(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report - Hospital for Sick Children"

?6^ • f 



3 

HA 

21 

1 

RSTS 




46th Annual Report 



192 1 



THE 



Hospital for Sick Children 



67 College Street, Toronto 




^^4^'>1;>^ 









N' S 




'9.?t 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Sir Edmund B. Osier, Chairman 

S. G. Gurry 



Strachan Johnston 
Robert F. Scott 
Douglas S. Robertson 
Sir James W. Woods 
Irving E. Robertson 



H. H. Williams 

R. A. Laidlaw 

G. T. Clarkson 

H. W. Petrie 



Honorable Justice W. N. Ferguson 



Secretary-Treasurer, 



Superintendent 

Miss Florence J. Potts 



Watson Swaine. 

Supt. of Training School 

Miss Kathleen Panton 



HONORARY CONSULTING STAFF 



Department of Medicine 

Dr. Allen Baines i Dr. H. T. Machell 

Dr. A. H. McPhedran I Dr. W. B. Thistle 

Dr. J. T. Fotheringham 



Department of Surgery 



Mr. 


I. 


H 


Cameron 






Dr. 


F. 


N. G. Starr 


Dr. 


A. 


Primrose 






Dr. 


C. 


Shuttleworth 


Dr. 


B. 


Z. 


Milner 






Dr. 


D. 


MacLennan 








Dr. 


G. 


Royce 







ACTIVE CONSULTING STAFF 



Department of IVIedicine — 
Dr. W. Goldie 

Department of Surgery — 
Dr. C. L. Starr 

Department of Laryngology — 

Dr. Geoffrey Boyd 



Department of Ophthalmology- 
Dr. J, MacCallum 

Department of Pathology — 
Prof. J. J. McKenzie 

Department of Chemistry — 

Professor A. Hunter 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREOSf, TORONTO. 



ACTIVE STAFF— MEDICINE 



Department of Medicine — 

Dr. Allan Brown, 

Physician-in-Chief 
Dr. Alan Canfield 
Dr. Joseph. S. Graham 
Dr. George Boyer 
Dr. Beverley Hannah 

Associate Physicians — 

Dr. George Smith 
Dr. Eldward Morgan 
Dr. George Pirie 

Assistant Physicians — 
Dr. Arthur Goulding 
Dr. Frank Park 
Dr. Frank Hassard 
Dr. H. A. Dixon (Dermatology) 
Dr. Alfred Hart 

Clinical Assistants — 
Dr. Gladys Boyd, 

Fellow In Pediatrics 
Dr. Frederick Tisdale 



Dr. Roy Simpson 
Dr. C. S. McDougal 
Dr. G. A. Davis 
Dr. M. A. Cox 
Dr. H. McClelland 

In Charge of Tuberculosis 
Dr. Harold Parsons, Chief 
Dr. J. H. Elliott, Associate 

Chemical Research Laboratories — 
Angelia M. Courtney, B.A., Rad- 
cliffe College ((Harvard Uni- 
versity), Director. 
Ida F. McLachlan, B.A., Toronto, 
Assistant Director. 

Department of Dentistry — 
Dr. J. A. Bothwell 
Dr. H. K. Richardson 

Medical Registrar — 

Dr. F. S. Park 



ACTIVE STAFF— SURGERY 



Department of Surgery — 
Dr. W. E. Gallic, 
Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Associate Surgeons — 
Dr. D. E. Robertson 
Dr. Bruce Robertson 

Assistant Surgeons — 
Dr. A. B. Le Mesurier 
Dr. R, I. Harris 

Department of Laryngology- 

Dr. Edmund Boyd, 
Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Clinical Assistants — 

Dr. D. E. S. Wishart 
Dr. J. G. Strachan 
Dr. H. E. Burnham 



Department of Ophthalmology — 
Dr. W. H. Lowry, 
Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Associate Surgeon — 
Dr. W. W. Wright 

Assistant Surgeon — 

Dr. C. E. Hill 

Clinical Assistant — 
Dr. L. Sebert 

Department of Pathology and Bac- 
teriology — 
Dr. I. H. Erb, Director. 

Department of Radiology — 
Dr A. H. Rolph 

Department of Anaesthetics — 
Dr. C. H. Robson 
Dr. H. J. Shields, Assistant. 

Surgical Registrar — 
Dr. A. B. Le Mesurier 



Resident Physician — Dr. H. S. Little 



INTERNE STAFF 



Dr. H. I. Palmer 
Dr. Stanley Graham 
Dr. Milo Brady 
Dr. A. M. Jeffrey 
Dr. W. L. McKenzie 
Dr. E. J. Lehman 



Dr. N. D. Morris 
Dr. W. W. Moffatt 
Dr. E. W. Nettleton 
Dr. R. H. Middleton 
Dr. C. R. McCorvie 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHIIiDRBN, TORONTO. 



The Hospital for Sick Children 

and 

The Lakeside Home 

FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



In the forty-sixth year of the history of the Hospital for Sick 
Children, nothing stands out more conspicuously than the tre- 
mendous growth of its Out-Patient Services. An increase within 
twelve months of almost fifty per cent, in the volume of work in 
this sphere of activity compels attention to the new relationship with 
its community, which a modern hospital must maintain and 
strengthen. Day by day through the past year the number of 
patients at the O. P. D. increased. The records show an average 
attendance of 188. One day shows 300, and the smallest number in 
one day 90. 

Almost lialf a century ago the Hospital cared for a few cot 
patients only. To-day it finds itself under increasing pressure for 
more accommodation for out-patient work, which has increased 
beyond all conjectuire. 

The Hospital for Sick Children has committed itself to the 
supremely wise adage that "an ounce of prevention is worth a 
pound of cure." Its method for the prevention of serious illness 
among Ontario children is to convince the mothers and fathers of 
the wisdom of early diagnosis, and to offer them counsel from 
experts in the diseases and disabilities of dhildren. 

In this work it co-operates closely with the Health and Welfare 
Agencies of the City of Toronto, and the Province of Ontario, In 
Toronto for instance, the Public Health Nurses keep vigilant watch 
over the Health of the sichool children. To the Hospital are referred 
all suspects for clinical investigation and professional advice. The 
vital sta/tistics of the City of Toronto prove the efficacy of this co- 
ordinationw The tremendous increase in the Out-Patient Depart- 
ment of the Hospital for Sick Children is irrefutable evidence that 
the idea has ta'ken hold among the less well-to-do members of the 
comimunity. Instructional work has been necessary to put the 



THE HOSPITAL, FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



Hospital in close and intimate contact with the home. The remark- 
able growth of ithis Hospital's- Out-Patient Services proves that 
the past efforts in preparing the field has been more than justified by- 
present day results. 

Out-Patients' Visits this year 57,574 

Out-Patients' Visits last year 40,934 

Increase 16,640 

While the increase in the work of the Out-Patient Services is 
striking evidence of the confidence and esteem in which the 
Hospital for Sick Children is held by the general public, such 
growth is accompanied by a most serious problem — that of increased 
accommodation. Alternative plans are under consideration. It is 
possible that a subsidiary clinic may be establ'isihed in one or more 
outlying districts; of the City for the greater convenience of the 
parents, and also that developments upon the present site may be 
concentrated upon increasing the cot accommodation. On the other 
hand, the Hospital is most conveniently situated with regard to the 
Medical School of the University of Toronto, and it is argued that 
the educational value of the Hospital would be decreased were any 
portion of its work removed to a considerable distance from the 
Medical Lecture Rooms of the University. 

In the In-Patient Department similar advance is noted : 
1921 — 91,165 days' stay of patients. 
1920—84,902 days' stay of patients. 
Increase — 6,263. 

The average stay of a cot patient was a little over 17 days. The 
daily average was 267, ranging fromi a maximium of 305 to a 
minimum of 115. 

Part of this increase ^may possibly be ascribed to compulsory 
economies under post-war conditions. This would naturally broaden 
out the sphere of hospital activity, and in that way further emphasize 
upon the community the great asset which it has in a modern 
hospital for children. Unfortunately the same conditions which 
increase such an insititution's range of public service also diminish 
the financial support received from- its subscribers. 

The Trustees regret to announce a decrease in monetary aid 
from the general public, from fraternal societies, churches, public 
schools, and also from ithe simall fees collected for the care of children 
who are not officially classed as dependent upon municipal orders 
for treatment. There is also a decrease in 'bequests. 

BEQUESTS IN THE YEAR 1920-1921. 

The Trustees acknowledge, with thanks, bequests from the 
estates of: — William Wood, Toronto, $333.34; Henry James, 
Brantford, $250; Mrs. E. A. Jolliffe, Toronto, $100; Phillis Wilkinson, 
Orangeville, $700; Mrs. Lizzie Gibb, St. Catharines', $100; Atkinson 
Poole, iRodney, $100; Wim. Lo^an, Toronto, $7; Elias Rogers, 
Toronto, $100; J. B. McMurcliy, Gananoque, $200; John Sloan, 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



Township of Esquesing-, $100; Dr. Daniel Cliaric, Toronto, $1,07970; 
Franois Richardson, Toronto, $100; William' Warren, Toronto, ^75 ; 
William Ramsay, Bowland, Scot., $200; Jermyn and J. Edgeworth, 
$1,255; Andrew Orr Hasting-s, Toronto, $221.91; Wm. J. Cashin, 
Stratford, $100; Benjamin Allen, Toronto, $125 ; R. R. Newborn, New 
Toronto, $19.40; Bernard Davis, Toronto, $200; Mrs. Frederick 
Knight, Peterborough, $50; Dinisha Michael, Toronto, $449.46; Mrs. 
Sophronia Wright, Township N. Norwich, $107.44; Charles Reed, 
Toronto, $100; Sophia Hyman, Brantford, $1,000; Agnes A. Hutton, 
Windsor, $500 ; Agnes Harvey, Seaforth, $6.87 ; Emily A. Fleming, 
Toronto, $50; Mary Eleanor Wright, Bolton, $51.30; Henry Trull, 
Oshawa, $500; R. H. Sims, Kitchener, $500; Alice S. Patterson, Twp. 
of Dunwich, $500; M. Moses, Toronto, $1,000; Joseph Hobbs, Bangor, 
Mich., $100; Henry Woods, Aylmer, $76; Mary Pollard, Toronto, 
$19.12; Pauline Davis, Toronto, $100; Norman J. Copping, Toronto, 
$500 ; Rev. John Gibson, Toronto, $80 ; Mary Barkwell, Port Hope, 
$100; Estate, J. Ross Robertson, Toronto, $10,000. Total— $21,356.54. 

