached to the general's service as body guard and 
was with General Thomas until the close of the war. He was mustered 
out on September 15, 1865, at Nashville, Tennessee. 

After the close of the war Joseph Hanchett returned to his home in 
this county and resumed his farming operations. He began with a small 
farm of eighty acres of cheap land, the country being "new" thereabout 
at that time, and gradually established a comfortable home; but not until 
he had overcome some rather discouraging setbacks, for twice he lost his 
farm, onl}^ to regain it again, and he has added to his original holdings 
until he now has a fine place of one hundred and sixty acres of well-tilled 
and productive land and is quite well circumstanced. 

On March 4, 1856, Joseph Hanchett was united in marriage to Angeline 
Husker, who was born in Lenawee county, this state, on September 23, 1839, 
daughter of William and Mabel (Wallid) Husker, who has been a valuable 
.11 1(1 competent helpmate to him all these years since. Mr. and Mrs. Hanchett 
are quiet, unassuming people, who have the respect and regard of their 
many friends. Mr. Hanchett is a Republican and has served the public as 
treasurer of the highway commission. He is a member of James Corel 
I\)st, Grand Army of the Republic, at Palo, and is held in high regard by 
the comrades of that \x)st, as well as by all who know him throughout this 
l)art of the state, in which for so many years he has been a substantial 
factor. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hanchett were born two children, Irving and Cora. 
Irving died when twenty-three years of age. and Cora married Marshall 
Sherd and lives on the farm directly south of her father's home place. 



354 MONTCAT.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 



JAMES MINKR. 



On another page in this vohinie, in the biographical sketch relating to 
the venerable Uriah Miner, one of the best-known and most highly respected 
pioneers of this county, there is set out in detail something of the genealogy 
of the Miner family and of the beginnings of that family's work in Mont- 
cahii county, l^ack in the days of the very beginning of a social order here- 
about, and it therefore will not be necessary, in this connection, to repeat 
these details here, it being sufficient to say that James Miner, a progressive 
and energetic farmer of Bloomer township, this county, is a native of Ohio, 
who was born on a farm in Van Wert county, that state, December 26, 
1856, son of Uriah and i\latilda J. ( Bodel ) Miner, second child and hrst- 
lK)rn son of that excellent couple, both of whom are still living, at a ripe old 
age. at their home in Bloomer township, this county. 

James Miner was about twelve or thirteen years old when he came to 
this county with liis parents from Ohio and he grew to manhood on the 
])ioneer f.-n'm in Blo(.)mer township, i)roving an invaluable assistant to his 
father in the strenuous labors connected with the clearing of the forest and 
rendering habitable the then wilderness. Tie received his elementary educa- 
tion in tb.e district school of his home neighborhood, supplementing the 
same by a course in the high school at Ithica, county seat of the adjoining 
county of (Iratiol. after which he entered college at Batde Oeek, u])on the 
com])letion of which excellent course he began teaching school and for three 
years, i<S<S]-<S4, was thus engaged in Montcalm and Gratiot counties. lie 
then went to Battle Creek, in which city he was connected with the Review^ 
:'.nd Herald Publishing ComjKniy until 1898, during which time he took a 
course in the dental department of the University of Michigan, from which 
he was graduated in 1898. Upon receiving his diploma he entered ui>on the 
practice of his profession at Battle Creek and was thus engaged until 1904, 
in wdiich year bis e}es began to fail and he was most reluctantly compelled 
to relinquish his practice. lie then went to Chicago, where for five vears 
he was actively connected with the great publishing house of Rand McNally 
& Company. At the end of that time, in April, 1909, he returned to his 
old home in this county and, in order to relieve his father of the cares of 
the farm, advancing years by that time having begun to leave their trace 
upon the rolmst figure of his pioneer father, bought the old home i>lace and 
has since that time been very successfully oi)erating the same, making his 
home there. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 355 

In 190T James Miner was united in marriage to Ola J. Hall, who was 
\,r.vu in Towa. daughter of James M. and Flora (ATurdock) Hall, who later 
iiK'ved to a farm two or three miles out of Chattanooga, Tennessee, where 
(lie dausrhter g^e^v to womanhood. While attending college at Battle Creek 
>!ic met Doctor Miner, who then was practicing dentistry there, and their 
marriage followed shortly thereafter. Doctor and ATrs. Miner take a proper 
part in the social activities of their home neighborhood and are held in high 
rcuard thereabout. 



URIAH MINER. 



Uriah ]\Iiner. one of the oldest and l.)est-kno\vn pioneers of Montcalm 
county, who for nearly fifty years has been identified with the interests of 
this region, now living, in the calm "sunset time" of his life, on the place 
which he claimed from the forest wilderness in Bloomer town.ship in 1859, 
a ])lace now owned and managed by his son, James Miner, a well-known 
f.irmer of that section, is a native of Ohio, having been born in Harrison 
county, that state, on February 5, i(S28. son of John and Barbara (Shaffer) 
Miner, both natives of that same state. 

John Miner was a sturdy Ohio farmer, who moved with his family to 
Allen comity, Indiana, where, in the neighborhood of Ft. Wayne, he and his 
wife spent th.e remainder of their lives. When his parents moved to Indi- 
ana. Uriah Miner was about fourteen years old and he grew to manhood on 
ilie hotne farm in Allen county, that state. In September. 1853, he married 
Matilda J. Bodel. who was born near Columbus, Ohio, daughter of John S. 
and Sarah (Smith) Bodel, who later moved to Van Wert county, Ohio, 
\vhere the daughter lived until her marriage. After his marriage Uriah 
Miner began farming in Van Wert county and presently bought a farm 
tlierc, not far from the home of his wife's parents, on which he lived until 
1866. In i8rx} he came to Michigan, putting in his lot with that of the 
P'oneers who then were Ix^ginning to penetrate the forest wilds of Mont- 
'-dm county. Some time previous to taking up his permanent residence 
here he had l)een attracted by the possibilities presented by this region and 
ha<l Ijought ail eighty-acre tract of timber land in the southeast part of 
i)l()omer town.ship. this county, and had cleared fourteen acres of the same 
before moving his family here. On this cleared tract he had erected a little 
board shanty, twelve by fourteen feet in dimensions, and there he installed 
his family, this unpretentious dwelling serving as a place of abode until he 



356 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

presently built a somewhat more secure, but still humble, house of logs, ni 
which the famil\- made their home until he erected his present substantial 
farm house in 18S2, and there he and his wnfe, ever a competent and valu- 
able helpmate to him in the trying days of forest pioneering, have made 
their home ever since. The i)lacc is well improved, with its substantial house, 
barns and out-l)uiklings, well-tilled rields and fine orchard and long has been 
regarded as one of the most home-like and attractive places thereabout. 

To Uriah and Matilda J. (Bodel) Miner four children have been born, 
namely : Carrie, who married B. Franklin Ayres, of Allegan county, this 
state, and has three children, Orville, lamest and lulna ; James, a biographical 
sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume; Marion, of Gratiot 
county, this state, who married Emma Reynolds and has three children, 
Mrs. Carrie Wheeler. I^oy and Grace, and J. Perry, of Allegan county, this 
state, who married Bessie McAllister, upon whose death he married, secondly, 
Sarah, his deceased wife's sister and adopted a little girl named Mildred. 
Mr. and Mrs. Miner for many years have been earnest and influential mem- 
bers of the Seventh-Day Adventist church and their children have been 
reared in that faith. 



A. R. B'VCON & SON. 



"Maple Lawn Farm," an admirably kept place of two hundred and 
twenty acres, located one mile south of Sheridan, this county, is regarded as 
one of the veritable landmarks thereabout. The proprietors of "Maple 
Lawn Farm." /Xithur K. Bacon & Son, are considered as properly rei)resenta- 
tive of the progressive spirit of modern agriculturism and are recognized as 
among the substantial and enterprising citizens of Montcalm county. As 
breeders of fine stock they have made a great success and the live-stock 
products of their place arc widely known and in constant demand. 

Arthur K. Bacon was born on a farm near the center of Bushncll town- 
shi]), this county, on April 8, 1864, only son of Joseph IL and Susan D. 
(Weed) Bacon, both natives of Michigan, the former of whom was born in 
Lenawee county and the latter in Wayne county. 

Joseph D. Bacon came to Montcalm county when ten years of age with 
his parents, who settled here at that time and here s|>ent the remainder of 
their lives. He grew to manhood on the home farm and in 186 r enlisted 
in Company D, Ninth Regiment, Michigan Volunteer Infantry, with which 
he served for four years, or until the close of the war. receiving his honor- 



MONTCALM COUxXTY, MICHIGAN. 2)57 

able discharge in 1865. During a visit with friends in this county, Susan D. 
Weed, a charming young woman from Wayne county, was introduced to 
Joseph ]). Bacon and it was not long thereafter until they were married. 
They went to iiousekeei)ing on a farm, in the central section of Bushnell 
township and there resided until past middle age, when they retired to a 
cuinfortahle home in Sheridan, where their last days were s])ent. They were 
iiiembers of the Alctliodist cliurch and ever were recognized as among the 
leaders in all good w-orks in their neighborhood, being held in very high 
esteem thereabout. Mr. Bacon was a memljer of Thomas Custer Post, 
( iraiid Army of the Repnblic, in the affairs of which he ever took a warn: 
interest and was held in the most affectionate regard by his veteran comrades. 

Arthur V.. Bacon, the only child of this excellent couple, was reared on 
tlie liome farm and remained there until his marriage, in 1883, at which 
lime he bought a farm of forty acres in the neighborhood of his home and 
there made a new home. He i>resently added to his original holding an 
adjoining tract of forty acres and after farming for about ten years, sold 
(he place and established the first newspaper at Ken wick, the Advertiser, 
which he conducted there for one year and six months, at the end of which 
time he moved the plant to Sheridan, and for ten years (juite successfully 
conducted the Adveriiser at that place. He then sold the newspa];)er and 
bought the farm on which he is now living and has been very successful in 
his farming operations. To the tract originally ])urchased, he has added 
from time to time as the requirements of his growing operations made nec- 
essary, until now the farm embraces two hundred and twenty acres of as 
line land as Hes in Montcalm county, the most of which is under excellent 
cultivation. 

On December 13, 1883, .Arthur E. Bacon was united in marriage to 
Allie E. Sherd, who was born in Eenawee county, this state, on March 28, 
1862, daughter of William Sherd and wife, who came to this county when 
(heir daughter, Allie, was ten years of age, she therefore having received 
her education in the schools of this county. To this union two children have 
been born, Eleanor E.. lx)rn on .April 19. 188=5, who married William H. 
Lavery, of Bushnell tOAvnship, and has three children, a son and two daugh- 
ters, Clare, born in September, 1905, and Lela, Octol>er 19, 19 ro, and Mel- 
vin C, l^^ebruary 13, t888, who married Lulu M. Cleveland in May, 1906, 
and has two children, l)oth daughters, Lora, l)orn on Octol)er 11, 1910. and 
i'^dith, Novcm1>er 26, 1914. Mr. and Mrs. Bacon are members of the 
Methodist church, as are their children, and the family is held in high 
esteem throughout the Sheridan neighlx)rhood. 



35^ MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 

Mclvin C. Racon was reared as a farmer and i.s now a half owner and 
partner with his father in operating "Maple Lawn I'^irni,'' under the firm 
name of A. E. Bacon ik Son, a name now well known among breeder.^ 
throughout this section of the state. Tliey make a specialty of raising line 
stock, with ])articular attention to Shorthorn cattle. Shropshire sheep and 
Hampshire hogs, their hne herd of cattle being headed l)y 'Mlazelet T*ontiac 
Korndy" 142673; their hogs by ""Foljy"' 2519 and their sheep are pedigreed 
also. A. E. Bacon & .Son also are the ]>roprietors of the Sheridan poultr}- 
yards, where they make a specialty of purebred Plymouth Rocks, handling 
six varieties of this popular l>reed, with which they have made (juite a "hit'" 
at various poultry shows throughout the state. 

Arthur K. Bacon is a Republican and gives pro])er attention to the ])oli- 
tical aliairs of the county, his long newspaper experience having given him 
a thorough ac(|uaintance with civic conditions in Montcalm ccninty, but has 
never l)een included in the office-seeking class and has held no political 
offices. He is an earnest-minded, progressive and enterprising citizen, who 
enjoys the contidencc and regard of all. 



WILLIAM F. DAVIS. 

William V. Davis, a well-known resident of the Carson City neighbor- 
hood, a progressi\'e farmer of Bloomer township, this county, living one and 
one-half miles west and three-fourths of a mile north of Carson City, is a 
native of Xew York, having l)een horn near the city of Batavia, that state, on 
July 4, 1857, son of Thomas i). and Caroline (Crawford) Davis, pioneers 
of Montcalm county, of whom further mention is made in a l>iogra[)hical 
sketch relating to the fc^rmer, ]>resented elsewhere in this volume. 

William F. Davis was not two years of age when his parents came to 
this county and he conse(|uently has been a witness of the wonderful develop- 
ment that has been made in this region within a single generation of man- 
kind. He grew up amid the primitive conditions which the ])ioneers here- 
about were compelled to face, attending the rude district school of his home 
neighborhood in the days of his youth and aided his father in the develop- 
ment of the home place. As a young man he spent a year and six months in 
Dakota, at the end of which time he returned home and in 1889 married a 
neighbor girl and engaged in farming on his own account. I-'or about fifteen 
years after his marriage, Mr. Davis lived on a farm just south of the Grand 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 359 

lYiink railroad, one and one-half miles west of Carson City, and then moved 
to the old homestead farm, just north of the railroad, where ever since 
has made his home. In addition to the eighty acres in that tract, which he 
now owns, he is also farming an adjoining eighty and is doing well, l^eing 
regarded as one of the snhstantial farmers of that neighborhood. 

In the fall of 1889 William V. Davis was united in marriage to Frances 
R. l-'nller, who was born in Steuben county, New York, daughter of Thomas 
[■. and Amanda L. (Schuyler) Fuller, pioneers of this county, further men- 
tion of whom is made in a I.Mographical sketch of Thomas F. Fuller, presented 
elsewhere in this volume. I'Yances Fuller came to this county with her par- 
ents about i860 and spent her early years on a farm just south of the rail- 
road from her present home. ITer mother died in the spring of 1864, after 
which her father, with his two children, herself and her brother. Scott, 
returned to New York state, where they lived for about two years, at the 
end of which time they returned to their home in this county and later 
hVances b'uller lived for some time in South Dakota. 

To William V. and hYances R. (Fuller) Davis two children have been 
born, Winnie Fula, who was graduated from the high school at Carson 
Cit\-, after which she attended Ferris Institute and is now teaching school in 
this county, and Ruth TT., who is a student in the high school at Carson City. 
Air. and Mrs. Davis and their daughters are members of the Methodist 
church and take a proper part in all the good works of the neighborhood in 
which they live, the family being held in high regard therealx)ut. 



Vl\l C. ATT.CHIN. 



Vir C. Allchin, su]>ervisor of Bushnell township, this county, is a well- 
known farmer living on rural route No. i, out of Fenwick. He was born 
on the farm that he now owns, July 25, 1869, son of lidward and Elizabeth, 
(Curtis) Allchin, both natives of New York state, who. in the days of their 
youth, had come from New York to Michigan with their respective' parents, 
the tw^o families settling in Lenawee county. There Edward Allchin and 
Elizabeth Curtis were united in marriage, after which they came to this 
county, where they entered eighty acres of land in section 20, of Bushnell 
township, erected a log cabin and ])roceeded to make a home in the then 
wilderness. As they prospered they added to their original tract until they 
were the owners of a fine farm of one hundred acres, all of which was 



360 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

brought under excellent cultivation and there they spent the remainder of 
their li\es, being counted among the most substantial residents of that neigii- 
borhood, helpful in all good ways. 

'.Po lulward and Jilizabeth (Curtis) Allchin nine children were born, 
namely: Burdette, deceased: Alice, wife of William i-ieimer, of Taoli. Ionia 
county, this state; Delfred, deceased; Alar)', widow of (ieorge W. Eitelbuss, 
of Bushnell township, this county; Pearl, wife of William iMlnmnds, ol 
Isabella county, this state; Lizzie, wife of (ieorge Reeves, of Stanton, this 
county; Vir C. the immediate subject of this biographical sketch; \^erna, 
wife of K. 1^. Cha])nian, (.)f l^'enwick. this countw and Octa, wife of Orlando 
Galloup, of Bushnell. 

Vir C. Allchin was reared on the home farm, receiving his elementary 
education in the district schools of his neighborhood, which he supplemented 
by a course in the schools at Greenville and h'enton. preparing himself for 
teaching, and for ten years taught school in the district schools of this 
county, continuing, however, to live on the home ]>lace, assisting his father 
in the oi)erations of the farm, he being the only son at home, and finally 
gave over teaching and devoted his attention wholly to farming, in which 
he has been quite successful, having bought sixty acres across the road from 
the home place, which, added to the original home acres, gives him an excel- 
lent farm. Air. Allchin not only is a good farmer, but an enterprising and 
public-spirited citizen, who has given his careful and intelligent thought to 
the general betterment of local conditions. Tn the w^irk of the Grange he 
has long been active and is past master of his local grange. Tn 1903 he was 
elected supervisor of Bushnell township and, with the exception of a period 
of two years, has held that office ever since, his services in that connection 
having been of large value to the public. 