When patients are admitted to the Hospital under an order from 
a Municipality, the latter makes a statutory contribution of $1.50 per 
day. There is also the Provincial Grant of fifty centS' per day up to 
120 days. As the cost of operating the Hospital, less any depart- 
mental balances, works out ait over $4.00 per day, it is inevitable that 
there must be a deficit each year. The Hospital has no endowment 
whatsoever, beyond an annual legacy of ten thousand dollars. 
Voluntary contributions have never made good the yearly deficit. 

The Trustees gratefully record a Special Grant from' the City of 
Toronto of $90,000.00, in consideration of an undertaking that the 
$145,000.00 Bank Overdraft at the end of the fiscal year would be 
wiped out. When this had been done, the Hospital was able to show 
a very small credit balance sufficient to carry on operations for a few 
days at most. 

The Overdrafts at the close of the past two years were : 

Sept. 30th, 1921 . . . ., $141,625.92 

Sept. 30th, 1920 $145,042.72 

Accounts payable, and accrued charges for 1921 brought the total 
obligations at the end of the year $159,478.17. 

The year's work for 1921 may be briefly summarized — a remark- 
able increase in both In-Patients and Out-Patients work, and a con- 
siderable shrinkage in ordinary revenue, which would have brought 
about a critical embarrassment to the Hospital's power for public 
service, had it not been for the generous intervention of the 
Corporation of the City of Toronto. 

For the Trust, 




Chairman. 



THE HOSPITAL, FOB SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



Cots Named in Perpetuity by Payment of $2,000 

For the year ending Sept. 30th, 1921. 



Name of Cot. Est'd 

In memory of Euphemia Fenwick 1820 

The Jane J. Price Cot 1920 

The William Mcllwralth Cot 1921 

The Baby June Monk Cot 1921 

In Loving Memory of Salem Grlswold 

Kitchen 1921 

The W. A. Kemp Cot 1921 

The M. E. Bowbeer Cot 1921 

The A. Greenly Cot 1921 

The Thomas Long Cot 1921 

The H. W. Petrle Cot 1921 

The Brampton S. Schools' Cot 1921 

Sons of England Founders' Memorial Cot . . 1921 



By Whom Established. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Mcintosh, To- 
ronto. 

The heirs of the Estate. 

Estate of William Mcllwralth, Bur- 
ford. 

Mrs. W. Q. Monk, Toronto. 

Mrs. S. G. Kitchen, St. George, Ont. 
Mrs. W. A. Kemp and Family, To- 
ronto. 
Estate of Miss M. E. Bowbeer, Milton. 
Estate of Alfred Greenly. 
Estate of Thomas Long, Toronto. 
H. W. Petrle, Esq., Toronto. 
Sunday Schools in Brampton. 
Supreme Lodge, S.O.E., Toronto. 



COTS NAMED BY PAYMENT OF $100 ANNUALLY. 

St. Paul's S. S. Cot 1886 St. Paul's (Anglican) S. S., Toronto. 

Toronto Police Cot 1891 Toronto Police Force. 

Nora and Ernest Cot 1896 Harris H. Fudger, Toronto. 

Toronto Fire Department Cot 1898 Firemen of Toronto Brigade. 

Harry and Fred Housser Cot 1899 H. B. Housser, Toronto. 

The Dorothy Fulford Hardy Cot 1901 Mrs. A. C. Hardy, Brockvllle. 

Lilias Fitton Cot 1903 H. W. Fitton, Toronto. 

The Thomas Thornton Cot 1905 Mrs. H. N. Smith, Fort Erie. 

Jean Evelyn Boeckh Cot 1910 Mrs. E. C. Boeckh, Toronto. 

Toronto Saturday Night Cot 1910 "Saturday Night," Limited. 

Massey-Harris Cot 1910 Massey-Harrls Co., Toronto. 

Hannah Walker Cot 1911 T. L. Walker, Toronto. 

The Zeta Masonic Cot 1911 Zeta Lodge, 410, A.F. & A.M., Toronto 

Eliza MerlUa Broddy Cot 1912 Bequest of R. Broddy, Brampton. 

St. Peter's Anglican S. S. Cot 1912 St. Peter's (Anglican) S. S., Toronto. 

"The Lord's Tenth" Cot, In memory of J. 

H. G., Winnipeg 1912 Mrs. Thos. H. Cleghorn, Toronto. 

The George and Louisa Hale Cot 1914 Misses C. and H. Hale, Toronto. 

The Z. A. Lash Cot 1914 Z. A. Lash, Toronto. 

The Ria New Cot 1915 Ryland H. New, Toronto. 

The Fred and Baby Sister Cot 1915 Mrs. R. A. Tanner, Watford. 

Katherlne Conboy Cot 1916 Dr. Fred. J. Conboy, Toronto. 

The Dorothy Dods Cot 1916 John M. Dods, Orangevllle. 

The Lowndes Company Cot 1918 The Lowndes Company, Toronto. 

The Erwin C. Greb Cot 1918 Mr. Edwin C. Greb, Kitchener. 

The Marlon McLaren Cot 1918 Mr. D. McLaren, Toronto. 

The Thomas Kinnear Cot 1918 Mr. T. H. Kinnear, Toronto. 

A Thanksgiving Cot 1919 Anonymous. 

The Blbridge Burden Cot 1919 A Friend. 

The James Glffen Cot 1919 Beq. Mr. Jas. Glffen, Brampton. 

The Lieut. J. Harry Knox Cot 1919 Mrs. Harvey Knox, Toronto 

The John D. Ivey Cot 1919 Mr. A. M. Ivey, Toronto. 

The Mary Bailey Thornton Cot % 1919 Mrs. Herbert Nelson Smith, Fort Erie 

Major Walter Eyere Curry Cot 1919 Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Curry, Toronto 

The Dempster Thanksgiving Cot 1919 Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Dempster, Toronto 

The Slg'n Charles W. D. Mooney Cot . . . 1919 Miss Mary A. Mooney, Inverness, Que. 

The Hebrew Maternity Child Welfare Cot . . 1920 Hebrew Maternity Child Welfare 
_. , ,„ Society, Toronto. 

The Letitla Woodward Cot 1920 Mr. Charles L. Wisner, Toronto 

The Capt. Murray H. Paterson Cot 1920 MIsb Jessie D. Paterson, Ohiatham, Ont. 

Th^ w I, , r, 4. ^^^^ Toung Ladies' Bible Class, Deer Park 

The Wohelo Cot Presbyterian Church, Toronto. 

The Allen Theatres Cot 1920 The Allen Theatres, Limited, Toronto. 

In Memory of Murray Nellson 1920 Mr. Morden Nellson, Toronto 

The Isobel Routly Cot 1920 Mr. H. T. Routly, Toronto 

The Whcaton Cot 1920 Mrs. C. F. Wheaton, Toronto. 

m?® ?*• Cliristopher Cot 1920 St. Christopher's House, Toronto. 

The A. B. Beverly Cot 1921 Mrs. A. B. Beverly, Toronto. 

The Herbert J. Hamilton Cot 1921 Mrs. W. Q. Howell, Guelph, Ont. 

The Dennis Avenue Public School Cot . . . 1921 The Dennis Avenue Public School, 
mi. »> .^ ^ Mount Dennis, Ont. 

The Ruth Cot 1921 Mr. C. O. Strange, Toronto. 

The Danforth Methodist Toung Men's Cot. . 1821 The Toung Men of Danforth Metho- 
m.. ^ , ^ ,- "H^ Church, Toronto. 

The Ralph M. Singer Cot 1821 Dr. Bessie T. Singer, Toronto 

Employees, H. W. Petrle, Limited, Cot ... 1821 Employees H. W. Petrle, Limited. 

Runnymede Children's Community Cot .... 1821 The Children of Runnymede. 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



COTS NAMED IN THE LAKESIDE HOME BY PAYMENT OF $25 ANNUALLY. 

The Adelaide Cot 1891 "A Sympathizer," Brockville. 

Northern Congregational S. S. Cot 1902 Northern Congregational S.S., Toronto 

Wesley Methodist S. S. Cots, Nos. 1 and 2.. 1904 Wesley Methodist S. S., Clinton. 
North St. Methodist Church S. S. Cot . . . 1904 North St. Meth. Ch. S. S., Goderich. 

Upper Canada College Cat 1905 Boys of U. C. College, Toronto. 

William Thoburn Cot 1906 William Thobiirn, Almonte. 

The Simcoe Methodist S. S. Cot 1907 Simcoe Methodist Sunday School. 

The Rev. M. Sadler Cot 1907 Mr. A. R. Greene, Toronto. 

The Jean, Burton and Elizabeth Cot 1911 Jean, B. and E. Millar, Pembroke. 

Harbord Collegiate Institute Cot 1911 Pupils of Harbord Coll. Inst., Toronto 

Alliston High and Public Schools' Cot 1911 Public School Children, Alliston. 

William T. Hall Cot 1912 Mr. Thomas Hall, St. Thomas. 

Lyde Thorne Cot 1912 Mrs. A. Tuck, Stoney Creek. 

Ridgeway Methodist S. S. Cot 1912 Methodist S. S., Ridgeway. 

The Atwood Chapter Cot 1912 Atwood Chapter, 149, Rainy River. 

The St. Andrew's Windsor Cot 1913 Adult Bible Class, Windsor, Ont. 

Jarvis Street Collegiate Institute Cot 1913 Jarvls St. Coll. Institute, Toronto. 

Bonar Presbyterian S. S. Cat 1914 Bonar Presbyterian S. S., Toronto. 

Grace Church S. S. Cot, Brantford 1914 Grace Church S. S., Brantford. 

Temiskaming Preceptory, No. 60, Cot 1915 Temiskaming Preceptory, No. 60, 

Halleybury. 

The Margaret Dods Cot 1916 Mr. John M. Dods, Orangeville. 

The Doris Alida Salmond Cot 1916 Mr. James J. Salmond, Toronto. 

The Reg. Henderson Memorial Cot 1917 By Employees of the Tower Canadian, 

' Limited, Toronto. 

Capt. W. H. Featherstonhaugh Cot 1918 Mrs. G. C. Ludlow, Toronto. 

The John Ross Ro'bertson Lodge Cot 1918 John Ross Robertson Lodge, U.D., 

' A. F. & A. M., Toronto. 

Masonic Lodge Royal, No. 453, Cot 1918 Masonic Lodge Royal, No. 463, Fort 

William, Ont. 
The Abell Cot 1918 Mrs. Mabel Crawford, R. R. No. 1, 

Aylmer. 

The Mount Pleasant S. S. Cot 1919 Mount Pleasant S. S. 

The Glen Mawr Cot 1919 Glen Mawr Girls' School, Toronto. 

C. G. E. Co. Supply Works Employees' Cot.. 1919 By C. G. E. Co. Supply Works 

Employees, Toronto. 
The Sarah Warne Cot 1919 Beq. Sarah Warne, Brantford (for 8 

years). 

The A. G. Giles and Wife Cot 1919 Mr. and Mrs. A. Giles, St. Thomas. 

The Brampton S. Schools' Cot 1919 Sunday Schools in Brampton. 

The Oakville Public Schools' Cot 1919 OakvlUe Public Schools. 

Central Model School, Peterboro", Cot . . . 1918 Central Model School, Peterboro', Ont. 
The Fidelia Davles, April 3rd, 1919, Cot . . 1919 Bequest of the late Miss Fidelia 

Davies, Toronto. 
The George and Edmond Hymmen Cot . . . 1919 Mr. H. L. Hymmen, Kitchener, Ont, 

Carlisle Methodist Sunday School Cot 1920 Carlisle Methodist S.S., Carlisle, Ont. 

The Abitibi, No. 540, A. F. & A. M., Cot . . 1920 Abltibl, No. 540, A.F. & A.M. Lodge, 

, Iroquois Falls, Ont 

The Laura Secord Memorial Cot 1920 Laura Secord Memorial School. 

Queenston, Ont. 
Merritton Public School Children's Cot . . . 1920 Merritton Public School, Merrltton. 

Ont. 

The W. H. Patterson Cot 1920 Mr. W. H. Patterson, Toronto. 

The McLaren Cot 1920 Mr. G. H. McLaren, Toronto. 

Brotherhood of Locomotive EngiD" 

eers, Chapleau, Ont. 
The J. J. Scully Division, No. 544, Cot ... 1920 J. J. Scully Dlv., No. 554, G.LA. 
The Sydenham High School Cot 1920 Sydenham High School. Sydenham, 

Ont. 
The George Allan Gourley Memorial Cot . . 1920 By "A Friend," Arnprior, Ont. 

The Sunnyside Set Cot 1920 The Sunnyside Set, Gait, Ont. 

"Brighten the Corner" Cot 1920 St. John's Road Baptist Church, To- 

I ronto. 

The Duntroon Branch Women's Inet. Cot. . 1920 Women's Institute, Duntroon, Ont. 

The Whea.ton Cot 1920 Mrs. C. F. Wheaton, Toronto. 

The Mary Frankish Cot 1921 Mrs. C. H. Wilson, Toronto. 

The Women's Institute Cot, Everett, Ont. . . 1921 The Women's Institute, Everett, Ont 
Employees Sowtham Press, Limited, Cots 1921 Employees, Southam Press, Limited, 

Nos. 1 and 2 Toronto. 

The Good Cheer Cot 1921 The Good Cheer Club, Goderich, Ont. 

The Shirley Street School Cot, in memory 

of WHlie Nutt. accidentally killed Oct. 1921 The Pupils of Shirley Street School, 

9, 1920 Toronto. 

The Flossie M. McPhall Memorial Cct 1921 Mr. Orval K. McPhall, Bothwell, Ont. 

The A. M. Weldon Cot, "Inasmuch" 1921 Mrs. A. Graham, Union, Ont. 

COTS NAMED IN PERPETUITY IN THE LAKESIDE HOME FOB 9S00. 

The Allan Norman Cot 1892 Mr. and Mrs. G. A. McKenzle. 

Sigma Beta Sorority Westbourne School Cot 1905 Westbourne School, Toronto. 

The Royal Arch Masons' Cot 1908 Grand Chapter of Canada, R.A.M. 

The Mikado Cot 1909 Mr. Kenjl Ishikawa, Yokohama, 

Japan. 

Mother's Cot 1911 Mr. and Mrs. A. McCredle, Cblppaw* 

The Louise Bloaoom Gun Munro Cot .... 1912 Mr. E. C. Gun, Cleveland, Ohio. 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



COTS NAMED IN PERPETUITY IN THE LAKESIDE HOME FOB $500 — Continued. 

Augrusta Louise Irving Cot 1914 Mrs. L. Sutherland, Montreal, and 

Mrs. A. Jarvjs, Toronto. 

The James Maclennan Cot 1915 Hon. James Maclennan, Toronto. 

The J. I. Carter Cot 1915 Beq. of late Mr. J. I. Carter, Sarnia. 

The Mrs. Minnie Gregg Cot 1915 Beq. late Mr. T. A. Gregg, Toronto. 

Edith K. Thompson Memorial Cot 1916 Mrs. K. Thompson and Daughters, 

Belleville. 

The Thomas Davies Cot 1917 Bequest late Mr. T. Davles, Toronto. 

Zeta Psl Service Cot 1919 Theta XI Chapter, Toronto. 

In Memory of John and Eunice Mooney Cot 1917 Mary A. Mooney, Inverness, Que. 

The Joseph T. Slater Cot 1919 Bequest of the late Mrs. Kate L. 

Slater, Toronto. 

The T. R. White Cot 1919 Mrs. Thos. R. White, Alliston. Ont. 

The Ernest B. Cook Cot 1920 Mrs. Sarah Cook, Toronto. 

The Bruce Adair Morrison Cot, In memory 1921 Mr. S. Roether, Toronto, 
of Marguerlite Roether Morrison 

The H. W. Petrie Cot 1921 H. W. Petrie, Esq.. Toronto. 

COTS ENDOWED IN PERPETUITY BY PAYMENT OF $10,000. 

The Cawthra Mulock Cot 1906 Cawthra Mulock, Toronto. 

The T. Eaton Co., Toronto, Employees' Cot 1919 T. Eaton Co. Employees. 



PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOL COTS. 

New Cot»— City Hospital — By Public and New Cots — ^Lalteside Home— By Public and 
Separate Schools of Toronto and Ontario. Separate Schools of Toronto and Ontario. 



Balmy Beach P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Withrow Avenue P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

McCaul P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Rosedale P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Clinton Street P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

HlUcrest P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Pauline Avenue P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Runnymede P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Birch Cliff P. S. Cot, Birch Cliff, Ont. 

Holy Rosary Separate School Cot, Toronto. 

S. S. No. 10, Colchester South, P. S. Cot, 

Colchester S. Township. 
City View (S. S. No. 12, Nepean Tp.) Cot, 

City View, Ont. 
Vineland P. S. Cot, Vlneland, Ont. 

Mill Street, Leamington, P. S. Cot, Leaming- 
ton, Ont. 



Kew Beach P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Pape Avenue P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Duke Street P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

John Ross Robertson P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Palmerston Avenue P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

McMurrich P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Dewson Street P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Western Avenue P. S. Cot, Toronto. 

Torrens Avenue P. S. Cot, Todmorden, Onf 

St. Basil's Separate School Cot, Toronto. 

Grand Bend P. S. Cot, Grand Bend, Ont. 

Picton P. S. Cot, Plcton, Ont. 

Scarborough Jet. P. S. Cot, Scarborough 

Jet., Ont. 
S. S. No. 7,, East Zorra. P. S. Cot, East 

Zorra Tp. 



IN THE HOSPITAL 
$2,000 Names a Cot Forever $100 Names a Cot Year by Year 



IN THE LAKESIDE HOME 
$500 Names a Cot Forever $25 Names a Cot Year by Year 



REMEMBER THE SICK CHILDREN IN YOUR WILL 
Read the names of those who have memorial cots. $2,000 
names a cot in perpetuity. If you cannot found a cot, leave something 
— if only a hundred dollars — to help to nurse sick little ones. The 
form to use is: — "I Give, Devise and Bequeath to The Hospital for 
Sick Children, Toronto," the sum of 



10 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



Operating: Account for 

Housekeeplngr E x - 
penses, including 
Food, Fuel, Water, 
Ice, etc $112,494.38 

Salaries and Wages 178,105.67 

Drugs, Medicine, Sur- 
gical and Orthopae- 
dic Supplies, etc. . . 

Clothing, Boots, etc. 

Sundry Expenses.... 

Printing, Stationery, 
Postage, etc 

Interest 

Insurance and Taxes 

Bad Debts 

Repairs and Renewals, 
Bldg., Plant, Equip. 

Repairs and Renewals. 
Furniture and Fur- 
nishings 12,057.50 

$388, 

Reserve for Depreci- 
ation on Building, 
Plant and Equip- 
ment 

Reserve for Depreci- 
ation on Furniture 
and Furnishings. . 



Year Ending 30tli September, 1921. 

Paying Patients $86,890.83 

City Patients 82,201.09 

Provincial Govern - 
ment Grants Receiv- 
able to 30th Sep- 
tember, 1921 42,608.53 



22,011.58 
5,206.79 
7,393.04 

11,214.00 
9,213.62 
1,411.61 
7,618.45 

22,214.34 



585.66 



1,942.42 



940.96 



2,528.08 



$391,469.04 



Students* Fees 1,703.31 

X - R a y Department 

Refvenu© 1,672.17 

Rents Revenue Net . . 1,166.04 



Operating Loss carried 
to Investment Account 



$211,700.45 

4,541.52 
175,227.07 



391.469.04 



Balance from Operating Ac- 
count $ 175,227.07 

Balance. Sept 30, 1921 1,239,246.41 



Investment Account 

Surplus 




$1,414,473.48 



^ per 
Balance Sheet 
of 30th Sept., 

1920 $1,206,218.27 

Less : Adjust- „_,„„„ 

ments 10,313.78. 



Special Grant 

from City of 

Toronto re de- 
ficit to 30th 

Sept., 1920...$ 90,000.00 
Portion of 3ub- 

scriptions, etc.. 

applied agarinst 

deficit to 30th 

Sept., 1920 55,000.00 

General Donations , .$38,981.61 
For Naming Cots.. 10.053.42 
Toronto Schools . . 12,286.76 
Other Ontario Schools 2,424.01 

Municipalities 3,622.70 

Post Office Sub- 
scriptions 649.11 

Sunday Schools and 

Churches 2,946.14 

Societies 6,758.14 

$77,721.89 
Less: Applied aigalnst 
deficit to 30th 
Sept., 1920. as 
above 56,000.00 



$1,195,904.49 



145.000.00 



Bequests and Lega- 
cies during year 

Subscriptions dur- 
ing year for Cots 
in perpetuity . . . 



22,721.89 
32,847.10 

18.000.00 
$1,414,473.48 



We have audited the accounts of the Hospital for Sick Children for the year end- 
ing 30th September, 1921, and we certify that the Balance Sheet amd recited Statements 
set forth fairly and truly the financial position of the Hospital on the date stated and 
the revenue and expenditure for the period. 