On September 30, 1891, Vir C. Allchin was united in marriage to Ida 
G. Comstock. daughter of William fl. and Catherine (Dodson) Comstock, 
and to this union four children have been bom, Dewey C, born on April 27, 
' 1898, a student in the Sheridan high school; Catherine, May 21, tc^oo; Eliza- 
beth, April 14, 1903, and Cecil. October 3, 1908. ATr. and ATrs. Allchin are 
active participants in the social life of their community and are quite popular 
with their many friends thereabout. 

Air. Allchin is a Rei>ublican and in addition to his long service as super- 
visor has also served the township in the capacity of clerk. He is the j^resent 
noble grand of the I^'enwick lodge of the Odd Fellows and is a member of the 
Knights of the ATaccabees, taking much interest in the workings of these 
lodges, as well as in his work in the Grange, and is held in high regard by all. 



MONTCALM COL'NTY, MICHIGAN. 361 

A'IRS. MTXA l^LCCK. 

Mrs. Miua Peck, owner of "I'leasant \iew Farm,"' one-half mile west 
(.f I'ierson, thi^ county, widow^ of the late Ford S. IVck, for years one of 
ilic l.jest-known and most ])rooTessive farmers of that ncighljorhood, is a 
native of Aiicliigan,- having- been l)orn in the neighboring county of Kent on 
January 26. i<^57, daughter of IToratio and Sarah (Riley) Webster, the 
former a native of Ne\v ^'ork state and the latter a native of England. 

floratio Webster was a railroad locomotive engineer, who had a run 
into l>troit, in which city he married Sarah Kiley wdio had come to the 
United States from hLngland Avith her parents when she was five years old, 
the family settling in Detroit, where she grew to womanhood and where she 
married. Later Horatio Webster and his family settled at Paris, in Mecosta 
county. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, of whom seven 
are still living, as follow: Alary, a sj)inster; Charles, a painter, living at 
-Atlanta. Georgia; Cieorge, a farmer, living near Deighton, this state; Aiina, 
the itumediatc subject of this biographical sketch: Nellie, who married Fred 
Peck; i-rank. who is living in northern Michigan, and Ida, who is the wife 
of John Grice. 

Mina Webster was reared in Grand Rapids and received an excellent 
education in the schools of that city. On January 26, 1878, she married 
I'ord S. TVck, who was Ix^rn in the state of New York in 1853 ^^id whose 
parents came to Alichigan when he was a child, settling in Pierson township, 
becoming substantial residents of that community, and it w^as there that 
I'ord Peck grew to manhood, reared on the farm and receiving his education 
in the district school of that neighlxjrhood. After their marriage. Mr. and 
Mrs. Peck located on the old Peck homestead, wdiich Mr. Peck later i)ur- 
chased, a fine farm of eighty acres, which is now^ owned by his widow and 
which is very appropriately known throughout that section of the countv as 
"Pleasant \'iew Farm.'* 

Ford S. Peck was a Republican and ever took an earnest part in the 
civic affairs of the community, having been clerk of the township for seven 
years. ITe was an earnest Methodist, one of the leaders in the local church, 
to the interests of which his father also had been warmly devoted, and he 
and his wife were regarded as among the leaders in all good works there- 
about, Mrs. Peck still retaining her active interest in all movements designed 
to advance the cause of good citizenship and l)etter morals in her commun- 
ity. Mr. Peck died on May 13. 1912, and was widely mourned throughout 



362 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

that neighborhood, for he was a man who had done well his part in all the 
relations of life and had made a good name in the commnnity. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Peck Ixit two children were born, one of whom died in infancy. The 
survivor, Arthur E. Peck, who was born on August 3, 1879, was graduated 
from the high school at Pierson, after which he entered the commercial col- 
lege at Grand Paj^ids and upon comi)leting the course there began teaching 
school. Fie married Ruby (^ole and to this union one child has been born, a 
daughter, Marian, born in December, .1910. 



MARSHALL I). SHERD. 

"Sutmy Slope b\irm," a well-kept tract of productive land, eighty acres 
in extent, on rural route No. i, lying three and one-half miles east and three 
miles south of Sheridan, in this county, is owned by Marshall D. Sherd, 
who has been a resident of Montcalm county since he was nine years of age. 

Marshall D. Sherd was born in Lenawee county, this state, on March 
27, icSf)!, son of William and I'^liza (Lewis) Sherd, the former of whom 
was born in New York state and the latter in Sandusky county, Ohio, whose 
respecti\e ])arents were among the ]>ioneer settlers in Lenawee county, h'ol- 
lowing their marriage, William and Eliza Sherd, for some years, lived on a 
farni in Lenawee cxninty, but in t!^7o came to this comity and made their 
home in I'ushnell township. Mrs. Sherd died on the home farm in that 
to\^nship in June. KJ14. and Mr. .Sherd is still living, one of the best-known 
residents of that neighborhood. The\- were the ])arents of five children, 
four of whom are still living, as follow: I^stella, wife of Charles Soles; 
]\larsha]l 1).. the subject of this sketch; Lavcrne. a farmer of Bushnell town- 
shi]). this county, and .\lzada, wife of A. K. Bacon. 

na\ing been but nine years of age when he came to .Montcalm county 
with his parents, Marshall D. Sherd has lived here practically all his life. 
He received his education in the district schools of r:^)ushnell township and 
remained under the parental roof until he was twenty-one years of age, after 
which he went to farming on his own account. The next year he was mar- 
ried and he and his wife went to housekeei)ing, and in 1893 ^^^^y moved to 
"Sunn\' Slope Farm'" and have pros]iered. being now considered (|uite well 
circumstanced. 

On January 17. 1883, jMarsh.all D. Sherd was united in marriage to 
Corrinna Hanchett, who was born in Bushnell township on February 17, 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 363 

1862. danj^htcr of Joseph and An^^^tline (Iluskcr) Hanchctt, prominent resi- 
dents of tiiat townshi]), and to this union five children have been born, all 
sons, namely: Berkeley II., born on Keljrnary 9, 1884; Mahlon J., January 
26, 1886; T.eslie M., July 31, 1894; Alerrit W.. March 31. 1899, and Irving 
D., September 2, 1901. Of these children. ISerkeley married T.ela C. Warne 
and they have one child, Helen; Mahlon married Olive Thomas and they 
have four children, Ruth, Irene, Doris and Kate; Leslie married Mildred 
Hoyt and lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

A'Ir. and Mrs. Sherd are quiet, unassuming people, who take a proper 
part in the social affairs of their neighborhood and arc held in high regard. 
Mr. Sherd is a Republican and for years has given close attention to the 
political affairs of the county, and has served as treasurer of Bushnell town- 
ship. He is a member of the Modern W'oodmen of America and takes much 
interest in the affairs of that popular order. 



CHARLES M. W HITL. 



Charles M. White, a native of J3ushnell township, Montcalm county, 
2\lichigan, and the son of LaRoy and Mary Jane (Maccomber) White, was 
l>orn on June 9, 1863. 

LaRoy White was Iiorn in the state of New ^'ork and came with his 
father when a young man of eighteen years to Michigan. They hrst located 
near ^'psilanti, but remained there but a short time, when they came to 
lUishnell township and entered land from the government and here John B. 
\\'hitc, the father of LaRoy. made his home until his death. 

Mary Jane Maccomber was born in Rochester, New York. Her mother 
died when she w-as born and her father was killed while working as a bridge 
builder. Some time later she wms adopted by another family and moved to 
Lena\\ee county, ^Michigan, with them when but seven years of age. The 
adopted parents luade their home there until the time of their death, some 
years later. Laivoy White and Mary Jane Maccomber l>ecame acquainted 
in Lenawee county and were married there. Mr. White was cutting wood in 
the county at the time and selling it at Y])silanti, wdiere the couple took up 
their residence soon after their marriage. Their residence there was of short 
duration and they came to Montcalm county, where they entered forty acres 
of land, in section 23, Bushnell township. Here they made their home for 
the next eight years, when they came to the farm where they made their 



364 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

home until their death, where ('harles M. VVliite now hves, Mr. White hav- 
ing died on March 19, igoi. and Mrs. White on January 24, 1906. I-al-Joy 
White and wife were the parents of four chikh-en : Eugene, deceased; 
Wilhani, Milhe, deceased, and Charles AT. 

C'harles M. White lived at home, where he assisted on the farm and 
received his education in the common schools of his county, until at the age 
of twenty-one, he left home and for two years was engaged in various kinds 
of work, fie then returned home and was married to Lillian Fuller, on 
November 20. 1885. Mrs. \\'hite was the daughter of \\711iam and Alwilda 
(Jackson) Fuller, of Sheridan, Michigan. After his marriage, Mr. White 
bought thirty acres of land of the old home place, and at the death of his 
mother he purchased the other thirty acres which constitutes his ])resent 
farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. White are the i)arents of seven children: An infant who 
died; Arthur Clay, of Sheridan; Alwilda. the wife of Ray TTaysmer, of 
Lansing; Alger, at home; Victor, at school in Sheridan; Arlie, deceased, and 
Bernice, at home. 

Fraternally, Mr. White is a member of the Knights of the Maccabees. 
He is a member of the Free Baptist church, and politicUly he is an advocate 
of the principals of the Republican party, though he is not an ofifice seeker, 
he has for years been a director of his school district and for the i)ast nine 
years has iK'en its treasurer. 



T^. L. CRANDALL. 



E. L. Oandall, the son of Stephen and Eliza (Fuller) Crandall, was 
born in Alfred, Allegany county, New^ York, on Noveml)er 16, 1865. 

Stephen and Eliza Crandall, the parents of E. L. Crandall, were natives 
of New "^'ork and came to Montcalm county in an early day, w-hen it was 
very sparsely settled. Mr. Crandall came w'ith the intention of entering the 
lumber and shingle business. He at once entered land and began preparation 
to make this his permanent home. Llis was the first frame house erected in 
Sheridan and the place has changed hands but a few times. 

But few of the Crandall family settled west of New York, but the 
Fuller family came to Michigan soon after the settlement here of Stephen 
Crandall. The Crandalls were farmers in New York and came to their west- 
ern home when E. L. was but a babe, three months old. Thev resided in 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 365 

Sheridan for three years, from 1866 to 1869, where Mr. Crandall was 
engaged in teaming and the Uimber and shingle business. At that time the 
family came to Bushnell township, where Mr. Crandall bought eighty acre:-, 
of land and here the family made their home for many years. Since his 
retirement from active work, Mr. Crandall has lived in Sheridan and later in 
Grand Rapids, where he still resides. Mrs. Crandall died in 1908. 

Mr. and Mrs. Crandall were the parents of six children, all of whom are 
living; ilattie is the wife of Fred Regis and lives in Evergreen township; 
Fred lives in Bushnell township; E. L., the subject of this sketch; Frank, of 
Detroit; Emma, the widow of Raymond Mabie, lives in Detroit, and Elmer, 
a salesman who makes his home in Mississippi. 

E. L. Crandall grew to manhood on the home farm and received his 
education in the common schools of the township. He worked for others 
until after his marriage, on Octol^er 22, 1890, to Clara Galloup, the daughter 
of A. P. and Betsey (Bennett) Galloup. 

A. P. Galloup settled in Ohio as a young man of twenty-live years, and 
there met and married Betsey Bennett. During their residence in Ohio three 
children were born to them. Later they moved to Ionia county, where they 
made their home for one year, after which they settled on a farm in Mont- 
calm county, w^here the parents spent the remainder of their lives. They 
were the parents of nine children: Zillah, the wife of George Shoop; Noah; 
Miranda, the wife of George Taylor; Calfurna, deceased, was the wife of 
Walter Kingsbury; i^Yances, deceased, was the wife of Hiram Taylor; Louis 
B. ; Fenton ; vShcrman, deceased, and Clara, the wife of E. L. Crandall. 

After his marriage, Mr. Crandall settled a short distance west of his 
present home. He now owns eighty acres of well-improved land, with sub- 
stantial and modern buildings, located in Bushnell township, three miles 
southeast of Sheridan. Mr. and Mrs. Crandall are the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : (Jar is a graduate of the Sheridan high school and is at 
present attending the Ferris Institute at Big Rajnds ; Zelma, who died at the 
age of four; Theresa, at home, and attending the district school, and one 
who died in infancy. 

Mr. Crandall and his family are active and influential members of the 
Baptist church of Bushnell township, and Mr. Crandall is a member of the 
oflficial board and takes much interest in the administration of the church. 
]\)litically, Mr. Crandall is a member of the Republican party and has been 
an overseer and a member of the board of review. He has also served as 
moderator for his school district for a number of vears. 



366 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICMTGAN. 

JAMES H. VERPLANCK. 

James H. X^erplanck, successful farmer and stock raiser, and a citizen 
])romincnt in the affairs of Ijuslmell township, Montcahn county, Michigan, 
was born in Cayuoa county. New York, on April 5, 1851, the son of Andrew 
and I'ietsy (Jewell) \ erplanck, the former of Dutch descent and a repre- 
sentative of the famous Xew ^'ork state \'erplanck family, the latter of 
y\merican and Jrish descent, she having l)cen the daughter of Isaac and 
Betsy (O'Brien) Jewell. 

James t\. \'er];)lanck moved to Washtenaw' county, Michigan, and located 
with his mother in Eyons townshi]), wdierc he lived until 1859, and then, his 
mother having died, he returned to New York state and lived with an aunt 
for some years. When about fifteen years of age. in 1866. James H. 
\'erplanck again came to Michigan and lived with his father in Calhoun 
county for about two years and then went back to New York state, where he 
made his home until twenty-one years of age, engaging in general farm 
work during this time. About 1872 Mr. Verplanck came to Greenville, 
Montcahn county, and for the next nine years engaged in farming and in 
lumber work, devoting the greater part of his time as a lumljcrman to the 
running of logs dow-n the streams of his locality. Tn 1882 James TI. Ver- 
planck, having ]>reviously married, bought a farm of eighty acres in Mont- 
calm township, Montcalm county, w^here Mr. \'^erplauck lived as a farmer 
and raiser of purebred Shorthorn cattle until tqto, when he purchased his 
present farm of two hundred and fifty-(i\'e acres in Bushnell township, which 
is known as the "I-"air Plains Stock Farm." On his modern and w^ll- 
ecfuipped farm, Mr. Verj^ilanck now is engaged wMth notal)le success as a 
farmer, together with the raising of large numbers of high-grade Percheron 
horses and purebred cattle. 

On October tq, 1881, James li. V^erplanck was married to Mary Jean- 
ette Desi>el(ler, a daughter of Peter and Dena (Debree) J>spelder, well- 
knowMi people of Montcalm county. To the marriage of James TT. and Mary 
Jeanette Verplanck were born two children, Edna and Rudolph. Edna, on 
December 8, 1905, w"is married to Victor h. Green, a farmer living near 
Greenville, in Montcnlm township, and has one son, James Edwin, seven 
years old. Rudolph was married on September 3, 1912, to Blanche Pitcher, 
of Sheridan, and has one child, born on December 25, 1915, named Jasper 
Garrett. On December 8, 1899, Mary Jeanette, the wife of James H. Ver- 
planck, died, and on February 20, 1902. Mr. Verplanck was married, sec- 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 367 

oiuUy, to Audrianna Dcspelder, a sister of his deceased wife. To this mar- 
riage no children have l)een Ixjrn. Mr. \''eri)lanck and his family are mem- 
bers ol the Congregational clnircli, heing active in the work and worship of 
this denomination in Montcalm county. 

James IT. \'erplanck has been active in the ])o]itical and official affairs 
ol' Aiontcahn county, having served as clerk of Montcalm townshi]) for two 
\ears, and in the year 1(890 was engaged in the taking of the federal census, 
Mr. \erplanck is one of the highly respected citizens of Montcalm county, 
his activity for general welfare and im])rovement having given him a ])lace 
among the leaders of the community. 



PROF. TdaVLS B. GATJ.OUP. 

Prof. Lewis B. Galloup, a farmer and music teacher living on rural 
route No. 4, Sheridan, Michigan, is the proprietor of "i^ioneer Ranch," 
consisting of one hundred acres of land, situated two miles east of the town 
of Sheridan. He was born on March 6, 1881, on the land mentioned, the 
son of /\. P. and Betsey (Pjennett) Galloup. His father was a native of 
A'ew York state and his mother of the state of Ohio. They were married in 
Ohio and after that event came to Michigan, about the year 185 1, and lived 
near J>yons, Michigan, for one year, and then came to Montcalm county 
and settled in Bushnell township, where they lived until his death. A. P. 
Galloup first entered eighty acres of land under the government homestead 
law. and later forty additional acres, upon which he built a home. He was 
active in local politics; in religion a Baptist. They had nine children, five 
of whom are yet living, of these, Xoah is a farmer; Zillah is the widow of 
George Shooj); Lewis B. and Linton live in Bushnell township; Clara is the 
wife of T^dward Crandall. 

Lewis B. Galloup was reared on the farm and attended the common 
schools. He also took a course in instrumental music and became a music 
teacher. He organized classes and taught for thirty years. Lie married 
ivhoda Williams and of their two children one died in infancy and the other, 
iv. B. Galloup, seventeen years of age, lives at home with his father. 