We have seen satisfactory vouchers for the expenditures, and that tiie revenue, In- 
cluding that from the endowment and other investments, has been properly accounted for. 
We have confirmed the bank balances and seen the investment securities, but we have 
not examined the titles to the properties. CLARKSON, GORDON & D4LWORTH. 

Toronto, lath December, 1921 Chartered Accountants. 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN. TORONTO. 



11 



CITIES, TOWNS, VILLAGES, ETC., FROM WHICH PATIENTS WERE RBCEIYED AT 
THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN FOR YEAR ENDING 
SEPTEMBER 30. 1921. 



Place No. 

Aglncourt 4 

Algonquin 1 

Allandale 1 

Allan Park 1 

AlUston 1 

Almonte 1 

Alport 1 

Amhio Lake .... 1 

Appin 1 

Arner 1 

Arnow 1 

Arthur 1 

Aurora 8 

Aylmer 2 

Aylmer West .... 1 
Azelda 3 

Bagrnor 1 

Bswla 1 

Ballycroy 1 

Belle River 1 

Belleville 3 

Belwood 1 

Blgrwood 3 

Bignrark 1 

Blrohcliffe 12 

Bobcaygeon .... 3 

Bolton 2 

Bonarlaw 1 

Bowmanville .... 2 
Bracebrldge .... 2 

Bradford 1 

Brampton 3 

Branchton 1 

Brandon. Man. . . 1 

Brantford 12 

Brlgiht 2 

Brighton 3 

Bronte 1 

Burk's Palls .... 2 

Burwash 1 

Byng Inlet 2 

Calabogrle 1 

Caledonia 1 

Caledon Eaat ... 1 

Capreol 3 

Caroa, 9ask 1 

CarrvllI© 2 

Carrying Place . . 1 

Cartier 1 

iCestleitoti 1 

Cayuga 2 

Cedarval© 3 

Charlton 2 

Chatsworth 1 

Cheltenham 2 

Ohesley 2 

ChurchlU 1 

Cttyvlew 1 

Clarke 2 

Cobalt 3 

Cobourg 6 

Cochrane 1 

ColboTne 2 

Coldwater 1 

Co-lUngwood 1 

CoUlna Bay 2 

Comma.nda 1 

Coniaton 1 

Constableville N.T. 1 

Cooksvlill'e 4 

Copper Cliff 2 

Corbetton 1 

Creemore 1 

rvelhi 1 

Detroit 3 

Downsview 1 

Dunbartoa 1 



Place No. 

DunnvUle 1 

Dunsford 1 

Durham 2 

Du'tton 1 

Earlscourt 15 

East Toronto ... .39 

Echo Place 1 

Edmonton, Alb. . . 1 

Eganvllle 1 

Bgliniton 5 

BImvale 1 

Eilora 1 

Elpihin 1 

Emo 1 

Empress 1 

Erie, Pa 1 

Etobicoke, P.O. . 2 

Exeter 1 

Fairbanks 35 

Fenelon Falls ... 1 

Fenwlck 1 

Fergus 1 

Flesherton 1 

Foleyet 1 

Fort Francis .... 1 

Fort William 6 

Franz 1 

Frultland 1 

Gadflhin Sta. ... 1 

Galetta 2 

Gaat 8 

Georgetown 3 

Glanworth 1 

Glen Allen 2 

Glen WUUanMi ... 1 

Gorml^ 2 

Grafton 1 

Grand Bend 1 

Grant 1 

Gravenhurst .... 2 

Guel3>h 15 

Hall ey bury 3 

Hallburtoa 1 

Hamilton 29 

Hanover 1 

Hawarden, Sask. . 1 
Humber Bay .... 9 

Huntsviile 2 

Hybla 1 

IngepsoU 2 

Islington 5 

Iroquois Falls ... 1 

Kamloops, B.C. . . 1 

Kapuskasinig .... 1 

Keene 1 

Keswick 1 

Kingston 4 

Kitchener 6 

Konaoko 1 

Korah 1 

Krugersdorf . . . . 1 

Lambton 3 

Lambton Mills ... 6 

Lanark 1 

Landing 4 

Lefroy 1 

Levack Mines ... 1 

Lindsay 2 

Lltitle Current . . . 1 

LltUe York 2 

Llstowel 2 

London 6 

Lous Branch .... 17 

Lowbanks 1 



Place No. 

Magnetiewan 1 

Malton 2 

Maple 1 

Marshville 1 

Massey 1 

Midford 1 

Millbank 1 

MUton 3 

Mimlco 21 

Minalco Beach . . 4 

Mlnden 1 

Mississippi Sta. . . 1 

Mitchell 1 

Mohawk 1 

Molra 2 

Mono Road 1 

Montreal, Que. . . 3 

Moorefleld 1 

Mounlt Albert .... 1 
Mount Dennis . . .33 

MoTint Forest .... 3 

Newcastle 1 

New Hamburg . . 6 
New Liskeard ... 2 

Newmarket 9 

Newtonibrook .... 2 
New Toronto ... .18 
Niagara Falls ... 2 
Niagara - on - the- 

Lake 1 

Nipigon 1 

Niplsslng 2 

Nixon 1 

NoelvliUe 1 

North Bay 9 

North Toronto . . 8 

OakvlUe 15 

Oakwood ....... 12 

Orlllia 2 

Oahawa 16 

Ottawa 3 

Owen Sound .... 4 

Pakeniham 1 

Pakesley 1 

Palmererton 1 

Paris 3 

Parry Sound .... 2 

Penetang 2 

P«rth 1 

Peterboro 4 

PIittsTjurg, Pa. . . 1 

Plckerlnjg 1 

Port Arthur 2 

Port Credit 7 

Port Dalhousle . . 1 

Port Dover 2 

Port Hope 3 

Port Lock 1 

Port Stanley .... 2 
Powassan 3 

Quadvllle 2 

Raymond 1 

Reaboro 13 

Richmond HIU . . 1 

Ripley 4 

Rosseau 1 

Runnymede 16 

St. Catharines ... 7 

St. Davids 2 

St. Marys 3 

3t. Thomas 5 

Sarnla 1 

Saskatoon, Sask. . 1 

Sault Ste. Maiie . 4 

Scarboro 10 

Scarlert Plains ... 2 

Sohomiberg 1 



Place No. 

Schumacher 1 

Seagrav© 1 

Seilkirk 1 

Shallow Lake' .... 2 

Shanty Bay 1 

Shelburnie 1 

Silver Hill 1 

Silverthorne ... .13 

Sllverwater 1 

Sim'CO'6 4 

Smith's Falls .... 3 

Smlthvllle 2 

Southampton .... 1 

South Porcupine . 2 

South River 4 

Sprucedalle 1 

Staffa 1 

Stoney Creek .... 1 

Stouffvllle 1 

Stratford 5 

Stpeetsvllle 3 

Sturgeon Falls . . 2 

Sudbury 8 

Sunderland 1 

Swansea 12 

Tecumseh 1 

remperancevUle . 1 

Thame«fard 1 

Thed'ford 1 

Thornhilll 2 

Thornton 1 

Thorold 5 

nilsonburg 1 

Timiakaming .... 1 

TUmmlns 2 

TodmoTden 39 

Toronto 4,314 

Tory Hill 2 

Tottenham 1 

Trenton 3 

Trout Creek .... 2 

Udora 1 

Up ter grove 1 

Utterson 2 

Uxbrldge 1 

Vancouver, B.C. . 1 

Vanessa 2 

Walkerton 1 

Wallacebung .... 1 

WaUensteln 1 

Warren 1 

Waterloo 2 

Waubaushene .... 3 

Welland 5 

Wellealey 1 

West Falrbank . . 1 

West Hamilton . . 1 

West HUl 2 

Weston 21 

West Toron-to ... 12 

Whitby 2 

Whitefish 1 

Whltestone 2 

Wlartton 2 

Wlllowdiaile 1 

Wlllowvaile 1 

WUsonvUlie 1 

WlndeoTTiere .... 1 

Windsor 3 

Woodbrldge 1 

Woodstock 1 

Woodvllle 1 

Worthington .... 1 

Wychwood 7 

Wyebrldge 1 

Zepher 1 

Total 5.277 



12 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



COUNTIES FROM WHERE PATIENTS WERE ADMITTED. 



District Number 

or of 

County Patients 

Algoma 21 

Brant 17 

Bruce 11 

Carleton 6 

Duff erla 2 

Durham 8 

Eigin 11 

Essex 4 

Front enace 7 

Grenvllle 1 

Grey 13 

Haldlmand 6 

Haliburton. 4 

Haiton 22 



District Number 

or of 

County Patients 

Hastiniira 10 

Huron. 2 

Kenit 1 

Lambton 2 

Lanark 8 

Lincoln 14 

Middlesiex 9 

Muskoka 12 

NipisBing 28 

Norfolk 11 

Northumberland . 13 

Ontario 26 

Oxford 7 

Parry Sound ... .24 



District Number 

or of 

•bounty Patients 

Pe«l 26 

Perth 15 

Peterborough ... 5 
Prince Edward . . 1 
Rainy River .... 2 

Renfrew 4 

Simcoe 22 

Sudbury District. 1 
Temlfikamlnig ... 19 
Thunder Bay . . .10 

Victoria 21 

Waterloo 18 

Welland 14 

Wellinjgton 26 



District Number 

01 of 

County Patients 

Wentworth 32 

York 429 

Alberta 2 

British Columbia. 3 

Manitoba 1 

Michigan, U.S.A.. 3 

New York 1 

Pennsylvania ... 2 

Quebec 5 

Saskatchewan . . 3 

963 

City Patients 4,314 



5,277 



CLASSIFICATION OF PATIENTS FOR YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30TH. 1921 



Religion — 

Protestants of any denomination 

Roman Catholics 

Other Religions 

Nationalities — 

Canada 

England 

Ireland 

Scotland 

United States 

Other Countries , 

Res'idence of Patients — 

City of Toronto 

York County (other than Toronto) 

Counties in Ontario (other than York) . . , 

Provinces of Canada (other than Ontario) 

United States 

No. of patients remaining in Sept. 30'th, 1920 . 
No. of patients admitted during year 

No. of patients under treatment for year 



Boys 

2,284 

314 

304 



2,355 
244 
294 

7 
2 

126 

2,776 1 

2.902 I 



Girls I Total 

1,826 I 4,110 

322 I 636 

227 I 631 



4,022 

393 

52 

83 

15 

712 



1,959 I 4,314 

185 I 429 

221 I 515 

6 I 13 

4 I 6 

136 I 262 
2,239 I 5,015 

2.375 I 5.277 



2,187 


1,835 


235 


158 


27 


25 


49 


34 


9 


6 


396 


317 



NUMBER OF PATIENTS RECEIVED FROM CITY AND COUNTRY. 
Since the year 1875 to the year ending September SOtb, 1921. 