Rhoda Williams was born on May 9. 1874. in Bloomer township, Mont- 
calm county, daughter of Charles and Caroline Jane (Blanchard) Williams, 
l)Oth of whom were born in Chautauqua county. New York, and were there 
married and later moved to Michigan and settled on a farm in Bloomer town- 



368 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

sliip, near Butternut, where they were pioneers. They had two children, Lee 
and Rhoda; T.ce Hves with his parents. Mr. and Mrs. WilHams are now 
living in J.^vergreen township, Montcalm county. Mr. Williams served three 
years in the xNinth New York Ca\'alry in the Civil War. 

In religion I-'rof. L. B. (jalloup is a Republican and is a member of the 
Baptist church. Mrs. Galloup belongs to the Seventh-Day Adventist church. 
Professor Gallon]) has for years been recognized as a ]>rolicient teacher of 
music and has taught not only in this but in other counties, giving individual 
instruction, specializing in instrumental music. 



ADELBERT A. HERRTCK. 

Adelbert A. Jlerrick, successful farmer, extensive stock raiser, and 
man prominent in the affairs of Bushnell township, Montcalm county, Mich- 
igan, was born in Washtenaw county, Michigan, on July 6, i860, a son of 
Nathan and Mary J. (Dailey) Herrick, lx)th of whom were lx)rn in Wash- 
tenaw county. 

l^^ollowing his marriage, in his native country, Nathan Herrick moved to 
Ingham county, Michigan, where he lived for two years and then returned 
to Washtenaw county, which he made his home until the year 1875, when 
he moved to Bushnell township, Montcalm county. Nathan Herrick was 
in his day a noted veterinary surgeon and practiced that profession until 
his death. While he was the owner and manager of a farm he devoted the 
major portion of his time to his profession. He also taught many students, 
and many capable veterinarians in this section of the country received their 
instruction from Mr. Herrick. Nathan and Mary J. Herrick were the 
parents of the following children: Gharles R., Adelbert A., Rose, James E., 
Anna J., Walter, and Dewey, who died when eight years old. 

Adell^ert A. Herrick received his early education in the common schools 
of his community, and at the schools of Ithaca, Gratiot county, and Palo, 
Ionia county, also attending the Palo high school. After his school days, 
Mr. Herrick was employed in a general store and as a grain buyer for his 
brother Charles, following this line of work for two and one-half years. 
Later, Adelbert A. Herrick having married, he and his brother James bought 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in Bushnell township, Montcahn 
county, which was the old homestead, which Mr. Herrick has greatlv 
improved and to which he has added land at various times until now he is 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 369 

ilie owner of more than five hundred acres of land, which he cuhivates as 
a general farmer and where he engages in the raising of Percheron horses 
ind other good grade live stock. The farm of Adelbert A. Herrick is one 
.)f the best improxed of the entire community, he having erected a modern 
jifteen-room house, constructed of line sandstone, and has built a com- 
modious and convenient l)arn, together with other buildings, all of which 
are well cared for. The farm of Mr. Herrick is known as the "Prairie 
( reek Stock Farm." 

Adelbert A. Herrick was married to Fannie Sanders, who died three 
years after their marriage, and six years later Mr. Herrick was married, 
secondly, to Clara Chapman, who came to Montcalm county when she was 
an infant, and after the completion of her education was a school teacher 
tor some years. Mr. Herrick and his wife are members of the Baptist 
church, of Palo, Tonia county, Adelbert A. Herrick having been a member 
of this church since 1886, during this time he having been a deacon for 
many years and for some time was sui)erintendent of the Sunday school. 

In political life, Adelbert A. Herrick has been active, having served as 
township treasurer for two terms. As a business man, Mr. Herrick is a 
stockholder in dii'ferent enterprises, and is also a ])roperty owner in Detroit, 
Michigan, as well as being a man who has l)een interested in the lumber 
business locally. 



IT^FD F. DFAN. 



Among the prominent and valued citizens of Ikishnell township, Mont- 
<alm county, Michigan, is l^'red L. Dean, farmer, lecturer on scientific agri- 
'.ulture, former teacher and educator, and man prominent in the afifairs of 
Montcalm county, whcj was born in Bushnell township, on February 22, 
1N60, the son of George \.. and Sarah (Holland) Dean. 

George L. Dean, who was born in Cayuga county. New York, a son of 
* harles Dean and wife, came to Michigan, when a young man and made his 
!i<)nie in this state, living at Hudson until 1865, when he moved to Montcalm 
'Oiinty and located in section 9, P.nshnell townsbip, where he oi)erated a mill 
tor some time and then engaged in general farming on fifty-two acres of 
'and. (ieorge F. Dean was first married to Nellie Underbill, who died 
-hortly following their removal to Montcalm county. Some years later Mr. 
Dean was married, secondly, to Sarah Holland, and to this marriage were 
(24b) 



3/0 MONTCALM COl-XTY. MICMTGAN. 

born three children: J^'rcd L., of this sketch; Don \V., a successful fanner of 
Ionia county, and l)iz \\'., a hardware dealer, of AIcTh-ide. 

h'red T>. De;ui received his elementary education iti the ])ublic sdiools 
of Bushnell township, after which, he attended and graduated fntni the 
Stanton hii^h school and then became a student at the j\lt. Pleasant Normal 
School for some time. Later, ?^lr. Dean engaged in the professicju of a 
school teacher, following the duties of this work until IQ07. during this time 
having taught in vari(.)us schook throughout Montcalm county and the A'icin- 
it}'-. About tlie year i<)0/ b'red L. Dean purchased a farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres, located in Bushnell township, where he has since made liis 
home and where he now engages in general farming and in the raising of 
purebred IJolstein cattle, his stock in this line being of the best to be found 
in the community. In addition to his other farm activities, l'>ed T.. Dean 
engages in the dairy business and in the conduct of state institute work, tbe 
farm of Mr. Dean being known as the ''.Xgricultural Development h^arm." 
Fred D. Dean has been notably successful as a scientific farmer and as a 
student of adxanced methods in agriculture, his knowledge along this line 
resulting in his being called to various places throughout Michigan and neigh- 
boring states for the purpose of giving lectures and instruction on agricul- 
i\\Y<i\ methods and ])rogress. As president of the jMontcahn h'armers In.sti- 
tute Society. .Mr. Dean is taking a leading part in "the development of the 
resources of this count}-, and in the raising of agricultural standards and 
results. 

On April 6, 1893, T^retl L. Dean w^as married to Ida M. Hare, who was 
a well-known school teacher of Montcalm county, she 1>eing the daughter of 
Frank D. Ilarc and wife, ])rominent i^eople of Ferris township. To the 
marriage of Fred T>. and Ida ]\T. Dean have been born three children : 
Lela, wdio was educated in the grade schools and later at the Sheridan high 
school, afterward becoming a school teacher, until her marriage to Floyd 
Robinson, of Bushnell township; Nina, who was graduated from the Sheri- 
dan high school and the county normal school at Stanton, she now being a 
teacher in the schools of Bushnell tow^iship, and George F., who now is a 
student of the Sheridan high school. Mrs. Dean is an active member of the 
Baptist church and takes a leading part in the worship and the other elTorts 
of this denomination, in Bushnell townshi]). 

Fred L. Dean is known for his efforts as a social w'orker and for his 
interest in the improvement of general conditions in Montcalm county, and 
the vicinity, he now being a memlKT of the executive committee of the Mont- 



MONTCALM COl'N'TY, MICrilGAN. ^yi 

calm County ^Anti-Saloon League, and a man who is especially active in 
temperance circles. Mrs. Dean is president of the Bushuell township Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union and co-operates with her hushand in the advance- 
ment of the temijcrance cause in this community. 

In politics, Fred L. Dean is a Democrat and while he has taken no 
especial part in the i)arty activity, he is known as a man who is active and 
influential in matters jjertaininj^ to party welfare and proi^ress. Mr. Dean 
is one of the esteemed and honored men of Montcalm county, his unselfish 
and clean life, toi^ether with his efforts for the promotion of the i^eneral 
welfare in social, j)olilical and agricultural matters. ha\ing gi\-en him a 
]jlace (;f note amono- the citizens of Montcalm and surrounding counties. 



CHAXClvLI.OR K. IIKiBKR. 

forenujst in the agricultural field of Montcalm count}- is Chancellor 
llighee, who for several years, has devoted his entire attention to stock 
raising and general farming. As a descendant of a family of pioneer farm- 
ers it is only natural that the inherent traits of his nature should have won 
for him a place of prominence in the held of endeavor which he has chosen. 
I lis life has lieen one of consecutive industry and the prosperity now enjoyed 
hy him its legitimate reward. Chancellor l^dward llighee is a native of 
Ionia county, Michigan, having heen born there on the 28th of June, 1852. 
Tie is the son of PJenjamin and Daura Maria (Goodwin) Higbee, both of 
whom were born in the state of Xew York, the former in Broome county 
and the latter in Steul>en, Oneida county. Laura M. Goodwin, who was 
born on the 23r(l of February, 1827, mo\-ed to Tonia county in 1840 with her 
l)arents, Air. and Mrs. Chauncey Goodwin, who were among the first settlers 
to locate in that count}-, outside the cit}' of L^nia. moving there in 1838. 
Mr. Goodwin experienced during his life in the wilderness all the incidents 
of a pioneer life. In order to reach Detroit in those days he was obliged 
to follow blazed trails with a team of oxen and to ford the rivers that crossed 
the path so that the journey lasted several days. Laura M. Goodwin, w^ho 
was reared amid these scenes of pioneer life, profited by the experiences of 
her girlhood, the hardships of which only tended to strengthen her character. 
On July 4, 1841. the marriage of Laura Goodwin to Benjamin Higtee took 
])lacc. 

Lhe father of the subject of this sketch was born on the r5th of Novem- 



372 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

ber, 1818. and moved to Ionia county in 1838, where he settled for a time 
in the village of Ionia. During the first i:>eriod of his stay in this loaUity 
he clerked in the first hotel of Ionia and later became interested in the Ashur 
pottery plant which was the first one of its kind in that community. After 
his marriage, ^\r. llighee moved to section 36, of Orleans town.ship, where 
his father owned a large farm. I'he TTigbee estate was finally divided among 
the three brothers of the family, and Benjamin TTigbee took up his residence 
on the home farm. Tie cleared the timber and developed the fartn condi- 
tions in a manner deserving of the highest praise of the community. After 
sixty-seven years of .wedded life, Mr. TTigl)ee passed away on the ist of 
i\pril, 1908. and his wife, who had proved a devoted companion, died one 
month later. Mr. Higbee was always ardent in hi> suppcjrt of the Prohibi- 
tional i)arty and worked untiringly for its extension. Tie was also a \'alu- 
able memlxir of the I'aptist church. At one time Mr. ITigbee was em])loyed 
by the Ionia. Montcalm and Clinton Insurance Company. 

i'he subject of this sketch was reared to the duties of farm life from 
an early age and upon reaching the age of manhood bought ])art of his 
father's estate which he used for general farming, l.ater he bought a ])art 
of his uncle's farm. The entire farm covered one hundred and fifty-tw(j 
acres of land in Orleans township, and twenty acres in liastern township. 
Mr. TTigbee is fanfiliar with every branch of agriculture and is esi>ecially 
interested in stock buying and shipping. 

In March. 1910, Mr. lligbee came to Butternut for permanent resi- 
dence, where he owns one hundred and seven acres. The residence at Butter- 
nut, belonging to Mr. Tligbee, was entirely destroyed by fire, December 26. 
1914, Init has since been replaced by a lieautiful brick bungalow of the most 
modern design and construction. The land surrounding the home has ])roved 
to l)e a \'aluable investment and the subject of this sketch has not only realized 
large '^ums from the sale of town lots which were in I-kitternut, but als(j 
form wheat and grain. 

Mr. Tiigbec is a man of the highest public spirit but has never sought 
to give this loyalty expression in the seeking of a public office. He has a 
poi)ular standing in the community and is looked upon as a man of large 
and substantial views. T'^or three terms he held the office of justice of the 
peace in Orleans townshi]). 

On the J St of January, 1875, (Chancellor E. Higbee was married to Ida 
Bishop, a native of b^ckson, and the daughter of Orlando and F.liza (Wil- 
cox) Grover. When Mrs. TTigliee was three years old her father died and 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 373 

she was adopted by Noah Bishop and his wife who resided in Easton town- 
>hip, lonia county. 

To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Ilighec tlie following" children ha\c 1>een 
horn: lilanche married Herman Bluemly and lives in Butternut, where her 
husband is interested in the stock l)usiness with Mr. Higbee, and they have 
one son. Corris ("hancellor; Grace, who is the wife of Dr. W. A. Hart, 
ivrakes her home in Lapeer and has one daughter. Marjorie. 

Mr. and Mrs. Higbee hold mem])ership in the Baptist church, where 
they arc looked ui)on as benefactors as well as ardent w^orkers. In fraternal 
affairs Mr. Higbee is a memljcr of the Odd Fellows and the Maccabees, and 
both he and his wife are afifiliated with the Grange. 



ORLAND W. GALLOUr. 

Orland W. (jalloup. well-known farmer and prominent citizen of Bush- 
nell township, Montcalm county, Michigan, was lx)rn in Bushnell township, 
this county, on November 10, 1873, the son of N. B. and Matilda rfaylor) 
(ialloup, natives of Ohio and of Canada, resi>ectively. 

N. B. Galloup came to Michigan with his father, Austin P. Galloup, 
and located in lonia county, where they lived for a short time and then came 
to Bushnell township, Montcalm county, at which place the elder Galloup 
homesteaded eighty acres of land, which he cultivated for some time, after 
which he disposed of his homestead and moved to another farm located 
nearby, where A. P. Galloup lived until after the death of his wnfe and then 
spent the remainder of his days among his children in Bushnell township. 
N. B. Galloup was married- to Matilda Taylor, of Canada, a daughter of 
Hiram Taylor and wife, Matilda having come to Michigan, where she lived 
with her brothers and sisters until her marriage. N. B. and Matilda Galloup 
were the parents of two children, Orland W. and Jesse J., the latter living 
at home. 

Orland W. Galloup was reared on the home farm and was educated in 
the schools of Montcalm county, securing the greater part of a high school 
education, after which he became a farmer, working on the home place until 
after his marriage, when he was engaged as a farm helper on a neighboring 
farm for about two years, and then bought forty acres of farm land in 
December, 1906, which he has cultivated, together with a rented farm, since 
that time. Orland W. Galloup now is engaged in general farming and 



374 -MOXTCAI.M COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 

Slock raising on his farm of eighty acres, located near Slierician, in P)nshnell 
township. 

On May to, iHgg. Orland \\\ (jallou]) was married to Octa .\Hchin, a 
daughter of Juhvard Allchin and wife. Orland \Y. and Octa Galhni]) are the 
parents of one child, ( "lare .\., ^^•ho now is a student of the Sheridan high 
school. Mr. (ialloup and his family are menil)ers of the h'ree I'aptist church, 
in Buslmell township, a congregation wdiich Mr. Galloup has served as a 
deacon as well as a memher of the church hoard. 

\n the official life of the communit}-. Orland W. CJallou]) has Ijeen active, 
ha\ ing served Ihishnell township as a justice of the peace and as moderator 
of the townshi]") school hoard. Tn ])olitics. ^Ir. (lallou]) is an ardent Re])uhli- 
can. 

Fraternally, Orland \V. Gallou|> is a prominent memljer of \'ickery\ille 
J.odge Xo. 756, Knights of the Afaccahees, and he is a leading memher of the 
(irange, in Ihishnell township. 



ArJU-.KT A. kTCFI.XRDSOX. 

Albert A. kicliardson has been a resident of Bloomer township, this 
county, for over sixty years, lie was born on December to, 1842. in 
Cornisli, Xew Hampshire. He is the son of .\riel K. and Afary (Arm- 
strong) Richardson, the former of whom was a nati\e of Xew Hampshire 
and the latter of X'ermont. The Kichardsous came to Montcalm county as 
earlv as 1855 and settled in Bloomer township, which was in the first stage 
of its agricultural development. 'J'he settlers w^ere few and the land was 
covered with timber and wild underbrush. Mr. Richardson built a cabin on 
the northwest corner of the cross roads at IjJoomer Center and devoted the 
remainder of his life to the (.)ccui)ation of farming. b\)r a number of years 
he filled the ])Osition of postmaster at Bloomer Outer. Mr. Richardson 
passed away in January, T()Oo, and his wife died in 1886. The cou])le reared 
the following children: .Mljert A., the subject of this sketch; Anna, Ella 
and Victoria. 

.Albert ,V. Richardson spent his boyhood days on the old Richardson 
farm in IMoomer township and upon reaching the age of manhood was 
ol.>liged to lay aside his farm work and answer the call for volunteers to serve 
in the Civil AVar. On November 9, i86t, he enlisted in the First Regiment, 
United States Sharpshooters, and remained in the service a year, when, owing 



MONTCALM COI'NTY, MICHIGAN. 375 

Id |)hysic;'.l (iisal)ility. he was forced to resign from active service. He was 
(li-cliarged on October 29, 1862, and for the six months following was nnahle 
1(1 lea\e his home owing to poor health. 

After his return, to Rloomer tcn\nship the snbject of this sketch l)OUght 
idrt}- acres of land, which n(;w forms a part of the Cliffc farm. After 
i\>iding on this place for li\e years he sold out to Mr. ClifTe and bought the 
larm where he now resides in section 20, which contains one hundred and 
ninct\- acres, h'or sexeral \ears during his residence on this f.arm he served 
,!-> highway ccjmmissioner. 

On December i8. 1864. Albert Richardson was united in marriage to 
b-uie l.ouks, a native of Norfolk county, Ontario, Canada, the daughter of 
William I [. and Julia Ann ( l*.urger) Louks. William T.onks, who was born 
111 X'ermont, came with his family, in the fall of i860, to Montcalm county, 
where he settled on a farm one and one-half miles south of Carson C^ity. 
( )n the 1 8th of November, !886. Mr. Louks passed away, and in November 
of the following year Mrs. T.ouks, who was a native of Canada, passed aw^ay. 

}'dr. and Mrs. i\ichardson became the parents of two children, .Asa, 
who follows the occupation of a farmer in N'irg^inia, and T.eon wdio is inter- 
ested in dairy farming, also in \'irginia. Mr. Richardson has w'on the esteem 
■<\ the meml)ers of his community for the manner in which he has conducted 
i' e ]:ni:'ic affairs in which he has been interested and for the high ideals of 
ritizenship to which he has li\ed. lie is a member of the Grand .Army of 
die Iveijublic. 



.11. K. hristJ':r. 



il. \'l. Ileisler, well-knowMi farmer and prominent citi/.en of Bushneli 
I'l'wnship, Montcalm county, Micliigan. was born in Mahoning county, Ohio, 
"11 lA'bruary 9. 1863, a son of L). W. and Catherine (McDonald) Ileisler, 
nati\es of Mahoning county and of Jefferson county, Ohio, respectively. 

After his marriage D. W. Ileisler and his wife came to Michigan from 
dicir home in Ohio, in 1866, and located on a farm in Bushnell township, 
Montcalm county, where the elder Ileisler engaged in farming and where he 
'iperated the first saw-mill of the community for many years. D. W. Ileisler 
\vas a prominent man of Bushnell township, having served as justice of the 
peace for t\\enty-se\en }-ears, during which time he was active and influential 
in the affairs of the Re])ublican l>arty in this community. The elder Heisler 
\\as a member of the Alasons. D. W. and Catherine Heisler were the par- 



37^ MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

ents of four children, three of whom are hving: Charles, a farmer of New 
Haven township, Gratiot county; Jl. K., the subject of this sketch, and Emma, 
the wife of George Low, of Grand Ra]>ids, Michigan. 

H. K. Ifeisler received his education in the public schools of Montcalm 
county, after which he became a farmer, working on the home ])lace for 
some years and then he secured the home farm, where he now is successfully 
engaged in the cultivation of eighty acres, thirty acres of which is pasture 
and the rest improved and highly productive soil. 

On January 4, T<Sr)4, H. E. TTeisler was married to Eva Wcllwood, who 
was born in Bloomer township, Montcalm county, a daughter of Edward and 
Elizabeth Wellwood, of Bloomer township. 

H. E. ETcisler is a member of Palo Lodge No. 203, Eree and Accepted 
Masons, and together with his wife Mr. Heisler is a member of the Order of 
the Eastern Star. Tn politics, H. l'". Heisler is a Republican and has served 
his towi'ship as treasurer. i\'Ir. Heisler is one of the highlv respected and 
esteemed men of Bushne'l township. 



CHARLES HAWLEY. 



Among the successful farmers and stock raisers of Bushnell township, 
Montcalm county, Michigan, is Charles Hawley, who was born in Roch- 
ester, New York, on March 1, 1845, a son of Charles and Eliza (Darling) 
Hawley, natives of Genesee county, New York. 

Charles Hawley, Sr., after his marriage in New York state, came to 
Michigan, about 1855, and located at the town of Lil)erty, Jackson county, 
where he lived for some time and then moved to Iowa, living there for 
about one year, after which he returned to Michigan, and lived for the 
remainder of his days in Ronald township, Ionia county, where he was 
engaged in general farming on one hundred and sixty acres of land. Charles 
Hawley, Sr., was a prominent citizen of his community, having served for 
many years as justice of the peace, as well as being a man who, together 
with his wife, was active in the work and worship of the Baptist church, 
at Palo, Ionia county. Charles and Eliza Hawley were the parents of nine 
children, seven of whom survive, Charlotte, Susan, Lida, Marion, Charles, 
Byron and Asa. 

Charles Hawley, the subject of this sketch, received his limited educa- 
tion in the common .schools of Ionia county, Michigan, after which he 



\fONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. T^JJ 

L'ccame a farmer, working on the home farm until thirty-one years of age 
when Mr. Hawley, having married, moved to Bushville township, Montcalm 
county, and purchased a farm of eighty acres, located south of the town of 
Sheridan, a place which he has improved until it is one of the best farms 
of the county, and on which he now is engaged in general farming and in 
the raising of Durham cattle and fine horses. The well-improved, modernly 
equipped and conveniently arranged farm of Mr. Hawley is known as 
"Maple Ridge Stock Farm." 

On July 4, 1872, Charles Hawley was married to Mahala Manier, of 
Ionia county. In the home of Charles and Mahala Hawley is one adopted 
daughter, Mabel. 

In politics, Mr. Hawdcy is a Republican, and although he has not 
aspired to public office, he has filled his place well and is known as a man 
who acts intelligently in political matters and as a citizen who is ready at 
all times to do his part in the promotion of the good citizenship. 



RI'lV. NORMAN L,. OTIS. 

One of the best-known ministers of Montcalm county is Rev. Norman 
L. Otis, a native of New fane township, Niagara county. New York, where 
he was born on April 12, 1834. His father, Chester Otis, who was born in 
Canada, was of Scotch-Irish extraction, and his mother, who was Phoebe 
Wright before her marriage, was born in Vermont. 

When Norman L. CHis w-as live years old his parents moved to Mich- 
igan and located in W^ashtenaw county, in Sharon township. Later they 
settled near A11)ion, where Norman Otis grew to manhood. Norman L. 
Otis gained his preliminary education in the public schools of W^ashtcnaw 
county, and thereafter completed a course in Albion College. A youth of 
deep spirituality and true earnestness, he early decided to prepare himself 
for the duties of the ministry and at the age of twenty-one preached his first 
sermon in the Methodist church in the Hastings circuit. His ministrations 
in this community were broken suddenly by the outbreak of the Civil War, 
and the subject of this sketch joined the army in 1862. His wife at this 
time became seriously ill and Mr. Otis was given permission to remain at 
home for a short w^hile, during which time his wife passed away. After the 
death of his wife Mr. Otis returned to his duties in the army and was com- 
'uissioned chaplain of the Eighth Michigan Cavalrv' with which he remained 



3/8 MOXTCAI.M COL'XTY, MICUIGAX. 

until the close of the war. After the war Mr. Otis was unahle to rcsuiiie his 
cliarge as pastor and spent several }'ears in regainin^^ his healtli. In 1870 
he assumed a position in the C "ong-regational church which led him to Mich- 
igan \vhere he had charge of the pastorate of the churches at Hubbardstoii 
and Carson C ity. .Vfter fom- years si)ent in this community he went to 
Ithica where he remained four years, lie then went to Crystal where he 
organized a church and where he preached for ten \'ears \vith the greatest 
success and popularit}-. After Mr. (Jtis moved to the farm where he now 
resides, in the southwestern part of IMoomer township), lie took charge of 
the church at nulternut for iouv }ears. .Since passing his eightieth l)irth- 
day he has resigned from acti\e work, Ijut is still able to attend services and 
assist at formal meetings. Mr. Otis never has sought ]>ul)lic oflices, but 
owing to his po[)ularity was chosen justice of the ])eace, an oflice he has held 
for twenty-four years with the highest praise of the people of the community 
ill which he resides. 

At the age of twenty-two years, Xorman L. Olis married .hlizabeth 
Morgan, who was born and reared near .\berdecnshire, ,Sc()tland. and who 
came to /\merica w itli her parents, who settled near .\kron, Ohio. Later 
the family mo\cd to linrry county. Michigan, when tliat section of the state 
\\a> a wilderness. Three sons were lK,»rn to the union oi the Reverend and 
y\r>. Otis, as follow: l-'rederick lUiss, who died at the age of twenty-six 
while attending the \'ale Divinity School: Clark, who resides in ]''rankfort, 
Michigan, where he has a large fruit farm and is a well known horticulturist, 
and a son who died in infancy. Clark Otis has a family of four children, 
hdorence, Harry, Walter and Arthur. Airs. Fdizabeth Otis died in 1862. 

Idle Re\'. Xorman Otis was married, secondly, in 1864, in Allegan, to 
Ann Aferrill C'oi)]>, the daughter of Dr. J. M. C"o[)p, a physician who moved 
to Allegan county, Michigan, from western .\'e\v 'S'oi-k. One daughter was 
born to the subject of this sketch by his second marriage, I.. (Irace, who 
attended college and took her Bachelor of Arts degree, and became the wife 
of Joseph D. llarter, who took the degree of Master of Raws at .Vnn Arbor, 
and who is now trustee, secretary and treasurer of Olivet OoUege, at Olivet, 
Michigan. 

Rev. Norman h. Otis is a mem1,)er of the (irand Army of the Repul)lie 
and for many years has been chaplain of the post at Carson Citv. lie is 
known in this part of the state as a valual)le contriluitor to magazines and 
newspa])crs of articles on church history and war items, b'or a number of 
years he acted as correspondent for a newspaper where his writings, owing 
to their pleasing style and acciu'acv of dc-cription. found welcome. 



MONTCALM COlNTY, MICHIGAN. 379 



J. FRANK ISHAM. 



Among the settlers of iMontcalni county who have seen the development 
uf this section of the state is J. Frank Isham, who has been a resident of 
Ijloomer township for almost fifty years, lie was born on June 23, 1866, in 
iJIoomer township, and is the son oi Alfred R. and Mary (Carey) Isham. 
Alfred Isham was a native of Rortland, Ionia county, Michigan, and was 
the son of A. D. Isham, who, with his wife, came to this part of the country 
in the early pioneer days. While their son, Alfred, was still a boy Mr. and 
Mrs. Isham returned to their native state of New York where they remained 
until ICS55, wlien they returned to Montcalm county and settled in the north- 
western part of ijloomer township. The land upon which they settled was 
obtained by them through a government grant, a copy of which is still in 
the hands of the subject of this sketch. At the time of granting the claim 
the small sum of hfty cents an acre was paid by Mr. Tshani in order to gain 
[lossession of the homestead. All the privations of early pioneer life were 
endured by A. 1). Lsham and his wife. There were no roads save those 
which had been chopped by hand through the forests, and the most valuable 
l)east of burden Was the ox which drew the wagon of provisions to the nearest 
town. Mr. and Mrs. Isham remained on the homestead until their death. 

Althongh Alfred K. Isham devoted much of his time to general farming 
he v.as also interested in many other lines of activity. In partnership with 
Charles Ooss he built a cheese factory in 1890, and during the same year 
he erected a brick store in Butternut. lie always took an active interest in 
things pertaining to civic welfare and did much for the community in which 
he lived. At the time of his death he was owner of two hundred and ten 
acres of land. I'or a time he served as supcr\^isor of the township. His 
death occurred on January 23, 1911, and his wife passed away on July 22, 
1909. Mrs. Isham was tlie daugiiter of Jackson Carey, one of the prominent 
settlers of Hastings, Michigan, where Mrs. Isham was Ix^rn. She became 
the mother of two sons, one of whom is the subject of this sketch, and Will 
Isham, who resides in Fargo, North Dakota. 

W'ith the exception of four years which were spent in other occupations, 
J. Frank Isham has followed general farming throughout his life. During 
the vears 1903-04 he acted as traveling salesman for the J. I. Case Threshing 
Machine Company, and later served in the same capacity for the company in 
f.atising, Michigan. Mr. Isham also became interested in the store at Butter- 
nut which was owned by his father and where he was emplo3'ed for two 



380 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

years. The farm now nianag"ed by the subject of this sketch extends over 
two hundred and ten acres of land and is kept in an excellent state of culti- 
vation. Aside from the farm residence there is another smaller building on 
the grounds which is also used as a dwelling. 

On May 7, 1893. the marriage of J. Frank Tsham to Jennie Wellwood, 
a native of Evergreen township, Alontcalm county, was solemnized. She is 
the daughter of Edward and T^lizabeth A\''elhvood, the former of w^hom was 
born in Chatham, Kent county, Canada, and later moved to Bushnell town- 
ship, in this count)', wdiere he folknvs the occupation of a farmer. He is 
also an extensive landowner in Bloomer township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Isham are the parents of one son, Charles, w^ho was lx)rn 
on September 4, igog. Tn fraternal affairs Mr. Tsham has always taken a 
prominent i)art and is at the present time a popular member of Carson City 
Lodge No. 306, Free and Accepted Masons. 



CPIESTER K. CFFANDLER. 

One of the most widely-known men of Montcalm county is Chester E. 
Chandler, who, owdng to the large field covered by his activities as an auc- 
tioneer, has numbered among his acquaintances citizens from every part of 
the county. As a man of an engaging personality, force of conviction and 
powers of administration he has easily attained success in a line of work 
which has appealed to him since his l)oyhood. With a thorough knowledge 
of affairs pertaining to agriculture and a wealth of information on all 
branches of rural economy, he has filled a place in the industrial activities 
of the county in a manner deserving of the highest praise. 

Chester E. Chandler is a native of Ashford, Cattaragus county, New 
York, where he was born on the 30th of September, 1864. He is the son 
of Archelaus and Ellen (Frank) Chandler, the former of whom was born 
in Connecticut, of h2nglish parentage. Ellen Frank w^as the daughter of 
Jacob and Elizabeth (Ouackcnbush) Frank, natives of Germany, and claimed 
Ashford, New York, as her birthplace. At the time of his marriage Mr. 
Chandler was captain of a boat on the Erie canal and made his home at 
Palmyra, New York. After his marriage he took up his residence at Ash- 
ford, vvhcre he followed the occupation of an auctioneer with much success 
and where he lived until his death, which occurred when the subject of this 
sketch was just two and one-half years old. After the death of her husband. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 381 

whom she survived iifteen years, Mrs. Chandler married l^obert Mackie, a 
native of New York, who was of Scotch ancestry. The family moved from 
Sugartown, New York, to I'Yanklinville, where Mrs. Chandler passed away. 

71ie early education of Chester E. Chandler was received at the Wcst- 
licld .Academy, in Chantau(|ua county, New York. Upon completing the 
course of study prescribed by the academy he returned to the farm in h^rank- 
lin\ille where he remained until he was se\'enteen years old. After his mar- 
riage, which tocjk place in i8(S6, 'Sir. Chandler came to Montcalm where he 
purchased the farm which still remains his home. The land, which con- 
sisted at that time of eighty acres, was partly owned by his wife and Mr. 
Chandler gained full possession of the estate by buying out the other heirs. 
From time to time the suljject of this sketch has bouglit land surrounding the 
original farm until he has gained a tract of one hundred and seventeen acres. 

At an early age Chester \\. Chandler accpiired a love of oratory and 
pul)lic s])eaking, which was a family trait, and which found expression in 
many instances. The first opj)ortunity given Mr. Chandler to serve as an 
auctioneer occurred when he was nineteen years old, during the time when 
he was employed in a general store at Linden Center in (liautauqua county. 
The manager expressed his intention of closing out the business and Mr. 
Chandler seized the opportunity of originating a week sale, with himself as 
auctioneer of the stock. The venture proved most successful and Mr. 
Chandler soon learned through his accomplishments in this line of work 
that he was possessed of more than ordinary talent, .\fter he had followed 
the (Kxnipation of a farmer for some years in Montcalm county, he decided 
t(^ take u[> auctioneering as a profession and began on the 8th of March, 
i8()3, to sell stocks of general merchandise in Montcalm, Mecosta and Isabella 
counties. Since that time he has conducted over tw-enty-cight hundred sales 
of many varieties and in \'arious localities. Although he has been inter- 
ested in a numl>er of different kinds of sales, Mr. Chandler has made a 
specialty of farm and stock sales. His business, which extends over seven 
counties, often averages one hundred and sev^enty-fivc sales a year. Aside 
from his occupation as an auctioneer. Mr. Chandler has also been interested 
in the life insurance business and for the last three years has represented 
the Tincoln National f.ife Insurance Company, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
which has an agency in ihis state extending over six counties. During his 
residence in this county, Mr. Chandler has taken an active and prominent 
part in the affairs of the Republican party. 

On the 2 1st of February. t886. Chester K. Chandler was united in mar- 



382 MONTCALM COUNTY. .MICHIGAN. 

riag-e to Delia Rich, the daiu^hter of Addison and Harriet (Camp) l^Jich. a 
native of Sandusky, Xew ^'ork. iJer parents came to Montcalm county in 
i<S6q and settled on the farm n(j\v occuijied hy Mr. (diandler and his family. 
The oriijinal homestead was covered with timl)er and wild imdcrhrush and 
the task of clearino- the land and cultivating- the soil was heser with manv of 
tiie hardshi])s of pioneer life in this state. Mr. I^ich ])assed away in 1(885 
and his wife sr.rvived him until tqto. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Chandler one son. TTarry TT., has been horn, who will 
complete the high school course in 1916. Lie was horn on the <)th of 
Dcccml)er. 1896, and during his school years has made an unusual record 
for attendance and high deportment, never having been tardv during his 
entire attendance in school. His average standing in. his studies for three 
and one-half }-ears of school has lieen gOjA. having taken his class honors at 
each term. He holds membership in the Congregational church. The sub- 
ject of this sketch holds membership in Carson City T.odge Xo. 306. b^ree and 
Accepted Masons, and for twenty-four years was a member of the Mac- 
cabees. Mr. Chandler was one of the first settlers in this ])art of the county 
and for miles around the vicinity of his home few citizens may l)e found 
who were here when the subject of this sketch came to Montcalm coimtv 
for permanent residence. 