AND RESULTS OF TREATMENTS. 





In- 


Patients 




In-Patients — Results 




Total 


Year. 
















Out- 


Out- 
















Patients 


and In- 






Sh 


"S 




Im- 


Unim- 






patients 




5 ^ 


£f 


o 


Cured 


proved 


proved 


Died 








fe U 


b b 


Eh 














1875-1904 


7818 


2663 


10371 


6567 


33S6 


855 


573 


49526 


59807 


1905-1910 


4249 


2217 


6466 


2992 


1611 


486 


699 


61433 


57899 


1911 .... 


856 


384 


1239 


530 


369 


59 


139 1 


14903 


16142 


1&12 


963 


341 


1294 


666 


345 


75 


159 


17862 


19156 


1913 .... 


1325 


323 


1648 


506 


666 


94 


256 


26507 


27155 


1914 


1868 


394 


22152 


839 


761 


149 


326 


31970 


34222 


1915 


2339 


4©9 


2838 


1236 


767 


175 


463 


40667 


43405 


1916 


2453 


692 


3045 


1341 


933 


193 


370 


39603 


42648 


1917 


3094 


646 


3740 


2126 


892 


160 


379 


39654 


43394 


1918 


4289 


759 


6048 


3211 


1082 


194 


359 


39683 


44631 


1919 


4306 


760 


5065 


3297 


889 


204 


466 


36697 


41762 


1920 


4053 


930 


4983 


3007 


926 


253 


536 


40934 


45917 


1921 


4314 


963 


5277 


2945 

28153 


1210 

1 13807 


323 


568 
5281 


57674 
485813 


62861 




41905 


11361 


53266 


3220 


1 539079 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 13 



SURGICAL REPORT 



A gilance at the record of surgical patients treated during the past 
year, and at the list of operations^ performed, will show that the. 
amount of surgical work lin the Hospital is steadily increasing. Ten 
years ago there were seldom more than a dozen operations performed 
each month, whereas during the last year the monthly average was 
nearly two hundred. 

These operations cover practically the whole field of surgery, 
including tlhat of the head and brain, chest, abdomen, the extremities 
and spine, the eye, ear, nose and throat. Owing to the steadily 
increasing number of motor accidents, many more head and skull 
operations are performed than formerly. With regard to the ear, 
nose and throat, wonderfull: progress has been made in recent years. 
Of particular interest in connection with the latter is the facility 
with which surgeons are now able to cope with pins, coins, small 
toys, or particles' of food wlhich become lodged in the gullet or enter 
the windpipe or lung. The skilful manipulation of modern electrical 
instruments has greatly reduced the mortality resuHing from childish 
accidents and lessened the suffening accompanying them. 

While all bramches of surgical work show an increase in the 
number of patientsi treated, there has been a considerable change in 
the ratio w'hich some departments bear to the whole. Thus, t!he 
amount of brain surgery and abdominal surgery shows a markedly 
increased ratio. Whereas that of patients suffering from tuberculosis 
of the bones and joints shows a decline. It is interesting to note 
in the latter regard that the great majority of patients admitted now- 
a-days are recorded as new-comers from Great Britain or foreign 
lands. This speaks well fof the campaign which has been waged in 
Canada during the past ten years against tubercullosis. This disease, 
wthich in dhildhood attacks the bones particul'arly, is contracted either 
from contact with adults suffering from actual pulmonary trouble or 
from the drinking of milk from tuberculous cattle. It is possible by 
careful laboratory tests to distinguish between the bovine and human 
type of infection. Tests made in the Hospital for Sick Children show 
that the bovine type is non-existent amongst Toronto children. This, 
of course, is due to inspection of cattle and pasteurization of milk. 



14 THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 

SURGICAL RESEARCH. 

In addition to Hospital routine surgery, considerable progress 
has been made in research work. The Itarge nulmber of patients in 
the Hospita)! and up-to-date equipment make investigation and 
research possible, and the policy df the Hospital for Sick Children is 
to encourage this. Last year one of the surgical staff perfected a 
method of blood transfusion, A\^hiich has proven beneficial in cases of 
acute poisoning, such as occurs in erysipelas, gas poisoning and 
severe burns. In Great Britain and the United States, where 'hospi- 
tals have given the treatment, favorable results are shown. Experi- 
ments, too, have been made in order to ascertain the valuie in a 
children's hospital of the treatment of fractures practised during tihe 
war. Methods which in pre-war days were unknown are now used, 
in miany instances attended by success, and in almost alii with com- 
fort to the little patient. With a view to enhancing the firmi healing 
of wounded tissues, excellent work has been done. For example, a 
tendon severed for some time, or which has been partially destroyed, 
m'akes satisfactory healing a difficult matter; whereas the plan of 
sewing together such structures with stitches of living tissue 
obtained from the locality of the injury has had marvellous effect. 

Reports have still to be made in other fields of research. 

EXTENSION NECESSARY. 

It is an assured fact that if the present high standard of the 
Hospital's surgical work is to be maintained, and if the ever- 
increasing number of p'atients are to be cared for, extension in 
plant and equipment will be absolutely necessary. The most press- 
ing requirements are the enlargement of the out-patient department 
and the establishment of an all-year-round convalescent home, where 
patients suffering from surgical tulberculosis cam be treated more 
effectively than in the city. Originally, College street was an ideal 
location for the treatment of such patients, but the city's growth is 
rapidly decreasing the supply of fresh air and sunsliine, so necessary 
to these children. Those interested in the welfare of the Hospital 
are now confronted by this problem, which resolves itself into a 
necessity if the child life nurtured by us is to be strengthened and 
spared for the years to come. 

W. E. GALLIE, 

Surgeon-in-Chief. 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



15 



SURGICAL REPORT. 
Oct. 1. 1920 to Sept. 30, 1921. 



Septicaemia 

Pyemia 

General military tuberculosis 

Contusion of or injury to 
abdomen 

Infection of abdominal wall 

Peritonitis — diffuse suppur- 
ative 

Peritonitis-pneumococcal. . 

Intestinal obstruction .... 

Foreign body in Intestines 

Intussusception 

Faecal fistula 

Pyloric stenosis 

Prolapse of rectum 

Imperforate anus 

Acute appendicitis 

Chronic appendicitis 

Appendiceal abscess 

Splenomegaly-von Jacksch 

Splenomegaly-banti 

Infection of umbilicus .... 

Umbilical sinus 

Patent urachus 

Haemorrhage um.bllicus . . 

Inguinal hernia 

Strangulated inguinal hernia 

Femoral hernia 

Ventral hernia . .^ 

Umbilical hernia 

Ulceration of oesophagus . . 

Cyst of mesentery 

Rupture of kidney 

Sarcoma of kidney 

Perinephritic abscess 

Pyelitis 

Tuberculosis of kidney .... 

Ectopia "Vesicae 

Vaginitis 

Eneuresis 

Rupture of urethra 

Stricture of urethra 

Undescended testicle 

Hydrocele 

Hydrocele of cord 

Hypospadias 

Epispadias 

Phimosis 

Balanitis 

Wound of perineum 

Abscess of perineum 

Cervical adenitis, suppur- 
ative 

Cervical adenitis, non-sup- 
purative 

Cervicai adenitis, tuberculous 

Axillary adenitis, suppura- 
tive 

Mesenteric adenitis, tubercu- 
lous 

Inguinal adenitis, suppura- 
tive 

Inguinal adenitis, non-sup- 
purative 

Inguinal adenitis, tuberculous 

Popliteal adenitis, suppura- 
tive 

Hyperplasia of thyroid .... 

Thyro-glossal cyst 

Contusion of chest wall . . . 

Infection or abscess of chest 
wall 

Pleurisy 

Empyaema, non-tuberculous 

Pneumo-thorax and pyo- 
pneumo-thorax 

Bronchitis 

Bronoho pneumonia 



P a 



Bt 



Lobar pneumonia 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary , 

Epilepsy 

Concussion (without frac- 
ture of skull) 

Hydrocephalus 

OeJiebral haemorrhage 

Brain tumor 

Meningocele 

Spina bifida 

Meningitis, cerebro spinal 

Meningitis, pneumococcal . 

Anterior poliomyelitis .... 

Birth paralysis, spastic para 
plegia 

Birth paralysis, spastic dip- 
legia 

Birth paralysis, spastic mon 
optegla 

Birth paralysis, spastic hem- 
iplegia 

Obstetrical paralysis, arm. 

Ulnar nerve paralysis . . . 

Severed nerve 

Haenxorrhagic disease of 
the new born 

Haemophilia 

Secondary anaemia 

Shock 

Acidosis 

Multiple abscessea 

Furunculosis 

Naevus 

Sebaceous or dermoid cyst . 

Burn 

Contracture following burn. 

Cellulitis of face 

Wound of face 

Hare-lip 

Cleft-palate 

Hare-lip and cleft-plate . . 

Abscess of parotid gland . . 

Tumour of parotid gland . . 

Epistaxis 

Injury to palate 

Ulcerative stomatitis 

Ranula 

Dentlgerous cyst 

Haematoma of scalp 

Cellulitis or abscess of scalp 

Scalp wound 

Contusion of scalp 

Branchial cyst 

Cellulitis of hand 

Wound of hand 

Ganglion of hand or wrist. 

Wound of arm. 

Abscess or cellulitis of arm. 

Injury or wound of foot . . 

Foreign body in foot 

Cellulitis of foot 

Ganglion of foot 

Ingrown toenail 

Ulcer of leg 

Wound of leg 

Abscess or cellulitis of leg. 

Abscess or cellulitis of thigh 

Wound of Thigh 

Haematoma of thigh 

Contusion of back 

Abscess of back 

Teno-synovltis, suppurative. 

Severed tendons 

Scabies 

Purpura 

Undiagnosed 

Non-union or malunlon of 
fracture 



10 



20 

1 



1 
6 
6 
7 

i 
1 

16 

8 



2 

ii 

*2 



1 
1 
1 

'i 

1 

3 

12 

1 
1 
5 
3 

i 

2 
4 

3 

i 
■5 

6 
4 

1 

i 
4 
2 
2 

i 

2 

is 



3 

17 
4 



11 



16 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



SURGICAL REPORT— Concluded. 






Sarcoma of bone 

Enchondroma 

Fragllitas ossium 

Fracture of femur 

Osteomyelitis of femur . . . 

Coxa vara 

Fracture of tibia and fibula 

Fracture of tibia 

Osteomyelitis of tibia 

Fracture of fibula 

Osteomyelitis of fibula .... 

Osteomyelitis of tarsus .... 

Kohler's disease 

Fracture of metatarsal bone 
and phalanges 

Osteomyelitis of ilium .... 

Osteomyelitis of ischium . . . 

Fracture of pelvis 

Separation of symphysis 
pubis 

Osteomyelitis of pelvis .... 

Osteomyelitis of sternum . .' 

Fracture of scapula 

Fracture of clavicle 

Fracture of humerus 

Osteomyelitis of humerus . . 

Fracture of radius and ulna 

Fracture of radius 

Osteomyelitis of radius . . . 

Separation of epiphysis, ra- 
dius 

Fracture of metacarpal bone 
and phalanges 

Osteomyelitis of metacarpal 
bone and phalanges . . 

Fracture of skull 

Osteomyelitis of skull 

Fracture of superior maxilla 

Fracture of inferior maxilla 

Ostesmyelitis of Inferior 
maxilla , 

Pott's disease, cervical ... 

Pott's disease, dorsal .... 

Pott's disease, lumbar .... 

Arthritis of spinal joint . 

Fracture of ribs 

Tuberculosis of ribs 

Coccygeal sinus 

Sprain of ankle 

Arthritis of ankle, tubercu 
loua 

Arthritis of knee, suppura- 
tive 

Arthritis of knee, tuberotilous' 

Ankylosis of knee joint 

Bursitis of knee 

Flexion deformity of knee 

Arthritis of hip, tuberculous 

Arthritis of hip, suppura- 
tive 

Arthritis of hip, non-sup- 
puratlve 

Flexion deformity of hip 

Congenital dislocation of hip 

Pathological dislocation of 
hip 

Traumatic dislocation of hip 

Perthes disease 

Dislocation of elbow 

Arthritis of elbow, tubercu- 
lous 

Flexion deformity of elbow. 

Ankylosis of tempero-mandl-' 
bular joint 

Multiple arthritis, non-sup- 
purative 

Gonorrhaeal arthritis 

Dislocation of joints of hands 



16 



Disease 



S^ 



Talipes equino varus, con- 
genital 

Pes cavus, congenital 

Talipes calcaneo-varus, con- 
genital 

Congenital elevation of sca- 
pula 

Congenital malformation of 
fingers 

Congenital flexion deform- 
ity of elbow 

Congenital deformity of toes 

Volkmann's Ischaemic con- 
tracture 

Hammer toe 

Flat foot 

Hallux valgus 

Pes cavus, paralytic 

Talipes valgus, paralytic . . 

Talipes varus, paralytic . . . 

Talipes calcanous, paralytic. 

Talipes calcaneo-varus, par- 
alytic 

Talipes calcaaeo-valgus, par 
alytic 

Talipes equinus, paralytic . . 

Talipes equino varus, para- 
lytic 

Talipes equino valgus, para- 
lytic 

Genu varum 

Genu valgum 

Congenital malformation of 
thigh or leg 

Amputation stump 

Scoliosis, congenital 

Scoliosis, acquired 

Tonticollis, congenital 

Torticollis, acquired 

Bar, Nose and Throat 

Furunculosis of ear 

Microtia 

Cellulitis of ear 

Otitis media, acute 

Otitis media, chronic 

Mastoiditis, acute 

Mastoiditis, chronic 

Post aural adenitis 

Post aural sinus 

Thrombosis lateral sinus . . 

Foreign body in bronchus . 

Stricture of larynx 

Congestion of larynx 

Paralysis of vocal chords . 

Foreign body in oesophagus 

Congenital stricture of oeso 
phagus 

Stricture of oesophagus . . 

Oesophageal fistula 

Retro-pharyngeal abscess 

Abscess on bridge of nose 

Fracture of nose 

Deflected septum 

Haematoma, septum .... 

Hypertrophy of turbinates. 

Tonsillitis 

Peritonsillar abscess 

Adenoids 

Tonsils and adenoids ..... .1585 

Haemorrhage following re- 
moval of tonsils 

Cervical adenitis 

Cellulitis of face 

Sequestrum, occipital bone . 

Osteomyelitis of occipital 
bone 



11 



Total 2233|80Q|174 81 



Analysis of Diseases with Results — In-patients treated Oct. 1, 1920, to Sept. 30. 
1921- It te to be observed that many patients were suffering from more than one disease. 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



17 



SURGICAL OPERATIONS. 
Oct. 1, 1920 to Sept. 30, 1921. 



Operations Total 

Craniotomy ''' 

Decompression of Fracture of Skull . . 3 

Drainage of Ventricle 1 

Intercostal Drainage 7 

Resection of Rib 35 

Estlander'a Operation 2 

Exploratory Laparotomy 6 

Laparotomy for Draina.ge 16 

Operation for Hypertrophic Plyoric 

Stenosis 16 

Reduction of Intussusception 20 

Resection of Intestine 6 

Artificial Anus 1 

Appendectomy 61 

Splenectomy 2 

Operation for Imperforate Anus .... 4 

Repair of Inguinal Hernia 99 

Repair of Femoral Hernia 1 

Repair of Ventrail Hernia 3 

Reipair of Umbilical Hernia 4 

Intestinal Anastomosis 3 

Nephrectomy 1 

Cystoscopic Examination 3 

Transplantation of Urfeters 4 

Dilatation of Urethra 1 

Operation for Hypospadias 1 

Orchidopexy 4 

Orohideotonly 1 

Excision of Hydrocele 5 

Osteotomy 34 

Reduction of Fracture 108 

Reduction of Displaced Epiphysis .... 1 

Open Reduction of Fracture 20 

Direct Fixation of Fracture 14 

Bone Graft 2 

Spinal Bon© Graft 4 

Sequestrecitomiy 21 

Obliteration of Bone Cavity 2 

Astragalectomy 5 

Oateoclaais 1 

Soutter's Operation 2 

Removal of Bone Plate 3 

Reduction of Dislocation 6 

Open Reduction of Dislocation 2 

Reduction of Congenital Dislocation of 

Hip 5 

Arthrotomy g 

Arthrodesijs 19 

Exoision of Joint 5 

Forcible Manipulation of Joint 2 

Tendon Transfer 14 

Tendon Fixation 12 

Free Tendon Graft 2 

Tendion Lengthening 34 

Tenotomy 6 

Freeing of Tendon 2 

Sutuning of Tendon 2 

Faaolotomy 19 

Suturiing of Nerve 2 

Stoeiff el's Operation 9 

Exploratory Incision 6 

Amputation 4 

Blood Transfusion 333 

ExaB-ngniinatlon 17 



Suturing of Wound 
BJxolslon of Wound 



Operations Total 

Removal of Foreign Body 4 

Plastic Operation 1 

Skin Grafting 5 

Pedunculated Flap Graft 2 

Exaision of Scar Tissue 2 

Repair of Cleft Palate 21 

Repair of Hare Lip 24 

Manipulation of Club Foot 33 

Bxolalon of Meningocele 7 

Excision of Tumour 3 

Excision of Naevus 6 

Exciiision of Ulcer 1 

Excision of Sinus 5 

BxcHsion of Cyst 14 

Evaouation of Haematoma 1 

Incision for Dralinage 90 

Curettement of Tubercuaous Abscess. . 11 

Excision of Lymph Glands 9 

Thyroidectomy 2 

Operation for Tortlcollia 5 

Division of Shortened Muscle 3 

Operation for Ingrown Toenaid 2 

Eye, Kor, Nose and Throat. 

Enucleation 2 

Needling of Cataract 16 

Resection and Tenotomy of Rectus . . 31 

Iridectomy 1 

Advancement of Externus Rectus ... 5 

Skin Graft, Eye 3 

Cauthotomy 1 

Removal of Naevus 1 

Removal of Lipoma 1 

Plastic Operation 1 

ExcMon of Lacrimal Sac 3 

Inioislon of Abscess 3 

Correction of Ptosis' 3 

Neediling of Adhesions 1 

Incision and Drainage of Peipltonslllar 

.Aboess 1 1 

Exploratton of Lateral Sinus 1 

Submucous Reaectlonj of Nasal Septum 15 

Mastoid— SinDpl© 83 

Mastoid — Radical 6 

Currettlng Old Mastoid 8 

Removal of Adenoids 60 

Removal of Tonsils and Adenoids . . 1623 

Trimming of Turbinates 2 

Incision of Poat Auricuiar Absceas . . 11 

Incision of Abscess 1 

Haematoma — Septum 1 

Dilatation of Stricture of Oeaiophagus. 7 

Removal of Foreign body In Oesophagus 11 

Dilatation of Stricture of Larynx .... 1 

Laryngoscopy 9 

Plastic Operation of Pharynx 1 

Removal of Foreign Body In Bronchus 4 

Plastic Skin Graft 2 

Bronohoscoplc Exam.lnatlO'n 5 

Traaheotomy 4 

Plastic Operation on No8« 2 

Reduction of Fracture of Nose 1 

Transplantation of Oartllege 1 

Inciislon of Retro-Pharyngeal Abscess. 1 

Sequ'estreotomy of Occipital Bone .... 3 

Total 3249 



18 THE HOSPITAL FOR SIOK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



MEDICAL REPORT 



The past year has been unparalleled in the history of the Hos- 
pital as far as development has occurred. Our clinics have very 
materially increased, while our accommodation for in-patients has 
been taxed to the utmost. Some conception of the work accom- 
plished may be gleaned from the fact that there were 27,100 out- 
patients attended the various Medical Clinics, while 4,069 were ad- 
mitted to the wards. 

In analysing the causes of dteath it is found that the acute 
respiratory affections head the list. The mortality in all types of 
pneumonia being 56 per cent., this disease being extremely fatal in 
young infants. This figure is in striking contrast to the mortality 
in summer diarrhoea, which was only 8 per cent. This comparison 
alone indicates the value of prophylactic methods in infancy. Eight 
years ago t.\e mortality in summer diarrhoea exceeded the death 
rate of respi;:atory diseases. Unfortunately, however, in spite of 
extensive research work there has been little change in the mor- 
tality in this type of case. Most successful measures, however, 
result in the education of the general public to realize the extreme 
infectiousness of the simple head cold. Our mortality for the ex- 
treme degree of difficult feeding case, known as marasmus, has 
almost been cut in half and we hope through further research work 
to redtuce this rate. 

RESEARCH WORK. 

Under the able direction of Miss A. M. Courtney twenty-two 
research problems during the past year are in the process of com- 
pletion. Important contributions have been made concerning the 
cause and cure of rickets, an improved method of artificially feeding 
infants, and in the treatment of acute intestinal intoxication and 
also a very definite advance in the dietetic management of Chronic 
Intestinal Indigestion in oMfer children. 