MRS. MARY S. KITETBUSS. 

Mrs. Mary S. I'jtelbuss. the wn'dow of George W. ivitelbuss, is the pro- 
prietor of the farm known as '"Pioneer F'lace,'" consisting of two hundred 
and twenty-three acres of land l\'ing four and one-half miles southeast of 
l-'enwick. Michigan, on rural route No. i. She was born in Bushnell town- 
shi]), October 20, 1863. the daughter of Edward and Elizabeth (Curtis) 
Allchin. Both oi her i)ar(nits were natives of the state of New York and 
came to Michigan where they located in Eenawee county and there they 
grew to maturity and were married. Then they moved to Bushnell town- 
ship, and entered, by homestead, one hundred acres of land, upon which he 
built a log cabin and became a well-to-do farmer. lie was a soldier in the 
Civil War. He became the father of nine children, eight of whom lived to 
maturity: Burdett, deceased; Alice, wife of William J^eimer; Delfred, 
deceased; Mary S. ; Pearl, wife of William lulmonds. of Isal)ella county, 
Michigan; I^lizabeth, wife of George Reeves; \'ir C, a farmer and super- 



MONTCALM COl'XTY, MICJJIGAX. 38 J 

visor of Biishticll township; X'ernie, wife of l\ol)crt Cha]>nian, of Fcnwick, 
Michigan: Octa N., wife of (). (jallon[>, of lUishnell township. 

Mary S. AUchin was reared on the farm and echieated in the district 
schools. She was married to (ieoroe W. Ritelbnss on Octol>cr 15, 1879. 
Me was Ijoni in Ionia count}', just across the hne from Palo. Michiiji-an. 
.\iarcli 2;^, I'SvS, and was a child wlien his father entered the land now 
known as "Pioneer I'lace." 

Mrs. Mary vS. I'jtelbuss became the mother of three children, namely: 
Catherine, who graduated at the I'alo liij^h school and the State Normal, is 
now tht- wife of B. R. Snow and lives in Fenwick, Michigan; W'ard A., of 
-St. Johns, Michigan, is a carpenter; Lea M., is the wife of Abraham ITor- 
igan, and li^•es in C^reenville, Michig-an. Mrs. Kitellniss is a member of the 
(irange, and the auxiliary to the Maccabees. 

Mrs. Kitelbuss is a prominent woman, l)eing well known in this part of 
the state. Mr. h'itellmss died on June 12. 1903, and was buried in the 
Bushnell cemetery. Tie was a prominent worker and member of the Meth- 
odist cluirch at Fenwick. He was instrumental in building this church and 
contributed of his means aiid time to secure its erection. Tn 1885 Mr. Kitel- 
buss mo\ed from the farm and erected a hardware store in Fenwick and 
engaged in this Inisiness for nine years, after which he and his family 
returned to his farm, lie remained on the farm until his death. Tie was 
l)opular among all who knew him and during his lifetime was an ardent 
I 'rohibitionist. , 



Hl^NRY RADER. 

Henry Rader is one of the many men wdio have found ample opix^r- 
tuin"ty in America for the realization of laudable ambition, especially in the 
agricultural field. He was born on July 12, J862, in Germany, as were also 
his brothers and sisters, by name:- Com'ad. John 11., George, (Catherine, 
Una and Lizzie. John 11. served for four years in the German army and 
in 1915 was acting as recruitin.g officer in the great w'orld war. Conrad 
and C'alherine (Hinkk) Ivadcr. parents of Henry Rader, w'ere born and 
reared in Germany and remained in that country all their lives. Of their 
seven children only two immigrated to America, naniely. George and Henry, 
(jcorge arri\-ing in 1883. He at once engaged in the vocation of farmer and 
located in Amble. Michigan, where he has since remained. 



384 MONTCAJ.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

Henry Rader attended the German schools until he was fourteen years 
of age and was then conlirmed by T<ev. Clajbury, pastor of the German 
Lutheran church. After receiving his education and spending three years 
as a lalwring man in his native country he sought his fortune in the United 
States, immigrating in 1880. Locating in Howard City. Michigan, he began 
his ex[)erience with an uncle and later engaged in the lumber woods, fol- 
lowing this line of endeavor for some time. In 1888 Henry Rader was 
married to Mary (jarbow, also a native of Germany, and established a resi- 
dence on forty acres of land located six miles south of Howard City, Mich- 
igan. This farm has been increased until it now consists of one hundred 
and thirty-two acres of well improved and well cultivated soil. 

Henry Rader and his wife are the parents of these children: Lena, 
Lizzie, Emma, Malinda, George and Herman, deceased, and Henry. Politic- 
ally, Henry Rader is a stanch Republican and the entire family are devout 
members of the German Lutheran church, at Howard City, Michigan. 



WILLIAM McHATTlE. 

William McHattie, farmer and representative citizen of Montcalm 
county, Michigan, possesses many of the admirable qualities and character- 
istics of his sturdy Scotch ancestry. He was born on June 28, 1852, in 
Morayshire, Scotland, and is the son of Alexander and Marguerite (Taylor) 
McHattie, also natives of Morayshire, Scotland. Alexander McTLittie was 
a shoemaker by trade and followed that vocation for many years, later 
accepting a govermuenl position as mail carrier. When he had reached 
an advanced age he retired to the \illage of Kingston, Scotland, where he 
remained until his death. 

William xMcHattie is one of eleven children born of his parents' union, 
and is the youngest of the family. After completing his education in the 
common schools of his native country he engaged in agricultural pursuits 
in the interest of others. Tn 1873 he immigrated to Canada where he 
located in Grey county. Ontario, intending to prove a claim, but later 
removed to Michigan without doing so. Tn 1878 he located in Pine town- 
ship, Montcalm county, Michigan, where he was employed in the woods 
for some time. In J882 W'illiam McHattie purchased one hundred and 
thirty-two acres of cut-over timber land in section 20, of Pine township, 
which has since become one of the best equipped farms in the county. He 




WILLIAM McTTATTIE. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. •:58s 

has always l)cen exceptionally active in extending the principles of the 
Jvcpublican party, and was elected, in 1904, tcj serve as county treasurer 
ni Alontcahn county, lie served in this capacity for four years and was 
liicn elected to serve as township supervisor for five years, having been 
elected in 1895, f896, 191 1, 1912, and again in 1913. in 1914 he was 
county delegate to the i\e])ul)lican state convention at Kalamazoo. Michigan, 
,111(1 has also represented the county twice in Detroit and once in Bay City, 
Michigan. He is aiifiliated wath the Free and Accepted Masons and in his 
religious faith is a Presbyterian, in w hicii church his family are also 
members. 

(.)n Octoljcr 8, 1879. in Cirey county, Ontario, (Canada, William 
Mcllattic and Marguerite Story were imited in marriage and three children 
w ere born of this union : Walter, married Gladys Ellsworth and is the 
clerk of Pine township, Montcalm county, Michigan: Annabel), and Mar- 
guerite. .Marguerite (Story) Mcllattic was born on November 4, 1850, in 
Grey county, Ontario, Canada, and is the daughter of Walter and Jessie 
( Douglass) Story, who were natives of Roxburgh county Scotland. Thev 
located in Canada previous to their marriage, the mother coming with her 
|)arents w^hen but a small child. 



LYMAN HUNT. 



Lyman iriunt, a well-known and prosperous farmer of Douglass town- 
>liip, this county, who for years was regarded as one of the most experienced 
and ex[;ert lumbermen in this section of the state, is a native son of Mich- 
igan, having been born on a pioneer farm in Kalamazoo county, this state, 
May 26, 1843. son of Aaron and h^mmaline (Card) Hunt, l)oth natives of 
\'crmont, who lived north (;f IkilTalo, at Clarence Hollow. New "S'ork, and 
liecame early settlers of Michigan, coming from Kalamazoo county to Alont- 
calni county at an early day in the settlement of this C()unty, being among 
ihe \ery earliest ])ioneers of Douglass townshi])', Aaron Hunt having been 
one of the men Avho cut out the road from Stanton out in the direction of 
bis homestead. Aaron Hunt homesteadcd a quarter of a section of land 
in Douglass townshi]), besides which he bought fort}' acres of state swamp 
land at one dollar an acre and pnK-eedcd to develo]) the same. He did a 
large business in pine timber during his clearing operations and it was while 
(25b) 



386 MONTCAT.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

thus engaged, in 1862, about iive years after having settled in this county, 
that he met with a fatal accident, a falling log crushing his body so severely 
that he died rive days later. He and his wife were the parents of eleven 
children, of whom the following besides the su1>ject of this sketch grew 
to maturity: David, deceased; Stanton; Mary, who died in 1912; Eli, who 
died in 1914; William, now deceased; Sarah, who lives at McBride; Henry, 
who lives in St. Johns, Clinton county, this stale; (lardner, of Douglas town- 
ship; Albert, of McBride. and Mrs. Elizabeth iValb 

Eyman Hunt had grown to manhood wdien his parents came to Mont- 
calm county and had had even then a somewhat extensive exi)erience in the 
lumber woods, instead of accompanying" the family to this count}" he wenl 
to Rockford and was engaged there and at Grand Rapids in luml)er mills 
until the death of his father, after which he joined the family in their home 
in I^ougiass township and ever since has lived there. During the summers 
he worked in the mills and during the winters in lumber camps, early becom- 
ing widely known as an expert "timber cruiser." In company with his 
])rothers, Henry and William, JNlr. Hunt presently went into the lumber 
business and this partnership continued for live years, after wdiich .Mr. Hunt 
continued in business alone and was very successful, remaining actively con- 
nected with the lumber business in Montcalm county for a ]>erio(l of twenty- 
eight years, or until the a\'ailable timber hereabout w^as practically exhausted, 
most of the time working a crew of from seventy to one hundred men. 
.Since retiring from the lumber business Mr. Himt has confined his atten- 
tion pretty largely to the development of his fine farm of eighty acres in 
Douglass township, and has one of the Ix^st-appointcd and most thoroughly 
cultivated ))laces in that part of the county, long having been recognized as 
one of the best farmers thereabout. 

On Deceml>er 12, 1871, Lyman Hunt w^as united in marriage to Rizpah 
Auten, who also was 1)orn in Kalamazoo county, this state, and whose par- 
ents, natives of New York, had settled in Montcalm county on August 25, 
1870. and to this union seven children have been born, as follow: I^idna, 
who died at the age of seven years ; Minnie, who taught school in this county 
for eight or ten years and is now cashier in the Hotel T'onchartrain at 
Detroit; Grace, w'ho married Harvey Lee, died in 1914; Jennie, who mar- 
ried Chester Henry, of Chatham, Ohio, and has two children; Myrtle, who 
married Harry Broughton and lives at Detroit; Morris, who married Mary 
Singleton, lives at Detroit, where he is a car inspector on the Michigan Cen- 
tral railroad ; and Harold, who makes his home on the paternal farm, but 



MONTCALM COUNTY, iMICIIIGAN. 387 

spends his winters in Detroit with the Hudson Automobile Company. The 
Hunts ever have been active in the general social life of their community, 
actively interested in all movements designed to advance the common good 
iJKTcahout, and are held in the highest esteem throughout tliat entire section 
of the county. I.yman Hunt is a Democrat and is active in the interests 
of that party. He and his wife are members of the Maccabees. 



ELI SOUlb'K. 



Atriong the well-known farmers and stock raisers of Bushnell township, 
Moniealm county, Aiicliigan, is VA\ S(|uire, the owner of "Brookside Farm," 
who was born in (iratiot county, Michigan, on ()ctoI>cr 2y, 1858, a son of 
I'ranklin and i'^liza A. (Harrington) Scjuire, the former born in Geauga 
(ounty, Ohio, on l^'ebruary 15, 1827, the latter near Adrian, Michigan, at 
which place they were married on February 23, 1851. 

After their marriage JM-anklin S(|uire and his wife located in Lenawee 
county, Michigan, where they lived until 1854, and then moved to Gratiot 
county, the elder Squire there homesteading one hundred and sixty acres 
of land, a place on which he built the first frame house of the community 
and where he lived as a successful fanner until 1902, when Franklin Squire 
and his family came to Montcalm county, and located in Bloomer town- 
snip, where he lived for the remainder of his days, dying on August 31, 
19T3, his wife having died in t866. Franklin and Eliza A. Squire were 
the parents of eight children, three of whom survive: Eli, the subject of 
this sketch; Alice, the wife of Nehemiah Hayner, of Clinton county, Mich- 
igan, and John, a resident of Hastings, Michigan. 

Eli Squire received his education in the schools of Gratiot county, 
Michigan, after which he lived on the home farm until he was sixteen years 
of age and then he worked on neighboring farms for one summer, after- 
ward going into the woods of the region, where he was employed for twenty- 
three years, rising from a humble position to that of head sawyer for one 
of the great mills of the Michigan lumber interests. Tn the year 1904, Eli 
Squire came to Montcalm county, and located on a farm of two hundred 
:icres whicli he had i)urchased three years previously, and on this farm Mr. 
Squire has placed a number of improvements and has added land until now 
he is the owner of two hundred and eighty acres, which was formerly 
known as the old Porter farm, now known as "Brookside Farm." On his 



3^8 MOXTCAI.M COUNTY. MICIIICAN. 

farm l.{li Squire is now engaged in general agricultural pursuits, he being 
known as one of the more progressive and one of the most successful farm- 
ers and stock raisers of the township and county. 

On November 25. iS8r, I'^Ji S(|uire was married to Anna Shuttleworth. 
and t(^ this unicMi have been bc^rn four children; Alida. who was educated 
in and graduated from the b'erris Institute of Big Rapids, Michigan, and 
who now is the wife of l\. I). I.amic, a chemist with the Stearns Companv, 
of Detroit. .Michigaji; .Mia, a high school graduate and a graduate of the 
Detroit C"ouser\atory of Music, now the wife of W. J. Trip]), who is superin- 
tendent of tlie pui)lic schools at Rockland. Michigan; l^arl. wdio is a graduate 
(tf Albion College, and who was a student of Harvard University, for one 
year, he now being '-u])erintendent of the Western Packing ('om]:)anv, of 
(diicago. and I-\-le, who now is a student iu the i)ublic schools of Carson 
City. Montcalm county. 

I'^Ji Scjuire is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, carr\- 
ing insurance in this organization. Tn jiolitics. Mr. Sipiire is a l\C])ul)lican. 
being well known in the ranks of this partv. 



WJLLIAM MADER. 



One of the prominent and influential farmers of J'ierson township. 
Montcalm county, is William Mader, the son of Carl and Christena 
( Strenger ) Mader. William Mader was born in I'ommern, (Icrmany. on 
August 22. iHdy. and came to the United States in 1882, having at first 
located in Wisconsin, where he remained but a short time and later came tu 
Montcalm county. Dor the next three or four years he was employed on 
a farm near ] loward City and in the woods of that section. After his resi- 
dence of some few years in Montcalm county he returned to Wisconsin 
where he remained for one year, after which he returned to his former home 
in Michigan, 

William Mader was married on October 3, 1898, to .\ugusta Raasch. 
Mrs. Mader was born in Germany and came to the United States alone. 
Having settled in Michigan she met and married ]\Tr. Mader. Hy their 
united efforts and hard work, they have built for themselves a most com- 
fortable and pleasing home. When Mr. Mader hrst Ijecame a resident of 
the county he purchased their original forty acres and since added to thi^ 
another forty acres in Pierson townshi]) and fifty acres in Maple \'alle\- 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 389 

i. )\vnship. Dy his diligence and close application to the duties of his farm 
!ic has succeeded in bringing it into a high state of cultivation. Coming- to 
die United States, without money or intluence. ATr. and Mrs. XFader have by 
hp.rd work won recognition b\- dieir own efforts. 

Mr. and Airs. Mader are the parents of one child, Arnold, who was 
born on I'^bruary 11. u)0(). W'illiani Mader and wife are active and 
Inllucntial tnembers of the (lerman Evangelical Lutheran church at Howard 
I i'.v and take great interest in all church w^ork. T^)litically, Mr. Mader 
i> a Democrat. Imt is not active in the i)oiitical affairs of the community. 



GKORCtF r. banton. 

Xumbered among the essentiallv representative ])usiness men of Mont- 
calm county, is George R. Banton, whose family name has been linked with 
the industrial advancement of this ]:)art of the state for almost sixty years. 
The subject of this sketch has contributed his share of honor to the family 
whose reputation has always been one of highest regard. He was born in 
lUoomer township, this county, on the 25th of .May, 1874, and is the son 
of Kdwin R. and Samantha ( FTolcomb) Banton. 