OUT-PATIENT CLINICS. 

The total medical attendance in this department has attained 
an average volume of more than double that of 1920. This has been 
largely due to the very excellent attention and skill given to the 
patients by the various specialists and nurses. 

Those deserving special mention are: (1) Nutrition Clinic, which 
is devoted to the improvement in general health of the children of 
the pre-school and school age — a great deal of the work in this clinic 
consists in the education of both mother and child regarding food 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 19 

and hygiene. (2) Venereal Disease Clinic — Some idea of the amount 
of work accomplished in the clinic may be gleaned from the fact that 
approximately 3,000 treatments have been given in the past year, 
and, as a result, many little lives saved that otherwise would suc- 
cumb to these most terrible ravages of society. (3) Tuberculosis — 
During the past year 702 new patients were seen and placed under 
proper supervision, in co-operation with the I.O.D.E. Preventorium. 
This fact alone will indicate the necessity and value which such a 
clinic is to the community. (4) Neurological — In association with 
this clinic is an "observation class" for defective children. In this 
class the child! is observed for a period of two weeks, during whic'h 
time a definite estimation is made of the child's capacity for mental 
activity. This branch of the clinic is under the direction of a 
specially qualified teacher whose experience among defectives has 
been extensive. (5) Cardiac Clinic — During the past year this clinic 
has been established, its chief object is to gain an idea of the extent 
of heart disease in the community, by remedial measures to reduce 
its incidence and by supervision improve the care of those already 
afflicted. 

All this work has directly influenced' the general infant mor- 
tality in this city to such an extent that Toronto can now be classed 
as one of the cities on the continent boasting of the lowest infant 
death rate. With our present organization we feel that the Hospi- 
tal, in addition to caring for the sick, is a real community centre, and 
in this manner can offer to the medical student or practitioners, or 
even specialists, just as wide and practical a field as is possible. For 
future physicians, the broader the contact with concrete problems 
during his training, the sooner will he be able to make his own defi- 
nite contribution to medical life as he in turn meets it in home, 
school, hospital and community. For the physician to-day who goes 
out of our medical schools without realizing some of the broader 
applications and fields of usefulness now open to medicine is not 
only incompletely informed as to the modern trend of medicine, 
but also is handicapping the advance of medicine as one of the great 
educational and social factors in the development and betterment 
of our race and humanity. In conclusion I wish to take this oppor* 
tunity of thanking the medical and nursing staff for their untiring 
devotion to their work diuring the past year. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

ALAN BROWN, 

Physician-in-Chief, 



20 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



MEDICAL REPORT. 



Congrenital Alalformations 

Mouth 

Intestine 

Eye (Cataract) 

Heart 

Upper extremity 

Loweir extremity 

Spina ibifida 

Reoto-vag'inal fiatula .... 

Hermaphroditism 

Hypospadlua 

Disrestive System 

Alvelor abscess 

Dental carries 

Ging-lvltis 

Thrush 

Stomatitis (ulcerative) . . 
Stomatitis (catarrhal) 
Stomatitis (aphthous) 

Acute pharyngitis 

Retro-pharyngeal abscess. 
Peritonsillar abscess .... 
Hypertrophy tonsils and 

adenoids 

Oesophageal stricture . 

Acute tonsilitis 

Chronic tonsilitis .... 
Hypertrophic stenosis of 

pylorus 

Pylorospasm 

Gastritis 

Constipation 

Fermentative diarrhoea 

Duodenal ulcer 

Prolapse of rectum . . 

Acute colitis 

Intestinal intoxication 

Pat indigestion 

Acute intestinal Indigestion 
Chronic intestinal indlges 

tion 

Infant feeding 

Hernia (inguinal) 

Hernia (umibilical) 

Infectious diarrhoea .... 

Dyspepsia 

Volvulus 

Mesentery, Feritonenm and 
Omentum 

Ascites 

Acute peritonitis — 

Bacillus coll 

Streptococcus haemolltlcu9 

Staphylococcus aureus 

Pneumococcus 

Chronic peritonitis, strep 

verldans 

JAver, Gall Bladder and 
Gall Ducts 
Jaundice (acute catarrhal).] 
Ductless Glands ( 

Dyspitultajism 

Svprairenal haemorrhage 

Cretinism 

Grave's disease 

Circulatory System 

Phlebitis 

Sinus thrombosis 

Throm.boBls of cavernous atnus 

Heart — 

Carditis 

Acute endocarditis , . . 
Chronic endocarditis . 
Acute myocarditis . . . 
Acute fibrinous p&rlcardltis 
Acut« purulent peiricaclltls 



Pn Q 



4 

1 
30 

1 

10 
4 

1 

2 

202 



119 



11 



116 
2 



Disease— 



I -a 

er 

(3 O, 



35 



Pericarditis with effusion.. 

Chronic pericarditis 

Hydropericardium 

Bespiratory System 
Pleurisy — 

With effusion 

Acute fibrinous 

Chronic fibrinous 

Empyaema (pneumococcus) 

Empyaema (streptococcus 
haemolyt) 

Empyaema (staphylococcus 
aureus 

Empyaema (organism un- 
known) 

Hydrothorax 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Pneumonia (broncho) .... 

Pneumonia (unresolved) . . 

Pneumonia (hypostatic) . , 

Pneumonia (septic) 

Infarction of lung . 

Multiple abscesses of lung. 

Laryngitis 

Obstruction of larynx .... 

Acute bronchitis 

Chronic -bronchitis 

Capillary bronchitis 

Acute nasopharyngltle 

Chronic nasopharyngitis . . 

Acute rhinitis 

Eplstaxis ■ 

Lymphatic System 

Bronchial adenitis 

Cervical adenitis 

Status lymphatlcus 

General lymphatism 

Infected Diseases 

Abscess of subcutaneous tis 
sues 

Cellulitis 

Infected wound 

Gonococcus infection — 

Of conjunctiva 

Of vagina 

Sepsis of new born 

Septicaemia (streptococcus 
haftmolyticus) 

Septicaemia (streptococcus 
non-haemolyticus) .... 

Septicaemia (staphylococcus 
aureus) 

Septicaemia (mixed Infec- 
tion 

Septicaemia (organism not 

isolated) 

Diphtheria — 

Faucial 

Nasal 

Laryngleal 

Conjunctival 

Carrier 

Furunculoels 

Chorea 

Acute rheum.atlc fever .... 

Rheumatic torticollis 

Oerebro-spinal menlinlgitls . . 

Erysipelas 

Pyaemia 

Onychia 

Jaundice (acute Infective). 

Measles 

German measles 

Mumps 

Whooping cough 

Chlckenpox 

Smallpox 



61 

72 
4 



101 

3 

190 

1 
1 
1 



13 



12 



18 

17 

4 

1 

3 

24 

23 

10 

1 

^1 
38 

1 

1 

ii 

1 
1 

21 
31 



2 

6 

13 

i 

3 



18 



22 



11 



19 
37 

14 

21 



20 

1 
1 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



21 



MEDICAL REPORT— Continued. 



P 0. 



s> 



Scarlet fever 

Typhoid fever 

Influenza 

Congenital syphilis 

Syphilitic periostitis 

Syphilitic arthritis 

Cerebro^apinal syphUla .... 

Cerebral syphilis 

Tuberculosis — 

Acute general miliary . . . . 

Acute miliary of lung 

Of lung 

Of akin 

Of bronchial glands 

Of mediastinal glands .... 

Of cervical glands 

Of axillaxy glands 

Of liver 

Of eye 

Of spleen 

Of kidney 

Of Intestine 

Of peritoneum 

Of spine 

Of knee 

Of cerebrum 

Of menlngaa 

Tuberculous daetylltis .... 

Tuberculous keratitis 

Site not stated 

Tuberculosis contacts 

Bones and Cartilagres 

Osteogenesis Imperfecta . . 

Acute periostitis 

Subacute arthritis 

Chronic osteo arthrltia .... 

Poly arthritis 

Suppurative arthritis (stre'P.) 
Nerroag System 

Neurotic child 

Epilepsy 

Idiopathic tremor 

Neuralgia 

Convulsions (unknown etio- 
logy) 

Habit spasm 

Pseudo hypertrophic muscu- 
lar paralysis 

Herpes zoster 

Post diphtheiretic paralysis . 

Birth palsy 

Spastic diplegia 

Hemiplegia 

Infantile cerebral dipleigia. 

Poliomyelitis (acute anter- 
ior) 

Polio encephalitis 

Myelitis (transverse) 

Encephalitis (letharglca) . 

Acute encephalitis 

Encephalitis (unknown ori- 
gin) 

Post encephalUtc cerebral 
sclerosis 

Idiocy (maniac) 

Idiocy (Mongolian) 

ImibeclUty , 

Mental deficiency 

Dementia 

Macrocephalic Idiocy .... 

Defective cerebral develop 
ment 

Cerebral thrombosis 

Abscess of brain , 

Masturbation 

Hydrocephalus 



9 22 

41 1 

11 2 

1 



17 



Meningitis — 

Aoute haemorrhagic 

Staphylococcal 

Streptococcal 

Pneumococcal 

Influenza 

Acute (organism not stated) 

Menlngo-myelooele 

Infantile cerebral haemor- 
rhage 

Subdural haemorrhage . . . 

Meningeal haemorrhage . 
Bar 

Otitis media 

Mastoiditis 

Eye 

Lachrymal abscess 

Cellulitis of orbit 

Ulcer of cornea 

Acute blepharitis 

Conjunctivitis 

Purulent conjunctivitis . . 

Phlyctenular conjunctivitis 

Opacity of lens capsule . . 

Adhesions followling con 
genital cataract 

Over action, inferior oblique 

Dacryocystitis 

Phlyctenular keratitis 

Interstitial keratitis 

Iridocylltls 

Prolapse of Iris 

Convergent squint 

Strabismus 

Cataract 

Ptosis 

Epicanthus 

Glioma 

Hardeolum 

Oedema of eyelids 

Parasites 

Intestinal parasites 

Oxyurls vermicularls 

Poisonings 

Bromidlsm 

Strychnine 

Drug 

Food 

Skin, Hair and Nails 

Eczema 

Eczema seborrhoea 

Dermatitis, seborrhoea .... 

Bum of skin 

Impetigo 

Impetigo, contagiosa 

Impetigo, bullous 

Erythema nodosum 

Scabies 

Urticaria 

Purpura 

Ulcers of legs (X-ray burns) 

Ringworm 

Scrofuloderma . .' 

Infection of skin 

Miscellaneoas 

Acidosis 

Acetonaemla 

Aorodiynla 

Asthma 

Dialbetes, mellitus 

Debility 

Exudative diathesis 

Mastitis 

Decomposition 

Malnutrition 

Myositis ' 



166 



13 



163 

1 



loe 



A^nalysia of Diseases with Results — In-patients treated Oct. 1, 1920, to Sept. 80, 
1»Z1. It Is to be observed then itisinx j>{ttlents were sufferingr from more than one diseajwi 



22 



THE HOSPITAL FOR SICK CHILDREN, TORONTO. 



MEDICAL REPORT— Concluded. 

Analysis of Diseases with Results — In-patients treated Oct. 1, 1920, to Sept. 80. 
1921. It is to be observed that many patients wer-e suffering from more than one disease. 



Disease — 


o 

3 


■o 

V 

t 

M 


■ ■0 
Da 


• 

s 


Disease — 


•a 
2 

5 


•0 

> 

1 


Unim- 
proved 

Died 


Rickets 


1 
5 

2. 
2 

i 

37 


31 

"e 

9 

4 

ii 

8 

'i 


72 
3 

i 
ii 

2 

'4 

6 

"i 

1 
1 

i 


i 

2 

'2 
2 

1 

1 
27 


Ophthalmia neonati)rum(not 
gonococcus) 


1 
1 

1 

'e 

19 


1 

"3 
33 

'4 

"7 

1 


S 
1 
2 

13 

i 

1 
1 

1 
2 

i 

1 

846 










Icterus neonatorum 

Cephal haematoma 

Haematoma .eterno, mastoid 
Omphalitis 








Spontaneous gangrene .... 






Diseases of the Blood 

Secondary anaemia 

Splenic anaemia 

Von Jaksch's anaemia .... 
Leukaemia, myelogenic . . . 

Leukaemia, aplastic 

Leukaemia, acute lymphatic 
Haemophilia 




Urinary Organs 


1 


Bacil'luria (B. coli) 

Acute nephritis 


1 

4 

16 

1 
1 










1 






Post scarletinal nephritis. . 
Phimosis 


Tumoars 

Naevus 






Adhesions around clitoris. . 
Vaginitis (not gonococcus) . 


1 




Tumour of cord 

Tumour of eye 


"i 




Diseases of the New Bom 

Haemarrhaglc disease of new 


Tumour of brain 

Tumour of hypophysis .... 
Sarcoma of lung 

Total 16 


i 


Prematurity . . . 


15 


3 

■ • 


11 

1 




Atelectasis 


6011086 


477 



CORRECTIVE GYMNASIUM WORK. 
Last year 2,469 treatments were given 
in this Department, showing a higher aver- 
age than any previous year. The number 
of patients treated in the Gymnasium Out- 
patient Department 1920-21 was 128. Of 
these the most important are : — 

Scoliosis , 29 

Paralysis (various types) 40 

Flat Feet 18 



TortlcolHn 



16 



DISPENSARY 
Report for the Year Ending Sept 30th, 1921. 
Month Prescriptions Orders 

October , 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Julj 

August 

September 



1,736 


712 


1,935 


498 


2,390 


434 


2,466 


455 


2,527 


420 


2,588 


520 


2,575 


506 


2,482 


494 


2,202 


438 


2,122 


392 


2,214 


481 


2,262 


498 



Totals 



27,449 



5,848 



REPORT OF OTJT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT, 1020-1921. 

The total number of out-patient attendances was 57,574. Of these 27,645 were 
girls and 29,929 boys. 

The largest number of out-patients treated in any on*, day was 300; the smallest, 
90; and the dally average 18&. TJi^e above cases may be classified as follows : — 



REPORT. 

Medical Cases — New cases .... 3,924 

Repeats 10,940 

Cases treated 14,864 

Surgical Cases — New cases . . . 2,262 

Repeats 13,709 

Cases treated 15,971 

Orthopaedic Cases — ^N«w cases. 255 

Repeat^ 1,376 

Cases treated 1,631 

Eye Cases — New cases 1,252 

Repeats 2,674 

Cases treated • 3,926 



Nose, Throat and Ear cases — 

New cases 3,279 

Repeats 5,667 

Cases treated 8,946 

Chest Cases — New cashes 626 

Repeats 2,620 

Cases treated 3,146 

Child Welfare Clinic 1,309 

Nutritional Clinic 1.201 

Venereal Disease Clinic 2,800 

Neuroloigical Clinic 1,131 

Skin Clinic 2,569 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 

Removal of tonsils and adenoids ....1546 

Removal of foreign body from foot, arm 5 

Removal of foreign body from ear .... 6 

Removal of toes 4 

Removal oif angioma 4 

Removal of papillioma 26 

Removal of toe nail 5 

Removal of needle from foot 2 

Removal of finger nail 6 

Removal of thumb 1 

Incising abscesses ,'. 167 

Incising infected arm. hand 54 

Inicising infected foot 5 

Excision of ganglion 9 



Excision of naevus 

Excision of cyst 

Paracentesis 

Reduction of fracture of tibia and fibula 

Reduction of fracture of humerus 

Reduction of fracture of clavicle 

Reduction of fracture of ulna and radius 

Reduction of fracture of radius 

Reduction of fracture of colles's 

Wounds sutured 

Manipulation (club feet) 

Incising tendons (club feet) 

Circumcisions 



Total 24S7 



THE HOSPITAI. FOR SICK OHII.DREN, TORONTO. 



23 



REPORT OF PATHOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 
Oct. 1st, 1920, to Sept. 30th, 1921. 

Duriiiif the year there were 351 post-mortem examinations made. These are 
clas.sified as shown in the accompanying table. Obviously many of these cases had suf- 
fered from more than one condition; for example, the majority of Cci»ses of Tuberculous 
Meningitis also had Miliary Tuberculosis to a certam degree, and vice versa. Only 
the most outstanding condition has been entered on the table in order that the total 
may correspond with the actuail number of autopsies performed. 



Abscess. Alveolar 

Abscesa, Cerebellar 

Abscess. Cerebral 

Acute Intestinal Intoxication 

Anaemia, Von Jaksch's 

Arthritis. Acute Septic 

Atresia. Congenital of the Ileum 

Bronchitis, Acute 

Burns and Scalds 

Congenital Heart 

Decomposition 

Diabetes Mellitus • • • 

Di:atation of Heart (Acute Myocardial 

Failure) 

Diphtheria r 

Ectopia Vesicae 

Empyema 

Encephalitis 

Endocarditis 

Epilepsy, Jacksonian 

Erysipelas 

Exomphalos Congenital 

Fermentative Diarrhoea 

Fractured Skull 

Haemorrhage. Birth 

Haemorrhage, Intestinal 

Haemorrhage. Pulmonary 

Hepatitis, Infectious 

Hydrocephalus, Internal 

Ileo-colitis 

Impetigo 

Infarct. Pu'monary 

Intussusception 

Leukemia. Lymphatic (Atypical) .... 
Macrocephalus 



1 
31 
1 
2 
1 
9 
5 
1 
55 
4 

1 
4 
1 
4 
3 
2 
1 
4 
1 
15 
4 
8 
1 
1 
2 
4 
9 
1 
1 
4 
1 



Mastoiditis 

Meningitis. Influenzal 

Meningitis, Meningococcic 

Meningitis, Pneumococcic 

Meningitis. Streptococcic 

Meningitis, Tuberculous 

Nephritis 

Obliteration of Bile Ducts, Congenital 

Obstruction, Intestinal 

Osteomyelitis, Acute 

Otitis Media 

Pericarditis 

Peritonitis, Acute 

Poisoning, Carbolic Acid 

Poisoning, Strychnine 

Pneumonia, Lobar 

Pneumonia, Septic 

Pneumonia, Broncho, Non-Tuberculous 
Pneumonia. Broncho, Tuberculous . . . 

Prematurity 

Pyelitis 

Pyloric Stenosis 

Pyonephrosis 

Sepsis Neonatorum 

Septicaemia 

Status Lymphaticus 

Syphi is. Congenital 

Thrombosis, Intracranial 

Tuberculosis, Miliary 

Tumours, Alveolar Sarcoma (Renal) . . . 

Tumours, Glioma, Cerebellar 

Tumours, Lymphosarcoma 

Ulcer, Duodenal 



Tota : 



3 

2 
1 
4 
6 

7 
1 
3 
3 
1 

14 

1 

4 
3 

4() 

1 

10 

i 
] 

8 

15 

4 

7 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

3^1 



Other work in the Laboratory may be summarized as follows : 



Blood Cultures (123 positive) 387 

Vaginal Smears (31 positive) 290 

Stoo'.s Examined 99 

Pneumococci Typed 47 

Widal Tests 33 

Urines Cultured 183 

Blood transfusions arranged for 404 

Nose Throat and Ear Cultures for 

Diphtheria Bacilli (340 positive) . . 1401 

Cerebro-spinal Fluids Examined .... 74 



Sputums Examined 

Pus from Wounds and Abcesses 

Guinea Pigs Inoculated for Tubercle 

Bacilli (17 positive) 

Guinea Pigs Inoculated for other 

Organisms 

Tissues Examined 

Misicellaneous 



Total 



70 
205 

50 

2 
188 
876 

4315 



REPORT OF X-RAV DEPARTMENT, OCT. 

1, 1920. TO SEPT. 30, 1921. 



Total number of case.o examined .... 3.450 

Of which, chest cas^s 800 

Fracture cases 1,500 

Actual Radiographs made. over. . . . 7,000 

Treatments given, over 200 

Photographs made, for Hospital Rec- 
ords, over 370 

Fluoroscopic examinations, over .... 425 

Other conditions 1.150 



AGE AND SEX 
For the Year Ending 



OF PATIENTS 
September 30th. 1921. 



Under 1 year . . . 

1 year and under 

2 yrs. and under 

3 yrs. and under 

4 yrs. and under 

5 yrs. and under 
yrs. and under 

7 yrs. and under 

8 yrs. and under 

9 yrs. and under 10 

10 yrs. and under 11 

11 yrs. and under 12 

12 yrs. and under 13 

13 yrs. and under 14 

14 yrs. and under 15 



Boys I 
695 
212 
135 
144 
181 
170 
219 
199 
199 
173 
144 
146 
129 
93 
63 

2.902 



Girls I 
473 i 
159 I 
104 I 
156 I 

137 I 

138 I 
193 I 
191 i 
180 I 
147 I 
143 I 
109 I 
119 1 

90 I 

36 I 

2.375 I 



Total 
1,168 
371 
239 
300 
318 
308 
413 
390 
379 
320 
287 
255 
248 
183 
99 
5.277 




THE NURSES' RESIDENCE AND TRAINING SCHOOL