Edwin R. Banton w-as l)orn in 1836, in Bangor, Maine, and at the age 
of fourteen moved with his parents to the state of New York. From that 
state he moved to Ionia, Michigan, where he made his home with his brother, 
Alfred Banton. In 1864 he came to Bloomer township, this county, where 
he located on a tract of land one and one-half miles northwest of Butternut, 
on the north edge of the township. At the l>eg-inning- of his residence in 
this locality Indians were still inhabiting the remote sections of the forests 
and wild animals were common. In the year 1900 Edwin R. Banton went 
to Flint, where for three years he was eiigag-ed in the music l>usiness, which 
he eventually gave up and returned to his farm. Samantha (IToIcomb) 
P)anton was reared near the lakes of Seneca and Cayuga, in New York, and 
moved to Ionia with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Holcomb, when she 
was still a child. Her father built a dam at Ionia and during the process 
of installing a woolen-mill on the dam caught a severe cold which resulted 
in his death. Aside from the subject of this sketch, Mrs. Edwin Banton 
reared a daughter, who is now Mrs. Ella J. Smith. Mr. Banton is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity and is a communicant of the Methodist church, 
of which church his wife was a member. 



390 -MONTCALM COl.NTY, MICHIGAN. 

Georj^e R. I:>anton, after completing the course in the common schools 
of Bloomer township, attended the Cx)llegiate Institute at Waterloo, Iowa, 
and later entered the Yerington Business College, at St. Louis, IMichigan. 
For two }'ears following his graduation from the school just mentioned he 
folk.nved the occupation of a farmer in the northwestern part of I^loomer 
township. Mr. Banton then decided to enter tlie business world and man- 
aged a general merchandise store for five years. At the end of that time 
he sold the store and invested in the grain buusiness of Butternut, a field of 
endeavor wdiich has proved to be extremely profitable. As the Ixisiness grew 
Air. Banton felt the need of a partner in the management of afl:*airs and two 
years ago gave the place of partner to William F. Kerr, in 1905 they built 
the ele\ator at Butternut. The road to success followed l)y the subject of 
this sketch has not always been smooth, it has been set with discouragement 
and disappointment, but these things have never fostered despair in the heart 
of Air. Banton. Two years after the elevator had been completed it burned 
to the groiuid, l)ut since that time has been rebuilt and the best of mechanical 
equipment installed. 

On the 30th of January, 1895, the marriage of George R. Banton and 
Grace Alorey took place. Mrs. Banton was born in l^onald township, Ionia 
county, Michigan, the daughter of John and Alary (Lester) Morey. John 
Alorey, who was born near Schuylerville, in Saratoga county, New York, 
on the 17th of July, 1839, was the son of Xelson and C'athcrine (Simmons) 
Alorey, and came to Michigan as early as i86r, where he entered the pro- 
fession of school teaching. Before coming to this i>art of the country Mr. 
Alorey had experience as a teacher in the public schools of the East. Dur- 
ing his teaching term at b'remont he was married and for some time follow- 
ing continued to practice his profession in Ronald townshij), of Ljnia county. 
Tn Alarch, 1892, after he had spent over thirty years as a farmer and teacher 
in this community, Air. Alorey returned to New^ York, where his death 
occurred in the foUowdng July. Llynm his return to the place of his birth 
Air. ATorey bought back the old home farm of his father's. 

Alary Lester was born in Saratoga county, New York, and was the 
daughter of George and hdizabeth (Fitzsimmons) Lester. Her father, who 
was one of the most prominent lumbermen of his time, was born near Rome, 
Oneida county, New York. As early as 1850 he moved to Newago, Mich- 
igan, where he engaged the lumber business which w-as one of the most 
thriving industries of that locality. He took charge of the business estal> 
Hshed by a 'luml)er com])any of Glenns Falls, New York, which he con- 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 39I 

(iucted for ten years. In his native state he had also been interested in the 
grain business and devoted part of his time in Michigan to that hne of work. 
As a result of an attack of pneumonia which he contracted during a trip 
to ('iiicago, Mr. J.ester (bed in the spring of i86j. Two years after his 
dcatli his wife moved to Ionia county where she bought a farm and where 
she Hved a short time before moving to Detroit where she passed away in 
April, 1903. Mary Lester completed her education in the Saratoga Semin- 
ary, in New York. She became the mother of five children, one of whom 
died in infancy; Jessie, the widow of William McKean, lives in Detroit; 
(jrace became the wife of the sul)ject of this sketch; Nelson Claire resides in 
(irand Ra])ids; Leon J. died in 1913. 

(jcorge R. Banton is deeply interested in the affairs of his home and 
takes a true delight in planning the future of his children. The eldest child, 
Ronald, is a graduate of the Carson City high school and Glenn and Mary 
are still attending school. The members of the family attend the Congrega- 
tional church and participate in all movements for its welfare. Fraternally, 
Mr. Ranton is affiliated w'ith the Masons and with the Maccabees. 



JOHN M. FrrZPATRICK. 

Imbued with a strong desire for achievement and possessing those sterl- 
ing attributes of character which are the elements of the best in citizenship, 
John M. Fitzpatrick has steadily climbed the ladder of success until he has 
reached a place of prominence in the community in which he lives. His 
business ability and manifestation of high principles of living have given 
him a position of the highest esteem in the county which has been his home 
for over twenty-five years. John M. Fitzpatrick was born on the 17th of 
September, 1856, in Boston, Erie coimty, New York, and is the son of 
Thomas and Mary (Cottrell) Fitzpatrick, the former of whom was a native 
of County Clare, Ireland. Thomas Fitzpatrick was l.x)rn in 1815 and u^mdh 
arriving in this country settled in Springville, New York, where he estab- 
lished his residence until 1859, when he went to Sardinia, in the same state. 
Mr. Fitzpatrick followed the occupation of a farmer and a blacksmith, until 
his death which occurred on the 12th of May, 1876. Mary Cottrell was a 
native of Utica, New York, and became the mother of thirteen children. 
Three years after the death of her husband, in 1879, Mrs. Fitzpatrick passed 
away. 



392 MONTCALM C(H-NTY, MICHIGAN. 

The early lite of John Al. h^ilz])alriek was s])ent in Sardinia, where lie 
learned the first ])rincij.)les necessary for cheese inakin<^\ a hranch of tlie agri- 
cultural industry which he followed for oxer forty years with marked suc- 
cess. In the year jS()o John M. I''itzpatrick left his native home and came 
to Butternut, in .Montcalm county, for permanent residence. Upon arriving- 
in this section of the state he worked for Cross tK: Isham, who were at that 
time in the act of erecting their cheese factory. After working for this 
firm for one year. Air. I^tzpatrick had accumulated sufficient funds to enahle 
him to Iniy out one of the partners, Air. Tsham. Several years later he 
hought out the interest belonging to Air. Cross, and ran the business inde- 
pendently until 1915, when he sold the factory to the Campl>ell I'rothers 
Company, of Detroit. 

When the business was ojtened in 1890 only fi\e or six p.atrons brought 
milk for cheese making, and after a short time the managers decided to 
sell cheese in Stanton. This decision ga\e evidence in the beginning of 
meeting disap])ointment. as it was difficult for a new factor}- to take the place 
of one which had been e.stablished in that community for twenty years, and 
\\hose goods had been giving entire satisfaction, howexer, Air. h'itzpatrick 
proved that he was even able to meet courageously, strong competition. TTis 
business continued to increase from time to time until the management now 
handles twenty thousand pounds of niilk a day. Air. Fitz])atrick has extended 
his Ijusiness until he owns aside from the main factory, three cheese fac- 
tories in other localities. 

In partnership with his brother. H. P. k^itzpatrick in 1894. the subject 
of this sketch bought a creamery in (^arson Cit}-, which they converted into 
a cheese factory. .After selling out to his brother. Air. k'itzpatrick opened 
a new cheese factory at Fenwick, with C'hauncey Case as his ])artner in the 
business. Later this factory was sold to A\'illiam Katon. one of the employees. 
Tn the year 1900, Air. h^itzpatrick carried on the most extensive interests 
in cheese making that he had attempted since entering that field of endeavor. 
lie managed three factories, located at Butternut, h>.nwick and Crvstal. 
The Crystal factory was at last sold to Air. C'ase and the sul)ject of this 
sketch began to de\ote more time to the interests of general farming. The 
farm owned by the subject of this sketch is situated a short distance north- 
east of Butternut and extends over one hundred and twenty acres of land. 
The family residence, how'ever, is maintained in the village of Butternut. 

The marriage of John Ai. Fitzpatrick to Luella flopkins was solemm'zed 
in 1880. Mrs. Fitzpatrick, wdio is a native of Sardinia. New York, is ihc 



MUXTCALM COl'NTY, MICHIGAN. Y)3 

(lanohter of Daniel W. and Lncinda (Reynolds) Hopkins. Daniel IIo])kins 
was born in 1839, in Pennsxlvania, hnt s]3ent most of his life in Sardinia, 
where he followed the ocenpation of a farnser. I Te jiassed away in 1913, 
and his Avife, Dnrinda, who snr\i\es him and who is also a native of New 
York, resides in ^'orkshire, New ^'ork. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fitzi)atriek are the ])arents of the following- children: 
("ora M . who was horn in 188') and who became the wife of Lewis Digrow, 
resides in Carscjn City; l^va ]\larie is the widow of Harry Wilson, and lives 
in 'r(.)ledo. Ohio, and has one child. Louise, born on i^'ebrnary 28, 1913; 
\'era C. is the wife of LImer F. Ilarret and has two dan^ii-hters. TTelen and 
C]enevie\'e. and they reside in Toledo. AH the children of Mr. and Mrs. 
h"ilz])atrick were horn in Sardinia. New York. 

Although he has never aspired to ]X)litical offices. Mr. lMtzi)atrick enters 
lieartily into e\er}- movement for the l)etterment of the community in which 
he lives and gives his firm snpjXDrt to affairs for civic welfare. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the Maccabees and in his religiotis \'iews he is a follower 
of the teachings of the Catholic church and attends St. Afnry's church at 
(\'U'son Cit}', Alichigan. 



LUCIUS n. SCHERMKRHORN. 

Lucius Vy. Schermerhorn, because of his sterling (|ualities of character 
and honest endeavc^r. has won a place of high regard in the community in 
which he lives. His birth occurred on .\ovemher 9, 1856, in Channiihon, 
Will county. Illinois, and he is the son of Isaac and Jane (Baccus ) Schermer- 
horn. Isaac Schermerhorn was a native of Schenectady, New York, and 
was the son ol* John U. Schermerhorn, who was a native of Holland. Jane 
( Baccus ) Schermerhorn was horn in Oakland county. ^Michigan. She came 
to Montcalm county, Michigan, with her husband and family in 1868, where 
Isaac Schermerhorn was engaged in the lumber business. He specialized 
in large s(|uare timbers, which were used in the construction of large huild- 
ings, l.)ut he later engaged in agricultural jMirsuits in Montcalm township, of 
this county, and remained here until his remo\al to Stanton. Michigan, where 
his death occurred. 

Lucius B. Schermerhorn was reared as a farmer and after completing 
his schooling, engaged in the vocation in which he has since remained. In 
t88o he ])urchased one hundred and sixty acres of partially cleared land, 
in section 36. of Pine township, of this county, for which he paid sixteen 



394 MONTCAf.M COaNTY, MICHIGAN. 

dollars. One hundred and ten acres of this land is now cleared and under 
culti\'ation, and is devoted to general agriculture and stock raising-. 

On April 20, 1883, Lucius B. Schermerhorn was united in marriage to 
Charlotte Churchill, daughter of John and Henrietta S. (Wilcox) Churchill, 
and of the four children born of their union only one is now living, namely, 
Alva \\^, who was l)orn on December 19, 1892, and assists his father with 
the work on the home farm. The names of the other children follow : 
Ivan, born on January 9, 1884, and died on April it, t888; Gladys, born 
on January 11, 1889, and died on April 24, of the same year, during an 
epidemic of diphtheria, and Guy, whose birth occurred on June 23, 1902, 
died on January 28, 1905. The mother of these children was a native of 
Montcalm county, Michigan. She died on June 27, 1902. Politically, 
Lucius B. Schermerhorn votes independent of party. liis fraternal relations 
are with the Knights of the Maccabees, who hold him in high esteem. 



EDWIN R. BANTON. 



Lchvin R. Banton, one of the pioneers of Montcalm county, a well- 
known resident of the northern part of Bloomer township, this county, is a 
native of ALiine, having Ijeen born in Bangor, that state, on June 2, 1836, 
son of Joseph B. and Sophronia (Raulet) Banton, the former of whom was 
born in Manchester, Lngland, and the latter in Maine. Joseph B. Banton 
was a sea-faring man, ca])tain of a vessel on the Atlantic in the earlier years 
of his manhood, who later retired to shore and became a Maine farmer. 
He was a highly educated man and gave his son, Edwin R.. every assistance 
in ac(|uiring a liberal education. 

In the fair of 1857, he then having reached his majority, lulwin R. 
Banton came to Michigan, seeking- fortune amid the conditions that even 
then gave large ])romise in this section of the state. He located at Lmia, 
where, on March i, 1864, he married Samantha Holcomb, who was born in 
Xew York, but who liad come to Michigan with lier parents in her girlhood 
and had been reared at Ionia, in the November following Mr. Banton and 
his bride came to this county and entered a tract of land in the midst of the 
forest at the north edge of Bloomer township and there proceeded to make 
their home in the wilderness. I'heir first home was a log cabin, eleven by 
twelve feet in dimensions, in which they lived for twelve years l)efore they 
supplanted it by a more pretentious residence, and there, with the excei>tion 



MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 395 

of a few years following^ kxx), in which he was eni^aj^ed in the music busi- 
ness at FHnt, this state, Mr. Bariton has made his home ever since. 

To Edwin \\. and Samantha ( Holcomb) Banton two children were born, 
(ieorge R., the well-icncjwn elevator man, of Butternut, this county, a bio- 
graphical sketch of whom is presented else\\here in this volume, and Fdla, 
a former welbknown school teacher of this county, who married George A. 
.Smith, a tra\'eling salesman and auctioneer, and has one child, a daughter, 
Nila B., who was graduated from the University of Michigan and is now 
a teacher in the city schools of Cahnnet. this state. Tv)llowing the death of 
the mother of these children, Mr. Banton married, secondly, l\Trs. Loretta 
(Yaw) Searle, daughter of Calvin and Nancy (Packard) Yaw, and w^idow 
of \\'allace .Searle, a former well-known farmer of Bushnell township, this 
count}', who died in March, 189.4. Mr. Searle w-as lx)rn in Batavia, New 
York, and came to this county when he was twenty-one years of age, the 
remainder of his life having been spent here. Mrs. Banton was lx)rn in the 
city of Chagrin Falls, in Geauga county, Ohio, her father having l^een a 
native of Wales and her mother of New York state. They moved to Mich- 
igan when she was ten years of age and settled in Sidney township, this 
county, where they bought a farm and established their permanent home. 



HERMAN W. SMITTT. 

Tferman \V. Smith, postmaster at Entrican and a well-known and pro- 
gressive merchant of that thriving village, is a native son of Montcalm 
county, having been born on a farm in Douglass township, April 11, 1875, 
son of Byron and Colista (Lee) Smith, the former of whom died in 1899 
and the latter of whom is still living in D<juglass township. 

Byron Smith was born at Smithport, Pennsylvania, Deceml)er 25, 1855, 
son of Silas L. and Mary (Yaughn) Smith, who emigrated from Pennsyl- 
vania to Michigan in 1861 and settled on a tract of land in Douglass town- 
ship, this county, where the village of Entrican now stands and in that 
neighborhood spent the remainder of their lixes. Silas L. Smith was an 
expert woodsman and was for years active in the work of clearing the forests 
hereal)<)ut. Upon settling in J>)uglass township he took a small farm of 
forty acres, which he later sold and 1>ought a farm of eighty acres in Cato 
township, where his last days were si>ent, meeting a tragic death in 1887, 
when he w^as fatally gored by an angry bull. He was active in local affairs 



396 MONTCALM C()L-NTY\ MICHIGAN. 

and had ser\-e(l his townshi]) in the capacity of treasurer and supervisor, to 
which oflices he was elected on the Democratic ticket. Tie and his wife 
were the parents of three chiUh'en. their only son, Byron, father of the suh- 
ject of this sketch, ha\ino liad two sisters, ]\lrs. I'hoebe Luther, now li\-ing 
in Nebraska, and Mrs. Xettie Luther, now li\in,^- in Oregon. 

Byron Sniitli was about six years of age when his parents nioxed to 
this county and he grew to manhood on the paternal farm and followed farm- 
inj^ all throui^h his life. On March 31, 1874, he married Colista Lee. who 
was born in Canada, July 24, 1856. daui^hter of i'eter and Rebecca (Shaver) 
Lee, who drove throuLih with their family in a covered wagon to this county 
in 1865 and settled in Douglass township, about a mile and a half east of 
l^ntrican. Peter Lee became a substantial farmer, the owner of a farm 
of more than two hundred acres, and was also active in local i)ul)lic affairs, 
having serxed his towaiship as su])ervisor and as treasurer at different times, 
being elected to the same on the Republican ticket. lie and his wife were 
earnest members of the Afethodist church and ever were active in good 
works. They were the parents of hve children, of whom there are still liv- 
ing, Mrs. Sophrona Buckrell, of Muskegan, this state; the mother of the 
subject of this sketch, and Elgin, of Kdmore; the second born, Mrs. Adaline 
Bennett and James being deceased, the former having died in 1908. Peter 
Lee died in 1878 and his widow survived him many years, her death occurring 
at the home of her grandson, Herman W. Smith, at Entrican, in 1909. 

To Byron and Colista (Lee) Smith two children w^ere born, their 
only son, J k^rman \V., having a younger sister, (jertrudc, born in 1884, 
who was graduated from the .Michigan State Normal at Mt. Pleasant and 
was for years one of Montcalm county's well-known teachers. She mar- 
ried \\'. V. rL)rn, who is emj^loyed in her brother's store at Entrican, and 
has one child, a daughter, Cecelia. I'yron Smith was for years one of 
the best-known farmers in Douglass townshij), his well-kept place, ''Rose 
Lawn Earm," about one and one-half miles west from Entrican, being long- 
regarded as one of the model farms of the neighl>orhood. Mr. Smith was 
a Republican, taking a good citizen's part in local political affairs, but w^as 
never an aspirant for office, though he did serve the public very accepta1>ly 
for a time as highway commissioner. FTe and his wife were members of 
the Methodist church and at the time of his death in 1899 he had been serv- 
ing for .some years as one of the stewards of the church. Tn 1910 his widow 
married, secondly, Oscar Johnson, who was born in Kent county, this state, 
and is now^ living in Douglass township. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 397 

IJcrnian W. Smith was reared on the lionie farm in Douglass township, 
receixing' his ok'mentary e(hication in the district school in the neighl)orhood 
ut his home. I^vincing unusual aptitude for his studies he was sent to tiie 
high school at Ionia and upon completing the course there successfully passed 
the examination for teacher's license and for six years was engaged as a 
teacher, conducting in all, eighteen terms of school, in the meantime taking 
a course in the Normal School at Big Rapids and at Alt. Pleasant. During 
his service as a teacher he taught two years in C^ato township, and the bal- 
ance of the time in Douglass township. Jn October, 1900, Mr. Smith began 
his business career l)y engaging in the general merchandise business at Bowne 
Center, in Kent county, and x\as there thus engaged for three years, at the 
end of which time he l)OUght the general store of Arthur J. Stcere at Entrican, 
this county, an eight-thousand-dollar stock of goods, to which he added the 
fi\-e-thousan(l-(lollar stock he had been carrying at Bowne Center, and has 
e\er since been successfully engaged in business at Entrican, having l)uilt up 
quite a nourishing and profitable business, his trade covering a rich section 
for miles thereabout. In addition to his general merchandise business, Mr. 
Smith also acts as agent for the International line of agricultural imple- 
ments and farm machinery and has an extensive trade in that line. Mr. 
Smith is an enterprising, energetic and up-to-date merchant, looking closely 
after all lines of his business and occupies a high place in the estimation of 
commercial circles generally hereabout. He is a Re])ublican and for years 
has given close attention to political affairs in this county, l)eing accounted 
one (jf the leaders of the part}- in his part of the county. In 1913 he was 
appointed ])ostmaster at Entrican and ever since has performed the duties of 
that office in a manner very acceptable to the people of that vicinity, the post- 
office being conducted in his store. 

On August 29, 1896. Herman W. Smith was united in marriage to 
Grace Steere, who was born at Crystal, this county, daughter of Leonard 
and Sarah (Jason) .Steere. prominent pioneers of that neighborhood, a 
detailed history of which family is set out in the biogra])hical sketch of 
Mrs. Smith's brother, Arthur J. Steere, a prominent merchant of McBride, 
])resented elsewhere in this volume. Mr. and Mrs. .Smith are active mem- 
bers of the Methodist church at Entrican. Mr. Smith l>eing one of the 
trustees of the church, and both take an interested ])art in the general social 
actixities of the community, being held in high esteem by all thereabout. 
Mr. Smith is an Odd Fellow, a memlTcr of the local lodge of the Macca- 
bees and of the Gleaners and takes a warm interest in the affairs of all these 
several organizations. 



39^ MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 

El^ XEST A. KEMP. 

lu'iiest A. Kemp, proniinciit l)iisincss man and citizen of (jreenville, 
Alontcalni counly, Michigan, was born in Kalamazoo county, Miciiig'an, on 
l'YM)ruar\- 2H, j86r, a son of Alfred and Mary ( Jones) Kemp, the former 
born in England, in 1814, the latter born in Erie county, i^ennsylvania, 
where she lived until moving to Kalamazoo county, Michigan, where she 
was married. 

Alfred Kenij) came to America, with his ]xirents, when he was a boy 
and lived in New York state, for a lime, after which he moved to Kalamazoo 
county, Michigan, where he g-rew to manhood and where he lived until the 
outbreak of the Civil War. Alfred Kemp enlisted with the Seventh Regi- 
ment, Michigan Volunteer C^avalry and served for four years, at the battle 
of Gettysburg being seriously wounded. Eollowing the close of the Civil 
War, Alfred Kemp returned to Kalamazoo county, Michigan, where he 
engaged in farming for the remainder of his active life. Alfred and ]\Iary 
Kemp were the parents of eight children, of whom four survive, namely: 
Wilham, of Clinton county; Ered, of Pasadena, California: O. C, of Green- 
ville, Alontcalm county, and Ernest A., the subject of this sketch. 

Ernest A. Kemp was educated in the common schools and lived at 
home until he was nineteen years of age, in 1879 becoming an employee of 
his brother, O. C. Kemp, in the insurance business at Greenville, Michigan. 
Eater, Ernest A. Kemp secured a half interest in the business and then some 
time afterward became the sole proprietor of the agency, he now, as a result 
of his able management, being at the head of one of the best known and 
most thriving agencies of the community, it 1)cing known now as E. A. 
Kemp & Son. 

In September, 1887, Ernest A. Kemp was married to Sarah M. 
Hutchins, who was born in Greenville and after completing her education 
in the public scliools became a school teacher, a profession which she fol- 
lowed for seven years, w^hen she was married. Ernest A. and Sarah M. 
Kemp are the parents of two cihldren : E. Stanley, twenty-four years of 
age, who after completing his education in the Greenville public schools and 
at the University of Michigan, became associated with his father in the 
insurance business, and Lucile, twenty-one years of age, who was educated 
at the Greenville high school, now a student at the Detroit Con.servatory of 
Music. 

Ernest A. Kemp is not only prominent in the insurance business at 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 399 

Greenville, Moiitcalni coiinly, but he is active in other business circles, 
now beiuL': a director of the C'onnnercial State Saving's Ijank, as well as serv- 
iui^ on the directorate of the Moore Plow and Implement Company, and the 
Northland Lumlier Com])any. 

Mr. Kemp is a well-known member of the lodge of Knights of I'ythias, 
in Cireen\ille, and is active in all community matters. In politics he is a 
ivcpnblican. 



SHRRAIAN KONG. 

Sherman Kong", prosperous farmer and man of influence in the affairs 
of KeynoUls township, "Montcalm county. Michigan, was born in Phiron 
count}'. Ohio, on April ii, 1867. the son of James and Harriet (McKelvey) 
l>ong. natives of Kiuron county, Ohio, they being of Irish descent. 

James Kong was a son of Andrew Kong, who came from his home in 
Ireland to America and located at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where after 
living for about live years, he moved to Ohio, and settled in Huron county, 
where Andrew 1-ong made his home for the remainder of his days. Follow- 
ing his marriage to Harriet McKelvey, a daughter of Robert McKelvey and 
wife, wlio came to Huron county, Ohio, from Ireland, at an early date, 
James Kong, in 1878, came to Michigan, and located in Kalkaska county, 
where he bought a farni and one year later sold that place and came to 
Reynolds townshi]), Montcalm county. Here James Kong purchased one 
thousand acres of land, some of which he sold, retaining four hundred and 
forty-five acres, which he cultivated for the remainder of his active life, he 
also having conducted a mill for about twenty-live years. James and Har- 
riet Kong- were the parents of two children. Grant, of this county, and 
vSherman. James Kong died in 1911; his wife, Harriet, died in 1893. 

Sherman Kong received his education in the common schools of his 
locality, after which he worked on the home farni for some years, and then 
he was given [possession of four hundred and forty-five acres of land in sec- 
tions IT and 12. of Reynolds township, on which Mr. Kong now is success- 
fully engaged in general agricultural pursuits. 

Sherman Kong is one of the i>rominent citizens of Reynolds township, 
his activity for the development of the community and its resources, as well 
as his interest in modern agriculture and the advancement of the general con- 
ditions of the farmer in this locality, having given him a place of note among 
the valued citizens of Montcalm county. In politics, Mr. Kong is an ardent 



400 MONTCAI.M COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

Republican, and although he has not as))irc(l to ])uh!ic oriiec, preferring to 
ser\e as a ];rivate eitizen, he has l)cen active in the election of good ollicers 
and the i)roniotion of good citizenship. 



ANGUS 11. Mcdonald. 

One of the pul)hc-spirited citizens and progressive business men of 
Six Lakes, Montcalm county, Michigan, is iVngus H. AlcDonald, a native 
of the Dominion of Canada, born at Kingston. April ii, 1853, a son of 
William K. and Charlotte (Wright) McDonald. Both parents were born 
in Canada, the father on Novemlx^- 3, 1821. at Prescott, near Kingston. 
He was a son of Andrew McDonald and wife, who came to the Doniinicjn 
fiom Scotland, having been born and reared in b".dinburgh. William K. 
McDonald was a dealer in cattle, horses and other live stock, and died on 
Septeml.ier 20. 1885. tlis wife, who was born in 1830, died Januar\' 16, 
1869, when just forty years of age. 

Angus Id. McDonald was one of a fann'ly of six children, the eldest 
dying in infancy, and .\ngus is next in order of birth; Andrew lives at 
Cleveland; Malcolm still remains at Kingston, in Canada; Marinda lives 
in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania; Daniel is deceased, and Clara is Mrs. Redlen, 
living near the old home in Canada. 

Mr. McDonald left C^mada in 1870, and came to Greenville in 1872, 
where he remained for ten years. He then came to Six Lakes and has since 
that time been actively engaged in various luisiness enterprises in this 
section. He was at first employed in luml)er and shingle mills in Six Lakes 
and \icinit\- and later ()])erated same. When the lumber business had seen 
its best days, he purclia.^cd an elevator and operated it for ele\-en or twelve 
\'ears, selling out to J. W. Gaffield and Sons. Mr. McDonald has now 
practically retired from active business matters and gives considerable 
attention to his farm in Pelvidere township. He lives on his farm of one 
hundred and twenty acres just outside the corporation of vSix Lakes, and 
owned another farm of eighty acres elsewhere in the township which he 
recently sold. Pie is also agent for the Ford automobile in Relvidere. 
Home, Richland and one-half of Douglas t()w-nshii)s and formerly had the 
agency for the whole of Genesee county. He is a hustler and places many 
of these machines during a season. 

Mr. McDonald gives ardent sup^xort to the Republican i)arty and has 




ANGi;s H. Mcdonald. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 4OI 

-.erved twelve years as township treasurer of Belvidere township in addition 
10 other services rendered his party. He holds fraternal affiliation with 
(he Free and Accepted Masons, being connected with the blue lodge at 
Six Lakes and the chapter at Stanton. lie is also a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows through the local lodge at Edmore, and 
uikes a commendable interest in the work of these orders. 

Angus H. McDonald was married on July 5, 1882, to Theresa J. Lake, 
horn on July 13, 1857, in Gratiot county, this state, a daughter of John 
;uk1 Nancy Lake. Mrs. McDonald passed from this life on March 19, 1914. 
Mr. McDonald has two adopted children: Andrew H., at home attending 
school, and Clara JL, wife of Lieut. F. C. Mecox. a native of Greenville, 
Michigan, now of the Seventh Regiment. United States Army, located at 
I'.l Paso, Texas, and they have two children, Robert A., and hloyd C, Jr. 
Mr. .McDonald is very highly esteemed by his fellow townsmen, is pos- 
sessed of keen business foresight and integrity al)ove reproach, conse- 
((uently, he is entitled to the high regard- in which he is held. 



GEORGE V. ayMDKN. 



George F. Comden, supervisor of Douglass township, this county, and 
one of the best-known and most highly respected farmers of. that section 
of the county, is a native of the British dominion across the line to the 
ijortli, having been born in Canada on Alay i, 1872, son of the Rev. Anthony 
j. and Sarah (Widdess) Comden, the former a native of ICngland and the 
latter of Canada, for years prominent and influential residents of Douglass 
to\\nship, this county. The Rev. Anthony J. Comden, who died in 1898, 
at the age of sixty-eight years, was for years not only a substantial farmer 
of Douglass township, but was one of the best-known "local" preachers 
aitached to the Ionia district of the Michigan conference of the Methodist 
I'.piscopal church, long Jiaving 1>een engaged as pastor of the Langston 
circuit of that district, a leader in all good works thereabout, whose death 
was widely luourned throughout the circuit in which he had labored so 
imsellishly and so usefully. His widow is now living at Stanton, this county, 
enjoying many evidences of the high esteem in which she is held by all who 
know her. 

The Rev. Anthonv J. Comden was F^ngHsh by birth and bl<;od. having 
(26b) 



402 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

been born witbin two miles of tbe town of Torqnay, in Devonsbirc. V.ng;- 
land, Noveml)er 12. 184T, son of Tbomas and Jane (Tnckcr) Coniden, wbo 
were tbe parents of five otber cbikb-en. Tbomas S., Mary, Sarab. Maria 
and EHza. In 1855 tbe lad, Antbony, being tben about tbirteen years of 
age, tbe Ccnndens emigrated from l^nglrmd to Canada, and settled on a farm 
on wbat is now known as tbe IDnrbam and Nortbumberland tract, wbere 
Antbonv grew to manbood. assisting in tbe development of tbe new farm, 
and wbere be remained until bis twenty-fourtb year. In 1866 be married 
Sarab Widdess, wbo was born at ( "artwrigbt, Canada, in Octoljer, 1845. 
and in 1868 came to Alicbigan. settling on a farm near Pontiac. in Oakland 
county, in October of tbat year, and tbere be remained until 1880. in wbicb 
year be and bis family came to tbis county and settled in Douglass town- 
sbip, wbere tbey estal}lisbed a permanent bome. Mr. ("omden bought a 
((uarter section of land bere. wbicb be proceeded to improve until at tbe 
time of his. deatb, in 1898, be bad a well-cultivated and model farm. 

Intensely earnest in bis nature. Mr. Comden early became interested in 
religion and by tbougbtful and studious api)lication fitted biniself for tbe 
pulpit, sitting up late at night after tbe lalwrs of tbe day in order tbat be 
might be ])roperly ecjuipped for conveying to others tbe message of tbe 
Gospel wbicb rested heavily on bis heart. He was ordained as a "local" 
preacher of the Methodist conference and for ten years served most accept- 
ably as ])astor of the T.angston circuit, being thus engaged in the dual voca- 
tion of farmer and minister of the Gos])el. in l)oth of which he was highly 
successful. Tbe Rev. :\nthony J. Compton also took an intense interest in 
educational matters and for years was influential in tbe work of elevating 
tbe standards of education in this county. He was treasurer of tbe school 
1x)ard for years and in many ways assisted in promoting the cause of tbe 
schools in Douglass township. He also was assessor of his district for nine 
years' and in all his relations to tbe ])ul>lic service was as faithful and con- 
scientious as he was in his private relations with his fellowmen. He was a 
most earnest worker in the Sunday school and organized a number of such 
schools during bis term of service in this community. He was a member 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, in the affairs of which order he 
took a warm interest. 

To tbe Rev. .\ntbony J. and Sarab (Widdess) Comden ten children 
were born, as follow : Mary, wbo married J. Luther, and lives in Mecosta 
county, this state; Ella, who married T,acey l^'arwell and lives at Ouincv, 
this state: l^lizalx.^tb. deceased: (leorge F.. the immediate subject of this 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 4O3 

biogTa]:)hical sketch; Samuel, a farmer of Doiic^lass township, this county, 
who is highway commissioner for that township; Lily, wife of the Rev. 
William Mann, of North Muskegon, this state; Charles, who lives at Stan- 
ton, this county; Emma, wife of E. O. ^'^ver, of Douglass township; Fred, 
a Douglass township farmer, and one other wdio died in infancy. 

George T. Comden was eight years of age when his i)arents moved 
from Oakland county to Montcalm county and he grew up on the home 
farm in Douglass townsiii]). Tie remained at home until his marriage, at the 
age of twenty-three, after which he settled on a farm of forty acres in 
Douglass township, which he presently increased l>y purchase to one hundred 
and twenty acres. Eater, however, he sold eighty acres of that tract and 
is now confining his farming operations to his w'ell-kei)t place of forty acres. 
Mr. Comden is a Republican and has ever taken an active part in local 
]>olitical affairs. TTe was treasurer of the township for six terms and has 
served on the school board for more than sixteen years, still serving as a 
director, and in other ways has done his part well in doing what he could 
to advance the better interests of the community. 

Tn 1895, at Greenville, this county. George E. Comden was united in 
marriage to Mamie V. Steele, who was l)orn at I Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Overmeyer) Steele, the former a native 
of Pennsylvania and the latter of Germany. John Steele's father, Captain 
Steele, was a wealthy shipper at Philadelphia, for twenty-five years a sea 
captain, who had an interest in six vessels and warehouses and was for 
years harlx)r-master at Philadelphia. He was the father of ten children, of 
whom three are still living, William, of Philadelphia; George, of Grand 
Rapids, this state, and Walter, who lives in the .state of W^ashington. To 
John Steele and wife three children were 1x)rn, Joseph Conrad, w^ho died in 
1898; Charles Daniel, who is with the W^aldron Lake Resort Company at 
Charlevoix, this state, and Mamie X'irginia, who married Mr. Comden. 
John Steele died in Philadel])hia. His widow died in 1899, at the age of 
sixty-one years. She was ten years of age when she came to this country 
from Germany with her parents and she grew to Avomanhood in Baltimore, 
Maryland, w^here she married John Steele, 

To George F. and Mamie Virginia (Steele) Comden two children have 
been born. Roy I'hompson. l^orn on June t. 1901, who died when eleven 
days old. and Carl, March 25, 1897. Mr. and Mrs. Comden also have an 
adopted daughter, Dorothy Grace. They are devoted members of the Meth- 
odist church, Mr. Comden having 1>ecome connected with that church when 



404 MONTCALM COUNTY. MICHIGAN. 

thirteen years of age and his wife also at an early age, and are interested in 
all community good works, being held in high esteem throughout the neigh- 
borhood of their home. Mr. C(;mden is one of the stewards of the church 
and has l.)een a trustee of the same ever since it was Iniilt. He is a meml^er 
of the lodge of the lnde])endent Order of Odd l-'>llows at Entrican and 
takes a warm interest in the affairs of that order. 



R015KRT NEVE. 



Of the fourteen children born to his parents, l\ol)ert Xeve and his 
brother, James, are the only ones who survive. 1'hrown upon his ow^n 
resources at a very early age, Robert Neve has overcome all obstacles and 
now holds an envial)le place among the citizens of Montcalm county, Mich- 
igan. His efforts in ac([uiring an honorable competency have been well 
directed and guided by a Christian spirit. Jle was born on March 22. 1853, 
in Rotterdam, New York, and is the son of William and Mary (Page) 
i\e\e, l)Oth nati\es of ICngland, who married there and reared thirteen of 
their children in that country. They immigrated to America where the 
death of William Xeve occurred in 1855, J^obert Xeve l)eing nearly two 
years of age at the time. Ju^llowing their arrival on American shores the 
family located in the state of Xew \'ork but sul)seciuently removed to Ionia 
county, Michigan, where tbe husband and father died. A farm was pur- 
chased, the iirst payment l)eing made l)y William Xeve. and the sons paid the 
balance due. The widow removed to Montcalm county, Michigan, in 1860 
and took a homestead of forty acres which is now ])art of the Rohert Xeve 
farm, and she made a home for her son, Robert, until he was old enough 
to support himself, at which time he assumed the care of his mother until 
her death in 1894- 

On hebruary 24, 1879. at the age of twenty-six. Ixobert Xeve was mar- 
ried to Eanny Eastwood, who w^as born on July 12. 1859, in Oakland 
county. Michigan, and they became the parents of three daughters and two 
sons, Grace, P>lanch, Mary. William and Ohester. Grace is a graduate of 
the I'ierson high school and the wife of Ered Hartwell and they reside at 
Sand Eake; Blanch is also a graduate of the Pier.son school and is the wife 
of Paul Shafley and they live at Lansing; Mary died, aged nineteen years; 
William died in infancy, and Chester, who died aged seven years. The 
family are members of the Methodist E])iscopal church of Pierson, and 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 405 

active supporters of that denomination. At the time of his marriage, Robert 
Xeve was the owner of forty acres of land which is now a part of the one 
hundred and twenty acres comprising- his home place. This property is 
devoted to the breeding of Poland Cliina hogs, the herd leader being "Big 
Bone Terfection." and Shorthorn cattle as well as Oxford sheep. "Star 
Duke" is the leacler of the cattle, which herd was started in igcx). The 
breeding of hogs was begun in 1875 and succeeded so well that the breeding 
of cattle and sheep iKcame a natural se(|uence. The stock farm is known 
as "S])ring Water Stock Farm," and the forty acres which is devoted to 
general agriculture is known as ".Sunny Nook Garden and hVuit Farm." 
K'obert Xe\e is a man that is well known throughout Montcalm county 
as an honorable, ui)right citizen and is well liked by all who know him. In 
his political vie\\s he is a stanch Republican and has served as highway com- 
missi(Micr of Fierson townshii). ITis brother, James Neve, married Anstus 
Kinnv and is a retired farmer liviug south of the towm of Pierson. 



E. A. KITTLE. 



On rural route No. i, out of Sidney, this county, one-half mile south 
of that pleasant village, is a snug little farm of sixty acres, where, in a 
comfortable and hospitable home live E. A. Kittle and wife, well-known and 
l)opular residents of that part of the county. 

K. A. Kittle was born on a farm in Wood county, Ohio, on September 
21, 1854, son of John and Martha (Brisbin) Kittle, the former of whom 
was born in Holland and the latter in Ohio. John Kittle came to the United 
.States in his early manhood and for a time lived in New York state, but 
later went to Ohio, where, in Wood county, he married Martha Brisbin and 
settled down on a small farm, wdiere his three children were born, the sub- 
ject of this sketch having two sisters, Mary, wife of W^illiam Thomas, of 
Stanton, this county, and Alice, wife of Lawson Ackerman, of "Wilson, 
New York. John Kittle died in 1856, his only son being at that time but 
two years of age, and his widow married again, to which second union three 
children were born, namely: Levi Ilunsicker, of Stanton, this county; 
Rena, who married John Nillwood, of Evergreen township, this county, 
and C^. J. Ilunsicker, of McGufifey, Ohio. In 1866 the Hunsickers came to 
this county from Ohio, making the journey overland by "prairie schooner," 



406 MONTCALM COUNTY, MICfilGAN. 

and settled at Stanton. \i. A. Kittle at that time was twelve years of age 
and he eontinned his school work in the schools of Stanton. Two years later 
his mother wa.s killed 1>\- a falling tree and thus, at the age of fourteen, he 
was left to "shift for himself." He secured work in a shingle factory, 
where he w^orked for a wage of one dollar and lifty cents a day for aliout a 
)-ear, at the end of wliich time he returned to Wood county, Ohio, where he 
went to work on a farm and continued his schooling during the winter 
months. Presently he returned to this county and resumed his former 
employment in the shingle mill, becoming in lime <-m expert shingle packer, 
and was there empUjyed until he lx)ught his present farm on the outskirts 
of Sidney, where he ever since has lived very comfortably and very con- 
tentedly, he and his good wife enjoying the confidence and esteem of all 
who know them. 

On May 14, 1876. E. A. Kittle was united in marriage to Eva J. 
Griffin, who was born in Warren count}'. New York, on December i, 1853, 
daughter of Reuben and Mary J. Griffin, and wdio came to this county with 
her parents in i860, she then being but six years of age. Her father enlisted 
for service in the Union army, in a Michigan regiment, in November, 1861, 
and w^as discharged in June, 1862, on a physician's certiiicate of disability. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Kittle but one child has l)een born, a daughter. Lulu M., 
l)orn on October 2. 1878, who married C. j. Olin, of Douglass township, 
this county, and has four children, as follow : Reuben E., born on Septem- 
ber 30, 1899; ]lerl)ert. January 29, 1904; Eva. July 5. 1908, and Mary, in 
April, 19T0. Mrs. Kittle is a member of the congregational church and 
takes an active interest in the various benehcences of the same, being looked 
upon as one of the leaders in the several woman's aid movements in con- 
nection with the congregation. 

Mr. Kittle is a Republican and for years has taken an active and 
influential part in local politics. I^'or tw^o terms he served as treasurer of 
Sidney township and in other ways has given of his time and energies to 
the public service. He is a member of Star Eodge No. 250, Free and 
Accepted Masons, at Stanton, and Mrs. Kittle is a niember of Chai)ter No. 
47, Order of the }£astern vStar. in which interesting woman's auxiliarv to the 
Masonic order she for some time occupied the chair of I^^lecta. She also 
is a member of the Woman's Relief Corps and in lx)th of these organiza- 
tions she takes a deep and <active interest. Mr. and Mrs. Kittle are genial 
and hospitable in their relations with their neighljors and occuj)y a very 
high place in the estimation of the i)eoi>le of that community. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 40/ 

JOHN FJNNKGAN. 

One of the best-known and most popular farmers in Evergreen town- 
shil). this county, is John iMunes^an, who has been a resident of this county 
suice t866, in which year he came to Michigan and followed the tinil:>er 
woods until timber was pretty well exhausted in this section, after which 
Ik- developed the farm which he had meanwdiile bought and has resided there 
c\er since, he and his good wife being among the most resi>ccted residents 
o\ that section. Their farm is a w^ell-kept place on the state road in section 
7. I'lvergreen township, rural route No. 5, out of Stanton. 

John Finnegan was born in W'iljsborough, Essex county. New York, on 
J'C'hruary 28, 1837, son of Michael and Mary (McCuskcr) Einnegan, the 
t'ornier of whom was a native of Ireland and the latter of New York state, 
horn of Irish parents. 

Michael iMunegan was but a lad when his parents emigrated to this 
country and settled in New York state and it w'as there that he grew to 
manhood. There he married Mary McCusker, to which union fourteen 
children were born, of whom eight sons and one daughter are still living, 
kichard Einnegan, one of these sons, was a soldier in the Union army 
(luring the Civil War. the other sons l)eing Thomas, Charles, William, James, 
Ccorge, Henry and John, the subject of this sketch. 

John Einnegan was reared on the home farm in New York, receiving 
iiu excellent education in the schools of his home neighborhood. On May 
i8. 1866. he married Catherine ('hambers, who was born in LawTcnce county, 
Xcw York, in 1844. and he and his bride at once came to Aiichigan, w^here 
Mr. 1^'innegan went into the lumber business. He became an expert timber 
man and ]>rcsently was raised to the position of lumber inspector, a position 
He held as long as he remained in that business, which was until the timber 
had Ijeen pretty well cut out in this region. In the meantime he had bought 
Uie farm on wdiich he is now living in Evergreen townshi]), this county, and 
in 1880 he and his wife moved onto the same and straightway l>egan to 
flevelop, it. until it gradually was brought to its present excellent state of 
cultivation, a highly improved and delightful place of residence. 

AFr. iMunegan is a Democrat and takes a proper degree of interest in the 
political movements of the times. For two years he served his home town- 
"^hij) in the capacity of supervisor, in which ix:)sition he performed excellent 
service. He is regarded as one of the substantial men of his township and 
he and his wife are held in high esteem by their many friends thereabout. 



4^S MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 



rosvvi<:ll i<leck. 



Roswell Fleck, farmer of Belvidcre township, Montcalm county, Mich- 
ijL^an. was born in Hillsdale county, this state, A])ril 15, US45, a son of John 
and I'riscilla (Swaj^er) IHeck. Air. Pleck's father was proljably born in 
Massachusetts (no exact record being obtainable), and was brought with 
his parents to Ohio, where they settled on a farm on the banks of the San- 
dusky river. There Mr. hleck's father grew to manhood and was reared 
as a farmer. Both parents died in Ohio, and John moved to Hillsdale 
county, this state, where he located and married. He operated a grist-mill 
for many years in partnership wdth his l)rothcr. George. He was a life-long 
farmer, a man highly respected, who took an active part in the early de\-elop- 
ment of Hillsdale county. Roswell IHeck is the youngest of a family of 
eight children, namely: George, Tsabelle, Rose, Fletcher, Elizal>eth. 
Leonard, Rachael and Roswell, and the latter is the only survixor. His 
mother died when he was very small and his father brought the children to 
Montcalm county, settling on a farm with his l>rother, George, aljout four 
nn'Ies east of Greenville, h'airplain township. There he married Mary 
Butterworth and to that union were born five children : Cyrus, of Mecosta 
county, this state; Frederick, of Sidney township, this county: John, 
deceased; Luella, now Mrs. Sharkey, of Richland township, and Cliarles, 
who died in infancy. John I'leck died in Sidney in 1874 at the age of 
sixty-eight years. 

Roswell Fleck was sixteen years of age when he came to b'airplain 
township, Montcalm county, and in addition to being reared a farmer he 
also learned the carpenter's trade, following his two v(jcations together. He 
came to Six i^akes in i(S75 and has accumulated considerable land in Bel- 
videre township. His farm of two hundred and eighty acres is located about 
one-half mile east of Six Lakes and he took up his residence thereon in 
1895 ^^^d follows general fanning and stock raising. 

On August 3, 1862, Roswell Fleck enlisted for service in the Civil War 
at Greenville, this state, as a private in Company F, Tw^enty-first Regiment, 
Michigan Volunteer Infantry, and served two years and ten months. He 
was given an honorable discharge on June 25, 1865, having served in the 
western campaign and been engaged in the imjx)rtant battles of Perrysville, 
Chickamauga, Bentonville, Stone's River, the siege of Savannah, and many 
other skirmishes. He became ill with typhoid after the battle of vStone's 
River and was confined to a hospital for five months. 



MONTCALM COUNTY, MICFilGAN. 4O9 

Roswell Fleck was married on Decemlxir 17, 1865, to Helen C. Meil, 
born in the state of .Wmv ^'ork, September 20, T847, a daughter of (Uiarles 
Homer Meil and wife. (A history of the AJeil family is given in connec- 
tion with biogra])lu' of L. M. Meil, j^robatc judge at Stanton, presented 
elsewhere in this volume.) To Mr. and Mrs. Fleck were born three chil- 
dren, the eldest of whom, Percy, was married first to Amelia Newman and 
by her became the father of two children, Arlington and Mildred. After 
her death he married Maggie Erner, who has borne him four children, 
Lawrence. C'atherine, Helen and Eleanor. Percy l^'leck is a carpenter by 
trade and works in a factory at Greenville. Oscar and his wife, who was 
Edith Ncvins, live at home with the father, assisting him in the work of 
the farm. They have four children, Harlan, Eucus, May Alice and Asa Guy. 
Inez, the youngest of the family, died on September 20, 1886. Mrs. Flelen 
b1eck died on February 20, 191 3. 

On March i, 191 5, Mr. Fleck retired from the iX)sition of postmaster 
of Six Lakes, after having served for ten years. He is an active Republican 
and has served as clerk of Belvidere township for five terms and was 
formerly director and moderator of the school lx>ard. Mr. Fleck is a 
member of the Free and Accepted Masons through the local lodge at Six 
L>akes and is a faithful and devoted member of the First Congregational 
church of Six Lakes. Mr. Fleck is a man of many excellent qualities. He 
is public spirited, of unfjuestionable integrity and of a genial disposition 
which wins and holds friends. 



JOSICPH B. STEERE. 



One of the I)est-known }'oung farmers in Montcalm county is Joseph B. 
Steere, proprietor of ''Steere h^irms,'' consisting of two hundred and thirty- 
six acres, situated on rural route No. 5. out of Stanton, in Evergreen town- 
ship, five miles east and three miles south of the county seat. 

Joseph B. Steere was born on a farm in Crystal Eake township, this 
county, on December 12, 1876, son of William and Emma (Tone) Steere, 
the former of whom was born in Lenawee county, this state, and the latter 
near the village of Bergen, in Genesee count}^ New York. Both were teach- 
ers in the public schools of Michigan and it was through this mutual relation 
that they met, the ac(|uaintance quickly growing into a warmer attachment, 
which shortlv was followed bv marriage. Emma Tone was educated in her 



4TO MONTCALM COUNTY, MICHIGAN. 

home schools tor the ])rofession of teaching and came to ^Michigan to follow- 
that vocation, hcing located in Ionia county, where William Steere also was 
teaching. Some time after their marriage, William Steere and his wife 
came to .Montcalm county and bought a farm in Crystal Lake township, 
where they made a home and where they reared their family. They pros- 
{Hircd and later added totheir i)(,)ssessions by the purchase of a farm in Ever- 
green township. Both are now living comfortably retired at Crystal, where 
the>- have a pleasant home and where they enjoy the respect and esteem of 
their many friends. Air. Steere is a Republican and is looked upon as one 
of Montcalm county's most sub.stantial citizens. He and his wdfe are mem- 
bers of the Methodist l^piscopal church and their children were reared in 
that faith. These children, eight in number, are all living, as follow : Edith, 
living in Crystal, a dressmaker and school teacher, who formerly was 
em])loyed in a large establishment in Detroit; Joseph B., the immediate sul> 
ject of this biograi)hical sketch: "l^eonard, a well-known farmer in Evergreen 
township, this county; Ellen, formerly a teacher in the public schools of 
Montcalm county, now^ the wife of I'eter Johnson; Dr. Thomas, a veterinary 
surgeon at Belding, this county: I'^lecta, a graduate of Albion College, w^ho 
is a well-known teacher in the schools of this county; Ethel, also a teacher, 
w ho was graduated from the high school, after which she took a course in the 
county normal, and \\ ilfred, a farmer in Crystal Take township. 

J«jseph R. Steere was reared on the paternal farm in Crystal Lake tow-n- 
.'^hip, receiving an excellent education in the neighl)orhood schools, and early 
devoted himself to farming. He married Lillian Scott